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Sample records for anticholinergic drugs scopolamine

  1. The antidepressant effects of anticholinergic drugs.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2009-06-01

    Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter that is important for communication between neurons and muscle, is involved in direct neurotransmission in the autonomic parasympathetic nervous system, and has been implicated in cognitive processing, arousal, and attention in the brain. The cholinergic-adrenergic hypothesis of mood disorders states that a given affective state might represent a balance between central cholinergic and adrenergic neurotransmitter activity in those areas of the brain regulating moods. According to this hypothesis, depression would be the clinical manifestation of a state of cholinergic dominance, whereas mania would reflect adrenergic dominance. On the basis of this hypothesis, anticholinergic drugs have been investigated as potential treatments for depression, but study results have not shown consistent antidepressant effects. However, the dosage dependency of scopolamine's effect across different studies and the lack of antidepressant effects with other anticholinergic drugs suggest that a specific muscarinic receptor subtype might be most relevant to the potential antidepressant mechanism of action of anticholinergic drugs.

  2. Comparative study on pharmacokinetics of a series of anticholinergics, atropine, anisodamine, anisodine, scopolamine and tiotropium in rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fengjie; Li, Cuiyun; Wang, Xin; Ren, Shuangxia; Li, Ning; Liu, Qi; Zhou, Sufeng; Lu, Yang; Zhao, Di; Chen, Xijing

    2015-09-01

    The compound series of traditional anticholinergics [atropine (Atr), anisodamine (Ani), anisodine (AT3), and scopolamine (Sco)], naturally occurring belladonna alkaloid, have been approved for numerous therapeutic uses since 1970s. Tiotropium, a novel M receptor antagonist for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, was structurally modified based on atropine-like drugs. Clinical phenomena suggested that the changes of substituent group were related to the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of the agents. In an attempt to compare the pharmacokinetics of the series of anticholinergics and investigate the subsets motivating selective anticholinergic potencies, a sensitive LC-MS/MS method was established to analyze the differences of pharmacokinetic parameters. In this paper, we determined the pharmacokinetics of atropine, anisodamine, anisodine, scopolamine, and tiotropium after i.v. and i.g. single dose administration. After i.v. administration, the maximum drug plasma concentrations (C max) of Atr, Ani, AT3, and Sco were 274.25 ± 53.66, 267.50 ± 33.16, 340.50 ± 44.52, and 483.75 ± 78.13 ng/mL. Tiotropium had a slightly higher area under the curve with a significant increase of C max value. Because of their partial solubility, Atr, Ani, AT3, and Sco had different bioavailability in rats of 21.62, 10.78, 80.45 and 2.52 %, respectively. Following i.g. administration of tiotropium, the C max value below 20 ng/mL revealed the very low oral absorption. The urinary excretion rates of Atr, Ani, AT3, Sco and tiotropium were 11.33, 54.86, 32.67, 8.69 and 73.91 %. This work provided relatively comprehensive preclinical data on the series of anticholinergics, which may be used to explain the clinical adverse effects and applications.

  3. Anticholinergic drugs--functional antidotes for the treatment of tabun intoxication.

    PubMed

    Krejcová, Gabriela; Kassa, Jirí

    2004-01-01

    1. To study the influence of antidotes on tabun-induced neurotoxicity, the rats were injected intramuscularly with organophosphate tabun (LD50). The efficacy of choice antidotal treatment consisting of acetylcholinesterase reactivator obidoxime and one of four anticholinergic drugs (atropine, benactyzine, biperiden, scopolamine) was compared. 2. Testing of tabun-induced neurotoxicity progress was carried out using the method Functional observational battery. The experimental animals as well as controls were observed at 24 hours and 7 days following tabun or saline administration. 3. The results were compared to the condition of animals without anticholinergic drug (oxime alone) and control rats that received physiological solution instead of tabun and treatment. Antidotal treatment involving centrally acting anticholinergic drugs (benactyzine, biperiden, scopolamine) showed significantly higher neuroprotective efficacy compared to antidotal treatment containing atropine.

  4. Study of the n-methyl-d-aspartate antagonistic properties of anticholinergic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    McDonough, J.H.; Shih, T.M.

    1995-12-31

    A study of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonistic properties of anticholinergic drugs. PHARMACOL BIOCHEM BEHAV. 51(2/3) 249-253, 1995. Drugs that act at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex have the ability to terminate nerve agent-induced seizures and modulate the neuropathologic consequences of agent exposure. Drugs with mixed anticholinergic and anti-NMDA properties potentially provide an ideal class of compounds for development as anticonvulsant treatments for nerve agent casualties. The present experiment evaluated the potential NMDA antagonist activity of 11 anticholinergic drugs by determining whether pretreatment with the compound was capable of protecting mice from the lethal effects of NMDA. The following anticholinergic drugs antagonized NMDA lethality and are ranked according to their potency: mecamylamine > procyclidine = benactyzine > biperiden > tribexyphenidyl. The anticholinergics atropine, aprophen, azaprophen, benztropine, 3-quinudidinyl benzilate (QNB), and scopolamine failed to show NMDA antagonist properties. In addition, and unexpectedly, diazepam, ethanol, and pentobarbital were also shown to be capable of antagonizing NMDA lethality over a certain range of doses. The advantages and limitations of using antagonism of NMDA lethality in mice as a bioassay for determining the NMDA antagonist properties of drugs are also discussed.

  5. [Effect of anticholinergic drugs on cognitive impairment in the elderly].

    PubMed

    López-Álvarez, Jorge; Zea Sevilla, María Ascensión; Agüera Ortiz, Luis; Fernández Blázquez, Miguel Ángel; Valentí Soler, Meritxell; Martínez-Martín, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    The use of anticholinergic drugs is common in the elderly, even in people with cognitive impairment. A systematic search was conducted in PubMed (anticholinergic effects, anticholinergic and dementia) to define the effects of anticholinergic drugs in the elderly. We emphasized the search in patterns of use, the combined use with AChEIs, the measurement of the Serum Anticholinergic Activity, and the short-term and long-term cognitive effects. The conclusions are that the use of anticholinergic drugs is common in the elderly, even more so than the medical prescription of AChEIs in Alzheimer's disease. The use of anticholinergic drugs may result in cognitive impairment. In long-term use it may generate a worsening of cognitive functions. It can lead to a wrong diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment or dementia, and they can also initiate signs of dementia. Greater cognitive effects appear when there is a previous deficit, but cognitive effects from anticholinergic drugs disappear in severe dementia. The presence of ApoEɛ4 increases the vulnerability for cognitive impairment when these drugs are employed.

  6. Anticholinergic Accumulation: A Slumbering Interaction between Drugs and Food Supplements.

    PubMed

    Vrolijk, Misha F; Opperhuizen, Antoon; Jansen, Eugène H J M; Bast, Aalt; Haenen, Guido R M M

    2015-12-01

    Many compounds display anticholinergic effects which might give rise to cognitive impairment and even delirium. These side effects are caused by their ability to bind to muscarinic receptors in our brain. Especially with combination of compounds, these serious effects are seen. This phenomenon, known as anticholinergic accumulation, is especially seen in the elderly. A classification of drugs for anticholinergic side effects has been made based on clinical observations, the ACB score. Here, we aimed to substantiate this classification by comparing the affinity of numerous drugs for the muscarinic receptors to the ACB score. Additionally, a number of supplements were screened. The affinity of the compounds was determined by their ability to displace the radioligand [(3)H]pirenzepine of the muscarinic receptor induced by these compounds. Our results show that the affinity of a compound for the muscarinic receptors correlated with its ACB score. Also food supplements appeared to bind to these muscarinic receptors. Moreover, several drug-drug, supplement-supplement and supplement-drug combinations had an affinity that is higher than the affinity of single compounds. This explains the phenomenon of anticholinergic accumulation. In conclusion, care should be taken to drug-drug and supplement-drug combinations with respect to anticholinergic accumulation.

  7. Anticonvulsant Treatment of Nerve Agent Seizures: Anticholinergics versus Diazepam in Soman-Intoxicated Guinea Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    8 June 1999 Abstract A total of eight anticholinergic drugs (aprophen, atropine, azaprophen, benactyzine, biperiden , procyclidine, scopolamine...procyclidine and aprophen terminated seizures most rapidly while scopolamine, trihexyphenidyl, biperiden , and diazepam were significantly slower. When...given 40 min after seizure onset, diazepam was the most potent compound tested, followed by scopolamine, benactyzine and biperiden ; atropine was not

  8. Perspectives on the Use of Scopolamine as an Adjunct Treatment to Enhance Survival Following Organophosphorus Nerve Agent Poisoning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    MILITARY MEDICINE, 175, 11:878,2010 Perspectives on the Use of Scopolamine as an Adjunct Treatment to Enhance Survival Following Organophosphorus...Nerve Agent Poisoning Irwin Koplovitz, RhD; Susan Schulz ABSTRACT Scopolamine (SCP) is an anticholinergic drug used clinically for decades to treat...PB is currently EDA approved only for use against soman. Scopolamine (SCP) is a well known anticholinergic drug that has been used clinically for

  9. Therapy against organophosphate poisoning: The importance of anticholinergic drugs with antiglutamatergic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, Ben Avi Raveh, Lily

    2008-10-15

    Potent cholinesterase inhibitors (e.g., soman, sarin), induce a wide range of deleterious effects including convulsions, behavioral impairments and ultimately, death. Due to the likelihood of various scenarios of military or terrorist attacks by these and other chemical weapons, research has to be aimed at finding optimal therapies. Early accumulation of acetylcholine in synaptic clefts was suggested to trigger an array of toxic events including an excessive release of glutamate, culminating in the activation of its receptors. Stimulation of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) subtype of these receptors was associated with the neuronal injury that initiates organophosphate-induced brain damage. The notion of a stepwise mechanism yielded treatments based on a combination of an immediate administration of enzyme reactivators and anticholinergic drugs. This strategy dramatically increased survival rates but did not abolish convulsions and failed to prevent the ensuing cognitive dysfunction. Efforts to improve this paradigm by adding anticonvulsants or antiglutamatergic drugs with anti-epileptic characteristics produced dubious results. Under these conditions, benactyzine and caramiphen, agents with anticholinergic and antiglutamatergic properties, provided improved protection when introduced as adjunct agents to oximes, reversible cholinesterase inhibitors and/or specific antimuscarinic drugs such as atropine. In contrast, the specific antimuscarinic drug scopolamine failed to block soman-induced changes in glutamatergic and behavioral parameters even when given prophylactically. These findings along with a large number of additional reports led towards the conclusion that the therapeutic advantage of drugs such as benactyzine and caramiphen could derive from their ability to modulate central cholinergic and glutamate neurotransmission.

  10. Therapy against organophosphate poisoning: the importance of anticholinergic drugs with antiglutamatergic properties.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Ben Avi; Raveh, Lily

    2008-10-15

    Potent cholinesterase inhibitors (e.g., soman, sarin), induce a wide range of deleterious effects including convulsions, behavioral impairments and ultimately, death. Due to the likelihood of various scenarios of military or terrorist attacks by these and other chemical weapons, research has to be aimed at finding optimal therapies. Early accumulation of acetylcholine in synaptic clefts was suggested to trigger an array of toxic events including an excessive release of glutamate, culminating in the activation of its receptors. Stimulation of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) subtype of these receptors was associated with the neuronal injury that initiates organophosphate-induced brain damage. The notion of a stepwise mechanism yielded treatments based on a combination of an immediate administration of enzyme reactivators and anticholinergic drugs. This strategy dramatically increased survival rates but did not abolish convulsions and failed to prevent the ensuing cognitive dysfunction. Efforts to improve this paradigm by adding anticonvulsants or antiglutamatergic drugs with anti-epileptic characteristics produced dubious results. Under these conditions, benactyzine and caramiphen, agents with anticholinergic and antiglutamatergic properties, provided improved protection when introduced as adjunct agents to oximes, reversible cholinesterase inhibitors and/or specific antimuscarinic drugs such as atropine. In contrast, the specific antimuscarinic drug scopolamine failed to block soman-induced changes in glutamatergic and behavioral parameters even when given prophylactically. These findings along with a large number of additional reports led towards the conclusion that the therapeutic advantage of drugs such as benactyzine and caramiphen could derive from their ability to modulate central cholinergic and glutamate neurotransmission.

  11. [Anticholinergic drugs in the therapy of obstructive airway diseases].

    PubMed

    Windt, Roland

    2011-04-01

    The anticholinergic effects from botanical preparations of the deadly nightshade family have been used for hundreds of years for the treatment of obstructive airway diseases. Nowadays, derivatives of the plant alkaloids with quaternary ammonium structure, ipratropium bromide and tiotropium bromide, are used, which retain the bronchodilator properties of the parent compounds but are much safer since they are poorly absorbed across biologic membranes. They are the bronchodilators of choice in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, ipratropium is considered a second-line agent in the treatment of asthma as the bronchodilatory effects seen with ipratropium are less than those seen with beta-adrenergic drugs. Tiotropium is only approved for use in COPD. Though, a recent study provides some evidence that this agent may be an alternative to long-acting beta agonists as an add-on therapy to inhaled glucocorticoids for asthma.

  12. Liquid-Spray Formulation Of Scopolamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1992-01-01

    Scopolamine, fast-acting anticholinergic drug, formulated into drops administered intranasally. Formulation very useful for people who need immediate relief from motion sickness, and they can administer it to themselves. Also used in other clinical situations in which fast-acting anticholinergic medication required. Modified into such other forms as gel preparation, aqueous-base ointment, or aerosol spray or mist; also dispensed in metered-dose delivery system.

  13. The effect of anticholinergic drugs on the electrolyte content of gastric juice

    PubMed Central

    Piper, D. W.; Stiel, Mirjam C.

    1961-01-01

    Gastric secretion was stimulated by insulin hypoglycaemia and the effect of increasing doses of anticholinergic drugs on the volume, acid, and electrolyte content of gastric juice was studied. The sodium and potassium output was depressed to a far less extent than the acid output and the drop in volume of secretion and acid output after anticholinergic drugs is almost entirely due to decreased acid secretion. With increasing anticholinergic suppression of the volume of secretion, there is a marked fall in potassium output and a lesser fall in sodium output. The potassium concentration showed a slight fall and there was a rise in sodium concentration. PMID:14486842

  14. Anticonvulsant actions of anticholinergic drugs in soman poisoning. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Capacio, B.R.; Shih, T.M.

    1991-12-31

    The acute effects of the organophosphorus cholinesterase inhibitor soman include hypersecretions, convulsions, and death. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anticholinergic compounds, aprophen, atropine sulfate, azaprophen, benactyzine, benztropine, biperiden, scopolamine HBr, and trihexyphenidyl for their efficacy in preventing soman-induced hypersecretions and convulsions. Male rats were injected with the oxime HI-6 (125 mg/kg, i.p.), to increase survival time, along with various intramuscular doses of the anticholinergics 30 min prior to a dose of soman that produced 100% convulsions. Signs of intoxication as well as the time-to-onset of convulsions were observed. The calculated anticonvulsant median effective dose values were 0.18, 0.33, 0.36, 0.55, 2.17, 2.30, 2.45, and 31.09 micro mol per kilogram for scopolamine HBr, biperiden, trihexyphenidy, benactyzine, benztropine, azaprophen, aprophen, and atropine sulfate, respectively. The same rank order by potency for inhibition of hypersecretions among these compounds was observed.

  15. Intranasal scopolamine preparation and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi (Inventor); Cintron, Nitza M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A new method and preparation for intranasal delivery of scopolamine provides a safe and effective treatment for motion sickness and other conditions requiring anticholinergic therapy. The preparation can be in the form of aqueous nasal drops, mist spray, gel or oinment. Intranasal delivery of scopolamine has similar bioavailability and effect of intravenous delivery and is far superior to oral dosage. Scopolamine is prepared in a buffered saline solution at the desired dosage rate for effective anticholinergic response.

  16. Drugs with anticholinergic properties, cognitive decline, and dementia in an elderly general population: the 3-city study

    PubMed Central

    Carrière, Isabelle; Fourrier-Reglat, Annie; Dartigues, Jean-François; Rouaud, Olivier; Pasquier, Florence; Ritchie, Karen; Ancelin, Marie-Laure

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between use of medications with anticholinergic properties, cognitive decline and incident dementia in a large community-based sample of subjects aged 65 years and over. Methods Participants were 4128 women and 2784 men from a population-based cohort recruited from three French cities. Cognitive performance, clinical diagnosis of dementia and anticholinergic use were evaluated at base-line, 2 and 4 year later. Results 7.5% of subjects reported anticholinergic drug use at base-line. Multivariate adjusted logistic regression indicated that women reporting anticholinergic drugs at base-line showed greater decline over four years in verbal fluency scores (OR=1.41, CI=1.11–1.79) and in global cognitive functioning (OR=1.22, CI=0.96–1.55) than women not using anticholinergic drugs. In men, an association was found with decline in visual memory (OR=1.63, CI=1.08–2.47) and to a lesser extent in executive function (OR=1.47, CI=0.89–2.44). Significant interactions were observed in women between anticholinergic use and age, apolipoprotein E, or hormone replacement therapy. A significantly 1.4–2 fold higher risk of cognitive decline was observed for continuous anticholinergic users but not for those having discontinued. The risk of incident dementia over the four-year followup was also increased in continuous users (HR=1.65, CI=1.00–2.73) but not in those having discontinued anticholinergic drugs (HR=1.28, CI=0.59–2.76). Conclusions Elderly people taking anticholinergic drugs were at increased risk for cognitive decline and dementia. Discontinuing anticholinergic treatment was associated with a decreased risk. Physicians should carefully consider prescription of anticholinergic drugs in elderly people especially in the oldest old and persons at high genetic risk of cognitive disorder. PMID:19636034

  17. Drugs with anticholinergic properties and cognitive performance in the elderly: results from the PAQUID Study

    PubMed Central

    Lechevallier-Michel, Nathalie; Molimard, Mathieu; Dartigues, Jean-François; Fabrigoule, Colette; Fourrier-Réglat, Annie

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To measure the association between the use of drugs with anticholinergic properties and cognitive performance in an elderly population, the PAQUID cohort. Methods The sample studied was composed of 1780 subjects aged 70 and older, living at home in South western France. Data on socio-demographic characteristics, medical history and drug use were collected using a standardized questionnaire. Cognitive performance was assessed using the following neuropsychological tests: the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) which evaluates global cognitive functioning, the Benton Visual Retention Test (BVRT) which assesses immediate visual memory, and the Isaacs’ Set Test (IST) which assesses verbal fluency. For each test, scores were dichotomized between low performance and normal to high performance using the score at the 10th percentile of the study sample as the cut-off point, according to age, gender and educational level. The association between the use of drugs with anticholinergic properties and cognitive performance was examined using logistic regression models, adjusting for several potential confounding factors. Results About 13.7% of the subjects used at least one drug with anticholinergic properties. In multivariate analyses, the use of these drugs was significantly associated with low performance in the BVRT [odds ratio (OR) = 1.6; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1, 2.3] and in the IST (OR = 1.9; 95% CI 1.3, 2.8). The association found with low performance in the MMSE (OR = 1.4; 95% CI 1.0, 2.1) was barely statistically significant. Conclusion These findings suggest that the use of drugs with anticholinergic properties is associated with low cognitive performance among community-dwelling elderly people. PMID:15676035

  18. Changes in extrapyramidal symptoms following anticholinergic drug withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Perenyi, A; Gardos, G; Samu, I; Kallos, M; Cole, J O

    1983-03-01

    An antiparkinson drug (APK) withdrawal study was carried out in 34 schizophrenic outpatients on maintenance neuroleptics. Sixty-five percent of patients were without major complaints after 2 weeks of APK discontinuation, while 35% reported adverse effects including extrapyramidal, autonomic, and behavioral symptoms. Male patients and those on higher diethazine doses before withdrawal reported more complaints. Ratings showed significant increases of parkinsonism, as well as dyskinesia following APK withdrawal. No clinical evidence was obtained in support of the notion of cholinergic hypersensitivity in patients showing "tremors" at baseline.

  19. Scopolamine induced amnesia is reversed by Bacopa monniera through participation of kinase-CREB pathway.

    PubMed

    Saraf, Manish Kumar; Anand, Akshay; Prabhakar, Sudesh

    2010-02-01

    Scopolamine, an anticholinergic drug, is reported to produce amnesia by interference of long term potentiation and has been used for discerning the efficacy of various antiamnesic drugs. The intoxication with anticholinergics and benzodiazepines tend to produce neurodegeneration which cause memory deficits. Our earlier reports have shown the antiamnesic drug, B. monniera to be capable of alleviating diazepam induced memory deficits. We have now tested how scopolamine affects downstream signaling molecules of long term potentiation and if B. monniera can also modulate the scopolamine induced amnesia. We used Morris water maze scale to test the amnesic effect of scopolamine and its reversal by B. monniera. Rota-rod test was used to screen muscle coordination activity of mice before water maze investigations were carried out. The results showed that scopolamine downregulated protein kinase C and iNOS without affecting cAMP, protein kinase A, calmodulin, MAP kinase, nitrite, CREB and pCREB. B. monniera reversed the scopolamine induced amnesia by significantly improving calmodulin and by partially attenuating protein kinase C and pCREB. These observations suggest involvement of calmodulin in evoking antiamnesic effects of B. monniera.

  20. Influence of ammonium chloride on the tissue distribution of anticholinergic drugs in rats.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, J; Yokogawa, K; Nakashima, E; Ohkuma, S; Ichimura, F

    1998-07-01

    Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) increases lysosomal pH and thereby abolishes intralysosomal accumulation of drugs. Its effect on the tissue distribution of biperiden and trihexyphenidyl in rats has been investigated. The tissue-plasma concentration ratios (Kp) of these drugs in various tissues were determined by infusion studies at steady-state in the presence or absence of NH4Cl. Treatment with NH4Cl reduced the Kp values for both drugs, causing the largest reduction in Kp in the lung (52.1 to 11.8 for biperiden and 59.5 to 18.9 for trihexyphenidyl; ratios of decrease 0.77 and 0.68, respectively), followed by the heart and kidneys, with relatively small reductions in the brain, gut, muscle and fat. Subcellular fractionation studies in the lung indicated that the subcellular fraction-plasma concentration ratio of each drug at the steady state (K(p,sf)) was reduced by treatment with NH4Cl, with the largest decrease in the post-nuclear fraction (ratio of decrease 0.82 for biperiden and 0.74 for trihexyphenidyl), followed by the nucleus, microsomes and supernatant, in that order. A strong correlation was found between the ratio of decrease in K(p,sf) after NH4Cl treatment and the specific activity of acid phosphatases, a marker of lysosomes, in each fraction (biperiden, r = 0.948; trihexyphenidyl, r = 0.945). These results suggest that acidic organelles contribute significantly to the distribution kinetics of anticholinergic drugs.

  1. The Anticholinergic and Antiglutamatergic Drug Caramiphen Reduces Seizure Duration in Soman-Exposed Rats: Synergism with the Benzodiazepine Diazepam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    organophosphate poisoning by pretreatment with a carbamate. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 43, 207–216. Gordon, R.K., Haigh, J.R., Garcia, G.E., Feaster, S.R...value of gacyclidine (GK-11) as adjuvant medication to conventional treatments of organophosphate poisoning : primate experiments mimicking various...Raveh, L., 2008. Therapy against organophosphate poisoning : the impor- tance of anticholinergic drugs with antiglutamatergic properties. Toxicol. Appl

  2. Use of Physostigmine by the Intravenous, Intramuscular, and Oral Routes in the Therapy of Anticholinergic Drug Intoxication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-05-01

    large doses of other compounds, such as phenothiazine8 and certain tricyclic antidepressants , 9 •1 1 which appear to have some degree of cholinergic... time , physostigmine was available commercially in a preparation containing 4 mg/ml* and this dose represented a volume of about I ml for a 70-kg man...After a light breakfast, they received an anticholinergic drug (intravenously or intramuscularly) and, at the time (s) specified under results, were

  3. Methyllycaconitine- and scopolamine-induced cognitive dysfunction: differential reversal effect by cognition-enhancing drugs

    PubMed Central

    Andriambeloson, Emile; Huyard, Bertrand; Poiraud, Etienne; Wagner, Stéphanie

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence pointing to the pivotal role of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAchR) dysfunction in cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease or schizophrenia. This study was undertaken to establish and characterize an in vivo model for cognitive disorder secondary to the blockade of α7 nAChR by its specific antagonist, methyllycaconitine (MLA). The results show that MLA elicited cognitive dysfunction as assessed by reduced spontaneous alternation of mice in the T-maze. The maximal effect of MLA produced 25–30% reduction in the spontaneous alternation of mice, a level comparable with that induced by the muscarinic antagonism of scopolamine. Donepezil and galantamine fully reversed both MLA and scopolamine-induced cognitive dysfunction. However, the ED50 of donepezil and galantamine was significantly shifted to the left in the MLA- compared to scopolamine-treated mice (0.0005 and 0.002 mg/kg for donepezil; 0.0003 and 0.7 mg/kg for galantamine). Moreover, memantine elicited marked reversion of cognitive dysfunction (up to 70%) in MLA-treated mice while only a weak reversal effect at high dose of memantine (less than 20%) was observed in scopolamine-treated mice. The above findings indicate that MLA-induced cognitive dysfunction in the mouse is highly sensitive and more responsive to the current procognitive drugs than the traditional scopolamine-based assay. Thus, it can be of value for the preclinical screening and profiling of cognition-enhancing drugs. PMID:25505596

  4. Effects of injectable anticholinergic drugs on soman-induced lethality and convulsant/subconvulsant activity

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, L.W.; Anderson, D.R.; Lennox, W.J.; Bowersox, S.L.; Anders, J.C.

    1993-05-13

    FDA approved, injectable preparations of candidate compounds BENZTROPINE (BZT), 1.0 mg/ml; biperiden (BIP), 5.0 mg/ml; dicyclomine (DCL), 10 mg/ml; 1-hyoscyamine (HYO), 0.5 mg/ml; orphenadrine (ORP), 30 mg/ml; scopolamine (SCP), 1.0 mg/ml were tested in parallel with diazepam (DZ, the standard) in male guinea pigs against ongoing soman induced convulsive (CV)/sub-CV activity. Three trained graders concurrently assigned CV/sub-CV scores (12 - convulsions; 0 normal) to each animal. Animals received (im) pyridostigmine (PYR; 26 ug/kg) 30 min before soman (56 ug/kg; 2 LD50), atropine (2 mg/kg) admixed with 2-PAM (25 mg/kg) at one min after soman, and the candidate drug preparation at 5.67 min post soman, a time when CV activity is assured. BIP and SCP demonstrated efficacy over dosage ranges between 10 and 0.3 and 1.0 and 0.13 mg/kg, respectively, while the other preparations were less effective at their respective maximum dosages. At optimal dosages of SCP (0.5 mg/kg) and BIP (10 mg/kg), the CV/sub-CV scores were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than those of DZ.

  5. Acetylcholine and choline levels in rabbit fetuses exposed to anticholinergics.

    PubMed

    McBride, W G; Hicks, L J

    1987-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that acetylcholine, choline acetylase and acetylcholinesterase may have an ontogenic and trophic influence in the embryo, and that therefore certain drugs may produce malformations via their effect on the acetylcholine and choline levels in the fetus. Thalidomide and the anticholinergics, scopolamine hydrobromide and orphenadrine hydrochloride, and doxylamine succinate, an antihistamine with secondary anticholinergic action, were administered to pregnant New Zealand White rabbit does from day 8 to day 15 of gestation. Cesarean sections were performed on gestational day 16, the fetuses removed and the acetylcholine and choline contents of the fetuses and placentas were estimated by organic extraction and derivation for injection into a GCMS. These acetylcholine and choline levels were compared with those of the fetuses and placentas of the control animals mated with the same buck on the same day as the treated animals. Thalidomide (50 mg/kg) did not affect acetylcholine or choline levels in the fetuses or the placentas obtained from the treated animal. Scopolamine (approximately 100 micrograms/kg) reduced the choline level in the placenta and fetus but not the acetylcholine levels. Orphenadrine (approximately 24 mg/kg) reduced acetylcholine and choline levels in the fetus and choline levels in the placenta. Doxylamine succinate (10 mg/kg) reduced the acetylcholine levels in the fetus and the choline levels in the placenta. The placenta is a fetal organ and the significance of acetylcholine production by the placenta is as yet unknown. The reduction in acetylcholine levels in the fetus exposed to drugs with an anticholinergic action may be of significance in the production of malformations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Development of a screening method for the most commonly abused anticholinergic drugs in Jordan; trihexyphenidyl, procyclidine and biperiden.

    PubMed

    Hadidi, Kamal A

    2004-10-01

    A sensitive and rapid method for the simultaneous determination of three commonly abused anticholinergic drugs in Jordan; trihexyphenidyl, procyclidine, and biperiden in plasma and urine has been developed using solid phase extraction and GC-MS. Linearity was established from therapeutic to fatal concentrations of the three drugs; 5-300 ng/ml in plasma, with correlation coefficient r(2) > or = 0.9978 and 10-800 ng/ml in urine r(2) > or = 0.9993. Recoveries were in the range of 86-92% and intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviations (n = 6) were in the range of 6.6-10.3% for the three drugs at three different concentrations in plasma and urine. The base peak m/z 98 for trihexyphenidyl, m/z 84 for procyclidine, and m/z 98 and 218 for biperiden, and m/z 339 for papaverine (internal standard) were monitored at selective ion monitoring; their retention times were 8.10, 8.67 and 8.92 min, respectively, and 14.79 min for the internal standard with analysis time of 16.75 min. The limit of detection of 0.5 ng/ml was attained for trihexyphenidyl and procyclidine, while for biperiden 2.0 and 1.0 ng/ml in spiked plasma and urine, respectively. This method has been applied to forensic and authentic samples taken from abuser and patients using these drugs. The method will offer the clinicians and the legal authority the right diagnosis regarding the anticholinergic involved in any case of abuse with less than 1 h per sample (plasma or urine) from the time of receiving.

  7. Scopolamine-induced convulsions in fasted mice after food intake: effects of glucose intake, antimuscarinic activity and anticonvulsant drugs.

    PubMed

    Enginar, Nurhan; Nurten, Asiye; Celik, Pinar Yamantürk; Açikmeşe, Bariş

    2005-09-01

    The present study was performed to further evaluate the contribution of antimuscarinic activity and hypoglycaemia to the development of scopolamine-induced convulsions in fasted mice after food intake. The effects of anticonvulsant drugs on convulsions were also evaluated. Antimuscarinic drugs atropine (3 mg/kg) and biperiden (10 mg/kg) were given intraperitoneally (i.p) to animals fasted for 48 h. Like scopolamine, both drugs induced convulsions after animals were allowed to eat ad libitum. Another group of animals was given glucose (5%) in drinking water during fasting. These animals, although they had normoglycaemic blood levels after fasting, also developed convulsions after treated with scopolamine i.p. (3 mg/kg), atropine (3 mg/kg) or biperiden (10 mg/kg) and allowed to eat ad libitum. Among the drugs studied, only valproate (340 mg/kg), gabapentin (50 mg/kg) and diazepam (2.5 and 5 mg/kg) markedly reduced the incidence of scopolamine-induced convulsions. The present results indicate that antimuscarinic activity, but not hypoglycaemia, underlies these convulsions which do not respond to most of the conventional anticonvulsant drugs.

  8. Delirium due to scopolamine patch in a 4-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yang-Guang; Chen, Po-Hon; Chang, Fang-Yuan; Wu, Li-Te; Liao, Kuo-Yu; Wu, Tzee-Chung

    2011-03-01

    The scopolamine patch is usually used to reduce postoperative nausea and vomiting associated with anesthesia and/or surgery. It is also commonly used for the prevention of motion sickness. Transdermal scopolamine patches have been used for decades and there are few reports in the literature of toxic psychosis associated with the product. Most documented cases of acute psychosis following administration of scopolamine or other anticholinergic agents have been from the adult population. Here we present a 4-year-old boy with deteriorated cognitive function and changed mental status acutely. Besides flushing skin and psychotic behaviors including bizarre actions, hallucinations, aggressive behavior, hyperactivity, and incoherent speech were also noticed. Symptoms and signs were resolved after removal of scopolamine patch and conservative management. This case is possibly one of the youngest patients to exhibit such toxic effects. We hope to relay information about common agents with anticholinergic effects to clinical practitioners and remind that drug-induced psychosis should be considered in children with acute changes in behavior.

  9. Amnesic effects of the anticholinergic drugs, trihexyphenidyl and biperiden: differences in binding properties to the brain muscarinic receptor.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Y; Ohue, M; Kitaura, T; Kihira, K

    1999-07-10

    An amnesic effect of anticholinergic drugs was previously described from several behavioral studies. We examined this effect induced by trihexyphenidyl and biperiden, clinically used in the parkinsonism and schizophrenic patients, by using passive avoidance tasks. Both of these drugs (0.1-10 mg/kg, s.c.) showed dose-dependent amnesic effects in the acquisition and retrieval phases. However, the effect induced by trihexyphenidyl was transient, whereas that of biperiden was long-lasting. To clarify the reason for the different duration of the amnesic activity, binding to the muscarinic receptor was examined. In the Scatchard analysis, trihexyphenidyl competed with [(3)H]quinuclidinyl benzilate ([(3)H]QNB) on the muscarinic receptor (showed increased K(d) and unchanged B(max) value), while biperiden decreased [(3)H]QNB binding (B(max) value) significantly. Furthermore, in an exchange assay for receptor inactivation, trihexyphenidyl binding to muscarinic receptors was exchanged by [(3)H]QNB completely, but biperiden decreased the exchangeable binding of [(3)H]QNB in a dose dependent manner (0.1-100 nM). These results suggested that the binding of trihexyphenidyl and biperiden to muscarinic receptor might be completely reversible and partially irreversible, respectively, whereas the K(i) values of these two drugs were similar. In conclusion, this difference in binding property may explain the difference in the time-course of the amnesic effect induced by trihexyphenidyl and biperiden.

  10. Drugs with anticholinergic effects and cognitive impairment, falls and all-cause mortality in older adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ruxton, Kimberley; Woodman, Richard J; Mangoni, Arduino A

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim was to investigate associations between drugs with anticholinergic effects (DACEs) and cognitive impairment, falls and all-cause mortality in older adults. Methods A literature search using CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Embase and PubMed databases was conducted for randomized controlled trials, prospective and retrospective cohort and case-control studies examining the use of DACEs in subjects ≥65 years with outcomes on falls, cognitive impairment and all-cause mortality. Retrieved articles were published on or before June 2013. Anticholinergic exposure was investigated using drug class, DACE scoring systems (anticholinergic cognitive burden scale, ACB; anticholinergic drug scale, ADS; anticholinergic risk scale, ARS; anticholinergic component of the drug burden index, DBIAC) or assessment of individual DACEs. Meta-analyses were performed to pool the results from individual studies. Results Eighteen studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria (total 124 286 participants). Exposure to DACEs as a class was associated with increased odds of cognitive impairment (OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.16, 1.73). Olanzapine and trazodone were associated with increased odds and risk of falls (OR 2.16, 95% CI 1.05, 4.44; RR 1.79, 95% CI 1.60, 1.97, respectively), but amitriptyline, paroxetine and risperidone were not (RR 1.73, 95% CI 0.81, 2.65; RR 1.80, 95% CI 0.81, 2.79; RR 1.39, 95% CI 0.59, 3.26, respectively). A unit increase in the ACB scale was associated with a doubling in odds of all-cause mortality (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.82, 2.33) but there were no associations with the DBIAC (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.55, 1.42) or the ARS (OR 3.56, 95% CI 0.29, 43.27). Conclusions Certain individual DACEs or increased overall DACE exposure may increase the risks of cognitive impairment, falls and all-cause mortality in older adults. PMID:25735839

  11. Learning and memory in the forced swimming test: effects of antidepressants having varying degrees of anticholinergic activity.

    PubMed

    Enginar, Nurhan; Yamantürk-Çelik, Pınar; Nurten, Asiye; Güney, Dilvin Berrak

    2016-07-01

    The antidepressant-induced reduction in immobility time in the forced swimming test may depend on memory impairment due to the drug's anticholinergic efficacy. Therefore, the present study evaluated learning and memory of the immobility response in rats after the pretest and test administrations of antidepressants having potent, comparatively lower, and no anticholinergic activities. Immobility was measured in the test session performed 24 h after the pretest session. Scopolamine and MK-801, which are agents that have memory impairing effects, were used as reference drugs for a better evaluation of the memory processes in the test. The pretest administrations of imipramine (15 and 30 mg/kg), amitriptyline (7.5 and 15 mg/kg), trazodone (10 mg/kg), fluoxetine (10 and 20 mg/kg), and moclobemide (10 and 20 mg/kg) were ineffective, whereas the pretest administrations of scopolamine (0.5 mg/kg) and MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) decreased immobility time suggesting impaired "learning to be immobile" in the animals. The test administrations of imipramine (30 mg/kg), amitriptyline (15 mg/kg), moclobemide (10 mg/kg), scopolamine (0.5 and 1 mg/kg), and MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) decreased immobility time, which suggested that the drugs exerted antidepressant activity or the animals did not recall that attempting to escape was futile. The test administrations of trazodone (10 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (10 and 20 mg/kg) produced no effect on immobility time. Even though the false-negative and positive responses made it somewhat difficult to interpret the findings, this study demonstrated that when given before the pretest antidepressants with or without anticholinergic activity seemed to be devoid of impairing the learning process in the test.

  12. No effect of the anticholinergic drugs trihexyphenidyl and biperiden on the plasma concentrations of bromperidol and its reduced metabolite.

    PubMed

    Otani, K; Ishida, M; Yasui, N; Kondo, T; Mihara, K; Suzuki, A; Kaneko, S; Inoue, Y; Shibata, M; Ikeda, K

    1997-04-01

    Effects of the anticholinergic drugs trihexyphenidyl and biperiden on plasma concentrations of bromperidol and its reduced metabolite were studied. Subjects comprised 20 schizophrenic inpatients taking bromperidol, 6-18 mg/ day for 1-9 weeks. Patients were randomly allocated to one of two treatment sequences: trihexyphenidyl-biperiden (n = 12) or biperiden-trihexyphenidyl (n = 8). Each sequence consisted of two 2-week phases, with no washout period between the two phases. The daily dose of trihexyphenidyl was 8 mg and that of biperiden 6 mg. Plasma concentrations of bromperidol and reduced bromperidol were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). There was no significant difference in plasma bromperidol or reduced bromperidol concentrations among baseline, trihexyphenidyl and biperiden phases: 7.3 +/- 3.7 versus 7.2 +/- 4.1 versus 7.0 +/- 4.3 ng/ml and 2.0 +/- 2.1 versus 2.2 +/- 2.1 versus 1.9 +/- 2.0 ng/ml, respectively. The present study thus suggests that neither trihexyphenidyl nor biperiden affects plasma concentrations of bromperidol and its reduced metabolite.

  13. Synergistic effects of the anti-cholinergic R,R-glycopyrrolate with anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Andreas; Bauhofer, Artur; Petzold, Ursula; Cnota, Peter J; Maus, Joachim; Brune, Kay; Szelenyi, Stefan

    2006-12-15

    Currently, much effort is geared towards developing therapies that impact on the inflammation in respiratory diseases such as asthma and COPD, assuming that this will improve disease pathology. R,R-Glycopyrrolate, a quaternary ammonium compound, is a muscarinic receptor antagonist with the potential to be used as a long-acting bronchodilator in patients with asthma and COPD. In this study we evaluated whether the combination of R,R-glycopyrrolate with known anti-inflammatory drugs results in synergistic effects. Human primary monocytes were used as an in vitro model system. M3, M4, M1 and M2 receptors were expressed in these cells in descending order. The combinatory effects of the drugs on the release of TNF-alpha after lipopolysaccharide stimulation were analyzed. R,R-Glycopyrrolate alone did not affect LPS induced TNF-alpha release. The PDE4 inhibitor rolipram dose dependently inhibited the TNF-alpha release. Maximum inhibition was around 70%. The IC(35) for rolipram was 68.9+/-15.2 nM. The simultaneous administration of 10 microM R,R-glycopyrrolate reduced the IC(35) to 1.70+/-1.18 nM. The anti-histamine azelastine inhibited TNF-alpha release dose dependently. The simultaneous administration of R,R-glycopyrrolate did not influence the action of azelastine. The corticosteroid budesonide inhibited the TNF-alpha release dose dependently with an IC(50) of 0.55+/-0.13 nM. The simultaneous administration of 10 microM R,R-glycopyrrolate reduced the IC(50) to 0.13+/-0.03 nM. Finally, R,R-glycopyrrolate was most effective in the triple combination with budesonide and rolipram in the reduction of TNF-alpha release. In conclusion, R,R-glycopyrrolate acts synergistically with the PDE4 inhibitor rolipram and the steroid budesonide in inhibiting inflammatory mediators.

  14. Neuromodulatory propensity of Bacopa monniera against scopolamine-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells via down-regulation of AChE and up-regulation of BDNF and muscarnic-1 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Pandareesh, M D; Anand, T

    2013-10-01

    Scopolamine is a competitive antagonist of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, and thus classified as an anti-muscarinic and anti-cholinergic drug. PC12 cell lines possess muscarinic receptors and mimic the neuronal cells. These cells were treated with different concentrations of scopolamine for 24 h and were protected from the cellular damage by pretreatment with Bacopa monniera extract (BME). In current study, we have explored the molecular mechanism of neuromodulatory and antioxidant propensity of (BME) to attenuate scopolamine-induced cytotoxicity using PC12 cells. Our results elucidate that pretreatment of PC12 cells with BME ameliorates the mitochondrial and plasma membrane damage induced by 3 μg/ml scopolamine to 54.83 and 30.30 % as evidenced by MTT and lactate dehydrogenase assays respectively. BME (100 μg/ml) ameliorated scopolamine effect by down-regulating acetylcholine esterase and up-regulating brain-derived neurotropic factor and muscarinic muscarinic-1 receptor expression. BME pretreated cells also showed significant protection against scopolamine-induced toxicity by restoring the levels of antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation. This result indicates that the scopolamine-induced cytotoxicity and neuromodulatory changes were restored with the pretreatment of BME.

  15. No Neuromuscular Side-Effects of Scopolamine in Sensorimotor Control and Force-Generating Capacity Among Parabolic Fliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritzmann, Ramona; Freyler, Kathrin; Krause, Anne; Gollhofer, Albert

    2016-10-01

    Scopolamine is used to counteract motion sickness in parabolic flight (PF) experiments. Although the drug's anticholinergic properties effectively impede vomiting, recent studies document other sensory side-effects in the central nervous system that may considerably influence sensorimotor performance. This study aimed to quantify such effects in order to determine if they are of methodological and operational significance for sensorimotor control. Ten subjects of a PF campaign received a weight-sex-based dose of a subcutaneous scopolamine injection. Sensorimotor performance was recorded before medication, 20min, 2h and 4h after injection in four space-relevant paradigms: balance control in one-leg stance with eyes open (protocol 1) and closed as well as force-generating capacity in countermovement jumps and hops (protocol 2). Postural sway, forces and joint angles were recorded. Neuromuscular control was assessed by electromyography and peripheral nerve stimulation; H-reflexes and M-waves were used to monitor spinal excitability of the Ia afferent reflex circuitry and maximal motor output. (1) H-reflex amplitudes, latencies and functional reflexes remained unchanged after scopolamine injection. (2) M-waves, neuromuscular activation intensities and antagonistic muscle coordination did not change with scopolamine administration. (3) Balance performance and force-generating capacity were not impeded by scopolamine. We found no evidence for changes in sensorimotor control in response to scopolamine injection. Sensory processing of daily relevant reflexes, spinal excitability, maximal motor output and performance parameters were not sensitive to the medication. We conclude that scopolamine administration can be used to counteract motion sickness in PF without methodological and operational concerns or interference regarding sensorimotor skills associated with neuromuscular control.

  16. An integrative review of standardized clinical evaluation tool utilization in anticholinergic drug trials for neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Stothers, L; Tsang, B; Nigro, M; Lazare, D; Macnab, A

    2016-01-01

    Study design: To review prospective and randomized trials studying anticholinergic therapy for neurogenic bladder in SCI to identify whether trials included standardized clinical evaluation tools and reporting measures now recognized to enhance clinical trial data. Methods: A systematic search via EMBASE, MEDLINE, CENTRAL, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), HTA (Health Technology Assessment), CMR (Comprehensive Microbial Resource), HAPI (Health and Psychosocial Instruments) and PsycINFO using the key term spinal cord injury crossed with oxybutynin, tolterodine, darifenacin, solifenacin, fesoterodine, trospium chloride, propiverine, propantheline and anticholinergic(s) for 1946–2015 inclusive. We then collated whether standardized clinical tools, measures and descriptors were used within each study identified: American Spine Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale; symptom scores validated in SCI; technical methodology for urodynamics/video urodynamics; urinary diaries; and standardized urologic terminology. Results: A total of 1225 entries with 610 unique articles were identified, 14 randomized and 16 prospective studies. In 6/30 the population comprised SCI patients with neurogenic bladder alone; the remainder included mixed neurogenic etiologies. Classification using the ASIA impairment scale was used in <10% of studies; none used symptom scores validated in SCI; <50% reported urodynamic test methodology fully, incorporated urinary diaries or used International Continence Society Standardization Subcommittee urinary tract terminology. Conclusion: Integrative review of trials from 1946 to 2015 identified infrequent use of standardized clinical evaluation tools and reporting measures. Data from future trials evaluating therapies for neurogenic bladder would likely be more applicable to specific SCI patients if current standardized classification and descriptors now available were used consistently: for example, the ASIA scale

  17. Towards an animal model of an antipsychotic drug-resistant cognitive impairment in schizophrenia: scopolamine induces abnormally persistent latent inhibition, which can be reversed by cognitive enhancers but not by antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Barak, Segev; Weiner, Ina

    2009-03-01

    Schizophrenia symptoms segregate into positive, negative and cognitive, which exhibit differential sensitivity to drugs. Recent efforts to identify treatments targeting cognitive impairments in schizophrenia have directed attention to the cholinergic system for its well documented role in cognition. Relatedly, muscarinic antagonists (e.g. scopolamine) produce an 'antimuscarinic syndrome', characterized by psychosis and cognitive impairments. Latent inhibition (LI) is the poorer conditioning to a stimulus resulting from its non-reinforced pre-exposure. LI indexes the ability to ignore irrelevant stimuli and aberrations of this capacity produced by pro-psychotic agents (e.g. amphetamine, MK-801) are used extensively to model attentional impairments in schizophrenia. We recently showed that LI was disrupted by scopolamine at low doses, and this was reversed by typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs (APDs) and the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine. Here, at a higher dose (1.5 mg/kg), scopolamine produced an opposite pole of attentional impairment, namely, attentional perseveration, whereby scopolamine-treated rats persisted in expressing LI under strong conditioning that prevented LI expression in controls. Scopolamine-induced persistent LI was reversed by cholinergic and glycinergic cognitive enhancers (physostigmine and glycine) but was resistant to both typical and atypical APDs (haloperidol and clozapine). The latter sets scopolamine-induced persistent LI apart from scopolamine- and amphetamine-induced disrupted LI, which are reversed by both typical and atypical APDs, as well as from other cases of abnormally persistent LI including MK-801-induced persistent LI, which is reversed by atypical APDs. Thus, scopolamine-induced persistent LI may provide a pharmacological LI model for screening cognitive enhancers that are efficient for the treatment of APD-resistant cognitive impairments in schizophrenia.

  18. Effect of sequence of administration on the pharmacokinetic interaction between the anticholinergic drug biperiden and [3H]quinuclidinyl benzylate or [3H]N-methylscopolamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, J; Yokogawa, K; Nakashima, E; Takayasu, T; Ohshima, T; Ichimura, F

    1998-02-01

    In rats the pharmacokinetic interactions between the anticholinergic drug biperiden and [3H]quinuclidinyl benzylate ([3H]QNB) or [3H]N-methylscopolamine ([3H]NMS) is affected by the sequence in which the drugs are administered. Drug concentrations in various tissues were determined after intravenous administration of [3H]QNB or [3H]NMS (325 ng kg(-1)). Biperiden (6.4 mg kg(-1)) was administered either 5 min before, concomitantly with or 20 min after injection of [3H]QNB or [3H]NMS. When biperiden was administered concomitantly with or before [3H]QNB, distribution of [3H]QNB among the regions of the brain and other tissues was reduced; at 4 h the ratio of the distribution of [3H]QNB for experimental animals to that for control animals ranged from 0.15 to 0.9. When biperiden was administered after [3H]QNB, the distribution of [3H]QNB in the brain and other tissues was significantly higher than for the other two treatments (P < 0.01). However, for [3H]NMS the sequence of administration had no effect on the distribution of the drug in the brain and other tissues except for the kidney. In-vitro, in crude synaptosomal membranes, the amount of [3H]QNB at 2 h relative to the control concentration at equilibrium was 87% when biperiden was added before [3H]QNB and 56% when biperiden was added after [3H]QNB. In both instances the concentration of [3H]NMS reached equilibrium within 30 min. These findings suggest that the difference between the rate constant of association and dissociation at the possible site of action gives rise to the effect of the sequence of administration on the pharmacokinetic interaction.

  19. A comparison of the efficacy of pyridostigmine alone and the combination of pyridostigmine with anticholinergic drugs as pharmacological pretreatment of tabun-poisoned rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Kassa, Jirí; Vachek, J

    2002-08-15

    The ability of two types of pharmacological pretreatment (pyridostigmine alone or pyridostigmine in combination with two anticholinergic drugs) to increase the resistance of rats and mice against tabun and to increase the therapeutic efficacy of common antidotal treatment of tabun-poisoned rats and mice was compared. A significant decrease in the LD50 values of tabun was observed when mice as well as rats were pretreated with the prophylactic antidotal mixture consisting of pyridostigmine, benactyzine and trihexyphenidyle, designated PANPAL. Pyridostigmine-pretreated rats were also more resistant against acute lethal effects of tabun but pyridostigmine-induced resistance of rats was not so high as PANPAL-induced resistance. In addition, the pharmacological pretreatment with pyridostigmine alone was not able to protect mice against tabun-induced acute toxicity. The pharmacological pretreatment with pyridostigmine alone was able to increase the efficacy of currently used antidotal treatment (obidoxime in combination with atropine and diazepam) of tabun-induced poisoning, but PANPAL-induced increase in the efficacy of the same antidotal treatment was significantly higher than an increase induced by pyridostigmine alone. PANPAL-induced increase in the efficacy of antidotal treatment of tabun poisoning was also observed in mice. These findings confirm that PANPAL pretreatment of tabun-poisoned rats and mice seems to be much more suitable than currently used pyridostigmine alone.

  20. Effect of Scopolamine Butylbromide on Clozapine-induced Hypersalivation in Schizophrenic Patients: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Ippei; Suzuki, Tatsuyo; Kishi, Taro; Kanamori, Daisuke; Hanya, Manako; Uno, Junji; Fujita, Kiyoshi; Kamei, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-30

    Clozapine has been demonstrated to be useful for treating refractory schizophrenia. However, hypersalivation occurs in 31.0- 97.4% of the patients treated with clozapine. Accordingly, some patients who are disturbed by their hypersalivation refuse to continue with clozapine treatment. This study investigated the efficacy of the anticholinergic agent scopolamine butylbromide against clozapine-induced hypersalivation. Five schizophrenia patients were coadministered scopolamine butylbromide (30-60 mg/ day) for 4 weeks. At the baseline and after 4 weeks' treatment, we subjectively evaluated hypersalivation using a visual analog scale and objectively assessed it using the Drooling Severity Scale and Drooling Frequency Scale. As a result, improvements in the patients' Drooling Severity Scale and Drooling Frequency Scale scores, but no improvements in their visual analog scale scores, were observed after scopolamine butylbromide treatment. These results indicate that at least some schizophrenic patients with clozapine-induced hypersalivation would benefit from scopolamine butylbromide treatment. We conclude that clozapine-induced hypersalivation is one factor of stress to patients. Subjective hypersalivation was not improved, but objective hypersalivation was, by scopolamine butylbromide treatment. However, scopolamine butylbromide and clozapine possess anticholinergic effects so clinicians should closely monitor patients who take scopolamine butylbromide.

  1. Comparative studies on the effects of the nootropic drugs adafenoxate, meclofenoxate and piracetam, and of citicholine on scopolamine-impaired memory, exploratory behavior and physical capabilities (experiments on rats and mice).

    PubMed

    Petkov, V D; Mosharrof, A H; Petkov, V V

    1988-01-01

    The effects of adafenoxate (Adf), meclofenoxate (Mf), piracetam (Pc), and citicholine (CCh) on scopolamine (Scop)--impaired memory and exploratory behavior (experiments on rats) and on physical capabilities (experiments on mice) were studied. In the experiments with scopolamine (2 mg/kg i.p.) we used the step-through passive avoidance method to determine the memory changes. In the case of single treatment with the drugs tested scopolamine was injected immediately after training and Adf, Mf, and CCh at doses of 20 and 100 mg/kg and Pc at a dose of 100 mg/kg were administered immediately after scopolamine. In the case of multiple administration the drugs were applied at the same doses for 7 days before training. Scopolamine was injected immediately after training. Retention tests were given 3 and 24 hours later. All the four drugs tested prevented to a large extent or completely the scopolamine-induced retrograde amnesia. However, significant quantitative differences in the antiamnestic effects of the drugs tested were observed. The effects of the four drugs on exploratory behavior were tested in the Opto Varimex apparatus. After 7-day treatment with the drugs at the doses utilized, the behavior of experimental animals was observed for 10 min, checking out the changes in the frequency of rearing, ambulation, and rotation. Only Adf at a dose of 50 mg/kg significantly decreased rearing and ambulation frequencies; this effect was considered to be an expression of accelerated habituation. The physical capabilities of mice were studied, using the method of treadmill (revolving drum activity cage) training. Before the experiment the mice received orally Adf, Mf, and Pc at a dose of 100 mg/kg or were injected intraperitoneally with CCh at doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg once daily for 7 days. The number of revolutions of the drum cages was counted for 4 hours. Only Pc significantly increased the physical capabilities of mice and much delayed the occurrence of fatigue.

  2. [CENTRAL ANTICHOLINERGIC... SYNDROME?].

    PubMed

    Danilov, M S; Lebedinskii, K M

    2015-01-01

    While reading special literature in diferent languages the authors noted surprising fact: the term and concept of "central anticholinergic syndrome" is well-known as common anaesthesia complication in German (abbr: ZAS) and partially Spanish sources, but in Russian, English or French literature is used only in toxicological context. Describing etiology, pathogenesis, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of the complication manifesting with comatose, agitated or shivering forms, the authors analyzing the reasons for such a noticeably diferent approaches to the situation reaching 10% of all the general anaesthesia cases. Probably, ZAS isn't nosologically clearly defined syndrome, but just adverse appearance of one of the fundamental general anaesthesia mechanisms? Anyway, the problem of central cholinergic activity suppression, excessive by its amplitude and/or duration, exists all over the world. German concept of ZAS allows the anaesthesiologist to resolve it on pathogenically generalized basis, while in other professional communities various symptomatic approaches seem to be more common.

  3. Scopolamine administration modulates muscarinic, nicotinic and NMDA receptor systems.

    PubMed

    Falsafi, Soheil Keihan; Deli, Alev; Höger, Harald; Pollak, Arnold; Lubec, Gert

    2012-01-01

    Studies on the effect of scopolamine on memory are abundant but so far only regulation of the muscarinic receptor (M1) has been reported. We hypothesized that levels of other cholinergic brain receptors as the nicotinic receptors and the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, known to be involved in memory formation, would be modified by scopolamine administration.C57BL/6J mice were used for the experiments and divided into four groups. Two groups were given scopolamine 1 mg/kg i.p. (the first group was trained and the second group untrained) in the multiple T-maze (MTM), a paradigm for evaluation of spatial memory. Likewise, vehicle-treated mice were trained or untrained thus serving as controls. Hippocampal levels of M1, nicotinic receptor alpha 4 (Nic4) and 7 (Nic7) and subunit NR1containing complexes were determined by immunoblotting on blue native gel electrophoresis.Vehicle-treated trained mice learned the task and showed memory retrieval on day 8, while scopolamine-treatment led to significant impairment of performance in the MTM. At the day of retrieval, hippocampal levels for M1, Nic7 and NR1 were higher in the scopolamine treated groups than in vehicle-treated groups.The concerted action, i.e. the pattern of four brain receptor complexes regulated by the anticholinergic compound scopolamine, is shown. Insight into probable action mechanisms of scopolamine at the brain receptor complex level in the hippocampus is provided. Scopolamine treatment is a standard approach to test cognitive enhancers and other psychoactive compounds in pharmacological studies and therefore knowledge on mechanisms is of pivotal interest.

  4. Atropine and Other Anticholinergic Drugs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    compromise near- who first analyzed the pharmacology and toxicol- vision in the case of accidental use. Military re- ogy of tabun obtained from captured...Lipp JA and Dola TJ (1978). Effect of atropine upon 290-293. the cerebrovascular system during soman-induced NakajimaT.Ohta S. Morita H etal. (1997...sarin: Clinical manifes- Wills JH (1963). Pharmacological antagonists of the tations and treatment of accidental poisoning by anticholinesterase agents

  5. Anticholinergic burden and cognitive function in a large German cohort of hospitalized geriatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Pfistermeister, Barbara; Tümena, Thomas; Gaßmann, Karl-Günter; Maas, Renke; Fromm, Martin F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies suggest an association between use of anticholinergic drugs in elderly patients and cognitive impairment. However, there are still limited data on the association of anticholinergic drug use and cognitive impairment as well as contribution of individual drugs to anticholinergic load using large, well-documented patient cohorts treated in geriatric units from Europe. Methods We investigated 797,440 prescriptions to 89,579 hospitalized patients treated in geriatric units within the GiB-DAT database. Data of all patients discharged between 1 January 2013 and 30 June 2015 was included. The Anticholinergic Cognitive Burden (ACB) scale was used to classify anticholinergic drugs as definite (score 2 or 3) and possible anticholinergics (score 1). Cognitive function was determined using Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the standardized scale for dementia (4D+S). Results In two multivariable logistic regression models age, sex, number of drugs and ACB total scores were identified as variables independently associated with cognitive impairment as measured by MMSE (odds ratio per ACB unit 1.114, 95% CI 1.099–1.130) or the diagnosis dementia (odds ratio 1.159 per ACB unit, 95% CI 1.144–1.173, both p < 0.0001). High anticholinergic load was associated with patients with severe cognitive impairment (p < 0.05 for all pairwise comparisons). ACB score 3 anticholinergic drugs contributed 77.9% to the cumulative amount of ACB points in patients with an anticholinergic load of 3 and higher. Conclusions Using a cross-sectional study design, a significant positive association between anticholinergic drug load and cognitive impairment in European patients treated in specialised geriatric units was found. The most frequently used definitve anticholinergic drugs were quetiapine, amitriptyline and carbamazepine. PMID:28187171

  6. Anticholinergics boost the pathological process of neurodegeneration with increased inflammation in a tauopathy mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yoshiyama, Yasumasa; Kojima, Ayako; Itoh, Kimiko; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Arai, Kimihito

    2012-01-01

    Anticholinergics, and drugs with anticholinergic properties, are widely and frequently prescribed, especially to the elderly. It is well known that these drugs decrease cognitive function and increase the risk of dementia. Although the mechanism of anticholinergic drug-induced cognitive impairment has been assumed to be functionally reduced acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmission, some data have indicated that anticholinergics might enhance the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we investigated the pathological effects of anticholinergics on neurodegeneration. We chronically administered two anticholinergics, trihexyphenidyl (TP) and propiverine (PP) (the latter with less central anticholinergic action), to neurodegenerative tauopathy model mice 2 to 10 months old. Furthermore, because the ACh nervous system regulates both central and peripheral inflammation, we administered TP or PP to PS19 mice in which we had artificially induced inflammation by lipopolysaccharide injection. Tau pathology, synaptic loss, and neurodegeneration in the hippocampal region, as well as tau insolubility and phosphorylation, were markedly increased in TP-treated mice and mildly increased in PP-treated mice. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis revealed microglial proliferation and activation. Moreover, anticholinergics increased interleukin-1β expression in both the spleen and brain of the tauopathy model mice intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide to induce systemic inflammation. Interestingly, these alterations were more strongly observed in TP-treated mice than in PP-treated mice, consistent with the level of central anticholinergic action. Anticholinergic drugs not only impair cognitive function by decreased ACh neurotransmission, but also accelerate neurodegeneration by suppressing an ACh-dependent anti-inflammatory system. Anticholinergics should be less readily prescribed to reduce the risk of dementia.

  7. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Intranasal Scopolamine in Plasma Saliva and Urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Tam, V.; Chow, Diana S. L.; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2014-01-01

    An intranasal gel formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under the Food and Drug Administration guidelines for clinical trials with an Investigative New Drug (IND). The aim of this project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationship between plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trial with INSCOP.

  8. Investigation of anti-motion sickness drugs in the squirrel monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, B. S.; Money, K. E.; Kohl, R. L.; Kinter, L. B.

    1992-01-01

    Early attempts to develop an animal model for anti-motion sickness drugs, using dogs and cats; were unsuccessful. Dogs did not show a beneficial effect of scopolamine (probably the best single anti-motion sickness drug for humans thus far) and the findings in cats were not definitive. The authors have developed an animal model using the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) of the Bolivian phenotype. Unrestrained monkeys in a small lucite cage were tested in an apparatus that induces motion sickness by combining vertical oscillation and horizontal rotation in a visually unrestricted laboratory environment. Signs of motion sickness were scored using a rating scale. Ten susceptible monkeys (weighing 800-1000 g) were given a total of five tests each, to establish the baseline susceptibility level. Based on the anticholinergic activity of scopolamine, the sensitivity of squirrel monkey to scopolamine was investigated, and the appropriate dose of scopolamine for this species was determined. Then various anti-motion sickness preparations were administered in subsequent tests: 100 ug scopolamine per monkey; 140 ug dexedrine; 50 ug scopolamine plus 70 ug dexedrine; 100 ug scopolamine plus 140 ug dexedrine; 3 mg promethazine; 3 mg promethazine plus 3 mg ephedrine. All these preparations were significantly effective in preventing motion sickness in the monkeys. Ephedrine, by itself, which is marginally effective in humans, was ineffective in the monkeys at the doses tried (0.3-6.0 mg). The squirrel monkey appears to be a good animal model for antimotion sickness drugs. Peripherally acting antihistamines such as astemizole and terfenadine were found to be ineffective, whereas flunarizine, and an arginine vasopressin V1 antagonist, showed significant activity in preventing motion sickness.

  9. [The first labor analgesia with drug was already performed in late Meiji-Period (1868-1912): trace of opioid-scopolamine which was used in Akiko Yosano, back to its origins].

    PubMed

    Okutomi, Toshiyuki

    2013-02-01

    There have been some records of labor analgesia with intravenous or rectal anesthetics in early Showa-period (1926-1989). However, the author found that labor analgesia had been already attempted for some women in late Meiji-period (1868-1912). One of agents used was pantopon, a water-soluble opioid without serious respiratory depression as morphine. The drug was developed and produced in Germany. Some doctors applied this agent with scopolamine to labor analgesia in Europe. They also reported that this combination also conferred excellent analgesic effects without any serious complications in the mother and fetus. This combination was originally used for general surgery with inhaled anesthesia at that period. It remains uncertain how Japanese doctors got pantopon scopolamine from Germany.

  10. Pro-oxidant activity of zuclopenthixol in vivo: differential effect of the drug on brain oxidative status of scopolamine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Amani E

    2004-08-01

    Several clinical studies implicated oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of both psychosis and dementia. As dementia is commonly associated with psychosis, antipsychotic medications are of importance in the pharmacotherapy of dementia particularly as a number of antipsychotics were reported to demonstrate neuronal pro-oxidant and/or antioxidant properties. Impairment of learning and memory, as the most characteristic manifestation of dementia, could be induced in experimental animals by acute administration of scopolamine (SCO) with a resultant elevation in brain oxidative status. This study investigated the potential pro-oxidant and/or antioxidant activity of the antipsychotic drug zuclopenthixol acetate, as its effect on brain oxidative status has yet to be evaluated. A 2 x 3 between-subjects factorial design was used to investigate the simultaneous and interactive effects of zuclopenthixol (0.7 and 1.4 mg/kg i.p.) and SCO on rat brain malondialdehyde, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase levels/activities. Results revealed a significant pro-oxidant effect for both zuclopenthixol and SCO alone conditions. In addition, combined treatment of zuclopenthixol and SCO was found to be significantly different compared to either treatment conditions with regard to their effect on different brain oxidative stress indices. Such findings may have valuable implications in the pharmacotherapy of both psychosis and dementia.

  11. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Intranasal Scopolamine in Plasma Saliva and Urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Chow, D. S. L.; Tam, V.; Putcha, L.

    2014-01-01

    An intranasal gel formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under the Food and Drug Administration guidelines for clinical trials for an Investigative New Drug (IND). The aim of this project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationship between plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trial with INSCOP. METHODS: Twelve healthy human subjects were administered three dose levels (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg) of INSCOP. Serial blood, saliva and urine samples were collected between 5 min to 24 h after dosing and scopolamine concentrations measured by using a validated LC-MS-MS assay. Pharmacokinetic Compartmental models, using actual dosing and sampling times, were built using Phoenix (version 1.2). Model discrimination was performed, by minimizing the Akaike Information Criteria (AIC), maximizing the coefficient of determination (r²) and by comparison of the quality of fit plots. RESULTS: The best structural model to describe scopolamine disposition after INSCOP administration (minimal AIC =907.2) consisted of one compartment for plasma, saliva and urine respectively that were inter-connected with different rate constants. The estimated values of PK parameters were compiled in Table 1. The model fitting exercises revealed a nonlinear PK for scopolamine between plasma and saliva compartments for K21, Vmax and Km. CONCLUSION: PK model for INSCOP was developed and for the first time it satisfactorily predicted the PK of scopolamine in plasma, saliva and urine after INSCOP administration. Using non-linear PK yielded the best structural model to describe scopolamine disposition between plasma and saliva compartments, and inclusion of non-linear PK resulted in a significant improved model fitting. The model can be utilized to predict scopolamine plasma concentration using saliva and/or urine data that

  12. Dose escalation pharmacokinetics of intranasal scopolamine gel formulation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Boyd, Jason L; Daniels, Vernie; Wang, Zuwei; Chow, Diana S-L; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2015-02-01

    Astronauts experience Space Motion Sickness requiring treatment with an anti-motion sickness medication, scopolamine during space missions. Bioavailability after oral administration of scopolamine is low and variable, and absorption form transdermal patch is slow and prolonged. Intranasal administration achieves faster absorption and higher bioavailability of drugs that are subject to extrahepatic, first pass metabolism after oral dosing. We examined pharmacokinetics of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mg doses of the Investigational New Drug formulation of intranasal scopolamine gel (INSCOP) in 12 healthy subjects using a randomized, double-blind cross-over study design. Subjects received one squirt of 0.1 g of gel containing either 0.1 mg or 0.2 mg/0.1 mL scopolamine or placebo in each nostril. Serial blood samples and total urine voids were collected after dosing and drug concentrations were determined using a modified LC-MS-MS method. Results indicate dose-linear pharmacokinetics of scopolamine with linear increases in Cmax and AUC within the dose range tested. Plasma drug concentrations were significantly lower in females than in males after administration of 0.4 dose. All three doses were well tolerated with no unexpected or serious adverse side effects reported. These results suggest that intranasal scopolamine gel formulation (INSCOP) offers a fast, reliable, and safe alternative for the treatment of motion sickness.

  13. Working Memory in the Odor Span Task: Effects of Chlordiazepoxide, Dizocilpine (MK801), Morphine and Scopolamine

    PubMed Central

    Galizio, Mark; Deal, Melissa; Hawkey, Andrew; April, Brooke

    2012-01-01

    Rationale A number of tasks are used to assess working memory in rodents, but the Odor Span task (OST) is unique in studying performance as a function of the number of stimuli to remember. Objectives The purpose of the present study was to better characterize the behavioral pharmacology of the OST by exploring the effects of several amnestic agents including an NMDA antagonist (dizocilpine), a positive GABA-A modulator (chlordiazepoxide), an anticholinergic compound (scopolamine) and as a negative control, an opiate receptor agonist (morphine). Methods Rats were trained to perform on the OST which is a non-match-to-sample procedure with an incrementing number of sample odors to remember as the session progresses. Trials with a simple odor discrimination task (SD) were interspersed to provide a control for effects unrelated to memory load. Results All four drugs disrupted performances on the OST task in a dose-dependent fashion, but only the NMDA antagonist dizocilpine produced impairments that were clearly dependent on the number of stimuli to remember. Dizocilpine impaired OST performance at a dose (0.1 mg/kg) that did not affect SD and that impairment depended on memory-load. Chlordiazepoxide (3.0 mg/kg) also produced amnestic effects that were manifest by shorter memory spans and runs of correct responding. In contrast, morphine and scopolamine impaired OST accuracy only at doses that also disrupted SD (18.0 and 0.3 mg/kg, respectively). Conclusions These results provide evidence of NMDA and benzodiazepine modulation of working memory as assessed by the OST. PMID:22918519

  14. Midazolam: An Improved Anticonvulsant Treatment for Nerve Agent-Induced Seizures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    several potent anticholinergic drugs ( biperiden , scopolamine, trihexyphenidyl) appeared to be viable candidates for development. It was decided at...benzodiazepines (diazepam or midazolam), along with one of the anticholinergic drugs ( biperiden , scopolamine, trihexyphenidyl) for controlling soman-induced

  15. COPD - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - control drugs; Bronchodilators - COPD - control drugs; Beta agonist inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Anticholinergic inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Long-acting inhaler - COPD - control drugs; ...

  16. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in clinical use of scopolamine.

    PubMed

    Renner, Ulf D; Oertel, Reinhard; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2005-10-01

    The alkaloid L-(-)-scopolamine [L-(-)-hyoscine] competitively inhibits muscarinic receptors for acetylcholine and acts as a nonselective muscarinic antagonist, producing both peripheral antimuscarinic properties and central sedative, antiemetic, and amnestic effects. The parasympatholytic scopolamine, structurally very similar to atropine (racemate of hyoscyamine), is used in conditions requiring decreased parasympathetic activity, primarily for its effect on the eye, gastrointestinal tract, heart, and salivary and bronchial secretion glands, and in special circumstances for a CNS action. Therefore, scopolamine is most suitable for premedication before anesthesia and for antiemetic effects. This alkaloid is the most effective single agent to prevent motion sickness. Scopolamine was the first drug to be made commercially available in a transdermal therapeutic system (TTS-patch) delivering alkaloid. Recently, pharmacokinetic data on scopolamine in different biozlogic matrices were obtained most efficiently using liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) or gas chromatography online coupled to mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic parameters are dependent on the dosage form (oral dose, tablets; parenteral application; IV infusion; SC and IM injection). Scopolamine has a limited bioavailability if orally administered. The maximum drug concentration occurs approximately 0.5 hours after oral administration. Because only 2.6% of nonmetabolized L-(-)-scopolamine is excreted in urine, a first-pass metabolism is suggested to occur after oral administration of scopolamine. Because of its short half-life in plasma and dose-dependent adverse effects (in particular hallucinations and the less serious reactions, eg, vertigo, dry mouth, drowsiness), the clinical use of scopolamine administered orally or parenterally is limited. To minimize the relatively high incidence of side effects, the transdermal dosage form has been developed. The commercially available TTS

  17. Treatment of motion sickness in parabolic flight with buccal scopolamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norfleet, William T.; Degioanni, Joseph J.; Reschke, Millard F.; Bungo, Michael W.; Kutyna, Frank A.; Homick, Jerry L.; Calkins, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    Treatment of acute motion sickness induced by parabolic flight with a preparation of scopolamine placed in the buccal pouch was investigated. Twenty-one subjects flew aboard a KC-135 aircraft operated by NASA which performed parabolic maneuvers resulting in periods of 0-g, 1-g, and 1.8-g. Each subject flew once with a tablet containing scopolamine and once with a placebo in a random order, crossover design. Signs and symptoms of motion sickness were systematically recorded during each parabola by an investigator who was blind to the content of the tablet. Compared with flights using placebo, flights with buccal scopolamine resulted in significantly lower scores for nausea (31-35 percent reduction) and vomiting (50 percent reduction in number of parabolas with vomiting). Side effects of the drug during flight were negligible. It is concluded that buccal scopolamine is more effective than a placebo in treating ongoing motion sickness.

  18. Catalytic activity of ruthenium(III) on the oxidation of an anticholinergic drug-atropine sulfate monohydrate by copper(III) periodate complex in aqueous alkaline medium - decarboxylation and free radical mechanism.

    PubMed

    Byadagi, Kirthi S; Nandibewoor, Sharanappa T; Chimatadar, Shivamurti A

    2013-01-01

    Atropine sulfate monohydrate (ASM) is an anticholinergic drug, having a wide spectrum of activity. Hence, the kinetics of oxidation of ASM by diperiodatocuperate (DPC) in the presence of micro (10-6) amounts of Ru(III) catalyst has been investigated spectrophotometrically in aqueous alkaline medium at I = 0.50 mol dm-3. The reaction between DPC and ASM exhibits 1:2 stoichiometry (ASM:DPC) i. e., one mole of ASM require two moles of DPC to give products. The main oxidation products were confirmed by spectral studies. The reaction is first order with respect to [DPC] and [Ru(III)], while the order with respect to [ASM] and [OH-] was less than unity. The rates decreased with increase in periodate concentration. The reaction rates revealed that Ru(III) catalyzed reaction was about seven-fold faster than the uncatalyzed reaction. The catalytic constant (KC) was also determined at different temperatures. A plausible mechanism is proposed. The activation parameters with respect to slow step of the mechanism were calculated and the thermodynamic quantities were also determined. Kinetic experiments suggest that [Cu(H2IO6)(H2O)2] is the reactive Cu(III) species and [Ru(H2O)5OH]2+ is the reactive Ru(III) species.

  19. [Anticholinergics for overactive bladder: does subtype selectivity play a role?].

    PubMed

    Michel, M C; Barendrecht, M M; Oelke, M

    2006-07-01

    Anticholinergics act in the treatment of overactive bladder by blocking muscarinic receptors of which five subtypes exist. Their desired effects occur via M(3) receptors, but a role for M(2) receptors is being discussed. Adverse effects such as dry mouth and constipation occur also via M(3) receptors, but M(2) and M(1) receptors can mediate side effects in the heart or on cognitive function, respectively. Therefore, an M(3)-selective drug such as darifenacin could theoretically be less effective but also have fewer cardiac or central nervous side effects. However, the limited available clinical data do not support a smaller efficacy or better general tolerability. The lack of adverse effects on cognitive function is well documented for darifenacin, but it cannot yet be determined definitively whether this discriminates it from other modern anticholinergics.

  20. Scopolamine in racing horses: trace identifications associated with dietary or environmental exposure.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Kimberly; Dirikolu, Levent; Hughes, Charlie G; Tobin, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Scopolamine (L-hyoscine) identifications, often in small-number clusters, have been reported worldwide in performance horses over the last 30 years. Scopolamine is an Association of Racing Commissioners International (ARCI) class 3, penalty class B, substance with potential to affect performance. As such, scopolamine identification(s) in race or performance horses can result in significant penalties for the connections of the horse(s). Reviewed here is the worldwide distribution of scopolamine containing plants (primarily Datura spp.), with estimates of their potential toxicity to horses through dietary and/or environmental exposure. Also reviewed are the basic pharmacology of scopolamine and its precursor, urinary concentrations following feedstuff exposure, and the probable pharmacological/forensic significance of such findings. Based on an overview of the world literature on scopolamine, the expected characteristics of inadvertent environmental exposure are also presented with a view to making clear the potential of scopolamine identifications, with or without atropine, as a direct and expected outcome of both the worldwide distribution of scopolamine-containing plants and the sensitivity of modern equine drug testing. It is of particular interest that only 2/30 reported post-event equine identifications of scopolamine have been associated with atropine, suggesting that failure to identify atropine is not a biomarker of pharmaceutical administration of scopolamine. Available quantitative information associated with scopolamine identifications is consistent with the 75 ng/mL regulatory threshold for scopolamine currently used in Louisiana racing in the USA and the 30 ng/mL reporting threshold in effect in European racing.

  1. Toxicological results in a fatal and two non-fatal cases of scopolamine-facilitated robberies.

    PubMed

    Lusthof, K J; Bosman, I J; Kubat, B; Vincenten-van Maanen, M J

    2017-02-04

    The use of scopolamine as an incapacitating drug, in sexual crimes and robberies, has been known for many decades. However, blood concentrations and doses of scopolamine in those cases are largely unknown. Here we present the toxicological results of one fatal and two non-fatal cases in a series of scopolamine-facilitated robberies. In the fatal case, the concentration of scopolamine in heart blood was 0.30mg/L, about 3000 times higher than the average therapeutic level of 0.0001mg/L (for one dermal patch). In femoral blood, the concentration of scopolamine was much lower (0.0048mg/L), but still 50 times higher than therapeutic levels. The scopolamine concentration in the stomach was very high (20mg/kg) as compared to the heart blood and femoral blood, which explains the very high concentration in heart blood by postmortem leakage from the stomach. In the non-fatal case, the scopolamine concentration in serum, obtained 23h after the incident, was 0.00035mg/L. The estimated concentration of scopolamine at the time of the incident is 0.0035mg/L. In the other non-fatal case, scopolamine was detected in urine and in hair.

  2. Herbal Medicines Induced Anticholinergic Poisoning in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chan, Thomas Y K

    2016-03-18

    In the present review, the main objective was to report the incidence and causes of herbal medicines induced anticholinergic poisoning in Hong Kong during 1989-2012 and to emphasize the importance of pharmacovigilance, investigations and preventive measures. Relevant papers, official figures and unpublished data were obtained from Medline search, the Department of Health and the Drug and Poisons Information Bureau. In the New Territories East (where ~20% of the Hong Kong population lived), the incidence of herbal medicines induced anticholinergic poisoning during 1989-1993 was 0.09 per 100,000 population. There were no confirmed cases during 1994-1996. In the whole of Hong Kong, the incidence during 2000-June 2005 was 0.03 per 100,000 population. Contamination of Rhizoma Atractylodis (50%) and erroneous substitution (42%) were the main causes. The incidence during 2008-2012 was 0.06 per 100,000 population. Contamination of non-toxic herbs (50%) and erroneous substitution (41%) were the main causes. In Hong Kong, contamination of non-toxic herbs by tropane alkaloids and substitution of Flos Campsis by toxic Flos Daturae Metelis were the predominant causes of herbal medicines induced anticholinergic poisoning. Systematic studies along the supply chain are necessary to identify the likely sources of contamination. If erroneous substitution of Flos Campsis by Flos Daturae Metelis could be prevented, 40% of herbal medicines induced anticholinergic poisoning would not have occurred. Regular inspection of the retailer, continuing education for the staff in the herbal trade and repeated publicity measures will also be required. Pharmacovigilance of herbal medicines should help determine the incidence and causes of adverse reactions and monitor the effectiveness of preventive measures.

  3. Play behavior in rats pretreated with scopolamine: increased play solicitation by the non-injected partner.

    PubMed

    Deak, Terrence; Panksepp, Jaak

    2006-01-30

    Play behavior was assessed in juvenile rat pups following chronic administration of scopolamine (0.5 or 1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) to one partner in each dyad of rats. Scopolamine administration significantly reduced the number of pins and mean pin duration of both playmates in pairs where only one rat was injected with scopolamine (irrespective of dose). However, dorsal contacts were significantly increased in rats exposed to a play partner that had been injected with scopolamine, indicating an increase in play solicitation when the partner was rendered non-responsive with this drug. These effects were stable and consistent over the course of 15 days of repeated testing in the presence of scopolamine. In other words, normal animals did not extinguish play solicitation even after prolonged periods of non-reciprocity. Upon cessation of drug treatment, play behavior returned largely to normal in both animals. Overall locomotor activity levels were significantly reduced in pairs where one rat had been injected with scopolamine. Together, these data suggest that the effects of repeated scopolamine are acute in nature, and that disruption of normal play behavior following chronic scopolamine treatment does not produce long-term impairments in social play behavior beyond acute action of the drug.

  4. Microdialysis pharmacokinetic study of scopolamine in plasma, olfactory bulb and vestibule after intranasal administration.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yan; Ying, Mingzhen; Xu, Shuai; Wang, Feng; Zou, Aifeng; Cao, Shilei; Jiang, Xinguo; Wang, Yajie

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the microdialysis pharmacokinetic of scopolamine in plasma, olfactory bulb and vestibule after intranasal administration. The pharmacokinetic study of subcutaneous and oral administration was also performed in rats. From the in vivo results, scopolamine intranasal administration can avoid hepatic first-pass effect. Tmax plasma samples after intranasal administration were significantly faster than oral administration and subcutaneous injection. The relative bioavailability of intranasal administrations was 51.8-70% when compared with subcutaneous injection. Moreover, one can see that in comparison with scopolamine subcutaneous administration, scopolamine intranasal gel and solutions can increased drug target index (DTI) with olfactory bulb 1.69 and 2.05, vestibule 1.80 and 2.15, respectively. The results indicated that scopolamine can be absorbed directly through the olfactory mucosa into the olfactory bulb, and then transported to various brain tissue after intranasal administration, with the characteristics of brain drug delivery.

  5. Experimental motion sickness - Efficacy of transdermal scopolamine plus ephedrine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.; Cramer, D. B.; Wood, C. D.

    1981-01-01

    A double-blind, placebo-controlled study compared the efficacy of transdermal therapeutic system-scopolamine administered alone and combined with ephedrine sulfate given orally in doses of 12.5, 25, and 50 mg. Eight normal male students were exposed to stressful accelerations in a slow-rotation room after receiving 10 apparently identical treatments comprising the four drugs and six placebos. Efficacy of the drug was defined in terms of the placebo range and categorized as beneficial, inconsequential, or detrimental. None of the effects was detrimental. Overall beneficial effects were 60% for transdermal therapeutic system-scopolamine (plus placebo) and 57% for the three transdermal therapeutic system-scopolamine plus ephedrine combinations.

  6. Differential neuropsychopharmacological influences of naturally occurring tropane alkaloids anisodamine versus scopolamine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Wei; Song, Ming-Ke; Cui, Yong-Yao; Wang, Hao; Zhu, Liang; Niu, Yin-Yao; Yang, Li-Min; Lu, Yang; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2008-10-10

    Two naturally occurring tropane alkaloids, anisodamine and scopolamine, structurally dissimilar in one OH group, are well established as muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonists in clinic and basic research. However, experimental evidence for central effects of anisodamine is limited and conflicting compared with that of scopolamine. In the present study, Morris water maze test, long-term potentiation (LTP) recording and receptor radioligand binding assays were used to explore the disparity in neuropsychopharmacological influences of anisodamine versus scopolamine and possible mechanisms. Anisodamine, at 10-40-fold higher doses than those of scopolamine, did not produce any spatial cognitive deficits as scopolamine, but tended to improve cognition at the repeated high doses. LTP in vivo was then adopted to predict BBB permeability of the muscarinic antagonists following systemic drug administration. Contrary to scopolamine, anisodamine did not influence the formation of LTP in the CA(1) region of rat hippocampus at 40-fold higher dose than that of scopolamine. Additionally, receptor radioligand binding assays (RRLBA) revealed that the binding affinity of anisodamine to mice brain mAChR was much lower than that of scopolamine. The findings suggested that anisodamine did not impair cognition nor depress LTP primarily due to its poor BBB permeability. This work enlarged knowledge of structure-activity relationship among tropane alkaloids, meanwhile providing evidence for more reasonable drug prescription in clinic.

  7. Caffeine attenuates scopolamine-induced memory impairment in humans.

    PubMed

    Riedel, W; Hogervorst, E; Leboux, R; Verhey, F; van Praag, H; Jolles, J

    1995-11-01

    Caffeine consumption can be beneficial for cognitive functioning. Although caffeine is widely recognized as a mild CNS stimulant drug, the most important consequence of its adenosine antagonism is cholinergic stimulation, which might lead to improvement of higher cognitive functions, particularly memory. In this study, the scopolamine model of amnesia was used to test the cholinergic effects of caffeine, administered as three cups of coffee. Subjects were 16 healthy volunteers who received 250 mg caffeine and 2 mg nicotine separately, in a placebo-controlled double-blind cross-over design. Compared to placebo, nicotine attenuated the scopolamine-induced impairment of storage in short-term memory and attenuated the scopolamine-induced slowing of speed of short-term memory scanning. Nicotine also attenuated the scopolamine-induced slowing of reaction time in a response competition task. Caffeine attenuated the scopolamine-induced impairment of free recall from short- and long-term memory, quality and speed of retrieval from long-term memory in a word learning task, and other cognitive and non-cognitive measures, such as perceptual sensitivity in visual search, reading speed, and rate of finger-tapping. On the basis of these results it was concluded that caffeine possesses cholinergic cognition enhancing properties. Caffeine could be used as a control drug in studies using the scopolamine paradigm and possibly also in other experimental studies of cognitive enhancers, as the effects of a newly developed cognition enhancing drug should at least be superior to the effects of three cups of coffee.

  8. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Intranasal Scopolamine in Plasma Saliva and Urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Tam, V. H.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2015-01-01

    An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness (SMS). The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under IND (Investigational New Drug) guidelines. The aim of the project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationships among plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trial protocol with INSCOP. Twelve healthy human subjects were administered at three dose levels (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg) of INSCOP. Serial blood, saliva and urine samples were collected between 5 min to 24 h after dosing and scopolamine concentrations were measured by using a validated LC-MS-MS assay. PK compartmental models, using actual dosing and sampling time, were established using Phoenix (version 1.2). Model selection was based on a likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL (i.e. log-likelihood ratio test)) and comparison of the quality of fit plots. The results: Predictable correlations among scopolamine concentrations in compartments of plasma, saliva and urine were established, and for the first time the model satisfactorily predicted the population and individual PK of INSCOP in plasma, saliva and urine. The model can be utilized to predict the INSCOP plasma concentration by saliva and urine data, and it will be useful for monitoring the PK of scopolamine in space and other remote environments using non-invasive sampling of saliva and/or urine.

  9. 2-Phenylethynyl-butyltellurium enhances learning and memory impaired by scopolamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Souza, Ana Cristina G; Bruning, César A; Acker, Carmine I; Neto, José S S; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2013-08-01

    Taking into account the memory-enhancing properties of 2-phenylethynyl-butyltellurium (PEBT) and the constant search for drugs that improve cognitive performance, the present study was designed to investigate the effect of PEBT on cognitive impairment induced by scopolamine in mice. PEBT (10 mg/kg, gavage) was administered to mice 1 h before the probe trial in the Morris water maze task. Memory impairment was induced by scopolamine (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) 30 min before the probe trial. PEBT significantly ameliorated the scopolamine-induced impairment of long-term memory, as indicated by a decrease in escape latency and an increase in the number of crossings of the platform location when compared with the amnesic mice. To evaluate the effect of PEBT on different phases of memory (acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval) impaired by scopolamine, the step-down inhibitory avoidance task was used. Scopolamine was administered 30 min before training (acquisition), test (retrieval), or immediately after training (consolidation). PEBT, administered 30 min before scopolamine, increased step-down latency in memory-impaired mice, improving the consolidation and retrieval stages, but not acquisition. No significant alterations in locomotor or exploratory behaviors were found in animals treated with PEBT and/or scopolamine. PEBT improved memory deficits during consolidation and retrieval induced by scopolamine.

  10. Scopolamine and depression: a role for muscarinic antagonism?

    PubMed

    Hasselmann, Helge

    2014-01-01

    Depressive disorders have, for a sizeable extent, proven resilient to pharmacotherapy. Established drugs such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) often provide inadequate symptom relief and sometimes fail altogether. Recently, interest in antidepressant effects of scopolamine, a non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonist, has arisen. Initial evidence suggests that scopolamine provides relatively rapid and long-lasting symptom alleviation for unipolar and bipolar depressed patients. At the same time, side effects of medical dosages appear mild and transient in nature. The aim of the present review is to tentatively discuss the antidepressant potential of scopolamine and to outline putative neurobiological pathways. Clearly, mAChR antagonism provides an intriguing novel therapeutical approach for treating depressive disorders.

  11. Discrimination of Solanaceae taxa and quantification of scopolamine and hyoscyamine by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Annette; Kurtze, Lukas; Krähmer, Andrea; Hagels, Hansjoerg; Schulz, Hartwig

    2014-10-01

    Plant species of the Solanaceae family (nightshades) contain pharmacologically active anticholinergic tropane alkaloids, e.g., scopolamine and hyoscyamine. Tropane alkaloids are of special interest, either as active principles or as starting materials for semisynthetic production of other substances. For genetic evaluation, domestication, cultivation, harvest and post-harvest treatments, quantification of the individual active principles is necessary to monitor industrial processes and the resulting finished products. Up to now, frequently applied methods for quantification are based on high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography optionally combined with mass spectrometry. However, alternative analytical methods have the potential to replace the established standard methods partly. In this context, attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy enabled chemotaxonomical classification of the Solanaceae Atropa belladonna, Datura stramonium, Hyoscyamus niger, Solanum dulcamara, and Duboisia in combination with cluster analysis. Also discrimination of genotypes within species was achieved to some extent. The most characteristic scopolamine bands could be identified in attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectra of Solanaceae leaves, which allow a fast characterisation of plants with high scopolamine content. Applying a partial least square algorithm, very good calibration statistics were obtained for the prediction of the scopolamine content (residual prediction deviation = 7.67), and moderate prediction quality could be achieved for the hyoscyamine content (residual prediction deviation = 2.48).

  12. Behavioral Tolerance to Anticholinergic Agents.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    negative reinforcement (avoidance of brief electric shocks). Each procedure was designed to allow within-subject determination of drug effects. In the...maintained by negative reinforcement ; c) eating of the food pellets used as positive reinforcers was suppressed by atropine, sometimes for more than a...also resulted in decreased responding. Evidence of antagonism between atropine and physostigmine was observed for behavior maintained alternatly by positive and negative reinforcement . Keywords: Tolerances(physiology);

  13. Further evaluation of mechanisms associated with the antidepressant-like signature of scopolamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Martin, Anna E; Schober, Douglas A; Nikolayev, Alexander; Tolstikov, Vladimir V; Anderson, Wesley H; Higgs, Richard E; Kuo, Ming-Shang; Laksmanan, Anastasia; Catlow, John T; Li, Xia; Felder, Christian C; Witkin, Jeffrey M

    2017-03-09

    Conventional antidepressants lack efficacy for many patients (treatment-resistant depression or TRD) and generally take weeks to produce full therapeutic response in others. Emerging data has identified certain drugs such as ketamine as rapidly-acting antidepressants for major depressive disorder and TRD. Scopolamine, a drug used to treat motion sickness and nausea, has also been demonstrated to function as a rapidly-acting antidepressant. The mechanisms associated with efficacy in TRD patients and rapid onset of action have been suggested to involve a-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. Since the work on these mechanisms with scopolamine has been limited, the present set of experiments was designed to further explore these mechanisms of action. Male, NIH Swiss mice demonstrated a robust and immediate antidepressant signature when studied under the forced-swim test. The AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX prevented this antidepressant-like effect of scopolamine and ketamine. An orally-bioavilable mTOR inhibitor (ADZ8055) also attenuated the antidepressant-like effects of scopolamine and ketamine. Scopolamine was also shown to augment the antidepressant-like effect of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram. When given in combination, scopolamine and ketamine acted synergistically to produce antidepressant-like effects. Although drug interaction data suggested that additional mechanisms might be at play, metabolomic analysis of frontal cortex and plasma from muscarinic M1+/+ and M1 -/- mice given scopolamine or vehicle did not reveal any hints as to the nature of these additional mechanisms of action. Overall, the data substantiate and extend the idea that AMPA and mTOR signaling pathways are necessary for the antidepressant-like effects of scopolamine and ketamine, mechanisms that appear to be of general significance for TRD therapeutic agents.

  14. Rapid determination of scopolamine in evidence of recreational and predatory use.

    PubMed

    Sáiz, Jorge; Mai, Thanh Duc; López, María López; Bartolomé, Carmen; Hauser, Peter C; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, scopolamine has become a drug of common use for recreational and predatory purposes and several ways of administration have been devised. A method for the rapid analysis of suspicious samples was developed, using a portable capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection. The method allows the separation of scopolamine from atropine which has a similar structure and is present along with scopolamine in some samples. The method was demonstrated to be useful for the fast analysis of several types of evidential items which have recently been reported to have been abused with fatal consequences or employed for criminal purposes. An infusion of Datura stramonium L., in which scopolamine and atropine naturally coexist, was analyzed for being frequently consumed for recreational purposes. A spiked moisturizing cream and six spiked alcoholic beverages were also analyzed. In spite of the complexity of the specimens, the sample pre-treatment methods developed were simple and fast.

  15. Differential effects of scopolamine and amphetamine on microcomputer-based performance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Robert S.; Odenheimer, Robert C.; Baltzley, Dennis R.; Dunlap, William P.; Wood, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of four weekly treatments with scopolamine (1.0 mg) and d-amphetamine (10 mg), separately or in combination, on human performance were investigated in 16 subjects undergoing nine performance tests from a menu of microcomputer-based tests administered after the treatment. It was d-amphetamine treatment that enhanced the results of motor and perceptual speed tests, while scopolamine had no effect on these tests. Two of the five cognitive tests showed reductions with scopolamine. The effects of scopolamine in this and other studies are considered in terms of a model which implies that the magnitude of the performance deficit depends on the performance type and the dosage level of the drug.

  16. Effects of scopolamine and dextroamphetamine on human performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmedtje, John F., Jr.; Oman, Charles M.; Letz, Richard; Baker, Edward L.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of two drugs used to prevent symptoms of motion sickness in the operational environment were examined in this study of human performance as measured by computer-based tests of cognitive and psychomotor skills. Each subject was exposed repetitively to five tests: symbol-digit substitution, simple reaction time, pattern recognition, digit span memory, and pattern memory. Although there have been previous reports of decreases in human performance in similar testing with higher dosages of scopolamine or dextroamphetamine, no significant decrements were observed with the operational-level combined dose used in this study (0.4 mg oral scopolamine and 5.0 mg oral dextroamphetamine.) The controversy over the use of combination drug therapy in this environnment is discussed along with the indications for further research based on the findings.

  17. Anticholinergic medication use and dementia: latest evidence and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Shelly L.; Hanlon, Joseph T.

    2016-01-01

    Use of medications with anticholinergic activity is widespread in older adults. Several studies have highlighted that anticholinergic use may be associated with an increased risk of dementia. The objective of this narrative review is to describe and evaluate studies of anticholinergic medication use and dementia and provide practical suggestions for avoiding use of these medications in older adults. A comprehensive review of the literature, citations from recent reviews and the author’s personal files was conducted. Four studies were found that evaluated anticholinergic use and dementia as the primary outcome. Three studies focused on overall anticholinergic medication use and reported a statistically significantly increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. In one study, dementia risk was primarily found with higher cumulative doses; people using anticholinergic medications at the minimum effective dose recommended for older adults for at least 3 years were at highest risk. In contrast, a study conducted in nursing-home residents with depression did not find that paroxetine [a highly anticholinergic selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant, (SSRI)] increased risk for dementia compared with other SSRIs (without anticholinergic activity). Further study is needed to understand the mechanism by which anticholinergic medications may increase risk. In conclusion, there is evidence from three observational studies suggesting that anticholinergic medications may increase dementia risk. Given this potential risk and the myriad of other well-known adverse effects (i.e. constipation, blurred vision, urinary retention, and delirium) associated with anticholinergic medications, it is prudent for prescribers and older adults to minimize use of these medications and consider alternatives when possible. PMID:27695623

  18. Prevention of experimental motion sickness by scopolamine absorbed through the skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.; Knepton, J.; Shaw, J.

    1976-01-01

    A double-blind placebo-controlled study compared the efficacy of the antimotion sickness drug scopolamine when administered by oral or transdermal routes. A secondary purpose was to extend our bioassay involving fixed-dose combinations of the homergic drugs promethazine and ephedrine. After receiving 12 apparently identical drug-placebo treatments, eight normal male students were exposed in a slow rotation room to stressful accelerations generated by their execution of 40 head movements out of the plane of the room's rotation at 1 rpm and at 1-rpm increments until either symptoms were experienced (just short of frank motion sickness) or the 27-rpm ceiling on the test was reached. Efficacy of a drug was defined in terms of the placebo-range and categorized as beneficial, inconsequential, or detrimental. The only detrimental effect was with scopolamine given orally. It is concluded that the advantages of the transdermal scopolamine, which include minimal side effects and prolonged effectiveness, deserve full exploitation.

  19. Effect of low-dose scopolamine on autonomic control of the heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raeder, E. A.; Stys, A.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    Background: In low doses, scopolamine paradoxically enhances parasympathetic outflow to the heart. The mechanisms which mediate this action are not fully understood. Moreover, there are conflicting data regarding the potential role of sympathetic activity. This study in 17 healthy individuals was designed to characterize the influence of low dose transdermal scopolamine on the gain of the baroreflex and respiratory heart rate reflex and to determine the role of sympathetic activity. Methods: The effect of scopolamine was analyzed in the time and frequency domain by computing heart rate variability indices. The gains of the respiratory heart rate reflex and the baroreflex were estimated simultaneously by means of a cardiovascular system identification approach using an optimized autoregressive moving average algorithm. Measurements were repeated in the upright posture to assess the influence of enhanced sympathetic activity. In six subjects ambulatory ECGs were recorded to determine whether there are diurnal variations of the effect of scopolamine. Results: Scopolamine enhances vagal modulation of heart rate through both the respiratory-heart rate reflex and the baroreflex, as the gains of both were augmented by the drug in the supine and in the upright postures. Conclusions: Scopolamine increases parasympathetic cardiac control by augmenting the gain of the respiratory-heart rate and baroreflex. This action is not attenuated in the upright posture when sympathetic tone is increased.

  20. Inhibitory avoidance memory deficit induced by scopolamine: interaction with glutamatergic system in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Pakpour, Bahareh; Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Nayer-Nouri, Touraj; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2010-12-01

    The possible involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in amnesia induced by scopolamine was investigated. An inhibitory (passive) avoidance task was used for memory assessment in male Wistar rats. The results revealed that intra-NAc administration of a nonselective muscarinic acetylcholine antagonist, scopolamine (1 and 2 g/rat) impaired memory consolidation in the animals when tested 24 h later. Post-training intra-NAc administration of NMDA (0.005 and 0.01 g/rat) also impaired memory consolidation, whereas post-training intra-NAc administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (0.5, 1 and 1.5 g/rat) did not. Intra-NAc co-administration of an ineffective dose of NMDA with ineffective doses of scopolamine (0.25 and 0.5 g/rat) after training had no significant effect on memory consolidation, but intra-NAc injections of effective doses of NMDA (0.005 and 0.01 g/rat) prevented the amnesic effect of an effective dose of scopolamine (2 g/rat). In contrast, intra-NAc co-administration of MK-801 (0.5, 1 and 1.5 g/rat) along with an effective dose of scopolamine (2 g/rat) did not prevent the effect of the latter drug. It can be concluded that NMDA receptors in the NAc are involved in the modulation of memory consolidation that was affected by scopolamine.

  1. A case of pediatric age anticholinergic intoxication due to accidental Datura stramonium ingestion admitting with visual hallucination.

    PubMed

    Şanlıdağ, Burçin; Derinöz, Okşan; Yıldız, Nagehan

    2014-01-01

    Datura stramonium (DS) is a hallucinogenic plant that can produce anticholinergic toxicity because of its significant concentrations of toxic alkaloids, such as atropine, hyoscyamine, and scopolamine. DS grows in both rural and urban areas in Turkey. Clinical findings of toxicity are similar to those of atropine toxicity. DS abuse is common among adolescents because of its hallucinatory effects. However, accidental DS poisoning from contaminated food is very rare. Accidental poisonings are commonly seen among children. Children are more prone to the toxic effects of atropine; ingestion of even a small amount can cause serious central nervous system symptoms. Treatment is supportive; antidote treatment is given rarely. An eight-year-old male with accidental DS poisoning who presented to the Pediatric Emergency Department with aggression, agitation, delirium, and visual hallucinations is reported.

  2. Dexamethasone mimicks the antimotion sickness effects of amphetamine and scopolamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, Randall Lee

    1986-01-01

    Based on preliminary suggestions that individual differences in susceptibility to stressful motion might be related to physiological differences in responses of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, the efficacy of dexamethasone and metyrapone is tested in subjects exposed to cross-coupled accelerative semicircular canal stimulation on a rotating chair. Subjects given 0.5 mg of dexamethasone every 6 h for 48 h could endure 80 percent more stressful motion (P = 0.03) in a within-subjects design study, whereas, no improvement followed treatment with 750 mg of metryapone every 4 h for 24 h. The efficacy of dexamethasone might be explained in terms of its neurochemical actions on several neurotransmitter systems which are also modulated by such classical antimotion sickness drugs as amphetamine and scopolamine. Because dexamethasone induces adaptive changes within the central nervous system it may prove superior to scopolamine and amphetamine which possess significant side effects, are short acting, and rapidly tolerated.

  3. Dexamethasone mimicks the antimotion sickness effects of amphetamine and scopolamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Randall Lee

    Based on preliminary suggestions that individual differences in susceptibility to stressful motion might be related to physiological differences in responses of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, we tested the efficacy of dexamethasone and metyrapone in subjects exposed to cross-coupled accelerative semicircular canal stimulation on a rotating chair. Subjects given 0.5 mg of dexamethasone every 6 h for 48 h could endure 80% more stressful motion ( P = 0.03) in a within-subjects design study, whereas, no improvement followed treatment with 750 mg of metryapone every 4 h for 24 h. The efficacy of dexamethasone might be explained in terms of its neurochemical actions on several neurotransmitter systems which are also modulated by such classical antimotion sickness drugs as amphetamine and scopolamine. Because dexamethasone induces adaptive changes within the central nervous system it may prove superior to scopolamine and amphetamine which possess significant side effects, are short acting, and rapidly tolerated.

  4. Refractory overactive bladder: Beyond oral anticholinergic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Glinski, Ronald W.; Siegel, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: In this review, we discuss the treatment of refractory overactive bladder (OAB) that has not adequately responded to medication therapy and we propose an appropriate care pathway to the treatment of OAB. We also attempt to address the cost of OAB treatments. Materials and Methods: A selective expert review of the current literature on the subject of refractory OAB using MEDLINE was performed and the data is summarized. We also review our experience in treating refractory OAB. The role and outcomes of various treatment options for refractory OAB are discussed and combined therapy with oral anticholinergics is explored. Emerging remedies including intravesical botulinum toxin injection and pudendal neuromodulation are also reviewed, along with conventional surgical options. Results: In general behavioral therapy, pelvic floor electrical stimulation, magnetic therapy and posterior tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS), have shown symptom decreases in 50-80% of patients with OAB. Depending on the study, combination therapy with oral anticholinergics seems to improve efficacy of behavioral therapy and PTNS in approximately 10-30%. In multicenter, long-term randomized controlled trials, sacral neuromodulation has been shown to improve symptoms of OAB and OAB incontinence in up to 80% of the patients treated. Studies involving emerging therapies such as pudendal serve stimulation suggest that there may be a 15-20% increase in efficacy over sacral neuromodulation, but long-term studies are not yet available. Another emerging therapy, botulinum toxin, is also showing similar success in reducing OAB symptoms in 80-90% of patients. Surgical approaches, such as bladder augmentation, are a last resort in the treatment of OAB and are rarely used at this point unless upper tract damage is a concern and all other treatment options have been exhausted. Conclusion: The vast majority of OAB patients can be managed successfully by behavioral options with or without

  5. Pharmaceutical Product Development: Intranasal Scopolamine (INSCOP) Metered Dose Spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; Crady, Camille; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Motion sickness (MS) has been a problem associated with space flight, the modern military and commercial air and water transportation for many years. Clinical studies have shown that scopolamine is the most effective medication for the prevention of motion sickness (Dornhoffer et al, 2004); however, the two most common methods of administration (transdermal and oral) have performance limitations that compromise its utility. Intranasal administration offers a noninvasive treatment modality, and has been shown to counter many of the problems associated with oral and transdermal administration. With the elimination of the first pass effect by the liver, intranasal delivery achieves higher and more reliable bioavailability than an equivalent oral dose. This allows for the potential of enhanced efficacy at a reduced dose, thus minimizing the occurrence of untoward side effects. An Intranasal scopolamine (INSCOP) gel formulation was prepared and tested in four ground-based clinical trials under an active Investigational New Drug (IND) application with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Although there were early indicators that the intranasal gel formulation was effective, there were aspects of formulation viscosity and the delivery system that were less desirable. The INSCOP gel formulation has since been reformulated into an aqueous spray dosage form packaged in a precise, metered dose delivery system; thereby enhancing dose uniformity, increased user satisfaction and palatability, and a potentially more rapid onset of action. Recent reports of new therapeutic indications for scopolamine has prompted a wide spread interest in new scopolamine dosage forms. The novel dosage form and delivery system of INSCOP spray shows promise as an effective treatment for motion sickness targeted at the armed forces, spaceflight, and commercial sea, air, and space travel markets, as well as prospective psychotherapy for mental and emotional disorders.

  6. Use of anticholinergic bronchodilation in children.

    PubMed

    Rubin, B K; Albers, G M

    1996-01-29

    Ipratropium bromide is a quaternary ammonium anticholinergic bronchodilator with minimal systemic absorption across the blood-airway barrier. Ipratropium bromide has become primary therapy for the treatment of adults with chronic bronchitis, but its use in children has been limited. Ipratropium bromide can be safely used in the management of acute bronchiolitis, recognizing that most infants do not appear to respond to any bronchodilator medication. When used with a beta-agonist bronchodilator for the therapy of acute childhood asthma, ipratropium bromide appears to provide bronchodilation beyond that achieved by either agent used alone. There are insufficient published data to determine the appropriate use if ipratropium bromide in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, although many of those symptomatic after the age of 6 months seem to benefit from either ipratropium bromide or beta-agonists. As ipratropium bromide has no intrinsic anti-inflammatory properties, its role in the chronic therapy of asthma and related disorders is still unclear.

  7. Impact of Gender on Pharmocokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, L.; Lei, Wu.; S-L Chow, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness (SMS), which is commonly experienced by astronauts during space missions. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under IND guidelines. Since information is lacking on the effect of gender on the PK of Scopolamine, we examined gender differences in PK parameters of INSCOP at three dose levels of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg. Methods: Plasma scopolamine concentrations as a function of time data were collected from twelve normal healthy human subjects (6 male/6 female) who participated in a fully randomized double blind crossover study. The PK parameters were derived using WinNonlin. Covariate analysis of PK profiles was performed using NONMEN and statistically compared using a likelihood ratio test on the difference of objective function value (OFV). Statistical significance for covariate analysis was set at P<0.05(?OFV=3.84). Results: No significant difference in PK parameters between male and female subjects was observed with 0.1 and 0.2 mg doses. However, CL and Vd were significantly different between male and female subjects at the 0.4 mg dose. Results from population covariate modeling analysis indicate that a onecompartment PK model with first-order elimination rate offers best fit for describing INSCOP concentration-time profiles. The inclusion of sex as a covariate enhanced the model fitting (?OFV=-4.1) owing to the genderdependent CL and Vd differences after the 0.4 mg dose. Conclusion: Statistical modeling of scopolamine concentration-time data suggests gender-dependent pharmacokinetics of scopolamine at the high dose level of 0.4 mg. Clearance of the parent compound was significantly faster and the volume of distribution was significantly higher in males than in females, As a result, including gender as a covariate to the pharmacokinetic model of scopolamine offers the best fit for PK modeling of the drug at dose

  8. Population Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness (SMS).The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) was evaluated using data collected in Phase II IND protocols. We reported earlier statistically significant gender differences in PK parameters of INSCOP at a dose level of 0.4 mg. To identify covariates that influence PK parameters of INSCOP, we examined population covariates of INSCOP PK model for 0.4 mg dose. Methods: Plasma scopolamine concentrations versus time data were collected from 20 normal healthy human subjects (11 male/9 female) after a 0.4 mg dose. Phoenix NLME was employed for PK analysis of these data using gender, body weight and age as covariates for model selection. Model selection was based on a likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL). Statistical significance for base model building and individual covariate analysis was set at P less than 0.05{delta(-2LL)=3.84}. Results: A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order elimination best described INSCOP concentration ]time profiles. Inclusion of gender, body weight and age as covariates individually significantly reduced -2LL by the cut-off value of 3.84(P less than 0.05) when tested against the base model. After the forward stepwise selection and backward elimination steps, gender was selected to add to the final model which had significant influence on absorption rate constant (ka) and the volume of distribution (V) of INSCOP. Conclusion: A population pharmacokinetic model for INSCOP has been identified and gender was a significant contributing covariate for the final model. The volume of distribution and Ka were significantly higher in males than in females which confirm gender-dependent pharmacokinetics of scopolamine after administration of a 0.4 mg dose.

  9. Validation of a Best-Fit Pharmacokinetic Model for Scopolamine Disposition after Intranasal Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Chow, D. S-L.; Tam, V.; Putcha, L.

    2015-01-01

    An intranasal gel formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Motion Sickness. Bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were determined per Investigative New Drug (IND) evaluation guidance by the Food and Drug Administration. Earlier, we reported the development of a PK model that can predict the relationship between plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine (SCOP) concentrations using data collected from an IND clinical trial with INSCOP. This data analysis project is designed to validate the reported best fit PK model for SCOP by comparing observed and model predicted SCOP concentration-time profiles after administration of INSCOP.

  10. Dementia and lower urinary dysfunction: with a reference to anticholinergic use in elderly population.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamanishi, Tomonori; Kishi, Masahiko

    2008-09-01

    Urinary incontinence is common in patients with dementia, and is more prevalent in demented than in non-demented older individuals. Neurogenic incontinence is common in multiple cerebral infarction and dementia with Lewy bodies, and in both diseases walking difficulty and falls are common. In contrast, functional incontinence is common in Alzheimer's disease due to cognitive disability and decreased motivation. Central cholinergic stimulation is the mainstay in the treatment of cognitive decline. In contrast, to date, the use of anticholinergic medications for detrusor overactivity in the elderly is still under consideration, since anticholinergic drugs may lead to undesirable events particularly in the central nervous system, although many studies have used severely demented cases. In the future, studies seeking treatment regimens for an elderly individual with both dementia and urinary dysfunction are warranted.

  11. Effects of chronic scopolamine administration on spatial working memory and hippocampal receptors related to learning.

    PubMed

    Doguc, Duygu K; Delibas, Namik; Vural, Huseyin; Altuntas, Irfan; Sutcu, Recep; Sonmez, Yonca

    2012-12-01

    Scopolamine has been used in neuropsychopharmacology as a standard drug that leads to symptoms mimicking cognitive deficits seen during the aging process in healthy humans and animals. Scopolamine is known to be a nonselective muscarinic receptor blocker, but its chronic effect on the expression of certain hippocampal receptors is not clear. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of chronic scopolamine administration on hippocampal receptor expression and spatial working memory in two different learning tasks, the water maze and the eight-arm radial maze. Male rats (8-12 months) were trained in both tasks. Subsequently, different groups received physiological saline or 0.1, 0.8, or 2 mg/kg scopolamine hydrobromide, respectively, for 15 days. After drug administration, the rats were retested for both tasks, and hippocampal expressions of NR2A, NR2B, nAChRα7, and mAChRM1 receptors were assessed by western blotting analysis. In both tasks, the spatial working memory was decreased dose dependently in all groups compared with the control group. In terms of receptor expressions, 0.8 and 2 mg/kg scopolamine administration significantly decreased NR2A protein expression, which corroborates suggestions of an interaction between cholinergic and glutamatergic receptors in the hippocampus.

  12. Aerosolized scopolamine protects against microinstillation inhalation toxicity to sarin in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Che, Magnus M; Chanda, Soma; Song, Jian; Doctor, Bhupendra P; Rezk, Peter E; Sabnekar, Praveena; Perkins, Michael W; Sciuto, Alfred M; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P

    2011-07-01

    Sarin is a volatile nerve agent that has been used in the Tokyo subway attack. Inhalation is predicted to be the major route of exposure if sarin is used in war or terrorism. Currently available treatments are limited for effective postexposure protection against sarin under mass casualty scenario. Nasal drug delivery is a potential treatment option for mass casualty under field conditions. We evaluated the efficacy of endotracheal administration of muscarinic antagonist scopolamine, a secretion blocker which effectively crosses the blood-brain barrier for protection against sarin inhalation toxicity. Age and weight matched male Hartley guinea pigs were exposed to 677.4 mg/m³ or 846.5 mg/ m³ (1.2 × LCt₅₀) sarin by microinstillation inhalation exposure for 4 min. One minute later, the animals exposed to 846.5 mg/ m³ sarin were treated with endotracheally aerosolized scopolamine (0.25 mg/kg) and allowed to recover for 24 h for efficacy evaluation. The results showed that treatment with scopolamine increased the survival rate from 20% to 100% observed in untreated sarin-exposed animals. Behavioral symptoms of nerve agent toxicity including, convulsions and muscular tremors were reduced in sarin-exposed animals treated with scopolamine. Sarin-induced body weight loss, decreased blood O₂ saturation and pulse rate were returned to basal levels in scopolamine-treated animals. Increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell death due to sarin exposure was returned to normal levels after treatment with scopolamine. Taken together, these data indicate that postexposure treatment with aerosolized scopolamine prevents respiratory toxicity and protects against lethal inhalation exposure to sarin in guinea pigs.

  13. Antiparkinson drugs used as prophylactics for nerve agents: studies of cognitive side effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Myhrer, Trond; Enger, Siri; Aas, Pål

    2008-06-01

    Antiparkinson agents possess excellent anticonvulsant properties against nerve agent-induced seizures by exerting both cholinergic and glutamatergic antagonisms. It is important, however, that drugs used as prophylactics not by themselves cause impairment of cognitive capability. The purpose of the present study was to make a comparative assessment of potential cognitive effects of benactyzine (0.3 mg/kg), biperiden (0.11 mg/kg), caramiphen (10 mg/kg), procyclidine (3 mg/kg), and trihexyphenidyl (0.12 mg/kg) separately and each in combination with physostigmine (0.1 mg/kg). The results showed that benactyzine, caramiphen, and trihexyphenidyl reduced rats' innate preference for novelty, whereas biperiden and procyclidine did not. When benactyzine, caramiphen, and trihexyphenidyl were combined with physostigmine the cognitive impairment disappeared. This counteracting effect, however, caused changes in locomotor and rearing activities not seen by each drug alone. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and anticholinergics used as prophylactics can offset each other, but exceptions are observed in a previous study when a very potent anticholinergic (scopolamine) or a high dose of procyclidine still results in cognitive deficits in spite of coadministration with physostigmine. Among the present drugs tested, procyclidine appears to be a robust anticonvulsant with few cognitive side effects.

  14. Dexmedetomidine Infusion to Control Agitation due to Anticholinergic Toxidromes in Adolescents, a Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ada; Tobias, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α2-adrenergic agonist approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the sedation of adults who are intubated on mechanical ventilation and in non-intubated adults who are undergoing surgical procedures. However, it has also recently become a commonly used sedative agent in varied clinical settings for the pediatric patient as well. We present the use of dexmedetomidine for sedation in a unique clinical scenario, the severely agitated and combative patient following the intentional misuse of anticholinergic drugs. Its applications in this situation are discussed, and previous reports in the literature are reviewed. PMID:26380573

  15. [Effect of scopolamine on depression in mice].

    PubMed

    Ji, Cheng-xue; Zhang, Jian-jun

    2011-04-01

    Based on the report of previous clinical study which showed cholinergic receptor antagonist scopolamine had antidepressant activity, this study was to investigate the antidepressant activity of scopolamine and explore its effective dose in mice, and to evaluate the effect of scopolamine on the central nervous system and learning/memory ability at its antidepressant effective dose. Tail suspension test, forced swimming test, step-down passive avoidance test and open field test were used to evaluate its effects on mice. Compared with the vehicle control group, single-dose administration of scopolamine (0.1-0.4 mg x kg(-1), ip) significantly decreased the immobility time (P < 0.01 or P < 0.001) in tail suspension test, and significantly decreased the immobility time (P < 0.001) in forced swimming test, but had no effect on the step-down latency and errors in step-down passive avoidance test. Scopolamine (0.1 and 0.2 mg x kg(-1), ip) had no influence on the locomotor activity in open field test, while at dose of 0.4 mg x kg(-1) significantly increase the locomotor activity. These results showed that scopolamine produced reliable antidepressant effect at doses of 0.1 and 0.2 mg x kg(-1), without impairment on learning and memory, as well as excitory or inhibitory effect on central nervous system in mice.

  16. Dipeptide preparation Noopept prevents scopolamine-induced deficit of spatial memory in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Belnik, A P; Ostrovskaya, R U; Poletaeva, I I

    2007-04-01

    The effect of original nootropic preparation Noopept on learning and long-term memory was studied with BALB/c mice. Scopolamine (1 mg/kg) impaired long-term memory trace, while Noopept (0.5 mg/kg) had no significant effect. Noopept completely prevented the development of cognitive disorders induced by scopolamine (blockade of muscarinic cholinergic receptors). Our results confirmed the presence of choline-positive effect in dipeptide piracetam analogue Noopept on retrieval of learned skill of finding a submerged platform (spatial memory). We conclude that the effectiveness of this drug should be evaluated in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Attenuating effect of bioactive coumarins from Convolvulus pluricaulis on scopolamine-induced amnesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Malik, Jai; Karan, Maninder; Vasisht, Karan

    2016-01-01

    Convolvulus pluricaulis Chois. (Convolvulaceae) has been used in Ayurveda as Medhya Rasyana (nervine tonic) to treat various mental disorders. This study was designed to isolate the bioactive compound(s) of this plant and to evaluate their effect against scopolamine-induced amnesia. Column chromatography of the chloroform and ethyl-acetate fractions led to the isolation of three coumarins identified as scopoletin, ayapanin and scopolin. All the three compounds at 2.5, 5, 10 and 15 mg/kg, p.o. were evaluated for memory-enhancing activity against scopolamine-induced amnesia using elevated plus maze and step down paradigms. Effect on acetylcholinesterase activity in mice brain was also evaluated. Scopoletin and scopolin, in both the paradigms, significantly and dose dependently attenuated the scopolamine-induced amnesic effect. Furthermore, these compounds at 10 and 15 mg/kg exhibited activity comparable to that of standard drug, donepezil. The compounds also exhibited significant acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of Scopolamine Intranasal Gel Formulation (INSCOP) During Antiorthostatic Bedrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; Boyd, J. L.; Du, B.; Daniels, V.; Crady, C.

    2011-01-01

    Space Motion sickness (SMS) is an age old problem for space travelers on short and long duration space flight Oral antiemetics are not very effective in space due to poor bioavailability. Scopolamine (SCOP) is the most frequently used drug by recreational travelers V patch, tablets available on the market. Common side effects of antiemetics, in general, include drowsiness, sedation, dry mouth and reduced psychomotor performance. Severity and persistence of side effects are often dose related Side effects can be detrimental in high performance demanding settings, e.g. space flight, military.

  19. A Modified LC/MS/MS Method with Enhanced Sensitivity for the Determination of Scopolamine in Human Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zuwei; Vaksman, Zalman; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2008-01-01

    Intranasal scopolamine is a choice drug for the treatment of motion sickness during space flight because of its quick onset of action, short half-life and favorable sideeffects profile. The dose administered usually ranges between 0.1 and 0.4 mg. Such small doses make it difficult to detect concentrations of scopolamine in biological fluids using existing sensitive LC/MS/MS method, especially when the biological sample volumes are limited. To measure scopolamine in human plasma to facilitate pharmacokinetic evaluation of the drug, we developed a sensitive LC/MS/MS method using 96 well micro elution plates for solid phase extraction (SPE) of scopolamine in human plasma. Human plasma (100-250 micro L) were loaded onto Waters Oasis HLB 96 well micro elution plate and eluted with 50 L of organic solvent without evaporation and reconstitution. HPLC separation of the eluted sample was performed using an Agilent Zorbax SB-CN column (50 x 2.1 mm) at a flow rate of 0.2 mL/min for 3 minutes. The mobile phase for separation was 80:20 (v/v) methanol: ammonium acetate (30 mM) in water. Concentrations of scopolamine were determined using a Micromass Quattro Micro(TM) mass spectrometer with electrospray ionization (ESI). ESI mass spectra were acquired in positive ion mode with multiple reaction monitoring for the determination of scopolamine m/z = 304.2 right arrow 138.1 and internal standard hyoscyamine m/z = 290.2 right arrow 124.1. The method is rapid, reproducible, specific and has the following parameters: scopolamine and the IS are eluted at about 1.1 and 1.7 min respectively. The linear range is 25-10000 pg/mL for scopolamine in human plasma with correlation coefficients greater than 0.99 and CV less than 0.5%. The intra-day and inter-day CVs are less than 15% for quality control samples with concentrations of 75,300, and 750 pg/mL of scopolamine in human plasma. SPE using 96 well micro elution plates allows rapid sample preparation and enhanced sensitivity for the LC

  20. The muscarinic antagonists scopolamine and atropine are competitive antagonists at 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Martin; Thompson, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    Scopolamine is a high affinity muscarinic antagonist that is used for the prevention of post-operative nausea and vomiting. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists are used for the same purpose and are structurally related to scopolamine. To examine whether 5-HT3 receptors are affected by scopolamine we examined the effects of this drug on the electrophysiological and ligand binding properties of 5-HT3A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes and HEK293 cells, respectively. 5-HT3 receptor-responses were reversibly inhibited by scopolamine with an IC50 of 2.09 μM. Competitive antagonism was shown by Schild plot (pA2 = 5.02) and by competition with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists [(3)H]granisetron (Ki = 6.76 μM) and G-FL (Ki = 4.90 μM). The related molecule, atropine, similarly inhibited 5-HT evoked responses in oocytes with an IC50 of 1.74 μM, and competed with G-FL with a Ki of 7.94 μM. The reverse experiment revealed that granisetron also competitively bound to muscarinic receptors (Ki = 6.5 μM). In behavioural studies scopolamine is used to block muscarinic receptors and induce a cognitive deficit, and centrally administered concentrations can exceed the IC50 values found here. It is therefore possible that 5-HT3 receptors are also inhibited. Studies that utilise higher concentrations of scopolamine should be mindful of these potential off-target effects.

  1. Bad trip due to anticholinergic effect of cannabis.

    PubMed

    Mangot, Ajish G

    2013-01-01

    Cannabis in its various forms has been known since time immemorial, the use of which has been rising steadily in India. 'Bad trips' have been documented after cannabis use, manifestations ranging from vague anxiety and fear to profoundly disturbing states of terror and psychosis. Cannabis is known to affect various neurotransmitters, but 'bad trip' due to its anticholinergic effect has never been described in literature to the best of author's knowledge. Hereby, the author describes a case of a young adult male experiencing profound anticholinergic effects after being exposed for the first time in his life to bhang, a local oral preparation of cannabis.

  2. No influence of scopolamine hydrobromide on odor detection performance of rats.

    PubMed

    Doty, Richard L; Bagla, Ritu; Misra, Robert; Mueller, Eric; Kerr, Kara-Lynne

    2003-11-01

    Despite speculation that the muscarinic cholinergic antagonist, scopolamine, may influence the olfactory sensitivity of rats, there have been no definitive studies on this point to date. In this study, we examined the influence of a range of doses of scopolamine hydrobromine (namely, 0.10, 0.125, 0.15 and 0.20 mg/kg i.p.) on the odor detection performance of 15 adult male Long-Evans rats to ethyl acetate. Air-dilution olfactometry and a go/no-go operant signal detection task were employed. The drug conditions and a saline control were administered to each animal in an order counterbalanced by Latin squares, with 2 day intervals interspersed between tests. Scopolamine had no significant influence on odor detection performance per se, as measured by percent correct S+ and S- responses and a non-parametric signal detection measure of sensitivity. This is in contrast to the relatively large effects previously observed in the same test paradigm for such drugs as the D-1 agonist SKF 38393 and the D-2 agonist quinpirole. These data suggest that scopolamine has no meaningful influence on a well-practiced odor detection task.

  3. The effects of amphetamine and scopolamine on adjunctive drinking and wheel-running in rats.

    PubMed

    Williams, J L; White, J M

    1984-01-01

    Two groups of rats were exposed to a fixed-interval 90 s schedule of food reinforcement. One group had access to a drinking tube containing water and the second had access to a running wheel. Amphetamine (0.3-10.0 mg/kg) and scopolamine (0.1-3.0 mg/kg) were assessed for their effects on lever-pressing, adjunctive drinking and adjunctive wheel-running. Low to moderate doses of amphetamine increased overall rates of lever-pressing, whereas the highest dose decreased them. Scopolamine decreased overall lever-pressing rates in a dose-dependent manner. Both drugs changed the within-interval pattern of lever-pressing from one of increasing probability through the interval to almost constant probability throughout. Overall rates of adjunctive drinking and adjunctive wheel-running were decreased by amphetamine and scopolamine. Amphetamine failed to alter the within-interval patterns of either drinking or wheel-running in any substantial manner. The effect of scopolamine was to make the probabilities of each adjunctive behaviour more even through the interval. Although the two drugs had different actions, there was little difference in the way drinking and wheel-running were affected by each.

  4. Anticholinergic and blood pressure effects of mianserin, amitriptyline and placebo

    PubMed Central

    Kopera, H.

    1978-01-01

    1 Eighteen healthy male volunteers were treated at random in double-blind conditions with mianserin, amitriptyline, or placebo for 8 days. Measurements were made of various parameters indicative of anticholinergic and blood pressure effects. 2 Mianserin showed no significant anticholinergic effects on any of the measures used. Compared with placebo, mianserin significantly reduced pupil diameter and tended to increase salivary production and increase the distance of the near point. 3 Amitriptyline showed evidence of anticholinergic effects in that salivary production fell to a level significantly lower than that of the mianserin- or placebo-treated subjects. The distance of the near point tended to increase during amitriptyline treatment. Compared with placebo, amitriptyline also significantly reduced pupil diameter on some occasions. 4 Amitriptyline produced postural hypotension to a statistically significant degree, whereas this effect was not observed during mianserin treatment. 5 In conclusion, mianserin in doses of up to 60 mg daily given to healthy males seemed to lack the anticholinergic effects and postural hypotension associated with amitriptyline treatment. PMID:341941

  5. Pharmacotherapeutics of Intranasal Scopolamine: FDA Regulations and Procedures for Clinical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, H.; Daniels, V. R.; Vaksman, Z.; Boyd, J. L.; Buckey, J. C.; Locke, J. P.; Putcha, L.

    2007-01-01

    Space Motion Sickness (SMS) is commonly experienced by astronauts and often requires treatment with medications during the early flight days of a space mission. Bioavailability of oral (PO) SMS medications is often low and highly variable; additionally, physiological changes in a microgravity environment exacerbate variability and decrease bioavailability. These factors prompted NASA to develop an intranasal dosage form of scopolamine (INSCOP) suitable for the treatment of SMS. However, to assure safety and efficacy of treatment in space, NASA physicians prescribe commercially available pharmaceutical products only. Development of a pharmaceutical preparation for clinical use must follow distinct clinical phases of testing, phase I through IV to be exact, before it can be approved by the FDA for approval for clinical use. After a physician sponsored Investigative New Drug (IND) application was approved by the FDA, a phase I clinical trial of INSCOP formulation was completed in normal human subjects and results published. The current project includes three phase II clinical protocols for the assessment of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PK/PD), efficacy, and safety of INSCOP. Three clinical protocols that were submitted to FDA to accomplish the project objectives: 1) 002-A, a FDA Phase II dose ranging study with four dose levels between 0.1 and 0.4 mg in 12 subjects to assess PK/PD, 2) 002-B, a phase II clinical efficacy study in eighteen healthy subjects to compare efficacy of 0.2 (low dose) and 0.4 mg (high dose) INSCOP for prophylactic treatment of motion-induces (off-axis vertical rotation) symptoms, and (3) 002-C, a phase II clinical study with twelve subjects to determine bioavailability and pharmacodynamics of two doses (0.2 and 0.4 mg) of INSCOP in simulated microgravity, antiorthostatic bedrest. All regulatory procedures were competed that include certification for Good laboratory Procedures by Theradex , clinical documentation, personnel training

  6. The role of tiotropium bromide, a long-acting anticholinergic bronchodilator, in the management of COPD.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Farzad; O'Donnell, Denis E

    2005-01-01

    Bronchodilator therapy forms the mainstay of treatment for symptomatic patients with COPD. Long-acting bronchodilators, which maintain sustained airway patency over a 24-hour period, represent an advance in therapy. Tiotropium bromide is a new long-acting inhaled anticholinergic agent with superior pharmacodynamic properties compared with the short-acting anticholinergic, ipratropium bromide. Tiotropium bromide has been consistently shown to have a greater impact than ipratropium bromide on clinically important outcome measures such as health status. The mechanisms of clinical benefit with tiotropium bromide are multifactorial, but improved airway function, which enhances lung emptying and allows sustained deflation of over-inflated lungs, appears to explain improvements in dyspnea and exercise endurance in COPD. Inhaled tiotropium bromide therapy has also been associated with reduction in acute exacerbations of COPD as well as reduced hospitalizations. The safety profile of tiotropium bromide is impressive: dry mouth is the most common adverse event and rarely necessitates termination of the drug. No tachyphylaxis to tiotropium bromide has been demonstrated in clinical trials lasting up to 1 year. There is preliminary information that the combination of long-acting anticholinergics and long-acting beta2-adrenoceptor agonists provides additive physiological and clinical benefits. According to recent international guidelines, long-acting bronchodilators should be considered early in the management of symptomatic patients with COPD in order to achieve effective symptom alleviation and reduction in activity limitation. Tiotropium bromide, because of its once-daily administration and its established efficacy and tolerability profile, has emerged as an attractive therapeutic option for this condition.

  7. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Rapid-Acting Antidepressants Ketamine and Scopolamine.

    PubMed

    Wohleb, Eric S; Gerhard, Danielle; Thomas, Alex; Duman, Ronald S

    2017-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a prevalent neuropsychiatric disease that causes profound social and economic burdens. The impact of MDD is compounded by the limited therapeutic efficacy and delay of weeks to months of currently available medications. These issues highlight the need for more efficacious and faster-acting treatments to alleviate the burdens of MDD. Recent breakthroughs demonstrate that certain drugs, including ketamine and scopolamine, produce rapid and long-lasting antidepressant effects in MDD patients. Moreover, preclinical work has shown that the antidepressant actions of ketamine and scopolamine in rodent models are caused by an increase of extracellular glutamate, elevated BDNF, activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) cascade, and increased number and function of spine synapses in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Here we review studies showing that both ketamine and scopolamine elicit rapid antidepressant effects through converging molecular and cellular mechanisms in the PFC. In addition, we discuss evidence that selective antagonists of NMDA and muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor subtypes (i.e., NR2B and M1-AChR) in the PFC produce comparable antidepressant responses. Furthermore, we discuss evidence that ketamine and scopolamine antagonize inhibitory interneurons in the PFC leading to disinhibition of pyramidal neurons and increased extracellular glutamate that promotes the rapid antidepressant responses to these agents. Collectively, these studies indicate that specific NMDA and mACh receptor subtypes on GABAergic interneurons are promising targets for novel rapid-acting antidepressant therapies.

  8. Galantamine reverses scopolamine-induced behavioral alterations in Dugesia tigrina.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Latha; Amatya, Christina; DeSaer, Cassie J; Dalhoff, Zachary; Eggerichs, Michael R

    2014-09-01

    In planaria (Dugesia tigrina), scopolamine, a nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonist, induced distinct behaviors of attenuated motility and C-like hyperactivity. Planarian locomotor velocity (pLMV) displayed a dose-dependent negative correlation with scopolamine concentrations from 0.001 to 1.0 mM, and a further increase in scopolamine concentration to 2.25 mM did not further decrease pLMV. Planarian hyperactivity counts was dose-dependently increased following pretreatment with scopolamine concentrations from 0.001 to 0.5 mM and then decreased for scopolamine concentrations ≥ 1 mM. Planarian learning and memory investigated using classical Pavlovian conditioning experiments demonstrated that scopolamine (1 mM) negatively influenced associative learning indicated by a significant decrease in % positive behaviors from 86 % (control) to 14 % (1 mM scopolamine) and similarly altered memory retention, which is indicated by a decrease in % positive behaviors from 69 % (control) to 27 % (1 mM scopolamine). Galantamine demonstrated a complex behavior in planarian motility experiments since co-application of low concentrations of galantamine (0.001 and 0.01 mM) protected planaria against 1 mM scopolamine-induced motility impairments; however, pLMV was significantly decreased when planaria were tested in the presence of 0.1 mM galantamine alone. Effects of co-treatment of scopolamine and galantamine on memory retention in planaria via classical Pavlovian conditioning experiments showed that galantamine (0.01 mM) partially reversed scopolamine (1 mM)-induced memory deficits in planaria as the % positive behaviors increased from 27 to 63 %. The results demonstrate, for the first time in planaria, scopolamine's effects in causing learning and memory impairments and galantamine's ability in reversing scopolamine-induced memory impairments.

  9. Anticholinergic Versus Botulinum Toxin A Comparison Trial for the Treatment of Bothersome Urge Urinary Incontinence: ABC Trial

    PubMed Central

    Visco, Anthony G.; Brubaker, Linda; Richter, Holly E.; Nygaard, Ingrid; Paraiso, Marie Fidela; Menefee, Shawn A.; Schaffer, Joseph; Wei, John; Chai, Toby; Janz, Nancy; Spino, Cathie; Meikle, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This trial compares the change in urgency urinary incontinence episodes over 6 months, tolerability and cost effectiveness between women receiving daily anticholinergic therapy plus a single intra-detrusor injection of saline versus a single intra-detrusor injection of 100 unit of botulinum toxin A plus daily oral placebo tablets. We present the rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial, Anticholinergic versus Botulinum Toxin, Comparison Trial for the Treatment of Bothersome Urge Urinary Incontinence: ABC Trial, conducted by the NICHD-funded Pelvic Floor Disorders Network. We discuss the innovative nature of this trial and the challenges related to choice of patient population, maintaining masking, cost-effectiveness, ethical considerations, measuring adherence, and placebo development and testing. Enrollment began in April, 2010. 242 participants will be randomized and primary outcome data analysis is anticipated to begin in mid 2012. Several challenges in the trial design are discussed. Randomization to placebo intradetrusor injections may limit recruitment, potentially impacting generalizability. Other challenges included the heavy marketing of drugs for overactive bladder which could impact recruitment of drug naïve women. In addition, anticholinergic medications often cause dry mouth, making masking difficult. Finally, adverse reporting of transient urinary retention is challenging as there is no standardized definition; yet this is the most common adverse event following intradetrusor botulinum toxin injection. The ABC trial will help women with urgency urinary incontinence balance efficacy, side effects and cost of anticholinergic medication versus botulinum toxin intradetrusor injection. The results have the potential to fundamentally change the therapeutic approach to this condition. PMID:22008247

  10. A Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Disposition in Plasma, Saliva and Urine of Scopolamine after Intranasal Administration to Healthy Human Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Tam, V. H.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2014-01-01

    An intranasal gel formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under the Food and Drug Administration guidelines for clinical trials with an Investigative New Drug (IND) protocol. The aim of this project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationship between plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trials with INSCOP. Methods: Twelve healthy human subjects were administered three dose levels (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg) of INSCOP. Serial blood, saliva and urine samples were collected between 5 min and 24 h after dosing and scopolamine concentrations were measured by using a validated LC-MS-MS assay. Pharmacokinetic Compartmental models, using actual dosing and sampling times, were built using Phoenix (version 1.2). Model selection was based on the likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL) and comparison of the quality of fit plots. Results: The best structural model for INSCOP (minimal -2LL= 502.8) was established. It consisted of one compartment each for plasma, saliva and urine, respectively, which were connected with linear transport processes except the nonlinear PK process from plasma to saliva compartment. The best-fit estimates of PK parameters from individual PK compartmental analysis and Population PK model analysis were shown in Tables 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusion: A population PK model that could predict population and individual PK of scopolamine in plasma, saliva and urine after dosing was developed and validated. Incorporating a non-linear transfer from plasma to saliva compartments resulted in a significantly improved model fitting. The model could be used to predict scopolamine plasma concentrations from salivary and urinary drug levels, allowing non-invasive therapeutic monitoring of scopolamine in space and other remote environments.

  11. Hippocampal memory enhancing activity of pine needle extract against scopolamine-induced amnesia in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Lee, Hye-Won; Han, Jong-Min; Lee, Sam-Keun; Kim, Dong-Woon; Saravanakumar, Arthanari; Son, Chang-Gue

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the neuropharmacological effects of 30% ethanolic pine needle extract (PNE) on memory impairment caused by scopolamine injection in mice hippocampus. Mice were orally pretreated with PNE (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg) or tacrine (10 mg/kg) for 7 days, and scopolamine (2 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally, 30 min before the Morris water maze task on first day. To evaluate memory function, the Morris water maze task was performed for 5 days consecutively. Scopolamine increased the escape latency and cumulative path-length but decreases the time spent in target quadrant, which were ameliorated by pretreatment with PNE. Oxidant-antioxidant balance, acetylcholinesterase activity, neurogenesis and their connecting pathway were abnormally altered by scopolamine in hippocampus and/or sera, while those alterations were recovered by pretreatment with PNE. As lipid peroxidation, 4HNE-positive stained cells were ameliorated in hippocampus pretreated with PNE. Pretreatment with PNE increased the proliferating cells and immature neurons against hippocampal neurogenesis suppressed by scopolamine, which was confirmed by ki67- and DCX-positive stained cells. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) in both protein and gene were facilitated by PNE pretreatment. These findings suggest that PNE could be a potent neuropharmacological drug against amnesia, and its possible mechanism might be modulating cholinergic activity via CREB-BDNF pathway. PMID:25974329

  12. Hippocampal memory enhancing activity of pine needle extract against scopolamine-induced amnesia in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Lee, Hye-Won; Han, Jong-Min; Lee, Sam-Keun; Kim, Dong-Woon; Saravanakumar, Arthanari; Son, Chang-Gue

    2015-05-14

    We evaluated the neuropharmacological effects of 30% ethanolic pine needle extract (PNE) on memory impairment caused by scopolamine injection in mice hippocampus. Mice were orally pretreated with PNE (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg) or tacrine (10 mg/kg) for 7 days, and scopolamine (2 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally, 30 min before the Morris water maze task on first day. To evaluate memory function, the Morris water maze task was performed for 5 days consecutively. Scopolamine increased the escape latency and cumulative path-length but decreases the time spent in target quadrant, which were ameliorated by pretreatment with PNE. Oxidant-antioxidant balance, acetylcholinesterase activity, neurogenesis and their connecting pathway were abnormally altered by scopolamine in hippocampus and/or sera, while those alterations were recovered by pretreatment with PNE. As lipid peroxidation, 4HNE-positive stained cells were ameliorated in hippocampus pretreated with PNE. Pretreatment with PNE increased the proliferating cells and immature neurons against hippocampal neurogenesis suppressed by scopolamine, which was confirmed by ki67- and DCX-positive stained cells. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) in both protein and gene were facilitated by PNE pretreatment. These findings suggest that PNE could be a potent neuropharmacological drug against amnesia, and its possible mechanism might be modulating cholinergic activity via CREB-BDNF pathway.

  13. Anticholinergic toxicity from nightshade berry poisoning responsive to physostigmine.

    PubMed

    Ceha, L J; Presperin, C; Young, E; Allswede, M; Erickson, T

    1997-01-01

    The woody nightshade, Solanum dulcamara, belongs to the genus Solanum and its primary toxin is solanine. We report a large nightshade ingestion in a 4-yr-old girl who presented to the emergency department in acute anticholinergic crisis. The child was given 0.2 mg of intravenous physostigmine (0.02 mg/kg). Within 50 min, the patient received two additional equal doses with complete resolution of symptoms. After 36 h of observation, the child was discharged. Our patient presented with symptoms more suggestive of the deadly nightshade species, Atropa belladonna, which is native to Europe; however, a detailed laboratory analysis of the suspect berries revealed no atropine or hyoscyamine. Analysis did reveal sterols consistent with solanine. This is a unique case presentation of woody nightshade, S. dulcamara, poisoning presenting with anticholinergic crisis and responding to physostigmine.

  14. Anticholinergic syndrome and supraventricular tachycardia caused by lavender tea toxicity.

    PubMed

    Acikalin, Ayca; Gulen, Muge; Kara, Banu; Icme, Ferhat; Cagliyan, Caglar Emre; Satar, Salim

    2012-01-01

    Lavender plants have been used for their cosmetic and biologic benefits for many centries. Extracts from Lavandula plants have been found to cause antimuscarinic effects by blocking sodium and calcium ion channels in in vitro and in vivo studies. We present a case of poisoning by ingestion of tea made from Lavender stoechas ( grass). The patient was admitted to our emergency department with supraventricular tachycardia due to anticholinergic syndrome triggered by drinking lavender tea. On electrocardiography, a narrow QRS complex tachycardia was evident. After carotid sinus massage, the patient immediately returned to sinus rhythm. There are no reported data about the toxicity of Lavender stoechas plants with respect to supraventricular tachycardia, anticholinergic syndrome or sympathetic nerve activity.

  15. Effects of transdermal scopolamine, alone or in combination with cimetidine, on total 24 hour gastric acid secretion in patients with duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, C T; Feldman, M

    1986-01-01

    Transdermal scopolamine is an antimuscarinic preparation approved for use in the United States for prevention of motion sickness. A recent study using this drug (0.5 mg/patch) suggested that enough scopolamine was absorbed through the skin to reduce basal gastric acid secretion in patients with duodenal ulcer. We have compared the effect of transdermal scopolamine and oral cimetidine (400 mg twice daily) in seven men with chronic duodenal ulcer, both alone and in combination, on acid secretion throughout an entire 24 hour period in a placebo-controlled, randomised, double blinded cross over study. The effect of these drugs on basal, interprandial, and nocturnal gastric juice volume and hydrogen ion concentration also was measured. Transdermal scopolamine had no significant effect on mean 24 hour acid secretion (placebo, 409.4 mmol/day; scopolamine, 364.0 mmol/day) nor did it have a significant effect on gastric juice volume or hydrogen ion concentration. The combination of transdermal scopolamine plus cimetidine was not more effective than cimetidine alone in reducing total 24 hour acid secretion (mean, 231.8 versus 235.3 mmol/day) nor in reducing gastric juice volume or hydrogen ion concentration. PMID:3804025

  16. NMR Identification and MS Conformation of the Scopolamine Neurotoxin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    SCOPOLAMINE NEUROTOXIN Terry J. Henderson Jonathan M. Oyler RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DIRECTORATE David B. Cullinan MSCIENCE APPLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL...From - To) XX- 11-2007 Final Mar 2000 - Mar 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER NMR Identification and MS Conformation of the Scopolamine ...spectroscopy. These were used to elucidate the molecular structure of the powder’s major component and positively identify it as the scopolamine biotoxin

  17. Combined Scopolamine and Ethanol Treatment Results in a Locomotor Stimulant Response Suggestive of Synergism That is Not Blocked by Dopamine Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Scibelli, Angela C.; Phillips, Tamara J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are well positioned to mediate ethanol’s stimulant effects. To investigate this possibility, we examined the effects of scopolamine, a receptor subtype nonselective mAChR antagonist, on ethanol-induced stimulation in genotypes highly sensitive to this effect of ethanol. We also investigated whether the dopamine D1-like receptor antagonist, SCH-23390 or the dopamine D2-like receptor antagonist, haloperidol, could block the extreme stimulant response found following co-administration of scopolamine and ethanol. Methods Scopolamine (0, 0.0625, 0.125, 0.25, or 0.5 mg/kg) was given 10 minutes prior to saline or ethanol (0.75 to 2 g/kg) to female FAST (Experiment I) or DBA/2J (Experiment II) mice that were then tested for locomotion for 30 minutes. In Experiments III and IV, respectively, SCH-23390 (0, 0.015, or 0.03 mg/kg) was given 10 minutes prior, and haloperidol (0, 0.08, or 0.16 mg/kg) was given 2 minutes prior, to scopolamine (0 or 0.5 mg/kg), followed 10 minutes later by saline or ethanol (1.5 g/kg) and female DBA/2J mice were tested for locomotion for 30 minutes. Results FAST and DBA/2J mice displayed a robust enhancement of the locomotor effects of ethanol following pretreatment with scopolamine that was suggestive of synergism. SCH-23390 had no effect on the response to the scopolamine + ethanol drug combination, nor did it attenuate ethanol- or scopolamine-induced locomotor activity. Haloperidol, while attenuating the effects of ethanol, was not able to block the effects of scopolamine or the robust response to the scopolamine-ethanol drug combination. Conclusions These results suggest that while muscarinic receptor antagonism robustly enhances acute locomotor stimulation to ethanol, dopamine receptors are not involved in the super-additive interaction of scopolamine and ethanol treatment. They also suggest that in addition to cautions regarding the use of alcohol when scopolamine is clinically

  18. Relevance of dosage in adherence to treatment with long-acting anticholinergics in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, José Luis; Paredero, José Manuel; Piedra, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to assess the degree of adherence for two standard regimens for administrating anticholinergic drugs (12 and 24 hours) in patients with chronic obstruction of the airflow and to establish whether the use of a once-daily dose improves the level of treatment adherence. Methods We used long-acting anticholinergics (LAMAs) as a study variable, and included the entire health area of Castile-La Mancha, numbering 2,100,998 inhabitants, as the study population. We analyzed a total of 16,446 patients who had been prescribed a LAMA between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2013. The follow-up period, based on a centralized system of electronic prescription management, was extended until December 2014. Results During 2013, the medication collected was 7.4%–10.7% higher than indicated by labeling. This was very similar for all LAMAs, irrespective of the patient’s sex, the molecule, the device, and the drug dosage. We did not observe seasonal variations in the consumption of LAMAs, nor did we detect differences between prescription drugs for once-daily (every 24 hours) versus twice-daily (every 12 hours) administration, between the different molecules, or between different types of inhalers for the same molecule. The results were similar in 2014. Conclusion The principal conclusion of this study is that, in an area with a centralized management system of pharmacological prescriptions, adherence to treatment with LAMAs is very high, irrespective of the molecules or inhalation device. We did not find that patients who used twice-daily medication had a lower adherence. PMID:26929614

  19. Pharmacokinetics of Scopolamine Intranasal Gel Formulation (INSCOP) During Antiorthostatic Bedrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, L.; Du, B.; Daniels, V.

    2010-01-01

    Space Motion Sickness (SMS) is experienced during early flight days of space missions and on reduced gravity simulation flights which require treatment with medications. Oral administration of scopolamine tablets is still a common practice to prevent SMS symptoms. Bioavailability of medications taken by mouth for SMS is often low and variable. Intranasal (IN) administration of medications has been reported to achieve higher and more reliable bioavailability than from an equivalent oral dose. In this FDA reviewed phase II clinical trial, we evaluated pharmacokinetics of an investigative new drug formulation, INSCOP during ambulatory (AMB) and antiorthostatic bedrest (HBR), a ground-based microgravity analog. Twelve subjects including 6 males and 6 females received 0.2 and 0.4 mg doses of INSCOP on separate days during AMB and ABR in a randomized, double blind cross over experimental design. Blood samples were collected at regular time intervals for 24 h post dose and analyzed for free scopolamine concentrations by an LC-MS-MS method. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using concentration versus time data and compared between AMB and ABR conditions. Results indicated that maximum concentration and relative bioavailability increased marginally during ABR compared to AMB; differences in PK parameters between AMB and ABR were greater with 0.2 mg than with 0.4 mg dose. Gender specific differences in PK parameters was observed both during AMB and ABR with differences higher in females between the two conditions than in males. A significant observation is that while gender differences in PK appear to exist, the differences in primary PK parameters between AMB and ABR after IN administration, unlike oral administration, are minimal and may not be clinically significant for both genders.

  20. Transdermal Delivery of Scopolamine by Natural Submicron Injectors: In-Vivo Study in Pig

    PubMed Central

    Shaoul, Esther; Ayalon, Ari; Tal, Yossi; Lotan, Tamar

    2012-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery has made a notable contribution to medical practice, but has yet to fully achieve its potential as an alternative to oral delivery and hypodermic injections. While transdermal delivery systems would appear to provide an attractive solution for local and systemic drug delivery, only a limited number of drugs can be delivered through the outer layer of the skin. The most difficult to deliver in this way are hydrophilic drugs. The aquatic phylum Cnidaria, which includes sea anemones, corals, jellyfish and hydra, is one of the most ancient multicellular phyla that possess stinging cells containing organelles (cnidocysts), comprising a sophisticated injection system. The apparatus is folded within collagenous microcapsules and upon activation injects a thin tubule that immediately penetrates the prey and delivers its contents. Here we show that this natural microscopic injection system can be adapted for systemic transdermal drug delivery once it is isolated from the cells and uploaded with the drug. Using a topically applied gel containing isolated natural sea anemone injectors and the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine, we found that the formulated injectors could penetrate porcine skin and immediately deliver this hydrophilic drug. An in-vivo study in pigs demonstrated, for the first time, rapid systemic delivery of scopolamine, with Tmax of 30 minutes and Cmax 5 times higher than in controls treated topically with a scopolamine-containing gel without cnidocysts. The ability of the formulated natural injection system to penetrate a barrier as thick as the skin and systemically deliver an exogenous compound presents an intriguing and attractive alternative for hydrophilic transdermal drug delivery. PMID:22363770

  1. Transdermal delivery of scopolamine by natural submicron injectors: in-vivo study in pig.

    PubMed

    Shaoul, Esther; Ayalon, Ari; Tal, Yossi; Lotan, Tamar

    2012-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery has made a notable contribution to medical practice, but has yet to fully achieve its potential as an alternative to oral delivery and hypodermic injections. While transdermal delivery systems would appear to provide an attractive solution for local and systemic drug delivery, only a limited number of drugs can be delivered through the outer layer of the skin. The most difficult to deliver in this way are hydrophilic drugs. The aquatic phylum Cnidaria, which includes sea anemones, corals, jellyfish and hydra, is one of the most ancient multicellular phyla that possess stinging cells containing organelles (cnidocysts), comprising a sophisticated injection system. The apparatus is folded within collagenous microcapsules and upon activation injects a thin tubule that immediately penetrates the prey and delivers its contents. Here we show that this natural microscopic injection system can be adapted for systemic transdermal drug delivery once it is isolated from the cells and uploaded with the drug. Using a topically applied gel containing isolated natural sea anemone injectors and the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine, we found that the formulated injectors could penetrate porcine skin and immediately deliver this hydrophilic drug. An in-vivo study in pigs demonstrated, for the first time, rapid systemic delivery of scopolamine, with T(max) of 30 minutes and C(max) 5 times higher than in controls treated topically with a scopolamine-containing gel without cnidocysts. The ability of the formulated natural injection system to penetrate a barrier as thick as the skin and systemically deliver an exogenous compound presents an intriguing and attractive alternative for hydrophilic transdermal drug delivery.

  2. Effect of Anticholinergic Use for the Treatment of Overactive Bladder on Cognitive Function in Post-Menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Geller, Elizabeth J.; Crane, Andrea K.; Wells, Ellen C.; Robinson, Barbara L.; Jannelli, Mary L.; Khandelwal, Christine M.; Connolly, AnnaMarie; Parnell, Brent A.; Matthews, Catherine A.; Dumond, Julie B.; Busby-Whitehead, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Background Overactive bladder (OAB) is a common condition affecting the elderly. The mainstay of treatment for OAB is medical therapy with anticholinergics. However, adverse events have been reported with this class of drugs including cognitive changes. Objective To investigate the effect of an anticholinergic medication on cognitive function in postmenopausal women being treated for OAB. Study Design Prospective cohort study conducted from January to December 2010, with 12-week follow-up after medication initiation. Setting Urogynecology clinic at one academic medical center. Patients Women age 55 or older seeking treatment for OAB and opting for anticholinergic therapy were recruited. Intervention Baseline cognitive function was assessed via the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test – Revised Form (HVLT-R) (and its 5 subscales), the Orientation, Memory & Concentration (OMC) short form, and the Mini-Cog evaluation. After initiation of trospium chloride extended release, cognitive function was reassessed at Day 1, Week 1, Week 4 and Week 12. Bladder function was assessed via three condition-specific quality of life questionnaires. Secondary outcomes included change in bladder symptoms, correlation between cognitive and bladder symptoms, and overall medication compliance. Main Outcome Measure Change in HVLT-R score at Week 4 after medication initiation, compared to baseline (pre-medication) score. Results Of 50 women enrolled, 35 completed the assessment. Average age was 70.4 years and 77.1% had previously taken anticholinergic medication for OAB. At enrollment 65.7% had severe overactive bladder and 71.4% had severe urge incontinence. Cognitive function showed an initial decline on Day 1 in HVLT-R total score (p=0.037), HVLT-R Delayed Recognition subscale (p=0.011) and HVLT-R Recognition Bias subscale (p=0.01). At Week 1 the HVLT-R Learning subscale declined from baseline (p=0.029). All HVLT-R scores normalized by Week 4. OMC remained stable throughout. The Mini

  3. Methyl jasmonate increases the tropane alkaloid scopolamine and reduces natural herbivory in Brugmansia suaveolens: is scopolamine responsible for plant resistance?

    PubMed

    Arab, A; Alves, M N; Sartoratto, A; Ogasawara, D C; Trigo, J R

    2012-02-01

    The tropane alkaloid (TA) scopolamine is suggested to protect Brugmansia suaveolens (Solanaceae) against herbivorous insects. To test this prediction in a natural environment, scopolamine was induced by methyl jasmonate (MJ) in potted plants which were left 10 days in the field. MJ-treated plants increased their scopolamine concentration in leaves and herbivory decreased. These findings suggest a cause-effect relationship. However, experiments in laboratory showed that scopolamine affect differently the performance of the specialist larvae of the ithomiine butterfly Placidina euryanassa (C. Felder & R. Felder) and the generalist fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith): the specialist that sequester this TA from B. suaveolens leaves was not negatively affected, but the generalist was. Therefore, scopolamine probably acts only against insects that are not adapted to TAs. Other compounds that are MJ elicited may also play a role in plant resistance against herbivory by generalist and specialist insects, and deserve future investigations.

  4. [Preparation of scopolamine hydrobromide nanoparticles-in-microsphere system].

    PubMed

    Lü, Wei-ling; Hu, Jin-hong; Zhu, Quan-gang; Li, Feng-qian

    2010-07-01

    This study is to prepare scopolamine hydrobromide nanoparticles-in-microsphere system (SH-NiMS) and evaluate its drug release characteristics in vitro. SH nanoparticles were prepared by ionic crosslinking method with tripolyphosphate (TPP) as crosslinker and chitosan as carrier. Orthogonal design was used to optimize the formulation of SH nanoparticles, which took the property of encapsulation efficiency and drug loading as evaluation parameters. With HPMC as carrier, adjusted the parameters of spray drying technique and sprayed the SH nanoparticles in microspheres encaposulated by HPMC was formed and which is called nanoparticles-in-microsphere system (NiMS). SH-NiMS appearances were observed by SEM, structure was obsearved by FT-IR and the release characteristics in vitro were evaluated. The optimized formulation of SH nanoparticles was TPP/CS 1:3 (w/w), HPMC 0.3%, SH 0.2%. The solution peristaltic speed of the spray drying technique was adjusted to 15%, and the temperature of inlet was 110 degrees C. The encapsulation product yeild, drug loading and particle sizes of SH-NiMS were 94.2%, 20.4%, and 1256.5 nm, respectively. The appearances and the structure of SH-NiMS were good. The preparation method of SH-NiMS is stable and reliable to use, which provide a new way to develop new dosage form.

  5. Scopolamine provocation-based pharmacological MRI model for testing procognitive agents.

    PubMed

    Hegedűs, Nikolett; Laszy, Judit; Gyertyán, István; Kocsis, Pál; Gajári, Dávid; Dávid, Szabolcs; Deli, Levente; Pozsgay, Zsófia; Tihanyi, Károly

    2015-04-01

    There is a huge unmet need to understand and treat pathological cognitive impairment. The development of disease modifying cognitive enhancers is hindered by the lack of correct pathomechanism and suitable animal models. Most animal models to study cognition and pathology do not fulfil either the predictive validity, face validity or construct validity criteria, and also outcome measures greatly differ from those of human trials. Fortunately, some pharmacological agents such as scopolamine evoke similar effects on cognition and cerebral circulation in rodents and humans and functional MRI enables us to compare cognitive agents directly in different species. In this paper we report the validation of a scopolamine based rodent pharmacological MRI provocation model. The effects of deemed procognitive agents (donepezil, vinpocetine, piracetam, alpha 7 selective cholinergic compounds EVP-6124, PNU-120596) were compared on the blood-oxygen-level dependent responses and also linked to rodent cognitive models. These drugs revealed significant effect on scopolamine induced blood-oxygen-level dependent change except for piracetam. In the water labyrinth test only PNU-120596 did not show a significant effect. This provocational model is suitable for testing procognitive compounds. These functional MR imaging experiments can be paralleled with human studies, which may help reduce the number of false cognitive clinical trials.

  6. Antiamnesic activity of Syzygium cumini against scopolamine induced spatial memory impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Alikatte, Kanaka Latha; Akondi, Butchi Raju; Yerragunta, Venu Gopal; Veerareddy, Prabhakar Reddy; Palle, Suresh

    2012-11-01

    We evaluated the Antiamnesic effects of methanolic extract of Syzygium cumini (MESC) on spatial memory impairments induced by scopolamine (1 mg/kg, i.p.), a muscarinic antagonist, using the Radial arm maze, Morris water maze, learned helpless ness tests. Effect of MESC was evaluated and compared to standard drug, piracetam (200 mg/kg, i.p.). The MESC significantly (p<0.05) improved the impairment of short term or working memory induced by scopolamine in the Radial arm maze test, and significantly (p<0.05) reversed cognitive impairments in rats as measured by the learned helplessness test. In addition, MESC decreased escape latencies in the Morris water maze test. The activity of acetylcholinesterase in the brain was inhibited significantly (p<0.05) by treatment with MESC to a level similar to that observed in rats treated with piracetam. Moreover treatment with MESC (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) to scopolamine induced rats significantly (p<0.05) decreased TBARS levels which was accompanied by an increase in the activities of SOD and Catalase. MESC has dose dependent effect and 400 mg/kg dose shown more prominent results when compared to 200 mg/kg dose of MESC. These results indicate that MESC may exert anti-amnesic activity via inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and antioxidant mechanisms in the brain.

  7. Anticholinergic Toxic Syndrome Caused by Atropa Belladonna Fruit (Deadly Nightshade): A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Demirhan, Abdullah; Tekelioğlu, Ümit Yaşar; Yıldız, İsa; Korkmaz, Tanzer; Bilgi, Murat; Akkaya, Akcan; Koçoğlu, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Atropa Belladonna poisoning may lead to anticholinergic syndrome. Ingestion of high amounts of the plant may cause lethargy, coma, and even a serious clinical picture leading to death. In this case report, we aimed to present a case with anticholinergic syndrome that developed after ingestion of the fruit called “Deadly Nightshade” in our country. PMID:27366377

  8. Anticholinergic Exposure During Rehabilitation: Cognitive and Physical Function Outcomes in Patients With Delirium Superimposed On Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kolanowski, Ann; Mogle, Jacqueline; Fick, Donna M.; Campbell, Noll; Hill, Nikki; Mulhall, Paula; Behrens, Liza; Colancecco, Elise; Boustani, Malaz; Clare, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We examined the association between anticholinergic medication exposure and subsequent cognitive and physical function in patients with delirium superimposed on dementia during rehabilitation. We also examined length of stay and discharge disposition by anticholinergic medication exposure. Design In this secondary analysis we used control group data from an ongoing randomized clinical trial. Setting/Participants Participants with delirium and dementia were enrolled at admission to post-acute care. These 99 participants had a mean age of 86.11 (± 6.83) years; 67.6% were female; 98% were Caucasian; and 33% were positive for at least one APOE e4 allele. Measures We obtained daily measures of cognitive and physical function using: Digit Span; memory, orientation and attention items from the Montreal Cognitive Assessment; CLOX; Confusion Assessment Method; and Barthel Index. Anticholinergic medication exposure was measured weekly using the Anticholinergic Cognitive Burden Scale. Results Using multilevel models for time we found that greater use of clinically relevant anticholinergic medications in the previous week reduced cognitive and physical function, as measured by Digit Span Backwards and the Barthel Index, in the current week. There was no effect of anticholinergic medication use on delirium severity, and APOE status did not moderate any outcomes. Greater use of clinically relevant anticholinergic medications was related to longer length of stay but not discharge disposition. Conclusion For vulnerable older adults, anticholinergic exposure represents a potentially modifiable risk factor for poor attention, working memory, physical function and greater length of stay during rehabilitation. PMID:26419732

  9. Intranasal scopolamine affects the semicircular canals centrally and peripherally.

    PubMed

    Weerts, Aurélie P; Putcha, Lakshmi; Hoag, Stephen W; Hallgren, Emma; Van Ombergen, Angelique; Van de Heyning, Paul H; Wuyts, Floris L

    2015-08-01

    Space motion sickness (SMS), a condition caused by an intravestibular conflict, remains an important obstacle that astronauts encounter during the first days in space. Promethazine is currently the standard treatment of SMS, but scopolamine is used by some astronauts to prevent SMS. However, the oral and transdermal routes of administration of scopolamine are known to have substantial drawbacks. Intranasal administration of scopolamine ensures a fast absorption and rapid onset of therapeutic effect, which might prove to be suitable for use during spaceflights. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of intranasally administered scopolamine (0.4 mg) on the semicircular canals (SCCs) and the otoliths. This double-blind, placebo-controlled study was performed on 19 healthy male subjects. The function of the horizontal SCC and the vestibulo-ocular reflex, as well as the saccular function and utricular function, were evaluated. Scopolamine turned out to affect mainly the SCCs centrally and peripherally but also the utricles to a lesser extent. Centrally, the most probable site of action is the medial vestibular nucleus, where the highest density of muscarinic receptors has been demonstrated and afferent fibers from the SCCs and utricles synapse. Furthermore, our results suggest the presence of muscarinic receptors in the peripheral vestibular system on which scopolamine has a suppressive effect. Given the depressant actions on the SCCs, it is suggested that the pharmacodynamic effect of scopolamine may be attributed to the obliteration of intravestibular conflict that arises during (S)MS.

  10. The influence of scopolamine on motor control and attentional processes

    PubMed Central

    Bestaven, Emma; Kambrun, Charline; Guehl, Dominique; Cazalets, Jean-René

    2016-01-01

    Background: Motion sickness may be caused by a sensory conflict between the visual and the vestibular systems. Scopolamine, known to be the most effective therapy to control the vegetative symptoms of motion sickness, acts on the vestibular nucleus and potentially the vestibulospinal pathway, which may affect balance and motor tasks requiring both attentional process and motor balance. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of scopolamine on motor control and attentional processes. Methods: Seven subjects were evaluated on four different tasks before and after a subcutaneous injection of scopolamine (0.2 mg): a one-minute balance test, a subjective visual vertical test, a pointing task and a galvanic vestibular stimulation with EMG recordings. Results: The results showed that the reaction time and the movement duration were not modified after the injection of scopolamine. However, there was an increase in the center of pressure displacement during the balance test, a decrease in EMG muscle response after galvanic vestibular stimulation and an alteration in the perception of verticality. Discussion: These results confirm that low doses of scopolamine such as those prescribed to avoid motion sickness have no effect on attentional processes, but that it is essential to consider the responsiveness of each subject. However, scopolamine did affect postural control and the perception of verticality. In conclusion, the use of scopolamine to prevent motion sickness must be considered carefully because it could increase imbalances in situations when individuals are already at risk of falling (e.g., sailing, parabolic flight). PMID:27169000

  11. Hebb-Williams performance and scopolamine challenge in rats with partial immunotoxic hippocampal cholinergic deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Marques Pereira, Patricia; Cosquer, Brigitte; Schimchowitsch, Sarah; Cassel, Jean-Christophe

    2005-01-15

    Recent studies suggested that the cholinergic innervation of the hippocampus is not crucial for spatial learning, but it might be important for other forms of learning. This study assessed the effects of partial immunotoxic cholinergic lesions in the medial septum and concurrent scopolamine challenge in a complex learning task, the Hebb-Williams maze. Long-Evans rats were given intraseptal injections of 192 IgG-saporin (SAPO). Rats injected with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) served as controls. Starting 25 days after surgery, behavioural performance was assessed in the Hebb-Williams maze test without prior or after injection of scopolamine (0.17 or 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.). In SAPO rats, histochemical analysis showed a 40-45% decrease in the density of hippocampal AChE staining. The number of ChAT-positive cell bodies in the medial septum was also significantly decreased (-56%) and there was a non-significant reduction of the number of parvalbumine-positive neurons. The behavioural results demonstrated that the lesions induced small but significant learning deficits. At 0.17 mg/kg, scopolamine produced more impairments in SAPO rats than in PBS-injected rats, suggesting an additive effect between the partial lesion and the drug. These observations indicate that the Hebb-Williams test may be more sensitive to alterations of septohippocampal cholinergic function, than radial- or water-maze tasks. They also show that subtle learning deficits can be detected after partial lesions of the cholinergic septohippocampal pathways. Finally, the data from the scopolamine challenge are in keeping with clinical results showing higher sensitivity to muscarinic blockade in aged subjects in whom weaker cholinergic functions can be presumed.

  12. An Animal Model of Drug-Induced Thermoregulatory and Endurance Decrements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    suppression. Anticholinesterase drugs are used clinically for treatment of myasthenia gravis, Alzheimer’s disease , anticholinergic syndrome, and as a pretreatment against potential organophosphorus exposure.

  13. Efficacy assessment of various anticholinergic agents against topical sarin-induced miosis and visual impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Gore, Ariel; Brandeis, Rachel; Egoz, Inbal; Peri, David; Turetz, Joseph; Bloch-Shilderman, Eugenia

    2012-04-01

    Eye exposure to the organophosphorus (OP) irreversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitor sarin results in long-term miosis and reduction in visual function. Anticholinergic drugs, such as atropine or homatropine, which are used topically in order to counter these effects may produce mydriasis and partial cycloplegia, which may worsen visual performance. This study was aimed to test the efficacy of short-acting anticholinergic drugs against sarin-induced miosis and visual impairment, which will minimally insult vision. Long-Evans rats, exposed topically to various sarin doses from 0 to 10 μg, showed a dose-dependent miosis, which returned to pre-exposure levels within 24-48 h. Tropicamide treatment rapidly widened the miotic effect to a different extent depending on time following treatment and dosage given. Cyclopentolate, however, showed a delayed response that finally widened the pupils in a dose-dependent manner. Atropine treatment showed a rapid widening of the pinpoint pupils exceeding baseline level finally causing mydriasis. Light reflex test showed that the contraction ability of the iris following atropine treatment was impaired, as opposed to the use of tropicamide which facilitated the iris contraction, similar to control. Finally, tropicamide and atropine treatments ameliorated the visual impairment, as opposed to cyclopentolate, which worsened visual performance. Considering that tropicamide treatment against sarin exposure did not cause mydriasis nor did it impair the iris contraction flexibility as a response to light, the use of this drug should be taken into consideration as a first-choice topical treatment against OP intoxication.

  14. Associations between Anticholinergic Burden and Adverse Health Outcomes in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Crispo, James A. G.; Willis, Allison W.; Thibault, Dylan P.; Fortin, Yannick; Hays, Harlen D.; McNair, Douglas S.; Bjerre, Lise M.; Kohen, Dafna E.; Perez-Lloret, Santiago; Mattison, Donald R.; Krewski, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background Elderly adults should avoid medications with anticholinergic effects since they may increase the risk of adverse events, including falls, delirium, and cognitive impairment. However, data on anticholinergic burden are limited in subpopulations, such as individuals with Parkinson disease (PD). The objective of this study was to determine whether anticholinergic burden was associated with adverse outcomes in a PD inpatient population. Methods Using the Cerner Health Facts® database, we retrospectively examined anticholinergic medication use, diagnoses, and hospital revisits within a cohort of 16,302 PD inpatients admitted to a Cerner hospital between 2000 and 2011. Anticholinergic burden was computed using the Anticholinergic Risk Scale (ARS). Primary outcomes were associations between ARS score and diagnosis of fracture and delirium. Secondary outcomes included associations between ARS score and 30-day hospital revisits. Results Many individuals (57.8%) were prescribed non-PD medications with moderate to very strong anticholinergic potential. Individuals with the greatest ARS score (≥4) were more likely to be diagnosed with fractures (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 1.56, 95% CI: 1.29–1.88) and delirium (AOR: 1.61, 95% CI: 1.08–2.40) relative to those with no anticholinergic burden. Similarly, inpatients with the greatest ARS score were more likely to visit the emergency department (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR): 1.32, 95% CI: 1.10–1.58) and be readmitted (AHR: 1.16, 95% CI: 1.01–1.33) within 30-days of discharge. Conclusions We found a positive association between increased anticholinergic burden and adverse outcomes among individuals with PD. Additional pharmacovigilance studies are needed to better understand risks associated with anticholinergic medication use in PD. PMID:26939130

  15. Total isoflavones from soybean and tempeh reversed scopolamine-induced amnesia, improved cholinergic activities and reduced neuroinflammation in brain.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aliya; Ramasamy, Kalavathy; Jaafar, Siti Murnirah; Majeed, Abu Bakar Abdul; Mani, Vasudevan

    2014-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to compare the neuroprotective effects between total isoflavones from soybean and tempeh against scopolamine-induced cognitive dysfunction. Total isoflavones (10, 20 and 40mg/kg) from soybean (SI) and tempeh (TI) were administered orally to different groups of rats (n=6) for 15days. Piracetam (400mg/kg, p.o.) was used as a standard drug while scopolamine (1mg/kg, i.p.) was used to induce amnesia in the animals. Radial arm and elevated plus mazes served as exteroceptive behavioural models to measure memory. Brain cholinergic activities (acetylcholine and acetylcholinesterase) and neuroinflammatory activities (COX-1, COX-2, IL-1β and IL10) were also assessed. Treatment with SI and TI significantly reversed the scopolamine effect and improved memory with TI group at 40mg/kg, p.o. exhibiting the best improvement (p<0.001) in rats. The TI (10, 20 and 40mg/kg, p.o.) significantly increased (p<0.001) acetylcholine and reduced acetylcholinesterase levels. Meanwhile, only a high dose (40mg/kg, p.o.) of SI showed significant improvement (p<0.05) in the cholinergic activities. Neuroinflammation study also showed that TI (40mg/kg, p.o.) was able to reduce inflammation better than SI. The TI ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory in rats through the cholinergic neuronal pathway and by prevention of neuroinflammation.

  16. Cognitive-enhancing and antioxidant activities of iridoid glycosides from Scrophularia buergeriana in scopolamine-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Eun Ju; Lee, Ki Yong; Kim, Seung Hyun; Sung, Sang Hyun; Kim, Young Choong

    2008-06-24

    The cognitive-enhancing activities of E-harpagoside and 8-O-E-p-methoxycinnamoylharpagide (MCA-Hg) isolated from Scrophularia buergeriana were evaluated in scopolamine-induced amnesic mice by the Morris water maze and by passive avoidance tests. E-harpagoside and MCA-Hg significantly improved the impairment of reference memory induced by scopolamine in the Morris water maze test. The mean escape latency, the mean path length and swimming movement were also improved by both compounds. In passive avoidance test, E-harpagoside and MCA-Hg (2 mg/kg body weight, p.o.) significantly ameliorated scopolamine-induced amnesia by as much as 70% of the level found in normal control mice. Donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and the most widely used drug for AD treatment was employed as a positive control. The activity of acetylcholinesterase was inhibited significantly by E-harpagoside or MCA-Hg within the cortex and hippocampus to a level similar to that observed in mice treated with donepezil (2 mg/kg body weight, p.o.). Moreover, treatment with E-harpagoside or MCA-Hg to scopolamine-induced amnesic mice significantly decreased TBARS level which was accompanied by an increase in the activities or contents of glutathione reductase, SOD and reduced GSH. We believe these data demonstrate that E-harpagoside or MCA-Hg exerted potent cognitive-enhancing activity through both anti-acetylcholinesterase and antioxidant mechanisms.

  17. Transdermal scopolamine for prevention of motion sickness : clinical pharmacokinetics and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Nachum, Zohar; Shupak, Avi; Gordon, Carlos R

    2006-01-01

    -term use of the drug. The adverse effects produced by TTS-S, although less frequent, are qualitatively typical of those reported for the oral and parenteral formulations of this agent. Dry mouth occurs in about 50-60% of subjects, drowsiness in up to 20%, and allergic contact dermatitis in 10%. Transient impairment of ocular accommodation has also been observed, in some cases possibly the result of finger-to-eye contamination. Low-dose pyridostigmine was found effective in preventing cycloplegia but not mydriasis. Adverse CNS effects, including toxic psychosis (mainly in elderly and paediatric patients), have been reported only occasionally, as have difficulty in urinating, headache, rashes and erythema. Adverse effects were not correlated with plasma scopolamine concentrations. TTS-S produced only about half the incidence of drowsiness caused by oral dimenhydrinate or cinnarizine, and a level of adverse effects similar to that found with oral meclizine. Performance is not affected by short-term use. Prolonged or repeated application may cause some impairment of memory storage for new information. However, sea studies revealed significantly less reports of a decrement in performance or drowsiness due to prevention of sea sickness. The recommended dosage is a single TTS-S patch applied to the postauricular area at least 6-8 hours before the anti-motion sickness effect is required. For faster protection, the patch may be applied 1 hour before the journey in combination with oral scopolamine (0.3 or 0.6 mg). After 72 hours, the patch should be removed and a new one applied behind the opposite ear. Its place in therapy is mainly on long journeys (6-12 hours or longer), to avoid repeated oral doses, or when oral therapy is ineffective or intolerable.

  18. Protective Role of Ashwagandha Leaf Extract and Its Component Withanone on Scopolamine-Induced Changes in the Brain and Brain-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rumani; Saxena, Nishant; Kaul, Sunil C.; Wadhwa, Renu; Thakur, Mahendra K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Scopolamine is a well-known cholinergic antagonist that causes amnesia in human and animal models. Scopolamine-induced amnesia in rodent models has been widely used to understand the molecular, biochemical, behavioral changes, and to delineate therapeutic targets of memory impairment. Although this has been linked to the decrease in central cholinergic neuronal activity following the blockade of muscarinic receptors, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanism(s) particularly the effect on neuroplasticity remains elusive. In the present study, we have investigated (i) the effects of scopolamine on the molecules involved in neuronal and glial plasticity both in vivo and in vitro and (ii) their recovery by alcoholic extract of Ashwagandha leaves (i-Extract). Methodology/Principal Findings As a drug model, scopolamine hydrobromide was administered intraperitoneally to mice and its effect on the brain function was determined by molecular analyses. The results showed that the scopolamine caused downregulation of the expression of BDNF and GFAP in dose and time dependent manner, and these effects were markedly attenuated in response to i-Extract treatment. Similar to our observations in animal model system, we found that the scopolamine induced cytotoxicity in IMR32 neuronal and C6 glioma cells. It was associated with downregulation of neuronal cell markers NF-H, MAP2, PSD-95, GAP-43 and glial cell marker GFAP and with upregulation of DNA damage- γH2AX and oxidative stress- ROS markers. Furthermore, these molecules showed recovery when cells were treated with i-Extract or its purified component, withanone. Conclusion Our study suggested that besides cholinergic blockade, scopolamine-induced memory loss may be associated with oxidative stress and Ashwagandha i-Extract, and withanone may serve as potential preventive and therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative disorders and hence warrant further molecular analyses. PMID:22096544

  19. Scopolamine-induced deficits in social memory in mice: reversal by donepezil.

    PubMed

    Riedel, G; Kang, S H; Choi, D Y; Platt, B

    2009-12-01

    Deficits in social behaviour is a characteristic of numerous mental disorders including autism, schizophrenia, depression and Alzheimer's disease. For the assessment of pharmacological and genetic experimental disease models, conventional social interaction tasks bear the uncertainty that any drug-induced abnormality of the investigator may feed back to the drug-free companion modifying its reactions. A considerable technical improvement was recently reported by Moy et al. [Moy SS, Nadler JJ, Perez A, Barbaro RP, Johns JM, Magnuson T, et al. Sociability and preference for social novelty in five inbred strains: an approach to assess autistic-like behaviours in mice. Genes Brain Behav 2004;3:287-302] in which the drug free partner is confined to a small cage and social contacts of the investigator are recorded uncontaminated of any social reactions of the stranger. Using this novel behavioural paradigm, we here show in C57Bl/6 female mice that sociability (social interaction with a stranger mouse) is not impaired after administration of the anxiolytic diazepam (0.1-1 mg/kg) or the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine hydrobromide (0.1-1 mg/kg). However, social memory tested after a short time interval was impaired by both drugs in a dose-dependent manner (diazepam: > or = 0.5mg/kg; scopolamine: > or = 0.3mg/kg). The scopolamine-induced short-term memory deficit was reversed to normal by the choline esterase inhibitor donepezil (1 mg/kg). Given this dependence of social recognition on the cholinergic system, combined with the clinical observation of reduced social contacts in dementia patients, sociability may offer a novel endpoint biomarker with translational value in experimental models of cognitive dysfunction.

  20. Effects of discontinuing anticholinergic treatment on movement disorders, cognition and psychopathology in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Beauclair, Linda; Annable, Lawrence; Bélanger, Marie-Claire; Kolivakis, Theodore T.; Margolese, Howard C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Physicians have prescribed anticholinergic agents such as benztropine, procyclidine, biperiden and trihexyphenidyl for treatment and prophylaxis of antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) for decades. Anticholinergic agents can however worsen tardive dyskinesia and cause many adverse effects, including cognitive impairment. Previous studies of anticholinergic discontinuation in patients with schizophrenia receiving antipsychotics have yielded a wide range of EPS relapse rates. Improvement in cognition after anticholinergic withdrawal was observed in some studies. Objective: This study evaluated the effect of anticholinergic discontinuation on movement disorders, cognition and general psychopathology after a 4-week taper in 20 outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder treated with antipsychotics. Results: Eighteen of twenty patients successfully discontinued their anticholinergic medication; two did not because of akathisia. Repeated measures analysis of variance did not show a significant effect of anticholinergic discontinuation on total Extrapyramidal Symptoms Rating Scale score or on the Parkinsonism, Akathisia, Dystonia or Tardive Dyskinesia subscales. However, significant improvement was found on the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia composite z score at weeks 6, 8 and 12 compared with baseline. Significant improvements were seen on the motor and the symbol-coding tasks. No significant effects were observed on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Clinical Global Impression – Severity and Clinical Global Impression – Improvement scales. Conclusion: In this 12-week study of anticholinergic discontinuation in 20 outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, gradual decrease and discontinuation of anticholinergics led to a positive effect on cognition. There were no adverse consequences on general psychopathology and no significant differences for 18 of 20 subjects on movement disorders

  1. Procognitive effect of AC-3933 in aged mice, and synergistic effect of combination with donepezil in scopolamine-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takashi; Hatayama, Yuki; Nakamichi, Keiko; Yoshida, Naoyuki

    2014-12-15

    We have previously reported that AC-3933, a newly developed benzodiazepine receptor partial inverse agonist, facilitates acetylcholine release in the hippocampus and ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory deficits in rats. To further confirm the procognitive effect of AC-3933, we assessed in this study the beneficial effects of this compound in aged mice using the Y-maze and object recognition tests. In addition, we investigated the synergistic effect of AC-3933 and donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor, on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice. In aged mice, oral administration of AC-3933 at doses of 0.05-0.1 mg/kg and 0.05 mg/kg significantly improved spatial working memory and episodic memory, respectively. In scopolamine-treated mice, both AC-3933 and donepezil significantly ameliorated memory deficits in the Y-maze test at doses of 0.3-3 mg/kg and 10-15 mg/kg, respectively. The beneficial effect of AC-3933, but not that of donepezil, on scopolamine-induced memory impairment was antagonized by flumazenil, a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, indicating that the procognitive action of AC-3933 arises via a mechanism different from that of donepezil. Co-administration of donepezil at the suboptimal dose of 3 mg/kg with AC-3933 at doses of 0.1-1 mg/kg significantly ameliorated scopolamine-induced memory impairment, suggesting that AC-3933 potentiates the effect of donepezil on memory impairment induced by cholinergic hypofunction. These findings indicate that AC-3933 not only has good potential as a cognitive enhancer by itself, but also is useful as a concomitant drug for the treatment of Alzheimer׳s disease.

  2. CDP-choline attenuates scopolamine induced disruption of prepulse inhibition in rats: involvement of central nicotinic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Uslu, Gulsah; Savci, Vahide; Buyukuysal, Levent R; Goktalay, Gokhan

    2014-05-21

    It has been shown that cholinergic system plays an important role in schizophrenia-associated cognitive deficits, therefore cholinergic drugs are novel targets for the treatment of cognitive deficits seen in schizophrenia. We aimed to test the effects of CDP-choline on sensorimotor gating functioning, which is an important function for the integration of sensory and cognitive information processing and the execution of appropriate motor responses. In this study, prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle reflex was used to test the sensorimotor gating functioning, and the effects of CDP-choline on scopolamine induced PPI disruption were evaluated in rats. Furthermore, the contribution of the cholinergic mechanism in these effects was determined. CDP-choline (75, 250, 500mg/kg) by itself had no effect on the PPI in naïve animals. Scopolamine (0.4mg/kg; s.c.) significantly decreased the PPI levels and intraperitoneal administration of CDP-choline (250mg/kg) attenuated the effects of scopolamine. A non-specific nicotinic receptor antagonist, mecamylamine and an alpha 7 nicotinic receptor (α7-nAChR) antagonist, methyllycaconitine were used to investigate the mechanism underlying the effects of CDP-choline. Mecamylamine (3mg/kg; s.c.), and methyllycaconitine (10μg; i.c.v.) completely blocked the reversal effects of CDP-choline on scopolamine induced disruption of PPI. These results demonstrate that exogenous administration of CDP-choline attenuates scopolamine induced PPI disruption and show that the activation of central α7-nAChR may play a critical role in this effect.

  3. Effects of rivastigmine and memantine alone and in combination on learning and memory in rats with scopolamine-induced amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Yanev, Peter Georgiev; Dimitrova, Darinka Slavcheva

    2015-01-01

    Background Cholinesterase inhibitors and glutamate blockers are commonly used for the treatment of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease. The aim was to evaluate the effects of rivastigmine and memantine alone or in combination in rats with scopolamine-impaired memory. Method 5 groups of rats were used: control, scopolamine (model), model with rivastigmine, model with memantine, and model with both drugs. Active avoidance test was performed and the number of conditioned responses, unconditioned responses and intertrial crossing were recorded. Passive avoidance tests step-through with criteria latency of reaction 180 s in the light chamber and step-down with criteria latency of reaction 60 s on the platform were done. Results Control rats learned the task and kept it on memory tests. Scopolamine treated rats failed to perform it. The rivastigmine, memantine and its combination groups showed increased CRs during learning and memory retention tests. In both passive avoidance tests an increased latency of reaction was observed in the drug treated groups. Conclusion The combination of both drugs rivastigmine and memantine is more effective than the use of the single drug in cognitive impaired rats. Cholinesterase inhibitors and NMDA blockers may be combined in the treatment of different kind of dementias.

  4. Scopolamine and MK801-induced working memory deficits in rats are not reversed by CBD-rich cannabis extracts.

    PubMed

    Fadda, Paola; Robinson, Lianne; Fratta, Walter; Pertwee, Roger G; Riedel, Gernot

    2006-04-03

    Smoking marijuana causes working and short-term memory deficits, an effect that is mediated by cannabinoid receptor (CB1) activation in the brain. While this may be due to the main psychoactive constituent Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC), plant extracts also contain other cannabinoid and terpenoid compounds with unknown properties. Towards this end, we have recently shown that high concentrations of plant extracts rich in cannabidiol (CBD) can reverse working memory deficits induced by Delta9-THC which is a remaining contaminant of this extract [Fadda P, Robinson L, Fratta W, Pertwee RG, Riedel G. Differential effects of THC- and CBD-rich cannabis-extracts on working memory in rats. Neuropahrmacology 2004;47:1170-9]. Since this effect was dose-dependent and indicative of memory enhancing qualities of the CBD-rich extract, this prompted a wider investigation into the effects of CBD on other forms of amnesia in order to determine the mechanism of action and to reveal its potency against anticholinergic and antiglutamatergic agents. We employed a spatial delayed matching to position task in the open-field water maze. Both scopolamine (0.2 mg/kg i.p.) and dizocilpine (MK801: 0.1mg/kg i.p.) impaired working memory at delays of 30 s and 4 h. Two doses of CBD-rich extracts (5 and 10 mg/kg), which did not affect working memory when given alone, were unable to reverse these deficits when co-administered with scopolamine or MK801. These data suggest that reversal of working memory deficits by CBD-rich extracts are specific to the cannabinoid system and do not compensate for acutely induced cholinergic or glutamatergic receptor hypoactivity.

  5. Intra- and inter-laboratory validation of a dipstick immunoassay for the detection of tropane alkaloids hyoscyamine and scopolamine in animal feed.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Patrick P J; von Holst, Christoph; Nivarlet, Noan; van Egmond, Hans P

    2014-01-01

    Tropane alkaloids (TAs) are toxic secondary metabolites produced by plants of, inter alia, the genera Datura (thorn apple) and Atropa (deadly nightshade). The most relevant TAs are (-)-L-hyoscyamine and (-)-L-scopolamine, which act as antagonists of acetylcholine muscarinic receptors and can induce a variety of distinct toxic syndromes in mammals (anti-cholinergic poisoning). The European Union has regulated the presence of seeds of Datura sp. in animal feeds, specifying that the content should not exceed 1000 mg kg(-1) (Directive 2002/32/EC). For materials that have not been ground, visual screening methods are often used to comply with these regulations, but these cannot be used for ground materials and compound feeds. Immunological assays, preferably in dipstick format, can be a simple and cost-effective approach to monitor feedstuffs in an HACCP setting in control laboratories. So far no reports have been published on immunoassays that are capable of detecting both hyoscyamine and scopolamine with equal sensitivity and that can be used, preferably in dipstick format, for application as a fast screening tool in feed analysis. This study presents the results obtained for the in-house and inter-laboratory validation of a dipstick immunoassay for the detection of hyoscyamine and scopolamine in animal feed. The target level was set at 800 µg kg(-1) for the sum of both alkaloids. By using a representative set of compound feeds during validation and a robust study design, a reliable impression of the relevant characteristics of the assay could be obtained. The dipstick test displayed similar sensitivity towards the two alkaloids and it could be concluded that the test has a very low probability of producing a false-positive result at blank level or a false-negative result at target level. The assay can be used for monitoring of TAs in feedstuffs, but has also potential as a quick screening tool in food- or feed-related poisonings.

  6. Mechanisms of antimotion sickness drugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. D.; Manno, J. E.; Wood, M. J.; Manno, B. R.; Redetzki, H. M.

    1987-01-01

    Eight subjects, male and female, were rotated using the step method to progressively increase the speed of rotation (+2 rpm) after every 40 head movements to a maximum of 35 rpm. The end point for motion sickness was the Graybiel Malaise III total of symptoms short of frank nausea. The drug treatments were placebo, scopolamine 0.6 mg and 1 mg, scopolamine 0.6 mg/d-amphetamine 10 mg, scopolamine 1 mg/d-amphetamine 10 mg, and amphetamine 10 mg. Scopolamine increased tolerated head movements over placebo level by + 81; scopolamine 1 mg + 183; d-amphetamine by + 118; scopolamine 0.6/d-amphetamine by + 165; and scopolamine 1 mg/d-amphetamine 10 mg by + 201. The drugs effective in preventing motion sickness are considered to be divided into those with central acetylcholine blocking activity and those which enhance norepinephrine activity. A combination of both of these actions produces the most effective antimotion sickness medications. It is concluded that the balance between the acetylcholine and norepinephrine activity in the CNS appears to be responsible for motion sickness.

  7. Attenuation of scopolamine-induced cognitive dysfunction by obovatol.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong-Young; Lee, Young-Jung; Lee, Sun Young; Lee, Yoot Mo; Lee, Hyun Hee; Choi, Im Seop; Oh, Ki-Wan; Han, Sang Bae; Nam, Sang-Yoon; Hong, Jin Tae

    2012-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent cause of dementia in the elderly people. The disease is pathologically characterized by extracellular deposition of beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ), cholinergic neurodegeneration and elevation of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity in the affected regions. In this study, we investigated the effects of obovatol on memory dysfunction, which was caused by scopolamine. Obovatol (0.2, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg for 7 day) attenuated scopolamine (1 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced amnesia in a dose-dependent manner, as revealed by the Morris water maze test and step-through passive avoidance test. Mechanism studies exhibited that obovatol dose-dependently alleviated scopolamine-induced increase in Aβ generation and β-secretase activity in the cortex and hippocampus. Obovatol also attenuated scopolamine-induced rise in AChE activity in the cortex and hippocampus. Obovatol might rescue scopolamine-mediated impaired learning and memory function by attenuating Aβ accumulation and stabilizing cholinergic neurotransmission, which suggests that the natural compound could be a useful agent for the prevention of the development or progression of AD neurodegeneration.

  8. Antiamnesic effect of stevioside in scopolamine-treated rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepika; Puri, Munish; Tiwary, Ashok K.; Singh, Nirmal; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2010-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to explore the potential of stevioside in memory dysfunction of rats. Memory impairment was produced by scopolamine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) in animals. Morris water maze (MWM) test was employed to assess learning and memory. Brain acetylcholinestrase enzyme (AChE) activity was measured to assess the central cholinergic activity. The levels of brain thiobarbituric acid-reactive species (TBARS) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were estimated to assess the degree of oxidative stress. Scopolamine administration induced significant impairment of learning and memory in rats, as indicated by a marked decrease in MWM performance. Scopolamine administration also produced a significant enhancement of brain AChE activity and brain oxidative stress (increase in TBARS and decrease in GSH) levels. Pretreatment of stevioside (250 mg/kg dose orally) significantly reversed scopolamine-induced learning and memory deficits along with attenuation of scopolamine-induced rise in brain AChE activity and brain oxidative stress levels. It may be concluded that stevioside exerts a memory-preservative effect in cognitive deficits of rats possibly through its multiple actions. PMID:20871768

  9. Nocturnal Elevation of Plasma Melatonin and Urinary 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid in Young Men: Attempts at Modification by Brief Changes in Environmental Lighting and Sleep and by Autonomic Drugs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    DIURNAL VARIATIONS, *BIOLOGICAL RHYTHMS, *AUTONOMIC AGENTS, HUMANS, BIOCHEMISTRY, LIGHT, METABOLISM, DARKNESS, PHYSIOLOGY, DRUGS, SECRETION, INDOLES, ACETIC ACID , ENDOCRINOLOGY, PINEAL GLAND, ISOPROTERENOL, SCOPOLAMINE.

  10. Neonatal treatment with scopolamine butylbromide prevents metabolic dysfunction in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Malta, Ananda; Souza, Aline Amenencia de; Ribeiro, Tatiane Aparecida; Francisco, Flávio Andrade; Pavanello, Audrei; Prates, Kelly Valério; Tófolo, Laize Peron; Miranda, Rosiane Aparecida; Oliveira, Júlio Cezar de; Martins, Isabela Peixoto; Previate, Carina; Gomes, Rodrigo Mello; Franco, Claudinéia Conationi da Silva; Natali, Maria Raquel Marçal; Palma-Rigo, Kesia; Mathias, Paulo Cezar de Freitas

    2016-01-01

    We tested whether treatment with a cholinergic antagonist could reduce insulin levels in early postnatal life and attenuate metabolic dysfunctions induced by early overfeeding in adult male rats. Wistar rats raised in small litters (SLs, 3 pups/dam) and normal litters (NLs, 9 pups/dam) were used in models of early overfeeding and normal feeding, respectively. During the first 12 days of lactation, animals in the SL and NL groups received scopolamine butylbromide (B), while the controls received saline (S) injections. The drug treatment decreased insulin levels in pups from both groups, and as adults, these animals showed improvements in glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, vagus nerve activity, fat tissue accretion, insulinemia, leptinemia, body weight gain and food intake. Low glucose and cholinergic insulinotropic effects were observed in pancreatic islets from both groups. Low protein expression was observed for the muscarinic M3 acetylcholine receptor subtype (M3mAChR), although M2mAChR subtype expression was increased in SL-B islets. In addition, beta-cell density was reduced in drug-treated rats. These results indicate that early postnatal scopolamine butylbromide treatment inhibits early overfeeding-induced metabolic dysfunctions in adult rats, which might be caused by insulin decreases during lactation, associated with reduced parasympathetic activity and expression of M3mAChR in pancreatic islets. PMID:27561682

  11. Nootropic activity of Crataeva nurvala Buch-Ham against scopolamine induced cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Atanu; Shashidhara, Shastry Chakrakodi; Saha, Santanu

    2015-01-01

    Loss of cognition is one of the age related mental problems and a characteristic symptom of neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer’s. Crataeva nurvala Buch-Ham, a well explored traditional Indian medicinal plant of Westernghats, is routinely used as folkloric medicine to treat various ailments in particular urolithiasis and neurological disorders associated with cognitive dysfunction. The objective of the study was to evaluate the nootropic activity of Crataeva nurvala Buch-Ham stem bark in different learning and memory paradigm viz. Elevated plus maze and Y-maze against scopolamine induced cognitive impairment. Moreover, to elucidate possible mechanism, we studied the influence of Crataeva nurvala ethanolic extract on central cholinergic activity via estimating the whole brain acetyl cholinesterase enzyme. Ethanolic extracts of Crataeva nurvala (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight) were administered to adult Wistar rats for successive seven days and the acquisition, retention and retrieval of spatial recognition memory was determined against scopolamine (1 mg/kg, i.p.) induced amnesia through exteroceptive behavioral models viz. Elevated plus maze and Y-maze models. Further, whole brain acetyl cholinesterase enzyme was estimated through Ellman’s method. Pretreatment with Crataeva nurvala ethanolic extract significantly improved spatial learning and memory against scopolamine induced amnesia. Moreover, Crataeva nurvala extract decreased rat brain acetyl cholinesterase activity in a dose dependent manner and comparable to the standard drug Piracetam. The results indicate that ethanolic extract of Crataeva nurvala might be a useful as nootropic agent to delay the onset and reduce the severity of symptoms associated with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. The underlying mechanism of action of its nootropic potentiality might be attributed to its anticholinesterase property. PMID:27065767

  12. Assessment of the pharmacodynamics of intranasal, intravenous and oral scopolamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietze, Karen J.

    1990-01-01

    Space motion sickness is an important issue in the space medical sciences program. One of the objectives of the ongoing clinical experimental protocol Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine in Normal Subjects is to evaluate the pharmacodynamics of scopolamine using salivary flow rate and pH profiles and cognitive performance tests as pharmacodynamic parameters. Normal volunteers collected saliva and performed the NTI Multiresource Performance Battery tests at designed time intervals to establish control saliva flow rates, salivary pH profiles, and the characteristics of the learning curve for the performance program under normal conditions. In the clinical part of the study, saliva samples and performance test scores are collected from healthy nonsmoking subjects after receiving a single 0.4 mg dose of either intranasal, intravenous, or oral scopolamine.

  13. Activation of dopamine D1 receptors in the medial septum improves scopolamine-induced amnesia in the dorsal hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza; Ardjmand, Abolfazl; Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Rezayof, Ameneh

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, we investigated the influence of intra-medial septum (intra-MS) injections of dopamine D1 receptor agents on amnesia induced by intra-CA1 injections of a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, scopolamine. This study used a step-through inhibitory (passive) avoidance task to assess memory in adult male Wistar rats. The results showed that in the animals that received post-training intra-MS injections of saline, intra-CA1 administrations of scopolamine (0.75, 1, and 2 μg/rat) decreased inhibitory avoidance (IA) memory consolidation as evidenced by a decrease in step-through latency on the test day, which was suggestive of drug-induced amnesia. Post-training intra-MS injections of a dopamine D1 receptor agonist, SKF38393 at doses of 0.1, 0.15, and 0.3 μg/rat had no effect, but at dose of 0.5 μg/rat impaired IA memory consolidation. Interestingly, intra-MS injections of SKF38393 (0.15, 0.3 and 0.5 μg/rat) significantly prevented amnesia induced by intra-CA1 injections of scopolamine (1 μg/rat). Intra-MS injections of a dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390 (0.5 and 0.75 μg/rat) by itself impaired IA memory consolidation, and also at dose of 0.75 μg/rat increased amnesia induced by intra-CA1 administrations of an ineffective dose of scopolamine (0.5 μg/rat). Post-training intra-MS injections of ineffective doses of SCH23390 (0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 μg/rat) prevented an effective dose of SKF38393 response to the impaired effect of scopolamine. These results suggest that dopamine D1 receptors in the MS via projection neurons to the hippocampus affect impairment of memory consolidation induced by intra-CA injections of scopolamine.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine Gel Formulation (Inscop)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Jason L.; Du, Brian; Daniels, Vernie; Simmons, Rita; Buckey, Jay; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2009-01-01

    Space Motion Sickness (SMS) is commonly experienced by astronauts and often requires treatment with medications during early flight days of space missions. Orally administered scopolamine is commonly used by astronauts to prevent SMS. Bioavailability of oral (PO) SMS medications is often low and highly variable. Intranasal (IN) administration of medications achieves higher and more reliable bioavailability than from an equivalent PO dose. Methods: To test the safety and reliability of INSCOP, two clinical studies were performed, a dose escalation study and a comparison study administering INSCOP during normal ambulation and head down tilt bedrest. Efficacy was evaluated by testing INSCOP with two, different motion sickness inducing paradigms. Results: Preliminary results indicate that INSCOP demonstrates linear pharmacokinetics and a low side effect profile. In head down tilt bedrest, relative bioavailability of INSCOP was increased for females at both doses (0.2 and 0.4 mg) and for males at the higher dose (0.4 mg) but is reduced at the lower dose (0.2 mg) compared to normal ambulation. INSCOP displays gender specific differences during ABR. One of the treatment efficacy trials conducted at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center demonstrated that INSCOP is efficacious at both doses (0.2 and 0.4 mg) in suppressing motion sickness symptoms as indicated by longer chair ride times with INSCOP administration than with placebo, and efficacy increases with dose. Similar results were seen using another motion sickness simulator, the motion simulator dome, at the Naval Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory, with significantly increased time in the dome in motion-susceptible subjects when using INSCOP compared to untreated controls. Conclusion: Higher bioavailability, linear pharmacokinetics, a low incidence of side effects, and a favorable efficacy profile make INSCOP a desirable formulation for prophylactic and rescue treatment of astronauts in space and military personnel on

  15. Heart-rate variability (HRV) in the ECG trace of routine EEGs: fast monitoring for the anticholinergic effects of clozapine and olanzapine?

    PubMed

    Eschweiler, G W; Bartels, M; Längle, G; Wild, B; Gaertner, I; Nickola, M

    2002-05-01

    Drug monitoring in psychiatry usually serves psychoactive drug plasma concentration measurement. Anticholinergic properties offer a faster approach to monitoring pharmacodynamic intraindividual effects of the drug by measuring their effects on heart rate variability (HRV), which is sympathetically and parasympathetically controlled via cholinergic synapses. The plasma concentrations of the atypical antipsychotics clozapine and olanzapine correlated with parameters of HRV in 59 patients suffering from schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. HRV during 4 minutes at rest was extracted from the ECG trace of a routine digital EEG registration in addition to blood sampling for plasma concentration measurement (HPLC method). We calculated sympathetically and parasympathetically controlled heart frequency bands (low, medium and high frequency) and other HRV parameters, coefficient of variation (CV), and root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD). All HRV parameters were significantly more impaired in clozapine patients (n = 33, mean clozapine plasma concentration 331 +/- 294 ng/ml) than in olanzapine patients (n = 26, mean olanzapine plasma concentration 42 +/- 32 ng/ml) and demonstrated 1.7 - 4.8 times the cardiac anticholinergic properties of clozapine in vivo. 14 out of 14 patients with a CV beyond 3.2 % had clozapine plasma concentrations below the proposed optimal therapeutic concentration of 350 ng/ml. All HRV parameters were inversely and significantly correlated with the clozapine plasma concentrations (such as lgCV: r = - 0.73, p < 0.001) and, to a lesser extent, with the olanzapine plasma concentrations (lgCV r = - 0.44, p < 0.05). These results underline the potential clinical value of HRV parameter extraction from routine ECGs in predicting plasma concentrations and objective individual neurocardiac effects of drugs with anticholinergic properties.

  16. Effects of pH and dose on nasal absorption of scopolamine hydrobromide in human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, S.; Sileno, A. P.; deMeireles, J. C.; Dua, R.; Pimplaskar, H. K.; Xia, W. J.; Marinaro, J.; Langenback, E.; Matos, F. J.; Putcha, L.; Romeo, V. D.; Behl, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of formulation pH and dose on nasal absorption of scopolamine hydrobromide, the single most effective drug available for the prevention of nausea and vomiting induced by motion sickness. METHODS: Human subjects received scopolamine nasally at a dose of 0.2 mg/0.05 mL or 0.4 mg/0.10 mL, blood samples were collected at different time points, and plasma scopolamine concentrations were determined by LC-MS/MS. RESULTS: Following administration of a 0.2 mg dose, the average Cmax values were found to be 262+/-118, 419+/-161, and 488+/-331 pg/ mL for pH 4.0, 7.0, and 9.0 formulations, respectively. At the 0.4 mg dose the average Cmax values were found to be 503+/-199, 933+/-449, and 1,308+/-473 pg/mL for pH 4.0, 7.0, and 9.0 formulations, respectively. At a 0.2 mg dose, the AUC values were found to be 23,208+/-6,824, 29,145+/-9,225, and 25,721+/-5,294 pg x min/mL for formulation pH 4.0, 7.0, and 9.0, respectively. At a 0.4 mg dose, the average AUC value was found to be high for pH 9.0 formulation (70,740+/-29,381 pg x min/mL) as compared to those of pH 4.0 (59,573+/-13,700 pg x min/mL) and pH 7.0 (55,298+/-17,305 pg x min/mL) formulations. Both the Cmax and AUC values were almost doubled with doubling the dose. On the other hand, the average Tmax, values decreased linearly with a decrease in formulation pH at both doses. For example, at a 0.4 mg dose, the average Tmax values were 26.7+/-5.8, 15.0+/-10.0, and 8.8+/-2.5 minutes at formulation pH 4.0, 7.0, and 9.0, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Nasal absorption of scopolamine hydrobromide in human subjects increased substantially with increases in formulation pH and dose.

  17. A comparative study of neuroprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors against scopolamine-induced memory impairments in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jawaid, Talha; Jahan, Shah; Kamal, Mehnaz

    2015-01-01

    The comparative study of neuroprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors against scopolamine-induced neuroinflammation in albino Wistar rats was studied. Male albino rats were administered with scopolamine to induce memory impairment. The standard nootropic agent, piracetam (200 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), perindopril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), enalapril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), and ramipril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]) were administered in different group of animals for 5 days. On 5th day, scopolamine (1 mg/kg b.w., i.p.) was administered after 60 min of the last dose of test drug. Memory function was evaluated in Morris water maze (MWM) test and pole climbing test (PCT). Biochemical estimations like glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and acetylcholinesterase activity in the brain were estimated after completion of behavior study. All three test groups shows improvement in learning and memory in comparison to control group. Perindopril treated group showed a more effective significant decrease in escape latency time and transfer latency time compared to enalapril and ramipril treated group on day 4 in MWM test and PCT, respectively. Perindopril shows a significant reduction in MDA level and acetylcholinesterase activity and a significant rise in GSH level compared to enalapril and ramipril. The finding of this study indicates that Perindopril is more effective in memory retention compared to enalapril and ramipril. PMID:26317078

  18. Effect of residual solvent in polymer adhesive matrix on release and skin permeation of scopolamine.

    PubMed

    Anders, Kunst; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-08-01

    The effects of varying level of residual solvent on the release and permeation of scopolamine from two different polyacrylate matrices through excised mouse skin has been determined. Matrices of the drug-in-adhesive type were prepared having different contents of residual ethyl acetate or heptane adjusted via the drying time at 30°C in a forced-convection oven. The neutral DuroTak 87-4098 showed no effects of residual ethyl acetate on either release or permeation, but was influenced by residual heptane. An increase in release rate from the matrix occurred with an enhancing effect on permeation. The self-curing DuroTak 87-2677 showed effects of residual heptane on both release and permeation. Both solvents were lost from the matrix on contact with an aqueous acceptor medium, although to different extents. Levels of residual ethyl acetate or heptane that fall below the ICH guideline (0.5% w/w) had, however, only a minor, yet measurable, effect on scopolamine release and skin uptake compared with higher solvent levels.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine Gel Formation During Antiorthostatic Bedrest - A Microgravity Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshmi, Putcha; Singh, R. P.; Crady, V. A.; Derendorf, H.

    2011-01-01

    Space Motion sickness (SMS) is an age old problem for astronauts on both short and long duration space flights. Scopolamine (SCOP) is the most frequently used drug for the treatment of motion sickness (MS) which is currently available in transdermal patch and tablet dosage forms. These formulations of SCOP are ineffective for the treatment of SMS. Intranasal dosage forms are noninvasive with rapid absorption and enhanced bioavailability thus allowing precise and reduced dosing options in addition to offering rescue and treatment options. As such, an intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed and Pharmacokinetics (PK) and bioavailability were determined under IND guidelines. The present clinical trial compares PK and bioavailability of INSCOP in 12 normal, healthy subjects (6 male/ 6 female) during ambulation (AMB) and antiorthostatic bedrest (ABR) used as a ground-based microgravity analog. Subjects received 0.2 and 0.4 mg doses of INSCOP during AMB and ABR in a four-way crossover design. Results indicated no difference between AMB and ABR in PK parameters after 0.2 mg dose. Clearance (Cls) decreased with a concomitant increase in maximum concentration and area under concentration versus time curve (AUC) during ABR after the 0.4 mg dose. This difference in AUC and Cls at the higher but not the lower dose during ABR may suggest that ABR may affect metabolism and/or clearance at higher doses of INSCOP. These results indicate that dosing adjustment may be required for treatment of SMS with INSCOP in space.

  20. Scopolamine modulates paternal parental retrieval behavior in mice induced by the maternal mate.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Hiroko; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Lopatina, Olga; Brown, David A; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2013-06-24

    Appropriate parental care by the father can greatly facilitate healthy human family life. Much less is known from animal studies about the factors leading to paternal parental care than those favoring maternal parent care. Recently, we have reported that sires of the ICR strain of laboratory mice can express maternal-like retrieval behavior when separated from their pups through ultrasound and pheromonal signals from the dam, i.e. mate-dependent parental care. The sire's retrieval behavior was inhibited by prior treatment of scopolamine, a muscarinic cholinergic inhibitor, and recovered by physostigmine. KCNQ K(+)-channel blocking and enhancing drugs, linopiridine and retigabine, were also examined. Linopiridine alone did not enhance care after pairing with the dam, nor change scopolamine-induced inhibition of care. Retigabine totally suppressed parental care, and this effect was partially rescued by co-administration of linopiridine. These results indicate the involvement of cholinergic cellular signaling in the central nervous system in the maternal induction of paternal parental behavior in ICR mice.

  1. Distribution of hyoscyamine and scopolamine in Datura stramonium.

    PubMed

    Miraldi, E; Masti, A; Ferri, S; Barni Comparini, I

    2001-08-01

    The production of hyoscyamine and scopolamine in Datura stramonium has been investigated in the different plant parts, at different stages of their life cycle. Maximum contents were found in the stems and leaves of young plants, hyoscyamine being always the predominant component.

  2. Effects of scopolamine on autonomic profiles underlying motion sickness susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uijtdehaage, Sebastian H. J.; Stern, Robert M.; Koch, Kenneth L.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of scopolamine on the physiological patterns occurring prior to and during motion sickness stimulation. In addition, the use of physiological profiles in the prediction of motion sickness was evaluated. Sixty subjects ingested either 0.6 mg scopolamine, 2.5 mg methoscopolamine, or a placebo. Heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (an index of vagal tone), and electrogastrograms were measured prior to and during the exposure to a rotating optokinetic drum. Compared to the other groups, the scopolamine group reported fewer motion sickness symptoms, and displayed lower HR, higher vagal tone, enhanced normal gastric myoelectric activity, and depressed gastric dysrhythmias before and during motion sickness induction. Distinct physiological profiles prior to drum rotation could reliably differentiate individuals who would develop gastric discomfort from those who would not. Symptom-free subjects were characterized by high levels of vagal tone and low HR across conditions, and by maintaining normal (3 cpm) electrogastrographic activity during drum rotation. It was concluded that scopolamine offered motion sickness protection by initiating a pattern of increased vagal tone and gastric myoelectric stability.

  3. Lack of anticholinergic side effects with a new antidepressent--trazodone.

    PubMed

    Gershon, S; Newton, R

    1980-03-01

    An analysis was made of the occurrence of anticholinergic side effects in 15 multicenter studies of 379 patients with endogenous depression who received either trazodone, imipramine, or placebo. The incidence of 4 anticholinergic side effects was examined: dry mouth, blurred vision, bowel movement disturbance, and delayed urine flow. When the number of patients having each of the 4 symptoms was compared, there were no statistically significant differences in the incidence of side effects between the trazodone and placebo groups. However, comparisons between trazodone and imipramine indicated the incidence of side effects was significantly lower in the trazodone group.

  4. Mini Review: Anticholinergic Activity as a Behavioral Pathology of Lewy Body Disease and Proposal of the Concept of "Anticholinergic Spectrum Disorders".

    PubMed

    Hori, Koji; Konishi, Kimiko; Hosoi, Misa; Tomioka, Hiroi; Tani, Masayuki; Kitajima, Yuka; Hachisu, Mitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Given the relationship between anticholinergic activity (AA) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), we rereview our hypothesis of the endogenous appearance of AA in AD. Briefly, because acetylcholine (ACh) regulates not only cognitive function but also the inflammatory system, when ACh downregulation reaches a critical level, inflammation increases, triggering the appearance of cytokines with AA. Moreover, based on a case report of a patient with mild AD and slightly deteriorated ACh, we also speculate that AA can appear endogenously in Lewy body disease due to the dual action of the downregulation of ACh and hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Based on these hypotheses, we consider AA to be a behavioral pathology of Lewy body disease. We also propose the concept of "anticholinergic spectrum disorders," which encompass a variety of conditions, including AD, Lewy body disease, and delirium. Finally, we suggest the prescription of cholinesterase inhibitors to patients in this spectrum of disorders to abolish AA by upregulating ACh.

  5. Treatment of disorders characterized by reversible airway obstruction in childhood: are anti-cholinergic agents the answer?

    PubMed

    Quizon, Annabelle; Colin, Andrew A; Pelosi, Umberto; Rossi, Giovanni A

    2012-01-01

    Release of acetylcholine from parasympathetic nerves in the airways activates postjunctional muscarinic receptors present on smooth muscle, submucosal glands and blood vessels. This triggers bronchoconstriction, muscle hypertrophy, mucus secretion, and vasodilatation, respectively. The release of acetylcholine from parasympathetic nerves in lungs is induced by a variety of stimuli and downregulated by the inhibitory activity of neuronal M2 muscarinic receptors via a feedback mechanism. Increased parasympathetic nerve activity occurs in a variety of airway diseases in childhood, including viral-induced wheeze and asthma. Common to these conditions are reversible airway obstruction, mucus hypersecretion, vasodilation and enhanced vascular permeability. In animal models of airway hyperreactivity similar findings of increased acetylcholine release resulting in enhanced supply of this neurotransmitter to the postjunctional smooth muscles, submucosal glands and airway vessels, were demonstrated. While the number and function of postjunctional muscarinic receptors in the airways are unchanged in such airway disorders, inhibitory activity on the parasympathetic nerves appears to be impaired. Specifically, M2 muscarinic receptor dysfunction has been demonstrated in models of bronchial hyperreactivity induced by a variety of triggers, including viruses, atmospheric pollutants and allergens. The mechanisms leading to impairment of neuronal M2 muscarinic receptor function and their putative relevance to the pathogenesis and the treatment of airway disease in childhood are described. Finally, the available data on the activity of ipratropium bromide, a short-acting anticholinergic drug, in the most common pediatric airway disease are reported and the possible therapeutic efficacy of tiotropium bromide, a more recently introduced long-acting, selective anticholinergic compound, is discussed.

  6. Transdermal scopolamine in the prevention of motion sickness - Evaluation of the time course of efficacy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homick, J. L.; Reschke, M. F.; Degioanni, J.; Cintron-Trevino, N. M.; Kohl, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    This study evaluated the time course of efficacy of transdermal scopolamine in the prevention of motion sickness induced by exposure to coriolis stimulation in a rotating chair. We measured levels of efficacy, quantified side effects and symptoms, and determined inter- and intra-subject variability following use of transdermal scopolamine. The response to transdermal scopolamine was highly variable, although overall we recorded a 40 percent improvement in test scores 16-72 h after application of the transdermal system. This variability could not be explained solely by the levels of scopolamine present in the blood. The improvement was not due to the artifactual repression by scopolamine of selected symptoms of motion sickness. An unexpectedly high incidence of side effects was reported. It was concluded that the therapeutic use of transdermal scopolamine be evaluated individually and that individuals be cautioned that subsequent usage may not always be effective.

  7. Mental confusion associated with scopolamine patch in elderly with mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Won; Suh, Mee Kyung; Chin, Juhee; Na, Duk L

    2009-01-01

    Mental confusion or delirium can occur after application of scopolamine patch. However, predisposing factors for scopolamine-induced delirium are not known. It is expected that undetected incipient dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) may be prone to develop mental confusion after applying the scopolamine patch. For the past 5 years, we found seven elderly women who had experienced transdermal scopolamine-induced mental confusion. They underwent neuropsychological tests after recovery from mental confusion (mean duration from onset to the test: 66 days). The results showed that all the patients were impaired in at least one of cognitive domains, fulfilling the criteria of MCI. These findings suggest that scopolamine patch-induced mental confusion should be included in the differential diagnoses of mental confusion in elderly, especially in travel situation, and that older people with undetected MCI are prone to develop scopolamine patch-induced mental confusion.

  8. Protection against sarin-induced seizures in rats by direct brain microinjection of scopolamine, midazolam or MK-801.

    PubMed

    Skovira, Jacob W; McDonough, John H; Shih, Tsung-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Control of seizure activity is critical to survival and neuroprotection following nerve agent exposure. Extensive research has shown that three classes of drugs, muscarinic antagonists, benzodiazepines, and N-methyl-D: -aspartate antagonists, are capable of moderating these seizures. This study began to map the neural areas in rat brain that respond to these three drug classes resulting in anticonvulsant effects. Drugs of each class (scopolamine, midazolam, MK-801) were evaluated for their ability to prevent sarin-induced seizures when injected into specific brain areas (lateral ventricle, anterior piriform cortex, basolateral amygdala, area tempestas). Animals were pretreated by microinjection with saline or a dose of drug from one of the three classes 30 min prior to receiving 150 microg/kg sarin, subcutaneously, followed by 2.0 mg/kg atropine methylnitrate, intramuscularly. Animals were then returned to their cages, where electroencephalographic activity was monitored for seizures. Anticonvulsant effective doses (ED(50)) were determined using an up-down dosing procedure over successive animals. Scopolamine provided anticonvulsant effects in each area tested, while midazolam was effective in each area except the lateral ventricle. MK-801 was only effective at preventing seizures when injected into the basolateral amygdala or area tempestas. The results show a unique neuroanatomical and pharmacological specificity for control of nerve agent-induced seizures.

  9. Induction of a transient dysexecutive syndrome in Parkinson's disease using a~subclinical dose of scopolamine.

    PubMed

    Bédard, M.A.; Lemay, S.; Gagnon, J.F.; Masson, H.; Paquet, F.

    1998-01-01

    Parkinson's Disease (PD) is often associated with a subcortico-frontal syndrome (SCFS) that is mainly characterized by executive dysfunctions. The complete biochemistry of these dysfunctions remain misunderstood although many studies have suggested a role of the dopaminergic lesions. However, cholinergic lesions in this disease may also account for the SCFS occurrence. The present study has assessed the effects of an acute subclinical dose of scopolamine in normal controls and in PD patients who were devoid of cognitive deficit. Results indicates that PD patients but not normal controls developed a transient SCFS for the duration of the drug action. In contrast to other populations with cholinergic depletions - such as Alzheimer's disease - cholinergic blockage in PD exacerbates specifically the dysexecutive syndrome without inducing amnesia or sedation. Such a discrepancy between these two neuropsychological profiles are discussed in terms of the specificity of the underlying cholinergic lesions.

  10. Release and Skin Permeation of Scopolamine From Thin Polymer Films in Relation to Thermodynamic Activity.

    PubMed

    Kunst, Anders; Lee, Geoffrey

    2016-04-01

    The object was to demonstrate if the diffusional flux of the drug out of a drug-in-adhesive-type matrix and its subsequent permeation through an excised skin membrane is a linear function of the drug's thermodynamic activity in the thin polymer film. The thermodynamic activity, ap(*), is defined here as the degree of saturation of the drug in the polymer. Both release and release/permeation of scopolamine base from 3 different poylacrylate pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) were measured. The values for ap(*) were calculated using previous published saturation solubilities, wp(s), of the drug in the PSAs. Different rates of release and release/permeation were determined between the 3 PSAs. These differences could be accounted for quantitatively by correlating with ap(*) rather than the concentration of the drug in the polymer films. At similar values for ap(*) the same release or release/permeation rates from the different polymers were measured. The differences could not be related to cross-linking or presence of ionizable groups of the polymers that should influence diffusivity.

  11. Anticholinergic Use and Recurrent Falls in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Findings From the Health ABC Study

    PubMed Central

    Marcum, Zachary A.; Perera, Subashan; Thorpe, Joshua M.; Switzer, Galen E.; Gray, Shelly L.; Castle, Nicholas G.; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.; Simonsick, Eleanor M.; Bauer, Douglas C.; Shorr, Ronald I.; Studenski, Stephanie A.; Hanlon, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although it is generally accepted that anticholinergic use may lead to a fall, results from studies assessing the association between anticholinergic use and falls are mixed. In addition, direct evidence of an association between use of anticholinergic medications and recurrent falls among community-dwelling elders is not available. Objective To assess the association between anticholinergic use across multiple anticholinergic subclasses, including over-the-counter medications, and recurrent falls. Methods This was a longitudinal analysis of 2948 participants, with data collected via interview at year 1 from the Health, Aging and Body Composition study and followed through year 7 (1997–2004). Self-reported use of anticholinergic medication was identified at years 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6 as defined by the list from the 2015 American Geriatrics Society Beers Criteria. Dosage and duration were also examined. The main outcome was recurrent falls (≥2) in an ensuing 12-month period from each medication data collection. Results Using multivariable generalized estimating equation models, controlling for demographic, health status/behaviors, and access-to-care factors, a 34% increase in likelihood of recurrent falls in anticholinergic users (adjusted odds ratio = 1.34; 95% CI = 0.93–1.93) was observed, but the results were not statistically significant; similar results were found with higher doses and longer duration of use. Conclusion Increased point estimates suggest an association of anticholinergic use with recurrent falls, but the associations did not reach statistical significance. Future studies are needed for more definitive evidence and to examine other measures of anticholinergic burden and associations with more intermediate adverse effects such as cognitive function. PMID:26228936

  12. Post-training scopolamine treatment induced maladaptive behavior in open field habituation task in rats.

    PubMed

    Popović, Natalija; Caballero-Bleda, María; Popović, Miroljub

    2014-01-01

    The effects of scopolamine on memory consolidation are controversial and depend on several factors (i.e. site of administration, time of administration and testing, dose, cognitive task, experimental protocol, specie, strain, etc.). Generally, the range dose of systemic administered scopolamine, used in memory consolidation studies, has varied from 0.05 to 50 mg/kg. However, according to the literature, the most frequently used doses of scopolamine efficient on memory consolidation, are 1 and 30 mg/kg, low and high doses, respectively. In open field habituation studies only lower doses of scopolamine were used to test memory consolidation. Therefore, in the present study we compared the effects of low (1 mg/kg) and high (30 mg/kg) scopolamine dose, on the open field habituation task, in male Wistar rats. Scopolamine was administered immediately after the acquisition task and animals were retested 48 h later on. On the retested day, the ambulation and rearing in the open field decreased in the same manner in all tested groups. In saline- and 1 mg/kg scopolamine-treated animals, the time spent in grooming significantly decreased in the habituation task, while the same parameter significantly increased in animals treated with 30 mg/kg of scopolamine. The defecation rate significantly decreased (control group), maintained (1 mg/kg of scopolamine treated animals) or significantly increased (30 mg/kg of scopolamine treated group) on retention test. In conclusion, the present data suggest that post-training scopolamine administration does not affect locomotion neither exploration in the habituation to a novel environment, but increases defecation and grooming, two behaviours associated with fearful and stressful situations.

  13. Time course of scopolamine effect on memory consolidation and forgetting in rats.

    PubMed

    Popović, Miroljub; Giménez de Béjar, Verónica; Popović, Natalija; Caballero-Bleda, María

    2015-02-01

    The effect of scopolamine on the consolidation and forgetting of emotional memory has not been completely elucidated yet. The aim of the present study was to investigate the time course of scopolamine effect on consolidation and forgetting of passive avoidance response. In a first experiment of the present study, we tested the effect of scopolamine (1mg/kg, i.p., immediately after acquisition), on 24h and 48h retention performance of the step-through passive avoidance task, in adult male Wistar rats. On the 24h retested trial, the latency of the passive avoidance response was significantly lower, while on the 48h retested trial it was significantly higher in scopolamine than in the saline-treated group. In a second experiment, we assessed the 24h time course of scopolamine (1mg/kg) effect on memory consolidation in passive avoidance task. We found that scopolamine administration only within the first six and half hours after acquisition improved memory consolidation in 48h retention performance. Finally, a third experiment was performed on the saline- and scopolamine-treated rats (given immediately after acquisition) that on the 48h retention test did not step through into the dark compartment during the cut-off time. These animals were retested weekly for up to first three months, and after that, every three months until the end of experiment (i.e., 15 months after acquisition). The passive avoidance response in the saline treated group lasted up to 6 weeks after acquisition, while in the scopolamine treated group 50% of animals conserved the initial level of passive avoidance response until the experiment end point. In conclusion, the present data suggest that (1) improving or impairment effect of scopolamine given in post-training periods depends on delay of retention trial, (2) memory consolidation process could be modify by scopolamine within first six and half hours after training and (3) scopolamine could delay forgetting of emotional memory.

  14. Protective effects of aerosolized scopolamine against soman-induced acute respiratory toxicity in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Michael W; Pierre, Zdenka; Rezk, Peter; Song, Jian; Oguntayo, Samuel; Morthole, Venee; Sciuto, Alfred M; Doctor, Bhupendra P; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P

    2011-12-01

    The protective efficacy of the antimuscarinic agent scopolamine was evaluated against soman (o-pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate [GD])-induced respiratory toxicity in guinea pigs. Anesthetized animals were exposed to GD (841 mg/m(3)) by microinstillation inhalation exposure and treated 30 seconds later with endotracheally aerosolized scopolamine (0.25 mg/kg) and allowed to recover for 24 hours. Treatment with scopolamine significantly increased survival and reduced clinical signs of toxicity and body weight loss in GD-exposed animals. Analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid showed normalization of GD-induced increased cell death, total cell count, and protein following scopolamine treatment. The BAL fluid acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase levels were also increased by scopolamine treatment. Respiratory dynamics parameters were normalized at 4 and 24 hours post-GD exposure in scopolamine-treated animals. Lung histology showed that scopolamine treatment reduced bronchial epithelial and subepithelial inflammation and multifocal alveolar septal edema. These results suggest that aerosolized scopolamine considerably protects against GD-induced respiratory toxicity.

  15. 78 FR 52939 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive Patent License: Use of Scopolamine to Treat Depression

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... Scopolamine to Treat Depression AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... 25, 2005, titled ``Scopolamine for the Treatment of Depression and Anxiety'' [HHS Ref. No. E-175-2004... Treatment of Depression and Anxiety'' [HHS Ref. No. E-175-2004/0-EP-03]; 3. German Patent 1896025,...

  16. DL0410 Ameliorates Memory and Cognitive Impairments Induced by Scopolamine via Increasing Cholinergic Neurotransmission in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lian, Wenwen; Fang, Jiansong; Xu, Lvjie; Zhou, Wei; Kang, De; Xiong, Wandi; Jia, Hao; Liu, Ai-Lin; Du, Guan-Hua

    2017-03-06

    Deficiency of the cholinergic system is thought to play a vital role in cognitive impairment of dementia. DL0410 was discovered as a dual inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinestease (BuChE), with potent efficiency in in-vitro experiments, but its in vivo effect on the cholinergic model has not been evaluated, and its action mechanism has also not been illustrated. In the present study, the capability of DL0410 in ameliorating the amnesia induced by scopolamine was investigated, and its effect on the cholinergic system in the hippocampus and its binding mode in the active site of AChE was also explored. Mice were administrated DL0410 (3 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg, and 30 mg/kg), and mice treated with donepezil were used as a positive control. The Morris water maze, escape learning task, and passive avoidance task were used as behavioral tests. The test results indicated that DL0410 could significantly improve the learning and memory impairments induced by scopolamine, with 10 mg/kg performing best. Further, DL0410 inhibited the AChE activity and increased acetylcholine (ACh) levels in a dose-dependent manner, and interacted with the active site of AChE in a similar manner as donepezil. However, no difference in the activity of BuChE was found in this study. All of the evidence indicated that its AChE inhibition is an important mechanism in the anti-amnesia effect. In conclusion, DL0410 could be an effective therapeutic drug for the treatment of dementia, especially Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Heat Tolerance and the Peripheral Effects of Anticholinergics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-30

    from in vitro dose - response assays on isolated tissues suspended in organ baths, where the concentration of drugs can be carefully controlled. It would...obtaining accurate and reproducible dose - response data non-invasively from the eccrine sweat gland system, (2) to compare effectiveness of different locally...applied cholinergic muscarinic antagonists in altering dose - response patterns of eccrine glands to locally applied cholinergic agonists, (3) to study

  18. Over-Prescribed Medications, Under-Appreciated Risks: A Review of the Cognitive Effects of Anticholinergic Medications in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Britt, Daniel M I; Day, Gregory S

    2016-01-01

    Anticholinergic medications are associated with adverse cognitive effects in cognitively normal and impaired individuals, with a greater magnitude of effect observed in individuals with preexisting cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer disease.

  19. Perspectives on transdermal scopolamine for the treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting.

    PubMed

    Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Philip, Beverly K; Leslie, John B; Taylor, Robert; Raffa, Robert B

    2012-06-01

    Transdermal scopolamine, a patch system that delivers 1.5 mg of scopolamine gradually over 72 hours following an initial bolus, was approved in the United States in 2001 for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) in adults. Scopolamine (hyoscine) is a selective competitive anatagonist of muscarinic cholinergic receptors. Low serum concentrations of scopolamine produce an antiemetic effect. Transdermal scopolamine is effective in preventing PONV versus placebo [relative risk (RR)=0.77, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.61-0.98, P = 0.03] and a significantly reduced risk for postoperative nausea (RR=0.59, 95% CI, 0.48-0.73, P < 0.001), postoperative vomiting (RR=0.68, 95% CI, 0.61-0.76, P < 0.001), and PONV (RR 0.73, 95% CI, 0.60-0.88, P = 001) in the first 24 hours after the start of anesthesia.

  20. Transdermal scopolamine and perioperative anisocoria in craniofacial surgery: a report of 3 patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, David T; Jenkins, Nelson L; Anastasopulos, Alexandra J; Volpe, A George; Lee, Bernard T; Lalikos, Janice F

    2013-03-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a common complaint after plastic and reconstructive surgery. Transdermal scopolamine is a commonly used agent for prevention of PONV. Anisocoria from transdermal scopolamine use is an adverse effect that has not been reported in the plastic surgery literature. We present a series of 3 craniofacial patients in which ipsilateral mydriasis occurred and spontaneously resolved after removal of the scopolamine patch. Given the various causes and potentially grave implications of unilateral mydriasis, we discourage the use of transdermal scopolamine in craniofacial surgery, and especially in orbital surgery. However, if transdermal scopolamine is decided to be used for PONV prophylaxis, we recommend educating the patient, the operating room staff, and the surgical team regarding this potential adverse effect and to avoid finger-to-eye contamination after patch manipulation.

  1. Rubus coreanus Miquel ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory impairments in ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mi-Ran; Lee, Min Young; Hong, Ji Eun; Kim, Jeong Eun; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kim, Tae Hwan; Chun, Jang Woo; Shin, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Eun Ji

    2014-10-01

    The present study investigated the effect of Rubus coreanus Miquel (RCM) on scopolamine-induced memory impairments in ICR mice. Mice were orally administrated RCM for 4 weeks and scopolamine was intraperitoneally injected into mice to induce memory impairment. RCM improved the scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice. The increase of acetylcholinesterase activity caused by scopolamine was significantly attenuated by RCM treatment. RCM increased the levels of acetylcholine in the brain and serum of mice. The expression of choline acetyltransferase, phospho-cyclic AMP response element-binding protein, and phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase was significantly increased within the brain of mice treated with RCM. The brain antioxidant enzyme activity decreased by scopolamine was increased by RCM. These results demonstrate that RCM exerts a memory-enhancing effect via the improvement of cholinergic function and the potentiated antioxidant activity in memory-impaired mice. The results suggest that RCM may be a useful agent for improving memory impairment.

  2. Mini Review: Anticholinergic Activity as a Behavioral Pathology of Lewy Body Disease and Proposal of the Concept of “Anticholinergic Spectrum Disorders”

    PubMed Central

    Tomioka, Hiroi; Hachisu, Mitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Given the relationship between anticholinergic activity (AA) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), we rereview our hypothesis of the endogenous appearance of AA in AD. Briefly, because acetylcholine (ACh) regulates not only cognitive function but also the inflammatory system, when ACh downregulation reaches a critical level, inflammation increases, triggering the appearance of cytokines with AA. Moreover, based on a case report of a patient with mild AD and slightly deteriorated ACh, we also speculate that AA can appear endogenously in Lewy body disease due to the dual action of the downregulation of ACh and hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Based on these hypotheses, we consider AA to be a behavioral pathology of Lewy body disease. We also propose the concept of “anticholinergic spectrum disorders,” which encompass a variety of conditions, including AD, Lewy body disease, and delirium. Finally, we suggest the prescription of cholinesterase inhibitors to patients in this spectrum of disorders to abolish AA by upregulating ACh. PMID:27738546

  3. Comparison of peripheral anticholinergic effects of antidepressants: dry mouth.

    PubMed

    Rafaelsen, O J; Clemmesen, L; Lund, H; Mikkelsen, P L; Bolwig, T G

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-one healthy volunteers were given single doses of placebo or antidepressants corresponding to average daily doses of patient medications. Spontaneous whole mouth and parotid salivation was measured two, six, and ten hours after drug administration in session 1; in session 2 after ten hours. The results indicate that a subdivision of antidepressants into four groups can be made according to inhibitory effect on salivation: (a) isocarboxazide and lithium citrate with no effect, (b) zimelidine and nomifensine with slight effect, (c) imipramine oxide and mianserin with moderate effect and (d) maprotiline, nortriptyline, clomipramine, imipramine, and amitriptyline with pronounced effect. Research implications and predictive value for new antidepressants are discussed.

  4. Comparative neurotransmitter reuptake and anticholinergic potencies of the 8-hydroxy metabolites of clomipramine.

    PubMed

    Núñez, R; Perel, J M

    1995-01-01

    We hypothesize that 8-hydroxy-clomipramine (8-OH-CMI), the major hydroxy metabolite of clomipramine (CMI), may have antidepressant properties with less anticholinergic potency than CMI. We compared the potencies of 8-OH-CMI and CMI for inhibition of serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake and the potencies of these compounds for blockade of muscarinic receptors. We also compared the antimuscarinic potencies of desmethylclomipramine (DCMI) and 8-hydroxy-desmethylclomipramine (8-OH-DCMI). We found that 8-OH-CMI inhibits the uptake of serotonin and norepinephrine to the same extent as CMI and that 8-OH-CMI has far less antimuscarinic potency than CMI. We also found that 8-OH-DCMI has about one-tenth the antimuscarinic potency of DCMI. Since the therapeutic efficacy of CMI may be related to its effect on the reuptake of neurotransmitters, and since the extent of clinical anticholinergic effects of tricyclic antidepressants has been shown to be related to their in vitro antimuscarinic potencies, these results raise the possibility that 8-OH-CMI may be an analogue of CMI with fewer anticholinergic side effects than the parent compound.

  5. Relative bioavailability of scopolamine dosage forms and interaction with dextroamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Jason L; Du, Brian; Vaksman, Zalman; Locke, James P; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2007-07-01

    The NASA Reduced Gravity Office (RGO) uses scopolamine (SCOP) alone and in combination with dextoamphetamine (DEX) to treat motion sickness symptoms during DC-9 parabolic flights. The medications are sometimes dispensed as custom dosage forms in gelatin capsules for convenience. Reports of treatment failure during flights by the flight surgeons suggest that these formulations may be less efficacious for the treatment of motion sickness due to unreliable and inadequate bioavailability. We estimated bioavailability of four different oral formulations used by the NASA RGO physicians for the treatment of motion sickness.

  6. Catecholaminergic responses to stressful motion stimuli, scopolamine plus amphetamine, and dexamethasone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, R. L.; Chelen, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    Peripheral levels of epinephrine (EPI) and neoepinephrine (NE) generally rise following stressful motion stimuli. Effective anti-motion sickness drugs, scopolamine plus, d-amphetamine (S/D) and dexamthasone (DEX) modulate release of EPI and NE. This modulation may be of etiological relevance. Methods: Severe nausea was induced by exposure to coriolis simulation using a rotating chair. Chronic administration of S/D (0.4 and 5 mg/da) DEX (3 mg/day) and placebo preceded coriolis simulation. EPI and NE were measured immediately before and after simulation. A double-blind crossover design was used. Results: Nausea-induced elevations of EPI (2.5 fold, p less than .01) and NE were not diminished upon repeated exposure and adaptation to the stressor. Subjects with more pronounced elevations of EPI following simulation displayed higher resistance to stressful motion (p less .05). Alteration of peripheral catechlomaine levels following drug suggested that motion sickness was not mediated by peripheral catechlolamine receptor simulation. EPI and NE levels were 2.8 and 3.6-fold higher (p less than .03 and .01) after nausea without DEX treatment. DEX loading halved pre-stress levels of EPI and NE (p less than .05). Conclusions: Marked differences were noted in individual responses to drug and systematic responses of EPI and NE. It is possible that the responses of EPI to motion sickness may predict resistance to stressful motion and represent a peripheral manifestation of some as yet unknown central event of etiologic relevance.

  7. Scopolamine-induced convulsions in fasted animals after food intake: sensitivity of C57BL/6J mice and Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Enginar, Nurhan; Nurten, Asiye; Türkmen, Aslı Zengin; Çağla, Büyüklü

    2015-05-01

    Food intake triggers convulsions in fasted BALB/c mice and Wistar albino rats treated with antimuscarinic drugs, scopolamine or atropine. Inbred strain studies have yielded considerable information regarding genetic influences on seizure susceptibility and factors contribute to epileptogenesis in rodents. This study, therefore, investigated sensitivity to antimuscarinic-induced seizures in C57BL/6J mice and Sprague-Dawley rats. Food deprivation for 48h in mice and 52h in rats did not produce strain differences in body weight loss. Fasted animals treated i.p. with 3mg/kg scopolamine developed convulsions after food intake. The incidence of convulsions was indifferent in comparison to BALB/c mice and Wistar albino rats. Number of animals developing stage 5 was more and onset of convulsions was longer in C57BL/6J mice than in BALB/c mice. Strain-related differences in sensitivity to seizures in C57BL/6J mice may need further evaluation for investigating genetic influences on scopolamine-induced seizures.

  8. A neuroanatomical analysis of the effects of a memory impairing dose of scopolamine in the rat brain using cytochrome c oxidase as principle marker.

    PubMed

    Hescham, Sarah; Temel, Yasin; Casaca-Carreira, João; Arslantas, Kemal; Yakkioui, Youssef; Blokland, Arjan; Jahanshahi, Ali

    2014-09-01

    Acetylcholine plays a role in mnemonic and attentional processes, but also in locomotor and anxiety-related behavior. Receptor blockage by scopolamine can therefore induce cognitive as well as motor deficits and increase anxiety levels. Here we show that scopolamine, at a dose that has previously been found to affect learning and memory performance (0.1 mg/kg i.p.), has a widespread effect on cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry in various regions of the rat brain. We found a down-regulation of cytochrome c oxidase in the nucleus basalis, in movement-related structures such as the primary motor cortex and the globus pallidus, memory-related structures such as the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex and in anxiety-related structures like the amygdala, which also plays a role in memory. However choline acetyltransferase levels were only affected in the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus and both, choline acetyltransferase and c-Fos expression levels were decreased in the amygdala. These findings corroborate strong cognitive behavioral effects of this drug, but also suggest possible anxiety- and locomotor-related changes in subjects. Moreover, they present histochemical evidence that the effects of scopolamine are not ultimately restricted to cognitive parameters.

  9. Unique Scopolamine Withdrawal Syndrome After Standard Transdermal Use.

    PubMed

    Manno, Maurizio; Di Renzo, Gianfranco; Bianco, Pasquale; Sbordone, Carmine; De Matteis, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 62-year-old woman who developed a withdrawal syndrome after using a standard 1.5-mg transdermal scopolamine (TDS) patch behind the ear to prevent motion sickness during sailing. The patient, who had used TDS occasionally for years without significant adverse effects, more recently, having worn a patch continuously for 7 days, approximately 24 to 36 hours after removing the patch developed dizziness, nausea, sweating, fatigue, and drowsiness. All symptoms disappeared without therapy in about 2 days. Approximately 1 year after the first episode, though, a very similar, more severe disabling reaction developed on 2 occasions. Drowsiness and malaise were accompanied by severe asthenia, orthostatic sweating, inability to stand, and hypotension. All clinical tests (electrocardiogram; spirometry; blood cell count; plasma levels of cortisol, sodium, and potassium; and liver and kidney function tests) were negative, and symptoms disappeared slowly, after several days. Although we are certain that scopolamine was responsible for the symptoms, we are less clear as to the nature of the disorder. The effects being more severe after a more prolonged use of the TDS patch, the increase in severity each successive time, and the time lag between removing the patch and appearance of symptoms all indicated a withdrawal syndrome for which several mechanisms may be suggested.

  10. Treatment of severe motion sickness with antimotion sickness drug injections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, Ashton; Lackner, James R.

    1987-01-01

    This report concerns the use of intramuscular injections of scopolamine, promethazine, and dramamine to treat severely motion sick individuals participating in parabolic flight experiments. The findings indicate that a majority of individuals received benefit from 50-mg injections of promethazine or 0.5 mg-injections of scopolamine. By contrast, 50-mg injections of dramamine and 25-mg injections of promethazine were nonbeneficial. The use of antimotion drug injections for treating space motion sickness is discussed.

  11. Prejudices in pharmacology and pharmacotherapy. The so-called anticholinergic effect of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Bein, H J

    1977-09-01

    Imipramine and similarly acting compounds provoke a number of undesired reactions usually classified as so-called anticholinergic effects. Instances of dry mouth, disturbance of micturition and tachycardia are regularly quoted in the literature. It is contended that these effects are not necessarily due to inhibition of the vagal system, but preferentially attributable to increased activity of the sympathetic system, predominantly mediated by the beta- or the alpha-adrenergic receptors, depending on the organ affected. This hypothesis is not only theoretically interesting, but also of practical clinical significance with regard to possible remedies.

  12. Estrogen levels modify scopolamine-induced amnesia in gonadally intact rats.

    PubMed

    de Macêdo Medeiros, André; Izídio, Geison Souza; Sousa, Diego Silveira; Macedo, Priscila Tavares; Silva, Anatildes Feitosa; Shiramizu, Victor Kenji Medeiros; Cabral, Alicia; Ribeiro, Alessandra Mussi; Silva, Regina Helena

    2014-08-04

    Previous studies suggested that estrogen plays a role in cognitive function by modulating the cholinergic transmission. However, most of the studies dealing with this subject have been conducted using ovariectomized rats. In the present study we evaluated the effects of physiological and supra-physiological variation of estrogen levels on scopolamine-induced amnesia in gonadally intact female rats. We used the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task (PMDAT) in order to evaluate anxiety levels and motor activity concomitantly to the memory performance. In experiment 1, female Wistar rats in each estrous cycle phase received scopolamine (1 mg/kg) or saline i.p. 20 min before the training session in the PMDAT. In experiment 2, rats in diestrus received estradiol valerate (1 mg/kg) or sesame oil i.m., and scopolamine (1 mg/kg) or saline i.p., 45 min and 20 min before the training, respectively. In experiment 3, rats in diestrus received scopolamine (1 mg/kg) or saline i.p. 20 min before the training, and estradiol valerate (1 mg/kg) or sesame oil i.m. immediately after the training session. In all experiments, a test session was performed 24 h later. The main results showed that: (1) scopolamine impaired retrieval and induced anxiolytic and hyperlocomotor effects in all experiments; (2) this cholinergic antagonist impaired acquisition only in animals in diestrus; (3) acute administration of estradiol valerate prevented the learning impairment induced by scopolamine and (4) interfered with memory consolidation process. The results suggest that endogenous variations in estrogen levels across the estrous cycle modulate some aspects of memory mediated by the cholinergic system. Indeed, specifically in diestrus, a stage with low estrogen levels, the impairment produced by scopolamine on the acquisition was counteracted by exogenous administration of the hormone, whereas the posttraining treatment potentiated the negative effects of scopolamine during the consolidation phase

  13. Extinction and recovery of an avoidance memory impaired by scopolamine.

    PubMed

    Navarro, N M; Krawczyk, M C; Boccia, M M; Blake, M G

    2017-03-15

    Pre-training administration of scopolamine (SCP) resembles situations of cholinergic dysfunction, leading to memory impairment of mice trained in an inhibitory avoidance task. We suggest here that SCP does not impair memory formation, but acquisition is affected in a way that reduces the strength of the stored memory, thus making this memory less able to control behavior when tested. Hence, a memory trace is stored, but is poorly expressed during the test. Although weakly expressed, this memory shows extinction during successive tests, and can be strengthened by using a reminder. Our results indicate that memories stored under cholinergic dysfunction conditions seem absent or lost, but are in fact present and experience common memory processes, such as extinction, and could be even recovered by using appropriate protocols.

  14. Scopolamine effects on functional brain connectivity: a pharmacological model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bajo, R; Pusil, S; López, M E; Canuet, L; Pereda, E; Osipova, D; Maestú, F; Pekkonen, E

    2015-07-01

    Scopolamine administration may be considered as a psychopharmacological model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we studied a group of healthy elderly under scopolamine to test whether it elicits similar changes in brain connectivity as those observed in AD, thereby verifying a possible model of AD impairment. We did it by testing healthy elderly subjects in two experimental conditions: glycopyrrolate (placebo) and scopolamine administration. We then analyzed magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data corresponding to both conditions in resting-state with eyes closed. This analysis was performed in source space by combining a nonlinear frequency band-specific measure of functional connectivity (phase locking value, PLV) with network analysis methods. Under scopolamine, functional connectivity between several brain areas was significantly reduced as compared to placebo, in most frequency bands analyzed. Besides, regarding the two complex network indices studied (clustering and shortest path length), clustering significantly decreased in the alpha band while shortest path length significantly increased also in alpha band both after scopolamine administration. Overall our findings indicate that both PLV and graph analysis are suitable tools to measure brain connectivity changes induced by scopolamine, which causes alterations in brain connectivity apparently similar to those reported in AD.

  15. Scopolamine rapidly increases mTORC1 signaling, synaptogenesis, and antidepressant behavioral responses

    PubMed Central

    Voleti, Bhavya; Navarria, Andrea; Liu, Rong-Jian; Banasr, Mounira; Li, Nanxin; Terwilliger, Rose; Sanacora, Gerard; Eid, Tore; Aghajanian, George; Duman, Ronald S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical studies report that scopolamine, an acetylcholine muscarinic receptor antagonist, produces rapid antidepressant effects in depressed patients, but the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic response have not been determined. The present study examines the role of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and synaptogenesis, which have been implicated in the rapid actions of NMDA receptor antagonists. Methods The influence of scopolamine on mTORC1 signaling was determined by analysis of the phosphorylated and activated forms of mTORC1 signaling proteins in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The numbers and function of spine synapses were analyzed by whole cell patch clamp recording and 2-photon image analysis of PFC neurons. The actions of scopolamine were examined in the forced swim test in the absence or presence of selective mTORC1 and AMPA receptor inhibitors. Results The results demonstrate that a single, low dose of scopolamine rapidly increases mTORC1 signaling and the number and function of spine synapses in layer V pyramidal neurons in the PFC. Scopolamine administration also produces an antidepressant response in the forced swim test that is blocked by pretreatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor or by a glutamate AMPA receptor antagonist. Conclusions Taken together, the results demonstrate that the antidepressant actions of scopolamine require mTORC1 signaling and are associated with increased glutamate transmission, and synaptogenesis, similar to NMDA receptor antagonists. These findings provide novel targets for safer and more efficacious rapid acting antidepressant agents. PMID:23751205

  16. Anthriscus nemorosa essential oil inhalation prevents memory impairment, anxiety and depression in scopolamine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Bagci, Eyup; Aydin, Emel; Ungureanu, Eugen; Hritcu, Lucian

    2016-12-01

    Anthriscus nemorosa (Bieb.) Sprengel is used for medicinal purposes in traditional medicine around the world, including Turkey. Ethnobotanical studies suggest that Anthriscus essential oil could improve memory in Alzheimer's disease. The current study was hypothesized to investigate the beneficial effects of inhaled Anthriscus nemorosa essential oil on memory, anxiety and depression in scopolamine-treated rats. Anthriscus nemorosa essential oil was administered by inhalation in the doses of 1% and 3% for 21 continuous days and scopolamine (0.7mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 30min before the behavioral testing. Y-maze and radial arm-maze tests were used for assessing memory processes. Also, the anxiety and depressive responses were studied by elevated plus-maze and forced swimming tests. As expected, the scopolamine alone-treated rats exhibited the following: decrease the percentage of the spontaneous alternation in Y-maze test, increase the number of working and reference memory errors in radial arm-maze test, decrease of the exploratory activity, the percentage of the time spent and the number of entries in the open arm within elevated plus-maze test and decrease of swimming time and increase of immobility time within forced swimming test. However, dual scopolamine and Anthriscus nemorosa essential oil-treated rats showed significant improvement of memory formation and exhibited anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects in scopolamine-treated rats. These results suggest that Anthriscus nemorosa essential oil inhalation can prevent scopolamine-induced memory impairment, anxiety and depression.

  17. Effects of vitexin on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Esmail; Nassiri-Asl, Marjan; Sheikhi, Mehdi; Shafiee, Mahsa

    2013-06-30

    Various synthetic derivatives of natural flavonoids are known to have neuroactive properties. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of vitexin (5, 7, 4-trihydroxyflavone-8-glucoside), a flavonoid found in such plants as tartary buckwheat sprouts, wheat leaves phenolome, Mimosa pudica Linn and Passiflora spp, on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in rats. To achieve this goal, we assessed the effects of vitexin on memory retrieval in the presence or absence of scopolamine using a step-through passive avoidance trial. In the first part of the study, vitexin (25, 50, and 100 microM) was administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) before acquisition trials. In the second part, vitexin, at the same doses, was administered before scopolamine (10 microg, i.c.v.) and before the acquisition trials. During retention tests, vitexin (100 microM) in the absence of scopolamine significantly increased the step-through latencies compared to scopolamine. In addition, vitexin (100 microM) significantly reversed the shorter step-through latencies induced by scopolamine (P < 0.05). These results indicate that vitexin has a potential role in enhancing memory retrieval. A possible mechanism is modulation of cholinergic receptors; however, other mechanisms may be involved in its effects in acute exposure.

  18. Ascorbic acid attenuates scopolamine-induced spatial learning deficits in the water maze.

    PubMed

    Harrison, F E; Hosseini, A H; Dawes, S M; Weaver, S; May, J M

    2009-12-28

    Vitamin C (ascorbate) has important antioxidant functions that can help protect against oxidative stress in the brain and damage associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. When administered parenterally ascorbate can bypass saturable uptake mechanisms in the gut and thus higher tissue concentrations can be achieved than by oral administration. In the present study we show that ascorbate (125 mg/kg) administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) 1-h before testing, partially attenuated scopolamine-induced (1 mg/kg i.p.) cognitive deficits in Morris water maze performance in young mice. Cumulative search error, but not escape latency nor path length, was significantly improved during acquisition in ascorbate plus scopolamine-treated mice although performance did not equal that of control mice. During the probe trial, scopolamine led to increased search error and chance level of time spent in the platform quadrant, whereas mice pre-treated with ascorbate prior to scopolamine did not differ from control mice on these measures. Ascorbate had no effect on unimpaired, control mice and neither did it reduce the peripheral, activity-increasing effects of scopolamine. Ascorbate alone increased acetylcholinesterase activity in the medial forebrain area but had no effect in cortex or striatum. This change, and its action against the amnestic effects of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine, suggest that ascorbate may be acting in part via altered cholinergic signaling. However, further investigation is necessary to isolate the cognition-enhancing effects of ascorbate.

  19. Scopolamine effects on functional brain connectivity: a pharmacological model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Bajo, R.; Pusil, S.; López, M. E.; Canuet, L.; Pereda, E.; Osipova, D.; Maestú, F.; Pekkonen, E.

    2015-01-01

    Scopolamine administration may be considered as a psychopharmacological model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here, we studied a group of healthy elderly under scopolamine to test whether it elicits similar changes in brain connectivity as those observed in AD, thereby verifying a possible model of AD impairment. We did it by testing healthy elderly subjects in two experimental conditions: glycopyrrolate (placebo) and scopolamine administration. We then analyzed magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data corresponding to both conditions in resting-state with eyes closed. This analysis was performed in source space by combining a nonlinear frequency band-specific measure of functional connectivity (phase locking value, PLV) with network analysis methods. Under scopolamine, functional connectivity between several brain areas was significantly reduced as compared to placebo, in most frequency bands analyzed. Besides, regarding the two complex network indices studied (clustering and shortest path length), clustering significantly decreased in the alpha band while shortest path length significantly increased also in alpha band both after scopolamine administration. Overall our findings indicate that both PLV and graph analysis are suitable tools to measure brain connectivity changes induced by scopolamine, which causes alterations in brain connectivity apparently similar to those reported in AD. PMID:26130273

  20. Synthesis of the optical isomers of a new anticholinergic drug, penehyclidine hydrochloride (8018).

    PubMed

    Han, Xiang-Yu; Liu, He; Liu, Chun-He; Wu, Bo; Chen, Lan-Fu; Zhong, Bo-Hua; Liu, Ke-Liang

    2005-04-15

    A practical diastereoselective synthetic method for 8018 enantiopure isomers is described. The intramolecular asymmetric epoxidation of mono-sulfonate 4 was applied for the execution of the synthesis of the key chiral building block for the first time. The isomers were obtained with 70-76% yields in 99-100% ee.

  1. Effect of physostigmine and gastric lavage in a Datura stramonium-induced anticholinergic poisoning epidemic.

    PubMed

    Salen, Philip; Shih, Richard; Sierzenski, Paul; Reed, James

    2003-07-01

    This study examines the impact of the administration of physostigmine and of nasogastric evacuation of Jimsonweed seeds on intensive-care unit (ICU) use and the length of stay in the hospital after Jimsonweed poisoning. Clinical data for this retrospective study were gathered from records of consecutive patients treated for Jimsonweed poisoning from September to November 1997. Descriptive statistics, Fisher's exact test, and Student t-test were used to analyze important clinical and sociodemographic variables. There were 17 victims of the Jimsonweed ingestion epidemic, all of whom presented with an anticholinergic toxidrome 3 to 9 hours after ingestion. Reported quantities of seed ingestion ranged from a low of 7 seeds to as high as 200 seeds. Altered mentation, manifested by combative behavior, necessitated admission of 13 patients to the ICU. The administration of physostigmine did not reduce admissions to the ICU (P = 0.54) or reduce length of stay in the hospital (P = 0.45) compared with the use of benzodiazepines alone. Nasogastric lavage was performed in 14 (82%) and seeds were recovered in 8 (57%) of those lavaged. The successful removal of Jimsonweed seeds did not decrease ICU use rates (P = 0.68) or shorten length of stay in the hospital compared with not recovering seeds (P = 0.85). The use of physostigmine and the successful nasogastric lavage of Jimsonweed seeds did not result in decreased intensive-care use or shorter length of stay in the hospital for Jimsonweed-induced anticholinergic toxicity.

  2. Amelioration of scopolamine induced cognitive dysfunction and oxidative stress by Inonotus obliquus - a medicinal mushroom.

    PubMed

    Giridharan, Vijayasree Vayalanellore; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan Amirthalingam; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2011-06-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the cognitive enhancing and anti-oxidant activities of Inonotus obliquus (Chaga) against scopolamine-induced experimental amnesia. Methanolic extract of Chaga (MEC) at 50 and 100 mg kg (-1)doses were administered orally for 7 days to amnesic mice. Learning and memory was assessed by passive avoidance task (PAT) and Morris water maze (MWM) test. Tacrine (THA, 10 mg kg (-1), orally (p.o)) used as a reference drug. To elucidate the mechanism of the cognitive enhancing activity of MEC, the activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), anti-oxidant enzymes, the levels of acetylcholine (ACh) and nitrite of mice brain homogenates were evaluated. MEC treatment for 7 days significantly improved the learning and memory as measured by PAT and MWM paradigms. Further, MEC significantly reduced the oxidative-nitritive stress, as evidenced by a decrease in malondialdehyde and nitrite levels and restored the glutathione and superoxide dismutase levels in a dose dependent manner. In addition, MEC treatment significantly decreased the AChE activity in both the salt and detergent-soluble fraction of brain homogenates. Further, treatment with MEC restored the levels of ACh as did THA. Thus, the significant cognitive enhancement observed in mice after MEC administration is closely related to higher brain anti-oxidant properties and inhibition of AChE activity. These findings stress the critical impact of Chaga, a medicinal mushroom, on the higher brain functions like learning and memory.

  3. Deer bone extract prevents against scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Du, Chun Nan; Min, A Young; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Shin, Suk Kyung; Yu, Ha Ni; Sohn, Eun Jeong; Ahn, Chang-Won; Jung, Sung Ug; Park, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Mee Ree

    2015-02-01

    Deer bone has been used as a health-enhancing food as well as an antiaging agent in traditional Oriental medicine. Recently, the water extract of deer bone (DBE) showed a neuroprotective action against glutamate or Aβ1-42-induced cell death of mouse hippocampal cells by exerting antioxidant activity through the suppression of MAP kinases. The present study is to examine whether DBE improves memory impairment induced by scopolamine. DBE (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg) was administered orally to mice for 14 days, and then scopolamine (2 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered together with DBE for another 7 days. Memory performance was evaluated in the Morris water maze (MWM) test and passive avoidance test. Also, brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity, biomarkers of oxidative stress and the loss of neuronal cells in the hippocampus, was evaluated by histological examinations. Administration of DBE significantly restored memory impairments induced by scopolamine in the MWM test (escape latency and number of crossing platform area), and in the passive avoidance test. Treatment with DBE inhibited the AChE activity and increased the ChAT activity in the brain of memory-impaired mice induced by scopolamine. Additionally, the administration of DBE significantly prevented the increase of lipid peroxidation and the decrease of glutathione level in the brain of mice treated with scopolamine. Also, the DBE treatment restored the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase to control the level. Furthermore, scopolamine-induced oxidative damage of neurons in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions were prevented by DBE treatment. It is suggested that DBE may be useful for memory improvement through the regulation of cholinergic marker enzyme activities and the suppression of oxidative damage of neurons in the brain of mice treated with scopolamine.

  4. Ameliorative effect of rosmarinic acid on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Hasanein, Parisa; Mahtaj, Azam Kazemian

    2015-01-12

    Rosmarinic acid (RA) is a natural phenol that exerts different biological activities, such as antioxidant activity and neuroprotective effects. In this study, we hypothesized that administration of RA (8, 16, and 32 mg/kg, p.o.) for 7 days would effect on scopolamine-induced cognitive dysfunction as an extensively used model of cognitive impairment. The rats were divided into 10 groups. The acquisition trial was done 1h after the last administration of RA. Animals were divided into control, RA (8, 16, and 32 mg/kg) and donepezil (2 mg/kg) treated controls, scopolamine, RA (8, 16, and 32 mg/kg), and donepezil (2 mg/kg) treated scopolamine groups. Memory impairment was induced by scopolamine treatment (1 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min after the administration of RA, donepezil, or saline. Scopolamine administration caused cognition deficits in the PAL and memory paradigm. While orally RA administration (16 and 32 mg/kg) improved learning and memory in control rats, it reversed learning and memory deficits of scopolamine received groups. Administration of RA at the dose of 8 mg/kg did not alter cognitive function in control and scopolamine treated groups. The combination of anticholinesterase, neuroprotective, and antioxidant properties of RA may all be responsible for the observed effects. These results indicate the beneficial effects of subchronic RA administration in passive avoidance learning and memory in control rats as well as in a pharmacological model of cholinergic deficit which continue to expand the knowledge base in creating new treatment strategies for cognition deficits and dementia. Of course, further studies are warranted for clinical use of RA in the management of demented subjects.

  5. Antidepressant effects of the muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist scopolamine: a review.

    PubMed

    Drevets, Wayne C; Zarate, Carlos A; Furey, Maura L

    2013-06-15

    The muscarinic cholinergic receptor system has been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression, with physiological evidence indicating this system is overactive or hyperresponsive in depression and with genetic evidence showing that variation in genes coding for receptors within this system are associated with higher risk for depression. In studies aimed at assessing whether a reduction in muscarinic cholinergic receptor function would improve depressive symptoms, the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine manifested antidepressant effects that were robust and rapid relative to conventional pharmacotherapies. Here, we review the data from a series of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies involving subjects with unipolar or bipolar depression treated with parenteral doses of scopolamine. The onset and duration of the antidepressant response are considered in light of scopolamine's pharmacokinetic properties and an emerging literature that characterizes scopolamine's effects on neurobiological systems beyond the cholinergic system that appear relevant to the neurobiology of mood disorders. Scopolamine infused at 4.0 μg/kg intravenously produced robust antidepressant effects versus placebo, which were evident within 3 days after the initial infusion. Placebo-adjusted remission rates were 56% and 45% for the initial and subsequent replication studies, respectively. While effective in male and female subjects, the change in depression ratings was greater in female subjects. Clinical improvement persisted more than 2 weeks following the final infusion. The timing and persistence of the antidepressant response to scopolamine suggest a mechanism beyond that of direct muscarinic cholinergic antagonism. These temporal relationships suggest that scopolamine-induced changes in gene expression and synaptic plasticity may confer the therapeutic mechanism.

  6. 21 CFR 310.533 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... contained in Atropa belladonna and Datura stramonium have been present as ingredients in cough-cold drug... Atropa belladonna and Datura stramonium, are neither safe nor effective as an OTC anticholinergic....

  7. 21 CFR 310.533 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... contained in Atropa belladonna and Datura stramonium have been present as ingredients in cough-cold drug... Atropa belladonna and Datura stramonium, are neither safe nor effective as an OTC anticholinergic....

  8. 21 CFR 310.533 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... contained in Atropa belladonna and Datura stramonium have been present as ingredients in cough-cold drug... Atropa belladonna and Datura stramonium, are neither safe nor effective as an OTC anticholinergic....

  9. 21 CFR 310.533 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... contained in Atropa belladonna and Datura stramonium have been present as ingredients in cough-cold drug... Atropa belladonna and Datura stramonium, are neither safe nor effective as an OTC anticholinergic....

  10. 21 CFR 310.533 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... contained in Atropa belladonna and Datura stramonium have been present as ingredients in cough-cold drug... Atropa belladonna and Datura stramonium, are neither safe nor effective as an OTC anticholinergic....

  11. Anticholinergic delirium following Datura stramonium ingestion: Implications for the Internet age.

    PubMed

    Vearrier, David; Greenberg, Michael I

    2010-07-01

    Recreational use of Datura to deliberately induce an anticholinergic delirium is not uncommon. We present a case of Datura intoxication in a young adult who learned about the recreational use of Datura on the Internet and subsequently purchased Datura stramonium seeds from an online vendor. Using the Google search engine, we conducted searches for "Datura," "jimson weed" and "Datura seeds" and reviewed the first 200 search results for each search term. We found 16 websites recommending the recreational use of Datura, 12 vendors selling seeds of genus Datura and one website that both promoted the recreational use of Datura and also sold Datura stramonium leaves. The promotion of recreational use of Datura on the Internet represents a danger to public health and the ability to purchase Datura seeds from Internet vendors may increase the prevalence of Datura abuse.

  12. Anticholinergic delirium following Datura stramonium ingestion: Implications for the Internet age

    PubMed Central

    Vearrier, David; Greenberg, Michael I

    2010-01-01

    Recreational use of Datura to deliberately induce an anticholinergic delirium is not uncommon. We present a case of Datura intoxication in a young adult who learned about the recreational use of Datura on the Internet and subsequently purchased Datura stramonium seeds from an online vendor. Using the Google search engine, we conducted searches for “Datura,” “jimson weed” and “Datura seeds” and reviewed the first 200 search results for each search term. We found 16 websites recommending the recreational use of Datura, 12 vendors selling seeds of genus Datura and one website that both promoted the recreational use of Datura and also sold Datura stramonium leaves. The promotion of recreational use of Datura on the Internet represents a danger to public health and the ability to purchase Datura seeds from Internet vendors may increase the prevalence of Datura abuse. PMID:20930988

  13. Determination of Scopolamine in Human Saliva Using Solid Phase Extraction and LC/MS/MS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zuwei; Vaksman, Zalman; Boyd, Jason; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Scopolamine is the preferred treatment for motion sickness during space flight because of its quick onset of action, short half-life and favorable side-effect profile. The dose administered depends on the mode of administration and usually ranges between 0.1 and 0.8 mg. Such small doses make it difficult to detect concentrations of scopolamine in biological fluids by using conventional HPLC methods. To measure scopolamine in saliva and thereby to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of scopolamine, we developed an LC/MS/MS method using off-line solid phase extraction. Method: Samples (0.5mL) were loaded onto Waters Oasis HLB co-polymer cartridges (10 mg, 1 mL) and eluted with 0.5 mL methanol without evaporation and reconstitution. HPLC separation of the eluted sample was performed using an Agilent Zorbax SB-CN column (50 x 2.1 mm) at a flow rate of 0.2 mL/min for 4 minutes. The mobile phase for separation was 90:10 (v/v) methanol: ammonium acetate (2 mM) in water, pH 5.0 +/- 0.1. Concentrations of scopolamine were determined using a Micromass Quattro Micro(TM) mass spectrometer with electrospray ionization (ESI). ESI mass spectra were acquired in positive ion mode with multiple reaction monitoring for the determination of scopolamine m/z = 304.2 yields 138.1 and internal standard (IS) hyoscyamine m/z = 290.2 yields 124.1. Results: The method is rapid, reproducible, specific and has the following parameters: scopolamine and the IS are eluted at 1.7 and 3.2 min respectively. The linear range is 50-5000 pg/mL for scopolamine in saliva with correlation coefficients > 0.99 with a CV < 0.5 %. The intra-day and inter-day CVs are < 15 % for quality control samples with concentrations of 75, 300, 750 and 3000 pg/mL of scopolamine in human saliva. Conclusion: Solid phase extraction allows more rapid sample preparation and greater precision than liquid extraction. Furthermore, we increased the sensitivity and specificity by adjusting the LC mobile phase and using an MS

  14. Brain Network Activation (BNA) reveals scopolamine-induced impairment of visual working memory.

    PubMed

    Reches, Amit; Levy-Cooperman, Naama; Laufer, Ilan; Shani-Hershkovitch, Revital; Ziv, Keren; Kerem, Dani; Gal, Noga; Stern, Yaki; Cukierman, Guy; Romach, Myroslava K; Sellers, Edward M; Geva, Amir B

    2014-09-01

    The overarching goal of this event-related potential (ERP) study was to examine the effects of scopolamine on the dynamics of brain network activation using a novel ERP network analysis method known as Brain Network Activation (BNA). BNA was used for extracting group-common stimulus-activated network patterns elicited to matching probe stimuli in the context of a delayed matching-to-sample task following placebo and scopolamine treatments administered to healthy participants. The BNA extracted networks revealed the existence of two pathophysiological mechanisms following scopolamine, disconnection, and compensation. Specifically, weaker frontal theta and parietal alpha coupling was accompanied with enhanced fronto-centro-parietal theta activation relative to placebo. In addition, using the characteristic BNA network of each treatment as well as corresponding literature-guided selective subnetworks as combined biomarkers managed to differentiate between individual responses to each of the treatments. Behavioral effects associated with scopolamine included delayed response time and impaired response accuracy. These results indicate that the BNA method is sensitive to the effects of scopolamine on working memory and that it may potentially enable diagnosis and treatment assessment of dysfunctions associated with cholinergic deficiency.

  15. GABA interneurons mediate the rapid antidepressant-like effects of scopolamine

    PubMed Central

    Wohleb, Eric S.; Wu, Min; Gerhard, Danielle M.; Taylor, Seth R.; Picciotto, Marina R.; Alreja, Meenakshi; Duman, Ronald S.

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a recurring psychiatric illness that causes substantial health and socioeconomic burdens. Clinical reports have revealed that scopolamine, a nonselective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, produces rapid antidepressant effects in individuals with MDD. Preclinical models suggest that these rapid antidepressant effects can be recapitulated with blockade of M1-type muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M1-AChR); however, the cellular mechanisms underlying activity-dependent synaptic and behavioral responses to scopolamine have not been determined. Here, we demonstrate that the antidepressant-like effects of scopolamine are mediated by GABA interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Both GABAergic (GAD67+) interneurons and glutamatergic (CaMKII+) interneurons in the mPFC expressed M1-AChR. In mice, viral-mediated knockdown of M1-AChR specifically in GABAergic neurons, but not glutamatergic neurons, in the mPFC attenuated the antidepressant-like effects of scopolamine. Immunohistology and electrophysiology showed that somatostatin (SST) interneurons in the mPFC express M1-AChR at higher levels than parvalbumin interneurons. Moreover, knockdown of M1-AChR in SST interneurons in the mPFC demonstrated that M1-AChR expression in these neurons is required for the rapid antidepressant-like effects of scopolamine. These data indicate that SST interneurons in the mPFC are a promising pharmacological target for developing rapid-acting antidepressant therapies. PMID:27270172

  16. Locomotor activating effects of cocaine and scopolamine combinations in rats: isobolographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Morgane

    2014-08-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors are currently receiving renewed interest as viable targets for treating various psychiatric disorders. Dopaminergic and muscarinic systems interact in complex ways. The goal of this study was to quantify the interaction between a systemically administered psychomotor stimulant and muscarinic antagonist at the behavioral level. Through isobolographic analysis of locomotor activity data, we assessed the effects of three cocaine/scopolamine mixtures in terms of deviation from simple dose addition (additivity), at four effect levels. All three mixtures produced some more-than-additive (synergistic) effects, as lower doses were needed to produce the given effects relative to the calculated effect of additive doses. A mixture with comparable contributions from cocaine and scopolamine produced significantly more-than-additive effects at all but the lowest effect level examined. A mostly-cocaine mixture was more-than-additive only at low effect levels, whereas a mostly-scopolamine mixture produced effects more consistent with additivity, with only the highest effect level barely reaching significant synergism. Our study confirms and quantifies previous findings that suggested synergistic effects of stimulants and muscarinic antagonists. The synergism implies that cocaine and scopolamine stimulate locomotor activity through nonidentical pathways, and was most pronounced for a mixture containing cocaine and scopolamine in comparable proportions.

  17. Agmatine protects against scopolamine-induced water maze performance impairment and hippocampal ERK and Akt inactivation.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Maryam; Khales, Golnaz Yadollahi; Abbasi, Leila; Zarifkar, Asadollah; Rastegar, Karim

    2012-04-01

    Cholinergic brain activity plays a significant role in memory. Scopolamine a muscarinic cholinergic antagonist is known to induce impairment in Morris water maze performance, the task which is mainly dependent on the hippocampus. It is suggested that hippocampal ERK and Akt activation play roles in synaptic plasticity and some types of learning and memory. Agmatine, a polyamine derived from l-arginine decarboxylation, is recently shown to exert some neuroprotective effects. This study was aimed to investigate if agmatine could reverse scopolamine-induced memory impairment and possible hippocampal ERK and Akt activity alteration. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200-250 g were randomly assigned into 5 groups. The animals were trained for 3 days in Morris water maze and in day 4 their memory retention was assessed in probe trial which was consisted of a 60 s trial with no platform. Scopolamine (1 mg/kg/ip) or saline were injected 30 min and agmatine (20 or 40 mg/kg/ip) was administered 60 min before each session. The hippocampi were isolated after behavioral studies and western blotting studies on hippocampal lysates were done to determine the levels of activated ERK and Akt. Scopolamine treatment not only impaired water maze learning and memory, but also decreased the amount of phosphorylated (activated) ERK and Akt. Agmatine pre-treatment prevented both the learning impairment and hippocampal ERK and Akt inactivation induced by scopolamine. It seems that agmatine may act as a candidate substance against amnesia.

  18. The Ameliorating Effect of Myrrh on Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairments in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Baral, Samrat; Cho, Du-Hyong; Pariyar, Ramesh; Yoon, Chi-Su; Chang, Bo-yoon; Kim, Dae-Sung; Cho, Hyoung-Kwon; Kim, Sung Yeon; Oh, Hyuncheol; Kim, Youn-Chul; Kim, Jaehyo; Seo, Jungwon

    2015-01-01

    Myrrh has been used since ancient times for the treatment of various diseases such as inflammatory diseases, gynecological diseases, and hemiplegia. In the present study, we investigated the effects of aqueous extracts of myrrh resin (AEM) on scopolamine-induced memory impairments in mice. AEM was estimated with (2E,5E)-6-hydroxy-2,6-dimethylhepta-2,4-dienal as a representative constituent by HPLC. The oral administration of AEM for 7 days significantly reversed scopolamine-induced reduction of spontaneous alternation in the Y-maze test. In the passive avoidance task, AEM also restored the decreased latency time of the retention trial by scopolamine treatment. In addition, Western blot analysis and Immunohistochemistry revealed that AEM reversed scopolamine-decreased phosphorylation of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Our study demonstrates for the first time that AEM ameliorates the scopolamine-induced memory impairments in mice and increases the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK in the hippocampus of mice brain. These results suggest that AEM has the therapeutic potential in memory impairments. PMID:26635888

  19. The effect of antimotion sickness drugs on habituation to motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. D.; Manno, J. E.; Manno, B. R.; Odenheimer, R. C.; Bairnsfather, L. E.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanism which allows for increased exposure to motion and accelerates habituation is investigated. The responses of 12 male and female subjects between 18-30 years rotated once a day for 5 days on the Contraves Goerz rotating chair after receiving placebo, 10 mg d-amphetamine, 0.6 mg scopolamine with 5 mg d-amphetamine, and 1.0 mg scopolamine are studied. It is observed that with placebo the subjects performed 48 more head movements than untreated subjects, 118 more movements with d-amphetamine, 176 more with 0.6 mg scopolamine with d-amphetamine, and 186 more with 1.0 scopolamine. The data reveal that exposure to rotation increases tolerance from 88 head movements on day 2 to 159 on day 4 at 17.4 rpm and with placebo; 96 to 186 at 19.9 rpm with 10 mg d-amphetamine; 111 to 273 at 20.2 rpm with scopolamine with d-amphetamine, and 141 to 279 at 22.4 rpm with 1.0 mg scopolamine. It is noted that a combination of cholinergic blocking and norepinephrine activation action is most effective in preventing the development of motion sickness and habituation is due to the greater exposure to vestibular simulation permitted by the drugs.

  20. Enhancing the scopolamine production in transgenic plants of Atropa belladonna by overexpressing pmt and h6h genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xirong; Chen, Min; Yang, Chunxian; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Lei; Lan, Xiaozhong; Tang, Kexuan; Liao, Zhihua

    2011-12-01

    Atropa belladonna is officially deemed as the commercial plant to produce scopolamine in China. In this study we report the simultaneous overexpression of two functional genes involved in biosynthesis of scopolamine, which encode the upstream key enzyme putrescine N-methyltransferase (PMT) and the downstream key enzyme hyoscyamine 6β-hydroxylase (H6H), respectively, in transgenic herbal plants Atropa belladonna. Analysis of gene expression profile indicated that both pmt and h6h were expressed at a higher level in transgenic lines, which would be favorable for biosynthesis of scopolamine. High-performance liquid chromatography result suggested that transgenic lines could produce higher accumulation of scopolamine at different levels compared with wild-type lines. Scopolamine content increased to 7.3-fold in transgenic line D9 compared with control lines. This study not only confirms that co-overexpression of pmt and h6h is an ideal method to improve the biosynthetic capacity of scopolamine but also successfully cultivates the transgenic line D9, which significantly enhanced the scopolamine accumulation. Our research can serve as an alternative choice to provide scopolamine resources for relative industry, which is more competitive than conventional market.

  1. A novel spray-dried nanoparticles-in-microparticles system for formulating scopolamine hydrobromide into orally disintegrating tablets.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng-Qian; Yan, Cheng; Bi, Juan; Lv, Wei-Lin; Ji, Rui-Rui; Chen, Xu; Su, Jia-Can; Hu, Jin-Hong

    2011-01-01

    Scopolamine hydrobromide (SH)-loaded microparticles were prepared from a colloidal fluid containing ionotropic-gelated chitosan nanoparticles using a spray-drying method. The spray-dried microparticles were then formulated into orally disintegrating tablets (ODTs) using a wet granulation tablet formation process. A drug entrapment efficiency of about 90% (w/w) and loading capacity of 20% (w/w) were achieved for the microparticles, which ranged from 2 μm to 8 μm in diameter. Results of disintegration tests showed that the formulated ODTs could be completely dissolved within 45 seconds. Drug dissolution profiles suggested that SH is released more slowly from tablets made using the microencapsulation process compared with tablets containing SH that is free or in the form of nanoparticles. The time it took for 90% of the drug to be released increased significantly from 3 minutes for conventional ODTs to 90 minutes for ODTs with crosslinked microparticles. Compared with ODTs made with noncrosslinked microparticles, it was thus possible to achieve an even lower drug release rate using tablets with appropriate chitosan crosslinking. Results obtained indicate that the development of new ODTs designed with crosslinked microparticles might be a rational way to overcome the unwanted taste of conventional ODTs and the side effects related to SH's intrinsic characteristics.

  2. Control of drooling using transdermal scopolamine skin patches. A case report.

    PubMed

    Mato Montero, Abigail; Limeres Posse, Jacobo; Tomás Carmona, Inmaculada; Fernández Feijoo, Javier; Diz Dios, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    Transdermal scopolamine has been shown to be very useful in the management of drooling, particularly in patients with neurological or neuropsychiatric disturbances or severe developmental disorders. In this paper, we present the case of a 24-year-old patient with a diagnosis of cerebral palsy and a severe problem of drooling, exacerbated by marked mandibular prognathism. After exclusion of other therapeutic alternatives, it was decided to use sustained-release transdermal scopolamine patches (Scopoderm TTS). This technique consists of the application every three days of a patch with 1.5 mg of scopolamine in the area of the mastoid apophysis; the patch releases a dose of 0.5 mg of the active substance over each 24 hour period. The patient underwent periodic clinical and laboratory follow-up over a period of three years, achieving satisfactory results with no significant undesirable effects.

  3. Lactucopicrin ameliorates oxidative stress mediated by scopolamine-induced neurotoxicity through activation of the NRF2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Ramu; Subedi, Lalita; Yeo, Eui-Ju; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2016-10-01

    Cholinergic activity plays a vital role in cognitive function, and is reduced in individuals with neurodegenerative diseases. Scopolamine, a muscarinic cholinergic antagonist, has been employed in many studies to understand, identify, and characterize therapeutic targets for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Scopolamine-induced dementia is associated with impairments in memory and cognitive function, as seen in patients with AD. The current study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying scopolamine-induced cholinergic neuronal dysfunction and the neuroprotective effect of lactucopicrin, an inhibitor of acetylcholine esterase (AChE). We investigated apoptotic cell death, caspase activation, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial dysfunction, and the expression levels of anti- and pro-apoptotic proteins in scopolamine-treated C6 cells. We also analyzed the expression levels of antioxidant enzymes and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) in C6 cells and neurite outgrowth in N2a neuroblastoma cells. Our results revealed that 1 h scopolamine pre-treatment induced cytotoxicity by increasing apoptotic cell death via oxidative stress-mediated caspase 3 activation and mitochondrial dysfunction. Scopolamine also downregulated the expression the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase, and the transcription factor NRF2. Lactucopicrin treatment protected C6 cells from scopolamine-induced toxicity by reversing the effects of scopolamine on those markers of toxicity. In addition, scopolamine attenuated the secretion of neurotrophic nerve growth factor (NGF) in C6 cells and neurite outgrowth in N2a cells. As expected, lactucopicrin treatment enhanced NGF secretion and neurite outgrowth. Our study is the first to show that lactucopicrin, a potential neuroprotective agent, ameliorates scopolamine-induced cholinergic dysfunction via NRF2 activation and subsequent expression of antioxidant enzymes.

  4. Scopolamine impairs behavioural function and arginine metabolism in the rat dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Knox, Logan T; Jing, Yu; Fleete, Michael S; Collie, Nicola D; Zhang, Hu; Liu, Ping

    2011-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with progressive memory loss. It has been shown that the cholinergic neurotransmission deficit is one of the neurochemical characteristics of AD, and that L-arginine and its metabolites also play a prominent role in AD pathogenesis. Scopolamine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor antagonist, blocks cholinergic neurotransmission and impairs behavioural function, including learning and memory. This study investigated the effects of scopolamine on animals' behavioural performance and L-arginine metabolism in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Rats were given intraperitoneal injections of scopolamine (0.8 mg/kg) or saline (1 ml/kg) and tested in the Y-maze, open field, water maze and elevated plus maze 30 min post-treatment. After completion of the behavioural testing, the CA1, CA2/3 and dentate gyrus (DG) sub-regions of the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex were harvested to measure the activity and protein expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and arginase, and the levels of L-arginine, L-citrulline, L-ornithine, agmatine, putrescine, spermidine, spermine, glutamate and GABA. Scopolamine treated rats displayed reduced alternation and exploratory behaviour, increased swimming speed and impaired spatial learning and memory. There were significantly decreased NOS activity, increased arginase activity, and increased L-ornithine and putrescine levels in the DG, but not other regions examined, in the scopolamine treated rats as compared to the controls. These findings suggest that scopolamine impairs behavioural function and alters L-arginine metabolism in the DG sub-region of the hippocampus specifically. The underlying mechanisms of it remain to be explored further.

  5. Calotropis procera: A potential cognition enhancer in scopolamine and electroconvulsive shock-induced amnesia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Malabade, Rohit; Taranalli, Ashok D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Present study evaluates the effect of Calotropis procera (Apocynaceae) dry latex on cognitive function in rats using scopolamine and electroconvulsive shock (ECS) induced amnesia model. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were pretreated with 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg of C. procera dry latex in scopolamine-induced amnesia model. Dose showing maximum effect in cognitive performance was selected and further evaluated using scopolamine and ECS-induced amnesia model for its effect on neurochemical enzymes and cognitive performance. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, β amyloid1-42, and dopamine level were analyzed, while the cognitive performance was assessed by elevated plus maze, step-through passive avoidance test, and Morris water maze. Simultaneously, C. procera dry latex (25, 50, 100, 250, 500, and 1000 μg/mL) was screened for in vitro AChE inhibition assay. Results: Pretreatment with (200, 400 and 800 mg/kg) C. procera dry latex shows dose dependent increase in cognitive performance in scopolamine-induced amnesia. Further, pretreatment with the selected dose (800 mg/kg) showed significant improvement in transfer latency (P < 0.001, P < 0.01), escape latency (P < 0.05), time spent in target quadrant (P < 0.001) also significant decrease in AChE activity (P < 0.05), β amyloid1-42 level (P < 0.001), and increase in dopamine level (P < 0.01) in rat brain homogenate when compared with scopolamine and ECS disease control groups. IC50 for C. procera dry latex was found to be <1000 μg/mL. Conclusions: Pretreatment with C. procera dry latex (800 mg/kg) produced significant cognition enhancement by improving cognitive performance and decreasing the marker neurochemical enzyme activity in scopolamine and ECS-induced amnesia model. PMID:26288476

  6. Scopolamine in Brugmansia suaveolens (Solanaceae): defense, allocation, costs, and induced response.

    PubMed

    Alves, Marcos Nopper; Sartoratto, Adilson; Trigo, José Roberto

    2007-02-01

    Brugmansia suaveolens (Solanaceae) contains tropane alkaloids (TAs), which can act as chemical defenses. Selective pressures might modulate the allocation of alkaloids within the plant, as postulated by optimal-defense theory. By tracing scopolamine, the most abundant TA in this species, we found that scopolamine in an artificial diet, in concentrations similar to those in leaves of B. suaveolens, increased mortality and prolonged developmental time of the larvae of the generalist noctuid moth Spodoptera frugiperda. A diet of undamaged leaves of B. suaveolens also showed a large negative effect on the growth of larvae of S. frugiperda compared to a diet of leaves of Ricinus communis, a species that did not have negative effects on this moth; more valuable plant parts, such as young leaves, flowers, and unripe fruits with seeds, have higher scopolamine concentrations than other tissues; leaves of B. suaveolens increase their content of scopolamine after artificial damage. The highest induction was found 24 hr after the damage, and after that, scopolamine content decreased to constitutive levels. This increase represented a cost, because in another experiment, a treatment with methyl jasmonate, an elicitor hormone, increased scopolamine production 9.5-fold and decreased leaf growth 2.3-fold; a diet of artificially damaged leaves of B. suaveolens showed a negative effect on the growth of larvae of S. furgiperda compared to undamaged leaves, suggesting that damage by herbivores induces resistance. Our data are in line with the optimal-defense theory, but experiments in the field with herbivores that share an evolutionary history with B. suaveolens must be undertaken to understand the dynamics of TA allocation in response to herbivory.

  7. Lycium barbarum polysaccharides prevent memory and neurogenesis impairments in scopolamine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiwei; Cheng, Xiang; Chen, Jinzhong; Yi, Xin; Nie, Dekang; Sun, Xiaohui; Qin, Jianbing; Tian, Meiling; Jin, Guohua; Zhang, Xinhua

    2014-01-01

    Lycium barbarum is used both as a food additive and as a medicinal herb in many countries, and L. barbarum polysaccharides (LBPs), a major cell component, are reported to have a wide range of beneficial effects including neuroprotection, anti-aging and anticancer properties, and immune modulation. The effects of LBPs on neuronal function, neurogenesis, and drug-induced learning and memory deficits have not been assessed. We report the therapeutic effects of LBPs on learning and memory and neurogenesis in scopolamine (SCO)-treated rats. LBPs were administered via gastric perfusion for 2 weeks before the onset of subcutaneous SCO treatment for a further 4 weeks. As expected, SCO impaired performance in novel object and object location recognition tasks, and Morris water maze. However, dual SCO- and LBP-treated rats spent significantly more time exploring the novel object or location in the recognition tasks and had significant shorter escape latency in the water maze. SCO administration led to a decrease in Ki67- or DCX-immunoreactive cells in the dentate gyrus and damage of dendritic development of the new neurons; LBP prevented these SCO-induced reductions in cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation. LBP also protected SCO-induced loss of neuronal processes in DCX-immunoreactive neurons. Biochemical investigation indicated that LBP decreased the SCO-induced oxidative stress in hippocampus and reversed the ratio Bax/Bcl-2 that exhibited increase after SCO treatment. However, decrease of BDNF and increase of AChE induced by SCO showed no response to LBP administration. These results suggest that LBPs can prevent SCO-induced cognitive and memory deficits and reductions in cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation. Suppression of oxidative stress and apoptosis may be involved in the above effects of LBPs that may be a promising candidate to restore memory functions and neurogenesis.

  8. Lycium barbarum Polysaccharides Prevent Memory and Neurogenesis Impairments in Scopolamine-Treated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinzhong; Yi, Xin; Nie, Dekang; Sun, Xiaohui; Qin, Jianbing; Tian, Meiling; Jin, Guohua; Zhang, Xinhua

    2014-01-01

    Lycium barbarum is used both as a food additive and as a medicinal herb in many countries, and L. barbarum polysaccharides (LBPs), a major cell component, are reported to have a wide range of beneficial effects including neuroprotection, anti-aging and anticancer properties, and immune modulation. The effects of LBPs on neuronal function, neurogenesis, and drug-induced learning and memory deficits have not been assessed. We report the therapeutic effects of LBPs on learning and memory and neurogenesis in scopolamine (SCO)-treated rats. LBPs were administered via gastric perfusion for 2 weeks before the onset of subcutaneous SCO treatment for a further 4 weeks. As expected, SCO impaired performance in novel object and object location recognition tasks, and Morris water maze. However, dual SCO- and LBP-treated rats spent significantly more time exploring the novel object or location in the recognition tasks and had significant shorter escape latency in the water maze. SCO administration led to a decrease in Ki67- or DCX-immunoreactive cells in the dentate gyrus and damage of dendritic development of the new neurons; LBP prevented these SCO-induced reductions in cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation. LBP also protected SCO-induced loss of neuronal processes in DCX-immunoreactive neurons. Biochemical investigation indicated that LBP decreased the SCO-induced oxidative stress in hippocampus and reversed the ratio Bax/Bcl-2 that exhibited increase after SCO treatment. However, decrease of BDNF and increase of AChE induced by SCO showed no response to LBP administration. These results suggest that LBPs can prevent SCO-induced cognitive and memory deficits and reductions in cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation. Suppression of oxidative stress and apoptosis may be involved in the above effects of LBPs that may be a promising candidate to restore memory functions and neurogenesis. PMID:24505383

  9. D-cycloserine in Prelimbic Cortex Reverses Scopolamine-Induced Deficits in Olfactory Memory in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Portero-Tresserra, Marta; Cristóbal-Narváez, Paula; Martí-Nicolovius, Margarita; Guillazo-Blanch, Gemma; Vale-Martínez, Anna

    2013-01-01

    A significant interaction between N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and muscarinic receptors has been suggested in the modulation of learning and memory processes. The present study further investigates this issue and explores whether d-cycloserine (DCS), a partial agonist at the glycine binding site of the NMDA receptors that has been regarded as a cognitive enhancer, would reverse scopolamine (SCOP)-induced amnesia in two olfactory learning tasks when administered into the prelimbic cortex (PLC). Thus, in experiment 1, DCS (10 µg/site) was infused prior to acquisition of odor discrimination (ODT) and social transmission of food preference (STFP), which have been previously characterized as paradigms sensitive to PLC muscarinic blockade. Immediately after learning such tasks, SCOP was injected (20 µg/site) and the effects of both drugs (alone and combined) were tested in 24-h retention tests. To assess whether DCS effects may depend on the difficulty of the task, in the STFP the rats expressed their food preference either in a standard two-choice test (experiment 1) or a more challenging three-choice test (experiment 2). The results showed that bilateral intra-PLC infusions of SCOP markedly disrupted the ODT and STFP memory tests. Additionally, infusions of DCS alone into the PLC enhanced ODT but not STFP retention. However, the DCS treatment reversed SCOP-induced memory deficits in both tasks, and this effect seemed more apparent in ODT and 3-choice STFP. Such results support the interaction between the glutamatergic and the cholinergic systems in the PLC in such a way that positive modulation of the NMDA receptor/channel, through activation of the glycine binding site, may compensate dysfunction of muscarinic neurotransmission involved in stimulus-reward and relational learning tasks. PMID:23936452

  10. Behavioral effects and drug vulnerability in rats exposed to Pfiesteria toxin.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Perry M; Parris, Brian; Schultz, Sarah; Jones, Jermaine; Gordon, Andrew; Dyer, Brian; Marshall, Harold

    2005-01-01

    Pfiesteria piscicida is a dinoflagellate which has a lethal effect on fish and also causes a syndrome of toxic effects in humans. Cognitive impairment is a prominent aspect of Pfiesteria's toxicity, and this neurocognitive effect resulting from toxin exposure has been demonstrated previously in a rat model. Four experiments are presented here, which replicate, confirm and extend some of the initial research and also show that similar cognitive deficits result from exposure to the toxin of another species, Pfiesteria shumwayae. Rats were given intraperitoneal injections of filtered water taken from toxic Pfiesteria cultures and tested in the radial arm maze (RAM). In two experiments, exposure to toxin from either species (piscicida or shumwayae) retarded acquisition of RAM performance in a non-interrupted win-shift RAM paradigm. A scopolamine challenge showed increased vulnerability to anticholinergic effects in exposed rats, even after nondrugged RAM performance was not different from controls. A third experiment featured a more difficult RAM test which included a 150-min interruption-delay. Toxin exposure also degraded performance in this version of the RAM, and the impairment was potentiated by the scopolamine challenge. The fourth experiment demonstrated retarded learning of the reversal of a RAM procedure which tested reference memory. In agreement with earlier research, these results indicate that Pfiesteria toxin interferes with the learning required to adapt to changing behavioral requirements. They also demonstrate that a latent toxin-produced CNS dysfunction persists after behavior appears normal, as revealed by potentiation of scopolamine's impairment of efficient RAM performance.

  11. Safety and efficacy of tiotropium Respimat versus HandiHaler in patients naive to treatment with inhaled anticholinergics: a post hoc analysis of the TIOSPIR trial

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Robert; Calverley, Peter MA; Dahl, Ronald; Dusser, Daniel; Metzdorf, Norbert; Müller, Achim; Fowler, Andy; Anzueto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who were naive to anticholinergics before the TIOtropium Safety and Performance In Respimat (TIOSPIR) trial may reflect patients seen in practice, in particular in primary care. In addition, investigating safety in these patients avoids the potential bias in patients who previously received anticholinergics and may be tolerant of their effects. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether patients naive to anticholinergic therapy who were treated with tiotropium Respimat 2.5 or 5 μg had different safety and efficacy outcomes than patients treated with tiotropium HandiHaler 18 μg. Methods: A post hoc analysis of patients who were not receiving anticholinergics before TIOSPIR (N=6,966/17,135) was conducted. Primary end points were risk of death from any cause and risk of COPD exacerbation. Secondary outcomes included severe exacerbation and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). Additional analysis of exacerbations was carried out in anticholinergic-naive patients with moderate (GOLD II) disease. Results: Anticholinergic-naive patients had less severe disease than the total TIOSPIR population. Discontinuations because of anticholinergic side effects were infrequent (0.9% overall). Similar to the primary study, patients in the tiotropium Respimat groups had no difference in the risk of death or risk of any or severe exacerbation than patients treated with tiotropium HandiHaler. Risk of MACE was similar across the Respimat and HandiHaler groups. Rates of exacerbations in the subgroup of patients with moderate disease were similar across the Respimat and HandiHaler groups. Conclusions: Tiotropium Respimat and HandiHaler have similar safety and efficacy profiles in patients who are naive to anticholinergic therapy. PMID:26540491

  12. Auraptene consolidates memory, reverses scopolamine-disrupted memory in passive avoidance task, and ameliorates retention deficits in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizian, Kaveh; Yaghoobi, Najmeh Sadat; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Shahraki, Jafar; Rezaee, Ramin; Hashemzaei, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Auraptene (7-geranyloxycoumarin) (AUR), from Citrus species has shown anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and beta-secretase inhibitory effects. Scopolamine is a nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonist which causes short-term memory impairments and is used for inducing animal model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This research aimed to investigate the effect of AUR on scopolamine-induced avoidance memory retention deficits in step-through task in mice. Materials and Methods: The effect of four-day pre-training injections of AUR (50, 75, and 100 mg/kg, subcutaneous (SC)) and scopolamine (1 mg/kg, IP), and their co-administration on avoidance memory retention in step-through passive avoidance task, was investigated by measuring the latency to enter to the dark chamber. Results: Pre-training administration of AUR caused significant increase in step-through latency in comparison with control group, 48, 96, and 168 hr after training trial. The findings of this study showed that scopolamine (1 mg/kg, IP, for four consecutive days) impaired passive avoidance memory retention compared to saline-treated animals. Step-through passive avoidance task results showed that AUR markedly reversed scopolamine-induced avoidance memory retention impairments, 24 and 168 hr after training trial in step-through task. Conclusion: Results from co-administration of AUR and scopolamine showed that AUR reversed scopolamine-induced passive avoidance memory retention impairments. PMID:26730337

  13. Rapid antidepressant actions of scopolamine: Role of medial prefrontal cortex and M1-subtype muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Navarria, Andrea; Wohleb, Eric S; Voleti, Bhavya; Ota, Kristie T; Dutheil, Sophie; Lepack, Ashley E; Dwyer, Jason M; Fuchikami, Manabu; Becker, Astrid; Drago, Filippo; Duman, Ronald S

    2015-10-01

    Clinical studies demonstrate that scopolamine, a non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAchR) antagonist, produces rapid therapeutic effects in depressed patients, and preclinical studies report that the actions of scopolamine require glutamate receptor activation and the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). The present study extends these findings to determine the role of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and specific muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M-AchR) subtypes in the actions of scopolamine. The administration of scopolamine increases the activity marker Fos in the mPFC, including the infralimbic (IL) and prelimbic (PrL) subregions. Microinfusions of scopolamine into either the IL or the PrL produced significant antidepressant responses in the forced swim test, and neuronal silencing of IL or PrL blocked the antidepressant effects of systemic scopolamine. The results also demonstrate that the systemic administration of a selective M1-AChR antagonist, VU0255035, produced an antidepressant response and stimulated mTORC1 signaling in the PFC, similar to the actions of scopolamine. Finally, we used a chronic unpredictable stress model as a more rigorous test of rapid antidepressant actions and found that a single dose of scopolamine or VU0255035 blocked the anhedonic response caused by CUS, an effect that requires the chronic administration of typical antidepressants. Taken together, these findings indicate that mPFC is a critical mediator of the behavioral actions of scopolamine and identify the M1-AChR as a therapeutic target for the development of novel and selective rapid-acting antidepressants.

  14. Hippocampal chromatin-modifying enzymes are pivotal for scopolamine-induced synaptic plasticity gene expression changes and memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Singh, Padmanabh; Konar, Arpita; Kumar, Ashish; Srivas, Sweta; Thakur, Mahendra K

    2015-08-01

    The amnesic potential of scopolamine is well manifested through synaptic plasticity gene expression changes and behavioral paradigms of memory impairment. However, the underlying mechanism remains obscure and consequently ideal therapeutic target is lacking. In this context, chromatin-modifying enzymes, which regulate memory gene expression changes, deserve major attention. Therefore, we analyzed the expression of chromatin-modifying enzymes and recovery potential of enzyme modulators in scopolamine-induced amnesia. Scopolamine administration drastically up-regulated DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1) and HDAC2 expression while CREB-binding protein (CBP), DNMT3a and DNMT3b remained unaffected. HDAC inhibitor sodium butyrate and DNMT inhibitor Aza-2'deoxycytidine recovered scopolamine-impaired hippocampal-dependent memory consolidation with concomitant increase in the expression of synaptic plasticity genes Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Arc and level of histone H3K9 and H3K14 acetylation and decrease in DNA methylation level. Sodium butyrate showed more pronounced effect than Aza-2'deoxycytidine and their co-administration did not exhibit synergistic effect on gene expression. Taken together, we showed for the first time that scopolamine-induced up-regulation of chromatin-modifying enzymes, HDAC2 and DNMT1, leads to gene expression changes and consequent decline in memory consolidation. Our findings on the action of scopolamine as an epigenetic modulator can pave a path for ideal therapeutic targets. We propose the following putative pathway for scopolamine-mediated memory impairment; scopolamine up-regulates hippocampal DNMT1 and HDAC2 expression, induces methylation and deacetylation of BDNF and Arc promoter, represses gene expression and eventually impairs memory consolidation. On the other hand, Aza-2 and NaB inhibit DNMT1 and HDAC2 respectively, up-regulate BDNF and Arc expression and recover memory consolidation. We elucidate the action of

  15. Effects of discontinuation of long-term anticholinergic treatment in elderly schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Drimer, T; Shahal, B; Barak, Y

    2004-01-01

    Anticholinergic medication (ACM) is frequently used in psychiatry to treat the side-effects of D2 blocking agents. However, ACM is not without adverse effects and, in the elderly, cognitive and memory impairments have been emphasized. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of discontinuation of ACM on cognitive functions in a group of elderly chronic schizophrenia patients. Twenty-seven elderly patients (age 60 years or older), who were diagnosed as suffering from schizophrenia (DSM-IV) and receiving ACM in addition to antipsychotic treatment, were enrolled. Before and after ACM was discontinued, the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive (ADAS-Cog) subscale was administered. Twenty-one patients completed the study. All were receiving Akineton (biperiden), 2-6 mg daily before the study. Significant improvement in the ADAS-Cog total score was demonstrated (P < 0.03), as well as in the ideational praxia and orientation subscales. Improvement was correlated with the previous dose of biperidin. No adverse events or emergent extrapyramidal symptoms were noted. Discontinuation of ACM may be warranted in chronic schizophrenia patients since it may improve cognitive functioning with no adverse effects.

  16. Modulation of adenosine signaling prevents scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Bortolotto, Josiane Woutheres; Melo, Gabriela Madalena de; Cognato, Giana de Paula; Vianna, Mônica Ryff Moreira; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2015-02-01

    Adenosine, a purine ribonucleoside, exhibits neuromodulatory and neuroprotective effects in the brain and is involved in memory formation and cognitive function. Adenosine signaling is mediated by adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3); in turn, nucleotide and nucleoside-metabolizing enzymes and adenosine transporters regulate its levels. Scopolamine, a muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist, has profound amnesic effects in a variety of learning paradigms and has been used to induce cognitive deficits in animal models. This study investigated the effects of acute exposure to caffeine (a non-selective antagonist of adenosine receptors A1 and A2A), ZM 241385 (adenosine receptor A2A antagonist), DPCPX (adenosine receptor A1 antagonist), dipyridamole (inhibitor of nucleoside transporters) and EHNA (inhibitor of adenosine deaminase) in a model of pharmacological cognitive impairment induced by scopolamine in adult zebrafish. Caffeine, ZM 241385, DPCPX, dipyridamole, and EHNA were acutely administered independently via i.p. in zebrafish, followed by exposure to scopolamine dissolved in tank water (200μM). These compounds prevented the scopolamine-induced amnesia without impacting locomotor activity or social interaction. Together, these data support the hypothesis that adenosine signaling may modulate memory processing, suggesting that these compounds present a potential preventive strategy against cognitive impairment.

  17. Gongjin-Dan Enhances Hippocampal Memory in a Mouse Model of Scopolamine-Induced Amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Seok; Hong, Sung-Shin; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Lee, Hye-Won; Kim, Won-Yong; Lee, Sam-Keun; Son, Chang-Gue

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the neuropharmacological effects of Gongjin-Dan (GJD) on the memory impairment caused by scopolamine injection. BALB/c mice were orally treated with GJD (100, 200, or 400 mg/kg, daily) or tacrine (THA, 10 mg/kg) for 10 days, and scopolamine (2 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally. The radial arm maze and passive avoidance tests were performed to evaluate the animal’s learning and memory. Scopolamine increased the task completing time, the number of total errors (reference and working memory error) in the radial arm maze task, and the latency time in the passive avoidance test, which were significantly ameliorated by treatment with GJD. The GJD treatment also attenuated the scopolamine-induced hyperactivation of acetylcholinesterase activity, and suppression of the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF) and their receptors in the hippocampus. These effects of GJD were supported by both the doublecortin (DCX)-positive staining and Nissl staining, which were used to measure hippocampal neurogenesis and atrophy, respectively. These findings strongly suggest that GJD exerts a potent anti-amnesic effect, and its underlying mechanism might involve the modulation of cholinergic activity. PMID:27483466

  18. Antiamnesic Effects of Walnuts Consumption on Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairments in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Harandi, Shaahin; Golchin, Leila; Ansari, Mehdi; Moradi, Alireza; Shabani, Mohammad; Sheibani, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disease, which impairs memory and cognitive function. Walnuts are a dietary source of polyphenols, antioxidants and other compounds with health beneficial effects. These characteristic of walnuts make them perfect candidates for evaluation of their possible effects on neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore the present study was designed to investigate the effects of walnuts consumption (2%, 6% and 9% walnut diets) on memory enhancement and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of brain in scopolamine-induced amnesic rats. Methods: Learning, memory and locomotor activity parameters were evaluated using Morris water maze (MWM), passive avoidance and rotarod tests. Results: Our results showed that consumption of walnuts at doses of 6% and 9% significantly restored the scopolamine-induced memory impairments in the MWM and passive avoidance tests. Moreover, the potential of walnuts to prevent scopolamine neurotoxicity was also reflected by the decreased AChE activity in the whole brain in comparison with the scopolamine group. Discussion: These results suggest that walnuts may be useful against memory impairment and it may exert these anti-amnesic activities via inhibition of AChE activity in the brain. It would be worthwhile to explore the potential of this nut and its active components in the management of the AD. PMID:27307953

  19. Amnesia of Inhibitory Avoidance by Scopolamine Is Overcome by Previous Openfield Exposure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colettis, Natalia C.; Snitcofsky, Marina; Kornisiuk, Edgar E.; Gonzalez, Emilio N.; Quillfeldt, Jorge A.; Jerusalinsky, Diana A.

    2014-01-01

    The muscarinic cholinergic receptor (MAChR) blockade with scopolamine either extended or restricted to the hippocampus, before or after training in inhibitory avoidance (IA) caused anterograde or retrograde amnesia, respectively, in the rat, because there was no long-term memory (LTM) expression. Adult Wistar rats previously exposed to one or two…

  20. Blockade of the dorsal hippocampal dopamine D1 receptors inhibits the scopolamine-induced state-dependent learning in rats.

    PubMed

    Piri, M; Rostampour, M; Nasehi, M; Zarrindast, M R

    2013-11-12

    In the present study, we investigated the possible role of the dorsal hippocampal (CA1) dopamine D1 receptors on scopolamine-induced amnesia as well as scopolamine state-dependent memory in adult male Wistar rats. Animals were bilaterally implanted with chronic cannulae in the CA1 regions of the dorsal hippocampus, trained in a step-through type inhibitory avoidance task, and tested 24h after training for their step-through latency. Results indicated that pre-training or pre-test intra-CA1 administration of scopolamine (1.5 and 3 μg/rat) dose-dependently reduced the step-through latency, showing an amnestic response. The pre-training scopolamine-induced amnesia (3 μg/rat) was reversed by the pre-test administration of scopolamine, indicating a state-dependent effect. Similarly, the pre-test administration of dopamine D1 receptor agonist, 1-phenyl-7,8-dihydroxy-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrochloride (SKF38393; 1, 2 and 4 μg/rat, intra-CA1), could significantly reverse the scopolamine-induced amnesia. Interestingly, administration of an ineffective dose of scopolamine (0.25 μg/rat, intra-CA1) before different doses of SKF38393, blocked the reversal effect of SKF38393 on the pre-training scopolamine-induced amnesia. Moreover, while the pre-test intra-CA1 injection of the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, R(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrochloride (SCH23390; 0.1 and 0.5 μg/rat, intra-CA1), resulted in apparent memory impairment, microinjection of the same doses of this agent inhibited the scopolamine-induced state-dependent memory. These results indicate that the CA1 dopamine D1 receptors may potentially play an important role in scopolamine-induced amnesia as well as the scopolamine state-dependent memory. Furthermore, our results propose that dopamine D1 receptor agonist, SKF38393 reverses the scopolamine-induced amnesia via acetylcholine release and possibly through the activation of muscarinic

  1. Relative Bioavailability of Scopolamine Dosage Forms and Interaction with Dextroamphetamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Jason L.; Du, Brian; Vaksman, Zalman; Locke, James P.; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Reduced Gravity Office (RGO) uses scopolamine (SCOP) and in combination with dextoamphetamine (DEX) to manage motion sickness symptoms during parabolic flights. The medications are dispensed as custom dosage forms as gelatin capsules. Anecdotal evidence of efficacy suggests that these formulations are unreliable and less efficacious for the treatment of motion sickness. We estimated bioavailability of four different oral formulations used by NASA for the treatment of motion sickness. Twelve healthy, non-smoking subjects between 21and 48 years of age received four treatments on separate days in a randomized fashion; the treatments were 0.8 mg SCOP alone as tablet, 0.8 mg SCOP alone in gel cap, 0.8 mg SCOP and 10 mg DEX as tablets, and 0.8 mg SCOP and 10 mg DEX in gel cap. After each treatment, blood, saliva, and urine samples were collected at scheduled time intervals for 24 h after dosing. Bioavailability and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated and compared using ANOVA. After administration of SCOP tablets alone, maximum concentration (C(sub max)) and time for maximum concentration (t(sub max)) were 0.26 plus or minus 0.04 ng/mL and 0.71 plus or minus 0.02 h, respectively; volume of distribution, and clearance were 47.6 plus or minus 4.72 L/kg and 23.0 plus or minus 4.58 L/h/kg, respectively. SCOP t(sub max) after administration as gelcaps was significantly longer than that with tablets (1.04 h, p less than 0.05), but no significant differences in other pharmacokinetic parameters of SCOP were observed between the two dosage forms. When coadministered with DEX, the area underneath the concentration versus time curve (AUC) of SCOP was significantly reduced to 0.61 plus or minus 0.09 and 0.64 plus or minus 0.11 ng (raised dot) h/mL after administration as a tablet or gelcap formulation, respectively; SCOP C(sub max) was lower after coadministration with DEX, this difference, however, was not statistically significant. Delayed absorption with gelcaps

  2. Aqueous extracts from asparagus stems prevent memory impairments in scopolamine-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Sui, Zifang; Qi, Ce; Huang, Yunxiang; Ma, Shufeng; Wang, Xinguo; Le, Guowei; Sun, Jin

    2017-03-09

    Aqueous extracts from Asparagus officinalis L. stems (AEAS) are rich in polysaccharides, gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), and steroidal saponin. This study was designed to investigate the effects of AEAS on learning, memory, and acetylcholinesterase-related activity in a scopolamine-induced model of amnesia. Sixty ICR mice were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 10) including the control group (CT), scopolamine group (SC), donepezil group (DON), low, medium, and high dose groups of AEAS (LS, MS, HS; 1.6 mL kg(-1), 8 mL kg(-1), 16 mL kg(-1)). The results showed that 8 mL kg(-1) of AEAS used in this study significantly reversed scopolamine-induced cognitive impairments in mice in the novel object recognition test (P < 0.05) and the Y-maze test (P < 0.05), and also improved the latency to escape in the Morris water maze test (P < 0.05). Moreover, it significantly increased acetylcholine and inhibited acetylcholinesterase activity in the hippocampus, which was directly related to the reduction in learning and memory impairments. It also reversed scopolamine-induced reduction in the hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) mRNA expression. AEAS protected against scopolamine-induced memory deficits. In conclusion, AEAS protected learning and memory function in mice by enhancing the activity of the cholinergic nervous system, and increasing BDNF and CREB expression. This suggests that AEAS has the potential to prevent cognitive impairments in age-related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Effect of Gingko biloba extract on scopolamine-induced apoptosis in the hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed

    Jahanshahi, M; Nickmahzar, E G; Babakordi, F

    2013-09-01

    Apoptosis, known as programmed cell death, plays a crucial role in normal development and tissue homeostasis. Apoptosis is also involved in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Amnesia refers to the loss of memory and can also be a warning sign of neurodegenerative diseases. The antioxidant properties of Ginkgo biloba extract was known previously. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of Ginkgo biloba extract on the rat's hippocampal apoptotic neurons number after Scopolamine based amnesia. Thirty-six adult male Wistar rats were used. Rats were randomly divided into control, sham, protective and treatment groups. The rats in the sham group received only scopolamine hydrobromide (3 mg/kg) intraperitoneally. The rats in the protective and treatment groups received Ginkgo biloba extract (40, 80 mg/kg) for 7 days intraperitoneally before/after scopolamine injection. Then 48 h after the last injection, the brains of rats were withdrawn and fixed with paraformaldehyde, and then, after histological processing, the slices were stained with the TUNEL kit for apoptotic neurons. Data were compared by the ANOVA Post Hoc Tukey test; P < 0.05 was considered significant. Our results showed that Scopolamine (in the sham group) increased significantly the number of apoptotic neurons in all areas of the hippocampus compared with the control. Whereas, Ginkgo biloba extract reduce the neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampus before and/or after encounter with scopolamine. We concluded that pretreatment and treatment injection of Ginkgo biloba extract can have a protective effect for neurons and it can limit apoptosis in all area of the hippocampus.

  4. Prevention of scopolamine-induced memory deficits by schisandrin B, an antioxidant lignan from Schisandra chinensis in mice.

    PubMed

    Giridharan, Vijayasree V; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Sato, Shinji; Ko, Kam Ming; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2011-08-01

    The preventive effect of schisandrin B (Sch B), an antioxidant ingredient of Schisandra chinensis, was studied on scopolamine-induced dementia in mouse. Scopolamine developed oxidative stress in the brain with the decreased levels of antioxidant enzymes and increased nitrite level. At the same time, a significant impairment of learning and memory occurred when evaluated by passive avoidance task (PAT) and Morris water maze (MWM) with concomitant increase of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and decreased acetylcholine levels. Pre-treatment by Sch B (10, 25, 50 mg/kg) effectively prevented scopolamine-induced oxidative stress and improved behavioural tasks. Further, the scopolamine-induced increase in AChE activity was significantly suppressed and the level of acetylcholine was maintained as normal by Sch B treatment. These results suggest that Sch B have protective function against cerebral functional defects such as dementia not only by antioxidant prevention but also exerting its potent cognitive-enhancing activity through modulation of acetylcholine level.

  5. Synergism Between Anticholinergic and Oxime Treatments Against Sarin-Induced Ocular Insult in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gore, A; Brandeis, R; Egoz, I; Turetz, J; Nili, U; Grauer, E; Bloch-Shilderman, E

    2015-08-01

    Eye exposure to the extremely toxic organophosphorus sarin results in long-term miosis and visual impairment. As current treatment using atropine or homatropine eye drops may lead to considerable visual side effects, alternative combined treatments of intramuscular (im) oximes (16.8 µmol/kg, im) with atropine (0.5 mg/kg, im) or with the short acting antimuscarinic tropicamide (0.5%; w/v) eye drops were thus evaluated. The combined treatments efficacy following topical exposure to sarin (1 µg) was assessed by measuring pupil width and light reflex using an infra-red based digital photographic system. Results showed that the combined treatment of various oximes with atropine or with topical tropicamide eye drops rapidly reversed the sarin-induced miosis and presented a long-term improvement of 67-98% (oxime+tropicamide) or 84-109% (oxime+atropine) in pupil widening as early as 10-min following treatment. This recovery was shown to persist for at least 8-h following exposure. All combined treatments facilitated the ability of the iris to contract following sarin insult as tested by a light reflex response.Our findings emphasize the high efficacy of im oxime treatment combined with either atropine im or tropicamide eye drops in counteracting sarin-induced ocular insult. Therefore, in a mass casualty scenario the systemic combined treatment may be sufficient to ameliorate sarin-induced ocular insult with no need for additional, topical anticholinergic treatment at least in the initial stage of intoxication. For very mild casualties, who are unlikely to receive im treatment, the combined oxime (im) with topical tropicamide treatment may be sufficient in ameliorating the ocular insult.

  6. 5-HT6 receptor antagonist reversal of emotional learning and prepulse inhibition deficits induced by apomorphine or scopolamine.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Ellen S; Neumaier, John F

    2008-01-01

    5-HT6 receptors have been implicated in consolidation of visuospatial and reward-based learning tasks. Since 5-HT6 receptors may be important in modulation of sensory gating which is often affected in schizophrenic patients, we tested whether Ro 4368554, a 5-HT6 selective antagonist at a dose of 10 mg/kg, could reverse the loss of prepulse inhibition from apomorphine or scopolamine. In addition, we also tested whether Ro 4368554 altered fear conditioning using fear potentiated startle, a model for emotional learning. Prepulse inhibition of startle was disrupted by apomorphine (0.5 mg/kg) when prepulse emissions were 5 dB above background but not above 15 dB, while scopolamine (0.5 mg/kg) caused disruption at both prepulse levels. Scopolamine-mediated disruption was not reversed by Ro 4368854 but apomorphine-mediated disruption was significantly ameliorated by 5-HT6 inhibition. For fear potentiated startle, scopolamine and/or Ro 4368554 were administered before two daily fear conditioning sessions; rats were tested on the following day. Rats that received scopolamine displayed no fear potentiated startle but Ro 4368554 reversed this scopolamine deficit. Additionally, we mapped Fos induction in rats treated with scopolamine and/or Ro 4368554; scopolamine increased Fos expression in the central nucleus of the amygdala and this was attenuated by Ro 4368554. In summary, we have demonstrated the efficacy of 5-HT6 antagonists in modulating sensory gating and fear conditioning, and thus may be of therapeutic use for schizophrenia-related disorders.

  7. Dorsolateral frontal cortex and peripheral muscarinic receptors participation in the discriminative stimulus properties of scopolamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Aguayo-DelCastillo, Alejandra; Vélazquez-Martínez, David N; Sánchez-Castillo, Hugo; Casasola, César

    2013-08-01

    Organisms are capable of making decisions based on their ability to discriminate between different stimuli. This principle is fundamental for the adaptation of organisms to their environment, by emitting appropriate behaviors based on a previously acquired discriminative process. The present study analyzed the participation of the peripheral nervous system, the M₁ muscarinic receptor subtype, as well as the contribution of the dorsolateral frontal cortex to discrimination process using scopolamine as discriminative stimulus. Male Wistar rats were trained to discriminate between scopolamine (1.0 mg/kg) and saline injections (i.p.) using a two-lever operant procedure. Once discrimination was acquired, generalization curves for scopolamine, methylscopolamine, pirenzepine, dorsolateral frontal cortex lesion and control conditions were obtained. Results showed that rats were able to discriminate and generalize its responses to different doses of scopolamine but not for methylscopolamine or pirenzepine, thus the data suggest that discriminative properties of scopolamine are processed in CNS and that the M₁ receptor does not participate in this process. Dorsolateral frontal cortex lesion did not produce any statistically significant difference in the generalization curve, which suggests that a system different from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex may be responsible for the control of stimulus produced by scopolamine.

  8. Antiamnesic and Antioxidants Effects of Ferulago angulata Essential Oil Against Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment in Laboratory Rats.

    PubMed

    Hritcu, Lucian; Bagci, Eyup; Aydin, Emel; Mihasan, Marius

    2015-09-01

    Ferulago angulata (Apiaceae) is a shrub indigenous to western Iran, Turkey and Iraq. In traditional medicine, F. angulata is recommended for treating digestive pains, hemorrhoids, snake bite, ulcers and as sedative. In the present study, the effects of inhaled F. angulata essential oil (1 and 3%, daily, for 21 days) on spatial memory performance were assessed in scopolamine-treated rats. Scopolamine-induced memory impairments were observed, as measured by the Y-maze and radial arm-maze tasks. Decreased activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase along with increase of acetylcholinesterase activity and decrease of total content of reduced glutathione were observed in the rat hippocampal homogenates of scopolamine-treated animals as compared with control. Production of protein carbonyl and malondialdehyde significantly increased in the rat hippocampal homogenates of scopolamine-treated animals as compared with control, as a consequence of impaired antioxidant enzymes activities. Additionally, in scopolamine-treated rats exposure to F. angulata essential oil significantly improved memory formation and decreased oxidative stress, suggesting memory-enhancing and antioxidant effects. Therefore, our results suggest that multiple exposures to F. angulata essential oil ameliorate scopolamine-induced spatial memory impairment by attenuation of the oxidative stress in the rat hippocampus.

  9. Cognition Enhancing and Neuromodulatory Propensity of Bacopa monniera Extract Against Scopolamine Induced Cognitive Impairments in Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Pandareesh, M D; Anand, T; Khanum, Farhath

    2016-05-01

    Cognition-enhancing activity of Bacopa monniera extract (BME) was evaluated against scopolamine-induced amnesic rats by novel object recognition test (NOR), elevated plus maze (EPM) and Morris water maze (MWM) tests. Scopolamine (2 mg/kg body wt, i.p.) was used to induce amnesia in rats. Piracetam (200 mg/kg body wt, i.p.) was used as positive control. BME at three different dosages (i.e., 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg body wt.) improved the impairment induced by scopolamine by increasing the discrimination index of NOR and by decreasing the transfer latency of EPM and escape latency of MWM tests. Our results further elucidate that BME administration has normalized the neurotransmitters (acetylcholine, glutamate, 5-hydroxytryptamine, dopamine, 3,4 dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, norepinephrine) levels that were altered by scopolamine administration in hippocampus of rat brain. BME administration also ameliorated scopolamine effect by down-regulating AChE and up-regulating BDNF, muscarinic M1 receptor and CREB expression in brain hippocampus confirms the potent neuroprotective role and these results are in corroboration with the earlier in vitro studies. BME administration showed significant protection against scopolamine-induced toxicity by restoring the levels of antioxidant and lipid peroxidation. These results indicate that, cognition-enhancing and neuromodulatory propensity of BME is through modulating the expression of AChE, BDNF, MUS-1, CREB and also by altering the levels of neurotransmitters in hippocampus of rat brain.

  10. Anti-amnesic activity of Citrus aurantium flowers extract against scopolamine-induced memory impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Rahnama, Samira; Rabiei, Zahra; Alibabaei, Zahra; Mokhtari, Shiva; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Deris, Fatemeh

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurological disorder that mostly affects the elderly population. Learning and memory impairment as the most characteristic manifestation of dementia could be induced chemically by scopolamine, a cholinergic antagonist. Cholinergic neurotransmission mediated brain oxidative stress. Citrus aurantium (CA) has traditionally been used for the treatment of insomnia, anxiety and epilepsy. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of Citrus aurantium on scopolamine-induced learning and memory deficit in rats. Forty-two Wistar rats were divided into six equal groups. (1) Control (received saline), (2) SCOP (scopolamine at a dose of 1 mg/kg for 15 days), (3) and (4) SCOP + CA (scopolamine and CA extract at doses of 300 and 600 mg/kg per day for 15 days), (5) and (6) intact groups (CA extract at 300 and 600 mg/kg per day for 15 days, respectively). Administration of CA flower extract significantly restored memory and learning impairments induced by scopolamine in the passive avoidance test and also reduced escape latency during trial sessions in the Morris water maze test. Citrus aurantium flower extract significantly decreased the serum malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Citrus aurantium flower extract has repairing effects on memory and behavioral disorders produced by scopolamine and may have beneficial effects in the treatment of AD.

  11. Anticholinergics in the treatment of children and adults with acute asthma: a systematic review with meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, G; Castro-Rodriguez, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Current guidelines recommend the use of a combination of inhaled ß2 agonists and anticholinergics, particularly for patients with acute severe or life threatening asthma in the emergency setting. However, this statement is based on a relatively small number of randomised controlled trials and related systematic reviews. A review was undertaken to incorporate the more recent evidence available about the effectiveness of treatment with a combination of ß2 agonists and anticholinergics compared with ß2 agonists alone in the treatment of acute asthma. Methods: A search was conducted of all randomised controlled trials published before April 2005. Results: Data from 32 randomised controlled trials (n = 3611 subjects) showed significant reductions in hospital admissions in both children (RR = 0.73; 95% CI 0.63 to 0.85, p = 0.0001) and adults (RR = 0.68; 95% CI 0.53 to 0.86, p = 0.002) treated with inhaled anticholinergic agents. Combined treatment also produced a significant increase in spirometric parameters 60–120 minutes after the last treatment in both children (SMD = –0.54; 95% CI –0.28 to –0.81, p = 0.0001) and adults (SMD = –0.36; 95% CI –0.23 to –0.49, p = 0.00001). Conclusions: This review strongly suggests that the addition of multiple doses of inhaled ipratropium bromide to ß2 agonists is indicated as the standard treatment in children, adolescents, and adults with moderate to severe exacerbations of asthma in the emergency setting. PMID:16055613

  12. Fermented Sipjeondaebo-tang Alleviates Memory Deficits and Loss of Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Scopolamine-induced Amnesia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Ra; Lee, Heeeun; Park, Hwayong; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the anti-amnesic effects of SJ and fermented SJ (FSJ) on scopolamine (SCO)-induced amnesia mouse model. Mice were orally co-treated with SJ or FSJ (125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) and SCO (1 mg/kg), which was injected intraperitoneally for 14 days. SCO decreased the step-through latency and prolonged latency time to find the hidden platform in the passive avoidance test and Morris water maze test, respectively, and both SCO effects were ameliorated by FSJ treatment. FSJ was discovered to promote hippocampal neurogenesis during SCO treatment by increasing proliferation and survival of BrdU-positive cells, immature/mature neurons. In the hippocampus of SCO, oxidative stress and the activity of acetylcholinesterase were elevated, whereas the levels of acetylcholine and choline acetyltransferase were diminished; however, all of these alterations were attenuated by FSJ-treatment. The alterations in brain-derived neurotrophic factor, phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein, and phosphorylated Akt that occurred following SCO treatment were protected by FSJ administration. Therefore, our findings are the first to suggest that FSJ may be a promising therapeutic drug for the treatment of amnesia and aging-related or neurodegenerative disease-related memory impairment. Furthermore, the molecular mechanism by which FSJ exerts its effects may involve modulation of the cholinergic system and BDNF/CREB/Akt pathway. PMID:26939918

  13. Melatonin attenuates scopolamine-induced memory/synaptic disorder by rescuing EPACs/miR-124/Egr1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiong; Wang, Zhi-Hao; Wu, Yuan-Yuan; Tang, Hui; Tan, Lu; Wang, Xiang; Gao, Xin-Ya; Xiong, Yan-Si; Liu, Dan; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Zhu, Ling-Qiang

    2013-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent type of dementia in elderly people. There are decreased melatonin levels in the serum of AD patients, and melatonin supplements are able to reverse AD pathology and memory deficits in many animal experiments and clinical trials. However, the underlying mechanism regarding how melatonin rescues the AD-like memory/synaptic disorder remains unknown. Here, we use the Morris water maze, step-down inhibitory avoidance task, in vivo long-term potentiation recording, and Golgi staining and report that intraperitoneal injection of melatonin (1 mg/kg/day) for 14 days in rats effectively reverses the memory and synaptic impairment in scopolamine-induced amnesia, a well-recognized dementia animal model. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting experiments, we further determined that melatonin rescues the EPACs/miR-124/Egr1 signal pathway, which is important in learning and memory, as reported recently. Our studies provide a novel underlying epigenetic mechanism for melatonin to attenuate the synaptic disorder and could benefit drug discovery in neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Fermented Sipjeondaebo-tang Alleviates Memory Deficits and Loss of Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Scopolamine-induced Amnesia in Mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee Ra; Lee, Heeeun; Park, Hwayong; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2016-03-04

    We investigated the anti-amnesic effects of SJ and fermented SJ (FSJ) on scopolamine (SCO)-induced amnesia mouse model. Mice were orally co-treated with SJ or FSJ (125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) and SCO (1 mg/kg), which was injected intraperitoneally for 14 days. SCO decreased the step-through latency and prolonged latency time to find the hidden platform in the passive avoidance test and Morris water maze test, respectively, and both SCO effects were ameliorated by FSJ treatment. FSJ was discovered to promote hippocampal neurogenesis during SCO treatment by increasing proliferation and survival of BrdU-positive cells, immature/mature neurons. In the hippocampus of SCO, oxidative stress and the activity of acetylcholinesterase were elevated, whereas the levels of acetylcholine and choline acetyltransferase were diminished; however, all of these alterations were attenuated by FSJ-treatment. The alterations in brain-derived neurotrophic factor, phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein, and phosphorylated Akt that occurred following SCO treatment were protected by FSJ administration. Therefore, our findings are the first to suggest that FSJ may be a promising therapeutic drug for the treatment of amnesia and aging-related or neurodegenerative disease-related memory impairment. Furthermore, the molecular mechanism by which FSJ exerts its effects may involve modulation of the cholinergic system and BDNF/CREB/Akt pathway.

  15. Histaminergic response to Coriolis stimulation: implication for transdermal scopolamine therapy of motion sickness.

    PubMed

    Wang, E T; Zhou, D R; He, L H

    1992-07-01

    The blood levels of histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in 10 subjects, with or without administration of the transdermal therapeutic system of scopolamine (TTS-S), were measured following motion sickness (MS) induced by Coriolis stimulation. Histamine and 5-HT were assayed using the fluorometric method. The results demonstrated that the blood levels of histamine increased significantly following MS and were even higher in the subjects using TTS-S, but we found neither significant changes in the blood levels of 5-HT following MS nor any effect of TTS-S on it. The results suggest that histamine contributes to the development of MS, and scopolamine may exert its anti-MS action by affecting the histaminergic system as well as the acetylcholinergic system; there may not be a definite relation between 5-HT and the development of MS.

  16. Ameliorative effect of betulin from Betula platyphylla bark on scopolamine-induced amnesic mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, Namki; Kim, Hyeon Woo; Lee, Hee Kyoung; Jeon, Byung Ju; Sung, Sang Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease induced by cholinergic neuron damage or amyloid-beta aggregation in the basal forebrain region and resulting in cognitive disorder. We previously reported on the neuroprotective effects of Betula platyphylla bark (BPB) in an amyloid-beta-induced amnesic mouse model. In this study, we obtained a cognitive-enhancing compound by assessing results using a scopolamine-induced amnesic mouse model. Our results show that oral treatment of mice with BPB and betulin significantly ameliorated scopolamine-induced memory deficits in both passive avoidance and Y-maze tests. In the Morris water maze test, administration of BPB and betulin significantly improved memory and cognitive function indicating the formation of working and reference memories in treated mice. Moreover, betulin significantly increased glutathione content in mouse hippocampus, and the increase was greater than that from betulinic acid treatment. We conclude that BPB and its active component betulin have potential as therapeutic, cognitive enhancer in AD.

  17. Efficacy evaluation of physostigmine and anticholinergic adjuncts as a pretreatment for nerve agent intoxication. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    von Bredow, J.; Corcoran, K.; Maitland, G.; Kaminskis, A.; Adams, N.

    1991-12-31

    Pretreatment of nonhuman primates with physostigmine (Phy) and scopolamine or physostigmine and trihexyphenidyl 25 min before exposure to 2 LD50 soman im resulted in complete survival without convulsions or loss of consciousness. When identically pretreated animals were challenged with 5 LD50s of soman followed by atropine and 2-PAM therapy 1 min later, all animals experienced a loss of consciousness for approximately 10 min followed by functional recovery within an additional 20 min. These findings indicated that a pretreatment regimen composed of Phy and cholinolytic is capable of protecting primates from an absolute lethal dose of soman with rapid recovery from incapacitation. Physostigmine, nerve agent pretreatment, cynomolgus monkeys soman (GD).

  18. Effects of Transdermal Scopolamine on Auditory-Monitoring Performance and Event-Related Potentials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-21

    abilities of those it was meant to help. Scopolamine’s side effects include drowsiness , fatigue , slowing, difficulties in performing concurrent tasks...and Donchin (1983). All summary ERP measurements were scored by machine. Thirty-two signal averages were formed for each subject, corresponding to the...Wilson, G.F., Herning, R.I, Pickworth, W., & VanOrden, K.F. (1992). The OMPAT Level I Neurophysiological Performance Assessment Battery: NPPAB

  19. Beneficial effects of ellagic acid against animal models of scopolamine- and diazepam-induced cognitive impairments.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Mohammad Taghi; Farbood, Yaghoub; Naghizadeh, Bahareh; Shabani, Sohreh; Mirshekar, Mohammad Ali; Sarkaki, Alireza

    2016-10-01

    Context In a previous study, it has been shown that ellagic acid (EA), a polyphenolic compound found in pomegranate and different berries, prevents cognitive and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) impairments induced by traumatic brain injury in rats through antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Objective The present study was conducted to assess the potential of EA as a memory enhancer. Materials and methods The elevated plus maze (EPM) and passive avoidance (PA) paradigm were used to evaluate learning and memory parameters. Three doses (10, 30 and 100 mg/kg, i.p.) of EA were administered to animals. Memory impairment was induced by scopolamine treatment (0.4 mg/kg, i.p.) and/or diazepam (1 mg/kg, i.p.). Acquisition trials were carried out 30 min after scopolamine treatment and retention trials were performed for 5 min 24 h after the acquisition trials. Results EA at doses 30 and 100 mg/kg significantly reversed the amnesia induced by scopolamine (0.4 mg/kg, i.p.) in the EPM and PA tests in mice. Also, EA at doses 30 and 100 mg/kg significantly antagonized the amnesia induced by diazepam (1 mg/kg, i.p.) in EPM test in rats. Moreover, chronic administration of EA at dose 30 mg/kg ameliorated the memory deficit induced by diazepam (1 mg/kg, i.p.) in rats. Discussion and conclusion This study demonstrates that ellagic acid is effective in preventing scopolamine- and diazepam-induced cognitive impairments without altering the animals' locomotion. This suggests the potential of EA application as a useful memory restorative agent in the treatment of dementia seen in elderly persons.

  20. Clove oil reverses learning and memory deficits in scopolamine-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Halder, Sumita; Mehta, Ashish Krishan; Kar, Rajarshi; Mustafa, Mohammad; Mediratta, Pramod Kumari; Sharma, Krishna Kishore

    2011-05-01

    The present study was performed to examine the effect of Eugenia caryophyllata (Myrtaceae) on learning and memory, and also evaluate whether it can modulate oxidative stress in mice. Passive avoidance step-down task and elevated plus-maze were used to assess learning and memory in scopolamine-treated mice. Oxidative stress parameters were also assessed in brain samples by estimating the malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels at the end of the study. Scopolamine (0.3 mg/kg, i. p.) produced impairment of acquisition memory as evidenced by a decrease in step-down latency and an increase in transfer latency on day 1, and also impairment of retention of memory on day 2. Pretreatment with clove oil (0.05 mL/kg and 0.1 mL/kg) for 3 weeks significantly reversed the increase in acquisition latency and all the doses (0.025, 0.05, 0.1 mL/kg, i. p.) reversed the increase in retention latency induced by scopolamine (0.3 mg/kg, i. p.) in elevated plus-maze. However, 0.05 mL/kg clove oil attenuated memory deficits in the passive avoidance step-down task. Brain samples showed a significant decrease in MDA levels in the group treated with clove oil (0.05 and 0.025 mL/kg). GSH levels were also increased in clove oil-treated mice though the results were not significant. Thus, it can be concluded that clove oil can reverse the short-term and long-term memory deficits induced by scopolamine (0.3 mg/kg, i. p.) and this effect can, to some extent, be attributed to decreased oxidative stress.

  1. Cholinergic modulation of pavlovian fear conditioning: effects of intrahippocampal scopolamine infusion.

    PubMed

    Gale, G D; Anagnostaras, S G; Fanselow, M S

    2001-01-01

    Cholinergic neurotransmission has been implicated in the acquisition of a variety of tasks, including Pavlovian fear conditioning. To more precisely define the role of cholinergic modulation in this process, the effect of site-specific cholinergic antagonism was assessed. Male Long-Evans rats were implanted with chronic, bilateral cannulae aimed at the dorsal hippocampus. Infusions of scopolamine hydrobromide (50 microg bilaterally) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were made immediately prior to a signaled Pavlovian fear conditioning procedure. On consecutive days following training, all rats were given independent tests assessing freezing to both the training context and the tone conditional stimulus (CS). Relative to PBS infused controls, rats that received intrahippocampal infusions of scopolamine showed a significant attenuation of contextual freezing but comparable levels of freezing to the tone CS. Neither shock sensitivity nor general activity levels differed between rats infused with scopolamine or PBS. These findings suggest that fear conditioning to context, but not discrete CS, requires intact cholinergic neurotransmission in the hippocampus.

  2. The context preexposure facilitation effect in mice: a dose-response analysis of pretraining scopolamine administration.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kevin L; Kennard, John A; Sherer, Daniel J; Comalli, David M; Woodruff-Pak, Diana S

    2011-11-20

    The context preexposure facilitation effect (CPFE) is an elaboration of contextual fear conditioning and refers to enhanced contextual conditioning resulting from preexposure to the context prior to a separate, brief context-shock episode. A version of the CPFE developed by Rudy and colleagues in rats has demonstrated greater sensitivity to pre-training hippocampal insult relative to standard contextual fear conditioning preparations. Our aim was to adapt the Rudy CPFE procedures to mice. In Experiment 1 we compared performance of young adult male C57BL6/J mice on two versions of the CPFE. One version - not previously used in mice - adapted methods established by Rudy and colleagues, and the other CPFE task replicated procedures previously established in this mouse strain by Gould and colleagues. In Experiment 2 we compared the effects of pre-training intraperitoneal administration of moderate levels of scopolamine or methylscopolamine on contextual conditioning between mice trained using the Rudy CPFE method and a separate group trained using standard contextual fear procedures. Scopolamine is a muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist that impairs hippocampal function. Robust freezing to the conditioning context was observed in mice trained using the Rudy CPFE method (Experiment 1), and greater scopolamine-induced impairments in contextual freezing were observed using this CPFE method relative to mice trained using standard contextual fear procedures (Experiment 2). These findings support use of the Rudy CPFE task as a behavioral assay for hippocampal function in mice.

  3. Cognitive-Enhancing Effect of Aronia melanocarpa Extract against Memory Impairment Induced by Scopolamine in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeon Yong; Weon, Jin Bae; Jung, Youn Sik; Kim, Nam Young; Kim, Myong Ki; Ma, Choong Je

    2016-01-01

    Aronia melanocarpa (A. melanocarpa) berries are a fruit with a marked antioxidant effect. The objective of this study was to confirm the effect of A. melanocarpa berries extract against scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice using the Morris water maze and passive avoidance test. Moreover, we determined a possible mechanism of the cognitive-enhancing effect involving AChE activity and BDNF and p-CREB expression in the hippocampus of mice. A. melanocarpa berries extract attenuated the learning and memory impairment induced by scopolamine in the Morris water maze (79.3 ± 0.8 s of 200 mg/kg and 64.4 ± 10.7 s of 400 mg/kg on day 4) and passive avoidance tests (46.0 ± 41.1 s of 200 mg/kg and 25.6 ± 18.7 s of 400 mg/kg). A. melanocarpa berries extract reduced the acetylcholinesterase level in the hippocampus of scopolamine-injected mice and increased BDNF and p-CREB expression in the hippocampus. The major compound, cyanidin-3-O-galactoside, also reversed memory impairment. These results showed that A. melanocarpa berries extract improved memory impairment by inhibiting AChE and increasing BDNF and p-CREB expression, and cyanidin-3-O-galactoside may be responsible for the effect of A. melanocarpa berries extract. PMID:27239211

  4. Determination of tropane alkaloids atropine and scopolamine by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in plant organs of Datura species.

    PubMed

    Jakabová, Silvia; Vincze, Lajos; Farkas, Agnes; Kilár, Ferenc; Boros, Borbála; Felinger, Attila

    2012-04-06

    Hyoscyamine (atropine) and scopolamine are the predominant tropane alkaloids in the Datura genus, occurring in all plant organs. The assessment of the alkaloid content of various plant parts is essential from the viewpoint of medical use, but also as a potential risk of toxicity for humans and animals. Therefore, a reliable method for the determination of tropane alkaloid content is of high importance. The present work aimed at the elaboration of a rapid method for determination of the most abundant Datura alkaloids by LC-MS technique using a new generation of core-shell particle packed column. Tropane alkaloid content was investigated in various plant organs of four Datura taxa (D. innoxia, D. metel, D. stramonium, and D. stramonium var. tatula), grown under the same conditions, in two developmental stages. We have developed a rapid LC-MS method for the quantitative determination of atropine and scopolamine, which was successfully applied to quantify the alkaloids in different plant organs (leaves, flowers, stems, seeds) of thorn apples after a simple sample preparation step. Elaboration and validation of the method and analysis of plant extracts were done by UFLC-MS technique, employing an Ascentis Express C18 column. Detection was done in positive ionization mode (ESI+) and the method suitability was evaluated by several validation characteristics. Quantitation limits are 333 and 167 pgmL(-1) for scopolamine and atropine, respectively, and the method shows very good repeatability. The analysis of Datura extracts revealed significant differences depending on the species, the organ and the sampling period. Atropine was found to be dominant over scopolamine in three out of the four taxa investigated. D. innoxia showed the highest concentrations of scopolamine in all organs examined, whereas D. metel accumulated the lowest scopolamine levels. Hyoscyamine, measured as atropine, was the highest in D. stramonium var. tatula, and the lowest in D. innoxia. Samples

  5. Piracetam prevents scopolamine-induced memory impairment and decrease of NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities.

    PubMed

    Marisco, Patricia C; Carvalho, Fabiano B; Rosa, Michelle M; Girardi, Bruna A; Gutierres, Jessié M; Jaques, Jeandre A S; Salla, Ana P S; Pimentel, Víctor C; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Leal, Daniela B R; Mello, Carlos F; Rubin, Maribel A

    2013-08-01

    Piracetam improves cognitive function in animals and in human beings, but its mechanism of action is still not completely known. In the present study, we investigated whether enzymes involved in extracellular adenine nucleotide metabolism, adenosine triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase), 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) are affected by piracetam in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of animals subjected to scopolamine-induced memory impairment. Piracetam (0.02 μmol/5 μL, intracerebroventricular, 60 min pre-training) prevented memory impairment induced by scopolamine (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneal, immediately post-training) in the inhibitory avoidance learning and in the object recognition task. Scopolamine reduced the activity of NTPDase in hippocampus (53 % for ATP and 53 % for ADP hydrolysis) and cerebral cortex (28 % for ATP hydrolysis). Scopolamine also decreased the activity of 5'-nucleotidase (43 %) and ADA (91 %) in hippocampus. The same effect was observed in the cerebral cortex for 5'-nucleotidase (38 %) and ADA (68 %) activities. Piracetam fully prevented scopolamine-induced memory impairment and decrease of NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities in synaptosomes from cerebral cortex and hippocampus. In vitro experiments show that piracetam and scopolamine did not alter enzymatic activity in cerebral cortex synaptosomes. Moreover, piracetam prevented scopolamine-induced increase of TBARS levels in hippocampus and cerebral cortex. These results suggest that piracetam-induced improvement of memory is associated with protection against oxidative stress and maintenance of NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and ADA activities, and suggest the purinergic system as a putative target of piracetam.

  6. Conformational studies on the four stereoisomers of the novel anticholinergic 4-(dimethylamino)-2-phenyl-2-(2-pyridyl)pentanamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyasu, Hitoshi; Nakanishi, Isao; Tanaka, Akito; Murano, Kenji; Matsuo, Masaaki

    1995-04-01

    To interpret differences in the anticholinergic activity among the four steroisomers of 4-(dimethylamino)-2-phenyl-2-(2-pyridyl)pentanamide ( 1-4), we performed conformational studies using the semiempirical molecular orbital method. The structures of the global minimum-energy conformations obtained for 1-4, however, could not explain the different activities, particularly in terms of distances between the essential pharmacophores. We thus implemented superimposition studies, using the energetically stable conformations of the most active stereoisomer, 1( 2S,4R), as a template. The energy penalties for a conformation change of the less active stereoisomers 2-4 from their global minimum-energy structure to a new conformation, fitting onto the global minimum-energy conformation of 1, appear to account for the differences in the pharmacological potency better than using the other conformations of 1 as a template. We thus presume that the global minimum-energy conformation of 1 is closely related to the bioactive conformation for these anticholinergics, and also that the pharmacological potency is linked to how readily these substances can change their conformations to fit the muscarinic receptor.

  7. Cognitive enhancing effect of the fermented Gumiganghwal-tang on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Weon, Jin Bae; Lee, Jiwoo; Eom, Min Rye; Jung, Youn Sik; Ma, Choong Je

    2016-01-01

    Gumiganghwal-tang (GT) is a traditional herbal medicine that is widely used for its anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic actions. Fermented GT has been reported to inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and to exert a neuroprotective effect. In this study, we investigated the effect of fermented GT against scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice using the Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests. The results of the Morris water maze test indicated that fermented GT significantly decreased escape latency, as compared with that observed in the scopolamine-treated group. In the prove test, fermented GT attenuated the decreased time spent in the target quadrant observed after scopolamine treatment. The results of the passive avoidance test indicated that the treatment with fermented GT increased latency time when compared with the scopolamine-treated group. Moreover, fermented GT inhibited AChE activity in the hippocampi of the treated mice. These results suggest that fermented GT reduced scopolamine-induced amnesia in mice through AChE inhibition. Therefore, we hypothesize that fermented GT may be a useful therapeutic agent for the prevention or treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Role of percutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation either alone or combined with an anticholinergic agent in treating patients with overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kızılyel, Sadık; Karakeçi, Ahmet; Ozan, Tunç; Ünüş, İhsan; Barut, Osman; Onur, Rahmi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS), either alone or combined with an anticholinergic agent, in treating patients with an overactive bladder (OAB) in whom previous conservative treatment failed. Material and methods In this study, we included a total of 30 female patients with OAB in whom all conventional therapies failed between January 2010 and April 2011. Patients were randomly divided into three groups: Group 1, PTNS group; Group 2, patients receiving an anticholinergic agent; and Group 3, patients receiving both PTNS and anticholinergic agent. PTNS treatment continued for 12 weeks with each session lasting 30 min. Results All parameters of the bladder diary significantly improved in all groups (p<0.05). Similarly, all scores measured by questionnaires (UDI-6, IIQ-7, and OABSS) revealed significant improvements in all groups. When the improvements in symptoms were compared among the groups, there was a statistically significantly higher improvement in groups 1 and 3 than in Group 2. Conclusion PTNS is a safe, simple, and minimally invasive treatment modality in patients with OAB, and it may be suggested either alone or in combination with anticholinergics when conventional treatments fail. PMID:26623150

  9. Agmatine, a metabolite of L-arginine, reverses scopolamine-induced learning and memory impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Utkan, Tijen; Gocmez, Semil S; Regunathan, Soundararajan; Aricioglu, Feyza

    2012-10-01

    Agmatine (l-amino-4-guanidino-butane), a metabolite of L-arginine through the action of arginine decarboxylase, is a novel neurotransmitter. In the present study, effects of agmatine on cognitive functions have been evaluated by using one trial step-down passive avoidance and three panel runway task. Agmatine (20, 40, 80 mg/kg i.p.) was administered either in the presence or absence of a cholinergic antagonist, scopolamine (1 mg/kg i.p.). Scopolamine significantly impaired learning and memory in both passive avoidance and three panel runway test. Agmatine did not affect emotional learning, working and reference memory but significantly improved scopolamine-induced impairment of learning and memory in a dose dependent manner. Our results indicate that agmatine, as an endogenous substance, may have an important role in modulation of learning and memory functions.

  10. Validation and scopolamine-reversal of latent learning in the water maze utilizing a revised direct platform placement procedure.

    PubMed

    Malin, David H; Schaar, Krystal L; Izygon, Jonathan J; Nghiem, Duyen M; Jabitta, Sikirat Y; Henceroth, Mallori M; Chang, Yu-Hsuan; Daggett, Jenny M; Ward, Christopher P

    2015-08-01

    The Morris water maze is routinely used to explore neurobiological mechanisms of working memory. Humans can often acquire working memory relevant to performing a task by mere sensory observation, without having to actually perform the task followed by reinforcement. This can be modeled in the water maze through direct placement of a rat on the escape platform so that it can observe the location, and then assessing the subject's performance in swimming back to the platform. However, direct placement procedures have hardly been studied for two decades, reflecting a controversy about whether direct placement resulted in sufficiently rapid and direct swims back to the platform. In the present study, utilizing revised training methods, a more comprehensive measure of trajectory directness, a more rigorous sham-trained control procedure and an optimal placement-test interval, rats swam almost directly back to the platform in under 4s, significantly more quickly and directly than sham-trained subjects. Muscarinic cholinergic mechanisms, which are inactivated by scopolamine, are essential to memory for standard learning paradigms in the water maze. This experiment determined whether this would also be true for latent learning. ANOVA revealed significant negative effects of scopolamine on both speed and accuracy of trajectory, as well as significant positive effects of direct placement training vs. sham-training. In a probe trial, placement-trained animals without scopolamine spent significantly more time and path length in the target quadrant than trained rats with scopolamine and sham-trained rats without scopolamine. Scopolamine impairments are likely due to effects on memory, since the same dose had little effect on performance with a visible platform. The revised direct placement model offers a means of further comparing the neural mechanisms of latent learning with those of standard instrumental learning.

  11. Promoting scopolamine biosynthesis in transgenic Atropa belladonna plants with pmt and h6h overexpression under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ke; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Qiaozhuo; Qiang, Wei; Guo, Jianjun; Lan, Xiaozhong; Chen, Min; Liao, Zhihua

    2016-09-01

    Atropa belladonna is one of the most important plant sources for producing pharmaceutical tropane alkaloids (TAs). T1 progeny of transgenic A. belladonna, in which putrescine N-methyltransferase (EC. 2.1.1.53) from Nicotiana tabacum (NtPMT) and hyoscyamine 6β-hydroxylase (EC. 1.14.11.14) from Hyoscyamus niger (HnH6H) were overexpressed, were established to investigate TA biosynthesis and distribution in ripe fruits, leaves, stems, primary roots and secondary roots under field conditions. Both NtPMT and HnH6H were detected at the transcriptional level in transgenic plants, whereas they were not detected in wild-type plants. The transgenes did not influence the root-specific expression patterns of endogenous TA biosynthetic genes in A. belladonna. All four endogenous TA biosynthetic genes (AbPMT, AbTRI, AbCYP80F1 and AbH6H) had the highest/exclusive expression levels in secondary roots, suggesting that TAs were mainly synthesized in secondary roots. T1 progeny of transgenic A. belladonna showed an impressive scopolamine-rich chemotype that greatly improved the pharmaceutical value of A. belladonna. The higher efficiency of hyoscyamine conversion was found in aerial than in underground parts. In aerial parts of transgenic plants, hyoscyamine was totally converted to downstream alkaloids, especially scopolamine. Hyoscyamine, anisodamine and scopolamine were detected in underground parts, but scopolamine and anisodamine were more abundant than hyoscyamine. The exclusively higher levels of anisodamine in roots suggested that it might be difficult for its translocation from root to aerial organs. T1 progeny of transgenic A. belladonna, which produces scopolamine at very high levels (2.94-5.13 mg g(-1)) in field conditions, can provide more valuable plant materials for scopolamine production.

  12. The anticholinergic and antiglutamatergic drug caramiphen reduces seizure duration in soman-exposed rats: Synergism with the benzodiazepine diazepam

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, M.K.; Wright, L.K.M.; Stone, M.F.; Schwartz, J.E.; Kelley, N.R.; Moffett, M.C.; Lee, R.B.; Lumley, L.A.

    2012-03-15

    Therapy of seizure activity following exposure to the nerve agent soman (GD) includes treatment with the anticonvulsant diazepam (DZP), an allosteric modulator of γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABA{sub A}) receptors. However, seizure activity itself causes the endocytosis of GABA{sub A} receptors and diminishes the inhibitory effects of GABA, thereby reducing the efficacy of DZP. Treatment with an N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist prevents this reduction in GABAergic inhibition. We examined the efficacy of the NMDA receptor antagonist caramiphen edisylate (CED; 20 mg/kg, im) and DZP (10 mg/kg, sc), administered both separately and in combination, at 10, 20 or 30 min following seizure onset for attenuation of the deleterious effects associated with GD exposure (1.2 LD{sub 50}; 132 μg/kg, sc) in rats. Outcomes evaluated were seizure duration, neuropathology, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, body weight, and temperature. We also examined the use of the reversible AChE inhibitor physostigmine (PHY; 0.2 mg/kg, im) as a therapy for GD exposure. We found that the combination of CED and DZP yielded a synergistic effect, shortening seizure durations and reducing neuropathology compared to DZP alone, when treatment was delayed 20–30 min after seizure onset. PHY reduced the number of animals that developed seizures, protected a fraction of AChE from GD inhibition, and attenuated post-exposure body weight and temperature loss independent of CED and/or DZP treatment. We conclude that: 1) CED and DZP treatment offers considerable protection against the effects of GD and 2) PHY is a potential therapeutic option following GD exposure, albeit with a limited window of opportunity. -- Highlights: ► Soman (GD) produced seizure activity resulting in neuropathology in rats. ► Tx: caramiphen (CED) and/or diazepam (DZP) @ 10, 20 or 30 min after seizure onset. ► CED/DZP showed superior anticonvulsant and neuroprotective capacity. ► Physostigmine (PHY) was examined as an adjunct post-exposure therapy. ► PHY attenuated GD-induced seizure development, but not seizure duration.

  13. Ameliorative effects of amide derivatives of 1,3,4-thiadiazoles on scopolamine induced cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kulshreshtha, Akanksha; Piplani, Poonam

    2016-10-21

    The present study reports the effect of amide derivatives of 1,3,4-thiadizoles on scopolamine induced deficit cholinergic neurotransmission and oxidative stress serving as promising leads for the therapeutics of cognitive dysfunction. Fourteen compounds (2c-8d) have been synthesised and evaluated against behavioural alterations using step down passive avoidance protocol and morris water maze and at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg with reference to the standard, Rivastigmine. All the synthesised compounds were evaluated for their in vitro acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition at five different concentrations using mice brain homogenate as the source of the enzyme. Biochemical estimation of markers of oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase, glutathione, plasma nitrite, catalase) has also been carried out to assess the role of synthesised molecules on the oxidative damage induced by scopolamine. The compounds 5c, 6c and 8c displayed appreciable activity with an IC50 value of 3 μM, 3.033 μM and 2.743 μM, respectively towards acetylcholinesterase inhibition. These compounds also decreased scopolamine induced oxidative stress, thus serving as promising leads for the amelioration of oxidative stress induced cognitive decline. The molecular docking study performed to predict the binding mode of the compounds also suggested that these compounds bind appreciably with the amino acids present in the active site of recombinant human acetylcholinesterase (rhAChE). The results indicated that these compounds could be further traversed as inhibitors of AChE and oxidative stress for the treatment of cognitive dysfunction.

  14. Scopolamine given pre-Trial 1 prevents the one-trial tolerance phenomenon in the elevated plus-maze Trial 2.

    PubMed

    Bertoglio, L J; Carobrez, A P

    2004-02-01

    A learned avoidance response has been one of the hypotheses proposed to explain the 'one-trial tolerance' (OTT) phenomenon, which represents a drug's loss of anxiolytic-like effect in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) test in experienced rodents. Based on these facts, if some kind of learning occurs throughout Trial 1, then an impairment of its acquisition would maintain the drug's anxiolytic-like effect on Trial 2. Using male Wistar rats, the present study examined whether scopolamine (SCO; 0.5-1.5 mg/kg), a drug that impairs learning acquisition, given 30 min prior to Trial 1, actually prevents the OTT phenomenon to either the midazolam (MDZ; 0.5 mg/kg) or the memantine (MEM; 8.0 mg/kg) anxiolytic-like effect on the EPM Trial 2 (48 h later). According to the results, both MDZ and MEM increased open-arm exploration (indicating anxiolysis) on Trial 2 only in rats that had been treated previously with 1.5 mg/kg SCO. These results were observed in the absence of change in general exploratory activity. The present findings suggest that SCO impaired the acquisition of the behavioral strategy to cope with the subsequent EPM exposure that supposedly underlies the OTT phenomenon, thereby revealing the anxiolytic-like effects of MDZ and MEM on Trial 2.

  15. Drug Burden Index in older adults: theoretical and practical issues.

    PubMed

    Kouladjian, Lisa; Gnjidic, Danijela; Chen, Timothy F; Mangoni, Arduino A; Hilmer, Sarah N

    2014-01-01

    Anticholinergic and sedative medications are commonly used in older adults and are associated with adverse clinical outcomes. The Drug Burden Index was developed to measure the cumulative exposure to these medications in older adults and its impact on physical and cognitive function. This narrative review discusses the research and clinical applications of the Drug Burden Index, and its advantages and limitations, compared with other pharmacologically developed measures of high-risk prescribing.

  16. Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This document contains the third volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of drugs and includes articles by leading authorities in delinquency and substance abuse who share their views on causes and cures for the drug problem among youth in this country.…

  17. [Clinically significant drug-drug interactions between analgesics and psychotopics].

    PubMed

    Strobach, Dorothea

    2012-07-01

    Combining analgesic and psychotropic drugs can lead to pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic drug interactions. Under treatment with several serotonergic substances serotonin syndrome can occur, e.g., with certain opioids and antidepressant drugs. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors also affect the serotonin level in platelets, this can raise the risk for gastrointestinal bleeding especially in combination with non-steroidal antirheumatic drugs. Anticholinergic effects and sedation are common side effects of psychotropic but also analgesic drugs with possible additive results. A wide range of interactions between analgesics and psychotropics can occure during metabolism, especially via the cytochrome-P-system. The clinical relevance of warnings on drug interactions from data banks has always to be judged for the individual patient.

  18. The effects of Anethum graveolens essence on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Mesripour, Azadeh; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Bahrami, Bahareh

    2016-01-01

    Since Anethum graveolens (Dill) has phytoestrogenic compounds and it is proven that estrogens exert beneficial effects on cognition; the aim of this study was to understand if this plant can improve memory performance. Male Balb/c mice weighing 25-30 g were used in this study and memory was assessed by the novel object recognition task. In this method, the difference in the exploration time between a familiar object and a novel object is taken as an index of memory performance (recognition index, RI). Scopolamine significantly reduced memory index (RI = -15.5% ± 3.0). Dill essence (100 mg/kg, ip) prevented the harmful effects of scopolamine on memory (RI = 40% ± 5.5), thus RI did not differ with control animals (RI = 50% ± 5.8). In addition, 17-β estradiol also prevented memory impairment in animals (0.2 mg/kg, ip; RI = 35.8% ± 6.5). Nevertheless, the beneficial effects of dill essence were antagonized by prior injection of tamoxifen (1 mg/kg, ip; RI = -30% ± 7.8). Although phytoesrogens are not steroids, the beneficial effect of dill on memory, at least in part, may have been achieved by estrogenic receptors present in the brain. Thus dill essence could be promising in improving memory and cognition, mainly in postmenopausal women.

  19. Neuroprotective Effects of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase on Scopolamine Induced Memory Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Jeong; Lee, Jun-Ho; Chung, Hwan-Suck; Song, Joo-Hyun; Ha, Joohun

    2013-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an important regulator of energy metabolism, is activated in response to cellular stress when intracellular levels of AMP increase. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of AMPK against scopolamine-induced memory impairment in vivo and glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in vitro. An adenovirus expressing AMPK wild type alpha subunit (WT) or a dominant negative form (DN) was injected into the hippocampus of rats using a stereotaxic apparatus. The AMPK WT-injected rats showed significant reversal of the scopolamine induced cognitive deficit as evaluated by escape latency in the Morris water maze. In addition, they showed enhanced acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-reactive neurons in the hippocampus, implying increased cholinergic activity in response to AMPK. We also studied the cellular mechanism by which AMPK protects against glutamate-induced cell death in primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons. We further demonstrated that AMPK WT-infected cells increased cell viability and reduced Annexin V positive hippocampal neurons. Western blot analysis indicated that AMPK WT-infected cells reduced the expression of Bax and had no effects on Bcl-2, which resulted in a decreased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. These data suggest that AMPK is a useful cognitive impairment treatment target, and that its beneficial effects are mediated via the protective capacity of hippocampal neurons. PMID:23946693

  20. The effects of Anethum graveolens essence on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mesripour, Azadeh; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Bahrami, Bahareh

    2016-01-01

    Since Anethum graveolens (Dill) has phytoestrogenic compounds and it is proven that estrogens exert beneficial effects on cognition; the aim of this study was to understand if this plant can improve memory performance. Male Balb/c mice weighing 25-30 g were used in this study and memory was assessed by the novel object recognition task. In this method, the difference in the exploration time between a familiar object and a novel object is taken as an index of memory performance (recognition index, RI). Scopolamine significantly reduced memory index (RI = -15.5% ± 3.0). Dill essence (100 mg/kg, ip) prevented the harmful effects of scopolamine on memory (RI = 40% ± 5.5), thus RI did not differ with control animals (RI = 50% ± 5.8). In addition, 17-β estradiol also prevented memory impairment in animals (0.2 mg/kg, ip; RI = 35.8% ± 6.5). Nevertheless, the beneficial effects of dill essence were antagonized by prior injection of tamoxifen (1 mg/kg, ip; RI = -30% ± 7.8). Although phytoesrogens are not steroids, the beneficial effect of dill on memory, at least in part, may have been achieved by estrogenic receptors present in the brain. Thus dill essence could be promising in improving memory and cognition, mainly in postmenopausal women. PMID:27168754

  1. Antimotion-sickness efficacy of scopolamine 12 and 72 hours after transdermal administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.; Cramer, D. B.; Wood, C. D.

    1982-01-01

    The antimotion sickness remedy, transdermal therapeutic system-scopolamine, administered in this experiment was scheduled to deliver 1.0 mg of scopolamine over a period of 3 d, and this paper compares its efficacy 12 and 72 h after administration. In a double-blind study, six male college students were individually exposed to a standardized provocative test in a slow rotation room after six apparently identical treatments comprising four placebos and two medications. Efficacy was categorized as beneficial, inconsequential, or detrimental. None of the responses was detrimental. Following the first administration of the therapeutic system, there were four beneficial responses after 12 h but none was beneficial after 72 h. Following the second treatment regimen, there were four beneficial responses after 12 h and three beneficial responses after 72 h. Great individual differences were demonstrated, two subjects accounting for six beneficial responses and two accounting for only one beneficial response. The difference in efficacy after 12 and 72 h has practical and theoretical significance.

  2. PASS assisted prediction and pharmacological evaluation of hesperidin against scopolamine induced amnesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Habibyar, Ahmad Farid; Sharma, Neha; Khurana, Navneet

    2016-10-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that leads to memory impairment. However, the exact etiology of AD is not clear but cholinergic dysfunction and oxidative stress are considered to play an important role in its pathogenesis. Because of this reason, antioxidant compounds are expected to play potential beneficial role in this disease. Among number of antioxidant compounds, hesperidin (HSD) was selected for this study on the basis of its reported antioxidant and neuroprotective effects. Moreover, it has shown higher probable activity value for scavenging free radical along with anti-dementia effects, predicted by PASS online computer program. Current study was designed to evaluate the nootropic and antioxidant effects of HSD. The different groups of animals received scopolamine (2mg/kg) along with co-treamtment of HSD (100, 200mg/kg) and donepezil HCl (3mg/kg) i.p. for consecutive 10 days. Behavioral tests were carried out, 30min after respective treatment on 2nd, 5th and 9th day for memory evaluation. On 10th day of treatment, the animals were sacrificed and the homogenates of brain hippocampus and cortex were used for biochemical estimation. Co-treatment with HSD at both doses significantly reversed the changes in memory and biochemical alterations, induced by scopolamine administration. It can be concluded that HSD has strong memory enhancing and anti-oxidant effects, therefore, it can be considered as a potential candidate for its further pharmacological evaluation for AD-induced dementia.

  3. Pretreatment with 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde blocks scopolamine-induced learning deficit in contextual and spatial memory in male mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Younghwan; Gao, Qingtao; Kim, Eunji; Lee, Younghwa; Park, Se Jin; Lee, Hyung Eun; Jang, Dae Sik; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2015-07-01

    5-Hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde (5-HMF) is a compound derived from the dehydration of certain sugars. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of 5-HMF on the cognitive impairment induced by scopolamine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist. To measure various cognitive functions, we conducted the step-through passive avoidance task, the Y-maze task and the Morris water maze task. A single administration of 5-HMF (5 or 10mg/kg, p.o.) significantly attenuates scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment in these behavioral tasks without changes in locomotor activity, and the effect of 5-HMF on scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment was significantly reversed by a sub-effective dose of MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist. In addition, a single administration of 5-HMF (10mg/kg, p.o.) enhanced the cognitive performance of normal naïve mice in the passive avoidance task. Furthermore, Western blot analysis revealed that the levels of phosphorylated Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-α (CaMKII) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) were significantly enhanced by the single administration of 5-HMF in the hippocampal tissues. Taken together, the present study suggests that 5-HMF may block scopolamine-induced learning deficit and enhance cognitive function via the activation of NMDA receptor signaling, including CaMKII and ERK, and would be an effective candidate against cognitive disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  4. The Ameliorating Effect of Steamed and Fermented Codonopsis lanceolata on Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Weon, Jin Bae; Yun, Bo-Ra; Lee, Jiwoo; Eom, Min Rye; Kim, Ji Seon; Lee, Hyeon Yong; Park, Dong-Sik; Chung, Hee-Chul; Chung, Jae Youn; Ma, Choong Je

    2013-01-01

    Codonopsis lanceolata (Campanulaceae) have been traditionally used to treat lung inflammatory diseases, such as asthma, tonsillitis, and pharyngitis. The present study was performed to evaluate the cognitive-enhancing effects of steamed and fermented C. lanceolata in scopolamine-induced memory impairments in mice. Cognitive abilities were determined by the Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests. Mice orally received fermented C. lanceolata extract at doses of 100, 300, or 500 mg/kg body weight. Fermented C. lanceolata extract (500 mg/kg body weight, p.o.) significantly shortened the escape latency times that were increased by scopolamine on the 4th day of trial sessions in the Morris water maze task. In addition, it exerted longer step-through latency times than those of the scopolamine-treated group in the passive avoidance test. Furthermore, the neuroprotective effects of fermented C. lanceolata extract on glutamate-induced neurocytotoxicity were investigated in HT22 cells. Fermented C. lanceolata extract showed a relative protection ratio of 59.62% at 500 μg/mL. In conclusion, fermented C. lanceolata extract ameliorated scopolamine-induced memory impairments, exerted neuroprotective effects, and improved activity compared to that found with original C. lanceolata. Further study will be required to investigate the mechanisms underlying this cognitive-enhancing activity. PMID:23935665

  5. P7C3 Attenuates the Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairments in C57BL/6J Mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Song, Lu; Huang, Chao; Zhang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Memory impairment is the most common symptom in patients with Alzheimer's disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the memory enhancing effects of P7C3, a recently identified compound with robust proneurogenic and neuroprotective effects, on the cognitive impairment induced by scopolamine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist. Different behavior tests including the Y-maze, Morris water maze, and passive avoidance tests were performed to measure cognitive functions. Scopolamine significantly decreased the spontaneous alternation and step-through latency of C57BL/6J mice in Y-maze test and passive avoidance test, whereas increased the time of mice spent to find the hidden platform in Morris water maze test. Importantly, intraperitoneal administration of P7C3 effectively reversed those Scopolamine-induced cognitive impairments in C57BL/6J mice. Furthermore, P7C3 treatment significantly enhanced the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling pathway in the cortex and hippocampus, and the usage of selective BDNF signaling inhibitor fully blocked the anti-amnesic effects of P7C3. Therefore, these findings suggest that P7C3 could improve the scopolamine-induced learning and memory impairment possibly through activation of BDNF signaling pathway, thereby exhibiting a cognition-enhancing potential.

  6. In Vitro Acaricidal Activity of Atropa belladonna and Its Components, Scopolamine and Atropine, against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    PubMed Central

    Godara, R.; Katoch, M.; Yadav, Anish; Parveen, S.; Vij, Bhavna; Khajuria, Varun; Singh, G.; Singh, Nirbhay K.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro efficacy of methanolic extract of Atropa belladonna and its components scopolamine and atropine was assessed against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. Five concentrations of the extract (1.25%, 2.5%, 5%, 10%, and 20%) were used whereas scopolamine and atropine were each tested at 0.1%. In adult immersion test, the extract was lethal to ticks at 20% concentration. The LC50 and LC95 values were determined as 6.875% and 17.306%, respectively. The extract caused a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in egg mass production at 10% concentration. In larval packet test, the extract was lethal to larvae in the concentrations of 10% and 20% after 24 h, with LC50 and LC95 values of 1.321% and 4.935%, respectively. Scopolamine and atropine showed 93.3% and 60.0% mortality of adult ticks, respectively, but they caused complete (100%) blocking of hatching as well as 100% larval mortality. Scopolamine and atropine were observed to be more potent than the crude extract at an equivalent concentration in both the bioassays. PMID:25516877

  7. Lithium attenuates scopolamine-induced memory deficits with inhibition of GSK-3β and preservation of postsynaptic components.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Xiong; Tan, Lu; Liu, Dan; Liu, Xing-Hua; Wang, Qun; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Zhu, Ling-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic dysfunction plays a crucial role in the memory deterioration of Alzheimer's disease, but the molecular mechanism is not fully understood. By employing a widely recognized cholinergic dysfunction rat model that was produced by intraperitoneal injection of scopolamine, we investigated the mechanisms underlying scopolamine-induced memory deficits. We found that scopolamine caused spatial learning and memory deficits that involved activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and impairments of dendrite arborization and spine formation/maturation associated with alterations of AMPAR, Homer1, and CREB. Pretreatment by intraperitoneal injection of lithium, an inhibitor of GSK-3, for one week prevented the synaptic changes and the learning and memory deficits induced by scopolamine. Lithium treatment also activated cholineacetyltransferase and inhibited acetylcholinesterase, which might have also contributed to the improved memory. Our findings suggest that GSK-3β may be a key molecular mediator of cholinergic synaptic dysfunction, and that inhibition of GSK-3β by lithium may be promising in protecting cholinergic synaptic functions.

  8. The Effects of Inhaled Pimpinella peregrina Essential Oil on Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment, Anxiety, and Depression in Laboratory Rats.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Emel; Hritcu, Lucian; Dogan, Gulden; Hayta, Sukru; Bagci, Eyup

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, we identified the effects of inhaled Pimpinella peregrina essential oil (1 and 3 %, for 21 continuous days) on scopolamine-induced memory impairment, anxiety, and depression in laboratory rats. Y-maze and radial arm-maze tests were used for assessing memory processes. Also, the anxiety and depressive responses were studied by means of the elevated plus-maze and forced swimming tests. The scopolamine alone-treated rats exhibited the following: decrease of the spontaneous alternation percentage in Y-maze test, increase of the number of working and reference memory errors in radial arm-maze test, along with decrease of the exploratory activity, the percentage of the time spent and the number of entries in the open arm within elevated plus-maze test and decrease of swimming time and increase of immobility time within forced swimming test. Inhalation of the P. peregrina essential oil significantly improved memory formation and exhibited anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects in scopolamine-treated rats. Our results suggest that the P. peregrina essential oil inhalation ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory impairment, anxiety, and depression. Moreover, studies on the P. peregrina essential oil may open a new therapeutic window for the prevention of neurological abnormalities closely related to Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Studies on effects of Emblica officinalis (Amla) on oxidative stress and cholinergic function in scopolamine induced amnesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Golechha, Mahaveer; Bhatia, Jagriti; Arya, Dharmveer Singh

    2012-01-01

    Emblica officinalis, commonly known as amla, is an important medicinal plant of India. Its fruits have potent antioxidant activity due to the presence of tannoids, tannins, vitamin C and flavonoids. The aim of this study was to investigate the beneficial effect of the hydroalcoholic extract of the fruits of Emblica officinalis (EO) on memory impairment in Swiss albino mice. Scopolamine (1 mg kg(-1), i.p)was administered to induce amnesia and the memory was evaluated by using elevated plus-maze and passive avoidance tests. Piracetam (200 mg kg(-1), i.p.) was used as a standard nootropic agent. The EO extract was administered intraperitoneally in four graded doses (150, 300, 450 and 600 mg kg(-1)) for 7 consecutive days to different groups of mice. The mice were sacrificed on the 8th day following assessment of memory. The brain malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) as well as acetylcholinesterase (AchE)) activity was determined. It was observed that EO extract reversed the amnesia induced by scopolamine. The mean transfer latency and retention latency in the EO extract 600 mg kg(-1) group vs the vehicle treated scopolamine group was 13.46 sec (p<0.001) and 134.4 sec (p<0.001) vs 23.99 sec and 44.55 sec, respectively. EO extract treatment also significantly (p<0.001) ameliorated the oxidative stress induced by scopolamine administration. The mice brain MDA and GSH levels in the EO extract 600 mg kg(-1) group vs the scopolamine group were 29.95 nmol g(-1) of wet tissue and 51.87 microg g(-1) tissue vs 55.22 nmol g(-1) of wet tissue and 28.33 microg g(-1) tissue, respectively. Further, EO extract (300, 450 and 600 mg kg(-1), i.p) significantly (p<0.001) reversed the rise in brain acetyl cholinesterase (AchE) level induced by scopolamine. The mice brain Ach E levels in the EO extract 600 mg kg(-1) group as compared to the scopolamine group was 70.23 vs 151.49 U mg(-1) protein(-1), respectively. These results suggestthat EO possesses memory enhancing, antioxidant

  10. Drug-induced variations in the probability of occurrence of multiple corrective saccades.

    PubMed

    Oliva, G A

    2001-06-01

    The amplitude of goal-directed 10 degrees elicited saccades and the probability that the main saccade will be followed by multiple corrective saccades increased significantly for 10 subjects after Scopolamine treatment (0.5-mg intramuscularly injected). The results suggest a perceptual rather than a motor effect for the drug.

  11. Theory of antimotion sickness drug mechanisms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, D. C.; Graybiel, A.

    1972-01-01

    The results of a series of antimotion sickness drug evaluations indicates that drugs with central anticholinergic actions and drugs that increase central sympathetic activity are effective against motion sickness. The combination of these actions produces a synergistic effect against motion sickness. The effect of these medications on central acetylcholine or on norepinephrine could alter a balance between the neurons in the vestibular and reticular areas which influence motion sickness and also sympathetic and parasympathetic reactions. It is suggested that this could be their mechanism of action in preventing motion sickness.

  12. M1 and m2 muscarinic receptor subtypes regulate antidepressant-like effects of the rapidly acting antidepressant scopolamine.

    PubMed

    Witkin, J M; Overshiner, C; Li, X; Catlow, J T; Wishart, G N; Schober, D A; Heinz, B A; Nikolayev, A; Tolstikov, V V; Anderson, W H; Higgs, R E; Kuo, M-S; Felder, C C

    2014-11-01

    Scopolamine produces rapid and significant symptom improvement in patients with depression, and most notably in patients who do not respond to current antidepressant treatments. Scopolamine is a nonselective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, and it is not known which one or more of the five receptor subtypes in the muscarinic family are mediating these therapeutic effects. We used the mouse forced-swim test, an antidepressant detecting assay, in wild-type and transgenic mice in which each muscarinic receptor subtype had been genetically deleted to define the relevant receptor subtypes. Only the M1 and M2 knockout (KO) mice had a blunted response to scopolamine in the forced-swim assay. In contrast, the effects of the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine were not significantly altered by gene deletion of any of the five muscarinic receptors. The muscarinic antagonists biperiden, pirenzepine, and VU0255035 (N-[3-oxo-3-[4-(4-pyridinyl)-1-piper azinyl]propyl]-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole-4-sulfonamide) with selectivity for M1 over M2 receptors also demonstrated activity in the forced-swim test, which was attenuated in M1 but not M2 receptor KO mice. An antagonist with selectivity of M2 over M1 receptors (SCH226206 [(2-amino-3-methyl-phenyl)-[4-[4-[[4-(3 chlorophenyl)sulfonylphenyl]methyl]-1-piperidyl]-1-piperidyl]methanone]) was also active in the forced-swim assay, and the effects were deleted in M2 (-/-) mice. Brain exposure and locomotor activity in the KO mice demonstrated that these behavioral effects of scopolamine are pharmacodynamic in nature. These data establish muscarinic M1 and M2 receptors as sufficient to generate behavioral effects consistent with an antidepressant phenotype and therefore as potential targets in the antidepressant effects of scopolamine.

  13. Side effects of antimotion sickness drugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. D.; Manno, J. E.; Manno, B. R.; Redetzki, H. M.; Wood, M. D.; Vekovius, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    The effects on operational proficiency of the antimotion sickness drugs scopolamine, promethazine and d-amphetamine are tested using a computerized pursuit meter. Proficiency is not significantly affected by oral doses of 0.25 mg or 0.50 mg scopolamine but is descreased by oral or I.M. doses of 25 mg promethazine. The performance decrement associated with 25 mg oral promethazine is prevented when combined with 10 mg oral d-amphetamine. The combination of 25 mg I.M. promethazine, 25 mg oral promethazine and 10 mg d-amphetamine produces less performance decrement than oral or I.M. doses of promethazine alone, though more performance decrement than a placebo. I.M. promethazine is adsorbed slowly and consequently may provoke drowsiness.

  14. Cognitive enhancing and antioxidant activity of ethyl acetate soluble fraction of the methanol extract of Hibiscus rosa sinensis in scopolamine-induced amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Nade, Vandana S.; Kanhere, Sampat V.; Kawale, Laxman A.; Yadav, Adhikrao V.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the cognitive enhancing and antioxidant activity of Hibiscus rosa sinensis. Materials and Methods: The learning and memory was impaired by administration of scopolamine (1 mg/kg, i.p.) in mice which is associated with altered brain oxidative status. The object recognition test (ORT) and passive avoidance test (PAT) were used to assess cognitive enhancing activity. Animals were treated with an ethyl acetate soluble fraction of the methanol extract of H. sinensis (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o). Results: The ethyl acetate soluble fraction of the methanol extract of H. sinensis (EASF) attenuated amnesia induced by scopolamine and aging. The discrimination index (DI) was significantly decreased in the aged and scopolamine group in ORT. Pretreatment with EASF significantly increased the DI. In PAT, scopolamine-treated mice exhibited significantly shorter step-down latencies (SDL). EASF treatment showed a significant increase in SDL in young, aged as well as in scopolamine-treated animals. The biochemical analysis of brain revealed that scopolamine treatment increased lipid peroxidation and decreased levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione reductase (GSH). Administration of extract significantly reduced LPO and reversed the decrease in brain SOD and GSH levels. The administration of H. sinensis improved memory in amnesic mice and prevented the oxidative stress associated with scopolamine. The mechanism of such protection of H. sinensis may be due to augmentation of cellular antioxidants. Conclusion: The results of the present study suggested that H. sinensis had a protective role against age and scopolamine-induced amnesia, indicating its utility in management of cognitive disorders. PMID:21572646

  15. Effect of oxotremorine, physostigmine, and scopolamine on brain acetylcholine synthesis: a study using HPLC

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, N.; Beley, A. )

    1990-11-01

    The synthesis rate of brain acetylcholine (ACh) was estimated in mice following i.v. administration of ({sup 3}H)choline (Ch). The measurements were performed 1 min after the tracer injection, using the ({sup 3}H)ACh/({sup 3}H)Ch specific radioactivity ratio as an index of ACh synthesis rate. Endogenous and labeled Ch and ACh were quantified using HPLC methodology. Oxotremorine and physostigmine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) increased the steady state concentration of brain ACh by + 130% and 84%, respectively and of Ch by + 60% (oxotremorine); they decreased ACh synthesis by 62 and 55%, respectively. By contrast, scopolamine (0.7 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased the cerebral content of Ch by - 26% and of ACh by - 23% without enhancing the synthesis of ACh. The results show the utility of HPLC methodology in the investigation of ACh turnover.

  16. Effects of lavender oil inhalation on improving scopolamine-induced spatial memory impairment in laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Hritcu, Lucian; Cioanca, Oana; Hancianu, Monica

    2012-04-15

    Lavender is reported to be an effective medical plant in treating inflammation, depression, stress and mild anxiety in Europe and the USA. The present study investigated the effects of two different lavender essential oils from Lavandula angustifolia ssp. angustifolia Mill. (Lamiaceae) and Lavandula hybrida Rev. (Lamiaceae) on neurological capacity of male Wistar rats subjected to scopolamine (0.7mg/kg)-induced dementia rat model. Chronic exposures to lavender essential oils (daily, for 7 continuous days) significantly reduced anxiety-like behavior and inhibited depression in elevated plus-maze and forced swimming tests, suggesting anxiolytic and antidepressant activity. Also, spatial memory performance in Y-maze and radial arm-maze tasks was improved, suggesting positive effects on memory formation. Taken together, multiple exposures to lavender essential oils could effectively reverse spatial memory deficits induced by dysfunction of the cholinergic system in the rat brain and might provide an opportunity for management neurological abnormalities in dementia conditions.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine Gel Formulation During Antiorthostatic Bed Rest, a Microgravity Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Rajendra P.; Daniels, Vernie R.; Crady, Camille J.; Derendorf, H.; Putcha, L.

    2011-01-01

    Statement of Purpose, Innovation or Hypothesis: Space Motion sickness (SMS) is a long-standing problem for astronauts on both short and long duration space flights. Scopolamine (SCOP) is frequently used for the treatment of motion sickness (MS), and is available as transdermal patch and tablet dosage forms. These formulations of SCOP are ineffective for the treatment of SMS. Intranasal dosage forms are noninvasive with rapid absorption and enhanced bioavailability, thus allowing precise and reduced dosing in addition to offering rescue and treatment options. An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed and pharmacokinetics (PK) and bioavailability were determined in clinical trials with human subjects under IND guidelines.Description of Methods and Materials: The present clinical trial compares PK and bioavailability of INSCOP in 12 normal, healthy subjects (6 male/ 6 female) during ambulation (AMB) and antiorthostaticbed rest (ABR) used as a ground-based microgravity analog. Subjects received 0.2 mg and 0.4 mg doses of INSCOP during AMB and ABR in a 4-way crossover design.Data and Results: Results indicated no difference between AMB and ABR in PK parameters after 0.2 mg dose, Clearance (Cls) decreased with a concomitant increase in maximum concentration and area under concentration-versus-time curve (AUC) during ABR after the 0.4 mg dose.Interpretation, Conclusion or Significance: The difference in AUC and Cls at the higher (0.4 mg) but not the lower dose (0.2 mg) during ABR suggests that ABR may affect metabolism and/or clearance of INSCOP at higher doses . These results indicate that dosing adjustment may be required for treatment of SMS with INSCOP in space.

  18. Scopolamine disrupts hippocampal activity during allocentric spatial memory in humans: an fMRI study using a virtual reality analogue of the Morris Water Maze.

    PubMed

    Antonova, Elena; Parslow, David; Brammer, Michael; Simmons, Andrew; Williams, Steven; Dawson, Gerard R; Morris, Robin

    2011-09-01

    The role of the septohippocampal cholinergic system in memory disorders is well established. The effects of cholinergic challenge in animals have been extensively studied using the Morris Water Maze (MWM) which engages allocentric spatial memory. The present study investigated the effect of the centrally active muscarinic antagonist scopolamine on allocentric spatial memory in humans using a virtual reality analogue of the MWM task, the Arena task. Twenty right-handed healthy male adults with a mean age of 28 years (range 23-35 years) were studied using functional MRI in a randomized double-blind cross-over design with scopolamine bromide (0.4 mg i.m.) or placebo (saline) administered 70-90 min before the beginning of the functional scan. Scopolamine induced a significant reduction in the activation of the hippocampus/parahippocampal gyrus compared with placebo. Furthermore, there was dissociation between hippocampus-based and striatal-based memory systems, which were significantly more activated in the placebo and scopolamine conditions, respectively. The activation of the striatal system under scopolamine challenge was accompanied by the activation of the amygdala. In conclusion, the study extends the well-documented finding in animals of the attenuating effect of scopolamine on hippocampal activity during allocentric spatial memory to humans. Furthermore, the results call for further investigation of the dissociation between the hippocampal and neostriatal memory systems during allocentric spatial processing under cholinergic blockade in humans.

  19. Cognitive and behavioral effects of cholinergic, dopaminergic, and serotonergic blockade in humans.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, B; Martin, A; Hill, J; Mack, C; Molchan, S; Martinez, R; Murphy, D L; Sunderland, T

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the cognitive and behavioral effects of anticholinergic, antidopaminergic, and antiserotonergic agents given alone and in combination to normal volunteers. Twelve young male volunteers took part in this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study of six drug conditions, each administered on separate days [haloperidol (2 mg p.o.) +/-scopolamine (0.5 mg i.v.), metergoline (4 mg p.o.) +/-scopolamine (0.5 mg i.v.), placebo, and scopolamine alone (0.5 mg i.v.)]. Scopolamine-induced sedation (p < .01), slowed information processing (p < .01) and impaired new learning and memory (p < .01), but did not affect attention or retrieval from semantic memory. Given alone, haloperidol selectively impaired the ability to rapidly switch cognitive sets (p < .05), and metergoline decreased pupil size (p < .01) but did not induce cognitive deficits. In combination with scopolamine, neither haloperidol nor metergoline produced a worsening of the subjects' cognitive performance above and beyond that seen with scopolamine alone. On the contrary, a trend (p < .10) for haloperidol to reverse some of the scopolamine-induced exacerbation of verbal short-term forgetting was observed. The data indicate that scopolamine and haloperidol can independently and selectively affect cognition and that at the doses tested in this study no synergistic exacerbation of cognitive functioning was found when cholinergic blockage was coupled with dopaminergic or serotonergic blockade.

  20. The effects of daidzin and its aglycon, daidzein, on the scopolamine-induced memory impairment in male mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Jung, Hyun Ah; Park, Se Jin; Kim, Jong Min; Lee, Seungjoo; Choi, Jae Su; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Ko, Kwang Ho; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2010-10-01

    In this study, the effect of daidzin or daidzein isolated from Pueraria lobata on the memory impairments induced by scopolamine was assessed in male mice using the passive avoidance and the Morris water maze tasks. Administration of daidzin (5 mg/kg) or daidzein (5 mg/kg) significantly reversed the scopolamine (1 mg/kg)-induced cognitive impairments in male mice as evidenced by the passive avoidance test (p < 0.05) and on the Morris water maze test (p < 0.05). Moreover, the ameliorating effects of daidzin or daidzein were antagonized by tamoxifen (1 mg/kg), the nonspecific estrogen receptor antagonist. These results indicate that daidzin or daidzein may be useful in cognitive impairment induced by cholinergic dysfunction, and this beneficial effect is mediated, in part, via estrogen receptor.

  1. Beneficial effect of commercial Rhodiola extract in rats with scopolamine-induced memory impairment on active avoidance.

    PubMed

    Vasileva, Liliya V; Getova, Damianka P; Doncheva, Nina D; Marchev, Andrey S; Georgiev, Milen I

    2016-12-04

    Rhodiola rosea L., family Crassulaceae also known as Golden Root or Arctic root is one of the most widely used medicinal plants with effect on cognitive dysfunction, psychological stress and depression. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of a standardized commercial Rhodiola extract on learning and memory processes in naive rats as well as its effects in rats with scopolamine-induced memory impairment.

  2. Isolation of atropine and scopolamine from plant material using liquid-liquid extraction and EXtrelut(®) columns.

    PubMed

    Śramska, Paula; Maciejka, Artur; Topolewska, Anna; Stepnowski, Piotr; Haliński, Łukasz P

    2017-02-01

    Tropane alkaloids are toxic secondary metabolites produced by Solanaceae plants. Among them, plants from Datura genus produce significant amounts of scopolamine and hyoscyamine; the latter undergoes racemization to atropine during isolation. Because of their biological importance, toxic properties and commonly reported food and animal feed contamination by different Datura sp. organs, there is a constant need for reliable methods for the analysis of tropane alkaloids in many matrices. In the current study, three extraction and sample-clean up procedures for the determination of scopolamine and atropine in plant material were compared in terms of their effectiveness and repeatability. Standard liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and EXtrelut(®) NT 3 columns were used for the sample clean-up. Combined ultrasound-assisted extraction and 24h static extraction using ethyl acetate, followed by multiple LLE steps was found the most effective separation method among tested. However, absolute extraction recovery was relatively low and reached 45-67% for atropine and 52-73% for scopolamine, depending on the compound concentration. The same method was also the most effective one for the isolation of target compounds from Datura stramonium leaves. EXtrelut(®) columns, on the other hand, displayed relatively low effectiveness in isolating atropine and scopolamine from such a complex matrix and hence could not be recommended. The most effective method was also applied to the extraction of alkaloids from roots and stems of D. stramonium. Quantitative analyses were performed using validated method based on gas chromatography with flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Based on the results, the importance of the proper selection of internal standards in the analysis of tropane alkaloids was stressed out.

  3. Protection Against Sarin-Induced Seizures in Rats by Direct Brain Microinjection of Scopolamine, Midazolam or MK-801

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    CONTRACT NUMBER scopolamine , midazolam or MK-801 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Skovira, JW, McDonough, JH, Shih...ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER US Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense ATTN: MCMR-CDR-P 3100 Ricketts Point Road Aberdeen Proving... Medical Research Institute Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD of Chemical Defense 21010-5400 ATTN: MCMR-CDZ-I 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT 3100 Ricketts

  4. Tetramethylpyrazine protects against scopolamine-induced memory impairments in rats by reversing the cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Yu, Xiao; Luo, Xiao-Ping; Yang, Shu-Hua; Zheng, Dong

    2013-09-15

    Tetramethylpyrazine is used in the treatment of many neurological diseases because of its neuroprotective effect. Here, we demonstrate that administration of tetramethylpyrazine effectively reverses memory deficits induced by scopolamine. Moreover, tetramethylpyrazine preserves postsynaptic protein synthesis and restores cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway signaling deficits. Our study not only explores the actions of tetramethylpyrazine on synapses, but also provides novel evidence for the possible therapeutic use of tetramethylpyrazine in dementia.

  5. Effects of Fructus Akebiae on learning and memory impairment in a scopolamine-induced animal model of dementia

    PubMed Central

    WANG, JINGHUA; WANG, XUAN; LV, BAOSHENG; YUAN, WEIXIU; FENG, ZEGUO; MI, WEIDONG; ZHANG, HONG

    2014-01-01

    Fructus Akebiae (FAE) is a component of traditional Chinese medicines used for the clinical treatment of amnesia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of FAE extract on scopolamine-induced learning and memory impairment in mice and Sprague-Dawley rats. Treatment with FAE (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg) was investigated in scopolamine-treated animals, and its effects on different types of memory were examined using the T-maze, the Morris water maze task, the novel object recognition test, the passive avoidance task and the step-down test. The results revealed that 5 and 10 mg/kg FAE attenuated scopolamine-mediated impairment of cognition, including spatial, episodic, aversive, and short- and long-term memory. Overall, these results suggest that FAE is an effective cognitive enhancer, and thus highlights the value of a multi-target strategy to address the complexity of cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25009638

  6. Aqueous and hydroalcoholic extracts of Black Maca (Lepidium meyenii) improve scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Julio; Dang, Haixia; Gong, Mengjuan; Liu, Xinmin; Chen, Shi-Lin; Gonzales, Gustavo F

    2007-10-01

    Lepidium meyenii Walp. (Brassicaceae), known as Maca, is a Peruvian hypocotyl growing exclusively between 4,000 and 4,500 m altitude in the central Peruvian Andes, particularly in Junin plateau. Previously, Black variety of Maca showed to be more beneficial than other varieties of Maca on learning and memory in ovariectomized mice on the water finding test. The present study aimed to test two different doses of aqueous (0.50 and 2.00 g/kg) and hydroalcoholic (0.25 and 1.00 g/kg) extracts of Black Maca administered for 35 days on memory impairment induced by scopolamine (1mg/kg body weight i.p.) in male mice. Memory and learning were evaluated using the water Morris maze and the step-down avoidance test. Brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and monoamine oxidase (MAO) activities in brain were also determined. Both extracts of Black Maca significantly ameliorated the scopolamine-induced memory impairment as measured in both the water Morris maze and the step-down avoidance tests. Black Maca extracts inhibited AChE activity, whereas MAO activity was not affected. These results indicate that Black Maca improves scopolamine-induced memory deficits.

  7. Neuroprotective effects of inhaled lavender oil on scopolamine-induced dementia via anti-oxidative activities in rats.

    PubMed

    Hancianu, Monica; Cioanca, Oana; Mihasan, Marius; Hritcu, Lucian

    2013-03-15

    Lavender is used in traditional medicines in Asia, Europe, ancient Greece and Rome, and was mentioned in the Bible and in ancient Jewish texts. Also, lavender is reported to be an effective medical plant in treating inflammation, depression, stress and headache. The present study was undertaken in order to investigate the antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities of the lavender essential oils from Lavandula angustifolia ssp. angustifolia Mill. and Lavandula hybrida Rev. using superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase (CAT) specific activities, total content of reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA) level (lipid peroxidation) and DNA fragmentation assays in male Wistar rats subjected to scopolamine-induced dementia rat model. In scopolamine-treated rats, lavender essential oils showed potent antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities. Subacute exposures (daily, for 7 continuous days) to lavender oils significantly increased antioxidant enzyme activities (SOD, GPX and CAT), total content of reduced GSH and reduced lipid peroxidation (MDA level) in rat temporal lobe homogenates, suggesting antioxidant potential. Also, DNA cleavage patterns were absent in the lavender groups, suggesting antiapoptotic activity. Taken together, our results suggest that antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities of the lavender essential oils are the major mechanisms for their potent neuroprotective effects against scopolamine-induced oxidative stress in the rat brain.

  8. Evaluation of Cucurbita maxima extract against scopolamine-induced amnesia in rats: implication of tumour necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Jawaid, Talha; Shakya, Ashok K; Siddiqui, Hefazat Hussain; Kamal, Mehnaz

    2014-01-01

    Cucurbita maxima (CM) seed oil is commonly used in Indian folk medicine to treat various ailments. We have investigated the effect of CM seed oil on memory impairment induced by scopolamine in rats. Male adult Wistar rats were administered scopolamine 1 mg/kg body weight, i.p. or 1.25 mg/kg body weight, s.c. to induce memory impairment. The nootropic agent piracetam 100 mg/kg body weight, i.p. and CM seed oil 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight, p.o. were administered daily for five consecutive days. The memory function was evaluated in the Morris water maze (MWM) test, the social recognition test (SRT), the elevated plus maze (EPM) test, and the pole climbing test (PCT). Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and oxidative stress parameters were estimated in the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of the brains after completion of the behavioural studies. The effects of scopolamine on the levels of the tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) transcript were also investigated. Scopolamine caused memory impairment in all the behavioural paradigms along with a significant increase in the AChE activity and oxidative stress in the brain. Scopolamine also caused a significant increase in the expression of TNF-α in the hippocampus. CM seed oil exhibited antiamnesic activity as indicated by a significant reduction in the latency time in the MWM test and decreased social interaction during trial 2 in the SRT. Further, treatment with CM seed oil significantly decreased the AChE activity and malondialdehyde levels and increased the glutathione level in brain regions. CM seed oil also significantly decreased the expression of TNF-α in the hippocampus. The effect of CM seed oil on behavioural and biochemical parameters was comparable to that observed in rats treated with piracetam. These results indicate that CM seed oil may exert antiamnesic activity which may be attributed to the inhibition of AChE and inflammation as well as its antioxidant activity in the brain.

  9. Bis(9)-(-)-nor-meptazinol as a novel dual-binding AChEI potently ameliorates scopolamine-induced cognitive deficits in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Xia, Zheng; Zhang, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jian-rong; Ge, Xin-Xing; Li, Juan; Cui, Yongyao; Qiu, Zhui-Bai; Xu, Jun; Xie, Qiong; Wang, Hao; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2013-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifaceted neurodegenerative disorder which is characterized by the progressive deterioration of cognition and the emergence of behavioral and psychological symptoms in aging patients. Given that the clinical effectiveness of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) has still been questioned due to dubious disease-modifying effects, the multi-target directed ligand (MTDL) design has become an emerging strategy for developing new drugs for AD treatment. Bis(9)-(-)-nor-meptazinol (Bis-Mep) was firstly reported by us as a novel MTDL for both potent cholinesterase and amyloid-β aggregation inhibition. In this study, we further explored its AChE inhibition kinetic features and cognitive amelioration. Bis-Mep was found to be a mixed-type inhibitor on electric eel AChE by enzyme kinetic study. Molecular docking revealed that two "water bridges" located at the two wings of Bis-Mep stabilized its interaction with both catalytic and peripheral anionic sites of AChE. Furthermore, subcutaneous administration of Bis-Mep (10, 100 or 1000 ng/kg) significantly reversed the scopolamine-induced memory deficits in a typical bell-shaped dose-response manner. The maximal cognitive amelioration of Bis-Mep was achieved at 100 ng/kg, comparable with the effect of a reference drug Huperzine A at 1 mg/kg and also the relevant AChE inhibition in brain. These findings suggested that Bis-Mep might be a promising dual-binding AChE inhibitor for potential AD therapeutics.

  10. Inhibition of central angiotensin converting enzyme ameliorates scopolamine induced memory impairment in mice: role of cholinergic neurotransmission, cerebral blood flow and brain energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tota, Santoshkumar; Nath, Chandishwar; Najmi, Abul Kalam; Shukla, Rakesh; Hanif, Kashif

    2012-06-15

    Evidences indicate that inhibition of central Renin angiotensin system (RAS) ameliorates memory impairment in animals and humans. Earlier we have reported involvement of central angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in streptozotocin induced neurodegeneration and memory impairment. The present study investigated the role of central ACE in cholinergic neurotransmission, brain energy metabolism and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in model of memory impairment induced by injection of scopolamine in mice. Perindopril (0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg, PO) was given orally for one week before administration of scopolamine (3mg/kg, IP). Then, memory function was evaluated by Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests. CBF was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. Biochemical and molecular parameters were estimated after the completion of behavioral studies. Scopolamine caused impairment in memory which was associated with reduced CBF, acetylcholine (ACh) level and elevated acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) level. Perindopril ameliorated scopolamine induced amnesia in both the behavioral paradigms. Further, perindopril prevented elevation of AChE and MDA level in mice brain. There was a significant increase in CBF and ACh level in perindopril treated mice. However, scopolamine had no significant effect on ATP level and mRNA expression of angiotensin receptors and ACE in cortex and hippocampus. But, perindopril significantly decreased ACE activity in brain without affecting its mRNA expression. The study clearly showed the interaction between ACE and cholinergic neurotransmission and beneficial effect of perindopril can be attributed to improvement in central cholinergic neurotransmission and CBF.

  11. [Effect and mechanism of Coeloglossum viride var. bracteatum extract on scopolamine-induced deficits of learning and memory behavior of rodents].

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Wang, Ya-fang; Ma, Bo; Liu, Geng-tao; Zhang, Jian-jun

    2009-05-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect and mechanism of Coeloglossum viride var. bracteatum extract (CE) on scopolamine-induced learning and memory deficits. Learning and memory deficits of mice were evaluated by step-down passive avoidance test. Long-term potentiation of rats was detected in the dentate gyrus of hippocampus. Brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activities were also determined. The results showed that scopolamine impaired learning and memory performance and LTP induction in hippocampus. Oral administration of CE (5, 10, and 20 mg x kg(-1)) significantly alleviated scopolamine-induced memory deficits measured by step-down test (P < 0.05). CE (5 mg x kg(-1), ip) significantly reversed the inhibitory effect of scopolamine on LTP in rats. In addition, CE was found to increase the activity of ChAT in rat brain. These results suggested that CE could alleviate scopolamine-induced learning and memory deficits, which might be due to the LTP-improvement and ChAT activity enhancement.

  12. Effect of olanzapine on scopolamine induced deficits in differential reinforcement of low rate 72s (DRL-72s) schedule in rats: involvement of the serotonergic receptors in restoring the deficits.

    PubMed

    Jayarajan, Pradeep; Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Shinde, Anil

    2013-11-15

    Scopolamine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor antagonist has widespread central nervous system effects. Muscarinic receptors located in the central nervous system play a vital role in the modulation of impulsivity. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effect of scopolamine on impulsivity using differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate 72-s schedule (DRL-72s) and to demonstrate the involvement of serotonergic receptors in mediating the effect of olanzapine (atypical antipsychotic) on scopolamine induced impulsivity. Scopolamine impaired the performance of the rats trained under DRL-72s schedule. Olanzapine reversed the deficits induced by scopolamine. We evaluated the effect of donepezil (cholinesterase inhibitor), SB-742457 (5-HT6 and 5-HT2a antagonist), and haloperidol (typical antipsychotic) in rats challenged with scopolamine in the DRL-72s schedule to identify the receptor(s) involved in reversing the deficits. SB-742457 partially reversed the deficits, but donepezil and haloperidol did not show any effects on the deficits induced by scopolamine. Olanzapine and SB-742457 shifted the peak location (PkL) towards longer IRT duration, indicating a decrease in motor impulsivity. Modulation of scopolamine-induced impulsivity by olanzapine could be partly due to its antagonistic action at 5-HT2a and 5-HT6 receptors, respectively. Superior effects of olanzapine on impulsivity in schizophrenic patients may be mediated through the antagonism of 5-HT2a and 5-HT6 receptors.

  13. Protection against brain tissues oxidative damage as a possible mechanism for improving effects of low doses of estradiol on scopolamine-induced learning and memory impairments in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Hejazian, Seyed Hassan; Karimi, Sareh; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Mousavi, Seyed Mojtaba; Soukhtanloo, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Regarding the anti-oxidative effects on the central nervous system, the possible protection against brain tissues oxidative damage as a possible mechanism for improving effects of low doses of estradiol on scopolamine-induced learning and memory impairments was investigated in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Materials and Methods: The OVX rats treated by (1) vehicle, (2) scopolamine, and (3–4) scopolamine plus estradiol (20 or 20 or 60 μg/kg). Estradiol was administered (20 or 60 μg/kg, intraperitoneally) daily for 6 weeks after ovariectomy. The rats were examined for learning and memory using passive avoidance test. Scopolamine (2 mg/kg) was injected 30 min after training in the test. The brains were then removed to determine malondialdehyde (MDA) and thiol contents. Results: Scopolamine shortened the time latency to enter the dark compartment in (P < 0.01). Compared to scopolamine, pretreatment by both doses of estradiol prolonged the latency to enter the dark compartment (P < 0.01). The brain tissues MDA concentration as an index of lipid peroxidation was decreased (P < 0.05). Pretreatment by estradiol lowered the concentration of MDA, while it increased thiol content compared to scopolamine (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01). Conclusions: These results allow us to suggest a protection against brain tissues oxidative damage as a possible mechanism for improving effects of low doses of estradiol on scopolamine-induced learning and memory impairments in OVX rats. PMID:27563633

  14. Sodium Tanshinone IIA Sulfonate Attenuates Scopolamine-Induced Cognitive Dysfunctions via Improving Cholinergic System

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi-Jun; Yang, Cong; Li, Lin; Hou, Bo-Nan; Chen, Hui-Fang; Wang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Sodium Tanshinone IIA sulfonate (STS) is a derivative of Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA). Tan IIA has been reported to possess neuroprotective effects against Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, whether STS possesses effect on AD remains unclear. This study aims to estimate whether STS could protect against scopolamine- (SCOP-) induced learning and memory deficit in Kunming mice. Morris water maze results showed that oral administration of STS (10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg) and Donepezil shortened escape latency, increased crossing times of the original position of the platform, and increased the time spent in the target quadrant. STS decreased the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and increased the activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in the hippocampus and cortex of SCOP-treated mice. Oxidative stress results showed that STS increased the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and decreased the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in hippocampus and cortex. In addition, western blot was carried out to detect the expression of apoptosis related proteins (Bcl-2, Bax, and Caspase-3). STS upregulated the protein expression of Bcl-2 and downregulated the proteins expression of Bax and Caspase-3. These results indicated that STS might become a promising therapeutic candidate for attenuating AD-like pathological dysfunction. PMID:27556046

  15. Protection against soman and sarin exposure by transdermal physostigmine and scopolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Meshulam, Y.; Davidovici, R.; Levy, A.

    1993-05-13

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of physostigmine (physo), administered via sustained release (SR) methods, with and without scopolamine, against soman and sarin exposure in guinea-pigs. Transdermal physo pad (3 sq cm/kg; 60-80 ug/sq cm), containing a vehicle based on propionic acid, was applied onto the dorsal back of the animals, 24 hours before exposure to the cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitors. At the time of exposure, physo concentrations in brain and plasma were 3.6 ng/g and 4.1 ng/ml respectively. Brain and whole blood ChE activity were inhibited to 70% and 57% of their original activity. Transdermal physo by itself protected up to 70% of the animals exposed to 1.5 LD(50) of soman or sarin (100% mortality was recorded in the control group). Combining transdermal physo with Scopoderm (by Ciba Geigy Inc.) provided full protection against 1.5 LD(50).

  16. β-glucan attenuated scopolamine induced cognitive impairment via hippocampal acetylcholinesterase inhibition in rats.

    PubMed

    Haider, Ali; Inam, Wali; Khan, Shahab Ali; Hifza; Mahmood, Wajahat; Abbas, Ghulam

    2016-08-01

    β-glucan (polysaccharide) rich diet has been reported to enhance cognition in humans but the mechanism remained elusive. Keeping this in mind, the present study was designed to investigate the interaction of β-glucan with central cholinergic system. Briefly, in-silico analysis revealed promising interactions of β-glucan with the catalytic residues of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme. In line with this outcome, the in vitro assay (Ellman's method) also exhibited inhibition of AChE by β-glucan (IC50=0.68±0.08μg/µl). Furthermore, the in vivo study (Morris water maze) showed significant dose dependent reversal of the amnesic effect of scopolamine (2mg/kg i.p.) by β-glucan treatment (5, 25, 50 and 100mg/kg, i.p.). Finally, the hippocampi of aforementioned treated animals also revealed dose dependent inhibition of AChE enzyme. Hence, it can be deduced that β-glucan possesses potential to enhance central cholinergic tone via inhibiting AChE enzyme. In conclusion, the present study provides mechanistic insight to the cognition enhancing potential of β-glucan. Keeping in mind its dietary use and abundance in nature, it can be considered as economic therapeutic option against cognitive ailments associated with decline in cholinergic neurotransmission.

  17. Efficacy comparison of scopolamine and diazepam against soman-induced debilitation in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.R.; Gennings, C.; Carter, W.H.; Harris, L.W.; Lennox, W.J.

    1994-12-31

    The efficacy of diazepam (DZ) and scopolamine (SCP), in combination with atropine (ATR) + oxime therapy, against soman-induced seizure/convulsive activity and associated brain damage has been demonstrated, but the efficacy of each against the incapacitating effects of soman has not been addressed. Thus, the therapeutic efficacies of SCP (5 doses; 0-0.86 mg/kg) and DZ (5 doses; 0-5 mg/kg), when each was used in conjunction with ATR (3 doses; 0.5-8 mg/kg) + 2-PAM (25 mg/kg) therapy, were compared in groups of pyridostigmine pretreated guinea pigs exposed to 1.6, 2.0, 2.5, or 3.2 LD5Os of soman. Response surface methodology was employed to describe the relationship between soman-induced incapacitation and the ATR/DZ or ATRISCP dosages. Incapacitation was measured by toxicity scores assigned by three graders to test animals at 60 min postsoman. Results show that as the dosage of SCP increased, the mean toxicity scores decreased. Also, within the indicated dose ranges used, the efficacy of SCP was not dependent on the presence of ATR. In contrast, ATR alone was found to be more effective than when combined with DZ at any dose, and indicates that DZ might be temporarily contributing to soman-induced incapacitation. These findings suggest that in guinea pigs, SCP could replace ATR or DZ, or both, as therapy against soman-induced incapacitation.

  18. Efficacy comparison of scopolamine (SCP) and diazepam (DZ) against soman-induced lethality in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, L.W.; Gennings, C.; Carter, W.H.; Anderson, D.R.; Lennox, W.J.

    1994-12-31

    Diazepam (DZ) and scopolamine (SCP) are known to be beneficial when each is used in combination with atropine (AT) + oxime therapy against intoxication by soman, but the efficacy of each might be expected to vary with the dosage of AT. Thus, the therapeutic efficacy of SCP (5 doses; 0 - 0.86 mg/kg) versus DZ (5 doses; 0 - 5 mg/kg), when used in conjunction with AT (3 doses; 0.5 - S mg/kg) + 2-PAM (25 mg/kg) therapy, was tested in groups of pyridostigmine pretreated guinea pigs exposed to 1.6, 2.0, 2.5 or 3.2 LD5Os of soman. Response surface methodology was employed to describe the relationship between lethality and the AT/DZ or AT/SCP dosages. Results show that within the indicated dose ranges used, the efficacy of SCP is not dependent on the presence of AT, whereas AT is needed for DZ to maintain the lowest probability of death. These findings suggest that in guinea pigs SCP could supplement AT or replace DZ as therapy against nerve agent intoxication.

  19. Secreted calmodulin-like skin protein ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masaaki; Tajima, Hirohisa; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Matsuoka, Masaaki

    2014-06-18

    Humanin, a short bioactive peptide, inhibits cell death in a variety of cell-based death models through Humanin receptors in vitro. In vivo, Humanin ameliorates both muscarinic receptor antagonist-induced memory impairment in normal mice and memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-relevant mouse models including aged transgenic mice expressing a familial AD-linked gene. Recently, calmodulin-like skin protein (CLSP) has been shown to be secreted from skin tissues, contain a region minimally similar to the core region of Humanin, and inhibit AD-related neuronal death through the heterotrimeric Humanin receptor on the cell surface in vitro. As CLSP is much more potent than Humanin and efficiently transported through blood circulation across the blood-brain barrier to the central nervous system, CLSP is considered as a physiological agonist that binds to the heterotrimeric Humanin receptor and triggers the Humanin-induced signals in central nervous system. However, it remains unknown whether CLSP ameliorates memory impairment in mouse dementia models as Humanin does. In this study, we show that recombinant CLSP, administered intracerebroventricularly or intraperitoneally, ameliorates scopolamine-induced dementia in mice.

  20. Trachyspermum ammi Seeds Supplementation Helps Reverse Scopolamine, Alprazolam and Electroshock Induced Amnesia.

    PubMed

    Soni, Kapil; Parle, Milind

    2017-01-17

    The present study was designed to explore the beneficial effects of successive 10 days administration of Trachyspermum ammi seed's powder (TASP) along with diet (at the dose of 0.5%, 1.0% and 2.0% w/w) on learning and memory of mice. A total of 306 mice divided in 51 equal groups were employed in the study. Passive avoidance paradigm (PAP) and Object recognition Task (ORT) were employed as exteroceptive models. The brain acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE), serum cholesterol, brain monoaldehyde (MDA), brain reduced glutathione (GSH) and brain nitrite were estimated and Alprazolam, Scopolamine and Electroshock induced amnesia was employed to describe the actions. Treatment of TASP significantly increased step down latency of PAA and significantly increased discrimination index of ORT in groups with or without amnesia when compared to respective control groups. Furthermore, TASP administration resulted in significant fall in brain AChE activity, brain MDA level and brain nitrite level with simultaneous rise in brain GSH level, thereby decreased oxidative damage. A significant decrease in serum cholesterol was also observed. Ajowan supplementation may prove a remedy for the management of cognitive disorders owing to have pro-cholinergic, antioxidant and hypo-lipidemic activities.

  1. Effects of microinjection of scopolamine into the neostriatum of rats on performance of a food conditioned reflex at different levels of fixation.

    PubMed

    Tikhonravov, D L; Shapovalova, K B; Dyubkacheva, T A

    1997-01-01

    Chronic experiments performed on 32 Sprague-Dawley rats using a movement-feeding operant reflex (Skinner box) model showed that microinjection of scopolamine into the neostriatum had effects on this reflex which depended on the stage of learning. In animals with weakly fixed reflexes (prior to reaching the stage of memory consolidation), bilateral microinjection of 0.3 microgram of scopolamine into the caudate nucleus completely inhibited the reflex for a prolonged period of time. When the operant habit was well fixed, bilateral microinjection of the same doses of scopolamine into the neostriatum had no effect on the reflex. These results suggest that the neostriatum cholinergic system is critically involved in forming the motor engram. The cholinergic system of the caudate nucleus either takes no part in realizing the well-fixed conditioned reflex movement response and/or other forebrain structures are involved in the reflex, compensating for the disturbance in neostriatal cholinergic function.

  2. Neuronal Death Following Soman Intoxication: Necrosis or Apoptosis?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER US Army Medical Research Institute of...MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) US Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense Aberdeen Proving...40 min after onset of seizures, the anticholinergic drugs scopolamine and atropine failed to block soman-induced seizures, but diazepam and MK-801

  3. Beneficial effects of resveratrol on scopolamine but not mecamylamine induced memory impairment in the passive avoidance and Morris water maze tests in rats.

    PubMed

    Gacar, Nejat; Mutlu, Oguz; Utkan, Tijen; Komsuoglu Celikyurt, Ipek; Gocmez, Semil Selcen; Ulak, Güner

    2011-09-01

    Resveratrol (3,5,4-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene), which is found in grapes and red wine has been shown to protect neuronal cells with its antioxidant activity, improve memory function in dementia and reverse acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of resveratrol on emotional and spatial memory in naive rats, as well as on scopolamine- and mecamylamine-induced memory impairment in the passive avoidance and Morris water maze (MWM) tests. Resveratrol (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg), scopolamine (0.6 mg/kg) and mecamylamine (10mg/kg) were administered to male Wistar rats. In the passive avoidance test, there was no significant difference in the first day latency between all groups, whereas scopolamine and mecamylamine significantly shortened the second day latency compared to the control group. Resveratrol reversed the effect of scopolamine at all doses used, but it had no effect on mecamylamine-induced memory impairment in the passive avoidance test. Both scopolamine and mecamylamine significantly decreased the time spent in the escape platform quadrant during the probe trial of the MWM test compared to the control group. Resveratrol reversed the effect of scopolamine at all doses, but did not change the effect of mecamylamine in the MWM test. There were no significant differences in the locomotor activities of any of the groups. In conclusion, we suggested that resveratrol had improving effects on learning and memory by acting on muscarinic cholinergic receptors and at least in part, may reverse AChE activity.

  4. Clinically relevant drug interactions with anti-Alzheimer's drugs.

    PubMed

    Caraci, Filippo; Sultana, Janet; Drago, Filippo; Spina, Edoardo

    2017-03-03

    The aging world population had led to an increase in the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The drugs used to slow down the onset of AD, galantamine, donepezil, rivastigmine and memantine, are generally well-tolerated. However, drug interactions between these drugs and other drugs are an important aspect of patient safety that should be borne in mind, particularly given the high burden of polypharmacy in the elderly. The aim of this review is to provide an updated review of clinically significant drug-drug interactions concerning drugs approved for AD. PubMed was searched for relevant keywords. No time limit was imposed but only articles in English published in peer-reviewed journals were selected. Relevant literature was also identified from the references of identified articles. Further information was obtained from drug summary of product characteristics. The major pharmacokinetic interactions identified concerned fluoxetine, paroxetine and ketoconazole when used with galantamine or donepezil. On the other hand, the major potential pharmacodynamic interactions concerned anti-dementia drugs and general anesthesia agents, anti-cholinergic drugs, conventional antipsychotics and bradycardia-inducing drugs. In clinical practice memantine shows a lower potential for pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) compared to other drug classes. In conclusion, the concomitant use of anti-dementia drugs with other drugs can have variable clinical effects, making appropriate prescribing of these drugs very challenging. A simple and coherent way of presenting evidence on complex drug interaction information from heterogenous sources to clinicians is needed in order for the voluminous data available to have an impact on clinical practice.

  5. Acute effects of a low-dose atropine/scopolamine mixture as a food contaminant in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Perharič, Lucija; Juvan, Katja Ažman; Stanovnik, Lovro

    2013-09-01

    To verify the assumptions in our previous risk assessment of an atropine/scopolamine mixture in buckwheat flour, we performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study in 20 healthy, adult volunteers. The volunteers ingested a traditional Slovenian buckwheat meal, made of boiled buckwheat flour to which alkaloids were added. In addition to the placebo they ingested 0.12/0.10, 0.37/0.29, 1.22/0.95, 3.58/2.81 and 12.10/9.50 µg kg(-1) body mass (BM) of the atropine/scopolamine mixture. The changes in body temperature, heart rate, salivary and sweat secretion, pupil size, near-point vision and subjective symptoms were recorded regularly for 4 h after the ingestion. Decreased salivary and sweat secretion, increased heart rate and pupil size and reduced near-point vision accompanied by characteristic subjective symptoms were observed at 12.10/9.50 µg kg(-1) BM. At doses of 0.37/0.29 and 1.22/0.95 µg kg(-1) BM, a significant decrease in the heart rate was noted, which we consider to be a critical effect of a low-dose exposure to the atropine/scopolamine mixture. Although this did not have any clinical relevance in our subjects, it may have serious implications if it occurred in people with pre-existent cardiac conditions or those on medications that may cause bradycardia. No significant changes in the observed end points were noted at 0.12/0.10 µg kg(-1) BM. We estimate that the NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level) for the atropine/scopolamine mixture lies between the lower two administered doses. Applying the uncertainty factor of 10, we propose a new provisional Acute Reference Doses (ARfDs) of the mixture, i.e. 0.01 µg kg(-1) BM for each alkaloid, and a further refinement using higher-tier approaches.

  6. [Pharmacokinetics of scopolamine hydrobromide oral disintegrative microencapsule tablets in Beagle dogs determined with LC-MS/MS].

    PubMed

    Xia, Tian; Liu, De-Ding; Shi, Li-Fu; Hu, Jin-Hong

    2011-08-01

    The study aims to elucidate the characteristics of pharmacokinetics of scopolamine hydrobromide oral disintegrative microencapsule tablets in healthy Beagle dogs. Chromatographic separation was performed on a C18 column (100 mm x 3.0 mm, 3.5 microm) with methanol - 2 mmol x L(-1) ammonium formate (25 : 75) as the mobile phase. A trip-quadrupole tandem mass spectrum with the electrospray ionization (ESI) source was applied and positive ion multiple reaction monitoring mode was operated. Six Beagle dogs were randomly devided into two groups. They received oral single dose of scopolamine hydrobromide oral disintegrative microencapsule tablets 0.6 mg (test tablet) or scopolamine hydrobromide normal tablets (reference tablet). Plasma samples were collected at designed time. Plasma concentration of scopolamine hydrobromide was determined by LC-MS/MS and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. The pharmacokinetic parameters of test tablet vs reference tablet were as follows: C(max): (8.16 +/- 0.67) ng x mL(-1) vs (3.54 +/- 0.64) ng x mL(-1); t1/2: (2.83 +/- 0.45) h vs (3.85 +/- 0.82) h; t(max): (1.25 +/- 0.27) h vs (0.42 +/- 0.09) h; AUC(0-12h): (25.06 +/- 3.75) h x ng x mL(-1) vs (9.59 +/- 1.02) h x ng x mL(-1); AUC(0-infinity): (26.30 +/- 3.92) h x ng x mL(-1) vs (10.80 +/- 1.45) h x ng x mL(-1); MRT(0-12h): (3.38 +/- 0.34) h vs (3.86 +/- 0.26) h; MRT(0-infinity): (3.98 +/- 0.63) h vs (5.37 +/- 1.00) h. The absorption rate and AUC of test tablet is different from that of reference tablet. The bioavailability of test tablet is better than those of reference tablet.

  7. Honokiol improves learning and memory impairments induced by scopolamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Xian, Yan-Fang; Ip, Siu-Po; Mao, Qing-Qiu; Su, Zi-Ren; Chen, Jian-Nan; Lai, Xiao-Ping; Lin, Zhi-Xiu

    2015-08-05

    Honokiol, a lignan isolated from the bark of Magnolia officinalis, has been reported to ameliorate the learning and memory impairments in senesed (SAMP8) mice. However, whether honokiol could improve scopolamine (SCOP)-induced learning and memory deficits in mice is still unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether honokiol could reverse the SCOP-induced learning and memory impairments in mice and to elucidate its underlying mechanisms of action. Mice were given daily intraperitoneal injection of honokiol (10 and 20mg/kg) for 21 consecutive days. The results showed that honokiol significantly improved spatial learning and memory function (as assessed by the Morris water maze test) in the SCOP-treated mice. In addition, treatment with honokiol significantly decreased the protein and mRNA levels of interleukin (IL)-1β and the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), while significantly increased the protein and mRNA levels of IL-10, and the level of acetylcholine (Ach) in the brain of the SCOP-treated mice. Moreover, honokiol also significantly suppressed the production of prostaglandin E 2 (PGE2) and mRNA expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the brain of the SCOP-treated mice. Mechanistic investigations revealed that honokiol could markedly reverse the amount of phosphorylated Akt and extracellular regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) changes in the brain of the SCOP-treated mice. These results amply demonstrated that honokiol could improve learning and memory impairments induced by SCOP in mice, and the protective action may be mediated, at least in part, by inhibition of AChE activity, and amelioration of the neuroinflammatory processes in the SCOP-treated mice.

  8. Novel peptide VIP-TAT with higher affinity for PAC1 inhibited scopolamine induced amnesia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rongjie; Yang, Yanxu; Cui, Zekai; Zheng, Lijun; Zeng, Zhixing; Zhang, Huahua

    2014-10-01

    A novel peptide VIP-TAT with a cell penetrating peptide TAT at the C-terminus of VIP was constructed and prepared using intein mediated purification with an affinity chitin-binding tag (IMPACT) system to enhance the brain uptake efficiency for the medical application in central nervous system. It was found by labeling VIP-TAT and VIP with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) that the extension with TAT increased the brain uptake efficiency of VIP-TAT significantly. Then short-term and long-term treatment with scopolamine (Scop) was used to evaluate the effect of VIP-TAT or VIP on Scop induced amnesia. Both short-term and long-term administration of VIP-TAT inhibited the latent time reduction in step-through test induced by Scop significantly, but long-term administration of VIP aggravated the Scop induced amnesia. Long-term i.p. injection of VIP-TAT was shown to have positive effect by inhibiting the oxidative damage, apoptosis and the cholinergic system activity reduction that induced by Scop, while VIP exerted negative effect in brain opposite to that in periphery system. The in vitro data showed that VIP-TAT had not only protective but also proliferative effect on Neuro2a cells which was inhibited by PAC1 antagonist PACAP(6-38). Competition binding assay and cAMP assay confirmed that VIP-TAT had higher affinity and activation for PAC1 than VIP. So it was concluded that the significantly stronger protective effect of VIP-TAT against Scop induced amnesia than VIP was due to (1) the enhanced brain uptake efficiency of VIP-TAT and (2) the increased affinity and activation of VIP-TAT for receptor PAC1.

  9. Fucoxanthin, a Marine Carotenoid, Reverses Scopolamine-Induced Cognitive Impairments in Mice and Inhibits Acetylcholinesterase in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiajia; Huang, Ling; Yu, Jie; Xiang, Siying; Wang, Jialing; Zhang, Jinrong; Yan, Xiaojun; Cui, Wei; He, Shan; Wang, Qinwen

    2016-03-25

    Fucoxanthin, a natural carotenoid abundant in edible brown seaweeds, has been shown to possess anti-cancer, anti-oxidant, anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects. In this study, we report for the first time that fucoxanthin effectively protects against scopolamine-induced cognitive impairments in mice. In addition, fucoxanthin significantly reversed the scopolamine-induced increase of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and decreased both choline acetyltransferase activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression. Using an in vitro AChE activity assay, we discovered that fucoxanthin directly inhibits AChE with an IC50 value of 81.2 μM. Molecular docking analysis suggests that fucoxanthin likely interacts with the peripheral anionic site within AChE, which is in accordance with enzymatic activity results showing that fucoxanthin inhibits AChE in a non-competitive manner. Based on our current findings, we anticipate that fucoxanthin might exhibit great therapeutic efficacy for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease by acting on multiple targets, including inhibiting AChE and increasing BDNF expression.

  10. Neuroprotective and Antiamnesic Effects of Mitragyna inermis Willd (Rubiaceae) on Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bum, Elisabeth Ngo; Taïwé, Germain Sotoing; Ngoupaye, Gwladys Temkou; Sidiki, Neteydji; Moto, Fleur Clarisse Okomolo; Kouemou, Nadège; Njapdounke, Stephanie Jacqueline Kameni; Nkantchoua, Gisele; Omam, Jean Pierre Omam; Mairaira, Veronique

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To assess memory improvement and neuroprotective and antioxidant effects of Mitragyna inermis (M. inermis) leaf decoction on the central nervous system. Methodology. Leaf decoction of M. inermis was tested on learning and memory in normal and scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment in mice using memory behavioral tests such as the Morris water maze, object recognition task, and elevated plus maze. Oxidative stress enzymes—catalase, superoxide dismutase, and the thiobarbituric acid reactive substance, a product of lipid peroxidation—were quantified. In each test, mice 18 to 25 g were divided into groups of 5. Results. The extract reversed the effects of scopolamine in mice. The extract significantly increased discrimination index in the object recognition task test and inflexion ratio in the elevated plus maze test. The times spent in target quadrant in MWM increased while the transfer latency decreased in mice treated by M. inermis at the dose of 196.5 mg/kg. The activity levels of superoxide dismutase and catalase were significantly increased, whereas the thiobarbituric acid reactive substance was significantly decreased after 8 consecutive days of treatment with M. inermis at the dose of 393 mg/kg. Conclusion. These results suggest that M. inermis leaf extract possess potential antiamnesic effects. PMID:28386162

  11. Fucoxanthin, a Marine Carotenoid, Reverses Scopolamine-Induced Cognitive Impairments in Mice and Inhibits Acetylcholinesterase in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jiajia; Huang, Ling; Yu, Jie; Xiang, Siying; Wang, Jialing; Zhang, Jinrong; Yan, Xiaojun; Cui, Wei; He, Shan; Wang, Qinwen

    2016-01-01

    Fucoxanthin, a natural carotenoid abundant in edible brown seaweeds, has been shown to possess anti-cancer, anti-oxidant, anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects. In this study, we report for the first time that fucoxanthin effectively protects against scopolamine-induced cognitive impairments in mice. In addition, fucoxanthin significantly reversed the scopolamine-induced increase of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and decreased both choline acetyltransferase activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression. Using an in vitro AChE activity assay, we discovered that fucoxanthin directly inhibits AChE with an IC50 value of 81.2 μM. Molecular docking analysis suggests that fucoxanthin likely interacts with the peripheral anionic site within AChE, which is in accordance with enzymatic activity results showing that fucoxanthin inhibits AChE in a non-competitive manner. Based on our current findings, we anticipate that fucoxanthin might exhibit great therapeutic efficacy for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease by acting on multiple targets, including inhibiting AChE and increasing BDNF expression. PMID:27023569

  12. The Protective Role of Selenium on Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment, Oxidative Stress, and Apoptosis in Aged Rats: The Involvement of TRPM2 and TRPV1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Hasan; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Demirci, Kadir; Övey, İshak Suat

    2016-03-28

    Inhibition of Ca(2+) entry into the hippocampus and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) through inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist drugs is the current standard of care in neuronal diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, dementia, and peripheral pain. Oxidative stress activates Ca(2+)-permeable TRPM2 and TRPV1, and recent studies indicate that selenium (Se) is a potent TRPM2 and TRPV1 channel antagonist in the hippocampus and DRG. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective properties of Se in primary hippocampal and DRG neuron cultures of aged rats when given alone or in combination with scopolamine (SCOP). Thirty-two aged (18-24 months old) rats were divided into four groups. The first and second groups received a placebo and SCOP (1 mg/kg/day), respectively. The third and fourth groups received intraperitoneal Se (1.5 mg/kg/ over day) and SCOP + Se, respectively. The hippocampal and DRG neurons also were stimulated in vitro with a TRPV1 channel agonist (capsaicin) and a TRPM2 channel agonist (cumene hydroperoxide). We found that Se was fully effective in reversing SCOP-induced TRPM2 and TRPV1 current densities as well as errors in working memory and reference memory. In addition, Se completely reduced SCOP-induced oxidative toxicity by modulating lipid peroxidation, reducing glutathione and glutathione peroxidase. The Se and SCOP + Se treatments also decreased poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, intracellular free Ca(2+) concentrations, apoptosis, and caspase 3, caspase 9, and mitochondrial membrane depolarization values in the hippocampus. In conclusion, the current study reports on the cellular level for SCOP and Se on the different endocytotoxic cascades for the first time. Notably, the research indicates that Se can result in remarkable neuroprotective and memory impairment effects in the hippocampal neurons of rats. Graphical abstract Possible molecular pathways of involvement of selenium (Se) in scopolamine (SCOP) induced

  13. Comparison of efficacy of ginger with various antimotion sickness drugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. D.; Manno, J. E.; Wood, M. J.; Manno, B. R.; Mims, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    Ginger and several other medications were compared with scopolamine and d-amphetamine for effectiveness in prevention of motion sickness. Methods: Double-blind techniques were used. The subjects were given the medications two hours before they were rotated in a chair making head movements until a symptom total short of vomiting was reached. Standardized N.A.S.A. techniques were used for speed of rotation and end-point of motion sickness. Results: The three doses of ginger were all at the placebo level of efficacy. Amitriptyline, ethopropazine and trihexyphenidyl increased the tolerated head movements but the increase was not statistically significant. Significant levels of protection were produced by dimenhydrinate, promethazine, scopolamine and d-amphetamine. Protection was further increased by combination of these latter drugs with d-amphetamine. Efficacy was greatest as the dose was increased. Conclusions: The medication of choice in this study was scopolamine 0.6 mg with d-amphetamine 10 mg. This combination provided good protection with acceptable side effects.

  14. The ameliorating effects of 2,3-dihydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice and its neuroprotective activity.

    PubMed

    Weon, Jin Bae; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Ma, Choong Je

    2013-12-15

    We isolated 2,3-dihydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone, a neuroprotective compound from Cynenchum paniculatum in our previous study. The present study was conducted to investigate the possible neuroprotective effect of 2,3-dihydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone that has been previously isolated from Cynenchum paniculatum on hippocampal neuronal cell line, HT22 cells and its possible cognitive-enhancing effect on scopolamine-induced amnesia in mice. Neuroprotective effect against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in HT22 cells was evaluated by MTT assay. Also, cognitive enhancing effect against scopolamine (1mg/kg, ip) induced learning and memory deficit was measured by Morris water maze test. Oral administered of 2,3-dihydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone (1, 10, 20, 40 and 50mg/kg) to amnesic mice induced by scopolamine. In Morris water maze test, 2,3-dihydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone (50mg/kg) improved the impairment of spatial memory induced by scopolamine. 2,3-Dihydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone protect HT22 cells on glutamate induced cell-death in a dose-dependent manner (EC50 value: 10.94μM). Furthermore, 2,3-dihydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone was found to inhibit [Ca(2+)] accumulation in HT22 cells and had antioxidantive activity. The results showed that 2,3-dihydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone exert neuroprotective and cognitive-enhancing activities through its antioxidant activity. We suggest that 2,3-dihydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone improves cognitive function and may be helpful for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Biomedical Effects of Chemical-Threat-Agent Antidote and Pretreatment Drugs. An Abstracted Bibliography. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    and average atropine tissue levels. No correlation existed between pulse rate and plasma levels of atropine. (Cont’d) 10 3. There was no significant...change in blood pressure. 4. Atropine was widely distributed in tissues . Atropine disappears rapidly from the plasma after i.v. administration. INDEX...TITLE: Drug effects on the auditory speech discrimination mechanism : The action of atropine and scopolamine C : Acta Otolaryngologica kStockh), 1964, 58

  16. Use of psychotropic drugs and associated dental diseases.

    PubMed

    Fratto, Giovanni; Manzon, Licia

    2014-01-01

    Patients with problems related to central nervous system dysfunctions are often treated with psychotropic drugs. These include antipsychotics, antidepressants, mood stabilizers, anticonvulsants, and drugs blocking specific receptors in the brain such as anticholinergics or beta-blockers. However, these medications have serious side effects affecting the oral health. In addition, many dental patients make use of psychoactive drugs, such as amphetamine, ecstasy, and cocaine. This article aims to review data on the psychotropic drugs being used in the last 30 years, their pharmacological profile, with special attention to the side effects related to the oral health. Oral diseases such as bruxism, orofacial dystonia, oromandibular dyskinesia, and rabbit syndrome are related to extrapyramidal effects of antipsychotic drugs because of their antagonist activity on the dopaminergic receptors. Drugs with anticholinergic and/or antiadrenergic effects such as tricyclic antidepressants may cause dry mouth and related complications such as candidiasis and other oral infections. Among mood stabilizers, lithium treatment induces a wide range of side effects on oral system including dry mouth, sialorrhea, infections, and ulceration of the oral cavity. Psychostimulants may instead provoke xerotomia, gingival enlargements, bruxism, dental erosion, mucosal ulceration, and oral/nasal lesions. This literature review supports the idea that the higher prevalence of oral diseases among patients with mental disorders may be attributed to the side effects of their medications mediated by complex interactions between different targeted receptors. Thus, dentists must be aware of the possible risks of these medications in order to take appropriate precautions in treating these patients.

  17. Nootropic, neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects of phloretin in scopolamine induced amnesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghumatkar, Priya J; Patil, Sachin P; Jain, Pankaj D; Tambe, Rufi M; Sathaye, Sadhana

    2015-08-01

    Phloretin (PHL), a dihydrochalcone flavonoid usually present in the roots and leaves of apple tree. In vitro study on GT1-7 immortalized hypothalamic neurons exposed to amyloid beta (25-35), demonstrated that PHL significantly influenced membrane fluidity and potential. PHL also significantly decreased excitotoxicity by restoring the calcium homeostasis in the same. Thus, PHL proves to be a promising therapeutic moiety which should be further screened in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the nootropic, neuroprotective and neurotrophic roles of PHL in the subacute scopolamine induced amnesia in mice. In this study, mice were pretreated with PHL 2.5mg/kg, 5mg/kg, 10mg/kg and Donepezil (DON) 1mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p) for 14days. The last 7days of treatment regimen included daily injection of SCP 1.5mg/kg to induce cognitive deficits. Mice were subjected to behavioral analysis. Biochemical estimation of the brain homogenates for acetylcholinesterase and oxidative stress biomarkers were conducted. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis for the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was carried out particularly in the hippocampus. PHL was found to significantly improve the performance of mice in Morris water maze test (P<0.001) and significantly decreased the acetylcholinesterase activity (P<0.001) at all doses compared to SCP treated mice. Also, PHL significantly elevated the activity of antioxidant enzymes viz. superoxide dismutase, catalase, reduced glutathione levels (P<0.001) and decreased malonaldehyde levels (P<0.001) in comparison with the SCP group. Immunohistochemistry revealed that PHL treatment dose dependently improved BDNF levels in the hippocampus which were found to be significantly depleted (P<0.001) in the SCP group. Additionally, PHL (10mg/kg) significantly enhanced the spatial memory formation (P<0.05) and neurotrophicity (P<0.001) compared to DON (1mg/kg). The aforementioned research

  18. ESP-102, a standardized combined extract of Angelica gigas, Saururus chinensis and Schizandra chinensis, significantly improved scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, So Young; Lee, Ki Yong; Koo, Kyung Ah; Yoon, Jeong Seon; Lim, Song Won; Kim, Young Choong; Sung, Sang Hyun

    2005-02-25

    We assessed the effects of oral treatments of ESP-102, a standardized combined extract of Angelica gigas, Saururus chinensis and Schizandra chinensis, on learning and memory deficit. The cognition-enhancing effect of ESP-102 was investigated in scopolamine-induced (1 mg/kg body weight, s.c.) amnesic mice with both passive avoidance and Morris water maze performance tests. Acute oral treatment (single administration prior to scopolamine treatment) of mice with ESP-102 (doses in the range of 10 to 100 mg/kg body weight) significantly reduced scopolamine-induced memory deficits in the passive avoidance performance test. Another noteworthy result included the fact that prolonged oral daily treatments of mice with much lower amounts of ESP-102 (1 and 10 mg/kg body weight) for ten days reversed scopolamine-induced memory deficits. In the Morris water maze performance test, both acute and prolonged oral treatments with ESP-102 (single administration of 100 mg/kg body weight or prolonged daily administration of 1 and 10 mg/kg body weight for ten days, respectively, significantly ameliorated scopolamine-induced memory deficits as indicated by the formation of long-term and/or short-term spatial memory. In addition, we investigated the effects of ESP-102 on neurotoxicity induced by amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta25-35) or glutamate in primary cultured cortical neurons of rats. Pretreatment of cultures with ESP-102 (0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 mug/ml) significantly protected neurons from neurotoxicity induced by either glutamate or Abeta25-35. These results suggest that ESP-102 may have some protective characteristics against neuronal cell death and cognitive impairments often observed in Alzheimer's disease, stroke, ischemic injury and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Scopolamine into the anterior cingulate cortex diminishes nociception in a neuropathic pain model in the rat: an interruption of 'nociception-related memory acquisition'?

    PubMed

    Ortega-Legaspi, J Manuel; López-Avila, Alberto; Coffeen, Ulises; del Angel, Rosendo; Pellicer, Francisco

    2003-01-01

    The cingulate cortex plays a key role in the affective component related to pain perception. This structure receives cholinergic projections and also plays a role in memory processing. Therefore, we propose that the cholinergic system in the anterior cingulate cortex is involved in the nociceptive memory process. We used scopolamine (10 microg in 0.25 mircrol/saline) microinjected into the anterior cingulate cortex, either before thermonociception followed by a sciatic denervation, between thermonociception and denervation or after both procedures (n=10 each). The vehicle group (saline solution 0.9%, n=14) was microinjected before thermonociception. Chronic nociception was measured by the autotomy score, which onset and incidence were also determined. Group scopolamine-thermonociception-denervation (STD) presented the lowest autotomy score as compared to vehicle and group thermonociception-denervation-scopolamine (TDS) (vehicle vs. STD, p=0.002, STD vs. TDS, p=0.001). Group thermonociception-scopolamine-denervation (TSD) showed a diminished autotomy score when compared to TDS (p=0.053). STD group showed a delay in the onset of AB as compared to the rest of the groups. Group TSD presented a significative delay (p=0.048) in AB onset when compared to group TDS. There were no differences in the incidence between groups. The results show that nociception-related memory processed in the anterior cingulate cortex is susceptible of being modified by the cholinergic transmission blockade. When scopolamine is microinjected prior to the nociceptive stimuli, nociception-related memory acquisition is prevented. The evidence obtained in this study shows the role of the anterior cingulate cortex in the acquisition of nociception-related memory.

  20. Natural drug extracts for a nutritive-tonic drink, promotes the induction of long-term potentiation in rat hippocampal dentate gyrus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Yasuko; Ishige, Kumiko; Ohtakara, Tomohiro; Ito, Yoshihisa

    2006-07-01

    We have shown previously that oral administration of a nutritive-tonic drink (NTD) improves scopolamine-induced memory impairment in the passive avoidance task and Morris water-maze in mice and that this action is attributable to the natural drug extracts, rather than synthetic drugs such as taurine and caffeine, in the NTD. In order to investigate the mechanism underlying the antiamnesic effects of the natural drug extracts, the effects of the extracts on the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) was investigated in the dentate gyrus (DG) of normal and scopolamine-treated rats. Oral administration of natural drug extracts enhanced the induction of population spike amplitude induced by weak tetanic stimulation (30 pulses at 60 Hz). Scopolamine (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) completely inhibited the induction of LTP induced by both weak and strong tetanic stimulation (100 pulses at 100 Hz). Natural drug extracts enhanced partially but significantly the induction of LTP by strong tetanus, but had a very weak effect on that induced by weak tetanus. These results suggest that LTP induced by strong tetanus is sensitive to natural drug extracts, and that the antiamnesic effect of the NTD is at least partly attributable to the LTP-improving effect of the natural drug extracts in the DG.

  1. Effects of drugs on mucus clearance.

    PubMed

    Houtmeyers, E; Gosselink, R; Gayan-Ramirez, G; Decramer, M

    1999-08-01

    Mucociliary clearance (MCC), the process in which airway mucus together with substances trapped within are moved out of the lungs, is an important defence mechanism of the human body. Drugs may alter this process, such that it is necessary to know the effect of the drugs on MCC. Indeed, agents stimulating MCC may be used therapeutically in respiratory medicine, especially in patients suspected of having an impairment of their mucociliary transport system. In contrast, caution should be taken with drugs depressing MCC as an undesired side-effect, independently of their therapeutic indication. Since cough clearance (CC) serves as a back-up system when MCC fails, the influence of drugs must be examined not only on MCC but also on CC. Ultimately, the clinical repercussions of alterations in mucus transport induced by drug administration must be studied. Tertiary ammonium compounds (anticholinergics), aspirin, anaesthetic agents and benzodiazepines have been shown to be capable of depressing the mucociliary transport system. Cholinergics, methylxanthines, sodium cromoglycate, hypertonic saline, saline as well as water aerosol have been shown to increase MCC. Adrenergic antagonists, guaifenesin, S-carboxymethylcysteine, sodium 2-mercapto-ethane sulphonate and frusemide have been reported not to alter the mucociliary transport significantly. Amiloride, uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP), quaternary ammonium compounds (anticholinergics), adrenergic agonists, corticosteroids, recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase), N-acetylcysteine, bromhexine and ambroxol have been reported either not to change or to augment MCC. Indirect data suggest that surfactant as well as antibiotics may improve the mucociliary transport system. As for the influence of drugs on CC, amiloride and rhDNase have been demonstrated to increase the effectiveness of cough. A trend towards an improved CC was noted after treatment with adrenergic agonists. The anticholinergic agent ipratropium bromide, which

  2. Neurophysiological responses to stressful motion and anti-motion sickness drugs as mediated by the limbic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, R. L.; Odell, S.

    1982-01-01

    Performance is characterized in terms of attention and memory, categorizing extrinsic mechanism mediated by ACTH, norepinephrine and dopamine, and intrinsic mechanisms as cholinergic. The cholinergic role in memory and performance was viewed from within the limbic system and related to volitional influences of frontal cortical afferents and behavioral responses of hypothalamic and reticular system efferents. The inhibitory influence of the hippocampus on the autonomic and hormonal responses mediated through the hypothalamus, pituitary, and brain stem are correlated with the actions of such anti-motion sickness drugs as scopolamine and amphetamine. These drugs appear to exert their effects on motion sickness symptomatology through diverse though synergistic neurochemical mechanisms involving the septohippocampal pathway and other limbic system structures. The particular impact of the limbic system on an animal's behavioral and hormonal responses to stress is influenced by ACTH, cortisol, scopolamine, and amphetamine.

  3. Scopolamine and amphetamine produce similar decision-making deficits on a rat gambling task via independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Mason M; Malcolm, Emma; Shoaib, Mohammed; Winstanley, Catharine A

    2015-03-15

    Disorders characterized by disturbed cholinergic signaling, such as schizophrenia, exhibit impaired performance on measures of real-world cost/benefit decision-making. Whether the cholinergic system contributes to the choice deficits observed is currently unknown. We therefore determined the effects of broad-acting agonists and antagonists at the nicotinic and muscarinic receptor on decision making, as measured by the rodent gambling task (rGT). Given the anatomical and functional connectivity of the cholinergic and dopaminergic systems, we also sought to modulate amphetamine's previously reported effect on rGT performance via the cholinergic system. Male rats were trained on the rGT, during which animals chose from four different options. The optimal strategy on the rGT is to favor options associated with smaller immediate rewards and less punishment/loss. Impulsive action was also measured by recording the number of premature responses made. Performance on the rGT was assessed following acute treatment with the muscarinic receptor agonist oxotremorine, the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine, nicotine, and the nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine. Similar to the effect produced by amphetamine, muscarinic receptor antagonism with scopolamine (0.1mg/kg) impaired decision making, albeit to a lesser degree. Prior muscarinic agonism with oxotremorine was unable to attenuate amphetamine's effects on rGT performance. Oxotremorine, nicotine, and mecamylamine did not affect the choice profile. We therefore conclude that modulation of the muscarinic, but not nicotinic, receptor system can affect decision making under conditions of risk and uncertainty. Such findings contribute to a broader understanding of the cognitive deficits observed in disorders in which cholinergic signaling is compromised.

  4. An approach to drug induced delirium in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Alagiakrishnan, K; Wiens, C

    2004-01-01

    Drugs have been associated with the development of delirium in the elderly. Successful treatment of delirium depends on identifying the reversible contributing factors, and drugs are the most common reversible cause of delirium. Anticholinergic medications, benzodiazepines, and narcotics in high doses are common causes of drug induced delirium. This article provides an approach for clinicians to prevent, recognise, and manage drug induced delirium. It also reviews the mechanisms for this condition, especially the neurotransmitter imbalances involving acetylcholine, dopamine, and gamma aminobutyric acid and discusses the age related changes that may contribute to altered pharmacological effects which have a role in delirium. Specific interventions for high risk elderly with the goal of preventing drug induced delirium are discussed. PMID:15254302

  5. Human Serial Learning: Enhancement with Arecholine and Choline and Impairment with Scopolamine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitaram, N.; Weingartner, Herbert

    1978-01-01

    The effects of particular drugs in human memory abilities was examined. The degree of memory enhancement produced by arecholine and choline and the impairment after scopolamaine were inversely proportional to the subject's performance in placebo; that is, "poor" performers were more vulnerable to the drugs than were "good" performers. (Author/CP)

  6. [Cloning and expression of the key enzyme hyoscyamine 6 beta-hydroxylase gene (DaH6H) in scopolamine biosynthesis of Datura arborea].

    PubMed

    Qiang, Wei; Hou, Yan-ling; Li, Xiao; Xia, Ke; Liao, Zhi-hua

    2015-10-01

    Hyoscyamine 6 beta-hydroxylase (H6H) is the last rate-limiting enzyme directly catalyzing the formation of scopolamine in tropane alkaloids (TAs) biosynthesis pathway. It is the primary target gene in the genetic modification of TAs metabolic pathway. Full-length cDNA and gDNA sequences of a novel H6H gene were cloned from Datura arborea (DaH6H, GenBank accession numbers for cDNA and gDNA are KR006981 and KR006983, respectively). Nucleotide sequence analysis reveals an open reading frame of 1375 bp encoding 347 amino acids in the cDNA of DaH6H, while the gDNA of DaH6H contains four exons and three introns, with the highest similarity to the gDNA of H6H from D. stramonium. DaH6H also exhibited the most identity of 90.5% with DsH6H in amino acids and harbored conserved 2-oxoglutarate binding motif and two iron binding motifs. The expression level of DaH6H was highest in the mature leaf, followed by the secondary root, and with no expression in the primary root based on qPCR analysis. Its expression was inhibited by MeJA. DaH6H was expressed in E. coli and a 39 kD recombinant protein was detected in SDS-PAGE. Comparison of the contents of scopolamine and hyoscyamine in various TAs-producing plants revealed that D. arborea was one of the rare scopolamine predominant plants. Cloning of DaH6H gene will allow more research in the molecular regulatory mechanism of TAs biosynthesis in distinct plants and provide a new candidate gene for scopolamine metabolic engineering.

  7. Task- and Treatment Length-Dependent Effects of Vortioxetine on Scopolamine-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction and Hippocampal Extracellular Acetylcholine in Rats.

    PubMed

    Pehrson, Alan L; Hillhouse, Todd M; Haddjeri, Nasser; Rovera, Renaud; Porter, Joseph H; Mørk, Arne; Smagin, Gennady; Song, Dekun; Budac, David; Cajina, Manuel; Sanchez, Connie

    2016-09-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common psychiatric disorder that often features impairments in cognitive function, and these cognitive symptoms can be important determinants of functional ability. Vortioxetine is a multimodal antidepressant that may improve some aspects of cognitive function in patients with MDD, including attention, processing speed, executive function, and memory. However, the cause of these effects is unclear, and there are several competing theories on the underlying mechanism, notably including regionally-selective downstream enhancement of glutamate neurotransmission and increased acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmission. The current work sought to evaluate the ACh hypothesis by examining vortioxetine's ability to reverse scopolamine-induced impairments in rodent tests of memory and attention. Additionally, vortioxetine's effects on hippocampal extracellular ACh levels were examined alongside studies of vortioxetine's pharmacokinetic profile. We found that acute vortioxetine reversed scopolamine-induced impairments in social and object recognition memory, but did not alter scopolamine-induced impairments in attention. Acute vortioxetine also induced a modest and short-lived increase in hippocampal ACh levels. However, this short-term effect is at variance with vortioxetine's moderately long brain half life (5.1 hours). Interestingly, subchronic vortioxetine treatment failed to reverse scopolamine-induced social recognition memory deficits and had no effects on basal hippocampal ACh levels. These data suggest that vortioxetine has some effects on memory that could be mediated through cholinergic neurotransmission, however these effects are modest and only seen under acute dosing conditions. These limitations may argue against cholinergic mechanisms being the primary mediator of vortioxetine's cognitive effects, which are observed under chronic dosing conditions in patients with MDD.

  8. Task- and Treatment Length–Dependent Effects of Vortioxetine on Scopolamine-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction and Hippocampal Extracellular Acetylcholine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pehrson, Alan L.; Hillhouse, Todd M.; Haddjeri, Nasser; Rovera, Renaud; Porter, Joseph H.; Mørk, Arne; Smagin, Gennady; Song, Dekun; Budac, David; Cajina, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common psychiatric disorder that often features impairments in cognitive function, and these cognitive symptoms can be important determinants of functional ability. Vortioxetine is a multimodal antidepressant that may improve some aspects of cognitive function in patients with MDD, including attention, processing speed, executive function, and memory. However, the cause of these effects is unclear, and there are several competing theories on the underlying mechanism, notably including regionally-selective downstream enhancement of glutamate neurotransmission and increased acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmission. The current work sought to evaluate the ACh hypothesis by examining vortioxetine’s ability to reverse scopolamine-induced impairments in rodent tests of memory and attention. Additionally, vortioxetine’s effects on hippocampal extracellular ACh levels were examined alongside studies of vortioxetine’s pharmacokinetic profile. We found that acute vortioxetine reversed scopolamine-induced impairments in social and object recognition memory, but did not alter scopolamine-induced impairments in attention. Acute vortioxetine also induced a modest and short-lived increase in hippocampal ACh levels. However, this short-term effect is at variance with vortioxetine’s moderately long brain half life (5.1 hours). Interestingly, subchronic vortioxetine treatment failed to reverse scopolamine-induced social recognition memory deficits and had no effects on basal hippocampal ACh levels. These data suggest that vortioxetine has some effects on memory that could be mediated through cholinergic neurotransmission, however these effects are modest and only seen under acute dosing conditions. These limitations may argue against cholinergic mechanisms being the primary mediator of vortioxetine′s cognitive effects, which are observed under chronic dosing conditions in patients with MDD. PMID:27402279

  9. Simple validated LC-MS/MS method for the determination of atropine and scopolamine in plasma for clinical and forensic toxicological purposes.

    PubMed

    Koželj, Gordana; Perharič, Lucija; Stanovnik, Lovro; Prosen, Helena

    2014-08-05

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the determination of atropine and scopolamine in 100μL human plasma was developed and validated. Sample pretreatment consisted of protein precipitation with acetonitrile followed by a concentration step. Analytes and levobupivacaine (internal standard) were separated on a Zorbax XDB-CN column (75mm×4.6mm i.d., 3.5μm) with gradient elution (purified water, acetonitrile, formic acid). The triple quadrupole MS was operated in ESI positive mode. Matrix effect was estimated for deproteinised plasma samples. Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) was used for quantification in the range of 0.10-50.00ng/mL. Interday precision for both tropanes and intraday precision for atropine was <10%, intraday precision for scopolamine was <14% and <18% at lower limit of quantification (LLOQ). Mean interday and intraday accuracies for atropine were within ±7% and for scopolamine within ±11%. The method can be used for determination of therapeutic and toxic levels of both compounds and has been successfully applied to a study of pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of tropanes, where plasma samples of volunteers were collected at fixed time intervals after ingestion of a buckwheat meal, spiked with five low doses of tropanes.

  10. Anti-Amnesic Effect of Fermented Ganoderma lucidum Water Extracts by Lactic Acid Bacteria on Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yu Jin; Yang, Hee Sun; Jo, Jun Hee; Lee, Sang Cheon; Park, Tae Young; Choi, Bong Suk; Seo, Kyoung Sun; Huh, Chang Ki

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the anti-amnesic effect of fermented Ganoderma lucidum water extracts (GW) on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in rats. GW were fermented by the lactic acid bacterium Bifidobacterium bifidum (FGWB), followed by Lactobacillus sakei LI033 (FGWBL). To induce amnesia, scopolamine (1 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected into rats 30 min before the behavioral tests. Step-through latencies of rats treated with primary fermented extracts (300 mg/kg, FGWB) and secondary fermented extracts (300 mg/kg, FGWBL) were significantly longer than those of rats treated with GW (300 mg/kg) in the retention trial of the multiple trial passive avoidance test. In the Morris water maze task, FGWBL significantly shortened escape latencies in training trials. Furthermore, swimming times within the target zone during the probe trial with FGWBL were significantly higher than the GW and FGWB treatments. In addition, acetylcholinesterase activities were lower in the brains of scopolamine-treated rats treated with FGWBL. These results suggest that FGWBL could be useful to enhance learning memory and cognitive function via cholinergic dysfunction. PMID:26176000

  11. ESP-102, a Combined Herbal Extract of Angelica gigas, Saururus chinensis, and Schisandra chinensis, Changes Synaptic Plasticity and Attenuates Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment in Rat Hippocampus Tissue.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Bum; Hwang, Eun-Sang; Choi, Ga-Young; Lee, Seok; Park, Tae-Suk; Lee, Cheol-Won; Lee, Eun-Suk; Kim, Young-Choong; Kim, Sang Seong; Lee, Sung-Ok; Park, Ji-Ho

    2016-01-01

    ESP-102, an extract from Angelica gigas, Saururus chinensis, and Schisandra chinensis, has been used as herbal medicine and dietary supplement in Korea. Despite the numerous bioactivities in vitro and in vivo studies, its effects on neuronal networks remain elusive. To address the neuronal effect, we examined synaptic plasticity in organotypic hippocampal slice culture with multielectrode array. Our results showed an increase in excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP), indicating the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP), in the presence of ESP-102. In addition, the neuroprotective effect of ESP-102 was also tested by application of scopolamine to the hippocampal slice. Interestingly, ESP-102 competitively antagonized the preventative LTP effect induced by scopolamine. The scopolamine-induced reduction in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and GluR-2 expression was also rescued by ESP-102. In terms of mode of action, ESP-102 appears to act on the presynaptic region independent of AMPA/NMDA receptors. Based on these findings, ESP-102 can be suggested as a novel herbal ingredient with memory enhancing as well as neuroprotective effects.

  12. ESP-102, a Combined Herbal Extract of Angelica gigas, Saururus chinensis, and Schisandra chinensis, Changes Synaptic Plasticity and Attenuates Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment in Rat Hippocampus Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Bum; Hwang, Eun-Sang; Choi, Ga-Young; Lee, Seok; Park, Tae-Suk; Lee, Cheol-Won; Lee, Eun-Suk; Kim, Young-Choong; Kim, Sang Seong; Lee, Sung-Ok; Park, Ji-Ho

    2016-01-01

    ESP-102, an extract from Angelica gigas, Saururus chinensis, and Schisandra chinensis, has been used as herbal medicine and dietary supplement in Korea. Despite the numerous bioactivities in vitro and in vivo studies, its effects on neuronal networks remain elusive. To address the neuronal effect, we examined synaptic plasticity in organotypic hippocampal slice culture with multielectrode array. Our results showed an increase in excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP), indicating the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP), in the presence of ESP-102. In addition, the neuroprotective effect of ESP-102 was also tested by application of scopolamine to the hippocampal slice. Interestingly, ESP-102 competitively antagonized the preventative LTP effect induced by scopolamine. The scopolamine-induced reduction in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and GluR-2 expression was also rescued by ESP-102. In terms of mode of action, ESP-102 appears to act on the presynaptic region independent of AMPA/NMDA receptors. Based on these findings, ESP-102 can be suggested as a novel herbal ingredient with memory enhancing as well as neuroprotective effects. PMID:27298627

  13. Simultaneous determination of atropine and scopolamine in buckwheat and related products using modified QuEChERS and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongping; Marín-Sáez, Jesús; Romero-González, Roberto; Garrido Frenich, Antonia

    2017-03-01

    A method was developed for the determination of atropine and scopolamine in buckwheat and related products. A modified QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) extraction procedure was evaluated. Dispersive solid phase extraction (d-SPE) was studied as clean-up step, using graphitized black carbon (GBC) and primary secondary amine (PSA). The extract was diluted with water (50:50, v/v) prior to chromatographic analysis. The method was validated and recoveries (except chia samples spiked at 10μg/kg) ranged from 75% to 92%. Intra and inter-day precision was lower than or equal to 17%. The limit of quantification of atropine and scopolamine was 0.4 and 2μg/kg, respectively. Eight types of samples (buckwheat, wheat, soy, buckwheat flour, buckwheat noodle, amaranth grain, chia seeds and peeled millet) were analyzed. Target compounds were not found above the detection limits of the method, but three transformation products of scopolamine (norscopine, hydroscopolamine and dihydroxyscopolamine) were putative identified in the tested samples using high resolution mass spectrometry (Exactive-Orbitrap).

  14. Comparison of ginsenosides Rg1 and Rb1 for their effects on improving scopolamine-induced learning and memory impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong; Sun, Li-Hua; Jia, William; Liu, Xin-Min; Dang, Hai-Xia; Mai, Wen-Li; Wang, Ning; Steinmetz, Andre; Wang, Yu-Qin; Xu, Chang-Jiang

    2010-12-01

    Rg1 and Rb1 are two major active compounds of ginseng that facilitate learning and memory. The present study aimed to compare the nootropic effects of Rg1 and Rb1 in a scopolamine induced dementia mice model. After 6 and 12 mg/kg of Rg1 and Rb1 intraperitoneal administration to mice for 7 days, their effects were assessed using the step-down passive avoidance (SD) and the Morris water maze (MWM) tests, the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, acetylcholine (ACh) content and serotonin (5-HT) level in the hippocampus were analysed after SD and MWM tests. The results showed that Rg1 and Rb1 ameliorated cognition-deficiency in mice with dementia. Rg1 showed stronger effects than Rb1 on escape acquisition in MWM. Both Rg1 and Rb1 increased ACh levels in the hippocampus, but Rg1 inhibited AChE activity while Rb1 had no effect on AChE activity. Both Rg1 and Rb1 inhibited the decrease of 5-HT induced by scopolamine, but Rb1 was more active than the same dose of Rg1. These results demonstrate that multiple administrations of Rg1 and Rb1 are effective in improving memory deficiency induced by scopolamine. Rg1 appears to be more potent than Rb1 in improving acquisition impairment, and the two ginsenosides may act through different mechanisms.

  15. Protective effects of mangosteen extract on H2O2-induced cytotoxicity in SK-N-SH cells and scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Sattayasai, Jintana; Chaonapan, Pongsatorn; Arkaravichie, Tarinee; Soi-Ampornkul, Rungtip; Junnu, Sarawut; Charoensilp, Patcharakajee; Samer, Jutima; Jantaravinid, Jiraporn; Masaratana, Patarabutr; Suktitipat, Bhoom; Manissorn, Juthatip; Thongboonkerd, Visith; Neungton, Neelobol; Moongkarndi, Primchanien

    2013-01-01

    Mangosteen extracts (ME) contain high levels of polyphenolic compounds and antioxidant activity. Protective effects of ME against β-amyloid peptide (Aβ), induced cytotoxicity have been reported. Here, we further studied the protective effects of ME against oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and demonstrated the protection against memory impairment in mice. The cytoprotective effects of ME were measured as cell viability and the reduction in ROS activity. In SK-N-SH cell cultures, 200 μg/ml ME could partially antagonize the effects of 150 or 300 µM H2O2 on cell viability, ROS level and caspase-3 activity. At 200, 400 or 800 µg/ml, ME reduced AChE activity of SK-N-SH cells to about 60% of the control. In vivo study, Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests were used to assess the memory of the animals. ME, especially at 100 mg/kg body weight, could improve the animal's memory and also antagonize the effect of scopolamine on memory. The increase in ROS level and caspase-3 activity in the brain of scopolamine-treated mice were antagonized by the ME treatment. The study demonstrated cytoprotective effects of ME against H2O2 and PCB-52 toxicity and having AChE inhibitory effect in cell culture. ME treatment in mice could attenuate scopolamine-induced memory deficit and oxidative stress in brain.

  16. Protective Effects of Mangosteen Extract on H2O2-Induced Cytotoxicity in SK-N-SH Cells and Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sattayasai, Jintana; Chaonapan, Pongsatorn; Arkaravichie, Tarinee; Soi-ampornkul, Rungtip; Junnu, Sarawut; Charoensilp, Patcharakajee; Samer, Jutima; Jantaravinid, Jiraporn; Masaratana, Patarabutr; Suktitipat, Bhoom; Manissorn, Juthatip; Thongboonkerd, Visith; Neungton, Neelobol; Moongkarndi, Primchanien

    2013-01-01

    Mangosteen extracts (ME) contain high levels of polyphenolic compounds and antioxidant activity. Protective effects of ME against β-amyloid peptide (Aβ), induced cytotoxicity have been reported. Here, we further studied the protective effects of ME against oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and demonstrated the protection against memory impairment in mice. The cytoprotective effects of ME were measured as cell viability and the reduction in ROS activity. In SK-N-SH cell cultures, 200 μg/ml ME could partially antagonize the effects of 150 or 300 µM H2O2 on cell viability, ROS level and caspase-3 activity. At 200, 400 or 800 µg/ml, ME reduced AChE activity of SK-N-SH cells to about 60% of the control. In vivo study, Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests were used to assess the memory of the animals. ME, especially at 100 mg/kg body weight, could improve the animal’s memory and also antagonize the effect of scopolamine on memory. The increase in ROS level and caspase-3 activity in the brain of scopolamine-treated mice were antagonized by the ME treatment. The study demonstrated cytoprotective effects of ME against H2O2 and PCB-52 toxicity and having AChE inhibitory effect in cell culture. ME treatment in mice could attenuate scopolamine-induced memory deficit and oxidative stress in brain. PMID:24386444

  17. Drugs affecting the eye.

    PubMed

    Taylor, F

    1985-08-01

    This discussion reviews drugs that affect the eye, including antihyperglycemic agents; corticosteroids; antirheumatic drugs (quinolines, indomethacin, and allopurinol); psychiatric drugs (phenothiazine, thioridazine, and chlorpromazine); drugs used in cardiology (practolol, amiodarone, and digitalis gylcosides); drugs implicated in optic neuritis and atrophy, drugs with an anticholinergic action; oral contraceptives (OCs); and topical drugs and systemic effects. Refractive changes, either myopic or hypermetropic, can occur as a result of hyperglycemia, and variation in vision is sometimes a presenting symptom in diabetes mellitus. If it causes a change in the refraction, treatment of hyperglycemia almost always produces a temporary hypermetropia. A return to the original refractive state often takes weeks, sometimes months. There is some evidence that patients adequately treated with insulin improve more rapidly than those taking oral medication. Such patients always should be referred for opthalmological evaluation as other factors might be responsible, but it might not be possible to order the appropriate spectacle correction for some time. The most important ocular side effect of the systemic adiministration of corticosteroids is the formation of a posterior subcapsular cataract. Glaucoma also can result from corticosteroids, most often when they are applied topically. Corticosteroids have been implicated in the production of benign intracranial hypertension, which is paradoxical because they also are used in its treatment. The most important side effect of drugs such as chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine is an almost always irreversible maculopathy with resultant loss of central vision. Corneal and retinal changes similar to those caused by the quinolines have been reported with indomethacin, but there is some question about a cause and effect relationship. The National Registry of Drug Induced Ocular Side Effects in the US published 30 case histories of

  18. Drug-induced hyperhidrosis and hypohidrosis: incidence, prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Cheshire, William P; Fealey, Robert D

    2008-01-01

    The human sweating response is subject to the influence of diverse classes of drugs. Some act centrally at the hypothalamus or at spinal thermoregulatory centres, while others act at sympathetic ganglia or at the eccrine-neuroeffector junction. Pharmacological disturbances of sweating have broad clinical implications. Drugs that induce hyperhidrosis, or sweating in excess of that needed to maintain thermoregulation, can cause patient discomfort and embarrassment, and include cholinesterase inhibitors, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, opioids and tricyclic antidepressants. Drugs that induce hypohidrosis, or deficient sweating, can increase the risk of heat exhaustion or heat stroke and include antimuscarinic anticholinergic agents, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants. As acetylcholine is the principal neuroeccrine mediator, anhidrosis is one of the clinical hallmarks by which acute anticholinergic toxicity may be recognized. The symptom of dry mouth often accompanies the less apparent symptom of hypohidrosis because the muscarinic M(3) acetylcholine receptor type predominates at both sweat and salivary glands. Management options include dose reduction, drug substitution or discontinuation. When compelling medical indications require continuation of a drug causing hyperhidrosis, the addition of a pharmacological agent to suppress sweating can help to reduce symptoms. When hypohidrotic drugs must be continued, deficient sweating can be managed by avoiding situations of heat stress and cooling the skin with externally applied water. The availability of clinical tests for the assessment of sudomotor dysfunction in neurological disease has enhanced recognition of the complex effects of drugs on sweating. Advances in the understanding of drug-induced anhidrosis have also enlarged the therapeutic repertoire of effective treatments for hyperhidrosis.

  19. A Special Extract of Bacopa monnieri (CDRI-08) Restores Learning and Memory by Upregulating Expression of the NMDA Receptor Subunit GluN2B in the Brain of Scopolamine-Induced Amnesic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Rakesh; Singh, Hemant K.; Prasad, S.

    2015-01-01

    In the present communication, we have investigated effects of the CDRI-08, a well characterized extract of Bacopa monnieri, on expression of the GluN2B subunit of NMDAR in various brain regions of the scopolamine-induced amnesic mice. Our behavioral data reveal that scopolamine-treated amnesic mice exhibit significant decline in the spatial memory compared to the normal control mice. Our RT-PCR and immunoblotting data revealed that the scopolamine treatment resulted in a significant downregulation of the NMDAR GluN2B subunit expression in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Our enzyme assay data revealed that scopolamine caused a significant increase in the acetylcholinesterase activity in both the brain regions. Further, oral administration of the CDRI-08 to scopolamine-treated amnesic mice restored the spatial memory which was found to be associated with significant upregulation of the GluN2B subunit expression and decline in the acetylcholinesterase activity in prefrontal cortex as well as hippocampus towards their levels in the normal control mice. Our study provides the evidence for the mechanism underlying role of the Bacopa monnieri extract (CDRI-08) in restoring spatial memory in amnesic mice, which may have therapeutic implications. PMID:26413117

  20. Vitamin C deficiency increases basal exploratory activity but decreases scopolamine-induced activity in APP/PSEN1 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, F. E.; May, J. M.; McDonald, M. P.

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant and its levels are decreased in Alzheimer's patients. Even sub-clinical vitamin C deficiency could impact disease development. To investigate this principle we crossed APP/PSEN1 transgenic mice with Gulo knockout mice unable to synthesize their own vitamin C. Experimental mice were maintained from 6 weeks of age on standard (0.33 g/L) or reduced (0.099 g/L) levels of vitamin C and then assessed for changes in behavior and neuropathology. APP/PSEN1 mice showed impaired spatial learning in the Barnes maze and water maze that was not further impacted by vitamin C level. However, long-term decreased vitamin C levels led to hyperactivity in transgenic mice, with altered locomotor habituation and increased omission errors in the Barnes maze. Decreased vitamin C also led to increased oxidative stress. Transgenic mice were more susceptible to the activity-enhancing effects of scopolamine and low vitamin C attenuated these effects in both genotypes. These data indicate an interaction between the cholinergic system and vitamin C that could be important given the cholinergic degeneration associated with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19941887

  1. Measures of anxiety, amygdala volumes, and hippocampal scopolamine phMRI response in elderly female rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Haley, Gwendolen E; McGuire, Acacia; Berteau-Pavy, Daphnee; Weiss, Alison; Patel, Roshni; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Urbanski, Henryk F; Raber, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    In nonhuman primates, anxiety levels are typically assessed by observing social hierarchies or behavior in an intruder task. As measures of anxiety might influence performance on a particular cognitive task, it is important to analyze these measures in the same room as used for the cognitive task. As we use a playroom for the spatial maze test, we classified elderly female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) monkeys, as bold or reserved monkeys based on the time spent in specific areas of this room. Based on their exploratory behavior in the playroom, bold monkeys were defined as animals that spent 20% more time in the unprotected areas of the room than in the protected areas, whereas reserved monkeys spent a comparable amount of time in both areas. MRI analyses showed that reserved monkeys had a smaller amygdala compared to bold monkeys but there were no group differences in hippocampal volumes. In addition, the amount of time spent in the corners of the room was negatively correlated with the right amygdala as well as the total amygdala size. Finally, reserved monkeys showed a lower phMRI response to the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine compared to the bold monkeys. Thus, in elderly female nonhuman primates measures of anxiety are associated with structural amygdala differences and hippocampal muscarinic receptor function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Anxiety and Depression'.

  2. Simultaneous determination of scopolamine, hyoscyamine and anisodamine in in vitro growth media of selected Solanaceae hairy roots by CE method.

    PubMed

    Dziomba, Szymon; Łepek, Teresa; Jaremicz, Zbigniew; Łuczkiewicz, Maria; Prahl, Adam; Kowalski, Piotr

    2015-09-15

    An electrophoretic method for fast separation of three tropane alkaloids (hyoscyamine, anisodamine and scopolamine) was presented. The substances were complete resolved in less than one minute due to utilization of relatively short capillary (20.2cm effective length) and high voltage (25kV). Detector probing frequency was found among the parameters that significantly affected the detection sensitivity. The performed experiments showed insufficient available probing frequency of used commercial spectrophotometric detector according to capillary electrophoresis (CE) separation potential. Under the optimized conditions the background electrolyte (BGE) was composed of 20mM Tris, 6mM HCl and 20mM NaCl (pH 8.50). All analyses were carried out in fused silica capillaries of 50μm (inner diameter) and 31.2cm (total capillary length). Samples were injected hydrodynamically (5s; 3.45kPa) without any sample preparation step and separation was performed at 25kV. The elaborated method was applied in plant cultures growth media analysis after incubation with hairy roots of selected Solanaceae species. The performed experiments proved the usefulness of CE in quality control of biotechnological processes.

  3. Efficacy and Safety of Initial Combination Treatment of an Alpha Blocker with an Anticholinergic Medication in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Patients with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms: Updated Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Sun, Hwa Yeon; Choi, Hoon; Park, Jae Young; Bae, Jae Hyun; Doo, Seung Whan; Yang, Won Jae; Song, Yun Seob; Ko, Young Myoung

    2017-01-01

    Background There is still controversy as to whether initial combination treatment is superior to serial addition of anticholinergics after maintenance or induction of alpha blockers in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)/lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) Objective The objective of this study was to determine the benefits and safety of initial combination treatment of an alpha blocker with anticholinergic medication in BPH/LUTS through a systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods We conducted a meta-analysis of improvement in LUTS using International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), maximal urinary flow rate (Qmax), post-voided residual volume (PVR), and quality of life (QoL). Results In total, 16 studies were included in our analysis, with a total sample size of 3,548 subjects (2,195 experimental subjects and 1,353 controls). The mean change in total IPSS improvement from baseline in the combination group versus the alpha blocker monotherapy group was -0.03 (95% CI: -0.14–0.08). The pooled overall SMD change of storage IPSS improvement from baseline was -0.28 (95% CI: -0.40 - -0.17). The pooled overall SMD changes of QoL, Qmax, and PVR were -0.29 (95% CI: -0.50 - -0.07), 0.00 (95% CI: -0.08–0.08), and 0.56 (95% CI: 0.23–0.89), respectively. There was no significant difference in the number of acute urinary retention (AUR) events or PVR. Conclusions Initial combination treatment of an alpha blocker with anticholinergic medication is efficacious for in BPH/ LUTS with improved measures such as storage symptoms and QoL without causing significant deterioration of voiding function. PMID:28072862

  4. Present and future drug treatment for Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Schapira, A

    2005-01-01

    Considerable advances made in defining the aetiology, pathogenesis, and pathology of Parkinson's disease (PD) have resulted in the development and rapid expansion of the pharmacopoeia available for treatment. Anticholinergics were used before the introduction of levodopa which is now the drug most commonly used. Dopamine agonists are effective when used alone or as an adjunct to levodopa, while monoamine oxidase B inhibitors improve motor function in early and advanced PD. However, treatment mainly addresses the dopaminergic features of the disease and leaves its progressive course unaffected; the drug treatment available for the management of non-motor symptoms is limited. This article seeks to set current treatment options in context, review emerging and novel drug treatments for PD, and assess the prospects for disease modification. Surgical therapies are not considered. PMID:16227533

  5. Evaluation of acetylcholine, seizure activity and neuropathology following high-dose nerve agent exposure and delayed neuroprotective treatment drugs in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Acon-Chen, Cindy; Koenig, Jeffrey A; Smith, Garrett R; Truitt, Amber R; Thomas, Thaddeus P; Shih, Tsung-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Organophosphorus nerve agents such as soman (GD) inhibit acetylcholinesterase, producing an excess of acetylcholine (ACh), which results in respiratory distress, convulsions and status epilepticus that leads to neuropathology. Several drugs (topiramate, clobazam, pregnanolone, allopregnanolone, UBP 302, cyclopentyladenosine [CPA], ketamine, midazolam and scopolamine) have been identified as potential neuroprotectants that may terminate seizures and reduce brain damage. To systematically evaluate their efficacy, this study employed in vivo striatal microdialysis and liquid chromatography to respectively collect and analyze extracellular ACh in freely moving rats treated with these drugs 20 min after seizure onset induced by a high dose of GD. Along with microdialysis, EEG activity was recorded and neuropathology assessed at 24 h. GD induced a marked increase of ACh, which peaked at 30 min post-exposure to 800% of control levels and then steadily decreased toward baseline levels. Approximately 40 min after treatment, only midazolam (10 mg/kg) and CPA (60 mg/kg) caused a significant reduction of ACh levels, with CPA reducing ACh levels more rapidly than midazolam. Both drugs facilitated a return to baseline levels at least 55 min after treatment. At 24 h, only animals treated with CPA (67%), midazolam (18%) and scopolamine (27%) exhibited seizure termination. While all treatments except for topiramate reduced neuropathology, CPA, midazolam and scopolamine showed the greatest reduction in pathology. Our results suggest that delayed treatment with CPA, midazolam, or scopolamine is effective at reducing GD-induced seizure activity and neuropathology, with CPA and midazolam capable of facilitating a reduction in GD-induced ACh elevation.

  6. N-palmitoyl serotonin alleviates scopolamine-induced memory impairment via regulation of cholinergic and antioxidant systems, and expression of BDNF and p-CREB in mice.

    PubMed

    Min, A Young; Doo, Choon Nan; Son, Eun Jung; Sung, Nak Yun; Lee, Kun Jong; Sok, Dai-Eun; Kim, Mee Ree

    2015-12-05

    N-Palmitoyl-5-hydroxytryptamines (Pal-5HT), a cannabinoid, has recently been reported to express anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory actions in RBL-2H3 cells, and ameliorate glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in HT-22 cells. In this study, we examined the effect of Pal-5HT on deficits of learning and memory induced by scopolamine in mice. Memory performance was evaluated using Morris water maze test and passive avoidance test. Activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), level of oxidative stress markers, and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB) were determined. Loss of neuronal cells in hippocampus was evaluated by histological examinations. Pal-5HT significantly improved the amnesia in the behavioral assessment. Pal-5HT regulated cholinergic function by inhibiting scopolamine-induced elevation of AChE activity and decline of ChAT activity. Pal-5HT suppressed oxidative stress by increasing activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) or NAD(P)H quinine oxidoreductase-1 (NQO-1) and lowering MDA level. Additionally, it prevented against scopolamine-induced expression of iNOS and COX-2. Moreover, Pal-5HT suppressed the death of neuronal cells in CA1 and CA3 regions, while it restored expression of p-CREB and BDNF in hippocampus. Taken together, Pal-5HT is suggested to ameliorate deficits of memory and learning through regulation of cholinergic function, activation of antioxidant systems as well as restoration of BDNF and p-CREB expression. From these, Pal-5HT may be a potential candidate to prevent against neurodegeneration related to the memory deficit.

  7. Protective effects of aloe-emodin on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice and H₂O₂-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Tao, Li; Xie, Jianmei; Wang, Yuting; Wang, Shi; Wu, Shuangchan; Wang, Qiman; Ding, Hong

    2014-12-01

    Aloe-emodin (AE) is one of the most important active components of Rheum officinale Baill. The present study aimed to investigate that AE could attenuate scopolamine-induced cognitive deficits via inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and modulating oxidative stress. Kunming (KM) mice were received intraperitoneal injection of scopolamine (2 mg/kg) to induce cognitive impairment. Learning and memory performance were assessed in the Morris water maze (MWM). After behavioral testing, the mice were sacrificed and their hippocampi were removed for biochemical assays (superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), malondialdehyde (MDA), AChE and acetylcholine (ACh)). In vitro, we also performed the AChE activity assay and H₂O₂-induced PC12 cells toxicity assay. After 2 h exposure to 200 μM H₂O₂ in PC12 cells, the cytotoxicity were evaluated by cell viability (MTT), nitric oxide (NO)/lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Our results confirmed that AE showed significant improvement in cognitive deficit in scopolamine-induced amnesia animal model. Besides, it increased SOD, GPx activities and ACh content, while decreased the level of MDA and AChE activity in AE treated mice. In addition, AE was found to inhibit AChE activity (IC₅₀ = 18.37 μg/ml) in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, preincubation of PC12 cells with AE could prevent cytotoxicity induced by H₂O₂ and reduce significantly extracellular release of NO, LDH and intracellular accumulation of ROS. The study indicated that AE could have neuroprotective effects against Alzheimer's disease (AD) via inhibiting the activity of AChE and modulating oxidative stress.

  8. Analytical developments in toxicological investigation of drug-facilitated sexual assault.

    PubMed

    Negrusz, Adam; Gaensslen, R E

    2003-08-01

    This paper gives a general overview of the drug-facilitated sexual assault phenomenon. Sexual assault perpetrated on both women and men, while incapacitated by so-called date-rape drugs, recently became the focus of many investigations conducted by law enforcement agencies in the US throughout the 1990s; an alarming increase in reports of this crime as well as in the number of scientific publications on drug-facilitated sexual assault has been observed. The list of drugs reportedly associated with sexual assault is long and among others includes flunitrazepam with other benzodiazepines such as diazepam, temazepam, clonazepam, oxazepam, as well as gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), ketamine, and scopolamine. We discuss the most recent analytical developments in the toxicological investigation of drug-facilitated rape designed to reveal drug presence and that may help successfully prosecute perpetrators.

  9. The coumarin scopoletin potentiates acetylcholine release from synaptosomes, amplifies hippocampal long-term potentiation and ameliorates anticholinergic- and age-impaired memory

    PubMed Central

    Hornick, A.; Lieb, A.; Vo, N.P.; Rollinger, J.M.; Stuppner, H.; Prast, H.

    2011-01-01

    In a previous study the simple, naturally derived coumarin scopoletin (SCT) was identified as an inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), using a pharmacophore-based virtual screening approach. In this study the potential of SCT as procholinergic and cognition-enhancing therapeutic was investigated in a more detailed way, using different experimental approaches like measuring newly synthesized acetylcholine (ACh) in synaptosomes, long-term potentiation (LTP) experiments in hippocampal slices, and behavior studies. SCT enhanced the K+-stimulated release of ACh from rat frontal cortex synaptosomes, showing a bell-shaped dose effect curve (Emax: 4 μM). This effect was blocked by the nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) antagonists mecamylamine (MEC) and dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHE). The nAChR agonist (and AChE inhibitor) galantamine induced a similar increase in ACh release (Emax: 1 μM). SCT potentiated LTP in hippocampal slices of rat brain. The high-frequency stimulation (HFS)-induced, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor dependent LTP of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials at CA3-CA1 synapses was greatly enhanced by pre-HFS application of SCT (4 μM for 4 min). This effect was mimicked by nicotine (2 μM) and abolished by MEC, suggesting an effect on nAChRs. SCT did not restore the total inhibition of LTP by NMDA receptor antagonist d, l-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5). SCT (2 μg, i.c.v.) increased T-maze alternation and ameliorated novel object recognition of mice with scopolamine-induced cholinergic deficit. It also reduced age-associated deficits in object memory of 15–18-month-old mice (2 mg/kg sc). Our findings suggest that SCT possesses memory-improving properties, which are based on its direct nAChR agonistic activity. Therefore, SCT might be able to rescue impaired cholinergic functions by enhancing nAChR-mediated release of neurotransmitters and promoting neural plasticity in hippocampus. PMID:21945033

  10. Scopolamine- and diazepam-induced amnesia are blocked by systemic and intraseptal administration of substance P and choline chloride.

    PubMed

    Costa, Joseane Carvalho; Costa, Kauê Machado; do Nascimento, José Luiz Martins

    2010-09-01

    Systemic (IP) and/or intraseptal (IS) administration of scopolamine (SCP) and diazepam (DZP) induce amnesia, whereas IP injection of the neuropeptide substance P (SP) and choline chloride (ChCl) produce memory facilitation. The septohippocampal cholinergic system has been pointed out as a possible site of SCP and DZP-induced amnesia as well as for the mnemonic effects induced by SP and ChCl. We performed a series of experiments in order to investigate the interactions between cholinergic and GABA/benzodiazepine (GABA/BZD) systems with the SPergic system on inhibitory avoidance retention. Male Wistar rats were trained and tested in a step-down inhibitory avoidance task (1.0 mA footshock). Animals received, pre-training, IP (1.0 mg/kg) or IS (1.0 nM/0.5 microl) injection of DZP, SCP (SCP; 1.0 mg/kg - IP or 0.5 microM/0.5 microl--IS) or vehicle (VEH). Immediately after training they received an IP or IS injections of SP 1-11 (50 microg/kg--IP or 1.0 nM/0.5 microl--IS), SP 1-7 (167 microg/kg--IP or 1.0 nM/0.5 microl--IS), ChCl (20 mg/kg--IP or 0.3 microM/0.5 microl--IS) or VEH. Rats pretreated with SCP and DZP showed amnesia. Post-trial treatments with SP 1-11, SP 1-7 or ChCl blocked the amnesic effects of SCP and DZP. These findings suggest an interaction between SPergic and cholinergic mechanisms with GABAergic systems in the modulation of inhibitory avoidance retention and that the effects of these treatments are mediated, at least in part, by interactions in the septohippocampal pathway.

  11. Effects of Chronic Scopolamine Treatment on Cognitive Impairments and Myelin Basic Protein Expression in the Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Park, Joon Ha; Choi, Hyun Young; Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Kim, In Hye; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Lee, Jae-Chul; Won, Moo-Ho; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich-Na; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Choi, Jung Hoon; Chung, Jin-Young; Lee, Choong-Hyun; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kang, Il Jun; Kim, Jong-Dai

    2016-08-01

    Myelin plays an important role in learning and memory, and degradation of myelin is a key feature in the pathogenesis of neurological disorders involving cognitive dysfunction. Myelin basic protein (MBP) is one of the most abundant structural proteins in myelin and is essential for myelin formation and compaction. In this study, we first examined changes in the distribution of MBP-immunoreactive myelinated fibers and MBP levels according to hippocampal subregion in mice following chronic systemic treatment with 1 mg/kg scopolamine (SCO) for 4 weeks. We found that SCO-induced cognitive impairments, as assayed by the water maze and passive avoidance tests, were significantly reduced 1 week after SCO treatment and the impairments were maintained without any hippocampal neuronal loss. MBP-immunoreactive myelinated fibers were easily detected in the stratum radiatum and lacunosum-moleculare of the hippocampus proper (CA1-3 region) and in the molecular and polymorphic layers of the dentate gyrus. The distribution of MBP-immunoreactive myelinated fibers was not altered 1 week after SCO treatment. However, the density of MBP-immunoreactive myelinated fibers was significantly decreased 2 weeks after SCO treatment; thereafter, the density gradually, though not significantly, decreased with time. In addition, the changing pattern of MBP levels in the hippocampus following SCO treatment corresponded to immunohistochemical changes. In brief, this study shows that chronic systemic treatment with SCO induced significant degradation of MBP in the hippocampus without neuronal loss at least 2 weeks after SCO treatment, although cognitive impairments occurred 1 week after SCO treatment.

  12. Oral Administration of Gintonin Attenuates Cholinergic Impairments by Scopolamine, Amyloid-β Protein, and Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Shin, Eun-Joo; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Choi, Sun-Hye; Jung, Seok-Won; Cho, Ik-Hyun; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Kim, Joon Yong; Han, Jung-Soo; Chung, ChiHye; Jang, Choon-Gon; Rhim, Hyewon; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2015-09-01

    Gintonin is a novel ginseng-derived lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor ligand. Oral administration of gintonin ameliorates learning and memory dysfunctions in Alzheimer's disease (AD) animal models. The brain cholinergic system plays a key role in cognitive functions. The brains of AD patients show a reduction in acetylcholine concentration caused by cholinergic system impairments. However, little is known about the role of LPA in the cholinergic system. In this study, we used gintonin to investigate the effect of LPA receptor activation on the cholinergic system in vitro and in vivo using wild-type and AD animal models. Gintonin induced [Ca(2+)]i transient in cultured mouse hippocampal neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Gintonin-mediated [Ca(2+)]i transients were linked to stimulation of acetylcholine release through LPA receptor activation. Oral administration of gintonin-enriched fraction (25, 50, or 100 mg/kg, 3 weeks) significantly attenuated scopolamine-induced memory impairment. Oral administration of gintonin (25 or 50 mg/kg, 2 weeks) also significantly attenuated amyloid-β protein (Aβ)-induced cholinergic dysfunctions, such as decreased acetylcholine concentration, decreased choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity and immunoreactivity, and increased acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity. In a transgenic AD mouse model, long-term oral administration of gintonin (25 or 50 mg/kg, 3 months) also attenuated AD-related cholinergic impairments. In this study, we showed that activation of G protein-coupled LPA receptors by gintonin is coupled to the regulation of cholinergic functions. Furthermore, this study showed that gintonin could be a novel agent for the restoration of cholinergic system damages due to Aβ and could be utilized for AD prevention or therapy.

  13. Bone Marrow-Derived Endothelial Progenitor Cells Protect Against Scopolamine-Induced Alzheimer-Like Pathological Aberrations.

    PubMed

    Safar, Marwa M; Arab, Hany H; Rizk, Sherine M; El-Maraghy, Shohda A

    2016-04-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Patients with AD have displayed decreased circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) which repair and maintain the endothelial function. Transplantation of EPCs has emerged as a promising approach for the management of cerebrovascular diseases including ischemic stroke, however, its impact on AD has been poorly described. Thus, the current study aimed at investigating the effects of bone marrow-derived (BM) EPCs transplantation in repeated scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment, an experimental model that replicates biomarkers of AD. Intravenously transplanted BM-EPCs migrated into the brain of rats and improved the learning and memory deficits. Meanwhile, they mitigated the deposition of amyloid plaques and associated histopathological alterations. At the molecular levels, BM-EPCs blunted the increase of hippocampal amyloid beta protein (Aβ), amyloid precursor protein (APP) and reinstated the Aβ-degrading neprilysin together with downregulation of p-tau and its upstream glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). They also corrected the perturbations of neurotransmitter levels including restoration of acetylcholine and associated esterase along with dopamine, GABA, and the neuroexitatory glutamate. Furthermore, BM-EPCs induced behavioral recovery via boosting of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its upstream cAMP response element binding (CREB), suppression of the proinflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and upregulation of interleukin-10 (IL-10). BM-EPCs also augmented Nrf2 and seladin-1. Generally, these actions were analogous to those exerted by adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) and the reference anti-Alzheimer donepezil. For the first time, these findings highlight the beneficial actions of BM-EPCs against the memory

  14. Behavioral Tolerance to Anticholinergic Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-20

    tolerance to marihuana in rats. Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, 1, 73-76. 43 40. Olson, J. and Carder, B. (1974) Behavioral tolerance to... marihuana as a function of amount of prior training. Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, 2, 243-247. 41. Sidman, M. (1960) Tactics of Scientific

  15. Decreasing the load? Is a Multidisciplinary Multistep Medication Review in older people an effective intervention to reduce a patient's Drug Burden Index? Protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    van der Meer, Helene G; Wouters, Hans; van Hulten, Rolf; Pras, Niesko; Taxis, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Older people often use medications with anticholinergic or sedative side effects which increase the risk of falling and worsen cognitive impairment. The Drug Burden Index (DBI) is a measure of the burden of anticholinergic and sedative medications. Medication reviews are typically done by a pharmacist in collaboration with a general practitioner to optimise the medication use and reduce these adverse drug events. We will evaluate whether a Multidisciplinary Multistep Medication Review (3MR) is an effective intervention to reduce a patient's DBI. Methods A randomised controlled trial including 160 patients from 15 community pharmacies will be conducted. Per pharmacy, 1 pharmacist will perform a structured 3MR in close collaboration with the general practitioner, including the objective to reduce the DBI. Analysis Primary outcome—the difference in proportion of patients having a decrease in DBI≥0.5 in the intervention and control groups at follow-up. Secondary outcomes—anticholinergic and sedative side effects, falls, cognitive function, activities of daily living, quality of life, hospital admission, and mortality. Ethics and dissemination The burden of patients will be kept at a minimum. The 3MR can be considered as usual care by the pharmacist and general practitioner. Medical specialists will be consulted, if necessary. The intervention is specifically aimed at older community-dwelling patients in an attempt to optimise prescribing, in particular, to reduce medication with anticholinergic and sedative properties. Study results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and will be distributed through information channels targeting professionals. Trial registration number NCT02317666; Pre-results. PMID:26700279

  16. The Future of Bladder Control—Intravesical Drug Delivery, a Pinch of Pepper, and Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Matthew O; Lavelle, John P; Sacks, Michael S; Chancellor, Michael B

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of urinary incontinence and overactive bladder problems will continue to grow as the population ages. Future treatments are likely to include an implantable drug delivery system, gene therapy, and the intravesical use of the vallinoids capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX). An understanding of the urothelium is essential for effective design of these therapies. Intravesical anticholinergic drug treatment is currently not widely used, but intravesical pumps are under development to provide less cumbersome treatment methods and will provide nonsurgical options for patients who cannot tolerate oral anticholinergic agents. Research on the use of capsaicin as an intravesicular drug has had limited success, but trials have confirmed the efficacy of intravesical capsaicin for detrusor hyperreflexia. RTX is as effective as capsaicin but without side effects, such as pain and inflammatory neuropeptide release. RTX treatment may eliminate the need for surgical and other drug treatments of lower urinary tract dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injuries. Gene therapy will change the practice of urology by addressing the deficiencies that cause symptoms rather than attacking the symptoms themselves. PMID:16985646

  17. Acetyl-L-carnitine rescues scopolamine-induced memory deficits by restoring insulin-like growth factor II via decreasing p53 oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Wang, Liang-Ping; Tang, Hui; Shan, Wan-Ying; Wang, Xiong; Liu, Dan; Wu, Yuan-Yuan; Tian, Qing; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Zhu, Ling-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the cholinergic neurons loss and impairments of learning and memory. Scopolamine is common used to imitate AD pathological features and also causes an obvious oxidative stress. In this study, we found that intraperitoneal administration of supplementary acetyl-L-carnitine partially reverses the learning and memory defects induced by scopolamine. We also found that acetyl-L-carnitine reverses the impairment of long-term potentiation, dendritic abnormalities, and the impaired recruitment of synaptic protein. The beneficial effects of acetyl-L-carnitine may occur through amelioration of oxidative stress because it effectively decreases the levels of oxidative products and increases the activity of superoxide dismutase; this leads to a recovery in the suppressed activity of p53 caused oxidative stimuli, which in turn restores levels of insulin-like growth factor II, an important hormone for learning and memory. Our study provides the first evidence of the potential utility of acetyl-L-carnitine in treating the synaptic disorders prevalent in AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Synaptic Basis of Neurodegenerative Disorders'.

  18. Improvement in Long-Term Memory following Chronic Administration of Eryngium planum Root Extract in Scopolamine Model: Behavioral and Molecular Study

    PubMed Central

    Ozarowski, Marcin; Thiem, Barbara; Mikolajczak, Przemyslaw L.; Piasecka, Anna; Kachlicki, Piotr; Szulc, Michal; Kaminska, Ewa; Bogacz, Anna; Kujawski, Radoslaw; Bartkowiak-Wieczorek, Joanna; Kujawska, Malgorzata; Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga; Budzianowski, Jaromir; Kędziora, Izabela; Seremak-Mrozikiewicz, Agnieszka; Czerny, Boguslaw; Bobkiewicz-Kozłowska, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Eryngium planum L. (EP) is as a rare medicinal plant with a lot of potentials as pharmaceutical crops. The aim of our study was to assess the effect of subchronic (28-fold) administration of a 70% ethanol extract of EP roots (200 mg/kg, p.o.) on behavioral and cognitive responses in Wistar rats linked with acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), and beta-secretase (BACE-1) mRNA levels and AChE and BuChE activities in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. On the last day of experiment, 30 min after the last dose of EP or Huperzine A (HU), scopolamine (SC) was given at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg b.w. intraperitoneally. The results of a passive avoidance test showed an improvement in long-term memory produced by the EP extract in both scopolamine-induced rats and control group. EP caused an insignificant inhibition of AChE and BuChE activities in the frontal cortex and the hippocampus. EP decreased mRNA AChE, BuChE, and BACE-1 levels, especially in the cortex. Our results suggest that the EP extract led to the improvement of the long-term memory in rats coupled with total saponin content. The mechanism of EP action is probably complicated, since HPLC-MS analysis showed 64 chemical compounds (phenolics, saponins) in the extract of EP roots. PMID:26483842

  19. Drug Abuse and Psychosis: New Insights into Drug-induced Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Suji; Kim, Tae Kyoo; Chung, Sooyoung

    2017-01-01

    Addictive drug use or prescribed medicine abuse can cause psychosis. Some representative symptoms frequently elicited by patients with psychosis are hallucination, anhedonia, and disrupted executive functions. These psychoses are categorized into three classifications of symptoms: positive, negative, and cognitive. The symptoms of DIP are not different from the symptoms of schizophrenia, and it is difficult to distinguish between them. Due to this ambiguity of distinction between the DIP and schizophrenia, the DIP animal model has been frequently used as the schizophrenia animal model. However, although the symptoms may be the same, its causes are clearly different in that DIP is acquired and schizophrenia is heritable. Therefore, in this review, we cover several DIP models such as of amphetamine, PCP/ketamine, scopolamine, and LSD, and then we also address three schizophrenia models through a genetic approach with a new perspective that distinguishes DIP from schizophrenia. PMID:28243163

  20. Three-dimensional solubility parameters and their use in characterising the permeation of drugs through the skin.

    PubMed

    Groning, R; Braun, F J

    1996-05-01

    The physico-chemical properties of drug substances are major determinants of their transdermal absorption. In the present study the concept of the three-dimensional solubility parameters of Hansen was applied in conjunction with the Bagley projection to describe the permeation of drugs and model substances through the skin. Drug permeation data from the literature were compared with the calculated solubility parameters of the drugs. It was demonstrated that the permeation of drugs can be estimated by their position in the Bagley diagram. There is a linear correlation between the logarithm of the skin permeation of drugs and the exchange cohesive energy for the steroids testosterone, progesterone, hydrocortisone acetate, corticosterone, cortisone, and dexamethasone. A linear correlation can be confirmed for the permeation of glyceryl trinitrate, digitoxin, oestradiol, scopolamine, atropine, diethylcarbamazine, fentanyl, and chlorpheniramine. In the case of morphine, codeine, sufentanil, meperidine and hydromorphone there is a linear relationship, too.

  1. Lactobacillus casei-01 facilitates the ameliorative effects of proanthocyanidins extracted from lotus seedpod on learning and memory impairment in scopolamine-induced amnesia mice.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Juan; Li, Shuyi; Sui, Yong; Wu, Qian; Li, Xiaopeng; Xie, Bijun; Zhang, Mingwei; Sun, Zhida

    2014-01-01

    Learning and memory abilities are associated with alterations in gut function. The two-way proanthocyanidins-microbiota interaction in vivo enhances the physiological activities of proanthocyanidins and promotes the regulation of gut function. Proanthocyanidins extracted from lotus seedpod (LSPC) have shown the memory-enhancing ability. However, there has been no literature about whether Lactobacillus casei-01 (LC) enhances the ameliorative effects of LSPC on learning and memory abilities. In this study, learning and memory abilities of scopolamine-induced amnesia mice were evaluated by Y-maze test after 20-day administration of LC (10(9) cfu/kg body weight (BW)), LSPC (low dose was 60 mg/kg BW (L-LSPC) and high dose was 90 mg/kg BW (H-LSPC)), or LSPC and LC combinations (L-LSPC+LC and H-LSPC+LC). Alterations in antioxidant defense ability and oxidative damage of brain, serum and colon, and brain cholinergic system were investigated as the possible mechanisms. As a result, the error times of H-LSPC+LC group were reduced by 41.59% and 68.75% relative to those of H-LSPC and LC groups respectively. LSPC and LC combinations ameliorated scopolamine-induced memory impairment by improving total antioxidant capacity (TAOC) level, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) activities of brain, serum and colon, suppressing malondialdehyde (MDA) level of brain, serum and colon, and inhibiting brain acetylcholinesterase (AchE), myeloperoxidase, total nitric oxide synthase and neural nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activities, and nNOS mRNA level. Moreover, LC facilitated the ameliorative effects of H-LSPC on GSH-Px activity of colon, TAOC level, GSH-Px activity and ratio of T-SOD to MDA of brain and serum, and the inhibitory effects of H-LSPC on serum MDA level, brain nNOS mRNA level and AchE activity. These results indicated that LC promoted the memory-enhancing effect of LSPC in scopolamine-induced amnesia mice.

  2. Effects of harmine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, on spatial learning and memory of APP/PS1 transgenic mice and scopolamine-induced memory impairment mice.

    PubMed

    He, Dandan; Wu, Hui; Wei, Yue; Liu, Wei; Huang, Fei; Shi, Hailian; Zhang, Beibei; Wu, Xiaojun; Wang, Changhong

    2015-12-05

    Harmine, a β-carboline alkaloid present in Peganum harmala with a wide spectrum of pharmacological activities, has been shown to exert strong inhibition against acetylcholinesterase in vitro. However, whether it can rescue the impaired cognition has not been elucidated yet. In current study, we examined its effects on scopolamine-induced memory impairment mice and APP/PS1 transgenic mice, one of the models for Alzheimer's disease, using Morris Water Maze test. In addition, whether harmine could penetrate blood brain barrier, interact with and inhibit acetylcholinesterase, and activate downstream signaling network was also investigated. Our results showed that harmine (20mg/kg) administered by oral gavage for 2 weeks could effectively enhance the spatial cognition of C57BL/6 mice impaired by intraperitoneal injection of scopolamine (1mg/kg). Meanwhile, long-term consumption of harmine (20mg/kg) for 10 weeks also slightly benefited the impaired memory of APP/PS1 mice. Furthermore, harmine could pass through blood brain barrier, penetrate into the brain parenchyma shortly after oral administration, and modulate the expression of Egr-1, c-Jun and c-Fos. Molecular docking assay disclosed that harmine molecule could directly dock into the catalytic active site of acetylcholinesterase, which was partially confirmed by its in vivo inhibitory activity on acetylcholinesterase. Taken together, all these results suggested that harmine could ameliorate impaired memory by enhancement of cholinergic neurotransmission via inhibiting the activity of acetylcholinesterase, which may contribute to its clinical use in the therapy of neurological diseases characterized with acetylcholinesterase deficiency.

  3. Effects of intra-hippocampal microinjection of vitamin B12 on the orofacial pain and memory impairments induced by scopolamine and orofacial pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Erfanparast, Amir; Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Nemati, Shaghayegh

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of microinjection of vitamin B12 into the hippocampus on the orofacial pain and memory impairments induced by scopolamine and orofacial pain. In ketamine-xylazine anesthetized rats, the right and left sides of the dorsal hippocampus (CA1) were implanted with two guide cannulas. Orofacial pain was induced by subcutaneous injection of formalin (1.5%, 50μl) into the right vibrissa pad, and the durations of face rubbing were recorded at 3-min blocks for 45min. Morris water maze (MWM) was used for evaluation of learning and memory. Finally, locomotor activity was assessed using an open-field test. Vitamin B12 attenuated both phases of formalin-induced orofacial pain. Prior administration of naloxone and naloxonazine, but not naltrindole and nor-binaltorphimine, prevented this effect. Vitamin B12 and physostigmine decreased latency time as well as traveled distance in Morris water maze. In addition, these chemicals improved scopolamine-induced memory impairment. The memory impairment induced by orofacial pain was improved by vitamin B12 and physostigmine used alone. Naloxone prevented, whereas physostigmine enhanced the memory improving effect of vitamin B12 in the pain-induced memory impairment. All the above-mentioned chemicals did not alter locomotor activity. The results of the present study showed that at the level of the dorsal hippocampus, vitamin B12 modulated orofacial pain through a mu-opioid receptor mechanism. In addition, vitamin B12 contributed to hippocampal cholinergic system in processing of memory. Moreover, cholinergic and opioid systems may be involved in improving effect of vitamin B12 on pain-induced memory impairment.

  4. Drug prescription appropriateness in the elderly: an Italian study

    PubMed Central

    Allegri, Nicola; Rossi, Federica; Del Signore, Federica; Bertazzoni, Paolo; Bellazzi, Roberto; Sandrini, Giorgio; Vecchi, Tomaso; Liccione, Davide; Pascale, Alessia; Govoni, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Correct drug prescription in the elderly is a difficult task that requires careful survey of the current pharmacological therapies. In this article, we reviewed the drug prescriptions provided to 860 persons aged 65 years or over, residing in a small city of Lombardy, Italy. Methods Subjects were recruited from a local nursing home, the Pavia and Vigevano Neuropsychological Center for Alzheimer’s Disease, general practitioners’ offices, and the local University of the Third Age. For each patient, the amount of potentially inappropriate prescriptions (PIPs), sedative and anticholinergic load (SL and AL, respectively), and drug–drug interactions were evaluated. Results Widespread polypharmacy, giving rise to 10.06% of PIPs in the whole collection of prescriptions, was observed. In particular, PIPs mainly concern drugs acting at the central nervous system level, mostly benzodiazepines and antipsychotics. Moreover, approximately one-fourth of the subjects had an elevated SL and approximately one-tenth a high AL. Drug–drug interactions were frequent (266 requiring medical attention), up to five for each single patient. Of concern was the underuse of antidementia drugs: only 20 patients received a cholinesterase inhibitor or memantine, although 183 patients were potentially suitable for this treatment. Conclusion These results demonstrate the need to develop novel strategies aimed at improving the quality of drug prescription. PMID:28228653

  5. Scopolamine Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... patch from its protective pouch. To expose the adhesive surface of the patch, the clear plastic protective ... peeled off and discarded. Contact with the exposed adhesive layer should be avoided to prevent contamination of ...

  6. Adverse effects of drug therapies on male and female sexual function.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Th; Bader, M; Uckert, S; Staehler, M; Becker, A; Stief, C G

    2006-12-01

    Sexual dysfunctions (SD) are adverse effects of common drug therapies that have rarely been considered in investigations so far. Possibly it is barely known that many widespread and frequently prescribed medications and drug therapies can have significant impact on vascular and nerval processes as well as on endocrinologic and psychoneuroendocrinologic systems and therefore can influence sexual functions. Impotence and disorders of the erectile function can mainly be caused by antidopaminergic mechanisms, whereas ejaculatory disorders and anorgasmia often can be explained by antiserotoninergic effects. Anticholinergic and adrenoloytic agents can also cause a particular impairment of erectile functions. The following considerations will show that the detection and treatment of SD (also in women!) should be given much more attention since drug-induced SDs occur predominantly in indications where a SD itself can be a symptom of the disease.

  7. Doxylamine toxicity: seizure, rhabdomyolysis and false positive urine drug screen for methadone.

    PubMed

    Syed, Husnain; Som, Sumit; Khan, Nazia; Faltas, Wael

    2009-01-01

    The present report highlights the possible adverse effects of doxylamine, a common over the counter sleep aid. Doxylamine is an antihistamine that at toxic doses can cause anticholinergic effects, including seizures, rhabdomyolysis and death. The following case describes a patient with doxylamine toxicity who presented with seizure and confusion. Our patient was managed symptomatically, and remained otherwise stable throughout his hospitalisation. This case is atypical in terms of a delayed rhabdomyolysis and a false positive urine drug screen test for methadone. There is evidence that doxylamine at toxic levels can lead to false positives for methadone and phencyclidine testing using immunoassay-based urine drug screen kits. Urine drug screen testing on patients who are hospitalised is typically performed using immunoassays. However, in certain cases confirmatory secondary testing may be required. Doxylamine is prone to abuse and knowledge of the clinical presentation of its toxicity and the management of acute overdose can be life-saving.

  8. Arousal and stability - The effects of five new sympathomimetic drugs suggest a new principle for the prevention of space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, R. L.; Calkins, D. S.; Mandell, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    Sympathomimetic agents are frequent components in antimotion-sickness drug combinations because of their usefulness in counteracting the sedation caused by stressful motion or resulting from the administration of other antimotion-sickness drugs. The noradrenergic neurochemistry of the brain's arousal-attentional systems prompted us to evaluate the efficacy of five new sympathomimetic drugs and to further define the role of arousal in susceptibility to motion. Subjects were orally administered methamphetamine (20 mg), phenmetrazine (25 mg), phentermine (37.5 mg), methylphenidate (20 mg), or pemoline (75 mg) 2 h prior to taking a Staircase Profile Test. All of the drugs increased resistance to stressful coriolis stimulation by 80-120 percent. Methylphenidate and pemoline showed fewer side effects. These findings, interpreted in conjunction with the documented inefficacy of most anticholinergic and antihistaminergic drugs tested to date, suggest that sympathomimetic drugs or a generalized state of arosusal can inhibit the development of motion sickness.

  9. Evaluation of antimotion sickness drug side effects on performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. D.; Manno, J. E.; Manno, B. R.; Redetzki, H. M.; Wood, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of antimotion-sickness drugs on the performance in computerized-pursuit-meter tests of groups of ten 18-30-yr-old male and female subjects are investigated experimentally using double-blind placebo techniques. The results are presented in tables and graphs and discussed in detail. The proficiency scores are as good as or better than placebo values for subjects given d-amphetamine (DA) 5 or 10 mg, promethazine (P) 25 mg + scopolamine (S) 400 ng + DA 10 mg, S 1 mg + DA 10 mg, S 250-600 ng, marezine 50 mg, meclizine 50 mg, dimenhydrinate 50 mg, S 1 mg + DA 5 mg, or P 25 mg + DA 10 mg. Significantly lower scores are seen in subjects given S 800 ng or 1 mg, P 25 mg (oral or IM), P 25 mg + S 400 ng, and P 25 mg oral + P 25 mg IM + DA 10 mg.

  10. Simultaneous determination of atropine, scopolamine, and anisodamine from Hyoscyamus niger L. in rat plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and its application to a pharmacokinetics study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peiting; Li, Yemeng; Liu, Guanghui; Sun, Xiuman; Zhou, Yuting; Deng, Xuejiao; Liao, Qiongfeng; Xie, Zhiyong

    2014-10-01

    In order to investigate the pharmacokinetics of tropane alkaloids in Hyoscyamus niger L., a sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous determination of atropine, scopolamine, and anisodamine in rat plasma is developed and fully validated, using homatropine as an internal standard. The separation of the four compounds was carried out on a BDS Hypersil C18 column using a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and water (containing 10 mmol ammonium acetate). Calibration curves were linear from 0.2 to 40 ng/mL for atropine, scopolamine, and from 0.08 to 20 ng/mL for anisodamine. The precision of three analytes was <5.89% and the accuracy was between -1.04 to 2.94%. This method is successfully applied to rat pharmacokinetics analysis of the three tropane alkaloids after oral administration of H. niger extract. The maximum concentration of these three tropane alkaloids was reached within 15 min, and the maximum concentrations were 31.36 ± 7.35 ng/mL for atropine, 49.94 ± 2.67 ng/mL for scopolamine, and 2.83 ± 1.49 ng/mL for anisodamine. The pharmacokinetic parameters revealed areas under the curve of 22.76 ± 5.80, 16.80 ± 3.08, and 4.31 ± 1.21 ng/h mL and mean residence times of 2.08 ± 0.55, 1.19 ± 0.45, and 3.28 ± 0.78 h for atropine, scopolamine, and anisodamine, respectively.

  11. Efficient biosynthesis of rare natural product scopolamine using E. coli cells expressing a S14P/K97A mutant of hyoscyamine 6β-hydroxylase AaH6H.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yue-De; He, Yu-Cai; Li, Hao; Kai, Guo-Yin; Xu, Jian-He; Yu, Hui-Lei

    2015-10-10

    Hyoscyamine 6β-hydroxylase (H6H, EC 1.14.11.11), an α-ketoglutarate dependent dioxygenase catalyzes the hydroxylation of (-)-hyoscyamine and the subsequent epoxidation of 6β-hydroxyhyoscyamine to form scopolamine, a valuable natural alkaloid. In this study, random mutagenesis and site-directed saturation mutagenesis were used to enhance the hydroxylation activity of H6H from Anisodus acutangulus (AaH6H). A double mutant, AaH6HM1 (S14P/K97A), showed a 3.4-fold improved hydroxylation activity compared with the wild-type enzyme, and the in vivo epoxidation activity was also improved by 2.3 times. After 34h cultivation of Escherichia coli cells harboring Aah6hm1 in a 5-L bioreactor with a working volume of 3L, scopolamine was produced via a single-enzyme-mediated two-step transformation from 500mgL(-1) (-)-hyoscyamine in 97% conversion, and 1.068g of the product were isolated, corresponding to a space-time yield of 251mgL(-1)d(-1). This study shows that the protein engineering of some key enzymes is a promising and effective way for improving the production of rare natural products such as scopolamine.

  12. Determination of the effectiveness of components of the herbal medicine Toki-Shakuyaku-San and fractions of Angelica acutiloba in improving the scopolamine-induced impairment of rat's spatial cognition in eight-armed radial maze test.

    PubMed

    Hatip-Al-Khatib, Izzettin; Egashira, Nobuaki; Mishima, Kenichi; Iwasaki, Katsunori; Iwasaki, Kiyo; Kurauchi, Kouji; Inui, Keiichiro; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Fujiwara, Michihiro

    2004-09-01

    The improving effects of various components of Toki-Shakuyaku-San (TSS) and fractions isolated from Angelica acutiloba Radix (Toki) on scopolamine-induced spatial memory impairment were investigated in eight-armed radial maze. The scopolamine-induced memory impairment was characterized by prominent increase of error choices in addition to decreased correct choices. Toki, Cnidium officinale Rhizoma (Senkyu), Poria cocos Hoelen (Bukuryo), Alisma orientale Rhizoma (Takusha), and Atractylodes lancea Rhizoma (Sojutsu) increased the correct choices, while only the Toki, Sojutsu, and Takusha decreased the error choices. No effect was produced by Paeonia lactiflora Radix (Shakuyaku). Investigation of effects of fractions isolated from Toki revealed that its activity mainly resided in the butanol layer and its contents of N-methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxamide and amines. Moreover, the alkaloid, internal and external solutions (containing poly-, di-, and monosaccharides) obtained by dialysis with Visking cellophane tubing also improved the memory. However, no improving properties were detected for methanol and hexanol layers, L-(-)-tryptophan, L-arginine, L-(-)-lysine, and choline chloride. The results showed that the TSS components could improve the reference and working memory impaired by scopolamine. The improving effect of TSS is produced greatly by the Toki component, the activity of which was greatly produced by the fraction extracted by butanol.

  13. Drugs (including oxygen) in severe COPD.

    PubMed

    Albert, P; Calverley, P M A

    2008-05-01

    Access to comprehensive guidelines on the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is now available, and several treatment goals of therapy have been identified from these guidelines, which have since been studied in clinical trials. Drug therapy is a key component of an individual patient's management plan, particularly in more severe disease. During the past few years, a number of new drug treatments have become available, although these are not always appropriately prescribed; this is particularly the case for oxygen. For patients with a history of exacerbations, there is good evidence for the use of inhaled long-acting anticholinergic agents or combined inhaled steroids and long-acting beta-agonists. Evidence for prophylactic antibiotics and antioxidant agents is lacking. Nutritional and calorie supplementation have not been shown to improve exercise capacity. Statins may improve outcomes in COPD, but prospective trials are needed to confirm this. The evidence for the use of long-term oxygen therapy in hypoxaemic patients is robust. Ambulatory oxygen improves exercise capacity, but whether it is used appropriately is in doubt. Overall, short burst oxygen therapy does not offer a benefit and therefore cannot be recommended.

  14. Prodrugs of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs), More Than Meets the Eye: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Qandil, Amjad M.

    2012-01-01

    The design and the synthesis of prodrugs for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been given much attention by medicinal chemists, especially in the last decade. As a therapeutic group, NSAIDs are among the most widely used prescribed and over the counter (OTC) medications. The rich literature about potential NSAID prodrugs clearly shows a shift from alkyl, aryalkyl or aryl esters with the sole role of masking the carboxylic acid group, to more elaborate conjugates that contain carefully chosen groups to serve specific purposes, such as enhancement of water solubility and dissolution, nitric oxide release, hydrogen sulfide release, antioxidant activity, anticholinergic and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory (AChEI) activity and site-specific targeting and delivery. This review will focus on NSAID prodrugs that have been designed or were, later, found to possess intrinsic pharmacological activity as an intact chemical entity. Such intrinsic activity might augment the anti-inflammatory activity of the NSAID, reduce its side effects or transform the potential therapeutic use from classical anti-inflammatory action to something else. Reports discussed in this review will be those of NO-NSAIDs, anticholinergic and AChEI-NSAIDs, Phospho-NSAIDs and some miscellaneous agents. In most cases, this review will cover literature dealing with these NSAID prodrugs from the year 2006 and later. Older literature will be used when necessary, e.g., to explain the chemical and biological mechanisms of action. PMID:23247285

  15. Heat Tolerance and the Peripheral Effects of Anticholinergics. 1. A Non-Invasive Method for Estimating the Cholinergic Sensitivity of the Eccrine Glands in Humans.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-30

    used as sensitive index of anticholiinergic drug potency. Independently, we developed 1 human sweat gland assayd d+ fftf -ng from theirs in several...derived from an assembly of 4 evaporative capsules with .pecially designed electronics, is our primary measurement [3]. Sweat counts are determined on...can be defined. Apparatus. The anode assembly consists of a machined 11.5 cm x 3.7 cm PlexigTas block containing four 0.9 cm D Ag/AgCl buttons removed

  16. Prefrontal cortex lesions and scopolamine impair attention performance of C57BL/6 mice in a novel 2-choice visual discrimination task.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Gregory M; Shelton, Delia; McKinney, A P; Caniga, Michael; Marcus, Jacob N; Ferguson, Mitchell T; Kornecook, Thomas J; Dodart, Jean-Cosme

    2009-12-01

    Sustained attention is defined as the ability or capacity to remain focused on the occurrence of rare events over long periods of time. We describe here the development of a novel, operant-based attention task that can be learned by mice in 8-10 days. Mice were trained on a 2-choice visual discrimination task in an operant chamber, wherein the correct response on any given trial was a lever-press cued by a stimulus light. Upon reaching a criterion of greater than 80% correct responses, all subjects were tested in a mixed-trial attention paradigm combining four different stimulus durations within a single session (0.5, 1, 2, or 10 s). During attention testing, the percentage of correct responses decreased as a function of stimulus duration, indicating a performance decrement which parallels increasing attentional demand within the task. Pretreatment with the muscarinic-receptor antagonist scopolamine yielded a reliable, dose-dependent performance deficit whereas nicotine treatment improved the percentage of correct responses during trials with the greatest attentional demand. Moreover, medial prefrontal cortex lesions impaired attention performance without affecting acquisition or retention of the discrimination rule. These results underscore the utility of this task as a novel means of assessing attentional processes in mice in a relatively high-throughput manner.

  17. α-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone ameliorates ocular surface dysfunctions and lesions in a scopolamine-induced dry eye model via PKA-CREB and MEK-Erk pathways.

    PubMed

    Ru, Yusha; Huang, Yue; Liu, Huijuan; Du, Juan; Meng, Zhu; Dou, Zexia; Liu, Xun; Wei, Rui Hua; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Shaozhen

    2015-12-21

    Dry eye is a highly prevalent, chronic, and multifactorial disease that compromises quality of life and generates socioeconomic burdens. The pathogenic factors of dry eye disease (DED) include tear secretion abnormalities, tear film instability, and ocular surface inflammation. An effective intervention targeting the pathogenic factors is needed to control this disease. Here we applied α-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) twice a day to the ocular surface of a scopolamine-induced dry eye rat model. The results showed that α-MSH at different doses ameliorated tear secretion, tear film stability, and corneal integrity, and corrected overexpression of proinflammatory factors, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IFN-γ, in ocular surface of the dry eye rats. Moreover, α-MSH, at 10(-4) μg/μl, maintained corneal morphology, inhibited apoptosis, and restored the number and size of conjunctival goblet cells in the dry eye rats. Mechanistically, α-MSH activated both PKA-CREB and MEK-Erk pathways in the dry eye corneas and conjunctivas; pharmacological blockade of either pathway abolished α-MSH's protective effects, suggesting that both pathways are necessary for α-MSH's protection under dry eye condition. The peliotropic protective functions and explicit signaling mechanism of α-MSH warrant translation of the α-MSH-containing eye drop into a novel and effective intervention to DED.

  18. Influence of the Melissa officinalis Leaf Extract on Long-Term Memory in Scopolamine Animal Model with Assessment of Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Ozarowski, Marcin; Mikolajczak, Przemyslaw L.; Piasecka, Anna; Kachlicki, Piotr; Kujawski, Radoslaw; Bogacz, Anna; Bartkowiak-Wieczorek, Joanna; Szulc, Michal; Kaminska, Ewa; Kujawska, Malgorzata; Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga; Gryszczynska, Agnieszka; Opala, Bogna; Lowicki, Zdzislaw; Seremak-Mrozikiewicz, Agnieszka; Czerny, Boguslaw

    2016-01-01

    Melissa officinalis (MO, English: lemon balm, Lamiaceae), one of the oldest and still most popular aromatic medicinal plants, is used in phytomedicine for the prevention and treatment of nervous disturbances. The aim of our study was to assess the effect of subchronic (28-fold) administration of a 50% ethanol extract of MO leaves (200 mg/kg, p.o.) compared with rosmarinic acid (RA, 10 mg/kg, p.o.) and huperzine A (HU, 0.5 mg/kg, p.o.) on behavioral and cognitive responses in scopolamine-induced rats. The results were linked with acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), and beta-secretase (BACE-1) mRNA levels and AChE and BuChE activities in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of rats. In our study, MO and HU, but not RA, showed an improvement in long-term memory. The results were in line with mRNA levels, since MO produced a decrease of AChE mRNA level by 52% in the cortex and caused a strong significant inhibition of BACE1 mRNA transcription (64% in the frontal cortex; 50% in the hippocampus). However, the extract produced only an insignificant inhibition of AChE activity in the frontal cortex. The mechanisms of MO action are probably more complicated, since its role as a modulator of beta-secretase activity should be taken into consideration. PMID:27239217

  19. Influence of the Melissa officinalis Leaf Extract on Long-Term Memory in Scopolamine Animal Model with Assessment of Mechanism of Action.

    PubMed

    Ozarowski, Marcin; Mikolajczak, Przemyslaw L; Piasecka, Anna; Kachlicki, Piotr; Kujawski, Radoslaw; Bogacz, Anna; Bartkowiak-Wieczorek, Joanna; Szulc, Michal; Kaminska, Ewa; Kujawska, Malgorzata; Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga; Gryszczynska, Agnieszka; Opala, Bogna; Lowicki, Zdzislaw; Seremak-Mrozikiewicz, Agnieszka; Czerny, Boguslaw

    2016-01-01

    Melissa officinalis (MO, English: lemon balm, Lamiaceae), one of the oldest and still most popular aromatic medicinal plants, is used in phytomedicine for the prevention and treatment of nervous disturbances. The aim of our study was to assess the effect of subchronic (28-fold) administration of a 50% ethanol extract of MO leaves (200 mg/kg, p.o.) compared with rosmarinic acid (RA, 10 mg/kg, p.o.) and huperzine A (HU, 0.5 mg/kg, p.o.) on behavioral and cognitive responses in scopolamine-induced rats. The results were linked with acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), and beta-secretase (BACE-1) mRNA levels and AChE and BuChE activities in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of rats. In our study, MO and HU, but not RA, showed an improvement in long-term memory. The results were in line with mRNA levels, since MO produced a decrease of AChE mRNA level by 52% in the cortex and caused a strong significant inhibition of BACE1 mRNA transcription (64% in the frontal cortex; 50% in the hippocampus). However, the extract produced only an insignificant inhibition of AChE activity in the frontal cortex. The mechanisms of MO action are probably more complicated, since its role as a modulator of beta-secretase activity should be taken into consideration.

  20. Anti-amnesic effect of alkaloid fraction from Lycopodiella cernua (L.) Pic. Serm. on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Chuong, Nguyen Ngoc; Trung, Bui Huu; Luan, Tran Cong; Hung, Tran Manh; Dang, Nguyen Hai; Dat, Nguyen Tien

    2014-07-11

    Lycopodiella cernua (L.) Pic. Serm. (Licopodiaceae) has been used in Vietnamese folk medicine for treating central nervous system conditions. In this study, the alkaloid fraction from the methanol extract of this plant (VLC) was evaluated for in vitro acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity in cognition-relevant brain areas of mice. In in vivo study, the cognitive-enhancing effect of VLC on amnesic mice induced by scopolamine was investigated by assessing a passive avoidance and a Morris water maze test. VLC inhibited AChE activity in mouse frontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum with IC50 values of 26.7, 32.2 and 25.7μg/mL, respectively. Administration of VLC (10, 20, 50 and 100mg/kg, p.o.) significantly reversed cognitive impairments in mice by passive avoidance test. Treating with VLC (50mg/kg) reduced escape latencies in training trials and prolonged swimming times in the target quadrant during the probe trial in the water maze task (P<0.05). These results indicated that L. cernua originated from Vietnam has anti-cholinesterase activity and might be useful for the treatment of cognitive impairment.

  1. A novel extended sequence learning task (ESLeT) for rodents: validation and the effects of amphetamine, scopolamine and striatal lesions.

    PubMed

    Dunnett, Stephen B; Fuller, Anna; Rosser, Anne E; Brooks, Simon P

    2012-06-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases of the basal ganglia have been associated with impairments in 'implicit learning', failing to detect repeated sequences embedded in long series of random stimuli. The present study has introduced a novel 5-step sequence learning task (ESLeT) for rats, in which the animals learn to respond to randomly occurring stimuli in a horizontal spatial array, and to chain 5 sequential stimulus-response choices to gain food reward. The rats exhibit improved performance in both speed and accuracy of responding when the sequence is predictable following the first stimulus in the chain, suggesting a comparable capacity for 'implicit learning'. Performance was more rapid but less accurate when the rats were pre-treated with the dopamine indirect agonist amphetamine, markedly disrupted in both dependent variables when pre-treated with the cholinergic antagonist, scopolamine, and modestly disrupted following bilateral striatal lesions, with distinctive patterns of error and changes in the precise patterns of stimulus-by-stimulus responding associated with each experimental treatment. The ESLeT task provides a new test with distinctive advantages for the analysis of vigilance, serial responding and procedural motor learning in animal models of human neurodegenerative disease.

  2. Asparagus adscendens root extract enhances cognition and protects against scopolamine induced amnesia: An in-silico and in-vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Pahwa, Priyanka; Goel, Rajesh Kumar

    2016-12-25

    Asparagus adscendens Roxb. commonly known as safed musli and belonging to the Liliaceae family is cultivated mainly in Asian countries. In traditional medicine, safed musli is recommended as nerve tonic and remedy for memory impairment. The present study was aimed to evaluate nootropic and antiamnesic activities of Asparagus adscendens extract (AAE) using in silico and in vivo approach. Phytoconstituents of A. adscendens root reported in literature were subjected to in silico prediction using PASS and Pharmaexpert. The radial arm maze and passive shock avoidance paradigm were employed to evaluate nootropic activity. Subsequently, the anti-amnesic activity was evaluated in scopolamine induced amnesia model. To elucidate the mechanism of nootropic activity, the effect of AAE on the activities of acetylcholinesterase and antioxidant enzymes in the cortex and hippocampus of mice were also evaluated. In silico activity spectrum for all of A. adscendens phytoconstituents exhibited excellent prediction score for nootropic activity. Pretreatment with AAE (50, 100 & 200 mg/kg, i.p.) for 15 days showed significant decrease in working memory error, reference memory error and retrieval latency in radial arm maze and decrease in step down latency in passive shock avoidance paradigm were observed. Further, AAE significantly reduced acetylcholinesterase and oxidative stress parameters in cortex and hippocampus of mice. Thus, in silico and in vivo results suggest that A. adscendens root may exert its nootropic activity through both anti-acetylcholinesterase and antioxidant activities.

  3. Drug allergies

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction - drug (medication); Drug hypersensitivity; Medication hypersensitivity ... A drug allergy involves an immune response in the body that produces an allergic reaction to a medicine. The ...

  4. The future of combining inhaled drugs for COPD.

    PubMed

    Bjerg, Anders; Lundbäck, Bo; Lötvall, Jan

    2012-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality globally, and its prevalence is projected to continue to increase owing to trends in smoking. Treatment of COPD has evolved from the initial adaptations of drugs and treatment strategies successfully used in asthma into more specific pharmacological strategies following global guidelines. Bronchodilating anticholinergic and beta-2-stimulating agents and anti-inflammatory corticosteroid drugs delivered by inhalators are the mainstay of COPD treatment. Despite significant progress, current pharmacotherapies neither fully alleviate the airway obstruction in COPD, nor reverse the progressive nature of the disease. This review discusses inhalation therapies which have recently become clinically available or are being developed, with focus on combination therapies. There is accumulating evidence that the combination of two or all three drug classes, triple therapy, is superior to single drug therapy. Several fixed combinations of both currently available and novel molecules will be launched for clinical use within the next few years. Also, improved understanding of subgroups within the clinical spectrum of COPD, is likely to offer new potentials to improve COPD care.

  5. Drug Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... over-the-counter drug. The FDA evaluates the safety of a drug by looking at Side effects ... clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying ...

  6. Two Distinct Types of Hypercontractile Esophagus: Classic and Spastic Jackhammer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yun Soo; Min, Yang Won; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2016-01-01

    Hypercontractile esophagus (nicknamed jackhammer esophagus) is a recently defined disease within the esophageal motility disorders classification. Responses to treatments for jackhammer esophagus have been inconsistent in previous trials, possibly due to its heterogeneous manifestation. Thus, we reviewed 10 patients diagnosed with jackhammer esophagus and compared their clinical and manometric features at baseline. Additionally, manometric and symptomatic responses after treatment with known smooth muscle relaxants, including anticholinergic drugs (cimetropium bromide and scopolamine butylbromide) and a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor (sildenafil) were compared. We observed two distinct subgroups in the findings: one with hypercontractility and normal distal latencies (“classic jackhammer esophagus,” n=7) and the other with hypercontractility and short distal latencies (“spastic jackhammer esophagus,” n=3). The two types also differed in their responses to medications in that symptoms improved upon treatment with an anticholinergic agent in classic jackhammer esophagus patients, while spastic jackhammer esophagus was unresponsive to both the anticholinergic drugs and the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor. In conclusion, hypercontractile esophagus may be a heterogeneous disease with different underlying pathophysiologies. We introduced two novel terms, “classic jackhammer esophagus” and “spastic jackhammer esophagus,” to distinguish the two types. PMID:27458179

  7. The dual-acting AChE inhibitor and H3 receptor antagonist UW-MD-72 reverses amnesia induced by scopolamine or dizocilpine in passive avoidance paradigm in rats.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Bassem; Khan, Nadia; Darras, Fouad H; Pockes, Steffen; Decker, Michael

    2016-10-15

    Both the acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and the histamine H3 receptor (H3R) are involved in the metabolism and modulation of acetylcholine release and numerous other centrally acting neurotransmitters. Hence, dual-active AChE inhibitors (AChEIs) and H3R antagonists hold potential to treat cognitive disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD). The novel dual-acting AChEI and H3R antagonist 7-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)-2,3-dihydropyrrolo[2,1-b]quinazolin-9(1H)-one (UW-MD-72) shows excellent selectivity profiles over the AChE's isoenzyme butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) as well as high and balanced in-vitro affinities at both AChE and hH3R with IC50 of 5.4μM on hAChE and hH3R antagonism with Ki of 2.54μM, respectively. In the current study, the effects of UW-MD-72 (1.25, 2.5, and 5mg/kg, i.p.) on memory deficits induced by the muscarinic cholinergic antagonist scopolamine (SCO) and the non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist dizocilpine (DIZ) were investigated in a step-through type passive avoidance paradigm in adult male rats applying donepezil (DOZ) and pitolisant (PIT) as reference drugs. The results observed show that SCO (2mg/kg, i.p.) and DIZ (0.1mg/kg, i.p.) significantly impaired learning and memory in rats. However, acute systemic administration of UW-MD-72 significantly ameliorated the SCO- and DIZ-induced amnesic effects. Furthermore, the ameliorating activity of UW-MD-72 (1.25mg/kg, i.p.) in DIZ-induced amnesia was partly reversed when rats were pretreated with the centrally-acting H2R antagonist zolantidine (ZOL, 10mg/kg, i.p.), but not with the CNS penetrant H1R antagonist pyrilamine (PYR, 10mg/kg, i.p.). Moreover, ameliorative effect of UW-MD-72 (1.25mg/kg, i.p.) in DIZ-induced amnesia was strongly reversed when rats were pretreated with a combination of ZOL (10mg/kg, i.p.) and SCO (1.0mg/kg, i.p.), indicating that these memory enhancing effects were, in addition to other neural circuits, observed through histaminergic H2R as well as

  8. Drugs, drugs--who has the drugs?

    PubMed

    Blair, James

    2012-01-01

    Drug diversion, although on the increase, is not the only problem involving drugs that hospital security officials should be concerned with. Growing drug shortages, offshore production, counterfeiting, and weaknesses in the drug supply chain in case of a world-wide pandemic, are even greater causes for concern, the author claims.

  9. An Educational Intervention to Decrease Drug Costs Related to Terminal Secretions in a Hospice Organization.

    PubMed

    Brock, Cara; Cooper, Sarah; Herndon, Christopher M

    2017-03-01

    Terminal secretions is a common symptom seen in hospice patients. Antimuscarinic drugs are commonly used to treat this symptom despite a lack of supporting data. Wide variability in cost exists among these treatments. Hospice program data were assessed to identify high-use and high-cost medications. An educational intervention (EI) was developed to target one such medication, transdermal scopolamine. The EI focused on efficacy, safety, and actual cost (by unit and total expenditure) for each possible treatment of terminal secretions. Following the EI, drug utilization data was re-evaluated. Prior to the deployment of the EI, total monthly hospice drug costs averaged $91,405 (SD 1,444) with an average drug cost per patient per day of $11.42 (SD 0.54). Monthly costs of drugs frequently employed to treat terminal secretions averaged $7,187.67 (SD 2,253) pre-intervention. Following the EI, monthly drug costs decreased 22.5%, average daily patient drug costs decreased 11.1%, and total anti-secretion costs decreased 28.5% after adjusting for difference in census. Education regarding the use and cost of medications to treat symptoms at end-of-life in hospice patients can be an intervention used to lead to significant cost savings to hospice organizations while maintaining appropriate symptom management for patients. Future interventions to target additional high-cost medications are warranted.

  10. Neuropeptide S enhances memory and mitigates memory impairment induced by MK801, scopolamine or Aβ₁₋₄₂ in mice novel object and object location recognition tasks.

    PubMed

    Han, Ren-Wen; Zhang, Rui-San; Xu, Hong-Jiao; Chang, Min; Peng, Ya-Li; Wang, Rui

    2013-07-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS), the endogenous ligand of NPSR, has been shown to promote arousal and anxiolytic-like effects. According to the predominant distribution of NPSR in brain tissues associated with learning and memory, NPS has been reported to modulate cognitive function in rodents. Here, we investigated the role of NPS in memory formation, and determined whether NPS could mitigate memory impairment induced by selective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK801, muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist scopolamine or Aβ₁₋₄₂ in mice, using novel object and object location recognition tasks. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of 1 nmol NPS 5 min after training not only facilitated object recognition memory formation, but also prolonged memory retention in both tasks. The improvement of object recognition memory induced by NPS could be blocked by the selective NPSR antagonist SHA 68, indicating pharmacological specificity. Then, we found that i.c.v. injection of NPS reversed memory disruption induced by MK801, scopolamine or Aβ₁₋₄₂ in both tasks. In summary, our results indicate that NPS facilitates memory formation and prolongs the retention of memory through activation of the NPSR, and mitigates amnesia induced by blockage of glutamatergic or cholinergic system or by Aβ₁₋₄₂, suggesting that NPS/NPSR system may be a new target for enhancing memory and treating amnesia.

  11. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  12. Action of anti-tussive drugs on the emetic reflex of Suncus murinus (house musk shrew).

    PubMed

    Chan, Shun-Wan; Rudd, John A; Lin, Ge; Li, Ping

    2007-03-22

    The cough and emetic reflexes involve a synchronized firing of motor neurones involved in respiratory control. Tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonists and 5-HT1A receptor agonists are examples of centrally acting drugs that reduce cough and emesis. In the present studies, therefore, we examined the possibility that other classes of drugs known to reducing cough have anti-emetic properties to prevent emesis induced by diverse challenges. We examined the potential of codeine (1-10 mg/kg), baclofen (1-10 mg/kg), scopolamine (0.3-10 mg/kg), diphenhydramine (1-10 mg/kg), imperialine (1-30 mg/kg) and verticine (0.3-3 mg/kg) to inhibit emesis induced by nicotine (5 mg/kg, s.c.), copper sulphate (120 mg/kg, intragastric), and provocative motion (4 cm horizontal displacement, delivered at 1 Hz) in Suncus murinus (house musk shrew). Only codeine had broad inhibitory properties (P<0.05) to antagonize emesis induced by all challenges with ID50 values ranging from 1.2 to 2.3 mg/kg. Baclofen antagonized emesis induced by nicotine (maximum reduction was 44.9%, P<0.05) and motion (maximum reduction was 97.3%, P<0.01), but potentiated copper sulphate-induced emesis (maximum potentiation was 73.0%, P<0.05). Scopolamine antagonized copper sulphate-induced emesis (maximum reduction was 61.2%, P<0.05) and imperialine antagonized nicotine-induced emesis (maximum reduction was 30.2%, P<0.01), but verticine potentiated motion-induced emesis (maximum potentiation was 60.0%, P<0.05). Diphenhydramine did not significantly reduce emesis induced by any of the challenges (P>0.05). In conclusion, codeine has broad inhibitory anti-emetic actions but a known ability to reduce coughing does not necessarily predict broad inhibitory anti-emetic properties.

  13. Generic Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Generic Drugs: The Same Medicine for Less Money What is a generic drug? A generic is a copy of a brand-name drug. A brand- name drug has a patent. When ... benefit to your health, and you will save money. 7KH IHGHUDO )RRG DQG 'UXJ $GPLQLVWUDWLRQ )'$ UHJXODWHV ERWK ...

  14. Drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yawalkar, N

    2009-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity represents an immune-mediated reaction to a drug. Although several drug hypersensitivity reactions are confined to the skin and rather mild, some may be life threatening and also involve further organs such as liver, kidney and bone marrow. The exact pathogenesis of many drug hypersensitivity reactions is still obscure. In this review the concepts on how small molecular drugs can activate the immune system are discussed and the hapten, prohapten and p-i concept are explained. Furthermore, the classification of drug hypersensitivity reactions and some common and severe clinical manifestations of drug-induced T cell mediated reactions are presented.

  15. Current and future drugs for treatment of MS-associated bladder dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Andersson, K-E

    2014-07-01

    A majority of patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) will develop lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) during the course of the disease. Even if antimuscarinic (anticholinergic) treatment is currently the mainstay of conservative treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO), including MS-induced NDO, extensive data regarding their effectiveness and safeness are lacking. When antimuscarinic medications fail to prove efficacious, a further option is intradetrusor injections of onabotulinumtoxin A. In several studies, more than half (and up 76%) of the patients treated with onabotulinumtoxin A experienced significant improvement in symptoms or even achieved complete continence. Cannabis extracts have shown some promise but has still not gained wide acceptance as an effective treatment. Over the last few years many new disease-modifying drugs that have been approved and introduced for treatment of MS. These drugs may have effects not only on the MS disease process, but also on the disease symptoms, including LUTS. However, MS is not primarily a bladder disease and treatment of the underlying pathophysiology should be the main goal of treatment. Since most of the urology drugs are targeting LUTS, these drugs should be regarded as "adds on" to treatments modifying the underlying disorder. Considering that most of these drugs have not been studied specifically with respect to efficacy on LUTS, and since they are not without significant side effects, it seems important that if and when they are going to be used for treatment of bladder symptoms should be a joint decision between the neurologist and urologist taking care of the patient.

  16. Prediction of Antichollintergic Drug Response Using a Thermoregulatory Exchange Index

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    psychoses are those compounds which have a degree of anticholinergic action directly on eccrine sweat glands which disrupts thermoregulation. Atropine...compounds which have a degree of anticholinergic action directly on eccrine sweat glands which disrupts thermoregulation. Atropine (a potent nerve agent...Pharm. 30, 209-221. Sato, K., Sato, F., 1981. Pharmacologic responsiveness of iso- lated single eccrine sweat glands. Am. J. Physiol. (Reg. Integrative Comp. Physiol.) 240, R44-R51.

  17. Drug Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of other allergies, such as food allergy or hay fever Allergic reaction to another drug A family history ... so, what drug was it? Do you have hay fever, food allergy or other allergies? Is there a ...

  18. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription Drugs & Cold ... in the past year. Middle Figure: Driving after marijuana use is more common than driving after alcohol ...

  19. Drugs (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drugs for fever, cough, stuffy nose, runny nose, diarrhea, and allergies are common drugs which are especially helpful during times of illness. All medications should be kept out of the reach of children.

  20. Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... abuse also plays a role in many major social problems, such as drugged driving, violence, stress, and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a ...

  1. Drug Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviton, Harvey S.

    1975-01-01

    This article attempts to assemble pertinent information about the drug problem, particularily marihuana. It also focuses on the need for an educational program for drug control with the public schools as the main arena. (Author/HMV)

  2. Drug Debacle.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-07-01

    Medicaid's Vendor Drug Program is under examination by the Texas Legislature. TMA's Physicians Medicaid Congress is seizing the opportunity to call for an administrative overhaul of a drug benefit physicians describe as unnecessarily complicated and confusing.

  3. Datura stramonium L. poisoning in a geophagous child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bouziri, Asma; Hamdi, Asma; Borgi, Aida; Hadj, Sarra Bel; Fitouri, Zohra; Menif, Khaled; Ben Jaballah, Nejla

    2011-06-15

    Datura stramonium L. (DS) is a wild-growing plant widely distributed and easily accessible. It contains a variety of toxic anticholinergic alkaloids such as atropine, hyoscamine, and scopolamine. Voluntary or accidental ingestion can produce severe anticholinergic poisoning. We report an unusual case of DS intoxication occurring in a geophagous young child after accidental ingestion of the plant. Our case is original because of the young age of the victim and the underlying geophagia facilitating the occurrence of poisoning.

  4. [Drug treatment of early-stage (de novo and "honeymoon") Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Cesaro, P; Defebvre, L

    2014-04-01

    In this article, we discuss the management of motor symptoms during the early phases of Parkinson's disease, excluding that of any other clinical manifestation. We relied primarily upon recently published data and do not describe older publications relating to anticholinergic drugs or amantadine. The initial pharmacological treatment of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is symptomatic and remains based upon dopaminergic drugs. However, the development of new drugs has broadened the range of strategic options and improved overall patient management. Announcing the diagnosis is a critical moment, as pointed out by patients' associations. Patients should be advised to maintain personal, professional, social and physical activities as long as possible. The potential benefit of early pharmacological treatment should be explained, focusing on the possible disease-modifying effect of drugs such as rasagiline. According to current guidelines, L-Dopa is preferred in patients above 65years of age, while those below 65 should be treated with dopamine agonists. Like monoamine oxidase inhibitors B (MAOI-B), synthetic dopamine agonists exhibit several advantages: easy-to-use treatment with a once-daily administration, delayed L-Dopa initiation, significant efficacy on motor symptoms (although lower than that of L-Dopa). MOAI can be prescribed in association with L-Dopa or dopamine agonists. Rasagiline also delays L-Dopa initiation, and consequently motor complications.

  5. Drug Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NBOD2, a program developed at Goddard Space Flight Center to solve equations of motion coupled N-body systems is used by E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co. to model potential drugs as a series of elements. The program analyses the vibrational and static motions of independent components in drugs. Information generated from this process is used to design specific drugs to interact with enzymes in designated ways.

  6. Drug Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... mental health disorders, several factors may contribute to development of drug addiction and dependence. The main factors are: Environment. Environmental factors, including your family's beliefs and attitudes ...

  7. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Naloxone Pain Prevention Treatment Trends & Statistics Women and Drugs Publications Funding Funding Opportunities Clinical Research Post-Award Concerns General Information Grant & Contract Application ...

  8. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Naloxone Pain Prevention Treatment Trends & Statistics Women and Drugs Publications Funding Funding Opportunities Clinical Research Post-Award Concerns General Information Grant & Contract Application ...

  9. Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cosmetics Tobacco Products Home Drug Databases Drugs@FDA Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Search by Drug Name, Active Ingredient, or Application Number Enter at ...

  10. Efficacy of phosphatidylcholine in the modulation of motion sickness susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, R. L.; Ryan, P.; Homick, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of pharmacological doses of phosphatidylcholine (lecithin) in the modulation of motion sickness induced by exposure to coriolis stimulation in a rotating chair. Subjects received daily dietary supplements of 25 grams of lecithin (90 percent phosphatidylcholine) and were tested for their susceptibility to motion sickness after 4 h, 2 d, and 21 d. A small but statistically significant increase in susceptibility (+15 percent) was noted 4 h after supplemental phosphatidylcholine, with four of nine subjects demonstrating a marked increase in susceptibility. This finding was attributed to choline's stimulatory action on cholinergic systems, an action which opposes that of the classical antimotion sickness drug scopolamine. Chronic lecithin loading revealed a trend towards reduced susceptibility, possibly indicating the occurrence of adaptive mechanisms such as receptor down-regulation. Withdrawal from lecithin loading, perhaps coupled with anticholinergic treatment, might prove to be a potent prophylactic regimen and ought to be tested.

  11. Drug Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sardana, Raj K.

    This autoinstructional lesson deals with the study of such drugs as marijuana and LSD, with emphasis on drug abuse. It is suggested that it can be used in science classes at the middle level of school. No prerequisites are suggested. The teacher's guide lists the behavioral objectives, the equipment needed to complete the experience and suggests…

  12. Antineoplastic Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadée, Wolfgang; El Sayed, Yousry Mahmoud

    The limited scope of therapeutic drug-level monitoring in cancer chemotherapy results from the often complex biochemical mechanisms that contribute to antineoplastic activity and obscure the relationships among drug serum levels and therapeutic benefits. Moreover, new agents for cancer chemotherapy are being introduced at a more rapid rate than for the treatment of other diseases, although the successful application of therapeutic drug-level monitoring may require several years of intensive study of the significance of serum drug levels. However, drug level monitoring can be of considerable value during phase I clinical trials of new antineoplastic agents in order to assess drug metabolism, bioavailability, and intersubject variability; these are important parameters in the interpretation of clinical studies, but have no immediate benefit to the patient. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) probably represents the most versatile and easily adaptable analytical technique for drug metabolite screening (1). HPLC may therefore now be the method of choice during phase I clinical trials of antineoplastic drugs. For example, within a single week we developed an HPLC assay—using a C18 reverse-phase column, UV detection, and direct serum injection after protein precipitation—for the new radiosensitizer, misonidazole (2).

  13. Effects of psychoactive drugs in the Vogel conflict test in mice.

    PubMed

    Umezu, T

    1999-06-01

    This study examined effects of various psychoactive drugs on the Vogel conflict test, where drinking behavior is punished by electric shocks, in ICR mice to clarify the pharmacological features of this method in mice. A benzodiazepine anxiolytic diazepam and a barbiturate pentobarbital produced significant anticonflict effects, which mean that these drugs increased the number of electric shocks mice received during 40-min test session. On the other hand, yohimbine (alpha2-receptor antagonist), caffeine (adenosine-receptor antagonist), scopolamine (muscarinic cholinergic antagonist), cyclazocine (sigma-receptor antagonist), cimetidine (H2-receptor antagonist), baclofen (GABA(B)-receptor agonist), MK-801 (NMDA-receptor antagonist), buspirone (5-HT1A-receptor agonist), chlorpromazine (dopamine-receptor antagonist) and haloperidol (dopamine-receptor and sigma-receptor antagonist) all did not produce anticonflict effects in this test using ICR mice. The results suggest that the Vogel conflict test is applicable to ICR mice and that this test in mice is appropriate as a screening method for drugs that have apparent anti-anxiety actions.

  14. [Club drugs].

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Diogo Frasquilho; Carmo, Ana Lisa; da Silva, Joaquim Alves; Navarro, Rita; Góis, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Club drugs are the following substances: Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA); Methamphetamine; Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD); Ketamine; Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and Flunitrazepam. These substances are mainly used by adolescents and young adults, mostly in recreational settings like dance clubs and rave parties. These drugs have diverse psychotropic effects, are associated with several degrees of toxicity, dependence and long term adverse effects. Some have been used for several decades, while others are relatively recent substances of abuse. They have distinct pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, are not easy to detect and, many times, the use of club drugs is under diagnosed. Although the use of these drugs is increasingly common, few health professionals feel comfortable with the diagnosis and treatment. The authors performed a systematic literature review, with the goal of synthesising the existing knowledge about club drugs, namely epidemiology, mechanism of action, detection, adverse reactions and treatment. The purpose of this article is creating in Portuguese language a knowledge data base on club drugs, that health professionals of various specialties can use as a reference when dealing with individual with this kind of drug abuse.

  15. Drug dependence

    MedlinePlus

    ... starts using drugs to try to self-treat mental illness. Support Groups Many support groups are available in ... American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. ...

  16. Drug Facts

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA (Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth ( ... Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine ...

  17. Drug abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Weiss RD. Drugs of abuse. In: Goldman L, ... Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the ...

  18. Study Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... may have withdrawal symptoms like depression, thoughts of suicide, intense drug cravings, sleep problems, and fatigue. The ... some proven ways to boost concentration and beat stress: Meditation . Even a few minutes of meditation each ...

  19. Drug-drug interactions: antiretroviral drugs and recreational drugs.

    PubMed

    Staltari, Orietta; Leporini, Christian; Caroleo, Benedetto; Russo, Emilio; Siniscalchi, Antonio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Gallelli, Luca

    2014-01-01

    With the advances in antiretroviral (ARV) therapy, patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are living longer, however, some patients encounter co- morbidities which sometimes require treatment. Therefore, during the treatment with ARV drugs these patients could take several recreational drugs (e.g. amphetamines, hallucinogenes, opiates, or alcohol) with a possible development of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). In particular, Nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs/NtRTIs) are mainly excreted through the kidney and are not substrates of the cytochrome P450 or P-glycoprotein, therefore the DDIs during this treatment are minimal. In contrast, the other ARV drugs (i.e. non-nucleoside reversetranscriptase inhibitors, Protease inhibitors, Integrase inhibitors, chemokine receptor 5 antagonists and HIV-fusion inhibitors) are an important class of antiretroviral medications that are frequent components of HAART regimens but show several DDIs related to interaction with the cytochrome P450 or P-glycoprotein. In this paper we will review data concerning the possibility of DDI in HIV patients treated with ARV and taking recreational drugs.

  20. Addictive and non-addictive drugs induce distinct and specific patterns of ERK activation in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Valjent, Emmanuel; Pagès, Christiane; Hervé, Denis; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Caboche, Jocelyne

    2004-04-01

    A major goal of research on addiction is to identify the molecular mechanisms of long-lasting behavioural alterations induced by drugs of abuse. Cocaine and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the striatum and blockade of the ERK pathway prevents establishment of conditioned place preference to these drugs. However, it is not known whether activation of ERK in the striatum is specific for these two drugs and/or this brain region. We studied the appearance of phospho-ERK immunoreactive neurons in CD-1 mouse brain following acute administration of drugs commonly abused by humans, cocaine, morphine, nicotine and THC, or of other psychoactive compounds including caffeine, scopolamine, antidepressants and antipsychotics. Each drug generated a distinct regional pattern of ERK activation. All drugs of abuse increased ERK phosphorylation in nucleus accumbens, lateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, central amygdala and deep layers of prefrontal cortex, through a dopamine D1 receptor-dependent mechanism. Although some non-addictive drugs moderately activated ERK in a few of these areas, they never induced this combined pattern of strong activation. Antidepressants and caffeine activated ERK in hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Typical antipsychotics mildly activated ERK in dorsal striatum and superficial prefrontal cortex, whereas clozapine had no effect in the striatum, but more widespread effects in cortex and amygdala. Our results outline a subset of structures in which ERK activation might specifically contribute to the long-term effects of drugs of abuse, and suggest mapping ERK activation in brain as a way to identify potential sites of action of psychoactive drugs.

  1. Development of "Laser Ablation Direct Analysis in Real Time Imaging" Mass Spectrometry: Application to Spatial Distribution Mapping of Metabolites Along the Biosynthetic Cascade Leading to Synthesis of Atropine and Scopolamine in Plant Tissue.

    PubMed

    Fowble, Kristen L; Teramoto, Kanae; Cody, Robert B; Edwards, David; Guarrera, Donna; Musah, Rabi A

    2017-03-21

    Methods for the accomplishment of small-molecule imaging by mass spectrometry are challenged by the need for sample pretreatment steps, such as cryo-sectioning, dehydration, chemical fixation, or application of a matrix or solvent, that must be performed to obtain interpretable spatial distribution data. Furthermore, these steps along with requirements of the mass analyzer such as high vacuum, can severely limit the range of sample types that can be analyzed by this powerful method. Here, we report the development of a laser ablation-direct analysis in real time imaging mass spectrometry approach which couples a 213 nm Nd:YAG solid state UV laser to a direct analysis in a real time ion source and high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer. This platform enables facile determination of the spatial distribution of small-molecules spanning a range of polarities in a diversity of sample types and requires no matrix, vacuum, solvent, or complicated sample pretreatment steps. It furnishes high-resolution data, can be performed under ambient conditions on samples in their native form, and results in little to no fragmentation of analytes. We demonstrate its application through determination of the spatial distribution of molecules involved in the biosynthetic cascade leading to formation of the clinically relevant alkaloids atropine and scopolamine in Datura leichhardtii seed tissue.

  2. Multifunctional drugs as novel antidotes for organophosphates' poisoning.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Ben Avi; Raveh, Lily

    2011-12-18

    Some organophosphorus compounds (OPs) are nerve agents that continue to concern military personnel and civilians as potential battlefield and terrorist threats. Additionally, OPs are used in agriculture where they are associated with numerous cases of intentional and accidental misuse. These toxicants induce an array of deleterious effects including respiratory distress, convulsions and ultimately death. A mechanism involving a rapid and potent inhibition of peripheral and central cholinesterases leading to a massive buildup of acetylcholine in synaptic clefts was suggested as the underlying trigger of the toxic events. Indeed, therapy comprised of an acetylcholinesterase reactivator (i.e., oxime) and a cholinergic antagonist (e.g., atropine) is the accepted major paradigm for protection. This approach yields a remarkable survival rate but fails to prevent neurological and behavioral deficits. Extensive research revealed a complex picture consisting of an early activation of several neurotransmitter systems, in which the glutamatergic plays a pivotal role., Data accumulated in recent years support the concept that multi-targeting of pathways including glutamatergic and cholinergic circuits is required for an effective treatment. Drugs that demonstrate the ability to interact with several systems (e.g., caramiphen) were found to afford a superior protection against OPs as compared to specific antimuscarinic ligands (e.g., scopolamine). Compounds that potently block muscarinic receptors, interact with the NMDA ion channel and in addition are able to modulate σ(1) sites and/or GABAergic transmission seem to represent the emerging backbone for novel antidotes against OP poisoning. Several multifunctional drugs are already used for complex diseases e.g., cancer and depression.

  3. Drug watch.

    PubMed

    Whitson, S

    1999-01-01

    Recent developments on new anti-HIV agents and drugs for opportunistic infections are highlighted. Information is provided on the infusion inhibitor T-20; DuPont's second generation non-nukes, DPC 961 and DPC 963; Papirine (PEN203) for the human papilloma virus; Sporanox for treating fungal infections; and the antiretroviral protein, lysozyme. In addition, information is given on a plant found in the Bolivian rainforest that may contain compounds to prevent HIV infection by blocking the enzyme, integrase. Other promising new drugs addressed at the 6th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections are listed in a table. Contact information for US clinical trials is provided.

  4. NO-SSRIs: Nitric Oxide Chimera Drugs Incorporating a Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Hay, Samer; Schiefer, Isaac T; Chandrasena, R Esala P; Li, Min; Abdelhamid, Ramy; Wang, Yue-Ting; Tavassoli, Ehsan; Michalsen, Bradley; Asghodom, Rezene T; Luo, Jia; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2011-09-08

    Hybrid nitrate drugs have been reported to provide NO bioactivity to ameliorate side effects or to provide ancillary therapeutic activity. Hybrid nitrate selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (NO-SSRIs) were prepared to improve the therapeutic profile of this drug class. A synthetic strategy for use of a thiocarbamate linker was developed, which in the case of NO-fluoxetine facilitated hydrolysis to fluoxetine at pH 7.4 within 7 hours. In cell culture, NO-SSRIs were weak inhibitors of the serotonin transporter, however, in the forced swimming task (FST) in rats, NO-fluoxetine demonstrated classical antidepressant activity. Comparison of NO-fluoxetine, with fluoxetine, and an NO-chimera nitrate developed for Alzheimer's disease (GT-1061), was made in the step through passive avoidance (STPA) test of learning and memory in rats treated with scopolamine as an amnesic agent. Fluoxetine was inactive, whereas NO-fluoxetine and GT-1061 both restored long-term memory. GT-1061 also produced antidepressant behavior in FST. These data support the potential for NO-SSRIs to overcome the lag in onset of therapeutic action and provide co-therapy of neuropathologies concomitant with depression.

  5. First evidence that drugs of abuse produce behavioral sensitization and cross sensitization in planarians.

    PubMed

    Rawls, Scott M; Patil, Tavni; Yuvasheva, Ekaternia; Raffa, Robert B

    2010-07-01

    Behavioral sensitization in mammals, including humans, is sensitive to factors such as administration route, testing environment, and pharmacokinetic confounds, unrelated to the drugs themselves that are difficult to eliminate. Simpler animals less susceptible to these confounding influences may be advantageous substitutes for studying sensitization. We tested this hypothesis by determining whether planarians display sensitization and cross sensitization to cocaine and glutamate. Planarian hyperactivity was quantified as the number of C-like hyperkinesias during a 1-min drug exposure. Planarians exposed initially to cocaine (or glutamate) on day 1 were challenged with cocaine (or glutamate) after 2 or 6 days of abstinence. Acute cocaine or glutamate produced concentration-related hyperactivity. Cocaine or glutamate challenge after 2 and 6 days of abstinence enhanced the hyperactivity, indicating the substances produced planarian behavioral sensitization. Cross-sensitization experiments showed that cocaine produced greater hyperactivity in planarians earlier exposed to glutamate than in glutamate-naive planarians, and vice versa. Behavioral responses were pharmacologically selective because neither scopolamine nor caffeine produced planarian behavioral sensitization despite causing hyperactivity after initial administration, and acute gamma-aminobutyric acid did not cause hyperactivity. Demonstration of pharmacologically selective behavioral sensitization in planarians suggests that these flatworms represent a sensitive in-vivo model to study cocaine behavioral sensitization and to screen potential abuse-deterrent therapeutics.

  6. Antineoplastic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Sara; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antineoplastic drugs is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  7. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), also known as G, Liquid Ecstasy, and Soap Ketamine, also known as Special K, K, Vitamin K, and Jet Rohypnol, also known as Roofies Methamphetamine, also known as Speed, Ice, Chalk, Meth, Crystal, Crank, and Glass Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD), also ...

  8. Transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Müller, Fabian; Fromm, Martin F

    2011-07-01

    Drug-drug interactions are a serious clinical issue. An important mechanism underlying drug-drug interactions is induction or inhibition of drug transporters that mediate the cellular uptake and efflux of xenobiotics. Especially drug transporters of the small intestine, liver and kidney are major determinants of the pharmacokinetic profile of drugs. Transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions in these three organs can considerably influence the pharmacokinetics and clinical effects of drugs. In this article, we focus on probe drugs lacking significant metabolism to highlight mechanisms of interactions of selected intestinal, hepatic and renal drug transporters (e.g., organic anion transporting polypeptide [OATP] 1A2, OATP2B1, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, P-gp, organic anion transporter [OAT] 1, OAT3, breast cancer resistance protein [BCRP], organic cation transporter [OCT] 2 and multidrug and toxin extrusion protein [MATE] 1). Genotype-dependent drug-drug interactions are also discussed.

  9. Drugs and pharmaceuticals: management of intoxication and antidotes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Silas W

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of patients poisoned with drugs and pharmaceuticals can be quite challenging. Diverse exposure circumstances, varied clinical presentations, unique patient-specific factors, and inconsistent diagnostic and therapeutic infrastructure support, coupled with relatively few definitive antidotes, may complicate evaluation and management. The historical approach to poisoned patients (patient arousal, toxin elimination, and toxin identification) has given way to rigorous attention to the fundamental aspects of basic life support--airway management, oxygenation and ventilation, circulatory competence, thermoregulation, and substrate availability. Selected patients may benefit from methods to alter toxin pharmacokinetics to minimize systemic, target organ, or tissue compartment exposure (either by decreasing absorption or increasing elimination). These may include syrup of ipecac, orogastric lavage, activated single- or multi-dose charcoal, whole bowel irrigation, endoscopy and surgery, urinary alkalinization, saline diuresis, or extracorporeal methods (hemodialysis, charcoal hemoperfusion, continuous venovenous hemofiltration, and exchange transfusion). Pharmaceutical adjuncts and antidotes may be useful in toxicant-induced hyperthermias. In the context of analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anticholinergic, anticonvulsant, antihyperglycemic, antimicrobial, antineoplastic, cardiovascular, opioid, or sedative-hypnotic agents overdose, N-acetylcysteine, physostigmine, L-carnitine, dextrose, octreotide, pyridoxine, dexrazoxane, leucovorin, glucarpidase, atropine, calcium, digoxin-specific antibody fragments, glucagon, high-dose insulin euglycemia therapy, lipid emulsion, magnesium, sodium bicarbonate, naloxone, and flumazenil are specifically reviewed. In summary, patients generally benefit from aggressive support of vital functions, careful history and physical examination, specific laboratory analyses, a thoughtful consideration of the risks and benefits of

  10. Interaction of valproic acid and amitriptyline: analysis of therapeutic drug monitoring data under naturalistic conditions.

    PubMed

    Unterecker, Stefan; Burger, Rainer; Hohage, Amelie; Deckert, Jürgen; Pfuhlmann, Bruno

    2013-08-01

    Amitriptyline (AMI) and valproic acid (VPA) are common psychotropic drugs which are frequently used in psychiatry and also administered in neurology or anesthesia in the absence of a psychiatric indication. On the basis of the case of a 73-year-old man with therapy-resistant major depressive episode who experienced anticholinergic delirium after adding VPA to AMI, we retrospectively analyzed therapeutic drug monitoring data of the years 2008 to 2010. We assessed cases receiving a combination of AMI and VPA, and obtained a control sample of AMI patients without VPA which were matched for sex, age, daily dose, and comedication. Both samples were compared regarding the serum levels of AMI and nortriptyline (NOR) as well as the ratio of NOR and AMI with the Mann-Whitney U test. The combination of AMI and VPA led to a remarkable increase of AMI and NOR serum levels. When comparing 33 patients who received comedication with VPA versus 33 matched controls, the total concentration by combining mean AMI and NOR serum levels (237.1 [119.9] vs 126.4 [52.8] ng/mL) and NOR/AMI ratio (1.300 [0.905] vs 0.865 [0.455]) was significantly higher. Both AMI and VPA are widely prescribed drugs. A combination of both is common for psychiatric or neurologic patients. A cautious dosing of AMI with VPA comedication is advisable, and therapeutic drug monitoring should be performed because this combination may lead to a remarkable increase of AMI and NOR serum levels.

  11. Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Month Approvals, tentative approvals, and supplements Original New Drug Approvals (NDAs and BLAs) by Month All applications ... FDA. Does not include tentative approvals. Original Abbreviated New Drug Approvals (ANDAs) by Month Generic Drug Approvals. Does ...

  12. Transport of ipratropium, an anti-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease drug, is mediated by organic cation/carnitine transporters in human bronchial epithelial cells: implications for carrier-mediated pulmonary absorption.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toshimichi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Haruta, Tsunemitsu; Shirasaka, Yoshiyuki; Keogh, John P; Tamai, Ikumi

    2010-02-01

    Ipratropium bromide, an anticholinergic drug used for the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, has low oral bioavailability, but systemic exposure, superior to oral administration, can be achieved by inhalation. Therefore, we investigated the pulmonary absorption mechanism of ipratropium using human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells. [3H]Ipratropium uptake by BEAS-2B cells was temperature-dependent and saturable, with a K(m) value of 78.0 microM, suggesting involvement of carrier-mediated uptake. An RT-PCR study showed that organic cation/carnitine transporters OCTN1 and OCTN2 are expressed in BEAS-2B cells, but organic cation transporters (OCTs) are not. Uptake of [3H]ipratropium by HEK293 cells expressing OCTN1 (HEK293/OCTN1) and OCTN2 (HEK293/OCTN2) was significantly increased, compared with mock-transfected cells, and the estimated K(m) values were 444 microM and 53.0 microM, respectively. Finally, the contributions of OCTN1 and OCTN2 to ipratropium uptake were evaluated by measuring [3H]ipratropium uptake by BEAS-2B cells in which OCTN1 or OCTN2 gene expression had been silenced. Knock-down of OCTN1 or OCTN2 suppressed the uptake of [3H]ipratropium to 78.2% and 14.8% of that by control BEAS-2B cells, respectively. In addition, another anticholinergic, tiotropium, was also taken up by both HEK293/OCTN1 and HEK293/OCTN2 cells. Therefore, ipratropium and tiotropium are taken up primarily by OCTN2, and to a lesser extent by OCTN1, in bronchial epithelial cells. These findings are consistent with the pharmacological activity of the drugs after administration via inhalation.

  13. Antiplatelet Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, Jack; Spencer, Frederick A.; Baglin, Trevor P.; Weitz, Jeffrey I.

    2012-01-01

    The article describes the mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of aspirin, dipyridamole, cilostazol, the thienopyridines, and the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists. The relationships among dose, efficacy, and safety are discussed along with a mechanistic overview of results of randomized clinical trials. The article does not provide specific management recommendations but highlights important practical aspects of antiplatelet therapy, including optimal dosing, the variable balance between benefits and risks when antiplatelet therapies are used alone or in combination with other antiplatelet drugs in different clinical settings, and the implications of persistently high platelet reactivity despite such treatment. PMID:22315278

  14. Drugs Approved for Neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for neuroblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  15. Drugs Approved for Retinoblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for retinoblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  16. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the FDA for use in leukemia. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  17. Club Drug Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... different from other illicit drugs?What are the dangers of taking club drugs?What can I do ... Drug Use | Gamma-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB)Learn about the dangers of taking gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), an illegal drug ...

  18. Effects of Drug Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... Used Drugs in the Past Drug Use Prevention Phone Numbers and Websites Search ... and the brain , sometimes forever. Learn more about: how drug use and mental health problems often happen together the link between drug use ...

  19. Urine drug screen

    MedlinePlus

    Drug screen -- urine ... detect the presence of illegal and some prescription drugs in your urine. Their presence indicates that you recently used these drugs. Some drugs may remain in your system for ...

  20. The non-neuronal cholinergic system as novel drug target in the airways.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Michael Paul

    2012-11-27

    The parasympathetic nervous system is a key regulator of the human organism involved in the pathophysiology of various disorders through cholinergic mechanisms. In the lungs, acetylcholine (ACh) released by vagal nerve endings stimulates muscarinic receptors thereby increasing airway smooth muscle tone. Contraction of airway smooth muscle cells leads to increased respiratory resistance and dyspnea. An additional branch of the cholinergic system is the non-neuronal cholinergic system expressed in nearly all cell types present in the airways. Activation of this system may contribute to an increased cholinergic tone in the lungs, inducing pathophysiological processes like inflammation, remodeling, mucus hypersecretion and chronic cough. Selective muscarinic receptor antagonists specifically inhibit acetylcholine at the receptor inducing bronchodilation in patients with obstructive airway diseases. This paper reviews preclinical pharmacological research activities on anticholinergics including experimental models of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, COPD. It discloses various options to follow up the non-neuronal cholinergic system as a novel drug target for the treatment of key aspects of obstructive airway diseases, in particular those of a chronic nature.

  1. Stability study of a new antidote drug combination (Atropine-HI-6-Prodiazepam) for treatment of organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Clair, P; Wiberg, K; Granelli, I; Carlsson Bratt, I; Blanchet, G

    2000-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the chemical stability of a new antidote combination for the treatment of organophosphate poisoning. The antidote combination was packed (enclosed) in two plastic compartments separated by a barrier film. One of them contained a powder oxime cholinesterase reactivator (HI-6-monohydrate 1-[[[4-(aminocarbonyl)pyridinio]methoxy]methyl]-2-[(hydro xyimino)meth yl]-pyridinium dichloride). The other contained an anticholinergic (Atropine) and an anticonvulsant (Prodiazepam or Avizafone (L-lysyl-N-(2-benzoyl-4-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-glycinamide dihydrochloride) drug in a liquid mixture. The plastic compartments were mounted in an autoinjector device to study the dissolution of HI-6 by ejection of the solution. Drug analysis was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography. The results obtained after 6 months show that this new antidote combination is stable. The amount of each antidote is unchanged during the study. Some known degradation products can be detected in small amounts. The autoinjector mechanism used, gives a complete dissolution of HI-6 powder in the liquid mixture throughout the study.

  2. Drugs and the Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This booklet explores various aspects of drug addiction, with a special focus on drugs' effects on the brain. A brief introduction presents information on the rampant use of drugs in society and elaborates the distinction between drug abuse and drug addiction. Next, a detailed analysis of the brain and its functions is given. Drugs target the more…

  3. DrugCentral: online drug compendium

    PubMed Central

    Ursu, Oleg; Holmes, Jayme; Knockel, Jeffrey; Bologa, Cristian G.; Yang, Jeremy J.; Mathias, Stephen L.; Nelson, Stuart J.; Oprea, Tudor I.

    2017-01-01

    DrugCentral (http://drugcentral.org) is an open-access online drug compendium. DrugCentral integrates structure, bioactivity, regulatory, pharmacologic actions and indications for active pharmaceutical ingredients approved by FDA and other regulatory agencies. Monitoring of regulatory agencies for new drugs approvals ensures the resource is up-to-date. DrugCentral integrates content for active ingredients with pharmaceutical formulations, indexing drugs and drug label annotations, complementing similar resources available online. Its complementarity with other online resources is facilitated by cross referencing to external resources. At the molecular level, DrugCentral bridges drug-target interactions with pharmacological action and indications. The integration with FDA drug labels enables text mining applications for drug adverse events and clinical trial information. Chemical structure overlap between DrugCentral and five online drug resources, and the overlap between DrugCentral FDA-approved drugs and their presence in four different chemical collections, are discussed. DrugCentral can be accessed via the web application or downloaded in relational database format. PMID:27789690

  4. Drug Preferences of Multiple Drug Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harford, Robert J.

    1978-01-01

    Examined drug preferences of a group of active multiple drug abusers referred for treatment. Nearly half the respondents preferred drugs other than type they most frequently used. Preferences were related to method of administration. Results suggest preference is one among several determinants of drug use. (Author/BEF)

  5. Personality, Drug Preference, Drug Use, and Drug Availability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Marc; Boyer, Bret; Kumar, V. K.; Prout, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between drug preference, drug use, drug availability, and personality among individuals (n = 100) in treatment for substance abuse in an effort to replicate the results of an earlier study (Feldman, Kumar, Angelini, Pekala, & Porter, 2007) designed to test prediction derived from Eysenck's (1957, 1967)…

  6. Drug combination therapy increases successful drug repositioning.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Sanderson, Philip E; Zheng, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Repositioning of approved drugs has recently gained new momentum for rapid identification and development of new therapeutics for diseases that lack effective drug treatment. Reported repurposing screens have increased dramatically in number in the past five years. However, many newly identified compounds have low potency; this limits their immediate clinical applications because the known, tolerated plasma drug concentrations are lower than the required therapeutic drug concentrations. Drug combinations of two or more compounds with different mechanisms of action are an alternative approach to increase the success rate of drug repositioning.

  7. Personality, drug preference, drug use, and drug availability.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Marc; Boyer, Bret; Kumar, V K; Prout, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between drug preference, drug use, drug availability, and personality among individuals (n = 100) in treatment for substance abuse in an effort to replicate the results of an earlier study (Feldman, Kumar, Angelini, Pekala, & Porter, 2007) designed to test prediction derived from Eysenck's (1957, 1967) theories. Drug preference was measured by the method of paired-comparison and personality was measured with the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire-50 CC. Contrary to expectations, high compared with low scorers on Sociability and Impulsive-Sensation Seeking preferred depressants. Surprisingly, low compared with high scorers on neuroticism did not differ in preference for alcohol. As in the previous study, drug preference, use, and availability were highly correlated, although ease of availability was slightly more predictive of drug use than drug preference. Clinical and theoretical implications are discussed.

  8. 99 Films on Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, David O., Ed.

    This catalog describes and evaluates 16-millimeter films about various aspects of drug use. Among the subjects covered by the 99 films are the composition and effects of different drugs, reasons why people use drugs, life in the drug culture, the problem of law enforcement, and various means of dealing with drug users. Each film is synopsized. Two…

  9. Drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and novel cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Marazzi, Giuseppe; Greco, Cesare; Gaudio, Carlo; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2015-10-15

    The combination of aspirin and the thienopyridine clopidogrel is a cornerstone in the prevention of atherothrombotic events. These two agents act in concert to ameliorate the prothrombotic processes stimulated by plaque rupture and vessel injury complicating cardiovascular disease. Guidelines recommend the use of clopidogrel in patients with acute coronary syndromes and in those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, and the drug remains the most utilized P2Y12 receptor inhibitor despite the fact that newer antiplatelet agents are now available. In recent years, numerous studies have shown inconsistency in the efficacy of clopidogrel to prevent atherothrombotic events. Studies of platelet function testing have shown variability in the response to clopidogrel. One of the major reason for this phenomenon lies in the interaction between clopidogrel and other drugs that may affect clopidogrel absorption, metabolism, and ultimately its antiplatelet action. Importantly, these drug-drug interactions have prognostic implications, since patients with high on-treatment platelet reactivity associated with reduced clopidogrel metabolism have an increased risk of ischemia. Previous systematic reviews have focused on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and specific pharmacologic classes, such as proton pump inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, and statins. However, more recent pieces of scientific evidence show that clopidogrel may also interact with newer drugs that are now available for the treatment of cardiovascular patients. Accordingly, the aim of this review is to highlight and discuss recent data on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and third-generation proton pump inhibitors, pantoprazole and lansoprazole, statins, pitavastatin, and antianginal drug, ranolazine.

  10. Attitudes towards drug legalization among drug users.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Roberto A; Richard, Alan J

    2002-01-01

    Research shows that support for legalization of drugs varies significantly among different sociodemographic and political groups. Yet there is little research examining the degree of support for legalization of drugs among drug users. This paper examines how frequency and type of drug use affect the support for legalization of drugs after adjusting for the effects of political affiliation and sociodemographic characteristics. A sample of 188 drug users and non-drug users were asked whether they would support the legalization of marijuana, cocaine, and heroin. Respondents reported their use of marijuana, crack, cocaine, heroin, speedball, and/or methamphetamines during the previous 30 days. Support for legalization of drugs was analyzed by estimating three separate logistic regressions. The results showed that the support for the legalization of drugs depended on the definition of "drug user" and the type of drug. In general, however, the results showed that marijuana users were more likely to support legalizing marijuana, but they were less likely to support the legalization of cocaine and heroin. On the other hand, users of crack, cocaine, heroin, speedball, and/or methamphetamines were more likely to support legalizing all drugs including cocaine and heroin.

  11. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Visitor Information Contact Us Research > NIAID's Role in Research > Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance > Understanding share with facebook share with twitter ... Prevention, Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Antimicrobial ... To prevent antimicrobial resistance, you and your healthcare ...

  12. Drug Plan Coverage Rules

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medication Therapy Management programs Drug plan coverage rules , current page Using your drug plan for the first time Filling a prescription without your new plan card Costs for Medicare drug coverage Joining a health or ...

  13. Drugs Approved for Melanoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Melanoma This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Melanoma Aldesleukin Cobimetinib Cotellic (Cobimetinib) Dabrafenib Dacarbazine DTIC-Dome ( ...

  14. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user.

  15. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  16. National Drug IQ Challenge

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Drug IQ Challenge 2016 National Drug & Alcohol IQ Challenge Print Get Started! Correct/Total Questions: Score: ... accessible version of the 2016 National Drug & Alcohol IQ Challenge , [PDF, 637KB]. Download an accessible version of ...

  17. Prescription Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Whether they're using street drugs or medications, drug abusers often have trouble at school, at home, with ... a short period of time may make a drug abuser aggressive or paranoid. Although stimulant abuse might not ...

  18. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Chandra; Zuniga, Baltazar; Song, Chung Seog; Jiang, Shoulei; Cropper, Jodie; Park, Sulgi; Chatterjee, Bandana

    Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0) and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III). Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs), i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor) and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor), and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR), due to transactivation of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs) present in phase 0-III genes. Additional NRs, like HNF4-α, FXR, LXR-α play important roles in drug metabolism in certain settings, such as in relation to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. The phase I enzymes CYP3A4/A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2A6, CYP2J2, and CYP2E1 metabolize >90% of all prescription drugs, and phase II conjugation of hydrophilic functional groups (with/without phase I modification) facilitates drug clearance. The conjugation step is mediated by broad-specificity transferases like UGTs, SULTs, GSTs. This review delves into our current understanding of PXR/CAR/VDR-mediated regulation of DME and transporter expression, as well as effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and epigenome (specified by promoter methylation, histone modification, microRNAs, long non coding RNAs) on the expression of PXR/CAR/VDR and phase 0-III mediators, and their impacts on variable drug response. Therapeutic agents that target epigenetic regulation and the molecular basis and consequences (overdosing, underdosing, or beneficial outcome) of drug-drug/drug-food/drug-herb interactions are also discussed. Precision medicine requires understanding of a drug's impact on DME and transporter activity and their NR-regulated expression in order to achieve optimal drug efficacy without adverse drug reactions. In future drug screening, new tools such as humanized mouse models and

  19. Nanoencapsulation for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Avnesh; Singla, Rubbel; Guliani, Anika; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Nanoencapsulation of drug/small molecules in nanocarriers (NCs) is a very promising approach for development of nanomedicine. Modern drug encapsulation methods allow efficient loading of drug molecules inside the NCs thereby reducing systemic toxicity associated with drugs. Targeting of NCs can enhance the accumulation of nanonencapsulated drug at the diseased site. This article focussed on the synthesis methods, drug loading, drug release mechanism and cellular response of nanoencapsulated drugs on liposomes, micelles, carbon nanotubes, dendrimers, and magnetic NCs. Also the uses of these various NCs have been highlighted in the field of nanotechnology. PMID:26417260

  20. Text mining for drug-drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Heng-Yi; Chiang, Chien-Wei; Li, Lang

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms of drug-drug interaction (DDI), the study of pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and pharmacogenetics (PG) data are significant. In recent years, drug PK parameters, drug interaction parameters, and PG data have been unevenly collected in different databases and published extensively in literature. Also the lack of an appropriate PK ontology and a well-annotated PK corpus, which provide the background knowledge and the criteria of determining DDI, respectively, lead to the difficulty of developing DDI text mining tools for PK data collection from the literature and data integration from multiple databases.To conquer the issues, we constructed a comprehensive pharmacokinetics ontology. It includes all aspects of in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments, in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, as well as drug metabolism and transportation enzymes. Using our pharmacokinetics ontology, a PK corpus was constructed to present four classes of pharmacokinetics abstracts: in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, in vivo pharmacogenetic studies, in vivo drug interaction studies, and in vitro drug interaction studies. A novel hierarchical three-level annotation scheme was proposed and implemented to tag key terms, drug interaction sentences, and drug interaction pairs. The utility of the pharmacokinetics ontology was demonstrated by annotating three pharmacokinetics studies; and the utility of the PK corpus was demonstrated by a drug interaction extraction text mining analysis.The pharmacokinetics ontology annotates both in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments and in vivo pharmacokinetics studies. The PK corpus is a highly valuable resource for the text mining of pharmacokinetics parameters and drug interactions.

  1. Drug Delivery Systems for Platinum Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Vien T.; Scarano, Wei; Stenzel, Martina H.

    2013-09-01

    Since the discovery of cisplatin, drugs based on platinum, have made a significant impact on the treatment of various cancers. The administration of platinum drugs is however accompanied by significant side effects. This chapter discusses the types of drug delivery systems that have been developed in order to enable the targeted delivery while maintaining controlled temporal supply of the drug. The sizes of carriers range from nanometer to micrometer sized particles. The most common types of drug carriers are micelles, liposomes, nanoparticles, and dendrimers, but also a few microspheres have been developed. Most striking aspect of the delivery of platinum drugs is the possibility of physical encapsulation but also the binding of the drug to the polymer carrier coordinate covalent bond. Since platinum drugs have typically two permanent and two leaving ligands, the polymer can be part of either ligand. As the leaving ligand, the platinum drug is released often as cisplatin. If the polymer provides the functionality for the permanent ligand, a new macromolecular drug has been formed. In addition to the attachment of pt(II) drugs, recent offorts are devoted to the conjugation via the Pt((IV) prodrug.

  2. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Chandra; Zuniga, Baltazar; Song, Chung Seog; Jiang, Shoulei; Cropper, Jodie; Park, Sulgi; Chatterjee, Bandana

    2016-01-01

    Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0) and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III). Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs), i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor) and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor), and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR), due to transactivation of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs) present in phase 0-III genes. Additional NRs, like HNF4-α, FXR, LXR-α play important roles in drug metabolism in certain settings, such as in relation to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. The phase I enzymes CYP3A4/A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2A6, CYP2J2, and CYP2E1 metabolize >90% of all prescription drugs, and phase II conjugation of hydrophilic functional groups (with/without phase I modification) facilitates drug clearance. The conjugation step is mediated by broad-specificity transferases like UGTs, SULTs, GSTs. This review delves into our current understanding of PXR/CAR/VDR-mediated regulation of DME and transporter expression, as well as effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and epigenome (specified by promoter methylation, histone modification, microRNAs, long non coding RNAs) on the expression of PXR/CAR/VDR and phase 0-III mediators, and their impacts on variable drug response. Therapeutic agents that target epigenetic regulation and the molecular basis and consequences (overdosing, underdosing, or beneficial outcome) of drug-drug/drug-food/drug-herb interactions are also discussed. Precision medicine requires understanding of a drug’s impact on DME and transporter activity and their NR-regulated expression in order to achieve optimal drug efficacy without adverse drug reactions. In future drug screening, new tools such as humanized mouse models and

  3. Effects of dopamine agonists, catecholamine depletors, and cholinergic and GABAergic drugs on acute dyskinesias in squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Neale, R; Gerhardt, S; Liebman, J M

    1984-01-01

    It has been suggested that the neuroleptic-induced acute dyskinetic syndrome in monkeys may be a useful model of extrapyramidal dysfunction. Various drugs that have well-characterized effects on clinical extrapyramidal syndromes and on catecholaminergic, cholinergic, or GABAergic neurotransmission were assessed in dyskinesia-susceptible squirrel monkeys. Catecholamine depletors (alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine, tetrabenazine) induced the syndrome, as do dopamine (DA) receptor antagonists, and d-amphetamine reversed the effects of tetrabenazine. The haloperidol-induced syndrome was reversed by the indirectly acting DA agonists amantadine and L-dopa. Neither of the DA autoreceptor agonist TL-99 or 3-PPP elicited this syndrome, suggesting that these agents lack extrapyramidal involvement. Anticholinergics reversed haloperidol-induced dyskinesias and the cholinomimetic arecoline was capable of inducing dyskinesias. When coadministered repeatedly with haloperidol, benztropine suppressed the emergence of susceptibility to neuroleptic-induced dyskinesias. These results confirm that the acute dyskinetic syndrome in the monkey is characterized by DA deficiency and acetylcholine excess. Diazepam and baclofen, which have been reported to have some clinical benefit in tardive dyskinesia, suppressed haloperidol-induced acute dyskinesias without causing gross motor depression. Pharmacological manipulation of GABAergic pathways from striatum may constitute a fruitful approach to the treatment of dyskinetic motor disorders.

  4. Temperature Regulation Following Systemic Anticholinergic or Anticholinesterase Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    exercise; and 2) attenuated secretion from eccrine sweat glands. Conversely pyridostigmine, an anticholinesterase, increases cholinergic stimulation at...receptors because acetylcholine is not rapidly hydrolyzed and binds with available receptors in the synaptic area. 2 By this action, 1) eccrine sweat ...and mean weighted skin temperatures were measured continuo’-sly, as was forearm sweating rate, forearm blood flow (FBF, venou. occlusic-i

  5. What Are Drugs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Police and Peace Officers Association.

    This guide for parents presents, in Laotian and English, information about drugs, drug use and abuse, and treatment for drug use. Most of the information is presented in question and answer form to give parents the information they need to answer their children's questions and help prevent drug use. The following sections are included: (1)…

  6. Utah Drug Use Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Governor's Citizen Advisory Committee on Drugs, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This questionnaire assesses drug use practices in junior and senior high school students. The 21 multiple choice items pertain to drug use practices, use history, available of drugs, main reason for drug use, and demographic data. The questionnaire is untimed, group administered, and may be given by the classroom teacher in about 10 minutes. Item…

  7. Fighting the Drug War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Journal of State Government, 1990

    1990-01-01

    All nine articles in this periodical issue focus on the theme of the war against illegal drug use, approaching the topic from a variety of perspectives. The articles are: "The Drug War: Meeting the Challenge" (Stanley E. Morris); "Ways to Fight Drug Abuse" (Bruce A. Feldman); "Treatment Key to Fighting Drugs" (Stan…

  8. Drugs and Young People

    MedlinePlus

    Drug abuse is a serious public health problem. It affects almost every community and family in some way. Drug abuse in children and teenagers may pose a ... of young people may be more susceptible to drug abuse and addiction than adult brains. Abused drugs ...

  9. New drug update: 2010.

    PubMed

    Hussar, Daniel A

    2010-10-01

    Five new drugs that are used for medical problems often encountered in the elderly have been selected for consideration in this review. The uses and most important properties of these agents are considered, and a rating for each new drug is determined using the New Drug Comparison Rating (NDCR) system developed by the author. In the NDCR system, a rating from 1 to 5 (5 being the highest rating) is assigned for each new drug. The rating is based on a comparison of the new drug with related drugs already marketed. Advantages, disadvantages, and other important information regarding the new drug are identified and used as the basis for determining the rating.

  10. 2016 New Drug Update.

    PubMed

    Hussar, Daniel A

    2016-04-01

    Six new drugs marketed within the last year, which are used for medical problems often experienced by the elderly, have been selected for consideration in this review. The uses and most important properties of these agents are discussed, and a rating for each new drug is determined using the New Drug Comparison Rating (NDCR) system developed by the author. Advantages, disadvantages, and other important information regarding the new drug are identified and used as the basis for determining the rating. The drugs include a hypnotic, an anticoagulant, two drugs for heart failure, and two drugs to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

  11. New drug update: 2011.

    PubMed

    Hussar, Daniel A

    2012-04-01

    Five new drugs that are used for medical problems often encountered in the elderly have been selected for consideration in this review. The uses and most important properties of these agents are considered, and a rating for each new drug is determined using the New Drug Comparison Rating (NDCR) system developed by the author. In the NDCR system, a rating from 1 to 5 (5 being the highest rating) is assigned for each new drug. The rating is based on a comparison of the new drug with related drugs already marketed. Advantages, disadvantages, and other important information regarding the new drug are identified and used as the basis for determining the rating.

  12. Drug hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bonnetblanc, J M

    1993-01-01

    Some types of hypersensitivity to drugs are defined either by the generic name of the drug or descriptive terms. They are sometimes assimilated to pseudolymphoma because the causative drugs are often the same, although the eruption lacks clinical and histopathological criteria of pseudolymphoma. It is then suggested to use 'idiosyncratic drug hypersensitivity syndrome' to define this type of drug reaction. As the skin and other organs may be involved, a generic name would help to determine a better definition and a surveillance program.

  13. New drug update: 2012.

    PubMed

    Hussar, Daniel A

    2013-04-01

    Five new drugs that are used for medical problems often experienced by the elderly have been selected for consideration in this review. The uses and most important properties of these agents are considered, and a rating for each new drug is determined. The rating is based on a comparison of the new drug with related drugs already marketed. Advantages, disadvantages, and other important information regarding the new drug are identified and used as the basis for determining the rating.

  14. Drug interactions with oral sulphonylurea hypoglycaemic drugs.

    PubMed

    Hansen, J M; Christensen, L K

    1977-01-01

    The effect of the oral sulphonylurea hypoglycaemic drugs may be influenced by a large number of other drugs. Some of these combinations (e.g. phenylbutazone, sulphaphenazole) may re