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Sample records for anticancer targeted agents

  1. Naturally occurring anti-cancer agents targeting EZH2.

    PubMed

    Shahabipour, Fahimeh; Caraglia, Michele; Majeed, Muhammed; Derosa, Giuseppe; Maffioli, Pamela; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2017-03-18

    Natural products are considered as promising tools for the prevention and treatment of cancer. The enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is a histone methyltransferase unit of polycomb repressor complexes such as PRC2 complex that has oncogenic roles through interference with growth and metastatic potential. Several agents targeting EZH2 has been discovered but they often induce side effects in clinical trials. Recently, EZH2 has emerged as a potential target of natural products with documented anti-cancer effects and this discloses a new scenario for the development of EZH2 inhibitory strategies with agents with low cytotoxic detrimental effects. In fact, several natural products such as curcumin, triptolide, ursolic acid, sulforaphane, davidiin, tanshindiols, gambogic acid, berberine and Alcea rosea have been shown to serve as EZH2 modulators. Mechanisms like inhibition of histone H3K4, H3K27 and H3K36 trimethylation, down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase expression, competitive binding to the S-adenosylmethionine binding site of EZH2 and modulation of tumor-suppressive microRNAs have been demonstrated to mediate the EZH2-inhibitory activity of the mentioned natural products. This review summarizes the pathways that are regulated by various natural products resulting in the suppression of EZH2, and provides a plausible molecular mechanism for the putative anti-cancer effects of these compounds.

  2. Natural Compounds as Anticancer Agents Targeting DNA Topoisomerases

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Chetan Kumar; Majumder, Hemanta Kumar; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2017-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are important cellular enzymes found in almost all types of living cells (eukaryotic and prokaryotic). These enzymes are essential for various DNA metabolic processes e.g. replication, transcription, recombination, chromosomal decatenation etc. These enzymes are important molecular drug targets and inhibitors of these enzymes are widely used as effective anticancer and antibacterial drugs. However, topoisomerase inhibitors have some therapeutic limitations and they exert serious side effects during cancer chemotherapy. Thus, development of novel anticancer topoisomerase inhibitors is necessary for improving cancer chemotherapy. Nature serves as a repertoire of structurally and chemically diverse molecules and in the recent years many DNA topoisomerase inhibitors have been identified from natural sources. The present review discusses anticancer properties and therapeutic importance of eighteen recently identified natural topoisomerase inhibitors (from the year 2009 to 2015). Structural characteristics of these novel inhibitors provide backbones for designing and developing new anticancer drugs. PMID:28503091

  3. Targets of 3-bromopyruvate, a new, energy depleting, anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Dell'Antone, Paolo

    2009-11-01

    3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), a pyruvate analog recently proposed as a possible anticancer drug, was investigated in relation to its capacity to inhibit energy production in fractions obtained from normal cells (rat hepatocytes) and in isolated rat thymocytes . Findings were that main targets of the drug were glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and not hexokinase as suggested for hepatoma cells, and succinate -driven ATP synthesis. Consistently with the above findings, in the normal cells studied (thymocytes ) the drug elicited an important fall in ATP levels. The significance of the present findings in concern with a possible therapeutic usefulness of the drug is discussed.

  4. Development of anticancer agents targeting the Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangqian; Tian, Ye; Yang, Yanling; Hao, Jijun

    2017-03-17

    Hedgehog signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway which is essential in embryonic and postnatal development as well as adult organ homeostasis. Abnormal regulation of Hedgehog signaling is implicated in many diseases including cancer. Consequently, substantial efforts have made in the past to develop potential therapeutic agents that specifically target the Hedgehog signaling for cancer treatment. Here, we review the therapeutic agents for inhibition of the Hedgehog signaling and their clinical advances in cancer treatment.

  5. A novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent with high selectivity for cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Huan; Li, Dong-Wei; Yang, Li-Yun; Fu, Li; Zhu, Xun-Jin; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria have recently emerged as novel targets for cancer therapy due to its important roles in fundamental cellular function. Discovery of new chemotherapeutic agents that allow for simultaneous treatment and visualization of cancer is urgent. Herein, we demonstrate a novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent (FPB), exhibiting both imaging capability and anticancer activity. It can selectively accumulate in mitochondria and induce cell apoptosis. Notably, it results in much higher toxicity toward cancer cells owing to much higher uptake by cancer cells. These features make it highly attractive in cancer imaging and treatment. PMID:26337336

  6. Nanomicellar carriers for targeted delivery of anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Huang, Yixian; Li, Song

    2014-01-01

    Clinical application of anticancer drugs is limited by problems such as low water solubility, lack of tissue-specificity and toxicity. Formulation development represents an important approach to these problems. Among the many delivery systems studied, polymeric micelles have gained considerable attention owing to ease in preparation, small sizes (10–100 nm), and ability to solubilize water-insoluble anticancer drugs and accumulate specifically at the tumors. This article provides a brief review of several promising micellar systems and their applications in tumor therapy. The emphasis is placed on the discussion of the authors’ recent work on several nanomicellar systems that have both a delivery function and antitumor activity, named dual-function drug carriers. PMID:24341817

  7. Development of anticancer agents targeting the Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangqian; Hao, Jijun

    2015-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays indispensable roles in both embryonic development and adult homeostasis. Abnormal regulation of this pathway is implicated in many types of cancer. Consequently, substantial efforts have made to develop therapeutic agents as anticancer drugs by specifically targeting the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Here we systematically review the potential therapeutic agents that have been developed to date for inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin cascade as well as current status of clinical trials of some of these agents. PMID:26396911

  8. Designing multi-targeted agents: An emerging anticancer drug discovery paradigm.

    PubMed

    Fu, Rong-Geng; Sun, Yuan; Sheng, Wen-Bing; Liao, Duan-Fang

    2017-08-18

    The dominant paradigm in drug discovery is to design ligands with maximum selectivity to act on individual drug targets. With the target-based approach, many new chemical entities have been discovered, developed, and further approved as drugs. However, there are a large number of complex diseases such as cancer that cannot be effectively treated or cured only with one medicine to modulate the biological function of a single target. As simultaneous intervention of two (or multiple) cancer progression relevant targets has shown improved therapeutic efficacy, the innovation of multi-targeted drugs has become a promising and prevailing research topic and numerous multi-targeted anticancer agents are currently at various developmental stages. However, most multi-pharmacophore scaffolds are usually discovered by serendipity or screening, while rational design by combining existing pharmacophore scaffolds remains an enormous challenge. In this review, four types of multi-pharmacophore modes are discussed, and the examples from literature will be used to introduce attractive lead compounds with the capability of simultaneously interfering with different enzyme or signaling pathway of cancer progression, which will reveal the trends and insights to help the design of the next generation multi-targeted anticancer agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Genetic and epigenetic studies for determining molecular targets of natural product anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujiong; Li, Yong; Liu, Xiaoming; Cho, William C S

    2013-06-01

    Cancer is a disease caused by a series of genetic and epigenetic alterations. Therefore, agents targeting the genetic and/or epigenetic machinery offer potential for the development of anticancer drugs. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that some common natural products [such as epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), curcumin, genistein, sulforaphane (SFN) and resveratrol] have anticancer properties through the mechanisms of altering epigenetic processes [including DNA methylation, histone modification, chromatin remodeling, microRNA (miRNA) regulation] and targeting cancer stem cells (CSCs). These bioactive compounds are able to revert epigenetic alterations in a variety of cancers in vitro and in vivo. They exert anticancer effects by targeting various signaling pathways related to the initiation, progression and metastasis of cancer. It appears that natural products hold great promise for cancer prevention and treatment by altering various epigenetic modifications. This review aims to discuss our current understanding of genetic and epigenetic targets of natural products and the effects of some common natural products on cancer chemoprevention and treatment.

  10. Engineering of bacteria for the visualization of targeted delivery of a cytolytic anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Sheng-Nan; Park, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Hee Jung; Zheng, Jin Hai; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Bom, Hee-Seung; Hong, Yeongjin; Szardenings, Michael; Shin, Myung Geun; Kim, Sun-Chang; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2013-11-01

    A number of recent reports have demonstrated that attenuated Salmonella typhimurium are capable of targeting both primary and metastatic tumors. The use of bacteria as a vehicle for the delivery of anticancer drugs requires a mechanism that precisely regulates and visualizes gene expression to ensure the appropriate timing and location of drug production. To integrate these functions into bacteria, we used a repressor-regulated tetracycline efflux system, in which the expression of a therapeutic gene and an imaging reporter gene were controlled by divergent promoters (tetAP and tetRP) in response to extracellular tetracycline. Attenuated S. typhimurium was transformed with the expression plasmids encoding cytolysin A, a therapeutic gene, and renilla luciferase variant 8, an imaging reporter gene, and administered intravenously to tumor-bearing mice. The engineered Salmonella successfully localized to tumor tissue and gene expression was dependent on the concentration of inducer, indicating the feasibility of peripheral control of bacterial gene expression. The bioluminescence signal permitted the localization of gene expression from the bacteria. The engineered bacteria significantly suppressed both primary and metastatic tumors and prolonged survival in mice. Therefore, engineered bacteria that carry a therapeutic and an imaging reporter gene for targeted anticancer therapy can be designed as a theranostic agent.

  11. Drug-induced interstitial lung diseases associated with molecular-targeted anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Gemma, Akihiko

    2009-02-01

    Little was known about drug-induced interstitial lung disease (ILD) when acute ILD-type events developed in several Japanese patients treated with gefitinib. A better understanding of drug-induced ILD is required, including more reliable data about the incidence of events associated with different treatments and identification of the risk factors for this type of ILD. Recent advances in imaging, molecular examination, and pathology have been used in postmarketing surveillance studies designed and conducted by an independent academic team to define the risk and to increase the amount of evidence about ILD related to various molecularly targeted anticancer agents. These studies may shed light on the underlying mechanisms of drug-induced ILD and appropriate evidence-based strategies that can be used to prevent or manage these events.

  12. Ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes as mitochondria-targeted two-photon photodynamic anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangping; Chen, Yu; Li, Guanying; Zhang, Pingyu; Jin, Chengzhi; Zeng, Leli; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-07-01

    Clinical acceptance of photodynamic therapy is currently hindered by poor depth efficacy and inefficient activation of the cell death machinery in cancer cells during treatment. To address these issues, photoactivation using two-photon absorption (TPA) is currently being examined. Mitochondria-targeted therapy represents a promising approach to target tumors selectively and may overcome the resistance in current anticancer therapies. Herein, four ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes (RuL1-RuL4) have been designed and developed to act as mitochondria-targeted two-photon photodynamic anticancer agents. These complexes exhibit very high singlet oxygen quantum yields in methanol (0.74-0.81), significant TPA cross sections (124-198 GM), remarkable mitochondrial accumulation, and deep penetration depth. Thus, RuL1-RuL4 were utilized as one-photon and two-photon absorbing photosensitizers in both monolayer cells and 3D multicellular spheroids (MCSs). These Ru(II) complexes were almost nontoxic towards cells and 3D MCSs in the dark and generate sufficient singlet oxygen under one- and two-photon irradiation to trigger cell death. Remarkably, RuL4 exhibited an IC50 value as low as 9.6 μM in one-photon PDT (λirr = 450 nm, 12 J cm(-2)) and 1.9 μM in two-photon PDT (λirr = 830 nm, 800 J cm(-2)) of 3D MCSs; moreover, RuL4 is an order of magnitude more toxic than cisplatin in the latter test system. The combination of mitochondria-targeting and two-photon activation provides a valuable paradigm to develop ruthenium(II) complexes for PDT applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatment Strategies that Enhance the Efficacy and Selectivity of Mitochondria-Targeted Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Modica-Napolitano, Josephine S.; Weissig, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Nearly a century has passed since Otto Warburg first observed high rates of aerobic glycolysis in a variety of tumor cell types and suggested that this phenomenon might be due to an impaired mitochondrial respiratory capacity in these cells. Subsequently, much has been written about the role of mitochondria in the initiation and/or progression of various forms of cancer, and the possibility of exploiting differences in mitochondrial structure and function between normal and malignant cells as targets for cancer chemotherapy. A number of mitochondria-targeted compounds have shown efficacy in selective cancer cell killing in pre-clinical and early clinical testing, including those that induce mitochondria permeability transition and apoptosis, metabolic inhibitors, and ROS regulators. To date, however, none has exhibited the standards for high selectivity and efficacy and low toxicity necessary to progress beyond phase III clinical trials and be used as a viable, single modality treatment option for human cancers. This review explores alternative treatment strategies that have been shown to enhance the efficacy and selectivity of mitochondria-targeted anticancer agents in vitro and in vivo, and may yet fulfill the clinical promise of exploiting the mitochondrion as a target for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:26230693

  14. [Visualization and analysis of adverse reactions of molecularly targeted anticancer agents using the self-organizing map (SOM)].

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Tomoyuki; Serizawa, Ayaka; Ohtsuki, Kaori; Kawakami, Junko; Sato, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Molecularly targeted anticancer agents cause a variety of adverse reactions compared with conventional anticancer agents because of their unique mechanisms of action. Sources of drug information such as package inserts (PIs) provide primarily document-based and numerical information. Therefore it is not easy to obtain a complete picture of drugs with similar effects, or to understand differences among drugs. In this study we used the self-organizing map (SOM) technique to visualize the adverse reactions indicated on PIs of 23 molecularly targeted anticancer agents as of March 2013. In both the presence/absence version and the frequency version, SOM was divided into domains according to mechanism of action, antibody drug or low-molecular weight drug, and molecular target. The component planes of the 753 adverse reaction items in the frequency version enabled us to grasp all available information and differences among the drugs. In some component planes in the presence/absence version, an adverse reaction that had not been reported for a drug but had already been reported for its proximally positioned drug(s) as of March 2013, was found to be reported thereafter by the Drug Safety Update (DSU) or the Adverse Event Report Search System "CzeekV," which is based on FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). Our results suggest that visualization of the adverse reactions of molecularly targeted anticancer agents by the SOM technique is useful not only to acquire all available information and differences among drugs, but also to predict the appearance of adverse reactions.

  15. Macromolecular Drug Targets in Cancer Treatment and Thiosemicarbazides as Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Küçükgüzel, Ş Güniz; Coşkun, Göknil P

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is known as abnormal cell division and consisting of a group of diseases on various organ tissues. Many therapies are available in cancer treatment such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy etc. Without damaging normal tissue, there is a huge need for specified anticancer drugs which have effect only on abnormal cancer cells. Therefore, advances in anticancer drug discovery in treating cancer in the recent years, directed towards to the macromolecular targets. Heterocyclic molecules, such as fluconazole, acetazolamide, etc., have a significant role in health care and pharmaceutical drug design. Thiosemicarbazides (NH2-NH-CSNH2) are the simplest hydrazine derivatives of thiocarbamic acid and are not only transition compounds, but they are also very effective organic compounds. Thiosemicarbazides possess an amide and amine protons, carbonyl and thione carbons. These structures have attracted the attention of the researchers in the development of novel compounds with anticonvulsant, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antimycobacterial, antifungal, antioxidant and anticancer activities. Recently, a number of thiosemicarbazides are available commercially as anticancer drugs for novel anticancer drug discovery. Antineoplastic or anticancer drugs prevent or inhibit the maturation and proliferation of neoplasms. These observations have been guiding the researchers for the development of new thiosemicarbazides that possess anticancer activity.

  16. Bridging academic science and clinical research in the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Matter, Alex

    2015-12-01

    This review starts with a brief history of drug discovery & development, and the place of Asia in this worldwide effort discussed. The conditions and constraints of a successful translational R&D involving academic basic research and clinical research are discussed and the Singapore model for pursuit of open R&D described. The importance of well-characterized, validated drug targets for the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents is emphasized, as well as a structured, high quality translational R&D. Furthermore, the characteristics of an attractive preclinical development drug candidate are discussed laying the foundation of a successful preclinical development. The most frequent sources of failures are described and risk management at every stage is highly recommended. Organizational factors are also considered to play an important role. The factors to consider before starting a new drug discovery & development project are described, and an example is given of a successful clinical project that has had its roots in local universities and was carried through preclinical development into phase I clinical trials.

  17. Bridging academic science and clinical research in the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Matter, Alex

    2015-01-01

    This review starts with a brief history of drug discovery & development, and the place of Asia in this worldwide effort discussed. The conditions and constraints of a successful translational R&D involving academic basic research and clinical research are discussed and the Singapore model for pursuit of open R&D described. The importance of well-characterized, validated drug targets for the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents is emphasized, as well as a structured, high quality translational R&D. Furthermore, the characteristics of an attractive preclinical development drug candidate are discussed laying the foundation of a successful preclinical development. The most frequent sources of failures are described and risk management at every stage is highly recommended. Organizational factors are also considered to play an important role. The factors to consider before starting a new drug discovery & development project are described, and an example is given of a successful clinical project that has had its roots in local universities and was carried through preclinical development into phase I clinical trials. PMID:26779369

  18. The flavonoid fisetin as an anticancer agent targeting the growth signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Rengarajan, Thamaraiselvan; Yaacob, Nik Soriani

    2016-10-15

    Epidemiological studies show that consumption of diets rich in fruits and vegetables is associated with lower risks of cancer. This evidence has kindled interest into research on bioactive food components and has till date resulted in the identification of many compounds with cancer preventive and therapeutic potential. Among such compounds is fisetin (3,7,3,4-tetrahydroxyflavone), a flavonol that is commonly found in many fruits and vegetables such as apples, persimmons, grapes, kiwis, strawberries, onions and cucumbers. Fisetin has been shown to inhibit or retard the growth of various cancer cells in culture and implanted tumors in vivo. Fisetin targets many components of intracellular signaling pathways including regulators of cell survival and apoptosis, tumor angiogenic and metastatic switches by modulating a distinct set of upstream kinases, transcription factors and their regulators. Current evidence supports the idea that fisetin is a promising agent for cancer treatment. This review summarizes reported anticancer effects of fisetin, and re-emphasizes its potential therapeutic role in the treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Applications of Targeting Anti-Cancer Agents in Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guang-Chun; Yang, Xu; Yu, Yan; Zhao, Dai-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Anti-cancer targeting drugs appear to be a new and powerful "weapon" for cancer therapies. These targeting drugs are directed against specific molecules that are over-expressed or where certain unique factors are aberrantly expressed either in cancer cells or in diseased cell sites. Compared with traditional chemotherapeutic drugs, these targeting drugs have the advantages of high specificity, efficacy and less side effects. Target therapy is a breakthrough and revolutionary advance in the field of cancer therapy. Tumor angiogenesis plays a key role in tumor growth and metastasis and the mutation of tyrosine kinases is also strongly associated with cancer progression. Thus, in this review, we will discuss the advances in the development of targeting anti-cancer drugs by narrowing it down to small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptors belonging to the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases and angiogenic inhibitors. It will also address concerns for drug resistance and adverse events.

  20. Honokiol analogs: a novel class of anticancer agents targeting cell signaling pathways and other bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ankit; Kumar Singh, Umesh; Chaudhary, Anurag

    2013-05-01

    Honokiol (3,5-di-(2-propenyl)-1,1-biphenyl-2,2-diol) is a natural bioactive neolignan isolated from the genus Magnolia. In recent studies, honokiol has been observed to have anti-angiogenic, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and GABA-modulating properties in vitro and in preclinical models. Honokiol and its analogs target multiple signaling pathways including NF-κB, STAT3, EGFR, mTOR and caspase-mediated common pathway, which regulate cancer initiation and progression. Honokiol and its targets of action may be helpful in the development of effective analogs and targeted cancer therapy. In this review, recent data describing the molecular targets of honokiol and its analogs with anticancer and some other bioactivities are discussed.

  1. The prince and the pauper. A tale of anticancer targeted agents

    PubMed Central

    Dueñas-González, Alfonso; García-López, Patricia; Herrera, Luis Alonso; Medina-Franco, Jose Luis; González-Fierro, Aurora; Candelaria, Myrna

    2008-01-01

    Cancer rates are set to increase at an alarming rate, from 10 million new cases globally in 2000 to 15 million in 2020. Regarding the pharmacological treatment of cancer, we currently are in the interphase of two treatment eras. The so-called pregenomic therapy which names the traditional cancer drugs, mainly cytotoxic drug types, and post-genomic era-type drugs referring to rationally-based designed. Although there are successful examples of this newer drug discovery approach, most target-specific agents only provide small gains in symptom control and/or survival, whereas others have consistently failed in the clinical testing. There is however, a characteristic shared by these agents: -their high cost-. This is expected as drug discovery and development is generally carried out within the commercial rather than the academic realm. Given the extraordinarily high therapeutic drug discovery-associated costs and risks, it is highly unlikely that any single public-sector research group will see a novel chemical "probe" become a "drug". An alternative drug development strategy is the exploitation of established drugs that have already been approved for treatment of non-cancerous diseases and whose cancer target has already been discovered. This strategy is also denominated drug repositioning, drug repurposing, or indication switch. Although traditionally development of these drugs was unlikely to be pursued by Big Pharma due to their limited commercial value, biopharmaceutical companies attempting to increase productivity at present are pursuing drug repositioning. More and more companies are scanning the existing pharmacopoeia for repositioning candidates, and the number of repositioning success stories is increasing. Here we provide noteworthy examples of known drugs whose potential anticancer activities have been highlighted, to encourage further research on these known drugs as a means to foster their translation into clinical trials utilizing the more limited

  2. The prince and the pauper. A tale of anticancer targeted agents.

    PubMed

    Dueñas-González, Alfonso; García-López, Patricia; Herrera, Luis Alonso; Medina-Franco, Jose Luis; González-Fierro, Aurora; Candelaria, Myrna

    2008-10-23

    Cancer rates are set to increase at an alarming rate, from 10 million new cases globally in 2000 to 15 million in 2020. Regarding the pharmacological treatment of cancer, we currently are in the interphase of two treatment eras. The so-called pregenomic therapy which names the traditional cancer drugs, mainly cytotoxic drug types, and post-genomic era-type drugs referring to rationally-based designed. Although there are successful examples of this newer drug discovery approach, most target-specific agents only provide small gains in symptom control and/or survival, whereas others have consistently failed in the clinical testing. There is however, a characteristic shared by these agents: -their high cost-. This is expected as drug discovery and development is generally carried out within the commercial rather than the academic realm. Given the extraordinarily high therapeutic drug discovery-associated costs and risks, it is highly unlikely that any single public-sector research group will see a novel chemical "probe" become a "drug". An alternative drug development strategy is the exploitation of established drugs that have already been approved for treatment of non-cancerous diseases and whose cancer target has already been discovered. This strategy is also denominated drug repositioning, drug repurposing, or indication switch. Although traditionally development of these drugs was unlikely to be pursued by Big Pharma due to their limited commercial value, biopharmaceutical companies attempting to increase productivity at present are pursuing drug repositioning. More and more companies are scanning the existing pharmacopoeia for repositioning candidates, and the number of repositioning success stories is increasing. Here we provide noteworthy examples of known drugs whose potential anticancer activities have been highlighted, to encourage further research on these known drugs as a means to foster their translation into clinical trials utilizing the more limited

  3. Novel platinum(IV) complexes conjugated with a wogonin derivative as multi-targeted anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaodong; Xu, Gang; Chen, Feihong; Fang, Lei; Gou, Shaohua

    2017-04-15

    Platinum-based complexes like cisplatin and oxaliplatin are well known the mainstay of chemotherapy regimens on clinic. Wogonin, a natural product that possesses wide biological activities, is now in phase I clinical test as an anticancer agent in China. Herein reported are a series of novel Pt(IV) complexes that conjugated a wogonin derivative (compound 3) to the axial position via a linker group. After being tethered to the platinum(IV) complexes, the wogonin derivative provided multiple anticancer effects, especially in compound 10, a fusion containing wogonin and cisplatin units. Compound 10 not only inherited the genotoxicity from cisplatin, but also obtained the COX inhibitory property from the wogonin derivative. Further mechanistic investigation revealed that compound 10 caused the accumulation of ROS, decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and then activated the p53 pathway. Overall, the research demonstrates that the "integrative" prodrug can be an effective strategy to promote the anticancer potency of Pt-based drugs for cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular Basis for the Inhibition of Human NMPRTase, a Novel Target for Anticancer Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Khan,J.; Tao, X.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NMPRTase) has a crucial role in the salvage pathway of NAD{sup +} biosynthesis, and a potent inhibitor of NMPRTase, FK866, can reduce cellular NAD+ levels and induce apoptosis in tumors. We have determined the crystal structures at up to 2.1-Angstroms resolution of human and murine NMPRTase, alone and in complex with the reaction product nicotinamide mononucleotide or the inhibitor FK866. The structures suggest that Asp219 is a determinant of substrate specificity of NMPRTase, which is confirmed by our mutagenesis studies. FK866 is bound in a tunnel at the interface of the NMPRTase dimer, and mutations in this binding site can abolish the inhibition by FK866. Contrary to current knowledge, the structures show that FK866 should compete directly with the nicotinamide substrate. Our structural and biochemical studies provide a starting point for the development of new anticancer agents.

  5. Cyclometalated iridium(III)-guanidinium complexes as mitochondria-targeted anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Song, Xing-Dong; Kong, Xia; He, Shu-Fen; Chen, Jia-Xi; Sun, Jing; Chen, Bing-Bing; Zhao, Jin-Wu; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2017-09-29

    Guanidinium-functionalized molecules are commonly studied for their use as pharmaceutically active compounds and drugs carriers. Herein, four cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes containing guanidinium ligands have been synthesized and characterized as potential anticancer agents. These complexes exhibit moderate antitumor activity in HeLa, MCF-7, HepG2, CNE-2, and A549 human tumor cells. Interestingly, all complexes showed higher cytotoxicity than cisplatin against a cisplatin-resistant cell line A549R, and less cytotoxicity on the nontumorigenic LO2 cells. Intracellular distribution studies suggest that these complexes are selectively localized in the mitochondria. Mechanism studies indicate that these complexes arrested the cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase and can influence mitochondrial integrity, inducing cancer cell death through reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Designed hybrid TPR peptide targeting Hsp90 as a novel anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Horibe, Tomohisa; Kohno, Masayuki; Haramoto, Mari; Ohara, Koji; Kawakami, Koji

    2011-01-14

    Despite an ever-improving understanding of the molecular biology of cancer, the treatment of most cancers has not changed dramatically in the past three decades and drugs that do not discriminate between tumor cells and normal tissues remain the mainstays of anticancer therapy. Since Hsp90 is typically involved in cell proliferation and survival, this is thought to play a key role in cancer, and Hsp90 has attracted considerable interest in recent years as a potential therapeutic target. We focused on the interaction of Hsp90 with its cofactor protein p60/Hop, and engineered a cell-permeable peptidomimetic, termed "hybrid Antp-TPR peptide", modeled on the binding interface between the molecular chaperone Hsp90 and the TPR2A domain of Hop. It was demonstrated that this designed hybrid Antp-TPR peptide inhibited the interaction of Hsp90 with the TPR2A domain, inducing cell death of breast, pancreatic, renal, lung, prostate, and gastric cancer cell lines in vitro. In contrast, Antp-TPR peptide did not affect the viability of normal cells. Moreover, analysis in vivo revealed that Antp-TPR peptide displayed a significant antitumor activity in a xenograft model of human pancreatic cancer in mice. These results indicate that Antp-TPR peptide would provide a potent and selective anticancer therapy to cancer patients.

  7. Designed hybrid TPR peptide targeting Hsp90 as a novel anticancer agent

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite an ever-improving understanding of the molecular biology of cancer, the treatment of most cancers has not changed dramatically in the past three decades and drugs that do not discriminate between tumor cells and normal tissues remain the mainstays of anticancer therapy. Since Hsp90 is typically involved in cell proliferation and survival, this is thought to play a key role in cancer, and Hsp90 has attracted considerable interest in recent years as a potential therapeutic target. Methods We focused on the interaction of Hsp90 with its cofactor protein p60/Hop, and engineered a cell-permeable peptidomimetic, termed "hybrid Antp-TPR peptide", modeled on the binding interface between the molecular chaperone Hsp90 and the TPR2A domain of Hop. Results It was demonstrated that this designed hybrid Antp-TPR peptide inhibited the interaction of Hsp90 with the TPR2A domain, inducing cell death of breast, pancreatic, renal, lung, prostate, and gastric cancer cell lines in vitro. In contrast, Antp-TPR peptide did not affect the viability of normal cells. Moreover, analysis in vivo revealed that Antp-TPR peptide displayed a significant antitumor activity in a xenograft model of human pancreatic cancer in mice. Conclusion These results indicate that Antp-TPR peptide would provide a potent and selective anticancer therapy to cancer patients. PMID:21235734

  8. Fluorine-Containing Taxoid Anticancer Agents and Their Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Joshua; Vineberg, Jacob G.; Zuniga, Edison S.; Ojima, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    A long-standing problem of conventional chemotherapy is the lack of tumor-specific treatments. Traditional chemotherapy relies on the premise that rapidly proliferating cancer cells are more likely to be killed by a cytotoxic agent. In reality, however, cytotoxic agents have very little or no specificity, which leads to systemic toxicity, causing undesirable severe side effects. Consequently, various “molecularly targeted cancer therapies” have been developed for use in specific cancers, including tumor-targeting drug delivery systems. In general, such a drug delivery system consists of a tumor recognition moiety and a cytotoxic “warhead” connected through a “smart” linker to form a conjugate. When a multi-functionalized nanomaterial is used as the vehicle, a “Trojan Horse” approach can be used for mass delivery of cytotoxic “warheads” to maximize the efficacy. Exploitation of the special properties of fluorine has proven successful in the development of new and effective biochemical tools as well as therapeutic agents. Fluorinated congeners can also serve as excellent probes for the investigation of biochemical mechanisms. 19F-NMR can provide unique and powerful tools for mechanistic investigations in chemical biology. This account presents our recent progress, in perspective, on the molecular approaches to the design and development of novel tumor-targeted drug delivery systems for new generation chemotherapy by exploiting the unique nature of fluorine. PMID:23935213

  9. Novel Anticancer Agents Based on Targeting the Trimer Interface of the PRL Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yunpeng; Yu, Zhi-Hong; Liu, Sijiu; Zhang, Lujuan; Zhang, Ruo-Yu; Zeng, Li-Fan; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2016-08-15

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL) oncoproteins are phosphatases overexpressed in numerous types of human cancer. Elevated levels of PRL associate with metastasis and poor clinical outcomes. In principle, PRL phosphatases offer appealing therapeutic targets, but they remain underexplored due to the lack of specific chemical probes. In this study, we address this issue by exploiting a unique property of PRL phosphatases, namely, that they may function as homotrimers. Starting from a sequential structure-based virtual screening and medicinal chemistry strategy, we identified Cmpd-43 and several analogs that disrupt PRL1 trimerization. Biochemical and structural analyses demonstrate that Cmpd-43 and its close analogs directly bind the PRL1 trimer interface and obstruct PRL1 trimerization. Cmpd-43 also specifically blocks the PRL1-induced cell proliferation and migration through attenuation of both ERK1/2 and Akt activity. Importantly, Cmpd-43 exerted potent anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo in a murine xenograft model of melanoma. Our results validate a trimerization-dependent signaling mechanism for PRL and offer proof of concept for trimerization inhibitors as candidate therapeutics to treat PRL-driven cancers. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4805-15. ©2016 AACR.

  10. Tumor-targeting peptides and small molecules as anti-cancer agents to overcome drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Sarafraz-Yazdi, Ehsan; Pincus, Matthew R; Michl, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of chemotherapy in cancer therapy, development of resistance to every new therapeutic has been the universal experience. The growing understanding of cancer genomics, cancer-associated signal transduction pathways, and key protein drivers of cancer has enabled cancer biologists and medicinal chemists to develop targeted molecules to interfere with these pathways to tackle drug resistant cancers. However, to the dismay of oncologists, the clinical use of many of these tools has once again brought to the forefront the inevitable challenge of drug resistance. It is now understood that cancer resistance to different therapies involves multiple challenges that encompass the cancer cell itself as well as host physiology. This review presents small molecule inhibitors and peptides as two therapeutic approaches in anti-cancer drug development. Resistance to selected samples of these novel therapies is described in the context of cell autonomous resistance, the contributions of the tumor microenvironment, and germ line factors. For each approach, advantages and disadvantages are discussed on how to better overcome the inevitable challenge of resistance in cancer treatment.

  11. Phosphorescent iridium(III)-bis-N-heterocyclic carbene complexes as mitochondria-targeted theranostic and photodynamic anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Tan, Cai-Ping; Zhang, Wei; He, Liang; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria-targeted compounds represent a promising approach to target tumors selectively and overcome resistance to current anticancer therapies. In this work, three cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes (1-3) containing bis-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands have been explored as theranostic and photodynamic agents targeting mitochondria. These complexes display rich photophysical properties, which greatly facilitates the study of their intracellular fate. All three complexes are more cytotoxic than cisplatin against the cancer cells screened. 1-3 can penetrate into human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells quickly and efficiently, and they can carry out theranostic functions by simultaneously inducing and monitoring the morphological changes in mitochondria. Mechanism studies show that these complexes exert their anticancer efficacy by initiating a cascade of events related to mitochondrial dysfunction. Additionally, they display up to 3 orders of magnitude higher cytotoxicity upon irradiation at 365 nm, which is so far the highest photocytotoxic responses reported for iridium complexes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Novel antibodies as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Zafir-Lavie, I; Michaeli, Y; Reiter, Y

    2007-05-28

    In recent years antibodies, whether generated by traditional hybridoma technology or by recombinant DNA strategies, have evolved from Paul Ehrlich's 'magic bullets' to a modern age 'guided missile'. In the recent years of immunologic research, we are witnessing development in the fields of antigen screening and protein engineering in order to create specific anticancer remedies. The developments in the field of recombinant DNA, protein engineering and cancer biology have let us gain insight into many cancer-related mechanisms. Moreover, novel techniques have facilitated tools allowing unique distinction between malignantly transformed cells, and regular ones. This understanding has paved the way for the rational design of a new age of pharmaceuticals: monoclonal antibodies and their fragments. Antibodies can select antigens on both a specific and a high-affinity account, and further implementation of these qualities is used to target cancer cells by specifically identifying exogenous antigens of cancer cell populations. The structure of the antibody provides plasticity resonating from its functional sites. This review will screen some of the many novel antibodies and antibody-based approaches that are being currently developed for clinical applications as the new generation of anticancer agents.

  13. Investigating the cellular fate of a DNA-targeted platinum-based anticancer agent by orthogonal double-click chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Xin; Ding, Song; Liu, Fang; Kucera, Gregory L.

    2014-01-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to study a platinum-based anticancer agent in intact NCI-H460 lung cancer cells. Orthogonal copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (click) reactions were used to simultaneously determine the cell-cycle-specific localization of the azide-functionalized platinum–acridine agent 1 and monitor its effects on nucleic acid metabolism. Copper-catalyzed postlabeling showed advantages over copper-free click chemistry using a dibenzocyclooctyne (DIBO)-modified reporter dye, which produced high background levels in microscopic images and failed to efficiently label platinum adducts in chromatin. Compound 1 was successfully labeled with the fluorophore DIBO to yield 1* (characterized by in-line high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray mass spectrometry). 1 and 1* show a high degree of colocalization in the confocal images, but the ability of 1* to target the (compacted) chromatin was markedly reduced, most likely owing to the steric bulk introduced by the DIBO tag. Nuclear platinum levels correlated inversely with the ability of the cells to synthesize DNA and cause cell cycle arrest, as confirmed by bivariate flow cytometry analysis. In addition, a decrease in the level of cellular transcription, shrinkage of the nucleolar regions, and redistribution of RNA into the cytosol were observed. Postlabeling in conjunction with colocalization experiments is a useful tool for studying the cell killing mechanism of this type of DNA-targeted agent. PMID:24407462

  14. Investigating the cellular fate of a DNA-targeted platinum-based anticancer agent by orthogonal double-click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xin; Ding, Song; Liu, Fang; Kucera, Gregory L; Bierbach, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to study a platinum-based anticancer agent in intact NCI-H460 lung cancer cells. Orthogonal copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click) reactions were used to simultaneously determine the cell-cycle-specific localization of the azide-functionalized platinum-acridine agent 1 and monitor its effects on nucleic acid metabolism. Copper-catalyzed postlabeling showed advantages over copper-free click chemistry using a dibenzocyclooctyne (DIBO)-modified reporter dye, which produced high background levels in microscopic images and failed to efficiently label platinum adducts in chromatin. Compound 1 was successfully labeled with the fluorophore DIBO to yield 1* (characterized by in-line high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray mass spectrometry). 1 and 1* show a high degree of colocalization in the confocal images, but the ability of 1* to target the (compacted) chromatin was markedly reduced, most likely owing to the steric bulk introduced by the DIBO tag. Nuclear platinum levels correlated inversely with the ability of the cells to synthesize DNA and cause cell cycle arrest, as confirmed by bivariate flow cytometry analysis. In addition, a decrease in the level of cellular transcription, shrinkage of the nucleolar regions, and redistribution of RNA into the cytosol were observed. Postlabeling in conjunction with colocalization experiments is a useful tool for studying the cell killing mechanism of this type of DNA-targeted agent.

  15. miR-137 restoration sensitizes multidrug-resistant MCF-7/ADM cells to anticancer agents by targeting YB-1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaolan; Li, Yuefeng; Shen, Huiling; Li, Hao; Long, Lulu; Hui, Lulu; Xu, Wenlin

    2013-02-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapeutic agents is a major obstacle to successful treatment in breast cancer patients. The aims of this study were to investigate whether miR-137 was involved in the regulation of MDR, and to explore the mechanism of miR-137 on the sensitivity of MCF-7/ADM cells. miR-137 was downregulated in MCF-7/ADM cells, and its expression was found to inversely correlate with Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) levels in breast cancer cells. Furthermore, YB-1 was confirmed as a target of miR-137 by luciferase reporter assay and western blot analysis. Moreover, elevated expression of miR-137 reduced the protein expression levels of YB-1 and P-gp, mimicking the effect of YB-1 knockdown in the sensitivity of MCF-7/ADM cells to anticancer agents, whereas restoration of YB-1 diminished this effect. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that miR-137 was involved in MDR in cancer through modulation of P-gp by targeting YB-1, suggesting that miR-137 might be a potential target for preventing and reversing MDR in tumor cells.

  16. 1,3,4-Oxadiazoles: An emerging scaffold to target growth factors, enzymes and kinases as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Shalini; Asati, Vivek; Singh, Jagadish; Roy, Partha Pratim

    2015-06-05

    Five member heterocyclic 1,3,4-oxadiazole nucleus find unique place in medicinal chemistry and plays significant role in producing anticancer activity. The small and simple 1,3,4-oxadiazole nucleus is present in various compounds involved in research aimed at evaluating new products that posses interesting pharmacological properties such as antitumour activity. Mono and 2,5-di-substituted-1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives have attracted considerable attention owing to their effective biological activity and extensive use. The important mechanism involved during its tumour suppression is related with the inhibition of different growth factors, enzymes and kinases including telomerase enzyme, histone deacetylase (HDAC), methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP), thymidylate synthase (TS), glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK), epidermal growth factor (EGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). The focused criteria of this review is to highlights the targeted inhibitory activity of 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives and their structure activity relationship to generate potential anticancer agents.

  17. Linker design for the modular assembly of multifunctional and targeted platinum(ii)-containing anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ding, S; Bierbach, U

    2016-08-16

    A versatile and efficient modular synthetic platform was developed for assembling multifunctional conjugates and targeted forms of platinum-(benz)acridines, a class of highly cytotoxic DNA-targeted hybrid agents. The synthetic strategy involved amide coupling between succinyl ester-modified platinum compounds (P1, P2) and a set of 11 biologically relevant primary and secondary amines (N1-N11). To demonstrate the feasibility and versatility of the approach, a structurally and functionally diverse range of amines was introduced. These include biologically active molecules, such as rucaparib (a PARP inhibitor), E/Z-endoxifen (an estrogen receptor antagonist), and a quinazoline-based tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Micro-scale reactions in Eppendorf tubes or on 96-well plates were used to screen for optimal coupling conditions in DMF solution with carbodiimide-, uronium-, and phosphonium-based compounds, as well as other common coupling reagents. Reactions with the phosphonium-based coupling reagent PyBOP produced the highest yields and gave the cleanest conversions. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the chemistry can also be performed in aqueous media and is amenable to parallel synthesis based on multiple consecutive reactions in DMF in a "one-tube" format. In-line LC-MS was used to assess the stability of the conjugates in physiologically relevant buffers. Hydrolysis of the conjugates occurs at the ester moiety and is facilitated by the aquated metal moiety under low-chloride ion conditions. The rate of ester cleavage greatly depends on the nature of the amine component. Potential applications of the linker technology are discussed.

  18. Noncovalent Binding to DNA: Still a Target in Developing Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Portugal, José; Barceló, Francisca

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding compounds are of extraordinary importance in medicine, accounting for a substantial portion of antitumor drugs in clinical usage. However, their mechanisms of action remain sometimes incompletely understood. This review critically examines two broad classes of molecules that bind noncovalently to DNA: intercalators and groove binders. Intercalators bind to DNA by inserting their chromophore moiety between two consecutive base pairs, whereas groove binders fit into the grooves of DNA. Noncovalent DNAinteractive drugs can recognize certain supramolecular DNA structures such as the Gquadruplexes found in telomeres and in numerous gene promoters, and they can act as topoisomerase I and II poisons. We discuss how DNA-binding compounds affect transcription and compete with protein factors for binding to consensus binding sites in gene promoters both in vitro and in cultured cancer cells. Moreover, we comment on the design of molecules that can tightly and specifically bind to any desired target DNA, such as various hairpin polyamides which efficacy as chemotherapeutic agents is being evaluated. At present, genome-wide studies, which provide details of events that may influence both cancer progression and therapeutic outcome, are a common way used to analyze the effects of DNA-binding compounds. A conclusive feature that emerges from reviewing the information on DNA-binding compounds is that both natural sources and chemical approaches can be productively used to obtain drugs to manipulate gene expression in cancer cells.

  19. Cutaneous reactions to anticancer agents targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor: a dermatology-oncology perspective.

    PubMed

    Lacouture, M E; Melosky, B L

    2007-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is often overexpressed or dysregulated in solid tumors. Targeting the EGFR-mediated signaling pathway has become routine practice in the treatment of lung, pancreatic, head and neck, and colon carcinomas. Available agents with selected activity towards the EGFR include low molecular weight tyrosine kinase inhibitors, e.g., erlotinib (Tarceva, Genentech BioOncology/ OSI Pharmaceuticals/ F. Hoffmann-La Roche) and monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab (Erbitux, Bristol-Myers Squibb/ ImClone Systems/ Merck) and panitumumab (Vectibix, Amgen). Their use is anticipated to increase for treating other solid tumors that are dependent on this pathway for growth and proliferation. Health Canada and the US FDA have approved erlotinib for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). It has also been approved in the US for use against pancreatic cancer in combination with gemcitabine (Gemzar, Eli Lilly). Cetuximab and most recently panitumumab (Vectibix, Amgen/ Abgenix) were approved by the US FDA for metastatic colorectal carcinoma. Cetuximab is also approved in the US for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The safety profile for this class of drugs is unique, with virtually no hematological toxicity, but frequent cutaneous and gastrointestinal side-effects. Although there is a dearth of randomized trials addressing treatment of the dermatological side-effects, some basic principles of management have been agreed upon and can likely improve patient compliance and decrease inappropriate dose reduction, which may negatively influence the antitumor effect.

  20. Safety Pharmacology of Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Martin, Pauline L

    2015-01-01

    The safety pharmacology testing for anticancer agents has historically differed for small molecule pharmaceutical drugs versus large-molecule biopharmaceuticals. For pharmaceutical drugs, dedicated safety pharmacology studies have been conducted according to the ICH M3 (R2), ICH 7A, and ICH S7B guidance documents. For biopharmaceuticals, safety pharmacology endpoints have been incorporated into the repeated-dose toxicology studies according to ICHS6 (R1). However, the introduction of the ICH S9 guidance document for the nonclinical evaluation for anticancer pharmaceuticals has allowed for a streamlined approach for both types of molecules to facilitate access of new potential therapeutics to cancer patients and to reduce the number of animal studies. Examples of the testing strategies that have previously been employed for some representative anticancer agents are provided, and their predictivity to adverse events noted in the clinic is discussed.

  1. Ester-Modified Cyclometalated Iridium(III) Complexes as Mitochondria-Targeting Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang-Xin; Chen, Mu-He; Hu, Xiao-Ying; Ye, Rui-Rong; Tan, Cai-Ping; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Organometallic iridium complexes are potent anticancer candidates which act through different mechanisms from cisplatin-based chemotherapy regimens. Here, ten phosphorescent cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes containing 2,2′-bipyridine-4,4′-dicarboxylic acid and its diester derivatives as ligands are designed and synthesized. The modification by ester group, which can be hydrolysed by esterase, facilitates the adjustment of drug-like properties. The quantum yields and emission lifetimes are influenced by variation of the ester substituents on the Ir(III) complexes. The cytotoxicity of these Ir(III) complexes is correlated with the length of their ester groups. Among them, 4a and 4b are found to be highly active against a panel of cancer cells screened, including cisplatin-resistant cancer cells. Mechanism studies in vitro indicate that they undergo hydrolysis of ester bonds, accumulate in mitochondria, and induce a series of cell-death related events mediated by mitochondria. Furthermore, 4a and 4b can induce pro-death autophagy and apoptosis simultaneously. Our study indicates that ester modification is a simple and feasible strategy to enhance the anticancer potency of Ir(III) complexes. PMID:27958338

  2. Development of anticancer agents: wizardry with osmium.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad; Babak, Maria V; Hartinger, Christian G

    2014-10-01

    Platinum compounds are one of the pillars of modern cancer chemotherapy. The apparent disadvantages of existing chemotherapeutics have led to the development of novel anticancer agents with alternative modes of action. Many complexes of the heavy metal osmium (Os) are potent growth inhibitors of human cancer cells and are active in vivo, often superior or comparable to cisplatin, as the benchmark metal-based anticancer agent, or clinically tested ruthenium (Ru) drug candidates. Depending on the choice of ligand system, osmium compounds exhibit diverse modes of action, including redox activation, DNA targeting or inhibition of protein kinases. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the development of osmium anticancer drug candidates and discuss their cellular mechanisms of action.

  3. Hybrid Compounds as Multitarget Directed Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Kucuksayan, Ertan; Ozben, Tomris

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a multifactorial disease including interactions of complex genetic and environmental factors. Clinical efficacy of anticancer chemotherapies is hampered by various factors including multidrug resistance (MDR). There is a strong need to discover more potent novel cancer drugs to kill cancer cells selectively. The recent new strategy for cancer treatment involves the design and synthesis of hybrid compounds as multitargeted anticancer agents. In this review, we focus on studies using hybrid compounds which were designed and synthesized from two or more different bioactive moieties conjugating them into a single hybrid drug. Hybrid compounds having more than a single target have been considered as more efficient and potent anticancer agents, since it is almost impossible to destroy cancer cells with a single target. Hybrid compounds overcome many disadvantages of single cancer drugs such as low solubility, adverse effects, and multi drug resistance. We have compiled the data of recent studies using the new hybrid anticancer drugs in cancer treatment. Thus, the design, synthesis and clinical trials of new hybrid compounds should be continued and supported in future. Results of recent studies have proved that they have a great potential to be used as novel anticancer drugs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Multi-platinum anti-cancer agents. Substitution-inert compounds for tumor selectivity and new targets.

    PubMed

    Farrell, N P

    2015-12-21

    This tutorial review summarizes chemical, biophysical and cellular biological properties of formally substitution-inert "non-covalent" polynuclear platinum complexes (PPCs). We demonstrate how modulation of the pharmacological factors affecting platinum compound cytotoxicity such as cellular accumulation, reactivity toward extracellular and intracellular sulfur-ligand nucleophiles and consequences of DNA binding is achieved to afford a profile of biological activity distinct from that of covalently-binding agents. The DNA binding of substitution-inert complexes is achieved by molecular recognition through minor groove spanning and backbone tracking of the phosphate clamp. In this situation, the square-planar tetra-am(m)ine Pt(ii) coordination units hydrogen bond to phosphate oxygen OP atoms to form bidentate N-O-N motifs. The modular nature of the polynuclear compounds results in high-affinity binding to DNA and very efficient nuclear condensation. These combined effects distinguish the phosphate clamp as a third mode of ligand-DNA binding, discrete from intercalation and minor-groove binding. The cellular consequences mirror those of the biophysical studies and a significant portion of nuclear DNA is compacted, a unique effect different from mitosis, senescence or apoptosis. Substitution-inert PPCs display cytotoxicity similar to cisplatin in a wide range of cell lines, and sensitivity is indifferent to p53 status. Cellular accumulation is mediated through binding to heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) allowing for possibilities of tumor selectivity as well as disruption of HSPG function, opening new targets for platinum antitumor agents. The combined properties show that covalently-binding chemotypes are not the unique arbiters of cytotoxicity and antitumor activity and meaningful antitumor profiles can be achieved even in the absence of Pt-DNA bond formation. These dual properties make the substitution-inert compounds a unique class of inherently dual

  5. Targeted Delivery of Anticancer Agents via a Dual Function Nanocarrier with an Interfacial Drug-Interactive Motif

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a dual-function drug carrier, polyethylene glycol (PEG)-derivatized farnesylthiosalicylate (FTS). Here we report that incorporation of a drug-interactive motif (Fmoc) into PEG5k–FTS2 led to further improvement in both drug loading capacity and formulation stability. Doxorubicin (DOX) formulated in PEG5k–Fmoc–FTS2 showed sustained release kinetics slower than those of DOX loaded in PEG5k–FTS2. The maximum tolerated dose of DOX- or paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded PEG5k–Fmoc–FTS2 was significantly higher than that of the free drug. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution studies showed that DOX/PEG5k–Fmoc–FTS2 mixed micelles were able to retain DOX in the bloodstream for a significant amount of time and efficiently deliver the drug to tumor sites. More importantly, drug (DOX or PTX)-loaded PEG5k–Fmoc–FTS2 led to superior antitumor activity over other treatments including drugs formulated in PEG5k–FTS2 in breast cancer and prostate cancer models. Our improved dual function carrier with a built-in drug-interactive motif represents a simple and effective system for targeted delivery of anticancer agents. PMID:25325795

  6. HS-133, a novel fluorescent phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor as a potential imaging and anticancer agent for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunseung; Son, Mi Kwon; Yun, Sun-Mi; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Kyeong-Ryoon; Lee, Soyoung; Kim, Donghee; Hong, Sungwoo; Hong, Soon-Sun

    2014-01-01

    As PI3K/Akt signaling is frequently deregulated in a wide variety of human tumors, PI3K inhibitors are an emerging class of drugs for cancer treatment. The monitoring of the drug behavior and distribution in the biological system can play an important role for targeted therapy and provide information regarding the response or resistance to available therapies. In this study, therefore, we have developed a family of xanthine derivatives, serving as a dual function exhibiting fluorescence, as well as inhibiting PI3K. Among them, HS-133 showed anti-proliferative effects and was monitored for its subcellular localization by a fluorescence microscopy. HS-133 suppressed the PI3K/Akt pathway and induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase. The induction of apoptosis by HS-133 was confirmed by the increases of the cleaved PARP, caspase-3, and caspase-8. Furthermore, HS-133 decreased the protein expression of HIF-1α and VEGF, as well inhibited the tube formation and migration of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In vivo imaging also showed that tumors were visualized fluorescent with HS-133, and its oral administration significantly inhibited the growth of tumor in SkBr3 mouse xenograft models. Thus, we suggest that HS-133 may be used as a fluorescent anticancer agent against human breast cancer. PMID:25338206

  7. Discovery and Development of Topoisomerase Inhibitors as Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Kathiravan, Muthu K; Kale, Anuj N; Nilewar, Shrikant

    2016-01-01

    As one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide, cancer is posing threat despite efforts being taken to develop effective anticancer drugs. There is an increase in number of chemotherapy treatments due to growing number of manifestations causing increasing toxicities of cytotoxic agents. Almost all the anticancer agents available till date have one or the other side effects. Topoisomerases are the attractive targets to develop effective anticancer agents. There has been development of many topoisomerase inhibitors till date and has shown good anticancer activity but their side effects outnumber their anticancer potential. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop effective therapeutic agents with fewer side effects. This review deals with design and development aspect of topoisomerase inhibitors as exciting novel anticancer agents. The emphasis has been laid in particular on the new potential heterocyles as TOP inhibitors in the field of medicinal chemistry. The review discusses about the topoisomerase poisons, TOP1 suppressors, TOP inhibitors and Dual TOP 1/2 inhibitors.

  8. Diacetoxyscirpenol as a new anticancer agent to target hypoxia-inducible factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yong-Joon; Shin, Hyun-Woo; Chun, Yang-Sook; Leutou, Alain Simplice; Son, Byeng Wha; Park, Jong-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia activates hypoxia-inducible factor 1, which promotes the progression of malignancy by stimulating angiogenesis and by augmenting the ability of tumors to survive. Thus, HIF-1 is one of the most compelling targets for treating cancers. The aim of this study was to find a small molecule that inhibits HIF-1 under hypoxia in cancer cells. 7,280 compounds in a chemical library were tested in a cancer cell line expressing luciferase HIF-dependently. Through three rounds of screening, we finally picked up a compound that originates from a marine bacterium parasitizing red alga. The antibiotic potently inhibited HIF-1 expression and its transcriptional activity in cancer cells exposed to hypoxia. Through two-step fractionation, diacetoxyscirpenol was purified and identified as a HIF-inhibiting ingredient. Mechanistically, diacetoxyscirpenol inhibits the synthesis of HIF-1α protein and also interferes with the dimerization of HIF-1α and ARNT. It attenuates HIF-mediated gene expression in cancer cells exposed to hypoxia, and by doing so reduces tumorigenic and angiogenic potentials of cancer cells. More importantly, diacetoxyscirpenol retarded tumor growth in mice, and reduced HIF-1α expression and vascular formation in the tumors. Overall, diacetoxyscirpenol is considered a potential drug deregulating the HIF-1 signaling pathway, and it could be beneficially employed for treating malignant tumors with hypoxic microenvironment. PMID:27613833

  9. Cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes as mitochondria-targeted anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Kai; Chen, Yu; Ouyang, Cheng; Guan, Rui-Lin; Ji, Liang-Nian; Chao, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Four cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes [Ir(dfppy)2(L)](+) (dfppy = 2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)pyridine, L = 6-(pyridin-2-yl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine, Ir1; 6-(isoquinolin-1-yl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine, Ir2; 6-(quinolin-2-yl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine, Ir3; 6-(isoquinolin-3-yl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine, Ir4) have been synthesized and characterized. Distinct from cisplatin, Ir1-Ir4 could specifically target mitochondria and induced apoptosis against various cancer cell lines, especially for cisplatin resistant cells. ICP-MS results indicated that Ir1-Ir4 were taken up via different mechanism for cancer cells and normal cells, which resulted in their high selectivity. The structure-activity relationship and signaling pathways were also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  10. Bacteriocins as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sumanpreet; Kaur, Sukhraj

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide, despite advances in its treatment and detection. The conventional chemotherapeutic agents used for the treatment of cancer have non-specific toxicity toward normal body cells that cause various side effects. Secondly, cancer cells are known to develop chemotherapy resistance in due course of treatment. Thus, the demand for novel anti-cancer agents is increasing day by day. Some of the experimental studies have reported the therapeutic potential of bacteriocins against various types of cancer cell lines. Bacteriocins are ribosomally-synthesized cationic peptides secreted by almost all groups of bacteria. Some bacteriocins have shown selective cytotoxicity toward cancer cells as compared to normal cells. This makes them promising candidates for further investigation and clinical trials. In this review article, we present the overview of the various cancer cell-specific cytotoxic bacteriocins, their mode of action and efficacies. PMID:26617524

  11. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel Rapamycin Benzothiazole Hybrids as mTOR Targeted Anti-cancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lijun; Huang, Jie; Chen, Xiaoming; Yu, Hui; Li, Kualiang; Yang, Dan; Chen, Xiaqin; Ying, Jiayin; Pan, Fusheng; Lv, Youbing; Cheng, Yuanrong

    2016-01-01

    The immunosuppressant drug rapamycin, was firstly identified as a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) allosteric inhibitor, and its derivatives have been successfully developed as anti-cancer drugs. Therefore, finding rapamycin derivatives with better anti-cancer activity has been proved to be an effective way to discover new targeted anti-cancer drugs. In this paper, structure modification was performed at the C-43 position of rapamycin using bioisosterism and a hybrid approach: a series of novel rapamycin-benzothiazole hybrids 4a-e, 5a-c, and 9a, b have been designed, synthesized and evaluated for their anti-cancer activity against Caski, CNE-2, SGC-7901, PC-3, SK-NEP-1 and A-375 human cancer cell lines. Some of these compounds (4a-e, 9a, b) displayed good to excellent potency against the Caski and SK-NEP-1 cell line as compared with rapamycin. Compound 9b as the most active compound showed IC50 values of 8.3 (Caski) and 9.6 μM (SK-NEP-1), respectively. In addition, research on the mechanism showed that 9b was able to cause G1 phase arrest and induce apoptosis in the Caski cell line. Most importantly, it significantly decreased the phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein, p70S6K1 and 4EBP1, which indicated that 9b inhibited the cancer cell growth by blocking the mTOR pathway and may have the potential to become a new mTOR inhibitor.

  12. Synthesis of Rapamycin Derivatives Containing the Triazole Moiety Used as Potential mTOR-Targeted Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lijun; Huang, Jie; Chen, Xiaoming; Yu, Hui; Li, Kualiang; Yang, Dan; Chen, Xiaqin; Ying, Jiayin; Pan, Fusheng; Lv, Youbing; Cheng, Yuanrong

    2016-06-01

    Rapamycin, a potent antifungal antibiotic, was approved as immunosuppressant, and lately its derivatives have been developed into mTOR targeting anticancer drugs. Structure modification was performed at the C-42 position of rapamycin, and a novel series of rapamycin triazole hybrids (4a-d, 5a-e, 8a-e, and 9a-e) was facilely synthesized via Huisgen's reaction. The anticancer activity of these compounds was evaluated against the Caski, H1299, MGC-803, and H460 human cancer cell lines. Some of the derivatives (8a-e, 9a-e) appeared to have stronger activity than that of rapamycin; however, 4a-d and 5a-e failed to show potential anticancer activity. Compound 9e with a (2,4-dichlorophenylamino)methyl moiety on the triazole ring was the most active anticancer compound, which showed IC50 values of 6.05 (Caski), 7.89 (H1299), 25.88 (MGC-803), and 8.60 μM (H460). In addition, research on the mechanism showed that 9e was able to cause cell morphological changes and to induce apoptosis in the Caski cell line. Most importantly, 9e can decrease the phosphorylation of mTOR and of its downstream key proteins, S6 and P70S6K1, indicating that 9e can effectively inhibit the mTOR signaling pathway. Thus, it may have the potential to become a new mTOR inhibitor against various cancers.

  13. Graphene oxide as a nanocarrier for controlled release and targeted delivery of an anticancer active agent, chlorogenic acid.

    PubMed

    Barahuie, Farahnaz; Saifullah, Bullo; Dorniani, Dena; Fakurazi, Sharida; Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Elfghi, Fawzi M

    2017-05-01

    We have synthesized graphene oxide using improved Hummer's method in order to explore the potential use of the resulting graphene oxide as a nanocarrier for an active anticancer agent, chlorogenic acid (CA). The synthesized graphene oxide and chlorogenic acid-graphene oxide nanocomposite (CAGO) were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and differential thermogravimetry analysis, Raman spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), UV-vis spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. The successful conjugation of chlorogenic acid onto graphene oxide through hydrogen bonding and π-π interaction was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, FTIR analysis and X-ray diffraction patterns. The loading of CA in the nanohybrid was estimated to be around 13.1% by UV-vis spectroscopy. The release profiles showed favourable, sustained and pH-dependent release of CA from CAGO nanocomposite and conformed well to the pseudo-second order kinetic model. Furthermore, the designed anticancer nanohybrid was thermally more stable than its counterpart. The in vitro cytotoxicity results revealed insignificant toxicity effect towards normal cell line, with a viability of >80% even at higher concentration of 50μg/mL. Contrarily, CAGO nanocomposite revealed enhanced toxic effect towards evaluated cancer cell lines (HepG2 human liver hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, A549 human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line, and HeLa human cervical cancer cell line) compared to its free form. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs): multitargeted anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Ververis, Katherine; Hiong, Alison; Karagiannis, Tom C; Licciardi, Paul V

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are an emerging class of therapeutics with potential as anticancer drugs. The rationale for developing HDAC inhibitors (and other chromatin-modifying agents) as anticancer therapies arose from the understanding that in addition to genetic mutations, epigenetic changes such as dysregulation of HDAC enzymes can alter phenotype and gene expression, disturb homeostasis, and contribute to neoplastic growth. The family of HDAC inhibitors is large and diverse. It includes a range of naturally occurring and synthetic compounds that differ in terms of structure, function, and specificity. HDAC inhibitors have multiple cell type-specific effects in vitro and in vivo, such as growth arrest, cell differentiation, and apoptosis in malignant cells. HDAC inhibitors have the potential to be used as monotherapies or in combination with other anticancer therapies. Currently, there are two HDAC inhibitors that have received approval from the US FDA for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, Zolinza) and depsipeptide (romidepsin, Istodax). More recently, depsipeptide has also gained FDA approval for the treatment of peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Many more clinical trials assessing the effects of various HDAC inhibitors on hematological and solid malignancies are currently being conducted. Despite the proven anticancer effects of particular HDAC inhibitors against certain cancers, many aspects of HDAC enzymes and HDAC inhibitors are still not fully understood. Increasing our understanding of the effects of HDAC inhibitors, their targets and mechanisms of action will be critical for the advancement of these drugs, especially to facilitate the rational design of HDAC inhibitors that are effective as antineoplastic agents. This review will discuss the use of HDAC inhibitors as multitargeted therapies for malignancy. Further, we outline the pharmacology and mechanisms of action of HDAC inhibitors while

  15. Taxane anticancer agents: a patent perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ojima, Iwao; Lichtenthal, Brendan; Lee, Siyeon; Wang, Changwei; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paclitaxel and docetaxel were two epoch-making anticancer drugs and have been successfully used in chemotherapy for a variety of cancer types. In 2010, a new taxane, cabazitaxel, was approved by FDA for use in combination with prednisone for the treatment of metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab™-paclitaxel; abraxane) nanodroplet formulation was another notable invention (FDA approval 2005 for refractory, metastatic, or relapsed breast cancer). Abraxane in combination with gemcitabine for the treatment of pancreatic cancer was approved by FDA in 2013. Accordingly, there have been a huge number of patent applications dealing with taxane anticancer agents in the last five years. Thus, it is a good time to review the progress in this area and find the next wave for new developments. Area covered This review article covers the patent literature from 2010 to early 2015 on various aspects of taxane-based chemotherapies and drug developments. Expert opinion Three FDA-approved taxane anticancer drugs will continue to expand their therapeutic applications, especially through drug combinations and new formulations. Inspired by the success of abraxane, new nano-formulations are emerging. Highly potent new-generation taxanes will play a key role in the development of efficacious tumor-targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:26651178

  16. The disulfide compound α-lipoic acid and its derivatives: A novel class of anticancer agents targeting mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Dörsam, Bastian; Fahrer, Jörg

    2016-02-01

    The endogenous disulfide α-lipoic acid (LA) is an essential mitochondrial co-factor. In addition, LA and its reduced counterpart dihydro lipoic acid form a potent redox couple with antioxidative functions, for which it is used as dietary supplement and therapeutic. Recently, it has gained attention due to its cytotoxic effects in cancer cells, which is the key aspect of this review. We initially recapitulate the dietary occurrence, gastrointestinal absorption and pharmacokinetics of LA, illustrating its diverse antioxidative mechanisms. We then focus on its mode of action in cancer cells, in which it triggers primarily the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, whereas non-transformed primary cells are hardly affected. Furthermore, LA impairs oncogenic signaling and displays anti-metastatic potential. Novel LA derivatives such as CPI-613, which target mitochondrial energy metabolism, are described and recent pre-clinical studies are presented, which demonstrate that LA and its derivatives exert antitumor activity in vivo. Finally, we highlight clinical studies currently performed with the LA analog CPI-613. In summary, LA and its derivatives are promising candidates to complement the arsenal of established anticancer drugs due to their mitochondria-targeted mode of action and non-genotoxic properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Folate-targeted pH-responsive calcium zoledronate nanoscale metal-organic frameworks: Turning a bone antiresorptive agent into an anticancer therapeutic.

    PubMed

    Au, Kin Man; Satterlee, Andrew; Min, Yuanzeng; Tian, Xi; Kim, Young Seok; Caster, Joseph M; Zhang, Longzhen; Zhang, Tian; Huang, Leaf; Wang, Andrew Z

    2016-03-01

    Zoledronate (Zol) is a third-generation bisphosphonate that is widely used as an anti-resorptive agent for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis. While there is preclinical data indicating that bisphosphonates such as Zol have direct cytotoxic effects on cancer cells, such effect has not been firmly established in the clinical setting. This is likely due to the rapid absorption of bisphosphonates by the skeleton after intravenous (i.v.) administration. Herein, we report the reformulation of Zol using nanotechnology and evaluation of this novel nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (nMOFs) formulation of Zol as an anticancer agent. The nMOF formulation is comprised of a calcium zoledronate (CaZol) core and a polyethylene glycol (PEG) surface. To preferentially deliver CaZol nMOFs to tumors as well as facilitate cellular uptake of Zol, we incorporated folate (Fol)-targeted ligands on the nMOFs. The folate receptor (FR) is known to be overexpressed in several tumor types, including head-and-neck, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers. We demonstrated that these targeted CaZol nMOFs possess excellent chemical and colloidal stability in physiological conditions. The release of encapsulated Zol from the nMOFs occurs in the mid-endosomes during nMOF endocytosis. In vitro toxicity studies demonstrated that Fol-targeted CaZol nMOFs are more efficient than small molecule Zol in inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in FR-overexpressing H460 non-small cell lung and PC3 prostate cancer cells. Our findings were further validated in vivo using mouse xenograft models of H460 and PC3. We demonstrated that Fol-targeted CaZol nMOFs are effective anticancer agents and increase the direct antitumor activity of Zol by 80-85% in vivo through inhibition of tumor neovasculature, and inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis.

  18. Redesigning the DNA-Targeted Chromophore in Platinum–Acridine Anticancer Agents: A Structure–Activity Relationship Study

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Amanda J.; Liu, Fang; Bartenstein, Thomas F.; Haines, Laura G.; Levine, Keith E.; Kucera, Gregory L.; Bierbach, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Platinum–acridine hybrid agents show low-nanomolar potency in chemoresistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but high systemic toxicity in vivo. To reduce the promiscuous genotoxicity of these agents and improve their pharmacological properties, a modular build–click–screen approach was used to evaluate a small library of twenty hybrid agents containing truncated and extended chromophores of varying basicities. Selected derivatives were resynthesized and tested in five NSCLC cell lines representing large cell, squamous cell, and adenocarcinomas. 7-Aminobenz[c]acridine was identified as a promising scaffold in a hybrid agent (P1–B1) that maintained submicromolar activity in several of the DNA-repair proficient and p53-mutant cancer models, while showing improved tolerability in mice by 32-fold compared to the parent platinum–acridine (P1–A1). The distribution and DNA/RNA adduct levels produced by the acridine- and benz[c]acridine-based analogues in NCI-H460 cells (confocal microscopy, ICP-MS), and their ability to bind G-quadruplex forming DNA sequences (CD spectroscopy, HR-ESMS) were studied. P1–B1 emerges as a less genotoxic, more tolerable, and potentially more target-selective hybrid agent than P1–A1. PMID:25302716

  19. Designed TPR Modules as Novel Anticancer Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Cortajarena,A.; Yi, F.; Regan, L.

    2008-01-01

    Molecules specifically designed to modulate protein-protein interactions have tremendous potential as novel therapeutic agents. One important anticancer target is the chaperone Hsp90, whose activity is essential for the folding of many oncogenic proteins, including HER2, IGFIR, AKT, RAF-1, and FLT-3. Here we report the design and characterization of new tetratricopeptide repeat modules, which bind to the C-terminus of Hsp90 with higher affinity and with greater specificity than natural Hsp90-binding co-chaperones. Thus, when these modules are introduced into the cell, they out-compete endogenous co-chaperones for binding, thereby inhibiting Hsp90 function. The effect of Hsp90 inhibition in this fashion is dramatic; HER2 levels are substantially decreased and BT474 HER2 positive breast cancer cells are killed. Our designs thus provide new tools with which to dissect the mechanism of Hsp90-mediated protein folding and also open the door to the development of an entirely new class of anticancer agents.

  20. Utilizing hydrogen sulfide as a novel anti-cancer agent by targeting cancer glycolysis and pH imbalance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Z-W; Teo, X-Y; Tay, E Y-W; Tan, C-H; Hagen, T; Moore, P K; Deng, L-W

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Many disparate studies have reported the ambiguous role of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in cell survival. The present study investigated the effect of H2S on the viability of cancer and non-cancer cells. Experimental Approach Cancer and non-cancer cells were exposed to H2S [using sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) and GYY4137] and cell viability was examined by crystal violet assay. We then examined cancer cellular glycolysis by in vitro enzymatic assays and pH regulator activity. Lastly, intracellular pH (pHi) was determined by ratiometric pHi measurement using BCECF staining. Key Results Continuous, but not a single, exposure to H2S decreased cell survival more effectively in cancer cells, as compared to non-cancer cells. Slow H2S-releasing donor, GYY4137, significantly increased glycolysis, leading to overproduction of lactate. H2S also decreased anion exchanger and sodium/proton exchanger activity. The combination of increased metabolic acid production and defective pH regulation resulted in an uncontrolled intracellular acidification, leading to cancer cell death. In contrast, no significant intracellular acidification or cell death was observed in non-cancer cells. Conclusions and Implications Low and continuous exposure to H2S targets metabolic processes and pH homeostasis in cancer cells, potentially serving as a novel and selective anti-cancer strategy. PMID:24827113

  1. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of nitrogen-containing macrocyclic bisbibenzyl derivatives as potent anticancer agents by targeting the lysosome.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Liu, Jun; Gao, Yun; Zheng, Hong-Bo; Li, Lin; Hu, Qing-Wen; Yuan, Hui-Qing; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2017-08-18

    A series of novel nitrogen-containing macrocyclic bisbibenzyl derivatives was designed, synthesized, and evaluated for antiproliferative activity against three anthropic cancer cell lines. Among these novel molecules, the tri-O-alkylated compound 18a displayed the most potent anticancer activity against the A549, MCF-7, and k562 cancer cell lines, with IC50 values of 0.51, 0.23, and 0.19 μM, respectively, which were obviously superior to those of the parent compound riccardin D, and were 3-10-fold better than those of the clinical used drug ADR. The bis-Mannich derivative 11b also exhibited significantly enhanced antiproliferative potency, with submicromolar IC50 values. Structure-activity relationship analyses of these newly synthesized compounds were also performed. Mechanistic studies indicated that these compounds could target the lysosome to induce lysosomal membrane permeabilization, and could also induce cell death that displayed features characteristic of both apoptosis and necrosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents. Besides these emphases are given especially for two endogenous derivatives of glutamic acid such as glutamine and glutamate. Glutamine is a derivative of glutamic acid and is formed in the body from glutamic acid and ammonia in an energy requiring reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthase. It also possesses anticancer activity. So the transportation and metabolism of glutamine are also discussed for better understanding the role of glutamic acid. Glutamates are the carboxylate anions and salts of glutamic acid. Here the roles of various enzymes required for the metabolism of glutamates are also discussed. PMID:24227952

  3. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents. Besides these emphases are given especially for two endogenous derivatives of glutamic acid such as glutamine and glutamate. Glutamine is a derivative of glutamic acid and is formed in the body from glutamic acid and ammonia in an energy requiring reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthase. It also possesses anticancer activity. So the transportation and metabolism of glutamine are also discussed for better understanding the role of glutamic acid. Glutamates are the carboxylate anions and salts of glutamic acid. Here the roles of various enzymes required for the metabolism of glutamates are also discussed.

  4. Agents from amphibians with anticancer properties.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chuang-Xin; Nan, Ke-Jun; Lei, Yan

    2008-11-01

    Amphibians have been found to be a source of agents with anticancer properties. Bufalin, for example, is an anticancer agent that may induce apoptosis by its interaction with other genes and cellular components. Certain peptides with anticancer activities have been found in amphibian skin; they include magainins, aureins, citropin 1.1 and gaegurins. These peptides may exert a cytotoxic effect on human cancer cells through various mechanisms. Onconase, amphinase, cSBL (sialic acid-binding lectin purified from Rana catesbeiana eggs) and jSBL (sialic acid-binding lectin purified from Rana japonica eggs), which belong to the RNase A family, were purified from the oocyte cells and eggs of three amphibians, and they induce cytotoxicity by degrading cellular RNA. This paper discusses the medical and pharmaceutical significance of products derived from amphibians.

  5. Tetrazole Derivatives as Promising Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Popova, Elena A; Protas, Aleksandra V; Trifonov, Rostislav E

    2017-03-27

    Tetrazole cycle is a promising pharmacophore fragment frequently used in the development of novel drugs. This moiety is a stable, practically non-metabolized bioisosteric analog of carboxylic, cis-amide, and other functional groups. Over recent 10-15 years, various isomeric forms of tetrazole (NH-unsubstituted, 1H-1-substituted, and 2H-2-substituted tetrazoles) have been successfully used in the design of promising anticancer drugs. Coordination compounds of transition metals containing tetrazoles as ligands, semisynthetic tetrazolyl derivatives of natural compounds (biogenic acids, peptides, steroids, combretastatin, etc.), 5-oxo and 5-thiotetrazoles, and some other related compounds have been recognized as promising antineoplastic agents. This review presents a comprehensive analysis of modern approaches to synthesis of these tetrazole derivatives as well as their biological (anticancer) properties. The most promising structure types of tetrazoles to be used as anticancer agents have been picked out.

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of a series of resveratrol analogues as potent anti-cancer agents that target tubulin.

    PubMed

    Madadi, Nikhil R; Zong, Hongliang; Ketkar, Amit; Zheng, Chen; Penthala, Narsimha R; Janganati, Venumadhav; Bommagani, Shobanbabu; Eoff, Robert L; Guzman, Monica L; Crooks, Peter A

    2015-05-01

    A series of novel diarylacrylonitrile and trans-stilbene analogues of resveratrol has been synthesized and evaluated for their anticancer activities against a panel of 60 human cancer cell lines. The diarylacrylonitrile analogues 3b and 4a exhibited the most potent anticancer activity of all the analogues synthesized in this study, with GI50 values of < 10 nM against almost all the cell lines in the human cancer cell panel. Compounds 3b and 4a were also screened against the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell line, MV4-11, and were found to have potent cytotoxic properties that are likely mediated through inhibition of tubulin polymerization. Results from molecular docking studies indicate a common binding site for 4a and 3b on the 3,3-tubulin heterodimer, with a slightly more favorable binding for 3b compared to 4a; this is consistent with the results from the microtubule assays, which demonstrate that 4a is more potent than 3b in inhibiting tubulin polymerization in MV4-11 cells. Taken together, these data suggest that diarylacrylonitriles 3b and 4a may have potential as antitubulin therapeutics for treatment of both solid and hematological tumors.

  7. Adherence to targeted oral anticancer medications.

    PubMed

    Geynisman, Daniel M; Wickersham, Karen E

    2013-04-01

    The use of targeted oral anticancer medications (OAMs) is becoming increasingly prevalent in cancer care. Approximately 25-30% of the oncology drug pipeline involves oral agents and there are now over 50 OAMs approved by the Food and Drug Administration. This change represents a major shift in management of patients with cancer from directly observed, intermittent intravenous therapy to self-administered, oral chronic therapy. The increased prevalence of OAMs raises the issue of adherence in oncology, including understanding the challenges of adherence to OAMs. This review focuses on studies of adherence for patients taking molecularly targeted OAMs for breast cancer, chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We then discuss barriers to adherence and studies performed to date testing interventions for improving adherence. Finally, we discuss future areas of investigation needed to define and improve adherence to OAMs in targeted therapy for cancer.

  8. Recent development of anticancer therapeutics targeting Akt.

    PubMed

    Morrow, John K; Du-Cuny, Lei; Chen, Lu; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J; Mash, Eugene A; Powis, Garth; Zhang, Shuxing

    2011-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Akt has proven to be a significant signaling target, involved in various biological functions. Because of its cardinal role in numerous cellular responses, Akt has been implicated in many human diseases, particularly cancer. It has been established that Akt is a viable and feasible target for anticancer therapeutics. Analysis of all Akt kinases reveals conserved homology for an N-terminal regulatory domain, which contains a pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain for cellular translocation, a kinase domain with serine/threonine specificity, and a C-terminal extension domain. These well defined regions have been targeted, and various approaches, including in silico methods, have been implemented to develop Akt inhibitors. In spite of unique techniques and a prolific body of knowledge surrounding Akt, no targeted Akt therapeutics have reached the market yet. Here we will highlight successes and challenges to date on the development of anticancer agents modulating the Akt pathway in recent patents as well as discuss the methods employed for this task. Special attention will be given to patents with focus on those discoveries using computer-aided drug design approaches.

  9. Recent Development of Anticancer Therapeutics Targeting Akt

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, John K.; Du-Cuny, Lei; Chen, Lu; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J.; Mash, Eugene A.; Powis, Garth; Zhang, Shuxing

    2013-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Akt has proven to be a significant signaling target, involved in various biological functions. Because of its cardinal role in numerous cellular responses, Akt has been implicated in many human diseases, particularly cancer. It has been established that Akt is a viable and feasible target for anticancer therapeutics. Analysis of all Akt kinases reveals conserved homology for an N-terminal regulatory domain, which contains a pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain for cellular translocation, a kinase domain with serine/threonine specificity, and a C-terminal extension domain. These well defined regions have been targeted, and various approaches, including in silico methods, have been implemented to develop Akt inhibitors. In spite of unique techniques and a prolific body of knowledge surrounding Akt, no targeted Akt therapeutics have reached the market yet. Here we will highlight successes and challenges to date on the development of anticancer agents modulating the Akt pathway in recent patents as well as discuss the methods employed for this task. Special attention will be given to patents with focus on those discoveries using computer-aided drug design approaches. PMID:21110830

  10. Nanovectors for anticancer agents based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Douziech-Eyrolles, Laurence; Marchais, Hervé; Hervé, Katel; Munnier, Emilie; Soucé, Martin; Linassier, Claude; Dubois, Pierre; Chourpa, Igor

    2007-01-01

    During the last decade, the application of nanotechnologies for anticancer drug delivery has been extensively explored, hoping to improve the efficacy and to reduce side effects of chemotherapy. The present review is dedicated to a certain kind of anticancer drug nanovectors developed to target tumors with the help of an external magnetic field. More particularly, this work treats anticancer drug nanoformulations based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with biocompatible polymers. The major purpose is to focus on the specific requirements and technological difficulties related to controlled delivery of antitumoral agents. We attempt to state the problem and its possible perspectives by considering the three major constituents of the magnetic therapeutic vectors: iron oxide nanoparticles, polymeric coating and anticancer drug. PMID:18203422

  11. Anticancer agents: towards the future.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Manlio

    2004-09-01

    A major need in cancer chemotherapy is the availability of cancer cell-specific drugs. This paper discusses recent advances and perspectives in the field of selective drug recognition considering the key targets tyrosine kinases, DNA-topoisomerases and telomerase.

  12. Discovery of novel 2-aryl-4-benzoyl-imidazoles targeting the colchicines binding site in tubulin as potential anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianjun; Wang, Zhao; Li, Chien-Ming; Lu, Yan; Vaddady, Pavan K.; Meibohm, Bernd; Dalton, James T.; Miller, Duane D.; Li, Wei

    2010-01-01

    A series of 2-aryl-4-benzoyl-imidazoles (ABI) was synthesized as a result of structural modifications based on the previous set of 2-aryl-imidazole-4-carboxylic amide (AICA) derivatives and 4-substituted methoxylbenzoyl-aryl-thiazoles (SMART). The average IC50 of the most active compound (5da) was 15.7 nM. ABI analogs have substantially improved aqueous solubility (48.9 μg/mL for 5ga vs. 0.909 μg/mL for SMART-1, 0.137 μg/mL for paclitaxel, and 1.04 μg/mL for Combretastatin A4). Mechanism of action studies indicate that the anticancer activity of ABI analogs is through inhibition of tubulin polymerization by interacting with the colchicine binding site. Unlike paclitaxel and colchicine, the ABI compounds were equally potent against multidrug resistant cancer cells and the sensitive parental melanoma cancer cells. In vivo results indicated that 5cb was more effective than DTIC in inhibiting melanoma xenograph tumor growth. Our results suggest that the novel ABI compounds may be developed to effectively treat drug-resistant tumors. PMID:20919720

  13. The quinolone family: from antibacterial to anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Sissi, Claudia; Palumbo, Manlio

    2003-11-01

    The present review focuses on the structural modifications responsible for the transformation of an antibacterial into an anticancer agent. Indeed, a distinctive feature of drugs based on the quinolone structure is their remarkable ability to target different type II topoisomerase enzymes. In particular, some congeners of this drug family display high activity not only against bacterial topoisomerases, but also against eukaryotic topoisomerases and are toxic to cultured mammalian cells and in vivo tumor models. Hence, these cytotoxic quinolones represent an exploitable source of new anticancer agents, which might also help addressing side-toxicity and resistance phenomena. Their ability to bind metal ion co-factors represents an additional means of modulating their pharmacological response(s). Moreover, quinolones link antibacterial and anticancer chemotherapy together and provide an opportunity to clarify drug mechanism across divergent species.

  14. Biomarkers of occupational exposure do anticancer agents: a minireview.

    PubMed

    Suspiro, A; Prista, J

    2011-11-10

    The majority of anticancer agents has in common DNA-damaging properties and affects not only target-cells but also non-tumour cells. Its genotoxicity has been demonstrated in experimental models and in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. Health care personnel involved in the preparation and administration of chemotherapy is therefore at risk for adverse health effects, since most environmental sampling studies demonstrated that there is widespread contamination of work surfaces and equipments with anticancer drugs. Adherence to safety guidelines and proper use of personal protective equipment are insufficient to prevent significant absorption, as evidenced by the presence of detectable amounts of drugs in urine samples and increased frequency of genotoxicity biomarkers. In this minireview, a critical appraisal of the most important biomarkers used for the evaluation of occupational exposure to anticancer agents as well as a summary of the key findings from several studies published in this field is performed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Crude drugs as anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Xiaoyang; Kesari, Santosh; Wen, Patrick Y; Huang, Xudong

    2011-01-01

    Although tremendous progress has been made in basic cancer biology and in the development of novel cancer treatments, cancer remains a leading cause of death in the world. The etiopathogenesis of cancer is complex. Besides genetic predisposition, known environmental factors associated with cancer are: diet, lifestyle, and environmental toxins. Toxicity of drugs and eventual relapse of cancers contribute to high cancer death rates. Current therapeutic interventions for cancer- surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, thermotherapy, etc. are far from being curative for many forms of cancer. Chemotherapy, in particular, though the most commonly used cancer treatment, is usually associated with side effects with varying degrees of severity. The purpose of this brief review is to assemble current literature on some crude drugs and to focus on their beneficial roles and drug targets in cancer therapy and chemo-prevention. Although their pharmacological mechanisms and biochemical roles in cancer biology and tumor chemo-prevention are not fully understood, crude drugs are believed to have nutriceutical effects upon cancer patients. PMID:21394282

  16. Advances in cobalt complexes as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Catherine R; Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan

    2015-08-21

    The evolution of resistance to traditional platinum-based anticancer drugs has compelled researchers to investigate the cytostatic properties of alternative transition metal-based compounds. The anticancer potential of cobalt complexes has been extensively studied over the last three decades, and much time has been devoted to understanding their mechanisms of action. This perspective catalogues the development of antiproliferative cobalt complexes, and provides an in depth analysis of their mode of action. Early studies on simple cobalt coordination complexes, Schiff base complexes, and cobalt-carbonyl clusters will be documented. The physiologically relevant redox properties of cobalt will be highlighted and the role this plays in the preparation of hypoxia selective prodrugs and imaging agents will be discussed. The use of cobalt-containing cobalamin as a cancer specific delivery agent for cytotoxins will also be described. The work summarised in this perspective shows that the biochemical and biophysical properties of cobalt-containing compounds can be fine-tuned to produce new generations of anticancer agents with clinically relevant efficacies.

  17. Inhibitors of carbohydrate processing: A new class of anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Goss, P E; Baker, M A; Carver, J P; Dennis, J W

    1995-09-01

    There is a need for anticancer agents with novel mechanisms of action. Recently identified molecular targets for new anticancer agents include inducers of cell differentiation, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis, as well as signaling pathways for growth factors and cytokines. Another unexplored opportunity is presented by the ubiquitous intracellular glycoprotein glycosylation pathway. This complex process, concerned with the addition of sugars onto newly synthesized proteins, occurs in the lumen of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and in the Golgi. There are estimates of over 200 glycosyltransferase enzymes in this pathway, which results in considerable structural diversity of carbohydrates found on secreted and transmembrane glycoproteins. The specificity of glycosyltransferases for acceptors and sugar-nucleotide donors dictates linkage positions between sugars, anomeric configuration of linkages, and monosaccharide composition. Specific carbohydrate structures participate in cell-cell and cell-substratum interactions affecting processes such as lymphocyte trafficking, immune cell stimulation, embryogenesis, and cancer metastasis. Of the carbohydrate-processing inhibitors presently available, the alkaloid swainsonine, a Golgi alpha-mannosidase II inhibitor, is the first to have been selected for clinical testing based on its anticancer activity, p.o. availability, and low toxicity in mice. Herein, we review the rationale for targeting Golgi carbohydrate processing pathways in the treatment of cancer, and summarize the preclinical and clinical results with swainsonine. Prospects for the development of second generation inhibitors with improved specificity for Golgi-processing enzymes are discussed. Potential clinical applications of this new class of anticancer agents are emphasized.

  18. Novel 1,6-naphthyridin-2(1H)-ones as potential anticancer agents targeting Hsp90.

    PubMed

    Montoir, David; Barillé-Nion, Sophie; Tonnerre, Alain; Juin, Philippe; Duflos, Muriel; Bazin, Marc-Antoine

    2016-08-25

    Hsp90 is an ATP-dependent chaperone known to be overexpressed in many cancers. This way, Hsp90 is an important target for drug discovery. Novobiocin, an aminocoumarin antibiotic, was reported to inhibit Hsp90 targeting C-terminal domain, and showed anti-proliferative properties, leading to the development of new and more active compounds. Consequently, a new set of novobiocin analogs derived from 1,6-naphthyridin-2(1H)-one scaffold was designed, synthesized and evaluated against two breast cancer cell lines. Subsequently, cell cycle progression and apoptosis were conducted on best candidates, finally Western Blot analysis was performed to measure their ability to induce degradation of Hsp90 client proteins.

  19. Chemical genetics analysis of an aniline mustard anticancer agent reveals complex I of the electron transport chain as a target.

    PubMed

    Fedeles, Bogdan I; Zhu, Angela Y; Young, Kellie S; Hillier, Shawn M; Proffitt, Kyle D; Essigmann, John M; Croy, Robert G

    2011-09-30

    The antitumor agent 11β (CAS 865070-37-7), consisting of a DNA-damaging aniline mustard linked to an androgen receptor (AR) ligand, is known to form covalent DNA adducts and to induce apoptosis potently in AR-positive prostate cancer cells in vitro; it also strongly prevents growth of LNCaP xenografts in mice. The present study describes the unexpectedly strong activity of 11β against the AR-negative HeLa cells, both in cell culture and tumor xenografts, and uncovers a new mechanism of action that likely explains this activity. Cellular fractionation experiments indicated that mitochondria are the major intracellular sink for 11β; flow cytometry studies showed that 11β exposure rapidly induced oxidative stress, mitochondria being an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Additionally, 11β inhibited oxygen consumption both in intact HeLa cells and in isolated mitochondria. Specifically, 11β blocked uncoupled oxygen consumption when mitochondria were incubated with complex I substrates, but it had no effect on oxygen consumption driven by substrates acting downstream of complex I in the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Moreover, 11β enhanced ROS generation in isolated mitochondria, suggesting that complex I inhibition is responsible for ROS production. At the cellular level, the presence of antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine or vitamin E) significantly reduced the toxicity of 11β, implicating ROS production as an important contributor to cytotoxicity. Collectively, our findings establish complex I inhibition and ROS generation as a new mechanism of action for 11β, which supplements conventional DNA adduct formation to promote cancer cell death.

  20. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of di-substituted noscapine analogs as potent and microtubule-targeted anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ram C; Gundala, Sushma R; Karna, Prasanthi; Lopus, Manu; Gupta, Kamlesh K; Nagaraju, Mulpuri; Hamelberg, Donald; Tandon, Vibha; Panda, Dulal; Reid, Michelle D; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-01-01

    Noscapine is an opium-derived kinder-gentler microtubule-modulating drug, currently in Phase I/II clinical trials for cancer chemotherapy. Here, we report the synthesis of four more potent di-substituted brominated derivatives of noscapine, 9-Br-7-OH-NOS (2), 9-Br-7-OCONHEt-NOS (3), 9-Br-7-OCONHBn-NOS (4), and 9-Br-7-OAc-NOS (5) and their chemotherapeutic efficacy on PC-3 and MDA-MB-231 cells. The four derivatives were observed to have higher tubulin binding activity than noscapine and significantly affect tubulin polymerization. The equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) for the interaction between tubulin and 2, 3, 4, 5 was found to be, 55±6μM, 44±6μM, 26±3μM, and 21±1μM respectively, which is comparable to parent analog. The effects of these di-substituted noscapine analogs on cell cycle parameters indicate that the cells enter a quiescent phase without undergoing further cell division. The varying biological activity of these analogs and bulk of substituent at position-7 of the benzofuranone ring system of the parent molecule was rationalized utilizing predictive in silico molecular modeling. Furthermore, the immunoblot analysis of protein lysates from cells treated with 4 and 5, revealed the induction of apoptosis and down-regulation of survivin levels. This result was further supported by the enhanced activity of caspase-3/7 enzymes in treated samples compared to the controls. Hence, these compounds showed a great potential for studying microtubule-mediated processes and as chemotherapeutic agents for the management of human cancers.

  1. Therapeutic drug monitoring of targeted anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Decosterd, Laurent A; Widmer, Nicolas; Zaman, Khalil; Cardoso, Evelina; Buclin, Thierry; Csajka, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    New oral targeted anticancer therapies are revolutionizing cancer treatment by transforming previously deadly malignancies into chronically manageable conditions. Nevertheless, drug resistance, persistence of cancer stem cells, and adverse drug effects still limit their ability to stabilize or cure malignant diseases in the long term. Response to targeted anticancer therapy is influenced by tumor genetics and by variability in drug concentrations. However, despite a significant inter-patient pharmacokinetic variability, targeted anticancer drugs are essentially licensed at fixed doses. Their therapeutic use could however be optimized by individualization of their dosage, based on blood concentration measurements via the therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). TDM can increase the probability of therapeutic responses to targeted anticancer therapies, and would help minimize the risk of major adverse reactions.

  2. Reengineered tricyclic anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Kastrinsky, David B; Sangodkar, Jaya; Zaware, Nilesh; Izadmehr, Sudeh; Dhawan, Neil S; Narla, Goutham; Ohlmeyer, Michael

    2015-10-01

    The phenothiazine and dibenzazepine tricyclics are potent neurotropic drugs with a documented but underutilized anti-cancer side effect. Reengineering these agents (TFP, CPZ, CIP) by replacing the basic amine with a neutral polar functional group (e.g., RTC-1, RTC-2) abrogated their CNS effects as demonstrated by in vitro pharmacological assays and in vivo behavioral models. Further optimization generated several phenothiazines and dibenzazepines with improved anti-cancer potency, exemplified by RTC-5. This new lead demonstrated efficacy against a xenograft model of an EGFR driven cancer without the neurotropic effects exhibited by the parent molecules. Its effects were attributed to concomitant negative regulation of PI3K-AKT and RAS-ERK signaling.

  3. Organoiridium Complexes: Anticancer Agents and Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Conspectus Iridium is a relatively rare precious heavy metal, only slightly less dense than osmium. Researchers have long recognized the catalytic properties of square-planar IrI complexes, such as Crabtree’s hydrogenation catalyst, an organometallic complex with cyclooctadiene, phosphane, and pyridine ligands. More recently, chemists have developed half-sandwich pseudo-octahedral pentamethylcyclopentadienyl IrIII complexes containing diamine ligands that efficiently catalyze transfer hydrogenation reactions of ketones and aldehydes in water using H2 or formate as the hydrogen source. Although sometimes assumed to be chemically inert, the reactivity of low-spin 5d6 IrIII centers is highly dependent on the set of ligands. Cp* complexes with strong σ-donor C∧C-chelating ligands can even stabilize IrIV and catalyze the oxidation of water. In comparison with well developed Ir catalysts, Ir-based pharmaceuticals are still in their infancy. In this Account, we review recent developments in organoiridium complexes as both catalysts and anticancer agents. Initial studies of anticancer activity with organoiridium complexes focused on square-planar IrI complexes because of their structural and electronic similarity to PtII anticancer complexes such as cisplatin. Recently, researchers have studied half-sandwich IrIII anticancer complexes. These complexes with the formula [(Cpx)Ir(L∧L′)Z]0/n+ (with Cp* or extended Cp* and L∧L′ = chelated C∧N or N∧N ligands) have a much greater potency (nanomolar) toward a range of cancer cells (especially leukemia, colon cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, and melanoma) than cisplatin. Their mechanism of action may involve both an attack on DNA and a perturbation of the redox status of cells. Some of these complexes can form IrIII-hydride complexes using coenzyme NAD(P)H as a source of hydride to catalyze the generation of H2 or the reduction of quinones to semiquinones. Intriguingly, relatively unreactive organoiridium

  4. Organoiridium complexes: anticancer agents and catalysts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhe; Sadler, Peter J

    2014-04-15

    Iridium is a relatively rare precious heavy metal, only slightly less dense than osmium. Researchers have long recognized the catalytic properties of square-planar Ir(I) complexes, such as Crabtree's hydrogenation catalyst, an organometallic complex with cyclooctadiene, phosphane, and pyridine ligands. More recently, chemists have developed half-sandwich pseudo-octahedral pentamethylcyclopentadienyl Ir(III) complexes containing diamine ligands that efficiently catalyze transfer hydrogenation reactions of ketones and aldehydes in water using H2 or formate as the hydrogen source. Although sometimes assumed to be chemically inert, the reactivity of low-spin 5d(6) Ir(III) centers is highly dependent on the set of ligands. Cp* complexes with strong σ-donor C^C-chelating ligands can even stabilize Ir(IV) and catalyze the oxidation of water. In comparison with well developed Ir catalysts, Ir-based pharmaceuticals are still in their infancy. In this Account, we review recent developments in organoiridium complexes as both catalysts and anticancer agents. Initial studies of anticancer activity with organoiridium complexes focused on square-planar Ir(I) complexes because of their structural and electronic similarity to Pt(II) anticancer complexes such as cisplatin. Recently, researchers have studied half-sandwich Ir(III) anticancer complexes. These complexes with the formula [(Cp(x))Ir(L^L')Z](0/n+) (with Cp* or extended Cp* and L^L' = chelated C^N or N^N ligands) have a much greater potency (nanomolar) toward a range of cancer cells (especially leukemia, colon cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, and melanoma) than cisplatin. Their mechanism of action may involve both an attack on DNA and a perturbation of the redox status of cells. Some of these complexes can form Ir(III)-hydride complexes using coenzyme NAD(P)H as a source of hydride to catalyze the generation of H2 or the reduction of quinones to semiquinones. Intriguingly, relatively unreactive organoiridium

  5. Oral anticancer agent medication adherence by outpatients.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Michio; Usami, Eiseki; Iwai, Mina; Nakao, Toshiya; Yoshimura, Tomoaki; Mori, Hiromi; Sugiyama, Tadashi; Teramachi, Hitomi

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, medication adherence and factors affecting adherence were examined in patients taking oral anticancer agents. In June 2013, 172 outpatients who had been prescribed oral anticancer agents by Ogaki Municipal Hospital (Ogaki, Gifu, Japan) completed a questionnaire survey, with answers rated on a five-point Likert scale. The factors that affect medication adherence were evaluated using a customer satisfaction (CS) analysis. For patients with good and insufficient adherence to medication, the median ages were 66 years (range, 21-85 years) and 73 years (range, 30-90 years), respectively (P=0.0004), while the median dosing time was 131 days (range, 3-3,585 days) and 219 days (24-3,465 days), respectively (P=0.0447). In 36.0% (62 out of 172) of the cases, there was insufficient medication adherence; 64.5% of those cases (40 out of 62) showed good medication compliance (4-5 point rating score). However, these patients did not fully understand the effects or side-effects of the drugs, giving a score of three points or less. The percentage of patients with good medication compliance was 87.2% (150 out of 172). Through the CS analysis, three items, the interest in the drug, the desire to consult about the drug and the condition of the patient, were extracted as items for improvement. Overall, the medication compliance of the patients taking the oral anticancer agents was good, but the medication adherence was insufficient. To improve medication adherence, a better understanding of the effectiveness and necessity of drugs and their side-effects is required. In addition, the interest of patients in their medication should be encouraged and intervention should be tailored to the condition of the patient. These steps should lead to improved medication adherence.

  6. Oral anticancer agent medication adherence by outpatients

    PubMed Central

    KIMURA, MICHIO; USAMI, EISEKI; IWAI, MINA; NAKAO, TOSHIYA; YOSHIMURA, TOMOAKI; MORI, HIROMI; SUGIYAMA, TADASHI; TERAMACHI, HITOMI

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, medication adherence and factors affecting adherence were examined in patients taking oral anticancer agents. In June 2013, 172 outpatients who had been prescribed oral anticancer agents by Ogaki Municipal Hospital (Ogaki, Gifu, Japan) completed a questionnaire survey, with answers rated on a five-point Likert scale. The factors that affect medication adherence were evaluated using a customer satisfaction (CS) analysis. For patients with good and insufficient adherence to medication, the median ages were 66 years (range, 21–85 years) and 73 years (range, 30–90 years), respectively (P=0.0004), while the median dosing time was 131 days (range, 3–3,585 days) and 219 days (24–3,465 days), respectively (P=0.0447). In 36.0% (62 out of 172) of the cases, there was insufficient medication adherence; 64.5% of those cases (40 out of 62) showed good medication compliance (4–5 point rating score). However, these patients did not fully understand the effects or side-effects of the drugs, giving a score of three points or less. The percentage of patients with good medication compliance was 87.2% (150 out of 172). Through the CS analysis, three items, the interest in the drug, the desire to consult about the drug and the condition of the patient, were extracted as items for improvement. Overall, the medication compliance of the patients taking the oral anticancer agents was good, but the medication adherence was insufficient. To improve medication adherence, a better understanding of the effectiveness and necessity of drugs and their side-effects is required. In addition, the interest of patients in their medication should be encouraged and intervention should be tailored to the condition of the patient. These steps should lead to improved medication adherence. PMID:25295117

  7. Proteomic profiling predicts drug response to novel targeted anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fan; Li, Zilin; Hua, Yunfen; Lim, Yoon Pin

    2016-01-01

    Most recently approved anti-cancer drugs by the US FDA are targeted therapeutic agents and this represents an important trend for future anticancer therapy. Unlike conventional chemotherapy that rarely considers individual differences, it is crucial for targeted therapies to identify the beneficial subgroup of patients for the treatment. Currently, genomics and transcriptomics are the major 'omic' analytics used in studies of drug response prediction. However, proteomic profiling excels both in its advantages of directly detecting an instantaneous dynamic of the whole proteome, which contains most current diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets. Moreover, proteomic profiling improves understanding of the mechanism for drug resistance and helps finding optimal combination therapy. This article reviews the recent success of applications of proteomic analytics in predicting the response to targeted anticancer therapeutics, and discusses the potential avenues and pitfalls of proteomic platforms and techniques used most in the field.

  8. Targeted anticancer therapy: overexpressed receptors and nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Ahamed, Maqusood; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Alrokayan, Salman A; Kumar, Sudhir

    2014-09-25

    Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to cancer cells and tissues is a promising field due to its potential to spare unaffected cells and tissues, but it has been a major challenge to achieve success in these therapeutic approaches. Several innovative approaches to targeted drug delivery have been devised based on available knowledge in cancer biology and on technological advancements. To achieve the desired selectivity of drug delivery, nanotechnology has enabled researchers to design nanoparticles (NPs) to incorporate anticancer drugs and act as nanocarriers. Recently, many receptor molecules known to be overexpressed in cancer have been explored as docking sites for the targeting of anticancer drugs. In principle, anticancer drugs can be concentrated specifically in cancer cells and tissues by conjugating drug-containing nanocarriers with ligands against these receptors. Several mechanisms can be employed to induce triggered drug release in response to either endogenous trigger or exogenous trigger so that the anticancer drug is only released upon reaching and preferentially accumulating in the tumor tissue. This review focuses on overexpressed receptors exploited in targeting drugs to cancerous tissues and the tumor microenvironment. We briefly evaluate the structure and function of these receptor molecules, emphasizing the elegant mechanisms by which certain characteristics of cancer can be exploited in cancer treatment. After this discussion of receptors, we review their respective ligands and then the anticancer drugs delivered by nanotechnology in preclinical models of cancer. Ligand-functionalized nanocarriers have delivered significantly higher amounts of anticancer drugs in many in vitro and in vivo models of cancer compared to cancer models lacking such receptors or drug carrying nanocarriers devoid of ligand. This increased concentration of anticancer drug in the tumor site enabled by nanotechnology could have a major impact on the efficiency of cancer

  9. Farnesyl transferase inhibitors as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Haluska, P; Dy, G K; Adjei, A A

    2002-09-01

    Protein farnesylation catalysed by the enzyme farnesyl protein transferase involves the addition of a 15-carbon farnesyl group to conserved amino acid residues at the carboxyl terminus of certain proteins. Protein substrates of farnesyl transferase include several G-proteins, which are critical intermediates of cell signalling and cytoskeletal organisation such as Ras, Rho, PxF and lamins A and B. Activated Ras proteins trigger a cascade of phosphorylation events through sequential activation of the PI3 kinase/AKT pathway, which is critical for cell survival, and the Raf/Mek/Erk kinase pathway that has been implicated in cell proliferation. Ras mutations which encode for constitutively activated proteins are found in 30% of human cancers. Because farnesylation of Ras is required for its transforming and proliferative activity, the farnesyl protein transferase inhibitors were designed as anticancer agents to abrogate Ras function. However, current evidence suggests that the anticancer activity of the farnesyl transferase inhibitors may not be simply due to Ras inhibition. This review will discuss available clinical data on three of these agents that are currently undergoing clinical trials.

  10. Exploiting developments in nanotechnology for the preferential delivery of platinum-based anti-cancer agents to tumours: targeting some of the hallmarks of cancer.

    PubMed

    Parker, James P; Ude, Ziga; Marmion, Celine J

    2016-01-01

    Platinum drugs as anti-cancer therapeutics are held in extremely high regard. Despite their success, there are drawbacks associated with their use; their dose-limiting toxicity, their limited activity against an array of common cancers and patient resistance to Pt-based therapeutic regimes. Current investigations in medicinal inorganic chemistry strive to offset these shortcomings through selective targeting of Pt drugs and/or the development of Pt drugs with new or multiple modes of action. A comprehensive overview showcasing how liposomes, nanocapsules, polymers, dendrimers, nanoparticles and nanotubes may be employed as vehicles to selectively deliver cytotoxic Pt payloads to tumour cells is provided.

  11. Decoration of gold nanoparticles with thiolated pH-responsive polymeric (PEG-b-p(2-dimethylamio ethyl methacrylate-co-itaconic acid) shell: A novel platform for targeting of anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Marjan; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to design and develop a new pH-responsive nano-platform for controlled and targeted delivery of anticancer drugs. Engineering of pH-responsive nanocarriers was prepared via decoration of gold nanoparticles (NPs) by thiolated (methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly((2-dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate-co-itaconic acid) (mPEG-b-p(DMAEMA-co-IA) copolymer and fully characterized by various techniques and subsequently used for loading and targeted delivery of anticancer agent, methotrexate (MTX). By conjugation of MTX with the amino groups of polymeric shell of gold NPs (with the high loading capacity of 31%), since MTX is also the target ligand of folate receptors, the targeted performance of NPs examined through the cell uptake study. The results indicated that MTX-loaded NPs showed 1.3 times more cell internalization than MTX free NPs. Cell cytotoxicity studies pointed out ~1.5 and 3 times higher cell cytotoxicity after 24h for MTX-loaded nanoparticles than MTX in MTT assay and cell cycle arrest experiments, respectively. Additionally, mPEG was used as the outer shell of NPs which caused the long-term dispersibility of the NPs even under high ionic strength. The in-vitro pH-triggered drug release of MTX showed that MTX released more than three times in simulated cancerous tissue (40°C, pH5.3) than physiologic condition (37°C, pH7.4) during 48h. The results of various experiments determined that the developed smart nanocarrier proposed as a promising nanocarrier for active and passive targeting of anionic anti-cancer agents such as MTX. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Autophagy modulation as a target for anticancer drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Xu, Huai-long; Liu, Yong-xi; An, Na; Zhao, Si; Bao, Jin-ku

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process involving the engulfment and degradation of non-essential or abnormal cellular organelles and proteins, is crucial for homeostatic maintenance in living cells. This highly regulated, multi-step process has been implicated in diverse diseases including cancer. Autophagy can function as either a promoter or a suppressor of cancer, which makes it a promising and challenging therapeutic target. Herein, we overview the regulatory mechanisms and dual roles of autophagy in cancer. We also describe some of the representative agents that exert their anticancer effects by regulating autophagy. Additionally, some emerging strategies aimed at modulating autophagy are discussed as having the potential for future anticancer drug discovery. In summary, these findings will provide valuable information to better utilize autophagy in the future development of anticancer therapeutics that meet clinical requirements. PMID:23564085

  13. Marine Mollusk‐Derived Agents with Antiproliferative Activity as Promising Anticancer Agents to Overcome Chemotherapy Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lefranc, Florence; Carbone, Marianna; Mollo, Ernesto; Gavagnin, Margherita; Betancourt, Tania; Dasari, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The chemical investigation of marine mollusks has led to the isolation of a wide variety of bioactive metabolites, which evolved in marine organisms as favorable adaptations to survive in different environments. Most of them are derived from food sources, but they can be also biosynthesized de novo by the mollusks themselves, or produced by symbionts. Consequently, the isolated compounds cannot be strictly considered as “chemotaxonomic markers” for the different molluscan species. However, the chemical investigation of this phylum has provided many compounds of interest as potential anticancer drugs that assume particular importance in the light of the growing literature on cancer biology and chemotherapy. The current review highlights the diversity of chemical structures, mechanisms of action, and, most importantly, the potential of mollusk‐derived metabolites as anticancer agents, including those biosynthesized by mollusks and those of dietary origin. After the discussion of dolastatins and kahalalides, compounds previously studied in clinical trials, the review covers potentially promising anticancer agents, which are grouped based on their structural type and include terpenes, steroids, peptides, polyketides and nitrogen‐containing compounds. The “promise” of a mollusk‐derived natural product as an anticancer agent is evaluated on the basis of its ability to target biological characteristics of cancer cells responsible for poor treatment outcomes. These characteristics include high antiproliferative potency against cancer cells in vitro, preferential inhibition of the proliferation of cancer cells over normal ones, mechanism of action via nonapoptotic signaling pathways, circumvention of multidrug resistance phenotype, and high activity in vivo, among others. The review also includes sections on the targeted delivery of mollusk‐derived anticancer agents and solutions to their procurement in quantity. PMID:27925266

  14. IAPs as a target for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Danson, S; Dean, E; Dive, C; Ranson, M

    2007-12-01

    The avoidance of apoptosis is one of the hallmarks of cancer cells. In addition, failure to induce apoptosis by anticancer agents, either due to limitations of the drug or the tumour cell evading apoptosis, is a reason for chemotherapeutic failure. Two general pathways for apoptotic cell death have been characterised, the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways which merge in the final common pathway. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is an anti-apoptotic protein in the final common pathway that inhibits caspases and suppresses apoptosis. XIAP is over-expressed in many cancer cell lines and cancer tissues. High XIAP expression has been correlated with resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy and to poor clinical outcome by some investigators. Manipulation of apoptosis is an attractive therapeutic concept. Much effort has been spent on inhibiting the anti-apoptotic protein, B cell lymphoma gene 2 (Bcl-2) which is part of the intrinsic pathway. Now attention is turning to inhibition of XIAP as a cancer drug target. It has been argued that it is more effective to block the final common pathway rather than just the intrinsic arm. Inhibition of XIAP can be with either antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) or small molecule inhibitors. In vitro, XIAP antagonists produce XIAP knockdown and apoptosis which is associated with sensitisation of tumour cells to radiotherapy and cytotoxic drugs. In vivo, XIAP antagonists have antitumour effects and sensitise tumours to the effects of chemotherapy. This review will summarise the preclinical data for both ASO and small molecule inhibition of XIAP and discuss emerging Phase I data. Future strategies for manipulation of XIAP and the clinical development of XIAP inhibitors will be discussed.

  15. Plant Antimicrobial Peptides as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Rodríguez, Jaquelina Julia; López-Gómez, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are part of the innate immune defense mechanism of many organisms and are promising candidates to treat infections caused by pathogenic bacteria to animals and humans. AMPs also display anticancer activities because of their ability to inactivate a wide range of cancer cells. Cancer remains a cause of high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Therefore, the development of methods for its control is desirable. Attractive alternatives include plant AMP thionins, defensins, and cyclotides, which have anticancer activities. Here, we provide an overview of plant AMPs anticancer activities, with an emphasis on their mode of action, their selectivity, and their efficacy. PMID:25815333

  16. Efficient synthesis of benzamide riboside, a potential anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Bonnac, Laurent F; Gao, Guang-Yao; Chen, Liqiang; Patterson, Steven E; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N; Pankiewicz, Krzysztof W

    2007-01-01

    An efficient five step synthesis of benzamide riboside (BR) amenable for a large scale synthesis has been developed. It allows for extensive pre-clinical studies of BR as a potential anticancer agent.

  17. Protocols for Studying Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs) as Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Madera, Laurence; Hoskin, David W

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a class of small cationic peptides that are important for host defense. In a manner that is similar to AMP-mediated destruction of microbial pathogens, certain AMPs can physically associate with the anionic lipid membrane components of cancer cells, resulting in destabilization of the lipid membrane and subsequent peptide binding to intracellular targets, which ultimately leads to the death of the cancer cell. In comparison, normal healthy cells possess a neutral membrane charge and are therefore less affected by AMPs. Based on the selective cytotoxicity of certain AMPs for cancer cells, these peptides represent a potential reservoir of novel anticancer therapeutic agents. The development and improvement of AMPs as anticancer agents requires appropriate methods for determining the effects of these peptides on the viability and function of cancer cells. In this chapter, we describe methods to assess the ability of AMPs to cause cell membrane damage (measured by propidium iodide uptake), apoptosis and/or necrosis (measured by annexin V-FLUOS/propidium iodide staining), and mitochondrial membrane destabilization (measured by 3,3'-dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide staining), as well as reduced motility (measured by a migration and invasion assay) of cancer cells growing in suspension or as monolayers. We also describe a tubule-forming assay that can be used to assess the effect of AMPs on angiogenesis.

  18. Targeting protein-protein interactions as an anticancer strategy.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Andrei A; Khuri, Fadlo R; Fu, Haian

    2013-07-01

    The emergence and convergence of cancer genomics, targeted therapies, and network oncology have significantly expanded the landscape of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks in cancer for therapeutic discovery. Extensive biological and clinical investigations have led to the identification of protein interaction hubs and nodes that are critical for the acquisition and maintenance of characteristics of cancer essential for cell transformation. Such cancer-enabling PPIs have become promising therapeutic targets. With technological advances in PPI modulator discovery and validation of PPI-targeting agents in clinical settings, targeting of PPI interfaces as an anticancer strategy has become a reality. Future research directed at genomics-based PPI target discovery, PPI interface characterization, PPI-focused chemical library design, and patient-genomic subpopulation-driven clinical studies is expected to accelerate the development of the next generation of PPI-based anticancer agents for personalized precision medicine. Here we briefly review prominent PPIs that mediate cancer-acquired properties, highlight recognized challenges and promising clinical results in targeting PPIs, and outline emerging opportunities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Recent Trends in Targeted Anticancer Prodrug and Conjugate Design

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Yashveer; Palombo, Matthew; Sinko, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    Anticancer drugs are often nonselective antiproliferative agents (cytotoxins) that preferentially kill dividing cells by attacking their DNA at some level. The lack of selectivity results in significant toxicity to noncancerous proliferating cells. These toxicities along with drug resistance exhibited by the solid tumors are major therapy limiting factors that results into poor prognosis for patients. Prodrug and conjugate design involves the synthesis of inactive drug derivatives that are converted to an active form inside the body and preferably at the site of action. Classical prodrug and conjugate design has focused on the development of prodrugs that can overcome physicochemical (e.g., solubility, chemical instability) or biopharmaceutical problems (e.g., bioavailability, toxicity) associated with common anticancer drugs. The recent targeted prodrug and conjugate design, on the other hand, hinges on the selective delivery of anticancer agents to tumor tissues thereby avoiding their cytotoxic effects on noncancerous cells. Targeting strategies have attempted to take advantage of low extracellular pH, elevated enzymes in tumor tissues, the hypoxic environment inside the tumor core, and tumor-specific antigens expressed on tumor cell surfaces. The present review highlights recent trends in prodrug and conjugate rationale and design for cancer treatment. The various approaches that are currently being explored are critically analyzed and a comparative account of the advantages and disadvantages associated with each approach is presented. PMID:18691040

  20. Mitochondria: a promising target for anticancer alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Urra, Félix A; Cordova-Delgado, Miguel; Pessoa-Mahana, Hernan; Ramírez-Rodríguez, Oney; Weiss-Lopez, Boris; Ferreira, Jorge; Araya-Maturana, Ramiro

    2013-01-01

    A great number of alkaloids exhibit high potential in cancer research. Some of them are anticancer drugs with well-defined clinical uses, exerting their action on microtubules dynamics or DNA replication and topology. On the other hand, mitochondria have been recognized as an essential organelle in the establishment of tumor characteristics, especially the resistance to cell death, high proliferative capacity and adaptation to unfavorable cellular environment. Interestingly, many alkaloids exert their anticancer activities affecting selectively some functions of the tumor mitochondria by 1) modulating OXPHOS and ADP/ATP transport, 2) increasing ROS levels and mitochondrial potential dissipation by crosstalk between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, 3) inducing mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and autophagy, 4) inhibiting mitochondrial metabolic pathways and 5) by alteration of the morphology and biogenesis of this organelle. These antecedents show the relevance of developing research about the effects of alkaloids on functions controlled by tumor mitochondria, offering an attractive target for the design of new alkaloid derivatives, considering organelle- specific delivery strategies. This review describes mitochondria as a central component in the anticancer action of a set of alkaloids, in a way to illustrate the importance of this organelle in medicinal chemistry.

  1. Natural anti-cancer agents: Implications in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Marasini, Bishal; Sahu, Ravi P

    2017-03-15

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancy accounting for the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Among several explored anti-cancer agents, Gemcitabine, a nucleoside analogue remained a front line chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, gemcitabine exerts a low response rate with limited progression free survival in cancer patients due to cellular resistance of pancreatic tumors to this therapy. Several chemotherapeutic agents have been explored in combination with gemcitabine against pancreatic cancer with overall mixed responses and survival rates. Naturally occurring dietary agents possess promising anti-cancer properties and have been shown to target various oncogenic signaling pathways in in-vitro and in-vivo pancreatic cancer models. Multiple studies using natural compounds have shown increased therapeutic efficacy of gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer models. This review is focused on recent updates on preclinical and clinical studies utilizing natural anti-cancer agents with gemcitabine against pancreatic cancer.

  2. Targeted NF1 cancer therapeutics with multiple modes of action: small molecule hormone-like agents resembling the natural anticancer metabolite, 2-methoxyoestradiol.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu-chi; Upadhyayula, Ravi; Cevallos, Stephanie; Messick, Ryan J; Hsia, Tammy; Leese, Mathew P; Jewett, Douglas M; Ferrer-Torres, Daysha; Roth, Therese M; Dohle, Wolfgang; Potter, Barry V L; Barald, Kate F

    2015-10-20

    Both the number and size of tumours in NF1 patients increase in response to the rise in steroid hormones seen at puberty and during pregnancy. The size of tumours decreases after delivery, suggesting that hormone-targeting therapy might provide a viable new NF1 treatment approach. Our earlier studies demonstrated that human NF1 tumour cell lines either went through apoptosis or ceased growth in the presence of 2-methoxyoestradiol (2ME2), a naturally occurring anticancer metabolite of 17-β estradiol. Previous reports of treatment with sulfamoylated steroidal and non-steroidal derivatives of 2ME2 showed promising reductions in tumour burden in hormone-responsive cancers other than NF1. Here we present the first studies indicating that 2ME2 derivatives could also provide an avenue for treating NF1, for which few treatment options are available. STX3451, (2-(3-Bromo-4,5-dimethoxybenzyl)-7-methoxy-6-sulfamoyloxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline), a non-steroidal sulphamate analogue of 2ME2, was tested in dose-dependent studies of malignant and benign NF1 human tumour cell lines and cell lines with variable controlled neurofibromin expression. The mechanisms of action of STX3451 were also analysed. We found that STX3451-induced apoptosis in human malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) cell lines, even in the presence of elevated oestrogen and progesterone. It inhibits both PI3 kinase and mTOR signalling pathways. It disrupts actin- and microtubule-based cytoskeletal structures in cell lines derived from human MPNSTs and in cells derived from benign plexiform neurofibromas. STX3451 selectively kills MPNST-derived cells, but also halts growth of other tumour-derived NF1 cell lines. STX3451 provides a new approach for inducing cell death and lowering tumour burden in NF1 and other hormone-responsive cancers with limited treatment options.

  3. Deubiquitinating enzymes as novel anticancer targets

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Benjamin; Marblestone, Jeffrey G; Butt, Tauseef R; Mattern, Michael R

    2008-01-01

    Tagging proteins with mono- or poly-ubiquitin is now recognized as a multifaceted and universal means of regulating cell growth and physiology. It does so by controlling the cellular lifetime of nearly all eukaryotic proteins and the cellular localization of many critical proteins. Enzymes of the ubiquitin pathway add (ligases) or remove (deubiquitinases [DUBs]) ubiquitin tags to or from their target proteins in a selective fashion. Similarly to the kinases and their corresponding phosphatases, ubiquitin ligases and DUBs have become actively studied molecular oncology targets for drug discovery. Approximately 79 functional DUBs exist in the human proteome, suggesting that selective intervention is a reasonable therapeutic objective, with the goal of downregulating or ablating oncogene products or, alternatively, upregulating or sparing tumor suppressors. In the following review, this fascinating class of regulatory enzymes will be described, and specific examples of DUBs that are viable targets for anticancer therapy will be considered. PMID:17381419

  4. Targeting Lipid Metabolic Reprogramming as Anticancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Ji-Young; Lee, Ho-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells rewire their metabolism to satisfy the demands of growth and survival, and this metabolic reprogramming has been recognized as an emerging hallmark of cancer. Lipid metabolism is pivotal in cellular process that converts nutrients into energy, building blocks for membrane biogenesis and the generation of signaling molecules. Accumulating evidence suggests that cancer cells show alterations in different aspects of lipid metabolism. The changes in lipid metabolism of cancer cells can affect numerous cellular processes, including cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. The potential dependence of cancer cells on the deregulated lipid metabolism suggests that enzymes and regulating factors involved in this process are promising targets for cancer treatment. In this review, we focus on the features associated with the lipid metabolic pathways in cancer, and highlight recent advances on the therapeutic targets of specific lipid metabolic enzymes or regulating factors and target-directed small molecules that can be potentially used as anticancer drugs. PMID:28053954

  5. The use of cannabinoids as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Guillermo; Hernández-Tiedra, Sonia; Dávila, David; Lorente, Mar

    2016-01-04

    It is well-established that cannabinoids exert palliative effects on some cancer-associated symptoms. In addition evidences obtained during the last fifteen years support that these compounds can reduce tumor growth in animal models of cancer. Cannabinoids have been shown to activate an ER-stress related pathway that leads to the stimulation of autophagy-mediated cancer cell death. In addition, cannabinoids inhibit tumor angiogenesis and decrease cancer cell migration. The mechanisms of resistance to cannabinoid anticancer action as well as the possible strategies to develop cannabinoid-based combinational therapies to fight cancer have also started to be explored. In this review we will summarize these observations (that have already helped to set the bases for the development of the first clinical studies to investigate the potential clinical benefit of using cannabinoids in anticancer therapies) and will discuss the possible future avenues of research in this area. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 1,2-Bis(methylsulfonyl)-1-(2-chloroethyl)-2-[[1-(4-nitrophenyl)ethoxy]carbonyl]hydrazine: An anticancer agent targeting hypoxic cells

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Helen A.; Penketh, Philip G.; Shyam, Krishnamurthy; Rockwell, Sara; Sartorelli, Alan C.

    2005-01-01

    To target malignant cells residing in hypoxic regions of solid tumors, we have designed and synthesized prodrugs generating the cytotoxic alkylating species 1,2-bis(methylsulfonyl)-1-(2-chloroethyl)hydrazine (90CE) after bioreductive activation. We postulate that one of these agents, 1,2-bis(methylsulfonyl)-1-(2-chloroethyl)-2-[[1-(4-nitrophenyl)ethoxy]carbonyl]hydrazine (KS119), requires enzymatic nitro reduction to produce 90CE, whereas another agent, 1,2-bis(methylsulfonyl)-1-(2-chloroethyl)-2-[(4-nitrobenzyloxy)carbonyl]hydrazine (PNBC), can also be activated by nucleophilic attack by thiols such as glutathione (GSH)/GST. We demonstrated that these agents selectively kill hypoxic EMT6 mouse mammary carcinoma and CHO cells. In hypoxia, 50 μM KS119 produced 5 logs of kill of EMT6 cells without discernable cytotoxicity in air; similar effects were observed with CHO cells. PNBC was less efficacious against hypoxic tumor cells and also had some toxicity to aerobic cells, presumably because of GST/thiol activation, making PNBC less interesting as a selective hypoxic-cell cytotoxin. BALB/c mice with established EMT6 solid tumors were used to demonstrate that KS119 could reach and kill hypoxic cells in solid tumors. To gain information on bioreductive enzymes involved in the activation of KS119, cytotoxicity was measured in CHO cell lines overexpressing NADH:cytochrome b5 reductase (NBR), NADPH:cytochrome P450 reductase (NPR), or NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). Increased cytotoxicity occurred in cells overexpressing NBR and NPR, whereas overexpressed NQO1 had no effect. These findings were supported by enzymatic studies using purified NPR and xanthine oxidase to activate KS119. KS119 has significant potential as a hypoxia-selective tumor-cell cytotoxin and is unlikely to cause major toxicity to well oxygenated normal tissues. PMID:15964988

  7. Targeted deletion of the ara operon of Salmonella typhimurium enhances L-arabinose accumulation and drives PBAD-promoted expression of anti-cancer toxins and imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyun; Lim, Daejin; Kim, Geun-Joong; Park, Seung-Hwan; Sik Kim, Hyeon; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-specific expression of antitumor drugs can be achieved using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium harboring the PBAD promoter, which is induced by L-arabinose. However, L-arabinose does not accumulate because it is metabolized to D-xylulose-5-P by enzymes encoded by the ara operon in Salmonellae. To address this problem, we developed an engineered strain of S. typhimurium in which the ara operon is deleted. Linear DNA transformation was performed using λ red recombinase to exchange the ara operon with linear DNA carrying an antibiotic-resistance gene with homology to regions adjacent to the ara operon. The ara operon-deleted strain and its parental strain were transformed with a plasmid encoding Renilla luciferase variant 8 (RLuc8) or cytolysin A (clyA) under the control of the PBAD promoter. Luciferase assays demonstrated that RLuc8 expression was 49-fold higher in the ara operon-deleted S. typhimurium than in the parental strain after the addition of L-arabinose. In vivo bioluminescence imaging showed that the tumor tissue targeted by the ara operon-deleted Salmonella had a stronger imaging signal (~30-fold) than that targeted by the parental strain. Mice with murine colon cancer (CT26) that had been injected with the ara operon-deleted S. typhimurium expressing clyA showed significant tumor suppression. The present report demonstrates that deletion of the ara operon of S. typhimurium enhances L-arabinose accumulation and thereby drives PBAD-promoted expression of cytotoxic agents and imaging agents. This is a promising approach for tumor therapy and imaging.

  8. Recent Researches in Metal Supramolecular Complexes as Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cheng-He; Zhang, Yi-Yi; Yan, Cong-Yan; Wan, Kun; Gan, Lin-Ling; Shi, Yuan

    2010-04-12

    The research and development of metal supramolecular complexes as anticancer supramolecular drugs, which are aggregates mainly formed by one or more inorganic metal compounds with one or more either inorganic or organic molecules in general via coordination bonds, has been a quite rapidly developing, increasingly active and newly rising highlight interdisciplinary field. Numerous efforts have been directed toward metal supramolecular complexes as potential anticancer agents and the unprecedented progress has been made. This has opened up a wholly new and infinite space to create novel metal-based bioactive supermolecules. More importantly, metal-based complex supermolecules as potential anticancer agents with wide potential applications have become highlight topics in recent years, and are becoming increasingly useful and important in preventing and treating cancer diseases. In view of the rapid progress in metal complex anticancer supermolecules with rich variation of structural types, this work systematically reviewed the recent research and development of the whole range of metal-based supramolecular complexes as anticancer agents mainly in 2009. The perspectives of the foreseeable future and potential application of metal supramolecular complexes in cancer therapy were also presented. It is hoped that this review will serve as a stimulant for new thoughts in the quest for rational designs of more active and less toxic metal supramolecular complex anticancer drugs.

  9. Recent researches in metal supramolecular complexes as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cheng-He; Zhang, Yi-Yi; Yan, Cong-Yan; Wan, Kun; Gan, Lin-Ling; Shi, Yuan

    2010-06-01

    The research and development of metal supramolecular complexes as anticancer supramolecular drugs, which are aggregates mainly formed by one or more inorganic metal compounds with one or more either inorganic or organic molecules in general via coordination bonds, has been a quite rapidly developing, increasingly active and newly rising highlight interdisciplinary field. Numerous efforts have been directed toward metal supramolecular complexes as potential anticancer agents and the unprecedented progress has been made. This has opened up a wholly new and infinite space to create novel metal-based bioactive supermolecules. More importantly, metal-based complex supermolecules as potential anticancer agents with wide potential applications have become highlight topics in recent years, and are becoming increasingly useful and important in preventing and treating cancer diseases. In view of the rapid progress in metal complex anticancer supermolecules with rich variation of structural types, this work systematically reviewed the recent research and development of the whole range of metal-based supramolecular complexes as anticancer agents mainly in 2009. The perspectives of the foreseeable future and potential application of metal supramolecular complexes in cancer therapy were also presented. It is hoped that this review will serve as a stimulant for new thoughts in the quest for rational designs of more active and less toxic metal supramolecular complex anticancer drugs.

  10. Targeting aerobic glycolysis: 3-bromopyruvate as a promising anticancer drug.

    PubMed

    Cardaci, Simone; Desideri, Enrico; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2012-02-01

    The Warburg effect refers to the phenomenon whereby cancer cells avidly take up glucose and produce lactic acid under aerobic conditions. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying tumor reliance on glycolysis remains not completely clear, its inhibition opens feasible therapeutic windows for cancer treatment. Indeed, several small molecules have emerged by combinatorial studies exhibiting promising anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo, as a single agent or in combination with other therapeutic modalities. Therefore, besides reviewing the alterations of glycolysis that occur with malignant transformation, this manuscript aims at recapitulating the most effective pharmacological therapeutics of its targeting. In particular, we describe the principal mechanisms of action and the main targets of 3-bromopyruvate, an alkylating agent with impressive antitumor effects in several models of animal tumors. Moreover, we discuss the chemo-potentiating strategies that would make unparalleled the putative therapeutic efficacy of its use in clinical settings.

  11. T-oligo as an anticancer agent in colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wojdyla, Luke; Stone, Amanda L.; Sethakorn, Nan; Uppada, Srijayaprakash B.; Devito, Joseph T.; Bissonnette, Marc; Puri, Neelu

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • T-oligo induces cell cycle arrest, senescence, apoptosis, and differentiation in CRC. • Treatment with T-oligo downregulates telomere-associated proteins. • T-oligo combined with an EGFR-TKI additively inhibits cellular proliferation. • T-oligo has potential as an effective therapeutic agent for CRC. - Abstract: In the United States, there will be an estimated 96,830 new cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) and 50,310 deaths in 2014. CRC is often detected at late stages of the disease, at which point there is no effective chemotherapy. Thus, there is an urgent need for effective novel therapies that have minimal effects on normal cells. T-oligo, an oligonucleotide homologous to the 3′-telomere overhang, induces potent DNA damage responses in multiple malignant cell types, however, its efficacy in CRC has not been studied. This is the first investigation demonstrating T-oligo-induced anticancer effects in two CRC cell lines, HT-29 and LoVo, which are highly resistant to conventional chemotherapies. In this investigation, we show that T-oligo may mediate its DNA damage responses through the p53/p73 pathway, thereby inhibiting cellular proliferation and inducing apoptosis or senescence. Additionally, upregulation of downstream DNA damage response proteins, including E2F1, p53 or p73, was observed. In LoVo cells, T-oligo induced senescence, decreased clonogenicity, and increased expression of senescence associated proteins p21, p27, and p53. In addition, downregulation of POT1 and TRF2, two components of the shelterin protein complex which protects telomeric ends, was observed. Moreover, we studied the antiproliferative effects of T-oligo in combination with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Gefitinib, which resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation. Collectively, these data provide evidence that T-oligo alone, or in combination with other molecularly targeted therapies, has potential as an anti-cancer agent in CRC.

  12. DNA helicases as targets for anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sudha; Doherty, Kevin M; Brosh, Robert M

    2005-05-01

    DNA helicases have essential roles in nucleic acid metabolism by facilitating cellular processes including replication, recombination, DNA repair, and transcription. The vital roles of helicases in these pathways are reflected by their emerging importance in the maintenance of genomic stability. Recently, a number of human diseases with cancer predisposition have been shown to be genetically linked to a specific helicase defect. This has led researchers to further investigate the roles of helicases in cancer biology, and to study the efficacy of targeting human DNA helicases for anti-cancer drug treatment. Helicase-specific inhibition in malignant cells may compromise the high proliferation rates of cancerous tissues. The role of RecQ helicases in response to replicational stress suggests a molecular target for selectively eliminating malignant tumor cells by a cancer chemotherapeutic agent. Alternate DNA secondary structures such as G-quadruplexes that may form in regulatory regions of oncogenes or G-rich telomere sequences are potential targets for cancer therapy since these sequence-specific structures are proposed to affect gene expression and telomerase activation, respectively. Small molecule inhibitors of G-quadruplex helicases may be used to regulate cell cycle progression by modulating promotor activation or disrupting telomere maintenance, important processes of cellular transformation. The design of small molecules which deter helicase function at telomeres may provide a molecular target since telomerase activity is necessary for the proliferation of numerous immortal cells. Although evidence suggests that helicases are specifically inhibited by certain DNA binding compounds, another area of promise in anti-cancer therapy is siRNA technology. Specific knockdown of helicase expression can be utilized as a means to sensitize oncogenic proliferating cell lines. This review will address these topics in detail and summarize the current avenues of research in

  13. Topoisomerase as target for antibacterial and anticancer drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Kathiravan, Muthu K; Khilare, Madhavi M; Nikoomanesh, Kiana; Chothe, Aparna S; Jain, Kishor S

    2013-06-01

    DNA topoisomerases comprise a major aspect of basic cellular biology and are molecular targets for a variety of drugs like antibiotics, antibacterials and anticancer drugs. They act by inhibiting the topoisomerase molecule from relegating DNA strands after cleavage and convert the topoisomerases molecule into a DNA damaging agent. Though drugs of various categories acting through different mechanisms are available for the treatment, there are still problems associated with the currently available drugs. Therefore, Structural biologists, Structural chemists and Medicinal chemists all around the world have been identifying, designing, synthesizing and evaluating a variety of novel bioactive molecules targeting topoisomerase. This review summarizes types of topoisomerase and drug treating each class along with their structural requirement and activity. The emphasis has been laid in particular on the new potential heterocyles and the possible treatments as well as the current ongoing research status in the field of topoisomerase as dual targeting.

  14. Biodegradable polymers for targeted delivery of anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Doppalapudi, Sindhu; Jain, Anjali; Domb, Abraham J; Khan, Wahid

    2016-06-01

    Biodegradable polymers have been used for more than three decades in cancer treatment and have received increased interest in recent years. A range of biodegradable polymeric drug delivery systems designed for localized and systemic administration of therapeutic agents as well as tumor-targeting macromolecules has entered into the clinical phase of development, indicating the significance of biodegradable polymers in cancer therapy. This review elaborates upon applications of biodegradable polymers in the delivery and targeting of anti-cancer agents. Design of various drug delivery systems based on biodegradable polymers has been described. Moreover, the indication of polymers in the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs via passive, active targeting, and localized drug delivery are also covered. Biodegradable polymer-based drug delivery systems have the potential to deliver the payload to the target and can enhance drug availability at desired sites. Systemic toxicity and serious side effects observed with conventional cancer therapeutics can be significantly reduced with targeted polymeric systems. Still, there are many challenges that need to be met with respect to the degradation kinetics of the system, diffusion of drug payload within solid tumors, targeting tumoral tissue and tumor heterogeneity.

  15. Coumarin: a promising scaffold for anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manjinder; Kohli, Swarandeep; Sandhu, Sonali; Bansal, Yogita; Bansal, Gulshan

    2015-01-01

    Coumarin enjoys an important place in drug discovery process due to its presence in diversity of biologically active compounds. Many compounds of plant origin are derivatives of coumarin. Taking these natural products as lead, research groups across the globe have designed and synthesized numerous coumarin analogues for treatment of varied diseases. Cancer is one of the dreadful chronic diseases, and many drugs are available for its treatment. However, due to heterogeneity of cancer, the search is still on to develop drugs for specific types of cancers. The present review is an attempt to study various coumarin derivatives of natural as well as synthetic origins, which are identified or developed for the treatment of different types of cancers. Herein, we have classified various anticancer coumarin derivatives on the basis of their origin as well as substitution around it. These are discussed under the headings of natural, semi-synthetic and synthetic coumarin derivatives. The synthetic coumarin derivatives are further classified as mono-, di- and poly-substituted and fused coumarin derivatives. Of the six positions available for substituents on coumarin nucleus, only three positions (C-3, C-4 and C-7) are exploited for the selection of functional groups appropriate for anticancer activity. The other positions (C-5, C-6 and C-8) are either unexplored or very less exploited. The present review is expected to provide the medicinal chemists a guide to choose new functional groups for substitution at different positions of coumarin nucleus for development of novel compounds for the treatment of a specific type of cancer.

  16. Natural compounds as anticancer agents: Experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiao; Jiang, Yang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    Cancer prevention research has drawn much attention worldwide. It is believed that some types of cancer can be prevented by following a healthy life style. Cancer chemoprevention by either natural or synthetic agents is a promising route towards lowering cancer incidence. In recent years, the concept of cancer chemoprevention has evolved greatly. Experimental studies in animal models demonstrate that the reversal or suppression of premalignant lesions by chemopreventive agents is achievable. Natural occurring agents such as dietary phytochemicals, tea polyphenols and resveratrol show chemopreventive activity in animal models. Moreover, clinical trials for testing the safety and efficacy of a variety of natural agents in preventing or treating human malignancy have been ongoing. Here, we summarize experimental data on the chemopreventive or tumor suppressive effects of several natural compounds including curcumin, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, resveratrol, indole-3-carbinol, and vitamin D. PMID:24520533

  17. Hyperglycaemia Induced by Novel Anticancer Agents: An Undesirable Complication or a Potential Therapeutic Opportunity?

    PubMed

    Shah, Rashmi R

    2017-03-01

    Signalling pathways involving protein kinase, insulin-like growth factor 1, insulin receptors and the phosphoinositide 3 kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) system are critical in promoting oncogenesis. The use of anticancer agents that inhibit these pathways frequently results in hyperglycaemia, an on-target effect of these drugs. Hyperglycaemia induced by these agents denotes optimal inhibition of the desired pharmacological target. As hyperglycaemia can be treated successfully and effectively with metformin, managing this complication by reducing the dose of or discontinuing the anticancer drug may be counterproductive, especially if it is otherwise effective and clinically tolerated. The use of metformin to treat hyperglycaemia induced by anticancer drugs provides a valuable therapeutic opportunity of potentiating their clinical anticancer effects. Although evidence from randomised controlled trials is awaited, extensive preclinical evidence and clinical observational studies suggest that metformin has anticancer properties that improve overall survival in patients with diabetes and a variety of cancers. Metformin has also been reported to reverse resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-inhibiting tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This review summarises briefly the role of the above signalling pathways in oncogenesis, the causal association between inhibition of these pathways and hyperglycaemia, and the effect of metformin on clinical outcomes resulting from its anticancer properties. The evidence reviewed herein, albeit almost exclusively from observational studies, provides support for a greater use of metformin not only in patients with cancer and diabetes or drug-induced hyperglycaemia but also potentially as an anticancer drug. However, prospective randomised controlled studies are needed in all these settings to better assess the effect on clinical outcomes of adding metformin to ongoing anticancer therapy.

  18. Insight into the reactive form of the anticancer agent iproplatin.

    PubMed

    Volckova, Erika; Weaver, Evelyne; Bose, Rathindra N

    2008-05-01

    The reaction of iproplatin with reduced glutathione at different mole ratios yielded cis-di(isopropylamine)chloro-glutathionatoplatinum(II), not the expected cis-dichloro- species, indicating a mode of action of this anticancer agent that is different from that of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II).

  19. Selective anti-cancer agents as anti-aging drugs.

    PubMed

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-12-01

    Recent groundbreaking discoveries have revealed that IGF-1, Ras, MEK, AMPK, TSC1/2, FOXO, PI3K, mTOR, S6K, and NFκB are involved in the aging process. This is remarkable because the same signaling molecules, oncoproteins and tumor suppressors, are well-known targets for cancer therapy. Furthermore, anti-cancer drugs aimed at some of these targets have been already developed. This arsenal could be potentially employed for anti-aging interventions (given that similar signaling molecules are involved in both cancer and aging). In cancer, intrinsic and acquired resistance, tumor heterogeneity, adaptation, and genetic instability of cancer cells all hinder cancer-directed therapy. But for anti-aging applications, these hurdles are irrelevant. For example, since anti-aging interventions should be aimed at normal postmitotic cells, no selection for resistance is expected. At low doses, certain agents may decelerate aging and age-related diseases. Importantly, deceleration of aging can in turn postpone cancer, which is an age-related disease.

  20. NSAIDs: Old Drugs Reveal New Anticancer Targets.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Gary A; Keeton, Adam B; Tinsley, Heather N; Whitt, Jason D; Gary, Bernard D; Mathew, Bini; Singh, Raj; Grizzle, William E; Reynolds, Robert C

    2010-05-25

    There is compelling evidence that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors have antineoplastic activity, but toxicity from cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition and the suppression of physiologically important prostaglandins limits their use for cancer chemoprevention. Previous studies as reviewed here suggest that the mechanism for their anticancer properties does not require COX inhibition, but instead involves an off-target effect. In support of this possibility, recent molecular modeling studies have shown that the NSAID sulindac can be chemically modified to selectively design out its COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitory activity. Unexpectedly, certain derivatives that were synthesized based on in silico modeling displayed increased potency to inhibit tumor cell growth. Other experiments have shown that sulindac can inhibit phosphodiesterase to increase intracellular cyclic GMP levels and that this activity is closely associated with its ability to selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells. Together, these studies suggest that COX-independent mechanisms can be targeted to develop safer and more efficacious drugs for cancer chemoprevention.

  1. coral Software: QSAR for Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Benfenati, Emilio; Toropov, Andrey A; Toropova, Alla P; Manganaro, Alberto; Gonella Diaza, Rodolfo

    2011-06-01

    CORrelations And Logic (coral at http://www.insilico.eu/coral) is freeware aimed at establishing a quantitative structure - property/activity relationships (QSPR/QSAR). Simplified molecular input line entry system (SMILES) is used to represent the molecular structure. In fact, symbols in SMILES nomenclatures are indicators of the presence of defined molecular fragments. By means of the calculation with Monte Carlo optimization of the so called correlation weights (contributions) for the above-mentioned molecular fragments, one can define optimal SMILES-based descriptors, which are correlated with an endpoint for the training set. The predictability of these descriptors for an external validation set can be estimated. A collection of SMILES-based models of anticancer activity of 1,4-dihydro-4-oxo-1-(2-thiazolyl)-1,8-naphthyridines for different splits into training and validation set which are calculated with the coral are examined and discussed. Good performance has been obtained for three splits: the r(2) ranged between 0.778 and 0.829 for the sub-training set, between 0.828 and 0.933 for the calibration set, and between 0.807 and 0.931 for the validation set. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Pharmacogenetics and Pharmacogenomics of Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Huang, R. Stephanie; Ratain, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Large interindividual variation is observed in both the response and toxicity associated with anticancer therapy. The etiology of this variation is multifactorial, but is due in part to host genetic variations. Pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomic studies have successfully identified genetic variants that contribute to this variation in susceptibility to chemotherapy. This review provides an overview of the progress made in the field of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics using a five-stage architecture, which includes 1) determining the role of genetics in drug response; 2) screening and identifying genetic markers; 3) validating genetic markers; 4) clinical utility assessment; and 5) pharmacoeconomic impact. Examples are provided to illustrate the identification, validation, utility, and challenges of these pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomic markers, with the focus on the current application of this knowledge in cancer therapy. With the advance of technology, it becomes feasible to evaluate the human genome in a relatively inexpensive and efficient manner; however, extensive pharmacogenetic research and education are urgently needed to improve the translation of pharmacogenetic concepts from bench to bedside. PMID:19147868

  3. Cysteine-modifying agents: a possible approach for effective anticancer and antiviral drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Casini, Angela; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2002-01-01

    Modification of cysteine residues in proteins, due to a) the participation of the thiol moiety of this amino acid in oxido-reduction reactions, b) its ability to strongly coordinate transition metal ions, or c) its nucleophilic nature and facile reaction with electrophiles, may be critically important for the design of novel types of pharmacological agents. Application of such procedures recently led to the design of novel antivirals, mainly based on the reaction of zinc finger proteins with disulfides and related derivatives. This approach was particularly successful for developing novel antiviral agents for human immunodeficiency virus and human papilloma virus. Several new anticancer therapeutic approaches, mainly targeting tubulin, have also been reported. Thus, this unique amino acid offers very interesting possibilities for developing particularly useful pharmacological agents, which generally possess a completely different mechanism of action compared with classic agents in clinical use, thus avoiding major problems such as multidrug resistance (for antiviral and anticancer agents) or high toxicity. PMID:12426135

  4. Pharmacologic agents targeting autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Vakifahmetoglu-Norberg, Helin; Xia, Hong-guang; Yuan, Junying

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an important intracellular catabolic mechanism critically involved in regulating tissue homeostasis. The implication of autophagy in human diseases and the need to understand its regulatory mechanisms in mammalian cells have stimulated research efforts that led to the development of high-throughput screening protocols and small-molecule modulators that can activate or inhibit autophagy. Herein we review the current landscape in the development of screening technology as well as the molecules and pharmacologic agents targeting the regulatory mechanisms of autophagy. We also evaluate the potential therapeutic application of these compounds in different human pathologies. PMID:25654545

  5. Alkaloids Isolated from Natural Herbs as the Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jin-Jian; Bao, Jiao-Lin; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Huang, Min; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2012-01-01

    Alkaloids are important chemical compounds that serve as a rich reservoir for drug discovery. Several alkaloids isolated from natural herbs exhibit antiproliferation and antimetastasis effects on various types of cancers both in vitro and in vivo. Alkaloids, such as camptothecin and vinblastine, have already been successfully developed into anticancer drugs. This paper focuses on the naturally derived alkaloids with prospective anticancer properties, such as berberine, evodiamine, matrine, piperine, sanguinarine, and tetrandrine, and summarizes the mechanisms of action of these compounds. Based on the information in the literature that is summarized in this paper, the use of alkaloids as anticancer agents is very promising, but more research and clinical trials are necessary before final recommendations on specific alkaloids can be made. PMID:22988474

  6. ING Proteins as Potential Anticancer Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Unoki, M.; Kumamoto, K.; Harris, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    Recent emerging evidence suggests that ING family proteins play roles in carcinogenesis both as oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes depending on the family members and on cell status. Previous results from non-physiologic overexpression experiments showed that all five family members induce apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, thus it had been thought until very recently that all of the family members function as tumor suppressor genes. Therefore restoration of ING family proteins in cancer cells has been proposed as a treatment for cancers. However, ING2 knockdown experiments showed unexpected results: ING2 knockdown led to senescence in normal human fibroblast cells and suppressed cancer cell growth. ING2 is also overexpressed in colorectal cancer, and promotes cancer cell invasion through an MMP13 dependent pathway. Additionally, it was reported that ING2 has two isoforms, ING2a and ING2b. Although expression of ING2a predominates compared with ING2b, both isoforms confer resistance against cell cycle arrest or apoptosis to cancer cells, thus knockdown of both isoforms is critical to remove this resistance. Taken together, these results suggest that ING2 can function as an oncogene in some specific types of cancer cells, indicating restoration of this gene in cancer cells could cause cancer progression. Because knockdown of ING2 suppresses cancer cell invasion and induces apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, ING2 may be an anticancer drug target. In this brief review, we discuss possible clinical applications of ING2 with the latest knowledge of molecular targeted therapies. PMID:19442116

  7. Double layered hydroxides as potential anti-cancer drug delivery agents.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Ufana; Ashraf, S M

    2013-04-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology has changed the scenario of the medical world by revolutionizing the diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of cancer. This nanotechnology has been proved miraculous in detecting cancer cells, delivering chemotherapeutic agents and monitoring treatment from non-specific to highly targeted killing of tumor cells. In the past few decades, a number of inorganic materials have been investigated such as calcium phosphate, gold, carbon materials, silicon oxide, iron oxide, and layered double hydroxide (LDH) for examining their efficacy in targeting drug delivery. The reason behind the selection of these inorganic materials was their versatile and unique features efficient in drug delivery, such as wide availability, rich surface functionality, good biocompatibility, potential for target delivery, and controlled release of the drug from these inorganic nanomaterials. Although, the drug-LDH hybrids are found to be quite instrumental because of their application as advanced anti-cancer drug delivery systems, there has not been much research on them. This mini review is set to highlight the advancement made in the use of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as anti-cancer drug delivery agents. Along with the advantages of LDHs as anti-cancer drug delivery agents, the process of interaction of some of the common anti-cancer drugs with LDH has also been discussed.

  8. Targeting Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases for Anticancer Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Latanya. M.; Lawrence, Harshani. R.; Sebti, Saïd. M.; Lawrence, Nicholas. J.; Wu, Jie.

    2010-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are a diverse family of enzymes encoded by 107 genes in the human genome. Together with protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), PTPs regulate various cellular activities essential for the initiation and maintenance of malignant phenotypes. While PTK inhibitors are now used routinely for cancer treatment, the PTP inhibitor development field is still in the discovery phase. In this article, the suitability of targeting PTPs for novel anticancer drug discovery is discussed. Examples are presented for PTPs that have been targeted for anticancer drug discovery as well as potential new PTP targets for novel anticancer drug discovery. PMID:20337577

  9. A review of ceramide analogs as potential anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiawang; Beckman, Barbara S.; Foroozesh, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ceramide serves as a central mediator in sphingolipid metabolism and signaling pathways, regulating many fundamental cellular responses. It is referred to as a “tumor suppressor lipid”, since it powerfully potentiates signaling events which drive apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and autophagic responses. In the typical cancer cell, ceramide levels and signaling are usually suppressed by over-expression of ceramide-metabolizing enzymes or down-regulation of ceramide-generating enzymes. However, chemotherapeutic drugs as well as radiotherapy increase intracellular ceramide levels while exogenously treating cancer cells with short-chain ceramides leads to anti-cancer effects. All evidence currently points to the fact that the up-regulation of ceramide level is a promising anti-cancer target. In this review, we exhibited a full scroll of anti-cancer ceramide analogs as down-stream receptor agonists and ceramide metabolizing enzyme inhibitors. PMID:23919551

  10. Cullin-RING Ligases as Attractive Anti-cancer Targets

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongchao; Sun, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) promotes the timely degradation of short-lived proteins with key regulatory roles in a vast array of biological processes, such as cell cycle progression, oncogenesis and genome integrity. Thus, abnormal regulation of UPS disrupts the protein homeostasis and causes many human diseases, particularly cancer. Indeed, the FDA approval of bortezomib, the first class of general proteasome inhibitor, for the treatment of multiple myeloma, demonstrated that the UPS can be an attractive anti-cancer target. However, normal cell toxicity associated with bortezomib, resulting from global inhibition of protein degradation, promotes the focus of drug discovery efforts on targeting enzymes upstream of the proteasome for better specificity. E3 ubiquitin ligases, particularly those known to be activated in human cancer, become an attractive choice. Cullin-RING Ligases (CRLs) with multiple components are the largest family of E3 ubiquitin ligases and are responsible for ubiquitination of ~20% of cellular proteins degraded through UPS. Activity of CRLs is dynamically regulated and requires the RING component and cullin neddylation. In this review, we will introduce the UPS and CRL E3s and discuss the biological processes regulated by each of eight CRLs through substrate degradation. We will further discuss how cullin neddylation controls CRL activity, and how CRLs are being validated as the attractive cancer targets by abrogating the RING component through genetic means and by inhibiting cullin neddylation via MLN4924, a small molecule indirect inhibitor of CRLs, currently in several Phase I clinical trials. Finally, we will discuss current efforts and future perspectives on the development of additional inhibitors of CRLs by targeting E2 and/or E3 of cullin neddylation and CRL-mediated ubiquitination as potential anti-cancer agents. PMID:23151137

  11. Adherence enhancing interventions for oral anticancer agents: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mathes, Tim; Antoine, Sunya-Lee; Pieper, Dawid; Eikermann, Michaela

    2014-02-01

    The use of oral anticancer agents has increased in the last decades. Adherence is a crucial factor for the success of oral anticancer agent therapy. However, many patients are non-adherent. The objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of adherence interventions in patients taking oral anticancer agents. A systematic literature search was performed in Medline and Embase. Titles and abstracts and in case of potential relevance, full-texts were assessed for eligibility according to the predefined inclusion criteria. The study quality was evaluated. Both process steps were carried out independently by two reviewers. Relevant data on study design, patients, interventions and results were extracted in standardized tables by one reviewer and checked by a second reviewer. Six controlled studies were included. Only one study was randomized. The study quality was moderate to low. One study showed statistically significant results in favor of the adherence intervention, two studies showed a tendency in favor of the intervention, one study showed an inconsistent result depending on the adherence definition and one study showed almost identical adherence rates in both groups. One study showed a tendency in favor of the control group. Although most of the interventions are not very effective, it appears that certain adherence enhancing interventions could have a promising effect. One crucial point is the consideration of the baseline adherence when choosing patients to avoid ceiling effects. The evidence is limited due to lack of sufficient studies and partly inconsistent results. Further high quality studies are needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Magnetic polymer nanospheres for anticancer drug targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juríková, A.; Csach, K.; Koneracká, M.; Závišová, V.; Múčková, M.; Tomašovičová, N.; Lancz, G.; Kopčanský, P.; Timko, M.; Miškuf, J.

    2010-01-01

    Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) polymer (PLGA) nanospheres loaded with biocom-patible magnetic fluid as a magnetic carrier and anticancer drug Taxol were prepared by the modified nanoprecipitation method with size of 200-250 nm in diameter. The PLGA polymer was utilized as a capsulation material due to its biodegradability and biocompatibility. Taxol as an important anticancer drug was chosen for its significant role against a wide range of tumours. Thermal properties of the drug-polymer system were characterized using thermal analysis methods. It was determined the solubility of Taxol in PLGA nanospheres. Magnetic properties investigated using SQUID magnetometry showed superparamagnetism of the prepared magnetic polymer nanospheres.

  13. Oxidative phosphorylation-dependent regulation of cancer cell apoptosis in response to anticancer agents

    DOE PAGES

    Yadav, N.; Kumar, S.; Marlowe, T.; ...

    2015-11-05

    Cancer cells tend to develop resistance to various types of anticancer agents, whether they adopt similar or distinct mechanisms to evade cell death in response to a broad spectrum of cancer therapeutics is not fully defined. Current study concludes that DNA-damaging agents (etoposide and doxorubicin), ER stressor (thapsigargin), and histone deacetylase inhibitor (apicidin) target oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for apoptosis induction, whereas other anticancer agents including staurosporine, taxol, and sorafenib induce apoptosis in an OXPHOS-independent manner. DNA-damaging agents promoted mitochondrial biogenesis accompanied by increased accumulation of cellular and mitochondrial ROS, mitochondrial protein-folding machinery, and mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Induction of mitochondrialmore » biogenesis occurred in a caspase activation-independent mechanism but was reduced by autophagy inhibition and p53-deficiency. Abrogation of complex-I blocked DNA-damage-induced caspase activation and apoptosis, whereas inhibition of complex-II or a combined deficiency of OXPHOS complexes I, III, IV, and V due to impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis did not modulate caspase activity. Mechanistic analysis revealed that inhibition of caspase activation in response to anticancer agents associates with decreased release of mitochondrial cytochrome c in complex-I-deficient cells compared with wild type (WT) cells. Gross OXPHOS deficiencies promoted increased release of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria compared with WT or complex-I-deficient cells, suggesting that cells harboring defective OXPHOS trigger caspase-dependent as well as caspase-independent apoptosis in response to anticancer agents. Interestingly, DNA-damaging agent doxorubicin showed strong binding to mitochondria, which was disrupted by complex-I-deficiency but not by complex-II-deficiency. Thapsigargin-induced caspase activation was reduced upon abrogation of complex-I or gross OXPHOS

  14. Oxidative phosphorylation-dependent regulation of cancer cell apoptosis in response to anticancer agents

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, N.; Kumar, S.; Marlowe, T.; Chaudhary, A. K.; Kumar, R.; Wang, J.; O'Malley, J.; Boland, P. M.; Jayanthi, S.; Kumar, T. K. S.; Yadava, N.; Chandra, D.

    2015-11-05

    Cancer cells tend to develop resistance to various types of anticancer agents, whether they adopt similar or distinct mechanisms to evade cell death in response to a broad spectrum of cancer therapeutics is not fully defined. Current study concludes that DNA-damaging agents (etoposide and doxorubicin), ER stressor (thapsigargin), and histone deacetylase inhibitor (apicidin) target oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for apoptosis induction, whereas other anticancer agents including staurosporine, taxol, and sorafenib induce apoptosis in an OXPHOS-independent manner. DNA-damaging agents promoted mitochondrial biogenesis accompanied by increased accumulation of cellular and mitochondrial ROS, mitochondrial protein-folding machinery, and mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Induction of mitochondrial biogenesis occurred in a caspase activation-independent mechanism but was reduced by autophagy inhibition and p53-deficiency. Abrogation of complex-I blocked DNA-damage-induced caspase activation and apoptosis, whereas inhibition of complex-II or a combined deficiency of OXPHOS complexes I, III, IV, and V due to impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis did not modulate caspase activity. Mechanistic analysis revealed that inhibition of caspase activation in response to anticancer agents associates with decreased release of mitochondrial cytochrome c in complex-I-deficient cells compared with wild type (WT) cells. Gross OXPHOS deficiencies promoted increased release of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria compared with WT or complex-I-deficient cells, suggesting that cells harboring defective OXPHOS trigger caspase-dependent as well as caspase-independent apoptosis in response to anticancer agents. Interestingly, DNA-damaging agent doxorubicin showed strong binding to mitochondria, which was disrupted by complex-I-deficiency but not by complex-II-deficiency. Thapsigargin-induced caspase activation was reduced upon abrogation of complex-I or gross OXPHOS deficiency

  15. Oxidative phosphorylation-dependent regulation of cancer cell apoptosis in response to anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, N; Kumar, S; Marlowe, T; Chaudhary, A K; Kumar, R; Wang, J; O'Malley, J; Boland, P M; Jayanthi, S; Kumar, T K S; Yadava, N; Chandra, D

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells tend to develop resistance to various types of anticancer agents, whether they adopt similar or distinct mechanisms to evade cell death in response to a broad spectrum of cancer therapeutics is not fully defined. Current study concludes that DNA-damaging agents (etoposide and doxorubicin), ER stressor (thapsigargin), and histone deacetylase inhibitor (apicidin) target oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for apoptosis induction, whereas other anticancer agents including staurosporine, taxol, and sorafenib induce apoptosis in an OXPHOS-independent manner. DNA-damaging agents promoted mitochondrial biogenesis accompanied by increased accumulation of cellular and mitochondrial ROS, mitochondrial protein-folding machinery, and mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Induction of mitochondrial biogenesis occurred in a caspase activation-independent mechanism but was reduced by autophagy inhibition and p53-deficiency. Abrogation of complex-I blocked DNA-damage-induced caspase activation and apoptosis, whereas inhibition of complex-II or a combined deficiency of OXPHOS complexes I, III, IV, and V due to impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis did not modulate caspase activity. Mechanistic analysis revealed that inhibition of caspase activation in response to anticancer agents associates with decreased release of mitochondrial cytochrome c in complex-I-deficient cells compared with wild type (WT) cells. Gross OXPHOS deficiencies promoted increased release of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria compared with WT or complex-I-deficient cells, suggesting that cells harboring defective OXPHOS trigger caspase-dependent as well as caspase-independent apoptosis in response to anticancer agents. Interestingly, DNA-damaging agent doxorubicin showed strong binding to mitochondria, which was disrupted by complex-I-deficiency but not by complex-II-deficiency. Thapsigargin-induced caspase activation was reduced upon abrogation of complex-I or gross OXPHOS deficiency

  16. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ciardiello, F

    2000-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-driven autocrine growth pathway has been implicated in the development and progression of the majority of the most common human epithelial cancers, making the blockade of this growth pathway a promising anticancer therapeutic strategy. Different approaches have been developed to block EGFR activation and/or function in cancer cells. In the past 15 years, various anti-EGFR blocking monoclonal antibodies (MAb), recombinant proteins containing transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFalpha) or EGF fused to toxins, and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been generated and their biological and potentially therapeutic properties characterised. One of these agents, MAb IMC-C225, a chimeric human-mouse IgG1 MAb, is the first anti-EGFR agent to enter phase II to III clinical trials in patients with cancer. Several small compounds that block the ligand-induced activation of the EGFR tyrosine kinase have been developed. Among these EGFR-TKIs, various quinazoline-derived agents have been synthesised and have shown promising activity as anticancer agents in preclinical models. ZD1839 ('Iressa'), an anilinoquinazoline, is an orally active, selective EGFR-TKI which is currently under clinical evaluation in phase II to III clinical trials in patients with cancer. Preclinical data for ZD1839 strongly support the possibility of potentiating the antitumour activity of conventional chemotherapy with agents that selectively block the EGFR.

  17. Recent advances in oral anticancer agents for colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Raj Kumar

    2013-12-01

    To provide therapeutic alternatives to intravenous colon chemotherapy major recent research is focusing on the development of oral chemotherapeutic agents with the intention to improve the quality of life of patients. Initially 5-fluorouracil was most commonly used for the treatment of colorectal cancer but currently oxaliplatin and irinotecan are also available. The majority of these new drugs are pyrimidines and their analogs. The rationale for using oral anticancer agents is discussed and new drugs, such as farnesyl protein transferase inhibitor S-1, rubitecan, ZD9331, MMI-166, eflornithine, sulindac, and oral camptothecin analogs, among others, are presented with the results of their preclinical and clinical developments. This article focuses on the advancement of clinical development and also discusses the relative merits and demerits of these agents. The accelerated approval of these agents by regulatory authorities is supported by survival benefit, response rate and time to progression.

  18. Identification of 4-arylidene curcumin analogues as novel proteasome inhibitors for potential anticancer agents targeting 19S regulatory particle associated deubiquitinase.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xin; Zuo, Yinglin; Ke, Hongpeng; Luo, Jiaming; Lou, Lanlan; Qin, Wenjing; Wang, Youqiao; Liu, Ziyi; Chen, Daoyuan; Sun, Haixia; Zheng, Weichao; Zhu, Cuige; Wang, Ruimin; Wen, Gesi; Du, Jun; Zhou, Binhua; Bu, Xianzhang

    2017-08-01

    The proteasomal 19S regulatory particle (RP) associated deubiquitinases (DUBs) have attracted much attention owing to their potential as a therapeutic target for cancer therapy. Identification of new entities against 19S RP associated DUBs and illustration of the underlying mechanisms is crucial for discovery of novel proteasome blockers. In this study, a series of 4-arylidene curcumin analogues were identified as potent proteasome inhibitor by preferentially blocking deubiquitinase function of proteasomal 19S RP with moderate 20S CP inhibition. The most active compound 33 exhibited a major inhibitory effect on 19S RP-associated ubiquitin-specific proteases 14, along with a minor effect on ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase 5, which resulted in dysfunction of proteasome, and subsequently accumulated ubiquitinated proteins (such as IκB) in several cancer cells. Remarkably, though both 19S RP and 20S CP inhibition induced significantly endoplasmic reticulum stress and triggered caspase-12/9 pathway activation to promote cancer cell apoptosis, the 19S RP inhibition by 33 avoided slow onset time, Bcl-2 overexpression, and PERK-phosphorylation, which contribute to the deficiencies of clinical drug Bortezomib. These systematic studies provided insights in the development of novel proteasome inhibitors for cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Adding pharmacogenomics to the development of new marine-derived anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Jimeno, José; Aracil, Miguel; Tercero, Juan Carlos

    2006-01-01

    Nature has always been a highly productive tool in the development of anticancer therapies. Renewed interest in the potential of this tool has recently been sparked by the realization that the marine ecosystem can be used for the discovery and development of new compounds with clinical potential in advanced resistant tumors. These compounds can be incorporated into combination approaches in a chronic therapy scenario. Our marine anticancer program is using the sea to develop new agents with activity in resistant solid tumors and to identify new cellular targets for therapeutic intervention. This review describes the integration of different pharmacogenomic tools in the development of Yondelis™, Aplidin® and Kahalalide F, three marine-derived compounds currently in Phase II or III development. Our results are reinforcing the targeted selectivity of these agents and opening the gates for customized therapies in cancer patients in the near future. PMID:16401350

  20. New anticancer agents: role of clinical pharmacy services.

    PubMed

    Leveque, Dominique; Delpeuch, Amina; Gourieux, Benedicte

    2014-04-01

    Clinical pharmacy (or clinical pharmacy services) aims to contribute to safe medication use by providing comprehensive management to patients and medical staff, both in the community and the hospital. In oncology, these services include comprehensive medication reviews integrating chemotherapy, supportive care and ambulatory treatment for co-morbidities, medication information for the medical staff and patients, therapeutic drug monitoring (anticancer agents, anti-infective agents, immunosuppressive drugs in recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplantation), supportive care counseling (nutritional support, pain management, chemotherapy side-effects prophylaxis and treatment), elaboration of therapeutic guidelines, optimal use of economic resources. With regard to new anticancer agents, pharmacists both in the community and in hospitals are faced with a growing body of complex information as well as the development of ambulatory treatment (oral agents, subcutaneous administration). Clinical pharmacists with oncology training have the potential to optimize drug use both in the hospital and the community. With the understanding and recognition of drug interactions and side-effects, pharmacists can provide timely interventions and information to health providers, as well as counseling to patients.

  1. Discovery of new anticancer agents from higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li; Chai, Hee-Byung; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2012-01-01

    1. ABSTRACT Small organic molecules derived from higher plants have been one of the mainstays of cancer chemotherapy for approximately the past half a century. In the present review, selected single chemical entity natural products of plant origin and their semi-synthetic derivatives currently in clinical trials are featured as examples of new cancer chemotherapeutic drug candidates. Several more recently isolated compounds obtained from plants showing promising in vivo biological activity are also discussed in terms of their potential as anticancer agents, with many of these obtained from species that grow in tropical regions. Since extracts of only a relatively small proportion of the ca. 300,000 higher plants on earth have been screened biologically to date, bioactive compounds from plants should play an important role in future anticancer drug discovery efforts. PMID:22202049

  2. Resveratrol as an anti-cancer agent: A review.

    PubMed

    Rauf, Abdur; Imran, Muhammad; Butt, Masood Sadiq; Nadeem, Muhammad; Peters, Dennis G; Mubarak, Mohammad S

    2016-12-21

    Owing to their antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activity, grapes (Vitis vinifera L.) are the archetypal paradigms of fruits used not only for nutritional purposes, but also for exclusive therapeutics. Grapes are a prominent and promising source of phytochemicals, especially resveratrol, a phytoalexin antioxidant found in red grapes which has both chemopreventive and therapeutic effects against various ailments. Resveratrol's role in reducing different human cancers, including breast, cervical, uterine, blood, kidney, liver, eye, bladder, thyroid, esophageal, prostate, brain, lung, skin, gastric, colon, head and neck, bone, ovarian, and cervical, has been reviewed. This review covers the literature that deals with the anti-cancer mechanism of resveratrol with special reference to antioxidant potential. Furthermore, this article summarizes the literature pertaining to resveratrol as an anti-cancer agent.

  3. Pharmacophore modeling and in silico toxicity assessment of potential anticancer agents from African medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Simoben, Conrad Veranso; Karaman, Berin; Ngwa, Valery Fuh; Judson, Philip Neville; Sippl, Wolfgang; Mbaze, Luc Meva’a

    2016-01-01

    Molecular modeling has been employed in the search for lead compounds of chemotherapy to fight cancer. In this study, pharmacophore models have been generated and validated for use in virtual screening protocols for eight known anticancer drug targets, including tyrosine kinase, protein kinase B β, cyclin-dependent kinase, protein farnesyltransferase, human protein kinase, glycogen synthase kinase, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1. Pharmacophore models were validated through receiver operating characteristic and Güner–Henry scoring methods, indicating that several of the models generated could be useful for the identification of potential anticancer agents from natural product databases. The validated pharmacophore models were used as three-dimensional search queries for virtual screening of the newly developed AfroCancer database (~400 compounds from African medicinal plants), along with the Naturally Occurring Plant-based Anticancer Compound-Activity-Target dataset (comprising ~1,500 published naturally occurring plant-based compounds from around the world). Additionally, an in silico assessment of toxicity of the two datasets was carried out by the use of 88 toxicity end points predicted by the Lhasa’s expert knowledge-based system (Derek), showing that only an insignificant proportion of the promising anticancer agents would be likely showing high toxicity profiles. A diversity study of the two datasets, carried out using the analysis of principal components from the most important physicochemical properties often used to access drug-likeness of compound datasets, showed that the two datasets do not occupy the same chemical space. PMID:27445461

  4. Pharmacophore modeling and in silico toxicity assessment of potential anticancer agents from African medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Simoben, Conrad Veranso; Karaman, Berin; Ngwa, Valery Fuh; Judson, Philip Neville; Sippl, Wolfgang; Mbaze, Luc Meva'a

    2016-01-01

    Molecular modeling has been employed in the search for lead compounds of chemotherapy to fight cancer. In this study, pharmacophore models have been generated and validated for use in virtual screening protocols for eight known anticancer drug targets, including tyrosine kinase, protein kinase B β, cyclin-dependent kinase, protein farnesyltransferase, human protein kinase, glycogen synthase kinase, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1. Pharmacophore models were validated through receiver operating characteristic and Güner-Henry scoring methods, indicating that several of the models generated could be useful for the identification of potential anticancer agents from natural product databases. The validated pharmacophore models were used as three-dimensional search queries for virtual screening of the newly developed AfroCancer database (~400 compounds from African medicinal plants), along with the Naturally Occurring Plant-based Anticancer Compound-Activity-Target dataset (comprising ~1,500 published naturally occurring plant-based compounds from around the world). Additionally, an in silico assessment of toxicity of the two datasets was carried out by the use of 88 toxicity end points predicted by the Lhasa's expert knowledge-based system (Derek), showing that only an insignificant proportion of the promising anticancer agents would be likely showing high toxicity profiles. A diversity study of the two datasets, carried out using the analysis of principal components from the most important physicochemical properties often used to access drug-likeness of compound datasets, showed that the two datasets do not occupy the same chemical space.

  5. Novel epigallocatechin gallate analogs as potential anticancer agents: a patent review (2009 – present)

    PubMed Central

    Landis-Piwowar, Kristin; Chen, Di; Foldes, Robert; Chan, Tak-Hang; Dou, Qing Ping

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Over the past three years numerous patents and patent applications have been published relating to scientific advances in the use of the green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) (the most abundant, and bioactive compound in green tea) and its analogs as anticancer agents. EGCG affects multiple molecular targets involved in cancer cell proliferation and survival; however, polyphenolic catechins, such as EGCG, generally exhibit poor oral bioavailability. Since the anticancer activity of polyphenols largely depends on their susceptibility to biotransformation reactions, numerous EGCG derivatives, analogs and prodrugs have been designed to improve the stability, bioavailability and anticancer potency of the native compound. Areas covered This review focuses on the applications of EGCG and its analogs, derivatives and prodrugs in the prevention and treatment of human cancers. A comprehensive description of patents related to EGCG and its derivatives, analogs and prodrugs and their uses as anticancer agents is included. Expert opinion EGCG targets multiple essential survival proteins and pathways in human cancer cells. Because it is unstable physiologically, numerous alterations to the EGCG molecule have been patented, either to improve the integrity of the native compound or to generate a more stable yet similarly efficacious molecule. EGCG and its derivatives, analogs and prodrugs could be developed into future drugs for chemoprevention, chemosensitization, radiosensitization and/or cancer interception. PMID:23230990

  6. The potential of combi-molecules with DNA-damaging function as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guohui; Fan, Tengjiao; Zhao, Lijiao; Zhou, Yue; Zhong, Rugang

    2017-03-01

    DNA-damaging agents, such as methylating agents, chloroethylating agents and platinum-based agents, have been extensively used as anticancer drugs. However, the side effects, high toxicity, lack of selectivity and resistance severely limit their clinical applications. In recent years, a strategy combining a DNA-damaging agent with a bioactive molecule (e.g., enzyme inhibitors) or carrier (e.g., steroid hormone and DNA intercalators) to produce a new 'combi-molecule' with improved efficacy or selectivity has been attempted to overcome these drawbacks. The combi-molecule simultaneously acts on two targets and is expected to possess better potency than the parent compounds. Many studies have shown DNA-damaging combi-molecules exhibiting excellent anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. This review focuses on the development of combi-molecules, which possess increased DNA-damaging potency, anticancer efficacy and tumor selectivity and reduced side reactions than the parent compounds. The future opportunities and challenges in the discovery of combi-molecules were also discussed.

  7. A pharmacological approach for the selection of potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Double, John A

    2004-09-01

    Historically, the process of developing new anticancer agents was largely empirical. Today, because of improvements in our knowledge of the molecular processes involved in the development of cancer, the process of developing new agents is becoming more rational. Researchers from Cancer Research UK, the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer and the National Cancer Institute have shown that, by undertaking a pharmacological approach to the selection of potential anticancer agents, both meaningful antitumour data and an 80% reduction in animal usage can be obtained. It has also been demonstrated that a new pharmacological tool, the "hollow fibre system", in which tumour cells are grown in biocompatible fibres which are implanted into mice, can be used to produce meaningful antitumour data with pharmacodynamic endpoints. By increasing the amount of data that can be obtained from a single animal and opening up the possibility of eliminating the need for untreated control animals, the hollow fibre system has the potential to make a significant contribution to both reduction and refinement.

  8. Discovery and Evaluation of PRL Trimer Disruptors for Novel Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yunpeng; Yu, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of PRL phosphatases (PRL1, PRL2, and PRL3) has been found in a variety of late-stage tumors and their distant metastatic sites. Therefore, the oncogenic PRL phosphatases represent intriguing targets for cancer therapy. There is considerable interest in identifying small molecule inhibitors targeting PRLs as novel anticancer agents. However, it has been difficult to acquire phosphatase activity-based PRL inhibitors due to the unusual wide and shallow catalytic pockets of PRLs revealed by crystal structure studies. Here, we present a novel method to identify PRL1 inhibitors by targeting the PRL1 trimer interface and the procedure to characterize their biochemical and cellular activity.

  9. New Molecular Targets of Anticancer Therapy - Current Status and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Marianna; Muszalska, Izabela; Jelinska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Molecularly targeted anticancer therapy involves the use of drugs or other substances affecting specific molecular targets that play a part in the development, progression and spread of a given neoplasm. By contrast, the majority of classical chemotherapeutics act on all rapidly proliferating cells, both healthy and cancerous ones. Target anticancer drugs are designed to achieve a particular aim and they usually act cytostatically, not cytotoxically like classical chemotherapeutics. At present, more than 300 biological molecular targets have been identified. The proteins involved in cellular metabolism include (among others) receptor proteins, signal transduction proteins, mRNA thread matrix synthesis proteins participating in neoplastic transformation, cell cycle control proteins, functional and structural proteins. The receptor proteins that are targeted by currently used anticancer drugs comprise the epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor(VEGFR). Target anticancer drugs may affect extracellular receptor domains (antibodies) or intracellular receptor domains (tyrosine kinase inhibitors). The blocking of the mRNA thread containing information about the structure of oncogenes (signal transduction proteins) is another molecular target of anticancer drugs. That type of treatment, referred to as antisense therapy, is in clinical trials. When the synthesis of genetic material is disturbed, in most cases the passage to the next cycle phase is blocked. The key proteins responsible for the blockage are cyclines and cycline- dependent kinases (CDK). Clinical trials are focused on natural and synthetic substances capable of blocking various CDKs. The paper discusses the molecular targets and chemical structure of target anticancer drugs that have been approved for and currently applied in antineoplastic therapy together with indications and contraindications for their

  10. Molecular targets and anticancer potential of sanguinarine-a benzophenanthridine alkaloid.

    PubMed

    Galadari, Sehamuddin; Rahman, Anees; Pallichankandy, Siraj; Thayyullathil, Faisal

    2017-10-15

    Cancer is an enormous global health burden, and should be effectively addressed with better therapeutic strategies. Currently, over 60% of the clinically approved anticancer agents are either directly isolated from natural sources or are modified from natural lead molecules. Sanguinarine (SNG), a quaternary benzophenanthridine alkaloid has gained increasing attention in recent years as a potential anticancer agent. There is a large untapped source of phytochemical-based anticancer agents remaining to be explored. This review article aims to recapitulate different anticancer properties of SNG, and describes some of the molecular targets involved in exerting its effect. It also depicts the pharmacokinetic and toxicological properties of SNG, two parameters important in determining the druggability of a molecule. Numerous in vivo and in vitro published studies have signified the anticancer properties of SNG. In order to collate and decipher these properties, an extensive literature search was conducted in PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Scopus using keywords followed by the evaluation of the relevant articles where the relevant reports are integrated and analyzed. Apart from inducing cell death, SNG inhibits pro-tumorigenic processes such as invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis in different cancers. Moreover, SNG has been shown to synergistically enhance the sensitivity of several chemotherapeutic agents and is effective against a variety of multi-drug resistant cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Discovery of Anticancer Agents of Diverse Natural Origin

    PubMed Central

    KINGHORN, A. DOUGLAS; CARCACHE DE BLANCO, ESPERANZA J.; LUCAS, DAVID M.; RAKOTONDRAIBE, H. LIVA; ORJALA, JIMMY; SOEJARTO, D. DOEL; OBERLIES, NICHOLAS H.; PEARCE, CEDRIC J.; WANI, MANSUKH C.; STOCKWELL, BRENT R.; BURDETTE, JOANNA E.; SWANSON, STEVEN M.; FUCHS, JAMES R.; PHELPS, MITCHELL A.; XU, LIHUI; ZHANG, XIAOLI; SHEN, YOUNG YONGCHUN

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress is described in an ongoing collaborative multidisciplinary research project directed towards the purification, structural characterization, chemical modification, and biological evaluation of new potential natural product anticancer agents obtained from a diverse group of organisms, comprising tropical plants, aquatic and terrestrial cyanobacteria, and filamentous fungi. Information is provided on how these organisms are collected and processed. The types of bioassays are indicated in which initial extracts, chromatographic fractions, and purified isolated compounds of these acquisitions are tested. Several promising biologically active lead compounds from each major organism major class investigated are described, and these may be seen to be representative of very wide chemical diversity. PMID:27793884

  12. Quinolones in the Search for New Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Batalha, Pedro Netto; Vieira de Souza, Maria Cecília Bastos; Peña-Cabrera, Eduardo; Cruz, David Cruz; da Costa Santos Boechat, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Quinolones have a large bio-dynamicity. Although they are well known as antibacterials, another important activity has been investigated - quinolones are able to inhibit cancer cell proliferation. In view of the great versatility associated with the synthesis of quinolones, many researchers have spent time and resources on the development of new structurally diversified quinolone derivatives with the purpose of finding new possibilities for cancer treatment. In this review some of the most recent advances in the search for new quinolone anticancer agents are highlighted, with focus on naturally occurring substances, bioactive metal complexes, molecular hybrids, photosensitizers and heterocycle condensed quinolones.

  13. Neurotoxicity of Biologically Targeted Agents in Pediatric Cancer Trials

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Elizabeth M.; Rao, Amulya A. Nageswara; Scafidi, Joseph; Packer, Roger J.

    2013-01-01

    Biologically targeted agents offer the promise of delivering specific anticancer effects while limiting damage to healthy tissue, including the central and peripheral nervous systems. During the past 5-10 years, these agents were examined in preclinical and adult clinical trials, and are used with increasing frequency in children with cancer. This review evaluates current knowledge about neurotoxicity from biologically targeted anticancer agents, particularly those in pediatric clinical trials. For each drug, neurotoxicity data are reviewed in adult (particularly studies of brain tumors) and pediatric studies when available. Overall, these agents are well tolerated, with few serious neurotoxic effects. Data from younger patients are limited, and more neurotoxicity may occur in the pediatric population because these agents target pathways that control not only tumorigenesis but also neural maturation. Further investigation is needed into long-term neurologic effects, particularly in children. PMID:22490765

  14. Mitochondria and Mitochondrial ROS in Cancer: Novel Targets for Anticancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuhui; Karakhanova, Svetlana; Hartwig, Werner; D'Haese, Jan G; Philippov, Pavel P; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondria are indispensable for energy metabolism, apoptosis regulation, and cell signaling. Mitochondria in malignant cells differ structurally and functionally from those in normal cells and participate actively in metabolic reprogramming. Mitochondria in cancer cells are characterized by reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction, which promotes cancer development by inducing genomic instability, modifying gene expression, and participating in signaling pathways. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA mutations caused by oxidative damage that impair the oxidative phosphorylation process will result in further mitochondrial ROS production, completing the "vicious cycle" between mitochondria, ROS, genomic instability, and cancer development. The multiple essential roles of mitochondria have been utilized for designing novel mitochondria-targeted anticancer agents. Selective drug delivery to mitochondria helps to increase specificity and reduce toxicity of these agents. In order to reduce mitochondrial ROS production, mitochondria-targeted antioxidants can specifically accumulate in mitochondria by affiliating to a lipophilic penetrating cation and prevent mitochondria from oxidative damage. In consistence with the oncogenic role of ROS, mitochondria-targeted antioxidants are found to be effective in cancer prevention and anticancer therapy. A better understanding of the role played by mitochondria in cancer development will help to reveal more therapeutic targets, and will help to increase the activity and selectivity of mitochondria-targeted anticancer drugs. In this review we summarized the impact of mitochondria on cancer and gave summary about the possibilities to target mitochondria for anticancer therapies. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2570-2581, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. In vitro evaluation of a combination treatment involving anticancer agents and an aurora kinase B inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Senna; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Nakayama, Yoshifumi; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Harada, Yoshikazu; Koi, Chiho; Kurata, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Yasuo

    2016-11-01

    Aurora kinase B (AURKB) inhibitors are regarded as potential molecular-targeting drugs for cancer therapy. The present study evaluated the cytotoxic effect of a combination of AZD1152-hQPA, an AURKB inhibitor, and various anticancer agents on the HeLa human cervical cancer cell line, as well as its cisplatin-resistant equivalent HCP4 cell line. It was demonstrated that AZD1152-hQPA had an antagonistic effect on the cytotoxicity of cisplatin, etoposide and doxorubicin, but had a synergistic effect on that of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), Am80 and TAC-101, when tested on HeLa cells. Cisplatin, etoposide and doxorubicin were shown to increase the cellular expression of AURKB, while ATRA, Am80 and TAC-101 downregulated its expression. These results suggested that AURKB expression is regulated by these anticancer agents at the transcriptional level, and that the level of expression of AURKB may influence the cytotoxic effect of AZD1152-hQPA. Therefore, when using anticancer agents, decreasing the expression of AURKB using a molecular-targeting drug may be an optimal therapeutic strategy.

  16. In vitro evaluation of a combination treatment involving anticancer agents and an aurora kinase B inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Senna; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Nakayama, Yoshifumi; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Harada, Yoshikazu; Koi, Chiho; Kurata, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Aurora kinase B (AURKB) inhibitors are regarded as potential molecular-targeting drugs for cancer therapy. The present study evaluated the cytotoxic effect of a combination of AZD1152-hQPA, an AURKB inhibitor, and various anticancer agents on the HeLa human cervical cancer cell line, as well as its cisplatin-resistant equivalent HCP4 cell line. It was demonstrated that AZD1152-hQPA had an antagonistic effect on the cytotoxicity of cisplatin, etoposide and doxorubicin, but had a synergistic effect on that of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), Am80 and TAC-101, when tested on HeLa cells. Cisplatin, etoposide and doxorubicin were shown to increase the cellular expression of AURKB, while ATRA, Am80 and TAC-101 downregulated its expression. These results suggested that AURKB expression is regulated by these anticancer agents at the transcriptional level, and that the level of expression of AURKB may influence the cytotoxic effect of AZD1152-hQPA. Therefore, when using anticancer agents, decreasing the expression of AURKB using a molecular-targeting drug may be an optimal therapeutic strategy. PMID:27895801

  17. Discovery and development of natural product oridonin-inspired anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ye; Ding, Chunyong; Ye, Na; Liu, Zhiqing; Wold, Eric A; Chen, Haiying; Wild, Christopher; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2016-10-21

    Natural products have historically been, and continue to be, an invaluable source for the discovery of various therapeutic agents. Oridonin, a natural diterpenoid widely applied in traditional Chinese medicines, exhibits a broad range of biological effects including anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities. To further improve its potency, aqueous solubility and bioavailability, the oridonin template serves as an exciting platform for drug discovery to yield better candidates with unique targets and enhanced drug properties. A number of oridonin derivatives (e.g. HAO472) have been designed and synthesized, and have contributed to substantial progress in the identification of new agents and relevant molecular mechanistic studies toward the treatment of human cancers and other diseases. This review summarizes the recent advances in medicinal chemistry on the explorations of novel oridonin analogues as potential anticancer therapeutics, and provides a detailed discussion of future directions for the development and progression of this class of molecules into the clinic.

  18. Mitosis-targeted anti-cancer therapies: where they stand

    PubMed Central

    Chan, K-S; Koh, C-G; Li, H-Y

    2012-01-01

    The strategy of clinically targeting cancerous cells at their most vulnerable state during mitosis has instigated numerous studies into the mitotic cell death (MCD) pathway. As the hallmark of cancer revolves around cell-cycle deregulation, it is not surprising that antimitotic therapies are effective against the abnormal proliferation of transformed cells. Moreover, these antimitotic drugs are also highly selective and sensitive. Despite the robust rate of discovery and the development of mitosis-selective inhibitors, the unpredictable complexities of the human body's response to these drugs still herald the biggest challenge towards clinical success. Undoubtedly, the need to bridge the gap between promising preclinical trials and effective translational bedside treatment prompts further investigations towards mapping out the mechanistic pathways of MCD, understanding how these drugs work as medicine in the body and more comprehensive target validations. In this review, current antimitotic agents are summarized with particular emphasis on the evaluation of their clinical efficacy as well as their limitations. In addition, we discuss the basis behind the lack of activity of these inhibitors in human trials and the potential and future directions of mitotic anticancer strategies. PMID:23076219

  19. Canonical and new generation anticancer drugs also target energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Reséndiz, Ileana; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; Pacheco-Velázquez, Silvia C; López-Ramírez, Sayra Y; Rumjanek, Franklin D; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2014-07-01

    Significant efforts have been made for the development of new anticancer drugs (protein kinase or proteasome inhibitors, monoclonal humanized antibodies) with presumably low or negligible side effects and high specificity. However, an in-depth analysis of the side effects of several currently used canonical (platin-based drugs, taxanes, anthracyclines, etoposides, antimetabolites) and new generation anticancer drugs as the first line of clinical treatment reveals significant perturbation of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation. Canonical and new generation drug side effects include decreased (1) intracellular ATP levels, (2) glycolytic/mitochondrial enzyme/transporter activities and/or (3) mitochondrial electrical membrane potentials. Furthermore, the anti-proliferative effects of these drugs are markedly attenuated in tumor rho (0) cells, in which functional mitochondria are absent; in addition, several anticancer drugs directly interact with isolated mitochondria affecting their functions. Therefore, several anticancer drugs also target the energy metabolism, and hence, the documented inhibitory effect of anticancer drugs on cancer growth should also be linked to the blocking of ATP supply pathways. These often overlooked effects of canonical and new generation anticancer drugs emphasize the role of energy metabolism in maintaining cancer cells viable and its targeting as a complementary and successful strategy for cancer treatment.

  20. New substituted 4H-chromenes as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shivaputra A; Wang, Jin; Li, Xiaochen S; Chen, Jianjun; Jones, Terreia S; Hosni-Ahmed, Amira; Patil, Renukadevi; Seibel, William L; Li, Wei; Miller, Duane D

    2012-07-01

    As a continuation of our efforts to discover and develop small molecules as anticancer agents, we identified GRI-394837 as an initial hit from similarity search on RGD and its analogs. Based on GRI-394837, we designed and synthesized a focused set of novel chromenes (4a-e) in a single step using microwave method. All five compounds showed activity in the nanomolar range (IC(50): 7.4-640 nM) in two melanoma, three prostate and four glioma cancer cell lines. The chromene 4e is active against all the cell lines and particularly against the A172 human glioma cell line (IC(50): 7.4 nM). Interestingly, in vitro tubulin polymerization assay shows 4e to be a weak tubulin polymerization inhibitor but it shows very strong cytotoxicity in cellular assays, therefore there must be additional unknown mechanism(s) for the anticancer activity. Additionally, the strong antiproliferative activity was verified by one of the selected chromene (4a) by the NCI 60 cell line screen. These results strongly suggest that the novel chromenes could be further developed as a potential therapeutic agent for a variety of aggressive cancers. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. New substituted 4H-chromenes as anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Shivaputra A.; Wang, Jin; Li, Xiaochen S.; Chen, Jianjun; Jones, Terreia S.; Hosni-Ahmed, Amira; Patil, Renukadevi; Seibel, William L.; Li, Wei; Miller, Duane D.

    2013-01-01

    As a continuation of our efforts to discover and develop small molecules as anticancer agents, we identified GRI-394837 as an initial hit from similarity search on RGD and its analogs. Based on GRI-394837, we designed and synthesized a focused set of novel chromenes (4a–e) in a single step using microwave method. All five compounds showed activity in the nanomolar range (IC50: 7.4–640 nM) in two melanoma, three prostate and four glioma cancer cell lines. The chromene 4e is active against all the cell lines and particularly against the A172 human glioma cell line (IC50: 7.4 nM). Interestingly, in vitro tubulin polymerization assay shows 4e to be a weak tubulin polymerization inhibitor but it shows very strong cytotoxicity in cellular assays, therefore there must be additional unknown mechanism(s) for the anticancer activity. Additionally, the strong antiproliferative activity was verified by one of the selected chromene (4a) by the NCI 60 cell line screen. These results strongly suggest that the novel chromenes could be further developed as a potential therapeutic agent for a variety of aggressive cancers. PMID:22608389

  2. Non-covalent carriage of anticancer agents by humanized antibody trastuzumab.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Arpita; Sharma, Sweta; Yadav, Veejendra Kumar

    2016-05-01

    This article explores the internalization and non-covalent carriage of small molecule anticancer agents like vinca alkaloids by humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab. Such carriage is marked by significant reduction in side effects and increased therapeutic value of these anticancer agents. This study is coherent with few clinical observations of enhanced efficiency of these anticancer agents when co-administered with therapeutic antibodies. This study will also serve as the foundation for screening a database of anticancer agents for possible compounds that may be co-delivered alongwith the antibody. Based on this study vincristine conformation inside antibody and its charge environment may be used as descriptors for screening purposes.

  3. Carnosol: A promising anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory agent

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeremy J.

    2011-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet and more specifically certain meats, fruits, vegetables, and olive oil found in certain parts of the Mediterranean region have been associated with a decreased cardiovascular and diabetes risk. More recently, several population based studies have observed with these lifestyle choices have reported an overall reduced risk for several cancers. One study in particular observed an inverse relationship between consumption of Mediterranean herbs such as rosemary, sage, parsley, and oregano with lung cancer. In light of these findings there is a need to explore and identify the anti-cancer properties of these medicincal herbs and to identify the phytochemicals therein. One agent in particular, carnosol, has been evaluated for anti-cancer property in prostate, breast, skin, leukemia, and colon cancer with promising results. These studies have provided evidence that carnosol targets multiple deregulated pathways associated with inflammation and cancer that include nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB), apoptotic related proteins, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3 K)/Akt, androgen and estrogen receptors, as well as molecular targets. In addition, carnosol appears to be well tolerated in that it has a selective toxicity towards cancer cells versus non-tumorigenic cells and is well tolerated when administered to animals. This mini-review reports on the pre-clinical studies that have been performed to date with carnosol describing mechanistic, efficacy, and safety/tolerability studies as a cancer chemoprevention and anti-cancer agent. PMID:21382660

  4. Comprehensive Review on Betulin as a Potent Anticancer Agent

    PubMed Central

    Kiełbus, Michał; Stepulak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Numerous plant-derived substances, and their derivatives, are effective antitumour and chemopreventive agents. Yet, there are also a plethora of tumour types that do not respond, or become resistant, to these natural substances. This requires the discovery of new active compounds. Betulin (BE) is a pentacyclic triterpene and secondary metabolite of plants abundantly found in the outer bark of the birch tree Betulaceae sp. BE displays a broad spectrum of biological and pharmacological properties, among which the anticancer and chemopreventive activity attract most of the attention. In this vein, BE and its natural and synthetic derivatives act specifically on cancer cells with low cytotoxicity towards normal cells. Although the antineoplastic mechanism of action of BE is not well understood yet, several interesting aspects of BE's interactions are coming to light. This review will summarize the anticancer and chemopreventive potential of BE in vitro and in vivo by carefully dissecting and comparing the doses and tumour lines used in previous studies, as well as focusing on mechanisms underlying its activity at cellular and molecular level, and discuss future prospects. PMID:25866796

  5. Monofunctional and Higher-Valent Platinum Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Timothy C.; Wilson, Justin J.

    2013-01-01

    Platinum compounds represent one of the great success stories of metals in medicine. Following the serendipitous discovery of the anticancer activity of cisplatin by Rosenberg, a large number of cisplatin variants have been prepared and tested for their ability to kill cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth. These efforts continue today with increased realization that new strategies are needed to overcome issues of toxicity and resistance inherent to treatment by the approved platinum anticancer agents. One approach has been the use of so-called “non-traditional” platinum(II) and platinum(IV) compounds that violate the structure-activity relationships that governed platinum drug-development research for many years. Another is the use of specialized drug delivery strategies. Here we describe recent developments from our laboratory involving monofunctional platinum(II) complexes together with an historical account of the manner by which we came to investigate these compounds and their relationship to previously studied molecules. We also discuss work carried out using platinum(IV) prodrugs and the development of nanoconstructs designed to deliver them in vivo. PMID:23738524

  6. Comprehensive review on betulin as a potent anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Król, Sylwia Katarzyna; Kiełbus, Michał; Rivero-Müller, Adolfo; Stepulak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Numerous plant-derived substances, and their derivatives, are effective antitumour and chemopreventive agents. Yet, there are also a plethora of tumour types that do not respond, or become resistant, to these natural substances. This requires the discovery of new active compounds. Betulin (BE) is a pentacyclic triterpene and secondary metabolite of plants abundantly found in the outer bark of the birch tree Betulaceae sp. BE displays a broad spectrum of biological and pharmacological properties, among which the anticancer and chemopreventive activity attract most of the attention. In this vein, BE and its natural and synthetic derivatives act specifically on cancer cells with low cytotoxicity towards normal cells. Although the antineoplastic mechanism of action of BE is not well understood yet, several interesting aspects of BE's interactions are coming to light. This review will summarize the anticancer and chemopreventive potential of BE in vitro and in vivo by carefully dissecting and comparing the doses and tumour lines used in previous studies, as well as focusing on mechanisms underlying its activity at cellular and molecular level, and discuss future prospects.

  7. Safe handling and administration considerations of oral anticancer agents in the clinical and home setting.

    PubMed

    Lester, Joanne

    2012-12-01

    The use of hormonal, chemotherapeutic, and targeted biologic oral agents has exponentially increased since the early 2000s. Oral therapies have the advantage of persistent exposure of the cytotoxic drug to tumor cells and the tumor environment. The use of oral anticancer agents provides therapeutic drug treatment for patients with cancer in the comfort of their home or alternative settings, such as retirement homes and assisted living or extended-care facilities. Practices to ensure safe storage, handling, administration, and disposal of oral agents are necessary to prevent additional exposure of hazardous substances to the environment, professionals, patients, family members, and caretakers. Providers should consider potential barriers to adherence and compliance, and develop strategies to ensure optimal therapeutic benefit prior to initiation of oral agents.

  8. Mitochondrial chaperones may be targets for anti-cancer drugs

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at NCI have found that a mitochondrial chaperone protein, TRAP1, may act indirectly as a tumor suppressor as well as a novel target for developing anti-cancer drugs. Chaperone proteins, such as TRAP1, help other proteins adapt to stress, but sc

  9. HB-EGF inhibition in combination with various anticancer agents enhances its antitumor effects in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Sanui, Ayako; Yotsumoto, Fusanori; Tsujioka, Hiroshi; Fukami, Tatsuya; Horiuchi, Shinji; Shirota, Kyoko; Yoshizato, Toshiyuki; Kawarabayashi, Tatsuhiko; Kuroki, Masahide; Miyamoto, Shingo

    2010-08-01

    Advanced gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most lethal malignancies. Although many anticancer agents exist for the treatment of GC, its prognosis remains extremely poor. Therefore, further development of targeted therapies is required for patients with GC. To assess the role of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) as a target for GC therapy, the expression of EGF receptor ligands in GC cell lines, and the antitumor effects of an HB-EGF inhibitor (CRM197) as a single agent and in combination with other anticancer agents was assessed in GC cells. HB-EGF was the predominantly expressed ligand among EGF receptor ligands in all the cells. CRM197 induced significant cell apoptosis. Anticancer agents augmented the secretion of HB-EGF into the medium and simultaneously induced cell apoptosis. Combination of CRM197 with other anticancer agents significantly enhanced cell apoptosis. Additionally, co-administration of CRM197 and paclitaxel resulted in synergistic antitumor effects. These results suggested that HB-EGF is a rational target for GC therapy.

  10. Phytochemicals and Biogenic Metallic Nanoparticles as Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Pasupuleti Visweswara; Nallappan, Devi; Madhavi, Kondeti; Rahman, Shafiqur; Jun Wei, Lim; Gan, Siew Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Several classes of drugs are available to treat different types of cancer. Currently, researchers are paying significant attention to the development of drugs at the nanoscale level to increase their target specificity and to reduce their concentrations. Nanotechnology is a promising and growing field with multiple subdisciplines, such as nanostructures, nanomaterials, and nanoparticles. These materials have gained prominence in science due to their size, shape, and potential efficacy. Nanomedicine is an important field involving the use of various types of nanoparticles to treat cancer and cancerous cells. Synthesis of nanoparticles targeting biological pathways has become tremendously prominent due to the higher efficacy and fewer side effects of nanodrugs compared to other commercial cancer drugs. In this review, different medicinal plants and their active compounds, as well as green-synthesized metallic nanoparticles from medicinal plants, are discussed in relation to their anticancer activities. PMID:27057273

  11. New gold carbene complexes as candidate anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Pratesi, Alessandro; Cirri, Damiano; Đurović, Mirjana D; Pillozzi, Serena; Petroni, Giulia; Bugarčić, Živadin D; Messori, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    Three structurally related gold(I) carbene complexes with bulky hydrophobic ligands i.e. 1-3 were investigated in solution for further consideration as candidate anticancer agents. Cytotoxic assays were subsequently conducted on bone marrow-derived preosteoclast cell line of human origin (FLG 29.1) and human colon cancer cells (HCT-116). A far greater cytotoxic activity was measured for compound 1 against HCT-116 cells compared to 2 and 3; conversely, all compounds were highly and similarly active against FLG 29.1 cells. Results obtained for the reaction of complexes 1 and 2 with RNase A documented the occurrence of a weak interaction with this model protein and the formation of a tiny amount of the corresponding adduct. Moreover, a certain reactivity of the complex 2 was also detected toward GSH. The general implications of the obtained results are discussed.

  12. Artemisinin as an anticancer drug: Recent advances in target profiling and mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yin Kwan; Xu, Chengchao; Kalesh, Karunakaran A; He, Yingke; Lin, Qingsong; Wong, W S Fred; Shen, Han-Ming; Wang, Jigang

    2017-06-23

    Artemisinin and its derivatives (collectively termed as artemisinins) are among the most important and effective antimalarial drugs, with proven safety and efficacy in clinical use. Beyond their antimalarial effects, artemisinins have also been shown to possess selective anticancer properties, demonstrating cytotoxic effects against a wide range of cancer types both in vitro and in vivo. These effects appear to be mediated by artemisinin-induced changes in multiple signaling pathways, interfering simultaneously with multiple hallmarks of cancer. Great strides have been taken to characterize these pathways and to reveal their anticancer mechanisms of action of artemisinin. Moreover, encouraging data have also been obtained from a limited number of clinical trials to support their anticancer property. However, there are several key gaps in knowledge that continue to serve as significant barriers to the repurposing of artemisinins as effective anticancer agents. This review focuses on important and emerging aspects of this field, highlighting breakthroughs in unresolved questions as well as novel techniques and approaches that have been taken in recent studies. We discuss the mechanism of artemisinin activation in cancer, novel and significant findings with regards to artemisinin target proteins and pathways, new understandings in artemisinin-induced cell death mechanisms, as well as the practical issues of repurposing artemisinin. We believe these will be important topics in realizing the potential of artemisinin and its derivatives as safe and potent anticancer agents. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Anticancer Efficacy of Photodynamic Therapy with Lung Cancer-Targeted Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ji-Eun; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Jheon, Sanghoon

    2016-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a non-invasive and non-surgical method representing an attractive alternative choice for lung cancer treatment. Photosensitizers selectively accumulate in tumor tissue and lead to tumor cell death in the presence of oxygen and the proper wavelength of light. To increase the therapeutic effect of PDT, we developed both photosensitizer- and anticancer agent-loaded lung cancer-targeted nanoparticles. Both enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect-based passive targeting and hyaluronic-acid-CD44 interaction-based active targeting were applied. CD44 is a well-known hyaluronic acid receptor that is often introduced as a biomarker of non-small cell lung cancer. In addition, a combination of PDT and chemotherapy is adopted in the present study. This combination concept may increase anticancer therapeutic effects and reduce adverse reactions. We chose hypocrellin B (HB) as a novel photosensitizer in this study. It has been reported that HB causes higher anticancer efficacy of PDT compared to hematoporphyrin derivatives(1). Paclitaxel was selected as the anticancer drug since it has proven to be a potential treatment for lung cancer(2). The antitumor efficacies of photosensitizer (HB) solution, photosensitizer encapsulated hyaluronic acid-ceramide nanoparticles (HB-NPs), and both photosensitizer- and anticancer agent (paclitaxel)-encapsulated hyaluronic acid-ceramide nanoparticles (HB-P-NPs) after PDT were compared both in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro phototoxicity in A549 (human lung adenocarcinoma) cells and the in vivo antitumor efficacy in A549 tumor-bearing mice were evaluated. The HB-P-NP treatment group showed the most effective anticancer effect after PDT. In conclusion, the HB-P-NPs prepared in the present study represent a potential and novel photosensitizer delivery system in treating lung cancer with PDT.

  14. 2-Sulfonylpyrimidines: Mild alkylating agents with anticancer activity toward p53-compromised cells

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Matthias R.; Joerger, Andreas C.; Fersht, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 has the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Many of p53’s oncogenic mutants are just destabilized and rapidly aggregate, and are targets for stabilization by drugs. We found certain 2-sulfonylpyrimidines, including one named PK11007, to be mild thiol alkylators with anticancer activity in several cell lines, especially those with mutationally compromised p53. PK11007 acted by two routes: p53 dependent and p53 independent. PK11007 stabilized p53 in vitro via selective alkylation of two surface-exposed cysteines without compromising its DNA binding activity. Unstable p53 was reactivated by PK11007 in some cancer cell lines, leading to up-regulation of p53 target genes such as p21 and PUMA. More generally, there was cell death that was independent of p53 but dependent on glutathione depletion and associated with highly elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as also found for the anticancer agent PRIMA-1MET(APR-246). PK11007 may be a lead for anticancer drugs that target cells with nonfunctional p53 or impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification in a wide variety of mutant p53 cells. PMID:27551077

  15. 2-Sulfonylpyrimidines: Mild alkylating agents with anticancer activity toward p53-compromised cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Matthias R; Joerger, Andreas C; Fersht, Alan R

    2016-09-06

    The tumor suppressor p53 has the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Many of p53's oncogenic mutants are just destabilized and rapidly aggregate, and are targets for stabilization by drugs. We found certain 2-sulfonylpyrimidines, including one named PK11007, to be mild thiol alkylators with anticancer activity in several cell lines, especially those with mutationally compromised p53. PK11007 acted by two routes: p53 dependent and p53 independent. PK11007 stabilized p53 in vitro via selective alkylation of two surface-exposed cysteines without compromising its DNA binding activity. Unstable p53 was reactivated by PK11007 in some cancer cell lines, leading to up-regulation of p53 target genes such as p21 and PUMA. More generally, there was cell death that was independent of p53 but dependent on glutathione depletion and associated with highly elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as also found for the anticancer agent PRIMA-1(MET)(APR-246). PK11007 may be a lead for anticancer drugs that target cells with nonfunctional p53 or impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification in a wide variety of mutant p53 cells.

  16. Analysis of Food and Drug Administration-approved anticancer agents in the NCI60 panel of human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Holbeck, Susan L; Collins, Jerry M; Doroshow, James H

    2010-05-01

    Since the early 1990s the Developmental Therapeutics Program of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has utilized a panel of 60 human tumor cell lines (NCI60) representing 9 tissue types to screen for potential new anticancer agents. To date, about 100,000 compounds and 50,000 natural product extracts have been screened. Early in this program it was discovered that the pattern of growth inhibition in these cell lines was similar for compounds of similar mechanism. The development of the COMPARE algorithm provided a means by which investigators, starting with a compound of interest, could identify other compounds whose pattern of growth inhibition was similar. With extensive molecular characterization of these cell lines, COMPARE and other user-defined algorithms have been used to link patterns of molecular expression and drug sensitivity. We describe here the results of screening current Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved anticancer agents in the NCI60 screen, with an emphasis on those agents that target signal transduction. We analyzed results from agents with mechanisms of action presumed to be similar; we also carried out a hierarchical clustering of all of these agents. The addition of data from recently approved anticancer agents will increase the utility of the NCI60 databases to the cancer research community. These data are freely accessible to the public on the DTP website (http://dtp.cancer.gov/). The FDA-approved anticancer agents are themselves available from the NCI as a plated set of compounds for research use.

  17. Targeting the Hippo Pathway for Anti-cancer Therapies.

    PubMed

    Gong, Rui; Yu, Fa-Xing

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway is critical in regulating tissue homeostasis, organ size, and tumorigenesis. YAP and TAZ, two major effectors of the Hippo pathway, function as transcriptional co-activators and promote target gene expression mainly through interaction with TEAD family transcription factors. As oncoproteins, YAP and TAZ are frequently activated or highly expressed in various cancer specimens. Moreover, their activity has been linked to resistance to a few widely used anti-cancer drugs, and YAP activation contributes to cancer relapse. Thus, the Hippo pathway, especially YAP/TAZ-TEAD interaction, represents an attractive target for anti-cancer therapies. Here, we will discuss potential approaches to inhibit YAP/TAZ activity, and also review currently available small molecules targeting the Hippo pathway.

  18. Targeting mitosis for anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Sudakin, Valery; Yen, Timothy J

    2007-01-01

    Basic research that has focused on achieving a mechanistic understanding of mitosis has provided unprecedented molecular and biochemical insights into this highly complex phase of the cell cycle. The discovery process has uncovered an ever-expanding list of novel proteins that orchestrate and coordinate spindle formation and chromosome dynamics during mitosis. That many of these proteins appear to function solely in mitosis makes them ideal targets for the development of mitosis-specific cancer drugs. The clinical successes seen with anti-microtubule drugs such as taxanes and the vinca alkaloids have also encouraged the development of drugs that specifically target mitosis. Drugs that selectively inhibit mitotic kinesins involved in spindle and kinetochore functions, as well as kinases that regulate these activities, are currently in various stages of clinical trials. Our increased understanding of mitosis has also revealed that this process is targeted by inhibitors of farnesyl transferase, histone deacetylase, and Hsp90. Although these drugs were originally designed to block cell proliferation by inhibiting signaling pathways and altering gene expression, it is clear now that these drugs can also directly interfere with the mitotic process. The increased attention to mitosis as a chemotherapeutic target has also raised an important issue regarding the cellular determinants that specify drug sensitivity. One likely contribution is the mitotic checkpoint, a failsafe mechanism that delays mitotic exit so that cells whose chromosomes are not properly attached to the spindle have extra time to correct their errors. As the biochemical activity of the mitotic checkpoint is finite, cells cannot indefinitely sustain the delay, as in cases where cells are treated with anti-mitotic drugs. When the mitotic checkpoint activity is eventually lost, cells will exit mitosis and become aneuploid. While many of the aneuploid cells may die because of massive chromosome imbalance

  19. Targeting tumor glycolysis by a mitotropic agent.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Altered metabolism in cancer cells is exemplified by enhanced glucose utilization, a biochemical signature that is clinically exploited for cancer diagnosis using positron-emission tomography and computed tomography imaging. Accordingly, disrupting the glucose metabolism of cancer cells has been contemplated as a potential therapeutic strategy against cancer. Experimental evidences indicate that targeting glucose metabolism by inhibition of glycolysis or oxidative phosphorylation promotes anticancer effects. Yet, successful clinical translation of antimetabolites or energy blockers to treat cancer remains a challenge, primarily due to lack of efficacy and/or systemic toxicity. Recently, using nanotechnology, Marrache and Dhar have documented the feasibility of delivering a glycolytic inhibitor through triphenylphosphonium (TPP), a mitotropic agent that selectively targets mitochondria based on membrane potential. Furthermore, by utilizing gold nanoparticles the investigators also demonstrated the potential for simultaneous induction of photothermal therapy, thus facilitating an additional line of attack on cancer cells. The report establishes that specific inhibition of tumor glycolysis is achievable through TPP-dependent selective targeting of cancer cells. This nanotechnological approach involving TPP-guided selective delivery of an antiglycolytic agent complemented with photothermal therapy provides a new window of opportunity for effective and specific targeting of tumor glycolysis.

  20. Therapeutic strategies with oral fluoropyrimidine anticancer agent, S-1 against oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Harada, Koji; Ferdous, Tarannum; Ueyama, Yoshiya

    2017-08-01

    Oral cancer has been recognized as a tumor with low sensitivity to anticancer agents. However, introduction of S-1, an oral cancer agent is improving treatment outcome for patients with oral cancer. In addition, S-1, as a main drug for oral cancer treatment in Japan can be easily available for outpatients. In fact, S-1 exerts high therapeutic effects with acceptable side effects. Moreover, combined chemotherapy with S-1 shows higher efficacy than S-1 alone, and combined chemo-radiotherapy with S-1 exerts remarkable therapeutic effects. Furthermore, we should consider the combined therapy of S-1 and molecular targeting agents right now as these combinations were reportedly useful for oral cancer treatment. Here, we describe our findings related to S-1 that were obtained experimentally and clinically, and favorable therapeutic strategies with S-1 against oral cancer with bibliographic considerations.

  1. Polylactide-co-glycolide nanoparticles for controlled delivery of anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Dinarvand, R; Sepehri, N; Manoochehri, S; Rouhani, H; Atyabi, F

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of anticancer agents may be hindered by low solubility in water, poor permeability, and high efflux from cells. Nanomaterials have been used to enable drug delivery with lower toxicity to healthy cells and enhanced drug delivery to tumor cells. Different nanoparticles have been developed using different polymers with or without surface modification to target tumor cells both passively and/or actively. Polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA), a biodegradable polyester approved for human use, has been used extensively. Here we report on recent developments concerning PLGA nanoparticles prepared for cancer treatment. We review the methods used for the preparation and characterization of PLGA nanoparticles and their applications in the delivery of a number of active agents. Increasing experience in the field of preparation, characterization, and in vivo application of PLGA nanoparticles has provided the necessary momentum for promising future use of these agents in cancer treatment, with higher efficacy and fewer side effects. PMID:21720501

  2. Immuno-chemotherapeutic platinum(IV) prodrugs of cisplatin as multimodal anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Wong, Daniel Yuan Qiang; Yeo, Charmian Hui Fang; Ang, Wee Han

    2014-06-23

    There is growing consensus that the clinical therapeutic efficacy of some chemotherapeutic agents depends on their off-target immune-modulating effects. Pt anticancer drugs have previously been identified to be potent immunomodulators of both the innate and the adaptive immune system. Nevertheless, there has been little development in the rational design of Pt-based chemotherapeutic agents to exploit their immune-activating capabilities. The FPR1/2 formyl peptide receptors are highly expressed in immune cells, as well as in many metastatic cancers. Herein, we report a rationally designed multimodal Pt(IV) prodrug containing a FPR1/2-targeting peptide that combines chemotherapy with immunotherapy to achieve therapeutic synergy and demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Anticancer Gold(III) Porphyrins Target Mitochondrial Chaperone Hsp60.

    PubMed

    Hu, Di; Liu, Yungen; Lai, Yau-Tsz; Tong, Ka-Chung; Fung, Yi-Man; Lok, Chun-Nam; Che, Chi-Ming

    2016-01-22

    Identification of the molecular target(s) of anticancer metal complexes is a formidable challenge since most of them are unstable toward ligand exchange reaction(s) or biological reduction under physiological conditions. Gold(III) meso-tetraphenylporphyrin (gold-1 a) is notable for its high stability in biological milieux and potent in vitro and in vivo anticancer activities. Herein, extensive chemical biology approaches employing photo-affinity labeling, click chemistry, chemical proteomics, cellular thermal shift, saturation-transfer difference NMR, protein fluorescence quenching, and protein chaperone assays were used to provide compelling evidence that heat-shock protein 60 (Hsp60), a mitochondrial chaperone and potential anticancer target, is a direct target of gold-1 a in vitro and in cells. Structure-activity studies with a panel of non-porphyrin gold(III) complexes and other metalloporphyrins revealed that Hsp60 inhibition is specifically dependent on both the gold(III) ion and the porphyrin ligand.

  4. Carfilzomib is an effective anticancer agent in anaplastic thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Amit; Zhang, Lisa; Boufraqech, Myriem; Zhang, Yaqin; Patel, Dhaval; Shen, Min; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-06-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human malignancies. Currently, there is no standard or effective therapy for ATC. Drug repurposing for cancer treatment is an emerging approach for identifying compounds that may have antineoplastic effects. The aim of this study was to use high-throughput drug library screening to identify and subsequently validate novel therapeutic agents with anticancer effects in ATC. We performed quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) in ATC cell lines (SW-1736, 8505C, and C-643), using a compound library of 3282 drugs. qHTS identified 100 compounds that were active in all three ATC cell lines. Proteasome inhibitors were one of the most active drug categories according to enrichment analysis. Of the three proteasome inhibitors screened, a second-generation proteasome inhibitor, carfilzomib, was the most active. Treatment of ATC cells with carfilzomib significantly inhibited cellular proliferation and induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Mechanistically, carfilzomib increased expression of p27 (CDKN1B) and decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein ATF4. Pretreatment with carfilzomib reduced in vivo metastases (lung, bone, liver, and kidney) and disease progression, and decreased N-cadherin expression. Carfilzomib treatment of mice with established, widely metastatic disease significantly increased their survival, without significant toxicity. Our findings support the use or clinical study of carfilzomib as a therapeutic option in patients with advanced and metastatic ATC.

  5. Diaryl Urea: A Privileged Structure in Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Garuti, Laura; Roberti, Marinella; Bottegoni, Giovanni; Ferraro, Mariarosaria

    2016-01-01

    The diaryl urea is an important fragment/pharmacophore in constructing anticancer molecules due to its near-perfect binding with certain acceptors. The urea NH moiety is a favorable hydrogen bond donor, while the urea oxygen atom is regarded as an excellent acceptor. Many novel compounds have been synthesized and evaluated for their antitumor activity with the successful development of sorafenib. Moreover, this structure is used to link alkylating pharmacophores with high affinity DNA binders. In addition, the diaryl urea is present in several kinase inhibitors, such as RAF, KDR and Aurora kinases. Above all, this moiety is used in the type II inhibitors: it usually forms one or two hydrogen bonds with a conserved glutamic acid and one with the backbone amide of the aspartic acid in the DFG motif. In addition, some diaryl urea derivatives act as Hedgehog (Hh) ligands, binding and inhibiting proteins involved in the homonymous Hh signaling pathway. In this review we provide some of the methodologies adopted for the synthesis of diaryl ureas and a description of the most representative antitumor agents bearing the diaryl urea moiety, focusing on their mechanisms bound to the receptors and structure-activity relationships (SAR). An increased knowledge of these derivatives could prompt the search to find new and more potent compounds.

  6. Xanthones from Mangosteen Extracts as Natural Chemopreventive Agents: Potential Anticancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Shan, T.; Ma, Q.; Guo, K.; Liu, J.; Li, W.; Wang, F.; Wu, E.

    2011-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the treatment and management of malignant tumors still remain a formidable challenge for public health. New strategies for cancer treatment are being developed, and one of the most promising treatment strategies involves the application of chemopreventive agents. The search for novel and effective cancer chemopreventive agents has led to the identification of various naturally occurring compounds. Xanthones, from the pericarp, whole fruit, heartwood, and leaf of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana Linn., GML), are known to possess a wide spectrum of pharmacologic properties, including anti-oxidant, anti-tumor, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, and anti-viral activities. The potential chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities of xanthones have been demonstrated in different stages of carcinogenesis (initiation, promotion, and progression) and are known to control cell division and growth, apoptosis, inflammation, and metastasis. Multiple lines of evidence from numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have confirmed that xanthones inhibit proliferation of a wide range of human tumor cell types by modulating various targets and signaling transduction pathways. Here we provide a concise and comprehensive review of preclinical data and assess the observed anticancer effects of xanthones, supporting its remarkable potential as an anticancer agent. PMID:21902651

  7. Current developments of coumarin-based anti-cancer agents in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Emami, Saeed; Dadashpour, Sakineh

    2015-09-18

    Cancer is one of the leading health hazards and the prominent cause of death in the world. A number of anticancer agents are currently in clinical practice and used for treatment of various kinds of cancers. There is no doubt that the existing arsenal of anticancer agents is insufficient due to the high incidence of side effects and multidrug resistance. In the efforts to develop suitable anticancer drugs, medicinal chemists have focused on coumarin derivatives. Coumarin is a naturally occurring compound and a versatile synthetic scaffold possessing wide spectrum of biological effects including potential anticancer activity. This review article covers the current developments of coumarin-based anticancer agents and also discusses the structure-activity relationship of the most potent compounds.

  8. Difficult to swallow: issues affecting optimal adherence to oral anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Winson Y

    2013-01-01

    The number of anticancer drugs currently available in oral formulation has increased dramatically over the past 15 to 20 years, especially with the recent development of new hormonal and targeted therapies. At present, approximately 25% of all cancer drugs are available in oral formulation, with numbers expected to increase exponentially in the coming years. The convenience associated with the self-administration of oral therapy, the requirement of fewer trips to the physician's office, and the lack of infusion reactions are all benefits for patients, allowing them to potentially maintain their relative independence while undergoing active anticancer treatment. On the other hand, there are growing concerns regarding patients' poor adherence to oral therapy as well as the challenges of monitoring patient compliance when treatment administration does not occur in the presence of health care professional (HCPs). More importantly, poor adherence to proven therapies may detrimentally affect the patients' clinical outcomes, such as survival. Thus, there is an urgent need to identify more effective strategies to measure and monitor adherence to oral anticancer agents in an effort to maximize their therapeutic benefits.

  9. Validating Aurora B as an anti-cancer drug target.

    PubMed

    Girdler, Fiona; Gascoigne, Karen E; Eyers, Patrick A; Hartmuth, Sonya; Crafter, Claire; Foote, Kevin M; Keen, Nicholas J; Taylor, Stephen S

    2006-09-01

    The Aurora kinases, a family of mitotic regulators, have received much attention as potential targets for novel anti-cancer therapeutics. Several Aurora kinase inhibitors have been described including ZM447439, which prevents chromosome alignment, spindle checkpoint function and cytokinesis. Subsequently, ZM447439-treated cells exit mitosis without dividing and lose viability. Because ZM447439 inhibits both Aurora A and B, we set out to determine which phenotypes are due to inhibition of which kinase. Using molecular genetic approaches, we show that inhibition of Aurora B kinase activity phenocopies ZM447439. Furthermore, a novel ZM compound, which is 100 times more selective for Aurora B over Aurora A in vitro, induces identical phenotypes. Importantly, inhibition of Aurora B kinase activity induces a penetrant anti-proliferative phenotype, indicating that Aurora B is an attractive anti-cancer drug target. Using molecular genetic and chemical-genetic approaches, we also probe the role of Aurora A kinase activity. We show that simultaneous repression of Aurora A plus induction of a catalytic mutant induces a monopolar phenotype. Consistently, another novel ZM-related inhibitor, which is 20 times as potent against Aurora A compared with ZM447439, induces a monopolar phenotype. Expression of a drug-resistant Aurora A mutant reverts this phenotype, demonstrating that Aurora A kinase activity is required for spindle bipolarity in human cells. Because small molecule-mediated inhibition of Aurora A and Aurora B yields distinct phenotypes, our observations indicate that the Auroras may present two avenues for anti-cancer drug discovery.

  10. CNIO cancer conference: targeted search for anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peter M

    2003-06-01

    The topics discussed at the conference covered many aspects of cancer research, from the genetic search for new targets, target validation and drug discovery, all the way to preclinical and clinical development of oncology drugs. Here the presentations on new metabolic, angiogenic, cell cycle and other molecular targets, as well as recent developments with experimental drugs with action on some of these targets, are summarised. Particular emphasis is placed on the emerging realisation that changes in the metabolic phenotype lie at the heart of cellular transformation. New insights into the biological links between cancer cell metabolism and the balance between survival and death signalling are likely to lead to the identification of a new category of anticancer targets.

  11. Safe and targeted anticancer therapy for ovarian cancer using a novel class of curcumin analogs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A diagnosis of advanced ovarian cancer is the beginning of a long and arduous journey for a patient. Worldwide, approximately half of the individuals undergoing therapy for advanced cancer will succumb to the disease, or consequences of treatment. Well-known and widely-used chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin, paclitaxel, 5-fluorouracil, and doxorubicin are toxic to both cancer and non-cancerous cells, and have debilitating side effects Therefore, development of new targeted anticancer therapies that can selectively kill cancer cells while sparing the surrounding healthy tissues is essential to develop more effective therapies. We have developed a new class of synthetic curcumin analogs, diarylidenyl-piperidones (DAPs), which have higher anticancer activity and enhanced bio-absorption than curcumin. The DAP backbone structure exhibits cytotoxic (anticancer) activity, whereas the N-hydroxypyrroline (-NOH) moiety found on some variants functions as a cellular- or tissue-specific modulator (antioxidant) of cytotoxicity. The anticancer activity of the DAPs has been evaluated using a number of ovarian cancer cell lines, and the safety has been evaluated in a number of non-cancerous cell lines. Both variations of the DAP compounds showed similar levels of cell death in ovarian cancer cells, however the compounds with the -NOH modification were less toxic to non-cancerous cells. The selective cytotoxicity of the DAP–NOH compounds suggests that they will be useful as safe and effective anticancer agents. This article reviews some of the key findings of our work with the DAP compounds, and compares this to some of the targeted therapies currently used in ovarian cancer therapy. PMID:23663277

  12. Flavaglines: potent anticancer drugs that target prohibitins and the helicase eIF4A.

    PubMed

    Basmadjian, Christine; Thuaud, Frédéric; Ribeiro, Nigel; Désaubry, Laurent

    2013-12-01

    Flavaglines are complex natural products that are found in several medicinal plants of Southeast Asia in the genus Aglaia; these compounds have shown exceptional anticancer and cytoprotective activities. This review describes the significance of flavaglines as a new class of pharmacological agents and presents recent developments in their synthesis, structure-activity relationships, identification of their molecular targets and modes of action. Flavaglines display a unique profile of anticancer activities that are mediated by two classes of unrelated proteins: prohibitins and the translation initiation factor eIF4A. The identification of these molecular targets is expected to accelerate advancement toward clinical studies. The selectivity of cytotoxicity towards cancer cells has been shown to be due to an inhibition of the transcription factor HSF1 and an upregulation of the tumor suppressor TXNIP. In addition, flavaglines display potent anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective and neuroprotective activities; however, the mechanisms underlying these activities are yet to be elucidated.

  13. Polymeric Micelles in Anticancer Therapy: Targeting, Imaging and Triggered Release

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Wouter; Bos, Mariska; Storm, Gert; Nijsen, J. Frank W.; Hennink, Wim E.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Micelles are colloidal particles with a size around 5–100 nm which are currently under investigation as carriers for hydrophobic drugs in anticancer therapy. Currently, five micellar formulations for anticancer therapy are under clinical evaluation, of which Genexol-PM has been FDA approved for use in patients with breast cancer. Micelle-based drug delivery, however, can be improved in different ways. Targeting ligands can be attached to the micelles which specifically recognize and bind to receptors overexpressed in tumor cells, and chelation or incorporation of imaging moieties enables tracking micelles in vivo for biodistribution studies. Moreover, pH-, thermo-, ultrasound-, or light-sensitive block copolymers allow for controlled micelle dissociation and triggered drug release. The combination of these approaches will further improve specificity and efficacy of micelle-based drug delivery and brings the development of a ‘magic bullet’ a major step forward. PMID:20725771

  14. Targeted anticancer prodrug with mesoporous silica nanoparticles as vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jianquan; Fang, Gang; Wang, Xiaodan; Zeng, Fang; Xiang, Yufei; Wu, Shuizhu

    2011-11-01

    A targeted anticancer prodrug system was fabricated with 180 nm mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) as carriers. The anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was conjugated to the particles through an acid-sensitive carboxylic hydrazone linker which is cleavable under acidic conditions. Moreover, folic acid (FA) was covalently conjugated to the particle surface as the targeting ligand for folate receptors (FRs) overexpressed in some cancer cells. The in vitro release profiles of DOX from the MSN-based prodrug systems showed a strong dependence on the environmental pH values. The fluorescent dye FITC was incorporated in the MSNs so as to trace the cellular uptake on a fluorescence microscope. Cellular uptakes by HeLa, A549 and L929 cell lines were tested for FA-conjugated MSNs and plain MSNs respectively, and a much more efficient uptake by FR-positive cancer cells (HeLa) can be achieved by conjugation of folic acid onto the particles because of the folate-receptor-mediated endocytosis. The cytotoxicities for the FA-conjugated MSN prodrug, the plain MSN prodrug and free DOX against three cell lines were determined, and the result indicates that the FA-conjugated MSN prodrug exhibits higher cytotoxicity to FR-positive cells, and reduced cytotoxicity to FR-negative cells. Thus, with 180 nm MSNs as the carriers for the prodrug system, good drug loading, selective targeting and sustained release of drug molecules within targeted cancer cells can be realized. This study may provide useful insights for designing and improving the applicability of MSNs in targeted anticancer prodrug systems.

  15. BET Inhibitors as Anticancer Agents: A Patent Review.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imran; Choi, Gildon; Lee, Kwangho

    2017-08-08

    Bromodomain and extra terminal (BET) family of bromodomain proteins (BRDs), comprised of four members in humans (BRD2, BRD3, BRD4, and BRDT), has emerged as a promising new cancer target class for small-molecule drug discovery. This review discusses the patent literature of BET inhibitors (2010-2017) for the treatment of cancer and other related diseases. BET proteins act as 'epigenetic readers' and bind to acetylated lysine residues on the tails of histones H3 and H4. Inhibition of BET proteins for a wide array of therapeutic applications has led to the discovery and development of various BET inhibitors. The increasing significance of BET inhibitors as a potential anticancer therapeutic has led to an extensive patent activity both from academia and pharmaceutical industry. Several of the BET inhibitors are under clinical development for the treatment of various kinds of cancers. The unmet needs and challenges associated with BET inhibition for cancer treatment have been portrayed in this review. An insight into the current developments and future prospects has been described as well. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Cardiotoxicity of Molecularly Targeted Agents

    PubMed Central

    Hedhli, Nadia; Russell, Kerry S

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac toxicity of molecularly targeted cancer agents is increasingly recognized as a significant side effect of chemotherapy. These new potent therapies may not only affect the survival of cancer cells, but have the potential to adversely impact normal cardiac and vascular function. Unraveling the mechanisms by which these therapies affect the heart and vasculature is crucial for improving drug design and finding alternative therapies to protect patients predisposed to cardiovascular disease. In this review, we summarize the classification and side effects of currently approved molecularly targeted chemotherapeutics. PMID:22758623

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of Anti-cancer Activities of β-elemene: Targeting Hallmarks of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shiyu; Ling, Chunhua; Li, Wei; Jiang, Hongxin; Zhi, Qiaoming; Jiang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Increasing knowledge on the hallmark characteristics of cancer and tumor pharmacology has promoted the introduction of phytochemicals, such as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in cancer therapy, which modulate numerous molecular targets and exert anticancer activities. β-elemene, an active and non-toxic compound isolated from the Chinese medicinal herb Rhizoma Zedoariae, has been explored as a potent anti-cancer agent against multiple cancers in extensive clinical trials and experimental research in vivo and in vitro. β-elemene exerts therapeutic potential via modulation of core hallmark capabilities of cancer by suppressing proliferative signaling, such as MAPK and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway, inducing cell death, up-regulating growth suppressors, deactivating invasion and metastasis and interacting replicative immortality and attenuating angiogenesis. Recent studies have significantly improved our understanding of anti-cancer activities and underlying molecular mechanisms of this Chinese medicine. This review presents these novel findings regarding the unique properties of β-elemene as an agent for cancer treatment, with an emphasis on multi-targeting biological and molecular regulation.

  18. Conjugation of vitamin E analog α-TOS to Pt(IV) complexes for dual-targeting anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Song, Ying; Lippard, Stephen J

    2014-03-07

    We report two platinum(IV) complexes conjugated with a vitamin E analog, α-tocopherol succinate (α-TOS). One of the conjugates displays the activity of both cisplatin and α-TOS in cancer cells, causing damage to DNA and mitochondria simultaneously. Accordingly, it serves as a promising dual-targeting anticancer agent.

  19. Conjugation of Vitamin E Analog α-TOS to Pt(IV) Complexes for Dual-Targeting Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Song, Ying

    2014-01-01

    We report two platinum(IV) complexes conjugated with a vitamin E analog, α-tocopherol succinate (α-TOS). One of the conjugates displays the activity of both cisplatin and αTOS in cancer cells, causing damage to DNA and mitochondria simultaneously. Accordingly, it serves as promising dual-targeting anticancer agent. PMID:24452361

  20. Co-targeting cancer drug escape pathways confers clinical advantage for multi-target anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Tao, Lin; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Feng; Chen, Zhe; Jiang, Yu Yang; Chen, Yu Zong

    2015-12-01

    Recent investigations have suggested that anticancer therapeutics may be enhanced by co-targeting the primary anticancer target and the corresponding drug escape pathways. Whether this strategy confers statistically significant clinical advantage has not been systematically investigated. This question was probed by the evaluation of the clinical status and the multiple targets of 23 approved and 136 clinical trial multi-target anticancer drugs with particular focus on those co-targeting EGFR, HER2, Abl, VEGFR2, mTOR, PI3K, Alk, MEK, KIT, and DNA topoisomerase, and some of the 14, 7, 13, 20, 6, 5, 7, 2, 4 and 10 cancer drug escape pathways respectively. Most of the approved (73.9%) and phase III (75.0%), the majority of the Phase II (62.8%) and I (53.6%), and the minority of the discontinued (35.3%) multi-target drugs were found to co-target cancer drug escape pathways. This suggests that co-targeting anticancer targets and drug escape pathways confer significant clinical advantage and such strategy can be more extensively explored. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Novel C6-substituted 1,3,4-oxadiazinones as potential anti-cancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yujin; Yun, Hye Jeong; Min, Hye-Young; Lee, Ho Jin; Pham, Phuong Chi; Moon, Jayoung; Kwon, Dah In; Lim, Bumhee; Suh, Young-Ger; Lee, Jeeyeon; Lee, Ho-Young

    2015-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a membrane receptor tyrosine kinase over-expressed in a number of tumors. However, combating resistance is one of the main challenges in the currently available IGF-1R inhibitor-based cancer therapies. Increased Src activation has been reported to confer resistance to anti-IGF-1R therapeutics in various tumor cells. An urgent unmet need for IGF-1R inhibitors is to suppress Src rephosphorylation induced by current anti-IGF-1R regimens. In efforts to develop effective anticancer agents targeting the IGF-1R signaling pathway, we explored 2-aryl-1,3,4-oxadiazin-5-ones as a novel scaffold that is structurally unrelated to current tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The compound, LL-2003, exhibited promising antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo; it effectively suppressed IGF-1R and Src and induced apoptosis in various non-small cell lung cancer cells. Further optimizations for enhanced potency in cellular assays need to be followed, but our strategy to identify novel IGF-1R/Src inhibitors may open a new avenue to develop more efficient anticancer agents. PMID:26515601

  2. Toad Glandular Secretions and Skin Extractions as Anti-Inflammatory and Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Tan, C. K.; Hashimi, Saeed M.; Zulfiker, Abu Hasanat Md.; Wei, Ming Q.

    2014-01-01

    Toad glandular secretions and skin extractions contain many natural agents which may provide a unique resource for novel drug development. The dried secretion from the auricular and skin glands of Chinese toad (Bufo bufo gargarizans) is named Chansu, which has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) for treating infection and inflammation for hundreds of years. The sterilized hot water extraction of dried toad skin is named Huachansu (Cinobufacini) which was developed for treating hepatitis B virus (HBV) and several types of cancers. However, the mechanisms of action of Chansu, Huachansu, and their constituents within are not well reported. Existing studies have suggested that their anti-inflammation and anticancer potential were via targeting Nuclear Factor (NF)-κB and its signalling pathways which are crucial hallmarks of inflammation and cancer in various experimental models. Here, we review some current studies of Chansu, Huachansu, and their compounds in terms of their use as both anti-inflammatory and anticancer agents. We also explored the potential use of toad glandular secretions and skin extractions as alternate resources for treating human cancers in combinational therapies. PMID:24734105

  3. Cell Targeting in Anti-Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd; Siew, John Shia Kwong; Zakaria, Hayati; Saad, Suria Mohd; Ni, Lim Shen; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach towards cancer treatment. The main aim of the therapy is to destroy cancer cells, usually by apoptotic mechanisms, and preserving others. However, its application has been hindered by many factors including poor cellular uptake, non-specific cell targeting and undesirable interferences with other genes or gene products. A variety of strategies exist to improve cellular uptake efficiency of gene-based therapies. This paper highlights advancements in gene therapy research and its application in relation to anti-cancer treatment. PMID:22977356

  4. Anti-cancer chalcones: Structural and molecular target perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Debarshi Kar; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Asati, Vivek

    2015-06-15

    Chalcone or (E)-1,3-diphenyl-2-propene-1-one scaffold remained a fascination among researchers in the 21st century due to its simple chemistry, ease of synthesis and a wide variety of promising biological activities. Several natural and (semi) synthetic chalcones have shown anti-cancer activity due to their inhibitory potential against various targets namely ABCG2/P-gp/BCRP, 5α-reductase, aromatase, 17-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, HDAC/Situin-1, proteasome, VEGF, VEGFR-2 kinase, MMP-2/9, JAK/STAT signaling pathways, CDC25B, tubulin, cathepsin-K, topoisomerase-II, Wnt, NF-κB, B-Raf and mTOR etc. In this review, a comprehensive study on molecular targets/pathways involved in carcinogenesis, mechanism of actions (MOAs), structure activity relationships (SARs) and patents granted have been highlighted. With the knowledge of molecular targets, structural insights and SARs, this review may be helpful for (medicinal) chemists to design more potent, safe, selective and cost effective anti-cancer chalcones.

  5. Dermatologic adverse events in pediatric patients receiving targeted anticancer therapies: a pooled analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pratilas, Christine A.; Sibaud, Vincent; Boralevi, Franck; Lacouture, Mario E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The dermatologic adverse events (AEs) of various molecularly targeted therapies are well-described in adult cancer patients. Little has been reported on the incidence and clinical presentation of such AEs in pediatric patients with cancer. To address this gap, we analyzed the dermatologic AEs reported across clinical trials of targeted anticancer therapies in pediatric patients. METHODS We conducted an electronic literature search (PubMed, American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meetings’ abstracts, ClinicalTrials.gov, NCI’s Pediatric Oncology Branch webpage) to identify clinical trials involving targeted anticancer therapies that reported dermatologic AEs in their safety data. Studies were limited to the pediatric population, monotherapy trials (oncology), and English language publications. RESULTS Pooled data from 19 clinical studies investigating 11 targeted anticancer agents (alemtuzumab, rituximab, imatinib, dasatinib, erlotinib, vandetanib, sorafenib, cabozantinib, pazopanib, everolimus, and temsirolimus) were analyzed. The most frequently encountered dermatologic AEs were rash (127/660; 19%), xerosis (18/100; 18%), mucositis (68/402; 17%) and pruritus (12/169; 7%). Other AEs included pigmentary abnormalities of the skin/hair (13%), hair disorders (trichomegaly, hypertrichosis, alopecia and madarosis; 14%), urticaria (7%), palmoplantar erythrodysesthesia (7%), erythema, acne, purpura, skin fissures, other ‘unknown skin changes’, exanthem, infection, flushing, telangiectasia, and photosensitivity. CONCLUSION This study describes the dermatologic manifestations of targeted anticancer therapy-related AEs in the pediatric population. Since these AEs are often associated with significant morbidity, it is imperative that pediatric oncologists be familiar with their recognition and management, to avoid unnecessary dose modifications and/or termination, and to prevent impairments in patients’ quality of life. PMID:25683226

  6. Dermatologic adverse events in pediatric patients receiving targeted anticancer therapies: a pooled analysis.

    PubMed

    Belum, Viswanath Reddy; Washington, Courtney; Pratilas, Christine A; Sibaud, Vincent; Boralevi, Franck; Lacouture, Mario E

    2015-05-01

    The dermatologic adverse events (AEs) of various molecularly targeted therapies are well-described in adult cancer patients. Little has been reported on the incidence and clinical presentation of such AEs in pediatric patients with cancer. To address this gap, we analyzed the dermatologic AEs reported across clinical trials of targeted anticancer therapies in pediatric patients. We conducted an electronic literature search (PubMed, American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meetings' abstracts, ClinicalTrials.gov, NCI's Pediatric Oncology Branch webpage) to identify clinical trials involving targeted anticancer therapies that reported dermatologic AEs in their safety data. Studies were limited to the pediatric population, monotherapy trials (oncology), and English language publications. Pooled data from 19 clinical studies investigating 11 targeted anticancer agents (alemtuzumab, rituximab, imatinib, dasatinib, erlotinib, vandetanib, sorafenib, cabozantinib, pazopanib, everolimus, and temsirolimus) were analyzed. The most frequently encountered dermatologic AEs were rash (127/660; 19%), xerosis (18/100; 18%), mucositis (68/402; 17%), and pruritus (12/169; 7%). Other AEs included pigmentary abnormalities of the skin/hair (13%), hair disorders (trichomegaly, hypertrichosis, alopecia, and madarosis; 14%), urticaria (7%), palmoplantar erythrodysesthesia (7%), erythema, acne, purpura, skin fissures, other 'unknown skin changes', exanthem, infection, flushing, telangiectasia, and photosensitivity. This study describes the dermatologic manifestations of targeted anticancer therapy-related AEs in the pediatric population. Since these AEs are often associated with significant morbidity, it is imperative that pediatric oncologists be familiar with their recognition and management, to avoid unnecessary dose modifications and/or termination, and to prevent impairments in patients' quality of life. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. ER maleate is a novel anticancer agent in oral cancer: implications for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Guodong; Somasundaram, Raj Thani; Jessa, Fatima; Srivastava, Gunjan; MacMillan, Christina; Witterick, Ian; Walfish, Paul G.; Ralhan, Ranju

    2016-01-01

    ER maleate [10-(3-Aminopropyl)-3, 4-dimethyl-9(10H)-acridinone maleate] identified in a kinome screen was investigated as a novel anticancer agent for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Our aim was to demonstrate its anticancer effects, identify putative molecular targets and determine their clinical relevance and investigate its chemosensitization potential for platinum drugs to aid in OSCC management. Biologic effects of ER maleate were determined using oral cancer cell lines in vitro and oral tumor xenografts in vivo. mRNA profiling, real time PCR and western blot revealed ER maleate modulated the expression of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). Their clinical significance was determined in oral SCC patients by immunohistochemistry and correlated with prognosis by Kaplan-Meier survival and multivariate Cox regression analyses. ER maleate induced cell apoptosis, inhibited proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in oral cancer cells. Imagestream analysis revealed cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and increased polyploidy, unravelling deregulation of cell division and cell death. Mechanistically, ER maleate decreased expression of PLK1 and Syk, induced cleavage of PARP, caspase9 and caspase3, and increased chemosensitivity to carboplatin; significantly suppressed tumor growth and increased antitumor activity of carboplatin in tumor xenografts. ER maleate treated tumor xenografts showed reduced PLK1 and Syk expression. Clinical investigations revealed overexpression of PLK1 and Syk in oral SCC patients that correlated with disease prognosis. Our in vitro and in vivo findings provide a strong rationale for pre-clinical efficacy of ER maleate as a novel anticancer agent and chemosensitizer of platinum drugs for OSCC. PMID:26934445

  8. The Anticancer Agent Chaetocin Is a Competitive Substrate and Inhibitor of Thioredoxin Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Tibodeau, Jennifer D.; Benson, Linda M.; Isham, Crescent R.; Owen, Whyte G.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We recently reported that the antineoplastic thiodioxopiperazine natural product chaetocin potently induces cellular oxidative stress, thus selectively killing cancer cells. In pursuit of underlying molecular mechanisms, we now report that chaetocin is a competitive and selective substrate for the oxidative stress mitigation enzyme thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1) with lower Km than the TrxR1 native substrate thioredoxin (Trx; chaetocin Km = 4.6 ± 0.6 μM, Trx Km = 104.7 ± 26 μM), thereby attenuating reduction of the critical downstream ROS remediation substrate Trx at achieved intracellular concentrations. Consistent with a role for TrxR1 targeting in the anticancer effects of chaetocin, overexpression of the TrxR1 downstream effector Trx in HeLa cells conferred resistance to chaetocin-induced, but not to doxorubicin-induced, cytotoxicity. As the TrxR/Trx pathway is of central importance in limiting cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS)—and as chaetocin exerts its selective anticancer effects via ROS imposition—the inhibition of TrxR1 by chaetocin has potential to explain its selective anticancer effects. These observations have important implications not just with regard to the mechanism of action and clinical development of chaetocin and related thiodioxopiperazines, but also with regard to the utility of molecular targets within the thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin pathway in the development of novel candidate antineoplastic agents. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 1097–1106. PMID:18999987

  9. Chalcone-benzoxaborole hybrids as novel anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiong; Yang, Fei; Qiao, Zhitao; Zhu, Mingyan; Zhou, Huchen

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we report the synthesis of a series of chalcone-benzoxaborole hybrid molecules and the evaluation of their anticancer activity. Their anticancer potency and toxicity were tested on three human cancer cell lines and two normal cell lines. The 4-fluoro compound 15 was found to be the most potent compound with an IC50 value of 1.4μM on SKOV3 cells. The 4-iodo compound 18 and 3-methyloxy-4-amino compound 47 showed good potency on SKOV3 cells while exhibiting low toxicity on normal cells. This work extended the application of benzoxaboroles to the field of anticancer research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dual-drug loaded nanoformulation with a galactosamine homing moiety for liver-targeted anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Nafees; Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Kun; Zhu, Chengcheng; Zhu, Zhenzhu; Jiao, Yang; Guo, Zijian

    2016-08-16

    Drug resistance and unfavorable pharmacokinetics are the major obstacles for conventional anticancer drugs. A combination of different anticancer drugs into one formulation is a common strategy to alleviate the side effects of individual drugs in clinical practice. Platinum anticancer drugs are the typical defective therapeutic agents for cancer chemotherapy and have poor selectivity for tumor cells. In this study, a nanosystem composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), Pt(IV) prodrug (PPD) and α-tocopheryl succinate (α-TOS) was designed to overcome these defects. The Pt(IV) prodrug, c,c,t-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2(O2CC(CH3)3)2], was prepared by the reaction of oxoplatin with trimethylacetic anhydride and its structure was characterized by X-ray crystallography. The PPD and α-TOS self-assembled with PLGA, forming a dual-drug loaded nanoparticle (DDNP). The surface of the DDNP was decorated with galactosamine (G), giving rise to a G-DDNP that can actively target the liver cancer cells through the overexpressed asialoglycoprotein receptors. The DDNPs and G-DDNPs were characterized by SEM, TEM, and DLS. They are spherical in shape with required polydispersity and suitable mean size (ca. 150 nm). The in vitro cytotoxicity of DDNPs and G-DDNPs was tested against the human SMMC-7721 liver cancer cell line. G-DDNPs are more potent than the corresponding free drugs and untargeted DDNP, showing that some synergistic and tumor-specific effects are achieved by this strategy. The results demonstrate that dual-drug loaded nanoformulations with tumor-targeting function could be effective anticancer agents for conquering the shortcomings related to single-drug chemotherapy.

  11. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel diphenylthiazole-based cyclooxygenase inhibitors as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Abdelazeem, Ahmed H; Gouda, Ahmed M; Omar, Hany A; Tolba, Mai F

    2014-12-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most widely used medications as analgesics and antipyretics. Currently, there is a growing interest in their antitumor activity and their ability to reduce the risk and mortality of several cancers. While several studies revealed the ability of NSAIDs to induce apoptosis and inhibit angiogenesis in cancer cells, their exact anticancer mechanism is not fully understood. However, both cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent and -independent pathways were reported to have a role. In an attempt to develop new anticancer agents, a series of diphenylthiazole substituted thiazolidinone derivatives was synthesized and evaluated for their anticancer activity against a panel of cancer cell lines. Additionally, the inhibitory activity of the synthesized derivatives against COX enzymes was investigated as a potential mechanism for the anticancer activity. Cytotoxicity assay results showed that compounds 15b and 16b were the most potent anticancer agents with half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) between 8.88 and 19.25μM against five different human cancer cell lines. Interestingly, COX inhibition assay results were in agreement with that of the cytotoxicity assays where the most potent anticancer compounds showed good COX-2 inhibition comparable to that of celecoxib. Further support to our results were gained by the docking studies which suggested the ability of compound 15b to bind into COX-2 enzyme with low energy scores. Collectively, these results demonstrated the promising activity of the newly designed compounds as leads for subsequent development into potential anticancer agents.

  12. A review of economic impact of targeted oral anticancer medications.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chan; Chien, Chun-Ru; Geynisman, Daniel M; Smieliauskas, Fabrice; Shih, Ya-Chen T

    2014-02-01

    There has been a rapid increase in the use of targeted oral anticancer medications (OAMs) in the past decade. As OAMs are often expensive, economic consideration play a significant role in the decision to prescribe, receive or cover them. This paper performs a systematic review of costs or budgetary impact of targeted OAMs to better understand their economic impact on the healthcare system, patients as well as payers. We present our review in a summary table that describes the method and main findings, take into account multiple factors, such as country, analytical approach, cost type, study perspective, timeframe, data sources, study population and care setting when we interpret the results from different papers, and discuss the policy and clinical implications. Our review raises a concern regarding the role of sponsorship on findings of economic analyses as the vast majority of pharmaceutical company-sponsored studies reported cost advantages toward the sponsor's drugs.

  13. Targeting Anti-Cancer Active Compounds: Affinity-Based Chromatographic Assays

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Cardoso, Carmen Lucia; Seidl, Claudia; Moaddel, Ruin; Cass, Quezia Bezerra

    2016-01-01

    Affinity-based chromatography assays encompass the use of solid supports containing immobilized biological targets to monitor binding events in the isolation , identification and/or characterization of bioactive compounds. This powerful bioanalytical technique allows the screening of potential binders through fast analyses that can be directly performed using isolated substances or complex matrices. An overview of the recent researches in frontal and zonal affinity-based chromatography screening assays, which has been used as a tool in the identification and characterization of new anti-cancer agents, is discussed. In addition, a critical evaluation of the recently emerged ligands fishing assays in complex mixtures is also discussed. PMID:27306095

  14. Determining the optimal dose in the development of anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Mathijssen, Ron H J; Sparreboom, Alex; Verweij, Jaap

    2014-05-01

    Identification of the optimal dose remains a key challenge in drug development. For cytotoxic drugs, the standard approach is based on identifying the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in phase I trials and incorporating this to subsequent trials. However, this strategy does not take into account important aspects of clinical pharmacology. For targeted agents, the dose-effect relationships from preclinical studies are less obvious, and it is important to change the way these agents are developed to avoid recommending drug doses for different populations without evidence of differential antitumour effects in different diseases. The use of expanded cohorts in phase I trials to better define MTD and refine dose optimization should be further explored together with a focus on efficacy rather than toxicity-based predictions. Another key consideration in dose optimization is related to interindividual pharmacokinetic variability. High variability in intra-individual pharmacokinetics has been observed for many orally-administered drugs, especially those with low bioavailability, which might complicate identification of dose-effect relationships. End-organ dysfunction, interactions with other prescription drugs, herbal supplements, adherence, and food intake can influence pharmacokinetics. It is important these variables are identified during early clinical trials and considered in the development of further phase II and subsequent large-scale phase III studies.

  15. Structure-activity analysis of 2'-modified cinnamaldehyde analogues as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Gan, Fei Fei; Chua, Yee Shin; Scarmagnani, Silvia; Palaniappan, Puvithira; Franks, Mark; Poobalasingam, Thurka; Bradshaw, Tracey D; Westwell, Andrew D; Hagen, Thilo

    2009-10-02

    The natural product 2'-hydroxycinnamaldehyde (HCA) and its analogue, 2'-benzoyloxycinnamaldehyde (BCA), have been previously shown to have antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects in vitro and inhibit tumor growth in vivo. In this study, we use structure-activity analysis to define structural features that are important for the activity of cinnamaldehyde analogues. Our results emphasize an important role for both the propenal group as well as the modification at the 2'-position. Further studies were aimed to characterize the mechanism of action of BCA. Exposure to BCA induced cell death via caspase-dependent and -independent pathways. Cell death was not due to autophagy or necrosis as a result of energy depletion or induction of reactive oxygen species. Our findings have important implications for future drug design and highlight the importance of defining molecular drug targets for this promising class of potential anticancer agents.

  16. Importance of influx and efflux systems and xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in intratumoral disposition of anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Rochat, B

    2009-08-01

    In this review, intratumoral drug disposition will be integrated into the wide range of resistance mechanisms to anticancer agents with particular emphasis on targeted protein kinase inhibitors. Six rules will be established: 1. There is a high variability of extracellular/intracellular drug level ratios; 2. There are three main systems involved in intratumoral drug disposition that are composed of SLC, ABC and XME enzymes; 3. There is a synergistic interplay between these three systems; 4. In cancer subclones, there is a strong genomic instability that leads to a highly variable expression of SLC, ABC or XME enzymes; 5. Tumor-expressed metabolizing enzymes play a role in tumor-specific ADME and cell survival and 6. These three systems are involved in the appearance of resistance (transient event) or in the resistance itself. In addition, this article will investigate whether the overexpression of some ABC and XME systems in cancer cells is just a random consequence of DNA/chromosomal instability, hypo- or hypermethylation and microRNA deregulation, or a more organized modification induced by transposable elements. Experiments will also have to establish if these tumor-expressed enzymes participate in cell metabolism or in tumor-specific ADME or if they are only markers of clonal evolution and genomic deregulation. Eventually, the review will underline that the fate of anticancer agents in cancer cells should be more thoroughly investigated from drug discovery to clinical studies. Indeed, inhibition of tumor expressed metabolizing enzymes could strongly increase drug disposition, specifically in the target cells resulting in more efficient therapies.

  17. Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Erlotinib–NSAID Conjugates as More Comprehensive Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel anticancer agents were designed and synthesized based on coupling of different nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with the epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, erlotinib. Both the antiproliferative and pharmacokinetic activity of the target compounds were evaluated using HCC827 and A431 tumor cell lines. Among the derivatives made, compounds 10a, 10c, and 21g showed superb potency, comparable to that of erlotinib. Furthermore, preliminary SAR analysis showed that when the NSAIDs were conjugated via linkage to C-6 OH versus linkage to C-7 OH of the quinazoline nucleus, superior anticancer activity was achieved. Finally, the in vitro pharmacokinetic profile of several conjugates demonstrated the desired dissociation kinetics as the coupled molecules were effectively hydrolyzed, releasing both erlotinib and the specific NSAID in a time-dependent manner. The conjugation strategy represents a unique and simplified approach toward combination therapy, particularly for the treatment of cancers where both EGFR overexpression and inflammation play a direct role in disease progression. PMID:26487917

  18. Nrf2 activity as a potential biomarker for the pan-epigenetic anticancer agent, RRx-001

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Shoucheng; Sekar, Thillai Veerapazham; Scicinski, Jan; Oronsky, Bryan; Peehl, Donna M.; Knox, Susan J.; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a master regulatory transcription factor that plays an important role in the antioxidant response pathway against anticancer drug-induced cytotoxic effects. RRx-001 is a new anticancer agent that generates reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and leads to epigenetic alterations in cancer cells. Here we report the RRx-001 mediated nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and the activation of expression of its downstream enzymes HO-1 and NQO1 in tumor cells. Inhibition of intrinsic Nrf2 expression by Nrf2-specific siRNA increased cell sensitivity to RRx-001. Molecular imaging of tumor cells co-expressing pARE-Firefly luciferase and pCMV-Renilla luciferase-mRFP in vitro and in vivo in mice revealed that RRx-001 significantly increased ARE-FLUC signal in cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, suggesting that RRx-001 is an effective activator of the Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway. The pre-treatment level of ARE-FLUC signal in cells, reflecting basal activity of Nrf2, negatively correlated with the tumor response to RRx-001. The results support the concept that RRx-001 activates Nrf2-ARE antioxidant signaling pathways in tumor cells. Hence measurement of Nrf2-mediated activation of downstream target genes through ARE signaling may constitute a useful molecular biomarker for the early prediction of response to RRx-001 treatment, and thereby guide therapeutic decision-making. PMID:26280276

  19. Salinomycin: a novel anti-cancer agent with known anti-coccidial activities.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuang; Wang, Fengfei; Wong, Eric T; Fonkem, Ekokobe; Hsieh, Tze-Chen; Wu, Joseph M; Wu, Erxi

    2013-01-01

    Salinomycin, traditionally used as an anti-coccidial drug, has recently been shown to possess anti-cancer and anti-cancer stem cell (CSC) effects, as well as activities to overcome multi-drug resistance based on studies using human cancer cell lines, xenograft mice, and in case reports involving cancer patients in pilot clinical trials. Therefore, salinomycin may be considered as a promising novel anti-cancer agent despite its largely unknown mechanism of action. This review summarizes the pharmacologic effects of salinomycin and presents possible mechanisms by which salinomycin exerts its anti-tumorigenic activities. Recent advances and potential complications that might limit the utilization of salinomycin as an anti-cancer and anti-CSC agent are also presented and discussed.

  20. Design and synthesis of 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives as anti-cancer agent.

    PubMed

    Viradiya, Denish; Mirza, Sheefa; Shaikh, Faraz; Kakadiya, Rajesh; Rathod, Anand; Jain, Nayan; Rawal, Rakesh; Shah, Anamik

    2016-12-06

    A series of 1,4-dihydropyridine based compounds bearing benzylpyridinium moiety have been designed and evaluated for in vitro anticancer activity against glioblastoma U87MG, lung cancer A549 and colorectal adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cell lines using the MTT assay. Among these compounds, 7b, 7d, 7e, and 7f exhibited potent anticancer activity against the cell lines tested. The cytotoxicity of the synthesized derivatives was compared to standard drugs (carboplatin, gemcitabine, and daunorubicin). Thus, synthesized 1,4-dihydropyridines can be considered as the encouraging molecules for further drug development as anticancer agents.

  1. Diterpenes and Their Derivatives as Potential Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Islam, Muhammad Torequl

    2017-05-01

    As therapeutic tools, diterpenes and their derivatives have gained much attention of the medicinal scientists nowadays. It is due to their pledging and important biological activities. This review congregates the anticancer diterpenes. For this, a search was made with selected keywords in PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, Scopus, The American Chemical Society and miscellaneous databases from January 2012 to January 2017 for the published articles. A total 28, 789 published articles were seen. Among them, 240 were included in this study. More than 250 important anticancer diterpenes and their derivatives were seen in the databases, acting in the different pathways. Some of them are already under clinical trials, while others are in the nonclinical and/or pre-clinical trials. In conclusion, diterpenes may be one of the lead molecules in the treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Cell cycle regulatory E3 ubiquitin ligases as anticancer targets.

    PubMed

    Pray, Todd R; Parlati, Francesco; Huang, Jianing; Wong, Brian R; Payan, Donald G; Bennett, Mark K; Issakani, Sarkiz Daniel; Molineaux, Susan; Demo, Susan D

    2002-12-01

    Disregulation of the cell cycle and proliferation play key roles in cellular transformation and tumorigenesis. Such processes are intimately tied to the concentration, localization and activity of enzymes, adapters, receptors, and structural proteins in cells. Ubiquitination of these cellular regulatory proteins, governed by specific enzymes in the ubiquitin (Ub) conjugation cascade, has profound effects on their various functions, most commonly through proteasome targeting and degradation. This review will focus on a variety of E3 Ub ligases as potential oncology drug targets, with particular emphasis on the role of these molecules in the regulation of stability, localization, and activity of key proteins such as tumor suppressors and oncoproteins. E3 ubiquitin ligases that have established roles in cell cycle and apoptosis, such as the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), the Skp-1-Cul1-F-box class, and the murine double minute 2 (MDM2) protein, in addition to more recently discovered E3 ubiquitin ligases which may be similarly important in tumorigenesis, (e.g. Smurf family, CHFR, and Efp), will be discussed. We will present evidence to support E3 ligases as good biological targets in the development of anticancer therapeutics and address challenges in drug discovery for these targets.

  3. Inhibition of Mitochondrial Complex II by the Anticancer Agent Lonidamine*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lili; Shestov, Alexander A.; Worth, Andrew J.; Nath, Kavindra; Nelson, David S.; Leeper, Dennis B.; Glickson, Jerry D.; Blair, Ian A.

    2016-01-01

    The antitumor agent lonidamine (LND; 1-(2,4-dichlorobenzyl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxylic acid) is known to interfere with energy-yielding processes in cancer cells. However, the effect of LND on central energy metabolism has never been fully characterized. In this study, we report that a significant amount of succinate is accumulated in LND-treated cells. LND inhibits the formation of fumarate and malate and suppresses succinate-induced respiration of isolated mitochondria. Utilizing biochemical assays, we determined that LND inhibits the succinate-ubiquinone reductase activity of respiratory complex II without fully blocking succinate dehydrogenase activity. LND also induces cellular reactive oxygen species through complex II, which reduced the viability of the DB-1 melanoma cell line. The ability of LND to promote cell death was potentiated by its suppression of the pentose phosphate pathway, which resulted in inhibition of NADPH and glutathione generation. Using stable isotope tracers in combination with isotopologue analysis, we showed that LND increased glutaminolysis but decreased reductive carboxylation of glutamine-derived α-ketoglutarate. Our findings on the previously uncharacterized effects of LND may provide potential combinational therapeutic approaches for targeting cancer metabolism. PMID:26521302

  4. Targeting MKK3 as a novel anticancer strategy: molecular mechanisms and therapeutical implications

    PubMed Central

    Baldari, S; Ubertini, V; Garufi, A; D'Orazi, G; Bossi, G

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3 (MAP2K3, MKK3) is a member of the dual specificity protein kinase group that belongs to the MAP kinase kinase family. This kinase is activated by mitogenic or stress-inducing stimuli and participates in the MAP kinase-mediated signaling cascade, leading to cell proliferation and survival. Several studies highlighted a critical role for MKK3 in tumor progression and invasion, and we previously identified MKK3 as transcriptional target of mutant (mut) p53 to sustain cell proliferation and survival, thus rendering MKK3 a promising target for anticancer therapies. Here, we found that targeting MKK3 with RNA interference, in both wild-type (wt) and mutp53-carrying cells, induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagy that, respectively, contributed to stabilize wtp53 and degrade mutp53. MKK3 depletion reduced cancer cell proliferation and viability, whereas no significant effects were observed in normal cellular context. Noteworthy, MKK3 depletion in combination with chemotherapeutic agents increased tumor cell response to the drugs, in both wtp53 and mutp53 cancer cells, as demonstrated by enhanced poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and reduced clonogenic ability in vitro. In addition, MKK3 depletion reduced tumor growth and improved biological response to chemotherapeutic in vivo. The overall results indicate MKK3 as a novel promising molecular target for the development of more efficient anticancer treatments in both wtp53- and mutp53-carrying tumors. PMID:25633290

  5. Anticancer efficacy of the metabolic blocker 3-bromopyruvate: specific molecular targeting.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram; Kunjithapatham, Rani; Geschwind, Jean-Francois

    2013-01-01

    The anticancer efficacy of the pyruvate analog 3-bromopyruvate has been demonstrated in multiple tumor models. The chief principle underlying the antitumor effects of 3-bromopyruvate is its ability to effectively target the energy metabolism of cancer cells. Biochemically, the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) has been identified as the primary target of 3-bromopyruvate. Its inhibition results in the depletion of intracellular ATP, causing cell death. Several reports have also demonstrated that in addition to GAPDH inhibition, the induction of cellular stress also contributes to 3-bromopyruvate treatment-dependent apoptosis. Furthermore, recent evidence shows that 3-bromopyruvate is taken up selectively by tumor cells via the monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) that are frequently overexpressed in cancer cells (for the export of lactate produced during aerobic glycolysis). The preferential uptake of 3-bromopyruvate via MCTs facilitates selective targeting of tumor cells while leaving healthy and non-malignant tissue untouched. Taken together, the specificity of molecular (GAPDH) targeting and selective uptake by tumor cells, underscore the potential of 3-bromopyruvate as a potent and promising anticancer agent. In this review, we highlight the mechanistic characteristics of 3-bromopyruvate and discuss its potential for translation into the clinic.

  6. Effect of Adherence on Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Relationships of Oral Targeted Anticancer Drugs.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Evelina; Csajka, Chantal; Schneider, Marie P; Widmer, Nicolas

    2017-06-20

    The emergence of oral targeted anticancer agents transformed several cancers into chronic conditions with a need for long-term oral treatment. Although cancer is a life-threatening condition, oncology medication adherence-the extent to which a patient follows the drug regimen that is intended by the prescriber-can be suboptimal in the long term, as in any other chronic disease. Poor adherence can impact negatively on clinical outcomes, notably because most of these drugs are given as a standard non-individualized dosage despite marked inter-individual variabilities that can lead to toxic or inefficacious drug concentrations. This has been especially studied with the prototypal drug imatinib. In the context of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), increasingly advocated for oral anticancer treatment optimization, unreported suboptimal adherence affecting drug intake history may lead to significant bias in the concentration interpretation and inappropriate dosage adjustments. In the same way, suboptimal adherence may also bias the results of pharmacokinetic modeling studies, which will affect in turn Bayesian TDM interpretation that relies on such population models. Detailed knowledge of the influence of adherence on plasma concentrations in pharmacokinetic studies or in routine TDM programs is however presently missing in the oncology field. Studies on this topic are therefore eagerly awaited to better pilot the treatment of cancer with the new targeted agents and to find their optimal dosage regimen. Hence, the development and assessment of effective medication adherence programs are warranted for these treatments.

  7. On the structural basis and design guidelines for type II topoisomerase-targeting anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chyuan-Chuan; Li, Yi-Ching; Wang, Ying-Ren; Li, Tsai-Kun; Chan, Nei-Li

    2013-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases (Top2s) alter DNA topology via the formation of an enzyme–DNA adduct termed cleavage complex, which harbors a transient double-strand break in one DNA to allow the passage of another. Agents targeting human Top2s are clinically active anticancer drugs whose trapping of Top2-mediated DNA breakage effectively induces genome fragmentation and cell death. To understand the structural basis of this drug action, we previously determined the structure of human Top2 β-isoform forming a cleavage complex with the drug etoposide and DNA, and described the insertion of drug into DNA cleavage site and drug-induced decoupling of catalytic groups. By developing a post-crystallization drug replacement procedure that simplifies structural characterization of drug-stabilized cleavage complexes, we have extended the analysis toward other structurally distinct drugs, m-AMSA and mitoxantrone. Besides the expected drug intercalation, a switch in ribose puckering in the 3′-nucleotide of the cleavage site was robustly observed in the new structures, representing a new mechanism for trapping the Top2 cleavage complex. Analysis of drug-binding modes and the conformational landscapes of the drug-binding pockets provide rationalization of the drugs’ structural-activity relationships and explain why Top2 mutants exhibit differential effects toward each drug. Drug design guidelines were proposed to facilitate the development of isoform-specific Top2-targeting anticancer agents. PMID:24038465

  8. On the structural basis and design guidelines for type II topoisomerase-targeting anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chyuan-Chuan; Li, Yi-Ching; Wang, Ying-Ren; Li, Tsai-Kun; Chan, Nei-Li

    2013-12-01

    Type II topoisomerases (Top2s) alter DNA topology via the formation of an enzyme-DNA adduct termed cleavage complex, which harbors a transient double-strand break in one DNA to allow the passage of another. Agents targeting human Top2s are clinically active anticancer drugs whose trapping of Top2-mediated DNA breakage effectively induces genome fragmentation and cell death. To understand the structural basis of this drug action, we previously determined the structure of human Top2 β-isoform forming a cleavage complex with the drug etoposide and DNA, and described the insertion of drug into DNA cleavage site and drug-induced decoupling of catalytic groups. By developing a post-crystallization drug replacement procedure that simplifies structural characterization of drug-stabilized cleavage complexes, we have extended the analysis toward other structurally distinct drugs, m-AMSA and mitoxantrone. Besides the expected drug intercalation, a switch in ribose puckering in the 3'-nucleotide of the cleavage site was robustly observed in the new structures, representing a new mechanism for trapping the Top2 cleavage complex. Analysis of drug-binding modes and the conformational landscapes of the drug-binding pockets provide rationalization of the drugs' structural-activity relationships and explain why Top2 mutants exhibit differential effects toward each drug. Drug design guidelines were proposed to facilitate the development of isoform-specific Top2-targeting anticancer agents.

  9. Proteomic Analysis of Anticancer TCMs Targeted at Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Yu, Ru-Yuan; He, Qing-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a rich resource of anticancer drugs. Increasing bioactive natural compounds extracted from TCMs are known to exert significant antitumor effects, but the action mechanisms of TCMs are far from clear. Proteomics, a powerful platform to comprehensively profile drug-regulated proteins, has been widely applied to the mechanistic investigation of TCMs and the identification of drug targets. In this paper, we discuss several bioactive TCM products including terpenoids, flavonoids, and glycosides that were extensively investigated by proteomics to illustrate their antitumor mechanisms in various cancers. Interestingly, many of these natural compounds isolated from TCMs mostly exert their tumor-suppressing functions by specifically targeting mitochondria in cancer cells. These TCM components induce the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of cytochrome c, and the accumulation of ROS, initiating apoptosis cascade signaling. Proteomics provides systematic views that help to understand the molecular mechanisms of the TCM in tumor cells; it bears the inherent limitations in uncovering the drug-protein interactions, however. Subcellular fractionation may be coupled with proteomics to capture and identify target proteins in mitochondria-enriched lysates. Furthermore, translating mRNA analysis, a new technology profiling the drug-regulated genes in translatome level, may be integrated into the systematic investigation, revealing global information valuable for understanding the action mechanism of TCMs. PMID:26568766

  10. A Theoretical Model for the Hormetic Dose-response Curve for Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Yoshimasu, Tatsuya; Ohashi, Takuya; Oura, Shoji; Kokawa, Yozo; Kawago, Mitsumasa; Hirai, Yoshimitsu; Miyasaka, Miwako; Nishiguchi, Haruka; Kawashima, Sayoko; Yata, Yumi; Honda, Mariko; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Okamura, Yoshitaka

    2015-11-01

    In the present article, we quantitatively evaluated the dose-response relationship of hormetic reactions of anticancer agents in vitro. Serial dilutions of gemcitabine, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, vinorelbine, and paclitaxel were administered to the A549 non-small-cell lung cancer cell line. The bi-phasic sigmoidal curve with hormetic and cytotoxic effects is given by the formula y=(a-b/(1+exp(c(*)log(x)-d)))/(1+exp(e(*)log(x)-f)), that was used to perform a non-linear least square regression. The dose-responses of the five anticancer agents were fitted to this equation. Gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil, which had the lowest ED50 for their hormetic reaction, had the most pronounced promotive effects out of the five anticancer agents tested. The hormetic reaction progressed exponentially with culturing time. Our theoretical model will be useful in predicting how hormetic reactions affect patients with malignant tumors.

  11. (-)-Arctigenin as a lead compound for anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gui-Rong; Li, Hong-Fu; Dou, De-Qiang; Xu, Yu-Bin; Jiang, Hong-Shuai; Li, Fu-Rui; Kang, Ting-Guo

    2013-01-01

    (-)-Arctigenin, an important active constituent of the traditional Chinese herb Fructus Arctii, was found to exhibit various bioactivities, so it can be used as a good lead compound for further structure modification in order to find a safer and more potent medicine. (-)-Arctigenin derivatives 1-5 of (-)-arctingen were obtained by modifying with ammonolysis at the lactone ring and sulphonylation at C (6') and C (6″) and O-demethylation at CH3O-C (3'), CH3O-C (3″) and CH3O-C (4″), and their anticancer bioactivities were examined.

  12. Aurora kinase family: a new target for anticancer drug.

    PubMed

    Macarulla, Teresa; Ramos, Francisco Javier; Tabernero, Josep

    2008-06-01

    Aurora kinases (AK) are the name given to a family of Serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) protein kinases. These proteins represent a novel family of kinases crucial for cell cycle control. The cell division process is one of the hallmarks of every living organism. Within the complete cell-cycle process, mitosis constitutes one of the most critical steps. The main purpose of mitosis is to segregate sister chromatics into two daughters cells. It is a complex biologic process, and errors in this mechanism can lead to genomic instability, a condition associated with tumorigenesis. This process is tightly regulated by several proteins, some of them acting as check-points that ultimately ensure the correct temporal and spatial coordination of this critical biologic process. Among this network of mitotic regulators, AK play a critical role in cellular division by controlling chromatid segregation. Three AK family members have been identified in mammalian cells: A, B, and C. These proteins are implicated in several vital events in mitosis. In experimental models, overexpression of AK can induce spindle defects, chromosome mis-segregation, and malignant transformation. Conversely, downregulation of AK expression cause mitotic arrest and apoptosis in tumor cell lines. The expression levels of human AK are increased in certain types of cancer including breast, colon, pancreatic, ovarian, and gastric tumors. This observation has lent an interest to this family of kinases as potential drug targets for development of new anticancer therapies. This review focuses in recent progress in the role of AK in tumorogenesis and the development of new anticancer drug against AK proteins. This manuscript also includes some relevant patents as well.

  13. Marine Peptides as Anticancer Agents: A Remedy to Mankind by Nature.

    PubMed

    Negi, Beena; Kumar, Deepak; Rawat, Diwan S

    2017-01-01

    In the search of bioactive molecules, nature has always been an important source and most of the drugs in clinic are either natural products or derived from natural products. The ocean has played significant role as thousands of molecules and their metabolites with different types of biological activity such as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-malarial, antioxidant, anti HIV and anticancer activity have been isolated from marine organisms. In particular, marine peptides have attracted much attention due to their high specificity against cancer cell lines that may be attributed to the various unusual amino acid residues and their sequences in the peptide chain. This review aims to identify the various anticancer agents isolated from the marine system and their anticancer potential. We did literature search for the anticancer peptides isolated from the different types of microorganism found in the marine system. Total one eighty eight papers were reviewed concisely and most of the important information from these papers were extracted and kept in the present manuscript. This review gives details about the isolation, anticancer potential and mechanism of action of the anticancer peptides of the marine origin. Many of these molecules such as aplidine, dolastatin 10, didemnin B, kahalalide F, elisidepsin (PM02734) are in clinical trials for the treatment of various cancers. With the interdisciplinary and collaborative research and technical advancements we can search more promising and affordable anticancer drugs in future. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Emerging Role of G-quadruplex DNA as Target in Anticancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cimino-Reale, Graziella; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Folini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    DNA has represented the most exploited target for the development of anticancer agents. It is now established that DNA may assume a variety of non-B conformations. This evidence has generated a total novel wave of interest in DNA as a cancer-associated target, since its distinct non-B structures may be regarded as sites for selective therapeutic intervention. G-quadruplexes are peculiar non-B DNA conformations that may form within guaninerich nucleic acid sequences. They are generated by a core of two or more vertically stacked G-quartets (i.e., the square planar arrangement of four guanine residues) held together by intervening loops of variable length. The evidence that G-quadruplexes are highly polymorphic and overrepresented within human genome points out at such non-B DNA conformations as druggable sites amenable of targeting by small molecules. In the present paper we will provide a concise overview on the emerging role of G-quadruplex structures forming within telomeres, gene promoters and mitochondrial DNA as a promising therapeutic target in cancer. In this context, a variety of small molecules has been documented to have excellent G-quadruplex binding/stabilizing properties and to exert good antiproliferative and antitumor activity in several in vitro and in vivo models of human cancers. Pieces of evidence indicate that targeting G-quadruplexes may represent an innovative and fascinating approach for the therapeutic management of the neoplastic disease. However, several issues still need to be addressed both at chemical and biological level before G-quadruplex-interacting molecules will turn out into effective therapeutic agents. Nevertheless, this has been an exciting, though sometime subdued, field of research over the last century. The continued improvements in methodologies and the development of specific tools will contribute not only to achieve the design and development of potentially novel anticancer approaches but also to deepen our knowledge of

  15. PEPTIDE TARGETING OF PLATINUM ANTI-CANCER DRUGS

    PubMed Central

    Ndinguri, Margaret W.; Solipuram, Rajasree; Gambrell, Robert P.; Aggarwal, Sita; Hansel, William; Hammer, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    Besides various side effects caused by platinum anticancer drugs, they are not efficiently absorbed by the tumor cells. Two Pt-peptide conjugates; cyclic mPeg-CNGRC-Pt (7) and cyclic mPeg-CNGRC-Pten (8) bearing the Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR) targeting sequence, a malonoyl linker and low molecular weight miniPEG groups have been synthesized. The platinum ligand was attached to the peptide via the carboxylic end of the malonate group at the end of the peptide. The pegylated peptide is non toxic and highly soluble in water. Platinum conjugates synthesized using the pegylated peptides are also water soluble with reduced or eliminated peptide immunogenicity. The choice of carboplatin as our untargeted platinum complex was due to the fact that malonate linker chelates platinum in a manner similar to carboplatin. Cell toxicity assay and competition assay on the PC-3 cells (CD13 positive receptors) revealed selective delivery and destruction of PC-3 cells using targeted Pt-peptide conjugates 7 and 8 significantly more than untargeted carboplatin. Platinum uptake on PC-3 cells was 12-fold more for conjugate 7 and 3-fold more for conjugate 8 compared to the untargeted carboplatin indicating selectively activation of the CD13 receptors and delivery of the conjugates to CD13 positive cells. Further analysis on effects of conjugates 7 and 8 on PC-3 cells using caspase-3/7, fluorescence microscopy and DNA fragmentation confirmed that the cells were dying by apoptosis. PMID:19775102

  16. New Pt-NNSO core anticancer agents: Structural optimization and investigation of their anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Chong, Shu Xian; Jin, Yinxue; Au-Yeung, Steve Chik Fun; To, Kenneth Kin Wah

    2017-02-12

    A series of new platinum Pt(II) compounds possessing a bidentate leaving ligand modified from oxaliplatin has been synthesized, with one of the oxygen ligating atom substituted for a sulphur atom (resulting in a Pt-NNSO coordination core structure). The general structures are R,R-diaminocyclohexane (DACH)-Pt-(methylthio)acetic acid (K4) and DACH-Pt-(thiophenylacetic acid) (K4 derivatives). Substitution of an electron donating or withdrawing group at the ortho or para position on the phenyl ring of K4 derivatives was found to affect the complexes' stability, reactivity with the biological molecules (5'-guanosine monophosphate (5'-GMP) and L-methionine (L-Met)) and anticancer activity. (1)H NMR experiments demonstrated that Pt-NNSO complexes formed a mixture of mono- and diadduct with 5'-GMP in various ratios, which are different from the classical Pt drugs (forming mainly diadduct). In addition, all of the K4 derivatives with improved lipophilicity are less deactivated by L-Met in comparison to cisplatin (CDDP) and oxaliplatin. Biological assessments showed that all Pt-NNSO complexes are less toxic than CDDP in normal porcine kidney cells and are minimally affected by drug resistance. Some of the new compounds also displayed comparable anticancer activity to CDDP or better than carboplatin in a few cancer cell lines. The lower reactivity of the Pt-NNSO compounds than CDDP towards thiol molecules, presumably leading to less efflux in resistant cancer cells, and the ability to inhibit autophagy were believed to allow the new compounds to be less affected by Pt resistance.

  17. Effects of herbal products on the metabolism and transport of anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    He, Shu-Ming; Yang, An-Kui; Li, Xiao-Tian; Du, Yao-Min; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2010-10-01

    Cancer patients on chemotherapy treatment often seek herbal therapies and this may alter the clearance of anticancer drugs. Many anticancer drugs are metabolized by CYPs and are substrates of P-glycoprotein, breast cancer resistance protein and multi-drug resistance proteins. CYPs and drug transporters are subject to inhibition and/or induction by the herbal medicines used by cancer patients and the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of anticancer agents may be altered by herbal products. There are increased reports on the interaction of herbal medicines with anticancer agents. A clinical study in cancer patients reported that treatment of St John's wort at 900 mg/day orally for 18 days decreased the plasma levels of the active metabolite of irinotecan, SN-38, by 42%. In healthy subjects, treatment with St John's wort for 2 weeks significantly decreased the systemic exposure of imatinib by 32%. Induction and/or inhibition of CYPs and transporters is considered an important mechanism for these interactions. Potential interactions of herbal medicines with anticancer agents have become a safety concern in cancer chemotherapy. Further studies are warranted to investigate the efficacy and safety profiles of herbal medicines commonly used by cancer patients.

  18. Pegylated arginine deiminase: a novel anticancer enzyme agent

    PubMed Central

    Feun, Lynn; Savaraj, Niramol

    2011-01-01

    Pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20) is a novel anticancer enzyme that produces depletion of arginine, which is a nonessential amino acid in humans. Certain tumours, such as malignant melanoma and hepatocellular carcinoma, are auxotrophic for arginine. These tumours that are sensitive to arginine depletion do not express argininosuccinate synthetase, a key enzyme in the synthesis of arginine from citrulline. ADI-PEG20 inhibits human melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas in vitro and in vivo. Phase I – II trials in patients with melanoma and hepatocellular carcinomas have shown the drug to have antitumour activity and tolerable side effects. Large Phase II trials and randomised, controlled Phase III trials are needed to determine its overall efficacy in the treatment of these malignancies and others. PMID:16787144

  19. Chrysin-benzothiazole conjugates as antioxidant and anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Bhupendra M; Patel, Rahul V; Keum, Young-Soo; Kim, Doo Hwan

    2015-12-01

    7-(4-Bromobutoxy)-5-hydroxy-2-phenyl-4H-chromen-4-one, obtained from chrysin with 1,4-dibromobutane, was combined with a wide range of 6-substituted 2-aminobenzthiazoles, which had been prepared from the corresponding anilines with potassium thiocyanate. Free radical scavenging efficacies of newer analogues were measured using DPPH and ABTS assays, in addition to the assessment of their anticancer activity against cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa and CaSki) and ovarian cancer cell line (SK-OV-3) implementing the SRB assay. Cytotoxicity of titled compounds was checked using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) non-cancer cell line. Overall, 6a-r indicated remarkable antioxidant power as DPPH and ABTS(+) scavengers; particularly the presence of halogen(s) (6g, 6h, 6j-6l) was favourable with IC50 values comparable to the control ascorbic acid. Unsubstituted benzothiazole ring favored the activity of resultant compounds (6a and 6r) against HeLa cell line, whereas presence of chlorine (6g) or a di-fluoro group (6k) was a key to exert strong action against CaSki. Moreover, a mono-fluoro (6j) and a ketonic functionality (6o) were beneficial to display anticipated anticancer effects against ovarian cancer cell line SK-OV-3. The structural assignments of the new products were done on the basis of IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of ubiquitin ligases and the proteasome in oncogenesis: novel targets for anticancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Micel, Lindsey N; Tentler, John J; Smith, Peter G; Eckhardt, Gail S

    2013-03-20

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) regulates the ubiquitination, and thus degradation and turnover, of many proteins vital to cellular regulation and function. The UPS comprises a sequential series of enzymatic processes using four key enzyme families: E1 (ubiquitin-activating enzymes), E2 (ubiquitin-carrier proteins), E3 (ubiquitin-protein ligases), and E4 (ubiquitin chain assembly factors). Because the UPS is a crucial regulator of the cell cycle, and abnormal cell-cycle control can lead to oncogenesis, aberrancies within the UPS pathway can result in a malignant cellular phenotype and thus has become an attractive target for novel anticancer agents. This article will provide an overall review of the mechanics of the UPS, describe aberrancies leading to cancer, and give an overview of current drug therapies selectively targeting the UPS.

  1. Role of Ubiquitin Ligases and the Proteasome in Oncogenesis: Novel Targets for Anticancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Micel, Lindsey N.; Tentler, John J.; Smith, Peter G.; Eckhardt, Gail S.

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) regulates the ubiquitination, and thus degradation and turnover, of many proteins vital to cellular regulation and function. The UPS comprises a sequential series of enzymatic processes using four key enzyme families: E1 (ubiquitin-activating enzymes), E2 (ubiquitin-carrier proteins), E3 (ubiquitin-protein ligases), and E4 (ubiquitin chain assembly factors). Because the UPS is a crucial regulator of the cell cycle, and abnormal cell-cycle control can lead to oncogenesis, aberrancies within the UPS pathway can result in a malignant cellular phenotype and thus has become an attractive target for novel anticancer agents. This article will provide an overall review of the mechanics of the UPS, describe aberrancies leading to cancer, and give an overview of current drug therapies selectively targeting the UPS. PMID:23358974

  2. Design of Enzymatically Cleavable Prodrugs of a Potent Platinum-Containing Anticancer Agent

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Song; Pickard, Amanda J.; Kucera, Gregory L.

    2014-01-01

    Using a versatile synthetic approach, a new class of potential ester prodrugs of highly potent, but systemically too toxic, platinum–acridine anticancer agents was generated. The new hybrids contain a hydroxyl group, which has been masked with a cleavable lipophilic acyl moiety. Both butanoic (butyric) and bulkier 2-propanepentanoic (valproic) esters were introduced. The goals of this design were to improve the drug-like properties (e.g., logD) and to reduce the systemic toxicity of the pharmacophore. Two distinct pathways by which the target compounds undergo effective ester hydrolysis, the proposed activating step, have been confirmed: platinum-assisted, self-immolative ester cleavage in a low-chloride environment (LC-ESMS, NMR spectroscopy) and enzymatic cleavage by human carboxylesterase-2 (hCES-2) (LC-ESMS). The valproic acid ester derivatives are the first example of a metal-containing agent cleavable by the pro-drug-converting enzyme. They show excellent chemical stability and reduced systemic toxicity. Preliminary results from screening in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines (A549, NCI-H1435) suggest that the mechanism of the valproic esters may involve intracellular deesterification. PMID:25303639

  3. Plant Anticancer Agents XXXIII. Constituents of Passerina vulgaris1.

    PubMed

    Ji-Xian, G; Handa, S S; Pezzuto, J M; Kinghorn, A D; Farnsworth, N R

    1984-06-01

    Two lignans of known structure, (+)-syringaresinol, a cytotoxic agent, and (+)-nortrachelogenin, a compound with demonstrated antileukemic activity, were isolated from a biologically active extract of the stems of PASSERINA VULGARIS.

  4. Recent development in [1,4]benzodiazepines as potent anticancer agents: a review.

    PubMed

    Gill, Rupinder Kaur; Kaushik, Shiv Om; Chugh, Jasreen; Bansal, Sumit; Shah, Anamik; Bariwal, Jitender

    2014-01-01

    The [1,4]benzodiazepine is an important class of heterocyclic compounds and clinically used for many ailments in humans. The [1,4]benzodiazepine has unique structure that mimics the peptide linkage. This interesting observation completely shifted the interest of medicinal chemist for [1,4]benzodiazepine from CNS acting drugs to anticancer agents. During last few decades, a large number of reports have appeared in the literature highlighting the anticancer activity of [1,4]benzodiazepines. Here, in this article, we have discussed the brief synthesis, origin of [1,4]benzodiazepines as anticancer agent, their mechanism of action and latest developments in this field. We have compiled the most important literature reports from last few decades till date.

  5. Alopecia in patients treated with molecularly targeted anticancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Belum, V R; Marulanda, K; Ensslin, C; Gorcey, L; Parikh, T; Wu, S; Busam, K J; Gerber, P A; Lacouture, M E

    2015-12-01

    The introduction of molecularly targeted anticancer therapies presents new challenges, among which dermatologic adverse events are noteworthy. Alopecia in particular is frequently reported, but the true incidence is not known. We sought to ascertain the incidence and risk of developing alopecia during treatment with approved inhibitors of oncogenic pathways and molecules [anaplastic lymphoma kinase, breakpoint cluster region-abelson, B-rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma, Bruton's tyrosine kinase, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, epidermal growth factor receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2, Janus kinase, MAPK/ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) Kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, smoothened, vascular endothelial growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet derived growth factor receptor; proteasomes; CD20, CD30, CD52]. Electronic database (PubMed, Web of Science) and ASCO meeting abstract searches were conducted to identify clinical trials reporting alopecia. Meta-analysis was conducted utilizing fixed- or random-effects models. The calculated overall incidence of all-grade alopecia was 14.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 12.6% to 17.2%]-lowest with bortezomib, 2.2% (95% CI 0.4% to 10.9%), and highest with vismodegib, 56.9% (95% CI 50.5% to 63.1%). There was an increased risk of all-grade alopecia [relative risk (RR), 7.9 (95% CI 6.2-10.09, P ≤ 0.01)] compared with placebo, but when compared with chemotherapy, the risk was lower [RR, 0.32 (95% CI 0.2-0.55, P ≤ 0.01)]. Targeted therapies are associated with an increased risk of alopecia. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Alopecia in patients treated with molecularly targeted anticancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Belum, V. R.; Marulanda, K.; Ensslin, C.; Gorcey, L.; Parikh, T.; Wu, S.; Busam, K. J.; Gerber, P. A.; Lacouture, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The introduction of molecularly targeted anticancer therapies presents new challenges, among which dermatologic adverse events are noteworthy. Alopecia in particular is frequently reported, but the true incidence is not known. Patients and methods We sought to ascertain the incidence and risk of developing alopecia during treatment with approved inhibitors of oncogenic pathways and molecules [anaplastic lymphoma kinase, breakpoint cluster region-abelson, B-rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma, Bruton's tyrosine kinase, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, epidermal growth factor receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2, Janus kinase, MAPK/ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) Kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, smoothened, vascular endothelial growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet derived growth factor receptor; proteasomes; CD20, CD30, CD52]. Electronic database (PubMed, Web of Science) and ASCO meeting abstract searches were conducted to identify clinical trials reporting alopecia. Meta-analysis was conducted utilizing fixed- or random-effects models. Results The calculated overall incidence of all-grade alopecia was 14.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 12.6% to 17.2%]—lowest with bortezomib, 2.2% (95% CI 0.4% to 10.9%), and highest with vismodegib, 56.9% (95% CI 50.5% to 63.1%). There was an increased risk of all-grade alopecia [relative risk (RR), 7.9 (95% CI 6.2–10.09, P ≤ 0.01)] compared with placebo, but when compared with chemotherapy, the risk was lower [RR, 0.32 (95% CI 0.2–0.55, P ≤ 0.01)]. Conclusions Targeted therapies are associated with an increased risk of alopecia. PMID:26387145

  7. Prediction and Early Evaluation of Anticancer Therapy Response: From Imaging of Drug Efflux Pumps to Targeted Therapy Response.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingqing; Li, Zheng; Li, Shaoshun

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) describes the resistance of tumor cells to chemotherapy and has been ascribed to the overexpression of drug efflux pumps. Molecular imaging of drug efflux pumps is helpful to identify the patients who may be resistant to the chemotherapy and thus will avoid the unnecessary treatment and increase the therapeutic effectiveness. Imaging probes targeting drug efflux pumps can non-invasively evaluate the Pgp function and play an important role in identification of MDR, prediction of response, and monitoring MDR modulation. On the other hand, new anticancer agents based on molecular targets such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and angiogenic factor receptor may potentially be combined with chemotherapeutic drugs to overcome the MDR. Imaging of molecular targets visualize treatment response of patients at molecular level vividly and help to select right patients for certain targeted anticancer therapy. Among all the imaging modalities, nuclear imaging including positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging has the greatest promise for rapid translation to the clinic and can realize quantitative visualization of biochemical processes in vivo. In this review, we will summarize the nuclear imaging probes utilized for predicting and evaluating the early anticancer therapy response.99mTc labeled agents and PET based radiopharmaceuticals like 18F-Paclitaxel, 11C-Verapamil for drug efflux pumps imaging will be discussed here. Moreover, molecular imaging probes used for targeted therapy response evaluation like 18F-Tamoxifen,89Zr-Trastuzumab will also be introduced in this review.

  8. Mitochondria death/survival signaling pathways in cardiotoxicity induced by anthracyclines and anticancer-targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Montaigne, David; Hurt, Christopher; Neviere, Remi

    2012-01-01

    Anthracyclines remain the cornerstone of treatment in many malignancies but these agents have a cumulative dose relationship with cardiotoxicity. Development of cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure induced by anthracyclines are typically dose-dependent, irreversible, and cumulative. Although past studies of cardiotoxicity have focused on anthracyclines, more recently interest has turned to anticancer drugs that target many proteins kinases, such as tyrosine kinases. An attractive model to explain the mechanism of this cardiotoxicity could be myocyte loss through cell death pathways. Inhibition of mitochondrial transition permeability is a valuable tool to prevent doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. In response to anthracycline treatment, activation of several protein kinases, neuregulin/ErbB2 signaling, and transcriptional factors modify mitochondrial functions that determine cell death or survival through the modulation of mitochondrial membrane permeability. Cellular response to anthracyclines is also modulated by a myriad of transcriptional factors that influence cell fate. Several novel targeted chemotherapeutic agents have been associated with a small but worrying risk of left ventricular dysfunction. Agents such as trastuzumab and tyrosine kinase inhibitors can lead to cardiotoxicity that is fundamentally different from that caused by anthracyclines, whereas biological effects converge to the mitochondria as a critical target.

  9. Mitochondria Death/Survival Signaling Pathways in Cardiotoxicity Induced by Anthracyclines and Anticancer-Targeted Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Montaigne, David; Hurt, Christopher; Neviere, Remi

    2012-01-01

    Anthracyclines remain the cornerstone of treatment in many malignancies but these agents have a cumulative dose relationship with cardiotoxicity. Development of cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure induced by anthracyclines are typically dose-dependent, irreversible, and cumulative. Although past studies of cardiotoxicity have focused on anthracyclines, more recently interest has turned to anticancer drugs that target many proteins kinases, such as tyrosine kinases. An attractive model to explain the mechanism of this cardiotoxicity could be myocyte loss through cell death pathways. Inhibition of mitochondrial transition permeability is a valuable tool to prevent doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. In response to anthracycline treatment, activation of several protein kinases, neuregulin/ErbB2 signaling, and transcriptional factors modify mitochondrial functions that determine cell death or survival through the modulation of mitochondrial membrane permeability. Cellular response to anthracyclines is also modulated by a myriad of transcriptional factors that influence cell fate. Several novel targeted chemotherapeutic agents have been associated with a small but worrying risk of left ventricular dysfunction. Agents such as trastuzumab and tyrosine kinase inhibitors can lead to cardiotoxicity that is fundamentally different from that caused by anthracyclines, whereas biological effects converge to the mitochondria as a critical target. PMID:22482055

  10. A Team-based Assignment to Integrate Basic Science and Pharmacotherapeutic Principles for Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Sonali; Jungsuwadee, Paiboon; Sakharkar, Prashant

    2017-06-01

    Objective. To implement and evaluate an active-learning, team-based assignment centered on anticancer agents for the integration of basic science and pharmacotherapeutic principles. Methods. Student teams were assigned a specific anticancer agent and were expected to answer a series of questions on the written section of the assignment, followed by a presentation to the class. Each assignment was assessed using a grading rubric that was mapped to the 2013 CAPE educational outcomes. Student perceptions of the assignment were assessed using a short survey. Results. Student cohort performance on the assignment was in the B range (83%) with a mean of 33.2 out of 40. Using the grading rubric, the 12 student cohorts performed particularly well under professionalism (Domain 4.4) that focuses on personal and professional development from CAPE 2013 with means >4 on a 1-5 scale. Student impressions of the assignment suggested that students believed the assignment had a positive effect on their learning and should be continued. Conclusion. The assignment provided a focused review of basic science and pharmacotherapeutic principles and enabled integration of concepts relating to the therapeutic application of anticancer agents, and management of anticancer agent mediated adverse effects. The assignment could contribute toward preparing students for the evolving role of the pharmacist in the management of cancer.

  11. A Team-based Assignment to Integrate Basic Science and Pharmacotherapeutic Principles for Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Jungsuwadee, Paiboon; Sakharkar, Prashant

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To implement and evaluate an active-learning, team-based assignment centered on anticancer agents for the integration of basic science and pharmacotherapeutic principles. Methods. Student teams were assigned a specific anticancer agent and were expected to answer a series of questions on the written section of the assignment, followed by a presentation to the class. Each assignment was assessed using a grading rubric that was mapped to the 2013 CAPE educational outcomes. Student perceptions of the assignment were assessed using a short survey. Results. Student cohort performance on the assignment was in the B range (83%) with a mean of 33.2 out of 40. Using the grading rubric, the 12 student cohorts performed particularly well under professionalism (Domain 4.4) that focuses on personal and professional development from CAPE 2013 with means >4 on a 1-5 scale. Student impressions of the assignment suggested that students believed the assignment had a positive effect on their learning and should be continued. Conclusion. The assignment provided a focused review of basic science and pharmacotherapeutic principles and enabled integration of concepts relating to the therapeutic application of anticancer agents, and management of anticancer agent mediated adverse effects. The assignment could contribute toward preparing students for the evolving role of the pharmacist in the management of cancer. PMID:28720921

  12. Cost savings from dose rounding of biologic anticancer agents in adults.

    PubMed

    Winger, Brenda J; Clements, Elizabeth A; DeYoung, Jaculin L; O'Rourke, Timothy J; Claypool, Deborah L; Vachon, Steve; VanDyke, Thomas H; Zimmer-Young, Jennifer; Kintzel, Polly E

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine the cost savings related to a dose-rounding process for adult biologic anticancer agents. Biologic anticancer agents prepared by the inpatient pharmacy were identified retrospectively through completed chemotherapy preparation checklists and medication orders on file in the pharmacy or by the clinical pharmacist for adult oncology from the medical records of patients in her practice. The specific products screened for evaluation were aldesleukin, bevacizumab, cetuximab, denileukin diftitox, gemtuzumab, rituximab, and trastuzumab. Data collected included drug name, ordered dose, rounded dose, and product vials not wasted. Specific drug costs were provided by the department's purchasing office. The project was reviewed and approved by the institutional review board to allow retrospective data collection from patient records. Cost savings were evaluated retrospectively for the time period of January 1, 2005 through March 31, 2005. One hundred and twenty-six orders for biologic anticancer agents were processed by the pharmacy department during the 3-month time period of data collection. Dose rounding could reduce drug wastage for 42% of these orders. Potential cost savings from dose rounding was $24,434 for the 3-month interval evaluated. However, nonadherence to dose rounding for 29 rituximab orders decreased the actual cost savings to $15,922. Individual staff education was reinforced to address nonadherence. Routine dose rounding of biologic anticancer agents to an amount within 10% of the ordered dose achieved cost savings through reduction of drug wastage at our institution.

  13. Geranylgeranyltransferase I as a target for anti-cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Philips, Mark R.; Cox, Adrienne D.

    2007-01-01

    Posttranslational modification is critical for the function of the gene products of ras oncogenes, which are frequently mutated in cancer. Ras proteins are modified by farnesyltransferase (FTase), but many related small GTPases that also end in a CAAX motif (where C is cysteine, A is often an aliphatic amino acid, and X is any amino acid) are modified by a closely related enzyme known as geranylgeranyltransferase type I (GGTase-I). Accordingly, inhibitors for both of these enzymes have been developed, and those active against FTase are in clinical trials. In this issue of the JCI, Sjogren et al. report the development of a mouse strain homozygous for a conditional allele of the gene that encodes GGTase-I (see the related article beginning on page 1294). They found that ablation of the GGTase-I–encoding gene in cells destined to produce lung tumors driven by oncogenic K-Ras resulted in delayed onset and decreased severity of disease, validating in a genetic model the theory that GGTase-I is a good target for anti-cancer drug development. PMID:17476354

  14. Fanconi anemia D2 protein confers chemoresistance in response to the anticancer agent, irofulven.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutian; Wiltshire, Timothy; Senft, Jamie; Wenger, Sharon L; Reed, Eddie; Wang, Weixin

    2006-12-01

    The Fanconi anemia-BRCA pathway of genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically repressed in human cancer. The proteins of this pathway play pivotal roles in DNA damage signaling and repair. Irofulven is one of a new class of anticancer agents that are analogues of mushroom-derived illudin toxins. Preclinical studies and clinical trials have shown that irofulven is effective against several tumor cell types. The exact nature of irofulven-induced DNA damage is not completely understood. Previously, we have shown that irofulven activates ATM and its targets, NBS1, SMC1, CHK2, and p53. In this study, we hypothesize that irofulven induces DNA double-strand breaks and FANCD2 may play an important role in modulating cellular responses and chemosensitivity in response to irofulven treatment. By using cells that are proficient or deficient for FANCD2, ATR, or ATM, we showed that irofulven induces FANCD2 monoubiquitination and nuclear foci formation. ATR is important in mediating irofulven-induced FANCD2 monoubiquitination. Furthermore, we showed that FANCD2 plays a critical role in maintaining chromosome integrity and modulating chemosensitivity in response to irofulven-induced DNA damage. Therefore, this study suggests that it might be clinically significant to target irofulven therapy to cancers defective for proteins of the Fanconi anemia-BRCA pathway.

  15. Novel glyoxalase-I inhibitors possessing a “zinc-binding feature” as potential anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Al-Balas, Qosay A; Hassan, Mohammad A; Al-Shar’i, Nizar A; Mhaidat, Nizar M; Almaaytah, Ammar M; Al-Mahasneh, Fatima M; Isawi, Israa H

    2016-01-01

    Background The glyoxalase system including two thiol-dependent enzymes, glyoxalase I (Glo-I) and glyoxalase II, plays an important role in a ubiquitous metabolic pathway involved in cellular detoxification of cytotoxic 2-oxoaldehydes. Tumor cells have high glycolytic activity, leading to increased cellular levels of these toxic metabolites. The increased activity of the detoxification system in cancerous cells makes this pathway a viable target for developing novel anticancer agents. In this study, we examined the potential utility of non-glutathione-based inhibitors of the Glo-I enzyme as novel anticancer drugs. Methods Computer-aided drug design techniques, such as customized pharmacophoric features, virtual screening, and flexible docking, were used to achieve the project goals. Retrieved hits were extensively filtered and subsequently docked into the active site of the enzyme. The biological activities of retrieved hits were assessed using an in vitro assay against Glo-I. Results Since Glo-I is a zinc metalloenzyme, a customized Zn-binding pharmacophoric feature was used to search for selective inhibitors via virtual screening of a small-molecule database. Seven hits were selected, purchased, and biologically evaluated. Three of the seven hits inhibited Glo-I activity, the most effective of which exerted 76.4% inhibition at a concentration of 25 µM. Conclusion We successfully identified a potential Glo-I inhibitor that can serve as a lead compound for further optimization. Moreover, our in silico and experimental results were highly correlated. Hence, the docking protocol adopted in this study may be efficiently employed in future optimization steps. PMID:27574401

  16. Novel glyoxalase-I inhibitors possessing a "zinc-binding feature" as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Al-Balas, Qosay A; Hassan, Mohammad A; Al-Shar'i, Nizar A; Mhaidat, Nizar M; Almaaytah, Ammar M; Al-Mahasneh, Fatima M; Isawi, Israa H

    2016-01-01

    The glyoxalase system including two thiol-dependent enzymes, glyoxalase I (Glo-I) and glyoxalase II, plays an important role in a ubiquitous metabolic pathway involved in cellular detoxification of cytotoxic 2-oxoaldehydes. Tumor cells have high glycolytic activity, leading to increased cellular levels of these toxic metabolites. The increased activity of the detoxification system in cancerous cells makes this pathway a viable target for developing novel anticancer agents. In this study, we examined the potential utility of non-glutathione-based inhibitors of the Glo-I enzyme as novel anticancer drugs. Computer-aided drug design techniques, such as customized pharmacophoric features, virtual screening, and flexible docking, were used to achieve the project goals. Retrieved hits were extensively filtered and subsequently docked into the active site of the enzyme. The biological activities of retrieved hits were assessed using an in vitro assay against Glo-I. Since Glo-I is a zinc metalloenzyme, a customized Zn-binding pharmacophoric feature was used to search for selective inhibitors via virtual screening of a small-molecule database. Seven hits were selected, purchased, and biologically evaluated. Three of the seven hits inhibited Glo-I activity, the most effective of which exerted 76.4% inhibition at a concentration of 25 µM. We successfully identified a potential Glo-I inhibitor that can serve as a lead compound for further optimization. Moreover, our in silico and experimental results were highly correlated. Hence, the docking protocol adopted in this study may be efficiently employed in future optimization steps.

  17. Targeting autophagy in cancer stem cells as an anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Dan; Yu, Jin; Dong, Hui; Zhang, Jianwei; Yang, Shiming

    2017-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which comprise a small proportion of total cancer cells, have special capacities for self-renewal, differentiation and tumor formation. Currently, CSCs are regarded as the major cause of the failure in anticancer therapy, such as chemoresistance and/or radioresistance, tumor recurrence and metastasis. Autophagy, a process of cellular self-digestion and response to stress, has a role in tumor formation and progression, and it may play a dual role in CSCs-related resistance to anticancer therapy. Most researchers believe that autophagy contributes to stemness maintenance of CSCs and is responsible for the failure of anticancer therapy. Unexpectedly, several studies have also suggested that loss of stemness in CSCs could be mediated by autophagy. Here, we review the recent advances in CSCs and autophagy, especially analyze the complex relationship between them, and hope to apply this new knowledge to the strategies for anticancer therapy.

  18. Bioassay-Guided Isolation of Sesquiterpene Coumarins from Ferula narthex Bioss: A New Anticancer Agent

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Mahboob; Khan, Ajmal; Wadood, Abdul; Khan, Ayesha; Bashir, Shumaila; Aman, Akhtar; Jan, Abdul Khaliq; Rauf, Abdur; Ahmad, Bashir; Khan, Abdur Rahman; Farooq, Umar

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of cancer management with chemotherapy (anticancer drugs) is to kill the neoplastic (cancerous) cell instead of a normal healthy cell. The bioassay-guided isolation of two new sesquiterpene coumarins (compounds 1 and 2) have been carried out from Ferula narthex collected from Chitral, locally known as “Raw.” Anticancer activity of crude and all fractions have been carried out to prevent carcinogenesis by using MTT assay. The n-hexane fraction showed good activity with an IC50 value of 5.434 ± 0.249 μg/mL, followed by crude MeFn extract 7.317 ± 0.535 μg/mL, and CHCl3 fraction 9.613 ± 0.548 μg/mL. Compounds 1 and 2 were isolated from chloroform fraction. Among tested pure compounds, compound 1 showed good anticancer activity with IC50 value of 14.074 ± 0.414 μg/mL. PASS (Prediction of Activity Spectra) analysis of the compound 1 was carried out, in order to predicts their binding probability with anti-cancer target. As a results the compound 1 showed binding probability with human histone acetyltransferase with Pa (probability to be active) value of 0.303. The compound 1 was docked against human histone acetyltransferase (anti-cancer drug target) by using molecular docking simulations. Molecular docking results showed that compound 1 accommodate well in the anti-cancer drug target. Moreover the activity support cancer chemo preventive activity of different compounds isolated from the genus Ferula, in accordance with the previously reported anticancer activities of the genus. PMID:26909039

  19. Design, synthesis, and anticancer activity of novel berberine derivatives prepared via CuAAC "click" chemistry as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Yan, Tian-Hua; Yan, Lan; Li, Qian; Wang, Rui-Lian; Hu, Zhen-Lin; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Sun, Qing-Yan; Cao, Yong-Bing

    2014-01-01

    A series of novel derivatives of phenyl-substituted berberine triazolyls has been designed and synthesized via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition click chemistry in an attempt to develop antitumor agents. All of the compounds were evaluated for anticancer activity against a panel of three human cancer cell lines, including MCF-7 (breast), SW-1990 (pancreatic), and SMMC-7721 (liver) and the noncancerous human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) cell lines. The results indicated that most of the compounds displayed notable anticancer activities against the MCF-7 cells compared with berberine. Among these derivatives, compound 16 showed the most potent inhibitory activity against the SW-1990 and SMMC-7721 cell lines, with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 8.54±1.97 μM and 11.87±1.83 μM, respectively. Compound 36 exhibited the most potent inhibitory activity against the MCF-7 cell line, with an IC50 value of 12.57±1.96 μM. Compound 16 and compound 36 exhibited low cytotoxicity in the HUVEC cell line, with IC50 values of 25.49±3.24 μM and 30.47±3.47 μM. Furthermore, compounds 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 32, and 36 exhibited much better selectivity than berberine toward the normal cell line HUVEC.

  20. A translational study "case report" on the small molecule "energy blocker" 3-bromopyruvate (3BP) as a potent anticancer agent: from bench side to bedside.

    PubMed

    Ko, Y H; Verhoeven, H A; Lee, M J; Corbin, D J; Vogl, T J; Pedersen, P L

    2012-02-01

    The small alkylating molecule, 3-bromopyruvate (3BP), is a potent and specific anticancer agent. 3BP is different in its action from most currently available chemo-drugs. Thus, 3BP targets cancer cells' energy metabolism, both its high glycolysis ("Warburg Effect") and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. This inhibits/ blocks total energy production leading to a depletion of energy reserves. Moreover, 3BP as an "Energy Blocker", is very rapid in killing such cells. This is in sharp contrast to most commonly used anticancer agents that usually take longer to show a noticeable effect. In addition, 3BP at its effective concentrations that kill cancer cells has little or no effect on normal cells. Therefore, 3BP can be considered a member, perhaps one of the first, of a new class of anticancer agents. Following 3BP's discovery as a novel anticancer agent in vitro in the Year 2000 (Published in Ko et al. Can Lett 173:83-91, 2001), and also as a highly effective and rapid anticancer agent in vivo shortly thereafter (Ko et al. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 324:269-275, 2004), its efficacy as a potent anticancer agent in humans was demonstrated. Here, based on translational research, we report results of a case study in a young adult cancer patient with fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, a bench side discovery in the Department of Biological Chemistry at Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine was taken effectively to bedside treatment at Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt/Main Hospital, Germany. The results obtained hold promise for 3BP as a future cancer therapeutic without apparent cyto-toxicity when formulated properly.

  1. Monocarboxylate Transporter 1 Inhibitors as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Potent monocarboxylate transporter 1 inhibitors (MCT1) have been developed based on α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid template. Structure–activity relationship studies demonstrate that the introduction of p-N, N-dialkyl/diaryl, and o-methoxy groups into cyanocinnamic acid has maximal MCT1 inhibitory activity. Systemic toxicity studies in healthy ICR mice with few potent MCT1 inhibitors indicate normal body weight gains in treated animals. In vivo tumor growth inhibition studies in colorectal adenocarcinoma (WiDr cell line) in nude mice xenograft models establish that compound 27 exhibits single agent activity in inhibiting the tumor growth. PMID:26005533

  2. Monocarboxylate transporter 1 inhibitors as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Gurrapu, Shirisha; Jonnalagadda, Sravan K; Alam, Mohammad A; Nelson, Grady L; Sneve, Mary G; Drewes, Lester R; Mereddy, Venkatram R

    2015-05-14

    Potent monocarboxylate transporter 1 inhibitors (MCT1) have been developed based on α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid template. Structure-activity relationship studies demonstrate that the introduction of p-N, N-dialkyl/diaryl, and o-methoxy groups into cyanocinnamic acid has maximal MCT1 inhibitory activity. Systemic toxicity studies in healthy ICR mice with few potent MCT1 inhibitors indicate normal body weight gains in treated animals. In vivo tumor growth inhibition studies in colorectal adenocarcinoma (WiDr cell line) in nude mice xenograft models establish that compound 27 exhibits single agent activity in inhibiting the tumor growth.

  3. Investigation of Vietnamese plants for potential anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Lynette Bueno; Still, Patrick C.; Naman, C. Benjamin; Ren, Yulin; Pan, Li; Chai, Hee-Byung; Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza J.; Ninh, Tran Ngoc; Van Thanh, Bui; Swanson, Steven M.; Soejarto, Djaja D.

    2014-01-01

    Higher plants continue to afford humankind with many new drugs, for a variety of disease types. In this review, recent phytochemical and biological progress is presented for part of a collaborative multi-institutional project directed towards the discovery of new antitumor agents. The specific focus is on bioactive natural products isolated and characterized structurally from tropical plants collected in Vietnam. The plant collection, identification, and processing steps are described, and the natural products isolated from these species are summarized with their biological activities. PMID:25395897

  4. Polyamide platinum anticancer complexes designed to target specific DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, David; Wheate, Nial J; Ralph, Stephen F; Howard, Warren A; Tor, Yitzhak; Aldrich-Wright, Janice R

    2006-07-24

    Two new platinum complexes, trans-chlorodiammine[N-(2-aminoethyl)-4-[4-(N-methylimidazole-2-carboxamido)-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamido]-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamide]platinum(II) chloride (DJ1953-2) and trans-chlorodiammine[N-(6-aminohexyl)-4-[4-(N-methylimidazole-2-carboxamido)-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamido]-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamide]platinum(II) chloride (DJ1953-6) have been synthesized as proof-of-concept molecules in the design of agents that can specifically target genes in DNA. Coordinate covalent binding to DNA was demonstrated with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Using circular dichroism, these complexes were found to show greater DNA binding affinity to the target sequence: d(CATTGTCAGAC)(2), than toward either d(GTCTGTCAATG)(2,) which contains different flanking sequences, or d(CATTGAGAGAC)(2), which contains a double base pair mismatch sequence. DJ1953-2 unwinds the DNA helix by around 13 degrees , but neither metal complex significantly affects the DNA melting temperature. Unlike simple DNA minor groove binders, DJ1953-2 is able to inhibit, in vitro, RNA synthesis. The cytotoxicity of both metal complexes in the L1210 murine leukaemia cell line was also determined, with DJ1953-6 (34 microM) more active than DJ1953-2 (>50 microM). These results demonstrate the potential of polyamide platinum complexes and provide the structural basis for designer agents that are able to recognize biologically relevant sequences and prevent DNA transcription and replication.

  5. Repurposing the Clinically Efficacious Antifungal Agent Itraconazole as an Anticancer Chemotherapeutic.

    PubMed

    Pace, Jennifer R; DeBerardinis, Albert M; Sail, Vibhavari; Tacheva-Grigorova, Silvia K; Chan, Kelly A; Tran, Raymond; Raccuia, Daniel S; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Hadden, M Kyle

    2016-04-28

    Itraconazole (ITZ) is an FDA-approved member of the triazole class of antifungal agents. Two recent drug repurposing screens identified ITZ as a promising anticancer chemotherapeutic that inhibits both the angiogenesis and hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathways. We have synthesized and evaluated first- and second-generation ITZ analogues for their anti-Hh and antiangiogenic activities to probe more fully the structural requirements for these anticancer properties. Our overall results suggest that the triazole functionality is required for ITZ-mediated inhibition of angiogenesis but that it is not essential for inhibition of Hh signaling. The synthesis and evaluation of stereochemically defined des-triazole ITZ analogues also provides key information as to the optimal configuration around the dioxolane ring of the ITZ scaffold. Finally, the results from our studies suggest that two distinct cellular mechanisms of action govern the anticancer properties of the ITZ scaffold.

  6. Recent developments of C-4 substituted coumarin derivatives as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Dandriyal, Jyoti; Singla, Ramit; Kumar, Manvendra; Jaitak, Vikas

    2016-08-25

    Cancer is a prominent cause of death in global. Currently, the numbers of drugs that are in clinical practice are having a high prevalence of side effect and multidrug resistance. Researchers have made an attempt to expand a suitable anticancer drug that has no MDR and side effect. Coumarin scaffold became an attractive subject due to their broad spectrum of pharmacological activities. Coumarin derivatives extensively explored for anticancer activities as it possesses minimum side effect along with multi-drug reversal activity. Coumarin derivatives can act by various mechanisms on different tumor cell lines depending on substitution pattern of the core structure of coumarin. Substitution on coumarin nucleus leads to the search for more potent compounds. In this review, we have made an effort to give a synthetic strategy for the preparation of C-4 substituted coumarin derivatives as anticancer agents based on their mechanism of action and also discuss the SAR of the most active compound.

  7. Reprogramming urokinase into an antibody-recruiting anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Jakobsche, Charles E; McEnaney, Patrick J; Zhang, Andrew X; Spiegel, David A

    2012-02-17

    Synthetic compounds for controlling or creating human immunity have the potential to revolutionize disease treatment. Motivated by challenges in this arena, we report herein a strategy to target metastatic cancer cells for immune-mediated destruction by targeting the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and uPAR are overexpressed on the surfaces of a wide range of invasive cancer cells and are believed to contribute substantially to the migratory propensities of these cells. The key component of our approach is an antibody-recruiting molecule that targets the urokinase receptor (ARM-U). This bifunctional construct is formed by selectively, covalently attaching an antibody-binding small molecule to the active site of the urokinase enzyme. We demonstrate that ARM-U is capable of directing antibodies to the surfaces of target cancer cells and mediating both antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against multiple human cancer cell lines. We believe that the reported strategy has the potential to inform novel treatment options for a variety of deadly, invasive cancers.

  8. Ligand substitutions between ruthenium-cymene compounds can control protein versus DNA targeting and anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Adhireksan, Zenita; Davey, Gabriela E; Campomanes, Pablo; Groessl, Michael; Clavel, Catherine M; Yu, Haojie; Nazarov, Alexey A; Yeo, Charmian Hui Fang; Ang, Wee Han; Dröge, Peter; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Dyson, Paul J; Davey, Curt A

    2014-03-18

    Ruthenium compounds have become promising alternatives to platinum drugs by displaying specific activities against different cancers and favourable toxicity and clearance properties. Nonetheless, their molecular targeting and mechanism of action are poorly understood. Here we study two prototypical ruthenium-arene agents-the cytotoxic antiprimary tumour compound [(η(6)-p-cymene)Ru(ethylene-diamine)Cl]PF6 and the relatively non-cytotoxic antimetastasis compound [(η(6)-p-cymene)Ru(1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane)Cl2]-and discover that the former targets the DNA of chromatin, while the latter preferentially forms adducts on the histone proteins. Using a novel 'atom-to-cell' approach, we establish the basis for the surprisingly site-selective adduct formation behaviour and distinct cellular impact of these two chemically similar anticancer agents, which suggests that the cytotoxic effects arise largely from DNA lesions, whereas the protein adducts may be linked to the other therapeutic activities. Our study shows promise for developing new ruthenium drugs, via ligand-based modulation of DNA versus protein binding and thus cytotoxic potential, to target distinguishing epigenetic features of cancer cells.

  9. Histone deacetylase inhibitors: understanding a new wave of anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Villar-Garea, Ana; Esteller, Manel

    2004-11-01

    Cancer is as much an epigenetic disease as it is a genetic and cytogenetic disease. The discovery that drastic changes in DNA methylation and histone modifications are commonly found in human tumors has inspired various laboratories and pharmaceutical companies to develop and study epigenetic drugs. One of the most promising groups of agents is the inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs), which have different biochemical and biologic properties but have a single common activity: induction of acetylation in histones, the key proteins in nucleosome and chromatin structure. One of the main mechanisms of action of HDAC inhibitors is the transcriptional reactivation of dormant tumor-suppressor genes, such as p21WAF1. However, their pleiotropic nature leaves open the possibility that their well-known differentiation, cell-cycle arrest and apoptotic properties are also involved in other functions associated with HDAC inhibition. Many phase I clinical trials indicate that HDAC inhibitors appear to be well-tolerated drugs. Thus, the field is ready for rigorous biologic and clinical scrutiny to validate the therapeutic potential of these drugs. Our current data indicate that the use of HDAC inhibitors, probably in association with classical chemotherapy drugs or in combination with DNA-demethylating agents, could be promising for cancer patients.

  10. Mefloquine-oxazolidine derivatives: a new class of anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Felipe A R; Bomfim, Igor da S; Cavalcanti, Bruno C; Pessoa, Claudia; Goncalves, Raoni S B; Wardell, James L; Wardell, Solange M S V; de Souza, Marcus V N

    2014-01-01

    A series of 23 racemic mefloquine-oxazolidine derivatives, 4-[3-(aryl)hexahydro[1,3]oxazolo[3,4-a]pyridin-1-yl]-2,8-bis(trifluoromethyl)quinolines, derived from (R*, S*)-(±)-mefloquine and arenealdehydes, have been evaluated for their activity against four cancer cell lines (HCT-8, OVCAR-8, HL-60, and SF-295). Good cytotoxicities have been determined with IC50 values ranging from 0.59 to 4.79 μg/mL. In general compounds with aryl groups having strong electron-releasing substituents, such as HO and MeO, or electron-rich heteroaryl groups, for example imidazol-2-y-l, are active. However, other factors such as steric effects may play a role. As both the active and non-active conformations of the mefloquine-oxazolidine derivatives are similar, it is concluded that molecular conformations do not play a significant role either. This study is the first to evaluate mefloquine derivatives as antitumor agents. The mefloquine-oxazolidine derivatives are considered to be useful leads for the rational design of new antitumor agents.

  11. Heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) as anticancer target for drug discovery: an ample computational perspective.

    PubMed

    Kumalo, Hezekiel M; Bhakat, Soumendranath; Soliman, Mahmoud E

    2015-11-01

    There are over 100 different types of cancer, and each is classified based on the type of cell that is initially affected. If left untreated, cancer can result in serious health problems and eventually death. Recently, the paradigm of cancer chemotherapy has evolved to use a combination approach, which involves the use of multiple drugs each of which targets an individual protein. Inhibition of heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is one of the novel key cancer targets. Because of its ability to target several signaling pathways, Hsp90 inhibition emerged as a useful strategy to treat a wide variety of cancers. Molecular modeling approaches and methodologies have become 'close counterparts' to experiments in drug design and discovery workflows. A wide range of molecular modeling approaches have been developed, each of which has different objectives and outcomes. In this review, we provide an up-to-date systematic overview on the different computational models implemented toward the design of Hsp90 inhibitors as anticancer agents. Although this is the main emphasis of this review, different topics such as background and current statistics of cancer, different anticancer targets including Hsp90, and the structure and function of Hsp90 from an experimental perspective, for example, X-ray and NMR, are also addressed in this report. To the best of our knowledge, this review is the first account, which comprehensively outlines various molecular modeling efforts directed toward identification of anticancer drugs targeting Hsp90. We believe that the information, methods, and perspectives highlighted in this report would assist researchers in the discovery of potential anticancer agents. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Vascular targeting agents enhance chemotherapeutic agent activities in solid tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Siemann, Dietmar W; Mercer, Emma; Lepler, Sharon; Rojiani, Amyn M

    2002-05-01

    The utility of combining the vascular targeting agents 5,6-dimethyl-xanthenone-4 acetic acid (DMXAA) and combretastatin A-4 disodium phosphate (CA4DP) with the anticancer drugs cisplatin and cyclophosphamide (CP) was evaluated in experimental rodent (KHT sarcoma), human breast (SKBR3) and ovarian (OW-1) tumor models. Doses of the vascular targeting agents that led to rapid vascular shutdown and subsequent extensive central tumor necrosis were identified. Histologic evaluation showed morphologic damage of tumor cells within a few hours after treatment, followed by extensive hemorrhagic necrosis and dose-dependent neoplastic cell death as a result of prolonged ischemia. Whereas these effects were induced by a range of CA4DP doses (10-150 mg/kg), the dose response to DMXAA was extremely steep; doses < or = 15 mg/kg were ineffective and doses > or = 20 mg/kg were toxic. DMXAA also enhanced the tumor cell killing of cisplatin, but doses > 15 mg/kg were required. In contrast, CA4DP increased cisplatin-induced tumor cell killing at all doses studied. This enhancement of cisplatin efficacy was dependent on the sequence and interval between the agents. The greatest effects were achieved when the vascular targeting agents were administered 1-3 hr after cisplatin. When CA4DP (100 mg/kg) or DMXAA (17.5 mg/kg) were administered 1 hr after a range of doses of cisplatin or CP, the tumor cell kill was 10-500-fold greater than that seen with chemotherapy alone. In addition, the inclusion of the antivascular agents did not increase bone marrow stem cell toxicity associated with these anticancer drugs, thus giving rise to a therapeutic gain.

  13. Synthesis and evaluation of 3-ylideneoxindole acetamides as potent anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Chun-Tang; Lee, Wei-Chun; Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Cheng, Jing-Jy; Lin, Lie-Chwen; Chen, Chih-Yu; Song, Jen-Shin; Wu, Ming-Hsien; Shia, Kak-Shan; Li, Wen-Tai

    2015-06-15

    Indirubin, an active component in the traditional Chinese medicine formula Danggui Longhui Wan, shows promising anticancer effects. Meisoindigo is an analog derived from indirubin, which is less toxic and appears to be even more potent against cancer. In considering meisoindigo as a structural template for the development of new drugs, we designed and synthesized a series of 3-ylideneoxindole acetamides as novel anticancer agents. The acetamides were then evaluated for in vitro and in vivo anticancer activities. The 3-ylideneoxindole acetamides were found to have better anticancer activity than was indirubin-3'-oxime in several cancer cell lines and also displayed a spectrum of activity similar to that of the drug candidate roscovitine, a CDK inhibitor. Among the 3-ylideneoxindole acetamides, compound 10 showed particularly good efficacy. Cell cycle analysis further revealed that compound 10 arrested cells in the G1 phase and caused an increase in the sub-G1 population, indicating that the apoptosis pathway had been induced. In addition, exposure of cells to compound 10 led to the upregulation of the cell-cycle regulator cyclin D1, which was sustained at a high level. In contrast, the same compound induced a short-term elevation in the level of cyclin E, which was followed by a rapid decrease and the attenuation of Rb phosphorylation. Furthermore, a docking model suggests that compound 10 binds to the active site of CDK4. In testing the therapeutic potency of compound 10 on CT26-xenografted BALB/c mice, a significant reduction in tumor size comparable to that of cisplatin was found when administrated via the i.p. route. The mice presented no loss of body weight, indicating that this compound possesses low toxicity. In the future, we are planning in vivo investigations of these new active anticancer agents to better elucidate active mechanisms at the cellular level and thus benefit the development of anticancer therapies.

  14. Three amino acid derivatives of valproic acid: design, synthesis, theoretical and experimental evaluation as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Luna-Palencia, Gabriela R; Martinez-Ramos, Federico; Vasquez-Moctezuma, Ismael; Fragoso-Vazquez, Manuel Jonathan; Mendieta-Wejebe, Jessica Elena; Padilla-Martínez, Itzia I; Sixto-Lopez, Yudibeth; Mendez-Luna, David; Trujillo-Ferrara, Jose; Meraz-Rios, Marco A; Fonseca-Sabater, Yadira; Correa-Basurto, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is extensively used as an anticonvulsive agent and as a treatment for other neurological disorders. It has been shown that VPA exerts an anti-proliferative effect on several types of cancer cells by inhibiting the activity of histone deacetylases (HDACs), which are involved in replication and differentiation processes. However, VPA has some disadvantages, among which are poor water solubility and hepatotoxicity. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to design and synthesize three derivatives of VPA to improve its physicochemical properties and anti-proliferative effects. For this purpose, the amino acids aspartic acid, glutamic acid and proline were added to the molecular structure of VPA. Docking and molecular dynamics simulations were used to determine the mode of recognition of these three derivatives by different conformations of HDAC8. This receptor was used as the specific target because of its high affinity for this type of substrate. The results demonstrate that, compared to VPA, the test compounds bind to different sites on the enzyme and that hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions play key roles in this difference. The IC50 values of the VPA derivatives, experimentally determined using HeLa cells, were in the mM range. This result indicates that the derivatives have greater antiproliferative effects than the parent compound. Hence, these results suggest that these amino acid derivatives may represent a good alternative for anticancer treatment.

  15. Rational drug design of indazole-based diarylurea derivatives as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yan-Yan; Cheng, He-Juan; Tian, Zhen-Hua; Zhao, Jian-Chun; Li, Gang; Chu, Yang-Yang; Sun, Chang-Jun; Li, Wen-Bao

    2017-10-01

    A series of novel indazole-based diarylurea derivatives targeting c-kit were designed by structure-based drug design. The derivatives were prepared, and their antiproliferative activities were evaluated against human colon cancer HCT-116 cell line and hepatocellular carcinoma PLC/PRF/5 cell line. The antiproliferative activities demonstrated that six of nine compounds exhibited comparable activities with sorafenib against HCT-116. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis indicated that the indazole ring part tolerated different kinds of substituents, and the N position of the central pyridine ring played key roles in antiproliferative activity. The SAR and interaction mechanisms were further explored using molecular docking method. Compound 1i with N-(2-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)ethyl)-carboxamide possessed improved solubility, 596.1 ng/ml and best activities, IC50 at 1.0 μm against HCT-116, and 3.48 μm against PLC/PRF/5. It is a promising anticancer agent for further development. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Molecular mechanism of action of microtubule-stabilizing anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Prota, Andrea E; Bargsten, Katja; Zurwerra, Didier; Field, Jessica J; Díaz, José Fernando; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2013-02-01

    Microtubule-stabilizing agents (MSAs) are efficacious chemotherapeutic drugs widely used for the treatment of cancer. Despite the importance of MSAs for medical applications and basic research, their molecular mechanisms of action on tubulin and microtubules remain elusive. We determined high-resolution crystal structures of αβ-tubulin in complex with two unrelated MSAs, zampanolide and epothilone A. Both compounds were bound to the taxane pocket of β-tubulin and used their respective side chains to induce structuring of the M-loop into a short helix. Because the M-loop establishes lateral tubulin contacts in microtubules, these findings explain how taxane-site MSAs promote microtubule assembly and stability. Further, our results offer fundamental structural insights into the control mechanisms of microtubule dynamics.

  17. Hormetic Effect of Berberine Attenuates the Anticancer Activity of Chemotherapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jiaolin; Huang, Borong; Zou, Lidi; Chen, Shenghui; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Yulin; Chen, Meiwan; Wan, Jian-Bo; Su, Huanxing; Wang, Yitao; He, Chengwei

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of biphasic dose response characterized by exhibiting stimulatory or beneficial effects at low doses and inhibitory or toxic effects at high doses. Increasing numbers of chemicals of various types have been shown to induce apparent hormetic effect on cancer cells. However, the underlying significance and mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Berberine, one of the major active components of Rhizoma coptidis, has been manifested with notable anticancer activities. This study aims to investigate the hormetic effect of berberine and its influence on the anticancer activities of chemotherapeutic agents. Our results demonstrated that berberine at low dose range (1.25 ~ 5 μM) promoted cell proliferation to 112% ~170% of the untreated control in various cancer cells, while berberine at high dose rage (10 ~ 80 μM) inhibited cell proliferation. Further, we observed that co-treatment with low dose berberine could significantly attenuate the anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic agents, including fluorouracil (5-FU), camptothecin (CPT), and paclitaxel (TAX). The hormetic effect and thereby the attenuated anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic drugs by berberine may attributable to the activated protective stress response in cancer cells triggered by berberine, as evidenced by up-regulated MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. These results provided important information to understand the potential side effects of hormesis, and suggested cautious application of natural compounds and relevant herbs in adjuvant treatment of cancer.

  18. Hormetic Effect of Berberine Attenuates the Anticancer Activity of Chemotherapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Lidi; Chen, Shenghui; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Yulin; Chen, Meiwan; Wan, Jian-Bo; Su, Huanxing; Wang, Yitao; He, Chengwei

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of biphasic dose response characterized by exhibiting stimulatory or beneficial effects at low doses and inhibitory or toxic effects at high doses. Increasing numbers of chemicals of various types have been shown to induce apparent hormetic effect on cancer cells. However, the underlying significance and mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Berberine, one of the major active components of Rhizoma coptidis, has been manifested with notable anticancer activities. This study aims to investigate the hormetic effect of berberine and its influence on the anticancer activities of chemotherapeutic agents. Our results demonstrated that berberine at low dose range (1.25 ~ 5 μM) promoted cell proliferation to 112% ~170% of the untreated control in various cancer cells, while berberine at high dose rage (10 ~ 80 μM) inhibited cell proliferation. Further, we observed that co-treatment with low dose berberine could significantly attenuate the anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic agents, including fluorouracil (5-FU), camptothecin (CPT), and paclitaxel (TAX). The hormetic effect and thereby the attenuated anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic drugs by berberine may attributable to the activated protective stress response in cancer cells triggered by berberine, as evidenced by up-regulated MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. These results provided important information to understand the potential side effects of hormesis, and suggested cautious application of natural compounds and relevant herbs in adjuvant treatment of cancer. PMID:26421434

  19. Benzimidazole clubbed with triazolo-thiadiazoles and triazolo-thiadiazines: new anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Husain, Asif; Rashid, Mohd; Shaharyar, M; Siddiqui, Anees A; Mishra, Ravinesh

    2013-04-01

    Two series of Benzimidazole clubbed with triazolo-thiadiazoles (5a-q, 5r, 5s and 5x-a(1)) and triazolo-thiadiazines (5t-w) were synthesized with an aim to produce promising anticancer agents. In vitro anticancer activities of synthesized compounds were investigated at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) against NCI 60 cell line panel; results showed good to remarkable broad-spectrum anticancer activity. Among them, the compound 5h (NCS: 760452, 1-(1H-benzo [d] imidazol-2-yl)-3-(6-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-[1,2,4]triazolo[3,4-b][1,3,4]thiadiazol-3-yl) propan-1-one) exhibited significant growth inhibition with GI50 values ranging from 0.20 to 2.58 μM and found superior selectivity for the leukemia cell lines and further screened at 10-fold dilutions of five different concentrations (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 μM). The 5h may possibly be used as lead compound for developing new anticancer agents.

  20. Can Some Marine-Derived Fungal Metabolites Become Actual Anticancer Agents?

    PubMed

    Gomes, Nelson G M; Lefranc, Florence; Kijjoa, Anake; Kiss, Robert

    2015-06-19

    Marine fungi are known to produce structurally unique secondary metabolites, and more than 1000 marine fungal-derived metabolites have already been reported. Despite the absence of marine fungal-derived metabolites in the current clinical pipeline, dozens of them have been classified as potential chemotherapy candidates because of their anticancer activity. Over the last decade, several comprehensive reviews have covered the potential anticancer activity of marine fungal-derived metabolites. However, these reviews consider the term "cytotoxicity" to be synonymous with "anticancer agent", which is not actually true. Indeed, a cytotoxic compound is by definition a poisonous compound. To become a potential anticancer agent, a cytotoxic compound must at least display (i) selectivity between normal and cancer cells (ii) activity against multidrug-resistant (MDR) cancer cells; and (iii) a preferentially non-apoptotic cell death mechanism, as it is now well known that a high proportion of cancer cells that resist chemotherapy are in fact apoptosis-resistant cancer cells against which pro-apoptotic drugs have more than limited efficacy. The present review thus focuses on the cytotoxic marine fungal-derived metabolites whose ability to kill cancer cells has been reported in the literature. Particular attention is paid to the compounds that kill cancer cells through non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms.

  1. Mitochondria targeting nano agents in cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria have emerged as noteworthy therapeutic targets as their physiological functions are often altered in pathological conditions such as cancer. The electronic databases of MEDLINE, EMBASE and PubMed were searched for recent studies reporting the importance of mitochondria targeting nanoagents in cancer therapeutics. The concluding remarks of the above papers mostly confirmed the growing potential of these novel nanoagents in the area of anticancer research. Furthermore, numerous studies demonstrated the immense potential of nanocarriers in delivering mitochondria-acting compounds to their target site. Among the assemblage of nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are becoming more prominent for drug delivery due to favorable attributes including their unique shape, which promotes cellular uptake, and large aspect ratio that facilitates conjugation of bioactive molecules on their surface. The present review focused on the current view of variable options available in mitochondria-targeting anticancer therapeutics. It may be concluded that improvements are essential for its establishment as a gold standard therapeutic option especially in the clinical setting. PMID:28105197

  2. Rationale and clinical use of multitargeting anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Melisi, Davide; Piro, Geny; Tamburrino, Anna; Carbone, Carmine; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2013-08-01

    Human solid tumors contain genetically distinct subpopulations of tumor cells that can be enriched under selective pressure of specific treatments. This heterogeneous nature reflects the dynamism of drug response and it represents a fundamental driver of resistance. Moreover, the complexity of cancer disease is increased by the activity of cross-talking, redundant signaling pathways, escape pathways and compensatory events, which triggers activation of secondary growth and survival. Broad multi-targeted approaches are requested to overcome a complex, heterogeneous, and dynamic disease such as cancer.

  3. Large-scale automatic extraction of side effects associated with targeted anticancer drugs from full-text oncological articles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rong; Wang, QuanQiu

    2015-06-01

    Targeted anticancer drugs such as imatinib, trastuzumab and erlotinib dramatically improved treatment outcomes in cancer patients, however, these innovative agents are often associated with unexpected side effects. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these side effects are not well understood. The availability of a comprehensive knowledge base of side effects associated with targeted anticancer drugs has the potential to illuminate complex pathways underlying toxicities induced by these innovative drugs. While side effect association knowledge for targeted drugs exists in multiple heterogeneous data sources, published full-text oncological articles represent an important source of pivotal, investigational, and even failed trials in a variety of patient populations. In this study, we present an automatic process to extract targeted anticancer drug-associated side effects (drug-SE pairs) from a large number of high profile full-text oncological articles. We downloaded 13,855 full-text articles from the Journal of Oncology (JCO) published between 1983 and 2013. We developed text classification, relationship extraction, signaling filtering, and signal prioritization algorithms to extract drug-SE pairs from downloaded articles. We extracted a total of 26,264 drug-SE pairs with an average precision of 0.405, a recall of 0.899, and an F1 score of 0.465. We show that side effect knowledge from JCO articles is largely complementary to that from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) drug labels. Through integrative correlation analysis, we show that targeted drug-associated side effects positively correlate with their gene targets and disease indications. In conclusion, this unique database that we built from a large number of high-profile oncological articles could facilitate the development of computational models to understand toxic effects associated with targeted anticancer drugs.

  4. Bacterial biosynthesis and maturation of the didemnin anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Kersten, Roland D.; Nam, Sang-Jip; Lu, Liang; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz M.; Zheng, Huajun; Fenical, William; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2012-01-01

    The antineoplastic agent didemnin B from the Caribbean tunicate Trididemnum solidum was the first marine drug to be clinically tested in humans. Because of its limited supply and its complex cyclic depsipeptide structure, considerable challenges were encountered during didemnin B's development that continue to limit aplidine (dehydrodidemnin B), which is currently being evaluated in numerous clinical trials. Herein we show that the didemnins are bacterial products produced by the marine α-proteobacteria Tistrella mobilis and Tistrella bauzanensis via a unique post-assembly line maturation process. Complete genome sequence analysis of the 6,513,401 bp T. mobilis strain KA081020-065 with its five circular replicons revealed the putative didemnin biosynthetic gene cluster (did) on the 1,126,962 bp megaplasmid pTM3. The did locus encodes a 13-module hybrid nonribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase enzyme complex organized in a co-linear arrangement for the synthesis of the fatty acylglutamine ester derivatives didemnins X and Y rather than didemnin B as first anticipated. Imaging mass spectrometry of T. mobilis bacterial colonies captured the time-dependent extracellular conversion of the didemnin X and Y precursors to didemnin B in support of an unusual post-synthetase activation mechanism. Significantly, the discovery of the didemnin biosynthetic gene cluster may provide a long-term solution to the supply problem that presently hinders this group of marine natural products and pave the way for the genetic engineering of new didemnin congeners. PMID:22458477

  5. Photophysical characterization of anticancer drug valrubicin in rHDL nanoparticles and its use as an imaging agent.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sunil; Chib, Rahul; Raut, Sangram; Bermudez, Jaclyn; Sabnis, Nirupama; Duggal, Divya; Kimball, Joseph D; Lacko, Andras G; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles are target-specific drug delivery agents that are increasingly used in cancer therapy to enhance bioavailability and to reduce off target toxicity of anti-cancer agents. Valrubicin is an anti-cancer drug, currently approved only for vesicular bladder cancer treatment because of its poor water solubility. On the other hand, valrubicin carrying reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL) nanoparticles appear ideally suited for extended applications, including systemic cancer chemotherapy. We determined selected fluorescence properties of the free (unencapsulated) drug vs. valrubicin incorporated into rHDL nanoparticles. We have found that upon encapsulation into rHDL nanoparticles the quantum yield of valrubicin fluorescence increased six fold while its fluorescence lifetime increased about 2 fold. Accordingly, these and potassium iodide (KI) quenching data suggest that upon incorporation, valrubicin is localized deep in the interior of the nanoparticle, inside the lipid matrix. Fluorescence anisotropy of the rHDL valrubicin nanoparticles was also found to be high along with extended rotational correlation time. The fluorescence of valrubicin could also be utilized to assess its distribution upon delivery to prostate cancer (PC3) cells. Overall the fluorescence properties of the rHDL: valrubicin complex reveal valuable novel characteristics of this drug delivery vehicle that may be particularly applicable when used in systemic (intravenous) therapy.

  6. The potential for substance P antagonists as anti-cancer agents in brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Harford-Wright, Elizabeth; Lewis, Kate M; Vink, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Despite recent advances in cancer treatment and diagnosis, the prognosis for patients with CNS tumours remains extremely poor. This is, in part, due to the difficulty in completely removing tumours surgically, and also because of the presence of the blood brain barrier, which can prevent the entry of chemotherapeutic agents typically used in cancer treatment. Despite the presence of the blood brain barrier, tumour cells are capable of entering and colonising the brain to form secondary brain tumours. Additionally, tumour related disruption of the blood brain barrier is associated with the clinical presentation of many patients, with accompanying increases in intracranial pressure due, in part, to the development of vasogenic oedema. Vasogenic oedema results because the newly formed angiogenic vessels within brain tumours do not retain the highly selective properties of the blood brain barrier, and thus allow for the extravasation of plasma proteins and water into the brain parenchyma. Tachykinins, and in particular substance P, have been implicated in blood brain barrier disruption and the genesis of cerebral oedema in other CNS insults via a process known as neurogenic inflammation. Recent evidence suggests that substance P may play a similar role in CNS tumours. It has been well established that an upregulation of substance P and its receptors occurs in a number of different cancer types, including CNS neoplasms. In addition to disrupting blood brain barrier permeability, substance P and the NK1 receptors facilitate promotion of tumour growth and the development of cerebral oedema. Accordingly, recent patents describe the potential of NK1 receptor antagonists as anti-cancer agents suggesting that substance P may provide a novel cancer treatment target. This review will examine the role of substance P in the development of CNS tumours.

  7. Targeting Tumor Metabolism for Cancer Treatment: Is Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinases (PDKs) a Viable Anticancer Target?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Shao-Lin; Hu, Xiaohui; Tam, Kin Yip

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains a lethal threat to global lives. Development of novel anticancer therapeutics is still a challenge to scientists in the field of biomedicine. In cancer cells, the metabolic features are significantly different from those of normal ones, which are hallmarks of several malignancies. Recent studies brought atypical cellular metabolism, such as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect, into the scientific limelight. Targeting these altered metabolic pathways in cancer cells presents a promising therapeutic strategy. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs), key enzymes in the pathway of glucose metabolism, could inactivate the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) by phosphorylating it and preserving the substrates pyruvate, lactate and alanine for gluconeogenesis. Overexpression of PDKs could block the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to satisfy high oxygen demand in cancer cells, while inhibition of PDKs could upregulate the activity of PDC and rectify the balance between the demand and supply of oxygen, which could lead to cancer cell death. Thus, inhibitors targeting PDKs represent a promising strategy for cancer treatment by acting on glycolytic tumors while showing minimal side effects on the oxidative healthy organs. This review considers the role of PDKs as regulator of PDC that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate in mitochondrion. It is concluded that PDKs are solid therapeutic targets. Inhibition of PDKs could be an attractive therapeutic approach for the development of anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26681918

  8. [Developing FGFR inhibitors as potential anti-cancer agents].

    PubMed

    Zsákai, Lilian; Németh, Gábor; Szántai-Kis, Csaba; Greff, Zoltán; Horváth, Zoltán; Szokol, Bálint; Baska, Ferenc; Boon, Tin Chuad; Orfi, Lászlo; Kéri, Györgya

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR) family is a sequentially highly related subgroup of membrane proteins consisting of four tyrosine kinase type enzyme: FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3 and FGFR4. These are kinases of great interest in a wide spectrum of physiological processes such as tissue repair via controlling cell proliferation. As initiatiors of cell proliferation, in some cases they have leading roles in several types of cancer, eg. breast cancer, pancreas cancer, gastric tumors and multiple myeloma via overexpression and/or mutation. This phenomenon makes them promising targets for drug development in order to develop signal transduction therapies based on small molecule FGFR inhibitors. We have developed two main groups of lead molecules: compounds with benzotiophene and oxindole cores utilizing numerous methods from in silico modelling via in vitro biochemichal assays and testing on relevant cell lines to cytotoxicity assays.

  9. The anticancer agent 3-bromopyruvate: a simple but powerful molecule taken from the lab to the bedside.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Silva, J; Queirós, O; Baltazar, F; Ułaszewski, S; Goffeau, A; Ko, Y H; Pedersen, P L; Preto, A; Casal, M

    2016-08-01

    At the beginning of the twenty-first century, 3-bromopyruvate (3BP), a simple alkylating chemical compound was presented to the scientific community as a potent anticancer agent, able to cause rapid toxicity to cancer cells without bystander effects on normal tissues. The altered metabolism of cancers, an essential hallmark for their progression, also became their Achilles heel by facilitating 3BP's selective entry and specific targeting. Treatment with 3BP has been administered in several cancer type models both in vitro and in vivo, either alone or in combination with other anticancer therapeutic approaches. These studies clearly demonstrate 3BP's broad action against multiple cancer types. Clinical trials using 3BP are needed to further support its anticancer efficacy against multiple cancer types thus making it available to more than 30 million patients living with cancer worldwide. This review discusses current knowledge about 3BP related to cancer and discusses also the possibility of its use in future clinical applications as it relates to safety and treatment issues.

  10. Metal complexes of curcumin for cellular imaging, targeting, and photoinduced anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samya; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2015-07-21

    Curcumin is a polyphenolic species. As an active ingredient of turmeric, it is well-known for its traditional medicinal properties. The therapeutic values include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and anticancer activity with the last being primarily due to inhibition of the transcription factor NF-κB besides affecting several biological pathways to arrest tumor growth and its progression. Curcumin with all these positive qualities has only remained a potential candidate for cancer treatment over the years without seeing any proper usage because of its hydrolytic instability involving the diketo moiety in a cellular medium and its poor bioavailability. The situation has changed considerably in recent years with the observation that curcumin in monoanionic form could be stabilized on binding to a metal ion. The reports from our group and other groups have shown that curcumin in the metal-bound form retains its therapeutic potential. This has opened up new avenues to develop curcumin-based metal complexes as anticancer agents. Zinc(II) complexes of curcumin are shown to be stable in a cellular medium. They display moderate cytotoxicity against prostate cancer and neuroblastoma cell lines. A similar stabilization and cytotoxic effect is reported for (arene)ruthenium(II) complexes of curcumin against a variety of cell lines. The half-sandwich 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphatricyclo-[3.3.1.1]decane (RAPTA)-type ruthenium(II) complexes of curcumin are shown to be promising cytotoxic agents with low micromolar concentrations for a series of cancer cell lines. In a different approach, cobalt(III) complexes of curcumin are used for its cellular delivery in hypoxic tumor cells using intracellular agents that reduce the metal and release curcumin as a cytotoxin. Utilizing the photophysical and photochemical properties of the curcumin dye, we have designed and synthesized photoactive curcumin metal complexes that are used for cellular imaging by fluorescence microscopy and

  11. [Phase I clinical trial design of anticancer agents--a Fibonacci and a modified Fibonacci sequence].

    PubMed

    Kusaba, H; Tamura, T

    2000-05-01

    A Phase I clinical trial of an anticancer agent is the first evaluation in humans, and it is an important step in drug development. From the ethical point of view, the goal is to escalate to the maximum tolerated dose quickly, yet safely, to minimize the likelihood of treating patients at doses that are too low or high. It is expected that the contradictions between safety and efficacy in the Phase I clinical trials will be solved by developing methods. The modified Fibonacci sequence has been generally adopted for dose escalation, although it includes some problems. It is necessary to recognize that the method used for Phase I clinical trials for anticancer agents remains unsatisfactory, and that it is also necessary to develop more ethical and scientific methods.

  12. The application of click chemistry in the synthesis of agents with anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Nan; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Bing-Xin; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between alkynes and azides (click chemistry) to form 1,2,3-triazoles is the most popular reaction due to its reliability, specificity, and biocompatibility. This reaction has the potential to shorten procedures, and render more efficient lead identification and optimization procedures in medicinal chemistry, which is a powerful modular synthetic approach toward the assembly of new molecular entities and has been applied in anticancer drugs discovery increasingly. The present review focuses mainly on the applications of this reaction in the field of synthesis of agents with anticancer activity, which are divided into four groups: topoisomerase II inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and antimicrotubule agents. PMID:25792812

  13. Evaluation of Degradation Properties of Polyglycolide and Its Potential as Delivery Vehicle for Anticancer Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Noorsal, K.; Ghani, S. M.; Yunos, D. M.; Mohamed, M. S. W.; Yahya, A. F.

    2010-03-11

    Biodegradable polymers offer a unique combination of properties that can be tailored to suit nearly any controlled drug delivery application. The most common biodegradable polymers used for biomedical applications are semicrystalline polyesters and polyethers which possess good mechanical properties and have been used in many controlled release applications. Drug release from these polymers may be controlled by several mechanisms and these include diffusion of drug through a matrix, dissolution of polymer matrix and degradation of the polymer. This study aims to investigate the degradation and drug release properties of polyglycolide (1.03 dL/g), in which, cis platin, an anticancer agent was used as the model drug. The degradation behaviour of the chosen polymer is thought to largely govern the release of the anticancer agent in vitro.

  14. The application of click chemistry in the synthesis of agents with anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Nan; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Bing-Xin; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between alkynes and azides (click chemistry) to form 1,2,3-triazoles is the most popular reaction due to its reliability, specificity, and biocompatibility. This reaction has the potential to shorten procedures, and render more efficient lead identification and optimization procedures in medicinal chemistry, which is a powerful modular synthetic approach toward the assembly of new molecular entities and has been applied in anticancer drugs discovery increasingly. The present review focuses mainly on the applications of this reaction in the field of synthesis of agents with anticancer activity, which are divided into four groups: topoisomerase II inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and antimicrotubule agents.

  15. Small molecules targeting c-Myc oncogene: promising anti-cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing-Jia; Wu, Yan-Ling; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Zhang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear transcription factor c-Myc is a member of the Myc gene family with multiple functions and located on band q24.1 of chromosome 8. The c-Myc gene is activated by chromosomal translocation, rearrangement, and amplification. Its encoded protein transduces intracellular signals to the nucleus, resulting in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, and has the ability to transform cells and bind chromosomal DNA. c-Myc also plays a critical role in malignant transformation. The abnormal over-expression of c-Myc is frequently observed in some tumors, including carcinomas of the breast, colon, and cervix, as well as small-cell lung cancer, osteosarcomas, glioblastomas, and myeloid leukemias, therefore making it a possible target for anticancer therapy. In this minireview, we summarize unique characteristics of c-Myc and therapeutic strategies against cancer using small molecules targeting the oncogene, and discuss the prospects in the development of agents targeting c-Myc, in particular G-quadruplexes formed in c-Myc promoter and c-Myc/Max dimerization. Such information will be of importance for the research and development of c-Myc-targeted drugs.

  16. Small Molecules Targeting c-Myc Oncogene: Promising Anti-Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bing-Jia; Wu, Yan-Ling; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Zhang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear transcription factor c-Myc is a member of the Myc gene family with multiple functions and located on band q24.1 of chromosome 8. The c-Myc gene is activated by chromosomal translocation, rearrangement, and amplification. Its encoded protein transduces intracellular signals to the nucleus, resulting in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, and has the ability to transform cells and bind chromosomal DNA. c-Myc also plays a critical role in malignant transformation. The abnormal over-expression of c-Myc is frequently observed in some tumors, including carcinomas of the breast, colon, and cervix, as well as small-cell lung cancer, osteosarcomas, glioblastomas, and myeloid leukemias, therefore making it a possible target for anticancer therapy. In this minireview, we summarize unique characteristics of c-Myc and therapeutic strategies against cancer using small molecules targeting the oncogene, and discuss the prospects in the development of agents targeting c-Myc, in particular G-quadruplexes formed in c-Myc promoter and c-Myc/Max dimerization. Such information will be of importance for the research and development of c-Myc-targeted drugs. PMID:25332683

  17. Development of novel anticancer agents in older patients: pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and other considerations.

    PubMed

    Murgo, Anthony J; Espinoza-Delgado, Igor

    2005-01-01

    The development of novel anticancer agents in older patients presents both challenges and unique opportunities. Intrapatient variability due to comorbid conditions and the use of multiple concomitant medications may overshadow other age-related differences in pharmacokinetics. The increasing interest in oral agents may be especially problematic in older patients who have difficulty with adherence, particularly if the oral agents are given in combination or according to complex schedules. Polypharmacy, chronic comorbid conditions, and impaired organ reserve in the elderly can lead to pharmacodynamic differences such as increased toxicity and, possibly, reduced efficacy. Hampered immune responsiveness is an important area warranting further research. The development of novel agents to treat older patients with cancer cannot be successfully accomplished without increasing the proportion of elderly patients entered into clinical trials. Furthermore, data obtained from studies in older patients may provide valuable information applicable to the development of novel agents in younger patients and to a better understanding of cancer biology and treatment in general.

  18. Rad51 and BRCA2--New molecular targets for sensitizing glioma cells to alkylating anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Quiros, Steve; Roos, Wynand Paul; Kaina, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    First line chemotherapeutics for brain tumors (malignant gliomas) are alkylating agents such as temozolomide and nimustine. Despite growing knowledge of how these agents work, patients suffering from this malignancy still face a dismal prognosis. Alkylating agents target DNA, forming the killing lesion O(6)-alkylguanine, which is converted into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that trigger apoptosis. Here we assessed whether inhibiting repair of DSBs by homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is a reasonable strategy for sensitizing glioma cells to alkylating agents. For down-regulation of HR in glioma cells, we used an interference RNA (iRNA) approach targeting Rad51 and BRCA2, and for NHEJ we employed the DNA-PK inhibitor NU7026. We also assessed whether inhibition of poly(ADP)ribosyltransferase (PARP) by olaparib would enhance the killing effect. The data show that knockdown of Rad51 or BRCA2 greatly sensitizes cells to DSBs and the induction of cell death following temozolomide and nimustine (ACNU). It did not sensitize to ionizing radiation (IR). The expression of O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) abolished all these effects, indicating that O(6)-alkylguanine induced by these drugs is the primary lesion responsible for the formation of DSBs and increased sensitivity of glioma cells following knockdown of Rad51 and BRCA2. Inhibition of DNA-PK only slightly sensitized to temozolomide whereas a significant effect was observed with IR. A triple strategy including siRNA and the PARP inhibitor olaparib further improved the killing effect of temozolomide. The data provides evidence that down-regulation of Rad51 or BRCA2 is a reasonable strategy for sensitizing glioma cells to killing by O(6)-alkylating anti-cancer drugs. The data also provide proof of principle that a triple strategy involving down-regulation of HR, PARP inhibition and MGMT depletion may greatly enhance the therapeutic effect of temozolomide.

  19. Rational design of biaryl pharmacophore inserted noscapine derivatives as potent tubulin binding anticancer agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoshi, Seneha; Manchukonda, Naresh Kumar; Suri, Charu; Sharma, Manya; Sridhar, Balasubramanian; Joseph, Silja; Lopus, Manu; Kantevari, Srinivas; Baitharu, Iswar; Naik, Pradeep Kumar

    2015-03-01

    We have strategically designed a series of noscapine derivatives by inserting biaryl pharmacophore (a major structural constituent of many of the microtubule-targeting natural anticancer compounds) onto the scaffold structure of noscapine. Molecular interaction of these derivatives with α,β-tubulin heterodimer was investigated by molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy calculation. The predictive binding affinity indicates that the newly designed noscapinoids bind to tubulin with a greater affinity. The predictive binding free energy (ΔGbind, pred) of these derivatives (ranging from -5.568 to -5.970 kcal/mol) based on linear interaction energy (LIE) method with a surface generalized Born (SGB) continuum solvation model showed improved binding affinity with tubulin compared to the lead compound, natural α-noscapine (-5.505 kcal/mol). Guided by the computational findings, these new biaryl type α-noscapine congeners were synthesized from 9-bromo-α-noscapine using optimized Suzuki reaction conditions for further experimental evaluation. The derivatives showed improved inhibition of the proliferation of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7), human cervical cancer cells (HeLa) and human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549), compared to natural noscapine. The cell cycle analysis in MCF-7 further revealed that these compounds alter the cell cycle profile and cause mitotic arrest at G2/M phase more strongly than noscapine. Tubulin binding assay revealed higher binding affinity to tubulin, as suggested by dissociation constant (Kd) of 126 ± 5.0 µM for 5a, 107 ± 5.0 µM for 5c, 70 ± 4.0 µM for 5d, and 68 ± 6.0 µM for 5e compared to noscapine (Kd of 152 ± 1.0 µM). In fact, the experimentally determined value of ΔGbind, expt (calculated from the Kd value) are consistent with the predicted value of ΔGbind, pred calculated based on LIE-SGB. Based on these results, one of the derivative 5e of this series was used for further toxicological

  20. Rational design of biaryl pharmacophore inserted noscapine derivatives as potent tubulin binding anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Santoshi, Seneha; Manchukonda, Naresh Kumar; Suri, Charu; Sharma, Manya; Sridhar, Balasubramanian; Joseph, Silja; Lopus, Manu; Kantevari, Srinivas; Baitharu, Iswar; Naik, Pradeep Kumar

    2015-03-01

    We have strategically designed a series of noscapine derivatives by inserting biaryl pharmacophore (a major structural constituent of many of the microtubule-targeting natural anticancer compounds) onto the scaffold structure of noscapine. Molecular interaction of these derivatives with α,β-tubulin heterodimer was investigated by molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy calculation. The predictive binding affinity indicates that the newly designed noscapinoids bind to tubulin with a greater affinity. The predictive binding free energy (ΔG(bind, pred)) of these derivatives (ranging from -5.568 to -5.970 kcal/mol) based on linear interaction energy (LIE) method with a surface generalized Born (SGB) continuum solvation model showed improved binding affinity with tubulin compared to the lead compound, natural α-noscapine (-5.505 kcal/mol). Guided by the computational findings, these new biaryl type α-noscapine congeners were synthesized from 9-bromo-α-noscapine using optimized Suzuki reaction conditions for further experimental evaluation. The derivatives showed improved inhibition of the proliferation of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7), human cervical cancer cells (HeLa) and human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549), compared to natural noscapine. The cell cycle analysis in MCF-7 further revealed that these compounds alter the cell cycle profile and cause mitotic arrest at G2/M phase more strongly than noscapine. Tubulin binding assay revealed higher binding affinity to tubulin, as suggested by dissociation constant (Kd) of 126 ± 5.0 µM for 5a, 107 ± 5.0 µM for 5c, 70 ± 4.0 µM for 5d, and 68 ± 6.0 µM for 5e compared to noscapine (Kd of 152 ± 1.0 µM). In fact, the experimentally determined value of ΔG(bind, expt) (calculated from the Kd value) are consistent with the predicted value of ΔG(bind, pred) calculated based on LIE-SGB. Based on these results, one of the derivative 5e of this series was used for further

  1. Can Some Marine-Derived Fungal Metabolites Become Actual Anticancer Agents?

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Nelson G. M.; Lefranc, Florence; Kijjoa, Anake; Kiss, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Marine fungi are known to produce structurally unique secondary metabolites, and more than 1000 marine fungal-derived metabolites have already been reported. Despite the absence of marine fungal-derived metabolites in the current clinical pipeline, dozens of them have been classified as potential chemotherapy candidates because of their anticancer activity. Over the last decade, several comprehensive reviews have covered the potential anticancer activity of marine fungal-derived metabolites. However, these reviews consider the term “cytotoxicity” to be synonymous with “anticancer agent”, which is not actually true. Indeed, a cytotoxic compound is by definition a poisonous compound. To become a potential anticancer agent, a cytotoxic compound must at least display (i) selectivity between normal and cancer cells (ii) activity against multidrug-resistant (MDR) cancer cells; and (iii) a preferentially non-apoptotic cell death mechanism, as it is now well known that a high proportion of cancer cells that resist chemotherapy are in fact apoptosis-resistant cancer cells against which pro-apoptotic drugs have more than limited efficacy. The present review thus focuses on the cytotoxic marine fungal-derived metabolites whose ability to kill cancer cells has been reported in the literature. Particular attention is paid to the compounds that kill cancer cells through non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms. PMID:26090846

  2. Dual Stimuli-Activatable Oxidative Stress Amplifying Agent as a Hybrid Anticancer Prodrug.

    PubMed

    Han, Eunji; Kwon, Byeongsu; Yoo, Donghyuck; Kang, Changsun; Khang, Gilson; Lee, Dongwon

    2017-04-19

    Compared to normal cells, cancer cells have a higher level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to aberrant metabolism and disruption of redox homeostasis which drive their proliferation and promote progression and metastasis of cancers. The altered redox balance and biological difference between normal cells and cancer cells provide a basis for the development of anticancer agents which are able to generate pharmacological ROS insults to kill cancer cells preferentially. In this study, we report a new hybrid anticancer drug, termed OSamp, which undergoes esterase- and acid-catalyzed hydrolysis to deplete antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and generate ROS, simultaneously. OSamp significantly elevated oxidative stress in cancer cells, leading to enhanced apoptotic cancer cell death through mitochondrial membrane disruption, cytochrome c release, activation of pro-caspase 3, and deactivation of STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription-3). OSamp, administered intravenously, significantly suppressed the tumor growth in a mouse model of tumor xenografts without notable side effects. Oxidative stress amplifying OSamp holds tremendous potential as a new anticancer therapeutic and provides a new therapeutic paradigm which can be extended to development of hybrid anticancer drugs.

  3. Adherence and patients' experiences with the use of oral anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Timmers, Lonneke; Boons, Christel C L M; Kropff, Femke; van de Ven, Peter M; Swart, Eleonora L; Smit, Egbert F; Zweegman, Sonja; Kroep, Judith R; Timmer-Bonte, Johanna N H; Boven, Epie; Hugtenburg, Jacqueline G

    2014-02-01

    A rapidly growing number of oral anticancer agents has become available in oncology and hematology. Though these introductions have several benefits, medication adherence is an issue of concern. Little is known about the factors influencing adherence to treatment with oral anticancer agents in daily practice. Material and methods. In this observational, multicenter study including 216 patients, carried out between October 2010 and March 2012, the use of oral anticancer drugs was assessed by means of a telephonic pill count, a questionnaire and a review of the patient's medical file and pharmacy medication records. Parameters collected were patients' demographics, treatment characteristics, beliefs and attitude towards disease and medicines, self-reported adherence, side effects, quality of life and satisfaction about information. Patients off treatment filled out a questionnaire about the reasons for discontinuation. Optimal adherence was defined as ≥ 95%-≤ 105%. Results. The mean adherence rate (AR) (n = 177) was 99.1% with 20.3% of patients having a sub-optimal AR (< 95%, > 105%) consisting both of under- and over-adherence. Multivariate analyses showed that being on a cyclic dosing regimen (rather than a continuous regimen), not living alone and being highly educated increased the chances of optimal adherence (ORs = 4.88, 4.59 and 2.53, respectively). In addition, optimal adherence was found to be less common in patients reporting treatment control (OR = 0.77). One third of 79 patients off treatment reported their experienced side effects as one of the reasons for discontinuation. Discussion. Although most patients are fully adherent to oral anticancer agents, there is a substantial number tending to non-adherence. Patients living alone and those on a continuous dosing regimen are most likely to adhere sub-optimally. Interventions to improve adherence should specifically address these patients and be tailored to the needs of the individual patient.

  4. Ligand substitutions between ruthenium–cymene compounds can control protein versus DNA targeting and anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Adhireksan, Zenita; Davey, Gabriela E.; Campomanes, Pablo; Groessl, Michael; Clavel, Catherine M.; Yu, Haojie; Nazarov, Alexey A.; Yeo, Charmian Hui Fang; Ang, Wee Han; Dröge, Peter; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Dyson, Paul J.; Davey, Curt A.

    2014-01-01

    Ruthenium compounds have become promising alternatives to platinum drugs by displaying specific activities against different cancers and favourable toxicity and clearance properties. Nonetheless, their molecular targeting and mechanism of action are poorly understood. Here we study two prototypical ruthenium-arene agents—the cytotoxic antiprimary tumour compound [(η6-p-cymene)Ru(ethylene-diamine)Cl]PF6 and the relatively non-cytotoxic antimetastasis compound [(η6-p-cymene)Ru(1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane)Cl2]—and discover that the former targets the DNA of chromatin, while the latter preferentially forms adducts on the histone proteins. Using a novel ‘atom-to-cell’ approach, we establish the basis for the surprisingly site-selective adduct formation behaviour and distinct cellular impact of these two chemically similar anticancer agents, which suggests that the cytotoxic effects arise largely from DNA lesions, whereas the protein adducts may be linked to the other therapeutic activities. Our study shows promise for developing new ruthenium drugs, via ligand-based modulation of DNA versus protein binding and thus cytotoxic potential, to target distinguishing epigenetic features of cancer cells. PMID:24637564

  5. Telomeres and telomerase: Pharmacological targets for new anticancer strategies?

    PubMed

    Pendino, F; Tarkanyi, I; Dudognon, C; Hillion, J; Lanotte, M; Aradi, J; Ségal-Bendirdjian, E

    2006-03-01

    Telomeres are located at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Human telomerase, a cellular reverse transcriptase, is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis and extension of telomeric DNA. It is composed of at least, a template RNA component (hTR; human Telomerase RNA) and a catalytic subunit, the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). The absence of telomerase is associated with telomere shortening and aging of somatic cells, while high telomerase activity is observed in over 85% of human cancer cells, strongly indicating its key role during tumorigenesis. Several details regarding telomere structure and telomerase regulation have already been elucidated, providing new targets for therapeutic exploitation. Further support for anti-telomerase approaches comes from recent studies indicating that telomerase is endowed of additional functions in the control of growth and survival of tumor cells that do not depend only on the ability of this enzyme to maintain telomere length. This observation suggests that inhibiting telomerase or its synthesis may have additional anti-proliferative and apoptosis inducing effect, independently of the reduction of telomere length during cell divisions. This article reviews the basic information about the biology of telomeres and telomerase and attempts to present various approaches that are currently under investigation to inhibit its expression and its activity. We summarize herein distinct anti-telomerase approaches like antisense strategies, reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and G-quadruplex interacting agents, and also review molecules targeting hTERT expression, such as retinoids and evaluate them for their therapeutic potential. "They conceive a certain theory, and everything has to fit into that theory. If one little fact will not fit it, they throw it aside. But it is always the facts that will not fit in that are significant". "Death on the Nile". Agatha Christie.

  6. Combining immunotherapy and anticancer agents: the right path to achieve cancer cure?

    PubMed

    Apetoh, L; Ladoire, S; Coukos, G; Ghiringhelli, F

    2015-09-01

    Recent clinical trials revealed the impressive efficacy of immunological checkpoint blockade in different types of metastatic cancers. Such data underscore that immunotherapy is one of the most promising strategies for cancer treatment. In addition, preclinical studies provide evidence that some cytotoxic drugs have the ability to stimulate the immune system, resulting in anti-tumor immune responses that contribute to clinical efficacy of these agents. These observations raise the hypothesis that the next step for cancer treatment is the combination of cytotoxic agents and immunotherapies. The present review aims to summarize the immune-mediated effects of chemotherapeutic agents and their clinical relevance, the biological and clinical features of immune checkpoint blockers and finally, the preclinical and clinical rationale for novel therapeutic strategies combining anticancer agents and immune checkpoint blockers. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Pro-oxidant activity of dietary chemopreventive agents: an under-appreciated anti-cancer property.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Asfar S; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Hadi, S M

    2013-01-01

    " Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food" was quoted by Hippocrates more than two thousand years ago and since ancient times the health benefits of different natural agents have been exploited. In modern research, the disease preventive benefits of many such natural agents, particularly dietary compounds and their derivatives, has been attributed to their well recognized activity as the regulators of redox state of the cell. Nevertheless, most of these studies have focused on their antioxidant activity. A large body of evidence indicates that a major fraction of these agents can elicit pro-oxidant (radical generating) behavior which has been linked to their anti-cancer effects. This editorial provides an overview of the under-appreciated pro-oxidant activity of natural products, with a special focus on their ability to generate reactive oxygen species in the presence of transition metal ions, and discusses their possible use as cancer chemotherapeutic agents.

  8. Overview on the current status of virtual high-throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry approaches in multi-target anticancer drug discovery; Part I.

    PubMed

    Geromichalos, George D; Alifieris, Constantinos E; Geromichalou, Elena G; Trafalis, Dimitrios T

    2016-01-01

    Conventional drug design embraces the "one gene, one drug, one disease" philosophy. Nowadays, new generation of anti- cancer drugs, able to inhibit more than one pathway, is believed to play a major role in contemporary anticancer drug research. In this way, polypharmacology, focusing on multi-target drugs, has emerged as a new paradigm in drug discovery. A number of recent successful drugs have in part or in whole emerged from a structure-based research approach. Many advances including crystallography and informatics are behind these successes. Increasing insight into the genetics and molecular biology of cancer has resulted in the identification of an increasing number of potential molecular targets, for anticancer drug discovery and development. These targets can be approached through exploitation of emerging structural biology, "rational" drug design, screening of chemical libraries, or a combination of these methods. The result is the rapid discovery of new anticancer drugs. In this article we discuss the application of molecular modeling, molecular docking and virtual high-throughput screening to multi-targeted anticancer drug discovery. Efforts have been made to employ in silico methods for facilitating the search and design of selective multi-target agents. These computer aided molecular design methods have shown promising potential in facilitating drug discovery directed at selective multiple targets and is expected to contribute to intelligent lead anticancer drugs.

  9. Centrosome – a promising anti-cancer target

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Rivera, Yainyrette; Saavedra, Harold I

    2016-01-01

    The centrosome, an organelle discovered >100 years ago, is the main microtubule-organizing center in mammalian organisms. The centrosome is composed of a pair of centrioles surrounded by the pericentriolar material (PMC) and plays a major role in the regulation of cell cycle transitions (G1-S, G2-M, and metaphase-anaphase), ensuring the normality of cell division. Hundreds of proteins found in the centrosome exert a variety of roles, including microtubule dynamics, nucleation, and kinetochore–microtubule attachments that allow correct chromosome alignment and segregation. Errors in these processes lead to structural (shape, size, number, position, and composition), functional (abnormal microtubule nucleation and disorganized spindles), and numerical (centrosome amplification [CA]) centrosome aberrations causing aneuploidy and genomic instability. Compelling data demonstrate that centrosomes are implicated in cancer, because there are important oncogenic and tumor suppressor proteins that are localized in this organelle and drive centrosome aberrations. Centrosome defects have been found in pre-neoplasias and tumors from breast, ovaries, prostate, head and neck, lung, liver, and bladder among many others. Several drugs/compounds against centrosomal proteins have shown promising results. Other drugs have higher toxicity with modest or no benefits, and there are more recently developed agents being tested in clinical trials. All of this emerging evidence suggests that targeting centrosome aberrations may be a future avenue for therapeutic intervention in cancer research. PMID:28008224

  10. Identification of endoplasmic reticulum stress-inducing agents by antagonizing autophagy: a new potential strategy for identification of anti-cancer therapeutics in B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Emilia; Maddocks, Kami; Flynn, Joseph; Jones, Jeffrey; Cole, Sara L.; Zhang, Xiaoli; Byrd, John C.; Johnson, Amy J.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays a vital function in multiple cellular processes. There is a growing interest in developing therapeutic agents that can target the ER in cancer cells, inducing a stress response that leads to cell death. However, ER stress-inducing agents can also induce autophagy, a survival strategy of cancer cells. Therefore, by inhibiting autophagy we can increase the efficacy of the ER stress-inducing agents. Nelfinavir, a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitor with anti-cancer properties, can induce ER stress. Nelfinavir’s effects on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are yet to be elucidated. Herein we demonstrate that nelfinavir induces ER morphological changes and stress response, along with an autophagic protective strategy. Our data reveal that chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, significantly increases nelfinavir cytotoxicity. These results identify a novel strategy potentially effective in CLL treatment, by repositioning two well-known drugs as a combinatorial therapy with anti-cancer properties. PMID:23469959

  11. Essential Oils and Their Constituents as Anticancer Agents: A Mechanistic View

    PubMed Central

    Mantha, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    Exploring natural plant products as an option to find new chemical entities as anticancer agents is one of the fastest growing areas of research. Recently, in the last decade, essential oils (EOs) have been under study for their use in cancer therapy and the present review is an attempt to collect and document the available studies indicating EOs and their constituents as anticancer agents. This review enlists nearly 130 studies of EOs from various plant species and their constituents that have been studied so far for their anticancer potential and these studies have been classified as in vitro and in vivo studies for EOs and their constituents. This review also highlights in-depth various mechanisms of action of different EOs and their constituents reported in the treatment strategies for different types of cancer. The current review indicates that EOs and their constituents act by multiple pathways and mechanisms involving apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, antimetastatic and antiangiogenic, increased levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS), DNA repair modulation, and others to demonstrate their antiproliferative activity in the cancer cell. The effect of EOs and their constituents on tumour suppressor proteins (p53 and Akt), transcription factors (NF-κB and AP-1), MAPK-pathway, and detoxification enzymes like SOD, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase has also been discussed. PMID:25003106

  12. Plant-derived anticancer agents: a promising treatment for bone metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Juárez, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a very frequent complication of advanced cancer, and it remains an incurable disease. Current therapies that have been approved for the treatment of bone metastases delay the occurrence of skeletal-related events and can extend the patient's lifespan by a few years. However, they will not cure or cause the regression of established bone metastases, and new side effects are emerging after prolonged treatment. Thus, new therapies are severely needed. There are compelling evidences from in vitro and in vivo preclinical studies that support the use of compounds derived from plants to treat several forms of cancers including bone metastasis. More than 25% of the drugs used during the past 20 years were directly derived from plants, whereas another 25% are chemically altered natural products. Still, only 5–15% of the ∼250 000 higher plants have ever been investigated for bioactive compounds. There is a growing interest for the study of anticancer drugs with relatively low side effects that target specific key signaling pathways that control the establishment and progression of the cancer metastasis. Therefore, further studies are needed to identify new natural compounds with high efficiency in cancer prevention and treatment. Extensive reviews about plant-derived agents and their use in cancer have been published, but none when it comes to the treatment of bone metastases. Only a few of these compounds have been evaluated for the treatment of bone metastasis; here we describe some of the most prominent ones that are having the potential to reach the clinic soon. PMID:28243436

  13. Neem Limonoids as Anticancer Agents: Modulation of Cancer Hallmarks and Oncogenic Signaling.

    PubMed

    Nagini, Siddavaram

    2014-01-01

    Neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) is one of the most versatile medicinal plants, widely distributed in the Indian subcontinent. Neem is a rich source of limonoids that are endowed with potent medicinal properties predominantly antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities. Azadirachtin, gedunin, and nimbolide are more extensively investigated relative to other neem limonoids. Accumulating evidence indicates that the anticancer effects of neem limonoids are mediated through the inhibition of hallmark capabilities of cancer such as cell proliferation, apoptosis evasion, inflammation, invasion, and angiogenesis. The neem limonoids have been demonstrated to target oncogenic signaling kinases and transcription factors chiefly, NF-κB, Wnt/β-catenin, PI3K/Akt, MAPK, and JAK/STAT signaling pathways. Neem limonoids that target multiple pathways that are aberrant in cancer are ideal candidates for cancer chemoprevention and therapy.

  14. Research Progress in the Modification of Quercetin Leading to Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Massi, Alessandro; Bortolini, Olga; Ragno, Daniele; Bernardi, Tatiana; Sacchetti, Gianni; Tacchini, Massimo; De Risi, Carmela

    2017-07-29

    The flavonoid quercetin (3,3',4',5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) is widely distributed in plants, foods, and beverages. This polyphenol compound exhibits varied biological actions such as antioxidant, radical-scavenging, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antiviral, gastroprotective, immune-modulator, and finds also application in the treatment of obesity, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Besides, quercetin can prevent neurological disorders and exerts protection against mitochondrial damages. Various in vitro studies have assessed the anticancer effects of quercetin, although there are no conclusive data regarding its mode of action. However, low bioavailability, poor aqueous solubility as well as rapid body clearance, fast metabolism and enzymatic degradation hamper the use of quercetin as therapeutic agent, so intense research efforts have been focused on the modification of the quercetin scaffold to obtain analogs with potentially improved properties for clinical applications. This review gives an overview of the developments in the synthesis and anticancer-related activities of quercetin derivatives reported from 2012 to 2016.

  15. Evolution in medicinal chemistry of ursolic acid derivatives as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haijun; Gao, Yu; Wang, Ailan; Zhou, Xiaobin; Zheng, Yunquan; Zhou, Jia

    2015-03-06

    Currently, there is a renewed interest in common dietaries and plant-based traditional medicines for the prevention and treatment of cancer. In the search for potential anticancer agents from natural sources, ursolic acid (UA), a pentacyclic triterpenoid widely found in various medicinal herbs and fruits, exhibits powerful biological effects including its attractive anticancer activity against various types of cancer cells. However, the limited solubility, rapid metabolism and poor bioavailability of UA restricted its further clinical applications. In the past decade, with substantial progress toward the development of new chemical entities for the treatment of cancer, numerous UA derivatives have been designed and prepared to overcome its disadvantages. Despite extensive effort, discovery of effective UA derivatives has so far met with only limited success. This review summarizes the current status of the structural diversity and evolution in medicinal chemistry of UA analogues and provides a detailed discussion of future direction for further research in the chemical modifications of UA.

  16. Pharmacokinetic Properties of Anticancer Agents for the Treatment of CNS Tumors: Update of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Jacus, Megan O.; Daryani, Vinay M.; Harstead, K. Elaine; Patel, Yogesh T.; Throm, Stacy L.; Stewart, Clinton F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant improvement in outcomes for patients with hematological malignancies and solid tumors over the past 10 years, patients with primary or metastatic brain tumors continue to have a poor prognosis. A primary reason for this is the inability of many chemotherapeutic drugs to penetrate into the brain and brain tumors at concentrations high enough to exert an antitumor effect due to unique barriers and efflux transporters. Several studies have been published recently examining the CNS pharmacokinetics of various anticancer drugs in patients with primary and metastatic brain tumors. To summarize recent advances in the field, this review will critically present studies published within the last 9 years examining brain and cerebrospinal fluid penetration of clinically available anticancer agents for patients with CNS tumors. PMID:26293618

  17. Evolution in Medicinal Chemistry of Ursolic Acid Derivatives as Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haijun; Gao, Yu; Wang, Ailan; Zhou, Xiaobin; Zheng, Yunquan; Zhou, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is a renewed interest in common dietaries and plant-based traditional medicines for the prevention and treatment of cancer. In the search for potential anticancer agents from natural sources, ursolic acid (UA), a pentacyclic triterpenoid widely found in various medicinal herbs and fruits, exhibits powerful biological effects including its attractive anticancer activity against various types of cancer cells. However, the limited solubility, rapid metabolism and poor bioavailability of UA restricted its further clinical applications. In the past decade, with substantial progress toward the development of new chemical entities for the treatment of cancer, numerous UA derivatives have been designed and prepared to overcome its disadvantages. Despite extensive effort, discovery of effective UA derivatives has so far met with only limited success. This review summarizes the current status of the structural diversity and evolution in medicinal chemistry of UA analogues and provides a detailed discussion of future direction for further research in the chemical modifications of UA. PMID:25617694

  18. Recent development of ATP-competitive small molecule phosphatidylinostitol-3-kinase inhibitors as anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Wan, Wen-zhu; Li, Yan; Zhou, Guan-lian; Liu, Xin-guang

    2017-01-01

    Phosphatidylinostitol-3-kinase (PI3K) is the potential anticancer target in the PI3K/Akt/ mTOR pathway. Here we reviewed the ATP-competitive small molecule PI3K inhibitors in the past few years, including the pan Class I PI3K inhibitors, the isoform-specific PI3K inhibitors and/or the PI3K/mTOR dual inhibitors. PMID:27769061

  19. Pre-clinical evaluation of a novel class of anti-cancer agents, the Pyrrolo-1, 5-benzoxazepines

    PubMed Central

    Greene, LM; Butini, S; Campiani, G; Williams, DC; Zisterer, DM

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules are currently ranked one of the most validated targets for chemotherapy; with clinical use of microtubule targeting agents (MTAs) extending beyond half a century. Recent research has focused on the development of novel MTAs to combat drug resistance and drug associated toxicities. Of particular interest are compounds structurally different to those currently used within the clinic. The pyrrolo-1, 5-benzoxazepines (PBOXs) are a structurally distinct novel group of anti-cancer agents, some of which target tubulin. Herein, we review the chemistry, mechanism of action, preclinical development of the PBOXs and comparisons with clinically relevant chemotherapeutics. The PBOXs induce a range of cellular responses including; cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, autophagy, anti-vascular and anti-angiogenic effects. The apoptotic potential of the PBOXs extends across a wide spectrum of cancer-derived cell lines, by targeting tubulin and multiple molecular pathways frequently deregulated in human cancers. Extensive experimental data suggest that combining the PBOXs with established chemotherapeutics or radiation is therapeutically advantageous. Pre-clinical highlights of the PBOXs include; cancer specificity and improved therapeutic efficacy as compared to some current first line therapeutics. PMID:27994676

  20. Multi-targeted hybrids based on HDAC inhibitors for anti-cancer drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seung-Yong

    2012-02-01

    Multi-targeted hybrids combine two drugs in a single molecule to have greater medicinal effects than its individual components. Recently, a number of anti-cancer drug candidates such as CUDC-101 (Curis) have been designed based on linking properly two selected pharmacophores endowed with activity against different therapeutic targets.

  1. Acoustic response from adherent targeted contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shukui; Kruse, Dustin E.; Ferrara, Katherine W.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    In ultrasonic molecular imaging, encapsulated micron-sized gas bubbles are tethered to a blood vessel wall by targeting ligands. A challenging problem is to detect the echoes from adherent microbubbles and distinguish them from echoes from non-adherent agents and tissue. Echoes from adherent contrast agents are observed to include a high amplitude at the fundamental frequency, and significantly different spectral shape compared with free agents (p < 0.0003). Mechanisms for the observed acoustical difference and potential techniques to utilize these differences for molecular imaging are proposed. PMID:17225437

  2. Targeted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Caruthers, Shelton D; Winter, Patrick M; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2006-01-01

    The era of personalized medicine is emerging as physicians attempt to diagnose disease in asymptomatic individuals and treat pathology early in its natural history. A novel tool in an emerging armamentarium, molecular imaging will allow noninvasive characterization and segmentation of patients for delivering custom-tailored therapy. Nanoparticulate agents, such as superparamagnetic agents, liposomes, perfluorocarbon nanoparticle emulsions, and dendrimers, are being intensively researched as formulation platforms for various targeted clinical applications. As exemplified by perfluorocarbon nanoparticles, these new agents, in combination with the rapid innovations in imaging hardware and software, will allow the emergence of new medical diagnostic and therapeutic paradigms.

  3. Expression of sulfotransferase SULT1A1 in cancer cells predicts susceptibility to the novel anticancer agent NSC-743380.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao; Cao, Mengru; Wang, Li; Wu, Shuhong; Liu, Xiaoying; Li, Hongyu; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Rui-Yu; Sun, Xiaoping; Wei, Caimiao; Baggerly, Keith A; Roth, Jack A; Wang, Michael; Swisher, Stephen G; Fang, Bingliang

    2015-01-01

    The small molecule anticancer agent NSC-743380 modulates functions of multiple cancer-related pathways and is highly active in a subset of cancer cell lines in the NCI-60 cell line panel. It also has promising in vivo anticancer activity. However, the mechanisms underlying NSC-743380's selective anticancer activity remain uncharacterized. To determine biomarkers that may be used to identify responders to this novel anticancer agent, we performed correlation analysis on NSC-743380's anticancer activity and the gene expression levels in NCI-60 cell lines and characterized the functions of the top associated genes in NSC-743380-mediated anticancer activity. We found sulfotransferase SULT1A1 is causally associated with NSC-743380's anticancer activity. SULT1A1 was expressed in NSC-743380-sensitive cell lines but was undetectable in resistant cancer cells. Ectopic expression of SULT1A1 in NSC743380 resistant cancer cells dramatically sensitized the resistant cells to NSC-743380. Knockdown of the SULT1A1 in the NSC-743380 sensitive cancer cell line rendered it resistance to NSC-743380. The SULT1A1 protein levels in cell lysates from 18 leukemia cell lines reliably predicted the susceptibility of the cell lines to NSC-743380. Thus, expression of SULT1A1 in cancer cells is required for NSC-743380's anticancer activity and can be used as a biomarker for identification of NSC-743380 responders.

  4. Targeting Cytochrome P450 Enzymes: A New Approach in Anti-cancer Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Robert D.; Njar, Vincent C.O.

    2007-01-01

    Cytochrome P450s (CYPs) represent a large class of heme-containing enzymes that catalyze the metabolism of multitudes of substrates both endogenous and exogenous. Until recently, however, CYPs have been largely overlooked in cancer drug development, acknowledged only for their role in Phase I metabolism of chemotherapeutics. The first successful strategy targeting CYP enzymes in cancer therapy was the development of potent inhibitors of CYP19 (aromatase) for the treatment of breast cancer. Aromatase inhibitors ushered in a new era in hormone ablation therapy for estrogen dependent cancers, and have paved the way for similar strategies (i.e. inhibition of CYP17) that combat androgen dependent prostate cancer. Identification of CYPs involved in the inactivation of anti-cancer metabolites of Vitamin D3 and Vitamin A has triggered development of agents that target these enzymes as well. The discovery of the over-expression of exogenous metabolizing CYPs, such as CYP1B1, in cancer cells has roused interest in the development of inhibitors for chemoprevention and of prodrugs designed to be activated by CYPs only in cancer cells. Finally, the expression of CYPs within tumors has been utilized in the development of bioreductive molecules that are activated by CYPs only under hypoxic conditions. This review offers the first comprehensive analysis of strategies in drug development that either inhibit or exploit CYP enzymes for the treatment of cancer. PMID:17544277

  5. Mapping Novel Metabolic Nodes Targeted by Anti-Cancer Drugs that Impair Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lindsay S; Yan, Peter; Bateman, Leslie A; Nomura, Daniel K

    2017-03-08

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 receptor-negative subtypes of breast cancers that show the worst prognoses and lack targeted therapies. Here, we have coupled the screening of ∼400 anticancer agents that are under development or in the clinic with chemoproteomic and metabolomic profiling to identify novel metabolic mechanisms for agents that impair TNBC pathogenicity. We identify 20 anticancer compounds that significantly impaired cell survival across multiple types of TNBC cells. Among these 20 leads, the phytoestrogenic natural product licochalcone A was of interest, since TNBCs are unresponsive to estrogenic therapies, indicating that licochalcone A was likely acting through another target. Using chemoproteomic profiling approaches, we reveal that licochalcone A impairs TNBC pathogenicity, not through modulating estrogen receptor activity but rather through inhibiting prostaglandin reductase 1, a metabolic enzyme involved in leukotriene B4 inactivation. We also more broadly performed metabolomic profiling to map additional metabolic mechanisms of compounds that impair TNBC pathogenicity. Overlaying lipidomic profiling with drug responses, we find that deubiquitinase inhibitors cause dramatic elevations in acyl carnitine levels, which impair mitochondrial respiration and contribute to TNBC pathogenic impairments. We thus put forth two unique metabolic nodes that are targeted by drugs or drug candidates that impair TNBC pathogenicity. Our results also showcase the utility of coupling drug screens with chemoproteomic and metabolomic profiling to uncover unique metabolic drivers of TNBC pathogenicity.

  6. Inner conflict in patients receiving oral anticancer agents: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Hiroko; Takahashi, Tsunehiro

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the experiences of patients receiving oral anticancer agents. Design A qualitative study using semistructured interviews with a grounded theory approach. Setting A university hospital in Japan. Participants 14 patients with gastric cancer who managed their cancer with oral anticancer agents. Results Patients with cancer experienced inner conflict between rational belief and emotional resistance to taking medication due to confrontation with cancer, doubt regarding efficacy and concerns over potential harm attached to use of the agent. Although they perceived themselves as being adherent to medication, they reported partial non-adherent behaviours. The patients reassessed their lives through the experience of inner conflict and, ultimately, they recognised their role in medication therapy. Conclusions Patients with cancer experienced inner conflict, in which considerable emotional resistance to taking their medication affected their occasional non-adherent behaviours. In patient-centred care, it is imperative that healthcare providers understand patients’ inner conflict and inconsistency between their subjective view and behaviour to support patient adherence. PMID:25872938

  7. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) Extract as a Potential Complementary Agent in Anticancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    González-Vallinas, Margarita; Reglero, Guillermo; Ramírez de Molina, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains an important cause of mortality nowadays and, therefore, new therapeutic approaches are still needed. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) has been reported to possess antitumor activities both in vitro and in animal studies. Some of these activities were attributed to its major components, such as carnosic acid, carnosol, ursolic acid, and rosmarinic acid. Initially, the antitumor effects of rosemary were attributed to its antioxidant activity. However, in recent years, a lack of correlation between antioxidant and antitumor effects exerted by rosemary was reported, and different molecular mechanisms were related to its tumor inhibitory properties. Moreover, supported by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Food and Safety Authority, specific compositions of rosemary extract were demonstrated to be safe for human health and used as antioxidant additive in foods, suggesting the potential easy application of this agent as a complementary approach in cancer therapy. In this review, we aim to summarize the reported anticancer effects of rosemary, the demonstrated molecular mechanisms related to these effects and the interactions between rosemary and currently used anticancer agents. The possibility of using rosemary extract as a complementary agent in cancer therapy in comparison with its isolated components is discussed.

  8. Inner conflict in patients receiving oral anticancer agents: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Yagasaki, Kaori; Komatsu, Hiroko; Takahashi, Tsunehiro

    2015-04-14

    To explore the experiences of patients receiving oral anticancer agents. A qualitative study using semistructured interviews with a grounded theory approach. A university hospital in Japan. 14 patients with gastric cancer who managed their cancer with oral anticancer agents. Patients with cancer experienced inner conflict between rational belief and emotional resistance to taking medication due to confrontation with cancer, doubt regarding efficacy and concerns over potential harm attached to use of the agent. Although they perceived themselves as being adherent to medication, they reported partial non-adherent behaviours. The patients reassessed their lives through the experience of inner conflict and, ultimately, they recognised their role in medication therapy. Patients with cancer experienced inner conflict, in which considerable emotional resistance to taking their medication affected their occasional non-adherent behaviours. In patient-centred care, it is imperative that healthcare providers understand patients' inner conflict and inconsistency between their subjective view and behaviour to support patient adherence. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Adherence influencing factors in patients taking oral anticancer agents: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mathes, Tim; Pieper, Dawid; Antoine, Sunya-Lee; Eikermann, Michaela

    2014-06-01

    The use of oral anticancer agents increased steadily in the last decades. Although oral anticancer agent adherence is important for a successful treatment, many patients are insufficiently adherent. To evaluate adherence influencing factors in patients taking oral anticancer agents. A systematic literature search was performed in Medline and Embase. Titles and abstracts and in case of relevance, full-texts were screened according to predefined inclusion criteria. The risk of bias was assessed. Both were carried out independently by two reviewers. Relevant data on study characteristics and results were extracted in standardized tables by one reviewer and checked by a second. A meta-analysis was not performed because of clinical and methodological heterogeneity between the studies to avoid misleading results. Data were synthesized in narrative way using a standardized procedure. Twenty-two relevant studies were identified. The study quality was moderate. Especially the risk of bias regarding the measurement of influencing factors and adherence was mostly unclear. Social support, intake of aromatase inhibitors, and lower out-of-pocket costs for OACA seem to have a positive effect on adherence. Depression and the number of different medications seem to have a negative effect on adherence. Low age and very high age seem to be associated with lower adherence. The remaining factors showed either mostly no influence or were heterogeneous regarding the effect direction and statistical significance. There are some factors that seem to have influence on adherence in patients taking OACA. However, due to the heterogeneity no general conclusions can be made also for these factors that can be applied to all indications, medications, settings, countries etc. The results should rather be considered as indications for factors that can have an influence on adherence to OACA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Anti-Cancer Phytometabolites Targeting Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Torquato, Heron F V; Goettert, Márcia I; Justo, Giselle Z; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J

    2017-04-01

    Medicinal plants are a plentiful source of bioactive molecules with much structural diversity. In cancer treatment, molecules obtained from plants represent an attractive alternative to other treatments because several plant-derived compounds have exhibited lower toxicity and higher selectivity against cancer cells. In this review, we focus on the possible application of bioactive molecules obtained from plants against more primitive cell populations in cancers, cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells are present in several kinds of tumors and are responsible for recurrences and metastases. Common anti-cancer drugs exhibit lower effectiveness against cancer stem cells because of their biological features. However, recently discovered natural phytometabolites exert cytotoxic effects on this rare population of cells in cancers. Therefore, this review presents the latest research on promising compounds from plants that can act as antitumor drugs and that mainly affect stem cell populations in cancers.

  11. A review of the evidence for occupational exposure risks to novel anticancer agents - A focus on monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    King, Julie; Alexander, Marliese; Byrne, Jenny; MacMillan, Kent; Mollo, Adele; Kirsa, Sue; Green, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Evidence of occupational exposure risks to novel anticancer agents is limited and yet to be formally evaluated from the Australian healthcare perspective. From March to September 2013 medical databases, organizational policies, drug monographs, and the World Wide Web were searched for evidence relating to occupational exposure to monoclonal antibodies, fusion proteins, gene therapies, and other unclassified novel anticancer agents. Australian legislation, national and international guidelines, and drug company information excluded novel agents or provided inconsistent risk assessments and safe handling recommendations. Monoclonal antibody guidelines reported conflicting information and were often divergent with available evidence and pharmacologic rationale demonstrating minimal internalisation ability and occupational exposure risk. Despite similar physiochemical, pharmacologic, and internalisation properties to monoclonal antibodies, fusion proteins were included in only a minority of guidelines. Clinical directives for the safe handling of gene therapies and live vaccines were limited, where available focusing on prevention against exposure and cross-contamination. Although mechanistically different, novel small molecule agents (proteasome inhibitors), possess similar physiochemical and internalisation properties to traditional cytotoxic agents warranting cytotoxic classification and handling. Novel agents are rapidly emerging into clinical practice, and healthcare personnel have few resources to evaluate risk and provide safety recommendations. Novel agents possess differing physical, molecular and pharmacological profiles compared to traditional cytotoxic anticancer agents. Evaluation of occupational exposure risk should consider both toxicity and internalisation. Evidence-based guidance able to direct safe handling practices for novel anticancer agents across a variety of clinical settings is urgently required. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Seeking new anti-cancer agents from autophagy-regulating natural products.

    PubMed

    Hua, Fang; Shang, Shuang; Hu, Zhuo-Wei

    2017-04-01

    Natural products are an important original source of many widely used drugs, including anti-cancer drugs. Early research efforts for seeking anti-cancer therapy from the natural products are mainly focused on the compounds with cytotoxicity capability. The good examples include vinblastine, vincristine, the camptothecin derivatives; topotecan, irinotecan, epipodophyllotoxin derivatives and paclitaxel. In a recent decade, the fundamental progression has been made in the understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms regarding tumor initiation, metastasis, therapeutic resistance, immune escape, and relapse, which provide a great opportunity for the development of new mechanism-based anticancer drugs, especially drugs against new molecular and cellular targets. Autophagy, a critical cell homeostasis mechanism and promising drug target involved in a verity of human diseases including cancer, can be modulated by many compounds derived from natural products. In this review, we'll give a short introduction of autophagy and discuss the roles of autophagy in the tumorigenesis and progression. And then, we summarize the accumulated evidences to show the anti-tumor effects of several compounds derived from natural products through modulation of autophagy activity.

  13. Discovery and Development of the Anticancer Agent Salinosporamide A (NPI-0052)

    PubMed Central

    Fenical, William; Jensen, Paul R.; Palladino, Michael A.; Lam, Kin S.; Lloyd, G. Kenneth; Potts, Barbara C.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of the anticancer agent salinosporamide A (NPI-0052) resulted from the exploration of new marine environments and a commitment to the potential of the ocean to yield new natural products for drug discovery and development. Driving the success of this process was the linkage of academic research together with the ability and commitment of industry to undertake drug development and provide the resources and expertise to advance the entry of salinosporamide A (NPI-0052) into human clinical trials. This paper offers a chronicle of the important events that facilitated the rapid clinical development of this exciting molecule. PMID:19022674

  14. Novel, Broad Spectrum Anticancer Agents Containing the Tricyclic 5:7:5-Fused Diimidazodiazepine Ring System

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis of a series of novel, broad spectrum anticancer agents containing the tricyclic 5:7:5-fused diimidazo[4,5-d:4′,5′-f][1,3]diazepine ring system is reported. Compounds 1, 2, 8, 11, and 12 in the series show promising in vitro antitumor activity with low micromolar IC50 values against prostate, lung, breast, and ovarian cancer cell lines. Some notions about structure−activity relationships and a possible mechanism of biological activity are presented. Also presented are preliminary in vivo toxicity studies of 1 using SCID mice. PMID:21572541

  15. DFT-based QSAR study and molecular design of AHMA derivatives as potent anticancer agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jincan; Shen, Yong; Liao, Siyan; Chen, Lanmei; Zheng, Kangcheng

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) of 3-(9-acridinylamino)-5-hydroxymethylaniline (AHMA) derivatives and their alkylcarbamates as potent anticancer agents has been studied using density functional theory (DFT), molecular mechanics (MM+), and statistical methods. In the best established QSAR equation, the energy (ENL) of the next lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (NLUMO) and the net charges (QFR) of the first atom of the substituent R, as well as the steric parameter (MR2) of subsituent R2 are the main independent factors contributing to the anticancer activity of the compounds. A new scheme determining outliers by ?leave-one-out? (LOO) cross-validation coefficient (q2n-i) was suggested and successfully used. The fitting correlation coefficient (R2) and the ?LOO? cross-validation coefficient (q2) values for the training set of 25 compounds are 0.881 and 0.829, respectively. The predicted activities of 5 compounds in the test set using this QSAR model are in good agreement with their experimental values, indicating that this model has excellent predictive ability. Based on the established QSAR equation, 10 new compounds with rather high anticancer activity much greater than that of 34 compounds have been designed and await experimental verification.

  16. Benzimidazole bearing oxadiazole and triazolo-thiadiazoles nucleus: design and synthesis as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Husain, Asif; Rashid, Mohd; Mishra, Ravinesh; Parveen, Shama; Shin, Dong-Soo; Kumar, Deepak

    2012-09-01

    Two new series of benzimidazole bearing oxadiazole[1-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-3-(5-substituted-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)propan-1-ones (4a-l)] and triazolo-thiadiazoles[1-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-3-(6-(substituted)-[1,2,4]triazolo[3,4-b][1,3,4]thiadiazol-3-yl)propan-1-one (7a-e)] have been synthesized successfully from 4-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-4-oxobutanehydrazide (3) with an aim to produce promising anticancer agents. In vitro anticancer activities of synthesized compounds were screened at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), USA, according to their applied protocol against full NCI 60 human cell lines panel; results showed good to remarkable anticancer activity. Among them, compound (4j, NCS: 761980) exhibited significant growth inhibition and further screened at 10-fold dilutions of five different concentrations (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 μM) with GI(50) values ranging from 0.49 to 48.0 μM and found superior for the non-small cell lung cancer cell lines like HOP-92 (GI(50) 0.49, TGI 19.9,LC(50) >100 and Log(10)GI(50) -6.30, Log(10)TGI -4.70, Log(10)LC(50) >-4.00).

  17. Roles of Pyridine and Pyrimidine Derivatives as Privileged Scaffolds in Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Prachayasittikul, Supaluk; Pingaew, Ratchanok; Worachartcheewan, Apilak; Sinthupoom, Nujarin; Prachayasittikul, Veda; Ruchirawat, Somsak; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2017-01-01

    Cancer has been considered to be a global health concern due to the impact of disease on the quality of life. The continual increase of cancer cases as well as the resistance of cancer cells to the existing drugs have driven the search for novel anticancer drugs with better potency and selectivity, improved pharmacokinetic profiles, and minimum toxicities. Pyridine and pyrimidine are presented in natural products and genetic materials. These pyridine/pyrimidine core structures have been noted for their roles in many biological processes as well as in cancer pathogenesis, which make such compounds become attractive scaffolds for discovery of novel drugs. In the recent years, pyridine- and pyrimidine-based anticancer drugs have been developed based on structural modification of these core structures (i.e., substitution with moieties and rings, conjugation with other compounds, and coordination with metal ions). Detailed discussion is provided in this review to highlight the potential of these small molecules as privileged scaffolds with attractive properties and biological activities for the search of novel anticancer agents. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Structure-Activity Relationships of Orotidine-5′-Monophosphate Decarboxylase Inhibitors as Anticancer Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Bello, A.; Konforte, D; Poduch, E; Furlonger, C; Wei, L; Liu, Y; Lewis, M; Pai, E; Paige, C; Kotra, L

    2009-01-01

    A series of 6-substituted and 5-fluoro-6-substituted uridine derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their potential as anticancer agents. The designed molecules were synthesized from either fully protected uridine or the corresponding 5-fluorouridine derivatives. The mononucleotide derivatives were used for enzyme inhibition investigations against ODCase. Anticancer activities of all the synthesized derivatives were evaluated using the nucleoside forms of the inhibitors. 5-Fluoro-UMP was a very weak inhibitor of ODCase. 6-Azido-5-fluoro and 5-fluoro-6-iodo derivatives are covalent inhibitors of ODCase, and the active site Lys145 residue covalently binds to the ligand after the elimination of the 6-substitution. Among the synthesized nucleoside derivatives, 6-azido-5-fluoro, 6-amino-5-fluoro, and 6-carbaldehyde-5-fluoro derivatives showed potent anticancer activities in cell-based assays against various leukemia cell lines. On the basis of the overall profile, 6-azido-5-fluoro and 6-amino-5-fluoro uridine derivatives exhibited potential for further investigations.

  19. Synthesis and Evaluation of Aminothiazole-Paeonol Derivatives as Potential Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Ying; Kapoor, Mohit; Huang, Ying-Pei; Lin, Hui-Hsien; Liang, Yu-Chuan; Lin, Yu-Ling; Huang, Su-Chin; Liao, Wei-Neng; Chen, Jen-Kun; Huang, Jer-Shing; Hsu, Ming-Hua

    2016-01-26

    In this study, novel aminothiazole-paeonol derivatives were synthesized and characterized using ¹H-NMR, (13)C-NMR, IR, mass spectroscopy, and high performance liquid chromatography. All the new synthesized compounds were evaluated according to their anticancer effect on seven cancer cell lines. The experimental results indicated that these compounds possess high anticancer potential regarding human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS cells) and human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29 cells). Among these compounds, N-[4-(2-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)thiazol-2-yl]-4-methoxybenzenesulfonamide (13c) had the most potent inhibitory activity, with IC50 values of 4.0 µM to AGS, 4.4 µM to HT-29 cells and 5.8 µM to HeLa cells. The 4-fluoro-N-[4-(2-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)thiazol-2-yl]benzenesulfonamide (13d) was the second potent compound, showing IC50 values of 7.2, 11.2 and 13.8 µM to AGS , HT-29 and HeLa cells, respectively. These compounds are superior to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for relatively higher potency against AGS and HT-29 human cancer cell lines along with lower cytotoxicity to fibroblasts. Novel aminothiazole-paeonol derivatives in this work might be a series of promising lead compounds to develop anticancer agents for treating gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma.

  20. Platinum, palladium, gold and ruthenium complexes as anticancer agents: Current clinical uses, cytotoxicity studies and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lazarević, Tatjana; Rilak, Ana; Bugarčić, Živadin D

    2017-04-18

    Metallodrugs offer potential for unique mechanism of drug action based on the choice of the metal, its oxidation state, the types and number of coordinated ligands and the coordination geometry. This review illustrates notable recent progress in the field of medicinal bioinorganic chemistry as many new approaches to the design of innovative metal-based anticancer drugs are emerging. Current research addressing the problems associated with platinum drugs has focused on other metal-based therapeutics that have different modes of action and on prodrug and targeting strategies in an effort to diminish the side-effects of cisplatin chemotherapy. Examples of metal compounds and chelating agents currently in clinical use, clinical trials or preclinical development are highlighted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman Khazim; Albalawi, Sulaiman Mansour; Athar, Md Tanwir; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Al-Shahrani, Hamoud; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70-90%) in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2-3 fold) indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for treatment of breast

  2. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman Khazim; Albalawi, Sulaiman Mansour; Athar, Md Tanwir; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Al-Shahrani, Hamoud; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70–90%) in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2–3 fold) indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for treatment of

  3. Mitochondrial Targeting of Vitamin E Succinate Enhances Its Pro-apoptotic and Anti-cancer Activity via Mitochondrial Complex II*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lan-Feng; Jameson, Victoria J. A.; Tilly, David; Cerny, Jiri; Mahdavian, Elahe; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; Hernández-Esquivel, Luz; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara; Stursa, Jan; Witting, Paul K.; Stantic, Bela; Rohlena, Jakub; Truksa, Jaroslav; Kluckova, Katarina; Dyason, Jeffrey C.; Ledvina, Miroslav; Salvatore, Brian A.; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Coster, Mark J.; Ralph, Stephen J.; Smith, Robin A. J.; Neuzil, Jiri

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex II (CII) has been recently identified as a novel target for anti-cancer drugs. Mitochondrially targeted vitamin E succinate (MitoVES) is modified so that it is preferentially localized to mitochondria, greatly enhancing its pro-apoptotic and anti-cancer activity. Using genetically manipulated cells, MitoVES caused apoptosis and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in CII-proficient malignant cells but not their CII-dysfunctional counterparts. MitoVES inhibited the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity of CII with IC50 of 80 μm, whereas the electron transfer from CII to CIII was inhibited with IC50 of 1.5 μm. The agent had no effect either on the enzymatic activity of CI or on electron transfer from CI to CIII. Over 24 h, MitoVES caused stabilization of the oxygen-dependent destruction domain of HIF1α fused to GFP, indicating promotion of the state of pseudohypoxia. Molecular modeling predicted the succinyl group anchored into the proximal CII ubiquinone (UbQ)-binding site and successively reduced interaction energies for serially shorter phytyl chain homologs of MitoVES correlated with their lower effects on apoptosis induction, ROS generation, and SDH activity. Mutation of the UbQ-binding Ser68 within the proximal site of the CII SDHC subunit (S68A or S68L) suppressed both ROS generation and apoptosis induction by MitoVES. In vivo studies indicated that MitoVES also acts by causing pseudohypoxia in the context of tumor suppression. We propose that mitochondrial targeting of VES with an 11-carbon chain localizes the agent into an ideal position across the interface of the mitochondrial inner membrane and matrix, optimizing its biological effects as an anti-cancer drug. PMID:21059645

  4. Mitochondrial targeting of vitamin E succinate enhances its pro-apoptotic and anti-cancer activity via mitochondrial complex II.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lan-Feng; Jameson, Victoria J A; Tilly, David; Cerny, Jiri; Mahdavian, Elahe; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; Hernández-Esquivel, Luz; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara; Stursa, Jan; Witting, Paul K; Stantic, Bela; Rohlena, Jakub; Truksa, Jaroslav; Kluckova, Katarina; Dyason, Jeffrey C; Ledvina, Miroslav; Salvatore, Brian A; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Coster, Mark J; Ralph, Stephen J; Smith, Robin A J; Neuzil, Jiri

    2011-02-04

    Mitochondrial complex II (CII) has been recently identified as a novel target for anti-cancer drugs. Mitochondrially targeted vitamin E succinate (MitoVES) is modified so that it is preferentially localized to mitochondria, greatly enhancing its pro-apoptotic and anti-cancer activity. Using genetically manipulated cells, MitoVES caused apoptosis and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in CII-proficient malignant cells but not their CII-dysfunctional counterparts. MitoVES inhibited the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity of CII with IC(50) of 80 μM, whereas the electron transfer from CII to CIII was inhibited with IC(50) of 1.5 μM. The agent had no effect either on the enzymatic activity of CI or on electron transfer from CI to CIII. Over 24 h, MitoVES caused stabilization of the oxygen-dependent destruction domain of HIF1α fused to GFP, indicating promotion of the state of pseudohypoxia. Molecular modeling predicted the succinyl group anchored into the proximal CII ubiquinone (UbQ)-binding site and successively reduced interaction energies for serially shorter phytyl chain homologs of MitoVES correlated with their lower effects on apoptosis induction, ROS generation, and SDH activity. Mutation of the UbQ-binding Ser(68) within the proximal site of the CII SDHC subunit (S68A or S68L) suppressed both ROS generation and apoptosis induction by MitoVES. In vivo studies indicated that MitoVES also acts by causing pseudohypoxia in the context of tumor suppression. We propose that mitochondrial targeting of VES with an 11-carbon chain localizes the agent into an ideal position across the interface of the mitochondrial inner membrane and matrix, optimizing its biological effects as an anti-cancer drug.

  5. Multi-agent cooperative target search.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinwen; Xie, Lihua; Xu, Jun; Xu, Zhao

    2014-05-26

    This paper addresses a vision-based cooperative search for multiple mobile ground targets by a group of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) with limited sensing and communication capabilities. The airborne camera on each UAV has a limited field of view and its target discriminability varies as a function of altitude. First, by dividing the whole surveillance region into cells, a probability map can be formed for each UAV indicating the probability of target existence within each cell. Then, we propose a distributed probability map updating model which includes the fusion of measurement information, information sharing among neighboring agents, information decay and transmission due to environmental changes such as the target movement. Furthermore, we formulate the target search problem as a multi-agent cooperative coverage control problem by optimizing the collective coverage area and the detection performance. The proposed map updating model and the cooperative control scheme are distributed, i.e., assuming that each agent only communicates with its neighbors within its communication range. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms is illustrated by simulation.

  6. Multi-Agent Cooperative Target Search

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinwen; Xie, Lihua; Xu, Jun; Xu, Zhao

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses a vision-based cooperative search for multiple mobile ground targets by a group of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) with limited sensing and communication capabilities. The airborne camera on each UAV has a limited field of view and its target discriminability varies as a function of altitude. First, by dividing the whole surveillance region into cells, a probability map can be formed for each UAV indicating the probability of target existence within each cell. Then, we propose a distributed probability map updating model which includes the fusion of measurement information, information sharing among neighboring agents, information decay and transmission due to environmental changes such as the target movement. Furthermore, we formulate the target search problem as a multi-agent cooperative coverage control problem by optimizing the collective coverage area and the detection performance. The proposed map updating model and the cooperative control scheme are distributed, i.e., assuming that each agent only communicates with its neighbors within its communication range. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms is illustrated by simulation. PMID:24865884

  7. Preclinical Investigations of PM01183 (Lurbinectedin) as a Single Agent or in Combination with Other Anticancer Agents for Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ryoko; Mabuchi, Seiji; Kawano, Mahiru; Sasano, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Yuri; Kuroda, Hiromasa; Kozasa, Katsumi; Hashimoto, Kae; Sawada, Kenjiro; Kimura, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the antitumor effects of lurbinectedin as a single agent or in combination with existing anticancer agents for clear cell carcinoma (CCC) of the ovary, which is regarded as an aggressive, chemoresistant, histological subtype. Methods Using human ovarian CCC cell lines, the antitumor effects of lurbinectedin, SN-38, doxorubicin, cisplatin, and paclitaxel as single agents were assessed using the MTS assay. Then, the antitumor effects of combination therapies involving lurbinectedin and 1 of the other 4 agents were evaluated using isobologram analysis to examine whether these combinations displayed synergistic effects. The antitumor activity of each treatment was also examined using cisplatin-resistant and paclitaxel-resistant CCC sublines. Finally, we determined the effects of mTORC1 inhibition on the antitumor activity of lurbinectedin-based chemotherapy. Results Lurbinectedin exhibited significant antitumor activity toward chemosensitive and chemoresistant CCC cells in vitro. An examination of mouse CCC cell xenografts revealed that lurbinectedin significantly inhibits tumor growth. Among the tested combinations, lurbinectedin plus SN-38 resulted in a significant synergistic effect. This combination also had strong synergistic effects on both the cisplatin-resistant and paclitaxel-resistant CCC cell lines. Everolimus significantly enhanced the antitumor activity of lurbinectedin-based chemotherapies. Conclusions Lurbinectedin, a new agent that targets active transcription, exhibits antitumor activity in CCC when used as a single agent and has synergistic antitumor effects when combined with irinotecan. Our results indicate that lurbinectedin is a promising agent for treating ovarian CCC, both as a first-line treatment and as a salvage treatment for recurrent lesions that develop after platinum-based or paclitaxel treatment. PMID:26986199

  8. Folate-receptor-targeted radionuclide imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Ke, Chun-Yen; Mathias, Carla J; Green, Mark A

    2004-04-29

    The cell-membrane folate receptor is a potential molecular target for tumor-selective drug delivery, including delivery of radiolabeled folate-chelate conjugates for diagnostic imaging. This review surveys the growing literature on tumor imaging with radionuclide agents targeted to the folate receptor. Successful folate-receptor targeting has been reported, both in vitro and in vivo, using a variety of radionuclides that are suitable for clinical diagnostic imaging (67Ga, 111In, 99mTc, 66Ga, and 64Cu). While none of these agents has, to date, been demonstrated to have clinical efficacy as a diagnostic tool, existing data indicates that it is feasible to noninvasively assess (at least qualitatively) tissue folate receptor levels by external radionuclide imaging.

  9. Reverse screening approach to identify potential anti-cancer targets of dipyridamole

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Shu-Min; Zhan, Dong-Ling; Zhang, Shu-Hua; Song, Li-Qiang; Han, Wei-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Dipyridamole (DIP) inhibits thrombus formation when given chronically, and causes vasodilation over a short time. To date, DIP can increase the anticancer drugs (5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, piperidine, vincristine) concentration in cancer cells and hence enhance the efficacy of treatment cancer. The inhibition of DIP may result in increased 5-fluorouracil efficacy and diminish the drug side effects. But the actual molecular targets remain unknown. In this study, reverse protein-ligands docking, and quantum mechanics were used to search for the potential molecular targets of DIP. The quantum mechanics calculation was performed by using Gaussian 03 program package. Reverse pharmacophore mapping was used to search for potential molecular target candidates for a given small molecule. The docking study was used for exploring the potential anti-cancer targets of dipyridamole. The two predicted binders with the statistically significant prediction are dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) (PDB Id: 1GTE) and human spindle checkpoint kinase Bub1 (PDB Id: 3E7E). Structure analysis suggests that electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonding play an important role in their binding process. The strong functional linkage of DIP and 5FU supports our prediction. In conclusion, these results generate a tractable set of anticancer proteins. The exploration of polypharmacology will provide us new opportunities in treating systematic diseases, such as the cancers. The results would generate a tractable set of anticancer target proteins for future experimental validations. PMID:28077994

  10. Molecular Targets Underlying the Anticancer Effects of Quercetin: An Update.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fazlullah; Niaz, Kamal; Maqbool, Faheem; Ismail Hassan, Fatima; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Nagulapalli Venkata, Kalyan C; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Bishayee, Anupam

    2016-08-29

    Quercetin, a medicinally important member of the flavonoid family, is one of the most prominent dietary antioxidants. It is present in a variety of foods-including fruits, vegetables, tea, wine, as well as other dietary supplements-and is responsible for various health benefits. Numerous pharmacological effects of quercetin include protection against diseases, such as osteoporosis, certain forms of malignant tumors, and pulmonary and cardiovascular disorders. Quercetin has the special ability of scavenging highly reactive species, such as hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radicals. These oxygen radicals are called reactive oxygen species, which can cause oxidative damage to cellular components, such as proteins, lipids, and deoxyribonucleic acid. Various oxygen radicals play important roles in pathophysiological and degenerative processes, such as aging. Subsequently, several studies have been performed to evaluate possible advantageous health effects of quercetin and to collect scientific evidence for these beneficial health claims. These studies also gather data in order to evaluate the exact mechanism(s) of action and toxicological effects of quercetin. The purpose of this review is to present and critically analyze molecular pathways underlying the anticancer effects of quercetin. Current limitations and future directions of research on this bioactive dietary polyphenol are also critically discussed.

  11. Death receptors as targets for anti-cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Papenfuss, Kerstin; Cordier, Stefanie M; Walczak, Henning

    2008-01-01

    Human tumour cells are characterized by their ability to avoid the normal regulatory mechanisms of cell growth, division and death. The classical chemotherapy aims to kill tumour cells by causing DNA damage-induced apoptosis. However, as many tumour cells posses mutations in intracellular apoptosis-sensing molecules like p53, they are not capable of inducing apoptosis on their own and are therefore resistant to chemotherapy. With the discovery of the death receptors the opportunity arose to directly trigger apoptosis from the outside of tumour cells, thereby circumventing chemotherapeutic resistance. Death receptors belong to the tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily, with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-1, CD95 and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-R1 and -R2 being the most prominent members. This review covers the current knowledge about these four death receptors, summarizes pre-clinical approaches engaging these death receptors in anti-cancer therapy and also gives an overview about their application in clinical trials conducted to date. PMID:19210756

  12. Molecular Targets Underlying the Anticancer Effects of Quercetin: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fazlullah; Niaz, Kamal; Maqbool, Faheem; Ismail Hassan, Fatima; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Nagulapalli Venkata, Kalyan C.; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Bishayee, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a medicinally important member of the flavonoid family, is one of the most prominent dietary antioxidants. It is present in a variety of foods—including fruits, vegetables, tea, wine, as well as other dietary supplements—and is responsible for various health benefits. Numerous pharmacological effects of quercetin include protection against diseases, such as osteoporosis, certain forms of malignant tumors, and pulmonary and cardiovascular disorders. Quercetin has the special ability of scavenging highly reactive species, such as hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radicals. These oxygen radicals are called reactive oxygen species, which can cause oxidative damage to cellular components, such as proteins, lipids, and deoxyribonucleic acid. Various oxygen radicals play important roles in pathophysiological and degenerative processes, such as aging. Subsequently, several studies have been performed to evaluate possible advantageous health effects of quercetin and to collect scientific evidence for these beneficial health claims. These studies also gather data in order to evaluate the exact mechanism(s) of action and toxicological effects of quercetin. The purpose of this review is to present and critically analyze molecular pathways underlying the anticancer effects of quercetin. Current limitations and future directions of research on this bioactive dietary polyphenol are also critically discussed. PMID:27589790

  13. [Sensitivity of esophageal cancer to anticancer agents and supplementary chemotherapy combined with surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Masaki, Y; Ishigami, K; Oka, M; Matsumoto, N; Honma, K; Uchiyama, T

    1986-04-01

    The authors examined the sensitivities of esophageal cancer to Bleomycin (BLM), Peplomycin (PEP), Cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-FU by the INAS method using 3H-thymidine or 14C-formate as labeled precursors, and determined the concentrations of anticancer agents in cancer lesions by the Band Culture method. On the other hand, the authors investigated the superiority or inferiority of various methods of BLM administration by observing the prevention effect of BLM on the development of experimental esophageal cancer in rats. Forty-three cases out of 76, 57%, showed a sensitivity to BLM, 60% to PEP, 38% to CDDP and 56% to 5-FU. As to the types of roentgenological findings, the superficial and tumorous types showed a high sensitivity rate. As to the types of macroscopical findings, the protruded and superficial types showed a high sensitivity rate. As to the types of histological findings, well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma showed a high sensitivity rate. Sensitivity was higher in metastatic lymph nodes than in main cancer lesions. Tumor tissues which had undergone previous hyperthermic management (at 42 degrees C) showed a higher sensitivity than those which had not. PEP at a half dose brought about the same grade of anticancer effect as BLM. The sensitivities of esophageal cancer to various anticancer agents showed individual differences among clinical cases. Therefore, combination chemotherapy for esophageal cancer was thought to be an effective administration method. The divided administration of small doses of BLM was thought to be more superior than the one-shot administration of a large dose for esophageal cancer. The results of the INAS sensitivity test were perfectly coincident with the effects of chemotherapy in clinical cases of esophageal cancer.

  14. Chemotherapy, targeted agents, antiemetics and growth-factors in human milk: how should we counsel cancer patients about breastfeeding?

    PubMed

    Pistilli, Barbara; Bellettini, Giulia; Giovannetti, Elisa; Codacci-Pisanelli, Giovanni; Azim, Hatem A; Benedetti, Giovanni; Sarno, Maria Anna; Peccatori, Fedro A

    2013-05-01

    An increasing number of women are diagnosed with cancer during pregnancy and lactation. Women are usually advised to interrupt breastfeeding during systemic anticancer treatment for fear of serious adverse effects to the nursed infant. However, the issue is poorly addressed in the literature and very few studies have evaluated the safety of breastfeeding during or after cytotoxic drugs or target agents administration. In this review we will analyze the available evidence that addresses the issue of anticancer drugs, targeted agents, antiemetics and growth-factors excretion in human milk. This could serve as a unique resource that may aid physicians in the management of breastfeeding cancer patients interested in maintaining lactation during treatment.

  15. Highly Adaptable Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells as a Functional Model for Testing Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Balraj; Shamsnia, Anna; Raythatha, Milan R.; Milligan, Ryan D.; Cady, Amanda M.; Madan, Simran; Lucci, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    A major obstacle in developing effective therapies against solid tumors stems from an inability to adequately model the rare subpopulation of panresistant cancer cells that may often drive the disease. We describe a strategy for optimally modeling highly abnormal and highly adaptable human triple-negative breast cancer cells, and evaluating therapies for their ability to eradicate such cells. To overcome the shortcomings often associated with cell culture models, we incorporated several features in our model including a selection of highly adaptable cancer cells based on their ability to survive a metabolic challenge. We have previously shown that metabolically adaptable cancer cells efficiently metastasize to multiple organs in nude mice. Here we show that the cancer cells modeled in our system feature an embryo-like gene expression and amplification of the fat mass and obesity associated gene FTO. We also provide evidence of upregulation of ZEB1 and downregulation of GRHL2 indicating increased epithelial to mesenchymal transition in metabolically adaptable cancer cells. Our results obtained with a variety of anticancer agents support the validity of the model of realistic panresistance and suggest that it could be used for developing anticancer agents that would overcome panresistance. PMID:25279830

  16. Nano-Fenton Reactors as a New Class of Oxidative Stress Amplifying Anticancer Therapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Byeongsu; Han, Eunji; Yang, Wonseok; Cho, Wooram; Yoo, Wooyoung; Hwang, Junyeon; Kwon, Byoung-Mog; Lee, Dongwon

    2016-03-09

    Cancer cells, compared to normal cells, are under oxidative stress associated with an elevated level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and are more vulnerable to oxidative stress induced by ROS generating agents. Thus, manipulation of the ROS level provides a logical approach to kill cancer cells preferentially, without significant toxicity to normal cells, and great efforts have been dedicated to the development of strategies to induce cytotoxic oxidative stress for cancer treatment. Fenton reaction is an important biological reaction in which irons convert hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to highly toxic hydroxyl radicals that escalate ROS stress. Here, we report Fenton reaction-performing polymer (PolyCAFe) micelles as a new class of ROS-manipulating anticancer therapeutic agents. Amphiphilic PolyCAFe incorporates H2O2-generating benzoyloxycinnamaldehyde and iron-containing compounds in its backbone and self-assembles to form micelles that serve as Nano-Fenton reactors to generate cytotoxic hydroxyl radicals, killing cancer cells preferentially. When intravenously injected, PolyCAFe micelles could accumulate in tumors preferentially to remarkably suppress tumor growth, without toxicity to normal tissues. This study demonstrates the tremendous translatable potential of Nano-Fenton reactors as a new class of anticancer drugs.

  17. Covalent Organic Framework Material Bearing Phloroglucinol Building Units as a Potent Anticancer Agent.

    PubMed

    Bhanja, Piyali; Mishra, Snehasis; Manna, Krishnendu; Mallick, Arijit; Das Saha, Krishna; Bhaumik, Asim

    2017-09-20

    Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) having periodicity in pores of nanoscale dimensions can be suitably designed for the organic building units bearing reactive functional groups at their surfaces. Thus, they are an attractive option as an anticancer agent to overcome the limitations of chemotherapy. Herein, we first report a new porous biodegradable nitrogen containing COF material, EDTFP-1 (ethylenedianiline-triformyl phloroglucinol), synthesized using 4,4'-ethylenedianiline and 2,4,6-triformylphloroglucinol via Schiff base condensation reaction. EDTFP-1 exhibited 3D-hexagonal porous structure with average pores of ca. 1.5 nm dimension. Here, we have explored the anticancer potentiality of EDTFP-1. Result demonstrated an enhanced cytotoxicity was observed against four cancer cells HCT 116, HepG2, A549, and MIA-Paca2 with significant lower IC50 on HCT116 cells. Additionally, EDTFP-1-induced cell death was associated with the characteristic apoptotic changes like cell membrane blebbing, nuclear DNA fragmentation, externalization of phosphatidylserine from the cell membrane followed by a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential as well as modulation of pro and antiapoptotic proteins. Further, the result depicted a direct correlation between the generations of ROS with mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis through the involvement of p53 phosphorylation upon EDTFP-1 induction, suggesting this COF material is a novel chemotherapeutic agent for cancer treatment.

  18. Indole-fused benzooxazepines: a new structural class of anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ashok K; Raj, Vinit; Rai, Amit; Keshari, Amit K; Saha, Sudipta

    2017-01-01

    Aim: A new series of compounds (1a–16a) bearing indole-fused benzooxazepine was synthesized, characterized and evaluated for anticancer activity. Materials & methods: In this study, all the synthesized compounds were screened via in vitro anticancer testing on Hep-G2 cancer cell line. A computational study was carried out on cancer-related targets including IL-2, IL-6, COX-2 Caspase-3 and Caspase-8. Results: Some of the synthesized compounds effectively controlled the growth of cancerous cells. Conclusion: The most active compounds – 6a, 10a, 13a, 14a and 15a – exemplify notable anticancer profile with GI50 <10 μg/ml. Preliminary structure–activity relationship among the tested compounds can produce an assumption that the electronegative groups at phenyl ring attached with indole-fused benzooxazepine are instrumental for the activity. Molecular docking study showed crucial hydrogen bond and π–π stacking interactions, with good ADMET profiling and molecular dynamic simulation. PMID:28344831

  19. Pharmacological profile and Pharmacogenomics of anti-cancer drugs used for targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Di Francia, Raffaele; De Monaco, Angela; Saggese, Mariangela; Iaccarino, Giancarla; Crisci, Stefania; Frigeri, Ferdinando; De Filippi, Rosaria; Berretta, Massimiliano; Pinto, Antonio

    2017-02-08

    Drugs for targeted therapies are primarily Small Molecules Inhibitors (SMIs), monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), interfering RNA molecules and microRNA. The use of these new agents generates a multifaceted step in the pharmacokinetics (PK) of these drugs. Individual PK variability is often large, and unpredictability observed in the response to the pharmacogenetic profile of the patient (e.g. cytochome P450 enzyme), patient characteristics such as adherence to treatment and environmental factors. Objective This review aims to overview the latest anticancer drugs eligible for targeted therapies and the most recent finding in pharmacogenomics related to toxicity/resistance because either individual gene polymorphisms or acquired mutation in a cancer cell. In addition, an early outline evaluation of the genotyping costs and methods have been taken into consideration. Future outlook To date, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of mAbs and SMIs is not yet supported by heavy scientific evidence. Extensive effort should be made for targeted therapies to better define concentration-effect relationships and to perform comparative randomized trials of classic dosing versus PK-guided adaptive dosing. The detection of individual pharmacogenomics profile could be the key for the oncologists that will have new resources to make treatment decisions for their patients in order to maximize the benefit and minimize the toxicity. Based on this purpose, the clinician should evaluate advantages and limitations, in terms of costs and applicability, of the most appropriate pharmacological approach to performing a tailored therapy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Small Molecule Sequential Dual-Targeting Theragnostic Strategy (SMSDTTS): from Preclinical Experiments towards Possible Clinical Anticancer Applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Junjie; Oyen, Raymond; Verbruggen, Alfons; Ni, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    Hitting the evasive tumor cells proves challenging in targeted cancer therapies. A general and unconventional anticancer approach namely small molecule sequential dual-targeting theragnostic strategy (SMSDTTS) has recently been introduced with the aims to target and debulk the tumor mass, wipe out the residual tumor cells, and meanwhile enable cancer detectability. This dual targeting approach works in two steps for systemic delivery of two naturally derived drugs. First, an anti-tubulin vascular disrupting agent, e.g., combretastatin A4 phosphate (CA4P), is injected to selectively cut off tumor blood supply and to cause massive necrosis, which nevertheless always leaves peripheral tumor residues. Secondly, a necrosis-avid radiopharmaceutical, namely (131)I-hypericin ((131)I-Hyp), is administered the next day, which accumulates in intratumoral necrosis and irradiates the residual cancer cells with beta particles. Theoretically, this complementary targeted approach may biologically and radioactively ablate solid tumors and reduce the risk of local recurrence, remote metastases, and thus cancer mortality. Meanwhile, the emitted gamma rays facilitate radio-scintigraphy to detect tumors and follow up the therapy, hence a simultaneous theragnostic approach. SMSDTTS has now shown promise from multicenter animal experiments and may demonstrate unique anticancer efficacy in upcoming preliminary clinical trials. In this short review article, information about the two involved agents, the rationale of SMSDTTS, its preclinical antitumor efficacy, multifocal targetability, simultaneous theragnostic property, and toxicities of the dose regimens are summarized. Meanwhile, possible drawbacks, practical challenges and future improvement with SMSDTTS are discussed, which hopefully may help to push forward this strategy from preclinical experiments towards possible clinical applications.

  1. Organometallic Palladium Complexes with a Water-Soluble Iminophosphorane Ligand as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Monica; Calvo-Sanjuán, Rubén; Sanaú, Mercedes; Marzo, Isabel; Contel, María

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a new water-soluble iminophosphorane ligand TPA=N-C(O)-2BrC6H4 (C,N-IM; TPA = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane) 1 is reported. Oxidative addition of 1 to Pd2(dba)3 affords the orthopalladated dimer [Pd(μ-Br){C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}]2 (2) as a mixture of cis and trans isomers (1:1 molar ratio) where the iminophosphorane moeity behaves as a C,N-pincer ligand. By addition of different neutral or monoanionic ligands to 2, the bridging bromide can be cleaved and a variety of hydrophilic or water-soluble mononuclear organometallic palladium(II) complexes of the type [Pd{C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}(L-L)] (L-L = acac (3); S2CNMe2 (4); 4,7-Diphenyl-1,10-phenanthrolinedisulfonic acid disodium salt C12H6N2(C6H4SO3Na)2 (5)); [Pd{C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}(L)Br] (L = P(mC6H4SO3Na)3 (6); P(3-Pyridyl)3 (7)) and, [Pd(C6H4(C(O)N=TPA)-2}(TPA)2Br] (8) are obtained as single isomers. All new complexes were tested as potential anticancer agents and their cytotoxicity properties were evaluated in vitro against human Jurkat-T acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells, normal T-lymphocytes (PBMC) and DU-145 human prostate cancer cells. Compounds [Pd(μ-Br){C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}]2 (2) and [Pd{C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}(acac)] 3 (which has been crystallographically characterized) display the higher cytotoxicity against the above mentioned cancer cell lines while being less toxic to normal T-lymphocytes (peripheral blood mononuclear cells: PBMC). In addition, 3 is very toxic to cisplatin resistant Jurkat shBak indicating a cell death pathway that may be different to that of cisplatin. The interaction of 2 and 3 with plasmid (pBR322) DNA is much weaker than that of cisplatin pointing to an alternative biomolecular target for these cytotoxic compounds. All the compounds show an interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) faster than that of cisplatin. PMID:23066172

  2. Development of an In Vitro Model to Screen CYP1B1-Targeted Anticancer Prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiying; Chen, Yao; Drbohlav, Laura M; Wu, Judy Qiju; Wang, Michael Zhuo

    2016-12-01

    Cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) is an anticancer therapeutic target due to its overexpression in a number of steroid hormone-related cancers. One anticancer drug discovery strategy is to develop prodrugs specifically activated by CYP1B1 in malignant tissues to cytotoxic metabolites. Here, we aimed to develop an in vitro screening model for CYP1B1-targeted anticancer prodrugs using the KLE human endometrial carcinoma cell line. KLE cells demonstrated superior stability of CYP1B1 expression relative to transiently transfected cells and did not express any appreciable amount of cognate CYP1A1 or CYP1A2, which would have compromised the specificity of the screening assay. The effect of two CYP1B1-targeted probe prodrugs on KLE cells was evaluated in the absence and presence of a CYP1B1 inhibitor to chemically "knock out" CYP1B1 activity (CYP1B1 inhibited). Both probe prodrugs were more toxic to KLE cells than to CYP1B1-inhibited KLE cells and significantly induced G0/G1 arrest and decreased the S phase in KLE cells. They also exhibited pro-apoptotic effects in KLE cells, which were attenuated in CYP1B1-inhibited KLE cells. In summary, a KLE cell-based model has been characterized to be suitable for identifying CYP1B1-targeted anticancer prodrugs and should be further developed and employed for screening chemical libraries.

  3. Targeting multiplicity: the key factor for anti-cancer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gary-Bobo, M; Vaillant, O; Maynadier, M; Basile, I; Gallud, A; El Cheikh, K; Bouffard, E; Morère, A; Rébillard, X; Puche, P; Nirdé, P; Garcia, M

    2013-01-01

    In this mini-review, we focus on different strategies to bring nanotools specifically to cancer cells. We discuss about a better targeting of tumor, combining the characteristics of tumor environment, the increase in nanoparticles life time, the biomarkers overexpressed on cancer cells and different physical methods for non invasive therapies. Here we detail the necessity of a synergy between passive and active targeting for an actual specificity of cancer cells.

  4. Molecular combo of photodynamic therapeutic agent silicon(iv) phthalocyanine and anticancer drug cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jiafei; Zhang, Yangmiao; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhang, Changli; Guo, Zijian

    2009-02-28

    The combination of a red light PDT agent and a Pt(ii)-based chemotherapeutic drug at the molecular level maintains the intrinsic functions of each unit; the conjugated complexes exhibit remarkable photocytoxicity and demonstrate potential to serve as agents for DNA-targeting PDT as well as red light photochemotherapy.

  5. Evaluation of respiration of mitochondria in cancer cells exposed to mitochondria-targeted agents.

    PubMed

    Kluckova, Katarina; Dong, Lan-Feng; Bajzikova, Martina; Rohlena, Jakub; Neuzil, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Respiration is one of the major functions of mitochondria, whereby these vital organelles use oxygen to produce energy. Many agents that may be of potential clinical relevance act by targeting mitochondria, where they may suppress mitochondrial respiration. It is therefore important to evaluate this process and understand how this is modulated by small molecules. Here, we describe the general methodology to assess respiration in cultured cells, followed by the evaluation of the effect of one anticancer agent targeted to mitochondria on this process, and also how to assess this in tumor tissue.

  6. Heterobivalent Imaging Agents Targeting Prostate Cancer Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    has been implicated as a salient player in the pathobiology of cancers of epithelial origin, e.g. prostate, cervix , ovarian, colon and...ANSI Std. Z39.18 W81XWH-10-1-0481 Heterobivalent Imaging Agents Targeting Prostate Cancer Training Aaron LeBeau University of California, San...Francisco San Francisco, CA 94103 Annual Summary 31 MAY 2010 - 1JUN 201101-06-2011 To determine the utility of imaging MT-SP1 in cancer , xenografts of

  7. Rational Combinations of Targeted Agents in AML

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Prithviraj; Grant, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Despite modest improvements in survival over the last several decades, the treatment of AML continues to present a formidable challenge. Most patients are elderly, and these individuals, as well as those with secondary, therapy-related, or relapsed/refractory AML, are particularly difficult to treat, owing to both aggressive disease biology and the high toxicity of current chemotherapeutic regimens. It has become increasingly apparent in recent years that coordinated interruption of cooperative survival signaling pathways in malignant cells is necessary for optimal therapeutic results. The modest efficacy of monotherapy with both cytotoxic and targeted agents in AML testifies to this. As the complex biology of AML continues to be elucidated, many “synthetic lethal” strategies involving rational combinations of targeted agents have been developed. Unfortunately, relatively few of these have been tested clinically, although there is growing interest in this area. In this article, the preclinical and, where available, clinical data on some of the most promising rational combinations of targeted agents in AML are summarized. While new molecules should continue to be combined with conventional genotoxic drugs of proven efficacy, there is perhaps a need to rethink traditional philosophies of clinical trial development and regulatory approval with a focus on mechanism-based, synergistic strategies. PMID:26113989

  8. 3-bromopyruvate: a new targeted antiglycolytic agent and a promise for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy-Kanniappan, S; Vali, M; Kunjithapatham, R; Buijs, M; Syed, L H; Rao, P P; Ota, S; Kwak, B K; Loffroy, R; Geschwind, J F

    2010-08-01

    The pyruvate analog, 3-bromopyruvate, is an alkylating agent and a potent inhibitor of glycolysis. This antiglycolytic property of 3-bromopyruvate has recently been exploited to target cancer cells, as most tumors depend on glycolysis for their energy requirements. The anticancer effect of 3-bromopyruvate is achieved by depleting intracellular energy (ATP) resulting in tumor cell death. In this review, we will discuss the principal mechanism of action and primary targets of 3-bromopyruvate, and report the impressive antitumor effects of 3-bromopyruvate in multiple animal tumor models. We describe that the primary mechanism of 3-bromopyruvate is via preferential alkylation of GAPDH and that 3-bromopyruvate mediated cell death is linked to generation of free radicals. Research in our laboratory also revealed that 3-bromopyruvate induces endoplasmic reticulum stress, inhibits global protein synthesis further contributing to cancer cell death. Therefore, these and other studies reveal the tremendous potential of 3-bromopyruvate as an anticancer agent.

  9. New perspective for an old antidiabetic drug: metformin as anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Leone, Alessandra; Di Gennaro, Elena; Bruzzese, Francesca; Avallone, Antonio; Budillon, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Metformin, an inexpensive, well-tolerated oral agent that is commonly used in the first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes, has become the focus of intense research as a potential anticancer agent. This research reflects a convergence of epidemiologic, clinical, and preclinical evidence, suggesting that metformin may lower cancer risk in diabetics and improve outcomes of many common cancers. Notably, metformin mediates an approximately 30 % reduction in the lifetime risk of cancer in diabetic patients. There is growing recognition that metformin may act (1) directly on cancer cells, primarily by impacting mitochondrial respiration leading to the activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which controls energy homeostasis in cells, but also through other mechanisms or (2) indirectly on the host metabolism, largely through AMPK-mediated reduction in hepatic gluconeogenesis, leading to reduced circulating insulin levels and decreased insulin/IGF-1 receptor-mediated activation of the PI3K pathway. Support for this comes from the observation that metformin inhibits cancer cell growth in vitro and delays the onset of tobacco carcinogen-induced lung cancer in mice and that metformin and its analog phenformin delay spontaneous tumor development cancer-prone transgenic mice. The potential for both direct antitumor effects and indirect host-mediated effects has sparked enormous interest, but has led to added challenges in translating preclinical findings to the clinical setting. Nonetheless, the accumulation of evidence has been sufficient to justify initiation of clinical trials of metformin as an anticancer agent in the clinical setting, including a large-scale adjuvant study in breast cancer, with additional studies planned.

  10. Methotrexate-conjugated and hyperbranched polyglycerol-grafted Fe₃O₄ magnetic nanoparticles for targeted anticancer effects.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Neoh, Koon-Gee; Wang, Rong; Zong, Bao-Yu; Tan, Jia Yong; Kang, En-Tang

    2013-01-23

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles grafted with hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG) and conjugated with methotrexate (MTX) (MNP-g-HPG-MTX) were synthesized via a sol-gel reaction followed by thiol-ene click chemistry and esterification reaction. The successful grafting of MTX and HPG onto the nanoparticles was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and UV-visible spectroscopy. The HPG-graft layer confers the magnetic nanoparticles with good dispersibility and stability in aqueous medium and macrophage-evasive property while the MTX acts as a chemotherapeutic drug as well as a tumor targeting ligand. The dose-dependent targeting and anticancer effect of the MNP-g-HPG-MTX nanoparticles were evaluated, and the results showed that depending on the amount of conjugated MTX and the concentration of the incubated nanoparticles, the uptake of MNP-g-HPG-MTX nanoparticles by human head and neck cancer (KB) cells can be eight times or more higher than those by 3T3 fibroblasts and RAW macrophages. As a result, the MNP-g-HPG-MTX nanoparticles are capable of killing ∼50% of the KB cells while at the same time exhibiting low cytotoxicity towards 3T3 fibroblasts and RAW macrophages. Thus, such nanoparticles can potentially be used as active targeting anticancer agents.

  11. Targeted alpha anticancer therapies: update and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Barry J; Huang, Chen-Yu; Clarke, Raymond A

    2014-01-01

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) is an emerging option for local and systemic cancer treatment. Preclinical research and clinical trials show that alpha-emitting radionuclides can kill targeted cancer cells while sparing normal cells, thus reducing toxicity. 223RaCl2 (Xofigo®) is the first alpha emitting radioisotope to gain registration in the US for palliative therapy of prostate cancer bone metastases by indirect physiological targeting. The alpha emitting radioisotopes 211At, 213Bi, 225Ac and 227Th are being used to label targeting vectors such as monoclonal antibodies for specific cancer therapy indications. In this review, safety and tolerance aspects are considered with respect to microdosimetry, specific energy, Monte Carlo model calculations, biodosimetry, equivalent dose and mutagenesis. The clinical efficacy of TAT for solid tumors may also be enhanced by its capacity for tumor anti-vascular (TAVAT) effects. This review emphasizes key aspects of TAT research with respect to the PAI2-uPAR complex and the monoclonal antibodies bevacizumab, C595 and J591. Clinical trial outcomes are reviewed for neuroendocrine tumors, leukemia, glioma, melanoma, non-Hodgkins lymphoma, and prostate bone metastases. Recommendations and future directions are proposed. PMID:25422581

  12. Mechanistic Basis of Sensitivity/Resistance Towards Anti-Cancer Drugs Targeting Topoisomerase II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    putatively identified menadione as having reacted with Cys427 by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization ( MALDI ) MS . Preliminary results from LC-ESI- MS ...modification of hstopo Ila by anticancer drugs and chemopreventive agents. To this end, we developed a cysteine footprinting technique using liquid ...chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI- MS ) to assess the differential reactivities of the cysteine residues of hstopo Ila and

  13. Mechanistic Basis of Sensitivity/Resistance Towards Anti-cancer Drugs Targeting Topoisomerase II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    we putatively identified menadione as having reacted with Cys427 by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization ( MALDI ) MS . Preliminary results...hstopo IIα by anticancer drugs and chemopreventive agents. To this end, we developed a cysteine footprinting technique using liquid chromatography...electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI- MS ) to assess the differential reactivities of the cysteine residues of hstopo IIα and compared

  14. Phytantriol based liquid crystal provide sustained release of anticancer drug as a novel embolic agent.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lingzhen; Mei, Liling; Shan, Ziyun; Huang, Ying; Pan, Xin; Li, Ge; Gu, Yukun; Wu, Chuanbin

    2016-01-01

    Phytantriol has received increasing amount of attention in drug delivery system, however, the ability of the phytantriol based liquid crystal as a novel embolic agent to provide a sustained release delivery system is yet to be comprehensively demonstrated. The purpose of this study was to prepare a phytantriol-based cubic phase precursor solution loaded with anticancer drug hydroxycamptothecine (HCPT) and evaluate its embolization properties, in vitro drug release and cytotoxicity. Phase behavior of the phytantriol-solvent-water system was investigated by visual inspection and polarized light microscopy, and no phase transition was observed in the presence of HCPT within the studied dose range. Water uptake by the phytantriol matrices was determined gravimetrically, suggesting that the swelling complied with the second order kinetics. In vitro evaluation of embolic efficacy indicated that the isotropic solution displayed a satisfactory embolization effect. In vitro drug release results showed a sustained-release up to 30 days and the release behavior was affected by the initial composition and drug loading. Moreover, the in vitro cytotoxicity and anticancer activity were evaluated by MTT assay. No appreciable mortality was observed for NIH 3T3 cells after 48 h exposure to blank formulations, and the anticancer activity of HCPT-loaded formulations to HepG2 and SMMC7721 cells was strongly dependent on the drug loading and treatment time. Taken together, these results indicate that phytantriol-based cubic phase embolic gelling solution is a promising potential carrier for HCPT delivery to achieve a sustained drug release by vascular embolization, and this technology may be potential for clinical applications.

  15. Isatin Derived Spirocyclic Analogues with α-Methylene-γ-butyrolactone as Anticancer Agents: A Structure-Activity Relationship Study.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sandeep; Blowers, Elizabeth C; Tebbe, Calvin; Contreras, Jacob I; Radhakrishnan, Prakash; Kizhake, Smitha; Zhou, Tian; Rajule, Rajkumar N; Arnst, Jamie L; Munkarah, Adnan R; Rattan, Ramandeep; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2016-05-26

    Design, synthesis, and evaluation of α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone analogues and their evaluation as anticancer agents is described. SAR identified a spirocyclic analogue 19 that inhibited TNFα-induced NF-κB activity, cancer cell growth and tumor growth in an ovarian cancer model. A second iteration of synthesis and screening identified 29 which inhibited cancer cell growth with low-μM potency. Our data suggest that an isatin-derived spirocyclic α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone is a suitable core for optimization to identify novel anticancer agents.

  16. Withaferin-A--A Natural Anticancer Agent with Pleitropic Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Chul; Choi, Bu Young

    2016-03-04

    Cancer, being the second leading cause of mortality, exists as a formidable health challenge. In spite of our enormous efforts, the emerging complexities in the molecular nature of disease progression limit the real success in finding an effective cancer cure. It is now conceivable that cancer is, in fact, a progressive illness, and the morbidity and mortality from cancer can be reduced by interfering with various oncogenic signaling pathways. A wide variety of structurally diverse classes of bioactive phytochemicals have been shown to exert anticancer effects in a large number of preclinical studies. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that withaferin-A can prevent the development of cancers of various histotypes. Accumulating data from different rodent models and cell culture experiments have revealed that withaferin-A suppresses experimentally induced carcinogenesis, largely by virtue of its potent anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing properties. Moreover, withaferin-A sensitizes resistant cancer cells to existing chemotherapeutic agents. The purpose of this review is to highlight the mechanistic aspects underlying anticancer effects of withaferin-A.

  17. Cultivation and utility of Piptoporus betulinus fruiting bodies as a source of anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Pleszczyńska, Małgorzata; Wiater, Adrian; Siwulski, Marek; Lemieszek, Marta K; Kunaszewska, Justyna; Kaczor, Józef; Rzeski, Wojciech; Janusz, Grzegorz; Szczodrak, Janusz

    2016-09-01

    Piptoporus betulinus is a wood-rotting basidiomycete used in medicine and biotechnology. However, to date, no indoor method for cultivation of this mushroom fruiting bodies has been developed. Here we present the first report of successful production of P. betulinus mature fruiting bodies in artificial conditions. Four P. betulinus strains were isolated from natural habitats and their mycelia were inoculated into birch sawdust substrate supplemented with organic additives. All the strains effectively colonized the medium but only one of them produced fruiting bodies. Moisture and organic supplementation of the substrate significantly determined the fruiting process. The biological efficiency of the P. betulinus PB01 strain cultivated on optimal substrate (moisture and organic substance content of 55 and 65 and 25 or 35 %, respectively) ranged from 12 to 16 %. The mature fruiting bodies reached weight in the range from 50 to 120 g. Anticancer properties of water and ethanol extracts isolated from both cultured and nature-derived fruiting bodies of P. betulinus were examined in human colon adenocarcinoma, human lung carcinoma and human breast cancer cell lines. The studies revealed antiproliferative and antimigrative properties of all the investigated extracts. Nevertheless the most pronounced effects demonstrated the ethanol extracts, obtained from fruiting bodies of cultured P. betulinus. Summarizing, our studies proved that P. betulinus can be induced to fruit in indoor artificial culture and the cultured fruiting bodies can be used as a source of potential anticancer agents. In this respect, they are at least as valuable as those sourced from nature.

  18. Natural Product-Derived Spirooxindole Fragments Serve as Privileged Substructures for Discovery of New Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bin; Zheng, Yi-Chao; Shi, Xiao-Jing; Qi, Ping-Ping; Liu, Hong-Min

    2016-01-01

    The utility of natural products for identifying anticancer agents has been highly pursued in the last decades and over 100 drug molecules in clinic are natural products or natural product-derived compounds. Natural products are believed to be able to cover unexplored chemical space that is normally not occupied by commercially available molecule libraries. However, the low abundance and synthetic intractability of natural products have limited their applications in drug discovery. Recently, the identification of biologically relevant fragments derived from biologically validated natural products has been recognized as a powerful strategy in searching new biological probes and drugs. The spirocyclic oxindoles, as privileged structural scaffolds, have shown their potential in designing new drugs. Several anticancer drug candidates such as SAR405838, RO8994, CFI-400945 and their bioisosteres are undergoing clinical trials or preclinical studies. To highlight the significant progress, we focus on illustrating the discovery of SAR405838, RO8994, CFI-400945 and their bioisosteres for cancer therapy using substructure-based strategies and discussing modes of action, binding models and preclinical data.

  19. Organogold(III) compounds as experimental anticancer agents: chemical and biological profiles.

    PubMed

    Massai, Lara; Cirri, Damiano; Michelucci, Elena; Bartoli, Gianluca; Guerri, Annalisa; Cinellu, Maria A; Cocco, Fabio; Gabbiani, Chiara; Messori, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    In the last few years gold(III) complexes have attracted growing attention in the medicinal chemistry community as candidate anticancer agents. In particular some organogold(III) compounds manifested quite attractive pharmacological behaviors in preclinical studies. Here we compare the chemical and biological properties of the novel organogold(III) complex [Au(bipy(dmb)-H)(NH(CO)CH3)][PF6] (Aubipy(aa)) with those of its parent compounds [Au(bipy(dmb)-H)(OH)][PF6] (Aubipy(c)) and [Au2(bipy(dmb)-H)2)(μ-O)][PF6]2 (Au2bipy(c)), previously synthesized and characterized. The three study compounds were comparatively assessed for their antiproliferative actions against HCT-116 cancer cells, revealing moderate cytotoxic effects. Proapoptotic and cell cycle effects were also monitored. Afterward, to gain additional mechanistic insight, the three gold compounds were challenged against the model proteins HEWL, RNase A and cytochrome c and reactions investigated through UV-Vis and ESI-MS analysis. A peculiar and roughly invariant protein metalation profile emerges in the three cases consisting of protein binding of {Au(bipy(dmb)-H)} moieties. The implications of these results are discussed in the frame of current knowledge on anticancer gold compounds.

  20. Biological agents targeting beyond TNF-alpha

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rashmi; Sharma, Chaman Lal; Mahajan, Annil

    2008-01-01

    Biological agents represent an important addition to the therapies for immuno-inflammatory conditions and have a great impact on the disease course and quality of life of these patients. However, recent reports of serious infections like tuberculosis, demyelinating and neurodegenerative diseases, pancytopenia, cardiovascular diseases, etc. after anti-TNF therapy raised questions on their safety. Hence, focus is shifted towards drugs targeting cytokine checkpoints in the inflammatory cascades beyond TNF-α. Existing therapeutic targets include the biological agents acting as antagonists of various inflammatory cytokines (Anakinra, Tocilizumab, Atlizumab) and modulators of CD80 or CD86-CD28 co-stimulatory signal (Abatacept), CD2 receptors on T-cells (Alefacept), CD11a, subunit of leukocyte function-associated antigen 1 (Efalizumab), vitronectin receptor and CD20 antigen on pre-B, immature and mature B cells (Rituximab). With the introduction of these novel molecules the future for immunomodulatory intervention in rheumatology, asthma, crohn's disease, septic shock etc. looks very promising. These novel therapeutic agents could truly give a new hope to the clinician to modify the disease and achieve tangible improvements in the lives of the patients. PMID:19742267

  1. Targeted Delivery System of Nanobiomaterials in Anticancer Therapy: From Cells to Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Su-Eon; Jin, Hyo-Eon; Hong, Soon-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Targeted delivery systems of nanobiomaterials are necessary to be developed for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Nanobiomaterials can be engineered to recognize cancer-specific receptors at the cellular levels and to deliver anticancer drugs into the diseased sites. In particular, nanobiomaterial-based nanocarriers, so-called nanoplatforms, are the design of the targeted delivery systems such as liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles/micelles, nanoconjugates, norganic materials, carbon-based nanobiomaterials, and bioinspired phage system, which are based on the nanosize of 1–100 nm in diameter. In this review, the design and the application of these nanoplatforms are discussed at the cellular levels as well as in the clinics. We believe that this review can offer recent advances in the targeted delivery systems of nanobiomaterials regarding in vitro and in vivo applications and the translation of nanobiomaterials to nanomedicine in anticancer therapy. PMID:24672796

  2. DNA and aptamer stabilized gold nanoparticles for targeted delivery of anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Alfonso; Posch, Christian; Garcimartín, Yolanda; Celli, Anna; Sanlorenzo, Martina; Vujic, Igor; Ma, Jeffrey; Zekhtser, Mitchell; Rappersberger, Klemens; Ortiz-Urda, Susana; Somoza, Álvaro

    2014-07-07

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) can be used as carriers of a variety of therapeutics. Ideally, drugs are released in the target cells in response to cell specific intracellular triggers. In this study, GNPs are loaded with doxorubicin or AZD8055, using a self-immolative linker which facilitates the release of anticancer therapeutics in malignant cells without modifications of the active compound. An additional modification with the aptamer AS1411 further increases the selectivity of GNPs towards cancer cells. Both modifications increase targeted delivery of therapeutics with GNPs. Whereas GNPs without anticancer drugs do not affect cell viability in all cells tested, AS1411 modified GNPs loaded with doxorubicin or AZD8055 show significant and increased reduction of cell viability in breast cancer and uveal melanoma cell lines. These results highlight that modified GNPs can be functionalized to increase the efficacy of cancer therapeutics and may further reduce toxicity by increasing targeted delivery towards malignant cells.

  3. Promises and challenges of anticancer drugs that target the epigenome.

    PubMed

    Verbrugge, Inge; Johnstone, Ricky W; Bots, Michael

    2011-10-01

    The occurrence of epigenetic aberrations in cancer and their role in promoting tumorigenesis has led to the development of various small molecule inhibitors that target epigenetic enzymes. In preclinical settings, many epigenetic inhibitors demonstrate promising activity against a variety of both hematological and solid tumors. The therapeutic efficacy of those inhibitors that have entered the clinic however, is restricted predominantly to hematological malignancies. Here we outline the observed epigenetic aberrations in various types of cancer and the clinical responses to epigenetic drugs. We furthermore discuss strategies to improve the responsiveness of both hematological and solid malignancies to epigenetic drugs.

  4. Characterization of anticancer agents by their growth inhibitory activity and relationships to mechanism of action and structure.

    PubMed

    Keskin, O; Bahar, I; Jernigan, R L; Beutler, J A; Shoemaker, R H; Sausville, E A; Covell, D G

    2000-04-01

    An analysis of the growth inhibitory potency of 122 anticancer agents available from the National Cancer Institute anticancer drug screen is presented. Methods of singular value decomposition (SVD) were applied to determine the matrix of distances between all compounds. These SVD-derived dissimilarity distances were used to cluster compounds that exhibit similar tumor growth inhibitory activity patterns against 60 human cancer cell lines. Cluster analysis divides the 122 standard agents into 25 statistically distinct groups. The first eight groups include structurally diverse compounds with reactive functionalities that act as DNA-damaging agents while the remaining 17 groups include compounds that inhibit nucleic acid biosynthesis and mitosis. Examination of the average activity patterns across the 60 tumor cell lines reveals unique 'fingerprints' associated with each group. A diverse set of structural features are observed for compounds within these groups, with frequent occurrences of strong within-group structural similarities. Clustering of cell types by their response to the 122 anticancer agents divides the 60 cell types into 21 groups. The strongest within-panel groupings were found for the renal, leukemia and ovarian cell panels. These results contribute to the basis for comparisons between log(GI(50)) screening patterns of the 122 anticancer agents and additional tested compounds.

  5. Synthesis of novel anticancer agents through opening of spiroacetal ring of diosgenin.

    PubMed

    Hamid, A A; Hasanain, Mohammad; Singh, Arjun; Bhukya, Balakishan; Omprakash; Vasudev, Prema G; Sarkar, Jayanta; Chanda, Debabrata; Khan, Feroz; Aiyelaagbe, O O; Negi, Arvind S

    2014-09-01

    Diosgenin has been modified to furostane derivatives after opening the F-spiroacetal ring. The aldehyde group at C26 in derivative 8 was unexpectedly transformed to the ketone 9. The structure of ketone 9 was confirmed by spectroscopy and finally by X-ray crystallography. Five of the diosgenin derivatives showed significant anticancer activity against human cancer cell lines. The most potent molecule of this series i.e. compound 7, inhibited cellular growth by arresting the population at G0/G1 phase of cell division cycle. Cells undergo apoptosis after exposure to the derivative 7 which was evident by increase in sub G0 population in cell cycle analysis. Docking experiments showed caspase-3 and caspase-9 as possible molecular targets for these compounds. This was further validated by cleavage of PARP, a caspase target in apoptotic pathway. Compound 7 was found non-toxic up to 1000mg/kg dose in acute oral toxicity in Swiss albino mice.

  6. Receptor tyrosine kinases as target for anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Brunelleschi, S; Penengo, L; Santoro, M M; Gaudino, G

    2002-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are cell surface transmembrane proteins responsible for intracellular signal transduction. They are expressed in several cell types and, after activation by growth factor binding, trigger a series of intracellular pathways, leading to a wide variety of cell responses (e.g., differentiation, proliferation, migration and invasion, angiogenesis, survival). Over-expression and/or structural alteration of RTKs family members are often associated to human cancers and tumor cells are known to use RTK transduction pathways to achieve tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Therefore, RTKs represent pivotal target in approaches of cancer therapy. A number of small molecules acting as RTK inhibitors have been synthesized by pharmaceutical companies and are under clinical trials, are being analyzed in animal models or have been successfully marketed. Ligand-dependent downregulation of RTKs is a critical step for modulating their activity and the adaptor Cbl has been indicated as the key protein involved in negative regulation of RTKs, such as EGF and HGF receptors. These data suggest novel potential pharmacological targets for the treatment of human malignancies associated to oncogenic activation of RTKs.

  7. ADAM10 as a target for anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Moss, Marcia L; Stoeck, Alexander; Yan, Wenbo; Dempsey, Peter J

    2008-02-01

    There is a great unmet medical need in the area of cancer treatment. A potential therapeutic target for intervention in cancer is ADAM10. ADAM10 is a disintegrin-metalloproteinase that processes membrane bound proteins from the cell surface to yield soluble forms. Pharmaceutical companies are actively seeking out inhibitors of ADAM10 for treatments in cancer as the enzyme is known to release the ErbB receptor, HER2/ErbB2 from the cell membrane, an event that is necessary for HER2 positive tumor cells to proliferate. ADAM10 is also capable of processing betacellulin indicating that an inhibitor could be used against EGFR/ErbB1 and/or HER4/ErbB4 receptor positive tumor cells that are betacellulin-dependent. ADAM10 is the principle sheddase for several other molecules associated with cancer proliferation, differentiation, adhesion and migration such as Notch, E-cadherin, CD44 and L1 adhesion molecule indicating that targeting ADAM10 with specific inhibitors could be beneficial.

  8. Physics considerations in targeted anticancer drug delivery by magnetoelectric nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stimphil, Emmanuel; Nagesetti, Abhignyan; Guduru, Rakesh; Stewart, Tiffanie; Rodzinski, Alexandra; Liang, Ping; Khizroev, Sakhrat

    2017-06-01

    In regard to cancer therapy, magnetoelectric nanoparticles (MENs) have proven to be in a class of its own when compared to any other nanoparticle type. Like conventional magnetic nanoparticles, they can be used for externally controlled drug delivery via application of a magnetic field gradient and image-guided delivery. However, unlike conventional nanoparticles, due to the presence of a non-zero magnetoelectric effect, MENs provide a unique mix of important properties to address key challenges in modern cancer therapy: (i) a targeting mechanism driven by a physical force rather than antibody matching, (ii) a high-specificity delivery to enhance the cellular uptake of therapeutic drugs across the cancer cell membranes only, while sparing normal cells, (iii) an externally controlled mechanism to release drugs on demand, and (iv) a capability for image guided precision medicine. These properties separate MEN-based targeted delivery from traditional biotechnology approaches and lay a foundation for the complementary approach of technobiology. The biotechnology approach stems from the underlying biology and exploits bioinformatics to find the right therapy. In contrast, the technobiology approach is geared towards using the physics of molecular-level interactions between cells and nanoparticles to treat cancer at the most fundamental level and thus can be extended to all the cancers. This paper gives an overview of the current state of the art and presents an ab initio model to describe the underlying mechanisms of cancer treatment with MENs from the perspective of basic physics.

  9. Novel anticancer agent, SQAP, binds to focal adhesion kinase and modulates its activity

    PubMed Central

    Izaguirre-Carbonell, Jesus; Kawakubo, Hirofumi; Murata, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Toshifumi; Kusayanagi, Tomoe; Tsukuda, Senko; Hirakawa, Takeshi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Kanai, Yoshihiro; Ohta, Keisuke; Miura, Masahiko; Sakaguchi, Kengo; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Sahara, Hiroeki; Kamisuki, Shinji; Sugawara, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    SQAP is a novel and promising anticancer agent that was obtained by structural modifications from a natural compound. SQAP inhibits angiogenesis in vivo resulting in increased hypoxia and reduced tumor volume. In this study, the mechanism by which SQAP modifies the tumor microenvironment was revealed through the application of a T7 phage display screening. This approach identified five SQAP-binding proteins including sterol carrier protein 2, multifunctional enzyme type 2, proteasomal ubiquitin receptor, UV excision repair protein and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). All the interactions were confirmed by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Since FAK plays an important role in cell turnover and angiogenesis, the influence of SQAP on FAK was the principal goal of this study. SQAP decreased FAK phosphorylation and cell migration in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and A549 cancer cells. These findings suggest that inhibition of FAK phosphorylation works as the mechanism for the anti-angiogenesis activity of SQAP. PMID:26456697

  10. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)—Propranolol as an anti-cancer agent

    PubMed Central

    Pantziarka, Pan; Bouche, Gauthier; Sukhatme, Vidula; Meheus, Lydie; Rooman, Ilse; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2016-01-01

    Propranolol (PRO) is a well-known and widely used non-selective beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist (beta-blocker), with a range of actions which are of interest in an oncological context. PRO displays effects on cellular proliferation and invasion, on the immune system, on the angiogenic cascade, and on tumour cell sensitivity to existing treatments. Both pre-clinical and clinical evidence of these effects, in multiple cancer types, is assessed and summarised and relevant mechanisms of action outlined. In particular there is evidence that PRO is effective at multiple points in the metastatic cascade, particularly in the context of the post-surgical wound response. Based on this evidence the case is made for further clinical investigation of the anticancer effects of PRO, particularly in combination with other agents. A number of trials are on-going, in different treatment settings for various cancers. PMID:27899953

  11. Investigation of Degradation Properties of Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) Matrix for Anticancer Agent Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Ghani, S. M.; Mohamed, M. S. W.; Yahya, A. F.; Noorsal, K.

    2010-03-11

    Poly(lactide-co-glycolide)(PLA{sub 50}GA{sub 50}) is a biodegradable and biocompatible polymer. It offers tremendous potential as a basis for drug delivery, either as drug delivery system alone or in conjugate with a medical device. The PLA{sub 50}GA{sub 50} is the material of choice for relatively shorter-duration applications, while the homopolymer PLA (poly-L-lactide) and PGA (polyglycolide) are preferred for longer term delivery of drugs. This paper discusses the degradation properties of poly(lactide-co-glycolide)(PLA{sub 50}GA{sub 50}) at inherent viscosity of 0.89 dL/g as preliminary studies for anticancer agent delivery.

  12. Synthesis and biological evaluation of pyrazole derivatives containing thiourea skeleton as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Lv, Peng-Cheng; Li, Huan-Qiu; Sun, Juan; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2010-07-01

    Two series of pyrazole derivatives designing for potential EGFR kinase inhibitors have been discovered. Some of them exhibited significant EGFR inhibitory activity. Compound 3-(3,4-dimethylphenyl)-5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole-1-carbothioamide (C5) displayed the most potent EGFR inhibitory activity with IC₅₀ of 0.07 μM, which was comparable to the positive control erlotinib. Docking simulation was performed to position compound C5 into the EGFR active site to determine the probable binding model. Antiproliferative assay results indicating that some of the pyrazole derivatives own high antiproliferative activity against MCF-7. Compound C5 showed significant antiproliferative activity against MCF-7 with IC₅₀ of 0.08 μM. Therefore, compound C5 with potent inhibitory activity in tumor growth inhibition would be a potential anticancer agent.

  13. DNA and aptamer stabilized gold nanoparticles for targeted delivery of anticancer therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre, Alfonso; Posch, Christian; Garcimartín, Yolanda; Celli, Anna; Sanlorenzo, Martina; Vujic, Igor; Ma, Jeffrey; Zekhtser, Mitchell; Rappersberger, Klemens; Ortiz-Urda, Susana; Somoza, Álvaro

    2014-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) can be used as carriers of a variety of therapeutics. Ideally, drugs are released in the target cells in response to cell specific intracellular triggers. In this study, GNPs are loaded with doxorubicin or AZD8055, using a self-immolative linker which facilitates the release of anticancer therapeutics in malignant cells without modifications of the active compound. An additional modification with the aptamer AS1411 further increases the selectivity of GNPs towards cancer cells. Both modifications increase targeted delivery of therapeutics with GNPs. Whereas GNPs without anticancer drugs do not affect cell viability in all cells tested, AS1411 modified GNPs loaded with doxorubicin or AZD8055 show significant and increased reduction of cell viability in breast cancer and uveal melanoma cell lines. These results highlight that modified GNPs can be functionalized to increase the efficacy of cancer therapeutics and may further reduce toxicity by increasing targeted delivery towards malignant cells.Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) can be used as carriers of a variety of therapeutics. Ideally, drugs are released in the target cells in response to cell specific intracellular triggers. In this study, GNPs are loaded with doxorubicin or AZD8055, using a self-immolative linker which facilitates the release of anticancer therapeutics in malignant cells without modifications of the active compound. An additional modification with the aptamer AS1411 further increases the selectivity of GNPs towards cancer cells. Both modifications increase targeted delivery of therapeutics with GNPs. Whereas GNPs without anticancer drugs do not affect cell viability in all cells tested, AS1411 modified GNPs loaded with doxorubicin or AZD8055 show significant and increased reduction of cell viability in breast cancer and uveal melanoma cell lines. These results highlight that modified GNPs can be functionalized to increase the efficacy of cancer therapeutics and may further

  14. Targeting metabolic syndrome: candidate natural agents.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xuan; Weng, Jianping

    2010-12-01

    Following on from impressive economic development and urbanization, China is currently experiencing a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Patients with metabolic syndrome suffer from the "The Deadly Quartet" of hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypertension, and central (or upper body) obesity. Current treatment strategies directed towards metabolic syndrome tend to be limited to just one of these four conditions, so developing novel drugs to target multiple metabolic abnormalities could be preferable to current approaches. New insights suggest benefits of natural agents as treatments for metabolic syndrome. Herein, we review the evidence for using nine such agents developed on the basis of traditional medicine or herbal preparations. © 2010 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 2-alkoxycarbonylallyl esters as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ronayne, Conor T; Solano, Lucas N; Nelson, Grady L; Lueth, Erica A; Hubbard, Skyler L; Schumacher, Tanner J; Gardner, Zachary S; Jonnalagadda, Sravan K; Gurrapu, Shirisha; Holy, Jon; Mereddy, Venkatram R

    2017-02-15

    The reaction of carboxylic acids with Baylis-Hillman reaction derived α-bromomethyl acrylic esters readily provide 2-(alkoxycarbonyl)allyl esters in good to excellent yields. These functionalized allyl esters have been evaluated for their cell proliferation inhibition properties against breast cancer (MDA-MB-231 and 4T1) and pancreatic cancer (MIAPaCa-2) cell lines to explore their potential as anticancer agents. Several of the synthesized derivatives exhibit good potency against all three cancer cell lines. Our structure activity relationship (SAR) studies on 2-carboxycarbonyl allyl esters indicate that substituted aromatic carboxylic acids provide enhanced activity compared to substituted aliphatic carboxylic acid analogs. Di- and tri-allyl esters derived from di-and tri-carboxylic acids exhibit higher inhibition of cell proliferation than mono esters. Further SAR studies indicate that the double bond in the 2-(alkoxycarbonyl)allyl ester is required for its activity, and there is no increase in activity with increased chain length of the alkoxy group. Two lead candidate compounds have been identified from the cell proliferation inhibition studies and their preliminary mechanism of action as DNA damaging agents has been evaluated using epifluorescence and western blot analysis. One of the lead compounds has been further evaluated for its systemic toxicity in healthy CD-1 mice followed by anticancer efficacy in a triple negative breast cancer MDA-MB-231 xenograft model in NOD-SCID mice. These two in vivo studies indicate that the lead compound is well tolerated in healthy CD-1 mice and exhibits good tumor growth inhibition compared to breast cancer drug doxorubicin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Targeting Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans and their Modifying Enzymes to Enhance Anticancer Chemotherapy Efficacy and Overcome Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Lanzi, Cinzia; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Cassinelli, Giuliana

    2017-01-01

    Targeting heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) and enzymes involved in heparan sulfate (HS) chain editing is emerging as a new anticancer strategy. The involvement of HSPGs in tumor cell signaling, inflammation, angiogenesis and metastasis indicates that agents able to inhibit aberrant HSPG functions can potentially act as multitarget drugs affecting both tumor cell growth and the supportive boost provided by the microenvironment. Moreover, accumulating evidence supports that an altered expression or function of HSPGs, or of the complex enzyme system regulating their activities, can also depress the tumor response to anticancer treatments in several tumor types. Thereby, targeting HSPGs or HSPG modifying enzymes appears an appealing approach to enhance chemotherapy efficacy. A great deal of effort from academia and industry has led to the development of agents mimicking HS, and/or inhibiting HSPG modifying enzymes. Inhibitors of Sulf-2, an endosulfatase that edits the HS sulfation pattern, and inhibitors of heparanase, the endoglycosidase that produces functional HS fragments, appear particularly promising. In fact, a Sulf-2 inhibitor (OKN-007), and two heparanase inhibitors/HS mimics (roneparstat, PG545) are currently under early clinical investigation. In this review, we summarized preclinical studies in experimental tumor models of the main chemical classes of Sulf-2 and heparanase inhibitors. We described examples of different mechanisms through which heparanase and HSPGs, often in cooperation, may impact tumor sensitivity to various antitumor agents. Finally, we reported a few preclinical studies showing increased antitumor efficacy obtained with the use of candidate clinical HS mimics in combination regimens. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Pancratistatin: a natural anti-cancer compound that targets mitochondria specifically in cancer cells to induce apoptosis.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, A; Kekre, N; McNulty, J; Pandey, S

    2005-05-01

    The major hurdle in the fight against cancer is the non-specific nature of current treatments. The search for specific drugs that are non-cytotoxic to normal cells and can effectively target cancer cells has lead some researchers to investigate the potential anti-cancer activity of natural compounds. Some natural compounds, such as Taxol, have been shown to possess some anti-cancer potential. Pancratistatin (PST) is a natural compound that was isolated from the spider lily Pancratium littorale and shown to exhibit antineoplastic activity. The specificity of PST to cancer cells and the mechanism of PST's action remain unknown. This study provides a detailed look at the effect of PST treatment on cancerous and normal cells. Our results indicate that PST induced apoptosis selectively in cancer cells and that the mitochondria may be the site of action of PST in cancer cells. A biochemical target available specifically in cancer cells may lead to the development of new and more effective cancer fighting agents.

  18. Redox and pH-responsive gold nanoparticles as a new platform for simultaneous triple anti-cancer drugs targeting.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Marjan; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2017-03-30

    Cancer is considered to be one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide and nanotechnology was shown to have a unique potential to enhance the therapeutic performance of anti-cancer agents. A novel dual stimuli-responsive polyethylene glycol (PEG) block copolymer was synthesized for the decoration and stabilization of gold nanoparticles (NPs) to carry multiple anti-cancer drugs, doxorubicin (DOX), methotrexate (MTX) and 6-mercaptopurine (MP). DOX, MTX and MP were successfully loaded (the loading capacity of 37%, 12%, and 49%, respectively) into the NPs by ionic interaction (DOX and MTX) and disulphide-covalent bond formation (MP) in the polymeric shell of NPs. Furthermore, the triggered drugs release ability of NPs was shown through the comparison of simulated physiological and tumor tissue environments. The enhanced efficiency of the developed NPs and their targeted performance via MTX (target ligand of folate receptors) decoration were illustrated through the various cell cytotoxicity studies such as MTT assay, DAPI staining, and flow cytometry on various cancer cell lines with different levels of folate receptors. Our proposed idea in simultaneous delivery of three cytotoxic drugs with our newly designed PEGylated gold NPs may provide promising and novel prospect in cancer therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Magnetic core-shell hybrid nanoparticles for receptor targeted anti-cancer therapy and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Shanavas, Asifkhan; Sasidharan, Sisini; Bahadur, Dhirendra; Srivastava, Rohit

    2017-01-15

    Hybrid nanoparticles with magnetic poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticle 'core', surface modified with folate-chitosan (fol-cht) conjugate 'shell' are evaluated as simultaneous anti-cancer therapeutic and MRI contrast agent. The fol-cht conjugate is prepared using carbodiimide crosslinking chemistry at an optimized folate to amine (chitosan) molar ratio for further coating on PLGA nanoparticles loaded with docetaxel and well packed super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). Apart from possessing a targeting moiety, the coating provides a physical barrier to avoid undesired burst release of drug and also imparts sensitivity to acidic pH, due to protonated amine group dependent decondensation of the coating and subsequent drug release. The biocompatible hybrid nanoparticles provide receptor targeted docetaxel and SPION delivery for anti-cancer therapy and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging respectively, as tested in both folate receptor positive and negative cancer cells. Enhancement in nanoparticle uptake by folate receptor positive oral cancer cells caused significant increase in docetaxel mediated cytotoxicity. While polymeric encapsulation and fol-cht coating negatively affects the magnetic property of iron oxide nanoparticles, their aggregation in the core, shortened the overall T2 relaxation time thereby enhancing the nanoparticle relaxivity to provide better in vitro MR imaging.

  20. Targeting IAPs as an approach to anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Straub, Christopher S

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis is an essential process for embryonic and lymphocyte development, immune system modulation and tissue homeostasis. Defects in apoptotic signaling often lead to diseases of immune deficiency, neurodegeneration and cancer [1, 2]. In the cancer arena, these defects may contribute to the establishment and growth of tumors. Moreover, many cytotoxic chemotherapies act in part by activating these apoptotic networks. Occasionally apoptotic pathways are activated, however key players downstream of initiation are inhibited by negative regulators that have been dysregulated by the diseased state of the cell. Removal of these barriers to apoptosis signaling, it has been rationalized, could restore cell death in diseased cells while sparing those that are not primed for programmed cell death. Additionally, the subversion of these death evading mechanisms may re-sensitize cells that have developed resistance to chemotherapies in this manner. The importance of apoptosis as a maintenance process, and the promise that restoring this signaling could mean in treating cancer has placed many targets on the front line of oncology research. Approaches are being developed that will activate death receptor pathways, synthetically activate caspases, restore the activity of tumor suppressor genes such as p53, and counteract the effects of anti-apoptotic factors. Among these approaches, small molecules are in clinical trials against several anti-apoptotic players, namely the Bcl-2 and IAP proteins. This review will focus on the efforts being advanced against the Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAP), the chemical matter of the inhibitors and the biology emerging from this research.

  1. Tyrosine kinase, aurora kinase and leucine aminopeptidase as attractive drug targets in anticancer therapy - characterisation of their inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ziemska, Joanna; Solecka, Jolanta

    Cancers are the leading cause of deaths all over the world. Available anticancer agents used in clinics exhibit low therapeutic index and usually high toxicity. Wide spreading drug resistance of cancer cells induce a demanding need to search for new drug targets. Currently, many on-going studies on novel compounds with potent anticancer activity, high selectivity as well as new modes of action are conducted. In this work, we describe in details three enzyme groups, which are at present of extensive interest to medical researchers and pharmaceutical companies. These include receptor tyrosine kinases (e.g. EGFR enzymes) and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (Src enzymes), type A, B and C Aurora kinases and aminopeptidases, especially leucine aminopeptidase. We discuss classification of these enzymes, biochemistry as well as their role in the cell cycle under normal conditions and during cancerogenesis. Further on, the work describes enzyme inhibitors that are under in vitro, preclinical, clinical studies as well as drugs available on the market. Both, chemical structures of discovered inhibitors and the role of chemical moieties in novel drug design are discussed. Described enzymes play essential role in cell cycle, especially in mitosis (Aurora kinases), cell differentiation, growth and apoptosis (tyrosine kinases) as well as G1/S transition (leucine aminopeptidase). In cancer cells, they are overexpressed and only their inhibition may stop tumor progression. This review presents the clinical outcomes of selected inhibitors and argues the safety of drug usage in human volunteers. Clinical studies of EGFR and Src kinase inhibitors in different tumors clearly show the need for molecular selection of patients (to those with mutations in genes coding EGFR and Src) to achieve positive clinical response. Current data indicates the great necessity for new anticancer treatment and actions to limit off-target activity.

  2. AMPK as a Potential Anticancer Target – Friend or Foe?

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Hsiao-Ching; Chou, Chih-Chien; Kulp, Samuel K.; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key player in maintaining energy homeostasis in response to metabolic stress. Beyond diabetes and metabolic syndrome, there is a growing interest in the therapeutic exploitation of the AMPK pathway in cancer treatment in light of its unique ability to regulate cancer cell proliferation through the reprogramming of cell metabolism. Although many studies support the tumor-suppressive role of AMPK, emerging evidence suggests that the metabolic checkpoint function of AMPK might be overridden by stress or oncogenic signals so that tumor cells use AMPK activation as a survival strategy to gain growth advantage. These findings underscore the complexity in the cellular function of AMPK in maintaining energy homeostasis under physiological versus pathological conditions. Thus, this review aims to provide an overview of recent findings on the functional interplay of AMPK with different cell metabolic and signaling effectors, particularly histone deacetylases, in mediating downstream tumor suppressive or promoting mechanisms in different cell systems. Although AMPK activation inhibits tumor growth by targeting multiple signaling pathways relevant to tumorigenesis, under certain cellular contexts or certain stages of tumor development, AMPK might act as a protective response to metabolic stresses, such as nutrient deprivation, low oxygen, and low pH, or as a downstream effectors of oncogenic proteins, including androgen receptor, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, c-Src, and MYC. Thus, investigations to define at which stage(s) of tumorigenesis and cancer progression or for which genetic aberrations AMPK inhibition might represent a more relevant strategy than AMPK activation for cancer treatment are clearly warranted. PMID:23859619

  3. Targeting tumor perfusion and oxygenation to improve the outcome of anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bénédicte F; Sonveaux, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are widespread clinical modalities for cancer treatment. Among other biological influences, hypoxia is a main factor limiting the efficacy of radiotherapy, primarily because oxygen is involved in the stabilization of the DNA damage caused by ionizing radiations. Radiobiological hypoxia is found in regions of rodent and human tumors with a tissue oxygenation level below 10 mmHg at which tumor cells become increasingly resistant to radiation damage. Since hypoxic tumor cells remain clonogenic, their resistance to the treatment strongly influences the therapeutic outcome of radiotherapy. There is therefore an urgent need to identify adjuvant treatment modalities aimed to increase tumor pO(2) at the time of radiotherapy. Since tumor hypoxia fundamentally results from an imbalance between oxygen delivery by poorly efficient blood vessels and oxygen consumption by tumor cells with high metabolic activities, two promising approaches are those targeting vascular reactivity and tumor cell respiration. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the development and use of tumor-selective vasodilators, inhibitors of tumor cell respiration, and drugs and treatments combining both activities in the context of tumor sensitization to X-ray radiotherapy. Tumor-selective vasodilation may also be used to improve the delivery of circulating anticancer agents to tumors. Imaging tumor perfusion and oxygenation is of importance not only for the development and validation of such combination treatments, but also to determine which patients could benefit from the therapy. Numerous techniques have been developed in the preclinical setting. Hence, this review also briefly describes both magnetic resonance and non-magnetic resonance in vivo methods and compares them in terms of sensitivity, quantitative or semi-quantitative properties, temporal, and spatial resolutions, as well as translational aspects.

  4. Hierarchical pulmonary target nanoparticles via inhaled administration for anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Xu, Liu; Fan, Qin; Li, Man; Wang, Jingjing; Wu, Li; Li, Weidong; Duan, Jinao; Chen, Zhipeng

    2017-11-01

    Inhalation administration, compared with intravenous administration, significantly enhances chemotherapeutic drug exposure to the lung tissue and may increase the therapeutic effect for pulmonary anticancer. However, further identification of cancer cells after lung deposition of inhaled drugs is necessary to avoid side effects on normal lung tissue and to maximize drug efficacy. Moreover, as the action site of the major drug was intracellular organelles, drug target to the specific organelle is the final key for accurate drug delivery. Here, we designed a novel multifunctional nanoparticles (MNPs) for pulmonary antitumor and the material was well-designed for hierarchical target involved lung tissue target, cancer cell target, and mitochondrial target. The biodistribution in vivo determined by UHPLC-MS/MS method was employed to verify the drug concentration overwhelmingly increasing in lung tissue through inhaled administration compared with intravenous administration. Cellular uptake assay using A549 cells proved the efficient receptor-mediated cell endocytosis. Confocal laser scanning microscopy observation showed the location of MNPs in cells was mitochondria. All results confirmed the intelligent material can progressively play hierarchical target functions, which could induce more cell apoptosis related to mitochondrial damage. It provides a smart and efficient nanocarrier platform for hierarchical targeting of pulmonary anticancer drug. So far, this kind of material for pulmonary mitochondrial-target has not been seen in other reports.

  5. Hierarchical targeted hepatocyte mitochondrial multifunctional chitosan nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhipeng; Zhang, Liujie; Song, Yang; He, Jiayu; Wu, Li; Zhao, Can; Xiao, Yanyu; Li, Wei; Cai, Baochang; Cheng, Haibo; Li, Weidong

    2015-06-01

    The overwhelming majority of drugs exert their pharmacological effects after reaching their target sites of action, however, these target sites are mainly located in the cytosol or intracellular organelles. Consequently, delivering drugs to the specific organelle is the key to achieve maximum therapeutic effects and minimum side-effects. In the work reported here, we designed, synthesized, and evaluated a novel mitochondrial-targeted multifunctional nanoparticles (MNPs) based on chitosan derivatives according to the physiological environment of the tumor and the requirement of mitochondrial targeting drug delivery. The intelligent chitosan nanoparticles possess various functions such as stealth, hepatocyte targeting, multistage pH-response, lysosomal escape and mitochondrial targeting, which lead to targeted drug release after the progressively shedding of functional groups, thus realize the efficient intracellular delivery and mitochondrial localization, inhibit the growth of tumor, elevate the antitumor efficacy, and reduce the toxicity of anticancer drugs. It provides a safe and efficient nanocarrier platform for mitochondria targeting anticancer drug delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Advances in the chemistry and pharmacology of ecteinascidins, a promising new class of anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Manzanares, I; Cuevas, C; García-Nieto, R; Marco, E; Gago, F

    2001-11-01

    Ecteinascidins are marine natural products consisting of two or three linked tetrahydroisoquinoline subunits and an active carbinolamine functional group. Their potent antiproliferative activity against a variety of tumor cells has made them attractive candidates for development as anticancer agents. The lead compound, ecteinascidin 743 (ET 743), is currently in phase II clinical trials but the low amounts present in its natural source, the tunicate Ecteinascidia turbinata, made it necessary to develop efficient synthetic procedures. Recent improvements on the original synthesis are reviewed as well as new strategies starting from readily available cyanosafracin B. ET 743 is known to bind to the minor groove of DNA giving rise to a covalent adduct with the exocyclic amino group at position 2 of a guanine in a fashion similar to saframycin antibiotics. Some of the resulting complexes have been studied by a variety of biochemical and spectroscopic methods and also by computer simulations. The rules for sequence specificity have been well established (preferred targets are RGC and YGG, where R and Y stand for purine and pyrimidine, respectively), and it has been shown that binding of ET 743 to DNA is accompanied by minor groove widening and DNA bending towards the major groove. Although the precise target for antitumor action remains to be unambiguously defined, a role in affecting the transcriptional regulation of some inducible genes is rapidly emerging.

  7. Synthesis, characterization and molecular docking studies of thiouracil derivatives as potent thymidylate synthase inhibitors and potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    El-Naggar, Abeer M; Abou-El-Regal, Mohsen M; El-Metwally, Souad A; Sherbiny, Farag F; Eissa, Ibrahim H

    2017-08-16

    Thymidylate synthase (TS), one of folate-dependent enzymes, is a key and well-recognized target for anticancer agents. In this study, a series of 6-aryl-5-cyano thiouracil derivatives were designed and synthesized in accordance with essential pharmacophoric features of known TS inhibitors. Nineteen compounds were screened in vitro for their anti-proliferative activities toward HePG-2, MCF-7, HCT-116, and PC-3 cell lines. Compounds [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and 24 exhibited high anti-proliferative activity, comparable to that of 5-fluorouracil. Additionally, ten compounds with potent anti-proliferative activities were further evaluated for their ability to inhibit TS enzyme. Six compounds ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], 22, 23 and 24) demonstrated potent dose-related TS inhibition with [Formula: see text] values ranging from 1.57 to [Formula: see text]. The in vitro TS activity results were consistent with those of the cytotoxicity assay where the most potent anti-proliferative compounds of the series showed good TS inhibitory activity comparable to that of 5-fluorouracil. Furthermore, molecular docking studies were carried out to investigate the binding pattern of the designed compounds with the prospective target, TS (PDB-code: 1JU6).

  8. Gold-Containing Indoles as Anti-Cancer Agents that Potentiate the Cytotoxic Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Sandra; Gao, Lei; Lee, Irene; Gray, Thomas; Berdis, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the design and application of several distinct gold-containing indoles as anti-cancer agents. When used individually, all gold-bearing compounds display cytostatic effects against leukemia and adherent cancer cell lines. However, two gold-bearing indoles show unique behavior by increasing the cytotoxic effects of clinically relevant levels of ionizing radiation. Quantifying the amount of DNA damage demonstrates that each gold-indole enhances apoptosis by inhibiting DNA repair. Both Au(I)-indoles were tested for inhibitory effects against various cellular targets including thioredoxin reductase, a known target of several gold compounds, and various ATP-dependent kinases. While neither compound significantly inhibits the activity of thioreoxin reductase, both showed inhibitory effects against several kinases associated with cancer initiation and progression. The inhibition of these kinases provides a possible mechanism for the ability of these Au(I)-indoles potentiate the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation. Clinical applications of combining Au(I)-indoles with ionizing radiation are discussed as a new strategy to achieve chemosensitization of cancer cells. PMID:22289037

  9. Identification of potential transmembrane protease serine 4 inhibitors as anti-cancer agents by integrated computational approach.

    PubMed

    Ilamathi, M; Hemanth, R; Nishanth, S; Sivaramakrishnan, V

    2016-01-21

    Transmembrane protease serine 4 is a well known cell surface protease facilitating the extracellular matrix degradation and epithelial mesenchymal transition in hepatocellular carcinoma. Henceforth targeting transmembrane protease serine 4 is strongly believed to provide therapeutic intervention against hepatocellular carcinoma. Owing to lack of crystal structure for human transmembrane protease serine 4, we predicted its three dimensional structure for the first time in this study. Experimentally proven inhibitor-Tyroserleutide (TSL) against hepatocellular carcinoma via transmembrane protease serine 4 was used as a benchmark to identify structurally similar candidates from PubChem database to create the TSL library. Virtual screening of TSL library against modeled transmembrane protease serine 4 revealed the top four potential inhibitors. Further binding free energy (ΔGbind) analysis of the potential inhibitors revealed the best potential lead compound against transmembrane protease serine 4. Drug likeliness nature of the top four potential hits were additionally analyzed in comparison to TSL to confirm on the best potential lead compound with the highest % of human oral absorption. Consequently, e-pharmacophore mapping of the best potential lead compound yielded a six point feature. It was observed to contain four hydrogen bond donor sites (D), one positively ionizable site (P) and one aromatic ring (R). Such e-pharmacophore insight obtained from structural determinants by integrated computational analysis could serve as a framework for further advancement of drug discovery process of new anti-cancer agents with less toxicity and high specificity targeting transmembrane protease serine 4 and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  10. Molecularly targeted agents in oculoplastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Allen, Richard C

    2017-09-01

    Significant advances have been made in oncology and rheumatology with the introduction of molecularly targeted agents (MTAs). MTAs consist of monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the recent applications of MTAs to orbital, lacrimal, and eyelid disease. The use of monoclonal antibodies has been described in the treatment of orbital vascular lesions, lymphoma, and squamous cell carcinoma. Inflammatory conditions treated with monoclonal antibodies include thyroid eye disease, IgG4 disease, and granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Immunotherapy with checkpoint inhibitors has also found applications to orbital disease. Use of small molecule inhibitors has been described in the treatment of basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and Erdheim-Chester disease. There are many orbital, lacrimal, and eyelid side effects of MTAs with which the oculoplastic surgeon should be familiar, including hypertrichosis, edema, and orbital and eyelid inflammation. MTAs represent the future of treatment of oncologic and inflammatory conditions. Application of these agents to orbital, lacrimal, and eyelid disease will continue to expand. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms of oculoplastic disorders will facilitate additional potential pathways that could be targeted for therapy.

  11. Preparation and characterization of novel chitosan-protamine nanoparticles for nucleus-targeted anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiwei; Hou, Jiahui; Shi, Yijie; Su, Chang; Zhao, Liang

    It is well known that most anticancer drugs commonly show high toxicity to the DNA of tumor cells and exert effects by combining with the DNA or associated enzymes in the nucleus. Most developed drugs are first delivered into the cytoplasm and then transferred to the nucleus through the membrane pores. Sometimes, the transportation of drugs from cytoplasm to nucleus is not efficient and often results in poor therapeutic effects. In this study, we developed special and novel nanoparticles (NPs) made of chitosan and protamine for targeted nuclear capture of drugs to enhance anticancer effects. The anticancer effects of nuclear targeted-delivery of drugs in NPs were also evaluated by investigating cytotoxicity, cellular uptake mechanism, and cell apoptosis on cells. Chitosan-protamine NPs were characterized by good drug entrapment, sustained release, small average particle size, low polydispersity index, and high encapsulation efficiency; and accomplished the efficient nuclear delivery of fluorouracil (5-Fu). Compared with free 5-Fu and 5-Fu-loaded chitosan NPs, treatment of A549 cells and HeLa cells with 5-Fu-loaded chitosan-protamine NPs showed the highest cytotoxicity and further induced the significant apoptosis of cells. In addition, 5-Fu-loaded chitosan-protamine NPs exhibited the best efficiency in inhibiting tumor growth than the other three formulations. 5-Fu-loaded chitosan-protamine NPs enhanced antitumor efficacy through the targeted nuclear capture of drugs and showed promising potential as a nanodelivery system for quickly locating drugs in the nucleus of cells.

  12. Targeting carbonic anhydrase IX improves the anti-cancer efficacy of mTOR inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Faes, Seraina; Planche, Anne; Uldry, Emilie; Santoro, Tania; Pythoud, Catherine; Stehle, Jean-Christophe; Horlbeck, Janine; Letovanec, Igor; Riggi, Nicolo; Datta, Dipak; Demartines, Nicolas; Dormond, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) by chemical inhibitors, such as rapamycin, has demonstrated anti-cancer activity in preclinical and clinical trials. Their efficacy is, however, limited and tumors eventually relapse through resistance formation. In this study, using two different cancer mouse models, we identify tumor hypoxia as a novel mechanism of resistance of cancer cells against mTORC1 inhibitors. Indeed, we show that the activity of mTORC1 is mainly restricted to the non-hypoxic tumor compartment, as evidenced by a mutually exclusive staining pattern of the mTORC1 activity marker pS6 and the hypoxia marker pimonidazole. Consequently, whereas rapamycin reduces cancer cell proliferation in non-hypoxic regions, it has no effect in hypoxic areas, suggesting that cancer cells proliferate independently of mTORC1 under hypoxia. Targeting the hypoxic tumor compartment by knockdown of carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) using short hairpin RNA or by chemical inhibition of CAIX with acetazolamide potentiates the anti-cancer activity of rapamycin. Taken together, these data emphasize that hypoxia impairs the anti-cancer efficacy of rapalogs. Therapeutic strategies targeting the hypoxic tumor compartment, such as the inhibition of CAIX, potentiate the efficacy of rapamycin and warrant further clinical evaluation. PMID:27153561

  13. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Novel Selenium (Se-NSAID) Molecules as Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Plano, Daniel; Karelia, Deepkamal N; Pandey, Manoj K; Spallholz, Julian E; Amin, Shantu; Sharma, Arun K

    2016-03-10

    The synthesis and anticancer evaluation of novel selenium-nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (Se-NSAID) hybrid molecules are reported. The Se-aspirin analogue 8 was identified as the most effective agent in reducing the viability of different cancer cell lines, particularly colorectal cancer (CRC) cells, was more selective toward cancer cells than normal cells, and was >10 times more potent than 5-FU, the current therapy for CRC. Compound 8 inhibits CRC growth via the inhibition of the cell cycle in G1 and G2/M phases and reduces the cell cycle markers like cyclin E1 and B1 in a dose dependent manner; the inhibition of the cell cycle may be dependent on the ability of 8 to induce p21 expression. Furthermore, 8 induces apoptosis by activating caspase 3/7 and PARP cleavage, and its longer exposure causes increase in intracellular ROS levels in CRC cells. Taken together, 8 has the potential to be developed further as a chemotherapeutic agent for CRC.

  14. Dietary polyphenols as antioxidants and anticancer agents: more questions than answers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Miao-Lin

    2011-01-01

    High intake of fruit and vegetables is believed to be beneficial to human health. Fruit, vegetables and some beverages, such as tea and coffee, are particularly rich in dietary polyphenols. Various studies have suggested (but not proven) that dietary polyphenols may protect against cardiovasucalar diseases, neurodegenerative diseases and some forms of cancer. Dietary polyphenols may exert their anticancer effects through several possible mechanisms, such as removal of carcinogenic agents, modulation of cancer cell signaling and antioxidant enzymatic activities, and induction of apoptosis as well as cell cycle arrest. Some of these effects may be related, at least partly, to their antioxidant activities. In recent years, a new concept of the antioxidant effects of dietary polyphenols has emerged, i.e., direct scavenging activity toward reactive species and indirect antioxidant activity; the latter activity is thought to arise primarily via the activation of nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 which stimulates the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S-transferase, catalase, NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1), and/or phase II enzymes. The direct antioxidant activity of dietary polyphenols in vivo is probably limited because of their low concentrations in vivo, except in the gastrointestinal tract where they are present in high concentrations. Paradoxically, the pro-oxidant effect of dietary polyphenols may contribute to the activation of antioxidant enzymes and protective proteins in cultured cells and animal models because of the adaptation of cells and tissues to mild/moderate oxidative stress. Despite a plethora of in vitro studies on dietary polyphenols, many questions remain to be answered, such as: (1) How relevant are the direct and indirect antioxidant activities of dietary polyphenols in vivo? (2) How important are these activities in the anticancer effects of dietary polyphenols? (3) Do the pro

  15. Landscape of Targeted Anti-Cancer Drug Synergies in Melanoma Identifies a Novel BRAF-VEGFR/PDGFR Combination Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Adam A.; Amzallag, Arnaud; Pruteanu-Malinici, Iulian; Baniya, Subash; Cooper, Zachary A.; Piris, Adriano; Hargreaves, Leeza; Igras, Vivien; Frederick, Dennie T.; Lawrence, Donald P.; Haber, Daniel A.; Flaherty, Keith T.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Benes, Cyril H.; Fisher, David E.

    2015-01-01

    A newer generation of anti-cancer drugs targeting underlying somatic genetic driver events have resulted in high single-agent or single-pathway response rates in selected patients, but few patients achieve complete responses and a sizeable fraction of patients relapse within a year. Thus, there is a pressing need for identification of combinations of targeted agents which induce more complete responses and prevent disease progression. We describe the results of a combination screen of an unprecedented scale in mammalian cells performed using a collection of targeted, clinically tractable agents across a large panel of melanoma cell lines. We find that even the most synergistic drug pairs are effective only in a discrete number of cell lines, underlying a strong context dependency for synergy, with strong, widespread synergies often corresponding to non-specific or off-target drug effects such as multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1) transporter inhibition. We identified drugs sensitizing cell lines that are BRAFV600E mutant but intrinsically resistant to BRAF inhibitor PLX4720, including the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor/kinase insert domain receptor (VEGFR/KDR) and platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) family inhibitor cediranib. The combination of cediranib and PLX4720 induced apoptosis in vitro and tumor regression in animal models. This synergistic interaction is likely due to engagement of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), demonstrating the potential of drug- rather than gene-specific combination discovery approaches. Patients with elevated biopsy KDR expression showed decreased progression free survival in trials of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase pathway inhibitors. Thus, high-throughput unbiased screening of targeted drug combinations, with appropriate library selection and mechanistic follow-up, can yield clinically-actionable drug combinations. PMID:26461489

  16. Application of computer assisted combinatorial chemistry in antivirial, antimalarial and anticancer agents design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burello, E.; Bologa, C.; Frecer, V.; Miertus, S.

    Combinatorial chemistry and technologies have been developed to a stage where synthetic schemes are available for generation of a large variety of organic molecules. The innovative concept of combinatorial design assumes that screening of a large and diverse library of compounds will increase the probability of finding an active analogue among the compounds tested. Since the rate at which libraries are screened for activity currently constitutes a limitation to the use of combinatorial technologies, it is important to be selective about the number of compounds to be synthesized. Early experience with combinatorial chemistry indicated that chemical diversity alone did not result in a significant increase in the number of generated lead compounds. Emphasis has therefore been increasingly put on the use of computer assisted combinatorial chemical techniques. Computational methods are valuable in the design of virtual libraries of molecular models. Selection strategies based on computed physicochemical properties of the models or of a target compound are introduced to reduce the time and costs of library synthesis and screening. In addition, computational structure-based library focusing methods can be used to perform in silico screening of the activity of compounds against a target receptor by docking the ligands into the receptor model. Three case studies are discussed dealing with the design of targeted combinatorial libraries of inhibitors of HIV-1 protease, P. falciparum plasmepsin and human urokinase as potential antivirial, antimalarial and anticancer drugs. These illustrate library focusing strategies.

  17. Bone-targeting agents in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzman, Daniel L.; Boikos, Sosipatros A.; Carducci, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastases are present in the vast majority of men with advanced prostate cancer, representing the main cause for morbidity and mortality. Recurrent or metastatic disease is managed initially with androgen deprivation but the majority of the patients eventually will progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer, with patients developing bone metastases in most of the cases. Survival and growth of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is dependent on a complex microenvironment (onco-niche) that includes the osteoblasts, the osteoclasts, the endothelium, and the stroma. This review summarizes agents that target the pathways involved in this complex interaction between prostate cancer and bone micro-environment and aim to transform lethal metastatic prostate cancer into a chronic disease. PMID:24398856

  18. Bone-targeting agents in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Suzman, Daniel L; Boikos, Sosipatros A; Carducci, Michael A

    2014-09-01

    Bone metastases are present in the vast majority of men with advanced prostate cancer, representing the main cause for morbidity and mortality. Recurrent or metastatic disease is managed initially with androgen deprivation but the majority of the patients eventually will progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer, with patients developing bone metastases in most of the cases. Survival and growth of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is dependent on a complex microenvironment (onco-niche) that includes the osteoblasts, the osteoclasts, the endothelium, and the stroma. This review summarizes agents that target the pathways involved in this complex interaction between prostate cancer and bone microenvironment and aim to transform lethal metastatic prostate cancer into a chronic disease.

  19. Thymoquinone as an anticancer agent: evidence from inhibition of cancer cells viability and invasion in vitro and tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Attoub, Samir; Sperandio, Olivier; Raza, Haider; Arafat, Kholoud; Al-Salam, Suhail; Al Sultan, Mahmood Ahmed; Al Safi, Maha; Takahashi, Takashi; Adem, Abdu

    2013-10-01

    Phytochemical compounds are emerging as a new generation of anticancer agents with limited toxicity in cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential impact of thymoquinone (TQ), the major constituent of black seed, on survival, invasion of cancer cells in vitro, and tumor growth in vivo. Exposure of cells derived from lung (LNM35), liver (HepG2), colon (HT29), melanoma (MDA-MB-435), and breast (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7) tumors to increasing TQ concentrations resulted in a significant inhibition of viability through the inhibition of Akt phosphorylation leading to DNA damage and activation of the mitochondrial-signaling proapoptotic pathway. We provide evidence that TQ at non-toxic concentrations inhibited the invasive potential of LNM35, MDA-MB-231, and MDA-MB231-1833 cancer cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that TQ synergizes with DNA-damaging agent cisplatin to inhibit cellular viability. The anticancer activity of thymoquinone was also investigated in athymic mice inoculated with the LNM35 lung cells. Administration of TQ (10 mg/kg/i.p.) for 18 days inhibited the LNM35 tumor growth by 39% (P < 0.05). Tumor growth inhibition was associated with significant increase in the activated caspase-3. The in silico target identification suggests several potential targets of TQ mainly HDAC2 proteins and the 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase. In this context, we demonstrated that TQ treatment resulted in a significant inhibition of HDAC2 proteins. In view of the available experimental findings, we contend that thymoquinone and/or its analogues may have clinical potential as an anticancer agent alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin.

  20. A New Method Without Organic Solvent to Targeted Nanodrug for Enhanced Anticancer Efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shichao; Yang, Xiangrui; Zou, Mingyuan; Hou, Zhenqing; Yan, Jianghua

    2017-06-01

    Since the hydrophobic group is always essential to the synthesis of the drug-loaded nanoparticles, a majority of the methods rely heavily on organic solvent, which may not be completely removed and might be a potential threat to the patients. In this study, we completely "green" synthesized 10-hydroxycamptothecine (HCPT) loaded, folate (FA)-modified nanoneedles (HFNDs) for highly efficient cancer therapy with high drug loading, targeting property, and imaging capability. It should be noted that no organic solvent was used in the preparation process. In vitro cell uptake study and the in vivo distribution study showed that the HFNDs, with FA on the surface, revealed an obviously targeting property and entered the HeLa cells easier than the chitosan-HCPT nanoneedles without FA modified (NDs). The cytotoxicity tests illustrated that the HFNDs possessed better killing ability to HeLa cells than the individual drug or the NDs in the same dose, indicating its good anticancer effect. The in vivo anticancer experiment further revealed the pronounced anticancer effects and the lower side effects of the HFNDs. This new method without organic solvent will lead to a promising sustained drug delivery system for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Calculation of molecular features with apparent impact on both activity of mutagens and activity of anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Toropov, Andrey A; Toropova, Alla P; Benfenati, Emilio; Gini, Giuseppina; Leszczynska, Danuta; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2012-09-01

    The analysis of the influence of molecular features which can be extracted from the simplified molecular input line entry system (SMILES) and involved in the process of the building up of a series of QSAR models (with different splits into training and test sets) by means of the CORAL software for mutagenicity and anticancer activity has been performed. The presence of nitrogen (sp3) is favorable for decrease of the both endpoints; the presence of only one ring is also promotor for decrease of the both endpoints; however the presence of two or three rings is favorable for increase of mutagenicity and decrease of anticancer activity. These findings provide useful criteria for further experimental and computational studies in the search for new anticancer agents.

  2. HER2 Targeted Molecular MR Imaging Using a De Novo Designed Protein Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Jingjuan; Li, Shunyi; Wei, Lixia; Jiang, Jie; Long, Robert; Mao, Hui; Wei, Ling; Wang, Liya; Yang, Hua; Grossniklaus, Hans E.; Liu, Zhi-Ren; Yang, Jenny J.

    2011-01-01

    The application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to non-invasively assess disease biomarkers has been hampered by the lack of desired contrast agents with high relaxivity, targeting capability, and optimized pharmacokinetics. We have developed a novel MR imaging probe targeting to HER2, a biomarker for various cancer types and a drug target for anti-cancer therapies. This multimodal HER20targeted MR imaging probe integrates a de novo designed protein contrast agent with a high affinity HER2 affibody and a near IR fluorescent dye. Our probe can differentially monitor tumors with different expression levels of HER2 in both human cell lines and xenograft mice models. In addition to its 100-fold higher dose efficiency compared to clinically approved non-targeting contrast agent DTPA, our developed agent also exhibits advantages in crossing the endothelial boundary, tissue distribution, and tumor tissue retention over reported contrast agents as demonstrated by even distribution of the imaging probe across the entire tumor mass. This contrast agent will provide a powerful tool for quantitative assessment of molecular markers, and improved resolution for diagnosis, prognosis and drug discovery. PMID:21455310

  3. Neddylation Pathway as a Novel Anti-cancer Target: Mechanistic Investigation and Therapeutic Implication.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanan; Jia, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    Protein neddylation, a newly characterized posttranslational modification that adds the ubiquitin-like molecule NEDD8 to substrates, modulates important biological processes, whereas dysfunction of neddylation may cause several serious diseases, such as cancer. Inhibition of neddylation pathway has emerged as a promising anticancer strategy, as evidenced by development of the NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) inhibitor MLN4924. Due to its potent anti-cancer efficacy and well-tolerated toxicity, MLN4924 has been evaluated in multiple Phase I clinical trials for solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Recently, accumulating evidences indicate that neddylation pathway also plays a pivotal role in the regulation of multiple processes of tumor microenvironment (TME), such as tumor angiogenesis and the function of immune cells. In this review, we briefly summarize the latest progresses in this field and highlight neddylation pathway as an attractive therapeutic target against human cancer.

  4. Targeted delivery of 5-fluorouracil to cholangiocarcinoma cells using folic acid as a targeting agent.

    PubMed

    Ngernyuang, Nipaporn; Seubwai, Wunchana; Daduang, Sakda; Boonsiri, Patcharee; Limpaiboon, Temduang; Daduang, Jureerut

    2016-03-01

    There are limits to the standard treatment for cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) including drug resistance and side effects. The objective of this study was to develop a new technique for carrying drugs by conjugation with gold nanoparticles and using folic acid as a targeting agent in order to increase drug sensitivity. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were functionalized with 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and folic acid (FA) using polyethylene glycol (PEG) shell as a linker (AuNPs-PEG-5FU-FA). Its cytotoxicity was tested in CCA cell lines (M139 and M213) which express folic acid receptor (FA receptor). The results showed that AuNPs-PEG-5FU-FA increased the cytotoxic effects in the M139 and M213 cells by 4.76% and 7.95%, respectively compared to those treated with free 5FU+FA. It is found that the cytotoxicity of the AuNPs-PEG-5FU-FA correlates with FA receptor expression suggested the use of FA as a targeted therapy. The mechanism of cytotoxicity was mediated via mitochondrial apoptotic pathway as determined by apoptosis array. In conclusion, our findings shed some light on the use of gold nanoparticles for conjugation with potential compounds and FA as targeted therapy which contribute to the improvement of anti-cancer drug efficacy. In vivo study should be warranted for its effectiveness of stability, biosafety and side effect reduction.

  5. Covalent Ligand Discovery against Druggable Hotspots Targeted by Anti-cancer Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Elizabeth A; Ward, Carl C; Spradlin, Jessica N; Bateman, Leslie A; Huffman, Tucker R; Miyamoto, David K; Kleinman, Jordan I; Nomura, Daniel K

    2017-09-11

    Many natural products that show therapeutic activities are often difficult to synthesize or isolate and have unknown targets, hindering their development as drugs. Identifying druggable hotspots targeted by covalently acting anti-cancer natural products can enable pharmacological interrogation of these sites with more synthetically tractable compounds. Here, we used chemoproteomic platforms to discover that the anti-cancer natural product withaferin A targets C377 on the regulatory subunit PPP2R1A of the tumor-suppressor protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) complex leading to activation of PP2A activity, inactivation of AKT, and impaired breast cancer cell proliferation. We developed a more synthetically tractable cysteine-reactive covalent ligand, JNS 1-40, that selectively targets C377 of PPP2R1A to impair breast cancer signaling, proliferation, and in vivo tumor growth. Our study highlights the utility of using chemoproteomics to map druggable hotspots targeted by complex natural products and subsequently interrogating these sites with more synthetically tractable covalent ligands for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The interactions of anticancer agents with tea catechins: current evidence from preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Shang, Weihu; Lu, Weidong; Han, Mei; Qiao, Jinping

    2014-01-01

    Tea catechins exhibit a broad range of pharmacological activities that impart beneficial effects on human health. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), one of the major tea catechins, has been widely associated with cancer prevention and treatment. In addition, tea catechins in combination with anticancer drugs are being evaluated as a new cancer treatment strategy. However, the interactions of anticancer drugs with tea catechins are largely unknown. Accumulated data indicate significant interactions between anticancer drugs and tea catechins, such as synergistic tumor inhibition or antagonist activity. Therefore, it is critical to understand comprehensively the effects of tea catechins on anticancer drugs. Focusing on evidence from preclinical studies, this paper will review the interactions between anticancer drugs and tea catechins, including pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics effects. We hope that by detailing the interactions between anticancer drugs and tea catechins, more attention will be directed to this important therapeutic combination in the future.

  7. A transesterification reaction is implicated in the covalent binding of benzo[b]acronycine anticancer agents with DNA and glutathion.

    PubMed

    David-Cordonnier, Marie Hélène; Laine, William; Kouach, Mostafa; Briand, Gilbert; Vezin, Hervé; Gaslonde, Thomas; Michel, Sylvie; Doan Thi Mai, Huong; Tillequin, Francois; Koch, Michel; Léonce, Stéphane; Pierré, Alain; Bailly, Christian

    2004-01-02

    The benzo[b]acronycine derivative S23906-1 has been recently identified as a promising antitumor agent, showing remarkable in vivo activities against a panel of solid tumors. The anticancer activity is attributed to the capacity of the drug to alkylate DNA, selectively at the exocyclic 2-amino group of guanine residues. Hydrolysis of the C-1 and C-2 acetate groups of S23906-1 provides the diol compound S28907-1 which is inactive whereas the intermediate C-2 monoacetate derivative S28687-1 is both highly reactive toward DNA and cytotoxic. The reactivity of this later compound S28687-1 toward two bionucleophiles, DNA and the tripeptide glutathion, has been investigated by mass spectrometry to identify the nature of the (type II) covalent adducts characterized by the loss of the acetate group at position 2. On the basis of NMR and molecular modeling analyses, the reaction mechanism is explained by a transesterification process where the acetate leaving group is transferred from position C-2 to C-1. Altogether, the study validates the reaction scheme of benzo[b]acronycine derivative with its target.

  8. Anticancer Agents: Does a Phosphonium Behave Like a Gold(I) Phosphine Complex? Let a "Smart" Probe Answer!

    PubMed

    Ali, Moussa; Dondaine, Lucile; Adolle, Anais; Sampaio, Carla; Chotard, Florian; Richard, Philippe; Denat, Franck; Bettaieb, Ali; Le Gendre, Pierre; Laurens, Véronique; Goze, Christine; Paul, Catherine; Bodio, Ewen

    2015-06-11

    Gold phosphine complexes, such as auranofin, have been recognized for decades as antirheumatic agents. Clinical trials are now underway to validate their use in anticancer or anti-HIV treatments. However, their mechanisms of action remain unclear. A challenging question is whether the gold phosphine complex is a prodrug that is administered in an inactive precursor form or rather that the gold atom remains attached to the phosphine ligand during treatment. In this study, we present two novel gold complexes, which we compared to auranofin and to their phosphonium analogue. The chosen ligand is a phosphine-based smart probe, whose strong fluorescence depends on the presence of the gold atom. The in vitro biological action of the gold complexes and the phosphonium derivative were investigated, and a preliminary in vivo study in healthy zebrafish larvae allowed us to evaluate gold complex biodistribution and toxicity. The different analyses carried out showed that these gold complexes were stable and behaved differently from phosphonium and auranofin, both in vitro and in vivo. Two-photon microscopy experiments demonstrated that the cellular targets of these gold complexes are not the same as those of the phosphonium analogue. Moreover, despite similar IC50 values in some cancer cell lines, gold complexes displayed a low toxicity in vivo, in contrast to the phosphonium salt. They are therefore suitable for future in vivo investigations.

  9. Pharmacokinetics and derivation of an anticancer dosing regimen for the novel anti-cancer agent isobutyl-deoxynyboquinone (IB-DNQ), a NQO1 bioactivatable molecule, in the domestic felid species.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Alycen P; Francis, Joshua M; Pajak, Malgorzata; Parkinson, Elizabeth I; Wycislo, Kathryn L; Rosol, Thomas J; Brown, Megan E; London, Cheryl A; Dirikolu, Levent; Hergenrother, Paul J; Fan, Timothy M

    2016-12-14

    Isobutyl-deoxynyboquinone (IB-DNQ) is a selective substrate for NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1), an enzyme overexpressed in many solid tumors. Following activation by NQO1, IB-DNQ participates in a catalytic futile reduction/reoxidation cycle with consequent toxic reactive oxygen species generation within the tumor microenvironment. To elucidate the potential of IB-DNQ to serve as a novel anticancer agent, in vitro studies coupled with in vivo pharmacokinetic and toxicologic investigations in the domestic felid species were conducted to investigate the tractability of IB-DNQ as a translationally applicable anticancer agent. First, using feline oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) as a comparative cancer model, expressions of NQO1 were characterized in not only human, but also feline OSCC tissue microarrays. Second, IB-DNQ mediated cytotoxicity in three immortalized feline OSCC cell lines were studied under dose-dependent and sequential exposure conditions. Third, the feasibility of administering IB-DNQ at doses predicted to achieve cytotoxic plasma concentrations and biologically relevant durations of exposure were investigated through pharmacokinetic and tolerability studies in healthy research felines. Intravenous administration of IB-DNQ at 1.0-2.0 mg/kg achieved peak plasma concentrations and durations of exposure reaching or exceeding predicted in vitro cytotoxic concentrations. Clinical adverse side effects including ptyalism and tachypnea exhibited during and post-IV infusion of IB-DNQ were transient and tolerable. Additionally, IB-DNQ administration did not produce acute or delayed-onset unacceptable hematologic, non-hematologic, or off-target oxidative toxicities. Collectively, the findings reported here within provide important safety and pharmacokinetic data to support the continued development of IB-DNQ as a novel anticancer strategy for NQO1 expressing cancers.

  10. Natural product modulators of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as potential anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Tiago; Sieglitz, Florian; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L

    2016-11-07

    Treatment of cancer is a significant challenge in clinical medicine, and its research is a top priority in chemical biology and drug discovery. Consequently, there is an urgent need for identifying innovative chemotypes capable of modulating unexploited drug targets. The transient receptor potential (TRPs) channels persist scarcely explored as targets, despite intervening in a plethora of pathophysiological events in numerous diseases, including cancer. Both agonists and antagonists have proven capable of evoking phenotype changes leading to either cell death or reduced cell migration. Among these, natural products entail biologically pre-validated and privileged architectures for TRP recognition. Furthermore, several natural products have significantly contributed to our current knowledge on TRP biology. In this Tutorial Review we focus on selected natural products, e.g. capsaicinoids, cannabinoids and terpenes, by highlighting challenges and opportunities in their use as starting points for designing natural product-inspired TRP channel modulators. Importantly, the de-orphanization of natural products as TRP channel ligands may leverage their exploration as viable strategy for developing anticancer therapies. Finally, we foresee that TRP channels may be explored for the selective pharmacodelivery of cytotoxic payloads to diseased tissues, providing an innovative platform in chemical biology and molecular medicine.

  11. Synthesis of xanthohumol analogues and discovery of potent thioredoxin reductase inhibitor as potential anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baoxin; Duan, Dongzhu; Ge, Chunpo; Yao, Juan; Liu, Yaping; Li, Xinming; Fang, Jianguo

    2015-02-26

    The selenoprotein thioredoxin reductases (TrxRs) are attractive targets for anticancer drugs development. Xanthohumol (Xn), a naturally occurring polyphenol chalcone from hops, has received increasing attention because of its multiple pharmacological activities. We synthesized Xn and its 43 analogues and discovered that compound 13n displayed the highest cytotoxicity toward HeLa cells (IC50 = 1.4 μM). Structure-activity relationship study indicates that the prenyl group is not necessary for cytotoxicity, and introducing electron-withdrawing group, especially on the meta-position, is favored. In addition, methylation of the phenoxyl groups generally improves the potency. Mechanistic study revealed that 13n selectively inhibits TrxR and induces reactive oxygen species and apoptosis in HeLa cells. Cells overexpressing TrxR are resistant to 13n insult, while knockdown of TrxR sensitizes cells to 13n treatment, highlighting the physiological significance of targeting TrxR by 13n. The clarification of the structural determinants for the potency would guide the design of novel potent molecules for future development.

  12. Recent developments in L-asparaginase discovery and its potential as anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Abhinav; Khan, Abdul Arif; Khurshid, Mohsin; Kalam, Mohd Abul; Jain, Sudhir K; Singhal, Pradeep K

    2016-04-01

    L-Asparaginase (EC3.5.1.1) is an enzyme, which is used for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and other related blood cancers from a long time. This enzyme selectively hydrolyzes the extracellular amino acid L-asparagine into L-aspartate and ammonia, leading to nutritional deficiencies, protein synthesis inhibition, and ultimately death of lymphoblastic cells by apoptosis. Currently, bacterial asparaginases are used for treatment purpose but offers scepticism due to a number of toxicities, including thrombosis, pancreatitis, hyperglycemia, and hepatotoxicity. Resistance towards bacterial asparaginase is another major disadvantage during cancer management. This situation attracted attention of researchers towards alternative sources of L-asparaginase, including plants and fungi. Present article discusses about potential of L-asparaginase as an anticancer agent, its mechanism of action, and adverse effects related to current asparaginase formulations. This article also provides an outlook for recent developments in L-asparaginase discovery from alternative sources and their potential as a less toxic alternative to current formulations.

  13. Synergistic Anticancer Effect of Tocotrienol Combined with Chemotherapeutic Agents or Dietary Components: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Eitsuka, Takahiro; Tatewaki, Naoto; Nishida, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2016-01-01

    Tocotrienol (T3), unsaturated vitamin E, is gaining a lot of attention owing to its potent anticancer effect, since its efficacy is much greater than that of tocopherol (Toc). Various factors are known to be involved in such antitumor action, including cell cycle arrest, apoptosis induction, antiangiogenesis, anti-metastasis, nuclear factor-κB suppression, and telomerase inhibition. Owing to a difference in the affinity of T3 and Toc for the α-tocopherol transfer protein, the bioavailability of orally ingested T3 is lower than that of Toc. Furthermore, cellular uptake of T3 is interrupted by coadministration of α-Toc in vitro and in vivo. Based on this, several studies are in progress to screen for molecules that can synergize with T3 in order to augment its potency. Combinations of T3 with chemotherapeutic drugs (e.g., statins, celecoxib, and gefitinib) or dietary components (e.g., polyphenols, sesamin, and ferulic acid) exhibit synergistic actions on cancer cell growth and signaling pathways. In this review, we summarize the current status of synergistic effects of T3 and an array of agents on cancer cells, and discuss their molecular mechanisms of action. These combination strategies would encourage further investigation and application in cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:27669218

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of a series of benzothiophene acrylonitrile analogs as anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Penthala, Narsimha Reddy; Sonar, Vijayakumar, N.; Horn, Jamie; Leggas, Markos; Yadlapalli, Jai Shankar K. B.; Crooks, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    A new library of small molecules with structural features resembling combretastatin analogs was synthesized and evaluated for anticancer activity against a panel of 60 human cancer cell lines. Three novel acrylonitrile analogs (5, 6 and 13) caused a significant reduction in cell growth in almost all the cell lines examined, with GI50 values generally in the range 10–100 nM. Based on the structural characteristics of similar drugs, we hypothesized that the cytotoxic activity was likely due to interaction with tubulin. Furthermore, these compounds appeared to overcome cell-associated P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated resistance, since they were equipotent in inhibiting OVCAR8 and NCI/ADR-Res cell growth. Given that antitubulin drugs are among the most effective agents for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer we sought to validate the results from the 60 cell panel by studying the representative analog 6 utilizing prostate cancer cell lines, as well as exploring the molecular mechanism of the cytotoxic action of this analog. PMID:23956835

  15. Parthenium hysterophorus: A Probable Source of Anticancer, Antioxidant and Anti-HIV Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shashank; Chashoo, Gousia; Saxena, Ajit K.; Pandey, Abhay K.

    2013-01-01

    The present work reports the anticancer, antioxidant, lipo-protective, and anti-HIV activities of phytoconstituents present in P. hysterophorus leaf. Dried leaf samples were sequentially extracted with nonpolar and polar solvents. Ethanol fraction showed noticeable cytotoxic activity (81–85%) in SRB assay against MCF-7 and THP-1 cancer cell lines at 100 μg/ml concentration, while lower activity was observed with DU-145 cell line. The same extract exhibited 17–98% growth inhibition of HL-60 cancer cell lines in MTT assay, showing concentration dependent response. Ethanol extract caused 12% reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and 10% increment in sub G1 population of HL-60 cell lines. Several leaf fractions, namely, ethyl acetate, ethanol, and aqueous fractions exhibited considerable reducing capability at higher concentrations. Most of the extracts demonstrated appreciable (>75%) metal ion chelating and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities at 200 µg/ml. All the extracts except aqueous fraction accounted for about 70–80% inhibition of lipid peroxidation in rat liver homogenate indicating protective response against membrane damage. About 40% inhibition of reverse transcriptase (RT) activity was observed in hexane fraction in anti-HIV assay at 6.0 µg/ml concentration. The study showed that phytochemicals present in P. hysterophorus leaf have considerable potential as cytotoxic and antioxidant agents with low to moderate anti-HIV activity. PMID:24350290

  16. Microencapsulation of lectin anti-cancer agent and controlled release by alginate beads, biosafety approach.

    PubMed

    El-Aassar, M R; Hafez, Elsayed E; El-Deeb, Nehal M; Fouda, Moustafa M G

    2014-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is considered as one of the most aggressive cancer worldwide. In Egypt, the prevalence of HCC is increasing during last years. Recently, drug-loaded microparticles were used to improve the efficiency of various medical treatments. This study is designed to evaluate the anticancer potentialities of lectins against HCC while hinting to its safety usage. The aim is also extended to encapsulate lectins in alginate microbeads for oral drug delivery purposes. The extracted lectins showed anti-proliferative effect against HCC with a percentage of 60.76% by using its nontoxic dose with an up-regulation of P53 gene expression. Concerning the handling of lectin alginate microbeads for oral drug delivery, the prepared lectin alginate beads were ∼100μm in diameter. The efficiency of the microcapsules was checked by scanning electron microscopy, the SEM showed the change on the alginate beads surface revealing the successful lectin encapsulation. The release of lectins from the microbeads depended on a variety of factors as the microbeads forming carriers and the amount-encapsulated lectins. The Pisum sativum extracted lectins may be considered as a promising agent in controlling HCC and this solid dosage form could be suitable for oral administration complemented with/or without the standard HCC drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimizing the restored chemotactic behavior of anticancer agent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium VNP20009.

    PubMed

    Broadway, Katherine M; Suh, Seungbeum; Behkam, Bahareh; Scharf, Birgit E

    2017-06-10

    Bacteria, including strains of Salmonella, have been researched and applied as therapeutic cancer agents for centuries. Salmonella are particularly of interest due to their facultative anaerobic nature, facilitating colonization of differentially oxygenated tumor regions. Additionally, Salmonella can be manipulated with relative ease, resulting in the ability to attenuate the pathogen or engineer vectors for drug delivery. It was recently discovered that the anti-cancer Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain VNP20009 is lacking in chemotactic ability, due to a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism in cheY. Replacing the mutated copy of cheY with the wild-type sequence restored chemotaxis to 70% of the parental strain. We aimed to investigate further if chemotaxis of VNP20009 can be optimized. By restoring the gene msbB in VNP20009 cheY(+), which confers attenuation by lipid A modification, we observed a 9% increase in swimming speed, 13% increase in swim plate performance, 19% increase in microfluidic device partitioning towards the attractant at the optimum concentration gradient, and mitigation of a non-motile cell subpopulation. We conclude that chemotaxis can be enhanced further but at the cost of changing one defining characteristic of VNP20009. A less compromised strain might be needed to employ for investigating bacterial chemotaxis in tumor interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Rescuing chemotaxis of the anticancer agent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium VNP20009.

    PubMed

    Broadway, Katherine M; Denson, Elizabeth A P; Jensen, Roderick V; Scharf, Birgit E

    2015-10-10

    The role of chemotaxis and motility in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium tumor colonization remains unclear. We determined through swim plate assays that the well-established anticancer agent S. Typhimurium VNP20009 is deficient in chemotaxis, and that this phenotype is suppressible. Through genome sequencing, we revealed that VNP20009 and four selected suppressor mutants had a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in cheY causing a mutation in the conserved proline residue at position 110. CheY is the response regulator that interacts with the flagellar motor-switch complex and modulates rotational bias. The four suppressor mutants additionally carried non-synonymous SNPs in fliM encoding a flagellar switch protein. The CheY-P110S mutation in VNP20009 likely rendered the protein unable to interact with FliM, a phenotype that could be suppressed by mutations in FliM. We replaced the mutated cheY in VNP20009 with the wild-type copy and chemotaxis was partially restored. The swim ring of the rescued strain, VNP20009 cheY(+), was 46% the size of the parental strain 14028 swim ring. When tested in capillary assays, VNP20009 cheY(+) was 69% efficient in chemotaxis towards the attractant aspartate as compared to 14028. Potential reasons for the lack of complete restoration and implications for bacterial tumor colonization will be discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)—diclofenac as an anti-cancer agent

    PubMed Central

    Pantziarka, Pan; Sukhatme, Vidula; Bouche, Gauthier; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2016-01-01

    Diclofenac (DCF) is a well-known and widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), with a range of actions which are of interest in an oncological context. While there has long been an interest in the use of NSAIDs in chemoprevention, there is now emerging evidence that such drugs may have activity in a treatment setting. DCF, which is a potent inhibitor of COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 synthesis, displays a range of effects on the immune system, the angiogenic cascade, chemo- and radio-sensitivity and tumour metabolism. Both pre-clinical and clinical evidence of these effects, in multiple cancer types, is assessed and summarised and relevant mechanisms of action outlined. Based on this evidence the case is made for further clinical investigation of the anticancer effects of DCF, particularly in combination with other agents - with a range of possible multi-drug and multi-modality combinations outlined in the supplementary materials accompanying the main paper. PMID:26823679

  20. The role of human cytochrome P450 enzymes in the metabolism of anticancer agents: implications for drug interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Kivistö, K T; Kroemer, H K; Eichelbaum, M

    1995-01-01

    1. Little information is available about the pharmacokinetic interactions of anticancer drugs in man. However, clinically significant drug interactions do occur in cancer chemotherapy, and it is likely that important interactions have not been recognized. 2. Specific cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes have been recently shown to be involved in the metabolism of several essential anticancer agents. In particular, enzymes of the CYP3A subfamily play a role in the metabolism of many anticancer drugs, including epipodophyllotoxins, ifosphamide, tamoxifen, taxol and vinca alkaloids. CYP3A4 has been shown to catalyse the activation of the prodrug ifosphamide, raising the possibility that ifosphamide could be activated in tumour tissues containing this enzyme. 3. As examples of recently found, clinically significant interactions, cyclosporin considerably increases plasma doxorubicin and etoposide concentrations. Although cyclosporin and calcium channel blockers may influence the pharmacokinetics of certain anticancer agents by inhibiting their CYP3A mediated metabolism, it is more likely that these P-glycoprotein inhibitors inhibit P-glycoprotein mediated drug elimination. 4. Appropriate caution should be exercised when combining P-glycoprotein inhibitors and potential CYP3A inhibitors with cancer chemotherapy. PMID:8703657

  1. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Genistein Analogues as Anti-Cancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Pahoua; Wang, Rubing; Zhang, Xiaojie; Torre, Eduardo DeLa; Leon, Francisco; Zhang, Qiang; Zheng, Shilong; Wang, Guangdi; Chen, Qiao-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is a bioactive isoflavone derived from soybeans. The tie-in between the intake of genistein and the decreased incidence of some solid tumors (including prostate cancer) has been demonstrated by epidemiological studies. The potential of genistein in treating prostate cancer has also been displayed by in vitro cell-based and in vivo animal experiments. Genistein has entered clinical trials for both chemoprevention and potential treatment of prostate cancer. Even though the low oral bioavailability has presented the major challenges to genistein’s further clinical development, chemical modulation of genistein holds the promise to generate potential anti-prostate cancer agents with enhanced potency and/or better pharmacokinetic profiles than genistein. As part of our ongoing project to develop natural products-based anti-prostate cancer agents, the current study was undertaken to synthesize eight genistein analogues for cytotoxic evaluation in three prostate cancer cell lines (PC-3, DU-145, LNCaP; both androgen-sensitive and androgen-refractory cell lines), as well as one aggressive cervical cancer cell line (HeLa). Eight genistein analogues have been successfully synthesized with Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction as a key step. Their in vitro anti-cancer potential was evaluated by trypan blue exclusion assay and WST-1 cell proliferation assay against a panel of four human cancer cell lines. The acquired data suggest i) that the C-5 and C-7 hydroxyl groups in genistein are very important for the cytotoxicity and anti-proliferative activity; and ii) that 1-alkyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl and pyridine-3-yl might act as good bioisosteres for the 4'-hydroxyphenyl moiety in genistein. PMID:25991428

  2. Extracellular Matrix-dependent Pathways in Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines Reveal Potential Targets for Anticancer Therapies.

    PubMed

    Stankevicius, Vaidotas; Vasauskas, Gintautas; Noreikiene, Rimante; Kuodyte, Karolina; Valius, Mindaugas; Suziedelis, Kestutis

    2016-09-01

    Cancer cells grown in a 3D culture are more resistant to anticancer therapy treatment compared to those in a monolayer 2D culture. Emerging evidence has suggested that the key reasons for increased cell survival could be gene expression changes in cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction-dependent manner. Global gene-expression changes were obtained in human colorectal carcinoma HT29 and DLD1 cell lines between 2D and laminin-rich (lr) ECM 3D growth conditions by gene-expression microarray analysis. The most significantly altered functional categories were revealed by Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis. The microarray data revealed that 841 and 1190 genes were differentially expressed in colorectal carcinoma DLD1 and HT29 cells. KEGG analysis indicated that the most significantly altered categories were cell adhesion, mitogen-activated protein kinase and immune response. Our results indicate altered pathways related to cancer development and progression and suggest potential ECM-regulated targets for the development of anticancer therapies. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  3. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α ligands as anticancer drugs targeting mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Grabacka, Maja; Pierzchalska, Malgorzata; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cells show metabolic features distinctive from normal tissues, with characteristically enhanced aerobic glycolysis, glutaminolysis and lipid synthesis. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPAR α) is activated by nutrients (fatty acids and their derivatives) and influences these metabolic pathways acting antagonistically to oncogenic Akt and c-Myc. Therefore PPAR α can be regarded as a candidate target molecule in supplementary anticancer pharmacotherapy as well as dietary therapeutic approach. This idea is based on hitting the cancer cell metabolic weak points through PPAR α mediated stimulation of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis with simultaneous reduction of glucose and glutamine consumption. PPAR α activity is induced by fasting and its molecular consequences overlap with the effects of calorie restriction and ketogenic diet (CRKD). CRKD induces increase of NAD+/NADH ratio and drop in ATP/AMP ratio. The first one is the main stimulus for enhanced protein deacetylase SIRT1 activity; the second one activates AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). Both SIRT1 and AMPK exert their major metabolic activities such as fatty acid oxidation and block of glycolysis and protein, nucleotide and fatty acid synthesis through the effector protein peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma 1 α coactivator (PGC-1α). PGC-1α cooperates with PPAR α and their activities might contribute to potential anticancer effects of CRKD, which were reported for various brain tumors. Therefore, PPAR α activation can engage molecular interplay among SIRT1, AMPK, and PGC-1α that provides a new, low toxicity dietary approach supplementing traditional anticancer regimen.

  4. Immune mechanisms regulating pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of PEGylated liposomal anticancer agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gina

    integrated approaches, we were able to identify the immunological mechanisms at the molecular, tissue, and clinical levels that may contribute to inter-individual variability in PK and PD of PLD. This dissertation research has a potential to make an impact on development of future NP-based anticancer therapeutics as well as on clinical use of PLD (DoxilRTM) and other PEGylated liposomal anticancer agents.

  5. Design, synthesis, molecular modeling and biological evaluation of novel 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine derivatives as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Eissa, Ibrahim H; El-Naggar, Abeer M; El-Hashash, Maher A

    2016-08-01

    In trying to develop new anticancer agents, a series of 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine derivatives was designed and synthesized. Fifteen compounds were evaluated in vitro for their anti-proliferative activity against HePG-2, MCF-7, HCT-116, and PC-3 cell lines. Additionally, DNA binding affinity of the synthesized derivatives was investigated as a potential mechanism for the anticancer activity using DNA/methyl green assay and association constants assay. Compounds 19, 20, 21, 24 and 25 exhibited good activity against the four cancer cells comparable to that of doxorubicin. Interestingly, DNA binding assay results were in agreement with that of the cytotoxicity assays where the most potent anticancer compounds showed good DNA binding affinity comparable to that of doxorubicin and daunorubicin. Furthermore, a molecular docking of the tested compounds was carried out to investigate their binding pattern with the prospective target, DNA (PDB-code: 152d). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of naphthalene-based thiosemicarbazone derivatives as new anticancer agents against LNCaP prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Altintop, Mehlika Dilek; Sever, Belgin; Özdemir, Ahmet; Kuş, Gökhan; Oztopcu-Vatan, Pinar; Kabadere, Selda; Kaplancikli, Zafer Asim

    2016-01-01

    Fourteen new naphthalene-based thiosemicarbazone derivatives were designed as anticancer agents against LNCaP human prostate cancer cells and synthesized. MTT assay indicated that compounds 6, 8 and 11 exhibited inhibitory effect on LNCaP cells. Among these compounds, 4-(naphthalen-1-yl)-1-[1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylidene)thiosemicarbazide (6), which caused more than 50% death on LNCaP cells, was chosen for flow cytometric analysis of apoptosis. Flow cytometric analysis pointed out that compound 6 also showed apoptotic effect on LNCaP cells. Compound 6 can be considered as a promising anticancer agent against LNCaP cells owing to its potent cytotoxic activity and apoptotic effect.

  7. Preparation and characterization of novel chitosan–protamine nanoparticles for nucleus-targeted anticancer drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiwei; Hou, Jiahui; Shi, Yijie; Su, Chang; Zhao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that most anticancer drugs commonly show high toxicity to the DNA of tumor cells and exert effects by combining with the DNA or associated enzymes in the nucleus. Most developed drugs are first delivered into the cytoplasm and then transferred to the nucleus through the membrane pores. Sometimes, the transportation of drugs from cytoplasm to nucleus is not efficient and often results in poor therapeutic effects. In this study, we developed special and novel nanoparticles (NPs) made of chitosan and protamine for targeted nuclear capture of drugs to enhance anticancer effects. The anticancer effects of nuclear targeted-delivery of drugs in NPs were also evaluated by investigating cytotoxicity, cellular uptake mechanism, and cell apoptosis on cells. Chitosan–protamine NPs were characterized by good drug entrapment, sustained release, small average particle size, low polydispersity index, and high encapsulation efficiency; and accomplished the efficient nuclear delivery of fluorouracil (5-Fu). Compared with free 5-Fu and 5-Fu-loaded chitosan NPs, treatment of A549 cells and HeLa cells with 5-Fu-loaded chitosan–protamine NPs showed the highest cytotoxicity and further induced the significant apoptosis of cells. In addition, 5-Fu-loaded chitosan–protamine NPs exhibited the best efficiency in inhibiting tumor growth than the other three formulations. 5-Fu-loaded chitosan–protamine NPs enhanced antitumor efficacy through the targeted nuclear capture of drugs and showed promising potential as a nanodelivery system for quickly locating drugs in the nucleus of cells. PMID:27881917

  8. Post-marketing research and its outcome for novel anticancer agents approved by both the FDA and EMA between 2005 and 2010: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Zeitoun, Jean-David; Baron, Gabriel; Vivot, Alexandre; Atal, Ignacio; Downing, Nicholas S; Ross, Joseph S; Ravaud, Philippe

    2017-09-20

    Post-marketing research in oncology has rarely been described. We aimed to characterize post-marketing trials for a consistent set of anticancer agents over a long period. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of post-marketing trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov through September 2014 for novel anticancer agents approved by both the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency between 2005 and 2010. All relevant post-marketing trials were classified according to indication, primary outcome, starting date, sponsors, and planned enrollment. Supplemental indications were retrieved from regulatory documents and publication rate was assessed by two different methods. Ten novel anticancer agents were eligible: five were indicated for hematologic malignancies and the remaining five for solid cancers (three for kidney cancer). We identified 2345 post-marketing trials; 1362 (58.1%) targeted an indication other than the originally approved one. We observed extreme variations among drugs in both number of post-marketing trials [range 8-530] and overall population to be enrolled per trial [1-8381]. Post-marketing trials assessed almost all types of cancers, the three most frequently studied cancers being leukemia, kidney cancer and myeloma. In all, 6.6% of post-marketing trials had a clinical endpoint as a primary outcome, and 35.9% and 54.1% had a safety or surrogate endpoint, respectively, as a primary outcome. Nine drugs obtained approval for supplemental indications. The publication rate at 10 years was 12.3% to 26.1% depending on the analysis method. In conclusion, we found that post-marketing research in oncology is highly heterogeneous and the publication rate of launched trials is low. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 UICC.

  9. A DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drug CY190602 with significantly enhanced anticancer potency.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan; Ding, Hongyu; Li, Xiaoxi; Pallasch, Christian P; Hong, Liya; Guo, Dianwu; Chen, Yi; Wang, Difei; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yajie; Hemann, Michael T; Jiang, Hai

    2015-03-09

    Genotoxic drugs constitute a major treatment modality for human cancers; however, cancer cells' intrinsic DNA repair capability often increases the threshold of lethality and renders these drugs ineffective. The emerging roles of HDACs in DNA repair provide new opportunities for improving traditional genotoxic drugs. Here, we report the development and characterization of CY190602, a novel bendamustine-derived drug with significantly enhanced anticancer potency. We show that CY190602's enhanced potency can be attributed to its newly gained ability to inhibit HDACs. Using this novel DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drug as a tool, we further explored HDAC's role in DNA repair. We found that HDAC activities are essential for the expression of several genes involved in DNA synthesis and repair, including TYMS, Tip60, CBP, EP300, and MSL1. Importantly, CY190602, the first-in-class example of such DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drugs, exhibited significantly enhanced anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. These findings provide rationales for incorporating HDAC inhibitory moieties into genotoxic drugs, so as to overcome the repair capacity of cancer cells. Systematic development of similar DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drugs may represent a novel opportunity for improving cancer therapy.

  10. Folate-conjugated boron nitride nanospheres for targeted delivery of anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shini; Zhang, Huijie; Yan, Ting; Huang, Dandi; Zhi, Chunyi; Nakanishi, Hideki; Gao, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    With its unique physical and chemical properties and structural similarity to carbon, boron nitride (BN) has attracted considerable attention and found many applications. Biomedical applications of BN have recently started to emerge, raising great hopes in drug and gene delivery. Here, we developed a targeted anticancer drug delivery system based on folate-conjugated BN nanospheres (BNNS) with receptor-mediated targeting. Folic acid (FA) was successfully grafted onto BNNS via esterification reaction. In vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that BNNS-FA complexes were non-toxic to HeLa cells up to a concentration of 100 μg/mL. Then, doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), a commonly used anticancer drug, was loaded onto BNNS-FA complexes. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes were stable at pH 7.4 but effectively released DOX at pH 5.0, which exhibited a pH sensitive and sustained release pattern. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes could be recognized and specifically internalized by HeLa cells via FA receptor-mediated endocytosis. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes exhibited greater cytotoxicity to HeLa cells than free DOX and BNNS/DOX complexes due to the increased cellular uptake of DOX mediated by the FA receptor. Therefore, BNNS-FA complexes had strong potential for targeted cancer therapy. PMID:27695318

  11. Lentiviral Vector-based Insertional Mutagenesis Identifies Genes Involved in the Resistance to Targeted Anticancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ranzani, Marco; Annunziato, Stefano; Calabria, Andrea; Brasca, Stefano; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Gallina, Pierangela; Naldini, Luigi; Montini, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    The high transduction efficiency of lentiviral vectors in a wide variety of cells makes them an ideal tool for forward genetics screenings addressing issues of cancer research. Although molecular targeted therapies have provided significant advances in tumor treatment, relapses often occur by the expansion of tumor cell clones carrying mutations that confer resistance. Identification of the culprits of anticancer drug resistance is fundamental for the achievement of long-term response. Here, we developed a new lentiviral vector-based insertional mutagenesis screening to identify genes that confer resistance to clinically relevant targeted anticancer therapies. By applying this genome-wide approach to cell lines representing two subtypes of HER2+ breast cancer, we identified 62 candidate lapatinib resistance genes. We validated the top ranking genes, i.e., PIK3CA and PIK3CB, by showing that their forced expression confers resistance to lapatinib in vitro and found that their mutation/overexpression is associated to poor prognosis in human breast tumors. Then, we successfully applied this approach to the identification of erlotinib resistance genes in pancreatic cancer, thus showing the intrinsic versatility of the approach. The acquired knowledge can help identifying combinations of targeted drugs to overcome the occurrence of resistance, thus opening new horizons for more effective treatment of tumors. PMID:25195596

  12. Folate-conjugated boron nitride nanospheres for targeted delivery of anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shini; Zhang, Huijie; Yan, Ting; Huang, Dandi; Zhi, Chunyi; Nakanishi, Hideki; Gao, Xiao-Dong

    With its unique physical and chemical properties and structural similarity to carbon, boron nitride (BN) has attracted considerable attention and found many applications. Biomedical applications of BN have recently started to emerge, raising great hopes in drug and gene delivery. Here, we developed a targeted anticancer drug delivery system based on folate-conjugated BN nanospheres (BNNS) with receptor-mediated targeting. Folic acid (FA) was successfully grafted onto BNNS via esterification reaction. In vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that BNNS-FA complexes were non-toxic to HeLa cells up to a concentration of 100 μg/mL. Then, doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), a commonly used anticancer drug, was loaded onto BNNS-FA complexes. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes were stable at pH 7.4 but effectively released DOX at pH 5.0, which exhibited a pH sensitive and sustained release pattern. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes could be recognized and specifically internalized by HeLa cells via FA receptor-mediated endocytosis. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes exhibited greater cytotoxicity to HeLa cells than free DOX and BNNS/DOX complexes due to the increased cellular uptake of DOX mediated by the FA receptor. Therefore, BNNS-FA complexes had strong potential for targeted cancer therapy.

  13. A DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drug CY190602 with significantly enhanced anticancer potency

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chuan; Ding, Hongyu; Li, Xiaoxi; Pallasch, Christian P; Hong, Liya; Guo, Dianwu; Chen, Yi; Wang, Difei; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yajie; Hemann, Michael T; Jiang, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic drugs constitute a major treatment modality for human cancers; however, cancer cells' intrinsic DNA repair capability often increases the threshold of lethality and renders these drugs ineffective. The emerging roles of HDACs in DNA repair provide new opportunities for improving traditional genotoxic drugs. Here, we report the development and characterization of CY190602, a novel bendamustine-derived drug with significantly enhanced anticancer potency. We show that CY190602's enhanced potency can be attributed to its newly gained ability to inhibit HDACs. Using this novel DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drug as a tool, we further explored HDAC's role in DNA repair. We found that HDAC activities are essential for the expression of several genes involved in DNA synthesis and repair, including TYMS, Tip60, CBP, EP300, and MSL1. Importantly, CY190602, the first-in-class example of such DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drugs, exhibited significantly enhanced anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. These findings provide rationales for incorporating HDAC inhibitory moieties into genotoxic drugs, so as to overcome the repair capacity of cancer cells. Systematic development of similar DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drugs may represent a novel opportunity for improving cancer therapy. PMID:25759362

  14. PEGylated anticancer-carbon nanotubes complex targeting mitochondria of lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Lee, Yeon Kyung; Lee, Jong Yeon; Hong, Jeong Hee; Khang, Dongwoo

    2017-09-13

    Although activating apoptosis in cancer cells by targeting the mitochondria is an effective strategy for cancer therapy, insufficient targeting of the mitochondria in cancer cells restricts the availability in clinical treatment. Here, we report on a polyethylene glycol-coated carbon nanotube-ABT737 nanodrug that improves the mitochondrial targeting of lung cancer cells. The polyethylene glycol-coated carbon nanotube-ABT737 nanodrug internalized into the early endosomes via macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis in advance of early endosomal escape and delivered into the mitochondria. Cytosol release of nanodrug led to apoptosis of lung cancer cells by abruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, inducing Bcl-2-mediated apoptosis and generating intracellular reactive oxygen species. As such, this study provides an effective strategy for increasing the anti-lung cancer efficacy by increasing mitochondria accumulation rate of cytosol released anticancer nanodrugs. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  15. Iron(III)-binding of the anticancer agents doxorubicin and vosaroxin.

    PubMed

    Mjos, Katja Dralle; Cawthray, Jacqueline F; Jamieson, Gene; Fox, Judith A; Orvig, Chris

    2015-02-07

    The Fe(iii)-binding constant of vosaroxin, an anticancer quinolone derivative, has been determined spectrophotometrically and compared with the analogous Fe(iii) complex formed with doxorubicin. The in vivo metabolic stability and iron coordination properties of the quinolones compared to the anthracylines may provide significant benefit to cardiovascular safety. The mechanism of action of both molecules target the topoisomerase II enzyme. Both doxorubicin (Hdox, log βFeL3 = 33.41, pM = 17.0) and vosaroxin (Hvox, log βFeL3 = 33.80(3), pM = 15.9) bind iron(iii) with comparable strength; at physiological pH however, [Fe(vox)3] is the predominant species in contrast to a mixture of species observed for the Fe:dox system. Iron(iii) nitrate and gallium(iii) nitrate at a 1 : 3 ratio with vosaroxin formed stable tris(vosaroxacino)-iron(iii) and tris(vosaroxino)gallium(iii) complexes that were isolated and characterized. Their redox behavior was studied by CV, and their stereochemistry was further explored in temperature dependent (1)H NMR studies. The molecular pharmacology of their interaction with iron(iii) may be one possible differentiation in the safety profile of quinolones compared to anthracyclines in relation to cardiotoxicity.

  16. Network Pharmacology Strategies Toward Multi-Target Anticancer Therapies: From Computational Models to Experimental Design Principles

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jing; Aittokallio, Tero

    2014-01-01

    Polypharmacology has emerged as novel means in drug discovery for improving treatment response in clinical use. However, to really capitalize on the polypharmacological effects of drugs, there is a critical need to better model and understand how the complex interactions between drugs and their cellular targets contribute to drug efficacy and possible side effects. Network graphs provide a convenient modeling framework for dealing with the fact that most drugs act on cellular systems through targeting multiple proteins both through on-target and off-target binding. Network pharmacology models aim at addressing questions such as how and where in the disease network should one target to inhibit disease phenotypes, such as cancer growth, ideally leading to therapies that are less vulnerable to drug resistance and side effects by means of attacking the disease network at the systems level through synergistic and synthetic lethal interactions. Since the exponentially increasing number of potential drug target combinations makes pure experimental approach quickly unfeasible, this review depicts a number of computational models and algorithms that can effectively reduce the search space for determining the most promising combinations for experimental evaluation. Such computational-experimental strategies are geared toward realizing the full potential of multi-target treatments in different disease phenotypes. Our specific focus is on system-level network approaches to polypharmacology designs in anticancer drug discovery, where we give representative examples of how network-centric modeling may offer systematic strategies toward better understanding and even predicting the phenotypic responses to multi-target therapies.

  17. Design, synthesis, and anticancer activity of novel berberine derivatives prepared via CuAAC “click” chemistry as potential anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Yan, Tian-Hua; Yan, Lan; Li, Qian; Wang, Rui-Lian; Hu, Zhen-Lin; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Sun, Qing-Yan; Cao, Yong-Bing

    2014-01-01

    A series of novel derivatives of phenyl-substituted berberine triazolyls has been designed and synthesized via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition click chemistry in an attempt to develop antitumor agents. All of the compounds were evaluated for anticancer activity against a panel of three human cancer cell lines, including MCF-7 (breast), SW-1990 (pancreatic), and SMMC-7721 (liver) and the noncancerous human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) cell lines. The results indicated that most of the compounds displayed notable anticancer activities against the MCF-7 cells compared with berberine. Among these derivatives, compound 16 showed the most potent inhibitory activity against the SW-1990 and SMMC-7721 cell lines, with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 8.54±1.97 μM and 11.87±1.83 μM, respectively. Compound 36 exhibited the most potent inhibitory activity against the MCF-7 cell line, with an IC50 value of 12.57±1.96 μM. Compound 16 and compound 36 exhibited low cytotoxicity in the HUVEC cell line, with IC50 values of 25.49±3.24 μM and 30.47±3.47 μM. Furthermore, compounds 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 32, and 36 exhibited much better selectivity than berberine toward the normal cell line HUVEC. PMID:25120353

  18. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of estradiol-chlorambucil hybrids as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Atul; Saha, Pijus; Descôteaux, Caroline; Leblanc, Valérie; Asselin, Eric; Bérubé, Gervais

    2010-03-01

    A series of estradiol-chlorambucil hybrids was synthesized as anticancer drugs for site-directed chemotherapy of breast cancer. The novel compounds were synthesized in good yields through efficient modifications of estrone at position 16alpha of the steroid nucleus. The newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for their anticancer efficacy in different hormone-dependent and hormone-independent breast cancer cell lines. The novel hybrids showed significant in vitro anticancer activity when compared to chlorambucil. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) reveals the influence of the length of the spacer chain between carrier and drug molecule. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. New Pyrazolopyrimidine Inhibitors of Protein Kinase D as Potent Anticancer Agents for Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Manuj; Johnson, James; Li, Zhihong; Xu, Shuping; Wipf, Peter; Wang, Qiming Jane

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of protein kinase D (PKD) as a potential therapeutic target for several diseases including cancer has triggered the search for potent, selective, and cell-permeable small molecule inhibitors. In this study, we describe the identification, in vitro characterization, structure-activity analysis, and biological evaluation of a novel PKD inhibitory scaffold exemplified by 1-naphthyl PP1 (1-NA-PP1). 1-NA-PP1 and IKK-16 were identified as pan-PKD inhibitors in a small-scale targeted kinase inhibitor library assay. Both screening hits inhibited PKD isoforms at about 100 nM and were ATP-competitive inhibitors. Analysis of several related kinases indicated that 1-NA-PP1 was highly selective for PKD as compared to IKK-16. SAR analysis showed that 1-NA-PP1 was considerably more potent and showed distinct substituent effects at the pyrazolopyrimidine core. 1-NA-PP1 was cell-active, and potently blocked prostate cancer cell proliferation by inducing G2/M arrest. It also potently blocked the migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells, demonstrating promising anticancer activities on multiple fronts. Overexpression of PKD1 or PKD3 almost completely reversed the growth arrest and the inhibition of tumor cell invasion caused by 1-NA-PP1, indicating that its anti-proliferative and anti-invasive activities were mediated through the inhibition of PKD. Interestingly, a 12-fold increase in sensitivity to 1-NA-PP1 could be achieved by engineering a gatekeeper mutation in the active site of PKD1, suggesting that 1-NA-PP1 could be paired with the analog-sensitive PKD1M659G for dissecting PKD-specific functions and signaling pathways in various biological systems. PMID:24086585

  20. Indolin-2-one compounds targeting thioredoxin reductase as potential anticancer drug leads

    PubMed Central

    Kaminska, Kamila K.; Bertrand, Helene C.; Tajima, Hisashi; Stafford, William C.; Cheng, Qing; Chen, Wan; Wells, Geoffrey; Arner, Elias S.J.; Chew, Eng-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Several compounds bearing the indolinone chemical scaffold are known to possess anticancer properties. For example, the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib is an arylideneindolin-2-one compound. The chemical versatility associated with structural modifications of indolinone compounds underlies the potential to discover additional derivatives possessing anticancer properties. Previously synthesized 3-(2-oxoethylidene)indolin-2-one compounds, also known as supercinnamaldehyde (SCA) compounds in reference to the parent compound 1 [1-methyl-3(2-oxopropylidene)indolin-2-one], bear a nitrogen-linked α,β-unsaturated carbonyl (Michael acceptor) moiety. Here we found that analogs bearing N-substituents, in particular compound 4 and 5 carrying an N-butyl and N-benzyl substituent, respectively, were strongly cytotoxic towards human HCT 116 colorectal and MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells. These compounds also displayed strong thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) inhibitory activity that was likely attributed to the electrophilicity of the Michael acceptor moiety. Their selectivity towards cellular TrxR inhibition over related antioxidant enzymes glutathione reductase (GR), thioredoxin (Trx) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) was mediated through targeting of the selenocysteine (Sec) residue in the highly accessible C-terminal active site of TrxR. TrxR inhibition mediated by indolin-2-one compounds led to cellular Trx oxidation, increased oxidative stress and activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1). These events also led to activation of p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, and cell death with apoptotic features of PARP cleavage and caspase 3 activation. In conclusion, these results suggest that indolin-2-one-based compounds specifically targeting TrxR may serve as novel drug leads for anticancer therapy. PMID:27244886

  1. Cytotoxicity and neurocytotoxicity of new marine anticancer agents evaluated using in vitro assays.

    PubMed

    Geldof, A A; Mastbergen, S C; Henrar, R E; Faircloth, G T

    1999-01-01

    New classes of anticancer drugs, isolated from marine organisms, have been shown to possess cytotoxic activity against multiple tumor types. Aplidine, didemnin B, and isohomohalichondrin B (IHB), among the more promising antitumor candidates, have been evaluated in the present study on a comparative basis in terms of their antiproliferative activity and neurotoxic effects in vitro. Using a panel of different human, prostatic cancer cell lines (DU 145, PC-3 and LNCaP-FGC) the effects of Aplidine, didemnin B, and IHB on tumor cell proliferation were tested in a colorimetric (XTT) assay and compared with the effects of vincristine, vinorelbine, and Taxol. Under analogous in vitro conditions these drugs were also monitored for neurocytotoxic effects using a PC 12 cell line based model. Didemnin B and - especially - Aplidine were more effective in the inhibition of prostate cancer cell proliferation than vincristine, vinorelbine or Taxol at concentration levels between 5 and 50 pmol/ml. At these same concentrations, however, Didemnin B and Aplidine were also most potent in the in vitro neurotoxicity assays. IHB was found to exert even more potent antiproliferative activity (at concentration levels between 0.05 and 0.1 pmol/ml). However, neurotoxic effects were also found to be present at these levels. After drug withdrawal, the neurotoxic damage, inflicted by aplidine or IHB appeared to be more long lasting than after vincristine or vinorelbine exposure. These results point to high antiproliferative activity of aplidine and IHB in prostate cancer. At the same time, the data urge some caution in the clinical use of these agents because of potential neurotoxic side-effects. The use of a newly formulated Aplidine may involve a more favorable therapeutic profile.

  2. Treatment with oral anticancer agents: symptom severity and attribution, and interference with comorbidity management.

    PubMed

    Spoelstra, Sandra L; Given, Charles W; Sikorskii, Alla; Majumder, Atreyee; Schueller, Monica; Given, Barbara A

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence, severity, and attribution of symptoms, as well as the interference with management of comorbidities, in patients who have been prescribed oral anticancer agents (OAs). Descriptive exploratory study. A comprehensive cancer center and two community-based oncology programs in the midwestern United States. 30 adults undergoing OA treatment. Five phone interviews were conducted during eight weeks. Linear mixed effects and generalized estimating equations were used to examine symptoms and interference over time. Symptoms and comorbid conditions. The mean age of participants was 65.1 years. Fifteen participants were female, 25 were Caucasian, and 23 had comorbidities. Twenty-one patients had late-stage cancer, and rates of adherence were 90%. Fatigue, sleep disturbance, and numbness or tingling in hands and feet were highly prevalent symptoms. Younger age was associated with higher symptom severity (p < 0.01) and interference (p = 0.01). Patients with more comorbidities tended to report higher symptom severity. Simultaneous IV chemotherapy was not a predictor of symptom severity or interference over age and comorbidity. Symptoms were most frequently attributed to cancer and its treatment. Patients with a greater number of comorbidities were more likely to include comorbidities in symptom attribution and reported interference from the OA with managing comorbid conditions. Symptoms may be more severe in patients prescribed OAs who are younger and have comorbid conditions. More comorbidities and absence of simultaneous IV chemotherapy increased the likelihood of inclusion of chronic conditions in symptom attribution. Patients reported that OA treatment interfered with comorbidity management. Nurses need to take comorbidities into account when caring for patients prescribed OAs because the chronic conditions may influence symptom severity and the ability to manage symptoms.

  3. The in vitro metabolism of phospho-sulindac amide, a novel potential anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Xie, Gang; Cheng, Ka-Wing; Huang, Liqun; Rigas, Basil

    2014-09-15

    Phospho-sulindac amide (PSA) is a novel potential anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory agent. Here we report the metabolism of PSA in vitro. PSA was rapidly hydroxylated at its butane-phosphate moiety to form two di-hydroxyl-PSA and four mono-hydroxyl-PSA metabolites in mouse and human liver microsomes. PSA also can be oxidized or reduced at its sulindac moiety to form PSA sulfone and PSA sulfide, respectively. PSA was mono-hydroxylated and cleared more rapidly in mouse liver microsomes than in human liver microsomes. Of eight major human cytochrome P450s (CYPs), CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 exclusively catalyzed the hydroxylation and sulfoxidation reactions of PSA, respectively. We also examined the metabolism of PSA by three major human flavin monooxygenases (FMOs). FMO1, FMO3 and FMO5 were all capable of catalyzing the sulfoxidation (but not hydroxylation) of PSA, with FMO1 being by far the most active isoform. PSA was predominantly sulfoxidized in human kidney microsomes because FMO1 is the dominant isoform in human kidney. PSA (versus sulindac) is a preferred substrate of both CYPs and FMOs, likely because of its greater lipophilicity and masked-COOH group. Ketoconazole (a CYP3A4 inhibitor) and alkaline pH strongly inhibited the hydroxylation of PSA, but moderately suppressed its sulfoxidation in liver microsomes. Together, our results establish the metabolic pathways of PSA, identify the major enzymes mediating its biotransformations and reveal significant inter-species and inter-tissue differences in its metabolism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The in vitro metabolism of phospho-sulindac amide, a novel potential anticancer agent

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Gang; Cheng, Ka-Wing; Huang, Liqun; Rigas, Basil

    2014-01-01

    Phospho-sulindac amide (PSA) is a novel potential anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory agent. Here we report the metabolism of PSA in vitro. PSA was rapidly hydroxylated at its butane-phosphate moiety to form two di-hydroxyl-PSA and four mono-hydroxyl-PSA metabolites in mouse and human liver microsomes. PSA also can be oxidized or reduced at its sulindac moiety to form PSA sulfone and PSA sulfide, respectively. PSA was mono-hydroxylated and cleared more rapidly in mouse liver microsomes than in human liver microsomes. Of eight major human cytochrome P450s (CYPs), CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 exclusively catalyzed the hydroxylation and sulfoxidation reactions of PSA, respectively. We also examined the metabolism of PSA by three major human flavin monooxygenases (FMOs). FMO1, FMO3 and FMO5 were all capable of catalyzing the sulfoxidation (but not hydroxylation) of PSA, with FMO1 being by far the most active isoform. PSA was predominantly sulfoxidized in human kidney microsomes because FMO1 is the dominant isoform in human kidney. PSA (versus sulindac) is a preferred substrate of both CYPs and FMOs, likely because of its greater lipophilicity and masked –COOH group. Ketoconazole (a CYP3A4 inhibitor) and alkaline pH strongly inhibited the hydroxylation of PSA, but moderately suppressed its sulfoxidation in liver microsomes. Together, our results establish the metabolic pathways of PSA, identify the major enzymes mediating its biotransformations and reveal significant inter-species and inter-tissue differences in its metabolism. PMID:25044307

  5. Multi-target pursuit formation of multi-agent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jing; Guan, Xin-Ping; Luo, Xiao-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to design a team of agents that can accomplish multi-target pursuit formation using a developed leader—follower strategy. It is supposed that every target can accept a certain number of agents. First, each agent can automatically choose its target based on the distance from the agent to the target and the number of agents accepted by the target. In view of the fact that all agents are randomly dispersed in the workplace at the initial time, we present a numbering strategy for them. During the movement of agents, not every agent can always obtain pertinent state information about the targets. So, a developed leader—follower strategy and a pursuit formation algorithm are proposed. Under the proposed method, agents with the same target can maintain a circle formation. Furthermore, it turns out that the pursuit formation algorithm for agents to the desired formation is convergent. Simulation studies are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. One-carbon metabolism and nucleotide biosynthesis as attractive targets for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Shuvalov, Oleg; Petukhov, Alexey; Daks, Alexandra; Fedorova, Olga; Vasileva, Elena; Barlev, Nickolai A

    2017-02-03

    Cancer-related metabolism has recently emerged as one of the "hallmarks of cancer". It has several important features, including altered metabolism of glucose and glutamine. Importantly, altered cancer metabolism connects different biochemical pathways into the one fine-tuned metabolic network, which stimulates high proliferation rates and plasticity to malignant cells. Among the keystones of cancer metabolism are one-carbon metabolism and nucleotide biosynthesis, which provide building blocks to anabolic reactions. Accordingly, the importance of these metabolic pathways for anticancer therapy has well been documented by more than fifty years of clinical use of specific metabolic inhibitors - methotrexate and nucleotides analogs. In this review we discuss one-carbon metabolism and nucleotide biosynthesis as common and specific features of many, if not all, tumors. The key enzymes involved in these pathways also represent promising anti-cancer therapeutic targets. We review different aspects of these metabolic pathways including their biochemistry, compartmentalization and expression of the key enzymes and their regulation at different levels. We also discuss the effects of known inhibitors of these pathways as well as the recent data on other enzymes of the same pathways as perspective pharmacological targets.

  7. Discovery of potent and selective inhibitors of ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3 related (ATR) protein kinase as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Jean-Damien; Durrant, Steven J; Golec, Julian M C; Kay, David P; Knegtel, Ronald M A; MacCormick, Somhairle; Mortimore, Michael; O'Donnell, Michael E; Pinder, Joanne L; Reaper, Philip M; Rutherford, Alistair P; Wang, Paul S H; Young, Stephen C; Pollard, John R

    2011-04-14

    DNA-damaging agents are among the most frequently used anticancer drugs. However, they provide only modest benefit in most cancers. This may be attributed to a genome maintenance network, the DNA damage response (DDR), that recognizes and repairs damaged DNA. ATR is a major regulator of the DDR and an attractive anticancer target. Herein, we describe the discovery of a series of aminopyrazines with potent and selective ATR inhibition. Compound 45 inhibits ATR with a K(i) of 6 nM, shows >600-fold selectivity over related kinases ATM or DNA-PK, and blocks ATR signaling in cells with an IC(50) of 0.42 μM. Using this compound, we show that ATR inhibition markedly enhances death induced by DNA-damaging agents in certain cancers but not normal cells. This differential response between cancer and normal cells highlights the great potential for ATR inhibition as a novel mechanism to dramatically increase the efficacy of many established drugs and ionizing radiation.

  8. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor A Ligands as Anticancer Drugs Targeting Mitochondrial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Grabacka, Maja; Pierzchalska, Malgorzata; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Tumor cells show metabolic features distinctive from normal tissues, with characteristically enhanced aerobic glycolysis, glutaminolysis and lipid synthesis. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPAR α) is activated by nutrients (fatty acids and their derivatives) and influences these metabolic pathways acting antagonistically to oncogenic Akt and c-Myc. Therefore PPAR α can be regarded as a candidate target molecule in supplementary anticancer pharmacotherapy as well as dietary therapeutic approach. This idea is based on hitting the cancer cell metabolic weak points through PPAR α mediated stimulation of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis with simultaneous reduction of glucose and glutamine consumption. PPAR α activity is induced by fasting and its molecular consequences overlap with the effects of calorie restriction and ketogenic diet (CRKD). CRKD induces increase of NAD+/NADH ratio and drop in ATP/AMP ratio. The first one is the main stimulus for enhanced protein deacetylase SIRT1 activity; the second one activates AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). Both SIRT1 and AMPK exert their major metabolic activities such as fatty acid oxidation and block of glycolysis and protein, nucleotide and fatty acid synthesis through the effector protein peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma 1 α coactivator (PGC-1α). PGC-1α cooperates with PPAR α and their activities might contribute to potential anticancer effects of CRKD, which were reported for various brain tumors. Therefore, PPAR α activation can engage molecular interplay among SIRT1, AMPK, and PGC-1α that provides a new, low toxicity dietary approach supplementing traditional anticancer regimen. PMID:21133850

  9. Molecular explorations of substituted 2-(4-phenylquinolin-2-yl) phenols as phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors and anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Alagumuthu, Manikandan; Arumugam, Sivakumar

    2017-02-01

    Substituted 2-(4-phenylquinolin-2-yl) phenols (PQPDs) emerged as the inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and anticancer agents. PI3K inhibition was assessed by competitive ELISA. Anticancer activity was evaluated against breast cancer (MCF-7), skin cancer (G-361), and colon cancer (HCT 116) cell lines. In PI3 Kinase assay, PQPDs 4c, 4d, and 4k were inactive with IC50 >5 µM. IC50 for 4a, 4b, 4f-h, and 4j was ≥0.05 µM. Rest PQPDs IC50 was <1.0 µM. Anticancer activity found selective toward breast cancer (MCF-7); 4a, 4b, and 4j were showed excellent inhibitory (73.95, 68.36, and 70.06%) and IC50 1.16 µM (4a), 2.07 µM (4b), 1.021 µM (4f) and 1.981 µM (4j) while the standard (Doxorubicin) found with IC50 1.812 µM (72% inhibition). PQPDs were docked into the active site of PI3 Kinase p110α (PDB ID: 2RD0). Docking results suggested the hydrophobic interactions in PI3K binding pocket conquered affinity of the most favorable binding ligands [4a, 4b: inhibitory constant (ki) = 53.33, 41.23 pM]. PI3K assay and cancer cell line experimental results ensured that the inhibitory and anticancer activity potentials of PQPDs are more selective toward breast cancer treatments. PQPDs 4a, 4b, 4f, 4g, and 4j were displayed potent PI3 Kinase and anticancer activities. SAR studies demonstrated PQPDs as the PI3K precise inhibitors with the impending to treat various cancers.

  10. Synthesis, crystallographic characterization and electrochemical property of a copper(II) complex of the anticancer agent elesclomol.

    PubMed

    Vo, Nha Huu; Xia, Zhiqiang; Hanko, Jason; Yun, Tong; Bloom, Steve; Shen, Jianhua; Koya, Keizo; Sun, Lijun; Chen, Shoujun

    2014-01-01

    Elesclomol is a novel anticancer agent that has been evaluated in a number of late stage clinical trials. A new and convenie