Science.gov

Sample records for anticuerpos anti lkm-1

  1. [Autoimmune hepatitis in a girl with presence of anti-LKM1 antibodies].

    PubMed

    Larraín, F; Miquel, J F; González, S

    1997-06-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is an inflammatory liver disease characterized by dense mononuclear cell infiltrate in the portal tract, and serologically by the presence of non-organ and liver-specific autoantibodies and increased levels of gammaglobulins in the absence of a known etiology. Three subgroups of autoimmune hepatitis have been recognized, depending on the nature of the autoantibody present in the serum: Type 1 autoimmune hepatitis, associated with smooth-muscle (SMA) or antinuclear antibody (ANA) seropositivity; type 2, with anti-liver/kidney microsome antibody (anti-LKM1), and type 3, with the absence of ANA, SMA and anti-LKM1 and presence of other autoantibodies such as anti-soluble liver antigen (SLA). Subtypes of chronic autoimmune hepatitis have clinically different features and prognoses. An 8 year old female patient presented mild jaundice of insidious onset. The liver was tender and enlarged. Serologic markers for A, B, C, E, Epstein Barr and cytomegalovirus were negative. The liver biopsy showed a histological picture consistent with chronic active hepatitis. High titers of anti-liver/kidney-microsome antibody were found by indirect immunofluorescence test, and this finding was confirmed by Western blot against specific liver microsome antigens. Therapy with prednisolone induced a clinical and biochemical remission after four weeks. The suspension of therapy under strict medical control produced a rapid relapse of clinical and biochemical features. The reinitiation of prednisolone was successful, and an alternate-day program was started and maintained until 8 months follow-up.

  2. Immunoglobulin GM and KM Allotypes and Prevalence of Anti-LKM1 Autoantibodies in Patients with Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Muratori, Paolo; Sutherland, Susan E.; Muratori, Luigi; Granito, Alessandro; Guidi, Marcello; Pappas, Georges; Lenzi, Marco; Bianchi, Francesco B.; Pandey, Janardan P.

    2006-01-01

    GM and KM allotypes—genetic markers of immunoglobulin (Ig) γ and κ chains, respectively—are associated with humoral immunity to several infection- and autoimmunity-related epitopes. We hypothesized that GM and KM allotypes contribute to the generation of autoantibodies to liver/kidney microsomal antigen 1 (LKM1) in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected persons. To test this hypothesis, we characterized 129 persons with persistent HCV infection for several GM and KM markers and for anti-LKM1 antibodies. The heterozygous GM 1,3,17 23 5,13,21 phenotype was significantly associated with the prevalence of anti-LKM1 antibodies (odds ratio, 5.13; P = 0.002), suggesting its involvement in this autoimmune phenomenon in HCV infection. PMID:16641304

  3. Detection on immunoblot of new proteins from the soluble fraction of the cell recognized either by anti-liver-kidney microsome antibodies type 1 or by anti-liver cytosol antibodies type 1--relationship with hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ballot, E; Desbos, A; Monier, J C

    1996-09-01

    Antibodies directed against liver cytosol protein, called anti-liver cytosol type 1 (LC1 Ab), have been described by both immunofluorescence (IF) and immunodiffusion techniques in sera from patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). They have never been found in association with antibodies directed against the hepatitis C virus (HCV), unlike the anti-liver-kidney microsome antibodies type 1 (LKM1 Ab), the serological marker of AIH type 2. This suggests that there are two subgroups of AIH type 2, i.e., HCV-related and non-HCV-related. In this study, immunoblotting experiments were performed using proteins from the soluble phase of the rat liver cell; 141 sera which tested positive for LKM1 Ab by IF, 24 identified as having LC1 Ab by IF, and 50 from blood donors as controls were analyzed. Three bands were stained by LC1 Ab sera more often than by the control sera, and with a statistically significant frequency. These 3 proteins were located at apparent Mr 50,000, 55,000, and 60,000. The LKM1 Ab-positive sera as defined by IF stained six bands with a statistically significant frequency compared to the controls. Their apparent Mr were 35,000, 39,000, 47,000, 50,000, 55,000, and 60,000. LKM1 Ab-positive sera which were anti-HCV negative recognized a 60,000 protein belonging to the soluble phase of the cell, with a statistically significant frequency compared to LKM1 Ab-positive sera which were anti-HCV positive. This 60,000 protein was also recognized by LC1 Ab-positive sera, which were almost always anti-HCV negative. The presence of antibodies against a 60,000 protein from the soluble phase of the cell is discussed in terms of the anti-HCV serological markers found in the sera from patients with AIH. PMID:8811044

  4. Diagnóstico diferencial en la encefalitis por anticuerpos contra el receptor NMDA

    PubMed Central

    González-Valcárcel, J.; Rosenfeld, M.R.; Dalmau, J.

    2011-01-01

    Resumen Introducción La encefalitis por anticuerpos contra el receptor de NMDA (NMDAR) suele desarrollarse como un síndrome característico de evolución multifásica y diagnóstico diferencial amplio. Pacientes Presentamos a 2 pacientes diagnosticadas de encefalitis por anticuerpos NMDAR con un cuadro clínico típico, pero que inicialmente señaló otras etiologías. Discusión La afectación frecuente de pacientes jóvenes con manifestaciones psiquiátricas prominentes indica frecuentemente otras consideraciones diagnósticas; las más frecuentes son las encefalitis virales, los procesos psiquiátricos y el síndrome neuroléptico maligno. Varios síndromes previamente definidos de manera parcial o descriptiva en adultos y pacientes pediátricos probablemente eran casos de encefalitis anti-NMDAR. Conclusiones La encefalitis anti-NMDAR debe considerarse en pacientes jóvenes con manifestaciones psiquiátricas subagudas, movimientos anormales y alteraciones autonómicas. La caracterización clínica e inmunológica de esta enfermedad ha llevado a la identificación de nuevos anticuerpos que afectan a procesos de memoria, aprendizaje, conducta y psicosis. PMID:20964986

  5. Anti-soluble liver antigen (SLA) antibodies in chronic HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Vitozzi, Susana; Lapierre, Pascal; Djilali-Saiah, Idriss; Marceau, Gabriel; Beland, Kathie; Alvarez, Fernando

    2004-05-01

    Hepatitis C infection is associated with autoimmune disorders, such as the production of autoantibodies. Anti-LKM1 and anti-LC1, immunomarkers of type 2 autoimmune hepatitis, have been previously associated with a HCV infection. Anti-Soluble-Liver-Antigen autoantibodies (SLA) are specifically associated with type 1 and type 2 autoimmune hepatitis and more closely related to patients who relapse after steroid therapy. The recent molecular cloning of the soluble liver antigen provides the opportunity to develop more specific tests for the detection of antibodies against it. The aim of this work is to characterize anti-soluble-liver autoantibodies in sera from patients chronically infected by HCV. A recombinant cDNA from activated Jurkat cells coding for the full length tRNP(Ser)Sec/SLA antigen was obtained. ELISA, Western Blot and immunoprecipitation tests were developed and used to search for linear and conformational epitopes recognized by anti-SLA antibodies in sera from patients chronically infected by HCV. Anti-soluble liver antigen antibodies were found in sera from 10.4% of HCV-infected patients. The prevalence was significantly increased to 27% when anti-LKM1 was also present. Most anti-SLA reactivity was directed against conformational epitopes on the antigen. The means titers by ELISA were lower than those obtained in type 2 AIH. The result of autoantibody isotyping showed a subclass restriction to IgG1 and also IgG4. This study shows the presence of anti-SLA antibodies in approximately 10% of HCV infected patients. The prevalence of SLA autoantibodies in HCV infected patients increases when LKM1 autoantibodies are also present. The relationship between the prevalence of this characteristic autoimmune hepatitis autoantibody and the implication of an autoimmune phenomenon in the liver injury of patients chronically infected by HCV needs further investigation.

  6. Anticuerpos derivados de pacientes se dirigen a células tumorales

    Cancer.gov

    Artículo del blog Temas y relatos de un anticuerpo derivado de pacientes que destruye células tumorales en estirpes celulares de varios tipos de cáncer e hizo lento el crecimiento en modelos murinos de cáncer de cerebro y pulmón sin signo de efectos.

  7. Detection of anti-lactoferrin antibodies and anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies in autoimmune hepatitis: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Liming; Zhang, Yuhong; Peng, Weihua; Chen, Juanjuan; Li, Hua; Ming, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Anti-lactoferrin antibodies (ALA) and anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies (AMPA) are specific serological markers for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). The project aimed to detect ALA and AMPA and explore their clinical significances in AIH patients. 59 AIH patients, 217 non AIH patients, and 50 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. ALA and AMPA were detected by ELISA. Antineutropil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and anti-smooth muscle antibodies (ASMA) were examined by indirect immunofluorescence. Antimitochondrial antibody M2 subtype (AMA-M2), anti-liver kidney microsomal antibody Type 1 (LKM1), anti-liver cytosol antibody Type 1 (LC1), and anti-soluble liver antigen/liver-pancreas antibodies (SLA/LP) were tested by immunoblot. The positivity for ALA was 18.6% in AIH group, only one patient in non-AIH group was positive for ALA; the positivity for AMPA was 59.3% in AIH group, with significant differences (P < 0.01) compared with other groups. The specificities for ALA and AMPA were 99.63% and 97.75%; the sensitivities were 18.64% and 59.32%; and the accuracy rates were 84.97% and 90.80%, respectively. A certain correlation was observed between ALA and SLA/LP, AMPA and ANCA, ASMA in AIH group. ALA and AMPA were associated with AIH, and had high clinical diagnostic value. Co-detection with other relative autoantibodies could play an important role in differential diagnosis of AIH.

  8. Encefalitis por anticuerpos contra el receptor de NMDA: experiencia con seis pacientes pediátricos. Potencial eficacia del metotrexato

    PubMed Central

    Bravo-Oro, Antonio; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos; Quezada-Corona, Arturo; Dalmau, Josep; Campos-Guevara, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    Introducción La encefalitis por anticuerpos contra el receptor de N-metil-D-aspartato (NMDA) es una entidad cada vez más diagnosticada en edad pediátrica. A diferencia de los adultos, en muchos casos no se asocia a tumores y las manifestaciones iniciales en niños más frecuentes son crisis convulsivas y trastornos del movimiento, mientras que en los adultos predominan las alteraciones psiquiátricas. Casos clínicos Presentamos seis casos pediátricos confirmados con anticuerpos contra la subunidad NR1 del receptor de NMDA en suero y líquido cefalorraquídeo. Cinco de los casos comenzaron con crisis convulsivas como manifestación clínica inicial antes de desarrollar el cuadro clásico de esta entidad. En todos los casos se utilizaron esteroides como primera línea de tratamiento, con los que sólo se observó control de las manifestaciones en uno, por lo que el resto de los pacientes requirió inmunomoduladores de segunda línea. Todos los pacientes recibieron metotrexato como tratamiento inmunomodulador para evitar recaídas y la evolución fue a la mejoría en todos ellos. Conclusiones En nuestra serie de pacientes con encefalitis por anticuerpos contra el receptor de NMDA, ninguno se asoció a tumores. Todos los casos recibieron metotrexato por lo menos durante un año, no observamos eventos adversos clínicos ni por laboratorio, ni hubo secuelas neurológicas ni recaídas durante el tratamiento. Aunque es una serie pequeña y es deseable incrementar el número y tiempo de evolución, consideramos el metotrexato una excelente alternativa como tratamiento inmunomodulador para esta patología. PMID:24150952

  9. Anti-ENA antibody profile in hepatitis C patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Batchoun, Raymond G; Al-Najdawi, Malek A; Al-Taamary, Sameh

    2011-07-01

    Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is increasing all over the world, especially among hemodialysis patients. HCV is one of the major autoantibody inducing viruses, where anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-smooth muscle antibodies (ASMA), anti-liver kidney microsome antibodies (LKM-1), and rheumatoid factor (RF) have been related to HCV. Few studies have investigated the presence of anti-extractable nuclear antigens (ENA) antibodies in chronic liver diseases, especially in chronic hepatitis C cases, but none investigated its immunostimulation role in hemodialysis units. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of HCV among chronic kidney disease- Stage 5 (CKD5) patients undergoing hemodialysis and the prevalence of ENA antibodies among them. Sera of 134 patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis, were screened for HCV antibodies and ENA antibodies profile, using ELISA and Immunoblot technique. 41 HCV-positive blood bank donors were used as controls. Sixty-four (47.7%) of 134 patients undergoing hemodialysis were infected with HCV. Thirty-three (51.6%) of 64 patients with HCV infection undergoing hemodialysis had anti-ENA antibodies: 9 (27.3%) showed anti-SSA antibodies and 22 (66.7%) had anti-SSB antibodies. The prevalence of anti-ENA antibodies was significantly higher in the patients with HCV infection, undergoing hemodialysis, compared with both control groups (hepatitis C-positive blood bank donors and hepatitis C-negative patients undergoing hemodialysis). Seventeen of 33 HCV antibodies-positive males undergoing hemodialysis had anti-ENA antibodies, compared with 16 of 31 females, indicating no sex related difference. This study emphasizes the high prevalence of HCV infection in our hemodialysis patients, comparable to that of other Middle Eastern countries, but higher than Western ones. A strong association was observed between anti-HCV positivity and hemodialysis duration, as well as anti-ENA antibody profile. However, these

  10. Anti-soluble liver antigen/liver-pancreas (SLA/LP) antibodies in pediatric patients with autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Vitozzi, Susana; Djilali-Saiah, Idriss; Lapierre, Pascal; Alvarez, Fernando

    2002-12-01

    Antibodies against soluble liver antigen/liver-pancreas (SLA/LP) have been associated with severe autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and poor outcome, but most of these reports have focused on adult patients. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and clinical significance of anti-SLA/LP antibodies in a pediatric population with AIH. We developed a quantitative enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA), a Western blot (WB) and an immunoprecipitation assay (IPA) based on recombinant cDNA from activated Jurkat cells. The specificity of these tests was validated by testing 200 serum samples from healthy subjects, and from patients with liver and non-liver diseases. Anti-SLA/LP antibodies were found in patients with type 1 and type 2 AIH. The prevalence of these antibodies in patients with type 1 AIH was: 42% when tested by ELISA, 15% by WB and 50% by IPA. In patients with type 2 AIH, the prevalence rates were 42% by ELISA, 18% by WB and 44% by IPA. The mean titer values for anti-SLA/LP antibodies was significantly higher in type 2 AIH (1:1,300 +/- 339) than in type 1 AIH (1:600 +/- 71; p < 0.0001) and closely associated with higher titers of anti-liver kidney microsome type 1 (LKM1) and anti-liver cytosol type 1 (LC1) antibodies in sera. The presence of anti-SLA/LP showed a significant female preponderance in type 1 and 2 AIH patients (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.003, respectively), and was significantly correlated with a lower age at diagnosis (p = 0.05) in type 1 AIH patients. In conclusion, anti-SLA/LP antibodies in pediatric patients are associated with both type 1 and 2 AIH.

  11. A rare case of Addison's disease, hepatitis, thyreoiditis, positive IgG anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies and partial IgA deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mihaylova, Snejina; Yankova, Petja; Atanasova, Iliana; Nikolova-Vlahova, Milena; Naumova, Elissaveta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Selective IgA deficiency (IgAD) is the most prevalent type of primary immune deficiencies, but partial IgA deficiency is even more common. Addison's disease is a rare condition associated with primary adrenal insufficiency due to infection or autoimmune destruction of the adrenals. The association between IgA deficiency and Addison's disease is very rare. Case and laboratory data We observed a 22-year-old male patient with marked darkening of the skin, especially on the palms and areolae, jaundice on the skin and sclera, astheno-adynamia, hypotension (80/50 mm Hg), and pain in the right hypochondrium. The laboratory investigations revealed increased serum levels of total and indirect bilirubin, AST, ALT, GGT and LDH, negative HBsAg, anti-HBc IgM, anti-HCV and anti-HAV IgM, very low serum IgA levels (0.16 g/l) with normal IgG and IgM, negative ANA, ANCA, AMA, LKM-1, anti-GAD-60, anti-IA-2, anti-thyroglobulin antibodies, a mild increase in anti-TPO antibodies titer, a marked increase in IgG anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies, with no typical changes in cellular immunity, negative T-SPOT-TB test, HLA – A*01; B*08; DRB1*03; DQB1*02, karyotype – 46, XY. Conclusions We present a rare case of partial IgA deficiency with Addison's disease, hepatitis, thyroiditis and positive anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies. IgAD and some autoimmune disorders share several predisposing HLA genes, thus explaining the increased prevalence of IgAD in certain patient groups. PMID:27536208

  12. An Overlap Syndrome involving systemic lupus erythematosus and autoimmune hepatitis in an adolescent girl.

    PubMed

    Battagliotti, Cristina; Rispolo Klubek, Daniela; Karakachoff, Mario; Costaguta, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    La superposición del lupus eritematoso sistémico y la hepatitis autoinmune se describe ocasionalmente. Aunque ambas enfermedades pueden compartir ciertos hallazgos, como poliartralgias, hipergammaglobulinemia y anticuerpo antinúcleo positivo, son consideradas dos diferentes. Se presenta a una paciente de 14 años con lupus eritematoso sistémico, que, luego de dos años, consultó por ictericia. Sin antecedentes de ingesta de drogas, alcohol o exposición a virus hepatotropos. Tenia un aumento de las enzimas hepáticas con anticuerpos antinúcleo, anti-ADN de doble cadena y LKM 1 positivos. La biopsia hepática mostró una hepatitis de interfase con infiltrado linfoplasmocitario. De esta manera, cumplia con los criterios diagnósticos tanto para lupus eritematoso sistémico como para hepatitis autoinmune. Tratada con corticoides y micofenolato mofetil, mejoró su clinica y laboratorio. Conclusión. La hepatitis autoinmune puede ocurrir en el curso del lupus eritematoso sistémico. Un diagnóstico temprano es importante para prevenir el avance de la enfermedad; es obligatoria la realización de la biopsia hepática.

  13. The anti-cloak.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huanyang; Luo, Xudong; Ma, Hongru; Chan, C T

    2008-09-15

    A kind of transformation media, which we shall call the "anti-cloak", is proposed to partially defeat the cloaking effect of the invisibility cloak. An object with an outer shell of "anti-cloak" is visible to the outside if it is coated with the invisible cloak. Fourier-Bessel analysis confirms this finding by showing that external electromagnetic wave can penetrate into the interior of the invisibility cloak with the help of the anti-cloak. PMID:18794996

  14. Anti-addiction vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaoyun; Orson, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite intensive efforts to eradicate it, addiction to both legal and illicit drugs continues to be a major worldwide medical and social problem. Anti-addiction vaccines can produce the antibodies to block the effects of these drugs on the brain, and have great potential to ameliorate the morbidity and mortality associated with illicit drug intoxications. This review provides a current overview of anti-addiction vaccines that are under clinical trial and pre-clinical research evaluation. It also outlines the development challenges, ethical concerns, and likely future intervention for anti-addiction vaccines. PMID:22003367

  15. Anti-Fog Compound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Tracer Chemical Corporation's TRX Anti-Fog Composition is an inexpensive product which prevents condensation on plastic and glass surfaces. It was the result from a Tech Briefs article detailing a Johnson Space Center compound.

  16. Anti-inflammatory Diets.

    PubMed

    Sears, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Chronic disease is driven by inflammation. This article will provide an overview on how the balance of macronutrients and omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in the diet can alter the expression of inflammatory genes. In particular, how the balance of the protein to glycemic load of a meal can alter the generation of insulin and glucagon and the how the balance of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids can effect eicosanoid formation. Clinical results on the reduction of inflammation following anti-inflammatory diets are discussed as well as the molecular targets of anti-inflammatory nutrition. To overcome silent inflammation requires an anti-inflammatory diet (with omega-3s and polyphenols, in particular those of Maqui). The most important aspect of such an anti-inflammatory diet is the stabilization of insulin and reduced intake of omega-6 fatty acids. The ultimate treatment lies in reestablishing hormonal and genetic balance to generate satiety instead of constant hunger. Anti-inflammatory nutrition, balanced 40:30:30 with caloric restriction, should be considered as a form of gene silencing technology, in particular the silencing of the genes involved in the generation of silent inflammation. To this anti-inflammatory diet foundation supplemental omega-3 fatty acids at the level of 2-3 g of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) per day should be added. Finally, a diet rich in colorful, nonstarchy vegetables would contribute adequate amounts of polyphenols to help not only to inhibit nuclear factor (NF)-κB (primary molecular target of inflammation) but also activate AMP kinase. Understanding the impact of an anti-inflammatory diet on silent inflammation can elevate the diet from simply a source of calories to being on the cutting edge of gene-silencing technology. PMID:26400429

  17. Discrete anti-gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P. ); Starson, S. )

    1991-03-01

    Discrete physics, because it replaces time evolution generated by the energy operator with a global bit-string generator (program universe) and replaces fields'' with the relativistic Wheeler-Feynman action at a distance,'' allows the consistent formulation of the concept of signed gravitational charge for massive particles. The resulting prediction made by this version of the theory is that free anti-particles near the surface of the earth will fall'' up with the same acceleration that the corresponding particles fall down. So far as we can see, no current experimental information is in conflict with this prediction of our theory. The experiment crusis will be one of the anti-proton or anti-hydrogen experiments at CERN. Our prediction should be much easier to test than the small effects which those experiments are currently designed to detect or bound. 23 refs.

  18. Insane anti-Membranes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giecold, Gregory; Orsi, Francesco; Puhm, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    The backreactions of anti-branes on a variety of supergravity backgrounds have been shown in a recent series of papers to be riled by some unexplained flux singularities. All of the situations studied so far involve backgrounds with (close to) AdS-asymptotics. It is the purpose of this work to study the backreaction of anti-M2 branes on a background exhibiting a different UV behavior: the so-called 8 regular solution of eleven-dimensional supergravity that we consider has "Taub-NUT type" asymptotics. As it turns out, some subleading infrared singularities are inevitable; they cannot be naturally ascribed to the anti-branes backreacting on this background. Moreover, our configuration does not involve smeared branes. This lends further credence to the work of Bena et al. [33] suggesting that the singularities encountered are in no way remnants of smearing that would wash away once brane polarization is taken into account.

  19. Anti-Shock Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Ames Research Center developed a prototype pressure suit for hemophiliac children, based on research of astronauts' physiological responses in microgravity. Zoex Corporation picked up the design and patents and developed an anti-shock garment for paramedic use. Marketed by Dyna Med, the suit reverses the effect of shock on the body's blood distribution by applying counterpressure to the legs and abdomen, returning blood to vital organs and stabilizing body pressure until the patient reaches a hospital. The DMAST (Dyna Med Anti-Shock Trousers) employ lower pressure than other shock garments, and are non-inflatable.

  20. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the ...

  1. Anti-Glare Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Glare from CRT screens has been blamed for blurred vision, eyestrain, headaches, etc. Optical Coating Laboratory, Inc. (OCLI) manufactures a coating to reduce glare which was used to coat the windows on the Gemini and Apollo spacecraft. In addition, OCLI offers anti-glare filters (Glare Guard) utilizing the same thin film coating technology. The coating minimizes brightness, provides enhanced contrast and improves readability. The filters are OCLI's first consumer product.

  2. Anti-diabetic Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The hyperglycaemia continues to be a major health problem in India and other developing countries. This imbalance of blood glucose causes serious health problems such as damages to the blood vessel, poor healing of wounds, retinal damage, renal damage--kidney failure. The in vitro enzyme models and evaluation of hypoglycaemic effect of sample on normal and glucose-loaded rats has been used as a prediction experiment in this chapter before going for anti-diabetic experiment using animal models. PMID:26939280

  3. Anti-Microtubule Drugs.

    PubMed

    Florian, Stefan; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule drugs that target microtubules (MTs), many of them natural products, have long been important tools in the MT field. Indeed, tubulin (Tb) was discovered, in part, as the protein binding partner of colchicine. Several anti-MT drug classes also have important medical uses, notably colchicine, which is used to treat gout, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), and pericarditis, and the vinca alkaloids and taxanes, which are used to treat cancer. Anti-MT drugs have in common that they bind specifically to Tb in the dimer, MT or some other form. However, their effects on polymerization dynamics and on the human body differ markedly. Here we briefly review the most-studied molecules, and comment on their uses in basic research and medicine. Our focus is on practical applications of different anti-MT drugs in the laboratory, and key points that users should be aware of when designing experiments. We also touch on interesting unsolved problems, particularly in the area of medical applications. In our opinion, the mechanism by which any MT drug cures or treats any disease is still unsolved, despite decades of research. Solving this problem for particular drug-disease combinations might open new uses for old drugs, or provide insights into novel routes for treatment. PMID:27193863

  4. Characterization of anti-anti-idiotypic antibodies that bind antigen and an anti-idiotype

    PubMed Central

    Goldbaum, Fernando A.; Velikovsky, C. Alejandro; Dall’Acqua, William; Fossati, Carlos A.; Fields, Barry A.; Braden, Bradford C.; Poljak, Roberto J.; Mariuzza, Roy A.

    1997-01-01

    Two mouse monoclonal anti-anti-idiotopic antibodies (anti-anti-Id, Ab3), AF14 and AF52, were prepared by immunizing BALB/c mice with rabbit polyclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies (anti-Id, Ab2) raised against antibody D1.3 (Ab1) specific for the antigen hen egg lysozyme. AF14 and AF52 react with an “internal image” monoclonal mouse anti-Id antibody E5.2 (Ab2), previously raised against D1.3, with affinity constants (1.0 × 109 M−1 and 2.4 × 107 M−1, respectively) usually observed in secondary responses against protein antigens. They also react with the antigen but with lower affinity (1.8 × 106 M−1 and 3.8 × 106 M−1). This pattern of affinities for the anti-Id and for the antigen also was displayed by the sera of the immunized mice. The amino acid sequences of AF14 and AF52 are very close to that of D1.3. In particular, the amino acid side chains that contribute to contacts with both antigen and anti-Id are largely conserved in AF14 and AF52 compared with D1.3. Therapeutic immunizations against different pathogenic antigens using anti-Id antibodies have been proposed. Our experiments show that a response to an anti-Id immunogen elicits anti-anti-Id antibodies that are optimized for binding the anti-Id antibodies rather than the antigen. PMID:9238040

  5. Anti-cartilage antibody.

    PubMed

    Greenbury, C L; Skingle, J

    1979-08-01

    Antibody to cartilage has been demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence on rat trachea in the serum of about 3% of 1126 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Titres ranged from 1:20 to 1:640. The antibody was not found in 284 patients with primary or secondary osteoarthritis or in 1825 blood donors, nor, with the exception of two weak reactors, in 1314 paraplegic patients. In most cases the antibody appears to be specific for native type II collagen. Using this as an antigen in a haemagglutination test 94% of anti-cartilage sera were positive, whereas among 100 rheumatoid control sera there were only three weak positives. More than 80% of patients with antibody had some erosion of articular cartilage, but there was no correlation with age, sex, duration of disease, nor any recognisable clinical event or change.

  6. Anti-cartilage antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Greenbury, C L; Skingle, J

    1979-01-01

    Antibody to cartilage has been demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence on rat trachea in the serum of about 3% of 1126 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Titres ranged from 1:20 to 1:640. The antibody was not found in 284 patients with primary or secondary osteoarthritis or in 1825 blood donors, nor, with the exception of two weak reactors, in 1314 paraplegic patients. In most cases the antibody appears to be specific for native type II collagen. Using this as an antigen in a haemagglutination test 94% of anti-cartilage sera were positive, whereas among 100 rheumatoid control sera there were only three weak positives. More than 80% of patients with antibody had some erosion of articular cartilage, but there was no correlation with age, sex, duration of disease, nor any recognisable clinical event or change. Images Fig. 1 PMID:389957

  7. Anti-vibration gloves?

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sue; Dong, Ren G; Welcome, Daniel E; McDowell, Thomas W

    2015-03-01

    For exposure to hand-transmitted vibration (HTV), personal protective equipment is sold in the form of anti-vibration (AV) gloves, but it remains unclear how much these gloves actually reduce vibration exposure or prevent the development of hand-arm vibration syndrome in the workplace. This commentary describes some of the issues that surround the classification of AV gloves, the assessment of their effectiveness and their applicability in the workplace. The available information shows that AV gloves are unreliable as devices for controlling HTV exposures. Other means of vibration control, such as using alternative production techniques, low-vibration machinery, routine preventative maintenance regimes, and controlling exposure durations are far more likely to deliver effective vibration reductions and should be implemented. Furthermore, AV gloves may introduce some adverse effects such as increasing grip force and reducing manual dexterity. Therefore, one should balance the benefits of AV gloves and their potential adverse effects if their use is considered.

  8. Anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Kehoe, John; Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2009-09-15

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  9. [Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis: two paediatric cases].

    PubMed

    González-Toro, M Cristina; Jadraque-Rodríguez, Rocío; Sempere-Pérez, Ángela; Martínez-Pastor, Pedro; Jover-Cerdá, Jenaro; Gómez-Gosálvez, Francisco

    2013-12-01

    Introduccion. La encefalitis asociada a anticuerpos antirreceptores de N-metil-D-aspartato (NMDA) es una patologia neurologica autoinmune documentada en la poblacion pediatrica de manera creciente en los ultimos años. Se presentan dos casos de nuestra experiencia con clinica similar. Casos clinicos. Caso 1: niña de 5 años que inicia un cuadro de convulsiones y alteracion de conciencia, asociando trastornos del movimiento y regresion de habilidades previamente adquiridas que evoluciona a autismo. Caso 2: niña de 13 años que presenta hemiparesia izquierda, movimientos anomalos, trastorno de conducta y disautonomia. En ambos casos se obtienen anticuerpos antirreceptores de NMDA positivos en el liquido cefalorraquideo y se diagnostican de encefalitis antirreceptor de NMDA. En el primer caso se inicia el tratamiento con perfusion intravenosa de corticoides e inmunoglobulinas y es necesario asociar rituximab. En el segundo, corticoides e inmunoglobulinas. La evolucion fue favorable en ambas pacientes, con una leve alteracion del lenguaje como secuela en el primer caso y una recaida en el segundo caso, con resolucion completa. Conclusion. La encefalitis antirreceptor de NMDA es un trastorno tratable y es importante el diagnostico y tratamiento precoz, ya que mejora el pronostico y disminuye las recaidas.

  10. Pharmacogenomics of Anti-platelet and Anti-coagulation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fisch, Adam S.; Perry, Christina G.; Stephens, Sarah H.; Horenstein, Richard B.; Shuldiner, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Arterial thrombosis is a major component of vascular disease, especially myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke. Current anti-thrombotic therapies such as warfarin and clopidogrel are effective in inhibiting cardiovascular events; however, there is great inter-individual variability in response to these medications. In recent years, it has been recognized that genetic factors play a significant role in drug response, and, subsequently, common variants in genes responsible for metabolism and drug action have been identified. These discoveries along with the new diagnostic targets and therapeutic strategies on the horizon hold promise for more effective individualized anti-coagulation and anti-platelet therapy. PMID:23797323

  11. (Anti)hypertriton lifetime puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu-Gang

    2016-05-01

    Most calculations on the lifetime of (anti)hypertriton gave a similar lifetime which is close to the lifetime of free Λ decays. However, recent measurements on (anti)hypertriton lifetime demonstrate a much short lifetime. All results for (anti)hypertriton lifetime by two-body decay channel of 3He + π for Au+Au collision at RHIC, Pb+Pb collision at LHC and Li + C collisions at GSI show a significant short lifetime in comparison with lifetime of free Λ decays. However, theoretical interpretation remains puzzle.

  12. Anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activities of Moroccan commercial essential oils.

    PubMed

    Aazza, Smail; Lyoussi, Badiaa; Megías, Cristina; Cortés-Giraldo, Isabel; Vioque, Javier; Figueiredo, A Cristina; Miguel, Maria G

    2014-04-01

    Essential oils (EO) possess antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, insect repellent, anti-cancer, and antioxidant properties, among others. In the present work, the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activities of Moroccan commercial EOs (Citrus aurantium, C. limon, Cupressus sempervirens, Eucalyptus globulus, Foeniculum vulgare and Thymus vulgaris) were evaluated and compared with their main constituents. T. vulgaris EO showed the best free radicals scavenging capacity. This EO was also the most effective against lipid peroxidation along with C. limon and F. vulgare EOs. C. sempervirens EO was the most effective in scavenging NO free radicals, whereas C. limon EO showed the best chelating power. Not all of the major compounds of the EO were responsible for the whole activity of the EOs. T. vulgaris EO showed the best anti-proliferative activity against THP-1 cells in contrast to that of F. vulgare. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of the EOs were plant species dependent and not always attributable to the EOs main components. Nevertheless, the EOs anti-proliferative activities were more related to their main components, as with T. vulgaris, C. limon, E. globulus and C. sempervirens. PMID:24868891

  13. [Reversible cortical atrophy secondary to anti-NMDA receptor antibody encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Bravo-Oro, Antonio; Acosta-Yebra, Danae; Grimaldo-Zapata, Ilse P; Reyes-Vaca, Guillermo

    2015-05-16

    Introduccion. La encefalitis por anticuerpos antirreceptor de N-metil-D-aspartato (NMDA) inicialmente se describio como un sindrome paraneoplasico asociado a teratoma de ovario, pero cada vez con mas frecuencia se han ido publicando casos en mujeres jovenes y niños como un cuadro encefalopatico autoinmune secundario en el 40-50% de los casos a un proceso viral. Clinicamente, se caracteriza por un cuadro progresivo de manifestaciones psiquiatricas, crisis convulsivas, discinesias y disautonomias. Un hallazgo neurorradiologico poco comunicado es la atrofia cortical reversible, de la cual se desconoce su mecanismo. Caso clinico. Niña que a los 6 años comenzo con crisis convulsivas focales, con electroencefalograma epileptogeno y tomografia de craneo inicial normal. Se inicio tratamiento anticonvulsionante. A las tres semanas aparecieron nuevas crisis convulsivas, manifestaciones psiquiatricas y alteraciones en el ciclo de sueño-vigilia. Ante la sospecha de encefalitis por anticuerpos antirreceptor de NMDA, estos se determinaron en el suero y el liquido cefalorraquideo con resultado positivo. Resonancia magnetica durante el ingreso con atrofia cortical generalizada. Oncologia Pediatrica descarto asociacion a tumores. A los dos años del cuadro, con la paciente libre de crisis convulsivas, una valoracion neuropsicologica mostro la afectacion de funciones ejecutivas y una resonancia magnetica de control evidencio la recuperacion de la atrofia cortical. Conclusion. El mecanismo de la atrofia cortical reversible se desconoce, pero en pacientes con encefalitis por anticuerpos antirreceptor de NMDA podria ser directamente proporcional a la cantidad de anticuerpos circulantes y el tiempo de exposicion a estos en la corteza cerebral. Es muy importante el diagnostico temprano y el inicio de inmunomodulacion.

  14. Anti-collagenase, anti-elastase and anti-oxidant activities of extracts from 21 plants

    PubMed Central

    Thring, Tamsyn SA; Hili, Pauline; Naughton, Declan P

    2009-01-01

    Background Owing to their roles in tissue remodelling in health and disease, several studies have reported investigations on plant extracts as inhibitors of proteinases and as anti-oxidants. Methods The anti-ageing and anti-oxidant properties of 23 plant extracts (from 21 plant species) were assessed as anti-elastase and anti-collagenase activities and in selected anti-oxidant assays along with phenolic content. Results Anti-elastase activities were observed for nine of the extracts with inhibitory activity in the following order: white tea (~89%), cleavers (~58%), burdock root (~51%), bladderwrack (~50%), anise and angelica (~32%). Anti-collagenase activities were exhibited by sixteen plants of which the highest activity was seen in white tea (~87%), green tea (~47%), rose tincture (~41%), and lavender (~31%). Nine plant extracts had activities against both elastase (E) and collagenase (C) and were ranked in the order of white tea (E:89%, C:87%) > bladderwrack (E:50%, C:25%) > cleavers (E:58%, C:7%) > rose tincture (E:22%, C:41%) > green tea (E:10%: C:47%) > rose aqueous (E: 24%, C:26%) > angelica (E:32%, C:17%) > anise (E:32%, C:6%) > pomegranate (E:15%, C:11%). Total phenolic content varied between 0.05 and 0.26 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/mL with the exception of white tea (0.77 mg GAE/mL). For anti-oxidant assessment, the Trolox equivalent anti-oxidant capacity (TEAC) assay revealed activity for all extracts. White tea had the highest activity equivalent to ~21 μM Trolox for a 6.25 μg aliquot. In addition, seven extracts exhibited activities = 10 μM Trolox with witch hazel (6.25 μg = 13 μM Trolox) and rose aqueous (6.25 μg = 10 μM Trolox) showing very high activities at low concentrations. A high activity for white tea was also found in the superoxide dismutase (SOD) assay in which it exhibited ~88% inhibition of reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium. High activities were also observed for green tea (86.41%), rose tincture (82.77%), witch hazel (82

  15. Anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, A; Newsom Davis, J

    1980-01-01

    Early suggestions that a humoral factor might be implicated in the disorder of neuromuscular transmission in myasthenia gravis have been confirmed by the detection of anti-AChR antibody in 85-90% of the patients with generalised disease and in 75% of cases with restricted ocular myasthenia. Plasma exchange reveals that serum anti-AChR usually has an inverse relationship to muscle strength and present evidence indicates that patients responding to thymectomy and immunosuppressive durg treatment usually show a consistent decline in serum anti-AChR titres. The antibody is heterogeneous and can lead to a loss of muscle AChR by several mechanisms. Anti-AChR is produced in the thymus in relatively small amounts. Anti-AChR antibody synthesis by thymic lymphocytes and pokeweed stimulated peripheral lymphocytes in culture provides a means of studying the effect of different lymphocyte populations in vitro. Analysis of clinical, immunological and HLA antigen characteristics in MG suggest that more than one mechanism may underlie the breakdown in tolerance to AChR, leading to the production of anti-AChR antibodies. PMID:7400823

  16. Anti-abortion movement.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K

    1985-01-01

    At the same time that American women celebrate the freedoms won thus far for so many Americans, American women must realize they face some of the greatest threats to liberty in recent memory. To understand this movement against American women, it is necessary to first understand the roots of the historic movement for women's rights. Reproductive freedom for many years topped the agenda of the modern women's movement. At a time and in a land where rights were being enriched and liberty prized, choice took a prominent role, specifically, the right to abortion but also generally to repdocuctive freedom and the many underlying issues involved. This is why the various efforts to criminalize abortion effect every citizen, because they pose a serious threat to the constitutional rights of each individual. This is the intellectual view, or the "head" argument. The Constitution states that: "Congress shall make no laws respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; the enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people; and no state shall make or enforce any laws which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the US." Each of these clauses expresses the philosophy on which the Constitution was founded -- individual liberty. While there has been some legitimate disagreement over what constitutes an inalienable right, the concept is clear: the government should not become involved in personal philosophical or religious matters, except to permit the freedom of personal philosophical or religious expression. The anti-abortion contignent makes its case by claiming that a fertilized egg is a cona fide person and should, therefore, be guaranteed the Constitution's full roster of protections. In its landmark Roe v. Wade opinion, the Supreme Court held what pro-choice activities have been claiming for years. Since there is no empirical test by which measure

  17. Anti-DNA antibodies in SLE

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 8 chapters. Some of the titles are: Anti-DNA Antibodies in SLE: Historical Perspective; Specificity of Anti-DNA Antibodies in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Monoclonial Autoimmune Anti-DNA Antibodies; and Structure--Function Analyses of Anti-DNA Autoantibodies.

  18. Anti-abortion movement.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K

    1985-01-01

    At the same time that American women celebrate the freedoms won thus far for so many Americans, American women must realize they face some of the greatest threats to liberty in recent memory. To understand this movement against American women, it is necessary to first understand the roots of the historic movement for women's rights. Reproductive freedom for many years topped the agenda of the modern women's movement. At a time and in a land where rights were being enriched and liberty prized, choice took a prominent role, specifically, the right to abortion but also generally to repdocuctive freedom and the many underlying issues involved. This is why the various efforts to criminalize abortion effect every citizen, because they pose a serious threat to the constitutional rights of each individual. This is the intellectual view, or the "head" argument. The Constitution states that: "Congress shall make no laws respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; the enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people; and no state shall make or enforce any laws which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the US." Each of these clauses expresses the philosophy on which the Constitution was founded -- individual liberty. While there has been some legitimate disagreement over what constitutes an inalienable right, the concept is clear: the government should not become involved in personal philosophical or religious matters, except to permit the freedom of personal philosophical or religious expression. The anti-abortion contignent makes its case by claiming that a fertilized egg is a cona fide person and should, therefore, be guaranteed the Constitution's full roster of protections. In its landmark Roe v. Wade opinion, the Supreme Court held what pro-choice activities have been claiming for years. Since there is no empirical test by which measure

  19. The Anti-Doping Movement.

    PubMed

    Willick, Stuart E; Miller, Geoffrey D; Eichner, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Historical reports of doping in sports date as far back as the ancient Greek Olympic Games. The anti-doping community considers doping in sports to be cheating and a violation of the spirit of sport. During the past century, there has been an increasing awareness of the extent of doping in sports and the health risks of doping. In response, the anti-doping movement has endeavored to educate athletes and others about the health risks of doping and promote a level playing field. Doping control is now undertaken in most countries around the world and at most elite sports competitions. As athletes have found new ways to dope, however, the anti-doping community has endeavored to strengthen its educational and deterrence efforts. It is incumbent upon sports medicine professionals to understand the health risks of doping and all doping control processes. PMID:26972261

  20. On Mathematical Anti-Evolutionism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenhouse, Jason

    2016-03-01

    The teaching of evolution in American high schools has long been a source of controversy. The past decade has seen an important shift in the rhetoric of anti-evolutionists, toward arguments of a strongly mathematical character. These mathematical arguments, while different in their specifics, follow the same general program and rely on the same underlying model of evolution. We shall discuss the nature and history of this program and model and describe general reasons for skepticism with regard to any anti-evolutionary arguments based upon them. We shall then survey the major arguments used by anti-evolutionists, to show how our general considerations make it possible to quickly identify their weakest points.

  1. The Anti-Doping Movement.

    PubMed

    Willick, Stuart E; Miller, Geoffrey D; Eichner, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Historical reports of doping in sports date as far back as the ancient Greek Olympic Games. The anti-doping community considers doping in sports to be cheating and a violation of the spirit of sport. During the past century, there has been an increasing awareness of the extent of doping in sports and the health risks of doping. In response, the anti-doping movement has endeavored to educate athletes and others about the health risks of doping and promote a level playing field. Doping control is now undertaken in most countries around the world and at most elite sports competitions. As athletes have found new ways to dope, however, the anti-doping community has endeavored to strengthen its educational and deterrence efforts. It is incumbent upon sports medicine professionals to understand the health risks of doping and all doping control processes.

  2. Idiotypes of pre-existing human anti-carcinoma anti-T and anti-Tn antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, M; Lenert, G; Springer, G F

    1993-02-01

    All humans normally possess antibodies, predominantly IgM, that react specifically with the Thomsen-Friedenreich (T) and the Tn antigens which are present in immunoreactive form on > 85% of all human carcinomas, but not in healthy and otherwise diseased tissues. We report here a serological study of idiotype expression and antigen reactivity of the anti-T and anti-Tn antibodies. Idiotypy was analyzed with rabbit antibodies raised against, and made specific for, affinity-purified polyclonal anti-T and anti-Tn antibodies from blood group A1B healthy adult donors. Anti-T and anti-Tn antibodies cross-reacted idiotypically in spite of their distinct epitope specificities. By adsorbing anti-T antibodies on insolubilized synthetic T carbohydrate we could firmly link idiotype expression with antigen reactivity. The relation of idiotype expression to the antigen-binding site of plant seed lectins was also studied; one originated from Arachis hypogaea [peanut agglutinin (PNA)], the other from Artocarpus integrifolia (Jacalin). PNA inhibited only anti-T antibodies. Jacalin inhibited both anti-T and anti-Tn antibodies in a dose-dependent manner. Neither idiotypic nor anti-idiotypic antibodies diminished the binding of lectins to T and Tn epitopes. The shared idiotypes on natural anti-T and anti-Tn antibodies permit consideration of application of their anti-idiotypes in treatment and/or prevention of human carcinoma.

  3. Anti-inflammatory, Anti-estrogenic, and Anti-implantation Activity of Bergia suffruticosa (Delile) Fenzl

    PubMed Central

    Bind, Sandeep Kumar; Jivrajani, Mehul; Anandjiwala, Sheetal; Nivsarkar, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bergia suffruticosa (Delile) Fenzl (Syn. Bergia odorata Edgew) (Elatinaceae family) is used traditionally to repair bones and is applied as a poultice on sores. It is also used for stomach troubles and as an antidote to scorpion stings. So far, very little scientific work has been reported to validate its ethnomedical uses in the alleviation of pain, bone repair, etc., Objective: This study was designed to explore the anti-inflammatory and anti-implantation potential of n-hexane extract of B. suffruticosa whole plant in mice along with identification of its chemical constituents. Materials and Methods: n-Hexane extract of B. suffruticosa whole plant was screened for acute and chronic anti-inflammatory activity followed by an anti-estrogenic activity. Eventually, n-hexane extract was tested for anti-implantation activity by exploiting markers of uterine receptivity, lipid peroxidation, and superoxide enzyme activity. The extract was administered orally at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight in each study. Results: Thin layer chromatography fingerprint profile of n-hexane extract revealed the presence of lupeol and β-sitosterol. The n-hexane extract reduced the edema by 80% in acute inflammation, whereas it reduced edema to 75% on the 5th day in chronic inflammation. The n-hexane extract reduced elevated malonaldehyde level from 6 to 2.5 nmol/g × 10−5 and increased superoxide dismutase enzyme activity from 0 to 350 units/g in treated animals on the 5th day of pregnancy. Moreover, extract decreased uterine weight from 0.33 to 0.2 g in estradiol treated animals. Conclusion: These results indicate that n-hexane extract of B. suffruticosa is having potent anti-inflammatory, anti-estrogenic, and anti-implantation activity. This is the first report of all the pharmacological activities of B. suffruticosa mentioned above. SUMMARY TLC fingerprint profile of n-hexane extract of Bergia suffruticosa whole plant revealed the presence of lupeol and

  4. Anti-angiogenesis in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2013-06-01

    The nature of the angiogenic balance in neuroblastoma is complex, and a spectrum of angiogenesis stimulators and inhibitors have been detected in neuroblastoma tumours. The complex relationships between angiogenic cascade and anti-angiogenic agents in the tumour vascular phase have indicated that anti-angiogenesis can be considered as a strategy for the adjuvant therapy of neuroblastoma. The major goal is to establish if inhibition of angiogenesis is a realistic therapeutic strategy for inhibiting tumour cell dissemination and the formation of metastasis in neuroblastoma.

  5. Anti-creationism in America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hee-Joo

    This thesis documents the development of organised anti-creationism in America. The revival of creationism culminated in the late 1970s with the success of creationists' national campaign for the introduction of legislation mandating "equal-time" for scientific creationism and evolution in the public schools. This prompted a proliferation of local protest groups which were eventually linked by the network called the Committees of Correspondence. This network became the political arm of the anti-creation movement at the grass-roots level. On the other hand, a small group of evolutionists responded to the creationist arguments by launching a journal, Creation/Evolution, which disseminated anti-creationism arguments. At the educational front, the National Association of Biology Teachers led the battle. These political, polemical and educational efforts were combined and evolved into the National Center for Science Education in 1986. With the NCSE, the evolution camp for the first time had its own full-time defenders to oppose large well-financed anti-evolution efforts. It appears, however, that the impact of organised anti-creationism was fairly limited. Evidence suggests that, despite anti-creationists' concerted efforts, the creationist movement in the nineties is as vigorous as ever and its influence on public beliefs about origins of the organic world remains strong. Gallup Polls have consistently shown that almost half of the adult population in the U.S. believes in the creation of humans about 10,000 years ago. Despite this dismal situation, major scientific bodies have failed to become directly engaged in the anti-creationism campaign due to their concern over public relation. Scientific organisations depend on public support for their research funds and therefore they generally do not want to offend the public by directly challenging its cherished beliefs such as creationism. Therefore, the ongoing battle has been largely left in the hands of individual

  6. Skin anti-aging strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ganceviciene, Ruta; Liakou, Aikaterini I.; Theodoridis, Athanasios; Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Zouboulis, Christos C.

    2012-01-01

    Skin aging is a complex biological process influenced by a combination of endogenous or intrinsic and exogenous or extrinsic factors. Because of the fact that skin health and beauty is considered one of the principal factors representing overall “well-being” and the perception of “health” in humans, several anti-aging strategies have been developed during the last years. It is the intention of this article to review the most important anti-aging strategies that dermatologists have nowadays in hand, including including preventive measurements, cosmetological strategies, topical and systemic therapeutic agents and invasive procedures. PMID:23467476

  7. Marine algal natural products with anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For their various bioactivities, biomaterials derived from marine algae are important ingredients in many products, such as cosmetics and drugs for treating cancer and other diseases. This mini-review comprehensively compares the bioactivities and biological functions of biomaterials from red, green, brown, and blue-green algae. The anti-oxidative effects and bioactivities of several different crude extracts of algae have been evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Natural products derived from marine algae protect cells by modulating the effects of oxidative stress. Because oxidative stress plays important roles in inflammatory reactions and in carcinogenesis, marine algal natural products have potential for use in anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:23724847

  8. On Mathematical Anti-Evolutionism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenhouse, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The teaching of evolution in American high schools has long been a source of controversy. The past decade has seen an important shift in the rhetoric of anti-evolutionists, toward arguments of a strongly mathematical character. These mathematical arguments, while different in their specifics, follow the same general program and rely on the same…

  9. Perioperative anti-endotoxin strategies.

    PubMed

    Houdijk, A P; Meijer, C; Cuesta, M A; Meyer, S; Van Leeuwen, P A

    1997-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria are potent stimuli for the production of numerous cytokines by the immune cells. The systemic inflammatory response to these gut-derived endotoxins is therefore dependent on the responsiveness of the immune system. This paper presents results on anti-endotoxin strategies and the responsiveness to endotoxin in animal models of liver failure. Following partial hepatectomy in the normal rat, anti-endotoxin treatment using the enteral endotoxin binder cholestyramine and the bactericidal permeability-increasing protein showed beneficial effects in terms of reducing the exaggerated metabolic and inflammatory responses. Similar beneficial effects of gut endotoxin restriction were found in bile duct ligated rats subjected to a laparotomy. The beneficial effects of anti-endotoxin strategies in these models were explained by completely different mechanisms. In partial hepatectomized rats the effects were explained by the direct inhibition of the stimulatory action of endotoxin on immune cells preventing an exaggerated inflammatory response. In contrast, in postoperative BDL rats the effects of anti-endotoxin therapy were explained by the restoration of endotoxin sensitivity of the immune cells resulting in an inflammatory response necessary for an adequate reaction to surgery. These different mechanism will be discussed in the light of the phenomenon of endotoxin tolerance.

  10. Anti-Sulfoglucuronosyl Paragloboside Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongpei; Usuki, Seigo; Quarles, Brandy; Rivner, Michael H.; Ariga, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. Although the etiology of ALS is obscure, genetic studies of familiar ALS suggest a multifactorial etiology for this condition. Similarly, there probably are multiple causes for sporadic ALS. Autoimmune-mediated motor neuron dysfunction is one proposed etiology for sporadic ALS. In the present study, anti-glycolipid antibodies including GM1, GD1b, GD3, and sulfoglucuronosyl paragloboside (SGPG) were investigated in the sera of a large number of patient samples, including 113 ALS patients and 50 healthy controls, by means of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with affinity parametric complex criterion evaluation and thin-layer chromatography immunooverlay (immuno-TLC). Anti-SGPG antibodies were found in the sera of 13.3% ALS patients (15 out of 113). The highest titer reached 1:1600. The presence of anti-SGPG antibodies in the serum samples was also confirmed by immuno-TLC. Importantly, a multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the presence of anti-SGPG antibody was positively correlated with age (p < .01) and negatively correlated with ALS Functional Rating Scale score (p < .05). Moreover, the localization of SGPG-immunoreactivity on the motor neurons of rat spinal cord and a mouse motor neuronal cell line, NSC-34 was observed by an immunofluorescence method. These data suggest that SGPG could represent a specific pathogenic antigen in those ALS patients. The presence of anti-SGPG antibodies in the serum of ALS patients should represent a diagnostic biomarker of ALS, and it could reflect the severity of the disease. PMID:27683876

  11. The Scientist as Anti-Hero

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goran, Morris

    1976-01-01

    Suggests a new strategy for the proponents of science to rebut the cultural anti-science wave. This strategy involves publicizing the anti-hero scientist and presents a number of candidates from the past as examples. (GS)

  12. Anti-clogging filter system

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Erik P.

    2015-05-19

    An anti-clogging filter system for filtering a fluid containing large particles and small particles includes an enclosure with at least one individual elongated tubular filter element in the enclosure. The individual elongated tubular filter element has an internal passage, a closed end, an open end, and a filtering material in or on the individual elongated tubular filter element. The fluid travels through the open end of the elongated tubular element and through the internal passage and through the filtering material. An anti-clogging element is positioned on or adjacent the individual elongated tubular filter element and provides a fluid curtain that preferentially directs the larger particulates to one area of the filter material allowing the remainder of the filter material to remain more efficient.

  13. Compact anti-radon facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fajt, L.; Kouba, P.; Mamedov, F.; Smolek, K.; Štekl, I.

    2015-08-17

    Suppression of radon background is one of main tasks in ultra-low background experiments. The most promising technique for suppression of radon is its adsorption on charcoal. Within the frame of the NEMO-3 experiment, radon trapping facility (RTF) was installed in Modane underground laboratory in 2004. Based on long-term experience with this facility a new compact transportable anti-radon facility was constructed in cooperation among IEAP CTU, SÚRO and ATEKO company. The device provides 20m{sup 3}/h of purified air (air radon activity at the output ∼10mBq/m{sup 3}). The basic features and preliminary results of anti-radon device testing are presented.

  14. Brane - Anti-Brane Democracy

    SciTech Connect

    Rajaraman, Arvind

    2003-06-02

    We suggest a duality invariant formula for the entropy and temperature of nonextreme black holes in supersymmetric string theory. The entropy is given in terms of the duality invariant parameter of the deviation from extremality and 56 SU(8) covariant central charges. It interpolates between the entropies of Schwarzschild solution and extremal solutions with various amount of unbroken supersymmetries and therefore serves for classification of black holes in supersymmetric string theories. We introduce the second auxiliary 56 via E(7) symmetric constraint. The symmetric and antisymmetric combinations of these two multiplets are related via moduli to the corresponding two fundamental representations of E(7): brane and anti-brane ''numbers.'' Using the CPT as well as C symmetry of the entropy formula and duality one can explain the mysterious simplicity of the non-extreme black hole area formula in terms of branes and anti-branes.

  15. Anti-Atlas Mountains, Morocco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Anti-Atlas Mountains of northern Africa and the nearby Atlas mountains were created by the prolonged collision of the African and Eurasian tectonic plates, beginning about 80 million years ago. Massive sandstone and limestone layers have been crumpled and uplifted more than 4,000 meters in the High Atlas and to lower elevations in the Anti-Atlas. Between more continuous major fold structures, such as the Jbel Ouarkziz in the southwestern Anti-Atlas, tighter secondary folds (arrow) have developed. Earlier, the supercontinent of Pangea rifted apart to form precursors to the Mediterranean and the Atlantic Ocean (Beauchamp and others, 1996). In those seas sands, clays, limey sediments, and evaporite layers (gypsum, rock salt) were deposited. Later, during the mountain-building plate collision, the gypsum layers flowed under the pressure and provided a slippery surface on which overlying rigid rocks could glide (Burkhard, 2001). The broad, open style of folds seen in this view is common where evaporites are involved in the deformation. Other examples can be found in the Southern Zagros of Iran and the Sierra Madre Oriental of Mexico. Information Sources: Beauchamp, W., Barazangi, M., Demnati, A., and El Alji, M., 1996, Intracontinental rifting and inversion: Missour Basin and Atlas Mountains, Morocco: Tulsa, American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 80, No. 9, p. 1459-1482. Burkhard, Martin, 2001, Tectonics of the Anti-Atlas of Morocco -- Thin-skin/thick-skin relationships in an atypical foreland fold belt. University of Neuchatel, Switzerland: http://www-geol.unine.ch/Structural/Antiatlas.html (accessed 1/29/02). STS108-711-25 was taken in December, 2001 by the crew of Space Shuttle mission 108 using a Hasselblad camera with 250-mm lens. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography

  16. Anti Transglutaminase Antibodies Cause Ataxia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boscolo, Sabrina; Lorenzon, Andrea; Sblattero, Daniele; Florian, Fiorella; Stebel, Marco; Marzari, Roberto; Not, Tarcisio; Aeschlimann, Daniel; Ventura, Alessandro; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder characterized by the presence of anti-transglutaminase 2 (TG2) and anti-gliadin antibodies. Amongst the neurological dysfunctions associated with CD, ataxia represents the most common one. Methods We analyzed by immunohistochemistry, the anti-neural reactivity of the serum from 20 CD patients. To determine the role of anti-TG2 antibodies in ataxia, two anti-TG2 single chain variable fragments (scFv), isolated from a phage-display IgA antibody library, were characterized by immunohistochemistry and ELISA, and injected in mice to study their effects on motor coordination. We found that 75% of the CD patient population without evidence of neurological involvement, has circulating anti-neural IgA and/or IgG antibodies. Two anti-TG2 scFvs, cloned from one CD patient, stained blood vessels but only one reacted with neurons. This anti-TG2 antibody showed cross reactivity with the transglutaminase isozymes TG3 and TG6. Intraventricular injection of the anti-TG2 or the anti-TG2/3/6 cross-reactive scFv provoked transient, equally intensive ataxia in mice. Conclusion The serum from CD patients contains anti-TG2, TG3 and TG6 antibodies that may potentially cause ataxia. PMID:20300628

  17. [The anti-inflammatory effect of auranofin].

    PubMed

    Hiroi, J; Ohara, K; Fujitsu, T; Hirai, O; Satoh, S; Ochi, T; Senoh, H; Mori, J; Kikuchi, H

    1985-12-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of auranofin were studied and compared with those of indomethacin, gold sodium thiomalate (GST) and D-penicillamine. Auranofin was active as indomethacin in inhibiting carrageenan induced paw edema in rats, but was less potent than indomethacin in inhibiting UV-induced erythema in guinea pigs. Auranofin inhibited Arthus type paw edema and reverse PCA reaction in rats, on which indomethacin was ineffective. The inhibitory activity of auranofin on adjuvant arthritis was weaker than that of indomethacin. In in vitro experiments, auranofin did not show any suppression of cyclooxygenase activity, but was capable of suppression of lysosomal enzyme release and chemotaxis of neutrophils and macrophages. In addition to these anti-inflammatory activities, auranofin had almost equal anti-analgesic and anti-pyretic activity to that of indomethacin. The above results indicated that the anti-inflammatory profiles of auranofin and indomethacin differ, so we can expect new therapeutic activities of auranofin. GST had similar anti-inflammatory and anti-analgesic profiles to those of auranofin; however, the activities were less potent than auranofin and devoid of anti-pyretic activity. D-penicillamine did not show any anti-inflammatory, anti-analgesic or anti-pyretic activity. PMID:3937805

  18. Anti-Inflammatory Agents for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rayburn, Elizabeth R.; Ezell, Scharri J.; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation is closely linked to cancer, and many anti-cancer agents are also used to treat inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis. Moreover, chronic inflammation increases the risk for various cancers, indicating that eliminating inflammation may represent a valid strategy for cancer prevention and therapy. This article explores the relationship between inflammation and cancer with an emphasis on epidemiological evidence, summarizes the current use of anti-inflammatory agents for cancer prevention and therapy, and describes the mechanisms underlying the anti-cancer effects of anti-inflammatory agents. Since monotherapy is generally insufficient for treating cancer, the combined use of anti-inflammatory agents and conventional cancer therapy is also a focal point in discussion. In addition, we also briefly describe future directions that should be explored for anti-cancer anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:20333321

  19. Anti-Cyclic Citrullinated Peptide (Anti-CCP) and Anti-Mutated Citrullinated Vimentin (Anti-MCV) Relation with Extra-Articular Manifestations in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Lopez, Laura; Rocha-Muñoz, Alberto Daniel; Ponce-Guarneros, Manuel; Flores-Chavez, Alejandra; Salazar-Paramo, Mario; Cardona-Muñoz, Ernesto German; Fajardo-Robledo, Nicte Selene; Zavaleta-Muñiz, Soraya Amali; Garcia-Cobian, Teresa; Gamez-Nava, Jorge Ivan

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the association between anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP) and anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin antibodies (anti-MCV) with the presence of extra-articular (ExRA) manifestations in 225 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Ninety-five patients had ExRA and 130 had no ExRA. There was no association of anti-CCP and anti-MCV levels with the presence of ExRA as total group (P = 0.40 and P = 0.91, resp.). Making an analysis of individual manifestations, rheumatoid nodules were associated with positivity for rheumatoid factor (RF); (P = 0.01), anti-CCP (P = 0.048), and anti-MCV (P = 0.02). Instead, RF, anti-CCP, or anti-MCV were not associated with SS, chronic anemia, or peripheral neuropathy. Levels of anti-CCP correlated with the score of the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-Di) (r = 0.154, P = 0.03), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR); (r = 0.155, P = 0.03), and RF (P = 0.254, P < 0.001), whereas anti-MCV titres only correlated with RF (r = 0.169, P = 0.02). On adjusted analysis, ExRA was associated with longer age (P = 0.015), longer disease duration (P = 0.007), higher DAS-28 score (P = 0.002), and higher HAQ-DI score (P = 0.007), but serum levels of anti-CCP and anti-MCV were not associated. These findings show the need to strengthen the evaluation of the pathogenic mechanisms implied in each specific ExRA manifestation. PMID:24804270

  20. In vitro screening for anti-acetylcholiesterase, anti-oxidant, anti-glucosidase, anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial effect of three traditional medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Ghareeb, Doaa A.; ElAhwany, Amani M.D.; El-mallawany, Sherif M.; Saif, Ashraf A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we investigated the phytoconstituents Calluna vulgaris, Ferula hermonis and Tribulus terrestris, and then assessed their possible biological activities by using standard methods. A preliminary phytochemical investigation of the three extracts revealed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, proteins, lipids, phenolic compounds, saponins, sterols and amino acids. Three extracts showed anti-oxidant effect as they inhibited the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) oxidation and production of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Moreover, three extracts showed anti-acetylcholiesterase (AChE) and this effect was concentration dependent. C. vulgaris was the most potent inhibitor of AChE. Furthermore, the three plant extracts had an inhibitory effect toward α-glucosidase. The inhibitory effect was concentration dependent and the most potent inhibitor for α-glucosidase was the extract from T. terrestris. Calluna vulgaris showed anti-inflammatory effect at tested concentrations while the other two extracts exhibited this effect only at concentration of 25 μg/mL. Finally, C. vulgaris had a significant effect against pathogenic bacteria (Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Erwinia sp., Klebsiella pneumonia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) in comparison to other extracts from Ferula sp., or Tribulus sp. In conclusion, all tested extracts could be promising sources for the treatment of diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, infectious diseases and oxidative stress related disorders because they are rich in phenols and flavonoids that give anti-oxidant molecules and produce an inhibitory effect against the tested enzymes. PMID:26740784

  1. Anti-backlash gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A gear bearing having a first gear and a second gear, each having a plurality of teeth. Each gear operates on two non-parallel surfaces of the opposing gear teeth to perform both gear and bearing functions simultaneously. The gears are moving at substantially the same speed at their contact points. The gears may be roller gear bearings or phase-shifted gear bearings, and may be arranged in a planet/sun system or used as a transmission. One preferred embodiment discloses and describes an anti-backlash feature to counter ''dead zones'' in the gear bearing movement.

  2. Environmentally friendly anti-icing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockyer, Robert T. (Inventor); Zuk, John (Inventor); Haslim, Leonard A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention describes an aqueous, non-electrolytic, non-toxic, biodegradable, continuous single phase liquid anti-icing or deicing composition for use on the surfaces of, for example, aircraft, airport pavements, roadways, walkways, bridges, entrances, structures, canals, locks, components, vessels, nautical components, railroad switches, and motor vehicles. The anti-icing or deicing composition comprises: (a) water; (b) a non-toxic freezing point depressant selected from the group consisting of monohydric alcohols having from 2 to 6 carbon atoms, polyhydric alcohols having from 3 to 12 carbon atoms, monomethyl or ethyl ethers of polyhydric alcohols having from 3 to 12 atoms or mixtures thereof, wherein the freezing point depressant present is between about 14 to 60 percent by weight; (c) a thickener which is present in between about 0.01 and 10 percent by weight; and (d) optionally a corrosion inhibitor which is present in between about 0.01 and 0.1 percent by weight of the total composition. In one embodiment, the deicing composition further includes (e) a monohydric primary aliphatic unbranched alcohol as a means of forming a thin layer of the composition on the surface of the structure to be given ice protection, and/or as means of forming a homogenized foam with xanthan thickener; which alcohol is selected from the group consisting of alcohols having between 8 to 24 carbon atoms, preferably, 1-dodecanol. Compositions of water, propylene glycol, and/or propanol and xanthan are preferred.

  3. [Anti-basal ganglia antibody].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masaharu

    2013-04-01

    Sydenham's chorea (SC) is a major manifestation of rheumatic fever, and the production of anti-basal ganglia antibodies (ABGA) has been proposed in SC. The pathogenesis is hypothesized as autoimmune targeting of the basal ganglia via molecular mimicry, triggered by streptococcal infection. The spectrum of diseases in which ABGA may be involved has been broadened to include other extrapyramidal movement disorders, such as tics, dystonia, and Parkinsonism, as well as other psychiatric disorders. The autoimmune hypothesis in the presence and absence of ABGA has been suggested in Tourette's syndrome (TS), early onset obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD), and pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS). Recently, the relationship between ABGA and dopamine neurons in the basal ganglia has been examined, and autoantibodies against dopamine receptors were detected in the sera from patients with basal ganglia encephalitis. In Japan, the occurrence of subacute encephalitis, where patients suffer from episodes of altered behavior and involuntary movements, has increased. Immune-modulating treatments are effective, indicating the involvement of an autoimmune mechanism. We aimed to detect the anti-neuronal autoantibodies in such encephalitis, using immunohistochemical assessment of patient sera. The sera from patients showing involuntary movements had immunoreactivity for basal ganglia neurons. Further epitopes for ABGA will be investigated in basal ganglia disorders other than SC, TS, OCD, and PANDAS. PMID:23568985

  4. Perfect anti-reflection from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Q-Han Park

    2013-01-01

    Reducing unwanted reflections through impedance matching, called anti-reflection, has long been an important challenge in optics and electrical engineering. Beyond trial and error optimization, however, a systematic way to realize anti-reflection is still absent. Here, we report the discovery of an analytic solution to this long standing problem. For electromagnetic waves, we find the graded permittivity and permeability that completely remove any given impedance mismatch. We demonstrate that perfect broadband anti-reflection is possible when a dispersive, graded refractive index medium is used for the impedance-matching layer. We also present a design rule for the ultra-thin anti-reflection coating which we confirm experimentally by showing the anti-reflection behavior of an exemplary λ/25-thick coating made of metamaterials. This work opens a new path to anti-reflection applications in optoelectronic device, transmission line and stealth technologies.

  5. [Anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic oral vaccines?].

    PubMed

    Lomholt, H B; Kilian, M

    1996-09-16

    Recent data suggest clinical efficacy of specific antigens delivered at mucosal sites in the treatment of certain organ specific autoimmune diseases. This approach appears non-toxic and has no side effects. Phase I/II human trials on multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis show positive outcomes. Furthermore, animal studies point to beneficial effects on uveitis, diabetes mellitus, transplantation reactions and allergic diseases. The immunological mechanism is oral tolerance, a well known principle for induction of a systemic hyporesponse to specific antigens. The tolerance is most pronounced on delayed type hypersensibility and IgE-mediated reactions. At least three different mechanisms mediate the tolerance. Low doses of antigen induce active suppression, intermediate doses induce clonal T-cell anergy, and high doses induce clonal T-cell deletion. The recent improvements in the understanding of the mechanisms of oral tolerance have fueled an interest in manipulating this principle to develop anti-inflammatory vaccines. PMID:8966773

  6. Anti S enigma in a pregnant patient.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Paramjit; Kaur, Gagandeep; Basu, Sabita; Kaur, Ravneet

    2014-04-01

    Among the antibodies of the MNS blood group system, anti S antibody is generally IgG antibody reacting at 37 °C. It is rarely implicated in hemolytic transfusion reaction; however, it can lead to potentially severe transfusion reactions. Anti S is also capable of causing mild to severe fatal hemolytic disease of newborn. We report a case of anti S antibody in a pregnant patient with complicated falciparum malaria.

  7. Anti-idiotypes, receptors, and molecular mimicry

    SciTech Connect

    Linthicum, D.S.; Farid, N.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides a review of new methods and results in anti-idiotypes, receptors, and molecular mimicry. It begins with a discussion of the theoretical background of the anti-idiotypic network, it's role in the regulation of immune response, and the physical characteristics of anti-idiotypic antibodies. It then goes on to explore many applications in such areas as insulin action, thyroid cell function, the neurosciences, cardiology, virology, pharmacology, and reproduction.

  8. Anti cytokine therapy in chronic inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Charlotte; Davies, Ruth; Choy, Ernest

    2016-10-01

    This is a review looking at anti cytokine therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Psoriatic Arthritis (PSA) and Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS). The review explores the similarities and differences in the clinical features, as well as treatments and cytokines involved in the development and propagation of the disease. Particular attention is paid to TNFα inhibitors IL-1ra, IL-6 and JAK kinase Inhibitors, anti IL23 and IL-12 and the new developments with anti-IL-17. PMID:27497159

  9. [Haemolytic disease of the newborn--from a mother with anti-Kell, anti-E and anti-Vel anti-erythrocyte alloantibodies].

    PubMed

    Vućinović, M; Jadrić, H; Karelović, D; Roje, D; Haspl-Hundrić, Z; Hrgović, Z; Vućinović, Z

    2004-10-01

    A grave form of HDN (haemolytic disease of the new-born) is described in female twins, caused by Kell, E and Vel isoimmunisation. The weakly vital and anaemic new-born babies were hospitalised with signs of respiratory distress on the first day of their life after the delivery by Caesarean section in the 38 (th) week of pregnancy in the General Hospital Dubrovnik. Already during the first hours of their life jaundice developed with a high bilirubin level for their age. The direct Coombs' test on the twins and the indirect Coombs' test on the mother were positive. Immuno-haematological analysis proved the presence of anti-Kell, anti-E and the very rare anti-Vel antibodies in the mother's serum and in the plasma of both twins. We had no possibility to obtain appropriate blood for the indicated exsanguine transfusion because cross-probes with the accessible blood samples were positive. Up to the fourteenth day of life the anaemia deepened and was aggravated in one twin, the Kell positive one (phenotype CcDEe,Kk) in relation to the other, the Kell negative (phenotype CcDEe,kk) twin. The recovery of the female twins started on the 15 (th) day of life, after the transfusion of blood (phenotype: 0,ccddee, Vel negative, Kel negative), received from the bank of rare blood groups in London. This is the first described case of haemolytic disease of the new-born caused by antibodies on the antigen Kell, E and Vel. The low frequency of immunisation with rare antigens such as Kell, E and Vel, does not exclude the possibility of the occurrence of grave forms of haemolytic disease. All pregnant women with a positive indirect Coombs' test should be further immuno-haematologically tested in order to identify the antibodies type so that the treatment of the new-borns could be commenced in time.

  10. Developing Anti-tick Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Mallon, Alina

    2016-01-01

    Ticks are responsible for the transmission of viral, bacterial, and protozoal diseases of man and animals and also produce significant economic losses to cattle industry. The use of acaricides constitutes a major component of integrated tick control strategies. However, this is accompanied by the selection of acaricide-resistant ticks and contamination of environment and milk and meat products with drug residues. These issues highlight the need for alternative approaches to control tick infestations and have triggered the search for tick protective antigens for vaccine development. Vaccination as a tick control method has been practiced since the introduction of TickGARD and Gavac that were developed using the midgut glycoprotein Bm86 as antigen. Gavac within integrated tick management systems has proven to reduce the number of acaricidal applications per year that are required to control some strains of R. microplus ticks in different geographical regions. Nevertheless, it has limited or no efficacy against other tick species. These issues have stimulated research for additional tick protective antigens with critical functions in the tick. This chapter presents methodologies for the design and test of molecules as antigens against ticks. Considerations about different methods for the tick control compared to the immunological methods, the desirable characteristics for an anti-tick vaccine and the obstacles encountered for developing this kind of vaccines are discussed. Detailed methodologies for the establishment of a biological model to test new molecules as immunogens against ticks and to perform challenge trials with this model are presented. General considerations in the efficacy calculation for any anti-tick vaccine are also discussed. PMID:27076303

  11. FISH OIL AND VITAMIN E CHANGE LIPID PROFILES AND ANTI-LDL-ANTIBODIES IN TWO DIFFERENT ETHNIC GROUPS OF WOMEN TRANSITIONING THROUGH MENOPAUSE.

    PubMed

    Alves Luzia, Liania; Mendes Aldrighi, José; Teixeira Damasceno, Nágila Raquel; Rodrigues Sampaio, Geni; Aparecida Manólio Soares, Rosana; Tande Silva, Isis; De Queiroz Mello, Ana Paula; Ferreira Carioca, Antonio Augusto; Ferraz da Silva Torres, Elizabeth Aparecida

    2015-07-01

    Introducción: diversos estudios han investigado la relación entre la transición a la menopausia y las enfermedades cardiovasculares. Generalmente, la población de etnia blanca posee bajos niveles de factores de riesgo coronarios, particularmente dislipidemia, hipertensión, obesidad, diabetes y bajas tasas de mortalidad por enfermedades del corazón en comparación con la población de etnia negra. Además, varios estudios demostraron efectos cardioprotectores y antiinflamatorios provenientes de ácidos grasos poliinsaturados omega-3 (ácido eicosapentaenoico y ácido docosahexaenoico) de origen marino. El objetivo del estudio fue investigar el efecto de la suplementación de omega-3 combinado o no con vitamina E en biomarcadores oxidativos y perfiles lipídicos en mujeres blancas y no blancas con dislipidemia en transición hacia la menopausia. Métodos: fue realizado un estudio randomizado, duplo- ciego, placebo-controlado. Setenta y cuatro mujeres elegibles fueron escogidas para recibir: aceite de pescado, aceite de pescado con vitamina E y placebo durante tres meses. Fueron recogidas muestras de sangre en de referencia, 45 y 90 días para realizar exámenes bioquímicos y de biomarcadores para estrés oxidativo. Las variables socioeconómicas y de estilo de vida fueron recogidas por medio de cuestionarios estandarizados. Resultados: después de 90 días, el grupo tratado con aceite de pescado con vitamina E tuvo una disminución significativa para colesterol total y LDL-C. Además, hubo una disminución de anticuerpos anti-LDL después de 45 días. La concentración de plasma TBARS aumentó después de 90 días en el grupo que recibió solamente aceite de pescado, comparado con los grupos placebo y aceite de pescado con vitamina E. Todos los efectos observados fueron independientes del grupo étnico. Conclusión: la suplementación con aceite de pescado y vitamina E redujo el colesterol total y LDL-C, pero tuvo un efecto opuesto en el estrés oxidativo

  12. Preliminary evaluation of anti-pyretic and anti-ulcerogenic activities of Sida cordifolia methanolic extract.

    PubMed

    Philip, Binu K; Muralidharan, A; Natarajan, B; Varadamurthy, S; Venkataraman, S

    2008-04-01

    The anti-pyretic and anti-ulcerogenic properties of methanolic extract of Sida cordifolia aerial parts (MESC) were investigated in rats. Oral dose of 500 mg/kg MESC significantly reduced pyrexia induced by TAB vaccine. MESC exhibited significant anti-ulcerogenic effect against aspirin and ethanol induced damage. Both these properties were comparable to the reference drugs.

  13. Autoantibodies against CYP2D6 and other drug-metabolizing enzymes in autoimmune hepatitis type 2.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Takaharu; Shinoda, Masakazu; Tanaka, Yuta; Kuno, Takuya; Hattori, Asuka; Usui, Toru; Kuno, Nayumi; Osaka, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a disease of unknown etiology, characterized by liver-related autoantibodies. Autoimmune hepatitis is subdivided into two major types: AIH type 1 is characterized by the detection of ANA, SMA, ANCA, anti-ASGP-R, and anti-SLA/LP. Autoimmune hepatitis type 2 is characterized to be mainly related with drug-metabolizing enzymes as autoantigens, such as anti-LKM (liver-kidney microsomal antigen)-1 against CYP2D6, anti-LKM-2 against CYP2C9-tienilic acid, anti-LKM-3 against UGT1A, and anti-LC1 (liver cytosol antigen)-1 and anti-APS (autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type-1) against CYP1A2, CYP2A6, and others. Anti-LKM-1 sera inhibited CYP2D6 activity in vitro but did not inhibit cellular drug metabolism in vivo. CYP2D6 is the major target autoantigen of LKM-1 and expressed on plasma membrane (PM) of hepatocytes, suggesting a pathogenic role for anti-LKM-1 in liver injury as a trigger. Anti-CYP1A2 was observed in dihydralazine-induced hepatitis, and radiolabeled CYP1A2 disappeared from the PM with a half-life of less than 30 min, whereas microsomal CYP1A2 was stably radiolabeled for several hours. Main antigenic epitopes on CYP2D6 are aa 193-212, aa 257-269, and aa 321-351; and D263 is essential. The third epitope is located on the surface of the protein CYP2D6 and displays a hydrophobic patch that is situated between an aromatic residue (W316) and histidine (H326). Some drugs such as anticonvulsants (phenobarbital, phenytoin, and carbamazepine) and halothane are suggested to induce hepatitis with anti-CYP3A and anti-CYP2E1, respectively. Autoantibodies against CYP11A1, CYP17, and/or CYP21 involved in the synthesis of steroid hormones are also detected in patients with adrenal failure, gonadal failure, and/or Addison disease.

  14. Anti-malware software and medical devices.

    PubMed

    2010-10-01

    Just as much as healthcare information systems, medical devices need protection against cybersecurity threats. Anti-malware software can help safeguard the devices in your facility-but it has limitations and even risks. Find out what steps you can take to manage anti-malware applications in your devices. PMID:21306047

  15. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2011-12-20

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  16. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2013-04-16

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  17. Rational Laboratory Diagnostics of Antiphospholipid Antibodies: Anti-Cardiolipin, Anti-β2-Glycoprotein I, Anti-Prothrombin and Anti-Annexin V Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Cucnik, Sasa; Gaspersic, Natasa; Ambrozic, Ales; Kveder, Tanja; Rozman, Blaz

    2010-01-01

    A possible co-appearance of anticardiolipin (aCL), anti-β2-glycoprotein I (anti-β2-GPI), anti-prothrombin (aPT) and anti-annexin V (aANXV) antibodies of IgG, IgM and IgA class were studied in 58 patients with SLE alone and 32 patients APS in the view of rational laboratory diagnostics. The presence of anti-phospholipid antibodies (aPL) were defined by our in-house ELISA methods. Out of 17 aCL negative SLE patients 6 had other antigenically defined aPL antibodies. In 13 patients only IgA but not IgG and IgM anti-β2GPI were detected. Different combinations of aPL subsets were equally distributed in APS and SLE groups. The prevalence of aANXV were similar in APS and SLE patients which was not the case with other aPL. Our findings support the idea of measuring additional subsets of aPL (aPT and aANXV) in unclear cases. IgA (either aCL or anti-β2-GPI) improved neither the diagnostic specificity nor diagnostic sensitivity, but only increased the frequency of the total anti-β2-GPI.

  18. Anti-calculus and whitening toothpastes.

    PubMed

    van Loveren, Cor; Duckworth, Ralph M

    2013-01-01

    In terms of novel formulations, there seems to have been a shift in emphasis from anti-caries/anti-gingivitis to anti-calculus/whitening toothpastes in recent years. The anti-calculus and whitening effects of toothpastes are to some extent based on the same active ingredients: compounds of high affinity for tooth mineral. Due to this affinity, crystal growth may be hindered (anti-calculus) and chromophores be displaced (whitening). Besides these common ingredients, both types of toothpaste may contain agents specifically aimed at each condition. Clinical studies have shown that these active ingredients can be successfully formulated in fluoride toothpastes to give significant reductions in supragingival calculus and stain formation and facilitate their removal. Some of the ingredients are formulated in toothpastes that additionally contain anti-plaque and anti-gingivitis ingredients, making these toothpastes (together with the fluoride) truly multi-functional. The development of these products is not straightforward because of interaction between formulation components and because the active ingredients must maintain their beneficial characteristics during the shelf life of the paste. Neither a therapeutic benefit (in terms of less gingivitis or less caries) nor a societal benefit (in terms of less treatment demand) has been demonstrated as a result of the anti-calculus and whitening effects of toothpastes. PMID:23817060

  19. U.S. Anti-Doping Agency

    MedlinePlus

    U.S. Anti-Doping Agency   Athletes: Login Help Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram Linkedin U.S. Anti-Doping Agency ( ... 2632 Email usada@usada.org Find us on: Facebook Twitter YouTube Linkedin Instagram Recent News U.S. Track & ...

  20. Anti-malware software and medical devices.

    PubMed

    2010-10-01

    Just as much as healthcare information systems, medical devices need protection against cybersecurity threats. Anti-malware software can help safeguard the devices in your facility-but it has limitations and even risks. Find out what steps you can take to manage anti-malware applications in your devices.

  1. Rewiring macrophages for anti-tumour immunity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yunqin; Biswas, Subhra K

    2016-06-28

    Tumour-associated macrophages facilitate cancer progression, but whether they can be reprogrammed to elicit an anti-tumour response remains unclear. Deletion of the microRNA-processing enzyme Dicer is now shown to rewire macrophages to an anti-tumour mode, leading to an enhanced response to immunotherapy and inhibition of tumour progression. PMID:27350442

  2. Anti-idiotype vaccine against cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya-Chatterjee, M; Chatterjee, S K; Foon, K A

    2000-09-15

    Immunization with anti-idiotype (Id) antibodies represents a novel new approach to active immunotherapy. Extensive studies in animal tumor models have demonstrated the efficacy of anti-Id vaccines in preventing tumor growth and curing mice with established tumor. We have developed and characterized several murine monoclonal anti-Id antibodies (Ab2) which mimic distinct human tumor-associated antigens (TAA) and can be used as surrogate antigens for triggering active anti-tumor immunity in cancer patients. Encouraging results have been obtained in recent clinical trials. In this article, we will review the existing literature and summarize our own findings showing the potential of this approach for various human cancers. We will also discuss where anti-Id vaccines may perform better than traditional antigen vaccines. PMID:10996628

  3. Cross-reactivity of anti-human, anti-porcine and anti-bovine cytokine antibodies with cetacean tissues.

    PubMed

    Jaber, J R; Pérez, J; Zafra, R; Herráez, P; Rodríguez, F; Arbelo, M; de los Monteros, A Espinosa; Fernández, A

    2010-07-01

    The cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies specific for human, porcine and bovine cytokines was evaluated for three cetacean species: Atlantic spotted dolphins (Stenella frontalis), striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) and fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus). Formalin-fixed and snap-frozen tissue sections of lung, spleen, liver and mesenteric lymph node were evaluated. T and B lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages were detected by use of anti-human CD3, IgG and lysozyme polyclonal antibodies (pAbs), respectively. These reagents were successfully applied to both fixed and frozen tissues. Anti-human interleukin (IL)-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-8, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and CD25, anti-porcine IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, and anti-bovine IL-4 and interferon (IFN)-gamma antibodies produced immunolabelling in cetacean snap-frozen lymph node sections similar to that obtained with tissue from the species of origin, but they did not react with formalin-fixed tissue sections. Anti-porcine IL-12 pAb did not react with snap-frozen cetacean tissue samples. Macrophages and lymphocytes were the most common cells immunolabelled with the anti-cytokine antibodies. This panel of anti-cytokine antibodies may be used to evaluate cytokine expression in snap-frozen tissue samples from the cetacean species tested. PMID:20163803

  4. Methane attenuates myocardial ischemia injury in rats through anti-oxidative, anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory actions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ouyang; Ye, Zhouheng; Cao, Zhiyong; Manaenko, Anatol; Ning, Ke; Zhai, Xiao; Zhang, Rongjia; Zhang, Ting; Chen, Xiao; Liu, Wenwu; Sun, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) remains the most frequent cardiovascular disease with high mortality. Recently, methane has been shown protective effects on small intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury. We hypothesized that methane-rich saline (MS) could protect the myocardium again MI via its anti-oxidative, anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects. In experiment 1, tetrazolium chloride staining and detection of myocardial enzymes and oxidative and inflammatory parameters were performed at 12h after MI to determine the optimal dose at which intraperitoneal MS exerted the best protective effects on MI. In experiment 2, rats were treated with 10 ml/kg MS. Myocyte apoptosis was detected 72 h after MI, and cardiac function and myocardial remodeling were evaluated 4 weeks after MI. Results showed different dose of MS reduced infarct area, decreased myocardial enzymes, inhibited inflammation and oxidative stress following MI. The optimal dose of MS was 10 mg/kg. Moreover, treatment with 10mg/kg MS for 3 days significantly reduced myocyte apoptosis, improved cardiac function and inhibited myocardial remodeling (reduced anterior wall thickness, attenuated myocyte hypertrophy, and decreased myocardial collagen). MS protects the myocardium of MI rats via its anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and anti-remodeling activities. Thus, MS provides a novel and promising strategy for the treatment of ischemic heart diseases. PMID:26585905

  5. Cross-reactivity of anti-human, anti-porcine and anti-bovine cytokine antibodies with cetacean tissues.

    PubMed

    Jaber, J R; Pérez, J; Zafra, R; Herráez, P; Rodríguez, F; Arbelo, M; de los Monteros, A Espinosa; Fernández, A

    2010-07-01

    The cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies specific for human, porcine and bovine cytokines was evaluated for three cetacean species: Atlantic spotted dolphins (Stenella frontalis), striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) and fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus). Formalin-fixed and snap-frozen tissue sections of lung, spleen, liver and mesenteric lymph node were evaluated. T and B lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages were detected by use of anti-human CD3, IgG and lysozyme polyclonal antibodies (pAbs), respectively. These reagents were successfully applied to both fixed and frozen tissues. Anti-human interleukin (IL)-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-8, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and CD25, anti-porcine IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, and anti-bovine IL-4 and interferon (IFN)-gamma antibodies produced immunolabelling in cetacean snap-frozen lymph node sections similar to that obtained with tissue from the species of origin, but they did not react with formalin-fixed tissue sections. Anti-porcine IL-12 pAb did not react with snap-frozen cetacean tissue samples. Macrophages and lymphocytes were the most common cells immunolabelled with the anti-cytokine antibodies. This panel of anti-cytokine antibodies may be used to evaluate cytokine expression in snap-frozen tissue samples from the cetacean species tested.

  6. Hypolipidemic, anti-obesity, anti-inflammatory, anti-osteoporotic, and anti-neoplastic properties of amine carboxyboranes.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, I H; Chen, S Y; Rajendran, K G; Sood, A; Spielvogel, B F; Shih, J

    1994-01-01

    supplies from fowl and pigs. The amine-carboxyboranes were effective anti-inflammatory agents against septic shock, induced edema, pleurisy, and chronic arthritis at 2.5 to 8 mg/kg. Lysosomal and proteolytic enzyme activities were also inhibited. More significantly, the agents were dual inhibitors of prostaglandin cyclooxygenase and 5'-lipoxygenase activities. These compounds also affected cytokine release and white cell migration. Subsequent studies showed that the amine-carboxyboranes were potent anti-osteoporotic agents reducing calcium resorption as well as increasing calcium and proline incorporation into mouse pup calvaria and rat UMR-106 collagen. PMID:7889876

  7. Anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the extracts of Stauntonia chinensis.

    PubMed

    Ying, Chen; Ning, Wu; Ying, Liu; Hao, Gao; Hua-Jin, Dong; Rui-Bin, Su; Xin-Sheng, Yao; Jin, Li

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of Stauntonia chinensis (S. chinensis) and the possible action mechanisms of effective fractions. The anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of S. chinensis extracts, including the 60% EtOH extract (YMG), the n-BuOH extract (YMGB) and the aqueous residue (YMGW) of YMG, and the fractions from YMGB (YMGB1~YMGB7) were investigated by using the mouse acetic acid-induced writhing test and the rat formalin test. The effect of these extracts on the PGE2 production was tested as well. In the mouse acetic acid-induced writhing test and the rat formalin test, YMGW and YMGB displayed anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities, suggesting that they were the active ingredients of YMG. Among the fractions isolated from YMGB, YMGB1, YMGB3, YMGB4 and YMGB6 were the main active ingredients producing anti-nociceptive activity and YMGB3, YMGB5, YMGB6 and YMGB7 were the main active ingredients producing anti-inflammatory activity. Additionally, YMGW, YMGB and its separations reduced the production of PGE2, which might be the mechanism of them producing anti-inflammatory activity. These results demonstrated the active ingredients of S. chinensis producing anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities, which is valuable to validate the substance basis of S. chinensis's pharmacological actions.

  8. [Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Engen, Kristine; Agartz, Ingrid

    2016-06-01

    BACKGROUND In 2007 a clinical disease caused by autoantibodies directed against the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor was described for the first time. Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis is a subacute, autoimmune neurological disorder with psychiatric manifestations. The disease is a form of limbic encephalitis and is often paraneoplastic. The condition is also treatable. In this review article we examine the development of the disease, clinical practice, diagnostics and treatment.MATERIAL AND METHOD The article is based on references retrieved from searches in PubMed, and a discretionary selection of articles from the authors' own literature archive.RESULTS The disease most frequently affects young women. It may initially be perceived as a psychiatric condition, as it usually presents in the form of delusions, hallucinations or mania. The diagnosis should be suspected in patients who later develop neurological symptoms such as various movement disorders, epileptic seizures and autonomic instability. Examination of serum or cerebrospinal fluid for NMDA receptor antibodies should be included in the assessment of patients with suspected encephalitis. MRI, EEG and assessment for tumours are important tools in diagnosing the condition and any underlying malignancy.INTERPRETATION If treatment is initiated early, the prognosis is good. Altogether 75 % of patients will fully recover or experience significant improvement. Apart from surgical resection of a possible tumour, the treatment consists of immunotherapy. Because of good possibilities for treatment, it is important that clinicians, particularly those in acute psychiatry, are aware of and alert to this condition. PMID:27325034

  9. Quantum anti-Zeno effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaulakys, B.; Gontis, V.

    1997-08-01

    Prevention of a quantum system's time evolution by repetitive, frequent measurements of the system's state has been called the quantum Zeno effect (or paradox). Here we investigate theoretically and numerically the effect of repeated measurements on the quantum dynamics of multilevel systems that exhibit the quantum localization of classical chaos. The analysis is based on the wave function and Schrödinger equation, without introduction of the density matrix. We show how the quantum Zeno effect in simple few-level systems can be recovered and understood by formal modeling the effect of measurement on the dynamics by randomizing the phases of the measured states. This analysis is extended to investigate the dynamics of multilevel systems driven by an intense external force and affected by frequent measurements. We show that frequent measurements of such quantum systems results in delocalization of the quantum suppression of classical chaos. This result is the opposite of the quantum Zeno effect. The phenomenon of delocalization of the quantum suppression and restoration of quasi-classical time evolution of these systems, owing to repetitive frequent measurements, can therefore be called the quantum anti-Zeno effect. From this analysis we furthermore conclude that frequently or continuously observable quasiclassical systems evolve basically in a classical manner.

  10. Electromagnetic anti-jam telemetry tool

    DOEpatents

    Ganesan, Harini; Mayzenberg, Nataliya

    2008-02-12

    A mud-pulse telemetry tool includes a tool housing, a motor disposed in the tool housing, and a magnetic coupling coupled to the motor and having an inner shaft and an outer shaft. The tool may also include a stator coupled to the tool housing, a restrictor disposed proximate the stator and coupled to the magnetic coupling, so that the restrictor and the stator adapted to generate selected pulses in a drilling fluid when the restrictor is selectively rotated. The tool may also include a first anti-jam magnet coupled to the too housing, and an second anti-jam magnet disposed proximate the first anti-jam magnet and coupled to the inner shaft and/or the outer shaft, wherein at least one of the first anti-jam magnet and the second anti-jam magnet is an electromagnet, and wherein the first anti-jam magnet and the second anti-jam magnet are positioned with adjacent like poles.

  11. Diagnostic criteria of autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Grant, Charlotte R; Longhi, Maria Serena; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic immune-mediated liver disorder characterised by female preponderance, elevated transaminase and immunoglobulin G levels, seropositivity for autoantibodies and interface hepatitis. Presentation is highly variable, therefore AIH should be considered during the diagnostic workup of any increase in liver enzyme levels. A set of inclusion and exclusion criteria for the diagnosis of AIH have been established by the International Autoimmune Hepatitis Group (IAIHG). There are two main types of AIH: type 1, positive for anti-nuclear (ANA) and/or anti-smooth muscle antibodies (SMAs) and type 2, defined by the presence of anti-liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM-1) and/or anti-liver cytosol type 1 (LC-1) autoantibodies. The central role of autoantibodies in the diagnosis of AIH has led the IAIHG to produce a consensus statement detailing appropriate and effective methods for their detection. Autoantibodies should be tested by indirect immunofluorescence at an initial dilution of 1/40 in adults and 1/10 in children on a freshly prepared rodent substrate that includes kidney, liver and stomach sections to allow for the simultaneous detection of all reactivities relevant to AIH. Anti-LKM-1 is often confused with anti-mitochondrial antibody (AMA) if rodent kidney is used as the sole immunofluorescence substrate. The identification of the molecular targets of anti-LKM-1 and AMA has led to the establishment of immuno-assays based on the use of the recombinant or purified autoantigens. Perinuclear anti-nuclear neutrophil antibody (p-ANNA) is an additional marker of AIH-1; anti soluble liver antigen (SLA) antibodies are specific for autoimmune liver disease, can be present in AIH-1 and AIH-2 and are associated with a more severe clinical course. Anti-SLA are detectable by ELISA or radio-immuno-assays, but not by immunofluorescence. AIH is exquisitely responsive to immunosuppressive treatment, which should be instituted promptly to

  12. A Surge of Anti-Semitism or McCarthyism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how faculty members nationwide are reacting to a Web site that tracks professors' anti-Israel statements, and to a speech by Harvard's president, who linked an anti-Israel petition to anti-Semitism. (EV)

  13. Self Retaining Anti-Rotation Key

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, Alan Benjamin Christopher (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Anti-rotation keys are typically used in applications where an end of a threaded stud is received in a housing, and where the opposite end of the stud projects from the housing to allow attachment of another component to the housing. Once partially received in the housing, further rotation of the stud is prevented by an anti-rotation key. The disclosed anti-rotation key is self-retaining, in that it prevents itself from "backing out" of the channel due to vibration or thermal expansion of the housing, etc., while also being removable from the channel if desired.

  14. Anti-infective Natural Products from Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Niedermeyer, Timo Horst Johannes

    2015-10-01

    Cyanobacteria are a promising yet underexplored source for novel natural products with potent biological activities. While predominantly cytotoxic compounds have been isolated from cyanobacteria in the past, there are also a significant number of compounds known that possess anti-infective activities. As the need for novel anti-infective lead compounds is high, this manuscript aims at giving a concise overview on the current knowledge about anti-infective secondary metabolites isolated from cyanobacteria. Antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, antiprotozoal, and molluscicidal activities are discussed. Covering up to February 2015.

  15. Anti-Atlas Mountains, Morocco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Anti-Atlas Mountains of Morocco formed as a result of the collision of the African and Eurasian tectonic plates about 80 million years ago. This collision destroyed the Tethys Ocean; the limestone, sandstone, claystone, and gypsum layers that formed the ocean bed were folded and crumpled to create the Atlas and Anti-Atlas Mountains. In this ASTER image, short wavelength infrared bands are combined to dramatically highlight the different rock types, and illustrate the complex folding. The yellowish, orange and green areas are limestones, sandstones and gypsum; the dark blue and green areas are underlying granitic rocks. The ability to map geology using ASTER data is enhanced by the multiple short wavelength infrared bands, that are sensitive to differences in rock mineralogy. This image was acquired on June 13, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils

  16. Anti-glomerular basement membrane blood test

    MedlinePlus

    GBM antibody test; Antibody to human glomerular basement membrane; Anti-GBM antibodies ... Normally, there are none of these antibodies in the blood. Normal ... labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk ...

  17. Laparoscopic Anti-Reflux (GERD) Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Opportunities Sponsorship Opportunities Login Laparoscopic Anti-Reflux (GERD) Surgery Patient Information from SAGES Print PDF Find a SAGES Surgeon Surgery for “Heartburn” If you suffer from moderate to ...

  18. Quark dynamics of N anti N annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1985-01-01

    It is argued that recent observations of strong L dependence and approximate selection rules in certain N anti N annihilation modes necessitate a description of the reaction mechanism in terms of quark-gluon degrees of freedom.

  19. Measuring the {anti u}/{anti d} asymmetry in the proton sea: Fermilab E866

    SciTech Connect

    Hawker, E.A.; Awes, T.; Brown, C.; E866 Collaboration

    1998-07-01

    Experiment E866, conducted at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, is a high statistics experiment to measure {anti u}(x)/{anti d}(x) in the proton over a wide range of x. A review of the current evidence for {anti u}(x) {ne} {anti d}(x) in the proton is given and is followed by a short description of the spectrometer and the experimental procedures used in E866. Preliminary results are shown for the ratio of the Drell-Yan cross sections {sigma}{sup pd}/2{sigma}{sup pp}. The preliminary results confirm the conclusions of both the NMC and NA51 collaborations that there is an {anti u}/{anti d}(x) asymmetry in the proton sea.

  20. Alkene anti-Dihydroxylation with Malonoyl Peroxides.

    PubMed

    Alamillo-Ferrer, Carla; Davidson, Stuart C; Rawling, Michael J; Theodoulou, Natalie H; Campbell, Matthew; Humphreys, Philip G; Kennedy, Alan R; Tomkinson, Nicholas C O

    2015-10-16

    Malonoyl peroxide 1, prepared in a single step from the commercially available diacid, is an effective reagent for the anti-dihydroxylation of alkenes. Reaction of 1 with an alkene in the presence of acetic acid at 40 °C followed by alkaline hydrolysis leads to the corresponding diol (35-92%) with up to 13:1 anti-selectivity. A mechanism consistent with experimental findings is proposed that accounts for the selectivity observed. PMID:26425839

  1. Characterization of multilayer anti-fog coatings.

    PubMed

    Chevallier, Pascale; Turgeon, Stéphane; Sarra-Bournet, Christian; Turcotte, Raphaël; Laroche, Gaétan

    2011-03-01

    Fog formation on transparent substrates constitutes a major challenge in several optical applications requiring excellent light transmission characteristics. Anti-fog coatings are hydrophilic, enabling water to spread uniformly on the surface rather than form dispersed droplets. Despite the development of several anti-fog coating strategies, the long-term stability, adherence to the underlying substrate, and resistance to cleaning procedures are not yet optimal. We report on a polymer-based anti-fog coating covalently grafted onto glass surfaces by means of a multistep process. Glass substrates were first activated by plasma functionalization to provide amino groups on the surface, resulting in the subsequent covalent bonding of the polymeric layers. The anti-fog coating was then created by the successive spin coating of (poly(ethylene-maleic anhydride) (PEMA) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) layers. PEMA acted as an interface by covalently reacting with both the glass surface amino functionalities and the PVA hydroxyl groups, while PVA added the necessary surface hydrophilicity to provide anti-fog properties. Each step of the procedure was monitored by XPS, which confirmed the successful grafting of the coating. Coating thickness was evaluated by profilometry, nanoindentation, and UV visible light transmission. The hydrophilic nature of the anti-fog coating was assessed by water contact angle (CA), and its anti-fog efficiency was determined visually and tested quantitatively for the first time using an ASTM standard protocol. Results show that the PEMA/PVA coating not only delayed the initial period required for fog formation but also decreased the rate of light transmission decay. Finally, following a 24 hour immersion in water, these PEMA/PVA coatings remained stable and preserved their anti-fog properties.

  2. Naturally derived anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Asres, Kaleab; Seyoum, Ameha; Veeresham, Ciddi; Bucar, Franz; Gibbons, Simon

    2005-07-01

    The urgent need for new anti-HIV/AIDS drugs is a global concern. In addition to obvious economical and commercial hurdles, HIV/AIDS patients are faced with multifarious difficulties associated with the currently approved anti-HIV drugs. Adverse effects, the emergence of drug resistance and the narrow spectrum of activity have limited the therapeutic usefulness of the various reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors that are currently available on the market. This has driven many scientists to look for new anti-retrovirals with better efficacy, safety and affordability. As has always been the case in the search for cures, natural sources offer great promise. Several natural products, mostly of plant origin have been shown to possess promising activities that could assist in the prevention and/or amelioration of the disease. Many of these anti-HIV agents have other medicinal values as well, which afford them further prospective as novel leads for the development of new drugs that can deal with both the virus and the various disorders that characterize HIV/AIDS. The aim of this review is to report new discoveries and updates pertaining to anti-HIV natural products. In the review anti-HIV agents have been classified according to their chemical classes rather than their target in the HIV replicative cycle, which is the most frequently encountered approach. Perusal of the literature revealed that most of these promising naturally derived anti-HIV compounds are flavonoids, coumarins, terpenoids, alkaloids, polyphenols, polysaccharides or proteins. It is our strong conviction that the results and experiences with many of the anti-HIV natural products will inspire and motivate even more researchers to look for new leads from plants and other natural sources. PMID:16161055

  3. [Partial group-specific phytohemagglutinins anti-B1 and anti-B2].

    PubMed

    Potapov, M I

    2004-01-01

    Saline phytohemagglutinins (PHA) were detected in the aril of seeds Evonymus alata and E. sacrosancta (anti-B1) and in seeds Sophora japonica (anti-B2). They are highly sensitive to samples used in the detection of incomplete antibodies. Sophora contains also an incomplete partial PHA anti-B2 of the blocking type. As for extracts, they obviously do not contain PHA to erythrocytes of animals. PMID:15008090

  4. Anti-Inflammatory Iridoids of Botanical Origin

    PubMed Central

    Viljoen, A; Mncwangi, N; Vermaak, I

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a manifestation of a wide range of disorders which include; arthritis, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, inflammatory bowel syndrome, physical injury and infection amongst many others. Common treatment modalities are usually non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, paracetamol, indomethacin and ibuprofen as well as corticosteroids such as prednisone. These however, may be associated with a host of side effects due to non-selectivity for cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes involved in inflammation and those with selectivity may be highly priced. Thus, there is a continuing search for safe and effective anti-inflammatory molecules from natural sources. Research has confirmed that iridoids exhibit promising anti-inflammatory activity which may be beneficial in the treatment of inflammation. Iridoids are secondary metabolites present in various plants, especially in species belonging to the Apocynaceae, Lamiaceae, Loganiaceae, Rubiaceae, Scrophulariaceae and Verbenaceae families. Many of these ethnobotanicals have an illustrious history of traditional use alluding to their use to treat inflammation. Although iridoids exhibit a wide range of pharmacological activities such as cardiovascular, hepatoprotection, hypoglycaemic, antimutagenic, antispasmodic, anti-tumour, antiviral, immunomodulation and purgative effects this review will acutely focus on their anti-inflammatory properties. The paper aims to present a summary for the most prominent iridoid-containing plants for which anti-inflammatory activity has been demonstrated in vitro and / or in vivo. PMID:22414102

  5. The Superheavy Elements and Anti-Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasovski, Petar K.

    2004-02-04

    The essence of any propulsion concept is to overcome gravity. Anti-gravity is a natural means to achieve this. Thus, the technology to pursue anti-gravity, by using superheavy elements, may provide a new propulsion paradigm. The theory of superluminal relativity provides a hypothesis for existence of elements with atomic number up to Z = 145, some of which may possess anti-gravity properties. Analysis results show that curved space-time exists demonstrating both gravitic and anti-gravitic properties not only around nuclei but inside the nuclei as well. Two groups of elements (Z < 64 and 63 < Z <145) exist that demonstrate these capabilities. The nuclei of the first group of elements have the masses with only the property of gravity. The nuclei of the elements of the second group have the masses with both properties: gravity and anti-gravity in two different ranges of curved space-time around the nuclei.. The hypothetical element with Z = 145 is the unique among all elements whose nucleus has only anti-gravity property. It is proposed that this element be named Hawking, in honour of Stephen W. Hawking.

  6. The Superheavy Elements and Anti-Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasovski, Petar K.

    2004-02-01

    The essence of any propulsion concept is to overcome gravity. Anti-gravity is a natural means to achieve this. Thus, the technology to pursue anti-gravity, by using superheavy elements, may provide a new propulsion paradigm. The theory of superluminal relativity provides a hypothesis for existence of elements with atomic number up to Z = 145, some of which may possess anti-gravity properties. Analysis results show that curved space-time exists demonstrating both gravitic and anti-gravitic properties not only around nuclei but inside the nuclei as well. Two groups of elements (Z < 64 and 63 < Z <145) exist that demonstrate these capabilities. The nuclei of the first group of elements have the masses with only the property of gravity. The nuclei of the elements of the second group have the masses with both properties: gravity and anti-gravity in two different ranges of curved space-time around the nuclei.. The hypothetical element with Z = 145 is the unique among all elements whose nucleus has only anti-gravity property. It is proposed that this element be named Hawking, in honour of Stephen W. Hawking.

  7. Case of diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis with anti-Ku and anti-centromere antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Sonoko; Ueda-Hayakawa, Ikuko; Isei, Taiki; Okamoto, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-01

    We report the case of a 58-year-old man who had an ulcer on the right middle finger that was cured by surgery 4 years before consultation with our department. A few years after the surgery, he noticed recurrence of the ulcer and sclerosis of the skin. At the initial examination, skin sclerosis was observed from the fingers to the upper arms and from the feet to the thighs. Pitting scars on the fingertips and punctured hemorrhages of the nail-fold capillaries were also present. Gastroscopy showed slight reflex esophagitis. Laboratory findings were positive for antinuclear antibody (ANA; 1:640) with a speckled and discrete speckled pattern. Anti-topoisomerase I (anti-topo I) antibody and anti-RNA polymerase III were negative, but anti-centromere antibody was positive in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Anti-Ku antibody was positive in an immunoprecipitation assay using extracts of the leukemia cell line K562. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed with diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis with anti-Ku and anti-centromere antibodies. Treatment with an oral antiplatelet agent, vitamin E, a proton pump inhibitor, and i.v. lipoprostaglandin E1 were started. Subsequently, there has been repeated recurrence of finger ulcers, but no muscle involvement has been detected since his first visit. This is the first reported case of systemic sclerosis with anti-Ku and anti-centromere antibodies.

  8. Anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-oedematous effects of Lafoensia pacari extract and ellagic acid.

    PubMed

    Rogerio, Alexandre P; Fontanari, Caroline; Melo, Mirian C C; Ambrosio, Sérgio R; de Souza, Glória E P; Pereira, Paulo S; França, Suzelei C; da Costa, Fernando B; Albuquerque, Deijanira A; Faccioli, Lúcia H

    2006-09-01

    Lafoensia pacari St. Hil. (Lythraceae) is used in traditional medicine to treat inflammation. Previously, we demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effect that the ethanolic extract of L. pacari has in Toxocara canis infection (a model of systemic eosinophilia). In this study, we tested the anti-inflammatory activity of the same L. pacari extract in mice injected intraperitoneally with beta-glucan present in fraction 1 (F1) of the Histoplasma capsulatum cell wall (a model of acute eosinophilic inflammation). We also determined the anti-oedematous, analgesic and anti-pyretic effects of L. pacari extract in carrageenan-induced paw oedema, acetic acid writhing and LPS-induced fever, respectively. L. pacari extract significantly inhibited leucocyte recruitment into the peritoneal cavity induced by beta-glucan. In addition, the L. pacari extract presented significant analgesic, anti-oedematous and anti-pyretic effects. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the L. pacari extract in the F1 model led us to identify ellagic acid. As did the extract, ellagic acid presented anti-inflammatory, anti-oedematous and analgesic effects. However, ellagic acid had no anti-pyretic effect, suggesting that other compounds present in the plant stem are responsible for this effect. Nevertheless, our results demonstrate potential therapeutic effects of L. pacari extract and ellagic acid, providing new prospects for the development of drugs to treat pain, oedema and inflammation. PMID:16945186

  9. [Autoimmune hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Marcais, O; Larrey, D

    1994-01-01

    Acute and chronic autoimmune hepatitis are uncommon inflammatory liver diseases, mainly occurring in young women, in association with hypergammaglobulinemia and serum autoantibodies. Different types have been described: type 1 characterized by anti-smooth muscle and anti-nuclear antibodies; type 2 characterized by anti-LKM1 antibodies; type 3 characterized by anti-SLA antibodies. Other types, still not clearly defined, may exist. Autoimmune hepatitis are associated with HLA A1 B8 DR3 and HLA DR4. Without any treatment, the disease leads to cirrhosis and, uncommonly, to fulminant hepatitis. Large doses of corticosteroids usually allow to control the disease. Relapse of hepatitis is frequent after corticosteroid withdrawal. Concomitant administration of immunosuppressive agents such as azathioprine allows to reduce corticosteroid dosage and contributes to maintain the remission of the disease. Liver transplantation may be indicated in cases of severe cirrhosis or fulminant hepatitis.

  10. Sleeve gastrectomy with anti-reflux procedures

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Sergio; Lacombe, Arnaldo; de Aquino, Caio Gustavo Gaspar; Malzoni, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Sleeve gastrectomy is the fastest growing surgical procedure to treat obesity in the world but it may cause or worsen gastroesophageal reflux disease. This article originally aimed to describe the addition of anti-reflux procedures (removal of periesophageal fats pads, hiatoplasty, a small plication and fixation of the gastric remnant in position) to the usual sleeve gastrectomy and to report early and late results. Methods Eighty-eight obese patients that also presented symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease were submitted to sleeve gastrectomy with anti-reflux procedures. Fifty of them were also submitted to a transit bipartition. The weight loss of these patients was compared to consecutive 360 patients previously submitted to the usual sleeve gastrectomy and to 1,140 submitted to sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition. Gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms were specifically inquired in all anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy patients and compared to the results of the same questionnaire applied to 50 sleeve gastrectomy patients and 60 sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition patients that also presented preoperative symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Results In terms of weight loss, excess of body mass index loss percentage after anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy is not inferior to the usual sleeve gastrectomy and anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition is not inferior to sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition. Anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy did not add morbidity but significantly diminished gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and the use of proton pump inhibitors to treat this condition. Conclusion The addition of anti-reflux procedures, such as hiatoplasty and cardioplication, to the usual sleeve gastrectomy did not add morbidity neither worsened the weight loss but significantly reduced the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms as well as the use of proton pump inhibitors. PMID:25295447

  11. 49 CFR 238.407 - Anti-climbing mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Anti-climbing mechanism. 238.407 Section 238.407... Equipment § 238.407 Anti-climbing mechanism. (a) Each power car shall have an anti-climbing mechanism at its... before the anti-climbing mechanism fully engages. (b) Interior train coupling points between...

  12. 49 CFR 238.407 - Anti-climbing mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Anti-climbing mechanism. 238.407 Section 238.407... Equipment § 238.407 Anti-climbing mechanism. (a) Each power car shall have an anti-climbing mechanism at its... before the anti-climbing mechanism fully engages. (b) Interior train coupling points between...

  13. 49 CFR 238.407 - Anti-climbing mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Anti-climbing mechanism. 238.407 Section 238.407... Equipment § 238.407 Anti-climbing mechanism. (a) Each power car shall have an anti-climbing mechanism at its... before the anti-climbing mechanism fully engages. (b) Interior train coupling points between...

  14. 49 CFR 238.407 - Anti-climbing mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Anti-climbing mechanism. 238.407 Section 238.407... Equipment § 238.407 Anti-climbing mechanism. (a) Each power car shall have an anti-climbing mechanism at its... before the anti-climbing mechanism fully engages. (b) Interior train coupling points between...

  15. 49 CFR 238.407 - Anti-climbing mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Anti-climbing mechanism. 238.407 Section 238.407... Equipment § 238.407 Anti-climbing mechanism. (a) Each power car shall have an anti-climbing mechanism at its... before the anti-climbing mechanism fully engages. (b) Interior train coupling points between...

  16. The anti-inflammatory action of nepitrin, a flavonoid.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, O P

    1982-07-01

    The anti-inflammatory efficacy of nepitrin (5,3',4'-trihydroxy-6-methoxy flavone), a flavonoid, was investigated in both acute and chronic models of inflammation in rats. Nepitrin was found to possess significant anti-inflammatory activity in the exudative and proliferative phases of inflammation. This action of nepitrin could be due to its anti-bradykinin and anti-angiotensin action. Nepitrin also possessed anti-pyretic and weak analgesic activity. The study reveals that nepitrin may be useful as an anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic agent. PMID:6982607

  17. Antibodies to P450IID6, SLA, PDH-E2 and BCKD-E2 in Japanese patients with chronic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, M; Morshed, S A; Parveen, S; Kono, K; Matsuoka, H; Manns, M P

    1997-12-01

    Auto-antibodies specific to various antigens in chronic hepatitis (CH) have been detected but their specificities and implications were uncertain. The aims of the present study were to investigate the frequency and the significance of seropositivity of antibodies to P450IID6 or liver/kidney microsome 1 (LKM1), soluble liver antigen (SLA), pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKD) in 188 Japanese patients with different forms of CH by western blot or enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Anti-LKM1 was also measured by indirect immunofluorescent test. Anti-P450IID6 was found in 6/188 (3.2%) CH patients including 5/104 (4.8%) with hepatitis C virus (C) infection and 1/12 (8.3%) CH-C patients with antibodies to nuclear and smooth muscle antigens and hypergammaglobulinaemia (> 2.5 g/dL). This patient was the only one diagnosed with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). All CH patients with hepatitis B (B), hepatitis non-B non-C (NBNC) and AIH were seronegative for anti-LKM1. Antibodies to soluble liver antigen were found in two of 188 (1%) patients, one with AIH and one with CH-B. Anti-BCKD-E2 but not anti-PDH-E2 was found in four patients (2.5%), one with AIH, two with CH-C, and one with NBNC. There was no obvious difference in age, sex ratio and laboratory findings in patients with or without anti-SLA and anti-BCKD-E2. Antibodies to P450IID6, SLA, PDH-E2 and BCKD-E2 are uncommon in adult CH-C, CH-B, CH-NBNC and AIH patients in Japan. Some of these patients positive for auto-antibodies appear to have autoimmune features and might require a careful follow up. The heterogeneity of these antibodies in CH preclude further justification for subtyping of AIH by the presence of the distinct auto-antibodies.

  18. Defining an "Anti" Stance: Key Pedagogical Questions about Engaging Anti-Racism in College Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebollo-Gil, Guillermo; Moras, Amanda

    2006-01-01

    This paper draws from social science literature on Whiteness and anti-racism as well as personal classroom experience to examine the obstacles educators face in teaching anti-racism to White college students. Emphasis is placed on popular perceptions and common definitions of the word "racism" as it is used in mainstream American society. The…

  19. In vitro anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic activities of thalidomide dithiocarbamate analogs.

    PubMed

    El-Aarag, Bishoy Y A; Kasai, Tomonari; Zahran, Magdy A H; Zakhary, Nadia I; Shigehiro, Tsukasa; Sekhar, Sreeja C; Agwa, Hussein S; Mizutani, Akifumi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kakuta, Hiroki; Seno, Masaharu

    2014-08-01

    Inhibition of angiogenesis is currently perceived as a promising strategy in the treatment of cancer. The anti-angiogenicity of thalidomide has inspired a second wave of research on this teratogenic drug. The present study aimed to investigate the anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic activities of two thalidomide dithiocarbamate analogs by studying their anti-proliferative effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines. Their action on the expression levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, VEGF165, and MMP-2 was also assessed. Furthermore, their effect on angiogenesis was evaluated through wound healing, migration, tube formation, and nitric oxide (NO) assays. Results illustrated that the proliferation of HUVECs and MDA-MB-231 cells was not significantly affected by thalidomide at 6.25-100μM. Thalidomide failed to block angiogenesis at similar concentrations. By contrast, thalidomide dithiocarbamate analogs exhibited significant anti-proliferative action on HUVECs and MDA-MB-231 cells without causing cytotoxicity and also showed powerful anti-angiogenicity in wound healing, migration, tube formation, and NO assays. Thalidomide analogs 1 and 2 demonstrated more potent activity to suppress expression levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, VEGF165, and MMP-2 than thalidomide. Analog 1 consistently, showed the highest potency and efficacy in all the assays. Taken together, our results support further development and evaluation of novel thalidomide analogs as anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic agents.

  20. In vitro anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic activities of thalidomide dithiocarbamate analogs.

    PubMed

    El-Aarag, Bishoy Y A; Kasai, Tomonari; Zahran, Magdy A H; Zakhary, Nadia I; Shigehiro, Tsukasa; Sekhar, Sreeja C; Agwa, Hussein S; Mizutani, Akifumi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kakuta, Hiroki; Seno, Masaharu

    2014-08-01

    Inhibition of angiogenesis is currently perceived as a promising strategy in the treatment of cancer. The anti-angiogenicity of thalidomide has inspired a second wave of research on this teratogenic drug. The present study aimed to investigate the anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic activities of two thalidomide dithiocarbamate analogs by studying their anti-proliferative effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines. Their action on the expression levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, VEGF165, and MMP-2 was also assessed. Furthermore, their effect on angiogenesis was evaluated through wound healing, migration, tube formation, and nitric oxide (NO) assays. Results illustrated that the proliferation of HUVECs and MDA-MB-231 cells was not significantly affected by thalidomide at 6.25-100μM. Thalidomide failed to block angiogenesis at similar concentrations. By contrast, thalidomide dithiocarbamate analogs exhibited significant anti-proliferative action on HUVECs and MDA-MB-231 cells without causing cytotoxicity and also showed powerful anti-angiogenicity in wound healing, migration, tube formation, and NO assays. Thalidomide analogs 1 and 2 demonstrated more potent activity to suppress expression levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, VEGF165, and MMP-2 than thalidomide. Analog 1 consistently, showed the highest potency and efficacy in all the assays. Taken together, our results support further development and evaluation of novel thalidomide analogs as anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic agents. PMID:24859059

  1. Immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties of triptolide: A mini review

    PubMed Central

    Ziaei, Samira; Halaby, Reginald

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Triptolide, the active component of Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F has been used to treat autoimmune and inflammatory conditions for over two hundred years in traditional Chinese medicine. However, the processes through which triptolide exerts immunosuppression and anti-inflammation are not understood well. In this review, we discuss the autoimmune disorders and inflammatory conditions that are currently treated with triptolide. Triptolide also possesses anti-tumorigenic effects. We discuss the toxicity of various triptolide derivatives and offer suggestions to improve its safety. This study also examines the clinical trials that have investigated the efficacy of triptolide. Our aim is to examine the mechanisms that are responsible for the immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer effects of triptolide. Materials and Methods: The present review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature with respect to the immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties of triptolide. Results: Triptolide possesses immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer effects. Conclusion: Triptolide can be used alone or in combination with existing therapeutic modalities as novel treatments for autoimmune disorders, cancers, and for immunosuppression. PMID:27222828

  2. Anti-inflammatory iridoids of botanical origin.

    PubMed

    Viljoen, A; Mncwangi, N; Vermaak, I

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a manifestation of a wide range of disorders which include; arthritis, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, inflammatory bowel syndrome, physical injury and infection amongst many others. Common treatment modalities are usually nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, paracetamol, indomethacin and ibuprofen as well as corticosteroids such as prednisone. These however, may be associated with a host of side effects due to non-selectivity for cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes involved in inflammation and those with selectivity may be highly priced. Thus, there is a continuing search for safe and effective antiinflammatory molecules from natural sources. Research has confirmed that iridoids exhibit promising anti-inflammatory activity which may be beneficial in the treatment of inflammation. Iridoids are secondary metabolites present in various plants, especially in species belonging to the Apocynaceae, Lamiaceae, Loganiaceae, Rubiaceae, Scrophulariaceae and Verbenaceae families. Many of these ethnobotanicals have an illustrious history of traditional use alluding to their use to treat inflammation. Although iridoids exhibit a wide range of pharmacological activities such as cardiovascular, hepatoprotection, hypoglycaemic, antimutagenic, antispasmodic, anti-tumour, antiviral, immunomodulation and purgative effects this review will acutely focus on their anti-inflammatory properties. The paper aims to present a summary for the most prominent iridoid-containing plants for which anti-inflammatory activity has been demonstrated in vitro and / or in vivo.

  3. Anti-enterobacteria antibodies in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lapadula, G; Iannone, F; Covelli, M; Numo, R; Pipitone, V

    1992-01-01

    The occurrence of certain antibacterial antibodies was studied in the sera of 22 healthy donors (HD) and 66 patients with different diseases. The cases investigated included 22 rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 22 non-arthritic-psoriasis (NAP), and 22 psoriatic arthritis (PA) patients. A complement fixation test was used with Yersinia enterocolitica 0:3 type (YEC), Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YPT), Campylobacter jejuni (CJ), and Campylobacter fetus (CF) antigens; the detection of anti-Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) antibodies was carried out using an immunoperoxidase colorimetric slide test that allowed the detection of isotypes of specific antibodies. It was found that the synthesis of anti-CF, CJ, YEC, and YPT antibodies in NAP patients does not differ significantly from that of the HD group; on the contrary, the antibody levels were statistically higher in PA than in the other disease groups or in the healthy controls, although only anti-CF antibodies seemed to significantly differentiate (p = 0.000003) the PA group from the others. Anti-CT IgA antibody titers were found to be significantly higher in the PA as well as in the RA groups when compared with the controls, while the antibody levels in NAP patients showed no clear-cut difference with respect to those of either the arthritic patients or the healthy controls. By showing that anti-enterobacterial antibodies are increased in PA but not in NAP patients, our data furnish additional support to the thesis of a pathogenic role of bacterial infections in psoriatic arthritis.

  4. Clinical Scenarios for Discordant Anti-Xa.

    PubMed

    Vera-Aguilera, Jesus; Yousef, Hindi; Beltran-Melgarejo, Diego; Teng, Teng Hugh; Jan, Ramos; Mok, Mary; Vera-Aguilera, Carlos; Moreno-Aguilera, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Anti-Xa test measures the activity of heparin against the activity of activated coagulation factor X; significant variability of anti-Xa levels in common clinical scenarios has been observed. Objective. To review the most common clinical settings in which anti-Xa results can be bias. Evidence Review. Guidelines and current literature search: we used PubMed, Medline, Embase, and MEDION, from 2000 to October 2013. Results. Anti-Xa test is widely used; however the assay underestimates heparin concentration in the presence of significant AT deficiency, pregnancy, end stage renal disease, and postthrombolysis and in patients with hyperbilirubinemia; limited published data evaluating the safety and effectiveness of anti-Xa assays for managing UH therapy is available. Conclusions and Relevance. To our knowledge this is the first paper that summarizes the most common causes in which this assay can be affected, several "day to day" clinical scenarios can modify the outcomes, and we concur that these rarely recognized scenarios can be affected by negative outcomes in the daily practice. PMID:27293440

  5. Clinical Scenarios for Discordant Anti-Xa

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Aguilera, Jesus; Yousef, Hindi; Beltran-Melgarejo, Diego; Teng, Teng Hugh; Jan, Ramos; Mok, Mary; Vera-Aguilera, Carlos; Moreno-Aguilera, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Anti-Xa test measures the activity of heparin against the activity of activated coagulation factor X; significant variability of anti-Xa levels in common clinical scenarios has been observed. Objective. To review the most common clinical settings in which anti-Xa results can be bias. Evidence Review. Guidelines and current literature search: we used PubMed, Medline, Embase, and MEDION, from 2000 to October 2013. Results. Anti-Xa test is widely used; however the assay underestimates heparin concentration in the presence of significant AT deficiency, pregnancy, end stage renal disease, and postthrombolysis and in patients with hyperbilirubinemia; limited published data evaluating the safety and effectiveness of anti-Xa assays for managing UH therapy is available. Conclusions and Relevance. To our knowledge this is the first paper that summarizes the most common causes in which this assay can be affected, several “day to day” clinical scenarios can modify the outcomes, and we concur that these rarely recognized scenarios can be affected by negative outcomes in the daily practice. PMID:27293440

  6. Tumor angiogenesis and anti-angiogenic therapy.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yoshiaki

    2012-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic therapy is an anti-cancer strategy that targets the new vessels that grow to provide oxygen and nutrients to actively proliferating tumor cells. Most of the current anti-cancer reagents used in the clinical setting indiscriminately target all rapidly dividing cells, resulting in severe adverse effects such as immunosuppression, intestinal problems and hair loss. In comparison, anti-angiogenic reagents theoretically have fewer side effects because, except in the uterine endometrium, neoangiogenesis rarely occurs in healthy adults. Currently, the most established approach for limiting tumor angiogenesis is blockade of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway. In line with the results of preclinical studies, significant therapeutic effects of VEGF blockers have been reported in various types of human cancers, even in patients with progressive/recurrent cancer who could not otherwise be treated. However, some patients are refractory to this treatment or acquire resistance to VEGF inhibitors. Moreover, several studies have shown that VEGF blockade damages healthy vessels and results in adverse effects such as hemorrhagic and thrombotic events. In recent research that indicated possible ways to overcome these problems, several VEGF-independent and tumor-selective pro-angiogenic mechanisms were discovered that could be targeted in combination with or without conventional VEGF blockade. These findings offer opportunities to greatly improve current anti-angiogenic treatment for cancer.

  7. Anti-inflammatory iridoids of botanical origin.

    PubMed

    Viljoen, A; Mncwangi, N; Vermaak, I

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a manifestation of a wide range of disorders which include; arthritis, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, inflammatory bowel syndrome, physical injury and infection amongst many others. Common treatment modalities are usually nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, paracetamol, indomethacin and ibuprofen as well as corticosteroids such as prednisone. These however, may be associated with a host of side effects due to non-selectivity for cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes involved in inflammation and those with selectivity may be highly priced. Thus, there is a continuing search for safe and effective antiinflammatory molecules from natural sources. Research has confirmed that iridoids exhibit promising anti-inflammatory activity which may be beneficial in the treatment of inflammation. Iridoids are secondary metabolites present in various plants, especially in species belonging to the Apocynaceae, Lamiaceae, Loganiaceae, Rubiaceae, Scrophulariaceae and Verbenaceae families. Many of these ethnobotanicals have an illustrious history of traditional use alluding to their use to treat inflammation. Although iridoids exhibit a wide range of pharmacological activities such as cardiovascular, hepatoprotection, hypoglycaemic, antimutagenic, antispasmodic, anti-tumour, antiviral, immunomodulation and purgative effects this review will acutely focus on their anti-inflammatory properties. The paper aims to present a summary for the most prominent iridoid-containing plants for which anti-inflammatory activity has been demonstrated in vitro and / or in vivo. PMID:22414102

  8. The influence of paracetamol on the anti-inflammatory, the anti-pyretic and the analgesic activity of indomethacin.

    PubMed

    van Kolfschoten, A A; Hagelen, F; Hillen, F C; van Noordwijk, J

    1983-09-01

    Interactions between indomethacin (INDO) and paracetamol (PAR) with regard to their anti-inflammatory, anti-pyretic and analgesic activities were studied in rats. The anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic effects of INDO and PAR were additive. Although antagonism was observed in the analgesic test, the effect of the combination was not inferior to that of PAR alone. PMID:6651406

  9. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activities of Caesalpinia decapetala

    PubMed Central

    Parveen, Amna; Sajid Hamid Akash, Muhammad; Rehman, Kanwal; Mahmood, Qaisar; Qadir, Muhammad Imran

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In many pathological conditions, pain, inflammation and fever are interdependent to each other. Due to the use of synthetic drugs, many unwanted effects usually appear. Various studies have been conducted on Caesalpinia decapetala (C. decapetala) to evaluate its effects in the treatment of various diseases but no sufficient scientific literature is available online to prove its analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activities. Methods: The analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activities of 70% aqueous methanolic and n-hexane extracts of C. decapetala was evaluated using Swiss albino mice (20-30 g). Results: The results showed that aqueous methanolic extract of C. decapetala at the dose of 100 mg/kg exhibited significant (p< 0.05) activities in various pain models including acetic acid-induced writhing (18.4 ± 0.53), formalin-induced licking (275 ± 4.18) and hot plate method (2.3 ± 0.0328); whereas,  n-hexane extract showed its effects in acetic acid-induced writhing (20 ± 0.31), formalin-induced licking (293 ± 1.20) and hot plate method (2.224 ± 0.029) compared to the effects observed in control group animals. Similarly, the aqueous methanolic extract of C. decapetala after 2 h of treatment exhibited more significant anti-inflammatory (0.66 ± 0.06) and anti-pyretic (38.81 ± 0.05) activities compared to the control group animals. Conclusion: From the findings of our present study, we concluded that the aqueous methanolic extract of C. decapetala has stronger analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic effects than its n-hexane extract. Further studies are required to investigate the active constituents of C. decapetala that exhibit analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activities. PMID:24790898

  10. Deicing and Anti-Icing Unite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    With funding from Glenn's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, Cox & Company, Inc., built an ice protection system that combines thermal anti-icing and mechanical deicing to keep airfoils (wings and other lifting surfaces) clear of ice. Cox's concept was to combine an anti-icing system with NASA's Electro-Mechanical Expulsion Deicing System, a mechanical deicer. The anti-icing element of this hybrid would reduce the aerodynamic losses associated with deicing systems. The Cox Low Power Ice Protection System is the first new aircraft ice protection system that has been approved by the Federal Aviation Administration for use on a business jet in 40 years. While the system is currently sized for Premier class aircraft, there are no apparent constraints prohibiting its use on aircraft of any size. The company is investigating further applications, such as adapting the system for unmanned aerial vehicles and other military aircraft.

  11. Observations on fluxes near anti-branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Maldonado, Diego; Diaz, Juan; Van Riet, Thomas; Vercnocke, Bert

    2016-01-01

    We revisit necessary conditions for gluing local (anti-)D3 throats into flux throats with opposite charge. These consistency conditions typically reveal singularities in the 3-form fluxes whose meaning is being debated. In this note we prove, under well-motivated assumptions, that unphysical singularities can potentially be avoided when the anti-branes polarise into spherical NS5 branes, with a specific radius. If a consistent solution can then indeed be found, our analysis seems to suggests a rather large correction to the radius of the polarization sphere compared to the probe result. We furthermore comment on the gluing conditions at finite temperature and point out that one specific assumption of a recent no-go theorem can be broken if anti-branes are indeed to polarise into spherical NS5 branes at zero temperature.

  12. Systematic review: new serological markers (anti-glycan, anti-GP2, anti-GM-CSF Ab) in the prediction of IBD patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bonneau, J; Dumestre-Perard, C; Rinaudo-Gaujous, M; Genin, C; Sparrow, M; Roblin, X; Paul, S

    2015-03-01

    Traditionally, IBD diagnosis is based on clinical, radiological, endoscopic, and histological criteria. Biomarkers are needed in cases of uncertain diagnosis, or to predict disease course and therapeutic response. No guideline recommends the detection of antibodies (including ASCA and ANCA) for diagnosis or prognosis of IBD to date. However, many recent data suggest the potential role of new serological markers (anti-glycan (ACCA, ALCA, AMCA, anti-L and anti-C), anti-GP2 and anti-GM-CSF Ab). This review focuses on clinical utility of these new serological markers in diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic monitoring of IBD. Literature review of anti-glycan, anti-GP2 and anti-GM-CSF Ab and their impact on diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of therapeutic response was performed in PubMed/MEDLINE up to June 2014. Anti-glycan, anti-GP2 and anti-GM-CSF Ab are especially associated with CD and seem to be correlated with complicated disease phenotypes even if results differ between studies. Although anti-glycan Ab and anti-GP2 Ab have low sensitivity in diagnosis of IBD, they could identify a small number of CD patients not detected by other tests such as ASCA. Anti-glycan Abs are associated with a progression to a more severe disease course and a higher risk for IBD-related surgery. Anti-GP2 Ab could particularly contribute to better stratify cases of pouchitis. Anti-GM-CSF Ab seems to be correlated with disease activity and could help predict relapses. These new promising biomarkers could particularly be useful in stratification of patients according to disease phenotype and risk of complications. They could be a valuable aid in prediction of disease course and therapeutic response but more prospective studies are needed.

  13. Supersymmetric Kerr-anti-de Sitter solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Cvetic, Mirjam; Gao Peng; Simon, Joan

    2005-07-15

    We prove the existence of one quarter supersymmetric type IIB configurations that arise as nontrivial scaling solutions of the standard five-dimensional Kerr-anti-de Sitter black holes by the explicit construction of its Killing spinors. This neutral, spinning solution is asymptotic to the static anti-de Sitter space-time with cosmological constant -(1/l{sup 2}), it has two finite equal angular momenta J{sub 1}={+-}J{sub 2}, mass M=(1/l)(|J{sub 1}|+|J{sub 2}|) and a naked singularity. We also address the scaling limit associated with one-half supersymmetric solution with only one angular momentum.

  14. The anti-inflammatory effect of opioids.

    PubMed

    Gavalas, A; Victoratos, P; Yiangou, M; Hadjipetrou-Kourounakis, L; Rekka, E; Kourounakis, P

    1994-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory activity of two novel opioids PM and PO as well as of pethidine was studied. The mouse paw edema, induced by various phlogistic agents, was significantly inhibited after the administration of opioids, fact that was independent of their antioxidant properties. The anti-inflammatory action of the above opioids was not reversed by naloxone. These results suggest that a variety of complex regulatory activities may be performed by opioid agonists via naloxone-sensitive or naloxone insensitive receptors on inflammatory cells, directly or indirectly by the inhibition of cytokines and mediators involved in inflammation.

  15. Anti-Rga: identifying serologic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Strohm, P L; Molthan, L

    1982-12-01

    Anti-Rga is a rare alloantibody that is difficult to recognize and identify. Although posing no apparent transfusion risk itself, it can mask the presence of underlying alloantibodies which could be transfusion risks. The five patients reported here demonstrate the serologic findings characteristic of anti-Rga. Known Rg(a-) test cells and multiple "target cells" in neutralization studies are needed to demonstrate partial neutralization findings and to detect underlying alloantibody. Other observations were that clotted samples of red cells retained Rga reactivity for 49 days, whereas EDTA-anticoagulated red cell samples lost such reactivity after 13 days. Frozen red cells tested within hours of deglycerolization showed excellent Rga reactivity.

  16. Anti-aging medicine: pitfalls and hopes.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Ligia J; Barbagallo, Mario; Morley, John E

    2009-03-01

    Since the beginnings of time humans have searched for a fountain of youth. This has led to many extravagant claims which have been highly profitable for their proponents. This area has become known as anti-aging medicine and has deservedly been frowned upon by the medical establishment. On the other hand, in the last decades dramatic advances in our understanding of the aging process have come from studies in worms, flies and mice. This article reviews some of these advances and places the extravagant claims of anti-aging medicine in perspective. We conclude that a balanced diet of moderate proportions and exercise remain today the only proven fountain of youth.

  17. Binding of Nontarget Organisms to Anti-Salmonella and Anti-E. coli O157 Immunomagnetic Beads: Most Probable Composition of Background Eubacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present herein the composition of bacterial communities occurring in ground chicken and the changes which arise in these populations based upon non-selective partitioning by commercially-available Dynal anti-Salmonella and anti-E. coli O157 immunomagnetic beads (IMB). In a trial survey of variou...

  18. AntiAngioPred: A Server for Prediction of Anti-Angiogenic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Ettayapuram Ramaprasad, Azhagiya Singam; Singh, Sandeep; Gajendra P S, Raghava; Venkatesan, Subramanian

    2015-01-01

    The process of angiogenesis is a vital step towards the formation of malignant tumors. Anti-angiogenic peptides are therefore promising candidates in the treatment of cancer. In this study, we have collected anti-angiogenic peptides from the literature and analyzed the residue preference in these peptides. Residues like Cys, Pro, Ser, Arg, Trp, Thr and Gly are preferred while Ala, Asp, Ile, Leu, Val and Phe are not preferred in these peptides. There is a positional preference of Ser, Pro, Trp and Cys in the N terminal region and Cys, Gly and Arg in the C terminal region of anti-angiogenic peptides. Motif analysis suggests the motifs "CG-G", "TC", "SC", "SP-S", etc., which are highly prominent in anti-angiogenic peptides. Based on the primary analysis, we developed prediction models using different machine learning based methods. The maximum accuracy and MCC for amino acid composition based model is 80.9% and 0.62 respectively. The performance of the models on independent dataset is also reasonable. Based on the above study, we have developed a user-friendly web server named "AntiAngioPred" for the prediction of anti-angiogenic peptides. AntiAngioPred web server is freely accessible at http://clri.res.in/subramanian/tools/antiangiopred/index.html (mirror site: http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/antiangiopred/). PMID:26335203

  19. Structural Liberalism and Anti-Bullying Legislation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaught, Sabina E.

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the legal, semantic, and material implications of Massachusetts' anti-bullying law through an analytic framework of structural liberalism. Specifically, this article asks how the law produces categories of fit and unfit subjects of the state through raced and gendered practices of individualism, paternalism,…

  20. Utopian Education and Anti-Utopian Anthropology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papastephanou, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the connection of education, utopia and anthropology, aiming to tease out some educational implications of anti-utopian anthropological essentialism and to show why these should be staved off. It will be shown how an anthropology that tarnishes human nature operates and how it affects educational intervention in the shaping…

  1. Inexpensive anti-fog coating for windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmin, D. L., Jr.; Morrison, H. D.

    1971-01-01

    Coating applications include anti-fog protection for deep-sea diving equipment, fire protection helmets, and windows of vehicles used in hazardous environments. Basic coating composition includes liquid detergent, deionized water, and oxygen compatible fire-resistant oil. Composition prevents visor fogging under maximum metabolic load for 5 hours and longer.

  2. Cultural Diversity and Anti-Poverty Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamont, Michele; Small, Mario Luis

    2010-01-01

    This article examines how anti-poverty policy has considered the role of culture and how it ought to do so. While some have explained poverty as a function of the presumed cultural deficiency or distinctiveness of the poor, we suggest that these explanations have not been convincing and that policy requires a broader and more sophisticated…

  3. Quantum Zeno and anti-Zeno paradoxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S. M.

    2001-02-01

    Continuous observation of a time independent projection operator is known to prevent change of state (the quantum Zeno paradox). We discuss the recent result that generic continuous measurement of time dependent projection operators will in fact ensure change of state: an anti-Zeno paradox.

  4. The Anti-Trash Costume Bash

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokrocki, Mary

    2010-01-01

    To educate one's students about recycling garbage, art teachers can plan an "anti-trash costume bash" to promote public awareness of the ugly, unhealthy, and costly effects of litter. Such an event was brainstormed by the Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG), a regional agency made up of the valley communities in Arizona working to promote a…

  5. Anti-Semitism in First Year Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Matthew; Myers, Gerald M.

    2011-01-01

    Robert Cohen, Assistant Professor English at Fairbanks University, has just completed a contentious meeting of his First Year Composition class, which had discussed a paper written by one of the students. Joe Anderson's paper contained statements that have been historically used as anti-Semitic slogans. Cohen attempted to avoid embarrassing…

  6. The scientific foundation of anti-psychiatry.

    PubMed

    van Praag, H M

    1978-08-01

    Anti-psychiatry has exerted a substantial influence on the thoughts of workers in the field of mental hygiene; on those of the psychiatrically trained, but even much more on those without psychiatric training. Consequently it seemed important to me to investigate the strength of the foundation of this school of thought. This has been the objective of this study. The point of crystallization of anti-psychiatry is the labelling theory on the origin of deviant behaviour. The scientific status of anti-psychiatry stands or falls with that of the labelling theory. Since this theory has not been formulated in verifiable hypotheses, I ventured to formulate "theses", and then tested these against empirical obtained data. The results of this study were largely negative. The empirical material does not support the labelling theory, and in many cases even contradicts it. Consequently anti-psychiatry--as a model to explain the development of psychological disorders--has not a leg to stand on. The labelling theory has had great merits as a "sensitizing theory". It has given momentum to innovative tendencies in psychiatry. Now that it has proved to be untenable on its principal points, however, it should be abandoned. It has become a rubber check, which has no scientific buying-power. PMID:696382

  7. Anti-forensics of chromatic aberration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Owen; Stamm, Matthew C.

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade, a number of information forensic techniques have been developed to identify digital image manipulation and falsification. Recent research has shown, however, that an intelligent forger can use anti-forensic countermeasures to disguise their forgeries. In this paper, an anti-forensic technique is proposed to falsify the lateral chromatic aberration present in a digital image. Lateral chromatic aberration corresponds to the relative contraction or expansion between an image's color channels that occurs due to a lens's inability to focus all wavelengths of light on the same point. Previous work has used localized inconsistencies in an image's chromatic aberration to expose cut-and-paste image forgeries. The anti-forensic technique presented in this paper operates by estimating the expected lateral chromatic aberration at an image location, then removing deviations from this estimate caused by tampering or falsification. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate that our anti-forensic technique can be used to effectively disguise evidence of an image forgery.

  8. Localised anti-branes in flux backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnett, Gavin S.

    2015-06-01

    Solutions corresponding to finite temperature (anti)-D3 and M2 branes localised in flux backgrounds are constructed in a linear approximation. The flux backgrounds considered are toy models for the IR of the Klebanov-Strassler solution and its M-theory analogue, the Cvetič-Gibbons-Lü-Pope solution. Smooth solutions exist for either sign charge, in stark contrast with the previously considered case of smeared black branes. That the singularities of the anti-branes in the zero temperature extremal limit can be shielded behind a finite temperature horizon indicates that the singularities are physical and resolvable by string theory. As the charge of the branes grows large and negative, the flux at the horizon increases without bound and diverges in the extremal limit, which suggests a resolution via brane polarisation à la Polchinski-Strassler. It therefore appears that the anti-brane singularities do not indicate a problem with the SUSY-breaking metastable states corresponding to expanded anti-brane configurations in these backgrounds, nor with the use of these states in constructing the de Sitter landscape.

  9. Anti-Oxidant, Anti-Aging, and Anti-Melanogenic Properties of the Essential Oils from Two Varieties of Alpinia zerumbet.

    PubMed

    Tu, Pham Thi Be; Tawata, Shinkichi

    2015-09-14

    Here, we investigated the anti-oxidant and anti-aging effects of essential oils (EOs) from the leaves of Alpinia zerumbet (tairin and shima) in vitro and anti-melanogenic effects in B16F10 melanoma cells. The anti-oxidant activities were performed with 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH); 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS); nitric oxide; singlet oxygen; hydroxyl radical scavenging; and xanthine oxidase. The inhibitory activities against collagenase, elastase, hyaluronidase, and tyrosinase were employed for anti-aging. The anti-melanogenic was assessed in B16F10 melanoma cells by melanin synthesis and intracellular tyrosinase inhibitory activity. The volatile chemical composition of the essential oil was analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The EO was a complex mixture mainly consisting of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. The results revealed that tairin and shima EOs showed strong anti-oxidant activities against DPPH and nitric oxide, hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, and xanthine oxidase inhibition. Compared to shima EO; tairin EO exhibited strong anti-aging activity by inhibiting collagenase, tyrosinase, hyaluronidase, and elastase (IC50 = 11 ± 0.1; 25 ± 1.2; 83 ± 1.6; and 213 ± 2 μg/mL, respectively). Both EOs inhibited intracellular tyrosinase activity; thus, reducing melanin synthesis. These results suggest that tairin EO has better anti-oxidant/anti-aging activity than shima EO, but both are equally anti-melanogenic.

  10. Belgian recommendations on ANA, anti-dsDNA and anti-ENA antibody testing.

    PubMed

    Van Blerk, M; Bossuyt, X; Humbel, R; Mewis, A; Servais, G; Tomasi, J P; Van Campenhout, C; Van Hoovels, L; Vercammen, M; Damoiseaux, J; Coucke, W; Van de Walle, P

    2014-04-01

    Autoantibodies to nuclear antigens, i.e. antinuclear antibodies (ANA), antibodies to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and extractable nuclear antigens (ENA), are useful as diagnostic markers for a variety of autoimmune diseases. In March 2010, the Belgian national External Quality Assessment Scheme sent a questionnaire on ANA, anti-dsDNA and anti-ENA antibody testing designed by the Dutch EASI (European Autoimmunity Standardization Initiative) team, to all clinical laboratories performing ANA testing. Virtually all laboratories completed the questionnaire (97·7%, 127/130). This paper discusses the results of this questionnaire and provides valuable information on the state-of-the-art of ANA, anti-dsDNA and anti-ENA antibody testing as practiced in the Belgian laboratories. In addition, this work presents practical recommendations developed by the members of the advisory board of the scheme as a result of the outcome of this study.

  11. More than being against it: anti-racism and anti-oppression in mental health services.

    PubMed

    Corneau, Simon; Stergiopoulos, Vicky

    2012-04-01

    Anti-racism and anti-oppression frameworks of practice are being increasingly advocated for in efforts to address racism and oppression embedded in mental health and social services, and to help reduce their impact on mental health and clinical outcomes. This literature review summarizes how these two philosophies of practice are conceptualized and the strategies used within these frameworks as they are applied to service provision toward racialized groups. The strategies identified can be grouped in seven main categories: empowerment, education, alliance building, language, alternative healing strategies, advocacy, social justice/activism, and fostering reflexivity. Although anti-racism and anti-oppression frameworks have limitations, they may offer useful approaches to service delivery and would benefit from further study.

  12. Astemizole: an old anti-histamine as a new promising anti-cancer drug.

    PubMed

    García-Quiroz, Janice; Camacho, Javier

    2011-03-01

    Mortality-to-incidence ratio in cancer patients is extremely high, positioning cancer as a major cause of death worldwide. Despite hundreds of clinical trials for anti-cancer drugs that are currently in progress, most clinical trials for novel drug treatments fail to pass Phase I. However, previously developed drugs with novel anti-tumor properties offer a viable and cost-effective alternative to fight cancer. Histamine favors the proliferation of normal and malignant cells. Several anti-histamine drugs, including astemizole, can inhibit tumor cell proliferation. Astemizole has gained enormous interest since it also targets important proteins involved in cancer progression, namely, ether à-go-go 1 (Eag1) and Eag-related gene (Erg) potassium channels. Furthermore, Eag1 is thought to be an important marker and a therapeutic target for several different cancers. Astemizole inhibits Eag1 and Erg channel activity, and in cells expressing the Eag1 channel it decreases tumor cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. It should be noted that some cardiovascular side effects have been reported for astemizole in a few rare cases. Nevertheless, astemizole stands as a very promising anti-cancer tool because it displays several anti-proliferative mechanisms, may serve as the basis to synthesize new anti-cancer agents, and has been previously administered clinically. In this review we will summarize the main findings relating to histamine and anti-histamines in cancer cell proliferation focusing on astemizole targets (Eag1 and Erg channels), and its anti-cancer effects in vitro and in vivo. We will also describe the side effects of astemizole and discuss proposals to overcome such effects in cancer patients. Finally, we will remark on the relevance of developing novel astemizole-related compounds. PMID:21443504

  13. The anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effect of the methanol extract from brittle star

    PubMed Central

    Baharara, Javad; Amini, Elaheh; Mousavi, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anti-angiogenic therapy is a crucial step in cancer treatment. The discovery of new anti-angiogenic compounds from marine organisms has become an attractive concept in anti-cancer therapy. Because little data correlated to the pro- and anti-angiogenic efficacies of Ophiuroidea, which include brittle star, the current study was designed to explore the anti-angiogenic potential of brittle star methanol extract in vitro and in vivo. Methods: The anti-proliferative effect of brittle star extract on A2780cp cells was examined by MTT assays, and transcriptional expression of VEGF and b-FGF was evaluated by RT-PCR. In an in vivo model, 40 fertilized Ross eggs were divided into control and three experimental groups. The experimental groups were incubated with brittle star extract at concentrations of 25, 50 and 100 µg/ml, and photographed by photo-stereomicroscopy. Ultimately, numbers and lengths of vessels were measured by Image J software. Data were analyzed with SPSS software (p<0.05). Results: Results illustrated that the brittle star extract exerted a dose- and time-dependent anti-proliferative effect on A2780cp cancer cells. In addition, VEGF and b-FGF expression decreased with brittle star methanol extract treatment. Macroscopic evaluations revealed significant changes in the second and third experimental group compared to controls (p<0.05). Conclusion: These finding revealed the anti-angiogenic effects of brittle star methanol extract in vitro and in vivo confer novel insight into the application of natural marine products in angiogenesis-related pathologies. PMID:26989740

  14. Anti-tumor and anti-viral activities of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Bao, Jin-Ku

    2013-04-01

    Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectin family, a superfamily of strictly mannose-binding specific lectins widespread among monocotyledonous plants, is well-known to possess a broad range of biological functions such as anti-tumor, anti-viral and anti-fungal activities. Herein, we mainly focused on exploring the precise molecular mechanisms by which GNA-related lectins induce cancer cell apoptotic and autophagic death targeting mitochondria-mediated ROS-p38-p53 apoptotic or autophagic pathway, Ras-Raf and PI3K-Akt anti-apoptotic or anti-autophagic pathways. In addition, we further discussed the molecular mechanisms of GNA-related lectins exerting anti-viral activities by blocking the entry of the virus into its target cells, preventing transmission of the virus as well as forcing virus to delete glycan in its envelope protein and triggering neutralizing antibody. In conclusion, these findings may provide a new perspective of GNA-related lectins as potential drugs for cancer and virus therapeutics in the future.

  15. Sterols from Mytilidae show anti-aging and neuroprotective effects via anti-oxidative activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujuan; Lin, Yanfei; Cao, Xueli; Xiang, Lan; Qi, Jianhua

    2014-11-25

    For screening anti-aging samples from marine natural products, K6001 yeast strain was employed as a bioassay system. The active mussel extract was separated to give an active sterol fraction (SF). SF was further purified, and four sterol compounds were obtained. Their structures were determined to be cholesterol (CHOL), brassicasterol, crinosterol, and 24-methylenecholesterol. All compounds showed similar anti-aging activity. To understand the action mechanism involved, anti-oxidative experiments, reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays, and malondialdehyde (MDA) tests were performed on the most abundant compound, CHOL. Results indicated that treatment with CHOL increases the survival rate of yeast under oxidative stress and decreases ROS and MDA levels. In addition, mutations of uth1, skn7, sod1, and sod2, which feature a K6001 background, were employed and the lifespans of the mutations were not affected by CHOL. These results demonstrate that CHOL exerts anti-aging effects via anti-oxidative stress. Based on the connection between neuroprotection and anti-aging, neuroprotective experiments were performed in PC12 cells. Paraquat was used to induce oxidative stress and the results showed that the CHOL and SF protect the PC12 cells from the injury induced by paraquat. In addition, these substance exhibited nerve growth factor (NGF) mimic activities again confirmed their neuroprotective function.

  16. Lectins with anti-HIV activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun; Singh, Senjam Sunil; Yin, Cuiming; Dan, Xiuli; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai

    2015-01-01

    Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin) lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana) lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus). The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed. PMID:25569520

  17. Lectins with anti-HIV activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun; Singh, Senjam Sunil; Yin, Cuiming; Dan, Xiuli; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai

    2015-01-01

    Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin) lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana) lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus). The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed.

  18. IGFBP-4 Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Tumorigenic Effects Are Associated with Anti-Cathepsin B Activity1

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, María J; Ball, Marguerite; Rukhlova, Marina; Slinn, Jacqueline; L'Abbe, Denis; Iqbal, Umar; Monette, Robert; Hagedorn, Martin; O'Connor-McCourt, Maureen D; Durocher, Yves; Stanimirovic, Danica B

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4/IBP-4) has potent IGF-independent anti-angiogenic and antitumorigenic effects. In this study, we demonstrated that these activities are located in the IGFBP-4 C-terminal protein fragment (CIBP-4), a region containing a thyroglobulin type 1 (Tg1) domain. Proteins bearing Tg1 domains have been shown to inhibit cathepsins, lysosomal enzymes involved in basement membrane degradation and implicated in tumor invasion and angiogenesis. In our studies, CIBP-4 was shown to internalize and co-localize with lysosomal-like structures in both endothelial cells (ECs) and glioblastoma U87MG cells. CIBP-4 also inhibited both growth factor-induced EC tubulogenesis in Matrigel and the concomitant increases in intracellular cathepsin B (CatB) activity. In vitro assays confirmed CIBP-4 capacity to block recombinant CatB activity. Biodistribution analysis of intravenously injected CIBP-4-Cy5.5 in a glioblastoma tumor xenograft model indicated targeted accumulation of CIBP-4 in tumors. Most importantly, CIBP-4 reduced tumor growth in this animal model by 60%. Pleiotropic anti-angiogenic and anti-tumorigenic activities of CIBP-4 most likely underlie its observed therapeutic potential against glioblastoma. PMID:23633927

  19. Syndrome in question: antisynthetase syndrome (anti-PL-7)*

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Ana Cláudia Cavalcante; Gige, Tatiana Cristina; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2016-01-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome is a rare autoimmune disease characterized by interstitial lung disease and/or inflammatory myositis, with positive antisynthetase antibodies (anti-Jo-1, anti-PL-7, anti-PL-12, ZO, OJ, anti-KE or KS). Other symptoms described include: non-erosive arthritis, fever, Raynaud's phenomenon, and "mechanic's hands." The first therapeutic option is corticotherapy, followed by other immunosuppressants. The prognosis of the disease is quite limited when compared to other inflammatory myopathies with negative antisynthetase antibodies.

  20. Study ofe+e- to Lambda anti-Lambda, Lambda anti-Sigma^0,Sigma^0 anti-Sigma^0 using Initial State Radiation with BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2007-09-14

    We study the e+e- --> Lambda anti-Lambda gamma, Lambda anti-Sigma0 gamma, Sigma0 anti-Sigma0 gamma processes using 230 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the BaBar detector at e+e- center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV. From the analysis of the baryon-antibaryon mass spectra the cross sections for e+e- --> Lambda anti-Lambda, Lambda anti-Sigma0, Sigma0 anti-Sigma0 are measured in the dibaryon mass range from threshold up to 3 GeV/c{sup 2}. The ratio of electric and magnetic form factors, |G{sub E}/G{sub M}|, is measured for e+e- --> Lambda anti-Lambda, and limits on the relative phase between Lambda form factors are obtained. We also measure the J/psi --> Lambda anti-Lambda, Sigma0 anti-Sigma0 and psi(2S) --> Lambda anti-Lambda branching fractions.

  1. 49 CFR 238.205 - Anti-climbing mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Anti-climbing mechanism. 238.205 Section 238.205... Equipment § 238.205 Anti-climbing mechanism. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, all..., 2010, shall have at both the forward and rear ends an anti-climbing mechanism capable of resisting...

  2. 49 CFR 238.205 - Anti-climbing mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Anti-climbing mechanism. 238.205 Section 238.205... Equipment § 238.205 Anti-climbing mechanism. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, all..., 2010, shall have at both the forward and rear ends an anti-climbing mechanism capable of resisting...

  3. 49 CFR 238.205 - Anti-climbing mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Anti-climbing mechanism. 238.205 Section 238.205... Equipment § 238.205 Anti-climbing mechanism. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, all..., 2010, shall have at both the forward and rear ends an anti-climbing mechanism capable of resisting...

  4. 49 CFR 238.205 - Anti-climbing mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Anti-climbing mechanism. 238.205 Section 238.205... Equipment § 238.205 Anti-climbing mechanism. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, all..., 2010, shall have at both the forward and rear ends an anti-climbing mechanism capable of resisting...

  5. 49 CFR 238.205 - Anti-climbing mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Anti-climbing mechanism. 238.205 Section 238.205... Equipment § 238.205 Anti-climbing mechanism. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, all..., 2010, shall have at both the forward and rear ends an anti-climbing mechanism capable of resisting...

  6. Effect of low ionic strength on anti-Pr reactions.

    PubMed

    Leo, A; Kreft, H; Hack, H; Roelcke, D

    1996-01-01

    The effect of low ionic strength (LIS) on 28 anti-Pr, 20 anti-I and 20 anti-i cold agglutinins was investigated. The reaction of the anti-Pr CAs varies markedly. In most cases LIS has an enhancing effect. In some cases the thermal amplitude was widened so far that the reaction at 37 degrees C under LIS was stronger than at 0 degree C in PBS. With regard to the anti-Pr subspecificities anti Pr1, -Pr2 and -Pr3 or to the distinction of the immunodominant NeuNAc group (alpha a2,6- or alpha 2,3-bond) a correlation between these characteristics and the reaction in LIS could not be identified. The anti-I are not influenced by LISS, anti-i in a few cases. The reason for the variable reaction of the anti-Pr remains unclear. To further elucidate the LISS effect on anti-Pr, the contribution of the antibody structure should be regarded, but data for the use of H- and L-chain genes in anti-Pr are sparse. For compatibility testing in the routine laboratory, LISS-sensitive anti-Pr may play a role in disturbing the screening for RBC antibodies.

  7. 33 CFR 183.568 - Anti-siphon protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Anti-siphon protection. 183.568...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Manufacturer Requirements § 183.568 Anti-siphon... above the level of the tank top; or (b) Have an anti-siphon device or an electrically operated fuel...

  8. 33 CFR 183.568 - Anti-siphon protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Anti-siphon protection. 183.568...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Manufacturer Requirements § 183.568 Anti-siphon... above the level of the tank top; or (b) Have an anti-siphon device or an electrically operated fuel...

  9. 33 CFR 183.568 - Anti-siphon protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Anti-siphon protection. 183.568...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Manufacturer Requirements § 183.568 Anti-siphon... above the level of the tank top; or (b) Have an anti-siphon device or an electrically operated fuel...

  10. 33 CFR 183.568 - Anti-siphon protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Anti-siphon protection. 183.568...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Manufacturer Requirements § 183.568 Anti-siphon... above the level of the tank top; or (b) Have an anti-siphon device or an electrically operated fuel...

  11. 15 CFR 742.8 - Anti-terrorism: Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Iran. 742.8 Section... BASED CONTROLS § 742.8 Anti-terrorism: Iran. (a) License Requirements. (1) A license is required for anti-terrorism purposes to export or reexport to Iran any item for which AT column 1 or AT column 2...

  12. 15 CFR 742.10 - Anti-terrorism: Sudan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Sudan. 742.10 Section...-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.10 Anti-terrorism: Sudan. (a) License requirements. (1) If AT column 1 or AT... ECCN, a license is required for export to Sudan for anti-terrorism purposes. 1 AT column 1 refers...

  13. 15 CFR 742.8 - Anti-terrorism: Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Iran. 742.8 Section... BASED CONTROLS § 742.8 Anti-terrorism: Iran. (a) License Requirements. (1) A license is required for anti-terrorism purposes to export or reexport to Iran any item for which AT column 1 or AT column 2...

  14. 15 CFR 742.8 - Anti-terrorism: Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Iran. 742.8 Section... BASED CONTROLS § 742.8 Anti-terrorism: Iran. (a) License Requirements. (1) A license is required for anti-terrorism purposes to export or reexport to Iran any item for which AT column 1 or AT column 2...

  15. 15 CFR 742.10 - Anti-terrorism: Sudan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Sudan. 742.10 Section...-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.10 Anti-terrorism: Sudan. (a) License requirements. (1) If AT column 1 or AT... ECCN, a license is required for export to Sudan for anti-terrorism purposes. 1 AT column 1 refers...

  16. 15 CFR 742.10 - Anti-terrorism: Sudan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Sudan. 742.10 Section...-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.10 Anti-terrorism: Sudan. (a) License requirements. (1) If AT column 1 or AT... ECCN, a license is required for export to Sudan for anti-terrorism purposes. 1 AT column 1 refers...

  17. 15 CFR 742.10 - Anti-terrorism: Sudan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Sudan. 742.10 Section...-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.10 Anti-terrorism: Sudan. (a) License requirements. (1) If AT column 1 or AT... ECCN, a license is required for export to Sudan for anti-terrorism purposes. 1 AT column 1 refers...

  18. 15 CFR 742.8 - Anti-terrorism: Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Iran. 742.8 Section... BASED CONTROLS § 742.8 Anti-terrorism: Iran. (a) License Requirements. (1) A license is required for anti-terrorism purposes to export or reexport to Iran any item for which AT column 1 or AT column 2...

  19. Laying the Foundation for Literacy: An Anti-Bias Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corson, Patricia

    2000-01-01

    Defines an anti-bias curriculum as accepting the legitimacy of children's home languages, acknowledging all attempts at communication, and promoting active involvement of traditional, extended, and non-traditional families. Examines anti-bias education, language, and literacy. Identifies six tenets of anti-bias educators. Advocates laying the…

  20. 15 CFR 742.9 - Anti-terrorism: Syria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Syria. 742.9 Section... BASED CONTROLS § 742.9 Anti-terrorism: Syria. (a) License requirements. (1) If AT Column 1 of the... required for export and reexport to Syria for anti-terrorism purposes. (2) The Secretary of State...

  1. 15 CFR 742.9 - Anti-terrorism: Syria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Syria. 742.9 Section... BASED CONTROLS § 742.9 Anti-terrorism: Syria. (a) License requirements. (1) If AT Column 1 of the... required for export and reexport to Syria for anti-terrorism purposes. (2) The Secretary of State...

  2. 15 CFR 742.9 - Anti-terrorism: Syria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Syria. 742.9 Section... BASED CONTROLS § 742.9 Anti-terrorism: Syria. (a) License requirements. (1) If AT Column 1 of the... required for export and reexport to Syria for anti-terrorism purposes. (2) The Secretary of State...

  3. 15 CFR 742.9 - Anti-terrorism: Syria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Syria. 742.9 Section... BASED CONTROLS § 742.9 Anti-terrorism: Syria. (a) License requirements. (1) If AT Column 1 of the... required for export and reexport to Syria for anti-terrorism purposes. (2) The Secretary of State...

  4. 15 CFR 742.9 - Anti-terrorism: Syria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Syria. 742.9 Section... BASED CONTROLS § 742.9 Anti-terrorism: Syria. (a) License requirements. (1) If AT Column 1 of the... required for export and reexport to Syria for anti-terrorism purposes. (2) The Secretary of State...

  5. Anti-Progressivism in Education: Past and Present

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban, Wayne J.

    2013-01-01

    This essay takes a look at what I call anti-progressivism in education or, more particularly, criticism of progressive education that was so vocal and visceral that it earns a label, at least initially, of anti-progressivism. After a brief introduction discussing the terms in general, I look at three instances of anti-progressivism in the 1950s…

  6. 15 CFR 742.8 - Anti-terrorism: Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Iran. 742.8 Section... BASED CONTROLS § 742.8 Anti-terrorism: Iran. (a) License Requirements. (1) A license is required for anti-terrorism purposes to export or reexport to Iran any item for which AT column 1 or AT column 2...

  7. 15 CFR 742.10 - Anti-terrorism: Sudan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Sudan. 742.10 Section...-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.10 Anti-terrorism: Sudan. (a) License requirements. (1) If AT column 1 or AT... ECCN, a license is required for export to Sudan for anti-terrorism purposes. 1 AT column 1 refers...

  8. Medicinal plants with anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Maione, Francesco; Russo, Rosa; Khan, Haroon; Mascolo, Nicola

    2016-06-01

    Medicinal plants have been the main remedy to treat various ailments for a long time and nowadays, many drugs have been developed from traditional medicine. This paper reviews some medicinal plants and their main constituents which possess anti-inflammatory activities useful for curing joint inflammation, inflammatory skin disorders, cardiovascular inflammation and other inflammatory diseases. Here, we provide a brief overview of quick and easy reading on the role of medicinal plants and their main constituents in these inflammatory diseases. We hope that this overview will shed some light on the function of these natural anti-inflammatory compounds and attract the interest of investigators aiming at the design of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of various inflammatory conditions.

  9. Anti-aging pharmacology: Promises and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Vaiserman, Alexander M; Lushchak, Oleh V; Koliada, Alexander K

    2016-11-01

    Life expectancy has grown dramatically in modern times. This increase, however, is not accompanied by the same increase in healthspan. Efforts to extend healthspan through pharmacological agents targeting aging-related pathological changes are now in the spotlight of geroscience, the main idea of which is that delaying of aging is far more effective than preventing the particular chronic disorders. Currently, anti-aging pharmacology is a rapidly developing discipline. It is a preventive field of health care, as opposed to conventional medicine which focuses on treating symptoms rather than root causes of illness. A number of pharmacological agents targeting basic aging pathways (i.e., calorie restriction mimetics, autophagy inducers, senolytics etc.) are now under investigation. This review summarizes the literature related to advances, perspectives and challenges in the field of anti-aging pharmacology. PMID:27524412

  10. [Evaluation in school anti-tobacco programmes].

    PubMed

    Szymborski, J; Berkowska, M; Sito, A; Malkowska, A

    2000-01-01

    The National Research Institute of Mother and Child (NRIMC) school anti-tobacco programmes are presented. They are discussed with reference to the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines and other effective school programmes to prevent tobacco use among children and young people. The general objectives of the programmes at different educational levels and the elaborated strategic recommendations are presented. The own conceptualised evaluation model of school anti-tobacco programmes is analysed, including process and outcome evaluation. The presented model clarifies concepts and procedures of planning the design and evaluation of the programme in its different stages. In our opinion, the NRIMC evaluation model can be applied in other heath promotion programmes.

  11. [The anti-asylum movement in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Lüchmann, Lígia Helena Hahn; Rodrigues, Jefferson

    2007-01-01

    This study reviews the history of the national anti-asylum struggle in Brazil. It analyzes some of the movement's difficulties, achievements and challenges. The theory of social movements is used here as an important analytical tool to understand this collective action, to the degree in which theory allows an appraisal of this type of social action rooted in its many configurations, evidencing the complexity of the contemporary world. The anti-asylum movement is composed of many stakeholders whose struggles and conflicts have been developed through different social-political-institutional dimensions. It encompasses at different moments and to different degrees, a movement which articulates solidarity and conflict relations and social denunciations in an attempt to transform relations and conceptions that are discriminatory and which are intended to control the "insane" and "insanity" in our country.

  12. Blackfolds in (anti)-de Sitter backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Armas, Jay; Obers, Niels A.

    2011-04-15

    We construct different neutral blackfold solutions in Anti-de Sitter and de Sitter background spacetimes in the limit where the cosmological constant is taken to be much smaller than the horizon size. This includes a class of blackfolds with horizons that are products of odd-spheres times a transverse sphere, for which the thermodynamic stability is also studied. Moreover, we exhibit a specific case in which the same blackfold solution can describe different limiting black hole spacetimes therefore illustrating the geometric character of the blackfold approach. Furthermore, we show that the higher-dimensional Kerr-(Anti)-de Sitter black hole allows for ultraspinning regimes in the same limit under consideration and demonstrate that this is correctly described by a pancaked blackfold geometry. We also give evidence for the possibility of saturating the rigidity theorem in these backgrounds.

  13. Asymptotically anti-de Sitter Proca stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Miguel; Brito, Richard

    2016-09-01

    We show that complex, massive spin-1 fields minimally coupled to Einstein's gravity with a negative cosmological constant, admit asymptotically anti-de Sitter self-gravitating solutions. Focusing on four-dimensional spacetimes, we start by obtaining analytical solutions in the test-field limit, where the Proca field equations can be solved in a fixed anti-de Sitter background, and then find fully nonlinear solutions numerically. These solutions are a natural extension of the recently found asymptotically flat Proca stars and share similar properties with scalar boson stars. In particular, we show that they are stable against spherically symmetric linear perturbations for a range of fundamental frequencies limited by their point of maximum mass. We finish with an overview of the behavior of Proca stars in five dimensions.

  14. Medicinal plants with anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Maione, Francesco; Russo, Rosa; Khan, Haroon; Mascolo, Nicola

    2016-06-01

    Medicinal plants have been the main remedy to treat various ailments for a long time and nowadays, many drugs have been developed from traditional medicine. This paper reviews some medicinal plants and their main constituents which possess anti-inflammatory activities useful for curing joint inflammation, inflammatory skin disorders, cardiovascular inflammation and other inflammatory diseases. Here, we provide a brief overview of quick and easy reading on the role of medicinal plants and their main constituents in these inflammatory diseases. We hope that this overview will shed some light on the function of these natural anti-inflammatory compounds and attract the interest of investigators aiming at the design of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of various inflammatory conditions. PMID:26221780

  15. Anti-inflammatory actions of acupuncture.

    PubMed Central

    Zijlstra, Freek J; van den Berg-de Lange, Ineke; Huygen, Frank J P M; Klein, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Acupuncture has a beneficial effect when treating many diseases and painful conditions, and therefore is thought to be useful as a complementary therapy or to replace generally accepted pharmacological intervention. The attributive effect of acupuncture has been investigated in inflammatory diseases, including asthma, rhinitis, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, epicondylitis, complex regional pain syndrome type 1 and vasculitis. Large randomised trials demonstrating the immediate and sustained effect of acupuncture are missing. Mechanisms underlying the ascribed immunosuppressive actions of acupuncture are reviewed in this communication. The acupuncture-controlled release of neuropeptides from nerve endings and subsequent vasodilative and anti-inflammatory effects through calcitonine gene-related peptide is hypothesised. The complex interactions with substance P, the analgesic contribution of beta-endorphin and the balance between cell-specific pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-10 are discussed. PMID:12775355

  16. [Anti-aging medicine: science or marketing ?].

    PubMed

    Cogan, E

    2015-09-01

    Anti-aging medicine is self defined as a preventive medicine, combining nutritional recommendations, dietary supplements, prescriptions for hormones and various aesthetic techniques. The essential aim is to reduce the risk of aging, both psychically, physically and aesthetically. Although many scientific studies in animals or in vitro models have demonstrated the deleterious role of oxidative stress and of hormonal, vitamin or trace elements deficiencies, the transposition to humans of these findings is marginal and does not justify the therapeutic proposals advocated by the anti aging medicine. These practices are mostly not based on any scientific basis both in the diagnostic and therapeutic fields. These approaches are particularly costly for gullible patients in search of well being and abused by a carefully organized marketing involving tacit complicity of doctors, laboratories and firms producing hormones and dietary supplements and various substances devoted for aesthetic purposes.

  17. Prospects for Anti-Biofilm Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    This commentary highlights several avenues currently being pursued in research labs to the development of new anti-biofilm pharmaceuticals. There is a real need for alternative therapeutic modalities for treating the persistent infections that sometimes form on implanted medical devices or compromised niches within the body. Strategies being researched include discovering new antimicrobial agents that kill microorganisms in biofilms more effectively than do existing antibiotics, designing drugs that block microbial adhesion or interfere with intercellular communication, developing chemistries to disperse biofilms, and combining agents with different mechanisms of action. Though the need is great, the pathway to commercialization of new drugs is steep. One possible streamlined approach to navigating the regulatory approval process is to repurpose old drugs, a strategy that a few groups have shown can yield agents with anti-biofilm properties. PMID:26343685

  18. Reengineered tricyclic anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Kastrinsky, David B; Sangodkar, Jaya; Zaware, Nilesh; Izadmehr, Sudeh; Dhawan, Neil S; Narla, Goutham; Ohlmeyer, Michael

    2015-10-01

    The phenothiazine and dibenzazepine tricyclics are potent neurotropic drugs with a documented but underutilized anti-cancer side effect. Reengineering these agents (TFP, CPZ, CIP) by replacing the basic amine with a neutral polar functional group (e.g., RTC-1, RTC-2) abrogated their CNS effects as demonstrated by in vitro pharmacological assays and in vivo behavioral models. Further optimization generated several phenothiazines and dibenzazepines with improved anti-cancer potency, exemplified by RTC-5. This new lead demonstrated efficacy against a xenograft model of an EGFR driven cancer without the neurotropic effects exhibited by the parent molecules. Its effects were attributed to concomitant negative regulation of PI3K-AKT and RAS-ERK signaling. PMID:26372073

  19. [Anti-aging medicine: science or marketing ?].

    PubMed

    Cogan, E

    2015-09-01

    Anti-aging medicine is self defined as a preventive medicine, combining nutritional recommendations, dietary supplements, prescriptions for hormones and various aesthetic techniques. The essential aim is to reduce the risk of aging, both psychically, physically and aesthetically. Although many scientific studies in animals or in vitro models have demonstrated the deleterious role of oxidative stress and of hormonal, vitamin or trace elements deficiencies, the transposition to humans of these findings is marginal and does not justify the therapeutic proposals advocated by the anti aging medicine. These practices are mostly not based on any scientific basis both in the diagnostic and therapeutic fields. These approaches are particularly costly for gullible patients in search of well being and abused by a carefully organized marketing involving tacit complicity of doctors, laboratories and firms producing hormones and dietary supplements and various substances devoted for aesthetic purposes. PMID:26591329

  20. The bizarre anti-de Sitter spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokołowski, Leszek M.

    2016-08-01

    Anti-de Sitter spacetime is important in general relativity and modern field theory. We review its geometrical features and properties of light signals and free particles moving in it. By applying only the elementary tools of tensor calculus, we derive ab initio of all these properties and show that they are really weird. One finds superluminal velocities of light and particles, infinite particle energy necessary to escape at infinite distance and spacetime regions inaccessible by a free fall, though reachable by an accelerated spaceship. Radial timelike geodesics are identical to the circular ones and actually all timelike geodesics are identical to one circle in a fictitious five-dimensional space. Employing the latter space, one is able to explain these bizarre features of anti-de Sitter spacetime; in this sense the spacetime is not self-contained. This is not a physical world.

  1. Anti-aging pharmacology: Promises and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Vaiserman, Alexander M; Lushchak, Oleh V; Koliada, Alexander K

    2016-11-01

    Life expectancy has grown dramatically in modern times. This increase, however, is not accompanied by the same increase in healthspan. Efforts to extend healthspan through pharmacological agents targeting aging-related pathological changes are now in the spotlight of geroscience, the main idea of which is that delaying of aging is far more effective than preventing the particular chronic disorders. Currently, anti-aging pharmacology is a rapidly developing discipline. It is a preventive field of health care, as opposed to conventional medicine which focuses on treating symptoms rather than root causes of illness. A number of pharmacological agents targeting basic aging pathways (i.e., calorie restriction mimetics, autophagy inducers, senolytics etc.) are now under investigation. This review summarizes the literature related to advances, perspectives and challenges in the field of anti-aging pharmacology.

  2. Anti-fogging and anti-frosting behaviors of layer-by-layer assembled cellulose derivative thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibraen, Mahmoud H. M. A.; Yagoub, Hajo; Zhang, Xuejian; Xu, Jian; Yang, Shuguang

    2016-05-01

    Two cellulose derivatives, quaternized cellulose (QC) and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), were layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled to prepare a thin film. QC was also LbL assembled with two synthetic polyelectrolytes, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS), separately. The anti-fogging and anti-frosting properties of the assembled films were studied. QC/CMC thin film exhibits anti-fogging and anti-frosting behaviors, whereas QC/PAA and QC/PSS films do not have capacity for anti-fogging and anti-frosting. The anti-fogging and anti-frosting properties of QC/CMC film are attributed to that water molecules can be quickly adsorbed into the matrix of the film. The water adsorption of QC/CMC film was illustrated by the optical thickness increment.

  3. Carnosine, a protective, anti-ageing peptide?

    PubMed

    Hipkiss, A R

    1998-08-01

    Carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) has protective functions additional to anti-oxidant and free-radical scavenging roles. It extends cultured human fibroblast life-span, kills transformed cells, protects cells against aldehydes and an amyloid peptide fragment and inhibits, in vitro, protein glycation (formation of cross-links, carbonyl groups and AGEs) and DNA/protein cross-linking. Carnosine is an aldehyde scavenger, a likely lipofuscin (age pigment) precursor and possible modulator of diabetic complications, atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Gravity controlled anti-reverse rotation device

    DOEpatents

    Dickinson, Robert J.; Wetherill, Todd M.

    1983-01-01

    A gravity assisted anti-reverse rotation device for preventing reverse rotation of pumps and the like. A horizontally mounted pawl is disposed to mesh with a fixed ratchet preventing reverse rotation when the pawl is advanced into intercourse with the ratchet by a vertically mounted lever having a lumped mass. Gravitation action on the lumped mass urges the pawl into mesh with the ratchet, while centrifugal force on the lumped mass during forward, allowed rotation retracts the pawl away from the ratchet.

  5. Anti-thromboembolic strategies in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Cocco, Giuseppe; Amiet, Philpp; Jerie, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Oral anticoagulation (OAC) is highly effective for stroke prevention in high-risk-patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). AF is also a risk for dementia, and effective OAC reduces the risk of dementia. Up to 30% of patients with AF have a coronary artery disease and antiplatelets are used to avoid thrombotic complications. Patients with AF often have an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and undergo a percutaneous intervention with stent-implantation. These patients require a triple therapy, i.e. the combination of OAC with dual-antiplatelet therapy. It is obvious that OAC may induce bleeding with potentially deleterious effects on mortality. Even the occurrence of minor bleeding is problematic. The review describes available data on used anti-thromboembolic regimens in patients treated with OAC (vitamin K antagonists and non-vitamin K antagonists) who need a triple therapy (i.e. anticoagulation and antiplatelets). Most data are from patients who were treated for an ACS and cannot be directly extrapolated for patients with AF. The impact of used stents and novel P2Y12 antagonist-antiplatelets and duration of triple therapy is discussed. Often some high-risk patients with AF would need anticoagulation but cannot be given this therapy be-cause of excessive bleeding risks or contraindicating comorbidities: in these patients left atrial appendage closure with an occluding device can be used as an alternative to anti-thromboem-bolic therapy. The unavoidable anti-thromboembolic triple therapy carries a strong potential for bleeding events, which increase mortality. We have many data and several recommendations are offered. Nonetheless, we lack solid data on the best anti-thromboembolic regimen in patients with AF who need anticoagulation and antiplatelets. PMID:26779967

  6. Gravitational collapse in anti de Sitter space

    SciTech Connect

    Garfinkle, David

    2004-11-15

    A numerical and analytic treatment is presented here of the evolution of initial data of the kind that was conjectured by Hertog, Horowitz and Maeda to lead to a violation of cosmic censorship. That initial data is essentially a thick domain wall connecting two regions of anti de Sitter space. The evolution results in no violation of cosmic censorship, but rather the formation of a small black hole.

  7. Artemisinins: pharmacological actions beyond anti-malarial.

    PubMed

    Ho, Wanxing Eugene; Peh, Hong Yong; Chan, Tze Khee; Wong, W S Fred

    2014-04-01

    Artemisinins are a family of sesquiterpene trioxane lactone anti-malarial agents originally derived from Artemisia annua L. The anti-malarial action of artemisinins involves the formation of free radicals via cleavage of the endoperoxide bond in its structure, which mediate eradication of the Plasmodium species. With its established safety record in millions of malarial patients, artemisinins are also being investigated in diseases like infections, cancers and inflammation. Artemisinins have been reported to possess robust inhibitory effects against viruses (e.g. Human cytomegalovirus), protozoa (e.g. Toxoplasma gondii), helminths (e.g. Schistosoma species and Fasciola hepatica) and fungi (e.g. Cryptococcus neoformans). Artemisinins have demonstrated cytotoxic effects against a variety of cancer cells by inducing cell cycle arrest, promoting apoptosis, preventing angiogenesis, and abrogating cancer invasion and metastasis. Artemisinins have been evaluated in animal models of autoimmune diseases, allergic disorders and septic inflammation. The anti-inflammatory effects of artemisinins have been attributed to the inhibition of Toll-like receptors, Syk tyrosine kinase, phospholipase Cγ, PI3K/Akt, MAPK, STAT-1/3/5, NF-κB, Sp1 and Nrf2/ARE signaling pathways. This review provides a comprehensive update on non-malarial use of artemisinins, modes of action of artemisinins in different disease conditions, and drug development of artemisinins beyond anti-malarial. With the concerted efforts in the novel synthesis of artemisinin analogs and clinical pharmacology of artemisinins, it is likely that artemisinin drugs will become a major armamentarium combating a variety of human diseases beyond malaria. PMID:24316259

  8. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperlipidemic activities of Commiphora molmol extract (Myrrh)

    PubMed Central

    Shalaby, Mostafa Abbas; Hammouda, Ashraf Abd-Elkhalik

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to evaluate the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-hyperlipidemic activities of Commiphora molmol extract (CME) and its effects on body weight and blood lipids. Materials and Methods: The analgesic effect was assessed using thermal (hot plate test) and chemical (writhing test) stimuli to induce central and peripheral pain in mice. The anti-inflammatory activity was determined using formalin-induced paw edema in rats. For anti-hyperlipidemic effect, 25 rats were randomly divided into five groups (n = 5). Group 1 was fed on basal diet (normal control), while the other four groups were fed on high-fat diet for 6 weeks to induce obesity and hyperlipidemia. Thereafter, Group 2 was kept obese hyperlipidemic, and Groups 3, 4 and 5 were orally given CME in doses of 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg for 6 weeks, respectively. Body weight gains of rats were calculated, and blood samples were collected for analysis of blood lipids. Results: CME produced a dose-dependent analgesic effect using both hot plate and writhing tests in mice. The hot plate method appeared to be more sensitive than writhing test. CME exhibited an anti-inflammatory activity as it decreased volume of paw edema induced by formalin in rats. The extract decreased body weight gain; normalized the high levels of blood lipids and decreased atherogenic index low-density lipoprotein/ high-density lipoprotein in obese hyperlipidemic rats. Conclusion: The results denote that C. molmol extract (myrrh) has significant analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperlipidemic effects and reduces body weight gain and improves blood lipids profile. These results affirm the traditional use of C. molmol for the treatment of pain, inflammations, and hyperlipidemia. PMID:26401348

  9. ICAO's anti-SARS airport activities.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Silvio; Curdt-Christiansen, Claus M

    2003-11-01

    To prevent SARS from spreading through air travel and in order to rebuild the confidence of the traveling public in the safety of air travel, ICAO has set up an "Anti-SARS Airport Evaluation Project." The first phase of this project was to develop a set of protective measures for international airports in affected areas to adopt and implement and then to send out, on the request of Contracting States, a team of inspectors to evaluate and assess airports and issue a "statement of evaluation" that the airport inspected complies with the ICAO anti-SARS protective measures. In cooperation with the World Health Organization (WHO), the first part of phase 1 was completed in early June this year, and the second part of phase 1 followed soon after. By mid-July, five international airports in Southeast Asia had been inspected and found to be in full compliance with the ICAO anti-SARS protective measures. The success of this ICAO project is believed to have contributed significantly to the recovery of international air travel and related industries now taking place. Phase 2 of the project is now being developed. It is aimed at preventing a resurgence of SARS, but it also contains elements to make the methodology developed applicable to future outbreaks of any other communicable disease in which the mode of transmission could involve aviation and/or the need to prevent the spread of the disease by air travel.

  10. Talking back to the anti-nukes

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, H.

    1980-01-28

    When Jane Fonda and Tom Hayden were in their recent 52-city anti-nuclear roadshow, two quiet-spoken nuclear engineers dogged their steps, correcting their misstatements and challenging them to debate. If the truth squad does not appear on the same program with the anti-nuclear team, they are given equal time for rebuttals later. One specific tactic is to expose the anti-nuclear's side of its ability to offer alternatives for the nation's power needs that are more cost-effective, and that involve less risk to human life and the environment. The opposition to nuclear power has never quantified what the health effects are and what the costs would be of the alternatives for providing the electricity we need in this country. Gus Taylor, a member of the Campus America nuclear industry team, says this is not being honest with the public. The Campus America group stresses that there is not such a thing as riskless energy, but that there have been no deaths from nuclear radiation in power plant operation. When the issue of waste disposal is debated, the nuclear industry people counter that 16 Federal agencies are bickering over 23 scientifically feasible options for disposing of the waste. Attitudes before and after Three Mile Island are reviewed. (MCW)

  11. Standardization of anti-DNA antibody assays.

    PubMed

    Pisetsky, David S

    2013-07-01

    Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus and represent important biomarkers for clinical and research purposes. These antibodies are part of a family of antibodies to nucleosomes and bind to conserved sites widely present on DNA. While the value of anti-DNA as a biomarker is well established, the assay for these antibodies has involved a variety of DNA sources and systems to detect DNA-anti-DNA interactions. The influence of these variations on antibody detection has complicated assay standardization. As an antigen, DNA has unique features since it is a highly charged polymer that has structural heterogeneity. This heterogeneity can affect antigenicity which can vary on the basis of DNA origin, size, conformation and mobility. In addition, as a polymer, DNA can promote patterns of antibody binding based on monogamous or bivalent interaction which require an extended polynucleotide structure. Understanding the nature of DNA as an antigen can facilitate interpretation of serological tests and underpin efforts at better standardization.

  12. Anti-cancer agents counteracting tumor glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Granchi, Carlotta

    2012-01-01

    Can we consider cancer as a “metabolic disease”? Tumors are the result of a metabolic selection, forming tissues composed of heterogeneous cells that generally express an overactive metabolism as a common feature. In fact, cancer cells have to deal with increased needs for both energy and biosynthetic intermediates, in order to support their growth and invasiveness. However, their high proliferation rate often generates regions that are not sufficiently oxygenated. Therefore, their carbohydrate metabolism has to rely mostly on a glycolytic process that is uncoupled from oxidative phosphorylation. This metabolic switch, also known as the “Warburg Effect”, constitutes a fundamental adaptation of the tumor cells to a relatively hostile environment, and supports the evolution of aggressive and metastatic phenotypes. As a result, tumor glycolysis may constitute an attractive target for cancer therapy. This approach has often raised concerns that anti-glycolytic agents may cause serious side effects on normal cells. Actually, the key for a selective action against cancer cells can be found in their hyperbolic addiction to glycolysis, which may be exploited to generate new anti-cancer drugs showing minimal toxicity. In fact, there is growing evidence that supports many glycolytic enzymes and transporters as suitable candidate targets for cancer therapy. Herein we review some of the most relevant anti-glycolytic agents that have been investigated so far for the treatment of cancer. PMID:22684868

  13. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Selected Dihydroxyflavones

    PubMed Central

    Sangeetha, K.S.Sridevi

    2015-01-01

    Background The mechanism of inflammation is attributed, to release of reactive oxygen species from activated neutrophils and macrophages. Over production of reactive oxygen species may result in tissue injury by damaging macromolecules. Flavones are the polyphenolic compounds with antioxidant property. This antioxidant property of flavones may have beneficial effect against inflammation. Aim To study the anti-inflammatory effect of selected dihydroxyflavones (DHF) in albino rats. The prime objective of the present study is to identify safe and effective agents to treat inflammation from among the selected DHF group of compounds. Materials and Methods The present study was designed to investigate the anti-inflammatory action of four selected dihydroxyflavone derivatives; 2’,3’- dihydroxyflavone and 2’, 4’ -dihydroxyflavones, 5, 3’- dihydroxyflavone and 7, 3’ dihydroxyflavone. The anti-inflammatory activity of selected DHF was studied in rats by carrageenan induced hind paw oedema method. Results All the selected dihydroxyflavone derivatives showed dose and time dependent inhibition of carrageenan induced paw oedema. PMID:26155493

  14. Overlapping demyelinating syndromes and anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Titulaer, Maarten J.; Höftberger, Romana; Iizuka, Takahiro; Leypoldt, Frank; McCracken, Lindsey; Cellucci, Tania; Benson, Leslie A.; Shu, Huidy; Irioka, Takashi; Hirano, Makito; Singh, Gagandeep; Calvo, Alvaro Cobo; Kaida, Kenichi; Morales, Pamela S.; Wirtz, Paul W.; Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Reindl, Markus; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.; Graus, Francesc; Saiz, Albert; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report the clinical, radiological, and immunological association of demyelinating disorders with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis. Methods Clinical and radiological analysis of a cohort of 691 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Determination of antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) was performed using brain immunohistochemistry and cell-based assays. Results Twenty-three of 691 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis had prominent MRI and/or clinical features of demyelination. Group 1 included 12 patients in whom anti-NMDAR encephalitis was preceded or followed by independent episodes of NMO-spectrum disorder (5 cases, 4 anti-AQP4-positive), or brainstem or multifocal demyelinating syndromes (7 cases, all anti-MOG-positive). Group 2 included 11 patients in whom anti-NMDAR encephalitis occurred simultaneously with MRI and symptoms compatible with demyelination (5 AQ4-positive, 2 MOG-positive). Group 3 (136 controls) included 50 randomly selected patients with typical anti-NMDAR encephalitis, 56 with NMO, and 30 with multiple sclerosis: NMDAR-antibodies were detected only in the 50 anti-NMDAR patients, MOG-antibodies in 3/50 anti-NMDAR and 1/56 NMO patients, and AQP4-antibodies in 48/56 NMO and 1/50 anti-NMDAR patients (p<0.0001 for all comparisons with Groups 1 and 2). Most patients improved with immunotherapy, but compared with anti-NMDAR encephalitis the demyelinating episodes required more intensive therapy and resulted in more residual deficits. Only 1/23 NMDAR patients with signs of demyelination had ovarian teratoma compared with 18/50 anti-NMDAR controls (p=0.011) Interpretation Patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis may develop concurrent or separate episodes of demyelinating disorders, and conversely patients with NMO or demyelinating disorders with atypical symptoms (e.g., dyskinesias, psychosis) may have anti-NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:24700511

  15. [The anti-pyretic mechanism of alminoprofen].

    PubMed

    Maeda, E; Uematsu, T

    1991-12-01

    The anti-pyretic activity of alminoprofen (AP), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent, and its mode of action were investigated in conscious febrile rabbits. A fever was evoked by i.v. injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), intracisternal (i.c.) injection of leukocytic pyrogen (LP) or i.c. injection of arachidonic acid (AA). The amount of PGE2 or AP in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after i.v. LPS was estimated using an RIA or HPLC method. AP (3-30 mg/kg, p.o.) dose-dependently inhibited the LPS (0.5 micrograms/kg, i.v.)-induced fever; AP, ibuprofen, indomethacin and pranoprofen had ED50 values of 9.64, 26.45, 4.41 and 11.91 mg/kg, p.o., respectively. PGE2 in the CSF was markedly increased during the elevation of body temperature after i.v. LPS (0.5 microgram/kg). AP (30 mg/kg, p.o.) markedly inhibited the increase in PGE2 that was observed in the CSF during fever developed in response to i.v. LPS (0.5 micrograms/kg). The AP concentration in the CSF 2 hr after AP (30 mg/kg, p.o.) was 2.86 x 10(-6) (1.15-4.57 x 10(-6) M, a concentration too low to inhibit PG synthesis. A dose-dependent fever was observed after i.c. LP (1-8 unit) or AA (10-100 micrograms). AP (30 mg/kg, p.o.) shifted the dose-response curves for the i.c. LP-induced fever to the right, but did not have any effect on the i.c. AA-induced fever. These results suggest that AP has a relatively potent anti-pyretic activity, and its mechanism of action involves competition with LP at a site in the CNS, but does not involve an inhibition of cyclooxygenase at a central site, which has been considered as an anti-pyretic mechanism of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:1783327

  16. Chemical composition, antioxidant, anti-elastase, and anti-inflammatory activities of Illicium anisatum essential oil.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Sang-Suk; Oh, Tae-Heon; Baik, Jong Seok; Song, Gwanpil; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Chang-Gu

    2009-09-01

    The essential oil of air-dried Illicium anisatum (Illiciaceae), obtained by hydrodistillation was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Fifty-two components were identified in the essential oil and the main component was eucalyptol (21.8 %). The antioxidant and anti-elastase activities of the essential oil were also investigated; the essential oil exhibited moderate DPPH scavenging and anti-elastase activities. To clarify the mechanism of the anti-inflammatory activities of I. anisatum essential oil (IAE), we evaluated whether it could modulate the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) by activated macrophages. The results indicate that IAE is an effective inhibitor of LPS-induced NO and PGE2 production in RAW 264.7 cells. These inhibitory activities were accompanied by dose-dependent decreases in the expression of iNOS and COX-2 proteins and iNOS and COX-2 mRNA. In order to determine whether IAE can be safely applied to human skin, the cytotoxic effects of IAE were determined by colorimetric MTT assays in human dermal fibroblast and keratinocyte HaCaT cells. IAE exhibited low cytotoxicity at 100 microg mL-1. Based on these results, we suggest that IAE may be considered an anti-aging and anti-inflammatory candidate for cosmetic materials, but additional in vitro and in vivo tests have to be performed to prove its safety and efficacy.

  17. Anti-Candida and anti-Cryptococcus antifungal produced by marine microorganisms.

    PubMed

    El Amraoui, B; El Amraoui, M; Cohen, N; Fassouane, A

    2014-12-01

    In order to search for antifungal from biological origin, we performed a screening of marine microorganisms isolated from seawater, seaweed, sediment and marine invertebrates collected from different coastal areas of the Moroccan Atlantic Ocean. The antifungal activities of these isolates were investigated against the pathogenic yeasts involved in medical mycology. Whole cultures of 34 marine microorganisms were screened for antifungal activities using the method of agar diffusion against four yeasts. The results showed that among the 34 isolates studied, 13 (38%) strains have antifungal activity against at least one out of four yeast species, 11 isolates have anti-Candida albicans CIP 48.72 activity, 12 isolates have anti-C. albicans CIP 884.65 activity, 13 isolates have anti-Cryptococcus neoformans activity and only 6 isolates are actives against Candida tropicalis R2 resistant to nystatin and amphotericin B. Nine isolates showed strong fungicidal activity. Fourteen microorganisms were identified and assigned to the genera Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Alcaligenes, Bacillus, Chromobacterium, Enterococcus, Pantoea, and Pseudomonas. Due to a competitive role for space and nutrient, the marine microorganisms could produce more antimicrobials; therefore these marine microorganisms were expected to be potential resources of natural products such as those we research: anti-Candida and anti-Cryptococcus fungicides.

  18. Anti-tubulin drugs conjugated to anti-ErbB antibodies selectively radiosensitize

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Stephen R.; Yang, Howard C.; Savariar, Elamprakash N.; Aguilera, Joe; Crisp, Jessica L.; Jones, Karra A.; Whitney, Michael A.; Lippman, Scott M.; Cohen, Ezra E. W.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Advani, Sunil J.

    2016-01-01

    Tumour resistance to radiotherapy remains a barrier to improving cancer patient outcomes. To overcome radioresistance, certain drugs have been found to sensitize cells to ionizing radiation (IR). In theory, more potent radiosensitizing drugs should increase tumour kill and improve patient outcomes. In practice, clinical utility of potent radiosensitizing drugs is curtailed by off-target side effects. Here we report potent anti-tubulin drugs conjugated to anti-ErbB antibodies selectively radiosensitize to tumours based on surface receptor expression. While two classes of potent anti-tubulins, auristatins and maytansinoids, indiscriminately radiosensitize tumour cells, conjugating these potent anti-tubulins to anti-ErbB antibodies restrict their radiosensitizing capacity. Of translational significance, we report that a clinically used maytansinoid ADC, ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), with IR prolongs tumour control in target expressing HER2+ tumours but not target negative tumours. In contrast to ErbB signal inhibition, our findings establish an alternative therapeutic paradigm for ErbB-based radiosensitization using antibodies to restrict radiosensitizer delivery. PMID:27698471

  19. Nobiletin ameliorates cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury due to its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects.

    PubMed

    Malik, Salma; Bhatia, Jagriti; Suchal, Kapil; Gamad, Nanda; Dinda, Amit Kumar; Gupta, Yogender Kumar; Arya, Dharamvir Singh

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is an effective anti-cancer drug which causes remarkable toxicity to kidney by generating reactive oxygen species and by stimulating inflammatory and apoptotic pathway. Citrus flavonoid, like nobiletin has been reported to possess anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties. Hence, the present study was aimed to evaluate these properties of nobiletin, a polymethoxy flavone in cisplatin-induced acute renal injury. Adult male albino Wistar rats were divided into 6 groups. Nobiletin was administered at the dose of 1.25, 2.5 and 5mg/kg for a period of 10 days. On 7th day, a single injection of cisplatin (8 mg/kg) was injected to rats. Cisplatin administration resulted in renal dysfunction as evident by increase in serum creatinine and BUN levels. Oxidative stress in cisplatin group was reflected by increase in MDA level, and depletion of anti-oxidants such as glutathione, superoxide dismutase and catalase in renal tissue. Furthermore, cisplatin increased the expressions of Bax, caspase-3 and DNA damage along with decreased expression of Bcl-2 in the renal tissue. Histological analysis also revealed acute tubular necrosis. However, pretreatment with nobiletin preserved renal function and restored anti-oxidant status. Nobiletin supplementation inhibited activation of apoptotic pathways and DNA damage. It also attenuated tubular injury histologically. Collectively, the result of this study suggests the nephroprotective potential of nobiletin which may be related to its anti-oxidant, anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects.

  20. Hidden anti-double stranded DNA antibodies in autoimmune mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fish, F; Ziff, M

    1982-01-01

    When MRL/l mouse spleen cell culture supernatants were incubated with normal mouse spleen cells, a two-50-fold increase in anti-dsDNA activity was noted. A smaller increase in anti-ssDNA and no change in anti-TNP antibody activity were observed. This 'hidden' antibody in the MRL/l supernatants could not be revealed by DNAse digestion and could not be absorbed by a DNA cellulose column. Hidden antibody was removed from supernatants by sepharose-anti Ig. After DNAase digestion of the MRL/l supernatants, hidden anti-dsDNA could not be revealed by incubation with spleen cells. All the hidden activity was excluded by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300 (mol. wt greater than 300,000) but was banded in the low density protein area of caesium chloride equilibrium density gradients. It was also noted that MRL/l mouse sera had hidden anti-dsDNA antibodies. Hidden antibodies were present in both the IgG and IgM classes. The revealed antibodies demonstrated impaired ability to bind Fc specific anti-Ig reagents suggesting that they were partially degraded during the incubation with mouse spleen cells. The hidden anti-dsDNA thus appears to represent a DNA-anti-dsDNA complex, perhaps of very high affinity. It may explain why anti-dsDNA but not anti-ssDNA antibodies are of pathological importance in SLE. PMID:6756722

  1. No evidence for an independent role of anti-heparan sulphate reactivity apart from anti-DNA in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Hylkema, M N; Zwet, I V; Kramers, C; Van Bruggen, M C; Swaak, A J; Berden, J H; Smeenk, R J

    1995-01-01

    The presence of anti-heparan sulphate (HS) reactivity in serum is closely related to the occurrence of nephritis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Since patients with lupus nephritis in general also have high titres of anti-DNA antibodies, we wanted to clarify the relationship between anti-HS and anti-DNA reactivity in serum. Therefore, we studied longitudinally six patients with lupus nephritis who experienced 12 exacerbations of their disease, and five SLE patients without nephritis experiencing 10 periods of non-renal disease exacerbations. In addition, we tested single serum samples of another 24 patients obtained during a renal disease exacerbation and 22 sera of patients without nephritis. The sera of all patients were tested for anti-DNA (Farr assay) and anti-HS reactivity (ELISA). We confirmed that SLE patients during renal exacerbations have a significantly higher anti-HS reactivity than patients without nephritis (P < 0.003). In addition, patients with nephritis also had higher titres of anti-DNA antibodies during renal exacerbations than during non-renal exacerbations (P < 0.01). A correlation between anti-DNA and anti-HS reactivity was observed (r = 0.40, P < 0.02), which in itself explains the correlation between nephritis and anti-HS reactivity. Comparing sera from nephritis and non-nephritis patients matched for anti-DNA titre, we found no difference in anti-HS reactivity, and therefore must conclude that the anti-HS reactivity is a direct reflection of anti-DNA reactivity. PMID:7621592

  2. 'Medusa-head ataxia': the expanding spectrum of Purkinje cell antibodies in autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. Part 1: Anti-mGluR1, anti-Homer-3, anti-Sj/ITPR1 and anti-CARP VIII.

    PubMed

    Jarius, S; Wildemann, B

    2015-01-01

    Serological testing for anti-neural autoantibodies is important in patients presenting with idiopathic cerebellar ataxia, since these autoantibodies may indicate cancer, determine treatment and predict prognosis. While some of them target nuclear antigens present in all or most CNS neurons (e.g. anti-Hu, anti-Ri), others more specifically target antigens present in the cytoplasm or plasma membrane of Purkinje cells (PC). In this series of articles, we provide a detailed review of the clinical and paraclinical features, oncological, therapeutic and prognostic implications, pathogenetic relevance, and differential laboratory diagnosis of the 12 most common PC autoantibodies (often referred to as 'Medusa-head antibodies' due to their characteristic somatodendritic binding pattern when tested by immunohistochemistry). To assist immunologists and neurologists in diagnosing these disorders, typical high-resolution immunohistochemical images of all 12 reactivities are presented, diagnostic pitfalls discussed and all currently available assays reviewed. Of note, most of these antibodies target antigens involved in the mGluR1/calcium pathway essential for PC function and survival. Many of the antigens also play a role in spinocerebellar ataxia. Part 1 focuses on anti-metabotropic glutamate receptor 1-, anti-Homer protein homolog 3-, anti-Sj/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor- and anti-carbonic anhydrase-related protein VIII-associated autoimmune cerebellar ataxia (ACA); part 2 covers anti-protein kinase C gamma-, anti-glutamate receptor delta-2-, anti-Ca/RhoGTPase-activating protein 26- and anti-voltage-gated calcium channel-associated ACA; and part 3 reviews the current knowledge on anti-Tr/delta notch-like epidermal growth factor-related receptor-, anti-Nb/AP3B2-, anti-Yo/cerebellar degeneration-related protein 2- and Purkinje cell antibody 2-associated ACA, discusses differential diagnostic aspects and provides a summary and outlook. PMID:26377085

  3. 'Medusa-head ataxia': the expanding spectrum of Purkinje cell antibodies in autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. Part 1: Anti-mGluR1, anti-Homer-3, anti-Sj/ITPR1 and anti-CARP VIII.

    PubMed

    Jarius, S; Wildemann, B

    2015-09-17

    Serological testing for anti-neural autoantibodies is important in patients presenting with idiopathic cerebellar ataxia, since these autoantibodies may indicate cancer, determine treatment and predict prognosis. While some of them target nuclear antigens present in all or most CNS neurons (e.g. anti-Hu, anti-Ri), others more specifically target antigens present in the cytoplasm or plasma membrane of Purkinje cells (PC). In this series of articles, we provide a detailed review of the clinical and paraclinical features, oncological, therapeutic and prognostic implications, pathogenetic relevance, and differential laboratory diagnosis of the 12 most common PC autoantibodies (often referred to as 'Medusa-head antibodies' due to their characteristic somatodendritic binding pattern when tested by immunohistochemistry). To assist immunologists and neurologists in diagnosing these disorders, typical high-resolution immunohistochemical images of all 12 reactivities are presented, diagnostic pitfalls discussed and all currently available assays reviewed. Of note, most of these antibodies target antigens involved in the mGluR1/calcium pathway essential for PC function and survival. Many of the antigens also play a role in spinocerebellar ataxia. Part 1 focuses on anti-metabotropic glutamate receptor 1-, anti-Homer protein homolog 3-, anti-Sj/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor- and anti-carbonic anhydrase-related protein VIII-associated autoimmune cerebellar ataxia (ACA); part 2 covers anti-protein kinase C gamma-, anti-glutamate receptor delta-2-, anti-Ca/RhoGTPase-activating protein 26- and anti-voltage-gated calcium channel-associated ACA; and part 3 reviews the current knowledge on anti-Tr/delta notch-like epidermal growth factor-related receptor-, anti-Nb/AP3B2-, anti-Yo/cerebellar degeneration-related protein 2- and Purkinje cell antibody 2-associated ACA, discusses differential diagnostic aspects and provides a summary and outlook.

  4. 'Medusa head ataxia': the expanding spectrum of Purkinje cell antibodies in autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. Part 2: Anti-PKC-gamma, anti-GluR-delta2, anti-Ca/ARHGAP26 and anti-VGCC.

    PubMed

    Jarius, S; Wildemann, B

    2015-09-17

    Serological testing for anti-neural autoantibodies is important in patients presenting with idiopathic cerebellar ataxia, since these autoantibodies may indicate cancer, determine treatment and predict prognosis. While some of them target nuclear antigens present in all or most CNS neurons (e.g. anti-Hu, anti-Ri), others more specifically target antigens present in the cytoplasm or plasma membrane of Purkinje cells (PC). In this series of articles, we provide a detailed review of the clinical and paraclinical features, oncological, therapeutic and prognostic implications, pathogenetic relevance, and differential laboratory diagnosis of the 12 most common PC autoantibodies (often referred to as 'Medusa head antibodies' due their characteristic somatodendritic binding pattern when tested by immunohistochemistry). To assist immunologists and neurologists in diagnosing these disorders, typical high-resolution immunohistochemical images of all 12 reactivities are presented, diagnostic pitfalls discussed and all currently available assays reviewed. Of note, most of these antibodies target antigens involved in the mGluR1/calcium pathway essential for PC function and survival. Many of the antigens also play a role in spinocerebellar ataxia. Part 1 focuses on anti-metabotropic glutamate receptor 1-, anti-Homer protein homolog 3-, anti-Sj/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor- and anti-carbonic anhydrase-related protein VIII-associated autoimmune cerebellar ataxia (ACA); part 2 covers anti-protein kinase C gamma-, anti-glutamate receptor delta-2-, anti-Ca/RhoGTPase-activating protein 26- and anti-voltage-gated calcium channel-associated ACA; and part 3 reviews the current knowledge on anti-Tr/delta notch-like epidermal growth factor-related receptor-, anti-Nb/AP3B2-, anti-Yo/cerebellar degeneration-related protein 2- and Purkinje cell antibody 2-associated ACA, discusses differential diagnostic aspects, and provides a summary and outlook.

  5. Heterogeneous clinical spectrum of interstitial lung disease in patients with anti-EJ anti-synthetase syndrome: a case series.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Margherita; Notarnicola, Antonella; Dastmalchi, Maryam; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Iannone, Florenzo

    2016-09-01

    Auto-antibodies against aminoacyl-tRNA-synthetases (anti-ARS Abs) represent the hallmark of the anti-synthetase syndrome that is defined as the clinical association of fever, Raynaud's phenomenon, myositis, interstitial lung disease (ILD), arthritis and mechanic's hands. Recently, differences in clinical features depending on specific anti-ARS Abs have been reported. We describe three cases of anti-EJ (anti-glycyl) antibody-positive patients presenting with ILD as a common feature, but with heterogeneous histopathological and radiographic patterns and with different responses to treatment. Relapsing-remittent fever, refractory muscle involvement and seronegative arthritis were also striking clinical manifestations.

  6. Four dermatomyositis-specific autoantibodies-anti-TIF1γ, anti-NXP2, anti-SAE and anti-MDA5-in adult and juvenile patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies in a Hungarian cohort.

    PubMed

    Bodoki, Levente; Nagy-Vincze, Melinda; Griger, Zoltán; Betteridge, Zoe; Szöllősi, Lászlóné; Dankó, Katalin

    2014-12-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) are chronic systemic autoimmune diseases characterised by symmetrical, proximal muscle weakness. Dermatomyositis represents one subset of IIMs, in which skin rashes are present in addition to muscle weakness. Myositis-specific antibodies can only be detected in myositis, and they are directed against specific proteins found in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus of cells. With this case-based article, we introduce the recently detected anti-TIF1γ, anti-NXP2, anti-SAE and anti-MDA5 antibodies that form various clinical groups. These antibodies could be detected in patients with dermatomyositis. The myositis-specific autoantibodies of three hundred and thirty-seven Hungarian patients with IIM were detected. Retrospective analysis of the clinical findings has also been introduced by revision of the medical history. We had twelve patients with anti-TIF1γ positivity, four patients with anti-NXP2 positivity and four patients with anti-SAE positivity. We did not have any positive anti-MDA5 patients. The most relevant clinical findings were similar to those seen in previously published reports. Eleven of the twelve patients with anti-TIF1γ positivity had classical dermatomyositis. Three of the twelve anti-TIF1γ patients had cancer during the disease progression. This was two out of four for the anti-NXP2 subgroup and one in four for the anti-SAE subgroup. In two juvenile dermatomyositis cases, typical ulceration was seen in patients with anti-TIF1γ positivity. The frequency of pulmonary fibrosis during the disease progression was 2/12, 1/4 and 1/4 in anti-TIF1γ, anti-NXP2 and anti-SAE, respectively. Other extra-muscular manifestations, such as arthralgia, dysphagia, dysphonia and dyspnoea, were also detectable. The myositis subgroups determined by these myositis-specific autoantibodies differ from each other in their symptoms, prognosis and therapy responsiveness. Their detection is helpful for the preparation of an adequate

  7. The gastroprotective effect of menthol: involvement of anti-apoptotic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Rozza, Ariane Leite; Meira de Faria, Felipe; Souza Brito, Alba Regina; Pellizzon, Cláudia Helena

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the anti-apoptotic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of menthol against ethanol-induced gastric ulcers in rats. Wistar rats were orally treated with vehicle, carbenoxolone (100 mg/kg) or menthol (50 mg/kg) and then treated with ethanol to induce gastric ulcers. After euthanasia, stomach samples were prepared for histological slides and biochemical analyses. Immunohistochemical analyses of the cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic heat-shock protein-70 (HSP-70) and the apoptotic Bax protein were performed. The neutrophils were manually counted. The activity of the myeloperoxidase (MPO) was measured. To determine the level of antioxidant functions, the levels of glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase (GR) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured using ELISA. The levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) were assessed using ELISA kits. The menthol treated group presented 92% gastroprotection compared to the vehicle-treated group. An increased immunolabeled area was observed for HSP-70, and a decreased immunolabeled area was observed for the Bax protein in the menthol treated group. Menthol treatment induced a decrease in the activity of MPO and SOD, and the protein levels of GSH, GSH-Px and GR were increased. There was also a decrease in the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 and an increase in the level of IL-10. In conclusion, oral treatment with menthol displayed a gastroprotective activity through anti-apoptotic, antixidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms.

  8. Anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial activity, and cytotoxicity of halloysite surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, José Ascención; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia; Ramírez-Apán, María Teresa

    2013-11-01

    Halloysite is a naturally-occurring nanomaterial occurring in the thousands of tons and that serves as biomaterial, with applications in the areas of biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and medical research. This study reports on the anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic, and anti-oxidant activity of halloysite Jarrahdale (collected at ∼ 45 km SE of Perth, Western Australia; JA), Dragon Mine (provided by Natural Nano Inc., Rochester, New York; NA), and Kalgoorie Archean (collected at Siberia, ∼ 85km NW of Kalgoorlie, West Australia; PA). Prior to biological testing, halloysites were characterized by 27Al and 29Si Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, the anti-inflammatory activity was determined by (a) the mouse ear edema method, using 12-o-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) as anti-inflammatory agent; and (b) the myeloperoxidase enzymatic activity method (MPO). Cell viability was determined using the MTT method. Sample characterization by NMR method showed similar symmetry and atomic environments, with no evidence of distortion(s) due to shiftings in atomic ordering or electron density. The anti-inflammatory activity followed the order: PA>JA>NA, and remained invariant with time. Prolonged anti-inflammatory activity related inversely to surface area and lumen space. The low extent of infiltration at shorter reaction times confirmed a limiting number of active surface sites. EPR intensity signals followed the order: JA>NA>PA. The poor stabilization of RO species in PA suspensions was explained by tube alignment provoking occlusion, thus limiting transfer of H(+) or e(-) from-and-to the surface, and decreases in acidity associated to Al(oct). Cell viability (%) varied from one surface to the other, PA(92.3 ± 6.0), JA(84.9 ± 7.8), and NA(78.0 ± 5.6), but related directly to SBET values. PMID:23907053

  9. The Gastroprotective Effect of Menthol: Involvement of Anti-Apoptotic, Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Rozza, Ariane Leite; Meira de Faria, Felipe; Souza Brito, Alba Regina; Pellizzon, Cláudia Helena

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the anti-apoptotic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of menthol against ethanol-induced gastric ulcers in rats. Wistar rats were orally treated with vehicle, carbenoxolone (100 mg/kg) or menthol (50 mg/kg) and then treated with ethanol to induce gastric ulcers. After euthanasia, stomach samples were prepared for histological slides and biochemical analyses. Immunohistochemical analyses of the cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic heat-shock protein-70 (HSP-70) and the apoptotic Bax protein were performed. The neutrophils were manually counted. The activity of the myeloperoxidase (MPO) was measured. To determine the level of antioxidant functions, the levels of glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase (GR) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured using ELISA. The levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) were assessed using ELISA kits. The menthol treated group presented 92% gastroprotection compared to the vehicle-treated group. An increased immunolabeled area was observed for HSP-70, and a decreased immunolabeled area was observed for the Bax protein in the menthol treated group. Menthol treatment induced a decrease in the activity of MPO and SOD, and the protein levels of GSH, GSH-Px and GR were increased. There was also a decrease in the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 and an increase in the level of IL-10. In conclusion, oral treatment with menthol displayed a gastroprotective activity through anti-apoptotic, antixidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. PMID:24466200

  10. Anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial activity, and cytotoxicity of halloysite surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, José Ascención; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia; Ramírez-Apán, María Teresa

    2013-11-01

    Halloysite is a naturally-occurring nanomaterial occurring in the thousands of tons and that serves as biomaterial, with applications in the areas of biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and medical research. This study reports on the anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic, and anti-oxidant activity of halloysite Jarrahdale (collected at ∼ 45 km SE of Perth, Western Australia; JA), Dragon Mine (provided by Natural Nano Inc., Rochester, New York; NA), and Kalgoorie Archean (collected at Siberia, ∼ 85km NW of Kalgoorlie, West Australia; PA). Prior to biological testing, halloysites were characterized by 27Al and 29Si Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, the anti-inflammatory activity was determined by (a) the mouse ear edema method, using 12-o-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) as anti-inflammatory agent; and (b) the myeloperoxidase enzymatic activity method (MPO). Cell viability was determined using the MTT method. Sample characterization by NMR method showed similar symmetry and atomic environments, with no evidence of distortion(s) due to shiftings in atomic ordering or electron density. The anti-inflammatory activity followed the order: PA>JA>NA, and remained invariant with time. Prolonged anti-inflammatory activity related inversely to surface area and lumen space. The low extent of infiltration at shorter reaction times confirmed a limiting number of active surface sites. EPR intensity signals followed the order: JA>NA>PA. The poor stabilization of RO species in PA suspensions was explained by tube alignment provoking occlusion, thus limiting transfer of H(+) or e(-) from-and-to the surface, and decreases in acidity associated to Al(oct). Cell viability (%) varied from one surface to the other, PA(92.3 ± 6.0), JA(84.9 ± 7.8), and NA(78.0 ± 5.6), but related directly to SBET values.

  11. Gastric anti-ulcerative and anti-inflammatory activity of metyrosine in rats.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Abdulmecit; Polat, Beyzagul; Cadirci, Elif; Hacimuftuoglu, Ahmet; Halici, Zekai; Gulapoglu, Mine; Albayrak, Fatih; Suleyman, Halis

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the anti-inflammatory and anti-ulcerative effects of metyrosine, a selective tyrosine hydroxylase enzyme inhibitor, were investigated in rats. For ulcer experiments, indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer tests and ethanol-induced gastric ulcer tests were used. For these experiments, rats were fasted for 24 h. Different doses of metyrosine and 25 mg/kg doses of ranitidine were administered to rats, followed by indomethacin at 25 mg/kg for the indomethacin-induced ulcer test, or 50% ethanol for the ethanol-induced test. Results have shown that at all of the doses used (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg), metyrosine had significant anti-ulcerative effects in both indomethacin and ethanol-induced ulcer tests. Metyrosine doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg (especially the 200 mg/kg dose) also inhibited carrageenan-induced paw inflammation even more effectively than indomethacin. In addition, to characterize the anti-inflammatory mechanism of metyrosine we investigated its effects on cyclooxygenase (COX) activity in inflammatory tissue (rat paw). The results showed that all doses of metyrosine significantly inhibited high COX-2 activity. The degree of COX-2 inhibition correlated with the increase in anti-inflammatory activity. In conclusion, we found that metyrosine has more anti-inflammatory effects than indomethacin and that these effects can be attributed to the selective inhibition of COX-2 enzymes by metyrosine. We also found that adrenalin levels are reduced upon metyrosine treatment, which may be the cause of the observed gastro-protective effects of this compound.

  12. PTU-associated cutaneous vasculitis with ANCA anti-MPO and anti-PR3 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, E M G; Hartkamp, A; Kaasjager, H A H

    2003-09-01

    A 36-year-old woman presented at our clinic with symmetrical, tender, palpable purpuric lesions on her lower legs and buttocks after restarting PTU therapy for relapsing Graves' disease. PTU-induced vasculitis was diagnosed with remarkable ANCA anti-MPO and anti-PR3 antibody positivity. The purpuric skin lesions resolved immediately after discontinuation of the drug and the ANCA titres lowered. In the presence of activated neutrophils, PTU could induce a high cytotoxity and injure the vessel walls. Treatment of choice is discontinuation of the drug. Sometimes more aggressive therapy as cyclophosphamide or plasmapheresis is warranted.

  13. Anti-reflective and anti-soiling coatings for self-cleaning properties

    DOEpatents

    Brophy, Brenor L.; Nair, Vinod; Dave, Bakul Champaklal

    2016-05-31

    The disclosure discloses abrasion resistant, persistently hydrophobic and oleophobic, anti-reflective and anti-soiling coatings for glass. The coatings described herein have wide application, including for example the front cover glass of solar modules. Methods of applying the coatings using various apparatus are disclosed. Methods for using the coatings in solar energy generation plants to achieve greater energy yield and reduced operations costs are disclosed. Coating materials are formed by combinations of hydrolyzed silane-base precursors through sol-gel processes. Several methods of synthesis and formulation of coating materials are disclosed.

  14. Comparison of pulmonary involvement between patients expressing anti-PL-7 and anti-Jo-1 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tomonaga, Masaomi; Sakamoto, Noriho; Ishimatsu, Yuji; Kakugawa, Tomoyuki; Harada, Tatsuhiko; Nakashima, Shota; Hara, Atsuko; Hara, Shintaro; Horai, Yoshihiro; Kawakami, Atsushi; Mukae, Hiroshi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2015-02-01

    Anti-PL-7 is an anti-tRNA synthetase antibody, and interstitial lung disease (ILD) is the most frequent complication of anti-PL-7-associated antisynthetase syndrome. However, the features of ILD have not been fully elucidated. The present study retrospectively compares 7 and 15 patients who were positive for anti-PL-7 and anti-Jo-1 antibodies, respectively. The features of ILD did not significantly differ between the two groups, but the ratio of lymphocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was higher in the Jo-1 than in the PL-7 group. High-resolution computed tomography revealed nonspecific interstitial pneumonia in all patients in the PL-7 group and organizing pneumonia in four of the 15 patients in the Jo-1 group. These findings suggest that pulmonary complications slightly differ between patients expressing anti-PL-7 and anti-Jo-1 antibodies. Further studies are required to clarify the features of ILD associated with PL-7.

  15. Nano-curcumin prepared via supercritical: Improved anti-bacterial, anti-oxidant and anti-cancer efficacy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Maobin; Fan, Dejun; Zhao, Zheng; Li, Zhi; Li, Gang; Chen, Yufeng; He, Xiaowen; Chen, Aizheng; Li, Jiashen; Lin, Xiaofen; Zhi, Min; Li, Yi; Lan, Ping

    2015-12-30

    Curcumin (CM) possesses multiple biological activities. However, poor water solubility and low bioavailability limit its application in biomedical fields. CM nanoparticles (NPs) (230-240nm) were prepared by solution-enhanced dispersion via supercritical CO2 (SEDS) (22-22.5MPa pressure, 31-32.5°C temperature) and its biological functions were evaluated in this study. The Minimum inhibitory concentration of CM NPs against S. aureus (∼250μg/mL) was lower than CM-DMSO (∼500μg/mL). Meanwhile, CM NPs showed effective anti-oxidant ability at a concentration raging from 125 to 2000μg/mL. CM NPs showed time-dependent intracellular internalization ability, resulting in an enhanced anti-cancer effect on colorectal cancer cells (HCT116), and the mechanism could be explained by cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase associated with inducing apoptotic cells. Moreover, CM NPs exhibited reduced cytotoxicity on normal cells (NCM460) compared to CM-DMSO and 5-Fu. In conclusion, CM NPs prepared via SEDS showed potentials in biomedical applications.

  16. Optical "anti-transient" detected by MASTER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisenko, D.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Lipunov, V.; Balanutsa, P.; Yecheistov, V.; Tiurina, N.; Kornilov, V.; Belinski, A.; Shatskiy, N.; Chazov, V.; Kuznetsov, A.; Zimnukhov, D.; Krushinsky, V.; Zalozhnih, I.; Popov, A.; Bourdanov, A.; Punanova, A.; Ivanov, K.; Yazev, S.; Budnev, N.; Konstantinov, E.; Chuvalaev, O.; Poleshchuk, V.; Gress, O.; Parkhomenko, A.; Tlatov, A.; Dormidontov, D.; Senik, V.; Yurkov, V.; Sergienko, Y.; Varda, D.; Sinyakov, E.; Shurpakov, S.; Shumkov, V.; Podvorotny, P.; Levato, H.; Saffe, C.; Mallamaci, C.; Lopez, C.; Podest, F.

    2013-02-01

    We have started the search for the disappearing stars (optical "anti-transients", OATs) in the MASTER database. The first result is the detection of a deep (~3.5 magnitudes) fading of the bright star TYC 2505-672-1 whose variability was previously unknown. This star has the coordinates 09 53 10.00 +33 53 52.7 and magnitudes V=10.71, B=12.51 in Tycho2 catalogue and J=7.61, H=6.78, K=6.57 in 2MASS.

  17. Extended moment arm anti-spin device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, R. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A device which corrects aerodynamic spin is provided in which a collapsible boom extends an aircraft moment arm and an anti-spin parachute force is exerted upon the end of the moment arm to correct intentional or inadvertent aerodynamic spin. This configuration effects spin recovery by means of a parachute whose required diameter decreases as an inverse function of the increasing length of the moment arm. The collapsible boom enables the parachute to avoid the aircraft wake without mechanical assistance, retracts to permit steep takeoff, and permits a parachute to correct spin while minimizing associated aerodynamic, structural and in-flight complications.

  18. Anti-reverse siphon solar heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Larkin, W. J.

    1985-05-28

    A solar heater which is adapted for liquid heating and space heating, or both, utilizes a passive anti-reverse siphon concept in which fresh air or water is required to traverse upwardly along a passageway and then descend along a descending passageway insulated from the ascending passageway before it enters the solar heating chamber, with the result that the pressure heads generated in the ascending and descending passageways and the heating chamber offset one another such that forward, passive solar heating convection occurs, but in the evening when the heating chamber becomes cool, the normal reverse convection that occurs in passive units is stopped.

  19. Erdosteine: antitussive and anti-inflammatory effects.

    PubMed

    Dal Negro, Roberto W

    2008-01-01

    Erdosteine is a multifactorial drug currently used in COPD for its rheologic activity on bronchial secretions and its positive effects on bacterial adhesiveness. Erdosteine produces an active metabolite (Met 1) which was shown to produce antioxidant effects during the respiratory burst of human PMNs, due to the presence of an SH group. The substantial antitussive effects of erdosteine were first documented in clinical trials even though mucolytic agents are regarded as not consistently effective in ameliorating cough in patients with bronchitis, although they may be of benefit to this population in other ways. Actually, a mucolytic drug could exert antitussive effects if it also affects mucus consistency and enhances ciliary function. In the last decade, data from several studies on animal models pointed to the possible antitussive and anti-inflammatory properties of erdosteine and an indirect anti-inflammatory mechanism of action was suggested. Recently, data from some controlled versus placebo studies documented the antioxidant properties of erdosteine in humans and in current smokers with COPD. The mechanism of action was described as related to erdosteine's ability to inhibit some inflammatory mediators and some pro-inflammatory cytokines that are specifically involved in oxidative stress. As oxidative stress is also presumed to impair beta-adrenoceptor function and contribute to airway obstruction, specific controlled studies recently investigated the effect of antioxidant intervention on short-term airway response to salbutamol in nonreversible COPD, according to a double-blind design versus placebo and NAC. Only erdosteine consistently restored a significant short-term reversibility in COPD subjects, previously unresponsive to beta(2) adrenergics. This peculiar activity of erdosteine (to our knowledge never previously assessed) proved related to the ROS scavenging activity (which actually proved equal to that of N), and its significant inhibiting effect on

  20. Erdosteine: antitussive and anti-inflammatory effects.

    PubMed

    Dal Negro, Roberto W

    2008-01-01

    Erdosteine is a multifactorial drug currently used in COPD for its rheologic activity on bronchial secretions and its positive effects on bacterial adhesiveness. Erdosteine produces an active metabolite (Met 1) which was shown to produce antioxidant effects during the respiratory burst of human PMNs, due to the presence of an SH group. The substantial antitussive effects of erdosteine were first documented in clinical trials even though mucolytic agents are regarded as not consistently effective in ameliorating cough in patients with bronchitis, although they may be of benefit to this population in other ways. Actually, a mucolytic drug could exert antitussive effects if it also affects mucus consistency and enhances ciliary function. In the last decade, data from several studies on animal models pointed to the possible antitussive and anti-inflammatory properties of erdosteine and an indirect anti-inflammatory mechanism of action was suggested. Recently, data from some controlled versus placebo studies documented the antioxidant properties of erdosteine in humans and in current smokers with COPD. The mechanism of action was described as related to erdosteine's ability to inhibit some inflammatory mediators and some pro-inflammatory cytokines that are specifically involved in oxidative stress. As oxidative stress is also presumed to impair beta-adrenoceptor function and contribute to airway obstruction, specific controlled studies recently investigated the effect of antioxidant intervention on short-term airway response to salbutamol in nonreversible COPD, according to a double-blind design versus placebo and NAC. Only erdosteine consistently restored a significant short-term reversibility in COPD subjects, previously unresponsive to beta(2) adrenergics. This peculiar activity of erdosteine (to our knowledge never previously assessed) proved related to the ROS scavenging activity (which actually proved equal to that of N), and its significant inhibiting effect on

  1. Retinal Vasculitis in Anti-Synthetase Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Christopher P; Pecen, Paula E; Baynes, Kimberly; Ehlers, Justis P; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2016-09-01

    A 31-year-old woman with a history of anti-synthetase syndrome-related myositis and interstitial lung disease presented with acute-onset blurry vision and rash on her hands and feet. Visual acuity was hand motion in her right eye and 20/40 in her left eye. Dilated fundus exam showed extensive retinal vasculitis, diffuse intraretinal hemorrhages, and subretinal fluid. Optical coherence tomography revealed significant macular thickening, and fluorescein angiography revealed vascular leakage with peripheral nonperfusion. Aggressive systemic immunosuppression was initiated, with gradual resolution of her disease during 8 months of follow-up. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:874-879.].

  2. Anti-resonant hexagram hollow core fibers.

    PubMed

    Hayes, John R; Poletti, Francesco; Abokhamis, Mousavi S; Wheeler, Natalie V; Baddela, Naveen K; Richardson, David J

    2015-01-26

    Various simple anti-resonant, single cladding layer, hollow core fiber structures are examined. We show that the spacing between core and jacket glass and the shape of the support struts can be used to optimize confinement loss. We demonstrate the detrimental effect on confinement loss of thick nodes at the strut intersections and present a fabricated hexagram fiber that mitigates this effect in both straight and bent condition by presenting thin and radially elongated nodes. This fiber has loss comparable to published results for a first generation, multi-cladding ring, Kagome fiber with negative core curvature and has tolerable bend loss for many practical applications.

  3. Retinal Vasculitis in Anti-Synthetase Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Christopher P; Pecen, Paula E; Baynes, Kimberly; Ehlers, Justis P; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2016-09-01

    A 31-year-old woman with a history of anti-synthetase syndrome-related myositis and interstitial lung disease presented with acute-onset blurry vision and rash on her hands and feet. Visual acuity was hand motion in her right eye and 20/40 in her left eye. Dilated fundus exam showed extensive retinal vasculitis, diffuse intraretinal hemorrhages, and subretinal fluid. Optical coherence tomography revealed significant macular thickening, and fluorescein angiography revealed vascular leakage with peripheral nonperfusion. Aggressive systemic immunosuppression was initiated, with gradual resolution of her disease during 8 months of follow-up. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:874-879.]. PMID:27631486

  4. Ixodes dammini: salivary anti-complement activity.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, J M

    1987-12-01

    Saliva of the tick Ixodes dammini prevents hemolysis of rabbit erythrocytes by the human alternative pathway of complement. Deposition of C3b to activating surfaces and concomitant C3a release are inhibited. C3b deposition to activating surfaces is inhibited regardless the origin (humans, rat, mouse, guinea pig, and hamster) of the serum. The inhibitor elutes as a single peak upon gel filtration, with an apparent molecular weight of 49,000. Salivary anti-complement may contribute to successful feeding of I. dammini in their natural hosts. PMID:3119364

  5. Therapeutic effects of date fruits (Phoenix dactylifera) in the prevention of diseases via modulation of anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-tumour activity

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Arshad H; Aly, Salah M; Ali, Habeeb; Babiker, Ali Y; Srikar, Sauda; khan, Amjad A

    2014-01-01

    The current mode of treatment of various diseases based on synthetic drugs is expensive, alters genetic and metabolic pathways and also shows adverse side effects. Thus, safe and effective approach is needed to prevent the diseases development and progression. In this vista, Natural products are good remedy in the treatment/management of diseases and they are affordable and effective without any adverse effects. Dates are main fruit in the Arabian Peninsula and are considered to be one of the most significant commercial crops and also have been documented in Holy Quran and modern scientific literatures. Earlier studies have shown that constituents of dates act as potent antioxidant, anti-tumour as well as anti-inflammatory, provide a suitable alternative therapy in various diseases cure. In this review, dates fruits has medicinal value are summarized in terms of therapeutic implications in the diseases control through anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumour and ant-diabetic effect. PMID:24753740

  6. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activities of Thymus linearis.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Muhammad Imran; Parveen, Amna; Abbas, Khizar; Ali, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of aqueous methanolic and n-hexane extract of Thymus linearis. For measuring analgesic activity, writhing test, hot plate method and formalin test were performed and abdominal writhing was induced by intra-peritoneal injection of 0.2 ml of 3% acetic acid. While in formalin test, pain was experimentally induced by injecting 25 μl of 2.5% formalin in left hind paw. In hot plate method, pain was induced thermally by keeping the animals on a hot plate with temperature of about 51°C. Anti-inflammatory activity was assessed by carrageenan induced mice paw edema. For determination of antipyretic activity, pyrexia was induced by subcutaneous injection of 15% yeast. The results showed that both the extracts had significant analgesic activity (p<0.05); anti-inflammatory activity (p<0.05) and anti-pyretic activity (p<0.05). Therefore, it was concluded from this study that the extracts of Thymus linearis may be used against pain, pyrexia and inflammation.

  7. In vitro anti-leishmanial and anti-fungal effects of new SbIII carboxylates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Ring opening of phthalic anhydride has been carried out in acetic acid with glycine, β-alanine, L-phenylalanine, and 4-aminobenzoic acid to yield, respectively, 2-{[(carboxymethyl)amino]carbonyl}benzoic acid (I), 2-{[(2-carboxyethyl)amino]carbonyl}benzoic acid (II), 2-{[(1-carboxy-2-phenylethyl)amino]carbonyl}benzoic acid (III), and 2-[(4-carboxyanilino)carbonyl]benzoic acid (IV). Compounds I-IV have been employed as ligands for Sb(III) center (complexes V-VIII) in aqueous medium. FTIR and 1H NMR spectra proved the deprotonation of carboxylic protons and coordination of imine group and thereby tridentate behaviour of the ligands as chelates. Elemental, MS, and TGA analytic data confirmed the structural hypothesis based on spectroscopic results. All the compounds have been assayed in vitro for anti-leishmanial and anti-fungal activities against five leishmanial strains L. major (JISH118), L. major (MHOM/PK/88/DESTO), L. tropica (K27), L. infantum (LEM3437), L. mex mex (LV4), and L. donovani (H43); and Aspergillus Flavus, Aspergillus Fumigants, Aspergillus Niger, and Fusarium Solani. Compound VII exhibited good anti-leishmanial as well as anti-fungal impacts comparable to reference drugs.

  8. The anti-obesity drug orlistat reveals anti-viral activity.

    PubMed

    Ammer, Elisabeth; Nietzsche, Sandor; Rien, Christian; Kühnl, Alexander; Mader, Theresa; Heller, Regine; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Henke, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The administration of drugs to inhibit metabolic pathways not only reduces the risk of obesity-induced diseases in humans but may also hamper the replication of different viral pathogens. In order to investigate the value of the US Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-obesity drug orlistat in view of its anti-viral activity against different human-pathogenic viruses, several anti-viral studies, electron microscopy analyses as well as fatty acid uptake experiments were performed. The results indicate that administrations of non-cytotoxic concentrations of orlistat reduced the replication of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) in different cell types significantly. Moreover, orlistat revealed cell protective effects and modified the formation of multi-layered structures in CVB3-infected cells, which are necessary for viral replication. Lowering fatty acid uptake from the extracellular environment by phloretin administrations had only marginal impact on CVB3 replication. Finally, orlistat reduced also the replication of varicella-zoster virus moderately but had no significant influence on the replication of influenza A viruses. The data support further experiments into the value of orlistat as an inhibitor of the fatty acid synthase to develop new anti-viral compounds, which are based on the modulation of cellular metabolic pathways.

  9. Evading anti-angiogenic therapy: resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy in solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Nandini; De, Pradip; Brian, Leyland-Jones

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) dependent tumor angiogenesis is an essential step for the initiation and promotion of tumor progression. The hypothesis that VEGF-driven tumor angiogenesis is necessary and sufficient for metastatic progression of the tumor, has been the major premise of the use of anti-VEGF therapy for decades. While the success of anti-VEGF therapy in solid tumors has led to the success of knowledge-based-therapies over the past several years, failures of this therapeutic approach due to the development of inherent/acquired resistance has led to the increased understanding of VEGF-independent angiogenesis. Today, tumor-angiogenesis is not a synonymous term to VEGF-dependent function. The extensive study of VEGF-independent angiogenesis has revealed several key factors responsible for this phenomenon including the role of myeloid cells, and the contribution of entirely new phenomenon like vascular mimicry. In this review, we will present the cellular and molecular factors related to the development of anti-angiogenic resistance following anti-VEGF therapy in different solid tumors. PMID:26692917

  10. [Anti-NEP and anti-PLA2R antibodies in membranous nephropathy: an update].

    PubMed

    Pozdzik, A A; Debiec, H; I Brochériou; Husson, C; Rorive, S; Broeders, N; Le Moine, A; Ronco, P; Nortier, J

    2015-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN) is the most common cause for nephrotic syndrome in adults and occurs as an idiopathic (primary) or secondary disease. Since the early 2000's, substantial advances have been made in the understanding of the molecular bases of MN. The neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and the receptor for secretory phospholipase A2 (PLA2R) have been identified as target antigens for circulating and deposited antibodies in allo-immune neonatal and adult " idiopathic " MN, respectively. These antibodies recognize specific antigens of podocytes, precipitate as subepithelial immune complexes and activate complement leading to proteinuria. Anti-PLA2R antibodies are of particular clinical importance. Indeed, they are detected in approximately 70% of primary MN in adults, demonstrating that MN actually is an autoimmune condition specific to the kidney. In Europeans, genome-wide studies have shown an association between alleles of PLA2R1 and HLA DQA1 (class II genes of tissue histocompatibility complex) genes and idiopathic MN. Newly developed diagnostic tests detecting circulating anti-PLA2R antibody and PLA2R antigen in glomerular deposits have induced a change in paradigm in the diagnostic approach of idiopathic MN. Measurement of circulating anti-PLA2R antibody is also very useful for the monitoring of MN activity. However, the mechanisms responsible for the formation of anti-PLA2R antibodies as well as those involved in the progression of MN to end-stage renal disease remain to be defined.

  11. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-nociceptive activities and composition of Lythrum salicaria L. extracts.

    PubMed

    Tunalier, Zeynep; Koşar, Müberra; Küpeli, Esra; Caliş, Ihsan; Başer, K Hüsnü Can

    2007-04-01

    Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife) known as "Tibbi hevhulma" in Turkish is used for its several beneficial health effects against as diarrhea, chronic intestinal catarrh, hemorrhoid and eczema in the form of a decoction or a fluid extract and to treat varicose veins, bleeding of the gums, hemorrhoid and eczema, externally. Dried herbal parts of Lythrum salicaria L. (Lythraceae) were sequentially extracted with different solvents such as petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, methanol and 50% aqueous methanol. Water extract of Lythrum salicaria was also prepared under reflux. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of all the extracts were investigated using in vitro and in vivo methods, respectively. Free radical scavenging activity (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, DPPH* assay), iron(III) reductive activity, capacity of the inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation and MDA formation, anti-nociceptive activity (p-benzoquinone-induced abdominal constriction test) and anti-inflammatory activity (carrageenan-induced hind paw edema model) were used for all the extracts. In addition, the content of total phenolics, flavonoids and flavonols in all the extracts were determined with spectrophotometric methods. Results were compared with reference antioxidants via ascorbic acid, butylated hydroxytoluene, and gallic acid. Qualitative and quantitative compositions of all the extracts were analysed using a HPLC-PDA system. Polar fractions were found to be rich in flavonoids such as isovitexin and isoorientin.

  12. Anti-herpetic and anti-dengue activity of abietane ferruginol analogues synthesized from (+)-dehydroabietylamine.

    PubMed

    Roa-Linares, Vicky C; Brand, Yaneth M; Agudelo-Gomez, Lee S; Tangarife-Castaño, Verónica; Betancur-Galvis, Liliana A; Gallego-Gomez, Juan C; González, Miguel A

    2016-01-27

    The abietane-type diterpenoid (+)-ferruginol (1), a bioactive compound isolated from several plants, has attracted much attention as consequence of its pharmacological properties, which includes antibacterial, antifungal, antimicrobial, cardioprotective, anti-oxidative, anti-plasmodial, leishmanicidal, anti-ulcerogenic, anti-inflammatory and antitumor actions. In this study, we report on the antiviral evaluation of ferruginol (1) and several analogues synthesized from commercial (+)-dehydroabietylamine. Thus, the activity against Human Herpesvirus type 1, Human Herpesvirus type 2 and Dengue Virus type 2, was studied. Two ferruginol analogues showed high antiviral selectivity index and reduced viral plaque-size in post-infection stages against both Herpes and Dengue viruses. A promising lead, compound 8, was ten-fold more potent (EC50 = 1.4 μM) than the control ribavirin against Dengue Virus type 2. Our findings suggest that the 12-hydroxyabieta-8,11,13-triene skeleton, which is characteristic of the diterpenoid ferruginol (1), is an interesting molecular scaffold for development of novel antivirals. In addition, the cytotoxic and antifungal activities of the synthesized ferruginol analogues have also been investigated. (©)20155 Elsevier Science. All rights reserved. PMID:26638041

  13. Heparin alters viral serpin, serp-1, anti-thrombolytic activity to anti-thrombotic activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing; Schneider, Heather; Peters, Andrew; Macaulay, Colin; King, Elaine; Sun, Yunming; Liu, Liying; Dai, Erbin; Davids, Jennifer A; McFadden, Grant; Lucas, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (serpins) regulate coagulation and inflammation. Heparin, a glycosaminoglycan, is an important cofactor for modulation of the inhibitory function of mammalian serpins. The secreted myxoma viral serpin, Serp-1 exerts profound anti-inflammatory activity in a wide range of animal models. Serp-1 anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic activity is dependent upon inhibition of the uPA / uPA receptor thrombolytic complex. We demonstrate here that heparin binds to Serp-1 and enhances Serp-1 inhibition of thrombin, a human pro-thrombotic serine protease, in vitro, altering inhibitory activity to a more predominant anti-thrombotic activity. Heparin also facilitates the simultaneous thrombin-mediated cleavage of Serp-1 and prevents formation of a serpin-typical SDS-resistant complex, implying mutual neutralization of Serp-1 and thrombin. In a cell-based assay, heparin facilitates Serp-1 reversal of cellular activation by stabilizing cellular membrane fluidity in thrombin-activated monocytes. In conclusion, heparin and other GAGs serve as cofactors enhancing Serp-1 regulation of local thrombotic and inflammatory pathways. PMID:18949070

  14. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activities of Thymus linearis.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Muhammad Imran; Parveen, Amna; Abbas, Khizar; Ali, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of aqueous methanolic and n-hexane extract of Thymus linearis. For measuring analgesic activity, writhing test, hot plate method and formalin test were performed and abdominal writhing was induced by intra-peritoneal injection of 0.2 ml of 3% acetic acid. While in formalin test, pain was experimentally induced by injecting 25 μl of 2.5% formalin in left hind paw. In hot plate method, pain was induced thermally by keeping the animals on a hot plate with temperature of about 51°C. Anti-inflammatory activity was assessed by carrageenan induced mice paw edema. For determination of antipyretic activity, pyrexia was induced by subcutaneous injection of 15% yeast. The results showed that both the extracts had significant analgesic activity (p<0.05); anti-inflammatory activity (p<0.05) and anti-pyretic activity (p<0.05). Therefore, it was concluded from this study that the extracts of Thymus linearis may be used against pain, pyrexia and inflammation. PMID:27087102

  15. Anti IH: An antibody worth mention.

    PubMed

    Mohanan, Nithya; Henry, Nittin; Rafi, Aboobacker Mohamed; Innah, Susheela J

    2016-01-01

    A 72-year-old female with co-morbidities posted for surgical correction of fracture neck of femur without any history of transfusions was noted to have a hemoglobin level of 7 g/dl and packed red blood cells transfusion was ordered. Pretransfusion tests demonstrated A1B group with D positive on forward grouping. Reverse grouping showed a varying grade of agglutination with A, B, and O cells. Agglutination being stronger at 4°C. Antibody screening showed pan-agglutination, direct Coomb's test and auto control were negative. The serum reacted with adult O cells (OIadult) but not with adult Bombay cells (Oh Iadult) or O cord (Oicord) cells. A possibility of a compound cold antibody anti IH was made and A1B compatible cells were transfused to the patient. This case report illustrates anti-IH cold agglutinin with broad thermal amplitude. Uniqueness of this case report was O group incompatibility with A1B group, which was detected earlier and a catastrophic transfusion reaction being subverted. PMID:27605855

  16. Pharmacogenetics of Anti-Diabetes Drugs

    PubMed Central

    DiStefano, Johanna K.; Watanabe, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    A variety of treatment modalities exist for individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). In addition to dietary and physical activity interventions, T2D is also treated pharmacologically with nine major classes of approved drugs. These medications include insulin and its analogues, sulfonylureas, biguanides, thiazolidinediones (TZDs), meglitinides, α-glucosidase inhibitors, amylin analogues, incretin hormone mimetics, and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitors. Pharmacological treatment strategies for T2D are typically based on efficacy, yet favorable responses to such therapeutics are oftentimes variable and difficult to predict. Characterization of drug response is expected to substantially enhance our ability to provide patients with the most effective treatment strategy given their individual backgrounds, yet pharmacogenetic study of diabetes medications is still in its infancy. To date, major pharmacogenetic studies have focused on response to sulfonylureas, biguanides, and TZDs. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of pharmacogenetics investigations of these specific anti-diabetes medications. We focus not only on the results of these studies, but also on how experimental design, study sample issues, and definition of ‘response’ can significantly impact our interpretation of findings. Understanding the pharmacogenetics of anti-diabetes medications will provide critical baseline information for the development and implementation of genetic screening into therapeutic decision making, and lay the foundation for “individualized medicine” for patients with T2D. PMID:20936101

  17. High gain durable anti-reflective coating

    DOEpatents

    Maghsoodi, Sina; Brophy, Brenor L.; Colson, Thomas E.; Gonsalves, Peter R.; Abrams, Ze'ev R.

    2016-07-26

    Disclosed herein are polysilsesquioxane-based anti-reflective coating (ARC) compositions, methods of preparation, and methods of deposition on a substrate. In one embodiment, the polysilsesquioxane of this disclosure is prepared in a two-step process of acid catalyzed hydrolysis of organoalkoxysilane followed by addition of tetralkoxysilane that generates silicone polymers with >40 mol % silanol based on Si-NMR. These high silanol siloxane polymers are stable and have a long shelf-life in polar organic solvents at room temperature. Also disclosed are low refractive index ARC made from these compositions with and without additives such as porogens, templates, thermal radical initiator, photo radical initiators, crosslinkers, Si--OH condensation catalyst and nano-fillers. Also disclosed are methods and apparatus for applying coatings to flat substrates including substrate pre-treatment processes, coating processes and coating curing processes including skin-curing using hot-air knives. Also disclosed are coating compositions and formulations for highly tunable, durable, highly abrasion-resistant functionalized anti-reflective coatings.

  18. Optical enhancing durable anti-reflective coating

    DOEpatents

    Maghsoodi, Sina; Varadarajan, Aravamuthan; Movassat, Meisam

    2016-07-05

    Disclosed herein are polysilsesquioxane based anti-reflective coating (ARC) compositions, methods of preparation, and methods of deposition on a substrate. In embodiments, the polysilsesquioxane of this disclosure is prepared in a two-step process of acid catalyzed hydrolysis of organoalkoxysilane followed by addition of tetralkoxysilane that generates silicone polymers with >40 mol % silanol based on Si-NMR. These high silanol siloxane polymers are stable and have a long shelf-life in the polar organic solvents at room temperature. Also disclosed are low refractive index ARC made from these compositions with and without additives such as porogens, templates, Si--OH condensation catalyst and/or nanofillers. Also disclosed are methods and apparatus for applying coatings to flat substrates including substrate pre-treatment processes, coating processes including flow coating and roll coating, and coating curing processes including skin-curing using hot-air knives. Also disclosed are coating compositions and formulations for highly tunable, durable, highly abrasion-resistant functionalized anti-reflective coatings.

  19. Anti IH: An antibody worth mention.

    PubMed

    Mohanan, Nithya; Henry, Nittin; Rafi, Aboobacker Mohamed; Innah, Susheela J

    2016-01-01

    A 72-year-old female with co-morbidities posted for surgical correction of fracture neck of femur without any history of transfusions was noted to have a hemoglobin level of 7 g/dl and packed red blood cells transfusion was ordered. Pretransfusion tests demonstrated A1B group with D positive on forward grouping. Reverse grouping showed a varying grade of agglutination with A, B, and O cells. Agglutination being stronger at 4°C. Antibody screening showed pan-agglutination, direct Coomb's test and auto control were negative. The serum reacted with adult O cells (OIadult) but not with adult Bombay cells (Oh Iadult) or O cord (Oicord) cells. A possibility of a compound cold antibody anti IH was made and A1B compatible cells were transfused to the patient. This case report illustrates anti-IH cold agglutinin with broad thermal amplitude. Uniqueness of this case report was O group incompatibility with A1B group, which was detected earlier and a catastrophic transfusion reaction being subverted.

  20. Solar anti-reverse siphon system

    SciTech Connect

    Larkin, W.J.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes an anti-reverse siphon solar heating system consisting of: (a) a fluid chamber having an inlet and an outlet; (b) a continuous flow passageway comprising in normal downstream order: (i) an ascending passageway open and originating in the lower portion of the chamber and passing up through the top of the chamber; (ii) an anti-reverse siphon loop with a rising portion insulated and connected to the top of the ascending passageway and extending upward, an uppermost transverse portion, and a falling portion descending downwardly to define a downstream loop end; (iii) an ascending heating chamber with a heating element in thermal contact; (iv) a descending passageway connected to the downstream loop end and extending downward into a connection with the bottom of the ascending heating chamber and insulated from the heating chamber; (v) a return passageway connecting between the top of the heating chamber and the top of the fluid chamber; and, (c) the uppermost portion of the loop is higher than the uppermost portion of the ascending heating chamber, and the uppermost portion of the fluid chamber being at least as high as 1 foot beneath the uppermost portion of the ascending heating chamber.

  1. Interleukin-35 Limits Anti-Tumor Immunity.

    PubMed

    Turnis, Meghan E; Sawant, Deepali V; Szymczak-Workman, Andrea L; Andrews, Lawrence P; Delgoffe, Greg M; Yano, Hiroshi; Beres, Amy J; Vogel, Peter; Workman, Creg J; Vignali, Dario A A

    2016-02-16

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells pose a major barrier to effective anti-tumor immunity. Although Treg cell depletion enhances tumor rejection, the ensuing autoimmune sequelae limits its utility in the clinic and highlights the need for limiting Treg cell activity within the tumor microenvironment. Interleukin-35 (IL-35) is a Treg cell-secreted cytokine that inhibits T cell proliferation and function. Using an IL-35 reporter mouse, we observed substantial enrichment of IL-35(+) Treg cells in tumors. Neutralization with an IL-35-specific antibody or Treg cell-restricted deletion of IL-35 production limited tumor growth in multiple murine models of human cancer. Limiting intratumoral IL-35 enhanced T cell proliferation, effector function, antigen-specific responses, and long-term T cell memory. Treg cell-derived IL-35 promoted the expression of multiple inhibitory receptors (PD1, TIM3, LAG3), thereby facilitating intratumoral T cell exhaustion. These findings reveal previously unappreciated roles for IL-35 in limiting anti-tumor immunity and contributing to T cell dysfunction in the tumor microenvironment.

  2. Oral anti-diabetics in Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Islam, Najmul

    2015-05-01

    A large proportion of Muslim patients with type 2 diabetes fast during the month of Ramadan worldwide. Hypoglycaemia is one of the major complications associated with long periods without food during the fasting hours. There is also a risk of hyperglycaemia due to over indulgence in food during the two main meals of Suhur and Iftar. Healthcare providers need to be cognizant of the risk of fasting and be competent to provide Ramadan adjusted diabetes care particularly adjustment of oral anti diabetics. This review article has taken into consideration observational studies, randomized trial data, pathophysiology and practical experience in recommending adjustment in oral anti-diabetics during fasting in type-2 diabetics. Metformin and Thiazolidinediones (TZD'S) being insulin sensitizers need minimum adjustment with low risk of hypoglycaemia. Older generation Sulphonylureas (SU) pose a high risk of hypoglycaemia but the newer generations of Sulphonylureas have a reasonable safety profile. Alpha- Glucosidase inhibitors are safe during fasting but their use is limited due to the side effects.

  3. Hawkmoths produce anti-bat ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Barber, Jesse R; Kawahara, Akito Y

    2013-08-23

    Bats and moths have been engaged in aerial warfare for nearly 65 Myr. This arms race has produced a suite of counter-adaptations in moths, including bat-detecting ears. One set of defensive strategies involves the active production of sound; tiger moths' ultrasonic replies to bat attack have been shown to startle bats, warn the predators of bad taste and jam their biosonar. Here, we report that hawkmoths in the Choerocampina produce entirely ultrasonic sounds in response to tactile stimulation and the playback of biosonar attack sequences. Males do so by grating modified scraper scales on the outer surface of the genital valves against the inner margin of the last abdominal tergum. Preliminary data indicate that females also produce ultrasound to touch and playback of echolocation attack, but they do so with an entirely different mechanism. The anti-bat function of these sounds is unknown but might include startling, cross-family acoustic mimicry, warning of unprofitability or physical defence and/or jamming of echolocation. Hawkmoths present a novel and tractable system to study both the function and evolution of anti-bat defences. PMID:23825084

  4. Geldanamycin and its anti-cancer activities.

    PubMed

    Fukuyo, Yayoi; Hunt, Clayton R; Horikoshi, Nobuo

    2010-04-01

    Geldanamycin is a benzoquinone ansamycin antibiotic that manifests anti-cancer activity through the inhibition of HSP90-chaperone function. The HSP90 molecular chaperone is expressed at high levels in a wide variety of human cancers including melanoma, leukemia, and cancers in colon, prostate, lung, and breast. In cancer cells dependent upon mutated and/or over-expressed oncogene proteins, HSP90 is thought to have a critical role in regulating the stability, folding, and activity of HSP90-associated proteins, so-called "client proteins". These client proteins include the growth-stimulating proteins and kinases that support malignant transformation. Recently, oncogenic activating BRAF mutants have been identified in variety of cancers where constitutive activation of the MEK/ERK MAPK signaling pathway is the key for tumorigenesis, and they have been shown to be client proteins for HSP90. Accordingly, HSP90 inhibition can suppress certain cancer-causing client proteins and therefore represents an important therapeutic target. The molecular mechanism underlying the anti-cancer effect of HSP90 inhibition is complicated. Geldanamycin and its derivatives have been shown to induce the depletion of mutationally-activated BRAF through several mechanisms. In this review, we will describe the HSP90-inhibitory mechanism, focusing on recent progress in understanding HSP90 chaperone structure-function relationships, the identification of new HSP90 client proteins and the development of HSP90 inhibitors for clinical applications.

  5. Anti IH: An antibody worth mention

    PubMed Central

    Mohanan, Nithya; Henry, Nittin; Rafi, Aboobacker Mohamed; Innah, Susheela J.

    2016-01-01

    A 72-year-old female with co-morbidities posted for surgical correction of fracture neck of femur without any history of transfusions was noted to have a hemoglobin level of 7 g/dl and packed red blood cells transfusion was ordered. Pretransfusion tests demonstrated A1B group with D positive on forward grouping. Reverse grouping showed a varying grade of agglutination with A, B, and O cells. Agglutination being stronger at 4°C. Antibody screening showed pan-agglutination, direct Coomb's test and auto control were negative. The serum reacted with adult O cells (OIadult) but not with adult Bombay cells (Oh Iadult) or O cord (Oicord) cells. A possibility of a compound cold antibody anti IH was made and A1B compatible cells were transfused to the patient. This case report illustrates anti-IH cold agglutinin with broad thermal amplitude. Uniqueness of this case report was O group incompatibility with A1B group, which was detected earlier and a catastrophic transfusion reaction being subverted.

  6. Enterovirus-Specific Anti-peptide Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Poh, Chit Laa; Kirk, Katherine; Chua, Hui Na; Grollo, Lara

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-71) is the main causative agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) which is generally regarded as a mild childhood disease. In recent years, EV71 has emerged as a significant pathogen capable of causing high mortalities and severe neurological complications in large outbreaks in Asia. A formalin-inactivated EV71 whole virus vaccine has completed phase III trial in China but is currently unavailable clinically. The high cost of manufacturing and supply problems may limit practical implementations in developing countries. Synthetic peptides representing the native primary structure of the viral immunogen which is able to elicit neutralizing antibodies can be made readily and is cost effective. However, it is necessary to conjugate short synthetic peptides to carrier proteins to enhance their immunogenicity. This review describes the production of cross-neutralizing anti-peptide antibodies in response to immunization with synthetic peptides selected from in silico analysis, generation of B-cell epitopes of EV71 conjugated to a promiscuous T-cell epitope from Poliovirus, and evaluation of the neutralizing activities of the anti-peptide antibodies. Besides neutralizing EV71 in vitro, the neutralizing antibodies were cross-reactive against several Enteroviruses including CVA16, CVB4, CVB6, and ECHO13.

  7. Hawkmoths produce anti-bat ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Jesse R.; Kawahara, Akito Y.

    2013-01-01

    Bats and moths have been engaged in aerial warfare for nearly 65 Myr. This arms race has produced a suite of counter-adaptations in moths, including bat-detecting ears. One set of defensive strategies involves the active production of sound; tiger moths' ultrasonic replies to bat attack have been shown to startle bats, warn the predators of bad taste and jam their biosonar. Here, we report that hawkmoths in the Choerocampina produce entirely ultrasonic sounds in response to tactile stimulation and the playback of biosonar attack sequences. Males do so by grating modified scraper scales on the outer surface of the genital valves against the inner margin of the last abdominal tergum. Preliminary data indicate that females also produce ultrasound to touch and playback of echolocation attack, but they do so with an entirely different mechanism. The anti-bat function of these sounds is unknown but might include startling, cross-family acoustic mimicry, warning of unprofitability or physical defence and/or jamming of echolocation. Hawkmoths present a novel and tractable system to study both the function and evolution of anti-bat defences. PMID:23825084

  8. Cardiovascular safety of anti-diabetic drugs.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Kerins, D M; Walther, T

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes, underscoring the importance of choosing anti-diabetic drugs that do not increase cardiovascular risk but might reduce the risk of cardiovascular events. Most type 2 diabetic patients die from cardiovascular causes despite the beneficial effects of blood pressure (BP) and lipid-lowering medications. The prevalence of patients with cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus is growing exponentially. Approximately 40% of patients hospitalized with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction have diabetes mellitus. The recent trials conducted in patients with heart failure who had diabetes showed a different response to standard medication, with these patients being more prone to develop side effects than patients with the same degree of heart failure but without diabetes mellitus. Therefore, careful selection of drug therapy paying particular attention to cardiovascular safety is important in optimizing diabetic therapy. This review discusses the efficacy and safety of the most commonly prescribed anti-diabetic drugs in the context of cardiovascular impact. PMID:27533060

  9. Hawkmoths produce anti-bat ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Barber, Jesse R; Kawahara, Akito Y

    2013-08-23

    Bats and moths have been engaged in aerial warfare for nearly 65 Myr. This arms race has produced a suite of counter-adaptations in moths, including bat-detecting ears. One set of defensive strategies involves the active production of sound; tiger moths' ultrasonic replies to bat attack have been shown to startle bats, warn the predators of bad taste and jam their biosonar. Here, we report that hawkmoths in the Choerocampina produce entirely ultrasonic sounds in response to tactile stimulation and the playback of biosonar attack sequences. Males do so by grating modified scraper scales on the outer surface of the genital valves against the inner margin of the last abdominal tergum. Preliminary data indicate that females also produce ultrasound to touch and playback of echolocation attack, but they do so with an entirely different mechanism. The anti-bat function of these sounds is unknown but might include startling, cross-family acoustic mimicry, warning of unprofitability or physical defence and/or jamming of echolocation. Hawkmoths present a novel and tractable system to study both the function and evolution of anti-bat defences.

  10. Autoantibodies: Focus on anti-DNA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, Nina; Winkler, Thomas H; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill

    2011-01-01

    Ever since the days of Ehrlich and the birth of humoral immunity, self-reactivity or 'horror autotoxicus' as referred to by Paul Ehrlich, has been of great concern. For instance, in patients with the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), anti-nuclear and anti-DNA antibodies have been recognized for many years. Despite this, the exact mechanism as to how the immune system fails to protect the individual and allows these autoantibodies to develop in this and other systemic autoimmune diseases remains uncertain. So how can we explain their presence? Evidence suggests that B cells expressing autoreactive antibodies do not normally arise but rather undergo negative selection as they develop. In light of this, it might seem contradictory that not all autoreactive B cell clones are eliminated, although this may not even be the intention since autoantibodies are also found in healthy individuals and may even protect from autoimmunity. Here, we will discuss autoantibodies, in particular those recognizing DNA, with regard to their reactivity and their potentially pathogenic or protective properties. PMID:21776330

  11. Anti IH: An antibody worth mention

    PubMed Central

    Mohanan, Nithya; Henry, Nittin; Rafi, Aboobacker Mohamed; Innah, Susheela J.

    2016-01-01

    A 72-year-old female with co-morbidities posted for surgical correction of fracture neck of femur without any history of transfusions was noted to have a hemoglobin level of 7 g/dl and packed red blood cells transfusion was ordered. Pretransfusion tests demonstrated A1B group with D positive on forward grouping. Reverse grouping showed a varying grade of agglutination with A, B, and O cells. Agglutination being stronger at 4°C. Antibody screening showed pan-agglutination, direct Coomb's test and auto control were negative. The serum reacted with adult O cells (OIadult) but not with adult Bombay cells (Oh Iadult) or O cord (Oicord) cells. A possibility of a compound cold antibody anti IH was made and A1B compatible cells were transfused to the patient. This case report illustrates anti-IH cold agglutinin with broad thermal amplitude. Uniqueness of this case report was O group incompatibility with A1B group, which was detected earlier and a catastrophic transfusion reaction being subverted. PMID:27605855

  12. Anti-diarrheal constituents of Alpinia oxyphylla.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junqing; Wang, Sheng; Li, Yonghui; Xu, Peng; Chen, Feng; Tan, Yinfeng; Duan, Jinao

    2013-09-01

    Isolation, screening and in vivo assays have been used for evaluating anti-diarrhea bioactive of Alpinia oxyphylla. Preliminary experimental results showed that 95% ethanol extract and 90% ethanol elution significantly extended the onset time of diarrhea and reduced the wet feces proportion, however 50% ethanol election had no effect on diarrhea. Chemical analysis results displayed that Nootkatone, Tectochrysin and yakuchinone A may be bioactive ingredients for curing diarrhea. Duodenum in vitro experiment showed that Tectochrysin 50, 100 μM reduces carbachol-induced contraction, while yakuchinone A and Nootkatone had no effect. Bioinformatic computational method as molecular docking has been complementary to experimentally work to explore the potential mechanism. The study of pathogenesis of diarrhea in humans and animal models suggested that Na(+)/H(+) exchanger3 (NHE3) and aquaporin4 (AQP4) are causative agents of diarrhea. The analysis was done on the basis of scoring and binding ability and the docking analysis showed that Tectochrysin has maximum potential against NHE3 (PDB ID: 2OCS) and AQP4 (PDB ID: 3GD8). Tectochrysin indicated minimum energy score and the highest number of interactions with active site residues. These results suggested that A. oxyphylla might exhibit its anti-diarrhea effect partially by affecting the proteins of NHE3 and AQP4 with its active ingredient Tectochrysin. PMID:23583435

  13. Anti-diarrheal constituents of Alpinia oxyphylla.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junqing; Wang, Sheng; Li, Yonghui; Xu, Peng; Chen, Feng; Tan, Yinfeng; Duan, Jinao

    2013-09-01

    Isolation, screening and in vivo assays have been used for evaluating anti-diarrhea bioactive of Alpinia oxyphylla. Preliminary experimental results showed that 95% ethanol extract and 90% ethanol elution significantly extended the onset time of diarrhea and reduced the wet feces proportion, however 50% ethanol election had no effect on diarrhea. Chemical analysis results displayed that Nootkatone, Tectochrysin and yakuchinone A may be bioactive ingredients for curing diarrhea. Duodenum in vitro experiment showed that Tectochrysin 50, 100 μM reduces carbachol-induced contraction, while yakuchinone A and Nootkatone had no effect. Bioinformatic computational method as molecular docking has been complementary to experimentally work to explore the potential mechanism. The study of pathogenesis of diarrhea in humans and animal models suggested that Na(+)/H(+) exchanger3 (NHE3) and aquaporin4 (AQP4) are causative agents of diarrhea. The analysis was done on the basis of scoring and binding ability and the docking analysis showed that Tectochrysin has maximum potential against NHE3 (PDB ID: 2OCS) and AQP4 (PDB ID: 3GD8). Tectochrysin indicated minimum energy score and the highest number of interactions with active site residues. These results suggested that A. oxyphylla might exhibit its anti-diarrhea effect partially by affecting the proteins of NHE3 and AQP4 with its active ingredient Tectochrysin.

  14. [Hemorrhagic complications of anti-vitamin K].

    PubMed

    Al-Hajje, A; Calop, N; Bosson, J L; Calop, J; Allenet, B

    2009-03-01

    Adverse events related to oral anticoagulants represent a major public health problem. Hemorrhagic episodes are the most frequent complications and can be life-threatening. A 10 month prospective survey on all cases treated with anti-vitamin K (AVK), and admitted to emergency room of CHU Grenoble, was conducted to identify the hemorrhagic adverse drug events (HADE). The evaluation support was a directive questionnaire and consisted of 3 parts: patient characteristics, patient's medicated treatment and the hemorrhagic event. 216 patients treated with AVK were identified and 68 of them presented a hemorrhagic adverse drug event. 60 patients older than 65 years out of 158, presented HADE (38%); versus 8 patients < or = 65 years out of 58 (RR = 2.75; p = 0.0007). Among the patients who have their INR > or = 5, 79% developed HADE versus 16% in the group who had their INR < 5 (< 0.0001). In the group of patients who had a change in drug therapy within the 7 days preceding their admission, 47% developed HADE versus 25% of patients whose treatment was not modified: Anti-microbial agents were the drug most frequently involved. The patient's knowledge of INR value and signs of excess AVK were significant. Concerning missed dose, 48 patients declared taking the missed dose with the next dose or when they remembered: 35% of them developed HADE (p = 0.49).

  15. [Anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-pyretic activities of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, etofenamate, in experimental animals].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Motoyoshi, S; Imazu, C; Ishii, K; Yokoyama, Y; Seto, Y; Kadokawa, T; Shimizu, M

    1982-08-01

    Anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and anti-pyretic activities of orally administered etofenamate, the diethylene glycol ester of flufenamic acid, were investigated in experimental animals. Against acetic acid-induced vascular permeability in mice and ultra-violet light-induced erythema in guinea pigs, etofenamate produced a dose related inhibition at doses of 40--320 mg/kg and 5--20 mg/kg, respectively. In rats, felt-pellet-induced granuloma formation and adjuvant-induced arthritis were significantly inhibited by repeated administration of etofenamate at doses of 20 mg/kg/day for 5 days and 40 mg/kg/day for 21 days, respectively. Etofenamate showed an inhibitory activity on the squeak response caused by flexing and extending the silver nitrate-induced arthritic joint in rats; and it produced a dose related anti-writhing activity at doses of 50--300 mg/kg and 10--80 mg/kg in mice and rats, respectively, in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Etofenamate showed a significant anti-pyretic activity at doses of 0.2 mg/kg or more. These potencies of etofenamate were 0.5 to 1.6 times those of flufenamic acid. In particular, the anti-erythema, anti-arthritis, and anti-pyretic activities of etofenamate were approximately equivalent to or superior to those of flufenamic acid. From these results, it was suggested that etofenamate given orally, like other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, showed anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and anti-pyretic activities in experimental animals. PMID:6983482

  16. Plasma anti-serotonin and serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies are elevated in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Coplan, J D; Tamir, H; Calaprice, D; DeJesus, M; de la Nuez, M; Pine, D; Papp, L A; Klein, D F; Gorman, J M

    1999-04-01

    The psychoneuroimmunology of panic disorder is relatively unexplored. Alterations within brain stress systems that secondarily influence the immune system have been documented. A recent report indicated elevations of serotonin (5-HT) and ganglioside antibodies in patients with primary fibromyalgia, a condition with documented associations with panic disorder. In line with our interest in dysregulated 5-HT systems in panic disorder (PD), we wished to assess if antibodies directed at the 5-HT system were elevated in patients with PD in comparison to healthy volunteers. Sixty-three patients with panic disorder and 26 healthy volunteers were diagnosed by the SCID. Employing ELISA, we measured anti-5-HT and 5-HT anti-idiotypic antibodies (which are directed at 5-HT receptors). To include all subjects in one experiment, three different batches were run during the ELISA. Plasma serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies: there was a significant group effect [patients > controls (p = .007)] and batch effect but no interaction. The mean effect size for the three batches was .76. Following Z-score transformation of each separate batch and then combining all scores, patients demonstrated significantly elevated levels of plasma serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies. Neither sex nor age as covariates affected the significance of the results. There was a strong correlation between anti-serotonin antibody and serotonin anti-idiotypic antibody measures. Plasma anti-serotonin antibodies: there was a significant diagnosis effect [patients > controls (p = .037)]. Mean effect size for the three batches was .52. Upon Z-score transformation, there was a diagnosis effect with antibody elevations in patients. Covaried for sex and age, the result falls below significance to trend levels. The data raise the possibility that psychoimmune dysfunction, specifically related to the 5-HT system, may be present in PD. Potential interruption of 5-HT neurotransmission through autoimmune mechanisms may be of

  17. Measurement of the Z0 --> s anti-s Coupling at the SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Staengle, Hermann

    1999-11-24

    This dissertation presents a direct measurement of the parity-violating coupling of the Z{sup 0} to strange quarks, A{sub s}, derived from e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data containing approximately 550,000 hadronic decays of polarized Z{sup 0} bosons. Data were recorded with the SLC Large Detector (SLD) at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) between 1993 and 1998 with an average electron beam polarization of 73% and 74% during the 1993-5 and 1996-8 run periods, respectively. Making use of several unique features of the SLC and SLD, this measurement relies on a new generation particle identification system, the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector, to test the Standard Model prediction of universality in the coupling of the Z{sup 0} to down-type quarks. Polarized Z{sup 0} --> s anti-s events are tagged by the presence in each event hemisphere of a high-momentum K {+-}, K{sub s}{sup 0} or Lambda{sup 0}/ anti-Lambda{sup 0} identified using particle identification and/or a mass tag. The background from heavy flavor events is suppressed with the CCD-based vertex detector. The event thrust axis is signed with the strangeness of the tagged particle to point in the direction of the initial s quark. The coupling A{sub s} is derived from a maximum likelihood fit to the polar angle distributions of the tagged s quark measured with left- and right-handed electron beams. To reduce the model dependence of the measurement, the background from u anti-u and d anti-d events as well as the analyzing power of the method for s anti-s events are constrained from the data. We obtain A{sub s} = 0.86 {+-} 0.08(stat.) {+-} 0.05(syst.). The result is consistent with both the Standard Model prediction and previous bottom quark coupling mA{sub b}, measurements performed by SLD and LEP, and therefore supports the predicted universality of the Z{sup 0} to down-type quark couplings.

  18. The relationships between titers of anti-Ro or anti-La as measured by ELISA and salivary production rate with age correction.

    PubMed

    Takada, Kunio; Suzuki, Kimihiro; Matsumoto, Mitsuyo; Okada, Makoto; Nakanishi, Takashi; Horikoshi, Hideyuki; Higuchi, Tomoaki; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Ohsuzu, Fumitaka

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work was to clarify the clinical significance of titers of anti-Ro and anti-La, the relationships between titers of either anti-Ro or anti-La, and salivary production rate (SPR). These autoantibodies were titrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The Saxon test was performed to measure SPR. Fifty-one females who had anti-Ro but not anticentromere antibodies or anti-U1RNP were enrolled. SPR decreased significantly with age. In order to exclude the effect of aging on SPR, we calculated the "SPR with age correction." According to the results of a multiple regression analysis, only the anti-La titer was significantly associated with SPR with age correction. The distribution pattern of the anti-La titers consisted of two subgroups (with a titer index cutoff of 100.0): a negative anti-La titer (anti-La<25.0) and low anti-La titer (25.0anti-La<100.0) group, and a high anti-La titer group (anti-La>or=100.0). The concentration of serum IgG and the frequency of Sjögren's syndrome in the high anti-La titer group were significantly higher than those in the negative anti-La and low anti-La titer group. Several new aspects of the clinical significance of titrating anti-Ro and anti-La in comparison with SPR have been revealed.

  19. Anti-obesity activity of hen egg anti-lipase immunoglobulin yolk, a novel pancreatic lipase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is completely no report about both hen egg anti-lipase immunoglobulin yolk (IgY) and its anti-obesity action. Thus, we tried to isolate and characterize a novel anti-lipase immunoglobulin from hen egg yolk. Moreover, we investigated whether hen egg yolk anti-lipase IgY inhibits pancreatic lipase activity in vitro, and examined its ability to prevent obesity in a murine high fat diet-induced obesity model. Methods We determined the inhibitory action of Anti-lipase IgY on lipase activity in vitro. We also focused our evaluation on the anti-obesity properties of Anti-lipase IgY in a murine high fat diet-induced obesity model. Results Anti-lipase IgY blocked porcine lipase activity with an IC50 of 0.49 μM. Supplementing the high fat diet with only 0.2% (w/w) of Anti-lipase IgY for 35 days significantly decreased the weights of intraperitoneal adipose tissues, epididymal, mesenteric, retroperitoneal and perirenal adipose tissues, and the amounts of hepatic total lipid, triglyceride, and cholesterol. This was accompanied by a significant increase in the fecal excretion of triglyceride in the absence of diarrhea. Furthermore, Anti-lipase IgY treatment restored body weight gain to levels similar to mice fed with Control IgY. Conclusions This study provides the first report of the development of anti-lipase IgY and the direct evidence that inhibition of pancreatic lipase using Anti-lipase IgY is an effective anti-obesity treatment due to the associated increase in fecal excretion of triglyceride. PMID:24321125

  20. Buformin exhibits anti-proliferative and anti-invasive effects in endometrial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kilgore, Joshua; Jackson, Amanda L; Clark, Leslie H; Guo, Hui; Zhang, Lu; Jones, Hannah M; Gilliam, Timothy P; Gehrig, Paola A; Zhou, Chunxiao; Bae-Jump, Victoria L

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Biguanides are anti-diabetic drugs that are thought to have anti-tumorigenic effects. Most pre-clinical studies have focused on metformin for cancer treatment and prevention; however, buformin may be potentially more potent than metformin. Given this, our goal was to evaluate the effects of buformin on cell growth, adhesion and invasion in endometrial cancer cell lines. Methods: The ECC-1 and Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell lines were used. Cell proliferation was assessed by MTT assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle analysis was performed by FITC Annexin V assay and propidium iodide staining, respectively. Adhesion was analyzed using the laminin adhesion assay. Invasion was assessed using the transwell invasion assay. The effects of buformin on the AMPK/mTOR pathway were determined by Western immunoblotting. Results: Buformin and metformin inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in both endometrial cancer cell lines. IC50s were 1.4-1.6 mM for metformin and 8-150 μM for buformin. Buformin induced cell cycle G1 phase arrest in the ECC-1 cells and G2 phase arrest in the Ishikawa cells. For both ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells, treatment with buformin resulted in induction of apoptosis, reduction in adhesion and invasion, activation of AMPK and inhibition of phosphorylated-S6. Buformin potentiated the anti-proliferative effects of paclitaxel in both cell lines. Conclusion: Buformin has significant anti-proliferative and anti-metastatic effects in endometrial cancer cells through modulation of the AMPK/mTOR pathway. IC50 values were lower for buformin than metformin, suggesting that buformin may be more potent for endometrial cancer treatment and worthy of further investigation. PMID:27398153

  1. Anti-oxidant and Anti-hypercholesterolemic Activities of Wasabia japonica

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jae Ha; Bae, Man Jong; Yoo, Wang Keun; Ye, Shen; Xue, Charlie C. L.; Li, Chun Guang

    2010-01-01

    The effects of Wasabia japonica (WJ) were investigated in vitro and in vivo for their anti-oxidant and anti-hypercholesterolemic activities. It was found that the aqueous extracts of WJ leaves (WJL) had strong scavenging activities towards 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picryhydrazyl (DPPH) and nitric oxide (NO) free radicals in cell free systems. WJL also inhibited NO production and the expressions of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA and enzyme protein, determined by Griess reactions, RT-PCR or Western blotting respectively in Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages cells. The anti-hypercholesterolemic effects of WJ diet were investigated in hypercholesterolemia rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups and were fed with either normal diet (Group 1), or diet containing 1%(w/w) cholesterol (Groups 2, 3 and 4). After 4 weeks, Group 2 was changed to normal diet, Groups 3 and 4 were changed to the diet containing 5% WJ leaf and or 5% WJ root, respectively. 3 weeks after WJ diets, Serum HDL-cholesterol levels were significantly increased in WJ diet groups compared with the normal diet hypercholesterolemia rats. In contrast, the serum LDL-cholesterol levels and liver xanthine oxidase (XO) activity in WJ diet groups were significantly decreased. The results indicate that the WJ extracts have significant anti-oxidant activities, and the WJ diet exhibited anti-hypercholesterolemic action in high cholesterol diet rats, which was companied with modulations of cholesterol metabolism and decrease in liver XO activity. PMID:18955343

  2. Anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of Tagetes minuta essential oil in activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Karimian, Parastoo; Kavoosi, Gholamreza; Amirghofran, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of Tagetes minuta (T. minuta) essential oil. Methods In the present study T. minuta essential oil was obtained from leaves of T. minuta via hydro-distillation and then was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The anti-oxidant capacity of T. minuta essential oil was examined by measuring reactive oxygen, reactive nitrogen species and hydrogen peroxide scavenging. The anti-inflammatory activity of T. minuta essential oil was determined through measuring NADH oxidase, inducible nitric oxide synthase and TNF-α mRNA expression in lipopolysacharide-stimulated murine macrophages using real-time PCR. Results Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis indicated that the main components in the T. minuta essential oil were dihydrotagetone (33.86%), E-ocimene (19.92%), tagetone (16.15%), cis-β-ocimene (7.94%), Z-ocimene (5.27%), limonene (3.1%) and epoxyocimene (2.03%). The T. minuta essential oil had the ability to scavenge all reactive oxygen/reactive nitrogen species radicals with IC50 12-15 µg/mL, which indicated a potent radical scavenging activity. In addition, T. minuta essential oil significantly reduced NADH oxidase, inducible nitric oxide synthaseand TNF-α mRNA expression in the cells at concentrations of 50 µg/mL, indicating a capacity of this product to potentially modulate/diminish immune responses. Conclusions T. minuta essential oil has radical scavenging and anti-inflammatory activities and could potentially be used as a safe effective source of natural anti-oxidants in therapy against oxidative damage and stress associated with some inflammatory conditions. PMID:25182441

  3. Anti-MRSA and anti-TB metabolites from marine-derived Verrucosispora sp. MS100047.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pei; Xie, Feng; Ren, Biao; Wang, Qian; Wang, Jian; Wang, Qi; Abdel-Mageed, Wael M; Liu, Miaomiao; Han, Jianying; Oyeleye, Ayokunmi; Shen, Jinzhao; Song, Fuhang; Dai, Huanqin; Liu, Xueting; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-09-01

    Microbes belonging to the genus Verrucosispora possess significant chemical diversity and biological properties. They have attracted the interests of many researchers and are becoming promising resources in the marine natural product research field. A bioassay-guided isolation from the crude extract of Verrucosispora sp. strain MS100047, isolated from sediments collected from the South China Sea, has led to the identification of a new salicylic derivative, glycerol 1-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl benzoate (1), along with three known compounds, brevianamide F (2), abyssomicin B (3), and proximicin B (4). Compound 1 showed selective activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 12.5 μg/mL. Brevianamide F (2), which was isolated from actinomycete for the first time, showed a good anti-BCG activity with a MIC value of 12.5 μg/mL that has not been reported previously in literatures. Proximicin B (4) showed significant anti-MRSA (MIC = 3.125 μg/mL), anti-BCG (MIC = 6.25 μg/mL), and anti-tuberculosis (TB) (MIC = 25 μg/mL) activities. This is the first report on the anti-tubercular activities of proximicins. In addition, Verrucosispora sp. strain MS100047 was found to harbor 18 putative secondary metabolite gene clusters based on genomic sequence analysis. These include the biosynthetic loci encoding polyketide synthase (PKS) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) consistent with abyssomicins and proximicins, respectively. The biosynthetic pathways of these isolated compounds have been proposed. These results indicate that MS100047 possesses a great potential as a source of active secondary metabolites.

  4. Potential anti-HIV agents from marine resources: an overview.

    PubMed

    Vo, Thanh-Sang; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-11-29

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and is a global public health issue. Anti-HIV therapy involving chemical drugs has improved the life quality of HIV/AIDS patients. However, emergence of HIV drug resistance, side effects and the necessity for long-term anti-HIV treatment are the main reasons for failure of anti-HIV therapy. Therefore, it is essential to isolate novel anti-HIV therapeutics from natural resources. Recently, a great deal of interest has been expressed regarding marine-derived anti-HIV agents such as phlorotannins, sulfated chitooligosaccharides, sulfated polysaccharides, lectins and bioactive peptides. This contribution presents an overview of anti-HIV therapeutics derived from marine resources and their potential application in HIV therapy.

  5. [A spectrum of neurological diseases with anti-VGKC antibody].

    PubMed

    Arimura, Kimiyoshi; Watanabe, Osamu; Nagado, Tatsui

    2007-11-01

    Anti-VGKC antibody causing peripheral nerve hyperexcitability is already an established clinical entity. Recently, many patients with non-herpetic limbic encephalitis (NHLE) with anti-VGKC antibody have been reported. The characteristic clinical features are low serum Na+ concentration and good response to immunotherapy. Anti-VGK antibody positive NHLE is relatively frequent among immune-mediated NHLE. It is important to know that this disease is responsive to immunotherapy. Furthermore, anti-VGKC antibody is also positive in some intractable epilepsies. These findings suggest that anti-VGKC is correlated with hyperexcitability in both the peripheral and central nervous system and that the spectrum of anti-VGKC antibody syndrome is now expanding.

  6. Anti-icing coating with an aqueous lubricating layer.

    PubMed

    Dou, Renmei; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Yifan; Wang, Xupeng; Cui, Dapeng; Song, Yanlin; Jiang, Lei; Wang, Jianjun

    2014-05-28

    In this paper, an anti-icing coating with an aqueous lubricating layer is reported. This anti-icing coating can be directly applied to various substrates, and the ice adhesion strength on the coated surfaces can be lowered greatly as compared to uncoated substrates. We demonstrate for the first time that the formed ice on this anti-icing coating can be blown off by a wind action in the wind tunnel with a controlled temperature and wind velocity. Moreover, the low ice adhesion of the anti-icing coating can be maintained even when the temperature is lowered to -53 °C. The robustness and durability of the anti-icing coating are proved by the icing/de-icing experiments. The results show that the anti-icing coating with an aqueous lubricating layer is of great promise for practical applications.

  7. Potential Anti-HIV Agents from Marine Resources: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Thanh-Sang; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and is a global public health issue. Anti-HIV therapy involving chemical drugs has improved the life quality of HIV/AIDS patients. However, emergence of HIV drug resistance, side effects and the necessity for long-term anti-HIV treatment are the main reasons for failure of anti-HIV therapy. Therefore, it is essential to isolate novel anti-HIV therapeutics from natural resources. Recently, a great deal of interest has been expressed regarding marine-derived anti-HIV agents such as phlorotannins, sulfated chitooligosaccharides, sulfated polysaccharides, lectins and bioactive peptides. This contribution presents an overview of anti-HIV therapeutics derived from marine resources and their potential application in HIV therapy. PMID:21339954

  8. Disialoganglioside GD2 anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Cheung, N K; Canete, A; Cheung, I Y; Ye, J N; Liu, C

    1993-05-28

    Disialoganglioside GD2 is widely expressed among neuroblastomas, melanomas, small-cell lung carcinoma, sarcomas and brain tumors. Immunity directed against this antigen may have anti-tumor utility. Since GD2 is poorly immunogenic, anti-idiotypic antibodies may serve as alternative tumor vaccines. Monoclonal antibody 3F8, a murine IgG3 specific for GD2, has shown excellent tumor-targeting ability in vitro and in vivo. LOU/CN rats were immunized with 3F8 and their spleens were used in somatic-cell hybridization, using SP2/0, P3 and Y3 as fusion partners. Six anti-idiotypic (anti-id) MAbs (C2D8, Idio-2, AIG4, C2H7, C4E4, A2A6) were selected based on their reactivity with 3F8 and non-reactivity with murine IgG3 myelomas. Specificity of each anti-id was demonstrated by using various ELISA: (i) lack of direct binding to solid phase myelomas and serum proteins; (ii) inability of other myelomas to inhibit anti-id binding to 3F8; (iii) absence of cross-reactivity of other myelomas to solid-phase anti-id; (iv) lack of inhibition by anti-id of binding of other ganglioside antibodies to their antigens. Antigen specificity was further examined by inhibition of binding of 3F8 to GD2 on immuno-thin-layer chromatography, and by inhibition of 3F8 immunostaining of neuroblastoma cell lines. These 6 antibodies were demonstrated to be distinct, in view of their cross-reactivity, fusion partners and relative strength of binding to 3F8. Anti-GD2 antibodies were induced after immunization with these anti-id antibodies in C57Bl/6 mice. These rat anti-3F8-idiotypic antibodies with exquisite specificity for anti-GD2 antibodies may be useful in vaccine construction.

  9. Anti-aging cosmetics and its efficacy assessment methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang

    2015-07-01

    The mechanisms of skin aging, the active ingredients used in anti-aging cosmetics and evaluation methods for anti-aging cosmetics were surmised in this paper. And the mechanisms of skin aging were introduced in the intrinsic and extrinsic ways. Meanwhile, the anti-aging cosmetic active ingredients were classified in accordance with the mechanism of action. Various evaluation methods such as human evaluation, in vitro evaluation were also summarized.

  10. [Advances in the study on anti-HIV lignan compounds].

    PubMed

    Qin, Hao; Gao, Li; Guo, Jun

    2012-09-01

    Lignan compounds have a variety of pharmacological activities. The mechanism of anti-HIV lignans is through affecting a particular aspect of HIV replication cycle, thus inhibiting viral replication and infection. Lignan is divided into four categories based on different anti-HIV detection methods. In this paper, we summarize the advance in the study on anti-HIV lignan compounds in last two decades.

  11. 26 CFR 1.737-4 - Anti-abuse rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anti-abuse rule. 1.737-4 Section 1.737-4...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Distributions by A Partnership § 1.737-4 Anti-abuse rule. (a) In general. The... on all the facts and circumstances. See § 1.704-4(f) for an anti-abuse rule and examples in...

  12. Search for Anti-angiogenic Substances from Natural Sources.

    PubMed

    Kotoku, Naoyuki; Arai, Masayoshi; Kobayashi, Motomasa

    2016-01-01

    As angiogenesis is critical for tumor growth and metastasis, potent and selective anti-angiogenic agents with novel modes of action are highly needed for anti-cancer drug discovery. In this review, our studies focusing on the search for anti-angiogenic substances from natural sources, such as bastadins, globostellatic acid X methyl esters and cortistatins from marine sponges, and pyripyropenes from marine-derived fungus, together with senegasaponins from medicinal plant, are summarized. PMID:26833441

  13. Anti-D prophylaxis: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    de Haas, M; Finning, K; Massey, E; Roberts, D J

    2014-02-01

    The new British Committee for Standards in Haematology (BCSH) guidelines for the use of anti-D immunoglobulin in pregnancy provide a welcome clarification of the use of anti-D in ectopic pregnancy and after red cell salvage during caesarean section, of dosing with different preparations and distinguishing non-immune and immune anti-D. The routine use of anti-D prophylaxis (RAADP) to prevent Rhesus (Rh) D alloimmunisation during the third trimester is well established and requires careful and well-audited local implementation to achieve the maximum public health benefit. In the UK, such scrutiny may be provided by the reporting of failed anti-D prophylaxis at women who have produced an immune anti-D that is detectable for the first time in the current pregnancy through the voluntary Serious Hazards of Transfusion reporting scheme (SHOT). Application of fetal RHD genotyping would avoid giving anti-D to RhD negative women carrying an RhD negative fetus. RAADP is directed by fetal RHD genotyping in some countries in Northern Europe led by the Netherlands and Denmark. The economic case for RAADP directed by fetal RHD genotyping needs to be carefully evaluated and in England is under consideration by National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). Possible future developments include the use of monoclonal anti-D preparations, now in advanced clinical trials, and also testing the hypothesis that directed RAADP from early in the second trimester may further reduce anti-D immunisation. PMID:25121157

  14. Anti-Ku antibodies: Clinical, genetic and diagnostic insights.

    PubMed

    Belizna, C; Henrion, D; Beucher, A; Lavigne, C; Ghaali, A; Lévesque, H

    2010-08-01

    Anti-Ku antibodies are reported in various connective tissue diseases and the Ku complex can be responsible for a very strong autoimmune answer in autoimmune disease. Nowadays, anti-Ku antibodies are detected by ELISA, counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE), immunoblot (IB) and new highly performant techniques. Although the prevalence of anti-Ku antibodies is not homogenous, depending on several features such as disease type, genetic and geographical clustering, and also method of detection, they could be found in 55% overlap PM/systemic sclerosis patients. Moreover, anti-Ku antibodies are not associated with a particular clinical outcome, and especially with cancer related to myositis.

  15. Anti-hydrogen production with positron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Itahashi, Takahisa

    2008-08-08

    In low-energy antiproton physics, it is advantageous to be able to manipulate anti-particles as freely as normal particles. A robust production and storage system for high-quality positrons and antiprotons would be a substantial advance for the development of anti-matter science. The idea of electron beam ion trap could be applied for storage of anti-particle when the electron beam could be replaced by the positron beam. The bright positron beam would be brought about using synchrotron radiation source with a superconducting wiggler. The new scheme for production of anti-particles is proposed by using new accelerator technologies.

  16. Frequent rhabdomyolysis in anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jung-Ah; Lee, Soon-Tae; Kim, Tae-Joon; Moon, Jangsup; Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Byun, Jung-Ick; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Jung, Ki-Young; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical presentation and provocation factors of rhabdomyolysis in anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Among the 16 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis in our institutional cohort, nine patients had elevated CK enzyme levels and clinical evidence of rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis was more frequent after immunotherapy. The use of dopamine receptor blocker (DRB) increased the risk of rhabdomyolysis. None of the patients without rhabdomyolysis received DRBs. Rhabdomyolysis is a frequent complication in anti-NMDAR encephalitis and more common after immunotherapy and the use of DRBs increases the risk. Therefore, DRBs should be administered carefully in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:27609293

  17. Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis in a Pregnant Woman

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiyoung; Park, Seung Ha; Jung, Yu Ri; Park, Soon Won; Jung, Dae Soo

    2015-01-01

    Anti N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is one of the most common types of autoimmune synaptic encephalitis. Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis commonly occurs in young women with ovarian teratoma. It has variable clinical manifestations and treatment responses. Sometimes it is misdiagnosed as a psychiatric disorder or viral encephalitis. To the best of our knowledge, anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis is a rare condition in pregnant women. We report a case of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis in a pregnant woman who presented with abnormal behavior, epileptic seizure, and hypoventilation. PMID:26157673

  18. Vaccination approach to anti-angiogenic treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Wentink, Madelon Q; Huijbers, Elisabeth J M; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Verheul, Henk M W; Olsson, Anna-Karin; Griffioen, Arjan W

    2015-04-01

    Improvement of patient survival by anti-angiogenic therapy has proven limited. A vaccination approach inducing an immune response against the tumor vasculature combines the benefits of immunotherapy and anti-angiogenesis, and may overcome the limitations of current anti-angiogenic drugs. Strategies to use whole endothelial cell vaccines and DNA- or protein vaccines against key players in the VEGF signaling axis, as well as specific markers of tumor endothelial cells, have been tested in preclinical studies. Current clinical trials are now testing the promise of this specific anti-cancer vaccination approach. This review will highlight the state-of-the-art in this exciting field of cancer research.

  19. Gaseous mediator-based anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Sulaieva, Oksana; Wallace, John L

    2015-12-01

    Among the most commonly used drugs, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) remain problematic because of their propensity to cause serious adverse events, principally affecting the gastrointestinal tract. In recent years, the discovery of potent anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects of endogenous gaseous mediators (nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide, carbon monoxide) stimulated efforts to develop novel, combination NSAIDs that suppress prostaglandin synthesis (producing anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects) and release one or more of the cytoprotective gaseous mediators. Gaseous mediator-based anti-inflammatory drugs have reached the human clinical trial stage and show considerable promise as a safer option for treating chronic inflammatory diseases.

  20. Anti-D prophylaxis: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    de Haas, M; Finning, K; Massey, E; Roberts, D J

    2014-02-01

    The new British Committee for Standards in Haematology (BCSH) guidelines for the use of anti-D immunoglobulin in pregnancy provide a welcome clarification of the use of anti-D in ectopic pregnancy and after red cell salvage during caesarean section, of dosing with different preparations and distinguishing non-immune and immune anti-D. The routine use of anti-D prophylaxis (RAADP) to prevent Rhesus (Rh) D alloimmunisation during the third trimester is well established and requires careful and well-audited local implementation to achieve the maximum public health benefit. In the UK, such scrutiny may be provided by the reporting of failed anti-D prophylaxis at women who have produced an immune anti-D that is detectable for the first time in the current pregnancy through the voluntary Serious Hazards of Transfusion reporting scheme (SHOT). Application of fetal RHD genotyping would avoid giving anti-D to RhD negative women carrying an RhD negative fetus. RAADP is directed by fetal RHD genotyping in some countries in Northern Europe led by the Netherlands and Denmark. The economic case for RAADP directed by fetal RHD genotyping needs to be carefully evaluated and in England is under consideration by National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). Possible future developments include the use of monoclonal anti-D preparations, now in advanced clinical trials, and also testing the hypothesis that directed RAADP from early in the second trimester may further reduce anti-D immunisation.

  1. Pediatric anti-N methyl D aspartate receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Suri, Vinit; Sharma, Sushma; Gupta, Rohan; Sogani, S K; Mediratta, Sunit; Jadhao, Nilesh

    2013-05-01

    Anti-N Methyl D Aspartate Receptor encephalitis (anti-NMDARE) is a recently defined disease, which is probably more under-recognized than rare. We report a case of anti-NMDARE in a 13-years-old girl, who presented with intractable seizures. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second case of pediatric anti-NMDARE being reported from India. The need for a greater awareness of this disease and the subtle differences in clinical presentation between pediatric and adult patients are highlighted. PMID:24082929

  2. Anti-DNA antibodies--quintessential biomarkers of SLE.

    PubMed

    Pisetsky, David S

    2016-02-01

    Antibodies that recognize and bind to DNA (anti-DNA antibodies) are serological hallmarks of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and key markers for diagnosis and disease activity. In addition to common use in the clinic, anti-DNA antibody testing now also determines eligibility for clinical trials, raising important questions about the nature of the antibody-antigen interaction. At present, no 'gold standard' for serological assessment exists, and anti-DNA antibody binding can be measured with a variety of assay formats, which differ in the nature of the DNA substrates and in the conditions for binding and detection of antibodies. A mechanism called monogamous bivalency--in which high avidity results from simultaneous interaction of IgG Fab sites with a single polynucleotide chain--determines anti-DNA antibody binding; this mechanism might affect antibody detection in different assay formats. Although anti-DNA antibodies can promote pathogenesis by depositing in the kidney or driving cytokine production, they are not all alike, pathologically, and anti-DNA antibody expression does not necessarily correlate with active disease. Levels of anti-DNA antibodies in patients with SLE can vary over time, distinguishing anti-DNA antibodies from other pathogenic antinuclear antibodies. Elucidation of the binding specificities and the pathogenic roles of anti-DNA antibodies in SLE should enable improvements in the design of informative assays for both clinical and research purposes.

  3. Anti-atherosclerotic therapy based on botanicals.

    PubMed

    Orekhov, Alexander N; Sobenin, Igor A; Korneev, Nikolay V; Kirichenko, Tatyana V; Myasoedova, Veronika A; Melnichenko, Alexandra A; Balcells, Mercedes; Edelman, Elazer R; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2013-04-01

    Natural products including botanicals for both therapy of clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis and reduction of atherosclerosis risk factors are topics of recent patents. Only a few recent patents are relevant to the direct antiatherosclerotic therapy leading to regression of atherosclerotic lesions. Earlier, using a cellular model we have developed and patented several anti-atherosclerotic drugs. The AMAR (Atherosclerosis Monitoring and Atherogenicity Reduction) study was designed to estimate the effect of two-year treatment with time-released garlic-based drug Allicor on the progression of carotid atherosclerosis in 196 asymptomatic men aged 40-74 in double-blinded placebo-controlled randomized clinical study. The primary outcome was the rate of atherosclerosis progression, measured by high-resolution B-mode ultrasonography as the increase in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) of the far wall of common carotid arteries. The mean rate of IMT changes in Allicor-treated group (-0.022±0.007 mm per year) was significantly different (P = 0.002) from the placebo group in which there was a moderate progression of 0.015±0.008 mm at the overall mean baseline IMT of 0.931±0.009 mm. A significant correlation was found between the changes in blood serum atherogenicity (the ability of serum to induce cholesterol accumulation in cultured cells) during the study and the changes in intima-media thickness of common carotid arteries (r = 0.144, P = 0.045). Thus, the results of AMAR study demonstrate that long-term treatment with Allicor has a direct anti-atherosclerotic effect on carotid atherosclerosis and this effect is likely to be due to serum atherogenicity inhibition. The beneficial effects of other botanicals including Inflaminat (calendula, elder and violet), phytoestrogen- rich Karinat (garlic powder, extract of grape seeds, green tea leafs, hop cones, β-carotene, α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid) on atherosclerosis have also been revealed in clinical studies

  4. Congenital Heart Block Not Associated with Anti-Ro/La Antibodies: Comparison with Anti-Ro/La-positive Cases

    PubMed Central

    Brucato, Antonio; Grava, Chiara; Bortolati, Maria; Ikeda, Keigo; Milanesi, Ornella; Cimaz, Rolando; Ramoni, Veronique; Vignati, Gabriele; Martinelli, Stefano; Sadou, Youcef; Borghi, Adele; Tincani, Angela; Chan, Edward K.L.; Ruffatti, Amelia

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study anti-Ro/La-negative congenital heart block (CHB). Methods Forty-five fetuses with CHB were evaluated by analysis of anti-Ro/La antibodies using sensitive laboratory methods. Results There were 9 cases of anti-Ro/La-negative CHB; 3 died (33.3%). Only 3 (33.3%) were complete in utero and 5 (55.5%) were unstable. No specific etiology was diagnosed. Six infants (66.6%) were given pacemakers. There were 36 cases of anti-Ro/La-positive CHB. All except 2 infants (94.4%) had complete atrioventricular block in utero. Ten died (27.8%), one (2.7%) developed severe dilated cardiomyopathy, and 26 (72.2%) were given pacemakers. Conclusion Nine of the 45 consecutive CHB cases (20%) were anti-Ro/La-negative with no known cause. They were less stable and complete than the anti-Ro/La positive cases. PMID:19567621

  5. Monoclonal and polyclonal γM rheumatoid factors with anti-di- and anti-trinitrophenyl activity

    PubMed Central

    Hannestad, K.

    1969-01-01

    One M-component is described with anti-γG and anti-dinitrophenyl and anti-trinitrophenyl activity. The anti-hapten activity was shown by precipitation of DNP– and TNP–protein conjugates; this precipitation was specifically inhibited by the DNP–hapten. All of the M-component protein had these anti-hapten activities. The whole M-component also precipitated aggregated γG. DNP inhibited the anti-γG activity in precipitation and agglutination systems. Rheumatoid factors from sera of patients with classical rheumatoid arthritis exhibited similar, although weaker, reactivity with the haptens. The data indicate that rheumatoid factors cross-react with dinitrophenyl and trinitrophenyl groups. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 4FIG. 8 PMID:5797417

  6. [Assay of human anti-exoproteins to group A streptococci by microhaemagglutination: correlation with anti-streptolysin O and various anti-enzymes (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Alouf, J E; de Saint Martin, J; Eyquem, A; Geoffroy, C; Jacquemot, C; Duphot, M

    1978-01-01

    A microhaemagglutination test in disposable U plates has been devised for rapid, quantitative evaluation in antistreptococcal antibodies in human sera. Fresh or freeze-dried glutaraldehyde-treated sheep erythrocytes sensitized with over fifteen extracellular proteins released by group A Streptococcus pyogenes including streptolysin O, deoxyribonucleases, hyaluronatelyase, streptokinase and nicotinamide dinucleotide glycohydrolase were used. Haemagglutination and anti-streptolysin O (ASLO) titers were determined in parallel on 434 serum specimens from 123 healthy subjects ("controls") and 311 patients with a history of supposed or evident streptococcal infection. The titration of the four above-mentioned anti-enzyme antibodies has also been made on about 100 sera from both groups. Haemagglutination titre (HT) was less than 800 in control sera. By contrast it was greater than 800 up to 12 800 in patients specimens. Very good correlation was found between HT on the one hand and ASLO or anti-SK, anti-HA and anti-NADase antibodies on the other hand. HT and anti-DNase B antibodies were less correlated. Haemagglutination titres appear to rise earlier than serological titres of conventional streptococcal antibodies. The haemagglutination test described may be particularly helpful as a rapid serologic indicator of streptococcal infections and more reliable than the titration of ASLO alone, or of any one of anti-enzyme antibodies.

  7. Design of anti-burglar alarm systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şchiopu, Paul; Costea, Aurelian

    2015-02-01

    Security, as an important element that defines the quality of a system, represents the capacity of a system to preserve his own functional characteristics under pressure of external disruptive agents capable to represent danger for the system, for the environment of the system, and for the life of people inside the defined risk zone. The main goal of security is system stability. With ever new ideas, technology, procedures, actions and specialized institutions, integrated security services offer protection, surveillance and optimum conditions for system to function and to be used properly. Therefore, security represents the main quality parameter of all systems and processes, without it efficiency was not possible. Keyword list: Security; Anti-Burglar Alarm

  8. Advances in anti-epileptic drug testing.

    PubMed

    Krasowski, Matthew D; McMillin, Gwendolyn A

    2014-09-25

    In the past twenty-one years, 17 new antiepileptic drugs have been approved for use in the United States and/or Europe. These drugs are clobazam, ezogabine (retigabine), eslicarbazepine acetate, felbamate, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, perampanel, pregabalin, rufinamide, stiripentol, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin and zonisamide. Therapeutic drug monitoring is often used in the clinical dosing of the newer anti-epileptic drugs. The drugs with the best justifications for drug monitoring are lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, stiripentol, and zonisamide. Perampanel, stiripentol and tiagabine are strongly bound to serum proteins and are candidates for monitoring of the free drug fractions. Alternative specimens for therapeutic drug monitoring are saliva and dried blood spots. Therapeutic drug monitoring of the new antiepileptic drugs is discussed here for managing patients with epilepsy. PMID:24925169

  9. Polynucleotides encoding anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Kehoe, John; Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2011-01-11

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  10. Anti-racist innovation and nurse education.

    PubMed

    Cortis, J; Law, I G

    2005-04-01

    The focus on institutional racism within the Higher Education (HE) sector in the United Kingdom and nurse education, in particular, has so far been seriously lacking in investigation and scrutiny. The Race Relations (Amendment) Act (RRAA2000) has pushed institutional racism to the forefront of debates in public services, including both education and health services. This paper seeks to operationalise some key aspects of the debate over institutional racism and relates it to both these sectors. Based on empirical work funded by the Higher Education Funding Council for England and Wales (HEFCE) Innovations Project, this paper offers nurse education a framework to not only comply with the legal requirement of 'promoting racial harmony' (RRAA 2000) and the expectations from nursing as enshrined in the Code of Professional Conduct (NMC, 2000. The Code of Professional Conduct: Protecting the Public Through Professional Standards. NMC, London), but goes further to consider some key questions for anti-racist interventions.

  11. Anti-stiction coating for microelectromechanical devices

    DOEpatents

    Hankins, Matthew G.; Mayer, Thomas M.; Wheeler, David R.

    2006-05-16

    A method for depositing an anti-stiction coating on a MEMS device comprises reacting the vapor of an amino-functionalized silane precursor with a silicon surface of the MEMS device in a vacuum chamber. The method can further comprise cleaning the silicon surface of the MEMS device to form a clean hydroxylated silicon surface prior to reacting the precursor vapor with the silicon surface. The amino-functionalized silane precursor comprises at least one silicon atom, at least one reactive amino (or imine) pendant, and at least one hydrophobic pendant. The amino-functionalized silane precursor is highly reactive with the silicon surface, thereby eliminating the need for a post-process anneal step and enabling the reaction to occur at low pressure. Such vapor-phase deposition of the amino-functionalized silane coating provides a uniform surface morphology and strong adhesion to the silicon surface.

  12. Eco-epidemiology as anti-terrorism.

    PubMed

    Miller, Richard E

    Eco-epidemiology is a promising model for cross-disciplinary anti-terrorism. Derived from epidemiology's dominance of agents to illness and injury, the eco-epidemiological paradigm considers natural systems that generate causal pathways to disease and dynamic morbidity. Within this model is a hierarchy of systems interconnecting at biological, human, and social levels. Eco-epidemiology capitalizes on interacting components within and between system levels to identify contact patterns and apply mechanisms of control. Considering the complex and paradoxical nature of the threat-fear dynamic, a systematic, ecological approach would be more adaptive to terrorism's changing rules of engagement. To counter terrorism and nullify threat-fear, eco-epidemiology must be shared by public health researchers with threat assessment and harm reduction disciplines. PMID:17827097

  13. Review of Anti-Inflammatory Herbal Medicines.

    PubMed

    Ghasemian, Mona; Owlia, Sina; Owlia, Mohammad Bagher

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal plants and their secondary metabolites are progressively used in the treatment of diseases as a complementary medicine. Inflammation is a pathologic condition that includes a wide range of diseases such as rheumatic and immune-mediated conditions, diabetes, cardiovascular accident, and etcetera. We introduce some herbs which their anti-inflammatory effects have been evaluated in clinical and experimental studies. Curcuma longa, Zingiber officinale, Rosmarinus officinalis, Borago officinalis, evening primrose, and Devil's claw are some of the introduced medicinal herbs in this review. Since the treatment of inflammation is not a one-dimensional remedy, this review tries to reach a multidimensional therapeutic approach to inflammation with the help of herbal medicine and modification in lifestyle. PMID:27247570

  14. Multivalent glycoconjugates as anti-pathogenic agents†

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Anna; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesus; Casnati, Alessandro; De Castro, Cristina; Darbre, Tamis; Fieschi, Franck; Finne, Jukka; Funken, Horst; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Lahmann, Martina; Lindhorst, Thisbe K.; Marradi, Marco; Messner, Paul; Molinaro, Antonio; Murphy, Paul V.; Nativi, Cristina; Oscarson, Stefan; Penadés, Soledad; Peri, Francesco; Pieters, Roland J.; Renaudet, Olivier; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Richichi, Barbara; Rojo, Javier; Sansone, Francesco; Schäffer, Christina; Turnbull, W. Bruce; Velasco-Torrijos, Trinidad; Vidal, Sébastien; Vincent, Stéphane; Wennekes, Tom; Zuilhof, Han; Imberty, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Multivalency plays a major role in biological processes and particularly in the relationship between pathogenic microorganisms and their host that involves protein–glycan recognition. These interactions occur during the first steps of infection, for specific recognition between host and bacteria, but also at different stages of the immune response. The search for high-affinity ligands for studying such interactions involves the combination of carbohydrate head groups with different scaffolds and linkers generating multivalent glycocompounds with controlled spatial and topology parameters. By interfering with pathogen adhesion, such glycocompounds including glycopolymers, glycoclusters, glycodendrimers and glyconanoparticles have the potential to improve or replace antibiotic treatments that are now subverted by resistance. Multivalent glycoconjugates have also been used for stimulating the innate and adaptive immune systems, for example with carbohydrate-based vaccines. Bacteria present on their surfaces natural multivalent glycoconjugates such as lipopolysaccharides and S-layers that can also be exploited or targeted in anti-infectious strategies. PMID:23254759

  15. Anti-androgens in gynaecological practice.

    PubMed

    Reed, M J; Franks, S

    1988-09-01

    Hirsutism and acne in women are common distressing problems. Unwanted hair growth, acne and seborrhoea result from the action of androgens on the skin. Such effects depend not only on increased androgen production by the ovary or adrenal gland but also on the bioavailability of androgen to peripheral tissues. This in turn is related to transport of androgens in plasma by specific binding proteins and to peripheral metabolism of testosterone and androstenedione to their more potent 5 alpha-reduced derivatives. An effective anti-androgen is one which blocks the androgen receptor-mediated actions of testosterone and DHT on skin. CPA, the treatment of choice in the UK, is a potent androgen receptor-blocking steroid which also has progestational properties. When combined with ethinyloestradiol it also suppresses ovarian function, thus reducing androgen production, and provides effective contraception. PMID:2976627

  16. Review of Anti-Inflammatory Herbal Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemian, Mona; Owlia, Sina; Owlia, Mohammad Bagher

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal plants and their secondary metabolites are progressively used in the treatment of diseases as a complementary medicine. Inflammation is a pathologic condition that includes a wide range of diseases such as rheumatic and immune-mediated conditions, diabetes, cardiovascular accident, and etcetera. We introduce some herbs which their anti-inflammatory effects have been evaluated in clinical and experimental studies. Curcuma longa, Zingiber officinale, Rosmarinus officinalis, Borago officinalis, evening primrose, and Devil's claw are some of the introduced medicinal herbs in this review. Since the treatment of inflammation is not a one-dimensional remedy, this review tries to reach a multidimensional therapeutic approach to inflammation with the help of herbal medicine and modification in lifestyle. PMID:27247570

  17. Artemisinin anti-malarial drugs in China

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zongru

    2016-01-01

    Discovered by Youyou Tu, one of the 2015 Nobel Prize winners in Physiology or Medicine, together with many other Chinese scientists, artemisinin, artemether and artesunate, as well as other artemisinins, have brought the global anti-malarial treatment to a new era, saving millions of lives all around the world for the past 40 years. The discoveries of artemisinins were carried out beginning from the 1970s, a special period in China, by hundreds of scientists all together under the “whole nation” system. This article focusing on medicinal chemistry research, briefly introduced the discovery and invention course of the scientists according to the published papers, and highlighted their academic contribution and achievements. PMID:27006895

  18. Anti-angiogenic peptides for cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rosca, Elena V; Koskimaki, Jacob E; Rivera, Corban G; Pandey, Niranjan B; Tamiz, Amir P; Popel, Aleksander S

    2011-08-01

    Peptides have emerged as important therapeutics that are being rigorously tested in angiogenesis-dependent diseases due to their low toxicity and high specificity. Since the discovery of endogenous proteins and protein fragments that inhibit microvessel formation (thrombospondin, endostatin) several peptides have shown promise in pre-clinical and clinical studies for cancer. Peptides have been derived from thrombospondin, collagens, chemokines, coagulation cascade proteins, growth factors, and other classes of proteins and target different receptors. Here we survey recent developments for anti-angiogenic peptides with length not exceeding 50 amino acid residues that have shown activity in pre-clinical models of cancer or have been tested in clinical trials; some of the peptides have been modified and optimized, e.g., through L-to-D and non-natural amino acid substitutions. We highlight technological advances in peptide discovery and optimization including computational and bioinformatics tools and novel experimental techniques.

  19. Anti-TNFs: Originators and Biosimilars.

    PubMed

    Mantzaris, Gerassimos J

    2016-01-01

    In the last 20 years, the advent of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) biologics has revolutionized the treatment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) but the cost of biologic therapy now constitutes a large proportion of all healthcare expenditures. Patent expiration has sparked the healthcare industry's interest in the production of biosimilar (BS) versions of first generation biologics (originators [ORGs]) for market sharing. Having no access to the production line of the ORG, the sponsor of a BS needs to develop his own manufacturing process to produce a highly similar version of the reference product. Similarity in structure, physicochemical properties, biologic activity, efficacy and safety must be demonstrated by a comprehensive comparability exercise that includes the most sensitive in vitro tests, models and clinical condition with pre-defined equivalence margins. Extrapolation of indications, inter-changeability and automatic substitution between BS and ORG depend on a legal framework that varies between different agencies. It is not, therefore, unexpected that marketing authorization by the European Medicines Agency and other regulatory agencies (but not Health Canada) of CT-P13 (Remsima/Inflectra) as infliximab (Remicade) BSs for IBD by indication extrapolation has led to stormy discussions in the IBD community and beyond regarding the scientific adequacy of this decision. However, as we now have to live with BSs, we hope that the impeding automatic substitution in association with post-marketing pharmacovigilance, full traceability, registries and new studies will settle the controversy and will increase the confidence of physicians and patients. A universally adopted legal framework should be implemented because, as expected, the non-anti-TNFα BSs will be soon on the stage. PMID:26983015

  20. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD) & tissue transglutaminase (anti-TTG) antibodies in patients with thyroid autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Marwaha, R.K.; Garg, M.K.; Tandon, N.; Kanwar, Ratnesh; Narang, A.; Sastry, A.; Saberwal, A.; Bhadra, Kuntal

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Several autoimmune disorders have been reported to be associated with autoimmune thyroiditis and may coexist with other organ-specific autoantibodies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of tissue transglutaminase (anti-TTG) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD) antibodies in patients suffering from autoimmune thyroiditis as diagnosed by anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) antibodies, which may indicate high risk for developing celiac disease or type 1 diabetes mellitus. Methods: Five thousand children and 2800 adults were screening as part of a general health examination done on a voluntary basis in four different parts of Delhi. A total of 577 subjects positive for anti-TPO antibody constituted the cases. Equal number of age and sex matched anti-TPO antibody negative controls were randomly selected from the same cohort to form paired case control study. The cases and controls were further divided into two groups as follows: group-1 (children and adolescent <18 yr), group-2 (adults >18 yr). Serum samples of cases and controls were analysed for thyroid function test (FT3, FT4, and TSH), anti-TTG and anti-GAD antibodies. Results: A total of 1154 subjects (577 cases and 577 controls) were included in this study. Hypothyroidism was present in 40.2 per cent (232) cases compared to only 4.7 per cent (27) in controls (P<0.001). Anti-TTG and anti-GAD antibodies were present in 6.9 and 12.5 per cent subjects among cases compared to 3.5 per cent (P=0.015) and 4.3 per cent (P=0.001) in controls, respectively. Only anti-GAD antibody were significantly positive in cases among children and adolescents (P =0.0044) and adult (P=0.001) compared to controls. Levels of anti-TTG and anti-GAD antibodies increased with increasing titre of anti-TPO antibody. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings showed high positivity of anti-GAD and anti-TTG antibodies among subjects with thyroid autoimmunity. It is, therefore, important to have

  1. Anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic role of BMP receptor II in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Simic, Tatjana

    2013-09-01

    Evaluation of: Kim CW, Song H, Kumar S et al. Anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic role of BMP receptor II in endothelial cells. Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol. 33, 1350-1359 (2013). Increased expression of BMPs in atherosclerosis suggested that the knockdown of the receptor mediating BMP action would prevent endothelial inflammation and atherosclerosis. Based on this hypothesis, Kim et al. performed a series of experiments in which the effect of BMP receptor type II (BMPRII) knockout was tested in in vitro and in vivo models of atherogenesis. Unexpectedly, they found that the loss of BMPRII induces endothelial inflammation and atherosclerosis. Knockdown of BMPRII in endothelial cells induced monocyte adhesion through the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. The loss of BMPRII induced endothelial inflammation and atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice. Besides, BMPRII expression was gradually lost over the course of atherosclerosis progression in human coronary arteries. PMID:24020661

  2. Ultra rapid in vivo screening for anti-Alzheimer anti-amyloid drugs.

    PubMed

    Espargaró, Alba; Medina, Aina; Di Pietro, Ornella; Muñoz-Torrero, Diego; Sabate, Raimon

    2016-01-01

    More than 46 million people worldwide suffer from Alzheimer's disease. A large number of potential treatments have been proposed; among these, the inhibition of the aggregation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), considered one of the main culprits in Alzheimer's disease. Limitations in monitoring the aggregation of Aβ in cells and tissues restrict the screening of anti-amyloid drugs to in vitro studies in most cases. We have developed a simple but powerful method to track Aβ aggregation in vivo in real-time, using bacteria as in vivo amyloid reservoir. We use the specific amyloid dye Thioflavin-S (Th-S) to stain bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs), in this case mainly formed of Aβ in amyloid conformation. Th-S binding to amyloids leads to an increment of fluorescence that can be monitored. The quantification of the Th-S fluorescence along the time allows tracking Aβ aggregation and the effect of potential anti-aggregating agents. PMID:27000658

  3. Biodegradable nanoassemblies of piperlongumine display enhanced anti-angiogenesis and anti-tumor activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Chang, Ying; Yang, Chao; Sang, Zitai; Yang, Tao; Ang, Wei; Ye, Weiwei; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang; Luo, Youfu

    2014-03-01

    Piperlongumine (PL) shows an inhibitory effect on tumor growth; however, lipophilicity has restricted its further applications. Nanotechnology provides an effective method to overcome the poor water solubility of lipophilic drugs. Polymeric micelles with small particle size can passively target tumors by the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, thus improving their anti-tumor effects. In this study, to improve the water solubility and anti-tumor activity of PL, PL encapsulated polymeric micelles (PL micelles) were prepared by a solid dispersion method. The prepared PL micelles showed a small particle size and high encapsulation efficiency, which could be lyophilized into powder, and the re-dissolved PL micelles are homogenous and stable in water. In addition, a sustained release behavior of PL micelles was observed in vitro. Encapsulation of PL into polymeric micelles could increase the cytotoxicity, cellular uptake, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG), and reduce glutathione (GSH) levels in vitro. Encapsulation of PL into polymeric micelles enhanced its inhibitory effect on neovascularization both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with free PL, PL micelles showed a stronger inhibitory effect on the proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Additionally, in a transgenic zebrafish model, embryonic angiogenesis was inhibited by PL micelles. Furthermore, PL micelles were more effective in inhibiting tumor growth and prolonging survival in a subcutaneous CT-26 murine tumor model in vivo. Therefore, our data revealed that the encapsulation of PL into biodegradable polymeric micelles enhanced its anti-angiogenesis and anti-tumor activities both in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Anti-reflective and anti-soiling coatings with self-cleaning properties

    DOEpatents

    Nair, Vinod; Brophy, Brenor L.

    2016-10-04

    Disclosed herein is a coated glass element including a glass component and a coating adhered to the glass component through siloxane linkages, the coating having at least one of an anti-reflective property, a high abrasion resistance property and a hydrophobic property, wherein the coating comprises a dried gel formed from at least one hydrolyzed alkoxysilane-based sol and at least one hydrolyzed organosilane-based sol.

  5. Anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and cytotoxic activity of fibrous clays.

    PubMed

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio-; Ramírez-Apan, María Teresa; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención; Ronquillo de Jesús, Elba

    2015-05-01

    Produced worldwide at 1.2m tons per year, fibrous clays are used in the production of pet litter, animal feed stuff to roof parcels, construction and rheological additives, and other applications needing to replace long-fiber length asbestos. To the authors' knowledge, however, information on the beneficial effects of fibrous clays on health remains scarce. This paper reports on the anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and cytotoxic activity by sepiolite (Vallecas, Spain) and palygorskite (Torrejon El Rubio, Spain). The anti-inflammatory activity was determined using the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) methods. Histological cuts were obtained for quantifying leukocytes found in the epidermis. Palygorkite and sepiolite caused edema inhibition and migration of neutrophils ca. 68.64 and 45.54%, and 80 and 65%, respectively. Fibrous clays yielded high rates of infiltration, explained by cleavage of polysomes and exposure of silanol groups. Also, fibrous clays showed high inhibition of myeloperoxidase contents shortly after exposure, but decreased sharply afterwards. In contrast, tubular clays caused an increasing inhibition of myeloperoxidase with time. Thus, clay structure restricted the kinetics and mechanism of myeloperoxidase inhibition. Fibrous clays were screened in vitro against human cancer cell lines. Cytotoxicity was determined using the protein-binding dye sulforhodamine B (SRB). Exposing cancer human cells to sepiolite or palygorskite showed growth inhibition varying with cell line. This study shows that fibrous clays served as an effective anti-inflammatory, limited by chemical transfer and cellular-level signals responding exclusively to an early exposure to clay, and cell viability decreasing significantly only after exposure to high concentrations of sepiolite.

  6. Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Kahweol, a Coffee Diterpene

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Casimiro; Quesada, Ana R.; Medina, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies have shown that unfiltered coffee consumption is associated with a low incidence of cancer. This study aims to identify the effects of kahweol, an antioxidant diterpene contained in unfiltered coffee, on angiogenesis and key inflammatory molecules. Methodology/Principal Findings The experimental procedures included in vivo angiogenesis assays (both the chicken and quail choriallantoic membrane assay and the angiogenesis assay with fluorescent zebrafish), the ex vivo mouse aortic ring assay and the in vitro analysis of the effects of treatment of human endothelial cells with kahweol in cell growth, cell viability, cell migration and zymographic assays, as well as the tube formation assay on Matrigel. Additionally, two inflammation markers were determined, namely, the expression levels of cyclooxygenase 2 and the levels of secreted monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. We show for the first time that kahweol is an anti-angiogenic compound with inhibitory effects in two in vivo and one ex vivo angiogenesis models, with effects on specific steps of the angiogenic process: endothelial cell proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation on Matrigel. We also demonstrate the inhibitory effect of kahweol on the endothelial cell potential to remodel extracellular matrix by targeting two key molecules involved in the process, MMP-2 and uPA. Finally, the anti-inflammatory potential of this compound is demonstrated by its inhibition of both COX-2 expression and MCP-1 secretion in endothelial cells. Conclusion/Significance Taken together, our data indicate that, indeed, kahweol behaves as an anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic compound with potential use in antitumoral therapies. These data may contribute to the explanation of the reported antitumoral effects of kahweol, including the recent epidemiological meta-analysis showing that drinking coffee could decrease the risk of certain cancers. PMID:21858104

  7. Anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and cytotoxic activity of fibrous clays.

    PubMed

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio-; Ramírez-Apan, María Teresa; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención; Ronquillo de Jesús, Elba

    2015-05-01

    Produced worldwide at 1.2m tons per year, fibrous clays are used in the production of pet litter, animal feed stuff to roof parcels, construction and rheological additives, and other applications needing to replace long-fiber length asbestos. To the authors' knowledge, however, information on the beneficial effects of fibrous clays on health remains scarce. This paper reports on the anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and cytotoxic activity by sepiolite (Vallecas, Spain) and palygorskite (Torrejon El Rubio, Spain). The anti-inflammatory activity was determined using the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) methods. Histological cuts were obtained for quantifying leukocytes found in the epidermis. Palygorkite and sepiolite caused edema inhibition and migration of neutrophils ca. 68.64 and 45.54%, and 80 and 65%, respectively. Fibrous clays yielded high rates of infiltration, explained by cleavage of polysomes and exposure of silanol groups. Also, fibrous clays showed high inhibition of myeloperoxidase contents shortly after exposure, but decreased sharply afterwards. In contrast, tubular clays caused an increasing inhibition of myeloperoxidase with time. Thus, clay structure restricted the kinetics and mechanism of myeloperoxidase inhibition. Fibrous clays were screened in vitro against human cancer cell lines. Cytotoxicity was determined using the protein-binding dye sulforhodamine B (SRB). Exposing cancer human cells to sepiolite or palygorskite showed growth inhibition varying with cell line. This study shows that fibrous clays served as an effective anti-inflammatory, limited by chemical transfer and cellular-level signals responding exclusively to an early exposure to clay, and cell viability decreasing significantly only after exposure to high concentrations of sepiolite. PMID:25819359

  8. Anti-oxidation and Anti-wrinkling Effects of Jeju Horse Leg Bone Hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Hyun-Seok; Park, Nam-Gun; Kim, Young-Boong

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on the anti-oxidative and collagenase- and elastase inhibition effects of low molecular weight peptides (LMP) from commercial Jeju horse leg bone hydrolysates (JHLB) on pancreatin, via enzymatic hydrolysis. Cell viability of dermal fibroblasts exposed to UVB radiation upon treatment with LMP from JHLB was evaluated. Determination of the antioxidant activity of various concentrations of LMP from JHLB were carried out by assessing 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2-azino-bis-3-ethybenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS) radical scavenging activity, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). The DPPH radical scavenging activity of LMP from JHLB (20 mg/mL) was 92.21% and ABTS radical scavenging activity (15 mg/mL) was 99.50%. FRAP activity (30 mg/mL) was 364.72 μM/TE and ORAC activity (1 mg/mL) was 101.85 μM/TE. The anti-wrinkle potential was assessed by evaluating the elastase- and collagenase inhibition potential of these LMP. We found that 200 mg/mL of LMP from JHLB inhibited elastase activity by 41.32%, and 100 mg/mL of LMP from JHLB inhibited collagenase activity by 91.32%. The cell viability of untreated HS68 human dermal fibroblasts was 45% when exposed to a UVB radiation dose of 100 mJ/cm2. After 24 h of incubation with 500 μg/mL LMP from JHLB, the cell viability increased to 60%. These results indicate that LMP from JHLB has potential utility as an anti-oxidant and anti-wrinkle agent in the food and cosmetic industry. Additional in vivo tests should be carried out to further characterize these potential benefits. PMID:26761683

  9. Squalamine analogues as potential anti-trypanosomal and anti-leishmanial compounds.

    PubMed

    Khabnadideh, S; Tan, C L; Croft, S L; Kendrick, H; Yardley, V; Gilbert, I H

    2000-06-01

    This paper concerns the synthesis of various simplified analogues of the novel anti-microbial agent, squalamine. The compounds were then investigated for activity against Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African trypanosomiasis, Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease and Leishmania donovani, the causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis. Several compounds showed in vitro activity, especially against T. brucei and L. donovani. However, one compound showed poor in vivo activity. PMID:10866389

  10. Antioxidant activity, mutagenicity/anti-mutagenicity, and clastogenicity/anti-clastogenicity of lutein from marigold flowers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingchen; Tsao, Rong; Zhang, Shanfeng; Dong, Ziming; Yang, Raymond; Gong, Jianhua; Pei, Yingxin

    2006-09-01

    High dietary intake of lutein has been associated with risk reduction of many chronic diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), cancer, and cardiovascular diseases. Lutein in food is generally regarded as safe. However, information on the toxicological and beneficial effect of lutein at higher doses is limited. In this study, large amount of lutein was extracted and purified from marigold flower (Tagetes erecta L.). The antioxidant activity of lutein was examined by using the photochemiluminescence (PCL) assay and the beta-carotene-linoleic acid model system (beta-CLAMS). Lutein showed a greater antioxidant activity than the other two common carotenoids, beta-carotene and lycopene. The mutagenicity and anti-mutagenicity of lutein at 334, 668 and 1335 microg/plate were examined using the standard Ames test in the presence and absence of S9 mix. Lutein was not only found to be non-mutagenic at all doses, but it showed an anti-mutagenic effect in a dose-dependent manner. Similar results were found in a chromosome aberration test using Chinese hamster ovary cells for the evaluation of clastogenicity and anti-clastogenicity of lutein at 66.8, 133.5 and 267.0 mg/L. Our findings provided scientific evidence for the safe use and health beneficial effects of lutein. PMID:16757077

  11. Ortho-eugenol exhibits anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Fonsêca, Diogo V; Salgado, Paula R R; Aragão Neto, Humberto de C; Golzio, Adriana M F O; Caldas Filho, Marcelo R D; Melo, Cynthia G F; Leite, Fagner C; Piuvezam, Marcia R; Pordeus, Liana Clébia de Morais; Barbosa Filho, José M; Almeida, Reinaldo N

    2016-09-01

    Ortho-eugenol is a much used phenylpropanoid whose ability to reduce pain and inflammation has never been studied. Researching ortho-eugenol's antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity, and its possible mechanisms of action is therefore of interest. The administration of vehicle, ortho-eugenol (50, 75 and 100mg/kg i.p.), morphine (6mg/kg, i.p.) or dexamethasone (2mg/kg, s.c.) occurred 30min before the completion of pharmacological tests. Pretreatment with ortho-eugenol did not change motor coordination test results, but reduced the number of writhes and licking times in the writhing test and glutamate test, respectively. The reaction time from thermal stimulus was significantly increased in the hot plate test after administration of ortho-eugenol. Treatment with yohimbine reversed the antinociceptive effect of ortho-eugenol, suggesting involvement of the adrenergic system. In anti-inflammatory tests, ortho-eugenol inhibited acetic acid induced vascular permeability and leukocyte migration, reducing TNF-α and IL-1β by virtue of its suppression of NF-κB and p38 phosphorylated forms in the peritonitis test. From these results, ortho-eugenol antinociceptive effects mediated by the adrenergic system and anti-inflammatory activity through regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and phosphorylation of NF-kB and p38 become evident for the first time. PMID:27355133

  12. Recent Progress in Anti-Obesity and Anti-Diabetes Effect of Berries

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    Berries are rich in polyphenols such as anthocyanins. Various favorable functions of berries cannot be explained by their anti-oxidant properties, and thus, berries are now receiving great interest as food ingredients with “beyond antioxidant” functions. In this review, we discuss the potential health benefits of anthocyanin-rich berries, with a focus on prevention and treatment of obesity and diabetes. To better understand the physiological functionality of berries, the exact molecular mechanism of their anti-obesity and anti-diabetes effect should be clarified. Additionally, the relationship of metabolites and degradation products with health benefits derived from anthocyanins needs to be elucidated. The preventive effects of berries and anthocyanin-containing foods on the metabolic syndrome are not always supported by findings of interventional studies in humans, and thus further studies are necessary. Use of standardized diets and conditions by all research groups may address this problem. Berries are tasty foods that are easy to consume, and thus, investigating their health benefits is critical for health promotion and disease prevention. PMID:27058561

  13. Comparative anti-inflammatory effects of anti-arthritic herbal medicines and ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joshua J; Samad, Mohammed A; Kim, Kye S; Bae, Soochan

    2014-09-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), such as ibuprofen, are widely used over-the-counter drugs to treat arthritis, but they are often associated with side effects. Herbal medicines have been used to treat various diseases such as arthritis, but the scientific profiles are not well understood. In this study, we examined, in comparison with ibuprofen, the inhibitory effects on various inflammatory markers of the most commonly used herbal medicines to treat arthritis, boswellia (Boswellia sapindales), licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra), guggul (Commiphora wightii), and neem (Azadirachta indica). To elicit inflammatory response, we exposed mouse myoblast C2C12 cells to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), which are cytokines activated during an inflammatory response, were determined. The optimal non-toxic concentration was determined by exposing different concentrations of drugs (from 0.01 to 10 mg/mL). Cell death measurement revealed that the drug concentrations lower than 0.05 mg/mL were non-toxic concentrations for each drug, and these doses were used for the main experiments. We found that neem and licorice showed robust anti-inflammatory responses compared with ibuprofen. However, boswellia and guggul did not demonstrate significant anti-inflammatory responses. We concluded that neem and licorice are more effective than ibuprofen in suppressing LPS-induced inflammation in C2C12 cells. PMID:25918809

  14. Identification of anti-HIV and anti-reverse transcriptase activity from Tetracera scandens.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyeok Sang; Park, Jung Ae; Kim, Joo-Hwan; You, Ji Chang

    2012-03-01

    We report here that an ethanol extract of Tetracera scandens, a Vietnamese medicinal plant, has anti-HIV activity and possesses strong inhibitory activity against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RTase). Using a MT-4 cell-based assay, we found that the T. scandens extract inhibited effectively HIV virus replication with an IC(50) value in the range of 2.0-2.5 μg/ml while the cellular toxicity value (CC50) was more than 40-50 μg/ml concentration, thus yielding a minimum specificity index of 20-fold. Moreover, the anti-HIV efficacy of the T. scandens extract was determined to be due, in part, to its potent inhibitory activity against HIV-1 RTase activity in vitro. The inhibitory activity against the RTase was further confirmed by probing viral cDNA production, an intermediate of viral reverse transcription, in virus-infected cells using quantitative DNA-PCR analysis. Thus, these results suggest that T. scandens can be a useful source for the isolation and development of new anti- HIV-1 inhibitor(s). [BMB reports 2012; 45(3): 165-170]. PMID:22449703

  15. Antioxidant, Anti-Tyrosinase and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Oil Production Residues from Camellia tenuifloria.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Shu-Yuan; Ha, Choi-Lan; Wu, Pei-Shan; Yeh, Chiu-Ling; Su, Ying-Shan; Li, Man-Po; Wu, Ming-Jiuan

    2015-12-10

    Camellia tenuifloria is an indigenous Camellia species used for the production of camellia oil in Taiwan. This study investigated for the first time the potential antioxidant, anti-tyrosinase and anti-inflammatory activities of oil production byproducts, specifically those of the fruit shell, seed shell, and seed pomace from C. tenuifloria. It was found that the crude ethanol extract of the seed shell had the strongest DPPH scavenging and mushroom tyrosinase inhibitory activities, followed by the fruit shell, while seed pomace was the weakest. The IC50 values of crude extracts and fractions on monophenolase were smaller than diphenolase. The phenolic-rich methanol fraction of seed shell (SM) reduced nitric oxide (NO) production, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. It also repressed the expression of IL-1β, and secretion of prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) and IL-6 in response to LPS. SM strongly stimulated heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression and addition of zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), a HO-1 competitive inhibitor, reversed the inhibition of NO production, indicating the involvement of HO-1 in its anti-inflammatory activity. The effects observed in this study provide evidence for the reuse of residues from C. tenuifloria in the food additive, medicine and cosmetic industries.

  16. Antioxidant, Anti-Tyrosinase and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Oil Production Residues from Camellia tenuifloria

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Shu-Yuan; Ha, Choi-Lan; Wu, Pei-Shan; Yeh, Chiu-Ling; Su, Ying-Shan; Li, Man-Po; Wu, Ming-Jiuan

    2015-01-01

    Camellia tenuifloria is an indigenous Camellia species used for the production of camellia oil in Taiwan. This study investigated for the first time the potential antioxidant, anti-tyrosinase and anti-inflammatory activities of oil production byproducts, specifically those of the fruit shell, seed shell, and seed pomace from C. tenuifloria. It was found that the crude ethanol extract of the seed shell had the strongest DPPH scavenging and mushroom tyrosinase inhibitory activities, followed by the fruit shell, while seed pomace was the weakest. The IC50 values of crude extracts and fractions on monophenolase were smaller than diphenolase. The phenolic-rich methanol fraction of seed shell (SM) reduced nitric oxide (NO) production, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. It also repressed the expression of IL-1β, and secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and IL-6 in response to LPS. SM strongly stimulated heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression and addition of zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), a HO-1 competitive inhibitor, reversed the inhibition of NO production, indicating the involvement of HO-1 in its anti-inflammatory activity. The effects observed in this study provide evidence for the reuse of residues from C. tenuifloria in the food additive, medicine and cosmetic industries. PMID:26690417

  17. Cattle tick-associated bacteria exert anti-biofilm and anti-Tritrichomonas foetus activities.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, K R; Seixas, A; Conceição, J M; Zvoboda, D A; Barros, M P; Tasca, T; Macedo, A J; Termignoni, C

    2013-05-31

    Research on microbiota in cattle tick and the evaluation of its activity against other microorganisms can contribute to identify new molecules potentially useful to control infections caused by bacteria and protozoa. Biofilms pose increasing problems worldwide, mainly due to their resistance to antimicrobial therapies and host immune response. In this study we investigate the ability Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus-associated bacteria may exhibit to produce anti-biofilm and trichomonicidal compounds. Gut, ovary, salivary glands, and Gené organ were collected from engorged R. microplus female. Homogenates of each tissue were inoculated onto 15 distinct culture media. Anti-biofilm and trichomonicidal activities were analyzed by culturing each bacterium isolated in a liquid medium. Results showed that R. microplus cattle tick microflora varies for different tissues. Bacteria belonging to different genera (Aeromonas, Bacillus, Brevibacillus, Castelaniella, Comamonas, Kocuria, and Microbacterium) were identified. Interestingly, all bacterial species found displayed pronounced activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms, and also against the cattle pathogen Tritrichomonas foetus, confirming the hypothesis that cattle tick could be a source of bacteria active against pathogens. This is the first study showing that bacteria isolated from a tick exert anti-biofilm and trichomonicidal activities. PMID:23434012

  18. Ortho-eugenol exhibits anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Fonsêca, Diogo V; Salgado, Paula R R; Aragão Neto, Humberto de C; Golzio, Adriana M F O; Caldas Filho, Marcelo R D; Melo, Cynthia G F; Leite, Fagner C; Piuvezam, Marcia R; Pordeus, Liana Clébia de Morais; Barbosa Filho, José M; Almeida, Reinaldo N

    2016-09-01

    Ortho-eugenol is a much used phenylpropanoid whose ability to reduce pain and inflammation has never been studied. Researching ortho-eugenol's antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity, and its possible mechanisms of action is therefore of interest. The administration of vehicle, ortho-eugenol (50, 75 and 100mg/kg i.p.), morphine (6mg/kg, i.p.) or dexamethasone (2mg/kg, s.c.) occurred 30min before the completion of pharmacological tests. Pretreatment with ortho-eugenol did not change motor coordination test results, but reduced the number of writhes and licking times in the writhing test and glutamate test, respectively. The reaction time from thermal stimulus was significantly increased in the hot plate test after administration of ortho-eugenol. Treatment with yohimbine reversed the antinociceptive effect of ortho-eugenol, suggesting involvement of the adrenergic system. In anti-inflammatory tests, ortho-eugenol inhibited acetic acid induced vascular permeability and leukocyte migration, reducing TNF-α and IL-1β by virtue of its suppression of NF-κB and p38 phosphorylated forms in the peritonitis test. From these results, ortho-eugenol antinociceptive effects mediated by the adrenergic system and anti-inflammatory activity through regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and phosphorylation of NF-kB and p38 become evident for the first time.

  19. Evaluating the Anti-nociceptive and Anti-inflammatory Effects of Ketotifen and Fexofenadine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Anoush, Mahdieh; Mohammad Khani, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: As H1 and H3 receptors’ roles has been defined in peripheral pains in some papers and because histamine is known for its role in inflammatory responses; this study investigated the possible analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of ketotifen and fexofenadine as relatively safe long acting anti histamines in both chronic chemical pain and acute inflammation in rats. Methods: In this study, male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 225-250 grams were used. In order to evaluate the chemical chronic pain, sub-plantar injection of formalin applied and the pain scores were recorded every 15 seconds during 60 minutes. Carrageenan injection to the right hind paw was used for induction of acute inflammation and the paw edema was measured every 60 minutes for 4 hours. Results: Based on the results, both ketotifen and fexofenadine were able to significantly diminish chemical acute and chronic pain as well as inflammation in comparison with the control group and the effects were acceptable according to the standard treatment. Both effects for fexofenadine started later than those of ketotifen. Conclusion: According to the outcomes of the study, ketotifen and fexofenadine demonstrated significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory characteristics in both models of chemical pain and acute inflammation in laboratory animals. PMID:26236660

  20. Antioxidant, Anti-Tyrosinase and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Oil Production Residues from Camellia tenuifloria.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Shu-Yuan; Ha, Choi-Lan; Wu, Pei-Shan; Yeh, Chiu-Ling; Su, Ying-Shan; Li, Man-Po; Wu, Ming-Jiuan

    2015-01-01

    Camellia tenuifloria is an indigenous Camellia species used for the production of camellia oil in Taiwan. This study investigated for the first time the potential antioxidant, anti-tyrosinase and anti-inflammatory activities of oil production byproducts, specifically those of the fruit shell, seed shell, and seed pomace from C. tenuifloria. It was found that the crude ethanol extract of the seed shell had the strongest DPPH scavenging and mushroom tyrosinase inhibitory activities, followed by the fruit shell, while seed pomace was the weakest. The IC50 values of crude extracts and fractions on monophenolase were smaller than diphenolase. The phenolic-rich methanol fraction of seed shell (SM) reduced nitric oxide (NO) production, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. It also repressed the expression of IL-1β, and secretion of prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) and IL-6 in response to LPS. SM strongly stimulated heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression and addition of zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), a HO-1 competitive inhibitor, reversed the inhibition of NO production, indicating the involvement of HO-1 in its anti-inflammatory activity. The effects observed in this study provide evidence for the reuse of residues from C. tenuifloria in the food additive, medicine and cosmetic industries. PMID:26690417

  1. Anti-photoaging and Photoprotective Compounds Derived from Marine Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Pallela, Ramjee; Na-Young, Yoon; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Marine organisms form a prominent component of the oceanic population, which significantly contribute in the production of cosmeceutical and pharmaceutical molecules with biologically efficient moieties. In addition to the molecules of various biological activities like anti-bacterial, anti-cancerous, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative etc., these organisms also produce potential photoprotective or anti-photoaging agents, which are attracting present day researchers. Continuous exposure to UV irradiation (both UV-A and UV-B) leads to the skin cancer and other photoaging complications, which are typically mediated by the reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated in the oxidative pathways. Many of the anti-oxidative and anti-photoaging compounds have been identified previously, which work efficiently against photodamage of the skin. Recently, marine originated photoprotective or anti-photoaging behavior was observed in the methanol extracts of Corallina pilulifera (CPM). These extracts were found to exert potent antioxidant activity and protective effect on UV-A-induced oxidative stress in human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells by protecting DNA and also by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a key component in photoaging of the skin due to exposure to UV-A. The present review depicts various other photoprotective compounds from algae and other marine sources for further elaborative research and their probable use in cosmeceutical and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:20479974

  2. Anti-Bias Curriculum: Tools for Empowering Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derman-Sparks, Louise; And Others

    Young children are aware that color, language, gender, and physical ability are connected to privilege and power. Racism and sexism have a profound influence on children's developing sense of self and others. This book on the creation of anti-bias curriculum can be used to help young children develop anti-bias attitudes, learn to think critically,…

  3. 21 CFR 660.50 - Anti-Human Globulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Anti-Human Globulin. 660.50 Section 660.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Anti-Human Globulin § 660.50...

  4. 21 CFR 660.50 - Anti-Human Globulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anti-Human Globulin. 660.50 Section 660.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Anti-Human Globulin § 660.50...

  5. Anti-Social Behaviour: Children, Schools and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Dan

    2007-01-01

    Under Prime Minister Tony Blair's New Labour government, increased criminalisation of previously non-criminal behaviour, anti-social behaviour and greater accountability of children and parents for their behaviour were evident. The article provides an overview of anti-social behaviour legislation and the implications for children, schools and…

  6. Redesigning nature's poisons to create anti-tumor reagents.

    PubMed

    Vitetta, E S; Fulton, R J; May, R D; Till, M; Uhr, J W

    1987-11-20

    Immunotoxins are conjugates of cell-reactive antibodies and toxins or their subunits. In this report, the chemistry, biology, pharmacokinetics, and anti-tumor effects of first generation immunotoxins; the preparation of improved second generation immunotoxins that display greater anti-tumor efficacy; and the role of genetic engineering in creating third-generation immunotoxins are discussed.

  7. What's Missing? Anti-Racist Sex Education!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitten, Amanda; Sethna, Christabelle

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary sexual health curricula in Canada include information about sexual diversity and queer identities, but what remains missing is any explicit discussion of anti-racist sex education. Although there exists federal and provincial support for multiculturalism and anti-racism in schools, contemporary Canadian sex education omits crucial…

  8. 48 CFR 352.203-70 - Anti-lobbying.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Anti-lobbying. 352.203-70 Section 352.203-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 352.203-70 Anti-lobbying....

  9. 21 CFR 660.50 - Anti-Human Globulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anti-Human Globulin. 660.50 Section 660.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Anti-Human Globulin § 660.50...

  10. 21 CFR 660.50 - Anti-Human Globulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anti-Human Globulin. 660.50 Section 660.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Anti-Human Globulin § 660.50...

  11. 21 CFR 660.50 - Anti-Human Globulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anti-Human Globulin. 660.50 Section 660.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Anti-Human Globulin § 660.50...

  12. The Anti-Bias Approach in Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creaser, Barbara; Dau, Elizabeth

    This book on an anti-bias approach to early childhood education addresses aspects of diversity such as gender, race, and language within Australian society and provides strategies for working with families and staff to challenge existing attitudes and practices. Key features of the book include case studies showing anti-bias principles in action,…

  13. Middle School Students' Preferences for Anti-Bullying Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crothers, Laura M.; Kolbert, Jered B.; Barker, William F.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, 285 middle school students in the United States were surveyed to obtain their preferences regarding anti-bullying intervention strategies. Participants rated their preferences for 15 common anti-bullying intervention strategies involving teachers, students, and non-teaching staff. The strategies were generated based on a review of…

  14. Anti-Enterovirus 71 Agents of Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liyan; Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Lishu; Ma, Shurong; Liu, Yonghong

    2015-01-01

    This review, with 42 references, presents the fascinating area of anti-enterovirus 71 natural products over the last three decades for the first time. It covers literature published from 2005-2015 and refers to compounds isolated from biogenic sources. In total, 58 naturally-occurring anti-EV71 compounds are recorded. PMID:26370955

  15. Redesigning Nature's Poisons to Create Anti-Tumor Reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitetta, Ellen S.; Jerrold Fulton, R.; May, Richard D.; Till, Mark; Uhr, Jonathan W.

    1987-11-01

    Immunotoxins are conjugates of cell-reactive antibodies and toxins or their subunits. In this report, the chemistry, biology, pharmacokinetics, and anti-tumor effects of first generation immunotoxins; the preparation of improved second generation immunotoxins that display greater anti-tumor efficacy; and the role of genetic engineering in creating third-generation immunotoxins are discussed.

  16. 76 FR 76896 - International Anti-Fouling System Certificate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ...The Coast Guard is amending its vessel inspection regulations to add the International Anti-fouling System (IAFS) Certificate to the list of certificates a recognized classification society may issue on behalf of the Coast Guard. This action is being taken in response to recently enacted legislation implementing the International Convention on the Control of Harmful Anti-fouling Systems on......

  17. Anti-tumor effects and cellular mechanisms of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Han, Guohua; Xia, Jufeng; Gao, Jianjun; Inagaki, Yoshinori; Tang, Wei; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2015-02-01

    Resveratrol (3, 5, 4'-trihydroxystilbene) is a phytoalexin contained in a variety of plants, such as grapes, berries and especially in the dried roots of Polygonum cuspidatum Sieb. et Zucc. It has been shown to exhibit anti-oxidative and anti-inflammation activity, and to reverse the effects of aging. Its ability to suppress cell proliferation, induce apoptosis and suppress the metastasis and invasion in a number of cell lines has prompted a large interest from people for its use as an anti-tumor component. In this review, evidence of resveratrol's anti-tumor effects and molecular mechanisms are recapitulated. First, we present the anti-apoptosis, anti-invasion/metastasis and anti-inflammation effect of resveratrol; second, the main signaling pathways involved in these activities are described and summarized with the studies of different tumors involved. Resveratrol not only induces apoptosis of tumor cells through intrinsic/extrinsic pathways and cell cycle arrest, but also inhibits the invasion and metastasis abilities of tumors via modulating collagen degradation-related molecular targets. Altogether, the present findings suggest the anti-tumor potential of resveratrol against various types of cancers. PMID:25788047

  18. Colorful Horizons with Charge in Anti-de Sitter Space

    SciTech Connect

    Gubser, Steven S.

    2008-11-07

    An Abelian gauge symmetry can be spontaneously broken near a black hole horizon in anti-de Sitter space using a condensate of non-Abelian gauge fields. A second order phase transition is shown to separate Reissner-Nordstroem-anti-de Sitter solutions from a family of symmetry-breaking solutions which preserve a diagonal combination of gauge invariance and spatial rotational invariance.

  19. 7 CFR 1485.31 - Anti-fraud requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Anti-fraud requirements. 1485.31 Section 1485.31.... AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES Market Access Program § 1485.31 Anti-fraud requirements. (a) All MAP Participants. (1) All MAP Participants annually shall submit to CCC for approval a detailed fraud prevention...

  20. 7 CFR 1485.31 - Anti-fraud requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Anti-fraud requirements. 1485.31 Section 1485.31.... AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES Market Access Program § 1485.31 Anti-fraud requirements. (a) All MAP Participants. (1) All MAP Participants annually shall submit to CCC for approval a detailed fraud prevention...

  1. The Implications of Christian Anti-Semitism for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Patricia

    1995-01-01

    Maintains that the history of anti-Semitism has historical links to Christian theology. Asserts that Christianity provided ample fuel for the secular anti-Semitism preached by Hitler and the Nazi party. Contends that educators can draw important lessons on the value of education and the pedagogy of teaching history. (CFR)

  2. 78 FR 16692 - Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ..., Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS) for an additional 30 days. \\1\\ See 77 FR 74677. The 60... mandate at 72 FR 17688. Section 550 of the Homeland Security Appropriations Act of 2007 requires a risk... SECURITY Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS) AGENCY: National Protection and...

  3. Anti-Enterovirus 71 Agents of Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liyan; Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Lishu; Ma, Shurong; Liu, Yonghong

    2015-01-01

    This review, with 42 references, presents the fascinating area of anti-enterovirus 71 natural products over the last three decades for the first time. It covers literature published from 2005-2015 and refers to compounds isolated from biogenic sources. In total, 58 naturally-occurring anti-EV71 compounds are recorded.

  4. Therapeutic application of anti-angiogenic nanomaterials in cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sudip; Patra, Chitta Ranjan

    2016-06-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vasculature, plays a vital role in physiological and pathological processes (embryonic development, wound healing, tumor growth and metastasis). The overall balance of angiogenesis inside the human body is maintained by pro- and anti-angiogenic signals. The processes by which drugs inhibit angiogenesis as well as tumor growth are called the anti-angiogenesis technique, a most promising cancer treatment strategy. Over the last couple of decades, scientists have been developing angiogenesis inhibitors for the treatment of cancers. However, conventional anti-angiogenic therapy has several limitations including drug resistance that can create problems for a successful therapeutic strategy. Therefore, a new comprehensive treatment strategy using antiangiogenic agents for the treatment of cancer is urgently needed. Recently researchers have been developing and designing several nanoparticles that show anti-angiogenic properties. These nanomedicines could be useful as an alternative strategy for the treatment of various cancers using anti-angiogenic therapy. In this review article, we critically focus on the potential application of anti-angiogenic nanomaterial and nanoparticle based drug/siRNA/peptide delivery systems in cancer therapeutics. We also discuss the basic and clinical perspectives of anti-angiogenesis therapy, highlighting its importance in tumor angiogenesis, current status and future prospects and challenges.Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vasculature, plays a vital role in physiological and pathological processes (embryonic development, wound healing, tumor growth and metastasis). The overall balance of angiogenesis inside the human body is maintained by pro- and anti-angiogenic signals. The processes by which drugs inhibit angiogenesis as well as tumor growth are called the anti-angiogenesis technique, a most promising cancer treatment strategy. Over the

  5. Dopamine agonists, anti-progestins, anti-androgens, long-term-release GnRH agonists and anti-estrogens in canine reproduction: a review.

    PubMed

    Gobello, C

    2006-10-01

    Over the last 10 years, new drugs have been applied to canine reproduction, widening the spectrum of therapeutic possibilities for diseases that were previously surgically treated, and facilitating better control of the estrous cycle and fertility. Some are not approved for use in dogs; their use is experimental and further clinical trials are necessary. Dopamine agonists such as cabergoline, bromocriptine or metergoline are ergoderivative alkaloids that exert an anti-prolactinergic effect via stimulation of D2 pituitary receptors or inhibition of central serotoninergic ones. Their main indication is suppression of lactation. Anti-prolactinergic compounds have also been successfully used for pregnancy termination and shortening of interestrous intervals. Anti-progestins, (e.g. mifepristone and aglepristone) are synthetic steroids that bind with high affinity to progesterone (P4) receptors, preventing P4 from exerting its biological effects. Anti-progestins have been indicated in P4-dependent conditions, such as pregnancy termination, induction of parturition and the medical treatment of pyometra. Several groups of drugs have been described to have anti-androgenic properties through different mechanisms of action: progestins, receptor binding anti-androgens (e.g. flutamide), competitive enzyme inhibitors (e.g. finasteride), aromatase inhibitors, and GnRH agonists. Their main application is medical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Long-term release formulations of GnRH agonists (e.g. leuprolide or deslorelin acetate) postponed puberty and reversibly suppressed reproductive function in male and female dogs for periods exceeding 1 year. Anti-estrogens (e.g. clomiphene and tamoxifen citrate) are synthetic non-steroidal type I anti-estrogenic compounds that competitively block estrogen receptors with a combined antagonist-agonistic effect. In dogs, their action is more agonistic than antagonistic. PMID:16542717

  6. Do plants mediate their anti-diabetic effects through anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic actions? an in vitro assay of 3 Indian medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Both experimental and clinical studies suggest that oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of both types of diabetes mellitus. This oxidative stress leads to β-cell destruction by apoptosis. Hence exploring agents modulating oxidative stress is an effective strategy in the treatment of both Type I and Type II diabetes. Plants are a major source of anti-oxidants and exert protective effects against oxidative stress in biological systems. Phyllanthus emblica, Curcuma longa and Tinospora cordifolia are three such plants widely used in Ayurveda for their anti-hyperglycemic activity. Additionally their anti-oxidant properties have been scientifically validated in various experimental in vitro and in vivo models. Hence the present in vitro study was planned to assess whether the anti-hyperglycemic effects of the hydro-alcoholic extracts of Phyllanthus emblica (Pe) and Curcuma longa (Cl) and aqueous extract of Tinospora cordifolia (Tc) are mediated through their antioxidant and/or anti-apoptotic property in a streptozotocin induced stress model. Methods RINm5F cell line was used as a model of pancreatic β-cells against stress induced by streptozotocin (2 mM). Non-toxic concentrations of the plant extracts were identified using MTT assay. Lipid peroxidation through MDA release, modulation of apoptosis and insulin release were the variables measured to assess streptozotocin induced damage and protection afforded by the plant extracts. Results All 3 plants extracts significantly inhibited MDA release from RIN cells indicating protective effect against STZ induced oxidative damage. They also exhibited a dose dependent anti-apoptotic effect as seen by a decrease in the sub G0 population in response to STZ. None of the plant extracts affected insulin secretion from the cells to a great extent. Conclusion The present study thus demonstrated that the protective effect of the selected medicinal plants against oxidative stress induced by STZ in vitro

  7. Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of Carica papaya.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Saurabh; Cabot, Peter J; Shaw, P Nicholas; Hewavitharana, Amitha K

    2016-07-01

    Chronic inflammation is linked with the generation and progression of various diseases such as cancer, diabetes and atherosclerosis, and anti-inflammatory drugs therefore have the potential to assist in the treatment of these conditions. Carica papaya is a tropical plant that is traditionally used in the treatment of various ailments including inflammatory conditions. A literature search was conducted by using the keywords "papaya", "anti-inflammatory and inflammation" and "immunomodulation and immune" along with cross-referencing. Both in vitro and in vivo investigation studies were included. This is a review of all studies published since 2000 on the anti-inflammatory activity of papaya extracts and their effects on various immune-inflammatory mediators. Studies on the anti-inflammatory activities of recognized phytochemicals present in papaya are also included. Although in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that papaya extracts and papaya-associated phytochemicals possess anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, clinical studies are lacking.

  8. Development of Individualized Anti-Metastasis Strategies by Engineering Nanomedicines

    PubMed Central

    He, Qianjun; Guo, Shengrong; Qian, Zhiyong; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is deadly and also tough to treat as it is much more complicated than the primary tumour. Anti-metastasis approaches available so far are far from being optimal. A variety of nanomedicine formulas provide a plethora of opportunities for developing new strategies and means for tackling metastasis. It should be noted that individualized anti-metastatic nanomedicines are different from common anti-cancer nanomedicines as they specifically target different populations of malignant cells. This review briefly introduces the features of the metastatic cascade, and proposes a series of nanomedicine-based anti-metastasis strategies aiming to block each metastatic step. Moreover, we also concisely introduce the advantages of several promising nanoparticle platforms and their potential for constructing state-of-the-art individualized anti-metastatic nanomedicines. PMID:26056688

  9. Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of Carica papaya.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Saurabh; Cabot, Peter J; Shaw, P Nicholas; Hewavitharana, Amitha K

    2016-07-01

    Chronic inflammation is linked with the generation and progression of various diseases such as cancer, diabetes and atherosclerosis, and anti-inflammatory drugs therefore have the potential to assist in the treatment of these conditions. Carica papaya is a tropical plant that is traditionally used in the treatment of various ailments including inflammatory conditions. A literature search was conducted by using the keywords "papaya", "anti-inflammatory and inflammation" and "immunomodulation and immune" along with cross-referencing. Both in vitro and in vivo investigation studies were included. This is a review of all studies published since 2000 on the anti-inflammatory activity of papaya extracts and their effects on various immune-inflammatory mediators. Studies on the anti-inflammatory activities of recognized phytochemicals present in papaya are also included. Although in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that papaya extracts and papaya-associated phytochemicals possess anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, clinical studies are lacking. PMID:27416522

  10. The anti-oxidant activity of turmeric (Curcuma longa).

    PubMed

    Selvam, R; Subramanian, L; Gayathri, R; Angayarkanni, N

    1995-07-01

    The turmeric anti-oxidant protein (TAP) had been isolated from the aqueous extract of turmeric. The anti-oxidant principle was found to be a heat stable protein. Trypsin treatment abolished the anti-oxidant activity. The anti-oxidant principle had an absorbance maximum at 280 nm. After gel filtration, the protein showed a 2-fold increase in anti-oxidant activity and showed 2 bands in the SDS-PAGE with approximate molecular weight range of 24,000 Da. The protein showed a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect on the promoter induced lipid peroxidation. A 50% inhibitory activity of lipid peroxidation was observed at a protein concentration of 50 micrograms/ml. Ca(2+)-ATPase of rat brain homogenate was protected to nearly 50% of the initial activity from the lipid peroxidant induced inactivation by this protein. This protection of Ca(2+)-ATPase activity was found to be associated with the prevention of loss of -SH groups.

  11. Screening of Tanzanian medicinal plants for anti-Candida activity

    PubMed Central

    Runyoro, Deborah KB; Matee, Mecky IN; Ngassapa, Olipa D; Joseph, Cosam C; Mbwambo, Zakaria H

    2006-01-01

    Background Candida albicans has become resistant to the already limited, toxic and expensive anti-Candida agents available in the market. These factors necessitate the search for new anti-fungal agents. Methods Sixty-three plant extracts, from 56 Tanzanian plant species obtained through the literature and interviews with traditional healers, were evaluated for anti-Candida activity. Aqueous methanolic extracts were screened for anti-Candida activity by bioautography agar overlay method, using a standard strain of Candida albicans (ATCC 90028). Results Twenty- seven (48%) out of the 56 plants were found to be active. Extracts of the root barks of Albizia anthelmintica and Balanites aegyptiaca, and roots of Plectranthus barbatus showed strong activity. Conclusion The extracts that showed strong anti-Candida activity are worth of further investigation in order to isolate and identify the active compounds. PMID:16571139

  12. Lack of anti-tumor activity by anti-VEGF treatments in hepatic hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minsu; Choi, Jin-Young; Lim, Joon Seok; Park, Mi-Suk; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Kim, Honsoul

    2016-04-01

    Recently, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agents have been described in the literature as a valid treatment option for symptomatic liver hemangiomas, but only limited evidence supports this notion. The purpose of this study was to elucidate whether or not the administration of anti-VEGF agents can reliably achieve a size reduction in liver hemangiomas. We examined patients with incidental hemangiomas who received anti-angiogenic agents for the treatment of other malignancies. Our study population consisted of 17 colorectal cancer patients and one lung cancer patient carrying 21 hemangiomas who received bevacizumab, and seven renal cell carcinoma patients carrying nine hepatic hemangiomas who received sunitinib. We have measured the liver hemangioma volume on both the pre-treatment and post-treatment computed tomography images and then calculated the volume alteration rates. No statistically significant difference (P = 0.365) in the volume of the liver hemangiomas was observed before (1.1-168.8 cm(3); mean ± SD 19.8 ± 39.7 cm(3)) or after (1.2-163.6 cm(3); 19.3 ± 38.0 cm(3)) bevacizumab treatment. The volume reduction rate ranged from -35.0 to 11.2 % (mean ± SD -1.3 ± 10.8 %). The sunitinib treatment group also showed no statistically significant difference (P = 0.889) in hemangioma volume before (1.2-6.5 cm(3); 3.0 ± 1.8 cm(3)) or after (1.2-6.0 cm(3); 3.0-1.7 cm(3)) treatment. The volume reduction rate ranged from -13.3 to 7.7 % (median: mean ± SD -2.5 ± 6.6 %). We did not observe liver hemangioma shrinkage after bevacizumab or sunitinib treatment. Our data do not support the application of anti-VEGF agents for the treatment of hepatic hemangiomas.

  13. Potential therapeutic applications of multifunctional host-defense peptides from frog skin as anti-cancer, anti-viral, immunomodulatory, and anti-diabetic agents.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Mechkarska, Milena; Lukic, Miodrag L; Flatt, Peter R

    2014-07-01

    Frog skin constitutes a rich source of peptides with a wide range of biological properties. These include host-defense peptides with cytotoxic activities against bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses, and mammalian cells. Several hundred such peptides from diverse species have been described. Although attention has been focused mainly on antimicrobial activity, the therapeutic potential of frog skin peptides as anti-infective agents remains to be realized and no compound based upon their structures has yet been adopted in clinical practice. Consequently, alternative applications are being explored. Certain naturally occurring frog skin peptides, and analogs with improved therapeutic properties, show selective cytotoxicity against tumor cells and viruses and so have potential for development into anti-cancer and anti-viral agents. Some peptides display complex cytokine-mediated immunomodulatory properties. Effects on the production of both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines by peritoneal macrophages and peripheral blood mononuclear cells have been observed so that clinical applications as anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and immunostimulatory agents are possible. Several frog skin peptides, first identified on the basis of antimicrobial activity, have been shown to stimulate insulin release both in vitro and in vivo and so show potential as incretin-based therapies for treatment of patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review assesses the therapeutic possibilities of peptides from frogs belonging to the Ascaphidae, Alytidae, Pipidae, Dicroglossidae, Leptodactylidae, Hylidae, and Ranidae families that complement their potential role as anti-infectives for use against multidrug-resistant microorganisms. PMID:24793775

  14. Anti-tumoral, anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic efficacy of a tetravalent bispecific antibody (TAvi6) targeting VEGF-A and angiopoietin-2.

    PubMed

    Scheuer, Werner; Thomas, Markus; Hanke, Petra; Sam, Johannes; Osl, Franz; Weininger, Diana; Baehner, Monika; Seeber, Stefan; Kettenberger, Hubert; Schanzer, Jürgen; Brinkmann, Ulrich; Weidner, K Michael; Regula, Jörg; Klein, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A blockade has been validated clinically as a treatment for human cancers. Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) is a key regulator of blood vessel remodeling and maturation. In tumors, Ang-2 is up-regulated and an unfavorable prognostic factor. Recent data demonstrated that Ang-2 inhibition mediates anti-tumoral effects. We generated a tetravalent bispecific antibody (Ang-2-VEGF-TAvi6) targeting VEGF-A with 2 arms based on bevacizumab (Avastin®), and targeting Ang-2 with 2 arms based on a novel anti-Ang-2 antibody (LC06). The two Ang-2-targeting single-chain variable fragments are disulfide-stabilized and fused to the C-terminus of the heavy chain of bevacizumab. Treatment with Ang-2-VEGF-A-TAvi6 led to a complete abrogation of angiogenesis in the cornea micropocket assay. Metastatic spread and tumor growth of subcutaneous, orthotopic and anti-VEGF-A resistant tumors were also efficiently inhibited. These data further establish Ang-2-VEGF bispecific antibodies as a promising anti-angiogenic, anti-metastatic and anti-tumor agent for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26864324

  15. Effects of Egg Shell Membrane Hydrolysates on Anti-Inflammatory, Anti-Wrinkle, Anti-Microbial Activity and Moisture-Protection

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jinhee; Park, Kimoon; Yoo, Youngji; Kim, Jongkeun; Yang, Heejin; Shin, Youngjae

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of eggshell membrane hydrolysates (ESMH) on the anti-inflammatory, anti-wrinkle, anti-microbial activity, and moisture-protection for cosmetic use. Whole ESMH (before fractionation), and fraction I (>10 kDa), fraction II (3-10 kDa), and fraction III (<3 kDa) of the hydrolysates were assessed in this experiment. As lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and IFN-γ caused the inflammation on Raw264.7 cell, whole ESMH and fraction I showed to be effective in inhibiting the induction of cell inflammation depending on the concentration, and also showed outstanding effect to suppress the skin inflammation. Fraction I inhibited collagenase and elastase activities to a greater extent than the other fractions, while all fractions had antibiotic effects at concentrations of 10 mg/disc and 20 mg/disc. In addition, it showed the moisture protection effects of skin on the holding amount and losing amount of moisture in upper-inner arm of the human body with a relatively low loss rate in skin, which confirmed that the hydrolyzed fractions of ESM helps to form the superior protective layer of moisture. It was concluded that ESMH fractions with different molecular weights, especially the 10 kDa fraction, have anti-lipopolysaccharide, anti-IFN-γ-induced inflammation, anti- collagenase and elastase activities, and thus can be used as a cosmetic agent to protect skin. PMID:26760742

  16. Potential therapeutic applications of multifunctional host-defense peptides from frog skin as anti-cancer, anti-viral, immunomodulatory, and anti-diabetic agents.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Mechkarska, Milena; Lukic, Miodrag L; Flatt, Peter R

    2014-07-01

    Frog skin constitutes a rich source of peptides with a wide range of biological properties. These include host-defense peptides with cytotoxic activities against bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses, and mammalian cells. Several hundred such peptides from diverse species have been described. Although attention has been focused mainly on antimicrobial activity, the therapeutic potential of frog skin peptides as anti-infective agents remains to be realized and no compound based upon their structures has yet been adopted in clinical practice. Consequently, alternative applications are being explored. Certain naturally occurring frog skin peptides, and analogs with improved therapeutic properties, show selective cytotoxicity against tumor cells and viruses and so have potential for development into anti-cancer and anti-viral agents. Some peptides display complex cytokine-mediated immunomodulatory properties. Effects on the production of both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines by peritoneal macrophages and peripheral blood mononuclear cells have been observed so that clinical applications as anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and immunostimulatory agents are possible. Several frog skin peptides, first identified on the basis of antimicrobial activity, have been shown to stimulate insulin release both in vitro and in vivo and so show potential as incretin-based therapies for treatment of patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review assesses the therapeutic possibilities of peptides from frogs belonging to the Ascaphidae, Alytidae, Pipidae, Dicroglossidae, Leptodactylidae, Hylidae, and Ranidae families that complement their potential role as anti-infectives for use against multidrug-resistant microorganisms.

  17. Anti-tumoral, anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic efficacy of a tetravalent bispecific antibody (TAvi6) targeting VEGF-A and angiopoietin-2

    PubMed Central

    Scheuer, Werner; Thomas, Markus; Hanke, Petra; Sam, Johannes; Osl, Franz; Weininger, Diana; Baehner, Monika; Seeber, Stefan; Kettenberger, Hubert; Schanzer, Jürgen; Brinkmann, Ulrich; Weidner, K. Michael; Regula, Jörg; Klein, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A blockade has been validated clinically as a treatment for human cancers. Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) is a key regulator of blood vessel remodeling and maturation. In tumors, Ang-2 is up-regulated and an unfavorable prognostic factor. Recent data demonstrated that Ang-2 inhibition mediates anti-tumoral effects. We generated a tetravalent bispecific antibody (Ang-2-VEGF-TAvi6) targeting VEGF-A with 2 arms based on bevacizumab (Avastin®), and targeting Ang-2 with 2 arms based on a novel anti-Ang-2 antibody (LC06). The two Ang-2-targeting single-chain variable fragments are disulfide-stabilized and fused to the C-terminus of the heavy chain of bevacizumab. Treatment with Ang-2-VEGF-A-TAvi6 led to a complete abrogation of angiogenesis in the cornea micropocket assay. Metastatic spread and tumor growth of subcutaneous, orthotopic and anti-VEGF-A resistant tumors were also efficiently inhibited. These data further establish Ang-2-VEGF bispecific antibodies as a promising anti-angiogenic, anti-metastatic and anti-tumor agent for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26864324

  18. Recombinant anti-tenascin antibody constructs

    SciTech Connect

    ZALUTSKY, MICHAEL R

    2006-08-29

    The general objective of this research is to combine genetically derived molecular constructs reactive with tenascin, with appropriate radionuclides and labeling methods in order to generate more effective diagnostic and therapeutic reagents for oncologic nuclear medicine. Tenascin, a polymorphic extracellular matrix glycoprotein, is of interest because of its high expression on glioma, melanoma, as well as prostate and breast carcinoma. Recently, we have also documented high levels of tenascin in lymphomas, particularly those of higher grade, making the potential clinical impact of tenascin-specific radiodiagnostics and therapeutics even greater. An essential feature of our work plan is the ability to exploit our extensive clinical experience in order to design second-generation constructs with properties which could improve clinical efficacy. To date, we have treated over 150 brain tumor patients with 131I-labeled murine 81C6, an antibody which binds specifically to the alternatively spliced fibronectin type III repeats CD of the tenascin molecule. During the current grant period, we have made several observations which form the basis for our proposed specific aims. First, tissue distribution and catabolism experiments in animal models have demonstrated enhanced stability for a chimeric construct composed of murine variable regions and human IgG2 constant domains. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic studies in patients with 131I-labeled chimeric 81C6 have shown significantly longer retention in glioma tumor resection cavities compared with its murine parent. Second, we have initiated the first clinical trial of an endoradiotherapeutic labeled with the 7.2-hr -particle emitter 211At. Twelve glioma patients have received 211At-labeled chimeric 81C6 directly into their brain tumor resection cavity, and very encouraging results have been obtained. Now that the feasibility of human studies with 211At, has been demonstrated, the development and evaluation of anti

  19. Thrombophilia Associated with Anti-DFS70 Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Marlet, Julien; Ankri, Annick; Charuel, Jean-Luc; Ghillani-Dalbin, Pascale; Perret, Amélie; Martin-Toutain, Isabelle; Haroche, Julien; Amoura, Zahir; Musset, Lucile; Miyara, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Context Anti-DFS70 antibodies are the most frequent antinuclear antibodies (ANA) found in healthy individuals. We assessed the clinical significance of the presence of anti-DFS70 antibodies. Methods We defined a group of patients (n = 421) with anti-DFS70 antibodies and a group of patients (n = 63) with a history of idiopathic arterial and/or venous thrombotic disease and/or obstetric complication (i.e. ≥3 miscarriages, fetal death or premature birth with eclampsia). Anti-DFS70 antibodies prevalence was also assessed in a cohort of 300 healthy blood donors. Results The prevalence of thrombotic disease and/or obstetric complication in the 421 patients with anti-DFS70 antibodies was 13.1% (n = 55) and the prevalence of connective tissue disease was 19% (n = 80). Among the 63 patients with a history of thrombosis and/or obstetric complications, 7 (11.1%) had anti-DFS70 antibodies and among the latter, 5 had no common thrombophilic factor. In contrast, the prevalence of anti-DFS70 antibodies was of 3.0% (9 out of 300) in healthy donors. Finally, the Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (aPTT) ratio of patients with a history of thrombosis and anti-DFS70 antibodies was lower than the aPTT ratio of other patients, suggesting that thrombotic patients with anti-DFS70 antibodies may have a hypercoagulable state. Conclusion We described here for the first time an immune procoagulant state involving anti-DFS70 antibodies. PMID:26397729

  20. MAPKAP1 rs10118570 Polymorphism Is Associated with Anti-Infection and Anti-Hepatic Fibrogenesis in Schistosomiasis Japonica

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yunguo; Yan, Jianhua; Yuan, Zhidong; Wu, Lang; Cui, Hongjing; Luo, Haiqing; Kong, Qingming; Tang, Li; Leng, Shuilong; Liao, Yufeng; Fu, Weiming; Xiao, Qin; Li, Dongpei

    2014-01-01

    Chronic infection with Schistosoma japonicum is an important cause of hepatic fibrosis (HF). Human 9q33.3 is one of the most important loci for stress-related diseases. We examined the potential associations of 43 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with S. japonicum infection and HF in epidemic region in China. We identified a SNP (rs10118570 GG in mitogen-activated protein kinase associated protein 1, MAPKAP1) contributes to anti-infection (adjusted OR = 0.35) and anti-fibrogenesis (adjusted RR = 0.44) in the discovery study. Replicative and combined studies showed consistent protective quality for this genotype (replicative: adjusted OR = 0.37 for anti-infection, and adjusted RR = 0.40 for anti-fibrogenesis; Combined: adjusted OR = 0.45 for anti-infection, and adjusted RR = 0.42 for anti-fibrogenesis). Univariate and multivariate analysis in the discovery, replicative and combined studies, suggested that durations (years), splenomegaly, serum ALB and rs10118570 were independent predictors influencing the fibrogenesis. The analysis of gene-gene interaction showed rs10118570 functions independently. We conclude that MAPKAP1 may represent a novel anti-infection and anti-fibrogenesis genomic locus in chronic schistosomiasis japonica. And rs10118570 may be a potential biomarker and target for the treatment of this life-threatening ancient disease. PMID:25153992

  1. In vitro anti-biofilm and anti-bacterial activity of Junceella juncea for its biomedical application

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, P; Selvi, S Senthamil; Govindaraju, M

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the anti-biofilm and anti-bacterial activity of Junceella juncea (J. juncea) against biofilm forming pathogenic strains. Methods Gorgonians were extracted with methanol and analysed with fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Biofilm forming pathogens were identified by Congo red agar supplemented with sucrose. A quantitative spectrophotometric method was used to monitor in vitro biofilm reduction by microtitre plate assay. Anti-bacterial activity of methanolic gorgonian extract (MGE) was carried out by disc diffusion method followed by calculating the percentage of increase with crude methanol (CM). Results The presence of active functional group was exemplified by FT-IR spectroscopy. Dry, black, crystalline colonies confirm the production of extracellular polymeric substances responsible for biofilm formation in Congo red agar. MGE exhibited potential anti-biofilm activity against all tested bacterial strains. The anti-bacterial activity of methanolic extract was comparably higher in Salmonella typhii followed by Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae and Shigella flexneri. The overall percentage of increase was higher by 50.2% to CM. Conclusions To conclude, anti-biofilm and anti-bacterial efficacy of J. juncea is impressive over biofilm producing pathogens and are good source for novel anti-bacterial compounds. PMID:23593571

  2. Synthesis of modified steroids as a novel class of non-ulcerogenic, anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive agents.

    PubMed

    Mohareb, Rafat M; Elmegeed, Gamal A; Abdel-Salam, Omar M E; Doss, Senot H; William, Marian G

    2011-01-01

    The identification of compounds able to treat both pain and inflammation with limited side effects is one of the prominent goals in biomedical research. This study aimed at the synthesis of new modified steroids with structures justifying non-ulcerogenic, anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities. The steroid derivatives were synthesized via straightforward and efficient methods and their structures were established based on the analytical and spectral data. The in vivo anti-inflammatory, anti-nociceptive and anti-ulcerogenic activities of some of these compounds were studied. The newly synthesized compounds 8b, 19b, 24 and 31a showed anti-inflammatory, anti-nociceptive and anti-ulcerogenic activity with various intensities. Oedema was significantly reduced by either dose 25 or 50 mg/kg of all tested compounds at 3 and 4 h post-carrageenan. Compound 19b was the most effective in alleviating thermal pain. The analgesic activity of either dose of the compounds 8b, 24, 31a as well as the high dose 19b was significantly higher than that for indomethacin (IND). Gastric mucosal lesions caused in the rats by the administration of 96% EtOH and IND were inhibited by all tested compounds administered at (50 mg/kg) dose in the study.

  3. Anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic properties of Spirulina platensis and Spirulina lonar: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Somchit, Muhammad Nazrul; Mohamed, Nor Azura; Ahmad, Zuraini; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Shamsuddin, Lokman; Omar-Fauzee, Mohd Sofian; Kadir, Arifah Abdul

    2014-09-01

    Spirulina spp. is a blue-green algae belongs to the family of Oscillatoriaceae, which having diverse biological activity. The aim of this current study was to evaluate and compare the anti-pyretic and anti-inflammatory activity of Spirulina platensis/SP and Spirulina lonar/SL extracts. In the anti-pyretic study, the ability to reduce the rectal temperature of rats induced pyrexia with 2g/kg Brewer's Yeast (BY) was performed. Rats were dosed either 2 or 4 mg/kg SP or SL. Rectal temperature was taken every hour for 8 hours. Results shown that there were significant dose-dependent (p<0.05) reduction of both treatments. However, SP treatment revealed faster reduction in rectal temperature. For anti-inflammatory activity, the reduction in the volume of paw edema induced by Prostaglandin E2 (100 IU/rat intraplantar) was measured. Rats were dosed orally with 2 or 4 mg/kg SP or SL. The paw edema was measured every 30 minutes for 4 hours using plethysmometer. Results had shown a significant dose dependent reduction in diameter of paw edema (p<0.05). The finding suggests that SP and SL extracts have anti-pyretic and anti-inflammatory properties. However, SP was found to be more effective than SL as anti-pyretic and anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:25176383

  4. Influence of side chain configuration on anti-inflammatory analgesic and anti-pyretic properties of 4-biphenylyl alkanoic acids.

    PubMed

    Tenconi, F; Barzaghi, F; Riva, M; Meli, A

    1976-04-01

    A study on the influence of the number of carbon atoms in the side chain as well as side chain configuration on some pharmacologic properties of 4-biphenylyl alkanoic acids is presented. Unlike the chemical structure dependent anti-inflammatory properties, mild analgesic and anti-pyretic properties were neither dependent upon number of carbon atoms nor side chain configuration. PMID:939325

  5. Synthesis, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-ulcerogenic activities of certain novel Schiff's bases as fenamate isosteres.

    PubMed

    Alafeefy, Ahmed M; Bakht, Mohammed A; Ganaie, Majid A; Ansarie, Mohd N; El-Sayed, Nahed N; Awaad, Amani S

    2015-01-15

    A series of certain novel Schiff bases as fenamate isosteres (VI:a-k) were synthesized to locate analgesic, anti-inflammatory agent with minimal ulcerogenic potential. The structures of the newly synthesized compounds were elucidated on the basis of their elemental analysis as well as IR, and NMR and mass spectroscopic data. All the compounds were evaluated for their anti-inflammatory activity by carrageenan induced paw oedema method. The compounds possessing good anti-inflammatory activity were further tested for analgesic, ulcerogenic, lipid peroxidation potentials and liver toxicity. Compounds (VI-c), (VI-f), (VI-h) and (VI-i) showed the best anti-inflammatory and significant analgesic activities at doses comparable to that of the standard drug Indomethacin. However, compounds (VI-c) and (VI-f) could be considered the most potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic molecules with maximum reduction in gastro-intestinal ulceration with no hepatocyte necrosis or liver degeneration.

  6. Anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) antibody conjugated fluorescent nanoparticles probe for breast cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hun, Xu; Zhang, Zhujun

    2009-10-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticles (FNs) with unique optical properties may be useful as biosensors in living cancer cell imaging and cancer targeting. In this study, anti-EGFR antibody conjugated fluorescent nanoparticles (FNs) (anti-EGFR antibody conjugated FNs) probe was used to detect breast cancer cells. FNs with excellent character such as non-toxicity and photostability were first synthesized with a simple, cost-effective and environmentally friendly modified Stőber synthesis method, and then successfully modified with anti-EGFR antibody. This kind of fluorescence probe based on the anti-EGFR antibody conjugated FNs has been used to detect breast cancer cells with fluorescence microscopy imaging technology. The experimental results demonstrate that the anti-EGFR antibody conjugated FNs can effectively recognize breast cancer cells and exhibited good sensitivity and exceptional photostability, which would provide a novel way for the diagnosis and curative effect observation of breast cancer cells and offer a new method in detecting EGFR.

  7. Anti-TNF levels and anti-drug antibodies, immunosuppressants and clinical outcomes in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Ha, Christina; Mathur, Jagrati; Kornbluth, Asher

    2015-04-01

    The anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) antibodies have revolutionized the management of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. The development of assays to allow for the measurements of serum drug levels and anti-drug antibodies have provided a more objective means of therapeutic decision making, particularly among patients losing response to treatment. Additionally, more evidence is emerging that indicates the relationship between drug levels and response to therapy including clinical response, mucosal healing and sustained remission. The use of combination therapies of the anti-TNF agents and the thiopurine immunosuppressants may also decrease immunogenicity to the anti-TNF agents and potentiate response to therapy. With more evidence emerging evidence of the importance of therapeutic drug levels and anti-drug antibodies, clinicians may be able to better optimize the current arsenal of inflammatory bowel disease therapeutics to achieve greater rates of durable remission and improved quality of life.

  8. Unmasking the anti-La/SSB response in sera from patients with Sjogren's syndrome by specific blocking of anti-idiotypic antibodies to La/SSB antigenic determinants.

    PubMed Central

    Routsias, John G.; Touloupi, Evgenia; Dotsika, Eleni; Moulia, Avrilia; Tsikaris, Vassilios; Sakarellos, Constantinos; Sakarellos-Daitsiotis, Maria; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M.; Tzioufas, Athanasios G.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autoantigen La/SSB is molecular target of humoral autoimmunity in patients with primary Sjogren's Syndrome (pSS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this study, we investigated the existence and possible influence of anti-idiotypic response to anti-La/SSB antibodies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Synthetic peptide analogs (pep) of the major antigenic determinants of La/SSB (289-308 aa and 349-364 aa) were prepared. Based on "molecular recognition" theory, complementary peptides (cpep), derived by anti-parallel readings of the noncoding strand of La/SSB DNA encoding for its antigenic determinants, were constructed. Sera from 150 patients with anti-La/SSB antibodies, 30 patients without anti-La/SSB antibodies, and 42 normal individuals were tested against all four peptides. F(ab')(2) fragments from anti-peptide IgG were prepared and F(ab')(2) - IgG interactions were evaluated using a specific anti-idiotypic ELISA. RESULTS: All four peptides were recognized by anti-La positive sera (83% and 51% for pep and cpep 349-364 and 51% and 28% for pep and cpep289-308, respectively). Anti-cpep F(ab')(2 )bound to a common idiotype (Id) located within or spatially close to the antigen combining site of anti La/SSB (anti-pep) antibodies. Homologous and cross-inhibition experiments further confirmed this relation. The anti-idiotypic antibodies inhibited the anti-La/SSB antibody binding to recombinant La/SSB by 91%. To overcome the anti-idiotypic interference in anti-La/SSB detection, a specific assay was developed. Sera were heated for dissociation of Id-anti-Id complexes, anti-Id antibodies blocked with cpep, and anti-La/SSB reactivity was recovered. Application of this method to anti-Ro positive-anti-La/SSB "negative" sera showed that all anti-Ro/SSA positive autoimmune sera also possess anti-La/SSB antibodies. This reaction was not observed in 14 anti-Ro negative- anti-Sm/RNP positive sera from patients with SLE. CONCLUSIONS: Autoimmune sera from patients with p

  9. Anti-infective immunoadhesins from plants.

    PubMed

    Wycoff, Keith; Maclean, James; Belle, Archana; Yu, Lloyd; Tran, Y; Roy, Chad; Hayden, Frederick

    2015-10-01

    Immunoadhesins are recombinant proteins that combine the ligand-binding region of a receptor or adhesion molecule with immunoglobulin constant domains. All FDA-approved immunoadhesins are designed to modulate the interaction of a human receptor with its normal ligand, such as Etanercept (Enbrel(®) ), which interferes with the binding of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) to the TNF-alpha receptor and is used to treat inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Like antibodies, immunoadhesins have long circulating half-lives, are readily purified by affinity-based methods and have the avidity advantages conferred by bivalency. Immunoadhesins that incorporate normal cellular receptors for viruses or bacterial toxins hold great, but as yet unrealized, potential for treating infectious disease. As decoy receptors, immunoadhesins have potential advantages over pathogen-targeted monoclonal antibodies. Planet Biotechnology has specialized in developing anti-infective immunoadhesins using plant expression systems. An immunoadhesin incorporating the cellular receptor for anthrax toxin, CMG2, potently blocks toxin activity in vitro and protects animals against inhalational anthrax. An immunoadhesin based on the receptor for human rhinovirus, ICAM-1, potently blocks infection of human cells by one of the major causes of the common cold. An immunoadhesin targeting the MERS coronavirus is in an early stage of development. We describe here the unique challenges involved in designing and developing immunoadhesins targeting infectious diseases in the hope of inspiring further research into this promising class of drugs. PMID:26242703

  10. Adolescent experiences of anti-obesity drugs.

    PubMed

    White, B; Jamieson, L; Clifford, S; Shield, J P H; Christie, D; Smith, F; Wong, I C K; Viner, R M

    2015-06-01

    Only two anti-obesity drugs (AODs) are frequently prescribed in paediatric obesity, orlistat and metformin. Meta-analyses show modest benefit in clinical trials, yet analyses of prescribing databases show high levels of discontinuation in routine clinical practice. Increased understanding of young people's experiences taking AOD could result in improved prescribing and outcomes. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with young people aged 13-18 years and their parents from three specialist obesity clinics, analysed using a general thematic coding methodology. Theme saturation was achieved after interviews with 15 young people and 14 parents (13 parent-child dyads). Three models were developed. Model 1 explored factors influencing commencement of AOD. Six themes emerged: medication as a way out of obesity, enthusiasm and relief at the prospect of pharmaceutical treatment, last ditch attempt for some but not all, passive acceptance of medication, fear as a motivating factor, and unique treatments needed for unique individuals. Model 2 described the inter-relationship between dosing and side effects; side effects were a significant experience for many young people, and few adhered to prescribed regimens, independently changing lifestyle and dosage to tolerate medications. Model 3 described the patient-led decision process regarding drug continuation, influenced primarily by side effects and efficacy. Use of AODs is challenging for many adolescents. Multiple factors were identified that could be targeted to improve concordance and maximize efficacy.

  11. Carbon Nanotube Network Anti-fuses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, Paulo; Liao, Albert; Rodriguez-Nieva, Joaquin; Barros, Eduardo; Jung, Hyun; Hao, Ji; Jung, Yung; Dresselhaus, Mildred

    2014-03-01

    Copper interconnects are known to fail from electromigration at ~106 A/cm2. However, to continue aggressive scaling in integrated circuits (ICs), new materials that can carry much higher current densities will be required. For this reason, Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which can carry up to 109 A/cm2, are a promising replacement. We discover that after Joule breakdown, CNTs can be healed by applying a healing voltage VH. Such a technology could be useful to repair failed interconnects, creating anti-fuses for field programmable gate array (FPGA) or memory technology. We fabricate a CNT network using a dip-coating method and then we sweep a voltage across the device until the CNT network undergoes Joule breakdown, creating a physical gap (of ~ 10-40 nm) within the network. Making hysteretic I - V sweeps, we observe a sudden increase in current at a voltage ~50 - 80 % of the breakdown voltage VBD. We can reliably break and heal the device multiple times. We also observe the Raman coalescence induced mode (CIM), which is characteristic of sp hybridized carbon chains, after the breaking and healing process. According to our analysis, we conclude that the formation of carbon chains is key to promote the electrical restoration of the broken CNT network.

  12. Anti-infective immunoadhesins from plants

    PubMed Central

    Wycoff, Keith; Maclean, James; Belle, Archana; Yu, Lloyd; Tran, Y; Roy, Chad; Hayden, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Summary Immunoadhesins are recombinant proteins that combine the ligand-binding region of a receptor or adhesion molecule with immunoglobulin constant domains. All FDA-approved immunoadhesins are designed to modulate the interaction of a human receptor with its normal ligand, such as Etanercept (Enbrel®), which interferes with the binding of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) to the TNF-alpha receptor and is used to treat inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Like antibodies, immunoadhesins have long circulating half-lives, are readily purified by affinity-based methods and have the avidity advantages conferred by bivalency. Immunoadhesins that incorporate normal cellular receptors for viruses or bacterial toxins hold great, but as yet unrealized, potential for treating infectious disease. As decoy receptors, immunoadhesins have potential advantages over pathogen-targeted monoclonal antibodies. Planet Biotechnology has specialized in developing anti-infective immunoadhesins using plant expression systems. An immunoadhesin incorporating the cellular receptor for anthrax toxin, CMG2, potently blocks toxin activity in vitro and protects animals against inhalational anthrax. An immunoadhesin based on the receptor for human rhinovirus, ICAM-1, potently blocks infection of human cells by one of the major causes of the common cold. An immunoadhesin targeting the MERS coronavirus is in an early stage of development. We describe here the unique challenges involved in designing and developing immunoadhesins targeting infectious diseases in the hope of inspiring further research into this promising class of drugs. PMID:26242703

  13. Anti-complement sesquiterpenes from Viola yedoensis.

    PubMed

    Du, Dongsheng; Cheng, Zhihong; Chen, Daofeng

    2015-03-01

    Two new germacrane sesquiterpenes, yedoensins A (1) and B (2), together with 8 known ones (3-10) were isolated from the herb of Viola yedoensis. The structures of the new compounds were established by extensive spectroscopic means including 1D ((1)H and (13)C) and 2D NMR experiments (HSQC, HMBC, and NOESY) as well as HR-ESI-MS analysis. The absolute configurations of the known sesquiterpenes versicolactone B (3) and madolin W (6) were determined by a modified Mosher's method for the first time. The sesquiterpenes 1-3, and 5-9 exhibited anti-complement activity against the classical pathway (CP) and the alternative pathway (AP) with the CH50 and AP50 values ranging from 0.14 to 0.37mg/mL and 0.32 to 0.54mg/mL, respectively. Preliminary mechanism study using complement-depleted sera showed that yedoensin A (1) and versicolactone B (3) acted on C1q, C3 and C9, while madolin W (6), aristoyunnolin E (7) and madolin Y (9) interacted with C1q, C3, C5 and C9 components in the complement activation cascade.

  14. Context dependent anti-aliasing image reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaudet, Paul R.; Hunt, A.; Arlia, N.

    1989-01-01

    Image Reconstruction has been mostly confined to context free linear processes; the traditional continuum interpretation of digital array data uses a linear interpolator with or without an enhancement filter. Here, anti-aliasing context dependent interpretation techniques are investigated for image reconstruction. Pattern classification is applied to each neighborhood to assign it a context class; a different interpolation/filter is applied to neighborhoods of differing context. It is shown how the context dependent interpolation is computed through ensemble average statistics using high resolution training imagery from which the lower resolution image array data is obtained (simulation). A quadratic least squares (LS) context-free image quality model is described from which the context dependent interpolation coefficients are derived. It is shown how ensembles of high-resolution images can be used to capture the a priori special character of different context classes. As a consequence, a priori information such as the translational invariance of edges along the edge direction, edge discontinuity, and the character of corners is captured and can be used to interpret image array data with greater spatial resolution than would be expected by the Nyquist limit. A Gibb-like artifact associated with this super-resolution is discussed. More realistic context dependent image quality models are needed and a suggestion is made for using a quality model which now is finding application in data compression.

  15. An anti-glitch in a magnetar.

    PubMed

    Archibald, R F; Kaspi, V M; Ng, C-Y; Gourgouliatos, K N; Tsang, D; Scholz, P; Beardmore, A P; Gehrels, N; Kennea, J A

    2013-05-30

    Magnetars are neutron stars with X-ray and soft γ-ray outbursts thought to be powered by intense internal magnetic fields. Like conventional neutron stars in the form of radio pulsars, magnetars exhibit 'glitches' during which angular momentum is believed to be transferred between the solid outer crust and the superfluid component of the inner crust. The several hundred observed glitches in radio pulsars and magnetars have involved a sudden spin-up (increase in the angular velocity) of the star, presumably because the interior superfluid was rotating faster than the crust. Here we report X-ray timing observations of the magnetar 1E 2259+586 (ref. 8), which exhibited a clear 'anti-glitch'--a sudden spin-down. We show that this event, like some previous magnetar spin-up glitches, was accompanied by multiple X-ray radiative changes and a significant spin-down rate change. Such behaviour is not predicted by models of neutron star spin-down and, if of internal origin, is suggestive of differential rotation in the magnetar, supporting the need for a rethinking of glitch theory for all neutron stars.

  16. Antidepressant augmentation with anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2014-09-01

    Antidepressant augmentation strategies are commonly employed to treat depressed patients who do not respond to antidepressant monotherapy. Neuroinflammatory mechanisms have been implicated in depression, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been found effective in animal models of depression both in monotherapy and when used to augment antidepressant drugs. However, results with NSAIDs have been mixed in human observational studies, with both better and worse depression outcomes reported. Four small (pooled N = 160) randomized controlled trials suggest that celecoxib (200-400 mg/d) augmentation of antidepressant medication improves 4-6 week outcomes in major depressive disorder. There are no data, however, to support the use of celecoxib or other NSAIDs in antidepressant-resistant depression. There are also concerns about adverse events associated with NSAID treatment, and about pharmacodynamic drug interactions between these drugs and serotonin reuptake inhibitors. A reasonable conclusion for the present is that NSAID augmentation of antidepressants is, at best, a tentative approach in nonrefractory major depression.

  17. Advances in Mechanisms of Anti-oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a family of molecules that are continuously produced from oxygen consumption in aerobic cells. Controlled generation of ROS in normal cells serves useful purposes to regulate important cellular processes such as cell proliferation, inflammation, and immune response, but overproduction of ROS causes oxidative stress that contributes to the development of cancer, chronic disease, and aging. These hugely different consequences of ROS exposure demand a carefully balanced control of ROS production and disposition, which is largely achieved through the body’s elaborate antioxidant system. The human antioxidant system consists of small antioxidants, antioxidant proteins, ROS-metabolizing enzymes, as well as many regulator proteins that mediate adaptive responses to oxidant stress. How such a complex system reacts with oxidants and achieves the required specificity and sensitivity for proper anti-oxidation is incompletely understood. In this respect, new advances in the understanding of the chemistry that determines the reaction of a given oxidant or antioxidant with a protein target provide considerable insights into these and related questions. The findings hold certain promise for new drug development for preventing and treating diseases associated with oxidant tissue damage. PMID:24641954

  18. Anti-Idling Battery for Truck Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Keith Kelly

    2011-09-30

    In accordance to the Assistance Agreement DE-EE0001036, the objective of this project was to develop an advanced high voltage lithium-ion battery for use in an all-electric HVAC system for Class-7-8 heavy duty trucks. This system will help heavy duty truck drivers meet the tough new anti-idling laws being implemented by over 23 states. Quallion will be partnering with a major OEM supplier of HVAC systems to develop this system. The major OEM supplier will provide Quallion the necessary interface requirements and HVAC hardware to ensure successful testing of the all-electric system. At the end of the program, Quallion will deliver test data on three (3) batteries as well as test data for the prototype HVAC system. The objectives of the program are: (1) Battery Development - Objective 1 - Define battery and electronics specifications in preparation for building the prototype module. (Completed - summary included in report) and Objective 2 - Establish a functional prototype battery and characterize three batteries in-house. (Completed - photos and data included in report); (2) HVAC Development - Objective 1 - Collaborate with manufacturers to define HVAC components, layout, and electronics in preparation for establishing the prototype system. (Completed - photos and data included in report) and Objective 2 - Acquire components for three functional prototypes for use by Quallion. (Completed - photos and data included in report).

  19. Anti-idiotype antibody vaccine therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya-Chatterjee, Malaya; Chatterjee, Sunil K; Foon, Kenneth A

    2002-12-01

    The use of anti-idiotype (Id) antibodies as vaccines to stimulate antitumour immunity is one of several promising immunologic approaches to the therapy of cancer. Extensive studies in animal tumour models have demonstrated the efficacy of anti-Id vaccines in preventing tumour growth and curing mice with established tumours. A number of monoclonal anti-Id antibodies that mimic distinct human tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) have been developed and tested in the clinic, and demonstrate encouraging results. In general, the antigen mimicry by anti-Id antibodies has reflected structural homology in the majority of the cases, and amino acid sequence homology in a few of them. The greatest challenge of immunotherapy by means of anti-Id vaccines is to identify the optimal anti-Id antibody that will function as a true surrogate antigen for a TAA system, and ideally will generate both humoral and cellular immune responses. Although several clinical studies have shown enhanced survival of patients receiving anti-Id vaccines, the efficacy of these vaccines will depend on the results of several randomised Phase III clinical trials that are currently planned or ongoing. PMID:12517266

  20. Anti-ids in allergy: timeliness of a classic concept.

    PubMed

    Wallmann, Julia; Pali-Schöll, Isabella; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2010-06-01

    Anti-idiotypic antibodies (anti-ids) are part of natural immune responses with regulatory capacity. Their effect on an antigen-specific, so-called Ab1 antibody response, is dependent on 1) the original antigen, which they mirror, being Ab2 antibodies, and 2) their isotype. In the case of IgE-mediated allergy, natural anti-ids against allergen-specific IgE represent internal images of allergen molecules. A key biologic feature of allergens is that they can crosslink IgE, expressed by B-lymphocytes or passively bound via high affinity receptors to effector cells, which renders cellular activation. Therefore, the IgE cross linking capability of anti-ids determines whether they dampen or enhance immediate-type hypersensitivity. Correspondingly to classic antiallergen blocking IgG antibodies, anti-ids may also interact with inhibitory FcγRIIb receptors and, thereby, down-regulate T(H)2-type inflammation. Anti-ids and other B-cell epitope mimetics, like mimotopes and DARPins, represent antigen surrogates, which can be used for vaccination. Intriguingly, they may induce antibody responses without activating potentially proinflammatory, antiallergen T-lymphocytes. Taken together, collective evidence suggests that anti-ids, although representing immunologic classics, are a timeless concept in allergology.

  1. Research progress of ursolic acid's anti-tumor actions.

    PubMed

    Zang, Li-li; Wu, Bao-ning; Lin, Yuan; Wang, Jun; Fu, Lei; Tang, Ze-yao

    2014-01-01

    Ursolic acid (UA) is a sort of pentacyclic triterpenoid carboxylic acid purified from natural plant. UA has a series of biological effects such as sedative, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-diabetic, antiulcer, etc. It is discovered that UA has a broad-spectrum anti-tumor effect in recent years, which has attracted more and more scholars' attention. This review explained anti-tumor actions of UA, including (1) the protection of cells' DNA from different damages; (2) the anti-tumor cell proliferation by the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor/mitogen-activated protein kinase signal or of FoxM1 transcription factors, respectively; (3) antiangiogenesis, (4) the immunological surveillance to tumors; (5) the inhibition of tumor cell migration and invasion; (6) the effect of UA on caspase, cytochromes C, nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) or mammalian target of rapamycin signal to induce tumor cell apoptosis respectively, and etc. Moreover, UA has selective toxicity to tumor cells, basically no effect on normal cells. With further studies, UA would be one of the potential anti-tumor agents. PMID:24374755

  2. Anti-PEG immunity: emergence, characteristics, and unaddressed questions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi; Lai, Samuel K

    2015-01-01

    The modification of protein and nanoparticle therapeutics with polyethylene glycol (PEG), a flexible, uncharged, and highly hydrophilic polymer, is a widely adopted approach to reduce RES clearance, extend circulation time, and improve drug efficacy. Nevertheless, an emerging body of literature, generated by numerous research groups, demonstrates that the immune system can produce antibodies that specifically bind PEG, which can lead to the 'accelerated blood clearance' of PEGylated therapeutics. In animals, anti-PEG immunity is typically robust but short-lived and consists of a predominantly anti-PEG IgM response. Rodent studies suggest that the induction of anti-PEG antibodies (α-PEG Abs) primarily occurs through a type 2 T-cell independent mechanism. Although anti-PEG immunity is less well-studied in humans, the presence of α-PEG Abs has been correlated with reduced efficacy of PEGylated therapeutics in clinical trials. The prevalence of anti-PEG IgG and reports of memory immune responses, as well as the existence of α-PEG Abs in healthy untreated individuals, suggests that the mechanism(s) and features of human anti-PEG immune responses may differ from those of animal models. Many questions, including the incidence rate of pre-existing α-PEG Abs and immunological mechanism(s) of α-PEG Ab formation in humans, must be answered in order to fully address the potential complications of anti-PEG immunity.

  3. Anti-HIV activity of Indian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Sabde, Sudeep; Bodiwala, Hardik S; Karmase, Aniket; Deshpande, Preeti J; Kaur, Amandeep; Ahmed, Nafees; Chauthe, Siddheshwar K; Brahmbhatt, Keyur G; Phadke, Rasika U; Mitra, Debashis; Bhutani, Kamlesh Kumar; Singh, Inder Pal

    2011-07-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients face great socio-economic difficulties in obtaining treatment. There is an urgent need for new, safe, and cheap anti-HIV agents. Traditional medicinal plants are a valuable source of novel anti-HIV agents and may offer alternatives to expensive medicines in future. Various medicinal plants or plant-derived natural products have shown strong anti-HIV activity and are under various stages of clinical development in different parts of the world. The present study was directed towards assessment of anti-HIV activity of various extracts prepared from Indian medicinal plants. The plants were chosen on the basis of similarity of chemical constituents with reported anti-HIV compounds or on the basis of their traditional usage as immunomodulators. Different extracts were prepared by Soxhlet extraction and liquid-liquid partitioning. Ninety-two extracts were prepared from 23 plants. Anti-HIV activity was measured in a human CD4+ T-cell line, CEM-GFP cells infected with HIV-1NL4.3. Nine extracts of 8 different plants significantly reduced viral production in CEM-GFP cells infected with HIV-1NL4.3. Aegle marmelos, Argemone mexicana, Asparagus racemosus, Coleus forskohlii, and Rubia cordifolia demonstrated promising anti-HIV potential and were investigated for their active principles. PMID:21365365

  4. Evidences for anti-mycobacterium activities of lipids and surfactants.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Afzal; Singh, Sandeep Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is the most widespread and deadly airborne disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The two-pronged lethal effect on the bacteria using lipids/surfactants and anti-tubercular drugs may render the miniaturization of dose owing to synergistic and tandem effect of both. The current research has been focused on screening and evaluating various lipids/surfactants possessing inherent anti-mycobacterium activity that can ferry the anti-tubercular drugs. In vitro anti-mycobacterium activity was evaluated using agar well diffusion method. Furthermore, time-concentration dependent killing and DNA/RNA content release studies were performed to correlate the findings. The exact mechanism of bacterial killing was further elucidated by electron/atomic force microscopy studies. Finally, to negate any toxicity, in vitro hemolysis and toxicity studies were performed. The study revealed that capmul MCM C-8, labrasol and acconon C-80 possessed highest in vitro anti-mycobacterium activity. Electron/atomic force microscopy results confirmed in vitro studies and verified the killing of Mycobacterium owing to the release of cytoplasmic content after cell wall fragmentation and disruption. Moreover, the least hemolysis and hundred percent survivals rate of mice using the excipients demonstrated the safety aspects of explored excipients that can ferry the anti-tubercular drugs. The present study concluded the safe, efficient and synergistic activity of the explored excipients and anti-tubercular drugs in controlling the menace of tuberculosis.

  5. Pilot Fullerton dons EES anti-gravity suit lower torso on middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Pilot Fullerton dons ejection escape suit (EES) anti-gravity (anti-g) suit lower torso on forward port side middeck above potable water tank. Anti-g suit is an olive drab inner garment that complements EES.

  6. Anti-phospholipase A₂ receptor antibodies in recurrent membranous nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kattah, A; Ayalon, R; Beck, L H; Sethi, S; Sandor, D G; Cosio, F G; Gandhi, M J; Lorenz, E C; Salant, D J; Fervenza, F C

    2015-05-01

    About 70% of patients with primary membranous nephropathy (MN) have circulating anti-phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) antibodies that correlate with disease activity, but their predictive value in post-transplant (Tx) recurrent MN is uncertain. We evaluated 26 patients, 18 with recurrent MN and 8 without recurrence, with serial post-Tx serum samples and renal biopsies to determine if patients with pre-Tx anti-PLA2R are at increased risk of recurrence as compared to seronegative patients and to determine if post-Tx changes in anti-PLA2R correspond to the clinical course. In the recurrent group, 10/17 patients had anti-PLA2R at the time of Tx versus 2/7 patients in the nonrecurrent group. The positive predictive value of pre-Tx anti-PLA2R for recurrence was 83%, while the negative predictive value was 42%. Persistence or reappearance of post-Tx anti-PLA2R was associated with increasing proteinuria and resistant disease in 6/18 cases; little or no proteinuria occurred in cases with pre-Tx anti-PLA2R and biopsy evidence of recurrence in which the antibodies resolved with standard immunosuppression. Some cases with positive pre-Tx anti-PLA2R were seronegative at the time of recurrence. In conclusion, patients with positive pre-Tx anti-PLA2R should be monitored closely for recurrent MN. Persistence or reappearance of antibody post-Tx may indicate a more resistant disease.

  7. Production and Purification of Anti-Rhombomys opimus Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Akhavan, AA; Ghods, R; Jeddi-Tehrani, M; Yaghoobi-Ershadi, MR; Khamesipour, A; Mahmoudi, AR

    2011-01-01

    Background: Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) is an increasing public health problem in some endemic regions. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) conjugated rabbit anti-Rhombomys opimus (R. opimus) Ig is needed for immunoblotting and ELISA tests used to explore the immune response of the rodents against the sand fly saliva. In this study, the production of HRP conjugated rabbit anti-R. opimus Ig was conducted for the first time. Methods: Rhombomys opimus Ig was purified from serum by protein G affinity chromatography column and injected into rabbit to produce anti-R. opimus Ig antibody. The titration of antibody against R. opimus Ig in rabbit serum was checked using indirect ELISA. Rabbit anti-R. opimus Ig was purified by Sepharose-4B-R. opimus Ig column. Reactivity of this antibody was assessed by indirect ELISA and was conjugated to HRP by periodate method. Results: Approximately 3.5 mg Ig was purified from 1 ml R. opimus serum using protein G affinity chromatography column. The molecular weight of purified R. opimus Ig was estimated about 150 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Nearly 2.3 mg rabbit anti-R. opimus Ig was purified from 1 ml immunized rabbit serum. The purified antibody was conjugated to HRP and the optimum titer of HRP conjugated rabbit anti-R. opimus Ig was determined as 1:8000 using direct ELISA. Conclusion: HRP conjugated rabbit anti-Gerbil IgG has been produced by a few companies, but to our knowledge HRP conjugated rabbit anti-R. opimus Ig is not commercially available. Production of HRP conjugated rabbit anti-R. opimus Ig is considerably helpful for immunological studies of R. opimus, the main reservoir host of ZCL in Iran as well as some other countries. PMID:22808420

  8. Azaindole derivatives are inhibitors of microtubule dynamics, with anti-cancer and anti-angiogenic activities

    PubMed Central

    Prudent, Renaud; Vassal-Stermann, Émilie; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Mollaret, Marjorie; Viallet, Jean; Desroches-Castan, Agnès; Martinez, Anne; Barette, Caroline; Pillet, Catherine; Valdameri, Glaucio; Soleilhac, Emmanuelle; Di Pietro, Attilio; Feige, Jean-Jacques; Billaud, Marc; Florent, Jean-Claude; Lafanechère, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Drugs targeting microtubules are commonly used for cancer treatment. However, the potency of microtubule inhibitors used clinically is limited by the emergence of resistance. We thus designed a strategy to find new cell-permeable microtubule-targeting agents. Experimental Approach Using a cell-based assay designed to probe for microtubule polymerization status, we screened a chemical library and identified two azaindole derivatives, CM01 and CM02, as cell-permeable microtubule-depolymerizing agents. The mechanism of the anti-tumour effects of these two compounds was further investigated both in vivo and in vitro. Key Results CM01 and CM02 induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and exerted potent cytostatic effects on several cancer cell lines including multidrug-resistant (MDR) cell lines. In vitro experiments revealed that the azaindole derivatives inhibited tubulin polymerization and competed with colchicines for this effect, strongly indicating that tubulin is the cellular target of these azaindole derivatives. In vivo experiments, using a chicken chorioallantoic xenograft tumour assay, established that these compounds exert a potent anti-tumour effect. Furthermore, an assay probing the growth of vessels out of endothelial cell spheroids showed that CM01 and CM02 exert anti-angiogenic activities. Conclusions and Implications CM01 and CM02 are reversible microtubule-depolymerizing agents that exert potent cytostatic effects on human cancer cells of diverse origins, including MDR cells. They were also shown to inhibit angiogenesis and tumour growth in chorioallantoic breast cancer xenografts. Hence, these azaindole derivatives are attractive candidates for further preclinical investigations. PMID:23004938

  9. Immunotherapy: Beyond Anti-PD-1 and Anti-PD-L1 Therapies.

    PubMed

    Antonia, Scott J; Vansteenkiste, Johan F; Moon, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    Advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer are cancers in which chemotherapy produces a survival benefit, although it is small. We now know that anti-PD-1/PD-L1 has substantial clinical activity in both of these diseases, with an overall response rate (ORR) of 15%-20%. These responses are frequently rapid and durable, increase median overall survival (OS) compared with chemotherapy, and produce long-term survivors. Despite these very significant results, many patients do not benefit from anti-PD-1/PD-L1. This is because of the potential for malignancies to co-opt myriad immunosuppressive mechanisms other than aberrant expression of PD-L1. Conceptually, these can be divided into three categories. First, for some patients there is likely a failure to generate sufficient functional tumor antigen-specific T cells. Second, for others, tumor antigen-specific T cells may be generated but fail to enter into the tumor parenchyma. Finally, there are a large number of immunosuppressive mechanisms that have the potential to be operational within the tumor microenvironment: surface membrane immune checkpoint proteins PD-1, CTLA-4, LAG3, TIM3, BTLA, and adenosine A2AR; soluble factors and metabolic alterations interleukin (IL)-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, adenosine, IDO, and arginase; and inhibitory cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), regulatory T cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and tumor-associated macrophages. In this article, we discuss three strategies to generate more tumor-reactive T cells for patients: anti-CTLA-4, therapeutic tumor vaccination, and adoptive cellular therapy, with T cells redirected to tumor antigens using T-cell receptor (TCR) or chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) gene modification. We also review some of the various strategies in development to thwart tumor microenvironment immunosuppressive mechanisms. Strategies to drive more T cells into tumors remain a significant challenge.

  10. Immunotherapy: Beyond Anti-PD-1 and Anti-PD-L1 Therapies.

    PubMed

    Antonia, Scott J; Vansteenkiste, Johan F; Moon, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    Advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer are cancers in which chemotherapy produces a survival benefit, although it is small. We now know that anti-PD-1/PD-L1 has substantial clinical activity in both of these diseases, with an overall response rate (ORR) of 15%-20%. These responses are frequently rapid and durable, increase median overall survival (OS) compared with chemotherapy, and produce long-term survivors. Despite these very significant results, many patients do not benefit from anti-PD-1/PD-L1. This is because of the potential for malignancies to co-opt myriad immunosuppressive mechanisms other than aberrant expression of PD-L1. Conceptually, these can be divided into three categories. First, for some patients there is likely a failure to generate sufficient functional tumor antigen-specific T cells. Second, for others, tumor antigen-specific T cells may be generated but fail to enter into the tumor parenchyma. Finally, there are a large number of immunosuppressive mechanisms that have the potential to be operational within the tumor microenvironment: surface membrane immune checkpoint proteins PD-1, CTLA-4, LAG3, TIM3, BTLA, and adenosine A2AR; soluble factors and metabolic alterations interleukin (IL)-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, adenosine, IDO, and arginase; and inhibitory cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), regulatory T cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and tumor-associated macrophages. In this article, we discuss three strategies to generate more tumor-reactive T cells for patients: anti-CTLA-4, therapeutic tumor vaccination, and adoptive cellular therapy, with T cells redirected to tumor antigens using T-cell receptor (TCR) or chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) gene modification. We also review some of the various strategies in development to thwart tumor microenvironment immunosuppressive mechanisms. Strategies to drive more T cells into tumors remain a significant challenge. PMID

  11. Radar ECCM's new area: Anti-STEALTH and anti-ARM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nengjing

    1987-07-01

    While stealth and anti-radar missiles will become major threats to military radars, many countermeasures are also being developed. The commonly used countermeasures against these two threats are: the use of bistatic (or multistatic) systems and low carrier frequencies. Some techniques are also effective against electronic jamming, e.g., low probability intercept techniques (including super-low sidelobe antenna, frequency hopping, flexible and variable coded signals), bistatic (multistatic) systems, weak signal detection and high radar mobility. Clearly, these techniques should be the focal point for current radar research.

  12. Anti-metastatic therapy by urinary trypsin inhibitor in combination with an anti-cancer agent.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, H.; Shinohara, H.; Gotoh, J.; Fujie, M.; Fujishiro, S.; Terao, T.

    1995-01-01

    We have demonstrated that urinary trypsin inhibitor (UTI) purified from human urine is able to inhibit lung metastasis of mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL) cells in experimental and spontaneous metastasis models. In this study, we have investigated whether UTI in combination with an anti-cancer drug, etoposide, can prevent tumour metastasis and show an enhanced therapeutic effect. Subcutaneous (s.c.) implantation of 3LL cells (1 x 10(6) cells) in the abdominal wall of C57BL/6 female mice resulted in macroscopic lung metastasis within 21 days. Microscopic lung metastasis was established by day 14 after tumour cell inoculation, and surgical treatment alone after this time resulted in no inhibition of lung metastasis. The number of lung tumour colonies in the group of mice which received surgery at day 21 was greater than in mice which had tumours left in situ (P = 0.0017). Surgical treatment on day 7, followed by UTI administration (s.c.) for 7 days, led to a decrease in lung metastasis compared with untreated animals. A significant inhibition of the formation of pulmonary metastasis was obtained with daily s.c. injections of UTI for 7 days immediately after tumour cell inoculation. UTI administration did not affect the primary tumour size at the time of operation. In addition, etoposide treatment alone led to a smaller primary tumours and yielded reduction of the formation of lung metastasis in the group of mice which received surgery at day 14 (P = 0.0026). Even in mice which received surgical treatment on day 14, followed by the combination of UTI (500 micrograms per mouse, days 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 and 20) with etoposide (40 mg kg-1, days 14, 18 and 22), there was significant reduction of the formation of lung metastasis (P = 0.0001). Thus, the combination of an anti-metastatic agent with an anti-cancer drug, etoposide, might provide a therapeutically promising basis for anti-metastatic therapy. PMID:7577458

  13. Anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activities of the wild edible cruciferous: Diplotaxis simplex.

    PubMed

    Jdir, Hamida; Khemakham, Bassem; Najjaa, Hanen; Chakroun, Mouna; Jridi, Mourad; Ben Arfa, Abdelkarim; Ben Ali, Yassine; Zouari, Nacim

    2016-10-01

    Context The present study deals with new biological properties of the wild edible Diplotaxis simplex (Viv.) Spreng (Brassicaceae). Objectives The current study evaluates the antioxidant, the anti-inflammatory and the anti-cancer properties of ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts from D. simplex flowers. Materials and methods The anti-proliferative activity of the extracts (10-70 μg/mL) was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) against human colon cancer cell line Caco-2. The anti-inflammatory potential was evaluated by the inhibitory effect of the extracts (1.5-7.5 mg/mL) on phospholipase A2 activity as well as on carrageenan-induced paw oedema in mice. Extracts (200 mg/kg) or indomethacin (50 mg/kg) as positive control were injected intraperitoneally for albino mice prior to the induction of the oedema by carrageenan. Antioxidant activities were investigated using various complementary methods. Results Flower extracts contained a high level of polyphenolics (17.10-52.70 mg GAE/g) and flavonoids (74.20-100.60 mg QE/g), which correlate with its appreciable antioxidant potential in β-carotene peroxidation (IC50 value: 12.50-27.10 μg/mL), DPPH(•) radical-scavenging (IC50 value: 0.20-0.40 mg/mL), Fe(3+ )reducing (EC50 value: 0.10-0.14 mg/mL) and Fe(2+ )chelating (IC50 value: 0.20-0.60 mg/mL) assays. These extracts were effective in inhibiting cancer cell growth (IC50 value: 62.0-63.25 μg/mL). Besides, the ethyl acetate extract inhibited phospholipase A2 activity (IC50 value: 2.97 mg/mL) and reduced the paw oedema in mice (from 0.38 ± 0.01 to 0.24 ± 0.01 cm), 4 h post-carrageenan challenge. Conclusion These data suggest that D. simplex may be useful as a candidate in the treatment of inflammation and the colon cancer. PMID:26916801

  14. The World Anti-Doping Code in sport

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, David

    2015-01-01

    Summary Some athletes cheat by using drugs or medical methods such as transfusion to enhance their performance. However, this may put their health at risk. The World Anti-Doping Agency prohibits certain methods and drugs that may enhance performance, harm the athlete or violate the spirit of sport. Some may be banned only during competitions, but others are banned at all times. Prohibited substances include over-the-counter and prescription medicines. It is therefore important for athletes and health professionals to check what is permitted. There are many resources available through organisations such as the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority and the World Anti-Doping Agency. PMID:26648655

  15. The solution structure of an anti-CRISPR protein

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Karen L.; Garcia, Bianca; Bondy-Denomy, Joseph; Bona, Diane; Hidalgo-Reyes, Yurima; Davidson, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial CRISPR–Cas adaptive immune systems use small guide RNAs to protect against phage infection and invasion by foreign genetic elements. We previously demonstrated that a group of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phages encode anti-CRISPR proteins that inactivate the type I-F and I-E CRISPR–Cas systems using distinct mechanisms. Here, we present the three-dimensional structure of an anti-CRISPR protein and map a functional surface that is critical for its potent inhibitory activity. The interaction of the anti-CRISPR protein with the CRISPR–Cas complex through this functional surface is proposed to prevent the binding of target DNA. PMID:27725669

  16. [Review about mechanisms of anti-cancer of Solanum nigrum].

    PubMed

    An, Lei; Tang, Jin-tian; Liu, Xin-min; Gao, Nan-nan

    2006-08-01

    This paper gave a brief introduction of the effect of Solanum nigrum on anti-cancer. The experimental results showed that the total alkaloid isolated from S. nigrum interfered structure and function of tumor cell membrane, disturbed the synthesis of DNA and RNA, changed the cell cycle distribution, so that total alkaloids could play in inhibabition to tumor cells, while the glycoprotein (150 x 10(3)) isolated from S. nigrum might have shown anti-cancer abilities by blocking the anti-apoptotic pathway of NF-kappaB, activating caspase cascades reaction and increasing the production of nitric oxide. PMID:17048560

  17. Anti-inflammatory activity of Bacopa monniera in rodents.

    PubMed

    Channa, Shabana; Dar, Ahsana; Anjum, Shazia; Yaqoob, Muhammad; Atta-Ur-Rahman

    2006-03-01

    The ethanol extract of Bacopa monniera (Scrophulariaceae) exhibited marked anti-inflammatory activity against carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice and rats, an acute inflammatory model. To assess the possible mechanism of anti-inflammatory action against carrageenan, the ethanol extract was treated with chemical mediators (histamine, serotonin, bradykinin, prostaglandin E(2) and arachidonic acid)-induced edema in rats. The extract selectively inhibited prostaglandin E(2)-induced inflammation. Thus, it may be inferred that B. monniera possesses significant anti-inflammatory activity that may well be relevant for its effectiveness in the healing of various inflammatory conditions in traditional medicine.

  18. Anti-aromatase chemicals in red wine.

    PubMed

    Eng, E T; Williams, D; Mandava, U; Kirma, N; Tekmal, R R; Chen, S

    2002-06-01

    Estrogen synthesized in situ plays a more important role in breast cancer cell proliferation than does circulating estrogen. Aromatase is the enzyme that converts androgen to estrogen and is expressed at a higher level in breast cancer tissue than in surrounding noncancer tissue. A promising route of chemoprevention against breast cancer may be through the suppression of in situ estrogen formation using aromatase inhibitors. A diet high in fruits and vegetables may reduce the incidence of breast cancer, because they contain phytochemicals that can act as aromatase inhibitors. In our previous studies, we found that grapes and wine contain potent phytochemicals that can inhibit aromatase. We show that red wine was more effective than white wine in suppressing aromatase activity. Interestingly, our results from white wine studies suggest a weak inductive effect of alcohol on aromatase activity. On the other hand, the potent effect of anti-aromatase chemicals in red wine overcomes the weak inductive effect of alcohol in wine. Several purification procedures were performed on whole red wine to separate active aromatase inhibitors from non-active compounds. These techniques included liquid-liquid extraction, silica gel chromatography, various solid phase extraction (SPE) columns, and high performance liquid chromatography. An active Pinot Noir red wine SPE C18 column fraction (20% acetonitrile:water) was more effective than complete Pinot Noir wine in suppressing aromatase assay. This red wine extract was further analyzed in a transgenic mouse model in which aromatase was over-expressed in mammary tissue. Our gavaged red wine extract completely abrogated aromatase-induced hyperplasia and other neoplastic changes in mammary tissue. These results suggest that red wine or red wine extract may be a chemopreventive diet supplement for postmenopausal women who have a high risk of breast cancer. Further research is underway to purify and characterize the active compounds in red

  19. Anti hyperglycemic activities of Annona muricata (Linn).

    PubMed

    Adeyemi, David Olawale; Komolafe, Omobola Aderibigbe; Adewole, Olarinde Stephen; Obuotor, Efere Martins; Adenowo, Thomas Kehinde

    2008-10-25

    This study was designed to determine the effects of methanolic extracts of Annona muricata (Linn) on the blood glucose level of streptozotocin-induced diabetic Wistar rats. Thirty adult Wistar rats were randomly assigned into three groups (A, B and C) of ten rats each. Group A was the control, Group B was untreated hyperglycemic group and group C was A. muricata-treated group. Hyperglycemia was induced in groups B and C by a single intraperitoneal injection of 80 mg/kg streptozotocin dissolved in 0.1 M citrate buffer. The control group was intraperitoneally injected with equivalent volume of citrate buffer and all the animals were monitored for four weeks. Daily intra peritoneal injection of 100 mg/kg A. muricata was administered to group C rats for two weeks and the animals were monitored for another two weeks. The data obtained were analyzed with descriptive and inferential statistics. The result showed a mean body weight of 206 +/- 7.74 g, 173.29+/-5.13 g and 197 +/- 5.62 g respectively for the control, untreated diabetic and A. muricata-treated diabetic group, and a mean blood glucose concentration of 3.78 +/- 0.190 mmol/L, 21.64 +/- 2.229 mmol/L and 4.22 +/- 0.151 mmol/L for the control, untreated diabetic and treated diabetic groups respectively. A significant difference exists between the blood glucose concentrations of treated and untreated hyperglycemic groups of rats. The result of this study demonstrated that A. muricata possesses anti-hyperglycemic activities.

  20. Anti-inflammatory glucocorticoids: changing concepts.

    PubMed

    Newton, Robert

    2014-02-01

    Despite being the most effective anti-inflammatory treatment for chronic inflammatory diseases, the mechanisms by which glucocorticoids (corticosteroids) effect repression of inflammatory gene expression remain incompletely understood. Direct interaction of the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) with inflammatory transcription factors to repress transcriptional activity, i.e. transrepression, represents one mechanism of action. However, transcriptional activation, or transactivation, by NR3C1 also represents an important mechanism of glucocorticoid action. Glucocorticoids rapidly and profoundly increase expression of multiple genes, many with properties consistent with the repression of inflammatory gene expression. For example: the dual specificity phosphatase, DUSP1, reduces activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases; glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (TSC22D3) represses nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcriptional responses; inhibitor of κBα (NFKBIA) inhibits NF-κB; tristraprolin (ZFP36) destabilises and translationally represses inflammatory mRNAs; CDKN1C, a cell cycle regulator, may attenuate JUN N-terminal kinase signalling; and regulator of G-protein signalling 2 (RGS2), by reducing signalling from Gαq-linked G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), is bronchoprotective. While glucocorticoid-dependent transrepression can co-exist with transactivation, transactivation may account for the greatest level and most potent repression of inflammatory genes. Equally, NR3C1 transactivation is enhanced by β2-adrenoceptor agonists and may explain the enhanced clinical efficacy of β2-adrenoceptor/glucocorticoid combination therapies in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Finally, NR3C1 transactivation is reduced by inflammatory stimuli, including respiratory syncytial virus and human rhinovirus. This provides an explanation for glucocorticoid resistance. Continuing efforts to understand roles for glucocorticoid

  1. Anti-inflammatory therapies for cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Ridker, Paul M.; Lüscher, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    Atherothrombosis is no longer considered solely a disorder of lipoprotein accumulation in the arterial wall. Rather, the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic lesions is currently understood to have major inflammatory influences that encompass components of both the innate and acquired immune systems. Promising clinical data for ‘upstream’ biomarkers of inflammation such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) as well as ‘downstream’ biomarkers such as C-reactive protein, observations regarding cholesterol crystals as an activator of the IL-1β generating inflammasome, and recent Mendelian randomization data for the IL-6 receptor support the hypothesis that inflammatory mediators of atherosclerosis may converge on the central IL-1, tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α), IL-6 signalling pathway. On this basis, emerging anti-inflammatory approaches to vascular protection can be categorized into two broad groups, those that target the central IL-6 inflammatory signalling pathway and those that do not. Large-scale Phase III trials are now underway with agents that lead to marked reductions in IL-6 and C-reactive protein (such as canakinumab and methotrexate) as well as with agents that impact on diverse non-IL-6-dependent pathways (such as varespladib and darapladib). Both approaches have the potential to benefit patients and reduce vascular events. However, care should be taken when interpreting these trials as outcomes for agents that target IL-6 signalling are unlikely to be informative for therapies that target alternative pathways, and vice versa. As the inflammatory system is redundant, compensatory, and crucial for survival, evaluation of risks as well as benefits must drive the development of agents in this class. PMID:24864079

  2. Cannabinoids as novel anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Nagarkatti, Prakash; Pandey, Rupal; Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Hegde, Venkatesh L; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2009-01-01

    Cannabinoids are a group of compounds that mediate their effects through cannabinoid receptors. The discovery of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) as the major psychoactive principle in marijuana, as well as the identification of cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands, has led to a significant growth in research aimed at understanding the physiological functions of cannabinoids. Cannabinoid receptors include CB1, which is predominantly expressed in the brain, and CB2, which is primarily found on the cells of the immune system. The fact that both CB1 and CB2 receptors have been found on immune cells suggests that cannabinoids play an important role in the regulation of the immune system. Recent studies demonstrated that administration of THC into mice triggered marked apoptosis in T cells and dendritic cells, resulting in immunosuppression. In addition, several studies showed that cannabinoids downregulate cytokine and chemokine production and, in some models, upregulate T-regulatory cells (Tregs) as a mechanism to suppress inflammatory responses. The endocannabinoid system is also involved in immunoregulation. For example, administration of endocannabinoids or use of inhibitors of enzymes that break down the endocannabinoids, led to immunosuppression and recovery from immune-mediated injury to organs such as the liver. Manipulation of endocannabinoids and/or use of exogenous cannabinoids in vivo can constitute a potent treatment modality against inflammatory disorders. This review will focus on the potential use of cannabinoids as a new class of anti-inflammatory agents against a number of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases that are primarily triggered by activated T cells or other cellular immune components. PMID:20191092

  3. Anti-biofilm and anti-adherence activities of sub fraction 18 of Melastoma malabathricum towards Streptococcus mutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohazila M., H.; Nazlina, I.; Yaacob W., A.

    2014-09-01

    A study was carried out to isolate and identify the active compounds from Melastoma malabathricum stem bark that exhibit anti-biofilm and anti-adherence activities against Streptococcus mutans. Purification of the active compounds from the stem bark extract was performed via silica gel chromatography to produce 12 fractions. Further fractionation of fraction 9 by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) produced 21 sub fractions. All the sub fractions were subjected to thin layer chromatography (TLC) bioautography as preliminary screening to determine anti bacterial activity. TLC-bioautography showed that sub fraction 18 (SF18) demonstrated large inhibited zone against S. mutans. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) was used to identify the active compounds in SF18. Fraction SF18 revealed 27 compounds such as hexanoic acid, 8-methyl-1-undecene, propanenitrile, and 1-decene. Anti-biofilm and anti-adherence activities were determined using crystal violet and glass surface assays respectively. The concentrations that produced 50% reduction in anti-biofilm and anti-adherence activities were 1.88 mg/ml and 3.75 mg/ml respectively.

  4. Experiment to investigate anti. nu. /sub. mu. /. -->. anti. nu. /sub e/ oscillations at Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, H.W.; Toevs, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment, being planned at LAMPF, aims to investigate a possible neutrino oscillation channel, anti ..nu../sub ..mu../ ..-->.. anti ..nu../sub e/. If anti ..nu../sub ..mu../, produced in the LAMPF beam stop, oscillate to anti ..nu../sub e/, then interactions anti ..nu../sub e/ + p ..-->.. e/sup +/ + n, may be detected. A large volume liquid scintillator (4470 liter) emplaced at 33 m from the beam stop, detects e/sup +/ and n, after moderation in the hydrogenous liquid and capture in Gd, loaded into the scintillator. Our anticipated signal rate is currently estimated at 1.67 (sigma m/sup 2/)/sup 2//day assuming full amplitude oscillation. The corresponding counting rate, assuming all anti ..nu../sub ..mu../ have oscillated to anti ..nu../sub e/ at the detector is 1.5/day. Cosmic rates are estimated at 0.033/day. Correlated backgrounds from the beam stop are calculated to be small in comparison to cosmic events, except for reactions of ..nu../sub e/ in Pb. These reactions may be reduced with an Fe shield within the detector. With the above rate, a limit on the sensitivity of our experiment for the value of sigma m/sup 2/ is estimated at 0.12 eV/sup 2/ with 70 days of counting. Detector features, estimated background rates, and sensitivity values are discussed.

  5. Anti-cardiolipin/beta-2 glycoprotein activities co-exist on human anti-DNA antibody light chains.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Nagl, Sylvia; Kalsi, J K; Ravirajan, C T; Athwal, Dee; Latchman, David S; Pearl, Laurence H; Isenberg, David A

    2003-12-01

    We have recently shown that the human anti-DNA antibodies B3 and 33H11 also bind cardiolipin and that the anti-autoantigen activity resides predominantly on their lambda light chains. We now show that the two auto-antibodies possess strong reactivity to the plasma-protein 2-Glycoprotein I (beta2-GPI) also. Utilizing chain shuffling experiments involving an unrelated anti-p185 antibody 4D5 with insignificant reactivity to cardiolipin or to beta2-GPI, we now demonstrate that hybrid Fabs with constituent light chain, but not the heavy chain, of B3 or 33H11, exhibit anti-cardiolipin activity. Furthermore, the constructs possessing the auto-antibody-derived light chain also exhibited significant reactivity to beta2-GPI. The results suggest that anti-DNA, anti-cardiolipin and anti-beta2-GPI activities co-exist on the light chains of the antibodies studied and, importantly, these activities could be transferred to antibody constructs by their light chains alone. Computer-generated models of the three-dimensional structures of the auto-antibodies and their hybrids, suggest predominant interaction of their light chains with domain IV of beta2-GPI.

  6. Anti inflammatory and anti angiogenic effect of black raspberry extract on human esophageal and intestinal microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Medda, Rituparna; Lyros, Orestis; Schmidt, Jamie L; Jovanovic, Nebojsa; Nie, Linghui; Link, Benjamin J; Otterson, Mary F; Stoner, Gary D; Shaker, Reza; Rafiee, Parvaneh

    2015-01-01

    Polyphenolic compounds (anthocyanins, flavonoid glycosides) in berries prevent the initiation, promotion, and progression of carcinogenesis in rat's digestive tract and esophagus, in part, via anti-inflammatory pathways. Angiogenesis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation and tumorigenesis. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic effects of black raspberry extract (BRE) on two organ specific primary human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells, (HIMEC) and human esophageal microvascular endothelial cells (HEMEC), isolated from surgically resected human intestinal and donor discarded esophagus, respectively. HEMEC and HIMEC were stimulated with TNF-α/IL-1β with or without BRE. The anti-inflammatory effects of BRE were assessed based upon COX-2, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 gene and protein expression, PGE2 production, NFκB p65 subunit nuclear translocation as well as endothelial cell-leukocyte adhesion. The anti-angiogenic effects of BRE were assessed on cell migration, proliferation and tube formation following VEGF stimulation as well as on activation of Akt, MAPK and JNK signaling pathways. BRE inhibited TNF-α/IL-1β-induced NFκB p65 nuclear translocation, PGE2 production, up-regulation of COX-2, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 gene and protein expression and leukocyte binding in HEMEC but not in HIMEC. BRE attenuated VEGF-induced cell migration, proliferation and tube formation in both HEMEC and HIMEC. The anti-angiogenic effect of BRE is mediated by inhibition of Akt, MAPK and JNK phosphorylations. BRE exerted differential anti-inflammatory effects between HEMEC and HIMEC following TNF-α/IL-1β activation whereas demonstrated similar anti-angiogenic effects following VEGF stimulation in both cell lines. These findings may provide more insight into the anti-tumorigenic capacities of BRE in human disease and cancer.

  7. Anti-microorganism, anti-tumor, and immune activities of a novel polysaccharide isolated from Tricholoma matsutake

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yiling; Ding, Xiang; Hou, Wanru; Zhong, Jie; Zhu, Hongqing; Ma, Binxiang; Xu, Ting; Li, Junhua

    2013-01-01

    Background: Many more fungal polysaccharides have been reported to exhibit a variety of biological activities, including anti-tumor, immunostimulation, anti-oxidation, and so on. The non-starch polysaccharides have emerged as an important class of bioactive natural products. Objective: To investigate the anti-microorganism, anti-tumor, and immune activities of a novel polysaccharide (TMP-A) isolated from Tricholoma matsutake. Materials and Methods: The anti-microorganism activity of purified polysaccharides (TMP-A) was evaluated by the inhibition zone diameter, the anti-tumor activity was evaluated by the S180 tumor cells that were implanted subcutaneously into the Kunming strain male mice in vivo, and the immune activity was evaluated by lymphocyte proliferation and macrophage stimulation, respectively. Results: In this study, the most susceptible bacteria of TMP-A at a concentration of 20 mg/ml was Micrococcus lysodeikticus (inhibition zone diameter 24.38 ± 1.19 mm) and the TMP-A did not show any antifungal activity for the tested stains of the fungi. In addition, the inhibitory rate in mice treated with 80 mg/kg TMP-A could reach 68.422%, being the highest in the three doses, which might be comparable to mannatide. The anti-tumor activity of the TMP-A was usually believed to be a consequence of the stimulation of the cell-mediated immune response, because it could significantly promote the lymphocyte and macrophage cells in the dose range of 50–200 μg/mL and in the dose range of 100 – 400 μg/mL in vitro, respectively. Discussion and Conclusion: The results obtained in the present study indicate that the purification polysaccharide of Tricholoma matsutake is a potential source of natural broad-spectrum, anti-microorganism, anti-tumor, and immunomodulation. PMID:23930009

  8. Anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic activity of JAK inhibitor AZD1480

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hong; Herrmann, Andreas; Reckamp, Karen; Zhang, Wang; Pal, Sumanta; Hedvat, Michael; Zhang, Chunyan; Liang, Wei; Scuto, Anna; Weng, Shaobu; Morosini, Deborah; Cao, Zhu A.; Zinda, Michael; Figlin, Robert; Huszar, Dennis; Jove, Richard; Yu, Hua

    2011-01-01

    STAT3 has important functions in both tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment to facilitate cancer progression. The STAT regulatory kinase JAK has been strongly implicated in promoting oncogenesis of various solid tumors, including through the use of JAK kinase inhibitors such as AZD1480. However, direct evidence that JAK drives STAT3 function and cancer pathogenesis at the level of the tumor microenvironment has yet to be established clearly. In this study, we show that AZD1480 inhibits STAT3 in tumor-associated myeloid cells, reducing their number and inhibiting tumor metastasis. Myeloid cell-mediated angiogenesis was also diminished by AZD1480, with additional direct inhibition of endothelial cell function in vitro and in vivo. AZD1480 blocked lung infiltration of myeloid cells and formation of pulmonary metastases in both mouse syngeneic experimental and spontaneous metastatic models. Furthermore, AZD1480 reduced angiogenesis and metastasis in a human xenograft tumor model. Although the effects of AZD1480 on the tumor microenvironment were important for the observed anti-angiogenic activity, constitutive activation of STAT3 in tumor cells themselves could block these anti-angiogenic effects demonstrating the complexity of the JAK/STAT signaling network in tumor progression. Together, our results indicated that AZD1480 can effectively inhibit tumor angiogenesis and metastasis mediated by STAT3 in stromal cells as well as tumor cells. PMID:21920898

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of the Anti-Obesity and Anti-Diabetic Properties of Flavonoids

    PubMed Central

    Kawser Hossain, Mohammed; Abdal Dayem, Ahmed; Han, Jihae; Yin, Yingfu; Kim, Kyeongseok; Kumar Saha, Subbroto; Yang, Gwang-Mo; Choi, Hye Yeon; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are the most prevailing health concerns worldwide and their incidence is increasing at a high rate, resulting in enormous social costs. Obesity is a complex disease commonly accompanied by insulin resistance and increases in oxidative stress and inflammatory marker expression, leading to augmented fat mass in the body. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by the destruction of pancreatic β cells or diminished insulin secretion and action insulin. Obesity causes the development of metabolic disorders such as DM, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, and inflammation-based pathologies. Flavonoids are the secondary metabolites of plants and have 15-carbon skeleton structures containing two phenyl rings and a heterocyclic ring. More than 5000 naturally occurring flavonoids have been reported from various plants and have been found to possess many beneficial effects with advantages over chemical treatments. A number of studies have demonstrated the potential health benefits of natural flavonoids in treating obesity and DM, and show increased bioavailability and action on multiple molecular targets. This review summarizes the current progress in our understanding of the anti-obesity and anti-diabetic potential of natural flavonoids and their molecular mechanisms for preventing and/or treating obesity and diabetes. PMID:27092490

  10. Anti-carcinogenic and Anti-bacterial Properties of Selected Spices: Implications in Oral Health.

    PubMed

    Ganjre, Anjali; Kathariya, Rahul; Bagul, Neeta; Pawar, Vivek

    2015-10-01

    "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food", as said by the father of medicine, Hippocrates in 431 B.C. Nature has provided us with a variety of treatment modalities in the form of food. For the first 5,000 years of civilization, humans relied on herbs and foods for medicine. Only in the past 60 years have we forgotten our medicinal "roots" in favor of patented medicines. While pharmaceutical ingredients have their value, we should not overlook the well-documented, non-toxic and inexpensive healing properties of food. As an individual we consume food several times a day without a complete understanding of its innate qualities. As part of a daily diet, food plays a significant role in helping our bodies function at their best. There are hundreds of extremely nutritious foods, but the items in this article do more than providing healthy nutrients. Many of them consist of ingredients with hidden pharmaceutical qualities ranging from anti-inflammatory to anti-carcinogenic agent. They not only boost our innate immunity but also act as an adjunct to medicines for specific treatment. Prevention and management of symptoms can often be improved significantly through the foods we consume regularly. This paper overviews these beneficial traits of food ingredients, consumed on a daily basis, in various oral diseases. PMID:26566515

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of the Anti-Obesity and Anti-Diabetic Properties of Flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Kawser Hossain, Mohammed; Abdal Dayem, Ahmed; Han, Jihae; Yin, Yingfu; Kim, Kyeongseok; Kumar Saha, Subbroto; Yang, Gwang-Mo; Choi, Hye Yeon; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are the most prevailing health concerns worldwide and their incidence is increasing at a high rate, resulting in enormous social costs. Obesity is a complex disease commonly accompanied by insulin resistance and increases in oxidative stress and inflammatory marker expression, leading to augmented fat mass in the body. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by the destruction of pancreatic β cells or diminished insulin secretion and action insulin. Obesity causes the development of metabolic disorders such as DM, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, and inflammation-based pathologies. Flavonoids are the secondary metabolites of plants and have 15-carbon skeleton structures containing two phenyl rings and a heterocyclic ring. More than 5000 naturally occurring flavonoids have been reported from various plants and have been found to possess many beneficial effects with advantages over chemical treatments. A number of studies have demonstrated the potential health benefits of natural flavonoids in treating obesity and DM, and show increased bioavailability and action on multiple molecular targets. This review summarizes the current progress in our understanding of the anti-obesity and anti-diabetic potential of natural flavonoids and their molecular mechanisms for preventing and/or treating obesity and diabetes. PMID:27092490

  12. Anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory effects of ethanol extract from Houttuynia cordata poultice.

    PubMed

    Sekita, Yasuko; Murakami, Keiji; Yumoto, Hiromichi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Amoh, Takashi; Ogino, Satoshi; Matsuo, Takashi; Miyake, Yoichiro; Fukui, Hiroyuki; Kashiwada, Yoshiki

    2016-06-01

    Houttuynia cordata (HC) has been commonly used as many traditional remedies in local areas of Japan. Although many pharmacological activities of HC have been reported, the mechanism underlying the effect of HC remains unknown. We conducted the interview survey in Japan to verify how HC was actually used. The interview survey revealed that HC poultice (HCP) prepared from smothering fresh leaves of HC was most frequently used for the treatment of purulent skin diseases including furuncle and carbuncle with high effectiveness. Ethanol extract of HCP (eHCP) showed anti-bacterial effects against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and showed an anti-biofilm activity against MRSA. eHCP showed dose-dependent inhibition of S. aureus lipoteichoic acid (LTA)-induced interleukin-8 and CCL20 production in human keratinocyte without any cytotoxicity. These results suggest that HCP is effective for skin abscess and its underlying mechanism might be the complicated multiple activities for both bacteria and host cells. PMID:27023331

  13. Anti-Atherosclerotic and Anti-Inflammatory Actions of Sesame Oil

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhulu, Chandrakala Aluganti; Selvarajan, Krithika; Litvinov, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Atherosclerosis, a major form of cardiovascular disease, has now been recognized as a chronic inflammatory disease. Nonpharmacological means of treating chronic diseases have gained attention recently. We previously reported that sesame oil has anti-atherosclerotic properties. In this study, we have determined the mechanisms by which sesame oil might modulate atherosclerosis by identifying genes and inflammatory markers. Low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR−/−) female mice were fed with either an atherogenic diet or an atherogenic diet reformulated with sesame oil (sesame oil diet). Plasma lipids and atherosclerotic lesions were quantified after 3 months of feeding. Plasma samples were used for cytokine analysis. RNA was extracted from the liver tissue and used for global gene arrays. The sesame oil diet significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesions, plasma cholesterol, triglyceride, and LDL cholesterol levels in LDLR−/− mice. Plasma inflammatory cytokines, such as MCP-1, RANTES, IL-1α, IL-6, and CXCL-16, were significantly reduced, demonstrating an anti-inflammatory property of sesame oil. Gene array analysis showed that sesame oil induced many genes, including ABCA1, ABCA2, APOE, LCAT, and CYP7A1, which are involved in cholesterol metabolism and reverse cholesterol transport. In conclusion, our studies suggest that a sesame oil-enriched diet could be an effective nonpharmacological treatment for atherosclerosis by controlling inflammation and regulating lipid metabolism. PMID:25562618

  14. Nifuroxazide exerts potent anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activity in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yongxia; Ye, Tinghong; Yu, Xi; Lei, Qian; Yang, Fangfang; Xia, Yong; Song, Xuejiao; Liu, Li; Deng, Hongxia; Gao, Tiantao; Peng, Cuiting; Zuo, Weiqiong; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Lidan; Wang, Ningyu; Zhao, Lifeng; Xie, Yongmei; Yu, Luoting; Wei, Yuquan

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is a highly malignant neoplasm of melanocytes with considerable metastatic potential and drug resistance, explaining the need for new candidates that inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. The signal transducer and activator of the transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling pathway plays an important role in melanoma and has been validated as promising anticancer target for melanoma therapy. In this study, nifuroxazide, an antidiarrheal agent identified as an inhibitor of Stat3, was evaluated for its anti-melanoma activity in vitro and in vivo. It had potent anti-proliferative activity against various melanoma cell lines and could induce G2/M phase arrest and cell apoptosis. Moreover, nifuroxazide markedly impaired melanoma cell migration and invasion by down-regulating phosphorylated-Src, phosphorylated-FAK, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -2, MMP-9 and vimentin. It also significantly inhibited tumor growth without obvious side effects in the A375-bearing mice model by inducing apoptosis and reducing cell proliferation and metastasis. Notably, nifuroxazide significantly inhibited pulmonary metastases, which might be associated with the decrease of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). These findings suggested that nifuroxazide might be a potential agent for inhibiting the growth and metastasis of melanoma. PMID:26830149

  15. Nifuroxazide exerts potent anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activity in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongxia; Ye, Tinghong; Yu, Xi; Lei, Qian; Yang, Fangfang; Xia, Yong; Song, Xuejiao; Liu, Li; Deng, Hongxia; Gao, Tiantao; Peng, Cuiting; Zuo, Weiqiong; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Lidan; Wang, Ningyu; Zhao, Lifeng; Xie, Yongmei; Yu, Luoting; Wei, Yuquan

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is a highly malignant neoplasm of melanocytes with considerable metastatic potential and drug resistance, explaining the need for new candidates that inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. The signal transducer and activator of the transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling pathway plays an important role in melanoma and has been validated as promising anticancer target for melanoma therapy. In this study, nifuroxazide, an antidiarrheal agent identified as an inhibitor of Stat3, was evaluated for its anti-melanoma activity in vitro and in vivo. It had potent anti-proliferative activity against various melanoma cell lines and could induce G2/M phase arrest and cell apoptosis. Moreover, nifuroxazide markedly impaired melanoma cell migration and invasion by down-regulating phosphorylated-Src, phosphorylated-FAK, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -2, MMP-9 and vimentin. It also significantly inhibited tumor growth without obvious side effects in the A375-bearing mice model by inducing apoptosis and reducing cell proliferation and metastasis. Notably, nifuroxazide significantly inhibited pulmonary metastases, which might be associated with the decrease of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). These findings suggested that nifuroxazide might be a potential agent for inhibiting the growth and metastasis of melanoma. PMID:26830149

  16. Differential effects of anti-cancer and anti-hepatitis drugs on liver cystatin

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aaliya; Priyadarshini, Medha; Khan, Mohd Shahnawaz; Aatif, Mohammad; Amin, Fakhra; Tabrez, Shams; Zaher, Galila F.; Bano, Bilqees

    2014-01-01

    The drug–protein interaction has been the subject of increasing interest over the decades. In the present communication, the interaction of liver cystatin with anti-cancer (adriamycin) and anti-hepatitis (adevofir dipivoxil) drugs was studied by thiol-protease inhibitory assay, UV absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD). A static type of quenching was observed between the protein and the drug molecules. Binding constant (Ka) of adriamycin to liver cystatin (LC) was found to be 1.08 × 106 M−1. Moreover, binding site number was found to be 2. Importantly, cystatin loses its activity in the presence of adriamycin. However, intrinsic fluorescence studies in the presence of adevofir dipivoxil showed enhancement in the fluorescence intensity suggesting that binding of adevofir to LC caused unfolding of the protein. The unfolding of the test protein was also accompanied by significant loss of inhibitory activity. CD spectroscopy result showed, both adriamycin and adevofir dipivoxil caused perturbation in the secondary structure of liver cystatin. The possible implications of these results will help in combating drug induced off target effects. PMID:25561887

  17. Ultra rapid in vivo screening for anti-Alzheimer anti-amyloid drugs

    PubMed Central

    Espargaró, Alba; Medina, Aina; Di Pietro, Ornella; Muñoz-Torrero, Diego; Sabate, Raimon

    2016-01-01

    More than 46 million people worldwide suffer from Alzheimer’s disease. A large number of potential treatments have been proposed; among these, the inhibition of the aggregation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), considered one of the main culprits in Alzheimer’s disease. Limitations in monitoring the aggregation of Aβ in cells and tissues restrict the screening of anti-amyloid drugs to in vitro studies in most cases. We have developed a simple but powerful method to track Aβ aggregation in vivo in real-time, using bacteria as in vivo amyloid reservoir. We use the specific amyloid dye Thioflavin-S (Th-S) to stain bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs), in this case mainly formed of Aβ in amyloid conformation. Th-S binding to amyloids leads to an increment of fluorescence that can be monitored. The quantification of the Th-S fluorescence along the time allows tracking Aβ aggregation and the effect of potential anti-aggregating agents. PMID:27000658

  18. Anti-carcinogenic and Anti-bacterial Properties of Selected Spices: Implications in Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Ganjre, Anjali; Bagul, Neeta; Pawar, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food", as said by the father of medicine, Hippocrates in 431 B.C. Nature has provided us with a variety of treatment modalities in the form of food. For the first 5,000 years of civilization, humans relied on herbs and foods for medicine. Only in the past 60 years have we forgotten our medicinal "roots" in favor of patented medicines. While pharmaceutical ingredients have their value, we should not overlook the well-documented, non-toxic and inexpensive healing properties of food. As an individual we consume food several times a day without a complete understanding of its innate qualities. As part of a daily diet, food plays a significant role in helping our bodies function at their best. There are hundreds of extremely nutritious foods, but the items in this article do more than providing healthy nutrients. Many of them consist of ingredients with hidden pharmaceutical qualities ranging from anti-inflammatory to anti-carcinogenic agent. They not only boost our innate immunity but also act as an adjunct to medicines for specific treatment. Prevention and management of symptoms can often be improved significantly through the foods we consume regularly. This paper overviews these beneficial traits of food ingredients, consumed on a daily basis, in various oral diseases. PMID:26566515

  19. Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA) and anti-endomysial antibodies in spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Andretta, Marianne A; Vieira, Thaís D; Nishiara, Renato; Skare, Thelma L

    2012-02-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) are diseases with increased gut inflammation. To search for (anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae) ASCA IgA, ASCA IgG, and anti-endomysial antibodies (EmA-IgA) in a cohort of 70 patients with SpA, we found 18.6% (13/70) positive for IgA-ASCA in the SpA group and 3/57 (5.2%) in the control group (P = 0.031). ASCA IgG and EmA-IgA were found at the same frequency in SpA and controls. No relationship of ASCA IgA positivity could be established with disease activity (measured by ESR, C-reactive protein, and BASDAI), presence of uveitis, or peripheral arthritis neither with functional status measured by BASFI. SpA patients present an increase in the IgA-ASCA positivity without any relationship to disease activity, functional index, clinical profile or the presence of HLA-B27. There is no evidence of higher prevalence of EmA-IgA in SpA patients in the studied sample.

  20. Anti-atherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory actions of sesame oil.

    PubMed

    Narasimhulu, Chandrakala Aluganti; Selvarajan, Krithika; Litvinov, Dmitry; Parthasarathy, Sampath

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, a major form of cardiovascular disease, has now been recognized as a chronic inflammatory disease. Nonpharmacological means of treating chronic diseases have gained attention recently. We previously reported that sesame oil has anti-atherosclerotic properties. In this study, we have determined the mechanisms by which sesame oil might modulate atherosclerosis by identifying genes and inflammatory markers. Low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR(-/-)) female mice were fed with either an atherogenic diet or an atherogenic diet reformulated with sesame oil (sesame oil diet). Plasma lipids and atherosclerotic lesions were quantified after 3 months of feeding. Plasma samples were used for cytokine analysis. RNA was extracted from the liver tissue and used for global gene arrays. The sesame oil diet significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesions, plasma cholesterol, triglyceride, and LDL cholesterol levels in LDLR(-/-) mice. Plasma inflammatory cytokines, such as MCP-1, RANTES, IL-1α, IL-6, and CXCL-16, were significantly reduced, demonstrating an anti-inflammatory property of sesame oil. Gene array analysis showed that sesame oil induced many genes, including ABCA1, ABCA2, APOE, LCAT, and CYP7A1, which are involved in cholesterol metabolism and reverse cholesterol transport. In conclusion, our studies suggest that a sesame oil-enriched diet could be an effective nonpharmacological treatment for atherosclerosis by controlling inflammation and regulating lipid metabolism. PMID:25562618

  1. Anti-inflammatory/anti-amyloidogenic effects of plasmalogens in lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Neuroinflammation involves the activation of glial cells in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Plasmalogens (Pls) are glycerophospholipids constituting cellular membranes and play significant roles in membrane fluidity and cellular processes such as vesicular fusion and signal transduction. Methods In this study the preventive effects of Pls on systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroinflammation were investigated using immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR methods and analysis of brain glycerophospholipid levels in adult mice. Results Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of LPS (250 μg/kg) for seven days resulted in increases in the number of Iba-1-positive microglia and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus accompanied by the enhanced expression of IL-1β and TNF-α mRNAs. In addition, β-amyloid (Aβ3–16)-positive neurons appeared in the PFC and hippocampus of LPS-injected animals. The co-administration of Pls (i.p., 20 mg/kg) after daily LPS injections significantly attenuated both the activation of glial cells and the accumulation of Aβ proteins. Finally, the amount of Pls in the PFC and hippocampus decreased following the LPS injections and this reduction was suppressed by co-treatment with Pls. Conclusions These findings suggest that Pls have anti-neuroinflammatory and anti-amyloidogenic effects, thereby indicating the preventive or therapeutic application of Pls against AD. PMID:22889165

  2. Anti-inflammatory/anti-pyretic salicylic acid esters with low gastric ulcerogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Rainsford, K D; Whitehouse, M W

    1980-11-01

    The methyl and some other esters of acetylsalicylic and salicylic acids and their derivatives were found to have much lower gastric ulcerogenic activity (when assayed in the stress-sensitized rat) compared with their corresponding acids. There was little or no loss in therapeutic potencies of these salicylate esters as determined by assessment of anti-inflammatory activity (against the carrageenan-induced oedema) and antipyretic activity (against yeast-induced fever in rats. The methyl ester of acetylsalicylic acid (=AME) was almost devoid of gastric irritancy/ulcerogenicity (as observed with acetylsalicylic acid) when given orally to pigs for 10 days. AME had appreciable anti-inflammatory activity in the adjuvant-arthritis model and at high doses (200 mg/kg t.i.d.) was without the lethal effects seen with acetylsalicylic acid. Moreover, no toxic effects were seen after long-term administration of 100-1000 mg/kg/day AME for 3-4 months. The results provide further evidence for the hypothesis that the carboxylic acid moiety of salicylates is a major factor in the gastric ulcerogenic activity of these drugs. The methyl esters of these salicylates may be considered as models for the development of pro-drugs and in some cases may be therapeutic alternatives to acetylsalicylic acid or salicylate. PMID:6971045

  3. Anti-thrombotic effects of selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Manasa K; Singh, Sunil K; Roy, Arnab; Prakash, Vivek; Kumar, Anand; Dash, Debabrata

    2011-10-01

    Tamoxifen is a known anti-cancer drug and established estrogen receptor modulator. Few clinical studies have earlier implicated the drug in thrombotic complications attributable to lower anti-thrombin and protein S levels in plasma. However, action of tamoxifen on platelet signalling machinery has not been elucidated in detail. In the present report we show that tamoxifen is endowed with significant inhibitory property against human platelet aggregation. From a series of in vivo and in vitro studies tamoxifen was found to inhibit almost all platelet functions, prolong tail bleeding time in mouse and profoundly prevent thrombus formation at injured arterial wall in mice, as well as on collagen matrix perfused with platelet-rich plasma under arterial shear against the vehicle dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). These findings strongly suggest that tamoxifen significantly downregulates platelet responses and holds potential as a promising anti-platelet/anti-thrombotic agent. PMID:21866300

  4. Management of hypersensitivity reactions to anti-D immunoglobulin preparations.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, K; Nasser, S M

    2014-11-01

    RhD immunoglobulin G (anti-D) administered to pregnant Rh(-) women prevents Rh isoimmunization. Its use has significantly reduced the incidence of haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn previously responsible for one death in every 2200 births. In pregnancy, acute drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis can have serious deleterious effects on the mother and foetus/neonate. Women can be erroneously labelled as drug allergic as the investigation of hypersensitivity reactions in pregnancy is complex and drug challenges are usually contraindicated. We present three cases of suspected anti-D hypersensitivity clinically presenting as anaphylaxis and delayed transfusion-related reaction. We also propose a new algorithm for the investigations of such reaction. It relies on detailed history, cautious interpretation of skin tests, foetal Rh genotyping from maternal blood and, in some cases, anti-D challenges. This is not to deprive women of anti-D which might put their future pregnancies at risk. PMID:25066207

  5. Anti-thrombotic effects of selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Manasa K; Singh, Sunil K; Roy, Arnab; Prakash, Vivek; Kumar, Anand; Dash, Debabrata

    2011-10-01

    Tamoxifen is a known anti-cancer drug and established estrogen receptor modulator. Few clinical studies have earlier implicated the drug in thrombotic complications attributable to lower anti-thrombin and protein S levels in plasma. However, action of tamoxifen on platelet signalling machinery has not been elucidated in detail. In the present report we show that tamoxifen is endowed with significant inhibitory property against human platelet aggregation. From a series of in vivo and in vitro studies tamoxifen was found to inhibit almost all platelet functions, prolong tail bleeding time in mouse and profoundly prevent thrombus formation at injured arterial wall in mice, as well as on collagen matrix perfused with platelet-rich plasma under arterial shear against the vehicle dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). These findings strongly suggest that tamoxifen significantly downregulates platelet responses and holds potential as a promising anti-platelet/anti-thrombotic agent.

  6. Anti-inflammatory properties of bioactive titanium metals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bangcheng; Gan, Lu; Qu, Yang; Yue, Chongxia

    2010-09-01

    Anti-inflammatory properties of bioactive titanium metals prepared by anodic oxidation (AO-Ti) and alkali-heat (AH-Ti) treatments were studied by bacterial adhesion test and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity assay methods. The bioactivities of the metals were also evaluated by apatite formation ability and osteoblasts culture experiments. Both metals could induce apatite formation and support osteoblasts proliferation. At the condition with normal incandescent light shine, both bioactive titanium metals had antibacterial adhesion properties compared with the titanium metal without treatment. The MPO activity assay proved that they both showed anti-inflammatory properties in vivo. The bioactive AO-Ti had better anti-inflammatory properties than the AH-Ti. It indicated that it is possible to optimize the anti-inflammatory properties of the bioactive titanium metals by different preparation methods.

  7. Stem Cells Transplanted in Monkeys without Anti-Rejection Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160989.html Stem Cells Transplanted in Monkeys Without Anti-Rejection Drugs Scientists say goal is to create banks of stem cells that could be used for any human patient ...

  8. In Vitro Anti-Candida Activity of Zataria multiflora Boiss

    PubMed Central

    Dabbagh, Muhammad Ali; Fouladi, Zahra

    2007-01-01

    Zataria multiflora Boiss known as Avishan Shirazi (in Iran) is one of the valuable Iranian medicinal plants. The aim of study was to evaluate anti-Candida activity of Z. multiflora against different species of Candida in vitro. Anti-Candida activity of the aqueous, ethanolic and methanolic maceration extract of the aerial parts of Z. multiflora Boiss was studied in vitro. Anti-Candida activity against Candida species was done using serial dilutions of extracts in Sabouraud's dextrose agar. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the methanolic and ethanolic extracts was 70.7 and 127 mg l−1, respectively. Aqueous extract showed no remarkable activity against Candida species. We conclude that methanolic extract of the aerial parts of Z. multiflora Boiss has more anti-Candida effect at 70.7 mg l−1 compared to ethanolic extract 127 mg l−1. In addition, the isolates of Candida parapsilosis were more susceptible to methanolic extract than other tested species. PMID:17965766

  9. Anti-reflective nanoporous silicon for efficient hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Oh, Jihun; Branz, Howard M

    2014-05-20

    Exemplary embodiments are disclosed of anti-reflective nanoporous silicon for efficient hydrogen production by photoelectrolysis of water. A nanoporous black Si is disclosed as an efficient photocathode for H.sub.2 production from water splitting half-reaction.

  10. Anti-biofilm Activity as a Health Issue.

    PubMed

    Miquel, Sylvie; Lagrafeuille, Rosyne; Souweine, Bertrand; Forestier, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The formation and persistence of surface-attached microbial communities, known as biofilms, are responsible for 75% of human microbial infections (National Institutes of Health). Biofilm lifestyle confers several advantages to the pathogens, notably during the colonization process of medical devices and/or patients' organs. In addition, sessile bacteria have a high tolerance to exogenous stress including anti-infectious agents. Biofilms are highly competitive communities and some microorganisms exhibit anti-biofilm capacities such as bacterial growth inhibition, exclusion or competition, which enable them to acquire advantages and become dominant. The deciphering and control of anti-biofilm properties represent future challenges in human infection control. The aim of this review is to compare and discuss the mechanisms of natural bacterial anti-biofilm strategies/mechanisms recently identified in pathogenic, commensal and probiotic bacteria and the main synthetic strategies used in clinical practice, particularly for catheter-related infections.

  11. Anti-Cancer Potential of a Novel SERM Ormeloxifene

    PubMed Central

    Gara, Rishi Kumar; Sundram, Vasudha; Chauhan, Subhash C.; Jaggi, Meena

    2014-01-01

    Ormeloxifene is a non-steroidal Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator (SERM) that is used as an oral contraceptive. Recent studies have shown its potent anti-cancer activities in breast, head and neck, and chronic myeloid leukemia cells. Several in vivo and clinical studies have reported that ormeloxifene possesses an excellent therapeutic index and has been well-tolerated, without any haematological, biochemical or histopathological toxicity, even with chronic administration. A reasonably long period of time and an enormous financial commitment are required to develop a lead compound into a clinically approved anti-cancer drug. For these reasons and to circumvent these obstacles, ormeloxifene is a promising candidate on a fast track for the development or repurposing established drugs as anti-cancer agents for cancer treatment. The current review summarizes recent findings on ormeloxifene as an anti-cancer agent and future prospects of this clinically safe pharmacophore. PMID:23895678

  12. Directionality compensation for linear multivariable anti-windup synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adegbege, Ambrose A.; Heath, William P.

    2015-11-01

    We develop new synthesis procedures for optimising anti-windup control applicable to open-loop exponentially stable multivariable plants subject to hard bounds on the inputs. The optimising anti-windup control falls into a class of compensator commonly termed directionality compensation. The computation of the control involves the online solution of a low-order quadratic programme in place of simple saturation. We exploit the structure of the quadratic programme to incorporate directionality information into the offline anti-windup synthesis using a decoupled architecture similar to that proposed in the literature for anti-windup schemes with simple saturation. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the design compared to several schemes using a simulated example. Preliminary results of this work have been published in the proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, Orlando, 2011 (Adegbege & Heath, 2011a).

  13. Biochemical pharmacology of biflavonoids: implications for anti-inflammatory action.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Pyo; Park, Haeil; Son, Kun Ho; Chang, Hyeun Wook; Kang, Sam Sik

    2008-03-01

    Biflavonoids belong to a subclass of the plant flavonoid family. Distribution of biflavonoids in the plant kingdom is limited to several species. Previously, some pharmacological activities of biflavonoids were described such as inhibition of histamine release from mast cells and inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation, suggesting the anti-inflammatory/antiallergic potential of the biflavonoids. Furthermore, several natural biflavonoids including ochnaflavone and ginkgetin inhibit phospholipase A2. Most importantly, certain biflavonoids exhibit anti-inflammatory activity through the regulation of proinflammatory gene expression in vitro and in vivo. Recently, several synthetic approaches yielded new biflavonoid molecules with anti-inflammatory potential. These molecules also exhibit phospholipase A2 and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitory activity. Although the bioavailability needs be improved, certain biflavonoids may have potential as new anti-inflammatory agents. This is the first review of biflavonoid pharmacology to date.

  14. Anti-biofilm Activity as a Health Issue

    PubMed Central

    Miquel, Sylvie; Lagrafeuille, Rosyne; Souweine, Bertrand; Forestier, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The formation and persistence of surface-attached microbial communities, known as biofilms, are responsible for 75% of human microbial infections (National Institutes of Health). Biofilm lifestyle confers several advantages to the pathogens, notably during the colonization process of medical devices and/or patients’ organs. In addition, sessile bacteria have a high tolerance to exogenous stress including anti-infectious agents. Biofilms are highly competitive communities and some microorganisms exhibit anti-biofilm capacities such as bacterial growth inhibition, exclusion or competition, which enable them to acquire advantages and become dominant. The deciphering and control of anti-biofilm properties represent future challenges in human infection control. The aim of this review is to compare and discuss the mechanisms of natural bacterial anti-biofilm strategies/mechanisms recently identified in pathogenic, commensal and probiotic bacteria and the main synthetic strategies used in clinical practice, particularly for catheter-related infections. PMID:27199924

  15. How to Select Anti-Aging Skin Care Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... zone Video library Find a dermatologist How to select anti-aging skin care products Dermatologists share their ... make a noticeable difference. When shopping for sunscreen, select one that offers all of the following: Broad ...

  16. Tailoring insoluble nanobelts into soluble anti-UV nanopotpourris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinmin; Sun, Xiao Wei; Jiao, Zhihui; Khoo, Eugene; Lee, Pooi See; Ma, Jan; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2011-11-01

    Soluble, transparent and anti-UV nanopotpourris have been prepared by tailoring long nanobelts. The strains and layered structures facilitate the breaking of the as-synthesized nanobelts under an applied mechanical action. The developed tailoring process of nanobelts is a general top-down secondary processing of layered nanostructures at the nanoscale level, which can be expended to the modifications of layered nanowires, nanotubes and hierarchical nanostructures. By tailoring, the size, morphology and solubility are modified, which may open up an area of advanced processing of nanomaterials and hint at some potential applications. Because of the excellent solubility of the tailored nanopotpourris, they are easily dispersed in cosmetics or polymer films, which are quite useful for some anti-UV protection applications, such as anti-UV sunscreen creams and anti-UV window films for vehicles and buildings.

  17. Observation of B^0 -> p anti lamda D^(*)-

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y. Y.; Wang, M. Z.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Asner, David M.; Atmacan, H.; Aushev, T.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bobrov, A.; Bozek, A.; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dingfelder, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, Bryan G.; Gaur, Vipin; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, Sudeshna; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Glattaur, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Greenwald, D.; Grzymkowska, O.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hou, W. S.; Hsu, C. L.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jaegle, Igal; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Kawasaki, T.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kuhr, T.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lai, Yun-Tsung; Lee, I. S.; Li, L.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Masuda, M.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyake, Hideki; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, Subhashree; Moll, A.; Moon, H K.; Mori, T.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Ozaki, H.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, Bilas K.; Park, C. W.; Pedlar, Todd; Pestotnik, R.; Petric, M.; Piilonen, Leo E.; Rauch, J.; Ribezl, Eva; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, Himansu B.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Senyo, K.; Seong, Ilsoo; Sevior, ME; Shebalin, V.; Shen, CP; Shibata, TA; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y. S.; Staric, M.; Stypula, J.; Sumihama, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, Umberto; Tanida, K.; Teramoto, Y.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vorobyev, V.; Vossen, Anslem G.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, Jared AK; Yashchenko, S.; Yelton, John M.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2015-09-11

    We report the first observation of the decays B^0 -> p anti lamda D^(*)-. the data sample of 711 fb^-1 used in this analysis corresponds to 772 million B B bar pairs, collected at the Y(4S) resonance by the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. We observe 19.8σ and 10.8σ excesses of events for the two decay modes and measure the branching fractions ofB^0 -> p anti lamda D^- and B^0 -> p anti lamda D^*- to be (25.1 +/- 2.6 +/- 3.5) x 10^-6 and (33.6 +/- 6.3 +/- 4.4) x 10^-6, respectively, where the first predictions based on the generalized factorization approach. In addition, a threshold enhancement in the di-baryon (p anti lamda) consistent with that observed in similar B decays.

  18. Anti-GD2 Strategy in the Treatment of Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Richard K.; Sondel, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    The prognosis for advanced neuroblastoma remains poor with high risk of recurrence after consolidation. Therapies based on monoclonal antibodies that specifically target disialoganglioside GD2 on tumor cells are improving treatment results for high-risk neuroblastoma. This article reviews the use of anti-GD2 antibodies either as monotherapy or as part of a larger and more complex treatment approach for advanced neuroblastoma. We review how anti-GD2 antibodies can be combined with other treatments or strategies to enhance their clinical effects. Tumor resistance and other problems that decrease the efficacy of anti-GD2 antibodies are discussed. Future developments in the area of anti-GD2 immunotherapies for neuroblastoma are also addressed. PMID:21037966

  19. Axial symmetry, anti-BRST invariance, and modified anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshovi, Amir Abbass

    2016-07-01

    It is shown that, anti-BRST symmetry is the quantized counterpart of local axial symmetry in gauge theories. An extended form of descent equations is worked out, which yields a set of modified consistent anomalies.

  20. The first Korean case report of anti-Gerbich.

    PubMed

    Jeon, You La; Park, Tae Sung; Cho, Sun Young; Oh, Seung Hwan; Kim, Myeong Hee; Kang, So Young; Lee, Woo-In

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we report the first Korean case of an anti-Gerbich (Ge) alloantibody to a high-incidence antigen that belongs to the Ge blood group system. The alloantibody was detected in a middle-aged Korean woman who did not have a history of transfusion. Her blood type was B+, and findings from the antibody screening test revealed 1+ reactivity in all panels except the autocontrol. The cross-matching test showed incompatible results with all 5 packed red blood cells. Additional blood type antigen and antibody tests confirmed the anti-Ge alloantibody. While rare, cases of hemolytic transfusion reaction or hemolytic disease in newborns due to anti-Ge have been recently reported in the literature. Therefore, additional further studies on alloantibodies to high-incidence antigens, including anti-Ge, are necessary in the future. PMID:23130346

  1. Coexistent Wegener's granulomatosis and anti-glomerular basement membrane disease.

    PubMed

    Wahls, T L; Bonsib, S M; Schuster, V L

    1987-02-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis and Goodpasture's syndrome represent two major causes of a pulmonary-renal syndrome. We describe the clinical course and morphologic features of a patient in whom pulmonary manifestations of Wegener's granulomatosis developed and were followed six months later by anti-glomerular basement membrane disease. Although we regard this as a unique and probably fortuitous association, a genetic predisposition or a secondary form of anti-GBM disease cannot be excluded. PMID:3542802

  2. Synthesis and anti-inflammatory activity of chalcone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Herencia, F; Ferrándiz, M L; Ubeda, A; Domínguez, J N; Charris, J E; Lobo, G M; Alcaraz, M J

    1998-05-19

    Chalcones and their derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their anti-inflammatory activity. In vitro, chalcones 2, 4, 8, 10 and 13 inhibited degranulation and 5-lipoxygenase in human neutrophils, whereas 11 behaved as scavenger of superoxide. Only four compounds (4-7) inhibited cyclo-oxygenase-2 activity. The majority of these samples showed anti-inflammatory effects in the mouse air pouch model.

  3. Bromophenols from marine algae with potential anti-diabetic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiukun; Liu, Ming

    2012-12-01

    Marine algae contain various bromophenols with a variety of biological activities, including antimicrobial, anticancer, and anti-diabetic effects. Here, we briefly review the recent progress in researches on the biomaterials from marine algae, emphasizing the relationship between the structure and the potential anti-diabetic applications. Bromophenols from marine algae display their hyperglycemic effects by inhibiting the activities of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, α-glucosidase, as well as other mechanisms.

  4. Using anti pp annihilation to find exotic mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, S.R.

    1987-10-01

    Present data suggests that a number of mesons have been found which cannot be accommodated in standard anti qq multiplets. Theory suggests that such exotic mesons should exist in the spectrum of Quantum Chromodynamics, but provides little guide to their properties. It is argued that a high luminosity, low energy anti pp machine would be a powerful tool with which to search for such exotics.

  5. Synthesis and anti-inflammatory activity of aromatic glucosinolates.

    PubMed

    Vo, Quan V; Trenerry, Craige; Rochfort, Simone; Wadeson, Jenny; Leyton, Carolina; Hughes, Andrew B

    2013-10-01

    Aromatic GLs are important members of the glucosinolate family of compounds because of their potential biological activity and medicinal properties. This study has shown success in the high yielding synthesis of some important aromatic GLs as well as the results of testing for anti-inflammatory properties of the synthetic GLs. 3,4-Dimethoxyphenylglucosinolate was found to be the most active anti-inflammatory of the seven glucosinolates assayed. PMID:23978357

  6. Anti-aquaporin-4 antibody-positive dorsal midbrain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juyoun; Jeong, Seong-Hae; Park, Sang Min; Sohn, Eun Hee; Lee, Ae Young; Kim, Jae-Moon; Jo, Hyun-Jin; Lee, Yeon-Hee; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2015-04-01

    Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) can cause various ocular motor disorders in addition to optic neuritis. Ocular motor findings associated with NMOSD include spontaneous vertical and gaze-evoked nystagmus, wall-eyed bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia, and trochlear nerve palsy. The association between dorsal midbrain syndrome and anti-aquaporin-4 antibody seropositivity has not been reported. Here, we report a patient displaying typical dorsal midbrain syndrome and anti-aquaporin-4 antibody seropositivity.

  7. Anti-acne, anti-dandruff and anti-breast cancer efficacy of green synthesised silver nanoparticles using Coriandrum sativum leaf extract.

    PubMed

    Sathishkumar, Palanivel; Preethi, Johnson; Vijayan, Raji; Mohd Yusoff, Abdull Rahim; Ameen, Fuad; Suresh, Sadhasivam; Balagurunathan, Ramasamy; Palvannan, Thayumanavan

    2016-10-01

    In this present investigation, AgNPs were green synthesised using Coriandrum sativum leaf extract. The physicochemical properties of AgNPs were characterised using UV-visible spectrophotometer, field emission scanning microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray (FESEM/EDX), Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis. Further, in vitro anti-acne, anti-dandruff and anti-breast cancer efficacy of green synthesised AgNPs were assessed against Propionibacterium acnes MTCC 1951, Malassezia furfur MTCC 1374 and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cell line, respectively. The flavonoids present in the plant extract were responsible for the AgNPs synthesis. The green synthesised nanoparticles size was found to be ≈37nm. The BET analysis result shows that the surface area of the synthesised AgNPs was found to be 33.72m(2)g(-1). The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of AgNPs for acne causative agent P. acnes and dandruff causative agent M. furfur was found to be at 3.1 and 25μgmL(-1), respectively. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of the AgNPs for MCF-7 cells was calculated as 30.5μgmL(-1) and complete inhibition was observed at a concentration of 100μgmL(-1). Finally, our results proved that green synthesised AgNPs using C. sativum have great potential in biomedical applications such as anti-acne, anti-dandruff and anti-breast cancer treatment. PMID:27541567

  8. Anti-acne, anti-dandruff and anti-breast cancer efficacy of green synthesised silver nanoparticles using Coriandrum sativum leaf extract.

    PubMed

    Sathishkumar, Palanivel; Preethi, Johnson; Vijayan, Raji; Mohd Yusoff, Abdull Rahim; Ameen, Fuad; Suresh, Sadhasivam; Balagurunathan, Ramasamy; Palvannan, Thayumanavan

    2016-10-01

    In this present investigation, AgNPs were green synthesised using Coriandrum sativum leaf extract. The physicochemical properties of AgNPs were characterised using UV-visible spectrophotometer, field emission scanning microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray (FESEM/EDX), Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis. Further, in vitro anti-acne, anti-dandruff and anti-breast cancer efficacy of green synthesised AgNPs were assessed against Propionibacterium acnes MTCC 1951, Malassezia furfur MTCC 1374 and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cell line, respectively. The flavonoids present in the plant extract were responsible for the AgNPs synthesis. The green synthesised nanoparticles size was found to be ≈37nm. The BET analysis result shows that the surface area of the synthesised AgNPs was found to be 33.72m(2)g(-1). The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of AgNPs for acne causative agent P. acnes and dandruff causative agent M. furfur was found to be at 3.1 and 25μgmL(-1), respectively. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of the AgNPs for MCF-7 cells was calculated as 30.5μgmL(-1) and complete inhibition was observed at a concentration of 100μgmL(-1). Finally, our results proved that green synthesised AgNPs using C. sativum have great potential in biomedical applications such as anti-acne, anti-dandruff and anti-breast cancer treatment.

  9. Antioxidant, anti-collagenase and anti-elastase activities of Phyllanthus emblica, Manilkara zapota and silymarin: an in vitro comparative study for anti-aging applications.

    PubMed

    Pientaweeratch, Sirinya; Panapisal, Vipaporn; Tansirikongkol, Anyarporn

    2016-09-01

    Context Phyllanthus emblica L. (Euphorbiaceae) (amla), Manilkara zapota L.P. Royen (Sapotaceae) (sapota) and silymarin are reported to contain antioxidant effects. However, information on other biological activities relating to the anti-aging properties is limited. Objective To compare in vitro antioxidants, anti-collagenase (MMP-1 and MMP-2) and anti-elastase properties as well as the phenolic and flavonoid contents of amla, sapota and silymarin as potential anti-aging ingredients. Materials and methods The ethanol amla and sapota fruit extracts were prepared by three cycles of maceration with 24 h duration each. The total phenolic (TPC) and flavonoid (TFC) contents were determined. The antioxidant capacity was evaluated by DPPH and ABTS assays. The effects of MMP-1, MMP-2 and elastase inhibitions were determined by using the EnzChek® assay kits (Molecular-Probes, Eugene, OR). Results Amla exhibited the highest in TPC (362.43 ± 11.2 mg GAE/g) while silymarin showed the highest in TFC (21.04 ± 0.67 mg QE/g). Results of antioxidant activity by DPPH and ABTS methods showed that amla possessed the most potent capacity with IC50 values of 1.70 ± 0.07 and 4.45 ± 0.10 μg/mL, respectively. Highest inhibitions against MMP-1, MMP-2 and elastase were detected for sapota with IC50 values of 89.61 ± 0.96, 86.47 ± 3.04 and 35.73 ± 0.61 μg/mL, respectively. Discussion and conclusion Test extracts offered anti-aging properties in different mechanisms. Amla showed the highest phenolic content and antioxidant property with moderate anti-collagenase. Silymarin exhibited measurable flavonoid content with anti-elastase effect. Sapota showed the highest collagenase and elastase inhibitions with moderate antioxidant effect. Thus, extracts might be added as a mixture to gain the overall anti-aging effects. PMID:26912420

  10. Anti-NMDA-receptor antibody encephalitis in infants

    PubMed Central

    Matoq, Amr A.; Rappoport, Adam S.; Yang, Yiting; O'Babatunde, Jessica; Bakerywala, Rubina; Sheth, Raj D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antibody encephalitis is an autoimmune disorder manifesting subacutely with prominent aberrant movements and psychiatric symptoms. The clinical course is one of progressive clinical deterioration that can be halted and often reversed by early diagnosis and treatment. Patterns of presentation and etiology of anti-NMDA-receptor antibody encephalitis are dependent on age and can be challenging to recognize in very young children. Reports Sequential clinical case observations of anti-NMDA-receptor antibody encephalitis presenting in very young children were examined over a year at a single tertiary pediatric institution. Cerebrospinal fluid confirmed anti-NMDA-receptor antibodies in two cases (a 21-month-old boy and a 29-month-old girl) that demonstrated either bizarre behavioral patterns or status epilepticus both associated with progressive deterioration. Once recognized, the clinical course was arrested and reversed by aggressive treatment with plasma exchange, immunoglobulin, and high dose IV steroids. Conclusion Infants with anti-NMDA-receptor antibody encephalitis can present with frank seizures or seizure mimics. Regardless, prompt recognition and aggressive treatment of anti-NMDA-receptor antibody encephalitis, while challenging, can quickly arrest deterioration and hasten recovery, thereby, limiting neurological morbidity. PMID:26744696

  11. Alternative for Anti-TNF Antibodies for Arthritis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Paquet, Joseph; Henrionnet, Christel; Pinzano, Astrid; Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste; Gillet, Pierre; Netter, Patrick; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Loeuille, Damien; Pourel, Jacques; Grossin, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a proinflammatory cytokine, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases, including arthritis. Neutralization of this cytokine by anti-TNF-α antibodies has shown its efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is now widely used. Nevertheless, some patients currently treated with anti-TNF-α remain refractory or become nonresponder to these treatments. In this context, there is a need for new or complementary therapeutic strategies. In this study, we investigated in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory potentialities of an anti-TNF-α triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO), as judged from effects on two rat arthritis models. The inhibitory activity of this TFO on articular cells (synoviocytes and chondrocytes) was verified and compared to that of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in vitro. The use of the anti-TNF-α TFO as a preventive and local treatment in both acute and chronic arthritis models significantly reduced disease development. Furthermore, the TFO efficiently blocked synovitis and cartilage and bone destruction in the joints. The results presented here provide the first evidence that gene targeting by anti-TNF-α TFO modulates arthritis in vivo, thus providing proof-of-concept that it could be used as therapeutic tool for TNF-α-dependent inflammatory disorders. PMID:21811249

  12. Hypoglycemic agents and potential anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Vishal; Galdo, John A; Mathews, Suresh T

    2016-01-01

    Current literature shows an association of diabetes and secondary complications with chronic inflammation. Evidence of these immunological changes include altered levels of cytokines and chemokines, changes in the numbers and activation states of various leukocyte populations, apoptosis, and fibrosis during diabetes. Therefore, treatment of diabetes and its complications may include pharmacological strategies to reduce inflammation. Apart from anti-inflammatory drugs, various hypoglycemic agents have also been found to reduce inflammation that could contribute to improved outcomes. Extensive studies have been carried out with thiazolidinediones (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist), dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, and metformin (AMP-activated protein kinase activator) with each of these classes of compounds showing moderate-to-strong anti-inflammatory action. Sulfonylureas and alpha glucosidase inhibitors appeared to exert modest effects, while the injectable agents, insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, may improve secondary complications due to their anti-inflammatory potential. Currently, there is a lack of clinical data on anti-inflammatory effects of sodium–glucose cotransporter type 2 inhibitors. Nevertheless, for all these glucose-lowering agents, it is essential to distinguish between anti-inflammatory effects resulting from better glucose control and effects related to intrinsic anti-inflammatory actions of the pharmacological class of compounds. PMID:27114714

  13. The Development of Sugar-Based Anti-Melanogenic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Kim, Sung Tae; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Lee, Tae Ryong; Cho, Eun-Gyung

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of melanin production is important for managing skin darkness and hyperpigmentary disorders. Numerous anti-melanogenic agents that target tyrosinase activity/stability, melanosome maturation/transfer, or melanogenesis-related signaling pathways have been developed. As a rate-limiting enzyme in melanogenesis, tyrosinase has been the most attractive target, but tyrosinase-targeted treatments still pose serious potential risks, indicating the necessity of developing lower-risk anti-melanogenic agents. Sugars are ubiquitous natural compounds found in humans and other organisms. Here, we review the recent advances in research on the roles of sugars and sugar-related agents in melanogenesis and in the development of sugar-based anti-melanogenic agents. The proposed mechanisms of action of these agents include: (a) (natural sugars) disturbing proper melanosome maturation by inducing osmotic stress and inhibiting the PI3 kinase pathway and (b) (sugar derivatives) inhibiting tyrosinase maturation by blocking N-glycosylation. Finally, we propose an alternative strategy for developing anti-melanogenic sugars that theoretically reduce melanosomal pH by inhibiting a sucrose transporter and reduce tyrosinase activity by inhibiting copper incorporation into an active site. These studies provide evidence of the utility of sugar-based anti-melanogenic agents in managing skin darkness and curing pigmentary disorders and suggest a future direction for the development of physiologically favorable anti-melanogenic agents. PMID:27092497

  14. Alternative for anti-TNF antibodies for arthritis treatment.

    PubMed

    Paquet, Joseph; Henrionnet, Christel; Pinzano, Astrid; Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste; Gillet, Pierre; Netter, Patrick; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Loeuille, Damien; Pourel, Jacques; Grossin, Laurent

    2011-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a proinflammatory cytokine, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases, including arthritis. Neutralization of this cytokine by anti-TNF-α antibodies has shown its efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is now widely used. Nevertheless, some patients currently treated with anti-TNF-α remain refractory or become nonresponder to these treatments. In this context, there is a need for new or complementary therapeutic strategies. In this study, we investigated in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory potentialities of an anti-TNF-α triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO), as judged from effects on two rat arthritis models. The inhibitory activity of this TFO on articular cells (synoviocytes and chondrocytes) was verified and compared to that of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in vitro. The use of the anti-TNF-α TFO as a preventive and local treatment in both acute and chronic arthritis models significantly reduced disease development. Furthermore, the TFO efficiently blocked synovitis and cartilage and bone destruction in the joints. The results presented here provide the first evidence that gene targeting by anti-TNF-α TFO modulates arthritis in vivo, thus providing proof-of-concept that it could be used as therapeutic tool for TNF-α-dependent inflammatory disorders.

  15. Nazi indoctrination and anti-Semitic beliefs in Germany.

    PubMed

    Voigtländer, Nico; Voth, Hans-Joachim

    2015-06-30

    Attempts at modifying public opinions, attitudes, and beliefs range from advertising and schooling to "brainwashing." Their effectiveness is highly controversial. In this paper, we use survey data on anti-Semitic beliefs and attitudes in a representative sample of Germans surveyed in 1996 and 2006 to show that Nazi indoctrination--with its singular focus on fostering racial hatred--was highly effective. Between 1933 and 1945, young Germans were exposed to anti-Semitic ideology in schools, in the (extracurricular) Hitler Youth, and through radio, print, and film. As a result, Germans who grew up under the Nazi regime are much more anti-Semitic than those born before or after that period: the share of committed anti-Semites, who answer a host of questions about attitudes toward Jews in an extreme fashion, is 2-3 times higher than in the population as a whole. Results also hold for average beliefs, and not just the share of extremists; average views of Jews are much more negative among those born in the 1920s and 1930s. Nazi indoctrination was most effective where it could tap into preexisting prejudices; those born in districts that supported anti-Semitic parties before 1914 show the greatest increases in anti-Jewish attitudes. These findings demonstrate the extent to which beliefs can be modified through policy intervention. We also identify parameters amplifying the effectiveness of such measures, such as preexisting prejudices. PMID:26080394

  16. Antioxidant and Anti-Fatigue Constituents of Okra

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Fangbo; Zhong, Yu; Li, Mengqiu; Chang, Qi; Liao, Yonghong; Liu, Xinmin; Pan, Ruile

    2015-01-01

    Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench), a healthy vegetable, is widely spread in tropical and subtropical areas. Previous studies have proven that okra pods possess anti-fatigue activity, and the aim of this research is to clarify the anti-fatigue constituents. To achieve this, we divided okra pods (OPD) into seeds (OSD) and skins (OSK), and compared the contents of total polysaccharides, total polyphenols, total flavonoids, isoquercitrin, and quercetin-3-O-gentiobiose and the antioxidant activity in vitro and anti-fatigue activity in vivo between OSD and OSK. The contents of total polyphenols and total polysaccharides were 29.5% and 14.8% in OSD and 1.25% and 43.1% in OSK, respectively. Total flavonoids, isoquercitrin and quercetin-3-O-gentiobiose (5.35%, 2.067% and 2.741%, respectively) were only detected in OSD. Antioxidant assays, including 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and reducing power test, and weight-loaded swimming test showed OSD possessed significant antioxidant and anti-fatigue effects. Moreover, biochemical determination revealed that that anti-fatigue activity of OSD is caused by reducing the levels of blood lactic acid (BLA) and urea nitrogen (BUN), enhancing hepatic glycogen storage and promoting antioxidant ability by lowering malondialdehyde (MDA) level and increasing superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) levels. These results proved okra seeds were the anti-fatigue part of okra pods and polyphenols and flavonoids were active constituents. PMID:26516905

  17. [Anti-inflammatory effects of methylprednisolone aceponate in animals].

    PubMed

    Ikoma, Y; Yamashita, M; Kamitani, K; Nakagawa, H

    1991-11-01

    In the case of dermal application of the drugs to croton oil-induced ear edema in rats and picryl chloride-induced delayed type hypersensitivity in mice, the anti-inflammatory effect of methylprednisolone aceponate (MPA) was slightly weaker than those of clobetasol 17-propionate and diflucortolone 21-valerate, but stronger than those of hydrocortisone 17-butyrate and hydrocortisone 17-butyrate 21-propionate. Betamethasone 17-valerate applied dermally was less and more effective than MPA to ear edema in rats and delayed type hypersensitivity in mice, respectively. The anti-inflammatory effect of MPA was weaker in subcutaneous administration than in topical application to the two inflammatory models. It was suggested that MPA has strong anti-inflammatory effects and weak systemic effects by topical application. Methylprednisolone 17-propionate (MP-17P) and methylprednisolone (MP), unesterified in only the C-21 position and in both the C-17 and 21 positions of MPA, respectively, showed weaker anti-inflammatory activities than MPA by topical application to croton oil-induced ear edema. The ratio of the anti-inflammatory effects by topical application to subcutaneous administration of MPA was higher than those of MP-17P and MP. The excellent characteristics of MPA as a dermal anti-inflammatory drug are suggested to be derived from di-esterification of MP, which has a weak activity intrinsically. PMID:1813371

  18. Antioxidant and Anti-Fatigue Constituents of Okra.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fangbo; Zhong, Yu; Li, Mengqiu; Chang, Qi; Liao, Yonghong; Liu, Xinmin; Pan, Ruile

    2015-10-26

    Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench), a healthy vegetable, is widely spread in tropical and subtropical areas. Previous studies have proven that okra pods possess anti-fatigue activity, and the aim of this research is to clarify the anti-fatigue constituents. To achieve this, we divided okra pods (OPD) into seeds (OSD) and skins (OSK), and compared the contents of total polysaccharides, total polyphenols, total flavonoids, isoquercitrin, and quercetin-3-O-gentiobiose and the antioxidant activity in vitro and anti-fatigue activity in vivo between OSD and OSK. The contents of total polyphenols and total polysaccharides were 29.5% and 14.8% in OSD and 1.25% and 43.1% in OSK, respectively. Total flavonoids, isoquercitrin and quercetin-3-O-gentiobiose (5.35%, 2.067% and 2.741%, respectively) were only detected in OSD. Antioxidant assays, including 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and reducing power test, and weight-loaded swimming test showed OSD possessed significant antioxidant and anti-fatigue effects. Moreover, biochemical determination revealed that that anti-fatigue activity of OSD is caused by reducing the levels of blood lactic acid (BLA) and urea nitrogen (BUN), enhancing hepatic glycogen storage and promoting antioxidant ability by lowering malondialdehyde (MDA) level and increasing superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) levels. These results proved okra seeds were the anti-fatigue part of okra pods and polyphenols and flavonoids were active constituents.

  19. [Anti-MOG + neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders treated with plasmapheresis].

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Azusa; Nakamura, Sadao; Tamashiro, Kunihito; Fujihara, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    A 10-year-old boy developed bilateral optic neuritis and myelitis after a suspected viral infection and appendicitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed multiple lesions in both optic nerves, the optic chiasm, and the spinal cord. Several small lesions were also observed in the cerebellum and cerebral white matter. The serum tested negative for anti-aquaporin (AQP)-4 antibody and positive for anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibody. The diagnosis was neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD). Two courses of high-dose methylprednisolone were administered; however, only a small improvement in his visual acuity was achieved. He underwent 3 courses of plasma exchange to achieve sufficient visual acuity. After the serum anti-MOG antibody titer decreased to the cut-off level, oral prednisolone and azathioprine administration were also stopped, 10 months after onset. Recently, NMO and NMOSD cases positive for anti-MOG antibodies have been reported, which showed clinical features different from those of NMO cases positive for anti-AQP4 antibody. Although most of the reported cases responded to steroid therapy, plasma exchange was required in our case. Further analysis on larger numbers of cases is needed to establish treatments for anti-MOG antibody-positive NMO and NMOSD. PMID:27349083

  20. Antioxidant and Anti-Fatigue Constituents of Okra.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fangbo; Zhong, Yu; Li, Mengqiu; Chang, Qi; Liao, Yonghong; Liu, Xinmin; Pan, Ruile

    2015-10-01

    Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench), a healthy vegetable, is widely spread in tropical and subtropical areas. Previous studies have proven that okra pods possess anti-fatigue activity, and the aim of this research is to clarify the anti-fatigue constituents. To achieve this, we divided okra pods (OPD) into seeds (OSD) and skins (OSK), and compared the contents of total polysaccharides, total polyphenols, total flavonoids, isoquercitrin, and quercetin-3-O-gentiobiose and the antioxidant activity in vitro and anti-fatigue activity in vivo between OSD and OSK. The contents of total polyphenols and total polysaccharides were 29.5% and 14.8% in OSD and 1.25% and 43.1% in OSK, respectively. Total flavonoids, isoquercitrin and quercetin-3-O-gentiobiose (5.35%, 2.067% and 2.741%, respectively) were only detected in OSD. Antioxidant assays, including 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and reducing power test, and weight-loaded swimming test showed OSD possessed significant antioxidant and anti-fatigue effects. Moreover, biochemical determination revealed that that anti-fatigue activity of OSD is caused by reducing the levels of blood lactic acid (BLA) and urea nitrogen (BUN), enhancing hepatic glycogen storage and promoting antioxidant ability by lowering malondialdehyde (MDA) level and increasing superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) levels. These results proved okra seeds were the anti-fatigue part of okra pods and polyphenols and flavonoids were active constituents. PMID:26516905

  1. Anti-phospholipase A2 receptor antibody in membranous nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Qin, Weisong; Beck, Laurence H; Zeng, Caihong; Chen, Zhaohong; Li, Shijun; Zuo, Ke; Salant, David J; Liu, Zhihong

    2011-06-01

    The M-type phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) is a target autoantigen in adult idiopathic membranous nephropathy (MN), but the prevalence of autoantibodies against PLA2R is unknown among Chinese patients with MN. Here, we measured anti-PLA2R antibody in the serum of 60 patients with idiopathic MN, 20 with lupus-associated MN, 16 with hepatitis B (HBV)-associated MN, and 10 with tumor-associated MN. Among patients with idiopathic MN, 49 (82%) had detectable anti-PLA2R autoantibodies using a Western blot assay; an assay with greater sensitivity detected very low titers of anti-PLA2R in 10 of the remaining 11 patients. Using the standard assay, we detected anti-PLA2R antibody in only 1 patient with lupus, 1 with HBV, and 3 with cancer, producing an overall specificity of 89% in this cohort limited to patients with secondary MN. The enhanced assay detected low titers of anti-PLA2R in only 2 additional samples of HBV-associated MN. In summary, these results suggest that PLA2R is a major target antigen in Chinese idiopathic MN and that detection of anti-PLA2R is a sensitive test for idiopathic MN.

  2. Anti-Phospholipase A2 Receptor Antibody in Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Weisong; Beck, Laurence H.; Zeng, Caihong; Chen, Zhaohong; Li, Shijun; Zuo, Ke; Salant, David J.

    2011-01-01

    The M-type phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) is a target autoantigen in adult idiopathic membranous nephropathy (MN), but the prevalence of autoantibodies against PLA2R is unknown among Chinese patients with MN. Here, we measured anti-PLA2R antibody in the serum of 60 patients with idiopathic MN, 20 with lupus-associated MN, 16 with hepatitis B (HBV)-associated MN, and 10 with tumor-associated MN. Among patients with idiopathic MN, 49 (82%) had detectable anti-PLA2R autoantibodies using a Western blot assay; an assay with greater sensitivity detected very low titers of anti-PLA2R in 10 of the remaining 11 patients. Using the standard assay, we detected anti-PLA2R antibody in only 1 patient with lupus, 1 with HBV, and 3 with cancer, producing an overall specificity of 89% in this cohort limited to patients with secondary MN. The enhanced assay detected low titers of anti-PLA2R in only 2 additional samples of HBV-associated MN. In summary, these results suggest that PLA2R is a major target antigen in Chinese idiopathic MN and that detection of anti-PLA2R is a sensitive test for idiopathic MN. PMID:21566055

  3. Nazi indoctrination and anti-Semitic beliefs in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Voigtländer, Nico; Voth, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Attempts at modifying public opinions, attitudes, and beliefs range from advertising and schooling to “brainwashing.” Their effectiveness is highly controversial. In this paper, we use survey data on anti-Semitic beliefs and attitudes in a representative sample of Germans surveyed in 1996 and 2006 to show that Nazi indoctrination––with its singular focus on fostering racial hatred––was highly effective. Between 1933 and 1945, young Germans were exposed to anti-Semitic ideology in schools, in the (extracurricular) Hitler Youth, and through radio, print, and film. As a result, Germans who grew up under the Nazi regime are much more anti-Semitic than those born before or after that period: the share of committed anti-Semites, who answer a host of questions about attitudes toward Jews in an extreme fashion, is 2–3 times higher than in the population as a whole. Results also hold for average beliefs, and not just the share of extremists; average views of Jews are much more negative among those born in the 1920s and 1930s. Nazi indoctrination was most effective where it could tap into preexisting prejudices; those born in districts that supported anti-Semitic parties before 1914 show the greatest increases in anti-Jewish attitudes. These findings demonstrate the extent to which beliefs can be modified through policy intervention. We also identify parameters amplifying the effectiveness of such measures, such as preexisting prejudices. PMID:26080394

  4. The nature of the TRAP-Anti-TRAP complex.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Heddle, Jonathan G; Kikuchi, Kenichi; Unzai, Satoru; Akashi, Satoko; Park, Sam-Yong; Tame, Jeremy R H

    2009-02-17

    Tryptophan biosynthesis is subject to exquisite control in species of Bacillus and has become one of the best-studied model systems in gene regulation. The protein TRAP (trp RNA-binding attenuation protein) predominantly forms a ring-shaped 11-mer, which binds cognate RNA in the presence of tryptophan to suppress expression of the trp operon. TRAP is itself regulated by the protein Anti-TRAP, which binds to TRAP and prevents RNA binding. To date, the nature of this interaction has proved elusive. Here, we describe mass spectrometry and analytical centrifugation studies of the complex, and 2 crystal structures of the TRAP-Anti-TRAP complex. These crystal structures, both refined to 3.2-A resolution, show that Anti-TRAP binds to TRAP as a trimer, sterically blocking RNA binding. Mass spectrometry shows that 11-mer TRAP may bind up to 5 AT trimers, and an artificial 12-mer TRAP may bind 6. Both forms of TRAP make the same interactions with Anti-TRAP. Crystallization of wild-type TRAP with Anti-TRAP selectively pulls the 12-mer TRAP form out of solution, so the crystal structure of wild-type TRAP-Anti-TRAP complex reflects a minor species from a mixed population. PMID:19164760

  5. Butein is a novel anti-adipogenic compound[S

    PubMed Central

    Song, No-Joon; Yoon, Hyang-Jin; Kim, Ki Hyun; Jung, So-Ra; Jang, Woo-Seok; Seo, Cho-Rong; Lee, Young Min; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk; Hong, Joung-Woo; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Park, Ki-Moon; Lee, Kang Ro; Park, Kye Won

    2013-01-01

    Rhus verniciflua Stokes (RVS) has been used as a traditional herbal medicine for its various biological activities including anti-adipogenic effects. Activity-guided separation led to the identification of the anti-adipogenic functions of butein. Butein, a novel anti-adipogenic compound, robustly suppressed lipid accumulation and inhibited expression of adipogenic markers. Molecular studies showed that activated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and suppressed signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathways were mediated by butein. Analysis of the temporal expression profiles suggests that TGF-β signaling precedes the STAT3 in the butein-mediated anti-adipogenic cascade. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of STAT3 or SMAD2/3 blunted the inhibitory effects of butein on adipogenesis indicating that an interaction between two signaling pathways is required for the action of butein. Upon butein treatments, stimulation of TGF-β signaling was still preserved in STAT3 silenced cells, whereas regulation of STAT3 signaling by butein was significantly impaired in SMAD2/3 silenced cells, further showing that TGF-β acts upstream of STAT3 in the butein-mediated anti-adipogenesis. Taken together, the present study shows that butein, a novel anti-adipogenic compound from RVS, inhibits adipocyte differentiation through the TGF-β pathway followed by STAT3 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ signaling, further implicating potential roles of butein in TGF-β- and STAT3-dysregulated diseases. PMID:23468131

  6. Multiple Mechanisms of Anti-Cancer Effects Exerted by Astaxanthin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Handong

    2015-01-01

    Astaxanthin (ATX) is a xanthophyll carotenoid which has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) as food colorant in animal and fish feed. It is widely found in algae and aquatic animals and has powerful anti-oxidative activity. Previous studies have revealed that ATX, with its anti-oxidative property, is beneficial as a therapeutic agent for various diseases without any side effects or toxicity. In addition, ATX also shows preclinical anti-tumor efficacy both in vivo and in vitro in various cancer models. Several researches have deciphered that ATX exerts its anti-proliferative, anti-apoptosis and anti-invasion influence via different molecules and pathways including signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). Hence, ATX shows great promise as chemotherapeutic agents in cancer. Here, we review the rapidly advancing field of ATX in cancer therapy as well as some molecular targets of ATX. PMID:26184238

  7. Specific suppression of anti-DNA production in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Liebling, M.R.; Wong, C.; Radosevich, J.; Louie, J.S.

    1988-09-01

    To investigate the regulation of anti-DNA antibody production, we generated anti-DNA-specific suppressor cells by exposing normal human T cells and a small percentage of adherent cells to high concentrations of DNA. These cells suppressed the production of anti-DNA by both autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and allogeneic PBMC derived from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Anti-DNA production was suppressed significantly more than anti-RNA, antitetanus, or total immunoglobulin production. Specific suppression was enhanced by increasing the numbers of DNA-primed CD8+ cells and was obliterated by irradiation of the DNA-primed cells. In contrast to T cells from normal individuals, T cells obtained from two intensively studied SLE patients were unable to generate specific suppressor cells for anti-DNA production in both autologous and allogeneic test systems. Despite this defect, these patients were still capable of generating specific suppressor cells for antibody production directed against an exogenous antigen, tetanus toxoid.

  8. Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory-Organometallic Anticancer Compounds.

    PubMed

    Păunescu, Emilia; McArthur, Sarah; Soudani, Mylène; Scopelliti, Rosario; Dyson, Paul J

    2016-02-15

    Compounds that combine metal-based drugs with covalently linked targeted organic agents have been shown, in some instances, to exhibit superior anticancer properties compared to the individual counterparts. Within this framework, we prepared a series of organometallic ruthenium(II)- and osmium(II)-p-cymene complexes modified with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) indomethacin and diclofenac. The NSAIDs are attached to the organometallic moieties via monodentate (pyridine/phosphine) or bidentate (bipyridine) ligands, affording piano-stool Ru(II) and Os(II) arene complexes of general formula [M(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl2(N)], where N is a pyridine-based ligand, {2-(2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetoxy)ethyl-3-(pyridin-3-yl)propanoate} or {2-(2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetoxy)ethyl-3-(pyridin-3-yl)propanoate}, [M(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl2(P)], where P is a phosphine ligand, {2-(2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetoxy)ethyl-4-(diphenylphosphanyl)benzoate} or {2-(2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetoxy)ethyl-4-(diphenylphosphanyl)benzoate, and [M(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl(N,N')][Cl], where N,N' is a bipyridine-based ligand, (4'-methyl-[2,2'-bipyridin]-4-yl)methyl-2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetate), (4'-methyl-[2,2'-bipyridin]-4-yl)methyl-2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetate), (bis(2-(2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetoxy)ethyl)[2,2'-bipyridine]-5,5'-dicarboxylate), or (bis(2-(2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetoxy)ethyl)[2,2'-bipyridine]-5,5'-dicarboxylate). The antiproliferative properties of the complexes were assessed in human ovarian cancer cells (A2780 and A2780cisR, the latter being resistant to cisplatin) and nontumorigenic human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells. Some of the complexes are considerably more cytotoxic than the original drugs and also display significant cancer cell selectivity. PMID:26824462

  9. The meaning of anti-Ro and anti-La antibodies in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Molina, Gabriela; Leal-Alegre, Gustavo; Michel-Peregrina, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Anti-SSA/Ro and anti-La/SSB are the hallmark antibodies in primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS), being present in 60-70%. These antibodies have been associated with an earlier disease onset, glandular dysfunction and extraglandular manifestations as well as with other B cells activation markers. In addition an immunogenetic background is important for the autoantibody formation, having a stronger association with HLA-DR2 and HLA-DR3. Anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibodies are useful in the diagnosis of pSS and help to identify more "active" patients, however their association with response to treatment is unclear. Herein we review the evidence regarding the association of these antibodies with HLA background, demographic, clinical, glandular dysfunction, other serologic features and response to treatment in patients with pSS.

  10. Harmonization of anti-doping rules in a global context (World Anti-Doping Agency-laboratory accreditation perspective).

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Victoria; Miller, John H M; Rabin, Olivier; Squirrell, Alan; Westwood, Steven

    2012-07-01

    This article provides a review of the leading role of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) in the context of the global fight against doping in sport and the harmonization of anti-doping rules worldwide through the implementation of the World Anti-Doping Program. Particular emphasis is given to the WADA-laboratory accreditation program, which is coordinated by the Science Department of WADA in conjunction with the Laboratory Expert Group, and the cooperation with the international accreditation community through International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation and other organizations, all of which contribute to constant improvement of laboratory performance in the global fight against doping in sport. A perspective is provided of the means to refine the existing anti-doping rules and programs to ensure continuous improvement in order to face growing sophisticated challenges. A viewpoint on WADA's desire to embrace cooperation with other international organizations whose knowledge can contribute to the fight against doping in sport is acknowledged.

  11. Changing trends in anti-coagulant therapies. Are heparins and oral anti-coagulants challenged?

    PubMed

    Fareed, J; Iqbal, O; Cunanan, J; Demir, M; Wahi, R; Clarke, M; Adiguzel, C; Bick, R

    2008-06-01

    The conventional management of thrombotic and cardiovascular disorders is based on the use of heparin, oral anticoagulants and aspirin. Despite progress in the sciences, these drugs still remain a challenge and mystery. The development of low molecular weight heparins (LMWHS) and the synthesis of heparinomimetics represent a refined use of heparin. Additional drugs will continue to develop. However, none of these drugs will ever match the polypharmacology of heparin. Aspirin still remains the leading drug in the management of thrombotic and cardiovascular disorders. The newer antiplatelet drugs such as adenosine diphosphate receptor inhibitors, GPIIb/IIIa inhibitors and other specific inhibitors have limited effects and have been tested in patients who have already been treated with aspirin. Warfarin provides a convenient and affordable approach in the long-term outpatient management of thrombotic disorders. The optimized use of these drugs still remains the approach of choice to manage thrombotic disorders. The new anticoagulant targets, such as tissue factor, individual clotting factors, recombinant forms of serpins (antithrombin, heparin co-factor II and tissue factor pathway inhibitors), recombinant activated protein C, thrombomodulin and site specific serine proteases inhibitors complexes have also been developed. There is a major thrust on the development of orally bioavailable anti-Xa and IIa agents, which are slated to replace oral anticoagulants. Both the anti-factor Xa and anti-IIa agents have been developed for oral use and have provided impressive clinical results. However, safety concerns related to liver enzyme elevations and thrombosis rebound have been reported with their use. For these reasons, the US Food and Drug Administration did not approve the orally active antithrombin agent Ximelagatran for several indications. The synthetic pentasaccharide (Fondaparinux) has undergone clinical development. Unexpectedly, Fondaparinux also produced major

  12. Anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm antibodies, and the lupus anticoagulant: significant factors associated with lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Alba, P; Bento, L; Cuadrado, M; Karim, Y; Tungekar, M; Abbs, I; Khamashta, M; D'Cruz, D; Hughes, G

    2003-01-01

    Background: Lupus nephritis (LN) is a common manifestation in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Autoantibodies and ethnicity have been associated with LN, but the results are controversial. Objective: To study the immunological and demographic factors associated with the development of LN. Patients and methods: A retrospective case-control study of 127 patients with biopsy-proven LN, and 206 randomly selected patients with SLE without nephritis as controls was designed. All patients had attended our lupus unit during the past 12 years. Standard methods were used for laboratory testing. Results: Patients with LN were significantly younger than the controls at the time of SLE diagnosis (mean (SD) 25.6 (8.8) years v 33.7 (12.5) years; p<0.0001). The proportion of patients of black ethnic origin was significantly higher in the group with nephritis (p=0.02). There were no differences in sex distribution or duration of follow up. A higher proportion of anti-dsDNA, anti-RNP, anti-Sm, and lupus anticoagulant (LA) was seen in the group with nephritis (p=0.002; p=0.005; p=0.0001; p=0.01, respectively). In univariate, but not in multivariate, analysis male sex and absence of anti-dsDNA were associated with earlier onset of renal disease (p=0.03; p=0.008). In multivariate analysis the only factors associated with nephritis were younger age at diagnosis of SLE, black race, presence of anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm, and LA. No demographic or immunological associations were seen with WHO histological classes. Conclusions: Young, black patients with anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm antibodies, and positive LA, appear to have a higher risk of renal involvement. These patients should be carefully monitored for the development of LN. PMID:12759294

  13. Atrioventricular Conduction Delay in Fetuses Exposed to Anti-SSA/Ro and Anti-SSB/La Antibodies: A Magnetocardiography Study

    PubMed Central

    Wacker-Gußmann, Annette; Paulsen, Henrike; Kiefer-Schmidt, Isabelle; Henes, Joerg; Muenssinger, Jana; Weiss, Magdalene; Goelz, Rangmar; Preissl, Hubert

    2012-01-01

    Background. The presence of anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies during pregnancy is associated with fetal congenital heart block (CHB), which is primarily diagnosed through fetal echocardiography. Conclusive information about the complete electrophysiology of the fetal cardiac conducting system is still lacking. In addition to echocardiography, fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) can be used. fMCG is the magnetic analogue of the fetal electrocardiogram (ECG). Patients and Methods. Forty-eight pregnant women were enrolled in an observational study; 16 of them tested positive for anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies. In addition to routine fetal echocardiography, fMCG was used. Fetal cardiac time intervals (fCTIs) were extracted from the magnetic recordings by predefined procedures. ECGs in the neonates of the study group were performed within the first month after delivery. Results. The PQ segment of the fCTI was significantly prolonged in the study group (P = 0.007), representing a delay of the electrical impulse in the atrioventricular (AV) node. Other fCTIs were within normal range. None of the anti-SSA/Ro and/or anti-SSB/La fetuses progressed to a more advanced heart block during pregnancy or after birth. Conclusion. The study identified a low-risk population within antibody positive mothers, where PQ segment prolongation is associated with a lack of progression of the disease. PMID:23320018

  14. Comparison of Anti-Oxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Effects between Fresh and Aged Black Garlic Extracts.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yi Yeong; Ryu, Ji Hyeon; Shin, Jung-Hye; Kang, Min Jung; Kang, Jae Ran; Han, Jaehee; Kang, Dawon

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that aged black garlic (ABG) has strong anti-oxidant activity. Little is known however regarding the anti-inflammatory activity of ABG. This study was performed to identify and compare the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of ABG extract (ABGE) with those of fresh raw garlic (FRG) extract (FRGE). In addition, we investigated which components are responsible for the observed effects. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were used as a pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory stressor, respectively. ABGE showed high ABTS and DPPH radical scavenging activities and low ROS generation in RAW264.7 cells compared with FRGE. However, inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 and 5-lipooxygenase activities by FRGE was stronger than that by ABGE. FRGE reduced PGE₂, NO, IL-6, IL-1β, LTD₄, and LTE₄ production in LPS-activated RAW264.7 cells more than did ABGE. The combination of FRGE and sugar (galactose, glucose, fructose, or sucrose), which is more abundant in ABGE than in FRGE, decreased the anti-inflammatory activity compared with FRGE. FRGE-induced inhibition of NF-κB activation and pro-inflammatory gene expression was blocked by combination with sugars. The lower anti-inflammatory activity in ABGE than FRGE could result from the presence of sugars. Our results suggest that ABGE might be helpful for the treatment of diseases mediated predominantly by ROS. PMID:27043510

  15. Comparison of Anti-Oxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Effects between Fresh and Aged Black Garlic Extracts.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yi Yeong; Ryu, Ji Hyeon; Shin, Jung-Hye; Kang, Min Jung; Kang, Jae Ran; Han, Jaehee; Kang, Dawon

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that aged black garlic (ABG) has strong anti-oxidant activity. Little is known however regarding the anti-inflammatory activity of ABG. This study was performed to identify and compare the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of ABG extract (ABGE) with those of fresh raw garlic (FRG) extract (FRGE). In addition, we investigated which components are responsible for the observed effects. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were used as a pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory stressor, respectively. ABGE showed high ABTS and DPPH radical scavenging activities and low ROS generation in RAW264.7 cells compared with FRGE. However, inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 and 5-lipooxygenase activities by FRGE was stronger than that by ABGE. FRGE reduced PGE₂, NO, IL-6, IL-1β, LTD₄, and LTE₄ production in LPS-activated RAW264.7 cells more than did ABGE. The combination of FRGE and sugar (galactose, glucose, fructose, or sucrose), which is more abundant in ABGE than in FRGE, decreased the anti-inflammatory activity compared with FRGE. FRGE-induced inhibition of NF-κB activation and pro-inflammatory gene expression was blocked by combination with sugars. The lower anti-inflammatory activity in ABGE than FRGE could result from the presence of sugars. Our results suggest that ABGE might be helpful for the treatment of diseases mediated predominantly by ROS.

  16. Anti-cytochrome P450 IIE1 (anti IIE1) and dimethyl sulfoxide inhibit acetaminophen and dimethylnitrosamine oxidation similarly

    SciTech Connect

    Jaw, S.; Jeffery, E.H. ); Roberts, D.W. )

    1991-03-11

    To evaluate specificity of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the authors compared anti IIE1 and DMSO inhibition of P450 oxidations. Hepatic microsomes from control and acetone-induced female Swiss-Webster mice were preincubated with polyclonal anti IIE1 or IgG for 20 min at 4C before addition of an NADPH-generating system, DMSO or buffer, and substrate (Ethylmorphine, EM; dimethylnitrosamine, DMN; or acetaminophen, AP; 1 mM final concentration). After 20 min at 37C, the incubations were terminated by adding 20% trichloroacetic acid or methanol. Formaldehyde was determined by the Nash method when using EM or DMN as substrate. AP-glutathione conjugate was determined by HPLC when using AP as substrate. Anti IIE1 and DMSO did not inhibit EM demethylation in control or acetone microsomes. However, DMSO inhibited DMN demethylation by 26% and 64% in control and 30% and 75% in acetone microsomes. Anti IIE1 inhibited DMN demethylation by 44% and 24% in control and acetone microsomes, respectively. DMSO inhibited AP metabolism by 31% and 56% and anti IIE1 inhibited AP metabolism by 33%, in control microsomes. The inhibitions of DMN and AP metabolism by anti IIE1 and DMSO were only additive at submaximal inhibitor concentrations and confirm that DMSO specifically inhibits IIE1 activity.

  17. Anti-cancer, anti-diabetic and other pharmacologic and biological activities of penta-galloyl-glucose

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinhui; Li, Li; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Hagerman, Ann E.; Lü, Junxuan

    2010-01-01

    1, 2, 3, 4, 6-penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose (PGG) is a polyphenolic compound highly enriched in a number of medicinal herbals. Several in vitro and a handful of in vivo studies have shown that PGG exhibits multiple biological activities which implicate a great potential for PGG in the therapy and prevention of several major diseases including cancer and diabetes. Chemically and functionally, PGG appears to be distinct from its constituent gallic acid or tea polyphenols. For anti-cancer activity, three published in vivo preclinical cancer model studies with PGG support promising efficacy to selectively inhibit malignancy without host toxicity. Potential mechanisms include anti-angiogenesis, anti-proliferative actions through inhibition of DNA replicative synthesis and S-phase arrest and also G1 arrest, induction of apoptosis, anti-inflammation and anti-oxidation. Putative molecular targets include p53, Stat3, Cox-2, VEGFR1, AP-1, SP-1, Nrf-2 and MMP-9. For anti-diabetic activity, PGG and analogues appear to improve glucose uptake. However, very little is known about the absorption, pharmacokinetics and metabolism of PGG, nor its toxicity profile. The lack of large quantity of highly pure PGG has been a bottleneck limiting in vivo validation of cancer preventive and therapeutic efficacies in clinically relevant models. PMID:19575286

  18. Anti-anaphylactic and anti-inflammatory activities of a bioactive alkaloid from the root bark of Plumeria acutifolia Poir

    PubMed Central

    Vijayalakshmi, A; Ravichandiran, V; Velraj, Malarkodi; Hemalatha, S; Sudharani, G; Jayakumari, S

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the anti-anaphylactic, anti-inflammatory and membrane stabilizing properties of plumerianine (compound 1) isolated from the root bark of Plumeria acutifolia Poir. Methods The anti-anaphylactic activity of compound 1 (10, 25 and 50 mg/kg) was studied by using models such as passive cutaneous anaphylaxis, passive paw anaphylaxis and its anti-inflammatory activity against carrageenin induced paw edema and cotton pellet granuloma in albino rats was also investigated using ketotifen and indomethacin as reference drugs. Results A dose-dependent beneficial effect was observed on leakage of evans blue dye in skin challenged with antigen and on paw anaphylaxis induced by antiserum. The compound 1 also exhibited significant (P<0.01) inhibition of rat paw edema and granuloma tissue formation, including significant protection of RBC against the haemolytic effect of hypotonic solution, an indication of membrane-stabilizing activity. Conclusions Anti-anaphylactic activity of compound 1 may be possibly due to inhibition of the release of various inflammatory mediators. Anti-inflammatory activity of compound may be related to the inhibition of the early phase and late phase of inflammatory events. PMID:23569801

  19. Anti-coagulation effect of Fc fragment against anti-β2-GP1 antibodies in mouse models with APS.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weidong; Zhang, Yaou; Bu, Cunya; Sun, Shijing; Hu, Shaoliang; Cai, Guoping

    2011-01-01

    Anti-beta (2)-glycoprotein I (anti-β2-GP1) is one of the important pathogenesis factors responsible for thrombosis formation in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Administration of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is a common method used to inhibit the abnormal antibody levels and decrease the mortality of APS in emergency situations. We hypothesize that the Fc fragment of IgG is the molecular structure responsible for these effects. The present study investigates the beneficial effects of both recombinant and natural human Fc fragments of heterogeneous IgG against human anti-β2-GP1 antibodies in mouse models with APS. Results showed that both recombinant and natural human Fc fragments moderately but significantly decreased the levels of serum anti-β2-GP1 antibodies and had anti-coagulation effects in human β2-GP1-immunized mice. Furthermore, both recombinant and natural human Fc fragments inhibited thrombosis formation and decreased mortality in mouse models infused intravenously with human anti-β2GP1 antibodies from patients with APS. Findings suggest that the Fc fragment might be one of the active structural units of heterogeneous IgG. Thus, recombinant human Fc fragment administration may be a useful treatment for individuals with APS.

  20. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activities of aqueous ethanolic extract of Tamarix aphylla L. (Saltcedar) in mice.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Muhammad Imran; Abbas, Khizar; Hamayun, Rahma; Ali, Muhammad

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activity of aqueous ethanolic extracts of Tamarix aphylla. The powdered plant was extracted by the method of cold maceration using aqueous ethanol (70:30) as solvents. Analgesic activity was assessed by Eddy's hot plate method, formalin-induced paw licking and acetic acid-induced writhing in mice. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carageenan-induced mice paw edema. The anti-pyretic activity was determined by yeast-induced pyrexia in mice. The aqueous ethanolic extract of Tamarix aphylla showed 42% inhibition (p<0.005) of acetic acid- induced writhing, 63% reduction (p<0.005) in formalin-induced paw licking, and 42% increase (p<0.05) in reaction time as compared to normal control. The extract did not show significant anti-inflammatory activity. However, it showed significant antipyretic effect (p<0.005). The results of this study demonstrate that aqueous ethanolic extract of Tamarix aphylla exhibit analgesic and antipyretic activity but lacks anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:25362598