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Sample records for anticancer therapeutics targeting

  1. Therapeutic drug monitoring of targeted anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Decosterd, Laurent A; Widmer, Nicolas; Zaman, Khalil; Cardoso, Evelina; Buclin, Thierry; Csajka, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    New oral targeted anticancer therapies are revolutionizing cancer treatment by transforming previously deadly malignancies into chronically manageable conditions. Nevertheless, drug resistance, persistence of cancer stem cells, and adverse drug effects still limit their ability to stabilize or cure malignant diseases in the long term. Response to targeted anticancer therapy is influenced by tumor genetics and by variability in drug concentrations. However, despite a significant inter-patient pharmacokinetic variability, targeted anticancer drugs are essentially licensed at fixed doses. Their therapeutic use could however be optimized by individualization of their dosage, based on blood concentration measurements via the therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). TDM can increase the probability of therapeutic responses to targeted anticancer therapies, and would help minimize the risk of major adverse reactions.

  2. Recent development of anticancer therapeutics targeting Akt.

    PubMed

    Morrow, John K; Du-Cuny, Lei; Chen, Lu; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J; Mash, Eugene A; Powis, Garth; Zhang, Shuxing

    2011-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Akt has proven to be a significant signaling target, involved in various biological functions. Because of its cardinal role in numerous cellular responses, Akt has been implicated in many human diseases, particularly cancer. It has been established that Akt is a viable and feasible target for anticancer therapeutics. Analysis of all Akt kinases reveals conserved homology for an N-terminal regulatory domain, which contains a pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain for cellular translocation, a kinase domain with serine/threonine specificity, and a C-terminal extension domain. These well defined regions have been targeted, and various approaches, including in silico methods, have been implemented to develop Akt inhibitors. In spite of unique techniques and a prolific body of knowledge surrounding Akt, no targeted Akt therapeutics have reached the market yet. Here we will highlight successes and challenges to date on the development of anticancer agents modulating the Akt pathway in recent patents as well as discuss the methods employed for this task. Special attention will be given to patents with focus on those discoveries using computer-aided drug design approaches.

  3. Recent Development of Anticancer Therapeutics Targeting Akt

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, John K.; Du-Cuny, Lei; Chen, Lu; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J.; Mash, Eugene A.; Powis, Garth; Zhang, Shuxing

    2013-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Akt has proven to be a significant signaling target, involved in various biological functions. Because of its cardinal role in numerous cellular responses, Akt has been implicated in many human diseases, particularly cancer. It has been established that Akt is a viable and feasible target for anticancer therapeutics. Analysis of all Akt kinases reveals conserved homology for an N-terminal regulatory domain, which contains a pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain for cellular translocation, a kinase domain with serine/threonine specificity, and a C-terminal extension domain. These well defined regions have been targeted, and various approaches, including in silico methods, have been implemented to develop Akt inhibitors. In spite of unique techniques and a prolific body of knowledge surrounding Akt, no targeted Akt therapeutics have reached the market yet. Here we will highlight successes and challenges to date on the development of anticancer agents modulating the Akt pathway in recent patents as well as discuss the methods employed for this task. Special attention will be given to patents with focus on those discoveries using computer-aided drug design approaches. PMID:21110830

  4. Targeting Lipid Metabolic Reprogramming as Anticancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Ji-Young; Lee, Ho-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells rewire their metabolism to satisfy the demands of growth and survival, and this metabolic reprogramming has been recognized as an emerging hallmark of cancer. Lipid metabolism is pivotal in cellular process that converts nutrients into energy, building blocks for membrane biogenesis and the generation of signaling molecules. Accumulating evidence suggests that cancer cells show alterations in different aspects of lipid metabolism. The changes in lipid metabolism of cancer cells can affect numerous cellular processes, including cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. The potential dependence of cancer cells on the deregulated lipid metabolism suggests that enzymes and regulating factors involved in this process are promising targets for cancer treatment. In this review, we focus on the features associated with the lipid metabolic pathways in cancer, and highlight recent advances on the therapeutic targets of specific lipid metabolic enzymes or regulating factors and target-directed small molecules that can be potentially used as anticancer drugs. PMID:28053954

  5. Proteomic profiling predicts drug response to novel targeted anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fan; Li, Zilin; Hua, Yunfen; Lim, Yoon Pin

    2016-01-01

    Most recently approved anti-cancer drugs by the US FDA are targeted therapeutic agents and this represents an important trend for future anticancer therapy. Unlike conventional chemotherapy that rarely considers individual differences, it is crucial for targeted therapies to identify the beneficial subgroup of patients for the treatment. Currently, genomics and transcriptomics are the major 'omic' analytics used in studies of drug response prediction. However, proteomic profiling excels both in its advantages of directly detecting an instantaneous dynamic of the whole proteome, which contains most current diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets. Moreover, proteomic profiling improves understanding of the mechanism for drug resistance and helps finding optimal combination therapy. This article reviews the recent success of applications of proteomic analytics in predicting the response to targeted anticancer therapeutics, and discusses the potential avenues and pitfalls of proteomic platforms and techniques used most in the field.

  6. DNA and aptamer stabilized gold nanoparticles for targeted delivery of anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Alfonso; Posch, Christian; Garcimartín, Yolanda; Celli, Anna; Sanlorenzo, Martina; Vujic, Igor; Ma, Jeffrey; Zekhtser, Mitchell; Rappersberger, Klemens; Ortiz-Urda, Susana; Somoza, Álvaro

    2014-07-07

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) can be used as carriers of a variety of therapeutics. Ideally, drugs are released in the target cells in response to cell specific intracellular triggers. In this study, GNPs are loaded with doxorubicin or AZD8055, using a self-immolative linker which facilitates the release of anticancer therapeutics in malignant cells without modifications of the active compound. An additional modification with the aptamer AS1411 further increases the selectivity of GNPs towards cancer cells. Both modifications increase targeted delivery of therapeutics with GNPs. Whereas GNPs without anticancer drugs do not affect cell viability in all cells tested, AS1411 modified GNPs loaded with doxorubicin or AZD8055 show significant and increased reduction of cell viability in breast cancer and uveal melanoma cell lines. These results highlight that modified GNPs can be functionalized to increase the efficacy of cancer therapeutics and may further reduce toxicity by increasing targeted delivery towards malignant cells.

  7. DNA and aptamer stabilized gold nanoparticles for targeted delivery of anticancer therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre, Alfonso; Posch, Christian; Garcimartín, Yolanda; Celli, Anna; Sanlorenzo, Martina; Vujic, Igor; Ma, Jeffrey; Zekhtser, Mitchell; Rappersberger, Klemens; Ortiz-Urda, Susana; Somoza, Álvaro

    2014-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) can be used as carriers of a variety of therapeutics. Ideally, drugs are released in the target cells in response to cell specific intracellular triggers. In this study, GNPs are loaded with doxorubicin or AZD8055, using a self-immolative linker which facilitates the release of anticancer therapeutics in malignant cells without modifications of the active compound. An additional modification with the aptamer AS1411 further increases the selectivity of GNPs towards cancer cells. Both modifications increase targeted delivery of therapeutics with GNPs. Whereas GNPs without anticancer drugs do not affect cell viability in all cells tested, AS1411 modified GNPs loaded with doxorubicin or AZD8055 show significant and increased reduction of cell viability in breast cancer and uveal melanoma cell lines. These results highlight that modified GNPs can be functionalized to increase the efficacy of cancer therapeutics and may further reduce toxicity by increasing targeted delivery towards malignant cells.Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) can be used as carriers of a variety of therapeutics. Ideally, drugs are released in the target cells in response to cell specific intracellular triggers. In this study, GNPs are loaded with doxorubicin or AZD8055, using a self-immolative linker which facilitates the release of anticancer therapeutics in malignant cells without modifications of the active compound. An additional modification with the aptamer AS1411 further increases the selectivity of GNPs towards cancer cells. Both modifications increase targeted delivery of therapeutics with GNPs. Whereas GNPs without anticancer drugs do not affect cell viability in all cells tested, AS1411 modified GNPs loaded with doxorubicin or AZD8055 show significant and increased reduction of cell viability in breast cancer and uveal melanoma cell lines. These results highlight that modified GNPs can be functionalized to increase the efficacy of cancer therapeutics and may further

  8. Neddylation Pathway as a Novel Anti-cancer Target: Mechanistic Investigation and Therapeutic Implication.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanan; Jia, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    Protein neddylation, a newly characterized posttranslational modification that adds the ubiquitin-like molecule NEDD8 to substrates, modulates important biological processes, whereas dysfunction of neddylation may cause several serious diseases, such as cancer. Inhibition of neddylation pathway has emerged as a promising anticancer strategy, as evidenced by development of the NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) inhibitor MLN4924. Due to its potent anti-cancer efficacy and well-tolerated toxicity, MLN4924 has been evaluated in multiple Phase I clinical trials for solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Recently, accumulating evidences indicate that neddylation pathway also plays a pivotal role in the regulation of multiple processes of tumor microenvironment (TME), such as tumor angiogenesis and the function of immune cells. In this review, we briefly summarize the latest progresses in this field and highlight neddylation pathway as an attractive therapeutic target against human cancer.

  9. Small molecules targeting c-Myc oncogene: promising anti-cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing-Jia; Wu, Yan-Ling; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Zhang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear transcription factor c-Myc is a member of the Myc gene family with multiple functions and located on band q24.1 of chromosome 8. The c-Myc gene is activated by chromosomal translocation, rearrangement, and amplification. Its encoded protein transduces intracellular signals to the nucleus, resulting in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, and has the ability to transform cells and bind chromosomal DNA. c-Myc also plays a critical role in malignant transformation. The abnormal over-expression of c-Myc is frequently observed in some tumors, including carcinomas of the breast, colon, and cervix, as well as small-cell lung cancer, osteosarcomas, glioblastomas, and myeloid leukemias, therefore making it a possible target for anticancer therapy. In this minireview, we summarize unique characteristics of c-Myc and therapeutic strategies against cancer using small molecules targeting the oncogene, and discuss the prospects in the development of agents targeting c-Myc, in particular G-quadruplexes formed in c-Myc promoter and c-Myc/Max dimerization. Such information will be of importance for the research and development of c-Myc-targeted drugs.

  10. Small Molecules Targeting c-Myc Oncogene: Promising Anti-Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bing-Jia; Wu, Yan-Ling; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Zhang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear transcription factor c-Myc is a member of the Myc gene family with multiple functions and located on band q24.1 of chromosome 8. The c-Myc gene is activated by chromosomal translocation, rearrangement, and amplification. Its encoded protein transduces intracellular signals to the nucleus, resulting in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, and has the ability to transform cells and bind chromosomal DNA. c-Myc also plays a critical role in malignant transformation. The abnormal over-expression of c-Myc is frequently observed in some tumors, including carcinomas of the breast, colon, and cervix, as well as small-cell lung cancer, osteosarcomas, glioblastomas, and myeloid leukemias, therefore making it a possible target for anticancer therapy. In this minireview, we summarize unique characteristics of c-Myc and therapeutic strategies against cancer using small molecules targeting the oncogene, and discuss the prospects in the development of agents targeting c-Myc, in particular G-quadruplexes formed in c-Myc promoter and c-Myc/Max dimerization. Such information will be of importance for the research and development of c-Myc-targeted drugs. PMID:25332683

  11. The Applications of Targeting Anti-Cancer Agents in Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guang-Chun; Yang, Xu; Yu, Yan; Zhao, Dai-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Anti-cancer targeting drugs appear to be a new and powerful "weapon" for cancer therapies. These targeting drugs are directed against specific molecules that are over-expressed or where certain unique factors are aberrantly expressed either in cancer cells or in diseased cell sites. Compared with traditional chemotherapeutic drugs, these targeting drugs have the advantages of high specificity, efficacy and less side effects. Target therapy is a breakthrough and revolutionary advance in the field of cancer therapy. Tumor angiogenesis plays a key role in tumor growth and metastasis and the mutation of tyrosine kinases is also strongly associated with cancer progression. Thus, in this review, we will discuss the advances in the development of targeting anti-cancer drugs by narrowing it down to small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptors belonging to the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases and angiogenic inhibitors. It will also address concerns for drug resistance and adverse events.

  12. Targeting MKK3 as a novel anticancer strategy: molecular mechanisms and therapeutical implications

    PubMed Central

    Baldari, S; Ubertini, V; Garufi, A; D'Orazi, G; Bossi, G

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3 (MAP2K3, MKK3) is a member of the dual specificity protein kinase group that belongs to the MAP kinase kinase family. This kinase is activated by mitogenic or stress-inducing stimuli and participates in the MAP kinase-mediated signaling cascade, leading to cell proliferation and survival. Several studies highlighted a critical role for MKK3 in tumor progression and invasion, and we previously identified MKK3 as transcriptional target of mutant (mut) p53 to sustain cell proliferation and survival, thus rendering MKK3 a promising target for anticancer therapies. Here, we found that targeting MKK3 with RNA interference, in both wild-type (wt) and mutp53-carrying cells, induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagy that, respectively, contributed to stabilize wtp53 and degrade mutp53. MKK3 depletion reduced cancer cell proliferation and viability, whereas no significant effects were observed in normal cellular context. Noteworthy, MKK3 depletion in combination with chemotherapeutic agents increased tumor cell response to the drugs, in both wtp53 and mutp53 cancer cells, as demonstrated by enhanced poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and reduced clonogenic ability in vitro. In addition, MKK3 depletion reduced tumor growth and improved biological response to chemotherapeutic in vivo. The overall results indicate MKK3 as a novel promising molecular target for the development of more efficient anticancer treatments in both wtp53- and mutp53-carrying tumors. PMID:25633290

  13. Targeted anti-cancer prodrug based on carbon nanotube with photodynamic therapeutic effect and pH-triggered drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jianquan; Zeng, Fang; Xu, Jiangsheng; Wu, Shuizhu

    2013-09-01

    Herein, we describe a multifunctional anti-cancer prodrug system based on water-dispersible carbon nanotube (CNT); this prodrug system features active targeting, pH-triggered drug release, and photodynamic therapeutic properties. For this prodrug system (with the size of 100-300 nm), an anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX), was incorporated onto CNT via a cleavable hydrazone bond; and a targeting ligand (folic acid) was also coupled onto CNT. This prodrug can preferably enter folate receptor (FR)-positive cancer cells and undergo intracellular release of the drug triggered by the reduced pH. The targeted CNT-based prodrug system can cause lower cell viability toward FR-positive cells compared to the non-targeted ones. Moreover, the CNT carrier exhibits photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) action; and the cell viability of FR-positive cancer cells can be further reduced upon light irradiation. The dual effects of pH-triggered drug release and PDT increase the therapeutic efficacy of the DOX-CNT prodrug. This study may offer some useful insights on designing and improving the applicability of CNT for other drug delivery systems.

  14. Development of synthetic lethality anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fang, Bingliang

    2014-10-09

    The concept of synthetic lethality (the creation of a lethal phenotype from the combined effects of mutations in two or more genes) has recently been exploited in various efforts to develop new genotype-selective anticancer therapeutics. These efforts include screening for novel anticancer agents, identifying novel therapeutic targets, characterizing mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapy, and improving efficacies through the rational design of combination therapy. This review discusses recent developments in synthetic lethality anticancer therapeutics, including poly ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitors for BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutant cancers, checkpoint inhibitors for p53 mutant cancers, and small molecule agents targeting RAS gene mutant cancers. Because cancers are caused by mutations in multiple genes and abnormalities in multiple signaling pathways, synthetic lethality for a specific tumor suppressor gene or oncogene is likely cell context-dependent. Delineation of the mechanisms underlying synthetic lethality and identification of treatment response biomarkers will be critical for the success of synthetic lethality anticancer therapy.

  15. Stress-induced cellular adaptive strategies: ancient evolutionarily conserved programs as new anticancer therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Cipponi, Arcadi; Thomas, David M

    2014-06-01

    Despite the remarkable achievements of novel targeted anti-cancer drugs, most therapies only produce remission for a limited time, resistance to treatment, and relapse, often being the ultimate outcome. Drug resistance is due to highly efficient adaptive strategies utilized by cancer cells. Exogenous and endogenous stress stimuli are known to induce first-line responses, capable of re-establishing cellular homeostasis and determining cell fate decisions. Cancer cells may also mount second-line adaptive strategies, such as the mutator response. Hypermutable subpopulations of cells may expand under severe selective stress, thereby accelerating the emergence of adapted clones. As with first-line protective responses, these strategies appear highly conserved, and are found in yeasts and bacteria. We hypothesize that evolutionarily conserved programs rheostatically regulate mutability in fluctuating environments, and contribute to drug resistance in cancer cells. Elucidating the conserved genetic and molecular mechanisms may present novel opportunities to increase the effectiveness of cancer therapies. © 2014 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Apoptosis as anticancer mechanism: function and dysfunction of its modulators and targeted therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Pistritto, Giuseppa; Trisciuoglio, Daniela; Ceci, Claudia; Garufi, Alessia; D'Orazi, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is a form of programmed cell death that results in the orderly and efficient removal of damaged cells, such as those resulting from DNA damage or during development. Apoptosis can be triggered by signals from within the cell, such as genotoxic stress, or by extrinsic signals, such as the binding of ligands to cell surface death receptors. Deregulation in apoptotic cell death machinery is an hallmark of cancer. Apoptosis alteration is responsible not only for tumor development and progression but also for tumor resistance to therapies. Most anticancer drugs currently used in clinical oncology exploit the intact apoptotic signaling pathways to trigger cancer cell death. Thus, defects in the death pathways may result in drug resistance so limiting the efficacy of therapies. Therefore, a better understanding of the apoptotic cell death signaling pathways may improve the efficacy of cancer therapy and bypass resistance. This review will highlight the role of the fundamental regulators of apoptosis and how their deregulation, including activation of anti-apoptotic factors (i.e., Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, etc) or inactivation of pro-apoptotic factors (i.e., p53 pathway) ends up in cancer cell resistance to therapies. In addition, therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating apoptotic activity are briefly discussed. PMID:27019364

  17. The BCL2 Family: Key Mediators of the Apoptotic Response to Targeted Anticancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Hata, Aaron N; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Faber, Anthony C

    2015-05-01

    The ability of cancer cells to suppress apoptosis is critical for carcinogenesis. The BCL2 family proteins comprise the sentinel network that regulates the mitochondrial or intrinsic apoptotic response. Recent advances in our understanding of apoptotic signaling pathways have enabled methods to identify cancers that are "primed" to undergo apoptosis, and have revealed potential biomarkers that may predict which cancers will undergo apoptosis in response to specific therapies. Complementary efforts have focused on developing novel drugs that directly target antiapoptotic BCL2 family proteins. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the role of BCL2 family members in cancer development and response to therapy, focusing on targeted therapeutics, recent progress in the development of apoptotic biomarkers, and therapeutic strategies designed to overcome deficiencies in apoptosis. Apoptosis, long known to be important for response to conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, has more recently been shown to be essential for the efficacy of targeted therapies. Approaches that increase the likelihood of a cancer to undergo apoptosis following therapy may help improve targeted treatment strategies. Cancer Discov; 5(5); 475-87. ©2015 AACR. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Review of therapeutic drug monitoring of anticancer drugs part two--targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Nicolas; Bardin, Christophe; Chatelut, Etienne; Paci, Angelo; Beijnen, Jos; Levêque, Dominique; Veal, Gareth; Astier, Alain

    2014-08-01

    Most of oral targeted therapies are tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Oral administration generates a complex step in the pharmacokinetics (PK) of these drugs. Inter-individual PK variability is often large and variability observed in response is influenced not only by the genetic heterogeneity of drug targets, but also by the pharmacogenetic background of the patient (e.g. cytochome P450 and ABC transporter polymorphisms), patient characteristics such as adherence to treatment and environmental factors (drug-drug interactions). Retrospective studies have shown that targeted drug exposure, reflected in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) correlates with treatment response (efficacy/toxicity) in various cancers. Nevertheless levels of evidence for therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) are however heterogeneous among these agents and TDM is still uncommon for the majority of them. Evidence for imatinib currently exists, others are emerging for compounds including nilotinib, dasatinib, erlotinib, sunitinib, sorafenib and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors. Applications for TDM during oral targeted therapies may best be reserved for particular situations including lack of therapeutic response, severe or unexpected toxicities, anticipated drug-drug interactions and/or concerns over adherence treatment. Interpatient PK variability observed with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is comparable or slightly lower to that observed with TKIs. There are still few data with these agents in favour of TDM approaches, even if data showed encouraging results with rituximab, cetuximab and bevacizumab. At this time, TDM of mAbs is not yet supported by scientific evidence. Considerable effort should be made for targeted therapies to better define concentration-effect relationships and to perform comparative randomised trials of classic dosing versus pharmacokinetically-guided adaptive dosing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nrf2: a potential therapeutic target for naturally occurring anticancer drugs?

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Elena; Calcabrini, Cinzia; Turrini, Eleonora; Sestili, Piero; Fimognari, Carmela

    2017-08-01

    Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived-2)-like 2 is one of the most efficient cytoprotective rheostats against exogenous or endogenous oxidative insults. At present, the modulation of the Nrf2 pathway represents an interesting and highly explored strategy in the oncological area. Area covered: In this review, we present and discuss the different modulation of the Nrf2 pathway by some natural compounds with a well demonstrated anticancer activity, and critically analyze the challenges associated with the development of an Nrf2-based anticancer strategy. Expert opinion: Many natural compounds with a well-defined anticancer activity are able to modulate this pathway. Both Nrf2 inducers and inhibitors can be useful as anticancer strategy. However, since Nrf2 modulates many networks potentially involved in the detoxification process of anticancer drugs, its activation in cancer cells could lead to chemoresistance. The switch between a beneficial or detrimental role of Nrf2 in cancer cells essentially depends on the tight control of its activity, the specific conditions of tumor microenvironment, and cell type. In line with the paucity of clear data related to the mechanisms underpinning the role of Nrf2 in cancer development and chemoresistance, discovery and development of Nrf2-based strategies is one of the most critical and challenging assignments for fighting cancers.

  20. Caenorhabditis elegans: A Model System for Anti-Cancer Drug Discovery and Therapeutic Target Identification

    PubMed Central

    Kobet, Robert A.; Pan, Xiaoping; Zhang, Baohong; Pak, Stephen C.; Asch, Adam S.; Lee, Myon-Hee

    2014-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) offers a unique opportunity for biological and basic medical researches due to its genetic tractability and well-defined developmental lineage. It also provides an exceptional model for genetic, molecular, and cellular analysis of human disease-related genes. Recently, C. elegans has been used as an ideal model for the identification and functional analysis of drugs (or small-molecules) in vivo. In this review, we describe conserved oncogenic signaling pathways (Wnt, Notch, and Ras) and their potential roles in the development of cancer stem cells. During C. elegans germline development, these signaling pathways regulate multiple cellular processes such as germline stem cell niche specification, germline stem cell maintenance, and germ cell fate specification. Therefore, the aberrant regulations of these signaling pathways can cause either loss of germline stem cells or overproliferation of a specific cell type, resulting in sterility. This sterility phenotype allows us to identify drugs that can modulate the oncogenic signaling pathways directly or indirectly through a high-throughput screening. Current in vivo or in vitro screening methods are largely focused on the specific core signaling components. However, this phenotype-based screening will identify drugs that possibly target upstream or downstream of core signaling pathways as well as exclude toxic effects. Although phenotype-based drug screening is ideal, the identification of drug targets is a major challenge. We here introduce a new technique, called Drug Affinity Responsive Target Stability (DARTS). This innovative method is able to identify the target of the identified drug. Importantly, signaling pathways and their regulators in C. elegans are highly conserved in most vertebrates, including humans. Therefore, C. elegans will provide a great opportunity to identify therapeutic drugs and their targets, as well as to understand mechanisms underlying the

  1. Pharmacogenomics: road to anticancer therapeutics nirvana?

    PubMed

    Desai, Apurva A; Innocenti, Federico; Ratain, Mark J

    2003-09-29

    Interindividual differences in the toxicity and response to anticancer therapies are currently observed for essentially all available treatment regimens. Such 'unpredictable' drug responses are particularly dangerous in the context of anticancer agents that have narrow therapeutic indices. Pharmacogenomics attempts to elucidate the inherited basis of interindividual differences in drug response, with the eventual goal of minimizing such variability through the use of 'individualized' treatments. There are several emerging examples of genetic polymorphisms of drug-metabolizing enzymes, DNA repair genes and drug targets that have been shown to influence the toxicity and efficacy of anticancer treatment. This review discusses the role of genetic variants of UGT1A1, TS and EGFR to exemplify the potential impact of phramacogenomics on the field of anticancer therapeutics.

  2. Role of SNARE proteins in tumourigenesis and their potential as targets for novel anti-cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jianghui; Wang, Jiafu

    2015-08-01

    The function of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) in cellular trafficking, membrane fusion and vesicle release in synaptic nerve terminals is well characterised. Recent studies suggest that SNAREs are also important in the control of tumourigenesis through the regulation of multiple signalling and transportation pathways. The majority of published studies investigated the effects of knockdown/knockout or overexpression of particular SNAREs on the normal function of cells as well as their dysfunction in tumourigenesis promotion. SNAREs are involved in the regulation of cancer cell invasion, chemo-resistance, the transportation of autocrine and paracrine factors, autophagy, apoptosis and the phosphorylation of kinases essential for cancer cell biogenesis. This evidence highlights SNAREs as potential targets for novel cancer therapy. This is the first review to summarise the expression and role of SNAREs in cancer biology at the cellular level, their interaction with non-SNARE proteins and modulation of cellular signalling cascades. Finally, a strategy is proposed for developing novel anti-cancer therapeutics using targeted delivery of a SNARE-inactivating protease into malignant cells.

  3. 'Smartening' anticancer therapeutic nanosystems using biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Lozano, Rebeca; Cano, Manuel; Pimentel, Belén; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2015-12-01

    To be effective, anticancer agents must induce cell killing in a selective manner, something that is proving difficult to achieve. Drug delivery systems could help to solve problems associated with the lack of selectivity of classical chemotherapeutic agents. However, to realize this, such systems must overcome multiple physiological barriers. For instance, they must evade surveillance by the immune system, attach selectively to target cells, and gain access to their interior. Furthermore, there they must escape endosomal entrapment, and release their cargoes in a controlled manner, without affecting their functionality. Here we review recent efforts aiming at using biomolecules to confer these abilities to bare nanoparticles, to transform them into smart anticancer therapeutic nanosystems.

  4. Targeting Mutant KRAS for Anticancer Therapeutics: A Review of Novel Small Molecule Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanxiang; Kaiser, Christine E.; Frett, Brendan; Li, Hong-yu

    2015-01-01

    The RAS proteins play a role in cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival. Aberrant RAS signaling has been found to play a role in 30% of all cancers. KRAS, a key member of the RAS protein family, is an attractive cancer target, as frequent point mutations in the KRAS gene render the protein constitutively active. A number of attempts have been made to target aberrant KRAS signaling by identifying small molecule compounds that (1) are synthetic lethal to mutant KRAS, (2) block KRAS/GEF interactions, (3) inhibit downstream KRAS effectors, or (4) inhibit the post-translational processing of RAS proteins. In addition, inhibition of novel targets outside the main KRAS signaling pathway, specifically the cell cycle related kinase PLK1, has been shown have an effect in cells that harbor mutant KRAS. Herein we review the use of various high-throughput screening assays utilized to identify new small-molecule compounds capable of targeting mutant KRAS-driven cancers. PMID:23566315

  5. Emerging anticancer therapeutic targets and the cardiovascular system: is there cause for concern?

    PubMed

    Peng, Xuyang; Pentassuglia, Laura; Sawyer, Douglas B

    2010-04-02

    The race for a cure to cancer continues, fueled by unprecedented discoveries of fundamental biology underlying carcinogenesis and tumorigenesis. The expansion of the target list and tools to approach them is moving the oncology community extraordinarily rapidly to clinical trials, bringing new hope for cancer patients. This effort is also propelling biological discoveries in cardiovascular research, because many of the targets being explored in cancer play fundamental roles in the heart and vasculature. The combined efforts of cardiovascular and cancer biologists, along with clinical investigators in these fields, will be needed to understand how to safely exploit these efforts. Here, we discuss a few of the many research foci in oncology where we believe such collaboration will be particularly important.

  6. Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel 1 As an Emerging Drug Target for Novel Anti-Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda; Krelin, Yakov; Shteinfer-Kuzmine, Anna; Arif, Tasleem

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells share several properties, high proliferation potential, reprogramed metabolism, and resistance to apoptotic cues. Acquiring these hallmarks involves changes in key oncogenes and non-oncogenes essential for cancer cell survival and prosperity, and is accompanied by the increased energy requirements of proliferating cells. Mitochondria occupy a central position in cell life and death with mitochondrial bioenergetics, biosynthesis, and signaling are critical for tumorigenesis. Voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) is situated in the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) and serving as a mitochondrial gatekeeper. VDAC1 allowing the transfer of metabolites, fatty acid ions, Ca2+, reactive oxygen species, and cholesterol across the OMM and is a key player in mitochondrial-mediate apoptosis. Moreover, VDAC1 serves as a hub protein, interacting with diverse sets of proteins from the cytosol, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria that together regulate metabolic and signaling pathways. The observation that VDAC1 is over-expressed in many cancers suggests that the protein may play a pivotal role in cancer cell survival. However, VDAC1 is also important in mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, mediating release of apoptotic proteins and interacting with anti-apoptotic proteins, such as B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-xL, and hexokinase (HK), which are also highly expressed in many cancers. Strategically located in a “bottleneck” position, controlling metabolic homeostasis and apoptosis, VDAC1 thus represents an emerging target for anti-cancer drugs. This review presents an overview on the multi-functional mitochondrial protein VDAC1 performing several functions and interacting with distinct sets of partners to regulate both cell life and death, and highlights the importance of the protein for cancer cell survival. We address recent results related to the mechanisms of VDAC1-mediated apoptosis and the potential of associated proteins to modulate of VDAC1 activity

  7. Molecular interaction of a kinase inhibitor midostaurin with anticancer drug targets, S100A8 and EGFR: transcriptional profiling and molecular docking study for kidney cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Zeenat; Schulten, Hans-Juergen; Farsi, Hasan Ma; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah A; Gari, Mamdooh A; Chaudhary, Adeel Ga; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed H; Karim, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    The S100A8 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) proteins are proto-oncogenes that are strongly expressed in a number of cancer types. EGFR promotes cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration and survival by activating molecular pathways. Involvement of proinflammatory S100A8 in tumor cell differentiation and progression is largely unclear and not studied in kidney cancer (KC). S100A8 and EGFR are potential therapeutic biomarkers and anticancer drug targets for KC. In this study, we explored molecular mechanisms of interaction profiles of both molecules with potential anticancer drugs. We undertook transcriptional profiling in Saudi KCs using Affymetrix HuGene 1.0 ST arrays. We identified 1478 significantly expressed genes, including S100A8 and EGFR overexpression, using cut-off p value <0.05 and fold change ≥2. Additionally, we compared and confirmed our findings with expression data available at NCBI's GEO database. A significant number of genes associated with cancer showed involvement in cell cycle progression, DNA repair, tumor morphology, tissue development, and cell survival. Atherosclerosis signaling, leukocyte extravasation signaling, notch signaling, and IL-12 signaling were the most significantly disrupted signaling pathways. The present study provides an initial transcriptional profiling of Saudi KC patients. Our analysis suggests distinct transcriptomic signatures and pathways underlying molecular mechanisms of KC progression. Molecular docking analysis revealed that the kinase inhibitor "midostaurin" has amongst the selected drug targets, the best ligand properties to S100A8 and EGFR, with the implication that its binding inhibits downstream signaling in KC. This is the first structure-based docking study for the selected protein targets and anticancer drug, and the results indicate S100A8 and EGFR as attractive anticancer targets and midostaurin with effective drug properties for therapeutic intervention in KC.

  8. A novel nitric oxide-based anticancer therapeutics by macrophage-targeted poly(l-arginine)-based nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Shinpei; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2015-11-10

    In the immune system, macrophages in tumor tissue generate nitric oxide (NO), producing versatile effects including apoptosis of tumor cells, because inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in the cytoplasm of a macrophage produces NO using l-arginine as a substrate. Here, we propose novel NO-triggered immune therapeutics based on our newly designed nanoparticle system. We designed a poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(l-arginine) (i.e., PEG-b-P(l-Arg)) block copolymer and prepared polyion complex micelles (PEG-b-P(l-Arg)/m) composed of PEG-b-P(l-Arg) and chondroitin sulfate for systemic anticancer immunotherapy. iNOS treatment of PEG-b-P(l-Arg) did not generate NO, but NO molecules were detected after trypsin pretreatment, indicating that hydrolysis of P(l-Arg) to monomeric arginine was taking place in vitro. RAW264.7 macrophages abundantly generated NO from the PEG-b-P(l-Arg)/m in comparison with control micelles; this finding is indicative of robustness of the proposed method. It is interesting to note that systemic administration of PEG-b-P(l-Arg)/m had no noticeable adverse effects and suppressed the tumor growth rate in C26 tumor-bearing mice in a dose-dependent manner. Our newly designed nanoparticle-assisted arginine delivery system seems to hold promise as an NO-mediated anticancer immunotherapy.

  9. Penetrating the cell membrane, thermal targeting and novel anticancer drugs: the development of thermally targeted, elastin-like polypeptide cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jung Su; Kuna, Marija; Raucher, Drazen

    2014-04-01

    Therapeutic peptides offer important cancer treatment approaches. Designed to inhibit oncogenes and other oncoproteins, early therapeutic peptides applications were hampered by pharmacokinetic properties now addressed through tumor targeting strategies. Active targeting with environmentally responsive biopolymers or macromolecules enhances therapeutics accumulation at tumor sites; passive targeting with macromolecules, or liposomes, exploits angiogenesis and poor lymphatic drainage to preferentially accumulate therapeutics within tumors. Genetically engineered, thermally-responsive, elastin-like polypeptides use both strategies and cell-penetrating peptides to further intratumoral cell uptake. This review describes the development and application of cell-penetrating peptide-elastin-like polypeptide therapeutics for the thermally targeted delivery of therapeutic peptides.

  10. Targeted anticancer therapy: overexpressed receptors and nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Ahamed, Maqusood; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Alrokayan, Salman A; Kumar, Sudhir

    2014-09-25

    Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to cancer cells and tissues is a promising field due to its potential to spare unaffected cells and tissues, but it has been a major challenge to achieve success in these therapeutic approaches. Several innovative approaches to targeted drug delivery have been devised based on available knowledge in cancer biology and on technological advancements. To achieve the desired selectivity of drug delivery, nanotechnology has enabled researchers to design nanoparticles (NPs) to incorporate anticancer drugs and act as nanocarriers. Recently, many receptor molecules known to be overexpressed in cancer have been explored as docking sites for the targeting of anticancer drugs. In principle, anticancer drugs can be concentrated specifically in cancer cells and tissues by conjugating drug-containing nanocarriers with ligands against these receptors. Several mechanisms can be employed to induce triggered drug release in response to either endogenous trigger or exogenous trigger so that the anticancer drug is only released upon reaching and preferentially accumulating in the tumor tissue. This review focuses on overexpressed receptors exploited in targeting drugs to cancerous tissues and the tumor microenvironment. We briefly evaluate the structure and function of these receptor molecules, emphasizing the elegant mechanisms by which certain characteristics of cancer can be exploited in cancer treatment. After this discussion of receptors, we review their respective ligands and then the anticancer drugs delivered by nanotechnology in preclinical models of cancer. Ligand-functionalized nanocarriers have delivered significantly higher amounts of anticancer drugs in many in vitro and in vivo models of cancer compared to cancer models lacking such receptors or drug carrying nanocarriers devoid of ligand. This increased concentration of anticancer drug in the tumor site enabled by nanotechnology could have a major impact on the efficiency of cancer

  11. Melanoma cell surface-expressed phosphatidylserine as a therapeutic target for cationic anticancer peptide, temporin-1CEa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Che; Chen, Yin-Wang; Zhang, Liang; Gong, Xian-Ge; Zhou, Yang; Shang, De-Jing

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that temporin-1CEa, a cationic antimicrobial peptide, exerts preferential cytotoxicity toward cancer cells. However, the exact molecular mechanism for this cancer-selectivity is still largely unknown. Here, we found that the negatively charged phosphatidylserine (PS) expressed on cancer cell surface serves as a target for temporin-1CEa. Our results indicate that human A375 melanoma cells express 50-fold more PS than non-cancerous HaCaT cells. The expression of cell surface PS in various cancer cell lines closely correlated with their ability to be recognized, bound and killed by temporin-1CEa. Additionally, the cytotoxicity of temporin-1CEa against A375 cells can be ameliorated by annexin V, which binds to cell surface PS with high affinity. Moreover, the data of isothermal titration calorimetry assay further confirmed a direct binding of temporin-1CEa to PS, at a ratio of 1:5 (temporin-1CEa:PS). Interestingly, the circular dichroism spectra analysis using artificial biomembrane revealed that PS not only provides electrostatic attractive sites for temporin-1CEa but also confers the membrane-bound temporin-1CEa to form α-helical structure, therefore, enhances the affinity and membrane disrupting ability of temporin-1CEa. In summary, these findings suggested that the melanoma cells expressed PS may serve as a promising target for temporin-1CEa or other cationic anticancer peptides.

  12. Therapeutic Effectiveness of Anticancer Phytochemicals on Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jisun; Hlatky, Lynn; Jeong, Yong-Seob; Kim, Dohoon

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how to target cancer stem cells (CSCs) may provide helpful insights for the development of therapeutic or preventive strategies against cancers. Dietary phytochemicals with anticancer properties are promising candidates and have selective impact on CSCs. This review summarizes the influence of phytochemicals on heterogeneous cancer cell populations as well as on specific targeting of CSCs. PMID:27376325

  13. Hyaluronan: towards novel anti-cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Karbownik, Michał S; Nowak, Jerzy Z

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of the role of hyaluronan in physiology and various pathological conditions has changed since the complex nature of its synthesis, degradation and interactions with diverse binding proteins was revealed. Initially perceived only as an inert component of connective tissue, it is now known to be involved in multiple signaling pathways, including those involved in cancer pathogenesis and progression. Hyaluronan presents a mixture of various length polymer molecules from finely fragmented oligosaccharides, polymers intermediate in size, to huge aggregates of high molecular weight hyaluronan. While large molecules promote tissue integrity and quiescence, the generation of breakdown products enhances signaling transduction, contributing to the pro-oncogenic behavior of cancer cells. Low molecular weight hyaluronan has well-established angiogenic properties, while the smallest hyaluronan oligomers may counteract tumor development. These equivocal properties make the role of hyaluronan in cancer biology very complex. This review surveys recent data on hyaluronan biosynthesis, metabolism, and interactions with its binding proteins called hyaladherins (CD44, RHAMM), providing themolecular background underlying its differentiated biological activity. In particular, the article critically presents current ideas on actual role of hyaluronan in cancer. The paper additionally maps a path towards promising novel anti-cancer therapeutics which target hyaluronan metabolic enzymes and hyaladherins, and constitute hyaluronan-based drug delivery systems.

  14. Deubiquitinating enzymes as novel anticancer targets

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Benjamin; Marblestone, Jeffrey G; Butt, Tauseef R; Mattern, Michael R

    2008-01-01

    Tagging proteins with mono- or poly-ubiquitin is now recognized as a multifaceted and universal means of regulating cell growth and physiology. It does so by controlling the cellular lifetime of nearly all eukaryotic proteins and the cellular localization of many critical proteins. Enzymes of the ubiquitin pathway add (ligases) or remove (deubiquitinases [DUBs]) ubiquitin tags to or from their target proteins in a selective fashion. Similarly to the kinases and their corresponding phosphatases, ubiquitin ligases and DUBs have become actively studied molecular oncology targets for drug discovery. Approximately 79 functional DUBs exist in the human proteome, suggesting that selective intervention is a reasonable therapeutic objective, with the goal of downregulating or ablating oncogene products or, alternatively, upregulating or sparing tumor suppressors. In the following review, this fascinating class of regulatory enzymes will be described, and specific examples of DUBs that are viable targets for anticancer therapy will be considered. PMID:17381419

  15. Bacterial production and structure-functional validation of a recombinant antigen-binding fragment (Fab) of an anti-cancer therapeutic antibody targeting epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Hun; Sim, Dae-Won; Park, Dongsun; Jung, Tai-Geun; Lee, Seonghwan; Oh, Taeheun; Ha, Jong-Ryul; Seok, Seung-Hyeon; Seo, Min-Duk; Kang, Ho Chul; Kim, Young Pil; Won, Hyung-Sik

    2016-12-01

    Fragment engineering of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has emerged as an excellent paradigm to develop highly efficient therapeutic and/or diagnostic agents. Engineered mAb fragments can be economically produced in bacterial systems using recombinant DNA technologies. In this work, we established recombinant production in Escherichia coli for monovalent antigen-binding fragment (Fab) adopted from a clinically used anticancer mAB drug cetuximab targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Recombinant DNA constructs were designed to express both polypeptide chains comprising Fab in a single vector and to secrete them to bacterial periplasmic space for efficient folding. Particularly, a C-terminal engineering to confer an interchain disulfide bond appeared to be able to enhance its heterodimeric integrity and EGFR-binding activity. Conformational relevance of the purified final product was validated by mass spectrometry and crystal structure at 1.9 Å resolution. Finally, our recombinant cetuximab-Fab was found to have strong binding affinity to EGFR overexpressed in human squamous carcinoma model (A431) cells. Its binding ability was comparable to that of cetuximab. Its EGFR-binding affinity was estimated at approximately 0.7 nM of Kd in vitro, which was quite stronger than the binding affinity of natural ligand EGF. Hence, the results validate that our construction could serve as an efficient platform to produce a recombinant cetuximab-Fab with a retained antigen-binding functionality.

  16. Natural Compounds as Anticancer Agents Targeting DNA Topoisomerases

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Chetan Kumar; Majumder, Hemanta Kumar; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2017-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are important cellular enzymes found in almost all types of living cells (eukaryotic and prokaryotic). These enzymes are essential for various DNA metabolic processes e.g. replication, transcription, recombination, chromosomal decatenation etc. These enzymes are important molecular drug targets and inhibitors of these enzymes are widely used as effective anticancer and antibacterial drugs. However, topoisomerase inhibitors have some therapeutic limitations and they exert serious side effects during cancer chemotherapy. Thus, development of novel anticancer topoisomerase inhibitors is necessary for improving cancer chemotherapy. Nature serves as a repertoire of structurally and chemically diverse molecules and in the recent years many DNA topoisomerase inhibitors have been identified from natural sources. The present review discusses anticancer properties and therapeutic importance of eighteen recently identified natural topoisomerase inhibitors (from the year 2009 to 2015). Structural characteristics of these novel inhibitors provide backbones for designing and developing new anticancer drugs. PMID:28503091

  17. Targeting caspases in cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Patrick; Mishra, Murli; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    The identification of the fundamental role of apoptosis in the growth balance and normal homeostasis against cell proliferation led to the recognition of its loss contributing to tumorigenesis. The mechanistic significance of reinstating apoptosis signaling towards selective targeting of malignant cells heavily exploits the caspase family of death-inducing molecules as a powerful therapeutic platform for the development of potent anticancer strategies. Some apoptosis inhibitors induce caspase expression and activity in preclinical models and clinical trials by targeting both the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways and restoring the apoptotic capacity in human tumors. Furthermore, up-regulation of caspases emerges as a sensitizing mechanism for tumors exhibiting therapeutic resistance to radiation and adjuvant chemotherapy. This review provides a comprehensive discussion of the functional involvement of caspases in apoptosis control and the current understanding of reactivating caspase-mediated apoptosis signaling towards effective therapeutic modalities in cancer treatment. PMID:23509217

  18. Folate-targeted pH-responsive calcium zoledronate nanoscale metal-organic frameworks: Turning a bone antiresorptive agent into an anticancer therapeutic.

    PubMed

    Au, Kin Man; Satterlee, Andrew; Min, Yuanzeng; Tian, Xi; Kim, Young Seok; Caster, Joseph M; Zhang, Longzhen; Zhang, Tian; Huang, Leaf; Wang, Andrew Z

    2016-03-01

    Zoledronate (Zol) is a third-generation bisphosphonate that is widely used as an anti-resorptive agent for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis. While there is preclinical data indicating that bisphosphonates such as Zol have direct cytotoxic effects on cancer cells, such effect has not been firmly established in the clinical setting. This is likely due to the rapid absorption of bisphosphonates by the skeleton after intravenous (i.v.) administration. Herein, we report the reformulation of Zol using nanotechnology and evaluation of this novel nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (nMOFs) formulation of Zol as an anticancer agent. The nMOF formulation is comprised of a calcium zoledronate (CaZol) core and a polyethylene glycol (PEG) surface. To preferentially deliver CaZol nMOFs to tumors as well as facilitate cellular uptake of Zol, we incorporated folate (Fol)-targeted ligands on the nMOFs. The folate receptor (FR) is known to be overexpressed in several tumor types, including head-and-neck, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers. We demonstrated that these targeted CaZol nMOFs possess excellent chemical and colloidal stability in physiological conditions. The release of encapsulated Zol from the nMOFs occurs in the mid-endosomes during nMOF endocytosis. In vitro toxicity studies demonstrated that Fol-targeted CaZol nMOFs are more efficient than small molecule Zol in inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in FR-overexpressing H460 non-small cell lung and PC3 prostate cancer cells. Our findings were further validated in vivo using mouse xenograft models of H460 and PC3. We demonstrated that Fol-targeted CaZol nMOFs are effective anticancer agents and increase the direct antitumor activity of Zol by 80-85% in vivo through inhibition of tumor neovasculature, and inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis.

  19. Autophagy modulation as a target for anticancer drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Xu, Huai-long; Liu, Yong-xi; An, Na; Zhao, Si; Bao, Jin-ku

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process involving the engulfment and degradation of non-essential or abnormal cellular organelles and proteins, is crucial for homeostatic maintenance in living cells. This highly regulated, multi-step process has been implicated in diverse diseases including cancer. Autophagy can function as either a promoter or a suppressor of cancer, which makes it a promising and challenging therapeutic target. Herein, we overview the regulatory mechanisms and dual roles of autophagy in cancer. We also describe some of the representative agents that exert their anticancer effects by regulating autophagy. Additionally, some emerging strategies aimed at modulating autophagy are discussed as having the potential for future anticancer drug discovery. In summary, these findings will provide valuable information to better utilize autophagy in the future development of anticancer therapeutics that meet clinical requirements. PMID:23564085

  20. Mitochondria and lipid raft-located FOF1-ATP synthase as major therapeutic targets in the antileishmanial and anticancer activities of ether lipid edelfosine.

    PubMed

    Villa-Pulgarín, Janny A; Gajate, Consuelo; Botet, Javier; Jimenez, Alberto; Justies, Nicole; Varela-M, Rubén E; Cuesta-Marbán, Álvaro; Müller, Ingrid; Modolell, Manuel; Revuelta, José L; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2017-08-01

    anticancer actions of edelfosine share some common signaling processes, with mitochondria and raft-located FOF1-ATP synthase being critical in the killing process, thus identifying novel druggable targets for the treatment of leishmaniasis.

  1. Mitochondria and lipid raft-located FOF1-ATP synthase as major therapeutic targets in the antileishmanial and anticancer activities of ether lipid edelfosine

    PubMed Central

    Botet, Javier; Jimenez, Alberto; Justies, Nicole; Varela-M, Rubén E.; Cuesta-Marbán, Álvaro; Modolell, Manuel; Revuelta, José L.

    2017-01-01

    /Significance The present study shows that the antileishmanial and anticancer actions of edelfosine share some common signaling processes, with mitochondria and raft-located FOF1-ATP synthase being critical in the killing process, thus identifying novel druggable targets for the treatment of leishmaniasis. PMID:28829771

  2. IAPs as a target for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Danson, S; Dean, E; Dive, C; Ranson, M

    2007-12-01

    The avoidance of apoptosis is one of the hallmarks of cancer cells. In addition, failure to induce apoptosis by anticancer agents, either due to limitations of the drug or the tumour cell evading apoptosis, is a reason for chemotherapeutic failure. Two general pathways for apoptotic cell death have been characterised, the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways which merge in the final common pathway. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is an anti-apoptotic protein in the final common pathway that inhibits caspases and suppresses apoptosis. XIAP is over-expressed in many cancer cell lines and cancer tissues. High XIAP expression has been correlated with resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy and to poor clinical outcome by some investigators. Manipulation of apoptosis is an attractive therapeutic concept. Much effort has been spent on inhibiting the anti-apoptotic protein, B cell lymphoma gene 2 (Bcl-2) which is part of the intrinsic pathway. Now attention is turning to inhibition of XIAP as a cancer drug target. It has been argued that it is more effective to block the final common pathway rather than just the intrinsic arm. Inhibition of XIAP can be with either antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) or small molecule inhibitors. In vitro, XIAP antagonists produce XIAP knockdown and apoptosis which is associated with sensitisation of tumour cells to radiotherapy and cytotoxic drugs. In vivo, XIAP antagonists have antitumour effects and sensitise tumours to the effects of chemotherapy. This review will summarise the preclinical data for both ASO and small molecule inhibition of XIAP and discuss emerging Phase I data. Future strategies for manipulation of XIAP and the clinical development of XIAP inhibitors will be discussed.

  3. Targeting aerobic glycolysis: 3-bromopyruvate as a promising anticancer drug.

    PubMed

    Cardaci, Simone; Desideri, Enrico; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2012-02-01

    The Warburg effect refers to the phenomenon whereby cancer cells avidly take up glucose and produce lactic acid under aerobic conditions. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying tumor reliance on glycolysis remains not completely clear, its inhibition opens feasible therapeutic windows for cancer treatment. Indeed, several small molecules have emerged by combinatorial studies exhibiting promising anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo, as a single agent or in combination with other therapeutic modalities. Therefore, besides reviewing the alterations of glycolysis that occur with malignant transformation, this manuscript aims at recapitulating the most effective pharmacological therapeutics of its targeting. In particular, we describe the principal mechanisms of action and the main targets of 3-bromopyruvate, an alkylating agent with impressive antitumor effects in several models of animal tumors. Moreover, we discuss the chemo-potentiating strategies that would make unparalleled the putative therapeutic efficacy of its use in clinical settings.

  4. Anticancer activity of celastrol in combination with ErbB2-targeted therapeutics for treatment of ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Clubb, Robert J; Ortega-Cava, Cesar; Williams, Stetson H; Bailey, Tameka A; Duan, Lei; Zhao, Xiangshan; Reddi, Alagarasamy L; Nyong, Abijah M; Natarajan, Amarnath; Band, Vimla

    2011-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase ErbB2 is overexpressed in up to a third of breast cancers, allowing targeted therapy with ErbB2-directed humanized antibodies such as Trastuzumab. Concurrent targeting of ErbB2 stability with HSP90 inhibitors is synergistic with Trastuzumab, suggesting that pharmacological agents that can inhibit HSP90 as well as signaling pathways activated by ErbB2 could be useful against ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancers. The triterpene natural product Celastrol inhibits HSP90 and several pathways relevant to ErbB2-dependent oncogenesis including the NFκB pathway and the proteasome, and has shown promising activity in other cancer models. Here, we demonstrate that Celastrol exhibits in vitro antitumor activity against a panel of human breast cancer cell lines with selectivity towards those overexpressing ErbB2. Celastrol strongly synergized with ErbB2-targeted therapeutics Trastuzumab and Lapatinib, producing higher cytotoxicity with substantially lower doses of Celastrol. Celastrol significantly retarded the rate of growth of ErbB2-overexpressing human breast cancer cells in a mouse xenograft model with only minor systemic toxicity. Mechanistically, Celastrol not only induced the expected ubiquitinylation and degradation of ErbB2 and other HSP90 client proteins, but it also increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Our studies show that the Michael Acceptor functionality in Celastrol is important for its ability to destabilize ErbB2 and exert its bioactivity against ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer cells. These studies suggest the potential use of Michael acceptor-containing molecules as novel therapeutic modalities against ErbB2-driven breast cancer by targeting multiple biological attributes of the driver oncogene. PMID:21088503

  5. Targeted NF1 cancer therapeutics with multiple modes of action: small molecule hormone-like agents resembling the natural anticancer metabolite, 2-methoxyoestradiol.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu-chi; Upadhyayula, Ravi; Cevallos, Stephanie; Messick, Ryan J; Hsia, Tammy; Leese, Mathew P; Jewett, Douglas M; Ferrer-Torres, Daysha; Roth, Therese M; Dohle, Wolfgang; Potter, Barry V L; Barald, Kate F

    2015-10-20

    Both the number and size of tumours in NF1 patients increase in response to the rise in steroid hormones seen at puberty and during pregnancy. The size of tumours decreases after delivery, suggesting that hormone-targeting therapy might provide a viable new NF1 treatment approach. Our earlier studies demonstrated that human NF1 tumour cell lines either went through apoptosis or ceased growth in the presence of 2-methoxyoestradiol (2ME2), a naturally occurring anticancer metabolite of 17-β estradiol. Previous reports of treatment with sulfamoylated steroidal and non-steroidal derivatives of 2ME2 showed promising reductions in tumour burden in hormone-responsive cancers other than NF1. Here we present the first studies indicating that 2ME2 derivatives could also provide an avenue for treating NF1, for which few treatment options are available. STX3451, (2-(3-Bromo-4,5-dimethoxybenzyl)-7-methoxy-6-sulfamoyloxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline), a non-steroidal sulphamate analogue of 2ME2, was tested in dose-dependent studies of malignant and benign NF1 human tumour cell lines and cell lines with variable controlled neurofibromin expression. The mechanisms of action of STX3451 were also analysed. We found that STX3451-induced apoptosis in human malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) cell lines, even in the presence of elevated oestrogen and progesterone. It inhibits both PI3 kinase and mTOR signalling pathways. It disrupts actin- and microtubule-based cytoskeletal structures in cell lines derived from human MPNSTs and in cells derived from benign plexiform neurofibromas. STX3451 selectively kills MPNST-derived cells, but also halts growth of other tumour-derived NF1 cell lines. STX3451 provides a new approach for inducing cell death and lowering tumour burden in NF1 and other hormone-responsive cancers with limited treatment options.

  6. Complement-targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D

    2010-01-01

    The complement system is a central component of innate immunity and bridges the innate to the adaptive immune response. However, it can also turn its destructive capabilities against host cells and is involved in numerous diseases and pathological conditions. Modulation of the complement system has been recognized as a promising strategy in drug discovery, and a large number of therapeutic modalities have been developed. However, successful marketing of complement-targeted drugs has proved to be more difficult than initially expected, and many strategies have been discontinued. The US Food and Drug Administration’s approval of the first complement-specific drug, an antibody against complement component C5 (eculizumab; Soliris), in March 2007, was a long-awaited breakthrough in the field. Approval of eculizumab validates the complement system as therapeutic target and might facilitate clinical development of other promising drug candidates. PMID:17989689

  7. Targeting protein-protein interactions as an anticancer strategy.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Andrei A; Khuri, Fadlo R; Fu, Haian

    2013-07-01

    The emergence and convergence of cancer genomics, targeted therapies, and network oncology have significantly expanded the landscape of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks in cancer for therapeutic discovery. Extensive biological and clinical investigations have led to the identification of protein interaction hubs and nodes that are critical for the acquisition and maintenance of characteristics of cancer essential for cell transformation. Such cancer-enabling PPIs have become promising therapeutic targets. With technological advances in PPI modulator discovery and validation of PPI-targeting agents in clinical settings, targeting of PPI interfaces as an anticancer strategy has become a reality. Future research directed at genomics-based PPI target discovery, PPI interface characterization, PPI-focused chemical library design, and patient-genomic subpopulation-driven clinical studies is expected to accelerate the development of the next generation of PPI-based anticancer agents for personalized precision medicine. Here we briefly review prominent PPIs that mediate cancer-acquired properties, highlight recognized challenges and promising clinical results in targeting PPIs, and outline emerging opportunities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mitochondria: a promising target for anticancer alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Urra, Félix A; Cordova-Delgado, Miguel; Pessoa-Mahana, Hernan; Ramírez-Rodríguez, Oney; Weiss-Lopez, Boris; Ferreira, Jorge; Araya-Maturana, Ramiro

    2013-01-01

    A great number of alkaloids exhibit high potential in cancer research. Some of them are anticancer drugs with well-defined clinical uses, exerting their action on microtubules dynamics or DNA replication and topology. On the other hand, mitochondria have been recognized as an essential organelle in the establishment of tumor characteristics, especially the resistance to cell death, high proliferative capacity and adaptation to unfavorable cellular environment. Interestingly, many alkaloids exert their anticancer activities affecting selectively some functions of the tumor mitochondria by 1) modulating OXPHOS and ADP/ATP transport, 2) increasing ROS levels and mitochondrial potential dissipation by crosstalk between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, 3) inducing mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and autophagy, 4) inhibiting mitochondrial metabolic pathways and 5) by alteration of the morphology and biogenesis of this organelle. These antecedents show the relevance of developing research about the effects of alkaloids on functions controlled by tumor mitochondria, offering an attractive target for the design of new alkaloid derivatives, considering organelle- specific delivery strategies. This review describes mitochondria as a central component in the anticancer action of a set of alkaloids, in a way to illustrate the importance of this organelle in medicinal chemistry.

  9. Co-targeting cancer drug escape pathways confers clinical advantage for multi-target anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Tao, Lin; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Feng; Chen, Zhe; Jiang, Yu Yang; Chen, Yu Zong

    2015-12-01

    Recent investigations have suggested that anticancer therapeutics may be enhanced by co-targeting the primary anticancer target and the corresponding drug escape pathways. Whether this strategy confers statistically significant clinical advantage has not been systematically investigated. This question was probed by the evaluation of the clinical status and the multiple targets of 23 approved and 136 clinical trial multi-target anticancer drugs with particular focus on those co-targeting EGFR, HER2, Abl, VEGFR2, mTOR, PI3K, Alk, MEK, KIT, and DNA topoisomerase, and some of the 14, 7, 13, 20, 6, 5, 7, 2, 4 and 10 cancer drug escape pathways respectively. Most of the approved (73.9%) and phase III (75.0%), the majority of the Phase II (62.8%) and I (53.6%), and the minority of the discontinued (35.3%) multi-target drugs were found to co-target cancer drug escape pathways. This suggests that co-targeting anticancer targets and drug escape pathways confer significant clinical advantage and such strategy can be more extensively explored. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Adherence to targeted oral anticancer medications.

    PubMed

    Geynisman, Daniel M; Wickersham, Karen E

    2013-04-01

    The use of targeted oral anticancer medications (OAMs) is becoming increasingly prevalent in cancer care. Approximately 25-30% of the oncology drug pipeline involves oral agents and there are now over 50 OAMs approved by the Food and Drug Administration. This change represents a major shift in management of patients with cancer from directly observed, intermittent intravenous therapy to self-administered, oral chronic therapy. The increased prevalence of OAMs raises the issue of adherence in oncology, including understanding the challenges of adherence to OAMs. This review focuses on studies of adherence for patients taking molecularly targeted OAMs for breast cancer, chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We then discuss barriers to adherence and studies performed to date testing interventions for improving adherence. Finally, we discuss future areas of investigation needed to define and improve adherence to OAMs in targeted therapy for cancer.

  11. Targets of 3-bromopyruvate, a new, energy depleting, anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Dell'Antone, Paolo

    2009-11-01

    3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), a pyruvate analog recently proposed as a possible anticancer drug, was investigated in relation to its capacity to inhibit energy production in fractions obtained from normal cells (rat hepatocytes) and in isolated rat thymocytes . Findings were that main targets of the drug were glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and not hexokinase as suggested for hepatoma cells, and succinate -driven ATP synthesis. Consistently with the above findings, in the normal cells studied (thymocytes ) the drug elicited an important fall in ATP levels. The significance of the present findings in concern with a possible therapeutic usefulness of the drug is discussed.

  12. Validating Aurora B as an anti-cancer drug target.

    PubMed

    Girdler, Fiona; Gascoigne, Karen E; Eyers, Patrick A; Hartmuth, Sonya; Crafter, Claire; Foote, Kevin M; Keen, Nicholas J; Taylor, Stephen S

    2006-09-01

    The Aurora kinases, a family of mitotic regulators, have received much attention as potential targets for novel anti-cancer therapeutics. Several Aurora kinase inhibitors have been described including ZM447439, which prevents chromosome alignment, spindle checkpoint function and cytokinesis. Subsequently, ZM447439-treated cells exit mitosis without dividing and lose viability. Because ZM447439 inhibits both Aurora A and B, we set out to determine which phenotypes are due to inhibition of which kinase. Using molecular genetic approaches, we show that inhibition of Aurora B kinase activity phenocopies ZM447439. Furthermore, a novel ZM compound, which is 100 times more selective for Aurora B over Aurora A in vitro, induces identical phenotypes. Importantly, inhibition of Aurora B kinase activity induces a penetrant anti-proliferative phenotype, indicating that Aurora B is an attractive anti-cancer drug target. Using molecular genetic and chemical-genetic approaches, we also probe the role of Aurora A kinase activity. We show that simultaneous repression of Aurora A plus induction of a catalytic mutant induces a monopolar phenotype. Consistently, another novel ZM-related inhibitor, which is 20 times as potent against Aurora A compared with ZM447439, induces a monopolar phenotype. Expression of a drug-resistant Aurora A mutant reverts this phenotype, demonstrating that Aurora A kinase activity is required for spindle bipolarity in human cells. Because small molecule-mediated inhibition of Aurora A and Aurora B yields distinct phenotypes, our observations indicate that the Auroras may present two avenues for anti-cancer drug discovery.

  13. Mitochondria targeting nano agents in cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria have emerged as noteworthy therapeutic targets as their physiological functions are often altered in pathological conditions such as cancer. The electronic databases of MEDLINE, EMBASE and PubMed were searched for recent studies reporting the importance of mitochondria targeting nanoagents in cancer therapeutics. The concluding remarks of the above papers mostly confirmed the growing potential of these novel nanoagents in the area of anticancer research. Furthermore, numerous studies demonstrated the immense potential of nanocarriers in delivering mitochondria-acting compounds to their target site. Among the assemblage of nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are becoming more prominent for drug delivery due to favorable attributes including their unique shape, which promotes cellular uptake, and large aspect ratio that facilitates conjugation of bioactive molecules on their surface. The present review focused on the current view of variable options available in mitochondria-targeting anticancer therapeutics. It may be concluded that improvements are essential for its establishment as a gold standard therapeutic option especially in the clinical setting. PMID:28105197

  14. A multi-target therapeutic potential of Prunus domestica gum stabilized nanoparticles exhibited prospective anticancer, antibacterial, urease-inhibition, anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties.

    PubMed

    Islam, Nazar Ul; Amin, Raza; Shahid, Muhammad; Amin, Muhammad; Zaib, Sumera; Iqbal, Jamshed

    2017-05-23

    Phytotherapeutics exhibit diverse pharmacological effects that are based on the combined action of a mixture of phytoconstituents. In this study, Prunus domestica gum-loaded, stabilized gold and silver nanoparticles (Au/Ag-NPs) were evaluated for their prospective anticancer, antibacterial, urease-inhibition, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic properties. Au/Ag-NPs were biosynthesized and characterized with UV-Vis, FTIR, SEM, EDX, and XRD techniques. The effect of gum and metal ion concentration, reaction temperature, and time on the synthetic stability of nanoparticles was studied along with their post-synthetic stability against varying pH and salt concentrations, long-term storage and extremes of temperature. Nanoparticles were tested for anticancer (HeLa cervical cancer cells), antibacterial (Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa), urease inhibition (jack-bean urease), anti-inflammatory (carrageenan-induced paw edema), and antinociceptive (abdominal constriction response) activities. The nanoparticles were mostly spherical with an average particle size between 7 and 30 nm (Au-NPs) and 5-30 nm (Ag-NPs). Au/Ag-NPs maintained their colloidal stability and nanoscale characteristics against variations in physicochemical factors. Au/Ag-NPs have potent anticancer potential (IC50 = 2.14 ± 0.15 μg/mL and 3.45 ± 0.23 μg/mL). Au/Ag-NPs selectively suppressed the growth of S. aureus (10.5 ± 0.6 mm, 19.7 ± 0.4 mm), E. coli (10 ± 0.4 mm, 14.4 ± 0.7 mm), and P. aeruginosa (8.2 ± 0.3 mm, 13.1 ± 0.2 mm), as well as showed preferential inhibition against jack-bean urease (19.2 ± 0.86%, 21.5 ± 1.17%). At doses of 40 and 80 mg/kg, Au-NPs significantly ameliorated the increase in paw edema during the 1st h (P < 0.05, P < 0.01) and 2-5 h (P < 0.001) of carrageenan-induced inflammation compared to the 200 and 400 mg/kg doses of P. domestica gum (P < 0.05, P < 0.001). At similar doses, Au-NPs also

  15. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors as Anticancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Law, Mary E; Corsino, Patrick E; Narayan, Satya; Law, Brian K

    2015-11-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) have been considered promising drug targets for a number of years, but most CDK inhibitors have failed rigorous clinical testing. Recent studies demonstrating clear anticancer efficacy and reduced toxicity of CDK4/6 inhibitors such as palbociclib and multi-CDK inhibitors such as dinaciclib have rejuvenated the field. Favorable results with palbociclib and its recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval demonstrate that CDK inhibitors with narrow selectivity profiles can have clinical utility for therapy based on individual tumor genetics. A brief overview of results obtained with ATP-competitive inhibitors such as palbociclib and dinaciclib is presented, followed by a compilation of new avenues that have been pursued toward the development of novel, non-ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors. These creative ways to develop CDK inhibitors are presented along with crystal structures of these agents complexed with CDK2 to highlight differences in their binding sites and mechanisms of action. The recent successes of CDK inhibitors in the clinic, combined with the potential for structure-based routes to the development of non-ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors, and evidence that CDK inhibitors may have use in suppressing chromosomal instability and in synthetic lethal drug combinations inspire optimism that CDK inhibitors will become important weapons in the fight against cancer. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  16. Cardiotoxicity of the Anticancer Therapeutic Agent Bortezomib

    PubMed Central

    Nowis, Dominika; Mączewski, Michał; Mackiewicz, Urszula; Kujawa, Marek; Ratajska, Anna; Wieckowski, Mariusz R.; Wilczyński, Grzegorz M.; Malinowska, Monika; Bil, Jacek; Salwa, Paweł; Bugajski, Marek; Wójcik, Cezary; Siński, Maciej; Abramczyk, Piotr; Winiarska, Magdalena; Dąbrowska-Iwanicka, Anna; Duszyński, Jerzy; Jakóbisiak, Marek; Golab, Jakub

    2010-01-01

    Recent case reports provided alarming signals that treatment with bortezomib might be associated with cardiac events. In all reported cases, patients experiencing cardiac problems were previously or concomitantly treated with other chemotherapeutics including cardiotoxic anthracyclines. Therefore, it is difficult to distinguish which components of the therapeutic regimens contribute to cardiotoxicity. Here, we addressed the influence of bortezomib on cardiac function in rats that were not treated with other drugs. Rats were treated with bortezomib at a dose of 0.2 mg/kg thrice weekly. Echocardiography, histopathology, and electron microscopy were used to evaluate cardiac function and structural changes. Respiration of the rat heart mitochondria was measured polarographically. Cell culture experiments were used to determine the influence of bortezomib on cardiomyocyte survival, contractility, Ca2+ fluxes, induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress, and autophagy. Our findings indicate that bortezomib treatment leads to left ventricular contractile dysfunction manifested by a significant drop in left ventricle ejection fraction. Dramatic ultrastructural abnormalities of cardiomyocytes, especially within mitochondria, were accompanied by decreased ATP synthesis and decreased cardiomyocyte contractility. Monitoring of cardiac function in bortezomib-treated patients should be implemented to evaluate how frequently cardiotoxicity develops especially in patients with pre-existing cardiac conditions, as well as when using additional cardiotoxic drugs. PMID:20519734

  17. Biodegradable polymers for targeted delivery of anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Doppalapudi, Sindhu; Jain, Anjali; Domb, Abraham J; Khan, Wahid

    2016-06-01

    Biodegradable polymers have been used for more than three decades in cancer treatment and have received increased interest in recent years. A range of biodegradable polymeric drug delivery systems designed for localized and systemic administration of therapeutic agents as well as tumor-targeting macromolecules has entered into the clinical phase of development, indicating the significance of biodegradable polymers in cancer therapy. This review elaborates upon applications of biodegradable polymers in the delivery and targeting of anti-cancer agents. Design of various drug delivery systems based on biodegradable polymers has been described. Moreover, the indication of polymers in the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs via passive, active targeting, and localized drug delivery are also covered. Biodegradable polymer-based drug delivery systems have the potential to deliver the payload to the target and can enhance drug availability at desired sites. Systemic toxicity and serious side effects observed with conventional cancer therapeutics can be significantly reduced with targeted polymeric systems. Still, there are many challenges that need to be met with respect to the degradation kinetics of the system, diffusion of drug payload within solid tumors, targeting tumoral tissue and tumor heterogeneity.

  18. Hyperglycaemia Induced by Novel Anticancer Agents: An Undesirable Complication or a Potential Therapeutic Opportunity?

    PubMed

    Shah, Rashmi R

    2017-03-01

    Signalling pathways involving protein kinase, insulin-like growth factor 1, insulin receptors and the phosphoinositide 3 kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) system are critical in promoting oncogenesis. The use of anticancer agents that inhibit these pathways frequently results in hyperglycaemia, an on-target effect of these drugs. Hyperglycaemia induced by these agents denotes optimal inhibition of the desired pharmacological target. As hyperglycaemia can be treated successfully and effectively with metformin, managing this complication by reducing the dose of or discontinuing the anticancer drug may be counterproductive, especially if it is otherwise effective and clinically tolerated. The use of metformin to treat hyperglycaemia induced by anticancer drugs provides a valuable therapeutic opportunity of potentiating their clinical anticancer effects. Although evidence from randomised controlled trials is awaited, extensive preclinical evidence and clinical observational studies suggest that metformin has anticancer properties that improve overall survival in patients with diabetes and a variety of cancers. Metformin has also been reported to reverse resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-inhibiting tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This review summarises briefly the role of the above signalling pathways in oncogenesis, the causal association between inhibition of these pathways and hyperglycaemia, and the effect of metformin on clinical outcomes resulting from its anticancer properties. The evidence reviewed herein, albeit almost exclusively from observational studies, provides support for a greater use of metformin not only in patients with cancer and diabetes or drug-induced hyperglycaemia but also potentially as an anticancer drug. However, prospective randomised controlled studies are needed in all these settings to better assess the effect on clinical outcomes of adding metformin to ongoing anticancer therapy.

  19. Epilepsy: Novel therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Anovadiya, Ashish P.; Sanmukhani, Jayesh J.; Tripathi, C. B.

    2012-01-01

    Despite of established and effective therapy for epilepsy, 20–25% patients develop therapeutic failure; this encourages finding newer drugs. Novel approaches target receptors which remain unaffected by conventional therapy or inhibit epileptogenesis. AMPA receptor antagonists have shown faster and complete protection compared to diazepam. Protein kinase (PK) plays an important role in the development of epilepsy. PK inhibitors such as K252a, VID-82925, and Herbimycin A have been found effective in inhibition of spread of epileptiform activity and epileptogenesis. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are G protein-coupled receptors classified into three groups. Group 1 mGluRs antagonist and Groups 2 and 3 mGluRs agonists inhibited pentylenetetrazole-induced kindled seizures. Combined use of these agents has also shown favorable results. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a central role in multiple mechanisms of epileptogenesis. mTOR causes transcription, induction of proapoptotic proteins, and autophagy inhibition. Rapamycin was effective in suppression of recurrent seizures as well as in tuberous sclerosis and acute brain injury model. 5% CO2 showed potent effects on cortical epileptiform activity and convulsions in animal epilepsy models and in humans with drug-resistant partial epilepsy. It is found to be rapidly acting, safe and cheap, thus it can be a good option in emergency for suppression of seizure. Neurosteroids are considered as fourth generation neuromessengers, they act as positive allosteric modulators of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors. Clinical trial of ganaxolone, an allopregnanolone analogue, has shown a beneficial role in pharmacoresistant epilepsy. However, most of these drugs are tested in early phases of development and the possible use and safety in epilepsy has to be proven in clinical trials. PMID:22629084

  20. Insights into cardiovascular side-effects of modern anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Stortecky, Stefan; Suter, Thomas M

    2010-07-01

    Modern anticancer therapeutics can be associated with significant cardiovascular side-effects. Detection, risk assessment, and treatment of these unwanted effects are an important task for treating physicians. The purpose of this review is to focus on approved novel cancer therapeutics and discuss the most important cardiovascular side-effects, prognosis, and potential treatment. We will contrast these effects to those of conventional cardiotoxic chemotherapeutics. Modern anticancer therapeutics can cause cardiovascular ischemia, arrhythmias, cardiac dysfunction, heart failure, and arterial hypertension. Anti-HER2 drugs, or more specifically trastuzumab, can induce cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. Newer data show that these effects occur predominantly during treatment and patients who experience the side-effects often have a good cardiovascular prognosis. Antiangiogenic agents can induce arterial hypertension, arterial and venous thromboembolism, and less frequently QTc prolongation. Recent findings indicate that a high rate of patients treated with antivascular endothelial growth factor drugs develop arterial hypertension and may experience related complications. Preventive strategies or optimal treatment have been tested but controlled studies are missing. Cardiovascular side-effects of modern anticancer drugs can be a serious problem and need careful attention, prevention, or treatment.

  1. NSAIDs: Old Drugs Reveal New Anticancer Targets.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Gary A; Keeton, Adam B; Tinsley, Heather N; Whitt, Jason D; Gary, Bernard D; Mathew, Bini; Singh, Raj; Grizzle, William E; Reynolds, Robert C

    2010-05-25

    There is compelling evidence that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors have antineoplastic activity, but toxicity from cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition and the suppression of physiologically important prostaglandins limits their use for cancer chemoprevention. Previous studies as reviewed here suggest that the mechanism for their anticancer properties does not require COX inhibition, but instead involves an off-target effect. In support of this possibility, recent molecular modeling studies have shown that the NSAID sulindac can be chemically modified to selectively design out its COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitory activity. Unexpectedly, certain derivatives that were synthesized based on in silico modeling displayed increased potency to inhibit tumor cell growth. Other experiments have shown that sulindac can inhibit phosphodiesterase to increase intracellular cyclic GMP levels and that this activity is closely associated with its ability to selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells. Together, these studies suggest that COX-independent mechanisms can be targeted to develop safer and more efficacious drugs for cancer chemoprevention.

  2. Multi-targeted hybrids based on HDAC inhibitors for anti-cancer drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seung-Yong

    2012-02-01

    Multi-targeted hybrids combine two drugs in a single molecule to have greater medicinal effects than its individual components. Recently, a number of anti-cancer drug candidates such as CUDC-101 (Curis) have been designed based on linking properly two selected pharmacophores endowed with activity against different therapeutic targets.

  3. Targeting tumor suppressor networks for cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuning Emily; Ngo, Bryan; Modrek, Aram Sandaldjian; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a consequence of mutations in genes that control cell proliferation, differentiation and cellular homeostasis. These genes are classified into two categories: oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Together, overexpression of oncogenes and loss of tumor suppressors are the dominant driving forces for tumorigenesis. Hence, targeting oncogenes and tumor suppressors hold tremendous therapeutic potential for cancer treatment. In the last decade, the predominant cancer drug discovery strategy has relied on a traditional reductionist approach of dissecting molecular signaling pathways and designing inhibitors for the selected oncogenic targets. Remarkable therapies have been developed using this approach; however, targeting oncogenes is only part of the picture. Our understanding of the importance of tumor suppressors in preventing tumorigenesis has also advanced significantly and provides a new therapeutic window of opportunity. Given that tumor suppressors are frequently mutated, deleted, or silenced with loss-of-function, restoring their normal functions to treat cancer holds tremendous therapeutic potential. With the rapid expansion in our knowledge of cancer over the last several decades, developing effective anticancer regimens against tumor suppressor pathways has never been more promising. In this article, we will review the concept of tumor suppression, and outline the major therapeutic strategies and challenges of targeting tumor suppressor networks for cancer therapeutics.

  4. ING Proteins as Potential Anticancer Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Unoki, M.; Kumamoto, K.; Harris, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    Recent emerging evidence suggests that ING family proteins play roles in carcinogenesis both as oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes depending on the family members and on cell status. Previous results from non-physiologic overexpression experiments showed that all five family members induce apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, thus it had been thought until very recently that all of the family members function as tumor suppressor genes. Therefore restoration of ING family proteins in cancer cells has been proposed as a treatment for cancers. However, ING2 knockdown experiments showed unexpected results: ING2 knockdown led to senescence in normal human fibroblast cells and suppressed cancer cell growth. ING2 is also overexpressed in colorectal cancer, and promotes cancer cell invasion through an MMP13 dependent pathway. Additionally, it was reported that ING2 has two isoforms, ING2a and ING2b. Although expression of ING2a predominates compared with ING2b, both isoforms confer resistance against cell cycle arrest or apoptosis to cancer cells, thus knockdown of both isoforms is critical to remove this resistance. Taken together, these results suggest that ING2 can function as an oncogene in some specific types of cancer cells, indicating restoration of this gene in cancer cells could cause cancer progression. Because knockdown of ING2 suppresses cancer cell invasion and induces apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, ING2 may be an anticancer drug target. In this brief review, we discuss possible clinical applications of ING2 with the latest knowledge of molecular targeted therapies. PMID:19442116

  5. Targeting Tumor Metabolism for Cancer Treatment: Is Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinases (PDKs) a Viable Anticancer Target?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Shao-Lin; Hu, Xiaohui; Tam, Kin Yip

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains a lethal threat to global lives. Development of novel anticancer therapeutics is still a challenge to scientists in the field of biomedicine. In cancer cells, the metabolic features are significantly different from those of normal ones, which are hallmarks of several malignancies. Recent studies brought atypical cellular metabolism, such as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect, into the scientific limelight. Targeting these altered metabolic pathways in cancer cells presents a promising therapeutic strategy. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs), key enzymes in the pathway of glucose metabolism, could inactivate the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) by phosphorylating it and preserving the substrates pyruvate, lactate and alanine for gluconeogenesis. Overexpression of PDKs could block the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to satisfy high oxygen demand in cancer cells, while inhibition of PDKs could upregulate the activity of PDC and rectify the balance between the demand and supply of oxygen, which could lead to cancer cell death. Thus, inhibitors targeting PDKs represent a promising strategy for cancer treatment by acting on glycolytic tumors while showing minimal side effects on the oxidative healthy organs. This review considers the role of PDKs as regulator of PDC that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate in mitochondrion. It is concluded that PDKs are solid therapeutic targets. Inhibition of PDKs could be an attractive therapeutic approach for the development of anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26681918

  6. TSPO as a target for glioblastoma therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Werry, Eryn L; Barron, Melissa L; Kassiou, Michael

    2015-08-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO) is an 18-kDa five-transmembrane protein, which is primarily found in the outer mitochondrial membrane. Levels of this protein are up-regulated in the most aggressive and common glioma, glioblastoma multiforme (GM). Levels of TSPO also correlate with GM clinical outcome, suggesting that TSPO may be a novel GM diagnostic imaging agent. Therapeutically, targeting the TSPO may provide a mechanism to abrogate the apoptotic-resistant, invasive and aggressive nature of GM and may also provide a way of targeting other anti-cancer treatments to GM sites. This review highlights recent progress in research on TSPO-based diagnostic imaging and therapeutics for GM. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  7. Targeting Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases for Anticancer Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Latanya. M.; Lawrence, Harshani. R.; Sebti, Saïd. M.; Lawrence, Nicholas. J.; Wu, Jie.

    2010-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are a diverse family of enzymes encoded by 107 genes in the human genome. Together with protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), PTPs regulate various cellular activities essential for the initiation and maintenance of malignant phenotypes. While PTK inhibitors are now used routinely for cancer treatment, the PTP inhibitor development field is still in the discovery phase. In this article, the suitability of targeting PTPs for novel anticancer drug discovery is discussed. Examples are presented for PTPs that have been targeted for anticancer drug discovery as well as potential new PTP targets for novel anticancer drug discovery. PMID:20337577

  8. Biomaterials and Emerging Anticancer Therapeutics: Engineering the Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Luo; Mooney, David J

    2016-01-01

    The microenvironment is increasingly recognized to play key roles in cancer, and biomaterials provide a means to engineer microenvironments both in vitro and in vivo to study and manipulate cancer. In vitro cancer models using 3D matrices recapitulate key elements of the tumor microenvironment and have revealed new aspects of cancer biology. Cancer vaccines based on some of the same biomaterials have, in parallel, allowed for the engineering of durable prophylactic and therapeutic anticancer activity in preclinical studies, and some of these vaccines have moved to clinical trials. The impact of biomaterials engineering on cancer treatment is expected to further increase in importance in the years to come. PMID:26694936

  9. Therapeutic target database update 2014: a resource for targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chu; Zhang, Cheng; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Feng; Chen, Shang Ying; Zhang, Peng; Li, Ying Hong; Yang, Sheng Yong; Wei, Yu Quan; Tao, Lin; Chen, Yu Zong

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe an update of the Therapeutic Target Database (http://bidd.nus.edu.sg/group/ttd/ttd.asp) for better serving the bench-to-clinic communities and for enabling more convenient data access, processing and exchange. Extensive efforts from the research, industry, clinical, regulatory and management communities have been collectively directed at the discovery, investigation, application, monitoring and management of targeted therapeutics. Increasing efforts have been directed at the development of stratified and personalized medicines. These efforts may be facilitated by the knowledge of the efficacy targets and biomarkers of targeted therapeutics. Therefore, we added search tools for using the International Classification of Disease ICD-10-CM and ICD-9-CM codes to retrieve the target, biomarker and drug information (currently enabling the search of almost 900 targets, 1800 biomarkers and 6000 drugs related to 900 disease conditions). We added information of almost 1800 biomarkers for 300 disease conditions and 200 drug scaffolds for 700 drugs. We significantly expanded Therapeutic Target Database data contents to cover >2300 targets (388 successful and 461 clinical trial targets), 20 600 drugs (2003 approved and 3147 clinical trial drugs), 20,000 multitarget agents against almost 400 target-pairs and the activity data of 1400 agents against 300 cell lines.

  10. Integrin Targeted Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Melissa; Odde, Srinivas; Neamati, Nouri

    2011-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric, transmembrane receptors that function as mechanosensors, adhesion molecules and signal transduction platforms in a multitude of biological processes. As such, integrins are central to the etiology and pathology of many disease states. Therefore, pharmacological inhibition of integrins is of great interest for the treatment and prevention of disease. In the last two decades several integrin-targeted drugs have made their way into clinical use, many others are in clinical trials and still more are showing promise as they advance through preclinical development. Herein, this review examines and evaluates the various drugs and compounds targeting integrins and the disease states in which they are implicated. PMID:21547158

  11. Biological and therapeutic activities, and anticancer properties of curcumin

    PubMed Central

    PERRONE, DONATELLA; ARDITO, FATIMA; GIANNATEMPO, GIOVANNI; DIOGUARDI, MARIO; TROIANO, GIUSEPPE; LO RUSSO, LUCIO; DE LILLO, ALFREDO; LAINO, LUIGI; LO MUZIO, LORENZO

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant. Curcumin has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine, as it is nontoxic and exhibits a variety of therapeutic properties, including antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic activities. Recently, certain studies have indicated that curcumin may exert anticancer effects in a variety of biological pathways involved in mutagenesis, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, cell cycle regulation and metastasis. The present study reviewed previous studies in the literature, which support the therapeutic activity of curcumin in cancer. In addition, the present study elucidated a number of the challenges concerning the use of curcumin as an adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent. All the studies reviewed herein suggest that curcumin is able to exert anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet, antioxidative, hepatoprotective and antitumor activities, particularly against cancers of the liver, skin, pancreas, prostate, ovary, lung and head neck, as well as having a positive effect in the treatment of arthritis. PMID:26640527

  12. Magnetic polymer nanospheres for anticancer drug targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juríková, A.; Csach, K.; Koneracká, M.; Závišová, V.; Múčková, M.; Tomašovičová, N.; Lancz, G.; Kopčanský, P.; Timko, M.; Miškuf, J.

    2010-01-01

    Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) polymer (PLGA) nanospheres loaded with biocom-patible magnetic fluid as a magnetic carrier and anticancer drug Taxol were prepared by the modified nanoprecipitation method with size of 200-250 nm in diameter. The PLGA polymer was utilized as a capsulation material due to its biodegradability and biocompatibility. Taxol as an important anticancer drug was chosen for its significant role against a wide range of tumours. Thermal properties of the drug-polymer system were characterized using thermal analysis methods. It was determined the solubility of Taxol in PLGA nanospheres. Magnetic properties investigated using SQUID magnetometry showed superparamagnetism of the prepared magnetic polymer nanospheres.

  13. Targeting cellular metabolism to improve cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Y; Butler, E B; Tan, M

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic properties of cancer cells diverge significantly from those of normal cells. Energy production in cancer cells is abnormally dependent on aerobic glycolysis. In addition to the dependency on glycolysis, cancer cells have other atypical metabolic characteristics such as increased fatty acid synthesis and increased rates of glutamine metabolism. Emerging evidence shows that many features characteristic to cancer cells, such as dysregulated Warburg-like glucose metabolism, fatty acid synthesis and glutaminolysis are linked to therapeutic resistance in cancer treatment. Therefore, targeting cellular metabolism may improve the response to cancer therapeutics and the combination of chemotherapeutic drugs with cellular metabolism inhibitors may represent a promising strategy to overcome drug resistance in cancer therapy. Recently, several review articles have summarized the anticancer targets in the metabolic pathways and metabolic inhibitor-induced cell death pathways, however, the dysregulated metabolism in therapeutic resistance, which is a highly clinical relevant area in cancer metabolism research, has not been specifically addressed. From this unique angle, this review article will discuss the relationship between dysregulated cellular metabolism and cancer drug resistance and how targeting of metabolic enzymes, such as glucose transporters, hexokinase, pyruvate kinase M2, lactate dehydrogenase A, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, fatty acid synthase and glutaminase can enhance the efficacy of common therapeutic agents or overcome resistance to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. PMID:23470539

  14. Targeting cellular metabolism to improve cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Butler, E B; Tan, M

    2013-03-07

    The metabolic properties of cancer cells diverge significantly from those of normal cells. Energy production in cancer cells is abnormally dependent on aerobic glycolysis. In addition to the dependency on glycolysis, cancer cells have other atypical metabolic characteristics such as increased fatty acid synthesis and increased rates of glutamine metabolism. Emerging evidence shows that many features characteristic to cancer cells, such as dysregulated Warburg-like glucose metabolism, fatty acid synthesis and glutaminolysis are linked to therapeutic resistance in cancer treatment. Therefore, targeting cellular metabolism may improve the response to cancer therapeutics and the combination of chemotherapeutic drugs with cellular metabolism inhibitors may represent a promising strategy to overcome drug resistance in cancer therapy. Recently, several review articles have summarized the anticancer targets in the metabolic pathways and metabolic inhibitor-induced cell death pathways, however, the dysregulated metabolism in therapeutic resistance, which is a highly clinical relevant area in cancer metabolism research, has not been specifically addressed. From this unique angle, this review article will discuss the relationship between dysregulated cellular metabolism and cancer drug resistance and how targeting of metabolic enzymes, such as glucose transporters, hexokinase, pyruvate kinase M2, lactate dehydrogenase A, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, fatty acid synthase and glutaminase can enhance the efficacy of common therapeutic agents or overcome resistance to chemotherapy or radiotherapy.

  15. Cell cycle regulatory E3 ubiquitin ligases as anticancer targets.

    PubMed

    Pray, Todd R; Parlati, Francesco; Huang, Jianing; Wong, Brian R; Payan, Donald G; Bennett, Mark K; Issakani, Sarkiz Daniel; Molineaux, Susan; Demo, Susan D

    2002-12-01

    Disregulation of the cell cycle and proliferation play key roles in cellular transformation and tumorigenesis. Such processes are intimately tied to the concentration, localization and activity of enzymes, adapters, receptors, and structural proteins in cells. Ubiquitination of these cellular regulatory proteins, governed by specific enzymes in the ubiquitin (Ub) conjugation cascade, has profound effects on their various functions, most commonly through proteasome targeting and degradation. This review will focus on a variety of E3 Ub ligases as potential oncology drug targets, with particular emphasis on the role of these molecules in the regulation of stability, localization, and activity of key proteins such as tumor suppressors and oncoproteins. E3 ubiquitin ligases that have established roles in cell cycle and apoptosis, such as the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), the Skp-1-Cul1-F-box class, and the murine double minute 2 (MDM2) protein, in addition to more recently discovered E3 ubiquitin ligases which may be similarly important in tumorigenesis, (e.g. Smurf family, CHFR, and Efp), will be discussed. We will present evidence to support E3 ligases as good biological targets in the development of anticancer therapeutics and address challenges in drug discovery for these targets.

  16. Bromodomains as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Susanne; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Knapp, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Acetylation of lysine residues is a post-translational modification with broad relevance to cellular signalling and disease biology. Enzymes that ‘write’ (histone acetyltransferases, HATs) and ‘erase’ (histone deacetylases, HDACs) acetylation sites are an area of extensive research in current drug development, but very few potent inhibitors that modulate the ‘reading process’ mediated by acetyl lysines have been described. The principal readers of ɛ-N-acetyl lysine (Kac) marks are bromodomains (BRDs), which are a diverse family of evolutionary conserved protein-interaction modules. The conserved BRD fold contains a deep, largely hydrophobic acetyl lysine binding site, which represents an attractive pocket for the development of small, pharmaceutically active molecules. Proteins that contain BRDs have been implicated in the development of a large variety of diseases. Recently, two highly potent and selective inhibitors that target BRDs of the BET (bromodomains and extra-terminal) family provided compelling data supporting targeting of these BRDs in inflammation and in an aggressive type of squamous cell carcinoma. It is likely that BRDs will emerge alongside HATs and HDACs as interesting targets for drug development for the large number of diseases that are caused by aberrant acetylation of lysine residues. PMID:21933453

  17. Cancer therapeutics: Targeting the apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Khan, Khurum H; Blanco-Codesido, Montserrat; Molife, L Rhoda

    2014-06-01

    Apoptosis, a physiological process of programmed cell death, is disrupted in various malignancies. It has been exploited as an anti-cancer strategy traditionally by inducing DNA damage with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. With an increased understanding of the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis in recent years, novel approaches of targeting the apoptotic pathways have been tested in pre-clinical and clinical models. There are several early phase clinical trials investigating the therapeutic role of pro-apoptotic agents, both as single agents and in combination. In this review, we examine such treatment strategies, detailing the various compounds currently under clinical investigation, their potential roles in cancer therapeutics, and discussing approaches to their optimal use in the clinic. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Therapeutic strategies targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Xiaoyan; Shu, Jianchang; Du, Yiqi; Ben, Qiwen; Li, Zhaoshen

    2013-01-01

    Increasing studies have demonstrated a small proportion of cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in the cancer cell population. CSCs have powerful self-renewal capacity and tumor-initiating ability and are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. Conventional anticancer therapies kill the rapidly proliferating bulk cancer cells but spare the relatively quiescent CSCs, which cause cancer recurrence. So it is necessary to develop therapeutic strategies acting specifically on CSCs. In recent years, studies have shown that therapeutic agents such as metformin, salinomycin, DECA-14, rapamycin, oncostatin M (OSM), some natural compounds, oncolytic viruses, microRNAs, cell signaling pathway inhibitors, TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), interferon (IFN), telomerase inhibitors, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and monoclonal antibodies can suppress the self-renewal of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. A combination of these agents and conventional chemotherapy drugs can significantly inhibit tumor growth, metastasis and recurrence. These strategies targeting CSCs may bring new hopes to cancer therapy. PMID:23358473

  19. Therapeutic Targeting of Telomerase.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Kathrin; Walter, Michael

    2016-07-21

    Telomere length and cell function can be preserved by the human reverse transcriptase telomerase (hTERT), which synthesizes the new telomeric DNA from a RNA template, but is normally restricted to cells needing a high proliferative capacity, such as stem cells. Consequently, telomerase-based therapies to elongate short telomeres are developed, some of which have successfully reached the stage I in clinical trials. Telomerase is also permissive for tumorigenesis and 90% of all malignant tumors use telomerase to obtain immortality. Thus, reversal of telomerase upregulation in tumor cells is a potential strategy to treat cancer. Natural and small-molecule telomerase inhibitors, immunotherapeutic approaches, oligonucleotide inhibitors, and telomerase-directed gene therapy are useful treatment strategies. Telomerase is more widely expressed than any other tumor marker. The low expression in normal tissues, together with the longer telomeres in normal stem cells versus cancer cells, provides some degree of specificity with low risk of toxicity. However, long term telomerase inhibition may elicit negative effects in highly-proliferative cells which need telomerase for survival, and it may interfere with telomere-independent physiological functions. Moreover, only a few hTERT molecules are required to overcome senescence in cancer cells, and telomerase inhibition requires proliferating cells over a sufficient number of population doublings to induce tumor suppressive senescence. These limitations may explain the moderate success rates in many clinical studies. Despite extensive studies, only one vaccine and one telomerase antagonist are routinely used in clinical work. For complete eradication of all subpopulations of cancer cells a simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms will likely be needed. Possible technical improvements have been proposed including the development of more specific inhibitors, methods to increase the efficacy of vaccination methods, and

  20. Therapeutic Targeting of Telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Kathrin; Walter, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length and cell function can be preserved by the human reverse transcriptase telomerase (hTERT), which synthesizes the new telomeric DNA from a RNA template, but is normally restricted to cells needing a high proliferative capacity, such as stem cells. Consequently, telomerase-based therapies to elongate short telomeres are developed, some of which have successfully reached the stage I in clinical trials. Telomerase is also permissive for tumorigenesis and 90% of all malignant tumors use telomerase to obtain immortality. Thus, reversal of telomerase upregulation in tumor cells is a potential strategy to treat cancer. Natural and small-molecule telomerase inhibitors, immunotherapeutic approaches, oligonucleotide inhibitors, and telomerase-directed gene therapy are useful treatment strategies. Telomerase is more widely expressed than any other tumor marker. The low expression in normal tissues, together with the longer telomeres in normal stem cells versus cancer cells, provides some degree of specificity with low risk of toxicity. However, long term telomerase inhibition may elicit negative effects in highly-proliferative cells which need telomerase for survival, and it may interfere with telomere-independent physiological functions. Moreover, only a few hTERT molecules are required to overcome senescence in cancer cells, and telomerase inhibition requires proliferating cells over a sufficient number of population doublings to induce tumor suppressive senescence. These limitations may explain the moderate success rates in many clinical studies. Despite extensive studies, only one vaccine and one telomerase antagonist are routinely used in clinical work. For complete eradication of all subpopulations of cancer cells a simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms will likely be needed. Possible technical improvements have been proposed including the development of more specific inhibitors, methods to increase the efficacy of vaccination methods, and

  1. New Molecular Targets of Anticancer Therapy - Current Status and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Marianna; Muszalska, Izabela; Jelinska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Molecularly targeted anticancer therapy involves the use of drugs or other substances affecting specific molecular targets that play a part in the development, progression and spread of a given neoplasm. By contrast, the majority of classical chemotherapeutics act on all rapidly proliferating cells, both healthy and cancerous ones. Target anticancer drugs are designed to achieve a particular aim and they usually act cytostatically, not cytotoxically like classical chemotherapeutics. At present, more than 300 biological molecular targets have been identified. The proteins involved in cellular metabolism include (among others) receptor proteins, signal transduction proteins, mRNA thread matrix synthesis proteins participating in neoplastic transformation, cell cycle control proteins, functional and structural proteins. The receptor proteins that are targeted by currently used anticancer drugs comprise the epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor(VEGFR). Target anticancer drugs may affect extracellular receptor domains (antibodies) or intracellular receptor domains (tyrosine kinase inhibitors). The blocking of the mRNA thread containing information about the structure of oncogenes (signal transduction proteins) is another molecular target of anticancer drugs. That type of treatment, referred to as antisense therapy, is in clinical trials. When the synthesis of genetic material is disturbed, in most cases the passage to the next cycle phase is blocked. The key proteins responsible for the blockage are cyclines and cycline- dependent kinases (CDK). Clinical trials are focused on natural and synthetic substances capable of blocking various CDKs. The paper discusses the molecular targets and chemical structure of target anticancer drugs that have been approved for and currently applied in antineoplastic therapy together with indications and contraindications for their

  2. Canonical and new generation anticancer drugs also target energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Reséndiz, Ileana; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; Pacheco-Velázquez, Silvia C; López-Ramírez, Sayra Y; Rumjanek, Franklin D; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2014-07-01

    Significant efforts have been made for the development of new anticancer drugs (protein kinase or proteasome inhibitors, monoclonal humanized antibodies) with presumably low or negligible side effects and high specificity. However, an in-depth analysis of the side effects of several currently used canonical (platin-based drugs, taxanes, anthracyclines, etoposides, antimetabolites) and new generation anticancer drugs as the first line of clinical treatment reveals significant perturbation of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation. Canonical and new generation drug side effects include decreased (1) intracellular ATP levels, (2) glycolytic/mitochondrial enzyme/transporter activities and/or (3) mitochondrial electrical membrane potentials. Furthermore, the anti-proliferative effects of these drugs are markedly attenuated in tumor rho (0) cells, in which functional mitochondria are absent; in addition, several anticancer drugs directly interact with isolated mitochondria affecting their functions. Therefore, several anticancer drugs also target the energy metabolism, and hence, the documented inhibitory effect of anticancer drugs on cancer growth should also be linked to the blocking of ATP supply pathways. These often overlooked effects of canonical and new generation anticancer drugs emphasize the role of energy metabolism in maintaining cancer cells viable and its targeting as a complementary and successful strategy for cancer treatment.

  3. Targeted Strategies for Henipavirus Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Bossart, Katharine N; Bingham, John; Middleton, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    Hendra and Nipah viruses are related emergent paramyxoviruses that infect and cause disease in animals and humans. Disease manifests as a generalized vasculitis affecting multiple organs, but is the most severe in the respiratory and central nervous systems. The high case fatality and person-to-person transmission associated with the most recent NiV outbreaks, and the recent re-emergence of HeV, emphasize the importance and necessity of effective therapeutics for these novel agents. In recent years henipavirus research has revealed a more complete understanding of pathogenesis and, as a consequence, viable approaches towards vaccines and therapeutics have emerged. All strategies target early steps in viral replication including receptor binding and membrane fusion. Animal models have been developed, some of which may prove more valuable than others for evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic agents and regimes. Assessments of protective host immunity and drug pharmacokinetics will be crucial to the further advancement of therapeutic compounds. PMID:19440455

  4. Therapeutic strategies with oral fluoropyrimidine anticancer agent, S-1 against oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Harada, Koji; Ferdous, Tarannum; Ueyama, Yoshiya

    2017-08-01

    Oral cancer has been recognized as a tumor with low sensitivity to anticancer agents. However, introduction of S-1, an oral cancer agent is improving treatment outcome for patients with oral cancer. In addition, S-1, as a main drug for oral cancer treatment in Japan can be easily available for outpatients. In fact, S-1 exerts high therapeutic effects with acceptable side effects. Moreover, combined chemotherapy with S-1 shows higher efficacy than S-1 alone, and combined chemo-radiotherapy with S-1 exerts remarkable therapeutic effects. Furthermore, we should consider the combined therapy of S-1 and molecular targeting agents right now as these combinations were reportedly useful for oral cancer treatment. Here, we describe our findings related to S-1 that were obtained experimentally and clinically, and favorable therapeutic strategies with S-1 against oral cancer with bibliographic considerations.

  5. TARGETING POLYMER THERAPEUTICS TO BONE

    PubMed Central

    Low, Stewart; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2012-01-01

    An aging population in the developing world has led to an increase in musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoporosis and bone metastases. Left untreated many bone diseases cause debilitating pain and in the case of cancer, death. Many potential drugs are effective in treating diseases but result in side effects preventing their efficacy in the clinic. Bone, however, provides an unique environment of inorganic solids, which can be exploited in order to effectively target drugs to diseased tissue. By integration of bone targeting moieties to drug-carrying water-soluble polymers, the payload to diseased area can be increased while side effects decreased. The realization of clinically relevant bone targeted polymer therapeutics depends on (1) understanding bone targeting moiety interactions, (2) development of controlled drug delivery systems, as well as (3) understanding drug interactions. The latter makes it possible to develop bone targeted synergistic drug delivery systems. PMID:22316530

  6. Mitochondria and Mitochondrial ROS in Cancer: Novel Targets for Anticancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuhui; Karakhanova, Svetlana; Hartwig, Werner; D'Haese, Jan G; Philippov, Pavel P; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondria are indispensable for energy metabolism, apoptosis regulation, and cell signaling. Mitochondria in malignant cells differ structurally and functionally from those in normal cells and participate actively in metabolic reprogramming. Mitochondria in cancer cells are characterized by reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction, which promotes cancer development by inducing genomic instability, modifying gene expression, and participating in signaling pathways. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA mutations caused by oxidative damage that impair the oxidative phosphorylation process will result in further mitochondrial ROS production, completing the "vicious cycle" between mitochondria, ROS, genomic instability, and cancer development. The multiple essential roles of mitochondria have been utilized for designing novel mitochondria-targeted anticancer agents. Selective drug delivery to mitochondria helps to increase specificity and reduce toxicity of these agents. In order to reduce mitochondrial ROS production, mitochondria-targeted antioxidants can specifically accumulate in mitochondria by affiliating to a lipophilic penetrating cation and prevent mitochondria from oxidative damage. In consistence with the oncogenic role of ROS, mitochondria-targeted antioxidants are found to be effective in cancer prevention and anticancer therapy. A better understanding of the role played by mitochondria in cancer development will help to reveal more therapeutic targets, and will help to increase the activity and selectivity of mitochondria-targeted anticancer drugs. In this review we summarized the impact of mitochondria on cancer and gave summary about the possibilities to target mitochondria for anticancer therapies. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2570-2581, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Epigenetic Modifications as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Theresa K; De Carvalho, Daniel D; Jones, Peter A

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications work with genetic mechanisms to determine transcriptional activity and, while somatically heritable they are also reversible, making them good therapeutic candidates. Epigenetic changes can precede disease pathology and thus are diagnostic indicators for risk, and can act as prognostic indicators for disease progression. Histone deacetylase inhibitors and DNA methylation inhibitors have been FDA approved for several years and are clinically successful. More recently, histone methylation and microRNAs have also gained attention as potential therapeutic targets. The presence of multiple epigenetic aberrations within a diseased tissue and the abilities of cells to develop resistance suggest that combination therapies may be most beneficial. This review will focus on recent examples of using epigenetic modifications to evaluate disease risk, progression and clinical response and will describe the latest clinical advances in epigenetic therapies concentrating on treatments which combine epigenetic therapeutics with each other and with cytotoxic agents to increase clinical response. PMID:20944599

  8. Targeted intracellular delivery of therapeutics: an overview.

    PubMed

    Rawat, A; Vaidya, B; Khatri, K; Goyal, A K; Gupta, P N; Mahor, S; Paliwal, R; Rai, S; Vyas, S P

    2007-09-01

    During the last decade, intracellular drug delivery has become an emerging area of research in the medical and pharmaceutical field. Many therapeutic agents such as drugs and DNA/oligonucleotides can be delivered not just to the cell but also to a particular compartment of that cell to achieve better activity e.g. proapoptotic drugs to the mitochondria, antibiotics and enzymes to the lysosomes and various anticancer drugs and gene to the nucleus. The lipidic nature of biological membrans is the major obstacle to the intracellular delivery of macromolecular and ionic drugs. Additionally, after endocytosis, the lysosome, the major degradation compartment, needs to be avoided for better activity. To avoid these problems, various carriers have been investigated for efficient intracellular delivery, either by direct entry to cytoplasm or by escaping the endosomal compartment. These include cell penetrating peptides, and carrier systems such as liposomes, cationic lipids and polymers, polymeric nanoparticles, etc. Various properties of these carriers, including size, surface charge, composition and the presence of cell specific ligands, alter their efficacy and specificity towards particular cells. This review summarizes various aspects of targeted intracellular delivery of therapeutics including pathways, mechanisms and approaches. Various carrier constructs having potential for targeted intracellular delivery are also been discussed.

  9. Mitochondrial chaperones may be targets for anti-cancer drugs

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at NCI have found that a mitochondrial chaperone protein, TRAP1, may act indirectly as a tumor suppressor as well as a novel target for developing anti-cancer drugs. Chaperone proteins, such as TRAP1, help other proteins adapt to stress, but sc

  10. Anticancer Efficacy of Photodynamic Therapy with Lung Cancer-Targeted Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ji-Eun; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Jheon, Sanghoon

    2016-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a non-invasive and non-surgical method representing an attractive alternative choice for lung cancer treatment. Photosensitizers selectively accumulate in tumor tissue and lead to tumor cell death in the presence of oxygen and the proper wavelength of light. To increase the therapeutic effect of PDT, we developed both photosensitizer- and anticancer agent-loaded lung cancer-targeted nanoparticles. Both enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect-based passive targeting and hyaluronic-acid-CD44 interaction-based active targeting were applied. CD44 is a well-known hyaluronic acid receptor that is often introduced as a biomarker of non-small cell lung cancer. In addition, a combination of PDT and chemotherapy is adopted in the present study. This combination concept may increase anticancer therapeutic effects and reduce adverse reactions. We chose hypocrellin B (HB) as a novel photosensitizer in this study. It has been reported that HB causes higher anticancer efficacy of PDT compared to hematoporphyrin derivatives(1). Paclitaxel was selected as the anticancer drug since it has proven to be a potential treatment for lung cancer(2). The antitumor efficacies of photosensitizer (HB) solution, photosensitizer encapsulated hyaluronic acid-ceramide nanoparticles (HB-NPs), and both photosensitizer- and anticancer agent (paclitaxel)-encapsulated hyaluronic acid-ceramide nanoparticles (HB-P-NPs) after PDT were compared both in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro phototoxicity in A549 (human lung adenocarcinoma) cells and the in vivo antitumor efficacy in A549 tumor-bearing mice were evaluated. The HB-P-NP treatment group showed the most effective anticancer effect after PDT. In conclusion, the HB-P-NPs prepared in the present study represent a potential and novel photosensitizer delivery system in treating lung cancer with PDT.

  11. Neuroinflammation: a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Craft, Jeffrey M; Watterson, D Martin; Van Eldik, Linda J

    2005-10-01

    The increased appreciation of the importance of glial cell-propagated inflammation (termed 'neuroinflammation') in the progression of pathophysiology for diverse neurodegenerative diseases, has heightened interest in the rapid discovery of neuroinflammation-targeted therapeutics. Efforts include searches among existing drugs approved for other uses, as well as development of novel synthetic compounds that selectively downregulate neuroinflammatory responses. The use of existing drugs to target neuroinflammation has largely met with failure due to lack of efficacy or untoward side effects. However, the de novo development of new classes of therapeutics based on targeting selective aspects of glia activation pathways and glia-mediated pathophysiologies, versus targeting pathways of quantitative importance in non-CNS inflammatory responses, is yielding promising results in preclinical animal models. The authors briefly review selected clinical and preclinical data that reflect the prevailing approaches targeting neuroinflammation as a pathophysiological process contributing to onset or progression of neurodegenerative diseases. The authors conclude with opinions based on recent experimental proofs of concept using preclinical animal models of pathophysiology. The focus is on Alzheimer's disease, but the concepts are transferrable to other neurodegenerative disorders with an inflammatory component.

  12. Multilevel therapeutic targeting by topoisomerase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, P. J.; Souès, S.

    1994-01-01

    The successful use of cytotoxic agents in the clinical management of LCH depends upon the selective targeting of cells participating in the disease process. The topoisomerase 'poisons', currently used extensively in the treatment of aggressive malignancies, represent an intriguing class of cytotoxic agents exerting their cytostatic and cytotoxic effects at multiple levels according to cell type. The non-DNA intercalating topoisomerase II poison, etoposide (VP-16), is the "drug of first choice" in the treatment of LCH by cytotoxic chemotherapy. This major anticancer agent traps the nuclear enzyme DNA topoisomerase II on DNA in a sequence-specific manner, the processing of trapped complexes giving rise to a plethora of cellular effects not least the potential activation of pathways leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. This short review describes the principles of topoisomerase inhibition, the multiplicity of cellular effects and the concept of cellular targeting in LCH. The successful treatment of LCH by cytotoxic chemotherapy will depend on both the identity of the target tissues and a clear view of therapeutic intent, given the potential for induction of haematological neoplasia. PMID:8075006

  13. Development of an In Vitro Model to Screen CYP1B1-Targeted Anticancer Prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiying; Chen, Yao; Drbohlav, Laura M; Wu, Judy Qiju; Wang, Michael Zhuo

    2016-12-01

    Cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) is an anticancer therapeutic target due to its overexpression in a number of steroid hormone-related cancers. One anticancer drug discovery strategy is to develop prodrugs specifically activated by CYP1B1 in malignant tissues to cytotoxic metabolites. Here, we aimed to develop an in vitro screening model for CYP1B1-targeted anticancer prodrugs using the KLE human endometrial carcinoma cell line. KLE cells demonstrated superior stability of CYP1B1 expression relative to transiently transfected cells and did not express any appreciable amount of cognate CYP1A1 or CYP1A2, which would have compromised the specificity of the screening assay. The effect of two CYP1B1-targeted probe prodrugs on KLE cells was evaluated in the absence and presence of a CYP1B1 inhibitor to chemically "knock out" CYP1B1 activity (CYP1B1 inhibited). Both probe prodrugs were more toxic to KLE cells than to CYP1B1-inhibited KLE cells and significantly induced G0/G1 arrest and decreased the S phase in KLE cells. They also exhibited pro-apoptotic effects in KLE cells, which were attenuated in CYP1B1-inhibited KLE cells. In summary, a KLE cell-based model has been characterized to be suitable for identifying CYP1B1-targeted anticancer prodrugs and should be further developed and employed for screening chemical libraries.

  14. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors as Anticancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Corsino, Patrick E.; Narayan, Satya

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) have been considered promising drug targets for a number of years, but most CDK inhibitors have failed rigorous clinical testing. Recent studies demonstrating clear anticancer efficacy and reduced toxicity of CDK4/6 inhibitors such as palbociclib and multi-CDK inhibitors such as dinaciclib have rejuvenated the field. Favorable results with palbociclib and its recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval demonstrate that CDK inhibitors with narrow selectivity profiles can have clinical utility for therapy based on individual tumor genetics. A brief overview of results obtained with ATP-competitive inhibitors such as palbociclib and dinaciclib is presented, followed by a compilation of new avenues that have been pursued toward the development of novel, non–ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors. These creative ways to develop CDK inhibitors are presented along with crystal structures of these agents complexed with CDK2 to highlight differences in their binding sites and mechanisms of action. The recent successes of CDK inhibitors in the clinic, combined with the potential for structure-based routes to the development of non–ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors, and evidence that CDK inhibitors may have use in suppressing chromosomal instability and in synthetic lethal drug combinations inspire optimism that CDK inhibitors will become important weapons in the fight against cancer. PMID:26018905

  15. Targeting the Hippo Pathway for Anti-cancer Therapies.

    PubMed

    Gong, Rui; Yu, Fa-Xing

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway is critical in regulating tissue homeostasis, organ size, and tumorigenesis. YAP and TAZ, two major effectors of the Hippo pathway, function as transcriptional co-activators and promote target gene expression mainly through interaction with TEAD family transcription factors. As oncoproteins, YAP and TAZ are frequently activated or highly expressed in various cancer specimens. Moreover, their activity has been linked to resistance to a few widely used anti-cancer drugs, and YAP activation contributes to cancer relapse. Thus, the Hippo pathway, especially YAP/TAZ-TEAD interaction, represents an attractive target for anti-cancer therapies. Here, we will discuss potential approaches to inhibit YAP/TAZ activity, and also review currently available small molecules targeting the Hippo pathway.

  16. Targeting mitosis for anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Sudakin, Valery; Yen, Timothy J

    2007-01-01

    Basic research that has focused on achieving a mechanistic understanding of mitosis has provided unprecedented molecular and biochemical insights into this highly complex phase of the cell cycle. The discovery process has uncovered an ever-expanding list of novel proteins that orchestrate and coordinate spindle formation and chromosome dynamics during mitosis. That many of these proteins appear to function solely in mitosis makes them ideal targets for the development of mitosis-specific cancer drugs. The clinical successes seen with anti-microtubule drugs such as taxanes and the vinca alkaloids have also encouraged the development of drugs that specifically target mitosis. Drugs that selectively inhibit mitotic kinesins involved in spindle and kinetochore functions, as well as kinases that regulate these activities, are currently in various stages of clinical trials. Our increased understanding of mitosis has also revealed that this process is targeted by inhibitors of farnesyl transferase, histone deacetylase, and Hsp90. Although these drugs were originally designed to block cell proliferation by inhibiting signaling pathways and altering gene expression, it is clear now that these drugs can also directly interfere with the mitotic process. The increased attention to mitosis as a chemotherapeutic target has also raised an important issue regarding the cellular determinants that specify drug sensitivity. One likely contribution is the mitotic checkpoint, a failsafe mechanism that delays mitotic exit so that cells whose chromosomes are not properly attached to the spindle have extra time to correct their errors. As the biochemical activity of the mitotic checkpoint is finite, cells cannot indefinitely sustain the delay, as in cases where cells are treated with anti-mitotic drugs. When the mitotic checkpoint activity is eventually lost, cells will exit mitosis and become aneuploid. While many of the aneuploid cells may die because of massive chromosome imbalance

  17. Clusterin as a therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark R; Zoubeidi, Amina

    2017-02-01

    Clusterin (CLU) is a stress-activated, ATP-independent molecular chaperone, normally secreted from cells, that is up-regulated in Alzheimer disease and in many cancers. It plays important roles in protein homeostasis/proteostasis, inhibition of cell death pathways, and modulation of pro-survival signalling and transcriptional networks. Changes in the CLU gene locus are highly associated with Alzheimer disease, and many therapy-resistant cancers over-express CLU. The extensive post-translational processing and heterogeneous oligomerization of CLU have so far prevented any definitive structure determination. This in turn has meant that targeting CLU with small molecule inhibitors is challenging. Therefore, inhibiting CLU at the gene-expression level using siRNA or antisense is a valid approach to inhibit its function. Areas covered: This article reviews recent advances regarding the role of CLU in proteostasis, cellular trafficking, human diseases, and signalling pathways involved in oncogenesis. It addresses the rationale for CLU as a therapeutic target in cancer, and the current status of pre-clinical and clinical studies using CLU antisense inhibitor OGX011. Expert opinion: Discusses challenges facing the therapeutic targeting of CLU including rapid changes in the treatment landscape for prostate cancer with multiple new FDA approved drugs, selection of windows of intervention, and potential side effects when silencing CLU expression.

  18. Anticancer Gold(III) Porphyrins Target Mitochondrial Chaperone Hsp60.

    PubMed

    Hu, Di; Liu, Yungen; Lai, Yau-Tsz; Tong, Ka-Chung; Fung, Yi-Man; Lok, Chun-Nam; Che, Chi-Ming

    2016-01-22

    Identification of the molecular target(s) of anticancer metal complexes is a formidable challenge since most of them are unstable toward ligand exchange reaction(s) or biological reduction under physiological conditions. Gold(III) meso-tetraphenylporphyrin (gold-1 a) is notable for its high stability in biological milieux and potent in vitro and in vivo anticancer activities. Herein, extensive chemical biology approaches employing photo-affinity labeling, click chemistry, chemical proteomics, cellular thermal shift, saturation-transfer difference NMR, protein fluorescence quenching, and protein chaperone assays were used to provide compelling evidence that heat-shock protein 60 (Hsp60), a mitochondrial chaperone and potential anticancer target, is a direct target of gold-1 a in vitro and in cells. Structure-activity studies with a panel of non-porphyrin gold(III) complexes and other metalloporphyrins revealed that Hsp60 inhibition is specifically dependent on both the gold(III) ion and the porphyrin ligand.

  19. DNA ligases as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Tomkinson, Alan E.; Howes, Timothy R.L.; Wiest, Nathaniel E.

    2013-01-01

    During DNA replication, DNA joining events link Okazaki fragments on the lagging strand. In addition, they are required to repair DNA single- and double-strand breaks and to complete repair events initiated by the excision of mismatched and damaged bases. In human cells, there are three genes encoding DNA ligases. These enzymes are ATP-dependent and contain a conserved catalytic region. Biophysical studies have shown that the catalytic region contains three domains that, in the absence of DNA, are in an extended conformation. When the catalytic region engages a DNA nick, it adopts a compact, ring structure around the DNA nick with each of the three domains contacting the DNA. Protein-protein interactions involving the regions flanking the conserved catalytic regions of human DNA ligases play a major role in directing these enzymes to participate in specific DNA transactions. Among the human LIG genes, the LIG3 gene is unique in that it encodes multiple DNA ligase polypeptides with different N- and C-termini. One of these polypeptides is targeted to mitochondria where it plays an essential role in the maintenance of the mitochondrial genome. In the nucleus, DNA ligases I, III and IV have distinct but overlapping functions in DNA replication and repair. Small molecule inhibitors of human DNA ligases have been identified using structure-based approaches. As expected, these inhibitors are cytotoxic and also potentiate the cytotoxicity of DNA damaging agents. The results of preclinical studies with human cancer cell lines and mouse models of human cancer suggest that DNA ligase inhibitors may have utility as anti-cancer agents. PMID:24224145

  20. Molecular targets and anticancer potential of sanguinarine-a benzophenanthridine alkaloid.

    PubMed

    Galadari, Sehamuddin; Rahman, Anees; Pallichankandy, Siraj; Thayyullathil, Faisal

    2017-10-15

    Cancer is an enormous global health burden, and should be effectively addressed with better therapeutic strategies. Currently, over 60% of the clinically approved anticancer agents are either directly isolated from natural sources or are modified from natural lead molecules. Sanguinarine (SNG), a quaternary benzophenanthridine alkaloid has gained increasing attention in recent years as a potential anticancer agent. There is a large untapped source of phytochemical-based anticancer agents remaining to be explored. This review article aims to recapitulate different anticancer properties of SNG, and describes some of the molecular targets involved in exerting its effect. It also depicts the pharmacokinetic and toxicological properties of SNG, two parameters important in determining the druggability of a molecule. Numerous in vivo and in vitro published studies have signified the anticancer properties of SNG. In order to collate and decipher these properties, an extensive literature search was conducted in PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Scopus using keywords followed by the evaluation of the relevant articles where the relevant reports are integrated and analyzed. Apart from inducing cell death, SNG inhibits pro-tumorigenic processes such as invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis in different cancers. Moreover, SNG has been shown to synergistically enhance the sensitivity of several chemotherapeutic agents and is effective against a variety of multi-drug resistant cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of anticancer agents targeting the Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangqian; Hao, Jijun

    2015-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays indispensable roles in both embryonic development and adult homeostasis. Abnormal regulation of this pathway is implicated in many types of cancer. Consequently, substantial efforts have made to develop therapeutic agents as anticancer drugs by specifically targeting the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Here we systematically review the potential therapeutic agents that have been developed to date for inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin cascade as well as current status of clinical trials of some of these agents. PMID:26396911

  2. The impact of reactive oxygen species on anticancer therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Donika; Bakalova, Rumiana; Lazarova, Dessisslava; Gadjeva, Veselina; Zhelev, Zhivko

    2013-01-01

    Over 50 years of experience in free radical biology and medicine shows that normal cells of healthy mammals are characterized by a low steady-state level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a constant (reference) level of reducing equivalents. A lasting increase of ROS above the critical level leads to permanent oxidative stress in the cells. This could cause genomic instability and mutations, which are responsible for adaptation of cells to oxidative stress and their survival in an oxidative environment. In turn, these events could provoke malignancy. It is widely accepted that the balance between ROS and reducing equivalents in cells and tissues determines their redox status. The evaluation of tissue redox status has great diagnostic potential in cancer, as well as prognostic potential for cancer therapy, and could significantly contribute to the planning of appropriate treatment and to increasing the patients' quality of life. The conventional therapeutic strategy is based on drugs that increase ROS generation and induce apoptosis in cancer cells. However, this therapeutic approach has serious disadvantages: the expression of various toxic side effects in normal (non-cancer) tissues. The current review describes the basics of free radical biology in carcinogenesis. The authors emphasize the different redox status of normal and cancer cells, which permits the use of this parameter as a new therapeutic target. The authors also outline some directions for the development of promising therapeutic strategies based on the regulation of redox signaling using combined therapy. The review is intended for a broad readership - from non-specialists to researchers in the field of cancer biochemistry and pharmacy.

  3. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway an emerging anticancer strategy for therapeutics: a patent analysis.

    PubMed

    Jain, Chakresh K; Arora, Shivam; Khanna, Aparna; Gupta, Money; Wadhwa, Gulshan; Sharma, Sanjeev K

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of intracellular proteins is targeted by ubiquitin via non-lysosomal proteolytic pathway in the cell system. These ubiquitin molecules have been found to be conserved from yeast to humans. Ubiquitin proteasome machinery utilises ATP and other mechanisms for degrading proteins of cytosol as well as nucleus. This process of ubiquitination is regulated by activating the E3 enzyme ligase, involved in phosphorylation. In humans, proteins which regulate the cell cycle are controlled by ubiquitin; therefore the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway can be targeted for novel anti-cancer strategies. Dysregulation of the components of the ubiquitin system has been linked to many diseases like cancer and inflammation. The primary triggering mechanism (apoptosis) of these diseases can also be induced when TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) binds to its specific receptor DR4 and DR5. In this review, the emerging prospects and importance of ubiquitin proteasome pathway as an evolving anticancer strategy have been discussed. Current challenges in the field of drug discovery have also been discussed on the basis of recent patents on cancer diagnosis and therapeutics.

  4. Therapeutic targets in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Denton, Christopher P

    2007-01-01

    The precise aetiology of systemic sclerosis (SSc) remains elusive, but significant advances over the past few years have improved our understanding of the underlying pathogenic processes and identified key pathways and mediators that are potential therapeutic targets. The situation is complicated by the clinical heterogeneity of SSc and the differential pathogenesis that underlies the two commonest subsets, namely diffuse and limited cutaneous disease. However, there are common mediators that could be targeted to provide clinical benefit in both types of disease. To date, clinical success with therapies directed against logical profibrotic mediators, such as connective tissue growth factor and transforming growth factor-β, is yet to be reported, although studies are ongoing. More promising clinical results have been obtained with the dual endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan, which has been shown to manage two vascular complications of SSc effectively: pulmonary arterial hypertension and digital ulceration. It remains to be determined whether the identification of additional mediators merely furthers our knowledge of the natural history of SSc or presents targets that can be manipulated to manage SSc patients effectively. PMID:17767744

  5. Therapeutic target for protozoal diseases

    DOEpatents

    Rathore, Dharmendar; Jani, Dewal; Nagarkatti, Rana

    2008-10-21

    A novel Fasciclin Related Adhesive Protein (FRAP) from Plasmodium and related parasites is provided as a target for therapeutic intervention in diseases caused by the parasites. FRAP has been shown to play a critical role in adhesion to, or invasion into, host cells by the parasite. Furthermore, FRAP catalyzes the neutralization of heme by the parasite, by promoting its polymerization into hemozoin. This invention provides methods and compositions for therapies based on the administration of protein, DNA or cell-based vaccines and/or antibodies based on FRAP, or antigenic epitopes of FRAP, either alone or in combination with other parasite antigens. Methods for the development of compounds that inhibit the catalytic activity of FRAP, and diagnostic and laboratory methods utilizing FRAP are also provided.

  6. Therapeutic targeting of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Gores, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    The first objectives of this article are to review the structure, chemistry, and physiology of bile acids and the types of bile acid malabsorption observed in clinical practice. The second major theme addresses the classical or known properties of bile acids, such as the role of bile acid sequestration in the treatment of hyperlipidemia; the use of ursodeoxycholic acid in therapeutics, from traditional oriental medicine to being, until recently, the drug of choice in cholestatic liver diseases; and the potential for normalizing diverse bowel dysfunctions in irritable bowel syndrome, either by sequestering intraluminal bile acids for diarrhea or by delivering more bile acids to the colon to relieve constipation. The final objective addresses novel concepts and therapeutic opportunities such as the interaction of bile acids and the microbiome to control colonic infections, as in Clostridium difficile-associated colitis, and bile acid targeting of the farnesoid X receptor and G protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 with consequent effects on energy expenditure, fat metabolism, and glycemic control. PMID:26138466

  7. Recent Trends in Targeted Anticancer Prodrug and Conjugate Design

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Yashveer; Palombo, Matthew; Sinko, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    Anticancer drugs are often nonselective antiproliferative agents (cytotoxins) that preferentially kill dividing cells by attacking their DNA at some level. The lack of selectivity results in significant toxicity to noncancerous proliferating cells. These toxicities along with drug resistance exhibited by the solid tumors are major therapy limiting factors that results into poor prognosis for patients. Prodrug and conjugate design involves the synthesis of inactive drug derivatives that are converted to an active form inside the body and preferably at the site of action. Classical prodrug and conjugate design has focused on the development of prodrugs that can overcome physicochemical (e.g., solubility, chemical instability) or biopharmaceutical problems (e.g., bioavailability, toxicity) associated with common anticancer drugs. The recent targeted prodrug and conjugate design, on the other hand, hinges on the selective delivery of anticancer agents to tumor tissues thereby avoiding their cytotoxic effects on noncancerous cells. Targeting strategies have attempted to take advantage of low extracellular pH, elevated enzymes in tumor tissues, the hypoxic environment inside the tumor core, and tumor-specific antigens expressed on tumor cell surfaces. The present review highlights recent trends in prodrug and conjugate rationale and design for cancer treatment. The various approaches that are currently being explored are critically analyzed and a comparative account of the advantages and disadvantages associated with each approach is presented. PMID:18691040

  8. CNIO cancer conference: targeted search for anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peter M

    2003-06-01

    The topics discussed at the conference covered many aspects of cancer research, from the genetic search for new targets, target validation and drug discovery, all the way to preclinical and clinical development of oncology drugs. Here the presentations on new metabolic, angiogenic, cell cycle and other molecular targets, as well as recent developments with experimental drugs with action on some of these targets, are summarised. Particular emphasis is placed on the emerging realisation that changes in the metabolic phenotype lie at the heart of cellular transformation. New insights into the biological links between cancer cell metabolism and the balance between survival and death signalling are likely to lead to the identification of a new category of anticancer targets.

  9. Polymeric Micelles in Anticancer Therapy: Targeting, Imaging and Triggered Release

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Wouter; Bos, Mariska; Storm, Gert; Nijsen, J. Frank W.; Hennink, Wim E.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Micelles are colloidal particles with a size around 5–100 nm which are currently under investigation as carriers for hydrophobic drugs in anticancer therapy. Currently, five micellar formulations for anticancer therapy are under clinical evaluation, of which Genexol-PM has been FDA approved for use in patients with breast cancer. Micelle-based drug delivery, however, can be improved in different ways. Targeting ligands can be attached to the micelles which specifically recognize and bind to receptors overexpressed in tumor cells, and chelation or incorporation of imaging moieties enables tracking micelles in vivo for biodistribution studies. Moreover, pH-, thermo-, ultrasound-, or light-sensitive block copolymers allow for controlled micelle dissociation and triggered drug release. The combination of these approaches will further improve specificity and efficacy of micelle-based drug delivery and brings the development of a ‘magic bullet’ a major step forward. PMID:20725771

  10. Targeted anticancer prodrug with mesoporous silica nanoparticles as vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jianquan; Fang, Gang; Wang, Xiaodan; Zeng, Fang; Xiang, Yufei; Wu, Shuizhu

    2011-11-01

    A targeted anticancer prodrug system was fabricated with 180 nm mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) as carriers. The anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was conjugated to the particles through an acid-sensitive carboxylic hydrazone linker which is cleavable under acidic conditions. Moreover, folic acid (FA) was covalently conjugated to the particle surface as the targeting ligand for folate receptors (FRs) overexpressed in some cancer cells. The in vitro release profiles of DOX from the MSN-based prodrug systems showed a strong dependence on the environmental pH values. The fluorescent dye FITC was incorporated in the MSNs so as to trace the cellular uptake on a fluorescence microscope. Cellular uptakes by HeLa, A549 and L929 cell lines were tested for FA-conjugated MSNs and plain MSNs respectively, and a much more efficient uptake by FR-positive cancer cells (HeLa) can be achieved by conjugation of folic acid onto the particles because of the folate-receptor-mediated endocytosis. The cytotoxicities for the FA-conjugated MSN prodrug, the plain MSN prodrug and free DOX against three cell lines were determined, and the result indicates that the FA-conjugated MSN prodrug exhibits higher cytotoxicity to FR-positive cells, and reduced cytotoxicity to FR-negative cells. Thus, with 180 nm MSNs as the carriers for the prodrug system, good drug loading, selective targeting and sustained release of drug molecules within targeted cancer cells can be realized. This study may provide useful insights for designing and improving the applicability of MSNs in targeted anticancer prodrug systems.

  11. DNA helicases as targets for anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sudha; Doherty, Kevin M; Brosh, Robert M

    2005-05-01

    DNA helicases have essential roles in nucleic acid metabolism by facilitating cellular processes including replication, recombination, DNA repair, and transcription. The vital roles of helicases in these pathways are reflected by their emerging importance in the maintenance of genomic stability. Recently, a number of human diseases with cancer predisposition have been shown to be genetically linked to a specific helicase defect. This has led researchers to further investigate the roles of helicases in cancer biology, and to study the efficacy of targeting human DNA helicases for anti-cancer drug treatment. Helicase-specific inhibition in malignant cells may compromise the high proliferation rates of cancerous tissues. The role of RecQ helicases in response to replicational stress suggests a molecular target for selectively eliminating malignant tumor cells by a cancer chemotherapeutic agent. Alternate DNA secondary structures such as G-quadruplexes that may form in regulatory regions of oncogenes or G-rich telomere sequences are potential targets for cancer therapy since these sequence-specific structures are proposed to affect gene expression and telomerase activation, respectively. Small molecule inhibitors of G-quadruplex helicases may be used to regulate cell cycle progression by modulating promotor activation or disrupting telomere maintenance, important processes of cellular transformation. The design of small molecules which deter helicase function at telomeres may provide a molecular target since telomerase activity is necessary for the proliferation of numerous immortal cells. Although evidence suggests that helicases are specifically inhibited by certain DNA binding compounds, another area of promise in anti-cancer therapy is siRNA technology. Specific knockdown of helicase expression can be utilized as a means to sensitize oncogenic proliferating cell lines. This review will address these topics in detail and summarize the current avenues of research in

  12. HDAC Inhibitors as Novel Anti-Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Cristabelle; Chatterji, Biswa Prasun

    2015-01-01

    Malignant growth of cells is a condition characterized by unchecked cellular proliferation, genetic instability and epigenetic dysregulation. Up-regulated HDAC (Histone Deacetylase) enzyme activity is associated with a closed chromatin assembly and subsequent gene repression, forming a characteristic feature of malignantly transformed cells. Novel therapeutics are now targeting the zinc containing HDAC enzymes for treating various types of cancers. Recently, a spate of drugs acting via HDAC inhibition have been undergoing clinical trials and several patents present exciting molecules like PCI-24781 (Abexinostat), ITF- 2357 (Givinostat); MS-275 (Entinostat), MGCD 0103 (Mocetinostat), LBH-589 (Panobinostat), FK228 (Romidepsin), PXD-101 (Belinostat) and Valproic Acid to be used as alternatives or adjuvants to traditional chemotherapeutics. However, only three HDAC inhibitors have acquired FDA approval till date. Recently, PXD-101 obtained FDA approval for the treatment of Refractory or Relapsed Peripheral T cell lymphoma. The current article reviews patents that have introduced novel molecules that are HDAC isoform specific, superior to first generation HDAC inhibitors like SAHA (Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid) and TSA (Trichostatin A) and can be modified structurally to reduce toxic side effects and increase specificity. These molecules can combine the best characteristics of an ideal HDAC inhibiting drug either as monotherapy or in combinatorial therapy for cancer treatment thus, indicating promise to be included in the next generation of target specific HDAC inhibiting drugs.

  13. Toward Intracellular Targeted Delivery of Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Hetal; Debinski, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    A number of anti-cancer drugs have their targets localized to particular intracellular compartments. These drugs reach the targets mainly through diffusion, dependent on biophysical and biochemical forces that allow cell penetration. This means that both cancer cells and normal cells will be subjected to such diffusion; hence many of these drugs, like chemotherapeutics, are potentially toxic and the concentration achieved at the site of their action is often suboptimal. The same relates to radiation that indiscriminately affects normal and diseased cells. However, nature-designed systems enable compounds present in the extracellular environment to end up inside the cell and even travel to more specific intracellular compartments. For example, viruses and bacterial toxins can more or less specifically recognize eukaryotic cells, enter these cells, and direct some protein portions to designated intracellular areas. These phenomena have led to creative thinking, such as employing viruses or bacterial toxins for cargo delivery to cells and, more specifically, to cancer cells. Proteins can be genetically engineered in order to not only mimic what viruses and bacterial toxins can do, but also to add new functions, extending or changing the intracellular routes. It is possible to make conjugates or, more preferably, single-chain proteins that recognize cancer cells and deliver cargo inside the cells, even to the desired subcellular compartment. These findings offer new opportunities to deliver drugs/labels only to cancer cells and only to their site of action within the cells. The development of such dual-specificity vectors for targeting cancer cells is an attractive and potentially safer and more efficacious way of delivering drugs. We provide examples of this approach for delivering brain cancer therapeutics, using a specific biomarker on glioblastoma tumor cells. PMID:22671766

  14. Animal lectins: potential antitumor therapeutic targets in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhe; Zhang, Qian; Peng, Hao; Zhang, Wen-zhi

    2012-10-01

    Lectins, a group of carbohydrate-binding proteins ubiquitously distributed into plants and animals, are well-known to have astonishing numerous links to human cancers. In this review, we present a brief outline of the representative animal lectins such as galectins, C-type lectins, and annexins by targeting programmed cell death (or apoptosis) pathways, and also summarize these representative lectins as possible anti-cancer drug targets. Taken together, these inspiring findings would provide a comprehensive perspective for further elucidating the multifaceted roles of animal lectins in apoptosis pathways of cancer, which, in turn, may ultimately help us to exploit lectins for their therapeutic purposes in future drug discovery.

  15. Hierarchical pulmonary target nanoparticles via inhaled administration for anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Xu, Liu; Fan, Qin; Li, Man; Wang, Jingjing; Wu, Li; Li, Weidong; Duan, Jinao; Chen, Zhipeng

    2017-11-01

    Inhalation administration, compared with intravenous administration, significantly enhances chemotherapeutic drug exposure to the lung tissue and may increase the therapeutic effect for pulmonary anticancer. However, further identification of cancer cells after lung deposition of inhaled drugs is necessary to avoid side effects on normal lung tissue and to maximize drug efficacy. Moreover, as the action site of the major drug was intracellular organelles, drug target to the specific organelle is the final key for accurate drug delivery. Here, we designed a novel multifunctional nanoparticles (MNPs) for pulmonary antitumor and the material was well-designed for hierarchical target involved lung tissue target, cancer cell target, and mitochondrial target. The biodistribution in vivo determined by UHPLC-MS/MS method was employed to verify the drug concentration overwhelmingly increasing in lung tissue through inhaled administration compared with intravenous administration. Cellular uptake assay using A549 cells proved the efficient receptor-mediated cell endocytosis. Confocal laser scanning microscopy observation showed the location of MNPs in cells was mitochondria. All results confirmed the intelligent material can progressively play hierarchical target functions, which could induce more cell apoptosis related to mitochondrial damage. It provides a smart and efficient nanocarrier platform for hierarchical targeting of pulmonary anticancer drug. So far, this kind of material for pulmonary mitochondrial-target has not been seen in other reports.

  16. Hierarchical targeted hepatocyte mitochondrial multifunctional chitosan nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhipeng; Zhang, Liujie; Song, Yang; He, Jiayu; Wu, Li; Zhao, Can; Xiao, Yanyu; Li, Wei; Cai, Baochang; Cheng, Haibo; Li, Weidong

    2015-06-01

    The overwhelming majority of drugs exert their pharmacological effects after reaching their target sites of action, however, these target sites are mainly located in the cytosol or intracellular organelles. Consequently, delivering drugs to the specific organelle is the key to achieve maximum therapeutic effects and minimum side-effects. In the work reported here, we designed, synthesized, and evaluated a novel mitochondrial-targeted multifunctional nanoparticles (MNPs) based on chitosan derivatives according to the physiological environment of the tumor and the requirement of mitochondrial targeting drug delivery. The intelligent chitosan nanoparticles possess various functions such as stealth, hepatocyte targeting, multistage pH-response, lysosomal escape and mitochondrial targeting, which lead to targeted drug release after the progressively shedding of functional groups, thus realize the efficient intracellular delivery and mitochondrial localization, inhibit the growth of tumor, elevate the antitumor efficacy, and reduce the toxicity of anticancer drugs. It provides a safe and efficient nanocarrier platform for mitochondria targeting anticancer drug delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Testing therapeutic potency of anticancer drugs in animal studies: a commentary.

    PubMed

    Den Otter, Willem; Steerenberg, Peter A; Van der Laan, Jan Willem

    2002-04-01

    Regulatory authorities for medicines in European countries deal with many applications for admission to the market of anticancer drugs. Each application must be supported by preclinical and clinical data, among which testing of the therapeutic activity of drugs in animals is important. Recently, the Committee for Proprietary Medicinal Products (CPMP) has released a note for guidance on the preclinical evaluation of anticancer medicinal products. This note provides only general statements regarding tests of anticancer drugs in rodents. This stimulates considerations on how to organize and how to evaluate these tests. In this article we describe our considerations regarding these items based on our experience with applications in The Netherlands since 1993.

  18. [Therapeutic targets in Gaucher's disease].

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Pilar; Roca, Mercedes

    2011-09-01

    Gaucher's disease (GD) occurs because of deficiency of the enzyme beta-glucocerebrosidase that results in accumulation of this glycolipid compound in the cells of the macrophage-monocyte system. There are 3 types: type 1 is non-neuronopathic with primarily visceral signs and symptoms which range tremendously in severity; infantile-onset type 2 and later-onset type 3 involve the central nervous system. More than 300 mutations have been described in the gene, partially explaining phenotypic heterogeneity. Commercialization in 1991 of the first enzyme replacement therapy, alglucerase, resulted in a revolution in the management of patients with symptomatic GD (i.e., by improving the hematological and visceral signs and symptoms). Within the first 5 years of alglucerase, its safety and efficacy in improving hemoglobin levels and platelet counts, and in reducing splenic and hepatic enlargement were confirmed albeit recognizing its inability to impact neurological symptoms and signs because of its large molecular size. Recombinant imiglucerase soon replaced alglucerase as the standard of care for GD. The therapeutic targets recently defined as treatment goals were: normalization of cell counts; reduction of liver and spleen volume; elimination of the infiltration in the bone marrow to prevent the complications, and improvement in surrogate biomarkers.

  19. Targeting microenvironment in cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Matthew; Wei, Han; Lu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    During development of a novel treatment for cancer patients, the tumor microenvironment and its interaction with the tumor cells must be considered. Aspects such as the extracellular matrix (ECM), the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), secreted factors, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the host immune response, and tumor-associated microphages (TAM) are critical for cancer progression and metastasis. Additionally, signaling pathways such as the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) can promote further cytokine release in the tumor environment, and impact tumor progression greatly. Importantly, cytokine overexpression has been linked to drug resistance in cancers and is therefore an attractive target for combinational therapies. Specific inhibitors of cytokines involved in signaling between tumor cells and the microenvironment have not been studied in depth and have great potential for use in personalized medicines. Together, the interactions between the microenvironment and tumors are critical for tumor growth and promotion and should be taken into serious consideration for future novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:27270649

  20. Cell Targeting in Anti-Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd; Siew, John Shia Kwong; Zakaria, Hayati; Saad, Suria Mohd; Ni, Lim Shen; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach towards cancer treatment. The main aim of the therapy is to destroy cancer cells, usually by apoptotic mechanisms, and preserving others. However, its application has been hindered by many factors including poor cellular uptake, non-specific cell targeting and undesirable interferences with other genes or gene products. A variety of strategies exist to improve cellular uptake efficiency of gene-based therapies. This paper highlights advancements in gene therapy research and its application in relation to anti-cancer treatment. PMID:22977356

  1. Anti-cancer chalcones: Structural and molecular target perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Debarshi Kar; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Asati, Vivek

    2015-06-15

    Chalcone or (E)-1,3-diphenyl-2-propene-1-one scaffold remained a fascination among researchers in the 21st century due to its simple chemistry, ease of synthesis and a wide variety of promising biological activities. Several natural and (semi) synthetic chalcones have shown anti-cancer activity due to their inhibitory potential against various targets namely ABCG2/P-gp/BCRP, 5α-reductase, aromatase, 17-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, HDAC/Situin-1, proteasome, VEGF, VEGFR-2 kinase, MMP-2/9, JAK/STAT signaling pathways, CDC25B, tubulin, cathepsin-K, topoisomerase-II, Wnt, NF-κB, B-Raf and mTOR etc. In this review, a comprehensive study on molecular targets/pathways involved in carcinogenesis, mechanism of actions (MOAs), structure activity relationships (SARs) and patents granted have been highlighted. With the knowledge of molecular targets, structural insights and SARs, this review may be helpful for (medicinal) chemists to design more potent, safe, selective and cost effective anti-cancer chalcones.

  2. Topoisomerase as target for antibacterial and anticancer drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Kathiravan, Muthu K; Khilare, Madhavi M; Nikoomanesh, Kiana; Chothe, Aparna S; Jain, Kishor S

    2013-06-01

    DNA topoisomerases comprise a major aspect of basic cellular biology and are molecular targets for a variety of drugs like antibiotics, antibacterials and anticancer drugs. They act by inhibiting the topoisomerase molecule from relegating DNA strands after cleavage and convert the topoisomerases molecule into a DNA damaging agent. Though drugs of various categories acting through different mechanisms are available for the treatment, there are still problems associated with the currently available drugs. Therefore, Structural biologists, Structural chemists and Medicinal chemists all around the world have been identifying, designing, synthesizing and evaluating a variety of novel bioactive molecules targeting topoisomerase. This review summarizes types of topoisomerase and drug treating each class along with their structural requirement and activity. The emphasis has been laid in particular on the new potential heterocyles and the possible treatments as well as the current ongoing research status in the field of topoisomerase as dual targeting.

  3. Preparation and characterization of novel chitosan-protamine nanoparticles for nucleus-targeted anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiwei; Hou, Jiahui; Shi, Yijie; Su, Chang; Zhao, Liang

    It is well known that most anticancer drugs commonly show high toxicity to the DNA of tumor cells and exert effects by combining with the DNA or associated enzymes in the nucleus. Most developed drugs are first delivered into the cytoplasm and then transferred to the nucleus through the membrane pores. Sometimes, the transportation of drugs from cytoplasm to nucleus is not efficient and often results in poor therapeutic effects. In this study, we developed special and novel nanoparticles (NPs) made of chitosan and protamine for targeted nuclear capture of drugs to enhance anticancer effects. The anticancer effects of nuclear targeted-delivery of drugs in NPs were also evaluated by investigating cytotoxicity, cellular uptake mechanism, and cell apoptosis on cells. Chitosan-protamine NPs were characterized by good drug entrapment, sustained release, small average particle size, low polydispersity index, and high encapsulation efficiency; and accomplished the efficient nuclear delivery of fluorouracil (5-Fu). Compared with free 5-Fu and 5-Fu-loaded chitosan NPs, treatment of A549 cells and HeLa cells with 5-Fu-loaded chitosan-protamine NPs showed the highest cytotoxicity and further induced the significant apoptosis of cells. In addition, 5-Fu-loaded chitosan-protamine NPs exhibited the best efficiency in inhibiting tumor growth than the other three formulations. 5-Fu-loaded chitosan-protamine NPs enhanced antitumor efficacy through the targeted nuclear capture of drugs and showed promising potential as a nanodelivery system for quickly locating drugs in the nucleus of cells.

  4. Targeting carbonic anhydrase IX improves the anti-cancer efficacy of mTOR inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Faes, Seraina; Planche, Anne; Uldry, Emilie; Santoro, Tania; Pythoud, Catherine; Stehle, Jean-Christophe; Horlbeck, Janine; Letovanec, Igor; Riggi, Nicolo; Datta, Dipak; Demartines, Nicolas; Dormond, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) by chemical inhibitors, such as rapamycin, has demonstrated anti-cancer activity in preclinical and clinical trials. Their efficacy is, however, limited and tumors eventually relapse through resistance formation. In this study, using two different cancer mouse models, we identify tumor hypoxia as a novel mechanism of resistance of cancer cells against mTORC1 inhibitors. Indeed, we show that the activity of mTORC1 is mainly restricted to the non-hypoxic tumor compartment, as evidenced by a mutually exclusive staining pattern of the mTORC1 activity marker pS6 and the hypoxia marker pimonidazole. Consequently, whereas rapamycin reduces cancer cell proliferation in non-hypoxic regions, it has no effect in hypoxic areas, suggesting that cancer cells proliferate independently of mTORC1 under hypoxia. Targeting the hypoxic tumor compartment by knockdown of carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) using short hairpin RNA or by chemical inhibition of CAIX with acetazolamide potentiates the anti-cancer activity of rapamycin. Taken together, these data emphasize that hypoxia impairs the anti-cancer efficacy of rapalogs. Therapeutic strategies targeting the hypoxic tumor compartment, such as the inhibition of CAIX, potentiate the efficacy of rapamycin and warrant further clinical evaluation. PMID:27153561

  5. Designing multi-targeted agents: An emerging anticancer drug discovery paradigm.

    PubMed

    Fu, Rong-Geng; Sun, Yuan; Sheng, Wen-Bing; Liao, Duan-Fang

    2017-08-18

    The dominant paradigm in drug discovery is to design ligands with maximum selectivity to act on individual drug targets. With the target-based approach, many new chemical entities have been discovered, developed, and further approved as drugs. However, there are a large number of complex diseases such as cancer that cannot be effectively treated or cured only with one medicine to modulate the biological function of a single target. As simultaneous intervention of two (or multiple) cancer progression relevant targets has shown improved therapeutic efficacy, the innovation of multi-targeted drugs has become a promising and prevailing research topic and numerous multi-targeted anticancer agents are currently at various developmental stages. However, most multi-pharmacophore scaffolds are usually discovered by serendipity or screening, while rational design by combining existing pharmacophore scaffolds remains an enormous challenge. In this review, four types of multi-pharmacophore modes are discussed, and the examples from literature will be used to introduce attractive lead compounds with the capability of simultaneously interfering with different enzyme or signaling pathway of cancer progression, which will reveal the trends and insights to help the design of the next generation multi-targeted anticancer agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Therapeutic targeting of replicative immortality.

    PubMed

    Yaswen, Paul; MacKenzie, Karen L; Keith, W Nicol; Hentosh, Patricia; Rodier, Francis; Zhu, Jiyue; Firestone, Gary L; Matheu, Ander; Carnero, Amancio; Bilsland, Alan; Sundin, Tabetha; Honoki, Kanya; Fujii, Hiromasa; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Amedei, Amedeo; Amin, Amr; Helferich, Bill; Boosani, Chandra S; Guha, Gunjan; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Chen, Sophie; Mohammed, Sulma I; Azmi, Asfar S; Bhakta, Dipita; Halicka, Dorota; Niccolai, Elena; Aquilano, Katia; Ashraf, S Salman; Nowsheen, Somaira; Yang, Xujuan

    2015-12-01

    One of the hallmarks of malignant cell populations is the ability to undergo continuous proliferation. This property allows clonal lineages to acquire sequential aberrations that can fuel increasingly autonomous growth, invasiveness, and therapeutic resistance. Innate cellular mechanisms have evolved to regulate replicative potential as a hedge against malignant progression. When activated in the absence of normal terminal differentiation cues, these mechanisms can result in a state of persistent cytostasis. This state, termed "senescence," can be triggered by intrinsic cellular processes such as telomere dysfunction and oncogene expression, and by exogenous factors such as DNA damaging agents or oxidative environments. Despite differences in upstream signaling, senescence often involves convergent interdependent activation of tumor suppressors p53 and p16/pRB, but can be induced, albeit with reduced sensitivity, when these suppressors are compromised. Doses of conventional genotoxic drugs required to achieve cancer cell senescence are often much lower than doses required to achieve outright cell death. Additional therapies, such as those targeting cyclin dependent kinases or components of the PI3K signaling pathway, may induce senescence specifically in cancer cells by circumventing defects in tumor suppressor pathways or exploiting cancer cells' heightened requirements for telomerase. Such treatments sufficient to induce cancer cell senescence could provide increased patient survival with fewer and less severe side effects than conventional cytotoxic regimens. This positive aspect is countered by important caveats regarding senescence reversibility, genomic instability, and paracrine effects that may increase heterogeneity and adaptive resistance of surviving cancer cells. Nevertheless, agents that effectively disrupt replicative immortality will likely be valuable components of new combinatorial approaches to cancer therapy.

  7. Therapeutic targeting of replicative immortality

    PubMed Central

    Yaswen, Paul; MacKenzie, Karen L.; Keith, W. Nicol; Hentosh, Patricia; Rodier, Francis; Zhu, Jiyue; Firestone, Gary L.; Matheu, Ander; Carnero, Amancio; Bilsland, Alan; Sundin, Tabetha; Honoki, Kanya; Fujii, Hiromasa; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Amedei, Amedeo; Amin, Amr; Helferich, Bill; Boosani, Chandra S.; Guha, Gunjan; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Chen, Sophie; Mohammed, Sulma I.; Azmi, Asfar S.; Bhakta, Dipita; Halicka, Dorota; Niccolai, Elena; Aquilano, Katia; Ashraf, S. Salman; Nowsheen, Somaira; Yang, Xujuan

    2015-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of malignant cell populations is the ability to undergo continuous proliferation. This property allows clonal lineages to acquire sequential aberrations that can fuel increasingly autonomous growth, invasiveness, and therapeutic resistance. Innate cellular mechanisms have evolved to regulate replicative potential as a hedge against malignant progression. When activated in the absence of normal terminal differentiation cues, these mechanisms can result in a state of persistent cytostasis. This state, termed “senescence,” can be triggered by intrinsic cellular processes such as telomere dysfunction and oncogene expression, and by exogenous factors such as DNA damaging agents or oxidative environments. Despite differences in upstream signaling, senescence often involves convergent interdependent activation of tumor suppressors p53 and p16/pRB, but can be induced, albeit with reduced sensitivity, when these suppressors are compromised. Doses of conventional genotoxic drugs required to achieve cancer cell senescence are often much lower than doses required to achieve outright cell death. Additional therapies, such as those targeting cyclin dependent kinases or components of the PI3K signaling pathway, may induce senescence specifically in cancer cells by circumventing defects in tumor suppressor pathways or exploiting cancer cells’ heightened requirements for telomerase. Such treatments sufficient to induce cancer cell senescence could provide increased patient survival with fewer and less severe side effects than conventional cytotoxic regimens. This positive aspect is countered by important caveats regarding senescence reversibility, genomic instability, and paracrine effects that may increase heterogeneity and adaptive resistance of surviving cancer cells. Nevertheless, agents that effectively disrupt replicative immortality will likely be valuable components of new combinatorial approaches to cancer therapy. PMID:25869441

  8. Targeting malignant mitochondria with therapeutic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Constance, Jonathan E; Lim, Carol S

    2013-01-01

    The current status of peptides that target the mitochondria in the context of cancer is the focus of this review. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy used to kill tumor cells are principally mediated by the process of apoptosis that is governed by the mitochondria. The failure of anticancer therapy often resides at the level of the mitochondria. Therefore, the mitochondrion is a key pharmacological target in cancer due to many of the differences that arise between malignant and healthy cells at the level of this ubiquitous organelle. Additionally, targeting the characteristics of malignant mitochondria often rely on disruption of protein–protein interactions that are not generally amenable to small molecules. We discuss anticancer peptides that intersect with pathological changes in the mitochondrion. PMID:22946430

  9. Targeting malignant mitochondria with therapeutic peptides.

    PubMed

    Constance, Jonathan E; Lim, Carol S

    2012-08-01

    The current status of peptides that target the mitochondria in the context of cancer is the focus of this review. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy used to kill tumor cells are principally mediated by the process of apoptosis that is governed by the mitochondria. The failure of anticancer therapy often resides at the level of the mitochondria. Therefore, the mitochondrion is a key pharmacological target in cancer due to many of the differences that arise between malignant and healthy cells at the level of this ubiquitous organelle. Additionally, targeting the characteristics of malignant mitochondira often rely on disruption of protein--protein interactions that are not generally amenable to small molecules. We discuss anticancer peptides that intersect with pathological changes in the mitochondrion.

  10. Emerging Role of G-quadruplex DNA as Target in Anticancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cimino-Reale, Graziella; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Folini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    DNA has represented the most exploited target for the development of anticancer agents. It is now established that DNA may assume a variety of non-B conformations. This evidence has generated a total novel wave of interest in DNA as a cancer-associated target, since its distinct non-B structures may be regarded as sites for selective therapeutic intervention. G-quadruplexes are peculiar non-B DNA conformations that may form within guaninerich nucleic acid sequences. They are generated by a core of two or more vertically stacked G-quartets (i.e., the square planar arrangement of four guanine residues) held together by intervening loops of variable length. The evidence that G-quadruplexes are highly polymorphic and overrepresented within human genome points out at such non-B DNA conformations as druggable sites amenable of targeting by small molecules. In the present paper we will provide a concise overview on the emerging role of G-quadruplex structures forming within telomeres, gene promoters and mitochondrial DNA as a promising therapeutic target in cancer. In this context, a variety of small molecules has been documented to have excellent G-quadruplex binding/stabilizing properties and to exert good antiproliferative and antitumor activity in several in vitro and in vivo models of human cancers. Pieces of evidence indicate that targeting G-quadruplexes may represent an innovative and fascinating approach for the therapeutic management of the neoplastic disease. However, several issues still need to be addressed both at chemical and biological level before G-quadruplex-interacting molecules will turn out into effective therapeutic agents. Nevertheless, this has been an exciting, though sometime subdued, field of research over the last century. The continued improvements in methodologies and the development of specific tools will contribute not only to achieve the design and development of potentially novel anticancer approaches but also to deepen our knowledge of

  11. Network pharmacology-based virtual screening of natural products from Clerodendrum species for identification of novel anti-cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Barbi; Gogoi, Dhrubajyoti; Silla, Yumnam; Kakoti, Bibhuti Bhushan; Bhau, Brijmohan Singh

    2017-01-31

    Plant-derived natural products (NPs) play a vital role in the discovery of new drug molecules and these are used for development of novel therapeutic drugs for a specific disease target. Literature review suggests that natural products possess strong inhibitory efficacy against various types of cancer cells. Clerodendrum indicum and Clerodendrum serratum are reported to have anticancer activity; therefore a study was carried out to identify selective anticancer agents from these plants species. In this report, we employed a docking weighted network pharmacological approach to understand the multi-therapeutics potentiality of C. indicum and C. serratum against various types of cancer. A library of 53 natural products derived from these plants was compiled from the literature and three dimensional space analyses were performed in order to establish the drug-likeness of the NPs library. Further, an NPs-cancer network was built based on docking. We predicted five compounds, namely apigenin 7-glucoside, hispidulin, scutellarein-7-O-beta-d-glucuronate, acteoside and verbascoside, to be potential binding therapeutics for cancer target proteins. Apigenin 7-glucoside and hispidulin were found to have maximum binding interactions (relationship) with 17 cancer drug targets in terms of docking weighted network pharmacological analysis. Hence, we used an integrative approach obtained from network pharmacology for identifying combinatorial drug actions against the cancer targets. We believe that our present study may provide important clues for finding novel drug inhibitors for cancer.

  12. Naturally occurring anti-cancer agents targeting EZH2.

    PubMed

    Shahabipour, Fahimeh; Caraglia, Michele; Majeed, Muhammed; Derosa, Giuseppe; Maffioli, Pamela; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2017-03-18

    Natural products are considered as promising tools for the prevention and treatment of cancer. The enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is a histone methyltransferase unit of polycomb repressor complexes such as PRC2 complex that has oncogenic roles through interference with growth and metastatic potential. Several agents targeting EZH2 has been discovered but they often induce side effects in clinical trials. Recently, EZH2 has emerged as a potential target of natural products with documented anti-cancer effects and this discloses a new scenario for the development of EZH2 inhibitory strategies with agents with low cytotoxic detrimental effects. In fact, several natural products such as curcumin, triptolide, ursolic acid, sulforaphane, davidiin, tanshindiols, gambogic acid, berberine and Alcea rosea have been shown to serve as EZH2 modulators. Mechanisms like inhibition of histone H3K4, H3K27 and H3K36 trimethylation, down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase expression, competitive binding to the S-adenosylmethionine binding site of EZH2 and modulation of tumor-suppressive microRNAs have been demonstrated to mediate the EZH2-inhibitory activity of the mentioned natural products. This review summarizes the pathways that are regulated by various natural products resulting in the suppression of EZH2, and provides a plausible molecular mechanism for the putative anti-cancer effects of these compounds.

  13. Engineering of bacteria for the visualization of targeted delivery of a cytolytic anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Sheng-Nan; Park, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Hee Jung; Zheng, Jin Hai; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Bom, Hee-Seung; Hong, Yeongjin; Szardenings, Michael; Shin, Myung Geun; Kim, Sun-Chang; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2013-11-01

    A number of recent reports have demonstrated that attenuated Salmonella typhimurium are capable of targeting both primary and metastatic tumors. The use of bacteria as a vehicle for the delivery of anticancer drugs requires a mechanism that precisely regulates and visualizes gene expression to ensure the appropriate timing and location of drug production. To integrate these functions into bacteria, we used a repressor-regulated tetracycline efflux system, in which the expression of a therapeutic gene and an imaging reporter gene were controlled by divergent promoters (tetAP and tetRP) in response to extracellular tetracycline. Attenuated S. typhimurium was transformed with the expression plasmids encoding cytolysin A, a therapeutic gene, and renilla luciferase variant 8, an imaging reporter gene, and administered intravenously to tumor-bearing mice. The engineered Salmonella successfully localized to tumor tissue and gene expression was dependent on the concentration of inducer, indicating the feasibility of peripheral control of bacterial gene expression. The bioluminescence signal permitted the localization of gene expression from the bacteria. The engineered bacteria significantly suppressed both primary and metastatic tumors and prolonged survival in mice. Therefore, engineered bacteria that carry a therapeutic and an imaging reporter gene for targeted anticancer therapy can be designed as a theranostic agent.

  14. MicroRNA-targeted therapeutics for lung cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jing; Yang, Jiali; Luo, Meihui; Cho, William C; Liu, Xiaoming

    2017-02-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality worldwide. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous non-coding small RNAs that repress the expression of a broad array of target genes. Many efforts have been made to therapeutically target miRNAs in cancer treatments using miRNA mimics and miRNA antagonists. Areas covered: This article summarizes the recent findings with the role of miRNAs in lung cancer, and discusses the potential and challenges of developing miRNA-targeted therapeutics in this dreadful disease. Expert opinion: The development of miRNA-targeted therapeutics has become an important anti-cancer strategy. Results from both preclinical and clinical trials of microRNA replacement therapy have shown some promise in cancer treatment. However, some obstacles, including drug delivery, specificity, off-target effect, toxicity mediation, immunological activation and dosage determination should be addressed. Several delivery strategies have been employed, including naked oligonucleotides, liposomes, aptamer-conjugates, nanoparticles and viral vectors. However, delivery remains a main challenge in miRNA-targeting therapeutics. Furthermore, immune-related serious adverse events are also a concern, which indicates the complexity of miRNA-based therapy in clinical settings.

  15. A review of economic impact of targeted oral anticancer medications.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chan; Chien, Chun-Ru; Geynisman, Daniel M; Smieliauskas, Fabrice; Shih, Ya-Chen T

    2014-02-01

    There has been a rapid increase in the use of targeted oral anticancer medications (OAMs) in the past decade. As OAMs are often expensive, economic consideration play a significant role in the decision to prescribe, receive or cover them. This paper performs a systematic review of costs or budgetary impact of targeted OAMs to better understand their economic impact on the healthcare system, patients as well as payers. We present our review in a summary table that describes the method and main findings, take into account multiple factors, such as country, analytical approach, cost type, study perspective, timeframe, data sources, study population and care setting when we interpret the results from different papers, and discuss the policy and clinical implications. Our review raises a concern regarding the role of sponsorship on findings of economic analyses as the vast majority of pharmaceutical company-sponsored studies reported cost advantages toward the sponsor's drugs.

  16. Novel Antibody Therapeutics Targeting Mesothelin In Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao-Yan; Subramanyam, Babu; Sarapa, Nenad; Golfier, Sven; Dinter, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background Monoclonal antibodies have become attractive clinical anti-cancer drugs in the last 3 decades due to their targeting specificity and suitable pharmacokinetic properties. Mesothelin is a tumor-associated antigen with limited expression in normal tissues. It is frequently over-expressed on the cell membrane of a number of epithelial malignancies (e.g. mesothelioma, pancreatic, ovarian, lung, triple negative breast and gastric cancers). Methods Mesothelin is validated as a suitable antibody target for cancer therapy. A number of novel antibody therapeutics targeting mesothelin in development are compared and their mechanisms of action are also discussed. Both basic science and clinical data are provided to give a complete veiw of how an agent is developed from bench to bedside. Results Novel antibody therapeutics, including unconjugated monoclonal antibodies, recombinant immunotoxins and antibody-drug conjugates, targeting mesothelin exert anti-tumor activities by different mechanisms of action. Based on the convincing preclinical data generated with these molecules, the antibody therapeutics have been brought into early clinical evaluation where initial promising results were obtained. Conclusion These antibody therapeutics directed against mesothelin are expected to have different safety profiles, based on their different mechanism of action. Further clinical development will reveal which of these molecules shows the best efficacy and widest therapeutic window and thus is best suited to bring benefit to the patients. PMID:27853672

  17. Development of anticancer agents targeting the Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangqian; Tian, Ye; Yang, Yanling; Hao, Jijun

    2017-03-17

    Hedgehog signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway which is essential in embryonic and postnatal development as well as adult organ homeostasis. Abnormal regulation of Hedgehog signaling is implicated in many diseases including cancer. Consequently, substantial efforts have made in the past to develop potential therapeutic agents that specifically target the Hedgehog signaling for cancer treatment. Here, we review the therapeutic agents for inhibition of the Hedgehog signaling and their clinical advances in cancer treatment.

  18. Cullin-RING Ligases as Attractive Anti-cancer Targets

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongchao; Sun, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) promotes the timely degradation of short-lived proteins with key regulatory roles in a vast array of biological processes, such as cell cycle progression, oncogenesis and genome integrity. Thus, abnormal regulation of UPS disrupts the protein homeostasis and causes many human diseases, particularly cancer. Indeed, the FDA approval of bortezomib, the first class of general proteasome inhibitor, for the treatment of multiple myeloma, demonstrated that the UPS can be an attractive anti-cancer target. However, normal cell toxicity associated with bortezomib, resulting from global inhibition of protein degradation, promotes the focus of drug discovery efforts on targeting enzymes upstream of the proteasome for better specificity. E3 ubiquitin ligases, particularly those known to be activated in human cancer, become an attractive choice. Cullin-RING Ligases (CRLs) with multiple components are the largest family of E3 ubiquitin ligases and are responsible for ubiquitination of ~20% of cellular proteins degraded through UPS. Activity of CRLs is dynamically regulated and requires the RING component and cullin neddylation. In this review, we will introduce the UPS and CRL E3s and discuss the biological processes regulated by each of eight CRLs through substrate degradation. We will further discuss how cullin neddylation controls CRL activity, and how CRLs are being validated as the attractive cancer targets by abrogating the RING component through genetic means and by inhibiting cullin neddylation via MLN4924, a small molecule indirect inhibitor of CRLs, currently in several Phase I clinical trials. Finally, we will discuss current efforts and future perspectives on the development of additional inhibitors of CRLs by targeting E2 and/or E3 of cullin neddylation and CRL-mediated ubiquitination as potential anti-cancer agents. PMID:23151137

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Anti-cancer Activities of β-elemene: Targeting Hallmarks of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shiyu; Ling, Chunhua; Li, Wei; Jiang, Hongxin; Zhi, Qiaoming; Jiang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Increasing knowledge on the hallmark characteristics of cancer and tumor pharmacology has promoted the introduction of phytochemicals, such as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in cancer therapy, which modulate numerous molecular targets and exert anticancer activities. β-elemene, an active and non-toxic compound isolated from the Chinese medicinal herb Rhizoma Zedoariae, has been explored as a potent anti-cancer agent against multiple cancers in extensive clinical trials and experimental research in vivo and in vitro. β-elemene exerts therapeutic potential via modulation of core hallmark capabilities of cancer by suppressing proliferative signaling, such as MAPK and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway, inducing cell death, up-regulating growth suppressors, deactivating invasion and metastasis and interacting replicative immortality and attenuating angiogenesis. Recent studies have significantly improved our understanding of anti-cancer activities and underlying molecular mechanisms of this Chinese medicine. This review presents these novel findings regarding the unique properties of β-elemene as an agent for cancer treatment, with an emphasis on multi-targeting biological and molecular regulation.

  20. Covalent Ligand Discovery against Druggable Hotspots Targeted by Anti-cancer Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Elizabeth A; Ward, Carl C; Spradlin, Jessica N; Bateman, Leslie A; Huffman, Tucker R; Miyamoto, David K; Kleinman, Jordan I; Nomura, Daniel K

    2017-09-11

    Many natural products that show therapeutic activities are often difficult to synthesize or isolate and have unknown targets, hindering their development as drugs. Identifying druggable hotspots targeted by covalently acting anti-cancer natural products can enable pharmacological interrogation of these sites with more synthetically tractable compounds. Here, we used chemoproteomic platforms to discover that the anti-cancer natural product withaferin A targets C377 on the regulatory subunit PPP2R1A of the tumor-suppressor protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) complex leading to activation of PP2A activity, inactivation of AKT, and impaired breast cancer cell proliferation. We developed a more synthetically tractable cysteine-reactive covalent ligand, JNS 1-40, that selectively targets C377 of PPP2R1A to impair breast cancer signaling, proliferation, and in vivo tumor growth. Our study highlights the utility of using chemoproteomics to map druggable hotspots targeted by complex natural products and subsequently interrogating these sites with more synthetically tractable covalent ligands for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Glypican-3 antibodies: a new therapeutic target for liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Mingqian Feng, Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    Glypican-3 (GPC3) is an emerging therapeutic target in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), even though the biological function of GPC3 remains elusive. Currently human (MDX-1414 and HN3) and humanized mouse (GC33 and YP7) antibodies that target GPC3 for HCC treatment are under different stages of preclinical or clinical development. Humanized mouse antibody GC33 is being evaluated in a phase II clinical trial. Human antibodies MDX-1414 and HN3 are under different stages of preclinical evaluation. Here, we summarize current evidence for GPC3 as a new target in liver cancer, discuss both its oncogenic function and its mode of actions for current antibodies, and evaluate potential challenges for GPC3-targeted anti-cancer therapies. PMID:24140348

  2. Anticancer therapeutic potential of Mn porphyrin/ascorbate system.

    PubMed

    Tovmasyan, Artak; Sampaio, Romulo S; Boss, Mary-Keara; Bueno-Janice, Jacqueline C; Bader, Bader H; Thomas, Milini; Reboucas, Julio S; Orr, Michael; Chandler, Joshua D; Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P; Venkatraman, Talaignair N; Haberle, Sinisa; Kyui, Natalia; Lascola, Christopher D; Dewhirst, Mark W; Spasojevic, Ivan; Benov, Ludmil; Batinic-Haberle, Ines

    2015-12-01

    Ascorbate (Asc) as a single agent suppressed growth of several tumor cell lines in a mouse model. It has been tested in a Phase I Clinical Trial on pancreatic cancer patients where it exhibited no toxicity to normal tissue yet was of only marginal efficacy. The mechanism of its anticancer effect was attributed to the production of tumoricidal hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) during ascorbate oxidation catalyzed by endogenous metalloproteins. The amount of H2O2 could be maximized with exogenous catalyst that has optimized properties for such function and is localized within tumor. Herein we studied 14 Mn porphyrins (MnPs) which differ vastly with regards to their redox properties, charge, size/bulkiness and lipophilicity. Such properties affect the in vitro and in vivo ability of MnPs (i) to catalyze ascorbate oxidation resulting in the production of H2O2; (ii) to subsequently employ H2O2 in the catalysis of signaling proteins oxidations affecting cellular survival pathways; and (iii) to accumulate at site(s) of interest. The metal-centered reduction potential of MnPs studied, E1/2 of Mn(III)P/Mn(II)P redox couple, ranged from -200 to +350 mV vs NHE. Anionic and cationic, hydrophilic and lipophilic as well as short- and long-chained and bulky compounds were explored. Their ability to catalyze ascorbate oxidation, and in turn cytotoxic H2O2 production, was explored via spectrophotometric and electrochemical means. Bell-shape structure-activity relationship (SAR) was found between the initial rate for the catalysis of ascorbate oxidation, vo(Asc)ox and E1/2, identifying cationic Mn(III) N-substituted pyridylporphyrins with E1/2>0 mV vs NHE as efficient catalysts for ascorbate oxidation. The anticancer potential of MnPs/Asc system was subsequently tested in cellular (human MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and mouse 4T1) and animal models of breast cancer. At the concentrations where ascorbate (1mM) and MnPs (1 or 5 µM) alone did not trigger any alteration in cell viability, combined

  3. Algorithm for Designing Nanoscale Supramolecular Therapeutics with Increased Anticancer Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ashish; Pandey, Prithvi; Rao, Poornima; Mahmoud, Ayaat; Goldman, Aaron; Sabbisetti, Venkata; Parcha, Shashikanth; Natarajan, Siva Kumar; Chandrasekar, Vineethkrishna; Dinulescu, Daniela; Roy, Sudip; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2016-09-27

    In the chemical world, evolution is mirrored in the origin of nanoscale supramolecular structures from molecular subunits. The complexity of function acquired in a supramolecular system over a molecular subunit can be harnessed in the treatment of cancer. However, the design of supramolecular nanostructures is hindered by a limited atomistic level understanding of interactions between building blocks. Here, we report the development of a computational algorithm, which we term Volvox after the first multicellular organism, that sequentially integrates quantum mechanical energy-state- and force-field-based models with large-scale all-atomistic explicit water molecular dynamics simulations to design stable nanoscale lipidic supramolecular structures. In one example, we demonstrate that Volvox enables the design of a nanoscale taxane supramolecular therapeutic. In another example, we demonstrate that Volvox can be extended to optimizing the ratio of excipients to form a stable nanoscale supramolecular therapeutic. The nanoscale taxane supramolecular therapeutic exerts greater antitumor efficacy than a clinically used taxane in vivo. Volvox can emerge as a powerful tool in the design of nanoscale supramolecular therapeutics for effective treatment of cancer.

  4. Dual-drug loaded nanoformulation with a galactosamine homing moiety for liver-targeted anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Nafees; Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Kun; Zhu, Chengcheng; Zhu, Zhenzhu; Jiao, Yang; Guo, Zijian

    2016-08-16

    Drug resistance and unfavorable pharmacokinetics are the major obstacles for conventional anticancer drugs. A combination of different anticancer drugs into one formulation is a common strategy to alleviate the side effects of individual drugs in clinical practice. Platinum anticancer drugs are the typical defective therapeutic agents for cancer chemotherapy and have poor selectivity for tumor cells. In this study, a nanosystem composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), Pt(IV) prodrug (PPD) and α-tocopheryl succinate (α-TOS) was designed to overcome these defects. The Pt(IV) prodrug, c,c,t-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2(O2CC(CH3)3)2], was prepared by the reaction of oxoplatin with trimethylacetic anhydride and its structure was characterized by X-ray crystallography. The PPD and α-TOS self-assembled with PLGA, forming a dual-drug loaded nanoparticle (DDNP). The surface of the DDNP was decorated with galactosamine (G), giving rise to a G-DDNP that can actively target the liver cancer cells through the overexpressed asialoglycoprotein receptors. The DDNPs and G-DDNPs were characterized by SEM, TEM, and DLS. They are spherical in shape with required polydispersity and suitable mean size (ca. 150 nm). The in vitro cytotoxicity of DDNPs and G-DDNPs was tested against the human SMMC-7721 liver cancer cell line. G-DDNPs are more potent than the corresponding free drugs and untargeted DDNP, showing that some synergistic and tumor-specific effects are achieved by this strategy. The results demonstrate that dual-drug loaded nanoformulations with tumor-targeting function could be effective anticancer agents for conquering the shortcomings related to single-drug chemotherapy.

  5. Cisplatin encapsulated nanoparticle as a therapeutic agent for anticancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eka Putra, Gusti Ngurah Putu; Huang, Leaf; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2016-03-01

    The knowledge of manipulating size of biomaterials encapsulated drug into nano-scale particles has been researched and developed in treating cancer. Cancer is the second worldwide cause of death, therefore it is critical to treat cancers challenging with therapeutic modality of various mechanisms. Our preliminary investigation has studied cisplatin encapsulated into lipid-based nanoparticle and examined the therapeutic effect on xenografted animal model. We used mice with tumor volume ranging from 195 to 214 mm3 and then few mice were grouped into three groups including: control (PBS), lipid platinum chloride (LPC) nanoparticles and CDDP (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) at dose of 3mg cisplatin /kg body weight. The effect of the treatment was observed for 12 days post-injection. It showed that LPC NPs demonstrated a better therapeutic effect compared to CDDP at same 3mg cisplatin/kg drug dose of tumor size reduction, 96.6% and 11.1% respectively. In addition, mouse body weight loss of LPC, CDDP and PBS treated group are 12.1%, 24.3% and 1.4%. It means that by compared to CDDP group, LPC group demonstrated less side effect as not much reduction of body weight have found. Our findings have shown to be a potential modality to further investigate as a feasible cancer therapy modality.

  6. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α ligands as anticancer drugs targeting mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Grabacka, Maja; Pierzchalska, Malgorzata; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cells show metabolic features distinctive from normal tissues, with characteristically enhanced aerobic glycolysis, glutaminolysis and lipid synthesis. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPAR α) is activated by nutrients (fatty acids and their derivatives) and influences these metabolic pathways acting antagonistically to oncogenic Akt and c-Myc. Therefore PPAR α can be regarded as a candidate target molecule in supplementary anticancer pharmacotherapy as well as dietary therapeutic approach. This idea is based on hitting the cancer cell metabolic weak points through PPAR α mediated stimulation of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis with simultaneous reduction of glucose and glutamine consumption. PPAR α activity is induced by fasting and its molecular consequences overlap with the effects of calorie restriction and ketogenic diet (CRKD). CRKD induces increase of NAD+/NADH ratio and drop in ATP/AMP ratio. The first one is the main stimulus for enhanced protein deacetylase SIRT1 activity; the second one activates AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). Both SIRT1 and AMPK exert their major metabolic activities such as fatty acid oxidation and block of glycolysis and protein, nucleotide and fatty acid synthesis through the effector protein peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma 1 α coactivator (PGC-1α). PGC-1α cooperates with PPAR α and their activities might contribute to potential anticancer effects of CRKD, which were reported for various brain tumors. Therefore, PPAR α activation can engage molecular interplay among SIRT1, AMPK, and PGC-1α that provides a new, low toxicity dietary approach supplementing traditional anticancer regimen.

  7. Proteomic Analysis of Anticancer TCMs Targeted at Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Yu, Ru-Yuan; He, Qing-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a rich resource of anticancer drugs. Increasing bioactive natural compounds extracted from TCMs are known to exert significant antitumor effects, but the action mechanisms of TCMs are far from clear. Proteomics, a powerful platform to comprehensively profile drug-regulated proteins, has been widely applied to the mechanistic investigation of TCMs and the identification of drug targets. In this paper, we discuss several bioactive TCM products including terpenoids, flavonoids, and glycosides that were extensively investigated by proteomics to illustrate their antitumor mechanisms in various cancers. Interestingly, many of these natural compounds isolated from TCMs mostly exert their tumor-suppressing functions by specifically targeting mitochondria in cancer cells. These TCM components induce the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of cytochrome c, and the accumulation of ROS, initiating apoptosis cascade signaling. Proteomics provides systematic views that help to understand the molecular mechanisms of the TCM in tumor cells; it bears the inherent limitations in uncovering the drug-protein interactions, however. Subcellular fractionation may be coupled with proteomics to capture and identify target proteins in mitochondria-enriched lysates. Furthermore, translating mRNA analysis, a new technology profiling the drug-regulated genes in translatome level, may be integrated into the systematic investigation, revealing global information valuable for understanding the action mechanism of TCMs. PMID:26568766

  8. Getting Syk: Spleen Tyrosine Kinase as a Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Geahlen, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Syk is a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase well known for its ability to couple immune cell receptors to intracellular signaling pathways that regulate cellular responses to extracellular antigens and antigen-immunoglobulin complexes of particular importance to the initiation of inflammatory responses. Thus, Syk is an attractive target for therapeutic kinase inhibitors designed to ameliorate symptoms and consequences of acute and chronic inflammation. Its more recently recognized role as a promoter of cell survival in numerous cancer cell types ranging from leukemia to retinoblastoma has attracted considerable interest as a target for a new generation of anticancer drugs. This review discusses the biological processes in which Syk participates that have made this kinase such a compelling drug target. PMID:24975478

  9. Aurora kinase family: a new target for anticancer drug.

    PubMed

    Macarulla, Teresa; Ramos, Francisco Javier; Tabernero, Josep

    2008-06-01

    Aurora kinases (AK) are the name given to a family of Serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) protein kinases. These proteins represent a novel family of kinases crucial for cell cycle control. The cell division process is one of the hallmarks of every living organism. Within the complete cell-cycle process, mitosis constitutes one of the most critical steps. The main purpose of mitosis is to segregate sister chromatics into two daughters cells. It is a complex biologic process, and errors in this mechanism can lead to genomic instability, a condition associated with tumorigenesis. This process is tightly regulated by several proteins, some of them acting as check-points that ultimately ensure the correct temporal and spatial coordination of this critical biologic process. Among this network of mitotic regulators, AK play a critical role in cellular division by controlling chromatid segregation. Three AK family members have been identified in mammalian cells: A, B, and C. These proteins are implicated in several vital events in mitosis. In experimental models, overexpression of AK can induce spindle defects, chromosome mis-segregation, and malignant transformation. Conversely, downregulation of AK expression cause mitotic arrest and apoptosis in tumor cell lines. The expression levels of human AK are increased in certain types of cancer including breast, colon, pancreatic, ovarian, and gastric tumors. This observation has lent an interest to this family of kinases as potential drug targets for development of new anticancer therapies. This review focuses in recent progress in the role of AK in tumorogenesis and the development of new anticancer drug against AK proteins. This manuscript also includes some relevant patents as well.

  10. MicroRNA Targeted Therapeutic Approach for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yiwei; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the US and is expected to be the second leading cause of cancer-related death by 2030. Therefore, it is important to better understand the molecular pathogenesis, phenotypes and features of pancreatic cancer in order to design novel molecularly targeted therapies for achieving better therapeutic outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer. Recently, the roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the development and progression of pancreatic cancer became a hot topic in the scientific community of pancreatic cancer research. By conducting miRNA expression profiling, the aberrant expression of miRNAs was revealed in the serum and in cancer tissues from patients with pancreatic cancer. These aberrantly expressed miRNAs are critically correlated with the disease stage, drug resistance, and survival of pancreatic cancer patients. Hence, targeting these tiny molecules, the specific miRNAs, could provide an efficient and optimal approach in the therapy of pancreatic cancer. Indeed, the pre-clinical and in vivo experiments showed that nanoparticle delivery of synthetic oligonucleotides or treatment with natural agents could be useful to modulate the expression of miRNAs and thereby inhibit pancreatic cancer growth and progression, suggesting that targeting miRNAs combined with conventional anti-cancer therapeutics could be a novel therapeutic strategy for increasing drug sensitivity and achieving better therapeutic outcome of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. PMID:26929739

  11. Novel Therapeutic Targets for Chronic Migraine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Chronic migraine , defined as more than 15 days of headache per month, affects 4% of the population and is a particularly disabling condition. Traumatic...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-11-1-0646 TITLE: Novel Therapeutic Targets for Chronic Migraine ...COVERED 1 Sep 2011 – 31 Aug 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Novel Therapeutic Targets for Chronic Migraine 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH

  12. New therapeutic targets in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Martí, R M; Sorolla, A; Yeramian, A

    2012-09-01

    Research into molecular targets for drug development in melanoma is starting to bear fruit. Of the drugs tested to date in patients with metastatic melanoma, those that have yielded the best results are V600E BRAF inhibitors in melanomas carrying the V600E mutation; c-kit tyrosine kinase activity inhibitors in melanomas carrying c-kit mutations; and anti-cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) antibodies, which block the mechanisms involved in immune tolerance. Many problems have yet to be resolved in these areas, however, such as the rapid development of resistance to BRAF and c-kit inhibitors and the lack of biomarkers to predict treatment response in the case of CTLA-4 blockers. We review the results of targeted therapy with these and other drugs in metastatic melanoma and discuss what the future holds for this field. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  13. Discovery of a new function of curcumin which enhances its anticancer therapeutic potency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagahama, Koji; Utsumi, Tomoya; Kumano, Takayuki; Maekawa, Saeko; Oyama, Naho; Kawakami, Junji

    2016-08-01

    Curcumin has received immense attention over the past decades because of its diverse biological activities and recognized as a promising drug candidate in a large number of diseases. However, its clinical application has been hindered due to extremely low aqueous solubility, chemical stability, and cellular uptake. In this study, we discovered quite a new function of curcumin, i.e. pH-responsive endosomal disrupting activity, derived from curcumin’s self-assembly. We selected anticancer activity as an example of biological activities of curcumin, and investigated the contribution of pH-responsive property to its anticancer activity. As a result, we demonstrated that the pH-responsive property significantly enhances the anticancer activity of curcumin. Furthermore, we demonstrated a utility of the pH-responsive property of curcumin as delivery nanocarriers for doxorubicin toward combination cancer therapy. These results clearly indicate that the smart curcumin assemblies act as promising nanoplatform for development of curcumin-based therapeutics.

  14. Mitosis-targeted anti-cancer therapies: where they stand

    PubMed Central

    Chan, K-S; Koh, C-G; Li, H-Y

    2012-01-01

    The strategy of clinically targeting cancerous cells at their most vulnerable state during mitosis has instigated numerous studies into the mitotic cell death (MCD) pathway. As the hallmark of cancer revolves around cell-cycle deregulation, it is not surprising that antimitotic therapies are effective against the abnormal proliferation of transformed cells. Moreover, these antimitotic drugs are also highly selective and sensitive. Despite the robust rate of discovery and the development of mitosis-selective inhibitors, the unpredictable complexities of the human body's response to these drugs still herald the biggest challenge towards clinical success. Undoubtedly, the need to bridge the gap between promising preclinical trials and effective translational bedside treatment prompts further investigations towards mapping out the mechanistic pathways of MCD, understanding how these drugs work as medicine in the body and more comprehensive target validations. In this review, current antimitotic agents are summarized with particular emphasis on the evaluation of their clinical efficacy as well as their limitations. In addition, we discuss the basis behind the lack of activity of these inhibitors in human trials and the potential and future directions of mitotic anticancer strategies. PMID:23076219

  15. PEPTIDE TARGETING OF PLATINUM ANTI-CANCER DRUGS

    PubMed Central

    Ndinguri, Margaret W.; Solipuram, Rajasree; Gambrell, Robert P.; Aggarwal, Sita; Hansel, William; Hammer, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    Besides various side effects caused by platinum anticancer drugs, they are not efficiently absorbed by the tumor cells. Two Pt-peptide conjugates; cyclic mPeg-CNGRC-Pt (7) and cyclic mPeg-CNGRC-Pten (8) bearing the Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR) targeting sequence, a malonoyl linker and low molecular weight miniPEG groups have been synthesized. The platinum ligand was attached to the peptide via the carboxylic end of the malonate group at the end of the peptide. The pegylated peptide is non toxic and highly soluble in water. Platinum conjugates synthesized using the pegylated peptides are also water soluble with reduced or eliminated peptide immunogenicity. The choice of carboplatin as our untargeted platinum complex was due to the fact that malonate linker chelates platinum in a manner similar to carboplatin. Cell toxicity assay and competition assay on the PC-3 cells (CD13 positive receptors) revealed selective delivery and destruction of PC-3 cells using targeted Pt-peptide conjugates 7 and 8 significantly more than untargeted carboplatin. Platinum uptake on PC-3 cells was 12-fold more for conjugate 7 and 3-fold more for conjugate 8 compared to the untargeted carboplatin indicating selectively activation of the CD13 receptors and delivery of the conjugates to CD13 positive cells. Further analysis on effects of conjugates 7 and 8 on PC-3 cells using caspase-3/7, fluorescence microscopy and DNA fragmentation confirmed that the cells were dying by apoptosis. PMID:19775102

  16. Pro-Tumoral Inflammatory Myeloid Cells as Emerging Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Szebeni, Gabor J.; Vizler, Csaba; Nagy, Lajos I.; Kitajka, Klara; Puskas, Laszlo G.

    2016-01-01

    Since the observation of Virchow, it has long been known that the tumor microenvironment constitutes the soil for the infiltration of inflammatory cells and for the release of inflammatory mediators. Under certain circumstances, inflammation remains unresolved and promotes cancer development. Here, we review some of these indisputable experimental and clinical evidences of cancer related smouldering inflammation. The most common myeloid infiltrate in solid tumors is composed of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). These cells promote tumor growth by several mechanisms, including their inherent immunosuppressive activity, promotion of neoangiogenesis, mediation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and alteration of cellular metabolism. The pro-tumoral functions of TAMs and MDSCs are further enhanced by their cross-talk offering a myriad of potential anti-cancer therapeutic targets. We highlight these main pro-tumoral mechanisms of myeloid cells and give a general overview of their phenotypical and functional diversity, offering examples of possible therapeutic targets. Pharmacological targeting of inflammatory cells and molecular mediators may result in therapies improving patient condition and prognosis. Here, we review experimental and clinical findings on cancer-related inflammation with a major focus on creating an inventory of current small molecule-based therapeutic interventions targeting cancer-related inflammatory cells: TAMs and MDSCs. PMID:27886105

  17. A selective decoy-doxorubicin complex for targeted co-delivery, STAT3 probing and synergistic anti-cancer effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-Jen; Hou, Yung-Te; Chen, Lin-Chi

    2015-09-04

    A novel selective decoy oligodeoxynucleotide (dODN)-doxorubicin (DOX) complex is reported for cancer theranostics. It eliminates the use of a ligand or carrier for targeted delivery and disassembles into therapeutic dODN and DOX upon encountering over-activated STAT3 in cancer cells. Hence, in situ STAT3 probing and synergistic anti-cancer effect are attained at the same time.

  18. Preparation and characterization of novel chitosan–protamine nanoparticles for nucleus-targeted anticancer drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiwei; Hou, Jiahui; Shi, Yijie; Su, Chang; Zhao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that most anticancer drugs commonly show high toxicity to the DNA of tumor cells and exert effects by combining with the DNA or associated enzymes in the nucleus. Most developed drugs are first delivered into the cytoplasm and then transferred to the nucleus through the membrane pores. Sometimes, the transportation of drugs from cytoplasm to nucleus is not efficient and often results in poor therapeutic effects. In this study, we developed special and novel nanoparticles (NPs) made of chitosan and protamine for targeted nuclear capture of drugs to enhance anticancer effects. The anticancer effects of nuclear targeted-delivery of drugs in NPs were also evaluated by investigating cytotoxicity, cellular uptake mechanism, and cell apoptosis on cells. Chitosan–protamine NPs were characterized by good drug entrapment, sustained release, small average particle size, low polydispersity index, and high encapsulation efficiency; and accomplished the efficient nuclear delivery of fluorouracil (5-Fu). Compared with free 5-Fu and 5-Fu-loaded chitosan NPs, treatment of A549 cells and HeLa cells with 5-Fu-loaded chitosan–protamine NPs showed the highest cytotoxicity and further induced the significant apoptosis of cells. In addition, 5-Fu-loaded chitosan–protamine NPs exhibited the best efficiency in inhibiting tumor growth than the other three formulations. 5-Fu-loaded chitosan–protamine NPs enhanced antitumor efficacy through the targeted nuclear capture of drugs and showed promising potential as a nanodelivery system for quickly locating drugs in the nucleus of cells. PMID:27881917

  19. Targeted delivery of therapeutics to endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Eric; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2009-01-01

    The endothelium is a target for therapeutic and diagnostic interventions in a plethora of human disease conditions including ischemia, inflammation, edema, oxidative stress, thrombosis and hemorrhage, and metabolic and oncological diseases. Unfortunately, drugs have no affinity to the endothelium, thereby limiting the localization, timing, specificity, safety, and effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. Molecular determinants on the surface of resting and pathologically altered endothelial cells, including cell adhesion molecules, peptidases, and receptors involved in endocytosis, can be used for drug delivery to the endothelial surface and into intracellular compartments. Drug delivery platforms such as protein conjugates, recombinant fusion constructs, targeted liposomes, and stealth polymer carriers have been designed to target drugs and imaging agents to these determinants. We review endothelial target determinants and drug delivery systems, describe parameters that control the binding of drug carriers to the endothelium, and provide examples of the endothelial targeting of therapeutic enzymes designed for the treatment of acute vascular disorders including ischemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, and thrombosis. PMID:18815813

  20. Conotoxins: Molecular and Therapeutic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Richard J.

    Marine molluscs known as cone snails produce beautiful shells and a complex array of over 50,000 venom peptides evolved for prey capture and defence. Many of these peptides selectively modulate ion channels and transporters, making them a valuable source of new ligands for studying the role these targets play in normal and disease physiology. A number of conopeptides reduce pain in animal models, and several are now in pre-clinical and clinical development for the treatment of severe pain often associated with diseases such as cancer. Less than 1% of cone snail venom peptides are pharmacologically characterised.

  1. Alopecia in patients treated with molecularly targeted anticancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Belum, V R; Marulanda, K; Ensslin, C; Gorcey, L; Parikh, T; Wu, S; Busam, K J; Gerber, P A; Lacouture, M E

    2015-12-01

    The introduction of molecularly targeted anticancer therapies presents new challenges, among which dermatologic adverse events are noteworthy. Alopecia in particular is frequently reported, but the true incidence is not known. We sought to ascertain the incidence and risk of developing alopecia during treatment with approved inhibitors of oncogenic pathways and molecules [anaplastic lymphoma kinase, breakpoint cluster region-abelson, B-rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma, Bruton's tyrosine kinase, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, epidermal growth factor receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2, Janus kinase, MAPK/ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) Kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, smoothened, vascular endothelial growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet derived growth factor receptor; proteasomes; CD20, CD30, CD52]. Electronic database (PubMed, Web of Science) and ASCO meeting abstract searches were conducted to identify clinical trials reporting alopecia. Meta-analysis was conducted utilizing fixed- or random-effects models. The calculated overall incidence of all-grade alopecia was 14.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 12.6% to 17.2%]-lowest with bortezomib, 2.2% (95% CI 0.4% to 10.9%), and highest with vismodegib, 56.9% (95% CI 50.5% to 63.1%). There was an increased risk of all-grade alopecia [relative risk (RR), 7.9 (95% CI 6.2-10.09, P ≤ 0.01)] compared with placebo, but when compared with chemotherapy, the risk was lower [RR, 0.32 (95% CI 0.2-0.55, P ≤ 0.01)]. Targeted therapies are associated with an increased risk of alopecia. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Alopecia in patients treated with molecularly targeted anticancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Belum, V. R.; Marulanda, K.; Ensslin, C.; Gorcey, L.; Parikh, T.; Wu, S.; Busam, K. J.; Gerber, P. A.; Lacouture, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The introduction of molecularly targeted anticancer therapies presents new challenges, among which dermatologic adverse events are noteworthy. Alopecia in particular is frequently reported, but the true incidence is not known. Patients and methods We sought to ascertain the incidence and risk of developing alopecia during treatment with approved inhibitors of oncogenic pathways and molecules [anaplastic lymphoma kinase, breakpoint cluster region-abelson, B-rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma, Bruton's tyrosine kinase, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, epidermal growth factor receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2, Janus kinase, MAPK/ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) Kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, smoothened, vascular endothelial growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet derived growth factor receptor; proteasomes; CD20, CD30, CD52]. Electronic database (PubMed, Web of Science) and ASCO meeting abstract searches were conducted to identify clinical trials reporting alopecia. Meta-analysis was conducted utilizing fixed- or random-effects models. Results The calculated overall incidence of all-grade alopecia was 14.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 12.6% to 17.2%]—lowest with bortezomib, 2.2% (95% CI 0.4% to 10.9%), and highest with vismodegib, 56.9% (95% CI 50.5% to 63.1%). There was an increased risk of all-grade alopecia [relative risk (RR), 7.9 (95% CI 6.2–10.09, P ≤ 0.01)] compared with placebo, but when compared with chemotherapy, the risk was lower [RR, 0.32 (95% CI 0.2–0.55, P ≤ 0.01)]. Conclusions Targeted therapies are associated with an increased risk of alopecia. PMID:26387145

  3. Targeting therapeutics to the glomerulus with nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Jonathan E; Davis, Mark E

    2013-11-01

    Nanoparticles are an enabling technology for the creation of tissue-/cell-specific therapeutics that have been investigated extensively as targeted therapeutics for cancer. The kidney, specifically the glomerulus, is another accessible site for nanoparticle delivery that has been relatively overlooked as a target organ. Given the medical need for the development of more potent, kidney-targeted therapies, the use of nanoparticle-based therapeutics may be one such solution to this problem. Here, we review the literature on nanoparticle targeting of the glomerulus. Specifically, we provide a broad overview of nanoparticle-based therapeutics and how the unique structural characteristics of the glomerulus allow for selective, nanoparticle targeting of this area of the kidney. We then summarize literature examples of nanoparticle delivery to the glomerulus and elaborate on the appropriate nanoparticle design criteria for glomerular targeting. Finally, we discuss the behavior of nanoparticles in animal models of diseased glomeruli and review examples of nanoparticle therapeutic approaches that have shown promise in animal models of glomerulonephritic disease.

  4. One-carbon metabolism and nucleotide biosynthesis as attractive targets for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Shuvalov, Oleg; Petukhov, Alexey; Daks, Alexandra; Fedorova, Olga; Vasileva, Elena; Barlev, Nickolai A

    2017-02-03

    Cancer-related metabolism has recently emerged as one of the "hallmarks of cancer". It has several important features, including altered metabolism of glucose and glutamine. Importantly, altered cancer metabolism connects different biochemical pathways into the one fine-tuned metabolic network, which stimulates high proliferation rates and plasticity to malignant cells. Among the keystones of cancer metabolism are one-carbon metabolism and nucleotide biosynthesis, which provide building blocks to anabolic reactions. Accordingly, the importance of these metabolic pathways for anticancer therapy has well been documented by more than fifty years of clinical use of specific metabolic inhibitors - methotrexate and nucleotides analogs. In this review we discuss one-carbon metabolism and nucleotide biosynthesis as common and specific features of many, if not all, tumors. The key enzymes involved in these pathways also represent promising anti-cancer therapeutic targets. We review different aspects of these metabolic pathways including their biochemistry, compartmentalization and expression of the key enzymes and their regulation at different levels. We also discuss the effects of known inhibitors of these pathways as well as the recent data on other enzymes of the same pathways as perspective pharmacological targets.

  5. Effect of Adherence on Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Relationships of Oral Targeted Anticancer Drugs.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Evelina; Csajka, Chantal; Schneider, Marie P; Widmer, Nicolas

    2017-06-20

    The emergence of oral targeted anticancer agents transformed several cancers into chronic conditions with a need for long-term oral treatment. Although cancer is a life-threatening condition, oncology medication adherence-the extent to which a patient follows the drug regimen that is intended by the prescriber-can be suboptimal in the long term, as in any other chronic disease. Poor adherence can impact negatively on clinical outcomes, notably because most of these drugs are given as a standard non-individualized dosage despite marked inter-individual variabilities that can lead to toxic or inefficacious drug concentrations. This has been especially studied with the prototypal drug imatinib. In the context of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), increasingly advocated for oral anticancer treatment optimization, unreported suboptimal adherence affecting drug intake history may lead to significant bias in the concentration interpretation and inappropriate dosage adjustments. In the same way, suboptimal adherence may also bias the results of pharmacokinetic modeling studies, which will affect in turn Bayesian TDM interpretation that relies on such population models. Detailed knowledge of the influence of adherence on plasma concentrations in pharmacokinetic studies or in routine TDM programs is however presently missing in the oncology field. Studies on this topic are therefore eagerly awaited to better pilot the treatment of cancer with the new targeted agents and to find their optimal dosage regimen. Hence, the development and assessment of effective medication adherence programs are warranted for these treatments.

  6. Geranylgeranyltransferase I as a target for anti-cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Philips, Mark R.; Cox, Adrienne D.

    2007-01-01

    Posttranslational modification is critical for the function of the gene products of ras oncogenes, which are frequently mutated in cancer. Ras proteins are modified by farnesyltransferase (FTase), but many related small GTPases that also end in a CAAX motif (where C is cysteine, A is often an aliphatic amino acid, and X is any amino acid) are modified by a closely related enzyme known as geranylgeranyltransferase type I (GGTase-I). Accordingly, inhibitors for both of these enzymes have been developed, and those active against FTase are in clinical trials. In this issue of the JCI, Sjogren et al. report the development of a mouse strain homozygous for a conditional allele of the gene that encodes GGTase-I (see the related article beginning on page 1294). They found that ablation of the GGTase-I–encoding gene in cells destined to produce lung tumors driven by oncogenic K-Ras resulted in delayed onset and decreased severity of disease, validating in a genetic model the theory that GGTase-I is a good target for anti-cancer drug development. PMID:17476354

  7. Promises and challenges of anticancer drugs that target the epigenome.

    PubMed

    Verbrugge, Inge; Johnstone, Ricky W; Bots, Michael

    2011-10-01

    The occurrence of epigenetic aberrations in cancer and their role in promoting tumorigenesis has led to the development of various small molecule inhibitors that target epigenetic enzymes. In preclinical settings, many epigenetic inhibitors demonstrate promising activity against a variety of both hematological and solid tumors. The therapeutic efficacy of those inhibitors that have entered the clinic however, is restricted predominantly to hematological malignancies. Here we outline the observed epigenetic aberrations in various types of cancer and the clinical responses to epigenetic drugs. We furthermore discuss strategies to improve the responsiveness of both hematological and solid malignancies to epigenetic drugs.

  8. Targeting autophagy in cancer stem cells as an anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Dan; Yu, Jin; Dong, Hui; Zhang, Jianwei; Yang, Shiming

    2017-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which comprise a small proportion of total cancer cells, have special capacities for self-renewal, differentiation and tumor formation. Currently, CSCs are regarded as the major cause of the failure in anticancer therapy, such as chemoresistance and/or radioresistance, tumor recurrence and metastasis. Autophagy, a process of cellular self-digestion and response to stress, has a role in tumor formation and progression, and it may play a dual role in CSCs-related resistance to anticancer therapy. Most researchers believe that autophagy contributes to stemness maintenance of CSCs and is responsible for the failure of anticancer therapy. Unexpectedly, several studies have also suggested that loss of stemness in CSCs could be mediated by autophagy. Here, we review the recent advances in CSCs and autophagy, especially analyze the complex relationship between them, and hope to apply this new knowledge to the strategies for anticancer therapy.

  9. BET Bromodomain Proteins as Cancer Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Shu, Shaokun; Polyak, Kornelia

    2017-01-06

    Epigenetic regulators are emerging therapeutic targets in a wide variety of human cancers. BET bromodomain proteins have been identified as key regulators of oncogenic transcription factors including MYC; therefore, their inhibition might provide a way to block these "undruggable" targets. Several BET bromodomain inhibitors are in clinical development with promising preliminary findings. However, tumors acquire resistance to these agents in several different ways. In this review, we summarize the role that BET bromodomain proteins play in tumorigenesis as well as the molecular mechanisms underlying therapeutic responses and resistance to their inhibition with emphasis on BRD4 and breast cancer.

  10. Modelling targets for anticancer drug control optimization in physiologically structured cell population models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billy, Frédérique; Clairambault, Jean; Fercoq, Olivier; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Lorz, Alexander; Perthame, Benoît

    2012-09-01

    The main two pitfalls of therapeutics in clinical oncology, that limit increasing drug doses, are unwanted toxic side effects on healthy cell populations and occurrence of resistance to drugs in cancer cell populations. Depending on the constraint considered in the control problem at stake, toxicity or drug resistance, we present two different ways to model the evolution of proliferating cell populations, healthy and cancer, under the control of anti-cancer drugs. In the first case, we use a McKendrick age-structured model of the cell cycle, whereas in the second case, we use a model of evolutionary dynamics, physiologically structured according to a continuous phenotype standing for drug resistance. In both cases, we mention how drug targets may be chosen so as to accurately represent the effects of cytotoxic and of cytostatic drugs, separately, and how one may consider the problem of optimisation of combined therapies.

  11. Designed hybrid TPR peptide targeting Hsp90 as a novel anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Horibe, Tomohisa; Kohno, Masayuki; Haramoto, Mari; Ohara, Koji; Kawakami, Koji

    2011-01-14

    Despite an ever-improving understanding of the molecular biology of cancer, the treatment of most cancers has not changed dramatically in the past three decades and drugs that do not discriminate between tumor cells and normal tissues remain the mainstays of anticancer therapy. Since Hsp90 is typically involved in cell proliferation and survival, this is thought to play a key role in cancer, and Hsp90 has attracted considerable interest in recent years as a potential therapeutic target. We focused on the interaction of Hsp90 with its cofactor protein p60/Hop, and engineered a cell-permeable peptidomimetic, termed "hybrid Antp-TPR peptide", modeled on the binding interface between the molecular chaperone Hsp90 and the TPR2A domain of Hop. It was demonstrated that this designed hybrid Antp-TPR peptide inhibited the interaction of Hsp90 with the TPR2A domain, inducing cell death of breast, pancreatic, renal, lung, prostate, and gastric cancer cell lines in vitro. In contrast, Antp-TPR peptide did not affect the viability of normal cells. Moreover, analysis in vivo revealed that Antp-TPR peptide displayed a significant antitumor activity in a xenograft model of human pancreatic cancer in mice. These results indicate that Antp-TPR peptide would provide a potent and selective anticancer therapy to cancer patients.

  12. Designed hybrid TPR peptide targeting Hsp90 as a novel anticancer agent

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite an ever-improving understanding of the molecular biology of cancer, the treatment of most cancers has not changed dramatically in the past three decades and drugs that do not discriminate between tumor cells and normal tissues remain the mainstays of anticancer therapy. Since Hsp90 is typically involved in cell proliferation and survival, this is thought to play a key role in cancer, and Hsp90 has attracted considerable interest in recent years as a potential therapeutic target. Methods We focused on the interaction of Hsp90 with its cofactor protein p60/Hop, and engineered a cell-permeable peptidomimetic, termed "hybrid Antp-TPR peptide", modeled on the binding interface between the molecular chaperone Hsp90 and the TPR2A domain of Hop. Results It was demonstrated that this designed hybrid Antp-TPR peptide inhibited the interaction of Hsp90 with the TPR2A domain, inducing cell death of breast, pancreatic, renal, lung, prostate, and gastric cancer cell lines in vitro. In contrast, Antp-TPR peptide did not affect the viability of normal cells. Moreover, analysis in vivo revealed that Antp-TPR peptide displayed a significant antitumor activity in a xenograft model of human pancreatic cancer in mice. Conclusion These results indicate that Antp-TPR peptide would provide a potent and selective anticancer therapy to cancer patients. PMID:21235734

  13. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor A Ligands as Anticancer Drugs Targeting Mitochondrial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Grabacka, Maja; Pierzchalska, Malgorzata; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Tumor cells show metabolic features distinctive from normal tissues, with characteristically enhanced aerobic glycolysis, glutaminolysis and lipid synthesis. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPAR α) is activated by nutrients (fatty acids and their derivatives) and influences these metabolic pathways acting antagonistically to oncogenic Akt and c-Myc. Therefore PPAR α can be regarded as a candidate target molecule in supplementary anticancer pharmacotherapy as well as dietary therapeutic approach. This idea is based on hitting the cancer cell metabolic weak points through PPAR α mediated stimulation of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis with simultaneous reduction of glucose and glutamine consumption. PPAR α activity is induced by fasting and its molecular consequences overlap with the effects of calorie restriction and ketogenic diet (CRKD). CRKD induces increase of NAD+/NADH ratio and drop in ATP/AMP ratio. The first one is the main stimulus for enhanced protein deacetylase SIRT1 activity; the second one activates AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). Both SIRT1 and AMPK exert their major metabolic activities such as fatty acid oxidation and block of glycolysis and protein, nucleotide and fatty acid synthesis through the effector protein peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma 1 α coactivator (PGC-1α). PGC-1α cooperates with PPAR α and their activities might contribute to potential anticancer effects of CRKD, which were reported for various brain tumors. Therefore, PPAR α activation can engage molecular interplay among SIRT1, AMPK, and PGC-1α that provides a new, low toxicity dietary approach supplementing traditional anticancer regimen. PMID:21133850

  14. Prediction and Early Evaluation of Anticancer Therapy Response: From Imaging of Drug Efflux Pumps to Targeted Therapy Response.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingqing; Li, Zheng; Li, Shaoshun

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) describes the resistance of tumor cells to chemotherapy and has been ascribed to the overexpression of drug efflux pumps. Molecular imaging of drug efflux pumps is helpful to identify the patients who may be resistant to the chemotherapy and thus will avoid the unnecessary treatment and increase the therapeutic effectiveness. Imaging probes targeting drug efflux pumps can non-invasively evaluate the Pgp function and play an important role in identification of MDR, prediction of response, and monitoring MDR modulation. On the other hand, new anticancer agents based on molecular targets such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and angiogenic factor receptor may potentially be combined with chemotherapeutic drugs to overcome the MDR. Imaging of molecular targets visualize treatment response of patients at molecular level vividly and help to select right patients for certain targeted anticancer therapy. Among all the imaging modalities, nuclear imaging including positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging has the greatest promise for rapid translation to the clinic and can realize quantitative visualization of biochemical processes in vivo. In this review, we will summarize the nuclear imaging probes utilized for predicting and evaluating the early anticancer therapy response.99mTc labeled agents and PET based radiopharmaceuticals like 18F-Paclitaxel, 11C-Verapamil for drug efflux pumps imaging will be discussed here. Moreover, molecular imaging probes used for targeted therapy response evaluation like 18F-Tamoxifen,89Zr-Trastuzumab will also be introduced in this review.

  15. Quercetin nanocomposite as novel anticancer therapeutic: improved efficiency and reduced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Giuseppe; Vittorio, Orazio; Hampel, Silke; Iemma, Francesca; Parchi, Paolo; Cecchini, Marco; Puoci, Francesco; Picci, Nevio

    2013-06-14

    A three-functional nanocomposite was prepared by radical polymerization of methacrylic acid around carbon nanotubes in the presence of Quercetin as biologically active molecule and proposed as new anticancer therapeutic. The so-obtained hybrid material was characterized by FT-IR, Raman, SEM, TEM analyses, while the functionalization degree of 2.33 mg of Quercetin per g of composite was assessed by Folin-Ciocalteu test. Antioxidant test (DPPH and ABTS) showed that the covalent coupling did not interfere with the antioxidant properties of the flavonoid, while the anticancer activity was greatly enhanced with a recorded IC50 value much lower than free Quercetin. Cell viability tests on healthy cells demonstrated no-toxicity of the conjugate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Liver as a target for oligonucleotide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Alfica; Vaishnaw, Akshay; Fitzgerald, Kevin

    2013-12-01

    Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics are an emerging class of drugs that hold the promise for silencing "un-druggable" targets,thus creating unique opportunities for innovative medicines. As opposed to gene therapy, oligonucleotides are considered to be more akin to small molecule therapeutics because they are small,completely synthetic in origin, do not integrate into the host genome,and have a defined duration of therapeutic activity after which effects recover to baseline. They offer a high degree of specificity at the genetic level, thereby reducing off-target effects.At the same time, they provide a strategy for targeting any gene in the genome, including transcripts that produce mutated proteins.Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics include short interfering RNA (siRNA), that degrade target mRNA through RISC mediated RNAi; anti-miRs, that target miRNAs; miRNA mimics, that regulate target mRNA; antisense oligonucleotides, that may be working through RNAseH mediated mRNA decay; mRNA upregulation,by targeting long non-coding RNAs; and oligonucleotides induced alternative splicing [1]. All these approaches require some minimal degree of homology at the nucleic acid sequence level for them to be functional. The different mechanisms of action and their relevant activity are outlined in Fig. 1. Besides homology,RNA secondary structure has also been exploited in the case of ribozymes and aptamers, which act by binding to nucleic acids or proteins, respectively. While there have been many reports of gene knockdown and gene modulation in cell lines and mice with all these methods, very few have advanced to clinical stages.The main obstacle to date has been the safe and effective intracellular delivery of these compounds in higher species, including humans. Indeed, their action requires direct interaction with DNA/RNA within the target cell so even when one solves the issues of tissue and cellular access, intracellular/intranuclear location represents yet another barrier to

  17. Telomerase reverse transcriptase moonlights: Therapeutic targets beyond telomerase.

    PubMed

    Maida, Yoshiko; Masutomi, Kenkichi

    2015-11-01

    Telomeres, the repetitive sequences at chromosomal ends, protect intact chromosomes. Telomeres progressively shorten through successive rounds of cell divisions, and critically shortened telomeres trigger senescence and apoptosis. The enzyme that elongates telomeres and maintains their structure is known as telomerase. The catalytic subunit of this enzyme (telomerase reverse transcriptase [TERT]) is expressed at a high level in malignant cells, but at a very low level in normal cells. Although telomerase activity was long believed to be the only function of TERT, emerging evidence indicates that TERT plays roles beyond telomeres. For example, TERT contributes to stem cell maintenance and cell reprogramming processes in a manner independent of its canonical function. Even some types of splice variants that lack the telomerase catalytic domains exhibit the functions in a manner that does not depend on telomerase activity. We recently demonstrated that the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) activity of TERT is involved in regulation of gene silencing and heterochromatic transcription. Moreover, TERT RdRP activity is mediated by a newly identified complex, distinct from the authentic telomerase complex, that plays a role in cancer stem cells in a telomere maintenance independent manner. TERT has attracted interest as a molecular target for anticancer treatment, but previous efforts aimed at developing novel therapeutic strategies focused only on the canonical function of TERT. However, accumulating evidence about the non-canonical functions of TERT led us to speculate that the functions other than telomerase might be therapeutic targets as well. In this review, we discuss the non-canonical functions of TERT and their potential applications for anticancer treatment. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  18. Therapeutic targets in malignant glioblastoma microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Newcomb, Elizabeth W; Zagzag, David; Narayana, Ashwatha

    2009-07-01

    There is considerable evidence that the tissue microenvironment can suppress cancer and that microenvironment disruption is required for cancer growth and progression. Distortion of the microenvironment by tumor cells can promote growth, recruit nonmalignant cells that provide physiological resources, and facilitate invasion. Compared with the variable routes taken by cells to become cancers, the response of normal tissue to cancer is relatively consistent such that controlling cancer may be more readily achieved indirectly via the microenvironment. Here, we discuss 3 ideas about how the microenvironment, consisting of a vasculature, inflammatory cells, immune cells, growth factors, and extracellular matrix, might provide therapeutic targets in glioblastoma (GBM) in the context of radiotherapy (RT): (1) viable therapeutic targets exist in the GBM microenvironment, (2) RT alters the microenvironment of tissues and tumors; and (3) a potential benefit may be achieved by targeting the microenvironments induced by RT.

  19. Telomeres and telomerase: Pharmacological targets for new anticancer strategies?

    PubMed

    Pendino, F; Tarkanyi, I; Dudognon, C; Hillion, J; Lanotte, M; Aradi, J; Ségal-Bendirdjian, E

    2006-03-01

    Telomeres are located at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Human telomerase, a cellular reverse transcriptase, is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis and extension of telomeric DNA. It is composed of at least, a template RNA component (hTR; human Telomerase RNA) and a catalytic subunit, the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). The absence of telomerase is associated with telomere shortening and aging of somatic cells, while high telomerase activity is observed in over 85% of human cancer cells, strongly indicating its key role during tumorigenesis. Several details regarding telomere structure and telomerase regulation have already been elucidated, providing new targets for therapeutic exploitation. Further support for anti-telomerase approaches comes from recent studies indicating that telomerase is endowed of additional functions in the control of growth and survival of tumor cells that do not depend only on the ability of this enzyme to maintain telomere length. This observation suggests that inhibiting telomerase or its synthesis may have additional anti-proliferative and apoptosis inducing effect, independently of the reduction of telomere length during cell divisions. This article reviews the basic information about the biology of telomeres and telomerase and attempts to present various approaches that are currently under investigation to inhibit its expression and its activity. We summarize herein distinct anti-telomerase approaches like antisense strategies, reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and G-quadruplex interacting agents, and also review molecules targeting hTERT expression, such as retinoids and evaluate them for their therapeutic potential. "They conceive a certain theory, and everything has to fit into that theory. If one little fact will not fit it, they throw it aside. But it is always the facts that will not fit in that are significant". "Death on the Nile". Agatha Christie.

  20. Modulation of Epigenetic Targets for Anticancer Therapy: Clinicopathological Relevance, Structural Data and Drug Discovery Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Andreol, Federico; Barbosa, Arménio Jorge Moura; Daniele Parenti, Marco; Rio, Alberto Del

    2013-01-01

    Research on cancer epigenetics has flourished in the last decade. Nevertheless growing evidence point on the importance to understand the mechanisms by which epigenetic changes regulate the genesis and progression of cancer growth. Several epigenetic targets have been discovered and are currently under validation for new anticancer therapies. Drug discovery approaches aiming to target these epigenetic enzymes with small-molecules inhibitors have produced the first pre-clinical and clinical outcomes and many other compounds are now entering the pipeline as new candidate epidrugs. The most studied targets can be ascribed to histone deacetylases and DNA methyltransferases, although several other classes of enzymes are able to operate post-translational modifications to histone tails are also likely to represent new frontiers for therapeutic interventions. By acknowledging that the field of cancer epigenetics is evolving with an impressive rate of new findings, with this review we aim to provide a current overview of pre-clinical applications of small-molecules for cancer pathologies, combining them with the current knowledge of epigenetic targets in terms of available structural data and drug design perspectives. PMID:23016851

  1. [Cancer stem cells as the therapeutic target of tomorrow].

    PubMed

    Hatina, Jiří

    2017-02-01

    The concept of hierarchical organization of tumour cell population, with cancer stem cells positioned at the apex of the cell hierarchy, can explain at least some crucial aspects of biological and clinical behaviour of cancer, like its propensity to relapse as well as the development of therapeutic resistance. The underlying biological properties of cancer stem cells are crucially dependent on various signals, inhibition of which provides an attractive opportunity to attack pharmacologically cancer stem cells. Currently, a lot of such stemness-inhibitors undergo various phases of clinical testing. Interestingly, numerous old drugs that are in routine use in human and veterinary medicine for non-oncological indications appear to be able to specifically target cancer stem cells as well. As cancer stem cells, at least for most tumours, represent usually only a minor tumour cell fraction, it is quite probable that the main focus of the clinical use of the stemness inhibitors would consist in their rational combinations with traditional anticancer treatment modalities. A highly important goal for the future research is to identify reliable and clinically applicable predictive markers that would allow to apply these novel anticancer drugs on the individual basis within the context of personalized medicine.

  2. Epicardial fat: a new cardiovascular therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Iacobellis, Gianluca

    2016-04-01

    Epicardial fat is the visceral fat depot of the heart. Given its rapid metabolism, organ fat specificity and simple objective measurability, epicardial fat can serve as target for pharmaceutical agents targeting the adipose tissue. Epicardial fat has shown to significantly respond to thiazolidinediones, glucagon like peptide 1 receptor agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and statins. Epicardial fat may represent a measurable risk factor and modifiable therapeutic target. Targeted pharmaceutical interventions may allow the epicardial fat to resume its physiological role. A drug-induced browning effect on epicardial fat suggests the development of pharmacological strategies to increase energy consumption. The potential of modulating the epicardial fat transcriptome with targeted pharmacological agents can open new avenues in the pharmacotherapy of cardio-metabolic diseases.

  3. Liposarcoma: molecular targets and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Bill, Kate Lynn J; Casadei, Lucia; Prudner, Bethany C; Iwenofu, Hans; Strohecker, Anne M; Pollock, Raphael E

    2016-10-01

    Liposarcoma (LPS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma and accounts for approximately 20 % of all adult sarcomas. Current treatment modalities (surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy) all have limitations; therefore, molecularly driven studies are needed to improve the identification and increased understanding of genetic and epigenetic deregulations in LPS if we are to successfully target specific tumorigenic drivers. It can be anticipated that such biology-driven therapeutics will improve treatments by selectively deleting cancer cells while sparing normal tissues. This review will focus on several therapeutically actionable molecular markers identified in well-differentiated LPS and dedifferentiated LPS, highlighting their potential clinical applicability.

  4. ADAM10 as a target for anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Moss, Marcia L; Stoeck, Alexander; Yan, Wenbo; Dempsey, Peter J

    2008-02-01

    There is a great unmet medical need in the area of cancer treatment. A potential therapeutic target for intervention in cancer is ADAM10. ADAM10 is a disintegrin-metalloproteinase that processes membrane bound proteins from the cell surface to yield soluble forms. Pharmaceutical companies are actively seeking out inhibitors of ADAM10 for treatments in cancer as the enzyme is known to release the ErbB receptor, HER2/ErbB2 from the cell membrane, an event that is necessary for HER2 positive tumor cells to proliferate. ADAM10 is also capable of processing betacellulin indicating that an inhibitor could be used against EGFR/ErbB1 and/or HER4/ErbB4 receptor positive tumor cells that are betacellulin-dependent. ADAM10 is the principle sheddase for several other molecules associated with cancer proliferation, differentiation, adhesion and migration such as Notch, E-cadherin, CD44 and L1 adhesion molecule indicating that targeting ADAM10 with specific inhibitors could be beneficial.

  5. Physics considerations in targeted anticancer drug delivery by magnetoelectric nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stimphil, Emmanuel; Nagesetti, Abhignyan; Guduru, Rakesh; Stewart, Tiffanie; Rodzinski, Alexandra; Liang, Ping; Khizroev, Sakhrat

    2017-06-01

    In regard to cancer therapy, magnetoelectric nanoparticles (MENs) have proven to be in a class of its own when compared to any other nanoparticle type. Like conventional magnetic nanoparticles, they can be used for externally controlled drug delivery via application of a magnetic field gradient and image-guided delivery. However, unlike conventional nanoparticles, due to the presence of a non-zero magnetoelectric effect, MENs provide a unique mix of important properties to address key challenges in modern cancer therapy: (i) a targeting mechanism driven by a physical force rather than antibody matching, (ii) a high-specificity delivery to enhance the cellular uptake of therapeutic drugs across the cancer cell membranes only, while sparing normal cells, (iii) an externally controlled mechanism to release drugs on demand, and (iv) a capability for image guided precision medicine. These properties separate MEN-based targeted delivery from traditional biotechnology approaches and lay a foundation for the complementary approach of technobiology. The biotechnology approach stems from the underlying biology and exploits bioinformatics to find the right therapy. In contrast, the technobiology approach is geared towards using the physics of molecular-level interactions between cells and nanoparticles to treat cancer at the most fundamental level and thus can be extended to all the cancers. This paper gives an overview of the current state of the art and presents an ab initio model to describe the underlying mechanisms of cancer treatment with MENs from the perspective of basic physics.

  6. Discovery of a new function of curcumin which enhances its anticancer therapeutic potency

    PubMed Central

    Nagahama, Koji; Utsumi, Tomoya; Kumano, Takayuki; Maekawa, Saeko; Oyama, Naho; Kawakami, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin has received immense attention over the past decades because of its diverse biological activities and recognized as a promising drug candidate in a large number of diseases. However, its clinical application has been hindered due to extremely low aqueous solubility, chemical stability, and cellular uptake. In this study, we discovered quite a new function of curcumin, i.e. pH-responsive endosomal disrupting activity, derived from curcumin’s self-assembly. We selected anticancer activity as an example of biological activities of curcumin, and investigated the contribution of pH-responsive property to its anticancer activity. As a result, we demonstrated that the pH-responsive property significantly enhances the anticancer activity of curcumin. Furthermore, we demonstrated a utility of the pH-responsive property of curcumin as delivery nanocarriers for doxorubicin toward combination cancer therapy. These results clearly indicate that the smart curcumin assemblies act as promising nanoplatform for development of curcumin-based therapeutics. PMID:27476814

  7. Angiotensins as therapeutic targets beyond heart disease.

    PubMed

    Passos-Silva, Danielle Gomes; Brandan, Enrique; Santos, Robson Augusto Souza

    2015-05-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a pivotal role in cardiovascular and hydro-electrolyte homeostasis. Blockade of the RAS as a therapeutic strategy for treating hypertension and related cardiovascular diseases is well established. However, actions of the RAS go far beyond the targets initially described. In this regard, the recent identification of novel components of the RAS, including angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)], Ang-(1-9), and alamandine, have opened new possibilities for interfering with the development and manifestations of cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular diseases. In this article, we briefly review novel targets for angiotensins and its therapeutic implications in diverse areas, including cancer, inflammation, and glaucoma.

  8. Targeted Tumor Therapy with "Magnetic Drug Targeting": Therapeutic Efficacy of Ferrofluid Bound Mitoxantrone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexiou, Ch.; Schmid, R.; Jurgons, R.; Bergemann, Ch.; Arnold, W.; Parak, F.G.

    The difference between success or failure of chemotherapy depends not only on the drug itself but also on how it is delivered to its target. Biocompatible ferrofluids (FF) are paramagnetic nanoparticles, that may be used as a delivery system for anticancer agents in locoregional tumor therapy, called "magnetic drug targeting". Bound to medical drugs, such magnetic nanoparticles can be enriched in a desired body compartment (tumor) using an external magnetic field, which is focused on the area of the tumor. Through this form of target directed drug application, one attempts to concentrate a pharmacological agent at its site of action in order to minimize unwanted side effects in the organism and to increase its locoregional effectiveness. Tumor bearing rabbits (VX2 squamous cell carcinoma) in the area of the hind limb, were treated by a single intra-arterial injection (A. femoralis) of mitoxantrone bound ferrofluids (FF-MTX), while focusing an external magnetic field (1.7 Tesla) onto the tumor for 60 minutes. Complete tumor remissions could be achieved in these animals in a dose related manner (20% and 50% of the systemic dose of mitoxantrone), without any negative side effects, like e.g. leucocytopenia, alopecia or gastrointestinal disorders. The strong and specific therapeutic efficacy in tumor treatment with mitoxantrone bound ferrofluids may indicate that this system could be used as a delivery system for anticancer agents, like radionuclids, cancer-specific antibodies, anti-angiogenetic factors, genes etc.

  9. Memory as a new therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Nader, Karim; Hardt, Oliver; Lanius, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    This review aims to demonstrate how an understanding of the brain mechanisms involved in memory provides a basis for; (i) reconceptualizing some mental disorders; (ii) refining existing therapeutic tools; and (iii) designing new ones for targeting processes that maintain these disorders. First, some of the stages which a memory undergoes are defined, and the clinical relevance of an understanding of memory processing by the brain is discussed. This is followed by a brief review of some of the clinical studies that have targeted memory processes. Finally, some new insights provided by the field of neuroscience with implications for conceptualizing mental disorders are presented. PMID:24459414

  10. Therapeutic targeting of tumor suppressor genes.

    PubMed

    Morris, Luc G T; Chan, Timothy A

    2015-05-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistep process attributable to both gain-of-function mutations in oncogenes and loss-of-function mutations in tumor suppressor genes. Currently, most molecular targeted therapies are inhibitors of oncogenes, because inactivated tumor suppressor genes have proven harder to "drug." Nevertheless, in cancers, tumor suppressor genes undergo alteration more frequently than do oncogenes. In recent years, several promising strategies directed at tumor suppressor genes, or the pathways controlled by these genes, have emerged. Here, we describe advances in a number of different methodologies aimed at therapeutically targeting tumors driven by inactivated tumor suppressor genes.

  11. Memory as a new therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Nader, Karim; Hardt, Oliver; Lanius, Ruth

    2013-12-01

    This review aims to demonstrate how an understanding of the brain mechanisms involved in memory provides a basis for; (i) reconceptualizing some mental disorders; (ii) refining existing therapeutic tools; and (iii) designing new ones for targeting processes that maintain these disorders. First, some of the stages which a memory undergoes are defined, and the clinical relevance of an understanding of memory processing by the brain is discussed. This is followed by a brief review of some of the clinical studies that have targeted memory processes. Finally, some new insights provided by the field of neuroscience with implications for conceptualizing mental disorders are presented.

  12. Therapeutic targets for polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Patricia D

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a common genetic disease in which renal enlargement and loss of function is caused by progressive expansion of tubular cysts. To reverse the detrimental effects of PKD gene mutation(s) and to slow cystic expansion, new drug therapies are required. The underlying cell biology leading to identification of molecular targets for PKD is reviewed. Specific focus is on studies published at the early pre-clinical level. These include genetic and epigenetic modulators, and drugs to slow cystic expansion and disease progression. Discussion of specific drugs and clinical trials is not within the scope of this article. Literature research methods included EndNote and PubMed online searches using keyword combinations: polycystic kidneys disease, pre-clinical, molecular targets, signal transduction, genetic modulators, epigenetic, therapeutic, receptors, kinases. Where possible, the most recent citations concerning a given target are referenced. It is suggested that the most promising targets for future therapeutic development are those that target upstream signaling events at cell membranes, such as the vasopressin-2 receptor (AVPR2), EGFR/ErbB2, and the β-1-integrin receptor, as well as the intracellular integrator kinase, c-Src.

  13. Ligand substitutions between ruthenium–cymene compounds can control protein versus DNA targeting and anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Adhireksan, Zenita; Davey, Gabriela E.; Campomanes, Pablo; Groessl, Michael; Clavel, Catherine M.; Yu, Haojie; Nazarov, Alexey A.; Yeo, Charmian Hui Fang; Ang, Wee Han; Dröge, Peter; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Dyson, Paul J.; Davey, Curt A.

    2014-01-01

    Ruthenium compounds have become promising alternatives to platinum drugs by displaying specific activities against different cancers and favourable toxicity and clearance properties. Nonetheless, their molecular targeting and mechanism of action are poorly understood. Here we study two prototypical ruthenium-arene agents—the cytotoxic antiprimary tumour compound [(η6-p-cymene)Ru(ethylene-diamine)Cl]PF6 and the relatively non-cytotoxic antimetastasis compound [(η6-p-cymene)Ru(1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane)Cl2]—and discover that the former targets the DNA of chromatin, while the latter preferentially forms adducts on the histone proteins. Using a novel ‘atom-to-cell’ approach, we establish the basis for the surprisingly site-selective adduct formation behaviour and distinct cellular impact of these two chemically similar anticancer agents, which suggests that the cytotoxic effects arise largely from DNA lesions, whereas the protein adducts may be linked to the other therapeutic activities. Our study shows promise for developing new ruthenium drugs, via ligand-based modulation of DNA versus protein binding and thus cytotoxic potential, to target distinguishing epigenetic features of cancer cells. PMID:24637564

  14. Ligand substitutions between ruthenium-cymene compounds can control protein versus DNA targeting and anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Adhireksan, Zenita; Davey, Gabriela E; Campomanes, Pablo; Groessl, Michael; Clavel, Catherine M; Yu, Haojie; Nazarov, Alexey A; Yeo, Charmian Hui Fang; Ang, Wee Han; Dröge, Peter; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Dyson, Paul J; Davey, Curt A

    2014-03-18

    Ruthenium compounds have become promising alternatives to platinum drugs by displaying specific activities against different cancers and favourable toxicity and clearance properties. Nonetheless, their molecular targeting and mechanism of action are poorly understood. Here we study two prototypical ruthenium-arene agents-the cytotoxic antiprimary tumour compound [(η(6)-p-cymene)Ru(ethylene-diamine)Cl]PF6 and the relatively non-cytotoxic antimetastasis compound [(η(6)-p-cymene)Ru(1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane)Cl2]-and discover that the former targets the DNA of chromatin, while the latter preferentially forms adducts on the histone proteins. Using a novel 'atom-to-cell' approach, we establish the basis for the surprisingly site-selective adduct formation behaviour and distinct cellular impact of these two chemically similar anticancer agents, which suggests that the cytotoxic effects arise largely from DNA lesions, whereas the protein adducts may be linked to the other therapeutic activities. Our study shows promise for developing new ruthenium drugs, via ligand-based modulation of DNA versus protein binding and thus cytotoxic potential, to target distinguishing epigenetic features of cancer cells.

  15. Nanomicellar carriers for targeted delivery of anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Huang, Yixian; Li, Song

    2014-01-01

    Clinical application of anticancer drugs is limited by problems such as low water solubility, lack of tissue-specificity and toxicity. Formulation development represents an important approach to these problems. Among the many delivery systems studied, polymeric micelles have gained considerable attention owing to ease in preparation, small sizes (10–100 nm), and ability to solubilize water-insoluble anticancer drugs and accumulate specifically at the tumors. This article provides a brief review of several promising micellar systems and their applications in tumor therapy. The emphasis is placed on the discussion of the authors’ recent work on several nanomicellar systems that have both a delivery function and antitumor activity, named dual-function drug carriers. PMID:24341817

  16. Validating therapeutic targets through human genetics.

    PubMed

    Plenge, Robert M; Scolnick, Edward M; Altshuler, David

    2013-08-01

    More than 90% of the compounds that enter clinical trials fail to demonstrate sufficient safety and efficacy to gain regulatory approval. Most of this failure is due to the limited predictive value of preclinical models of disease, and our continued ignorance regarding the consequences of perturbing specific targets over long periods of time in humans. 'Experiments of nature' - naturally occurring mutations in humans that affect the activity of a particular protein target or targets - can be used to estimate the probable efficacy and toxicity of a drug targeting such proteins, as well as to establish causal rather than reactive relationships between targets and outcomes. Here, we describe the concept of dose-response curves derived from experiments of nature, with an emphasis on human genetics as a valuable tool to prioritize molecular targets in drug development. We discuss empirical examples of drug-gene pairs that support the role of human genetics in testing therapeutic hypotheses at the stage of target validation, provide objective criteria to prioritize genetic findings for future drug discovery efforts and highlight the limitations of a target validation approach that is anchored in human genetics.

  17. Metal complexes of curcumin for cellular imaging, targeting, and photoinduced anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samya; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2015-07-21

    Curcumin is a polyphenolic species. As an active ingredient of turmeric, it is well-known for its traditional medicinal properties. The therapeutic values include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and anticancer activity with the last being primarily due to inhibition of the transcription factor NF-κB besides affecting several biological pathways to arrest tumor growth and its progression. Curcumin with all these positive qualities has only remained a potential candidate for cancer treatment over the years without seeing any proper usage because of its hydrolytic instability involving the diketo moiety in a cellular medium and its poor bioavailability. The situation has changed considerably in recent years with the observation that curcumin in monoanionic form could be stabilized on binding to a metal ion. The reports from our group and other groups have shown that curcumin in the metal-bound form retains its therapeutic potential. This has opened up new avenues to develop curcumin-based metal complexes as anticancer agents. Zinc(II) complexes of curcumin are shown to be stable in a cellular medium. They display moderate cytotoxicity against prostate cancer and neuroblastoma cell lines. A similar stabilization and cytotoxic effect is reported for (arene)ruthenium(II) complexes of curcumin against a variety of cell lines. The half-sandwich 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphatricyclo-[3.3.1.1]decane (RAPTA)-type ruthenium(II) complexes of curcumin are shown to be promising cytotoxic agents with low micromolar concentrations for a series of cancer cell lines. In a different approach, cobalt(III) complexes of curcumin are used for its cellular delivery in hypoxic tumor cells using intracellular agents that reduce the metal and release curcumin as a cytotoxin. Utilizing the photophysical and photochemical properties of the curcumin dye, we have designed and synthesized photoactive curcumin metal complexes that are used for cellular imaging by fluorescence microscopy and

  18. Emerging therapeutics for targeting Akt in cancer.

    PubMed

    Gdowski, Andrew; Panchoo, Marlyn; Treuren, Timothy Van; Basu, Alakananda

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate goal of cancer therapeutic research is to develop effective, targeted therapeutics that exploit the vulnerabilities of cancer cells. The three isoforms of Akt, also known as protein kinase B (PKB), are important mediators of various pathways that transmit mitogenic signals from the cell's exterior to the effector proteins of the cell's interior. Due to Akt\\\\\\\\\\\\\\'s importance in cell functions such as growth, proliferation and cell survival, many cancer cells rely on this pathway to aid in their survival. This dependence can lead to chemoresistance and selection of more adapted populations of cancer cells. Thus, it is important to understand the functional significance of isoform specificity and its relation to chemoresistance. In this review, we have summarized recent studies on Akt isoform specific regulation as well as each isoform's role in chemoresistance, emphasizing their potential as targets for cancer therapy. We have also condensed ongoing clinical studies involving various types of Akt inhibitors while highlighting the type of study, rationale and co-therapies involved in identifying Akt isoforms as promising therapeutic targets.

  19. Centrosome – a promising anti-cancer target

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Rivera, Yainyrette; Saavedra, Harold I

    2016-01-01

    The centrosome, an organelle discovered >100 years ago, is the main microtubule-organizing center in mammalian organisms. The centrosome is composed of a pair of centrioles surrounded by the pericentriolar material (PMC) and plays a major role in the regulation of cell cycle transitions (G1-S, G2-M, and metaphase-anaphase), ensuring the normality of cell division. Hundreds of proteins found in the centrosome exert a variety of roles, including microtubule dynamics, nucleation, and kinetochore–microtubule attachments that allow correct chromosome alignment and segregation. Errors in these processes lead to structural (shape, size, number, position, and composition), functional (abnormal microtubule nucleation and disorganized spindles), and numerical (centrosome amplification [CA]) centrosome aberrations causing aneuploidy and genomic instability. Compelling data demonstrate that centrosomes are implicated in cancer, because there are important oncogenic and tumor suppressor proteins that are localized in this organelle and drive centrosome aberrations. Centrosome defects have been found in pre-neoplasias and tumors from breast, ovaries, prostate, head and neck, lung, liver, and bladder among many others. Several drugs/compounds against centrosomal proteins have shown promising results. Other drugs have higher toxicity with modest or no benefits, and there are more recently developed agents being tested in clinical trials. All of this emerging evidence suggests that targeting centrosome aberrations may be a future avenue for therapeutic intervention in cancer research. PMID:28008224

  20. Novel Anticancer Agents Based on Targeting the Trimer Interface of the PRL Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yunpeng; Yu, Zhi-Hong; Liu, Sijiu; Zhang, Lujuan; Zhang, Ruo-Yu; Zeng, Li-Fan; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2016-08-15

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL) oncoproteins are phosphatases overexpressed in numerous types of human cancer. Elevated levels of PRL associate with metastasis and poor clinical outcomes. In principle, PRL phosphatases offer appealing therapeutic targets, but they remain underexplored due to the lack of specific chemical probes. In this study, we address this issue by exploiting a unique property of PRL phosphatases, namely, that they may function as homotrimers. Starting from a sequential structure-based virtual screening and medicinal chemistry strategy, we identified Cmpd-43 and several analogs that disrupt PRL1 trimerization. Biochemical and structural analyses demonstrate that Cmpd-43 and its close analogs directly bind the PRL1 trimer interface and obstruct PRL1 trimerization. Cmpd-43 also specifically blocks the PRL1-induced cell proliferation and migration through attenuation of both ERK1/2 and Akt activity. Importantly, Cmpd-43 exerted potent anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo in a murine xenograft model of melanoma. Our results validate a trimerization-dependent signaling mechanism for PRL and offer proof of concept for trimerization inhibitors as candidate therapeutics to treat PRL-driven cancers. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4805-15. ©2016 AACR.

  1. The flavonoid fisetin as an anticancer agent targeting the growth signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Rengarajan, Thamaraiselvan; Yaacob, Nik Soriani

    2016-10-15

    Epidemiological studies show that consumption of diets rich in fruits and vegetables is associated with lower risks of cancer. This evidence has kindled interest into research on bioactive food components and has till date resulted in the identification of many compounds with cancer preventive and therapeutic potential. Among such compounds is fisetin (3,7,3,4-tetrahydroxyflavone), a flavonol that is commonly found in many fruits and vegetables such as apples, persimmons, grapes, kiwis, strawberries, onions and cucumbers. Fisetin has been shown to inhibit or retard the growth of various cancer cells in culture and implanted tumors in vivo. Fisetin targets many components of intracellular signaling pathways including regulators of cell survival and apoptosis, tumor angiogenic and metastatic switches by modulating a distinct set of upstream kinases, transcription factors and their regulators. Current evidence supports the idea that fisetin is a promising agent for cancer treatment. This review summarizes reported anticancer effects of fisetin, and re-emphasizes its potential therapeutic role in the treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Tumor-targeting peptides and small molecules as anti-cancer agents to overcome drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Sarafraz-Yazdi, Ehsan; Pincus, Matthew R; Michl, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of chemotherapy in cancer therapy, development of resistance to every new therapeutic has been the universal experience. The growing understanding of cancer genomics, cancer-associated signal transduction pathways, and key protein drivers of cancer has enabled cancer biologists and medicinal chemists to develop targeted molecules to interfere with these pathways to tackle drug resistant cancers. However, to the dismay of oncologists, the clinical use of many of these tools has once again brought to the forefront the inevitable challenge of drug resistance. It is now understood that cancer resistance to different therapies involves multiple challenges that encompass the cancer cell itself as well as host physiology. This review presents small molecule inhibitors and peptides as two therapeutic approaches in anti-cancer drug development. Resistance to selected samples of these novel therapies is described in the context of cell autonomous resistance, the contributions of the tumor microenvironment, and germ line factors. For each approach, advantages and disadvantages are discussed on how to better overcome the inevitable challenge of resistance in cancer treatment.

  3. Fibrinolytic Enzyme Cotherapy Improves Tumor Perfusion and Therapeutic Efficacy of Anticancer Nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Kirtane, Ameya R; Sadhukha, Tanmoy; Kim, Hyunjoon; Khanna, Vidhi; Koniar, Brenda; Panyam, Jayanth

    2017-03-15

    Elevated interstitial fluid pressure and solid stress within tumors contribute to poor intratumoral distribution of nanomedicine. In this study, we hypothesized that the presence of fibrin in tumor extracellular matrix contributes to hindered intratumoral distribution of nanocarriers and that this can be overcome through the use of a fibrinolytic enzyme such as tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Analysis of fibrin expression in human tumor biopsies showed significant fibrin staining in nearly all tumor types evaluated. However, staining was heterogeneous across and within tumor types. We determined the effect of fibrin on the diffusion, intratumoral distribution, and therapeutic efficacy of nanocarriers. Diffusivity of nanocarriers in fibrin matrices was limited and could be improved significantly by coincubation with tPA. In vivo, coadministration of tPA improved the anticancer efficacy of nanoparticle-encapsulated paclitaxel in subcutaneous syngeneic mouse melanoma and orthotopic xenograft lung cancer models. Furthermore, treatment with tPA led to decompression of blood vessels and improved tumor perfusion. Cotreatment with tPA resulted in greater intratumoral penetration of a model nanocarrier (Doxil), leading to enhanced availability of the drug in the tumor core. Fibrinolytics such as tPA are already approved for other indications. Fibrinolytic cotherapy is therefore a rapidly translatable strategy for improving therapeutic effectiveness of anticancer nanomedicine. Cancer Res; 77(6); 1465-75. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Development of both methotrexate and mitomycin C loaded PEGylated chitosan nanoparticles for targeted drug codelivery and synergistic anticancer effect.

    PubMed

    Jia, Mengmeng; Li, Yang; Yang, Xiangrui; Huang, Yuancan; Wu, Hongjie; Huang, Yu; Lin, Jinyan; Li, Yanxiu; Hou, Zhenqing; Zhang, Qiqing

    2014-07-23

    Codelivery of multiple drugs with one kind of drug carriers provided a promising strategy to suppress the drug resistance and achieve the synergistic therapeutic effect in cancer treatment. In this paper, we successfully developed both methotrexate (MTX) and mitomycin C (MMC) loaded PEGylated chitosan nanoparticles (CS-NPs) as drug delivery systems, in which MTX, as a folic acid analogue, was also employed as a tumor-targeting ligand. The new drug delivery systems can coordinate the early phase targeting effect with the late-phase anticancer effect. The (MTX+MMC)-PEG-CS-NPs possessed nanoscaled particle size, narrow particle size distribution, and appropriate multiple drug loading content and simultaneously sustained drug release. In vitro cell viability tests indicated that the (MTX+MMC)-PEG-CS-NPs exhibited concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxicity. Moreover, in vitro cellular uptake suggested that the (MTX+MMC)-PEG-CS-NPs could be efficiently taken up by cancer cells by FA receptor-mediated endocytosis. On the other hand, the (MTX+MMC)-PEG-CS-NPs can codelivery MTX and MMC to not only achieve the high accumulation at the tumor site but also more efficiently suppress the tumor cells growth than the delivery of either drug alone, indicating a synergistic effect. In fact, the codelivery of two anticancer drugs with distinct functions and different anticancer mechanisms was key to opening the door to their targeted drug delivery and synergistic anticancer effect. Therefore, the (MTX+MMC)-PEG-CS-NPs as targeted drug codelivery systems might have important potential in clinical implications for combination cancer chemotherapy.

  5. SLC Transporters as Therapeutic Targets: Emerging Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lawrence; Yee, Sook Wah; Kim, Richard B.; Giacomini, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Solute carrier (SLC) transporters — a family of more than 300 membrane-bound proteins that facilitate the transport of a wide array of substrates across biological membranes — have important roles in physiological processes ranging from the cellular uptake of nutrients to the absorption of drugs and other xenobiotics. Several classes of marketed drugs target well-known SLC transporters, such as neurotransmitter transporters, and human genetic studies have provided powerful insight into the roles of more-recently characterized SLC transporters in both rare and common diseases, indicating a wealth of new therapeutic opportunities. This Review summarizes knowledge on the roles of SLC transporters in human disease, describes strategies to target such transporters, and highlights current and investigational drugs that modulate SLC transporters, as well as promising drug targets. PMID:26111766

  6. MicroRNAs as Therapeutic Targets and Colorectal Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Mori, Masaki

    The diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) have improved greatly over recent years; however, CRC is still one of the most common cancers and a major cause of cancer death worldwide. Several recently developed drugs and treatment strategies are currently in clinical trials; however, there is still a compelling need for novel, highly efficacious therapies. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs consisting of 20-25 nucleotides that regulate post-transcriptional gene expression by binding to the 3'-untranslated region of mRNAs. miRNAs are known to regulate cancer pathways and to be expressed aberrantly in cancer. Since their initial discovery, a large number of miRNAs have been identified as oncogenes, whereas others function as tumor suppressors. Furthermore, signaling pathways that are important in CRC (e.g. the WNT, MAPK, TGF-β, TP53 and PI3K pathways) are regulated by miRNAs. A single miRNA can simultaneously regulate several target genes and pathways, indicating the therapeutic potential of miRNAs in CRC. However, significant obstacles remain to be overcome, such as an efficient miRNA delivery system, and the assessment of safety and side effects. Thus, miRNA therapy is still developing and possesses great potential for the treatment of CRC. In this chapter, we focus on miRNAs related to CRC and summarize previous studies that emphasize the therapeutic aspects of miRNAs in CRC.

  7. Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Characterization of Covalent Adducts of DNA with Anti-cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Silvestri, Catherine; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic activities of many anticancer and antibacterial drugs arise from their interactions with nucleic acid substrates. Some of these ligands interact with DNA in a way that causes conformational changes or damage to the nucleic acid targets, ultimately altering recognition by key DNA-specific enzymes, interfering with DNA transcription or prohibiting replication, and terminating cell growth and proliferation. The design and synthesis of ligands that bind to nucleic acids remains a dynamic field in medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical research. The quest for more selective and efficacious DNA-interactive anti-cancer chemotherapeutics has likewise catalyzed the need for sensitive analytical methods that can provide structural information about the nature of the resulting DNA adducts and provide insight into the mechanistic pathways of the DNA/drug interactions and the impact on the cellular processes in biological systems. This review focuses on the array of tandem mass spectrometric strategies developed and applied for characterization of covalent adducts formed between DNA and anti-cancer ligands. PMID:23150278

  8. Protein tyrosine phosphatases as potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    He, Rong-jun; Yu, Zhi-hong; Zhang, Ruo-yu; Zhang, Zhong-yin

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a key regulatory process in virtually all aspects of cellular functions. Dysregulation of protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a major cause of human diseases, such as cancers, diabetes, autoimmune disorders, and neurological diseases. Indeed, protein tyrosine phosphorylation-mediated signaling events offer ample therapeutic targets, and drug discovery efforts to date have brought over two dozen kinase inhibitors to the clinic. Accordingly, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are considered next-generation drug targets. For instance, PTP1B is a well-known targets of type 2 diabetes and obesity, and recent studies indicate that it is also a promising target for breast cancer. SHP2 is a bona-fide oncoprotein, mutations of which cause juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and solid tumors. In addition, LYP is strongly associated with type 1 diabetes and many other autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes recent findings on several highly recognized PTP family drug targets, including PTP1B, Src homology phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 2(SHP2), lymphoid-specific tyrosine phosphatase (LYP), CD45, Fas associated phosphatase-1 (FAP-1), striatal enriched tyrosine phosphatases (STEP), mitogen-activated protein kinase/dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (MKP-1), phosphatases of regenerating liver-1 (PRL), low molecular weight PTPs (LMWPTP), and CDC25. Given that there are over 100 family members, we hope this review will serve as a road map for innovative drug discovery targeting PTPs. PMID:25220640

  9. Macromolecular Drug Targets in Cancer Treatment and Thiosemicarbazides as Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Küçükgüzel, Ş Güniz; Coşkun, Göknil P

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is known as abnormal cell division and consisting of a group of diseases on various organ tissues. Many therapies are available in cancer treatment such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy etc. Without damaging normal tissue, there is a huge need for specified anticancer drugs which have effect only on abnormal cancer cells. Therefore, advances in anticancer drug discovery in treating cancer in the recent years, directed towards to the macromolecular targets. Heterocyclic molecules, such as fluconazole, acetazolamide, etc., have a significant role in health care and pharmaceutical drug design. Thiosemicarbazides (NH2-NH-CSNH2) are the simplest hydrazine derivatives of thiocarbamic acid and are not only transition compounds, but they are also very effective organic compounds. Thiosemicarbazides possess an amide and amine protons, carbonyl and thione carbons. These structures have attracted the attention of the researchers in the development of novel compounds with anticonvulsant, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antimycobacterial, antifungal, antioxidant and anticancer activities. Recently, a number of thiosemicarbazides are available commercially as anticancer drugs for novel anticancer drug discovery. Antineoplastic or anticancer drugs prevent or inhibit the maturation and proliferation of neoplasms. These observations have been guiding the researchers for the development of new thiosemicarbazides that possess anticancer activity.

  10. AMPK as a Potential Anticancer Target – Friend or Foe?

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Hsiao-Ching; Chou, Chih-Chien; Kulp, Samuel K.; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key player in maintaining energy homeostasis in response to metabolic stress. Beyond diabetes and metabolic syndrome, there is a growing interest in the therapeutic exploitation of the AMPK pathway in cancer treatment in light of its unique ability to regulate cancer cell proliferation through the reprogramming of cell metabolism. Although many studies support the tumor-suppressive role of AMPK, emerging evidence suggests that the metabolic checkpoint function of AMPK might be overridden by stress or oncogenic signals so that tumor cells use AMPK activation as a survival strategy to gain growth advantage. These findings underscore the complexity in the cellular function of AMPK in maintaining energy homeostasis under physiological versus pathological conditions. Thus, this review aims to provide an overview of recent findings on the functional interplay of AMPK with different cell metabolic and signaling effectors, particularly histone deacetylases, in mediating downstream tumor suppressive or promoting mechanisms in different cell systems. Although AMPK activation inhibits tumor growth by targeting multiple signaling pathways relevant to tumorigenesis, under certain cellular contexts or certain stages of tumor development, AMPK might act as a protective response to metabolic stresses, such as nutrient deprivation, low oxygen, and low pH, or as a downstream effectors of oncogenic proteins, including androgen receptor, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, c-Src, and MYC. Thus, investigations to define at which stage(s) of tumorigenesis and cancer progression or for which genetic aberrations AMPK inhibition might represent a more relevant strategy than AMPK activation for cancer treatment are clearly warranted. PMID:23859619

  11. OXavidin for Tissue Targeting Biotinylated Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    De Santis, Rita; Albertoni, Claudio; Rosi, Antonio; Leoni, Barbara; Petronzelli, Fiorella; D'Alessio, Valeria; Nucera, Eleonora; Salvatori, Giovanni; Paganelli, Giovanni; Verdoliva, Antonio; Carminati, Paolo; Nuzzolo, Carlo Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Avidin is a glycoprotein from hen egg white that binds biotin with very high affinity. Here we describe OXavidin, a product containing aldehyde groups, obtained by ligand-assisted sugar oxidation of avidin by sodium periodate. OXavidin chemically reacts with cellular and tissue proteins through Schiff's base formation thus residing in tissues for weeks while preserving the biotin binding capacity. The long tissue residence of OXavidin as well as that of OXavidin/biotinylated agent complex occurs in normal and neoplastic tissues and immunohistochemistry shows a strong and homogenous stromal localization. Once localized in tissue/tumor, OXavidin becomes an “artificial receptor” for intravenous injected biotin allowing tumor targeting with biotinylated therapeutics like radioisotopes or toxins. Moreover, present data also suggest that OXavidin might be useful for the homing of biotinylated cells. Overall, OXavidin exhibits a remarkable potential for many different therapeutic applications. PMID:20130784

  12. OXavidin for tissue targeting biotinylated therapeutics.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Rita; Albertoni, Claudio; Rosi, Antonio; Leoni, Barbara; Petronzelli, Fiorella; D'Alessio, Valeria; Nucera, Eleonora; Salvatori, Giovanni; Paganelli, Giovanni; Verdoliva, Antonio; Carminati, Paolo; Nuzzolo, Carlo Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Avidin is a glycoprotein from hen egg white that binds biotin with very high affinity. Here we describe OXavidin, a product containing aldehyde groups, obtained by ligand-assisted sugar oxidation of avidin by sodium periodate. OXavidin chemically reacts with cellular and tissue proteins through Schiff's base formation thus residing in tissues for weeks while preserving the biotin binding capacity. The long tissue residence of OXavidin as well as that of OXavidin/biotinylated agent complex occurs in normal and neoplastic tissues and immunohistochemistry shows a strong and homogenous stromal localization. Once localized in tissue/tumor, OXavidin becomes an "artificial receptor" for intravenous injected biotin allowing tumor targeting with biotinylated therapeutics like radioisotopes or toxins. Moreover, present data also suggest that OXavidin might be useful for the homing of biotinylated cells. Overall, OXavidin exhibits a remarkable potential for many different therapeutic applications.

  13. Mitochondria: A Therapeutic Target in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Paula I.; Zhu, Xiongwei; Wang, Xinglong; Lee, Hyoung-gon; Nunomura, Akihiko; Petersen, Robert B.; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Mitochondrial dysfunction has long been associated with neurodegenerative disease. Therefore, mitochondrial protective agents represent a unique direction for the development of drug candidates that can modify the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration. This review discusses evidence showing that mitochondrial dysfunction has a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We also debate the potential therapeutic efficacy of metabolic antioxidants, mitochondria-directed antioxidants and Szeto-Schiller (SS) peptides. Since these compounds preferentially target mitochondria, a major source of oxidative damage, they are promising therapeutic candidates for neurodegenerative diseases. Furthermore, we will briefly discuss the novel action of the antihistamine drug Dimebon on mitochondria. PMID:19853657

  14. Toll gates: An emerging therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Maheaswari, Rajendran; Sivasankar, Kiruthika; Subbarayan, Sathya

    2014-01-01

    Innate immune system forms the first line of defense against microbial infections, as it exerts an immediate response. Innate immunity works through Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which functions as primary sensors of pathogens. TLR activates multiple signaling cascades leading to the induction of genes responsible for the release of inflammatory cytokines and type I interferon. Thus, they induce antimicrobial responses and also have an instructive role in adaptive immunity. However, TLR-mediated inflammation is said to be responsible for many of the destructive host responses in inflammatory diseases like periodontitis. Hence, therapeutics targeting TLRs are being used to treat disease such as HIV, Hepatitis B, asthma etc. Recently, synthetic TLR agonists are tried as novel vaccine adjuvant in treating periodontal diseases. This paper reviews the scope of TLR-based therapeutics in treating periodontitis. PMID:25624622

  15. Peptide therapeutics: targeting the undruggable space.

    PubMed

    Tsomaia, Natia

    2015-04-13

    Rapid advancements in genomics have brought a better understanding of molecular mechanisms for various pathologies and identified a number of highly attractive target classes. Some of these targets include intracellular protein-protein interactions (PPIs), which control many essential biological pathways. Their surfaces are part of a diverse and unexplored biological space, where traditional small molecule scaffolds are not always successful. While large biologics can effectively modulate PPIs in the extracellular region, their limitation in crossing the cellular membrane leaves intracellular protein targets outside of their reach. There is a growing need in the pharmaceutical field to push the boundaries of traditional drug design and discover innovative molecules that are able to modulate key biological pathways by inhibiting intracellular PPIs. Peptides are one of the most promising classes of molecules that could deliver such therapeutics in the near future. In this review, we describe technological advancements and emerging chemical approaches for stabilizing active peptide conformations, including stapling, hydrogen bond surrogates, beta-hairpin mimetics, grafting on stable scaffolds, and macrocyclization. These design strategies carry the promise of opening the doors for peptide therapeutics to reach the currently "undruggable" space.

  16. Advancements in therapeutically targeting orphan GPCRs

    PubMed Central

    Stockert, Jennifer A.; Devi, Lakshmi A.

    2015-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are popular biological targets for drug discovery and development. To date there are more than 140 orphan GPCRs, i.e., receptors whose endogenous ligands are unknown. Traditionally orphan GPCRs have been difficult to study and the development of therapeutic compounds targeting these receptors has been extremely slow although these GPCRs are considered important targets based on their distribution and behavioral phenotype as revealed by animals lacking the receptor. Recent advances in several methods used to study orphan receptors, including protein crystallography and homology modeling are likely to be useful in the identification of therapeutics targeting these receptors. In the past 13 years, over a dozen different Class A GPCRs have been crystallized; this trend is exciting, since homology modeling of GPCRs has previously been limited by the availability of solved structures. As the number of solved GPCR structures continues to grow so does the number of templates that can be used to generate increasingly accurate models of phylogenetically related orphan GPCRs. The availability of solved structures along with the advances in using multiple templates to build models (in combination with molecular dynamics simulations that reveal structural information not provided by crystallographic data and methods for modeling hard-to-predict flexible loop regions) have improved the quality of GPCR homology models. This, in turn, has improved the success rates of virtual ligand screens that use homology models to identify potential receptor binding compounds. Experimental testing of the predicted hits and validation using traditional GPCR pharmacological approaches can be used to drive ligand-based efforts to probe orphan receptor biology as well as to define the chemotypes and chemical scaffolds important for binding. As a result of these advances, orphan GPCRs are emerging from relative obscurity as a new class of drug targets. PMID

  17. Self-illuminative cascade-reaction-driven anticancer therapeutic cassettes made of cooperatively interactive nanocomplexes.

    PubMed

    Song, Woo Chul; Shin, Seung Won; Park, Kyung Soo; Jang, Min Su; Choi, Jin-Ha; Oh, Byung-Keun; Um, Soong Ho

    2015-02-01

    Therapeutic options based on near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths have attracted attention owing to in vivo lowest-background interventions and the development of several nano-architectures with localized surface plasmon resonance. Because of their limited tissue penetration, the clinical use of NIR light-driven treatments is not widespread; this technology is inapplicable to infection sites in the deeper areas of internal tissues. In this study, we demonstrate a self-illuminative therapeutic cassette able to exert anticancer effects via a series of enzymatic, chemical, and optical cooperative cascade reactions. It consists of (1) NIR-illuminative nanocomplexes and (2) NIR-sensitive therapeutic cassettes, which demonstrate a 60% chemically-induced killing effect in a prostate cancer model without external NIR irradiation. This technology can also be actively exploited as an imaging agent due to adaptation of a self-illuminating nanocomplex. Consequently, these novel therapeutic cassettes, which work not only as a powerful internal NIR stimulant, but also as a biological imaging platform, provide a new rational design concept for biomedical use.

  18. Orthogonally functionalized nanoscale micelles for active targeted codelivery of methotrexate and mitomycin C with synergistic anticancer effect.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Lin, Jinyan; Wu, Hongjie; Chang, Ying; Yuan, Conghui; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Shuang; Hou, Zhenqing; Dai, Lizong

    2015-03-02

    The design of nanoscale drug delivery systems for the targeted codelivery of multiple therapeutic drugs still remains a formidable challenge (ACS Nano, 2013, 7, 9558-9570; ACS Nano, 2013, 7, 9518-9525). In this article, both mitomycin C (MMC) and methotrexate (MTX) loaded DSPE-PEG micelles (MTX-M-MMC) were prepared by self-assembly using the dialysis technique, in which MMC-soybean phosphatidylcholine complex (drug-phospholipid complex) was encapsulated within MTX-functionalized DSPE-PEG micelles. MTX-M-MMC could coordinate an early phase active targeting effect with a late-phase synergistic anticancer effect and enable a multiple-responsive controlled release of both drugs (MMC was released in a pH-dependent pattern, while MTX was released in a protease-dependent pattern). Furthermore, MTX-M-MMC could codeliver both drugs to significantly enhance the cellular uptake, intracellular delivery, cytotoxicity, and apoptosis in vitro and improve the tumor accumulation and penetration and anticancer effect in vivo compared with either both free drugs treatment or individual free drug treatment. To our knowledge, this work provided the first example of the systemically administrated, orthogonally functionalized, and self-assisted nanoscale micelles for targeted combination cancer chemotherapy. The highly convergent therapeutic strategy opened the door to more simplified, efficient, and flexible nanoscale drug delivery systems.

  19. Metformin and Anti-Cancer Therapeutics: Hopes for a More Enhanced Armamentarium Against Human Neoplasias?

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, Maria-Ioanna; Scorilas, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Metformin, a natural product from Galega officinalis, is an oral drug, now in the forefront of the therapeutic management of type-2 diabetes mellitus. A series of clinical observations of the last decades, support that metformin may contribute to lowering the risk of cancer development in diabetic patients, and also to improvement of response-to-therapy and survival in individuals with certain types of malignancies. Moreover, several preclinical in vitro and in vivo data indicate that metformin indeed exerts anti-proliferative capacities upon tumor cells mediated through a variety of mechanisms. Interestingly, metformin has been shown to act in synergy with certain anti-cancer agents and also to overcome chemo- and/or radio-resistance of various types of tumors, providing a hopeful rationale for novel therapeutic strategies against cancer development and progression. However, this remains an issue of controversy, since significant contradictions exist among the available data. Limitations of preclinical studies and caveats of epidemiological works, together with significant variances among the several types of cancer and the fact that the mode of metformin's action is largely unknown, make longitudinal surveys urgently needed. Now, a plethora of large clinical trials are active worldwide, aiming at determining the effect of metformin in the prevention or prognosis of a variety of human cancers. If encouraging results arise, metformin will be an attractive candidate adjuvant in the management of human neoplasias, due to its safety, tolerability and low-cost, expected to mitigate adverse effects and no-response parameters of current anti-cancer therapeutics, thus improving the quality of life and survival of cancer patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Reprogramming the oncogenic response: SET protein as a potential therapeutic target in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hung, Man-Hsin; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2017-07-01

    SET is a multitask oncoprotein that promotes the initiation and progression of cancer. Overexpression of SET has been characterized as being tumor-specific and is associated with adverse clinical outcomes in many different human malignant diseases. Notably, SET has been shown to promote the development of therapeutic resistance in cancer cells. Area covered: In this review, we summarized the currently available evidence relating to the oncogenic roles, biological functions and clinical relevance of SET protein in cancer. The anti-cancer effects of three different SET antagonists undergoing preclinical investigation are also discussed. Expert opinion: Emerging evidence supports the critical role of SET in regulating various different cancer hallmarks. Targeting the SET-associated protein interfaces may be a potential anti-cancer strategy for future development. However, more studies are required to clarify the best strategy to combine SET antagonists with other anti-cancer treatments and to explore possible biomarkers that predict responsiveness.

  1. Epigenetics and Therapeutic Targets Mediating Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Irfan A.; Mehler, Mark F.

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly evolving science of epigenetics is transforming our understanding of the nervous system in health and disease and holds great promise for the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches targeting neurological diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic factors and mechanisms serve as important mediators of the pathogenic processes that lead to irrevocable neural injury and of countervailing homeostatic and regenerative responses. Epigenetics is, therefore, of considerable translational significance to the field of neuroprotection. In this brief review, we provide an overview of epigenetic mechanisms and highlight the emerging roles played by epigenetic processes in neural cell dysfunction and death and in resultant neuroprotective responses. PMID:26236020

  2. Diabetic Kidney Disease: Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Toth-Manikowski, Stephanie; Atta, Mohamed G.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic that has led to a rise in diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Over the past two decades, there has been significant clarification of the various pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of DKD. Nonetheless, very little has changed in the way clinicians manage patients with this disorder. Indeed, treatment is primarily centered on controlling hyperglycemia and hypertension and inhibiting the renin-angiotensin system. The purpose of this review is to describe the current understanding of how the hemodynamic, metabolic, inflammatory, and alternative pathways are all entangled in pathogenesis of DKD and detail the various therapeutic targets that may one day play a role in quelling this epidemic. PMID:26064987

  3. Microvascular Targets for Anti-Fibrotic Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Kai-Ming T.; Sava, Parid; Gonzalez, Anjelica L.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrosis is characterized by excessive extracellular matrix deposition and is the pathological outcome of repetitive tissue injury in many disorders. The accumulation of matrix disrupts the structure and function of the native tissue and can affect multiple organs including the lungs, heart, liver, and skin. Unfortunately, current therapies against the deadliest and most common fibrosis are ineffective. The pathogenesis of fibrosis is the result of aberrant wound healing, therefore, the microvasculature plays an important role, contributing through regulation of leukocyte recruitment, inflammation, and angiogenesis. Further exacerbating the condition, microvascular endothelial cells and pericytes can transdifferentiate into matrix depositing myofibroblasts. The contribution of the microvasculature to fibrotic progression makes its cellular components and acellular products attractive therapeutic targets. In this review, we examine many of the cytokine, matrix, and cellular microvascular components involved in fibrosis and discuss their potential as targets for fibrotic therapies with a particular focus on developing nanotechnologies. PMID:24348218

  4. Mining the Genome for Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Florez, Jose C

    2017-07-01

    Current pharmacological options for type 2 diabetes do not cure the disease. Despite the availability of multiple drug classes that modulate glycemia effectively and minimize long-term complications, these agents do not reverse pathogenesis, and in practice they are not selected to correct the molecular profile specific to the patient. Pharmaceutical companies find drug development programs increasingly costly and burdensome, and many promising compounds fail before launch to market. Human genetics can help advance the therapeutic enterprise. Genomic discovery that is agnostic to preexisting knowledge has uncovered dozens of loci that influence glycemic dysregulation. Physiological investigation has begun to define disease subtypes, clarifying heterogeneity and suggesting molecular pathways for intervention. Convincing genetic associations have paved the way for the identification of effector transcripts that underlie the phenotype, and genetic or experimental proof of gain or loss of function in select cases has clarified the direction of effect to guide therapeutic development. Genetic studies can also examine off-target effects and furnish causal inference. As this information is curated and made widely available to all stakeholders, it is hoped that it will enhance therapeutic development pipelines by accelerating efficiency, maximizing cost-effectiveness, and raising ultimate success rates. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  5. Anti-Cancer Phytometabolites Targeting Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Torquato, Heron F V; Goettert, Márcia I; Justo, Giselle Z; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J

    2017-04-01

    Medicinal plants are a plentiful source of bioactive molecules with much structural diversity. In cancer treatment, molecules obtained from plants represent an attractive alternative to other treatments because several plant-derived compounds have exhibited lower toxicity and higher selectivity against cancer cells. In this review, we focus on the possible application of bioactive molecules obtained from plants against more primitive cell populations in cancers, cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells are present in several kinds of tumors and are responsible for recurrences and metastases. Common anti-cancer drugs exhibit lower effectiveness against cancer stem cells because of their biological features. However, recently discovered natural phytometabolites exert cytotoxic effects on this rare population of cells in cancers. Therefore, this review presents the latest research on promising compounds from plants that can act as antitumor drugs and that mainly affect stem cell populations in cancers.

  6. Aldehyde dehydrogenases in cancer stem cells: potential as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Clark, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to current chemotherapeutic or radiation-based cancer treatment strategies is a serious concern. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are typically able to evade treatment and establish a recurrent tumor or metastasis, and it is these that lead to the majority of cancer deaths. Therefore, a major current goal is to develop treatment strategies that eliminate the resistant CSCs as well as the bulk tumor cells in order to achieve complete disease clearance. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) are important for maintenance and differentiation of stem cells as well as normal development. There is expanding evidence that ALDH expression increases in response to therapy and promotes chemoresistance and survival mechanisms in CSCs. This perspective will discuss a paper by Cojoc and colleagues recently published in Cancer Research, that indicates ALDHs play a key role in resistance to radiation therapy and tumor recurrence in prostate cancer. The authors suggest that ALDHs are a potential therapeutic target for treatment prostate cancer patients to limit radiation resistance and disease recurrence. The findings are consistent with work from other cancers showing ALDHs are major contributors of CSC signaling and resistance to anti-cancer treatments. This perspective will address representative work concerning the validity of ALDH and the associated retinoic acid signaling pathway as chemotherapeutic targets for prostate as well as other cancers. PMID:28149880

  7. Nano-Fenton Reactors as a New Class of Oxidative Stress Amplifying Anticancer Therapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Byeongsu; Han, Eunji; Yang, Wonseok; Cho, Wooram; Yoo, Wooyoung; Hwang, Junyeon; Kwon, Byoung-Mog; Lee, Dongwon

    2016-03-09

    Cancer cells, compared to normal cells, are under oxidative stress associated with an elevated level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and are more vulnerable to oxidative stress induced by ROS generating agents. Thus, manipulation of the ROS level provides a logical approach to kill cancer cells preferentially, without significant toxicity to normal cells, and great efforts have been dedicated to the development of strategies to induce cytotoxic oxidative stress for cancer treatment. Fenton reaction is an important biological reaction in which irons convert hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to highly toxic hydroxyl radicals that escalate ROS stress. Here, we report Fenton reaction-performing polymer (PolyCAFe) micelles as a new class of ROS-manipulating anticancer therapeutic agents. Amphiphilic PolyCAFe incorporates H2O2-generating benzoyloxycinnamaldehyde and iron-containing compounds in its backbone and self-assembles to form micelles that serve as Nano-Fenton reactors to generate cytotoxic hydroxyl radicals, killing cancer cells preferentially. When intravenously injected, PolyCAFe micelles could accumulate in tumors preferentially to remarkably suppress tumor growth, without toxicity to normal tissues. This study demonstrates the tremendous translatable potential of Nano-Fenton reactors as a new class of anticancer drugs.

  8. Recent developments in mushrooms as anti-cancer therapeutics: a review.

    PubMed

    Patel, Seema; Goyal, Arun

    2012-03-01

    From time immemorial, mushrooms have been valued by humankind as a culinary wonder and folk medicine in Oriental practice. The last decade has witnessed the overwhelming interest of western research fraternity in pharmaceutical potential of mushrooms. The chief medicinal uses of mushrooms discovered so far are as anti-oxidant, anti-diabetic, hypocholesterolemic, anti-tumor, anti-cancer, immunomodulatory, anti-allergic, nephroprotective, and anti-microbial agents. The mushrooms credited with success against cancer belong to the genus Phellinus, Pleurotus, Agaricus, Ganoderma, Clitocybe, Antrodia, Trametes, Cordyceps, Xerocomus, Calvatia, Schizophyllum, Flammulina, Suillus, Inonotus, Inocybe, Funlia, Lactarius, Albatrellus, Russula, and Fomes. The anti-cancer compounds play crucial role as reactive oxygen species inducer, mitotic kinase inhibitor, anti-mitotic, angiogenesis inhibitor, topoisomerase inhibitor, leading to apoptosis, and eventually checking cancer proliferation. The present review updates the recent findings on the pharmacologically active compounds, their anti-tumor potential, and underlying mechanism of biological action in order to raise awareness for further investigations to develop cancer therapeutics from mushrooms. The mounting evidences from various research groups across the globe, regarding anti-tumor application of mushroom extracts unarguably make it a fast-track research area worth mass attention.

  9. Fibromyalgia syndrome--novel therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Ablin, Jacob N; Buskila, Dan

    2013-08-01

    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome characterized by the presence of chronic widespread pain, representing sensitization of the central nervous system. The pthophysiology of fibromyalgia is a complex and remains in evolution, encompassing diverse issues such as disturbed patterns of sleep, alter processing and decreased conditioned pain modulation at the spinal level, as well as increased connectivity between various pain - processing areas of the brain. This evolution is continuously uncovering potential novel therapeutic targets. Treatment of fibromyalgia is a multi - faceted endeavor, inevitably combining pharmacological as well as non - pharmacological approaches. 2δ ligands and selective nor-epinephrine - serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the current mainstays of pharmacological treatment. Novel re-uptake inhibitors targeting both nor -epinephrine and dopamine are potential additions to this armamentarium as are substance P antagonists, Opiod antagonism is another intriguing possibility. Canabinoid agonists hold promise in the treatment of fibromyalgia although current evidence is incomplete. Sodium Oxybate is a unique sleep - promoting medication while drugs those promot arousals such as modafilnil are also under investigation. In the current review, current and emerging therapeutic options for the syndrome of fibromyalgia are covered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Twist: a molecular target in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Asaduzzaman; Chen, Han-chun; Zhang, Dianzheng; Fu, Junjiang

    2013-10-01

    Twist, the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, is involved in the process of epithelial to mesenchymal transitions (EMTs), which play an essential role in cancer metastasis. Overexpression of Twist or its promoter methylation is a common scenario in metastatic carcinomas. Twist is activated by a variety of signal transduction pathways, including Akt, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, mitogen-activated protein kinase, Ras, and Wnt signaling. Activated Twist upregulates N-cadherin and downregulates E-cadherin, which are the hallmarks of EMT. Moreover, Twist plays an important role in some physiological processes involved in metastasis, like angiogenesis, invadopodia, extravasation, and chromosomal instability. Twist also protects cancer cells from apoptotic cell death. In addition, Twist is responsible for the stemness of cancer cells and the generation of drug resistance. Recently, targeting Twist has gained significant interests in cancer therapeutics. The inactivation of Twist by small RNA technology or chemotherapeutic approach has been proved successful. Moreover, several inhibitors which are antagonistic to the upstream or downstream molecules of Twist signaling pathways have also been identified. Development of potential treatment strategies by targeting Twist has a great promise in cancer therapeutics.

  11. New Therapeutic Targets in Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Demicco, Elizabeth G; Maki, Robert G; Lev, Dina C.; Lazar, Alexander J

    2012-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are an uncommon and diverse group of more than 50 mesenchymal malignancies. The pathogenesis of many of these is poorly understood, but others have begun to reveal the secrets of their inner workings. With considerable effort over recent years, soft tissue sarcomas have increasingly been classified on the basis of underlying molecular alterations. In turn, this has allowed the development and application of targeted agents in several specific, molecularly defined, sarcoma subtypes. This review will focus the rationale for targeted therapy in sarcoma, with emphasis on the relevance of specific molecular factors and pathways in both translocation-associated sarcomas and in genetically complex tumors. In addition, we will address some of the early successes in sarcoma targeted therapy as well as a few challenges and disappointments in this field. Finally we will discuss several possible opportunities represented by poorly understood, but potentially promising new therapeutic targets, as well as several novel biologic agents currently in preclinical and early phase I/II trials. This will provide the reader with context for understanding the current state this field and a sense of where it may be headed in the coming years. PMID:22498582

  12. A novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent with high selectivity for cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Huan; Li, Dong-Wei; Yang, Li-Yun; Fu, Li; Zhu, Xun-Jin; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria have recently emerged as novel targets for cancer therapy due to its important roles in fundamental cellular function. Discovery of new chemotherapeutic agents that allow for simultaneous treatment and visualization of cancer is urgent. Herein, we demonstrate a novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent (FPB), exhibiting both imaging capability and anticancer activity. It can selectively accumulate in mitochondria and induce cell apoptosis. Notably, it results in much higher toxicity toward cancer cells owing to much higher uptake by cancer cells. These features make it highly attractive in cancer imaging and treatment. PMID:26337336

  13. Interacting partners of FEN1 and its role in the development of anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kathera, Chandrasekhar; Zhang, Jing; Janardhan, Avilala; Sun, Hongfang; Ali, Wajid; Zhou, Xiaolong; He, Lingfeng; Guo, Zhigang

    2017-02-07

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) plays a key role in cellular communication, Protein-protein interaction connected with each other with hubs and nods involved in signaling pathways. These interactions used to develop network based biomarkers for early diagnosis of cancer. FEN1(Flap endonuclease 1) is a central component in cellular metabolism, over expression and decrease of FEN1 levels may cause cancer, these regulation changes of Flap endonuclease 1reported in many cancer cells, to consider this data may needs to develop a network based biomarker. The current review focused on types of PPI, based on nature, detection methods and its role in cancer. Interacting partners of Flap endonuclease 1 role in DNA replication repair and development of anticancer therapeutics based on Protein-protein interaction data.

  14. Enhanced anticancer efficacy of paclitaxel through multistage tumor-targeting liposomes modified with RGD and KLA peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiawei; Jiang, Lei; Lin, Yi; Gerhard, Ethan Michael; Jiang, Xuehua; Li, Li; Yang, Jian; Gu, Zhongwei

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria serve as both “energy factories” and “suicide weapon stores” of cells. Targeted delivery of cytotoxic drugs to the mitochondria of tumor cells and tumor vascular cells is a promising strategy to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy. Here, multistage tumor-targeting liposomes containing two targeted peptide-modified lipids, cRGD-PEG2000-DSPE and KLA-PEG2000-DSPE, were developed for encapsulation of the anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX, RGD-KLA/PTX-Lips). Compared with Taxol (free PTX), RGD/PTX-Lips and KLA/PTX-Lips, the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of RGD-KLA/PTX-Lips in vitro was 1.9-, 36.7- and 22.7-fold lower with 4T1 cells, respectively, because of higher levels of cellular uptake. Similar results were also observed with human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). An apoptosis assay showed that the total apoptotic ratio of RGD-KLA/PTX-Lips was the highest because of the mitochondria-targeted drug delivery and the activation of mitochondrial apoptosis pathways, as evidenced by visible mitochondrial localization, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c and increased activities of caspase-9 and caspase-3. The strongest tumor growth inhibition (TGI; 80.6%) and antiangiogenesis effects without systemic toxicity were also observed in RGD-KLA/PTX-Lip-treated 4T1 tumor xenograft BALB/c mice. In conclusion, these multistage tumor-targeting liposomes represent a promising anticancer drug delivery system (DDS) capable of maximizing anticancer therapeutic efficacy and minimizing systemic toxicity. PMID:28280323

  15. Reverse screening approach to identify potential anti-cancer targets of dipyridamole

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Shu-Min; Zhan, Dong-Ling; Zhang, Shu-Hua; Song, Li-Qiang; Han, Wei-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Dipyridamole (DIP) inhibits thrombus formation when given chronically, and causes vasodilation over a short time. To date, DIP can increase the anticancer drugs (5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, piperidine, vincristine) concentration in cancer cells and hence enhance the efficacy of treatment cancer. The inhibition of DIP may result in increased 5-fluorouracil efficacy and diminish the drug side effects. But the actual molecular targets remain unknown. In this study, reverse protein-ligands docking, and quantum mechanics were used to search for the potential molecular targets of DIP. The quantum mechanics calculation was performed by using Gaussian 03 program package. Reverse pharmacophore mapping was used to search for potential molecular target candidates for a given small molecule. The docking study was used for exploring the potential anti-cancer targets of dipyridamole. The two predicted binders with the statistically significant prediction are dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) (PDB Id: 1GTE) and human spindle checkpoint kinase Bub1 (PDB Id: 3E7E). Structure analysis suggests that electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonding play an important role in their binding process. The strong functional linkage of DIP and 5FU supports our prediction. In conclusion, these results generate a tractable set of anticancer proteins. The exploration of polypharmacology will provide us new opportunities in treating systematic diseases, such as the cancers. The results would generate a tractable set of anticancer target proteins for future experimental validations. PMID:28077994

  16. Evolution of Resistance to Targeted Anti-Cancer Therapies during Continuous and Pulsed Administration Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Jasmine; Michor, Franziska

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of small molecules targeted to specific oncogenic pathways has revolutionized anti-cancer therapy. However, such therapy often fails due to the evolution of acquired resistance. One long-standing question in clinical cancer research is the identification of optimum therapeutic administration strategies so that the risk of resistance is minimized. In this paper, we investigate optimal drug dosing schedules to prevent, or at least delay, the emergence of resistance. We design and analyze a stochastic mathematical model describing the evolutionary dynamics of a tumor cell population during therapy. We consider drug resistance emerging due to a single (epi)genetic alteration and calculate the probability of resistance arising during specific dosing strategies. We then optimize treatment protocols such that the risk of resistance is minimal while considering drug toxicity and side effects as constraints. Our methodology can be used to identify optimum drug administration schedules to avoid resistance conferred by one (epi)genetic alteration for any cancer and treatment type. PMID:19893626

  17. Mitochondrial DNA is a direct target of anti-cancer anthracycline drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Neil Poulton, Joanna

    2009-01-16

    The anthracyclines, such as doxorubicin (DXR), are potent anti-cancer drugs but they are limited by their clinical toxicity. The mechanisms involved remain poorly understood partly because of the difficulty in determining sub-cellular drug localisation. Using a novel method utilising the fluorescent DNA dye PicoGreen, we found that anthracyclines intercalated not only into nuclear DNA but also mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Intercalation of mtDNA by anthracyclines may thus contribute to the marked mitochondrial toxicity associated with these drugs. By contrast, ethidium bromide intercalated exclusively into mtDNA, without interacting with nuclear DNA, thereby explaining why mtDNA is the main target for ethidium. By exploiting PicoGreen quenching we also developed a novel assay for quantification of mtDNA levels by flow-cytometry, an approach which should be useful for studies of mitochondrial dysfunction. In summary our PicoGreen assay should be useful to study drug/DNA interactions within live cells, and facilitate therapeutic drug monitoring and kinetic studies in cancer patients.

  18. Molecular Targets Underlying the Anticancer Effects of Quercetin: An Update.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fazlullah; Niaz, Kamal; Maqbool, Faheem; Ismail Hassan, Fatima; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Nagulapalli Venkata, Kalyan C; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Bishayee, Anupam

    2016-08-29

    Quercetin, a medicinally important member of the flavonoid family, is one of the most prominent dietary antioxidants. It is present in a variety of foods-including fruits, vegetables, tea, wine, as well as other dietary supplements-and is responsible for various health benefits. Numerous pharmacological effects of quercetin include protection against diseases, such as osteoporosis, certain forms of malignant tumors, and pulmonary and cardiovascular disorders. Quercetin has the special ability of scavenging highly reactive species, such as hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radicals. These oxygen radicals are called reactive oxygen species, which can cause oxidative damage to cellular components, such as proteins, lipids, and deoxyribonucleic acid. Various oxygen radicals play important roles in pathophysiological and degenerative processes, such as aging. Subsequently, several studies have been performed to evaluate possible advantageous health effects of quercetin and to collect scientific evidence for these beneficial health claims. These studies also gather data in order to evaluate the exact mechanism(s) of action and toxicological effects of quercetin. The purpose of this review is to present and critically analyze molecular pathways underlying the anticancer effects of quercetin. Current limitations and future directions of research on this bioactive dietary polyphenol are also critically discussed.

  19. Death receptors as targets for anti-cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Papenfuss, Kerstin; Cordier, Stefanie M; Walczak, Henning

    2008-01-01

    Human tumour cells are characterized by their ability to avoid the normal regulatory mechanisms of cell growth, division and death. The classical chemotherapy aims to kill tumour cells by causing DNA damage-induced apoptosis. However, as many tumour cells posses mutations in intracellular apoptosis-sensing molecules like p53, they are not capable of inducing apoptosis on their own and are therefore resistant to chemotherapy. With the discovery of the death receptors the opportunity arose to directly trigger apoptosis from the outside of tumour cells, thereby circumventing chemotherapeutic resistance. Death receptors belong to the tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily, with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-1, CD95 and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-R1 and -R2 being the most prominent members. This review covers the current knowledge about these four death receptors, summarizes pre-clinical approaches engaging these death receptors in anti-cancer therapy and also gives an overview about their application in clinical trials conducted to date. PMID:19210756

  20. Molecular Targets Underlying the Anticancer Effects of Quercetin: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fazlullah; Niaz, Kamal; Maqbool, Faheem; Ismail Hassan, Fatima; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Nagulapalli Venkata, Kalyan C.; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Bishayee, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a medicinally important member of the flavonoid family, is one of the most prominent dietary antioxidants. It is present in a variety of foods—including fruits, vegetables, tea, wine, as well as other dietary supplements—and is responsible for various health benefits. Numerous pharmacological effects of quercetin include protection against diseases, such as osteoporosis, certain forms of malignant tumors, and pulmonary and cardiovascular disorders. Quercetin has the special ability of scavenging highly reactive species, such as hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radicals. These oxygen radicals are called reactive oxygen species, which can cause oxidative damage to cellular components, such as proteins, lipids, and deoxyribonucleic acid. Various oxygen radicals play important roles in pathophysiological and degenerative processes, such as aging. Subsequently, several studies have been performed to evaluate possible advantageous health effects of quercetin and to collect scientific evidence for these beneficial health claims. These studies also gather data in order to evaluate the exact mechanism(s) of action and toxicological effects of quercetin. The purpose of this review is to present and critically analyze molecular pathways underlying the anticancer effects of quercetin. Current limitations and future directions of research on this bioactive dietary polyphenol are also critically discussed. PMID:27589790

  1. Pharmacological profile and Pharmacogenomics of anti-cancer drugs used for targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Di Francia, Raffaele; De Monaco, Angela; Saggese, Mariangela; Iaccarino, Giancarla; Crisci, Stefania; Frigeri, Ferdinando; De Filippi, Rosaria; Berretta, Massimiliano; Pinto, Antonio

    2017-02-08

    Drugs for targeted therapies are primarily Small Molecules Inhibitors (SMIs), monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), interfering RNA molecules and microRNA. The use of these new agents generates a multifaceted step in the pharmacokinetics (PK) of these drugs. Individual PK variability is often large, and unpredictability observed in the response to the pharmacogenetic profile of the patient (e.g. cytochome P450 enzyme), patient characteristics such as adherence to treatment and environmental factors. Objective This review aims to overview the latest anticancer drugs eligible for targeted therapies and the most recent finding in pharmacogenomics related to toxicity/resistance because either individual gene polymorphisms or acquired mutation in a cancer cell. In addition, an early outline evaluation of the genotyping costs and methods have been taken into consideration. Future outlook To date, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of mAbs and SMIs is not yet supported by heavy scientific evidence. Extensive effort should be made for targeted therapies to better define concentration-effect relationships and to perform comparative randomized trials of classic dosing versus PK-guided adaptive dosing. The detection of individual pharmacogenomics profile could be the key for the oncologists that will have new resources to make treatment decisions for their patients in order to maximize the benefit and minimize the toxicity. Based on this purpose, the clinician should evaluate advantages and limitations, in terms of costs and applicability, of the most appropriate pharmacological approach to performing a tailored therapy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Targeting lactate metabolism for cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Joanne R; Cleveland, John L

    2013-09-01

    Lactate, once considered a waste product of glycolysis, has emerged as a critical regulator of cancer development, maintenance, and metastasis. Indeed, tumor lactate levels correlate with increased metastasis, tumor recurrence, and poor outcome. Lactate mediates cancer cell intrinsic effects on metabolism and has additional non-tumor cell autonomous effects that drive tumorigenesis. Tumor cells can metabolize lactate as an energy source and shuttle lactate to neighboring cancer cells, adjacent stroma, and vascular endothelial cells, which induces metabolic reprogramming. Lactate also plays roles in promoting tumor inflammation and in functioning as a signaling molecule that stimulates tumor angiogenesis. Here we review the mechanisms of lactate production and transport and highlight emerging evidence indicating that targeting lactate metabolism is a promising approach for cancer therapeutics.

  3. Epigenetics and therapeutic targets mediating neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Irfan A; Mehler, Mark F

    2015-12-02

    The rapidly evolving science of epigenetics is transforming our understanding of the nervous system in health and disease and holds great promise for the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches targeting neurological diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic factors and mechanisms serve as important mediators of the pathogenic processes that lead to irrevocable neural injury and of countervailing homeostatic and regenerative responses. Epigenetics is, therefore, of considerable translational significance to the field of neuroprotection. In this brief review, we provide an overview of epigenetic mechanisms and highlight the emerging roles played by epigenetic processes in neural cell dysfunction and death and in resultant neuroprotective responses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Targeting checkpoint kinase 1 in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tse, Archie N; Carvajal, Richard; Schwartz, Gary K

    2007-04-01

    Progression through the cell cycle is monitored by surveillance mechanisms known as cell cycle checkpoints. Our knowledge of the biochemical nature of checkpoint regulation during an unperturbed cell cycle and following DNA damage has expanded tremendously over the past decade. We now know that dysfunction in cell cycle checkpoints leads to genomic instability and contributes to tumor progression, and most agents used for cancer therapy, such as cytotoxic chemotherapy and ionizing radiation, also activate cell cycle checkpoints. Understanding how checkpoints are regulated is therefore important from the points of view of both tumorigenesis and cancer treatment. In this review, we present an overview of the molecular hierarchy of the checkpoint signaling network and the emerging role of checkpoint targets, especially checkpoint kinase 1, in cancer therapy. Further, we discuss the results of recent clinical trials involving the nonspecific checkpoint kinase 1 inhibitor, UCN-01, and the challenges we face with this new therapeutic approach.

  5. Integrins as Therapeutic Targets: Successes and Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Raab-Westphal, Sabine; Marshall, John F.; Goodman, Simon L.

    2017-01-01

    Integrins are transmembrane receptors that are central to the biology of many human pathologies. Classically mediating cell-extracellular matrix and cell-cell interaction, and with an emerging role as local activators of TGFβ, they influence cancer, fibrosis, thrombosis and inflammation. Their ligand binding and some regulatory sites are extracellular and sensitive to pharmacological intervention, as proven by the clinical success of seven drugs targeting them. The six drugs on the market in 2016 generated revenues of some US$3.5 billion, mainly from inhibitors of α4-series integrins. In this review we examine the current developments in integrin therapeutics, especially in cancer, and comment on the health economic implications of these developments. PMID:28832494

  6. Targeting lactate metabolism for cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Joanne R.; Cleveland, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Lactate, once considered a waste product of glycolysis, has emerged as a critical regulator of cancer development, maintenance, and metastasis. Indeed, tumor lactate levels correlate with increased metastasis, tumor recurrence, and poor outcome. Lactate mediates cancer cell intrinsic effects on metabolism and has additional non–tumor cell autonomous effects that drive tumorigenesis. Tumor cells can metabolize lactate as an energy source and shuttle lactate to neighboring cancer cells, adjacent stroma, and vascular endothelial cells, which induces metabolic reprogramming. Lactate also plays roles in promoting tumor inflammation and in functioning as a signaling molecule that stimulates tumor angiogenesis. Here we review the mechanisms of lactate production and transport and highlight emerging evidence indicating that targeting lactate metabolism is a promising approach for cancer therapeutics. PMID:23999443

  7. New therapeutic targets for cancer bone metastases

    PubMed Central

    Krzeszinski, Jing Y.; Wan, Yihong

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastases are dejected consequences of many types of tumors including breast, prostate, lung, kidney and thyroid cancers. This complicated process begins with the successful tumor cell epithelial–mesenchymal transition, escape from the original site, and penetration into circulation. The homing of tumor cells to the bone depends on both tumor-intrinsic traits and various molecules supplied by the bone metastatic niche. The colonization and growth of cancer cells in the osseous environment, which awaken their dormancy to form micro- and macro-metastasis, involve an intricate interaction between the circulating tumor cells and local bone cells including osteoclasts, osteoblasts, adipocytes and macrophages. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances in the identification of new molecules and novel mechanisms during each step of bone metastasis that may serve as promising therapeutic targets. PMID:25962679

  8. Development of Novel Activin-Targeted Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Justin L; Walton, Kelly L; Al-Musawi, Sara L; Kelly, Emily K; Qian, Hongwei; La, Mylinh; Lu, Louis; Lovrecz, George; Ziemann, Mark; Lazarus, Ross; El-Osta, Assam; Gregorevic, Paul; Harrison, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    Soluble activin type II receptors (ActRIIA/ActRIIB), via binding to diverse TGF-β proteins, can increase muscle and bone mass, correct anemia or protect against diet-induced obesity. While exciting, these multiple actions of soluble ActRIIA/IIB limit their therapeutic potential and highlight the need for new reagents that target specific ActRIIA/IIB ligands. Here, we modified the activin A and activin B prodomains, regions required for mature growth factor synthesis, to generate specific activin antagonists. Initially, the prodomains were fused to the Fc region of mouse IgG2A antibody and, subsequently, “fastener” residues (Lys45, Tyr96, His97, and Ala98; activin A numbering) that confer latency to other TGF-β proteins were incorporated. For the activin A prodomain, these modifications generated a reagent that potently (IC50 5 nmol/l) and specifically inhibited activin A signaling in vitro, and activin A-induced muscle wasting in vivo. Interestingly, the modified activin B prodomain inhibited both activin A and B signaling in vitro (IC50 ~2 nmol/l) and in vivo, suggesting it could serve as a general activin antagonist. Importantly, unlike soluble ActRIIA/IIB, the modified prodomains did not inhibit myostatin or GDF-11 activity. To underscore the therapeutic utility of specifically antagonising activin signaling, we demonstrate that the modified activin prodomains promote significant increases in muscle mass. PMID:25399825

  9. Identification of endoplasmic reticulum stress-inducing agents by antagonizing autophagy: a new potential strategy for identification of anti-cancer therapeutics in B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Emilia; Maddocks, Kami; Flynn, Joseph; Jones, Jeffrey; Cole, Sara L.; Zhang, Xiaoli; Byrd, John C.; Johnson, Amy J.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays a vital function in multiple cellular processes. There is a growing interest in developing therapeutic agents that can target the ER in cancer cells, inducing a stress response that leads to cell death. However, ER stress-inducing agents can also induce autophagy, a survival strategy of cancer cells. Therefore, by inhibiting autophagy we can increase the efficacy of the ER stress-inducing agents. Nelfinavir, a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitor with anti-cancer properties, can induce ER stress. Nelfinavir’s effects on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are yet to be elucidated. Herein we demonstrate that nelfinavir induces ER morphological changes and stress response, along with an autophagic protective strategy. Our data reveal that chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, significantly increases nelfinavir cytotoxicity. These results identify a novel strategy potentially effective in CLL treatment, by repositioning two well-known drugs as a combinatorial therapy with anti-cancer properties. PMID:23469959

  10. Destabilisation of dimeric 14-3-3 proteins as a novel approach to anti-cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Woodcock, Joanna M; Coolen, Carl; Goodwin, Katy L; Baek, Dong Jae; Bittman, Robert; Samuel, Michael S; Pitson, Stuart M; Lopez, Angel F

    2015-06-10

    14-3-3 proteins play a pivotal role in controlling cell proliferation and survival, two commonly dysregulated hallmarks of cancers. 14-3-3 protein expression is enhanced in many human cancers and correlates with more aggressive tumors and poor prognosis, suggesting a role for 14-3-3 proteins in tumorigenesis and/or progression. We showed previously that the dimeric state of 14-3-3 proteins is regulated by the lipid sphingosine, a physiological inducer of apoptosis. As the functions of 14-3-3 proteins are dependent on their dimeric state, this sphingosine-mediated 14-3-3 regulation provides a possible means to target dimeric 14-3-3 for therapeutic effect. However, sphingosine mimics are needed that are not susceptible to sphingolipid metabolism. We show here the identification and optimization of sphingosine mimetics that render dimeric 14-3-3 susceptible to phosphorylation at a site buried in the dimer interface and induce mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Two such compounds, RB-011 and RB-012, disrupt 14-3-3 dimers at low micromolar concentrations and induce rapid down-regulation of Raf-MAPK and PI3K-Akt signaling in Jurkat cells. Importantly, both RB-011 and RB-012 induce apoptosis of human A549 lung cancer cells and RB-012, through disruption of MAPK signaling, reduces xenograft growth in mice. Thus, these compounds provide proof-of-principle for this novel 14-3-3-targeting approach for anti-cancer drug discovery.

  11. Targeting multiplicity: the key factor for anti-cancer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gary-Bobo, M; Vaillant, O; Maynadier, M; Basile, I; Gallud, A; El Cheikh, K; Bouffard, E; Morère, A; Rébillard, X; Puche, P; Nirdé, P; Garcia, M

    2013-01-01

    In this mini-review, we focus on different strategies to bring nanotools specifically to cancer cells. We discuss about a better targeting of tumor, combining the characteristics of tumor environment, the increase in nanoparticles life time, the biomarkers overexpressed on cancer cells and different physical methods for non invasive therapies. Here we detail the necessity of a synergy between passive and active targeting for an actual specificity of cancer cells.

  12. Liquid biopsy and therapeutic response: Circulating tumor cell cultures for evaluation of anticancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Bee Luan; Grenci, Gianluca; Jing, Tengyang; Lim, Ying Bena; Lee, Soo Chin; Thiery, Jean Paul; Han, Jongyoon; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-01-01

    The lack of a robust anticancer drug screening system to monitor patients during treatment delays realization of personalized treatment. We demonstrate an efficient approach to evaluate drug response using patient-derived circulating tumor cell (CTC) cultures obtained from liquid biopsy. Custom microfabricated tapered microwells were integrated with microfluidics to allow robust formation of CTC clusters without pre-enrichment and subsequent drug screening in situ. Rapid feedback after 2 weeks promotes immediate intervention upon detection of drug resistance or tolerance. The procedure was clinically validated with blood samples (n = 73) from 55 patients with early-stage, newly diagnosed, locally advanced, or refractory metastatic breast cancer. Twenty-four of these samples were used for drug evaluation. Cluster formation potential correlated inversely with increased drug concentration and therapeutic treatment. This new and robust liquid biopsy technique can potentially evaluate patient prognosis with CTC clusters during treatment and provide a noninvasive and inexpensive assessment that can guide drug discovery development or therapeutic choices for personalized treatment. PMID:27453941

  13. Liquid biopsy and therapeutic response: Circulating tumor cell cultures for evaluation of anticancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Bee Luan; Grenci, Gianluca; Jing, Tengyang; Lim, Ying Bena; Lee, Soo Chin; Thiery, Jean Paul; Han, Jongyoon; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-07-01

    The lack of a robust anticancer drug screening system to monitor patients during treatment delays realization of personalized treatment. We demonstrate an efficient approach to evaluate drug response using patient-derived circulating tumor cell (CTC) cultures obtained from liquid biopsy. Custom microfabricated tapered microwells were integrated with microfluidics to allow robust formation of CTC clusters without pre-enrichment and subsequent drug screening in situ. Rapid feedback after 2 weeks promotes immediate intervention upon detection of drug resistance or tolerance. The procedure was clinically validated with blood samples (n = 73) from 55 patients with early-stage, newly diagnosed, locally advanced, or refractory metastatic breast cancer. Twenty-four of these samples were used for drug evaluation. Cluster formation potential correlated inversely with increased drug concentration and therapeutic treatment. This new and robust liquid biopsy technique can potentially evaluate patient prognosis with CTC clusters during treatment and provide a noninvasive and inexpensive assessment that can guide drug discovery development or therapeutic choices for personalized treatment.

  14. Therapeutic Targeting of Nuclear Export Inhibition in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Arjun; Saltarski, Jessica M; White, Michael A; Scaglioni, Pier P; Gerber, David E

    2017-09-01

    Intracellular compartmentalization and trafficking of molecules plays a critical role in complex and essential cellular processes. In lung cancer and other malignancies, aberrant nucleocytoplasmic transport of tumor suppressor proteins and cell cycle regulators results in tumorigenesis and inactivation of apoptosis. Pharmacologic agents targeting this process, termed selective inhibitors of nuclear export (SINE), have demonstrated antitumor efficacy in preclinical models and human clinical trials. Exportin-1 (XPO1), which serves as the sole exporter of several tumor suppressor proteins and cell cycle regulators, including retinoblastoma, adenomatous polyposis coli, p53, p73, p21, p27, forkhead box O, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, inhibitor of κB, topoisomerase II, and protease activated receptor 4-is the principal focus of development of SINE. The most extensively studied of the SINE to date, the exportin-1 inhibitor selinexor (KPT-330 [Karyopharm Therapeutics, Inc., Newton Centre, MA]), has demonstrated single-agent anticancer activity and synergistic effects in combination regimens against multiple cancer types, with principal toxicities of low-grade cytopenias and gastrointestinal effects. SINE may have particular relevance in KRAS-driven tumors, for which this treatment strategy demonstrates significant synthetic lethality. A multicenter phase 1/2 clinical trial of selinexor in previously treated advanced KRAS-mutant NSCLC is under way. Copyright © 2017 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ascaris lumbricoides: an overview of therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Hagel, Isabel; Giusti, Tatiana

    2010-10-01

    A. lumbricoides is the largest of the common nematode parasites of man and has been associated with intestinal pathology, respiratory symptoms and malnutrition in children from endemic areas. Current anthelmintic treatments have proven to be safe. However, a reduced efficacy of single dose drugs has been reported. In veterinary practice, anthelmintic drug resistance is an irreversible problem. Thus, research and development of sensitive tools for early detection of drug resistance as well as new anthelmintic approaches are urgently needed. In this review, we summarized data providing information about current drug therapy against A. lumbricoides and other intestinal helminths, new drugs in experimental trials, future drugs perspectives and the identification of immunogenic parasite molecules that may be suitable vaccine targets. In addition to the WHO recommended drugs (albendazole, mebendazole, levamisole, and pyrantel pamoate), new anthelmintic alternatives such as tribendimidine and Nitazoxanide have proved to be safe and effective against A. lumbricoides and other soil-transmitted helminthiases in human trials. Also, some new drugs for veterinary use, monepantel and cyclooctadepsipeptides (e.g., PF1022A), will probably expand future drug spectrum for human treatments. The development of genomic technology has provided a great amount of available nematode DNA sequences, coupled with new gene function data that may lead to the identification of new drug targets through efficient mining of nematode genomic databases. On the other hand, the identification of nematode antigens involved in different parasite vital functions as well as immunomodulatory molecules in animals and humans may contribute to future studies of new therapeutic approaches.

  16. Emerging therapeutic targets in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Puja; Hunt, Clayton R.; Pandita, Tej K.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of gastro-esophageal disease and associated rate of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is rising at an exponential rate in the United States. However, research targeting EAC is lagging behind, and much research is needed in the field to identify ways to diagnose EAC early as well as to improve the rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) to systemic therapies. Esophagectomy with subsequent reconstruction is known to be a morbid procedure that significantly impacts a patient's quality of life. If indeed the pCR rate of patients can be improved and those patients destined to be pCR can be identified ahead of time, they may be able to avoid this life-altering procedure. While cancer-specific biological pathways have been thoroughly investigated in other solid malignancies, much remains unexplored in EAC. In this review, we will highlight some of the latest research in the field in regards with EAC, along with new therapeutic targets that are currently being explored. After reviewing conventional treatment and current changes in medical therapy for EAC, we will focus on unchartered grounds such as cancer stem cells, genetics and epigenetics, immunotherapy, and chemoradio-resistant pathways as we simultaneously propose some investigational possibilities that could be applicable to EAC. PMID:27102294

  17. Importins and exportins as therapeutic targets in cancer.

    PubMed

    Mahipal, Amit; Malafa, Mokenge

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear transport proteins, importins and exportins (karyopherin-β proteins), may play an important role in cancer by transporting key mediators of oncogenesis across the nuclear membrane in cancer cells. During nucleocytoplasmic transport of tumor suppressor proteins and cell cycle regulators during the processing of these proteins, aberrant cellular growth signaling and inactivation of apoptosis can occur, both critical to growth and development of tumors. Karyopherin-β proteins bind to these cargo proteins and RanGTP for active transport across the nuclear membrane through the nuclear pore complex. Importins and exportins are overexpressed in multiple tumors including melanoma, pancreatic, breast, colon, gastric, prostate, esophageal, lung cancer, and lymphomas. Furthermore, some of the karyopherin-β proteins such as exportin-1 have been implicated in drug resistance in cancer. Importin and exportin inhibitors are being considered as therapeutic targets against cancer and have shown preclinical anticancer activity. Moreover, synergistic activity has been observed with various chemotherapeutic and targeted agents. However, clinical development of the exportin-1 inhibitor leptomycin B was stopped due to adverse events, including vomiting, anorexia, and dehydration. Selinexor, a selective nuclear export inhibitor, is being tested in multiple clinical trials both as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy. Selinexor has demonstrated clinical activity in multiple cancers, especially acute myelogenous leukemia and multiple myeloma. The roles of other importin and exportin inhibitors still need to be investigated clinically. Targeting the key mediators of nucleocytoplasmic transport in cancer cells represents a novel strategy in cancer intervention with the potential to significantly affect outcomes.

  18. The molecular basis of targeting protein kinases in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we provide an overview of targeted anticancer therapies with small molecule kinase inhibitors. First, we discuss why a single constitutively active kinase emanating from a variety of aberrant genetic alterations is capable of transforming a normal cell, leading it to acquire the hallmarks of a cancer cell. To draw attention to the fact that kinase inhibition in targeted cancer therapeutics differs from conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, we exploit a conceptual framework explaining why suppressed kinase activity will selectively kill only the so-called oncogene 'addicted' cancer cell, while sparing the healthy cell. Second, we introduce the protein kinase superfamily in light of its common active conformation with precisely positioned structural elements, and the diversified auto-inhibitory conformations among the kinase families. Understanding the detailed activation mechanism of individual kinases is essential to relate the observed oncogenic alterations to the elevated constitutively active state, to identify the mechanism of consequent drug resistance, and to guide the development of the next-generation inhibitors. To clarify the vital importance of structural guidelines in studies of oncogenesis, we explain how somatic mutations in EGFR result in kinase constitutive activation. Third, in addition to the common theme of secondary (acquired) mutations that prevent drug binding from blocking a signaling pathway which is hijacked by the aberrant activated kinase, we discuss scenarios of drug resistance and relapse by compensating lesions that bypass the inactivated pathway in a vertical or horizontal fashion. Collectively, these suggest that the future challenge of cancer therapy with small molecule kinase inhibitors will rely on the discovery of distinct combinations of optimized drugs to target individual subtypes of different cancers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular docking and dynamic simulation studies evidenced plausible immunotherapeutic anticancer property by Withaferin A targeting indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Reddy, S V G; Reddy, K Thammi; Kumari, V Valli; Basha, Syed Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is emerging as an important new therapeutic drug target for the treatment of cancer characterized by pathological immune suppression. IDO catalyzes the rate-limiting step of tryptophan degradation along the kynurenine pathway. Reduction in local tryptophan concentration and the production of immunomodulatory tryptophan metabolites contribute to the immunosuppressive effects of IDO. Presence of IDO on dentritic cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes leading to the activation of T cells toward forming immunosuppressive microenvironment for the survival of tumor cells has confirmed the importance of IDO as a promising novel anticancer immunotherapy drug target. On the other hand, Withaferin A (WA) - active constituent of Withania Somnifera ayurvedic herb has shown to be having a wide range of targeted anticancer properties. In the present study conducted here is an attempt to explore the potential of WA in attenuating IDO for immunotherapeutic tumor arresting activity and to elucidate the underlying mode of action in a computational approach. Our docking and molecular dynamic simulation results predict high binding affinity of the ligand to the receptor with up to -11.51 kcal/mol of energy and 3.63 nM of IC50 value. Further, de novo molecular dynamic simulations predicted stable ligand interactions with critically important residues SER167; ARG231; LYS377, and heme moiety involved in IDO's activity. Conclusively, our results strongly suggest WA as a valuable small ligand molecule with strong binding affinity toward IDO.

  20. Combining Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors and Kinase-Inhibiting Supramolecular Therapeutics for Enhanced Anticancer Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ashish; Natarajan, Siva Kumar; Chandrasekar, Vineethkrishna; Pandey, Prithvi Raj; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2016-09-29

    A major limitation of immune checkpoint inhibitors is that only a small subset of patients achieve durable clinical responses. This necessitates the development of combinatorial regimens with immunotherapy. However, some combinations, such as MEK- or PI3K-inhibitors with a PD1-PDL1 checkpoint inhibitor, are pharmacologically challenging to implement. We rationalized that such combinations can be enabled using nanoscale supramolecular targeted therapeutics, which spatially home into tumors and exert temporally sustained inhibition of the target. Here we describe two case studies where nanoscale MEK- and PI3K-targeting supramolecular therapeutics were engineered using a quantum mechanical all-atomistic simulation-based approach. The combinations of nanoscale MEK- and PI3K-targeting supramolecular therapeutics with checkpoint PDL1 and PD1 inhibitors exert enhanced antitumor outcome in melanoma and breast cancers in vivo, respectively. Additionally, the temporal sequence of administration impacts the outcome. The combination of supramolecular therapeutics and immunotherapy could emerge as a paradigm shift in the treatment of cancer.

  1. Anticancer properties and enhancement of therapeutic potential of cisplatin by leaf extract of Zanthoxylum armatum DC.

    PubMed

    Singh, Thangjam Davis; Meitei, Heikrujam Thoihen; Sharma, Adhikarimayum Lakhikumar; Robinson, Asem; Singh, Lisam Shanjukumar; Singh, Thiyam Ramsing

    2015-08-20

    Clinical use of chemotherapeutic drug, cisplatin is limited by its toxicity and drug resistance. Therefore, efforts continue for the discovery of novel combination therapies with cisplatin, to increase efficacy and reduce its toxicity. Here, we screened 16 medicinal plant extracts from Northeast part of India and found that leaf extract of Zanthoxylum armatum DC. (ZALE) induced cytotoxicity as well as an effect on the increasing of the efficiency of chemotherapeutic drugs (cisplatin, mitomycin C and camptothecin). This work shows detail molecular mechanism of anti-cancer activity of ZALE and its potential for combined treatment regimens to enhance the apoptotic response of chemotherapeutic drugs. ZALE induced cytotoxicity, nuclear blebbing and DNA fragmentation in HeLA cells suggesting apoptosis induction in human cervical cell line. However, the apoptosis induced was independent of caspase 3 activation and poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Further, ZALE activated Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathway as revealed by increased phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK), p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Inhibition of ERK activation but not p38 or JNK completely blocked the ZALE induced apoptosis suggesting an ERK dependent apoptosis. Moreover, ZALE generated DNA double strand breaks as suggested by the induction γH2AX foci formation. Interestingly, pretreatment of certain cancer cell lines with ZALE, sensitized the cancer cells to cisplatin and other chemotherapeutic drugs. Enhanced caspase activation was observed in the synergistic interaction among chemotherapeutic drugs and ZALE. Purification and identification of the bio-active molecules from the ZALE or as a complementary treatment for a sequential treatment of ZALE with chemotherapeutic drugs might be a new challenger to open a new therapeutic window for the novel anti-cancer treatment.

  2. Honokiol analogs: a novel class of anticancer agents targeting cell signaling pathways and other bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ankit; Kumar Singh, Umesh; Chaudhary, Anurag

    2013-05-01

    Honokiol (3,5-di-(2-propenyl)-1,1-biphenyl-2,2-diol) is a natural bioactive neolignan isolated from the genus Magnolia. In recent studies, honokiol has been observed to have anti-angiogenic, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and GABA-modulating properties in vitro and in preclinical models. Honokiol and its analogs target multiple signaling pathways including NF-κB, STAT3, EGFR, mTOR and caspase-mediated common pathway, which regulate cancer initiation and progression. Honokiol and its targets of action may be helpful in the development of effective analogs and targeted cancer therapy. In this review, recent data describing the molecular targets of honokiol and its analogs with anticancer and some other bioactivities are discussed.

  3. Rad51 and BRCA2--New molecular targets for sensitizing glioma cells to alkylating anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Quiros, Steve; Roos, Wynand Paul; Kaina, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    First line chemotherapeutics for brain tumors (malignant gliomas) are alkylating agents such as temozolomide and nimustine. Despite growing knowledge of how these agents work, patients suffering from this malignancy still face a dismal prognosis. Alkylating agents target DNA, forming the killing lesion O(6)-alkylguanine, which is converted into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that trigger apoptosis. Here we assessed whether inhibiting repair of DSBs by homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is a reasonable strategy for sensitizing glioma cells to alkylating agents. For down-regulation of HR in glioma cells, we used an interference RNA (iRNA) approach targeting Rad51 and BRCA2, and for NHEJ we employed the DNA-PK inhibitor NU7026. We also assessed whether inhibition of poly(ADP)ribosyltransferase (PARP) by olaparib would enhance the killing effect. The data show that knockdown of Rad51 or BRCA2 greatly sensitizes cells to DSBs and the induction of cell death following temozolomide and nimustine (ACNU). It did not sensitize to ionizing radiation (IR). The expression of O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) abolished all these effects, indicating that O(6)-alkylguanine induced by these drugs is the primary lesion responsible for the formation of DSBs and increased sensitivity of glioma cells following knockdown of Rad51 and BRCA2. Inhibition of DNA-PK only slightly sensitized to temozolomide whereas a significant effect was observed with IR. A triple strategy including siRNA and the PARP inhibitor olaparib further improved the killing effect of temozolomide. The data provides evidence that down-regulation of Rad51 or BRCA2 is a reasonable strategy for sensitizing glioma cells to killing by O(6)-alkylating anti-cancer drugs. The data also provide proof of principle that a triple strategy involving down-regulation of HR, PARP inhibition and MGMT depletion may greatly enhance the therapeutic effect of temozolomide.

  4. Historical review: Cytokines as therapeutics and targets of therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Vilcek, Jan; Feldmann, Marc

    2004-04-01

    Cytokine research has spawned the introduction of new therapies that have revolutionized the treatment of many important diseases. These therapeutic advances have resulted from two very different strategies. The first therapeutic strategy embodies the administration of purified, recombinant cytokines. The second relies on the administration of therapeutics that inhibit the harmful effects of upregulated, endogenous cytokines. Examples of successful cytokine therapeutics include hematopoietic growth factors (colony stimulating factors) and interferons. Prime examples of cytokine antagonists that have profoundly altered the treatment of some inflammatory disorders are agents that inhibit the effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF). In this article, we highlight some of the studies that have been responsible for the introduction of cytokine and anti-cytokine therapies, with emphasis on the development of interferons and anti-TNF agents.

  5. Targeted alpha anticancer therapies: update and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Barry J; Huang, Chen-Yu; Clarke, Raymond A

    2014-01-01

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) is an emerging option for local and systemic cancer treatment. Preclinical research and clinical trials show that alpha-emitting radionuclides can kill targeted cancer cells while sparing normal cells, thus reducing toxicity. 223RaCl2 (Xofigo®) is the first alpha emitting radioisotope to gain registration in the US for palliative therapy of prostate cancer bone metastases by indirect physiological targeting. The alpha emitting radioisotopes 211At, 213Bi, 225Ac and 227Th are being used to label targeting vectors such as monoclonal antibodies for specific cancer therapy indications. In this review, safety and tolerance aspects are considered with respect to microdosimetry, specific energy, Monte Carlo model calculations, biodosimetry, equivalent dose and mutagenesis. The clinical efficacy of TAT for solid tumors may also be enhanced by its capacity for tumor anti-vascular (TAVAT) effects. This review emphasizes key aspects of TAT research with respect to the PAI2-uPAR complex and the monoclonal antibodies bevacizumab, C595 and J591. Clinical trial outcomes are reviewed for neuroendocrine tumors, leukemia, glioma, melanoma, non-Hodgkins lymphoma, and prostate bone metastases. Recommendations and future directions are proposed. PMID:25422581

  6. Artemisinin as an anticancer drug: Recent advances in target profiling and mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yin Kwan; Xu, Chengchao; Kalesh, Karunakaran A; He, Yingke; Lin, Qingsong; Wong, W S Fred; Shen, Han-Ming; Wang, Jigang

    2017-06-23

    Artemisinin and its derivatives (collectively termed as artemisinins) are among the most important and effective antimalarial drugs, with proven safety and efficacy in clinical use. Beyond their antimalarial effects, artemisinins have also been shown to possess selective anticancer properties, demonstrating cytotoxic effects against a wide range of cancer types both in vitro and in vivo. These effects appear to be mediated by artemisinin-induced changes in multiple signaling pathways, interfering simultaneously with multiple hallmarks of cancer. Great strides have been taken to characterize these pathways and to reveal their anticancer mechanisms of action of artemisinin. Moreover, encouraging data have also been obtained from a limited number of clinical trials to support their anticancer property. However, there are several key gaps in knowledge that continue to serve as significant barriers to the repurposing of artemisinins as effective anticancer agents. This review focuses on important and emerging aspects of this field, highlighting breakthroughs in unresolved questions as well as novel techniques and approaches that have been taken in recent studies. We discuss the mechanism of artemisinin activation in cancer, novel and significant findings with regards to artemisinin target proteins and pathways, new understandings in artemisinin-induced cell death mechanisms, as well as the practical issues of repurposing artemisinin. We believe these will be important topics in realizing the potential of artemisinin and its derivatives as safe and potent anticancer agents. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Incomplete target neutralization by the anti-cancer antibody rilotumumab

    PubMed Central

    Greenall, Sameer A.; Adams, Timothy E.; Johns, Terrance G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The antibody rilotumumab, which has been tested in multiple Phase 2 and Phase 3 trials, has been reported to neutralize hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), the ligand for the oncogene MET. However, we report that rilotumumab does not prevent HGF from directly binding to MET on conventional and primary patient-derived human gliomasphere lines, a trait driven by the HGF α-chain, which remains free to engage cell-surface glycosaminoglycans and the receptor MET. This binding induces MET phosphorylation, initiates robust AKT and ERK signaling and potentiates biological effects such as cell scattering. This partial antagonism was highly exacerbated in the presence of activated epidermal growth factor receptor, which is common in several cancers. Hence, we confirm that rilotumumab is only a partial antagonist of HGF activity, a finding that has considerable implications for the therapeutic use of rilotumumab. PMID:26750997

  8. Mitochondria: A Therapeutic Target for Parkinson's Disease?

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu; Hoffer, Alan; Hoffer, Barry; Qi, Xin

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders. The exact causes of neuronal damage are unknown, but mounting evidence indicates that mitochondrial-mediated pathways contribute to the underlying mechanisms of dopaminergic neuronal cell death both in PD patients and in PD animal models. Mitochondria are organized in a highly dynamic tubular network that is continuously reshaped by opposing processes of fusion and fission. Defects in either fusion or fission, leading to mitochondrial fragmentation, limit mitochondrial motility, decrease energy production and increase oxidative stress, thereby promoting cell dysfunction and death. Thus, the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics processes, such as fusion, fission and mitophagy, represents important mechanisms controlling neuronal cell fate. In this review, we summarize some of the recent evidence supporting that impairment of mitochondrial dynamics, mitophagy and mitochondrial import occurs in cellular and animal PD models and disruption of these processes is a contributing mechanism to cell death in dopaminergic neurons. We also summarize mitochondria-targeting therapeutics in models of PD, proposing that modulation of mitochondrial impairment might be beneficial for drug development toward treatment of PD.

  9. Deubiquitinases: Novel Therapeutic Targets in Immune Surveillance?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a protective response of the organism to tissue injury or infection. It occurs when the immune system recognizes Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs) or Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern (DAMPs) through the activation of Pattern Recognition Receptors. This initiates a variety of signalling events that conclude in the upregulation of proinflammatory molecules, which initiate an appropriate immune response. This response is tightly regulated since any aberrant activation of immune responses would have severe pathological consequences such as sepsis or chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Accumulative evidence shows that the ubiquitin system, and in particular ubiquitin-specific isopeptidases also known as deubiquitinases (DUBs), plays crucial roles in the control of these immune pathways. In this review we will give an up-to-date overview on the role of DUBs in the NF-κB pathway and inflammasome activation, two intrinsically related events triggered by activation of the membrane TLRs as well as the cytosolic NOD and NLR receptors. Modulation of DUB activity by small molecules has been proposed as a way to control dysregulation or overactivation of these key players of the inflammatory response. We will also discuss the advances and challenges of a potential use of DUBs as therapeutic targets in inflammatory pathologies. PMID:27597804

  10. ASICs as therapeutic targets for migraine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is the most common neurological disorder and one of the most common chronic pain conditions. Despite its prevalence, the pathophysiology leading to migraine is poorly understood and the identification of new therapeutic targets has been slow. Several processes are currently thought to contribute to migraine including altered activity in the hypothalamus, cortical-spreading depression (CSD), and afferent sensory input from the cranial meninges. Decreased extracellular pH and subsequent activation of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) may contribute to each of these processes and may thus play a role in migraine pathophysiology. Although few studies have directly examined a role of ASICs in migraine, studies directly examining a connection have generated promising results including efficacy of ASIC blockers in both preclinical migraine models and in human migraine patients. The purpose of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology thought to contribute to migraine and findings that implicate decreased pH and/or ASICs in these events, as well as propose issues to be resolved in future studies of ASICs and migraine. PMID:25582295

  11. Deubiquitinases: Novel Therapeutic Targets in Immune Surveillance?

    PubMed

    Lopez-Castejon, Gloria; Edelmann, Mariola J

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a protective response of the organism to tissue injury or infection. It occurs when the immune system recognizes Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs) or Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern (DAMPs) through the activation of Pattern Recognition Receptors. This initiates a variety of signalling events that conclude in the upregulation of proinflammatory molecules, which initiate an appropriate immune response. This response is tightly regulated since any aberrant activation of immune responses would have severe pathological consequences such as sepsis or chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Accumulative evidence shows that the ubiquitin system, and in particular ubiquitin-specific isopeptidases also known as deubiquitinases (DUBs), plays crucial roles in the control of these immune pathways. In this review we will give an up-to-date overview on the role of DUBs in the NF-κB pathway and inflammasome activation, two intrinsically related events triggered by activation of the membrane TLRs as well as the cytosolic NOD and NLR receptors. Modulation of DUB activity by small molecules has been proposed as a way to control dysregulation or overactivation of these key players of the inflammatory response. We will also discuss the advances and challenges of a potential use of DUBs as therapeutic targets in inflammatory pathologies.

  12. Targeted Delivery System of Nanobiomaterials in Anticancer Therapy: From Cells to Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Su-Eon; Jin, Hyo-Eon; Hong, Soon-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Targeted delivery systems of nanobiomaterials are necessary to be developed for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Nanobiomaterials can be engineered to recognize cancer-specific receptors at the cellular levels and to deliver anticancer drugs into the diseased sites. In particular, nanobiomaterial-based nanocarriers, so-called nanoplatforms, are the design of the targeted delivery systems such as liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles/micelles, nanoconjugates, norganic materials, carbon-based nanobiomaterials, and bioinspired phage system, which are based on the nanosize of 1–100 nm in diameter. In this review, the design and the application of these nanoplatforms are discussed at the cellular levels as well as in the clinics. We believe that this review can offer recent advances in the targeted delivery systems of nanobiomaterials regarding in vitro and in vivo applications and the translation of nanobiomaterials to nanomedicine in anticancer therapy. PMID:24672796

  13. Targeting Epigenetic Processes in Photodynamic Therapy-Induced Anticancer Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wachowska, Malgorzata; Muchowicz, Angelika; Golab, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer is an approved therapeutic procedure that generates oxidative stress leading to cell death of tumor and stromal cells. Cell death resulting from oxidative damage to intracellular components leads to the release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that trigger robust inflammatory response and creates local conditions for effective sampling of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) by antigen-presenting cells. The latter can trigger development of TAA-specific adaptive immune response. However, due to a number of mechanisms, including epigenetic regulation of TAA expression, tumor cells evade immune recognition. Therefore, numerous approaches are being developed to combine PDT with immunotherapies to allow development of systemic immunity. In this review, we describe immunoregulatory mechanisms of epigenetic treatments that were shown to restore the expression of epigenetically silenced or down-regulated major histocompatibility complex molecules as well as TAA. We also discuss the results of our recent studies showing that epigenetic treatments based on administration of methyltransferase inhibitors in combination with PDT can release effective mechanisms leading to development of antitumor immunity and potentiated antitumor effects. PMID:26284197

  14. Receptor tyrosine kinases as target for anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Brunelleschi, S; Penengo, L; Santoro, M M; Gaudino, G

    2002-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are cell surface transmembrane proteins responsible for intracellular signal transduction. They are expressed in several cell types and, after activation by growth factor binding, trigger a series of intracellular pathways, leading to a wide variety of cell responses (e.g., differentiation, proliferation, migration and invasion, angiogenesis, survival). Over-expression and/or structural alteration of RTKs family members are often associated to human cancers and tumor cells are known to use RTK transduction pathways to achieve tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Therefore, RTKs represent pivotal target in approaches of cancer therapy. A number of small molecules acting as RTK inhibitors have been synthesized by pharmaceutical companies and are under clinical trials, are being analyzed in animal models or have been successfully marketed. Ligand-dependent downregulation of RTKs is a critical step for modulating their activity and the adaptor Cbl has been indicated as the key protein involved in negative regulation of RTKs, such as EGF and HGF receptors. These data suggest novel potential pharmacological targets for the treatment of human malignancies associated to oncogenic activation of RTKs.

  15. Polyamide platinum anticancer complexes designed to target specific DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, David; Wheate, Nial J; Ralph, Stephen F; Howard, Warren A; Tor, Yitzhak; Aldrich-Wright, Janice R

    2006-07-24

    Two new platinum complexes, trans-chlorodiammine[N-(2-aminoethyl)-4-[4-(N-methylimidazole-2-carboxamido)-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamido]-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamide]platinum(II) chloride (DJ1953-2) and trans-chlorodiammine[N-(6-aminohexyl)-4-[4-(N-methylimidazole-2-carboxamido)-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamido]-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamide]platinum(II) chloride (DJ1953-6) have been synthesized as proof-of-concept molecules in the design of agents that can specifically target genes in DNA. Coordinate covalent binding to DNA was demonstrated with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Using circular dichroism, these complexes were found to show greater DNA binding affinity to the target sequence: d(CATTGTCAGAC)(2), than toward either d(GTCTGTCAATG)(2,) which contains different flanking sequences, or d(CATTGAGAGAC)(2), which contains a double base pair mismatch sequence. DJ1953-2 unwinds the DNA helix by around 13 degrees , but neither metal complex significantly affects the DNA melting temperature. Unlike simple DNA minor groove binders, DJ1953-2 is able to inhibit, in vitro, RNA synthesis. The cytotoxicity of both metal complexes in the L1210 murine leukaemia cell line was also determined, with DJ1953-6 (34 microM) more active than DJ1953-2 (>50 microM). These results demonstrate the potential of polyamide platinum complexes and provide the structural basis for designer agents that are able to recognize biologically relevant sequences and prevent DNA transcription and replication.

  16. Redox and pH-responsive gold nanoparticles as a new platform for simultaneous triple anti-cancer drugs targeting.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Marjan; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2017-03-30

    Cancer is considered to be one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide and nanotechnology was shown to have a unique potential to enhance the therapeutic performance of anti-cancer agents. A novel dual stimuli-responsive polyethylene glycol (PEG) block copolymer was synthesized for the decoration and stabilization of gold nanoparticles (NPs) to carry multiple anti-cancer drugs, doxorubicin (DOX), methotrexate (MTX) and 6-mercaptopurine (MP). DOX, MTX and MP were successfully loaded (the loading capacity of 37%, 12%, and 49%, respectively) into the NPs by ionic interaction (DOX and MTX) and disulphide-covalent bond formation (MP) in the polymeric shell of NPs. Furthermore, the triggered drugs release ability of NPs was shown through the comparison of simulated physiological and tumor tissue environments. The enhanced efficiency of the developed NPs and their targeted performance via MTX (target ligand of folate receptors) decoration were illustrated through the various cell cytotoxicity studies such as MTT assay, DAPI staining, and flow cytometry on various cancer cell lines with different levels of folate receptors. Our proposed idea in simultaneous delivery of three cytotoxic drugs with our newly designed PEGylated gold NPs may provide promising and novel prospect in cancer therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Magnetic core-shell hybrid nanoparticles for receptor targeted anti-cancer therapy and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Shanavas, Asifkhan; Sasidharan, Sisini; Bahadur, Dhirendra; Srivastava, Rohit

    2017-01-15

    Hybrid nanoparticles with magnetic poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticle 'core', surface modified with folate-chitosan (fol-cht) conjugate 'shell' are evaluated as simultaneous anti-cancer therapeutic and MRI contrast agent. The fol-cht conjugate is prepared using carbodiimide crosslinking chemistry at an optimized folate to amine (chitosan) molar ratio for further coating on PLGA nanoparticles loaded with docetaxel and well packed super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). Apart from possessing a targeting moiety, the coating provides a physical barrier to avoid undesired burst release of drug and also imparts sensitivity to acidic pH, due to protonated amine group dependent decondensation of the coating and subsequent drug release. The biocompatible hybrid nanoparticles provide receptor targeted docetaxel and SPION delivery for anti-cancer therapy and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging respectively, as tested in both folate receptor positive and negative cancer cells. Enhancement in nanoparticle uptake by folate receptor positive oral cancer cells caused significant increase in docetaxel mediated cytotoxicity. While polymeric encapsulation and fol-cht coating negatively affects the magnetic property of iron oxide nanoparticles, their aggregation in the core, shortened the overall T2 relaxation time thereby enhancing the nanoparticle relaxivity to provide better in vitro MR imaging.

  18. Tyrosine kinase, aurora kinase and leucine aminopeptidase as attractive drug targets in anticancer therapy - characterisation of their inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ziemska, Joanna; Solecka, Jolanta

    Cancers are the leading cause of deaths all over the world. Available anticancer agents used in clinics exhibit low therapeutic index and usually high toxicity. Wide spreading drug resistance of cancer cells induce a demanding need to search for new drug targets. Currently, many on-going studies on novel compounds with potent anticancer activity, high selectivity as well as new modes of action are conducted. In this work, we describe in details three enzyme groups, which are at present of extensive interest to medical researchers and pharmaceutical companies. These include receptor tyrosine kinases (e.g. EGFR enzymes) and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (Src enzymes), type A, B and C Aurora kinases and aminopeptidases, especially leucine aminopeptidase. We discuss classification of these enzymes, biochemistry as well as their role in the cell cycle under normal conditions and during cancerogenesis. Further on, the work describes enzyme inhibitors that are under in vitro, preclinical, clinical studies as well as drugs available on the market. Both, chemical structures of discovered inhibitors and the role of chemical moieties in novel drug design are discussed. Described enzymes play essential role in cell cycle, especially in mitosis (Aurora kinases), cell differentiation, growth and apoptosis (tyrosine kinases) as well as G1/S transition (leucine aminopeptidase). In cancer cells, they are overexpressed and only their inhibition may stop tumor progression. This review presents the clinical outcomes of selected inhibitors and argues the safety of drug usage in human volunteers. Clinical studies of EGFR and Src kinase inhibitors in different tumors clearly show the need for molecular selection of patients (to those with mutations in genes coding EGFR and Src) to achieve positive clinical response. Current data indicates the great necessity for new anticancer treatment and actions to limit off-target activity.

  19. Targeting IAPs as an approach to anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Straub, Christopher S

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis is an essential process for embryonic and lymphocyte development, immune system modulation and tissue homeostasis. Defects in apoptotic signaling often lead to diseases of immune deficiency, neurodegeneration and cancer [1, 2]. In the cancer arena, these defects may contribute to the establishment and growth of tumors. Moreover, many cytotoxic chemotherapies act in part by activating these apoptotic networks. Occasionally apoptotic pathways are activated, however key players downstream of initiation are inhibited by negative regulators that have been dysregulated by the diseased state of the cell. Removal of these barriers to apoptosis signaling, it has been rationalized, could restore cell death in diseased cells while sparing those that are not primed for programmed cell death. Additionally, the subversion of these death evading mechanisms may re-sensitize cells that have developed resistance to chemotherapies in this manner. The importance of apoptosis as a maintenance process, and the promise that restoring this signaling could mean in treating cancer has placed many targets on the front line of oncology research. Approaches are being developed that will activate death receptor pathways, synthetically activate caspases, restore the activity of tumor suppressor genes such as p53, and counteract the effects of anti-apoptotic factors. Among these approaches, small molecules are in clinical trials against several anti-apoptotic players, namely the Bcl-2 and IAP proteins. This review will focus on the efforts being advanced against the Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAP), the chemical matter of the inhibitors and the biology emerging from this research.

  20. Potential of apoptotic pathway-targeted cancer therapeutic research: Where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Baig, S; Seevasant, I; Mohamad, J; Mukheem, A; Huri, H Z; Kamarul, T

    2016-01-14

    Underneath the intricacy of every cancer lies mysterious events that impel the tumour cell and its posterity into abnormal growth and tissue invasion. Oncogenic mutations disturb the regulatory circuits responsible for the governance of versatile cellular functions, permitting tumour cells to endure deregulated proliferation, resist to proapoptotic insults, invade and erode normal tissues and above all escape apoptosis. This disruption of apoptosis has been highly implicated in various malignancies and has been exploited as an anticancer strategy. Owing to the fact that apoptosis causes minimal inflammation and damage to the tissue, apoptotic cell death-based therapy has been the centre of attraction for the development of anticancer drugs. Increased understanding of the molecular pathways underlying apoptosis has enabled scientists to establish unique approaches targeting apoptosis pathways in cancer therapeutics. In this review, we reconnoitre the two major pathways (intrinsic and extrinsic) targeted cancer therapeutics, steering toward chief modulators of these pathways, such as B-cell lymphoma 2 protein family members (pro- and antiapoptotic), inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, and the foremost thespian of extrinsic pathway regulator, tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing agent. Together, we also will have a look from clinical perspective to address the agents (drugs) and therapeutic strategies adopted to target these specific proteins/pathways that have entered clinical trials.

  1. Dermatologic adverse events in pediatric patients receiving targeted anticancer therapies: a pooled analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pratilas, Christine A.; Sibaud, Vincent; Boralevi, Franck; Lacouture, Mario E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The dermatologic adverse events (AEs) of various molecularly targeted therapies are well-described in adult cancer patients. Little has been reported on the incidence and clinical presentation of such AEs in pediatric patients with cancer. To address this gap, we analyzed the dermatologic AEs reported across clinical trials of targeted anticancer therapies in pediatric patients. METHODS We conducted an electronic literature search (PubMed, American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meetings’ abstracts, ClinicalTrials.gov, NCI’s Pediatric Oncology Branch webpage) to identify clinical trials involving targeted anticancer therapies that reported dermatologic AEs in their safety data. Studies were limited to the pediatric population, monotherapy trials (oncology), and English language publications. RESULTS Pooled data from 19 clinical studies investigating 11 targeted anticancer agents (alemtuzumab, rituximab, imatinib, dasatinib, erlotinib, vandetanib, sorafenib, cabozantinib, pazopanib, everolimus, and temsirolimus) were analyzed. The most frequently encountered dermatologic AEs were rash (127/660; 19%), xerosis (18/100; 18%), mucositis (68/402; 17%) and pruritus (12/169; 7%). Other AEs included pigmentary abnormalities of the skin/hair (13%), hair disorders (trichomegaly, hypertrichosis, alopecia and madarosis; 14%), urticaria (7%), palmoplantar erythrodysesthesia (7%), erythema, acne, purpura, skin fissures, other ‘unknown skin changes’, exanthem, infection, flushing, telangiectasia, and photosensitivity. CONCLUSION This study describes the dermatologic manifestations of targeted anticancer therapy-related AEs in the pediatric population. Since these AEs are often associated with significant morbidity, it is imperative that pediatric oncologists be familiar with their recognition and management, to avoid unnecessary dose modifications and/or termination, and to prevent impairments in patients’ quality of life. PMID:25683226

  2. Dermatologic adverse events in pediatric patients receiving targeted anticancer therapies: a pooled analysis.

    PubMed

    Belum, Viswanath Reddy; Washington, Courtney; Pratilas, Christine A; Sibaud, Vincent; Boralevi, Franck; Lacouture, Mario E

    2015-05-01

    The dermatologic adverse events (AEs) of various molecularly targeted therapies are well-described in adult cancer patients. Little has been reported on the incidence and clinical presentation of such AEs in pediatric patients with cancer. To address this gap, we analyzed the dermatologic AEs reported across clinical trials of targeted anticancer therapies in pediatric patients. We conducted an electronic literature search (PubMed, American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meetings' abstracts, ClinicalTrials.gov, NCI's Pediatric Oncology Branch webpage) to identify clinical trials involving targeted anticancer therapies that reported dermatologic AEs in their safety data. Studies were limited to the pediatric population, monotherapy trials (oncology), and English language publications. Pooled data from 19 clinical studies investigating 11 targeted anticancer agents (alemtuzumab, rituximab, imatinib, dasatinib, erlotinib, vandetanib, sorafenib, cabozantinib, pazopanib, everolimus, and temsirolimus) were analyzed. The most frequently encountered dermatologic AEs were rash (127/660; 19%), xerosis (18/100; 18%), mucositis (68/402; 17%), and pruritus (12/169; 7%). Other AEs included pigmentary abnormalities of the skin/hair (13%), hair disorders (trichomegaly, hypertrichosis, alopecia, and madarosis; 14%), urticaria (7%), palmoplantar erythrodysesthesia (7%), erythema, acne, purpura, skin fissures, other 'unknown skin changes', exanthem, infection, flushing, telangiectasia, and photosensitivity. This study describes the dermatologic manifestations of targeted anticancer therapy-related AEs in the pediatric population. Since these AEs are often associated with significant morbidity, it is imperative that pediatric oncologists be familiar with their recognition and management, to avoid unnecessary dose modifications and/or termination, and to prevent impairments in patients' quality of life. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Using the Heat-Shock Response to Discover Anticancer Compounds that Target Protein Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Santagata, Sandro; Xu, Ya-ming; Wijeratne, E. M. Kithsiri; Kontnik, Renee; Rooney, Christine; Perley, Casey C; Kwon, Hyoungtae; Clardy, Jon; Kesari, Santosh; Whitesel, Luke; Lindquist, Susan; Gunatilaka, A.A. Leslie

    2011-01-01

    Unlike normal tissues, cancers experience profound alterations in protein homeostasis. Powerful innate adaptive mechanisms, especially the transcriptional response regulated by Heat Shock Factor 1 (HSF1), are activated in cancers to enable survival under these stressful conditions. Natural products that further tax these stress responses can overwhelm the ability to cope and could provide leads for the development of new, broadly effective anticancer drugs. To identify compounds that drive the HSF1-dependent stress response, we evaluated over 80,000 natural and synthetic compounds as well as partially purified natural product extracts using a reporter cell line optimized for high-throughput screening. Surprisingly, many of the strongly active compounds identified were natural products representing five diverse chemical classes (limonoids, curvularins, withanolides, celastraloids and colletofragarones). All of these compounds share the same chemical motif, an α,β-unsaturated carbonyl functionality, with strong potential for thiol-reactivity. Despite the lack of a priori mechanistic requirements in our primary phenotypic screen, this motif was found to be necessary albeit not sufficient, for both heat-shock activation and inhibition of glioma tumor cell growth. Within the withanolide class, a promising therapeutic index for the compound withaferin A was demonstrated in vivo using a stringent orthotopic human glioma xenograft model in mice. Our findings reveal that diverse organisms elaborate structurally complex thiol-reactive metabolites that act on the stress responses of heterologous organisms including humans. From a chemical biology perspective, they define a robust approach for discovering candidate compounds that target the malignant phenotype by disrupting protein homeostasis. PMID:22050377

  4. Targeting tumor perfusion and oxygenation to improve the outcome of anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bénédicte F; Sonveaux, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are widespread clinical modalities for cancer treatment. Among other biological influences, hypoxia is a main factor limiting the efficacy of radiotherapy, primarily because oxygen is involved in the stabilization of the DNA damage caused by ionizing radiations. Radiobiological hypoxia is found in regions of rodent and human tumors with a tissue oxygenation level below 10 mmHg at which tumor cells become increasingly resistant to radiation damage. Since hypoxic tumor cells remain clonogenic, their resistance to the treatment strongly influences the therapeutic outcome of radiotherapy. There is therefore an urgent need to identify adjuvant treatment modalities aimed to increase tumor pO(2) at the time of radiotherapy. Since tumor hypoxia fundamentally results from an imbalance between oxygen delivery by poorly efficient blood vessels and oxygen consumption by tumor cells with high metabolic activities, two promising approaches are those targeting vascular reactivity and tumor cell respiration. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the development and use of tumor-selective vasodilators, inhibitors of tumor cell respiration, and drugs and treatments combining both activities in the context of tumor sensitization to X-ray radiotherapy. Tumor-selective vasodilation may also be used to improve the delivery of circulating anticancer agents to tumors. Imaging tumor perfusion and oxygenation is of importance not only for the development and validation of such combination treatments, but also to determine which patients could benefit from the therapy. Numerous techniques have been developed in the preclinical setting. Hence, this review also briefly describes both magnetic resonance and non-magnetic resonance in vivo methods and compares them in terms of sensitivity, quantitative or semi-quantitative properties, temporal, and spatial resolutions, as well as translational aspects.

  5. Genetic and epigenetic studies for determining molecular targets of natural product anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujiong; Li, Yong; Liu, Xiaoming; Cho, William C S

    2013-06-01

    Cancer is a disease caused by a series of genetic and epigenetic alterations. Therefore, agents targeting the genetic and/or epigenetic machinery offer potential for the development of anticancer drugs. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that some common natural products [such as epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), curcumin, genistein, sulforaphane (SFN) and resveratrol] have anticancer properties through the mechanisms of altering epigenetic processes [including DNA methylation, histone modification, chromatin remodeling, microRNA (miRNA) regulation] and targeting cancer stem cells (CSCs). These bioactive compounds are able to revert epigenetic alterations in a variety of cancers in vitro and in vivo. They exert anticancer effects by targeting various signaling pathways related to the initiation, progression and metastasis of cancer. It appears that natural products hold great promise for cancer prevention and treatment by altering various epigenetic modifications. This review aims to discuss our current understanding of genetic and epigenetic targets of natural products and the effects of some common natural products on cancer chemoprevention and treatment.

  6. Safe and targeted anticancer therapy for ovarian cancer using a novel class of curcumin analogs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A diagnosis of advanced ovarian cancer is the beginning of a long and arduous journey for a patient. Worldwide, approximately half of the individuals undergoing therapy for advanced cancer will succumb to the disease, or consequences of treatment. Well-known and widely-used chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin, paclitaxel, 5-fluorouracil, and doxorubicin are toxic to both cancer and non-cancerous cells, and have debilitating side effects Therefore, development of new targeted anticancer therapies that can selectively kill cancer cells while sparing the surrounding healthy tissues is essential to develop more effective therapies. We have developed a new class of synthetic curcumin analogs, diarylidenyl-piperidones (DAPs), which have higher anticancer activity and enhanced bio-absorption than curcumin. The DAP backbone structure exhibits cytotoxic (anticancer) activity, whereas the N-hydroxypyrroline (-NOH) moiety found on some variants functions as a cellular- or tissue-specific modulator (antioxidant) of cytotoxicity. The anticancer activity of the DAPs has been evaluated using a number of ovarian cancer cell lines, and the safety has been evaluated in a number of non-cancerous cell lines. Both variations of the DAP compounds showed similar levels of cell death in ovarian cancer cells, however the compounds with the -NOH modification were less toxic to non-cancerous cells. The selective cytotoxicity of the DAP–NOH compounds suggests that they will be useful as safe and effective anticancer agents. This article reviews some of the key findings of our work with the DAP compounds, and compares this to some of the targeted therapies currently used in ovarian cancer therapy. PMID:23663277

  7. Flavaglines: potent anticancer drugs that target prohibitins and the helicase eIF4A.

    PubMed

    Basmadjian, Christine; Thuaud, Frédéric; Ribeiro, Nigel; Désaubry, Laurent

    2013-12-01

    Flavaglines are complex natural products that are found in several medicinal plants of Southeast Asia in the genus Aglaia; these compounds have shown exceptional anticancer and cytoprotective activities. This review describes the significance of flavaglines as a new class of pharmacological agents and presents recent developments in their synthesis, structure-activity relationships, identification of their molecular targets and modes of action. Flavaglines display a unique profile of anticancer activities that are mediated by two classes of unrelated proteins: prohibitins and the translation initiation factor eIF4A. The identification of these molecular targets is expected to accelerate advancement toward clinical studies. The selectivity of cytotoxicity towards cancer cells has been shown to be due to an inhibition of the transcription factor HSF1 and an upregulation of the tumor suppressor TXNIP. In addition, flavaglines display potent anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective and neuroprotective activities; however, the mechanisms underlying these activities are yet to be elucidated.

  8. Exploiting developments in nanotechnology for the preferential delivery of platinum-based anti-cancer agents to tumours: targeting some of the hallmarks of cancer.

    PubMed

    Parker, James P; Ude, Ziga; Marmion, Celine J

    2016-01-01

    Platinum drugs as anti-cancer therapeutics are held in extremely high regard. Despite their success, there are drawbacks associated with their use; their dose-limiting toxicity, their limited activity against an array of common cancers and patient resistance to Pt-based therapeutic regimes. Current investigations in medicinal inorganic chemistry strive to offset these shortcomings through selective targeting of Pt drugs and/or the development of Pt drugs with new or multiple modes of action. A comprehensive overview showcasing how liposomes, nanocapsules, polymers, dendrimers, nanoparticles and nanotubes may be employed as vehicles to selectively deliver cytotoxic Pt payloads to tumour cells is provided.

  9. Modelling the cancer growth process by Stochastic Differential Equations with the effect of Chondroitin Sulfate (CS) as anticancer therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syahidatul Ayuni Mazlan, Mazma; Rosli, Norhayati; Jauhari Arief Ichwan, Solachuddin; Suhaity Azmi, Nina

    2017-09-01

    A stochastic model is introduced to describe the growth of cancer affected by anti-cancer therapeutics of Chondroitin Sulfate (CS). The parameters values of the stochastic model are estimated via maximum likelihood function. The numerical method of Euler-Maruyama will be employed to solve the model numerically. The efficiency of the stochastic model is measured by comparing the simulated result with the experimental data.

  10. Tumor interstitial fluid pressure as an early-response marker for anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Stephane; Allegrini, Peter R; Becquet, Mike M; McSheehy, Paul Mj

    2009-09-01

    Solid tumors have a raised interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) due to high vessel permeability, low lymphatic drainage, poor perfusion, and high cell density around the blood vessels. To investigate tumor IFP as an early-response biomarker, we have tested the effect of seven anticancer chemotherapeutics including cytotoxics and targeted cytostatics in 13 experimental tumor models. IFP was recorded with the wick-in-needle method. Models were either ectopic or orthotopic and included mouse and rat syngeneic as well as human xenografts in nude mice. The mean basal IFP was between 4.4 and 15.2mm Hg; IFP was lowest in human tumor xenografts and highest in rat syngeneic models. Where measured, basal IFP correlated positively with relative tumor blood volume (rTBV) determined by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Most chemotherapeutics sooner (2 or 3 days) or later (6 or 7 days) lowered tumor IFP significantly, and the cytotoxic patupilone caused the greatest decrease in IFP. In rat mammary orthotopic BN472 tumors, significant drug-induced decreases in IFP and rTBV correlated positively with each other for both patupilone and the cytostatic vatalanib. In the two orthotopic models studied, early decreases in IFP were significantly (P < or = .005) correlated with late changes in tumor volume. Thus, drug-induced decreases in tumor IFP are an early marker of response to therapy, which could aid clinical development.

  11. Identifying Unexpected Therapeutic Targets via Chemical-Protein Interactome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lun; Chen, Jian; Shi, Leming; Hudock, Michael P.; Wang, Kejian; He, Lin

    2010-01-01

    Drug medications inevitably affect not only their intended protein targets but also other proteins as well. In this study we examined the hypothesis that drugs that share the same therapeutic effect also share a common therapeutic mechanism by targeting not only known drug targets, but also by interacting unexpectedly on the same cryptic targets. By constructing and mining an Alzheimer's disease (AD) drug-oriented chemical-protein interactome (CPI) using a matrix of 10 drug molecules known to treat AD towards 401 human protein pockets, we found that such cryptic targets exist. We recovered from CPI the only validated therapeutic target of AD, acetylcholinesterase (ACHE), and highlighted several other putative targets. For example, we discovered that estrogen receptor (ER) and histone deacetylase (HDAC), which have recently been identified as two new therapeutic targets of AD, might already have been targeted by the marketed AD drugs. We further established that the CPI profile of a drug can reflect its interacting character towards multi-protein sets, and that drugs with the same therapeutic attribute will share a similar interacting profile. These findings indicate that the CPI could represent the landscape of chemical-protein interactions and uncover “behind-the-scenes” aspects of the therapeutic mechanisms of existing drugs, providing testable hypotheses of the key nodes for network pharmacology or brand new drug targets for one-target pharmacology paradigm. PMID:20221449

  12. Transferrin receptors and the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Tracy R.; Bernabeu, Ezequiel; Rodríguez, José A.; Patel, Shabnum; Kozman, Maggie; Chiappetta, Diego A.; Holler, Eggehard; Ljubimova, Julia Y.; Helguera, Gustavo; Penichet, Manuel L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditional cancer therapy can be successful in destroying tumors, but can also cause dangerous side effects. Therefore, many targeted therapies are in development. The transferrin receptor (TfR) functions in cellular iron uptake through its interaction with transferrin. This receptor is an attractive molecule for the targeted therapy of cancer since it is upregulated on the surface of many cancer types and is efficiently internalized. This receptor can be targeted in two ways: 1) for the delivery of therapeutic molecules into malignant cells or 2) to block the natural function of the receptor leading directly to cancer cell death. Scope of review In the present article we discuss the strategies used to target the TfR for the delivery of therapeutic agents into cancer cells. We provide a summary of the vast types of anti-cancer drugs that have been delivered into cancer cells employing a variety of receptor binding molecules including Tf, anti-TfR antibodies, or TfR-binding peptides alone or in combination with carrier molecules including nanoparticles and viruses. Major conclusions Targeting the TfR has been shown to be effective in delivering many different therapeutic agents and causing cytotoxic effects in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. General significance The extensive use of TfR for targeted therapy attests to the versatility of targeting this receptor for therapeutic purposes against malignant cells. More advances in this area are expected to further improve the therapeutic potential of targeting the TfR for cancer therapy leading to an increase in the number of clinical trials of molecules targeting this receptor. PMID:21851850

  13. The prince and the pauper. A tale of anticancer targeted agents

    PubMed Central

    Dueñas-González, Alfonso; García-López, Patricia; Herrera, Luis Alonso; Medina-Franco, Jose Luis; González-Fierro, Aurora; Candelaria, Myrna

    2008-01-01

    Cancer rates are set to increase at an alarming rate, from 10 million new cases globally in 2000 to 15 million in 2020. Regarding the pharmacological treatment of cancer, we currently are in the interphase of two treatment eras. The so-called pregenomic therapy which names the traditional cancer drugs, mainly cytotoxic drug types, and post-genomic era-type drugs referring to rationally-based designed. Although there are successful examples of this newer drug discovery approach, most target-specific agents only provide small gains in symptom control and/or survival, whereas others have consistently failed in the clinical testing. There is however, a characteristic shared by these agents: -their high cost-. This is expected as drug discovery and development is generally carried out within the commercial rather than the academic realm. Given the extraordinarily high therapeutic drug discovery-associated costs and risks, it is highly unlikely that any single public-sector research group will see a novel chemical "probe" become a "drug". An alternative drug development strategy is the exploitation of established drugs that have already been approved for treatment of non-cancerous diseases and whose cancer target has already been discovered. This strategy is also denominated drug repositioning, drug repurposing, or indication switch. Although traditionally development of these drugs was unlikely to be pursued by Big Pharma due to their limited commercial value, biopharmaceutical companies attempting to increase productivity at present are pursuing drug repositioning. More and more companies are scanning the existing pharmacopoeia for repositioning candidates, and the number of repositioning success stories is increasing. Here we provide noteworthy examples of known drugs whose potential anticancer activities have been highlighted, to encourage further research on these known drugs as a means to foster their translation into clinical trials utilizing the more limited

  14. The prince and the pauper. A tale of anticancer targeted agents.

    PubMed

    Dueñas-González, Alfonso; García-López, Patricia; Herrera, Luis Alonso; Medina-Franco, Jose Luis; González-Fierro, Aurora; Candelaria, Myrna

    2008-10-23

    Cancer rates are set to increase at an alarming rate, from 10 million new cases globally in 2000 to 15 million in 2020. Regarding the pharmacological treatment of cancer, we currently are in the interphase of two treatment eras. The so-called pregenomic therapy which names the traditional cancer drugs, mainly cytotoxic drug types, and post-genomic era-type drugs referring to rationally-based designed. Although there are successful examples of this newer drug discovery approach, most target-specific agents only provide small gains in symptom control and/or survival, whereas others have consistently failed in the clinical testing. There is however, a characteristic shared by these agents: -their high cost-. This is expected as drug discovery and development is generally carried out within the commercial rather than the academic realm. Given the extraordinarily high therapeutic drug discovery-associated costs and risks, it is highly unlikely that any single public-sector research group will see a novel chemical "probe" become a "drug". An alternative drug development strategy is the exploitation of established drugs that have already been approved for treatment of non-cancerous diseases and whose cancer target has already been discovered. This strategy is also denominated drug repositioning, drug repurposing, or indication switch. Although traditionally development of these drugs was unlikely to be pursued by Big Pharma due to their limited commercial value, biopharmaceutical companies attempting to increase productivity at present are pursuing drug repositioning. More and more companies are scanning the existing pharmacopoeia for repositioning candidates, and the number of repositioning success stories is increasing. Here we provide noteworthy examples of known drugs whose potential anticancer activities have been highlighted, to encourage further research on these known drugs as a means to foster their translation into clinical trials utilizing the more limited

  15. A New Method Without Organic Solvent to Targeted Nanodrug for Enhanced Anticancer Efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shichao; Yang, Xiangrui; Zou, Mingyuan; Hou, Zhenqing; Yan, Jianghua

    2017-06-01

    Since the hydrophobic group is always essential to the synthesis of the drug-loaded nanoparticles, a majority of the methods rely heavily on organic solvent, which may not be completely removed and might be a potential threat to the patients. In this study, we completely "green" synthesized 10-hydroxycamptothecine (HCPT) loaded, folate (FA)-modified nanoneedles (HFNDs) for highly efficient cancer therapy with high drug loading, targeting property, and imaging capability. It should be noted that no organic solvent was used in the preparation process. In vitro cell uptake study and the in vivo distribution study showed that the HFNDs, with FA on the surface, revealed an obviously targeting property and entered the HeLa cells easier than the chitosan-HCPT nanoneedles without FA modified (NDs). The cytotoxicity tests illustrated that the HFNDs possessed better killing ability to HeLa cells than the individual drug or the NDs in the same dose, indicating its good anticancer effect. The in vivo anticancer experiment further revealed the pronounced anticancer effects and the lower side effects of the HFNDs. This new method without organic solvent will lead to a promising sustained drug delivery system for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  16. The Potential of Minipigs in the Development of Anticancer Therapeutics: Species Comparison and Examples of Special Applications.

    PubMed

    Mahl, Andreas; Dincer, Zuhal; Heining, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Minipigs are increasingly being used as an alternative to dog or monkey in nonclinical safety testing of pharmaceuticals since they share similar anatomical and physiological characteristics to humans. Integrative assessment of pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic data sets of drug candidates fromin silico,in vitro, andin vivoinvestigations form the basis for selecting the most relevant nonrodent species for toxicology studies. Developing anticancer therapeutics represents a special challenge for species selection due to their effects on multiple organ systems. The toxicological profile of anticancer drugs can be associated with steep dose-response curves, especially due to dose-limiting toxicity on the alimentary, hematopoietic, and immune systems. Selection of an appropriate species for toxicology studies is of importance to avoid an inappropriately low (without benefit for the late-stage cancer patient) or high clinical starting dose (with a risk of unexpected adverse reactions). Although the minipig has been the preferred species to develop drugs applied topically, it is only rarely used in anticancer drug development compared to dog and monkey. In this context, we discuss the potential of minipigs in anticancer drug development with examples of programs for oral and dermal administration, intravascular application in drug-eluting stents, and local chemotherapy (chemoembolization).

  17. OLIGODEOXYNUCLEOTIDES AS ANTI-CANCER THERAPEUTICS AND DIAGNOSTICS | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute Laboratory of Experimental Immunology is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize anti-cancer oligodeoxynucleotides.  

  18. Improving the targeting of therapeutics with single-domain antibodies.

    PubMed

    Turner, Kendrick B; Alves, Nathan J; Medintz, Igor L; Walper, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    The targeted delivery of therapeutic agents greatly increases their effectiveness while simultaneously reducing negative side effects. In the past, targeting of therapeutics has been accomplished with nucleic acids, peptides/proteins, and conventional antibodies. A promising alternative to the conventional antibodies often used in therapeutic targeting are significantly smaller-sized antibody fragments known as single-domain antibodies (sdAbs). Recent advances in the utility of sdAbs for targeting of therapeutic agents along with relevant examples from the literature are discussed. Their advantages when compared to other targeting strategies as well as their challenges and limitations is also covered. The development of sdAb-based targeted therapeutics will likely continue. The identification of novel protein modification techniques will provide more options for sdAb modification (conjugation, immobilization, functionalization), allowing a wider array of therapeutic agents to be successfully targeted and delivered using sdAbs. This will also spur the selection of sdAbs with specificity for other targets having relevance towards therapeutics.

  19. Interest of Tumor-Specific CD4 T Helper 1 Cells for Therapeutic Anticancer Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Galaine, Jeanne; Borg, Christophe; Godet, Yann; Adotévi, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, immunotherapy represents one promising approach for cancer treatment. Recently, spectacular results of cancer immunotherapy clinical trials have confirmed the crucial role of immune system in cancer regression. Therapeutic cancer vaccine represents one widely used immunotherapy strategy to stimulate tumor specific T cell responses but clinical impact remains disappointing in targeting CD8 T cells. Although CD8 T cells have been initially considered to be the main protagonists, it is now clear that CD4 T cells also play a critical role in antitumor response. In this article, we discuss the role of tumor antigen-specific CD4 T cell responses and how we can target these cells to improve cancer vaccines. PMID:26350591

  20. Targeting of MEK in lung cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Heigener, David F; Gandara, David R; Reck, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The MAP-kinase pathway, consisting of the kinases RAS, RAF, MEK, and ERK, is crucial for cell proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis, and migration of cells. Direct inhibition of RAS is not yet possible, whereas inhibition of RAF is already established in malignant melanoma and under investigation in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Due to their structure and function, the MEK proteins are attractive targets for cancer therapy and are also under investigation in NSCLC. We discuss strategies of targeting the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK pathway with emphasis on MEK inhibition, either alone or in combination with other targets or conventional chemotherapy.

  1. Emerging Mitochondrial Therapeutic Targets in Optic Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lopez Sanchez, M I G; Crowston, J G; Mackey, D A; Trounce, I A

    2016-09-01

    Optic neuropathies are an important cause of blindness worldwide. The study of the most common inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) has highlighted a fundamental role for mitochondrial function in the survival of the affected neuron-the retinal ganglion cell. A picture is now emerging that links mitochondrial dysfunction to optic nerve disease and other neurodegenerative processes. Insights gained from the peculiar susceptibility of retinal ganglion cells to mitochondrial dysfunction are likely to inform therapeutic development for glaucoma and other common neurodegenerative diseases of aging. Despite it being a fast-evolving field of research, a lack of access to human ocular tissues and limited animal models of mitochondrial disease have prevented direct retinal ganglion cell experimentation and delayed the development of efficient therapeutic strategies to prevent vision loss. Currently, there are no approved treatments for mitochondrial disease, including optic neuropathies caused by primary or secondary mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent advances in eye research have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms that mediate pathogenesis, and new therapeutic strategies including gene correction approaches are currently being investigated. Here, we review the general principles of mitochondrial biology relevant to retinal ganglion cell function and provide an overview of the major optic neuropathies with mitochondrial involvement, LHON and ADOA, whilst highlighting the emerging link between mitochondrial dysfunction and glaucoma. The pharmacological strategies currently being trialed to improve mitochondrial dysfunction in these optic neuropathies are discussed in addition to emerging therapeutic approaches to preserve retinal ganglion cell function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. PPARs as therapeutic targets in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    van Bilsen, Marc; van Nieuwenhoven, Frans A

    2010-10-01

    The role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors PPARα, PPARδ and PPARγ in cardiovascular disease is receiving widespread attention. As ligand-activated nuclear receptors, they play a role in regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism. This feature of the PPARs has been successfully exploited to treat systemic metabolic diseases, like hyperlipidemia and type-2 diabetes. Indirectly, their lipid lowering effect also leads to a reduction of the risk for cardiovascular diseases, primarily atherosclerosis. The pleiotropic effects of each of the PPAR isotypes on vascular and cardiac disease are discussed, with special emphasis on the molecular mechanism of action and on preclinical observations. The mechanism underlying the beneficial effect of PPARs is not confined to whole body metabolism, but also includes modulation of other vital processes, such as inflammation and cell fate (proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis). A large body of preclinical studies indicates that, in addition to their effect on atherogenesis, PPAR ligands also impact on ischemic heart disease and the development of cardiac failure. It remains to be established to what extent these intriguing observations can be translated into clinical practice. The versatile mechanism of action extends the potential therapeutic profile of the PPARs enormously. Conversely, this versatility makes it harder to attain a specific therapeutic effect, without increasing the risk of undesirable side effects. The future challenge will be to design PPAR-based therapeutic strategies that minimize the detrimental side effects.

  3. Anticancer efficacy of the metabolic blocker 3-bromopyruvate: specific molecular targeting.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram; Kunjithapatham, Rani; Geschwind, Jean-Francois

    2013-01-01

    The anticancer efficacy of the pyruvate analog 3-bromopyruvate has been demonstrated in multiple tumor models. The chief principle underlying the antitumor effects of 3-bromopyruvate is its ability to effectively target the energy metabolism of cancer cells. Biochemically, the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) has been identified as the primary target of 3-bromopyruvate. Its inhibition results in the depletion of intracellular ATP, causing cell death. Several reports have also demonstrated that in addition to GAPDH inhibition, the induction of cellular stress also contributes to 3-bromopyruvate treatment-dependent apoptosis. Furthermore, recent evidence shows that 3-bromopyruvate is taken up selectively by tumor cells via the monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) that are frequently overexpressed in cancer cells (for the export of lactate produced during aerobic glycolysis). The preferential uptake of 3-bromopyruvate via MCTs facilitates selective targeting of tumor cells while leaving healthy and non-malignant tissue untouched. Taken together, the specificity of molecular (GAPDH) targeting and selective uptake by tumor cells, underscore the potential of 3-bromopyruvate as a potent and promising anticancer agent. In this review, we highlight the mechanistic characteristics of 3-bromopyruvate and discuss its potential for translation into the clinic.

  4. EGFR/HER-targeted therapeutics in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilken, Jason A; Badri, Tayf; Cross, Sarah; Raji, Rhoda; Santin, Alessandro D; Schwartz, Peter; Branscum, Adam J; Baron, Andre T; Sakhitab, Adam I; Maihle, Nita J

    2012-03-01

    Despite decades of research and evolving treatment modalities, survival among patients with epithelial ovarian cancer has improved only incrementally. During this same period, the development of biologically targeted therapeutics has improved survival for patients with diverse malignancies. Many of these new drugs target the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER/ErbB) family of tyrosine kinases, which play a major role in the etiology and progression of many carcinomas, including epithelial ovarian cancer. While several HER-targeted therapeutics are US FDA approved for the treatment of various malignancies, none have gained approval for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Here, we review the published literature on HER-targeted therapeutics for the treatment of ovarian cancer, including novel HER-targeted therapeutics in various stages of clinical development, as well as the challenges that have limited the use of these inhibitors in clinical settings.

  5. Open Targets: a platform for therapeutic target identification and validation

    PubMed Central

    Koscielny, Gautier; An, Peter; Carvalho-Silva, Denise; Cham, Jennifer A.; Fumis, Luca; Gasparyan, Rippa; Hasan, Samiul; Karamanis, Nikiforos; Maguire, Michael; Papa, Eliseo; Pierleoni, Andrea; Pignatelli, Miguel; Platt, Theo; Rowland, Francis; Wankar, Priyanka; Bento, A. Patrícia; Burdett, Tony; Fabregat, Antonio; Forbes, Simon; Gaulton, Anna; Gonzalez, Cristina Yenyxe; Hermjakob, Henning; Hersey, Anne; Jupe, Steven; Kafkas, Şenay; Keays, Maria; Leroy, Catherine; Lopez, Francisco-Javier; Magarinos, Maria Paula; Malone, James; McEntyre, Johanna; Munoz-Pomer Fuentes, Alfonso; O'Donovan, Claire; Papatheodorou, Irene; Parkinson, Helen; Palka, Barbara; Paschall, Justin; Petryszak, Robert; Pratanwanich, Naruemon; Sarntivijal, Sirarat; Saunders, Gary; Sidiropoulos, Konstantinos; Smith, Thomas; Sondka, Zbyslaw; Stegle, Oliver; Tang, Y. Amy; Turner, Edward; Vaughan, Brendan; Vrousgou, Olga; Watkins, Xavier; Martin, Maria-Jesus; Sanseau, Philippe; Vamathevan, Jessica; Birney, Ewan; Barrett, Jeffrey; Dunham, Ian

    2017-01-01

    We have designed and developed a data integration and visualization platform that provides evidence about the association of known and potential drug targets with diseases. The platform is designed to support identification and prioritization of biological targets for follow-up. Each drug target is linked to a disease using integrated genome-wide data from a broad range of data sources. The platform provides either a target-centric workflow to identify diseases that may be associated with a specific target, or a disease-centric workflow to identify targets that may be associated with a specific disease. Users can easily transition between these target- and disease-centric workflows. The Open Targets Validation Platform is accessible at https://www.targetvalidation.org. PMID:27899665

  6. Extracellular Matrix-dependent Pathways in Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines Reveal Potential Targets for Anticancer Therapies.

    PubMed

    Stankevicius, Vaidotas; Vasauskas, Gintautas; Noreikiene, Rimante; Kuodyte, Karolina; Valius, Mindaugas; Suziedelis, Kestutis

    2016-09-01

    Cancer cells grown in a 3D culture are more resistant to anticancer therapy treatment compared to those in a monolayer 2D culture. Emerging evidence has suggested that the key reasons for increased cell survival could be gene expression changes in cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction-dependent manner. Global gene-expression changes were obtained in human colorectal carcinoma HT29 and DLD1 cell lines between 2D and laminin-rich (lr) ECM 3D growth conditions by gene-expression microarray analysis. The most significantly altered functional categories were revealed by Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis. The microarray data revealed that 841 and 1190 genes were differentially expressed in colorectal carcinoma DLD1 and HT29 cells. KEGG analysis indicated that the most significantly altered categories were cell adhesion, mitogen-activated protein kinase and immune response. Our results indicate altered pathways related to cancer development and progression and suggest potential ECM-regulated targets for the development of anticancer therapies. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  7. Potential Therapeutic Targets in Uterine Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Cuppens, Tine; Tuyaerts, Sandra; Amant, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Uterine sarcomas are rare tumors accounting for 3,4% of all uterine cancers. Even after radical hysterectomy, most patients relapse or present with distant metastases. The very limited clinical benefit of adjuvant cytotoxic treatments is reflected by high mortality rates, emphasizing the need for new treatment strategies. This review summarizes rising potential targets in four distinct subtypes of uterine sarcomas: leiomyosarcoma, low-grade and high-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma, and undifferentiated uterine sarcoma. Based on clinical reports, promising approaches for uterine leiomyosarcoma patients include inhibition of VEGF and mTOR signaling, preferably in combination with other targeted or cytotoxic compounds. Currently, the only targeted therapy approved in leiomyosarcoma patients is pazopanib, a multitargeted inhibitor blocking VEGFR, PDGFR, FGFR, and c-KIT. Additionally, preclinical evidence suggests effect of the inhibition of histone deacetylases, tyrosine kinase receptors, and the mitotic checkpoint protein aurora kinase A. In low-grade endometrial stromal sarcomas, antihormonal therapies including aromatase inhibitors and progestins have proven activity. Other potential targets are PDGFR, VEGFR, and histone deacetylases. In high-grade ESS that carry the YWHAE/FAM22A/B fusion gene, the generated 14-3-3 oncoprotein is a putative target, next to c-KIT and the Wnt pathway. The observation of heterogeneity within uterine sarcoma subtypes warrants a personalized treatment approach. PMID:26576131

  8. The use of therapeutic peptides to target and to kill cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Boohaker, R J; Lee, M W; Vishnubhotla, P; Perez, J M; Khaled, A R

    2012-01-01

    Peptide therapeutics is a promising field for emerging anti-cancer agents. Benefits include the ease and rapid synthesis of peptides and capacity for modifications. An existing and vast knowledge base of protein structure and function can be exploited for novel peptide design. Current research focuses on developing peptides that can (1) serve as tumor targeting moieties and (2) permeabilize membranes with cytotoxic consequences. A survey of recent findings reveals significant trends. Amphiphilic peptides with clusters of hydrophobic and cationic residues are features of anti-microbial peptides that confer the ability to eradicate microbes and show considerable anti-cancer toxicity. Peptides that assemble and form pores can disrupt cell or organelle membranes and cause apoptotic or necrotic death. Cell permeable and tumor-homing peptides can carry biologically active cargo to tumors or tumor vasculature. The challenge lies in developing the clinical application of therapeutic peptides. Improving delivery to tumors, minimizing non-specific toxic effects and discerning pharmacokinetic properties are high among the needs to produce a powerful therapeutic peptide for cancer treatment.

  9. The Use of Therapeutic Peptides to Target and to Kill Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boohaker, R.J.; Lee, M.W.; Vishnubhotla, P.; Perez, J.M.; Khaled, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide therapeutics is a promising field for emerging anti-cancer agents. Benefits include the ease and rapid synthesis of peptides and capacity for modifications. An existing and vast knowledge base of protein structure and function can be exploited for novel peptide design. Current research focuses on developing peptides that can (1) serve as tumor targeting moieties and (2) permeabilize membranes with cytotoxic consequences. A survey of recent findings reveals significant trends. Amphiphilic peptides with clusters of hydrophobic and cationic residues are features of anti-microbial peptides that confer the ability to eradicate microbes and show considerable anti-cancer toxicity. Peptides that assemble and form pores can disrupt cell or organelle membranes and cause apoptotic or necrotic death. Cell permeable and tumor-homing peptides can carry biologically active cargo to tumors or tumor vasculature. The challenge lies in developing the clinical application of therapeutic peptides. Improving delivery to tumors, minimizing non-specific toxic effects and discerning pharmacokinetic properties are high among the needs to produce a powerful therapeutic peptide for cancer treatment. PMID:22725698

  10. Metalloproteinases: potential therapeutic targets for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    In different inflammatory diseases, many metalloproteinases are over expressed and thought to promote progression of the disease. Understanding roles of these enzymes in disease progression as well as in normal homeostasis is crucial to identify target enzymes for the disease. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the autoimmune inflammatory diseases in which around 1-2 % of the world populations are suffered from. Roles of metalloproteinases are well documented in RA, but so far none of them is proposed to be a target enzyme. However, there are at least three enzymes that can potentially be molecular targets to inhibit progression of RA. Understanding roles of these enzymes in more detail and developing highly selective inhibitors to these enzymes would be essential for novel antimetalloproteinase therapies in future.

  11. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  12. Antibody Therapeutics Targeting Aβ and Tau.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Gilbert; Holtzman, David M

    2017-10-03

    The astonishing findings that active and passive immunization against amyloid-β (Aβ) in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) dramatically decreased amyloid burden led to a rapid initiation of human clinical trials with much enthusiasm. However, methodological issues and adverse effects relating to these clinical trials arose, challenging the effectiveness and safety of these reagents. Efforts are now underway to develop safer immunotherapeutic approaches toward Aβ and the treatment of individuals at risk for AD before or in the earliest stages of cognitive decline with new hopes. Furthermore, several studies have shown tau as a potential immunotherapeutic target for the treatment of tauopathy-related diseases including frontotemporal lobar dementia (FTLD). Both active and passive immunization targeting tau in mouse models of tauopathy effectively decreased tau pathology while improving cognitive performance. These preclinical studies have highlighted tau as an alternative target with much anticipation of clinical trials to be undertaken. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  13. The emerging market dynamics of targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Calfee, John E; Dupré, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Targeted biotech drugs that attack specific biological molecules that cause disease are bringing new benefits even as they foment pricing dynamics that are very different from those of traditional drugs. Targeted drugs tend not to compete with each other even when treating closely related diseases, which makes them resistant to price controls. We can expect the supply of expensive new so-called biotech drugs to continue. But the same properties that generate premium prices also facilitate inventing around successful drugs, eventually leading to vigorous competition despite the lack of generic alternatives.

  14. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of APRPG-modified angiogenic vessel targeting micelles for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Pan; Song, Shuangshuang; Li, Zhao; Tian, Ye; Zheng, Jiatong; Yang, Xinggang; Pan, Weisan

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed to evaluate the antitumor potential of the Ala-Pro-Arg-Pro-Gly (APRPG)-modified angiogenic vessel targeting drug delivery system using paclitaxel (PTX) as a model drug. In this study, an angiogenesis homing peptide APRPG was conjugated to the amphipathic copolymer PLGA-PEG and the synthesized copolymer APRPG-PEG-PLGA was used to prepare PTX encapsulated micelles (APRPG-PEG-Mic). The micelles were uniform spherical and exhibited a unimodal particle size distribution and a slight negative zeta-potential. The in vitro drug release result demonstrated a significant sustained release property of APRPG-PEG-Mic. Compared to Taxol(®) and Cont-PEG-Mic, APRPG-PEG-Mic showed a stronger cytotoxicity against two cancerous cell lines. In the cell uptake studies, the APRPG-modified micelles enhanced intracellular fluorescent intensity in EA.hy926 cells. The biodistribution study revealed the accumulation of APRPG-PEG-Mic in tumor tissues as a result of passive accumulation and active targeting. In comparison with Taxol(®) and Cont-PEG-Mic, APRPG-PEG-Mic reduced the tumor volume more significantly and prolonged the survival time of tumor-bearing mice, indicating a higher antitumor efficacy and lower systematic side effects of APRPG-PEG-Mic. The results indicated that APRPG-modified micelles could be an efficient target-delivery method to angiogenic vessels and a highly promising therapeutic system in anticancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Targeting Anti-Cancer Active Compounds: Affinity-Based Chromatographic Assays

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Cardoso, Carmen Lucia; Seidl, Claudia; Moaddel, Ruin; Cass, Quezia Bezerra

    2016-01-01

    Affinity-based chromatography assays encompass the use of solid supports containing immobilized biological targets to monitor binding events in the isolation , identification and/or characterization of bioactive compounds. This powerful bioanalytical technique allows the screening of potential binders through fast analyses that can be directly performed using isolated substances or complex matrices. An overview of the recent researches in frontal and zonal affinity-based chromatography screening assays, which has been used as a tool in the identification and characterization of new anti-cancer agents, is discussed. In addition, a critical evaluation of the recently emerged ligands fishing assays in complex mixtures is also discussed. PMID:27306095

  16. Channel gating pore: a new therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Kornilov, Polina; Peretz, Asher; Attali, Bernard

    2013-09-01

    Each subunit of voltage-gated cation channels comprises a voltage-sensing domain and a pore region. In a paper recently published in Cell Research, Li et al. showed that the gating charge pathway of the voltage sensor of the KCNQ2 K+ channel can accommodate small opener molecules and offer a new target to treat hyperexcitability disorders.

  17. Cyclophilins in atherosclerosis: a new therapeutic target?

    PubMed

    Bukrinsky, Michael; Orekhov, Alexander; Ditiatkovski, Michael; Sviridov, Dmitri

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic disease with a significant inflammatory component. Recent studies indicate a role of extracellular cyclophilins as contributors to endothelial inflammation and pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this article, we review current literature on pro-inflammatory activities of extracellular cyclophilins and discuss possible approaches to selectively target this novel proinflammatory factor.

  18. A DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drug CY190602 with significantly enhanced anticancer potency.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan; Ding, Hongyu; Li, Xiaoxi; Pallasch, Christian P; Hong, Liya; Guo, Dianwu; Chen, Yi; Wang, Difei; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yajie; Hemann, Michael T; Jiang, Hai

    2015-03-09

    Genotoxic drugs constitute a major treatment modality for human cancers; however, cancer cells' intrinsic DNA repair capability often increases the threshold of lethality and renders these drugs ineffective. The emerging roles of HDACs in DNA repair provide new opportunities for improving traditional genotoxic drugs. Here, we report the development and characterization of CY190602, a novel bendamustine-derived drug with significantly enhanced anticancer potency. We show that CY190602's enhanced potency can be attributed to its newly gained ability to inhibit HDACs. Using this novel DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drug as a tool, we further explored HDAC's role in DNA repair. We found that HDAC activities are essential for the expression of several genes involved in DNA synthesis and repair, including TYMS, Tip60, CBP, EP300, and MSL1. Importantly, CY190602, the first-in-class example of such DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drugs, exhibited significantly enhanced anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. These findings provide rationales for incorporating HDAC inhibitory moieties into genotoxic drugs, so as to overcome the repair capacity of cancer cells. Systematic development of similar DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drugs may represent a novel opportunity for improving cancer therapy.

  19. Folate-conjugated boron nitride nanospheres for targeted delivery of anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shini; Zhang, Huijie; Yan, Ting; Huang, Dandi; Zhi, Chunyi; Nakanishi, Hideki; Gao, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    With its unique physical and chemical properties and structural similarity to carbon, boron nitride (BN) has attracted considerable attention and found many applications. Biomedical applications of BN have recently started to emerge, raising great hopes in drug and gene delivery. Here, we developed a targeted anticancer drug delivery system based on folate-conjugated BN nanospheres (BNNS) with receptor-mediated targeting. Folic acid (FA) was successfully grafted onto BNNS via esterification reaction. In vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that BNNS-FA complexes were non-toxic to HeLa cells up to a concentration of 100 μg/mL. Then, doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), a commonly used anticancer drug, was loaded onto BNNS-FA complexes. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes were stable at pH 7.4 but effectively released DOX at pH 5.0, which exhibited a pH sensitive and sustained release pattern. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes could be recognized and specifically internalized by HeLa cells via FA receptor-mediated endocytosis. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes exhibited greater cytotoxicity to HeLa cells than free DOX and BNNS/DOX complexes due to the increased cellular uptake of DOX mediated by the FA receptor. Therefore, BNNS-FA complexes had strong potential for targeted cancer therapy. PMID:27695318

  20. Lentiviral Vector-based Insertional Mutagenesis Identifies Genes Involved in the Resistance to Targeted Anticancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ranzani, Marco; Annunziato, Stefano; Calabria, Andrea; Brasca, Stefano; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Gallina, Pierangela; Naldini, Luigi; Montini, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    The high transduction efficiency of lentiviral vectors in a wide variety of cells makes them an ideal tool for forward genetics screenings addressing issues of cancer research. Although molecular targeted therapies have provided significant advances in tumor treatment, relapses often occur by the expansion of tumor cell clones carrying mutations that confer resistance. Identification of the culprits of anticancer drug resistance is fundamental for the achievement of long-term response. Here, we developed a new lentiviral vector-based insertional mutagenesis screening to identify genes that confer resistance to clinically relevant targeted anticancer therapies. By applying this genome-wide approach to cell lines representing two subtypes of HER2+ breast cancer, we identified 62 candidate lapatinib resistance genes. We validated the top ranking genes, i.e., PIK3CA and PIK3CB, by showing that their forced expression confers resistance to lapatinib in vitro and found that their mutation/overexpression is associated to poor prognosis in human breast tumors. Then, we successfully applied this approach to the identification of erlotinib resistance genes in pancreatic cancer, thus showing the intrinsic versatility of the approach. The acquired knowledge can help identifying combinations of targeted drugs to overcome the occurrence of resistance, thus opening new horizons for more effective treatment of tumors. PMID:25195596

  1. Folate-conjugated boron nitride nanospheres for targeted delivery of anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shini; Zhang, Huijie; Yan, Ting; Huang, Dandi; Zhi, Chunyi; Nakanishi, Hideki; Gao, Xiao-Dong

    With its unique physical and chemical properties and structural similarity to carbon, boron nitride (BN) has attracted considerable attention and found many applications. Biomedical applications of BN have recently started to emerge, raising great hopes in drug and gene delivery. Here, we developed a targeted anticancer drug delivery system based on folate-conjugated BN nanospheres (BNNS) with receptor-mediated targeting. Folic acid (FA) was successfully grafted onto BNNS via esterification reaction. In vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that BNNS-FA complexes were non-toxic to HeLa cells up to a concentration of 100 μg/mL. Then, doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), a commonly used anticancer drug, was loaded onto BNNS-FA complexes. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes were stable at pH 7.4 but effectively released DOX at pH 5.0, which exhibited a pH sensitive and sustained release pattern. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes could be recognized and specifically internalized by HeLa cells via FA receptor-mediated endocytosis. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes exhibited greater cytotoxicity to HeLa cells than free DOX and BNNS/DOX complexes due to the increased cellular uptake of DOX mediated by the FA receptor. Therefore, BNNS-FA complexes had strong potential for targeted cancer therapy.

  2. A DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drug CY190602 with significantly enhanced anticancer potency

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chuan; Ding, Hongyu; Li, Xiaoxi; Pallasch, Christian P; Hong, Liya; Guo, Dianwu; Chen, Yi; Wang, Difei; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yajie; Hemann, Michael T; Jiang, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic drugs constitute a major treatment modality for human cancers; however, cancer cells' intrinsic DNA repair capability often increases the threshold of lethality and renders these drugs ineffective. The emerging roles of HDACs in DNA repair provide new opportunities for improving traditional genotoxic drugs. Here, we report the development and characterization of CY190602, a novel bendamustine-derived drug with significantly enhanced anticancer potency. We show that CY190602's enhanced potency can be attributed to its newly gained ability to inhibit HDACs. Using this novel DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drug as a tool, we further explored HDAC's role in DNA repair. We found that HDAC activities are essential for the expression of several genes involved in DNA synthesis and repair, including TYMS, Tip60, CBP, EP300, and MSL1. Importantly, CY190602, the first-in-class example of such DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drugs, exhibited significantly enhanced anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. These findings provide rationales for incorporating HDAC inhibitory moieties into genotoxic drugs, so as to overcome the repair capacity of cancer cells. Systematic development of similar DNA/HDAC dual-targeting drugs may represent a novel opportunity for improving cancer therapy. PMID:25759362

  3. Nuclear Targeting of Gold Nanoparticles for Improved Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Celina J; Chithrani, Devika B

    2016-01-01

    Nanomedicine is an exponentially growing field, and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in particular are extensively used in research due to their abilities as anti-cancer drug carriers for chemotherapy and as dose enhancers in radiotherapy. Most GNP research in the past involved a system where GNP localization was in the cytoplasm of the cell. However, it is predicted that therapy response can be enhanced if GNPs can be effectively targeted into the nucleus. With nuclear targeting, there is a possibility in producing additional free radicals in response to irradiation within the nucleus. This can cause more damage to the DNA of cancer cells. In this review article, we discuss the successful NP-based platforms available for nuclear targeting. In addition, we also present the possible mechanisms of nuclear targeting in detail followed by its applications in cancer therapy.

  4. PEGylated anticancer-carbon nanotubes complex targeting mitochondria of lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Lee, Yeon Kyung; Lee, Jong Yeon; Hong, Jeong Hee; Khang, Dongwoo

    2017-09-13

    Although activating apoptosis in cancer cells by targeting the mitochondria is an effective strategy for cancer therapy, insufficient targeting of the mitochondria in cancer cells restricts the availability in clinical treatment. Here, we report on a polyethylene glycol-coated carbon nanotube-ABT737 nanodrug that improves the mitochondrial targeting of lung cancer cells. The polyethylene glycol-coated carbon nanotube-ABT737 nanodrug internalized into the early endosomes via macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis in advance of early endosomal escape and delivered into the mitochondria. Cytosol release of nanodrug led to apoptosis of lung cancer cells by abruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, inducing Bcl-2-mediated apoptosis and generating intracellular reactive oxygen species. As such, this study provides an effective strategy for increasing the anti-lung cancer efficacy by increasing mitochondria accumulation rate of cytosol released anticancer nanodrugs. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  5. Emerging Therapeutics Targeting mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Malina, Abba; Mills, John R.; Pelletier, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    A defining feature of many cancers is deregulated translational control. Typically, this occurs at the level of recruitment of the 40S ribosomes to the 5′-cap of cellular messenger RNAs (mRNAs), the rate-limiting step of protein synthesis, which is controlled by the heterotrimeric eukaryotic initiation complex eIF4F. Thus, eIF4F in particular, and translation initiation in general, represent an exploitable vulnerability and unique opportunity for therapeutic intervention in many transformed cells. In this article, we discuss the development, mode of action and biological activity of a number of small-molecule inhibitors that interrupt PI3K/mTOR signaling control of eIF4F assembly, as well as compounds that more directly block eIF4F activity. PMID:22474009

  6. Alzheimer's disease: molecular concepts and therapeutic targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbender, K.; Masters, C.; Beyreuther, K.

    2001-06-01

    The beta amyloid peptide is the major component of the neuritic plaques, the characteristic lesions in Alzheimer's disease. Mutations in three genes (APP, PS-1, and PS-2) cause familial Alzheimer's disease by alteration of the rate of generation of amyloid peptide or the length of this peptide. However, in the 90% non-familial cases, other factors play a major pathogenetic role. These include the apolipoprotein E genotype, the "plaque-associated" proteins promoting the formation of toxic fibrillar aggregates or the chronic inflammatory responses. The aim of this review is to explain the steps in the complex cascade leading to Alzheimer's disease and, based on this, to report the current efforts to intervene in these different pathophysiological events in order to prevent progression of Alzheimer's disease. Whereas acetylcholine substitution is currently used in clinical practice, future therapeutical strategies to combat Alzheimer's disease may include anti-inflammatory treatments, vaccination against beta amyloid peptide, or treatment with cholesterol-lowering drugs.

  7. Antibody therapeutics targeting ion channels: are we there yet?

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Han; Li, Min

    2013-01-01

    The combination of technological advances, genomic sequences and market success is catalyzing rapid development of antibody-based therapeutics. Cell surface receptors and ion channel proteins are well known drug targets, but the latter has seen less success. The availability of crystal structures, better understanding of gating biophysics and validation of physiological roles now form an excellent foundation to pursue antibody-based therapeutics targeting ion channels to treat a variety of diseases. PMID:23381110

  8. Antibody therapeutics targeting ion channels: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Sun, Han; Li, Min

    2013-02-01

    The combination of technological advances, genomic sequences and market success is catalyzing rapid development of antibody-based therapeutics. Cell surface receptors and ion channel proteins are well known drug targets, but the latter has seen less success. The availability of crystal structures, better understanding of gating biophysics and validation of physiological roles now form an excellent foundation to pursue antibody-based therapeutics targeting ion channels to treat a variety of diseases.

  9. Pathways and therapeutic targets in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Shtivelman, Emma; Davies, Michael A.; Hwu, Patrick; Yang, James; Lotem, Michal; Oren, Moshe; Flaherty, Keith T.; Fisher, David E.

    2014-01-01

    This review aims to summarize the current knowledge of molecular pathways and their clinical relevance in melanoma. Metastatic melanoma was a grim diagnosis, but in recent years tremendous advances have been made in treatments. Chemotherapy provided little benefit in these patients, but development of targeted and new immune approaches made radical changes in prognosis. This would not have happened without remarkable advances in understanding the biology of disease and tremendous progress in the genomic (and other “omics”) scale analyses of tumors. The big problems facing the field are no longer focused exclusively on the development of new treatment modalities, though this is a very busy area of clinical research. The focus shifted now to understanding and overcoming resistance to targeted therapies, and understanding the underlying causes of the heterogeneous responses to immune therapy. PMID:24743024

  10. New Therapeutic Targets for Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Salvadore, Giacomo; DiazGranados, Nancy; Ibrahim, Lobna; Latov, David; Wheeler-Castillo, Cristina; Baumann, Jacqueline; Henter, Ioline D.; Zarate, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    Existing pharmacological treatments for bipolar disorder (BPD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) are often insufficient for many patients. Here we describe a number of targets/compounds that clinical and preclinical studies suggest could result in putative novel treatments for mood disorders. These include: 1) glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) and protein kinase C (PKC); 2) the purinergic system; 3) histone deacetylase (HDAC); 4) the melatonergic system; 5) the tachykinin neuropeptides system; 6) the glutamatergic system; and 7) oxidative stress and bioenergetics. The paper reviews data on new compounds that have shown antimanic or antidepressant effects in subjects with mood disorders or similar effects in preclinical animal models. Overall, an improved understanding of the neurobiological underpinnings of mood disorders is critical for developing targeted treatments that are more effective, act more rapidly, and are better tolerated than currently available therapies. PMID:20419280

  11. Targeting inflammation in diabetes: Newer therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Neeraj Kumar; Kant, Saket

    2014-10-15

    Inflammation has been recognised to both decrease beta cell insulin secretion and increase insulin resistance. Circulating cytokines can affect beta cell function directly leading to secretory dysfunction and increased apoptosis. These cytokines can also indirectly affect beta cell function by increasing adipocyte inflammation.The resulting glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity further enhance the inflammatory process resulting in a vicious cycle. Weight reduction and drugs such as metformin have been shown to decrease the levels of C-Reactive Protein by 31% and 13%, respectively. Pioglitazone, insulin and statins have anti-inflammatory effects. Interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists are in trials and NSAIDs such as salsalate have shown an improvement in insulin sensitivity. Inhibition of 12-lipo-oxygenase, histone de-acetylases, and activation of sirtuin-1 are upcoming molecular targets to reduce inflammation. These therapies have also been shown to decrease the conversion of pre-diabetes state to diabetes. Drugs like glicazide, troglitazone, N-acetylcysteine and selective COX-2 inhibitors have shown benefit in diabetic neuropathy by decreasing inflammatory markers. Retinopathy drugs are used to target vascular endothelial growth factor, angiopoietin-2, various proteinases and chemokines. Drugs targeting the proteinases and various chemokines are pentoxifylline, inhibitors of nuclear factor-kappa B and mammalian target of rapamycin and are in clinical trials for diabetic nephropathy. Commonly used drugs such as insulin, metformin, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, glucagon like peptide-1 agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors also decrease inflammation. Anti-inflammatory therapies represent a potential approach for the therapy of diabetes and its complications.

  12. Targeting inflammation in diabetes: Newer therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Neeraj Kumar; Kant, Saket

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation has been recognised to both decrease beta cell insulin secretion and increase insulin resistance. Circulating cytokines can affect beta cell function directly leading to secretory dysfunction and increased apoptosis. These cytokines can also indirectly affect beta cell function by increasing adipocyte inflammation.The resulting glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity further enhance the inflammatory process resulting in a vicious cycle. Weight reduction and drugs such as metformin have been shown to decrease the levels of C-Reactive Protein by 31% and 13%, respectively. Pioglitazone, insulin and statins have anti-inflammatory effects. Interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists are in trials and NSAIDs such as salsalate have shown an improvement in insulin sensitivity. Inhibition of 12-lipo-oxygenase, histone de-acetylases, and activation of sirtuin-1 are upcoming molecular targets to reduce inflammation. These therapies have also been shown to decrease the conversion of pre-diabetes state to diabetes. Drugs like glicazide, troglitazone, N-acetylcysteine and selective COX-2 inhibitors have shown benefit in diabetic neuropathy by decreasing inflammatory markers. Retinopathy drugs are used to target vascular endothelial growth factor, angiopoietin-2, various proteinases and chemokines. Drugs targeting the proteinases and various chemokines are pentoxifylline, inhibitors of nuclear factor-kappa B and mammalian target of rapamycin and are in clinical trials for diabetic nephropathy. Commonly used drugs such as insulin, metformin, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, glucagon like peptide-1 agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors also decrease inflammation. Anti-inflammatory therapies represent a potential approach for the therapy of diabetes and its complications. PMID:25317247

  13. Network Pharmacology Strategies Toward Multi-Target Anticancer Therapies: From Computational Models to Experimental Design Principles

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jing; Aittokallio, Tero

    2014-01-01

    Polypharmacology has emerged as novel means in drug discovery for improving treatment response in clinical use. However, to really capitalize on the polypharmacological effects of drugs, there is a critical need to better model and understand how the complex interactions between drugs and their cellular targets contribute to drug efficacy and possible side effects. Network graphs provide a convenient modeling framework for dealing with the fact that most drugs act on cellular systems through targeting multiple proteins both through on-target and off-target binding. Network pharmacology models aim at addressing questions such as how and where in the disease network should one target to inhibit disease phenotypes, such as cancer growth, ideally leading to therapies that are less vulnerable to drug resistance and side effects by means of attacking the disease network at the systems level through synergistic and synthetic lethal interactions. Since the exponentially increasing number of potential drug target combinations makes pure experimental approach quickly unfeasible, this review depicts a number of computational models and algorithms that can effectively reduce the search space for determining the most promising combinations for experimental evaluation. Such computational-experimental strategies are geared toward realizing the full potential of multi-target treatments in different disease phenotypes. Our specific focus is on system-level network approaches to polypharmacology designs in anticancer drug discovery, where we give representative examples of how network-centric modeling may offer systematic strategies toward better understanding and even predicting the phenotypic responses to multi-target therapies.

  14. Enhanced Delivery of Gold Nanoparticles with Therapeutic Potential for Targeting Human Brain Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etame, Arnold B.

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) remains a major challenge to the advancement and application of systemic anti-cancer therapeutics into the central nervous system. The structural and physiological delivery constraints of the BBB significantly limit the effectiveness of conventional chemotherapy, thereby making systemic administration a non-viable option for the vast majority of chemotherapy agents. Furthermore, the lack of specificity of conventional systemic chemotherapy when applied towards malignant brain tumors remains a major shortcoming. Hence novel therapeutic strategies that focus both on targeted and enhanced delivery across the BBB are warranted. In recent years nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as attractive vehicles for efficient delivery of targeted anti-cancer therapeutics. In particular, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have gained prominence in several targeting applications involving systemic cancers. Their enhanced permeation and retention within permissive tumor microvasculature provide a selective advantage for targeting. Malignant brain tumors also exhibit transport-permissive microvasculature secondary to blood brain barrier disruption. Hence AuNPs may have potential relevance for brain tumor targeting. However, the permeation of AuNPs across the BBB has not been well characterized, and hence is a potential limitation for successful application of AuNP-based therapeutics within the central nervous system (CNS). In this dissertation, we designed and characterized AuNPs and assessed the role of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the physical and biological properties of AuNPs. We established a size-dependent permeation profile with respect to core size as well as PEG length when AuNPs were assessed through a transport-permissive in-vitro BBB. This study was the first of its kind to systematically examine the influence of design on permeation of AuNPs through transport-permissive BBB. Given the significant delivery limitations through the non

  15. Indolin-2-one compounds targeting thioredoxin reductase as potential anticancer drug leads

    PubMed Central

    Kaminska, Kamila K.; Bertrand, Helene C.; Tajima, Hisashi; Stafford, William C.; Cheng, Qing; Chen, Wan; Wells, Geoffrey; Arner, Elias S.J.; Chew, Eng-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Several compounds bearing the indolinone chemical scaffold are known to possess anticancer properties. For example, the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib is an arylideneindolin-2-one compound. The chemical versatility associated with structural modifications of indolinone compounds underlies the potential to discover additional derivatives possessing anticancer properties. Previously synthesized 3-(2-oxoethylidene)indolin-2-one compounds, also known as supercinnamaldehyde (SCA) compounds in reference to the parent compound 1 [1-methyl-3(2-oxopropylidene)indolin-2-one], bear a nitrogen-linked α,β-unsaturated carbonyl (Michael acceptor) moiety. Here we found that analogs bearing N-substituents, in particular compound 4 and 5 carrying an N-butyl and N-benzyl substituent, respectively, were strongly cytotoxic towards human HCT 116 colorectal and MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells. These compounds also displayed strong thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) inhibitory activity that was likely attributed to the electrophilicity of the Michael acceptor moiety. Their selectivity towards cellular TrxR inhibition over related antioxidant enzymes glutathione reductase (GR), thioredoxin (Trx) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) was mediated through targeting of the selenocysteine (Sec) residue in the highly accessible C-terminal active site of TrxR. TrxR inhibition mediated by indolin-2-one compounds led to cellular Trx oxidation, increased oxidative stress and activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1). These events also led to activation of p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, and cell death with apoptotic features of PARP cleavage and caspase 3 activation. In conclusion, these results suggest that indolin-2-one-based compounds specifically targeting TrxR may serve as novel drug leads for anticancer therapy. PMID:27244886

  16. “Click” Synthesis of Dextran Macrostructures for Combinatorial-Designed Self-Assembled Nanoparticles Encapsulating Diverse Anticancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Abeylath, Sampath C.; Amiji, Mansoor

    2011-01-01

    With the non-specific toxicity of anticancer drugs to healthy tissues upon systemic administration, formulations capable of enhanced selectivity in delivery to the tumor mass and cells are highly desirable. Based on the diversity of the drug payloads, we have investigated a combinatorial-designed strategy where the nano-sized formulations are tailored based on the physicochemical properties of the drug and the delivery needs. Individually functionalized C2 to C12 lipid-, thiol-, and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-modified dextran derivatives were synthesized via “click” chemistry from O-pentynyl dextran and relevant azides. These functionalized dextrans in combination with anticancer drugs form nanoparticles by self-assembling in aqueous medium having PEG surface functionalization and intermolecular disulfide bonds. Using anticancer drugs with logP values ranging from −0.5 to 3.0, the optimized nanoparticles formulations were evaluated for preliminary cellular delivery and cytotoxic effects in SKOV3 human ovarian adenocarcinoma cells. The results show that with the appropriate selection of lipid-modified dextran, one can effectively tailor the self-assembled nano-formulation for intended therapeutic payload. PMID:21978947

  17. 'Click' synthesis of dextran macrostructures for combinatorial-designed self-assembled nanoparticles encapsulating diverse anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Abeylath, Sampath C; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2011-11-01

    With the non-specific toxicity of anticancer drugs to healthy tissues upon systemic administration, formulations capable of enhanced selectivity in delivery to the tumor mass and cells are highly desirable. Based on the diversity of the drug payloads, we have investigated a combinatorial-designed strategy where the nano-sized formulations are tailored based on the physicochemical properties of the drug and the delivery needs. Individually functionalized C(2) to C(12) lipid-, thiol-, and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-modified dextran derivatives were synthesized via 'click' chemistry from O-pentynyl dextran and relevant azides. These functionalized dextrans in combination with anticancer drugs form nanoparticles by self-assembling in aqueous medium having PEG surface functionalization and intermolecular disulfide bonds. Using anticancer drugs with logP values ranging from -0.5 to 3.0, the optimized nanoparticles formulations were evaluated for preliminary cellular delivery and cytotoxic effects in SKOV3 human ovarian adenocarcinoma cells. The results show that with the appropriate selection of lipid-modified dextran, one can effectively tailor the self-assembled nano-formulation for intended therapeutic payload. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Androgen Receptor: A Complex Therapeutic Target for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Dalton, James T

    2016-12-02

    Molecular and histopathological profiling have classified breast cancer into multiple sub-types empowering precision treatment. Although estrogen receptor (ER) and human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2) are the mainstay therapeutic targets in breast cancer, the androgen receptor (AR) is evolving as a molecular target for cancers that have developed resistance to conventional treatments. The high expression of AR in breast cancer and recent discovery and development of new nonsteroidal drugs targeting the AR provide a strong rationale for exploring it again as a therapeutic target in this disease. Ironically, both nonsteroidal agonists and antagonists for the AR are undergoing clinical trials, making AR a complicated target to understand in breast cancer. This review provides a detailed account of AR's therapeutic role in breast cancer.

  19. Androgen Receptor: A Complex Therapeutic Target for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Dalton, James T.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular and histopathological profiling have classified breast cancer into multiple sub-types empowering precision treatment. Although estrogen receptor (ER) and human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2) are the mainstay therapeutic targets in breast cancer, the androgen receptor (AR) is evolving as a molecular target for cancers that have developed resistance to conventional treatments. The high expression of AR in breast cancer and recent discovery and development of new nonsteroidal drugs targeting the AR provide a strong rationale for exploring it again as a therapeutic target in this disease. Ironically, both nonsteroidal agonists and antagonists for the AR are undergoing clinical trials, making AR a complicated target to understand in breast cancer. This review provides a detailed account of AR’s therapeutic role in breast cancer. PMID:27918430

  20. Translating cancer research into targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    de Bono, J S; Ashworth, Alan

    2010-09-30

    The emphasis in cancer drug development has shifted from cytotoxic, non-specific chemotherapies to molecularly targeted, rationally designed drugs promising greater efficacy and less side effects. Nevertheless, despite some successes drug development remains painfully slow. Here, we highlight the issues involved and suggest ways in which this process can be improved and expedited. We envision an increasing shift to integrated cancer research and biomarker-driven adaptive and hypothesis testing clinical trials. The goal is the development of specific cancer medicines to treat the individual patient, with treatment selection being driven by a detailed understanding of the genetics and biology of the patient and their cancer.

  1. Sphingolipid and Ceramide Homeostasis: Potential Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon A.; Mina, John G.; Denny, Paul W.; Smith, Terry K.

    2012-01-01

    Sphingolipids are ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells where they have been attributed a plethora of functions from the formation of structural domains to polarized cellular trafficking and signal transduction. Recent research has identified and characterised many of the key enzymes involved in sphingolipid metabolism and this has led to a heightened interest in the possibility of targeting these processes for therapies against cancers, Alzheimer's disease, and numerous important human pathogens. In this paper we outline the major pathways in eukaryotic sphingolipid metabolism and discuss these in relation to disease and therapy for both chronic and infectious conditions. PMID:22400113

  2. Human Isoprenoid Synthase Enzymes as Therapeutic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeok; Matralis, Alexios; Berghuis, Albert; Tsantrizos, Youla

    2014-07-01

    The complex biochemical network known as the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids in the human body, which consists of a vast array of metabolites that are vital for proper cellular functions. Two key isoprenoids, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) are responsible for the post-translational prenylation of small GTP-binding proteins, and serve as the biosynthetic precursors to numerous other biomolecules. The down-stream metabolite of FPP and GGPP is squalene, the precursor to steroids, bile acids, lipoproteins and vitamin D. In the past, interest in prenyl synthase inhibitors focused mainly on the role of the FPP in lytic bone diseases. More recently, pre-clinical and clinical studies have strongly implicated high levels of protein prenylation in a plethora of human diseases, including non-skeletal cancers, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus mainly on the potential therapeutic value of down-regulating the biosynthesis of FPP, GGPP and squalene. We summarize the most recent drug discovery efforts and the structural data available that support the current on-going studies.

  3. Neutrophils: potential therapeutic targets in tularemia?

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Lee-Ann H.

    2013-01-01

    The central role of neutrophils in innate immunity and host defense has long been recognized, and the ability of these cells to efficiently engulf and kill invading bacteria has been extensively studied, as has the role of neutrophil apoptosis in resolution of the inflammatory response. In the past few years additional immunoregulatory properties of neutrophils were discovered, and it is now clear that these cells play a much greater role in control of the immune response than was previously appreciated. In this regard, it is noteworthy that Francisella tularensis is one of relatively few pathogens that can successfully parasitize neutrophils as well as macrophages, DC and epithelial cells. Herein we will review the mechanisms used by F. tularensis to evade elimination by neutrophils. We will also reprise effects of this pathogen on neutrophil migration and lifespan as compared with other infectious and inflammatory disease states. In addition, we will discuss the evidence which suggests that neutrophils contribute to disease progression rather than effective defense during tularemia, and consider whether manipulation of neutrophil migration or turnover may be suitable adjunctive therapeutic strategies. PMID:24409419

  4. Human isoprenoid synthase enzymes as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaeok; Matralis, Alexios N.; Berghuis, Albert M.; Tsantrizos, Youla S.

    2014-01-01

    In the human body, the complex biochemical network known as the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids, which consists of a vast array of metabolites that are vital for proper cellular functions. Two key isoprenoids, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) are responsible for the post-translational prenylation of small GTP-binding proteins, and serve as the biosynthetic precursors to numerous other biomolecules. The down-stream metabolite of FPP and GGPP is squalene, the precursor to steroids, bile acids, lipoproteins, and vitamin D. In the past, interest in prenyl synthase inhibitors focused mainly on the role of the FPP in lytic bone diseases. More recently pre-clinical and clinical studies have strongly implicated high levels of protein prenylation in a plethora of human diseases, including non-skeletal cancers, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus mainly on the potential therapeutic value of down-regulating the biosynthesis of FPP, GGPP, and squalene. We summarize the most recent drug discovery efforts and the structural data available that support the current on-going studies. PMID:25101260

  5. Targeting TRP Channels For Novel Migraine Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is increasingly understood to be a disorder of the brain. In susceptible individuals, a variety of “triggers” may influence altered central excitability, resulting in the activation and sensitization of trigeminal nociceptive afferents surrounding blood vessels (i.e., the trigeminovascular system), leading to migraine pain. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are expressed in a subset of dural afferents, including those containing calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP). Activation of TRP channels promotes excitation of nociceptive afferent fibers and potentially lead to pain. In addition to pain, allodynia to mechanical and cold stimuli can result from sensitization of both peripheral afferents and of central pain pathways. TRP channels respond to a variety of endogenous conditions including chemical mediators and low pH. These channels can be activated by exogenous stimuli including a wide range of chemical and environmental irritants, some of which have been demonstrated to trigger migraine in humans. Activation of TRP channels can elicit CGRP release, and blocking the effects of CGRP through receptor antagonism or antibody strategies has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of migraine. Identification of approaches that can prevent activation of TRP channels provides an additional novel strategy for discovery of migraine therapeutics. PMID:25138211

  6. Targeting the Notch signaling pathway in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huajiao; Lu, Yi; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Xia; Keller, Evan T; Liu, Qian; Zhou, Qinghua; Zhang, Jian

    2014-11-01

    Despite advances in surgery, imaging, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, the poor overall cancer-related death rate remains unacceptable. Novel therapeutic strategies are desperately needed. Nowadays, targeted therapy has become the most promising therapy and a welcome asset to the cancer therapeutic arena. There is a large body of evidence demonstrating that the Notch signaling pathway is critically involved in the pathobiology of a variety of malignancies. In this review, we provide an overview of emerging data, highlight the mechanism of the Notch signaling pathway in the development of a wide range of cancers, and summarize recent progress in therapeutic targeting of the Notch signaling pathway.

  7. Targeting melanocortin receptors as potential novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Getting, Stephen J

    2006-07-01

    Adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH(1-39)) and the melanocortins (alpha, beta and gamma-melanocyte-stimulating hormone [MSH]) are derived from a larger precursor molecule known as the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) protein. They exert their numerous biological effects by activating 7 transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), leading to adenylyl cyclase activation and subsequent cAMP accumulation within the target cell. To date, 5 melanocortin receptors (MCR) have been identified and termed MC1R to MC5R, they have been shown to have a wide and varied distribution throughout the body, being found in the central nervous system (CNS), periphery and immune cells. Melanocortins have a multitude of actions including: (i) modulating disease pathologies including arthritis, asthma, obesity; (ii) affecting functions, for example erectile dysfunction, skin tanning; and (iii) organ systems, for example cardiovascular system. Recently a mechanistic approach has been identified with alpha-MSH preventing NF-kappaB activation via the preservation and expression of IkappaBalphaprotein. This leads to a reduction of pro-inflammatory mediators including cytokines and inhibition of adhesion molecule expression, with subsequent reduction in leukocyte emigration. Development of selective ligands with an appropriate pharmacokinetic profile will enable a pharmacological evaluation of the potential beneficial effects of the melanocortins. In this review I have discussed the potential mechanistic action for the melanocortins and some of the disease pathologies shown to be modulated. This review proposes targeting the MCR with the ultimate aim of controlling many of the diseases that we face today.

  8. Utility of network integrity methods in therapeutic target identification

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Qian; Schork, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the biological gene networks involved in a disease may lead to the identification of therapeutic targets. Such analysis requires exploring network properties, in particular the importance of individual network nodes (i.e., genes). There are many measures that consider the importance of nodes in a network and some may shed light on the biological significance and potential optimality of a gene or set of genes as therapeutic targets. This has been shown to be the case in cancer therapy. A dilemma exists, however, in finding the best therapeutic targets based on network analysis since the optimal targets should be nodes that are highly influential in, but not toxic to, the functioning of the entire network. In addition, cancer therapeutics targeting a single gene often result in relapse since compensatory, feedback and redundancy loops in the network may offset the activity associated with the targeted gene. Thus, multiple genes reflecting parallel functional cascades in a network should be targeted simultaneously, but require the identification of such targets. We propose a methodology that exploits centrality statistics characterizing the importance of nodes within a gene network that is constructed from the gene expression patterns in that network. We consider centrality measures based on both graph theory and spectral graph theory. We also consider the origins of a network topology, and show how different available representations yield different node importance results. We apply our techniques to tumor gene expression data and suggest that the identification of optimal therapeutic targets involving particular genes, pathways and sub-networks based on an analysis of the nodes in that network is possible and can facilitate individualized cancer treatments. The proposed methods also have the potential to identify candidate cancer therapeutic targets that are not thought to be oncogenes but nonetheless play important roles in the functioning of a cancer

  9. Utility of network integrity methods in therapeutic target identification.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qian; Schork, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the biological gene networks involved in a disease may lead to the identification of therapeutic targets. Such analysis requires exploring network properties, in particular the importance of individual network nodes (i.e., genes). There are many measures that consider the importance of nodes in a network and some may shed light on the biological significance and potential optimality of a gene or set of genes as therapeutic targets. This has been shown to be the case in cancer therapy. A dilemma exists, however, in finding the best therapeutic targets based on network analysis since the optimal targets should be nodes that are highly influential in, but not toxic to, the functioning of the entire network. In addition, cancer therapeutics targeting a single gene often result in relapse since compensatory, feedback and redundancy loops in the network may offset the activity associated with the targeted gene. Thus, multiple genes reflecting parallel functional cascades in a network should be targeted simultaneously, but require the identification of such targets. We propose a methodology that exploits centrality statistics characterizing the importance of nodes within a gene network that is constructed from the gene expression patterns in that network. We consider centrality measures based on both graph theory and spectral graph theory. We also consider the origins of a network topology, and show how different available representations yield different node importance results. We apply our techniques to tumor gene expression data and suggest that the identification of optimal therapeutic targets involving particular genes, pathways and sub-networks based on an analysis of the nodes in that network is possible and can facilitate individualized cancer treatments. The proposed methods also have the potential to identify candidate cancer therapeutic targets that are not thought to be oncogenes but nonetheless play important roles in the functioning of a cancer

  10. Slit/Robo pathway: a promising therapeutic target for cancer.

    PubMed

    Gara, Rishi K; Kumari, Sonam; Ganju, Aditya; Yallapu, Murali M; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C

    2015-01-01

    Axon guidance molecules, slit glycoprotein (Slit) and Roundabout receptor (Robo), have implications in the regulation of physiological processes. Recent studies indicate that Slit and Robo also have important roles in tumorigenesis, cancer progression and metastasis. The Slit/Robo pathway can be considered a master regulator for multiple oncogenic signaling pathways. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review on the role of these molecules and their associated signaling pathways in cancer progression and metastasis. Overall, the current available data suggest that the Slit/Robo pathway could be a promising target for development of anticancer drugs.

  11. On the structural basis and design guidelines for type II topoisomerase-targeting anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chyuan-Chuan; Li, Yi-Ching; Wang, Ying-Ren; Li, Tsai-Kun; Chan, Nei-Li

    2013-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases (Top2s) alter DNA topology via the formation of an enzyme–DNA adduct termed cleavage complex, which harbors a transient double-strand break in one DNA to allow the passage of another. Agents targeting human Top2s are clinically active anticancer drugs whose trapping of Top2-mediated DNA breakage effectively induces genome fragmentation and cell death. To understand the structural basis of this drug action, we previously determined the structure of human Top2 β-isoform forming a cleavage complex with the drug etoposide and DNA, and described the insertion of drug into DNA cleavage site and drug-induced decoupling of catalytic groups. By developing a post-crystallization drug replacement procedure that simplifies structural characterization of drug-stabilized cleavage complexes, we have extended the analysis toward other structurally distinct drugs, m-AMSA and mitoxantrone. Besides the expected drug intercalation, a switch in ribose puckering in the 3′-nucleotide of the cleavage site was robustly observed in the new structures, representing a new mechanism for trapping the Top2 cleavage complex. Analysis of drug-binding modes and the conformational landscapes of the drug-binding pockets provide rationalization of the drugs’ structural-activity relationships and explain why Top2 mutants exhibit differential effects toward each drug. Drug design guidelines were proposed to facilitate the development of isoform-specific Top2-targeting anticancer agents. PMID:24038465

  12. On the structural basis and design guidelines for type II topoisomerase-targeting anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chyuan-Chuan; Li, Yi-Ching; Wang, Ying-Ren; Li, Tsai-Kun; Chan, Nei-Li

    2013-12-01

    Type II topoisomerases (Top2s) alter DNA topology via the formation of an enzyme-DNA adduct termed cleavage complex, which harbors a transient double-strand break in one DNA to allow the passage of another. Agents targeting human Top2s are clinically active anticancer drugs whose trapping of Top2-mediated DNA breakage effectively induces genome fragmentation and cell death. To understand the structural basis of this drug action, we previously determined the structure of human Top2 β-isoform forming a cleavage complex with the drug etoposide and DNA, and described the insertion of drug into DNA cleavage site and drug-induced decoupling of catalytic groups. By developing a post-crystallization drug replacement procedure that simplifies structural characterization of drug-stabilized cleavage complexes, we have extended the analysis toward other structurally distinct drugs, m-AMSA and mitoxantrone. Besides the expected drug intercalation, a switch in ribose puckering in the 3'-nucleotide of the cleavage site was robustly observed in the new structures, representing a new mechanism for trapping the Top2 cleavage complex. Analysis of drug-binding modes and the conformational landscapes of the drug-binding pockets provide rationalization of the drugs' structural-activity relationships and explain why Top2 mutants exhibit differential effects toward each drug. Drug design guidelines were proposed to facilitate the development of isoform-specific Top2-targeting anticancer agents.

  13. Autonomic Ganglia: Target and Novel Therapeutic Tool

    PubMed Central

    Vernino, Steven; Sandroni, Paola; Singer, Wolfgang; Low, Phillip A.

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) are ligand-gated cation channels that are present throughout the nervous system. The muscle AChR mediates transmission at the neuromuscular junction; antibodies against the muscle AChR are the cause of myasthenia gravis. The ganglionic (α3-type) neuronal AChR mediates fast synaptic transmission in sympathetic, parasympathetic, and enteric autonomic ganglia. Impaired cholinergic ganglionic synaptic transmission is one important cause of autonomic failure. Pharmacological enhancement of ganglionic synaptic transmission may be a novel way to improve autonomic function. Ganglionic AChR antibodies are found in patients with autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG). Patients with AAG typically present with rapid onset of severe autonomic failure. Major clinical features include orthostatic hypotension, gastrointestinal dysmotility, anhidrosis, bladder dysfunction, and sicca symptoms. Impaired pupillary light reflex is often seen. Like myasthenia, AAG is an antibody-mediated neurological disorder. The disease can be reproduced in experimental animals by active immunization or passive antibody transfer. Patient may improve with plasma exchange treatment or other immunomodulatory treatment. Antibodies from patients with AAG inhibit ganglionic AChR currents. Other phenotypes of AAG are now recognized based on the results of antibody testing. These other presentations are generally associated with lower levels of ganglionic AChR antibodies. A chronic progressive form of AAG may resemble pure autonomic failure. Milder forms of dysautonomia, such as postural tachycardia syndrome, are associated with ganglionic AChR in 10–15% of cases. Since ganglionic synaptic transmission is a common pathway for all autonomic traffic, enhancement of autonomic function through inhibition of acetylcholinesterase is a potential specific therapeutic strategy for autonomic disorders. Increasing the strength of ganglionic transmission can ameliorate

  14. Discoidin Domains as Emerging Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Villoutreix, Bruno O; Miteva, Maria A

    2016-08-01

    Discoidin (DS) domains are found in eukaryotic and prokaryotic extracellular and transmembrane multidomain proteins. These small domains play different functional roles and can interact with phospholipids, glycans, and proteins, including collagens. DS domain-containing proteins are often involved in cellular adhesion, migration, proliferation, and matrix-remodeling events, while some play a major role in blood coagulation. Mutations in DS domains have been associated with various disease conditions. This review provides an update on the structure, function, and modulation of the DS domains, with a special emphasis on two circulating blood coagulation cofactors, factor V and factor VIII, and the transmembrane neuropilin receptors that have been targeted for inhibition by biologics and small chemical compounds.

  15. Mammalian circadian signaling networks and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Andrew C; Lewis, Warren G; Kay, Steve A

    2007-10-01

    Virtually all cells in the body have an intracellular clockwork based on a negative feedback mechanism. The circadian timekeeping system in mammals is a hierarchical multi-oscillator network, with the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) acting as the central pacemaker. The SCN synchronizes to daily light-dark cycles and coordinates rhythmic physiology and behavior. Synchronization in the SCN and at the organismal level is a key feature of the circadian clock system. In particular, intercellular coupling in the SCN synchronizes neuron oscillators and confers robustness against perturbations. Recent advances in our knowledge of and ability to manipulate circadian rhythms make available cell-based clock models, which lack strong coupling and are ideal for target discovery and chemical biology.

  16. Emerging Therapeutic Targets of Sepsis-Associated Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Sundararaman; Rosner, Mitchell H.; Okusa, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis-associated acute kidney injury (SA-AKI) is linked to high morbidity and mortality. Thus far singular approaches to target specific pathways known to contribute to the pathogenesis of SA-AKI have failed. Because of the complexity of the pathogenesis of SA-AKI, a reassessment necessitates integrative approaches to therapeutics of SA-AKI that include general supportive therapies such as the use of vasopressors, fluids, antimicrobial and target specific and time dependent therapeutics. There has been recent progress in our understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of SA-AKI including temporal nature of pro- and anti-inflammatory processes. In this review, we will discuss the clinical and experimental basis of emerging therapeutic approaches that focus on targeting early proinflammatory and late anti-inflammatory processes as well as therapeutics that may enhance cellular survival and recovery. Lastly we include ongoing clinical trials in sepsis. PMID:25795498

  17. Reformulating Tylocrebrine in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Targeted Polymeric Nanoparticles Improves Its Therapeutic Index.

    PubMed

    Kirtane, Ameya R; Wong, Henry L; Guru, Bharath Raja; Lis, Lev G; Georg, Gunda I; Gurvich, Vadim J; Panyam, Jayanth

    2015-08-03

    Several promising anticancer drug candidates have been sidelined owing to their poor physicochemical properties or unfavorable pharmacokinetics, resulting in high overall cost of drug discovery and development. Use of alternative formulation strategies that alleviate these issues can help advance new molecules to the clinic at a significantly lower cost. Tylocrebrine is a natural product with potent anticancer activity. Its clinical trial was discontinued following the discovery of severe central nervous system toxicities. To improve the safety and potency of tylocrebrine, we formulated the drug in polymeric nanoparticles targeted to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpressed on several types of tumors. Through in vitro studies in different cancer cell lines, we found that EGFR targeted nanoparticles were significantly more effective in killing tumor cells than the free drug. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies revealed that encapsulation in nanoparticles resulted in lower brain penetration and enhanced tumor accumulation of the drug. Further, targeted nanoparticles were characterized by significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibitory activity in a mouse xenograft model of epidermoid cancer. These results suggest that the therapeutic index of drugs that were previously considered unusable could be significantly improved by reformulation. Application of novel formulation strategies to previously abandoned drugs provides an opportunity to advance new molecules to the clinic at a lower cost. This can significantly increase the repertoire of treatment options available to cancer patients.

  18. Reformulating Tylocrebrine in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Targeted Polymeric Nanoparticles Improves Its Therapeutic Index

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Several promising anticancer drug candidates have been sidelined owing to their poor physicochemical properties or unfavorable pharmacokinetics, resulting in high overall cost of drug discovery and development. Use of alternative formulation strategies that alleviate these issues can help advance new molecules to the clinic at a significantly lower cost. Tylocrebrine is a natural product with potent anticancer activity. Its clinical trial was discontinued following the discovery of severe central nervous system toxicities. To improve the safety and potency of tylocrebrine, we formulated the drug in polymeric nanoparticles targeted to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpressed on several types of tumors. Through in vitro studies in different cancer cell lines, we found that EGFR targeted nanoparticles were significantly more effective in killing tumor cells than the free drug. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies revealed that encapsulation in nanoparticles resulted in lower brain penetration and enhanced tumor accumulation of the drug. Further, targeted nanoparticles were characterized by significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibitory activity in a mouse xenograft model of epidermoid cancer. These results suggest that the therapeutic index of drugs that were previously considered unusable could be significantly improved by reformulation. Application of novel formulation strategies to previously abandoned drugs provides an opportunity to advance new molecules to the clinic at a lower cost. This can significantly increase the repertoire of treatment options available to cancer patients. PMID:26065924

  19. Targeting Energy Metabolic Pathways as Therapeutic Intervention for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Intervention for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Yan Cheng, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Pennsylvania State University...Targeting Energy Metabolic Pathways as Therapeutic Intervention for Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0649 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...causes of cancer mortality in women. Current therapies for breast cancer mainly target molecular signaling pathways that promote tumor cell

  20. Is Estrogen a Therapeutic Target for Glaucoma?

    PubMed Central

    Dewundara, Samantha; Wiggs, Janey; Sullivan, David A.; Pasquale, Louis R.

    2016-01-01

    estrogen regulation, are associated with glaucoma. Conclusions Increasing evidence suggests that lifetime exposure to estrogen may alter the pathogenesis of glaucoma. Estrogen exposure may have a neuroprotective effect on the progression of POAG but further studies need to confirm this finding. The role of sex-specific preventive and therapeutic treatment may be on the horizon. PMID:26959139

  1. Is Estrogen a Therapeutic Target for Glaucoma?

    PubMed

    Dewundara, Samantha S; Wiggs, Janey L; Sullivan, David A; Pasquale, Louis R

    2016-01-01

    endothelial nitric oxide synthase, a gene receptive to estrogen regulation, are associated with glaucoma. The study concluded that increasing evidence suggests that lifetime exposure to estrogen may alter the pathogenesis of glaucoma. Estrogen exposure may have a neuroprotective effect on the progression of POAG but further studies need to confirm this finding. The role of sex-specific preventive and therapeutic treatment may be on the horizon.

  2. Role of ubiquitin ligases and the proteasome in oncogenesis: novel targets for anticancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Micel, Lindsey N; Tentler, John J; Smith, Peter G; Eckhardt, Gail S

    2013-03-20

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) regulates the ubiquitination, and thus degradation and turnover, of many proteins vital to cellular regulation and function. The UPS comprises a sequential series of enzymatic processes using four key enzyme families: E1 (ubiquitin-activating enzymes), E2 (ubiquitin-carrier proteins), E3 (ubiquitin-protein ligases), and E4 (ubiquitin chain assembly factors). Because the UPS is a crucial regulator of the cell cycle, and abnormal cell-cycle control can lead to oncogenesis, aberrancies within the UPS pathway can result in a malignant cellular phenotype and thus has become an attractive target for novel anticancer agents. This article will provide an overall review of the mechanics of the UPS, describe aberrancies leading to cancer, and give an overview of current drug therapies selectively targeting the UPS.

  3. Role of Ubiquitin Ligases and the Proteasome in Oncogenesis: Novel Targets for Anticancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Micel, Lindsey N.; Tentler, John J.; Smith, Peter G.; Eckhardt, Gail S.

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) regulates the ubiquitination, and thus degradation and turnover, of many proteins vital to cellular regulation and function. The UPS comprises a sequential series of enzymatic processes using four key enzyme families: E1 (ubiquitin-activating enzymes), E2 (ubiquitin-carrier proteins), E3 (ubiquitin-protein ligases), and E4 (ubiquitin chain assembly factors). Because the UPS is a crucial regulator of the cell cycle, and abnormal cell-cycle control can lead to oncogenesis, aberrancies within the UPS pathway can result in a malignant cellular phenotype and thus has become an attractive target for novel anticancer agents. This article will provide an overall review of the mechanics of the UPS, describe aberrancies leading to cancer, and give an overview of current drug therapies selectively targeting the UPS. PMID:23358974

  4. The disulfide compound α-lipoic acid and its derivatives: A novel class of anticancer agents targeting mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Dörsam, Bastian; Fahrer, Jörg

    2016-02-01

    The endogenous disulfide α-lipoic acid (LA) is an essential mitochondrial co-factor. In addition, LA and its reduced counterpart dihydro lipoic acid form a potent redox couple with antioxidative functions, for which it is used as dietary supplement and therapeutic. Recently, it has gained attention due to its cytotoxic effects in cancer cells, which is the key aspect of this review. We initially recapitulate the dietary occurrence, gastrointestinal absorption and pharmacokinetics of LA, illustrating its diverse antioxidative mechanisms. We then focus on its mode of action in cancer cells, in which it triggers primarily the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, whereas non-transformed primary cells are hardly affected. Furthermore, LA impairs oncogenic signaling and displays anti-metastatic potential. Novel LA derivatives such as CPI-613, which target mitochondrial energy metabolism, are described and recent pre-clinical studies are presented, which demonstrate that LA and its derivatives exert antitumor activity in vivo. Finally, we highlight clinical studies currently performed with the LA analog CPI-613. In summary, LA and its derivatives are promising candidates to complement the arsenal of established anticancer drugs due to their mitochondria-targeted mode of action and non-genotoxic properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Factor XI as a Therapeutic Target.

    PubMed

    Gailani, David; Gruber, Andras

    2016-07-01

    Factor XIa is a plasma serine protease that contributes to thrombin generation primarily through proteolytic activation of factor IX. Traditionally considered part of the intrinsic pathway of coagulation, several lines of evidence now suggest that factor XIa serves as an interface between the vitamin-K-dependent thrombin generation mechanism and the proinflammatory kallikrein-kinin system, allowing the 2 systems to influence each other. Work with animal models and results from epidemiological surveys of human populations support a role for factor XIa in thromboembolic disease. These data and the clinical observation that deficiency of factor XI, the zymogen of factor XIa, produces a relatively mild bleeding disorder suggest that drugs targeting factor XI or XIa could produce an antithrombotic effect while leaving hemostasis largely intact. Results of a recent trial comparing antisense-induced factor XI reduction to standard-dose low molecular-weight heparin as prophylaxis for venous thrombosis during knee replacement are encouraging in this regard. Here, we discuss recent findings on the biochemistry, physiology, and pathology of factor XI as they relate to thromboembolic disease. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Therapeutic Potential of Targeting the Ghrelin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Colldén, Gustav; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Müller, Timo D.

    2017-01-01

    Ghrelin was discovered in 1999 as the endogenous ligand of the growth-hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHSR1a). Since then, ghrelin has been found to exert a plethora of physiological effects that go far beyond its initial characterization as a growth hormone (GH) secretagogue. Among the numerous well-established effects of ghrelin are the stimulation of appetite and lipid accumulation, the modulation of immunity and inflammation, the stimulation of gastric motility, the improvement of cardiac performance, the modulation of stress, anxiety, taste sensation and reward-seeking behavior, as well as the regulation of glucose metabolism and thermogenesis. Due to a variety of beneficial effects on systems’ metabolism, pharmacological targeting of the endogenous ghrelin system is widely considered a valuable approach to treat metabolic complications, such as chronic inflammation, gastroparesis or cancer-associated anorexia and cachexia. The aim of this review is to discuss and highlight the broad pharmacological potential of ghrelin pathway modulation for the treatment of anorexia, cachexia, sarcopenia, cardiopathy, neurodegenerative disorders, renal and pulmonary disease, gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, inflammatory disorders and metabolic syndrome. PMID:28398233

  7. Phosphodiesterases as Therapeutic Targets for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among the elderly. In AD patients, memory loss is accompanied by the formation of beta-amyloid plaques and the appearance of tau in a pathological form. Given the lack of effective treatments for AD, the development of new management strategies for these patients is critical. The continued failure to find effective therapies using molecules aimed at addressing the anti-beta amyloid pathology has led researchers to focus on other non-amyloid-based approaches to restore memory function. Promising non-amyloid related candidate targets include phosphosdiesterases (PDEs), and indeed, Rolipram, a specific PDE4 inhibitor, was the first compound found to effectively restore cognitive deficits in animal models of AD. More recently, PDE5 inhibitors have also been shown to effectively restore memory function. Accordingly, inhibitors of other members of the PDE family may also improve memory performance in AD and non-AD animal models. Hence, in this review, we will summarize the data supporting the use of PDE inhibitors as cognitive enhancers and we will discuss the possible mechanisms of action underlying these effects. We shall also adopt a medicinal chemistry perspective that leads us to propose the most promising PDE candidates on the basis of inhibitor selectivity, brain distribution, and mechanism of action. PMID:23173065

  8. Targeting and therapeutic peptides in nanomedicine for atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Peptides in atherosclerosis nanomedicine provide structural, targeting, and therapeutic functionality and can assist in overcoming delivery barriers of traditional pharmaceuticals. Moreover, their inherent biocompatibility and biodegradability make them especially attractive as materials intended for use in vivo. In this review, an overview of nanoparticle-associated targeting and therapeutic peptides for atherosclerosis is provided, including peptides designed for cellular targets such as endothelial cells, monocytes, and macrophages as well as for plaque components such as collagen and fibrin. An emphasis is placed on recent advances in multimodal strategies and a discussion on current challenges and barriers for clinical applicability is presented. PMID:27022138

  9. Ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes as mitochondria-targeted two-photon photodynamic anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangping; Chen, Yu; Li, Guanying; Zhang, Pingyu; Jin, Chengzhi; Zeng, Leli; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-07-01

    Clinical acceptance of photodynamic therapy is currently hindered by poor depth efficacy and inefficient activation of the cell death machinery in cancer cells during treatment. To address these issues, photoactivation using two-photon absorption (TPA) is currently being examined. Mitochondria-targeted therapy represents a promising approach to target tumors selectively and may overcome the resistance in current anticancer therapies. Herein, four ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes (RuL1-RuL4) have been designed and developed to act as mitochondria-targeted two-photon photodynamic anticancer agents. These complexes exhibit very high singlet oxygen quantum yields in methanol (0.74-0.81), significant TPA cross sections (124-198 GM), remarkable mitochondrial accumulation, and deep penetration depth. Thus, RuL1-RuL4 were utilized as one-photon and two-photon absorbing photosensitizers in both monolayer cells and 3D multicellular spheroids (MCSs). These Ru(II) complexes were almost nontoxic towards cells and 3D MCSs in the dark and generate sufficient singlet oxygen under one- and two-photon irradiation to trigger cell death. Remarkably, RuL4 exhibited an IC50 value as low as 9.6 μM in one-photon PDT (λirr = 450 nm, 12 J cm(-2)) and 1.9 μM in two-photon PDT (λirr = 830 nm, 800 J cm(-2)) of 3D MCSs; moreover, RuL4 is an order of magnitude more toxic than cisplatin in the latter test system. The combination of mitochondria-targeting and two-photon activation provides a valuable paradigm to develop ruthenium(II) complexes for PDT applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cholera: pathophysiology and emerging therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Muanprasat, Chatchai; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj

    2013-05-01

    Cholera is a diarrheal disease that remains an important global health problem with several hundreds of thousands of reported cases each year. This disease is caused by intestinal infection with Vibrio cholerae, which is a highly motile gram-negative bacterium with a single-sheathed flagellum. In the course of cholera pathogenesis, V. cholerae expresses a transcriptional activator ToxT, which subsequently transactivates expressions of two crucial virulence factors: toxin-coregulated pilus and cholera toxin (CT). These factors are responsible for intestinal colonization of V. cholerae and induction of fluid secretion, respectively. In intestinal epithelial cells, CT binds to GM1 ganglioside receptors on the apical membrane and undergoes retrograde vesicular trafficking to endoplasmic reticulum, where it exploits endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation systems to release a catalytic A1 subunit of CT (CT A1) into cytoplasm. CT A1, in turn, catalyzes ADP ribosylation of α subunits of stimulatory G proteins, leading to a persistent activation of adenylate cyclase and an elevation of intracellular cAMP. Increased intracellular cAMP in human intestinal epithelial cells accounts for pathogenesis of profuse diarrhea and severe fluid loss in cholera. This review provides an overview of the pathophysiology of cholera diarrhea and discusses emerging drug targets for cholera, which include V. cholerae virulence factors, V. cholerae motility, CT binding to GM1 receptor, CT internalization and intoxication, as well as cAMP metabolism and transport proteins involved in cAMP-activated Cl(-) secretion. Future directions and perspectives of research on drug discovery and development for cholera are discussed.

  11. Tumor-homing, size-tunable clustered nanoparticles for anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinhwan; Lee, Yeong Mi; Kang, Youngnam; Kim, Won Jong

    2014-09-23

    We present herein a pH-responsive dynamic DNA nanocluster based on gold nanoparticles with highly packed nucleic acid assembly and evaluate its potential as a drug delivery vehicle with tumor-specific accumulation. Each gold nanoparticle was readily functionalized with various functional DNA sequences; in particular, we modified the surface of gold nanoparticles with bcl-2 antisense and i-motif binding sequences. Clustering of the gold nanoparticles induced by hybridization of each DNA sequence via i-motif DNA provided tumor targeting and drug loading capabilities. After cellular uptake, the drug was released by disassembly of the gold nanoparticle cluster into single gold nanoparticles in response to the pH decrease in the late endosome. Furthermore, the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein was down-regulated by the antisense-modified gold nanoparticles; thus, drug-mediated apoptosis was significantly accelerated by sensitizing the cancer cells to the drug. Our size-tunable clustered nucleic acid-grafted gold nanoparticles provide tumor homing in the blood circulation and are thus a potential multifunctional therapeutic agent in vivo as well as in vitro.

  12. Reprofiling a classical anthelmintic, pyrvinium pamoate, as an anti-cancer drug targeting mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Isao; Harada, Yasuo; Kasahara, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Pyrvinium pamoate (PP) is an FDA-approved classical anthelmintic, but is now attracting particular attention as an anti-cancer drug after recent findings of its potent cytotoxicity against various cancer cell lines only during glucose starvation, as well as its anti-tumor activity against hypovascular pancreatic cancer cells transplanted in mice. The molecular mechanisms by which PP promotes such preferential toxicity against cancer cells are currently under extensive investigation. PP suppressed the NADH-fumarate reductase system that mediates a reverse reaction of the mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex II in anaerobic organisms such as parasitic helminthes or mammalian cells under tumor microenvironment-mimicking hypoglycemic/hypoxic conditions, thereby inhibiting efficient ATP production. PP also inhibited the unfolded protein response induced by glucose starvation, thereby inhibiting the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. Even under normoglycemic/normoxic conditions, PP suppressed the mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex I and thereby STAT3, inhibiting the proliferation of myeloma/erythroleukemia cells. Here, we review accumulating knowledge on its working mechanisms and evaluate PP as a novel anti-cancer drug that targets mitochondrial respiration.

  13. Reprofiling a classical anthelmintic, pyrvinium pamoate, as an anti-cancer drug targeting mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Isao; Harada, Yasuo; Kasahara, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Pyrvinium pamoate (PP) is an FDA-approved classical anthelmintic, but is now attracting particular attention as an anti-cancer drug after recent findings of its potent cytotoxicity against various cancer cell lines only during glucose starvation, as well as its anti-tumor activity against hypovascular pancreatic cancer cells transplanted in mice. The molecular mechanisms by which PP promotes such preferential toxicity against cancer cells are currently under extensive investigation. PP suppressed the NADH-fumarate reductase system that mediates a reverse reaction of the mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex II in anaerobic organisms such as parasitic helminthes or mammalian cells under tumor microenvironment-mimicking hypoglycemic/hypoxic conditions, thereby inhibiting efficient ATP production. PP also inhibited the unfolded protein response induced by glucose starvation, thereby inhibiting the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. Even under normoglycemic/normoxic conditions, PP suppressed the mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex I and thereby STAT3, inhibiting the proliferation of myeloma/erythroleukemia cells. Here, we review accumulating knowledge on its working mechanisms and evaluate PP as a novel anti-cancer drug that targets mitochondrial respiration. PMID:23061049

  14. Cyclodextrin conjugated magnetic colloidal nanoparticles as a nanocarrier for targeted anticancer drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shashwat S.; Chen, Dong-Hwang

    2008-07-01

    A novel magnetic nanocarrier (CD-GAMNPs) was fabricated for targeted anticancer drug delivery by grafting cyclodextrin (CD) onto gum arabic modified magnetic nanoparticles (GAMNPs) using hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI) as a linker. Analyses by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed that the product had a mean diameter of 17.1 nm and a mean hydrodynamic diameter of 44.1 nm. The CD grafting was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that the amount of CD grafted on the GAMNPs was 16.8 mg g-1. The study on the loading of anticancer drug all-trans-retinoic acid (retinoic acid) revealed that the newly fabricated magnetic nanocarrier possessed a considerably higher adsorption capability as compared to GAMNPs due to the special hydrophobic cavity structure of CD, which could act as a host-guest complex with retinoic acid. Furthermore, it was found that the complexation of CD-GAMNPs with retinoic acid was exothermic and the presence of a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) led to the decrease in the inclusion of retinoic acid because the linear structure of sodium dodecyl sulfate made it easier to enter the cavity of CD as compared to less linear retinoic acid. In addition, the in vitro release profile of retinoic acid from CD-GAMNPs was characterized by an initial fast release followed by a delayed release phase.

  15. Targeting Neddylation Pathways to Inactivate Cullin-RING Ligases for Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongchao; Morgan, Meredith A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Protein neddylation is catalyzed by an E1 NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE), an E2 NEDD8-conjugating enzyme, and an E3 NEDD8 ligase. Known physiological substrates of neddylation are cullin family members. Cullin neddylation leads to activation of cullin-RING ligases (CRLs), the largest family of E3 ubiquitin ligases responsible for ubiquitylation and degradation of many key signaling/regulatory proteins. Thus, through modulating CRLs, neddylation regulates many biological processes, including cell cycle progression, signal transduction, and tumorigenesis. Given that NEDD8 is overexpressed and CRLs are abnormally activated in many human cancers, targeting protein neddylation, in general, and cullin neddylation, in particular, appears to be an attractive anticancer approach. Recent Advances: MLN4924, a small molecule inhibitor of NAE, was discovered that inactivates CRLs and causes accumulation of CRL substrates to suppress tumor cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Promising preclinical results advanced MLN4924 to several clinical trials for anticancer therapy. Critical Issues: In preclinical settings, MLN4924 effectively suppresses tumor cell growth by inducing apoptosis, senescence, and autophagy, and causes sensitization to chemoradiation therapies in a cellular context-dependent manner. Signal molecules that determine the cell fate upon MLN4924 treatment, however, remain elusive. Cancer cells develop MLN4924 resistance by selecting target mutations. Future Directions: In the clinical side, several Phase 1b trials are under way to determine the safety and efficacy of MLN4924, acting alone or in combination with conventional chemotherapy, against human solid tumors. In the preclinical side, the efforts are being made to develop additional neddylation inhibitors by targeting NEDD8 E2s and E3s. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2383–2400. PMID:24410571

  16. Zebrafish: predictive model for targeted cancer therapeutics from nature.

    PubMed

    Zulkhernain, Nursafwana Syazwani; Teo, Soo Hwang; Patel, Vyomesh; Tan, Pei Jean

    2014-01-01

    Targeted therapy, the treatment of cancer based on an underlying genetic alteration, is rapidly gaining favor as the preferred therapeutic approach. To date, although natural products represent a rich resource of bio-diverse drug candidates, only a few have been identified to be effective as targeted cancer therapies largely due to the incompatibilities to current high-throughput screening methods. In this article, we review the utility of a zebrafish developmental screen for bioactive natural product-based compounds that target signaling pathways that are intimately shared with those in humans. Any bioactive compound perturbing signaling pathways identified from phenotypic developmental defects in zebrafish embryos provide an opportunity for developing targeted therapies for human cancers. This model provides a promising tool in the search for targeted cancer therapeutics from natural products.

  17. MUC4 mucin- a therapeutic target for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Shailendra K; Kumar, Sushil; Cannon, Andrew; Hall, Bradley; Bhatia, Rakesh; Nasser, Mohd Wasim; Mahapatra, Sidharth; Batra, Surinder K; Jain, Maneesh

    2017-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is characterized by mucin overexpression. MUC4 is the most differentially overexpressed membrane-bound mucin that plays a functional role in disease progression and therapy resistance. Area covered: We describe the clinicopathological significance of MUC4, summarize mechanisms contributing to its deregulated expression, review preclinical studies aimed at inhibiting MUC4, and discuss how MUC4 overexpression provides opportunities for developing targeted therapies. Finally, we discuss the challenges for developing MUC4-based therapeutics, and identify areas where efforts should be directed to effectively exploit MUC4 as a therapeutic target for PC. Expert opinion: Studies demonstrating that abrogation of MUC4 expression reduces proliferation and metastasis of PC cells and enhances sensitivity to therapeutic agents affirm its utility as a therapeutic target. Emerging evidence also supports the suitability of MUC4 as a potential immunotherapy target. However, these studies have been limited to in vitro, ex vivo or in vivo approaches using xenograft tumors in immunodeficient murine models. For translational relevance, MUC4-targeted therapies should be evaluated in murine models with intact immune system and accurate tumor microenvironment. Additionally, future studies evaluating MUC4 as a target for immunotherapy must entail characterization of immune response in PC patients and investigate its association with immunosuppression and survival.

  18. Aptamers Against Immunologic Targets: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Prospects.

    PubMed

    Vorobyeva, Mariya; Timoshenko, Valentina; Vorobjev, Pavel; Venyaminova, Alya

    2016-02-01

    The concept of in vitro selection of nucleic acid aptamers emerged 25 years ago, and since then tremendous progress has been achieved in the development of different aptamers and their applications for various bioanalytical and therapeutic purposes. Among other protein targets of aptamers, immune system proteins are of particular interest both as diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets. The present review summarizes up-to-date articles concerning the selection and design of DNA and RNA aptamers against immunologic targets such as antibodies, cytokines, and T-cell and B-cell receptors. We also discuss the prospects of employing aptamers as recognizing modules of diagnostic aptasensors, potential therapeutic candidates for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and cancer, and specific tools for functional studies of immune system proteins.

  19. Cancer Stem Cells Therapeutic Target Database: The First Comprehensive Database for Therapeutic Targets of Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoqing; Cong, Ye; Luo, Huizhe Howard; Wu, Sijin; Zhao, Liyuan Eric; Liu, Quentin; Yang, Yongliang

    2017-02-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of tumor cells that have strong self-renewal capabilities and may contribute to the failure of conventional cancer therapies. Hence, therapeutics homing in on CSCs represent a novel and promising approach that may eradicate malignant tumors. However, the lack of information on validated targets of CSCs has greatly hindered the development of CSC-directed therapeutics. Herein, we describe the Cancer Stem Cells Therapeutic Target Database (CSCTT), the first online database to provide a rich bioinformatics resource for the display, search, and analysis of structure, function, and related annotation for therapeutic targets of cancer stem cells. CSCTT contains 135 proteins that are potential targets of CSCs, with validated experimental evidence manually curated from existing literatures. Proteins are carefully annotated with a detailed description of protein families, biological process, related diseases, and experimental evidences. In addition, CSCTT has compiled 213 documented therapeutic methods for cancer stem cells, including 118 small molecules and 20 biotherapy methods. The CSCTT may serve as a useful platform for the development of CSC-directed therapeutics against various malignant tumors. The CSCTT database is freely available to the public at http://www.csctt.org/. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:331-334.

  20. Cancer Stem Cells Therapeutic Target Database: The First Comprehensive Database for Therapeutic Targets of Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoqing; Cong, Ye; Luo, Huizhe Howard; Wu, Sijin; Zhao, Liyuan Eric; Liu, Quentin; Yang, Yongliang

    2016-09-02

    SummaryCancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of tumor cells that have strong self-renewal capabilities and may contribute to the failure of conventional cancer therapies. Hence, therapeutics homing in on CSCs represent a novel and promising approach that may eradicate malignant tumors. However, the lack of information on validated targets of CSCs has greatly hindered the development of CSC-directed therapeutics. Herein, we describe the Cancer Stem Cells Therapeutic Target Database (CSCTT), the first online database to provide a rich bioinformatics resource for the display, search, and analysis of structure, function, and related annotation for therapeutic targets of cancer stem cells. CSCTT contains 135 proteins that are potential targets of CSCs, with validated experimental evidence manually curated from existing literatures. Proteins are carefully annotated with a detailed description of protein families, biological process, related diseases, and experimental evidences. In addition, CSCTT has compiled 213 documented therapeutic methods for cancer stem cells, including 118 small molecules and 20 biotherapy methods. The CSCTT may serve as a useful platform for the development of CSC-directed therapeutics against various malignant tumors. The CSCTT database is freely available to the public at http://www.csctt.org/ SIGNIFICANCE: Although the definition and role of cancer stem cells (CSCs, also called tumor-initiating cells) remain a topic of much debate, increasing evidence suggests that CSCs may be the driving force behind chemotherapy/radiotherapy resistance, as well as metastasis. Consequently, the elimination or differentiation of CSCs is critical for treating malignant tumors and improving clinical outcomes. Unfortunately, the progress of research into the development of anti-CSC therapeutics has been rather slow, and no anti-CSC drugs are yet in clinical use. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop a database that compiles useful information for

  1. Computational identification of multi-omic correlates of anticancer therapeutic response

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A challenge in precision medicine is the transformation of genomic data into knowledge that can be used to stratify patients into treatment groups based on predicted clinical response. Although clinical trials remain the only way to truly measure drug toxicities and effectiveness, as a scientific community we lack the resources to clinically assess all drugs presently under development. Therefore, an effective preclinical model system that enables prediction of anticancer drug response could significantly speed the broader adoption of personalized medicine. Results Three large-scale pharmacogenomic studies have screened anticancer compounds in greater than 1000 distinct human cancer cell lines. We combined these datasets to generate and validate multi-omic predictors of drug response. We compared drug response signatures built using a penalized linear regression model and two non-linear machine learning techniques, random forest and support vector machine. The precision and robustness of each drug response signature was assessed using cross-validation across three independent datasets. Fifteen drugs were common among the datasets. We validated prediction signatures for eleven out of fifteen tested drugs (17-AAG, AZD0530, AZD6244, Erlotinib, Lapatinib, Nultin-3, Paclitaxel, PD0325901, PD0332991, PF02341066, and PLX4720). Conclusions Multi-omic predictors of drug response can be generated and validated for many drugs. Specifically, the random forest algorithm generated more precise and robust prediction signatures when compared to support vector machines and the more commonly used elastic net regression. The resulting drug response signatures can be used to stratify patients into treatment groups based on their individual tumor biology, with two major benefits: speeding the process of bringing preclinical drugs to market, and the repurposing and repositioning of existing anticancer therapies. PMID:25573145

  2. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin As a Therapeutic Target in Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Gengyang; Ren, Hui; Qiu, Ting; Zhang, Zhida; Zhao, Wenhua; Yu, Xiang; Huang, Jinjing; Tang, Jingjing; Liang, De; Yao, Zhensong; Yang, Zhidong; Jiang, Xiaobing

    2017-08-23

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a key role in sensing and integrating large amounts of environmental cues to regulate organismal growth, homeostasis, and many major cellular processes. Recently, mounting evidences highlight its roles in regulating bone homeostasis, which sheds light on the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. The activation/inhibition of mTOR signaling is reported to positively/negatively regulate bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs)/osteoblasts-mediated bone formation, adipogenic differentiation, osteocytes homeostasis, and osteoclasts-mediated bone resorption, which result in the changes of bone homeostasis, thereby resulting in or protect against osteoporosis. Given the likely importance of mTOR signaling in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, here we discuss the detailed mechanisms in mTOR machinery and its association with osteoporosis therapy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Treatment Strategies that Enhance the Efficacy and Selectivity of Mitochondria-Targeted Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Modica-Napolitano, Josephine S.; Weissig, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Nearly a century has passed since Otto Warburg first observed high rates of aerobic glycolysis in a variety of tumor cell types and suggested that this phenomenon might be due to an impaired mitochondrial respiratory capacity in these cells. Subsequently, much has been written about the role of mitochondria in the initiation and/or progression of various forms of cancer, and the possibility of exploiting differences in mitochondrial structure and function between normal and malignant cells as targets for cancer chemotherapy. A number of mitochondria-targeted compounds have shown efficacy in selective cancer cell killing in pre-clinical and early clinical testing, including those that induce mitochondria permeability transition and apoptosis, metabolic inhibitors, and ROS regulators. To date, however, none has exhibited the standards for high selectivity and efficacy and low toxicity necessary to progress beyond phase III clinical trials and be used as a viable, single modality treatment option for human cancers. This review explores alternative treatment strategies that have been shown to enhance the efficacy and selectivity of mitochondria-targeted anticancer agents in vitro and in vivo, and may yet fulfill the clinical promise of exploiting the mitochondrion as a target for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:26230693

  4. Nanoparticle formulations to enhance tumor targeting of poorly soluble polyphenols with potential anticancer properties.

    PubMed

    Bonferoni, Maria Cristina; Rossi, Silvia; Sandri, Giuseppina; Ferrari, Franca

    2017-10-01

    Polyphenols have been extensively studied for their relevant anticancer activity. Quite often however their instability, extensive metabolization, low bioavailability and poor solubility limit their application in cancer prevention and therapy. Formulation in nanoparticles has been widely proposed as a means to overcome these limits, maximize localization and specific activity at tumor site. The present review is intended as an update of literature regarding nanoparticulate carriers aimed to deliver polyphenols to the cancer site. Three molecules were chosen, all of which were hydrophobic and poorly soluble, representative of different polyphenol classes: quercetin (QT) among the flavonoid group, curcumin (CUR) as representative of curcuminoids, and resveratrol (RSV) among the stilbenes. In particular, nanoparticulate systems suitable for poorly soluble drugs will be described and attention will be paid to characteristics designed to improve tumor targeting, specific delivery and interaction with tumor cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Drug-induced interstitial lung diseases associated with molecular-targeted anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Gemma, Akihiko

    2009-02-01

    Little was known about drug-induced interstitial lung disease (ILD) when acute ILD-type events developed in several Japanese patients treated with gefitinib. A better understanding of drug-induced ILD is required, including more reliable data about the incidence of events associated with different treatments and identification of the risk factors for this type of ILD. Recent advances in imaging, molecular examination, and pathology have been used in postmarketing surveillance studies designed and conducted by an independent academic team to define the risk and to increase the amount of evidence about ILD related to various molecularly targeted anticancer agents. These studies may shed light on the underlying mechanisms of drug-induced ILD and appropriate evidence-based strategies that can be used to prevent or manage these events.

  6. Targeted search for anticancer drugs--CNIO cancer conference. 16-18 March, Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Lacal, Juan-Carlos; Carnero, Amancio

    2003-05-01

    The Spanish National Cancer Center has launched a new series of cancer conferences devoted to timely themes in oncology. These meetings aim to bring together a maximum of 50 participants, including 20 to 25 speakers along with 25 to 30 participants for in-depth discussion of new results and ideas in frontline cancer research. There is no registration fee to attend, but participants must organize their own travel and accommodation expenses; free communications are presented as posters, but a few may be selected for short (15 min) oral presentations. This particular meeting was organized by Amancio Carnero and David H Beach, and was mostly devoted to state of the art methodologies for the identification of new targets for anticancer drug design, although the development of novel drugs was also discussed.

  7. Anticancer Targets in the Glycolytic Metabolism of Tumors: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Porporato, Paolo E.; Dhup, Suveera; Dadhich, Rajesh K.; Copetti, Tamara; Sonveaux, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a metabolic disease and the solution of two metabolic equations: to produce energy with limited resources and to fulfill the biosynthetic needs of proliferating cells. Both equations are solved when glycolysis is uncoupled from oxidative phosphorylation in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, a process known as the glycolytic switch. This review addresses in a comprehensive manner the main molecular events accounting for high-rate glycolysis in cancer. It starts from modulation of the Pasteur Effect allowing short-term adaptation to hypoxia, highlights the key role exerted by the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor HIF-1 in long-term adaptation to hypoxia, and summarizes the current knowledge concerning the necessary involvement of aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) in cancer cell proliferation. Based on the many observations positioning glycolysis as a central player in malignancy, the most advanced anticancer treatments targeting tumor glycolysis are briefly reviewed. PMID:21904528

  8. Cancer stem cells: constantly evolving and functionally heterogeneous therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Rycaj, Kiera; Liu, Zhong-Min; Tang, Dean G

    2014-06-01

    Elucidating the origin of and dynamic interrelationship between intratumoral cell subpopulations has clear clinical significance in helping to understand the cellular basis of treatment response, therapeutic resistance, and tumor relapse. Cancer stem cells (CSC), together with clonal evolution driven by genetic alterations, generate cancer cell heterogeneity commonly observed in clinical samples. The 2013 Shanghai International Symposium on Cancer Stem Cells brought together leaders in the field to highlight the most recent progress in phenotyping, characterizing, and targeting CSCs and in elucidating the relationship between the cell-of-origin of cancer and CSCs. Discussions from the symposium emphasize the urgent need in developing novel therapeutics to target the constantly evolving CSCs.

  9. Targeting luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone: A potential therapeutics to treat gynecological and other cancers.

    PubMed

    Ghanghoria, Raksha; Kesharwani, Prashant; Tekade, Rakesh K; Jain, Narendra K

    2016-11-10

    Cancer is a prime healthcare problem that is significantly responsible for universal mortality. Despite distinguished advancements in medical field, chemotherapy is still the mainstay for the treatment of cancers. During chemotherapy, approximately 90% of the administered dose goes to normal tissues, with mere 2-5% precisely reaching the cancerous tissues. Subsequently, the resultant side effects and associated complications lead to dose reduction or even discontinuance of the therapy. Tumor directed therapy therefore, represents a fascinating approach to augment the therapeutic potential of anticancer bioactives as well as overcomes its side effects. The selective overexpression of LHRH receptors on human tumors compared to normal tissues makes them a suitable marker for diagnostics, molecular probes and targeted therapeutics. These understanding enabled the rational to conjugate LHRH with various cytotoxic drugs (doxorubicin, DOX; camptothecin etc.), cytotoxic genes [small interfering RNA (siRNA), micro RNA (miRNA)], as well as therapeutic nanocarriers (nanoparticles, liposomes or dendrimers) to facilitate their tumor specific delivery. LHRH conjugation enhances their delivery via LHRH receptor mediated endocytosis. Numerous cytotoxic analogs of LHRH were developed over the past two decades to target various types of cancers. The potency of LHRH compound were reported to be as high as 5,00-10,00 folds compared to parent molecules. The objective of this review article is to discuss reports on various LHRH analogs with special emphasis on their prospective application in the medical field. The article also focuses on the attributes that must be taken into account while designing a LHRH therapeutics with special account to the biochemistry and applications of these conjugates. The record on various cytotoxic analogs of LHRH are also discussed. It is anticipated that the knowledge of therapeutic and toxicological aspects of LHRH compounds will facilitate the

  10. Synthesis, Characterisation, and In Vitro Anticancer Activity of Curcumin Analogues Bearing Pyrazole/Pyrimidine Ring Targeting EGFR Tyrosine Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan, Mohamed Jawed; Khalilullah, Habibullah; Yasmin, Sabina; Jadav, Surender Singh; Govindasamy, Jeyabalan

    2013-01-01

    In search of potential therapeutics for cancer, we described herein the synthesis, characterization, and in vitro anticancer activity of a novel series of curcumin analogues. The anticancer effects were evaluated on a panel of 60 cell lines, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI) screening protocol. There were 10 tested compounds among 14 synthesized compounds, which showed potent anticancer activity in both one-dose and 5-dose assays. The most active compound of the series was 3,5-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methylstyryl)-1H-pyrazole-1-yl(phenyl)methanone (10) which showed mean growth percent of −28.71 in one-dose assay and GI50 values between 0.0079 and 1.86 µM in 5-dose assay. PMID:24089667

  11. IGF system targeted therapy: Therapeutic opportunities for ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Liefers-Visser, J A L; Meijering, R A M; Reyners, A K L; van der Zee, A G J; de Jong, S

    2017-09-08

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system comprises multiple growth factor receptors, including insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R), insulin receptor (IR) -A and -B. These receptors are activated upon binding to their respective growth factor ligands, IGF-I, IGF-II and insulin, and play an important role in development, maintenance, progression, survival and chemotherapeutic response of ovarian cancer. In many pre-clinical studies anti-IGF-1R/IR targeted strategies proved effective in reducing growth of ovarian cancer models. In addition, anti-IGF-1R targeted strategies potentiated the efficacy of platinum based chemotherapy. Despite the vast amount of encouraging and promising pre-clinical data, anti-IGF-1R/IR targeted strategies lacked efficacy in the clinic. The question is whether targeting the IGF-1R/IR signaling pathway still holds therapeutic potential. In this review we address the complexity of the IGF-1R/IR signaling pathway, including receptor heterodimerization within and outside the IGF system and downstream signaling. Further, we discuss the implications of this complexity on current targeted strategies and indicate therapeutic opportunities for successful targeting of the IGF-1R/IR signaling pathway in ovarian cancer. Multiple-targeted approaches circumventing bidirectional receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) compensation and prevention of system rewiring are expected to have more therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Anticancer property of bromelain with therapeutic potential in malignant peritoneal mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Krishna; Akhter, Javed; Chua, Terence C; Morris, David Lawson

    2013-05-01

    Bromelain is a mixture of proteolytic enzymes that is capable of hydrolyzing glycosidic linkages in glycoprotein. Glycoprotein's are ubiquitously distributed throughout the body and serve a variety of physiologic functions. Faulty glycosylation of proteins may lead to cancer. Antitumor properties of bromelain have been demonstrated in both, in vitro and in vivo studies, along with scanty anecdotal human studies. Various mechanistic pathways have been proposed to explain the anticancer properties of bromelain. However, proteolysis by bromelain has been suggested as a main pathway by some researchers. MUC1 is a glycoprotein that provides tumor cells with invasive, metastatic, and chemo-resistant properties. To date, there is no study that examines the effect of bromelain on MUC1. However, the viability of MUC1 expressing pancreatic and breast cancer cells are adversely affected by bromelain. Further, the efficacy of cisplatin and 5-FU are enhanced by adjuvant treatment with bromelain, indicating that the barrier function of MUC1 may be affected. Other studies have also indicated that there is a greater accumulation of 5-FU in the cell compartment on treatment with 5-FU and bromelain. Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) expresses MUC1 and initial studies have shown that the viability of MPM cells is adversely affected by exposure to bromelain. Further, bromelain in combination with either 5-FU or cisplatin, the efficacy of the chemotherapeutic drug is enhanced. Hence, current evidence indicates that bromelain may have the potential of being developed into an effective anticancer agent for MPM.

  13. Network modelling reveals the mechanism underlying colitis-associated colon cancer and identifies novel combinatorial anti-cancer targets.

    PubMed

    Lu, Junyan; Zeng, Hanlin; Liang, Zhongjie; Chen, Limin; Zhang, Liyi; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Hong; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Bairong; Huang, Ming; Geng, Meiyu; Spiegel, Sarah; Luo, Cheng

    2015-10-08

    The connection between inflammation and tumourigenesis has been well established. However, the detailed molecular mechanism underlying inflammation-associated tumourigenesis remains unknown because this process involves a complex interplay between immune microenvironments and epithelial cells. To obtain a more systematic understanding of inflammation-associated tumourigenesis as well as to identify novel therapeutic approaches, we constructed a knowledge-based network describing the development of colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC) by integrating the extracellular microenvironment and intracellular signalling pathways. Dynamic simulations of the CAC network revealed a core network module, including P53, MDM2, and AKT, that may govern the malignant transformation of colon epithelial cells in a pro-tumor inflammatory microenvironment. Furthermore, in silico mutation studies and experimental validations led to a novel finding that concurrently targeting ceramide and PI3K/AKT pathway by chemical probes or marketed drugs achieves synergistic anti-cancer effects. Overall, our network model can guide further mechanistic studies on CAC and provide new insights into the design of combinatorial cancer therapies in a rational manner.

  14. Network modelling reveals the mechanism underlying colitis-associated colon cancer and identifies novel combinatorial anti-cancer targets

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Junyan; Zeng, Hanlin; Liang, Zhongjie; Chen, Limin; Zhang, Liyi; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Hong; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Bairong; Huang, Ming; Geng, Meiyu; Spiegel, Sarah; Luo, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The connection between inflammation and tumourigenesis has been well established. However, the detailed molecular mechanism underlying inflammation-associated tumourigenesis remains unknown because this process involves a complex interplay between immune microenvironments and epithelial cells. To obtain a more systematic understanding of inflammation-associated tumourigenesis as well as to identify novel therapeutic approaches, we constructed a knowledge-based network describing the development of colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC) by integrating the extracellular microenvironment and intracellular signalling pathways. Dynamic simulations of the CAC network revealed a core network module, including P53, MDM2, and AKT, that may govern the malignant transformation of colon epithelial cells in a pro-tumor inflammatory microenvironment. Furthermore, in silico mutation studies and experimental validations led to a novel finding that concurrently targeting ceramide and PI3K/AKT pathway by chemical probes or marketed drugs achieves synergistic anti-cancer effects. Overall, our network model can guide further mechanistic studies on CAC and provide new insights into the design of combinatorial cancer therapies in a rational manner. PMID:26446703

  15. Mcl-1 Degradation Is Required for Targeted Therapeutics to Eradicate Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jingshan; Wang, Peng; Tan, Shuai; Chen, Dongshi; Nikolovska-Coleska, Zaneta; Zou, Fangdong; Yu, Jian; Zhang, Lin

    2017-05-01

    The Bcl-2 family protein Mcl-1 is often degraded in cancer cells subjected to effective therapeutic treatment, and defective Mcl-1 degradation has been associated with intrinsic and acquired drug resistance. However, a causal relationship between Mcl-1 degradation and anticancer drug responses has not been directly established, especially in solid tumor cells where Mcl-1 inhibition alone is insufficient to trigger cell death. In this study, we present evidence that Mcl-1 participates directly in determining effective therapeutic responses in colon cancer cells. In this setting, Mcl-1 degradation was induced by a variety of multikinase inhibitor drugs, where it relied upon GSK3β phosphorylation and FBW7-dependent ubiquitination. Specific blockade by genetic knock-in (KI) abolished apoptotic responses and conferred resistance to kinase inhibitors. Mcl-1-KI also suppressed the antiangiogenic and anti-hypoxic effects of kinase inhibitors in the tumor microenvironment. Interestingly, these same inhibitors also induced the BH3-only Bcl-2 family protein PUMA, which is required for apoptosis. Degradation-resistant Mcl-1 bound and sequestered PUMA from other prosurvival proteins to maintain cell survival, which was abolished by small-molecule Mcl-1 inhibitors. Our findings establish a pivotal role for Mcl-1 degradation in the response of colon cancer cells to targeted therapeutics, and they provide a useful rational platform to develop Mcl-1-targeting agents that can overcome drug resistance. Cancer Res; 77(9); 2512-21. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Actively targeted delivery of anticancer drug to tumor cells by redox-responsive star-shaped micelles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chunli; Guo, Xing; Qu, Qianqian; Tang, Zhaomin; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Shaobing

    2014-10-01

    In cancer therapy nanocargos based on star-shaped polymer exhibit unique features such as better stability, smaller size distribution and higher drug capacity in comparison to linear polymeric micelles. In this study, we developed a multifunctional star-shaped micellar system by combination of active targeting ability and redox-responsive behavior. The star-shaped micelles with good stability were self-assembled from four-arm poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer. The redox-responsive behaviors of these micelles triggered by glutathione were evaluated from the changes of micellar size, morphology and molecular weight. In vitro drug release profiles exhibited that in a stimulated normal physiological environment, the redox-responsive star-shaped micelles could maintain good stability, whereas in a reducing and acid environment similar with that of tumor cells, the encapsulated agent was promptly released. In vitro cellular uptake and subcellular localization of these micelles were further studied with confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry against the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa. In vivo and ex vivo DOX fluorescence imaging displayed that these FA-functionalized star-shaped micelles possessed much better specificity to target solid tumor. Both the qualitative and quantitative results of the antitumor effect in 4T1 tumor-bearing BALB/c mice demonstrated that these redox-responsive star-shaped micelles have a high therapeutic efficiency to artificial solid tumor. Therefore, the multifunctional star-shaped micelles are a potential platform for targeted anticancer drug delivery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Lovastatin protects keratinocytes from DNA damage-related pro-apoptotic stress responses stimulated by anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Verena; Albers, Anne; Fritz, Gerhard

    2016-06-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a relevant adverse effect of anticancer therapy involving ionizing radiation (IR) and doxorubicin (Doxo). Because DNA damage of keratinocytes is causative for the pathogenesis of OM, we aim to identify pharmacological measures for geno- and cytoprotection of keratinocytes. We investigated the influence of the lipid-lowering drug lovastatin on cell death, proliferation and DNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms of human keratinocytes following treatment with IR and Doxo. Lovastatin protected keratinocytes from the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of IR and Doxo as shown by a diminished induction of apoptosis as well as a reduced formation and slightly improved repair of DNA damage following Doxo and IR treatment, respectively. Lovastatin selectively blocked the activation of Chk1 and ATR kinases following treatment with IR, Doxo and the ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor hydroxyurea, indicating that the statin antagonizes ATR/Chk1-regulated replicative stress responses. Part of the cytoprotective activity of lovastatin seems to rest on a delayed entry of lovastatin treated cells into S-phase. Yet, because the statin also protected non-proliferating keratinocytes from IR- and Doxo-induced cytotoxicity, cell cycle independent protective mechanisms are involved, too. Lovastatin attenuates pro-toxic DNA damage-related responses of keratinocytes stimulated by OM-inducing anticancer therapeutics. The data encourage forthcoming in vivo and clinical studies addressing the usefulness of statins in the prevention of OM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. From toxins targeting ligand gated ion channels to therapeutic molecules.

    PubMed

    Nasiripourdori, Adak; Taly, Valérie; Grutter, Thomas; Taly, Antoine

    2011-03-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels (LGIC) play a central role in inter-cellular communication. This key function has two consequences: (i) these receptor channels are major targets for drug discovery because of their potential involvement in numerous human brain diseases; (ii) they are often found to be the target of plant and animal toxins. Together this makes toxin/receptor interactions important to drug discovery projects. Therefore, toxins acting on LGIC are presented and their current/potential therapeutic uses highlighted.

  19. Evolving therapeutic targets in ischemic stroke: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Sugunan, Sinoy; Joseph, Diya Binoy; Rajanikant, G K

    2013-04-01

    Ischemic stroke is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide for which the assemblage of therapeutic interventions has remained outstandingly limited. Several new insights into the causes of neuronal death during ischemic event have led to the identification of some important novel targets for intervention. This article highlights some of the promising protein targets, which are in the validation process and have the potential to get translated into viable neurotherapeutics against ischemic stroke.

  20. Recent developments in emerging therapeutic targets of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Margaret Man-Ger; Beier, Frank; Pest, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Despite the tremendous individual suffering and socioeconomic burden caused by osteoarthritis, there are currently no effective disease-modifying treatment options. This is in part because of our incomplete understanding of osteoarthritis disease mechanism. This review summarizes recent developments in therapeutic targets identified from surgical animal models of osteoarthritis that provide novel insight into osteoarthritis pathology and possess potential for progression into preclinical studies. Recent findings Several candidate pathways and processes that have been identified include chondrocyte autophagy, growth factor signaling, inflammation, and nociceptive signaling. Major strategies that possess therapeutic potential at the cellular level include inhibiting autophagy suppression and decreasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Cartilage anabolism and prevention of cartilage degradation has been shown to result from growth factor signaling modulation, such as TGF-β, TGF-α, and FGF; however, the results are context-dependent and require further investigation. Pain assessment studies in rodent surgical models have demonstrated potential in employing anti-NGF strategies for minimizing osteoarthritis-associated pain. Summary Studies of potential therapeutic targets in osteoarthritis using animal surgical models are helping to elucidate osteoarthritis pathology and propel therapeutics development. Further studies should continue to elucidate pathological mechanisms and therapeutic targets in various joint tissues to improve overall joint health. PMID:27906752

  1. Recent developments in emerging therapeutic targets of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Margaret Man-Ger; Beier, Frank; Pest, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    Despite the tremendous individual suffering and socioeconomic burden caused by osteoarthritis, there are currently no effective disease-modifying treatment options. This is in part because of our incomplete understanding of osteoarthritis disease mechanism. This review summarizes recent developments in therapeutic targets identified from surgical animal models of osteoarthritis that provide novel insight into osteoarthritis pathology and possess potential for progression into preclinical studies. Several candidate pathways and processes that have been identified include chondrocyte autophagy, growth factor signaling, inflammation, and nociceptive signaling. Major strategies that possess therapeutic potential at the cellular level include inhibiting autophagy suppression and decreasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Cartilage anabolism and prevention of cartilage degradation has been shown to result from growth factor signaling modulation, such as TGF-β, TGF-α, and FGF; however, the results are context-dependent and require further investigation. Pain assessment studies in rodent surgical models have demonstrated potential in employing anti-NGF strategies for minimizing osteoarthritis-associated pain. Studies of potential therapeutic targets in osteoarthritis using animal surgical models are helping to elucidate osteoarthritis pathology and propel therapeutics development. Further studies should continue to elucidate pathological mechanisms and therapeutic targets in various joint tissues to improve overall joint health.

  2. New therapeutic targets in rare genetic skeletal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Michael D; Bell, Peter A; Wright, Michael J; Pirog, Katarzyna A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Genetic skeletal diseases (GSDs) are a diverse and complex group of rare genetic conditions that affect the development and homeostasis of the skeleton. Although individually rare, as a group of related diseases, GSDs have an overall prevalence of at least 1 per 4,000 children. There are currently very few specific therapeutic interventions to prevent, halt or modify skeletal disease progression and therefore the generation of new and effective treatments requires novel and innovative research that can identify tractable therapeutic targets and biomarkers of these diseases. Areas covered: Remarkable progress has been made in identifying the genetic basis of the majority of GSDs and in developing relevant model systems that have delivered new knowledge on disease mechanisms and are now starting to identify novel therapeutic targets. This review will provide an overview of disease mechanisms that are shared amongst groups of different GSDs and describe potential therapeutic approaches that are under investigation. Expert opinion: The extensive clinical variability and genetic heterogeneity of GSDs renders this broad group of rare diseases a bench to bedside challenge. However, the evolving hypothesis that clinically different diseases might share common disease mechanisms is a powerful concept that will generate critical mass for the identification and validation of novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers. PMID:26635999

  3. New therapeutic targets in rare genetic skeletal diseases.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Michael D; Bell, Peter A; Wright, Michael J; Pirog, Katarzyna A

    2015-10-03

    Introduction: Genetic skeletal diseases (GSDs) are a diverse and complex group of rare genetic conditions that affect the development and homeostasis of the skeleton. Although individually rare, as a group of related diseases, GSDs have an overall prevalence of at least 1 per 4,000 children. There are currently very few specific therapeutic interventions to prevent, halt or modify skeletal disease progression and therefore the generation of new and effective treatments requires novel and innovative research that can identify tractable therapeutic targets and biomarkers of these diseases. Areas covered: Remarkable progress has been made in identifying the genetic basis of the majority of GSDs and in developing relevant model systems that have delivered new knowledge on disease mechanisms and are now starting to identify novel therapeutic targets. This review will provide an overview of disease mechanisms that are shared amongst groups of different GSDs and describe potential therapeutic approaches that are under investigation. Expert opinion: The extensive clinical variability and genetic heterogeneity of GSDs renders this broad group of rare diseases a bench to bedside challenge. However, the evolving hypothesis that clinically different diseases might share common disease mechanisms is a powerful concept that will generate critical mass for the identification and validation of novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers.

  4. Current and future therapeutic targets of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Di, Yuan Ming; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Guang Li, Chun; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systematic autoimmune disease which affects about 1% of the population world wide. This article aimed to identify current therapeutic targets for RA based on data from the literature and drug target related databases. Identified targets were further analysed using a powerful bioinformatics tool, PANTHER (Protein ANalysis THrough Evolutionary Relationships). Additionally, we explored future possible therapeutic targets for RA and discussed the possibility of discovering novel drugs with improved efficacy and reduced toxicity for RA treatment. Data on current clinical drugs for RA treatment were extracted from the US Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) website. Candidate targets of RA were extracted from three online databases: Drugbank, Therapeutic Target Database (TTD) and Potential Drug Target Database (PDTD). A total of 95 clinical protein targets for RA have been identified and were analysed using the PANTHER Classification System. According to the PANTHER analysis, most commonly involved pathways in current RA targeting includes inflammation mediated by chemokine and cytokine signalling pathways, angiogenesis, p53 pathway, de novo purine biosynthesis, T-cell activation, apoptosis signalling pathway and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor signalling pathway. Accordingly, current clinical agents for the treatment of RA mainly include corticosteroids, non-steriodal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). In addition, a number of investigational targets for RA have been identified and many novel drugs for RA therapy are under investigation. Current approaches to handle RA aim to ameliorate inflammation, to relieve pain, and most importantly to protect the cartilage, joints and bones from further damage by blocking proinflammatory molecules and inhibit the production of matrix-degrading factors. New drugs for RA with improved efficacy and safety should be developed.

  5. Mitochondria death/survival signaling pathways in cardiotoxicity induced by anthracyclines and anticancer-targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Montaigne, David; Hurt, Christopher; Neviere, Remi

    2012-01-01

    Anthracyclines remain the cornerstone of treatment in many malignancies but these agents have a cumulative dose relationship with cardiotoxicity. Development of cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure induced by anthracyclines are typically dose-dependent, irreversible, and cumulative. Although past studies of cardiotoxicity have focused on anthracyclines, more recently interest has turned to anticancer drugs that target many proteins kinases, such as tyrosine kinases. An attractive model to explain the mechanism of this cardiotoxicity could be myocyte loss through cell death pathways. Inhibition of mitochondrial transition permeability is a valuable tool to prevent doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. In response to anthracycline treatment, activation of several protein kinases, neuregulin/ErbB2 signaling, and transcriptional factors modify mitochondrial functions that determine cell death or survival through the modulation of mitochondrial membrane permeability. Cellular response to anthracyclines is also modulated by a myriad of transcriptional factors that influence cell fate. Several novel targeted chemotherapeutic agents have been associated with a small but worrying risk of left ventricular dysfunction. Agents such as trastuzumab and tyrosine kinase inhibitors can lead to cardiotoxicity that is fundamentally different from that caused by anthracyclines, whereas biological effects converge to the mitochondria as a critical target.

  6. Mitochondria Death/Survival Signaling Pathways in Cardiotoxicity Induced by Anthracyclines and Anticancer-Targeted Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Montaigne, David; Hurt, Christopher; Neviere, Remi

    2012-01-01

    Anthracyclines remain the cornerstone of treatment in many malignancies but these agents have a cumulative dose relationship with cardiotoxicity. Development of cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure induced by anthracyclines are typically dose-dependent, irreversible, and cumulative. Although past studies of cardiotoxicity have focused on anthracyclines, more recently interest has turned to anticancer drugs that target many proteins kinases, such as tyrosine kinases. An attractive model to explain the mechanism of this cardiotoxicity could be myocyte loss through cell death pathways. Inhibition of mitochondrial transition permeability is a valuable tool to prevent doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. In response to anthracycline treatment, activation of several protein kinases, neuregulin/ErbB2 signaling, and transcriptional factors modify mitochondrial functions that determine cell death or survival through the modulation of mitochondrial membrane permeability. Cellular response to anthracyclines is also modulated by a myriad of transcriptional factors that influence cell fate. Several novel targeted chemotherapeutic agents have been associated with a small but worrying risk of left ventricular dysfunction. Agents such as trastuzumab and tyrosine kinase inhibitors can lead to cardiotoxicity that is fundamentally different from that caused by anthracyclines, whereas biological effects converge to the mitochondria as a critical target. PMID:22482055

  7. In Vivo Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Imaging for Targeted Anti-Cancer Drug Delivery Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Kevin; Gaind, Vaibhav; Tsai, Hsiaorho; Bentz, Brian; Chelvam, Venkatesh; Low, Philip

    2012-02-01

    We describe an approach for the evaluation of targeted anti-cancer drug delivery in vivo. The method emulates the drug release and activation process through acceptor release from a targeted donor-acceptor pair that exhibits fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In this case, folate targeting of the cancer cells is used - 40 % of all human cancers, including ovarian, lung, breast, kidney, brain and colon cancer, over-express folate receptors. We demonstrate the reconstruction of the spatially-dependent FRET parameters in a mouse model and in tissue phantoms. The FRET parameterization is incorporated into a source for a diffusion equation model for photon transport in tissue, in a variant of optical diffusion tomography (ODT) called FRET-ODT. In addition to the spatially-dependent tissue parameters in the diffusion model (absorption and diffusion coefficients), the FRET parameters (donor-acceptor distance and yield) are imaged as a function of position. Modulated light measurements are made with various laser excitation positions and a gated camera. More generally, our method provides a new vehicle for studying disease at the molecular level by imaging FRET parameters in deep tissue, and allows the nanometer FRET ruler to be utilized in deep tissue.

  8. Elements toward novel therapeutic targeting of the adrenergic system.

    PubMed

    Ghanemi, Abdelaziz; Hu, Xintian

    2015-02-01

    Adrenergic receptors belong to the family of the G protein coupled receptors that represent important targets in the modern pharmacotherapies. Studies on different physiological and pathophysiological properties of the adrenergic system have led to novel evidences and theories that suggest novel possible targeting of such system in a variety of pathologies and disorders, even beyond the classical known therapeutic possibilities. Herein, those advances have been illustrated with selected concepts and different examples. Furthermore, we illustrated the applications and the therapeutic implications that such findings and advances might have in the contexts of experimental pharmacology, therapeutics and clinic. We hope that the content of this work will guide researches devoted to the adrenergic aspects that combine neurosciences with pharmacology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Current progress on aptamer-targeted oligonucleotide therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Dassie, Justin P; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2014-01-01

    Exploiting the power of the RNAi pathway through the use of therapeutic siRNA drugs has remarkable potential for treating a vast array of human disease conditions. However, difficulties in delivery of these and similar nucleic acid-based pharmacological agents to appropriate organs or tissues, remains a major impediment to their broad clinical application. Synthetic nucleic acid ligands (aptamers) have emerged as effective delivery vehicles for therapeutic oligonucleotides, including siRNAs. In this review, we summarize recent attractive developments in creatively employing cell-internalizing aptamers to deliver therapeutic oligonucleotides (e.g., siRNAs, miRNAs, anti-miRs and antisense oligos) to target cells. We also discuss advancements in aptamer-siRNA chimera technology, as well as, aptamer-functionalized nanoparticles for siRNA delivery. In addition, the challenges and future prospects of aptamer-targeted oligonucleotide drugs for clinical translation are further highlighted. PMID:24304250

  10. Molecular Targets in Alzheimer's Disease: From Pathogenesis to Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xuan; Zhang, Lu; Lian, Ya-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive cognitive decline usually beginning with impairment in the ability to form recent memories. Nonavailability of definitive therapeutic strategy urges developing pharmacological targets based on cell signaling pathways. A great revival of interest in nutraceuticals and adjuvant therapy has been put forward. Tea polyphenols for their multiple health benefits have also attracted the attention of researchers. Tea catechins showed enough potentiality to be used in future as therapeutic targets to provide neuroprotection against AD. This review attempts to present a concise map of different receptor signaling pathways associated with AD with an insight into drug designing based on the proposed signaling pathways, molecular mechanistic details of AD pathogenesis, and a scientific rationale for using tea polyphenols as proposed therapeutic agents in AD.

  11. AMPA Receptors as Therapeutic Targets for Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin; Goodman, Lucy; Fourie, Chantelle; Schenk, Susan; Leitch, Beulah; Montgomery, Johanna M

    2016-01-01

    Almost every neurological disease directly or indirectly affects synapse function in the brain. However, these diseases alter synapses through different mechanisms, ultimately resulting in altered synaptic transmission and/or plasticity. Glutamate is the major neurotransmitter that mediates excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain through activation of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) receptors. These receptors have therefore been identified as a target for the development of therapeutic treatments for neurological disorders including epilepsy, neurodegenerative diseases, autism, and drug addiction. The fact that AMPA receptors play a dominant role throughout the brain raises the significant challenge of selectively targeting only those regions affected by disease, and clinical trials have raised doubt regarding the feasibility of specifically targeting AMPA receptors for new therapeutic options. Benzamide compounds that act as positive allosteric AMPA receptor modulators, known as AMPAkines, can act on specific brain regions and were initially proposed to revolutionize the treatment of cognitive deficits associated with neurological disorders. Their therapeutic potential has since declined due to inconsistent results in clinical trials. However, recent advances in basic biomedical research are significantly increasing our knowledge of AMPA receptor structure, binding sites, and interactions with auxiliary proteins. In particular, the large complex of postsynaptic proteins that interact with AMPA receptor subunits have been shown to control AMPA receptor insertion, location, pharmacology, synaptic transmission, and plasticity. These proteins are now being considered as alternative therapeutic target sites for modulating AMPA receptors in neurological disorders.

  12. Thioaptamers for Therapeutic Targeting of Pathogenic Human Proteomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-31

    urgent need to expand the current therapeutic annamentarium. The pathogenic mechanism of arenaviruses is believed to involve dysregulation of cytokines... arenaviruses . Summary of Results Figure I. Schematic repreSt:ntation for immune responses post infection. Target A represents immune response clearing...working to develop thioaptamer countenneasures against BT agents including arenaviruses and flaviviruses. ODN Agentf: thioaptamers RNA and DNA

  13. Targeting PARP-1 allosteric regulation offers therapeutic potential against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Jamin D.; Tholey, Renee M.; Langelier, Marie-France; Planck, Jamie L.; Schiewer, Matthew J.; Lal, Shruti; Bildzukewicz, Nikolai A.; Yeo, Charles J.; Knudsen, Karen E.; Brody, Jonathan R.; Pascal, John M.

    2014-01-01

    PARP-1 is a nuclear protein that has important roles in maintenance of genomic integrity. During genotoxic stress, PARP-1 recruits to sites of DNA damage where PARP-1 domain architecture initiates catalytic activation and subsequent poly(ADP-ribose)-dependent DNA repair. PARP-1 inhibition is a promising new way to selectively target cancers harboring DNA repair deficiencies. However, current inhibitors target other PARPs raising important questions concerning long-term off-target effects. Here we propose a new strategy that targets PARP-1 allosteric regulation as a selective way of inhibiting PARP-1. We found that disruption of PARP-1 domain-domain contacts through mutagenesis held no cellular consequences on recruitment to DNA damage or a model system of transcriptional regulation, but prevented DNA-damage dependent catalytic activation. Further, PARP-1 mutant overexpression in a pancreatic cancer cell line (MIA PaCa-2) increased sensitivity to platinum-based anti-cancer agents. These results not only highlight the potential of a synergistic drug combination of allosteric PARP inhibitors with DNA damaging agents in genomically unstable cancer cells (regardless of homologous recombination status), but also signify important applications of selective PARP-1 inhibition. Lastly, the development of a high-throughput (HT) PARP-1 assay is described as a tool to promote discovery of novel PARP-1 selective inhibitors. PMID:24189460

  14. Targeting PARP-1 allosteric regulation offers therapeutic potential against cancer.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Jamin D; Tholey, Renee M; Langelier, Marie-France; Planck, Jamie L; Schiewer, Matthew J; Lal, Shruti; Bildzukewicz, Nikolai A; Yeo, Charles J; Knudsen, Karen E; Brody, Jonathan R; Pascal, John M

    2014-01-01

    PARP-1 is a nuclear protein that has important roles in maintenance of genomic integrity. During genotoxic stress, PARP-1 recruits to sites of DNA damage where PARP-1 domain architecture initiates catalytic activation and subsequent poly(ADP-ribose)-dependent DNA repair. PARP-1 inhibition is a promising new way to selectively target cancers harboring DNA repair deficiencies. However, current inhibitors target other PARPs, raising important questions about long-term off-target effects. Here, we propose a new strategy that targets PARP-1 allosteric regulation as a selective way of inhibiting PARP-1. We found that disruption of PARP-1 domain-domain contacts through mutagenesis held no cellular consequences on recruitment to DNA damage or a model system of transcriptional regulation, but prevented DNA-damage-dependent catalytic activation. Furthermore, PARP-1 mutant overexpression in a pancreatic cancer cell line (MIA PaCa-2) increased sensitivity to platinum-based anticancer agents. These results not only highlight the potential of a synergistic drug combination of allosteric PARP inhibitors with DNA-damaging agents in genomically unstable cancer cells (regardless of homologous recombination status), but also signify important applications of selective PARP-1 inhibition. Finally, the development of a high-throughput PARP-1 assay is described as a tool to promote discovery of novel PARP-1 selective inhibitors.

  15. Integrin-targeted pH-responsive micelles for enhanced efficiency of anticancer treatment in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinjian; Deng, Hongzhang; Liu, Qiang; Chu, Liping; Zhang, Yumin; Yang, Cuihong; Zhao, Xuefei; Huang, Pingsheng; Deng, Liandong; Dong, Anjie; Liu, Jianfeng

    2015-02-01

    The key to developing more nanocarriers for the delivery of drugs in clinical applications is to consider the route of the carrier from the administration site to the target tissue and to look for a simple design to complete this whole journey. We synthesized the amphiphilic copolymer cRGDfK-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(2,4,6-trimethoxybenzylidene-1,1,1-tris(hydroxymethyl) ethane methacrylate) (cRGD-PETM) to construct multifunctional micelles. These micelles combined enhanced drug-loading efficiency with tumor-targeting properties, visual detection and controllable intracellular drug release, resulting in an improved chemotherapeutic effect in vivo. Doxorubicin (DOX) was encapsulated within the cRGD-PETM micelles as a model drug (termed as cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms). The size and morphology of the micelles were characterized systematically. As a result of the hydrophobic interaction and the π-π conjugation between the DOX molecules and the PTTMA copolymers, the cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms showed an excellent drug-loading capacity. The results of in vitro drug-release studies indicated that the cumulative release of DOX from cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms at pH 5.0 was twice that at pH 7.4. The results of fluorescent microscopic analysis showed that the cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms could be internalized by 4T1 and HepG2 cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis with rapid intracellular drug release, which resulted in increased cytotoxicity compared with free DOX. Ex vivo imaging studies showed that the cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms improved the accumulation and retention of the drug in tumor tissues. Studies of the in vivo anticancer effects showed that the cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms had a significantly higher therapeutic efficacy with lower side-effects than free DOX and PETM/DOX Ms. These results show that the multifunctional cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms have great potential as vehicles for the delivery of hydrophobic anticancer drugs.

  16. Anticancer treatment and fertility: Effect of therapeutic modalities on reproductive system and functions.

    PubMed

    Vassilakopoulou, Maria; Boostandoost, Erfaneh; Papaxoinis, George; de La Motte Rouge, Thibault; Khayat, David; Psyrri, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    The significant improvement of cancer treatments entailed a longer life in cancer survivors and raised expectations for higher quality of life with minimized long-term toxicity. Infertility and gonadal dysfunction are adverse effects of anticancer therapy or may be related to specific tumors. In female cancer survivors, premature ovarian failure is common after antineoplastic treatments resulting in infertility and other morbidities related to oestrogen deficiency such as osteoporosis. In male cancer survivors, infertility and persistent a zoospermia is a more common long-term adverse effect than hypogonadism because germ cells are more sensitive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy than leydig cells. Gonadal toxicity and compromise of reproductive functions will be more efficiently prevented and treated if addressed before treatment initiation. This review focuses on these issues in young cancer survivors of childbearing age, where methods of protecting or restoring endocrine function and fertility need to be considered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Discovery and development of anticancer agents from marine sponges: perspectives based on a chemistry-experimental therapeutics collaborative program.

    PubMed

    Valeriote, Frederick A; Tenney, Karen; Media, Joseph; Pietraszkiewicz, Halina; Edelstein, Matthew; Johnson, Tyler A; Amagata, Taro; Crews, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    A collaborative program was initiated in 1990 between the natural product chemistry laboratory of Dr. Phillip Crews at the University of California Santa Cruz and the experimental therapeutics laboratory of Dr. Fred Valeriote at the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. The program focused on the discovery and development of anticancer drugs from sponge extracts. A novel in vitro disk diffusion, solid tumor selective assay was used to examine 2,036 extracts from 683 individual sponges. The bioassay-directed fractionation discovery component led to the identification of active pure compounds from many of these sponges. In most cases, pure compound was prepared in sufficient quantities to both chemically identify the active compound(s) as well as pursue one or more of the biological development components. The latter included IC50, clonogenic survival-concentration exposure, maximum tolerated dose, pharmacokinetics and therapeutic assessment studies. Solid tumor selective compounds included fascaplysin and 10-bromofascaplysin (Fascaplysinopsis), neoamphimedine, 5-methoxyneoamphimedine and alpkinidine (Xestospongia), makaluvamine C and makaluvamine H (Zyzzya), psymberin (Psammocinia and Ircinia), and ethylplakortide Z and ethyldidehydroplakortide Z (Plakortis). These compounds or analogs thereof continue to have therapeutic potential.

  18. Myostatin as a therapeutic target in Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Frank S; Rutkowski, Julia Lynn

    2012-11-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis is a devastating neurological disease that is inevitably fatal after 3-5years duration. Treatment options are minimal and as such new therapeutic modalities are required. In this review, we discuss the role of the myostatin pathway as a modulator of skeletal muscle mass and therapeutic approaches using biological based therapies. Both monoclonal antibodies to myostatin and a soluble receptor decoy to its high affinity receptor have been used in clinical trials of neuromuscular diseases and while there have been efficacy signals with the latter approach there have also been safety issues. Our approach is to target the high affinity receptor-binding site on myostatin and to develop a next generation set of therapeutic reagents built on a novel protein scaffold. This is the natural single domain VNAR found in sharks which is extremely versatile and has the ability to develop products with superior properties compared to existing therapeutics.

  19. NG2 proteoglycan as a pericyte target for anticancer therapy by tumor vessel infarction with retargeted tissue factor

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Caroline; Schliemann, Christoph; Ring, Janine; Kessler, Torsten; Bäumer, Sebastian; Angenendt, Linus; Mantke, Verena; Ross, Rebecca; Hintelmann, Heike; Spieker, Tilmann; Wardelmann, Eva; Mesters, Rolf M.; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Schwöppe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    tTF-TAA and tTF-LTL are fusion proteins consisting of the extracellular domain of tissue factor (TF) and the peptides TAASGVRSMH and LTLRWVGLMS, respectively. These peptides represent ligands of NG2, a surface proteoglycan expressed on angiogenic pericytes and some tumor cells. Here we have expressed the model compound tTF-NGR, tTF-TAA, and tTF-LTL with different lengths in the TF domain in E. coli and used these fusion proteins for functional studies in anticancer therapy. We aimed to retarget TF to tumor vessels leading to tumor vessel infarction with two barriers of selectivity, a) the leaky endothelial lining in tumor vessels with the target NG2 being expressed on pericytes on the abluminal side of the endothelial cell barrier and b) the preferential expression of NG2 on angiogenic vessels such as in tumors. Chromatography-purified tTF-TAA showed identical Factor X (FX)-activating procoagulatory activity as the model compound tTF-NGR with Km values of approx. 0.15 nM in Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The procoagulatory activity of tTF-LTL varied with the chosen length of the TF part of the fusion protein. Flow cytometry revealed specific binding of tTF-TAA to NG2-expressing pericytes and tumor cells with low affinity and dissociation KD in the high nM range. In vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging of tumor xenograft-carrying animals and of the explanted tumors showed reduction of tumor blood flow upon tTF-TAA application. Therapeutic experiments showed a reproducible antitumor activity of tTF-TAA against NG2-expressing A549-tumor xenografts, however, with a rather small therapeutic window (active/toxic dose in mg/kg body weight). PMID:26735180

  20. Targeting the pro-angiogenic forms of VEGF or inhibiting their expression as anti-cancer strategies.

    PubMed

    Guyot, Mélanie; Hilmi, Caroline; Ambrosetti, Damien; Merlano, Marco; Lo Nigro, Cristiana; Durivault, Jérôme; Grépin, Renaud; Pagès, Gilles

    2017-02-07

    Tumor growth relies on oxygen and blood supply depending on neo-vascularization. This process is mediated by the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) in many tumors. This paradigm has led to the development of specific therapeutic approaches targeting VEGF or its receptors. Despite their promising effects, these strategies have not improved overall survival of patients suffering from different cancers compared to standard therapies. We hypothesized that the existence of anti-angiogenic forms of VEGF VEGFxxxb which are still present in many tumors limit the therapeutic effects of the anti-VEGF antibodies bevacizumab/Avastin (BVZ). To test this hypothesis, we generated renal cell carcinoma cells (RCC) expressing VEGF165b. The incidence of tumors xenografts generated in nude mice and their growth were inferior to those obtained with control cells. Whereas BVZ had no effect on control tumors, it slowed-down the growth of tumor generated with VEGF165b expressing cells. A prophylactic immunization against the domain discriminating VEGF from VEGFxxxb isoforms inhibited the growth of tumor generated with two different syngenic tumor cell lines (melanoma (B16 cells) and RCC (RENCA cells)). Purified immunoglobulins from immunized mice also slowed-down tumor growth of human RCC xenografts in nude mice, producing a potent effect compared to BVZ in this model. Furthermore, down-regulating the serine-arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1) or masking SRSF1 binding sites by 2'O-Methyl RNA resulted in the increase of the VEGFxxxb/VEGF ratio. Therefore, a vaccine approach, specific antibodies against pro-angiogenic forms of VEGF, or increasing the VEGFxxxb/VEGF ratio may represent new prophylactic or pro-active anti-cancer strategies.

  1. Formulation and dosage of therapeutic nanosuspension for active targeting of docetaxel (WO 2014210485A1).

    PubMed

    Pooja, Deep; Kulhari, Hitesh; Adams, David J; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2016-07-01

    Non-specificity and drug resistance are two major limitations of all chemotherapeutic agents. Ligand-conjugated nanomedicine is the most versatile approach for targeted cancer therapy. Attaching a targeting ligand to the nanoparticle surface increases drug concentration at the desired sites, decreases the dose needed and lessens side effects. The subject of this patent evaluation describes the preparation of a therapeutic nanosuspension of an anticancer drug, docetaxel (DTX). The nanoparticle matrix comprised a polylactic acid-polyethylene glycol block copolymer (PLA-PEG). The nanoparticles were actively directed towards prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) over-expressing cancer cells using a targeting ligand S,S-2-{3-[1-carboxy-5-amino-pentyl-]ureido}-pantanedioic acid (GL2). The dose-limiting toxicity and maximum tolerated dose were determined for GL2-conjugated and DTX-loaded polymeric nanosuspensions. The efficacy of nanosuspensions was evaluated in people with various cancer types. The investigators claim the method of preparation of therapeutic nanosuspension, optimized composition of the formulation and dosage regimen for the clinical studies to effectively treat gastroesophageal and breast cancers.

  2. Trastuzumab Sensitizes Ovarian Cancer Cells to EGFR-targeted Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wilken, Jason A; Webster, Kristy T; Maihle, Nita J

    2010-03-27

    Early studies have demonstrated comparable levels of HER2/ErbB2 expression in both breast and ovarian cancer. Trastuzumab (Herceptin), a therapeutic monoclonal antibody directed against HER2, is FDA-approved for the treatment of both early and late stage breast cancer. However, clinical studies of trastuzumab in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients have not met the same level of success. Surprisingly, however, no reports have examined either the basis for primary trastuzumab resistance in ovarian cancer or potential ways of salvaging trastuzumab as a potential ovarian cancer therapeutic. An in vitro model of primary trastuzumab-resistant ovarian cancer was created by long-term culture of HER2-positive ovarian carcinoma-derived cell lines with trastuzumab. Trastuzumab treated vs. untreated parental cells were compared for HER receptor expression, trastuzumab sensitivity, and sensitivity to other HER-targeted therapeutics. In contrast to widely held assumptions, here we show that ovarian cancer cells that are not growth inhibited by trastuzumab are still responsive to trastuzumab. Specifically, we show that responsiveness to alternative HER-targeted inhibitors, such as gefitinib and cetuximab, is dramatically potentiated by long-term trastuzumab treatment of ovarian cancer cells. HER2-positive ovarian carcinoma-derived cells are, therefore, not "unresponsive" to trastuzumab as previously assumed, even when they not growth inhibited by this drug. Given the recent success of EGFR-targeted therapeutics for the treatment of other solid tumors, and the well-established safety profile of trastuzumab, results presented here provide a rationale for re-evaluation of trastuzumab as an experimental ovarian cancer therapeutic, either in concert with, or perhaps as a "primer" for EGFR-targeted therapeutics.

  3. Conjugation of vitamin E analog α-TOS to Pt(IV) complexes for dual-targeting anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Song, Ying; Lippard, Stephen J

    2014-03-07

    We report two platinum(IV) complexes conjugated with a vitamin E analog, α-tocopherol succinate (α-TOS). One of the conjugates displays the activity of both cisplatin and α-TOS in cancer cells, causing damage to DNA and mitochondria simultaneously. Accordingly, it serves as a promising dual-targeting anticancer agent.

  4. Conjugation of Vitamin E Analog α-TOS to Pt(IV) Complexes for Dual-Targeting Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Song, Ying

    2014-01-01

    We report two platinum(IV) complexes conjugated with a vitamin E analog, α-tocopherol succinate (α-TOS). One of the conjugates displays the activity of both cisplatin and αTOS in cancer cells, causing damage to DNA and mitochondria simultaneously. Accordingly, it serves as promising dual-targeting anticancer agent. PMID:24452361

  5. [Visualization and analysis of adverse reactions of molecularly targeted anticancer agents using the self-organizing map (SOM)].

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Tomoyuki; Serizawa, Ayaka; Ohtsuki, Kaori; Kawakami, Junko; Sato, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Molecularly targeted anticancer agents cause a variety of adverse reactions compared with conventional anticancer agents because of their unique mechanisms of action. Sources of drug information such as package inserts (PIs) provide primarily document-based and numerical information. Therefore it is not easy to obtain a complete picture of drugs with similar effects, or to understand differences among drugs. In this study we used the self-organizing map (SOM) technique to visualize the adverse reactions indicated on PIs of 23 molecularly targeted anticancer agents as of March 2013. In both the presence/absence version and the frequency version, SOM was divided into domains according to mechanism of action, antibody drug or low-molecular weight drug, and molecular target. The component planes of the 753 adverse reaction items in the frequency version enabled us to grasp all available information and differences among the drugs. In some component planes in the presence/absence version, an adverse reaction that had not been reported for a drug but had already been reported for its proximally positioned drug(s) as of March 2013, was found to be reported thereafter by the Drug Safety Update (DSU) or the Adverse Event Report Search System "CzeekV," which is based on FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). Our results suggest that visualization of the adverse reactions of molecularly targeted anticancer agents by the SOM technique is useful not only to acquire all available information and differences among drugs, but also to predict the appearance of adverse reactions.

  6. Dual-acting, function-responsive, and high drug payload nanospheres for combining simplicity and efficacy in both self-targeted multi-drug co-delivery and synergistic anticancer effect.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Lin, Jinyan; Liu, Guihua; Ma, Jinyuan; Xie, Liya; Guo, Fuqiang; Zhu, Xuan; Hou, Zhenqing

    2016-10-15

    Recently, the global trend in the field of nanomedicine has been toward the design of highly sophisticated drug delivery systems with specific targeting and synergistic therapeutic functions for improving therapeutic efficacy. But offering sophistication generally increases their complexity that might be disadvantageous in pharmaceutical development. We hypothesize that using a macromolecular prodrug with a dual role will be conductive to integrating its dual function into self-targeted multidrug co-delivery and combination cancer therapy. In this paper, the on-off switching function-responsive, macromolecular methotrexate (MTX) prodrug-self-targeted, controlled-/sustained-release, and high drug-loading hydroxylcamptothecin (HCPT) drug nanospheres were prepared and characterized. The self-targeting system can co-deliver multi-drug to different action sites with distinct anticancer mechanisms to specifically target folate receptors-overexpressing cancer cells with synergistic therapeutic efficiency. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Targeting chk2 kinase: molecular interaction maps and therapeutic rationale.

    PubMed

    Pommier, Yves; Sordet, Olivier; Rao, V Ashutosh; Zhang, Hongliang; Kohn, Kurt W

    2005-01-01

    Most anticancer drugs presently used clinically target genomic DNA. The selectivity of these anticancer drugs for tumor tissues is probably due to tumor-specific defects suppressing cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair, and enhancing apoptotic response in the tumor. We will review the molecular interactions within the ATM-Chk2 pathway implicating the DNA damage sensor kinases (ATM, ATR and DNA-PK), the adaptor BRCT proteins (Nbs1, Brca1, 53BP1, MDC1) and the effector kinases (Chk2, Chk1, Plk3, JNK, p38). The molecular interaction map convention (MIM) will be used for presenting this molecular network (http://discover.nci.nih.gov/mim/). A characteristic of the ATM-Chk2 pathway is its redundancy. First, ATM and Chk2 phosphorylate common substrates including p53, E2F1, BRCA1, and Chk2 itself, which suggests that Chk2 (also known as CHECK2, Cds1 in fission yeast, and Dmchk2 or Dmnk or Loki in the fruit fly) acts as a relay for ATM and/or as a salvage pathway when ATM is inactivated. Secondly, redundancy is apparent for the substrates, which can be phosphorylated/activated at similar residues by Chk2, Chk1, and the polo kinases (Plk's). Functionally, Chk2 can activate both apoptosis (via p53, E2F1 and PML) and cell cycle checkpoint (via Cdc25A and Cdc25C, p53, and BRCA1). We will review the short list of published Chk2 inhibitors. We will also propose a novel paradigm for screening interfacial inhibitors of Chk2. Chk2 inhibitors might be used to enhance the tumor selectivity of DNA targeted agents in p53-deficient tumors, and for the treatment of tumors whose growth depends on enhanced Chk2 activity.

  8. Therapeutic approaches to target alpha-synuclein pathology.

    PubMed

    Brundin, Patrik; Dave, Kuldip D; Kordower, Jeffrey H

    2017-10-04

    Starting two decades ago with the discoveries of genetic links between alpha-synuclein and Parkinson's disease risk and the identification of aggregated alpha-synuclein as the main protein constituent of Lewy pathology, alpha-synuclein has emerged as the major therapeutic target in Parkinson's disease and related synucleinopathies. Following the suggestion that alpha-synuclein pathology gradually spreads through the nervous system following a stereotypic pattern and the discovery that aggregated forms of alpha-synuclein can propagate pathology from one cell to another, and thereby probably aggravate existing deficits as well as generate additional symptoms, the idea that alpha-synuclein is a viable therapeutic target gained further support. In this review we describe current challenges and possibilities with alpha-synuclein as a therapeutic target. We briefly highlight gaps in the knowledge of the role of alpha-synuclein in disease, and propose that a deeper understanding of the pathobiology of alpha-synuclein can lead to improved therapeutic strategies. We describe several treatment approaches that are currently being tested in advanced animal experiments or already are in clinical trials. We have divided them into approaches that reduce alpha-synuclein production; inhibit alpha-synuclein aggregation inside cells; promote its degradation either inside or outside cells; and reduce its uptake by neighbouring cells following release from already affected neurons. Finally, we briefly discuss challenges related to the clinical testing of alpha-synuclein therapies, for example difficulties in monitoring target engagement and the need for relatively large trials of long duration. We conclude that alpha-synuclein remains one of the most compelling therapeutic targets for Parkinson's disease, and related synucleinopathies, and that the multitude of approaches being tested provides hope for the future. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Optimization of anti-cancer drugs and a targeting molecule on multifunctional gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizk, Nahla; Christoforou, Nicolas; Lee, Sungmun

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common and deadly cancer among women worldwide. Currently, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are useful for cancer treatment; however, strategic planning is critical in order to enhance the anti-cancer properties and reduce the side effects of cancer therapy. Here, we designed multifunctional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conjugated with two anti-cancer drugs, TGF-β1 antibody and methotrexate, and a cancer-targeting molecule, folic acid. First, optimum size and shape of AuNPs was selected by the highest uptake of AuNPs by MDA-MB-231, a metastatic human breast cancer cell line. It was 100 nm spherical AuNPs (S-AuNPs) that were used for further studies. A fixed amount (900 μl) of S-AuNP (3.8 × 108 particles/ml) was conjugated with folic acid-BSA or methotrexate-BSA. Methotrexate on S-AuNP induced cellular toxicity and the optimum amount of methotrexate-BSA (2.83 mM) was 500 μl. Uptake of S-AuNPs was enhanced by folate conjugation that binds to folate receptors overexpressed by MDA-MB-231 and the optimum uptake was at 500 μl of folic acid-BSA (2.83 mM). TGF-β1 antibody on S-AuNP reduced extracellular TGF-β1 of cancer cells by 30%. Due to their efficacy and tunable properties, we anticipate numerous clinical applications of multifunctional gold nanospheres in treating breast cancer.

  10. Optimization of anti-cancer drugs and a targeting molecule on multifunctional gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Nahla; Christoforou, Nicolas; Lee, Sungmun

    2016-05-06

    Breast cancer is the most common and deadly cancer among women worldwide. Currently, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are useful for cancer treatment; however, strategic planning is critical in order to enhance the anti-cancer properties and reduce the side effects of cancer therapy. Here, we designed multifunctional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conjugated with two anti-cancer drugs, TGF-β1 antibody and methotrexate, and a cancer-targeting molecule, folic acid. First, optimum size and shape of AuNPs was selected by the highest uptake of AuNPs by MDA-MB-231, a metastatic human breast cancer cell line. It was 100 nm spherical AuNPs (S-AuNPs) that were used for further studies. A fixed amount (900 μl) of S-AuNP (3.8 × 10(8) particles/ml) was conjugated with folic acid-BSA or methotrexate-BSA. Methotrexate on S-AuNP induced cellular toxicity and the optimum amount of methotrexate-BSA (2.83 mM) was 500 μl. Uptake of S-AuNPs was enhanced by folate conjugation that binds to folate receptors overexpressed by MDA-MB-231 and the optimum uptake was at 500 μl of folic acid-BSA (2.83 mM). TGF-β1 antibody on S-AuNP reduced extracellular TGF-β1 of cancer cells by 30%. Due to their efficacy and tunable properties, we anticipate numerous clinical applications of multifunctional gold nanospheres in treating breast cancer.

  11. B-cell targeted therapeutics in clinical development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    B lymphocytes are the source of humoral immunity and are thus a critical component of the adaptive immune system. However, B cells can also be pathogenic and the origin of disease. Deregulated B-cell function has been implicated in several autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis. B cells contribute to pathological immune responses through the secretion of cytokines, costimulation of T cells, antigen presentation, and the production of autoantibodies. DNA-and RNA-containing immune complexes can also induce the production of type I interferons, which further promotes the inflammatory response. B-cell depletion with the CD20 antibody rituximab has provided clinical proof of concept that targeting B cells and the humoral response can result in significant benefit to patients. Consequently, the interest in B-cell targeted therapies has greatly increased in recent years and a number of new biologics exploiting various mechanisms are now in clinical development. This review provides an overview on current developments in the area of B-cell targeted therapies by describing molecules and subpopulations that currently offer themselves as therapeutic targets, the different strategies to target B cells currently under investigation as well as an update on the status of novel therapeutics in clinical development. Emerging data from clinical trials are providing critical insight regarding the role of B cells and autoantibodies in various autoimmune conditions and will guide the development of more efficacious therapeutics and better patient selection. PMID:23566679

  12. Rethinking the metastatic cascade as a therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Mina, Lida A; Sledge, George W

    2011-06-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer death. The metastatic cascade is a complex yet inefficient process that we have only begun to understand in recent years. Several of the early steps of this cascade are not readily targetable in the clinic. Past therapeutic developmental strategies have not distinguished between micrometastases and overt metastases. This lack of understanding is apparent in therapies that have been developed for patients with metastatic disease that are not efficacious in patients with micrometastatic disease; that is, in the adjuvant setting. Moreover, drugs that target distant metastases often do not work in the adjuvant setting. This Review will discuss our current understanding of the metastatic cascade as it relates to therapy, emerging therapeutic targets in the metastatic process, and how novel antimetastatic therapies might be developed for clinical use.

  13. Chemical Proteomics Identifies Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 as the Molecular Target of Quercetin in Its Anti-cancer Effects in PC-3 Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Chia-Chen; Chen, Yun-Ju; Chen, Chih-Ta; Liu, Yu-Chih; Cheng, Fong-Chi; Hsu, Kai-Chao; Chow, Lu-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Quercetin, a flavonoid abundantly present in plants, is widely used as a phytotherapy in prostatitis and prostate cancer. Although quercetin has been reported to have a number of therapeutic effects, the cellular target(s) responsible for its anti-cancer action has not yet been clearly elucidated. Here, employing affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNPA1) as a direct target of quercetin. A specific interaction between quercetin and hnRNPA1 was validated by immunoblotting and in vitro binding experiments. We found that quercetin bound the C-terminal region of hnRNPA1, impairing the ability of hnRNPA1 to shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm and ultimately resulting in its cytoplasmic retention. In addition, hnRNPA1 was recruited to stress granules after treatment of cells with quercetin for up to 48 h, and the levels of cIAP1 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis), an internal ribosome entry site translation-dependent protein, were reduced by hnRNPA1 regulation. This is the first report that anti-cancer effects of quercetin are mediated, in part, by impairing functions of hnRNPA1, insights that were obtained using a chemical proteomics strategy. PMID:24962584

  14. Chemical proteomics identifies heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 as the molecular target of quercetin in its anti-cancer effects in PC-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Chia-Chen; Chen, Yun-Ju; Chen, Chih-Ta; Liu, Yu-Chih; Cheng, Fong-Chi; Hsu, Kai-Chao; Chow, Lu-Ping

    2014-08-08

    Quercetin, a flavonoid abundantly present in plants, is widely used as a phytotherapy in prostatitis and prostate cancer. Although quercetin has been reported to have a number of therapeutic effects, the cellular target(s) responsible for its anti-cancer action has not yet been clearly elucidated. Here, employing affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNPA1) as a direct target of quercetin. A specific interaction between quercetin and hnRNPA1 was validated by immunoblotting and in vitro binding experiments. We found that quercetin bound the C-terminal region of hnRNPA1, impairing the ability of hnRNPA1 to shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm and ultimately resulting in its cytoplasmic retention. In addition, hnRNPA1 was recruited to stress granules after treatment of cells with quercetin for up to 48 h, and the levels of cIAP1 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis), an internal ribosome entry site translation-dependent protein, were reduced by hnRNPA1 regulation. This is the first report that anti-cancer effects of quercetin are mediated, in part, by impairing functions of hnRNPA1, insights that were obtained using a chemical proteomics strategy.

  15. Breast cancer stem cells, EMT and therapeutic targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kotiyal, Srishti; Bhattacharya, Susinjan

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key molecules of signaling pathways can control growth of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). • Development of BCSCs also involves miRNA interactions. • Therapeutic achievement can be done by targeting identified targets in the BCSC pathways. - Abstract: A small heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells acts as seeds to induce new tumor growth. These seeds or breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) exhibit great phenotypical plasticity which allows them to undergo “epithelial to mesenchymal transition” (EMT) at the site of primary tumor and a future reverse transition. Apart from metastasis they are also responsible for maintaining the tumor and conferring it with drug and radiation resistance and a tendency for post-treatment relapse. Many of the signaling pathways involved in induction of EMT are involved in CSC generation and regulation. Here we are briefly reviewing the mechanism of TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, TNF-α, NF-κB, RTK signalling pathways which are involved in EMT as well as BCSCs maintenance. Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key/accessory players of these pathways could control growth of BCSCs and hence malignant cancer. Additionally several miRNAs are dysregulated in cancer stem cells indicating their roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. This review also lists the miRNA interactions identified in BCSCs and discusses on some newly identified targets in the BCSC regulatory pathways like SHIP2, nicastrin, Pin 1, IGF-1R, pro-inflammatory cytokines and syndecan which can be targeted for therapeutic achievements.

  16. Synergistic Anticancer Effect of Peptide-Docetaxel Nanoassembly Targeted to Tubulin: Toward Development of Dual Warhead Containing Nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Saswat; Saha, Abhijit; Mondal, Prasenjit; Jana, Batakrishna; Ghosh, Subhajit; Biswas, Atanu; Ghosh, Surajit

    2017-01-01

    Microtubule dynamics play a crucial role in cancer cell division. Various drugs are developed to target microtubule. Although a few of them show potential in treatment of cancer, but success rate is limited due to their poor bioavailability and lack of specificity. Thus, development of highly bioavailable and target specific anticancer drug is extremely necessary. To address these key issues, here, a combination of approaches such as development of a dodecapeptide-docetaxel nanoassembly targeted to tubulin and MUC1 (mucin 1, cell surface associated glycoprotein) targeting oligonucleotide aptamer conjugated liposome for delivering peptide-docetaxel nanoassembly into the breast cancer cell have been demonstrated. These studies reveal that the peptide forms nanoassembly and entraps docetaxel drug. Further, the liposomal formulation of peptide-docetaxel exerts synergistic anticancer effect, activates key mitotic check point proteins, and inhibits bipolar spindle formation, metastatic cancer cell migration, and growth of tumor mimicking 3D multicellular spheroid.

  17. Mitochondrial damage: a target for new therapeutic horizons.

    PubMed

    Soustiel, Jean F; Larisch, Sarit

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a leading cause of death and morbidity, as well as a considerable social and economical burden in western countries, and has thus emerged as a formidable therapeutic challenge. Yet despite tremendous efforts enlightening the mechanisms of neuronal death, hopes for the "magic bullet" have been repeatedly deceived, and TBI management has remained focused on the control of increased intracranial pressure. Indeed, impairment of cerebral metabolism is traditionally attributed to impaired oxygen delivery mediated by reduced cerebral perfusion in the swollen cerebral parenchyma. Although intuitively appealing, this hypothesis is not entirely supported by physiological facts and does not take into consideration mitochondrial dysfunction that has been repeatedly reported in both human and animal TBI. Although the nature and origin of the events leading to mitochondrial damage may be different, most share a permeabilization of mitochondrial membrane, which therefore may represent a logical target for new therapeutic strategies. Therefore, the proteins mediating these events may represent promising targets for new TBI therapies. Furthermore, mimicking anti-apoptotic proteins, such as Bcl-2 or XIAP, or inhibiting mitochondrial pro-apoptotic proteins, such as Smac/DIABLO, Omi/HTRA2, and ARTS (septin 4 isoform 2) may represent useful novel therapeutic strategies. This review focuses on mechanisms of the mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and its consequences and discusses the current and possible future therapeutic implications of this key event of neuronal death. Copyright 2010 The American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. MicroRNAs and other non-coding RNAs as targets for anticancer drug development

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Hui; Fabbri, Muller; Calin, George A.

    2015-01-01

    With the first cancer-targeted microRNA drug, MRX34, a liposome-based miR-34 mimic, entering phase I clinical trial in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma in April 2013, miRNA therapeutics are attracting special attention from both academia and biotechnology companies. Although to date the most studied non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are miRNAs, the importance of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) is increasingly being recognized. Here we summarize the roles of miRNAs and lncRNAs in cancer, with a focus on the recently identified novel mechanisms of action, and discuss the current strategies in designing ncRNA-targeting therapeutics, as well as the associated challenges. PMID:24172333

  19. Targeting Cytochrome P450 Enzymes: A New Approach in Anti-cancer Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Robert D.; Njar, Vincent C.O.

    2007-01-01

    Cytochrome P450s (CYPs) represent a large class of heme-containing enzymes that catalyze the metabolism of multitudes of substrates both endogenous and exogenous. Until recently, however, CYPs have been largely overlooked in cancer drug development, acknowledged only for their role in Phase I metabolism of chemotherapeutics. The first successful strategy targeting CYP enzymes in cancer therapy was the development of potent inhibitors of CYP19 (aromatase) for the treatment of breast cancer. Aromatase inhibitors ushered in a new era in hormone ablation therapy for estrogen dependent cancers, and have paved the way for similar strategies (i.e. inhibition of CYP17) that combat androgen dependent prostate cancer. Identification of CYPs involved in the inactivation of anti-cancer metabolites of Vitamin D3 and Vitamin A has triggered development of agents that target these enzymes as well. The discovery of the over-expression of exogenous metabolizing CYPs, such as CYP1B1, in cancer cells has roused interest in the development of inhibitors for chemoprevention and of prodrugs designed to be activated by CYPs only in cancer cells. Finally, the expression of CYPs within tumors has been utilized in the development of bioreductive molecules that are activated by CYPs only under hypoxic conditions. This review offers the first comprehensive analysis of strategies in drug development that either inhibit or exploit CYP enzymes for the treatment of cancer. PMID:17544277

  20. Bridging academic science and clinical research in the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Matter, Alex

    2015-12-01

    This review starts with a brief history of drug discovery & development, and the place of Asia in this worldwide effort discussed. The conditions and constraints of a successful translational R&D involving academic basic research and clinical research are discussed and the Singapore model for pursuit of open R&D described. The importance of well-characterized, validated drug targets for the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents is emphasized, as well as a structured, high quality translational R&D. Furthermore, the characteristics of an attractive preclinical development drug candidate are discussed laying the foundation of a successful preclinical development. The most frequent sources of failures are described and risk management at every stage is highly recommended. Organizational factors are also considered to play an important role. The factors to consider before starting a new drug discovery & development project are described, and an example is given of a successful clinical project that has had its roots in local universities and was carried through preclinical development into phase I clinical trials.

  1. Bridging academic science and clinical research in the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Matter, Alex

    2015-01-01

    This review starts with a brief history of drug discovery & development, and the place of Asia in this worldwide effort discussed. The conditions and constraints of a successful translational R&D involving academic basic research and clinical research are discussed and the Singapore model for pursuit of open R&D described. The importance of well-characterized, validated drug targets for the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents is emphasized, as well as a structured, high quality translational R&D. Furthermore, the characteristics of an attractive preclinical development drug candidate are discussed laying the foundation of a successful preclinical development. The most frequent sources of failures are described and risk management at every stage is highly recommended. Organizational factors are also considered to play an important role. The factors to consider before starting a new drug discovery & development project are described, and an example is given of a successful clinical project that has had its roots in local universities and was carried through preclinical development into phase I clinical trials. PMID:26779369

  2. The Epigenome as a therapeutic target for Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hegarty, Shane V.; Sullivan, Aideen M.; O'Keeffe, Gerard W.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common, progressive neurodegenerative disease characterised by degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons, aggregation of α-synuclein and motor symptoms. Current dopamine-replacement strategies provide symptomatic relief, however their effectiveness wear off over time and their prolonged use leads to disabling side-effects in PD patients. There is therefore a critical need to develop new drugs and drug targets to protect dopaminergic neurons and their axons from degeneration in PD. Over recent years, there has been robust evidence generated showing that epigenetic dysregulation occurs in PD patients, and that epigenetic modulation is a promising therapeutic approach for PD. This article first discusses the present evidence implicating global, and dopaminergic neuron-specific, alterations in the methylome in PD, and the therapeutic potential of pharmacologically targeting the methylome. It then focuses on another mechanism of epigenetic regulation, histone acetylation, and describes how the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes that mediate this process are attractive therapeutic targets for PD. It discusses the use of activators and/or inhibitors of HDACs and HATs in models of PD, and how these approaches for the selective modulation of histone acetylation elicit neuroprotective effects. Finally, it outlines the potential of employing small molecule epigenetic modulators as neuroprotective therapies for PD, and the future research that will be required to determine and realise this therapeutic potential. PMID:28123403

  3. Macrophage Polarization: Anti-cancer Strategies to Target Tumor-associated Macrophage in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Muhammad; Zhang, Jieqiong; Liang, Guikai; Ding, Ling; He, Qiaojun; Yang, Bo

    2017-01-20

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are the most abundant inflammatory cells and orchestrate different stages of breast cancer development. TAMs participate in the tumor angiogenesis, matrix remodeling, invasion, immunosuppression, metastasis, and chemoresistance in breast cancer. Several clinical studies indicate the association between the high influx of TAMs in tumor with poor prognosis in hepatocellular, ovarian, cervical, and breast cancer. Previously developed hypotheses have proposed that TAMs participate in antitumor responses of the body, while recently many clinical and experimental studies have revealed that TAMs in tumor microenvironment predominantly resemble with M2-like polarized macrophages and produce a high amount of anti-inflammatory factors which are directly responsible for the development of tumor. Various studies have shown that TAMs in tumor either enhance or antagonize the anti-tumor efficacy of cytotoxic agents, antibodies-targeting cancer cells, and therapeutic agents depending on the nature of treatment. Thereby, multiple roles of TAMs suggests that it is very important to develop novel therapeutic strategies to target TAMs in breast tumor. In this review, we have discussed the functional role of TAMs in breast cancer and summarized available recent advances potential therapeutic strategies that effectively target to TAMs cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Finding Potential Therapeutic Targets against Shigella flexneri through Proteome Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad Uzzal; Khan, Md. Arif; Hashem, Abu; Islam, Md. Monirul; Morshed, Mohammad Neaz; Keya, Chaman Ara; Salimullah, Md.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Shigella flexneri is a gram negative bacteria that causes the infectious disease “shigellosis.” S. flexneri is responsible for developing diarrhea, fever, and stomach cramps in human. Antibiotics are mostly given to patients infected with shigella. Resistance to antibiotics can hinder its treatment significantly. Upon identification of essential therapeutic targets, vaccine and drug could be effective therapy for the treatment of shigellosis. Methods: The study was designed for the identification and qualitative characterization for potential drug targets from S. flexneri by using the subtractive proteome analysis. A set of computational tools were used to identify essential proteins those are required for the survival of S. flexneri. Total proteome (13,503 proteins) of S. flexneri was retrieved from NCBI and further analyzed by subtractive channel analysis. After identification of the metabolic proteins we have also performed its qualitative characterization to pave the way for the identification of promising drug targets. Results: Subtractive analysis revealed that a list of 53 targets of S. flexneri were human non-homologous essential metabolic proteins that might be used for potential drug targets. We have also found that 11 drug targets are involved in unique pathway. Most of these proteins are cytoplasmic, can be used as broad spectrum drug targets, can interact with other proteins and show the druggable properties. The functionality and drug binding site analysis suggest a promising effective way to design the new drugs against S. flexneri. Conclusion: Among the 53 therapeutic targets identified through this study, 13 were found highly potential as drug targets based on their physicochemical properties whilst only one was found as vaccine target against S. flexneri. The outcome might also be used as module as well as circuit design in systems biology. PMID:27920755

  5. Cardio-protective and anti-cancer therapeutic potential of Nigella sativa

    PubMed Central

    Shafiq, Hammad; Ahmad, Asif; Masud, Tariq; Kaleem, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Nigella sativa is the miraculous plant having a lot of nutritional and medicinal benefits, and attracts large number of nutrition and pharmacological researchers. N. sativa seed composition shows that it is the blessing of nature and it contains and many bioactive compounds like thymoquinone, α-hederin, alkaloids, flavonoids, antioxidants, fatty acids many other compounds that have positive effects on curing of different diseases. Several medicinal properties of N. sativa like its anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, antioxidant activities and many others are well acknowledged. However, this article focuses on activity of N. sativa against cardiovascular diseases and cancer. For gathering required data the authors went through vast number of articles using search engines like Science direct, ELSEVIER, Pub Med, Willey on Line Library and Google scholar and the findings were classified on the basis of relevance of the topic and were reviewed in the article. N. sativa is rich source of different biologically active compounds and is found effective in controlling number of cardiovascular diseases and various cancers both in vivo and in vitro studies. PMID:25859300

  6. Cardio-protective and anti-cancer therapeutic potential of Nigella sativa.

    PubMed

    Shafiq, Hammad; Ahmad, Asif; Masud, Tariq; Kaleem, Muhammad

    2014-12-01

    Nigella sativa is the miraculous plant having a lot of nutritional and medicinal benefits, and attracts large number of nutrition and pharmacological researchers. N. sativa seed composition shows that it is the blessing of nature and it contains and many bioactive compounds like thymoquinone, α-hederin, alkaloids, flavonoids, antioxidants, fatty acids many other compounds that have positive effects on curing of different diseases. Several medicinal properties of N. sativa like its anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, antioxidant activities and many others are well acknowledged. However, this article focuses on activity of N. sativa against cardiovascular diseases and cancer. For gathering required data the authors went through vast number of articles using search engines like Science direct, ELSEVIER, Pub Med, Willey on Line Library and Google scholar and the findings were classified on the basis of relevance of the topic and were reviewed in the article. N. sativa is rich source of different biologically active compounds and is found effective in controlling number of cardiovascular diseases and various cancers both in vivo and in vitro studies.

  7. Potential Therapeutic Strategies for Hypertension-Exacerbated Cardiotoxicity of Anticancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kuriakose, Robin K.; Kukreja, Rakesh C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite their recognized cardiotoxic effects, anthracyclines remain an essential component in many anticancer regimens due to their superior antitumor efficacy. Epidemiologic data revealed that about one-third of cancer patients have hypertension, which is the most common comorbidity in cancer registries. The purpose of this review is to assess whether anthracycline chemotherapy exacerbates cardiotoxicity in patients with hypertension. A link between hypertension comorbidity and anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity (AIC) was first suggested in 1979. Subsequent preclinical and clinical studies have supported the notion that hypertension is a major risk factor for AIC, along with the cumulative anthracycline dosage. There are several common or overlapping pathological mechanisms in AIC and hypertension, such as oxidative stress. Current evidence supports the utility of cardioprotective modalities as adjunct treatment prior to and during anthracycline chemotherapy. Several promising cardioprotective approaches against AIC pathologies include dexrazoxane, early hypertension management, and dietary supplementation of nitrate with beetroot juice or other medicinal botanical derivatives (e.g., visnagin and Danshen), which have both antihypertensive and anti-AIC properties. Future research is warranted to further elucidate the mechanisms of hypertension and AIC comorbidity and to conduct well-controlled clinical trials for identifying effective clinical strategies to improve long-term prognoses in this subgroup of cancer patients. PMID:27829985

  8. Development of lipid nanoparticles for a histone deacetylases inhibitor as a promising anticancer therapeutic.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tuan Hiep; Chu, Duc Thanh; Truong, Duy Hieu; Tak, Jin Wook; Jeong, Jee-Heon; Hoang, Van Luong; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2016-05-01

    Vorinostat (VRS), a histone deacetylases inhibitor, has significant cytotoxic potential in a large number of human cancer cell lines. To clarify its promising anticancer potential and to improve its drawback related to physical properties and in vivo performance of VRS. VRS was successfully incorporated into nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) by the hot microemulsion method using sonication following a homogenization technique. After the optimization process, VRS-loaded NLCs (VRS-NLCs) were obtained as ideal quality nanoparticles with a spherical shape, small size (∼150 nm), negative charge (∼-22 mV), and narrow size distribution. In addition, the high entrapment efficiency (∼99%) and sustained drug release profile were recorded. Cytotoxicity study in three different cell lines (A549, MCF-7, and SCC-7) demonstrated higher cytotoxicity of VRS-NLCs than free drug. Finally, the AUC of VRS (118.16 ± 17.35 µgh/mL) was enhanced ∼4.4 times compared with that of free drug (27.03 ± 3.25 µgh/mL). These results suggest the potential of NLCs as an oral delivery system for enhancement of cellular uptake, in vitro cytotoxicity in cancer cell lines and the oral bioavailability of VRS.

  9. GPCR-targeting nanobodies: attractive research tools, diagnostics, and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Mujić-Delić, Azra; de Wit, Raymond H; Verkaar, Folkert; Smit, Martine J

    2014-05-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a major therapeutic target class. A large proportion of marketed drugs exert their effect through modulation of GPCR function, and GPCRs have been successfully targeted with small molecules. Yet, the number of small new molecular entities targeting GPCRs that has been approved as therapeutics in the past decade has been limited. With new and improved immunization-related technologies and advances in GPCR purification and expression techniques, antibody-based targeting of GPCRs has gained attention. The serendipitous discovery of a unique class of heavy chain antibodies (hcAbs) in the sera of camelids may provide novel GPCR-directed therapies. Antigen-binding fragments of hcAbs, also referred to as nanobodies, combine the advantages of both small molecules (e.g., molecular cavity binding, low production costs) and monoclonal antibodies (e.g., high affinity and specificity). Nanobodies are gaining ground as therapeutics and are also starting to find application as diagnostics and as high-quality tools in GPCR research. Herein, we review recent advances in the use of nanobodies in GPCR research.

  10. Therapeutic Implications of Targeting AKT Signaling in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V.; Robertson, Gavin P.

    2011-01-01

    Identification of key enzymes regulating melanoma progression and drug resistance has the potential to lead to the development of novel, more effective targeted agents for inhibiting this deadly form of skin cancer. The Akt3, also known as protein kinase B gamma, pathway enzymes regulate diverse cellular processes including proliferation, survival, and invasion thereby promoting the development of melanoma. Accumulating preclinical evidence demonstrates that therapeutic agents targeting these kinases alone or in combination with other pathway members could be effective for the long-term treatment of advanced-stage disease. However, currently, no selective and effective therapeutic agent targeting these kinases has been identified for clinical use. This paper provides an overview of the key enzymes of the PI3K pathway with emphasis placed on Akt3 and the negative regulator of this kinase called PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10). Mechanisms regulating these enzymes, their substrates and therapeutic implications of targeting these proteins to treat melanoma are also discussed. Finally, key issues that remain to be answered and future directions for interested researchers pertaining to this signaling cascade are highlighted. PMID:21461351

  11. Diverse Molecular Targets for Therapeutic Strategies in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sun-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia caused by neurodegenerative process and is tightly related to amyloid β (Aβ) and neurofibrillary tangles. The lack of early diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic remedy hinders the prevention of increasing population of AD patients every year. In spite of accumulated scientific information, numerous clinical trials for candidate drug targets have failed to be preceded into therapeutic development, therefore, AD-related sufferers including patients and caregivers, are desperate to seek the solution. Also, effective AD intervention is desperately needed to reduce AD-related societal threats to public health. In this review, we summarize various drug targets and strategies in recent preclinical studies and clinical trials for AD therapy: Allopathic treatment, immunotherapy, Aβ production/aggregation modulator, tau-targeting therapy and metabolic targeting. Some has already failed in their clinical trials and the others are still in various stages of investigations, both of which give us valuable information for future research in AD therapeutic development. PMID:25045220

  12. Diverse molecular targets for therapeutic strategies in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Han, Sun-Ho; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2014-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia caused by neurodegenerative process and is tightly related to amyloid β (Aβ) and neurofibrillary tangles. The lack of early diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic remedy hinders the prevention of increasing population of AD patients every year. In spite of accumulated scientific information, numerous clinical trials for candidate drug targets have failed to be preceded into therapeutic development, therefore, AD-related sufferers including patients and caregivers, are desperate to seek the solution. Also, effective AD intervention is desperately needed to reduce AD-related societal threats to public health. In this review, we summarize various drug targets and strategies in recent preclinical studies and clinical trials for AD therapy: Allopathic treatment, immunotherapy, Aβ production/aggregation modulator, tau-targeting therapy and metabolic targeting. Some has already failed in their clinical trials and the others are still in various stages of investigations, both of which give us valuable information for future research in AD therapeutic development.

  13. Therapeutic application of anti-arthritis, pain-releasing, and anti-cancer effects of bee venom and its constituent compounds.

    PubMed

    Son, Dong Ju; Lee, Jae Woong; Lee, Young Hee; Song, Ho Sueb; Lee, Chong Kil; Hong, Jin Tae

    2007-08-01

    Bee venom (BV) therapy (BVT), the therapeutic application of BV, has been used in traditional medicine to treat diseases, such as arthritis, rheumatism, pain, cancerous tumors, and skin diseases. BV contains a variety of peptides, including melittin, apamin, adolapin, the mast-cell-degranulating (MCD) peptide, enzymes (i.e., phospholipase [PL] A(2)), biologically active amines (i.e., histamine and epinephrine), and nonpeptide components which have a variety of pharmaceutical properties. BV has been reported to have anti-arthritis effects in several arthritis models. Melittin, a major peptide component of BV, has anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritis properties, and its inhibitory activity on nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) may be essential for the effects of BV. The anti-nociceptive effects of BV have also been demonstrated in thermal, visceral, and inflammatory pain models. Apcupoint stimulation (apipuncture) therapy into subcutaneous region may be important in the BV-induced anti-nociceptive effects. Multiple mechanisms, such as activation of the central and spinal opiod receptor, and alpha(2)-adrenergic activity, as well as activation of the descending serotonergic pathway have been suggested. The inhibition of c-Fos expression in the spinal cord by BV apipuncture in several nociceptive models is also reported to be a possible mechanism. BV also has anti-cancer activity. The cell cytotoxic effects through the activation of PLA(2) by melittin have been suggested to be the critical mechanism for the anti-cancer activity of BV. The conjugation of cell lytic peptide (melittin) with hormone receptors and gene therapy carrying melittin can be useful as a novel targeted therapy for some types of cancer, such as prostate and breast cancer.

  14. Large-scale automatic extraction of side effects associated with targeted anticancer drugs from full-text oncological articles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rong; Wang, QuanQiu

    2015-06-01

    Targeted anticancer drugs such as imatinib, trastuzumab and erlotinib dramatically improved treatment outcomes in cancer patients, however, these innovative agents are often associated with unexpected side effects. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these side effects are not well understood. The availability of a comprehensive knowledge base of side effects associated with targeted anticancer drugs has the potential to illuminate complex pathways underlying toxicities induced by these innovative drugs. While side effect association knowledge for targeted drugs exists in multiple heterogeneous data sources, published full-text oncological articles represent an important source of pivotal, investigational, and even failed trials in a variety of patient populations. In this study, we present an automatic process to extract targeted anticancer drug-associated side effects (drug-SE pairs) from a large number of high profile full-text oncological articles. We downloaded 13,855 full-text articles from the Journal of Oncology (JCO) published between 1983 and 2013. We developed text classification, relationship extraction, signaling filtering, and signal prioritization algorithms to extract drug-SE pairs from downloaded articles. We extracted a total of 26,264 drug-SE pairs with an average precision of 0.405, a recall of 0.899, and an F1 score of 0.465. We show that side effect knowledge from JCO articles is largely complementary to that from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) drug labels. Through integrative correlation analysis, we show that targeted drug-associated side effects positively correlate with their gene targets and disease indications. In conclusion, this unique database that we built from a large number of high-profile oncological articles could facilitate the development of computational models to understand toxic effects associated with targeted anticancer drugs.

  15. Methylselenocysteine - a Promising Antiangiogenic Agent for Overcoming Drug Delivery Barriers in Solid Malignancies for Therapeutic Synergy with Anticancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Arup

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Despite progress, chemotherapeutic response in solid malignancies has remained limited. While initial results of the use of antiangiogenic agents in combination chemotherapy indicated an enhanced therapeutic response, recent data indicates that the surviving cancer is not only able to surmount therapy, but is actually able to adapt a more aggressive metastatic phenotype. Thus, selecting an antiangiogenic agent that is less likely to lead to tumor resurgence is a key to future therapeutic success of antiangiogenic agents, in a combinatorial setting. Areas covered Against the broad spectrum of currently used antiangiogenic agents in the clinic, the putative benefits of the use of organo selenium (Se) compounds, such as methylselenocysteine (MSC), are discussed in this reiew. Expert opinion MSC, being part of the mammalian physiology, is a well tolerated, versatile and economical antiangiogenic agent. It down regulates multiple key upstream tumor survival markers, and enhances tumor drug delivery, at a given systemic dose of an anticancer agent, while protecting normal tissue from cytotoxic adverse effects. Further clinical trials, especially in poorly differentiated cancers, are warranted. PMID:21473705

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Diabetic Retinopathy: Potential Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Coucha, Maha; Elshaer, Sally L.; Eldahshan, Wael S.; Mysona, Barbara A.; El-Remessy, Azza B.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults in United States. Research indicates an association between oxidative stress and the development of diabetes complications. However, clinical trials with general antioxidants have failed to prove effective in diabetic patients. Mounting evidence from experimental studies that continue to elucidate the damaging effects of oxidative stress and inflammation in both vascular and neural retina suggest its critical role in the pathogenesis of DR. This review will outline the current management of DR as well as present potential experimental therapeutic interventions, focusing on molecules that link oxidative stress to inflammation to provide potential therapeutic targets for treatment or prevention of DR. Understanding the biochemical changes and the molecular events under diabetic conditions could provide new effective therapeutic tools to combat the disease. PMID:25949069

  17. Tau as a therapeutic target in neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Himmelstein, Diana S.; Ward, Sarah M.; Lancia, Jody K.; Patterson, Kristina R.

    2013-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein thought to help modulate the stability of neuronal microtubules. In tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s disease and several frontotemporal dementias, tau is abnormally modified and misfolded resulting in its disassociation from microtubules and the generation of pathological lesions characteristic for each disease. A recent surge in the population of people with neurodegenerative tauopathies has highlighted the immense need for disease-modifying therapies for these conditions, and new attention has focused on tau as a potential target for intervention. In the current work we summarize evidence linking tau to disease pathogenesis and review recent therapeutic approaches aimed at ameliorating tau dysfunction. The primary therapeutic tactics considered include kinase inhibitors and phosphatase activators, immunotherapies, small molecule inhibitors of protein aggregation, and microtubule-stabilizing agents. Although the evidence for tau-based treatments is encouraging, additional work is undoubtedly needed to optimize each treatment strategy for the successful development of safe and effective therapeutics. PMID:22790092

  18. pH/Reductant Dual-Responsive Core-Cross-Linked Micelles via Facile in Situ ATRP for Tumor-Targeted Delivery of Anticancer Drug with Enhanced Anticancer Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Tian, Kun; Jia, Xu; Zhao, Xubo; Liu, Peng

    2016-08-01

    Anticancer drugs cause severe side effects on normal tissues and organs due to their nonspecific delivery. Thus, tumor-targeting delivery of anticancer drugs remains a serious challenge in chemotherapy. Here a facile strategy was established for the pH/reductant dual-responsive core-cross-linked (CCL) micelles for tumor-targeted delivery of anticancer drug, via in situ atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). In the in vitro controlled release experiments with doxorubicin (DOX) as a model drug, the premature drug leakage rate was only 13.4% in the physiological medium within 36 h, while the cumulative release rate in the stimulated tumor microenvironment reached 78.7%, demonstrating the excellent tumor microenvironment responsive controlled release behavior upon acidic medium with high GSH level. As a folate receptor (FR) mediated targeting drug delivery system (DDS), the micelles showed excellent cytocompatibility, and enhanced anticancer efficiency after loading of DOX, compared with free DOX.

  19. Dual-targeting organometallic ruthenium(II) anticancer complexes bearing EGFR-inhibiting 4-anilinoquinazoline ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Zheng, Wei; Luo, Qun; Zhao, Yao; Zhang, Erlong; Liu, Suyan; Wang, Fuyi

    2015-08-07

    We have recently demonstrated that complexation with (η(6)-arene)Ru(II) fragments confers 4-anilinoquinazoline pharmacophores a higher potential for inducing cellular apoptosis while preserving the highly inhibitory activity of 4-anilinoquinazolines against EGFR and the reactivity of the ruthenium centre to 9-ethylguanine (Chem. Commun., 2013, 49, 10224-10226). Reported herein are the synthesis, characterisation and evaluation of the biological activity of a new series of ruthenium(ii) complexes of the type [(η(6)-arene)Ru(N,N-L)Cl]PF6 (arene = p-cymene, benzene, 2-phenylethanol or indane, L = 4-anilinoquinazolines). These organometallic ruthenium complexes undergo fast hydrolysis in aqueous solution. Intriguingly, the ligation of (arene)Ru(II) fragments with 4-anilinoquinazolines not only makes the target complexes excellent EGFR inhibitors, but also confers the complexes high affinity to bind to DNA minor grooves while maintaining their reactivity towards DNA bases, characterising them with dual-targeting properties. Molecular modelling studies reveal that the hydrolysis of these complexes is a favourable process which increases the affinity of the target complexes to bind to EGFR and DNA. In vitro biological activity assays show that most of this group of ruthenium complexes are selectively active inhibiting the EGF-stimulated growth of the HeLa cervical cancer cell line, and the most active complex [(η(6)-arene)Ru(N,N-L13)Cl]PF6 (, IC50 = 1.36 μM, = 4-(3'-chloro-4'-fluoroanilino)-6-(2-(2-aminoethyl)aminoethoxy)-7-methoxyquinazoline) is 29-fold more active than its analogue, [(η(6)-arene)Ru(N,N-ethylenediamine)Cl]PF6, and 21-fold more active than gefitinib, a well-known EGFR inhibitor in use clinically. These results highlight the strong promise to develop highly active ruthenium anticancer complexes by ligation of cytotoxic ruthenium pharmacophores with bioactive organic molecules.

  20. Targeting Notch degradation system provides promise for breast cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Shen, Jia-Xin; Wen, Xiao-Fen; Guo, Yu-Xian; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Notch receptor signaling pathways play an important role, not only in normal breast development but also in breast cancer development and progression. As a group of ligand-induced proteins, different subtypes of mammalian Notch (Notch1-4) are sensitive to subtle changes in protein levels. Thus, a clear understanding of mechanisms of Notch protein turnover is essential for understanding normal and pathological mechanisms of Notch functions. It has been suggested that there is a close relationship between the carcinogenesis and the dysregulation of Notch degradation. However, this relationship remains mostly undefined in the context of breast cancer, as protein degradation is mediated by numerous signaling pathways as well as certain molecule modulators (activators/inhibitors). In this review, we summarize the published data regarding the regulation of Notch family member degradation in breast cancer, while emphasizing areas that are likely to provide new therapeutic modalities for mechanism-based anti-cancer drugs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Therapeutic Targets of Triglyceride Metabolism as Informed by Human Genetics.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Robert C; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Hand, Nicholas J; Rader, Daniel J

    2016-04-01

    Human genetics has contributed to the development of multiple drugs to treat hyperlipidemia and coronary artery disease (CAD), most recently including antibodies targeting PCSK9 to reduce LDL cholesterol. Despite these successes, a large burden of CAD remains. Genetic and epidemiological studies have suggested that circulating triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) are a causal risk factor for CAD, presenting an opportunity for novel therapeutic strategies. We discuss recent unbiased human genetics testing, including genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and whole-genome or -exome sequencing, that have identified the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic lipogenesis pathways as important mechanisms in the regulation of circulating TRLs. Further strengthening the causal relationship between TRLs and CAD, findings such as these may provide novel targets for much-needed potential therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Therapeutics Targeting FGF Signaling Network in Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masaru

    2016-12-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling through its receptors, FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, or FGFR4, regulates cell fate, angiogenesis, immunity, and metabolism. Dysregulated FGF signaling causes human diseases, such as breast cancer, chondrodysplasia, gastric cancer, lung cancer, and X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets. Recombinant FGFs are pro-FGF signaling therapeutics for tissue and/or wound repair, whereas FGF analogs and gene therapy are under development for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and osteoarthritis. FGF traps, anti-FGF/FGFR monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), and small-molecule FGFR inhibitors are anti-FGF signaling therapeutics under development for the treatment of cancer, chondrodysplasia, and rickets. Here, I discuss the benefit-risk and cost-effectiveness issues of precision medicine targeting FGFRs, ALK, EGFR, and FLT3. FGFR-targeted therapy should be optimized for cancer treatment, focusing on genomic tests and recurrence.

  3. Phosphorylation events during viral infections provide potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Julie A.; Striker, Rob

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY For many medically relevant viruses, there is now considerable evidence that both viral and cellular kinases play important roles in viral infection. Ultimately, these kinases, and the cellular signaling pathways that they exploit, may serve as therapeutic targets for treating patients. Currently, small molecule inhibitors of kinases are under investigation as therapy for herpes viral infections. Additionally, a number of cellular or host-directed tyrosine kinase inhibitors that have been previously FDA-approved for cancer treatment are under study in animal models and clinical trials, as they have shown promise for the treatment of various viral infections as well. This review will highlight the wide range of viral proteins phosphorylated by viral and cellular kinases, and the potential for variability of kinase recognition sites within viral substrates to impact phosphorylation and kinase prediction. Research studying kinase-targeting prophylactic and therapeutic treatments for a number of viral infections will also be discussed. PMID:22113983

  4. Emerging Therapeutic Targets for Male Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Fankhauser, Christian Daniel; Honecker, Friedemann; Beyer, Jörg; Bode, Peter Karl

    2015-12-01

    Male germ cell tumors (GCTs) are curable cancers, yet 10-15 % of patients with metastatic disease fail cisplatin-based first-line treatments. While therapeutic options have increased for various other cancers, little progress has been made in the management of GCT in the last decades. A better understanding of the molecular alterations underlying the disease and identification of new therapeutic targets are needed. Several phase I/II studies with promising new agents are ongoing or have been completed, but most of those trials have been small and have not included translational research. Therefore, molecular profiles predictive for response or new agents have not been identified in male GCT so far. The purpose of this review is to highlight emerging targets and therapies with the potential to improve systemic treatment of metastatic male GCT and to develop strategies for future clinical trials.

  5. Therapeutic Targets for the Treatment of Hepatitis E Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Scott P.; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the most common causes of acute viral hepatitis in the world with an estimated 20 million infections per year. Although the mortality rate is less than 1% among the general population, pregnant women can have a fatality rate of up to 30%. Additionally, chronic hepatitis E has increasingly become a significant clinical problem in immunocompromised individuals. Effective antivirals against HEV are needed. Areas covered This review article addresses the current state of knowledge of HEV infections with regard to animal and cell culture model systems that are important for antiviral discovery and testing, our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of virus replication, our understanding of how each viral protein functions, and areas that can potentially be exploited as therapeutic targets. Expert opinion Lack of an efficient cell culture system for HEV propagation, the limited knowledge of HEV lifecycle, and the inherent self-limiting infection within the normal populace make the development of new therapeutic agents against HEV challenging. There are many promising therapeutic targets, and the tools for identifying and testing potential antivirals are rapidly evolving. The development of effective therapeutics against HEV in immunocompromised and pregnant patient populations is warranted. PMID:26073772

  6. Efficient delivery of therapeutic agents by using targeted albumin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kouchakzadeh, Hasan; Safavi, Maryam Sadat; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Albumin nanoparticles are one of the most important drug carriers for the delivery of therapeutic drugs, especially for the treatment of malignancies. This potential is due to their high binding capacity for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs and the possibility of surface modification. Accumulation of albumin-bound drugs in the tumor interstitium occurs by the enhanced permeability and retention effect, which is also facilitated by the 60-kDa glycoprotein transcytosis pathway and binding to secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine located in the tumor extracellular matrix. In addition, specific ligands such as monoclonal antibodies, folic acid, transferrin, and peptides can be conjugated to the surface of albumin nanoparticles to actively target the drug to its site of action. The albumin-bound paclitaxel, Abraxane, is one of the several therapeutic nanocarriers that have been approved for clinical use. By the development of Abraxane that demonstrates a higher response rate and improved tolerability and therapeutic efficiency in comparison with solvent-based formulation, and with consideration of its commercial success, albumin is attracting the interest of many biotechnological and pharmaceutical companies. This chapter explores the current targeted and nontargeted albumin-based nanoparticles that are in various stages of development for the delivery of therapeutic agents in order to enhance the efficacy of cancer treatment.

  7. MicroRNAs as novel predictive biomarkers and therapeutic targets in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stiegelbauer, Verena; Perakis, Samantha; Deutsch, Alexander; Ling, Hui; Gerger, Armin; Pichler, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in western countries. Despite significant improvement in available treatment options, CRC still remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Traditionally, 5-fluorouracil has been used as the main chemotherapy drug for treatment of metastatic CRC (mCRC). However, during the last two decades more effective chemotherapeutic agents such as oxaliplatin, irinotecan and the monoclonal antibodies cetuximab, panitumumab and bevacizumab have been used in clinical practice. More recently, the therapeutic armamentarium has been supplemented by the monoclonal antibodies bevacizumab, cetuximab and panitumumab as well as the protein-trap aflibercept and the small molecule multi-kinase inhibitor regorafenib. One of the major problems for the management of CRC is the inherent or acquired resistance to therapeutic approaches. The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small, endogenous, non-coding, single-stranded RNAs that play a role as post-transcriptional regulators, has added new dimensions to the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Because miRNAs are important regulators of carcinogenesis, progression, invasion, angiogenesis and metastases in CRC, they might serve as potential predictive and prognostic factors and even as therapeutic targets themselves. Several miRNAs are already known to be dysregulated in CRCs and have been linked to biological processes involved in tumor progression and response to anti-cancer therapies. This review summarizes current therapeutic approaches for treating CRC and highlights the role of miRNAs as novel predictive biomarkers and potential drug targets in CRC patients. PMID:25206276

  8. Integrated Stress Response as a Therapeutic Target for CNS Injuries.

    PubMed

    Romero-Ramírez, Lorenzo; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Barreda-Manso, M Asunción

    2017-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) injuries, caused by cerebrovascular pathologies or mechanical contusions (e.g., traumatic brain injury, TBI) comprise a diverse group of disorders that share the activation of the integrated stress response (ISR). This pathway is an innate protective mechanism, with encouraging potential as therapeutic target for CNS injury repair. In this review, we will focus on the progress in understanding the role of the ISR and we will discuss the effects of various small molecules that target the ISR on different animal models of CNS injury.

  9. From Toxins Targeting Ligand Gated Ion Channels to Therapeutic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nasiripourdori, Adak; Taly, Valérie; Grutter, Thomas; Taly, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels (LGIC) play a central role in inter-cellular communication. This key function has two consequences: (i) these receptor channels are major targets for drug discovery because of their potential involvement in numerous human brain diseases; (ii) they are often found to be the target of plant and animal toxins. Together this makes toxin/receptor interactions important to drug discovery projects. Therefore, toxins acting on LGIC are presented and their current/potential therapeutic uses highlighted. PMID:22069709

  10. Targeting the Prostate Cancer Microenvironment to Improve Therapeutic Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    of cancer cell lines poorly predict in vivo resistance, suggesting that cell autonomous and non -autonomous factors derived from the tumor...cell non -autonomous secretory program remain largely unexplored, and their potential as novel therapeutic targets to be exploited for enhancing...specific cell types comprising the prostate TME and define damage responses produced by non -genotoxic agents. Task 1.1: Establish xenografts compring PCa

  11. CBFBeta: A Novel Therapeutic Target for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    reversion is associated with altered expression of several microRNAs ( miRNAs )including miRNA -663, a tumor suppressor in gastric cancer . 15. SUBJECT...TERMS Core Binding Factor beta, microRNAs , malignant reversion, prostate cancer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: U 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Core Binding Factor beta: A Novel Therapeutic Target For Pros Prosrtate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER PCO80196 ostate Cancer

  12. Focal adhesion kinase: targeting adhesion signaling pathways for therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Parsons, J Thomas; Slack-Davis, Jill; Tilghman, Robert; Roberts, W Gregory

    2008-02-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays a central role in cancer progression and metastasis. Within this environment, cancer cells respond to a host of signals including growth factors and chemotactic factors, as well as signals from adjacent cells, cells in the surrounding stroma, and signals from the extracellular matrix. Targeting the pathways that mediate many of these signals has been a major goal in the effort to develop therapeutics.

  13. Breast Cancer: Current Molecular Therapeutic Targets and New Players.

    PubMed

    Nagini, Siddavaram

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the most frequent cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Breast cancer is a complex, heterogeneous disease classified into hormone-receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 overexpressing (HER2+) and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) based on histological features. Endocrine therapy, the mainstay of treatment for hormone-responsive breast cancer involves use of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), selective estrogen receptor downregulators (SERDs) and aromatase inhibitors (AIs). Agents that target estrogen receptor (ER) and HER2 such as tamoxifen and trastuzumab have been the most extensively used therapeutics for breast cancer. Crosstalk between ER and other signalling networks as well as epigenetic mechanisms have been envisaged to contribute to endocrine therapy resistance. TNBC, a complex, heterogeneous, aggressive form of breast cancer in which the cells do not express ER, progesterone receptor or HER2 is refractory to therapy. Several molecular targets are being explored to target TNBC including androgen receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Receptors, protein tyrosine kinases, phosphatases, proteases, PI3K/Akt signalling pathway, microRNAs (miRs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are potential therapeutic targets. miR-based therapeutic approaches include inhibition of oncomiRs by antisense oligonucleotides, restoration of tumour suppressors using miR mimics, and chemical modification of miRs. The lnRNAs HOTAIR, SPRY4-IT1, GAS5, and PANDAR, new players in tumour development and prognosis may have theranostic applications in breast cancer. Several novel classes of mechanism-based drugs have been designed and synthesised for treatment of breast cancer. Integration of nucleic acid sequencing studies with mass spectrometry-based peptide sequencing and posttranslational modifications as

  14. Polysaccharide-Gold Nanocluster Supramolecular Conjugates as a Versatile Platform for the Targeted Delivery of Anticancer Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Yang, Yang; Su, Yue; Chen, Jia-Tong; Liu, Yu

    2014-02-01

    Through the high affinity of the β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) cavity for adamantane moieties, novel polysaccharide-gold nanocluster supramolecular conjugates (HACD-AuNPs) were successfully constructed from gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) bearing adamantane moieties and cyclodextrin-grafted hyaluronic acid (HACD). Due to their porous structure, the supramolecular conjugates could serve as a versatile and biocompatible platform for the loading and delivery of various anticancer drugs, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), paclitaxel (PTX), camptothecin (CPT), irinotecan hydrochloride (CPT-11), and topotecan hydrochloride (TPT), by taking advantage of the controlled association/dissociation of drug molecules from the cavities formed by the HACD skeletons and AuNPs cores as well as by harnessing the efficient targeting of cancer cells by hyaluronic acid. Significantly, the release of anticancer drugs from the drug@HACD-AuNPs system was pH-responsive, with more efficient release occurring under a mildly acidic environment, such as that in a cancer cell. Taking the anticancer drug DOX as an example, cell viability experiments revealed that the DOX@HACD-AuNPs system exhibited similar tumor cell inhibition abilities but lower toxicity than free DOX due to the hyaluronic acid reporter-mediated endocytosis. Therefore, the HACD-AuNPs supramolecular conjugates may possess great potential for the targeted delivery of anticancer drugs.

  15. Systems approaches to design of targeted therapeutic delivery.

    PubMed

    Myerson, Jacob W; Brenner, Jacob S; Greineder, Colin F; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2015-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery aims to improve therapeutic effects and enable mechanisms that are not feasible for untargeted agents (e.g., due to impermeable biological barriers). To achieve targeting, a drug or its carrier should possess properties providing specific accumulation from circulation at the desired site. There are several examples of systems-inspired approaches that have been applied to achieve this goal. First, proteomics analysis of plasma membrane fraction of the vascular endothelium has identified a series of target molecules and their ligands (e.g., antibodies) that deliver conjugated cargoes to well-defined vascular cells and subcellular compartments. Second, selection of ligands binding to cells of interest using phage display libraries in vitro and in vivo has provided peptides and polypeptides that bind to normal and pathologically altered cells. Finally, large-scale high-throughput combinatorial synthesis and selection of lipid- and polymer-based nanocarriers varying their chemical components has yielded a series of carriers accumulating in diverse organs and delivering RNA interference agents to diverse cells. Together, these approaches offer a basis for systems-based design and selection of targets, targeting molecules, and targeting vehicles. Current studies focus on expanding the arsenal of these and alternative targeting strategies, devising drug delivery systems capitalizing on these strategies and evaluation of their benefit/risk ratio in adequate animal models of human diseases. These efforts, combined with better understanding of mechanisms and unintended consequences of these targeted interventions, need to be ultimately translated into industrial development and the clinical domain.

  16. Tumor therapeutics by design: targeting and activation of death receptors.

    PubMed

    Wajant, Harald; Gerspach, Jeannette; Pfizenmaier, Klaus

    2005-02-01

    Due to their strong apoptosis-inducing capacity, the death receptor ligands CD95L, TNF and TRAIL have been widely viewed as potential cancer therapeutics. While clinical data with CD95L and TRAIL are not yet available, TNF is a registered drug, albeit only for loco-regional application in a limited number of indications. The TNF experience has told us that specific delivery and restricted action is a major challenge in the development of multifunctional, pleiotropically acting cytokines into effective cancer therapeutics. Thus, gene-therapeutic approaches and new cytokine variants have been designed over the last 10 years with the aim of increasing anti-tumoral activity and reducing systemic side effects. Here, we present our current view of the therapeutic potential of the death receptor ligands TNF, CD95L and TRAIL and of the progress made towards improving their efficacy by tumor targeting, use of gene therapy and genetic engineering. Results generated with newly designed fusion proteins suggest that enhanced tumor-directed activity and prevention of undesirable actions of death receptor ligands is possible, thereby opening up a useful therapeutic window for all of the death receptor ligands, including CD95L.

  17. [Gap junctions: A new therapeutic target in major depressive disorder?].

    PubMed

    Sarrouilhe, D; Dejean, C

    2015-11-01

    Major depressive disorder is a multifactorial chronic and debilitating mood disease with high lifetime prevalence and is associated with excess mortality, especially from cardiovascular diseases and through suicide. The treatments of this disease with tricyclic antidepressants and monoamine oxidase inhibitors are poorly tolerated and those that selectively target serotonin and norepinephrine re-uptake are not effective in all patients, showing the need to find new therapeutic targets. Post-mortem studies of brains from patients with major depressive disorders described a reduced expression of the gap junction-forming membrane proteins connexin 30 and connexin 43 in the prefrontal cortex and the locus coeruleus. The use of chronic unpredictable stress, a rodent model of depression, suggests that astrocytic gap junction dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder. Chronic treatments of rats with fluoxetine and of rat cultured cortical astrocytes with amitriptyline support the hypothesis that the upregulation of gap