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Sample records for anticipatory postural reactions

  1. Kinesio taping in young healthy subjects does not affect postural reflex reactions and anticipatory postural adjustments of the trunk: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Voglar, Matej; Sarabon, Nejc

    2014-09-01

    Therapeutic Kinesio Taping method is used for treatment of various musculo-skeletal conditions. Kinesio Taping might have some small clinically important beneficial effects on range of motion and strength but findings about the effects on proprioception and muscle activation are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to test if Kinesio Taping influences anticipatory postural adjustments and postural reflex reactions. To test the hypothesis twelve healthy young participants were recruited in randomized, participants blinded, placebo controlled cross-over study. In the experimental condition the tape was applied over the paravertebral muscles and in placebo condition sham application of the tape was done transversally over the lumbar region. Timing of anticipatory postural adjustments to fast voluntary arms movement and postural reflex reactions to sudden loading over the hands were measured by means of superficial electromyography before and one hour after each tape application. Results showed no significant differences between Kinesio Taping and placebo taping conditions for any of the analyzed muscles in anticipatory postural adaptations (F1,11 < 0.23, p > 0.64, η2 < 0.04) or postural reflex reactions (F1,11 < 4.16, p > 0.07, η(2) < 0.49). Anticipatory postural adjustments of erector spinae and multifidus muscles were initiated significantly earlier after application of taping (regardless of technique) compared to pre-taping (F1,11 = 5.02, p = 0.046, η(2) = 0.31 and F1,11 = 6.18, p = 0.030, η(2) = 0.36 for erector spinae and multifidus, respectively). Taping application over lumbar region has potential beneficial effects on timing of anticipatory postural adjustments regardless of application technique but no effect on postural reflex reactions in young pain free participants. Further research in patients with low back pain would be encouraged. Key PointsApplication of Kinesio Taping does not affect postural reflex reactions in young healthy population

  2. Kinesio Taping in Young Healthy Subjects Does Not Affect Postural Reflex Reactions and Anticipatory Postural Adjustments of the Trunk: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Voglar, Matej; Sarabon, Nejc

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic Kinesio Taping method is used for treatment of various musculo-skeletal conditions. Kinesio Taping might have some small clinically important beneficial effects on range of motion and strength but findings about the effects on proprioception and muscle activation are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to test if Kinesio Taping influences anticipatory postural adjustments and postural reflex reactions. To test the hypothesis twelve healthy young participants were recruited in randomized, participants blinded, placebo controlled cross-over study. In the experimental condition the tape was applied over the paravertebral muscles and in placebo condition sham application of the tape was done transversally over the lumbar region. Timing of anticipatory postural adjustments to fast voluntary arms movement and postural reflex reactions to sudden loading over the hands were measured by means of superficial electromyography before and one hour after each tape application. Results showed no significant differences between Kinesio Taping and placebo taping conditions for any of the analyzed muscles in anticipatory postural adaptations (F1,11 < 0.23, p > 0.64, η2 < 0.04) or postural reflex reactions (F1,11 < 4.16, p > 0.07, η2 < 0.49). Anticipatory postural adjustments of erector spinae and multifidus muscles were initiated significantly earlier after application of taping (regardless of technique) compared to pre-taping (F1,11 = 5.02, p = 0.046, η2 = 0.31 and F1,11 = 6.18, p = 0.030, η2 = 0.36 for erector spinae and multifidus, respectively). Taping application over lumbar region has potential beneficial effects on timing of anticipatory postural adjustments regardless of application technique but no effect on postural reflex reactions in young pain free participants. Further research in patients with low back pain would be encouraged. Key Points Application of Kinesio Taping does not affect postural reflex reactions in young healthy population. Earlier

  3. The posterior shift anticipatory postural adjustment in choice reaction step initiation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ruopeng; Guerra, Richard; Shea, John B

    2015-05-01

    The ability to step quickly in response to a perturbation has been shown to be critical for prevention of falls. The cognitive processing, weight shifting, and locomotion must be well timed to execute a successful step. The purpose of this study was to compare the response preparation and response execution processes between a simple (SRST) and a choice reaction stepping task (CRST). Nine healthy young subjects were recruited to participate in this study. Subjects were required to stand on a forceplate and maintain their balance, and step forward on a second forceplate with either the left or right foot after hearing an auditory tone. The center of pressure (COP) was analyzed to determine the types of anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) prior to a step. The APA phase and stepping phase timing was calculated based on the COP trajectory. Findings showed that reaction time (RT), APA phase and overall stepping latency were slower for CRST than for SRST. We also identified an intermediate type of APA response (posterior shift APA) in addition to the correct and error APA response, and found the posterior shift APA response had the fastest execution time for CRST, and may be beneficial for falls prevention.

  4. Contribution of seat and foot reaction forces to anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) in sitting isometric ramp pushes.

    PubMed

    Le Bozec, Serge; Bouisset, Simon

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to examine the role of the upper and lower body on the dynamic phenomena, which precede the voluntary movement (anticipatory postural adjustments: APAs), and the way in which they contribute to postural control. In this view, sitting subjects were asked to perform horizontal two-handed ramp pushes as quickly as possible. A dynamometric bar was used to provide the push force (F(x)). Local reaction forces along the antero-posterior and vertical axes, at the seat and foot-rests (R(Sx), R(Sz), and R(fx), R(fz), respectively), as well as global ones (R(x) and R(z)), were measured. Two postural conditions were considered: full (100 BP) and one-third ischio-femoral contact (30 BP). Anticipatory postural adjustments durations (dAPAs) were measured between the onset of global or local (that is, at the seat and foot level) reaction forces, and the onset of push force increase. Firstly, the dAPAs were longer at the foot than at the seat level, that is, the APA sequence starts at the foot level: it is suggested that a "posturo-focal" sequence is followed, whose progression order is precisely dependent on the postural conditions. Moreover, the APA peak amplitudes (pAPA), measured at the seat contact were significantly greater than the corresponding ones measured at the foot contact: the upper body dynamics are larger than the lower body dynamics. Secondly, a greater peak push force (pF(x)) entailed significant dAPA increases, in preference to pAPA increases. As APAs are dynamic phenomena, they can perturb balance, suggesting that, in order to avoid unnecessary perturbation, APAs are increased in terms of duration rather than amplitude. Lastly, the impulses corresponding to the push force increase ("BPI(x)") and to the APA periods ("ACPI(x)") were calculated. As ACPI(x) was very low as compared to BPI(x), it was suggested that the APA action was limited to the period of the voluntary movement onset.

  5. Elderly Fallers Enhance Dynamic Stability Through Anticipatory Postural Adjustments during a Choice Stepping Reaction Time

    PubMed Central

    Tisserand, Romain; Robert, Thomas; Chabaud, Pascal; Bonnefoy, Marc; Chèze, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    In the case of disequilibrium, the capacity to step quickly is critical to avoid falling in elderly. This capacity can be simply assessed through the choice stepping reaction time test (CSRT), where elderly fallers (F) take longer to step than elderly non-fallers (NF). However, the reasons why elderly F elongate their stepping time remain unclear. The purpose of this study is to assess the characteristics of anticipated postural adjustments (APA) that elderly F develop in a stepping context and their consequences on the dynamic stability. Forty-four community-dwelling elderly subjects (20 F and 24 NF) performed a CSRT where kinematics and ground reaction forces were collected. Variables were analyzed using two-way repeated measures ANOVAs. Results for F compared to NF showed that stepping time is elongated, due to a longer APA phase. During APA, they seem to use two distinct balance strategies, depending on the axis: in the anteroposterior direction, we measured a smaller backward movement and slower peak velocity of the center of pressure (CoP); in the mediolateral direction, the CoP movement was similar in amplitude and peak velocity between groups but lasted longer. The biomechanical consequence of both strategies was an increased margin of stability (MoS) at foot-off, in the respective direction. By elongating their APA, elderly F use a safer balance strategy that prioritizes dynamic stability conditions instead of the objective of the task. Such a choice in balance strategy probably comes from muscular limitations and/or a higher fear of falling and paradoxically indicates an increased risk of fall. PMID:27965561

  6. An effect of posture on anticipatory anxiety.

    PubMed

    Lipnicki, Darren M; Byrne, Don G

    2008-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of body posture on state anxiety and psychological stress. Twenty normal adults performed a demanding mental arithmetic task in both standing and supine conditions, with subjective measures of anxiety and stress obtained before, immediately, and 10 min after the task. Participants were found to experience anticipatory anxiety when standing, although not when supine. The mechanism underlying this effect remains to be determined, although it could involve a postural difference in baroreceptor load.

  7. Two aspects of feedforward postural control: anticipatory postural adjustments and anticipatory synergy adjustments.

    PubMed

    Klous, Miriam; Mikulic, Pavle; Latash, Mark L

    2011-05-01

    We used the framework of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis to explore the relations between anticipatory synergy adjustments (ASAs) and anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) during feedforward control of vertical posture. ASAs represent a drop in the index of a multimuscle-mode synergy stabilizing the coordinate of the center of pressure in preparation to an action. ASAs reflect early changes of an index of covariation among variables reflecting muscle activation, whereas APAs reflect early changes in muscle activation levels averaged across trials. The assumed purpose of ASAs is to modify stability of performance variables, whereas the purpose of APAs is to change magnitudes of those variables. We hypothesized that ASAs would be seen before APAs and that this finding would be consistent with regard to the muscle-mode composition defined on the basis of different tasks and phases of action. Subjects performed a voluntary body sway task and a quick, bilateral shoulder flexion task under self-paced and reaction time conditions. Surface muscle activity of 12 leg and trunk muscles was analyzed to identify sets of 4 muscle modes for each task and for different phases within the shoulder flexion task. Variance components in the muscle-mode space and indexes of multimuscle-mode synergy stabilizing shift of the center of pressure were computed. ASAs were seen ∼ 100-150 ms prior to the task initiation, before APAs. The results were consistent with respect to different sets of muscle modes defined over the two tasks and different shoulder flexion phases. We conclude that the preparation for a self-triggered postural perturbation is associated with two types of anticipatory adjustments, ASAs and APAs. They reflect different feedforward processes within the hypothetical hierarchical control scheme, resulting in changes in patterns of covariation of elemental variables and in their patterns averaged across trials, respectively. The results show that synergies quantified

  8. Biomechanical approach to quantifying anticipatory postural adjustments in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Maki, B E

    1993-07-01

    The paper outlines a biomechanical approach to quantifying anticipatory postural adjustments in the elderly. The measurement problems that occur in applying the biomechanical approach to elderly subjects are described and the 'signal-to-noise' properties of three candidate measures are compared, using data from volitional unilateral arm-raise tests performed on 100 elderly subjects. The results suggest that changes in vertical ground reaction force provide the greatest potential for accurate measurement of anticipatory adjustments, in comparison with changes in horizontal force or centre-of-pressure displacement. By normalising the anticipatory change in vertical ground reaction force with respect to the vertical perturbation force induced by the arm motion, a measure of relative anticipatory response is derived. The use of this measure, as well as its limitations, are demonstrated by analysing its relationship to actual falling risk, monitored prospectively in the elderly subject population. The findings showed evidence of larger relative anticipatory adjustments in the subjects who experienced recurrent falls, and it is suggested that these responses may be indicative of disordered motor programming. However, to detect these differences, it was necessary to average responses over multiple trials and to exclude trials with very small arm acceleration or very large baseline 'noise' (associated with ongoing postural sway). The need to screen and exclude data would seem to limit the practical utility of this approach in testing elderly populations.

  9. Fear of falling modifies anticipatory postural control.

    PubMed

    Adkin, Allan L; Frank, James S; Carpenter, Mark G; Peysar, Gerhard W

    2002-03-01

    This study investigated the influence of fear of falling or postural threat on the control of posture and movement during a voluntary rise to toes task for 12 healthy young adults. Postural threat was modified through alterations to the surface height at which individuals stood (low or high platform) and changes in step restriction (away from or at the edge of the platform) creating four levels of postural threat: LOW AWAY, LOW EDGE, HIGH AWAY and HIGH EDGE. To rise to the toes, an initial postural adjustment must destabilise the body so that it can be moved forward and elevated to a new position of support over the toes. Centre of pressure and centre of mass profiles, as well as tibialis anterior (TA), soleus (SO) and gastrocnemius (GA) muscle activity patterns were used to describe this behaviour. The results showed that the performance of the rise to toes task was significantly modified when positioned at the edge of the high platform. In this situation, the central nervous system reduced the magnitude and rate of the postural adjustments and subsequent voluntary movement. Although the duration of the movement was lengthened for this most threatening condition, the sequencing and relative timing of TA, SO and GA muscle activity was preserved. These changes in rise to toes behaviour were accompanied by evidence of increased physiological arousal and participant reports of decreased confidence, increased anxiety and decreased stability. Evidence of fear of falling effects on anticipatory postural control is clinically relevant as it may explain deficits in this control observed in individuals with balance disorders. For example, individuals with Parkinson's disease or cerebellar dysfunction demonstrate impaired performance on the rise to toes task as reflected in alterations of both the timing and magnitude of their anticipatory postural adjustments. Our findings suggest alterations in the magnitude of postural adjustments may be magnified by fear of falling while

  10. The effect of asymmetry of posture on anticipatory postural adjustments.

    PubMed

    Aruin, Alexander S

    2006-06-19

    The study investigates the effect of body asymmetry on anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs). Subjects performed a task involving a standard load release induced by a shoulder abduction movement while standing symmetrically or in an asymmetrical stance with either their right or left leg in 45 degrees of external rotation. EMG activities of trunk and leg muscles were recorded during the postural perturbation and were quantified within the time intervals typical of APAs. Anticipatory postural adjustments were observed in all experimental conditions. It was found that asymmetrical body positioning was associated with significant asymmetrical patterns of APAs seen in the right and left distal muscles. These APA asymmetries were dependant upon the side in which the body asymmetry was induced: reduced APAs were observed in the leg muscles on the side of leg rotation, while increased APAs were seen in the muscles on the contralateral side. These findings stress the important role that body asymmetries play in the control of upright posture.

  11. Effects of changing stance conditions on anticipatory postural adjustment and reaction time to voluntary arm movement in humans

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, V; Kowalewski, R; Nakazawa, K; Colombo, G

    2000-01-01

    The effect on reaction time (RT) and anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) of unexpectedly changing stance conditions was studied using a push or pull arm movement task. The aim was to evaluate the modifiability of RT and APA by an external perturbation associated with an automatic compensatory reaction.Subjects standing on a moveable platform were asked to push or pull a rigid handle as quickly and as strongly as possible in response to the ‘go-signal’, a visual signal from a green or red light-emitting diode. Forward and backward translations of the platform were randomly induced at four time intervals after the go-signal. In some experiments to detect unspecific arousal there were no platform translations but an acoustic signal was given before the go-signal. Surface electromyographic activity (EMG) of upper arm and lower leg muscles was analysed.During the push task both RT and the duration of APA (onset of APA till the force signal indicating hand action) were shorter during backward than during forward translation. During the pull task the effect of platform translations was the reverse. The delay between go-signal and onset of APA remained constant. Consequently, RT and APA became shorter when the platform was translated in the same direction as that in which the upper body was displaced by the push or pull movement, and longer when it was translated in the opposite direction. The effects were maximal when translations were induced 250 ms after the go-signal, but a difference was detected up to 375 ms.Furthermore, with forward and backward platform translations RT was shorter when the translations were induced early rather than late after the go-signal. This was associated with a shortening of the delay between the go-signal and onset of APA, while APA duration remained constant. The shortened RT was in the range of that obtained when an acoustic signal was given just before the go-signal.It is concluded that (i) both the RT and the duration of APA can

  12. Anticipatory postural adjustments in conditions of simulated reduced gravity.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyan; Aruin, Alexander S

    2008-11-01

    The study investigates the role of decreased gravity on anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs). Subjects performed fast bilateral arm-raising movements and load releases while in conditions of normal and reduced gravity. Reduced gravity conditions were simulated by changing the ratio between the body weight and mass. Electromyographic (EMG) activity of dorsal and ventral trunk and leg muscles, as well as ground reaction forces, were recorded and quantified within the time intervals typical of APAs. Anticipatory postural adjustments were seen in normal gravity conditions as well as in simulated reduced gravity conditions. However, in decreased gravity conditions, the magnitudes of the anticipatory integrals of electromyography muscle activity (EMG) were smaller compared to normal gravity. Moreover, there was a linear relation between EMG and simulated decreased gravity and between the displacement of the center of pressure (COP) and simulated gravity. The study provides new data on the effect of gravity in feed-forward postural control and stresses the importance of taking into consideration its role in the control of upright posture.

  13. Anticipatory Postural Control of Stability during Gait Initiation Over Obstacles of Different Height and Distance Made Under Reaction-Time and Self-Initiated Instructions.

    PubMed

    Yiou, Eric; Artico, Romain; Teyssedre, Claudine A; Labaune, Ombeline; Fourcade, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Despite the abundant literature on obstacle crossing in humans, the question of how the central nervous system (CNS) controls postural stability during gait initiation with the goal to clear an obstacle remains unclear. Stabilizing features of gait initiation include anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) and lateral swing foot placement. To answer the above question, 14 participants initiated gait as fast as possible in three conditions of obstacle height, three conditions of obstacle distance and one obstacle-free (control) condition. Each of these conditions was performed with two levels of temporal pressure: reaction-time (high-pressure) and self-initiated (low-pressure) movements. A mechanical model of the body falling laterally under the influence of gravity and submitted to an elastic restoring force is proposed to assess the effect of initial (foot-off) center-of-mass position and velocity (or "initial center-of-mass set") on the stability at foot-contact. Results showed that the anticipatory peak of mediolateral (ML) center-of-pressure shift, the initial ML center-of-mass velocity and the duration of the swing phase, of gait initiation increased with obstacle height, but not with obstacle distance. These results suggest that ML APAs are scaled with swing duration in order to maintain an equivalent stability across experimental conditions. This statement is strengthened by the results obtained with the mechanical model, which showed how stability would be degraded if there was no adaptation of the initial center-of-mass set to swing duration. The anteroposterior (AP) component of APAs varied also according to obstacle height and distance, but in an opposite way to the ML component. Indeed, results showed that the anticipatory peak of backward center-of-pressure shift and the initial forward center-of-mass set decreased with obstacle height, probably in order to limit the risk to trip over the obstacle, while the forward center-of-mass velocity at foot

  14. Anticipatory Postural Control of Stability during Gait Initiation Over Obstacles of Different Height and Distance Made Under Reaction-Time and Self-Initiated Instructions

    PubMed Central

    Yiou, Eric; Artico, Romain; Teyssedre, Claudine A.; Labaune, Ombeline; Fourcade, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Despite the abundant literature on obstacle crossing in humans, the question of how the central nervous system (CNS) controls postural stability during gait initiation with the goal to clear an obstacle remains unclear. Stabilizing features of gait initiation include anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) and lateral swing foot placement. To answer the above question, 14 participants initiated gait as fast as possible in three conditions of obstacle height, three conditions of obstacle distance and one obstacle-free (control) condition. Each of these conditions was performed with two levels of temporal pressure: reaction-time (high-pressure) and self-initiated (low-pressure) movements. A mechanical model of the body falling laterally under the influence of gravity and submitted to an elastic restoring force is proposed to assess the effect of initial (foot-off) center-of-mass position and velocity (or “initial center-of-mass set”) on the stability at foot-contact. Results showed that the anticipatory peak of mediolateral (ML) center-of-pressure shift, the initial ML center-of-mass velocity and the duration of the swing phase, of gait initiation increased with obstacle height, but not with obstacle distance. These results suggest that ML APAs are scaled with swing duration in order to maintain an equivalent stability across experimental conditions. This statement is strengthened by the results obtained with the mechanical model, which showed how stability would be degraded if there was no adaptation of the initial center-of-mass set to swing duration. The anteroposterior (AP) component of APAs varied also according to obstacle height and distance, but in an opposite way to the ML component. Indeed, results showed that the anticipatory peak of backward center-of-pressure shift and the initial forward center-of-mass set decreased with obstacle height, probably in order to limit the risk to trip over the obstacle, while the forward center-of-mass velocity at foot

  15. A method to model anticipatory postural control in driver braking events.

    PubMed

    Östh, Jonas; Eliasson, Erik; Happee, Riender; Brolin, Karin

    2014-09-01

    Human body models (HBMs) for vehicle occupant simulations have recently been extended with active muscles and postural control strategies. Feedback control has been used to model occupant responses to autonomous braking interventions. However, driver postural responses during driver initiated braking differ greatly from autonomous braking. In the present study, an anticipatory postural response was hypothesized, modelled in a whole-body HBM with feedback controlled muscles, and validated using existing volunteer data. The anticipatory response was modelled as a time dependent change in the reference value for the feedback controllers, which generates correcting moments to counteract the braking deceleration. The results showed that, in 11 m/s(2) driver braking simulations, including the anticipatory postural response reduced the peak forward displacement of the head by 100mm, of the shoulder by 30 mm, while the peak head flexion rotation was reduced by 18°. The HBM kinematic response was within a one standard deviation corridor of corresponding test data from volunteers performing maximum braking. It was concluded that the hypothesized anticipatory responses can be modelled by changing the reference positions of the individual joint feedback controllers that regulate muscle activation levels. The addition of anticipatory postural control muscle activations appears to explain the difference in occupant kinematics between driver and autonomous braking. This method of modelling postural reactions can be applied to the simulation of other driver voluntary actions, such as emergency avoidance by steering.

  16. Deceleration affects anticipatory and reactive components of triggered postural responses.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Mark G; Thorstensson, Alf; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2005-12-01

    Understanding the physiological and psychological factors that contribute to healthy and pathological balance control in man has been made difficult by the confounding effects of the perturbations used to test balance reactions. The present study examined how postural responses were influenced by the acceleration-deceleration interval of an unexpected horizontal translation. Twelve adult males maintained balance during unexpected forward and backward surface translations with two different acceleration-deceleration intervals and presentation orders (serial or random). "SHORT" perturbations consisted of an initial acceleration (peak acceleration 1.3 m s(-2); duration 300 ms) followed 100 ms later by a deceleration. "LONG" perturbations had the same acceleration as SHORT perturbations, followed by a 2-s interval of constant velocity before deceleration. Surface and intra-muscular electromyography (EMG) from the leg, trunk, and shoulder muscles were recorded along with motion and force plate data. LONG perturbations induced larger trunk displacements compared to SHORT perturbations when presented randomly and larger EMG responses in proximal and distal muscles during later (500-800 ms) response intervals. During SHORT perturbations, activity in some antagonist muscles was found to be associated with deceleration and not the initial acceleration of the support surface. When predictable, SHORT perturbations facilitated the use of anticipatory mechanisms to attenuate early (100-400 ms) EMG response amplitudes, ankle torque change and trunk displacement. In contrast, LONG perturbations, without an early deceleration effect, did not facilitate anticipatory changes when presented in a predictable order. Therefore, perturbations with a short acceleration-deceleration interval can influence triggered postural responses through reactive effects and, when predictable with repeated exposure, through anticipatory mechanisms.

  17. Improvement of anticipatory postural adjustments for balance control: effect of a single training session.

    PubMed

    Kanekar, Neeta; Aruin, Alexander S

    2015-04-01

    Humans use anticipatory and compensatory postural strategies to maintain and restore balance when perturbed. Inefficient generation and utilization of anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) is one of the reasons for postural instability. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of training in improvement of APAs and its effect on subsequent control of posture. Thirteen healthy young adults were exposed to predictable external perturbations before and after a single training session consisting of catches of a medicine ball thrown at the shoulder level. 3-D body kinematics, EMG activity of thirteen trunk and lower limb muscles, and ground reaction forces were recorded before and immediately after a single training session. Muscle onsets, EMG integrals, center of pressure (COP), and center of mass (COM) displacements were analyzed during the anticipatory and compensatory phases of postural control. The effect of a single training session was seen as significantly early muscle onsets and larger anticipatory COP displacements. As a result, significantly smaller peak COM displacements were observed after the perturbation indicating greater postural stability. The outcome of this study provides a background for examining the role of training in improvement of APAs and its effect on postural stability in individuals in need.

  18. The effect of aging on anticipatory postural control.

    PubMed

    Kanekar, Neeta; Aruin, Alexander S

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the differences in anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) between young and older adults and its effect on subsequent control of posture. Ten healthy older adults and thirteen healthy young adults were exposed to predictable external perturbations using the pendulum impact paradigm. Electromyographic activity of the trunk and leg muscles, the center of pressure (COP), and center of mass (COM) displacements in the anterior-posterior direction were recorded and analyzed during the anticipatory and compensatory postural adjustments (CPAs) phases of postural control. The effect of aging was seen as delayed anticipatory muscle activity and larger compensatory muscle responses in older adults as compared to young adults. Moreover, in spite of such larger reactive responses, older adults were still more unstable, exhibiting larger COP and COM peak displacements after the perturbation than young adults when exposed to similar postural disturbances. Nonetheless, while APAs are impaired in older adults, the ability to recruit muscles anticipatorily is largely preserved; however, due to their smaller magnitudes and delayed onsets, it is likely that their effectiveness in reducing the magnitude of CPAs is smaller. The outcome of the study lends support toward investigating the ways of improving anticipatory postural control in people with balance impairments due to aging or neurological disorders.

  19. Can prepared anticipatory postural adjustments be updated by proprioception?

    PubMed

    Ruget, H; Blouin, J; Teasdale, N; Mouchnino, L

    2008-08-26

    Stepping over an obstacle is preceded by a center of pressure (CoP) shift, termed anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs). It provides an acceleration of the center of mass forward and laterally prior to step initiation. The APAs are characterized in the lateral direction by a force exerted by the moving leg onto the ground, followed by an unloading of the stepping leg and completed by an adjustment corresponding to a slow CoP shift toward the supporting foot. While the importance of sensory information in the setting of the APAs is undisputed, it is currently unknown whether sensory information can also be used online to modify the feedforward command of the APAs. The purpose of this study was to investigate how the CNS modulates the APAs when a modification of proprioceptive information (Ia) occurs before or during the initiation of the stepping movement. We used the vibration of ankle muscles acting in the lateral direction to induce modification of the afferent inflow. Subjects learned to step over an obstacle, eyes closed, in synchrony to a tone signal. When vibration was applied during the initiation of the APAs, no change in the early APAs was observed except in the case of a cutaneous stimulation (low frequency vibration); it is thus possible that the CNS relies less on proprioceptive information during this early phase. Only the final adjustment of the CoP seems to take into account the biased proprioceptive information. When vibration was applied well before the APAs onset, a postural reaction toward the side of the vibration was produced. When subjects voluntarily initiated a step after the postural reaction, the thrust amplitude was set according to the direction of the postural reaction. This suggests that the planned motor command of the APAs can be updated online before they are triggered.

  20. Cortical control of anticipatory postural adjustments prior to stepping.

    PubMed

    Varghese, J P; Merino, D M; Beyer, K B; McIlroy, W E

    2016-01-28

    Human bipedal balance control is achieved either reactively or predictively by a distributed network of neural areas within the central nervous system with a potential role for cerebral cortex. While the role of the cortex in reactive balance has been widely explored, only few studies have addressed the cortical activations related to predictive balance control. The present study investigated the cortical activations related to the preparation and execution of anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) that precede a step. This study also examined whether the preparatory cortical activations related to a specific movement is dependent on the context of control (postural component vs. focal component). Ground reaction forces and electroencephalographic (EEG) data were recorded from 14 healthy adults while they performed lateral weight shift and lateral stepping with and without initially preloading their weight to the stance leg. EEG analysis revealed that there were distinct movement-related potentials (MRPs) with concurrent event-related desynchronization (ERD) of mu and beta rhythms prior to the onset of APA and also to the onset of foot-off during lateral stepping in the fronto-central cortical areas. Also, the MRPs and ERD prior to the onset of APA and onset of lateral weight shift were not significantly different suggesting the comparable cortical activations for the generation of postural and focal movements. The present study reveals the occurrence of cortical activation prior to the execution of an APA that precedes a step. Importantly, this cortical activity appears independent of the context of the movement.

  1. The effect of aging on anticipatory postural control

    PubMed Central

    Kanekar, Neeta; Aruin, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the differences in anticipatory (APAs) postural adjustments between young and older adults and its effect on subsequent control of posture. Ten healthy older adults and thirteen healthy young adults were exposed to predictable external perturbations using the pendulum-impact paradigm. EMG activity of the trunk and leg muscles, the center of pressure (COP), and center of mass (COM) displacements in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction were recorded and analyzed during the anticipatory and compensatory (CPAs) phases of postural control. The effect of aging was seen as delayed anticipatory muscle activity and larger compensatory muscle responses in older adults as compared to young adults. Moreover, in spite of such larger reactive responses, older adults were still more unstable, exhibiting larger COP and COM peak displacements after the perturbation than young adults when exposed to similar postural disturbances. Nonetheless, while APAs are impaired in older adults, the ability to recruit muscles anticipatorily is largely preserved, however, due to their smaller magnitudes and delayed onsets, it is likely that their effectiveness in reducing the magnitude of CPAs is smaller. The outcome of the study lends support towards investigating the ways of improving anticipatory postural control in people with balance impairments due to aging or neurological disorders. PMID:24449006

  2. Anticipatory postural adjustments in individuals with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vennila; Kanekar, Neeta; Aruin, Alexander S

    2012-01-11

    Individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) frequently exhibit difficulties in balance maintenance. It is known that anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) play an important role in postural control. However, no information exists on how people living with MS utilize APAs for control of posture. A group of individuals with MS and a group of healthy control subjects performed rapid arm flexion and extension movements while standing on a force platform. Electromyographic (EMG) activity of six trunk and leg muscles and displacement of center of pressure (COP) were recorded and quantified within the time intervals typical of APAs. Individuals with MS demonstrated diminished ability to produce directional specific patterns of anticipatory EMGs as compared to control subjects. In addition, individuals with MS demonstrated smaller magnitudes of anticipatory muscle activation. This was associated with larger displacements of the COP during the balance restoration phase. These results suggest the importance of anticipatory postural control in maintenance of vertical posture in individuals with MS. The outcome of the study could be used while developing rehabilitation strategies focused on balance restoration in individuals with MS.

  3. Aging and balance control in response to external perturbations: role of anticipatory and compensatory postural mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kanekar, Neeta; Aruin, Alexander S

    2014-06-01

    The ability to maintain balance deteriorates with increasing age. Anticipatory and compensatory postural adjustments (APAs and CPAs, respectively), both, are known to be affected in the elderly. We examined the effect of aging on the ability of older adults to utilize APAs and its effect on subsequent control of posture (CPAs). Ten elderly individuals were exposed to external predictable and unpredictable perturbations applied to the upper body in the sagittal plane. Body kinematics, electromyographic activity of 13 muscles, and ground reaction forces were analyzed during the anticipatory and compensatory phases of postural control. The elderly were capable of recognizing an upcoming predictable perturbation and activated muscles prior to it. However, the older adults used different muscle strategies and sequence of muscle recruitment than that reported in young adults. Additionally, when the perturbations were unpredictable, no APAs were seen which resulted in large CPAs and greater peak displacements of the center of pressure (COP) and center of mass (COM) following perturbations. As opposed to this, when the perturbations were predictable, APAs were seen in older adults resulting in significantly smaller CPAs. The presence and utilization of APAs in older adults also improved postural stability following the perturbation as seen by significantly smaller COP and COM peak displacements. Using APAs in older adults significantly reduces the need for large CPAs, resulting in greater postural stability following a perturbation. The results provide a foundation for investigating the role of training in improving the interplay between anticipatory and compensatory postural control in older adults.

  4. Anticipatory postural adjustments in children with hemiplegia and diplegia.

    PubMed

    Girolami, Gay L; Shiratori, Takako; Aruin, Alexander S

    2011-12-01

    Anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) play an important role in the performance of many activities requiring the maintenance of standing posture. However, little is known about if and how children with cerebral palsy (CP) generate APAs. Two groups of children with CP (hemiplegia and diplegia) and a group of children with typical motor development performed arm flexion and extension movements while standing on a force platform. Electromyographic activity of six trunk and leg muscles and displacement of center of pressure (COP) were recorded. Children with CP were able to generate anticipatory postural adjustments and produce directionally specific APAs and COP displacements similar to those described in adults and typically developing children. However, children with diplegia were unable to generate APAs of the same magnitude as children with typical development and hemiplegia and had higher baseline muscle activity prior to movement. In children with diplegia, COP was posteriorly displaced and peak acceleration was smaller during bilateral extension compared to children with hemiplegia. The outcomes of the study highlight the role of APAs in the control of posture of children with CP and point out the similarities and differences in anticipatory control in children with diplegia and hemiplegia. These differences may foster ideas for treatment strategies to enhance APAs in children with CP.

  5. The role of anticipatory postural adjustments in compensatory control of posture: 1. Electromyographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Marcio J; Kanekar, Neeta; Aruin, Alexander S

    2010-06-01

    Anticipatory (APAs) and compensatory (CPAs) postural adjustments are the two principal mechanisms that the central nervous system uses to maintain equilibrium while standing. We studied the role of APAs in compensatory postural adjustments. Eight subjects were exposed to external predictable and unpredictable perturbations induced at the shoulder level, while standing with eyes open and closed. Electrical activity of leg and trunk muscles was recorded and analyzed during four epochs representing the time duration typical for anticipatory and compensatory postural control. No anticipatory activity of the trunk and leg muscles was seen in the case of unpredictable perturbations; instead, significant compensatory activation of muscles was observed. When the perturbations were predictable, strong anticipatory activation was seen in all the muscles: such APAs were associated with significantly smaller compensatory activity of muscles and COP displacements after the perturbations. The outcome of the study highlights the importance of APAs in control of posture and points out the existence of a relationship between the anticipatory and the compensatory components of postural control. It also suggests a possibility to enhance balance control by improving the APAs responses during external perturbations.

  6. Atypical anticipatory postural adjustments during gait initiation among individuals with sub-acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Rajachandrakumar, Roshanth; Fraser, Julia E; Schinkel-Ivy, Alison; Inness, Elizabeth L; Biasin, Lou; Brunton, Karen; McIlroy, William E; Mansfield, Avril

    2017-02-01

    Anticipatory postural adjustments, executed prior to gait initiation, help preserve lateral stability when stepping. Atypical patterns of anticipatory activity prior to gait initiation may occur in individuals with unilateral impairment (e.g., stroke). This study aimed to determine the prevalence, correlates, and consequences of atypical anticipatory postural adjustment patterns prior to gait initiation in a sub-acute stroke population. Forty independently-ambulatory individuals with sub-acute stroke stood on two force plates and initiated gait at a self-selected speed. Medio-lateral centre of pressure displacement was calculated and used to define anticipatory postural adjustments (shift in medio-lateral centre of pressure >10mm from baseline). Stroke severity, motor recovery, and functional balance and mobility status were also obtained. Three patterns were identified: single (typical), absent (atypical), and multiple (atypical) anticipatory postural adjustments. Thirty-five percent of trials had atypical anticipatory postural adjustments (absent and multiple). Frequency of absent anticipatory postural adjustments was negatively correlated with walking speed. Multiple anticipatory postural adjustments were more prevalent when leading with the non-paretic than the paretic limb. Trials with multiple anticipatory postural adjustments had longer duration of anticipatory postural adjustment and time to foot-off, and shorter unloading time than trials with single anticipatory postural adjustments. A high prevalence of atypical anticipatory control prior to gait initiation was found in individuals with stroke. Temporal differences were identified with multiple anticipatory postural adjustments, indicating altered gait initiation. These findings provide insight into postural control during gait initiation in individuals with sub-acute stroke, and may inform interventions to improve ambulation in this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of Parkinson's disease and levodopa on adaptation of anticipatory postural adjustments.

    PubMed

    Hall, L M; Brauer, S G; Horak, F; Hodges, P W

    2013-10-10

    Postural support alters anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs). Efficient adaptation to changes in postural support in reactive and centrally initiated postural synergies is impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD). This study examined whether APAs are affected differently by familiar and novel supports in people with PD, ON and OFF levodopa. The effect of PD and levodopa on the ability to immediately adapt APAs to changes in support and refine with practice was also investigated. Fourteen people with PD and 14 healthy control participants performed 20 single rapid leg lift tasks in four support conditions: unsupported, bilateral handgrip (familiar), bite plate (novel) and a combined handgrip+bite plate condition. APAs, identified from force plate data, were characterized by an increase in the vertical ground reaction force under the lifted leg as a result of a shift of weight toward the stance limb. Results showed the ability to incorporate familiar and novel external supports into the postural strategy was preserved in PD. Controls and PD patients in the OFF state further refined the postural strategy with practice as evidenced by changes in amplitude of vertical ground reaction forces and forces applied to support apparatus within conditions between the initial and final trials. In the ON state, people with PD failed to refine the use of postural supports in any condition. The results suggest that immediate postural adaptation is intact in people with PD and unaffected by levodopa administration but the ability to refine postural adaptations with task experience is compromised by dopamine therapy.

  8. Effects of lateral perturbations and changing stance conditions on anticipatory postural adjustment.

    PubMed

    Santos, Marcio J; Aruin, Alexander S

    2009-06-01

    The study investigates the role of lateral muscles and changing stance conditions in anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs). Subjects stood laterally to an aluminum pendulum released by an experimenter and were required to stop it with their right or left hand. Stance conditions were manipulated by having the subjects stand in the following positions: on a single limb (SS), with feet together (narrow base of support, NB), and with feet shoulder width apart (regular base of support, RB). Bilateral EMG activity of dorsal, ventral, and lateral trunk and leg muscles and ground reaction forces were recorded and quantified within the time intervals typical of APAs. Anticipatory postural adjustments were seen in all experimental conditions, and their magnitudes depended on the stance and the side of perturbation. Accordingly, APAs in lateral muscles increased on the side of perturbation in SS condition, while simultaneous activation of dorsal muscles occurred on the contralateral side. Smaller APAs were seen in lateral muscles in conditions with a wider base of support (NB, RB) and APAs in dorsal muscles were smaller in NB - in comparison to RB - stance. The results of the present study provide new data on the role of lateral, ventral, and dorsal muscles in anticipatory postural control when dealing with lateral perturbations in conditions of postural instability.

  9. Adaptability of anticipatory postural adjustments associated with voluntary movement

    PubMed Central

    Yiou, Eric; Caderby, Teddy; Hussein, Tarek

    2012-01-01

    The control of balance is crucial for efficiently performing most of our daily motor tasks, such as those involving goal-directed arm movements or whole body displacement. The purpose of this article is twofold. Firstly, it is to recall how balance can be maintained despite the different sources of postural perturbation arising during voluntary movement. The importance of the so-called “anticipatory postural adjustments” (APA), taken as a “line of defence” against the destabilizing effect induced by a predicted perturbation, is emphasized. Secondly, it is to report the results of recent studies that questioned the adaptability of APA to various constraints imposed on the postural system. The postural constraints envisaged here are classified into biomechanical (postural stability, superimposition of motor tasks), (neuro) physiological (fatigue), temporal (time pressure) and psychological (fear of falling, emotion). Overall, the results of these studies point out the capacity of the central nervous system (CNS) to adapt the spatio-temporal features of APA to each of these constraints. However, it seems that, depending on the constraint, the “priority” of the CNS was focused on postural stability maintenance, on body protection and/or on maintenance of focal movement performance. PMID:22720267

  10. Representation of grasp postures and anticipatory motor planning in children.

    PubMed

    Stöckel, Tino; Hughes, Charmayne M L; Schack, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we investigated anticipatory motor planning and the development of cognitive representation of grasp postures in children aged 7, 8, and 9 years. Overall, 9-year-old children were more likely to plan their movements to end in comfortable postures, and have distinct representational structures of certain grasp postures, compared to the 7- and 8-year old children. Additionally, the sensitivity toward comfortable end-states (end-state comfort) was related to the mental representation of certain grasp postures. Children with grasp comfort related and functionally well-structured representations were more likely to have satisfied end-state comfort in both the simple and the advanced planning condition. In contrast, end-state comfort satisfaction for the advanced planning condition was much lower for children whose cognitive representations were not structured by grasp comfort. The results of the present study support the notion that cognitive action representation plays an important role in the planning and control of grasp postures.

  11. Anticipatory postural adjustments and anticipatory synergy adjustments: preparing to a postural perturbation with predictable and unpredictable direction.

    PubMed

    Piscitelli, Daniele; Falaki, Ali; Solnik, Stanislaw; Latash, Mark L

    2017-03-01

    We explored two aspects of feed-forward postural control, anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) and anticipatory synergy adjustments (ASAs) seen prior to self-triggered unloading with known and unknown direction of the perturbation. In particular, we tested two main hypotheses predicting contrasting changes in APAs and ASAs. The first hypothesis predicted no major changes in ASAs. The second hypothesis predicted delayed APAs with predominance of co-contraction patterns when perturbation direction was unknown. Healthy subjects stood on the force plate and held a bar with two loads acting in the forward and backward directions. They pressed a trigger that released one of the loads causing a postural perturbation. In different series, the direction of the perturbation was either known (the same load released in all trials) or unknown (the subjects did not know which of the two loads would be released). Surface electromyograms were recorded and used to quantify APAs, synergies stabilizing center of pressure coordinate (within the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis), and ASA. APAs and ASAs were seen in all conditions. APAs were delayed, and predominance of co-contraction patterns was seen under the conditions with unpredictable direction of perturbation. In contrast, no significant changes in synergies and ASAs were seen. Overall, these results show that feed-forward control of vertical posture has two distinct components, reflected in APAs and ASAs, which show qualitatively different adjustments with changes in predictability of the direction of perturbation. These results are interpreted within the recently proposed hierarchical scheme of the synergic control of motor tasks. The observations underscore the complexity of the feed-forward postural control, which involves separate changes in salient performance variables (such as coordinate of the center of pressure) and in their stability properties.

  12. The threat of a support surface translation affects anticipatory postural control.

    PubMed

    Phanthanourak, Angel L; Cleworth, Taylor W; Adkin, Allan L; Carpenter, Mark G; Tokuno, Craig D

    2016-10-01

    This study examined how postural threat in the form of a potential perturbation affects an individual's ability to perform a heel raise. Seventeen adults completed three conditions: i) low threat, where participants performed a heel raise in response to a "go" tone, ii) high threat, where participants either heard the same "go" tone, for which they performed a heel raise, or experienced a support surface translation in the medio-lateral direction that disturbed their balance, and iii) choice reaction time task, where participants either completed a heel raise in response to the same "go" tone or a toe raise in response to a lower pitched tone. For all heel raise trials, anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) were quantified from center of pressure (COP) recordings and electromyographic (EMG) activity from the tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL). Results indicated that participants exhibited larger APAs, as reflected by the greater backward COP displacement (p=0.038) and velocity (p=0.022) as well as a larger TA EMG amplitude (p=0.045), during the high threat condition. During the execution phase of the heel raise, an earlier (p=0.014) and larger (p=0.041) SOL EMG activation were observed during the high threat condition. These results contrast with previous findings of reduced APAs when the postural threat was evoked through changes in surface height. Therefore, the characteristics of the postural threat must be considered to isolate the effects of threat on anticipatory movement control.

  13. Role of brain hemispheric dominance in anticipatory postural control strategies.

    PubMed

    Cioncoloni, David; Rosignoli, Deborah; Feurra, Matteo; Rossi, Simone; Bonifazi, Marco; Rossi, Alessandro; Mazzocchio, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    Most of the cerebral functions are asymmetrically represented in the two hemispheres. Moreover, dexterity and coordination of the distal segment of the dominant limbs depend on cortico-motor lateralization. In this study, we investigated whether postural control may be also considered a lateralized hemispheric brain function. To this aim, 15 young subjects were tested in standing position by measuring center of pressure (COP) shifts along the anteroposterior axis (COP-Y) during dynamic posturography before and after continuous Theta Burst Stimulation (cTBS) intervention applied to the dominant or non-dominant M1 hand area as well as to the vertex. We show that when subjects were expecting a forward platform translation, the COP-Y was positioned significantly backward or forward after dominant or non-dominant M1 stimulation, respectively. We postulate that cTBS applied on M1 may have disrupted the functional connectivity between intra- and interhemispheric areas implicated in the anticipatory control of postural stability. This study suggests a functional asymmetry between the two homologous primary motor areas, with the dominant hemisphere playing a critical role in the selection of the appropriate postural control strategy.

  14. Anticipatory Postural Adjustments in a Bimanual Load-Lifting Task in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jover, Marianne; Schmitz, Christina; Centelles, Laurie; Chabrol, Brigitte; Assaiante, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Postural control is a fundamental component of action in which deficits have been shown to contribute to motor difficulties in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). The purpose of this study was to examine anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) in children with DCD in a bimanual load-lifting task. Method: Sixteen children…

  15. Anticipatory Postural Adjustments in a Bimanual Load-Lifting Task in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jover, Marianne; Schmitz, Christina; Centelles, Laurie; Chabrol, Brigitte; Assaiante, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Postural control is a fundamental component of action in which deficits have been shown to contribute to motor difficulties in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). The purpose of this study was to examine anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) in children with DCD in a bimanual load-lifting task. Method: Sixteen children…

  16. The role of anticipatory postural adjustments in compensatory control of posture: 2. Biomechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Marcio J; Kanekar, Neeta; Aruin, Alexander S

    2010-06-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) utilizes anticipatory (APAs) and compensatory (CPAs) postural adjustments to maintain equilibrium while standing. It is known that these postural adjustments involve displacements of the center of mass (COM) and center of pressure (COP). The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between APAs and CPAs from a kinetic and kinematic perspective. Eight subjects were exposed to external predictable and unpredictable perturbations induced at the shoulder level while standing. Kinematic and kinetic data were recorded and analyzed during the time duration typical for anticipatory and compensatory postural adjustments. When the perturbations were unpredictable, the COM and COP displacements were larger compared to predictable conditions with APAs. Thus, the peak of COM displacement, after the pendulum impact, in the posterior direction reached 28+/-9.6mm in the unpredictable conditions with no APAs whereas it was 1.6 times smaller, reaching 17+/-5.5mm during predictable perturbations. Similarly, after the impact, the peak of COP displacement in the posterior direction was 60+/-14 mm for unpredictable conditions and 28+/-3.6mm for predictable conditions. Finally, the times of the peak COM and COP displacements were similar in the predictable and unpredictable conditions. This outcome provides additional knowledge about how body balance is controlled in presence and in absence of information about the forthcoming perturbation. Moreover, it suggests that control of posture could be enhanced by better utilization of APAs and such an approach could be considered as a valuable modality in the rehabilitation of individuals with balance impairment.

  17. Both anticipatory and compensatory postural adjustments are adapted while catching a ball in unstable standing posture.

    PubMed

    Scariot, Vanessa; Rios, Jaqueline L; Claudino, Renato; dos Santos, Eloá C; Angulski, Hanna B B; dos Santos, Marcio J

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to analyze the role of balance exercises on anticipatory (APA) and compensatory (CPA) postural adjustments in different conditions of postural stability. Sixteen subjects were required to catch a ball while standing on rigid floor, trampoline and foam cushion surfaces. Electromyographic activities (EMG) of postural muscles were analyzed during time windows typical for APAs and CPAs. Overall there were a reciprocal activation of the muscles around the ankle and co-activations between ventral and dorsal muscles of the thigh and trunk during the catching a ball task. Compared to the rigid floor, the tibialis anterior activation was greater during the trampoline condition (CPA: p = 0.006) and the soleus muscle inhibition was higher during foam cushion condition (APA: p = 0.001; CPA: p = 0.007). Thigh and trunk muscle activities were similar across the conditions. These results advance the knowledge in postural control during body perturbations standing on unstable surfaces.

  18. Modifications of anticipatory postural adjustments in a rock climbing task: the effect of supporting wall inclination.

    PubMed

    Noé, F

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of initial postural constraint on the realisation of a leg release in a rock climbing task. Two conditions were tested: a vertical posture and an overhanging posture. The overhanging posture was characterised by a large sustentation base, which enhanced the mechanical possibilities of the system. Subjects had to release their right foot in both postural conditions. In the vertical posture, movement's effectuation was associated with anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs). In the overhanging posture, the movement was performed without APAs. The results indicated that APAs were modulated according to the possibilities of force creation of the system. Hence, the disappearance of APAs in the overhanging posture was explained by the efficiency of the system to create the impulse necessary to perform the task.

  19. Effects of temporal and spatial cueing on anticipatory postural control in a rapid interceptive task.

    PubMed

    Huntley, Andrew H; Zettel, John L

    2015-04-10

    Balance disruptions induced by voluntary focal arm actions are accommodated via anticipatory postural adjustments, but how this coordinated control is organized by the central nervous system remains unclear: either as combined or separate streams of postural-focal motor commands. For example, a focal arm task that dictates extremely tight temporal constraints may induce a focal response in absence of an anticipatory postural adjustment, providing evidence for separate focal-postural control streams. This study sought to probe the organization of focal-postural control via an interceptive task with very little available response time, and to determine whether focal-postural coordination depends on temporal and/or spatial foreknowledge of the task. Ten healthy young adults (5 males and 5 females; 20-29 years) reacted to catch a ball when standing under four conditions of temporal and spatial foreknowledge. Response onset was characterized by muscle activity from both postural and focal arm muscles. The catching task resulted in rapid muscle responses, but there was no difference between the fastest focal and postural muscle onsets. As expected, temporal cuing resulted in faster focal and postural onsets compared to spatial and control cuing trials. The accompaniment and time-locking of focal and postural muscle onsets, suggests that postural-focal coupling remains intact even under external time constraints and provides evidence for a single combined command stream of postural and focal control under such circumstances.

  20. Influence of temporal pressure on anticipatory postural control of medio-lateral stability during rapid leg flexion.

    PubMed

    Yiou, E; Hussein, T; Larue, J

    2012-03-01

    During leg flexion from erect posture, postural stability along the medio-lateral direction is organized in advance during "anticipatory postural adjustments" (APAs). This study aimed to investigate the influence of temporal pressure on this anticipatory postural control of medio-lateral stability. Eight young healthy participants performed series of leg flexions (1) as soon as possible in response to an acoustic signal (reaction-time condition; condition with temporal pressure) and (2) in a self-initiated condition (no temporal pressure). Results showed that APAs duration was shorter in the reaction-time condition as compared to the self-initiated condition; this shortening was compensated by an increase in the medio-lateral center-of-pressure displacement so that the dynamic stability reached at foot-off, as measured by the "extrapolated center-of-mass", remained unchanged. It is concluded that when a complex task is performed under temporal pressure, the central nervous system is able to modulate the spatio-temporal features of APAs in a way to both hasten the initiation of the voluntary movement and maintain optimal conditions of dynamic stability. In other words, it seems that the central nervous system does not "trade off optimal stability for speed of movement initiation under reaction-time condition", as it had been proposed in the literature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhancement of anticipatory postural adjustments in older adults as a result of a single session of ball throwing exercise.

    PubMed

    Aruin, Alexander S; Kanekar, Neeta; Lee, Yun-Ju; Ganesan, Mohan

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the role of short-term training in improvement of anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) and its effect on subsequent control of posture in older adults. Nine healthy older adults were exposed to self-initiated and predictable external perturbations before and after a single training session consisting of throwing a medicine ball. EMG activity of eight trunk and leg muscles and ground reaction forces were recorded before and immediately after the training session. Muscle onsets and center of pressure displacements were analyzed during the anticipatory and compensatory phases of postural control. The training involving throwing of a medicine ball resulted in enhancement of the generation of APAs seen as significantly early onsets of leg and trunk muscle activity prior to the bilateral arm flexion task. Significantly early activation of postural muscles observed prior to the predictable external perturbation, the task that was not a part of training, indicates the transfer of the effect of the single training session. The observed training-related improvements of APAs suggest that APA-focused rehabilitation could be effective in improving postural control, functional balance, mobility, and quality of life in the elderly.

  2. Effects of anticipatory anxiety and visual input on postural sway in an aversive situation.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Mitsuo; Saitoh, Junko; Wada, Maki; Nagai, Masanori

    2010-04-19

    We have previously reported that state anxiety scores were positively correlated with postural sway while standing upright and gazing at a visual target (Ohno et al., 2004 [16]). The present study examines the effect of anticipatory anxiety and visual input on postural control in healthy individuals. An unpredictable aversive sound (100dB SPL) was delivered in order to induce anticipatory anxiety. Participants were asked to stand upright on a force plate with their eyes open and closed, and their center of pressure (COP) was measured. Analysis of the postural parameters revealed that the path lengths of the COP and the enveloped areas were greater in the anticipatory situation with the aversive sound than in the silent situation. Fast Fourier transform analysis showed that the frequency component related to vestibular inputs (0.1-1.0Hz) was increased during the anticipatory situation. The lower frequency (<0.1Hz) component was decreased in the medio-lateral axis during anticipation with the eyes closed due to shifting mean power frequencies to high frequency. The results suggest that anticipatory anxiety in healthy participants amplified the sway regardless of whether the eyes were open or closed, and that the vestibular inputs greatly influenced the amplification of postural sway.

  3. Directional specificity of postural threat on anticipatory postural adjustments during lateral leg raising.

    PubMed

    Gendre, Manon; Yiou, Eric; Gélat, Thierry; Honeine, Jean-Louis; Deroche, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    This study explored the directional specificity of fear of falling (FoF) effects on the stabilizing function of anticipatory postural adjustments (APA). Participants (N = 71) performed a series of lateral leg raises from an elevated surface in three conditions: in the "Control condition", participants stood at the middle of the surface; in the two test conditions, participants were positioned at the lateral edge of the surface so that the shift of the whole-body centre-of-mass during APA for leg raising was directed towards the edge ("Approach condition") or was directed away from the edge ("Avoidance condition"). Results showed that the amplitude of APA was lower in the "Approach condition" than in the "Control condition" (p < .01); this reduction was compensated for by an increase in APA duration (p < .05), so that both postural stability and motor performance (in terms of peak leg velocity, final leg posture and movement duration) remained unchanged. These changes in APA parameters were not present in the "Avoidance condition". Participants further self-reported a greater FoF (p < .001) and a lower ability to avoid a fall (p < .001) in the "Approach condition" (but not in the "Avoidance condition") than in the "Control condition". The results of this study show that the effects of FoF do not solely depend on initial environmental conditions, but also on the direction of APA relative to the location of the postural threat. These results support the so-called Motivational Direction Hypothesis, according to which approach and avoidance behaviours are primed by emotional state.

  4. Anticipatory postural adjustments associated with a loading perturbation in children with hemiplegic and diplegic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Shiratori, T; Girolami, G L; Aruin, A S

    2016-10-01

    Anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) in preparation for predictable externally induced loading perturbation were studied in children with typically development (TD), hemiplegic (HEMI), and diplegic (DIPL) cerebral palsy. Twenty-seven children (n = 9 in each group) were asked to stand and catch a load dropped from a pre-specified height. Electrical activity of the leg and trunk muscles and center of pressure (COP) displacements were recorded to quantify the APAs. All groups were able to generate APAs prior to the perturbation, but the magnitude was smaller and the onset was delayed in the dorsal (agonist) postural muscles in both HEMI and DIPL as compared to TD. HEMI and DIPL also generated APAs in the antagonist postural muscles. Anticipatory backward COP displacement was significantly different from the baseline value only in the TD and HEMI. HEMI and DIPL displayed a different postural control strategy; HEMI showed no difference in background postural activity from TD, but with diminished APAs in the agonist postural muscles compared to TD, while DIPL showed a higher background postural activity and diminished APAs in the agonist postural muscles compared to TD. These differences are important to consider when designing rehabilitation programs to improve posture and movement control in children with hemiplegic and diplegic cerebral palsy.

  5. Effects of neck flexion on contingent negative variation and anticipatory postural control during arm movement while standing.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Katsuo; Tomita, Hidehito; Maeda, Kaoru; Kunita, Kenji

    2009-02-01

    We investigated the effects of neck flexion on contingent negative variation (CNV) and anticipatory postural control using an arm flexion task in standing. CNV was adopted to evaluate the state of activation of brain areas related to anticipatory postural control. Subjects were required to flex the arms in response to a sound stimulus preceded by a warning sound stimulus. Two different intervals (2.0 and 3.5s) between these two stimuli were used in neck position in quiet standing (neck resting) and neck position at 80% angle of maximal neck flexion. The mean amplitude of CNV 100-ms before the response stimulus, recorded from a Cz electrode, was calculated. Onset timing of activation of the postural muscles (lumbar paraspinal, biceps femoris and gastrocnemius) with respect to the anterior deltoid was analyzed. Reaction time at the anterior deltoid was significantly shorter in the 2.0s period than in the 3.5s period, and in the neck flexion than in the neck resting in both periods. In the 2.0s, but not in the 3.5s period, neck flexion resulted in an increased CNV amplitude and an increased duration of preceding activation of the postural muscles, and the correlation between these increases was significant.

  6. Knee trembling during freezing of gait represents multiple anticipatory postural adjustments.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jesse V; Nutt, John G; Carlson-Kuhta, Patricia; Stephens, Marilee; Horak, Fay B

    2009-02-01

    Freezing of gait (FoG) is an episodic, brief inability to step that delays gait initiation or interrupts ongoing gait. FoG is often associated with an alternating shaking of the knees, clinically referred to as knee trembling or trembling in place. The pathophysiology of FoG and of the concomitant trembling knees is unknown; impaired postural adjustment in preparation for stepping is one hypothesis. We examined anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) prior to protective steps induced by a forward loss of balance in 10 Parkinson's disease (PD) subjects with marked FoG and in 10 control subjects. The amplitude and timing of the APAs were determined from changes in the vertical ground-reaction forces recorded by a force plate under each foot and were confirmed by electromyographic recordings of bilateral medial gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior and tensor fascia latae muscles. Protective steps were accomplished with a single APA followed by a step for control subjects, whereas PD subjects frequently exhibited multiple, alternating APAs coexistent with the knee trembling commonly observed during FoG as well as delayed, inadequate or no stepping. These multiple APAs were not delayed in onset and were of similar or larger amplitude than the single APAs exhibited by the control subjects. These observations suggest that multiple APAs produce the knee trembling commonly associated with FoG and that FoG associated with a forward loss of balance is caused by an inability to couple a normal APA to the stepping motor pattern.

  7. Anticipatory Posturing of the Vocal Tract Reveals Dissociation of Speech Movement Plans from Linguistic Units

    PubMed Central

    Tilsen, Sam; Spincemaille, Pascal; Xu, Bo; Doerschuk, Peter; Luh, Wen-Ming; Feldman, Elana; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Models of speech production typically assume that control over the timing of speech movements is governed by the selection of higher-level linguistic units, such as segments or syllables. This study used real-time magnetic resonance imaging of the vocal tract to investigate the anticipatory movements speakers make prior to producing a vocal response. Two factors were varied: preparation (whether or not speakers had foreknowledge of the target response) and pre-response constraint (whether or not speakers were required to maintain a specific vocal tract posture prior to the response). In prepared responses, many speakers were observed to produce pre-response anticipatory movements with a variety of articulators, showing that that speech movements can be readily dissociated from higher-level linguistic units. Substantial variation was observed across speakers with regard to the articulators used for anticipatory posturing and the contexts in which anticipatory movements occurred. The findings of this study have important consequences for models of speech production and for our understanding of the normal range of variation in anticipatory speech behaviors. PMID:26760511

  8. Anticipatory Posturing of the Vocal Tract Reveals Dissociation of Speech Movement Plans from Linguistic Units.

    PubMed

    Tilsen, Sam; Spincemaille, Pascal; Xu, Bo; Doerschuk, Peter; Luh, Wen-Ming; Feldman, Elana; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Models of speech production typically assume that control over the timing of speech movements is governed by the selection of higher-level linguistic units, such as segments or syllables. This study used real-time magnetic resonance imaging of the vocal tract to investigate the anticipatory movements speakers make prior to producing a vocal response. Two factors were varied: preparation (whether or not speakers had foreknowledge of the target response) and pre-response constraint (whether or not speakers were required to maintain a specific vocal tract posture prior to the response). In prepared responses, many speakers were observed to produce pre-response anticipatory movements with a variety of articulators, showing that that speech movements can be readily dissociated from higher-level linguistic units. Substantial variation was observed across speakers with regard to the articulators used for anticipatory posturing and the contexts in which anticipatory movements occurred. The findings of this study have important consequences for models of speech production and for our understanding of the normal range of variation in anticipatory speech behaviors.

  9. Threat-induced changes in attention during tests of static and anticipatory postural control.

    PubMed

    Zaback, Martin; Carpenter, Mark G; Adkin, Allan L

    2016-03-01

    Postural threat, manipulated through changes in surface height, influences postural control. Evidence suggests changes in attention may contribute to this relationship. However, limited research has explored where and how attention is reallocated when threatened. The primary aim of this study was to describe changes in attention when presented with a postural threat, while a secondary aim was to explore associations between changes in attention and postural control. Eighty-two healthy young adults completed tests of static (quiet standing) and anticipatory (rise to toes) postural control under threatening and non-threatening conditions. Participants completed an open-ended questionnaire after each postural task which asked them to list what they thought about or directed their attention toward. Each item listed was assigned a percentage value reflecting how much attention it occupied. Exit interviews were completed to help confirm where attention was directed. Five attention categories were identified: movement processes, threat-relevant stimuli, self-regulatory strategies, task objectives, and task-irrelevant information. For both postural tasks, the percentage values and number of items listed for movement processes, threat-relevant stimuli, and self-regulatory strategies increased under threatening compared to non-threatening conditions, while the percentage values and number of items listed for task objectives and task-irrelevant information decreased. Changes in attention related to movement processes and self-regulatory strategies were associated with changes in static postural control, while changes in attention related to threat-relevant stimuli were associated with changes in anticipatory postural control. These results suggest that threat-induced changes in attention are multidimensional and contribute to changes in postural control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Modulation of anticipatory postural activity for multiple conditions of a whole-body pointing task.

    PubMed

    Tolambiya, A; Chiovetto, E; Pozzo, T; Thomas, E

    2012-05-17

    This is a study on associated postural activities during the anticipatory segments of a multijoint movement. Several previous studies have shown that they are task dependant. The previous studies, however, have mostly been limited in demonstrating the presence of modulation for one task condition, that is, one aspect such as the distance of the target or the direction of reaching. Real-life activities like whole-body pointing, however, can vary in several ways. How specific is the adaptation of the postural activities for the diverse possibilities of a whole-body pointing task? We used a classification paradigm to answer this question. We examined the anticipatory postural electromyograms for four different types of whole-body pointing tasks. The presence of task-dependent modulations in these signals was probed by performing four-way classification tests using a support vector machine (SVM). The SVM was able to achieve significantly higher than chance performance in correctly predicting the movements at hand (Chance performance 25%). Using only anticipatory postural muscle activity, the correct movement at hand was predicted with a mean rate of 62%. Because this is 37% above chance performance, it suggests the presence of postural modulation for diverse conditions. The anticipatory activities consisted of both activations and deactivations. Movement prediction with the use of the activating muscles was significantly better than that obtained with the deactivating muscles. This suggests that more specific modulations for the movement at hand take place through activation, whereas the deactivation is more general. The study introduces a new method for investigating adaptations in motor control. It also sheds new light on the quantity and quality of information available in the feedforward segments of a voluntary multijoint motor activity.

  11. Shift of the Muscular Inhibition Latency during On-Line Acquisition of Anticipatory Postural Adjustments

    PubMed Central

    Barlaam, Fanny; Vaugoyeau, Marianne; Fortin, Carole; Assaiante, Christine; Schmitz, Christina

    2016-01-01

    During action, Anticipatory Postural Adjustments (APAs) cancel the consequences of a movement on postural stabilization. Their muscular expression is characterized by early changes in the activity of the postural muscles, before the movement begins. To explore the mechanisms enabling the acquisition of APAs, a learning paradigm was designed in which the voluntary lifting of a load with one hand triggered the unloading of another load suspended below the contralateral forearm. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the muscular expression that uncovers the progressive learning of new APAs. A trial-by-trial analysis of kinematic and electromyographic signals recorded on the right arm was conducted in twelve adults through six sessions of learning. Kinematic results reported an enhancement of the postural stabilization across learning. The main EMG pattern found during learning consisted of a flexor inhibition, where latency was shifted towards an earlier occurrence in parallel with the improvement of the postural performance. A linear regression analysis conducted between the inhibition latency and the maximal amplitude of elbow rotation showed that the earlier the inhibition onset, the better the postural stabilization. This study revealed that the progressive shift of the postural flexor inhibition latency could be considered as a reliable neurophysiological marker of the progressive learning of new APAs. Importantly, this marker could be used to track motor learning abnormalities in pathology. We relate our findings to the update of a forward predictive model of action, defined as a system that predicts beforehand the consequences of the action on posture. PMID:27192604

  12. Modulation of anticipatory postural adjustments of gait using a portable powered ankle-foot orthosis.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Matthew N; MacKinnon, Colum D; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T

    2013-06-01

    Prior to taking a step, properly coordinated anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) are generated to control posture and balance as the body is propelled forward. External cues (audio, visual, somatosensory) have been shown to facilitate gait initiation by improving the magnitude and timing of APAs in Parkinson's disease (PD), but the efficacy of these cueing strategies has been limited by their inability to produce the forces required to generate an appropriate APA. To date, mechanical cueing paradigms have been relatively underexplored. Using healthy young adults, we investigated the use of a portable powered ankle-foot orthosis (PPAFO) to provide a modest torque at the ankle as a mechanical cue to initiate gait. Subjects were instructed to initiate gait in five test conditions: (1) self-initiated in running shoes [baseline-shoe], (2) self-initiated trial in unpowered passive PPAFO [baseline-passive], (3) with acoustic go-cue in passive PPAFO [acoustic-passive], (4) acoustic go-cue and simultaneous mechanical assist from powered PPAFO [acoustic-assist], and (5) mechanical assist cue only [assist]. APA characteristics were quantified using ground reaction force (GRF), center of pressure (COP), and electromyography (EMG) data. Mechanical cueing significantly increased medial-lateral COP and GRF peak amplitude, and decreased GRF time to peak amplitude, COP and GRF onset times, and time to toe off. Mechanical cueing conditions also demonstrated consistent bimodal EMG behaviors across all subjects. Overall, these data suggest that the mechanical assist from the PPAFO can significantly improve APA timing parameters and increase APA force production in healthy young adults.

  13. Anticipatory and compensatory postural adjustments in conditions of body asymmetry induced by holding an object.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Lee, Yun-Ju; Aruin, Alexander S

    2015-11-01

    The effect of body asymmetry on anticipatory and compensatory postural adjustments was studied. Ten healthy subjects stood on the force platform and held an object in one hand which induced body asymmetry. Subjects were exposed to external perturbations applied to their shoulders while standing with either normal or narrow base of support. Bilateral electromyographic activity (EMG) of dorsal and ventral trunk and leg muscles and center-of-pressure displacements were recorded. Data was analyzed within the intervals typical for anticipatory (APA) and compensatory postural adjustments. Integrals of EMG activity and co-contraction and reciprocal activation of muscles were calculated and analyzed. Reciprocal activation of muscles on the target side and co-contraction of muscles on the contralateral side were seen when standing in asymmetrical stance and being subjected to external perturbations. Decreased magnitudes of co-contraction and reciprocal activation of muscles were seen in the APA phase while standing asymmetrically with narrow base of support. The findings highlight the importance of investigating the role of body asymmetry in maintaining control of vertical posture. The outcome of the study provides a foundation for future studies focusing on improvement in postural control in individuals with body asymmetry due to unilateral weakness.

  14. Effects of preparatory period on anticipatory postural control and contingent negative variation associated with rapid arm movement in standing posture.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kaoru; Fujiwara, Katsuo

    2007-01-01

    We investigated CNS motor preparation state and anticipatory postural muscle activation while subjects performed bilateral rapid arm movement at various intervals between warning and response stimulus (preparatory period) during standing. Motor preparation state was evaluated by integrated values of the late components of the contingent negative variation (late CNV), obtained by averaging electroencephalograms during the last 100ms of the preparatory period. For quantifying anticipatory postural muscle activation, we measured the onset of burst activity in postural muscles (lumbar paraspinal, biceps femoris, and gastrocnemius) with respect to anterior deltoid activity and integrated values of preceding activation. Subjects performed the arm movement with minimal delay in the warning stimulus-response stimulus-motor response paradigm under preparatory periods of 2.0, 3.0 and 3.5s. Late CNV did not differ between the 2.0-s and 3.0-s period, but was significantly smaller in the 3.5-s period than in the 2.0-s period, suggesting difficulty in predicting response timing in the 3.5-s period. No change was found on integrated values of preceding activations of postural muscles. Burst onset of all postural muscles significantly preceded anterior deltoid activation in all periods. Burst activity for gastrocnemius only occurred earlier in the 3.5-s period than in the 2.0-s and 3.0-s periods. Weak correlations were observed between late CNV and onset time of gastrocnemius activity. It is suggested that earlier activation of gastrocnemius is a strategy adopted when response stimulus timing is relatively difficult to predict.

  15. Anticipatory postural adjustments modify the movement-related potentials of upper extremity voluntary movement.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, S; Nakazawa, K; Shimizu, E; Shimoyama, I

    2008-01-01

    To elucidate the effect on movement-related potentials (MRPs) of anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) accompanied by voluntary focal movement, we examined the MRPs of shoulder flexion movement under standing and sitting postural conditions in 12 normal subjects. MRPs were evaluated based on three components: readiness potential (RP), motor potential (MP), and movement-monitoring potential. APAs were observed in the activities of postural muscles including the biceps femoris and erector spinae muscles only under standing conditions. The amplitudes of the three MRP components were larger under standing conditions than under sitting conditions for all recorded electrode positions, and the RP and MP amplitudes at the vertex position, which lies over the supplementary motor area (SMA), showed a prominent increase under standing conditions with the highest statistical significance. These results suggest that a recruited neural process of the cortical area including the SMA may be necessary to generate voluntary movement accompanied by APA.

  16. Forearm postural control during unloading: anticipatory changes in elbow stiffness.

    PubMed

    Biryukova, E V; Roschin, V Y; Frolov, A A; Ioffe, M E; Massion, J; Dufosse, M

    1999-01-01

    In this study, the equilibrium-point hypothesis of muscle-torque generation is used to evaluate the changes in central control parameters in the process of postural-maintenance learning. Muscle torque is described by a linear spring equation with modifiable stiffness, viscosity, and equilibrium angle. The stiffness is considered to be the estimation of the central command for antagonist-muscle coactivation and the equilibrium angle to be the estimation of the reciprocal command for a shift of invariant characteristics of the joint. In the experiments, a load applied to the forearm was released. The subjects were instructed to maintain their forearm in the initial horizontal position. Five sessions of approximately twenty trials each were carried out by eight subjects. During two "control" series, the load release was triggered by the experimenter. During three "learning" series, the load supported by one forearm was released by the subject's other hand. The elbow-joint angle, the angular acceleration, and the external load on the postural forearm were recorded. These recordings as well as anthropometric forearm characteristics were used to calculate the elbow-joint torque (which we called "experimental"). Linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate the equilibrium angle, joint stiffness, and viscosity at each trial. The "theoretical" torque was calculated using a linear spring equation with the found parameters. The good agreement observed between experimental and theoretical joint-torque time courses, apart from the very early period following unloading, argues in favor of the idea that the movement was mainly performed under a constant central command presetting the joint stiffness and the equilibrium angle. An overall increase in the stiffness occurred simultaneously with a decrease in the equilibrium angle during the "learning" series in all the subjects. This suggests that subjects learn to compensate for the disturbing effects of unloading by

  17. Pain reported during prolonged standing is associated with reduced anticipatory postural adjustments of the deep abdominals.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Paul W M; Romero, Rick; Brooks, Cristy

    2014-11-01

    Within the context of low back pain, the measurement of deep abdominal anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) during rapid limb movement has received much interest. There is dispute about the association between APAs and back pain. Moreover, there is limited evidence examining compensatory postural adjustments (CPAs) in back pain. This study examined the relationship between APAs and CPAs with pain reported in the low back during 2 h of prolonged standing. Twenty-six participants with no history of severe back pain performed 2-h prolonged standing. APAs and CPAs of the deep abdominal muscles (transverse abdominis/internal obliques) were measured by surface electromyography during rapid shoulder flexion and extension. APAs and CPAs measured pre-standing revealed symmetrical anticipatory activity, but an asymmetry between the different sides of the abdominal wall for CPAs. APAs and CPAs measured pre-standing were not associated with pain reported during standing. For the whole group, APA amplitudes were reduced post-standing during shoulder flexion (p = 0.005). Pain reported during standing was associated with the changes in APA amplitudes post-standing (rs = 0.43, p = 0.002). These findings support previous research using hypertonic saline injections to induce back pain that showed reduced APA amplitudes, and extends findings to suggest pain does not effect compensatory postural adjustments.

  18. Anticipatory and compensatory postural adjustments in sitting in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Bigongiari, Aline; de Andrade e Souza, Flávia; Franciulli, Patrícia Martins; Neto, Semaan El Razi; Araujo, Rubens Correa; Mochizuki, Luis

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine postural control in children with cerebral palsy performing a bilateral shoulder flexion to grasp a ball from a sitting posture. The participants were 12 typically developing children (control) without cerebral palsy and 12 children with cerebral palsy (CP). We analyzed the effect of ball mass (1 kg and 0.18 kg), postural adjustment (anticipatory, APA, and compensatory, CPA), and groups (control and CP) on the electrical activity of shoulder and trunk muscles with surface electromyography (EMG). Greater mean iEMG was seen in CPA, with heavy ball, and for posterior trunk muscles (p<.05). The children with CP presented the highest EMG and level of co-activation (p<.05). Linear regression indicated a positive relationship between EMG and aging for the control group, whereas that relationship was negative for participants with CP. We suggest that the main postural control strategy in children is based on corrections after the beginning of the movement. The linear relationship between EMG and aging suggests that postural control development is affected by central nervous disease which may lead to an increase in muscle co-activation.

  19. Smart phone as a tool for measuring anticipatory postural adjustments in healthy subjects, a step toward more personalized healthcare.

    PubMed

    Rigoberto, Martinez M; Toshiyo, Tamura; Masaki, Sekine

    2010-01-01

    We present a study on using a smart phone as a tool to evaluate anticipatory postural adjustments (APA) before the beginning of normal gait in healthy subjects. The results show a significantly lower amplitude of anticipatory postural adjustments in the mediolateral axis (ML) when subjects used the non-dominant leg for the first step compared with the amplitude when using the dominant leg. The use of smart phones as a tool for measuring APA enables more personalized and active healthcare for the population without the necessity of their buying or carrying other devices.

  20. Reactive and anticipatory control of posture and bipedal locomotion in a nonhuman primate.

    PubMed

    Mori, Futoshi; Nakajima, Katsumi; Tachibana, Atsumichi; Takasu, Chijiko; Mori, Masahiro; Tsujimoto, Toru; Tsukada, Hideo; Mori, Shigemi

    2004-01-01

    Bipedal locomotion is a common daily activity. Despite its apparent simplicity, it is a complex set of movements that requires the integrated neural control of multiple body segments. We have recently shown that the juvenile Japanese monkey, M. fuscata, can be operant-trained to walk bipedally on moving treadmill. It can control the body axis and lower limb movements when confronted by a change in treadmill speed. M. fuscata can also walk bipedally on a slanted treadmill. Furthermore, it can learn to clear an obstacle attached to the treadmill's belt. When failing to clear the obstacle, the monkey stumbles but quickly corrects its posture and the associated movements of multiple motor segments to again resume smooth bipedal walking. These results give indication that in learning to walk bipedally, M. fuscata transforms relevant visual, vestibular, proprioceptive, and exteroceptive sensory inputs into commands that engage both anticipatory and reactive motor mechanisms. Both mechanisms are essential for meeting external demands imposed upon posture and locomotion.

  1. Contributions of trunk muscles to anticipatory postural control in children with and without developmental coordination disorder.

    PubMed

    Kane, Kyra; Barden, John

    2012-06-01

    Current evidence suggests that movement quality is impacted by postural adjustments made in advance of planned movement. The trunk inevitably plays a key role in these adjustments, by creating a stable foundation for limb movement. The purpose of this study was to examine anticipatory trunk muscle activity during functional tasks in children with and without developmental coordination disorder (DCD). Eleven children with DCD (age 7 to 14 years) and 11 age-matched, typically-developing children performed three tasks: kicking a ball, climbing stairs, and single leg balance. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to examine the neuromuscular activity of bilateral transversus abdominis/internal oblique, external oblique and L3/4 erector spinae, as well as the right tibialis anterior and rectus femoris muscles. Onset latencies for each muscle were calculated relative to the onset of rectus femoris activity. In comparison to the children with DCD, the typically-developing children demonstrated earlier onsets for right tibialis anterior, bilateral external oblique, and right transversus abdominis/internal oblique muscles. These results suggest that anticipatory postural adjustments may be associated with movement problems in children with DCD, and that timing of both proximal and distal muscles should be considered when designing intervention programs for children with DCD.

  2. Deficits in task-specific modulation of anticipatory postural adjustments in individuals with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Hidehito; Fukaya, Yoshiki; Ueda, Tomomi; Honma, Shota; Yamashita, Eriya; Yamamoto, Yoshiji; Mori, Etsuko; Shionoya, Katsuyoshi

    2011-05-01

    We examined whether individuals with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (SDCP) have the ability to utilize lower leg muscles in anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) associated with voluntary arm movement while standing, as well as the ability to modulate APAs with changes in the degree of postural perturbation caused by arm movement. Seven individuals with spastic diplegia (SDCP group, 12-22 yr of age) and seven age- and sex-matched individuals without disability (control group) participated in this study. Participants flexed both shoulders and lifted a load under two different load conditions, during which electromyographic activities of focal and postural muscles were recorded. Although the timing of anticipatory activation of the erector spinae and medial hamstring (MH) muscles was similar in the two participant groups, that of the gastrocnemius (GcM) muscle was significantly later in the SDCP group than in the control group. An increase in anticipatory postural muscle activity with an increase in load was observed in MH and GcM in the control group but not in GcM in the SDCP group. The degree of modulation in MH was significantly smaller in the SDCP group than in the control group. An additional experiment confirmed that these differences in APAs between the two participant groups were unlikely to be attributable to their differences in initial standing posture before load lift. The present findings suggest that lower leg muscles play a minor role in APAs in individuals with spastic diplegia. In addition, it is likely that these individuals have difficulty modulating anticipatory postural muscle activity with changes in the degree of postural perturbation.

  3. The supplementary motor area contributes to the timing of the anticipatory postural adjustment during step initiation in participants with and without Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Jesse V.; Lou, Jau-Shin; Kraakevik, Jeff A.; Horak, Fay B.

    2009-01-01

    The supplementary motor area is thought to contribute to the generation of anticipatory postural adjustments (which act to stabilize supporting body segments prior to movement), but its precise role remains unclear. In addition, participants with Parkinson’s disease (PD) exhibit impaired function of the supplementary motor area as well as decreased amplitudes and altered timing of the anticipatory postural adjustment during step initiation, but the contribution of the supplementary motor area to these impairments also remains unclear. To determine how the supplementary motor area contributes to generating the anticipatory postural adjustment and to the impaired anticipatory postural adjustments of participants with PD, we examined the voluntary steps of 8 participants with PD and 8 participants without PD, before and after disrupting the supplementary motor area and dorsolateral premotor cortex, in separate sessions, with 1-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Both groups exhibited decreased durations of their anticipatory postural adjustments after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the supplementary motor area but not over the dorsolateral premotor cortex. Peak amplitudes of the anticipatory postural adjustments were unaffected by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to either site. The symptom severity of the participants with PD positively correlated with the extent that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the supplementary motor area affected the durations of their anticipatory postural adjustments. The results suggest that the supplementary motor area contributes to the timing of the anticipatory postural adjustment and that participants with PD exhibit impaired timing of their anticipatory postural adjustments, in part, due to progressive dysfunction of circuits associated with the supplementary motor area. PMID:19665521

  4. Anticipatory and Compensatory Postural Adjustments in Response to External Lateral Shoulder Perturbations in Subjects with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Swarowsky, Alessandra; dos Santos, Márcio José

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the anticipatory (APA) and compensatory (CPA) postural adjustments in individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD) during lateral instability of posture. Twenty-six subjects (13 individuals with PD and 13 healthy matched controls) were exposed to predictable lateral postural perturbations. The electromyographic (EMG) activity of the lateral muscles and the displacement of the center of pressure (COP) were recorded during four time intervals that are typical for postural adjustments, i.e., immediately before (APA1, APA2) and after (CPA1 and CPA2) the postural disturbances. The magnitude of the activity of the lateral muscles in the group with PD was lower only during the CPA time intervals and not during the anticipatory adjustments (APAs). Despite this finding, subjects with PD exhibit smaller COP excursions before and after the disturbance, probably due to lack of flexibility and proprioceptive impairments. The results of this study suggest that postural instability in subjects with PD can be partially explained by decreased postural sway, before and after perturbations, and reduced muscular activity after body disturbances. Our findings can motivate new studies to investigate therapeutic interventions that optimize the use of postural adjustment strategies in subjects with PD. PMID:27152640

  5. Corticomotor control of deep abdominal muscles in chronic low back pain and anticipatory postural adjustments.

    PubMed

    Massé-Alarie, Hugo; Flamand, Véronique H; Moffet, Hélène; Schneider, Cyril

    2012-04-01

    Contralateral transversus abdominis muscle (cTrA) is known to be anticipatory to rapid focal movement. The activation of ipsilateral TrA (iTrA) follows cTrA, but their anticipatory interaction in healthy subjects seems to be delayed in low back pain (LBP) patients. TrA delay in LBP is linked with reorganization of the primary motor cortex (M1), thus supporting that cortical changes underlie the altered postural control. Our study tested whether differences in postural adjustments were present in LBP for TrA onsets and co-activation, and whether these differences were paralleled by cortical motor changes. Thirteen chronic LBP patients and 9 healthy Controls were enrolled. Surface recordings of cTrA/internal oblique (IO) and iTrA/IO were collected during a rapid shoulder flexion task while standing. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of M1 tested TrA/IO corticospinal excitability, active motor threshold and short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI). In LBP compared to Controls, iTrA/IO activation was delayed, co-activation was absent, timing between TrA/IO onsets was impaired, and SICI was missing. Between-outcomes correlations observed in one group were not significant in the other. Delay of iTrA/IO and the lacking co-activation were not explained by between-group differences of transcranial magnetic stimulation outcomes. TrA/IO co-activation is present during rapid focal movement in healthy subjects only. LBP patients displayed an important alteration of the control of spine stability that can be explained by altered mechanisms of M1 motor programming.

  6. Relationship between improvements in motor performance and changes in anticipatory postural adjustments during whole-body reaching training.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroshi; Yamanaka, Masanori; Kasahara, Satoshi; Fukushima, Junko

    2014-10-01

    Anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) provide postural stability and play an important role in ensuring appropriate motor performance. APAs also change in various situations. However, it is unknown whether changes in APAs during repetitive movement training contribute to improvement in motor performance. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between improvement in motor performance and changes in APAs during repeated reaching training, as well as the learning effects on APA changes. Sixteen healthy subjects (23 ± 2 years of age) stood barefoot on a force platform and reached as quickly and accurately as possible to a target placed at their maximum reach distance immediately following a beep signal in a reaction time condition. Whole-body reaching training with the right arm was repeated 100 times for three consecutive days. Motor performance and APAs were evaluated on the first day, after discontinuation of training for one day, and again at three months. In addition, reaching with the left arm (untrained limb) was tested on the first and the fifth training day. Body position segments were measured using three-dimensional motion analysis. Surface electromyography of eight postural muscles in both lower limbs was recorded. Kinetics data were recorded using the force platform. Whole-body reaching training induced not only improvements in motor performance (e.g., increased peak hand velocity), but also changes in APAs (e.g., earlier APA onset and increased amplitude). These changes were strongly correlated with and occurred earlier than improvements in motor performance. The learning effects on APAs were retained after the discontinuation of training and were generalized to the untrained limb. These results suggest that change in APAs contributes to improvement in motor performance; that is, the central nervous system may be able to adapt APAs for improvement in motor performance. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  7. Anticipatory postural adjustments during lateral step motion in patients with hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Ichihashi, Noriaki; Shinya, Masahiro; Oda, Shingo

    2011-02-01

    Patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA) have difficulty with mediolateral postural control. Since the symptom of hip OA includes joint pain, which mostly occurs upon initial movement, patients with hip OA might have disabling problems with movement initiation. This study aimed to identify the movement strategy during the anticipatory postural adjustments in the lateral step motion in patients with hip OA. We studied 18 female subjects with unilateral hip OA and 10 healthy subjects, and measured temporal, kinetic, and kinematic variables. Patients with hip OA required a longer duration of anticipation phase than the control subjects, the total duration of lateral stepping was not different between the groups. Displacement of the center of mass to the supporting (affected) side during the anticipation phase was not different between the two groups. These findings suggest that, in patients with hip OA, the center of mass slowly moved to the affected side. Furthermore, patients with hip OA showed greater shift of the trunk to the supporting side than did the control subjects. These movement characteristics might contribute to the achievement of both protection of the affected hip joint and quickness in the subsequent lateral step in patients with hip OA.

  8. Influence of fear of falling on anticipatory postural control of medio-lateral stability during rapid leg flexion.

    PubMed

    Yiou, E; Deroche, T; Do, M C; Woodman, T

    2011-04-01

    During leg flexion from erect posture, postural stability is organized in advance during "anticipatory postural adjustments" (APA). During these APA, inertial forces are generated that propel the centre of gravity (CoG) laterally towards stance leg side. This study examined how fear of falling (FoF) may influence this anticipatory postural control of medio-lateral (ML) stability. Ten young healthy participants performed a series of leg flexions at maximal velocity from low and high surface heights (6 and 66 cm above ground, respectively). In this latter condition with increased FoF, stance foot was placed at the lateral edge of the support surface to induce maximal postural threat. Results showed that the amplitude of ML inertial forces generated during APA decreased with FoF; this decrease was compensated by an increase in APA duration so that the CoG position at time of swing foot-off was located further towards stance leg side. With these changes in ML APA, the CoG was propelled in the same final (unipodal) position above stance foot as in condition with low FoF. These results contrast with those obtained in the literature during quiet standing which showed that FoF did not have any influence on the ML component of postural control. It is proposed that ML APA are modified with increased FoF, in such a way that the risk of a sideway fall induced by the large CoG motion is attenuated.

  9. Temporal disruption of upper-limb anticipatory postural adjustments in cerebellar ataxic patients.

    PubMed

    Bruttini, Carlo; Esposti, Roberto; Bolzoni, Francesco; Vanotti, Alessandra; Mariotti, Caterina; Cavallari, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Voluntary movements induce postural perturbations, which are counteracted by anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) that preserve body equilibrium. Little is known about the neural structures generating APAs, but several studies suggested a role of sensory-motor areas, basal ganglia, supplementary motor area and thalamus. However, the role of the cerebellum still remains an open question. The aim of this present paper is to shed further light on the role of cerebellum in APAs organization. Thus, APAs that stabilize the arm when the index finger is briskly flexed were recorded in 13 ataxic subjects (seven sporadic cases, four dominant ataxia type III and two autosomal recessive), presenting a slowly progressive cerebellar syndrome with four-limb dysmetria, and compared with those obtained in 13 healthy subjects. The pattern of postural activity was similar in the two groups [excitation in triceps and inhibition in biceps and anterior deltoid (AD)], but apparent modifications in timing were observed in all ataxic subjects in which, on average, triceps brachii excitation lagged the onset of the prime mover flexor digitorum superficialis by about 27 ms and biceps and AD inhibition were almost synchronous to it. Instead, in normal subjects, triceps onset was synchronous to the prime mover and biceps and AD anticipated it by about 40 ms. The observed disruption of the intra-limb APA organization confirms that the cerebellum is involved in APA control and, considering cerebellar subjects as a model of dysmetria, also supports the view that a proper APA chain may play a crucial role in refining movement metria.

  10. Anticipatory Postural Adjustments associated with reaching movements are programmed according to the availability of visual information.

    PubMed

    Esposti, Roberto; Bruttini, Carlo; Bolzoni, Francesco; Cavallari, Paolo

    2017-02-17

    During goal-directed arm movements, the eyes, head, and arm are coordinated to look at and reach the target. We examined whether the expectancy of visual information about the target modifies Anticipatory Postural Adjustments (APAs). Ten standing subjects had to (1) move the eyes, head and arm, so as to reach, with both gaze and index-finger, a target of known position placed outside their visual field (Gaze-Reach); (2) look at the target while reaching it (Reach in Full Vision); (3) keep the gaze away until having touched it (Reach then Gaze) and (4) just Gaze without Reach the target. We recorded eye, head, right arm, and acromion kinematics, EMGs from upper- and lower-limb muscles, and forces exerted on the ground. In Gaze-Reach, two coordination strategies were found: when gaze preceded arm muscle recruitment (Gaze-first) and when the opposite occurred (Reach-first). APAs in acromion kinematics, leg muscles, and ground forces started significantly earlier in Gaze-first vs. Reach-first (mean time advance: 44.3 ± 8.9 ms), as it was in Reach in Full Vision vs. Reach then Gaze (39.5 ± 7.9 ms). The Gaze-first to Reach-first time-shift was similar to that between Reach in Full Vision and Reach then Gaze (p = 0.58). Moreover, Gaze without Reach data witnessed that the head-induced postural actions did not affect the APA onset in Gaze-first and Reach-first. In conclusion, in Gaze-first, the central control of posture considers visual information while planning the movement, like in Reach in Full Vision; while Reach-first is more similar to Reach then Gaze, where vision is not required.

  11. The effects of kinesio taping on potential in chronic low back pain patients anticipatory postural control and cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sea Hyun; Lee, Jeong Hun; Oh, Kyeong Ae; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2013-11-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of kinesio tape applied to chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients on anticipatory postural control and cerebral cortex potential. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty patients whose low back pain had continued for more than 12 weeks were selected and assigned to a control group (n=10) to which ordinary physical therapy was applied and an experimental group (n=10) to which kinesio tape was applied. Anticipatory postural control was evaluated using electromyography, and movement-related cortical potential (MRCP) was assessed using electroencephalography. Clinical evaluation was performed using a visual analogue scale and the Oswestry disability index. [Results] According to the analysis results for anticipatory postural control, there were significant decreases in the transversus abdominis (TrA) muscle and the external oblique muscle in both groups. Among them, the TrA of the experimental group exhibited the greatest differences. According to the results of a between-group comparison, there was significant difference in the TrA between the two groups. There was also a significant decrease in the MRCP of both groups. In particular, changes in the movement monitoring potential (MMP) of the experimental group were greatest at Fz, C3, Cz, and C4. According to the between-group comparison, there were significant differences in MMP at F3, C3, and Cz. Both groups saw VAS and ODI significantly decrease. Among them, the ODI of the experimental group underwent the greatest change. [Conclusion] Kinesio tape applied to CLBP patients reduced their pain and positively affected their anticipatory postural control and MRCP.

  12. The Effects of Kinesio Taping on Potential in Chronic Low Back Pain Patients Anticipatory Postural Control and Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sea Hyun; Lee, Jeong Hun; Oh, Kyeong Ae; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of kinesio tape applied to chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients on anticipatory postural control and cerebral cortex potential. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty patients whose low back pain had continued for more than 12 weeks were selected and assigned to a control group (n=10) to which ordinary physical therapy was applied and an experimental group (n=10) to which kinesio tape was applied. Anticipatory postural control was evaluated using electromyography, and movement-related cortical potential (MRCP) was assessed using electroencephalography. Clinical evaluation was performed using a visual analogue scale and the Oswestry disability index. [Results] According to the analysis results for anticipatory postural control, there were significant decreases in the transversus abdominis (TrA) muscle and the external oblique muscle in both groups. Among them, the TrA of the experimental group exhibited the greatest differences. According to the results of a between-group comparison, there was significant difference in the TrA between the two groups. There was also a significant decrease in the MRCP of both groups. In particular, changes in the movement monitoring potential (MMP) of the experimental group were greatest at Fz, C3, Cz, and C4. According to the between-group comparison, there were significant differences in MMP at F3, C3, and Cz. Both groups saw VAS and ODI significantly decrease. Among them, the ODI of the experimental group underwent the greatest change. [Conclusion] Kinesio tape applied to CLBP patients reduced their pain and positively affected their anticipatory postural control and MRCP. PMID:24396190

  13. [The influence of the leg load and the support mobility under leg on the anticipatory postural adjustment].

    PubMed

    Kazennikov, O V; Kireeva, T B; Shlykov, V Iu

    2015-01-01

    Anticipatory postural adjustment is an essential part of equilibrium maintainance during standing in human. So changes in stance condition could affect both control of equilibrium and anticipatory adjustment. Anticipatory changes in the stabilogram of each leg were studied in standing subject during the early stage of quick right arm lifting while legs were on two separated supports. The center of pressure (CP) movement was analyzed in three variants of experiment: both legs on immovable support, with only right leg on the movable support and with only left leg on the moveable support. In each standing condition subject stood with symmetrical load on two legs or with the load voluntary transferred to one leg. The anticipatory CP shift depended on the mobility of the support under the leg and on loading of the leg. While standing on unmovable supports with symmetrical load on the legs before lifting of the right arm CP of right leg shifted backward and CP of left leg--forward. While standing with one leg on movable support the anticipatory CP shift of this leg was small and did not depend on the load on the leg. However the shift of CP of the leg that was placed on the unmovable support depended on the load in the same way as in the case when both legs were on unmovable supports. Results suggested that since on movable support the support and proprioceptive afferent flow from distal part of the leg that was did not supply unambiguous information about body position, the role of distal joints in posture control is reduced.

  14. Does movement planning follow Fitts' law? Scaling anticipatory postural adjustments with movement speed and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Bertucco, M; Cesari, P

    2010-11-24

    We wanted to determine whether movement planning followed Fitts' law by investigating the relationship between movement planning and movement performance in experienced dancers executing a typical classical ballet step in which the big toe was pointed to targets at different distances and of different widths so as to obtain several indices of difficulty (ID). Movement time, velocity and variability at the target were the variables of movement performance kinematics; movement planning was evaluated by analysis of anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) to assess their modulation at different IDs. Movement time and peak of velocity were found to scale with the ID only when individual movement distance across target widths was entered into the analysis. APA magnitude and duration both scaled according to movement parameters but not in the same way. APA magnitude scaled with movement velocity, while APA duration was sensitive to the amplitude-to-accuracy ratio following the ID for movements performed in the shortest time interval when on-line feedback control is probably not available. Here we show that timing of muscle activation acts as an independent central command that triggers fine-tuning for speed-accuracy trade-off. Copyright © 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Do centrally programmed anticipatory postural adjustments in fast stepping affect performance of an associated "touche" movement?

    PubMed

    Do, M C; Yiou, E

    1999-12-01

    Ensuring maximum speed in executing a sequence of two voluntary movements requires the second movement to be triggered only after some delay. This is due to the existence of a "relative refractory period." If the second movement is initiated during the refractory period, its speed decreases (movement time increases). In the present study we tested the existence of a refractory period during the execution of a sequence of movements involving both the upper and the lower limbs. More precisely, we examined whether the maximal speed of the touche fencing movement is affected by the anticipatory postural adjustments (APA) preceding a voluntary lunge. The touche and the lunge are similar to a pointing task and a stepping forward movement, respectively. touche consists of hitting a target with a foil at maximal velocity. The results show that (a) when the touche was initiated prior to the onset of the APA of the lunge, the maximal foil velocity remains similar to that of an isolated touche, and (b) when the touche is initiated during the development of the APA of the lunge, the maximal foil velocity is lower than in the isolated touche. Furthermore, the maximal foil velocity decreases with the temporal progression of the APA and reaches its minimal value when initiated at the time of voluntary lunge execution ('foot off'). The discussion suggests that the centrally programmed APA that are elicited in the stepping forward movement induces a refractory period which affects performance of the pointing task.

  16. Anticipatory postural adjustments during cutting manoeuvres in football and their consequences for knee injury risk.

    PubMed

    Mornieux, Guillaume; Gehring, Dominic; Fürst, Patrick; Gollhofer, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs), i.e. preparatory positioning of the head, the trunk and the foot, are essential to initiate cutting manoeuvres during football games. The aim of the present study was to determine how APA strategies during cutting manoeuvres are influenced by a reduction of the time available to prepare the movement. Thirteen football players performed different cutting tasks, with directions of cutting either known prior to the task or indicated by a light signal occurring 850, 600 or 500 ms before ground contact. With less time available to prepare the cutting manoeuvre, the head was less orientated towards the cutting direction (P = 0.033) and the trunk was even more rotated in the opposite direction (P = 0.002), while the foot placement was not significantly influenced. Moreover, the induced higher lateral trunk flexion correlated with the increased knee abduction moment (r = 0.41; P = 0.009). Increasing lateral trunk flexion is the main strategy used to successfully perform a cutting manoeuvre when less time is available to prepare the movement. However, higher lateral trunk flexion was associated with an increased knee abduction moment and therefore an increased knee injury risk. Reducing lateral trunk flexion during cutting manoeuvres should be part of training programs seeking the optimisation of APAs.

  17. Anticipatory postural adjustments to arm movement reveal complex control of paraspinal muscles in the thorax.

    PubMed

    Lee, Linda-Joy; Coppieters, Michel W; Hodges, Paul W

    2009-02-01

    Anatomical and empirical data suggest that deep and superficial muscles may have different functions for thoracic spine control. This study investigated thoracic paraspinal muscle activity during anticipatory postural adjustments associated with arm movement. Electromyographic (EMG) recordings were made from the right deep (multifidus/rotatores) and superficial (longissimus) muscles at T5, T8, and T11 levels using fine-wire electrodes. Ten healthy participants performed fast unilateral and bilateral flexion and extension arm movements in response to a light. EMG amplitude was measured during 25ms epochs for 150ms before and 400ms after deltoid EMG onset. During arm flexion movements, multifidus and longissimus had two bursts of activity, one burst prior to deltoid and a late burst. With arm extension both muscles were active in a single burst after deltoid onset. There was differential activity with respect to direction of trunk rotation induced by arm movement. Right longissimus was most active with left arm movements and right multifidus was most active with right arm movements. All levels of the thorax responded similarly. We suggest that although thoracic multifidus and longissimus function similarly to control sagittal plane perturbations, these muscles are differentially active with rotational forces on the trunk.

  18. Anticipatory postural adjustments contribute to age-related changes in compensatory steps associated with unilateral perturbations.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Masaki; Saito, Mayumi; Ushiba, Junichi; Tomita, Yutaka; Minami, Mihoko; Masakado, Yoshihisa

    2012-07-01

    Compensatory steps are essential for preventing falls following perturbations. This study aimed to explore age-related changes in compensatory steps to unilateral perturbations, specifically in terms of whether anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) play a role in stabilizing lateral balance. Five young and five elderly male adults participated. The split-belt treadmill was used to provide bi- and unilateral perturbations, as forward or backward transitions, applied 10 times in random order. Backward steps evoked by unilateral forward perturbations were evaluated. We measured temporal characteristics, mediolateral (ML) center of mass (COM) motion, and ML step length of compensatory steps. Compensatory steps to unexpected perturbations showed delayed onset of foot-off (FO) and expanded lateral swing length in elderly compared to young subjects. Differences in COM motions and step width arose related to APAs. Elderly subjects showing APAs exhibited no significant differences in ML COM, ML COM velocity, or ML swing length compared to young subjects. However, elderly subjects without APAs showed significant changes toward instability in these parameters. The fact that APAs play a notable role, particularly in the elderly, in stability offers a new insight into preventing falls. However, APAs occurred in 29% of the steps of young and 35% of the steps of elderly subjects. If the occurrence of APAs in elderly people in response to compensatory steps was more frequent, fall risk would be reduced. Further studies, particularly into APA frequency, might contribute to improved intervention to prevent falls.

  19. Anticipatory control of center of mass and joint stability during voluntary arm movement from a standing posture: interplay between active and passive control.

    PubMed

    Patla, Aftab E; Ishac, Milad G; Winter, David A

    2002-04-01

    Anticipatory control of upright posture is the focus of this study that combines experimental and modeling work. Individuals were asked to raise or lower their arms from two initial postures such that the final posture of the arm was at 90 degrees with respect to the body. Holding different weights in the hand varied the magnitude of perturbation to postural stability generated by the arm movement. Whole body kinematics and ground reaction forces were measured. Inverse dynamic analysis was used to determine the internal joint moments at the shoulder, hip, knee and ankle, and reaction forces at the shoulder. Center of mass (COM) of the arm, posture (rest of the body without the arms) and whole body (net COM) were also determined. Changes in joint moment at the hip, knee and ankle revealed a significant effect of the direction of movement. The polarities of the joint moment response were appropriate for joint stabilization. Net COM change showed a systematic effect of the direction of movement even though the arm COM was displaced by the same amount and in the same direction for both arm raising and lowering conditions. In order to determine the effects of the passive forces and moments on the posture COM, the body was modeled as an inverted pendulum. The model was customized for each participant; the relevant model parameters were estimated from data obtained from each trial. The ankle joint stiffness and viscosity were adjusted to ensure postural equilibrium prior to arm movement. Joint reactive forces and moments generated by the arm movements were applied at the shoulder level of this inverted pendulum; these were the only inputs and no active control was included. The posture COM profile from the model simulation was calculated. Results show that simulated posture COM profile and measured posture COM profile are identical for about 200 ms following the onset of arm movement and then they deviate. Therefore, the initial control of COM is passive in nature and the

  20. Anticipatory postural adjustments in reach-to-grasp: effect of object mass predictability.

    PubMed

    Aimola, Ettore; Santello, Marco; La Grua, Giovanni; Casabona, Antonino

    2011-09-15

    Anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) are thought to compensate for upcoming and predictable perturbations before they occur, e.g., a backward shift of the body center of pressure (COP) before raising the arm. When the goal of arm movements is to reach, grasp, and manipulate an object, predicting the effect of raising the arm on body COP before reach onset could incorporate the properties of the object to be lifted, as both will affect postural control during reaching and object manipulation. Alternatively, the central nervous system (CNS) might use separate APAs to compensate for the effect of arm raising from raising the arm and object. To distinguish between these two scenarios, we asked subjects to reach, grasp, and lift an object whose mass (100g, 750g, or 1400g) was either constant across trials or variable from trial to trial ('predictable' and 'unpredictable' condition, respectively). We hypothesized that object mass would affect the magnitude of APAs in the predictable condition before the onset of object lift but not before the initial arm onset. We also expected COP variability following object lift to be reduced as a result of APAs. For the unpredictable condition, we expected 'default' APAs that would minimize postural perturbation following object lift. We found that both magnitude and timing of APAs were modulated as a function of predictable object mass prior to contact, rather than at the onset of the reaching movement. Specifically, COP position moved forward with increasing object load (p<0.05) and peak COP velocity related to object contact occurred significantly early for heavier loads (p<0.05). For the random condition, the COP position and timing at all loads resembled that associated with larger predictable loads. These findings suggest that modulating COP to a future event might be more accurate when timed to temporally close events, thus potentially reducing the computational load as well as risks of prediction errors. Additionally, our

  1. Independent walking as a major skill for the development of anticipatory postural control: evidence from adjustments to predictable perturbations.

    PubMed

    Cignetti, Fabien; Zedka, Milan; Vaugoyeau, Marianne; Assaiante, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Although there is suggestive evidence that a link exists between independent walking and the ability to establish anticipatory strategy to stabilize posture, the extent to which this skill facilitates the development of anticipatory postural control remains largely unknown. Here, we examined the role of independent walking on the infants' ability to anticipate predictable external perturbations. Non-walking infants, walking infants and adults were sitting on a platform that produced continuous rotation in the frontal plane. Surface electromyography (EMG) of neck and lower back muscles and the positions of markers located on the platform, the upper body and the head were recorded. Results from cross-correlation analysis between rectified and filtered EMGs and platform movement indicated that although muscle activation already occurred before platform movement in non-walking infants, only walking infants demonstrated an adult-like ability for anticipation. Moreover, results from further cross-correlation analysis between segmental angular displacement and platform movement together with measures of balance control at the end-points of rotation of the platform evidenced two sorts of behaviour. The adults behaved as a non-rigid non-inverted pendulum, rather stabilizing head in space, while both the walking and non-walking infants followed the platform, behaving as a rigid inverted pendulum. These results suggest that the acquisition of independent walking plays a role in the development of anticipatory postural control, likely improving the internal model for the sensorimotor control of posture. However, despite such improvement, integrating the dynamics of an external object, here the platform, within the model to maintain balance still remains challenging in infants.

  2. Independent Walking as a Major Skill for the Development of Anticipatory Postural Control: Evidence from Adjustments to Predictable Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Cignetti, Fabien; Zedka, Milan; Vaugoyeau, Marianne; Assaiante, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Although there is suggestive evidence that a link exists between independent walking and the ability to establish anticipatory strategy to stabilize posture, the extent to which this skill facilitates the development of anticipatory postural control remains largely unknown. Here, we examined the role of independent walking on the infants’ ability to anticipate predictable external perturbations. Non-walking infants, walking infants and adults were sitting on a platform that produced continuous rotation in the frontal plane. Surface electromyography (EMG) of neck and lower back muscles and the positions of markers located on the platform, the upper body and the head were recorded. Results from cross-correlation analysis between rectified and filtered EMGs and platform movement indicated that although muscle activation already occurred before platform movement in non-walking infants, only walking infants demonstrated an adult-like ability for anticipation. Moreover, results from further cross-correlation analysis between segmental angular displacement and platform movement together with measures of balance control at the end-points of rotation of the platform evidenced two sorts of behaviour. The adults behaved as a non-rigid non-inverted pendulum, rather stabilizing head in space, while both the walking and non-walking infants followed the platform, behaving as a rigid inverted pendulum. These results suggest that the acquisition of independent walking plays a role in the development of anticipatory postural control, likely improving the internal model for the sensorimotor control of posture. However, despite such improvement, integrating the dynamics of an external object, here the platform, within the model to maintain balance still remains challenging in infants. PMID:23409171

  3. Anticipatory postural muscle activity associated with bilateral arm flexion while standing in individuals with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Hidehito; Fukaya, Yoshiki; Honma, Shota; Ueda, Tomomi; Yamamoto, Yoshiji; Shionoya, Katsuyoshi

    2010-07-26

    Compared to automatic postural responses to external perturbation, little is known about anticipatory postural adjustments in individuals with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. In this study, we examined whether anticipatory activation of postural muscles would be observed before voluntary arm movement while standing in individuals with spastic diplegia. Seven individuals with spastic diplegia (SDCP(group), 12-22 years) and 7 age- and gender-matched individuals without disability (Control(group)) participated in this study. Participants performed bilateral arm flexion at maximum speed at their own timing while standing, during which electromyographic (EMG) activities of focal and postural muscles were recorded. In both groups, the erector spinae (ES) and medial hamstring (MH) muscles were activated in advance of the anterior deltoid muscle (AD), which is a focal muscle of arm flexion. Although start times of ES and MH with respect to AD were similar in the 2 groups, increases in EMG amplitudes of ES and MH in the anticipatory range from -150ms to +50ms, with respect to burst onset of AD, were significantly smaller in the SDCP(group) than in the Control(group). These findings suggest that individuals with spastic diplegia have the ability to anticipate the effects of disturbance of posture and equilibrium caused by arm movement and to activate postural muscles in advance of focal muscles. However, it is likely that the anticipatory increase in postural muscle activity is insufficient in individuals with spastic diplegia.

  4. Decoupling of stretch reflex and background muscle activity during anticipatory postural adjustments in humans.

    PubMed

    Vedula, Siddharth; Kearney, Robert E; Wagner, Ross; Stapley, Paul J

    2010-08-01

    We studied the evolution of stretch reflexes in relation to background electromyographic (EMG) activity in the soleus muscle preceding the onset of voluntary arm raise movements. Our objective was to investigate if changes in reflex EMG and muscle activity occur simultaneously and are similarly scaled in amplitude. Ten human subjects stood with each foot on pedals able to exert short dorsiflexor pulses during stance. Subjects were asked to product consistent voluntary arm raise movements to a target upon a visual cue. In (1/4) of trials, no pulse perturbations were given, but in the remaining (3/4)'s of all trials pulses were given randomly during a 600-ms period, from 400 ms before until 200 ms after the onset of the movements. Perturbation trials were sorted into 20-ms bins post hoc, and the amplitude of the reflex EMG component was calculated and compared to the EMG activity obtained when no pulses were given. Results showed that despite exhibiting similar profiles over time, the background EMG consistently inhibited before the reflex EMG did. However, times of reactivation (rebound) were variable across subjects, with background EMG activating before reflex for some subjects and vice versa for others. The minimum values of inhibition, time of inhibition and time of rebound for background and reflex EMG measures did not show significant linear correlations when all subjects' data were considered. These results suggest that reflex and background EMG components of anticipatory postural adjustments evolve differently in time and amplitude. This has implications for the independent control of reflexes and voluntary muscle activity.

  5. Time-Frequency and ERP Analyses of EEG to Characterize Anticipatory Postural Adjustments in a Bimanual Load-Lifting Task.

    PubMed

    Barlaam, Fanny; Descoins, Médéric; Bertrand, Olivier; Hasbroucq, Thierry; Vidal, Franck; Assaiante, Christine; Schmitz, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) compensate in advance for the destabilizing effect of a movement. This study investigated the specific involvement of each primary motor cortex (M1) during a bimanual load-lifting task in which subjects were required to maintain a stable forearm position during voluntary unloading. Kinematics, electromyographic, and electroencephalographic (EEG) data were recorded in eight right-handed healthy subjects lifting a load placed on their left forearm. Two EEG analyses were performed: a time-frequency (TF) analysis and an event-related potential (ERP) analysis. The TF analysis revealed a mean power decrease in the mu rhythm over the left and right M1 concomitant with lifting onset. Each decrease showed specific features: over the right M1, contralateral to the postural forearm, there was a steeper slope and a greater amplitude than over the left M1. Although a mu rhythm desynchronization has until now been the signature of cortical activity related to a motor component, we show that it can also be related to postural stabilization. We discuss the involvement of the mu rhythm desynchronization over the postural M1 in the high temporal precision enabling efficient APAs. ERP analysis showed a negative wave over the left M1 and a concomitant positive wave over the right M1. While the negative wave classically reflects M1 recruitment related to the forthcoming lifting, the novelty here is that the positive wave reflects the transmission of inhibitory commands toward the postural forearm.

  6. Does Observation of Postural Imbalance Induce a Postural Reaction?

    PubMed Central

    Tia, Banty; Saimpont, Arnaud; Paizis, Christos; Mourey, France; Fadiga, Luciano; Pozzo, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Background Several studies bring evidence that action observation elicits contagious responses during social interactions. However automatic imitative tendencies are generally inhibited and it remains unclear in which conditions mere action observation triggers motor behaviours. In this study, we addressed the question of contagious postural responses when observing human imbalance. Methodology/Principal Findings We recorded participants' body sway while they observed a fixation cross (control condition), an upright point-light display of a gymnast balancing on a rope, and the same point-light display presented upside down. Our results showed that, when the upright stimulus was displayed prior to the inverted one, centre of pressure area and antero-posterior path length were significantly greater in the upright condition compared to the control and upside down conditions. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate a contagious postural reaction suggesting a partial inefficiency of inhibitory processes. Further, kinematic information was sufficient to trigger this reaction. The difference recorded between the upright and upside down conditions indicates that the contagion effect was dependent on the integration of gravity constraints by body kinematics. Interestingly, the postural response was sensitive to habituation, and seemed to disappear when the observer was previously shown an inverted display. The motor contagion recorded here is consistent with previous work showing vegetative output during observation of an effortful movement and could indicate that lower level control facilitates contagion effects. PMID:21423622

  7. Task-related and person-related variables influence the effect of low back pain on anticipatory postural adjustments.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jesse V; Lyman, Courtney A; Hitt, Juvena R; Henry, Sharon M

    2017-08-01

    People with low back pain exhibit altered postural coordination that has been suggested as a target for treatment, but heterogeneous presentation has rendered it difficult to identify appropriate candidates and protocols for such treatments. This study evaluated the associations of task-related and person-related factors with the effect of low back pain on anticipatory postural adjustments. Thirteen subjects with and 13 without low back pain performed seated, rapid arm flexion in self-initiated and cued conditions. Mixed-model ANOVA were used to evaluate group and condition effects on APA onset latencies of trunk muscles, arm-raise velocity, and pre-movement cortical potentials. These measures were evaluated for correlation with pain ratings, Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire scores, and Modified Oswestry Questionnaire scores. Delayed postural adjustments of subjects with low back pain were greater in the cued condition than in the self-initiated condition. The group with low back pain exhibited larger-amplitude cortical potentials than the group without pain, but also significantly slower arm-raise velocities. With arm-raise velocity as a covariate, the effect of low back pain remained significant for the latencies of postural adjustments but not for cortical potentials. Latencies of the postural adjustments significantly correlated with Oswestry and Fear Avoidance Beliefs scores. Delayed postural adjustments with low back pain appear to be influenced by cueing of movement, pain-related disability and fear of activity. These results highlight the importance of subject characteristics, task condition, and task performance when comparing across studies or when developing treatment of people with low back pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The study of the variability of anticipatory postural adjustments in patients with recurrent non-specific low back pain.

    PubMed

    Hedayati, Rozita; Kahrizi, Sedighe; Parnianpour, Mohammad; Bahrami, Fariba; Kazemnejad, Anushiravan; Mobini, Bahram

    2014-01-01

    Intrinsic variability is present in all actions, including repetitive tasks. The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability of anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) of trunk muscles in participants with low back pain (LBP). The study included 21 participants with recurrent non-specific LBP (15 men, 6 women) and 21 healthy volunteers. Standard deviation of electromyographic activity of the external oblique (EO), transverse abdominis/internal oblique (TrA/IO), and erector spinae (ES) muscles onset relative to deltoid muscle onset was recorded in 75 rapid arm flexions, and the correlation with the participants' avoidance belief (the FABQ score) and disability (the Roland-Morris Questionnaire score) was statistically analyzed. participants with LBP exhibited less variability in timing of APAs of the TrA/IO muscle compared with the control group (P=0.047). The timing of APAs of the TrA/IO muscle was significantly correlated with the FABQ score (P=0.006). There was no significant correlation between this variable and disability (P=0.09). Decrease in variability of the timing of APA of the EO (P=0.45) and ES (P=0.6) muscles was not significant. The variability of the postural responses of participants with LBP decreased. Restoring variability in postural control responses might be a goal in rehabilitating these patients.

  9. Investigation of Anticipatory Postural Adjustments during One-Leg Stance Using Inertial Sensors: Evidence from Subjects with Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Bonora, Gianluca; Mancini, Martina; Carpinella, Ilaria; Chiari, Lorenzo; Ferrarin, Maurizio; Nutt, John G.; Horak, Fay B.

    2017-01-01

    The One-Leg Stance (OLS) test is a widely adopted tool for the clinical assessment of balance in the elderly and in subjects with neurological disorders. It was previously showed that the ability to control anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) prior to lifting one leg is significantly impaired by idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (iPD). However, it is not known how APAs are affected by other types of parkinsonism, such as frontal gait disorders (FGD). In this study, an instrumented OLS test based on wearable inertial sensors is proposed to investigate both the initial anticipatory phase and the subsequent unipedal balance. The sensitivity and the validity of the test have been evaluated. Twenty-five subjects with iPD presenting freezing of gait (FOG), 33 with iPD without FOG, 13 with FGD, and 32 healthy elderly controls were recruited. All subjects wore three inertial sensors positioned on the posterior trunk (L4–L5), and on the left and right frontal face of the tibias. Participants were asked to lift a foot and stand on a single leg as long as possible with eyes open, as proposed by the mini-BESTest. Temporal parameters and trunk acceleration were extracted from sensors and compared among groups. The results showed that, regarding the anticipatory phase, the peak of mediolateral trunk acceleration was significantly reduced compared to healthy controls (p < 0.05) in subjects with iPD with and without FOG, but not in FGD group (p = 0.151). Regarding the balance phase duration, a significant shortening was found in the three parkinsonian groups compared to controls (p < 0.001). Moreover, balance was significantly longer (p < 0.001) in iPD subjects without FOG compared to subjects with FGD and iPD subjects presenting FOG. Strong correlations between balance duration extracted by sensors and clinical mini-BESTest scores were found (ρ > 0.74), demonstrating the method’s validity. Our findings support the validity of the proposed method for

  10. Anticipatory postural activity of the deep trunk muscles differs between anatomical regions based on their mechanical advantage.

    PubMed

    Park, R J; Tsao, H; Cresswell, A G; Hodges, P W

    2014-03-07

    The functional differentiation between regions of psoas major (PM) and quadratus lumborum (QL) may underlie a mechanical basis for recruitment of motor units across the muscle. These mechanically unique fascicle regions of these complex multifascicular muscles, PM and QL, are likely to be controlled independently by the central nervous system (CNS). Fine-wire electrodes recorded the electromyographic activity of the PM fascicles arising from the transverse process (PM-t) and vertebral body (PM-v) and the anterior (QL-a) and posterior (QL-p) layers of QL on the right side during a postural perturbation associated with rapid arm movements. The findings of this study indicate that the CNS coordinates the activity of specific regions of PM and QL independently as a component of the anticipatory postural adjustments that precedes the predictable challenge to the spine associated with limb movements. The spatial and temporal features of discrete activity of different regions within PM and QL matched their differing mechanical advantage predicted from their anatomy. These findings suggest that the CNS differentially activates individual regions within complex spine muscles to control the three-dimensional forces applied to the spine. The data also point to a sophisticated control of muscle activation that appears based on mechanical advantage. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of stance width on postural movement pattern and anticipatory postural control associated with unilateral arm abduction.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Katsuo; Tomita, Hidehito; Kurokawa, Nozomi; Asai, Hitoshi; Maeda, Kaoru

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the effects of stance width on postural movement pattern and activation timing of postural muscles during unilateral arm abduction. Thirty-two healthy subjects abducted the right arm at their own timing. Stance width was 0, 9, 18 or 27 cm. Movement angles of leg lateral inclination and trunk lateral flexion to the leg in the frontal plane were analyzed. Based on movement angles at 0 cm width, subjects were classified into three groups: contralateral whole body leaning (CWBLg); ipsilateral trunk flexion (ITFg); and contralateral trunk flexion (CTFg). A high correlation between the movement angles was obtained at 0 cm width (r=0.82). With increasing stance width, postural movement pattern in the ITFg shifted to patterns characterized by lateral flexion of the trunk toward the side opposite to arm movement, and movement angle of leg-inclination in ITFg and CWBLg decreased. At 0 cm width, left gluteus medius and tensor fascia latae were activated significantly about 40 ms ahead of the right middle deltoid in CWBLg and CTFg, but not in ITFg. However, preceding activation became prominent (about 20 ms) in ITFg for wide stances. Moreover, bilateral activation of the tensor fascia latae was observed in CTFg for all widths.

  12. Effects of neck flexion on discriminative and cognitive processing in anticipatory postural control during bilateral arm movement.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Katsuo; Yaguchi, Chie; Kunita, Kenji; Mammadova, Aida

    2012-06-19

    We investigated the effect of neck flexion on discriminative and cognitive processing in postural control during bilateral arm movement while standing, using event-related potential (ERP) and electromyogram. Fourteen healthy subjects flexed their arms to the target stimuli with a 20% probability in neck resting and flexion positions. Amplitude and latency of N2 and P3, anterior deltoid (AD) reaction time, onset time of postural muscles with respect to AD activation, and peak amplitude and latency of all muscles were measured. With neck flexion, N2 and P3 amplitudes increased, N2 and P3 latencies and AD reaction time shortened, and onset times of all postural muscles became earlier. No significant differences in peak amplitude and latency of each muscle were found between neck positions. Significant positive correlations were found in changes with neck flexion between P3 latency and AD reaction time, and between N2 latency and onset time of erector spinae. These suggest that with neck flexion, attention allocation to discriminative and cognitive processing increased, and the processing speed increased with shortening of reaction time in focal muscles. In addition, the onset time of postural muscles became earlier without changing the activation pattern, which was associated with the hastened discriminative processing.

  13. Deficits in anticipatory inhibition of postural muscle activity associated with load release while standing in individuals with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Hidehito; Fukaya, Yoshiki; Totsuka, Kenji; Tsukahara, Yuri

    2013-04-01

    This study aimed to determine whether individuals with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (SDCP) have deficits in anticipatory inhibition of postural muscle activity. Nine individuals with SDCP (SDCP group, 3 female and 6 male, 13-24 yr of age) and nine age- and sex-matched individuals without disability (control group) participated in this study. Participants stood on a force platform, which was used to measure the position of the center of pressure (CoP), while holding a light or heavy load in front of their bodies. They then released the load by abducting both shoulders. Surface electromyograms were recorded from the rectus abdominis, erector spinae (ES), rectus femoris (RF), medial hamstring (MH), tibialis anterior (TA), and gastrocnemius (GcM) muscles. In the control group, anticipatory inhibition before load release and load-related modulation of the inhibition were observed in all the dorsal muscles recorded (ES, MH, and GcM). In the SDCP group, similar results were obtained in the trunk muscle (ES) but not in the lower limb muscles (MH and GcM), although individual differences were seen, especially in MH. Anticipatory activation of the ventral lower limb muscles (RF and TA) and load-related modulation of the activation were observed in both participant groups. CoP path length during load release was longer in the SDCP group than in the control group. The present findings suggest that individuals with SDCP exhibit deficits in anticipatory inhibition of postural muscles at the dorsal part of the lower limbs, which is likely to result in a larger disturbance of postural equilibrium.

  14. Anticipatory postural adjustments in arm muscles associated with movements of the contralateral limb and their possible role in interlimb coordination.

    PubMed

    Baldissera, Fausto; Rota, Viviana; Esposti, Roberto

    2008-02-01

    While sitting on a turnable stool, with both shoulders flexed at 90 degrees or, alternatively, with arms parallel to the trunk and the elbows flexed at 90 degrees--the hands being semisupine--subjects performed unidirectional and cyclic movements on the horizontal plane of the right arm (adduction-abduction) or hand (flexion-extension). The left arm was still, in a position symmetrical to that of the right limb and with the hand contacting a fixed support by the palmar or dorsal surface. During both unidirectional and cyclic arm or hand movements, activation of the prime mover muscles (right Pectoralis Major for arm adduction and Infraspinatus for abduction; right Flexor Carpi Radialis and Extensor Carpi Radialis for the hand movements) was accompanied by activation of the homologous muscles of the contralateral arm and inhibition of antagonists. The contralateral activities (1) regularly preceded the burst in the movement prime movers and (2) were organised in fixation chains that, exerting forces on the hand fixed support, will counterbalance the rotatory action exerted on the trunk by the primary movement. Based on these features, these activities may be classified as anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs). The observed APAs distribution is such as to favour the preferential (mirror symmetrical) coupling of upper limb movements on the horizontal plane. The possible role of these APAs in determining the different constraints experienced when performing mirror symmetrical versus isodirectional coupling is discussed.

  15. Anticipatory postural adjustments are unaffected by age and are not absent in patients with the freezing of gait phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Plate, A; Klein, K; Pelykh, O; Singh, A; Bötzel, K

    2016-09-01

    In bipedal gait, the initiation of the first step is preceded by a complex sequence of movements which shift the centre of mass of the body towards the stance foot to allow for a step of the swing foot. These anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) have been investigated in order to elucidate movement strategies in healthy and diseased persons. We studied the influence of several external parameters (age, type of step initiation) on APAs and investigated whether Parkinsonian patients may have different APAs. As a result, we found that externally elicited steps were preceded by faster and larger APAs than self-timed steps. Parkinsonian patients without the freezing of gait (FOG) phenomenon showed overall slightly reduced APAs but did not clearly differ from patients with FOG. Multiple APAs were seen in up to 25 % of the steps of the patients and in a much lower percentage of the steps of control subjects. The results indicate that APAs are significantly influenced by the timing of a step, i.e. are larger in externally elicited steps. The patients showed an overall preserved APA pattern but slowed movements and amplitude, indicating that increased bradykinesia due to progressive illness is a plausible explanation for these findings. The freezing phenomenon is not explained by a general absence or massive reduction in APA measures.

  16. Balance control in aging: improvements in anticipatory postural adjustments and updating of internal models.

    PubMed

    Kubicki, Alexandre; Mourey, France; Bonnetblanc, François

    2015-12-07

    Postural stability of older subjects can be estimated during orthostatic equilibrium. However, dynamic equilibrium is also important to investigate risks of fall. It implies different interpretations of measures given by force plates. Same dependant variables (e.g. center of pressure displacement) cannot be interpreted the same ways depending of the type of equilibrium that is investigated. In particular, sways increases during dynamic equilibrium and before movement execution may reflect an improvement of feedforward control.

  17. Atomoxetine reduces anticipatory responding in a 5-choice serial reaction time task for adult zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Matthew O.; Brock, Alistair J.; Sudwarts, Ari; Brennan, Caroline H.

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in impulse control are related to a number of psychiatric diagnoses, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, addiction, and pathological gambling. Despite increases in our knowledge about the underlying neurochemical and neuroanatomical correlates, understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms is less well established. Understanding these mechanisms is essential in order to move towards individualized treatment programs and increase efficacy of interventions. Zebrafish are a very useful vertebrate model for exploring molecular processes underlying disease owing to their small size and genetic tractability. Their utility in terms of behavioral neuroscience, however, hinges on the validation and publication of reliable assays with adequate translational relevance. Here, we report an initial pharmacological validation of a fully automated zebrafish version of the commonly used five-choice serial reaction time task using a variable interval pre-stimulus interval. We found that atomoxetine reduced anticipatory responses (0.6 mg/kg), whereas a high-dose (4 mg/kg) methylphenidate increased anticipatory responses and the number of trials completed in a session. On the basis of these results, we argue that similar neurochemical processes in fish as in mammals may control impulsivity, as operationally defined by anticipatory responses on a continuous performance task such as this, making zebrafish potentially a good model for exploring the molecular basis of impulse control disorders and for first-round drug screening. PMID:24481568

  18. Atomoxetine reduces anticipatory responding in a 5-choice serial reaction time task for adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Parker, Matthew O; Brock, Alistair J; Sudwarts, Ari; Brennan, Caroline H

    2014-07-01

    Deficits in impulse control are related to a number of psychiatric diagnoses, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, addiction, and pathological gambling. Despite increases in our knowledge about the underlying neurochemical and neuroanatomical correlates, understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms is less well established. Understanding these mechanisms is essential in order to move towards individualized treatment programs and increase efficacy of interventions. Zebrafish are a very useful vertebrate model for exploring molecular processes underlying disease owing to their small size and genetic tractability. Their utility in terms of behavioral neuroscience, however, hinges on the validation and publication of reliable assays with adequate translational relevance. Here, we report an initial pharmacological validation of a fully automated zebrafish version of the commonly used five-choice serial reaction time task using a variable interval pre-stimulus interval. We found that atomoxetine reduced anticipatory responses (0.6 mg/kg), whereas a high-dose (4 mg/kg) methylphenidate increased anticipatory responses and the number of trials completed in a session. On the basis of these results, we argue that similar neurochemical processes in fish as in mammals may control impulsivity, as operationally defined by anticipatory responses on a continuous performance task such as this, making zebrafish potentially a good model for exploring the molecular basis of impulse control disorders and for first-round drug screening.

  19. Fear of falling is associated with prolonged anticipatory postural adjustment during gait initiation under dual-task conditions in older adults.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Kazuki; Yamada, Minoru; Nagai, Koutatsu; Tanaka, Buichi; Mori, Shuhei; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2012-02-01

    Little is known about dynamic balance control under dual-task conditions in older adults with fear of falling (FoF). The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of FoF on anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) during gait initiation under dual-task conditions in older adults. Fifty-seven elderly volunteers (age, 79.2 [6.8] years) from the community participated in this study. Each participant was categorised into either the Fear (n=24) or No-fear (n=33) group on the basis of the presence or absence of FoF. Under single- and dual-task conditions, centre of pressure (COP) data were collected while the participants performed gait initiation trials from a starting position on a force platform. We also performed a 10-m walking test (WT), a timed up & go test (TUG), and a functional reach test (FR). The reaction and APA phases were measured from the COP data. The results showed that under the dual-task condition, the Fear group had significantly longer APA phases than the No-fear group, although no significant differences were observed between the 2 groups in the reaction and APA phases under the single-task condition and in any clinical measurements (WT, TUG, and FR). Our findings suggest that specific deficits in balance control occur in subjects with FoF during gait initiation while dual tasking, even if their physical functions are comparable to subjects without FoF. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Accuracy of pointing movements relies upon a specific tuning between anticipatory postural adjustments and prime mover activation.

    PubMed

    Caronni, A; Bolzoni, F; Esposti, R; Bruttini, C; Cavallari, P

    2013-05-01

    Equilibrium-perturbing forces associated with a voluntary upper-limb movement can be strong enough to displace the whole-body centre of mass. In this condition, anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs), developing in muscles other than the prime mover, are essential in maintaining the whole-body balance. Here, we test the hypothesis that APAs preceding an upper-limb target-reaching movement could play a role also in controlling the movement accuracy. Standing subjects (10) were asked to flex the right shoulder and touch with the index fingertip the centre of a target positioned in front of them. The reaching task was also performed while wearing and after doffing prismatic lenses (shifting the eye field rightward). EMGs from different upper- and lower-limb muscles and the mechanical actions to the ground were recorded. (i) Before wearing prisms, subjects were very accurate in hitting the target, and the pointing movements were accompanied by APAs in quadriceps (Q) and tibialis anterior (TA) of both sides, and in right hamstrings (H) and soleus (SOL). (ii) After donning prisms, rightward pointing errors occurred, associated with a significant APA increase in right Q and TA, but without changes in the recruitment of right anterior deltoid (prime mover) and biceps brachii. (iii) These pointing errors were progressively compensated in about 10 trials, indicating a sensorimotor adaptation, and APAs returned to values recorded before wearing prisms. (iv) After doffing prisms, pointing errors occurred in the opposite direction but changes in APAs did not reach significance. We propose that, besides preserving the whole-body balance, APAs are also tailored to obtain an accurate voluntary movement. Acta Physiologica © 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  1. The Organization and Control of Intra-Limb Anticipatory Postural Adjustments and Their Role in Movement Performance

    PubMed Central

    Cavallari, Paolo; Bolzoni, Francesco; Bruttini, Carlo; Esposti, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Anticipatory Postural Adjustments (APAs) are commonly described as unconscious muscular activities aimed to counterbalance the perturbation caused by the primary movement, so as to ensure the whole-body balance, as well as contributing to initiate the displacement of the body center of mass when starting gait or whole-body reaching movements. These activities usually create one or more fixation chains which spread over several muscles of different limbs, and may be thus called inter-limb APAs. However, it has been reported that APAs also precede voluntary movements involving tiny masses, like a flexion/extension of the wrist or even a brisk flexion of the index-finger. In particular, such movements are preceded by an intra-limb APA chain, that involves muscles acting on the proximal joints. Considering the small mass of the moving segments, it is unlikely that the ensuing perturbation could threaten the whole-body balance, so that it is interesting to enquire the physiological role of intra-limb APAs and their organization and control compared to inter-limb APAs. This review is focused on intra-limb APAs and highlights a strict correspondence in their behavior and temporal/spatial organization with respect to inter-limb APAs. Hence it is suggested that both are manifestations of the same phenomenon. Particular emphasis is given to intra-limb APAs preceding index-finger flexion, because their relatively simple biomechanics and the fact that muscular actions were limited to a single arm allowed peculiar investigations, leading to important conclusions. Indeed, such paradigm provided evidence that by granting a proper fixation of those body segments proximal to the moving one APAs are involved in refining movement precision, and also that APAs and prime mover activation are driven by a shared motor command. PMID:27807411

  2. The Organization and Control of Intra-Limb Anticipatory Postural Adjustments and Their Role in Movement Performance.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, Paolo; Bolzoni, Francesco; Bruttini, Carlo; Esposti, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Anticipatory Postural Adjustments (APAs) are commonly described as unconscious muscular activities aimed to counterbalance the perturbation caused by the primary movement, so as to ensure the whole-body balance, as well as contributing to initiate the displacement of the body center of mass when starting gait or whole-body reaching movements. These activities usually create one or more fixation chains which spread over several muscles of different limbs, and may be thus called inter-limb APAs. However, it has been reported that APAs also precede voluntary movements involving tiny masses, like a flexion/extension of the wrist or even a brisk flexion of the index-finger. In particular, such movements are preceded by an intra-limb APA chain, that involves muscles acting on the proximal joints. Considering the small mass of the moving segments, it is unlikely that the ensuing perturbation could threaten the whole-body balance, so that it is interesting to enquire the physiological role of intra-limb APAs and their organization and control compared to inter-limb APAs. This review is focused on intra-limb APAs and highlights a strict correspondence in their behavior and temporal/spatial organization with respect to inter-limb APAs. Hence it is suggested that both are manifestations of the same phenomenon. Particular emphasis is given to intra-limb APAs preceding index-finger flexion, because their relatively simple biomechanics and the fact that muscular actions were limited to a single arm allowed peculiar investigations, leading to important conclusions. Indeed, such paradigm provided evidence that by granting a proper fixation of those body segments proximal to the moving one APAs are involved in refining movement precision, and also that APAs and prime mover activation are driven by a shared motor command.

  3. First trial postural reactions to unexpected balance disturbances: a comparison with the acoustic startle reaction.

    PubMed

    Oude Nijhuis, Lars B; Allum, John H J; Valls-Solé, Josep; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2010-11-01

    Unexpected support-surface movements delivered during stance elicit "first trial" postural reactions, which are larger and cause greater instability compared with habituated responses. The nature of this first trial reaction remains unknown. We hypothesized that first trial postural reactions consist of a generalized startle reaction, with a similar muscle synergy as the acoustic startle response, combined with an automatic postural reaction. Therefore we compared acoustic startle responses to first trial postural reactions. Eight healthy subjects stood on a support surface that unexpectedly rotated backwards 10 times, followed by 10 startling acoustic stimuli, or vice versa. Outcome measures included full body kinematics and surface EMG from muscles involved in startle reactions or postural control. Postural perturbations and startling acoustic stimuli both elicited a clear first trial reaction, as reflected by larger kinematic and EMG responses. The ensuing habituation rate to repeated identical stimuli was comparable for neck and trunk muscles in both conditions. Onset latencies in neck muscles occurred significantly later for first trial perturbations compared with startle responses, but earlier in trunk muscles. Our results show that platform tilting initially induces reactions larger than needed to maintain equilibrium. For neck and trunk muscles, these first trial postural reactions resembled acoustic startle reflexes. First trial postural reactions may be triggered by interaction of afferent volleys formed by somatosensory and vestibular inputs. Acoustic startle reactions may also be partially triggered by vestibular inputs. Similar muscle activation driven by vestibular inputs may be the common element of first trial postural responses and acoustic startle reactions.

  4. Postural reactions to neck vibration in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Valkovic, Peter; Krafczyk, Siegbert; Saling, Marian; Benetin, Ján; Bötzel, Kai

    2006-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that reduced reactions to proprioceptive input signals contribute to postural instability in Parkinson's disease (PD), pulses of mechanical vibration were applied to the neck muscles of PD patients and healthy controls. This stimulus elicits postural reactions in standing subjects. Participating were 13 moderately affected PD patients, 13 severely affected PD patients, and 13 age-matched healthy subjects. Patients were tested on and off medication. Three-second-long pulses of vibration were regularly (10 times) applied to the posterior neck muscles while subjects kept their eyes open or closed. Postural responses to the stimuli were measured by static posturography. No intergroup difference in the pattern and latencies of responses was found. However, the amplitudes of the postural reactions (shift of center of foot pressure) were significantly larger in advanced PD patients; those of moderately affected PD patients did not differ from those of control subjects. Moreover, the size of postural responses in both latter groups decreased across the trial contrary to that of advanced PD patients. Comparison of the measures during on and off testing revealed no significant differences. These results indicate that neither afferent proprioceptive deficits nor central integrative functions but rather scaling and habituation of erroneous proprioceptive information are disturbed in the postural control of advanced PD. Nondopaminergic structures seem to be responsible for this impairment.

  5. The Use of Cognitive Cues for Anticipatory Strategies in a Dynamic Postural Control Task - Validation of a Novel Approach to Dual-Task Testing

    PubMed Central

    Grarup, Bo; Bangshaab, Jette

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dual-task testing is relevant in the assessment of postural control. A combination of a primary (motor) and a secondary (distracting cognitive) tasks is most often used. It remains a challenge however, to standardize and monitor the cognitive task. In this study a new dual-task testing approach with a facilitating, rather than distracting, cognitive component was evaluated. Methods Thirty-one community-dwelling elderly and fifteen young people were tested with respect to their ability to use anticipatory postural control strategies. The motor task consisted of twenty-five repetitive tasks in which the participants needed to exceed their limit of stability in order to touch one out of eight lights. The participants performed three tests. In two of the tests the color cues of the lights allowed the participants to utilize cognitive strategies to plan their next movement and improve their performance time. Results The young performed the baseline motor task test in an average of 29 seconds, while the average time for the elderly was 44 seconds. When comparing the performance time with a leading cue to the time with no cue, the young group improved their performance time significantly better than the elderly did: young: 17% (5), elderly: 5% (8); p<0.001. Similar differences were seen with a more complicated leading cue: young: 12% (5), elderly: 4% (9); p<0.01. The reliability of the test showed moderate to substantial agreement (ICC = 0.74), with a small learning effect between two sessions. Conclusion The dual-task test was sensitive enough to discriminate between elderly and young people. It revealed that the elderly did not utilize cognitive cues for their anticipatory postural control strategies as well as the young were able to. The test procedure was feasible and comprehensible for the participants, and it may be relevant to standardize a similar test for an alternative dual-task approach in the clinical setting. PMID:27487000

  6. Errors in Postural Preparation Lead to Increased Choice Reaction Times for Step Initiation in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Nutt, John G.; Horak, Fay B.

    2011-01-01

    Background. This study asked whether older adults were more likely than younger adults to err in the initial direction of their anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) prior to a step (indicating a motor program error), whether initial motor program errors accounted for reaction time differences for step initiation, and whether initial motor program errors were linked to inhibitory failure. Methods. In a stepping task with choice reaction time and simple reaction time conditions, we measured forces under the feet to quantify APA onset and step latency and we used body kinematics to quantify forward movement of center of mass and length of first step. Results. Trials with APA errors were almost three times as common for older adults as for younger adults, and they were nine times more likely in choice reaction time trials than in simple reaction time trials. In trials with APA errors, step latency was delayed, correlation between APA onset and step latency was diminished, and forward motion of the center of mass prior to the step was increased. Participants with more APA errors tended to have worse Stroop interference scores, regardless of age. Conclusions. The results support the hypothesis that findings of slow choice reaction time step initiation in older adults are attributable to inclusion of trials with incorrect initial motor preparation and that these errors are caused by deficits in response inhibition. By extension, the results also suggest that mixing of trials with correct and incorrect initial motor preparation might explain apparent choice reaction time slowing with age in upper limb tasks. PMID:21498431

  7. Anticipatory and compensatory postural adjustments in people with low back pain: a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Knox, Michael F; Chipchase, Lucy S; Schabrun, Siobhan M; Marshall, Paul W M

    2016-04-16

    Anticipatory (APAs) and compensatory (CPAs) postural adjustments are organised by the central nervous system (CNS) and serve to control postural perturbations. Ineffective APAs and CPAs have been hypothesised to contribute to the persistence of symptoms and disability in people with low back pain (LBP). Despite two decades of research, there is no systematic review investigating APAs and CPAs in people with LBP. Thus, the aim of the current review is to determine if APA and CPA onset or amplitude, as measured by electromyography (EMG), centre of pressure (COP), and kinematics, are altered in people with LBP. A systematic review and meta-analysis will be conducted. Searches will be conducted in electronic databases for full-text articles published before January 2016 using pre-defined search strategies that utilise combinations of keywords and medical subject heading terms. Two independent reviewers will screen potentially relevant articles for inclusion, extract data, and assess risk of bias for individual studies. Any disagreements will be resolved by a third reviewer. Studies comparing APA onset and amplitude and CPA onset and amplitude measured by EMG, COP, or kinematics between people with LBP and healthy individuals will be included if all aspects of the eligibility criteria are met. Data will be synthesised if studies are homogeneous; otherwise, results will be reviewed narratively. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic review to examine APAs and CPAs, as measured by EMG, COP, and kinematics in people with LBP. The findings of this review may aid in the identification of factors that play a role in the persistence of symptoms and disability and aid in the development of interventions to treat symptoms. PROSPERO CRD42016032815.

  8. The role of anticipatory postural adjustments in interlimb coordination of coupled arm movements in the parasagittal plane: II. Postural activities and coupling coordination during cyclic flexion-extension arm movements, ISO- and ANTI-directionally coupled.

    PubMed

    Baldissera, Fausto G; Esposti, Roberto

    2013-08-01

    When coupling cyclic adduction-abduction movements of the arms in the transverse (horizontal) plane, isodirectional (ISO) coupling is less stable than antidirectional (ANTI) coupling. We proposed that such deficiency stems from the disturbing action that anticipatory postural adjustments exert on ISO coupling. To ascertain if postural adjustments differentiate ISO versus ANTI coupling coordination in other types of cyclic arm movements, we examined flexion-extension oscillations in the parasagittal plane. Oscillations of the right arm alone elicited cyclic Postural Adjustments (PAs) in the left Anterior Deltoid and Posterior Deltoid, which replicated the excitation-inhibition pattern of the prime movers right Anterior Deltoid, right Posterior Deltoid. Cyclic PAs also developed symmetrically in Erector Spinae (RES and LES) and in phase opposition in Ischiocruralis (RIC and LIC), so as to discharge to the ground both an anteroposterior force, Fy, and a moment about the vertical axis, Tz. Oscillations of both arms in ISO coupling induced symmetric PAs in both ES and IC muscles, thus generating a large Fy but no Tz. In ANTI coupling, PAs in RES and LES remained symmetric but smaller in size, while PAs in RIC and LIC were large and opposite in phase, resulting in a large Tz and small Fy. Altogether, PAs would thus favour ISO and hamper ANTI parasagittal movements because (1) in the motor pathways to the prime movers of either arm, a convergence would occur between the voluntary commands and the commands for PAs linked to the movement of the other arm, the two commands having the same sign (excitatory or inhibitory) during ISO and an opposite sign during ANTI; (2) the postural effort of trunk and leg muscles would be higher for generating Tz in ANTI than Fy in ISO. These predictions fit with the finding that coupling stability was lower in ANTI than in ISO, i.e., opposite to horizontal movements. In conclusion, in both parasagittal and horizontal arm movements, the less

  9. Specific trunk and general exercise elicit similar changes in anticipatory postural adjustments in patients with chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Cristy; Kennedy, Suzanne; Marshall, Paul W M

    2012-12-01

    A randomized controlled trial. To compare changes in self-rated disability, pain, and anticipatory postural adjustments between specific trunk exercise and general exercise in patients with chronic low back pain. Chronic low back pain is associated with altered motor control of the trunk muscles. The best exercise to address altered motor control is unclear. Sixty-four patients with chronic low back pain were randomly assigned to a specific trunk exercise group (SEG) that included skilled cognitive activation of the trunk muscles in addition to a number of other best practice exercises, whereas the general exercise group performed only seated cycling exercise. The training program lasted for 8 weeks. Self-rated disability and pain scores were collected before and after the training period. Electromyographic activity of various trunk muscles was recorded during performance of a rapid shoulder flexion task before and after training. Muscle onsets were calculated, and the latency time (in ms) between the onset of each trunk muscle and the anterior deltoid formed the basis of the motor control analysis. After training, disability was significantly lower in the SEG (d = 0.62, P = 0.018). Pain was reduced in both groups after training (P < 0.05), but was lower for the SEG (P < 0.05). Despite the general exercise group performing no specific trunk exercise, similar changes in trunk muscle onsets were observed in both groups after training. SEG elicited significant reductions in self-rated disability and pain, whereas similar between-group changes in trunk muscle onsets were observed. The motor control adaptation seems to reflect a strategy of improved coordination between the trunk muscles with the unilateral shoulder movement. Trunk muscle onsets during rapid limb movement do not seem to be a valid mechanism of action for specific trunk exercise rehabilitation programs.

  10. Gait initiation is impaired in subjects with Parkinson's disease in the OFF state: Evidence from the analysis of the anticipatory postural adjustments through wearable inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Bonora, Gianluca; Mancini, Martina; Carpinella, Ilaria; Chiari, Lorenzo; Horak, Fay B; Ferrarin, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    People with Parkinson's disease (PD) typically demonstrate impaired anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) that shift the body center of mass forward (imbalance) and over the stance leg (unloading) prior to gait initiation. APAs are known to be smallest when people with PD are in their OFF-medication state compared to ON-medication or healthy controls. The aim of this pilot study is to validate a previously developed method for the assessment of gait initiation on PD patients in OFF state with body-worn, inertial sensors. Ten subjects with mild-to-moderate idiopathic PD and twelve healthy controls of similar age performed three gait initiation trials. The spatio-temporal parameters of APAs were extracted from three wearable sensors, placed on the shins and on the lower back, and validated with two force plates. Temporal parameters extracted from sensors and force plates, as well as the trunk medio-lateral acceleration and the correspondent displacement of the center of pressure, were significantly correlated. Subjects with PD showed hypometric adjustments in the medio-lateral direction (p-value<0.003) and increased duration of the unloading phase (p-value=0.04). The unloading phase was significantly longer than the imbalance (p-value=0.003) only in subjects with PD. The validity of the method of quantifying APAs from inertial sensors was confirmed in PD subjects by comparison with force plates. Sensitivity in discriminating PD patients from healthy controls was proven by both spatial and temporal parameters. Objective measures of gait initiation deficits with wearable technology provides valuable instrument for the assessment of gait initiation in clinical environments.

  11. Higher Precision in Pointing Movements of the Preferred vs. Non-Preferred Hand Is Associated with an Earlier Occurrence of Anticipatory Postural Adjustments

    PubMed Central

    Bruttini, Carlo; Esposti, Roberto; Bolzoni, Francesco; Cavallari, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    It is a common experience to exhibit a greater dexterity when performing a pointing movement with the preferred limb (PREF) vs. the non-preferred (NON-PREF) one. Here we provide evidence that the higher precision in pointing movements of the PREF vs. NON-PREF hand is associated with an earlier occurrence of the anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs). In this aim, we compared the APAs which stabilize the left or the right arm when performing a pen-pointing movement (prime mover flexor carpi radialis (FCR)). Moreover, we analyzed the elbow and wrist kinematics as well as the precision of the pointing movement. The mean kinematics of wrist movement and its latency, with respect to prime mover recruitment, were similar in the two sides, while APAs in triceps brachii (TB), biceps brachii (BB) and anterior deltoid (AD) were more anticipated when movements were performed with the PREF than with the NON-PREF hand (60–70 vs. 20–30 ms). APAs amplitudes were comparable in the muscles of the two sides. Earlier APAs in the preferred limb were associated with a better fixation of the elbow, which showed a lower excursion, and with a less scattered pointing error (PREF: 10.1 ± 0.8 mm; NON-PREF: 16.3 ± 1.7). Present results suggest that, by securing the more proximal joints dynamics, an appropriate timing of the intra-limb APAs is necessary for refining the voluntary movement precision, which is known to be scarce on the NON-PREF side. PMID:27486394

  12. Higher Precision in Pointing Movements of the Preferred vs. Non-Preferred Hand Is Associated with an Earlier Occurrence of Anticipatory Postural Adjustments.

    PubMed

    Bruttini, Carlo; Esposti, Roberto; Bolzoni, Francesco; Cavallari, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    It is a common experience to exhibit a greater dexterity when performing a pointing movement with the preferred limb (PREF) vs. the non-preferred (NON-PREF) one. Here we provide evidence that the higher precision in pointing movements of the PREF vs. NON-PREF hand is associated with an earlier occurrence of the anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs). In this aim, we compared the APAs which stabilize the left or the right arm when performing a pen-pointing movement (prime mover flexor carpi radialis (FCR)). Moreover, we analyzed the elbow and wrist kinematics as well as the precision of the pointing movement. The mean kinematics of wrist movement and its latency, with respect to prime mover recruitment, were similar in the two sides, while APAs in triceps brachii (TB), biceps brachii (BB) and anterior deltoid (AD) were more anticipated when movements were performed with the PREF than with the NON-PREF hand (60-70 vs. 20-30 ms). APAs amplitudes were comparable in the muscles of the two sides. Earlier APAs in the preferred limb were associated with a better fixation of the elbow, which showed a lower excursion, and with a less scattered pointing error (PREF: 10.1 ± 0.8 mm; NON-PREF: 16.3 ± 1.7). Present results suggest that, by securing the more proximal joints dynamics, an appropriate timing of the intra-limb APAs is necessary for refining the voluntary movement precision, which is known to be scarce on the NON-PREF side.

  13. Prioritizing attention on a reaction time task improves postural control and reaction time.

    PubMed

    Jehu, Deborah A; Desponts, Alyssa; Paquet, Nicole; Lajoie, Yves

    2015-02-01

    Flexible and appropriate allocation of attention resources is important during dual-tasking to achieve task goals while maintaining postural safety. This pilot study aimed to examine the influence of explicit prioritization of attention on the dual-task paradigm by employing two levels of difficulty for the postural tasks and reaction time (RT) tasks in healthy young adults. The task entailed standing on a force platform on two feet or on one foot, attending to posture or RT, and completing a simple or choice RT task. Participants verbally responded "top" as soon as the light cue illuminated. In general, attending to RT produced faster RTs (F(1,19) = 30.9, p < 0.001) and improved center of pressure (COP) Displacement (F(1,19) = 5.1, p < 0.05) and 95% Area Ellipse (F(1,19) = 7.1, p < 0.05). These findings suggest that prioritizing attention away from posture may be beneficial for postural performance when completing a second task.

  14. Assessing the acquisition of anticipatory responding in the pigeon using reaction time.

    PubMed

    García-Gallardo, Daniel; Navarro, Víctor M; Wasserman, Edward A

    2017-04-01

    We report a novel method for investigating the acquisition of anticipatory responding in the pigeon. Four pigeons (Columba livia) received food for pecking a starburst target stimulus displayed in the bottom-left or bottom-right portion of a computer screen. The target stimulus was preceded by 1 of 3 fractal images displayed in either the upper-left or upper-right portion of the screen: 1 of the fractals was perfectly correlated with the target appearing in the bottom-left, the second fractal was perfectly correlated with the target appearing in the bottom-right, and the third fractal was uncorrelated with the location of the target. The pigeons learned to anticipate the location of the upcoming target stimulus, because they were faster to peck the target stimulus on trials that involved a predictive fractal than on trials that involved a nonpredictive fractal. In a later phase, we reversed the signaled target location of each of the 2 predictive fractals. After an initial disruption in performance, the pigeons successfully learned the new stimulus assignments, exhibiting the same pattern of responding as during the initial training phase. Overall, the results document the utility of this novel training procedure and further underscore the role that associative processes play in anticipatory responding. (PsycINFO Database Record

  15. Do Equilibrium Constraints Modulate Postural Reaction when Viewing Imbalance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tia, Banty; Paizis, Christos; Mourey, France; Pozzo, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Action observation and action execution are tightly coupled on a neurophysiological and a behavioral level, such that visually perceiving an action can contaminate simultaneous and subsequent action execution. More specifically, observing a model in postural disequilibrium was shown to induce an increase in observers' body sway. Here we…

  16. Do Equilibrium Constraints Modulate Postural Reaction when Viewing Imbalance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tia, Banty; Paizis, Christos; Mourey, France; Pozzo, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Action observation and action execution are tightly coupled on a neurophysiological and a behavioral level, such that visually perceiving an action can contaminate simultaneous and subsequent action execution. More specifically, observing a model in postural disequilibrium was shown to induce an increase in observers' body sway. Here we…

  17. Influence of virtual height exposure on postural reactions to support surface translations.

    PubMed

    Cleworth, Taylor W; Chua, Romeo; Inglis, J Timothy; Carpenter, Mark G

    2016-06-01

    As fear of falling is related to the increased likelihood of falls, it is important to understand the effects of threat-related factors (fear, anxiety and confidence) on dynamic postural reactions. Previous studies designed to examine threat effects on dynamic postural reactions have methodological limitations and lack a comprehensive analysis of simultaneous kinetic, kinematic and electromyographical recordings. The current study addressed these limitations by examining postural reactions of 26 healthy young adults to unpredictable anterior-posterior support-surface translations (acceleration=0.6m/s(2), constant velocity=0.25m/s, total displacement=0.75m) while standing on a narrow virtual surface at Low (0.4cm) and High (3.2m) virtual heights. Standing at virtual height increased fear and anxiety, and decreased confidence. Prior to perturbations, threat led to increased tonic muscle activity in tibialis anterior, resulting in a higher co-contraction index between lower leg muscles. For backward perturbations, muscle activity in the lower leg and arm, and center of pressure peak displacements, were earlier and larger when standing at virtual height. In addition, arm flexion significantly increased while leg, trunk and center of mass displacements remained unchanged across heights. When controlling for leaning, threat-related factors can influence the neuro-mechanical responses to an unpredictable perturbation, causing specific characteristics of postural reactions to be facilitated in young adults when their balance is threatened. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Ground Reaction Forces Generated by Twenty-eight Hatha Yoga Postures.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Sylvia J; Hager, Ron; Lockhart, Barbara; Seeley, Matthew K

    Adherents claim many benefits from the practice of yoga, including promotion of bone health and prevention of osteoporosis. However, no known studies have investigated whether yoga enhances bone mineral density. Furthermore, none have estimated reaction forces applied by yoga practitioners. The purpose of this study was to collect ground reaction force (GRF) data on a variety of hatha yoga postures that would commonly be practiced in fitness centers or private studios. Twelve female and eight male volunteers performed a sequence of 28 hatha yoga postures while GRF data were collected with an AMTI strain-gauge force platform. The sequence was repeated six times by each study subject. Four dependent variables were studied: peak vertical GRF, mean vertical GRF, peak resultant GRF, and mean resultant GRF. Univariate analysis was used to identify mean values and standard deviations for the dependent variables. Peak vertical and resultant values of each posture were similar for all subjects, and standard deviations were small. Similarly, mean vertical and resultant values were similar for all subjects. This 28 posture yoga sequence produced low impact GRF applied to upper and lower extremities. Further research is warranted to determine whether these forces are sufficient to promote osteogenesis or maintain current bone health in yoga practitioners.

  19. Investigation of spinal posture signatures and ground reaction forces during landing in elite female gymnasts.

    PubMed

    Wade, Melanie; Campbell, Amity; Smith, Anne; Norcott, Joanne; O'Sullivan, Peter

    2012-12-01

    The link between static and dynamic landing lumbar postures, when gymnasts are exposed to large ground reaction forces, has not been established. This investigation aimed to (a) determine if a relationship exists between sagittal static and dynamic landing lumbar spine angles at peak ground reaction force (GRF) and (b) quantify how close to end-range postures the gymnasts were at landing peak GRF. Twenty-one female gymnasts' upper and lower lumbar spine angles were recorded: statically in sitting and standing, during landing of three gymnastic skills, and during active end-range lumbar flexion. Pearson's correlations were used to investigate relationships between the angles in different postures. Significant correlations (r = .77-.89, p <.01) were found between all the static/dynamic postures in the lower lumbar spine angle, while fewer and less significant upper lumbar spine correlations were reported. Thirty percent of gymnasts landed a backsault with their lower lumbar spine flexed beyond their active end-range while experiencing GRF 6.8-13.3 times their body weight. These results inform low back pain prevention and management strategies in this population and highlight areas for future research.

  20. Ground Reaction Forces Generated by Twenty-eight Hatha Yoga Postures

    PubMed Central

    WILCOX, SYLVIA J.; HAGER, RON; LOCKHART, BARBARA; SEELEY, MATTHEW K.

    2012-01-01

    Adherents claim many benefits from the practice of yoga, including promotion of bone health and prevention of osteoporosis. However, no known studies have investigated whether yoga enhances bone mineral density. Furthermore, none have estimated reaction forces applied by yoga practitioners. The purpose of this study was to collect ground reaction force (GRF) data on a variety of hatha yoga postures that would commonly be practiced in fitness centers or private studios. Twelve female and eight male volunteers performed a sequence of 28 hatha yoga postures while GRF data were collected with an AMTI strain-gauge force platform. The sequence was repeated six times by each study subject. Four dependent variables were studied: peak vertical GRF, mean vertical GRF, peak resultant GRF, and mean resultant GRF. Univariate analysis was used to identify mean values and standard deviations for the dependent variables. Peak vertical and resultant values of each posture were similar for all subjects, and standard deviations were small. Similarly, mean vertical and resultant values were similar for all subjects. This 28 posture yoga sequence produced low impact GRF applied to upper and lower extremities. Further research is warranted to determine whether these forces are sufficient to promote osteogenesis or maintain current bone health in yoga practitioners. PMID:27182380

  1. The role of anticipatory postural adjustments in interlimb coordination of coupled arm movements in the parasagittal plane: III. difference in the energy cost of postural actions during cyclic flexion-extension arm movements, ISO- and ANTI-directionally coupled.

    PubMed

    Esposti, Roberto; Limonta, Eloisa; Esposito, Fabio; Baldissera, Fausto G

    2013-11-01

    When oscillating the upper limbs together in the parasagittal plane, movements coordination is lower (i.e., variability of the interlimb relative phase is higher) in antidirectional (ANTI) than in isodirectional (ISO) coupling. In contrast, we previously observed that for arm movements in the horizontal plane, the coordination was worse in ISO than ANTI and the energetic cost of postural activities was higher in ISO. Having hypothesised that the higher postural cost was one factor responsible for the coordination deficit in horizontal ISO, we measured the oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]) in parasagittal movements, expecting that in this case too, the postural cost is higher in the less-coordinated mode (ANTI). Breath-by-breath metabolic ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]) and cardiorespiratory (HR, [Formula: see text]) parameters were measured in seven participants, who performed cyclic flexions-extensions in the parasagittal plane with either one arm or both arms, in ISO or ANTI coupling and at 1.4, 2.2 and 2.6 Hz. In each condition, the intermittent exercise (12 s movement, 12 s rest) lasted 264 s. A force platform recorded the mechanical actions to the ground. The exercise metabolic cost ([Formula: see text]) was found to be significantly higher in parasagittal ANTI than ISO. The movement amplitude being equal in the two modes, the ANTI-ISO difference should be ascribed to postural activities. This would confirm that the less-coordinated coupling mode requires the higher postural effort in parasagittal movements too. When rising the movement frequency, [Formula: see text] increased and linearly correlated with the coordination loss. Comparison of parasagittal with horizontal movements showed that [Formula: see text] was lower in parasagittal ANTI than in horizontal ISO (the less-coordinated modes), while it was not different between parasagittal ISO and horizontal ANTI (the more-coordinated modes).

  2. Anticipatory Systems via Anticipatory Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julià, Pere

    2010-11-01

    Although cybernetics and systems research have included references to biological phenomena from their very inception, their technical and conceptual wherewithal remains rooted in engineering and the physical and formal sciences. The methodological consequences of this make themselves increasingly felt as biological systems come under closer scrutiny, when the brain becomes the be-all-and-end-all of human cognition, or when individual and social behavior comes up for analysis. In the absence of prior empirical research, the application of a straight-jacketed modus operandi across the board can easily result in conceptual confusion. When the truly functional nature of the phenomena under discussion is not sharply differentiated from our constructional activities, our notational devices may well determine how we conceptualize the object of study instead of the other way around; witness, e.g., the growing literature on "observed" and "observing" systems. A mechanistic outlook fosters the continued treatment of organism and environment as disjoint domains, e.g., when cognition is treated in bucolic ignorance of conative factors without which there would be no cognition or any other behavior to speak of Elucidation of the specific variables, processes, and parameters involved in different fields is needed, if we are to achieve an effective treatment of the automaticity/self-regulation continuum and capture the synergism that emerges from the environment-organism interactivity. It is this interactivity that defines the boundaries of the system, self-regulating or otherwise. Clearly, there is need for deep foundational thinking and much of it revolves around language in the human case. Models are verbal constructions or the product of verbal constructions. Anticipatory systems seem like a good place to begin.

  3. Postural reactions of circulation and its regulation during simulated weightlessness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, V. I.; Valyev, V. A.; Kirillov, M. V.; Gornago, V. A.

    The extention and intensification of space exploration the influence of weightlessness on human organism and the formation of a new level of adaptation. The studies of blood circulation is very important because of freguent occurance of cardiovascular disorders in the middle age sudjects. In connection with extention and intensification of space exploration the influence of weightlessness on human organism and the formation of a new level of adaptation mechanisms acguires a special significance (5, 9, 10). The data obtained in recently undertaken model experiments (1, 5, 10), and also during space flights (5, 9) indicate that weightlessness in many ways affects various physiological systems of organism, and first of all cardiovascular system with the development of reflex, humoral and metabolic reactions. It also indicates, that the changes in functioning of cardiovascular system brings about the discruption of its regular responses, which is foremost expressed in decreased antigravitational response, which manifests itself in lowered orthostatic stability (2, 4, 6). It is worth mentioning, that the changes during previous investigations of haemodynamics were mainly carried out with the subjects under forty, therefore agerelated specific features of blood circulation system response are described in a few articles (5, 8). The studies of the kind are especially important because of frequent occurence of cardiovascular disorders such as heart and brain vessels atherosclerosis, hypertension in the middle age, which can to a great extent complicate and affect the "acute" period of adaptation to weightlessness and readaptation process.

  4. How does practise of internal Chinese martial arts influence postural reaction control?

    PubMed

    Gorgy, Olivier; Vercher, Jean-Louis; Coyle, Thelma

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of Chinese martial arts practice on postural reaction control after perturbation. Participants standing in Romberg tandem posture were subjected to an unexpected lateral platform translation with the eyes open or closed at two translation amplitudes. The peak displacement of the centre of pressure and of the centre of mass, and the onset latency of muscular activity (tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius, lumbodorsal muscular group, and rectus abdominis), were evaluated for martial arts practitioners and for sport and non-sport participants. Compared with the sport and non-sport participants, the martial arts group showed lower maximal centre of pressure and centre of mass peak displacements in both the lateral and anterior - posterior directions, but no difference was found in the onset of muscular responses. We conclude that martial arts practice influences postural reaction control during a fixed-support strategy in a tandem task. The martial arts group used the ankle joint more frequently than the sport and non-sport participants, especially in the eyes-closed conditions. Our results suggest that the better balance recovery in the martial arts group is a consequence of better control of biomechanical properties of the lower limbs (e.g. through muscular response by co-contraction), not a change in the neuromuscular temporal pattern.

  5. Postural stability, clicker reaction time and bow draw force predict performance in elite recurve archery.

    PubMed

    Spratford, Wayne; Campbell, Rhiannon

    2017-06-01

    Recurve archery is an Olympic sport that requires extreme precision, upper body strength and endurance. The purpose of this research was to quantify how postural stability variables both pre- and post-arrow release, draw force, flight time, arrow length and clicker reaction time, collectively, impacted on the performance or scoring outcomes in elite recurve archery athletes. Thirty-nine elite-level recurve archers (23 male and 16 female; mean age = 24.7 ± 7.3 years) from four different countries volunteered to participate in this study prior to competing at a World Cup event. An AMTI force platform (1000Hz) was used to obtain centre of pressure (COP) measurements 1s prior to arrow release and 0.5s post-arrow release. High-speed footage (200Hz) allowed for calculation of arrow flight time and score. Results identified clicker reaction time, draw force and maximum sway speed as the variables that best predicted shot performance. Specifically, reduced clicker reaction time, greater bow draw force and reduced postural sway speed post-arrow release were predictors of higher scoring shots. It is suggested that future research should focus on investigating shoulder muscle tremors at full draw in relation to clicker reaction time, and the effect of upper body strength interventions (specifically targeting the musculature around the shoulder girdle) on performance in recurve archers.

  6. Anticipatory Consumer Socialization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Roy L.; Moschis, George P.

    Anticipatory consumer socialization is the learning of consumer roles and perceptions, which will be assumed at a later time, such as those that children acquire before they become adult consumers. A survey of 784 adolescents was conducted in a southern state to examine the anticipatory consumer socialization effects of such factors as the mass…

  7. Reaction null-space filter: extracting reactionless synergies for optimal postural balance from motion capture data.

    PubMed

    Nenchev, D N; Miyamoto, Y; Iribe, H; Takeuchi, K; Sato, D

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces the notion of a reactionless synergy: a postural variation for a specific motion pattern/strategy, whereby the movements of the segments do not alter the force/moment balance at the feet. Given an optimal initial posture in terms of stability, a reactionless synergy can ensure optimality throughout the entire movement. Reactionless synergies are derived via a dynamical model wherein the feet are regarded to be unfixed. Though in contrast with the conventional fixed-feet models, this approach has the advantage of exhibiting the reactions at the feet explicitly. The dynamical model also facilitates a joint-space decomposition scheme yielding two motion components: the reactionless synergy and an orthogonal complement responsible for the dynamical coupling between the feet and the support. Since the reactionless synergy provides the basis (a feedforward control component) for optimal balance control, it may play an important role when evaluating balance abnormalities or when assessing optimality in balance control. We show how to apply the proposed method for analysis of motion capture data obtained from three voluntary movement patterns in the sagittal plane: squat, sway, and forward bend.

  8. Effects of regular Tai Chi practice and jogging on neuromuscular reaction during lateral postural control in older people.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-Jun; Xu, Dong-Qing; Li, Jing-Xian

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of regular Tai Chi practice and jogging on the neuromuscular activity of the trunk, hip, and ankle joint muscles of older people during lateral postural perturbation. A total of 42 older people participated in the study and formed the Tai Chi, jogging, and sedentary control groups. Electromyography signals were collected from the peroneus longus, anterior tibialis, gluteus medius, and erector spinae during unpredictable mediolateral perturbation. The Tai Chi group exhibited significantly faster latencies of the tibialis anterior and erector spinae than the control group. The jogging group showed a significantly shorter neuromuscular reaction time of the erector spinae than the control group. No significant difference was observed between the Tai Chi and jogging groups. Long-term regular Tai Chi practice enhanced the neuromuscular reaction of the erector spinae and tibialis anterior to lateral perturbation and will help timely posture correction when lateral postural distributions occur.

  9. The effect of decreased visual acuity on control of posture

    PubMed Central

    Sambit, Mohapatra; Vennila, Krishnan; Alexander S., Aruin

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of visual acuity on the anticipatory (APAs) and compensatory (CPAs) components of postural control. Methods Ten individuals participated in the experiments involving perturbations induced by a pendulum while their visual acuity was altered. The different visual acuity conditions were no glasses, blurred vision induced by wearing glasses with positive or negative lenses, and no vision. EMG activity of trunk and leg muscles and ground reaction forces were recorded during the typical anticipatory and compensatory periods. Results In the no vision condition the subjects did not generate APAs, which resulted in the largest displacements of the center of pressure (COP) after the perturbation (p<0.01). In all other visual conditions APAs were present showing a distal to proximal order of muscle activation. The subjects wearing positive glasses showed earlier and larger anticipatory EMGs than while wearing negative glasses or no glasses at all. Conclusions The study outcome revealed that changes in visual acuity induced by wearing differently powered eye glasses alter the generation APAs and as a consequence, affect the compensatory components of postural control. Significance The observed changes in APAs and CPAs in conditions with blurred vision induced by positive and negative glasses suggest the importance of using glasses with an appropriate power. This outcome should be taken into consideration in balance rehabilitation of individuals wearing glasses. PMID:21778109

  10. Postural Control in Children: Implications for Pediatric Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westcott, Sarah L.; Burtner, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Based on a systems theory of motor control, reactive postural control (RPA) and anticipatory postural control (APA) in children are reviewed from several perspectives in order to develop an evidence-based intervention strategy for improving postural control in children with limitations in motor function. Research on development of postural…

  11. Postural Control in Children: Implications for Pediatric Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westcott, Sarah L.; Burtner, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Based on a systems theory of motor control, reactive postural control (RPA) and anticipatory postural control (APA) in children are reviewed from several perspectives in order to develop an evidence-based intervention strategy for improving postural control in children with limitations in motor function. Research on development of postural…

  12. Adaptability and Prediction of Anticipatory Muscular Activity Parameters to Different Movements in the Sitting Position.

    PubMed

    Chikh, Soufien; Watelain, Eric; Faupin, Arnaud; Pinti, Antonio; Jarraya, Mohamed; Garnier, Cyril

    2016-08-01

    Voluntary movement often causes postural perturbation that requires an anticipatory postural adjustment to minimize perturbation and increase the efficiency and coordination during execution. This systematic review focuses specifically on the relationship between the parameters of anticipatory muscular activities and movement finality in sitting position among adults, to study the adaptability and predictability of anticipatory muscular activities parameters to different movements and conditions in sitting position in adults. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, Springer-Link, Engineering Village, and EbscoHost. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to retain the most rigorous and specific studies, yielding 76 articles, Seventeen articles were excluded at first reading, and after the application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, 23 were retained. In a sitting position, central nervous system activity precedes movement by diverse anticipatory muscular activities and shows the ability to adapt anticipatory muscular activity parameters to the movement direction, postural stability, or charge weight. In addition, these parameters could be adapted to the speed of execution, as found for the standing position. Parameters of anticipatory muscular activities (duration, order, and amplitude of muscle contractions constituting the anticipatory muscular activity) could be used as a predictive indicator of forthcoming movement. In addition, this systematic review may improve methodology in empirical studies and assistive technology for people with disabilities.

  13. Interference between postural control and spatial vs. non-spatial auditory reaction time tasks in older adults.

    PubMed

    Fuhrman, Susan I; Redfern, Mark S; Jennings, J Richard; Furman, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether spatial aspects of an information processing task influence dual-task interference. Two groups (Older/Young) of healthy adults participated in dual-task experiments. Two auditory information processing tasks included a frequency discrimination choice reaction time task (non-spatial task) and a lateralization choice reaction time task (spatial task). Postural tasks included combinations of standing with eyes open or eyes closed on either a fixed floor or a sway-referenced floor. Reaction times and postural sway via center of pressure were recorded. Baseline measures of reaction time and sway were subtracted from the corresponding dual-task results to calculate reaction time task costs and postural task costs. Reaction time task cost increased with eye closure (p = 0.01), sway-referenced flooring (p < 0.0001), and the spatial task (p = 0.04). Additionally, a significant (p = 0.05) task x vision x age interaction indicated that older subjects had a significant vision X task interaction whereas young subjects did not. However, when analyzed by age group, the young group showed minimal differences in interference for the spatial and non-spatial tasks with eyes open, but showed increased interference on the spatial relative to non-spatial task with eyes closed. On the contrary, older subjects demonstrated increased interference on the spatial relative to the non-spatial task with eyes open, but not with eyes closed. These findings suggest that visual-spatial interference may occur in older subjects when vision is used to maintain posture.

  14. Anticipatory guidance through DVD.

    PubMed

    Franz, Sandra; McMahon, Pamela M; Calongne, Laurinda; Steele-Moses, Susan K

    2014-03-01

    The major purpose of the study was to determine if a 5-minute DVD is an effective method for communicating anticipatory guidance to parents at their child's 4-month well-child visit. A total of 84 caregivers were randomly assigned to receive anticipatory guidance through standard care (written anticipatory guidance handout and free talk) or DVD (DVD format + standard care). Participants completed a brief questionnaire immediately before and after their visit. As anticipated, knowledge scores improved significantly from pre-test to post-test. There was also a significant interaction between format used for anticipatory guidance and time. Specifically, there was greater improvement in knowledge over time for parents in the DVD group as compared with the standard care group. Additionally, the mean knowledge level of those in the DVD group as compared with those in the standard care group trended toward significance. Finally, visit length was shortened by nearly 3 minutes in the DVD group, and close to 100% of all respondents, regardless of anticipatory guidance format, indicated that they were very satisfied with their visit and amount of information learned.

  15. Understanding 'anticipatory governance'.

    PubMed

    Guston, David H

    2014-04-01

    Anticipatory governance is 'a broad-based capacity extended through society that can act on a variety of inputs to manage emerging knowledge-based technologies while such management is still possible'. It motivates activities designed to build capacities in foresight, engagement, and integration--as well as through their production ensemble. These capacities encourage and support the reflection of scientists, engineers, policy makers, and other publics on their roles in new technologies. This article reviews the early history of the National Nanotechnology Initiative in the United States, and it further explicates anticipatory governance through exploring the genealogy of the term and addressing a set of critiques found in the literature. These critiques involve skepticism of three proximities of anticipatory governance: to its object, nanotechnology, which is a relatively indistinct one; to the public, which remains almost utterly naive toward nanotechnology; and to technoscience itself, which allegedly renders anticipatory governance complicit in its hubris. The article concludes that the changing venues and the amplification within them of the still, small voices of folks previously excluded from offering constructive visions of futures afforded by anticipatory governance may not be complete solutions to our woes in governing technology, but they certainly can contribute to bending the long arc of technoscience more toward humane ends.

  16. Development of action representation during adolescence as assessed from anticipatory control in a bimanual load-lifting task.

    PubMed

    Barlaam, F; Fortin, C; Vaugoyeau, M; Schmitz, C; Assaiante, C

    2012-09-27

    The aim of this study was to explore, during adolescence, alterations in the use of a sensori-motor representation as unveiled by the measurement of anticipatory postural control in a bimanual load-lifting task. We hypothesised that adolescence constitutes a period of refinement of anticipatory postural control due to on-going updates of the body schema and sensori-motor representations. The anticipatory postural control was assessed using a bimanual load-lifting paradigm in which subjects stabilise their left postural forearm, which is supporting an object, while they use their right hand to lift up the object. Kinematics and electromyographic data were recorded in two groups of adolescents (11-13 and 14-16 years of age) and a group of adults. Age and gender effects were tested. During voluntary unloading, the postural forearm stabilisation in adolescents was still different from the adult one, suggesting that further improvement of the postural forearm stabilisation must take place after the age of 16. No differences occur in the two adolescent groups. Moreover, girls presented a better stabilisation of the postural forearm than boys, indicating an earlier refinement of anticipatory postural control. The decrease of activity over postural flexors, which ensure postural stabilisation, appeared later in adolescents with respect to adults. Delayed timing adjustments and increased variability could reflect intense developmental processes underlain by an intense period of CNS maturation during adolescence. We discuss the role of brain maturation in the refinement of sensori-motor representations and the update of body schema.

  17. Attentional focus influences postural control and reaction time performances only during challenging dual-task conditions in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Remaud, Anthony; Boyas, Sébastien; Lajoie, Yves; Bilodeau, Martin

    2013-11-01

    The dual-task paradigm has previously been used to investigate the attentional demands associated with postural control. Previous studies have identified both the focus of attention and the difficulty of a postural task as potential factors influencing dual-task performance. The aim of this study was to examine how the instructed focus of attention influences dual-task performance during quiet standing tasks of various levels of difficulty. Thirteen young adults participated in two testing sessions consisting of standing as still as possible on a force platform in different postural conditions, while simultaneously performing a simple reaction time (RT) task. Postural task difficulty was manipulated by various combinations of three bases of support (feet together, tandem and single leg) and two visual conditions (eyes opened and closed). Participants were instructed to focus on either their balance or their RT performance, depending on the testing session. When comparing postural control with respect to session focus, anterior-posterior sway velocity decreased with the addition of the simple RT task when the focus was on balance, but only during the more difficult dual-task conditions. In contrast, sway area and medial-lateral sway velocity did not change between the two instructed focus sessions. Participants responded faster in all dual-task conditions when focusing on RT performance than on balance. The modified attention allocation index indicated that participants' ability to modulate their allocation of attentional resources to respond positively to instruction was more pronounced in the most challenging postural condition. The present findings could have important implications for the interpretation of dual-task performance in both clinical and research settings.

  18. Frequency of anticipatory trunk muscle onsets in children with and without developmental coordination disorder.

    PubMed

    Kane, Kyra; Barden, John

    2014-02-01

    This study used electromyography to compare the frequency of anticipatory postural adjustments for three bilateral trunk muscles and unilateral tibialis anterior muscle between children with and without developmental coordination disorder (DCD; n = 22, ages 7 to 14 years) during three tasks (kicking a ball, stepping onto a step, standing on one foot). Between-group comparisons demonstrated significantly less frequent anticipatory activation of ipsilateral tibialis anterior, ipsilateral transversus abdominis/internal oblique, and bilateral external oblique muscles in children with DCD. Odds ratios indicated that children with DCD utilized anticipatory contractions of these muscles one half to one quarter as often as the typically developing children did, while performing the same tasks. These results suggest that the movement difficulties experienced by children with DCD may be associated with less frequent anticipatory adjustments. For these children, inconsistent preparatory activation may contribute to postural control difficulties, excessive movement variability and poor movement quality.

  19. EMG analysis of human postural responses during parabolic flight microgravity episodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layne, Charles S.; Spooner, Brian S.

    1990-01-01

    Anticipatory postural activity in the trunk and legs precedes rapid shoulder flexion in unit gravity. The hypothesis that anticipatory activity is a component of a single neural command for arm movement was tested by monitoring the surface electromyographic activity of the biceps femoris, paraspinals, and deltoid muscles of three subjects during the microgravity phase of parabolic flight. If part of a single command, anticipatory postural activity would be expected to remain intact despite the absence of the body's center of gravity in a reduced gravity environment. However, in at least 75 percent of the microgravity trials anticipatory biceps femoris activity was absent, indicating a separation of postural and agonist muscle activity. Such a finding suggests that anticipatory postural biceps femoris activity may be initiated independently of agonist (deltoid) activity.

  20. EMG analysis of human postural responses during parabolic flight microgravity episodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layne, Charles S.; Spooner, Brian S.

    1990-01-01

    Anticipatory postural activity in the trunk and legs precedes rapid shoulder flexion in unit gravity. The hypothesis that anticipatory activity is a component of a single neural command for arm movement was tested by monitoring the surface electromyographic activity of the biceps femoris, paraspinals, and deltoid muscles of three subjects during the microgravity phase of parabolic flight. If part of a single command, anticipatory postural activity would be expected to remain intact despite the absence of the body's center of gravity in a reduced gravity environment. However, in at least 75 percent of the microgravity trials anticipatory biceps femoris activity was absent, indicating a separation of postural and agonist muscle activity. Such a finding suggests that anticipatory postural biceps femoris activity may be initiated independently of agonist (deltoid) activity.

  1. Anticipatory Adjustments to Being Picked Up in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Vasudevi; Markova, Gabriela; Wallot, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Anticipation of the actions of others is often used as a measure of action understanding in infancy. In contrast to studies of action understanding which set infants up as observers of actions directed elsewhere, in the present study we explored anticipatory postural adjustments made by infants to one of the most common adult actions directed to them – picking them up. We observed infant behavioural changes and recorded their postural shifts on a pressure mat in three phases: (i) a prior Chat phase, (ii) from the onset of Approach of the mother’s arms, and (iii) from the onset of Contact. In Study 1, eighteen 3-month-old infants showed systematic global postural changes during Approach and Contact, but not during Chat. There was an increase in specific adjustments of the arms (widening or raising) and legs (stiffening and extending or tucking up) during Approach and a decrease in thrashing/general movements during Contact. Shifts in postural stability were evident immediately after onset of Approach and more slowly after Contact, with no regular shifts during Chat. In Study 2 we followed ten infants at 2, 3 and 4 months of age. Anticipatory behavioural adjustments during Approach were present at all ages, but with greater differentiation from a prior Chat phase only at 3 and 4 months. Global postural shifts were also more phase differentiated in older infants. Moreover, there was significantly greater gaze to the mother’s hands during Approach at 4 months. Early anticipatory adjustments to being picked up suggest that infants’ awareness of actions directed to the self may occur earlier than of those directed elsewhere, and thus enable infants’ active participation in joint actions from early in life. PMID:23840324

  2. Reduced postural differences between phobic postural vertigo patients and healthy subjects during a postural threat.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Johan; Tjernström, Fredrik; Karlberg, Mikael; Fransson, Per Anders; Magnusson, Måns

    2009-08-01

    Phobic postural vertigo is characterized by subjective imbalance and dizziness while standing or walking, despite normal values for clinical balance tests. Patients with phobic postural vertigo exhibit an increased high-frequency sway in posturographic tests. Their postural sway, however, becomes similar to the sway of healthy subjects during difficult balance tasks. Posturographic recordings of 30 s of quiet stance was compared to recordings of 30 s of quiet stance during a postural threat, which consisted of the knowledge of forthcoming vibratory calf muscle stimulation, in 37 consecutive patients with phobic postural vertigo and 24 healthy subjects. During quiet stance without the threat of forthcoming vibratory stimulation, patients with phobic postural vertigo exhibited a postural sway containing significantly more high-frequency sway than the healthy subjects. During the quiet stance with forthcoming vibratory stimulation, i.e., anticipation of a postural threat, the significant differences between groups disappeared for all variables except sagittal high-frequency sway. During postural threat, healthy subjects seemed to adopt a postural strategy that was similar to that exhibited by phobic postural vertigo patients. The lack of additional effects facing a postural threat among phobic postural vertigo patients may be due to an already maximized postural adaptation. Deviant postural reactions among patients with phobic postural vertigo may be considered as an avoidant postural response due to a constant fear of losing postural control.

  3. Microgravity effects on 'postural' muscle activity patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layne, Charles S.; Spooner, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Changes in neuromuscular activation patterns associated with movements made in microgravity can contribute to muscular atrophy. Using electromyography (EMG) to monitor 'postural' muscles, it was found that free floating arm flexions made in microgravity were not always preceded by neuromuscular activation patterns normally observed during movements made in unit gravity. Additionally, manipulation of foot sensory input during microgravity arm flexion impacted upon anticipatory postural muscle activation.

  4. Anticipatory model of cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kercel, Stephen W.; Allgood, Glenn O.; Dress, William B.; Hylton, James O.

    1999-03-01

    The Anticipatory System (AS) formalism developed by Robert Rosen provides some insight into the problem of embedding intelligent behavior in machines. AS emulates the anticipatory behavior of biological systems. AS bases its behavior on its expectations about the near future and those expectations are modified as the system gains experience. The expectation is based on an internal model that is drawn from an appeal to physical reality. To be adaptive, the model must be able to update itself. To be practical, the model must run faster than real-time. The need for a physical model and the requirement that the model execute at extreme speeds, has held back the application of AS to practical problems. Two recent advances make it possible to consider the use of AS for practical intelligent sensors. First, advances in transducer technology make it possible to obtain previously unavailable data from which a model can be derived. For example, acoustic emissions (AE) can be fed into a Bayesian system identifier that enables the separation of a weak characterizing signal, such as the signature of pump cavitation precursors, from a strong masking signal, such as a pump vibration feature. The second advance is the development of extremely fast, but inexpensive, digital signal processing hardware on which it is possible to run an adaptive Bayesian-derived model faster than real-time. This paper reports the investigation of an AS using a model of cavitation based on hydrodynamic principles and Bayesian analysis of data from high-performance AE sensors.

  5. Anticipatory stress in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kiser, L; Heston, J; Hickerson, S; Millsap, P; Nunn, W; Pruitt, D

    1993-01-01

    Circumstances surrounding the New Madrid earthquake prediction on Dec. 3, 1990, offered a unique opportunity to study the effects of a disaster warning stage on children and adolescents. An initial structured interview was administered to 553 third- and 10th-grade students before December 3, with follow-up interviews conducted 6-8 weeks later. This study documents the existence of a mild but prevalent PTSD-like reaction that arose from exposure to a prediction of disaster. Further study of anticipatory stress reactions is needed to provide insights into the development of methods for providing support to children during disaster warnings.

  6. Exercise improves gait, reaction time and postural stability in older adults with type 2 diabetes and neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Steven; Colberg, Sheri R; Parson, Henri K; Vinik, Aaron I

    2014-01-01

    For older adults with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), declines in balance and walking ability are risk factors for falls, and peripheral neuropathy magnifies this risk. Exercise training may improve balance, gait and reduce the risk of falling. This study investigated the effects of 12weeks of aerobic exercise training on walking, balance, reaction time and falls risk metrics in older T2DM individuals with/without peripheral neuropathy. Adults with T2DM, 21 without (DM; age 58.7±1.7years) and 16 with neuropathy (DM-PN; age 58.9±1.9years), engaged in either moderate or intense supervised exercise training thrice-weekly for 12weeks. Pre/post-training assessments included falls risk (using the physiological profile assessment), standing balance, walking ability and hand/foot simple reaction time. Pre-training, the DM-PN group had higher falls risk, slower (hand) reaction times (232 vs. 219ms), walked at a slower speed (108 vs. 113cm/s) with shorter strides compared to the DM group. Following training, improvements in hand/foot reaction times and faster walking speed were seen for both groups. While falls risk was not significantly reduced, the observed changes in gait, reaction time and balance metrics suggest that aerobic exercise of varying intensities is beneficial for improving dynamic postural control in older T2DM adults with/without neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of expertise in shooting and Taekwondo on bipedal and unipedal postural control isolated or concurrent with a reaction-time task.

    PubMed

    Negahban, Hossein; Aryan, Najmolhoda; Mazaheri, Masood; Norasteh, Ali Asghar; Sanjari, Mohammad Ali

    2013-06-01

    It was hypothesized that training in 'static balance' or 'dynamic balance' sports has differential effects on postural control and its attention demands during quiet standing. In order to test this hypothesis, two groups of female athletes practicing shooting, as a 'static balance' sport, and Taekwondo, as a 'dynamic balance' sport, and a control group of non-physically active females voluntarily participated in this study. Postural control was assessed during bipedal and unipedal stance with and without performing a Go/No-go reaction time task. Visual and/or support surface conditions were manipulated in bipedal and unipedal stances in order to modify postural difficulty. Mixed model analysis of variance was used to determine the effects of dual tasking on postural and cognitive performance. Similar pattern of results were found in bipedal and unipedal stances, with Taekwondo practitioners displaying larger sway, shooters displaying lower sway and non-athletes displaying sway characteristics intermediate to Taekwondo and shooting athletes. Larger effect was found in bipedal stance. Single to dual-task comparison of postural control showed no significant effect of mental task on sway velocity in shooters, indicating less cognitive effort invested in balance control during bipedal stance. We suggest that expertise in shooting has a more pronounced effect on decreased sway in static balance conditions. Furthermore, shooters invest less attention in postures that are more specific to their training, i.e. bipedal stance.

  8. Anticipatory behavior in animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriyama, Tohru

    1999-03-01

    In the experiments of pill bugs (Armadillidium vulgare), some of them performed as if they had contained the models of themselves and the environment in view of computing their present state as a function of the prediction of the models. In a specific situation, they escaped from the experimental apparatus as if they had constituted spatial knowledge of it (open field surrounded by walls) in the process of exploratory behavior and used the knowledge. This species gets environmental information by tactile ability of antennae, not by visual one, and do not climb perpendicular walls in general condition. If they had not escaped in the experiment, they would have died of hunger or water deficit. In this paper I will present the result of this anticipatory behavior. I also discuss that the notion of anticipation, which is another name of autonomy, is inevitably introduced when one considers the process of understanding of animal behavior progressing without any common basis between animals and experimenters.

  9. Transfer of postural adaptation depends on context of prior exposure.

    PubMed

    Pienciak-Siewert, Alison; Barletta, Anthony J; Ahmed, Alaa A

    2014-04-01

    Postural control is significantly affected by the postural base of support; however, the effects on postural adaptation are not well understood. Here we investigated how adaptation and transfer of anticipatory postural control are affected by stance width. Subjects made reaching movements in a novel dynamic environment while holding the handle of a force-generating robotic arm. Each subject initially adapted to the dynamics while standing in a wide stance and then switched to a narrow stance, or vice versa. Our hypothesis is that anticipatory postural control, reflected in center of pressure (COP) movement, is not affected by stance width, as long as the control remains within functional limits; therefore we predicted that subjects in either stance would show similar COP movement by the end of adaptation and immediately upon transfer to the other stance. We found that both groups showed similar adaptation of postural control, by using different muscle activation strategies to account for the differing stance widths. One group, after adapting in wide stance, transferred similar postural control to narrow stance, by modifying their muscle activity to account for the new stance. Interestingly, the other group showed an increase in postural control when transferring from narrow to wide stance, associated with no change in muscle activity. These results confirm that adaptation of anticipatory postural control is not affected by stance width, as long as the control remains within biomechanical limits. However, transfer of control between stance widths is affected by the initial context in which the task is learned.

  10. Reaction to the sensory integration therapy in children with postural stability deficits.

    PubMed

    Maciaszek, Janusz; Kilan, Natalia; Bronikowski, Michal

    2016-10-05

    The goal was to examine the influence of sensory integration therapy (SIT) on one leg standing in children with deficits of the postural stability. 28 children 4 - 6 year old that could not stand on one leg for more than 20 seconds were randomly divided into control "C" and experimental "E" groups. Group "C" participated in standard classes in the kindergarten. Group "E" participated in sensory integration therapy (SIT) for 2 weeks, 5 times a week (additionally to the standard classes). Results of the experiment show that the skill of standing on one leg has significantly improved (p<0.01) in the group that underwent additional therapy. The change in time of standing on the right leg with eyes open in the E group was statistically and significantly higher than the changes observed in the same time in group C (F = 22.5, p = 0.001' η2 = 0.44). Similarly, significant changes in time of standing on the right leg with eyes closed were observed in group E. The foregoing changes were bigger in group E than in group C (F = 16. 1 , p = 0.004, η2 = 0.36). The analysis post hoc revealed that while there were no significant differences between the two groups on the pretest (p>0.05), there were significant differences between groups in right leg standing test with eyes open or closed on posttest. (p<0.05). Similar results were observed during on the one, left leg standing. The time of one leg standing with both eyes open and closed improved more significantly in group E than in group C (F = 20.4, p = 0.001, η2 = 0.42 respectively for the test with eyes open and F = 7.4, p = 0.010, η2 = 0.21 for the test with eyes closed). The analysis post hoc revealed that while there were no significant differences between the two groups on the pretest (p>0.05), there were significant differences between groups in left leg standing test with eyes open or closed on posttest. (p<0.05). Research conducted show that there is a positive influence of SIT on children with low level of postural

  11. Anticipatory systems as linguistic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekdahl, Bertil

    2000-05-01

    The idea of system is well established although not well defined. What makes up a system depends on the observer. Thinking in terms of systems is only a convenient way to conceptualize organizations, natural or artificial, that show coherent properties. Among all properties, which can be ascribed to systems, one property seems to be more outstanding than others, namely that of being anticipatory. In nature, anticipatory properties are found only in living organizations. In this way it can be said to separate non-living systems from living because there is no indication that any natural phenomenon occurring in systems where there is no indication of life is anticipatory. The characteristic of living systems is that they are exposed to the evolution contrary to causal systems that do not undergo changes due to the influence of the environment. Causal systems are related to the past in such a way that subsequent situations can be calculated from knowledge of past situations. In causal systems the past is the cause of the present and there is no reference to the future as a determining agent, contrary to anticipatory systems where expectations are the cause of the present action. Since anticipatory properties are characteristic of living systems, this property, as all other properties in living systems, is a result of the evolution and can be found in plants as well as in animals. Thus, it is not only tied to consciousness but is found at a more basic level, i.e., in the interplay between genotype and phenotype. Anticipation is part of the genetic language in such a way that appropriate actions, for events in the anticipatory systems environment, are inscribed in the genes. Anticipatory behavior, as a result of the interpretation of the genetic language, has been selected by the evolution. In this paper anticipatory systems are regarded as linguistic systems and I argue that as such anticipation cannot be fragmented but must be holistically studied. This has the

  12. Postural synergies and their development.

    PubMed

    Latash, Mark L; Krishnamoorthy, Vijaya; Scholz, John P; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2005-01-01

    The recent developments of a particular approach to analyzing motor synergies based on the principle of motor abundance has allowed a quantitative assessment of multi-effector coordination in motor tasks involving anticipatory adjustments to self-triggered postural perturbations and in voluntary postural sway. This approach, the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) hypothesis, is based on an assumption that the central nervous system organizes covariation of elemental variables to stabilize important performance variables in a task-specific manner. In particular, this approach has been used to demonstrate and to assess the emergence of synergies and their modification with motor practice in typical persons and persons with Down syndrome. The framework of the UCM hypothesis allows the formulation of testable hypotheses with respect to developing postural synergies in typically and atypically developing persons.

  13. Online mutability of step direction during rapid stepping reactions evoked by postural perturbation.

    PubMed

    Tripp, Bryan P; McIlroy, William E; Maki, Brian E

    2004-03-01

    Stepping reactions are often triggered rapidly in response to loss of balance. It has been unclear whether spatial step parameters are defined at time of step-initiation or whether they can be modulated online, during step execution, in response to sensory feedback about the evolving state of instability. This study explored the capacity to actively alter step direction subsequent to step initiation in six healthy young-adult subjects. To elicit forward-step reactions, subjects were released suddenly from a tethered forward lean. A second perturbation (medio-lateral support-surface translation) was applied at lags of 0-200 ms. Active reaction to the second perturbation was determined primarily through analysis of swing-leg hip-abductor activation. In addition, to gauge the biomechanical consequence of the changes in muscle activation, we compared the measured medio-lateral swing-foot displacement to that predicted by a simple passive mechanical model. Perturbations at 0-100 ms lag evoked active medio-lateral swing-foot deviation, allowing balance to be recovered with a single step. However, when the second perturbation occurred near foot-off (200-ms lag), there was no evidence of active alteration of step direction and subjects typically required additional steps to recover balance. The results suggest that step direction can be reparameterized during early stages of stepping reactions, but that step direction was not actively modulated in response to perturbation arising near start of swing phase.

  14. Self-Described Differences Between Legs in Ballet Dancers: Do They Relate to Postural Stability and Ground Reaction Force Measures?

    PubMed

    Mertz, Laura; Docherty, Carrie

    2012-12-01

    Ballet technique classes are designed to train dancers symmetrically, but they may actually create a lateral bias. It is unknown whether dancers in general are functionally asymmetrical, or how an individual dancer's perceived imbalance between legs might manifest itself. The purpose of this study was to examine ballet dancers' lateral preference by analyzing their postural stability and ground reaction forces in fifth position when landing from dance-specific jumps. Thirty university ballet majors volunteered to participate in this study. The subjects wore their own ballet technique shoes and performed fundamental ballet jumps out of fifth position on a force plate. The force plate recorded center of pressure (COP) and ground reaction force (GRF) data. Each subject completed a laterality questionnaire that determined his or her preferred landing leg for ballet jumps, self-identified stronger leg, and self-identified leg with better balance. All statistical comparisons were made between the leg indicated on the laterality questionnaire and the other leg (i.e., if the dancer's response to a question was "left," the comparison was made with the left leg as the "preferred" leg and the right leg as the "non-preferred leg"). No significant differences were identified between the limbs in any of the analyses conducted (all statistical comparisons produced p values > 0.05). The results of this study indicate that a dancer's preferential use of one limb over the other has no bearing on GRFs or balance ability after landing jumps in ballet. Similarly, dancers' opinions of their leg characteristics (such as one leg being stronger than the other) seem not to correlate with the dancers' actual ability to absorb GRFs or to balance when landing from ballet jumps.

  15. Anticipatory strategies of team-handball goalkeepers.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Davila, Marcos; Rojas, F Javier; Ortega, Manuel; Campos, Jose; Parraga, Juan

    2011-09-01

    This study seeks to discover whether handball goalkeepers employ a general anticipatory strategy when facing long distance throws and the effect of uncertainty on these strategies. Seven goalkeepers and four throwers took part. We used a force platform to analyse the goalkeeper's movements on the basis of reaction forces and two video cameras synchronised at 500 Hz to film the throw using 3D video techniques. The goalkeepers initiated their movement towards the side of the throw 193 ± 67 ms before the release of the ball and when the uncertainty was reduced the time increased to 349 ± 71 ms. The kinematics analysis of their centre of mass indicated that there was an anticipatory strategy of movement with certain modifications when there was greater uncertainty. All the average scores referring to velocity and lateral movement of the goalkeeper's centre of mass are significantly greater than those recorded for the experimental situation with bigger uncertainty. The methodology used has enabled us to tackle the study of anticipation from an analysis of the movement used by goalkeepers to save the ball.

  16. Examining the stability of dual-task posture and reaction time measures in older adults over five sessions: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Jehu, Deborah A; Paquet, Nicole; Lajoie, Yves

    2016-12-01

    Improved performance may be inherent due to repeated exposure to a testing protocol. However, limited research has examined this phenomenon in postural control. The aim was to determine the influence of repeated administration of a dual-task testing protocol once per week for 5 weeks on postural sway and reaction time. Ten healthy older adults (67.0 ± 6.9 years) stood on a force plate for 30 s in feet apart and semi-tandem positions while completing simple reaction time (SRT) and choice reaction time (CRT) tasks. They were instructed to stand as still as possible while verbally responding as fast as possible to the stimuli. No significant differences in postural sway were shown over time (p > 0.05). A plateau in average CRT emerged as the time effect revealed longer CRT during session 1 compared to sessions 3-5 (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the time effect for within-subject variability of CRT uncovered no plateaus as it was less variable in session 5 than sessions 1-4 (p < 0.05). The lack of a plateau in variability of CRT may have emerged as older adults may require longer to reach optimal performance potential in a dual-task context. Postural sway and SRT were stable over the 5 testing sessions, but variability of CRT continued to improve over time. These findings form a basis for future studies to examine performance-related improvements due to repeated exposure to a testing protocol in a dual-task setting.

  17. Age-Related Changes in Dynamic Postural Control and Attentional Demands are Minimally Affected by Local Muscle Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Remaud, Anthony; Thuong-Cong, Cécile; Bilodeau, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Normal aging results in alterations in the visual, vestibular and somtaosensory systems, which in turn modify the control of balance. Muscle fatigue may exacerbate these age-related changes in sensory and motor functions, and also increase the attentional demands associated with dynamic postural control. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aging on dynamic postural control and posture-related attentional demands before and after a plantar flexor fatigue protocol. Participants (young adults: n = 15; healthy seniors: n = 13) performed a dynamic postural task along the antero-posterior (AP) and the medio-lateral (ML) axes, with and without the addition of a simple reaction time (RT) task. The dynamic postural task consisted in following a moving circle on a computer screen with the representation of the center of pressure (COP). This protocol was repeated before and after a fatigue task where ankle plantar flexor muscles were targeted. The mean COP-target distance and the mean COP velocity were calculated for each trial. Cross-correlation analyses between the COP and target displacements were also performed. RTs were recorded during dual-task trials. Results showed that while young adults adopted an anticipatory control mode to move their COP as close as possible to the target center, seniors adopted a reactive control mode, lagging behind the target center. This resulted in longer COP-target distance and higher COP velocity in the latter group. Concurrently, RT increased more in seniors when switching from static stance to dynamic postural conditions, suggesting potential alterations in the central nervous system (CNS) functions. Finally, plantar flexor muscle fatigue and dual-tasking had only minor effects on dynamic postural control of both young adults and seniors. Future studies should investigate why the fatigue-induced changes in quiet standing postural control do not seem to transfer to dynamic balance tasks. PMID:26834626

  18. Age-Related Changes in Dynamic Postural Control and Attentional Demands are Minimally Affected by Local Muscle Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Remaud, Anthony; Thuong-Cong, Cécile; Bilodeau, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Normal aging results in alterations in the visual, vestibular and somtaosensory systems, which in turn modify the control of balance. Muscle fatigue may exacerbate these age-related changes in sensory and motor functions, and also increase the attentional demands associated with dynamic postural control. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aging on dynamic postural control and posture-related attentional demands before and after a plantar flexor fatigue protocol. Participants (young adults: n = 15; healthy seniors: n = 13) performed a dynamic postural task along the antero-posterior (AP) and the medio-lateral (ML) axes, with and without the addition of a simple reaction time (RT) task. The dynamic postural task consisted in following a moving circle on a computer screen with the representation of the center of pressure (COP). This protocol was repeated before and after a fatigue task where ankle plantar flexor muscles were targeted. The mean COP-target distance and the mean COP velocity were calculated for each trial. Cross-correlation analyses between the COP and target displacements were also performed. RTs were recorded during dual-task trials. Results showed that while young adults adopted an anticipatory control mode to move their COP as close as possible to the target center, seniors adopted a reactive control mode, lagging behind the target center. This resulted in longer COP-target distance and higher COP velocity in the latter group. Concurrently, RT increased more in seniors when switching from static stance to dynamic postural conditions, suggesting potential alterations in the central nervous system (CNS) functions. Finally, plantar flexor muscle fatigue and dual-tasking had only minor effects on dynamic postural control of both young adults and seniors. Future studies should investigate why the fatigue-induced changes in quiet standing postural control do not seem to transfer to dynamic balance tasks.

  19. Does postural chain mobility influence muscular control in sitting ramp pushes?

    PubMed

    Le Bozec, Serge; Bouisset, Simon

    2004-10-01

    focal EMGs, were phasic, a feature which characterises transient force exertion. The Rx reaction forces were associated with backward displacement of the centre of pressure, Xp. The centre of pressure displacement was interpreted as a backward pelvis rotation, an interpretation which was confirmed by backward and upward iliac crest accelerations. When ischio-femoral contact was reduced, the backward pelvis rotation was significantly increased, resulting from an increased pelvis and spine mobility. Distinct focal and postural EMG sequences were found to be associated with the effort. Two different sets of muscles were observed when considering recruitment order, the focal and the postural muscles. The ankle muscles were activated before the pelvis, the back and the scapular girdle, with the upper limb muscles activated only after the onset of the primum movens of push action (serratus anterior): the activation process followed a distal to proximal progression order. Moreover, the postural EMG sequence was anticipatory, that is there were anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs). Modifying the ischio-femoral contact did not induce a change in either the postural muscle set or in the recruitment order. There were significant increases in the level of activation (integrated EMG) of the postural muscles when ischio-femoral contact was reduced. They did not result from an increase in EMG duration but only from a modulation of EMG amplitude, suggesting that postural control for different ischio-femoral contacts involves adapting the motor program according to the postural requirements, rather than changing the postural strategy. Moreover, as APA amplitude was increased when ischio-femoral contact was reduced, it could be assumed that the postural chain is programmed in relation to postural chain mobility. In addition, the increase in postural EMGs was interpreted as an increased counter-perturbation opposed to an increased push force. It is concluded that greater mobility of

  20. Hand immobilization affects arm and shoulder postural control.

    PubMed

    Bolzoni, Francesco; Bruttini, Carlo; Esposti, Roberto; Cavallari, Paolo

    2012-07-01

    It is a common experience, immediately after the removal of a cast or a splint, to feel motor awkwardness, which is usually attributed to muscular and joint immobilization. However, the same feeling may also be perceived after a brief period of immobilization. We provide evidence that this last effect stems from changes in the cortical organization of the focal movement as well as in the associated anticipatory postural adjustments. Indeed, these two aspects of the motor act are strongly correlated, although scaled in different manners. In fact, they are both shaped in the primary motor cortex, they both undergo similar amplitude and latency modulation and, as we will show, they are both impaired by the immobilization of the lone prime mover. Neuromuscular effects of limb immobilization are well known; however, most papers focus on changes occurring in the pathways projecting to the prime mover, which acts on the immobilized joint. Conversely, this study investigates the effect of immobilization on anticipatory postural adjustments. Indeed, we show that 12 h of wrist and fingers immobilization effectively modify anticipatory postural adjustments of the elbow and the shoulder, that is, those joints not immobilized within the fixation chain. Accordingly, the motor impairment observed after short-term immobilization most likely stems from the unbalance between anticipatory postural adjustments and the focal movement.

  1. Anticipatory Deaccenting in Language Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Carbary, Kathleen; Brown, Meredith; Gunlogson, Christine; McDonough, Joyce M.; Fazlipour, Aleksandra; Tanenhaus, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the hypothesis that listeners can generate expectations about upcoming input using anticipatory deaccenting, in which the absence of a nuclear pitch accent on an utterance-new noun is licensed by the subsequent repetition of that noun (e.g. Drag the SQUARE with the house to the TRIangle with the house). The phonemic restoration paradigm was modified to obscure word-initial segmental information uniquely identifying the final word in a spoken instruction, resulting in a stimulus compatible with two lexical alternatives (e.g. mouse/house). In Experiment 1, we measured participants’ final interpretations and response times. Experiment 2 used the same materials in a crowd-sourced gating study. Sentence interpretations at gated intervals, final interpretations, and response times provided converging evidence that the anticipatory deaccenting pattern contributed to listeners’ referential expectations. The results illustrate the availability and importance of sentence-level accent patterns in spoken language comprehension. PMID:25642426

  2. Anticipatory Grief: A Mere Concept?

    PubMed

    Moon, Paul J

    2016-06-01

    Anticipatory grief (AG) has been studied, debated, and written about for several decades. This type of grief is also recognized in hospice and palliative care (HPC). The question, however, is whether the reality of AG is sufficiently upheld by professionals at the point of concrete service delivery. In other words, is AG a mere concept or is everyday practice of HPC duly informed of AG as evidenced by the resulting care delivery? © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Functional Neuroanatomy for Posture and Gait Control

    PubMed Central

    Takakusaki, Kaoru

    2017-01-01

    Here we argue functional neuroanatomy for posture-gait control. Multi-sensory information such as somatosensory, visual and vestibular sensation act on various areas of the brain so that adaptable posture-gait control can be achieved. Automatic process of gait, which is steady-state stepping movements associating with postural reflexes including headeye coordination accompanied by appropriate alignment of body segments and optimal level of postural muscle tone, is mediated by the descending pathways from the brainstem to the spinal cord. Particularly, reticulospinal pathways arising from the lateral part of the mesopontine tegmentum and spinal locomotor network contribute to this process. On the other hand, walking in unfamiliar circumstance requires cognitive process of postural control, which depends on knowledges of self-body, such as body schema and body motion in space. The cognitive information is produced at the temporoparietal association cortex, and is fundamental to sustention of vertical posture and construction of motor programs. The programs in the motor cortical areas run to execute anticipatory postural adjustment that is optimal for achievement of goal-directed movements. The basal ganglia and cerebellum may affect both the automatic and cognitive processes of posturegait control through reciprocal connections with the brainstem and cerebral cortex, respectively. Consequently, impairments in cognitive function by damages in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and cerebellum may disturb posture-gait control, resulting in falling. PMID:28122432

  4. Functional Neuroanatomy for Posture and Gait Control.

    PubMed

    Takakusaki, Kaoru

    2017-01-01

    Here we argue functional neuroanatomy for posture-gait control. Multi-sensory information such as somatosensory, visual and vestibular sensation act on various areas of the brain so that adaptable posture-gait control can be achieved. Automatic process of gait, which is steady-state stepping movements associating with postural reflexes including headeye coordination accompanied by appropriate alignment of body segments and optimal level of postural muscle tone, is mediated by the descending pathways from the brainstem to the spinal cord. Particularly, reticulospinal pathways arising from the lateral part of the mesopontine tegmentum and spinal locomotor network contribute to this process. On the other hand, walking in unfamiliar circumstance requires cognitive process of postural control, which depends on knowledges of self-body, such as body schema and body motion in space. The cognitive information is produced at the temporoparietal association cortex, and is fundamental to sustention of vertical posture and construction of motor programs. The programs in the motor cortical areas run to execute anticipatory postural adjustment that is optimal for achievement of goal-directed movements. The basal ganglia and cerebellum may affect both the automatic and cognitive processes of posturegait control through reciprocal connections with the brainstem and cerebral cortex, respectively. Consequently, impairments in cognitive function by damages in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and cerebellum may disturb posture-gait control, resulting in falling.

  5. Antisaccades in Parkinson disease: A new marker of postural control?

    PubMed

    Ewenczyk, Claire; Mesmoudi, Salma; Gallea, Cécile; Welter, Marie-Laure; Gaymard, Bertrand; Demain, Adèle; Yahia Cherif, Lydia; Degos, Bertrand; Benali, Habib; Pouget, Pierre; Poupon, Cyril; Lehericy, Stéphane; Rivaud-Péchoux, Sophie; Vidailhet, Marie

    2017-02-28

    To describe the relation between gaze and posture/gait control in Parkinson disease (PD) and to determine the role of the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) and cortex-MLR connection in saccadic behavior because this structure is a major area involved in both gait/postural control and gaze control networks. We recruited 30 patients with PD with or without altered postural control and 25 age-matched healthy controls (HCs). We assessed gait, balance, and neuropsychological status and separately recorded gait initiation and eye movements (visually guided saccades and volitional antisaccades). We identified correlations between the clinical and physiologic parameters that best characterized patients with postural instability. We measured resting-state functional connectivity in 2 pathways involving the frontal oculomotor cortices and the MLR and sought correlations with saccadic behavior. Patients with PD with postural instability showed altered antisaccade latencies that correlated with the stand-walk-sit time (r = 0.78, p < 0.001) and the duration of anticipatory postural adjustments before gait initiation (r = 0.61, p = 0.001). Functional connectivity between the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) and the frontal eye field correlated with antisaccade latency in the HCs (r = -0.54, p = 0.02) but not in patients with PD. In PD, impairment of antisaccade latencies, a simple and robust parameter, may be an indirect marker correlated with impaired release of anticipatory postural program. PPN alterations may account for both antisaccade and postural impairments. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Salivary a-Amylase Reflects Change in Attentional Demands during Postural Control: Comparison with Probe Reaction Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akizuki, Kazunori; Ohashi, Yukari

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The influence of attention on postural control and the relationship between attention and falling has been reported in previous studies. Although a dual-task procedure is commonly used to measure attentional demand, such procedures are affected by allocation policy, which is a mental strategy to divide attention between simultaneous…

  7. Salivary a-Amylase Reflects Change in Attentional Demands during Postural Control: Comparison with Probe Reaction Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akizuki, Kazunori; Ohashi, Yukari

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The influence of attention on postural control and the relationship between attention and falling has been reported in previous studies. Although a dual-task procedure is commonly used to measure attentional demand, such procedures are affected by allocation policy, which is a mental strategy to divide attention between simultaneous…

  8. Longer reaction time of the fibularis longus muscle and reduced postural control in basketball players with functional ankle instability: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Rebolledo, Guillermo; Guzmán-Muñoz, Eduardo; Gatica-Rojas, Valeska; Zbinden-Foncea, Hermann

    2015-08-01

    Motor control evaluation in subjects with functional ankle instability is questionable when both ankles of the same subject are compared (affected vs non-affected). To compare the postural control and reaction time of ankle muscles among: basketball players with FAI (instability group), basketball players without FAI (non-instability group) and healthy non-basketball-playing participants (control group). Case-control study. Laboratory. Instability (n = 10), non-instability (n = 10), and control groups (n = 11). Centre of pressure variables (area, velocity and sway) were measured with a force platform. Reaction time of ankle muscles was measured via electromyography. A one-way ANOVA demonstrated that there were significant differences between the instability and non-instability groups in the fibularis longus (p < 0.001), fibularis brevis (p = 0.031) and tibialis anterior (p = 0.049) muscles. Repeated-measures ANOVA and post hoc analysis determined significant differences for the area between the instability and non-instability groups (p = 0.001). Basketball players with FAI have reduced postural control and longer reaction time of the fibularis and tibialis anterior muscles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Exploring the future with anticipatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skulimowski, A. M. J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a theory of anticipatory networks that originates from anticipatory models of consequences in multicriteria decision problems. When making a decision, the decision maker takes into account the anticipated outcomes of each future decision problem linked by the causal relations with the present one. In a network of linked decision problems, the causal relations are defined between time-ordered nodes. The scenarios of future consequences of each decision are modeled by multiple vertices starting from an appropriate node. The network is supplemented by one or more relations of anticipation, or future feedback, which describe a situation where decision makers take into account the anticipated results of some future optimization problems while making their choice. So arises a multigraph of decision problems linked causally and by one or more anticipation relation, termed here the anticipatory network. We will present the properties of anticipatory networks and propose a method of reducing, transforming and using them to solve current decision problems. Furthermore, it will be shown that most anticipatory networks can be regarded as superanticipatory systems, i.e. systems that are anticipatory in the Rosen sense and contain a future model of at least one other anticipatory system. The anticipatory networks can also be applied to filter the set of future scenarios in a foresight exercise.

  10. Asymmetries in reactive and anticipatory balance control are of similar magnitude in Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Tjitske A; van Kordelaar, Joost; Engelhart, Denise; van Vugt, Jeroen P P; van der Kooij, Herman

    2016-01-01

    Many Parkinson's disease (PD) patients show asymmetries in balance control during quiet stance and in response to perturbations (i.e., reactive balance control) in the sagittal plane. In addition, PD patients show a reduced ability to anticipate to self-induced disturbances, but it is not clear whether these anticipatory responses can be asymmetric too. Furthermore, it is not known how reactive balance control and anticipatory balance control are related in PD patients. Therefore, we investigated whether reactive and anticipatory balance control are asymmetric to the same extent in PD patients. 14 PD patients and 10 controls participated. Reactive balance control (RBC) was investigated by applying external platform and force perturbations and relating the response of the left and right ankle torque to the body sway angle at the excited frequencies. Anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) were investigated by determining the increase in the left and right ankle torque just before the subjects released a force exerted with the hands against a force sensor. The symmetry ratio between the contribution of the left and right ankle was used to express the asymmetry in reactive and anticipatory balance control; the correlation between the two ratio's was investigated with Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. PD patients were more asymmetric in anticipatory (p=0.026) and reactive balance control (p=0.004) compared to controls and the symmetry ratios were significantly related (ρ=0.74; p=0.003) in PD patients. These findings suggest that asymmetric reactive balance control during bipedal stance may share a common pathophysiology with asymmetries in the anticipation of voluntary perturbations during, for instance, gait initiation.

  11. Applying Behavioral Conditioning to Identify Anticipatory Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Bethany L; Torres, Erika; Chesney, Charlie; Kantoniemi Moon, Veronica; Watters, Jason V

    2017-01-01

    The ability to predict regular events can be adaptive for nonhuman animals living in an otherwise unpredictable environment. Animals may exhibit behavioral changes preceding a predictable event; such changes reflect anticipatory behavior. Anticipatory behavior is broadly defined as a goal-directed increase in activity preceding a predictable event and can be useful for assessing well being in animals in captivity. Anticipation may look different in different animals, however, necessitating methods to generate and study anticipatory behaviors across species. This article includes a proposed method for generating and describing anticipatory behavior in zoos using behavioral conditioning. The article also includes discussion of case studies of the proposed method with 2 animals at the San Francisco Zoo: a silverback gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) and a red panda (Ailurus fulgens). The study evidence supports anticipation in both animals. As behavioral conditioning can be used with many animals, the proposed method provides a practical approach for using anticipatory behavior to assess animal well being in zoos.

  12. Age Related Decline in Postural Control Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stelmach, George E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Studied voluntary and reflexive mechanisms of postural control of young (N=8) and elderly (N=8) adults through measurement of reflexive reactions to large-fast and small-slow ankle rotation postural disturbances. Found reflexive mechanisms relatively intact for both groups although elderly appeared more disadvantaged when posture was under the…

  13. Age Related Decline in Postural Control Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stelmach, George E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Studied voluntary and reflexive mechanisms of postural control of young (N=8) and elderly (N=8) adults through measurement of reflexive reactions to large-fast and small-slow ankle rotation postural disturbances. Found reflexive mechanisms relatively intact for both groups although elderly appeared more disadvantaged when posture was under the…

  14. Stroboscopic Training Enhances Anticipatory Timing.

    PubMed

    Smith, Trevor Q; Mitroff, Stephen R

    The dynamic aspects of sports often place heavy demands on visual processing. As such, an important goal for sports training should be to enhance visual abilities. Recent research has suggested that training in a stroboscopic environment, where visual experiences alternate between visible and obscured, may provide a means of improving attentional and visual abilities. The current study explored whether stroboscopic training could impact anticipatory timing - the ability to predict where a moving stimulus will be at a specific point in time. Anticipatory timing is a critical skill for both sports and non-sports activities, and thus finding training improvements could have broad impacts. Participants completed a pre-training assessment that used a Bassin Anticipation Timer to measure their abilities to accurately predict the timing of a moving visual stimulus. Immediately after this initial assessment, the participants completed training trials, but in one of two conditions. Those in the Control condition proceeded as before with no change. Those in the Strobe condition completed the training trials while wearing specialized eyewear that had lenses that alternated between transparent and opaque (rate of 100ms visible to 150ms opaque). Post-training assessments were administered immediately after training, 10-minutes after training, and 10-days after training. Compared to the Control group, the Strobe group was significantly more accurate immediately after training, was more likely to respond early than to respond late immediately after training and 10 minutes later, and was more consistent in their timing estimates immediately after training and 10 minutes later.

  15. An Anticipatory Model of Cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, G.O.; Dress, W.B., Jr.; Hylton, J.O.; Kercel, S.W.

    1999-04-05

    The Anticipatory System (AS) formalism developed by Robert Rosen provides some insight into the problem of embedding intelligent behavior in machines. AS emulates the anticipatory behavior of biological systems. AS bases its behavior on its expectations about the near future and those expectations are modified as the system gains experience. The expectation is based on an internal model that is drawn from an appeal to physical reality. To be adaptive, the model must be able to update itself. To be practical, the model must run faster than real-time. The need for a physical model and the requirement that the model execute at extreme speeds, has held back the application of AS to practical problems. Two recent advances make it possible to consider the use of AS for practical intelligent sensors. First, advances in transducer technology make it possible to obtain previously unavailable data from which a model can be derived. For example, acoustic emissions (AE) can be fed into a Bayesian system identifier that enables the separation of a weak characterizing signal, such as the signature of pump cavitation precursors, from a strong masking signal, such as a pump vibration feature. The second advance is the development of extremely fast, but inexpensive, digital signal processing hardware on which it is possible to run an adaptive Bayesian-derived model faster than real-time. This paper reports the investigation of an AS using a model of cavitation based on hydrodynamic principles and Bayesian analysis of data from high-performance AE sensors.

  16. Impaired Synergic Control of Posture in Parkinson’s Patients without Postural Instability

    PubMed Central

    Falaki, Ali; Huang, Xuemei; Lewis, Mechelle M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Postural instability is one of most disabling motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease. Indices of multi-muscle synergies are new measurements of movement and postural stability. Objectives Multi-muscle synergies stabilizing vertical posture were studied in Parkinson’s disease patients without clinical symptoms of postural instability (Hoehn-Yahr- ≤ II) and age-matched controls. We tested the hypothesis that both synergy indices during quiet standing and synergy adjustments to self-triggered postural perturbations would be reduced in patients. Methods Eleven Parkinson’s disease patients and 11 controls performed whole-body tasks while standing. Surface electromyography was used to quantify synergy indices stabilizing center of pressure shifts in the anterior-posterior direction during a load-release task. Results Parkinson’s disease patients showed a significantly lower percentage of variance in the muscle activation space accounted for by the first four principal components, significantly reduced synergy indices during steady state, and significantly reduced anticipatory synergy adjustments (a drop in the synergy index prior to the self-triggered unloading). Conclusions The study demonstrates for the first time that impaired synergic control in Parkinson’s disease can be quantified in postural tasks, even in patients without clinical manifestations of postural instability. Synergy measurements may provide a biomarker sensitive for early problems with postural stability in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:27004660

  17. Concreteness of idiographic worry and anticipatory processing.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Sarah Kate; Stevens, Elizabeth S; Behar, Evelyn; Judah, Matt R; Mills, Adam C; Grant, DeMond M

    2017-03-01

    Worry and anticipatory processing are forms of repetitive negative thinking (RNT) that are associated with maladaptive characteristics and negative consequences. One key maladaptive characteristic of worry is its abstract nature (Goldwin & Behar, 2012; Stöber & Borkovec, 2002). Several investigations have relied on inductions of worry that are social-evaluative in nature, which precludes distinctions between worry and RNT about social-evaluative situations. The present study examined similarities and distinctions between worry and anticipatory processing on potentially important maladaptive characteristics. Participants (N = 279) engaged in idiographic periods of uninstructed mentation, worry, and anticipatory processing and provided thought samples during each minute of each induction. Thought samples were assessed for concreteness, degree of verbal-linguistic activity, and degree of imagery-based activity. Both worry and anticipatory processing were characterized by reduced concreteness, increased abstraction of thought over time, and a predominance of verbal-linguistic activity. However, worry was more abstract, more verbal-linguistic, and less imagery-based relative to anticipatory processing. Finally, worry demonstrated reductions in verbal-linguistic activity over time, whereas anticipatory processing demonstrated reductions in imagery-based activity over time. Worry was limited to non-social topics to distinguish worry from anticipatory processing, and may not represent worry that is social in nature. Generalizability may also be limited by use of an undergraduate sample. Results from the present study provide support for Stöber's theory regarding the reduced concreteness of worry, and suggest that although worry and anticipatory processing share some features, they also contain characteristics unique to each process. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Caffeine improves anticipatory processes in task switching.

    PubMed

    Tieges, Zoë; Snel, Jan; Kok, Albert; Wijnen, Jasper G; Lorist, Monicque M; Richard Ridderinkhof, K

    2006-08-01

    We studied the effects of moderate amounts of caffeine on task switching and task maintenance using mixed-task (AABB) blocks, in which participants alternated predictably between two tasks, and single-task (AAAA, BBBB) blocks. Switch costs refer to longer reaction times (RT) on task switch trials (e.g. AB) compared to task-repeat trials (e.g. BB); mixing costs refer to longer RTs in task-repeat trials compared to single-task trials. In a double-blind, within-subjects experiment, two caffeine doses (3 and 5mg/kg body weight) and a placebo were administered to 18 coffee drinkers. Both caffeine doses reduced switch costs compared to placebo. Event-related brain potentials revealed a negative deflection developing within the preparatory interval, which was larger for switch than for repeat trials. Caffeine increased this switch-related difference. These results suggest that coffee consumption improves task-switching performance by enhancing anticipatory processing such as task set updating, presumably through the neurochemical effects of caffeine on the dopamine system.

  19. Anticipatory sensitization to repeated stressors: the role of initial cortisol reactivity and meditation/emotion skills training.

    PubMed

    Turan, Bulent; Foltz, Carol; Cavanagh, James F; Wallace, B Alan; Cullen, Margaret; Rosenberg, Erika L; Jennings, Patricia A; Ekman, Paul; Kemeny, Margaret E

    2015-02-01

    Anticipation may play a role in shaping biological reactions to repeated stressors-a common feature of modern life. We aimed to demonstrate that: (a) individuals who display a larger cortisol response to an initial stressor exhibit progressive anticipatory sensitization, showing progressively higher cortisol levels before subsequent exposures, and (b) attention/emotional skills training can reduce the magnitude of this effect on progressive anticipatory sensitization. Female school teachers (N=76) were randomly assigned to attention/emotion skills and meditation training or to a control group. Participants completed 3 separate Trier Social Stress Tests (TSST): at baseline (Session 1), post-training (Session 2), and five months post (Session 3). Each TSST session included preparing and delivering a speech and performing an arithmetic task in front of critical evaluators. In each session participants' salivary cortisol levels were determined before and after the stressor. Control participants with larger cortisol reactivity to the first stressor showed increasing anticipatory (pre-stressor) cortisol levels with each successive stressor exposure (TSST session)-suggesting progressive anticipatory sensitization. Yet this association was absent in the training group. Supplementary analyses indicated that these findings occurred in the absence of group differences in cortisol reactivity. Findings suggest that the stress response can undergo progressive anticipatory sensitization, which may be modulated by attention/emotion-related processes. An important implication of the construct of progressive anticipatory sensitization is a possible self-perpetuating effect of stress reactions, providing a candidate mechanism for the translation of short-to-long-term stress reactions.

  20. The role of preparation in tuning anticipatory and reflex responses during catching.

    PubMed

    Lacquaniti, F; Maioli, C

    1989-01-01

    The pattern of muscle responses associated with catching a ball in the presence of vision was investigated by independently varying the height of the drop and the mass of the ball. It was found that the anticipatory EMG responses comprised early and late components. The early components were produced at a roughly constant latency (about 130 msec) from the time of ball release. Their mean amplitude decreased with increasing height of fall. Late components represented the major build-up of muscle activity preceding the ball's impact and were accompanied by limb flexion. Their onset time was roughly constant (about 100 msec) with respect to the time of impact (except in wrist extensors). This indicates that the timing of these responses was based on an accurate estimate of the instantaneous values of the time-to-contact (time remaining before impact). The mean amplitude of the late anticipatory responses increased linearly with the expected momentum of the ball at impact. The reflex responses evoked by the ball's impact consisted in a short-latency coactivation of flexor and extensor muscles at the elbow and wrist joints. Their mean amplitude generally increased with the intensity of the perturbation both in the stretched muscles and in the shortening muscles. We argue that both the anticipatory and the reflex coactivation are centrally preset in preparation for catching and are instrumental for stabilizing limb posture after impact. A model with linear, time-varying viscoelastic coefficients was used to assess the neural and mechanical contributions to the damping of limb oscillations induced by the ball's impact. The model demonstrates that (1) anticipatory muscle stiffening and anticipatory flexion of the limb are synergistic in building up resistance of the hand to vertical displacement and (2) the reflex coactivation produces a further increment of hand stiffness and viscosity which tends to offset the decrement which would result from the limb extension produced

  1. Influence of central set on anticipatory and triggered grip-force adjustments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winstein, C. J.; Horak, F. B.; Fisher, B. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The effects of predictability of load magnitude on anticipatory and triggered grip-force adjustments were studied as nine normal subjects used a precision grip to lift, hold, and replace an instrumented test object. Experience with a predictable stimulus has been shown to enhance magnitude scaling of triggered postural responses to different amplitudes of perturbations. However, this phenomenon, known as a central-set effect, has not been tested systematically for grip-force responses in the hand. In our study, predictability was manipulated by applying load perturbations of different magnitudes to the test object under conditions in which the upcoming load magnitude was presented repeatedly or under conditions in which the load magnitudes were presented randomly, each with two different pre-load grip conditions (unconstrained and constrained). In constrained conditions, initial grip forces were maintained near the minimum level necessary to prevent pre-loaded object slippage, while in unconstrained conditions, no initial grip force restrictions were imposed. The effect of predictable (blocked) and unpredictable (random) load presentations on scaling of anticipatory and triggered grip responses was tested by comparing the slopes of linear regressions between the imposed load and grip response magnitude. Anticipatory and triggered grip force responses were scaled to load magnitude in all conditions. However, regardless of pre-load grip force constraint, the gains (slopes) of grip responses relative to load magnitudes were greater when the magnitude of the upcoming load was predictable than when the load increase was unpredictable. In addition, a central-set effect was evidenced by the fewer number of drop trials in the predictable relative to unpredictable load conditions. Pre-load grip forces showed the greatest set effects. However, grip responses showed larger set effects, based on prediction, when pre-load grip force was constrained to lower levels. These

  2. Kinematic analysis of postural reactions to a posterior translation in rocker bottom shoes in younger and older adults.

    PubMed

    Kimel-Scott, Dorothy R; Gulledge, Elisha N; Bolena, Ryan E; Albright, Bruce C

    2014-01-01

    Shoes with rocker bottom soles are utilized by persons with diabetic peripheral neuropathy to reduce plantar pressures during gait. The risk of falls increases with age and is compounded by diabetic neuropathy. The purpose of this study was to analyze how rocker bottom shoes affect posture control of older adults (50-75 years old) and younger adults (20-35 years old) in response to posterior slide perturbations. The postural response to a posterior platform translation was normalized among subjects by applying the below threshold stepping velocity (BTSV) for each subject. The BTSV was the fastest velocity of platform translation that did not cause a stepping response while wearing the rocker bottom shoes. Joint excursion, time to first response, response time, and variability of mean peak joint angles were analyzed at the ankle, knee, hip, trunk, and head in the sagittal plane. The statistical analysis was a 2-factor mixed repeated measures design to determine interactions between and within shoe types and age groups. While wearing rocker bottom shoes, both age groups exhibited increased joint excursion, differences in time to initial response, and longer response time. The older group demonstrated decreased joint excursion and increased time to initial response compared to the younger group, as well as a significantly slower mean BTSV. These findings support the conclusion that in healthy older adults and in populations at risk for falls, the use of rocker bottom or other unstable shoes may increase the potential of falls when confronted with a standing perturbation such as a forceful slip or trip.

  3. Anticipatory Manoeuvres in Bird Flight

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Hong D.; Schiffner, Ingo; Srinivasan, Mandyam V.

    2016-01-01

    It is essential for birds to be agile and aware of their immediate environment, especially when flying through dense foliage. To investigate the type of visual signals and strategies used by birds while negotiating cluttered environments, we presented budgerigars with vertically oriented apertures of different widths. We find that, when flying through narrow apertures, birds execute their maneuvers in an anticipatory fashion, with wing closures, if necessary, occurring well in advance of the aperture. When passing through an aperture that is narrower than the wingspan, the birds close their wings at a specific, constant distance before the aperture, which is independent of aperture width. In these cases, the birds also fly significantly higher, possibly pre-compensating for the drop in altitude. The speed of approach is largely constant, and independent of the width of the aperture. The constancy of the approach speed suggests a simple means by which optic flow can be used to gauge the distance and width of the aperture, and guide wing closure. PMID:27270506

  4. The postural reaction to the drop of a hindlimb support in the standing cat remains following sensorimotor cortical ablation.

    PubMed

    Dufossé, M; Macpherson, J; Massion, J; Sybirska, E

    1985-04-19

    The postural response to an unexpected drop of either hindlimb platform was studied in the freely standing cat. The vertical forces, the forelimb electromyographic (EMG) activities and the movement of the trunk were analysed. A stereotyped diagonal pattern of support was observed. The imposed unloading of one hindlimb was followed by unloading of the diagonally opposite forelimb and loading of the two other limbs. In the ipsilateral loaded forelimb, the force increase is preceded by an activation of the biceps and is concomitant with a triceps coactivation. In the contralateral unloaded forelimb, reciprocal changes of biceps (activation) and triceps (inhibition) were observed and preceded the force decrease. Lateral or vertical displacement or rotation of the vertebral column at the high thoracic level, as evidenced by movie recording, began no earlier than 100 ms after the hindlimb drop and thus followed the EMG changes. Unilateral sensorimotor cortex ablation had no effect on this pattern or on the latencies of forelimb myographic responses. These results suggest that the hindlimb drop triggers stereotyped forelimb EMG responses which are organized centrally and that these responses are not mediated via a sensorimotor cortical loop.

  5. Influence of Cervical Spine Mobility on the Focal and Postural Components of the Sit-to-Stand Task.

    PubMed

    Hamaoui, Alain; Alamini-Rodrigues, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of cervical spine mobility on the focal and postural components of the sit-to-stand transition, which represent the preparatory and execution phases of the task, respectively. Sixteen asymptomatic female participants (22 ± 3 years, 163 ± 0,06 cm, 57,5 ± 5 kg), free of any neurological or musculoskeletal disorders, performed six trials of the sit-to-stand task at maximum speed, in four experimental conditions varying the mobility of the cervical spine by means of three different splints. A six-channel force plate, which collected the reaction forces and moments applied at its top surface, was used to calculate the center of pressure displacements along the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral axes. The local accelerations of the head, spine, and pelvis, were assessed by three pairs of accelerometers, oriented along the vertical and anterior-posterior axes. Restriction of cervical spine mobility resulted in an increased duration of the focal movement, associated with longer and larger postural adjustments. These results suggest that restricted cervical spine mobility impairs the posturo-kinetic capacity during the sit-to-stand task, leading to a lower motor performance and a reorganization of the anticipatory postural adjustments. In a clinical context, it might be assumed that preserving the articular free play of the cervical spine might be useful to favor STS performance and autonomy.

  6. Influence of Cervical Spine Mobility on the Focal and Postural Components of the Sit-to-Stand Task

    PubMed Central

    Hamaoui, Alain; Alamini-Rodrigues, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of cervical spine mobility on the focal and postural components of the sit-to-stand transition, which represent the preparatory and execution phases of the task, respectively. Sixteen asymptomatic female participants (22 ± 3 years, 163 ± 0,06 cm, 57,5 ± 5 kg), free of any neurological or musculoskeletal disorders, performed six trials of the sit-to-stand task at maximum speed, in four experimental conditions varying the mobility of the cervical spine by means of three different splints. A six-channel force plate, which collected the reaction forces and moments applied at its top surface, was used to calculate the center of pressure displacements along the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral axes. The local accelerations of the head, spine, and pelvis, were assessed by three pairs of accelerometers, oriented along the vertical and anterior-posterior axes. Restriction of cervical spine mobility resulted in an increased duration of the focal movement, associated with longer and larger postural adjustments. These results suggest that restricted cervical spine mobility impairs the posturo-kinetic capacity during the sit-to-stand task, leading to a lower motor performance and a reorganization of the anticipatory postural adjustments. In a clinical context, it might be assumed that preserving the articular free play of the cervical spine might be useful to favor STS performance and autonomy. PMID:28400724

  7. Transfer of dynamic learning across postures.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Alaa A; Wolpert, Daniel M

    2009-11-01

    When learning a difficult motor task, we often decompose the task so that the control of individual body segments is practiced in isolation. But on re-composition, the combined movements can result in novel and possibly complex internal forces between the body segments that were not experienced (or did not need to be compensated for) during isolated practice. Here we investigate whether dynamics learned in isolation by one part of the body can be used by other parts of the body to immediately predict and compensate for novel forces between body segments. Subjects reached to targets while holding the handle of a robotic, force-generating manipulandum. One group of subjects was initially exposed to the novel robot dynamics while seated and was then tested in a standing position. A second group was tested in the reverse order: standing then sitting. Both groups adapted their arm dynamics to the novel environment, and this movement learning transferred between seated and standing postures and vice versa. Both groups also generated anticipatory postural adjustments when standing and exposed to the force field for several trials. In the group that had learned the dynamics while seated, the appropriate postural adjustments were observed on the very first reach on standing. These results suggest that the CNS can immediately anticipate the effect of learned movement dynamics on a novel whole-body posture. The results support the existence of separate mappings for posture and movement, which encode similar dynamics but can be adapted independently.

  8. Transfer of Dynamic Learning Across Postures

    PubMed Central

    Wolpert, Daniel M.

    2009-01-01

    When learning a difficult motor task, we often decompose the task so that the control of individual body segments is practiced in isolation. But on re-composition, the combined movements can result in novel and possibly complex internal forces between the body segments that were not experienced (or did not need to be compensated for) during isolated practice. Here we investigate whether dynamics learned in isolation by one part of the body can be used by other parts of the body to immediately predict and compensate for novel forces between body segments. Subjects reached to targets while holding the handle of a robotic, force-generating manipulandum. One group of subjects was initially exposed to the novel robot dynamics while seated and was then tested in a standing position. A second group was tested in the reverse order: standing then sitting. Both groups adapted their arm dynamics to the novel environment, and this movement learning transferred between seated and standing postures and vice versa. Both groups also generated anticipatory postural adjustments when standing and exposed to the force field for several trials. In the group that had learned the dynamics while seated, the appropriate postural adjustments were observed on the very first reach on standing. These results suggest that the CNS can immediately anticipate the effect of learned movement dynamics on a novel whole-body posture. The results support the existence of separate mappings for posture and movement, which encode similar dynamics but can be adapted independently. PMID:19710374

  9. The social construction of anticipatory grief.

    PubMed

    Fulton, G; Madden, C; Minichiello, V

    1996-11-01

    As medical technology prolongs life and facilitates the early diagnosis of terminal illnesses such as AIDS, the concept of anticipatory grief requires further scrutiny. The original concept of anticipatory grief has become widely accepted. This paper, however, argues that the uncritical acceptance of this concept rests primarily on the authority of the biomedical model, which has focused analysis on the predictable symptomatology of the grief process, integrating this understanding into health care. This paper provides a critical review of the concept of anticipatory grief, highlighting conceptual shifts which are required if the concept is to be relevant to the subjective experiences of people who are confronted with life-threatening illness. The paper discusses the relevance of understanding the conceptual confusion which exists in the literature between "anticipatory grief" and "forewarning of loss". It is argued that grief may be the response to a loss of meaning, and that the psychological process of adjustment to loss requires individuals to engage in the reconstitution of purpose and meaning in their lives. Distinguishing between what is being expressed for past and present losses and what responses occur when individuals focus on various aspects of their future may shed light on some of the inconsistent and contradictory findings surrounding research on anticipatory grief.

  10. Anticipatory signatures of voluntary memory suppression.

    PubMed

    Hanslmayr, Simon; Leipold, Philipp; Pastötter, Bernhard; Bäuml, Karl-Heinz

    2009-03-04

    Voluntary memory suppression can keep unwanted memories from entering consciousness, inducing later forgetting of the information. In the present study, we searched for the existence of anticipatory processes, mediating such voluntary memory suppression. Using the think/no-think paradigm, subjects received a cue whether to prepare to think of a previously studied cue-target pair or whether to not let a previously studied cue-target pair enter consciousness. Examining event-related potentials, we identified two electrophysiological processes of voluntary memory suppression: (1) an early anticipatory process operating before the memory cue for a to-be-suppressed memory was provided, and (2) a later process operating after memory cue presentation. Both ERP effects were due to a decreased right frontal and left parietal positivity. They were positively related and predicted later forgetting. The results point to the existence of anticipatory processes, mediating voluntary memory suppression.

  11. Adaptive synchronization and anticipatory dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying-Jen; Chen, Chun-Chung; Lai, Pik-Yin; Chan, C. K.

    2015-09-01

    Many biological systems can sense periodical variations in a stimulus input and produce well-timed, anticipatory responses after the input is removed. Such systems show memory effects for retaining timing information in the stimulus and cannot be understood from traditional synchronization consideration of passive oscillatory systems. To understand this anticipatory phenomena, we consider oscillators built from excitable systems with the addition of an adaptive dynamics. With such systems, well-timed post-stimulus responses similar to those from experiments can be obtained. Furthermore, a well-known model of working memory is shown to possess similar anticipatory dynamics when the adaptive mechanism is identified with synaptic facilitation. The last finding suggests that this type of oscillator can be common in neuronal systems with plasticity.

  12. The effect of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug on two important predictors for accidental falls: postural balance and manual reaction time. A randomized, controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hegeman, Judith; Nienhuis, Bart; van den Bemt, Bart; Weerdesteyn, Vivian; van Limbeek, Jacques; Duysens, Jacques

    2011-04-01

    Accidental falls in older individuals are a major health and research topic. Increased reaction time and impaired postural balance have been determined as reliable predictors for those at risk of falling and are important functions of the central nervous system (CNS). An essential risk factor for falls is medication exposure. Amongst the medications related to accidental falls are the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). About 1-10% of all users experience CNS side effects. These side effects, such as dizziness, headaches, drowsiness, mood alteration, and confusion, seem to be more common during treatment with indomethacin. Hence, it is possible that maintenance of (static) postural balance and swift reactions to stimuli are affected by exposure to NSAIDs, indomethacin in particular, consequently putting older individuals at a greater risk for accidental falls. The present study investigated the effect of a high indomethacin dose in healthy middle-aged individuals on two important predictors of falls: postural balance and reaction time. Twenty-two healthy middle-aged individuals (59.5 ± 4.7 years) participated in this double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized crossover trial. Three measurements were conducted with a week interval each. A measurement consisted of postural balance as a single task and while concurrently performing a secondary cognitive task and reaction time tasks. For the first measurement indomethacin 75 mg (slow-release) or a visually identical placebo was randomly assigned. In total, five capsules were taken orally in the 2.5 days preceding assessment. The second measurement was without intervention, for the final one the first placebo group got indomethacin and vice versa. Repeated measures GLM revealed no significant differences between indomethacin, placebo, and baseline in any of the balance tasks. No differences in postural balance were found between the single and dual task conditions, or on the performance of the dual task

  13. Pedunculopontine network dysfunction in Parkinson's disease with postural control and sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Gallea, Cecile; Ewenczyk, Claire; Degos, Bertrand; Welter, Marie-Laure; Grabli, David; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Valabregue, Romain; Berroir, Pierre; Yahia-Cherif, Lydia; Bertasi, Eric; Fernandez-Vidal, Sara; Bardinet, Eric; Roze, Emmanuel; Benali, Habib; Poupon, Cyril; François, Chantal; Arnulf, Isabelle; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Vidailhet, Marie

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate pedunculopontine nucleus network dysfunctions that mediate impaired postural control and sleep disorder in Parkinson's disease. We examined (1) Parkinson's disease patients with impaired postural control and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (further abbreviated as sleep disorder), (2) Parkinson's disease patients with sleep disorder only, (3) Parkinson's disease patients with neither impaired postural control nor sleep disorder, and (4) healthy volunteers. We assessed postural control with clinical scores and biomechanical recordings during gait initiation. Participants had video polysomnography, daytime sleepiness self-evaluation, and resting-state functional MRIs. Patients with impaired postural control and sleep disorder had longer duration of anticipatory postural adjustments during gait initiation and decreased functional connectivity between the pedunculopontine nucleus and the supplementary motor area in the locomotor network that correlated negatively with the duration of anticipatory postural adjustments. Both groups of patients with sleep disorder had decreased functional connectivity between the pedunculopontine nucleus and the anterior cingulate cortex in the arousal network that correlated with daytime sleepiness. The degree of dysfunction in the arousal network was related to the degree of connectivity in the locomotor network in all patients with sleep disorder, but not in patients without sleep disorder or healthy volunteers. These results shed light on the functional neuroanatomy of pedunculopontine nucleus networks supporting the clinical manifestation and the interdependence between sleep and postural control impairments in Parkinson's disease. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  14. Active control of bias for the control of posture and movement.

    PubMed

    Guigon, Emmanuel

    2010-08-01

    Posture and movement are fundamental, intermixed components of motor coordination. Current approaches consider either that 1) movement is an active, anticipatory process and posture is a passive feedback process or 2) movement and posture result from a common passive process. In both cases, the presence of a passive component renders control scarcely robust and stable in the face of transmission delays and low feedback gains. Here we show in a model that posture and movement could result from the same active process: an optimal feedback control that drives the body from its estimated state to its goal in a given (planning) time by acting through muscles on the insertion position (bias) of compliant linkages (tendons). Computer simulations show that iteration of this process in the presence of noise indifferently produces realistic postural sway, fast goal-directed movements, and natural transitions between posture and movement.

  15. Reduce torques and stick the landing: limb posture during landing in toads.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Emanuel; Larson, Neil P; Abbott, Emily M; Danos, Nicole

    2014-10-15

    A controlled landing, where an animal does not crash or topple, requires enough stability to allow muscles to effectively dissipate mechanical energy. Toads (Rhinella marina) are exemplary models for understanding the mechanics and motor control of landing given their ability to land consistently during bouts of continuous hopping. Previous studies in anurans have shown that ground reaction forces (GRFs) during landing are significantly higher compared with takeoff and can potentially impart large torques about the center of mass (COM), destabilizing the body at impact. We predict that in order to minimize such torques, toads will align their COM with the GRF vector during the aerial phase in anticipation of impact. We combined high-speed videography and force-plate ergometry to quantify torques at the COM and relate the magnitude of torques to limb posture at impact. We show that modulation of hindlimb posture can shift the position of the COM by about 20% of snout-vent length. Rapid hindlimb flexion during the aerial phase of a hop moved the COM anteriorly and reduced torque by aligning the COM with the GRF vector. We found that the addition of extrinsic loads did not significantly alter landing behavior but did change the torques experienced at impact. We conclude that anticipatory hindlimb flexion during the aerial phase of a hop is a critical feature of a mechanically stable landing that allows toads to quickly string together multiple, continuous hops.

  16. Long-term retention of a divided attention psycho-motor test combining choice reaction test and postural balance test: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Rossi, R; Pascolo, P B

    2015-09-01

    Driving in degraded psychophysical conditions, such as under the influence of alcohol or drugs but also in a state of fatigue or drowsiness, is a growing problem. The current roadside tests used for detecting drugs from drivers suffer various limitations, while impairment is subjective and does not necessarily correlate with drug metabolite concentration found in body fluids. This work is a validation step towards the study of feasibility of a novel test conceived to assess psychophysical conditions of individuals performing at-risk activities. Motor gestures, long-term retention and learning phase related to the protocol are analysed in unimpaired subjects. The protocol is a divided attention test, which combines a critical tracking test achieved with postural movements and a visual choice reaction test. Ten healthy subjects participated in a first set of trials and in a second set after about six months. Each session required the carrying out of the test for ten times in order to investigate learning effect and performance over repetitions. In the first set the subjects showed a learning trend up to the third trial, whilst in the second set of trials they showed motor retention. Nevertheless, the overall performance did not significantly improve. Gestures are probably retained due to the type of tasks and the way in which the instructions are conveyed to the subjects. Moreover, motor retention after a short training suggests that the protocol is easy to learn and understand. Implications for roadside test usage and comparison with current tests are also discussed.

  17. Anticipatory Socialisation amongst Architects: A Qualitative Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sang, Katherine; Ison, Stephen; Dainty, Andrew; Powell, Abigail

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Those entering the architectural profession tend to be motivated by a desire to undertake creative design, although studies have revealed that many practicing architects feel they lack sufficient creative opportunities. Proponents of anticipatory socialisation argue that experiences prior to entering an occupation influence job…

  18. Rural Youth and Anticipatory Goal Deflection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, Evans W.; And Others

    Race, sex, community size, occupation of major wage earner, father's education, mother's education, and certainty of expectations were the variables used in this study to determine the "anticipatory occupational goal deflection" (AOGD) of urban and rural youth (blacks and whites) in Louisiana. Least squares analysis of variance and other…

  19. Anticipatory physiological regulation in feeding biology

    PubMed Central

    Power, Michael L.; Schulkin, Jay

    2008-01-01

    Anticipatory physiological regulation is an adaptive strategy that enables animals to respond faster to physiologic and metabolic challenges. The cephalic phase responses are anticipatory responses that prepare animals to digest, absorb and metabolize nutrients. They enable the sensory aspects of the food to interact with the metabolic state of the animal to influence feeding behavior. The anticipatory digestive secretions and metabolic adjustments in response to food cues are key adaptations that affect digestive and metabolic efficiency and aid in controlling the resulting elevation of metabolic fuels in the blood. Cephalic phase responses enable digestion, metabolism and appetite to be regulated in a coordinated fashion. These responses have significant effects on meal size. For example, if the cephalic phase insulin response is blocked the result is poor glucose control and smaller meals. Cephalic phase responses also are linked to motivation to feed, and may play a more direct role in regulating meal size beyond the permissive one of ameliorating negative consequences of feeding. For example, the orexigenic peptide ghrelin appears to display a cephalic phase response, rising before expected meal times. This anticipatory ghrelin response increases appetite; interestingly it also enhances fat absorption, linking appetite with digestion and metabolism. PMID:18045735

  20. Anticipatory Socialisation amongst Architects: A Qualitative Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sang, Katherine; Ison, Stephen; Dainty, Andrew; Powell, Abigail

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Those entering the architectural profession tend to be motivated by a desire to undertake creative design, although studies have revealed that many practicing architects feel they lack sufficient creative opportunities. Proponents of anticipatory socialisation argue that experiences prior to entering an occupation influence job…

  1. Anticipatory Cognitive Systems: a Theoretical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terenzi, Graziano

    This paper deals with the problem of understanding anticipation in biological and cognitive systems. It is argued that a physical theory can be considered as biologically plausible only if it incorporates the ability to describe systems which exhibit anticipatory behaviors. The paper introduces a cognitive level description of anticipation and provides a simple theoretical characterization of anticipatory systems on this level. Specifically, a simple model of a formal anticipatory neuron and a model (i.e. the τ-mirror architecture) of an anticipatory neural network which is based on the former are introduced and discussed. The basic feature of this architecture is that a part of the network learns to represent the behavior of the other part over time, thus constructing an implicit model of its own functioning. As a consequence, the network is capable of self-representation; anticipation, on a oscopic level, is nothing but a consequence of anticipation on a microscopic level. Some learning algorithms are also discussed together with related experimental tasks and possible integrations. The outcome of the paper is a formal characterization of anticipation in cognitive systems which aims at being incorporated in a comprehensive and more general physical theory.

  2. Neurobiology of food anticipatory circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Mistlberger, Ralph E

    2011-09-26

    Circadian rhythms in mammals can be entrained by daily schedules of light or food availability. A master light-entrainable circadian pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is comprised of a population of cell autonomous, transcriptionally based circadian oscillators with defined retinal inputs, circadian clock genes and neural outputs. By contrast, the neurobiology of food-entrainable circadian rhythmicity remains poorly understood at the systems and cellular levels. Induction of food-anticipatory activity rhythms by daily feeding schedules does not require the SCN, but these rhythms do exhibit defining properties of circadian clock control. Clock gene rhythms expressed in other brain regions and in peripheral organs are preferentially reset by mealtime, but lesions of specific hypothalamic, corticolimbic and brainstem structures do not eliminate all food anticipatory rhythms, suggesting control by a distributed, decentralized system of oscillators, or the existence of a critical oscillator at an unknown location. The melanocortin system and dorsomedial hypothalamus may play modulatory roles setting the level of anticipatory activity. The metabolic hormones ghrelin and leptin are not required to induce behavioral food anticipatory rhythms, but may also participate in gain setting. Clock gene mutations that disrupt light-entrainable rhythms generally do not eliminate food anticipatory rhythms, suggesting a novel timing mechanism. Recent evidence for non-transcriptional and network based circadian rhythmicity provides precedence, but any such mechanisms are likely to interact closely with known circadian clock genes, and some important double and triple clock gene knockouts remain to be phenotyped for food entrainment. Given the dominant role of food as an entraining stimulus for metabolic rhythms, the timing of daily food intake and the fidelity of food entrainment mechanisms are likely to have clinical relevance.

  3. Center of Pressure Displacement of Standing Posture during Rapid Movements Is Reorganised Due to Experimental Lower Extremity Muscle Pain

    PubMed Central

    Shiozawa, Shinichiro; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Postural control during rapid movements may be impaired due to musculoskeletal pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of experimental knee-related muscle pain on the center of pressure (CoP) displacement in a reaction time task condition. Methods Nine healthy males performed two reaction time tasks (dominant side shoulder flexion and bilateral heel lift) before, during, and after experimental pain induced in the dominant side vastus medialis or the tibialis anterior muscles by hypertonic saline injections. The CoP displacement was extracted from the ipsilateral and contralateral side by two force plates and the net CoP displacement was calculated. Results Compared with non-painful sessions, tibialis anterior muscle pain during the peak and peak-to-peak displacement for the CoP during anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) of the shoulder task reduced the peak-to-peak displacement of the net CoP in the medial-lateral direction (P<0.05). Tibialis anterior and vastus medialis muscle pain during shoulder flexion task reduced the anterior-posterior peak-to-peak displacement in the ipsilateral side (P<0.05). Conclusions The central nervous system in healthy individuals was sufficiently robust in maintaining the APA characteristics during pain, although the displacement of net and ipsilateral CoP in the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions during unilateral fast shoulder movement was altered. PMID:26680777

  4. Reactive and anticipatory looking in 6-month-old infants during a visual expectation paradigm.

    PubMed

    Quan, Jeffry; Bureau, Jean-François; Abdul Malik, Adam B; Wong, Johnny; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne

    2017-10-01

    This article presents data from 278 six-month-old infants who completed a visual expectation paradigm in which audiovisual stimuli were first presented randomly (random phase), and then in a spatial pattern (pattern phase). Infants' eye gaze behaviour was tracked with a 60 Hz Tobii eye-tracker in order to measure two types of looking behaviour: reactive looking (i.e., latency to shift eye gaze in reaction to the appearance of stimuli) and anticipatory looking (i.e., percentage of time spent looking at the location where the next stimulus is about to appear during the inter-stimulus interval). Data pertaining to missing data and task order effects are presented. Further analyses show that infants' reactive looking was faster in the pattern phase, compared to the random phase, and their anticipatory looking increased from random to pattern phases. Within the pattern phase, infants' reactive looking showed a quadratic trend, with reactive looking time latencies peaking in the middle portion of the phase. Similarly, within the pattern phase, infants' anticipatory looking also showed a quadratic trend, with anticipatory looking peaking during the middle portion of the phase.

  5. Postural control during pushing movement with risk of forward perturbation.

    PubMed

    Okai, Rika; Fujiwara, Motoko

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a forward bilateral pushing movement on postural control in a situation where known, unknown, and unpredictable perturbations may be induced. Participants stood upright and voluntarily pushed a handle with both hands. In the first task, the handle was free to be moved by the participant (perturbation; movable task) and in the second task, the handle was locked (stationary task). For each task, body displacement and observed applied force were recorded. Anticipatory postural control adjustment plays a vital role in body stability; however, in contrast to its role in maintaining stability, adjustment can generate a restricted voluntary movement because motor programming selects a postural control that gives priority to body stability over the target movement.

  6. Neural basis of anticipatory anxiety reappraisals.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Shinpei; Okamoto, Yasumasa; Yoshino, Atsuo; Kobayakawa, Makoto; Machino, Akihiko; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2014-01-01

    Reappraisal is a well-known emotion regulation strategy. Recent neuroimaging studies suggest that reappraisal recruits both medial and lateral prefrontal brain regions. However, few studies have investigated neural representation of reappraisals associated with anticipatory anxiety, and the specific nature of the brain activity underlying this process remains unclear. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate neural activity associated with reappraisals of transient anticipatory anxiety. Although transient anxiety activated mainly subcortical regions, reappraisals targeting the anxiety were associated with increased activity in the medial and lateral prefrontal regions (including the orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate cortices). Reappraisal decreased fear circuit activity (including the amygdala and thalamus). Correlational analysis demonstrated that reductions in subjective anxiety associated with reappraisal were correlated with orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate cortex activation. Reappraisal recruits medial and lateral prefrontal regions; particularly the orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate cortices are associated with successful use of this emotion regulation strategy.

  7. Anticipatory coarticulation facilitates word recognition in toddlers.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Tristan; McMillan, Brianna T M; Saffran, Jenny R; Ellis Weismer, Susan; Edwards, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Children learn from their environments and their caregivers. To capitalize on learning opportunities, young children have to recognize familiar words efficiently by integrating contextual cues across word boundaries. Previous research has shown that adults can use phonetic cues from anticipatory coarticulation during word recognition. We asked whether 18-24 month-olds (n=29) used coarticulatory cues on the word "the" when recognizing the following noun. We performed a looking-while-listening eyetracking experiment to examine word recognition in neutral vs. facilitating coarticulatory conditions. Participants looked to the target image significantly sooner when the determiner contained facilitating coarticulatory cues. These results provide the first evidence that novice word-learners can take advantage of anticipatory sub-phonemic cues during word recognition.

  8. Genetic Algorithms Viewed as Anticipatory Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocanu, Irina; Kalisz, Eugenia; Negreanu, Lorina

    2010-11-01

    This paper proposes a new version of genetic algorithms—the anticipatory genetic algorithm AGA. The performance evaluation included in the paper shows that AGA is superior to traditional genetic algorithm from both speed and accuracy points of view. The paper also presents how this algorithm can be applied to solve a complex problem: image annotation, intended to be used in content based image retrieval systems.

  9. Social Allostasis: Anticipatory Regulation of the Internal Milieu

    PubMed Central

    Schulkin, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Social regulation of the internal milieu is a fundamental behavioral adaptation. Cephalic capability is reflected by anticipatory behaviors to serve systemic physiological regulation. Homeostatic regulation, a dominant perspective, reflects reactive responses; allostatic regulation, the physiology of change, emphasizes longer-term anticipatory, and feedforward systems. Steroids, such as cortisol, and peptides such as corticotrophin releasing hormone are but one example of such anticipatory regulatory systems. The concept of “allostasis” is in part to take account of anticipatory control amidst diverse forms of adaptation underlying this regulatory adaptation that supports social contact and the internal milieu. PMID:21369352

  10. Older adults utilize less efficient postural control when performing pushing task

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun-Ju; Chen, Bing; Aruin, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to maintain balance deteriorates with increasing age. The aim was to investigate the role of age in generation of anticipatory (APA) and compensatory (CPA) postural adjustments during pushing an object. Older (68.8 ± 1.0 years) and young adults (30.1 ± 1.4 years) participated in the experiment involving pushing an object (a pendulum attached to the ceiling) using both hands. Electrical activity of six leg and trunk muscles and displacements of the center of pressure (COP) were recorded and analyzed during the APA and CPA phases. The onset time, integrals of muscle activity, and COP displacements were determined. In addition, the indexes of co-activation and reciprocal activation of muscles for the shank, thigh, and trunk segments were calculated. Older adults, compared to young adults, showed less efficient postural control seen as delayed anticipatory muscle onset times and delayed COP displacements. Moreover, older adults used co-activation of muscles during the CPA phase while younger subjects utilized reciprocal activation of muscles. The observed diminished efficiency of postural control during both anticipatory and compensatory postural adjustments observed in older adults might predispose them to falls while performing tasks involving pushing. The outcome provides a background for future studies focused on the optimization of the daily activities of older adults. PMID:26403099

  11. Anticipatory Mechanisms in Evolutionary Living Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Daniel M.; Holmberg, Stig C.

    2010-11-01

    This paper deals firstly with a revisiting of Darwin's theory of Natural Selection. Darwin in his book never uses the word "evolution", but shows a clear position about mutability of species. Darwin's Natural Selection was mainly inspired by the anticipatory Artificial Selection by humans in domestication, and the Malthus struggle for existence. Darwin showed that the struggle for existence leads to the preservation of the most divergent offspring of any one species. He cited several times the canon of "Natura non facit saltum". He spoke about the origin of life from some one primordial form, into which life was first breathed. Finally, Darwin made anticipation about the future researches in psychology. This paper cites the work of Ernst Mayr who was the first, after 90 years of an intense scientific debate, to present a new and stable Darwinian paradigm as the "Evolutionary Synthesis" in 1942. To explain what is life, the Living Systems Theory (LST) by J. G. Miller is presented. It is showed that the Autopoietic Systems Theory of Varela et al is also a fundamental component of living systems. In agreement with Darwin, the natural selection is a necessary condition for transformation of biological systems, but is not a sufficient condition. Thus, in this paper we conjecture that an anticipatory evolutionary mechanism exists with the genetic code that is a self-replicating and self-modifying anticipatory program. As demonstrated by Nobel laureate McClintock, evolution in genomes is programmed. The word "program" comes from "pro-gram" meaning to write before, by anticipation, and means a plan for the programming of a mechanism, or a sequence of coded instructions that can be inserted into a mechanism, or a sequence of coded instructions, as genes of behavioural responses, that is part of an organism. For example, cell death may be programmed by what is called the apoptosis. This definitively is a great breakthrough in our understanding of biological evolution. Hence

  12. Postural dependence of human locomotion during gait initiation

    PubMed Central

    Mille, Marie-Laure; Simoneau, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The initiation of human walking involves postural motor actions for body orientation and balance stabilization that must be effectively integrated with locomotion to allow safe and efficient transport. Our ability to coordinately adapt these functions to environmental or bodily changes through error-based motor learning is essential to effective performance. Predictive compensations for postural perturbations through anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) that stabilize mediolateral (ML) standing balance normally precede and accompany stepping. The temporal sequencing between these events may involve neural processes that suppress stepping until the expected stability conditions are achieved. If so, then an unexpected perturbation that disrupts the ML APAs should delay locomotion. This study investigated how the central nervous system (CNS) adapts posture and locomotion to perturbations of ML standing balance. Healthy human adults initiated locomotion while a resistance force was applied at the pelvis to perturb posture. In experiment 1, using random perturbations, step onset timing was delayed relative to the APA onset indicating that locomotion was withheld until expected stability conditions occurred. Furthermore, stepping parameters were adapted with the APAs indicating that motor prediction of the consequences of the postural changes likely modified the step motor command. In experiment 2, repetitive postural perturbations induced sustained locomotor aftereffects in some parameters (i.e., step height), immediate but rapidly readapted aftereffects in others, or had no aftereffects. These results indicated both rapid but transient reactive adaptations in the posture and gait assembly and more durable practice-dependent changes suggesting feedforward adaptation of locomotion in response to the prevailing postural conditions. PMID:25231611

  13. Early and Late Components of Feed-forward Postural Adjustments to Predictable Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Vennila; Latash, Mark L.; Aruin, Alexander S.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose was to investigate two types of feed-forward postural adjustments associated with preparation to predictable external perturbations. Methods Nine subjects stood on a wedge, toes-up or toes-down while a pendulum impacted their shoulders. EMGs of leg and trunk muscles were analyzed within the framework of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis. Results Early postural adjustments (EPAs) were seen 400–500 ms and anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs), 100–150 ms prior to the impact. EPAs and APAs were also seen in the time profiles of muscle modes representing muscle groups with linear scaling of the activation levels. Center of pressure shifts were stabilized by co-varied adjustments in muscle mode magnitudes across trials. The index of these multi-muscle synergies showed two drops (anticipatory synergy adjustments, ASAs), prior to EPA and APA in each subject. The findings were consistent between the two conditions. Conclusions The results show that feed-forward postural adjustments represent a sequence of two phenomena, EPAs and APAs. Each of those is preceded by ASAs that reduce stability of a variable that is to be adjusted during the EPAs and APAs. The findings fit a hierarchical scheme with synergic few-to-many mappings at each level of the hierarchy based on the referent body configuration hypothesis. Significance The results show the complexity of the postural preparation to action. Potentially, they have implications for the current strategies of rehabilitation of patients with neuro-motor disorders characterized by impaired postural control. PMID:21983281

  14. Personality traits and individual differences predict threat-induced changes in postural control.

    PubMed

    Zaback, Martin; Cleworth, Taylor W; Carpenter, Mark G; Adkin, Allan L

    2015-04-01

    This study explored whether specific personality traits and individual differences could predict changes in postural control when presented with a height-induced postural threat. Eighty-two healthy young adults completed questionnaires to assess trait anxiety, trait movement reinvestment (conscious motor processing, movement self-consciousness), physical risk-taking, and previous experience with height-related activities. Tests of static (quiet standing) and anticipatory (rise to toes) postural control were completed under low and high postural threat conditions. Personality traits and individual differences significantly predicted height-induced changes in static, but not anticipatory postural control. Individuals less prone to taking physical risks were more likely to lean further away from the platform edge and sway at higher frequencies and smaller amplitudes. Individuals more prone to conscious motor processing were more likely to lean further away from the platform edge and sway at larger amplitudes. Individuals more self-conscious about their movement appearance were more likely to sway at smaller amplitudes. Evidence is also provided that relationships between physical risk-taking and changes in static postural control are mediated through changes in fear of falling and physiological arousal. Results from this study may have indirect implications for balance assessment and treatment; however, further work exploring these factors in patient populations is necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Determining postural stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieberman, Erez (Inventor); Forth, Katharine E. (Inventor); Paloski, William H. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method for determining postural stability of a person can include acquiring a plurality of pressure data points over a period of time from at least one pressure sensor. The method can also include the step of identifying a postural state for each pressure data point to generate a plurality of postural states. The method can include the step of determining a postural state of the person at a point in time based on at least the plurality of postural states.

  16. Fingertip contact influences human postural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeka, J. J.; Lackner, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Touch and pressure stimulation of the body surface can strongly influence apparent body orientation, as well as the maintenance of upright posture during quiet stance. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between postural sway and contact forces at the fingertip while subjects touched a rigid metal bar. Subjects were tested in the tandem Romberg stance with eyes open or closed under three conditions of fingertip contact: no contact, touch contact (< 0.98 N of force), and force contact (as much force as desired). Touch contact was as effective as force contact or sight of the surroundings in reducing postural sway when compared to the no contact, eyes closed condition. Body sway and fingertip forces were essentially in phase with force contact, suggesting that fingertip contact forces are physically counteracting body sway. Time delays between body sway and fingertip forces were much larger with light touch contact, suggesting that the fingertip is providing information that allows anticipatory innervation of musculature to reduce body sway. The results are related to observations on precision grip as well as the somatosensory, proprioceptive, and motor mechanisms involved in the reduction of body sway.

  17. Fingertip contact influences human postural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeka, J. J.; Lackner, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Touch and pressure stimulation of the body surface can strongly influence apparent body orientation, as well as the maintenance of upright posture during quiet stance. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between postural sway and contact forces at the fingertip while subjects touched a rigid metal bar. Subjects were tested in the tandem Romberg stance with eyes open or closed under three conditions of fingertip contact: no contact, touch contact (< 0.98 N of force), and force contact (as much force as desired). Touch contact was as effective as force contact or sight of the surroundings in reducing postural sway when compared to the no contact, eyes closed condition. Body sway and fingertip forces were essentially in phase with force contact, suggesting that fingertip contact forces are physically counteracting body sway. Time delays between body sway and fingertip forces were much larger with light touch contact, suggesting that the fingertip is providing information that allows anticipatory innervation of musculature to reduce body sway. The results are related to observations on precision grip as well as the somatosensory, proprioceptive, and motor mechanisms involved in the reduction of body sway.

  18. The impact of unilateral brain damage on anticipatory grip force scaling when lifting everyday objects.

    PubMed

    Eidenmüller, S; Randerath, J; Goldenberg, G; Li, Y; Hermsdörfer, J

    2014-08-01

    The scaling of our finger forces according to the properties of manipulated objects is an elementary prerequisite of skilled motor behavior. Lesions of the motor-dominant left brain may impair several aspects of motor planning. For example, limb-apraxia, a tool-use disorder after left brain damage is thought to be caused by deficient recall or integration of tool-use knowledge into an action plan. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether left brain damage affects anticipatory force scaling when lifting everyday objects. We examined 26 stroke patients with unilateral brain damage (16 with left brain damage, ten with right brain damage) and 21 healthy control subjects. Limb apraxia was assessed by testing pantomime of familiar tool-use and imitation of meaningless hand postures. Participants grasped and lifted twelve randomly presented everyday objects. Grip force was measured with help of sensors fixed on thumb, index and middle-finger. The maximum rate of grip force was determined to quantify the precision of anticipation of object properties. Regression analysis yielded clear deficits of anticipation in the group of patients with left brain damage, while the comparison of patient with right brain damage with their respective control group did not reveal comparable deficits. Lesion-analyses indicate that brain structures typically associated with a tool-use network in the left hemisphere play an essential role for anticipatory grip force scaling, especially the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and the premotor cortex (PMC). Furthermore, significant correlations of impaired anticipation with limb apraxia scores suggest shared representations. However, the presence of dissociations, implicates also independent processes. Overall, our findings suggest that the left hemisphere is engaged in anticipatory grip force scaling for lifting everyday objects. The underlying neural substrate is not restricted to a single region or stream; instead it may rely on

  19. Understanding Anticipatory Socialization for New Student Affairs Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, Kara M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the anticipatory socialization experiences of new student affairs professionals. The focus was to gain a deeper understanding of how new professionals experience their anticipatory socialization, specifically the job search and pre-entry communication with their new organizations. The theory that emerged…

  20. Anticipatory Socialization and Male Catholic Adolescent Socio-Political Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Kane, James M.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Merton and Kitts' thesis of anticipatory socialization is supported. The importance of the class of destination, as opposed to the class of origin is underscored implying that anticipatory socialization is a primary explanation for differential attitudes formulated before adolescents have undergone mobility or achieved status positions equal to…

  1. Anticipatory Grief and AIDS: Strategies for Intervening with Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Rebecca J.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Anticipatory grief may have beneficial effects for caregivers of people with HIV infection or AIDS. Illness duration, stigmatization, and multiple losses may impede the caregiver's ability to effectively engage in the grief process, however. Discusses the impact of these aspects of the disease on the anticipatory grief process and mourning tasks…

  2. Understanding Anticipatory Socialization for New Student Affairs Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, Kara M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the anticipatory socialization experiences of new student affairs professionals. The focus was to gain a deeper understanding of how new professionals experience their anticipatory socialization, specifically the job search and pre-entry communication with their new organizations. The theory that emerged…

  3. Anticipatory smiling: Linking early affective communication and social outcome

    PubMed Central

    Parlade, Meaghan Venezia; Messinger, Daniel S.; Delgado, Christine E.F.; Kaiser, Marygrace Yale; Van Hecke, Amy Vaughan; Mundy, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    In anticipatory smiles, infants appear to communicate pre-existing positive affect by smiling at an object and then turning the smile toward an adult. We report two studies in which the precursors, development, and consequences of anticipatory smiling were investigated. Study 1 revealed a positive correlation between infant smiling at 6 months and the level of anticipatory smiling at 8 and 10 months during joint attention episodes, as well as a positive correlation between anticipatory smiling and parent-rated social expressivity scores at 30 months. Study 2 confirmed a developmental increase in the number of infants using anticipatory smiles between 9 and 12 months that had been initially documented in the Study 1 sample [Venezia, M., Messinger, D. S., Thorp, D., & Mundy, P. (2004). The development of anticipatory smiling. Infancy, 6(3), 397–406]. Additionally, anticipatory smiling at 9 months positively predicted parent-rated social competence scores at 30 months. Findings are discussed with regard to the importance of anticipatory smiling in early socioemotional development. PMID:19004500

  4. Informed consent, anticipatory regulation and ethnographic practice.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Elizabeth; Dingwall, Robert

    2007-12-01

    In this paper we examine the application of informed consent to ethnographic research in health care settings. We do not quarrel with either the principle of informed consent or its translation into the requirement that research should only be carried out with consenting participants. However, we do challenge the identification of informed consent with the particular set of bureaucratic practices of ethical review which currently operate in Canada, the US and elsewhere. We argue that these anticipatory regulatory regimes threaten the significant contribution of ethnographic research to the creation of more efficient, more effective, more equitable and more humane health care systems. Informed consent in ethnographic research is neither achievable nor demonstrable in the terms set by anticipatory regulatory regimes that take clinical research or biomedical experimentation as their paradigm cases. This is because of differences in the practices of ethnographic and biomedical research which we discuss. These include the extended periods of time ethnographers spend in the research setting, the emergent nature of ethnographic research focus and design, the nature and positioning of risk in ethnographic research, the power relationships between researchers and participants, and the public and semi-public nature of the settings normally studied. Anticipatory regulatory regimes are inimical to ethnographic research and risk undermining the contribution of systematic inquiry to understanding whether institutions do what they claim to do, fairly and civilly and with an appropriate mobilisation of resources. We do not suggest that we should simply ignore ethics or leave matters to the individual consciences of researchers. Rather, we need to develop and strengthen professional models of regulation which emphasise education, training and mutual accountability. We conclude the paper with a number of suggestions about how such professional models might be implemented.

  5. Anticipatory regulation of complex power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieno, Thomas Edward

    Electric generation control is performed in a distributed manner to supply power to geographically defined control areas. The goal of generation control is to keep the inadvertent flow of power across a control area's boundary as small as possible. If a difference exists between the power supplied and the power demanded in a control area, the load deficit or surplus would be either borrowed from or stored as the kinetic energy in rotating machines on the grid. This thesis addresses the challenge of matching the power demand of a local area grid with the power delivered by a coal-fired power plant. An anticipatory controller for a model power plant is presented to prescribe the power output into the grid. The control system forecasts what the future demand of the power customers in a control area is likely to be and modifies the fuel input to the power generation facility in order to match the predicted demand. A neural network was found to be an adaptable and robust prediction mechanism for the highly nonlinear data found in the power consumption patterns in a residential area of the Commonwealth Edison grid. The corresponding control schedule of the power plant was tuned to match the anticipated demand using an iterative neural network approach. The use of neural networks and an iterative scheme allows the controller design in this research to be applied to a broad range of control problems. The control methodology presented takes into account limits in the magnitude and rate of control actions. Simulations show that this implementation of anticipatory control of electric power demand is effective and especially well suited to dynamic systems that include a dead time or control limitations. The response of the anticipatory neural network control system was shown to be more energy efficient than feedback control for a typical thermal power regulation facility and to have a much smoother, reduced control effort.

  6. Anticipatory systems a short philosophical note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Vijver, Gertrudis

    1998-07-01

    My aim is to explore some aspects of anticipation from a philosophical point of view. I start from the way in which anticipation has been traditionally related to the relation between particular and universal, and situate from there the view of Robert Rosen, that is more adequately characterized in terms of local/global than in terms of particular/universal. A short comment on Rosen will lead me to suggest some possible lines of research with regard to a more dynamical approach of anticipatory systems.

  7. Motor-prediction improvements after virtual rehabilitation in geriatrics: frail patients reveal different learning curves for movement and postural control.

    PubMed

    Kubicki, A; Bonnetblanc, F; Petrement, G; Mourey, F

    2014-01-01

    Postural control associated with self-paced movement is critical for balance in frail older adults. The present work aimed to investigate the effects of a 2D virtual reality-based program on postural control associated with rapid arm movement in this population. Participants in an upright standing position performed rapid arm-raising movements towards a target. Practice-related changes were assessed by pre- and post-test comparisons of hand kinematics and centre-of-pressure (CoP) displacement parameters measured in a training group and a control group. During these pre- and post-test sessions, patients have to reach towards yellow balls appearing on the screen, form a standardized upright position (with 15cm between the two malleoli). Training group patients took part in six sessions of virtual game. In this, patients were asked to reach their arm towards yellow balls appearing on the screen, from an upright position. After training, we observed improvements in arm movements and in the initial phase of CoP displacement, especially in the anticipatory postural adjustments. Learning curves for these two types of motor improvements showed different rates. These were continuous for the control of the arm movement, and discontinuous for the control of the CoP during the anticipatory postural adjustments. These results suggest that some level of motor (re)-learning is maintained in frail patients with low functional reserves. They also suggest that re-learning of anticipatory postural control (i.e. motor prediction) is less robust than explicit motor learning involved for the arm reaching. This last point should encourage clinicians to extend the training course duration, even if reaching movement improvements seems acquired, in order to automate these anticipatory postural activities. However, other studies should be done to measure the retention of these two types of learning on a longer-term period. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Corticospinal Excitability of Trunk Muscles during Different Postural Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Shin-Yi; Gottardi, Sam E. A.; Hodges, Paul W.; Strutton, Paul H.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the primary motor cortex (M1) is involved in both voluntary, goal-directed movements and in postural control. Trunk muscles are involved in both tasks, however, the extent to which M1 controls these muscles in trunk flexion/extension (voluntary movement) and in rapid shoulder flexion (postural control) remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate this question by examining excitability of corticospinal inputs to trunk muscles during voluntary and postural tasks. Twenty healthy adults participated. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was delivered to the M1 to examine motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the trunk muscles (erector spinae (ES) and rectus abdominis (RA)) during dynamic shoulder flexion (DSF), static shoulder flexion (SSF), and static trunk extension (STE). The level of background muscle activity in the ES muscles was matched across tasks. MEP amplitudes in ES were significantly larger in DSF than in SSF or in STE; however, this was not observed for RA. Further, there were no differences in levels of muscle activity in RA between tasks. Our findings reveal that corticospinal excitability of the ES muscles appears greater during dynamic anticipatory posture-related adjustments than during static tasks requiring postural (SSF) and goal-directed voluntary (STE) activity. These results suggest that task-oriented rehabilitation of trunk muscles should be considered for optimal transfer of therapeutic effect to function. PMID:26807583

  9. Corticospinal Excitability of Trunk Muscles during Different Postural Tasks.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Shin-Yi; Gottardi, Sam E A; Hodges, Paul W; Strutton, Paul H

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the primary motor cortex (M1) is involved in both voluntary, goal-directed movements and in postural control. Trunk muscles are involved in both tasks, however, the extent to which M1 controls these muscles in trunk flexion/extension (voluntary movement) and in rapid shoulder flexion (postural control) remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate this question by examining excitability of corticospinal inputs to trunk muscles during voluntary and postural tasks. Twenty healthy adults participated. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was delivered to the M1 to examine motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the trunk muscles (erector spinae (ES) and rectus abdominis (RA)) during dynamic shoulder flexion (DSF), static shoulder flexion (SSF), and static trunk extension (STE). The level of background muscle activity in the ES muscles was matched across tasks. MEP amplitudes in ES were significantly larger in DSF than in SSF or in STE; however, this was not observed for RA. Further, there were no differences in levels of muscle activity in RA between tasks. Our findings reveal that corticospinal excitability of the ES muscles appears greater during dynamic anticipatory posture-related adjustments than during static tasks requiring postural (SSF) and goal-directed voluntary (STE) activity. These results suggest that task-oriented rehabilitation of trunk muscles should be considered for optimal transfer of therapeutic effect to function.

  10. Task-specificity of bilateral anticipatory activation of the deep abdominal muscles in healthy and chronic low back pain populations.

    PubMed

    Massé-Alarie, Hugo; Beaulieu, Louis-David; Preuss, Richard; Schneider, Cyril

    2015-02-01

    Cross-sectional study of lumbopelvic muscle activation during rapid limb movements in chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients and healthy controls. Controversy exists over whether bilateral anticipatory activation of the deep abdominal muscles represents a normal motor control strategy prior to all rapid limb movements, or if this is simply a task-specific strategy appropriate for only certain movement conditions. To assess the onset timing of the transversus abdominis/internal oblique muscles (TrA/IO) during two rapid limb movement tasks with different postural demands - bilateral shoulder flexion in standing, unilateral hip extension in prone lying - as well as differences between CLBP and controls. Twelve CLBP and 13 controls performed the two tasks in response to an auditory cue. Surface EMG was acquired bilaterally from five muscles, including TrA/IO. In both groups, 50% of bilateral shoulder flexion trials showed bilateral anticipatory TrA/IO activation. This was rare, however, in unilateral hip extension for which only the TrA/IO contralateral to the moving leg showed anticipatory activation. The only significant difference in lumbo-pelvic muscle onset timing between CLBP and controls was a delay in semitendinosus activation during bilateral shoulder flexion in standing. Our data suggest that bilateral anticipatory TrA/IO activation is a task-specific motor control strategy, appropriate for only certain rapid limb movement conditions. Furthermore, the presence of altered semitendinosus onset timing in the CLBP group during bilateral shoulder flexion may be reflective of other possible lumbo-pelvic motor control alterations among this population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of postural threat on postural responses to aversive visual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Lelard, Thierry; Krystkowiak, Pierre; Montalan, Benoît; Longin, Estelle; Bucchioni, Giulia; Ahmaidi, Said; Godefroy, Olivier; Mouras, Harold

    2014-06-01

    Recent research has shown that emotion influences postural control. The objective of the present study was to establish whether or not postural threat influences postural and physiological responses to aversive visual stimuli. In order to investigate the coupling between emotional reactions, motivated behavior and postural responses, we studied the displacement of the subject's center of pressure (COP) and the changes in electrodermal activity (EDA), heart rate (HR) and postural muscle activation. Thirty-two participants (15 males, 17 females; mean ± SD age: 21.4 ± 2.3) viewed affective and neutral pictures while standing still on a force platform in the presence or absence of postural threat. The HR and EDA data revealed that the emotional state varied as a function of the postural condition. The mean displacement in the anteroposterior (AP) axis was more rearwards in response to aversive stimuli that in response to neutral stimuli, in both the absence of postural threat (-0.65 mm and +0.90 mm for aversive and neutral stimuli, respectively) and the presence of postural threat (-0.00 mm vs. +0.89 mm, respectively). An aversive stimulus was associated with a shorter AP COP sway path than a neutral stimulus in the presence of a postural threat (167.26 mm vs. 174.66 mm for aversive and neutral stimuli, respectively) but not in the latter's absence (155.85 mm vs. 154.48 mm, respectively). Our results evidenced withdrawal behavior in response to an aversive stimulus (relative to a neutral stimulus) in the absence of postural threat. Withdrawal behavior was attenuated (but nevertheless active) in the presence of a postural threat. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Visuomotor Control of Human Adaptive Locomotion: Understanding the Anticipatory Nature

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    To maintain balance during locomotion, the central nervous system (CNS) accommodates changes in the constraints of spatial environment (e.g., existence of an obstacle or changes in the surface properties). Locomotion while modifying the basic movement patterns in response to such constraints is referred to as adaptive locomotion. The most powerful means of ensuring balance during adaptive locomotion is to visually perceive the environmental properties at a distance and modify the movement patterns in an anticipatory manner to avoid perturbation altogether. For this reason, visuomotor control of adaptive locomotion is characterized, at least in part, by its anticipatory nature. The purpose of the present article is to review the relevant studies which revealed the anticipatory nature of the visuomotor control of adaptive locomotion. The anticipatory locomotor adjustments for stationary and changeable environment, as well as the spatio-temporal patterns of gaze behavior to support the anticipatory locomotor adjustments are described. Such description will clearly show that anticipatory locomotor adjustments are initiated when an object of interest (e.g., a goal or obstacle) still exists in far space. This review also show that, as a prerequisite of anticipatory locomotor adjustments, environmental properties are accurately perceived from a distance in relation to individual’s action capabilities. PMID:23720647

  13. Visuomotor control of human adaptive locomotion: understanding the anticipatory nature.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    To maintain balance during locomotion, the central nervous system (CNS) accommodates changes in the constraints of spatial environment (e.g., existence of an obstacle or changes in the surface properties). Locomotion while modifying the basic movement patterns in response to such constraints is referred to as adaptive locomotion. The most powerful means of ensuring balance during adaptive locomotion is to visually perceive the environmental properties at a distance and modify the movement patterns in an anticipatory manner to avoid perturbation altogether. For this reason, visuomotor control of adaptive locomotion is characterized, at least in part, by its anticipatory nature. The purpose of the present article is to review the relevant studies which revealed the anticipatory nature of the visuomotor control of adaptive locomotion. The anticipatory locomotor adjustments for stationary and changeable environment, as well as the spatio-temporal patterns of gaze behavior to support the anticipatory locomotor adjustments are described. Such description will clearly show that anticipatory locomotor adjustments are initiated when an object of interest (e.g., a goal or obstacle) still exists in far space. This review also show that, as a prerequisite of anticipatory locomotor adjustments, environmental properties are accurately perceived from a distance in relation to individual's action capabilities.

  14. Postural motor learning in Parkinson's disease: The effect of practice on continuous compensatory postural regulation.

    PubMed

    Van Ooteghem, Karen; Frank, James S; Horak, Fay B

    2017-09-01

    Although balance training is considered the most effective treatment for balance impairments in Parkinson's disease (PD), few studies have examined if learning for balance control remains intact with PD. This study aimed to determine if learning for automatic postural responses is preserved in people with PD. Eleven participants with moderate PD (68±6.4years; H&Y: 2-3) on their usual medication maintained balance on a platform that oscillated forward and backward with variable amplitude and constant frequency. Participants completed 42 trials during one training session, and retention and transfer tests following a 24-h delay. Performance was measured by comparing spatial and temporal measures of whole-body centre of mass (COM) with platform displacements. Learning was compared between participants with PD and previously reported, age-matched older adults (Van Ooteghem et al., 2010). Although postural responses in participants with PD were impaired compared to control participants, a majority of PD participants improved their postural responses with practice as revealed by reduced COM displacements and improved phase relationships between COM and platform motion. Rates of improvement were comparable between groups demonstrating preserved adaptive capacity for participants with PD. Similar to control participants, the PD group moved toward anticipatory COM control as a strategy for improving stability, exhibited short-term retention of performance improvements, and demonstrated generalizability of the learned responses. Rate of improvement with practice, but not retention, was related to severity of motor impairments. Patients with moderate PD on medication demonstrate retention of improvements in automatic postural responses with practice suggesting that intrinsic postural motor learning is preserved in this group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [Risks of awkward posture].

    PubMed

    Bazzini, G; Capodaglio, E; Panigazzi, M; Prestifilippo, E; Vercesi, C

    2010-01-01

    For posture we mean the position of the body in the space and the relationship with its segments. The correct posture is determined by neurophysiological, biomechanical, emotional, psychological and relation factors, enabling us to perform daily and working activities with the lowest energy expenditure. When possible we suggest during posture variation, a preventive measure where there are prolonged fixed activities.

  16. Particular adaptations to potentially slippery surfaces: the effects of friction on consecutive postural adjustments (CPA).

    PubMed

    Memari, Sahel; Le Bozec, Serge; Bouisset, Simon

    2014-02-21

    This research deals with the postural adjustments that occur after the end of voluntary movement ("consecutive postural adjustments": CPAs). The influence of a potentially slippery surface on CPA characteristics was considered, with the aim of exploring more deeply the postural component of the task-movement. Seven male adults were asked to perform a single step, as quickly as possible, to their own footprint marked on the ground. A force plate measured the resultant reaction forces along the antero-posterior axis (R(x)) and the centre of pressure (COP) displacements along the antero-posterior and lateral axes (Xp and Yp). The velocity of the centre of gravity (COG) along the antero-posterior axis and the corresponding impulse (∫R(x)dt) were calculated; the peak velocity (termed "progression velocity": V(xG)) was measured. The required coefficient of friction (RCOF) along the progression axis (pμ(x)) was determined. Two materials, differing by their COF, were laid at foot contact (FC), providing a rough foot contact (RoFC), and a smooth foot contact (SmFC) considered to be potentially slippery. Two step lengths were also performed: a short step (SS) and a long step (LS). Finally, the subjects completed four series of ten steps each. These were preceded by preliminary trials, to allow them to acquire the necessary adaptation to experimental conditions. The antero-posterior force time course presented a positive phase, that included APAs ("anticipatory postural adjustments") and step execution (STEP), followed by a negative one, corresponding to CPAs. The backward impulse (CPI) was equal to the forward one (BPI), independently of friction and progression velocity. Moreover, V(xG) did not differ according to friction, but was faster when the step length was greater. Last CPA peak amplitudes (pCPA) were significantly greater and CPA durations (dCPA) shorter for RoFC and conversely for SmFC, contrary to APA. Finally, the results show a particular adaptation to the

  17. Self-Organizing Neural Network Models for State Anticipatory Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöllä, Matti; Honkela, Timo

    2006-06-01

    A vital mechanism of high-level natural cognitive systems is the anticipatory capability of making decisions based on predicted events in the future. While in some cases the performance of computational cognitive systems can be improved by modeling anticipatory behavior, it has been shown that for many cognitive tasks anticipation is mandatory. In this paper, we review the use of self-organizing artificial neural networks in constructing the state-space model of an anticipatory system. The biologically inspired self-organizing map (SOM) and its topologically dynamic variants such as the growing neural gas (GNG) are discussed using illustrative examples of their performance.

  18. Nautilus: A Concurrent Anticipatory Programming Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, P. Blauth; Costa, Simone A.; Machado, Júlio P.; Ramos, Jaime

    2002-09-01

    Nautilus is a concurrent anticipatory programming language based on the object-oriented language GNOME which is a simplified and revised version of OBLOG. A semantics for Nautilus is given by Nonsequencial Automata, that is a categorial semantic domain based on labeled transition system with full concurrency, where a class of morphisms stands for anticipation. The semantics of an object in Nautilus is given by an anticipation morphism, which is viewed as a special automaton morphism where target automata, called base, is determined by the computations of a freely generated automata able to simulate any object specified over the involved attributes, and the source automata is a relabelled restriction of the base. In order to introduce the anticipation of Nautilus, some examples are presented depicting the features of the language.

  19. Anticipatory nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kamen, Charles; Tejani, Mohamedtaki A.; Chandwani, Kavita; Janelsins, Michelle; Peoples, Anita R.; Roscoe, Joseph A.; Morrow, Gary R.

    2013-01-01

    As a specific variation of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, anticipatory nausea and vomiting (ANV) appears particularly linked to psychological processes. The three predominant factors related to ANV are classical conditioning; demographic and treatment-related factors; and anxiety or negative expectancies. Laboratory models have provided some support for these underlying mechanisms for ANV. ANV may be treated with medical or pharmacological interventions, including benzodiazepines and other psychotropic medications. However, behavioral treatments, including systematic desensitization, remain first line options for addressing ANV. Some complementary treatment approaches have shown promise in reducing ANV symptoms. Additional research into these approaches is needed. This review will address the underlying models of ANV and provide a discussion of these various treatment options. PMID:24157982

  20. Anticipatory Imagery: Its Relationship with Operational Structures and Length Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppenheimer, Louis

    1976-01-01

    The developmental relations between anticipatory imagery, conservation of length, and operational structures were investigated in 80 kindergarten and third-grade children by means of imagery tasks combined with a length conservation task. (MS)

  1. Does anticipatory sweating occur prior to fluid consumption?

    PubMed Central

    Wing, David; McClintock, Rebecca; Plumlee, Deva; Rathke, Michelle; Burnett, Tim; Lyons, Bailey; Buono, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine if anticipatory sweating occurs prior to fluid consumption in dehydrated subjects. It was hypothesized that there would first be an anticipatory response to the sight of water, and then with drinking, a second response caused by mechanical stimulation of oropharyngeal nerves. Dehydrated subjects (n=19) sat in a heat chamber for 30 minutes. At minute 15, a resistance hygrometer capsule was attached and sweat rate was measured every 3 seconds. At minute 35:00, a researcher entered the room with previously measured water (2 ml/kg euhydrated body weight). At minute 35:30, the subject was allowed to drink. Data collection continued for 5 minutes post consumption. As expected, 16 of the 19 subjects responded to oropharyngeal stimuli with increased sweat rate. However, the new finding was that a majority (12 of 19) also showed an anticipatory sweating response prior to fluid consumption. Subjects were divided into 4 groups based on the magnitude of the sweating response. Strong responders' (n=4) anticipatory response accounted for 50% or more of the total change in sweat rate. Moderate responders' (n=4) anticipatory response accounted for 20%-49%. Weak responders' (n=4) anticipatory response accounted for 6-20%. Finally, non-responders (n=7) showed no anticipatory response. Although previously noted anecdotally in the literature, the current study is the first to demonstrate that measurable anticipatory sweating occurs prior to fluid intake in dehydrated subjects in a significant percentage of the population. Such data suggests that cerebral input, like oropharyngeal stimulation, can temporarily remove the dehydration-induced inhibition of sweating. PMID:22461956

  2. Relationship between Muscle Function, Muscle Typology and Postural Performance According to Different Postural Conditions in Young and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Paillard, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Although motor output of the postural function clearly influences postural performance in young and older subjects, no relationship has been formally established between them. However, the relationship between lower-extremity muscle strength/power and postural performance is often pointed out, especially in older subjects. In fact, the influence of motor output may vary according to the postural condition considered (e.g., static, dynamic, challenging, disturbing). In static postural condition, there may be a relationship between lower-extremity muscle strength and postural performance when the value of muscle strength is below a certain threshold in older subjects. Above this threshold of muscle strength, this relationship may disappear. In dynamic postural condition, lower-extremity muscle power could facilitate compensatory postural actions, limiting induced body imbalance likely to generate falls in older subjects. In young subjects, there could be a relationship between very early rapid torque of the leg extensor muscles and postural performance. In the case of postural reaction to (external) perturbations, a high percentage of type II muscle fibers could be associated with the ability to react quickly to postural perturbations in young subjects, while it may enable a reduction in the risk of falls in older subjects. In practice, in older subjects, muscle strength and/or power training contributes to reducing the risk of falls, as well as slowing down the involution of muscle typology regarding type II muscle fibers. PMID:28861000

  3. Relationship between Muscle Function, Muscle Typology and Postural Performance According to Different Postural Conditions in Young and Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Paillard, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Although motor output of the postural function clearly influences postural performance in young and older subjects, no relationship has been formally established between them. However, the relationship between lower-extremity muscle strength/power and postural performance is often pointed out, especially in older subjects. In fact, the influence of motor output may vary according to the postural condition considered (e.g., static, dynamic, challenging, disturbing). In static postural condition, there may be a relationship between lower-extremity muscle strength and postural performance when the value of muscle strength is below a certain threshold in older subjects. Above this threshold of muscle strength, this relationship may disappear. In dynamic postural condition, lower-extremity muscle power could facilitate compensatory postural actions, limiting induced body imbalance likely to generate falls in older subjects. In young subjects, there could be a relationship between very early rapid torque of the leg extensor muscles and postural performance. In the case of postural reaction to (external) perturbations, a high percentage of type II muscle fibers could be associated with the ability to react quickly to postural perturbations in young subjects, while it may enable a reduction in the risk of falls in older subjects. In practice, in older subjects, muscle strength and/or power training contributes to reducing the risk of falls, as well as slowing down the involution of muscle typology regarding type II muscle fibers.

  4. Anticipatory adjustments to abrupt changes of opposing forces.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Katrin; Heuer, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Anticipatory adjustments to abrupt load changes are based on task-specific predictive information. The authors asked whether anticipatory adjustments to abrupt offsets of horizontal forces are related to expectancy. In two experiments participants held a position against an opposing force or moved against it. At force offset they had to stop rapidly. Duration of the opposing force or distance moved against it varied between blocks of trials and was constant within each block, or it varied from trial to trial. These two variations resulted in opposite changes of the expectancy of force offset with the passage of time or distance. With constant force durations or distances in each block of trials, anticipatory adjustments tended to be poorest with the longest duration or distance, but with variable force durations or distances they tended to be best with the longest duration or distance. Thus anticipatory adjustments were related to expectancy rather than time or distance per se. Anticipatory adjustments resulted in shorter peak amplitudes of the involuntary movements, accompanied by longer movement times in Experiment 1 and faster movement times in Experiment 2. Thus, for different states of the limb at abrupt dynamic changes anticipatory adjustments involve different mechanisms that modulate different mechanical characteristics.

  5. Acquisition of co-ordination between posture and movement in a bimanual task.

    PubMed

    Paulignan, Y; Dufossé, M; Hugon, M; Massion, J

    1989-01-01

    The acquisition of co-ordination between posture and movement was investigated in human subjects performing a load lifting task. Sitting subjects held their left (postural) forearm in a horizontal position while supporting a 1 kg load via an electromagnet. Perturbation of the postural forearm position consisted of the load release triggered either by the experimenter (control) or by the subject voluntarily moving the other arm. In the latter case, the movement involved the elbow joint (load lifting (A), isometric force change at the wrist level (B), elbow rotation (C) and pressing a button with the wrist (D] or the fingers (grip isometric force change). We recorded the maximal amplitude and maximal velocity of the rotation of the postural forearm, the EMG of the forearm flexors on both sides and the force exerted either by the load on the postural arm or by the isometric contraction of the moving arm. The maximal forearm angular velocity after unloading was known to be related to the level of muscle contraction before unloading. 1. In the control situation, repetition of the imposed unloading test resulted in a progressive reduction in the maximal forearm rotation without any decrease in the maximal velocity. The amplitude and duration of the unloading reflex were found to increase in parallel. These results suggest that an adaptive mechanism took place which increased the gain of the unloading reflex loop and reduced the mechanical effect of the perturbation. This mechanism was found to come into play not only in the control situation but also in other paradigms where the perturbation was expected by the subjects. 2. A decrease in both maximal amplitude and velocity of forearm rotation together with a weak "anticipatory" deactivation of the forearm postural flexors was observed when the unloading was caused by an elbow movement (situations A, B, C) which indicates that a feedforward postural control took place. An interlimb coordination was built up and stabilized

  6. TWO STAGES AND THREE COMPONENTS OF THE POSTURAL PREPARATION TO ACTION

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Vennila; Aruin, Alexander S.; Latash, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of postural preparation to action/perturbation have primarily focused on anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs), the changes in muscle activation levels resulting in the production of net forces and moments of force. We hypothesized that postural preparation to action consists of two stages: (1) Early postural adjustments (EPAs), seen a few hundred ms prior to an expected external perturbation; and (2) APAs seen about 100 ms prior to the perturbation. We also hypothesized that each stage consists of three components, anticipatory synergy adjustments seen as changes in co-variation of the magnitudes of commands to muscle groups (M-modes), changes in averaged across trials levels of muscle activation, and mechanical effects such as shifts of the center of pressure. Nine healthy participants were subjected to external perturbations created by a swinging pendulum while standing in a semi-squatting posture. Electrical activity of twelve trunk and leg muscles and displacements of the center of pressure were recorded and analyzed. Principal component analysis was used to identify four M-modes within the space of muscle activations using indices of integrated muscle activation. This analysis was performed twice, over two phases, 400-700 ms prior to the perturbation and over 200 ms just prior to the perturbation. Similar robust results were obtained using the data from both phases. An index of a multi-M-mode synergy stabilizing the center of pressure displacement was computed using the framework of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis. The results showed high synergy indices during quiet stance. Each of the two stages started with a drop in the synergy index followed by a change in the averaged across trials activation levels in postural muscles. There was a very long electromechanical delay during the early postural adjustments and a much shorter delay during the APAs. Overall, the results support our main hypothesis on the two stages and three

  7. The reliability and validity of the Saliba Postural Classification System.

    PubMed

    Collins, Cristiana Kahl; Johnson, Vicky Saliba; Godwin, Ellen M; Pappas, Evangelos

    2016-07-01

    To determine the reliability and validity of the Saliba Postural Classification System (SPCS). Two physical therapists classified pictures of 100 volunteer participants standing in their habitual posture for inter and intra-tester reliability. For validity, 54 participants stood on a force plate in a habitual and a corrected posture, while a vertical force was applied through the shoulders until the clinician felt a postural give. Data were extracted at the time the give was felt and at a time in the corrected posture that matched the peak vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) in the habitual posture. Inter-tester reliability demonstrated 75% agreement with a Kappa = 0.64 (95% CI = 0.524-0.756, SE = 0.059). Intra-tester reliability demonstrated 87% agreement with a Kappa = 0.8, (95% CI = 0.702-0.898, SE = 0.05) and 80% agreement with a Kappa = 0.706, (95% CI = 0.594-0818, SE = 0.057). The examiner applied a significantly higher (p < 0.001) peak vertical force in the corrected posture prior to a postural give when compared to the habitual posture. Within the corrected posture, the %VGRF was higher when the test was ongoing vs. when a postural give was felt (p < 0.001). The %VGRF was not different between the two postures when comparing the peaks (p = 0.214). The SPCS has substantial agreement for inter- and intra-tester reliability and is largely a valid postural classification system as determined by the larger vertical forces in the corrected postures. Further studies on the correlation between the SPCS and diagnostic classifications are indicated.

  8. From Anticipatory Corpse to Posthuman God.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Jeffrey P

    2016-12-01

    The essays in this issue of JMP are devoted to critical engagement of my book, The Anticipatory Corpse The essays, for the most part, accept the main thrust of my critique of medicine. The main thrust of the criticism is whether the scope of the critique is too totalizing, and whether the proposed remedy is sufficient. I greatly appreciate these interventions because they allow me this occasion to respond and clarify, and to even further extend the argument of my book. In this response essay, I maintain that the regnant social imaginary of medicine is the regnant social imaginary of our time. It is grounded in a specific ontotheology: where ontology is a power ontology; where material is malleable to the open-ended organization of power and dependent only on working out the efficient mechanisms of its enactment; where ethically it is oriented only to the immanent telos of utility maximization in the short run, and ultimately to some posthuman future in the long run. This ontotheology originates in the anticipatory corpse and is ordered toward some god-like posthuman being. The entire ontotheology finds enactment through the political economy of neoliberalism. This social imaginary constantly works to insulate itself from other social imaginaries through the use of its institutional power, through marginalization, circumscription, or absorption. The modern social imaginary of neoliberal societies marginalizes and politically isolates other social imaginaries, or transforms them into something acceptable to the neoliberal imaginary. Yet, these other social imaginaries could influence the larger social imaginary in novel ways, sometimes through withdrawal and sometimes through challenges. These other practices-again, usually practices ordered according to different ontological and teleological purposes-might serve as a source of renewal and transformation, but only if the practitioners of these other social imaginaries understand the ontotheological powers that they

  9. Predicting falls within the elderly community: comparison of postural sway, reaction time, the Berg balance scale and the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale for comparing fallers and non-fallers.

    PubMed

    Lajoie, Y; Gallagher, S P

    2004-01-01

    Simple reaction time, the Berg balance scale, the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale and postural sway were studied in order to determine cut-off scores as well as develop a model used in the prevention of fallers within the elderly community. One hundred and twenty-five subjects, 45 fallers and 80 non-fallers were evaluated throughout the study and results indicated that non-fallers have significantly faster reaction times, have higher scores on the Berg balance scale and the ABC scale as well as sway at slower frequencies when compared to fallers. Furthermore, all risk factors were subsequently entered into a logistic regression analysis and results showed that reaction time, the total Berg score and the total ABC score contributed significantly to the prediction of falls with 89% sensitivity and 96% specificity. A second logistic regression was carried out with the same previous variables as well as all questions of the Berg and ABC scales. Results from the logistic analysis revealed that three variables were associated with fall status with 91% sensitivity and 97% specificity. Results from the following study would seem rather valuable as an assessment tool for health care professionals in the identification and monitoring of potential fallers within nursing homes and throughout the community.

  10. Family Anticipatory Grief: An Integrative Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Alexandra; Barbosa, António

    2017-09-01

    Despite all the investment in research, uncertainty persists in anticipatory grief (AG) literature, concerning its nuclear characteristics and definition. This review aimed to synthesize recent research in order to develop further knowledge about the family experience of AG during a patient's end of life. An integrative review was performed using standard methods of analysis and synthesis. The electronic databases Medline, Web of Knowledge, and EBSCO and relevant journals were systematically searched since 1990 to October 2015. Twenty-nine articles were selected, the majority with samples composed of caregivers of terminally ill patients with cancer. From systematic comparison of data referring to family end-of-life experience emerged 10 themes, which correspond to AG nuclear characteristics: anticipation of death, emotional distress, intrapsychic and interpersonal protection, exclusive focus on the patient care, hope, ambivalence, personal losses, relational losses, end-of-life relational tasks, and transition. For the majority of family caregivers in occidental society, AG is a highly stressful and ambivalent experience due to anticipation of death and relational losses, while the patient is physically present and needed of care, so family must be functional and inhibit grief expressions. The present study contributes to a deeper conceptualization of this term and to a more sensitive clinical practice.

  11. Anomalous Anticipatory Responses in Networked Random Data

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Roger D.; Bancel, Peter A.

    2006-10-16

    We examine an 8-year archive of synchronized, parallel time series of random data from a world spanning network of physical random event generators (REGs). The archive is a publicly accessible matrix of normally distributed 200-bit sums recorded at 1 Hz which extends from August 1998 to the present. The primary question is whether these data show non-random structure associated with major events such as natural or man-made disasters, terrible accidents, or grand celebrations. Secondarily, we examine the time course of apparently correlated responses. Statistical analyses of the data reveal consistent evidence that events which strongly affect people engender small but significant effects. These include suggestions of anticipatory responses in some cases, leading to a series of specialized analyses to assess possible non-random structure preceding precisely timed events. A focused examination of data collected around the time of earthquakes with Richter magnitude 6 and greater reveals non-random structure with a number of intriguing, potentially important features. Anomalous effects in the REG data are seen only when the corresponding earthquakes occur in populated areas. No structure is found if they occur in the oceans. We infer that an important contributor to the effect is the relevance of the earthquake to humans. Epoch averaging reveals evidence for changes in the data some hours prior to the main temblor, suggestive of reverse causation.

  12. Meteorological support for anticipatory water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kok, C. J.; Wichers Schreur, B. G. J.; Vogelezang, D. H. P.

    2011-05-01

    Living with water is second nature to the inhabitants of the Netherlands. Managing water both as a resource and as a threat is a vital concern to the country. The responsibility for regional water management lies with the Dutch Regional Water Authorities. Their basic philosophy of a balance of safety and economic interests requires a sophisticated control and decision support system, with high quality meteorological inputs. The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute KNMI in conjunction with the Dutch Association of Regional Water Authorities has developed a warning system for extreme precipitation in support of anticipatory water management. Radar observations, short range deterministic forecasts and medium range ensemble predictions of precipitation are combined with risk profiles of individual water control boards in an automatic system, that warns of possible conditions outside normal control. This article describes the current operational system and presents examples of its application. A first evaluation of the possible value of this system, that essentially decouples meteorology and hydrology, is discussed, based on a first evaluation of the reliability of the precipitation forecasts. Finally, the article presents the current development of an extended system that uses combined probabilities of precipitation with wind, surge and river level forecasts to more accurately define risk conditions.

  13. Diurnally Entrained Anticipatory Behavior in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Kenia; Pan, Min; Masumura, Ken-ichi; Bonneau, Richard; Baliga, Nitin S.

    2009-01-01

    By sensing changes in one or few environmental factors biological systems can anticipate future changes in multiple factors over a wide range of time scales (daily to seasonal). This anticipatory behavior is important to the fitness of diverse species, and in context of the diurnal cycle it is overall typical of eukaryotes and some photoautotrophic bacteria but is yet to be observed in archaea. Here, we report the first observation of light-dark (LD)-entrained diurnal oscillatory transcription in up to 12% of all genes of a halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1. Significantly, the diurnally entrained transcription was observed under constant darkness after removal of the LD stimulus (free-running rhythms). The memory of diurnal entrainment was also associated with the synchronization of oxic and anoxic physiologies to the LD cycle. Our results suggest that under nutrient limited conditions halophilic archaea take advantage of the causal influence of sunlight (via temperature) on O2 diffusivity in a closed hypersaline environment to streamline their physiology and operate oxically during nighttime and anoxically during daytime. PMID:19424498

  14. The Time Course of Anticipatory Constraint Integration

    PubMed Central

    Kukona, Anuenue; Fang, Shin-Yi; Aicher, Karen A.; Chen, Helen; Magnuson, James S.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that as listeners hear sentences describing events in a scene, their eye movements anticipate upcoming linguistic items predicted by the unfolding relationship between scene and sentence. While this may reflect active prediction based on structural or contextual expectations, the influence of local thematic priming between words has not been fully examined. In Experiment 1, we presented verbs (e.g., arrest) in active (Subject-Verb-Object) sentences with displays containing verb-related patients (e.g., crook) and agents (e.g., policeman). We examined patient and agent fixations following the verb, after the agent role had been filled by another entity, but prior to bottom-up specification of the object. Participants were nearly as likely to fixate agents “anticipatorily” as patients, even though the agent role was already filled. However, the slight patient advantage suggested simultaneous influences of both local priming and active prediction. In Experiment 2, using passives (Object-Verb-Subject), we found stronger, but still graded influences of role prediction when more time elapsed between verb and target, and more syntactic cues were available. We interpret anticipatory fixations as emerging from constraint-based processes that involve both non-predictive thematic priming and active prediction. PMID:21237450

  15. Anticipatory Standards and the Commercialization of Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashba, Edward; Gamota, Daniel

    2003-08-01

    Standardization will play an increasing role in creating a smooth transition from the laboratory to the marketplace as products based on nanotechnology are developed and move into broad use. Traditionally, standards have evolved out of a need to achieve interoperability among existing products, create order in markets, simplify production and ensure safety. This view does not account for the escalating trend in standardization, especially in emerging technology sectors, in which standards working groups anticipate the evolution of a technology and facilitate its rapid development and entrée to the market place. It is important that the nanotechnology community views standards as a vital tool to promote progress along the nanotechnology value chain - from nanoscale materials that form the building blocks for components and devices to the integration of these devices into functional systems. This paper describes the need for and benefits derived from developing consensus standards in nanotechnology, and how standards are created. Anticipatory standards can nurture the growth of nanotechnology by drawing on the lessons learned from a standards effort that has and continues to revolutionize the telecommunications industry. Also, a brief review is presented on current efforts in the US to create nanotechnology standards.

  16. Anticipatory Planning in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Assessment of Independent and Joint Action Tasks.

    PubMed

    Scharoun, Sara M; Bryden, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders. Although not a diagnostic feature, motor impairments have been recently acknowledged as prevalent and significant, such that these children have difficulties planning, organizing and coordinating movements. This study aimed to further investigate anticipatory motor planning in children with ASD by means of assessing end- and beginning-state comfort, considering inconsistent reports of end-state comfort in independent action, and the study of beginning-state comfort being limited to one study with young adults. Five- to eleven-year-old children with ASD, and chronologically age- and sex-matched typically-developing children picked-up a glass and: (1) poured a cup of water; and (2) passed it to the researcher to pour a cup of water. End-state comfort was deemed evident if participants grasped the glass thumb-down followed by a 180° rotation; therefore ending with a thumb-up posture. Beginning-state comfort was deemed evident if participants passed the glass to the researcher oriented upright. Findings revealed less end-state comfort in children with ASD, attributed to motor planning deficits. Beginning-state comfort did not differ, ascribed to the habitual nature of the task; therefore reflecting a stimulus-driven response as opposed to an action which reflects anticipatory planning. The findings support difficulties with motor planning and control for children with ASD in an independent task. However, when acting with a familiar object in joint action, behavior does not differ, likely indicative of a habitual, stimulus-driven response.

  17. Anticipatory action planning increases from 3 to 10 years of age in typically developing children.

    PubMed

    Jongbloed-Pereboom, Marjolein; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Saraber-Schiphorst, Nicole; Crajé, Céline; Steenbergen, Bert

    2013-02-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess the development of action planning in a group of typically developing children aged 3 to 10 years (N=351). The second aim was to assess reliability of the action planning task and to relate the results of the action planning task to results of validated upper limb motor performance tests. Participants performed an action planning task in which they needed to grasp an object (a wooden play sword) and place it into a tight-fitting hole. Our main dependent variable was the grip type that participants used; that is, we measured whether initial grip was adapted in such a way that children reached a comfortable posture at the end of the action (the end-state comfort effect). Older children planned their actions more often in line with the end-state comfort effect compared with younger children. Test-retest and interrater reliability of the action planning task were good, with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) of .90 and .95, respectively. We compared the action planning task with manual dexterity tests in a subset of participants (n=197). We found a marginal relation with the manual dexterity tests, indicating that the action planning task measures different processes. In sum, our study showed that action planning increases from 3 to 10 years of age and that the experimental task we used is reliable in assessing anticipatory planning. Therefore, it may be used as a reliable additional test to investigate the degree to which motor behavior is affected at the cognitive level of anticipatory planning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Anticipatory Planning in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Assessment of Independent and Joint Action Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Scharoun, Sara M.; Bryden, Pamela J.

    2016-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders. Although not a diagnostic feature, motor impairments have been recently acknowledged as prevalent and significant, such that these children have difficulties planning, organizing and coordinating movements. This study aimed to further investigate anticipatory motor planning in children with ASD by means of assessing end- and beginning-state comfort, considering inconsistent reports of end-state comfort in independent action, and the study of beginning-state comfort being limited to one study with young adults. Five- to eleven-year-old children with ASD, and chronologically age- and sex-matched typically-developing children picked-up a glass and: (1) poured a cup of water; and (2) passed it to the researcher to pour a cup of water. End-state comfort was deemed evident if participants grasped the glass thumb-down followed by a 180° rotation; therefore ending with a thumb-up posture. Beginning-state comfort was deemed evident if participants passed the glass to the researcher oriented upright. Findings revealed less end-state comfort in children with ASD, attributed to motor planning deficits. Beginning-state comfort did not differ, ascribed to the habitual nature of the task; therefore reflecting a stimulus-driven response as opposed to an action which reflects anticipatory planning. The findings support difficulties with motor planning and control for children with ASD in an independent task. However, when acting with a familiar object in joint action, behavior does not differ, likely indicative of a habitual, stimulus-driven response. PMID:27601983

  19. Obesity Impact on the Attentional Cost for Controlling Posture

    PubMed Central

    Mignardot, Jean-Baptiste; Olivier, Isabelle; Promayon, Emmanuel; Nougier, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Background This study investigated the effects of obesity on attentional resources allocated to postural control in seating and unipedal standing. Methods Ten non obese adults (BMI = 22.4±1.3, age = 42.4±15.1) and 10 obese adult patients (BMI = 35.2±2.8, age = 46.2±19.6) maintained postural stability on a force platform in two postural tasks (seated and unipedal). The two postural tasks were performed (1) alone and (2) in a dual-task paradigm in combination with an auditory reaction time task (RT). Performing the RT task together with the postural one was supposed to require some attentional resources that allowed estimating the attentional cost of postural control. 4 trials were performed in each condition for a total of 16 trials. Findings (1) Whereas seated non obese and obese patients exhibited similar centre of foot pressure oscillations (CoP), in the unipedal stance only obese patients strongly increased their CoP sway in comparison to controls. (2) Whatever the postural task, the additional RT task did not affect postural stability. (3) Seated, RT did not differ between the two groups. (4) RT strongly increased between the two postural conditions in the obese patients only, suggesting that body schema and the use of internal models was altered with obesity. Interpretation Obese patients needed more attentional resources to control postural stability during unipedal stance than non obese participants. This was not the case in a more simple posture such as seating. To reduce the risk of fall as indicated by the critical values of CoP displacement, obese patients must dedicate a strong large part of their attentional resources to postural control, to the detriment of non-postural events. Obese patients were not able to easily perform multitasking as healthy adults do, reflecting weakened psycho-motor abilities. PMID:21187914

  20. Social Postural Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varlet, Manuel; Marin, Ludovic; Lagarde, Julien; Bardy, Benoit G.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to investigate whether a visual coupling between two people can produce spontaneous interpersonal postural coordination and change their intrapersonal postural coordination involved in the control of stance. We examined the front-to-back head displacements of participants and the angular motion of their hip and…

  1. Social Postural Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varlet, Manuel; Marin, Ludovic; Lagarde, Julien; Bardy, Benoit G.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to investigate whether a visual coupling between two people can produce spontaneous interpersonal postural coordination and change their intrapersonal postural coordination involved in the control of stance. We examined the front-to-back head displacements of participants and the angular motion of their hip and…

  2. Illustrating anticipatory life cycle assessment for emerging photovoltaic technologies.

    PubMed

    Wender, Ben A; Foley, Rider W; Prado-Lopez, Valentina; Ravikumar, Dwarakanath; Eisenberg, Daniel A; Hottle, Troy A; Sadowski, Jathan; Flanagan, William P; Fisher, Angela; Laurin, Lise; Bates, Matthew E; Linkov, Igor; Seager, Thomas P; Fraser, Matthew P; Guston, David H

    2014-09-16

    Current research policy and strategy documents recommend applying life cycle assessment (LCA) early in research and development (R&D) to guide emerging technologies toward decreased environmental burden. However, existing LCA practices are ill-suited to support these recommendations. Barriers related to data availability, rapid technology change, and isolation of environmental from technical research inhibit application of LCA to developing technologies. Overcoming these challenges requires methodological advances that help identify environmental opportunities prior to large R&D investments. Such an anticipatory approach to LCA requires synthesis of social, environmental, and technical knowledge beyond the capabilities of current practices. This paper introduces a novel framework for anticipatory LCA that incorporates technology forecasting, risk research, social engagement, and comparative impact assessment, then applies this framework to photovoltaic (PV) technologies. These examples illustrate the potential for anticipatory LCA to prioritize research questions and help guide environmentally responsible innovation of emerging technologies.

  3. Dynamic causal modelling of anticipatory skin conductance responses

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Dominik R.; Daunizeau, Jean; Friston, Karl J.; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Anticipatory skin conductance responses [SCRs] are a widely used measure of aversive conditioning in humans. Here, we describe a dynamic causal model [DCM] of how anticipatory, evoked, and spontaneous skin conductance changes are generated by sudomotor nerve activity. Inversion of this model, using variational Bayes, provides a means of inferring the most likely sympathetic nerve activity, given observed skin conductance responses. In two fear conditioning experiments, we demonstrate the predictive validity of the DCM by showing it has greater sensitivity to the effects of conditioning, relative to alternative (conventional) response estimates. Furthermore, we establish face validity by showing that trial-by-trial estimates of anticipatory sudomotor activity are better predicted by formal learning models, relative to response estimates from peak-scoring approaches. The model furnishes a potentially powerful approach to characterising SCR that exploits knowledge about how these signals are generated. PMID:20599582

  4. Anticipatory Eye Movements in Interleaving Templates of Human Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matessa, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Performance modeling has been made easier by architectures which package psychological theory for reuse at useful levels of abstraction. CPM-GOMS uses templates of behavior to package at a task level (e.g., mouse move-click, typing) predictions of lower-level cognitive, perceptual, and motor resource use. CPM-GOMS also has a theory for interleaving resource use between templates. One example of interleaving is anticipatory eye movements. This paper describes the use of ACT-Stitch, a framework for translating CPM-GOMS templates and interleaving theory into ACT-R, to model anticipatory eye movements in skilled behavior. The anticipatory eye movements explain performance in a well-practiced perceptual/motor task, and the interleaving theory is supported with results from an eye-tracking experiment.

  5. Postural dynamics in maximal isometric ramp efforts.

    PubMed

    Bouisset, Simon; Le Bozec, Serge; Ribreau, Christian

    2002-09-01

    Aglobal biomechanical model of transient push efforts is proposed where transient efforts are taken into consideration, with the aim to examine in greater depth the postural adjustments associated with voluntary efforts. In this context, the push effort is considered as a perturbation of balance, and the other reaction forces as a counter-perturbation which is necessary for the task to be performed efficiently. The subjects were asked to exert maximal horizontal two-handed isometric pushes on a dynamometric bar, as rapidly as possible. They were seated on a custom-designed device which measured global and partitive dynamic quantities. The results showed that the horizontal reaction forces and the horizontal displacement of the centre of pressure increased quasi-proportionally with the perturbation. In addition, it was established that vertical reaction forces increased at seat level whereas they decreased at foot level, resulting in minor vertical acceleration and displacement of the centre of gravity. On the contrary, the anteroposterior reaction forces increased both at foot and at seat levels. Based on a detailed examination of the various terms of the model, it is concluded that transient muscular effort induces dynamics of the postural chain. These observations support the view that there is a postural counter-perturbation which is associated with motor activity. More generally, the model helped to specify the effect of postural dynamic phenomena. It makes it possible to stress the importance of adherence at the contact level between the subject and the seat in the course of transient efforts.

  6. Foundations of anticipatory logic in biology and physics.

    PubMed

    Bettinger, Jesse S; Eastman, Timothy E

    2017-09-20

    Recent advances in modern physics and biology reveal several scenarios in which top-down effects (Ellis, 2016) and anticipatory systems (Rosen, 1980) indicate processes at work enabling active modeling and inference such that anticipated effects project onto potential causes. We extrapolate a broad landscape of anticipatory systems in the natural sciences extending to computational neuroscience of perception in the capacity of Bayesian inferential models of predictive processing. This line of reasoning also comes with philosophical foundations, which we develop in terms of counterfactual reasoning and possibility space, Whitehead's process thought, and correlations with Eastern wisdom traditions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Feedforward postural adjustments in a simple two-joint synergy in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Latash, M L; Aruin, A S; Neyman, I; Nicholas, J J; Shapiro, M B

    1995-04-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease, age-matched controls and young control subjects performed discrete elbow or wrist movements in a sagittal plane under the instruction to move one of the joints "as fast as possible." Relative stability of the other, postural joint was comparable in all 3 groups, while movement time was the highest in the patients and the lowest in young controls. Typically, EMG patterns in both muscle pairs acting at the joints demonstrated a commonly observed "tri-phasic" pattern. A cross-correlation analysis of the EMGs confirmed virtually simultaneous bursts in the wrist and elbow flexors and in the wrist and elbow extensors. In all 3 groups, there were no signs of anticipatory activation of postural muscles in about 90% of movements. We consider postural anticipation not a separate process, but a separate peripheral pattern of a single control process that may involve a number of joints and muscles. We conclude that the postural deficits in Parkinson's disease are not related to a basic deficit in the ability to generate feedforward postural adjustments but to other factors that may include the specificity of maintaining the vertical posture in the field of gravity.

  8. Effect of dual tasking on postural responses to rapid lower limb movement while seated on an exercise ball.

    PubMed

    Jones, P; Sorinola, I; Strutton, P H

    2014-06-01

    Postural adjustments are used by the central nervous system to pre-empt and correct perturbations in balance during voluntary body movements. Alteration in these responses is associated with a number of neuromuscular/musculoskeletal conditions. Attention has been identified as important in this system; performing a concurrent cognitive task has been suggested to reduce the efficacy of this postural control. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of concurrent cognitive tasking on anticipatory postural adjustments while sitting on an exercise ball with a view to help inform future rehabilitation programmes. Bilateral EMG activity was recorded from the external and internal obliques, rectus abdominis, erector spinae and the right rectus femoris of 20 healthy subjects (9 males) with mean (SD) age of 21.88 (0.86) years (range 21-24 years). A rapid hip flexion protocol was carried out under three conditions: no concurrent task, counting out loud up from one and completing a serial sevens task. The addition of the cognitive task delayed and reduced the EMG in the prime mover muscle but had little impact on the responses of the trunk muscles within the time frame of the anticipatory responses; suggestive of a decoupling of voluntary and postural control mechanisms. The results of this study suggest that perhaps the clinical effects of dual task may not be largely due to changes in anticipatory postural adjustments. However, it would be important to compare these results to those seen in older and functionally impaired individuals as this would be more representative of the typical population undertaking such rehabilitation programmes.

  9. Trial-to-trial adaptation in control of arm reaching and standing posture.

    PubMed

    Pienciak-Siewert, Alison; Horan, Dylan P; Ahmed, Alaa A

    2016-12-01

    Classical theories of motor learning hypothesize that adaptation is driven by sensorimotor error; this is supported by studies of arm and eye movements that have shown that trial-to-trial adaptation increases with error. Studies of postural control have shown that anticipatory postural adjustments increase with the magnitude of a perturbation. However, differences in adaptation have been observed between the two modalities, possibly due to either the inherent instability or sensory uncertainty in standing posture. Therefore, we hypothesized that trial-to-trial adaptation in posture should be driven by error, similar to what is observed in arm reaching, but the nature of the relationship between error and adaptation may differ. Here we investigated trial-to-trial adaptation of arm reaching and postural control concurrently; subjects made reaching movements in a novel dynamic environment of varying strengths, while standing and holding the handle of a force-generating robotic arm. We found that error and adaptation increased with perturbation strength in both arm and posture. Furthermore, in both modalities, adaptation showed a significant correlation with error magnitude. Our results indicate that adaptation scales proportionally with error in the arm and near proportionally in posture. In posture only, adaptation was not sensitive to small error sizes, which were similar in size to errors experienced in unperturbed baseline movements due to inherent variability. This finding may be explained as an effect of uncertainty about the source of small errors. Our findings suggest that in rehabilitation, postural error size should be considered relative to the magnitude of inherent movement variability.

  10. Postural neck pain: an investigation of habitual sitting posture, perception of 'good' posture and cervicothoracic kinaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Edmondston, Stephen J; Chan, Hon Yan; Ngai, Gorman Chi Wing; Warren, M Linda R; Williams, Jonathan M; Glennon, Susan; Netto, Kevin

    2007-11-01

    Impairments of cervico-cephalic kinaesthesia and habitual forward head posture have been considered important in the aetiology of postural neck pain, yet these factors have not been specifically examined in a homogeneous clinical population. The objective of this study was to compare the habitual sitting posture (HSP), perception of good posture and postural repositioning error (PRE) of the cervico-thoracic (CT) spine in individuals with postural neck pain, with a matched group of asymptomatic subjects. Twenty-one subjects with postural neck pain and 22 asymptomatic control subjects were recruited into the study. An optical motion analysis system was used to measure the HSP and perceived 'good' sitting posture. PRE was measured over six trials where the subject attempted to replicate their self-selected 'good' posture. There was no difference between the groups in the HSP but significant differences were identified in the perception of 'good' posture. Posture repositioning error was higher for the head posture variables than for CT and shoulder girdle variables in both groups. However, there was no significant difference in posture repositioning error between groups for any of the posture measures. The findings suggest that individuals with postural neck pain may have a different perception of 'good' posture, but no significant difference in HSP or kinaesthetic sensibility compared with matched asymptomatic subjects.

  11. Anticipatory Eye Movements Reveal Infants' Auditory and Visual Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurray, Bob; Aslin, Richard N.

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a new paradigm for the assessment of auditory and visual categories in 6-month-old infants using a 2-alternative anticipatory eye-movement response. Infants were trained by 2 different methods to anticipate the location of a visual reinforcer at 1 of 2 spatial locations (right or left) based on the identity of 2 cuing stimuli. After a…

  12. Anticipatory Governance: Bioethical Expertise for Human/Animal Chimeras.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Alison; Salter, Brian

    2012-09-01

    The governance demands generated by the use of human/animal chimeras in scientific research offer both a challenge and an opportunity for the development of new forms of anticipatory governance through the novel application of bioethical expertise. Anticipatory governance can be seen to have three stages of development whereby bioethical experts move from a reactive to a proactive stance at the edge of what is scientifically possible. In the process, the ethicists move upstream in their engagement with the science of human-to-animal chimeras. To what extent is the anticipatory coestablishment of the principles and operational rules of governance at this early stage in the development of the human-to-animal research field likely to result in a framework for bioethical decision making that is in support of science? The process of anticipatory governance is characterised by the entwining of the scientific and the philosophical so that judgements against science are also found to be philosophically unfounded, and conversely, those activities that are permissible are deemed so on both scientific and ethical grounds. Through what is presented as an organic process, the emerging bioethical framework for human-to-animal chimera research becomes a legitimating framework within which 'good' science can safely progress. Science gives bioethical expertise access to new governance territory; bioethical expertise gives science access to political acceptability.

  13. Anticipatory Governance: Bioethical Expertise for Human/Animal Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Alison; Salter, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The governance demands generated by the use of human/animal chimeras in scientific research offer both a challenge and an opportunity for the development of new forms of anticipatory governance through the novel application of bioethical expertise. Anticipatory governance can be seen to have three stages of development whereby bioethical experts move from a reactive to a proactive stance at the edge of what is scientifically possible. In the process, the ethicists move upstream in their engagement with the science of human-to-animal chimeras. To what extent is the anticipatory coestablishment of the principles and operational rules of governance at this early stage in the development of the human-to-animal research field likely to result in a framework for bioethical decision making that is in support of science? The process of anticipatory governance is characterised by the entwining of the scientific and the philosophical so that judgements against science are also found to be philosophically unfounded, and conversely, those activities that are permissible are deemed so on both scientific and ethical grounds. Through what is presented as an organic process, the emerging bioethical framework for human-to-animal chimera research becomes a legitimating framework within which ‘good’ science can safely progress. Science gives bioethical expertise access to new governance territory; bioethical expertise gives science access to political acceptability. PMID:23576848

  14. Longitudinal Analysis of the Development of Anticipatory Nausea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrykowski, Michael A.; Redd, William H.

    1987-01-01

    Interviewed chemotherapy outpatients (N=71) before and after chemotherapy infusions to assess the course of development of anticipatory nausea and vomiting (ANV). Revealed that onset of ANV early in the course of chemotherapy was associated with a pattern of low, stable levels of anxiety while later onset was characterized by a pattern of…

  15. College Counselors' Perceptions and Practices regarding Anticipatory Guidance on Firearms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, James; Mrdjenovich, Adam J.; Thompson, Amy; Dake, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This study assessed college counselors' anticipatory guidance on firearms for student clients. Participants: The membership of the Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors was used to identify a national random sample of counseling centers (n = 361). One counselor from each center was selected to survey.…

  16. Anticipatory Enrollment Management: Another Level of Enrollment Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Marguerite J.

    2012-01-01

    Building on the principles of Enrollment Management (EM) and Strategic Enrollment Management (SEM), Anticipatory Enrollment Management (AEM) offers another level of managing enrollment: anticipating future enrollment. AEM is grounded in the basic principles of Customer Relationship Management (CRM) and includes strategic out-reach to parents and…

  17. College Counselors' Perceptions and Practices regarding Anticipatory Guidance on Firearms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, James; Mrdjenovich, Adam J.; Thompson, Amy; Dake, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This study assessed college counselors' anticipatory guidance on firearms for student clients. Participants: The membership of the Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors was used to identify a national random sample of counseling centers (n = 361). One counselor from each center was selected to survey.…

  18. Corruption in Education Sector Development: A Suggestion for Anticipatory Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Shinichiro

    2001-01-01

    Proposes an anticipatory strategy that will help protect education sector development from corruption. The strategy, which may exist as a "hidden agenda" within a project, focuses on diagnosing rather than redressing a system thought to be corrupt, adopting prevention rather than punishment, informal rather than formal approaches, and…

  19. Anticipatory guidance for classroom conduct and learning problems.

    PubMed

    Kinsbourne, M; Swanson, J W

    1980-09-01

    Many children have learning and conduct problems due to developmental delays that are long lasting and cannot at present be cured. Within the natural history of these disorders a series of critical junctures normally arises. Informed anticipatory guidance by the physician at those times can forestall serious negative secondary effects on the child's personality development and on the family dynamics.

  20. Development of Anticipatory Visual Search in One-Year-Olds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimada, Shoko; Sano, Ryogoro

    The purpose of this study was to longitudinally examine the development of anticipatory visual search and to find out the effects of preceding experiences upon the search during the second year of life. The sample consisted of 18 Japanese firstborn nonretarded children from middle-class families who were individually tested at 11, 12, 14, 16, 22,…

  1. Anticipatory Enrollment Management: Another Level of Enrollment Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Marguerite J.

    2012-01-01

    Building on the principles of Enrollment Management (EM) and Strategic Enrollment Management (SEM), Anticipatory Enrollment Management (AEM) offers another level of managing enrollment: anticipating future enrollment. AEM is grounded in the basic principles of Customer Relationship Management (CRM) and includes strategic out-reach to parents and…

  2. Brain activation during anticipatory anxiety in social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Stephanie; Ritter, Viktoria; Tefikow, Susan; Stangier, Ulrich; Strauss, Bernhard; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Straube, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Exaggerated anticipatory anxiety during expectation of performance-related situations is an important feature of the psychopathology of social anxiety disorder (SAD). The neural basis of anticipatory anxiety in SAD has not been investigated in controlled studies. The current study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural correlates during the anticipation of public and evaluated speaking vs a control condition in 17 SAD patients and 17 healthy control subjects. FMRI results show increased activation of the insula and decreased activation of the ventral striatum in SAD patients, compared to control subjects during anticipation of a speech vs the control condition. In addition, an activation of the amygdala in SAD patients during the first half of the anticipation phase in the speech condition was observed. Finally, the amount of anticipatory anxiety of SAD patients was negatively correlated to the activation of the ventral striatum. This suggests an association between incentive function, motivation and anticipatory anxiety when SAD patients expect a performance situation.

  3. Temporal alignment of anticipatory motor cortical beta lateralisation in hidden visual-motor sequences.

    PubMed

    Heideman, Simone G; van Ede, Freek; Nobre, Anna C

    2017-09-16

    Performance improves when participants respond to events that are structured in repeating sequences, suggesting that learning can lead to proactive anticipatory preparation. Whereas most sequence-learning studies have emphasized spatial structure, most sequences also contain a prominent temporal structure. We used MEG to investigate spatial and temporal anticipatory neural dynamics in a modified serial reaction-time (SRT) task. Performance and brain activity were compared between blocks with learned spatial-temporal sequences and blocks with new sequences. After confirming a strong behavioural benefit of spatial-temporal predictability, we show lateralisation of beta oscillations in anticipation of the response associated with the upcoming target location, and show that this also aligns to the expected timing of these forthcoming events. This effect was found both when comparing between repeated (learned) and new (unlearned) sequences, as well as when comparing targets that were expected after short vs. long intervals within the repeated (learned) sequence. Our findings suggest that learning of spatial-temporal structure leads to proactive and dynamic modulation of motor cortical excitability in anticipation of both the location and timing of events that are relevant to guide action. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Predicting the unpredictable: critical analysis and practical implications of predictive anticipatory activity.

    PubMed

    Mossbridge, Julia A; Tressoldi, Patrizio; Utts, Jessica; Ives, John A; Radin, Dean; Jonas, Wayne B

    2014-01-01

    A recent meta-analysis of experiments from seven independent laboratories (n = 26) indicates that the human body can apparently detect randomly delivered stimuli occurring 1-10 s in the future (Mossbridge etal., 2012). The key observation in these studies is that human physiology appears to be able to distinguish between unpredictable dichotomous future stimuli, such as emotional vs. neutral images or sound vs. silence. This phenomenon has been called presentiment (as in "feeling the future"). In this paper we call it predictive anticipatory activity (PAA). The phenomenon is "predictive" because it can distinguish between upcoming stimuli; it is "anticipatory" because the physiological changes occur before a future event; and it is an "activity" because it involves changes in the cardiopulmonary, skin, and/or nervous systems. PAA is an unconscious phenomenon that seems to be a time-reversed reflection of the usual physiological response to a stimulus. It appears to resemble precognition (consciously knowing something is going to happen before it does), but PAA specifically refers to unconscious physiological reactions as opposed to conscious premonitions. Though it is possible that PAA underlies the conscious experience of precognition, experiments testing this idea have not produced clear results. The first part of this paper reviews the evidence for PAA and examines the two most difficult challenges for obtaining valid evidence for it: expectation bias and multiple analyses. The second part speculates on possible mechanisms and the theoretical implications of PAA for understanding physiology and consciousness. The third part examines potential practical applications.

  5. The influence of sounds on posture control.

    PubMed

    Siedlecka, Bożena; Sobera, Małgorzata; Sikora, Aleksandra; Drzewowska, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    It is still not clear which parameters of sound are the most significant for body reactions and whether the way of sound reception plays a role in body control. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of frequency, spectrum and loudness of sounds on posture control in healthy women and men. The study subjects were 29 young adults who were submitted to a 60-second standing test in the bipedal stance on the force platform (AMTI). During the tests, 3 sinusoidal sounds with various timing and 2 musical sounds (guitar and piano) of the frequency 225 Hz, 1000 Hz and 4000 Hz were applied through headphones. The centre of pressure (COP) amplitude was registered. The sway area and COP mean velocity were computed. It was found that high frequency sounds contributed to a significant decrease of sway area values. No significant influence of low frequency sounds on posture control was observed. The influence of the sound spectrum (timbre) on posture control is limited; only the crescendo spectrum improves the body stability in the bipedal stance and not the music spectrum as guitar and piano. The loudness of sound, although extremely high, is not the cause of postural control changing in relation to lower loudness. No effect of gender was found in terms of body stability under different sound conditions. Based on the results, it can be argued that, in general, in a bipedal stance in terms of stability high sound frequency improves posture control, whereas sound spectrum and intensity show a limited impact.

  6. Anticipatory electroencephalography alpha rhythm predicts subjective perception of pain intensity.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Brancucci, Alfredo; Del Percio, Claudio; Capotosto, Paolo; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Chen, Andrew C N; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2006-10-01

    This high-resolution electroencephalography (EEG) study tested the hypothesis that the suppression of rolandic alpha power before predictable painful stimulation affects the subject's subsequent evaluation of pain intensity, as a reflection of the influence of expectancy processes on painful stimulus processing. High-resolution EEG data were recorded (126 channels) from 10 healthy adult volunteers during the expectancy of a painful CO(2)-laser stimulation at the right wrist. Surface laplacian estimation enhanced the EEG spatial information content over 6 scalp regions of interest (left frontal, right frontal, left central, right central, left parietal, and right parietal areas). Spectral power was computed for 3 alpha sub-bands with reference to the individual alpha frequency peak (about 5-7 Hz for alpha 1, 7-9 Hz for alpha 2, and 9-11 Hz for alpha 3). The suppression of the alpha power before the painful stimulation [as reflected by the event-related desynchronization (ERD)] indexed the anticipatory cortical processes. Results showed maximum (negative) correlations between the alpha 2 and alpha 3 ERD amplitude at the left central area and the subjective evaluation of pain intensity (P < .001). The stronger the anticipatory alpha 2 and alpha 3 ERD, the higher the subjective evaluation of pain intensity. For alpha 3, that correlation was confirmed even when the effect of habituation across the recording session was taken into account. These results suggest that the anticipatory suppression of the alpha rhythms over the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex predicts subsequent subjects' evaluation of pain intensity, in line with its crucial role for the discrimination of that intensity. This electroencephalographic study showed that anticipatory activation/deactivation of sensorimotor cortex roughly predicts subjective evaluation of pain. This motivates further investigation on possible implications for the understanding of central chronic pain. Chronic pain

  7. The MM-CGI Cerebral Palsy: modification and pretesting of an instrument to measure anticipatory grief in parents whose child has cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Al-Gamal, Ekhlas; Long, Tony

    2014-07-01

    To establish the potential of a modified version of the MM-CGI Childhood Cancer to assess anticipatory grief in parents of children with cerebral palsy, to amend the existing scale for use with the specific patient group, to test the psychometric properties of the modified version (MM-CGI Cerebral Palsy) and to review the clinical potential of the new scale. Parents of children with cerebral palsy may experience reactions similar to parents of children with other enduring or life-limiting conditions, and anticipatory grief may be one such psychological reaction. While the burden of caring is sometimes balanced by positive perceptions of the child, which enhance coping ability, for many parents the outcome is damage to their physical and mental health and impaired family functioning. A cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational design. The MM-CGI Cerebral Palsy was administered in structured interviews with 204 parents. Standardised measures of caregivers' depression, stress and perceived social support were also administered. Mothers and fathers were recruited from healthcare centres and schools for special education. Cronbach's alpha was used to assess internal consistency, and Pearson's product-moment correlation was used to assess construct validity. The subscales were each found to measure a single dimension of anticipatory grief, and significant correlations were established with existing instruments. The instrument demonstrated excellent internal consistency reliability and good construct validity. The MM-CGI Cerebral Palsy could be useful for diagnosing anticipatory grief among parents of children with cerebral palsy. This preliminary work moves the programme on to testing in intervention studies. In the absence of an existing measure for the assessment of anticipatory grief, specifically in parents of children with cerebral palsy, the MM-CGI Cerebral Palsy could prove to be an effective assessment tool for clinicians and researchers. © 2013 John Wiley

  8. Autoimmune Basis for Postural Tachycardia Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-14

    Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome; Postural Tachycardia Syndrome; Tachycardia; Arrhythmias, Cardiac; Autonomic Nervous System Diseases; Orthostatic Intolerance; Cardiovascular Diseases; Primary Dysautonomias

  9. STEADFAST: Psychotherapeutic Intervention Improves Postural Strategy of Somatoform Vertigo and Dizziness

    PubMed Central

    Best, Christoph; Tschan, Regine; Stieber, Nikola; Beutel, Manfred E.; Eckhardt-Henn, Annegret; Dieterich, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Patients with somatoform vertigo and dizziness (SVD) disorders often report instability of stance or gait and fear of falling. Posturographic measurements indeed indicated a pathological postural strategy. Our goal was to evaluate the effectiveness of a psychotherapeutic and psychoeducational short-term intervention (PTI) using static posturography and psychometric examination. Seventeen SVD patients took part in the study. The effects of PTI on SVD were evaluated with quantitative static posturography. As primary endpoint a quotient characterizing the relation between horizontal and vertical sway was calculated (Q H/V), reflecting the individual postural strategy. Results of static posturography were compared to those of age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers (n = 28); baseline measurements were compared to results after PTI. The secondary endpoint was the participation-limiting consequences of SVD as measured by the Vertigo Handicap Questionnaire (VHQ). Compared to the healthy volunteers, the patients with SVD showed a postural strategy characterized by stiffening-up that resulted in a significantly reduced body sway quotient before PTI (patients: Q H/V = 0.31 versus controls: Q H/V = 0.38; p = 0.022). After PTI the postural behavior normalized, and psychological distress was reduced. PTI therefore appears to modify pathological balance behaviour. The postural strategy of patients with SVD possibly results from anxious anticipatory cocontraction of the antigravity muscles. PMID:26843786

  10. STEADFAST: Psychotherapeutic Intervention Improves Postural Strategy of Somatoform Vertigo and Dizziness.

    PubMed

    Best, Christoph; Tschan, Regine; Stieber, Nikola; Beutel, Manfred E; Eckhardt-Henn, Annegret; Dieterich, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Patients with somatoform vertigo and dizziness (SVD) disorders often report instability of stance or gait and fear of falling. Posturographic measurements indeed indicated a pathological postural strategy. Our goal was to evaluate the effectiveness of a psychotherapeutic and psychoeducational short-term intervention (PTI) using static posturography and psychometric examination. Seventeen SVD patients took part in the study. The effects of PTI on SVD were evaluated with quantitative static posturography. As primary endpoint a quotient characterizing the relation between horizontal and vertical sway was calculated (Q H/V ), reflecting the individual postural strategy. Results of static posturography were compared to those of age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers (n = 28); baseline measurements were compared to results after PTI. The secondary endpoint was the participation-limiting consequences of SVD as measured by the Vertigo Handicap Questionnaire (VHQ). Compared to the healthy volunteers, the patients with SVD showed a postural strategy characterized by stiffening-up that resulted in a significantly reduced body sway quotient before PTI (patients: Q H/V = 0.31 versus controls: Q H/V = 0.38; p = 0.022). After PTI the postural behavior normalized, and psychological distress was reduced. PTI therefore appears to modify pathological balance behaviour. The postural strategy of patients with SVD possibly results from anxious anticipatory cocontraction of the antigravity muscles.

  11. Configural processing in body posture recognition: an eye-tracking study.

    PubMed

    Tao, Weidong; Sun, Hongjin

    2013-11-13

    The body inversion effect is the finding that inverted body posture pictures are more difficult to recognize than upright body posture pictures are. The present study reinvestigated the body inversion effect in human observers using behavioral and eye movement measures to explore whether the body inversion effect correlates with specific eye movement features. Results showed that body postures elicited a robust and stable body inversion effect in reaction time throughout the experimental sessions. Eye-tracking data showed that the body inversion effect was robust only in the first fixation duration, but not in the second fixation duration. The analysis of the regions of interest showed that most fixations were located in the upper body for both the upright and the inverted body postures. Compared with inverted body postures, the upright postures led to a shorter reaction time and a shorter first fixation duration, but a larger portion of time to fixate on the head region, suggesting that participants tended to use head as a reference point to process upright body postures. For both the behavioral and the eye movement measures, the body inversion effect was robust for biomechanically possible body postures. However, for biomechanically impossible body postures (with angular manipulation of two joints), the effect was mixed. Although the error rate failed to show the body inversion effect, the reaction time measure and most eye movement measures, however, showed a body inversion effect. Overall, these results suggested that upright body postures are processed in expertise recognition and are processed configurally by human observers.

  12. Effects of medio-lateral postural perturbation induced by voluntary arm raising on the biomechanical organization of rapid step initiation.

    PubMed

    Yiou, Eric; Do, Manh-Cuong

    2011-10-01

    This study examined how the central nervous system organizes mediolateral (ML) "anticipatory postural adjustments" (APAs) for stepping initiation (SI) to take into account the postural perturbation induced by voluntary lateral arm raising. Subjects purposely stepped in isolation ("isolated stepping") or in combination with lateral raising of dominant arm ("motor sequence"). SI was carried out with the leg ipsilateral or controlateral to raising arm. Results showed that APA amplitude increased from "ipsilateral isolated stepping" to "ipsilateral sequence", but did not change in conditions involving controlateral leg; ML instability increased from "ipsilateral isolated stepping" to "ipsilateral sequence", but decreased from "controlateral isolated stepping" to "controlateral sequence". These changes were exacerbated when inertia was added at the hand during raising. These results suggest that APAs for SI are globally scaled as a function of the biomechanical consequences of forthcoming arm movement on ML postural stability.

  13. Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome is a disease characterized by excessively increased heart rate during orthostatic challenge associated with symptoms of orthostatic intolerance including dizziness, exercise intolerance, headache, fatigue, memory problems, nausea, blurred vision, pallor, and sweating, which improve with recumbence. Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome patients may present with a multitude of additional symptoms that are attributable to vascular vasoconstriction. Observed signs and symptoms in a patient with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome include tachycardia at rest, exaggerated heart rate increase with upright position and exercise, crushing chest pain, tremor, syncope, loss of vision, confusion, migraines, fatigue, heat intolerance, parasthesia, dysesthesia, allodynia, altered traditional senses, and thermoregulatory abnormalities. There are a number of possible dermatological manifestations of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome easily explained by its recently discovered pathophysiology. The author reports the case of a 22-year-old woman with moderate-to-severe postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome with numerous dermatological manifestations attributable to the disease process. The cutaneous manifestations observed in this patient are diverse and most noticeable during postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome flares. The most distinct are evanescent, hyperemic, sharply demarcated, irregular patches on the chest and neck area that resolve upon diascopy. This distinct “evanescent hyperemia” disappears spontaneously after seconds to minutes and reappears unexpectedly. Other observed dermatological manifestations of this systemic disease include Raynaud’s phenomenon, koilonychia, onychodystrophy, madarosis, dysesthesia, allodynia, telogen effluvium, increased capillary refill time, and livedo reticularis. The treatment of this disease poses a great challenge. The author reports the unprecedented use of an

  14. Anticipatory mourning: processes of expected loss in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Clukey, Lory

    2008-07-01

    This qualitative study explored the retrospective perceptions of the anticipatory mourning experience of caregivers who had not received hospice services. Data revealed five major processes that were consistently described by informants: realization; caretaking; presence; finding meaning; and transitioning. Characteristics of each of these processes are described. Study informants provided information about what was helpful to them. The implications for health care providers include: an awareness of changed family roles and relationship attachments that can cause strain on family systems; familiarity with the complex demands on caregivers and their need for accurate information, anticipatory guidance and support resources; professional expertise especially in regard to education about what to expect; a caring presence; and pain and symptom management.

  15. Physics-based seated posture prediction for pregnant women and validation considering ground and seat pan contacts.

    PubMed

    Howard, Bradley; Cloutier, Aimee; Yang, Jingzhou James

    2012-07-01

    An understanding of human seated posture is important across many fields of scientific research. Certain demographics, such as pregnant women, have special postural limitations that need to be considered. Physics-based posture prediction is a tool in which seated postures can be quickly and thoroughly analyzed, as long the predicted postures are realistic. This paper proposes and validates an optimization formulation to predict seated posture for pregnant women considering ground and seat pan contacts. For the optimization formulation, the design variables are joint angles (posture); the cost function is dependent on joint torques. Constraints include joint limits, joint torque limits, the distances from the end-effectors to target points, and self-collision avoidance constraints. Three different joint torque cost functions have been investigated to account for the special postural characteristics of pregnant women and consider the support reaction forces (SRFs) associated with seated posture. Postures are predicted for three different reaching tasks in common reaching directions using each of the objective function formulations. The predicted postures are validated against experimental postures obtained using motion capture. A linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the validity of the predicted postures and was the criteria for comparison between the different objective functions. A 56 degree of freedom model was used for the posture prediction. Use of the objective function minimizing the maximum normalized joint torque provided an R² value of 0.828, proving superior to either of two alternative functions.

  16. Action prediction based on anticipatory brain potentials during simulated driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaliliardali, Zahra; Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Gheorghe, Lucian Andrei; Millán, José del R.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. The ability of an automobile to infer the driver’s upcoming actions directly from neural signals could enrich the interaction of the car with its driver. Intelligent vehicles fitted with an on-board brain-computer interface able to decode the driver’s intentions can use this information to improve the driving experience. In this study we investigate the neural signatures of anticipation of specific actions, namely braking and accelerating. Approach. We investigated anticipatory slow cortical potentials in electroencephalogram recorded from 18 healthy participants in a driving simulator using a variant of the contingent negative variation (CNV) paradigm with Go and No-go conditions: count-down numbers followed by ‘Start’/‘Stop’ cue. We report decoding performance before the action onset using a quadratic discriminant analysis classifier based on temporal features. Main results. (i) Despite the visual and driving related cognitive distractions, we show the presence of anticipatory event related potentials locked to the stimuli onset similar to the widely reported CNV signal (with an average peak value of -8 μV at electrode Cz). (ii) We demonstrate the discrimination between cases requiring to perform an action upon imperative subsequent stimulus (Go condition, e.g. a ‘Red’ traffic light) versus events that do not require such action (No-go condition; e.g. a ‘Yellow’ light); with an average single trial classification performance of 0.83 ± 0.13 for braking and 0.79 ± 0.12 for accelerating (area under the curve). (iii) We show that the centro-medial anticipatory potentials are observed as early as 320 ± 200 ms before the action with a detection rate of 0.77 ± 0.12 in offline analysis. Significance. We show for the first time the feasibility of predicting the driver’s intention through decoding anticipatory related potentials during simulated car driving with high recognition rates.

  17. Postural stability and physical performance in social dancers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Guo; Ishikawa-Takata, Kazuko; Yamazaki, Hideo; Morita, Takae; Ohta, Toshiki

    2008-05-01

    This cross-sectional study examined the benefits of social dancing on postural stability and physical performance in dancers aged 50 years or more. Walking speed, lower limb reaction time and low back flexibility were measured in 202 social dancers and 202 community-dwelling comparison subjects aged 50-87 years. The results showed that dancers who were older than 60 years had better postural stability and faster leg reaction times, whilst dancers aged 50-59 showed only better flexibility, when compared with the controls. Male dancers had greater low back flexibility and leg reaction time compared to controls. In contrast, female dancers had superior performance only for leg reaction time when compared with controls. The results indicate that social dancing is associated with enhanced postural stability and physical performance in older adults.

  18. Emotion dysregulation, anticipatory cortisol, and substance use in urban adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kliewer, Wendy; Riley, Tennisha; Zaharakis, Nikola; Borre, Alicia; Drazdowski, Tess K; Jäggi, Lena

    2016-09-01

    Anticipatory cortisol is associated with risk for substance use in adolescents. The present study extended prior literature by testing a model linking family emotional climate, emotion dysregulation, anticipatory cortisol, and substance use. Participants were 229 adolescents (M = 11.94 years, SD = 1.55; 41% male; 92% African American) enrolled in a 4-wave study of stressors, physiological stress responses, and substance use. Caregivers completed measures of family emotional climate at baseline and adolescents' emotion dysregulation one and two years later; adolescents reported on their substance use at baseline and three years later at Wave 4. Adolescents completed a stress task at Wave 4; saliva samples taken immediately prior to the task were analyzed for cortisol. Longitudinal path models revealed that a negative emotional climate at home was associated with elevated emotion dysregulation at subsequent waves for all youth. Emotional dysregulation was prospectively associated with blunted anticipatory cortisol, which in turn was associated with elevated substance use, controlling for baseline substance use and age. However, these associations only were observed for females. This study suggests that helping girls in particular manage their emotional responses to stress more effectively may impact their physiological responses and reduce risk for substance use.

  19. Anticipatory precrash restraint sensor feasibility study: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.; Dress, W.B.

    1995-08-01

    This report explores feasibility of an anticipatory precrash restraint sensor. The foundation principle is the anticipation mechanism found at a primitive level of biological intelligence and originally formalized by the mathematical biologist Robert Rosen. A system based on formal anticipatory principles should significantly outperform conventional technologies. It offers the prospect of high payoff in prevention of death and injury. Sensors and processes are available to provide a good, fast, and inexpensive description of the present dynamical state of the vehicle to the embedded system model in the anticipation engine. The experimental part of this study found that inexpensive radar in a real-world setting does return useful data on target dynamics. The data produced by a radar system can be converted to target dynamical information by good, fast and inexpensive signal-processing techniques. Not only is the anticipatory sensor feasible, but further development under the sponsorship of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is necessary and desirable. There are a number of possible lines of follow-on investigation. The level of effort and expected benefits of various alternatives are discussed.

  20. Trait Anticipatory Pleasure Predicts Effort Expenditure for Reward

    PubMed Central

    Geaney, Joachim T.; Treadway, Michael T.; Smillie, Luke D.

    2015-01-01

    Research in motivation and emotion has been increasingly influenced by the perspective that processes underpinning the motivated approach of rewarding goals are distinct from those underpinning enjoyment during reward consummation. This distinction recently inspired the construction of the Temporal Experience of Pleasure Scale (TEPS), a self-report measure that distinguishes trait anticipatory pleasure (pre-reward feelings of desire) from consummatory pleasure (feelings of enjoyment and gratification upon reward attainment). In a university community sample (N = 97), we examined the TEPS subscales as predictors of (1) the willingness to expend effort for monetary rewards, and (2) affective responses to a pleasant mood induction procedure. Results showed that both anticipatory pleasure and a well-known trait measure of reward motivation predicted effort-expenditure for rewards when the probability of being rewarded was relatively low. Against expectations, consummatory pleasure was unrelated to induced pleasant affect. Taken together, our findings provide support for the validity of the TEPS anticipatory pleasure scale, but not the consummatory pleasure scale. PMID:26115223

  1. Building on Julian Tudor Hart's example of anticipatory care.

    PubMed

    Watt, Graham; O'Donnell, Catherine; Sridharan, Sanjeev

    2011-01-01

    The prevention and delay of chronic disease is an increasing priority in all advanced health-care systems, but sustainable, effective and equitable approaches remain elusive. In a famous pioneering example in the UK, Julian Tudor Hart combined reactive and anticipatory care within routine consultations in primary medical care, while applying a population approach to delivery and audit. This approach combined the structural advantages of UK general practice, including universal coverage and the absence of user fees, with his long-term commitment to individual patients, and was associated with a 28% reduction in premature mortality over a 25-year period. The more recent, and comprehensively evaluated Scottish National Health Service demonstration project, 'Have a Heart Paisley', took a different approach to cardiovascular prevention and health improvement, using population screening for ascertainment, health coaches and referral to specific health improvement programmes for diet, smoking and exercise. We draw from both examples to construct a conceptual framework for anticipatory care, based on active ingredients, programme pathways and whole system approaches. While the strengths of a family practice approach are coverage, continuity, co-ordination and long-term relationships, the larger health improvement programme offered additional resources and expertise. As theory and evidence accrue, the challenge is to combine the strengths of primary medical care and health improvement, in integrated, sustainable systems of anticipatory care, addressing the heterogeneity of individual needs and solutions, while achieving high levels of coverage, continuity, co-ordination and outcome.

  2. Immediate effects of anticipatory coarticulation in spoken-word recognition

    PubMed Central

    Salverda, Anne Pier; Kleinschmidt, Dave; Tanenhaus, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Two visual-world experiments examined listeners’ use of pre word-onset anticipatory coarticulation in spoken-word recognition. Experiment 1 established the shortest lag with which information in the speech signal influences eye-movement control, using stimuli such as “The … ladder is the target”. With a neutral token of the definite article preceding the target word, saccades to the referent were not more likely than saccades to an unrelated distractor until 200–240 ms after the onset of the target word. In Experiment 2, utterances contained definite articles which contained natural anticipatory coarticulation pertaining to the onset of the target word (“ The ladder … is the target”). A simple Gaussian classifier was able to predict the initial sound of the upcoming target word from formant information from the first few pitch periods of the article’s vowel. With these stimuli, effects of speech on eye-movement control began about 70 ms earlier than in Experiment 1, suggesting rapid use of anticipatory coarticulation. The results are interpreted as support for “data explanation” approaches to spoken-word recognition. Methodological implications for visual-world studies are also discussed. PMID:24511179

  3. Anticipatory Pleasure Predicts Motivation for Reward in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Sherdell, Lindsey; Waugh, Christian E.; Gotlib, Ian H.

    2012-01-01

    Anhedonia, the lack of interest or pleasure in response to hedonic stimuli or experiences, is a cardinal symptom of depression. This deficit in hedonic processing has been posited to influence depressed individuals’ motivation to engage in potentially rewarding experiences. Accumulating evidence indicates that hedonic processing is not a unitary construct but rather consists of an anticipatory and a consummatory phase. We examined how these components of hedonic processing influence motivation to obtain reward in participants diagnosed with major depression and in never-disordered controls. Thirty-eight currently depressed and 30 never-disordered control participants rated their liking of humorous and nonhumorous cartoons and then made a series of choices between viewing a cartoon from either group. Each choice was associated with a specified amount of effort participants would have to exert before viewing the chosen cartoon. Although depressed and control participants did not differ in their consummatory liking of the rewards, levels of reward liking predicted motivation to expend effort for the rewards only in the control participants; in the depressed participants, liking and motivation were dissociated. In the depressed group, levels of anticipatory anhedonia predicted motivation to exert effort for the rewards. These findings support the formulation that anhedonia is not a unitary construct and suggest that, for depressed individuals, deficits in motivation for reward are driven primarily by low anticipatory pleasure and not by decreased consummatory liking. PMID:21842963

  4. Anticipatory pleasure predicts motivation for reward in major depression.

    PubMed

    Sherdell, Lindsey; Waugh, Christian E; Gotlib, Ian H

    2012-02-01

    Anhedonia, the lack of interest or pleasure in response to hedonic stimuli or experiences, is a cardinal symptom of depression. This deficit in hedonic processing has been posited to influence depressed individuals' motivation to engage in potentially rewarding experiences. Accumulating evidence indicates that hedonic processing is not a unitary construct but rather consists of an anticipatory and a consummatory phase. We examined how these components of hedonic processing influence motivation to obtain reward in participants diagnosed with major depression and in never-disordered controls. Thirty-eight currently depressed and 30 never-disordered control participants rated their liking of humorous and nonhumorous cartoons and then made a series of choices between viewing a cartoon from either group. Each choice was associated with a specified amount of effort participants would have to exert before viewing the chosen cartoon. Although depressed and control participants did not differ in their consummatory liking of the rewards, levels of reward liking predicted motivation to expend effort for the rewards only in the control participants; in the depressed participants, liking and motivation were dissociated. In the depressed group, levels of anticipatory anhedonia predicted motivation to exert effort for the rewards. These findings support the formulation that anhedonia is not a unitary construct and suggest that, for depressed individuals, deficits in motivation for reward are driven primarily by low anticipatory pleasure and not by decreased consummatory liking. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. The experiences of families living with the anticipatory loss of a school-age child with spinal muscular atrophy - the parents' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bao-Huan; Mu, Pei-Fan; Wang, Wen-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    To probe into parents' anticipatory loss of school-age children with Type I or II spinal muscular atrophy. Spinal muscular atrophy is a rare disorder that causes death. Children die early due to either gradual atrophy or an infection of the lungs. Therefore, family members experience anticipatory loss, which causes grief before the actual loss. Family members feel physically and mentally exhausted, which results in a family crisis. Therefore, it is important to explore their experiences related to anticipatory loss to assist with the adjustment of the families to their circumstances. This study applied a phenomenology method and purposive sampling. The 19 parents who participated in this study were referred to us by two medical centers in Taiwan. Their average age was 32-49 years. Using in-depth interviews, this study explored parents' anticipatory loss. The interviews were recorded and transcribed. Meanings were extracted using Giorgi analysis, and precision was assessed according to Guba and Lincoln, which was treated as the evaluation standard. Four themes were identified from the parents' interviews. The themes included enduring the helplessness and pressure of care, suffering due to the child's rare and unknown condition, loss of hope and a reinforcement of the parent-child attachment, and avoiding the pressure of death and enriching the child's life. The research findings help nurses identify anticipatory loss among parents of school-age children with type I or II spinal muscular atrophy. They enhance health professionals' understanding of the panic that occurs in the society surrounding the families, family members' dynamic relationships, and the families' demands for care. In an attempt to providing intersubjective empathy and support with family having a child with type I and II SMA, nurses may recognize relevant family reactions and enhancing their hope and parent-child attachment. Encourage family members and child go beyond the pressure of death and

  6. Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A K; Garg, R; Ritch, A; Sarkar, P

    2007-07-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is an autonomic disturbance which has become better understood in recent years. It is now thought to encompass a group of disorders that have similar clinical features, such as orthostatic intolerance, but individual distinguishing parameters--for example, blood pressure and pulse rate. The clinical picture, diagnosis, and management of POTS are discussed.

  7. Posture and Movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session TP3 includes short reports on: (1) Modification of Goal-Directed Arm Movements During Inflight Adaptation to Microgravity; (2) Quantitative Analysis of Motion control in Long Term Microgravity; (3) Does the Centre of Gravity Remain the Stabilised Reference during Complex Human Postural Equilibrium Tasks in Weightlessness?; and (4) Arm End-Point Trajectories Under Normal and Microgravity Environments.

  8. Reactively and Anticipatory Behaving Agents for Artificial Life Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohout, Karel; Nahodil, Pavel

    2010-11-01

    Reactive behavior is still considered and the exact opposite for the anticipatory one. Despite the advances on the field of anticipation there are little thoughts on relation with the reactive behavior, the similarities and where the boundary is. In this article we will present our viewpoint and we will try to show that reactive and anticipatory behavior can be combined. This is the basic ground of our unified theory for anticipatory behavior architecture. We still miss such compact theory, which would integrate multiple aspects of anticipation. My multi-level anticipatory behavior approach is based on the current understanding of anticipation from both the artificial intelligence and biology point of view. As part of the explanation we will also elaborate on the topic of weak and strong artificial life. Anticipation is not matter of a single mechanism in a living organism. It was noted already that it happens on many different levels even in the very simple creatures. What we consider to be important for our work and what is our original though is that it happens even without voluntary control. We believe that this is novelty though for the anticipation theory. Naturally research of anticipation was in the beginning of this decade focused on the anticipatory principles bringing advances on the field itself. This allowed us to build on those, look at them from higher perspective, and use not one but multiple levels of anticipation in a creature design. This presents second original though and that is composition of the agent architecture that has anticipation built in almost every function. In this article we will focus only on first two levels within the 8-factor anticipation framework. We will introduce them as defined categories of anticipation and describe them from theory and implementation algorithm point of view. We will also present an experiment conducted, however this experiment serves more as explanatory example. These first two levels may seem trivial

  9. Steering vaccinomics innovations with anticipatory governance and participatory foresight.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Vural; Faraj, Samer A; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2011-09-01

    Vaccinomics is the convergence of vaccinology and population-based omics sciences. The success of knowledge-based innovations such as vaccinomics is not only contingent on access to new biotechnologies. It also requires new ways of governance of science, knowledge production, and management. This article presents a conceptual analysis of the anticipatory and adaptive approaches that are crucial for the responsible design and sustainable transition of vaccinomics to public health practice. Anticipatory governance is a new approach to manage the uncertainties embedded on an innovation trajectory with participatory foresight, in order to devise governance instruments for collective "steering" of science and technology. As a contrast to hitherto narrowly framed "downstream impact assessments" for emerging technologies, anticipatory governance adopts a broader and interventionist approach that recognizes the social construction of technology design and innovation. It includes in its process explicit mechanisms to understand the factors upstream to the innovation trajectory such as deliberation and cocultivation of the aims, motives, funding, design, and direction of science and technology, both by experts and publics. This upstream shift from a consumer "product uptake" focus to "participatory technology design" on the innovation trajectory is an appropriately radical and necessary departure in the field of technology assessment, especially given that considerable public funds are dedicated to innovations. Recent examples of demands by research funding agencies to anticipate the broad impacts of proposed research--at a very upstream stage at the time of research funding application--suggest that anticipatory governance with foresight may be one way how postgenomics scientific practice might transform in the future toward responsible innovation. Moreover, the present context of knowledge production in vaccinomics is such that policy making for vaccines of the 21st

  10. Multi-joint postural behavior in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Turcot, Katia; Sagawa, Yoshimasa; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Suvà, Domizio; Armand, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated balance impairment in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Although it is currently accepted that postural control depends on multi-joint coordination, no study has previously considered this postural strategy in patients suffering from knee OA. The objectives of this study were to investigate the multi-joint postural behavior in patients with knee OA and to evaluate the association with clinical outcomes. Eighty-seven patients with knee OA and twenty-five healthy elderly were recruited to the study. A motion analysis system and two force plates were used to investigate the joint kinematics (trunk and lower body segments), the lower body joint moments, the vertical ground reaction force ratio and the center of pressure (COP) during a quiet standing task. Pain, functional capacity and quality of life status were also recorded. Patients with symptomatic and severe knee OA adopt a more flexed posture at all joint levels in comparison with the control group. A significant difference in the mean ratio was found between groups, showing an asymmetric weight distribution in patients with knee OA. A significant decrease in the COP range in the anterior-posterior direction was also observed in the group of patients. Only small associations were observed between postural impairments and clinical outcomes. This study brings new insights regarding the postural behavior of patients with severe knee OA during a quiet standing task. The results confirm the multi-joint asymmetric posture adopted by this population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Posture and aging. Current fundamental studies and management concepts].

    PubMed

    Mourey, F; Camus, A; Pfitzenmeyer, P

    2000-02-19

    FUNDAMENTAL IMPORTANCE OF POSTURE: In the elderly subject, preservation of posture is fundamental to maintaining functional independence. In recent years, there has been much progress in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying strategies used to control equilibrium in the upright position. Physiological aging, associated with diverse disease states, dangerously alters the postural function, particularly anticipated adjustments which allow an adaptation of posture to movement. CLINICAL ASSESSMENT OF POSTURE: Several tests have been developed to assess posture in the elderly subject, particularly the time it takes to start walking. We selected certain tests which can be used in everyday practice to predict falls: the stance test, the improved Romberg test, the "timed get up and go test", measurement of walking cadence, assessment of balance reactions, sitting-standing and standing-sitting movements and capacity to get up off the floor. PATIENT CARE: Elderly patients with equilibrium disorders can benefit from specific personalized rehabilitation protocols. Different techniques have been developed for multiple afferential stimulation, reprogramming postural strategies, and correcting for deficient motor automatisms.

  12. Contraction of the human diaphragm during rapid postural adjustments.

    PubMed

    Hodges, P W; Butler, J E; McKenzie, D K; Gandevia, S C

    1997-12-01

    1. The response of the diaphragm to the postural perturbation produced by rapid flexion of the shoulder to a visual stimulus was evaluated in standing subjects. Gastric, oesophageal and transdiaphragmatic pressures were measured together with intramuscular and oesophageal recordings of electromyographic activity (EMG) in the diaphragm. To assess the mechanics of contraction of the diaphragm, dynamic changes in the length of the diaphragm were measured with ultrasonography. 2. With rapid flexion of the shoulder in response to a visual stimulus, EMG activity in the costal and crural diaphragm occurred about 20 ms prior to the onset of deltoid EMG. This anticipatory contraction occurred irrespective of the phase of respiration in which arm movement began. The onset of diaphragm EMG coincided with that of transversus abdominis. 3. Gastric and transdiaphragmatic pressures increased in association with the rapid arm flexion by 13.8 +/- 1.9 (mean +/- S.E.M.) and 13.5 +/- 1.8 cmH2O, respectively. The increases occurred 49 +/- 4 ms after the onset of diaphragm EMG, but preceded the onset of movement of the limb by 63 +/- 7 ms. 4. Ultrasonographic measurements revealed that the costal diaphragm shortened and then lengthened progressively during the increase in transdiaphragmatic pressure. 5. This study provides definitive evidence that the human diaphragm is involved in the control of postural stability during sudden voluntary movement of the limbs.

  13. Postural motor programming in paraplegic patients during rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Seelen, H A; Potten, Y J; Adam, J J; Drukker, J; Spaans, F; Huson, A

    1998-03-01

    One of the basic aims in the rehabilitation of thoracic spinal cord injured (SCI) patients concerns the regaining of sitting posture control. This implies the development of new postural strategies requiring the adjustment of motor programming processes. The aim of this study was to investigate the time course of postural reorganization during active, clinical rehabilitation of thoracic SCI patients with different SCI levels. Thus changes in motor programming in sitting balance control were investigated in two groups of complete low or high thoracic SCI patients. At several stages during the rehabilitation process an experiment was held in which sitting posture was perturbed systematically using submaximal reaching movements over four reaching distances. This bimanual reaching task was presented as a visual precue choice reaction time (RT) task in which reaching distance (i.e. grade of postural perturbation) was precued. Results indicated that in both high and low thoracic SCI patients RTs in movements involving postural perturbation became shorter during the course of the rehabilitation period. However, low thoracic SCI patients were generally slower in the programming of balance perturbing movements than high thoracic SCI patients, a phenomenon that did not change over time. Furthermore, initial differences in RTs as a function of grade of postural perturbation disappeared in both groups in the course of the rehabilitation phase. Precue benefit, equally large for both groups, did not change as a function of rehabilitation time. It is concluded that the observed phenomena signify the gradual development of new central postural control processes in both SCI groups during rehabilitation. Low thoracic SCI patients, having more residual sensorimotor functions, seem to adopt more complex strategies in maintaining and restoring sitting balance that take longer to specify and to programme. High thoracic SCI patients seem to rely on simpler strategies using more passive

  14. Age-related changes and sex differences in postural control adaptability in children during periodic floor oscillation with eyes closed.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Katsuo; Kiyota, Takeo; Mammadova, Aida; Yaguchi, Chie

    2011-01-01

    We investigated age-related changes and sex differences in adaptability of anticipatory postural control in children. Subjects comprised 449 children (4-12 years old) and 109 young adults (18-29 years old). Subjects stood with eyes closed on a force-platform fixed to a floor oscillator. We conducted five trials of 1-minute oscillation (0.5 Hz frequency, 2.5 cm amplitude) in the anteroposterior direction. Postural steadiness was quantified as the mean speed of the center of pressure in the anteroposterior direction (CoPy). In young adults, CoPy speed decreased rapidly until the third trial for both sexes. Adaptability was evaluated by changes in steadiness. The adaptability of children was categorized as "good," "moderate," and "poor," compared with a standard variation of the mean CoPy speed regression line between the first and fifth trials in young adults. Results were as follows: (1) anticipatory postural control adaptability starts to develop from age 6 in boys and 5 in girls, and greatly improves at age 7-8 in boys and 6 in girls; (2) the adaptability of children at age 11-12 (74% of boys and 63% of girls were categorized as "good") has not yet reached the same level as for young adults; (3) the adaptability at age 11-12 for girls is temporarily disturbed due to early puberty.

  15. Test Plan of the Anticipatory Wirelss Sensor Network for the Critical Energy Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos Rentel

    2006-09-01

    The test plan for the performance of the Anticipatory Wireless Sensor Network (A-WSN) is presented. The results of the test campaigns will be obtained after actual measurements are taken in the field with the Wireless Sensor Network developed by The Innovation Center-Eaton Corp., and the Anticipatory algorithms developed by ORNL.

  16. On Anticipatory Development of Dual Education Based on the Systemic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alshynbayeva, Zhuldyz; Sarbassova, Karlygash; Galiyeva, Temir; Kaltayeva, Gulnara; Bekmagambetov, Aidos

    2016-01-01

    The article addresses separate theoretical and methodical aspects of the anticipatory development of dual education in the Republic of Kazakhstan based on the systemic approach. It states the need to develop orientating basis of prospective professional activities in students. We define the concepts of anticipatory cognition and anticipatory…

  17. The Effects of Age and Preoral Sensorimotor Cues on Anticipatory Mouth Movement during Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shune, Samantha E.; Moon, Jerald B.; Goodman, Shawn S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of preoral sensorimotor cues on anticipatory swallowing/eating-related mouth movements in older and younger adults. It was hypothesized that these cues are essential to timing anticipatory oral motor patterns, and these movements are delayed in older as compared with younger adults.…

  18. Anticipatory Grief in New Family Caregivers of Persons with Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Garand, Linda; Lingler, Jennifer H.; Deardorf, Kaitlyn E.; DeKosky, Steven T.; Schulz, Richard; Reynolds, Charles F.; Dew, Mary Amanda

    2011-01-01

    Anticipatory grief is the process of experiencing normal phases of bereavement in advance of the loss of a significant person. To date, anticipatory grief has been examined in family caregivers to individuals who have had Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) an average of 3 to 6 years. Whether such grief is manifested early in the disease trajectory (at diagnosis) is unknown. Using a cross-sectional design, we examined differences in the nature and extent of anticipatory grief between family caregivers of persons with a new diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI, n=43) or AD (n=30). We also determined whether anticipatory grief levels were associated with caregiver demographics, caregiving burden, depressive symptoms and marital quality. Mean anticipatory grief levels were high in the total sample, with AD caregivers endorsing significantly more anticipatory grief than MCI caregivers. In general, AD caregivers endorsed difficulty functioning whereas MCI caregivers focused on themes of “missing the person” they once knew. Being a female caregiver, reporting higher levels of objective caregiving burden and higher depression levels each bore independent, statistically significant relationships with anticipatory grief. Given these findings, family caregivers of individuals with mild cognitive deficits or a new AD diagnosis may benefit from interventions specifically addressing anticipatory grief. PMID:21946013

  19. Predictors of Verb-Mediated Anticipatory Eye Movements in the Visual World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hintz, Florian; Meyer, Antje S.; Huettig, Falk

    2017-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that listeners use information extracted from verbs to guide anticipatory eye movements to objects in the visual context that satisfy the selection restrictions of the verb. An important question is what underlies such verb-mediated anticipatory eye gaze. Based on empirical and theoretical suggestions, we…

  20. The Effects of Age and Preoral Sensorimotor Cues on Anticipatory Mouth Movement during Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shune, Samantha E.; Moon, Jerald B.; Goodman, Shawn S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of preoral sensorimotor cues on anticipatory swallowing/eating-related mouth movements in older and younger adults. It was hypothesized that these cues are essential to timing anticipatory oral motor patterns, and these movements are delayed in older as compared with younger adults.…

  1. Stand Up Straight: Posture for Singers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauthier, Delores R.

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the importance of posture in music-making. Provides information on the importance of posture and the different types of posture stances to help students work toward better posture. Includes information on using kinesthetic experiences to help students improve their posture. (CMK)

  2. Posture Statement 2006

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    dispersed, comprising formal, informal, family, and cultural associations tied by varied and sometimes near- invisible links. Th ey ex- ploit the...coordination, and communication between all levels of government. USSOCOM’s leadership, vision, and initiative in prosecuting the GWOT was validated most...Rather, the new vision expresses a need for low density, high demand SOF assets to be postured with a “presence for purpose”, to be at the “right place

  3. Prior probability modulates anticipatory activity in category-specific areas.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Sabrina; Lepsien, Jöran; Kotz, Sonja A; Bar, Moshe

    2016-02-01

    Bayesian models are currently a dominant framework for describing human information processing. However, it is not clear yet how major tenets of this framework can be translated to brain processes. In this study, we addressed the neural underpinning of prior probability and its effect on anticipatory activity in category-specific areas. Before fMRI scanning, participants were trained in two behavioral sessions to learn the prior probability and correct order of visual events within a sequence. The events of each sequence included two different presentations of a geometric shape and one picture of either a house or a face, which appeared with either a high or a low likelihood. Each sequence was preceded by a cue that gave participants probabilistic information about which items to expect next. This allowed examining cue-related anticipatory modulation of activity as a function of prior probability in category-specific areas (fusiform face area and parahippocampal place area). Our findings show that activity in the fusiform face area was higher when faces had a higher prior probability. The finding of a difference between levels of expectations is consistent with graded, probabilistically modulated activity, but the data do not rule out the alternative explanation of a categorical neural response. Importantly, these differences were only visible during anticipation, and vanished at the time of stimulus presentation, calling for a functional distinction when considering the effects of prior probability. Finally, there were no anticipatory effects for houses in the parahippocampal place area, suggesting sensitivity to stimulus material when looking at effects of prediction.

  4. Hypothalamic neuropeptide systems and anticipatory weight change in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Adam, C L; Mercer, J G

    2001-01-01

    Seasonal animals are able both to programme changes in body weight in response to annual changes in photoperiod (anticipatory regulation) and to correct changes in body weight caused by imposed energetic demand (compensatory regulation). Experimental evidence from the Siberian hamster suggests that seasonally appropriate body weight is continually reset according to photoperiodic history, even when actual body weight is driven away from this target weight by manipulation of energy intake. These characteristics constitute the "sliding set point" of seasonal body weight regulation. To define the mechanisms and molecules underlying anticipatory body weight regulation, we are investigating the involvement of hypothalamic systems with an established role in the compensatory defence of body weight. Weight loss or restricted growth induced by short days (SD) results in low circulating leptin compared with long day (LD) controls. However, this chronic low leptin signal is read differently from acute low leptin resulting from food deprivation; leptin receptor gene expression in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) is lower in SD, whereas food deprivation increases expression levels, suggesting changes in sensitivity to leptin feedback. SD alterations in mRNA levels for a number of hypothalamic neuropeptide and receptor genes appear counter-intuitive for a SD body weight trajectory. However, early increases in ARC cocaine-and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) gene expression in SDs could be involved in driving body weight loss or growth restriction. The sites of photoperiod interaction with energy balance neuronal circuitry and the neurochemical encoding of body weight set point require full characterisation. Study of anticipatory regulation in seasonal animals offers new insight into body weight regulation across mammalian species, including man.

  5. Anticipatory coarticulation in multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tjaden, Kris

    2003-08-01

    Research investigating coarticulatory patterns in dysarthria has the potential to provide insight regarding deficits in the organizational coherence of phonetic events that may underlie deviant perceptual characteristics. The current study investigated anticipatory coarticulation for 17 speakers with multiple sclerosis (MS), 12 speakers with Parkinson's disease (PD), and 29 healthy control speakers. V1-C-V2 sequences were used to investigate intersyllabic vowel to vowel effects (V2 to V1 effects), intersyllabic consonant to vowel effects (C to V1 effects), and intrasyllabic vowel to consonant effects (V2 to C effects). Second formant frequencies and first moment coefficients were used to infer coarticulation. In general, patterns of intersyllabic and intrasyllabic coarticulation were similar for speakers with MS, speakers with PD, and healthy control speakers. It therefore appears unlikely that coarticulatory patterns for speakers diagnosed with MS or PD strongly contribute to deviant perceptual characteristics, at least for the current group of speakers, most of whom were mildly to moderately impaired. Anticipatory vowel effects in /k/+vowel sequences, however, tended to be reduced for speakers with MS and speakers with PD when data for these 2 speaker groups were pooled and compared to control speakers. These results were not attributable to group differences in speech rate or articulatory scaling, defined as the extent of articulatory movements, and further suggest that coarticulatory deficits are not unique to particular neurological diagnoses or dysarthrias. Potential explanations for the /k/+vowel results include difficulties with anterior-posterior tongue positioning and the competing influences of minimizing articulatory effort and maintaining sufficient perceptual contrast. Despite this subtle difference in coarticulation between disordered speakers and healthy control speakers, the overall results suggest that anticipatory coarticulation for speakers with

  6. Control of vertical posture while elevating one foot to avoid a real or virtual obstacle.

    PubMed

    Ida, Hirofumi; Mohapatra, Sambit; Aruin, Alexander

    2017-03-07

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the control of vertical posture during obstacle avoidance in a real versus a virtual reality (VR) environment. Ten healthy participants stood upright and lifted one leg to avoid colliding with a real obstacle sliding on the floor toward a participant and with its virtual image. Virtual obstacles were delivered by a head mounted display (HMD) or a 3D projector. The acceleration of the foot, center of pressure, and electrical activity of the leg and trunk muscles were measured and analyzed during the time intervals typical for early postural adjustments (EPAs), anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs), and compensatory postural adjustments (CPAs). The results showed that the peak acceleration of foot elevation in the HMD condition decreased significantly when compared with that of the real and 3D projector conditions. Reduced activity of the leg and trunk muscles was seen when dealing with virtual obstacles (HMD and 3D projector) as compared with that seen when dealing with real obstacles. These effects were more pronounced during APAs and CPAs. The onsets of muscle activities in the supporting limb were seen during EPAs and APAs. The observed modulation of muscle activity and altered patterns of movement seen while avoiding a virtual obstacle should be considered when designing virtual rehabilitation protocols.

  7. Differences in intermittent postural control between normal-weight and obese children.

    PubMed

    Villarrasa-Sapiña, Israel; García-Massó, Xavier; Serra-Añó, Pilar; Garcia-Lucerga, Consolación; Gonzalez, Luis-Millán; Lurbe, Empar

    2016-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine differences in postural control between obese and non-obese children. The study design was cross-sectional, prospective, between-subjects. Postural control variables were obtained from a group of obese children and a normal-weight control group under two different postural conditions: bipedal standing position with eyes open and bipedal standing with eyes closed. Variables were obtained for each balance condition using time domain and sway-density plot analysis of the center of pressure signals acquired by means of a force plate. Pairwise comparisons revealed significant differences between obese and normal-weight children in mean velocity in antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions, ellipse area and mean distance with both eyes open and eyes closed. Normal-weight subjects obtained lower values in all these variables than obese subjects. Furthermore, there were differences between both groups in mean peaks with eyes open and in mean time with eyes closed. Alterations were detected in the intermittent postural control in obese children. According to the results obtained, active anticipatory control produces higher center of pressure displacement responses in obese children and the periods during which balance is maintained by passive control and reflex mechanisms are of shorter duration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Control of grip force and vertical posture while holding an object and being perturbed.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Lee, Yun-Ju; Aruin, Alexander S

    2016-11-01

    We investigated motor control perspectives of coordinating maintenance of posture and application of grip force when holding an object and being perturbed. Ten subjects stood on the force platform holding an instrumented object in their dominant hand and were exposed to an external perturbation applied to their shoulders. Task demands were manipulated by positioning a slippery cap on top of the instrumented object. Grip force applied to the object, the object acceleration and the center of pressure (COP) were recorded and analyzed during the time intervals typical for the anticipatory (APA) and compensatory (CPA) components of postural control. Onsets of grip force were seen before the onsets of the COP displacement and initiation of movements of the handheld object during the APA phase of postural control, while the onsets of maximum grip force preceded the maximum COP displacement during the CPA phase. When the task demands increased by holding a handheld object with the slippery cap, subjects tended to generate grip force earlier and of a smaller magnitude; also, the COP displacement in the APA phase was smaller as compared to holding a handheld object only. The outcome provides a foundation for future studies of maintenance of vertical posture in people with impairments of balance and grip force control when holding an object and being perturbed.

  9. Postural development in rats.

    PubMed

    Lelard, T; Jamon, M; Gasc, J-P; Vidal, P-P

    2006-11-01

    Mammals adopt a limited number of postures during their day-to-day activities. These stereotyped skeletal configurations are functionally adequate and limit the number of degrees of freedom to be controlled by the central nervous system. The temporal pattern of emergence of these configurations in altricial mammals is unknown. We therefore carried out an X-ray study in unrestrained rats from birth (P0) until postnatal day 23 (P23). The X-rays showed that many of the skeletal configurations described in adult rodents were already present at birth. By contrast, limb placement changed abruptly at around P10. These skeletal configurations, observed in anesthetized pups, required the maintenance of precise motor control. On the other hand, motor control continued to mature, as shown by progressive changes in resting posture and head movements from P0 to P23. We suggest that a few innate skeletal configurations provide the necessary frames of reference for the gradual construction of an adult motor repertoire in altricial mammals, such as the rat. The apparent absence of a requirement for external sensorial cues in the maturation of this repertoire may account for the maturation of postural and motor control in utero in precocial mammals (Muir et al., 2000 for a review on the locomotor behavior of altricial and precocial animals).

  10. Vowel posture normalization.

    PubMed

    Hashi, M; Westbury, J R; Honda, K

    1998-10-01

    A simple normalization procedure was applied to point-parametrized articulatory data to yield quantitative speaker-general descriptions of "average" vowel postures. Articulatory data from 20 English and 8 Japanese speakers, drawn from existing x-ray microbeam database corpora, were included in the analysis. The purpose of the normalization procedure was to minimize the effects of differences in vocal tract size and shape on average postures derived from the raw data. The procedure resulted in a general reduction of cross-speaker variance in the y dimension of the normalized space, within both language groups. This result can be traced to a systematic source of variance in the y dimension of the raw data (i.e., palatal height) "successfully removed" from the normalized data. The procedure did not result in a comparable, general reduction in cross-speaker variance in the x dimension. This negative result can be traced partly to the new observation that some speakers within the English sample habitually placed their tongues in a fronted position for all vowels, whereas other speakers habitually placed their tongues in a rearward position. Methods for evaluating articulatory normalization schemes, and possible sources of interspeaker variability in vowel postures, are discussed.

  11. The characteristics and experiences of anticipatory mourning in caregivers of teenagers and young adults.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Rachel; Davies, Kerry; Lavender, Verna

    2015-11-01

    This article reports a systematic review of literature undertaken to identify characteristics and experiences of anticipatory mourning in caregivers of teenagers and young adults with life-limiting or life-threatening conditions. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using the key words 'anticipatory', 'mourning', 'grief', and synonyms. This review focused on six studies that met inclusion criteria and reported characteristics of anticipatory mourning in caregivers of teenagers and young adults. Characteristics and experiences were sorted into four main themes: symptoms; a sense of loss; caregiver behaviour; and the unique experience of caring for, or losing, a teenager or young adult. The review suggests that there are characteristics and experiences of anticipatory mourning that are unique to caregivers of this age group. The review also suggests that consideration of anticipatory mourning is important in offering holistic care to young adults and their caregivers, and points to the need for further research in this area.

  12. Posture modulates implicit hand maps.

    PubMed

    Longo, Matthew R

    2015-11-01

    Several forms of somatosensation require that afferent signals be informed by stored representations of body size and shape. Recent results have revealed that position sense relies on a highly distorted body representation. Changes of internal hand posture produce plastic alterations of processing in somatosensory cortex. This study therefore investigated how such postural changes affect implicit body representations underlying position sense. Participants localised the knuckles and tips of each finger in external space in two postures: the fingers splayed (Apart posture) or pressed together (Together posture). Comparison of the relative locations of the judgments of each landmark were used to construct implicit maps of represented hand structure. Spreading the fingers apart produced increases in the implicit representation of hand size, with no apparent effect on hand shape. Thus, changes of internal hand posture produce rapid modulation of how the hand itself is represented, paralleling the known effects on somatosensory cortical processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Predicting preschool pain-related anticipatory distress: the relative contribution of longitudinal and concurrent factors.

    PubMed

    Racine, Nicole M; Pillai Riddell, Rebecca R; Flora, David B; Taddio, Anna; Garfield, Hartley; Greenberg, Saul

    2016-09-01

    Anticipatory distress prior to a painful medical procedure can lead to negative sequelae including heightened pain experiences, avoidance of future medical procedures, and potential noncompliance with preventative health care, such as vaccinations. Few studies have examined the longitudinal and concurrent predictors of pain-related anticipatory distress. This article consists of 2 companion studies to examine both the longitudinal factors from infancy as well as concurrent factors from preschool that predict pain-related anticipatory distress at the preschool age. Study 1 examined how well preschool pain-related anticipatory distress was predicted by infant pain response at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months of age. In study 2, using a developmental psychopathology framework, longitudinal analyses examined the predisposing, precipitating, perpetuating, and present factors that led to the development of anticipatory distress during routine preschool vaccinations. A sample of 202 caregiver-child dyads was observed during their infant and preschool vaccinations (the Opportunities to Understand Childhood Hurt cohort) and was used for both studies. In study 1, pain response during infancy was not found to significantly predict pain-related anticipatory distress at preschool. In study 2, a strong explanatory model was created whereby 40% of the variance in preschool anticipatory distress was explained. Parental behaviours from infancy and preschool were the strongest predictors of child anticipatory distress at preschool. Child age positively predicted child anticipatory distress. This strongly suggests that the involvement of parents in pain management interventions during immunization is one of the most critical factors in predicting anticipatory distress to the preschool vaccination.

  14. Components of Standing Postural Control Evaluated in Pediatric Balance Measures: A Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Sibley, Kathryn M; Beauchamp, Marla K; Van Ooteghem, Karen; Paterson, Marie; Wittmeier, Kristy D

    2017-10-01

    To identify measures of standing balance validated in pediatric populations, and to determine the components of postural control captured in each tool. Electronic searches of MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL databases using key word combinations of postural balance/equilibrium, psychometrics/reproducibility of results/predictive value of tests, and child/pediatrics; gray literature; and hand searches. Inclusion criteria were measures with a stated objective to assess balance, with pediatric (≤18y) populations, with at least 1 psychometric evaluation, with at least 1 standing task, with a standardized protocol and evaluation criteria, and published in English. Two reviewers independently identified studies for inclusion. There were 21 measures included. Two reviewers extracted descriptive characteristics, and 2 investigators independently coded components of balance in each measure using a systems perspective for postural control, an established framework for balance in pediatric populations. Components of balance evaluated in measures were underlying motor systems (100% of measures), anticipatory postural control (72%), static stability (62%), sensory integration (52%), dynamic stability (48%), functional stability limits (24%), cognitive influences (24%), verticality (9%), and reactive postural control (0%). Assessing children's balance with valid and comprehensive measures is important for ensuring development of safe mobility and independence with functional tasks. Balance measures validated in pediatric populations to date do not comprehensively assess standing postural control and omit some key components for safe mobility and independence. Existing balance measures, that have been validated in adult populations and address some of the existing gaps in pediatric measures, warrant consideration for validation in children. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of dual tasking on the postural performance of people with and without multiple sclerosis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jesse V; Kasser, Susan L

    2012-06-01

    People with multiple sclerosis (MS) exhibit both cognitive and postural impairments. This study examined the effects of MS and of dual tasking on postural performance, and explored associations among dual-task postural performance, cognitive capacity, fear of falling, and fatigue. Thirteen subjects with MS (Expanded Disability Status Scale: 0-4.5) and 13 matched subjects without MS performed three tasks of standing postural control, with and without dual tasking amid an auditory Stroop task: (1) step initiation, (2) forward leaning to the limits of stability, and (3) postural responses to rotations of the support surface. Two-factor general linear models were used to evaluate differences between the groups (with or without MS) and two conditions (single or dual tasking) for each postural task. During step initiation, dual tasking significantly delayed the onset of the anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) more for the subjects with MS than for those without MS, and step lengths increased for the subjects with MS but decreased for those without MS. No other significant group-by-condition interactions were evident on the recorded variables of stepping, leaning, postural responses, or Stroop-response accuracies and latencies. The scores for the subjects with MS on the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale significantly associated with the change between single-task to dual-task conditions in APA onset and foot-lift onset during step initiation as well as in lean position variability and lean onset times during forward leaning. The results suggest dual-task effects were more evident during step initiation and are associated with levels of fatigue for subjects with MS.

  16. Anticipatory pleasure predicts effective connectivity in the mesolimbic system.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Yan, Chao; Xie, Wei-Zhen; Li, Ke; Zeng, Ya-Wei; Jin, Zhen; Cheung, Eric F C; Chan, Raymond C K

    2015-01-01

    Convergent evidence suggests the important role of the mesolimbic pathway in anticipating monetary rewards. However, the underlying mechanism of how the sub-regions interact with each other is still not clearly understood. Using dynamic causal modeling, we constructed a reward-related network for anticipating monetary reward using the Monetary Incentive Delay Task. Twenty-six healthy adolescents (Female/Male = 11/15; age = 18.69 ± 1.35 years; education = 12 ± 1.58 years) participated in the present study. The best-fit network involved the right substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area (SN/VTA), the right nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and the right thalamus, which were all activated during anticipation of monetary gain and loss. The SN/VTA directly activates the NAcc and the thalamus. More importantly, monetary gain modulated the connectivity from the SN/VTA to the NAcc and this was significantly correlated with subjective anticipatory pleasure (r = 0.649, p < 0.001). Our findings suggest that activity in the mesolimbic pathway during the anticipation of monetary reward could to some extent be predicted by subjective anticipatory pleasure.

  17. Language-driven anticipatory eye movements in virtual reality.

    PubMed

    Eichert, Nicole; Peeters, David; Hagoort, Peter

    2017-08-08

    Predictive language processing is often studied by measuring eye movements as participants look at objects on a computer screen while they listen to spoken sentences. This variant of the visual-world paradigm has revealed that information encountered by a listener at a spoken verb can give rise to anticipatory eye movements to a target object, which is taken to indicate that people predict upcoming words. The ecological validity of such findings remains questionable, however, because these computer experiments used two-dimensional stimuli that were mere abstractions of real-world objects. Here we present a visual-world paradigm study in a three-dimensional (3-D) immersive virtual reality environment. Despite significant changes in the stimulus materials and the different mode of stimulus presentation, language-mediated anticipatory eye movements were still observed. These findings thus indicate that people do predict upcoming words during language comprehension in a more naturalistic setting where natural depth cues are preserved. Moreover, the results confirm the feasibility of using eyetracking in rich and multimodal 3-D virtual environments.

  18. Foreign-accented speech modulates linguistic anticipatory processes.

    PubMed

    Romero-Rivas, Carlos; Martin, Clara D; Costa, Albert

    2016-05-01

    Listeners are able to anticipate upcoming words during sentence comprehension, and, as a result, they also pre-activate semantically related words. In the present study, we aim at exploring whether these anticipatory processes are modulated by indexical properties of the speakers, such as a speaker's accent. Event-related brain potentials were obtained while native speakers of Spanish listened to native (Experiment 1) or foreign-accented speakers (Experiment 2) of Spanish producing highly constrained sentences. The sentences ended in: (1) the highest cloze probability completion, (2) a word semantically related to the expected ending, or (3) a word with no semantic overlap with the expected ending. In Experiment 1, we observed smaller N400 mean amplitudes for the semantically related words as compared to the words with no semantic overlap, replicating previous findings. In Experiment 2, we observed no difference in integrating semantically related and unrelated words when listening to accented speech. These results suggest that linguistic anticipatory processes are affected by indexical properties of the speakers, such as the speaker's accent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Lighten up: Specific postural instructions affect axial rigidity and step initiation in patients with Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Rajal G.; Gurfinkel, Victor S.; Kwak, Elizabeth; Warden, Amelia C.; Horak, Fay B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with stooped postural alignment, increased postural sway, and reduced mobility. The Alexander Technique (AT) is a mindfulness-based approach to improving posture and mobility by reducing muscular interference while maintaining upward intentions. Evidence suggests that AT can reduce disability associated with PD, but a mechanism for this effect has not yet been established. Objective We investigated whether AT-based instructions reduce axial rigidity and increase upright postural alignment, and whether these instructions have different effects on postural alignment, axial rigidity, postural sway, and mobility than effort-based instructions regarding posture. Method Twenty subjects with PD practiced two sets of instructions and then attempted to implement both approaches (as well as a relaxed control condition) during quiet standing and step initiation. The ‘Lighten Up’ instructions relied on AT principles of reducing excess tension while encouraging length. The ‘Pull Up’ instructions relied on popular concepts of effortful posture correction. We measured kinematics, resistance to axial rotation, and ground reaction forces. Results Both sets of experimental instructions led to increases in upright postural alignment relative to the control condition. Only the Lighten Up instructions led to reduced postural sway, reduced axial postural tone, greater modifiability of tone, and a smoother center of pressure trajectory during step initiation, possibly indicating greater movement efficiency. Conclusion Mindful movement approaches such as AT may benefit balance and mobility in subjects with PD by acutely facilitating increased upright postural alignment while decreasing rigidity. PMID:25665828

  20. Developing Anticipatory Life Cycle Assessment Tools to Support Responsible Innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wender, Benjamin

    Several prominent research strategy organizations recommend applying life cycle assessment (LCA) early in the development of emerging technologies. For example, the US Environmental Protection Agency, the National Research Council, the Department of Energy, and the National Nanotechnology Initiative identify the potential for LCA to inform research and development (R&D) of photovoltaics and products containing engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). In this capacity, application of LCA to emerging technologies may contribute to the growing movement for responsible research and innovation (RRI). However, existing LCA practices are largely retrospective and ill-suited to support the objectives of RRI. For example, barriers related to data availability, rapid technology change, and isolation of environmental from technical research inhibit application of LCA to developing technologies. This dissertation focuses on development of anticipatory LCA tools that incorporate elements of technology forecasting, provide robust explorations of uncertainty, and engage diverse innovation actors in overcoming retrospective approaches to environmental assessment and improvement of emerging technologies. Chapter one contextualizes current LCA practices within the growing literature articulating RRI and identifies the optimal place in the stage gate innovation model to apply LCA. Chapter one concludes with a call to develop anticipatory LCA---building on the theory of anticipatory governance---as a series of methodological improvements that seek to align LCA practices with the objectives of RRI. Chapter two provides a framework for anticipatory LCA, identifies where research from multiple disciplines informs LCA practice, and builds off the recommendations presented in the preceding chapter. Chapter two focuses on crystalline and thin film photovoltaics (PV) to illustrate the novel framework, in part because PV is an environmentally motivated technology undergoing extensive R&D efforts and

  1. Determining posture from physiological tremor.

    PubMed

    Albert, Mark V; Kording, Konrad P

    2011-12-01

    The measurement of body and limb posture is important to many clinical and research studies. Current approaches either directly measure posture (e.g., using optical or magnetic methods) or more indirectly measure it by integrating changes over time (e.g., using gyroscopes and/or accelerometers). Here, we introduce a way of estimating posture from movements without requiring integration over time and the resulting complications. We show how the almost imperceptible tremor of the hand is affected by posture in an intuitive way and therefore can be used to estimate the posture of the arm. We recorded postures and tremor of the arms of volunteers. By using only the minor axis in the covariance of hand tremor, we could estimate the angle of the forearm with a standard deviation of about 4° when the subject's elbow is resting on a table and about 10° when it is off the table. This technique can also be applied as a post hoc analysis on other hand-position data sets to extract posture. This new method allows the estimation of body posture from tremor, is complementary to other techniques, and so can become a useful tool for future research and clinical applications.

  2. Determining posture from physiological tremor

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Mark V.; Kording, Konrad P.

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of body and limb posture is important to many clinical and research studies. Current approaches either directly measure posture (e.g., using optical or magnetic methods) or more indirectly measure it by integrating changes over time (e.g., using gyroscopes and/or accelerometers). Here, we introduce a way of estimating posture from movements without requiring integration over time and the resultingcomplications. Weshow how the almost imperceptible tremor of the hand is affected by posture in an intuitive way and therefore can be used to estimate the posture of the arm. We recorded postures and tremor of the arms of volunteers. By using only the minor axis in the covariance of hand tremor, we could estimate the angle of the forearm with a standard deviation of about 4° when the subject's elbow is resting on a table and about 10° when it is off the table. This technique can also be applied as a post hoc analysis on other hand-position data sets to extract posture. This new method allows the estimation of body posture from tremor, is complementary to other techniques, and so can become a useful tool for future research and clinical applications. PMID:21997329

  3. Distinguishing Anticipation from Causality: Anticipatory Bias in the Estimation of Information Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahs, Daniel W.; Pethel, Shawn D.

    2011-09-01

    We report that transfer entropy estimates obtained from low-resolution and/or small data sets show net information flow away from a purely anticipatory element whereas transfer entropy calculated using exact distributions show the flow towards it. This means that for real-world data sets anticipatory elements can appear to be strongly driving the network dynamics even when there is no possibility of such an influence. Furthermore, we show that in the low-resolution limit there is no statistic that can distinguish anticipatory elements from causal ones.

  4. Toward Sustainable Anticipatory Governance: Analyzing and Assessing Nanotechnology Innovation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Rider Williams

    Cities around the globe struggle with socio-economic disparities, resource inefficiency, environmental contamination, and quality-of-life challenges. Technological innovation, as one prominent approach to problem solving, promises to address these challenges; yet, introducing new technologies, such as nanotechnology, into society and cities has often resulted in negative consequences. Recent research has conceptually linked anticipatory governance and sustainability science: to understand the role of technology in complex problems our societies face; to anticipate negative consequences of technological innovation; and to promote long-term oriented and responsible governance of technologies. This dissertation advances this link conceptually and empirically, focusing on nanotechnology and urban sustainability challenges. The guiding question for this dissertation research is: How can nanotechnology be innovated and governed in responsible ways and with sustainable outcomes? The dissertation: analyzes the nanotechnology innovation process from an actor- and activities-oriented perspective (Chapter 2); assesses this innovation process from a comprehensive perspective on sustainable governance (Chapter 3); constructs a small set of future scenarios to consider future implications of different nanotechnology governance models (Chapter 4); and appraises the amenability of sustainability problems to nanotechnological interventions (Chapter 5). The four studies are based on data collected through literature review, document analysis, participant observation, interviews, workshops, and walking audits, as part of process analysis, scenario construction, and technology assessment. Research was conducted in collaboration with representatives from industry, government agencies, and civic organizations. The empirical parts of the four studies focus on Metropolitan Phoenix. Findings suggest that: predefined mandates and economic goals dominate the nanotechnology innovation process

  5. Attention Demand and Postural Control in Children with Hearing Deficit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derlich, Malgorzata; Krecisz, Krzysztof; Kuczynski, Michal

    2011-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms responsible for deteriorated postural control in children with hearing deficit (CwHD), we measured center-of-pressure (COP) variability, mean velocity and entropy in bipedal quiet stance (feet together) with or without the concurrent cognitive task (reaction to visual stimulus) on hard or foam surface in 29 CwHD and a…

  6. Attention Demand and Postural Control in Children with Hearing Deficit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derlich, Malgorzata; Krecisz, Krzysztof; Kuczynski, Michal

    2011-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms responsible for deteriorated postural control in children with hearing deficit (CwHD), we measured center-of-pressure (COP) variability, mean velocity and entropy in bipedal quiet stance (feet together) with or without the concurrent cognitive task (reaction to visual stimulus) on hard or foam surface in 29 CwHD and a…

  7. Postural performance of vestibular loss patients under increased postural threat.

    PubMed

    Young, Laurence R; Bernard-Demanze, Laurence; Dumitrescu, Michel; Magnan, Jacques; Borel, Liliane; Lacour, Michel

    2012-01-01

    The effects of increasing postural task difficulty on balance control was investigated in 9 compensated vestibular loss patients whose results were compared to 11 healthy adults. Subjects were tested in static (stable support) and dynamic (sinusoidal translation of the support) conditions, both at floor level and at height (62 cm above the floor), and with and without vision, to create an additional postural threat. Wavelet analysis of the center of foot pressure displacement and motion analysis of the body segments were used to evaluate the postural performance. Evaluation questionnaires were used to examine the compensation level of the patients (DHI test), their general anxiety level (SAST), fear of height (subjective scale), and workload (NASA TLX test). (Vestibular loss patients rely more on vision and spend more energy maintaining balance than controls, but they use the same postural strategy as normals in both static and dynamic conditions.) Questionnaire data all showed differences in behavior and perceptions between the controls and the patients. However, at height and without vision, a whole body strategy leading to rigid posture replaces the head stabilization strategy found for standing at floor level. The effects of height on postural control can be attributable to an increase in postural threat and attention changes resulting from modifications in perception.

  8. A new posture measurement method for measuring intrinsic standing posture.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Shigehisa; Kodama, Naoki; Maeda, Naoto; Sakamoto, Shunichi; Minagi, Shogo

    2014-04-01

    Although body posture in relation to the dental condition has been of great interest in the dental profession, rumination bias has been a substantial obstacle to achieving a reliable objective evaluation of the intrinsic body posture. The aim of this study was to establish a posture control protocol that would minimize the effect of bias. Fifteen healthy male volunteers (23-33 years of age) participated in this study. The posture movement was recorded for 10 seconds by a three-dimensional motion capture system. The experiment was performed on four different days. The posture was most stable at 4-5 seconds after the start of the front bulb gaze (the mean coefficient of variation ranged from 0.1 to 44.1). The intraclass correlation coefficients for four days were 0.871-0.975 (P < or = 0.001). It was concluded that the use of this measurement method helped in producing a reliable intrinsic standing posture where unbiased evaluation of the effect of any intervention on the body posture is researched.

  9. Gravitational Effects upon Locomotion Posture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, John K.; Bentley, Jason R.; Edwards, W. Brent; Perusek, Gail P.; Samorezov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    Researchers use actual microgravity (AM) during parabolic flight and simulated microgravity (SM) obtained with horizontal suspension analogs to better understand the effect of gravity upon gait. In both environments, the gravitational force is replaced by an external load (EL) that returns the subject to the treadmill. However, when compared to normal gravity (N), researchers consistently find reduced ground reaction forces (GRF) and subtle kinematic differences (Schaffner et al., 2005). On the International Space Station, the EL is applied by elastic bungees attached to a waist and shoulder harness. While bungees can provide EL approaching body weight (BW), their force-length characteristics coupled with vertical oscillations of the body during gait result in a variable load. However, during locomotion in N, the EL is consistently equal to 100% body weight. Comparisons between AM and N have shown that during running, GRF are decreased in AM (Schaffner et al, 2005). Kinematic evaluations in the past have focussed on joint range of motion rather than joint posture at specific instances of the gait cycle. The reduced GRF in microgravity may be a result of differing hip, knee, and ankle positions during contact. The purpose of this investigation was to compare joint angles of the lower extremities during walking and running in AM, SM, and N. We hypothesized that in AM and SM, joints would be more flexed at heel strike (HS), mid-stance (MS) and toe-off (TO) than in N.

  10. Influences of age and light touch on the preparation for protective stepping reactions.

    PubMed

    O-Phartkaruna, Tippawan; Pichaiyongwongdee, Sopa; Tretriluxana, Jarugool; Vachalathiti, Rungtiwa

    2014-07-01

    The present study examined the effect of light touch on the preparation for fall-induced protective stepping in elderly and young individuals. The subjects were perturbed with forward pull with no-touch and light touch conditions. Anticipatory periods, lift-off onset, center of pressure displacement and velocity were measured and analyzed. The authors observed a stabilizing effect during with light touch in pre-perturbation periods. During the perturbation, the elderly took steps earlier than did the young individuals by reducing anticipatory periods; however, their anterior stability limit was similar to that of the youth, indicating that the step was pre-selected. In the youth, a delay in anticipatory onset and shorter periods were observed with light touch, resulting from a limitation in lateral limb loading. Additionally, the stabilizing effect in the pre-perturbation period did not influence stabilization of preparatory period before stepping. In the elderly, shorter anticipatory periods and lower stability limits were also shown in light touch conditions. The authors concluded that the elderly were more concerned with a postural task than with light touch. Protective stepping is reflected in the state of balance stability and involves a pre-selection process. Light touch enhances postural stability in stance and impacts the stepping.

  11. Anticipatory Behavior and Intracellular Communication in Physarum polycephalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirakawa, Tomohiro; Gunji, Yukio-Pegio

    2006-06-01

    We used the plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum to investigate a communicative property of a cell. We allowed the plasmodium to form a tubular network that connected three food sources, which were arranged to be located at the vertices of an equilateral triangle. The global condition of the plasmodium is changed by the connection of two networks in such a way that the local solution of each network was not affected. We used several criteria to evaluate the character of the network. The change in the global condition appeared to cause significant difference in the network properties, and two connected networks showed homologous network formation. These data imply the presence of intracellular communication and anticipatory aspect in their communication.

  12. Center-of-pressure regularity as a marker for attentional investment in postural control: a comparison between sitting and standing postures.

    PubMed

    Roerdink, Melvyn; Hlavackova, Petra; Vuillerme, Nicolas

    2011-04-01

    Postural control is a highly automatized basic activity that requires limited attentional investments. These investments have been shown to increase from balancing experts to controls, and from controls to persons with impaired postural control. Such between-subject comparisons led to a proposed direct relation between the regularity of center-of-pressure (COP) fluctuations and the amount of attention invested in posture. This study aims to expand this relation to a within-subject comparison of conditions that differ in balance demands. Specifically, more regular COP fluctuations were expected for standing than sitting, as stimulus-response reaction-time studies showed that the required attentional demands are lower for sitting than standing. COP registrations were made for fifteen healthy young adults in seated and standing postures. COP regularity was quantified with sample entropy. As expected, COP fluctuations were found to be more regular for standing than sitting, as evidenced by significantly lower sample entropy values. These findings expand the relation between COP regularity and the amount of attention invested in posture to postural tasks that vary in balance demands. An assessment of COP regularity may thus not only be instrumental in the examination of attentional investment in posture in between-subject designs, but also for different postures in within-subjects designs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Coordination between posture and movement in a bimanual load-lifting task: is there a transfer?

    PubMed

    Ioffe, M; Massion, J; Gantchev, N; Dufosse, M; Kulikov, M A

    1996-06-01

    The present experimental series was designed to test the possibility that an anticipatory postural adjustment learned during the performance of a bimanual load lifting task may be transferred between the upper extremities. Eight seated subjects were asked to maintain horizontally one forearm (postural arm) loaded with a 1-kg load, which was fixed to the arm by means of an electromagnet. The unloading was triggered either by the experimenter pressing a switch (control) or by the subjects making a voluntary movement with their other arm (moving arm). In the latter case, the subject lifted a 1-kg load resting on a force platform with the moving hand, and the switching off was triggered when the force level reached a threshold of 0.5 kg. The maximum amplitude (MA) and the maximum velocity (MV) of the postural forearm elbow joint rotation occurring after the unloading were measured at each trial. The learning process was estimated by performing a regression analysis on each series of trials, using an exponential model, and from the intercept of the regression curve with the ordinate. 1. During the original learning session (three series of 20 trials), a decrease in MA and MV was found to occur both within the series and between the series during a session. 2. After the initial learning session, the sides of the postural and moving arm were interchanged to test whether any transfer had occurred. The first series of trials in the second session (transfer) and the last series of trials in the original learning session were compared and found to be significantly different in terms of the intercept (seven subjects in the case of MA, five subjects in the case of MV) and the slope (five subjects), indicating a lack of transfer. 3. The data recorded during the second transfer learning session indicated that learning occurred in all eight subjects in the case of MA and in six subjects in the case of MV. It was observed that the original learning session did not facilitate the

  14. Anticipatory brain activity predicts the success or failure of subsequent emotion regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ochsner, Kevin N.; Weber, Jochen; Wager, Tor D.

    2014-01-01

    Expectations about an upcoming emotional event have the power to shape one’s subsequent affective response for better or worse. Here, we used mediation analyses to examine the relationship between brain activity when anticipating the need to cognitively reappraise aversive images, amygdala responses to those images and subsequent success in diminishing negative affect. We found that anticipatory activity in right rostrolateral prefrontal cortex was associated with greater subsequent left amygdala responses to aversive images and decreased regulation success. In contrast, anticipatory ventral anterior insula activity was associated with reduced amygdala responses and greater reappraisal success. In both cases, left amygdala responses mediated the relationship between anticipatory activity and reappraisal success. These results suggest that anticipation facilitates successful reappraisal via reduced anticipatory prefrontal ‘cognitive’ elaboration and better integration of affective information in paralimbic and subcortical systems. PMID:23202664

  15. Risk Factors for Anticipatory Grief in Family Members of Terminally Ill Veterans Receiving Palliative Care Services.

    PubMed

    Burke, Laurie A; Clark, Karen A; Ali, Khatidja S; Gibson, Benjamin W; Smigelsky, Melissa A; Neimeyer, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Anticipatory grief is the process associated with grieving the loss of loved ones in advance of their inevitable death. Because anticipatory grief has been associated with a variety of outcomes, risk factors for this condition deserve closer consideration. Fifty-seven family members of terminally ill, hospice-eligible veterans receiving palliative care services completed measures assessing psychosocial factors and conditions. Elevated anticipatory grief was found in families characterized by relational dependency, lower education, and poor grief-specific support, who also experienced discomfort with closeness and intimacy, neuroticism, spiritual crisis, and an inability to make sense of the loss. Thus, in this sample, anticipatory grief appears to be part of a cluster of factors and associated distress that call for early monitoring and possible intervention.

  16. [Menisci and posture].

    PubMed

    Sérgio, J S

    2000-01-01

    The first aim of this work is not only to review the localised perspective of meniscopathy, concerned with the consequences of meniscectomy, but to also view it in a broader dimension, in the behavioural aspect--related to postural activity. The second aim is to establish the relationship between these two dimensions. Meniscopathies invariably lead to degenerative alterations of the knee joint--not sufficiently explained by the local factors--that result in a situation of osteoarthritis. Some investigators established that the osteoarthritis process should not be confined only to the mechanical responsibility, due to some studies that also confirm the existence of biochemical alterations. However, others have also shown that the nervous system (NS) is likely to influence the inflammatory manifestations through the unmyelinated afferent fibers and sympathetic efferent fibers of the joints. These fibers can interact with non-neural elements, releasing some mediators, such as P substance (PS) and norepinephrine (NE), which, by themselves, or through other substances, contribute to the exacerbation of the inflammatory process. In order to relate the facts above, this longitudinal study comprised the following approaches clinical: anthropometric; biotechnical; and posturographic. It was characterised by five moments of data collection, the periodicity of which is related to the time of the surgery: the first moment is before surgery, followed by the remaining four, at six-week intervals, the sample being composed of--15 male caucasians, aged between 20 and 30 years, working for the Air Force. These Subjects were divided into two groups, according to the amount of meniscus removed in the longitudinal direction. Group A--meniscectomy < 1/2 the longitudinal body, composed of 7 subjects, with an average age of 21.4 years; and Group B, meniscectomy > 1/2 the longitudinal body, composed of: 8 subjects, with an average age of 24.1 years. The statistical analysis contained a

  17. Stabilizing posture through imagery.

    PubMed

    Papalia, Eleonora; Manzoni, Diego; Santarcangelo, Enrica L

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In the general population, suppression of vision modulates body sway by increasing the center of pressure (CoP) velocity, while a light fingertip touch reduces the area of the CoP displacement in blindfolded subjects. This study assessed whether imagined fixation and fingertip touch differentially stabilize posture in subjects with high (highs) and low (lows) hypnotizability. Visual and tactile imageries were ineffective in lows. In highs, the effects of visual imagery could not be evaluated because the real information was ineffective; real tactile stimulation was effective only on velocity, but the imagery effects could not be definitely assessed owing to low effect size. The highs' larger variability could account for this and represents the most important finding.

  18. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  19. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  20. A telerehabilitation program improves postural control in multiple sclerosis patients: a Spanish preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Gutiérrez, Rosa; Cano-de-la-Cuerda, Roberto; Galán-del-Río, Fernando; Alguacil-Diego, Isabel María; Palacios-Ceña, Domingo; Miangolarra-Page, Juan Carlos

    2013-10-31

    Postural control disorders are among the most frequent motor disorder symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis. This study aims to demonstrate the potential improvements in postural control among patients with multiple sclerosis who complete a telerehabilitation program that represents a feasible alternative to physical therapy for situations in which conventional treatment is not available. Fifty patients were recruited. Control group (n = 25) received physiotherapy treatment twice a week (40 min per session). Experimental group (n = 25) received monitored telerehabilitation treatment via videoconference using the Xbox 360® and Kinect console. Experimental group attended 40 sessions, four sessions per week (20 min per session).The treatment schedule lasted 10 weeks for both groups. A computerized dynamic posturography (Sensory Organization Test) was used to evaluate all patients at baseline and at the end of the treatment protocol. Results showed an improvement over general balance in both groups. Visual preference and the contribution of vestibular information yielded significant differences in the experimental group. Our results demonstrated that a telerehabilitation program based on a virtual reality system allows one to optimize the sensory information processing and integration systems necessary to maintain the balance and postural control of people with multiple sclerosis. We suggest that our virtual reality program enables anticipatory PC and response mechanisms and might serve as a successful therapeutic alternative in situations in which conventional therapy is not readily available.

  1. A Telerehabilitation Program Improves Postural Control in Multiple Sclerosis Patients: A Spanish Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Gutiérrez, Rosa; Cano-de-la-Cuerda, Roberto; Galán-del-Río, Fernando; Alguacil-Diego, Isabel María; Palacios-Ceña, Domingo; Miangolarra-Page, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Postural control disorders are among the most frequent motor disorder symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis. This study aims to demonstrate the potential improvements in postural control among patients with multiple sclerosis who complete a telerehabilitation program that represents a feasible alternative to physical therapy for situations in which conventional treatment is not available. Fifty patients were recruited. Control group (n = 25) received physiotherapy treatment twice a week (40 min per session). Experimental group (n = 25) received monitored telerehabilitation treatment via videoconference using the Xbox 360® and Kinect console. Experimental group attended 40 sessions, four sessions per week (20 min per session).The treatment schedule lasted 10 weeks for both groups. A computerized dynamic posturography (Sensory Organization Test) was used to evaluate all patients at baseline and at the end of the treatment protocol. Results showed an improvement over general balance in both groups. Visual preference and the contribution of vestibular information yielded significant differences in the experimental group. Our results demonstrated that a telerehabilitation program based on a virtual reality system allows one to optimize the sensory information processing and integration systems necessary to maintain the balance and postural control of people with multiple sclerosis. We suggest that our virtual reality program enables anticipatory PC and response mechanisms and might serve as a successful therapeutic alternative in situations in which conventional therapy is not readily available. PMID:24185843

  2. Anticipatory control of grasping: independence of sensorimotor memories for kinematics and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Lukos, Jamie R; Ansuini, Caterina; Santello, Marco

    2008-11-26

    We have recently provided evidence for anticipatory grasp control mechanisms in the kinematic domain by showing that subjects modulate digit placement on an object based on its center of mass (CM) when it can be anticipated (Lukos et al., 2007). This behavior relied on sensorimotor memories about digit contact points and forces required for optimal manipulation. We found that accurate sensorimotor memories depended on the acquisition of implicit knowledge about object properties associated with repeated manipulations of the same object. Whereas implicit knowledge of object properties is essential for anticipatory grasp control, the extent to which subjects can use explicit knowledge to accurately scale digit forces in an anticipatory manner is controversial. Additionally, it is not known whether subjects are able to use explicit knowledge of object properties for anticipatory control of contact points. We addressed this question by asking subjects to grasp and lift an object while providing explicit knowledge of object CM location as visual or verbal cues. Contact point modulation and object roll, a measure of anticipatory force control, were assessed using blocked and random CM presentations. We found that explicit knowledge of object CM enabled subjects to modulate contact points. In contrast, subjects could not minimize object roll in the random condition to the same extent as in the blocked when provided with a verbal or visual cue. These findings point to a dissociation in the effect of explicit knowledge of object properties on grasp kinematics versus kinetics, thus suggesting independent anticipatory processes for grasping.

  3. Anticipatory control of grasping: independence of sensorimotor memories for kinematics and kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Lukos, Jamie R.; Ansuini, Caterina; Santello, Marco

    2008-01-01

    We have recently provided evidence for anticipatory grasp control mechanisms in the kinematic domain by showing that subjects modulate digit placement on an object based on its center of mass (CM) when it can be anticipated (Lukos et al., 2007). This behavior relied on sensorimotor memories about digit contact points and forces required for optimal manipulation. We found that accurate sensorimotor memories depended on the acquisition of implicit knowledge about object properties associated with repeated manipulations of the same object. Whereas implicit knowledge of object properties is essential for anticipatory grasp control, the extent to which subjects can use explicit knowledge to accurately scale digit forces in an anticipatory fashion is controversial. Additionally, it is not known if subjects are able to use explicit knowledge of object properties for anticipatory control of contact points. We addressed this question by asking subjects to grasp and lift an object while providing explicit knowledge of object CM location as visual or verbal cues. Contact point modulation and object roll, a measure of anticipatory force control, were assessed using blocked and random CM presentations. We found that explicit knowledge of object CM enabled subjects to modulate contact points. In contrast, subjects could not minimize object roll in the random condition to the same extent as in the blocked when provided with a verbal or visual cue. These findings point to a dissociation in the effect of explicit knowledge of object properties on grasp kinematics vs. kinetics, thus suggesting independent anticipatory processes for grasping. PMID:19036969

  4. Attention modulates step initiation postural adjustments in Parkinson freezers.

    PubMed

    Tard, Céline; Dujardin, Kathy; Bourriez, Jean-Louis; Destée, Alain; Derambure, Philippe; Defebvre, Luc; Delval, Arnaud

    2014-03-01

    In view of freezing of gait's circumstances of occurrence in Parkinson's disease, attentional resources appear to be involved in step initiation failure. Anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) are essential because they allow unloading of the stepping leg and so create the conditions required for progression. Our main objective was to establish whether or not a change in attentional load during step initiation modulates APAs differently in patients with vs. without freezing of gait. Three groups of 15 subjects were recruited: elderly people and parkinsonian patients with or without freezing of gait. Attention was modulated before step execution by means of an auditory oddball discrimination task with event-related potential recording. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of inappropriate APAs following the attentional task, i.e. APAs not followed by a step after an intercurrent auditory stimulus. In parkinsonian patients with freezing of gait, inappropriate APAs were recorded in 63% of the trials and were observed more frequently than in patients without freezing of gait (51%) and elderly controls (48%). Furthermore, inappropriate APAs in freezers were longer and more ample than in parkinsonian non-freezers and controls. Lastly, postural preparation was impaired in the parkinsonian patients. Our results indicate that allocation of attentional resources during step preparation influences the release of APAs differently in freezers and non-freezers. Modulating attentional load is partly responsible for triggering an inappropriate motor program. This difficulty in focusing attention or resisting interference may contribute (at least in part) to the gait initiation failure observed in parkinsonian freezers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The influence of initial posture on the sit-to-stand movement.

    PubMed

    Stevens, C; Bojsen-Møller, F; Soames, R W

    1989-01-01

    Head movements, ground reaction forces and electromyographic activity of selected muscles were recorded simultaneously from two subjects as they performed the sit-to-stand manouevre under a variety of conditions. The influence of initial leg posture on the magnitude of the various parameters under investigation was examined first. A preferred initial leg posture resulted in smaller magnitudes of head movement and ground reaction forces. EMG activity in some muscles, trapezius and erector spinae, decreased, while in others, quadriceps and hamstrings, it increased in the preferred leg posture. The decreases seen correlate with reductions in head movement observed. The effect of inhibiting habitual postural adjustments of the head and neck, by comparing "free" and "guided" movements was also examined. In guided movements there are significant reductions in head movement, ground reaction forces and EMG activity in trapezius, sternomastoid and erector spinae. It would appear that both initial leg posture and the abolition of habitual postural adjustment have a profound influence on the efficiency of the sit-to-stand manouevre. This preliminary study high-lights the practical importance of head posture in the diagnosis and treatment of movement disorders, as well as in movement education.

  6. Dynamic postural control and associated attentional demands in contemporary dancers versus non-dancers.

    PubMed

    Sirois-Leclerc, Geneviève; Remaud, Anthony; Bilodeau, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Postural control is not a fully automatic process, but requires a certain level of attention, particularly as the difficulty of the postural task increases. This study aimed at testing whether experienced contemporary dancers, because of their specialized training involving the control of posture/balance, would present with a dual-task performance suggesting lesser attentional demands associated with dynamic postural control compared with non-dancers. Twenty dancers and 16 non-dancers performed a dynamic postural tracking task in both antero-posterior and side-to-side directions, while standing on a force platform. The postural task was performed, in turn, 1) as a stand-alone task, and concurrently with both 2) a simple reaction time task and 3) a choice reaction time task. Postural control performance was estimated through variables calculated from centre of pressure movements. Although no overall group difference was found in reaction time values, we found a better ability to control the side to side movements of the centre of pressure during the tracking task in dancers compared with non-dancers, which was dependent on the secondary task. This suggests that such increased ability is influenced by available attentional resources.

  7. Dynamic postural control and associated attentional demands in contemporary dancers versus non-dancers

    PubMed Central

    Sirois-Leclerc, Geneviève; Remaud, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Postural control is not a fully automatic process, but requires a certain level of attention, particularly as the difficulty of the postural task increases. This study aimed at testing whether experienced contemporary dancers, because of their specialized training involving the control of posture/balance, would present with a dual-task performance suggesting lesser attentional demands associated with dynamic postural control compared with non-dancers. Twenty dancers and 16 non-dancers performed a dynamic postural tracking task in both antero-posterior and side-to-side directions, while standing on a force platform. The postural task was performed, in turn, 1) as a stand-alone task, and concurrently with both 2) a simple reaction time task and 3) a choice reaction time task. Postural control performance was estimated through variables calculated from centre of pressure movements. Although no overall group difference was found in reaction time values, we found a better ability to control the side to side movements of the centre of pressure during the tracking task in dancers compared with non-dancers, which was dependent on the secondary task. This suggests that such increased ability is influenced by available attentional resources. PMID:28323843

  8. [Stomatognathic system and body posture in children with sensoriomotor deficits].

    PubMed

    do Val, Daniela Cristina; Limongi, Suelly Cecília Olivan; Flabiano, Fabíola Custódio; da Silva, Ketley Cristine Linhares

    2005-01-01

    Literature points that body posture is an important aspect in the treatment of children with sensorimotor deficits. Considering individuals with cerebral palsy, reflexes are often more intense than reactions of rectification and equilibrium, causing, therefore, a delay or obstacle in cervical, torso and hip control. This delay has as a consequence an impact on the Stomatognathic System. To verify the relation between body posture and the Stomatognathic System in this population, regarding posture and function, and its effectiveness in the process of speech-language intervention. 17 children with sensorimotor deficits, aged between 1 and 6:3 years, were submitted to an initial assessment, followed by speech-language intervention and re-assessment. Speech-language intervention occurred for a period of 10 months, with weekly individual sessions, always in the presence of the caretaker. All sessions were transcribed in a specific protocol and the assessment and re-assessment sessions were videotaped. A statistically significant improvement of stomatognathic system in 100% of the children was observed, not only of the isolated structures, but also of the whole system. The same was observed for the assessed functions. The improvement of body posture of the studied children favored significantly the development and improvement of the stomatognathic system regarding the aspects of posture and function.

  9. Postural control during standing reach in children with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao-Ling; Yeh, Chun-Fu; Howe, Tsu-Hsin

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the dynamic postural control of children with Down syndrome (DS). Specifically, we compared postural control and goal-directed reaching performance between children with DS and typically developing children during standing reach. Standing reach performance was analyzed in three main phases using the kinematic and kinetic data collected from a force plate and a motion capture system. Fourteen children with DS, age and gender matched with fourteen typically developing children, were recruited for this study. The results showed that the demand of the standing reach task affected both dynamic postural control and reaching performance in children with DS, especially in the condition of beyond arm's length reaching. More postural adjustment strategies were recruited when reaching distance was beyond arm's length. Children with DS tended to use inefficient and conservative strategies for postural stability and reaching. That is, children with DS perform standing reach with increased reaction and execution time and decreased amplitudes of center of pressure displacements. Standing reach resembled functional balance that is required in daily activities. It is suggested to be considered as a part of strength and balance training program with graded task difficulty. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dual-Tasking Effects on Dynamic Postural Stability in Athletes With and Without Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi-Rad, Shahrzad; Salavati, Mahyar; Ebrahimi-Takamjani, Ismail; Akhbari, Behnam; Sherafat, Shiva; Negahban, Hossein; Lali, Pezhman; Mazaheri, Masood

    2016-12-01

    To compare the effect of dual tasking on postural stability between patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) and healthy controls. Single-limb postural stability was assessed in 17 athletes with ACL-R and 17 healthy matched athletes while standing on a Biodex Balance System platform in 4 conditions: stability level of 8 (ie, more-stable support surface) with eyes open, stability level of 8 with eyes closed, stability level of 6 (ie, less-stable support surface) with eyes open, and stability level of 6 with eyes closed. Postural-stability tasks were performed with and without auditory Stroop task. The anteroposterior stability index (APSI), mediolateral stability index (MLSI), and overall stability index (OSI) as measures of postural performance, as well as reaction time and error ratio as measures of cognitive performance, were recorded. Dual-tasking effect on postural stability was not significantly different between the groups in 3 postural conditions. Only in level 6 with eyes open, for APSI and OSI, patients with ACL-R showed lower postural stability under the dual-task condition. However, patients showed poorer performance on both reaction time and error ratio in all postural conditions. The patients with ACL-R appeared to sacrifice their cognitive performance to optimize their performance on postural stability. This posture-first strategy was reflected by a more pronounced effect of dual tasking on the auditory Stroop task than the postural-stability task. In situations where maintenance of posture is challenging, giving priority to the postural task at the expense of cognitive performance can ensure safety from balance loss.

  11. Imaging Posture Veils Neural Signals

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, Robert T.; Raz, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Whereas modern brain imaging often demands holding body positions incongruent with everyday life, posture governs both neural activity and cognitive performance. Humans commonly perform while upright; yet, many neuroimaging methodologies require participants to remain motionless and adhere to non-ecological comportments within a confined space. This inconsistency between ecological postures and imaging constraints undermines the transferability and generalizability of many a neuroimaging assay. Here we highlight the influence of posture on brain function and behavior. Specifically, we challenge the tacit assumption that brain processes and cognitive performance are comparable across a spectrum of positions. We provide an integrative synthesis regarding the increasingly prominent influence of imaging postures on autonomic function, mental capacity, sensory thresholds, and neural activity. Arguing that neuroimagers and cognitive scientists could benefit from considering the influence posture wields on both general functioning and brain activity, we examine existing imaging technologies and the potential of portable and versatile imaging devices (e.g., functional near infrared spectroscopy). Finally, we discuss ways that accounting for posture may help unveil the complex brain processes of everyday cognition. PMID:27818629

  12. A short essay on posture and movement.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J P

    1977-01-01

    Certain statements concerning the relation of posture and movement which have become traditional are re-examined--in particular, the statement 'Movement (that is, pysiological movement) consists of a series of postures. The theme of the essay is the posture--that is, postural activity--should be regarded as a function in its own right and not merely as a component of movement and, secondly, that expressions such as a' series of postures' or 'a change of posture' are not valid as definitions of physiological movement is general, but describe only movement which is part of the postural function. Voluntary movement consists of much more than a series of postures and its significance, ordinarily, is not postural. PMID:845603

  13. Postural threat influences conscious perception of postural sway.

    PubMed

    Cleworth, Taylor W; Carpenter, Mark G

    2016-05-04

    This study examined how changes in threat influenced conscious perceptions of postural sway. Young healthy adults stood on a forceplate mounted to a hydraulic lift placed at two heights (0.8m and 3.2m). At each height, subjects stood quietly with eyes open and eyes closed for 60s. Subjects were instructed to either stand normal, or stand normal and track their perceived sway in the antero-posterior plane by rotating a hand-held potentiometer. Participants reported an increased level of fear, anxiety, arousal and a decreased level of balance confidence when standing at height. In addition, postural sway amplitude decreased and frequency increased at height. However, there were no effects of height on perceived sway. When standing under conditions of increased postural threat, sway amplitude is reduced, while sway perception appears to remain unchanged. Therefore, when threat is increased, sensory gain may be increased to compensate for postural strategies that reduce sway (i.e. stiffening strategy), thereby ensuring sufficient afferent information is available to maintain, or even increase the conscious perception of postural sway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Metabolic activation of amygdala, lateral septum and accumbens circuits during food anticipatory behavior.

    PubMed

    Olivo, Diana; Caba, Mario; Gonzalez-Lima, Francisco; Rodríguez-Landa, Juan F; Corona-Morales, Aleph A

    2017-01-01

    When food is restricted to a brief fixed period every day, animals show an increase in temperature, corticosterone concentration and locomotor activity for 2-3h before feeding time, termed food anticipatory activity. Mechanisms and neuroanatomical circuits responsible for food anticipatory activity remain unclear, and may involve both oscillators and networks related to temporal conditioning. Rabbit pups are nursed once-a-day so they represent a natural model of circadian food anticipatory activity. Food anticipatory behavior in pups may be associated with neural circuits that temporally anticipate feeding, while the nursing event may produce consummatory effects. Therefore, we used New Zealand white rabbit pups entrained to circadian feeding to investigate the hypothesis that structures related to reward expectation and conditioned emotional responses would show a metabolic rhythm anticipatory of the nursing event, different from that shown by structures related to reward delivery. Quantitative cytochrome oxidase histochemistry was used to measure regional brain metabolic activity at eight different times during the day. We found that neural metabolism peaked before nursing, during food anticipatory behavior, in nuclei of the extended amygdala (basolateral, medial and central nuclei, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis), lateral septum and accumbens core. After pups were fed, however, maximal metabolic activity was expressed in the accumbens shell, caudate, putamen and cortical amygdala. Neural and behavioral activation persisted when animals were fasted by two cycles, at the time of expected nursing. These findings suggest that metabolic activation of amygdala-septal-accumbens circuits involved in temporal conditioning may contribute to food anticipatory activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Contribution of Pre-impact Spine Posture on Human Body Model Response in Whole-body Side Impact.

    PubMed

    Poulard, David; Subit, Damien; Donlon, John-Paul; Lessley, David J; Kim, Taewung; Park, Gwansik; Kent, Richard W

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze independently the contribution of pre-impact spine posture on impact response by subjecting a finite element human body model (HBM) to whole-body, lateral impacts. Seven postured models were created from the original HBM: one matching the standard driving posture and six matching pre-impact posture measured for each of six subjects tested in previously published experiments. The same measurements as those obtained during the experiments were calculated from the simulations, and biofidelity metrics based on signals correlation were established to compare the response of HBM to that of the cadavers. HBM responses showed good correlation with the subject response for the reaction forces, the rib strain (correlation score=0.8) and the overall kinematics. The pre-impact posture was found to greatly alter the reaction forces, deflections and the strain time histories mainly in terms of time delay. By modifying only the posture of HBM, the variability in the impact response was found to be equivalent to that observed in the experiments performed with cadavers with different anthropometries. The patterns observed in the responses of the postured HBM indicate that the inclination of the spine in the frontal plane plays a major role. The postured HBM sustained from 2 to 5 bone fractures, including the scapula in some cases, confirming that the pre-impact posture influences the injury outcome predicted by the simulation.

  16. Effects of low back pain and of Stabilization or Movement-System-Impairment treatments on voluntary postural adjustments: randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Lomond, Karen V.; Jacobs, Jesse V.; Hitt, Juvena R.; DeSarno, Michael J.; Bunn, Janice Y.; Henry, Sharon M.

    2014-01-01

    Background People with low back pain (LBP) exhibit impaired anticipatory postural adjustment (APAs). Objective To evaluate whether current motor retraining treatments address LBP-associated changes in movement coordination during tasks that do and do not require APAs. Design Prospectively registered, randomized controlled trial with a blinded assessor. Setting Outcome evaluations occurred in a university laboratory; treatments, in outpatient physical therapy clinics. Patients Fifteen subjects without LBP and 33 subjects with chronic, recurrent, non-specific LBP. Intervention Twelve subjects with LBP received stabilization treatment, 21 received Movement System Impairment (MSI)-based treatment, over 6 weekly 1-hour sessions plus home exercises. Measurements Pre- and post- treatment, surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded bilaterally from trunk and leg muscles during unsupported and supported leg-lifting tasks, which did and did not require an APA, respectively. Vertical reaction forces under the contralateral leg were recorded to characterize the APA. Oswestry disability scores and numeric pain ratings were also recorded. Results Persons with LBP demonstrated an impaired APA compared to persons without LBP, characterized by increased pre-movement contralateral force application and increased post-movement trunk EMG amplitude, regardless of the task. Following treatments, both groups similarly improved in disability and function; however, APA characteristics did not change (i.e. force application or EMG amplitude) in either task. Limitations Treating clinicians were not blinded to treatment allocation, only short-term outcomes were assessed, and main effects of treatment do not rule out non-specific effects of time or repeated exposure. Conclusions Movement impairments in persons with LBP are not limited to tasks requiring an APA. Stabilization and MSI-based treatments for LBP do not ameliorate, and may exacerbate, APA impairments (i.e., excessive force

  17. Engineering imaginaries: Anticipatory foresight for solar radiation management governance.

    PubMed

    Low, Sean

    2017-02-15

    Since solar radiation management (SRM) technologies do not yet exist and capacities to model their impacts are limited, proposals for its governance are implicitly designed not around realities, but possibilities - baskets of risk and benefit that are often components of future imaginaries. This paper reports on the project Solar Radiation Management: Foresight for Governance (SRM4G), which aimed to encourage an anticipatory mode of thinking about the future of an engineered climate. Leveraging the participation of 15 scholars and practitioners heavily engaged in early conversations on SRM governance, SRM4G applied scenario construction to generate a set of alternative futures leading to 2030, each exercising different influences on the need for - and challenges associated with - development of SRM technologies. The scenarios then provided the context for the design of systems of governance with the capacity and legitimacy to respond to those challenges, and for the evaluation of the advantages and drawbacks of different options against a wide range of imaginary but plausible futures. SRM4G sought to initiate a conversation within the SRM research community on the capacity of foresight approaches to highlight the centrality of conceptions of the future to discussions of SRM's threats and opportunities, and in doing so, examined and challenged the assumptions embedded in conceptualizing SRM's aims, development and governance, and discussed the capacity of governance options to adapt to a wide range of possibilities.

  18. Feasibility of an anticipatory noncontact precrash restraint actuation system

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.; Dress, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    The problem of providing an electronic warning of an impending crash to a precrash restraint system a fraction of a second before physical contact differs from more widely explored problems, such as providing several seconds of crash warning to a driver. One approach to precrash restraint sensing is to apply anticipatory system theory. This consists of nested simplified models of the system to be controlled and of the system`s environment. It requires sensory information to describe the ``current state`` of the system and the environment. The models use the sensory data to make a faster-than-real-time prediction about the near future. Anticipation theory is well founded but rarely used. A major problem is to extract real-time current-state information from inexpensive sensors. Providing current-state information to the nested models is the weakest element of the system. Therefore, sensors and real-time processing of sensor signals command the most attention in an assessment of system feasibility. This paper describes problem definition, potential ``showstoppers,`` and ways to overcome them. It includes experiments showing that inexpensive radar is a practical sensing element. It considers fast and inexpensive algorithms to extract information from sensor data.

  19. Anticipatory processes under academic stress: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hongxia; Yuan, Yiran; Yang, Can; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Kan; Wu, Jianhui

    2015-03-01

    It is well known that preparing for and taking high-stakes exams has a significant influence on the emotional and physiological wellbeing of exam-takers, but few studies have investigated the resulting cognitive changes. The current study examined the effect of examination-induced academic stress on anticipation in information processing. Anticipation was indexed using the contingent negative variation (CNV). Electroencephalograms (EEG) were collected from 42 participants using the classic S1-S2 paradigm. These participants were preparing for the Chinese National Postgraduate Entrance Exam (NPEE). EEGs were also collected from 21 age-matched, non-exam comparison participants. The levels of perceived stress and state anxiety were higher and both the initial CNV (iCNV) and the late CNV (lCNV) were more negative in the exam group than in the non-exam group. These results suggest that participants under academic stress experienced greater anticipation of upcoming events. More important, for the non-exam group, state anxiety was positively related to both the iCNV and lCNV amplitude, and this correlation existed when trait anxiety was controlled; however, there was no such relationship in the exam group. These results suggested that the cortical anticipatory activity in the high-stressed exam group reached the maximum ceiling, leaving little room for transient increases in state anxiety.

  20. α oscillations related to anticipatory attention follow temporal expectations.

    PubMed

    Rohenkohl, Gustavo; Nobre, Anna C

    2011-10-05

    Temporal expectations have been shown to enhance visual analysis of task-relevant events, especially when these are coupled with spatial expectations. Oscillatory brain activity, particularly in the alpha band, has been implicated in regulating excitability in visual areas as a function of anticipatory spatial attention. Here we asked whether temporal expectations derived from regular, rhythmic events can modulate ongoing oscillatory alpha-band activity, so that the changes in cortical excitability are focused over the time intervals at which target events are expected. The task we used involved making a perceptual discrimination about a small target stimulus that reappeared from "behind" a peripheral occluding band. Temporal expectations were manipulated by the regular, rhythmic versus irregular, arrhythmic approach of the stimulus toward the occluding band. Alpha-band activity was measured during the occlusion period, in which no stimulus was presented, but target reappearance was anticipated in conditions of high versus low temporal expectation. Time-frequency analysis showed that the amplitude of alpha-desynchronization followed the time course of temporal expectations. Alpha desynchronization increased rhythmically, peaking just before the expected reappearance of target times. Analysis of the event-related potentials evoked by the subsequent target stimuli showed enhancement of processing at both visual and motor stages. Our findings support a role for oscillations in regulating cortical excitability and suggest a plausible mechanism for biasing perception and action by temporal expectations.

  1. Alpha oscillations related to anticipatory attention follow temporal expectations

    PubMed Central

    Rohenkohl, Gustavo; Nobre, Anna C.

    2014-01-01

    Temporal expectations have been shown to enhance visual analysis of task-relevant events, especially when these are coupled with spatial expectations. Oscillatory brain activity, particularly in the alpha band, has been implicated in regulating excitability in visual areas as a function of anticipatory spatial attention. Here we asked whether temporal expectations derived from regular, rhythmic events can modulate ongoing oscillatory alpha-band activity, so that the changes in cortical excitability are focused over the time intervals at which target events are expected. The task we used involved making a perceptual discrimination about a small target stimulus that reappeared from ‘behind’ a peripheral occluding band. Temporal expectations were manipulated by the regular, rhythmic versus irregular, arrhythmic approach of the stimulus toward the occluding band. Alpha-band activity was measured during the occlusion period, in which no stimulus was presented, but target reappearance was anticipated in conditions of high versus low temporal expectation. Time-frequency analysis showed that the amplitude of alpha-desynchronisation followed the time course of temporal expectations. Alpha desynchronisation increased rhythmically, peaking just before the expected reappearance of target times. Analysis of the event-related potentials evoked by the subsequent target stimuli showed enhancement of processing at both visual and motor stages. Our findings support a role for oscillations in regulating cortical excitability and suggest a plausible mechanism for biasing perception and action by temporal expectations. PMID:21976492

  2. Mechanisms of automaticity and anticipatory control in fluid intelligence.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Arthur W

    2017-01-01

    The constructs of fluid (Gf) and crystalized (Gc) intelligence represent an early attempt to describe the mechanisms of problem solving in the vertebrate brain. Modern neuroscience demonstrates that problem solving involves interplay between the mechanisms of automaticity and anticipatory control, enabling nature's elegant solution to the challenges animals face in their environment. Studies of neural functioning are making clear the primary role of cortical-subcortical interactions in the manifestation of intelligent behavior in humans and other vertebrates. A tridimensional model of intelligent problem solving is explored, wherein the basal ganglia system (BGS) and cerebrocerebellar system (CCS) interact within large scale brain networks. The BGS and CCS work together to enable automaticity to occur. The BGS enables the organism to learn what to do through a powerful instrumental learning system. The BGS also regulates when behavior is released through an inhibitory system which is incredibly sensitive to context. The CCS enables the organism to learn how to perform adaptive behaviors. Internal cerebellar models enable gradual improvements in the quality of behavioral output. The BGS and CCS interact within large scale brain networks, including the dorsal attention network (DAN), ventral attention network (VAN), default mode network (DMN) and frontoparietal network (FPN). The interactions of these systems enable vertebrate organisms to develop a vast array of complex adaptive behaviors. The benefits and importance of developing clinical tests to measure the integrity of these systems is considered.

  3. Anticipatory Behavior in Response to Medicare Part D's Coverage Gap.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Cameron M; Zhang, Yuting

    2017-03-01

    Under the standard Medicare Part D benefit structure, copayments for medications change discontinuously at certain levels of accumulative drug spending. Beneficiaries pay 25% of the cost of medications in the initial phase, 100% in the coverage gap, and 5% in the catastrophic phase. We examine whether individuals anticipate these copayment changes and adjust their consumption in advance. We use variation in birth-months of beneficiaries who enroll in Part D plans when they first turn 65. Birth-months generate exogenous variation in the end-of-year price because those who enroll earlier in the year are more likely to reach the coverage gap than those who enroll later. We study the impact of variation in end-of-year price on the first three months of medication use immediately following enrollment. We use difference-in-differences to adjust for seasonal trends in use, by comparing our main study group with those who receive low-income subsidies, and therefore do not face a coverage gap. We find strong evidence of anticipatory behavior, with an implied elasticity with respect to future prices ranging from -0.2 to -0.5. In addition, we find that beneficiaries modify their consumption by changing the quantity of prescriptions filled, instead of switching between brand-name and generic drugs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Perception-action coupling and anticipatory performance in baseball batting.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Rajiv; Carlton, Les G

    2007-09-01

    The authors examined 10 expert and 10 novice baseball batters' ability to distinguish between a fastball and a change-up in a virtual environment. They used 2 different response modes: (a) an uncoupled response in which the batters verbally predicted the type of pitch and (b) a coupled response in which the batters swung a baseball bat to try and hit the virtual ball. The authors manipulated visual information from the pitcher and ball in 6 visual conditions. The batters were more accurate in predicting the type of pitch when the response was uncoupled. In coupled responses, experts were better able to use the first 100 ms of ball flight independently of the pitcher's kinematics. In addition, the skilled batters' stepping patterns were related to the pitcher's kinematics, whereas their swing time was related to ball speed. Those findings suggest that specific task requirements determine whether a highly coupled perception-action environment improves anticipatory performance. The authors also highlight the need for research on interceptive actions to be conducted in the performer's natural environment.

  5. Motor systems and postural instability.

    PubMed

    Vassar, Rachel L; Rose, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Acute alcohol intoxication and chronic alcohol dependence alter the neurologic control of posture and motor function. Ethanol delays the conduction of electric signals from the central nervous system to the muscles controlling posture and impairs the integration of sensory inputs required for maintaining vertical stance. Consequently, alcohol intoxication delays the ability to detect postural changes and enact the appropriate response. Common signs of acute alcohol intoxication include spinocerebellar and vestibulocerebellar ataxia, oculomotor changes, and increased reliance on visuospatial clues. Chronic alcoholism results in postural tremors and excessive sway during quiet stance that can persist even after sobriety is achieved. Underlying neurologic changes due to chronic alcoholism have been found to be associated with these characteristic postural changes and include decreased volume of the anterior superior vermis of the cerebellum, decreased connectivity within the corpus callosum, and overall cortical atrophy. Severity of motor impairments and other symptoms from alcoholism relate to a variety of factors, including duration of alcoholism, age, sex, and other health determinants and comorbidities. Imaging studies highlight the potential for partial recovery from neurologic and motor deficits caused by alcoholism. Emerging evidence on the motor and neurologic changes caused by alcohol dependence may allow for improved treatment and prevention of the morbidities associated with alcoholism.

  6. Sagittal plane trunk posture influences patellofemoral joint stress during running.

    PubMed

    Teng, Hsiang-Ling; Powers, Christopher M

    2014-10-01

    Cross-sectional, repeated-measures. Objectives To examine the association between sagittal plane trunk posture and patellofemoral joint (PFJ) stress, and to determine whether modifying sagittal plane trunk posture influences PFJ stress during running. Patellofemoral pain is the most common injury among runners and is thought to be the result of elevated PFJ stress. While sagittal plane trunk posture has been shown to influence tibiofemoral joint mechanics, no study has examined the influence of trunk posture on PFJ kinetics. Twenty-four asymptomatic recreational runners (12 women, 12 men) ran overground at a speed of 3.4 m/s under 3 trunk-posture conditions: self-selected, flexed, and extended. Trunk and knee kinematics, ground reaction forces, and electromyographic signals from selected lower extremity muscles were obtained. A previously described PFJ biomechanical model was used to quantify PFJ stress. The mean ± SD trunk flexion angles under the self-selected, flexed, and extended running conditions were 7.3° ± 3.6°, 14.1° ± 4.8°, and 4.0° ± 3.9°, respectively. A significant inverse relationship was observed between mean trunk flexion angle and peak PFJ stress during the self-selected condition (r = -0.60, P = .002). Peak PFJ stress was significantly lower in the flexed condition (mean ± SD, 20.2 ± 3.4 MPa; P<.001) and significantly higher in the extended condition (23.1 ± 3.4 MPa; P<.001) compared to the self-selected condition (21.5 ± 3.2 MPa). Sagittal plane trunk posture has a significant influence on PFJ kinetics during running. Incorporation of a forward trunk lean may be an effective strategy to reduce PFJ stress during running.

  7. Simultaneous Postural Adjustments (SPA) scrutinized using the Lissajous method.

    PubMed

    Fourcade, Paul; Hansen, Clint; LeBozec, Serge; Bouisset, Simon

    2014-11-28

    The goal of this research was to study the postural adjustments that occur during the course of a voluntary movement (Simultaneous Postural Adjustments: SPA). A pointing task performed at maximal velocity was considered and upper limb kinematics and body kinetics were recorded. A 2-DOF model was elaborated that distinguishes between the body segments that are mobilized in order to perform the pointing movement. These segments are the right upper limb (termed the “focal” component) and the rest of the body (termed the “postural” component). This model allowed for the calculation of both sub-systems׳ kinetics and a comparison of the resultant reaction (RoSh) with the corresponding action (AoSh) at the shoulder level. The analysis was based on the ellipsoidal shape of their relationship. The ellipse computation (“Lissajous ellipse”) allowed the time lag to be estimated. The results showed that the kinetics of the postural component preceded that of the focal ones and that the time lag during the SPA was not statistically different from the APA duration (dAPA). In addition, the kinetics of the postural component were found to be opposed to the perturbation induced by the pointing movement, but only during part of the SPA time interval. It was concluded that the postural component plays a dual role during the movement, which consists of postural stabilization and propulsive action, with one prevailing over the other depending on the time-instant of movement evolution. This new evidence in healthy subjects is helpful to further specify differences associated with motor impairments.

  8. A Simple Postflight Measure of Postural Atania in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Harm, D. I.; Kofman, I. S.; Wood, S. J.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    Astronauts returning from space flight universally present with postural ataxia. Throughout the Space Shuttle Program, measurement of ataxia has concentrated on sway in the anterior-posterior (AP) plane. The current investigation, as a part of a larger functional study, concentrated on characterizing postural instability using dynamic stabilographic sway patterns in both the AP and medial-lateral (ML) planes. To accomplish this goal, six astronauts from short-duration (Shuttle) and three from long-duration (ISS) flights were required to recover from a simulated fall. Subjects with eyes open, wearing running shoes lay prone on the floor for 2 minutes and then quickly stood up, maintained a quiet stance for 3 minutes, arms relaxed along the side of the body, and feet comfortably placed on the force plate. Crewmembers were tested twice before flight, on landing day (Shuttle only), and 1, 6, and 30 days after flight. Anterior-posterior and ML center-of-pressure (COP) coordinates were calculated from the ground reaction forces collected at 500 Hz. The 3-minute quiet stance trial was broken into three 1-minute segments for stabilogram diffusion analysis. A mean sway speed (rate of change of COP displacement) was also calculated as an additional postural stability parameter. While there was considerable variation, most of crewmembers tested exhibited increased stochastic activity evidenced by larger short-term COP diffusion coefficients postflight in both the AP and ML planes, suggesting significant changes in postural control mechanisms, particularly control of lower limb muscle function. As expected, postural instability of ISS astronauts on the first day postflight was similar to that of Shuttle crewmembers on landing day. Recoveries of stochastic activity and mean sway speed to baseline levels were typically observed by the 30th day postflight for both long-duration and short-duration crewmembers. Dynamic postural stability characteristics obtained in this low

  9. Independent and convergent signals from the pontomedullary reticular formation contribute to the control of posture and movement during reaching in the cat.

    PubMed

    Schepens, Bénédicte; Drew, Trevor

    2004-10-01

    We have addressed the nature of the postural control signals contained within the discharge activity of neurons in the pontomedullary reticular formation, including reticulospinal neurons, during a reaching task in the cat. We recorded the activity of 142 neurons during ipsilateral reaching movements that required anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) in the supporting limbs to maintain equilibrium. Discharge activity in 82/142 (58%) neurons was significantly increased before the onset of the reach. Most of these neurons discharged either in a phasic (22/82), tonic (10/82), or phasic/tonic (41/82) pattern. In each of these 3 groups, the onset of the discharge activity in some neurons was temporally related either to the go signal or to the onset of the movement. In many neurons, one component of the discharge sequence was better related to the go signal and another to the onset of the movement. Based on our previous behavioral study during the same task, we suggest that reticular neurons in which the discharge activity is better related to the go signal contribute to the initiation of the APAs that precede the movement. Neurons in which the discharge activity is better related to the movement signal might contribute to the initiation of the movement and to the production of the postural responses that accompany that movement. Together our results suggest the existence of neurons that signal posture and movement independently and others that encode a convergent signal that contributes to the control of both posture and movement.

  10. Striatal-Limbic Activation is Associated with Intensity of Anticipatory Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongyu; Spence, Jeffrey S.; Devous, Michael D.; Briggs, Richard W.; Goyal, Aman; Xiao, Hong; Yadav, Hardik; Adinoff, Bryon

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety experienced in anticipation of impending aversive events induces striatal-limbic activation. However, previous functional magnetic imaging (fMRI) studies of anticipatory anxiety have utilized post-test measures of anxiety, making a direct association between neural activation and distress problematic. This paradigm was designed to assess the BOLD response to an aversive conditioned stimulus while simultaneously measuring subjective anxiety. Fifteen male healthy subjects (45.5±8.5 years old) were studied. A high threat conditioned stimulus (CS) was paired with either an unpredictable, highly aversive (painful) or a non-aversive (non-painful) unconditioned stimulus and compared to a low threat CS paired with a predictable, non-aversive stimulus. Neural response was assessed with fMRI, and subjective anxiety (1 to 4) was recorded upon the presentation of each CS. High subjective ratings of real-time anticipatory anxiety (2, 3, and 4), relative to low anticipatory anxiety (1), elicited increased activation in the bilateral striatum, bilateral orbital frontal cortex, left anterior insula, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and decreased activation in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). The amplitude of BOLD signal change generally paralleled the subjective rating of anxiety. Real-time measures of anticipatory anxiety confirm previous reports, using post-test measures of anxiety, of striatal-limbic activation during anticipatory anxiety while simultaneously demonstrating an increase in BOLD response in parallel with heightened anxiety. PMID:23137803

  11. Different modalities of painful somatosensory stimulations affect anticipatory cortical processes: a high-resolution EEG study.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Brancucci, Alfredo; Capotosto, Paolo; Del Percio, Claudio; Romani, Gian Luca; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2007-03-15

    Pain sensation is characterized by multiple features that allow to differentiate pricking, burning, aching, stinging, and electrical shock. These features are sub-served by neural pathways that might give flexibility and selectivity to the cerebral anticipatory processes. In this line, the present high-resolution electroencephalography (EEG) study tested the hypothesis that the anticipatory cortical processes are stronger for painful thermal (biologically relevant) than electrical ("artificial") stimuli with similar intensity. EEG data (128 electrodes) were recorded in normal subjects during the expectancy of painful electrical or laser stimuli (visual omitted stimulus paradigm; interval between two painful stimuli: 16s), delivered over the median nerve region of the right arm (nonpainful stimuli as controls). After each stimulus, the subject reported the perceived stimulus intensity. Surface Laplacian estimation of the EEG data spatially enhanced the anticipatory stimulus-preceding negativity (SPN), which reflects motivational relevance of the stimulus. Subjects perceived no difference in the intensity of the electrical versus laser stimuli in both painful and nonpainful conditions. However, the anticipatory SPN appeared over large scalp regions before painful laser but not electrical stimulation. The same was true for the nonpainful stimulations. The present results suggest that the motivational anticipatory cortical processes are induced by nonpainful and painful biologically/ecologically relevant laser stimuli rather than by "artificial" electrical stimuli with similar intensity.

  12. The Effect of Massage on Anticipatory Anxiety and Procedural Pain in Patients with Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Najafi Ghezeljeh, Tahereh; Mohades Ardebili, Fatimah; Rafii, Forough; Manafi, Farzad

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pain related to burn injuries is one of the most troublesome pain intensity. This study aimed to investigate the effect of massage on anticipatory anxiety, procedural pain intensity, vital signs and relaxation level of patients with burn injury. METHODS In this quasi-experimental study, through convenience sampling, 60 hospitalized adult burn patients were selected from a specialized burn and reconstructive hospital. Subjects were assigned to massage and control groups through simple randomization. Massage was offered by using non aromatic oil about 10-15 minutes before wound care on intact part of the body once a day for 20 minutes on patients’ bedside for 3 consecutive days. In the 3 days, the control group did not received any massage and were asked to stay at bed. Demographic and clinical characteristics and vital signs, Visual Analogue Scale and the Persian version of Burn Specific Pain Anxiety Scale were used to determine baseline and procedural pain, anxiety and relaxation levels and anticipatory anxiety. RESULTS No significant difference was noted between mean score of pain intensity, anxiety and relaxation level, and vital signs in massage and control groups after intervention following wound care. In massage and control groups, there was no significant differences between mean scores of anticipatory anxiety before and after intervention. There was no significant difference between the mean scores of anticipatory anxiety in massage and control groups after intervention prior wound care. CONCLUSION Massage was shown not to have any effect on anticipatory anxiety and procedural pain. PMID:28289612

  13. The Effect of Massage on Anticipatory Anxiety and Procedural Pain in Patients with Burn Injury.

    PubMed

    Najafi Ghezeljeh, Tahereh; Mohades Ardebili, Fatimah; Rafii, Forough; Manafi, Farzad

    2017-01-01

    Pain related to burn injuries is one of the most troublesome pain intensity. This study aimed to investigate the effect of massage on anticipatory anxiety, procedural pain intensity, vital signs and relaxation level of patients with burn injury. In this quasi-experimental study, through convenience sampling, 60 hospitalized adult burn patients were selected from a specialized burn and reconstructive hospital. Subjects were assigned to massage and control groups through simple randomization. Massage was offered by using non aromatic oil about 10-15 minutes before wound care on intact part of the body once a day for 20 minutes on patients' bedside for 3 consecutive days. In the 3 days, the control group did not received any massage and were asked to stay at bed. Demographic and clinical characteristics and vital signs, Visual Analogue Scale and the Persian version of Burn Specific Pain Anxiety Scale were used to determine baseline and procedural pain, anxiety and relaxation levels and anticipatory anxiety. No significant difference was noted between mean score of pain intensity, anxiety and relaxation level, and vital signs in massage and control groups after intervention following wound care. In massage and control groups, there was no significant differences between mean scores of anticipatory anxiety before and after intervention. There was no significant difference between the mean scores of anticipatory anxiety in massage and control groups after intervention prior wound care. Massage was shown not to have any effect on anticipatory anxiety and procedural pain.

  14. Detecting anticipatory effects in speech articulation by means of spectral coefficient analyses

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yongqiang; Hao, Grace J.; Xue, Steve A.; Max, Ludo

    2011-01-01

    Few acoustic studies have attempted to examine anticipatory effects in the earliest part of the release of stop consonants. We investigated the ability of spectral coefficients to reveal anticipatory coarticulation in the burst and early aspiration of stops in monosyllables. Twenty American English speakers produced stop (/k,t,p/) – vowel (/æ,i,o/) – stop (/k,t,p/) sequences in two phrase positions. The first four spectral coefficients (mean, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis) were calculated for one window centered on the burst of the onset consonant and two subsequent, non-overlapping windows. All coefficients showed an influence of vowel-to-consonant anticipatory coarticulation. Which onset consonant showed the strongest vowel effect depended on the specific coefficient under consideration. A context-dependent consonant-to-consonant anticipatory effect was observed for onset /p/. Findings demonstrate that spectral coefficients can reveal subtle anticipatory adjustments as early as the burst of stop consonants. Different results for the four coefficients suggest that comprehensive spectral analyses offer advantages over other approaches. Studies using these techniques may expose previously unobserved articulatory adjustments among phonetic contexts or speaker populations. PMID:21686055

  15. Anticipatory and consummatory pleasure and displeasure in major depressive disorder: An experience sampling study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haijing; Mata, Jutta; Furman, Daniella J; Whitmer, Anson J; Gotlib, Ian H; Thompson, Renee J

    2017-02-01

    Pleasure and displeasure can be parsed into anticipatory and consummatory phases. However, research on pleasure and displeasure in major depressive disorder (MDD), a disorder characterized by anhedonia, has largely focused on deficits in the consummatory phase. Moreover, most studies in this area have been laboratory-based, raising the question of how component processes of pleasure and displeasure are experienced in the daily lives of depressed individuals. Using experience sampling, we compared anticipatory and consummatory pleasure and displeasure for daily activities reported by adults with MDD (n = 41) and healthy controls (n = 39). Participants carried electronic devices for one week and were randomly prompted eight times a day to answer questions about activities to which they most and least looked forward. Compared to healthy controls, MDD participants reported blunted levels of both anticipatory and consummatory pleasure and elevated levels of both anticipatory and consummatory displeasure for daily activities. Independent of MDD status, participants accurately predicted pleasure but overestimated displeasure. These results are the first to provide evidence that, across both anticipatory and consummatory phases, individuals with MDD experience blunted pleasure and elevated displeasure for daily activities. Our findings clarify the disturbances in pleasure and displeasure that characterize MDD and may inform treatment for this debilitating disorder. (PsycINFO Database Record

  16. Preparing for communication interactions: the value of anticipatory strategies for adults with hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Tye-Murray, N

    1992-04-01

    Some people with hearing impairment may use anticipatory strategies to prepare for an upcoming communication interaction, such as a doctor's appointment. They may consider vocabulary and statements that might occur, and they may practice speechreading a partner saying the items. Experiment 1 evaluated the effectiveness of two types of anticipatory strategies: workbook activities and situation-specific lipreading practice. Two groups of normal-hearing subjects were asked to prepare for a communication interaction in a bank setting where they would be required to recognize speech using only the visual signal. Each group was assigned to one type of anticipatory strategy. A third group served as a control group. Experiment 2 evaluated whether multifaceted anticipatory practice improved cochlear implant users' ability to recognize statements and words audiovisually that might occur in a doctor's office, bank, movie theater, and gas station. One group of implanted subjects received 4 days of training, 1 day for each setting, and a second group served as a control group. In both experiments, subjects who used anticipatory strategies did not improve their performance on situation-specific sentence tests more than the control subjects.

  17. Automatic and Interactive Key Posture Design by Combing the PIK with Parametric Posture Splicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shilei; Wu, Bing; Liang, Jiahong; Su, Jiongming

    Key posture design is commonly needed in computer animation. This paper presents an automatic and interactive whole body posture designing technique by combining the PIK (prioritized inverse kinematics) with the proposed parametric human posture splicing technique. The key feature of PIK is that the user can design a posture by adding high level constraints with different priorities. However, the PIK is essentially a numerical IK algorithm which relies on the iterative optimization starting from a good enough initial posture to get the final result. To speed up the running efficiency and ensure the lifelikeness of the final posture, the parametric posture splicing technique is proposed to generate the initial guess of the PIK. According to the set of the high level constraints, the whole body is divided into some partial parts, whose postures are then generated by the parametric posture synthesis from a single posture database. Then an initial posture guess with some main characteristics of the finally acceptable posture can be generated approximately by splicing these partial body postures together. Starting from this initial guess and with all constraints considered at different priority levels, the PIK can be initialized with a bias defined by this particularly initial guess and iterated step by step to get a final posture. The total process of the whole body posture generation is automatic and interactive. The experimental results show that this combination method can not only improve the computation efficiency of the PIK but also can simultaneously ensure the naturalness of the final posture.

  18. Postural control in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Jackeline Yumi; Quitschal, Rafaela Maia; Doná, Flávia; Ferraz, Henrique Ballalai; Ganança, Maurício Malavasi; Caovilla, Heloísa Helena

    2014-01-01

    Postural instability is one of the most disabling features of Parkinson's disease. To evaluate postural balance in Parkinson's disease. Thirty patients with Parkinson's disease were compared with controls using Tetrax™ interactive balance system posturography. For different positions, patients with Parkinson's disease showed a significantly higher weight distribution index, fall index, Fourier transformation at low-medium frequencies (F2-F4), and significantly lower right/left and toe/heel synchronization versus controls. Postural imbalance in Parkinson's disease patients is characterized by the abnormalities of weight distribution index, synchronization index, Fourier transformation index, and fall index as measured by Tetrax™ posturography. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Postural discomfort and perceived exertion in standardized box-holding postures.

    PubMed

    Olendorf, M R; Drury, C G

    2001-12-15

    To help in the design or redesign of workplaces it would be helpful to know in advance the postural stress consequences of a wide range of body postures. This experiment evaluated 168 postures chosen to represent those in the Ovako Working-posture Analysing System (OWAS) using Rated Perceived Exertion (RPE) and Body Part Discomfort (BPD) measures. The postures comprised all combinations of three arm postures, four back postures, seven leg postures and two forces (weights of held boxes). Twelve male subjects held each posture for a fixed duration (20 s) before providing RPE and BPD ratings. Analysis of the ratings gave highly significant main effects, with the major driver being the object weight. As each factor was varied, the largest effect was on the body region corresponding to that factor. A simple main-effects-only additive model explained 91% of the variance of RPE means for the postures.

  20. Posture in otoneurology. Volume I.

    PubMed

    Norré, M E

    1990-01-01

    In this study, posture is studied in the context of neuro-otological problems. In the several chapters, postural elements, postural influence upon balance aspects as well as postural components of the balance function in normal and pathological conditions are emphasized. Two main applications are put forward: rehabilitation by postural treatment techniques (REHAB) and examination techniques for the vestibulospinal aspects (posturography--PG). I. Balance function Balance is provided by automatic reflexes for stabilization of the visual field (vestibulo-ocular reflex--VOR) and for a correct posture, erect standing (vestibulo-spinal reflex--VSR) and head position (vestibulo-collic reflex--VCR). The fundamental characteristics of these reflexes are described, especially of those related to posture. The reflexes are elaborated on the basis of sensory inputs that inform about changed relations to space and environment, provided by visual, vestibular and proprioceptive systems. The sensory signals are further processed by the centers to adequate reflexes and to some extent to a conscious awareness. II. Dysfunction and adaptation Dysfunction in the balance mechanisms leads to erroneous reflexes, but most importantly to frightening sensations of vertigo. The peripheral disturbances produce a sensory mismatch which is the primum movens of vertigo. Built-in adaptive mechanisms cope with this disturbance and restore global balance function. The mechanisms involved have been studied as vestibular compensation and habituation, VOR-reflex plasticity and sensory "substitutive" compensation. The mechanisms are set into action by the dysfunctional situation and constitute an error-controlled process. Emphasis is laid upon the items related to rehabilitation treatment and posturography. A survey of clinical entities of vestibular peripheral dysfunction is included. III. Examination techniques The logical approach to the patient with vertigo consists in an analysis of the complaints

  1. Elevation of 2-AG by monoacylglycerol lipase inhibition in the visceral insular cortex interferes with anticipatory nausea in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Limebeer, Cheryl L; Rock, Erin M; Puvanenthirarajah, Nirushan; Niphakis, Micah J; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Parker, Linda A

    2016-04-01

    Anticipatory nausea (AN) is a conditioned nausea reaction experienced by chemotherapy patients upon returning to the clinic. Currently, there are no specific treatments for this phenomenon, with the classic antiemetic treatments (e.g., ondansetron) providing no relief. The rat model of AN, contextually elicited conditioned gaping reactions in rats, provides a tool for assessing potential treatments for this difficult to treat disorder. Systemically administered drugs which elevate the endocannabinoids, anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), by interfering with their respective degrading enzymes, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacyl glycerol lipase (MAGL) interfere with AN in the rat model. We have shown that MAGL inhibition within the visceral insular cortex (VIC) interferes with acute nausea in the gaping model (Sticht et al., 2015). Here we report that bilateral infusion of the MAGL inhibitor, MJN110 (but neither the FAAH inhibitor, PF3845, nor ondansetron) into the VIC suppressed contextually elicited conditioned gaping, and this effect was reversed by coadministration of the CB1 antagonist, AM251. These findings suggest that 2-AG within the VIC plays a critical role in the regulation of both acute nausea and AN. Because there are currently no specific therapeutics for chemotherapy patients that develop anticipatory nausea, MAGL inhibition by MJN110 may be a candidate treatment. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Postural Control in Children with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohen-Raz, Reuven; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Postural control was evaluated in 91 autistic, 166 normal, and 18 mentally retarded children using a computerized posturographic procedure. In comparison to normal children, the autistic subjects were less likely to exhibit age-related changes in postural performance, and postures were more variable and less stable. (Author/JDD)

  3. Postural Control in Children with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohen-Raz, Reuven; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Postural control was evaluated in 91 autistic, 166 normal, and 18 mentally retarded children using a computerized posturographic procedure. In comparison to normal children, the autistic subjects were less likely to exhibit age-related changes in postural performance, and postures were more variable and less stable. (Author/JDD)

  4. Grief reactions in dementia carers: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chan, Diana; Livingston, Gill; Jones, Louise; Sampson, Elizabeth L

    2013-01-01

    Supporting dementia carers is an identified target of the UK government, yet we know little about such family carers' grief before and after the death of the person with dementia for whom they care. We systematically review the existing literature on characteristics, prevalence, predictors and associations of grief in dementia carers before and after death. We searched electronic databases and found 31 publications meeting predetermined criteria. Grief in dementia carers, which may be normal or complicated, is a complex reaction to losses occurring before and after death. Carers experience anticipatory grief as multiple losses for themselves (companionship, personal freedom and control) and the person with dementia. Anticipation and ambiguity about the future, anger, frustration and guilt are core features. Anticipatory grief is greatest in moderate to severe stage dementia and spouse carers, especially when the person with dementia is institutionalised. There was poor quality evidence about the prevalence of grief; studies reported anticipatory grief between 47% and 71%, and complicated grief after death is estimated around 20%. Carer depression increases with anticipatory grief. Being a spouse carer and being depressed are the strongest predictors of complicated and normal grief after death. Grief in dementia carers can be expected; however, those at risk of distressing anticipatory and complicated grief may be identified and targeted for intervention when necessary. Higher quality research from a wider range of samples and countries is needed to explore this complex and emergent topic. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Randomized controlled trial of Anticipatory and Preventive multidisciplinary Team Care

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, William; Lemelin, Jacques; Dahrouge, Simone; Liddy, Clare; Armstrong, Catherine Deri; Legault, Frances; Dalziel, Bill; Zhang, Wei

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE T o examine whether quality of care (QOC) improves when nurse practitioners and pharmacists work with family physicians in community practice and focus their work on patients who are 50 years of age and older and considered to be at risk of experiencing adverse health outcomes. DESIGN Randomized controlled trial. SETTING A family health network with 8 family physicians, 5 nurses, and 11 administrative personnel serving 10 000 patients in a rural area near Ottawa, Ont. PARTICIPANTS Patients 50 years of age and older at risk of experiencing adverse health outcomes (N = 241). INTERVENTIONS At-risk patients were randomly assigned to receive usual care from their family physicians or Anticipatory and Preventive Team Care (APTCare) from a collaborative team composed of their physicians, 1 of 3 nurse practitioners, and a pharmacist. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Quality of care for chronic disease management (CDM) for diabetes, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. RESULTS Controlling for baseline demographic characteristics, the APTCare approach improved CDM QOC by 9.2% (P < .001) compared with traditional care. The APTCare intervention also improved preventive care by 16.5% (P < .001). We did not observe significant differences in other secondary outcome measures (intermediate clinical outcomes, quality of life [Short-Form 36 and health-related quality of life scales], functional status [instrumental activities of daily living scale] and service usage). CONCLUSION Additional resources in the form of collaborative multidisciplinary care teams with intensive interventions in primary care can improve QOC for CDM in a population of older at-risk patients. The appropriateness of this intervention will depend on its cost-effectiveness. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER NCT00238836 (CONSORT) PMID:20008582

  6. New Trends in Computing Anticipatory Systems : Emergence of Artificial Conscious Intelligence with Machine Learning Natural Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Daniel M.

    2008-10-01

    This paper deals with the challenge to create an Artificial Intelligence System with an Artificial Consciousness. For that, an introduction to computing anticipatory systems is presented, with the definitions of strong and weak anticipation. The quasi-anticipatory systems of Robert Rosen are linked to open-loop controllers. Then, some properties of the natural brain are presented in relation to the triune brain theory of Paul D. MacLean, and the mind time of Benjamin Libet, with his veto of the free will. The theory of the hyperincursive discrete anticipatory systems is recalled in view to introduce the concept of hyperincursive free will, which gives a similar veto mechanism: free will as unpredictable hyperincursive anticipation The concepts of endo-anticipation and exo-anticipation are then defined. Finally, some ideas about artificial conscious intelligence with natural language are presented, in relation to the Turing Machine, Formal Language, Intelligent Agents and Mutli-Agent System.

  7. The importance of interdisciplinary communication in the process of anticipatory prescribing.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Eleanor; Seymour, Jane

    2017-03-16

    In the UK there has been a widespread introduction of 'anticipatory prescribing' in community based palliative care. This involves general practitioners (GPs) writing prescriptions in anticipation of them being needed and has been encouraged to try to minimise the risk of patients suffering uncontrolled symptoms and distress; a key reason why terminally ill patients are admitted to hospital in contradiction of most people's preferences. This paper presents the findings from an ethnographic study of healthcare professionals across four care homes and four community sites in two regions (East Midlands and Lancashire/South Cumbria) of the UK. Data were collected from a range of community health professionals, resulting in 83 episodes of observation and 72 interviews. Findings highlight how essential good interdisciplinary communication is to the process of anticipatory prescribing and end-of-life care. This study found that when interdisciplinary communication worked well the anticipatory prescribing process could be carried out smoothly, optimising patient care.

  8. Preparing Children for Court: Effects of a Model Court Education Program on Children's Anticipatory Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Nathanson, Rebecca; Saywitz, Karen J

    2015-08-01

    The current study examined whether a pretrial preparation program, consisting of legal knowledge education, stress inoculation training, and a mock trial, is associated with decreased anticipatory anxiety of child witnesses. One hundred and ninety-three 4- to 17-year-olds who were awaiting impending legal proceedings attended Kids' Court School in Las Vegas, NV, one to two weeks before their court appearances. Participants completed a measure of anticipatory court-related anxiety before and after the intervention. As predicted, children's anticipatory anxiety decreased significantly from pretest to posttest. Results demonstrate the promise of a brief, unbiased, standardized program for reducing system-induced stress on child witnesses, while maintaining the integrity of the legal process. This study serves as a springboard to guide future research, practice, policy, and implementation on a larger scale.

  9. Predicting the unpredictable: critical analysis and practical implications of predictive anticipatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Mossbridge, Julia A.; Tressoldi, Patrizio; Utts, Jessica; Ives, John A.; Radin, Dean; Jonas, Wayne B.

    2014-01-01

    A recent meta-analysis of experiments from seven independent laboratories (n = 26) indicates that the human body can apparently detect randomly delivered stimuli occurring 1–10 s in the future (Mossbridge etal., 2012). The key observation in these studies is that human physiology appears to be able to distinguish between unpredictable dichotomous future stimuli, such as emotional vs. neutral images or sound vs. silence. This phenomenon has been called presentiment (as in “feeling the future”). In this paper we call it predictive anticipatory activity (PAA). The phenomenon is “predictive” because it can distinguish between upcoming stimuli; it is “anticipatory” because the physiological changes occur before a future event; and it is an “activity” because it involves changes in the cardiopulmonary, skin, and/or nervous systems. PAA is an unconscious phenomenon that seems to be a time-reversed reflection of the usual physiological response to a stimulus. It appears to resemble precognition (consciously knowing something is going to happen before it does), but PAA specifically refers to unconscious physiological reactions as opposed to conscious premonitions. Though it is possible that PAA underlies the conscious experience of precognition, experiments testing this idea have not produced clear results. The first part of this paper reviews the evidence for PAA and examines the two most difficult challenges for obtaining valid evidence for it: expectation bias and multiple analyses. The second part speculates on possible mechanisms and the theoretical implications of PAA for understanding physiology and consciousness. The third part examines potential practical applications. PMID:24723870

  10. Systematic Review: Predisposing, Precipitating, Perpetuating, and Present Factors Predicting Anticipatory Distress to Painful Medical Procedures in Children

    PubMed Central

    Pillai Riddell, Rebecca R.; Khan, Maria; Calic, Masa; Taddio, Anna; Tablon, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Objective To conduct a systematic review of the factors predicting anticipatory distress to painful medical procedures in children. Methods A systematic search was conducted to identify studies with factors related to anticipatory distress to painful medical procedures in children aged 0–18 years. The search retrieved 7,088 articles to review against inclusion criteria. A total of 77 studies were included in the review. Results 31 factors were found to predict anticipatory distress to painful medical procedures in children. A narrative synthesis of the evidence was conducted, and a summary figure is presented. Conclusions Many factors were elucidated that contribute to the occurrence of anticipatory distress to painful medical procedures. The factors that appear to increase anticipatory distress are child psychopathology, difficult child temperament, parent distress promoting behaviors, parent situational distress, previous pain events, parent anticipation of distress, and parent anxious predisposition. Longitudinal and experimental research is needed to further elucidate these factors. PMID:26338981

  11. How neural mediation of anticipatory and compensatory insulin release helps us tolerate food.

    PubMed

    Teff, Karen L

    2011-04-18

    Learned anticipatory and compensatory responses allow the animal and human to maintain metabolic homeostasis during periods of nutritional challenges, either acutely within each meal or chronically during periods of overnutrition. This paper discusses the role of neurally-mediated anticipatory responses in humans and their role in glucoregulation, focusing on cephalic phase insulin and pancreatic polypeptide release as well as compensatory insulin release during the etiology of insulin resistance. The necessary stimuli required to elicit CPIR and vagal activation are discussed and the role of CPIR and vagal efferent activation in intra-meal metabolic homeostasis and during chronic nutritional challenges are reviewed.

  12. How neural mediation of anticipatory and compensatory insulin release helps us tolerate food

    PubMed Central

    Teff, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    Learned anticipatory and compensatory responses allow the animal and human to maintain metabolic homeostasis during periods of nutritional challenges, either acutely within each meal or chronically during periods of overnutrition. This paper discusses the role of neurally-mediated anticipatory responses in humans and their role in glucoregulation, focusing on cephalic phase insulin and pancreatic polypeptide release as well as compensatory insulin release during the etiology of insulin resistance. The necessary stimuli required to elicit CPIR and vagal activation are discussed and the role of CPIR and vagal efferent activation in intra-meal metabolic homeostasis and during chronic nutritional challenges are reviewed. PMID:21256146

  13. Anticipatory visual perception as a bio-inspired mechanism underlying robot locomotion.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Alejandra; Laschi, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    Anticipation of sensory consequences of actions is critical for the predictive control of movement that explains most of our sensory-motor behaviors. Plenty of neuroscientific studies in humans suggest evidence of anticipatory mechanisms based on internal models. Several robotic implementations of predictive behaviors have been inspired on those biological mechanisms in order to achieve adaptive agents. This paper provides an overview of such neuroscientific and robotic evidences; a high-level architecture of sensory-motor coordination based on anticipatory visual perception and internal models is then introduced; and finally, the paper concludes by discussing the relevance of the proposed architecture within the context of current research in humanoid robotics.

  14. Using Narrative Approach for Anticipatory Grief Among Family Caregivers at Home

    PubMed Central

    Toyama, Hiroko; Honda, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Family caregivers of patients with terminal-stage cancer have numerous roles as caregivers, which can influence their anticipatory grief. The purpose of this study was to clarify how talking to family caregivers of patients with terminal illness using the narrative approach can influence such caregivers’ process of anticipatory grief. We conducted the narrative approach as an intervention with two family caregivers several times and qualitatively analyzed their narratives. The results indicated that these family caregivers had two primary roles—family member and caregiver—and that family caregivers felt trapped in their caregiver role. The narrative approach helped them transition into the role needed for coping with the loss. PMID:28462354

  15. [Influence of preliminary information about mass on anticipatory muscle activity during catching of falling object].

    PubMed

    Kazennikov, O V; Lipshits, M I

    2010-01-01

    Heavy or light object fell into the cup held between thumb and index fingers of sitting subject. The anticipatory muscle activity and the grip force applied to cup depended on the mass of object while the temporal parameters (time of beginning of muscle activity, duration of the activity, the time of grip force maximum) were constant. The preliminary verbal information about mass of the falling object was enough for predictive force programming. Without such information, i.e. during fall the object of unknown mass the anticipatory activity was planned in expectation of heavy weight.

  16. Postural analysis of nursing work.

    PubMed

    Hignett, S

    1996-06-01

    Back pain in the nursing profession is an acknowledged wide spread occupational hazard. This study used OWAS (Ovako Working posture Analysis System) to measure the severity of the working postures adopted by nurses on Care of the Elderly wards when carrying out manual handling operations for animate and inanimate loads. Twenty-six nurses were observed on 31 occasions to obtain 4299 observations, these data were collected and processed using the OWASCO and OWASAN programs, and then analysed by grouping the results into defined patient (animate) handling and non-patient (inanimate) handling tasks. A statistical comparison was made between the two groups using the percentage of action categories two, three and four, to the total number of action categories. A significant difference (p < 0.05) was found, demonstrating that the percentage of harmful postures adopted during patient handling tasks was significantly higher than during non-patient handling tasks. This high level of postural stress and the poor track record of risk management within the Health Care Industry leads to the recommendation that an attitudinal change is needed to successfully address and reduce the manual handling burden which is currently being carried by the nursing staff.

  17. Recognizing postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pavlik, Daniel; Agnew, Donna; Stiles, Lauren; Ditoro, Rachel

    2016-04-01

    This article describes the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnosis, and management of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), a potentially debilitating autonomic disorder that can have many causes and presentations. POTS can be mistaken for panic disorder, inappropriate sinus tachycardia, and chronic fatigue syndrome. Clinician suspicion for the syndrome is key to prompt patient diagnosis and treatment.

  18. [Faulty posture and selected respiratory indicators].

    PubMed

    Pawlicka-Lisowska, Agnieszka; Motylewski, Sławomir; Lisowski, Jacek; Michalak, Katarzyna; Poziomska-Piatkowska, Elzbieta

    2013-08-01

    Was to diagnose the body posture of physiotherapy students of the Medical University of Lodz and to determine the relationship between selected respiratory indicator and the incidence of faulty posture in the studied group. 196 students of Medical University of Lodz were included in the study. Posture assessment was conducted using Kasperczyk's points method. In the study authors indicated selected respiratory parameters, incuding: forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and maximum inspiratory and expiratory pressure measured in the mouth (MIP, MEP). The results of the study showed a reduction of the respiratory parameters rates (FVC, FEV1) and respiratory muscle strength (MIP, MEP) in the group of students with a poor posture compared to students with a good posture. Although the statistical analysis showed no significant correlation between the presence of the faulty posture and respiratory parameters, there was a clear tendency for those parameters to decrease in the group of students with a poor posture. The results of the examined indicators showed a reduction of the respiratory parameters rates (FVC, FEV1) and respiratory muscle strength (MIP, MEP) in the group of students with a poor posture compared to students with a good posture. The posture classified by Kasperczyk as good is prevailing in the studied. The results obtained in this study suggest the need to take action on the prevention and correction of faulty posture.

  19. Postural control and detection of slip/fall initiation in the elderly population.

    PubMed

    Kim, B J; Robinson, Charles J

    2005-07-15

    One of the common causes of morbidity and mortality in workplaces is related to slips or falls. Reaction to external disturbances, such as slips or falls, requires a process of perturbation detection and control of motion changes. Postural control is a common mechanism to compensate unexpected displacements of the body. The ability of postural control diminishes with ageing or neuropathy. In this study, two controlled groups, diabetics and non-diabetics in the elderly population, were investigated to compare how different postural control mechanisms would relate to the detection of perturbation and regain of balance. The ultra-low-vibration Sliding Linear Investigative Platform for Analyzing Lower Limb Stability SYSTEM was used to measure the biomechanical changes of posture and perturbation detection. In phase 1 of the analysis, static measures during quiet standing were considered to investigate the relationship between postural stability and perturbation detection capability. In phase 2 of the analysis, dynamic measures during an occurrence of perturbation were analysed. Statistical tests and linear logistic regression models were applied to find differences of postural control mechanisms and to build a predictive model for perturbation detection quantitatively. It is anticipated that the results of this study will contribute to more comprehensive understanding of postural control mechanisms and design of slip/fall prevention programmes.

  20. The effect of body posture on cognitive performance: a question of sleep quality

    PubMed Central

    Muehlhan, Markus; Marxen, Michael; Landsiedel, Julia; Malberg, Hagen; Zaunseder, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Nearly all functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies are conducted in the supine body posture, which has been discussed as a potential confounder of such examinations. The literature suggests that cognitive functions, such as problem solving or perception, differ between supine and upright postures. However, the effect of posture on many cognitive functions is still unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of body posture (supine vs. sitting) on one of the most frequently used paradigms in the cognitive sciences: the N-back working memory paradigm. Twenty-two subjects were investigated in a randomized within-subject design. Subjects performed the N-back task on two consecutive days in either the supine or the upright posture. Subjective sleep quality and chronic stress were recorded as covariates. Furthermore, changes in mood dimensions and heart rate variability (HRV) were assessed during the experiment. Results indicate that the quality of sleep strongly affects reaction times when subjects performed a working memory task in a supine posture. These effects, however, could not be observed in the sitting position. The findings can be explained by HRV parameters that indicated differences in autonomic regulation in the upright vs. the supine posture. The finding is of particular relevance for fMRI group comparisons when group differences in sleep quality cannot be ruled out. PMID:24723874

  1. Common motor mechanisms support body load in serially homologous legs of cockroaches in posture and walking.

    PubMed

    Quimby, Laura A; Amer, Ayman S; Zill, Sasha N

    2006-03-01

    We studied the mechanisms underlying support of body load in posture and walking in serially homologous legs of cockroaches. Activities of the trochanteral extensor muscle in the front or middle legs were recorded neurographically while animals were videotaped. Body load was increased via magnets attached to the thorax and varied through a coil below the substrate. In posture, tonic firing of the slow trochanteral extensor motoneuron (Ds) in each leg was strongly modulated by changing body load. Rapid load increases produced decreases in body height and sharp increments in extensor firing. The peak of extensor activity more closely approximated the maximum velocity of body displacement than the body position. In walking, extensor bursts in front and middle legs were initiated during swing and continued into the stance phase. Moderate tonic increases in body load elicited similar, specific, phase dependent changes in both legs: extensor firing was not altered in swing but was higher after foot placement in stance. These motor adjustments to load are not anticipatory but apparently depend upon sensory feedback. These data are consistent with previous findings in the hind legs and support the idea that body load is countered by common motor mechanisms in serially homologous legs.

  2. INFLUENCE OF INJURY ON DYNAMIC POSTURAL CONTROL IN RUNNERS

    PubMed Central

    Klusendorf, Anna; Kernozek, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Injury has been linked with altered postural control in active populations. The association between running injury and dynamic postural control has not been examined. Hypothesis/Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine dynamic postural control in injured and uninjured runners using the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT), Time to Stabilization (TTS) of ground reaction forces following a single-leg landing, and postural stability indices reflecting the fluctuations in GRFs during single-leg landing and stabilization tasks (forward and lateral hop). It was hypothesized that dynamic postural control differences would exist between runners with a history of injury that interrupted training for ≥7 days (INJ) when compared to runners without injury (CON). Design Case-control study Methods Twenty-two INJ (14 F, 8 M; 23.7 ± 2.1 y; 22.3 ± 2.8 kg/m2; 29.5 ± 16.3 mi/wk) currently running > 50% pre-injury mileage without pain were compared with twenty-two matched CON (14F, 8M; 22.7 ± 1.2 y; 22.7 ± 2.7 kg/m2; 31.2 ± 19.6 mi/wk). INJ group was stratified by site of injury into two groups (Hip/Thigh/Knee and Lower Leg/Ankle/Foot) for secondary analysis. Leg length-normalized anterior, posterolateral, and posteromedial reach distances on the SEBT, medial/lateral and anterior/posterior ground reaction force TTS, directional postural stability indices, and a composite dynamic postural stability index (DPSI), were assessed using mixed model ANOVA (α=0.05) and effect sizes (d). Results No group X direction interaction or group differences were observed for the SEBT (p=0.51, 0.71) or TTS (p=0.83, 0.72) measures. A group X direction interaction was found for postural stability indices during the forward landing task (p<0.01). Both Hip/Thigh/Knee and Lower leg/Ankle/Foot INJ groups demonstrated a greater vertical postural stability index (VPSI) (p=0.01 for both, d=0.80, 0.95) and DPSI (p=0.01, 0.02, d=0.75, 0.93) when

  3. INFLUENCE OF INJURY ON DYNAMIC POSTURAL CONTROL IN RUNNERS.

    PubMed

    Meardon, Stacey; Klusendorf, Anna; Kernozek, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Injury has been linked with altered postural control in active populations. The association between running injury and dynamic postural control has not been examined. The purpose of this study was to examine dynamic postural control in injured and uninjured runners using the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT), Time to Stabilization (TTS) of ground reaction forces following a single-leg landing, and postural stability indices reflecting the fluctuations in GRFs during single-leg landing and stabilization tasks (forward and lateral hop). It was hypothesized that dynamic postural control differences would exist between runners with a history of injury that interrupted training for ≥7 days (INJ) when compared to runners without injury (CON). Case-control study. Twenty-two INJ (14 F, 8 M; 23.7 ± 2.1 y; 22.3 ± 2.8 kg/m2; 29.5 ± 16.3 mi/wk) currently running > 50% pre-injury mileage without pain were compared with twenty-two matched CON (14F, 8M; 22.7 ± 1.2 y; 22.7 ± 2.7 kg/m2; 31.2 ± 19.6 mi/wk). INJ group was stratified by site of injury into two groups (Hip/Thigh/Knee and Lower Leg/Ankle/Foot) for secondary analysis. Leg length-normalized anterior, posterolateral, and posteromedial reach distances on the SEBT, medial/lateral and anterior/posterior ground reaction force TTS, directional postural stability indices, and a composite dynamic postural stability index (DPSI), were assessed using mixed model ANOVA (α=0.05) and effect sizes (d). No group X direction interaction or group differences were observed for the SEBT (p=0.51, 0.71) or TTS (p=0.83, 0.72) measures. A group X direction interaction was found for postural stability indices during the forward landing task (p<0.01). Both Hip/Thigh/Knee and Lower leg/Ankle/Foot INJ groups demonstrated a greater vertical postural stability index (VPSI) (p=0.01 for both, d=0.80, 0.95) and DPSI (p=0.01, 0.02, d=0.75, 0.93) when compared to CON suggesting impaired balance control. A group

  4. Hypnosis for the Management of Anticipatory Nausea and Vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Kravits, Kathy G.

    2015-01-01

    CASE STUDYBJ is a 34-year-old woman who was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer. She was treated with surgical removal of the primary tumor and sentinel node biopsy. Following surgery, she received chemotherapy. She was given antiemetic therapy prior to and immediately following chemotherapy. She began to experience significant and persistent nausea with intermittent episodes of vomiting after the second cycle of chemotherapy. She completed her chemotherapy but still experienced nausea and vomiting in response to several cues, such as smelling food cooking and going to the hospital. Her nausea and vomiting resulted in segregation from her family during meal time, which negatively impacted her quality of life. A hypnosis consultation was requested, and BJ was cooperative. She reported feeling very nauseated at the time of the interview. Hypnosis was discussed; her questions were answered, and the potential risks and benefits of hypnosis were reviewed. She agreed that she would like to try hypnosis. A hypnosis assessment was conducted and revealed that she had a history of profound motion sickness and severe, chronic childhood trauma associated with feelings of anxiety and hypervigilance. The therapeutic suggestions that were used with BJ included hypnotic suggestions for relaxation and removal of discomfort. A metaphor describing the central processing of the anticipatory nausea and vomiting as a thermostat that could be adjusted to reduce and eliminate the sensation was used to suggest that she could control her perceptions and in turn control the nausea. Posthypnotic suggestions included that at the earliest awareness of discomfort, rubbing the throat would eliminate that discomfort, and cooking aromas would be transformed into her favorite fragrance. Reversal went smoothly, and BJ reported satisfaction with the experience. BJ experienced significant reduction in symptoms after the first session. She had two more sessions, at which time she was able to eat

  5. The Integrity of Anticipatory Coarticulation in Fluent and Non-Fluent Tokens of Adults Who Stutter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Harvey M.; Byrd, Courtney T.; Guitar, Barry

    2011-01-01

    This article analysed the acoustic structure of voiced stop ++ vowel sequences in a group of persons who stutter (PWS). This phonetic unit was chosen because successful production is highly dependent on the differential tweaking of right-to-left anticipatory coarticulation as a function of stop place. Thus, essential elements of both speech motor…

  6. Fuzzy Integration of Support Vector Regression Models for Anticipatory Control of Complex Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alamaniotis, Miltiadis; Agarwal, Vivek

    2014-04-01

    Anticipatory control systems are a class of systems whose decisions are based on predictions for the future state of the system under monitoring. Anticipation denotes intelligence and is an inherent property of humans that make decisions by projecting in future. Likewise, artificially intelligent systems equipped with predictive functions may be utilized for anticipating future states of complex systems, and therefore facilitate automated control decisions. Anticipatory control of complex energy systems is paramount to their normal and safe operation. In this paper a new intelligent methodology integrating fuzzy inference with support vector regression is introduced. Our proposed methodology implements an anticipatory system aiming at controlling energy systems in a robust way. Initially a set of support vector regressors is adopted for making predictions over critical system parameters. Furthermore, the predicted values are fed into a two stage fuzzy inference system that makes decisions regarding the state of the energy system. The inference system integrates the individual predictions into a single one at its first stage, and outputs a decision together with a certainty factor computed at its second stage. The certainty factor is an index of the significance of the decision. The proposed anticipatory control system is tested on a real world set of data obtained from a complex energy system, describing the degradation of a turbine. Results exhibit the robustness of the proposed system in controlling complex energy systems.

  7. Insurance coverage and anticipatory guidance: are Hispanic children at a disadvantage?

    PubMed

    Moyce, Sally; Bell, Janice F; Fields, Bronwyn; de Leon Siantz, Mary Lou

    2014-10-01

    We examined pediatric insurance status and receipt of weight-related anticipatory guidance in the 2008-2010 Medical Expenditures Panel Survey (n = 12,438). Hispanic children were more likely than white children to report diet and exercise counseling, regardless of insurance. Given the risks of overweight and obesity among Hispanic children, these findings are promising.

  8. Association between anticipatory grief and problem solving among family caregivers of persons with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Nicole R; Hansen, Alexandra S; Barnato, Amber E; Garand, Linda

    2013-04-01

    Measure perceived involvement in medical decision making and determine if anticipatory grief is associated with problem solving among family caregivers of older adults with cognitive impairment. Retrospective analysis of baseline data from a caregiver intervention (n = 73). Multivariable regression models testing the association between caregivers' anticipatory grief, measured by the Anticipatory Grief Scale (AGS), with problem-solving abilities, measured by the social problem solving inventory-revised: short form (SPSI-R: S). 47/73 (64%) of caregivers reported involvement in medical decision making. Mean AGS was 70.1 (± 14.8) and mean SPSI-R: S was 107.2 (± 11.6). Higher AGS scores were associated with lower positive problem orientation (p = .041) and higher negative problem orientation scores (p = .001) but not other components of problem solving-rational problem solving, avoidance style, and impulsivity/carelessness style. Higher anticipatory grief among family caregivers impaired problem solving, which could have negative consequences for their medical decision making responsibilities.

  9. Waiting for spiders: brain activation during anticipatory anxiety in spider phobics.

    PubMed

    Straube, Thomas; Mentzel, Hans-Joachim; Miltner, Wolfgang H R

    2007-10-01

    Anticipatory anxiety during expectation of phobogenic stimuli is an integral part of abnormal behaviour in phobics. The neural basis of anticipatory anxiety in specific phobia is unknown. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we explored brain activation in subjects with spider phobia and in non-phobic subjects, while participants anticipated the presentation of either neutral or phobogenic visual stimuli. Subjective ratings indicated that anticipation of phobia-related stimuli was associated with increased anxiety in phobics but not in healthy subjects. FMRI results showed increased activation of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), insula, thalamus, and visual areas in phobics compared to controls during anticipation of phobia-relevant versus anticipation of neutral stimulation. Furthermore, for this contrast, we found also increased activation of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST). This particular finding supports models, which propose, based on animal experiments, a critical involvement of the BNST in anticipatory anxiety. Finally, correlation analysis revealed that subjective anxiety of phobics correlated significantly with activation in rostral and dorsal ACC and the anterior medial prefrontal cortex. Thus, activation in different ACC regions and the medial prefrontal cortex seems to be specifically associated with the severity of experienced anticipatory anxiety in subjects with spider phobia.

  10. Participatory and Anticipatory Stages of Mathematical Concept Learning: Further Empirical and Theoretical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Martin A.; Placa, Nicora; Avitzur, Arnon

    2016-01-01

    Tzur and Simon (2004) postulated 2 stages of development in learning a mathematical concept: participatory and anticipatory. The authors discuss the affordances for research of this stage distinction related to data analysis, task design, and assessment as demonstrated in a 2-year teaching experiment.

  11. Anticipatory 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations are associated with escalated alcohol intake in dependent rats

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Cara L.; Malavar, Jordan C.; George, Olivier; Koob, George F.; Vendruscolo, Leandro F.

    2014-01-01

    Rats emit 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) in situations of increased motivation, such as during the anticipation of palatable food or drugs of abuse. Whether the same holds true for the anticipation of alcohol intake remains unknown. Alcohol drinking in a nondependent state is thought to be mediated by its rewarding effects (positive reinforcement), whereas drinking in the dependent state is motivated by alcohol’s stress-relieving effects (negative reinforcement). Here, we measured context-elicited 50 kHz USVs in alcohol-dependent (alcohol vapor-exposed) and nondependent rats immediately before operant alcohol self-administration sessions. Dependent rats showed escalated levels of alcohol intake compared with nondependent rats. Overall, dependent and nondependent rats showed similar levels of anticipatory 50 kHz USVs. However, the number of anticipatory USVs was positively correlated with alcohol intake in dependent rats but not nondependent rats. Additionally, dependent rats with higher alcohol intake displayed increased anticipatory 50 kHz USVs compared with rats that had lower alcohol intake, whereas no difference was observed between rats with high and low alcohol intake in the nondependent group. Increased 50 kHz USVs were specific for the anticipation of alcohol self-administration and did not generalize to a novel environment. These findings suggest that anticipatory 50 kHz USVs may be an indicator of context-elicited negative reinforcement learning. PMID:24914463

  12. Vocational Anticipatory Socialization: College Students' Reports of Encouraging/Discouraging Sources and Messages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Samantha Rae; Myers, Karen K.

    2017-01-01

    Framed by social cognitive career theory, this study identified college students' perceptions of the most influential sources and content of encouraging/discouraging career messages (vocational anticipatory socialization [VAS]). A survey of 873 university students found that mothers, followed by teachers/professors, friends, and fathers, were…

  13. Monitoring same/different discrimination behavior in time and space: finding differences and anticipatory discrimination behavior.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Daniel I; Wasserman, Edward A

    2010-04-01

    Discrimination behavior in a standard, two-alternative forced choice same/different task is usually measured by the pigeon's pecking one or the other of two arbitrary report areas. We found that pigeons make anticipatory, discriminative responses to the visual display during the stimulus observing period prior to the availability of the report areas; the spatial distribution of these anticipatory discriminative responses strongly correlated with the upcoming choice response. These anticipatory pecks provide evidence that the process of discrimination occurs well before the moment of choice and that key aspects of this process can be revealed by looking at the distribution of observing responses. We also manipulated the variability of the displayed items to study the nature of these anticipatory responses; again, the spatial distribution of responding during the stimulus observing period strongly correlated with the upcoming choice response. The distribution of these prechoice pecks supports the theory that pigeons search for differences in the displayed items. If differences are found, then pigeons prepare to report "different"; if not, then they report "same."

  14. The Impact of Anticipatory Grief on Caregiver Burden in Dementia Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holley, Caitlin K.; Mast, Benjamin T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Interest in anticipatory grief (AG) has typically focused on terminal diseases such as cancer. However, the issues involved in AG are unique in the context of dementia due to the progressive deterioration of both cognitive and physical abilities. The current study investigated the nature of AG in a sample of dementia caregivers and…

  15. Searching for behavioral indicators of welfare in zoos: uncovering anticipatory behavior.

    PubMed

    Watters, Jason V

    2014-01-01

    A current focus of zoo-based research aims to identify indicators of animal welfare. Reliable behavioral indicators of welfare are highly desirable as behavioral observation is non invasive and requires little in the way of specialized equipment and other costly resources-save for observer time. Anticipatory behavior is an indicator of an animal's sensitivity to reward and as such, it is a real-time indicator of animals' own perceptions of their well-being. In fact, anticipatory behavior may generate a positive affective state and thus be at least a brief manifestation of good welfare itself. The husbandry conditions of most captive animals are such that food acquisition and other positive outcomes are highly scheduled and easily signaled. These conditions promote the development of anticipatory behavior, yet little research has either documented or interpreted this behavior in zoo and aquarium animals. This commentary suggests that anticipatory behavior could be a useful tool for assessing welfare and calls upon zoo and aquarium researchers to begin to develop this tool by describing the behavior and the circumstances that lead to its modulation.

  16. The Effects of Age and Preoral Sensorimotor Cues on Anticipatory Mouth Movement During Swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jerald B.; Goodman, Shawn S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of preoral sensorimotor cues on anticipatory swallowing/eating-related mouth movements in older and younger adults. It was hypothesized that these cues are essential to timing anticipatory oral motor patterns, and these movements are delayed in older as compared with younger adults. Method Using a 2 × 2 repeated-measures design, eating-related lip, jaw, and hand movements were recorded from 24 healthy older (ages 70–85 years) and 24 healthy younger (ages 18–30 years) adults under 4 conditions: typical self-feeding, typical assisted feeding (proprioceptive loss), sensory-loss self-feeding (auditory and visual loss/degradation), and sensory-loss assisted feeding (loss/degradation of all cues). Results All participants demonstrated anticipatory mouth opening. The absence of proprioception delayed lip-lowering onset, and sensory loss more negatively affected offset. Given at least 1 preoral sensorimotor cue, older adults initiated movement earlier than younger adults. Conclusions Preoral sensorimotor information influences anticipatory swallowing/eating-related mouth movements, highlighting the importance of these cues. Earlier movement in older adults may be a compensation, facilitating safe swallowing given other age-related declines. Further research is needed to determine if the negative impact of cue removal may be further exacerbated in a nonhealthy system (e.g., presence of dysphagia or disease), potentially increasing swallowing- and eating-related risks. PMID:26540553

  17. The Impact of Anticipatory Grief on Caregiver Burden in Dementia Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holley, Caitlin K.; Mast, Benjamin T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Interest in anticipatory grief (AG) has typically focused on terminal diseases such as cancer. However, the issues involved in AG are unique in the context of dementia due to the progressive deterioration of both cognitive and physical abilities. The current study investigated the nature of AG in a sample of dementia caregivers and…

  18. The influence of anticipatory processing on attentional biases in social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Mills, Adam C; Grant, DeMond M; Judah, Matt R; White, Evan J

    2014-09-01

    Research on cognitive theories of social anxiety disorder (SAD) has identified individual processes that influence this condition (e.g., cognitive biases, repetitive negative thinking), but few studies have attempted to examine the interaction between these processes. For example, attentional biases and anticipatory processing are theoretically related and have been found to influence symptoms of SAD, but they rarely have been studied together (i.e., Clark & Wells, 1995). Therefore, the goal of the current study was to examine the effect of anticipatory processing on attentional bias for internal (i.e., heart rate feedback) and external (i.e., emotional faces) threat information. A sample of 59 participants high (HSA) and low (LSA) in social anxiety symptoms engaged in a modified dot-probe task prior to (Time 1) and after (Time 2) an anticipatory processing or distraction task. HSAs who anticipated experienced an increase in attentional bias for internal information from Time 1 to Time 2, whereas HSAs in the distraction condition and LSAs in either condition experienced no changes. No changes in biases were found for HSAs for external biases, but LSAs who engaged in the distraction task became less avoidant of emotional faces from Time 1 to Time 2. This suggests that anticipatory processing results in an activation of attentional biases for physiological information as suggested by Clark and Wells.

  19. Children in Stress: Anticipatory Guidance in the Framework of the Educational System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingman, Avigdor

    1978-01-01

    This article suggests the application of anticipatory intervention principles in schools to meet the psychological needs of teachers, pupils, and parents as well as of the school as an organizational system for coping with extreme stress caused by either natural or man-made disaster. (Author)

  20. The Integrity of Anticipatory Coarticulation in Fluent and Non-Fluent Tokens of Adults Who Stutter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Harvey M.; Byrd, Courtney T.; Guitar, Barry

    2011-01-01

    This article analysed the acoustic structure of voiced stop ++ vowel sequences in a group of persons who stutter (PWS). This phonetic unit was chosen because successful production is highly dependent on the differential tweaking of right-to-left anticipatory coarticulation as a function of stop place. Thus, essential elements of both speech motor…

  1. Anticipatory 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations are associated with escalated alcohol intake in dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Buck, Cara L; Malavar, Jordan C; George, Olivier; Koob, George F; Vendruscolo, Leandro F

    2014-09-01

    Rats emit 50kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) in situations of increased motivation, such as during the anticipation of palatable food or drugs of abuse. Whether the same holds true for the anticipation of alcohol intake remains unknown. Alcohol drinking in a nondependent state is thought to be mediated by its rewarding effects (positive reinforcement), whereas drinking in the dependent state is motivated by alcohol's stress-relieving effects (negative reinforcement). Here, we measured context-elicited 50kHz USVs in alcohol-dependent (alcohol vapor-exposed) and nondependent rats immediately before operant alcohol self-administration sessions. Dependent rats showed escalated levels of alcohol intake compared with nondependent rats. Overall, dependent and nondependent rats showed similar levels of anticipatory 50kHz USVs. However, the number of anticipatory USVs was positively correlated with alcohol intake in dependent rats but not nondependent rats. Additionally, dependent rats with higher alcohol intake displayed increased anticipatory 50kHz USVs compared with rats that had lower alcohol intake, whereas no difference was observed between rats with high and low alcohol intake in the nondependent group. Increased 50kHz USVs were specific for the anticipation of alcohol self-administration and did not generalize to a novel environment. These findings suggest that anticipatory 50kHz USVs may be an indicator of context-elicited negative reinforcement learning.

  2. Anticipatory Speech Anxiety as a Function of Public Speaking Assignment Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Paul L.; Behnke, Ralph R.

    2006-01-01

    This investigation included two studies relating anticipatory public speaking anxiety to the nature of the speech assignment. Based on uncertainty reduction theory, which suggests that communicators are less comfortable in unfamiliar or unpredictable contexts, two hypotheses were advanced on the presumption that various types of assignments in a…

  3. Context-Based Apprehension versus Planning Demands: A Communibiological Analysis of Anticipatory Public Speaking Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Michael J.; Valencic, Kristin Marie

    2000-01-01

    Compares demand for speech preparation skills and trait public speaking apprehension as predictors of state anxiety experienced immediately before a graded classroom performance. Finds that public speaking apprehension significantly predicted anticipatory anxiety, while no significant effect was observed for planning skills. Examines findings…

  4. Participatory and Anticipatory Stages of Mathematical Concept Learning: Further Empirical and Theoretical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Martin A.; Placa, Nicora; Avitzur, Arnon

    2016-01-01

    Tzur and Simon (2004) postulated 2 stages of development in learning a mathematical concept: participatory and anticipatory. The authors discuss the affordances for research of this stage distinction related to data analysis, task design, and assessment as demonstrated in a 2-year teaching experiment.

  5. Comparison of postural stability between injured and uninjured ballet dancers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Lee, I-Jung; Liao, Jung-Hsien; Wu, Hong-Wen; Su, Fong-Chin

    2011-06-01

    Ballet movements require a limited base of support; thus, ballet dancers require a high level of postural control. However, postural stability in ballet dancers is still unclear and needs to be understood. To evaluate ballet dancers' postural stability in performing single-leg standing, the en pointe task, and the first and fifth positions and to determine differences in task performance among healthy nondancers, healthy dancers, and dancers with ankle sprains. Controlled laboratory study. Injured dancers, uninjured dancers, and nondancers were recruited for this study (N = 33 age-matched participants; n= 11 per group). The tasks tested were single-leg standing with eyes open and closed, first position, fifth position, and en pointe. Center of pressure parameters were calculated from the ground-reaction force collected with 1 force plate. Analysis of variance was used to assess the differences of center of pressure parameters among 3 groups in single-leg standing; independent t test was used to examine the differences of center of pressure parameters between injured and uninjured dancers. During single-leg standing, injured dancers had significantly greater maximum displacement in the medial-lateral direction and total trajectory of center of pressure, compared with the uninjured dancers and nondancers. During the first and fifth positions, the injured dancers demonstrated significantly greater standard deviation of center of pressure position in the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions, compared with the uninjured dancers. During en pointe, the injured dancers had significantly greater maximum displacement in the medial-lateral direction and the anterior-posterior direction, compared with the uninjured dancers. The injured and uninjured dancers demonstrated differences in postural stability in the medial-lateral direction during single-leg standing and the ballet postures. Although the injured dancers received ballet training, their postural stability

  6. Postural risk assessment of mechanised firewood processing.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Raffaele; Aminti, Giovanni; De Francesco, Fabio

    2017-03-01

    The study assessed the postural risk of mechanised firewood processing with eight machines, representing the main technology solutions available on the market. Assessment was conducted with the Ovako Working posture Analysis System (OWAS) on 1000 still frames randomly extracted from videotaped work samples. The postural risk associated with firewood processing was variable and associated with technology type. Simple, manually operated new machines incurred a higher postural risk compared with semi- or fully automatic machines. In contrast, new semi-automatic and automatic machines were generally free from postural risk. In all cases, attention should be paid to postural risk that may occur during blockage resolution. The study did not cover the postural risk of firewood processing sites as a whole. The study provided useful information for selecting firewood processing machinery and for improving firewood machinery design, as part of a more articulate strategy aimed at enhancing the safety of firewood processing work sites. Practitioner Summary: The postural risk associated with mechanised firewood processing (eg cutting and splitting) depends on the type of equipment. Postural risk is highest (OWAS Action Category 2) with new in-line machines, designed for operation by a single worker. Fully automatic machines present minimum postural risk, except during blockage resolution.

  7. Evidence for Time-of-Day Dependent Effect of Neurotoxic Dorsomedial Hypothalamic Lesions on Food Anticipatory Circadian Rhythms in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Glenn J.; Kent, Brianne A.; Patton, Danica F.; Jaholkowski, Mark; Marchant, Elliott G.; Mistlberger, Ralph E.

    2011-01-01

    The dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) is a site of circadian clock gene and immediate early gene expression inducible by daytime restricted feeding schedules that entrain food anticipatory circadian rhythms in rats and mice. The role of the DMH in the expression of anticipatory rhythms has been evaluated using different lesion methods. Partial lesions created with the neurotoxin ibotenic acid (IBO) have been reported to attenuate food anticipatory rhythms, while complete lesions made with radiofrequency current leave anticipatory rhythms largely intact. We tested a hypothesis that the DMH and fibers of passage spared by IBO lesions play a time-of-day dependent role in the expression of food anticipatory rhythms. Rats received intra-DMH microinjections of IBO and activity and body temperature (Tb) rhythms were recorded by telemetry during ad-lib food access, total food deprivation and scheduled feeding, with food provided for 4-h/day for 20 days in the middle of the light period and then for 20 days late in the dark period. During ad-lib food access, rats with DMH lesions exhibited a lower amplitude and mean level of light-dark entrained activity and Tb rhythms. During the daytime feeding schedule, all rats exhibited food anticipatory activity and Tb rhythms that persisted during 2 days without food in constant dark. In some rats with partial or total DMH ablation, the magnitude of the anticipatory rhythm was weak relative to most intact rats. When mealtime was shifted to the late night, the magnitude of the food anticipatory activity rhythms in these cases was restored to levels characteristic of intact rats. These results confirm that rats can anticipate scheduled daytime or nighttime meals without the DMH. Improved anticipation at night suggests a modulatory role for the DMH in the expression of food anticipatory activity rhythms during the daily light period, when nocturnal rodents normally sleep. PMID:21912674

  8. Evidence for time-of-day dependent effect of neurotoxic dorsomedial hypothalamic lesions on food anticipatory circadian rhythms in rats.

    PubMed

    Landry, Glenn J; Kent, Brianne A; Patton, Danica F; Jaholkowski, Mark; Marchant, Elliott G; Mistlberger, Ralph E

    2011-01-01

    The dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) is a site of circadian clock gene and immediate early gene expression inducible by daytime restricted feeding schedules that entrain food anticipatory circadian rhythms in rats and mice. The role of the DMH in the expression of anticipatory rhythms has been evaluated using different lesion methods. Partial lesions created with the neurotoxin ibotenic acid (IBO) have been reported to attenuate food anticipatory rhythms, while complete lesions made with radiofrequency current leave anticipatory rhythms largely intact. We tested a hypothesis that the DMH and fibers of passage spared by IBO lesions play a time-of-day dependent role in the expression of food anticipatory rhythms. Rats received intra-DMH microinjections of IBO and activity and body temperature (T(b)) rhythms were recorded by telemetry during ad-lib food access, total food deprivation and scheduled feeding, with food provided for 4-h/day for 20 days in the middle of the light period and then for 20 days late in the dark period. During ad-lib food access, rats with DMH lesions exhibited a lower amplitude and mean level of light-dark entrained activity and T(b) rhythms. During the daytime feeding schedule, all rats exhibited food anticipatory activity and T(b) rhythms that persisted during 2 days without food in constant dark. In some rats with partial or total DMH ablation, the magnitude of the anticipatory rhythm was weak relative to most intact rats. When mealtime was shifted to the late night, the magnitude of the food anticipatory activity rhythms in these cases was restored to levels characteristic of intact rats. These results confirm that rats can anticipate scheduled daytime or nighttime meals without the DMH. Improved anticipation at night suggests a modulatory role for the DMH in the expression of food anticipatory activity rhythms during the daily light period, when nocturnal rodents normally sleep.

  9. Anticipatory Reward Processing in Addicted Populations: A Focus on the Monetary Incentive Delay Task

    PubMed Central

    Balodis, Iris M.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in brain imaging techniques have allowed neurobiological research to temporally analyze signals coding for the anticipation of rewards. In addicted populations, both hypo- and hyper-responsiveness of brain regions (e.g., ventral striatum) implicated in drug effects and reward system processing have been reported during anticipation of generalized reward. Here, we discuss the current state of knowledge of reward processing in addictive disorders from a widely used and validated task: the Monetary Incentive Delay Task (MIDT). The current paper constrains review to those studies applying the MIDT in addicted and at-risk adult populations, with a focus on anticipatory processing and striatal regions activated during task performance, as well as the relationship of these regions with individual difference (e.g., impulsivity) and treatment outcome variables. We further review drug influences in challenge studies as a means to examine acute influences on reward processing in abstinent, recreationally using and addicted populations. Here, we discuss that generalized reward processing in addicted and at-risk populations is often characterized by divergent anticipatory signaling in the ventral striatum. Although methodological/task variations may underlie some discrepant findings, anticipatory signaling in the ventral striatum may also be influenced by smoking status, drug metabolites and treatment status in addicted populations. Divergent results across abstinent, recreationally using and addicted populations demonstrate complexities in interpreting findings. Future studies will benefit from focusing on characterizing how impulsivity and other addiction-related features relate to anticipatory striatal signaling over time. Additionally, identifying how anticipatory signals recover/adjust following protracted abstinence will be important in understanding recovery processes. PMID:25481621

  10. The Steps to Perfect Posture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Jon

    2007-01-01

    Many people have memories of being told to "stop slouching" while seated at the piano bench. But the reality is that good piano posture is not as simple as bolting upright on the bench when the teacher barks. According to Eric Sutz, a Chicago-area piano teacher and performer, one should see a natural curve in his/her lower lumbar area and should…

  11. The Steps to Perfect Posture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Jon

    2007-01-01

    Many people have memories of being told to "stop slouching" while seated at the piano bench. But the reality is that good piano posture is not as simple as bolting upright on the bench when the teacher barks. According to Eric Sutz, a Chicago-area piano teacher and performer, one should see a natural curve in his/her lower lumbar area and should…

  12. Guideline for the prevention and treatment of anticipatory nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy in pediatric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, L Lee; Robinson, Paula D; Boodhan, Sabrina; Holdsworth, Mark; Portwine, Carol; Gibson, Paul; Phillips, Robert; Maan, Cathy; Stefin, Nancy; Sung, Lillian

    2014-08-01

    This guideline provides an approach to the prevention and treatment of anticipatory chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in children. It was developed by an international, inter-professional panel using AGREE II methods and is based on systematic literature reviews. Evidence-based recommendations for pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions to prevent and treat anticipatory CINV in children receiving antineoplastic agents are provided. Gaps in the evidence used to support the recommendations are identified. The contribution of this guideline to anticipatory CINV control in children requires prospective evaluation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Postural consistency in skilled archers.

    PubMed

    Stuart, J; Atha, J

    1990-01-01

    The consistency of an archer's postural set at the moment of loose (arrow release) is commonly perceived to be an important determinant of success. The coach seeks, among other things, to provide the archer with information about postural consistency, details of which he acquires by eye or occasionally by video-recordings. The gains that might be achieved from more precise information are examined here. Nine skilled archers, classified into either skilled or elite groups according to their officially computed handicap, were continuously monitored and measured with a three-dimensional co-ordinate analyser (Charnwood Dynamics Coda-3 Scanner) while shooting two ends (series) of three arrows each. Considerable variability was observed in the precision with which the positions of head, elbow and bow at the moment of loose were replicated by archers of similar levels of skill. These results are interpreted to suggest that precise postural consistency may not be the primary feature distinguishing between the performance of archers at the higher skill levels.

  14. Perturbations of ground support alter posture and locomotion coupling during step initiation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Mark W; Hilliard, Marjorie Johnson; Martinez, Katherine M; Zhang, Yunhui; Simuni, Tanya; Mille, Marie-Laure

    2011-02-01

    During the initiation of stepping, anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) for lateral weight transfer and propulsion normally precede the onset of locomotion. In Parkinson's disease (PD), impaired step initiation typically involves altered APA ground force production with delayed step onset and deficits in stepping performance. If, as in stance and gait, sensory information about lower limb load is important for the control of stepping, then perturbations influencing loading conditions could affect the step initiation process. This study investigated the influence of changes in lower limb loading during step initiation in patients with PD and healthy control subjects. Participants performed rapid self-triggered step initiation with the impending single stance limb positioned over a pneumatically actuated platform. In perturbation trials, the stance limb ground support surface was either moved vertically downward (DROP) or upward (ELEVATE) by 1.5 cm shortly after the onset of the APA phase. Overall, PD patients demonstrated a longer APA duration, longer time to first step onset, and slower step speed than controls. In both groups, the DROP perturbation reinforced the intended APA kinetic changes for lateral weight transfer and resulted in a significant reduction in APA duration, increase in peak amplitude, and earlier time to first step onset compared with other conditions. During ELEVATE trials that opposed the intended weight transfer forces both groups rapidly adapted their stepping to preserve standing stability by decreasing step length and duration, and increasing step height and foot placement laterally. The findings suggested that sensory information associated with limb load and/or foot pressure modulates the spatial and temporal parameters of posture and locomotion components of step initiation in interaction with a centrally generated feedforward mode of neural control. Moreover, impaired step initiation in PD may at least acutely be enhanced by

  15. Postural Stability is Altered by Blood Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marais, M.; Denise, P.; Guincetre, J. Y.; Normand, H.

    2008-06-01

    Non-vestibular influences as shift in blood volume changed perception of body posture. Then, factors affecting blood shift may alter postural control. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effects of leg venous contention on postural stability. Twelve subjects were studied on a balance plate for 5 minutes with the eyes closed, in 3 conditions: with no leg venous contention or grade 1 and 3 support stockings. Standard deviation of x and y position was calculated before and after the closure of the eyes. Strong venous contention altered postural stability, after the eyes were closed, during the first 10 s of standing. As support stockings prevent blood shift induced by upright posture, this result is in line with the hypothesis that blood shifts influence the perception of body orientation and postural control among others factors as vision, vestibular inputs... This strong venous contention could induce an increase of fall.

  16. Common postural defects among music students.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Piñeiro, Patricia; Díaz-Pereira, M Pino; Martínez, Aurora

    2015-07-01

    Postural quality during musical performance affects both musculoskeletal health and the quality of the performance. In this study we examined the posture of 100 students at a Higher Conservatory of Music in Spain. By analysing video tapes and photographs of the students while performing, a panel of experts extracted values of 11 variables reflecting aspects of overall postural quality or the postural quality of various parts of the body. The most common postural defects were identified, together with the situations in which they occur. It is concluded that most students incur in unphysiological postures during performance. It is hoped that use of the results of this study will help correct these errors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Posture alters human resting-state.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Robert T; Lifshitz, Michael; Jones, Jennifer M; Raz, Amir

    2014-09-01

    Neuroimaging is ubiquitous; however, neuroimagers seldom investigate the putative impact of posture on brain activity. Whereas participants in most psychological experiments sit upright, many prominent neuroimaging techniques (e.g., functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)) require participants to lie supine. Such postural discrepancies may hold important implications for brain function in general and for fMRI in particular. We directly investigated the effect of posture on spontaneous brain dynamics by recording scalp electrical activity in four orthostatic conditions (lying supine, inclined at 45°, sitting upright, and standing erect). Here we show that upright versus supine posture increases widespread high-frequency oscillatory activity. Our electroencephalographic findings highlight the importance of posture as a determinant in neuroimaging. When generalizing supine imaging results to ecological human cognition, therefore, cognitive neuroscientists would benefit from considering the influence of posture on brain dynamics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Measuring Regularity of Human Postural Sway Using Approximate Entropy and Sample Entropy in Patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigoldi, Chiara; Cimolin, Veronica; Camerota, Filippo; Celletti, Claudia; Albertini, Giorgio; Mainardi, Luca; Galli, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    Ligament laxity in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT) patients can influence the intrinsic information about posture and movement and can have a negative effect on the appropriateness of postural reactions. Several measures have been proposed in literature to describe the planar migration of CoP over the base of support, and the…

  19. Measuring Regularity of Human Postural Sway Using Approximate Entropy and Sample Entropy in Patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigoldi, Chiara; Cimolin, Veronica; Camerota, Filippo; Celletti, Claudia; Albertini, Giorgio; Mainardi, Luca; Galli, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    Ligament laxity in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT) patients can influence the intrinsic information about posture and movement and can have a negative effect on the appropriateness of postural reactions. Several measures have been proposed in literature to describe the planar migration of CoP over the base of support, and the…

  20. Anticipatory grip force between 1 and 3g

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Olivier; Van Loon, ing.. Jack J. W. A.; Thonnard, Jean-Louis; Hermsdorfer, Joachim; Lefevre, Philippe

    One remarkable capacity of utilizing common tools appropriately as soon as we grasp them relies on the ability to determine in advance the grip force (GF) required to handle them in relation to their mechanical properties and the surrounding environment. This anticipatory strategy avoids the uncompressible delays in the feedback system. The predictive control of GF is made possible because the nervous system can learn, store and then select the internal representations of the dynamics of innumerable objects, known as internal models. Beside this flexibility, the nervous system's ability to learn different task dynamics is often limited in classical robotic experiments The environment itself can be profoundly modified in altered gravity or centrifugation. The few studies that investigated motor adaptation in such contexts did not consider the interaction between gravitational phases and even less the transitions across environments. Here, we tested subject's abilities to adapt to levels of gravitational fields generated by a human centrifuge. In Experiment 1, seven subjects performed 4 lifting trials in each gravitational phase (1 to 2.5g and then 2.5 to 1g by steps of 0.5g) with a 0.12 kg instrumented object. In Experiment 2, six subjects performed vertical oscillations of the object during transitions between 1 and 3g (0.5g steps, ascending and descending phases, profile repeated twice). We continuously measured GF, load force (LF) and ambient gravity. We hypothesized that participants were able to predictively adjust GF to the new environment. In Experiment 1, participants adjusted their GF proportionally to gravity and decreased GF across trials within a given gravitational environment. Preload phases decreased over time from 300ms to 50ms irrespective of gravity. We quantified the abilities of participants to switch across environments by subtracting GF recorded in the last trial in the current gravity level from GF during the first trial in the new environment

  1. The influence of propranolol on postural stability.

    PubMed

    Lidegaard, O; Jansen, E C; Korsgaard Larsen, T

    1984-06-01

    In a double-blind cross-over study, the influence of propranolol on postural stability was investigated in 7 normals. The postural stability was measured by a computer-assisted quantitative Romberg test. A dose of 10 mg propranolol administered intravenously resulted in an impaired postural stability, with a delay of about half an hour. This delay could be responsible for the missing correlation between the sway and plasma-propranolol.

  2. The neuropathic postural tachycardia syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Costa, F.; Shannon, J. R.; Robertson, R. M.; Wathen, M.; Stein, M.; Biaggioni, I.; Ertl, A.; Black, B.; Robertson, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The postural tachycardia syndrome is a common disorder that is characterized by chronic orthostatic symptoms and a dramatic increase in heart rate on standing, but that does not involve orthostatic hypotension. Several lines of evidence indicate that this disorder may result from sympathetic denervation of the legs. METHODS: We measured norepinephrine spillover (the rate of entry of norepinephrine into the venous circulation) in the arms and legs both before and in response to exposure to three stimuli (the cold pressor test, sodium nitroprusside infusion, and tyramine infusion) in 10 patients with the postural tachycardia syndrome and in 8 age- and sex-matched normal subjects. RESULTS: At base line, the mean (+/-SD) plasma norepinephrine concentration in the femoral vein was lower in the patients with the postural tachycardia syndrome than in the normal subjects (135+/-30 vs. 215+/-55 pg per milliliter [0.80+/-0.18 vs. 1.27+/-0.32 nmol per liter], P=0.001). Norepinephrine spillover in the arms increased to a similar extent in the two groups in response to each of the three stimuli, but the increases in the legs were smaller in the patients with the postural tachycardia syndrome than in the normal subjects (0.001+/-0.09 vs. 0.12+/-0.12 ng per minute per deciliter of tissue [0.006+/-0.53 vs. 0.71+/-0.71 nmol per minute per deciliter] with the cold pressor test, P=0.02; 0.02+/-0.07 vs. 0.23+/-0.17 ng per minute per deciliter [0.12+/-0.41 vs. 1.36+/-1.00 nmol per minute per deciliter] with nitroprusside infusion, P=0.01; and 0.008+/-0.09 vs. 0.19+/-0.25 ng per minute per deciliter [0.05+/-0.53 vs. 1.12+/-1.47 nmol per minute per deciliter] with tyramine infusion, P=0.04). CONCLUSIONS: The neuropathic postural tachycardia syndrome results from partial sympathetic denervation, especially in the legs.

  3. The neuropathic postural tachycardia syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Costa, F.; Shannon, J. R.; Robertson, R. M.; Wathen, M.; Stein, M.; Biaggioni, I.; Ertl, A.; Black, B.; Robertson, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The postural tachycardia syndrome is a common disorder that is characterized by chronic orthostatic symptoms and a dramatic increase in heart rate on standing, but that does not involve orthostatic hypotension. Several lines of evidence indicate that this disorder may result from sympathetic denervation of the legs. METHODS: We measured norepinephrine spillover (the rate of entry of norepinephrine into the venous circulation) in the arms and legs both before and in response to exposure to three stimuli (the cold pressor test, sodium nitroprusside infusion, and tyramine infusion) in 10 patients with the postural tachycardia syndrome and in 8 age- and sex-matched normal subjects. RESULTS: At base line, the mean (+/-SD) plasma norepinephrine concentration in the femoral vein was lower in the patients with the postural tachycardia syndrome than in the normal subjects (135+/-30 vs. 215+/-55 pg per milliliter [0.80+/-0.18 vs. 1.27+/-0.32 nmol per liter], P=0.001). Norepinephrine spillover in the arms increased to a similar extent in the two groups in response to each of the three stimuli, but the increases in the legs were smaller in the patients with the postural tachycardia syndrome than in the normal subjects (0.001+/-0.09 vs. 0.12+/-0.12 ng per minute per deciliter of tissue [0.006+/-0.53 vs. 0.71+/-0.71 nmol per minute per deciliter] with the cold pressor test, P=0.02; 0.02+/-0.07 vs. 0.23+/-0.17 ng per minute per deciliter [0.12+/-0.41 vs. 1.36+/-1.00 nmol per minute per deciliter] with nitroprusside infusion, P=0.01; and 0.008+/-0.09 vs. 0.19+/-0.25 ng per minute per deciliter [0.05+/-0.53 vs. 1.12+/-1.47 nmol per minute per deciliter] with tyramine infusion, P=0.04). CONCLUSIONS: The neuropathic postural tachycardia syndrome results from partial sympathetic denervation, especially in the legs.

  4. Impairments of trunk movements following left or right hemisphere lesions: dissociation between apraxic errors and postural instability.

    PubMed

    Spinazzola, Lucia; Cubelli, Roberto; Della Sala, Sergio

    2003-12-01

    Stroke patients present with apraxic or postural deficits involving trunk movements. Praxis and posture control have been associated with the functions of the left and the right hemisphere, respectively. For the first time, in this study the occurrence of apraxic and postural components in trunk movement deficits following right and left hemisphere lesions were investigated in the same participants. Twenty-three patients with left (L/pt), 12 with right (R/pt) hemisphere lesion, and 30 healthy controls were evaluated with a 21-item test assessing the imitation of meaningless, symbolic and reaching movements presented twice on visual or proprioceptive modality. Erroneous, motor responses of the trunk were classified as postural (compensations to overcome stability or asymmetry deficits) or apraxic (execution errors not due to biomechanical constraints). Postural instability reactions were significantly more frequent among the R/pts, whilst apraxic responses were overwhelming within the L/pts. The findings are consistent with the view that the left hemisphere is dominant for praxis and suggest that this dominance be extended to trunk praxis. The results also support the hypothesis that trunk postures are coded in relation to the environment by a representational system. A widespread network, mainly sitting in the right hemisphere, subserves this postural system. The distinction between praxic and postural deficits in executing trunk movements should be kept in mind when evaluating trunk movement difficulties shown by stroke patients, in following up their recovery or when tailoring rehabilitation programmes.

  5. The Contribution of Pre-impact Posture on Restrained Occupant Finite Element Model Response in Frontal Impact.

    PubMed

    Poulard, David; Subit, Damien; Nie, Bingbing; Donlon, John-Paul; Kent, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to discuss the influence of the pre-impact posture to the response of a finite element human body model (HBM) in frontal impacts. This study uses previously published cadaveric tests (PMHS), which measured six realistic pre-impact postures. Seven postured models were created from the THUMS occupant model (v4.0): one matching the standard UMTRI driving posture as it was the target posture in the experiments, and six matching the measured pre-impact postures. The same measurements as those obtained during the cadaveric tests were calculated from the simulations, and biofidelity metrics based on signals correlation (CORA) were established to compare the response of the seven models to the experiments. The HBM responses showed good agreement with the PMHS responses for the reaction forces (CORA = 0.80 ± 0.05) and the kinematics of the lower part of the torso but only fair correlation was found with the head, the upper spine, rib strains (CORA= 0.50 ± 0.05) and chest deflections (CORA = 0.67 ± 0.08). All models sustained rib fractures, sternal fracture and clavicle fracture. The average number of rib fractures for all the models was 5.3 ± 1.0, lower than in the experiments (10.8 ± 9.0). Variation in pre-impact posture greatly altered the time histories of the reaction forces, deflections and the rib strains, mainly in terms of time delay, but no definite improvement in HBM response or injury prediction was observed. By modifying only the posture of the HBM, the variability in the impact response was found to be equivalent to that observed in the experiments. The postured HBM sustained from 4 to 8 rib fractures, confirming that the pre-impact posture influenced the injury outcome predicted by the simulation. This study tries to answer an important question: what is the effect of occupant posture on kinematics and kinetics. Significant differences in kinematics observed between HBM and PMHS suggesting more coupling between the pelvis

  6. Does forward head posture affect postural control in human healthy volunteers?

    PubMed

    Silva, Anabela G; Johnson, Mark I

    2013-06-01

    Proprioceptive afferent input from neck muscles plays an important role in postural control. Forward head posture has the potential to impair proprioceptive information from neck muscles and contribute to postural control deficits in patients with neck pain. This study investigated whether induced forward head posture affects postural control in healthy participants when compared to natural head posture. Centre of pressure sway area, distance covered and mean velocity were measured during 30s of static standing using a force platform with 25 healthy individuals (mean age ± SD = 20.76 ± 2.19 years) in 8 different conditions. Base of support, eyes open or closed and natural or forward head posture varied within these testing conditions. The majority of comparisons between natural and forward head posture were not statistically significant (p>0.05). This suggests that induced forward head posture in young healthy adults does not challenge them enough to impair postural control. Future studies should evaluate whether forward head posture affects postural control of individuals with chronic neck pain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Correlation between