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Sample records for anticancer therapeutics targeting

  1. Anticancer strategies based on the metabolic profile of tumor cells: therapeutic targeting of the Warburg effect

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi-sha; Li, Lan-ya; Guan, Yi-di; Yang, Jin-ming; Cheng, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells rely mainly on glycolysis for energy production even in the presence of sufficient oxygen, a phenomenon termed the Warburg effect, which is the most outstanding characteristic of energy metabolism in cancer cells. This metabolic adaptation is believed to be critical for tumor cell growth and proliferation, and a number of onco-proteins and tumor suppressors, including the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, Myc, hypoxia-inducible factor and p53, are involved in the regulation of this metabolic adaptation. Moreover, glycolytic cancer cells are often invasive and impervious to therapeutic intervention. Thus, altered energy metabolism is now appreciated as a hallmark of cancer and a promising target for cancer treatment. A better understanding of the biology and the regulatory mechanisms of aerobic glycolysis has the potential to facilitate the development of glycolysis-based therapeutic interventions for cancer. In addition, glycolysis inhibition combined with DNA damaging drugs or chemotherapeutic agents may be effective anticancer strategies through weakening cell damage repair capacity and enhancing drug cytotoxicity. PMID:27374491

  2. The Applications of Targeting Anti-Cancer Agents in Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guang-Chun; Yang, Xu; Yu, Yan; Zhao, Dai-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Anti-cancer targeting drugs appear to be a new and powerful "weapon" for cancer therapies. These targeting drugs are directed against specific molecules that are over-expressed or where certain unique factors are aberrantly expressed either in cancer cells or in diseased cell sites. Compared with traditional chemotherapeutic drugs, these targeting drugs have the advantages of high specificity, efficacy and less side effects. Target therapy is a breakthrough and revolutionary advance in the field of cancer therapy. Tumor angiogenesis plays a key role in tumor growth and metastasis and the mutation of tyrosine kinases is also strongly associated with cancer progression. Thus, in this review, we will discuss the advances in the development of targeting anti-cancer drugs by narrowing it down to small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptors belonging to the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases and angiogenic inhibitors. It will also address concerns for drug resistance and adverse events.

  3. Histone/protein deacetylase SIRT1 is an anticancer therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Bor-Jang; Madabushi, Amrita; Jin, Jin; Lin, Shiou-Yuh S; Lu, A-Lien

    2014-01-01

    SIRT1, a member of the NAD+-dependent histone/protein deacetylase family, is involved in chromatin remodeling, DNA repair, and stress response and is a potential drug target. 5-fluorouracil (FU) and the SN1-type DNA methylating agent temozolomide (TMZ) are anticancer agents. In this study, we demonstrate that sirt1 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblast cells are more sensitive to FU and DNA methylating agents than normal cells. Based on these findings, the chemotherapy efficacy of SIRT1 inhibitors in combination with FU or TMZ were tested with human breast cancer cells. We found that treatments combining SIRT1 inhibitors with FU or TMZ show synergistic reduction of cell viability and colony formation of breast cancer cells. Thus, inhibition of SIRT1 activity provides a novel anticancer strategy. PMID:24959376

  4. Targeting MKK3 as a novel anticancer strategy: molecular mechanisms and therapeutical implications

    PubMed Central

    Baldari, S; Ubertini, V; Garufi, A; D'Orazi, G; Bossi, G

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3 (MAP2K3, MKK3) is a member of the dual specificity protein kinase group that belongs to the MAP kinase kinase family. This kinase is activated by mitogenic or stress-inducing stimuli and participates in the MAP kinase-mediated signaling cascade, leading to cell proliferation and survival. Several studies highlighted a critical role for MKK3 in tumor progression and invasion, and we previously identified MKK3 as transcriptional target of mutant (mut) p53 to sustain cell proliferation and survival, thus rendering MKK3 a promising target for anticancer therapies. Here, we found that targeting MKK3 with RNA interference, in both wild-type (wt) and mutp53-carrying cells, induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagy that, respectively, contributed to stabilize wtp53 and degrade mutp53. MKK3 depletion reduced cancer cell proliferation and viability, whereas no significant effects were observed in normal cellular context. Noteworthy, MKK3 depletion in combination with chemotherapeutic agents increased tumor cell response to the drugs, in both wtp53 and mutp53 cancer cells, as demonstrated by enhanced poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and reduced clonogenic ability in vitro. In addition, MKK3 depletion reduced tumor growth and improved biological response to chemotherapeutic in vivo. The overall results indicate MKK3 as a novel promising molecular target for the development of more efficient anticancer treatments in both wtp53- and mutp53-carrying tumors. PMID:25633290

  5. Development of synthetic lethality anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fang, Bingliang

    2014-10-01

    The concept of synthetic lethality (the creation of a lethal phenotype from the combined effects of mutations in two or more genes) has recently been exploited in various efforts to develop new genotype-selective anticancer therapeutics. These efforts include screening for novel anticancer agents, identifying novel therapeutic targets, characterizing mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapy, and improving efficacies through the rational design of combination therapy. This review discusses recent developments in synthetic lethality anticancer therapeutics, including poly ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitors for BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutant cancers, checkpoint inhibitors for p53 mutant cancers, and small molecule agents targeting RAS gene mutant cancers. Because cancers are caused by mutations in multiple genes and abnormalities in multiple signaling pathways, synthetic lethality for a specific tumor suppressor gene or oncogene is likely cell context-dependent. Delineation of the mechanisms underlying synthetic lethality and identification of treatment response biomarkers will be critical for the success of synthetic lethality anticancer therapy.

  6. Apoptosis as anticancer mechanism: function and dysfunction of its modulators and targeted therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Pistritto, Giuseppa; Trisciuoglio, Daniela; Ceci, Claudia; Garufi, Alessia; D'Orazi, Gabriella

    2016-04-01

    Apoptosis is a form of programmed cell death that results in the orderly and efficient removal of damaged cells, such as those resulting from DNA damage or during development. Apoptosis can be triggered by signals from within the cell, such as genotoxic stress, or by extrinsic signals, such as the binding of ligands to cell surface death receptors. Deregulation in apoptotic cell death machinery is an hallmark of cancer. Apoptosis alteration is responsible not only for tumor development and progression but also for tumor resistance to therapies. Most anticancer drugs currently used in clinical oncology exploit the intact apoptotic signaling pathways to trigger cancer cell death. Thus, defects in the death pathways may result in drug resistance so limiting the efficacy of therapies. Therefore, a better understanding of the apoptotic cell death signaling pathways may improve the efficacy of cancer therapy and bypass resistance. This review will highlight the role of the fundamental regulators of apoptosis and how their deregulation, including activation of anti-apoptotic factors (i.e., Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, etc) or inactivation of pro-apoptotic factors (i.e., p53 pathway) ends up in cancer cell resistance to therapies. In addition, therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating apoptotic activity are briefly discussed.

  7. Apoptosis as anticancer mechanism: function and dysfunction of its modulators and targeted therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Pistritto, Giuseppa; Trisciuoglio, Daniela; Ceci, Claudia; Garufi, Alessia; D'Orazi, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is a form of programmed cell death that results in the orderly and efficient removal of damaged cells, such as those resulting from DNA damage or during development. Apoptosis can be triggered by signals from within the cell, such as genotoxic stress, or by extrinsic signals, such as the binding of ligands to cell surface death receptors. Deregulation in apoptotic cell death machinery is an hallmark of cancer. Apoptosis alteration is responsible not only for tumor development and progression but also for tumor resistance to therapies. Most anticancer drugs currently used in clinical oncology exploit the intact apoptotic signaling pathways to trigger cancer cell death. Thus, defects in the death pathways may result in drug resistance so limiting the efficacy of therapies. Therefore, a better understanding of the apoptotic cell death signaling pathways may improve the efficacy of cancer therapy and bypass resistance. This review will highlight the role of the fundamental regulators of apoptosis and how their deregulation, including activation of anti-apoptotic factors (i.e., Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, etc) or inactivation of pro-apoptotic factors (i.e., p53 pathway) ends up in cancer cell resistance to therapies. In addition, therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating apoptotic activity are briefly discussed. PMID:27019364

  8. Role of SNARE proteins in tumourigenesis and their potential as targets for novel anti-cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jianghui; Wang, Jiafu

    2015-08-01

    The function of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) in cellular trafficking, membrane fusion and vesicle release in synaptic nerve terminals is well characterised. Recent studies suggest that SNAREs are also important in the control of tumourigenesis through the regulation of multiple signalling and transportation pathways. The majority of published studies investigated the effects of knockdown/knockout or overexpression of particular SNAREs on the normal function of cells as well as their dysfunction in tumourigenesis promotion. SNAREs are involved in the regulation of cancer cell invasion, chemo-resistance, the transportation of autocrine and paracrine factors, autophagy, apoptosis and the phosphorylation of kinases essential for cancer cell biogenesis. This evidence highlights SNAREs as potential targets for novel cancer therapy. This is the first review to summarise the expression and role of SNAREs in cancer biology at the cellular level, their interaction with non-SNARE proteins and modulation of cellular signalling cascades. Finally, a strategy is proposed for developing novel anti-cancer therapeutics using targeted delivery of a SNARE-inactivating protease into malignant cells.

  9. Molecular Interaction of a Kinase Inhibitor Midostaurin with Anticancer Drug Targets, S100A8 and EGFR: Transcriptional Profiling and Molecular Docking Study for Kidney Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Zeenat; Schulten, Hans-Juergen; Farsi, Hasan Ma; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah A.; Gari, Mamdooh A.; Chaudhary, Adeel Ga; Abuzenadah, Adel M.; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed H.; Karim, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    The S100A8 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) proteins are proto-oncogenes that are strongly expressed in a number of cancer types. EGFR promotes cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration and survival by activating molecular pathways. Involvement of proinflammatory S100A8 in tumor cell differentiation and progression is largely unclear and not studied in kidney cancer (KC). S100A8 and EGFR are potential therapeutic biomarkers and anticancer drug targets for KC. In this study, we explored molecular mechanisms of interaction profiles of both molecules with potential anticancer drugs. We undertook transcriptional profiling in Saudi KCs using Affymetrix HuGene 1.0 ST arrays. We identified 1478 significantly expressed genes, including S100A8 and EGFR overexpression, using cut-off p value <0.05 and fold change ≥2. Additionally, we compared and confirmed our findings with expression data available at NCBI’s GEO database. A significant number of genes associated with cancer showed involvement in cell cycle progression, DNA repair, tumor morphology, tissue development, and cell survival. Atherosclerosis signaling, leukocyte extravasation signaling, notch signaling, and IL-12 signaling were the most significantly disrupted signaling pathways. The present study provides an initial transcriptional profiling of Saudi KC patients. Our analysis suggests distinct transcriptomic signatures and pathways underlying molecular mechanisms of KC progression. Molecular docking analysis revealed that the kinase inhibitor "midostaurin" has amongst the selected drug targets, the best ligand properties to S100A8 and EGFR, with the implication that its binding inhibits downstream signaling in KC. This is the first structure-based docking study for the selected protein targets and anticancer drug, and the results indicate S100A8 and EGFR as attractive anticancer targets and midostaurin with effective drug properties for therapeutic intervention in KC. PMID:25789858

  10. Molecular interaction of a kinase inhibitor midostaurin with anticancer drug targets, S100A8 and EGFR: transcriptional profiling and molecular docking study for kidney cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Zeenat; Schulten, Hans-Juergen; Farsi, Hasan Ma; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah A; Gari, Mamdooh A; Chaudhary, Adeel Ga; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed H; Karim, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    The S100A8 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) proteins are proto-oncogenes that are strongly expressed in a number of cancer types. EGFR promotes cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration and survival by activating molecular pathways. Involvement of proinflammatory S100A8 in tumor cell differentiation and progression is largely unclear and not studied in kidney cancer (KC). S100A8 and EGFR are potential therapeutic biomarkers and anticancer drug targets for KC. In this study, we explored molecular mechanisms of interaction profiles of both molecules with potential anticancer drugs. We undertook transcriptional profiling in Saudi KCs using Affymetrix HuGene 1.0 ST arrays. We identified 1478 significantly expressed genes, including S100A8 and EGFR overexpression, using cut-off p value <0.05 and fold change ≥2. Additionally, we compared and confirmed our findings with expression data available at NCBI's GEO database. A significant number of genes associated with cancer showed involvement in cell cycle progression, DNA repair, tumor morphology, tissue development, and cell survival. Atherosclerosis signaling, leukocyte extravasation signaling, notch signaling, and IL-12 signaling were the most significantly disrupted signaling pathways. The present study provides an initial transcriptional profiling of Saudi KC patients. Our analysis suggests distinct transcriptomic signatures and pathways underlying molecular mechanisms of KC progression. Molecular docking analysis revealed that the kinase inhibitor "midostaurin" has amongst the selected drug targets, the best ligand properties to S100A8 and EGFR, with the implication that its binding inhibits downstream signaling in KC. This is the first structure-based docking study for the selected protein targets and anticancer drug, and the results indicate S100A8 and EGFR as attractive anticancer targets and midostaurin with effective drug properties for therapeutic intervention in KC. PMID:25789858

  11. A novel nitric oxide-based anticancer therapeutics by macrophage-targeted poly(l-arginine)-based nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Shinpei; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2015-11-10

    In the immune system, macrophages in tumor tissue generate nitric oxide (NO), producing versatile effects including apoptosis of tumor cells, because inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in the cytoplasm of a macrophage produces NO using l-arginine as a substrate. Here, we propose novel NO-triggered immune therapeutics based on our newly designed nanoparticle system. We designed a poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(l-arginine) (i.e., PEG-b-P(l-Arg)) block copolymer and prepared polyion complex micelles (PEG-b-P(l-Arg)/m) composed of PEG-b-P(l-Arg) and chondroitin sulfate for systemic anticancer immunotherapy. iNOS treatment of PEG-b-P(l-Arg) did not generate NO, but NO molecules were detected after trypsin pretreatment, indicating that hydrolysis of P(l-Arg) to monomeric arginine was taking place in vitro. RAW264.7 macrophages abundantly generated NO from the PEG-b-P(l-Arg)/m in comparison with control micelles; this finding is indicative of robustness of the proposed method. It is interesting to note that systemic administration of PEG-b-P(l-Arg)/m had no noticeable adverse effects and suppressed the tumor growth rate in C26 tumor-bearing mice in a dose-dependent manner. Our newly designed nanoparticle-assisted arginine delivery system seems to hold promise as an NO-mediated anticancer immunotherapy.

  12. Targeted anticancer therapy: overexpressed receptors and nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Ahamed, Maqusood; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Alrokayan, Salman A; Kumar, Sudhir

    2014-09-25

    Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to cancer cells and tissues is a promising field due to its potential to spare unaffected cells and tissues, but it has been a major challenge to achieve success in these therapeutic approaches. Several innovative approaches to targeted drug delivery have been devised based on available knowledge in cancer biology and on technological advancements. To achieve the desired selectivity of drug delivery, nanotechnology has enabled researchers to design nanoparticles (NPs) to incorporate anticancer drugs and act as nanocarriers. Recently, many receptor molecules known to be overexpressed in cancer have been explored as docking sites for the targeting of anticancer drugs. In principle, anticancer drugs can be concentrated specifically in cancer cells and tissues by conjugating drug-containing nanocarriers with ligands against these receptors. Several mechanisms can be employed to induce triggered drug release in response to either endogenous trigger or exogenous trigger so that the anticancer drug is only released upon reaching and preferentially accumulating in the tumor tissue. This review focuses on overexpressed receptors exploited in targeting drugs to cancerous tissues and the tumor microenvironment. We briefly evaluate the structure and function of these receptor molecules, emphasizing the elegant mechanisms by which certain characteristics of cancer can be exploited in cancer treatment. After this discussion of receptors, we review their respective ligands and then the anticancer drugs delivered by nanotechnology in preclinical models of cancer. Ligand-functionalized nanocarriers have delivered significantly higher amounts of anticancer drugs in many in vitro and in vivo models of cancer compared to cancer models lacking such receptors or drug carrying nanocarriers devoid of ligand. This increased concentration of anticancer drug in the tumor site enabled by nanotechnology could have a major impact on the efficiency of cancer

  13. Therapeutic Effectiveness of Anticancer Phytochemicals on Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jisun; Hlatky, Lynn; Jeong, Yong-Seob; Kim, Dohoon

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how to target cancer stem cells (CSCs) may provide helpful insights for the development of therapeutic or preventive strategies against cancers. Dietary phytochemicals with anticancer properties are promising candidates and have selective impact on CSCs. This review summarizes the influence of phytochemicals on heterogeneous cancer cell populations as well as on specific targeting of CSCs. PMID:27376325

  14. Folate-targeted pH-responsive calcium zoledronate nanoscale metal-organic frameworks: Turning a bone antiresorptive agent into an anticancer therapeutic.

    PubMed

    Au, Kin Man; Satterlee, Andrew; Min, Yuanzeng; Tian, Xi; Kim, Young Seok; Caster, Joseph M; Zhang, Longzhen; Zhang, Tian; Huang, Leaf; Wang, Andrew Z

    2016-03-01

    Zoledronate (Zol) is a third-generation bisphosphonate that is widely used as an anti-resorptive agent for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis. While there is preclinical data indicating that bisphosphonates such as Zol have direct cytotoxic effects on cancer cells, such effect has not been firmly established in the clinical setting. This is likely due to the rapid absorption of bisphosphonates by the skeleton after intravenous (i.v.) administration. Herein, we report the reformulation of Zol using nanotechnology and evaluation of this novel nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (nMOFs) formulation of Zol as an anticancer agent. The nMOF formulation is comprised of a calcium zoledronate (CaZol) core and a polyethylene glycol (PEG) surface. To preferentially deliver CaZol nMOFs to tumors as well as facilitate cellular uptake of Zol, we incorporated folate (Fol)-targeted ligands on the nMOFs. The folate receptor (FR) is known to be overexpressed in several tumor types, including head-and-neck, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers. We demonstrated that these targeted CaZol nMOFs possess excellent chemical and colloidal stability in physiological conditions. The release of encapsulated Zol from the nMOFs occurs in the mid-endosomes during nMOF endocytosis. In vitro toxicity studies demonstrated that Fol-targeted CaZol nMOFs are more efficient than small molecule Zol in inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in FR-overexpressing H460 non-small cell lung and PC3 prostate cancer cells. Our findings were further validated in vivo using mouse xenograft models of H460 and PC3. We demonstrated that Fol-targeted CaZol nMOFs are effective anticancer agents and increase the direct antitumor activity of Zol by 80-85% in vivo through inhibition of tumor neovasculature, and inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis.

  15. Tumour vasculature--a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, C. T.; Winslet, M. C.; Bradley, N. J.

    1995-01-01

    The tumour vasculature is vital for the establishment, growth and metastasis of solid tumours. Its physiological properties limit the effectiveness of conventional anti-cancer strategies. Therapeutic approaches directed at the tumour vasculature are reviewed, suggesting the potential of anti-angiogenesis and the targeting of vascular proliferation antigens as cancer treatments. PMID:7543770

  16. Epigenomes as therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Christopher A; Costa, Fabricio F

    2015-07-01

    Epigenetics is a molecular phenomenon that pertains to heritable changes in gene expression that do not involve changes in the DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications in a whole genome, known as the epigenome, play an essential role in the regulation of gene expression in both normal development and disease. Traditional epigenetic changes include DNA methylation and histone modifications. Recent evidence reveals that other players, such as non-coding RNAs, may have an epigenetic regulatory role. Aberrant epigenetic signaling is becoming to be known as a central component of human disease, and the reversible nature of the epigenetic modifications provides an exciting opportunity for the development of clinically relevant therapeutics. Current epigenetic therapies provide a clinical benefit through disrupting DNA methyltransferases or histone deacetylases. However, the emergence of next-generation epigenetic therapies provides an opportunity to more effectively disrupt epigenetic disease states. Novel epigenetic therapies may improve drug targeting and drug delivery, optimize dosing schedules, and improve the efficacy of preexisting treatment modalities (chemotherapy, radiation, and immunotherapy). This review discusses the epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to the disease, available epigenetic therapies, epigenetic therapies currently in development, and the potential future use of epigenetic therapeutics in a clinical setting.

  17. Validating Aurora B as an anti-cancer drug target.

    PubMed

    Girdler, Fiona; Gascoigne, Karen E; Eyers, Patrick A; Hartmuth, Sonya; Crafter, Claire; Foote, Kevin M; Keen, Nicholas J; Taylor, Stephen S

    2006-09-01

    The Aurora kinases, a family of mitotic regulators, have received much attention as potential targets for novel anti-cancer therapeutics. Several Aurora kinase inhibitors have been described including ZM447439, which prevents chromosome alignment, spindle checkpoint function and cytokinesis. Subsequently, ZM447439-treated cells exit mitosis without dividing and lose viability. Because ZM447439 inhibits both Aurora A and B, we set out to determine which phenotypes are due to inhibition of which kinase. Using molecular genetic approaches, we show that inhibition of Aurora B kinase activity phenocopies ZM447439. Furthermore, a novel ZM compound, which is 100 times more selective for Aurora B over Aurora A in vitro, induces identical phenotypes. Importantly, inhibition of Aurora B kinase activity induces a penetrant anti-proliferative phenotype, indicating that Aurora B is an attractive anti-cancer drug target. Using molecular genetic and chemical-genetic approaches, we also probe the role of Aurora A kinase activity. We show that simultaneous repression of Aurora A plus induction of a catalytic mutant induces a monopolar phenotype. Consistently, another novel ZM-related inhibitor, which is 20 times as potent against Aurora A compared with ZM447439, induces a monopolar phenotype. Expression of a drug-resistant Aurora A mutant reverts this phenotype, demonstrating that Aurora A kinase activity is required for spindle bipolarity in human cells. Because small molecule-mediated inhibition of Aurora A and Aurora B yields distinct phenotypes, our observations indicate that the Auroras may present two avenues for anti-cancer drug discovery.

  18. The anticancer immune response: indispensable for therapeutic success?

    PubMed Central

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Apetoh, Lionel; Ghiringhelli, François; André, Fabrice; Tesniere, Antoine; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Although the impact of tumor immunology on the clinical management of most cancers is still negligible, there is increasing evidence that anticancer immune responses may contribute to the control of cancer after conventional chemotherapy. Thus, radiotherapy and some chemotherapeutic agents, in particular anthracyclines, can induce specific immune responses that result either in immunogenic cancer cell death or in immunostimulatory side effects. This anticancer immune response then helps to eliminate residual cancer cells (those that fail to be killed by chemotherapy) or maintains micrometastases in a stage of dormancy. Based on these premises, in this Review we address the question, How may it be possible to ameliorate conventional therapies by stimulating the anticancer immune response? Moreover, we discuss the rationale of clinical trials to evaluate and eventually increase the contribution of antitumor immune responses to the therapeutic management of neoplasia. PMID:18523649

  19. Targeting tumor suppressor networks for cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuning Emily; Ngo, Bryan; Modrek, Aram Sandaldjian; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a consequence of mutations in genes that control cell proliferation, differentiation and cellular homeostasis. These genes are classified into two categories: oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Together, overexpression of oncogenes and loss of tumor suppressors are the dominant driving forces for tumorigenesis. Hence, targeting oncogenes and tumor suppressors hold tremendous therapeutic potential for cancer treatment. In the last decade, the predominant cancer drug discovery strategy has relied on a traditional reductionist approach of dissecting molecular signaling pathways and designing inhibitors for the selected oncogenic targets. Remarkable therapies have been developed using this approach; however, targeting oncogenes is only part of the picture. Our understanding of the importance of tumor suppressors in preventing tumorigenesis has also advanced significantly and provides a new therapeutic window of opportunity. Given that tumor suppressors are frequently mutated, deleted, or silenced with loss-of-function, restoring their normal functions to treat cancer holds tremendous therapeutic potential. With the rapid expansion in our knowledge of cancer over the last several decades, developing effective anticancer regimens against tumor suppressor pathways has never been more promising. In this article, we will review the concept of tumor suppression, and outline the major therapeutic strategies and challenges of targeting tumor suppressor networks for cancer therapeutics.

  20. TSPO as a target for glioblastoma therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Werry, Eryn L; Barron, Melissa L; Kassiou, Michael

    2015-08-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO) is an 18-kDa five-transmembrane protein, which is primarily found in the outer mitochondrial membrane. Levels of this protein are up-regulated in the most aggressive and common glioma, glioblastoma multiforme (GM). Levels of TSPO also correlate with GM clinical outcome, suggesting that TSPO may be a novel GM diagnostic imaging agent. Therapeutically, targeting the TSPO may provide a mechanism to abrogate the apoptotic-resistant, invasive and aggressive nature of GM and may also provide a way of targeting other anti-cancer treatments to GM sites. This review highlights recent progress in research on TSPO-based diagnostic imaging and therapeutics for GM.

  1. Folate-decorated anticancer drug and magnetic nanoparticles encapsulated polymeric carrier for liver cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Ji; Dong, Ming; Kong, Fan-Min; Zhou, Jian-Ping

    2015-07-15

    Nanoparticulate system with theranostic applications has attracted significant attention in cancer therapeutics. In the present study, we have developed a novel composite PLGA NP co-encapsulated with anticancer drug (sorafenib) and magnetic NP (SPION). We have successfully developed nanosized folate-conjugated PEGylated PLGA nanoparticles (SRF/FA-PEG-PLGA NP) with both anticancer and magnetic resonance property. We have showed that FA-conjugated NP exhibits sustained drug release and enhanced cellular uptake in BEL7402 cancer cells. The targeted NP effectively suppressed the tumor cell proliferation and has improved the anticancer efficacy than that of free drug or non-targeted one. Additionally, enhanced MRI properties demonstrate this formulation has good imaging agent characteristics. Finally, SRF/FA-PEG-PLGA NP effectively inhibited the colony forming ability indicating its superior anticancer effect. Together, these multifunctional nanoparticles would be most ideal to improve the therapeutic response in cancer and holds great potential to be a part of future nanomedicine. Our unique approach could be extended for multiple biomedical applications.

  2. Targeting Tumor Metabolism for Cancer Treatment: Is Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinases (PDKs) a Viable Anticancer Target?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Shao-Lin; Hu, Xiaohui; Tam, Kin Yip

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains a lethal threat to global lives. Development of novel anticancer therapeutics is still a challenge to scientists in the field of biomedicine. In cancer cells, the metabolic features are significantly different from those of normal ones, which are hallmarks of several malignancies. Recent studies brought atypical cellular metabolism, such as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect, into the scientific limelight. Targeting these altered metabolic pathways in cancer cells presents a promising therapeutic strategy. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs), key enzymes in the pathway of glucose metabolism, could inactivate the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) by phosphorylating it and preserving the substrates pyruvate, lactate and alanine for gluconeogenesis. Overexpression of PDKs could block the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to satisfy high oxygen demand in cancer cells, while inhibition of PDKs could upregulate the activity of PDC and rectify the balance between the demand and supply of oxygen, which could lead to cancer cell death. Thus, inhibitors targeting PDKs represent a promising strategy for cancer treatment by acting on glycolytic tumors while showing minimal side effects on the oxidative healthy organs. This review considers the role of PDKs as regulator of PDC that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate in mitochondrion. It is concluded that PDKs are solid therapeutic targets. Inhibition of PDKs could be an attractive therapeutic approach for the development of anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26681918

  3. Validating Aurora B as an anti-cancer drug target.

    PubMed

    Girdler, Fiona; Gascoigne, Karen E; Eyers, Patrick A; Hartmuth, Sonya; Crafter, Claire; Foote, Kevin M; Keen, Nicholas J; Taylor, Stephen S

    2006-09-01

    The Aurora kinases, a family of mitotic regulators, have received much attention as potential targets for novel anti-cancer therapeutics. Several Aurora kinase inhibitors have been described including ZM447439, which prevents chromosome alignment, spindle checkpoint function and cytokinesis. Subsequently, ZM447439-treated cells exit mitosis without dividing and lose viability. Because ZM447439 inhibits both Aurora A and B, we set out to determine which phenotypes are due to inhibition of which kinase. Using molecular genetic approaches, we show that inhibition of Aurora B kinase activity phenocopies ZM447439. Furthermore, a novel ZM compound, which is 100 times more selective for Aurora B over Aurora A in vitro, induces identical phenotypes. Importantly, inhibition of Aurora B kinase activity induces a penetrant anti-proliferative phenotype, indicating that Aurora B is an attractive anti-cancer drug target. Using molecular genetic and chemical-genetic approaches, we also probe the role of Aurora A kinase activity. We show that simultaneous repression of Aurora A plus induction of a catalytic mutant induces a monopolar phenotype. Consistently, another novel ZM-related inhibitor, which is 20 times as potent against Aurora A compared with ZM447439, induces a monopolar phenotype. Expression of a drug-resistant Aurora A mutant reverts this phenotype, demonstrating that Aurora A kinase activity is required for spindle bipolarity in human cells. Because small molecule-mediated inhibition of Aurora A and Aurora B yields distinct phenotypes, our observations indicate that the Auroras may present two avenues for anti-cancer drug discovery. PMID:16912073

  4. Biomaterials and Emerging Anticancer Therapeutics: Engineering the Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Luo; Mooney, David J

    2016-01-01

    The microenvironment is increasingly recognized to play key roles in cancer, and biomaterials provide a means to engineer microenvironments both in vitro and in vivo to study and manipulate cancer. In vitro cancer models using 3D matrices recapitulate key elements of the tumor microenvironment and have revealed new aspects of cancer biology. Cancer vaccines based on some of the same biomaterials have, in parallel, allowed for the engineering of durable prophylactic and therapeutic anticancer activity in preclinical studies, and some of these vaccines have moved to clinical trials. The impact of biomaterials engineering on cancer treatment is expected to further increase in importance in the years to come. PMID:26694936

  5. Biomaterials and emerging anticancer therapeutics: engineering the microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Gu, Luo; Mooney, David J

    2016-01-01

    The microenvironment is increasingly recognized to have key roles in cancer, and biomaterials provide a means to engineer microenvironments both in vitro and in vivo to study and manipulate cancer. In vitro cancer models using 3D matrices recapitulate key elements of the tumour microenvironment and have revealed new aspects of cancer biology. Cancer vaccines based on some of the same biomaterials have, in parallel, allowed for the engineering of durable prophylactic and therapeutic anticancer activity in preclinical studies, and some of these vaccines have moved to clinical trials. The impact of biomaterials engineering on cancer treatment is expected to further increase in importance in the years to come.

  6. Targeting cellular metabolism to improve cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Butler, E B; Tan, M

    2013-03-07

    The metabolic properties of cancer cells diverge significantly from those of normal cells. Energy production in cancer cells is abnormally dependent on aerobic glycolysis. In addition to the dependency on glycolysis, cancer cells have other atypical metabolic characteristics such as increased fatty acid synthesis and increased rates of glutamine metabolism. Emerging evidence shows that many features characteristic to cancer cells, such as dysregulated Warburg-like glucose metabolism, fatty acid synthesis and glutaminolysis are linked to therapeutic resistance in cancer treatment. Therefore, targeting cellular metabolism may improve the response to cancer therapeutics and the combination of chemotherapeutic drugs with cellular metabolism inhibitors may represent a promising strategy to overcome drug resistance in cancer therapy. Recently, several review articles have summarized the anticancer targets in the metabolic pathways and metabolic inhibitor-induced cell death pathways, however, the dysregulated metabolism in therapeutic resistance, which is a highly clinical relevant area in cancer metabolism research, has not been specifically addressed. From this unique angle, this review article will discuss the relationship between dysregulated cellular metabolism and cancer drug resistance and how targeting of metabolic enzymes, such as glucose transporters, hexokinase, pyruvate kinase M2, lactate dehydrogenase A, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, fatty acid synthase and glutaminase can enhance the efficacy of common therapeutic agents or overcome resistance to chemotherapy or radiotherapy.

  7. Integrin Targeted Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Melissa; Odde, Srinivas; Neamati, Nouri

    2011-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric, transmembrane receptors that function as mechanosensors, adhesion molecules and signal transduction platforms in a multitude of biological processes. As such, integrins are central to the etiology and pathology of many disease states. Therefore, pharmacological inhibition of integrins is of great interest for the treatment and prevention of disease. In the last two decades several integrin-targeted drugs have made their way into clinical use, many others are in clinical trials and still more are showing promise as they advance through preclinical development. Herein, this review examines and evaluates the various drugs and compounds targeting integrins and the disease states in which they are implicated. PMID:21547158

  8. Cancer therapeutics: Targeting the apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Khan, Khurum H; Blanco-Codesido, Montserrat; Molife, L Rhoda

    2014-06-01

    Apoptosis, a physiological process of programmed cell death, is disrupted in various malignancies. It has been exploited as an anti-cancer strategy traditionally by inducing DNA damage with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. With an increased understanding of the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis in recent years, novel approaches of targeting the apoptotic pathways have been tested in pre-clinical and clinical models. There are several early phase clinical trials investigating the therapeutic role of pro-apoptotic agents, both as single agents and in combination. In this review, we examine such treatment strategies, detailing the various compounds currently under clinical investigation, their potential roles in cancer therapeutics, and discussing approaches to their optimal use in the clinic.

  9. Biological and therapeutic activities, and anticancer properties of curcumin

    PubMed Central

    PERRONE, DONATELLA; ARDITO, FATIMA; GIANNATEMPO, GIOVANNI; DIOGUARDI, MARIO; TROIANO, GIUSEPPE; LO RUSSO, LUCIO; DE LILLO, ALFREDO; LAINO, LUIGI; LO MUZIO, LORENZO

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant. Curcumin has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine, as it is nontoxic and exhibits a variety of therapeutic properties, including antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic activities. Recently, certain studies have indicated that curcumin may exert anticancer effects in a variety of biological pathways involved in mutagenesis, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, cell cycle regulation and metastasis. The present study reviewed previous studies in the literature, which support the therapeutic activity of curcumin in cancer. In addition, the present study elucidated a number of the challenges concerning the use of curcumin as an adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent. All the studies reviewed herein suggest that curcumin is able to exert anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet, antioxidative, hepatoprotective and antitumor activities, particularly against cancers of the liver, skin, pancreas, prostate, ovary, lung and head neck, as well as having a positive effect in the treatment of arthritis. PMID:26640527

  10. Magnetic polymer nanospheres for anticancer drug targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juríková, A.; Csach, K.; Koneracká, M.; Závišová, V.; Múčková, M.; Tomašovičová, N.; Lancz, G.; Kopčanský, P.; Timko, M.; Miškuf, J.

    2010-01-01

    Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) polymer (PLGA) nanospheres loaded with biocom-patible magnetic fluid as a magnetic carrier and anticancer drug Taxol were prepared by the modified nanoprecipitation method with size of 200-250 nm in diameter. The PLGA polymer was utilized as a capsulation material due to its biodegradability and biocompatibility. Taxol as an important anticancer drug was chosen for its significant role against a wide range of tumours. Thermal properties of the drug-polymer system were characterized using thermal analysis methods. It was determined the solubility of Taxol in PLGA nanospheres. Magnetic properties investigated using SQUID magnetometry showed superparamagnetism of the prepared magnetic polymer nanospheres.

  11. Therapeutic Targeting of Telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Kathrin; Walter, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length and cell function can be preserved by the human reverse transcriptase telomerase (hTERT), which synthesizes the new telomeric DNA from a RNA template, but is normally restricted to cells needing a high proliferative capacity, such as stem cells. Consequently, telomerase-based therapies to elongate short telomeres are developed, some of which have successfully reached the stage I in clinical trials. Telomerase is also permissive for tumorigenesis and 90% of all malignant tumors use telomerase to obtain immortality. Thus, reversal of telomerase upregulation in tumor cells is a potential strategy to treat cancer. Natural and small-molecule telomerase inhibitors, immunotherapeutic approaches, oligonucleotide inhibitors, and telomerase-directed gene therapy are useful treatment strategies. Telomerase is more widely expressed than any other tumor marker. The low expression in normal tissues, together with the longer telomeres in normal stem cells versus cancer cells, provides some degree of specificity with low risk of toxicity. However, long term telomerase inhibition may elicit negative effects in highly-proliferative cells which need telomerase for survival, and it may interfere with telomere-independent physiological functions. Moreover, only a few hTERT molecules are required to overcome senescence in cancer cells, and telomerase inhibition requires proliferating cells over a sufficient number of population doublings to induce tumor suppressive senescence. These limitations may explain the moderate success rates in many clinical studies. Despite extensive studies, only one vaccine and one telomerase antagonist are routinely used in clinical work. For complete eradication of all subpopulations of cancer cells a simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms will likely be needed. Possible technical improvements have been proposed including the development of more specific inhibitors, methods to increase the efficacy of vaccination methods, and

  12. Therapeutic Targeting of Telomerase.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Kathrin; Walter, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length and cell function can be preserved by the human reverse transcriptase telomerase (hTERT), which synthesizes the new telomeric DNA from a RNA template, but is normally restricted to cells needing a high proliferative capacity, such as stem cells. Consequently, telomerase-based therapies to elongate short telomeres are developed, some of which have successfully reached the stage I in clinical trials. Telomerase is also permissive for tumorigenesis and 90% of all malignant tumors use telomerase to obtain immortality. Thus, reversal of telomerase upregulation in tumor cells is a potential strategy to treat cancer. Natural and small-molecule telomerase inhibitors, immunotherapeutic approaches, oligonucleotide inhibitors, and telomerase-directed gene therapy are useful treatment strategies. Telomerase is more widely expressed than any other tumor marker. The low expression in normal tissues, together with the longer telomeres in normal stem cells versus cancer cells, provides some degree of specificity with low risk of toxicity. However, long term telomerase inhibition may elicit negative effects in highly-proliferative cells which need telomerase for survival, and it may interfere with telomere-independent physiological functions. Moreover, only a few hTERT molecules are required to overcome senescence in cancer cells, and telomerase inhibition requires proliferating cells over a sufficient number of population doublings to induce tumor suppressive senescence. These limitations may explain the moderate success rates in many clinical studies. Despite extensive studies, only one vaccine and one telomerase antagonist are routinely used in clinical work. For complete eradication of all subpopulations of cancer cells a simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms will likely be needed. Possible technical improvements have been proposed including the development of more specific inhibitors, methods to increase the efficacy of vaccination methods, and

  13. Hierarchical targeted hepatocyte mitochondrial multifunctional chitosan nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhipeng; Zhang, Liujie; Song, Yang; He, Jiayu; Wu, Li; Zhao, Can; Xiao, Yanyu; Li, Wei; Cai, Baochang; Cheng, Haibo; Li, Weidong

    2015-06-01

    The overwhelming majority of drugs exert their pharmacological effects after reaching their target sites of action, however, these target sites are mainly located in the cytosol or intracellular organelles. Consequently, delivering drugs to the specific organelle is the key to achieve maximum therapeutic effects and minimum side-effects. In the work reported here, we designed, synthesized, and evaluated a novel mitochondrial-targeted multifunctional nanoparticles (MNPs) based on chitosan derivatives according to the physiological environment of the tumor and the requirement of mitochondrial targeting drug delivery. The intelligent chitosan nanoparticles possess various functions such as stealth, hepatocyte targeting, multistage pH-response, lysosomal escape and mitochondrial targeting, which lead to targeted drug release after the progressively shedding of functional groups, thus realize the efficient intracellular delivery and mitochondrial localization, inhibit the growth of tumor, elevate the antitumor efficacy, and reduce the toxicity of anticancer drugs. It provides a safe and efficient nanocarrier platform for mitochondria targeting anticancer drug delivery.

  14. Hierarchical targeted hepatocyte mitochondrial multifunctional chitosan nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhipeng; Zhang, Liujie; Song, Yang; He, Jiayu; Wu, Li; Zhao, Can; Xiao, Yanyu; Li, Wei; Cai, Baochang; Cheng, Haibo; Li, Weidong

    2015-06-01

    The overwhelming majority of drugs exert their pharmacological effects after reaching their target sites of action, however, these target sites are mainly located in the cytosol or intracellular organelles. Consequently, delivering drugs to the specific organelle is the key to achieve maximum therapeutic effects and minimum side-effects. In the work reported here, we designed, synthesized, and evaluated a novel mitochondrial-targeted multifunctional nanoparticles (MNPs) based on chitosan derivatives according to the physiological environment of the tumor and the requirement of mitochondrial targeting drug delivery. The intelligent chitosan nanoparticles possess various functions such as stealth, hepatocyte targeting, multistage pH-response, lysosomal escape and mitochondrial targeting, which lead to targeted drug release after the progressively shedding of functional groups, thus realize the efficient intracellular delivery and mitochondrial localization, inhibit the growth of tumor, elevate the antitumor efficacy, and reduce the toxicity of anticancer drugs. It provides a safe and efficient nanocarrier platform for mitochondria targeting anticancer drug delivery. PMID:25818430

  15. Transcription factors as targets of anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Gniazdowski, M; Czyz, M

    1999-01-01

    Several general and gene- and cell-selective transcription factors are required for specific transcription to occur. Many of them exert their functions through specific contacts either in the promoter region or at distant sequences regulating the initiation. These contacts may be altered by anticancer drugs which form non-covalent complexes with DNA. Covalent modifications of DNA by alkylating agents may prevent transcription factors from recognizing their specific sequences or may constitute multiple "unnatural" binding sites in DNA which attract the factors thus decreasing their availability in the cell. The anticancer drug-transcription factor interplay which is based on specific interactions with DNA may contribute to pharmacological properties of the former and provide a basis for the search for new drugs. PMID:10547027

  16. Targeted Strategies for Henipavirus Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Bossart, Katharine N; Bingham, John; Middleton, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    Hendra and Nipah viruses are related emergent paramyxoviruses that infect and cause disease in animals and humans. Disease manifests as a generalized vasculitis affecting multiple organs, but is the most severe in the respiratory and central nervous systems. The high case fatality and person-to-person transmission associated with the most recent NiV outbreaks, and the recent re-emergence of HeV, emphasize the importance and necessity of effective therapeutics for these novel agents. In recent years henipavirus research has revealed a more complete understanding of pathogenesis and, as a consequence, viable approaches towards vaccines and therapeutics have emerged. All strategies target early steps in viral replication including receptor binding and membrane fusion. Animal models have been developed, some of which may prove more valuable than others for evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic agents and regimes. Assessments of protective host immunity and drug pharmacokinetics will be crucial to the further advancement of therapeutic compounds. PMID:19440455

  17. Targeting polymer therapeutics to bone.

    PubMed

    Low, Stewart A; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2012-09-01

    An aging population in the developing world has led to an increase in musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoporosis and bone metastases. Left untreated many bone diseases cause debilitating pain and in the case of cancer, death. Many potential drugs are effective in treating diseases but result in side effects preventing their efficacy in the clinic. Bone, however, provides a unique environment of inorganic solids, which can be exploited in order to effectively target drugs to diseased tissue. By integration of bone targeting moieties to drug-carrying water-soluble polymers, the payload to diseased area can be increased while side effects decreased. The realization of clinically relevant bone targeted polymer therapeutics depends on (1) understanding bone targeting moiety interactions, (2) development of controlled drug delivery systems, as well as (3) understanding drug interactions. The latter makes it possible to develop bone targeted synergistic drug delivery systems.

  18. TARGETING POLYMER THERAPEUTICS TO BONE

    PubMed Central

    Low, Stewart; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2012-01-01

    An aging population in the developing world has led to an increase in musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoporosis and bone metastases. Left untreated many bone diseases cause debilitating pain and in the case of cancer, death. Many potential drugs are effective in treating diseases but result in side effects preventing their efficacy in the clinic. Bone, however, provides an unique environment of inorganic solids, which can be exploited in order to effectively target drugs to diseased tissue. By integration of bone targeting moieties to drug-carrying water-soluble polymers, the payload to diseased area can be increased while side effects decreased. The realization of clinically relevant bone targeted polymer therapeutics depends on (1) understanding bone targeting moiety interactions, (2) development of controlled drug delivery systems, as well as (3) understanding drug interactions. The latter makes it possible to develop bone targeted synergistic drug delivery systems. PMID:22316530

  19. Folate-mediated delivery of macromolecular anticancer therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingjuan; Low, Philip S

    2002-09-13

    The receptor for folic acid constitutes a useful target for tumor-specific drug delivery, primarily because: (1) it is upregulated in many human cancers, including malignancies of the ovary, brain, kidney, breast, myeloid cells and lung, (2) access to the folate receptor in those normal tissues that express it can be severely limited due to its location on the apical (externally-facing) membrane of polarized epithelia, and (3) folate receptor density appears to increase as the stage/grade of the cancer worsens. Thus, cancers that are most difficult to treat by classical methods may be most easily targeted with folate-linked therapeutics. To exploit these peculiarities of folate receptor expression, folic acid has been linked to both low molecular weight drugs and macromolecular complexes as a means of targeting the attached molecules to malignant cells. Conjugation of folic acid to macromolecules has been shown to enhance their delivery to folate receptor-expressing cancer cells in vitro in almost all situations tested. Folate-mediated macromolecular targeting in vivo has, however, yielded only mixed results, largely because of problems with macromolecule penetration of solid tumors. Nevertheless, prominent examples do exist where folate targeting has significantly improved the outcome of a macromolecule-based therapy, leading to complete cures of established tumors in many cases. This review presents a brief mechanistic background of folate-targeted macromolecular therapeutics and then summarizes the successes and failures observed with each major application of the technology.

  20. Mitochondria and Mitochondrial ROS in Cancer: Novel Targets for Anticancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuhui; Karakhanova, Svetlana; Hartwig, Werner; D'Haese, Jan G; Philippov, Pavel P; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondria are indispensable for energy metabolism, apoptosis regulation, and cell signaling. Mitochondria in malignant cells differ structurally and functionally from those in normal cells and participate actively in metabolic reprogramming. Mitochondria in cancer cells are characterized by reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction, which promotes cancer development by inducing genomic instability, modifying gene expression, and participating in signaling pathways. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA mutations caused by oxidative damage that impair the oxidative phosphorylation process will result in further mitochondrial ROS production, completing the "vicious cycle" between mitochondria, ROS, genomic instability, and cancer development. The multiple essential roles of mitochondria have been utilized for designing novel mitochondria-targeted anticancer agents. Selective drug delivery to mitochondria helps to increase specificity and reduce toxicity of these agents. In order to reduce mitochondrial ROS production, mitochondria-targeted antioxidants can specifically accumulate in mitochondria by affiliating to a lipophilic penetrating cation and prevent mitochondria from oxidative damage. In consistence with the oncogenic role of ROS, mitochondria-targeted antioxidants are found to be effective in cancer prevention and anticancer therapy. A better understanding of the role played by mitochondria in cancer development will help to reveal more therapeutic targets, and will help to increase the activity and selectivity of mitochondria-targeted anticancer drugs. In this review we summarized the impact of mitochondria on cancer and gave summary about the possibilities to target mitochondria for anticancer therapies. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2570-2581, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Mitochondrial chaperones may be targets for anti-cancer drugs

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at NCI have found that a mitochondrial chaperone protein, TRAP1, may act indirectly as a tumor suppressor as well as a novel target for developing anti-cancer drugs. Chaperone proteins, such as TRAP1, help other proteins adapt to stress, but sc

  2. Fibromyalgia syndrome: novel therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Ablin, Jacob N; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-05-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic disorder characterized by widespread pain and tenderness, accompanied by disturbed sleep, chronic fatigue and multiple additional functional symptoms. FMS continues to pose an unmet need regarding pharmacological treatment and many patients fail to achieve sufficient relief from existing treatments. As FMS is considered to be a condition in which pain amplification occurs within the CNS, therapeutic interventions, both pharmacological and otherwise, have revolved around attempts to influence pain processing in the CNS. In the current review, we present an update on novel targets in the search for effective treatment of FMS. PMID:27296699

  3. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors as Anticancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Law, Mary E; Corsino, Patrick E; Narayan, Satya; Law, Brian K

    2015-11-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) have been considered promising drug targets for a number of years, but most CDK inhibitors have failed rigorous clinical testing. Recent studies demonstrating clear anticancer efficacy and reduced toxicity of CDK4/6 inhibitors such as palbociclib and multi-CDK inhibitors such as dinaciclib have rejuvenated the field. Favorable results with palbociclib and its recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval demonstrate that CDK inhibitors with narrow selectivity profiles can have clinical utility for therapy based on individual tumor genetics. A brief overview of results obtained with ATP-competitive inhibitors such as palbociclib and dinaciclib is presented, followed by a compilation of new avenues that have been pursued toward the development of novel, non-ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors. These creative ways to develop CDK inhibitors are presented along with crystal structures of these agents complexed with CDK2 to highlight differences in their binding sites and mechanisms of action. The recent successes of CDK inhibitors in the clinic, combined with the potential for structure-based routes to the development of non-ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors, and evidence that CDK inhibitors may have use in suppressing chromosomal instability and in synthetic lethal drug combinations inspire optimism that CDK inhibitors will become important weapons in the fight against cancer.

  4. KRAS as a Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Frank

    2015-01-01

    KRAS proteins play a major role in human cancer, but have not yielded to therapeutic attack. New technologies in drug discovery and insights into signaling pathways that KRAS controls have promoted renewed efforts to develop therapies, either through direct targeting of KRAS itself, new ways of blocking KRAS processing, or by identifying targets that KRAS cancers depend on for survival. While drugs that block the well-established downstream pathways, RAF-MAPK and PI 3 kinase, are being tested in the clinic, new efforts are underway to exploit previously unrecognized vulnerabilities, such as altered metabolic networks, or novel pathways identified through synthetic lethal screens. Furthermore, new ways of suppressing KRAS gene expression and of harnessing the immune system offer further hope that new ways of treating KRAS are finally coming into view. These issues are discussed in this edition of CCR Focus. PMID:25878360

  5. Review of therapeutic drug monitoring of anticancer drugs part 1--cytotoxics.

    PubMed

    Paci, Angelo; Veal, Gareth; Bardin, Christophe; Levêque, Dominique; Widmer, Nicolas; Beijnen, Jos; Astier, Alain; Chatelut, Etienne

    2014-08-01

    Most anticancer drugs are characterised by a steep dose-response relationship and narrow therapeutic window. Inter-individual pharmacokinetic (PK) variability is often substantial. The most relevant PK parameter for cytotoxic drugs is the area under the plasma concentration versus time curve (AUC). Thus it is somewhat surprising that therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is still uncommon for the majority of agents. Goals of the review were to assess the rationale for more widely used TDM of cytotoxics in oncology. There are several reasons why TDM has never been fully implemented into daily oncology practice. These include difficulties in establishing appropriate concentration target ranges, common use of combination chemotherapies for many tumour types, analytical challenges with prodrugs, intracellular compounds, the paucity of published data from pharmacological trials and 'Day1 = Day21' administration schedules. There are some specific situations for which these limitations are overcome, including high dose methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil infusion, mitotane and some high dose chemotherapy regimens. TDM in paediatric oncology represents an important challenge. Established TDM approaches includes the widely used anticancer agents carboplatin, busulfan and methotrexate, with 13-cis-retinoic acid also recently of interest. Considerable effort should be made to better define concentration-effect relationships and to utilise tools such as population PK/PD models and comparative randomised trials of classic dosing versus pharmacokinetically guided adaptive dosing. There is an important heterogeneity among clinical practices and a strong need to promote TDM guidelines among the oncological community.

  6. Recent developments in receptor tyrosine kinases targeted anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Samir H.; Singh, Ratn D.; Joshi, Dilip V.; Patel, Hitesh B.; Mody, Shailesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Novel concepts and understanding of receptors lead to discoveries and optimization of many small molecules and antibodies as anti-cancerous drugs. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are such a promising class of receptors under the investigation in past three decades. RTKs are one of the essential mediators of cell signaling mechanism for various cellular processes. Transformations such as overexpression, dysregulation, or mutations of RTKs may result into malignancy, and thus are an important target for anticancer therapy. Numerous subfamilies of RTKs, such as epidermal growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptors, insulin-like growth factor receptor, and hepatocyte growth factor receptor, have been being investigated in recent years as target for anticancer therapy. The present review focuses several small molecules drugs as well as monoclonal antibodies targeting aforesaid subfamilies either approved or under investigation to treat the various cancers. PMID:27051190

  7. Development of anticancer agents targeting the Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangqian; Hao, Jijun

    2015-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays indispensable roles in both embryonic development and adult homeostasis. Abnormal regulation of this pathway is implicated in many types of cancer. Consequently, substantial efforts have made to develop therapeutic agents as anticancer drugs by specifically targeting the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Here we systematically review the potential therapeutic agents that have been developed to date for inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin cascade as well as current status of clinical trials of some of these agents. PMID:26396911

  8. Anticancer Gold(III) Porphyrins Target Mitochondrial Chaperone Hsp60.

    PubMed

    Hu, Di; Liu, Yungen; Lai, Yau-Tsz; Tong, Ka-Chung; Fung, Yi-Man; Lok, Chun-Nam; Che, Chi-Ming

    2016-01-22

    Identification of the molecular target(s) of anticancer metal complexes is a formidable challenge since most of them are unstable toward ligand exchange reaction(s) or biological reduction under physiological conditions. Gold(III) meso-tetraphenylporphyrin (gold-1 a) is notable for its high stability in biological milieux and potent in vitro and in vivo anticancer activities. Herein, extensive chemical biology approaches employing photo-affinity labeling, click chemistry, chemical proteomics, cellular thermal shift, saturation-transfer difference NMR, protein fluorescence quenching, and protein chaperone assays were used to provide compelling evidence that heat-shock protein 60 (Hsp60), a mitochondrial chaperone and potential anticancer target, is a direct target of gold-1 a in vitro and in cells. Structure-activity studies with a panel of non-porphyrin gold(III) complexes and other metalloporphyrins revealed that Hsp60 inhibition is specifically dependent on both the gold(III) ion and the porphyrin ligand.

  9. Anticancer Drug-Incorporated Layered Double Hydroxide Nanohybrids and Their Enhanced Anticancer Therapeutic Efficacy in Combination Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gyeong Jin; Kang, Joo-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoparticles have been studied as cellular delivery carriers for anionic anticancer agents. As MTX and 5-FU are clinically utilized anticancer drugs in combination therapy, we aimed to enhance the therapeutic performance with the help of LDH nanoparticles. Method. Anticancer drugs, MTX and 5-FU, and their combination, were incorporated into LDH by reconstruction method. Simply, LDHs were thermally pretreated at 400°C, and then reacted with drug solution to simultaneously form drug-incorporated LDH. Thus prepared MTX/LDH (ML), 5-FU/LDH (FL), and (MTX + 5-FU)/LDH (MFL) nanohybrids were characterized by X-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, zeta potential measurement, dynamic light scattering, and so forth. The nanohybrids were administrated to the human cervical adenocarcinoma, HeLa cells, in concentration-dependent manner, comparing with drug itself to verify the enhanced therapeutic efficacy. Conclusion. All the nanohybrids successfully accommodated intended drug molecules in their house-of-card-like structures during reconstruction reaction. It was found that the anticancer efficacy of MFL nanohybrid was higher than other nanohybrids, free drugs, or their mixtures, which means the multidrug-incorporated LDH nanohybrids could be potential drug delivery carriers for efficient cancer treatment via combination therapy. PMID:24860812

  10. Therapeutic target for protozoal diseases

    DOEpatents

    Rathore, Dharmendar; Jani, Dewal; Nagarkatti, Rana

    2008-10-21

    A novel Fasciclin Related Adhesive Protein (FRAP) from Plasmodium and related parasites is provided as a target for therapeutic intervention in diseases caused by the parasites. FRAP has been shown to play a critical role in adhesion to, or invasion into, host cells by the parasite. Furthermore, FRAP catalyzes the neutralization of heme by the parasite, by promoting its polymerization into hemozoin. This invention provides methods and compositions for therapies based on the administration of protein, DNA or cell-based vaccines and/or antibodies based on FRAP, or antigenic epitopes of FRAP, either alone or in combination with other parasite antigens. Methods for the development of compounds that inhibit the catalytic activity of FRAP, and diagnostic and laboratory methods utilizing FRAP are also provided.

  11. Therapeutic targeting of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Gores, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    The first objectives of this article are to review the structure, chemistry, and physiology of bile acids and the types of bile acid malabsorption observed in clinical practice. The second major theme addresses the classical or known properties of bile acids, such as the role of bile acid sequestration in the treatment of hyperlipidemia; the use of ursodeoxycholic acid in therapeutics, from traditional oriental medicine to being, until recently, the drug of choice in cholestatic liver diseases; and the potential for normalizing diverse bowel dysfunctions in irritable bowel syndrome, either by sequestering intraluminal bile acids for diarrhea or by delivering more bile acids to the colon to relieve constipation. The final objective addresses novel concepts and therapeutic opportunities such as the interaction of bile acids and the microbiome to control colonic infections, as in Clostridium difficile-associated colitis, and bile acid targeting of the farnesoid X receptor and G protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 with consequent effects on energy expenditure, fat metabolism, and glycemic control. PMID:26138466

  12. Renal toxicity of anticancer agents targeting HER2 and EGFR.

    PubMed

    Cosmai, Laura; Gallieni, Maurizio; Porta, Camillo

    2015-12-01

    EGFR and HER2 are found overexpressed and/or activated in many different human malignancies (e.g. breast and colon cancer), and a number of drugs specifically targeting these two tyrosine kinases have been developed over the years as anticancer agents. In the present review, the renal safety profile of presently available agents targeting either HER2 or EGFR will be discussed, together with the peculiarities related to their clinical use in patients with impaired renal function, or even in dialysis. Indeed, even though renal toxicity is not so common with these agents, it may nevertheless happen, especially when these agents are combined with traditional chemotherapeutic agents. As a whole, kidney impairment or dialysis should not be regarded per se as reasons not to administer or to stop an active anti-HER or anti-EGFR anticancer treatment, especially given the possibility of significantly improving the life expectancy of many cancer patients with the use of these agents. PMID:26341657

  13. Toward Intracellular Targeted Delivery of Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Hetal; Debinski, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    A number of anti-cancer drugs have their targets localized to particular intracellular compartments. These drugs reach the targets mainly through diffusion, dependent on biophysical and biochemical forces that allow cell penetration. This means that both cancer cells and normal cells will be subjected to such diffusion; hence many of these drugs, like chemotherapeutics, are potentially toxic and the concentration achieved at the site of their action is often suboptimal. The same relates to radiation that indiscriminately affects normal and diseased cells. However, nature-designed systems enable compounds present in the extracellular environment to end up inside the cell and even travel to more specific intracellular compartments. For example, viruses and bacterial toxins can more or less specifically recognize eukaryotic cells, enter these cells, and direct some protein portions to designated intracellular areas. These phenomena have led to creative thinking, such as employing viruses or bacterial toxins for cargo delivery to cells and, more specifically, to cancer cells. Proteins can be genetically engineered in order to not only mimic what viruses and bacterial toxins can do, but also to add new functions, extending or changing the intracellular routes. It is possible to make conjugates or, more preferably, single-chain proteins that recognize cancer cells and deliver cargo inside the cells, even to the desired subcellular compartment. These findings offer new opportunities to deliver drugs/labels only to cancer cells and only to their site of action within the cells. The development of such dual-specificity vectors for targeting cancer cells is an attractive and potentially safer and more efficacious way of delivering drugs. We provide examples of this approach for delivering brain cancer therapeutics, using a specific biomarker on glioblastoma tumor cells. PMID:22671766

  14. New dimension in therapeutic targeting of BCL-2 family proteins

    PubMed Central

    Besbes, Samaher; Mirshahi, Massoud; Pocard, Marc; Billard, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Proteins of the BCL-2 family control the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Targeting these proteins proves to be an attractive strategy for anticancer therapy. The biological context is based on the fact that BH3-only members of the family are specific antagonists of prosurvival members. This prompted the identification of “BH3 mimetic” compounds. These small peptides or organic molecules indeed mimic the BH3 domain of BH3-only proteins: by selectively binding and antagonizing prosurvival proteins, they can induce apoptosis in malignant cells. Some small-molecule inhibitors of prosurvival proteins have already entered clinical trials in cancer patients and two of them have shown significant therapeutic effects. The latest developments in the field of targeting BCL-2 family proteins highlight several new antagonists of prosurvival proteins as well as direct activators of proapoptotic proteins. These compounds open up novel prospects for the development of BH3 mimetic anticancer drugs. PMID:25970783

  15. HDAC Inhibitors as Novel Anti-Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Cristabelle; Chatterji, Biswa Prasun

    2015-01-01

    Malignant growth of cells is a condition characterized by unchecked cellular proliferation, genetic instability and epigenetic dysregulation. Up-regulated HDAC (Histone Deacetylase) enzyme activity is associated with a closed chromatin assembly and subsequent gene repression, forming a characteristic feature of malignantly transformed cells. Novel therapeutics are now targeting the zinc containing HDAC enzymes for treating various types of cancers. Recently, a spate of drugs acting via HDAC inhibition have been undergoing clinical trials and several patents present exciting molecules like PCI-24781 (Abexinostat), ITF- 2357 (Givinostat); MS-275 (Entinostat), MGCD 0103 (Mocetinostat), LBH-589 (Panobinostat), FK228 (Romidepsin), PXD-101 (Belinostat) and Valproic Acid to be used as alternatives or adjuvants to traditional chemotherapeutics. However, only three HDAC inhibitors have acquired FDA approval till date. Recently, PXD-101 obtained FDA approval for the treatment of Refractory or Relapsed Peripheral T cell lymphoma. The current article reviews patents that have introduced novel molecules that are HDAC isoform specific, superior to first generation HDAC inhibitors like SAHA (Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid) and TSA (Trichostatin A) and can be modified structurally to reduce toxic side effects and increase specificity. These molecules can combine the best characteristics of an ideal HDAC inhibiting drug either as monotherapy or in combinatorial therapy for cancer treatment thus, indicating promise to be included in the next generation of target specific HDAC inhibiting drugs.

  16. Deorphaning the Macromolecular Targets of the Natural Anticancer Compound Doliculide.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Gisbert; Reker, Daniel; Chen, Tao; Hauenstein, Kurt; Schneider, Petra; Altmann, Karl-Heinz

    2016-09-26

    The cyclodepsipeptide doliculide is a marine natural product with strong actin-polymerizing and anticancer activities. Evidence for doliculide acting as a potent and subtype-selective antagonist of prostanoid E receptor 3 (EP3) is presented. Computational target prediction suggested that this membrane receptor is a likely macromolecular target and enabled immediate in vitro validation. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the in silico deorphanization of phenotypic screening hits as a viable concept for future natural-product-inspired chemical biology and drug discovery efforts.

  17. Immunological Effects of Conventional Chemotherapy and Targeted Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Buqué, Aitziber; Kepp, Oliver; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-12-14

    The tremendous clinical success of checkpoint blockers illustrates the potential of reestablishing latent immunosurveillance for cancer therapy. Although largely neglected in the clinical practice, accumulating evidence indicates that the efficacy of conventional and targeted anticancer agents does not only involve direct cytostatic/cytotoxic effects, but also relies on the (re)activation of tumor-targeting immune responses. Chemotherapy can promote such responses by increasing the immunogenicity of malignant cells, or by inhibiting immunosuppressive circuitries that are established by developing neoplasms. These immunological "side" effects of chemotherapy are desirable, and their in-depth comprehension will facilitate the design of novel combinatorial regimens with improved clinical efficacy.

  18. Recent Trends in Targeted Anticancer Prodrug and Conjugate Design

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Yashveer; Palombo, Matthew; Sinko, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    Anticancer drugs are often nonselective antiproliferative agents (cytotoxins) that preferentially kill dividing cells by attacking their DNA at some level. The lack of selectivity results in significant toxicity to noncancerous proliferating cells. These toxicities along with drug resistance exhibited by the solid tumors are major therapy limiting factors that results into poor prognosis for patients. Prodrug and conjugate design involves the synthesis of inactive drug derivatives that are converted to an active form inside the body and preferably at the site of action. Classical prodrug and conjugate design has focused on the development of prodrugs that can overcome physicochemical (e.g., solubility, chemical instability) or biopharmaceutical problems (e.g., bioavailability, toxicity) associated with common anticancer drugs. The recent targeted prodrug and conjugate design, on the other hand, hinges on the selective delivery of anticancer agents to tumor tissues thereby avoiding their cytotoxic effects on noncancerous cells. Targeting strategies have attempted to take advantage of low extracellular pH, elevated enzymes in tumor tissues, the hypoxic environment inside the tumor core, and tumor-specific antigens expressed on tumor cell surfaces. The present review highlights recent trends in prodrug and conjugate rationale and design for cancer treatment. The various approaches that are currently being explored are critically analyzed and a comparative account of the advantages and disadvantages associated with each approach is presented. PMID:18691040

  19. Targeted anticancer prodrug with mesoporous silica nanoparticles as vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jianquan; Fang, Gang; Wang, Xiaodan; Zeng, Fang; Xiang, Yufei; Wu, Shuizhu

    2011-11-01

    A targeted anticancer prodrug system was fabricated with 180 nm mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) as carriers. The anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was conjugated to the particles through an acid-sensitive carboxylic hydrazone linker which is cleavable under acidic conditions. Moreover, folic acid (FA) was covalently conjugated to the particle surface as the targeting ligand for folate receptors (FRs) overexpressed in some cancer cells. The in vitro release profiles of DOX from the MSN-based prodrug systems showed a strong dependence on the environmental pH values. The fluorescent dye FITC was incorporated in the MSNs so as to trace the cellular uptake on a fluorescence microscope. Cellular uptakes by HeLa, A549 and L929 cell lines were tested for FA-conjugated MSNs and plain MSNs respectively, and a much more efficient uptake by FR-positive cancer cells (HeLa) can be achieved by conjugation of folic acid onto the particles because of the folate-receptor-mediated endocytosis. The cytotoxicities for the FA-conjugated MSN prodrug, the plain MSN prodrug and free DOX against three cell lines were determined, and the result indicates that the FA-conjugated MSN prodrug exhibits higher cytotoxicity to FR-positive cells, and reduced cytotoxicity to FR-negative cells. Thus, with 180 nm MSNs as the carriers for the prodrug system, good drug loading, selective targeting and sustained release of drug molecules within targeted cancer cells can be realized. This study may provide useful insights for designing and improving the applicability of MSNs in targeted anticancer prodrug systems.

  20. [Therapeutic targets in Gaucher's disease].

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Pilar; Roca, Mercedes

    2011-09-01

    Gaucher's disease (GD) occurs because of deficiency of the enzyme beta-glucocerebrosidase that results in accumulation of this glycolipid compound in the cells of the macrophage-monocyte system. There are 3 types: type 1 is non-neuronopathic with primarily visceral signs and symptoms which range tremendously in severity; infantile-onset type 2 and later-onset type 3 involve the central nervous system. More than 300 mutations have been described in the gene, partially explaining phenotypic heterogeneity. Commercialization in 1991 of the first enzyme replacement therapy, alglucerase, resulted in a revolution in the management of patients with symptomatic GD (i.e., by improving the hematological and visceral signs and symptoms). Within the first 5 years of alglucerase, its safety and efficacy in improving hemoglobin levels and platelet counts, and in reducing splenic and hepatic enlargement were confirmed albeit recognizing its inability to impact neurological symptoms and signs because of its large molecular size. Recombinant imiglucerase soon replaced alglucerase as the standard of care for GD. The therapeutic targets recently defined as treatment goals were: normalization of cell counts; reduction of liver and spleen volume; elimination of the infiltration in the bone marrow to prevent the complications, and improvement in surrogate biomarkers. PMID:22230126

  1. Therapeutic targeting of replicative immortality

    PubMed Central

    Yaswen, Paul; MacKenzie, Karen L.; Keith, W. Nicol; Hentosh, Patricia; Rodier, Francis; Zhu, Jiyue; Firestone, Gary L.; Matheu, Ander; Carnero, Amancio; Bilsland, Alan; Sundin, Tabetha; Honoki, Kanya; Fujii, Hiromasa; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Amedei, Amedeo; Amin, Amr; Helferich, Bill; Boosani, Chandra S.; Guha, Gunjan; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Chen, Sophie; Mohammed, Sulma I.; Azmi, Asfar S.; Bhakta, Dipita; Halicka, Dorota; Niccolai, Elena; Aquilano, Katia; Ashraf, S. Salman; Nowsheen, Somaira; Yang, Xujuan

    2015-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of malignant cell populations is the ability to undergo continuous proliferation. This property allows clonal lineages to acquire sequential aberrations that can fuel increasingly autonomous growth, invasiveness, and therapeutic resistance. Innate cellular mechanisms have evolved to regulate replicative potential as a hedge against malignant progression. When activated in the absence of normal terminal differentiation cues, these mechanisms can result in a state of persistent cytostasis. This state, termed “senescence,” can be triggered by intrinsic cellular processes such as telomere dysfunction and oncogene expression, and by exogenous factors such as DNA damaging agents or oxidative environments. Despite differences in upstream signaling, senescence often involves convergent interdependent activation of tumor suppressors p53 and p16/pRB, but can be induced, albeit with reduced sensitivity, when these suppressors are compromised. Doses of conventional genotoxic drugs required to achieve cancer cell senescence are often much lower than doses required to achieve outright cell death. Additional therapies, such as those targeting cyclin dependent kinases or components of the PI3K signaling pathway, may induce senescence specifically in cancer cells by circumventing defects in tumor suppressor pathways or exploiting cancer cells’ heightened requirements for telomerase. Such treatments sufficient to induce cancer cell senescence could provide increased patient survival with fewer and less severe side effects than conventional cytotoxic regimens. This positive aspect is countered by important caveats regarding senescence reversibility, genomic instability, and paracrine effects that may increase heterogeneity and adaptive resistance of surviving cancer cells. Nevertheless, agents that effectively disrupt replicative immortality will likely be valuable components of new combinatorial approaches to cancer therapy. PMID:25869441

  2. Engineering of bacteria for the visualization of targeted delivery of a cytolytic anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Sheng-Nan; Park, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Hee Jung; Zheng, Jin Hai; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Bom, Hee-Seung; Hong, Yeongjin; Szardenings, Michael; Shin, Myung Geun; Kim, Sun-Chang; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2013-11-01

    A number of recent reports have demonstrated that attenuated Salmonella typhimurium are capable of targeting both primary and metastatic tumors. The use of bacteria as a vehicle for the delivery of anticancer drugs requires a mechanism that precisely regulates and visualizes gene expression to ensure the appropriate timing and location of drug production. To integrate these functions into bacteria, we used a repressor-regulated tetracycline efflux system, in which the expression of a therapeutic gene and an imaging reporter gene were controlled by divergent promoters (tetAP and tetRP) in response to extracellular tetracycline. Attenuated S. typhimurium was transformed with the expression plasmids encoding cytolysin A, a therapeutic gene, and renilla luciferase variant 8, an imaging reporter gene, and administered intravenously to tumor-bearing mice. The engineered Salmonella successfully localized to tumor tissue and gene expression was dependent on the concentration of inducer, indicating the feasibility of peripheral control of bacterial gene expression. The bioluminescence signal permitted the localization of gene expression from the bacteria. The engineered bacteria significantly suppressed both primary and metastatic tumors and prolonged survival in mice. Therefore, engineered bacteria that carry a therapeutic and an imaging reporter gene for targeted anticancer therapy can be designed as a theranostic agent.

  3. Cisplatin encapsulated nanoparticle as a therapeutic agent for anticancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eka Putra, Gusti Ngurah Putu; Huang, Leaf; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2016-03-01

    The knowledge of manipulating size of biomaterials encapsulated drug into nano-scale particles has been researched and developed in treating cancer. Cancer is the second worldwide cause of death, therefore it is critical to treat cancers challenging with therapeutic modality of various mechanisms. Our preliminary investigation has studied cisplatin encapsulated into lipid-based nanoparticle and examined the therapeutic effect on xenografted animal model. We used mice with tumor volume ranging from 195 to 214 mm3 and then few mice were grouped into three groups including: control (PBS), lipid platinum chloride (LPC) nanoparticles and CDDP (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) at dose of 3mg cisplatin /kg body weight. The effect of the treatment was observed for 12 days post-injection. It showed that LPC NPs demonstrated a better therapeutic effect compared to CDDP at same 3mg cisplatin/kg drug dose of tumor size reduction, 96.6% and 11.1% respectively. In addition, mouse body weight loss of LPC, CDDP and PBS treated group are 12.1%, 24.3% and 1.4%. It means that by compared to CDDP group, LPC group demonstrated less side effect as not much reduction of body weight have found. Our findings have shown to be a potential modality to further investigate as a feasible cancer therapy modality.

  4. MicroRNA Targeted Therapeutic Approach for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yiwei; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the US and is expected to be the second leading cause of cancer-related death by 2030. Therefore, it is important to better understand the molecular pathogenesis, phenotypes and features of pancreatic cancer in order to design novel molecularly targeted therapies for achieving better therapeutic outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer. Recently, the roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the development and progression of pancreatic cancer became a hot topic in the scientific community of pancreatic cancer research. By conducting miRNA expression profiling, the aberrant expression of miRNAs was revealed in the serum and in cancer tissues from patients with pancreatic cancer. These aberrantly expressed miRNAs are critically correlated with the disease stage, drug resistance, and survival of pancreatic cancer patients. Hence, targeting these tiny molecules, the specific miRNAs, could provide an efficient and optimal approach in the therapy of pancreatic cancer. Indeed, the pre-clinical and in vivo experiments showed that nanoparticle delivery of synthetic oligonucleotides or treatment with natural agents could be useful to modulate the expression of miRNAs and thereby inhibit pancreatic cancer growth and progression, suggesting that targeting miRNAs combined with conventional anti-cancer therapeutics could be a novel therapeutic strategy for increasing drug sensitivity and achieving better therapeutic outcome of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. PMID:26929739

  5. Green design "bioinspired disassembly-reassembly strategy" applied for improved tumor-targeted anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruoning; Gu, Xiaochen; Zhou, Jianping; Shen, Lingjia; Yin, Lifang; Hua, Peiying; Ding, Yang

    2016-08-10

    In this study, a simple and green approach 'bioinspired disassembly-reassembly strategy' was employed to reconstitute lipoprotein nanoparticles (RLNs) using whole-components of endogenous ones (contained dehydrated human lipids and native apolipoproteins). These RLNs were engineered to mimic the configuration and properties of natural lipoproteins for efficient drug delivery. In testing therapeutic targeting to microtubules, paclitaxel (PTX) was reassembled into RLNs to achieve improved targeted anti-carcinoma treatment and minimize adverse effects, demonstrating ultimately more applicable than HDL-like particles which are based on exogenous lipid sources. We have characterized that apolipoprotein-decoration of PTX-loaded RLNs (RLNs-PTX) led to favoring uniformly dispersed distribution, increasing PTX-encapsulation with a sustained-release pattern, while enhancing biostability during blood circulation. The innate biological RLNs induced efficient intracellular trafficking of cargos in situ via multi-targeting mechanisms, including scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-mediated direct transmembrane delivery, as well as other lipoprotein-receptors associated endocytic pathways. The resulting anticancer treatment from RLNs-PTX was demonstrated a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 0.20μg/mL, cell apoptosis of 18.04% 24h post-incubation mainly arresting G2/M cell cycle in vitro, and tumor weight inhibition of 70.51% in vivo. Collectively, green-step assembly-based RLNs provided an efficient strategy for mediating tumor-targeted accumulation of PTX and enhanced anticancer efficacy. PMID:27238442

  6. Inhibitors of apoptotic proteins: new targets for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Mohammad; Qadir, Muhammad Imran; Perveen, Nadia; Ahmad, Bashir; Saleem, Uzma; Irshad, Tehseen; Ahmad, Bashir

    2013-09-01

    Inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs) can play an important role in inhibiting apoptosis by exerting their negative action on caspases (apoptotic proteins). There are eight proteins in this family: NAIP/BIRC1/NLRB, cellular IAP1 (cIAP1)/human IAP2/BIRC2, cellular IAP2 (cIAP2)/human IAP1/BIRC3, X-linked IAP (XIAP)/BIRC4, survivin/BIRC5, baculoviral IAP repeat (BIR)-containing ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme/apollon/BIRC6, livin/melanoma-IAP (ML-IAP)/BIRC7/KIAP, and testis-specific IAP (Ts-IAP)/hILP-2/BIRC8. Deregulation of these inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs) may push cell toward cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs) may provide new target for anticancer therapy. Drugs may be developed that are inhibiting these IAPs to induce apoptosis in cancerous cells.

  7. Inhibitors of apoptotic proteins: new targets for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Mohammad; Qadir, Muhammad Imran; Perveen, Nadia; Ahmad, Bashir; Saleem, Uzma; Irshad, Tehseen; Ahmad, Bashir

    2013-09-01

    Inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs) can play an important role in inhibiting apoptosis by exerting their negative action on caspases (apoptotic proteins). There are eight proteins in this family: NAIP/BIRC1/NLRB, cellular IAP1 (cIAP1)/human IAP2/BIRC2, cellular IAP2 (cIAP2)/human IAP1/BIRC3, X-linked IAP (XIAP)/BIRC4, survivin/BIRC5, baculoviral IAP repeat (BIR)-containing ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme/apollon/BIRC6, livin/melanoma-IAP (ML-IAP)/BIRC7/KIAP, and testis-specific IAP (Ts-IAP)/hILP-2/BIRC8. Deregulation of these inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs) may push cell toward cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs) may provide new target for anticancer therapy. Drugs may be developed that are inhibiting these IAPs to induce apoptosis in cancerous cells. PMID:23790005

  8. Promising therapeutic targets in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Matthay, Katherine K; George, Rani E; Yu, Alice L

    2012-05-15

    Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor in children, is derived from neural crest cells. Nearly half of patients present with metastatic disease and have a 5-year event-free survival of <50%. New approaches with targeted therapy may improve efficacy without increased toxicity. In this review we evaluate 3 promising targeted therapies: (i) (131)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a radiopharmaceutical that is taken up by human norepinephrine transporter (hNET), which is expressed in 90% of neuroblastomas; (ii) immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies targeting the GD2 ganglioside, which is expressed on 98% of neuroblastoma cells; and (iii) inhibitors of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), a tyrosine kinase that is mutated or amplified in ~10% of neuroblastomas and expressed on the surface of most neuroblastoma cells. Early-phase trials have confirmed the activity of (131)I-MIBG in relapsed neuroblastoma, with response rates of ~30%, but the technical aspects of administering large amounts of radioactivity in young children and limited access to this agent have hindered its incorporation into treatment of newly diagnosed patients. Anti-GD2 antibodies have also shown activity in relapsed disease, and a recent phase III randomized trial showed a significant improvement in event-free survival for patients receiving chimeric anti-GD2 (ch14.18) combined with cytokines and isotretinoin after myeloablative consolidation therapy. A recently approved small-molecule inhibitor of ALK has shown promising preclinical activity for neuroblastoma and is currently in phase I and II trials. This is the first agent directed to a specific mutation in neuroblastoma, and marks a new step toward personalized therapy for neuroblastoma. Further clinical development of targeted treatments offers new hope for children with neuroblastoma.

  9. Promising therapeutic targets in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Matthay, Katherine K.; George, Rani E.; Yu, Alice L.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, the most common extra- cranial solid tumor in children, is derived from neural crest cells. Nearly half of patients present with metastatic disease, and have 5-year EFS of less than 50%. New approaches with targeted therapy may improve efficacy without increased toxicity. The current review will evaluate three promising targeted therapies, including 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a radiopharmaceutical taken up by the human norepinephrine transporter expressed in 90% of neuroblastomas, immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies targeting the GD2 ganglioside, expressed on 98% of neuroblastoma cells, and inhibitors of ALK, a tyrosine kinase which is mutated or amplified in approximately 10% of neuroblastoma and expressed on the surface of most neuroblastoma cells. Early phase trials have confirmed the activity of 131I-MIBG in relapsed neuroblastoma, with response rates of about 30%, but the technical aspects of administration of large amounts of radioactivity in young children and the limited access have hindered incorporation into treatment of newly diagnosed patients. Anti-GD2 antibodies have also demonstrated activity in relapsed disease, and a recent phase III randomized trial showed a significant improvement in event-free survival for patients receiving chimeric anti-GD2 (ch14.18) combined with cytokines and isotretinoin after myeloablative consolidation therapy. A recently approved small molecule inhibitor of ALK has promising pre-clinical activity for neuroblastoma, and is currently in phase I and II trials. This is the first agent directed to a specific mutation in neuroblastoma, and marks a new step toward personalized therapy for neuroblastoma. Further clinical development of targeted treatments offers new hope for children with neuroblastoma. PMID:22589483

  10. Discovery of a new function of curcumin which enhances its anticancer therapeutic potency.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, Koji; Utsumi, Tomoya; Kumano, Takayuki; Maekawa, Saeko; Oyama, Naho; Kawakami, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin has received immense attention over the past decades because of its diverse biological activities and recognized as a promising drug candidate in a large number of diseases. However, its clinical application has been hindered due to extremely low aqueous solubility, chemical stability, and cellular uptake. In this study, we discovered quite a new function of curcumin, i.e. pH-responsive endosomal disrupting activity, derived from curcumin's self-assembly. We selected anticancer activity as an example of biological activities of curcumin, and investigated the contribution of pH-responsive property to its anticancer activity. As a result, we demonstrated that the pH-responsive property significantly enhances the anticancer activity of curcumin. Furthermore, we demonstrated a utility of the pH-responsive property of curcumin as delivery nanocarriers for doxorubicin toward combination cancer therapy. These results clearly indicate that the smart curcumin assemblies act as promising nanoplatform for development of curcumin-based therapeutics. PMID:27476814

  11. Discovery of a new function of curcumin which enhances its anticancer therapeutic potency.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, Koji; Utsumi, Tomoya; Kumano, Takayuki; Maekawa, Saeko; Oyama, Naho; Kawakami, Junji

    2016-08-01

    Curcumin has received immense attention over the past decades because of its diverse biological activities and recognized as a promising drug candidate in a large number of diseases. However, its clinical application has been hindered due to extremely low aqueous solubility, chemical stability, and cellular uptake. In this study, we discovered quite a new function of curcumin, i.e. pH-responsive endosomal disrupting activity, derived from curcumin's self-assembly. We selected anticancer activity as an example of biological activities of curcumin, and investigated the contribution of pH-responsive property to its anticancer activity. As a result, we demonstrated that the pH-responsive property significantly enhances the anticancer activity of curcumin. Furthermore, we demonstrated a utility of the pH-responsive property of curcumin as delivery nanocarriers for doxorubicin toward combination cancer therapy. These results clearly indicate that the smart curcumin assemblies act as promising nanoplatform for development of curcumin-based therapeutics.

  12. Discovery of a new function of curcumin which enhances its anticancer therapeutic potency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagahama, Koji; Utsumi, Tomoya; Kumano, Takayuki; Maekawa, Saeko; Oyama, Naho; Kawakami, Junji

    2016-08-01

    Curcumin has received immense attention over the past decades because of its diverse biological activities and recognized as a promising drug candidate in a large number of diseases. However, its clinical application has been hindered due to extremely low aqueous solubility, chemical stability, and cellular uptake. In this study, we discovered quite a new function of curcumin, i.e. pH-responsive endosomal disrupting activity, derived from curcumin’s self-assembly. We selected anticancer activity as an example of biological activities of curcumin, and investigated the contribution of pH-responsive property to its anticancer activity. As a result, we demonstrated that the pH-responsive property significantly enhances the anticancer activity of curcumin. Furthermore, we demonstrated a utility of the pH-responsive property of curcumin as delivery nanocarriers for doxorubicin toward combination cancer therapy. These results clearly indicate that the smart curcumin assemblies act as promising nanoplatform for development of curcumin-based therapeutics.

  13. Targeting NK Cells for Anticancer Immunotherapy: Clinical and Preclinical Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Carotta, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The recent success of checkpoint blockade has highlighted the potential of immunotherapy approaches for cancer treatment. Although the majority of approved immunotherapy drugs target T cell subsets, it is appreciated that other components of the immune system have important roles in tumor immune surveillance as well and thus represent promising additional targets for immunotherapy. Natural killer (NK) cells are the body’s first line of defense against infected or transformed cells, as they kill target cells in an antigen-independent manner. Although several studies have clearly demonstrated the active role of NK cells in cancer immune surveillance, only few clinically approved therapies currently exist that harness their potential. Our increased understanding of NK cell biology over the past few years has renewed the interest in NK cell-based anticancer therapies, which has lead to a steady increase of NK cell-based clinical and preclinical trials. Here, the role of NK cells in cancer immune surveillance is summarized, and several novel approaches to enhance NK cell cytotoxicity against cancer are discussed. PMID:27148271

  14. Proteomic Analysis of Anticancer TCMs Targeted at Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Yu, Ru-Yuan; He, Qing-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a rich resource of anticancer drugs. Increasing bioactive natural compounds extracted from TCMs are known to exert significant antitumor effects, but the action mechanisms of TCMs are far from clear. Proteomics, a powerful platform to comprehensively profile drug-regulated proteins, has been widely applied to the mechanistic investigation of TCMs and the identification of drug targets. In this paper, we discuss several bioactive TCM products including terpenoids, flavonoids, and glycosides that were extensively investigated by proteomics to illustrate their antitumor mechanisms in various cancers. Interestingly, many of these natural compounds isolated from TCMs mostly exert their tumor-suppressing functions by specifically targeting mitochondria in cancer cells. These TCM components induce the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of cytochrome c, and the accumulation of ROS, initiating apoptosis cascade signaling. Proteomics provides systematic views that help to understand the molecular mechanisms of the TCM in tumor cells; it bears the inherent limitations in uncovering the drug-protein interactions, however. Subcellular fractionation may be coupled with proteomics to capture and identify target proteins in mitochondria-enriched lysates. Furthermore, translating mRNA analysis, a new technology profiling the drug-regulated genes in translatome level, may be integrated into the systematic investigation, revealing global information valuable for understanding the action mechanism of TCMs. PMID:26568766

  15. Heat-Shock Protein 90-Targeted Nano Anticancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Rochani, Ankit K; Ravindran Girija, Aswathy; Borah, Ankita; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthi Kumar, D

    2016-04-01

    Suboptimal chemotherapy of anticancer drugs may be attributed to a variety of cellular mechanisms, which synergize to dodge the drug responses. Nearly 2 decades of heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90)-targeted drug discovery has shown that the mono-therapy with Hsp90 inhibitors seems to be relatively ineffective compared with combination treatment due to several cellular dodging mechanisms. In this article, we have tried to analyze and review the Hsp90 and mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR)-mediated drug resistance mechanisms. By using this information we have discussed about the rationale behind use of drug combinations that includes both or any one of these inhibitors for cancer therapy. Currently, biodegradable nano vector (NV)-loaded novel drug delivery systems have shown to resolve the problems of poor bioavailability. NVs of drugs such as paclitaxel, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, and others have been successfully introduced for medicinal use. Hence, looking at the success of NVs, in this article we have also discussed the progress made in the delivery of biodegradable NV-loaded Hsp90 and m-TOR-targeted inhibitors in multiple drug combinations. We have also discussed the possible ways by which the market success of biodegradable NVs can positively impact the clinical trials of anti-Hsp90 and m-TOR combination strategy. PMID:26886301

  16. Conotoxins: Molecular and Therapeutic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Richard J.

    Marine molluscs known as cone snails produce beautiful shells and a complex array of over 50,000 venom peptides evolved for prey capture and defence. Many of these peptides selectively modulate ion channels and transporters, making them a valuable source of new ligands for studying the role these targets play in normal and disease physiology. A number of conopeptides reduce pain in animal models, and several are now in pre-clinical and clinical development for the treatment of severe pain often associated with diseases such as cancer. Less than 1% of cone snail venom peptides are pharmacologically characterised.

  17. Injectable nanomaterials for drug delivery: carriers, targeting moieties, and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Webster, David M; Sundaram, Padma; Byrne, Mark E

    2013-05-01

    Therapeutics such as nucleic acids, proteins/peptides, vaccines, anti-cancer, and other drugs have disadvantages of low bio-availability, rapid clearance, and high toxicity. Thus, there is a significant need for the development of efficient delivery methods and carriers. Injectable nanocarriers have received much attention due to their vast range of structures and ability to contain multiple functional groups, both within the bulk material and on the surface of the particles. Nanocarriers may be tailored to control drug release and/or increase selective cell targeting, cellular uptake, drug solubility, and circulation time, all of which lead to a more efficacious delivery and action of therapeutics. The focus of this review is injectable, targeted nanoparticle drug delivery carriers highlighting the diversity of nanoparticle materials and structures as well as highlighting current therapeutics and targeting moieties. Structures and materials discussed include liposomes, polymersomes, dendrimers, cyclodextrin-containing polymers (CDPs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and gold nanoparticles. Additionally, current clinical trial information and details such as trial phase, treatment, active drug, carrier sponsor, and clinical trial identifier for different materials and structures are presented and discussed.

  18. Logical design of an anti-cancer agent targeting the plant homeodomain in Pygopus2.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ferdausi; Yamaguchi, Keiichi; Fukuoka, Mayuko; Elhelaly, Abdelazim Elsayed; Kuwata, Kazuo

    2016-09-01

    Pygopus2 (Pygo2) is a component of the Wnt signaling pathway, which is required for β-catenin mediated transcription. Plant homeodomain (PHD) finger in Pygo2 intercalates the methylated histone 3 (H3K4me) tail and HD1 domain of BCL9 that binds to β-catenin. Thus, PHD finger may be a potential target for the logical design of an anti-cancer drug. Here, we found that Spiro[2H-naphthol[1,2-b]pyran-2,4'-piperidine]-1'ethanol,3,4-dihydro-4-hydroxy-α-(6-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)) termed JBC117 interacts with D339, A348, R356, V376 and A378 in PHD corresponding to the binding sites with H3K4me and/or HD1, and has strong anti-cancer effects. For colon (HCT116) and lung (A549) cancer cell lines, IC50 values were 2.6 ± 0.16 and 3.3 ± 0.14 μM, respectively, while 33.80 ± 0.15 μM for the normal human fibroblast cells. JBC117 potently antagonized the cellular effects of β-catenin-dependent activity and also inhibited the migration and invasion of cancer cells. In vivo studies showed that the survival time of mice was significantly prolonged by the subcutaneous injection of JBC117 (10 mg/kg/day). In conclusion, JBC117 is a novel anti-cancer lead compound targeting the PHD finger of Pygo2 and has a therapeutic effect against colon and lung cancer.

  19. Molecular mechanisms and proposed targets for selected anticancer gold compounds.

    PubMed

    Casini, Angela; Messori, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, gold compounds constitute a family of very promising experimental agents for cancer treatment. Indeed, several gold(I) and gold(III) compounds were shown to manifest outstanding antiproliferative properties in vitro against selected human tumor cell lines and some of them performed remarkably well even in tumor models in vivo. Notably, the peculiar chemical properties of the gold centre impart innovative pharmacological profiles to gold-based metallodrugs most likely in relation to novel molecular mechanisms. The precise mechanisms through which cytotoxic gold compounds produce their biological effects are still largely unknown. Within this frame, the major aim of this review is to define the possible modes of action and the most probable biomolecular targets for a few representative gold compounds on which extensive biochemical and cellular data have been gathered. In particular, we will focus on auranofin and analogues, on gold(III) porphyrins and gold(III) dithiocarbamates. For these three families markedly distinct molecular mechanisms were recently invoked: a direct mitochondrial mechanism involving thioredoxin reductase inhibition in the case of the gold(I) complexes, the influence on some apoptotic proteins--i.e. MAPKs and Bcl-2--for gold(III) porphyrins, and the proteasome inhibition for gold(III) dithiocarbamates. In a few cases the distinct mechanisms may overlap. The general perspectives for the development of new gold compounds as effective anticancer agents with innovative modes of action are critically discussed. PMID:22039866

  20. Oncogenic fusion tyrosine kinases as molecular targets for anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Gunby, Rosalind H; Sala, Elisa; Tartari, Carmen J; Puttini, Miriam; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Mologni, Luca

    2007-11-01

    Deregulated activation of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) is a frequent event underlying malignant transformation in many types of cancer. The formation of oncogenic fusion tyrosine kinases (FTKs) resulting from genomic rearrangements, represents a common mechanism by which kinases escape the strict controls that normally regulate their expression and activation. FTKs are typically composed of an N-terminal dimerisation domain, provided by the fusion partner protein, fused to the kinase domain of receptor or non-receptor tyrosine kinases (non-RTKs). Since FTKs do not contain extracellular domains, they share many characteristics with non-RTKs in terms of their properties and approaches for therapeutic targeting. FTKs are cytoplasmic or sometimes nuclear proteins, depending on the normal distribution of their fusion partner. FTKs no longer respond to ligand and are instead constitutively activated by dimerisation induced by the fusion partner. Unlike RTKs, FTKs cannot be targeted by therapeutic antibodies, instead they require agents that can cross the cell membrane as with non-RTKs. Here we review the PTKs known to be expressed as FTKs in cancer and the strategies for molecularly targeting these FTKs in anti-cancer therapy. PMID:18045055

  1. Dietary lipids and adipocytes: potential therapeutic targets in cancers.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Hiu Yee; Chao, Xiaojuan; Su, Tao; Fu, Xiu-Qiong; Liu, Bin; Tse, Anfernee Kai Wing; Fong, Wang Fun; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2015-04-01

    Lipids play an important role to support the rapid growth of cancer cells, which can be derived from both the endogenous synthesis and exogenous supplies. Enhanced de novo fatty acid synthesis and mobilization of stored lipids in cancer cells promote tumorigenesis. Besides, lipids and fatty acids derived from diet or transferred from neighboring adipocytes also influence the proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. Indeed, the pathogenic roles of adipocytes in the tumor microenvironment have been recognized recently. The adipocyte-derived mediators or the cross talk between adipocytes and cancer cells in the microenvironment is gaining attention. This review will focus on the impacts of lipids on cancers and the pathogenic roles of adipocytes in tumorigenesis and discuss the possible anticancer therapeutic strategies targeting lipids in the cancer cells.

  2. Liver as a target for oligonucleotide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Alfica; Vaishnaw, Akshay; Fitzgerald, Kevin

    2013-12-01

    Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics are an emerging class of drugs that hold the promise for silencing "un-druggable" targets,thus creating unique opportunities for innovative medicines. As opposed to gene therapy, oligonucleotides are considered to be more akin to small molecule therapeutics because they are small,completely synthetic in origin, do not integrate into the host genome,and have a defined duration of therapeutic activity after which effects recover to baseline. They offer a high degree of specificity at the genetic level, thereby reducing off-target effects.At the same time, they provide a strategy for targeting any gene in the genome, including transcripts that produce mutated proteins.Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics include short interfering RNA (siRNA), that degrade target mRNA through RISC mediated RNAi; anti-miRs, that target miRNAs; miRNA mimics, that regulate target mRNA; antisense oligonucleotides, that may be working through RNAseH mediated mRNA decay; mRNA upregulation,by targeting long non-coding RNAs; and oligonucleotides induced alternative splicing [1]. All these approaches require some minimal degree of homology at the nucleic acid sequence level for them to be functional. The different mechanisms of action and their relevant activity are outlined in Fig. 1. Besides homology,RNA secondary structure has also been exploited in the case of ribozymes and aptamers, which act by binding to nucleic acids or proteins, respectively. While there have been many reports of gene knockdown and gene modulation in cell lines and mice with all these methods, very few have advanced to clinical stages.The main obstacle to date has been the safe and effective intracellular delivery of these compounds in higher species, including humans. Indeed, their action requires direct interaction with DNA/RNA within the target cell so even when one solves the issues of tissue and cellular access, intracellular/intranuclear location represents yet another barrier to

  3. Metformin and prostate cancer stem cells: a novel therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Mayer, M J; Klotz, L H; Venkateswaran, V

    2015-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in the world. Localized disease can be effectively treated with radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy. However, advanced prostate cancer is more difficult to treat and if metastatic, is incurable. There is a need for more effective therapy for advanced prostate cancer. One potential target is the cancer stem cell (CSC). CSCs have been described in several solid tumors, including prostate cancer, and contribute to therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. Metformin, a common oral biguanide used to treat type 2 diabetes, has been demonstrated to have anti-neoplastic effects. Specifically, metformin targets CSCs in breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, glioblastoma and colon cancer. Metformin acts directly on the mitochondria to inhibit oxidative phosphorylation and reduce mitochondrial ATP production. This forces tumor cells to compensate by increasing the rate of glycolysis. CSCs rely heavily on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for energy production. The glycolytic switch results in an energy crisis in these cells. Metformin could be used to exploit this metabolic weakness in CSCs. This would increase CSC sensitivity to conventional cancer therapies, circumventing treatment resistance and enhancing treatment efficacy. This review will explore the characteristics of prostate CSCs, their role in tumor propagation and therapeutic resistance and the role of metformin as a potential prostate CSC sensitizer to current anticancer therapies. PMID:26215782

  4. Metformin and prostate cancer stem cells: a novel therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Mayer, M J; Klotz, L H; Venkateswaran, V

    2015-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in the world. Localized disease can be effectively treated with radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy. However, advanced prostate cancer is more difficult to treat and if metastatic, is incurable. There is a need for more effective therapy for advanced prostate cancer. One potential target is the cancer stem cell (CSC). CSCs have been described in several solid tumors, including prostate cancer, and contribute to therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. Metformin, a common oral biguanide used to treat type 2 diabetes, has been demonstrated to have anti-neoplastic effects. Specifically, metformin targets CSCs in breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, glioblastoma and colon cancer. Metformin acts directly on the mitochondria to inhibit oxidative phosphorylation and reduce mitochondrial ATP production. This forces tumor cells to compensate by increasing the rate of glycolysis. CSCs rely heavily on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for energy production. The glycolytic switch results in an energy crisis in these cells. Metformin could be used to exploit this metabolic weakness in CSCs. This would increase CSC sensitivity to conventional cancer therapies, circumventing treatment resistance and enhancing treatment efficacy. This review will explore the characteristics of prostate CSCs, their role in tumor propagation and therapeutic resistance and the role of metformin as a potential prostate CSC sensitizer to current anticancer therapies.

  5. Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs with intravenously administered magnetic liposomes in osteosarcoma-bearing hamsters.

    PubMed

    Kubo, T; Sugita, T; Shimose, S; Nitta, Y; Ikuta, Y; Murakami, T

    2000-08-01

    Although active targeting of anticancer drugs using magnetically responsive carriers is a very attractive treatment approach for solid tumors, successful results are limited. In particular, the therapeutic utility of intravenously administered magnetically responsive carriers has to date not been clearly established. The present study investigates magnetic liposomes designed to act as anticancer drug carriers, which can be effectively delivered to solid tumors via intravenous administration. Magnetic liposomes with incorporated adriamycin (magnetic ADR liposomes) were prepared by the reverse-phase evaporation method, and an in vivo study was carried out to assess the magnetic targeting of these liposomes to hamster osteosarcoma. The average diameter of liposomes thus prepared was 146 nm. Syrian male hamsters inoculated with osteosarcoma, Os515, in the right hind limb were studied 7 days after inoculation. After the hamsters had received an intravenous administration of either magnetic ADR liposomes or ADR solution (corresponding to 5 mg ADR/kg), the ADR concentrations in plasma, tumor, liver, lung, heart, and kidney were determined at designated time intervals. Administration of magnetic ADR liposomes under magnetic force using a permanent magnet (0.4 tesla) implanted in solid tumor produced an approximately 4-fold higher maximum ADR concentration in the tumor than did administration of ADR solution. The former administration modality induced an increase in ADR concentration in the liver and lung and a decrease in the heart compared with concentrations produced by the latter. The present results indicated that intravenously administered magnetic ADR liposomes can be used to effectively deliver ADR to osteosarcoma implanted with a magnet, as well as to the lung, a common site of metastases for osteosarcoma. Our results also suggest that this new treatment approach, which involves a combination of magnet implantation at the target site and intravenous administration

  6. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase as a target for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Raymond, E; Faivre, S; Armand, J P

    2000-01-01

    Increasing knowledge of the structure and function of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) subfamily of tyrosine kinases and of their role in the initiation and progression of various cancers has, in recent years, provided the impetus for a substantial research effort aimed at developing new anticancer therapies that target specific components of the EGFR signal transduction pathway. Selective compounds have been developed that target either the extracellular ligand-binding region of the EGFR or the intracellular tyrosine kinase region, resulting in interference with the signalling pathways that modulate mitogenic and other cancer-promoting responses (e.g. cell motility, cell adhesion, invasion and angiogenesis). Potential new anticancer agents that target the extracellular ligand-binding region of the receptor include a number of monoclonal antibodies, immunotoxins and ligand-binding cytotoxic agents. Agents that target the intracellular tyrosine kinase region include small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which act by interfering with ATP binding to the receptor, and various other compounds that act at substrate-binding regions or downstream components of the signalling pathway. Currently, the most advanced of the newer therapies undergoing clinical development are antireceptor monoclonal antibodies (e.g. trastuzumab and cetuximab) and a number of small molecule EGFR-TKIs principally of the quinazoline and pyrazolo-pyrrolo-pyridopyrimidine inhibitor structural classes. The latter group of compounds offers several advantages in cancer chemotherapy, including the possibility of inhibiting specific deregulated pathways in cancer cells while having minimal effects on normal cell function. They also have favourable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties and low toxicity, and some TKIs such as the reversible inhibitor ZD1839 ('Iressa') are now undergoing phase II to III clinical trials. In addition, the accumulation of evidence from laboratory

  7. Modulation of Epigenetic Targets for Anticancer Therapy: Clinicopathological Relevance, Structural Data and Drug Discovery Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Andreol, Federico; Barbosa, Arménio Jorge Moura; Daniele Parenti, Marco; Rio, Alberto Del

    2013-01-01

    Research on cancer epigenetics has flourished in the last decade. Nevertheless growing evidence point on the importance to understand the mechanisms by which epigenetic changes regulate the genesis and progression of cancer growth. Several epigenetic targets have been discovered and are currently under validation for new anticancer therapies. Drug discovery approaches aiming to target these epigenetic enzymes with small-molecules inhibitors have produced the first pre-clinical and clinical outcomes and many other compounds are now entering the pipeline as new candidate epidrugs. The most studied targets can be ascribed to histone deacetylases and DNA methyltransferases, although several other classes of enzymes are able to operate post-translational modifications to histone tails are also likely to represent new frontiers for therapeutic interventions. By acknowledging that the field of cancer epigenetics is evolving with an impressive rate of new findings, with this review we aim to provide a current overview of pre-clinical applications of small-molecules for cancer pathologies, combining them with the current knowledge of epigenetic targets in terms of available structural data and drug design perspectives. PMID:23016851

  8. Targeted Secretion Inhibitors—Innovative Protein Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Keith; Chaddock, John

    2010-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are highly effective therapeutic products. Their therapeutic success results from highly specific and potent inhibition of neurotransmitter release with a duration of action measured in months. These same properties, however, make the botulinum neurotoxins the most potent acute lethal toxins known. Their toxicity and restricted target cell activity severely limits their clinical utility. Understanding the structure-function relationship of the neurotoxins has enabled the development of recombinant proteins selectively incorporating specific aspects of their pharmacology. The resulting proteins are not neurotoxins, but a new class of biopharmaceuticals, Targeted Secretion Inhibitors (TSI), suitable for the treatment of a wide range of diseases where secretion plays a major role. TSI proteins inhibit secretion for a prolonged period following a single application, making them particularly suited to the treatment of chronic diseases. A TSI for the treatment of chronic pain is in clinical development. PMID:22069575

  9. Angiotensins as therapeutic targets beyond heart disease.

    PubMed

    Passos-Silva, Danielle Gomes; Brandan, Enrique; Santos, Robson Augusto Souza

    2015-05-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a pivotal role in cardiovascular and hydro-electrolyte homeostasis. Blockade of the RAS as a therapeutic strategy for treating hypertension and related cardiovascular diseases is well established. However, actions of the RAS go far beyond the targets initially described. In this regard, the recent identification of novel components of the RAS, including angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)], Ang-(1-9), and alamandine, have opened new possibilities for interfering with the development and manifestations of cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular diseases. In this article, we briefly review novel targets for angiotensins and its therapeutic implications in diverse areas, including cancer, inflammation, and glaucoma. PMID:25847571

  10. Integrins as therapeutic targets: lessons and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Cox, Dermot; Brennan, Marian; Moran, Niamh

    2010-10-01

    The integrins are a large family of cell adhesion molecules that are essential for the regulation of cell growth and function. The identification of key roles for integrins in a diverse range of diseases, including cancer, infection, thrombosis and autoimmune disorders, has revealed their substantial potential as therapeutic targets. However, so far, pharmacological inhibitors for only three integrins have received marketing approval. This article discusses the structure and function of integrins, their roles in disease and the chequered history of the approved integrin antagonists. Recent advances in the understanding of integrin function, ligand interaction and signalling pathways suggest novel strategies for inhibiting integrin function that could help harness their full potential as therapeutic targets. PMID:20885411

  11. Telomeres and telomerase: Pharmacological targets for new anticancer strategies?

    PubMed

    Pendino, F; Tarkanyi, I; Dudognon, C; Hillion, J; Lanotte, M; Aradi, J; Ségal-Bendirdjian, E

    2006-03-01

    Telomeres are located at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Human telomerase, a cellular reverse transcriptase, is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis and extension of telomeric DNA. It is composed of at least, a template RNA component (hTR; human Telomerase RNA) and a catalytic subunit, the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). The absence of telomerase is associated with telomere shortening and aging of somatic cells, while high telomerase activity is observed in over 85% of human cancer cells, strongly indicating its key role during tumorigenesis. Several details regarding telomere structure and telomerase regulation have already been elucidated, providing new targets for therapeutic exploitation. Further support for anti-telomerase approaches comes from recent studies indicating that telomerase is endowed of additional functions in the control of growth and survival of tumor cells that do not depend only on the ability of this enzyme to maintain telomere length. This observation suggests that inhibiting telomerase or its synthesis may have additional anti-proliferative and apoptosis inducing effect, independently of the reduction of telomere length during cell divisions. This article reviews the basic information about the biology of telomeres and telomerase and attempts to present various approaches that are currently under investigation to inhibit its expression and its activity. We summarize herein distinct anti-telomerase approaches like antisense strategies, reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and G-quadruplex interacting agents, and also review molecules targeting hTERT expression, such as retinoids and evaluate them for their therapeutic potential. "They conceive a certain theory, and everything has to fit into that theory. If one little fact will not fit it, they throw it aside. But it is always the facts that will not fit in that are significant". "Death on the Nile". Agatha Christie.

  12. Memory as a new therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Nader, Karim; Hardt, Oliver; Lanius, Ruth

    2013-12-01

    This review aims to demonstrate how an understanding of the brain mechanisms involved in memory provides a basis for; (i) reconceptualizing some mental disorders; (ii) refining existing therapeutic tools; and (iii) designing new ones for targeting processes that maintain these disorders. First, some of the stages which a memory undergoes are defined, and the clinical relevance of an understanding of memory processing by the brain is discussed. This is followed by a brief review of some of the clinical studies that have targeted memory processes. Finally, some new insights provided by the field of neuroscience with implications for conceptualizing mental disorders are presented.

  13. Therapeutic Targeting of Tumor Suppressor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Luc G. T.; Chan, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistep process attributable to both gain-of-function mutations in oncogenes and loss-of-function mutations in tumor suppressor genes. Currently, most molecular targeted therapies are inhibitors of oncogenes, because inactivated tumor suppressor genes have proven harder to “drug.” Nevertheless, in cancers, tumor suppressor genes undergo alteration more frequently than do oncogenes. In recent years, several promising strategies directed at tumor suppressor genes, or the pathways controlled by these genes, have emerged. Here, we describe advances in a number of different methodologies aimed at therapeutically targeting tumors driven by inactivated tumor suppressor genes. PMID:25557041

  14. Discovery of a new function of curcumin which enhances its anticancer therapeutic potency

    PubMed Central

    Nagahama, Koji; Utsumi, Tomoya; Kumano, Takayuki; Maekawa, Saeko; Oyama, Naho; Kawakami, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin has received immense attention over the past decades because of its diverse biological activities and recognized as a promising drug candidate in a large number of diseases. However, its clinical application has been hindered due to extremely low aqueous solubility, chemical stability, and cellular uptake. In this study, we discovered quite a new function of curcumin, i.e. pH-responsive endosomal disrupting activity, derived from curcumin’s self-assembly. We selected anticancer activity as an example of biological activities of curcumin, and investigated the contribution of pH-responsive property to its anticancer activity. As a result, we demonstrated that the pH-responsive property significantly enhances the anticancer activity of curcumin. Furthermore, we demonstrated a utility of the pH-responsive property of curcumin as delivery nanocarriers for doxorubicin toward combination cancer therapy. These results clearly indicate that the smart curcumin assemblies act as promising nanoplatform for development of curcumin-based therapeutics. PMID:27476814

  15. Targeted Tumor Therapy with "Magnetic Drug Targeting": Therapeutic Efficacy of Ferrofluid Bound Mitoxantrone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexiou, Ch.; Schmid, R.; Jurgons, R.; Bergemann, Ch.; Arnold, W.; Parak, F.G.

    The difference between success or failure of chemotherapy depends not only on the drug itself but also on how it is delivered to its target. Biocompatible ferrofluids (FF) are paramagnetic nanoparticles, that may be used as a delivery system for anticancer agents in locoregional tumor therapy, called "magnetic drug targeting". Bound to medical drugs, such magnetic nanoparticles can be enriched in a desired body compartment (tumor) using an external magnetic field, which is focused on the area of the tumor. Through this form of target directed drug application, one attempts to concentrate a pharmacological agent at its site of action in order to minimize unwanted side effects in the organism and to increase its locoregional effectiveness. Tumor bearing rabbits (VX2 squamous cell carcinoma) in the area of the hind limb, were treated by a single intra-arterial injection (A. femoralis) of mitoxantrone bound ferrofluids (FF-MTX), while focusing an external magnetic field (1.7 Tesla) onto the tumor for 60 minutes. Complete tumor remissions could be achieved in these animals in a dose related manner (20% and 50% of the systemic dose of mitoxantrone), without any negative side effects, like e.g. leucocytopenia, alopecia or gastrointestinal disorders. The strong and specific therapeutic efficacy in tumor treatment with mitoxantrone bound ferrofluids may indicate that this system could be used as a delivery system for anticancer agents, like radionuclids, cancer-specific antibodies, anti-angiogenetic factors, genes etc.

  16. Emerging therapeutics for targeting Akt in cancer.

    PubMed

    Gdowski, Andrew; Panchoo, Marlyn; Treuren, Timothy Van; Basu, Alakananda

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate goal of cancer therapeutic research is to develop effective, targeted therapeutics that exploit the vulnerabilities of cancer cells. The three isoforms of Akt, also known as protein kinase B (PKB), are important mediators of various pathways that transmit mitogenic signals from the cell's exterior to the effector proteins of the cell's interior. Due to Akt\\\\\\\\\\\\\\'s importance in cell functions such as growth, proliferation and cell survival, many cancer cells rely on this pathway to aid in their survival. This dependence can lead to chemoresistance and selection of more adapted populations of cancer cells. Thus, it is important to understand the functional significance of isoform specificity and its relation to chemoresistance. In this review, we have summarized recent studies on Akt isoform specific regulation as well as each isoform's role in chemoresistance, emphasizing their potential as targets for cancer therapy. We have also condensed ongoing clinical studies involving various types of Akt inhibitors while highlighting the type of study, rationale and co-therapies involved in identifying Akt isoforms as promising therapeutic targets.

  17. ADAM10 as a target for anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Moss, Marcia L; Stoeck, Alexander; Yan, Wenbo; Dempsey, Peter J

    2008-02-01

    There is a great unmet medical need in the area of cancer treatment. A potential therapeutic target for intervention in cancer is ADAM10. ADAM10 is a disintegrin-metalloproteinase that processes membrane bound proteins from the cell surface to yield soluble forms. Pharmaceutical companies are actively seeking out inhibitors of ADAM10 for treatments in cancer as the enzyme is known to release the ErbB receptor, HER2/ErbB2 from the cell membrane, an event that is necessary for HER2 positive tumor cells to proliferate. ADAM10 is also capable of processing betacellulin indicating that an inhibitor could be used against EGFR/ErbB1 and/or HER4/ErbB4 receptor positive tumor cells that are betacellulin-dependent. ADAM10 is the principle sheddase for several other molecules associated with cancer proliferation, differentiation, adhesion and migration such as Notch, E-cadherin, CD44 and L1 adhesion molecule indicating that targeting ADAM10 with specific inhibitors could be beneficial.

  18. Novel therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shing-Chun; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has become the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the last two decades. Only 3%-15% of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer had 5 year survival rate. Drug resistance, high metastasis, poor prognosis and tumour relapse contributed to the malignancies and difficulties in treating pancreatic cancer. The current standard chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer is gemcitabine, however its efficacy is far from satisfactory, one of the reasons is due to the complex tumour microenvironment which decreases effective drug delivery to target cancer cell. Studies of the molecular pathology of pancreatic cancer have revealed that activation of KRAS, overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2, inactivation of p16INK4A and loss of p53 activities occurred in pancreatic cancer. Co-administration of gemcitabine and targeting the molecular pathological events happened in pancreatic cancer has brought an enhanced therapeutic effectiveness of gemcitabine. Therefore, studies looking for novel targets in hindering pancreatic tumour growth are emerging rapidly. In order to give a better understanding of the current findings and to seek the direction in future pancreatic cancer research; in this review we will focus on targets suppressing tumour metastatsis and progression, KRAS activated downstream effectors, the relationship of Notch signaling and Nodal/Activin signaling with pancreatic cancer cells, the current findings of non-coding RNAs in inhibiting pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, brief discussion in transcription remodeling by epigenetic modifiers (e.g., HDAC, BMI1, EZH2) and the plausible therapeutic applications of cancer stem cell and hyaluronan in tumour environment. PMID:25152585

  19. MicroRNAs as Therapeutic Targets and Colorectal Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Mori, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) have improved greatly over recent years; however, CRC is still one of the most common cancers and a major cause of cancer death worldwide. Several recently developed drugs and treatment strategies are currently in clinical trials; however, there is still a compelling need for novel, highly efficacious therapies. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs consisting of 20-25 nucleotides that regulate post-transcriptional gene expression by binding to the 3'-untranslated region of mRNAs. miRNAs are known to regulate cancer pathways and to be expressed aberrantly in cancer. Since their initial discovery, a large number of miRNAs have been identified as oncogenes, whereas others function as tumor suppressors. Furthermore, signaling pathways that are important in CRC (e.g. the WNT, MAPK, TGF-β, TP53 and PI3K pathways) are regulated by miRNAs. A single miRNA can simultaneously regulate several target genes and pathways, indicating the therapeutic potential of miRNAs in CRC. However, significant obstacles remain to be overcome, such as an efficient miRNA delivery system, and the assessment of safety and side effects. Thus, miRNA therapy is still developing and possesses great potential for the treatment of CRC. In this chapter, we focus on miRNAs related to CRC and summarize previous studies that emphasize the therapeutic aspects of miRNAs in CRC. PMID:27573904

  20. MicroRNAs as Therapeutic Targets and Colorectal Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Mori, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) have improved greatly over recent years; however, CRC is still one of the most common cancers and a major cause of cancer death worldwide. Several recently developed drugs and treatment strategies are currently in clinical trials; however, there is still a compelling need for novel, highly efficacious therapies. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs consisting of 20-25 nucleotides that regulate post-transcriptional gene expression by binding to the 3'-untranslated region of mRNAs. miRNAs are known to regulate cancer pathways and to be expressed aberrantly in cancer. Since their initial discovery, a large number of miRNAs have been identified as oncogenes, whereas others function as tumor suppressors. Furthermore, signaling pathways that are important in CRC (e.g. the WNT, MAPK, TGF-β, TP53 and PI3K pathways) are regulated by miRNAs. A single miRNA can simultaneously regulate several target genes and pathways, indicating the therapeutic potential of miRNAs in CRC. However, significant obstacles remain to be overcome, such as an efficient miRNA delivery system, and the assessment of safety and side effects. Thus, miRNA therapy is still developing and possesses great potential for the treatment of CRC. In this chapter, we focus on miRNAs related to CRC and summarize previous studies that emphasize the therapeutic aspects of miRNAs in CRC.

  1. Multifunctional Nanoprobes for Cancer Cell Targeting, Imaging and Anticancer Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkov, Pavel; Laronze-Cochard, Marie; Sapi, Janos; Sidorov, Lev N.; Nabiev, Igor

    The diagnosis and treatment of cancer have been greatly improved with recent developments in bio-nanotechnology, including engineering of multifunctional probes. One of the promising nanoscale tools for cancer imaging is fluorescent quantum dots (QDs), whose small size and unique optical properties allow them to penetrate into cells and ensure highly sensitive optical diagnosis of cancer at the cellular level. Furthermore, novel multi-functional probes have been developed in which QDs are conjugated with one or several functional molecules, including targeting moieties and therapeutic agents. Here, the strategy for engineering novel nanocarriers for controlled nucleus-targeted antitumor drug delivery and real-time imaging by single- or two-photon microscopy is described. A triple multifunctional nanoprobe is being developed that consists of a nitrogen-based heterocyclic derivative, an anticancer agent interacting with a DNA in living cells; a recognized molecule serving as a vector responsible for targeted delivery of the probe into cancer cells; and photoluminescent QDs providing the imaging capability of the probe. Subsequent optimization of the multifunctional nanoprobe will offer new possibilities for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Ligand substitutions between ruthenium–cymene compounds can control protein versus DNA targeting and anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Adhireksan, Zenita; Davey, Gabriela E.; Campomanes, Pablo; Groessl, Michael; Clavel, Catherine M.; Yu, Haojie; Nazarov, Alexey A.; Yeo, Charmian Hui Fang; Ang, Wee Han; Dröge, Peter; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Dyson, Paul J.; Davey, Curt A.

    2014-01-01

    Ruthenium compounds have become promising alternatives to platinum drugs by displaying specific activities against different cancers and favourable toxicity and clearance properties. Nonetheless, their molecular targeting and mechanism of action are poorly understood. Here we study two prototypical ruthenium-arene agents—the cytotoxic antiprimary tumour compound [(η6-p-cymene)Ru(ethylene-diamine)Cl]PF6 and the relatively non-cytotoxic antimetastasis compound [(η6-p-cymene)Ru(1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane)Cl2]—and discover that the former targets the DNA of chromatin, while the latter preferentially forms adducts on the histone proteins. Using a novel ‘atom-to-cell’ approach, we establish the basis for the surprisingly site-selective adduct formation behaviour and distinct cellular impact of these two chemically similar anticancer agents, which suggests that the cytotoxic effects arise largely from DNA lesions, whereas the protein adducts may be linked to the other therapeutic activities. Our study shows promise for developing new ruthenium drugs, via ligand-based modulation of DNA versus protein binding and thus cytotoxic potential, to target distinguishing epigenetic features of cancer cells. PMID:24637564

  3. Polymeric micelles loaded with platinum anticancer drugs target preangiogenic micrometastatic niches associated with inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hailiang; Cabral, Horacio; Toh, Kazuko; Mi, Peng; Chen, Yi-Chun; Matsumoto, Yu; Yamada, Naoki; Liu, Xueying; Kinoh, Hiroaki; Miura, Yutaka; Kano, Mitsunobu R; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2014-09-10

    Nanocarriers have been used for specific delivery of therapeutic agents to solid tumors based on the enhanced permeability and retention in cancerous tissues. Despite metastasis is the main reason of cancer-related death and a priority for nanocarrier-based therapies, the targeting ability of nanocarriers to the metastatic disease is poorly understood, especially for preangiogenic micrometastases as nanocarriers usually use the malignant neovasculature for enhancing their accumulation. Thus, herein, we studied the ability of micellar nanocarriers incorporating (1,2-diaminocyclohexane)platinum(II) (DACHPt) for treating liver metastases of bioluminescent murine colon adenocarcinoma C-26, during overt and preangiogenic metastatic stages. After intravenous injection, DACHPt-loaded micelles (DACHPt/m) effectively inhibited the tumor growth in both metastatic tumor models. While the anticancer activity of the micelles against overt metastases was associated with their selective accumulation in cancerous tissues having neovasculature, the ability of DACHPt/m to target preangiogenic metastases was correlated with the inflammatory microenvironment of the niche. This targeting capability of polymeric micelles to preangiogenic metastasis may provide a novel approach for early diagnosis and treatment of metastases. PMID:24956488

  4. SLC Transporters as Therapeutic Targets: Emerging Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lawrence; Yee, Sook Wah; Kim, Richard B.; Giacomini, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Solute carrier (SLC) transporters — a family of more than 300 membrane-bound proteins that facilitate the transport of a wide array of substrates across biological membranes — have important roles in physiological processes ranging from the cellular uptake of nutrients to the absorption of drugs and other xenobiotics. Several classes of marketed drugs target well-known SLC transporters, such as neurotransmitter transporters, and human genetic studies have provided powerful insight into the roles of more-recently characterized SLC transporters in both rare and common diseases, indicating a wealth of new therapeutic opportunities. This Review summarizes knowledge on the roles of SLC transporters in human disease, describes strategies to target such transporters, and highlights current and investigational drugs that modulate SLC transporters, as well as promising drug targets. PMID:26111766

  5. SLC transporters as therapeutic targets: emerging opportunities.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lawrence; Yee, Sook Wah; Kim, Richard B; Giacomini, Kathleen M

    2015-08-01

    Solute carrier (SLC) transporters - a family of more than 300 membrane-bound proteins that facilitate the transport of a wide array of substrates across biological membranes - have important roles in physiological processes ranging from the cellular uptake of nutrients to the absorption of drugs and other xenobiotics. Several classes of marketed drugs target well-known SLC transporters, such as neurotransmitter transporters, and human genetic studies have provided powerful insight into the roles of more-recently characterized SLC transporters in both rare and common diseases, indicating a wealth of new therapeutic opportunities. This Review summarizes knowledge on the roles of SLC transporters in human disease, describes strategies to target such transporters, and highlights current and investigational drugs that modulate SLC transporters, as well as promising drug targets.

  6. Nanomicellar carriers for targeted delivery of anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Huang, Yixian; Li, Song

    2014-01-01

    Clinical application of anticancer drugs is limited by problems such as low water solubility, lack of tissue-specificity and toxicity. Formulation development represents an important approach to these problems. Among the many delivery systems studied, polymeric micelles have gained considerable attention owing to ease in preparation, small sizes (10–100 nm), and ability to solubilize water-insoluble anticancer drugs and accumulate specifically at the tumors. This article provides a brief review of several promising micellar systems and their applications in tumor therapy. The emphasis is placed on the discussion of the authors’ recent work on several nanomicellar systems that have both a delivery function and antitumor activity, named dual-function drug carriers. PMID:24341817

  7. The flavonoid fisetin as an anticancer agent targeting the growth signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Rengarajan, Thamaraiselvan; Yaacob, Nik Soriani

    2016-10-15

    Epidemiological studies show that consumption of diets rich in fruits and vegetables is associated with lower risks of cancer. This evidence has kindled interest into research on bioactive food components and has till date resulted in the identification of many compounds with cancer preventive and therapeutic potential. Among such compounds is fisetin (3,7,3,4-tetrahydroxyflavone), a flavonol that is commonly found in many fruits and vegetables such as apples, persimmons, grapes, kiwis, strawberries, onions and cucumbers. Fisetin has been shown to inhibit or retard the growth of various cancer cells in culture and implanted tumors in vivo. Fisetin targets many components of intracellular signaling pathways including regulators of cell survival and apoptosis, tumor angiogenic and metastatic switches by modulating a distinct set of upstream kinases, transcription factors and their regulators. Current evidence supports the idea that fisetin is a promising agent for cancer treatment. This review summarizes reported anticancer effects of fisetin, and re-emphasizes its potential therapeutic role in the treatment of cancer. PMID:27377217

  8. The flavonoid fisetin as an anticancer agent targeting the growth signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Rengarajan, Thamaraiselvan; Yaacob, Nik Soriani

    2016-10-15

    Epidemiological studies show that consumption of diets rich in fruits and vegetables is associated with lower risks of cancer. This evidence has kindled interest into research on bioactive food components and has till date resulted in the identification of many compounds with cancer preventive and therapeutic potential. Among such compounds is fisetin (3,7,3,4-tetrahydroxyflavone), a flavonol that is commonly found in many fruits and vegetables such as apples, persimmons, grapes, kiwis, strawberries, onions and cucumbers. Fisetin has been shown to inhibit or retard the growth of various cancer cells in culture and implanted tumors in vivo. Fisetin targets many components of intracellular signaling pathways including regulators of cell survival and apoptosis, tumor angiogenic and metastatic switches by modulating a distinct set of upstream kinases, transcription factors and their regulators. Current evidence supports the idea that fisetin is a promising agent for cancer treatment. This review summarizes reported anticancer effects of fisetin, and re-emphasizes its potential therapeutic role in the treatment of cancer.

  9. Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Characterization of Covalent Adducts of DNA with Anti-cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Silvestri, Catherine; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic activities of many anticancer and antibacterial drugs arise from their interactions with nucleic acid substrates. Some of these ligands interact with DNA in a way that causes conformational changes or damage to the nucleic acid targets, ultimately altering recognition by key DNA-specific enzymes, interfering with DNA transcription or prohibiting replication, and terminating cell growth and proliferation. The design and synthesis of ligands that bind to nucleic acids remains a dynamic field in medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical research. The quest for more selective and efficacious DNA-interactive anti-cancer chemotherapeutics has likewise catalyzed the need for sensitive analytical methods that can provide structural information about the nature of the resulting DNA adducts and provide insight into the mechanistic pathways of the DNA/drug interactions and the impact on the cellular processes in biological systems. This review focuses on the array of tandem mass spectrometric strategies developed and applied for characterization of covalent adducts formed between DNA and anti-cancer ligands. PMID:23150278

  10. Advancements in therapeutically targeting orphan GPCRs

    PubMed Central

    Stockert, Jennifer A.; Devi, Lakshmi A.

    2015-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are popular biological targets for drug discovery and development. To date there are more than 140 orphan GPCRs, i.e., receptors whose endogenous ligands are unknown. Traditionally orphan GPCRs have been difficult to study and the development of therapeutic compounds targeting these receptors has been extremely slow although these GPCRs are considered important targets based on their distribution and behavioral phenotype as revealed by animals lacking the receptor. Recent advances in several methods used to study orphan receptors, including protein crystallography and homology modeling are likely to be useful in the identification of therapeutics targeting these receptors. In the past 13 years, over a dozen different Class A GPCRs have been crystallized; this trend is exciting, since homology modeling of GPCRs has previously been limited by the availability of solved structures. As the number of solved GPCR structures continues to grow so does the number of templates that can be used to generate increasingly accurate models of phylogenetically related orphan GPCRs. The availability of solved structures along with the advances in using multiple templates to build models (in combination with molecular dynamics simulations that reveal structural information not provided by crystallographic data and methods for modeling hard-to-predict flexible loop regions) have improved the quality of GPCR homology models. This, in turn, has improved the success rates of virtual ligand screens that use homology models to identify potential receptor binding compounds. Experimental testing of the predicted hits and validation using traditional GPCR pharmacological approaches can be used to drive ligand-based efforts to probe orphan receptor biology as well as to define the chemotypes and chemical scaffolds important for binding. As a result of these advances, orphan GPCRs are emerging from relative obscurity as a new class of drug targets. PMID

  11. Autophagy and chemotherapy resistance: a promising therapeutic target for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sui, X; Chen, R; Wang, Z; Huang, Z; Kong, N; Zhang, M; Han, W; Lou, F; Yang, J; Zhang, Q; Wang, X; He, C; Pan, H

    2013-01-01

    Induction of cell death and inhibition of cell survival are the main principles of cancer therapy. Resistance to chemotherapeutic agents is a major problem in oncology, which limits the effectiveness of anticancer drugs. A variety of factors contribute to drug resistance, including host factors, specific genetic or epigenetic alterations in the cancer cells and so on. Although various mechanisms by which cancer cells become resistant to anticancer drugs in the microenvironment have been well elucidated, how to circumvent this resistance to improve anticancer efficacy remains to be defined. Autophagy, an important homeostatic cellular recycling mechanism, is now emerging as a crucial player in response to metabolic and therapeutic stresses, which attempts to maintain/restore metabolic homeostasis through the catabolic lysis of excessive or unnecessary proteins and injured or aged organelles. Recently, several studies have shown that autophagy constitutes a potential target for cancer therapy and the induction of autophagy in response to therapeutics can be viewed as having a prodeath or a prosurvival role, which contributes to the anticancer efficacy of these drugs as well as drug resistance. Thus, understanding the novel function of autophagy may allow us to develop a promising therapeutic strategy to enhance the effects of chemotherapy and improve clinical outcomes in the treatment of cancer patients. PMID:24113172

  12. Diabetic Kidney Disease: Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Toth-Manikowski, Stephanie; Atta, Mohamed G.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic that has led to a rise in diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Over the past two decades, there has been significant clarification of the various pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of DKD. Nonetheless, very little has changed in the way clinicians manage patients with this disorder. Indeed, treatment is primarily centered on controlling hyperglycemia and hypertension and inhibiting the renin-angiotensin system. The purpose of this review is to describe the current understanding of how the hemodynamic, metabolic, inflammatory, and alternative pathways are all entangled in pathogenesis of DKD and detail the various therapeutic targets that may one day play a role in quelling this epidemic. PMID:26064987

  13. Twist: a molecular target in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Asaduzzaman; Chen, Han-chun; Zhang, Dianzheng; Fu, Junjiang

    2013-10-01

    Twist, the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, is involved in the process of epithelial to mesenchymal transitions (EMTs), which play an essential role in cancer metastasis. Overexpression of Twist or its promoter methylation is a common scenario in metastatic carcinomas. Twist is activated by a variety of signal transduction pathways, including Akt, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, mitogen-activated protein kinase, Ras, and Wnt signaling. Activated Twist upregulates N-cadherin and downregulates E-cadherin, which are the hallmarks of EMT. Moreover, Twist plays an important role in some physiological processes involved in metastasis, like angiogenesis, invadopodia, extravasation, and chromosomal instability. Twist also protects cancer cells from apoptotic cell death. In addition, Twist is responsible for the stemness of cancer cells and the generation of drug resistance. Recently, targeting Twist has gained significant interests in cancer therapeutics. The inactivation of Twist by small RNA technology or chemotherapeutic approach has been proved successful. Moreover, several inhibitors which are antagonistic to the upstream or downstream molecules of Twist signaling pathways have also been identified. Development of potential treatment strategies by targeting Twist has a great promise in cancer therapeutics.

  14. AMPK as a Potential Anticancer Target – Friend or Foe?

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Hsiao-Ching; Chou, Chih-Chien; Kulp, Samuel K.; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key player in maintaining energy homeostasis in response to metabolic stress. Beyond diabetes and metabolic syndrome, there is a growing interest in the therapeutic exploitation of the AMPK pathway in cancer treatment in light of its unique ability to regulate cancer cell proliferation through the reprogramming of cell metabolism. Although many studies support the tumor-suppressive role of AMPK, emerging evidence suggests that the metabolic checkpoint function of AMPK might be overridden by stress or oncogenic signals so that tumor cells use AMPK activation as a survival strategy to gain growth advantage. These findings underscore the complexity in the cellular function of AMPK in maintaining energy homeostasis under physiological versus pathological conditions. Thus, this review aims to provide an overview of recent findings on the functional interplay of AMPK with different cell metabolic and signaling effectors, particularly histone deacetylases, in mediating downstream tumor suppressive or promoting mechanisms in different cell systems. Although AMPK activation inhibits tumor growth by targeting multiple signaling pathways relevant to tumorigenesis, under certain cellular contexts or certain stages of tumor development, AMPK might act as a protective response to metabolic stresses, such as nutrient deprivation, low oxygen, and low pH, or as a downstream effectors of oncogenic proteins, including androgen receptor, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, c-Src, and MYC. Thus, investigations to define at which stage(s) of tumorigenesis and cancer progression or for which genetic aberrations AMPK inhibition might represent a more relevant strategy than AMPK activation for cancer treatment are clearly warranted. PMID:23859619

  15. AMPK as a potential anticancer target - friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hsiao-Ching; Chou, Chih-Chien; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key player in maintaining energy homeostasis in response to metabolic stress. Beyond diabetes and metabolic syndrome, there is a growing interest in the therapeutic exploitation of the AMPK pathway in cancer treatment in light of its unique ability to regulate cancer cell proliferation through the reprogramming of cell metabolism. Although many studies support the tumor-suppressive role of AMPK, emerging evidence suggests that the metabolic checkpoint function of AMPK might be overridden by stress or oncogenic signals so that tumor cells use AMPK activation as a survival strategy to gain growth advantage. These findings underscore the complexity in the cellular function of AMPK in maintaining energy homeostasis under physiological versus pathological conditions. Thus, this review aims to provide an overview of recent findings on the functional interplay of AMPK with different cell metabolic and signaling effectors, particularly histone deacetylases, in mediating downstream tumor suppressive or promoting mechanisms in different cell systems. Although AMPK activation inhibits tumor growth by targeting multiple signaling pathways relevant to tumorigenesis, under certain cellular contexts or certain stages of tumor development, AMPK might act as a protective response to metabolic stresses, such as nutrient deprivation, low oxygen, and low pH, or as downstream effectors of oncogenic proteins, including androgen receptor, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, c-Src, and MYC. Thus, investigations to define at which stage(s) of tumorigenesis and cancer progression or for which genetic aberrations AMPK inhibition might represent a more relevant strategy than AMPK activation for cancer treatment are clearly warranted.

  16. A novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent with high selectivity for cancer cells.

    PubMed

    He, Huan; Li, Dong-Wei; Yang, Li-Yun; Fu, Li; Zhu, Xun-Jin; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria have recently emerged as novel targets for cancer therapy due to its important roles in fundamental cellular function. Discovery of new chemotherapeutic agents that allow for simultaneous treatment and visualization of cancer is urgent. Herein, we demonstrate a novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent (FPB), exhibiting both imaging capability and anticancer activity. It can selectively accumulate in mitochondria and induce cell apoptosis. Notably, it results in much higher toxicity toward cancer cells owing to much higher uptake by cancer cells. These features make it highly attractive in cancer imaging and treatment. PMID:26337336

  17. A novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent with high selectivity for cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Huan; Li, Dong-Wei; Yang, Li-Yun; Fu, Li; Zhu, Xun-Jin; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria have recently emerged as novel targets for cancer therapy due to its important roles in fundamental cellular function. Discovery of new chemotherapeutic agents that allow for simultaneous treatment and visualization of cancer is urgent. Herein, we demonstrate a novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent (FPB), exhibiting both imaging capability and anticancer activity. It can selectively accumulate in mitochondria and induce cell apoptosis. Notably, it results in much higher toxicity toward cancer cells owing to much higher uptake by cancer cells. These features make it highly attractive in cancer imaging and treatment. PMID:26337336

  18. ADAM17, shedding, TACE as therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Rose-John, Stefan

    2013-05-01

    ADAM17 has been molecularly cloned as the enzyme responsible for cleavage of the transmembrane protein TNFα (TNFα converting enzyme, TACE). Later it was realized that ADAM17 was also responsible for the processing of cell adhesion proteins, cytokine and growth factor receptors and many ligands of the EGF receptor. Since TNFα is a target of anti-inflammatory therapies, it was speculated that inhibition of ADAM17 might be a therapeutic strategy in the treatment of inflammation or inflammation associated cancer. Meanwhile it has been recognized that ADAM17 governs many vital functions in the body and loss of ADAM17 leads to severe defects in the skin and to high susceptibility of the intestine to inflammation. Here I summarize data on the physiologic role of ADAM17 and the feasibility of specific blockade of this enzyme.

  19. Epigenetics and therapeutic targets mediating neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Irfan A; Mehler, Mark F

    2015-12-01

    The rapidly evolving science of epigenetics is transforming our understanding of the nervous system in health and disease and holds great promise for the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches targeting neurological diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic factors and mechanisms serve as important mediators of the pathogenic processes that lead to irrevocable neural injury and of countervailing homeostatic and regenerative responses. Epigenetics is, therefore, of considerable translational significance to the field of neuroprotection. In this brief review, we provide an overview of epigenetic mechanisms and highlight the emerging roles played by epigenetic processes in neural cell dysfunction and death and in resultant neuroprotective responses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection.

  20. [MUC1, a therapeutic target in oncology].

    PubMed

    Limacher, Jean-Marc; Acres, Bruce

    2007-03-01

    MUC1 is a large, highly glycosylated protein expressed on the apical membrane of many epithelial cells. With other members of the mucin family it contributes to the protection and function of mucosal cells. The intracellular part of the protein may also participate in signal transduction pathway, through multiple interactions with intracellular proteins. Overexpression of MUC1 is frequently observed in the majority of epithelial cancers and even in some haematological malignancies. In tumor cells, MUC1 loses apical distribution and is hypoglycosylated. These cancer-associated changes render it antigenic and make it an attractive target for a specific cancer immunotherapy. Several MUC1-based therapeutic cancer vaccines are currently under clinical investigation. PMID:17371767

  1. New therapeutic targets for cancer bone metastases

    PubMed Central

    Krzeszinski, Jing Y.; Wan, Yihong

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastases are dejected consequences of many types of tumors including breast, prostate, lung, kidney and thyroid cancers. This complicated process begins with the successful tumor cell epithelial–mesenchymal transition, escape from the original site, and penetration into circulation. The homing of tumor cells to the bone depends on both tumor-intrinsic traits and various molecules supplied by the bone metastatic niche. The colonization and growth of cancer cells in the osseous environment, which awaken their dormancy to form micro- and macro-metastasis, involve an intricate interaction between the circulating tumor cells and local bone cells including osteoclasts, osteoblasts, adipocytes and macrophages. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances in the identification of new molecules and novel mechanisms during each step of bone metastasis that may serve as promising therapeutic targets. PMID:25962679

  2. Bone defects: molecular and cellular therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Desiderio, Vincenzo; Tirino, Virginia; Papaccio, Gianpaolo; Paino, Francesca

    2014-06-01

    Bone defects are one of the most serious pathologies that need tissue regeneration therapies. Studies on mesenchymal stem cells are changing the way we treat bone diseases. MSCs have been used for the treatment of osteogenesis imperfecta, hypophosphatasia, osteonecrosis of the femoral head, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. In this context, it is becoming ever more clear that the future of therapies will be based on the use of stem cells. In this concise review, we highlight the importance of the use of MSCs in bone diseases, focusing on the role of histone deacetylases and Wnt pathways involved in osteogenesis. A better understanding of MSC biology and osteogenesis is needed in order to develop new and targeted therapeutic strategies for the treatment of bone diseases/disorders.

  3. Development of Novel Activin-Targeted Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Justin L; Walton, Kelly L; Al-Musawi, Sara L; Kelly, Emily K; Qian, Hongwei; La, Mylinh; Lu, Louis; Lovrecz, George; Ziemann, Mark; Lazarus, Ross; El-Osta, Assam; Gregorevic, Paul; Harrison, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    Soluble activin type II receptors (ActRIIA/ActRIIB), via binding to diverse TGF-β proteins, can increase muscle and bone mass, correct anemia or protect against diet-induced obesity. While exciting, these multiple actions of soluble ActRIIA/IIB limit their therapeutic potential and highlight the need for new reagents that target specific ActRIIA/IIB ligands. Here, we modified the activin A and activin B prodomains, regions required for mature growth factor synthesis, to generate specific activin antagonists. Initially, the prodomains were fused to the Fc region of mouse IgG2A antibody and, subsequently, “fastener” residues (Lys45, Tyr96, His97, and Ala98; activin A numbering) that confer latency to other TGF-β proteins were incorporated. For the activin A prodomain, these modifications generated a reagent that potently (IC50 5 nmol/l) and specifically inhibited activin A signaling in vitro, and activin A-induced muscle wasting in vivo. Interestingly, the modified activin B prodomain inhibited both activin A and B signaling in vitro (IC50 ~2 nmol/l) and in vivo, suggesting it could serve as a general activin antagonist. Importantly, unlike soluble ActRIIA/IIB, the modified prodomains did not inhibit myostatin or GDF-11 activity. To underscore the therapeutic utility of specifically antagonising activin signaling, we demonstrate that the modified activin prodomains promote significant increases in muscle mass. PMID:25399825

  4. Copper and conquer: copper complexes of di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazones as novel anti-cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Chan; Fouani, Leyla; Jansson, Patric J; Wooi, Danson; Sahni, Sumit; Lane, Darius J R; Palanimuthu, Duraippandi; Lok, Hiu Chuen; Kovačević, Zaklina; Huang, Michael L H; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Richardson, Des R

    2016-09-01

    Copper is an essential trace metal required by organisms to perform a number of important biological processes. Copper readily cycles between its reduced Cu(i) and oxidised Cu(ii) states, which makes it redox active in biological systems. This redox-cycling propensity is vital for copper to act as a catalytic co-factor in enzymes. While copper is essential for normal physiology, enhanced copper levels in tumours leads to cancer progression. In particular, the stimulatory effect of copper on angiogenesis has been established in the last several decades. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that copper affects tumour growth and promotes metastasis. Based on the effects of copper on cancer progression, chelators that bind copper have been developed as anti-cancer agents. In fact, a novel class of thiosemicarbazone compounds, namely the di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazones that bind copper, have shown great promise in terms of their anti-cancer activity. These agents have a unique mechanism of action, in which they form redox-active complexes with copper in the lysosomes of cancer cells. Furthermore, these agents are able to overcome P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mediated multi-drug resistance (MDR) and act as potent anti-oncogenic agents through their ability to up-regulate the metastasis suppressor protein, N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1). This review provides an overview of the metabolism and regulation of copper in normal physiology, followed by a discussion of the dysregulation of copper homeostasis in cancer and the effects of copper on cancer progression. Finally, recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of action of anti-cancer agents targeting copper are discussed.

  5. Copper and conquer: copper complexes of di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazones as novel anti-cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Chan; Fouani, Leyla; Jansson, Patric J; Wooi, Danson; Sahni, Sumit; Lane, Darius J R; Palanimuthu, Duraippandi; Lok, Hiu Chuen; Kovačević, Zaklina; Huang, Michael L H; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Richardson, Des R

    2016-09-01

    Copper is an essential trace metal required by organisms to perform a number of important biological processes. Copper readily cycles between its reduced Cu(i) and oxidised Cu(ii) states, which makes it redox active in biological systems. This redox-cycling propensity is vital for copper to act as a catalytic co-factor in enzymes. While copper is essential for normal physiology, enhanced copper levels in tumours leads to cancer progression. In particular, the stimulatory effect of copper on angiogenesis has been established in the last several decades. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that copper affects tumour growth and promotes metastasis. Based on the effects of copper on cancer progression, chelators that bind copper have been developed as anti-cancer agents. In fact, a novel class of thiosemicarbazone compounds, namely the di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazones that bind copper, have shown great promise in terms of their anti-cancer activity. These agents have a unique mechanism of action, in which they form redox-active complexes with copper in the lysosomes of cancer cells. Furthermore, these agents are able to overcome P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mediated multi-drug resistance (MDR) and act as potent anti-oncogenic agents through their ability to up-regulate the metastasis suppressor protein, N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1). This review provides an overview of the metabolism and regulation of copper in normal physiology, followed by a discussion of the dysregulation of copper homeostasis in cancer and the effects of copper on cancer progression. Finally, recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of action of anti-cancer agents targeting copper are discussed. PMID:27334916

  6. Update on Aurora Kinase Targeted Therapeutics in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Green, Myke R.; Woolery, Joseph E.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Mammalian cells contain three distinct serine/threonine protein kinases with highly conserved catalytic domains, including aurora A and B kinases that are essential regulators of mitotic entry and progression. Overexpression of aurora A and/or B kinase is associated with high proliferation rates and poor prognosis, making them ideal targets for anti-cancer therapy. Disruption of mitotic machinery is a proven anti-cancer strategy employed by multiple chemotherapeutic agents. Numerous small molecule inhibitors of the aurora kinases have been discovered and tested in vivo and in vitro, with a few currently in phase II testing. Areas covered This review provides the reader with updated results from both preclinical and human studies for each of the aurora kinase inhibitors (AKI) that are currently being investigated. The paper also covers in detail the late breaking and phase I data presented for AKIs thereby allowing the reader to compare and contrast individual and classrelated effects of AKIs. Expert opinion While the successful development and approval of an AKI for anti-cancer therapy remains unresolved, pre-clinical identification of resistant mechanisms would help design better early phase clinical trials where relevant combinations may be evaluated prior to phase II testing. The authors believe that aurora kinases are important anti-cancer targets that operate in collaboration with other oncogenes intimately involved in uncontrolled tumor proliferation and by providing a unique, targeted and complimentary anti-cancer mechanism, expand the available armamentarium against cancer. PMID:21556291

  7. Identification of endoplasmic reticulum stress-inducing agents by antagonizing autophagy: a new potential strategy for identification of anti-cancer therapeutics in B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Emilia; Maddocks, Kami; Flynn, Joseph; Jones, Jeffrey; Cole, Sara L; Zhang, Xiaoli; Byrd, John C; Johnson, Amy J

    2013-12-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays a vital function in multiple cellular processes. There is a growing interest in developing therapeutic agents that can target the ER in cancer cells, inducing a stress response that leads to cell death. However, ER stress-inducing agents can also induce autophagy, a survival strategy of cancer cells. Therefore, by inhibiting autophagy we can increase the efficacy of the ER stress-inducing agents. Nelfinavir, a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitor with anti-cancer properties, can induce ER stress. Nelfinavir's effects on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are yet to be elucidated. Herein we demonstrate that nelfinavir induces ER morphological changes and stress response, along with an autophagic protective strategy. Our data reveal that chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, significantly increases nelfinavir cytotoxicity. These results identify a novel strategy potentially effective in CLL treatment, by repositioning two well-known drugs as a combinatorial therapy with anti-cancer properties.

  8. Mitochondrial DNA is a direct target of anti-cancer anthracycline drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Neil Poulton, Joanna

    2009-01-16

    The anthracyclines, such as doxorubicin (DXR), are potent anti-cancer drugs but they are limited by their clinical toxicity. The mechanisms involved remain poorly understood partly because of the difficulty in determining sub-cellular drug localisation. Using a novel method utilising the fluorescent DNA dye PicoGreen, we found that anthracyclines intercalated not only into nuclear DNA but also mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Intercalation of mtDNA by anthracyclines may thus contribute to the marked mitochondrial toxicity associated with these drugs. By contrast, ethidium bromide intercalated exclusively into mtDNA, without interacting with nuclear DNA, thereby explaining why mtDNA is the main target for ethidium. By exploiting PicoGreen quenching we also developed a novel assay for quantification of mtDNA levels by flow-cytometry, an approach which should be useful for studies of mitochondrial dysfunction. In summary our PicoGreen assay should be useful to study drug/DNA interactions within live cells, and facilitate therapeutic drug monitoring and kinetic studies in cancer patients.

  9. The renaissance of polypharmacology in the development of anti-cancer therapeutics: Inhibition of the "Triad of Death" in cancer by Di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazones.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Patric J; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Lane, Darius J R; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Seebacher, Nicole A; Fouani, Leyla; Sahni, Sumit; Merlot, Angelica M; Richardson, Des R

    2015-10-01

    Cancer is a disease that is a "moving target", since as the condition progresses, the molecular targets change and evolve. Moreover, due to clonal selection, a specific anti-cancer drug with one molecular target may only be effective for a limited time period before drug resistance results and the agent becomes ineffective. Hence, the concept of an anti-tumor therapeutic exhibiting polypharmacology can be highly advantageous, rather than a therapeutic obstacle. A novel class of agents possessing these desirable properties are the di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazones, which bind iron and copper to affect a variety of critical molecular targets in tumors. In fact, these compounds possess multiple properties that enable them to overcome the "triad of death" in cancer, namely: primary tumor growth, drug resistance and metastasis. In fact, at the molecular level, their potent anti-oncogenic activity includes: up-regulation of the metastasis suppressor, N-myc downstream regulated gene 1; up-regulation of the tumor suppressor, PTEN; down-regulation of the proto-oncogene, cyclin D1; inhibition of the rate-limiting step in DNA synthesis catalyzed by ribonucleotide reductase; and the inhibition of multiple oncogenic signaling pathways, e.g., Ras/MAPK signaling, protein kinase B (AKT)/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, ROCK/pMLC2, etc. This Perspective article discusses the advantages of incorporating polypharmacology into anti-cancer drug design using the di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazones as a pertinent example. PMID:26318762

  10. Ascaris lumbricoides: an overview of therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Hagel, Isabel; Giusti, Tatiana

    2010-10-01

    A. lumbricoides is the largest of the common nematode parasites of man and has been associated with intestinal pathology, respiratory symptoms and malnutrition in children from endemic areas. Current anthelmintic treatments have proven to be safe. However, a reduced efficacy of single dose drugs has been reported. In veterinary practice, anthelmintic drug resistance is an irreversible problem. Thus, research and development of sensitive tools for early detection of drug resistance as well as new anthelmintic approaches are urgently needed. In this review, we summarized data providing information about current drug therapy against A. lumbricoides and other intestinal helminths, new drugs in experimental trials, future drugs perspectives and the identification of immunogenic parasite molecules that may be suitable vaccine targets. In addition to the WHO recommended drugs (albendazole, mebendazole, levamisole, and pyrantel pamoate), new anthelmintic alternatives such as tribendimidine and Nitazoxanide have proved to be safe and effective against A. lumbricoides and other soil-transmitted helminthiases in human trials. Also, some new drugs for veterinary use, monepantel and cyclooctadepsipeptides (e.g., PF1022A), will probably expand future drug spectrum for human treatments. The development of genomic technology has provided a great amount of available nematode DNA sequences, coupled with new gene function data that may lead to the identification of new drug targets through efficient mining of nematode genomic databases. On the other hand, the identification of nematode antigens involved in different parasite vital functions as well as immunomodulatory molecules in animals and humans may contribute to future studies of new therapeutic approaches.

  11. The molecular basis of targeting protein kinases in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we provide an overview of targeted anticancer therapies with small molecule kinase inhibitors. First, we discuss why a single constitutively active kinase emanating from a variety of aberrant genetic alterations is capable of transforming a normal cell, leading it to acquire the hallmarks of a cancer cell. To draw attention to the fact that kinase inhibition in targeted cancer therapeutics differs from conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, we exploit a conceptual framework explaining why suppressed kinase activity will selectively kill only the so-called oncogene 'addicted' cancer cell, while sparing the healthy cell. Second, we introduce the protein kinase superfamily in light of its common active conformation with precisely positioned structural elements, and the diversified auto-inhibitory conformations among the kinase families. Understanding the detailed activation mechanism of individual kinases is essential to relate the observed oncogenic alterations to the elevated constitutively active state, to identify the mechanism of consequent drug resistance, and to guide the development of the next-generation inhibitors. To clarify the vital importance of structural guidelines in studies of oncogenesis, we explain how somatic mutations in EGFR result in kinase constitutive activation. Third, in addition to the common theme of secondary (acquired) mutations that prevent drug binding from blocking a signaling pathway which is hijacked by the aberrant activated kinase, we discuss scenarios of drug resistance and relapse by compensating lesions that bypass the inactivated pathway in a vertical or horizontal fashion. Collectively, these suggest that the future challenge of cancer therapy with small molecule kinase inhibitors will rely on the discovery of distinct combinations of optimized drugs to target individual subtypes of different cancers.

  12. Liquid biopsy and therapeutic response: Circulating tumor cell cultures for evaluation of anticancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Bee Luan; Grenci, Gianluca; Jing, Tengyang; Lim, Ying Bena; Lee, Soo Chin; Thiery, Jean Paul; Han, Jongyoon; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-01-01

    The lack of a robust anticancer drug screening system to monitor patients during treatment delays realization of personalized treatment. We demonstrate an efficient approach to evaluate drug response using patient-derived circulating tumor cell (CTC) cultures obtained from liquid biopsy. Custom microfabricated tapered microwells were integrated with microfluidics to allow robust formation of CTC clusters without pre-enrichment and subsequent drug screening in situ. Rapid feedback after 2 weeks promotes immediate intervention upon detection of drug resistance or tolerance. The procedure was clinically validated with blood samples (n = 73) from 55 patients with early-stage, newly diagnosed, locally advanced, or refractory metastatic breast cancer. Twenty-four of these samples were used for drug evaluation. Cluster formation potential correlated inversely with increased drug concentration and therapeutic treatment. This new and robust liquid biopsy technique can potentially evaluate patient prognosis with CTC clusters during treatment and provide a noninvasive and inexpensive assessment that can guide drug discovery development or therapeutic choices for personalized treatment. PMID:27453941

  13. Controlled Chemical Derivatisation of Carbon Nanotubes with Imaging, Targeting, and Therapeutic Capabilities.

    PubMed

    Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Ali-Boucetta, Hanene; Fabbro, Chiara; Chaloin, Olivier; Kostarelos, Kostas; Bianco, Alberto

    2015-10-12

    In drug delivery, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) hold a great potential as carriers because of their ability to easily cross biological barriers and be internalised into cells. Their high aspect ratio allows multi-functionalisation and their development as a multimodal platform for targeted therapy. In this article, we report the controlled covalent derivatisation of triple-functionalised CNTs with the anticancer drug gemcitabine, folic acid as a targeting ligand and fluorescein as a probe. The anticancer activity of gemcitabine was maintained after covalent grafting onto the CNTs. The functionalised nanotubes were internalised into both folate-positive and negative cells, suggesting the passive diffusion of CNTs. Overall, our approach is versatile and offers a precise chemical control of the sidewall functionalisation of CNTs and the possibility to manoeuvre the types of functionalities required on the nanotubes for a multimodal therapeutic strategy.

  14. Therapeutic targets for treating fibrotic kidney diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So-Young; Kim, Sung Il; Choi, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Renal fibrosis is the hallmark of virtually all progressive kidney diseases and strongly correlates with the deterioration of kidney function. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade is central to the current treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) for the renoprotective effects aimed to prevent or slow progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, the incidence of CKD is still increasing, and there is a critical need for new therapeutics. Here, we review novel strategies targeting various components implicated in the fibrogenic pathway to inhibit or retard the loss of kidney function. We focus, in particular, on anti-fibrotic approaches that target transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, a key mediator of kidney fibrosis, and exciting new data on the role of autophagy. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-7 and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) are highlighted as modulators of pro-fibrotic TGF-β activity. BMP-7 has a protective role against TGF-β1 in kidney fibrosis, whereas CTGF enhances TGF-β-mediated fibrosis. We also discuss recent advances in the development of additional strategies for anti-fibrotic therapy. These include strategies targeting chemokine pathways via CC chemokine receptor 1 and 2 to modulate the inflammatory response, inhibition of phosphodiesterase to restore nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic 3′,5′ guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) function, inhibition of NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1) and 4 (Nox4) to suppress reactive oxygen species production, as well as inhibition of endothelin-1 or tumor necrosis factor-α to ameliorate progressive renal fibrosis. Furthermore, a brief overview of some of the biomarkers of kidney fibrosis currently being explored that may improve the ability to monitor anti-fibrotic therapies. It is hoped that evidence based on the preclinical and clinical data discussed in this review leads to novel anti-fibrotic therapies effective in patients with CKD to prevent or delay progression to ESRD. PMID

  15. Molecular Targets Underlying the Anticancer Effects of Quercetin: An Update.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fazlullah; Niaz, Kamal; Maqbool, Faheem; Ismail Hassan, Fatima; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Nagulapalli Venkata, Kalyan C; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Bishayee, Anupam

    2016-08-29

    Quercetin, a medicinally important member of the flavonoid family, is one of the most prominent dietary antioxidants. It is present in a variety of foods-including fruits, vegetables, tea, wine, as well as other dietary supplements-and is responsible for various health benefits. Numerous pharmacological effects of quercetin include protection against diseases, such as osteoporosis, certain forms of malignant tumors, and pulmonary and cardiovascular disorders. Quercetin has the special ability of scavenging highly reactive species, such as hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radicals. These oxygen radicals are called reactive oxygen species, which can cause oxidative damage to cellular components, such as proteins, lipids, and deoxyribonucleic acid. Various oxygen radicals play important roles in pathophysiological and degenerative processes, such as aging. Subsequently, several studies have been performed to evaluate possible advantageous health effects of quercetin and to collect scientific evidence for these beneficial health claims. These studies also gather data in order to evaluate the exact mechanism(s) of action and toxicological effects of quercetin. The purpose of this review is to present and critically analyze molecular pathways underlying the anticancer effects of quercetin. Current limitations and future directions of research on this bioactive dietary polyphenol are also critically discussed.

  16. Molecular Targets Underlying the Anticancer Effects of Quercetin: An Update.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fazlullah; Niaz, Kamal; Maqbool, Faheem; Ismail Hassan, Fatima; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Nagulapalli Venkata, Kalyan C; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Bishayee, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a medicinally important member of the flavonoid family, is one of the most prominent dietary antioxidants. It is present in a variety of foods-including fruits, vegetables, tea, wine, as well as other dietary supplements-and is responsible for various health benefits. Numerous pharmacological effects of quercetin include protection against diseases, such as osteoporosis, certain forms of malignant tumors, and pulmonary and cardiovascular disorders. Quercetin has the special ability of scavenging highly reactive species, such as hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radicals. These oxygen radicals are called reactive oxygen species, which can cause oxidative damage to cellular components, such as proteins, lipids, and deoxyribonucleic acid. Various oxygen radicals play important roles in pathophysiological and degenerative processes, such as aging. Subsequently, several studies have been performed to evaluate possible advantageous health effects of quercetin and to collect scientific evidence for these beneficial health claims. These studies also gather data in order to evaluate the exact mechanism(s) of action and toxicological effects of quercetin. The purpose of this review is to present and critically analyze molecular pathways underlying the anticancer effects of quercetin. Current limitations and future directions of research on this bioactive dietary polyphenol are also critically discussed. PMID:27589790

  17. Molecular Targets Underlying the Anticancer Effects of Quercetin: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fazlullah; Niaz, Kamal; Maqbool, Faheem; Ismail Hassan, Fatima; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Nagulapalli Venkata, Kalyan C.; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Bishayee, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a medicinally important member of the flavonoid family, is one of the most prominent dietary antioxidants. It is present in a variety of foods—including fruits, vegetables, tea, wine, as well as other dietary supplements—and is responsible for various health benefits. Numerous pharmacological effects of quercetin include protection against diseases, such as osteoporosis, certain forms of malignant tumors, and pulmonary and cardiovascular disorders. Quercetin has the special ability of scavenging highly reactive species, such as hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radicals. These oxygen radicals are called reactive oxygen species, which can cause oxidative damage to cellular components, such as proteins, lipids, and deoxyribonucleic acid. Various oxygen radicals play important roles in pathophysiological and degenerative processes, such as aging. Subsequently, several studies have been performed to evaluate possible advantageous health effects of quercetin and to collect scientific evidence for these beneficial health claims. These studies also gather data in order to evaluate the exact mechanism(s) of action and toxicological effects of quercetin. The purpose of this review is to present and critically analyze molecular pathways underlying the anticancer effects of quercetin. Current limitations and future directions of research on this bioactive dietary polyphenol are also critically discussed. PMID:27589790

  18. Death receptors as targets for anti-cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Papenfuss, Kerstin; Cordier, Stefanie M; Walczak, Henning

    2008-01-01

    Human tumour cells are characterized by their ability to avoid the normal regulatory mechanisms of cell growth, division and death. The classical chemotherapy aims to kill tumour cells by causing DNA damage-induced apoptosis. However, as many tumour cells posses mutations in intracellular apoptosis-sensing molecules like p53, they are not capable of inducing apoptosis on their own and are therefore resistant to chemotherapy. With the discovery of the death receptors the opportunity arose to directly trigger apoptosis from the outside of tumour cells, thereby circumventing chemotherapeutic resistance. Death receptors belong to the tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily, with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-1, CD95 and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-R1 and -R2 being the most prominent members. This review covers the current knowledge about these four death receptors, summarizes pre-clinical approaches engaging these death receptors in anti-cancer therapy and also gives an overview about their application in clinical trials conducted to date. PMID:19210756

  19. Emergence of zebrafish models in oncology for validating novel anticancer drug targets and nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K.

    2013-01-01

    The in vivo zebrafish models have recently attracted great attention in molecular oncology to investigate multiple genetic alterations associated with the development of human cancers and validate novel anticancer drug targets. Particularly, the transparent zebrafish models can be used as a xenotransplantation system to rapidly assess the tumorigenicity and metastatic behavior of cancer stem and/or progenitor cells and their progenies. Moreover, the zebrafish models have emerged as powerful tools for an in vivo testing of novel anticancer agents and nanomaterials for counteracting tumor formation and metastases and improving the efficacy of current radiation and chemotherapeutic treatments against aggressive, metastatic and lethal cancers. PMID:22903142

  20. Molecular biology of cancer-associated fibroblasts: can these cells be targeted in anti-cancer therapy?

    PubMed

    Gonda, Tamas A; Varro, Andrea; Wang, Timothy C; Tycko, Benjamin

    2010-02-01

    It is increasingly recognized that the non-neoplastic stromal compartment in most solid cancers plays an active role in tumor proliferation, invasion and metastasis. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are one of the most abundant cell types in the tumor stroma, and these cells are pro-tumorigenic. Evidence that CAFs are epigenetically and possibly also genetically distinct from normal fibroblasts is beginning to define these cells as potential targets of anti-cancer therapy. Here, we review the cell-of-origin and molecular biology of CAFs, arguing that such knowledge provides a rational basis for designing therapeutic strategies to coordinately and synergistically target both the stromal and malignant epithelial component of human cancers.

  1. Deubiquitinases: Novel Therapeutic Targets in Immune Surveillance?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a protective response of the organism to tissue injury or infection. It occurs when the immune system recognizes Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs) or Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern (DAMPs) through the activation of Pattern Recognition Receptors. This initiates a variety of signalling events that conclude in the upregulation of proinflammatory molecules, which initiate an appropriate immune response. This response is tightly regulated since any aberrant activation of immune responses would have severe pathological consequences such as sepsis or chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Accumulative evidence shows that the ubiquitin system, and in particular ubiquitin-specific isopeptidases also known as deubiquitinases (DUBs), plays crucial roles in the control of these immune pathways. In this review we will give an up-to-date overview on the role of DUBs in the NF-κB pathway and inflammasome activation, two intrinsically related events triggered by activation of the membrane TLRs as well as the cytosolic NOD and NLR receptors. Modulation of DUB activity by small molecules has been proposed as a way to control dysregulation or overactivation of these key players of the inflammatory response. We will also discuss the advances and challenges of a potential use of DUBs as therapeutic targets in inflammatory pathologies. PMID:27597804

  2. Deubiquitinases: Novel Therapeutic Targets in Immune Surveillance?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a protective response of the organism to tissue injury or infection. It occurs when the immune system recognizes Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs) or Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern (DAMPs) through the activation of Pattern Recognition Receptors. This initiates a variety of signalling events that conclude in the upregulation of proinflammatory molecules, which initiate an appropriate immune response. This response is tightly regulated since any aberrant activation of immune responses would have severe pathological consequences such as sepsis or chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Accumulative evidence shows that the ubiquitin system, and in particular ubiquitin-specific isopeptidases also known as deubiquitinases (DUBs), plays crucial roles in the control of these immune pathways. In this review we will give an up-to-date overview on the role of DUBs in the NF-κB pathway and inflammasome activation, two intrinsically related events triggered by activation of the membrane TLRs as well as the cytosolic NOD and NLR receptors. Modulation of DUB activity by small molecules has been proposed as a way to control dysregulation or overactivation of these key players of the inflammatory response. We will also discuss the advances and challenges of a potential use of DUBs as therapeutic targets in inflammatory pathologies.

  3. Cytokines as therapeutic targets in SLE.

    PubMed

    Rönnblom, Lars; Elkon, Keith B

    2010-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease involving most immune cells. Studies in both experimental animal models of lupus and patients with SLE have revealed a number of cytokine pathways that are important in the disease process. Among these are B-cell activating factor, which promotes B-cell survival and autoantibody production, interferon-alpha, which acts as an immune adjuvant, and tumor necrosis factor, which contributes to organ inflammation. This knowledge, in combination with the successful use of anti-TNF treatment in rheumatoid arthritis, has spurred the development of several biologic agents targeting different cytokines or their receptors in SLE. Consequently, many trials of anticytokine therapies for SLE are underway. Although most of these trials are small or in early phases, the results of some large studies have also been reported. In this Review, we discuss the rationale for anticytokine therapies in SLE and review agents currently in use, and those being developed and tested experimentally. We present the results from published trials and discuss the tentative conclusions that can be drawn regarding the efficacy of the new agents. Finally, we provide suggestions for the future of treatment for SLE, including new therapeutic strategies.

  4. ASICs as therapeutic targets for migraine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is the most common neurological disorder and one of the most common chronic pain conditions. Despite its prevalence, the pathophysiology leading to migraine is poorly understood and the identification of new therapeutic targets has been slow. Several processes are currently thought to contribute to migraine including altered activity in the hypothalamus, cortical-spreading depression (CSD), and afferent sensory input from the cranial meninges. Decreased extracellular pH and subsequent activation of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) may contribute to each of these processes and may thus play a role in migraine pathophysiology. Although few studies have directly examined a role of ASICs in migraine, studies directly examining a connection have generated promising results including efficacy of ASIC blockers in both preclinical migraine models and in human migraine patients. The purpose of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology thought to contribute to migraine and findings that implicate decreased pH and/or ASICs in these events, as well as propose issues to be resolved in future studies of ASICs and migraine. PMID:25582295

  5. Mitochondria: A Therapeutic Target for Parkinson's Disease?

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu; Hoffer, Alan; Hoffer, Barry; Qi, Xin

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders. The exact causes of neuronal damage are unknown, but mounting evidence indicates that mitochondrial-mediated pathways contribute to the underlying mechanisms of dopaminergic neuronal cell death both in PD patients and in PD animal models. Mitochondria are organized in a highly dynamic tubular network that is continuously reshaped by opposing processes of fusion and fission. Defects in either fusion or fission, leading to mitochondrial fragmentation, limit mitochondrial motility, decrease energy production and increase oxidative stress, thereby promoting cell dysfunction and death. Thus, the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics processes, such as fusion, fission and mitophagy, represents important mechanisms controlling neuronal cell fate. In this review, we summarize some of the recent evidence supporting that impairment of mitochondrial dynamics, mitophagy and mitochondrial import occurs in cellular and animal PD models and disruption of these processes is a contributing mechanism to cell death in dopaminergic neurons. We also summarize mitochondria-targeting therapeutics in models of PD, proposing that modulation of mitochondrial impairment might be beneficial for drug development toward treatment of PD.

  6. Targeting DNA Polymerase β for Therapeutic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Goellner, Eva M.; Svilar, David; Almeida, Karen H.; Sobol, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous disease processes. Hence, it is suggested that DNA repair proteins, which maintain the integrity of the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, play a critical role in reducing the onset of multiple diseases, including cancer, diabetes and neurodegeneration. As the primary DNA polymerase involved in base excision repair, DNA polymerase β (Polβ) has been implicated in multiple cellular processes, including genome maintenance and telomere processing and is suggested to play a role in oncogenic transformation, cell viability following stress and the cellular response to radiation, chemotherapy and environmental genotoxicants. Therefore, Polβ inhibitors may prove to be effective in cancer treatment. However, Polβ has a complex and highly regulated role in DNA metabolism. This complicates the development of effective Polβ-specific inhibitors useful for improving chemotherapy and radiation response without impacting normal cellular function. With multiple enzymatic activities, numerous binding partners and complex modes of regulation from post-translational modifications, there are many opportunities for Polβ inhibition that have yet to be resolved. To shed light on the varying possibilities and approaches of targeting Polβ for potential therapeutic intervention, we summarize the reported small molecule inhibitors of Polβ and discuss the genetic, biochemical and chemical studies that implicate additional options for Polβ inhibition. Further, we offer suggestions on possible inhibitor combinatorial approaches and the potential for tumor specificity for Polβ-inhibitors. PMID:22122465

  7. GPR35 as a Novel Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie, A. E.; Lappin, J. E.; Taylor, D. L.; Nicklin, S. A.; Milligan, G.

    2011-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remain the best studied class of cell surface receptors and the most tractable family of proteins for novel small molecule drug discovery. Despite this, a considerable number of GPCRs remain poorly characterized and in a significant number of cases, endogenous ligand(s) that activate them remain undefined or are of questionable physiological relevance. GPR35 was initially discovered over a decade ago but has remained an “orphan” receptor. Recent publications have highlighted novel ligands, both endogenously produced and synthetic, which demonstrate significant potency at this receptor. Furthermore, evidence is accumulating which highlights potential roles for GPR35 in disease and therefore, efforts to characterize GPR35 more fully and develop it as a novel therapeutic target in conditions that range from diabetes and hypertension to asthma are increasing. Recently identified ligands have shown marked species selective properties, indicating major challenges for future drug development. As we begin to understand these issues, the continuing efforts to identify novel agonist and antagonist ligands for GPR35 will help to decipher its true physiological relevance; translating multiple assay systems in vitro, to animal disease systems in vivo and finally to man. PMID:22654822

  8. Targeting α-synuclein: Therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Dehay, Benjamin; Decressac, Mickael; Bourdenx, Mathieu; Guadagnino, Irene; Fernagut, Pierre-Olivier; Tamburrino, Anna; Bassil, Fares; Meissner, Wassilios G; Bezard, Erwan

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of the central role of α-synuclein (αSyn) in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) has powered, in the last decade, the emergence of novel relevant models of this condition based on viral vector-mediated expression of the disease-causing protein or inoculation of toxic species of αSyn. Although the development of these powerful tools and models has provided considerable insights into the mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in PD, it has also been translated into the expansion of the landscape of preclinical therapeutic strategies. Much attention is now brought to the proteotoxic mechanisms induced by αSyn and how to block them using strategies inspired by intrinsic cellular pathways such as the enhancement of cellular clearance by the lysosomal-autophagic system, through proteasome-mediated degradation or through immunization. The important effort undertaken by several laboratories and consortia to tackle these issues and identify novel targets warrants great promise for the discovery not only of neuroprotective approaches but also of restorative strategies for PD and other synucleinopathies. In this viewpoint, we summarize the latest advances in this new area of PD research and will discuss promising approaches and ongoing challenges. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:26926119

  9. Phytochemical-mediated Protein Expression Profiling and the Potential Applications in Therapeutic Drug Target Identifications.

    PubMed

    Wong, Fai-Chu; Tan, Siok-Thing; Chai, Tsun-Thai

    2016-07-29

    Many phytochemicals derived from edible medicinal plants have been investigated intensively for their various bioactivities. However, the detailed mechanism and their corresponding molecular targets frequently remain elusive. In this review, we present a summary of the research works done on phytochemical-mediated molecular targets, identified via proteomic approach. Concurrently, we also highlighted some pharmaceutical drugs which could be traced back to their origins in phytochemicals. For ease of presentation, these identified protein targets were categorized into two important healthcare-related fields, namely anti-bacterial and anti-cancer research. Through this review, we hope to highlight the usefulness of comparative proteomic as a powerful tool in phytochemical-mediated protein target identifications. Likewise, we wish to inspire further investigations on some of these protein targets identified over the last few years. With contributions from all researchers, the accumulative efforts could eventually lead to the discovery of some target-specific, low-toxicity therapeutic agents.

  10. Potential of apoptotic pathway-targeted cancer therapeutic research: Where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    Baig, S; Seevasant, I; Mohamad, J; Mukheem, A; Huri, H Z; Kamarul, T

    2016-01-01

    Underneath the intricacy of every cancer lies mysterious events that impel the tumour cell and its posterity into abnormal growth and tissue invasion. Oncogenic mutations disturb the regulatory circuits responsible for the governance of versatile cellular functions, permitting tumour cells to endure deregulated proliferation, resist to proapoptotic insults, invade and erode normal tissues and above all escape apoptosis. This disruption of apoptosis has been highly implicated in various malignancies and has been exploited as an anticancer strategy. Owing to the fact that apoptosis causes minimal inflammation and damage to the tissue, apoptotic cell death-based therapy has been the centre of attraction for the development of anticancer drugs. Increased understanding of the molecular pathways underlying apoptosis has enabled scientists to establish unique approaches targeting apoptosis pathways in cancer therapeutics. In this review, we reconnoitre the two major pathways (intrinsic and extrinsic) targeted cancer therapeutics, steering toward chief modulators of these pathways, such as B-cell lymphoma 2 protein family members (pro- and antiapoptotic), inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, and the foremost thespian of extrinsic pathway regulator, tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing agent. Together, we also will have a look from clinical perspective to address the agents (drugs) and therapeutic strategies adopted to target these specific proteins/pathways that have entered clinical trials. PMID:26775709

  11. In vitro discovery of promising anti-cancer drug combinations using iterative maximisation of a therapeutic index

    PubMed Central

    Kashif, M.; Andersson, C.; Hassan, S.; Karlsson, H.; Senkowski, W.; Fryknäs, M.; Nygren, P.; Larsson, R.; Gustafsson, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    In vitro-based search for promising anti-cancer drug combinations may provide important leads to improved cancer therapies. Currently there are no integrated computational-experimental methods specifically designed to search for combinations, maximizing a predefined therapeutic index (TI) defined in terms of appropriate model systems. Here, such a pipeline is presented allowing the search for optimal combinations among an arbitrary number of drugs while also taking experimental variability into account. The TI optimized is the cytotoxicity difference (in vitro) between a target model and an adverse side effect model. Focusing on colorectal carcinoma (CRC), the pipeline provided several combinations that are effective in six different CRC models with limited cytotoxicity in normal cell models. Herein we describe the identification of the combination (Trichostatin A, Afungin, 17-AAG) and present results from subsequent characterisations, including efficacy in primary cultures of tumour cells from CRC patients. We hypothesize that its effect derives from potentiation of the proteotoxic action of 17-AAG by Trichostatin A and Afungin. The discovered drug combinations against CRC are significant findings themselves and also indicate that the proposed strategy has great potential for suggesting drug combination treatments suitable for other cancer types as well as for other complex diseases. PMID:26392291

  12. Diabetic Retinopathy and Inflammation: Novel Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Rangasamy, Sampathkumar; McGuire, Paul G.; Das, Arup

    2012-01-01

    Most anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapies in diabetic macular edema are not as robust as in proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Although the VEGF appears to be a good target in diabetic macular edema, the anti-VEGF therapies appear to be of transient benefit as the edema recurs within a few weeks, and repeated injections are necessary. There is new evidence that indicates ‘retinal inflammation’ as an important player in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. There are common sets of inflammatory cytokines that are upregulated in both the serum and vitreous and aqueous samples, in subjects with diabetic retinopathy, and these cytokines can have multiple interactions to impact the pathogenesis of the disease. The key inflammatory events involved in the blood retinal barrier (BRB) alteration appear to be: (1) Increased expression of endothelial adhesion molecules such as ICAM1, VCAM1, PECAM-1, and P-selectin, (2) adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelium, (3) release of inflammatory chemokines, cytokines, and vascular permeability factors, (4) alteration of adherens and tight junctional proteins between the endothelial cells, and (5) infiltration of leukocytes into the neuro-retina, resulting in the alteration of the blood retinal barrier (diapedesis). VEGF inhibition itself may not achieve neutralization of other inflammatory molecules involved in the inflammatory cascade of the breakdown of the BRB. It is possible that the novel selective inhibitors of the inflammatory cascade (like angiopoietin-2, TNFα, and chemokines) may be useful therapeutic agents in the treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME), either alone or in combination with the anti-VEGF drugs. PMID:22346115

  13. A natural anticancer agent thaspine targets human topoisomerase IB.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Silvia; Katkar, Prafulla; Vassallo, Oscar; Falconi, Mattia; Linder, Stig; Desideri, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    The different steps of the topoisomerase I catalytic cycle have been analyzed in the presence of the plant alkaloid thaspine (1- (2-(Dimethylamino)ethyl)-3,8-dimethoxychromeno[5,4,3-cde]chromene-5,10-dione), known to induce apoptosis in colon carcinoma cells. The experiments indicate that thaspine inhibits both the cleavage and the religation steps of the enzyme reaction. The inhibition is reversible and the effect is enhanced upon pre-incubation. Molecular docking simulations of thaspine over topoisomerase I, in the presence or absence of the DNA substrate, show that thaspine, when interacting with the enzyme alone in the closed or in the open state, can bind in proximity of the active residues preventing the cleavage reaction, whilst when docked with the enzyme-DNA cleavable complex intercalates between the DNA bases in a way similar to that found for camptothecin, explaining its religation inhibition. These results unequivocally demonstrate that thaspine targets human topoisomerase I .

  14. Exploiting developments in nanotechnology for the preferential delivery of platinum-based anti-cancer agents to tumours: targeting some of the hallmarks of cancer.

    PubMed

    Parker, James P; Ude, Ziga; Marmion, Celine J

    2016-01-01

    Platinum drugs as anti-cancer therapeutics are held in extremely high regard. Despite their success, there are drawbacks associated with their use; their dose-limiting toxicity, their limited activity against an array of common cancers and patient resistance to Pt-based therapeutic regimes. Current investigations in medicinal inorganic chemistry strive to offset these shortcomings through selective targeting of Pt drugs and/or the development of Pt drugs with new or multiple modes of action. A comprehensive overview showcasing how liposomes, nanocapsules, polymers, dendrimers, nanoparticles and nanotubes may be employed as vehicles to selectively deliver cytotoxic Pt payloads to tumour cells is provided.

  15. Dermatologic adverse events in pediatric patients receiving targeted anticancer therapies: a pooled analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pratilas, Christine A.; Sibaud, Vincent; Boralevi, Franck; Lacouture, Mario E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The dermatologic adverse events (AEs) of various molecularly targeted therapies are well-described in adult cancer patients. Little has been reported on the incidence and clinical presentation of such AEs in pediatric patients with cancer. To address this gap, we analyzed the dermatologic AEs reported across clinical trials of targeted anticancer therapies in pediatric patients. METHODS We conducted an electronic literature search (PubMed, American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meetings’ abstracts, ClinicalTrials.gov, NCI’s Pediatric Oncology Branch webpage) to identify clinical trials involving targeted anticancer therapies that reported dermatologic AEs in their safety data. Studies were limited to the pediatric population, monotherapy trials (oncology), and English language publications. RESULTS Pooled data from 19 clinical studies investigating 11 targeted anticancer agents (alemtuzumab, rituximab, imatinib, dasatinib, erlotinib, vandetanib, sorafenib, cabozantinib, pazopanib, everolimus, and temsirolimus) were analyzed. The most frequently encountered dermatologic AEs were rash (127/660; 19%), xerosis (18/100; 18%), mucositis (68/402; 17%) and pruritus (12/169; 7%). Other AEs included pigmentary abnormalities of the skin/hair (13%), hair disorders (trichomegaly, hypertrichosis, alopecia and madarosis; 14%), urticaria (7%), palmoplantar erythrodysesthesia (7%), erythema, acne, purpura, skin fissures, other ‘unknown skin changes’, exanthem, infection, flushing, telangiectasia, and photosensitivity. CONCLUSION This study describes the dermatologic manifestations of targeted anticancer therapy-related AEs in the pediatric population. Since these AEs are often associated with significant morbidity, it is imperative that pediatric oncologists be familiar with their recognition and management, to avoid unnecessary dose modifications and/or termination, and to prevent impairments in patients’ quality of life. PMID:25683226

  16. Targeting IAPs as an approach to anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Straub, Christopher S

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis is an essential process for embryonic and lymphocyte development, immune system modulation and tissue homeostasis. Defects in apoptotic signaling often lead to diseases of immune deficiency, neurodegeneration and cancer [1, 2]. In the cancer arena, these defects may contribute to the establishment and growth of tumors. Moreover, many cytotoxic chemotherapies act in part by activating these apoptotic networks. Occasionally apoptotic pathways are activated, however key players downstream of initiation are inhibited by negative regulators that have been dysregulated by the diseased state of the cell. Removal of these barriers to apoptosis signaling, it has been rationalized, could restore cell death in diseased cells while sparing those that are not primed for programmed cell death. Additionally, the subversion of these death evading mechanisms may re-sensitize cells that have developed resistance to chemotherapies in this manner. The importance of apoptosis as a maintenance process, and the promise that restoring this signaling could mean in treating cancer has placed many targets on the front line of oncology research. Approaches are being developed that will activate death receptor pathways, synthetically activate caspases, restore the activity of tumor suppressor genes such as p53, and counteract the effects of anti-apoptotic factors. Among these approaches, small molecules are in clinical trials against several anti-apoptotic players, namely the Bcl-2 and IAP proteins. This review will focus on the efforts being advanced against the Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAP), the chemical matter of the inhibitors and the biology emerging from this research.

  17. Transferrin receptors and the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Tracy R.; Bernabeu, Ezequiel; Rodríguez, José A.; Patel, Shabnum; Kozman, Maggie; Chiappetta, Diego A.; Holler, Eggehard; Ljubimova, Julia Y.; Helguera, Gustavo; Penichet, Manuel L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditional cancer therapy can be successful in destroying tumors, but can also cause dangerous side effects. Therefore, many targeted therapies are in development. The transferrin receptor (TfR) functions in cellular iron uptake through its interaction with transferrin. This receptor is an attractive molecule for the targeted therapy of cancer since it is upregulated on the surface of many cancer types and is efficiently internalized. This receptor can be targeted in two ways: 1) for the delivery of therapeutic molecules into malignant cells or 2) to block the natural function of the receptor leading directly to cancer cell death. Scope of review In the present article we discuss the strategies used to target the TfR for the delivery of therapeutic agents into cancer cells. We provide a summary of the vast types of anti-cancer drugs that have been delivered into cancer cells employing a variety of receptor binding molecules including Tf, anti-TfR antibodies, or TfR-binding peptides alone or in combination with carrier molecules including nanoparticles and viruses. Major conclusions Targeting the TfR has been shown to be effective in delivering many different therapeutic agents and causing cytotoxic effects in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. General significance The extensive use of TfR for targeted therapy attests to the versatility of targeting this receptor for therapeutic purposes against malignant cells. More advances in this area are expected to further improve the therapeutic potential of targeting the TfR for cancer therapy leading to an increase in the number of clinical trials of molecules targeting this receptor. PMID:21851850

  18. Tumor interstitial fluid pressure as an early-response marker for anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Stephane; Allegrini, Peter R; Becquet, Mike M; McSheehy, Paul Mj

    2009-09-01

    Solid tumors have a raised interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) due to high vessel permeability, low lymphatic drainage, poor perfusion, and high cell density around the blood vessels. To investigate tumor IFP as an early-response biomarker, we have tested the effect of seven anticancer chemotherapeutics including cytotoxics and targeted cytostatics in 13 experimental tumor models. IFP was recorded with the wick-in-needle method. Models were either ectopic or orthotopic and included mouse and rat syngeneic as well as human xenografts in nude mice. The mean basal IFP was between 4.4 and 15.2mm Hg; IFP was lowest in human tumor xenografts and highest in rat syngeneic models. Where measured, basal IFP correlated positively with relative tumor blood volume (rTBV) determined by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Most chemotherapeutics sooner (2 or 3 days) or later (6 or 7 days) lowered tumor IFP significantly, and the cytotoxic patupilone caused the greatest decrease in IFP. In rat mammary orthotopic BN472 tumors, significant drug-induced decreases in IFP and rTBV correlated positively with each other for both patupilone and the cytostatic vatalanib. In the two orthotopic models studied, early decreases in IFP were significantly (P < or = .005) correlated with late changes in tumor volume. Thus, drug-induced decreases in tumor IFP are an early marker of response to therapy, which could aid clinical development. PMID:19724681

  19. sGC-cGMP signaling: target for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Bian, Ka; Murad, Ferid

    2014-01-01

    The biologic endogenous production of cGMP was reported in the 1960s and followed by the demonstration of guanylyl cyclase activity and the isoforms of soluble and membrane-bound guanylyl cyclases. During the same period, cGMP specific phosphodiesterases also was discovered. Murad's lab established link between the endothelium derived relaxation factor (EDRF) and elevated cGMP concentration in the vascular system. October 12, 1998, the Nobel Assembly awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology to scientists Robert Furchgott, Louis Ignarro, and Ferid Murad for their discoveries concerning nitric oxide (NO) as a signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system. In contrast with the short research history of the enzymatic synthesis of NO, the introduction of nitrate-containing compounds for medicinal purposes marked its 150th anniversary in 1997. Glyceryl trinitrate (nitroglycerin; GTN) is the first compound of this category. Alfred Nobel (the founder of the Nobel Prize) himself had suffered from angina pectoris and was prescribed nitroglycerin for his chest pain while he refused to take due to the induction of headaches. Almost a century after its first chemical use, research in the nitric oxide and 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/cGMP) pathway has dramatically expanded and the role of NO/cGMP in physiology and pathology has been extensively studied. Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is the receptor for NO. The α1β1 heterodimer is the predominant isoform of sGC that is obligatory for catalytic activity. NO binds to the ferrous (Fe(2+)) heme at histidine 105 of the β1 subunit and leads to an increase in sGC activity and cGMP production of at least 200-fold. In this chapter, we reviewed the studies of sGC-cGMP signaling in cell proliferation; introduced our work of targeting sGC-cGMP signaling for cancer therapy; and explored the role of sGC-cGMP signaling in the chromatin-microenvironment.

  20. QSAR and docking studies on xanthone derivatives for anticancer activity targeting DNA topoisomerase IIα

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Sarfaraz; Khan, Feroz

    2014-01-01

    Due to the high mortality rate in India, the identification of novel molecules is important in the development of novel and potent anticancer drugs. Xanthones are natural constituents of plants in the families Bonnetiaceae and Clusiaceae, and comprise oxygenated heterocycles with a variety of biological activities along with an anticancer effect. To explore the anticancer compounds from xanthone derivatives, a quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) model was developed by the multiple linear regression method. The structure–activity relationship represented by the QSAR model yielded a high activity–descriptors relationship accuracy (84%) referred by regression coefficient (r2=0.84) and a high activity prediction accuracy (82%). Five molecular descriptors – dielectric energy, group count (hydroxyl), LogP (the logarithm of the partition coefficient between n-octanol and water), shape index basic (order 3), and the solvent-accessible surface area – were significantly correlated with anticancer activity. Using this QSAR model, a set of virtually designed xanthone derivatives was screened out. A molecular docking study was also carried out to predict the molecular interaction between proposed compounds and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) topoisomerase IIα. The pharmacokinetics parameters, such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity, were also calculated, and later an appraisal of synthetic accessibility of organic compounds was carried out. The strategy used in this study may provide understanding in designing novel DNA topoisomerase IIα inhibitors, as well as for other cancer targets. PMID:24516330

  1. Emerging Mitochondrial Therapeutic Targets in Optic Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lopez Sanchez, M I G; Crowston, J G; Mackey, D A; Trounce, I A

    2016-09-01

    Optic neuropathies are an important cause of blindness worldwide. The study of the most common inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) has highlighted a fundamental role for mitochondrial function in the survival of the affected neuron-the retinal ganglion cell. A picture is now emerging that links mitochondrial dysfunction to optic nerve disease and other neurodegenerative processes. Insights gained from the peculiar susceptibility of retinal ganglion cells to mitochondrial dysfunction are likely to inform therapeutic development for glaucoma and other common neurodegenerative diseases of aging. Despite it being a fast-evolving field of research, a lack of access to human ocular tissues and limited animal models of mitochondrial disease have prevented direct retinal ganglion cell experimentation and delayed the development of efficient therapeutic strategies to prevent vision loss. Currently, there are no approved treatments for mitochondrial disease, including optic neuropathies caused by primary or secondary mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent advances in eye research have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms that mediate pathogenesis, and new therapeutic strategies including gene correction approaches are currently being investigated. Here, we review the general principles of mitochondrial biology relevant to retinal ganglion cell function and provide an overview of the major optic neuropathies with mitochondrial involvement, LHON and ADOA, whilst highlighting the emerging link between mitochondrial dysfunction and glaucoma. The pharmacological strategies currently being trialed to improve mitochondrial dysfunction in these optic neuropathies are discussed in addition to emerging therapeutic approaches to preserve retinal ganglion cell function. PMID:27288727

  2. OLIGODEOXYNUCLEOTIDES AS ANTI-CANCER THERAPEUTICS AND DIAGNOSTICS | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute Laboratory of Experimental Immunology is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize anti-cancer oligodeoxynucleotides.  

  3. The prince and the pauper. A tale of anticancer targeted agents

    PubMed Central

    Dueñas-González, Alfonso; García-López, Patricia; Herrera, Luis Alonso; Medina-Franco, Jose Luis; González-Fierro, Aurora; Candelaria, Myrna

    2008-01-01

    Cancer rates are set to increase at an alarming rate, from 10 million new cases globally in 2000 to 15 million in 2020. Regarding the pharmacological treatment of cancer, we currently are in the interphase of two treatment eras. The so-called pregenomic therapy which names the traditional cancer drugs, mainly cytotoxic drug types, and post-genomic era-type drugs referring to rationally-based designed. Although there are successful examples of this newer drug discovery approach, most target-specific agents only provide small gains in symptom control and/or survival, whereas others have consistently failed in the clinical testing. There is however, a characteristic shared by these agents: -their high cost-. This is expected as drug discovery and development is generally carried out within the commercial rather than the academic realm. Given the extraordinarily high therapeutic drug discovery-associated costs and risks, it is highly unlikely that any single public-sector research group will see a novel chemical "probe" become a "drug". An alternative drug development strategy is the exploitation of established drugs that have already been approved for treatment of non-cancerous diseases and whose cancer target has already been discovered. This strategy is also denominated drug repositioning, drug repurposing, or indication switch. Although traditionally development of these drugs was unlikely to be pursued by Big Pharma due to their limited commercial value, biopharmaceutical companies attempting to increase productivity at present are pursuing drug repositioning. More and more companies are scanning the existing pharmacopoeia for repositioning candidates, and the number of repositioning success stories is increasing. Here we provide noteworthy examples of known drugs whose potential anticancer activities have been highlighted, to encourage further research on these known drugs as a means to foster their translation into clinical trials utilizing the more limited

  4. EGFR/HER-targeted therapeutics in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilken, Jason A; Badri, Tayf; Cross, Sarah; Raji, Rhoda; Santin, Alessandro D; Schwartz, Peter; Branscum, Adam J; Baron, Andre T; Sakhitab, Adam I; Maihle, Nita J

    2012-03-01

    Despite decades of research and evolving treatment modalities, survival among patients with epithelial ovarian cancer has improved only incrementally. During this same period, the development of biologically targeted therapeutics has improved survival for patients with diverse malignancies. Many of these new drugs target the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER/ErbB) family of tyrosine kinases, which play a major role in the etiology and progression of many carcinomas, including epithelial ovarian cancer. While several HER-targeted therapeutics are US FDA approved for the treatment of various malignancies, none have gained approval for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Here, we review the published literature on HER-targeted therapeutics for the treatment of ovarian cancer, including novel HER-targeted therapeutics in various stages of clinical development, as well as the challenges that have limited the use of these inhibitors in clinical settings.

  5. EGFR/HER-targeted therapeutics in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilken, Jason A; Badri, Tayf; Cross, Sarah; Raji, Rhoda; Santin, Alessandro D; Schwartz, Peter; Branscum, Adam J; Baron, Andre T; Sakhitab, Adam I; Maihle, Nita J

    2013-01-01

    Despite decades of research and evolving treatment modalities, survival among patients with epithelial ovarian cancer has improved only incrementally. During this same period, the development of biologically targeted therapeutics has improved survival for patients with diverse malignancies. Many of these new drugs target the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER/ErbB) family of tyrosine kinases, which play a major role in the etiology and progression of many carcinomas, including epithelial ovarian cancer. While several HER-targeted therapeutics are US FDA approved for the treatment of various malignancies, none have gained approval for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Here, we review the published literature on HER-targeted therapeutics for the treatment of ovarian cancer, including novel HER-targeted therapeutics in various stages of clinical development, as well as the challenges that have limited the use of these inhibitors in clinical settings. PMID:22416774

  6. Neuropeptides as therapeutic targets in anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Lin, En-Ju D

    2012-01-01

    In addition to the classical neurotransmitters, neuropeptides represent an important class of modulators for affective behaviors and associated disorders, such as anxiety disorders. Many neuropeptides are abundantly expressed in brain regions involved in emotional processing and anxiety behaviors. Moreover, risk factors for anxiety disorders such as stress modulate the expression of various neuropeptides in the brain. Due to the high prevalence of anxiety disorders and yet limited treatment options, there is a clear need for more effective therapeutics. In this regard, the various neuropeptides represent exciting candidates for new therapeutic designs. In this review, I will provide an up-to-date summary on the evidences for the involvement of seven neuropeptides in anxiety: corticotropin-releasing factor, urocortins, vasopressin, oxytocin, substance P, neuropeptide Y and galanin. This review will cover the behavioral effects of these neuropeptides in animal models of anxiety by both genetic and pharmacological manipulations. Human studies indicating a role for these neuropeptides in anxiety disorders will also be discussed.

  7. Introduction to Adenosine Receptors as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine acts as a cytoprotective modulator in response to stress to an organ or tissue. Although short-lived in the circulation, it can activate four sub-types of G protein-coupled adenosine receptors (ARs): A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. The alkylxanthines caffeine and theophylline are the prototypical antagonists of ARs, and their stimulant actions occur primarily through this mechanism. For each of the four AR subtypes, selective agonists and antagonists have been introduced and used to develop new therapeutic drug concepts. ARs are notable among the GPCR family in the number and variety of agonist therapeutic candidates that have been proposed. The selective and potent synthetic AR agonists, which are typically much longer lasting in the body than adenosine, have potential therapeutic applications based on their anti-inflammatory (A2A and A3), cardioprotective (preconditioning by A1 and A3 and postconditioning by A2B), cerebroprotective (A1 and A3), and antinociceptive (A1) properties. Potent and selective AR antagonists display therapeutic potential as kidney protective (A1), antifibrotic (A2A), neuroprotective (A2A), and antiglaucoma (A3) agents. AR agonists for cardiac imaging and positron-emitting AR antagonists are in development for diagnostic applications. Allosteric modulators of A1 and A3 ARs have been described. In addition to the use of selective agonists/antagonists as pharmacological tools, mouse strains in which an AR has been genetically deleted have aided in developing novel drug concepts based on the modulation of ARs. PMID:19639277

  8. Development of multifunctional nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery and noninvasive imaging of therapeutic effect.

    PubMed

    Sajja, Hari Krishna; East, Michael P; Mao, Hui; Wang, Y Andrew; Nie, Shuming; Yang, Lily

    2009-03-01

    Nanotechnology is a multidisciplinary scientific field undergoing explosive development. Nanometer-sized particles offer novel structural, optical and electronic properties that are not attainable with individual molecules or bulk solids. Advances in nanomedicine can be made by engineering biodegradable nanoparticles such as magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, polymers, dendrimers and liposomes that are capable of targeted delivery of both imaging agents and anticancer drugs. This leads toward the concept and possibility of personalized medicine for the potential of early detection of cancer lesions, determination of molecular signatures of the tumor by noninvasive imaging and, most importantly, molecular targeted cancer therapy. Increasing evidence suggests that the nanoparticles, whose surface contains a targeting molecule that binds to receptors highly expressed in tumor cells, can serve as cancer image contrast agents to increase sensitivity and specificity in tumor detection. In comparison with other small molecule contrast agents, the advantage of using nanoparticles is their large surface area and the possibility of surface modifications for further conjugation or encapsulation of large amounts of therapeutic agents. Targeted nanoparticles ferry large doses of therapeutic agents into malignant cells while sparing the normal healthy cells. Such multifunctional nanodevices hold the promise of significant improvement of current clinical management of cancer patients. This review explores the development of nanoparticles for enabling and improving the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents, the potential of nanomedicine, and the development of novel and more effective diagnostic and screening techniques to extend the limits of molecular diagnostics providing point-of-care diagnosis and more personalized medicine.

  9. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition: a new target in anticancer drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Marcucci, Fabrizio; Stassi, Giorgio; De Maria, Ruggero

    2016-05-01

    The conversion of cells with an epithelial phenotype into cells with a mesenchymal phenotype, referred to as epithelial-mesenchymal transition, is a critical process for embryonic development that also occurs in adult life, particularly during tumour progression. Tumour cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition acquire the capacity to disarm the body's antitumour defences, resist apoptosis and anticancer drugs, disseminate throughout the organism, and act as a reservoir that replenishes and expands the tumour cell population. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition is therefore becoming a target of prime interest for anticancer therapy. Here, we discuss the screening and classification of compounds that affect epithelial-mesenchymal transition, highlight some compounds of particular interest, and address issues related to their clinical application.

  10. Potential Therapeutic Targets in Uterine Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Cuppens, Tine; Tuyaerts, Sandra; Amant, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Uterine sarcomas are rare tumors accounting for 3,4% of all uterine cancers. Even after radical hysterectomy, most patients relapse or present with distant metastases. The very limited clinical benefit of adjuvant cytotoxic treatments is reflected by high mortality rates, emphasizing the need for new treatment strategies. This review summarizes rising potential targets in four distinct subtypes of uterine sarcomas: leiomyosarcoma, low-grade and high-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma, and undifferentiated uterine sarcoma. Based on clinical reports, promising approaches for uterine leiomyosarcoma patients include inhibition of VEGF and mTOR signaling, preferably in combination with other targeted or cytotoxic compounds. Currently, the only targeted therapy approved in leiomyosarcoma patients is pazopanib, a multitargeted inhibitor blocking VEGFR, PDGFR, FGFR, and c-KIT. Additionally, preclinical evidence suggests effect of the inhibition of histone deacetylases, tyrosine kinase receptors, and the mitotic checkpoint protein aurora kinase A. In low-grade endometrial stromal sarcomas, antihormonal therapies including aromatase inhibitors and progestins have proven activity. Other potential targets are PDGFR, VEGFR, and histone deacetylases. In high-grade ESS that carry the YWHAE/FAM22A/B fusion gene, the generated 14-3-3 oncoprotein is a putative target, next to c-KIT and the Wnt pathway. The observation of heterogeneity within uterine sarcoma subtypes warrants a personalized treatment approach. PMID:26576131

  11. Therapeutic targeting of splicing in cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stanley Chun-Wei; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have highlighted that splicing patterns are frequently altered in cancer and that mutations in genes encoding spliceosomal proteins, as well as mutations affecting the splicing of key cancer-associated genes, are enriched in cancer. In parallel, there is also accumulating evidence that several molecular subtypes of cancer are highly dependent on splicing function for cell survival. These findings have resulted in a growing interest in targeting splicing catalysis, splicing regulatory proteins, and/or specific key altered splicing events in the treatment of cancer. Here we present strategies that exist and that are in development to target altered dependency on the spliceosome, as well as aberrant splicing, in cancer. These include drugs to target global splicing in cancer subtypes that are preferentially dependent on wild-type splicing for survival, methods to alter post-translational modifications of splicing-regulating proteins, and strategies to modulate pathologic splicing events and protein-RNA interactions in cancer. PMID:27603132

  12. Prioritizing therapeutic targets using patient-derived xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Lodhia, K A; Hadley, A M; Haluska, P; Scott, C L

    2015-04-01

    Effective systemic treatment of cancer relies on the delivery of agents with optimal therapeutic potential. The molecular age of medicine has provided genomic tools that can identify a large number of potential therapeutic targets in individual patients, heralding the promise of personalized treatment. However, determining which potential targets actually drive tumor growth and should be prioritized for therapy is challenging. Indeed, reliable molecular matches of target and therapeutic agent have been stringently validated in the clinic for only a small number of targets. Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) are tumor models developed in immunocompromised mice using tumor procured directly from the patient. As patient surrogates, PDX models represent a powerful tool for addressing individualized therapy. Challenges include humanizing the immune system of PDX models and ensuring high quality molecular annotation, in order to maximize insights for the clinic. Importantly, PDX can be sampled repeatedly and in parallel, to reveal clonal evolution, which may predict mechanisms of drug resistance and inform therapeutic strategy design.

  13. Active targeting schemes for nanoparticle systems in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Byrne, James D; Betancourt, Tania; Brannon-Peppas, Lisa

    2008-12-14

    The objective of this review is to outline current major cancer targets for nanoparticle systems and give insight into the direction of the field. The major targeting strategies that have been used for the delivery of therapeutic or imaging agents to cancer have been broken into three sections. These sections are angiogenesis-associated targeting, targeting to uncontrolled cell proliferation markers, and tumor cell targeting. The targeting schemes explored for many of the reported nanoparticle systems suggest the great potential of targeted delivery to revolutionize cancer treatment.

  14. Therapeutic approaches to drug targets in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jamkhande, Prasad G.; Chandak, Prakash G.; Dhawale, Shashikant C.; Barde, Sonal R.; Tidke, Priti S.; Sakhare, Ram S.

    2013-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis and diabetes are responsible for major social and health burden as millions of people are dying every year. Out of which, atherosclerosis is the leading cause of deaths worldwide. The lipid abnormality is one of the major modifiable risk factors for atherosclerosis. Both genetic and environmental components are associated with the development of atherosclerotic plaques. Immune and inflammatory mediators have a complex role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Understanding of all these processes will help to invent a range of new biomarkers and novel treatment modalities targeting various cellular events in acute and chronic inflammation that are accountable for atherosclerosis. Several biochemical pathways, receptors and enzymes are involved in the development of atherosclerosis that would be possible targets for improving strategies for disease diagnosis and management. Earlier anti-inflammatory or lipid-lowering treatments could be useful for alleviating morbidity and mortality of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. However, novel drug targets like endoglin receptor, PPARα, squalene synthase, thyroid hormone analogues, scavenger receptor and thyroid hormone analogues are more powerful to control the process of atherosclerosis. Therefore, the review briefly focuses on different novel targets that act at the starting stage of the plaque form to the thrombus formation in the atherosclerosis. PMID:25061401

  15. Therapeutic Strategies for Targeting Ras Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gysin, Stephan; Salt, Megan; Young, Amy; McCormick, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Ras genes are frequently activated in cancer. Attempts to develop drugs that target mutant Ras proteins have, so far, been unsuccessful. Tumors bearing these mutations, therefore, remain among the most difficult to treat. Most efforts to block activated Ras have focused on pathways downstream. Drugs that inhibit Raf kinase have shown clinical benefit in the treatment of malignant melanoma. However, these drugs have failed to show clinical benefit in Ras mutant tumors. It remains unclear to what extent Ras depends on Raf kinase for transforming activity, even though Raf proteins bind directly to Ras and are certainly major effectors of Ras action in normal cells and in development. Furthermore, Raf kinase inhibitors can lead to paradoxical activation of the MAPK pathway. MEK inhibitors block the Ras-MAPK pathway, but often activate the PI3’-kinase, and have shown little clinical benefit as single agents. This activation is mediated by EGF-R and other receptor tyrosine kinases through relief of a negative feedback loop from ERK. Drug combinations that target multiple points within the Ras signaling network are likely to be necessary to achieve substantial clinical benefit. Other effectors may also contribute to Ras signaling and provide a source of targets. In addition, unbiased screens for genes necessary for Ras transformation have revealed new potential targets and have added to our understanding of Ras cancer biology. PMID:21779505

  16. Nuclear Targeting of Gold Nanoparticles for Improved Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Celina J; Chithrani, Devika B

    2016-01-01

    Nanomedicine is an exponentially growing field, and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in particular are extensively used in research due to their abilities as anti-cancer drug carriers for chemotherapy and as dose enhancers in radiotherapy. Most GNP research in the past involved a system where GNP localization was in the cytoplasm of the cell. However, it is predicted that therapy response can be enhanced if GNPs can be effectively targeted into the nucleus. With nuclear targeting, there is a possibility in producing additional free radicals in response to irradiation within the nucleus. This can cause more damage to the DNA of cancer cells. In this review article, we discuss the successful NP-based platforms available for nuclear targeting. In addition, we also present the possible mechanisms of nuclear targeting in detail followed by its applications in cancer therapy.

  17. Emerging Therapeutics Targeting mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Malina, Abba; Mills, John R.; Pelletier, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    A defining feature of many cancers is deregulated translational control. Typically, this occurs at the level of recruitment of the 40S ribosomes to the 5′-cap of cellular messenger RNAs (mRNAs), the rate-limiting step of protein synthesis, which is controlled by the heterotrimeric eukaryotic initiation complex eIF4F. Thus, eIF4F in particular, and translation initiation in general, represent an exploitable vulnerability and unique opportunity for therapeutic intervention in many transformed cells. In this article, we discuss the development, mode of action and biological activity of a number of small-molecule inhibitors that interrupt PI3K/mTOR signaling control of eIF4F assembly, as well as compounds that more directly block eIF4F activity. PMID:22474009

  18. Targeting PCSK9 for therapeutic gains.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Michael D; Fazio, Sergio; Tavori, Hagai

    2015-04-01

    Even though it is only a little over a decade from the discovery of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) as a plasma protein that associates with both hypercholesterolemia and low cholesterol syndromes, a rich literature has developed describing its unique physiology and the impact of antagonism of this molecule on cholesterol metabolism for therapeutic purposes. Indeed, the PCSK9 story is unfolding rapidly, with many answers and more questions. This review summarizes the most recent data from phase II/III clinical trials of PCSK9 inhibition with the three leading antibodies, highlights the clinical significance of the ongoing studies, and suggests future areas of investigation based on recent basic science discoveries on the physiology of PCSK9. PMID:25712137

  19. Alzheimer's disease: molecular concepts and therapeutic targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbender, K.; Masters, C.; Beyreuther, K.

    2001-06-01

    The beta amyloid peptide is the major component of the neuritic plaques, the characteristic lesions in Alzheimer's disease. Mutations in three genes (APP, PS-1, and PS-2) cause familial Alzheimer's disease by alteration of the rate of generation of amyloid peptide or the length of this peptide. However, in the 90% non-familial cases, other factors play a major pathogenetic role. These include the apolipoprotein E genotype, the "plaque-associated" proteins promoting the formation of toxic fibrillar aggregates or the chronic inflammatory responses. The aim of this review is to explain the steps in the complex cascade leading to Alzheimer's disease and, based on this, to report the current efforts to intervene in these different pathophysiological events in order to prevent progression of Alzheimer's disease. Whereas acetylcholine substitution is currently used in clinical practice, future therapeutical strategies to combat Alzheimer's disease may include anti-inflammatory treatments, vaccination against beta amyloid peptide, or treatment with cholesterol-lowering drugs.

  20. Enhanced Delivery of Gold Nanoparticles with Therapeutic Potential for Targeting Human Brain Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etame, Arnold B.

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) remains a major challenge to the advancement and application of systemic anti-cancer therapeutics into the central nervous system. The structural and physiological delivery constraints of the BBB significantly limit the effectiveness of conventional chemotherapy, thereby making systemic administration a non-viable option for the vast majority of chemotherapy agents. Furthermore, the lack of specificity of conventional systemic chemotherapy when applied towards malignant brain tumors remains a major shortcoming. Hence novel therapeutic strategies that focus both on targeted and enhanced delivery across the BBB are warranted. In recent years nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as attractive vehicles for efficient delivery of targeted anti-cancer therapeutics. In particular, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have gained prominence in several targeting applications involving systemic cancers. Their enhanced permeation and retention within permissive tumor microvasculature provide a selective advantage for targeting. Malignant brain tumors also exhibit transport-permissive microvasculature secondary to blood brain barrier disruption. Hence AuNPs may have potential relevance for brain tumor targeting. However, the permeation of AuNPs across the BBB has not been well characterized, and hence is a potential limitation for successful application of AuNP-based therapeutics within the central nervous system (CNS). In this dissertation, we designed and characterized AuNPs and assessed the role of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the physical and biological properties of AuNPs. We established a size-dependent permeation profile with respect to core size as well as PEG length when AuNPs were assessed through a transport-permissive in-vitro BBB. This study was the first of its kind to systematically examine the influence of design on permeation of AuNPs through transport-permissive BBB. Given the significant delivery limitations through the non

  1. Human synthetic lethal inference as potential anti-cancer target gene detection

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Two genes are called synthetic lethal (SL) if mutation of either alone is not lethal, but mutation of both leads to death or a significant decrease in organism's fitness. The detection of SL gene pairs constitutes a promising alternative for anti-cancer therapy. As cancer cells exhibit a large number of mutations, the identification of these mutated genes' SL partners may provide specific anti-cancer drug candidates, with minor perturbations to the healthy cells. Since existent SL data is mainly restricted to yeast screenings, the road towards human SL candidates is limited to inference methods. Results In the present work, we use phylogenetic analysis and database manipulation (BioGRID for interactions, Ensembl and NCBI for homology, Gene Ontology for GO attributes) in order to reconstruct the phylogenetically-inferred SL gene network for human. In addition, available data on cancer mutated genes (COSMIC and Cancer Gene Census databases) as well as on existent approved drugs (DrugBank database) supports our selection of cancer-therapy candidates. Conclusions Our work provides a complementary alternative to the current methods for drug discovering and gene target identification in anti-cancer research. Novel SL screening analysis and the use of highly curated databases would contribute to improve the results of this methodology. PMID:20015360

  2. Pathways and therapeutic targets in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Shtivelman, Emma; Davies, Michael A.; Hwu, Patrick; Yang, James; Lotem, Michal; Oren, Moshe; Flaherty, Keith T.; Fisher, David E.

    2014-01-01

    This review aims to summarize the current knowledge of molecular pathways and their clinical relevance in melanoma. Metastatic melanoma was a grim diagnosis, but in recent years tremendous advances have been made in treatments. Chemotherapy provided little benefit in these patients, but development of targeted and new immune approaches made radical changes in prognosis. This would not have happened without remarkable advances in understanding the biology of disease and tremendous progress in the genomic (and other “omics”) scale analyses of tumors. The big problems facing the field are no longer focused exclusively on the development of new treatment modalities, though this is a very busy area of clinical research. The focus shifted now to understanding and overcoming resistance to targeted therapies, and understanding the underlying causes of the heterogeneous responses to immune therapy. PMID:24743024

  3. Glycans as targets for therapeutic antitumor antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rabu, Catherine; McIntosh, Richard; Jurasova, Zuzana; Durrant, Lindy

    2012-08-01

    Glycans represent a vast class of molecules that modify either proteins or lipids. They exert and regulate important and complex functions in both normal and cancer cell metabolism. As such, the most immunogenic glycans have been targeted in passive and active immunotherapy in human cancer for the past 25 years but it is only recently that techniques have become available to uncover novel glycan targets. The main focus of this review article is to highlight why and how monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing glycans, and in particular the glycans expressed on glycolipids, are being used in various strategies to target and kill cancer cells. The article reports on the historical use of mAbs and on very recent progress made in antitumor therapy using the anti-GD2 mAb and the antiganglioside mAbs, anti-N-glycolylneuraminic acid mAb and anti-Lewis mAb. Anti-GD2 is showing great promise in Phase III clinical trials in adjuvant treatment of neuroblastoma. Racotumomab, an anti-idiotypic mAb mimicking N-glycolylneuraminic acid-containing gangliosides, is currently being tested in a randomized, controlled Phase II/III clinical trial. This article also presents various strategies used by different groups to develop mAbs against these naturally poorly immunogenic glycans.

  4. Targeting the Notch signaling pathway in cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huajiao; Lu, Yi; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Xia; Keller, Evan T; Liu, Qian; Zhou, Qinghua; Zhang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in surgery, imaging, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, the poor overall cancer-related death rate remains unacceptable. Novel therapeutic strategies are desperately needed. Nowadays, targeted therapy has become the most promising therapy and a welcome asset to the cancer therapeutic arena. There is a large body of evidence demonstrating that the Notch signaling pathway is critically involved in the pathobiology of a variety of malignancies. In this review, we provide an overview of emerging data, highlight the mechanism of the Notch signaling pathway in the development of a wide range of cancers, and summarize recent progress in therapeutic targeting of the Notch signaling pathway. PMID:26767041

  5. Therapeutic targeting of NOD1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, L; Gatheral, T

    2013-01-01

    The nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) protein is an intracellular receptor for breakdown products of peptidoglycan (PGN), an essential bacterial cell wall component. NOD1 responds to γ-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelic acid, which is an epitope unique to PGN structures from all Gram-negative bacteria and certain Gram-positive bacteria. Upon ligand recognition, NOD1 undergoes conformational changes and self-oligomerization mediated by the nucleotide-binding NACHT domains, followed by the recruitment and activation of the serine threonine kinase receptor-interacting protein 2 leading to the activation of NF-κB and MAPK pathways and induction of inflammatory genes. Much of our knowledge is derived from seminal studies using mice deficient in NOD1 and confirming an essential role for NOD1 in the host immune response against gastrointestinal and respiratory pathogens. In addition, recent studies have revealed a role for intracellular NOD1 receptors in the regulation of vascular inflammation and metabolism. This review will discuss our current understanding of intracellular NOD1 receptors in host immunity and chronic inflammatory disorders with a focus on cardiovascular diseases. Although therapeutic advances may have to wait until the complex interplay with pathogens, danger signals, other pattern recognition receptors and overlapping metabolic pathways is further unravelled, the steadily growing body of knowledge suggest that NOD1 antagonism might represent attractive candidate to reduce excessive inflammation associated to intestinal, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. PMID:23848281

  6. Targeting TRP channels for novel migraine therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Dussor, Gregory; Yan, J; Xie, Jennifer Y; Ossipov, Michael H; Dodick, David W; Porreca, Frank

    2014-11-19

    Migraine is increasingly understood to be a disorder of the brain. In susceptible individuals, a variety of "triggers" may influence altered central excitability, resulting in the activation and sensitization of trigeminal nociceptive afferents surrounding blood vessels (i.e., the trigeminovascular system), leading to migraine pain. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are expressed in a subset of dural afferents, including those containing calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP). Activation of TRP channels promotes excitation of nociceptive afferent fibers and potentially lead to pain. In addition to pain, allodynia to mechanical and cold stimuli can result from sensitization of both peripheral afferents and of central pain pathways. TRP channels respond to a variety of endogenous conditions including chemical mediators and low pH. These channels can be activated by exogenous stimuli including a wide range of chemical and environmental irritants, some of which have been demonstrated to trigger migraine in humans. Activation of TRP channels can elicit CGRP release, and blocking the effects of CGRP through receptor antagonism or antibody strategies has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of migraine. Identification of approaches that can prevent activation of TRP channels provides an additional novel strategy for discovery of migraine therapeutics.

  7. Human Isoprenoid Synthase Enzymes as Therapeutic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeok; Matralis, Alexios; Berghuis, Albert; Tsantrizos, Youla

    2014-07-01

    The complex biochemical network known as the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids in the human body, which consists of a vast array of metabolites that are vital for proper cellular functions. Two key isoprenoids, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) are responsible for the post-translational prenylation of small GTP-binding proteins, and serve as the biosynthetic precursors to numerous other biomolecules. The down-stream metabolite of FPP and GGPP is squalene, the precursor to steroids, bile acids, lipoproteins and vitamin D. In the past, interest in prenyl synthase inhibitors focused mainly on the role of the FPP in lytic bone diseases. More recently, pre-clinical and clinical studies have strongly implicated high levels of protein prenylation in a plethora of human diseases, including non-skeletal cancers, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus mainly on the potential therapeutic value of down-regulating the biosynthesis of FPP, GGPP and squalene. We summarize the most recent drug discovery efforts and the structural data available that support the current on-going studies.

  8. Human isoprenoid synthase enzymes as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaeok; Matralis, Alexios N.; Berghuis, Albert M.; Tsantrizos, Youla S.

    2014-01-01

    In the human body, the complex biochemical network known as the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids, which consists of a vast array of metabolites that are vital for proper cellular functions. Two key isoprenoids, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) are responsible for the post-translational prenylation of small GTP-binding proteins, and serve as the biosynthetic precursors to numerous other biomolecules. The down-stream metabolite of FPP and GGPP is squalene, the precursor to steroids, bile acids, lipoproteins, and vitamin D. In the past, interest in prenyl synthase inhibitors focused mainly on the role of the FPP in lytic bone diseases. More recently pre-clinical and clinical studies have strongly implicated high levels of protein prenylation in a plethora of human diseases, including non-skeletal cancers, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus mainly on the potential therapeutic value of down-regulating the biosynthesis of FPP, GGPP, and squalene. We summarize the most recent drug discovery efforts and the structural data available that support the current on-going studies. PMID:25101260

  9. Targeting melanocortin receptors as potential novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Getting, Stephen J

    2006-07-01

    Adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH(1-39)) and the melanocortins (alpha, beta and gamma-melanocyte-stimulating hormone [MSH]) are derived from a larger precursor molecule known as the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) protein. They exert their numerous biological effects by activating 7 transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), leading to adenylyl cyclase activation and subsequent cAMP accumulation within the target cell. To date, 5 melanocortin receptors (MCR) have been identified and termed MC1R to MC5R, they have been shown to have a wide and varied distribution throughout the body, being found in the central nervous system (CNS), periphery and immune cells. Melanocortins have a multitude of actions including: (i) modulating disease pathologies including arthritis, asthma, obesity; (ii) affecting functions, for example erectile dysfunction, skin tanning; and (iii) organ systems, for example cardiovascular system. Recently a mechanistic approach has been identified with alpha-MSH preventing NF-kappaB activation via the preservation and expression of IkappaBalphaprotein. This leads to a reduction of pro-inflammatory mediators including cytokines and inhibition of adhesion molecule expression, with subsequent reduction in leukocyte emigration. Development of selective ligands with an appropriate pharmacokinetic profile will enable a pharmacological evaluation of the potential beneficial effects of the melanocortins. In this review I have discussed the potential mechanistic action for the melanocortins and some of the disease pathologies shown to be modulated. This review proposes targeting the MCR with the ultimate aim of controlling many of the diseases that we face today.

  10. Folate-conjugated boron nitride nanospheres for targeted delivery of anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shini; Zhang, Huijie; Yan, Ting; Huang, Dandi; Zhi, Chunyi; Nakanishi, Hideki; Gao, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    With its unique physical and chemical properties and structural similarity to carbon, boron nitride (BN) has attracted considerable attention and found many applications. Biomedical applications of BN have recently started to emerge, raising great hopes in drug and gene delivery. Here, we developed a targeted anticancer drug delivery system based on folate-conjugated BN nanospheres (BNNS) with receptor-mediated targeting. Folic acid (FA) was successfully grafted onto BNNS via esterification reaction. In vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that BNNS-FA complexes were non-toxic to HeLa cells up to a concentration of 100 μg/mL. Then, doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), a commonly used anticancer drug, was loaded onto BNNS-FA complexes. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes were stable at pH 7.4 but effectively released DOX at pH 5.0, which exhibited a pH sensitive and sustained release pattern. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes could be recognized and specifically internalized by HeLa cells via FA receptor-mediated endocytosis. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes exhibited greater cytotoxicity to HeLa cells than free DOX and BNNS/DOX complexes due to the increased cellular uptake of DOX mediated by the FA receptor. Therefore, BNNS-FA complexes had strong potential for targeted cancer therapy. PMID:27695318

  11. Folate-conjugated boron nitride nanospheres for targeted delivery of anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shini; Zhang, Huijie; Yan, Ting; Huang, Dandi; Zhi, Chunyi; Nakanishi, Hideki; Gao, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    With its unique physical and chemical properties and structural similarity to carbon, boron nitride (BN) has attracted considerable attention and found many applications. Biomedical applications of BN have recently started to emerge, raising great hopes in drug and gene delivery. Here, we developed a targeted anticancer drug delivery system based on folate-conjugated BN nanospheres (BNNS) with receptor-mediated targeting. Folic acid (FA) was successfully grafted onto BNNS via esterification reaction. In vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that BNNS-FA complexes were non-toxic to HeLa cells up to a concentration of 100 μg/mL. Then, doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), a commonly used anticancer drug, was loaded onto BNNS-FA complexes. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes were stable at pH 7.4 but effectively released DOX at pH 5.0, which exhibited a pH sensitive and sustained release pattern. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes could be recognized and specifically internalized by HeLa cells via FA receptor-mediated endocytosis. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes exhibited greater cytotoxicity to HeLa cells than free DOX and BNNS/DOX complexes due to the increased cellular uptake of DOX mediated by the FA receptor. Therefore, BNNS-FA complexes had strong potential for targeted cancer therapy.

  12. Reformulating Tylocrebrine in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Targeted Polymeric Nanoparticles Improves Its Therapeutic Index

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Several promising anticancer drug candidates have been sidelined owing to their poor physicochemical properties or unfavorable pharmacokinetics, resulting in high overall cost of drug discovery and development. Use of alternative formulation strategies that alleviate these issues can help advance new molecules to the clinic at a significantly lower cost. Tylocrebrine is a natural product with potent anticancer activity. Its clinical trial was discontinued following the discovery of severe central nervous system toxicities. To improve the safety and potency of tylocrebrine, we formulated the drug in polymeric nanoparticles targeted to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpressed on several types of tumors. Through in vitro studies in different cancer cell lines, we found that EGFR targeted nanoparticles were significantly more effective in killing tumor cells than the free drug. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies revealed that encapsulation in nanoparticles resulted in lower brain penetration and enhanced tumor accumulation of the drug. Further, targeted nanoparticles were characterized by significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibitory activity in a mouse xenograft model of epidermoid cancer. These results suggest that the therapeutic index of drugs that were previously considered unusable could be significantly improved by reformulation. Application of novel formulation strategies to previously abandoned drugs provides an opportunity to advance new molecules to the clinic at a lower cost. This can significantly increase the repertoire of treatment options available to cancer patients. PMID:26065924

  13. Cardiovascular therapeutic uses of targeted ultrasound contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Susan T.; McPherson, David D.

    2009-01-01

    The therapeutic use of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) is an emerging methodology with high potential for enhanced directed therapeutic gene, bioactive gas, drug, and stem cell delivery. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction has already demonstrated feasibility for plasmid DNA delivery. Similarly, therapeutic ultrasound for thrombolysis treatment has been taken into the clinical setting, and the addition of UCAs for therapeutic delivery or enhanced effect through cavitation is a natural progression to this investigation. However, as with any new technique, safety needs to be first demonstrated before translation into clinical practice. This review article will focus on the development of UCAs for cardiac and vascular therapeutics as well as the limitations/concerns for the use of therapeutic ultrasound in clinical medicine in order to lay a foundation for investigators planning to enter this exciting field or for those who want to broaden their understanding. PMID:19581314

  14. Novel therapeutic targets in myeloma bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Webb, S L; Edwards, C M

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a neoplastic disorder of plasma cells characterized by clonal proliferation within the bone marrow. One of the major clinical features of multiple myeloma is the destructive osteolytic bone disease that occurs in the majority of patients. Myeloma bone disease is associated with increased osteoclast activity and suppression of osteoblastogenesis. Bisphosphonates have been the mainstay of treatment for many years; however, their use is limited by their inability to repair existing bone loss. Therefore, research into novel approaches for the treatment of myeloma bone disease is of the utmost importance. This review will discuss the current advances in our understanding of osteoclast stimulation and osteoblast suppression mechanisms in myeloma bone disease and the treatments that are under development to target this destructive and debilitating feature of myeloma. PMID:24750110

  15. Cancer targeted therapeutics: From molecules to drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Daxing; Auguste, Debra T

    2015-12-10

    The pitfall of all chemotherapeutics lies in drug resistance and the severe side effects experienced by patients. One way to reduce the off-target effects of chemotherapy on healthy tissues is to alter the biodistribution of drug. This can be achieved in two ways: Passive targeting utilizes shape, size, and surface chemistry to increase particle circulation and tumor accumulation. Active targeting employs either chemical moieties (e.g. peptides, sugars, aptamers, antibodies) to selectively bind to cell membranes or responsive elements (e.g. ultrasound, magnetism, light) to deliver its cargo within a local region. This article will focus on the systemic administration of anti-cancer agents and their ability to home to tumors and, if relevant, distant metastatic sites.

  16. Targeting and therapeutic peptides in nanomedicine for atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Peptides in atherosclerosis nanomedicine provide structural, targeting, and therapeutic functionality and can assist in overcoming delivery barriers of traditional pharmaceuticals. Moreover, their inherent biocompatibility and biodegradability make them especially attractive as materials intended for use in vivo. In this review, an overview of nanoparticle-associated targeting and therapeutic peptides for atherosclerosis is provided, including peptides designed for cellular targets such as endothelial cells, monocytes, and macrophages as well as for plaque components such as collagen and fibrin. An emphasis is placed on recent advances in multimodal strategies and a discussion on current challenges and barriers for clinical applicability is presented. PMID:27022138

  17. Targeting and therapeutic peptides in nanomedicine for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Eun Ji

    2016-05-01

    Peptides in atherosclerosis nanomedicine provide structural, targeting, and therapeutic functionality and can assist in overcoming delivery barriers of traditional pharmaceuticals. Moreover, their inherent biocompatibility and biodegradability make them especially attractive as materials intended for use in vivo In this review, an overview of nanoparticle-associated targeting and therapeutic peptides for atherosclerosis is provided, including peptides designed for cellular targets such as endothelial cells, monocytes, and macrophages as well as for plaque components such as collagen and fibrin. An emphasis is placed on recent advances in multimodal strategies and a discussion on current challenges and barriers for clinical applicability is presented.

  18. Native functionality and therapeutic targeting of arenaviral glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Crispin, Max; Zeltina, Antra; Zitzmann, Nicole; Bowden, Thomas A

    2016-06-01

    Surface glycoproteins direct cellular targeting, attachment, and membrane fusion of arenaviruses and are the primary target for neutralizing antibodies. Despite significant conservation of the glycoprotein architecture across the arenavirus family, there is considerable variation in the molecular recognition mechanisms used during host cell entry. We review recent progress in dissecting these infection events and describe how arenaviral glycoproteins can be targeted by small-molecule antivirals, the natural immune response, and immunoglobulin-based therapeutics. Arenaviral glycoprotein-mediated assembly and infection pathways present numerous opportunities and challenges for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27104809

  19. Network Pharmacology Strategies Toward Multi-Target Anticancer Therapies: From Computational Models to Experimental Design Principles

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jing; Aittokallio, Tero

    2014-01-01

    Polypharmacology has emerged as novel means in drug discovery for improving treatment response in clinical use. However, to really capitalize on the polypharmacological effects of drugs, there is a critical need to better model and understand how the complex interactions between drugs and their cellular targets contribute to drug efficacy and possible side effects. Network graphs provide a convenient modeling framework for dealing with the fact that most drugs act on cellular systems through targeting multiple proteins both through on-target and off-target binding. Network pharmacology models aim at addressing questions such as how and where in the disease network should one target to inhibit disease phenotypes, such as cancer growth, ideally leading to therapies that are less vulnerable to drug resistance and side effects by means of attacking the disease network at the systems level through synergistic and synthetic lethal interactions. Since the exponentially increasing number of potential drug target combinations makes pure experimental approach quickly unfeasible, this review depicts a number of computational models and algorithms that can effectively reduce the search space for determining the most promising combinations for experimental evaluation. Such computational-experimental strategies are geared toward realizing the full potential of multi-target treatments in different disease phenotypes. Our specific focus is on system-level network approaches to polypharmacology designs in anticancer drug discovery, where we give representative examples of how network-centric modeling may offer systematic strategies toward better understanding and even predicting the phenotypic responses to multi-target therapies.

  20. Is Estrogen a Therapeutic Target for Glaucoma?

    PubMed

    Dewundara, Samantha S; Wiggs, Janey L; Sullivan, David A; Pasquale, Louis R

    2016-01-01

    endothelial nitric oxide synthase, a gene receptive to estrogen regulation, are associated with glaucoma. The study concluded that increasing evidence suggests that lifetime exposure to estrogen may alter the pathogenesis of glaucoma. Estrogen exposure may have a neuroprotective effect on the progression of POAG but further studies need to confirm this finding. The role of sex-specific preventive and therapeutic treatment may be on the horizon. PMID:26959139

  1. MicroRNAs: novel therapeutic targets in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Roshan, Reema; Ghosh, Tanay; Scaria, Vinod; Pillai, Beena

    2009-12-01

    The prevalence of neurodegenerative disorders is rising steadily as human life expectancy increases. However, limited knowledge of the molecular basis of disease pathogenesis is a major hurdle in the identification of drug targets and development of therapeutic strategies for these largely incurable disorders. Recently, differential expression of endogenous regulatory small RNAs, known as 'microRNAs' (miRNAs), in patients of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and models of ataxia suggest that they might have key regulatory roles in neurodegeneration. miRNAs that can target known mediators of neurodegeneration offer potential therapeutic targets. Our bioinformatic analysis suggests novel miRNA-target interactions that could potentially influence neurodegeneration. The recent development of molecules that alter miRNA expression promises valuable tools that will enhance the therapeutic potential of miRNAs.

  2. Phosphodiesterases as Therapeutic Targets for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among the elderly. In AD patients, memory loss is accompanied by the formation of beta-amyloid plaques and the appearance of tau in a pathological form. Given the lack of effective treatments for AD, the development of new management strategies for these patients is critical. The continued failure to find effective therapies using molecules aimed at addressing the anti-beta amyloid pathology has led researchers to focus on other non-amyloid-based approaches to restore memory function. Promising non-amyloid related candidate targets include phosphosdiesterases (PDEs), and indeed, Rolipram, a specific PDE4 inhibitor, was the first compound found to effectively restore cognitive deficits in animal models of AD. More recently, PDE5 inhibitors have also been shown to effectively restore memory function. Accordingly, inhibitors of other members of the PDE family may also improve memory performance in AD and non-AD animal models. Hence, in this review, we will summarize the data supporting the use of PDE inhibitors as cognitive enhancers and we will discuss the possible mechanisms of action underlying these effects. We shall also adopt a medicinal chemistry perspective that leads us to propose the most promising PDE candidates on the basis of inhibitor selectivity, brain distribution, and mechanism of action. PMID:23173065

  3. Therapeutic Targeting of Syk in Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Colonna, Lucrezia; Catalano, Geoffrey; Chew, Claude; D’Agati, Vivette; Thomas, James W.; Wong, F. Susan; Schmitz, Jochen; Masuda, Esteban S.; Reizis, Boris; Tarakhovsky, Alexander; Clynes, Raphael

    2010-01-01

    In APCs, the protein tyrosine kinase Syk is required for signaling of several immunoreceptors, including the BCR and FcR. We show that conditional ablation of the syk gene in dendritic cells (DCs) abrogates FcγR-mediated cross priming of diabetogenic T cells in RIP-mOVA mice, a situation phenocopied in wild-type RIP-mOVA mice treated with the selective Syk inhibitor R788. In addition to blocking FcγR-mediated events, R788 also blocked BCR-mediated Ag presentation, thus broadly interrupting the humoral contributions to T cell-driven autoimmunity. Indeed, oral administration of R788 significantly delayed spontaneous diabetes onset in NOD mice and successfully delayed progression of early-established diabetes even when treatment was initiated after the development of glucose intolerance. At the DC level, R788 treatment was associated with reduced insulin-specific CD8 priming and decreased DC numbers. At the B cell level, R788 reduced total B cell numbers and total Ig concentrations. Interestingly, R788 increased the number of IL-10–producing B cells, thus inducing a tolerogenic B cell population with immunomodulatory activity. Taken together, we show by genetic and pharmacologic approaches that Syk in APCs is an attractive target in T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes. PMID:20601600

  4. Factor XI as a Therapeutic Target.

    PubMed

    Gailani, David; Gruber, Andras

    2016-07-01

    Factor XIa is a plasma serine protease that contributes to thrombin generation primarily through proteolytic activation of factor IX. Traditionally considered part of the intrinsic pathway of coagulation, several lines of evidence now suggest that factor XIa serves as an interface between the vitamin-K-dependent thrombin generation mechanism and the proinflammatory kallikrein-kinin system, allowing the 2 systems to influence each other. Work with animal models and results from epidemiological surveys of human populations support a role for factor XIa in thromboembolic disease. These data and the clinical observation that deficiency of factor XI, the zymogen of factor XIa, produces a relatively mild bleeding disorder suggest that drugs targeting factor XI or XIa could produce an antithrombotic effect while leaving hemostasis largely intact. Results of a recent trial comparing antisense-induced factor XI reduction to standard-dose low molecular-weight heparin as prophylaxis for venous thrombosis during knee replacement are encouraging in this regard. Here, we discuss recent findings on the biochemistry, physiology, and pathology of factor XI as they relate to thromboembolic disease. PMID:27174099

  5. Classical and Targeted Anticancer Drugs: An Appraisal of Mechanisms of Multidrug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Baguley, Bruce C

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which tumor cells resist the action of multiple anticancer drugs, often with widely different chemical structures, have been pursued for more than 30 years. The identification of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a drug efflux transporter protein with affinity for multiple therapeutic drugs, provided an important potential mechanism and further work, which identified other members of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family that act as drug transporters. Several observations, including results of clinical trials with pharmacological inhibitors of P-gp, have suggested that mechanisms other than efflux transporters should be considered as contributors to resistance, and in this review mechanisms of anticancer drug resistance are considered more broadly. Cells in human tumors exist is a state of continuous turnover, allowing ongoing selection and "survival of the fittest." Tumor cells die not only as a consequence of drug therapy but also by apoptosis induced by their microenvironment. Cell death can be mediated by host immune mechanisms and by nonimmune cells acting on so-called death receptors. The tumor cell proliferation rate is also important because it controls tumor regeneration. Resistance to therapy might therefore be considered to arise from a reduction of several distinct cell death mechanisms, as well as from an increased ability to regenerate. This review provides a perspective on these mechanisms, together with brief descriptions of some of the methods that can be used to investigate them in a clinical situation. PMID:26910066

  6. Cholera: pathophysiology and emerging therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Muanprasat, Chatchai; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj

    2013-05-01

    Cholera is a diarrheal disease that remains an important global health problem with several hundreds of thousands of reported cases each year. This disease is caused by intestinal infection with Vibrio cholerae, which is a highly motile gram-negative bacterium with a single-sheathed flagellum. In the course of cholera pathogenesis, V. cholerae expresses a transcriptional activator ToxT, which subsequently transactivates expressions of two crucial virulence factors: toxin-coregulated pilus and cholera toxin (CT). These factors are responsible for intestinal colonization of V. cholerae and induction of fluid secretion, respectively. In intestinal epithelial cells, CT binds to GM1 ganglioside receptors on the apical membrane and undergoes retrograde vesicular trafficking to endoplasmic reticulum, where it exploits endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation systems to release a catalytic A1 subunit of CT (CT A1) into cytoplasm. CT A1, in turn, catalyzes ADP ribosylation of α subunits of stimulatory G proteins, leading to a persistent activation of adenylate cyclase and an elevation of intracellular cAMP. Increased intracellular cAMP in human intestinal epithelial cells accounts for pathogenesis of profuse diarrhea and severe fluid loss in cholera. This review provides an overview of the pathophysiology of cholera diarrhea and discusses emerging drug targets for cholera, which include V. cholerae virulence factors, V. cholerae motility, CT binding to GM1 receptor, CT internalization and intoxication, as well as cAMP metabolism and transport proteins involved in cAMP-activated Cl(-) secretion. Future directions and perspectives of research on drug discovery and development for cholera are discussed. PMID:23651092

  7. Design, synthesis and evaluation of N-acetyl glucosamine (NAG)-PEG-doxorubicin targeted conjugates for anticancer delivery.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Smita K; Badhwar, Archana J; Kharas, Firuza; Khandare, Jayant J; Vavia, Pradeep R

    2012-10-15

    Efficacy of anticancer drug is limited by the severe adverse effects induced by drug; therefore the crux is in designing delivery systems targeted only to cancer cells. Toward this objectives, we propose, synthesis of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-doxorubicin (DOX) prodrug conjugates consisting N-acetyl glucosamine (NAG) as a targeting moiety. Multicomponent system proposed here is characterized by (1)H NMR, UV spectroscopy, and HPLC. The multicomponent system is evaluated for in vitro cellular kinetics and anticancer activity using MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Molecular modeling study demonstrated sterically stabilized conformations of polymeric conjugates. Interestingly, PEG-DOX conjugate with NAG ligand showed significantly higher cytotoxicity compared to drug conjugate with DOX. In addition, the polymer drug conjugate with NAG and DOX showed enhanced internalization and retention effect in cancer cells, compared to free DOX. Thus, with enhanced internalization and targeting ability of PEG conjugate of NAG-DOX has implication in targeted anticancer therapy.

  8. An inverse docking approach for identifying new potential anti-cancer targets.

    PubMed

    Grinter, Sam Z; Liang, Yayun; Huang, Sheng-You; Hyder, Salman M; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2011-04-01

    Inverse docking is a relatively new technique that has been used to identify potential receptor targets of small molecules. Our docking software package MDock is well suited for such an application as it is both computationally efficient, yet simultaneously shows adequate results in binding affinity predictions and enrichment tests. As a validation study, we present the first stage results of an inverse-docking study which seeks to identify potential direct targets of PRIMA-1. PRIMA-1 is well known for its ability to restore mutant p53's tumor suppressor function, leading to apoptosis in several types of cancer cells. For this reason, we believe that potential direct targets of PRIMA-1 identified in silico should be experimentally screened for their ability to inhibit cancer cell growth. The highest-ranked human protein of our PRIMA-1 docking results is oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC), which is part of the cholesterol synthetic pathway. The results of two followup experiments which treat OSC as a possible anti-cancer target are promising. We show that both PRIMA-1 and Ro 48-8071, a known potent OSC inhibitor, significantly reduce the viability of BT-474 and T47-D breast cancer cells relative to normal mammary cells. In addition, like PRIMA-1, we find that Ro 48-8071 results in increased binding of p53 to DNA in BT-474 cells (which express mutant p53). For the first time, Ro 48-8071 is shown as a potent agent in killing human breast cancer cells. The potential of OSC as a new target for developing anticancer therapies is worth further investigation.

  9. Targeting Notch degradation system provides promise for breast cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Shen, Jia-Xin; Wen, Xiao-Fen; Guo, Yu-Xian; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Notch receptor signaling pathways play an important role, not only in normal breast development but also in breast cancer development and progression. As a group of ligand-induced proteins, different subtypes of mammalian Notch (Notch1-4) are sensitive to subtle changes in protein levels. Thus, a clear understanding of mechanisms of Notch protein turnover is essential for understanding normal and pathological mechanisms of Notch functions. It has been suggested that there is a close relationship between the carcinogenesis and the dysregulation of Notch degradation. However, this relationship remains mostly undefined in the context of breast cancer, as protein degradation is mediated by numerous signaling pathways as well as certain molecule modulators (activators/inhibitors). In this review, we summarize the published data regarding the regulation of Notch family member degradation in breast cancer, while emphasizing areas that are likely to provide new therapeutic modalities for mechanism-based anti-cancer drugs.

  10. The disulfide compound α-lipoic acid and its derivatives: A novel class of anticancer agents targeting mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Dörsam, Bastian; Fahrer, Jörg

    2016-02-01

    The endogenous disulfide α-lipoic acid (LA) is an essential mitochondrial co-factor. In addition, LA and its reduced counterpart dihydro lipoic acid form a potent redox couple with antioxidative functions, for which it is used as dietary supplement and therapeutic. Recently, it has gained attention due to its cytotoxic effects in cancer cells, which is the key aspect of this review. We initially recapitulate the dietary occurrence, gastrointestinal absorption and pharmacokinetics of LA, illustrating its diverse antioxidative mechanisms. We then focus on its mode of action in cancer cells, in which it triggers primarily the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, whereas non-transformed primary cells are hardly affected. Furthermore, LA impairs oncogenic signaling and displays anti-metastatic potential. Novel LA derivatives such as CPI-613, which target mitochondrial energy metabolism, are described and recent pre-clinical studies are presented, which demonstrate that LA and its derivatives exert antitumor activity in vivo. Finally, we highlight clinical studies currently performed with the LA analog CPI-613. In summary, LA and its derivatives are promising candidates to complement the arsenal of established anticancer drugs due to their mitochondria-targeted mode of action and non-genotoxic properties.

  11. Cancer systems biology: embracing complexity to develop better anticancer therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Du, W; Elemento, O

    2015-06-01

    The transformation of normal cells into cancer cells and maintenance of the malignant state and phenotypes are associated with genetic and epigenetic deregulations, altered cellular signaling responses and aberrant interactions with the microenvironment. These alterations are constantly evolving as tumor cells face changing selective pressures induced by the cells themselves, the microenvironment and drug treatments. Tumors are also complex ecosystems where different, sometime heterogeneous, subclonal tumor populations and a variety of nontumor cells coexist in a constantly evolving manner. The interactions between molecules and between cells that arise as a result of these alterations and ecosystems are even more complex. The cancer research community is increasingly embracing this complexity and adopting a combination of systems biology methods and integrated analyses to understand and predictively model the activity of cancer cells. Systems biology approaches are helping to understand the mechanisms of tumor progression and design more effective cancer therapies. These approaches work in tandem with rapid technological advancements that enable data acquisition on a broader scale, with finer accuracy, higher dimensionality and higher throughput than ever. Using such data, computational and mathematical models help identify key deregulated functions and processes, establish predictive biomarkers and optimize therapeutic strategies. Moving forward, implementing patient-specific computational and mathematical models of cancer will significantly improve the specificity and efficacy of targeted therapy, and will accelerate the adoption of personalized and precision cancer medicine.

  12. [Causes, mechanisms and possible therapeutic targets of gout].

    PubMed

    Manigold, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Gout is the most frequent arthritis worldwide with increasing prevalence in industrialized countries and massive socioeconomic consequences. The knowledge regarding the pathomechanisms which lead to arthritis has substantially increased during the last decade. Consistently, new therapeutic approaches and substances appear at the horizon. This review covers aspects of clinical presentation, diagnosis and current treatment. The pathomechanisms leading to NLRP3 inflammasome activation and IL-1beta secretion are reviewed in detail. Finally, selected new therapeutic targets and substances are discussed.

  13. Zebrafish: predictive model for targeted cancer therapeutics from nature.

    PubMed

    Zulkhernain, Nursafwana Syazwani; Teo, Soo Hwang; Patel, Vyomesh; Tan, Pei Jean

    2014-01-01

    Targeted therapy, the treatment of cancer based on an underlying genetic alteration, is rapidly gaining favor as the preferred therapeutic approach. To date, although natural products represent a rich resource of bio-diverse drug candidates, only a few have been identified to be effective as targeted cancer therapies largely due to the incompatibilities to current high-throughput screening methods. In this article, we review the utility of a zebrafish developmental screen for bioactive natural product-based compounds that target signaling pathways that are intimately shared with those in humans. Any bioactive compound perturbing signaling pathways identified from phenotypic developmental defects in zebrafish embryos provide an opportunity for developing targeted therapies for human cancers. This model provides a promising tool in the search for targeted cancer therapeutics from natural products. PMID:25348017

  14. Dual targeting of heat shock proteins 90 and 70 promotes cell death and enhances the anticancer effect of chemotherapeutic agents in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liang; Sato, Fuminori; Sato, Ryuta; Matsubara, Takanori; Hirai, Kenichi; Yamasaki, Mutsushi; Shin, Toshitaka; Shimada, Tatsuo; Nomura, Takeo; Mori, Kenichi; Sumino, Yasuhiro; Mimata, Hiromitsu

    2014-06-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are molecular chaperones that stabilize numerous vital proteins, may be attractive targets for cancer therapy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible anticancer effect of single or dual targeting of HSP90 and HSP70 and the combination treatment with HSP inhibitors and chemotherapeutic agents in bladder cancer cells. The expression of HSP90 and the anticancer effect of the HSP90 inhibitor 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) coupled with cisplatin, docetaxel, or gemcitabine were examined using immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR, cell growth, flow cytometry, immunoblots and caspase-3/7 assays. The expression of HSP70 under HSP90 inhibition and the additive effect of HSP70 inhibitor pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ) were examined by the same assays and transmission electron microscopy. HSP90 was highly expressed in bladder cancer tissues and cell lines. 17-AAG enhanced the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of each chemotherapeutic agent. 17-AAG also suppressed Akt activity but induced the upregulation of HSP70. PFT-μ enhanced the effect of 17-AAG or chemotherapeutic agents; the triple combination of 17-AAG, PFT-μ and a chemotherapeutic agent showed the most significant anticancer effect on the T24 cell line. The combination of 17-AAG and PFT-μ markedly suppressed Akt and Bad activities. With HSP90 suppression, HSP70 overexpression possibly contributes to the avoidance of cell death and HSP70 may be a key molecule for overcoming resistance to the HSP90 inhibitor. The dual targeting of these two chaperones and the combination with conventional anticancer drugs could be a promising therapeutic option for patients with advanced bladder cancer.

  15. Principles of separation: indications and therapeutic targets for plasma exchange.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark E; Balogun, Rasheed A

    2014-01-01

    Extracorporeal "blood purification," mainly in the form of hemodialysis has been a major portion of the clinical activity of many nephrologists for the past 5 decades. A possibly older procedure, therapeutic plasma exchange, separates and then removes plasma as a method of removing pathogenic material from the patient. In contrast to hemodialysis, therapeutic plasma exchange preferentially removes biologic substances of high molecular weight such as autoantibodies or alloantibodies, antigen-antibody complexes, and Ig paraproteins. These molecular targets may be cleared through two alternative procedures: centrifugal separation and membrane separation. This review presents operational features of each procedure, with relevance to the nephrologist. Kinetics of removal of these plasma constituents are based on the principles of separation by the apheresis technique and by features specific to each molecular target, including their production and compartmentalization in the body. Molecular targets for common renal conditions requiring therapeutic plasma exchange are also discussed in detail.

  16. Tracking of Multimodal Therapeutic Nanocomplexes Targeting Breast Cancer in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bardhan, Rizia; Chen, Wenxue; Bartels, Marc; Perez-Torres, Carlos; Botero, Maria F.; McAninch, Robin Ward; Contreras, Alejandro; Schiff, Rachel; Pautler, Robia G.; Halas, Naomi J.; Joshi, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based therapeutics with local delivery and external electromagnetic field modulation holds extraordinary promise for soft-tissue cancers such as breast cancer; however, knowledge of the distribution and fate of nanoparticles in vivo is crucial for clinical translation. Here we demonstrate that multiple diagnostic capabilities can be introduced in photothermal therapeutic nanocomplexes by simultaneously enhancing both near-infrared fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We track nanocomplexes in vivo, examining the influence of HER2 antibody targeting on nanocomplex distribution over 72 h. This approach provides valuable, detailed information regarding the distribution and fate of complex nanoparticles designed for specific diagnostic and therapeutic functions. PMID:21090693

  17. Ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes as mitochondria-targeted two-photon photodynamic anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangping; Chen, Yu; Li, Guanying; Zhang, Pingyu; Jin, Chengzhi; Zeng, Leli; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-07-01

    Clinical acceptance of photodynamic therapy is currently hindered by poor depth efficacy and inefficient activation of the cell death machinery in cancer cells during treatment. To address these issues, photoactivation using two-photon absorption (TPA) is currently being examined. Mitochondria-targeted therapy represents a promising approach to target tumors selectively and may overcome the resistance in current anticancer therapies. Herein, four ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes (RuL1-RuL4) have been designed and developed to act as mitochondria-targeted two-photon photodynamic anticancer agents. These complexes exhibit very high singlet oxygen quantum yields in methanol (0.74-0.81), significant TPA cross sections (124-198 GM), remarkable mitochondrial accumulation, and deep penetration depth. Thus, RuL1-RuL4 were utilized as one-photon and two-photon absorbing photosensitizers in both monolayer cells and 3D multicellular spheroids (MCSs). These Ru(II) complexes were almost nontoxic towards cells and 3D MCSs in the dark and generate sufficient singlet oxygen under one- and two-photon irradiation to trigger cell death. Remarkably, RuL4 exhibited an IC50 value as low as 9.6 μM in one-photon PDT (λirr = 450 nm, 12 J cm(-2)) and 1.9 μM in two-photon PDT (λirr = 830 nm, 800 J cm(-2)) of 3D MCSs; moreover, RuL4 is an order of magnitude more toxic than cisplatin in the latter test system. The combination of mitochondria-targeting and two-photon activation provides a valuable paradigm to develop ruthenium(II) complexes for PDT applications.

  18. Nerve growth factor & TrkA as novel therapeutic targets in cancer.

    PubMed

    Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Tieftrunk, Elke; Schorn, Stephan; Friess, Helmut; Ceyhan, Güralp O

    2016-08-01

    In the past 20years, nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptors TrkA & p75NTR were recognized to be overexpressed in the overwhelming majority of human solid cancers. Recent studies discovered the presence of overactive TrkA signaling due to TrkA rearrangements or TrkA fusion products in frequent cancers like colorectal cancer, thyroid cancer, or acute myeloid leukemia. Thus, targeting TrkA/NGF via selective small-molecule-inhibitors or antibodies has gained enormous attention in the drug discovery sector. Clinical studies on the anti-cancer impact of NGF-blocking antibodies are likely to be accelerated after the recent removal of clinical holds on these agents by regulatory authorities. Based on these current developments, the present review provides not only a broad overview of the biological effects of NGF-TrkA-p75NTR on cancer cells and their microenvironment, but also explains why NGF and its receptors are going to evoke major interest as promising therapeutic anti-cancer targets in the coming decade. PMID:27264679

  19. Targeting Mitochondria as Therapeutic Strategy for Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pascale, Antonietta Valeria; Finelli, Rosa; Carillo, Anna Lisa; Annunziata, Roberto; Iaccarino, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are critical regulator of cell metabolism; thus, mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with many metabolic disorders. Defects in oxidative phosphorylation, ROS production, or mtDNA mutations are the main causes of mitochondrial dysfunction in many pathological conditions such as IR/diabetes, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. Thus, targeting mitochondria has been proposed as therapeutic approach for these conditions, leading to the development of small molecules to be tested in the clinical scenario. Here we discuss therapeutic interventions to treat mitochondrial dysfunction associated with two major metabolic disorders, metabolic syndrome, and cancer. Finally, novel mechanisms of regulation of mitochondrial function are discussed, which open new scenarios for mitochondria targeting. PMID:24757426

  20. Lipid A as a Drug Target and Therapeutic Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Sang Hoon

    2015-01-01

    In this review, lipid A, from its discovery to recent findings, is presented as a drug target and therapeutic molecule. First, the biosynthetic pathway for lipid A, the Raetz pathway, serves as a good drug target for antibiotic development. Several assay methods used to screen for inhibitors of lipid A synthesis will be presented, and some of the promising lead compounds will be described. Second, utilization of lipid A biosynthetic pathways by various bacterial species can generate modified lipid A molecules with therapeutic value. PMID:26535075

  1. New strategies in neuroblastoma: Therapeutic targeting of MYCN and ALK.

    PubMed

    Barone, Giuseppe; Anderson, John; Pearson, Andrew D J; Petrie, Kevin; Chesler, Louis

    2013-11-01

    Clinical outcome remains poor in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma, in which chemoresistant relapse is common following high-intensity conventional multimodal therapy. Novel treatment approaches are required. Although recent genomic profiling initiatives have not revealed a high frequency of mutations in any significant number of therapeutically targeted genes, two exceptions, amplification of the MYCN oncogene and somatically acquired tyrosine kinase domain point mutations in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), present exciting possibilities for targeted therapy. In contrast with the situation with ALK, in which a robust pipeline of pharmacologic agents is available from early clinical use in adult malignancy, therapeutic targeting of MYCN (and MYC oncoproteins in general) represents a significant medicinal chemistry challenge that has remained unsolved for two decades. We review the latest approaches envisioned for blockade of ALK activity in neuroblastoma, present a classification of potential approaches for therapeutic targeting of MYCN, and discuss how recent developments in targeting of MYC proteins seem to make therapeutic inhibition of MYCN a reality in the clinic.

  2. Methodological aspects of current problems in target-based anticancer drug development.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Takeharu; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Ichinose, Yukito; Oda, Shinya; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2006-06-01

    Differently from the conventional antineoplastic agents, target-based drugs are designed a priori, based on our knowledge of various physiological molecules that has been obtained by the development of molecular biology. This "Copernican revolution" in drug development may imply a paradigm shift in this field. However, contrary to the initial expectations, many drugs developed by this approach are now faced with difficulties, mainly because of the fundamental and theoretical limits of this approach. All of the physiological functions are not always known in all target molecules. In low-molecular-weight drugs, i.e., "inhibitors," targets disperse, due to the structural similarities in physiological molecules. This double-faced "out-of-focusing" causes many problems in various steps of drug development, drug design, clinical trials, and administration to patients. Many drugs are now being abandoned because of unexpectedly lower response rates or unforeseeable adverse effects, and the variety of the drugs exhibits a kaleidoscopic appearance. The double-faced "out-of-focusing" derives from the methodological limits in molecular biology, i.e., elementalism, and limits in our techniques for drug development. To overcome these currently inevitable limits, it appears essential to elucidate the specific changes in target molecules that chiefly promote tumor growth and, consequently, strongly predict response to the administered drugs. Precise and efficient detection of responder populations is the key to the development and establishment of target-based anticancer therapies. PMID:16850122

  3. Reprofiling a classical anthelmintic, pyrvinium pamoate, as an anti-cancer drug targeting mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Isao; Harada, Yasuo; Kasahara, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Pyrvinium pamoate (PP) is an FDA-approved classical anthelmintic, but is now attracting particular attention as an anti-cancer drug after recent findings of its potent cytotoxicity against various cancer cell lines only during glucose starvation, as well as its anti-tumor activity against hypovascular pancreatic cancer cells transplanted in mice. The molecular mechanisms by which PP promotes such preferential toxicity against cancer cells are currently under extensive investigation. PP suppressed the NADH-fumarate reductase system that mediates a reverse reaction of the mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex II in anaerobic organisms such as parasitic helminthes or mammalian cells under tumor microenvironment-mimicking hypoglycemic/hypoxic conditions, thereby inhibiting efficient ATP production. PP also inhibited the unfolded protein response induced by glucose starvation, thereby inhibiting the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. Even under normoglycemic/normoxic conditions, PP suppressed the mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex I and thereby STAT3, inhibiting the proliferation of myeloma/erythroleukemia cells. Here, we review accumulating knowledge on its working mechanisms and evaluate PP as a novel anti-cancer drug that targets mitochondrial respiration.

  4. Cyclodextrin conjugated magnetic colloidal nanoparticles as a nanocarrier for targeted anticancer drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shashwat S.; Chen, Dong-Hwang

    2008-07-01

    A novel magnetic nanocarrier (CD-GAMNPs) was fabricated for targeted anticancer drug delivery by grafting cyclodextrin (CD) onto gum arabic modified magnetic nanoparticles (GAMNPs) using hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI) as a linker. Analyses by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed that the product had a mean diameter of 17.1 nm and a mean hydrodynamic diameter of 44.1 nm. The CD grafting was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that the amount of CD grafted on the GAMNPs was 16.8 mg g-1. The study on the loading of anticancer drug all-trans-retinoic acid (retinoic acid) revealed that the newly fabricated magnetic nanocarrier possessed a considerably higher adsorption capability as compared to GAMNPs due to the special hydrophobic cavity structure of CD, which could act as a host-guest complex with retinoic acid. Furthermore, it was found that the complexation of CD-GAMNPs with retinoic acid was exothermic and the presence of a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) led to the decrease in the inclusion of retinoic acid because the linear structure of sodium dodecyl sulfate made it easier to enter the cavity of CD as compared to less linear retinoic acid. In addition, the in vitro release profile of retinoic acid from CD-GAMNPs was characterized by an initial fast release followed by a delayed release phase.

  5. Targeting Neddylation Pathways to Inactivate Cullin-RING Ligases for Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongchao; Morgan, Meredith A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Protein neddylation is catalyzed by an E1 NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE), an E2 NEDD8-conjugating enzyme, and an E3 NEDD8 ligase. Known physiological substrates of neddylation are cullin family members. Cullin neddylation leads to activation of cullin-RING ligases (CRLs), the largest family of E3 ubiquitin ligases responsible for ubiquitylation and degradation of many key signaling/regulatory proteins. Thus, through modulating CRLs, neddylation regulates many biological processes, including cell cycle progression, signal transduction, and tumorigenesis. Given that NEDD8 is overexpressed and CRLs are abnormally activated in many human cancers, targeting protein neddylation, in general, and cullin neddylation, in particular, appears to be an attractive anticancer approach. Recent Advances: MLN4924, a small molecule inhibitor of NAE, was discovered that inactivates CRLs and causes accumulation of CRL substrates to suppress tumor cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Promising preclinical results advanced MLN4924 to several clinical trials for anticancer therapy. Critical Issues: In preclinical settings, MLN4924 effectively suppresses tumor cell growth by inducing apoptosis, senescence, and autophagy, and causes sensitization to chemoradiation therapies in a cellular context-dependent manner. Signal molecules that determine the cell fate upon MLN4924 treatment, however, remain elusive. Cancer cells develop MLN4924 resistance by selecting target mutations. Future Directions: In the clinical side, several Phase 1b trials are under way to determine the safety and efficacy of MLN4924, acting alone or in combination with conventional chemotherapy, against human solid tumors. In the preclinical side, the efforts are being made to develop additional neddylation inhibitors by targeting NEDD8 E2s and E3s. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2383–2400. PMID:24410571

  6. New therapeutic targets in rare genetic skeletal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Michael D; Bell, Peter A; Wright, Michael J; Pirog, Katarzyna A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Genetic skeletal diseases (GSDs) are a diverse and complex group of rare genetic conditions that affect the development and homeostasis of the skeleton. Although individually rare, as a group of related diseases, GSDs have an overall prevalence of at least 1 per 4,000 children. There are currently very few specific therapeutic interventions to prevent, halt or modify skeletal disease progression and therefore the generation of new and effective treatments requires novel and innovative research that can identify tractable therapeutic targets and biomarkers of these diseases. Areas covered: Remarkable progress has been made in identifying the genetic basis of the majority of GSDs and in developing relevant model systems that have delivered new knowledge on disease mechanisms and are now starting to identify novel therapeutic targets. This review will provide an overview of disease mechanisms that are shared amongst groups of different GSDs and describe potential therapeutic approaches that are under investigation. Expert opinion: The extensive clinical variability and genetic heterogeneity of GSDs renders this broad group of rare diseases a bench to bedside challenge. However, the evolving hypothesis that clinically different diseases might share common disease mechanisms is a powerful concept that will generate critical mass for the identification and validation of novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers. PMID:26635999

  7. Anticancer property of bromelain with therapeutic potential in malignant peritoneal mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Krishna; Akhter, Javed; Chua, Terence C; Morris, David Lawson

    2013-05-01

    Bromelain is a mixture of proteolytic enzymes that is capable of hydrolyzing glycosidic linkages in glycoprotein. Glycoprotein's are ubiquitously distributed throughout the body and serve a variety of physiologic functions. Faulty glycosylation of proteins may lead to cancer. Antitumor properties of bromelain have been demonstrated in both, in vitro and in vivo studies, along with scanty anecdotal human studies. Various mechanistic pathways have been proposed to explain the anticancer properties of bromelain. However, proteolysis by bromelain has been suggested as a main pathway by some researchers. MUC1 is a glycoprotein that provides tumor cells with invasive, metastatic, and chemo-resistant properties. To date, there is no study that examines the effect of bromelain on MUC1. However, the viability of MUC1 expressing pancreatic and breast cancer cells are adversely affected by bromelain. Further, the efficacy of cisplatin and 5-FU are enhanced by adjuvant treatment with bromelain, indicating that the barrier function of MUC1 may be affected. Other studies have also indicated that there is a greater accumulation of 5-FU in the cell compartment on treatment with 5-FU and bromelain. Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) expresses MUC1 and initial studies have shown that the viability of MPM cells is adversely affected by exposure to bromelain. Further, bromelain in combination with either 5-FU or cisplatin, the efficacy of the chemotherapeutic drug is enhanced. Hence, current evidence indicates that bromelain may have the potential of being developed into an effective anticancer agent for MPM.

  8. Bone metastatic disease: taking aim at new therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Coluzzi, F; Di Bussolo, E; Mandatori, I; Mattia, C

    2011-01-01

    Conventional treatment for metastatic bone pain requires a multidisciplinary approach (medical therapy, surgery, and radiation), but is primarily palliative. Biphosphonates introduced the concept of disease-modifying therapy, by effectively reducing bone pain and skeletal related events in patients suffering from bone metastatic cancer. In the past decade, the growing knowledge of bone biology and our understanding of the molecular mechanisms at the basis of the interaction between cancer cells and bone matrix led to the identification of new therapeutic targets for innovative "smart drugs". The most investigated is the RANK/RANKL/OPG pathway, and denosumab, among novel targeted therapies, is the molecule that is in the most advanced development phase. Additional targets have been identified and potential novel therapeutic interventions, classified as inhibitors of bone resorption or stimulators of bone formation, are under preclinical and clinical evaluation. These promising targets include cathepsin K, the Src tyrosine kinases, integrins, chloride channels, the parathyroid hormone-related peptide, endotelin-1, sclerostin, and TGF-beta. Other pathways or molecules expressed by bone cells and cancer cells, such as CXCR4, GPNMB, EGF-family ligands, Wnt/DKK1, and MIP-1 alpha have recently emerged as potential targets. The aim of this review is to discuss the molecular mechanisms behind these emerging therapeutic targets in bone metastases and to give an overview of results from those in advanced clinical phases.

  9. Current and future therapeutic targets of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Di, Yuan Ming; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Guang Li, Chun; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systematic autoimmune disease which affects about 1% of the population world wide. This article aimed to identify current therapeutic targets for RA based on data from the literature and drug target related databases. Identified targets were further analysed using a powerful bioinformatics tool, PANTHER (Protein ANalysis THrough Evolutionary Relationships). Additionally, we explored future possible therapeutic targets for RA and discussed the possibility of discovering novel drugs with improved efficacy and reduced toxicity for RA treatment. Data on current clinical drugs for RA treatment were extracted from the US Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) website. Candidate targets of RA were extracted from three online databases: Drugbank, Therapeutic Target Database (TTD) and Potential Drug Target Database (PDTD). A total of 95 clinical protein targets for RA have been identified and were analysed using the PANTHER Classification System. According to the PANTHER analysis, most commonly involved pathways in current RA targeting includes inflammation mediated by chemokine and cytokine signalling pathways, angiogenesis, p53 pathway, de novo purine biosynthesis, T-cell activation, apoptosis signalling pathway and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor signalling pathway. Accordingly, current clinical agents for the treatment of RA mainly include corticosteroids, non-steriodal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). In addition, a number of investigational targets for RA have been identified and many novel drugs for RA therapy are under investigation. Current approaches to handle RA aim to ameliorate inflammation, to relieve pain, and most importantly to protect the cartilage, joints and bones from further damage by blocking proinflammatory molecules and inhibit the production of matrix-degrading factors. New drugs for RA with improved efficacy and safety should be developed

  10. Molecular Targets in Alzheimer's Disease: From Pathogenesis to Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xuan; Zhang, Lu; Lian, Ya-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive cognitive decline usually beginning with impairment in the ability to form recent memories. Nonavailability of definitive therapeutic strategy urges developing pharmacological targets based on cell signaling pathways. A great revival of interest in nutraceuticals and adjuvant therapy has been put forward. Tea polyphenols for their multiple health benefits have also attracted the attention of researchers. Tea catechins showed enough potentiality to be used in future as therapeutic targets to provide neuroprotection against AD. This review attempts to present a concise map of different receptor signaling pathways associated with AD with an insight into drug designing based on the proposed signaling pathways, molecular mechanistic details of AD pathogenesis, and a scientific rationale for using tea polyphenols as proposed therapeutic agents in AD. PMID:26665008

  11. Molecular Targets in Alzheimer's Disease: From Pathogenesis to Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xuan; Zhang, Lu; Lian, Ya-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive cognitive decline usually beginning with impairment in the ability to form recent memories. Nonavailability of definitive therapeutic strategy urges developing pharmacological targets based on cell signaling pathways. A great revival of interest in nutraceuticals and adjuvant therapy has been put forward. Tea polyphenols for their multiple health benefits have also attracted the attention of researchers. Tea catechins showed enough potentiality to be used in future as therapeutic targets to provide neuroprotection against AD. This review attempts to present a concise map of different receptor signaling pathways associated with AD with an insight into drug designing based on the proposed signaling pathways, molecular mechanistic details of AD pathogenesis, and a scientific rationale for using tea polyphenols as proposed therapeutic agents in AD.

  12. Molecular Targets in Alzheimer's Disease: From Pathogenesis to Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xuan; Zhang, Lu; Lian, Ya-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive cognitive decline usually beginning with impairment in the ability to form recent memories. Nonavailability of definitive therapeutic strategy urges developing pharmacological targets based on cell signaling pathways. A great revival of interest in nutraceuticals and adjuvant therapy has been put forward. Tea polyphenols for their multiple health benefits have also attracted the attention of researchers. Tea catechins showed enough potentiality to be used in future as therapeutic targets to provide neuroprotection against AD. This review attempts to present a concise map of different receptor signaling pathways associated with AD with an insight into drug designing based on the proposed signaling pathways, molecular mechanistic details of AD pathogenesis, and a scientific rationale for using tea polyphenols as proposed therapeutic agents in AD. PMID:26665008

  13. AMPA Receptors as Therapeutic Targets for Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin; Goodman, Lucy; Fourie, Chantelle; Schenk, Susan; Leitch, Beulah; Montgomery, Johanna M

    2016-01-01

    Almost every neurological disease directly or indirectly affects synapse function in the brain. However, these diseases alter synapses through different mechanisms, ultimately resulting in altered synaptic transmission and/or plasticity. Glutamate is the major neurotransmitter that mediates excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain through activation of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) receptors. These receptors have therefore been identified as a target for the development of therapeutic treatments for neurological disorders including epilepsy, neurodegenerative diseases, autism, and drug addiction. The fact that AMPA receptors play a dominant role throughout the brain raises the significant challenge of selectively targeting only those regions affected by disease, and clinical trials have raised doubt regarding the feasibility of specifically targeting AMPA receptors for new therapeutic options. Benzamide compounds that act as positive allosteric AMPA receptor modulators, known as AMPAkines, can act on specific brain regions and were initially proposed to revolutionize the treatment of cognitive deficits associated with neurological disorders. Their therapeutic potential has since declined due to inconsistent results in clinical trials. However, recent advances in basic biomedical research are significantly increasing our knowledge of AMPA receptor structure, binding sites, and interactions with auxiliary proteins. In particular, the large complex of postsynaptic proteins that interact with AMPA receptor subunits have been shown to control AMPA receptor insertion, location, pharmacology, synaptic transmission, and plasticity. These proteins are now being considered as alternative therapeutic target sites for modulating AMPA receptors in neurological disorders. PMID:26920691

  14. Development of Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Targeted Drug Delivery and Non-invasive Imaging of Therapeutic Effect

    PubMed Central

    Sajja, Hari Krishna; East, Michael P.; Mao, Hui; Wang, Andrew Y.; Nie, Shuming; Yang, Lily

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a multidisciplinary scientific field undergoing explosive development. Nanometer-sized particles offer novel structural, optical and electronic properties that are not attainable with individual molecules or bulk solids. Advances in nanomedicine can be made by engineering biodegradable nanoparticles such as magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, polymers, dendrimers and liposomes that are capable of targeted delivery of both imaging agents and anticancer drugs. This leads toward the concept and possibility of personalized medicine for the potential of early detection of cancer lesions, determination of molecular signatures of the tumor by non-invasive imaging and, most importantly, molecular targeted cancer therapy. Increasing evidence suggests that the nanoparticles, whose surface contains a targeting molecule that binds to receptors highly expressed in tumor cells, can serve as cancer image contrast agents to increase sensitivity and specificity in tumor detection. In comparison with other small molecule contrast agents, the advantage of using nanoparticles is their large surface area and the possibility of surface modifications for further conjugation or encapsulation of large amounts of therapeutic agents. Targeted nanoparticles ferry large doses of therapeutic agents into malignant cells while sparing the normal healthy cells. Such multifunctional nanodevices hold the promise of significant improvement of current clinical management of cancer patients. This review explores the development of nanoparticles for enabling and improving the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents, the potential of nanomedicine, and the development of novel and more effective diagnostic and screening techniques to extend the limits of molecular diagnostics providing point-of-care diagnosis and more personalized medicine. PMID:19275541

  15. Network pharmacology applications to map the unexplored target space and therapeutic potential of natural products.

    PubMed

    Kibble, Milla; Saarinen, Niina; Tang, Jing; Wennerberg, Krister; Mäkelä, Sari; Aittokallio, Tero

    2015-08-01

    It is widely accepted that drug discovery often requires a systems-level polypharmacology approach to tackle problems such as lack of efficacy and emerging resistance of single-targeted compounds. Network pharmacology approaches are increasingly being developed and applied to find new therapeutic opportunities and to re-purpose approved drugs. However, these recent advances have been relatively slow to be translated into the field of natural products. Here, we argue that a network pharmacology approach would enable an effective mapping of the yet unexplored target space of natural products, hence providing a systematic means to extend the druggable space of proteins implicated in various complex diseases. We give an overview of the key network pharmacology concepts and recent experimental-computational approaches that have been successfully applied to natural product research, including unbiased elucidation of mechanisms of action as well as systematic prediction of effective therapeutic combinations. We focus specifically on anticancer applications that use in vivo and in vitro functional phenotypic measurements, such as genome-wide transcriptomic response profiles, which enable a global modelling of the multi-target activity at the level of the biological pathways and interaction networks. We also provide representative examples of other disease applications, databases and tools as well as existing and emerging resources, which may prove useful for future natural product research. Finally, we offer our personal view of the current limitations, prospective developments and open questions in this exciting field.

  16. Treatment Strategies that Enhance the Efficacy and Selectivity of Mitochondria-Targeted Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Modica-Napolitano, Josephine S; Weissig, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Nearly a century has passed since Otto Warburg first observed high rates of aerobic glycolysis in a variety of tumor cell types and suggested that this phenomenon might be due to an impaired mitochondrial respiratory capacity in these cells. Subsequently, much has been written about the role of mitochondria in the initiation and/or progression of various forms of cancer, and the possibility of exploiting differences in mitochondrial structure and function between normal and malignant cells as targets for cancer chemotherapy. A number of mitochondria-targeted compounds have shown efficacy in selective cancer cell killing in pre-clinical and early clinical testing, including those that induce mitochondria permeability transition and apoptosis, metabolic inhibitors, and ROS regulators. To date, however, none has exhibited the standards for high selectivity and efficacy and low toxicity necessary to progress beyond phase III clinical trials and be used as a viable, single modality treatment option for human cancers. This review explores alternative treatment strategies that have been shown to enhance the efficacy and selectivity of mitochondria-targeted anticancer agents in vitro and in vivo, and may yet fulfill the clinical promise of exploiting the mitochondrion as a target for cancer chemotherapy.

  17. Targeting PARP-1 allosteric regulation offers therapeutic potential against cancer.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Jamin D; Tholey, Renee M; Langelier, Marie-France; Planck, Jamie L; Schiewer, Matthew J; Lal, Shruti; Bildzukewicz, Nikolai A; Yeo, Charles J; Knudsen, Karen E; Brody, Jonathan R; Pascal, John M

    2014-01-01

    PARP-1 is a nuclear protein that has important roles in maintenance of genomic integrity. During genotoxic stress, PARP-1 recruits to sites of DNA damage where PARP-1 domain architecture initiates catalytic activation and subsequent poly(ADP-ribose)-dependent DNA repair. PARP-1 inhibition is a promising new way to selectively target cancers harboring DNA repair deficiencies. However, current inhibitors target other PARPs, raising important questions about long-term off-target effects. Here, we propose a new strategy that targets PARP-1 allosteric regulation as a selective way of inhibiting PARP-1. We found that disruption of PARP-1 domain-domain contacts through mutagenesis held no cellular consequences on recruitment to DNA damage or a model system of transcriptional regulation, but prevented DNA-damage-dependent catalytic activation. Furthermore, PARP-1 mutant overexpression in a pancreatic cancer cell line (MIA PaCa-2) increased sensitivity to platinum-based anticancer agents. These results not only highlight the potential of a synergistic drug combination of allosteric PARP inhibitors with DNA-damaging agents in genomically unstable cancer cells (regardless of homologous recombination status), but also signify important applications of selective PARP-1 inhibition. Finally, the development of a high-throughput PARP-1 assay is described as a tool to promote discovery of novel PARP-1 selective inhibitors.

  18. Network modelling reveals the mechanism underlying colitis-associated colon cancer and identifies novel combinatorial anti-cancer targets.

    PubMed

    Lu, Junyan; Zeng, Hanlin; Liang, Zhongjie; Chen, Limin; Zhang, Liyi; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Hong; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Bairong; Huang, Ming; Geng, Meiyu; Spiegel, Sarah; Luo, Cheng

    2015-10-08

    The connection between inflammation and tumourigenesis has been well established. However, the detailed molecular mechanism underlying inflammation-associated tumourigenesis remains unknown because this process involves a complex interplay between immune microenvironments and epithelial cells. To obtain a more systematic understanding of inflammation-associated tumourigenesis as well as to identify novel therapeutic approaches, we constructed a knowledge-based network describing the development of colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC) by integrating the extracellular microenvironment and intracellular signalling pathways. Dynamic simulations of the CAC network revealed a core network module, including P53, MDM2, and AKT, that may govern the malignant transformation of colon epithelial cells in a pro-tumor inflammatory microenvironment. Furthermore, in silico mutation studies and experimental validations led to a novel finding that concurrently targeting ceramide and PI3K/AKT pathway by chemical probes or marketed drugs achieves synergistic anti-cancer effects. Overall, our network model can guide further mechanistic studies on CAC and provide new insights into the design of combinatorial cancer therapies in a rational manner.

  19. Actively targeted delivery of anticancer drug to tumor cells by redox-responsive star-shaped micelles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chunli; Guo, Xing; Qu, Qianqian; Tang, Zhaomin; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Shaobing

    2014-10-01

    In cancer therapy nanocargos based on star-shaped polymer exhibit unique features such as better stability, smaller size distribution and higher drug capacity in comparison to linear polymeric micelles. In this study, we developed a multifunctional star-shaped micellar system by combination of active targeting ability and redox-responsive behavior. The star-shaped micelles with good stability were self-assembled from four-arm poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer. The redox-responsive behaviors of these micelles triggered by glutathione were evaluated from the changes of micellar size, morphology and molecular weight. In vitro drug release profiles exhibited that in a stimulated normal physiological environment, the redox-responsive star-shaped micelles could maintain good stability, whereas in a reducing and acid environment similar with that of tumor cells, the encapsulated agent was promptly released. In vitro cellular uptake and subcellular localization of these micelles were further studied with confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry against the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa. In vivo and ex vivo DOX fluorescence imaging displayed that these FA-functionalized star-shaped micelles possessed much better specificity to target solid tumor. Both the qualitative and quantitative results of the antitumor effect in 4T1 tumor-bearing BALB/c mice demonstrated that these redox-responsive star-shaped micelles have a high therapeutic efficiency to artificial solid tumor. Therefore, the multifunctional star-shaped micelles are a potential platform for targeted anticancer drug delivery.

  20. B-cell targeted therapeutics in clinical development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    B lymphocytes are the source of humoral immunity and are thus a critical component of the adaptive immune system. However, B cells can also be pathogenic and the origin of disease. Deregulated B-cell function has been implicated in several autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis. B cells contribute to pathological immune responses through the secretion of cytokines, costimulation of T cells, antigen presentation, and the production of autoantibodies. DNA-and RNA-containing immune complexes can also induce the production of type I interferons, which further promotes the inflammatory response. B-cell depletion with the CD20 antibody rituximab has provided clinical proof of concept that targeting B cells and the humoral response can result in significant benefit to patients. Consequently, the interest in B-cell targeted therapies has greatly increased in recent years and a number of new biologics exploiting various mechanisms are now in clinical development. This review provides an overview on current developments in the area of B-cell targeted therapies by describing molecules and subpopulations that currently offer themselves as therapeutic targets, the different strategies to target B cells currently under investigation as well as an update on the status of novel therapeutics in clinical development. Emerging data from clinical trials are providing critical insight regarding the role of B cells and autoantibodies in various autoimmune conditions and will guide the development of more efficacious therapeutics and better patient selection. PMID:23566679

  1. Kisspeptin offers a novel therapeutic target in reproduction.

    PubMed

    Jayasena, Channa N; Dhillo, Waljit S

    2009-04-01

    The occurrence of reproductive infertility has become an increasing concern in the developed world, particularly following the recent trend of attempts at pregnancy later in maternal life. Most existing therapies for infertility, such as clomiphene and gonadotropins, aim to manipulate the traditional components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Several secretagogues of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) have been identified, including glutamate, neuropeptide tyrosine (NPY) and substance P; however, the broad array of action of these secretagogues in the CNS make them unsuitable as therapeutic targets. In the last 5 years, the Kisspeptin system has emerged as a critical regulator of reproduction and as a putative novel target of therapy for reproductive disorders. This review summarizes the relevant contemporary literature related to Kisspeptin, and assesses the potential applications of this group of peptides as a novel therapeutic target.

  2. Dual-acting, function-responsive, and high drug payload nanospheres for combining simplicity and efficacy in both self-targeted multi-drug co-delivery and synergistic anticancer effect.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Lin, Jinyan; Liu, Guihua; Ma, Jinyuan; Xie, Liya; Guo, Fuqiang; Zhu, Xuan; Hou, Zhenqing

    2016-10-15

    Recently, the global trend in the field of nanomedicine has been toward the design of highly sophisticated drug delivery systems with specific targeting and synergistic therapeutic functions for improving therapeutic efficacy. But offering sophistication generally increases their complexity that might be disadvantageous in pharmaceutical development. We hypothesize that using a macromolecular prodrug with a dual role will be conductive to integrating its dual function into self-targeted multidrug co-delivery and combination cancer therapy. In this paper, the on-off switching function-responsive, macromolecular methotrexate (MTX) prodrug-self-targeted, controlled-/sustained-release, and high drug-loading hydroxylcamptothecin (HCPT) drug nanospheres were prepared and characterized. The self-targeting system can co-deliver multi-drug to different action sites with distinct anticancer mechanisms to specifically target folate receptors-overexpressing cancer cells with synergistic therapeutic efficiency. PMID:27566011

  3. Breast cancer stem cells, EMT and therapeutic targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kotiyal, Srishti; Bhattacharya, Susinjan

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key molecules of signaling pathways can control growth of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). • Development of BCSCs also involves miRNA interactions. • Therapeutic achievement can be done by targeting identified targets in the BCSC pathways. - Abstract: A small heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells acts as seeds to induce new tumor growth. These seeds or breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) exhibit great phenotypical plasticity which allows them to undergo “epithelial to mesenchymal transition” (EMT) at the site of primary tumor and a future reverse transition. Apart from metastasis they are also responsible for maintaining the tumor and conferring it with drug and radiation resistance and a tendency for post-treatment relapse. Many of the signaling pathways involved in induction of EMT are involved in CSC generation and regulation. Here we are briefly reviewing the mechanism of TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, TNF-α, NF-κB, RTK signalling pathways which are involved in EMT as well as BCSCs maintenance. Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key/accessory players of these pathways could control growth of BCSCs and hence malignant cancer. Additionally several miRNAs are dysregulated in cancer stem cells indicating their roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. This review also lists the miRNA interactions identified in BCSCs and discusses on some newly identified targets in the BCSC regulatory pathways like SHIP2, nicastrin, Pin 1, IGF-1R, pro-inflammatory cytokines and syndecan which can be targeted for therapeutic achievements.

  4. Raf: a strategic target for therapeutic development against cancer.

    PubMed

    Beeram, Muralidhar; Patnaik, Amita; Rowinsky, Eric K

    2005-09-20

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway plays a critical role in transmitting proliferative signals generated by cell surface receptors and cytoplasmic signaling elements to the nucleus. Several important signaling elements of the MAPK pathway, particularly Ras and Raf, are encoded by oncogenes, and as such, their structures and functions can be modified, rendering them constitutively active. Because the MAPK pathway is dysregulated in a notable proportion of human malignancies, many of its aberrant and critical components represent strategic targets for therapeutic development against cancer. Raf, which is an essential serine/threonine kinase constituent of the MAPK pathway and a downstream effector of the central signal transduction mediator Ras, is activated in a wide range of human malignancies by aberrant signaling upstream of the protein (eg, growth factor receptors and mutant Ras) and activating mutations of the protein itself, both of which confer a proliferative advantage. Three isoforms of Raf have been identified, and therapeutics targeting Raf, including small-molecule inhibitors and antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ASON), are undergoing clinical evaluation. The outcomes of these investigations may have far-reaching implications in the management of many types of human cancer. This review outlines the structure and diverse functions of Raf, the rationale for targeting Raf as a therapeutic strategy against cancer, and the present status of various therapeutic approaches including ASONs and small molecules, particularly sorafenib (BAY 43-9006).

  5. NG2 proteoglycan as a pericyte target for anticancer therapy by tumor vessel infarction with retargeted tissue factor.

    PubMed

    Brand, Caroline; Schliemann, Christoph; Ring, Janine; Kessler, Torsten; Bäumer, Sebastian; Angenendt, Linus; Mantke, Verena; Ross, Rebecca; Hintelmann, Heike; Spieker, Tilmann; Wardelmann, Eva; Mesters, Rolf M; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Schwöppe, Christian

    2016-02-01

    tTF-TAA and tTF-LTL are fusion proteins consisting of the extracellular domain of tissue factor (TF) and the peptides TAASGVRSMH and LTLRWVGLMS, respectively. These peptides represent ligands of NG2, a surface proteoglycan expressed on angiogenic pericytes and some tumor cells. Here we have expressed the model compound tTF-NGR, tTF-TAA, and tTF-LTL with different lengths in the TF domain in E. coli and used these fusion proteins for functional studies in anticancer therapy. We aimed to retarget TF to tumor vessels leading to tumor vessel infarction with two barriers of selectivity, a) the leaky endothelial lining in tumor vessels with the target NG2 being expressed on pericytes on the abluminal side of the endothelial cell barrier and b) the preferential expression of NG2 on angiogenic vessels such as in tumors. Chromatography-purified tTF-TAA showed identical Factor X (FX)-activating procoagulatory activity as the model compound tTF-NGR with Km values of approx. 0.15 nM in Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The procoagulatory activity of tTF-LTL varied with the chosen length of the TF part of the fusion protein. Flow cytometry revealed specific binding of tTF-TAA to NG2-expressing pericytes and tumor cells with low affinity and dissociation KD in the high nM range. In vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging of tumor xenograft-carrying animals and of the explanted tumors showed reduction of tumor blood flow upon tTF-TAA application. Therapeutic experiments showed a reproducible antitumor activity of tTF-TAA against NG2-expressing A549-tumor xenografts, however, with a rather small therapeutic window (active/toxic dose in mg/kg body weight). PMID:26735180

  6. NG2 proteoglycan as a pericyte target for anticancer therapy by tumor vessel infarction with retargeted tissue factor

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Caroline; Schliemann, Christoph; Ring, Janine; Kessler, Torsten; Bäumer, Sebastian; Angenendt, Linus; Mantke, Verena; Ross, Rebecca; Hintelmann, Heike; Spieker, Tilmann; Wardelmann, Eva; Mesters, Rolf M.; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Schwöppe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    tTF-TAA and tTF-LTL are fusion proteins consisting of the extracellular domain of tissue factor (TF) and the peptides TAASGVRSMH and LTLRWVGLMS, respectively. These peptides represent ligands of NG2, a surface proteoglycan expressed on angiogenic pericytes and some tumor cells. Here we have expressed the model compound tTF-NGR, tTF-TAA, and tTF-LTL with different lengths in the TF domain in E. coli and used these fusion proteins for functional studies in anticancer therapy. We aimed to retarget TF to tumor vessels leading to tumor vessel infarction with two barriers of selectivity, a) the leaky endothelial lining in tumor vessels with the target NG2 being expressed on pericytes on the abluminal side of the endothelial cell barrier and b) the preferential expression of NG2 on angiogenic vessels such as in tumors. Chromatography-purified tTF-TAA showed identical Factor X (FX)-activating procoagulatory activity as the model compound tTF-NGR with Km values of approx. 0.15 nM in Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The procoagulatory activity of tTF-LTL varied with the chosen length of the TF part of the fusion protein. Flow cytometry revealed specific binding of tTF-TAA to NG2-expressing pericytes and tumor cells with low affinity and dissociation KD in the high nM range. In vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging of tumor xenograft-carrying animals and of the explanted tumors showed reduction of tumor blood flow upon tTF-TAA application. Therapeutic experiments showed a reproducible antitumor activity of tTF-TAA against NG2-expressing A549-tumor xenografts, however, with a rather small therapeutic window (active/toxic dose in mg/kg body weight). PMID:26735180

  7. Integrin-targeted pH-responsive micelles for enhanced efficiency of anticancer treatment in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinjian; Deng, Hongzhang; Liu, Qiang; Chu, Liping; Zhang, Yumin; Yang, Cuihong; Zhao, Xuefei; Huang, Pingsheng; Deng, Liandong; Dong, Anjie; Liu, Jianfeng

    2015-02-01

    The key to developing more nanocarriers for the delivery of drugs in clinical applications is to consider the route of the carrier from the administration site to the target tissue and to look for a simple design to complete this whole journey. We synthesized the amphiphilic copolymer cRGDfK-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(2,4,6-trimethoxybenzylidene-1,1,1-tris(hydroxymethyl) ethane methacrylate) (cRGD-PETM) to construct multifunctional micelles. These micelles combined enhanced drug-loading efficiency with tumor-targeting properties, visual detection and controllable intracellular drug release, resulting in an improved chemotherapeutic effect in vivo. Doxorubicin (DOX) was encapsulated within the cRGD-PETM micelles as a model drug (termed as cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms). The size and morphology of the micelles were characterized systematically. As a result of the hydrophobic interaction and the π-π conjugation between the DOX molecules and the PTTMA copolymers, the cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms showed an excellent drug-loading capacity. The results of in vitro drug-release studies indicated that the cumulative release of DOX from cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms at pH 5.0 was twice that at pH 7.4. The results of fluorescent microscopic analysis showed that the cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms could be internalized by 4T1 and HepG2 cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis with rapid intracellular drug release, which resulted in increased cytotoxicity compared with free DOX. Ex vivo imaging studies showed that the cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms improved the accumulation and retention of the drug in tumor tissues. Studies of the in vivo anticancer effects showed that the cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms had a significantly higher therapeutic efficacy with lower side-effects than free DOX and PETM/DOX Ms. These results show that the multifunctional cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms have great potential as vehicles for the delivery of hydrophobic anticancer drugs.

  8. Targeting DNA replication before it starts: Cdc7 as a therapeutic target in p53-mutant breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Acebes, Sara; Proctor, Ian; Loddo, Marco; Wollenschlaeger, Alex; Rashid, Mohammed; Falzon, Mary; Prevost, A Toby; Sainsbury, Richard; Stoeber, Kai; Williams, Gareth H

    2010-10-01

    Treatment options for triple-receptor negative (ER-/PR-/Her2-) and Her2-overexpressing (ER-/PR-/Her2+) breast cancers with acquired or de novo resistance are limited, and metastatic disease remains incurable. Targeting of growth signaling networks is often constrained by pathway redundancy or growth-independent cancer cell cycles. The cell-cycle protein Cdc7 regulates S phase by promoting DNA replication. This essential kinase acts as a convergence point for upstream growth signaling pathways and is therefore an attractive therapeutic target. We show that increased Cdc7 expression during mammary tumorigenesis is linked to Her2-overexpressing and triple-negative subtypes, accelerated cell cycle progression (P < 0.001), arrested tumor differentiation (P < 0.001), genomic instability (P = 0.019), increasing NPI score (P < 0.001), and reduced disease-free survival (HR = 1.98 [95% CI: 1.27-3.10]; P = 0.003), thus implicating its deregulation in the development of aggressive disease. Targeting Cdc7 with RNAi, we demonstrate that p53-mutant Her2-overexpressing and triple-negative breast cancer cell lines undergo an abortive S phase and apoptotic cell death due to loss of a p53-dependent Cdc7-inhibition checkpoint. In contrast, untransformed breast epithelial cells arrest in G1, remain viable, and are able to resume cell proliferation on recovery of Cdc7 kinase activity. Thus, Cdc7 appears to represent a potent and highly specific anticancer target in Her2-overexpressing and triple-negative breast cancers. Emerging Cdc7 kinase inhibitors may therefore significantly broaden the therapeutic armamentarium for treatment of the aggressive p53-mutant breast cancer subtypes identified in this study.

  9. In Vivo Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Imaging for Targeted Anti-Cancer Drug Delivery Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Kevin; Gaind, Vaibhav; Tsai, Hsiaorho; Bentz, Brian; Chelvam, Venkatesh; Low, Philip

    2012-02-01

    We describe an approach for the evaluation of targeted anti-cancer drug delivery in vivo. The method emulates the drug release and activation process through acceptor release from a targeted donor-acceptor pair that exhibits fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In this case, folate targeting of the cancer cells is used - 40 % of all human cancers, including ovarian, lung, breast, kidney, brain and colon cancer, over-express folate receptors. We demonstrate the reconstruction of the spatially-dependent FRET parameters in a mouse model and in tissue phantoms. The FRET parameterization is incorporated into a source for a diffusion equation model for photon transport in tissue, in a variant of optical diffusion tomography (ODT) called FRET-ODT. In addition to the spatially-dependent tissue parameters in the diffusion model (absorption and diffusion coefficients), the FRET parameters (donor-acceptor distance and yield) are imaged as a function of position. Modulated light measurements are made with various laser excitation positions and a gated camera. More generally, our method provides a new vehicle for studying disease at the molecular level by imaging FRET parameters in deep tissue, and allows the nanometer FRET ruler to be utilized in deep tissue.

  10. Dual CD44 and folate receptor-targeted nanoparticles for cancer diagnosis and anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Young; Termsarasab, Ubonvan; Park, Ju-Hwan; Lee, Song Yi; Ko, Seung-Hak; Shim, Jae-Seong; Chung, Suk-Jae; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Kim, Dae-Duk

    2016-08-28

    Dual CD44 and folate receptor targetable nanoparticles (NPs) based on hyaluronic acid-ceramide-folic acid (HACE-FA) were fabricated for improving tumor targetability. HACE-FA was synthesized via esterification between the carboxylic group of FA and hydroxyl group of HA. Doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded HACE-FA NPs, with a mean diameter of 120-130nm, narrow size distribution, and negative zeta potential, were prepared. The drug release from HACE-FA NPs were significantly increased in acidic pH (pH5.5) compared with physiological pH (7.4) (p<0.05). The cellular accumulation of the drug in HACE-FA NPs group was higher than that of HACE NPs group in SKOV-3 cells (human ovarian cancer cells; CD44 and folate receptor (FR)-positive cells). Dual targetability of HACE-FA NPs, compared to HACE NPs, was also verified in the SKOV-3 tumor-xenografted mouse model by near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging. Twenty-four hours after injection, HACE-FA NPs were accumulated mainly in tumor regions and their fluorescence intensity was 4.82-fold higher than that of HACE NPs (p<0.05). These findings suggest successful application of HACE-FA NPs for the accurate delivery of anticancer drugs to ovarian cancer. PMID:27320169

  11. [Visualization and analysis of adverse reactions of molecularly targeted anticancer agents using the self-organizing map (SOM)].

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Tomoyuki; Serizawa, Ayaka; Ohtsuki, Kaori; Kawakami, Junko; Sato, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Molecularly targeted anticancer agents cause a variety of adverse reactions compared with conventional anticancer agents because of their unique mechanisms of action. Sources of drug information such as package inserts (PIs) provide primarily document-based and numerical information. Therefore it is not easy to obtain a complete picture of drugs with similar effects, or to understand differences among drugs. In this study we used the self-organizing map (SOM) technique to visualize the adverse reactions indicated on PIs of 23 molecularly targeted anticancer agents as of March 2013. In both the presence/absence version and the frequency version, SOM was divided into domains according to mechanism of action, antibody drug or low-molecular weight drug, and molecular target. The component planes of the 753 adverse reaction items in the frequency version enabled us to grasp all available information and differences among the drugs. In some component planes in the presence/absence version, an adverse reaction that had not been reported for a drug but had already been reported for its proximally positioned drug(s) as of March 2013, was found to be reported thereafter by the Drug Safety Update (DSU) or the Adverse Event Report Search System "CzeekV," which is based on FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). Our results suggest that visualization of the adverse reactions of molecularly targeted anticancer agents by the SOM technique is useful not only to acquire all available information and differences among drugs, but also to predict the appearance of adverse reactions.

  12. Diverse Molecular Targets for Therapeutic Strategies in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sun-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia caused by neurodegenerative process and is tightly related to amyloid β (Aβ) and neurofibrillary tangles. The lack of early diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic remedy hinders the prevention of increasing population of AD patients every year. In spite of accumulated scientific information, numerous clinical trials for candidate drug targets have failed to be preceded into therapeutic development, therefore, AD-related sufferers including patients and caregivers, are desperate to seek the solution. Also, effective AD intervention is desperately needed to reduce AD-related societal threats to public health. In this review, we summarize various drug targets and strategies in recent preclinical studies and clinical trials for AD therapy: Allopathic treatment, immunotherapy, Aβ production/aggregation modulator, tau-targeting therapy and metabolic targeting. Some has already failed in their clinical trials and the others are still in various stages of investigations, both of which give us valuable information for future research in AD therapeutic development. PMID:25045220

  13. Exploiting the Fanconi Anemia Pathway for Targeted Anti-Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Ukhyun; Kim, Hyungjin

    2015-01-01

    Genome instability, primarily caused by faulty DNA repair mechanisms, drives tumorigenesis. Therapeutic interventions that exploit deregulated DNA repair in cancer have made considerable progress by targeting tumor-specific alterations of DNA repair factors, which either induces synthetic lethality or augments the efficacy of conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The study of Fanconi anemia (FA), a rare inherited blood disorder and cancer predisposition syndrome, has been instrumental in understanding the extent to which DNA repair defects contribute to tumorigenesis. The FA pathway functions to resolve blocked replication forks in response to DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs), and accumulating knowledge of its activation by the ubiquitin-mediated signaling pathway has provided promising therapeutic opportunities for cancer treatment. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of FA pathway regulation and its potential application for designing tailored therapeutics that take advantage of deregulated DNA ICL repair in cancer. PMID:26194820

  14. Optimization of anti-cancer drugs and a targeting molecule on multifunctional gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizk, Nahla; Christoforou, Nicolas; Lee, Sungmun

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common and deadly cancer among women worldwide. Currently, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are useful for cancer treatment; however, strategic planning is critical in order to enhance the anti-cancer properties and reduce the side effects of cancer therapy. Here, we designed multifunctional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conjugated with two anti-cancer drugs, TGF-β1 antibody and methotrexate, and a cancer-targeting molecule, folic acid. First, optimum size and shape of AuNPs was selected by the highest uptake of AuNPs by MDA-MB-231, a metastatic human breast cancer cell line. It was 100 nm spherical AuNPs (S-AuNPs) that were used for further studies. A fixed amount (900 μl) of S-AuNP (3.8 × 108 particles/ml) was conjugated with folic acid-BSA or methotrexate-BSA. Methotrexate on S-AuNP induced cellular toxicity and the optimum amount of methotrexate-BSA (2.83 mM) was 500 μl. Uptake of S-AuNPs was enhanced by folate conjugation that binds to folate receptors overexpressed by MDA-MB-231 and the optimum uptake was at 500 μl of folic acid-BSA (2.83 mM). TGF-β1 antibody on S-AuNP reduced extracellular TGF-β1 of cancer cells by 30%. Due to their efficacy and tunable properties, we anticipate numerous clinical applications of multifunctional gold nanospheres in treating breast cancer.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Diabetic Retinopathy: Potential Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Coucha, Maha; Elshaer, Sally L.; Eldahshan, Wael S.; Mysona, Barbara A.; El-Remessy, Azza B.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults in United States. Research indicates an association between oxidative stress and the development of diabetes complications. However, clinical trials with general antioxidants have failed to prove effective in diabetic patients. Mounting evidence from experimental studies that continue to elucidate the damaging effects of oxidative stress and inflammation in both vascular and neural retina suggest its critical role in the pathogenesis of DR. This review will outline the current management of DR as well as present potential experimental therapeutic interventions, focusing on molecules that link oxidative stress to inflammation to provide potential therapeutic targets for treatment or prevention of DR. Understanding the biochemical changes and the molecular events under diabetic conditions could provide new effective therapeutic tools to combat the disease. PMID:25949069

  16. Synthesis and anti-cancer activity of covalent conjugates of artemisinin and a transferrin-receptor targeting peptide.

    PubMed

    Oh, Steve; Kim, Byung Ju; Singh, Narendra P; Lai, Henry; Sasaki, Tomikazu

    2009-02-01

    Artemisinin, a natural product isolated from Artemisia annua L., shows a unique anti-cancer activity by an iron dependent mechanism. Artemisinin was covalently conjugated to a transferrin-receptor targeting peptide, HAIYPRH that binds to a cavity on the surface of transferrin receptor. This enables artemisinin to be co-internalized with receptor-bound transferrin. The iron released from transferrin can activate artemisinin to generate toxic radical species to kill cells. The artemisinin-peptide conjugates showed potent anti-cancer activity against Molt-4 leukemia cells with a significantly improved cancer/normal cells selectivity. PMID:18838215

  17. MicroRNAs as novel predictive biomarkers and therapeutic targets in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stiegelbauer, Verena; Perakis, Samantha; Deutsch, Alexander; Ling, Hui; Gerger, Armin; Pichler, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in western countries. Despite significant improvement in available treatment options, CRC still remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Traditionally, 5-fluorouracil has been used as the main chemotherapy drug for treatment of metastatic CRC (mCRC). However, during the last two decades more effective chemotherapeutic agents such as oxaliplatin, irinotecan and the monoclonal antibodies cetuximab, panitumumab and bevacizumab have been used in clinical practice. More recently, the therapeutic armamentarium has been supplemented by the monoclonal antibodies bevacizumab, cetuximab and panitumumab as well as the protein-trap aflibercept and the small molecule multi-kinase inhibitor regorafenib. One of the major problems for the management of CRC is the inherent or acquired resistance to therapeutic approaches. The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small, endogenous, non-coding, single-stranded RNAs that play a role as post-transcriptional regulators, has added new dimensions to the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Because miRNAs are important regulators of carcinogenesis, progression, invasion, angiogenesis and metastases in CRC, they might serve as potential predictive and prognostic factors and even as therapeutic targets themselves. Several miRNAs are already known to be dysregulated in CRCs and have been linked to biological processes involved in tumor progression and response to anti-cancer therapies. This review summarizes current therapeutic approaches for treating CRC and highlights the role of miRNAs as novel predictive biomarkers and potential drug targets in CRC patients. PMID:25206276

  18. Cardio-protective and anti-cancer therapeutic potential of Nigella sativa

    PubMed Central

    Shafiq, Hammad; Ahmad, Asif; Masud, Tariq; Kaleem, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Nigella sativa is the miraculous plant having a lot of nutritional and medicinal benefits, and attracts large number of nutrition and pharmacological researchers. N. sativa seed composition shows that it is the blessing of nature and it contains and many bioactive compounds like thymoquinone, α-hederin, alkaloids, flavonoids, antioxidants, fatty acids many other compounds that have positive effects on curing of different diseases. Several medicinal properties of N. sativa like its anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, antioxidant activities and many others are well acknowledged. However, this article focuses on activity of N. sativa against cardiovascular diseases and cancer. For gathering required data the authors went through vast number of articles using search engines like Science direct, ELSEVIER, Pub Med, Willey on Line Library and Google scholar and the findings were classified on the basis of relevance of the topic and were reviewed in the article. N. sativa is rich source of different biologically active compounds and is found effective in controlling number of cardiovascular diseases and various cancers both in vivo and in vitro studies. PMID:25859300

  19. Cardio-protective and anti-cancer therapeutic potential of Nigella sativa.

    PubMed

    Shafiq, Hammad; Ahmad, Asif; Masud, Tariq; Kaleem, Muhammad

    2014-12-01

    Nigella sativa is the miraculous plant having a lot of nutritional and medicinal benefits, and attracts large number of nutrition and pharmacological researchers. N. sativa seed composition shows that it is the blessing of nature and it contains and many bioactive compounds like thymoquinone, α-hederin, alkaloids, flavonoids, antioxidants, fatty acids many other compounds that have positive effects on curing of different diseases. Several medicinal properties of N. sativa like its anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, antioxidant activities and many others are well acknowledged. However, this article focuses on activity of N. sativa against cardiovascular diseases and cancer. For gathering required data the authors went through vast number of articles using search engines like Science direct, ELSEVIER, Pub Med, Willey on Line Library and Google scholar and the findings were classified on the basis of relevance of the topic and were reviewed in the article. N. sativa is rich source of different biologically active compounds and is found effective in controlling number of cardiovascular diseases and various cancers both in vivo and in vitro studies.

  20. MicroRNAs and other non-coding RNAs as targets for anticancer drug development

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Hui; Fabbri, Muller; Calin, George A.

    2015-01-01

    With the first cancer-targeted microRNA drug, MRX34, a liposome-based miR-34 mimic, entering phase I clinical trial in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma in April 2013, miRNA therapeutics are attracting special attention from both academia and biotechnology companies. Although to date the most studied non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are miRNAs, the importance of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) is increasingly being recognized. Here we summarize the roles of miRNAs and lncRNAs in cancer, with a focus on the recently identified novel mechanisms of action, and discuss the current strategies in designing ncRNA-targeting therapeutics, as well as the associated challenges. PMID:24172333

  1. Efficient delivery of therapeutic agents by using targeted albumin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kouchakzadeh, Hasan; Safavi, Maryam Sadat; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Albumin nanoparticles are one of the most important drug carriers for the delivery of therapeutic drugs, especially for the treatment of malignancies. This potential is due to their high binding capacity for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs and the possibility of surface modification. Accumulation of albumin-bound drugs in the tumor interstitium occurs by the enhanced permeability and retention effect, which is also facilitated by the 60-kDa glycoprotein transcytosis pathway and binding to secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine located in the tumor extracellular matrix. In addition, specific ligands such as monoclonal antibodies, folic acid, transferrin, and peptides can be conjugated to the surface of albumin nanoparticles to actively target the drug to its site of action. The albumin-bound paclitaxel, Abraxane, is one of the several therapeutic nanocarriers that have been approved for clinical use. By the development of Abraxane that demonstrates a higher response rate and improved tolerability and therapeutic efficiency in comparison with solvent-based formulation, and with consideration of its commercial success, albumin is attracting the interest of many biotechnological and pharmaceutical companies. This chapter explores the current targeted and nontargeted albumin-based nanoparticles that are in various stages of development for the delivery of therapeutic agents in order to enhance the efficacy of cancer treatment.

  2. Therapeutic Targets for the Treatment of Hepatitis E Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Scott P.; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the most common causes of acute viral hepatitis in the world with an estimated 20 million infections per year. Although the mortality rate is less than 1% among the general population, pregnant women can have a fatality rate of up to 30%. Additionally, chronic hepatitis E has increasingly become a significant clinical problem in immunocompromised individuals. Effective antivirals against HEV are needed. Areas covered This review article addresses the current state of knowledge of HEV infections with regard to animal and cell culture model systems that are important for antiviral discovery and testing, our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of virus replication, our understanding of how each viral protein functions, and areas that can potentially be exploited as therapeutic targets. Expert opinion Lack of an efficient cell culture system for HEV propagation, the limited knowledge of HEV lifecycle, and the inherent self-limiting infection within the normal populace make the development of new therapeutic agents against HEV challenging. There are many promising therapeutic targets, and the tools for identifying and testing potential antivirals are rapidly evolving. The development of effective therapeutics against HEV in immunocompromised and pregnant patient populations is warranted. PMID:26073772

  3. From Toxins Targeting Ligand Gated Ion Channels to Therapeutic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nasiripourdori, Adak; Taly, Valérie; Grutter, Thomas; Taly, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels (LGIC) play a central role in inter-cellular communication. This key function has two consequences: (i) these receptor channels are major targets for drug discovery because of their potential involvement in numerous human brain diseases; (ii) they are often found to be the target of plant and animal toxins. Together this makes toxin/receptor interactions important to drug discovery projects. Therefore, toxins acting on LGIC are presented and their current/potential therapeutic uses highlighted. PMID:22069709

  4. PPAR delta as a therapeutic target in metabolic disease

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Shannon M.; Lee, Chih-Hao

    2008-01-01

    PPARδ is the only member in the PPAR subfamily of nuclear receptors that is not a target of current drugs. Animal studies demonstrate PPARδ activation exerts many favorable effects, including reducing weight gain, increasing skeletal muscle metabolic rate and endurance, improving insulin sensitivity and cardiovascular function and suppressing atherogenic inflammation. These activities stem largely from the ability of PPARδ to control energy balance, reduce fat burden and protect against lipotoxicity caused by ectopic lipid deposition. Therefore, PPARδ represents a novel therapeutic target and the development of PPARδ agonists/modulators may be useful for treating the whole spectrum of metabolic syndrome. PMID:18036566

  5. Bridging academic science and clinical research in the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Matter, Alex

    2015-01-01

    This review starts with a brief history of drug discovery & development, and the place of Asia in this worldwide effort discussed. The conditions and constraints of a successful translational R&D involving academic basic research and clinical research are discussed and the Singapore model for pursuit of open R&D described. The importance of well-characterized, validated drug targets for the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents is emphasized, as well as a structured, high quality translational R&D. Furthermore, the characteristics of an attractive preclinical development drug candidate are discussed laying the foundation of a successful preclinical development. The most frequent sources of failures are described and risk management at every stage is highly recommended. Organizational factors are also considered to play an important role. The factors to consider before starting a new drug discovery & development project are described, and an example is given of a successful clinical project that has had its roots in local universities and was carried through preclinical development into phase I clinical trials. PMID:26779369

  6. Targeting Cytochrome P450 Enzymes: A New Approach in Anti-cancer Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Robert D.; Njar, Vincent C.O.

    2007-01-01

    Cytochrome P450s (CYPs) represent a large class of heme-containing enzymes that catalyze the metabolism of multitudes of substrates both endogenous and exogenous. Until recently, however, CYPs have been largely overlooked in cancer drug development, acknowledged only for their role in Phase I metabolism of chemotherapeutics. The first successful strategy targeting CYP enzymes in cancer therapy was the development of potent inhibitors of CYP19 (aromatase) for the treatment of breast cancer. Aromatase inhibitors ushered in a new era in hormone ablation therapy for estrogen dependent cancers, and have paved the way for similar strategies (i.e. inhibition of CYP17) that combat androgen dependent prostate cancer. Identification of CYPs involved in the inactivation of anti-cancer metabolites of Vitamin D3 and Vitamin A has triggered development of agents that target these enzymes as well. The discovery of the over-expression of exogenous metabolizing CYPs, such as CYP1B1, in cancer cells has roused interest in the development of inhibitors for chemoprevention and of prodrugs designed to be activated by CYPs only in cancer cells. Finally, the expression of CYPs within tumors has been utilized in the development of bioreductive molecules that are activated by CYPs only under hypoxic conditions. This review offers the first comprehensive analysis of strategies in drug development that either inhibit or exploit CYP enzymes for the treatment of cancer. PMID:17544277

  7. Lactobionic acid and carboxymethyl chitosan functionalized graphene oxide nanocomposites as targeted anticancer drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qixia; Lv, Yao; Williams, Gareth R; Tao, Lei; Yang, Huihui; Li, Heyu; Zhu, Limin

    2016-10-20

    In this work, we report a targeted drug delivery system built by functionalizing graphene oxide (GO) with carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC), fluorescein isothiocyanate and lactobionic acid (LA). Analogous systems without LA were prepared as controls. Doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto the composites through adsorption. The release behavior from both the LA-functionalized and the LA-free material is markedly pH sensitive. The modified GOs have high biocompatibility with the liver cancer cell line SMMC-7721, but can induce cell death after 24h incubation if loaded with DOX. Tests with shorter (2h) incubation times were undertaken to investigate the selectivity of the GO composites: under these conditions, neither DOX-loaded system was found to be toxic to the non-cancerous L929 cell line, but the LA-containing composite showed the ability to selectively induce cell death in cancerous (SMMC-7721) cells while the LA-free analogue was inactive here also. These findings show that the modified GO materials are strong potential candidates for targeted anticancer drug delivery systems. PMID:27474628

  8. Bridging academic science and clinical research in the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Matter, Alex

    2015-12-01

    This review starts with a brief history of drug discovery & development, and the place of Asia in this worldwide effort discussed. The conditions and constraints of a successful translational R&D involving academic basic research and clinical research are discussed and the Singapore model for pursuit of open R&D described. The importance of well-characterized, validated drug targets for the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents is emphasized, as well as a structured, high quality translational R&D. Furthermore, the characteristics of an attractive preclinical development drug candidate are discussed laying the foundation of a successful preclinical development. The most frequent sources of failures are described and risk management at every stage is highly recommended. Organizational factors are also considered to play an important role. The factors to consider before starting a new drug discovery & development project are described, and an example is given of a successful clinical project that has had its roots in local universities and was carried through preclinical development into phase I clinical trials. PMID:26779369

  9. Progress in Small Molecule and Biologic Therapeutics Targeting Ghrelin Signaling.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Kayleigh R; Darling, Joseph E; Hougland, James L

    2016-01-01

    Ghrelin is a circulating peptide hormone involved in regulation of a wide array of physiological processes. As an endogenous ligand for growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR1a), ghrelin is responsible for signaling involved in energy homeostasis, including appetite stimulation, glucose metabolism, insulin signaling, and adiposity. Ghrelin has also been implicated in modulation of several neurological processes. Dysregulation of ghrelin signaling is implicated in diseases related to these pathways, including obesity, type II diabetes, and regulation of appetite and body weight in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome. Multiple steps in the ghrelin signaling pathway are available for targeting in the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Agonists and antagonists of GHS-R1a have been widely studied and have shown varying levels of effectiveness within ghrelin-related physiological pathways. Agents targeting ghrelin directly, either through depletion of ghrelin levels in circulation or inhibitors of ghrelin O-acyltransferase whose action is required for ghrelin to become biologically active, are receiving increasing attention as potential therapeutic options. We discuss the approaches utilized to target ghrelin signaling and highlight the current challenges toward developing small-molecule agents as potential therapeutics for ghrelin-related diseases. PMID:26202202

  10. Magnetic antibody-linked nanomatchmakers for therapeutic cell targeting.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ke; Shen, Deliang; Hensley, M Taylor; Middleton, Ryan; Sun, Baiming; Liu, Weixin; De Couto, Geoffrey; Marbán, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a promising strategy for therapeutic cardiac regeneration, but current therapies are limited by inefficient interaction between potentially beneficial cells (either exogenously transplanted or endogenously recruited) and the injured tissue. Here we apply targeted nanomedicine to achieve in vivo cell-mediated tissue repair, imaging and localized enrichment without cellular transplantation. Iron nanoparticles are conjugated with two types of antibodies (one against antigens on therapeutic cells and the other directed at injured cells) to produce magnetic bifunctional cell engager (MagBICE). The antibodies link the therapeutic cells to the injured cells, whereas the iron core of MagBICE enables physical enrichment and imaging. We treat acute myocardial infarction by targeting exogenous bone marrow-derived stem cells (expressing CD45) or endogenous CD34-positive cells to injured cardiomyocytes (expressing myosin light chain. Targeting can be further enhanced by magnetic attraction, leading to augmented functional benefits. MagBICE represents a generalizable platform technology for regenerative medicine. PMID:25205020

  11. [Gap junctions: A new therapeutic target in major depressive disorder?].

    PubMed

    Sarrouilhe, D; Dejean, C

    2015-11-01

    Major depressive disorder is a multifactorial chronic and debilitating mood disease with high lifetime prevalence and is associated with excess mortality, especially from cardiovascular diseases and through suicide. The treatments of this disease with tricyclic antidepressants and monoamine oxidase inhibitors are poorly tolerated and those that selectively target serotonin and norepinephrine re-uptake are not effective in all patients, showing the need to find new therapeutic targets. Post-mortem studies of brains from patients with major depressive disorders described a reduced expression of the gap junction-forming membrane proteins connexin 30 and connexin 43 in the prefrontal cortex and the locus coeruleus. The use of chronic unpredictable stress, a rodent model of depression, suggests that astrocytic gap junction dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder. Chronic treatments of rats with fluoxetine and of rat cultured cortical astrocytes with amitriptyline support the hypothesis that the upregulation of gap junctional intercellular communication between brain astrocytes could be a novel mechanism for the therapeutic effect of antidepressants. In conclusion, astrocytic gap junctions are emerging as a new potential therapeutic target for the treatment of patients with major depressive disorder.

  12. Pleiotropic effects of statins: new therapeutic targets in drug design.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Onkar; Dhawan, Veena; Sharma, P L; Kumar, Puneet

    2016-07-01

    The HMG Co-enzyme inhibitors and new lipid-modifying agents expand their new therapeutic target options in the field of medical profession. Statins have been described as the most effective class of drugs to reduce serum cholesterol levels. Since the discovery of the first statin nearly 30 years ago, these drugs have become the main therapeutic approach to lower cholesterol levels. The present scientific research demonstrates numerous non-lipid modifiable effects of statins termed as pleiotropic effects of statins, which could be beneficial for the treatment of various devastating disorders. The most important positive effects of statins are anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, neuroprotective, anti-diabetes, and antithrombotic, improving endothelial dysfunction and attenuating vascular remodeling besides many others which are discussed under the scope of this review. In particular, inhibition of Rho and its downstream target, Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase (ROCK), and their agonistic action on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) can be viewed as the principle mechanisms underlying the pleiotropic effects of statins. With gradually increasing knowledge of new therapeutic targets of statins, their use has also been advocated in chronic inflammatory disorders for example rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In the scope of review, we highlight statins and their pleiotropic effects with reference to their harmful and beneficial effects as a novel approach for their use in the treatment of devastating disorders. Graphical abstract Pleiotropic effect of statins. PMID:27146293

  13. Targeting DNA repair, DNA metabolism and replication stress as anti-cancer strategies.

    PubMed

    Puigvert, Jordi Carreras; Sanjiv, Kumar; Helleday, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Anti-cancer therapies targeting and damaging the DNA have been extensively used in the last 50 years since the discovery of nitrogen mustards, antimetabolites and platin agents. The use of these drugs is often limited by dose-limiting side effects related to their poor specificity. In recent years, much effort has been put on the discovery and development of compounds that would exploit defects in DNA repair in cancer cells such as Wee1, Chk1 or PARP1 inhibitors. However, not all cancers respond to these inhibitors. Recently, new developments towards specifically targeting broader characteristics of cancer such as replication stress (RS) and lost redox homeostasis have emerged. Oncogenes induce proliferation signals, which also result in replication-associated DNA damage, i.e. RS. Our knowledge into overall causes of RS, lesions produced and how these are signalled in cells to activate cell cycle checkpoints is evolving. Inhibition of ATR, which would normally keep non-deleterious levels of RS, induces intolerable RS levels for cancer cells. Interestingly, links between replication and transcription appear to underlie RS along with a reduction of the dNTP pool. Remarkably, sanitization of the dNTP pool by MutT homologue 1, impeding incorporation of oxidized dNTPs into the DNA, seems to be crucial for cancer cell survival. In this minireview we present an overview of current and novel strategies to target DNA repair and exploit DNA damage to treat cancer. We present the current models for cancer-associated RS as well as cancer phenotypic lethality. Both strategies are poised to better target cancer cells and reduce side effects. PMID:26507796

  14. Critical questions in development of targeted nanoparticle therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Korsmeyer, Richard

    2016-01-01

    One of the fourteen Grand Challenges for Engineering articulated by the US National Academy of Engineering is ‘Engineer Better Medicines’. Although there are many ways that better medicines could be engineered, one of the most promising ideas is to improve our ability to deliver the therapeutic molecule more precisely to the desired target. Most conventional drug delivery methods (oral absorption, intravenous infusion etc.) result in systemic exposure to the therapeutic molecule, which places severe constraints on the types of molecules that can be used. A molecule administered by systemic delivery must be effective at low concentrations in the target tissue, yet safe everywhere else in the body. If drug carriers could be developed to deliver therapeutic molecules selectively to the desired target, it should be possible to greatly improve safety and efficacy of therapy. Nanoparticles (and related nanostructures, such as liposomes, nanoemulsions, micelles and dendrimers) are an attractive drug carrier concept because they can be made from a variety of materials engineered to have properties that allow loading and precise delivery of bound therapeutic molecules. The field of targeted nanoparticles has been extraordinarily active in the academic realm, with thousands of articles published over the last few years. Many of these publications seem to demonstrate very promising results in in vitro studies and even in animal models. In addition, a handful of human clinical trials are in progress. Yet, the biopharmaceutical industry has been relatively slow to make major investments in targeted nanoparticle development programs, despite a clear desire to introduce innovative new therapies to the market. What is the reason for such caution? Some degree of caution is no doubt due to the use of novel materials and the unproven nature of targeted nanoparticle technology, but many other unproven technologies have generated intense interest at various times. We believe that

  15. Identification of potential glucocorticoid receptor therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alexandra L.; Coarfa, Cristian; Qian, Jun; Wilkerson, Joseph J.; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Krett, Nancy L.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Rosen, Steven T.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are a cornerstone of combination therapies for multiple myeloma. However, patients ultimately develop resistance to GCs frequently based on decreased glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression. An understanding of the direct targets of GC actions, which induce cell death, is expected to culminate in potential therapeutic strategies for inducing cell death by regulating downstream targets in the absence of a functional GR. The specific goal of our research is to identify primary GR targets that contribute to GC-induced cell death, with the ultimate goal of developing novel therapeutics around these targets that can be used to overcome resistance to GCs in the absence of GR. Using the MM.1S glucocorticoid-sensitive human myeloma cell line, we began with the broad platform of gene expression profiling to identify glucocorticoid-regulated genes further refined by combination treatment with phosphatidylinositol-3’-kinase inhibition (PI3Ki). To further refine the search to distinguish direct and indirect targets of GR that respond to the combination GC and PI3Ki treatment of MM.1S cells, we integrated 1) gene expression profiles of combination GC treatment with PI3Ki, which induces synergistic cell death; 2) negative correlation between genes inhibited by combination treatment in MM.1S cells and genes over-expressed in myeloma patients to establish clinical relevance and 3) GR chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq) in myeloma cells to identify global chromatin binding for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Using established bioinformatics platforms, we have integrated these data sets to identify a subset of candidate genes that may form the basis for a comprehensive picture of glucocorticoid actions in multiple myeloma. As a proof of principle, we have verified two targets, namely RRM2 and BCL2L1, as primary functional targets of GR involved in GC-induced cell death. PMID:26715915

  16. Hepcidin: A Promising Therapeutic Target for Iron Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Sun, Bingbing; Yin, Huijun; Liu, Sijin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Iron is required for most forms of organisms, and it is the most essential element for the functions of many iron-containing proteins involved in oxygen transport, cellular respiration, DNA replication, and so on. Disorders of iron metabolism are associated with diverse diseases, including anemias (e.g., iron-deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic diseases) and iron overload diseases, such as hereditary hemochromatosis and β-thalassemia. Hepcidin (encoded by Hamp gene) is a peptide hormone synthesized by hepatocytes, and it plays an important role in regulating the systematic iron homeostasis. As the systemic iron regulator, hepcidin, not only controls dietary iron absorption and iron egress out of iron storage cells, but also induces iron redistribution in various organs. Deregulated hepcidin is often seen in a variety of iron-related diseases including anemias and iron overload disorders. In the case of iron overload disorders (e.g., hereditary hemochromatosis and β-thalassemia), hepatic hepcidin concentration is significantly reduced. Since hepcidin deregulation is responsible for iron disorder-associated diseases, the purpose of this review is to summarize the recent findings on therapeutics targeting hepcidin. Continuous efforts have been made to search for hepcidin mimics and chemical compounds that could be used to increase hepcidin level. Here, a literature search was conducted in PubMed, and research papers relevant to hepcidin regulation or hepcidin-centered therapeutic work were reviewed. On the basis of literature search, we recapitulated recent findings on therapeutic studies targeting hepcidin, including agonists and antagonists to modulate hepcidin expression or its downstream signaling. We also discussed the molecular mechanisms by which hepcidin level and iron metabolism are modulated. Elevating hepcidin concentration is an optimal strategy to ameliorate iron overload diseases, and also to relieve β-thalassemia phenotypes by improving

  17. Virus Maturation as a Novel HIV-1 Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Catherine S.; Salzwedel, Karl; Freed, Eric O.

    2009-01-01

    Development of novel therapeutic targets against HIV-1 is a high research priority due to the serious clinical consequences associated with acquisition of resistance to current antiretroviral drugs. The HIV-1 structural protein Gag represents a potential novel therapeutic target as it plays a central role in virus particle production, yet is not targeted by any of the currently approved antiretroviral drugs. The Gag polyprotein precursor multimerizes to form immature particles that bud from the infected cell. Concomitant with virus release, the Gag precursor undergoes proteolytic processing by the viral protease to generate the mature Gag proteins, which include capsid (CA). Once liberated from the Gag polyprotein precursor, CA molecules interact to reassemble into a condensed conical core, which organizes the viral RNA genome and several viral proteins to facilitate virus replication in the next round of infection. Correct Gag proteolytic processing and core assembly are therefore essential for virus infectivity. In this review, we discuss novel strategies to inhibit maturation by targeting proteolytic cleavage sites in Gag or CA-CA interactions required for core formation. The identification and development of lead maturation inhibitors are highlighted. PMID:19534569

  18. Classification of current anticancer immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vacchelli, Erika; Bravo-San Pedro, José-Manuel; Buqué, Aitziber; Senovilla, Laura; Baracco, Elisa Elena; Bloy, Norma; Castoldi, Francesca; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Agostinis, Patrizia; Apte, Ron N; Aranda, Fernando; Ayyoub, Maha; Beckhove, Philipp; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bracci, Laura; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Estaban; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Clayton, Aled; Colombo, Mario P; Coussens, Lisa; Dhodapkar, Madhav V; Eggermont, Alexander M; Fearon, Douglas T; Fridman, Wolf H; Fučíková, Jitka; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Galon, Jérôme; Garg, Abhishek; Ghiringhelli, François; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Hoos, Axel; Hosmalin, Anne; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kärre, Klas; Kepp, Oliver; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John M; Klein, Eva; Knuth, Alexander; Lewis, Claire E; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T; Lugli, Enrico; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Mavilio, Domenico; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Moretta, Lorenzo; Odunsi, Adekunke; Okada, Hideho; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Peter, Marcus E; Pienta, Kenneth J; Porgador, Angel; Prendergast, George C; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Restifo, Nicholas P; Rizvi, Naiyer; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Schreiber, Hans; Seliger, Barbara; Shiku, Hiroshi; Silva-Santos, Bruno; Smyth, Mark J; Speiser, Daniel E; Spisek, Radek; Srivastava, Pramod K; Talmadge, James E; Tartour, Eric; Van Der Burg, Sjoerd H; Van Den Eynde, Benoît J; Vile, Richard; Wagner, Hermann; Weber, Jeffrey S; Whiteside, Theresa L; Wolchok, Jedd D; Zitvogel, Laurence; Zou, Weiping; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-12-30

    During the past decades, anticancer immunotherapy has evolved from a promising therapeutic option to a robust clinical reality. Many immunotherapeutic regimens are now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for use in cancer patients, and many others are being investigated as standalone therapeutic interventions or combined with conventional treatments in clinical studies. Immunotherapies may be subdivided into "passive" and "active" based on their ability to engage the host immune system against cancer. Since the anticancer activity of most passive immunotherapeutics (including tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies) also relies on the host immune system, this classification does not properly reflect the complexity of the drug-host-tumor interaction. Alternatively, anticancer immunotherapeutics can be classified according to their antigen specificity. While some immunotherapies specifically target one (or a few) defined tumor-associated antigen(s), others operate in a relatively non-specific manner and boost natural or therapy-elicited anticancer immune responses of unknown and often broad specificity. Here, we propose a critical, integrated classification of anticancer immunotherapies and discuss the clinical relevance of these approaches.

  19. Classification of current anticancer immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Vacchelli, Erika; Pedro, José-Manuel Bravo-San; Buqué, Aitziber; Senovilla, Laura; Baracco, Elisa Elena; Bloy, Norma; Castoldi, Francesca; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Agostinis, Patrizia; Apte, Ron N.; Aranda, Fernando; Ayyoub, Maha; Beckhove, Philipp; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bracci, Laura; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Estaban; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Clayton, Aled; Colombo, Mario P.; Coussens, Lisa; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Eggermont, Alexander M.; Fearon, Douglas T.; Fridman, Wolf H.; Fučíková, Jitka; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Galon, Jérôme; Garg, Abhishek; Ghiringhelli, François; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Hoos, Axel; Hosmalin, Anne; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kärre, Klas; Kepp, Oliver; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John M.; Klein, Eva; Knuth, Alexander; Lewis, Claire E.; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T.; Lugli, Enrico; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Mavilio, Domenico; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Moretta, Lorenzo; Odunsi, Adekunke; Okada, Hideho; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Peter, Marcus E.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Porgador, Angel; Prendergast, George C.; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Rizvi, Naiyer; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Schreiber, Hans; Seliger, Barbara; Shiku, Hiroshi; Silva-Santos, Bruno; Smyth, Mark J.; Speiser, Daniel E.; Spisek, Radek; Srivastava, Pramod K.; Talmadge, James E.; Tartour, Eric; Van Der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Van Den Eynde, Benoît J.; Vile, Richard; Wagner, Hermann; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Zitvogel, Laurence; Zou, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    During the past decades, anticancer immunotherapy has evolved from a promising therapeutic option to a robust clinical reality. Many immunotherapeutic regimens are now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for use in cancer patients, and many others are being investigated as standalone therapeutic interventions or combined with conventional treatments in clinical studies. Immunotherapies may be subdivided into “passive” and “active” based on their ability to engage the host immune system against cancer. Since the anticancer activity of most passive immunotherapeutics (including tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies) also relies on the host immune system, this classification does not properly reflect the complexity of the drug-host-tumor interaction. Alternatively, anticancer immunotherapeutics can be classified according to their antigen specificity. While some immunotherapies specifically target one (or a few) defined tumor-associated antigen(s), others operate in a relatively non-specific manner and boost natural or therapy-elicited anticancer immune responses of unknown and often broad specificity. Here, we propose a critical, integrated classification of anticancer immunotherapies and discuss the clinical relevance of these approaches. PMID:25537519

  20. Classification of current anticancer immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vacchelli, Erika; Bravo-San Pedro, José-Manuel; Buqué, Aitziber; Senovilla, Laura; Baracco, Elisa Elena; Bloy, Norma; Castoldi, Francesca; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Agostinis, Patrizia; Apte, Ron N; Aranda, Fernando; Ayyoub, Maha; Beckhove, Philipp; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bracci, Laura; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Estaban; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Clayton, Aled; Colombo, Mario P; Coussens, Lisa; Dhodapkar, Madhav V; Eggermont, Alexander M; Fearon, Douglas T; Fridman, Wolf H; Fučíková, Jitka; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Galon, Jérôme; Garg, Abhishek; Ghiringhelli, François; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Hoos, Axel; Hosmalin, Anne; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kärre, Klas; Kepp, Oliver; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John M; Klein, Eva; Knuth, Alexander; Lewis, Claire E; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T; Lugli, Enrico; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Mavilio, Domenico; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Moretta, Lorenzo; Odunsi, Adekunke; Okada, Hideho; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Peter, Marcus E; Pienta, Kenneth J; Porgador, Angel; Prendergast, George C; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Restifo, Nicholas P; Rizvi, Naiyer; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Schreiber, Hans; Seliger, Barbara; Shiku, Hiroshi; Silva-Santos, Bruno; Smyth, Mark J; Speiser, Daniel E; Spisek, Radek; Srivastava, Pramod K; Talmadge, James E; Tartour, Eric; Van Der Burg, Sjoerd H; Van Den Eynde, Benoît J; Vile, Richard; Wagner, Hermann; Weber, Jeffrey S; Whiteside, Theresa L; Wolchok, Jedd D; Zitvogel, Laurence; Zou, Weiping; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-12-30

    During the past decades, anticancer immunotherapy has evolved from a promising therapeutic option to a robust clinical reality. Many immunotherapeutic regimens are now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for use in cancer patients, and many others are being investigated as standalone therapeutic interventions or combined with conventional treatments in clinical studies. Immunotherapies may be subdivided into "passive" and "active" based on their ability to engage the host immune system against cancer. Since the anticancer activity of most passive immunotherapeutics (including tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies) also relies on the host immune system, this classification does not properly reflect the complexity of the drug-host-tumor interaction. Alternatively, anticancer immunotherapeutics can be classified according to their antigen specificity. While some immunotherapies specifically target one (or a few) defined tumor-associated antigen(s), others operate in a relatively non-specific manner and boost natural or therapy-elicited anticancer immune responses of unknown and often broad specificity. Here, we propose a critical, integrated classification of anticancer immunotherapies and discuss the clinical relevance of these approaches. PMID:25537519

  1. Polysaccharide-Gold Nanocluster Supramolecular Conjugates as a Versatile Platform for the Targeted Delivery of Anticancer Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Yang, Yang; Su, Yue; Chen, Jia-Tong; Liu, Yu

    2014-02-01

    Through the high affinity of the β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) cavity for adamantane moieties, novel polysaccharide-gold nanocluster supramolecular conjugates (HACD-AuNPs) were successfully constructed from gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) bearing adamantane moieties and cyclodextrin-grafted hyaluronic acid (HACD). Due to their porous structure, the supramolecular conjugates could serve as a versatile and biocompatible platform for the loading and delivery of various anticancer drugs, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), paclitaxel (PTX), camptothecin (CPT), irinotecan hydrochloride (CPT-11), and topotecan hydrochloride (TPT), by taking advantage of the controlled association/dissociation of drug molecules from the cavities formed by the HACD skeletons and AuNPs cores as well as by harnessing the efficient targeting of cancer cells by hyaluronic acid. Significantly, the release of anticancer drugs from the drug@HACD-AuNPs system was pH-responsive, with more efficient release occurring under a mildly acidic environment, such as that in a cancer cell. Taking the anticancer drug DOX as an example, cell viability experiments revealed that the DOX@HACD-AuNPs system exhibited similar tumor cell inhibition abilities but lower toxicity than free DOX due to the hyaluronic acid reporter-mediated endocytosis. Therefore, the HACD-AuNPs supramolecular conjugates may possess great potential for the targeted delivery of anticancer drugs.

  2. Long-acting antituberculous therapeutic nanoparticles target macrophage endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Edagwa, Benson J.; Guo, Dongwei; Puligujja, Pavan; Chen, Han; McMillan, JoEllyn; Liu, Xinming; Gendelman, Howard E.; Narayanasamy, Prabagaran

    2014-01-01

    Eradication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection requires daily administration of combinations of rifampin (RIF), isoniazid [isonicotinylhydrazine (INH)], pyrazinamide, and ethambutol, among other drug therapies. To facilitate and optimize MTB therapeutic selections, a mononuclear phagocyte (MP; monocyte, macrophage, and dendritic cell)-targeted drug delivery strategy was developed. Long-acting nanoformulations of RIF and an INH derivative, pentenyl-INH (INHP), were prepared, and their physicochemical properties were evaluated. This included the evaluation of MP particle uptake and retention, cell viability, and antimicrobial efficacy. Drug levels reached 6 μg/106 cells in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) for nanoparticle treatments compared with 0.1 μg/106 cells for native drugs. High RIF and INHP levels were retained in MDM for >15 d following nanoparticle loading. Rapid loss of native drugs was observed in cells and culture fluids within 24 h. Antimicrobial activities were determined against Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis). Coadministration of nanoformulated RIF and INHP provided a 6-fold increase in therapeutic efficacy compared with equivalent concentrations of native drugs. Notably, nanoformulated RIF and INHP were found to be localized in recycling and late MDM endosomal compartments. These were the same compartments that contained the pathogen. Our results demonstrate the potential of antimicrobial nanomedicines to simplify MTB drug regimens.—Edagwa, B. J., Guo, D., Puligujja, P., Chen, H., McMillan, J., Liu, X., Gendelman, H. E., Narayanasamy, P. Long-acting antituberculous therapeutic nanoparticles target macrophage endosomes. PMID:25122556

  3. Mitochondria targeted therapeutic approaches in Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Rajnish K; Beal, M Flint

    2013-07-01

    Substantial evidence from both genetic and toxin induced animal and cellular models and postmortem human brain tissue indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in pathophysiology of the neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD), and Huntington's disease (HD). This review discusses the emerging understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction including bioenergetics defects, mitochondrial DNA mutations, familial nuclear DNA mutations, altered mitochondrial fusion/fission and morphology, mitochondrial transport/trafficking, altered transcription and increased interaction of pathogenic proteins with mitochondria in the pathogenesis of PD and HD. This review recapitulates some of the key therapeutic strategies applied to surmount mitochondrial dysfunction in these debilitating disorders. We discuss the therapeutic role of mitochondrial bioenergetic agents such as creatine, Coenzyme-Q10, mitochondrial targeted antioxidants and peptides, the SIRT1 activator resveratrol, and the pan-PPAR agonist bezafibrate in toxin and genetic cellular and animal models of PD and HD. We also summarize the phase II-III clinical trials conducted using some of these agents. Lastly, we discuss PGC-1α, TORC and Sirtuins as potential therapeutic targets for mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Mitochondrial function and dysfunction in neurodegeneration'.

  4. Molecular genetics and targeted therapeutics in biliary tract carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Eric I; Yee, Nelson S

    2016-01-01

    The primary malignancies of the biliary tract, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, often present at an advanced stage and are marginally sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that molecularly targeted agents may provide new hope for improving treatment response in biliary tract carcinoma (BTC). In this article, we provide a critical review of the pathogenesis and genetic abnormalities of biliary tract neoplasms, in addition to discussing the current and emerging targeted therapeutics in BTC. Genetic studies of biliary tumors have identified the growth factors and receptors as well as their downstream signaling pathways that control the growth and survival of biliary epithelia. Target-specific monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors directed against the signaling pathways that drive BTC growth and invasion have been developed. Numerous clinical trials designed to test these agents as either monotherapy or in combination with conventional chemotherapy have been completed or are currently underway. Research focusing on understanding the molecular basis of biliary tumorigenesis will continue to identify for targeted therapy the key mutations that drive growth and invasion of biliary neoplasms. Additional strategies that have emerged for treating this malignant disease include targeting the epigenetic alterations of BTC and immunotherapy. By integrating targeted therapy with molecular profiles of biliary tumor, we hope to provide precision treatment for patients with malignant diseases of the biliary tract. PMID:26819503

  5. Cholesterol-Targeted Anticancer and Apoptotic Effects of Anionic and Polycationic Amphiphilic Cyclodextrin Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Varan, Gamze; Öncül, Selin; Ercan, Ayşe; Benito, Juan M; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; Bilensoy, Erem

    2016-10-01

    Amphiphilic cyclodextrins (CDs) are biocompatible derivatives of natural CDs and are able to form nanoparticles or polyplexes spontaneously. In this study, nanoparticles prepared from nonionic (6OCaproβCD) or cationic amphiphilic CD (PC βCDC6) were used comparatively to develop nanoparticles intended for breast cancer therapy. The characterization of these nanoparticles was performed both by in vitro and cell culture studies. Furthermore, the apoptotic and cytotoxic effects of blank amphiphilic CDs were demonstrated by various mechanistic methods including Caspase-8 activity, lipid peroxidation assay, TUNEL assay, Tali(®)-based image analysis, cholesterol assay, and gene expression studies. Blank nanoparticles exerted cytotoxicity against a variety of cancer cells (MCF-7, HeLa, HepG2, and MB49) but none to healthy cells (L929, G/G). Interestingly, blank 6OCaproβCD and blank PC βCDC6 derivatives were found to be intrinsically effective on cell number and membrane integrity of MCF-7 cells in apoptosis studies. Further in-depth studies were performed to elucidate the selective mechanism of anticancer action in MCF-7 cells caused by these amphiphilic CDs. In conclusion, blank amphiphilic CD nanoparticles induced apoptosis through mitochondrial pathway targeted to cholesterol microdomains in cancer cell membrane. PMID:27488900

  6. Targeting anticancer drug delivery to pancreatic cancer cells using a fucose-bound nanoparticle approach.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Makoto; Takimoto, Rishu; Murase, Kazuyuki; Sato, Yasushi; Hirakawa, Masahiro; Tamura, Fumito; Sato, Tsutomu; Iyama, Satoshi; Osuga, Takahiro; Miyanishi, Koji; Takada, Kohichi; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kato, Junji

    2012-01-01

    Owing to its aggressiveness and the lack of effective therapies, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has a dismal prognosis. New strategies to improve treatment and survival are therefore urgently required. Numerous fucosylated antigens in sera serve as tumor markers for cancer detection and evaluation of treatment efficacy. Increased expression of fucosyltransferases has also been reported for pancreatic cancer. These enzymes accelerate malignant transformation through fucosylation of sialylated precursors, suggesting a crucial requirement for fucose by pancreatic cancer cells. With this in mind, we developed fucose-bound nanoparticles as vehicles for delivery of anticancer drugs specifically to cancer cells. L-fucose-bound liposomes containing Cy5.5 or Cisplatin were effectively delivered into CA19-9 expressing pancreatic cancer cells. Excess L-fucose decreased the efficiency of Cy5.5 introduction by L-fucose-bound liposomes, suggesting L-fucose-receptor-mediated delivery. Intravenously injected L-fucose-bound liposomes carrying Cisplatin were successfully delivered to pancreatic cancer cells, mediating efficient tumor growth inhibition as well as prolonging survival in mouse xenograft models. This modality represents a new strategy for pancreatic cancer cell-targeting therapy.

  7. Cholesterol-Targeted Anticancer and Apoptotic Effects of Anionic and Polycationic Amphiphilic Cyclodextrin Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Varan, Gamze; Öncül, Selin; Ercan, Ayşe; Benito, Juan M; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; Bilensoy, Erem

    2016-10-01

    Amphiphilic cyclodextrins (CDs) are biocompatible derivatives of natural CDs and are able to form nanoparticles or polyplexes spontaneously. In this study, nanoparticles prepared from nonionic (6OCaproβCD) or cationic amphiphilic CD (PC βCDC6) were used comparatively to develop nanoparticles intended for breast cancer therapy. The characterization of these nanoparticles was performed both by in vitro and cell culture studies. Furthermore, the apoptotic and cytotoxic effects of blank amphiphilic CDs were demonstrated by various mechanistic methods including Caspase-8 activity, lipid peroxidation assay, TUNEL assay, Tali(®)-based image analysis, cholesterol assay, and gene expression studies. Blank nanoparticles exerted cytotoxicity against a variety of cancer cells (MCF-7, HeLa, HepG2, and MB49) but none to healthy cells (L929, G/G). Interestingly, blank 6OCaproβCD and blank PC βCDC6 derivatives were found to be intrinsically effective on cell number and membrane integrity of MCF-7 cells in apoptosis studies. Further in-depth studies were performed to elucidate the selective mechanism of anticancer action in MCF-7 cells caused by these amphiphilic CDs. In conclusion, blank amphiphilic CD nanoparticles induced apoptosis through mitochondrial pathway targeted to cholesterol microdomains in cancer cell membrane.

  8. Therapeutic targeting of cancers with loss of PTEN function

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Lloye M.; Miller, Todd W.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is one of the most frequently disrupted tumor suppressors in cancer. The lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN antagonizes the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR pathway to repress tumor cell growth and survival. In the nucleus, PTEN promotes chromosome stability and DNA repair. Consequently, loss of PTEN function increases genomic instability. PTEN deficiency is caused by inherited germline mutations, somatic mutations, epigenetic and transcriptional silencing, post-translational modifications, and protein-protein interactions. Given the high frequency of PTEN deficiency across cancer subtypes, therapeutic approaches that exploit PTEN loss-of-function could provide effective treatment strategies. Herein, we discuss therapeutic strategies aimed at cancers with loss of PTEN function, and the challenges involved in treating patients afflicted with such cancers. We review preclinical and clinical findings, and highlight novel strategies under development to target PTEN-deficient cancers. PMID:24387334

  9. Vitamin A-aldehyde adducts: AMD risk and targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Sparrow, Janet R.

    2016-01-01

    Although currently available treatment options for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are limited, particularly for atrophic AMD, the identification of predisposing genetic variations has informed clinical studies addressing therapeutic options such as complement inhibitors and anti-inflammatory agents. To lower risk of early AMD, recommended lifestyle interventions such as the avoidance of smoking and the intake of low glycemic antioxidant-rich diets have largely followed from the identification of nongenetic modifiable factors. On the other hand, the challenge of understanding the complex relationship between aging and cumulative damage leading to AMD has fueled investigations of the visual cycle adducts that accumulate in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and are a hallmark of aging retina. These studies have revealed properties of these compounds that provide insights into processes that may compromise RPE and could contribute to disease mechanisms in AMD. This work has also led to the design of targeted therapeutics that are currently under investigation. PMID:27071115

  10. Engineering therapeutic antibodies targeting G-protein–coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Migyeong; Jung, Sang Taek

    2016-01-01

    G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the most attractive therapeutic target classes because of their critical roles in intracellular signaling and their clinical relevance to a variety of diseases, including cancer, infection and inflammation. However, high conformational variability, the small exposed area of extracellular epitopes and difficulty in the preparation of GPCR antigens have delayed both the isolation of therapeutic anti-GPCR antibodies as well as studies on the structure, function and biochemical mechanisms of GPCRs. To overcome the challenges in generating highly specific anti-GPCR antibodies with enhanced efficacy and safety, various forms of antigens have been successfully designed and employed for screening with newly emerged systems based on laboratory animal immunization and high-throughput-directed evolution. PMID:26846450

  11. Therapeutics targeting the inflammasome after central nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Dietrich, W Dalton; Keane, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Innate immunity is part of the early response of the body to deal with tissue damage and infections. Because of the early nature of the innate immune inflammatory response, this inflammatory reaction represents an attractive option as a therapeutic target. The inflammasome is a component of the innate immune response involved in the activation of caspase 1 and the processing of pro-interleukin 1β. In this article, we discuss the therapeutic potential of the inflammasome after central nervous system (CNS) injury and stroke, as well as the basic knowledge we have gained so far regarding inflammasome activation in the CNS. In addition, we discuss some of the therapies available or under investigation for the treatment of brain injury, spinal cord injury, and stroke. PMID:26024799

  12. Targeted complement inhibition and microvasculature in transplants: a therapeutic perspective.

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Hsu, J L; Assiri, A M; Broering, D C

    2016-02-01

    Active complement mediators play a key role in graft-versus-host diseases, but little attention has been given to the angiogenic balance and complement modulation during allograft acceptance. The complement cascade releases the powerful proinflammatory mediators C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins, C3b, C5b opsonins and terminal membrane attack complex into tissues, which are deleterious if unchecked. Blocking complement mediators has been considered to be a promising approach in the modern drug discovery plan, and a significant number of therapeutic alternatives have been developed to dampen complement activation and protect host cells. Numerous immune cells, especially macrophages, develop both anaphylatoxin and opsonin receptors on their cell surface and their binding affects the macrophage phenotype and their angiogenic properties. This review discusses the mechanism that complement contributes to angiogenic injury, and the development of future therapeutic targets by antagonizing activated complement mediators to preserve microvasculature in rejecting the transplanted organ.

  13. Are Doses and Schedules of Small-Molecule Targeted Anticancer Drugs Recommended by Phase I Studies Realistic?

    PubMed

    Roda, Desamparados; Jimenez, Begoña; Banerji, Udai

    2016-05-01

    Tolerability of molecularly targeted agents (MTA) used in cancer therapeutics is determined in phase I trials. We reviewed the reported incidence of toxicity in phase III trials at doses and schedules recommended by phase I trials to evaluate whether these recommendations are realistic when drugs are used in larger populations of patients. We systematically reviewed a safety profile of small molecule (SM-MTA) and mAb MTA (MA-MTA) approved by the FDA in the last 12 years. There was a significantly increased percentage of grade 3 or 4 adverse events reported with SM-MTA compared with MA-MTA [40% vs. 27%; RR 1.5; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.10-2.25, P = 0.038] in phase III studies. Importantly, a substantial proportion of patients (45%) treated with SM-MTA required dose modifications due to drug-related toxicity in phase III trials. However, this toxicity was associated to a definitive study drug discontinuation in only 9%. Overall, 25% of SM-MTA declared recommended phase II doses below MTD based on pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic data and these trials were associated with a significantly reduced number of dose modifications in registration trials (32% vs. 50%; RR 0.64; 95% CI, 0.43-0.88, P = 0.01). Tolerability is going to come into further focus due to the need for combinations of SM-MTA and other anticancer agents. There was a higher incidence of grade 3-4 toxicity in phase III trials in combinations versus single-agent SM-MTAs (64% vs. 37%; RR 1.73; 95% CI, 1.3-2.3, P = 0.001). These results indicate that phase I studies underestimate toxicity while recommending doses of SM-MTA. Clin Cancer Res; 22(9); 2127-32. ©2015 AACR.

  14. Endothelial FAK as a therapeutic target in disease.

    PubMed

    Infusino, Giovanni A; Jacobson, Jeffrey R

    2012-01-01

    Focal adhesions (FA) are important mediators of endothelial cytoskeletal interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) via transmembrane receptors, integrins and integrin-associated intracellular proteins. This communication is essential for a variety of cell processes including EC barrier regulation and is mediated by the non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase, focal adhesion kinase (FAK). As FA mediate the basic response of EC to a variety of stimuli and FAK is essential to these responses, the idea of targeting EC FAK as a therapeutic strategy for an assortment of diseases is highly promising. In particular, inhibition of FAK could prove beneficial in a variety of cancers via effects on EC proliferation and angiogenesis, in acute lung injury (ALI) via the attenuation of lung vascular permeability, and in rheumatoid arthritis via reductions in synovial angiogenesis. In addition, there are potential therapeutic benefits of FAK inhibition in cardiovascular disease and diabetic nephropathy as well. Several drugs that target EC FAK are now in existence and include agents currently under investigation in preclinical models as well as drugs that are readily available such as the sphingolipid analog FTY720 and statins. As the role of EC FAK in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases continues to be explored and new insights are revealed, drug targeting of FAK will continue to be an important area of investigation and may ultimately lead to highly novel and effective strategies to treat these diseases.

  15. Therapeutically targeting mitochondrial redox signalling alleviates endothelial dysfunction in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Cathal; Kenny, Louise C

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant placentation generating placental oxidative stress is proposed to play a critical role in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Unfortunately, therapeutic trials of antioxidants have been uniformly disappointing. There is provisional evidence implicating mitochondrial dysfunction as a source of oxidative stress in preeclampsia. Here we provide evidence that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species mediates endothelial dysfunction and establish that directly targeting mitochondrial scavenging may provide a protective role. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to 3% plasma from women with pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia resulted in a significant decrease in mitochondrial function with a subsequent significant increase in mitochondrial superoxide generation compared to cells exposed to plasma from women with uncomplicated pregnancies. Real-time PCR analysis showed increased expression of inflammatory markers TNF-α, TLR-9 and ICAM-1 respectively in endothelial cells treated with preeclampsia plasma. MitoTempo is a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant, pre-treatment of cells with MitoTempo protected against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death. Furthermore MitoTempo significantly reduced mitochondrial superoxide production in cells exposed to preeclampsia plasma by normalising mitochondrial metabolism. MitoTempo significantly altered the inflammatory profile of plasma treated cells. These novel data support a functional role for mitochondrial redox signaling in modulating the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and identifies mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants as potential therapeutic candidates. PMID:27604418

  16. Exosomal miRNAs as cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Thind, Arron; Wilson, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Intercommunication between cancer cells and with their surrounding and distant environments is key to the survival, progression and metastasis of the tumour. Exosomes play a role in this communication process. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is frequently dysregulated in tumour cells and can be reflected by distinct exosomal miRNA (ex-miRNA) profiles isolated from the bodily fluids of cancer patients. Here, the potential of ex-miRNA as a cancer biomarker and therapeutic target is critically analysed. Exosomes are a stable source of miRNA in bodily fluids but, despite a number of methods for exosome extraction and miRNA quantification, their suitability for diagnostics in a clinical setting is questionable. Furthermore, exosomally transferred miRNAs can alter the behaviour of recipient tumour and stromal cells to promote oncogenesis, highlighting a role in cell communication in cancer. However, our incomplete understanding of exosome biogenesis and miRNA loading mechanisms means that strategies to target exosomes or their transferred miRNAs are limited and not specific to tumour cells. Therefore, if ex-miRNA is to be employed in novel non-invasive diagnostic approaches and as a therapeutic target in cancer, two further advances are necessary: in methods to isolate and detect ex-miRNA, and a better understanding of their biogenesis and functions in tumour-cell communication. PMID:27440105

  17. Therapeutics targeting persistent inflammation in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Machowska, Anna; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a condition intrinsically linked to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its other typical sequelae, such as acquired immune dysfunction, protein-energy wasting (PEW), and accelerated vascular aging that promote premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) and infections, the two leading causes of death in CKD patients. Inflammation is a major contributor to complications in CKD, and inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, correlate with underlying causes and consequences of the inflamed uremic phenotype, such as oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, CVD, PEW, and infections, and are sensitive and independent predictors of outcome in CKD. Therefore, inflammation appears to be a logical target for potential preventive and therapeutic interventions in patients with CKD. Putative anti-inflammatory therapy strategies aiming at preventing complications and improving outcomes in CKD span over several areas: (1) dealing with the source of inflammation (such as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal or periodontal disease and depression); (2) providing nonspecific immune modulatory effects by promoting healthy dietary habits and other lifestyle changes; (3) promoting increased use of recognized pharmacologic interventions that have pleiotropic effects; and, (4) introducing novel targeted anticytokine interventions. This review provides a brief update on inflammatory biomarkers and possible therapeutic approaches targeting inflammation and the uremic inflammatory milieu in patients with CKD. PMID:26173187

  18. Glioblastoma Stem Cells as a New Therapeutic Target for Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kalkan, Rasime

    2015-01-01

    Primary and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs) are two distinct diseases. The genetic and epigenetic background of these tumors is highly variable. The treatment procedure for these tumors is often unsuccessful because of the cellular heterogeneity and intrinsic ability of the tumor cells to invade healthy tissues. The fatal outcome of these tumors promotes researchers to find out new markers associated with the prognosis and treatment planning. In this communication, the role of glioblastoma stem cells in tumor progression and the malignant behavior of GBMs are summarized with attention to the signaling pathways and molecular regulators that are involved in maintaining the glioblastoma stem cell phenotype. A better understanding of these stem cell-like cells is necessary for designing new effective treatments and developing novel molecular strategies to target glioblastoma stem cells. We discuss hypoxia as a new therapeutic target for GBM. We focus on the inhibition of signaling pathways, which are associated with the hypoxia-mediated maintenance of glioblastoma stem cells, and the knockdown of hypoxia-inducible factors, which could be identified as attractive molecular target approaches for GBM therapeutics. PMID:26617463

  19. Apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Abraha, Aman M; Ketema, Ezra B

    2016-08-15

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among adults. The disease begins as a benign adenomatous polyp, which develops into an advanced adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and then progresses to an invasive cancer. Appropriate apoptotic signaling is fundamentally important to preserve a healthy balance between cell death and cell survival and in maintaining genome integrity. Evasion of apoptotic pathway has been established as a prominent hallmark of several cancers. During colorectal cancer development, the balance between the rates of cell growth and apoptosis that maintains intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis gets progressively disturbed. Evidences are increasingly available to support the hypothesis that failure of apoptosis may be an important factor in the evolution of colorectal cancer and its poor response to chemotherapy and radiation. The other reason for targeting apoptotic pathway in the treatment of cancer is based on the observation that this process is deregulated in cancer cells but not in normal cells. As a result, colorectal cancer therapies designed to stimulate apoptosis in target cells would play a critical role in controlling its development and progression. A better understanding of the apoptotic signaling pathways, and the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade apoptotic death might lead to effective therapeutic strategies to inhibit cancer cell proliferation with minimal toxicity and high responses to chemotherapy. In this review, we analyzed the current understanding and future promises of apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:27574550

  20. Novel therapeutic targets on the horizon for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wan-Ling; Jain, Amit; Takano, Angela; Newell, Evan W; Iyer, N Gopalakrishna; Lim, Wan-Teck; Tan, Eng-Huat; Zhai, Weiwei; Hillmer, Axel M; Tam, Wai-Leong; Tan, Daniel S W

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, and is classically divided into two major histological subtypes: non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Although NSCLC and SCLC are considered distinct entities with different genomic landscapes, emerging evidence highlights a convergence in therapeutically relevant targets for both histologies. In adenocarcinomas with defined alterations such as EGFR mutations and ALK translocations, targeted therapies are now first-line standard of care. By contrast, many experimental and targeted agents remain largely unsuccessful for SCLC. Intense preclinical research and clinical trials are underway to exploit unique traits of lung cancer, such as oncogene dependency, DNA damage response, angiogenesis, and cellular plasticity arising from presence of cancer stem cell lineages. In addition, the promising clinical activity observed in NSCLC in response to immune checkpoint blockade has spurred great interest in the field of immunooncology, with the scope to develop a diverse repertoire of synergistic and personalised immunotherapeutics. In this Review, we discuss novel therapeutic agents for lung cancer that are in early-stage development, and how prospective clinical trials and drug development may be shaped by a deeper understanding of this heterogeneous disease. PMID:27511159

  1. Exosomal miRNAs as cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Thind, Arron; Wilson, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Intercommunication between cancer cells and with their surrounding and distant environments is key to the survival, progression and metastasis of the tumour. Exosomes play a role in this communication process. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is frequently dysregulated in tumour cells and can be reflected by distinct exosomal miRNA (ex-miRNA) profiles isolated from the bodily fluids of cancer patients. Here, the potential of ex-miRNA as a cancer biomarker and therapeutic target is critically analysed. Exosomes are a stable source of miRNA in bodily fluids but, despite a number of methods for exosome extraction and miRNA quantification, their suitability for diagnostics in a clinical setting is questionable. Furthermore, exosomally transferred miRNAs can alter the behaviour of recipient tumour and stromal cells to promote oncogenesis, highlighting a role in cell communication in cancer. However, our incomplete understanding of exosome biogenesis and miRNA loading mechanisms means that strategies to target exosomes or their transferred miRNAs are limited and not specific to tumour cells. Therefore, if ex-miRNA is to be employed in novel non-invasive diagnostic approaches and as a therapeutic target in cancer, two further advances are necessary: in methods to isolate and detect ex-miRNA, and a better understanding of their biogenesis and functions in tumour-cell communication. PMID:27440105

  2. Apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abraha, Aman M; Ketema, Ezra B

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among adults. The disease begins as a benign adenomatous polyp, which develops into an advanced adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and then progresses to an invasive cancer. Appropriate apoptotic signaling is fundamentally important to preserve a healthy balance between cell death and cell survival and in maintaining genome integrity. Evasion of apoptotic pathway has been established as a prominent hallmark of several cancers. During colorectal cancer development, the balance between the rates of cell growth and apoptosis that maintains intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis gets progressively disturbed. Evidences are increasingly available to support the hypothesis that failure of apoptosis may be an important factor in the evolution of colorectal cancer and its poor response to chemotherapy and radiation. The other reason for targeting apoptotic pathway in the treatment of cancer is based on the observation that this process is deregulated in cancer cells but not in normal cells. As a result, colorectal cancer therapies designed to stimulate apoptosis in target cells would play a critical role in controlling its development and progression. A better understanding of the apoptotic signaling pathways, and the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade apoptotic death might lead to effective therapeutic strategies to inhibit cancer cell proliferation with minimal toxicity and high responses to chemotherapy. In this review, we analyzed the current understanding and future promises of apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:27574550

  3. Emerging Therapeutic Strategies for Targeting Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    El Sabban, Maya; Mouteirik, Maha; Nasr, Rihab

    2013-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative disorder. Current targeted therapies designed to inhibit the tyrosine kinase activity of the BCR-ABL oncoprotein have made a significant breakthrough in the treatment of CML patients. However, CML remains a chronic disease that a patient must manage for life. Although tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) therapy has completely transformed the prognosis of CML, it has made the therapeutic management more complex. The interruption of TKI treatment results in early disease progression because it does not eliminate quiescent CML stem cells which remain a potential reservoir for disease relapse. This highlights the need to develop new therapeutic strategies for CML to achieve a permanent cure, and to allow TKI interruption. This review summarizes recent research done on alternative targeted therapies with a particular focus on some important signaling pathways (such as Alox5, Hedgehog, Wnt/b-catenin, autophagy, and PML) that have the potential to target CML stem cells and potentially provide cure for CML. PMID:23935640

  4. Therapeutic potential of targeting glucose metabolism in glioma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ichiro

    2014-11-01

    Glioblastoma is a highly lethal cancer. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) are potentially an attractive therapeutic target and eradication of GSCs may impact tumor growth and sensitize tumors to conventional therapies. The brain is one of the most metabolically active organs with glucose representing the most important, but not the only, source of energy and carbon. Like all other cancers, glioblastoma requires a continuous source of energy and molecular resources for new cell production with a preferential use of aerobic glycolysis, recognized as the Warburg effect. As selected metabolic nodes are amenable to therapeutic targeting, we observed that the Warburg effect may causally contribute to glioma heterogeneity. This Editorial summarizes recent studies that examine the relationship between GSCs and metabolism and briefly provides our views for the future directions. The ultimate goal is to establish a new concept by incorporating both the cellular hierarchical theory and the cellular evolution theory to explain tumor heterogeneity. Such concept may better elucidate the mechanisms of how tumors gain cellular and molecular complexity and guide us develop novel and effective targeted therapies.

  5. Therapeutically targeting mitochondrial redox signalling alleviates endothelial dysfunction in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Cathal; Kenny, Louise C.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant placentation generating placental oxidative stress is proposed to play a critical role in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Unfortunately, therapeutic trials of antioxidants have been uniformly disappointing. There is provisional evidence implicating mitochondrial dysfunction as a source of oxidative stress in preeclampsia. Here we provide evidence that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species mediates endothelial dysfunction and establish that directly targeting mitochondrial scavenging may provide a protective role. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to 3% plasma from women with pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia resulted in a significant decrease in mitochondrial function with a subsequent significant increase in mitochondrial superoxide generation compared to cells exposed to plasma from women with uncomplicated pregnancies. Real-time PCR analysis showed increased expression of inflammatory markers TNF-α, TLR-9 and ICAM-1 respectively in endothelial cells treated with preeclampsia plasma. MitoTempo is a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant, pre-treatment of cells with MitoTempo protected against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death. Furthermore MitoTempo significantly reduced mitochondrial superoxide production in cells exposed to preeclampsia plasma by normalising mitochondrial metabolism. MitoTempo significantly altered the inflammatory profile of plasma treated cells. These novel data support a functional role for mitochondrial redox signaling in modulating the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and identifies mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants as potential therapeutic candidates. PMID:27604418

  6. Therapeutics targeting persistent inflammation in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Machowska, Anna; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a condition intrinsically linked to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its other typical sequelae, such as acquired immune dysfunction, protein-energy wasting (PEW), and accelerated vascular aging that promote premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) and infections, the two leading causes of death in CKD patients. Inflammation is a major contributor to complications in CKD, and inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, correlate with underlying causes and consequences of the inflamed uremic phenotype, such as oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, CVD, PEW, and infections, and are sensitive and independent predictors of outcome in CKD. Therefore, inflammation appears to be a logical target for potential preventive and therapeutic interventions in patients with CKD. Putative anti-inflammatory therapy strategies aiming at preventing complications and improving outcomes in CKD span over several areas: (1) dealing with the source of inflammation (such as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal or periodontal disease and depression); (2) providing nonspecific immune modulatory effects by promoting healthy dietary habits and other lifestyle changes; (3) promoting increased use of recognized pharmacologic interventions that have pleiotropic effects; and, (4) introducing novel targeted anticytokine interventions. This review provides a brief update on inflammatory biomarkers and possible therapeutic approaches targeting inflammation and the uremic inflammatory milieu in patients with CKD.

  7. Novel clinical therapeutics targeting the epithelial to mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is implicated in many processes, ranging from tissue and organogenesis to cancer and metastatic spread. Understanding the key regulatory mechanisms and mediators within this process offers the opportunity to develop novel therapeutics with broad clinical applicability. To date, several components of EMT already are targeted using pharmacologic agents in fibrosis and cancer. As our knowledge of EMT continues to grow, the potential for novel therapeutics will also increase. This review focuses on the role of EMT both as a necessary part of development and a key player in disease progression, specifically the similarity in pathways used during both processes as targets for drug development. Also, the key role of the tumor microenvironment with EMT is outlined, focusing on both co-factors and cell types with the ability to modulate the progression of EMT in cancer and metastatic disease. Lastly, we discuss the current status of clinical therapies both in development and those progressed to clinical trial specifically targeting pathologic EMTs including small molecule inhibitors, non-coding RNAs, exogenous co-factors, and adjunctive therapies to current chemotherapeutics. PMID:25343018

  8. The Cockayne syndrome group B DNA repair protein as an anti-cancer target.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Mani, S; Kandimalla, E R; Yu, D; Agrawal, S; States, J C; Bregman, D B

    2001-12-01

    Cells from individuals with Cockayne syndrome (CS) have a defect in transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR), which rapidly corrects certain DNA lesions located on the transcribed strand of active genes. Despite this DNA repair defect, individuals with CS (of which there are two complementation groups, CSA and CSB) do not demonstrate an elevated incidence of cancer. Recently, we demonstrated that disruption of the CSB gene reduces the spontaneous tumor rate in cancer predisposed Ink4a/ARF-/- mice as well as causing their embryo fibroblasts to proliferate more slowly and be more sensitive to UV-induced apoptosis. In the present study we characterized phosphorothioate backbone antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AOs) that reduced the levels of CSB mRNA in A2780/CP70 ovarian carcinoma cells. The AOs caused the cells to proliferate more slowly and made them more sensitive to either cisplatin or oxaliplatin. The AOs also enhanced the cytotoxicity of hydrogen peroxide and gamma-radiation, both of which can induce oxidative DNA lesions, which are subject to TCR. The AOs did not potentiate the cytotoxicity of topotecan, which induces DNA strand breaks. Chemically modified () AOs (MBOs) targeting CSB were able to potentiate the anti-tumor effect of cisplatin against A2780/CP70 tumor xenografts formed in nude mice. The MBOs enabled a non-toxic (3 mg/kg) dose of cisplatin to have the same degree of anti-tumor efficacy as a more toxic (5 mg/kg) cisplatin dose. Collectively, these results suggest that the CSB gene product may be viewed as an anti-cancer target. PMID:11713576

  9. Increased Anticancer Efficacy of Intravesical Mitomycin C Therapy when Combined with a PCNA Targeting Peptide1

    PubMed Central

    Gederaas, Odrun A.; Søgaard, Caroline D.; Viset, Trond; Bachke, Siri; Bruheim, Per; Arum, Carl-Jørgen; Otterlei, Marit

    2014-01-01

    Non–muscle-invasive bladder cancers (NMIBCs) are tumors confined to the mucosa or the mucosa/submucosa. An important challenge in treatment of NMIBC is both high recurrence and high progression rates. Consequently, more efficacious intravesical treatment regimes are in demand. Inhibition of the cell’s DNA repair systems is a new promising strategy to improve cancer therapy, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a new promising target. PCNA is an essential scaffold protein in multiple cellular processes including DNA replication and repair. More than 200 proteins, many involved in stress responses, interact with PCNA through the AlkB homologue 2 PCNA-interacting motif (APIM), including several proteins directly or indirectly involved in repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). In this study, we targeted PCNA with a novel peptide drug containing the APIM sequence, ATX-101, to inhibit repair of the DNA damage introduced by the chemotherapeutics. A bladder cancer cell panel and two different orthotopic models of bladder cancer in rats, the AY-27 implantation model and the dietary BBN induction model, were applied. ATX-101 increased the anticancer efficacy of the ICL-inducing drug mitomycin C (MMC), as well as bleomycin and gemcitabine in all bladder cancer cell lines tested. Furthermore, we found that ATX-101 given intravesically in combination with MMC penetrated the bladder wall and further reduced the tumor growth in both the slow growing endogenously induced and the rapidly growing transplanted tumors. These results suggest that ATX-101 has the potential to improve the efficacy of current MMC treatment in NMIBC. PMID:25500092

  10. Targeted polymeric therapeutic nanoparticles: design, development and clinical translation†

    PubMed Central

    Kamaly, Nazila; Xiao, Zeyu; Valencia, Pedro M.; Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F.; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric materials have been used in a range of pharmaceutical and biotechnology products for more than 40 years. These materials have evolved from their earlier use as biodegradable products such as resorbable sutures, orthopaedic implants, macroscale and microscale drug delivery systems such as microparticles and wafers used as controlled drug release depots, to multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) capable of targeting, and controlled release of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. These newer generations of targeted and controlled release polymeric NPs are now engineered to navigate the complex in vivo environment, and incorporate functionalities for achieving target specificity, control of drug concentration and exposure kinetics at the tissue, cell, and subcellular levels. Indeed this optimization of drug pharmacology as aided by careful design of multifunctional NPs can lead to improved drug safety and efficacy, and may be complimentary to drug enhancements that are traditionally achieved by medicinal chemistry. In this regard, polymeric NPs have the potential to result in a highly differentiated new class of therapeutics, distinct from the original active drugs used in their composition, and distinct from first generation NPs that largely facilitated drug formulation. A greater flexibility in the design of drug molecules themselves may also be facilitated following their incorporation into NPs, as drug properties (solubility, metabolism, plasma binding, biodistribution, target tissue accumulation) will no longer be constrained to the same extent by drug chemical composition, but also become in-part the function of the physicochemical properties of the NP. The combination of optimally designed drugs with optimally engineered polymeric NPs opens up the possibility of improved clinical outcomes that may not be achievable with the administration of drugs in their conventional form. In this critical review, we aim to provide insights into the design and development

  11. Systems approaches to design of targeted therapeutic delivery

    PubMed Central

    Myerson, Jacob W.; Brenner, Jacob S.; Greineder, Colin F.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2016-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery aims to improve therapeutic effects and enable mechanisms that are not feasible for untargeted agents (e.g., due to impermeable biological barriers). To achieve targeting, a drug or its carrier should possess properties providing specific accumulation from circulation at the desired site. There are several examples of systems-inspired approaches that have been applied to achieve this goal. First, proteomics analysis of plasma membrane fraction of the vascular endothelium has identified a series of target molecules and their ligands (e.g., antibodies) that deliver conjugated cargoes to well-defined vascular cells and subcellular compartments. Second, selection of ligands binding to cells of interest using phage display libraries in vitro and in vivo has provided peptides and polypeptides that bind to normal and pathologically altered cells. Finally, large-scale high-throughput combinatorial synthesis and selection of lipid- and polymer-based nanocarriers varying their chemical components has yielded a series of carriers accumulating in diverse organs and delivering RNA interference agents to diverse cells. Together, these approaches offer a basis for systems-based design and selection of targets, targeting molecules, and targeting vehicles. Current studies focus on expanding the arsenal of these and alternative targeting strategies, devising drug delivery systems capitalizing on these strategies and evaluation of their benefit/risk ratio in adequate animal models of human diseases. These efforts, combined with better understanding of mechanisms and unintended consequences of these targeted interventions, need to be ultimately translated into industrial development and the clinical domain. PMID:25946066

  12. Therapeutic targeting of liver inflammation and fibrosis by nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Warzecha, Klaudia Theresa; Tacke, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Nanomedicine constitutes the emerging field of medical applications for nanotechnology such as nanomaterial-based drug delivery systems. This technology may hold exceptional potential for novel therapeutic approaches to liver diseases. The specific and unspecific targeting of macrophages, hepatic stellate cells (HSC), hepatocytes, and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) using nanomedicine has been developed and tested in preclinical settings. These four major cell types in the liver are crucially involved in the complex sequence of events that occurs during the initiation and maintenance of liver inflammation and fibrosis. Targeting different cell types can be based on their capacity to ingest surrounding material, endocytosis, and specificity for a single cell type can be achieved by targeting characteristic structures such as receptors, sugar moieties or peptide sequences. Macrophages and especially the liver-resident Kupffer cells are in the focus of nanomedicine due to their highly efficient and unspecific uptake of most nanomaterials as well as due to their critical pathogenic functions during inflammation and fibrogenesis. The mannose receptor enables targeting macrophages in liver disease, but macrophages can also become activated by certain nanomaterials, such as peptide-modified gold nanorods (AuNRs) that render them proinflammatory. HSC, the main collagen-producing cells during fibrosis, are currently targeted using nanoconstructs that recognize the mannose 6-phosphate and insulin-like growth factor II, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor 1, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor β, or integrins. Targeting of the major liver parenchymal cell, the hepatocyte, has only recently been achieved with high specificity by mimicking apolipoproteins, naturally occurring nanoparticles of the body. LSEC were found to be targeted most efficiently using carboxy-modified micelles and their integrin receptors. This review will summarize important

  13. Therapeutic targeting of liver inflammation and fibrosis by nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Bartneck, Matthias; Warzecha, Klaudia Theresa; Tacke, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Nanomedicine constitutes the emerging field of medical applications for nanotechnology such as nanomaterial-based drug delivery systems. This technology may hold exceptional potential for novel therapeutic approaches to liver diseases. The specific and unspecific targeting of macrophages, hepatic stellate cells (HSC), hepatocytes, and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) using nanomedicine has been developed and tested in preclinical settings. These four major cell types in the liver are crucially involved in the complex sequence of events that occurs during the initiation and maintenance of liver inflammation and fibrosis. Targeting different cell types can be based on their capacity to ingest surrounding material, endocytosis, and specificity for a single cell type can be achieved by targeting characteristic structures such as receptors, sugar moieties or peptide sequences. Macrophages and especially the liver-resident Kupffer cells are in the focus of nanomedicine due to their highly efficient and unspecific uptake of most nanomaterials as well as due to their critical pathogenic functions during inflammation and fibrogenesis. The mannose receptor enables targeting macrophages in liver disease, but macrophages can also become activated by certain nanomaterials, such as peptide-modified gold nanorods (AuNRs) that render them proinflammatory. HSC, the main collagen-producing cells during fibrosis, are currently targeted using nanoconstructs that recognize the mannose 6-phosphate and insulin-like growth factor II, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor 1, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor β, or integrins. Targeting of the major liver parenchymal cell, the hepatocyte, has only recently been achieved with high specificity by mimicking apolipoproteins, naturally occurring nanoparticles of the body. LSEC were found to be targeted most efficiently using carboxy-modified micelles and their integrin receptors. This review will summarize important

  14. Cholesterol catabolism as a therapeutic target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Hugues; Johnston, Jonathan B.; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is an intracellular pathogen that infects 10 million worldwide and kills 2 million people every year. The uptake and utilization of nutrients by Mtb within the host cell is still poorly understood, although lipids play an important role in Mtb persistence. The recent identification of a large regulon of cholesterol catabolic genes suggests that Mtb can use host sterol for infection and persistence. In this review, we report on recent progress in elucidation of the Mtb cholesterol catabolic reactions and their potential utility as targets for tuberculosis therapeutic agents. PMID:21924910

  15. Candidate genes and potential targets for therapeutics in Wilms' tumour.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Christopher; Coppes, Max J; Narendran, Aru

    2010-09-01

    Wilms' tumour (WT) is the most common malignant renal tumour of childhood. During the past two decades or so, molecular studies carried out on biopsy specimens and tumour-derived cell lines have identified a multitude of chromosomal and epigenetic alterations in WT. In addition, a significant amount of evidence has been gathered to identify the genes and signalling pathways that play a defining role in its genesis, growth, survival and treatment responsiveness. As such, these molecules and mechanisms constitute potential targets for novel therapeutic strategies for refractory WT. In this report we aim to review some of the many candidate genes and intersecting pathways that underlie the complexities of WT biology.

  16. T cells as a therapeutic target in SLE

    PubMed Central

    Comte, Denis; Karampetsou, Maria P.; Tsokos, George C.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by a loss of tolerance to multiple endogenous antigens. SLE etiology remains largely unknown, despite recent insight into the immunopathogenesis of the disease. T cells are important in the development of the disease by amplifying the immune response and contributing to organ damage. Aberrant signaling, cytokine secretion and tissue homing displayed by SLE T cells have been extensively studied and the underlying pathogenic molecular mechanisms are starting to be elucidated. T-cell targeted treatments are being explored in SLE patients. This review is an update on the T-cell abnormalities and related therapeutic options in SLE. PMID:25801878

  17. Oxidative Stress in Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Sources, Mechanisms, and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin; Tao, Chuanyuan; Gan, Qi; Zheng, Jun; Li, Hao; You, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is associated with the highest mortality and morbidity despite only constituting approximately 10–15% of all strokes. Complex underlying mechanisms consisting of cytotoxic, excitotoxic, and inflammatory effects of intraparenchymal blood are responsible for its highly damaging effects. Oxidative stress (OS) also plays an important role in brain injury after ICH but attracts less attention than other factors. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that the metabolite axis of hemoglobin-heme-iron is the key contributor to oxidative brain damage after ICH, although other factors, such as neuroinflammation and prooxidases, are involved. This review will discuss the sources, possible molecular mechanisms, and potential therapeutic targets of OS in ICH. PMID:26843907

  18. Brain Arteriovenous Malformation Modeling, Pathogenesis and Novel Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanqiu; Choi, Eun-Jung; McDougall, Cameron M.; Su, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Patients harboring brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM) are at life-threatening risk of rupture and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). The pathogenesis of bAVM has not been completely understood. Current treatment options are invasive and ≈ 20% of patients are not offered interventional therapy because of excessive treatment risk. There are no specific medical therapies to treat bAVMs. The lack of validated animal models has been an obstacle for testing hypotheses of bAVM pathogenesis and testing new therapies. In this review, we summarize bAVM model development; and bAVM pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets that have been identified during model development. PMID:24723256

  19. Inflammatory bowel disease: exploring gut pathophysiology for novel therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vipul; Varum, Felipe; Bravo, Roberto; Furrer, Esther; Bojic, Daniela; Basit, Abdul W

    2016-10-01

    Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are the 2 major phenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which are influenced by a complex interplay of immunological and genetic elements, though the precise etiology still remains unknown. With IBD developing into a globally prevailing disease, there is a need to explore new targets and a thorough understanding of the pathophysiological differences between the healthy and diseased gut could unearth new therapeutic opportunities. In this review, we provide an overview of the major aspects of IBD pathogenesis and thereafter present a comprehensive analysis of the gut pathophysiology leading to a discussion on some of the most promising targets and biologic therapies currently being explored. These include various gut proteins (CXCL-10, GATA-3, NKG2D, CD98, microRNAs), immune cells recruited to the gut (mast cells, eosinophils, toll-like receptors 2, 4), dysregulated proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6, -13, -18, -21), and commensal microbiota (probiotics and fecal microbiota transplantation). We also evaluate some of the emerging nonconventional therapies being explored in IBD treatment focusing on the latest developments in stem cell research, oral targeting of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue, novel anti-inflammatory signaling pathway targeting, adenosine deaminase inhibition, and the beneficial effects of antioxidant and nutraceutical therapies. In addition, we highlight the growth of biologics and their targets in IBD by providing information on the preclinical and clinical development of over 60 biopharmaceuticals representing the state of the art in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease drug development. PMID:27220087

  20. Chlorotoxin-conjugated graphene oxide for targeted delivery of an anticancer drug.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Gu, Wei; Xiao, Ning; Ye, Ling; Xu, Qunyuan

    2014-01-01

    Current chemotherapy for glioma is rarely satisfactory due to low therapeutic efficiency and systemic side effects. We have developed a glioma-targeted drug delivery system based on graphene oxide. Targeted peptide chlorotoxin-conjugated graphene oxide (CTX-GO) sheets were successfully synthesized and characterized. Doxorubicin was loaded onto CTX-GO (CTX-GO/DOX) with high efficiency (570 mg doxorubicin per gram CTX-GO) via noncovalent interactions. Doxorubicin release was pH-dependent and showed sustained-release properties. Cytotoxicity experiments demonstrated that CTX-GO/DOX mediated the highest rate of death of glioma cells compared with free doxorubicin or graphene oxide loaded with doxorubicin only. Further, conjugation with chlorotoxin enhanced accumulation of doxorubicin within glioma cells. These findings indicate that CTX-GO is a promising platform for drug delivery and provide a rationale for developing a glioma-specific drug delivery system.

  1. Pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics: role of mutational analysis in anti-cancer targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Savonarola, A; Palmirotta, R; Guadagni, F; Silvestris, F

    2012-08-01

    The goal of cancer pharmacogenomics is to obtain benefit from personalized approaches of cancer treatment and prevention. Recent advances in genomic research have shed light on the crucial role of genetic variants, mainly involving genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes, drug transporters and targets, in driving different treatment responses among individuals, in terms of therapeutic efficacy and safety. Although a considerable amount of new targeted agents have been designed based on a finely understanding of molecular alterations in cancer, a wide gap between pharmacogenomic knowledge and clinical application still persists. This review focuses on the relevance of mutational analyses in predicting individual response to antitumor therapy, in order to improve the translational impact of genetic information on clinical practice.

  2. Delivery of Therapeutic RNAs Into Target Cells IN VIVO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Mei Ying; Hagen, Thilo

    2014-02-01

    RNA-based therapy is one of the most promising approaches to treat human diseases. Specifically, the use of short interfering RNA (siRNA) siRNA and microRNA (miRNA) mimics for in vivo RNA interference has immense potential as it directly lowers the expression of the therapeutic target protein. However, there are a number of major roadblocks to the successful implementation of siRNA and other RNA based therapies in the clinic. These include the instability of RNAs in vivo and the difficulty to efficiently deliver the RNA into the target cells. Hence, various innovative approaches have been taken over the years to develop effective RNA delivery methods. These methods include liposome-, polymeric nanoparticle- and peptide-mediated cellular delivery. In a recent innovative study, bioengineered bacterial outer membrane vesicles were used as vehicles for effective delivery of siRNA into cells in vivo.

  3. In Search of New Therapeutic Targets in Obesity Treatment: Sirtuins

    PubMed Central

    Kurylowicz, Alina

    2016-01-01

    Most of the available non-invasive medical therapies for obesity are non-efficient in a long-term evaluation; therefore there is a constant need for new methods of treatment. Research on calorie restriction has led to the discovery of sirtuins (silent information regulators, SIRTs), enzymes regulating different cellular pathways that may constitute potential targets in the treatment of obesity. This review paper presents the role of SIRTs in the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism as well as in the differentiation of adipocytes. How disturbances of SIRTs’ expression and activity may lead to the development of obesity and related complications is discussed. A special emphasis is placed on polymorphisms in genes encoding SIRTs and their possible association with susceptibility to obesity and metabolic complications, as well as on data regarding altered expression of SIRTs in human obesity. Finally, the therapeutic potential of SIRTs-targeted strategies in the treatment of obesity and related disorders is discussed. PMID:27104517

  4. Targeting protozoan parasite metabolism: glycolytic enzymes in the therapeutic crosshairs.

    PubMed

    Harris, M T; Mitchell, W G; Morris, J C

    2014-01-01

    Glycolysis is an important metabolic pathway for most organisms, including protozoan parasites. Many of these primitive eukaryotes have streamlined their metabolism, favoring glycolysis for generating ATP in the glucose-rich environments in which they reside. Therefore, the enzymes involved in hexose metabolism could prove to be attractive targets for therapeutic development. This hypothesis is supported by a number of chemical and genetic validation studies. Additionally, the peculiar biochemistry of many of the components, along with limited protein sequence identity emphasizes the likelihood of developing compounds that selectively inhibit the parasite enzymes. In this review, we examine the status of target validation at the genetic and/or chemical levels from the protozoan parasites. While the proteins from some species have been interrogated to the point that well-defined lead compounds have been identified with activities against both enzyme and parasite growth, progress in other systems has to date been limited.

  5. Neuronal and Cardiovascular Potassium Channels as Therapeutic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Edward S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Potassium (K+) channels, with their diversity, often tissue-defined distribution, and critical role in controlling cellular excitability, have long held promise of being important drug targets for the treatment of dysrhythmias in the heart and abnormal neuronal activity within the brain. With the exception of drugs that target one particular class, ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels, very few selective K+ channel activators or inhibitors are currently licensed for clinical use in cardiovascular and neurological disease. Here we review what a range of human genetic disorders have told us about the role of specific K+ channel subunits, explore the potential of activators and inhibitors of specific channel populations as a therapeutic strategy, and discuss possible reasons for the difficulty in designing clinically relevant K+ channel modulators. PMID:26303307

  6. Therapeutic anticancer efficacy of a synthetic diazonamide analog in the absence of overt toxicity.

    PubMed

    Williams, Noelle S; Burgett, Anthony W G; Atkins, Ashley S; Wang, Xiaodong; Harran, Patrick G; McKnight, Steven L

    2007-02-13

    Blocking cell division through the inhibition of mitosis is one of the most successful clinical strategies for the treatment of cancer. Taxanes and vinca alkaloids are in widespread use and have demonstrated substantive therapeutic efficacy. Both classes of compounds bind directly to tubulin, a structural component of the mitotic spindle. The ubiquitous utilization of tubulin in cell division in both cancerous and normal cells, however, tempers the broad spectrum of activity of currently used antimitotics by significant toxicities in normal dividing tissue. Moreover, peripheral nerve cells that rely on microtubules to shuttle cargo along axonal processes are also damaged by tubulin-binding drugs. Thus, neutropenia and peripheral neuropathy are the most frequently cited dose-limiting toxicities of this class of chemotherapeutics. Here we report the preclinical assessment of AB-5, a structural and functional analog of the natural product diazonamide A. AB-5, like taxanes and vinca alkaloids, blocks cell division during mitosis. However, AB-5 works not by binding tubulin but rather through inhibition of a newly discovered role for ornithine-delta-aminotransferase in mitosis. We hereby report that, unlike other antimitotics, AB-5 is extremely well tolerated by mice when administered under conditions where the drug cures xenografted tumors as effectively as taxanes and vinca alkaloids. AB-5-treated mice show no weight loss, no change in overall physical appearance, and no evidence of neutropenia. These observations raise the possibility that AB-5 may have clinical utility for cancer therapy under conditions largely devoid of chemotherapeutic toxicity and suggest that further preclinical evaluation of AB-5 is warranted. PMID:17287337

  7. Self-Targeted, Shape-Assisted, and Controlled-Release Self-Delivery Nanodrug for Synergistic Targeting/Anticancer Effect of Cytoplasm and Nucleus of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Lin, Jinyan; Huang, Yu; Li, Yanxiu; Yang, Xiangrui; Wu, Hongjie; Wu, Shichao; Xie, Liya; Dai, Lizong; Hou, Zhenqing

    2015-11-25

    We constructed 10-hydroxycamptothecin (CPT) "nanodrugs" with functionalization of lipid-PEG-methotrexate (MTX) to prepare high-drug-loaded, and sustained/controlled-release MTX-PEG-CPT nanorods (NRs), in which MTX drug itself can serve as a specific "targeting ligand". The self-targeted nanodrug can codeliver both CPT and MTX drugs with distinct anticancer mechanisms. Furthermore, MTX-PEG-CPT NRs significantly reduced burst release, improved blood circulation and tumor accumulation, enhanced cellular uptake, and synergistically increased anticancer effect against tumor cells compared with MTX-PEG-CPT nanospheres (NSs) and either both free drugs or individual free drug. Therefore, the synergistic targeting/therapeuticy nano-multi-drug codelivery assisted by shape design may advantageously offer a promising new strategy for nanomedicine.

  8. Macrophages: an elusive yet emerging therapeutic target of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, R L; Singh, V; Barthwal, M K

    2008-07-01

    Macrophages are central to the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and thus can be very appropriate targets for therapy. Cell adhesion molecules mediating monocytes recruitment to the endothelium are attractive therapy targets and their inhibitors are in clinical trials. Macrophage scavenger receptors like SR-A and CD-36 mediate foam cell formation by facilitating the uptake of modified lipids. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), liver X receptor (LXR)-mediated signaling, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) induced phosphorylation events seem to play an important role in this phenomenon. Proteins affecting macrophage cholesterol metabolism and transport, including ATP-binding cassette (ABC) A1, ABCG1, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), apolipoprotein A-1 (ApoA-1), neutral cholesteryl ester hydrolase (NCEH) also regulate foam cell formation and are being developed as therapeutic targets by many pharmaceutical companies. Macrophage proliferation and apoptosis are important events controlling inflammatory response, plaque vulnerability, and destabilization. Free cholesterol (FC) activates the macrophage endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway and apoptosis. Free radicals and nitric oxide also modulate macrophage foam cell formation and apoptosis. Various antioxidants like AGI-1067 and BO-653 are in clinical trials for atherosclerosis treatment. Macrophage matrix metalloproteinase's (MMP's) play a significant role in weakening and rupture of plaques. Efforts are on to develop isoform specific MMP inhibitor. CD-14, MMP-3, ABCA1, Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4), lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), arachidonate lipoxygenase-15 (ALOX-15), and Connexin37 polymorphisms and macrophage dysfunction signify their importance in atherosclerosis. Deciphering the role of macrophages in regulating dyslipidemia and inflammation during atherosclerosis is important for developing them as therapeutic targets. PMID

  9. Bone marrow endothelium-targeted therapeutics for metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mai, Junhua; Huang, Yi; Mu, Chaofeng; Zhang, Guodong; Xu, Rong; Guo, Xiaojing; Xia, Xiaojun; Volk, David E; Lokesh, Ganesh L; Thiviyanathan, Varatharasa; Gorenstein, David G; Liu, Xuewu; Ferrari, Mauro; Shen, Haifa

    2014-08-10

    Effective treatment of cancer metastasis to the bone relies on bone marrow drug accumulation. The surface proteins in the bone marrow vascular endothelium provide docking sites for targeted drug delivery. We have developed a thioaptamer that specifically binds to E-selectin that is overexpressed in the vasculature of tumor and inflammatory tissues. In this study, we tested targeted delivery of therapeutic siRNA loaded in the E-selectin thioaptamer-conjugated multistage vector (ESTA-MSV) drug carrier to bone marrow for the treatment of breast cancer bone metastasis. We evaluated tumor type- and tumor growth stage-dependent targeting in mice bearing metastatic breast cancer in the bone, and carried out studies to identify factors that determine targeting efficiency. In a subsequent study, we delivered siRNA to knock down expression of the human STAT3 gene in murine xenograft models of human MDA-MB-231 breast tumor, and assessed therapeutic efficacy. Our studies revealed that the CD31(+)E-selectin(+) population accounted for 20.8%, 26.4% and 29.9% of total endothelial cells respectively inside the femur of mice bearing early, middle and late stage metastatic MDA-MB-231 tumors. In comparison, the double positive cells remained at a basal level in mice with early stage MCF-7 tumors, and jumped to 23.9% and 28.2% when tumor growth progressed to middle and late stages. Accumulation of ESTA-MSV inside the bone marrow correlated with the E-selectin expression pattern. There was up to 5-fold enrichment of the targeted MSV in the bone marrow of mice bearing early or late stage MDA-MB-231 tumors and of mice with late stage, but not early stage, MCF-7 tumors. Targeted delivery of STAT3 siRNA in ESTA-MSV resulted in knockdown of STAT3 expression in 48.7% of cancer cells inside the bone marrow. Weekly systemic administration of ESTA-MSV/STAT3 siRNA significantly extended survival of mice with MDA-MB-231 bone metastasis. In conclusion, targeting the overexpressed E

  10. Combinatorial high-throughput experimental and bioinformatic approach identifies molecular pathways linked with the sensitivity to anticancer target drugs

    PubMed Central

    Venkova, Larisa; Aliper, Alexander; Suntsova, Maria; Kholodenko, Roman; Shepelin, Denis; Borisov, Nicolas; Malakhova, Galina; Vasilov, Raif; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Effective choice of anticancer drugs is important problem of modern medicine. We developed a method termed OncoFinder for the analysis of new type of biomarkers reflecting activation of intracellular signaling and metabolic molecular pathways. These biomarkers may be linked with the sensitivity to anticancer drugs. In this study, we compared the experimental data obtained in our laboratory and in the Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer (GDS) project for testing response to anticancer drugs and transcriptomes of various human cell lines. The microarray-based profiling of transcriptomes was performed for the cell lines before the addition of drugs to the medium, and experimental growth inhibition curves were built for each drug, featuring characteristic IC50 values. We assayed here four target drugs - Pazopanib, Sorafenib, Sunitinib and Temsirolimus, and 238 different cell lines, of which 11 were profiled in our laboratory and 227 - in GDS project. Using the OncoFinder-processed transcriptomic data on ∼600 molecular pathways, we identified pathways showing significant correlation between pathway activation strength (PAS) and IC50 values for these drugs. Correlations reflect relationships between response to drug and pathway activation features. We intersected the results and found molecular pathways significantly correlated in both our assay and GDS project. For most of these pathways, we generated molecular models of their interaction with known molecular target(s) of the respective drugs. For the first time, our study uncovered mechanisms underlying cancer cell response to drugs at the high-throughput molecular interactomic level. PMID:26317900

  11. Combinatorial high-throughput experimental and bioinformatic approach identifies molecular pathways linked with the sensitivity to anticancer target drugs.

    PubMed

    Venkova, Larisa; Aliper, Alexander; Suntsova, Maria; Kholodenko, Roman; Shepelin, Denis; Borisov, Nicolas; Malakhova, Galina; Vasilov, Raif; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-09-29

    Effective choice of anticancer drugs is important problem of modern medicine. We developed a method termed OncoFinder for the analysis of new type of biomarkers reflecting activation of intracellular signaling and metabolic molecular pathways. These biomarkers may be linked with the sensitivity to anticancer drugs. In this study, we compared the experimental data obtained in our laboratory and in the Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer (GDS) project for testing response to anticancer drugs and transcriptomes of various human cell lines. The microarray-based profiling of transcriptomes was performed for the cell lines before the addition of drugs to the medium, and experimental growth inhibition curves were built for each drug, featuring characteristic IC50 values. We assayed here four target drugs - Pazopanib, Sorafenib, Sunitinib and Temsirolimus, and 238 different cell lines, of which 11 were profiled in our laboratory and 227 - in GDS project. Using the OncoFinder-processed transcriptomic data on ~600 molecular pathways, we identified pathways showing significant correlation between pathway activation strength (PAS) and IC50 values for these drugs. Correlations reflect relationships between response to drug and pathway activation features. We intersected the results and found molecular pathways significantly correlated in both our assay and GDS project. For most of these pathways, we generated molecular models of their interaction with known molecular target(s) of the respective drugs. For the first time, our study uncovered mechanisms underlying cancer cell response to drugs at the high-throughput molecular interactomic level. PMID:26317900

  12. Anticancer activity of Panax notoginseng extract 20(S)-25-OCH3-PPD: Targetting beta-catenin signalling.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiuli; Zhao, Yuqing; Fang, Wenfeng; Yang, Wancai

    2009-11-01

    1. The Wnt/beta-catenin pathway plays a critical role in carcinogenesis and so agents that target Wnt/beta-catenin may have potential in cancer prevention and therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anticancer activity of the novel natural product dammarane-type triterpene sapogenin (20(S)-25-OCH3-PPD; PPD25) isolated from the leaves of Panax notoginseng. 2. The anticancer activity of PPD25 was evaluated in three colon cancer cell lines and in one lung cancer cell line. The effects of PPD25 to inhibit proliferation and to induce apoptosis were evaluated. In addition, the potential mechanisms underlying the effects of PPD25 were investigated. 3. It was found that the addition of 5 or 25 micromol/L PPD25 to the culture medium significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in all four cancer cell lines. Mechanistic studies revealed that PPD25 significantly reduced the expression of beta-catenin, a key mediator in the Wnt pathway, as well as transcriptional targets of beta-catenin, namely c-myc, cyclin D1, cdk4 and T cell factor (TCF)-4. In addition, beta-catenin/TCF transcriptional activity was significantly suppressed by PPD25. 4. The data demonstrate that the PPD25 exerts its anticancer effect by targetting beta-catenin signalling, suggesting that PPD25 may have potential as a chemotherapeutic and/or chemopreventive agent for colon and lung cancer. PMID:19413587

  13. Stromal Fibroblast in Age-Related Cancer: Role in Tumorigenesis and Potential as Novel Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Elkhattouti, Abdelouahid; Hassan, Mohamed; Gomez, Christian R.

    2015-01-01

    Incidence of most common cancers increases with age due to accumulation of damage to cells and tissues. Stroma, the structure close to the basement membrane, is gaining increased attention from clinicians and researchers due to its increasingly, yet incompletely understood role in the development of age-related cancer. With advanced age, stroma generates a pro-tumorigenic microenvironment, exemplified by the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Components of the SASP, such as cytokines, chemokines, and high energy metabolites are main drivers of age-related cancer initiation and sustain its progression. Our purpose is to provide insight into the mechanistic role of the stroma, with particular emphasis on stromal fibroblasts, on the development of age-related tumors. We also present evidence of the potential of the stroma as target for tumor therapy. Likewise, a rationale for age-related antitumor therapy targeting the stroma is presented. We expect to foster debate on the underlining basis of age-related cancer pathobiology. We also would like to promote discussion on novel stroma-based anticancer therapeutic strategies tailored to treat the elderly. PMID:26284191

  14. Chaperonopathies and chaperonotherapy. Hsp60 as therapeutic target in cancer: potential benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Cappello, Francesco; Angileri, Francesca; de Macario, Everly Conway; Macario, Alberto J L

    2013-01-01

    In this minireview we focus on Hsp60 as a target for anticancer therapy. We discuss the new concepts of chaperonopathies and chaperonotherapy and present information on Hsp60 localization in the cell membrane of human tumor cells. We describe novel mechanisms for Hsp60 reaching the extracellular environment that involve membrane-associated stages, as well as data on anti-Hsp60 antibodies found in human sera, both in normal subjects and patients affected by autoimmune diseases. Finally, we discuss possible therapeutic applications of anti-Hsp60 antibodies in cancer treatment, evaluating also side effects on non-tumor cells. In conclusion, the way for investigating Hsp60-targeted anti-tumor therapy is open, at least for those tumors that express Hsp60 on its surface and/or secrete it outside the cell, as is the search for the molecular mechanisms involved in Hsp60 translocation from cytosol to cell membrane: elucidation of this mechanism will greatly facilitate the optimization of chaperonotherapy centered on Hsp60 with anti-tumor efficacy and minimal side effects.

  15. Stromal Fibroblast in Age-Related Cancer: Role in Tumorigenesis and Potential as Novel Therapeutic Target.

    PubMed

    Elkhattouti, Abdelouahid; Hassan, Mohamed; Gomez, Christian R

    2015-01-01

    Incidence of most common cancers increases with age due to accumulation of damage to cells and tissues. Stroma, the structure close to the basement membrane, is gaining increased attention from clinicians and researchers due to its increasingly, yet incompletely understood role in the development of age-related cancer. With advanced age, stroma generates a pro-tumorigenic microenvironment, exemplified by the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Components of the SASP, such as cytokines, chemokines, and high energy metabolites are main drivers of age-related cancer initiation and sustain its progression. Our purpose is to provide insight into the mechanistic role of the stroma, with particular emphasis on stromal fibroblasts, on the development of age-related tumors. We also present evidence of the potential of the stroma as target for tumor therapy. Likewise, a rationale for age-related antitumor therapy targeting the stroma is presented. We expect to foster debate on the underlining basis of age-related cancer pathobiology. We also would like to promote discussion on novel stroma-based anticancer therapeutic strategies tailored to treat the elderly. PMID:26284191

  16. Endocannabinoid System: A Multi-Facet Therapeutic Target.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Rimplejeet; Ambwani, Sneha R; Singh, Surjit

    2016-01-01

    the therapeutic targets for both cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists. One challenge is to develop drugs that target only cannabinoid receptors in a particular tissue and another is to invent drugs that act selectively on cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood brain barrier. Besides this, development of the suitable dosage forms with maximum efficacy and minimum adverse effects is also warranted. Another angle to be introspected for therapeutic abilities of this group of drugs is non-CB1 and non-CB2 receptor targets for cannabinoids. In order to successfully exploit the therapeutic potential of endocannabinoid system, it is imperative to further characterize the endocannabinoid system in terms of identification of the exact cellular location of cannabinoid receptors and their role as "protective" and "disease inducing substance", time-dependent changes in the expression of cannabinoid receptors.

  17. Endocannabinoid System: A Multi-Facet Therapeutic Target.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Rimplejeet; Ambwani, Sneha R; Singh, Surjit

    2016-01-01

    the therapeutic targets for both cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists. One challenge is to develop drugs that target only cannabinoid receptors in a particular tissue and another is to invent drugs that act selectively on cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood brain barrier. Besides this, development of the suitable dosage forms with maximum efficacy and minimum adverse effects is also warranted. Another angle to be introspected for therapeutic abilities of this group of drugs is non-CB1 and non-CB2 receptor targets for cannabinoids. In order to successfully exploit the therapeutic potential of endocannabinoid system, it is imperative to further characterize the endocannabinoid system in terms of identification of the exact cellular location of cannabinoid receptors and their role as "protective" and "disease inducing substance", time-dependent changes in the expression of cannabinoid receptors. PMID:27086601

  18. Carcinoma-Associated Fibroblasts Are a Promising Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Togo, Shinsaku; Polanska, Urszula M.; Horimoto, Yoshiya; Orimo, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Human carcinomas frequently exhibit significant stromal reactions such as the so-called “desmoplastic stroma” or “reactive stroma”, which is characterised by the existence of large numbers of stromal cells and extracellular matrix proteins. Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), which are rich in activated fibroblast populations exemplified by myofibroblasts, are among the predominant cell types present within the tumour-associated stroma. Increased numbers of stromal myofibroblasts are often associated with high-grade malignancies with poor prognoses in humans. CAF myofibroblasts possess abilities to promote primary tumour development, growth and progression by stimulating the processes of neoangiogenesis as well as tumour cell proliferation, survival, migration and invasion. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that CAFs serve as a niche supporting the metastatic colonisation of disseminated carcinoma cells in distant organs. Their contribution to primary and secondary malignancies makes these fibroblasts a potential therapeutic target and they also appear to be relevant to the development of drug resistance and tumour recurrence. This review summarises our current knowledge of tumour-promoting CAFs and discusses the therapeutic feasibility of targeting these cells as well as disrupting heterotypic interactions with other cell types in tumours that may improve the efficacy of current anti-tumour therapies. PMID:24216702

  19. Functional differentiation of cytotoxic cancer drugs and targeted cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Gian C; Barle, Ester Lovsin; Galati, Giuseppe; Kluwe, William M

    2014-10-01

    There is no nationally or internationally binding definition of the term "cytotoxic drug" although this term is used in a variety of regulations for pharmaceutical development and manufacturing of drugs as well as in regulations for protecting medical personnel from occupational exposure in pharmacy, hospital, and other healthcare settings. The term "cytotoxic drug" is frequently used as a synonym for any and all oncology or antineoplastic drugs. Pharmaceutical companies generate and receive requests for assessments of the potential hazards of drugs regularly - including cytotoxicity. This publication is intended to provide functional definitions that help to differentiate between generically-cytotoxic cancer drugs of significant risk to normal human tissues, and targeted cancer therapeutics that pose much lesser risks. Together with specific assessments, it provides comprehensible guidance on how to assess the relevant properties of cancer drugs, and how targeted therapeutics discriminate between cancer and normal cells. The position of several regulatory agencies in the long-term is clearly to regulate all drugs regardless of classification, according to scientific risk based data. Despite ongoing discussions on how to replace the term "cytotoxic drugs" in current regulations, it is expected that its use will continue for the near future.

  20. Genetic determinants and potential therapeutic targets for pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Reznik, Robert; Hendifar, Andrew E.; Tuli, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in both men and women in the United States, carrying a 5-year survival rate of approximately 5%, which is the poorest prognosis of any solid tumor type. Given the dismal prognosis associated with PDAC, a more thorough understanding of risk factors and genetic predisposition has important implications not only for cancer prevention, but also for screening techniques and the development of personalized therapies. While screening of the general population is not recommended or practicable with current diagnostic methods, studies are ongoing to evaluate its usefulness in people with at least 5- to 10-fold increased risk of PDAC. In order to help identify high-risk populations who would be most likely to benefit from early detection screening tests for pancreatic cancer, discovery of additional pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes is crucial. Thus, specific gene-based, gene-product, and marker-based testing for the early detection of pancreatic cancer are currently being developed, with the potential for these to be useful as potential therapeutic targets as well. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the genetic basis for PDAC with a focus on germline and familial determinants. A discussion of potential therapeutic targets and future directions in screening and treatment is also provided. PMID:24624093

  1. [Interleukin-17 as a therapeutic target in psoriasis].

    PubMed

    Torres, Tiago; Filipe, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory disease that affects up to 1-3% of the general population. An advanced understanding of the immune-pathogenesis of psoriasis has led to the development of new drugs that refine existing treatments or target novel molecular and immunologic pathways. IL-17 and Th17 cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune and immune-mediated disorders, including psoriasis. IL-17A, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, is produced by Th17 cells along with other effector cytokines, such as IL-17F an IL-22, but it is also expressed by other cells of the innate immune system, including mast cells, neutrophils or dendritic cells, that are found in psoriatic lesions. For this reason IL-17 has emerged as an attractive therapeutic target. Agents that inhibit IL-17 are in development and preliminary clinical results are promising, confirming the importance of IL-17 in psoriasis pathophysiology. Their selective intervention in the immune system makes them an attractive therapeutic approach to autoimmune diseases, particularly psoriasis, being possible that in the near future these novel therapies could be a valid alternative for currently available biologic agents.

  2. Alveolar bone loss: mechanisms, potential therapeutic targets, and interventions.

    PubMed

    Intini, G; Katsuragi, Y; Kirkwood, K L; Yang, S

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews recent research into mechanisms underlying bone resorption and highlights avenues of investigation that may generate new therapies to combat alveolar bone loss in periodontitis. Several proteins, signaling pathways, stem cells, and dietary supplements are discussed as they relate to periodontal bone loss and regeneration. RGS12 is a crucial protein that mediates osteoclastogenesis and bone destruction, and a potential therapeutic target. RGS12 likely regulates osteoclast differentiation through regulating calcium influx to control the calcium oscillation-NFATc1 pathway. A working model for RGS10 and RGS12 in the regulation of Ca(2+) oscillations during osteoclast differentiation is proposed. Initiation of inflammation depends on host cell-microbe interactions, including the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Oral p38 inhibitors reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone destruction in a rat periodontitis model but showed unsatisfactory safety profiles. The p38 substrate MK2 is a more specific therapeutic target with potentially superior tolerability. Furthermore, MKP-1 shows anti-inflammatory activity, reducing inflammatory cytokine biosynthesis and bone resorption. Multipotent skeletal stem cell (SSC) populations exist within the bone marrow and periosteum of long bones. These bone-marrow-derived SSCs and periosteum-derived SSCs have shown therapeutic potential in several applications, including bone and periodontal regeneration. The existence of craniofacial bone-specific SSCs is suggested based on existing studies. The effects of calcium, vitamin D, and soy isoflavone supplementation on alveolar and skeletal bone loss in post-menopausal women were investigated. Supplementation resulted in stabilization of forearm bone mass density and a reduced rate of alveolar bone loss over 1 yr, compared with placebo. Periodontal attachment levels were also well-maintained and alveolar bone loss suppressed during 24 wk of

  3. Cancer stem cells niche: a target for novel cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Yi, Shan-Yong; Hao, Yi-Bin; Nan, Ke-Jun; Fan, Tian-Li

    2013-05-01

    Nowadays, cancer has been a frequent disease, and the first or second most common cause of death worldwide. Despite a better understanding of the biology of cancer cells, the therapy of most cancers has not significantly changed for the past four decades. It is because conventional chemotherapies and/or radiation therapies are usually designed to eradicate highly proliferative cells. Mounting evidence has implicated that cancer is a disease of stem cells. Cancer stem cells (CSC) are often relatively quiescent, and therefore may not be affected by therapies targeting rapidly dividing cells. Like normal stem cells (NSC) residing in a "stem cell niche" that maintains them in a stem-like state, CSC also require a special microenvironment to control their self-renewal and undifferentiated state. The "CSC niche" is likely to be the most crucial target in the treatment of cancer. In this article, we summarize the current knowledge regarding CSC and their niche microenvironments. Understanding of CSC's origin, molecular profile, and interaction with their microenvironments, this could be a paradigm shift in the treatment of cancer, away from targeting the blast cells and towards the targeting of the CSC, thus improving therapeutic outcome.

  4. Current and novel therapeutic molecules and targets in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashwini; Nisha, Chaluveelaveedu Murleedharan; Silakari, Chitrangda; Sharma, Isha; Anusha, Kanukanti; Gupta, Nityasha; Nair, Prateek; Tripathi, Timir; Kumar, Awanish

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder in which the death of brain cells causes memory loss and cognitive decline, i.e., dementia. The disease starts with mild symptoms and gradually becomes severe. AD is one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Several different hallmarks of the disease have been reported such as deposits of β-amyloid around neurons, hyperphosphorylated tau protein, oxidative stress, dyshomeostasis of bio-metals, low levels of acetylcholine, etc. AD is not simple to diagnose since there is no single diagnostic test for it. Pharmacotherapy for AD currently provides only symptomatic relief and mostly targets cognitive revival. Computational biology approaches have proved to be reliable tools for the selection of novel targets and therapeutic ligands. Molecular docking is a key tool in computer-assisted drug design and development. Docking has been utilized to perform virtual screening on large libraries of compounds, and propose structural hypotheses of how the ligands bind with the target with lead optimization. Another potential application of docking is optimization stages of the drug-discovery cycle. This review summarizes the known drug targets of AD, in vivo active agents against AD, state-of-the-art docking studies done in AD, and future prospects of the docking with particular emphasis on AD. PMID:26220908

  5. Modeling of hyaluronic acid containing anti-cancer drugs-loaded polylactic-co-glycolic acid bioconjugates for targeted delivery to cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul-e-Saba, Adulphakdee, A.; Madthing, A.; Zafar, M. N.; Abdullah, M. A.

    2012-09-01

    Molecular modeling of hyaluronan (HA), polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), polyethylene glycol-bis-amine (PEG-bis-amine), Curcumin, Cisplatin and the conjugate HA-PEG-PLGA containing Curcumin/Cisplatin were performed using Discovery Studio 2.5 to better understand issues and constraints related to targeted delivery of potent anticancer drugs to cancer cells. HA, a versatile biopolymer is a ligand of cancer cell receptor, CD44 that can be particularly useful in a receptor-mediated cellular uptake of drug-incorporated nanoparticles. Biocompatible and biodegradable polymers, PLGA and PEG, serve as polymeric micelles for controlled-release of drug. Curcumin as a natural anticancer agent has poor solubility that limits its use in drug therapeutics, while platinum-based Cisplatin exhibits systemic cytotoxicity. These can be overcome via drug delivery in polymeric biocompatible vehicles. The PLGA-PEG-HA conjugate shows the total measurement of 105 bond length with average bond length of 1.274163 Å. The conjugation between PEG and HA occurs at C8-O1 atoms and can be manipulated to improve properties.

  6. Assessing the therapeutic efficacy of VEGFR-1-targeted polymer drug conjugates in mouse tumor models.

    PubMed

    Shamay, Yosi; Golan, Moran; Tyomkin, Dalia; David, Ayelet

    2016-05-10

    Polymer-drug conjugates that can actively target the tumor vasculature have emerged as an attractive technology for improving the therapeutic efficacy of cytotoxic drugs. We have recently provided, for the first time, in vivo evidence showing the significant advantage of the E-selectin-targeted N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer-doxorubicin conjugate, P-(Esbp)-DOX, in inhibiting primary tumor growth and preventing the formation and development of cancer metastases. Here, we describe the design of a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-1-targeted HPMA copolymer-DOX conjugate (P-(F56)-DOX) that can actively and simultaneously target different cell types in the tumor microenvironment, such as endothelial cells (ECs), bone marrow-derived cells and many human cancer cells of diverse tumor origin. The VEGFR-1-targeted copolymer was tested for its binding, internalization and in vitro cytotoxicity in ECs (bEnd.3 and cEND cells) and cancer cells (B16-F10, 3LL and HT29). The in vivo anti-cancer activity of P-(F56)-DOX was then tested in two tumor-bearing mice (TBM) models (i.e., primary Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL) tumors and B16-F10 melanoma pulmonary metastases), relative to that of the E-selectin-targeted system (P-(Esbp)-DOX) that solely targets ECs. Our results indicate that the binding and internalization profiles of the VEGFR-1-targeted copolymer were superior towards ECs as compared to cancer cells and correlated well to the level of VEGFR-1 expression in cells. Accordingly, the VEGFR-1-targeted copolymer (P-(F56)-DOX) was more toxic towards bEnd.3 cells than to cancer cells, and exhibited significantly higher cytotoxicity than did the non-targeted control copolymer. P-(F56)-DOX inhibited 3LL tumor growth and significantly prolonged the survival of mice with B16-F10 pulmonary metastases. When compared to a system that actively targets only tumor vascular ECs, P-(F56)-DOX and P-(Esbp)-DOX exhibited comparable efficacy in slowing the

  7. Assessing the therapeutic efficacy of VEGFR-1-targeted polymer drug conjugates in mouse tumor models.

    PubMed

    Shamay, Yosi; Golan, Moran; Tyomkin, Dalia; David, Ayelet

    2016-05-10

    Polymer-drug conjugates that can actively target the tumor vasculature have emerged as an attractive technology for improving the therapeutic efficacy of cytotoxic drugs. We have recently provided, for the first time, in vivo evidence showing the significant advantage of the E-selectin-targeted N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer-doxorubicin conjugate, P-(Esbp)-DOX, in inhibiting primary tumor growth and preventing the formation and development of cancer metastases. Here, we describe the design of a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-1-targeted HPMA copolymer-DOX conjugate (P-(F56)-DOX) that can actively and simultaneously target different cell types in the tumor microenvironment, such as endothelial cells (ECs), bone marrow-derived cells and many human cancer cells of diverse tumor origin. The VEGFR-1-targeted copolymer was tested for its binding, internalization and in vitro cytotoxicity in ECs (bEnd.3 and cEND cells) and cancer cells (B16-F10, 3LL and HT29). The in vivo anti-cancer activity of P-(F56)-DOX was then tested in two tumor-bearing mice (TBM) models (i.e., primary Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL) tumors and B16-F10 melanoma pulmonary metastases), relative to that of the E-selectin-targeted system (P-(Esbp)-DOX) that solely targets ECs. Our results indicate that the binding and internalization profiles of the VEGFR-1-targeted copolymer were superior towards ECs as compared to cancer cells and correlated well to the level of VEGFR-1 expression in cells. Accordingly, the VEGFR-1-targeted copolymer (P-(F56)-DOX) was more toxic towards bEnd.3 cells than to cancer cells, and exhibited significantly higher cytotoxicity than did the non-targeted control copolymer. P-(F56)-DOX inhibited 3LL tumor growth and significantly prolonged the survival of mice with B16-F10 pulmonary metastases. When compared to a system that actively targets only tumor vascular ECs, P-(F56)-DOX and P-(Esbp)-DOX exhibited comparable efficacy in slowing the

  8. SynLethDB: synthetic lethality database toward discovery of selective and sensitive anticancer drug targets.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Liu, Hui; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lethality (SL) is a type of genetic interaction between two genes such that simultaneous perturbations of the two genes result in cell death or a dramatic decrease of cell viability, while a perturbation of either gene alone is not lethal. SL reflects the biologically endogenous difference between cancer cells and normal cells, and thus the inhibition of SL partners of genes with cancer-specific mutations could selectively kill cancer cells but spare normal cells. Therefore, SL is emerging as a promising anticancer strategy that could potentially overcome the drawbacks of traditional chemotherapies by reducing severe side effects. Researchers have developed experimental technologies and computational prediction methods to identify SL gene pairs on human and a few model species. However, there has not been a comprehensive database dedicated to collecting SL pairs and related knowledge. In this paper, we propose a comprehensive database, SynLethDB (http://histone.sce.ntu.edu.sg/SynLethDB/), which contains SL pairs collected from biochemical assays, other related databases, computational predictions and text mining results on human and four model species, i.e. mouse, fruit fly, worm and yeast. For each SL pair, a confidence score was calculated by integrating individual scores derived from different evidence sources. We also developed a statistical analysis module to estimate the druggability and sensitivity of cancer cells upon drug treatments targeting human SL partners, based on large-scale genomic data, gene expression profiles and drug sensitivity profiles on more than 1000 cancer cell lines. To help users access and mine the wealth of the data, we developed other practical functionalities, such as search and filtering, orthology search, gene set enrichment analysis. Furthermore, a user-friendly web interface has been implemented to facilitate data analysis and interpretation. With the integrated data sets and analytics functionalities, SynLethDB would

  9. SynLethDB: synthetic lethality database toward discovery of selective and sensitive anticancer drug targets.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Liu, Hui; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lethality (SL) is a type of genetic interaction between two genes such that simultaneous perturbations of the two genes result in cell death or a dramatic decrease of cell viability, while a perturbation of either gene alone is not lethal. SL reflects the biologically endogenous difference between cancer cells and normal cells, and thus the inhibition of SL partners of genes with cancer-specific mutations could selectively kill cancer cells but spare normal cells. Therefore, SL is emerging as a promising anticancer strategy that could potentially overcome the drawbacks of traditional chemotherapies by reducing severe side effects. Researchers have developed experimental technologies and computational prediction methods to identify SL gene pairs on human and a few model species. However, there has not been a comprehensive database dedicated to collecting SL pairs and related knowledge. In this paper, we propose a comprehensive database, SynLethDB (http://histone.sce.ntu.edu.sg/SynLethDB/), which contains SL pairs collected from biochemical assays, other related databases, computational predictions and text mining results on human and four model species, i.e. mouse, fruit fly, worm and yeast. For each SL pair, a confidence score was calculated by integrating individual scores derived from different evidence sources. We also developed a statistical analysis module to estimate the druggability and sensitivity of cancer cells upon drug treatments targeting human SL partners, based on large-scale genomic data, gene expression profiles and drug sensitivity profiles on more than 1000 cancer cell lines. To help users access and mine the wealth of the data, we developed other practical functionalities, such as search and filtering, orthology search, gene set enrichment analysis. Furthermore, a user-friendly web interface has been implemented to facilitate data analysis and interpretation. With the integrated data sets and analytics functionalities, SynLethDB would

  10. Aptamers as targeting delivery devices or anti-cancer drugs for fighting tumors.

    PubMed

    Scaggiante, Bruna; Dapas, Barbara; Farra, Rossella; Grassi, Mario; Pozzato, Gabriele; Giansante, Carlo; Fiotti, Nicola; Tamai, Elisa; Tonon, Federica; Grassi, Gabriele

    2013-06-01

    Aptamer researches applied to the treatment of human cancers have increased since their discovery in 1990. This is due to different factors including: 1) the technical possibility to select, by SELEX-based procedures, specific aptamers targeting virtually any given molecule, 2) the aptamer favorable bio-activity in vivo, 3) the low production costs and 4) the ease synthesis and storage for the marketing. In the field of cancer treatments, aptamers have been studied as tumor-specific agents driving drugs into cancer cells; additionally they have been used as anti-neoplastic agents, able to inhibit tumor cell growth and dissemination when administered alone or in combination with conventional anti-neoplastic drugs. Aptamers are gaining an increased interest for pharmaceutical companies and some of them are under clinical evaluation trials. In this review we update the findings about the use of aptamers as "escort" molecules able to drive drugs into the cells and as antineoplastic drugs. Current anti-neoplastic treatments suffer from the intrinsic toxicity related to the un-specific targeting of both normal and tumorigenic proliferating cells. The aptamers could be useful to improve: 1) the selective targeting of molecules essential for the viability and expansion of tumor cells and/or the selective driving of chemotherapies into tumor cells, thus resulting in higher effectiveness and lower systemic side-effects compared to conventional anti-neoplastic drugs alone and 2) to improve the therapeutic index of currently used chemotherapies. Even if some problems related to the in vivo stability and pharmacokinetic/dynamics of aptamers remain to be improved, their potential use in the treatment of different human cancers is getting closer and closer to a practical therapeutic use.

  11. Clinical Implementation of Novel Targeted Therapeutics in Advanced Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chamberlin, Mary D; Bernhardt, Erica B; Miller, Todd W

    2016-11-01

    The majority of advanced breast cancers have genetic alterations that are potentially targetable with drugs. Through initiatives such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC), data can be mined to provide context for next-generation sequencing (NGS) results in the landscape of advanced breast cancer. Therapies for targets other than estrogen receptor alpha (ER) and HER2, such as cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6, were recently approved based on efficacy in patient subpopulations, but no predictive biomarkers have been found, leaving clinicians to continue a trial-and-error approach with each patient. Next-generation sequencing identifies potentially actionable alterations in genes thought to be drivers in the cancerous process including phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), AKT, fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs), and mutant HER2. Epigenetically directed and immunologic therapies have also shown promise for the treatment of breast cancer via histone deacetylases (HDAC) 1 and 3, programmed T cell death 1 (PD-1), and programmed T cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1). Identifying biomarkers to predict primary resistance in breast cancer will ultimately affect clinical decisions regarding adjuvant therapy in the first-line setting. However, the bulk of medical decision-making is currently made in the secondary resistance setting. Herein, we review the clinical potential of PI3K, AKT, FGFRs, mutant HER2, HDAC1/3, PD-1, and PD-L1 as therapeutic targets in breast cancer, focusing on the rationale for therapeutic development and the status of clinical testing. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2454-2463, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Novel Opportunities for Thymidylate Metabolism as a Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Peter M.; Fazzone, William; LaBonte, Melissa J.; Deng, Jinxia; Neamati, Nouri; Ladner, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    For over 40 years, the fluoropyrimidine 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has remained the central agent in therapeutic regimens employed in the treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) and is frequently combined with the DNA-damaging agent's oxaliplatin and irinotecan increasing response rates and improving overall survival. However, many patients will derive little or no benefit from treatment, highlighting the need to identify novel therapeutic targets to improve the efficacy of current 5-FU-based chemotherapeutic strategies. Deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase (dUTPase) catalyzes the hydrolysis of dUTP to dUMP and PPi providing substrate for thymidylate synthase (TS) and DNA synthesis and repair. Although dUTP is a normal intermediate in DNA synthesis, its accumulation and misincorporation into DNA as uracil is lethal. Importantly, uracil misincorporation represents an important mechanism of cytotoxicity induced by the TS-targeted class of chemotherapeutic agents including 5-FU. A growing body of evidence suggests that dUTPase is an important mediator of response to TS-targeted agents. In this manuscript we present further evidence demonstrating that elevated expression of dUTPase can protect breast cancer cells from the expansion of the intracellular uracil pool, translating to reduced growth inhibition following treatment with 5-FU. We therefore report the implementation of in silico drug development techniques to identify and develop small molecule inhibitors of dUTPase. As 5-FU and the oral 5-FU pro-drug capecitabine remain central agents in the treatment of a variety of malignancies, the clinical utility of a small molecule inhibitor to dUTPase represents a viable strategy to improve the clinical efficacy of these mainstay chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:18790783

  13. Epigenetic regulators as promising therapeutic targets in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gallipoli, Paolo; Giotopoulos, George; Huntly, Brian J P

    2015-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the most prevalent acute leukemia in adults, is an aggressive hematological malignancy arising in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. With the exception of a few specific AML subtypes, the mainstays of treatment have not significantly changed over the last 20 years, and are still based on standard cytotoxic chemotherapy. As a result, clinical outcome remains poor for the majority of patients, with overall long-term survival in the region of 20-30%. Recent successes in characterizing the genetic landscape of AML have highlighted that, despite its heterogeneity, many cases of AML carry recurrent mutations in genes encoding epigenetic regulators. Transcriptional dysregulation and altered epigenetic function have therefore emerged as exciting areas in AML research and it is becoming increasingly clear that epigenetic dysfunction is central to leukemogenesis in AML. This has subsequently paved the way for the development of epigenetically targeted therapies. In this review, we will discuss the most recent advances in our understanding of the role of epigenetic dysregulation in AML pathobiology. We will particularly focus on those altered epigenetic programs that have been shown to be central to the development and maintenance of AML in preclinical models. We will discuss the recent development of therapeutics specifically targeting these key epigenetic programs in AML, describe their mechanism of action and present their current clinical development. Finally, we will discuss the opportunities presented by epigenetically targeted therapy in AML and will highlight future challenges ahead for the AML community, to ensure that these novel therapeutics are optimally translated into clinical practice and result in clinical improvement for AML patients.

  14. Histone Deacetylase-3/CAGE Axis Targets EGFR Signaling and Regulates the Response to Anti-Cancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyuna; Kim, Youngmi; Goh, Hyeonjung; Jeoung, Dooil

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported the role of miR-326-HDAC3 loop in anti-cancer drug-resistance. CAGE, a cancer/testis antigen, regulates the response to anti-cancer drug-resistance by forming a negative feedback loop with miR-200b. Studies investigating the relationship between CAGE and HDAC3 revealed that HDAC3 negatively regulated the expression of CAGE. ChIP assays demonstrated the binding of HDAC3 to the promoter sequences of CAGE. However, CAGE did not affect the expression of HDAC3. We also found that EGFR signaling regulated the expressions of HDAC3 and CAGE. Anti-cancer drug-resistant cancer cell lines show an increased expression of pEGFRY845. HDAC3 was found to negatively regulate the expression of pEGFRY845. CAGE showed an interaction and co-localization with EGFR. It was seen that miR-326, a negative regulator of HDAC3, regulated the expression of CAGE, pEGFRY845, and the interaction between CAGE and EGFR. miR-326 inhibitor induced the binding of HDAC3 to the promoter sequences in anti-cancer drug-resistant Malme3MR cells, decreasing the tumorigenic potential of Malme3MR cells in a manner associated with its effect on the expression of HDAC3, CAGE and pEGFRY845. The down-regulation of HDAC3 enhanced the tumorigenic, angiogenic and invasion potential of the anti-cancer drug-sensitive Malme3M cells in CAGE-dependent manner. Studies revealed that PKCδ was responsible for the increased expression of pEGFRY845 and CAGE in Malme3MR cells. CAGE showed an interaction with PKCδ in Malme3MR cells. Our results show that HDAC3-CAGE axis can be employed as a target for overcoming resistance to EGFR inhibitors. PMID:26883907

  15. Characterizing and optimizing human anticancer drug targets based on topological properties in the context of biological pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Wang, Yan; Shang, Desi; Yu, Fulong; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Yan; Feng, Chenchen; Wang, Qiuyu; Xu, Yanjun; Liu, Yuejuan; Bai, Xuefeng; Li, Xuecang; Li, Chunquan

    2015-04-01

    One of the challenging problems in drug discovery is to identify the novel targets for drugs. Most of the traditional methods for drug targets optimization focused on identifying the particular families of "druggable targets", but ignored their topological properties based on the biological pathways. In this study, we characterized the topological properties of human anticancer drug targets (ADTs) in the context of biological pathways. We found that the ADTs tended to present the following seven topological properties: influence the number of the pathways related to cancer, be localized at the start or end of the pathways, interact with cancer related genes, exhibit higher connectivity, vulnerability, betweenness, and closeness than other genes. We first ranked ADTs based on their topological property values respectively, then fused them into one global-rank using the joint cumulative distribution of an N-dimensional order statistic to optimize human ADTs. We applied the optimization method to 13 anticancer drugs, respectively. Results demonstrated that over 70% of known ADTs were ranked in the top 20%. Furthermore, the performance for mercaptopurine was significant: 6 known targets (ADSL, GMPR2, GMPR, HPRT1, AMPD3, AMPD2) were ranked in the top 15 and other four out of the top 15 (MAT2A, CDKN1A, AREG, JUN) have the potentialities to become new targets for cancer therapy. PMID:25724580

  16. Targeting EZH2 and PRC2 dependence as novel anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bowen; Konze, Kyle D.; Jin, Jian; Wang, Gang Greg

    2016-01-01

    Distinctive patterns of chromatin modification control gene expression and define cellular identity during development and cell differentiation. Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), the sole mammalian enzymatic complex capable of establishing gene-repressive high-degree methylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27), plays crucial roles in regulation of normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Recently, increasing evidence has indicated that recurrent gain-of-function mutation and overexpression of EZH2, the catalytic subunit of PRC2, drive and promote malignant transformation such as B-cell lymphomagenesis, providing a rationale for PRC2 inhibition as a novel anticancer strategy. Here, we summarize the recently developed strategies for inhibition of PRC2, which include a series of highly specific, highly potent, small-molecule inhibitors of EZH2 and EZH1, an EZH2-related methyltransferase. PRC2 establishes functional crosstalk with numerous epigenetic machineries during dynamic regulation of gene transcription. Perturbation of such functional crosstalk caused by genetic events observed in various hematologic cancers, such as inactivation of SNF5 and somatic mutation of UTX, confers PRC2 dependence, thus rendering an increased sensitivity to PRC2 inhibition. We discuss our current understanding of EZH2 somatic mutations frequently found in B-cell lymphomas and recurrent mutations in various other epigenetic regulators as novel molecular predictors and determinants of PRC2 sensitivity. As recent advances have indicated a critical developmental or tumor-suppressive role for PRC2 and EZH2 in various tissue types, we discuss concerns over potentially toxic or even adverse effects associated with EZH2/1 inhibition in certain biological contexts or on cancer genetic background. Collectively, inhibition of PRC2 catalytic activity has emerged as a promising therapeutic intervention for the precise treatment of a range of genetically defined hematologic malignancies and can be

  17. Anticancer Properties of Capsaicin Against Human Cancer.

    PubMed

    Clark, Ruth; Lee, Seong-Ho

    2016-03-01

    There is persuasive epidemiological and experimental evidence that dietary phytochemicals have anticancer activity. Capsaicin is a bioactive phytochemical abundant in red and chili peppers. While the preponderance of the data strongly indicates significant anticancer benefits of capsaicin, more information to highlight molecular mechanisms of its action is required to improve our knowledge to be able to propose a potential therapeutic strategy for use of capsaicin against cancer. Capsaicin has been shown to alter the expression of several genes involved in cancer cell survival, growth arrest, angiogenesis and metastasis. Recently, many research groups, including ours, found that capsaicin targets multiple signaling pathways, oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes in various types of cancer models. In this review article, we highlight multiple molecular targets responsible for the anticancer mechanism of capsaicin. In addition, we deal with the benefits of combinational use of capsaicin with other dietary or chemotherapeutic compounds, focusing on synergistic anticancer activities. PMID:26976969

  18. Anticancer Properties of Capsaicin Against Human Cancer.

    PubMed

    Clark, Ruth; Lee, Seong-Ho

    2016-03-01

    There is persuasive epidemiological and experimental evidence that dietary phytochemicals have anticancer activity. Capsaicin is a bioactive phytochemical abundant in red and chili peppers. While the preponderance of the data strongly indicates significant anticancer benefits of capsaicin, more information to highlight molecular mechanisms of its action is required to improve our knowledge to be able to propose a potential therapeutic strategy for use of capsaicin against cancer. Capsaicin has been shown to alter the expression of several genes involved in cancer cell survival, growth arrest, angiogenesis and metastasis. Recently, many research groups, including ours, found that capsaicin targets multiple signaling pathways, oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes in various types of cancer models. In this review article, we highlight multiple molecular targets responsible for the anticancer mechanism of capsaicin. In addition, we deal with the benefits of combinational use of capsaicin with other dietary or chemotherapeutic compounds, focusing on synergistic anticancer activities.

  19. Fluorine-Containing Taxoid Anticancer Agents and Their Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Joshua; Vineberg, Jacob G.; Zuniga, Edison S.; Ojima, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    A long-standing problem of conventional chemotherapy is the lack of tumor-specific treatments. Traditional chemotherapy relies on the premise that rapidly proliferating cancer cells are more likely to be killed by a cytotoxic agent. In reality, however, cytotoxic agents have very little or no specificity, which leads to systemic toxicity, causing undesirable severe side effects. Consequently, various “molecularly targeted cancer therapies” have been developed for use in specific cancers, including tumor-targeting drug delivery systems. In general, such a drug delivery system consists of a tumor recognition moiety and a cytotoxic “warhead” connected through a “smart” linker to form a conjugate. When a multi-functionalized nanomaterial is used as the vehicle, a “Trojan Horse” approach can be used for mass delivery of cytotoxic “warheads” to maximize the efficacy. Exploitation of the special properties of fluorine has proven successful in the development of new and effective biochemical tools as well as therapeutic agents. Fluorinated congeners can also serve as excellent probes for the investigation of biochemical mechanisms. 19F-NMR can provide unique and powerful tools for mechanistic investigations in chemical biology. This account presents our recent progress, in perspective, on the molecular approaches to the design and development of novel tumor-targeted drug delivery systems for new generation chemotherapy by exploiting the unique nature of fluorine. PMID:23935213

  20. Mast cells: new therapeutic target in helminth immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Vukman, K V; Lalor, R; Aldridge, A; O'Neill, S M

    2016-01-01

    Helminth infection and their secreted antigens have a protective role in many immune-mediated inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. However, studies have focused primarily on identifying immune protective mechanisms of helminth infection and their secreted molecules on dendritic cells and macrophages. Given that mast cells have been shown to be implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of many inflammatory disorders, their role should also be examined and considered as cellular target for helminth-based therapies. As there is a dearth of studies examining the interaction of helminth-derived antigens and mast cells, this review will focus on the role of mast cells during helminth infection and examine our current understanding of the involvement of mast cells in TH 1/TH 17-mediated immune disorders. In this context, potential mechanisms by which helminths could target the TH 1/TH 17 promoting properties of mast cells can be identified to unveil novel therapeutic mast cell driven targets in combating these inflammatory disorders. PMID:26577605

  1. Key cancer cell signal transduction pathways as therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Roberto; Melisi, Davide; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2006-02-01

    Growth factor signals are propagated from the cell surface, through the action of transmembrane receptors, to intracellular effectors that control critical functions in human cancer cells, such as differentiation, growth, angiogenesis, and inhibition of cell death and apoptosis. Several kinases are involved in transduction pathways via sequential signalling activation. These kinases include transmembrane receptor kinases (e.g., epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR); or cytoplasmic kinases (e.g., PI3 kinase). In cancer cells, these signalling pathways are often altered and results in a phenotype characterized by uncontrolled growth and increased capability to invade surrounding tissue. Therefore, these crucial transduction molecules represent attractive targets for cancer therapy. This review will summarize current knowledge of key signal transduction pathways, that are altered in cancer cells, as therapeutic targets for novel selective inhibitors. The most advanced targeted agents currently under development interfere with function and expression of several signalling molecules, including the EGFR family; the vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors; and cytoplasmic kinases such as Ras, PI3K and mTOR.

  2. Rational approaches to design of therapeutics targeting molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Klasa, R J; List, A F; Cheson, B D

    2001-01-01

    This paper introduces novel therapeutic strategies focusing on a molecular marker relevant to a particular hematologic malignancy. Four different approaches targeting specific molecules in unique pathways will be presented. The common theme will be rational target selection in a strategy that has reached the early phase of human clinical trial in one malignancy, but with a much broader potential applicability to the technology. In Section I Dr. Richard Klasa presents preclinical data on the use of antisense oligonucleotides directed at the bcl-2 gene message to specifically downregulate Bcl-2 protein expression in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and render the cells more susceptible to the induction of apoptosis. In Section II Dr. Alan List reviews the targeting of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor in anti-angiogenesis strategies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In Section III Dr. Bruce Cheson describes recent progress in inhibiting cell cycle progression by selectively disrupting cyclin D1 with structurally unique compounds such as flavopiridol in mantle cell lymphoma as well as describing a new class of agents that affect proteasome degradation pathways.

  3. Complement involvement in kidney diseases: From physiopathology to therapeutical targeting

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Rosso, Giuseppina; Bertoni, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Complement cascade is involved in several renal diseases and in renal transplantation. The different components of the complement cascade might represent an optimal target for innovative therapies. In the first section of the paper the authors review the physiopathology of complement involvement in renal diseases and transplantation. In some cases this led to a reclassification of renal diseases moving from a histopathological to a physiopathological classification. The principal issues afforded are: renal diseases with complement over activation, renal diseases with complement dysregulation, progression of renal diseases and renal transplantation. In the second section the authors discuss the several complement components that could represent a therapeutic target. Even if only the anti C5 monoclonal antibody is on the market, many targets as C1, C3, C5a and C5aR are the object of national or international trials. In addition, many molecules proved to be effective in vitro or in preclinical trials and are waiting to move to human trials in the future. PMID:25949931

  4. DISC1 as a therapeutic target for mental illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Hikida, Takatoshi; Gamo, Nao J.; Sawa, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many genetic studies have indicated that DISC1 is not merely “disrupted-in-schizophrenia,” but is more generally implicated in various brain dysfunctions associated with aberrant neurodevelopment and intracellular signaling pathways. Thus, the DISC1 gene is mildly associated with a variety of brain disorders, including schizophrenia, mood disorders, and autism. This novel concept fits with the results from biological studies of DISC1, which include cell and animal models. Areas covered We review the molecular structure and functions of DISC1, particularly those in conjunction with its important interactors. Functions of these interacting proteins are also introduced under the concept of the “DISC1 interactome.” Finally, we discuss how the DISC1 interactome can provide potential therapeutic targets for mental illnesses. Expert opinion Modulation of DISC1 stability and post-transcriptional modifications may be key targets to address DISC1-related pathology. In addition, modulation of DISC1 interactors and the mechanisms of their interactions with DISC1 may also provide drug targets. Disc1 rodent models can subsequently be used as templates for in vivo validations of compounds designed for DISC1 and its interacting proteins. Furthermore, these rodents will serve as genetic models for schizophrenia and related conditions, especially in conjunction with their pathologies during the neurodevelopmental trajectory. PMID:23130881

  5. Nuclear receptors as therapeutic targets in cholestatic liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zollner, Gernot; Trauner, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Cholestasis results in intrahepatic accumulation of cytotoxic bile acids, which cause liver damage ultimately leading to biliary fibrosis and cirrhosis. Cholestatic liver injury is counteracted by a variety of adaptive hepatoprotective mechanisms including alterations in bile acid transport, synthesis and detoxification. The underlying molecular mechanisms are mediated mainly at a transcriptional level via a complex network involving nuclear receptors including the farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, vitamin D receptor and constitutive androstane receptor, which target overlapping, although not identical, sets of genes. Because the intrinsic adaptive response to bile acids cannot fully prevent liver injury in cholestasis, therapeutic targeting of these receptors via specific and potent agonists may further enhance the hepatic defence against toxic bile acids. Activation of these receptors results in repression of bile acid synthesis, induction of phases I and II bile acid hydroxylation and conjugation and stimulation of alternative bile acid export while limiting hepatocellular bile acid import. Furthermore, the use of nuclear receptor ligands may not only influence bile acid transport and metabolism but may also directly target hepatic fibrogenesis and inflammation. Many drugs already used to treat cholestasis and its complications such as pruritus (e.g. ursodeoxycholic acid, rifampicin, fibrates) may act via activation of nuclear receptors. More specific and potent nuclear receptor ligands are currently being developed. This article will review the current knowledge on nuclear receptors and their potential role in the treatment of cholestatic liver diseases. PMID:19133988

  6. Therapeutic Targeting of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fujimori, Yoshitaka; Otsuki, Sho; Sato, Yuya; Nakagawa, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy has become the global standard treatment for patients with metastatic or unresectable gastric cancer (GC), although outcomes remain unfavorable. Many molecular-targeted therapies inhibiting signaling pathways of various tyrosine kinase receptors have been developed, and monoclonal antibodies targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have become standard therapy for HER2-positive GC. An inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 or MET has also produced promising results in patients with GC. Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR) play key roles in tumor growth via activated signaling pathways in GC. Genomic amplification of FGFR2 leads to the aberrant activation found in GC tumors and is related to survival in patients with GC. This review discusses the clinical relevance of FGFR in GC and examines FGFR as a potential therapeutic target in patients with GC. Preclinical studies in animal models suggest that multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), including FGFR inhibitor, suppress tumor cell proliferation and delay tumor progression. Several TKIs are now being evaluated in clinical trials as treatment for metastatic or unresectable GC harboring FGFR2 amplification. PMID:26000013

  7. "Combo" nanomedicine: Co-delivery of multi-modal therapeutics for efficient, targeted, and safe cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Jessica A; Shim, Min Suk; Heo, Chan Yeong; Kwon, Young Jik

    2016-03-01

    The dynamic and versatile nature of diseases such as cancer has been a pivotal challenge for developing efficient and safe therapies. Cancer treatments using a single therapeutic agent often result in limited clinical outcomes due to tumor heterogeneity and drug resistance. Combination therapies using multiple therapeutic modalities can synergistically elevate anti-cancer activity while lowering doses of each agent, hence, reducing side effects. Co-administration of multiple therapeutic agents requires a delivery platform that can normalize pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the agents, prolong circulation, selectively accumulate, specifically bind to the target, and enable controlled release in target site. Nanomaterials, such as polymeric nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles/cages/shells, and carbon nanomaterials, have the desired properties, and they can mediate therapeutic effects different from those generated by small molecule drugs (e.g., gene therapy, photothermal therapy, photodynamic therapy, and radiotherapy). This review aims to provide an overview of developing multi-modal therapies using nanomaterials ("combo" nanomedicine) along with the rationale, up-to-date progress, further considerations, and the crucial roles of interdisciplinary approaches.

  8. Therapeutic targeting of BET protein BRD4 delays murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shitong; Sun, Yonghua; Sha, Hongyu

    2015-12-01

    BRD4 is a member of the BET (bromodomain and extraterminal domain) family proteins that can bind acetylated histones and influence transcription, which are considered as potential therapeutic targets in many distinct diseases. And the BET inhibitor JQ1 has been proven to be effective in suppressing multiple inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. This study aimed to examine the therapeutic potential of JQ1 on a lupus model, MRL-lpr mice. Ten-week-old MRL-lpr mice were treated with JQ1 (oral administration of 200mg/kg) or vehicle for 8weeks. The proteinuria, nephritic damage, serum biochemistry, autoantibodies and cytokines were examined. Splenocytes of MRL-lpr mice were isolated for in vitro experiments. Treatment with JQ1 significantly attenuated the progression of proteinuria and nephritis. The serum concentrations of anti-dsDNA antibody as well as B-cell activating factor (BAFF), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and INF-γ were inhibited, and IL-10 augmented by JQ1. Importantly, JQ1 improved the survival of lupus mice. In vitro, BAFF, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and INF-γ were inhibited, and IL-10 augmented by JQ1 (500nM) in the cultures of splenocytes from diseased MRL-lpr mice, which was further supported by a significant reduction in immune complex-mediated activation of human monocytes in vitro by JQ1. Taken together, JQ1 effectively alleviates lupus in MRL-lpr mice by suppressing BAFF, pro-inflammatory cytokines and autoimmunity, supporting the therapeutic value of JQ1 in lupus disease. PMID:26590112

  9. Inflammation as a Therapeutic Target for Diabetic Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Pop-Busui, Rodica; Ang, Lynn; Holmes, Crystal; Gallagher, Katherine; Feldman, Eva L

    2016-03-01

    Diabetic neuropathies (DNs) are one of the most prevalent chronic complications of diabetes and a major cause of disability, high mortality, and poor quality of life. Given the complex anatomy of the peripheral nervous system and types of fiber dysfunction, DNs have a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. The treatment of DNs continues to be challenging, likely due to the complex pathogenesis that involves an array of systemic and cellular imbalances in glucose and lipids metabolism. These lead to the activation of various biochemical pathways, including increased oxidative/nitrosative stress, activation of the polyol and protein kinase C pathways, activation of polyADP ribosylation, and activation of genes involved in neuronal damage, cyclooxygenase-2 activation, endothelial dysfunction, altered Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pump function, impaired C-peptide-related signaling pathways, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and low-grade inflammation. This review summarizes current evidence regarding the role of low-grade inflammation as a potential therapeutic target for DNs.

  10. Glucocorticoid receptor co-factors as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Simons, S. Stoney

    2010-01-01

    Summary Numerous transcriptional cofactors (e.g., coactivators, corepressors, and comodulators) are known to alter the maximal transcriptional activity (Amax) in gene induction and repression by steroid receptors in general and glucocorticoids in particular. However, recent data advance the earlier reports that these same factors also modify other parameters of glucocorticoid receptor transcriptional activity: the potency of agonists (or EC50) and the partial agonist activity of antisteroids (or PAA). In several instances, factors modulate the EC50 and/or PAA without changing Amax. Thus, studies of all three parameters reveal new factors acting at various stages of receptor action, thereby increasing the potential therapeutic targets for adjusting GR actions in pathological situations. PMID:20801081

  11. Featuring the nucleosome surface as a therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Isabel Torres Gomes; de Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes; Santos, Guilherme Martins

    2015-05-01

    Chromatin is the major regulator of gene expression and genome maintenance. Proteins that bind the nucleosome, the repetitive unit of chromatin, and the histone H4 tail are critical to establishing chromatin architecture and phenotypic outcomes. Intriguingly, nucleosome-binding proteins (NBPs) and the H4 tail peptide compete for the same binding site at an acidic region on the nucleosome surface. Although the essential facts about the nucleosome were revealed 17 years ago, new insights into its atomic structure and molecular mechanisms are still emerging. Several complex nucleosome:NBP structures were recently revealed, characterizing the NBP-binding sites on the nucleosome surface. Here we discuss the potential of the nucleosome surface as a therapeutic target and the impact and development of exogenous nucleosome-binding molecules (eNBMs).

  12. Escorts Take the Lead: Molecular Chaperones as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Dumaine; Devi, Lakshmi A.

    2011-01-01

    The functional and physiological diversity of transmembrane receptors results from factors that influence the pharmacology, signaling, and trafficking of these receptors. Receptor mutations and other modifications may lead to misfolding, intracellular retention, and ineffective signaling of transmembrane receptors. The importance of such mutations is highlighted by the fact that various diseases have been linked to mutations that lead to ineffective signaling of these receptors, resulting from the retention of receptors in intracellular compartments. Studies focused on understanding the regulation of trafficking and cell surface expression of newly synthesized receptors have highlighted molecular chaperones as key regulators of receptor maturation and sorting. In this chapter, we discuss the functions of molecular chaperones in the regulation of seven-transmembrane-containing G-protein-coupled receptor function and trafficking and explore ways in which chaperones can serve as novel therapeutic targets. PMID:20691961

  13. Therapeutic targets of triple-negative breast cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Jamdade, Vinayak S; Sethi, Nikunj; Mundhe, Nitin A; Kumar, Parveen; Lahkar, Mangala; Sinha, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the second most common cause of cancer deaths. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) does not show immunohistochemical expression of oestrogen receptors, progesterone receptors or HER2. At present, no suitable treatment option is available for patients with TNBC. This dearth of effective conventional therapies for the treatment of advanced stage breast cancer has provoked the development of novel strategies for the management of patients with TNBC. This review presents recent information associated with different therapeutic options for the treatment of TNBC focusing on promising targets such as the Notch signalling, Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog pathways, in addition to EGFR, PARP1, mTOR, TGF-β and angiogenesis inhibitors. PMID:26040571

  14. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) as a therapeutic target for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Neves, Joana; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2016-11-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and NPY receptors are widely expressed in the mammalian central nervous system. Studies in both humans and rodent models revealed that brain NPY levels are altered in some neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and Machado-Joseph disease. In this review, we will focus on the roles of NPY in the pathological mechanisms of these disorders, highlighting NPY as a neuroprotective agent, as a neural stem cell proliferative agent, as an agent that increases trophic support, as a stimulator of autophagy and as an inhibitor of excitotoxicity and neuroinflammation. Moreover, the effect of NPY in some clinical manifestations commonly observed in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and Machado-Joseph disease, such as depressive symptoms and body weight loss, are also discussed. In conclusion, this review highlights NPY system as a potential therapeutic target in neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Functions of astrocytes and their potential as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Kimelberg, Harold K.; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2010-01-01

    Astrocytes are often referred to, and historically have been regarded as, support cells of the mammalian CNS. Work over the last decade suggests otherwise, that astrocytes may in fact play a more active role in higher neural processing than previously recognized. Because astrocytes can potentially serve as novel therapeutic targets, it is critical to understand how astrocytes execute their diverse supportive tasks while maintaining neuronal health. To that end, this review will focus on the supportive roles of astrocytes, a line of study relevant to essentially all acute and chronic neurological diseases. Furthermore, this review will critically re-evaluate our concepts of the functional properties of astrocytes and relate these tasks to their intricate morphology. PMID:20880499

  16. Tetraspanins as therapeutic targets in hematological malignancy: a concise review

    PubMed Central

    Beckwith, Kyle A.; Byrd, John C.; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2015-01-01

    Tetraspanins belong to a family of transmembrane proteins which play a major role in the organization of the plasma membrane. While all immune cells express tetraspanins, most of these are present in a variety of other cell types. There are a select few, such as CD37 and CD53, which are restricted to hematopoietic lineages. Tetraspanins associate with numerous partners involved in a diverse set of biological processes, including cell activation, survival, proliferation, adhesion, and migration. The historical view has assigned them a scaffolding role, but recent discoveries suggest some tetraspanins can directly participate in signaling through interactions with cytoplasmic proteins. Given their potential roles in supporting tumor survival and immune evasion, an improved understanding of tetraspanin activity could prove clinically valuable. This review will focus on emerging data in the study of tetraspanins, advances in the clinical development of anti-CD37 therapeutics, and the future prospects of targeting tetraspanins in hematological malignancy. PMID:25852576

  17. Mitochondrial metals as a potential therapeutic target in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Grubman, A; White, A R; Liddell, J R

    2014-01-01

    Transition metals are critical for enzyme function and protein folding, but in excess can mediate neurotoxic oxidative processes. As mitochondria are particularly vulnerable to oxidative damage due to radicals generated during ATP production, mitochondrial biometal homeostasis must therefore be tightly controlled to safely harness the redox potential of metal enzyme cofactors. Dysregulation of metal functions is evident in numerous neurological disorders including Alzheimer's disease, stroke, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Friedrich's ataxia. This review describes the mitochondrial metal defects in these disorders and highlights novel metal-based therapeutic approaches that target mitochondrial metal homeostasis in neurological disorders. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24206195

  18. Interleukin-23: a promising therapeutic target in seronegative spondyloarthropathy.

    PubMed

    Sherlock, Jonathan P; Cua, Daniel J

    2013-06-01

    Particular therapeutic challenges are raised by the spondyloarthropathies which represent a key area of unmet medical need. Recent investigations have shown that these conditions are characterised both by altered responsiveness to interleukin(IL)-23 and expansion of IL-23 responsive cells as well as increased production of IL-23. The gut in particular has emerged as a key site of IL-23 production, and gut inflammation is known to be strongly clinically associated with these conditions. Moreover, HLA-B27, which is strongly associated with spondyloarthropathy, has also been shown to stimulate IL-23 production. The view is thus emerging that dysregulation of IL-23 biology is a unifying feature of spondyloarthropathy, suggesting that treatments targeting this cytokine are likely to be highly efficacious.

  19. Inflammation as a Therapeutic Target for Diabetic Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Pop-Busui, Rodica; Ang, Lynn; Holmes, Crystal; Gallagher, Katherine; Feldman, Eva L

    2016-03-01

    Diabetic neuropathies (DNs) are one of the most prevalent chronic complications of diabetes and a major cause of disability, high mortality, and poor quality of life. Given the complex anatomy of the peripheral nervous system and types of fiber dysfunction, DNs have a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. The treatment of DNs continues to be challenging, likely due to the complex pathogenesis that involves an array of systemic and cellular imbalances in glucose and lipids metabolism. These lead to the activation of various biochemical pathways, including increased oxidative/nitrosative stress, activation of the polyol and protein kinase C pathways, activation of polyADP ribosylation, and activation of genes involved in neuronal damage, cyclooxygenase-2 activation, endothelial dysfunction, altered Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pump function, impaired C-peptide-related signaling pathways, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and low-grade inflammation. This review summarizes current evidence regarding the role of low-grade inflammation as a potential therapeutic target for DNs. PMID:26897744

  20. Cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein: an attractive therapeutic target?

    PubMed Central

    Micheau, Olivier

    2003-01-01

    Cellular FLIP, also known as FLICE-inhibitory protein, has been identified as an inhibitor of apoptosis triggered by engagement of Death Receptor (DR) such as Fas or TRAIL. c-FLIP is recruited to DR signalling complexes, where it prevents caspase activation. Animal models indicated that c-FLIP plays an important role in T-cell proliferation and heart development. Abnormal c-FLIP expression has been identified in various diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis and various cancers. The present review focuses on recent insights in c-FLIP dysregulation associated with human diseases, and addresses the possibilities of using c-FLIP as a therapeutic target. PMID:12885274

  1. EZH2 in Bladder Cancer, a Promising Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Fernández, Mónica; Rubio, Carolina; Segovia, Cristina; López-Calderón, Fernando F.; Dueñas, Marta; Paramio, Jesús M.

    2015-01-01

    Bladder Cancer (BC) represents a current clinical and social challenge. The recent studies aimed to describe the genomic landscape of BC have underscored the relevance of epigenetic alterations in the pathogenesis of these tumors. Among the epigenetic alterations, histone modifications occupied a central role not only in cancer, but also in normal organism homeostasis and development. EZH2 (Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2) belongs to the Polycomb repressive complex 2 as its catalytic subunit, which through the trimethylation of H3 (Histone 3) on K27 (Lysine 27), produces gene silencing. EZH2 is frequently overexpressed in multiple tumor types, including BC, and plays multiple roles besides the well-recognized histone mark generation. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge on the oncogenic roles of EZH2 and its potential use as a therapeutic target, with special emphasis on BC pathogenesis and management. PMID:26580594

  2. [Mitochondrial dynamics: a potential new therapeutic target for heart failure].

    PubMed

    Kuzmicic, Jovan; Del Campo, Andrea; López-Crisosto, Camila; Morales, Pablo E; Pennanen, Christian; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Hechenleitner, Jonathan; Zepeda, Ramiro; Castro, Pablo F; Verdejo, Hugo E; Parra, Valentina; Chiong, Mario; Lavandero, Sergio

    2011-10-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles able to vary their morphology between elongated interconnected mitochondrial networks and fragmented disconnected arrays, through events of mitochondrial fusion and fission, respectively. These events allow the transmission of signaling messengers and exchange of metabolites within the cell. They have also been implicated in a variety of biological processes including embryonic development, metabolism, apoptosis, and autophagy. Although the majority of these studies have been confined to noncardiac cells, emerging evidence suggests that changes in mitochondrial morphology could participate in cardiac development, the response to ischemia-reperfusion injury, heart failure, and diabetes mellitus. In this article, we review how the mitochondrial dynamics are altered in different cardiac pathologies, with special emphasis on heart failure, and how this knowledge may provide new therapeutic targets for treating cardiovascular diseases. PMID:21820793

  3. Epigenetic modulators as therapeutic targets in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Graça, Inês; Pereira-Silva, Eva; Henrique, Rui; Packham, Graham; Crabb, Simon J; Jerónimo, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common non-cutaneous malignancies among men worldwide. Epigenetic aberrations, including changes in DNA methylation patterns and/or histone modifications, are key drivers of prostate carcinogenesis. These epigenetic defects might be due to deregulated function and/or expression of the epigenetic machinery, affecting the expression of several important genes. Remarkably, epigenetic modifications are reversible and numerous compounds that target the epigenetic enzymes and regulatory proteins were reported to be effective in cancer growth control. In fact, some of these drugs are already being tested in clinical trials. This review discusses the most important epigenetic alterations in prostate cancer, highlighting the role of epigenetic modulating compounds in pre-clinical and clinical trials as potential therapeutic agents for prostate cancer management. PMID:27651838

  4. Autophagy as a Therapeutic Target in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nemchenko, Andriy; Chiong, Mario; Turer, Aslan; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    The epidemic of heart failure continues apace, and development of novel therapies with clinical efficacy has lagged. Now, important insights into the molecular circuitry of cardiovascular autophagy have raised the prospect that this cellular pathway of protein quality control may be a target of clinical relevance. Whereas basal levels of autophagy are required for cell survival, excessive levels – or perhaps distinct forms of autophagic flux – contribute to disease pathogenesis. Our challenge will be to distinguish mechanisms that drive adaptive versus maladaptive autophagy and to manipulate those pathways for therapeutic gain. Recent evidence suggests this may be possible. Here, we review the fundamental biology of autophagy and its role in a variety of forms of cardiovascular disease. We discuss ways in which this evolutionarily conserved catabolic mechanism can be manipulated, discuss studies presently underway in heart disease, and provide our perspective on where this exciting field may lead in the future. PMID:21723289

  5. Stem cells as potential therapeutic targets for inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Udai P.; Singh, Narendra P.; Singh, Balwan; Mishra, Manoj K.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.; Singh, Shree Ram

    2010-01-01

    The rates of incidence and prevalence of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are rising. Estimates indicate >1 million new cases of IBD in the United States annually. The conventional therapies available for IBD range from anti-inflammatory drugs to immunosuppressive agents, but these therapies generally fail to achieve satisfactory results due to their side effects. Interest in a new therapeutic option, that is, biological therapy, has gained much momentum recently due to its focus on different stages of the inflammatory process. Stem cell (SC) research has become a new direction for IBD therapy due to our recent understanding of cell populations involved in the pathogenic process. To this end, hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells are receiving more attention from IBD investigators. The intestinal environment, with its crypts and niches, supports incoming embryonic and hematopoietic stem cells and allows them to engraft and differentiate. The above findings suggest that, in the future, SC-based therapy will be a promising alternative to conventional therapy for IBD. In this review, we discuss SCs as potential therapeutic targets for future treatment of IBD. PMID:20515838

  6. Therapeutic potential of targeting acinar cell reprogramming in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi-Hin; Li, You-Jia; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-08-21

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a common pancreatic cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treating this life-threatening disease remains challenging due to the lack of effective prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Apart from pancreatic duct cells, acinar cells may also be the origin of PDAC. During pancreatitis or combined with activating KRas(G12D) mutation, acinar cells lose their cellular identity and undergo a transdifferentiation process called acinar-to-ductal-metaplasia (ADM), forming duct cells which may then transform into pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually PDAC. During ADM, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Wnt, Notch and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Akt signaling inhibits the transcription of acinar-specific genes, including Mist and amylase, but promotes the expression of ductal genes, such as cytokeratin-19. Inhibition of this transdifferentiation process hinders the development of PanIN and PDAC. In addition, the transdifferentiated cells regain acinar identity, indicating ADM may be a reversible process. This provides a new therapeutic direction in treating PDAC through cancer reprogramming. Many studies have already demonstrated the success of switching PanIN/PDAC back to normal cells through the use of PD325901, the expression of E47, and the knockdown of Dickkopf-3. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways involved in ADM and the therapeutic potential of targeting reprogramming in order to treat PDAC. PMID:27610015

  7. Therapeutic potential of targeting acinar cell reprogramming in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chi-Hin; Li, You-Jia; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a common pancreatic cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treating this life-threatening disease remains challenging due to the lack of effective prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Apart from pancreatic duct cells, acinar cells may also be the origin of PDAC. During pancreatitis or combined with activating KRasG12D mutation, acinar cells lose their cellular identity and undergo a transdifferentiation process called acinar-to-ductal-metaplasia (ADM), forming duct cells which may then transform into pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually PDAC. During ADM, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Wnt, Notch and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Akt signaling inhibits the transcription of acinar-specific genes, including Mist and amylase, but promotes the expression of ductal genes, such as cytokeratin-19. Inhibition of this transdifferentiation process hinders the development of PanIN and PDAC. In addition, the transdifferentiated cells regain acinar identity, indicating ADM may be a reversible process. This provides a new therapeutic direction in treating PDAC through cancer reprogramming. Many studies have already demonstrated the success of switching PanIN/PDAC back to normal cells through the use of PD325901, the expression of E47, and the knockdown of Dickkopf-3. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways involved in ADM and the therapeutic potential of targeting reprogramming in order to treat PDAC.

  8. Cell migration in paediatric glioma; characterisation and potential therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Cockle, J V; Picton, S; Levesley, J; Ilett, E; Carcaboso, A M; Short, S; Steel, L P; Melcher, A; Lawler, S E; Brüning-Richardson, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Paediatric high grade glioma (pHGG) and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) are highly aggressive brain tumours. Their invasive phenotype contributes to their limited therapeutic response, and novel treatments that block brain tumour invasion are needed. Methods: Here, we examine the migratory characteristics and treatment effect of small molecule glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, lithium chloride (LiCl) and the indirubin derivative 6-bromoindirubin-oxime (BIO), previously shown to inhibit the migration of adult glioma cells, on two pHGG cell lines (SF188 and KNS42) and one patient-derived DIPG line (HSJD-DIPG-007) using 2D (transwell membrane, immunofluorescence, live cell imaging) and 3D (migration on nanofibre plates and spheroid invasion in collagen) assays. Results: All lines were migratory, but there were differences in morphology and migration rates. Both LiCl and BIO reduced migration and instigated cytoskeletal rearrangement of stress fibres and focal adhesions when viewed by immunofluorescence. In the presence of drugs, loss of polarity and differences in cellular movement were observed by live cell imaging. Conclusions: Ours is the first study to demonstrate that it is possible to pharmacologically target migration of paediatric glioma in vitro using LiCl and BIO, and we conclude that these agents and their derivatives warrant further preclinical investigation as potential anti-migratory therapeutics for these devastating tumours. PMID:25628092

  9. Prostate cancer: the need for biomarkers and new therapeutic targets*

    PubMed Central

    Felgueiras, Juliana; Silva, Joana Vieira; Fardilha, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) incidence and mortality have decreased in recent years. Nonetheless, it remains one of the most prevalent cancers in men, being a disquieting cause of men’s death worldwide. Changes in many cell signaling pathways have a predominant role in the onset, development, and progression of the disease. These include prominent pathways involved in the growth, apoptosis, and angiogenesis of the normal prostate gland, such as androgen and estrogen signaling, and other growth factor signaling pathways. Understanding the foundations of PCa is leading to the discovery of key molecules that could be used to improve patient management. The ideal scenario would be to have a panel of molecules, preferably detectable in body fluids, that are specific and sensitive biomarkers for PCa. In the early stages, androgen deprivation is the gold standard therapy. However, as the cancer progresses, it eventually becomes independent of androgens, and hormonal therapy fails. For this reason, androgen-independent PCa is still a major therapeutic challenge. By disrupting specific protein interactions or manipulating the expression of some key molecules, it might be possible to regulate tumor growth and metastasis formation, avoiding the systemic side effects of current therapies. Clinical trials are already underway to assess the efficacy of molecules specially designed to target key proteins or protein interactions. In this review, we address that recent progress made towards understanding PCa development and the molecular pathways underlying this pathology. We also discuss relevant molecular markers for the management of PCa and new therapeutic challenges. PMID:24390742

  10. The iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin: a possible therapeutic target?

    PubMed

    Rochette, Luc; Gudjoncik, Aurélie; Guenancia, Charles; Zeller, Marianne; Cottin, Yves; Vergely, Catherine

    2015-02-01

    The maintenance of stable extracellular and intracellular iron concentrations requires the coordinated regulation of iron transport into plasma. Iron is a fundamental cofactor for several enzymes involved in oxidation-reduction reactions. The redox ability of iron can lead to the production of oxygen free radicals, which can damage various cellular components. Therefore, the appropriate regulation of systemic iron homeostasis is decisive in vital processes. Hepcidin has emerged as the central regulatory molecule of systemic iron homeostasis. It is synthesized in hepatocytes and in other cells and released into the circulation. It inhibits the release of iron from enterocytes of the duodenum and from macrophages by binding to the iron exporter protein, ferroportin (FPN). FPN is a transmembrane protein responsible for iron export from cells into the plasma. Hepcidin is internalized with FPN and both are degraded in lysosomes. The hepcidin-FPN axis is the principal regulator of extracellular iron homeostasis in health and disease. Its manipulation via agonists and antagonists is an attractive and novel therapeutic strategy. Hepcidin agonists include compounds that mimic the activity of hepcidin and agents that increase the production of hepcidin by targeting hepcidin-regulatory molecules. The inhibition of hepcidin could be a potentially attractive therapeutic strategy in patients suffering from anaemia or chronic inflammation. In this review, we will summarize the role of hepcidin in iron homeostasis and its contribution to the pathophysiology of inflammation and iron disorders. We will examine emerging new strategies that modulate hepcidin metabolism.

  11. Therapeutic potential of targeting acinar cell reprogramming in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chi-Hin; Li, You-Jia; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a common pancreatic cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treating this life-threatening disease remains challenging due to the lack of effective prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Apart from pancreatic duct cells, acinar cells may also be the origin of PDAC. During pancreatitis or combined with activating KRasG12D mutation, acinar cells lose their cellular identity and undergo a transdifferentiation process called acinar-to-ductal-metaplasia (ADM), forming duct cells which may then transform into pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually PDAC. During ADM, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Wnt, Notch and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Akt signaling inhibits the transcription of acinar-specific genes, including Mist and amylase, but promotes the expression of ductal genes, such as cytokeratin-19. Inhibition of this transdifferentiation process hinders the development of PanIN and PDAC. In addition, the transdifferentiated cells regain acinar identity, indicating ADM may be a reversible process. This provides a new therapeutic direction in treating PDAC through cancer reprogramming. Many studies have already demonstrated the success of switching PanIN/PDAC back to normal cells through the use of PD325901, the expression of E47, and the knockdown of Dickkopf-3. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways involved in ADM and the therapeutic potential of targeting reprogramming in order to treat PDAC. PMID:27610015

  12. Beta-3 adrenoceptors as new therapeutic targets for cardiovascular pathologies.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Chantal; Rozec, Bertrand; Manoury, Boris; Balligand, Jean-Luc

    2011-09-01

    Catecholamines play a key role in the regulation of cardiovascular function, classically through ß(1/2)-adrenoreceptors (AR) activation. After ß(3)-AR cloning in the late 1980s, convincing evidence for ß(3)-AR expression and function in cardiovascular tissues recently initiated a reexamination of their involvement in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. Their upregulation in diseased cardiovascular tissues and resistance to desensitization suggest they may be attractive therapeutic targets. They may substitute for inoperant ß(1/2)-AR to mediate vasodilation in diabetic or atherosclerotic vessels. In cardiac ventricle, their contractile effects are functionally antipathetic to those of ß(1/2)-AR; in normal heart, ß(3)-ARs may mediate a moderate negative inotropic effect, but in heart failure, it may protect against adverse effects of excessive catecholamine stimulation by action on excitation-contraction coupling, electrophysiology, or remodelling. Thus, prospective studies in animals and patients at different stages of heart failure should lead to identify the best therapeutic window to use ß(3)-AR agonists and/or antagonists. PMID:21633786

  13. Autobiographical Memory Disturbances in Depression: A Novel Therapeutic Target?

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Cristiano A.; Carvalho, André F.; Alves, Gilberto S.; McIntyre, Roger S.; Hyphantis, Thomas N.; Cammarota, Martín

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by a dysfunctional processing of autobiographical memories. We review the following core domains of deficit: systematic biases favoring materials of negative emotional valence; diminished access and response to positive memories; a recollection of overgeneral memories in detriment of specific autobiographical memories; and the role of ruminative processes and avoidance when dealing with autobiographical memories. Furthermore, we review evidence from functional neuroimaging studies of neural circuits activated by the recollection of autobiographical memories in both healthy and depressive individuals. Disruptions in autobiographical memories predispose and portend onset and maintenance of depression. Thus, we discuss emerging therapeutics that target memory difficulties in those with depression. We review strategies for this clinical domain, including memory specificity training, method-of-loci, memory rescripting, and real-time fMRI neurofeedback training of amygdala activity in depression. We propose that the manipulation of the reconsolidation of autobiographical memories in depression might represent a novel yet largely unexplored, domain-specific, therapeutic opportunity for depression treatment. PMID:26380121

  14. ENaCs and ASICs as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Qadri, Yawar J.; Rooj, Arun K.

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and acid-sensitive ion channel (ASIC) branches of the ENaC/degenerin superfamily of cation channels have drawn increasing attention as potential therapeutic targets in a variety of diseases and conditions. Originally thought to be solely expressed in fluid absorptive epithelia and in neurons, it has become apparent that members of this family exhibit nearly ubiquitous expression. Therapeutic opportunities range from hypertension, due to the role of ENaC in maintaining whole body salt and water homeostasis, to anxiety disorders and pain associated with ASIC activity. As a physiologist intrigued by the fundamental mechanics of salt and water transport, it was natural that Dale Benos, to whom this series of reviews is dedicated, should have been at the forefront of research into the amiloride-sensitive sodium channel. The cloning of ENaC and subsequently the ASIC channels has revealed a far wider role for this channel family than was previously imagined. In this review, we will discuss the known and potential roles of ENaC and ASIC subunits in the wide variety of pathologies in which these channels have been implicated. Some of these, such as the role of ENaC in Liddle's syndrome are well established, others less so; however, all are related in that the fundamental defect is due to inappropriate channel activity. PMID:22277752

  15. Targeting Cell Death Pathways for Therapeutic Intervention in Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Garg, Jay P; Vucic, Domagoj

    2016-05-01

    Precise regulation of cell death and survival is essential for proper maintenance of organismal homeostasis, development, and the immune system. Deregulated cell death can lead to developmental defects, neuropathies, infections, and cancer. Kidney diseases, especially acute pathologies linked to ischemia-reperfusion injury, are among illnesses that profoundly are affected by improper regulation or execution of cell death pathways. Attempts to develop medicines for kidney diseases have been impacted by the complexity of these pathologies given the heterogeneous patient population and diverse etiologies. By analyzing cell death pathways activated in kidney diseases, we attempt to differentiate their importance for these pathologies with a goal of identifying those that have more profound impact and the best therapeutic potential. Although classic apoptosis still might be important, regulated necrosis pathways including necroptosis, ferroptosis, parthanatos, and mitochondrial permeability transition-associated cell death play a significantly role in kidney diseases, especially in acute kidney pathologies. Although targeting receptor-interacting protein 1 kinase appears to be the best therapeutic strategy, combination with inhibitors of other cell death pathways is likely to bring superior benefit and possible cure to patients suffering from kidney diseases. PMID:27339381

  16. Anticancer Effects of Mesothelin-Targeted Immunotoxin Therapy Are Regulated by Tyrosine Kinase DDR1.

    PubMed

    Ali-Rahmani, Fatima; FitzGerald, David J; Martin, Scott; Patel, Paresma; Prunotto, Marco; Ormanoglu, Pinar; Thomas, Craig; Pastan, Ira

    2016-03-15

    Recombinant immunotoxins (RIT) have been highly successful in cancer therapy due, in part, to the high cancer-specific expression of cell surface antigens such as mesothelin, which is overexpressed in mesothelioma, ovarian, lung, breast, and pancreatic cancers, but is limited in normal cells. RG7787 is a clinically optimized RIT consisting of a humanized anti-mesothelin Fab fused to domain III of Pseudomonas exotoxin A, in which immunogenic B-cell epitopes are silenced. To enhance the therapeutic efficacy of RITs, we conducted a kinome RNAi sensitization screen, which identified discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a collagen-activated tyrosine kinase, as a potential target. The collagen/DDR1 axis is implicated in tumor-stromal interactions and potentially affects tumor response to therapy. Therefore, we investigated the effects of DDR1 on RIT. Knockdown of DDR1 by siRNA or treatment with inhibitor, 7rh, greatly enhanced the cytotoxic activity of RG7787 in several cancer cell lines. Investigation into the mechanism of action showed DDR1 silencing was associated with decreased expression of several ribosomal proteins and enhanced inhibition of protein synthesis. Conversely, induction of DDR1 expression or collagen-stimulated DDR1 activity protected cancer cells from RG7787 killing. Moreover, the combination of RG7787 and DDR1 inhibitor caused greater shrinkage of tumor xenografts than either agent alone. These data demonstrate that DDR1 is a key modulator of RIT activity and represents a novel therapeutic strategy to improve targeting of mesothelin-expressing cancers. PMID:26719540

  17. Targeting macrophage necroptosis for therapeutic and diagnostic interventions in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Karunakaran, Denuja; Geoffrion, Michele; Wei, Lihui; Gan, Wei; Richards, Laura; Shangari, Prakriti; DeKemp, Ella M.; Beanlands, Rachelle A.; Perisic, Ljubica; Maegdefessel, Lars; Hedin, Ulf; Sad, Subash; Guo, Liang; Kolodgie, Frank D.; Virmani, Renu; Ruddy, Terrence; Rayner, Katey J.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis results from maladaptive inflammation driven primarily by macrophages, whose recruitment and proliferation drive plaque progression. In advanced plaques, macrophage death contributes centrally to the formation of plaque necrosis, which underlies the instability that promotes plaque rupture and myocardial infarction. Hence, targeting macrophage cell death pathways may offer promise for the stabilization of vulnerable plaques. Necroptosis is a recently discovered pathway of programmed cell necrosis regulated by RIP3 and MLKL kinases that, in contrast to apoptosis, induces a proinflammatory state. We show herein that necroptotic cell death is activated in human advanced atherosclerotic plaques and can be targeted in experimental atherosclerosis for both therapeutic and diagnostic interventions. In humans with unstable carotid atherosclerosis, expression of RIP3 and MLKL is increased, and MLKL phosphorylation, a key step in the commitment to necroptosis, is detected in advanced atheromas. Investigation of the molecular mechanisms underlying necroptosis showed that atherogenic forms of low-density lipoprotein increase RIP3 and MLKL transcription and phosphorylation—two critical steps in the execution of necroptosis. Using a radiotracer developed with the necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1), we show that 123I-Nec-1 localizes specifically to atherosclerotic plaques in Apoe−/− mice, and its uptake is tightly correlated to lesion areas by ex vivo nuclear imaging. Furthermore, treatment of Apoe−/− mice with established atherosclerosis with Nec-1 reduced lesion size and markers of plaque instability, including necrotic core formation. Collectively, our findings offer molecular insight into the mechanisms of macrophage cell death that drive necrotic core formation in atherosclerosis and suggest that this pathway can be used as both a diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the treatment of unstable atherosclerosis. PMID:27532042

  18. Hypoxia inducible factor in hepatocellular carcinoma: A therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Daniel; Wu, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed and deadly cancers worldwide; its incidence has been rising in the United States due to the increase in hepatitis C associated cirrhosis and the growing epidemic of obesity. There have been no effective therapeutic options in the advanced disease setting beyond sorafenib, a multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor that showed significant survival benefit. Because of this, there is an urgent need to search for novel pathways in sorafenib experienced patients. This review will focus on the role of hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-1α) in cancer development, specifically in HCC. We will discuss the biology of HIF-1α, the pathways with which it interacts, and the function of HIF-1α in HCC. Furthermore, we will review studies highlighting the relevance of HIF-1α in the clinical setting, as well as the pre-clinical data supporting its further investigation. Finally, we will conclude with a discussion of the potential role of a HIF-1α mRNA antagonist for the treatment of HCC, and hypothesize the ways in which such an inhibitor may be best utilized in the management of advanced HCC. Hypoxia plays a significant role in the development of HCC. HIF-1α is a key transcription factor involved in the hypoxic response of cancer cells. It activates transcription of genes responsible for angiogenesis, glucose metabolism, proliferation, invasion and metastasis in HCC. Its involvement in multiple, essential tumor pathways makes it an attractive potential therapeutic target in HCC. PMID:26576101

  19. Pathogenic Inflammation and Its Therapeutic Targeting in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Timothy A.; Tsantikos, Evelyn; Hibbs, Margaret L.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, lupus) is a highly complex and heterogeneous autoimmune disease that most often afflicts women in their child-bearing years. It is characterized by circulating self-reactive antibodies that deposit in tissues, including skin, kidneys, and brain, and the ensuing inflammatory response can lead to irreparable tissue damage. Over many years, clinical trials in SLE have focused on agents that control B- and T-lymphocyte activation, and, with the single exception of an agent known as belimumab which targets the B-cell survival factor BAFF, they have been disappointing. At present, standard therapy for SLE with mild disease is the agent hydroxychloroquine. During disease flares, steroids are often used, while the more severe manifestations with major organ involvement warrant potent, broad-spectrum immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide or mycophenolate. Current treatments have severe and dose-limiting toxicities and thus a more specific therapy targeting a causative factor or signaling pathway would be greatly beneficial in SLE treatment. Moreover, the ability to control inflammation alongside B-cell activation may be a superior approach for disease control. There has been a recent focus on the innate immune system and associated inflammation, which has uncovered key players in driving the pathogenesis of SLE. Delineating some of these intricate inflammatory mechanisms has been possible with studies using spontaneous mouse mutants and genetically engineered mice. These strains, to varying degrees, exhibit hallmarks of the human disease and therefore have been utilized to model human SLE and to test new drugs. Developing a better understanding of the initiation and perpetuation of disease in SLE may uncover suitable novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we discuss the involvement of inflammation in SLE disease pathogenesis, with a focus on several key proinflammatory cytokines and myeloid growth factors, and review the known

  20. FAK signaling in human cancer as a target for therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Brian Y; Timpson, Paul; Horvath, Lisa G; Daly, Roger J

    2015-02-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a key regulator of growth factor receptor- and integrin-mediated signals, governing fundamental processes in normal and cancer cells through its kinase activity and scaffolding function. Increased FAK expression and activity occurs in primary and metastatic cancers of many tissue origins, and is often associated with poor clinical outcome, highlighting FAK as a potential determinant of tumor development and metastasis. Indeed, data from cell culture and animal models of cancer provide strong lines of evidence that FAK promotes malignancy by regulating tumorigenic and metastatic potential through highly-coordinated signaling networks that orchestrate a diverse range of cellular processes, such as cell survival, proliferation, migration, invasion, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, angiogenesis and regulation of cancer stem cell activities. Such an integral role in governing malignant characteristics indicates that FAK represents a potential target for cancer therapeutics. While pharmacologic targeting of FAK scaffold function is still at an early stage of development, a number of small molecule-based FAK tyrosine kinase inhibitors are currently undergoing pre-clinical and clinical testing. In particular, PF-00562271, VS-4718 and VS-6063 show promising clinical activities in patients with selected solid cancers. Clinical testing of rationally designed FAK-targeting agents with implementation of predictive response biomarkers, such as merlin deficiency for VS-4718 in mesothelioma, may help improve clinical outcome for cancer patients. In this article, we have reviewed the current knowledge regarding FAK signaling in human cancer, and recent developments in the generation and clinical application of FAK-targeting pharmacologic agents.

  1. Tryptophan Hydroxylase-2: An Emerging Therapeutic Target for Stress Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guo-Lin; Miller, Gregory M.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) has been long recognized to modulate the stress response, and dysfunction of 5-HT has been implicated in numerous stress disorders. Accordingly, the 5-HT system has been targeted for the treatment of stress disorders. Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in 5-HT synthesis, and the recent identification of a second, neuron-specific TPH isoform (TPH2) opened up a new area of research. With a decade of extensive investigation, it is now recognized that: 1) TPH2 exhibits a highly flexible gene expression that is modulated by an increasing number of internal and external environmental factors including the biological clock, stressors, endogenous hormones, and antidepressant therapies; and 2) genetically determined TPH2 activity is linked to a growing body of stress-related neuronal correlates and behavioral traits. These findings reveal an active role of TPH2 in the stress response and provide new insights into the long recognized but not yet fully understood 5-HT-stress interaction. As a major modulator of 5-HT neurotransmission and the stress response, TPH2 is of both pathophysiological and pharmacological significance, and is emerging as a new therapeutic target for the treatment of stress disorders. Given that numerous antidepressant therapies influence TPH2 gene expression, TPH2 is already inadvertently targeted for the treatment of stress disorders. With increased understanding of the regulation of TPH2 activity we can now purposely utilize TPH2 as a target to develop new or optimize current therapies, which are expected to greatly improve the prevention and treatment of a wide variety of stress disorders. PMID:23435356

  2. The influenza virus NS1 protein as a therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Engel, Daniel A

    2013-09-01

    Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A virus plays a central role in virus replication and blockade of the host innate immune response, and is therefore being considered as a potential therapeutic target. The primary function of NS1 is to dampen the host interferon (IFN) response through several distinct molecular mechanisms that are triggered by interactions with dsRNA or specific cellular proteins. Sequestration of dsRNA by NS1 results in inhibition of the 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase/RNase L antiviral pathway, and also inhibition of dsRNA-dependent signaling required for new IFN production. Binding of NS1 to the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM25 prevents activation of RIG-I signaling and subsequent IFN induction. Cellular RNA processing is also targeted by NS1, through recognition of cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30), leading to inhibition of IFN-β mRNA processing as well as that of other cellular mRNAs. In addition NS1 binds to and inhibits cellular protein kinase R (PKR), thus blocking an important arm of the IFN system. Many additional proteins have been reported to interact with NS1, either directly or indirectly, which may serve its anti-IFN and additional functions, including the regulation of viral and host gene expression, signaling pathways and viral pathogenesis. Many of these interactions are potential targets for small-molecule intervention. Structural, biochemical and functional studies have resulted in hypotheses for drug discovery approaches that are beginning to bear experimental fruit, such as targeting the dsRNA-NS1 interaction, which could lead to restoration of innate immune function and inhibition of virus replication. This review describes biochemical, cell-based and nucleic acid-based approaches to identifying NS1 antagonists.

  3. The influenza virus NS1 protein as a therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A virus plays a central role in virus replication and blockade of the host innate immune response, and is therefore being considered as a potential therapeutic target. The primary function of NS1 is to dampen the host interferon (IFN) response through several distinct molecular mechanisms that are triggered by interactions with dsRNA or specific cellular proteins. Sequestration of dsRNA by NS1 results in inhibition of the 2’-5’ oligoadenylate synthetase/RNase L antiviral pathway, and also inhibition of dsRNA-dependent signaling required for new IFN production. Binding of NS1 to the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM25 prevents activation of RIG-I signaling and subsequent IFN induction. Cellular RNA processing is also targeted by NS1, through recognition of cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30), leading to inhibition of IFN- mRNA processing as well as that of other cellular mRNAs. In addition NS1 binds to and inhibits cellular protein kinase R (PKR), thus blocking an important arm of the IFN system. Many additional proteins have been reported to interact with NS1, either directly or indirectly, which may serve its anti-IFN and additional functions, including the regulation of viral and host gene expression, signaling pathways and viral pathogenesis. Many of these interactions are potential targets for small-molecule intervention. Structural, biochemical and functional studies have resulted in hypotheses for drug discovery approaches that are beginning to bear experimental fruit, such as targeting the dsRNA-NS1 interaction, which could lead to restoration of innate immune function and inhibition of virus replication. This review describes biochemical, cell-based and nucleic acid-based approaches to identifying NS1 antagonists. PMID:23796981

  4. Gene therapy-mediated delivery of targeted cytotoxins for glioma therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Candolfi, Marianela; Xiong, Weidong; Yagiz, Kader; Liu, Chunyan; Muhammad, A K M G; Puntel, Mariana; Foulad, David; Zadmehr, Ali; Ahlzadeh, Gabrielle E; Kroeger, Kurt M; Tesarfreund, Matthew; Lee, Sharon; Debinski, Waldemar; Sareen, Dhruv; Svendsen, Clive N; Rodriguez, Ron; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2010-11-16

    Restricting the cytotoxicity of anticancer agents by targeting receptors exclusively expressed on tumor cells is critical when treating infiltrative brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). GBMs express an IL-13 receptor (IL13Rα2) that differs from the physiological IL4R/IL13R receptor. We developed a regulatable adenoviral vector (Ad.mhIL-4.TRE.mhIL-13-PE) encoding a mutated human IL-13 fused to Pseudomonas exotoxin (mhIL-13-PE) that specifically binds to IL13Rα2 to provide sustained expression, effective anti-GBM cytotoxicity, and minimal neurotoxicity. The therapeutic Ad also encodes mutated human IL-4 that binds to the physiological IL4R/IL13R without interacting with IL13Rα2, thus inhibiting potential binding of mhIL-13-PE to normal brain cells. Using intracranial GBM xenografts and syngeneic mouse models, we tested the Ad.mhIL-4.TRE.mhIL-13-PE and two protein formulations, hIL-13-PE used in clinical trials (Cintredekin Besudotox) and a second-generation mhIL-13-PE. Cintredekin Besudotox doubled median survival without eliciting long-term survival and caused severe neurotoxicity; mhIL-13-PE led to ∼40% long-term survival, eliciting severe neurological toxicity at the high dose tested. In contrast, Ad-mediated delivery of mhIL-13-PE led to tumor regression and long-term survival in over 70% of the animals, without causing apparent neurotoxicity. Although Cintredekin Besudotox was originally developed to target GBM, when tested in a phase III trial it failed to achieve clinical endpoints and revealed neurotoxicity. Limitations of Cintredekin Besudotox include its short half-life, which demanded frequent or continued administration, and binding to IL4R/IL13R, present in normal brain cells. These shortcomings were overcome by our therapeutic Ad, thus representing a significant advance in the development of targeted therapeutics for GBM.

  5. pH-Sensitive stimulus-responsive nanocarriers for targeted delivery of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mahdi; Eslami, Masoud; Sahandi-Zangabad, Parham; Mirab, Fereshteh; Farajisafiloo, Negar; Shafaei, Zahra; Ghosh, Deepanjan; Bozorgomid, Mahnaz; Dashkhaneh, Fariba; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    In recent years miscellaneous smart micro/nanosystems that respond to various exogenous/endogenous stimuli including temperature, magnetic/electric field, mechanical force, ultrasound/light irradiation, redox potentials, and biomolecule concentration have been developed for targeted delivery and release of encapsulated therapeutic agents such as drugs, genes, proteins, and metal ions specifically at their required site of action. Owing to physiological differences between malignant and normal cells, or between tumors and normal tissues, pH-sensitive nanosystems represent promising smart delivery vehicles for transport and delivery of anticancer agents. Furthermore, pH-sensitive systems possess applications in delivery of metal ions and biomolecules such as proteins, insulin, etc., as well as co-delivery of cargos, dual pH-sensitive nanocarriers, dual/multi stimuli-responsive nanosystems, and even in the search for new solutions for therapy of diseases such as Alzheimer's. In order to design an optimized system, it is necessary to understand the various pH-responsive micro/nanoparticles and the different mechanisms of pH-sensitive drug release. This should be accompanied by an assessment of the theoretical and practical challenges in the design and use of these carriers. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:696-716. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1389 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26762467

  6. Encapsulation of magnetotactic bacteria for targeted and controlled delivery of anticancer agents for tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Afkhami, Fatemeh; Taherkhani, Samira; Mohammadi, Mahmood; Martel, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    We showed that magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) have great potentials to be used as microcarriers for targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. Indeed, magnetotaxis inherent in MTB can be exploited to direct them towards a tumor while being propelled by their own flagellated molecular motors. Nonetheless, although the thrust propelling force above 4 pN of the MC-1 MTB showed to be superior compared to other technologies for displacement in the microvasculature, MTB becomes much less efficient when travelling in larger blood vessels due to higher blood flow. In the latter case, a new technique developed by our group and referred to as Magnetic Resonance Navigation (MRN), has been successfully applied in larger vessels using synthetic microcarriers nut proved to be less efficient in the microvasculature due mainly to technological constraints. These findings called for the need to integrate both approaches by encapsulating MTB in special MRN-compatible microcarriers to be release in the vicinity of microvascular networks where they becomes more effective for targeting purposes in tumoral lesions. In this study Magnetococcus strain MC-1 were encapsulated in giant vesicles. The survival of the encapsulated bacteria was monitored. The release of bacteria from giant vesicles was also studied in different time intervals and conditions.

  7. Therapeutic targeting of casein kinase 1δ in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Laura H; Lafitte, Marie; Quereda, Victor; Grant, Wayne; Chen, Weimin; Bibian, Mathieu; Noguchi, Yoshihiko; Fallahi, Mohammad; Yang, Chunying; Chang, Jenny C; Roush, William R; Cleveland, John L; Duckett, Derek R

    2015-12-16

    Identification of specific drivers of human cancer is required to instruct the development of targeted therapeutics. We demonstrate that CSNK1D is amplified and/or overexpressed in human breast tumors and that casein kinase 1δ (CK1δ) is a vulnerability of human breast cancer subtypes overexpressing this kinase. Specifically, selective knockdown of CK1δ, or treatment with a highly selective and potent CK1δ inhibitor, triggers apoptosis of CK1δ-expressing breast tumor cells ex vivo, tumor regression in orthotopic models of triple-negative breast cancer, including patient-derived xenografts, and tumor growth inhibition in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2(+)) breast cancer models. We also show that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is a hallmark of human tumors overexpressing CK1δ, that disabling CK1δ blocks nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and T cell factor transcriptional activity, and that constitutively active β-catenin overrides the effects of inhibition or silencing of CK1δ. Thus, CK1δ inhibition represents a promising strategy for targeted treatment in human breast cancer with Wnt/β-catenin involvement.

  8. CTGF is a therapeutic target for metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Finger, E C; Cheng, C-F; Williams, T R; Rankin, E B; Bedogni, B; Tachiki, L; Spong, S; Giaccia, A J; Powell, M B

    2014-02-27

    Metastatic melanoma remains a devastating disease with a 5-year survival rate of less than five percent. Despite recent advances in targeted therapies for melanoma, only a small percentage of melanoma patients experience durable remissions. Therefore, it is critical to identify new therapies for the treatment of advanced melanoma. Here, we define connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) as a therapeutic target for metastatic melanoma. Clinically, CTGF expression correlates with tumor progression and is strongly induced by hypoxia through HIF-1 and HIF-2-dependent mechanisms. Genetic inhibition of CTGF in human melanoma cells is sufficient to significantly reduce orthotopic tumor growth, as well as metastatic tumor growth in the lung of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Mechanistically, inhibition of CTGF decreased invasion and migration associated with reduced matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression. Most importantly, the anti-CTGF antibody, FG-3019, had a profound inhibitory effect on the progression of established metastatic melanoma. These results offer the first preclinical validation of anti-CTGF therapy for the treatment of advanced melanoma and underscore the importance of tumor hypoxia in melanoma progression.

  9. CRADA Final Report: ErbB2 Targeted Cancer Therapeutics

    SciTech Connect

    Lupu, Ruth

    2002-08-27

    The aim of the study was to design novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of carcinomas which overexpress the erbB-2 oncogene product and/or the activator (HRG). erbB-2 is a tyrosine kinase growth factor receptor, that overexpression of which in invasive breast, prostate, ovarian and lung carcinomas correlates with poor prognosis and poor overall survival. In breast carcinomas, erbB-2 is overexpressed in 25%-30% of the invasive phenotype and in 70% of ductal carcinomas in situ. On the other hand, the erbB-2 activator, heregulin (HRG) is expressed in about 30% of invasive breast carcinomas and it is highly expressed in other carcinoIl1as including, ovarian, lung, and prostate. Interestingly, only 6% of invasive breast carcinomas co-express both HRG and erbB-2. It is known today that tumors that overexpress erbB-2 are a leading cause of death, making erbB-2 and its activator HRG critical targets for therapy. Targeting both the receptors and the activator would be beneficial for a significant number of cancer patients. At the final stages of the project we had obtained significant improvements over the peptide quality but not significant improvements were made towards the generation of humanized monoclonal antibodies.

  10. Osteocytic signalling pathways as therapeutic targets for bone fragility.

    PubMed

    Plotkin, Lilian I; Bellido, Teresita

    2016-10-01

    Osteocytes are differentiated osteoblasts that become surrounded by matrix during the process of bone formation. Acquisition of the osteocyte phenotype is achieved by profound changes in gene expression that facilitate adaptation to the changing cellular environment and constitute the molecular signature of osteocytes. During osteocytogenesis, the expression of genes that are characteristic of the osteoblast are altered and the expression of genes and/or proteins that impart dendritic cellular morphology, regulate matrix mineralization and control the function of cells at the bone surface are ordely modulated. The discovery of mutations in human osteocytic genes has contributed, in a large part, to our understanding of the role of osteocytes in bone homeostasis. Osteocytes are targets of the mechanical force imposed on the skeleton and have a critical role in integrating mechanosensory pathways with the action of hormones, which thereby leads to the orchestrated response of bone to environmental cues. Current, therapeutic approaches harness this accumulating knowledge by targeting osteocytic signalling pathways and messengers to improve skeletal health.

  11. Extracellular Bacterial Proteases in Chronic Wounds: A Potential Therapeutic Target?

    PubMed Central

    Suleman, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Bacterial biofilms are considered to be responsible for over 80% of persistent infections, including chronic lung infections, osteomyelitis, periodontitis, endocarditis, and chronic wounds. Over 60% of chronic wounds are colonized with bacteria that reside within a biofilm. The exaggerated proteolytic environment of chronic wounds, more specifically elevated matrix metalloproteinases, is thought to be one of the possible reasons as to why chronic wounds fail to heal. However, the role of bacterial proteases within chronic wounds is not fully understood. Recent Advances: Recent research has shown that bacterial proteases can enable colonization and facilitate bacterial immune evasion. The inhibition of bacterial proteases such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase B (LasB) has resulted in the disruption of the bacterial biofilm in vitro. P. aeruginosa is thought to be a key pathogen in chronic wound infection, and therefore, the disruption of these biofilms, potentially through the targeting of P. aeruginosa bacterial proteases, is an attractive therapeutic endeavor. Critical Issues: Disrupting biofilm formation through the inhibition of bacterial proteases may lead to the dissemination of bacteria from the biofilm, allowing planktonic cells to colonize new sites within the wound. Future Directions: Despite a plethora of evidence supporting the role of bacterial proteases as virulence factors in infection, there remains a distinct lack of research into the effect of bacterial proteases in chronic wounds. To assess the viability of targeting bacterial proteases, future research should aim to understand the role of these proteases in a variety of chronic wound subtypes. PMID:27785379

  12. Osteocytic signalling pathways as therapeutic targets for bone fragility.

    PubMed

    Plotkin, Lilian I; Bellido, Teresita

    2016-10-01

    Osteocytes are differentiated osteoblasts that become surrounded by matrix during the process of bone formation. Acquisition of the osteocyte phenotype is achieved by profound changes in gene expression that facilitate adaptation to the changing cellular environment and constitute the molecular signature of osteocytes. During osteocytogenesis, the expression of genes that are characteristic of the osteoblast are altered and the expression of genes and/or proteins that impart dendritic cellular morphology, regulate matrix mineralization and control the function of cells at the bone surface are ordely modulated. The discovery of mutations in human osteocytic genes has contributed, in a large part, to our understanding of the role of osteocytes in bone homeostasis. Osteocytes are targets of the mechanical force imposed on the skeleton and have a critical role in integrating mechanosensory pathways with the action of hormones, which thereby leads to the orchestrated response of bone to environmental cues. Current, therapeutic approaches harness this accumulating knowledge by targeting osteocytic signalling pathways and messengers to improve skeletal health. PMID:27230951

  13. Exploring Internal Ribosome Entry Sites as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Komar, Anton A.; Hatzoglou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Initiation of eukaryotic mRNA translation may proceed via several different routes, each requiring a different subset of factors and relying on different and specific interactions between the mRNA and the ribosome. Two modes predominate: (i) so-called cap-dependent initiation, which requires all canonical initiation factors and is responsible for about 95–97% of all initiation events in eukaryotic cells; and (ii) cap-independent internal initiation, which requires a reduced subset of initiation factors and accounts for up to 5% of the remaining initiation events. Internal initiation relies on the presence of so-called internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements in the 5′ UTRs of some viral and cellular mRNAs. These elements (often possessing complex secondary and tertiary structures) promote efficient interaction of the mRNA with the 40S ribosome and allow for internal ribosome entry. Internal initiation of translation of specific mRNAs may contribute to development of severe disease and pathological states, such as hepatitis C and cancer. Therefore, this cellular mechanism represents an attractive target for pharmacological modulation. The purpose of this review is to provide insight into current strategies used to target viral and cellular IRESs and discuss the physiological consequences (and potential therapeutic implications) of abrogation/modulation of IRES-mediated translation. PMID:26539410

  14. Molecular Strategies for Targeting Antioxidants to Mitochondria: Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial function and specifically its implication in cellular redox/oxidative balance is fundamental in controlling the life and death of cells, and has been implicated in a wide range of human pathologies. In this context, mitochondrial therapeutics, particularly those involving mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, have attracted increasing interest as potentially effective therapies for several human diseases. For the past 10 years, great progress has been made in the development and functional testing of molecules that specifically target mitochondria, and there has been special focus on compounds with antioxidant properties. In this review, we will discuss several such strategies, including molecules conjugated with lipophilic cations (e.g., triphenylphosphonium) or rhodamine, conjugates of plant alkaloids, amino-acid- and peptide-based compounds, and liposomes. This area has several major challenges that need to be confronted. Apart from antioxidants and other redox active molecules, current research aims at developing compounds that are capable of modulating other mitochondria-controlled processes, such as apoptosis and autophagy. Multiple chemically different molecular strategies have been developed as delivery tools that offer broad opportunities for mitochondrial manipulation. Additional studies, and particularly in vivo approaches under physiologically relevant conditions, are necessary to confirm the clinical usefulness of these molecules. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 686–729. PMID:25546574

  15. Angiogenesis in the kidney: a new therapeutic target?

    PubMed Central

    Lerman, Lilach O.; Chade, Alejandro R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review The prevalence of chronic kidney disease has been growing consistently for the past decades. Renal failure is often associated with defective angiogenesis, and recognition of the contribution of the renal microcirculation to the progression of chronic renal disease may aid in the development of therapeutic interventions. Recent findings Intra-renal proliferation, remodeling, and/or rarefaction of microvessels in response to injury can all aggravate nephron damage, and experimental evidence suggests that they may constitute the early steps in the complex pathways involved in progressive renal injury. Recent studies showed the benefits of targeted interventions deemed to promote neovascularization (e.g. progenitor cells, growth factors) on the ischemic myocardium and brain and in a few models of renal disease. Summary Evidence of aberrant renal microvascular architecture in various forms of renal disease provides the impetus to attempt modulating the renal microcirculation to interfere with the disease process. Targeted interventions to preserve the renal microcirculation may not only decrease the evolving injury in renal vascular disease but also potentially constitute a coadjuvant intervention to become part of a comprehensive management plan to improve the success of parallel strategies to preserve renal function, such as revascularization. PMID:19430335

  16. Toward intracellular targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics: progress and clinical outlook for brain tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Hetal; Debinski, Waldemar

    2012-08-01

    A number of anti-cancer drugs have their targets localized to particular intracellular compartments. These drugs reach the targets mainly through diffusion, dependent on biophysical and biochemical forces that allow cell penetration. This means that both cancer cells and normal cells will be subjected to such diffusion; hence many of these drugs, like chemotherapeutics, are potentially toxic and the concentration achieved at the site of their action is often suboptimal. The same relates to radiation that indiscriminately affects normal and diseased cells. However, nature-designed systems enable compounds present in the extracellular environment to end up inside the cell and even travel to more specific intracellular compartments. For example, viruses and bacterial toxins can more or less specifically recognize eukaryotic cells, enter these cells, and direct some protein portions to designated intracellular areas. These phenomena have led to creative thinking, such as employing viruses or bacterial toxins for cargo delivery to cells and, more specifically, to cancer cells. Proteins can be genetically engineered in order to not only mimic what viruses and bacterial toxins can do, but also to add new functions, extending or changing the intracellular routes. It is possible to make conjugates or, more preferably, single-chain proteins that recognize cancer cells and deliver cargo inside the cells, even to the desired subcellular compartment. These findings offer new opportunities to deliver drugs/labels only to cancer cells and only to their site of action within the cells. The development of such dual-specificity vectors for targeting cancer cells is an attractive and potentially safer and more efficacious way of delivering drugs. We provide examples of this approach for delivering brain cancer therapeutics, using a specific biomarker on glioblastoma tumor cells.

  17. Activin signaling as an emerging target for therapeutic interventions

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Nakatani, Masashi; Hitachi, Keisuke; Uezumi, Akiyoshi; Sunada, Yoshihide; Ageta, Hiroshi; Inokuchi, Kaoru

    2009-01-01

    After the initial discovery of activins as important regulators of reproduction, novel and diverse roles have been unraveled for them. Activins are expressed in various tissues and have a broad range of activities including the regulation of gonadal function, hormonal homeostasis, growth and differentiation of musculoskeletal tissues, regulation of growth and metastasis of cancer cells, proliferation and differentiation of embryonic stem cells, and even higher brain functions. Activins signal through a combination of type I and II transmembrane serine/threonine kinase receptors. Activin receptors are shared by multiple transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) ligands such as myostatin, growth and differentiation factor-11 and nodal. Thus, although the activity of each ligand is distinct, they are also redundant, both physiologically and pathologically in vivo. Activin receptors activated by ligands phosphorylate the receptor-regulated Smads for TGF-β, Smad2 and 3. The Smad proteins then undergo multimerization with the co-mediator Smad4, and translocate into the nucleus to regulate the transcription of target genes in cooperation with nuclear cofactors. Signaling through receptors and Smads is controlled by multiple mechanisms including phosphorylation and other posttranslational modifications such as sumoylation, which affect potein localization, stability and transcriptional activity. Non-Smad signaling also plays an important role in activin signaling. Extracellularly, follistatin and related proteins bind to activins and related TGF-β ligands, and control the signaling and availability of ligands. The functions of activins through activin receptors are pleiotrophic, cell type-specific and contextual, and they are involved in the etiology and pathogenesis of a variety of diseases. Accordingly, activin signaling may be a target for therapeutic interventions. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on activin signaling and discuss the potential roles of

  18. Neuropilin-1-targeted gold nanoparticles enhance therapeutic efficacy of platinum(IV) drug for prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Huo, Shuaidong; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Juan; Tan, Aaron; Li, Shengliang; Jin, Shubin; Xue, Xiangdong; Zhao, YuanYuan; Ji, Tianjiao; Han, Lu; Liu, Hong; Zhang, XiaoNing; Zhang, Jinchao; Zou, Guozhang; Wang, Tianyou; Tang, Suoqin; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2014-05-27

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs such as cisplatin, oxaliplatin, and carboplatin are some of the most potent chemotherapeutic agents but have limited applications due to severe dose-limiting side effects and a tendency for cancer cells to rapidly develop resistance. The therapeutic index can be improved through use of nanocarrier systems to target cancer cells efficiently. We developed a unique strategy to deliver a platinum(IV) drug to prostate cancer cells by constructing glutathione-stabilized (Au@GSH) gold nanoparticles. Glutathione (GSH) has well-known antioxidant properties, which lead to cancer regression. Here, we exploit the advantages of both the antioxidant properties and high surface-area-to-volume ratio of Au@GSH NPs to demonstrate their potential for delivery of a platinum(IV) drug by targeting the neuropilin-1 receptor (Nrp-1). A lethal dose of a platinum(IV) drug functionalized with the Nrp-1-targeting peptide (CRGDK) was delivered specifically to prostate cancer cells in vitro. Targeted peptide ensures specific binding to the Nrp-1 receptor, leading to enhanced cellular uptake level and cell toxicity. The nanocarriers were themselves nontoxic, but exhibited high cytotoxicity and increased efficacy when functionalized with the targeting peptide and drug. The uptake of drug-loaded nanocarriers is dependent on the interaction with Nrp-1 in cell lines expressing high (PC-3) and low (DU-145) levels of Nrp-1, as confirmed through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and confocal microscopy. The nanocarriers have effective anticancer activity, through upregulation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) protein (p50 and p65) expression and activation of NF-κB-DNA-binding activity. Our preliminary investigations with platinum(IV)-functionalized gold nanoparticles along with a targeting peptide hold significant promise for future cancer treatment.

  19. Neuropilin-1-targeted gold nanoparticles enhance therapeutic efficacy of platinum(IV) drug for prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Huo, Shuaidong; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Juan; Tan, Aaron; Li, Shengliang; Jin, Shubin; Xue, Xiangdong; Zhao, YuanYuan; Ji, Tianjiao; Han, Lu; Liu, Hong; Zhang, XiaoNing; Zhang, Jinchao; Zou, Guozhang; Wang, Tianyou; Tang, Suoqin; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2014-05-27

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs such as cisplatin, oxaliplatin, and carboplatin are some of the most potent chemotherapeutic agents but have limited applications due to severe dose-limiting side effects and a tendency for cancer cells to rapidly develop resistance. The therapeutic index can be improved through use of nanocarrier systems to target cancer cells efficiently. We developed a unique strategy to deliver a platinum(IV) drug to prostate cancer cells by constructing glutathione-stabilized (Au@GSH) gold nanoparticles. Glutathione (GSH) has well-known antioxidant properties, which lead to cancer regression. Here, we exploit the advantages of both the antioxidant properties and high surface-area-to-volume ratio of Au@GSH NPs to demonstrate their potential for delivery of a platinum(IV) drug by targeting the neuropilin-1 receptor (Nrp-1). A lethal dose of a platinum(IV) drug functionalized with the Nrp-1-targeting peptide (CRGDK) was delivered specifically to prostate cancer cells in vitro. Targeted peptide ensures specific binding to the Nrp-1 receptor, leading to enhanced cellular uptake level and cell toxicity. The nanocarriers were themselves nontoxic, but exhibited high cytotoxicity and increased efficacy when functionalized with the targeting peptide and drug. The uptake of drug-loaded nanocarriers is dependent on the interaction with Nrp-1 in cell lines expressing high (PC-3) and low (DU-145) levels of Nrp-1, as confirmed through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and confocal microscopy. The nanocarriers have effective anticancer activity, through upregulation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) protein (p50 and p65) expression and activation of NF-κB-DNA-binding activity. Our preliminary investigations with platinum(IV)-functionalized gold nanoparticles along with a targeting peptide hold significant promise for future cancer treatment. PMID:24730557

  20. RGD Peptide Cell-Surface Display Enhances the Targeting and Therapeutic Efficacy of Attenuated Salmonella-mediated Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Hwan; Zheng, Jin Hai; Nguyen, Vu Hong; Jiang, Sheng-Nan; Kim, Dong-Yeon; Szardenings, Michael; Min, Jung Hyun; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria-based anticancer therapies aim to overcome the limitations of current cancer therapy by actively targeting and efficiently removing cancer. To achieve this goal, new approaches that target and maintain bacterial drugs at sufficient concentrations during the therapeutic window are essential. Here, we examined the tumor tropism of attenuated Salmonella typhimurium displaying the RGD peptide sequence (ACDCRGDCFCG) on the external loop of outer membrane protein A (OmpA). RGD-displaying Salmonella strongly bound to cancer cells overexpressing αvβ3, but weakly bound to αvβ3-negative cancer cells, suggesting the feasibility of displaying a preferential homing peptide on the bacterial surface. In vivo studies revealed that RGD-displaying Salmonellae showed strong targeting efficiency, resulting in the regression in αvβ3-overexpressing cancer xenografts, and prolonged survival of mouse models of human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) and human melanoma (MDA-MB-435). Thus, surface engineering of Salmonellae to display RGD peptides increases both their targeting efficiency and therapeutic effect. PMID:27446500

  1. RGD Peptide Cell-Surface Display Enhances the Targeting and Therapeutic Efficacy of Attenuated Salmonella-mediated Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung-Hwan; Zheng, Jin Hai; Nguyen, Vu Hong; Jiang, Sheng-Nan; Kim, Dong-Yeon; Szardenings, Michael; Min, Jung Hyun; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E.; Min, Jung-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria-based anticancer therapies aim to overcome the limitations of current cancer therapy by actively targeting and efficiently removing cancer. To achieve this goal, new approaches that target and maintain bacterial drugs at sufficient concentrations during the therapeutic window are essential. Here, we examined the tumor tropism of attenuated Salmonella typhimurium displaying the RGD peptide sequence (ACDCRGDCFCG) on the external loop of outer membrane protein A (OmpA). RGD-displaying Salmonella strongly bound to cancer cells overexpressing αvβ3, but weakly bound to αvβ3-negative cancer cells, suggesting the feasibility of displaying a preferential homing peptide on the bacterial surface. In vivo studies revealed that RGD-displaying Salmonellae showed strong targeting efficiency, resulting in the regression in αvβ3-overexpressing cancer xenografts, and prolonged survival of mouse models of human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) and human melanoma (MDA-MB-435). Thus, surface engineering of Salmonellae to display RGD peptides increases both their targeting efficiency and therapeutic effect. PMID:27446500

  2. Cdc7 is a potent anti-cancer target in pancreatic cancer due to abrogation of the DNA origin activation checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Huggett, Matthew T.; Tudzarova, Slavica; Proctor, Ian; Loddo, Marco; Keane, Margaret G.; Stoeber, Kai; Williams, Gareth H.; Pereira, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cdc7 is a serine/threonine kinase which is responsible for the ‘firing’ of replication origins leading to initiation of DNA replication. Inhibition or depletion of Cdc7 in normal cells triggers a DNA origin activation checkpoint causing a reversible G1 arrest. Here we investigate Cdc7 as a novel therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer. Experimental design Cdc7 target validation was performed by immunoexpression profiling in a cohort of 73 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma including 24 controls. Secondly Cdc7 kinase was targeted in Capan-1 and PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cell line models using either an siRNA against Cdc7 or alternatively a small molecule inhibitor (SMI) of Cdc7 (PHA-767491). Results Cdc7 was significantly overexpressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma compared to benign pancreatic tissue (median LI 34.3% vs. 1.3%; P<0.0001). Cdc7 knockdown using siRNA in Capan-1 and PANC-1 cells resulted in marked apoptotic cell death when compared with control cells. A prominent sub-G1 peak was seen on flow cytometry (sub-G1 51% vs. 3% and 45% vs. 0.7% in Capan-1 and PANC-1 cells, respectively). Annexin V labelling confirmed apoptosis in 64% vs. 11% and 75% vs. 8%, respectively. Western blotting showed cleavage of PARP-1 and caspase-3 and presence of γH2A.X. TUNEL assay showed strong staining in treated cells. These results were mirrored following Cdc7 kinase inhibition with PHA-767491. Conclusions Our findings show that Cdc7 is a potent anti-cancer target in pancreatic adenocarcinoma and that Cdc7 immunoexpression levels might be used as a companion diagnostic to predict response to therapeutic siRNAs or SMIs directed against this kinase. PMID:26921250

  3. Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles for Targeted Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luk, Brian Tsengchi

    interactions between membranes and synthetic nanoparticles, and how the membrane coating technique faithfully translates the complexities of natural cellular membranes to the nanoscale. The following three sections explore potential therapeutic applications of membrane-coated nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery, biodetoxification, and immunomodulation. Ultimately, cell membrane-cloaked nanoparticles have the potential to significantly change the landscape of nanomedicine. The novel applications presented in this thesis are just a few of many examples currently being researched, with countless more avenues waiting to be explored.

  4. Preliminary anti-cancer photodynamic therapeutic in vitro studies with mixed-metal binuclear ruthenium(II)-vanadium(IV) complexes.

    PubMed

    Holder, Alvin A; Taylor, Patrick; Magnusen, Anthony R; Moffett, Erick T; Meyer, Kyle; Hong, Yiling; Ramsdale, Stuart E; Gordon, Michelle; Stubbs, Javelyn; Seymour, Luke A; Acharya, Dhiraj; Weber, Ralph T; Smith, Paul F; Dismukes, G Charles; Ji, Ping; Menocal, Laura; Bai, Fengwei; Williams, Jennie L; Cropek, Donald M; Jarrett, William L

    2013-09-01

    We report the synthesis and characterisation of mixed-metal binuclear ruthenium(II)-vanadium(IV) complexes, which were used as potential photodynamic therapeutic agents for melanoma cell growth inhibition. The novel complexes, [Ru(pbt)2(phen2DTT)](PF6)2·1.5H2O 1 (where phen2DTT = 1,4-bis(1,10-phenanthrolin-5-ylsulfanyl)butane-2,3-diol and pbt = 2-(2'-pyridyl)benzothiazole) and [Ru(pbt)2(tpphz)](PF6)2·3H2O 2 (where tpphz = tetrapyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c:3'',2''-h:2''',3'''-j]phenazine) were synthesised and characterised. Compound 1 was reacted with [VO(sal-L-tryp)(H2O)] (where sal-L-tryp = N-salicylidene-L-tryptophanate) to produce [Ru(pbt)2(phen2DTT)VO(sal-L-tryp)](PF6)2·5H2O 4; while [VO(sal-L-tryp)(H2O)] was reacted with compound 2 to produce [Ru(pbt)2(tpphz)VO(sal-L-tryp)](PF6)2·6H2O 3. All complexes were characterised by elemental analysis, HRMS, ESI MS, UV-visible absorption, ESR spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry, where appropriate. In vitro cell toxicity studies (with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay) via dark and light reaction conditions were carried out with sodium diaqua-4,4',4'',4''' tetrasulfophthalocyaninecobaltate(II) (Na4[Co(tspc)(H2O)2]), [VO(sal-L-tryp)(phen)]·H2O, and the chloride salts of complexes 3 and 4. Such studies involved A431, human epidermoid carcinoma cells; human amelanotic malignant melanoma cells; and HFF, non-cancerous human skin fibroblast cells. Both chloride salts of complexes 3 and 4 were found to be more toxic to melanoma cells than to non-cancerous fibroblast cells, and preferentially led to apoptosis of the melanoma cells over non-cancerous skin cells. The anti-cancer property of the chloride salts of complexes 3 and 4 was further enhanced when treated cells were exposed to light, while no such effect was observed on non-cancerous skin fibroblast cells. ESR and (51)V NMR spectroscopic studies were also used to assess the stability of the chloride salts of complexes 3

  5. LGR5 expressing cells of hair follicle as potential targets for antibody mediated anti-cancer laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Boris V.

    2013-02-01

    Near infrared laser immunotherapy becomes now a new promising research field to cure the patients with cancers. One of the critical limitation in medical application of this treatment is availability of the specific markers for delivery of laser-sensitive nanoparticles. When coupled to antibodies to the cancer stem cells markers these nanoparticles may be delivered to the cancer tissue and mediate the laser induced thermolysis of the cancer stem cells that initiate and drive growth of cancer. This paper addresses the Lgr5 cell surface marker mediating the Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction as a potential target for anti-cancer laser immunotherapy of skin cancers.

  6. Novel p53-dependent anticancer strategy by targeting iron signaling and BNIP3L-induced mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Wilfinger, Nastasia; Austin, Shane; Scheiber-Mojdehkar, Barbara; Berger, Walter; Reipert, Siegfried; Praschberger, Monika; Paur, Jakob; Trondl, Robert; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Zielinski, Christoph C.; Nowikovsky, Karin

    2016-01-01

    This study identifies BNIP3L as the key regulator of p53-dependent cell death mechanism in colon cancer cells targeted by the novel gallium based anticancer drug, KP46. KP46 specifically accumulated into mitochondria where it caused p53-dependent morphological and functional damage impairing mitochondrial dynamics and bioenergetics. Furthermore, competing with iron for cellular uptake, KP46 lowered the intracellular labile iron pools and intracellular heme. Accordingly, p53 accumulated in the nucleus where it activated its transcriptional target BNIP3L, a BH3 only domain protein with functions in apoptosis and mitophagy. Upregulated BNIP3L sensitized the mitochondrial permeability transition and strongly induced PARKIN-mediated mitochondrial clearance and cellular vacuolization. Downregulation of BNIP3L entirely rescued cell viability caused by exposure of KP46 for 24 hours, confirming that early induced cell death was regulated by BNIP3L. Altogether, targeting BNIP3L in wild-type p53 colon cancer cells is a novel anticancer strategy activating iron depletion signaling and the mitophagy-related cell death pathway. PMID:26517689

  7. Quinoxaline-Based Scaffolds Targeting Tyrosine Kinases and Their Potential Anticancer Activity.

    PubMed

    El Newahie, Aliya M S; Ismail, Nasser S M; Abou El Ella, Dalal A; Abouzid, Khaled A M

    2016-05-01

    Quinoxaline derivatives, also called benzopyrazines, are an important class of heterocyclic compounds. Quinoxalines have drawn great attention due to their wide spectrum of biological activities. They are considered as an important basis for anticancer drugs due to their potential activity as protein kinase inhibitors. In this review, we focus on the chemistry of the quinoxaline derivatives, the strategies for their synthesis, their potential activities against various tyrosine kinases, and on the structure-activity relationship studies reported to date.

  8. Matrix metalloproteinases as therapeutic targets for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Craig, Vanessa J; Zhang, Li; Hagood, James S; Owen, Caroline A

    2015-11-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a restrictive lung disease that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Current medical therapies are not fully effective at limiting mortality in patients with IPF, and new therapies are urgently needed. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are proteinases that, together, can degrade all components of the extracellular matrix and numerous nonmatrix proteins. MMPs and their inhibitors, tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs), have been implicated in the pathogenesis of IPF based upon the results of clinical studies reporting elevated levels of MMPs (including MMP-1, MMP-7, MMP-8, and MMP-9) in IPF blood and/or lung samples. Surprisingly, studies of gene-targeted mice in murine models of pulmonary fibrosis (PF) have demonstrated that most MMPs promote (rather than inhibit) the development of PF and have identified diverse mechanisms involved. These mechanisms include MMPs: (1) promoting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMP-3 and MMP-7); (2) increasing lung levels or activity of profibrotic mediators or reducing lung levels of antifibrotic mediators (MMP-3, MMP-7, and MMP-8); (3) promoting abnormal epithelial cell migration and other aberrant repair processes (MMP-3 and MMP-9); (4) inducing the switching of lung macrophage phenotypes from M1 to M2 types (MMP-10 and MMP-28); and (5) promoting fibrocyte migration (MMP-8). Two MMPs, MMP-13 and MMP-19, have antifibrotic activities in murine models of PF, and two MMPs, MMP-1 and MMP-10, have the potential to limit fibrotic responses to injury. Herein, we review what is known about the contributions of MMPs and TIMPs to the pathogenesis of IPF and discuss their potential as therapeutic targets for IPF.

  9. MicroRNAs as a therapeutic target for cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Paras Kumar; Tyagi, Neetu; Kumar, Munish; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2009-01-01

    Abstract MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are tiny, endogenous, conserved, non-coding RNAs that negatively modulate gene expression by either promoting the degradation of mRNA or down-regulating the protein production by translational repression. They maintain optimal dose of cellular proteins and thus play a crucial role in the regulation of biological functions. Recent discovery of miRNAs in the heart and their differential expressions in pathological conditions provide glimpses of undiscovered regulatory mechanisms underlying cardiovascular diseases. Nearly 50 miRNAs are overexpressed in mouse heart. The implication of several miRNAs in cardiovascular diseases has been well documented such as miRNA-1 in arrhythmia, miRNA-29 in cardiac fibrosis, miRNA-126 in angiogenesis and miRNA-133 in cardiac hypertrophy. Aberrant expression of Dicer (an enzyme required for maturation of all miRNAs) during heart failure indicates its direct involvement in the regulation of cardiac diseases. MiRNAs and Dicer provide a particular layer of network of precise gene regulation in heart and vascular tissues in a spatiotemporal manner suggesting their implications as a powerful intervention tool for therapy. The combined strategy of manipulating miRNAs in stem cells for their target directed differentiation and optimizing the mode of delivery of miRNAs to the desired cells would determine the future potential of miRNAs to treat a disease. This review embodies the recent progress made in microRNomics of cardiovascular diseases and the future of miRNAs as a potential therapeutic target - the putative challenges and the approaches to deal with it. PMID:19320780

  10. Small Molecule Sequential Dual-Targeting Theragnostic Strategy (SMSDTTS): from Preclinical Experiments towards Possible Clinical Anticancer Applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junjie; Oyen, Raymond; Verbruggen, Alfons; Ni, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    Hitting the evasive tumor cells proves challenging in targeted cancer therapies. A general and unconventional anticancer approach namely small molecule sequential dual-targeting theragnostic strategy (SMSDTTS) has recently been introduced with the aims to target and debulk the tumor mass, wipe out the residual tumor cells, and meanwhile enable cancer detectability. This dual targeting approach works in two steps for systemic delivery of two naturally derived drugs. First, an anti-tubulin vascular disrupting agent, e.g., combretastatin A4 phosphate (CA4P), is injected to selectively cut off tumor blood supply and to cause massive necrosis, which nevertheless always leaves peripheral tumor residues. Secondly, a necrosis-avid radiopharmaceutical, namely 131I-hypericin (131I-Hyp), is administered the next day, which accumulates in intratumoral necrosis and irradiates the residual cancer cells with beta particles. Theoretically, this complementary targeted approach may biologically and radioactively ablate solid tumors and reduce the risk of local recurrence, remote metastases, and thus cancer mortality. Meanwhile, the emitted gamma rays facilitate radio-scintigraphy to detect tumors and follow up the therapy, hence a simultaneous theragnostic approach. SMSDTTS has now shown promise from multicenter animal experiments and may demonstrate unique anticancer efficacy in upcoming preliminary clinical trials. In this short review article, information about the two involved agents, the rationale of SMSDTTS, its preclinical antitumor efficacy, multifocal targetability, simultaneous theragnostic property, and toxicities of the dose regimens are summarized. Meanwhile, possible drawbacks, practical challenges and future improvement with SMSDTTS are discussed, which hopefully may help to push forward this strategy from preclinical experiments towards possible clinical applications. PMID:23412554

  11. Trivanillic polyphenols with anticancer cytostatic effects through the targeting of multiple kinases and intracellular Ca2+ release.

    PubMed

    Lamoral-Theys, Delphine; Wauthoz, Nathalie; Heffeter, Petra; Mathieu, Véronique; Jungwirth, Utte; Lefranc, Florence; Nève, Jean; Dubois, Jacques; Dufrasne, François; Amighi, Karim; Berger, Walter; Gailly, Philippe; Kiss, Robert

    2012-07-01

    Cancer cells exhibit de-regulation of multiple cellular signalling pathways and treatments of various types of cancers with polyphenols are promising. We recently reported the synthesis of a series of 33 novel divanillic and trivanillic polyphenols that displayed anticancer activity, at least in vitro, through inhibiting various kinases. This study revealed that minor chemical modifications of a trivanillate scaffold could convert cytotoxic compounds into cytostatic ones. Compound 13c, a tri-chloro derivative of trivanillic ester, displayed marked inhibitory activities against FGF-, VEGF-, EGF- and Src-related kinases, all of which are implicated not only in angiogenesis but also in the biological aggressiveness of various cancer types. The pan-anti-kinase activity of 13c occurs at less than one-tenth of its mean IC(50) in vitro growth inhibitory concentrations towards a panel of 12 cancer cell lines. Of the 26 kinases for which 13c inhibited their activity by >75%, eight (Yes, Fyn, FGF-R1, EGFR, Btk, Mink, Ret and Itk) are implicated in control of the actin cytoskeleton organization to varying degrees. Compound 13c accordingly impaired the typical organization of the actin cytoskeleton in human U373 glioblastoma cells. The pan-anti-kinase activity and actin cytoskeleton organization impairment provoked by 13c concomitantly occurs with calcium homeostasis impairment but without provoking MDR phenotype activation. All of these anticancer properties enabled 13c to confer therapeutic benefits in vivo in a mouse melanoma pseudometastatic lung model. These data argue in favour of further chemically modifying trivanillates to produce novel and potent anticancer drugs. PMID:21810170

  12. Trivanillic polyphenols with anticancer cytostatic effects through the targeting of multiple kinases and intracellular Ca2+ release

    PubMed Central

    Lamoral-Theys, Delphine; Wauthoz, Nathalie; Heffeter, Petra; Mathieu, Véronique; Jungwirth, Utte; Lefranc, Florence; Nève, Jean; Dubois, Jacques; Dufrasne, François; Amighi, Karim; Berger, Walter; Gailly, Philippe; Kiss, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cancer cells exhibit de-regulation of multiple cellular signalling pathways and treatments of various types of cancers with polyphenols are promising. We recently reported the synthesis of a series of 33 novel divanillic and trivanillic polyphenols that displayed anticancer activity, at least in vitro, through inhibiting various kinases. This study revealed that minor chemical modifications of a trivanillate scaffold could convert cytotoxic compounds into cytostatic ones. Compound 13c, a tri-chloro derivative of trivanillic ester, displayed marked inhibitory activities against FGF-, VEGF-, EGF- and Src-related kinases, all of which are implicated not only in angiogenesis but also in the biological aggressiveness of various cancer types. The pan-anti-kinase activity of 13c occurs at less than one-tenth of its mean IC50in vitro growth inhibitory concentrations towards a panel of 12 cancer cell lines. Of the 26 kinases for which 13c inhibited their activity by >75%, eight (Yes, Fyn, FGF-R1, EGFR, Btk, Mink, Ret and Itk) are implicated in control of the actin cytoskeleton organization to varying degrees. Compound 13c accordingly impaired the typical organization of the actin cytoskeleton in human U373 glioblastoma cells. The pan-anti-kinase activity and actin cytoskeleton organization impairment provoked by 13c concomitantly occurs with calcium homeostasis impairment but without provoking MDR phenotype activation. All of these anticancer properties enabled 13c to confer therapeutic benefits in vivo in a mouse melanoma pseudometastatic lung model. These data argue in favour of further chemically modifying trivanillates to produce novel and potent anticancer drugs. PMID:21810170

  13. Mitochondria as a Therapeutic Target for Aging and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, P. Hemachandra; Reddy, Tejaswini P.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are cytoplasmic organelles responsible for life and death. Extensive evidence from animal models, postmortem brain studies of and clinical studies of aging and neurodegenerative diseases suggests that mitochondrial function is defective in aging and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Several lines of research suggest that mitochondrial abnormalities, including defects in oxidative phosphorylation, increased accumulation of mitochondrial DNA defects, impaired calcium influx, accumulation of mutant proteins in mitochondria, and mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation are important cellular changes in both early and late-onset neurodegenerative diseases. Further, emerging evidence suggests that structural changes in mitochondria, including increased mitochondrial fragmentation and decreased mitochondrial fusion, are critical factors associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in aging and neurodegenerative diseases. This paper discusses research that elucidates features of mitochondria that are associated with cellular dysfunction in aging and neurodegenerative diseases and discusses mitochondrial structural and functional changes, and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics in neurodegenerative diseases. It also outlines mitochondria-targeted therapeutics in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21470101

  14. Regression of Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy: Signaling Pathways and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jianglong; Kang, Y. James

    2012-01-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy is a key risk factor for heart failure. It is associated with increased interstitial fibrosis, cell death and cardiac dysfunction. The progression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy has long been considered as irreversible. However, recent clinical observations and experimental studies have produced evidence showing the reversal of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Left ventricle assist devices used in heart failure patients for bridging to transplantation not only improve peripheral circulation but also often cause reverse remodeling of the geometry and recovery of the function of the heart. Dietary supplementation with physiologically relevant levels of copper can reverse pathological cardiac hypertrophy in mice. Angiogenesis is essential and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a constitutive factor for the regression. The action of VEGF is mediated by VEGF receptor-1, whose activation is linked to cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase-1 (PKG-1) signaling pathways, and inhibition of cyclic GMP degradation leads to regression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Most of these pathways are regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor. Potential therapeutic targets for promoting the regression include: promotion of angiogenesis, selective enhancement of VEGF receptor-1 signaling pathways, stimulation of PKG-1 pathways, and sustention of hypoxia-inducible factor transcriptional activity. More exciting insights into the regression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy are emerging. The time of translating the concept of regression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy to clinical practice is coming. PMID:22750195

  15. DNA methylation as a target of epigenetic therapeutics in cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Keqin K; Li, Fangcheng; Li, Qiushi S; Yang, Kun; Jin, Bilian

    2013-02-01

    Epigenetic alterations have been implicated in the development and progression of human cancer. It is noteworthy that epigenetic modifications, in contrast to genetic mutations, are intrinsically reversible. This triggers an impressive interest of researchers in treatment of cancer patients via targeting epigenetic mechanisms, leading to subsequent intensive investigations of epigenetic drugs as a novel therapeutic intervention. DNA methylation, the major form of epigenetic modifications, is catalyzed by the maintenance DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1 and/or the de novo methyltransferases DNMT3A and DNMT3B. Aberrant expression of DNMTs and disruption of DNA methylation are closely associated with multiple forms of cancer, although the exact mechanisms underlying this link remain elusive. An array of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) frequently sustain promoter hypermethylation, which results in epigenetic silencing of these genes and makes cancer cells acquire growth advantages. DNA demethylating agents, re-activating TSGs via inhibiting hypermethylation of their promoter regions, are currently being tested in clinical trials, and several of them are already applied in clinics. DNA demethylating agents, used either alone or in combination with other agents, such as chemotherapeutic drugs and the histone deacetylase inhibitors, have shown to be effective in treatment of cancer, although only in a small set of patients. In this review, we examine and discuss the most recent advances in epigenetic therapy of cancer, with a focus on DNA demethylating agents.

  16. Innate inflammatory responses in stroke: mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Youl; Kawabori, Masahito; Yenari, Midori A.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a frequent cause of long-term disability and death worldwide. Ischemic stroke is more commonly encountered compared to hemorrhagic stroke, and leads to tissue death by ischemia due to occlusion of a cerebral artery. Inflammation is known to result as a result of ischemic injury, long thought to be involved in initiating the recovery and repair process. However, work over the past few decades indicates that aspects of this inflammatory response may in fact be detrimental to stroke outcome. Acutely, inflammation appears to have a detrimental effect, and anti-inflammatory treatments have been been studied as a potential therapeutic target. Chronically, reports suggest that post-ischemic inflammation is also essential for the tissue repairing and remodeling. The majority of the work in this area has centered around innate immune mechanisms, which will be the focus of this review. This review describes the different key players in neuroinflammation and their possible detrimental and protective effects in stroke. A better understanding of the roles of the different immune cells and their temporal profile of damage versus repair will help to clarify more effective modulation of inflammation post stroke. Introduction Stroke refers to conditions caused by occlusion and/or rupture of blood vessels in the brain, and is a leading cause of death and disability in the industrialized world. PMID:24372209

  17. BRD4 is a novel therapeutic target for liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ning; Hah, Nasun; Yu, Ruth T.; Sherman, Mara H.; Benner, Chris; Leblanc, Mathias; He, Mingxiao; Liddle, Christopher; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is characterized by the persistent deposition of extracellular matrix components by hepatic stellate cell (HSC)-derived myofibroblasts. It is the histological manifestation of progressive, but reversible wound-healing processes. An unabated fibrotic response results in chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, a pathological precursor of hepatocellular carcinoma. We report here that JQ1, a small molecule inhibitor of bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4), a member of bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) proteins, abrogate cytokine-induced activation of HSCs. Cistromic analyses reveal that BRD4 is highly enriched at enhancers associated with genes involved in multiple profibrotic pathways, where BRD4 is colocalized with profibrotic transcription factors. Furthermore, we show that JQ1 is not only protective, but can reverse the fibrotic response in carbon tetrachloride-induced fibrosis in mouse models. Our results implicate that BRD4 can act as a global genomic regulator to direct the fibrotic response through its coordinated regulation of myofibroblast transcription. This suggests BRD4 as a potential therapeutic target for patients with fibrotic complications. PMID:26644586

  18. 14-3-3 proteins as potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Meyerkord, Cheryl L.; Du, Yuhong; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Fu, Haian

    2011-01-01

    The 14-3-3 family of phosphoserine/phosphothreonine-binding proteins dynamically regulates the activity of client proteins in various signaling pathways that control diverse physiological and pathological processes. In response to environmental cues, 14-3-3 proteins orchestrate the highly regulated flow of signals through complex networks of molecular interactions to achieve well-controlled physiological outputs, such as cell proliferation or differentiation. Accumulating evidence now supports the concept that either an abnormal state of 14-3-3 protein expression, or dysregulation of 14-3-3/client protein interactions, contributes to the development of a large number of human diseases. In particular, clinical investigations in the field of oncology have demonstrated a correlation between upregulated 14-3-3 levels and poor survival of cancer patients. These studies highlight the rapid emergence of 14-3-3 proteins as a novel class of molecular target for potential therapeutic intervention. The current status of 14-3-3 modulator discovery is discussed. PMID:21983031

  19. Interferon-alpha: a therapeutic target in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Crow, Mary K

    2010-02-01

    The long history of elevated interferon (IFN)-alpha in association with disease activity in patients who have systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has assumed high significance in the past decade, with accumulating data strongly supporting broad activation of the type I IFN pathway in cells of patients who have lupus, and association of IFN pathway activation with significant clinical manifestations of SLE and increased disease activity based on validated measures. In addition, a convincing association of IFN pathway activation with the presence of autoantibodies specific for RNA-binding proteins has contributed to delineation of an important role for Toll-like receptor activation by RNA-containing immune complexes in amplifying innate immune system activation and IFN pathway activation. Although the primary triggers of SLE and the IFN pathway remain undefined, rapid progress in lupus genetics is helping define lupus-associated genetic variants with a functional relationship to IFN production or response in patients. Together, the explosion of data and understanding related to the IFN pathway in SLE have readied the lupus community for translation of those insights to improved patient care. Patience will be needed to allow collection of clinical data and biologic specimens across multiple clinical centers required to support testing of IFN activity, IFN-inducible gene expression and chemokine gene products as candidate biomarkers. Meanwhile, promising clinical trials are moving forward to test the safety and efficacy of monoclonal antibody inhibitors of IFN-alpha. Other therapeutic approaches to target the IFN pathway may follow close behind.

  20. GEMINs: potential therapeutic targets for spinal muscular atrophy?

    PubMed Central

    Borg, Rebecca; Cauchi, Ruben J.

    2014-01-01

    The motor neuron degenerative disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) remains one of the most frequently inherited causes of infant mortality. Afflicted patients loose the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene but retain one or more copies of SMN2, a homolog that is incorrectly spliced. Primary treatment strategies for SMA aim at boosting SMN protein levels, which are insufficient in patients. SMN is known to partner with a set of diverse proteins collectively known as GEMINs to form a macromolecular complex. The SMN-GEMINs complex is indispensible for chaperoning the assembly of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs), which are key for pre-mRNA splicing. Pharmaceutics that alleviate the neuromuscular phenotype by restoring the fundamental function of SMN without augmenting its levels are also crucial in the development of an effective treatment. Their use as an adjunct therapy is predicted to enhance benefit to patients. Inspired by the surprising discovery revealing a premier role for GEMINs in snRNP biogenesis together with in vivo studies documenting their requirement for the correct function of the motor system, this review speculates on whether GEMINs constitute valid targets for SMA therapeutic development. PMID:25360080

  1. BRD4 is a novel therapeutic target for liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ning; Hah, Nasun; Yu, Ruth T; Sherman, Mara H; Benner, Chris; Leblanc, Mathias; He, Mingxiao; Liddle, Christopher; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M

    2015-12-22

    Liver fibrosis is characterized by the persistent deposition of extracellular matrix components by hepatic stellate cell (HSC)-derived myofibroblasts. It is the histological manifestation of progressive, but reversible wound-healing processes. An unabated fibrotic response results in chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, a pathological precursor of hepatocellular carcinoma. We report here that JQ1, a small molecule inhibitor of bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4), a member of bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) proteins, abrogate cytokine-induced activation of HSCs. Cistromic analyses reveal that BRD4 is highly enriched at enhancers associated with genes involved in multiple profibrotic pathways, where BRD4 is colocalized with profibrotic transcription factors. Furthermore, we show that JQ1 is not only protective, but can reverse the fibrotic response in carbon tetrachloride-induced fibrosis in mouse models. Our results implicate that BRD4 can act as a global genomic regulator to direct the fibrotic response through its coordinated regulation of myofibroblast transcription. This suggests BRD4 as a potential therapeutic target for patients with fibrotic complications. PMID:26644586

  2. MPS1 kinase as a potential therapeutic target in medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Alimova, Irina; Ng, June; Harris, Peter; Birks, Diane; Donson, Andrew; Taylor, Michael D.; Foreman, Nicholas K.; Venkataraman, Sujatha; Vibhakar, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common type of malignant brain tumor that affects children. Although recent advances in chemotherapy and radiation have improved outcomes, high-risk patients perform poorly with significant morbidity. Gene expression profiling has revealed that monopolar spindle 1 (MPS1) (TTK1) is highly expressed in medulloblastoma patient samples compared to that noted in normal cerebellum. MPS1 is a key regulator of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), a mitotic mechanism specifically required for proper chromosomal alignment and segregation. The SAC can be activated in aneuploid cancer cells and MPS1 is overexpressed in many types of cancers. A previous study has demonstrated the effectiveness of inhibiting MPS1 with small-molecule inhibitors, but the role of MPS1 in medulloblastoma is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated that MPS1 inhibition by shRNA or with a small-molecule drug, NMS-P715, resulted in decreased cell growth, inhibition of clonogenic potential and induction of apoptosis in cells belonging to both the Shh and group 3 medulloblastoma genomic signature. These findings highlight MPS1 as a rational therapeutic target for medulloblastoma. PMID:27633003

  3. Cancer-Associated Myeloproliferation: Old Association, New Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Ryan A.

    2010-01-01

    The association between malignancy and development of a paraneoplastic leukocytosis, the so-called leukemoid reaction, has long been appreciated. Although a leukemoid reaction has conventionally been defined as a peripheral blood leukocytosis composed of both mature and immature granulocytes that exceeds 50,000/μL, a less profound leukocytosis may be appreciated in many patients harboring a malignant disease. More recent insights have shed new light on this long-recognized association, because research performed in both murine models and cancer patients has uncovered multiple mechanisms by which tumors both drive myelopoiesis, sometimes leading to a clinically apparent leukocytosis, and inhibit the differentiation of myeloid cells, resulting in a qualitative change in myelopoiesis. This qualitative change leads to the accumulation of immature myeloid cells, which due to their immune suppressive effects have been collectively called myeloid-derived suppressor cells. More recently, myeloid cells have been shown to promote tumor angiogenesis. Cancer-associated myeloproliferation is not merely a paraneoplastic phenomenon of questionable importance but leads to the suppression of host immunity and promotion of tumor angiogenesis, both of which play an integral part in tumorigenesis and metastasis. Therefore, cancer-associated myeloproliferation represents a novel therapeutic target in cancer that, decades after its recognition, is only now being translated into clinical practice. PMID:20592171

  4. [50 years of hepatology - from therapeutic nihilism to targeted therapies].

    PubMed

    Manns, Michael P

    2013-04-01

    Over the past 50 years significant progress has been made in the whole field of hepatology. Part of this is translation of basic research (biochemistry, immunology, virology, molecular biology and others) into clinical hepatology. This enabled us to understand more about the pathogenesis of liver diseases and led to the discovery of the five major hepatotropic viruses, the identification of hepatocellular autoantigens, and to the development of specific therapies for chronic hepatitis B, C and D. In addition, the molecular basis of most genetic liver diseases has been identified. Significant progress was made in the development of medical therapies for various liver diseases with different underlying etiologies. Surgery significantly contributed to the progress in the management of liver diseases; examples are laparoscopic cholecystectomy and the development of liver transplantation. A multimodal therapeutic algorithm has been established for the therapy of hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC); with Sorafenib "targeted therapy" has entered the area of HCC. The progress made over the last 50 years not only led to an aetiological differentiation of acute and chronic liver diseases but also to specific therapies based on the identification and understanding of the underlying etiology. PMID:23585265

  5. Risk Factors and Therapeutic Targets in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wörmann, Sonja Maria; Algül, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most challenging tumor entities worldwide, characterized as a highly aggressive disease with dismal overall prognosis and an incidence rate equalling mortality rate. Over the last decade, substantial progress has been made to define the morphological changes and key genetic events in pancreatic carcinogenesis. And yet, it is still unclear what factors trigger PC. Some risk factors appear to be associated with sex, age, race/ethnicity, or other rare genetic conditions. Additionally, modifying factors such as smoking, obesity, diabetes, occupational risk factors, etc., increase the potential for acquiring genetic mutations that may result in PC. Another hallmark of PC is its poor response to radio- and chemo-therapy. Current chemotherapeutic regimens could not provide substantial survival benefit with a clear increase in overall survival. Recently, several new approaches to significantly improve the clinical outcome of PC have been described involving downstream signaling cascades desmoplasia and stromal response as well as tumor microenvironment, immune response, vasculature, and angiogenesis. This review summarizes major risk factors for PC and tries to illuminate relevant targets considerable for new therapeutic approaches. PMID:24303367

  6. Heme oxygenase-1 as a potential therapeutic target for hepatoprotection.

    PubMed

    Farombi, Ebenezer Olatunde; Surh, Young Joon

    2006-09-30

    Heme oxygenase (HO), the rate limiting enzyme in the breakdown of heme into carbon monoxide (CO), iron and bilirubin, has recently received overwhelming research attention. To date three mammalian HO isozymes have been identified, and the only inducible form is HO-1 while HO-2 and HO-3 are constitutively expressed. Advances in unveiling signal transduction network indicate that a battery of redox-sensitive transcription factors, such as activator protein-1 (AP-1), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) and nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2), and their upstream kinases including mitogen-activated protein kinases play an important regulatory role in HO-1 gene induction. The products of the HO-catalyzed reaction, particularly CO and biliverdin/bilirubin have been shown to exert protective effects in several organs against oxidative and other noxious stimuli. In this context, it is interesting to note that induction of HO-1 expression contributes to protection against liver damage induced by several chemical compounds such as acetaminophen, carbon tetrachloride and heavy metals, suggesting HO-1 induction as an important cellular endeavor for hepatoprotection. The focus of this review is on the significance of targeted induction of HO-1 as a potential therapeutic strategy to protect against chemically-induced liver injury as well as hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:17002867

  7. Diacylglycerol kinase as a possible therapeutic target for neuronal diseases.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Yasuhito; Saito, Naoaki

    2014-04-07

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) is a lipid kinase converting diacylglycerol to phosphatidic acid, and regulates many enzymes including protein kinase C, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase, and mTOR. To date, ten mammalian DGK subtypes have been cloned and divided into five groups, and they show subtype-specific tissue distribution. Therefore, each DGK subtype is thought to be involved in respective cellular responses by regulating balance of the two lipid messengers, diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. Indeed, the recent researches using DGK knockout mice have clearly demonstrated the importance of DGK in the immune system and its pathophysiological roles in heart and insulin resistance in diabetes. Especially, most subtypes show high expression in brain with subtype specific regional distribution, suggesting that each subtype has important and unique functions in brain. Recently, neuronal functions of some DGK subtypes have accumulated. Here, we introduce DGKs with their structural motifs, summarize the enzymatic properties and neuronal functions, and discuss the possibility of DGKs as a therapeutic target of the neuronal diseases.

  8. Dengue virus RNA polymerase NS5: a potential therapeutic target?

    PubMed

    Rawlinson, Stephen M; Pryor, Melinda J; Wright, Peter J; Jans, David A

    2006-12-01

    Dengue fever (DF)/dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) is the most common arthropod-borne viral infection, where it is now estimated that 2.5-3 billion people world-wide are at risk of infection. Currently there is no available treatment, in the form of vaccine or drug, making eradication of the mosquito vector the only viable control measure, which has proved costly and of limited success. There are a number of different vaccines undergoing testing, but whilst a dengue vaccine is clearly desirable, there are several issues which make live-attenuated vaccines problematic. These include the phenomenon of antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) and the possibility of recombination of attenuated vaccine strains with wild-type flavivirus members reverting vaccines to a virulent form. Until we gain a better understanding of these issues and their associated risks, the safety of any live dengue vaccine cannot be assured. It therefore may be safer and more feasible for therapeutic-based approaches to be developed as an alternative to live vaccines. As our understanding of dengue molecular biology expands, new potential targets for drugs are emerging. One of the most promising is the dengue non-structural protein 5 (NS5), the largest and most highly conserved of the dengue proteins. This review examines the unique properties of NS5, including its functions, interactions, subcellular localisation and regulation, and looks at ways in which some of these may be exploited in our quest for effective drugs.

  9. Targeting CBLB as a potential therapeutic approach for disseminated candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yun; Tang, Juan; Guo, Hui; Zhao, Yixia; Tang, Rong; Ouyang, Song; Zeng, Qiuming; Rappleye, Chad A; Rajaram, Murugesan V S; Schlesinger, Larry S; Tao, Lijian; Brown, Gordon D; Langdon, Wallace Y; Li, Belinda T; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Disseminated candidiasis has become one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired blood stream infections with high mobility and mortality. However, the molecular basis of host defense against disseminated candidiasis remains elusive, and treatment options are limited. Here we report that the E3 ubiquitin ligase CBLB directs polyubiquitination of dectin-1 and dectin-2, two key pattern-recognition receptors for sensing Candida albicans, and their downstream kinase SYK, thus inhibiting dectin-1- and dectin-2-mediated innate immune responses. CBLB deficiency or inactivation protects mice from systemic infection with a lethal dose of C. albicans, and deficiency of dectin-1, dectin-2, or both in Cblb(-/-) mice abrogates this protection. Notably, silencing the Cblb gene in vivo protects mice from lethal systemic C. albicans infection. Our data reveal that CBLB is crucial for homeostatic control of innate immune responses mediated by dectin-1 and dectin-2. Our data also indicate that CBLB represents a potential therapeutic target for protection from disseminated candidiasis. PMID:27428899

  10. [Cyclooxygenase-2: a new therapeutic target in atherosclerosis?].

    PubMed

    Páramo, José A; Beloqui, Oscar; Orbe, Josune

    2006-05-27

    It is now widely accepted that atherosclerosis is a complex chronic inflammatory disorder of the arterial tree associated with several risk factors. From the initial phases to eventual rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques, a low-grade inflammation, also termed microinflammation, appears to play a key pathogenetic role. Systemic inflammatory markers (C reactive protein, cytokines adhesion molecules) also play a role in this process. Experimental and clinical evidence suggests that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), an enzyme which catalyzes the generation of prostaglandins from arachidonic acid, also contributes to lesion formation. Recent reports by our group have demonstrated increased monocyte COX-2 activity and the production of prostaglandin E2 in relation to cardiovascular risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis in asymptomatic subjects. Our findings support the notion that the COX-2/prostaglandin E2 axis may have a role, raising the question as to whether its selective inhibition might be an attractive therapeutic target in atherosclerosis. COX-2 inhibitors, collectively called "coxibs" (celecoxib, rofecoxib, valdecoxib, lumiracoxib, etc), held a promise as anti-inflammatory drugs without the some of the side effects of aspirin or non steroidal antiinflammatory agents. However, clinical studies raise several clinically relevant questions as to their beneficial role in atherosclerosis prevention, because of increased thrombogenicity and cardiovascular risk, and therefore coxibs should be restricted in atherosclerosis-prone patients.

  11. Structure and Potential Cellular Targets of HAMLET-like Anti-Cancer Compounds made from Milk Components.

    PubMed

    Rath, Emma M; Duff, Anthony P; Håkansson, Anders P; Vacher, Catherine S; Liu, Guo Jun; Knott, Robert B; Church, William Bret

    2015-01-01

    The HAMLET family of compounds (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made Lethal to Tumours) was discovered during studies on the properties of human milk, and is a class of protein-lipid complexes having broad spectrum anti-cancer, and some specific anti-bacterial properties. The structure of HAMLET-like compounds consists of an aggregation of partially unfolded protein making up the majority of the compound's mass, with fatty acid molecules bound in the hydrophobic core. This is a novel protein-lipid structure and has only recently been derived by small-angle X-ray scattering analysis. The structure is the basis of a novel cytotoxicity mechanism responsible for anti-cancer activity to all of the around 50 different cancer cell types for which the HAMLET family has been trialled. Multiple cytotoxic mechanisms have been hypothesised for the HAMLET-like compounds, but it is not yet clear which of those are the initiating cytotoxic mechanism(s) and which are subsequent activities triggered by the initiating mechanism(s). In addition to the studies into the structure of these compounds, this review presents the state of knowledge of the anti-cancer aspects of HAMLET-like compounds, the HAMLET-induced cytotoxic activities to cancer and non-cancer cells, and the several prospective cell membrane and intracellular targets of the HAMLET family. The emerging picture is that HAMLET-like compounds initiate their cytotoxic effects on what may be a cancer-specific target in the cell membrane that has yet to be identified. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  12. Targeting inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) for new breast cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaomeng; Bai, Longchuan; Lu, Jianfeng; Liu, Liu; Yang, Chao-Yie; Sun, Haiying

    2012-12-01

    Apoptosis resistance is a hallmark of human cancer. Research in the last two decades has identified key regulators of apoptosis, including inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). These critical apoptosis regulators have been targeted for the development of new cancer therapeutics. In this article, we will discuss three members of IAP proteins, namely XIAP, cIAP1 and cIAP2, as cancer therapeutic targets and the progress made in developing new cancer therapeutic agents to target these IAP proteins.

  13. Anti-cancer drug loaded iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles (Fe@Au) for magnetic drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Kayal, Sibnath; Ramanujan, Raju Vijayaraghavan

    2010-09-01

    Magnetic drug targeting, using core-shell magnetic carrier particles loaded with anti-cancer drugs, is an emerging and significant method of cancer treatment. Gold shell-iron core nanoparticles (Fe@Au) were synthesized by the reverse micelle method with aqueous reactants, surfactant, co-surfactant and oil phase. XRD, XPS, TEM and magnetic property measurements were utilized to characterize these core-shell nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements showed that the particles were superparamagnetic at room temperature and that the saturation magnetization decreased with increasing gold concentration. The anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto these Fe@Au nanoparticle carriers and the drug release profiles showed that upto 25% of adsorbed drug was released in 80 h. It was found that the amine (-NH2) group of DOX binds to the gold shell. An in vitro apparatus simulating the human circulatory system was used to determine the retention of these nanoparticle carriers when exposed to an external magnetic field. A high percentage of magnetic carriers could be retained for physiologically relevant flow speeds of fluid. The present findings show that DOX loaded gold coated iron nanoparticles are promising for magnetically targeted drug delivery. PMID:21133071

  14. Targeted Nanomedicine for Suppression of CD44 and Simultaneous Cell Death Induction in Ovarian Cancer: an Optimal Delivery of siRNA and Anticancer Drug

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vatsal; Taratula, Oleh; Garbuzenko, Olga B.; Taratula, Olena R.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Minko, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The proposed project is aimed at enhancing the efficiency of epithelial ovarian cancer treatment and reducing adverse side effects of chemotherapy using nanotechnology. Overexpression of the CD44 membrane receptor results in tumor initiation, growth, tumor stem cells specific behavior, development of drug resistance, and metastases. We hypothesize that a developed cancer targeted delivery system which combines CD44 siRNA with paclitaxel would successfully deliver its payload inside cancer cells, effectively induce cell death, and prevent metastases. Experimental Design: We synthesized, characterized, and tested a nanoscale-based drug delivery system containing a modified Polypropylenimine (PPI) dendrimer as a carrier; anticancer drug paclitaxel as a cell death inducer; a synthetic analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) peptide as a tumor targeting moiety, and siRNA targeted to CD44 mRNA. The proposed NDDS was tested in vitro and in vivo using metastatic ovarian cancer cells isolated from patients with malignant ascites. Results: We found that in contrast to cells isolated from primary tumors, CD44 was highly overexpressed in metastatic cancer cells. Treatment with the proposed tumor-targeted nanoscale-based nucleic acid and drug delivery system led to the suppression of CD44 mRNA and protein, efficient induction of cell death, effective tumor shrinkage, and prevention of adverse side effects on healthy organs. Conclusion: We show a high therapeutic potential for combinatorial treatment of ovarian carcinoma with a novel drug delivery system that effectively transports siRNA targeting to CD44 mRNA simultaneously with cytotoxic agents. PMID:24036854

  15. Target Acquired: Progress and Promise of Targeted Therapeutics in the Treatment of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Stuchbery, Ryan; Kurganovs, Natalie J; McCoy, Patrick J; Nelson, Colleen C; Hayes, Vanessa M; Corcoran, Niall M; Hovens, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is fundamentally a genomic disease caused by mutations or rearrangements in the DNA or epigenetic machinery of a patient. An emerging field in cancer treatment targets key aberrations arising from the mutational landscape of an individual patient's disease rather than employing a cancer-wide cytotoxic therapy approach. In prostate cancer in particular, where there is an observed variation in response to standard treatments between patients with disease of a similar pathological stage and grade, mutationdirected treatment may grow to be a viable tool for clinicians to tailor more effective treatments. This review will describe a number of mutations across multiple forms of cancer that have been successfully antagonised by targeted therapeutics including their identification, the development of targeted compounds to combat them and the development of resistance to these therapies. This review will continue to examine these same mutations in the treatment and management of prostate cancer; the prevalence of targetable mutations in prostate cancer, recent clinical trials of targeted-agents and the potential or limitations for their use.

  16. COGNITION AS A THERAPEUTIC TARGET IN LATE-LIFE DEPRESSION: POTENTIAL FOR NICOTINIC THERAPEUTICS

    PubMed Central

    Zurkovsky, Lilia; Taylor, Warren D.; Newhouse, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Depression is associated with impairments to cognition and brain function at any age, but such impairments in the elderly are particularly problematic because of the additional burden of normal cognitive aging and in some cases, structural brain pathology. Individuals with late-life depression exhibit impairments in cognition and brain structural integrity, alongside mood dysfunction. Antidepressant treatment improves symptoms in some but not all patients, and those who benefit may not return to the cognitive and functional level of nondepressed elderly. Thus, for comprehensive treatment of late-life depression, it may be necessary to address both the affective and cognitive deficits. In this review, we propose a model for the treatment of late-life depression in which nicotinic stimulation is used to improve cognitive performance and improve the efficacy of an antidepressant treatment of the syndrome of late-life depression. The cholinergic system is well-established as important to cognition. Although muscarinic stimulation may exacerbate depressive symptoms, nicotinic stimulation may improve cognition and neural functioning without a detriment to mood. While some studies of nicotinic subtype specific receptor agonists have shown promise in improving cognitive performance, less is known regarding how nicotinic receptor stimulation affects cognition in depressed elderly patients. Late-life depression thus represents a new therapeutic target for the development of nicotinic agonist drugs and parallel treatment of cognitive dysfunction along with medical and psychological approaches to treating mood dysfunction may be necessary to ensure full resolution of depressive illness in aging. PMID:23933385

  17. Targeting amyloid-degrading enzymes as therapeutic strategies in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Turner, Anthony J; Fisk, Lilia; Nalivaeva, Natalia N

    2004-12-01

    The levels of amyloid beta-peptides (Abeta) in the brain represent a dynamic equilibrium state as a result of their biosynthesis from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by beta- and gamma-secretases, their degradation by a team of amyloid-degrading enzymes, their subsequent oligomerization, and deposition into senile plaques. While most therapeutic attention has focused on developing inhibitors of secretases to prevent Abeta formation, enhancing the rate of Abeta degradation represents an alternative and viable strategy. Current evidence both in vivo and in vitro suggests that there are three major players in amyloid turnover: neprilysin, endothelin converting enzyme(s), and insulin-degrading enzyme, all of which are zinc metallopeptidases. Other proteases have also been implicated in amyloid metabolism, including angiotensin-converting enzyme, and plasmin but for these the evidence is less compelling. Neprilysin and endothelin converting enzyme(s) are homologous membrane proteins of the M13 peptidase family, which normally play roles in the biosynthesis and/or metabolism of regulatory peptides. Insulin-degrading enzyme is structurally and mechanistically distinct. The regional, cellular, and subcellular localizations of these enzymes differ, providing an efficient and diverse mechanism for protecting the brain against the normal accumulation of toxic Abeta peptides. Reduction in expression levels of some of these proteases following insults (e.g., hypoxia and ischemia) or aging might predispose to the development of Alzheimer's disease. Conversely, enhancement of their levels by gene delivery or pharmacological means could be neuroprotective. Even a relatively small enhancement of Abeta metabolism could slow the inexorable progression of the disease. The relative merits of targeting these enzymes for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease will be reviewed and possible side-effects of enhancing their activity evaluated.

  18. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Mechanisms, Redox Considerations, and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Biasi, Fiorella; Leonarduzzi, Gabriella; Oteiza, Patricia I.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Oxidative stress is thought to play a key role in the development of intestinal damage in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), because of its primary involvement in intestinal cells' aberrant immune and inflammatory responses to dietary antigens and to the commensal bacteria. During the active disease phase, activated leukocytes generate not only a wide spectrum of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but also excess oxidative reactions, which markedly alter the redox equilibrium within the gut mucosa, and maintain inflammation by inducing redox-sensitive signaling pathways and transcription factors. Moreover, several inflammatory molecules generate further oxidation products, leading to a self-sustaining and auto-amplifying vicious circle, which eventually impairs the gut barrier. The current treatment of IBD consists of long-term conventional anti-inflammatory therapy and often leads to drug refractoriness or intolerance, limiting patients' quality of life. Immune modulators or anti-tumor necrosis factor α antibodies have recently been used, but all carry the risk of significant side effects and a poor treatment response. Recent developments in molecular medicine point to the possibility of treating the oxidative stress associated with IBD, by designing a proper supplementation of specific lipids to induce local production of anti-inflammatory derivatives, as well as by developing biological therapies that target selective molecules (i.e., nuclear factor-κB, NADPH oxidase, prohibitins, or inflammasomes) involved in redox signaling. The clinical significance of oxidative stress in IBD is now becoming clear, and may soon lead to important new therapeutic options to lessen intestinal damage in this disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1711–1747. PMID:23305298

  19. "Siglec"ting the allergic response for therapeutic targeting.

    PubMed

    Bochner, Bruce S

    2016-06-01

    As a physician-scientist, I have pursued research related to translational immunology with the goal of improving our ability to diagnose and treat allergic, immunologic and other diseases involving eosinophils, basophils and mast cells. We have tried to delineate novel mechanisms of human disease, working whenever possible with primary human cells and tissues, attempting to identify targets that might be amenable to the development of new therapies. As a general strategy, we have compared eosinophils, basophils, mast cells and neutrophils to look for pathways in inflammation that were unique to distinct subsets of these cells. In doing so, the concepts of glycobiology did not enter my mind until we began noticing some intriguing functional differences involving selectins and their ligands among these cell types. One simple observation, that neutrophils were coated with a glycan that allowed them to interact with an endothelial adhesion molecule while eosinophils lacked this structure, pried open the glyco-door for me. Fruitful collaborations with card-carrying glycobiologists soon followed that have forever positively influenced our science, and have enhanced our hypotheses, experimental design, research opportunities and discoveries. Within a few years, we helped to discover Siglec-8, an I-type lectin expressed only on human eosinophils, basophils, mast cells. This receptor, together with its closest mouse counterpart Siglec-F, has been the primary focus of our work now for over a decade. If not for those in the fields of glycobiology and glycoimmunology, my lab would not have made much progress toward the goal of leveraging Siglec-8 for therapeutic purposes.

  20. GABAergic Signaling as Therapeutic Target for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cellot, Giada; Cherubini, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, early in postnatal life exerts a depolarizing and excitatory action. This depends on accumulation of chloride inside the cell via the cation–chloride importer NKCC1, being the expression of the chloride exporter KCC2 very low at birth. The developmentally regulated expression of KCC2 results in extrusion of chloride with age and a shift of GABA from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction. The depolarizing action of GABA leads to intracellular calcium rise through voltage-dependent calcium channels and/or N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. GABA-mediated calcium signals regulate a variety of developmental processes from cell proliferation migration, differentiation, synapse maturation, and neuronal wiring. Therefore, it is not surprising that some forms of neuro-developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are associated with alterations of GABAergic signaling and impairment of the excitatory/inhibitory balance in selective neuronal circuits. In this review, we will discuss how changes of GABAA-mediated neurotransmission affect several forms of ASDs including the Fragile X, the Angelman, and Rett syndromes. Then, we will describe various animal models of ASDs with GABAergic dysfunctions, highlighting their behavioral deficits and the possibility to rescue them by targeting selective components of the GABAergic synapse. In particular, we will discuss how in some cases, reverting the polarity of GABA responses from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction with the diuretic bumetanide, a selective blocker of NKCC1, may have beneficial effects on ASDs, thus opening new therapeutic perspectives for the treatment of these devastating disorders. PMID:25072038

  1. GABAergic signaling as therapeutic target for autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Cellot, Giada; Cherubini, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, early in postnatal life exerts a depolarizing and excitatory action. This depends on accumulation of chloride inside the cell via the cation-chloride importer NKCC1, being the expression of the chloride exporter KCC2 very low at birth. The developmentally regulated expression of KCC2 results in extrusion of chloride with age and a shift of GABA from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction. The depolarizing action of GABA leads to intracellular calcium rise through voltage-dependent calcium channels and/or N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. GABA-mediated calcium signals regulate a variety of developmental processes from cell proliferation migration, differentiation, synapse maturation, and neuronal wiring. Therefore, it is not surprising that some forms of neuro-developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are associated with alterations of GABAergic signaling and impairment of the excitatory/inhibitory balance in selective neuronal circuits. In this review, we will discuss how changes of GABAA-mediated neurotransmission affect several forms of ASDs including the Fragile X, the Angelman, and Rett syndromes. Then, we will describe various animal models of ASDs with GABAergic dysfunctions, highlighting their behavioral deficits and the possibility to rescue them by targeting selective components of the GABAergic synapse. In particular, we will discuss how in some cases, reverting the polarity of GABA responses from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction with the diuretic bumetanide, a selective blocker of NKCC1, may have beneficial effects on ASDs, thus opening new therapeutic perspectives for the treatment of these devastating disorders. PMID:25072038

  2. Target specific delivery of anticancer drug in silk fibroin based 3D distribution model of bone-breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Subia, Bano; Dey, Tuli; Sharma, Shaily; Kundu, Subhas C

    2015-02-01

    To avoid the indiscriminating action of anticancer drugs, the cancer cell specific targeting of drug molecule becomes a preferred choice for the treatment. The successful screening of the drug molecules in 2D culture system requires further validation. The failure of target specific drug in animal model raises the issue of creating a platform in between the in vitro (2D) and in vivo animal testing. The metastatic breast cancer cells migrate and settle at different sites such as bone tissue. This work evaluates the in vitro 3D model of the breast cancer and bone cells to understand the cellular interactions in the presence of a targeted anticancer drug delivery system. The silk fibroin based cytocompatible 3D scaffold is used as in vitro 3D distribution model. Human breast adenocarcinoma and osteoblast like cells are cocultured to evaluate the efficiency of doxorubicin loaded folic acid conjugated silk fibroin nanoparticle as drug delivery system. Decreasing population of the cancer cells, which lower the levels of vascular endothelial growth factors, glucose consumption, and lactate production are observed in the drug treated coculture constructs. The drug treated constructs do not show any major impact on bone mineralization. The diminished expression of osteogenic markers such as osteocalcein and alkaline phosphatase are recorded. The result indicates that this type of silk based 3D in vitro coculture model may be utilized as a bridge between the traditional 2D and animal model system to evaluate the new drug molecule (s) or to reassay the known drug molecules or to develop target specific drug in cancer research. PMID:25557227

  3. Target specific delivery of anticancer drug in silk fibroin based 3D distribution model of bone-breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Subia, Bano; Dey, Tuli; Sharma, Shaily; Kundu, Subhas C

    2015-02-01

    To avoid the indiscriminating action of anticancer drugs, the cancer cell specific targeting of drug molecule becomes a preferred choice for the treatment. The successful screening of the drug molecules in 2D culture system requires further validation. The failure of target specific drug in animal model raises the issue of creating a platform in between the in vitro (2D) and in vivo animal testing. The metastatic breast cancer cells migrate and settle at different sites such as bone tissue. This work evaluates the in vitro 3D model of the breast cancer and bone cells to understand the cellular interactions in the presence of a targeted anticancer drug delivery system. The silk fibroin based cytocompatible 3D scaffold is used as in vitro 3D distribution model. Human breast adenocarcinoma and osteoblast like cells are cocultured to evaluate the efficiency of doxorubicin loaded folic acid conjugated silk fibroin nanoparticle as drug delivery system. Decreasing population of the cancer cells, which lower the levels of vascular endothelial growth factors, glucose consumption, and lactate production are observed in the drug treated coculture constructs. The drug treated constructs do not show any major impact on bone mineralization. The diminished expression of osteogenic markers such as osteocalcein and alkaline phosphatase are recorded. The result indicates that this type of silk based 3D in vitro coculture model may be utilized as a bridge between the traditional 2D and animal model system to evaluate the new drug molecule (s) or to reassay the known drug molecules or to develop target specific drug in cancer research.

  4. Hyaluronic acid-decorated graphene oxide nanohybrids as nanocarriers for targeted and pH-responsive anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Song, Erqun; Han, Weiye; Li, Cheng; Cheng, Dan; Li, Lingrui; Liu, Lichao; Zhu, Guizhi; Song, Yang; Tan, Weihong

    2014-08-13

    A novel nanohybrid of hyaluronic acid (HA)-decorated graphene oxide (GO) was fabricated as a targeted and pH-responsive drug delivery system for controlling the release of anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) for tumor therapy. For the preparation, DOX was first loaded onto GO nanocarriers via π-π stacking and hydrogen-bonding interactions, and then it was decorated with HA to produce HA-GO-DOX nanohybrids via H-bonding interactions. In this strategy, HA served as both a targeting moiety and a hydrophilic group, making the as-prepared nanohybrids targeting, stable, and disperse. A high loading efficiency (42.9%) of DOX on the nanohybrids was also obtained. Cumulative DOX release from HA-GO-DOX was faster in pH 5.3 phosphate-buffered saline solution than that in pH 7.4, providing the basis for pH-response DOX release in the slightly acidic environment of tumor cells, while the much-slower DOX release from HA-GO-DOX than DOX showed the sustained drug-release capability of the nanohybrids. Fluorescent images of cellular uptake and cell viability analysis studies illustrated that these HA-GO-DOX nanohybrids significantly enhanced DOX accumulation in HA-targeted HepG2 cancer cells compared to HA-nontargeted RBMEC cells and subsequently induced selective cytotoxicity to HepG2 cells. In vivo antitumor efficiency of HA-GO-DOX nanohybrids showed obviously enhanced tumor inhibition rate for H22 hepatic cancer cell-bearing mice compared with free DOX and the GO-DOX formulation. These studies suggest that the HA-GO-DOX nanohybrids have potential clinical applications for anticancer drug delivery.

  5. Functionally defined therapeutic targets in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Catherine S; Tang, Yujie; Truffaux, Nathalene; Berlow, Noah E; Liu, Lining; Debily, Marie-Anne; Quist, Michael J; Davis, Lara E; Huang, Elaine C; Woo, Pamelyn J; Ponnuswami, Anitha; Chen, Spenser; Johung, Tessa B; Sun, Wenchao; Kogiso, Mari; Du, Yuchen; Qi, Lin; Huang, Yulun; Hütt-Cabezas, Marianne; Warren, Katherine E; Le Dret, Ludivine; Meltzer, Paul S; Mao, Hua; Quezado, Martha; van Vuurden, Dannis G; Abraham, Jinu; Fouladi, Maryam; Svalina, Matthew N; Wang, Nicholas; Hawkins, Cynthia; Nazarian, Javad; Alonso, Marta M; Raabe, Eric H; Hulleman, Esther; Spellman, Paul T; Li, Xiao-Nan; Keller, Charles; Pal, Ranadip; Grill, Jacques; Monje, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a fatal childhood cancer. We performed a chemical screen in patient-derived DIPG cultures along with RNA-seq analyses and integrated computational modeling to identify potentially effective therapeutic strategies. The multi-histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat demonstrated therapeutic efficacy both in vitro and in DIPG orthotopic xenograft models. Combination testing of panobinostat and the histone demethylase inhibitor GSK-J4 revealed that the two had synergistic effects. Together, these data suggest a promising therapeutic strategy for DIPG.

  6. Recent advances in targeting the telomeric G-quadruplex DNA sequence with small molecules as a strategy for anticancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad K; Jackson, Paul Jm; Rahman, Khondaker M; Thurston, David E

    2016-07-01

    Human telomeric DNA (hTelo), present at the ends of chromosomes to protect their integrity during cell division, comprises tandem repeats of the sequence d(TTAGGG) which is known to form a G-quadruplex secondary structure. This unique structural formation of DNA is distinct from the well-known helical structure that most genomic DNA is thought to adopt, and has recently gained prominence as a molecular target for new types of anticancer agents. In particular, compounds that can stabilize the intramolecular G-quadruplex formed within the human telomeric DNA sequence can inhibit the activity of the enzyme telomerase which is known to be upregulated in tumor cells and is a major contributor to their immortality. This provides the basis for the discovery and development of small molecules with the potential for selective toxicity toward tumor cells. This review summarizes the various families of small molecules reported in the literature that have telomeric quadruplex stabilizing properties, and assesses the potential for compounds of this type to be developed as novel anticancer therapies. A future perspective is also presented, emphasizing the need for researchers to adopt approaches that will allow the discovery of molecules with more drug-like properties in order to improve the chances of lead molecules reaching the clinic in the next decade. PMID:27442231

  7. THE TRPV1 RECEPTOR: TARGET OF TOXICANTS AND THERAPEUTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the structural and functional complexities of the TRPV1 is essential to the therapeutic modulation of inflammation and pain. Because of its central role in initiating inflammatory processes and integrating painful stimuli, there is an understandable interest...

  8. Siglec-15 is a potential therapeutic target for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Yusuke; Takahata, Masahiko; Mikuni, Shintaro; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Hamano, Hiroki; Angata, Takashi; Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu; Kinjo, Masataka; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2015-02-01

    organization of osteoclasts in both RANKL and TNF-α induced osteoclastogenesis. The present findings indicate that Siglec-15 is involved in estrogen deficiency-induced differentiation of osteoclasts and is thus a potential therapeutic target for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  9. Functionally-defined Therapeutic Targets in Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Catherine S.; Tang, Yujie; Truffaux, Nathalene; Berlow, Noah E.; Liu, Lining; Debily, Marie-Anne; Quist, Michael J.; Davis, Lara E.; Huang, Elaine C.; Woo, Pamelyn J; Ponnuswami, Anitha; Chen, Spenser; Johung, Tessa B.; Sun, Wenchao; Kogiso, Mari; Du, Yuchen; Lin, Qi; Huang, Yulun; Hütt-Cabezas, Marianne; Warren, Katherine E.; Dret, Ludivine Le; Meltzer, Paul S.; Mao, Hua; Quezado, Martha; van Vuurden, Dannis G.; Abraham, Jinu; Fouladi, Maryam; Svalina, Matthew N.; Wang, Nicholas; Hawkins, Cynthia; Nazarian, Javad; Alonso, Marta M.; Raabe, Eric; Hulleman, Esther; Spellman, Paul T.; Li, Xiao-Nan; Keller, Charles; Pal, Ranadip; Grill, Jacques; Monje, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG) is a fatal childhood cancer. We performed a chemical screen in patient-derived DIPG cultures along with RNAseq analyses and integrated computational modeling to identify potentially effective therapeutic strategies. The multi-histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat demonstrated efficacy in vitro and in DIPG orthotopic xenograft models. Combination testing of panobinostat with histone demethylase inhibitor GSKJ4 revealed synergy. Together, these data suggest a promising therapeutic strategy for DIPG. PMID:25939062

  10. Phage Displayed Peptides/Antibodies Recognizing Growth Factors and Their Tyrosine Kinase Receptors as Tools for Anti-Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ronca, Roberto; Benzoni, Patrizia; De Luca, Angela; Crescini, Elisabetta; Dell’Era, Patrizia

    2012-01-01

    The basic idea of displaying peptides on a phage, introduced by George P. Smith in 1985, was greatly developed and improved by McCafferty and colleagues at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology and, later, by Barbas and colleagues at the Scripps Research Institute. Their approach was dedicated to building a system for the production of antibodies, similar to a naïve B cell repertoire, in order to by-pass the standard hybridoma technology that requires animal immunization. Both groups merged the phage display technology with an antibody library to obtain a huge number of phage variants, each of them carrying a specific antibody ready to bind its target molecule, allowing, later on, rare phage (one in a million) to be isolated by affinity chromatography. Here, we will briefly review the basis of the technology and the therapeutic application of phage-derived bioactive molecules when addressed against key players in tumor development and progression: growth factors and their tyrosine kinase receptors. PMID:22606042

  11. (18)F-FDG PET/CT for Monitoring the Response of Breast Cancer to miR-143-Based Therapeutics by Targeting Tumor Glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ying; Zhang, Ling-Fei; Guo, Rui; Liang, Sheng; Zhang, Min; Shi, Shuo; Shang-Guan, Cheng-Fang; Liu, Mo-Fang; Li, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Increased glucose utilization is a hallmark of cancer, and tumor metabolism is emerging as anticancer target for therapeutic intervention. Triple-negative breast cancers TNBC are highly glycolytic and show poor clinical outcomes. We previously identified hexokinase 2, the major glycolytic enzyme, as a target gene of miR-143 in TNBC. Here, we developed a therapeutic formulation using cholesterol-modified miR-143 agomir encapsulated in a neutral lipid-based delivery agent that blocked tumor growth and glucose metabolism in TNBC tumor-bearing mice when administered systemically. The antioncogenic effects were accompanied by a reduction in the direct target hexokinase 2 and [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) uptake based on positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Treatment with miR-143 formulation has minimal toxic effects and mice tolerated it well. Thus, we demonstrated that miR-143 is a robust inhibitor of the Warburg effect and an effective therapeutic target for TNBC. In addition, (18)F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography can be used to specifically monitor the response of TNBC to miR-143-based therapeutics by targeting tumor glycolysis. PMID:27574783

  12. 18F-FDG PET/CT for Monitoring the Response of Breast Cancer to miR-143-Based Therapeutics by Targeting Tumor Glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Ying; Zhang, Ling-fei; Guo, Rui; Liang, Sheng; Zhang, Min; Shi, Shuo; Shang-Guan, Cheng-fang; Liu, Mo-fang; Li, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Increased glucose utilization is a hallmark of cancer, and tumor metabolism is emerging as anticancer target for therapeutic intervention. Triple-negative breast cancers TNBC are highly glycolytic and show poor clinical outcomes. We previously identified hexokinase 2, the major glycolytic enzyme, as a target gene of miR-143 in TNBC. Here, we developed a therapeutic formulation using cholesterol-modified miR-143 agomir encapsulated in a neutral lipid-based delivery agent that blocked tumor growth and glucose metabolism in TNBC tumor-bearing mice when administered systemically. The antioncogenic effects were accompanied by a reduction in the direct target hexokinase 2 and [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) uptake based on positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Treatment with miR-143 formulation has minimal toxic effects and mice tolerated it well. Thus, we demonstrated that miR-143 is a robust inhibitor of the Warburg effect and an effective therapeutic target for TNBC. In addition, 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography can be used to specifically monitor the response of TNBC to miR-143-based therapeutics by targeting tumor glycolysis. PMID:27574783

  13. Influence of molecular design on biodistribution and targeting properties of an Affibody-fused HER2-recognising anticancer toxin.

    PubMed

    Altai, Mohamed; Liu, Hao; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Gräslund, Torbjörn

    2016-09-01

    Targeted delivery of toxins is a promising way to treat disseminated cancer. The use of monoclonal antibodies as targeting moiety has provided proof-of-principle for this approach. However, extravasation and tissue penetration rates of antibody-based immunotoxins are limited due to antibody bulkiness. The use of a novel class of targeting probes, Affibody molecules, provides smaller toxin-conjugated constructs, which may improve targeting. Earlier, we have demonstrated that affitoxins containing a HER2-targeting Affibody moiety and a deimmunized and truncated exotoxin A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, PE38X8, provide highly selective toxicity to HER2-expressing cancer cells. To evaluate the influence of molecular design on targeting and biodistribution properties, a series of novel affitoxins were labelled with the residualizing radionuclide 111In. In this study, we have shown that the novel conjugates are more rapidly internalized compared with the parental affitoxin. The use of a (HE)3 purification tag instead of a hexahistidine tag enabled significant (p<0.05) reduction of the hepatic uptake of the affitoxin in a murine model. Fusion of the affitoxin with an albumin-binding domain (ABD) caused appreciable extension of the residence time in circulation and several-fold reduction of the renal uptake. The best variant, 111In-(HE)3-ZHER2-ABD-PE38X8, demonstrated receptor-specific accumulation in HER2-expressing SKOV-3 xenografts. In conclusion, a careful molecular design of scaffold protein based anticancer targeted toxins can appreciably improve their biodistribution and targeting properties. PMID:27573289

  14. Influence of molecular design on biodistribution and targeting properties of an Affibody-fused HER2-recognising anticancer toxin.

    PubMed

    Altai, Mohamed; Liu, Hao; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Gräslund, Torbjörn

    2016-09-01

    Targeted delivery of toxins is a promising way to treat disseminated cancer. The use of monoclonal antibodies as targeting moiety has provided proof-of-principle for this approach. However, extravasation and tissue penetration rates of antibody-based immunotoxins are limited due to antibody bulkiness. The use of a novel class of targeting probes, Affibody molecules, provides smaller toxin-conjugated constructs, which may improve targeting. Earlier, we have demonstrated that affitoxins containing a HER2-targeting Affibody moiety and a deimmunized and truncated exotoxin A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, PE38X8, provide highly selective toxicity to HER2-expressing cancer cells. To evaluate the influence of molecular design on targeting and biodistribution properties, a series of novel affitoxins were labelled with the residualizing radionuclide 111In. In this study, we have shown that the novel conjugates are more rapidly internalized compared with the parental affitoxin. The use of a (HE)3 purification tag instead of a hexahistidine tag enabled significant (p<0.05) reduction of the hepatic uptake of the affitoxin in a murine model. Fusion of the affitoxin with an albumin-binding domain (ABD) caused appreciable extension of the residence time in circulation and several-fold reduction of the renal uptake. The best variant, 111In-(HE)3-ZHER2-ABD-PE38X8, demonstrated receptor-specific accumulation in HER2-expressing SKOV-3 xenografts. In conclusion, a careful molecular design of scaffold protein based anticancer targeted toxins can appreciably improve their biodistribution and targeting properties.

  15. HIV-1 gp120 as a therapeutic target: Navigating a moving labyrinth

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Priyamvada; Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Bewley, Carole A.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The HIV-1 gp120 envelope (Env) glycoprotein mediates attachment of virus to human target cells that display requisite receptors, CD4 and co-receptor, generally CCR5. Despite high affinity interactions with host receptors and proof-of-principle by the drug maraviroc that interference with CCR5 provides therapeutic benefit, no licensed drug currently targets gp120. Areas covered An overview of the role of gp120 in HIV-1 entry and of sites of potential gp120 vulnerability to therapeutic inhibition is presented. Viral defenses that protect these sites and turn gp120 into a moving labyrinth are discussed together with strategies for circumventing these defenses to allow therapeutic targeting of gp120 sites of vulnerability. Expert opinion The gp120 envelope glycoprotein interacts with host proteins through multiple interfaces and has conserved structural features at these interaction sites. In spite of this, targeting gp120 for therapeutic purposes is challenging. Env mechanisms evolved to evade the humoral immune response also shield it from potential therapeutics. Nevertheless, substantial progress has been made in understanding HIV-1 gp120 structure and its interactions with host receptors, and in developing therapeutic leads that potently neutralize diverse HIV-1 strains. Synergies between advances in understanding, needs for therapeutics against novel viral targets, and characteristics of breadth and potency for a number of gp120-targetting lead molecules bodes well for gp120 as a HIV-1 therapeutic target. PMID:25724219

  16. Therapeutic Targets for Management of Periodontitis and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Corneliu; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic periodontitis (CP) worldwide imposes a rethinking of individualized therapy for patients with both conditions. Central to bidirectional links between DM and CP is deregulated systemic inflammation and dysfunctional immune responses to altered-self and non-self. Control of blood glucose levels and metabolic imbalances associated with hyperglycemia in DM, and disruption of pathogenic subgingival biofilms in CP are currently the main therapeutic approaches for these conditions. Mounting evidence suggests the need to integrate immune modulatory therapeutics in treatment regimens that address the unresolved inflammation associated with DM and CP. The current review discusses the pathogenesis of DM and CP with emphasis on deregulated inflammation, current therapeutic approaches and the novel pro-resolution lipid mediators derived from n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:26881443

  17. Targeting KIT in Melanoma: A Paradigm of Molecular Medicine and Targeted Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Woodman, Scott E.; Davies, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite multiple clinical trials utilizing a spectrum of therapeutic modalities, melanoma remains a disease with dismal outcomes in patients with advanced disease. However, it is now clear that melanoma is not a single entity, but can be molecularly divided into subtypes that generally correspond to the anatomical location of the primary melanoma. Melanomas from acral lentiginous, mucosal, and chronic sun-damaged sites frequently harbor activating mutations and/or increased copy number in the KIT tyrosine kinase receptor gene, which are very rare in the more common cutaneous tumors. Multiple case reports and early observations from clinical trials suggest that targeting mutant KIT with tyrosine kinase inhibitors is efficacious in KIT mutant melanoma. This review recounts what is known about the role of KIT in melanocyte maturation, our current understanding of KIT genetic aberrations in melanoma, and how this knowledge is being translated into clinical oncology. PMID:20457136

  18. Therapeutic targets in the Wnt signaling pathway: Feasibility of targeting TNIK in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Mari; Sawa, Masaaki; Yamada, Tesshi

    2015-12-01

    The genetic and epigenetic alterations occurring during the course of multistage colorectal carcinogenesis have been extensively studied in the last few decades. One of the most notable findings is that the great majority of colorectal cancers (>80%) have mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor gene. Loss of functional APC protein results in activation of canonical Wnt/β-catanin signaling and initiates intestinal carcinogenesis. Mutational inactivation of APC is the first genetic event, but colorectal cancer cells retain their dependency on constitutive Wnt signal activation even after accumulation of other genetic events. Accordingly, pharmacological blocking of Wnt signaling has been considered an attractive therapeutic approach for colorectal cancer. Several therapeutics targeting various molecular components of the Wnt signaling pathway, including porcupine, frizzled receptors and co-receptor, tankyrases, and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP), have been developed, and some of those are currently being evaluated in early-phase clinical trials. Traf2- and Nck-interacting protein kinase (TNIK) has been identified as a regulatory component of the T-cell factor-4 and β-catenin transcriptional complex independently by two research groups. TNIK regulates Wnt signaling in the most downstream part of the pathway, and its inhibition is expected to block the signal even in colorectal cancer cells with APC gene mutation. Here we discuss some of the TNIK inhibitors under preclinical development. PMID:26542362

  19. Cell Survival and Apoptosis Signaling as Therapeutic Target for Cancer: Marine Bioactive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Se-Kwon, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of apoptosis leads to activation of cell survival factors (e.g., AKT) causes continuous cell proliferation in cancer. Apoptosis, the major form of cellular suicide, is central to various physiological processes and the maintenance of homeostasis in multicellular organisms. A number of discoveries have clarified the molecular mechanism of apoptosis, thus clarifying the link between apoptosis and cell survival factors, which has a therapeutic outcome. Induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell survival by anticancer agents has been shown to correlate with tumor response. Cellular damage induces growth arrest and tumor suppression by inducing apoptosis, necrosis and senescence; the mechanism of cell death depends on the magnitude of DNA damage following exposure to various anticancer agents. Apoptosis is mainly regulated by cell survival and proliferating signaling molecules. As a new therapeutic strategy, alternative types of cell death might be exploited to control and eradicate cancer cells. This review discusses the signaling of apoptosis and cell survival, as well as the potential contribution of marine bioactive compounds, suggesting that new therapeutic strategies might follow. PMID:23348928

  20. Targeted Interventions for Homeless Children at a Therapeutic Nursery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris-Shortle, Carole; Melley, Alison H.; Kiser, Laurel J.; Levey, Eric; Cosgrove, Kim; Leviton, Audrey

    2006-01-01

    PACT: Helping Children with Special Needs, an affiliate of the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, Maryland, operates a therapeutic nursery that serves families who have at least one child from birth to 3 years of age, and who are living in a Baltimore City homeless shelter. In partnership with the Martin Luther King Early Head Start Program…

  1. Translational approaches targeting the p53 pathway for anti-cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Essmann, Frank; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor blocks cancer development by triggering apoptosis or cellular senescence in response to oncogenic stress or DNA damage. Consequently, the p53 signalling pathway is virtually always inactivated in human cancer cells. This unifying feature has commenced tremendous efforts to develop p53-based anti-cancer therapies. Different strategies exist that are adapted to the mechanisms of p53 inactivation. In p53-mutated tumours, delivery of wild-type p53 by adenovirus-based gene therapy is now practised in China. Also, remarkable progress has been made in the development of p53-binding drugs that can rescue and reactivate the function of mutant or misfolded p53. Other biologic approaches include the development of oncolytic viruses that are designed to specifically replicate in and kill p53-defective cells. Inactivation of wt-p53 frequently results from dysregulation of MDM2, an E3 ligase that regulates p53 levels. Small-molecule drugs that inhibit the interaction of MDM2 and p53 and block p53 degradation are currently tested in clinical trials. This survey highlights the recent developments that attempt to modulate the function of p53 and outlines strategies that are being investigated for pharmacological intervention in the p53 pathway. PMID:21718309

  2. Photochemical internalisation, a minimally invasive strategy for light-controlled endosomal escape of cancer stem cell-targeting therapeutics.