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Sample records for antidepressant nonresponders studied

  1. Nonresponders to Daily Paroxetine and Another SSRI in Men With Lifelong Premature Ejaculation: A Pharmacokinetic Dose-Escalation Study for a Rare Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Paddy KC; Touw, Daan; Schweitzer, Dave H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Nonresponse to any selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment is rare. In this study, we aimed to investigate ejaculation delay nonresponse to paroxetine treatment in men with lifelong premature ejaculation (PE) who were also known to be nonresponders to other SSRIs. Materials and Methods Five males with lifelong PE who were known nonresponders to paroxetine and other serotonergic antidepressants and eight males with lifelong PE who were specifically recruited were included. Blood sampling occurred 1 month and 1 day before the start of treatment and at the end of three consecutive series of 4 weeks of daily treatment with 10-, 20-, and 30-mg paroxetine, respectively. Blood samples for measurement of leptin and paroxetine were taken at 8:30 AM, 9:30 AM, 10:30 AM, and 11:30 AM, respectively. At 9:00 AM, one tablet of 10-, 20-, or 30-mg paroxetine was taken during the first, second, and third month, respectively. Intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) was measured with a stopwatch. The main outcome measures were the fold increase in the geometric mean IELT, serum leptin and paroxetine concentrations, body mass index (BMI), 5-HT1A receptor C-1019G polymorphism, and CYP2D6 mutations. Results Between the 7 paroxetine responders and 6 nonresponders, the fold increase in the geometric mean IELT was significantly different after daily 10-mg (p=0.003), 20-mg (p=0.002), and 30-mg paroxetine (p=0.026) and ranged from 2.0 to 8.8 and from 1.1 to 1.7, respectively. BMI at baseline and at the end of the study was not significantly different between responders and nonresponders. Serum leptin levels at baseline were similar in responders and nonresponders and did not change during treatment. The serum paroxetine concentration increased with increasing dosage and was not significantly different between responders and nonresponders. There was no association between the fold increase in the geometric mean IELT and serum paroxetine levels during the three

  2. Antidepressant No Help to Heart Failure Patients: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Antidepressant No Help to Heart Failure Patients: Study Depression in these cases may be caused by ... therapy and physical exercise," she said. For the study, Angermann and her colleagues randomly assigned 372 patients ...

  3. Endometrial cancer and antidepressants: A nationwide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiao-Fan; Chan, Hsiang-Lin; Hsieh, Yi-Hsuan; Liang, Hsin-Yi; Chiu, Wei-Che; Huang, Kuo-You; Lee, Yena; McIntyre, Roger S; Chen, Vincent Chin-Hung

    2016-07-01

    To our knowledge, the association between antidepressant exposure and endometrial cancer has not been previously explored. Herein, we aim to investigate the association between antidepressant prescription, including novel antidepressants, and the risk for endometrial cancer in a population-based study.Data for the analysis were derived from National Health Insurance Research Database. We identified 8392 cases with a diagnosis of endometrial cancer and 82,432 matched controls. A conditional logistic regression model was used, with adjusting for potentially confounding variables (e.g., comorbid psychiatric diseases, comorbid physical diseases, and other medications). Risk for endometrial cancer in the population-based study sample was categorized by, and assessed as a function of, antidepressant prescription and cumulative dosage.We report no association between endometrial cancer incidence and antidepressant prescription, including those prescribed either selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84-1.15) or serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (adjusted OR = 1.14; 95% CI, 0.76-1.71). We also did not identify an association between higher cumulative doses of antidepressant prescription and endometrial cancer.There was no association between antidepressant prescription and endometrial cancer. PMID:27442640

  4. Subjective effects of antidepressants: a pilot study of the varieties of antidepressant-induced experiences in meditators.

    PubMed

    Bitner, Robin; Hillman, Lorena; Victor, Bruce; Walsh, Roger

    2003-10-01

    The use of antidepressants continues to increase, yet relatively little is known about their precise subjective effects, and there is growing concern about subtle psychological side effects. One novel investigative approach to these problems may be to use introspectively trained subjects such as meditators. Experienced meditators recently taking antidepressants rated antidepressant effects on multiple dimensions of experience and reported significant emotional, motivational, and cognitive effects and benefits. This study suggests that a) meditators may benefit both clinically and meditatively from antidepressants, b) meditators may provide significant novel information on antidepressant effects, c) meditators may prove valuable for phenomenological investigations of psychopathology, drug effects, and therapies, d) meditation may prove a helpful maintenance therapy for depression, and e) enhanced equanimity may contribute to the broad therapeutic efficacy of antidepressants.

  5. Genome-wide association studies in pharmacogenomics of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Eugene; Lane, Hsien-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common psychiatric disorders worldwide. Doctors must prescribe antidepressants based on educated guesses due to the fact that it is unmanageable to predict the effectiveness of any particular antidepressant in an individual patient. With the recent advent of scientific research, the genome-wide association study (GWAS) is extensively employed to analyze hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms by high-throughput genotyping technologies. In addition to the candidate-gene approach, the GWAS approach has recently been utilized to investigate the determinants of antidepressant response to therapy. In this study, we reviewed GWAS studies, their limitations and future directions with respect to the pharmacogenomics of antidepressants in MDD.

  6. [What are the reasons for patient dropout in nursing home residents in an intervention study. An analysis of unit nonresponders in 12 German nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Budnick, Andrea; Jordan, Laura-Maria; Könner, Franziska; Hannemann, Bianca; Wulff, Ines; Kalinowski, Sonja; Kreutz, Reinhold; Dräger, Dagmar

    2015-02-01

    Hintergrund: Nonresponse verursacht zweifelsohne ein Bias in Studienergebnissen. Ausfallursachen in Studien mit Pflegeheimbewohner(inne)n sind bisher unzureichend untersucht. Ziel und Methode: Ziel dieser Studie war es, nach dem Prozessmodell induktiver Kategorienbildung nach Mayring (2010) reliable und valide Kategorien zu entwickeln, welche detailliert Ausfallgründe von Pflegeheimbewohner(inne)n abbilden. Zudem wurden Charakteristika der Unit-Nonresponder und der Responder verglichen. Ergebnisse: Die Kategorisierung der Ausfallgründe erfolgte im Längsschnitt mit insgesamt 522 Pflegeheimbewohner(inne)n. Identifiziert wurden vier Oberkategorien («generelle Ablehnung», «gesundheitliche Aspekte», «Erreichbarkeit», «Überforderung») sowie 17 Subkategorien. Unit-Nonresponder und Responder unterscheiden sich hinsichtlich Alter und Geschlecht nicht; jedoch zeigten sich Unterschiede im Follow-up bei Familienstand, Berufsabschluss und kognitivem Status. Schlussfolgerungen: Das vorgelegte Kategorienschema kann zukünftig zur Erfassung von Ausfallgründen im Setting Pflegeheim verwendet werden. Die detaillierte Erfassung der Ausfallursachen kann zur Optimierung der Responserate beitragen.

  7. Psychosocial work environment and antidepressant medication: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Bonde, Jens Peter E; Munch-Hansen, Torsten; Wieclaw, Joanna; Westergaard-Nielsen, Niels; Agerbo, Esben

    2009-01-01

    Background Adverse psychosocial work environments may lead to impaired mental health, but it is still a matter of conjecture if demonstrated associations are causal or biased. We aimed at verifying whether poor psychosocial working climate is related to increase of redeemed subscription of antidepressant medication. Methods Information on all antidepressant drugs (AD) purchased at pharmacies from 1995 through 2006 was obtained for a cohort of 21,129 Danish public service workers that participated in work climate surveys carried out during the period 2002–2005. Individual self-reports of psychosocial factors at work including satisfaction with the work climate and dimensions of the job strain model were obtained by self-administered questionnaires (response rate 77,2%). Each employee was assigned the average score value for all employees at his/her managerial work unit [1094 units with an average of 18 employees (range 3–120)]. The risk of first-time AD prescription during follow-up was examined according to level of satisfaction and psychosocial strain by Cox regression with adjustment for gender, age, marital status, occupational status and calendar year of the survey. Results The proportion of employees that received at least one prescription of ADs from 1995 through 2006 was 11.9% and prescriptions rose steadily from 1.50% in 1996 to the highest level 6.47% in 2006. ADs were prescribed more frequent among women, middle aged, employees with low occupational status and those living alone. None of the measured psychosocial work environment factors were consistently related to prescription of antidepressant drugs during the follow-up period. Conclusion The study does not indicate that a poor psychosocial work environment among public service employees is related to prescription of antidepressant pharmaceuticals. These findings need cautious interpretation because of lacking individual exposure assessments. PMID:19635130

  8. /sup 13/C NMR studies of the molecular flexibility of antidepressants

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, S.L.; Andrews, P.R.; Craik, D.J.; Gale, D.J.

    1986-02-01

    The solution dynamics of a series of clinically potent antidepressants have been investigated by measuring /sup 13/C NMR relaxation parameters. Correlation times and internal motional rates were calculated from spin-lattice relaxation times and nuclear Overhauser effects for the protonated carbons in mianserin, imipramine-like antidepressants, and amitriptyline-like antidepressants. These data were interpreted in terms of overall molecular tumbling, internal rotations, and inherent flexibility of these structures. Of particular interest was the conformational variability of the tricyclic nucleus of the tricyclic antidepressants, where the data indicated a fivefold difference in mobility of the dimethylene bridge of imipramine-like antidepressants relative to amitriptyline-like compounds. The implications of such a difference in internal motions is discussed in relation to previous NMR studies and to the reported differences in pharmacological activity of these antidepressants.

  9. No change in N-acetyl aspartate in first episode of moderate depression after antidepressant treatment: 1H magnetic spectroscopy study of left amygdala and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bajs Janović, Maja; Kalember, Petra; Janović, Špiro; Hrabač, Pero; Folnegović Grošić, Petra; Grošić, Vladimir; Radoš, Marko; Henigsberg, Neven

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of brain metabolites as biological correlates of the intensity, symptoms, and course of major depression has not been determined. It has also been inconclusive whether the change in brain metabolites, measured with proton magnetic spectroscopy, could be correlated with the treatment outcome. Methods Proton magnetic spectroscopy was performed in 29 participants with a first episode of moderate depression occurring in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and left amygdala at baseline and after 8 weeks of antidepressant treatment with escitalopram. The Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, and the Beck Depression Inventory were used to assess the intensity of depression at baseline and at the endpoint of the study. At endpoint, the participants were identified as responders (n=17) or nonresponders (n=12) to the antidepressant therapy. Results There was no significant change in the N-acetyl aspartate/creatine ratio (NAA/Cr) after treatment with antidepressant medication. The baseline and endpoint NAA/Cr ratios were not significantly different between the responder and nonresponder groups. The correlation between NAA/Cr and changes in the scores of clinical scales were not significant in either group. Conclusion This study could not confirm any significant changes in NAA after antidepressant treatment in the first episode of moderate depression, or in regard to therapy response in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex or left amygdala. Further research is necessary to conclude whether NAA alterations in the first episode of depression could possibly be different from chronic or late-onset depression, and whether NAA alterations in stress-induced (reactive) depression are different from endogenous depression. The potential role of NAA as a biomarker of a treatment effect has yet to be established. PMID:25278754

  10. Long-term prescribing of antidepressants in the older population: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Rebecca; Knapp, Peter; House, Allan O; Dimri, Vandana; Zermansky, Arnold; Petty, Duncan; Holmes, John; Raynor, David K

    2010-01-01

    Background High rates of long-term antidepressant prescribing have been identified in the older population. Aims To explore the attitudes of older patients and their GPs to taking long-term antidepressant therapy, and their accounts of the influences on long-term antidepressant use. Design of study Qualitative study using in-depth semi-structured interviews. Setting One primary care trust in North Bradford. Method Thirty-six patients aged ≥75 years and 10 GPs were interviewed. Patients were sampled to ensure diversity in age, sex, antidepressant type, and home circumstances. Results Participants perceived significant benefits and expressed little apprehension about taking long-term antidepressants, despite being aware of the psychological and social factors involved in onset and persistence of depression. Barriers to discontinuation were identified following four themes: pessimism about the course and curability of depression; negative expectations and experiences of ageing; medicine discontinuation perceived by patients as a threat to stability; and passive (therapeutic momentum) and active (therapeutic maintenance) decisions to accept the continuing need for medication. Conclusion There is concern at a public health level about high rates of long-term antidepressant prescribing, but no evidence was found of a drive for change either from the patients or the doctors interviewed. Any apprehension was more than balanced by attitudes and behaviours supporting continuation. These findings will need to be incorporated into the planning of interventions aimed at reducing long-term antidepressant prescribing in older people. PMID:20353660

  11. Study of antidepressant drugs in GPR39 (zinc receptor⁻/⁻) knockout mice, showing no effect of conventional antidepressants, but effectiveness of NMDA antagonists.

    PubMed

    Młyniec, Katarzyna; Gaweł, Magdalena; Nowak, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    The monoamine-based antidepressants that are currently used generate many side effects, and more than 30% of depressed patients do not respond to this therapy. Glutamate-based antidepressants seem to play an important role in therapy for depression, but there is still an extensive search for safe drugs. An antagonist of the glutamatergic NMDA receptor - namely, zinc - plays a part in maintaining homeostasis between glutamate and GABA via the GPR39 receptor, which has been found to be involved in the pathophysiology of depression. In this study we investigated the behavioral response resulting from chronic or acute treatment with monoamine-based antidepressants, such as imipramine, escitalopram or reboxetine, and from glutamate-based MK-801 or ketamine, as measured by the forced swim test (FST) in GPR39 knockout (GPR39 KO, -/-) mice versus wild-type (WT, +/+) controls. All the tested agents reduced the immobility time in the FST in the wild-type animals. However, only chronic or acute administration of MK-801 and ketamine (but not monoamine-based antidepressants) were active in the FST in GPR39 KO mice. Our results show for the first time that GPR39 is required for the antidepressant effect of monoamine-based antidepressants. PMID:25827929

  12. Studies on antidepressant action of a new oxazolidinone derivative AS-8.

    PubMed

    Kostowski, W; Płaźnik, A; Bidziński, A; Rosnowska, E; Jessa, M; Nazar, M

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of previous laboratory studies AS-8 was suggested to possess antidepressant-like activity. Forced swim test, learned helplessness and conflict Vogel's test were performed after three prior administrations of AS-8 (24, 5 and 1 h before the test). The data have shown that AS-8 produces moderate antidepressant effect but did not induce anxiolytic-like action. Biochemical data revealed increased brain 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels following AS-8 administration. The combined treatment of rats with AS-8 (100 mg/kg) and amitriptyline (5 mg/kg) or desipramine (1.25 mg/kg) significantly stimulated active behavior in the forced swim test above the level obtained with each of the drug given separately. The present data suggest the potential antidepressant efficacy of AS-8 in conjunction with small doses of tricyclic antidepressants.

  13. Antidepressant response to aripiprazole augmentation associated with enhanced FDOPA utilization in striatum: a preliminary PET study.

    PubMed

    Conway, Charles R; Chibnall, John T; Cumming, Paul; Mintun, Mark A; Gebara, Marie Anne I; Perantie, Dana C; Price, Joseph L; Cornell, Martha E; McConathy, Jonathan E; Gangwani, Sunil; Sheline, Yvette I

    2014-03-30

    Several double blind, prospective trials have demonstrated an antidepressant augmentation efficacy of aripiprazole in depressed patients unresponsive to standard antidepressant therapy. Although aripiprazole is now widely used for this indication, and much is known about its receptor-binding properties, the mechanism of its antidepressant augmentation remains ill-defined. In vivo animal studies and in vitro human studies using cloned dopamine dopamine D2 receptors suggest aripiprazole is a partial dopamine agonist; in this preliminary neuroimaging trial, we hypothesized that aripiprazole's antidepressant augmentation efficacy arises from dopamine partial agonist activity. To test this, we assessed the effects of aripiprazole augmentation on the cerebral utilization of 6-[(18)F]-fluoro-3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (FDOPA) using positron emission tomography (PET). Fourteen depressed patients, who had failed 8 weeks of antidepressant therapy with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, underwent FDOPA PET scans before and after aripiprazole augmentation; 11 responded to augmentation. Whole brain, voxel-wise comparisons of pre- and post-aripiprazole scans revealed increased FDOPA trapping in the right medial caudate of augmentation responders. An exploratory analysis of depressive symptoms revealed that responders experienced large improvements only in putatively dopaminergic symptoms of lassitude and inability to feel. These preliminary findings suggest that augmentation of antidepressant response by aripiprazole may be associated with potentiation of dopaminergic activity.

  14. Prenatal Antidepressant Exposure and Risk of Spontaneous Abortion – A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Kjaersgaard, Maiken Ina Siegismund; Parner, Erik Thorlund; Vestergaard, Mogens; Sørensen, Merete Juul; Olsen, Jørn; Christensen, Jakob; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Pedersen, Lars Henning

    2013-01-01

    particular were not associated with spontaneous abortions. Further studies are warranted on the newer non-SSRI antidepressants, as we had insufficient data to adjust for important confounding factors. PMID:24015208

  15. Disproportionate Reduction of Serotonin Transporter May Predict the Response and Adherence to Antidepressants in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder: A Positron Emission Tomography Study with 4-[18F]-ADAM

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Yi-Wei; Ho, Pei-Shen; Kuo, Shin-Chang; Chen, Chun-Yen; Liang, Chih-Sung; Yen, Che-Hung; Huang, Chang-Chih; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Shiue, Chyng-Yann; Huang, Wen-Sheng; Shyu, Jia-Fwu; Wan, Fang-Jung; Lu, Ru-Band

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many lines of evidence suggest the role of serotonin transporter (SERT)-mediated reuptake of serotonin in the pathophysiology and treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). This study aimed to examine whether the pretreatment of SERT binding potential or SERT binding ratio between terminal projection regions relative to the midbrain raphe nuclei was associated with treatment outcomes to SERT-targeted antidepressants. Methods: We recruited 39 antidepressant-naïve patients with MDD and 39 heathy controls. Positron emission tomography with N,N-dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-[18F]fluorophenylthio)benzylamine (4-[18F]-ADAM) was used to measure in vivo SERT availability prior to antidepressant treatment. The 21-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) was use to assess the severity of depression from baseline to week 6. All the patients with MDD had HDRS scores of 18 or more. Results: Pretreatment SERT binding in the thalamus and striatum positively correlated with an early reduction in HDRS scores at week 3. Nonresponders and dropout patients showed a proportionate reduction in SERT binding in the terminal projection regions and midbrain compared to healthy controls. In contrast, a disproportionate reduction in SERT binding in the terminal projection regions relative to midbrain was observed in responders. Conclusions: The results of this study suggested that a disproportionate reduction in SERT binding between terminal projection regions and midbrain may predict better treatment outcomes in patients with MDD. PMID:25568284

  16. Neurobiology of mood, anxiety, and emotions as revealed by studies of a unique antidepressant: tianeptine.

    PubMed

    McEwen, B S; Olié, J P

    2005-06-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence that structural remodeling of certain brain regions is a feature of depressive illness, and the postulated underlying mechanisms contribute to the idea that there is more to antidepressant actions that can be explained exclusively by a monoaminergic hypothesis. This review summarizes recent neurobiological studies on the antidepressant, tianeptine (S-1574, [3-chloro-6-methyl-5,5-dioxo-6,11-dihydro-(c,f)-dibenzo-(1,2-thiazepine)-11-yl) amino]-7 heptanoic acid, sodium salt), a compound with structural similarities to the tricyclic antidepressant agents, the efficacy and good tolerance of which have been clearly established. These studies have revealed that the neurobiological properties of tianeptine involve the dynamic interplay between numerous neurotransmitter systems, as well as a critical role of structural and functional plasticity in the brain regions that permit the full expression of emotional learning. Although the story is far from complete, the schema underlying the effect of tianeptine on central plasticity is the most thoroughly studied of any antidepressants. Effects of tianeptine on neuronal excitability, neuroprotection, anxiety, and memory have also been found. Together with clinical data on the efficacy of tianeptine as an antidepressant, these actions offer insights into how compounds like tianeptine may be useful in the treatment of neurobiological features of depressive disorders.

  17. Prevalence of Antidepressant Use during Pregnancy in Denmark, a Nation-Wide Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Solem, Espen; Andersen, Jon Trærup; Petersen, Morten; Broedbaek, Kasper; Andersen, Nadia Lyhne; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen

    2013-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and patterns of exposure to antidepressants before, during and after pregnancy in a cohort including all pregnant women in Denmark between 1997 and 2010. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study including 912 322 pregnancies. Information was retrieved from the Danish Birth Registry and The Register of Medicinal Product Statistics to identify women redeeming an antidepressant prescription during pregnancy. Exposure periods were based on standard treatment doses and dispensed pack sizes. Results We identified 19 740 pregnancies exposed to an antidepressant at some point during pregnancy. The rate of exposure increased from 0.2% in 1997 to 3.2% in 2010. We found that the rate of exposure was halved during the first 3 months of pregnancy. In contrast, we describe a clear increase in exposure after pregnancy among pre-delivery treatment-naïve women. Conclusions In spite of uncertainty concerning antidepressants’ safety during pregnancy we find a 16-fold increase in exposure rates between 1997 and 2010. The rates describe a sharp decrease in exposure during pregnancy that is probably caused by physicians’ hesitation to prescribe antidepressants and women’s fear of unwanted effects on the unborn child. More studies are needed to clarify the consequences of antidepressant discontinuation during pregnancy. PMID:23638179

  18. Antidepressant Use and Lifetime History of Mental Disorders in a Community Sample: Results from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study

    PubMed Central

    Takayanagi, Yoichiro; Spira, Adam P.; Bienvenu, O. Joseph; Hock, Rebecca S.; Carras, Michelle C.; Eaton, William W.; Mojtabai, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Past studies have shown that many individuals who use antidepressants do not have a current or lifetime history of mental disorders. However, recent studies suggest that the one-time retrospective evaluation of mental disorders commonly used in such studies may substantially underestimate the true lifetime prevalence of mental disorders. We examined the prevalence of mental disorders, assessed prospectively over multiple interviews, among individuals currently using antidepressants in a community sample. Methods Using data from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area (ECA) Survey Wave 1 (1981) through Wave 4 (2004) (N = 1071), we assessed lifetime prevalence of common mood and anxiety disorders according to the DSM-III and DSM-III-R criteria, based on 4 interviews, among participants who reported current antidepressant use. Furthermore, we examined factors associated with current antidepressant use. Results Thirteen percent of participants at Wave 4 reported currently using antidepressant medications. Among antidepressant users, 69% never met criteria for major depressive disorder (MDD), and 38% never met criteria for MDD, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, or generalized anxiety disorder in their lifetime. Female gender, Caucasian ethnicity, recent or current physical problems (e.g., loss of bladder control, hypertension and back pain) and recent mental health facility visits were associated with antidepressant use in addition to mental disorders. Conclusions Many individuals who are prescribed and use antidepressant medications may not have met criteria for mental disorders. Our data indicate that antidepressants are commonly used in the absence of clear evidence-based indications. PMID:25188822

  19. Cancer Mortality in People Treated with Antidepressants before Cancer Diagnosis: A Population Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuelian; Vedsted, Peter; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Wu, Chun Sen; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Olsen, Jørn; Benros, Michael Eriksen; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression is common after a cancer diagnosis and is associated with an increased mortality, but it is unclear whether depression occurring before the cancer diagnosis affects cancer mortality. We aimed to study cancer mortality of people treated with antidepressants before cancer diagnosis. Methods and Findings We conducted a population based cohort study of all adults diagnosed with cancer between January 2003 and December 2010 in Denmark (N = 201,662). We obtained information on cancer from the Danish Cancer Registry, on the day of death from the Danish Civil Registry, and on redeemed antidepressants from the Danish National Prescription Registry. Current users of antidepressants were defined as those who redeemed the latest prescription of antidepressant 0–4 months before cancer diagnosis (irrespective of earlier prescriptions), and former users as those who redeemed the latest prescription five or more months before cancer diagnosis. We estimated an all-cause one-year mortality rate ratio (MRR) and a conditional five-year MRR for patients who survived the first year after cancer diagnosis and confidence interval (CI) using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Overall, 33,111 (16.4%) patients redeemed at least one antidepressant prescription in the three years before cancer diagnosis of whom 21,851 (10.8%) were current users at the time of cancer diagnosis. Current antidepressant users had a 32% higher one-year mortality (MRR = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.29–1.35) and a 22% higher conditional five-year mortality (MRR = 1.22, 95% CI: 1.17–1.26) if patients survived the first year after the cancer diagnosis than patients not redeeming antidepressants. The one-year mortality was particularly high for patients who initiated antidepressant treatment within four months before cancer diagnosis (MRR = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.47–1.61). Former users had no increased cancer mortality. Conclusions Initiation of antidepressive treatment prior to cancer diagnosis is

  20. Antidepressants and the risk of hyponatremia: a Danish register-based population study

    PubMed Central

    Leth-Møller, Katja Biering; Hansen, Annette Højmann; Torstensson, Maia; Andersen, Stig Ejdrup; Ødum, Lars; Gislasson, Gunnar; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Holm, Ellen Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between classes of antidepressants and hyponatremia, and between specific antidepressants and hyponatremia. Design Retrospective register-based cohort study using nationwide registers from 1998 to 2012. Setting The North Denmark Region. Participants In total, 638 352 individuals were included. Primary and secondary outcome measures Plasma sodium was obtained from the LABKA database. The primary outcome was hyponatremia defined as plasma sodium (p-sodium) below 135 mmol/L and secondary outcome was severe hyponatremia defined as p-sodium below 130 mmol/L. The association between use of specific antidepressants and hyponatremia was analysed using multivariable Poisson regression models. Results An event of hyponatremia occurred in 72 509 individuals and 11.36% (n=6476) of these events happened during treatment with antidepressants. Incidence rate ratios and CIs for the association with hyponatremia in the first p-sodium measured after initiation of treatment were for citalopram 7.8 (CI 7.42 to 8.20); clomipramine 4.93 (CI 2.72 to 8.94); duloxetine 2.05 (CI 1.44 to 292); venlafaxine 2.90 (CI 2.43 to 3.46); mirtazapine 2.95 (CI 2.71 to 3.21); and mianserin 0.90 (CI 0.71 to 1.14). Conclusions All antidepressants except mianserin are associated with hyponatremia. The association is strongest with citalopram and lowest with duloxetine, venlafaxine and mirtazapine. PMID:27194321

  1. Antidepressants and Gastric Cancer: A Nationwide Population-Based Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chiao-Fan; Chan, Hsiang-Lin; Liang, Hsin-Yi; Lee, Yena; McIntyre, Roger S.; Chen, Vincent Chin-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Background To our knowledge, no epidemiological study has reported on whether an association between antidepressant exposure and gastric cancer exists. Herein, we aim to investigate the possible association between antidepressant exposure and gastric cancer incidence. Methods Using a nested case-control design, we identified 26289 cases with gastric cancer and 127984 controls from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). The data were analyzed using a conditional logistic regression model adjusting for possible confounding variables. Results We found antidepressant use did not increase the risk of gastric cancer. The lack of an association between antidepressant prescription and elevated gastric cancer incidence was apparent for across selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), tricyclic agents (TCAs), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase A (RIMA), trazodone, mirtazapine and bupropion. There were slightly decreased gastric cancer risks of SSRIs use (≧28 DDD group, adjusted OR = 0.87; 95% CI = 0.78–0.96). Sensitive analysis showed SSRIs, TCAs, and SNRIs did not increase gastric cancer risks significantly even in the group with peptic ulcer history. Conclusions An association between antidepressant exposure and gastric cancer was not apparent in this analysis. PMID:26606417

  2. [The new versus the old antidepressant drugs: a comparative study of their psychopharmacological profiles (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Puech, A J; Chermat, R; Doare, L; Poncelet, M; Simon, P

    1981-01-01

    We studied 13 known or potential antidepressants, choosen in different pharmacological classes: desipramine, imipramine, nialamide, dexamphetamine, AHR 1118, amineptine, iprindole, mianserine, nomifensine, salbutamol, TRH viloxazine, zimelidine. Each of these compounds was studied on 8 psychopharmacological tests: motor activity, reserpine induced hypothermia, reserpine induced ptosis, oxotremorine induced hypothermia, oxotremorine induced tremors, high doses apomorphine induced hypothermia, potentiation of toxic effects of yohimbine, behavioural despair. Clinical active compounds are efficient on yohimbine test and at least on one model of hypothermia; with a few exceptions, easy to explain, substances with a clearly demonstrated antidepressant activity in human have some common effects; these common effects can be used to predict, from animal experiments, an antidepressant effect in man.

  3. [Comparative study of the antidepressant and anxiolytic activity of fluoxetine and tianeptine].

    PubMed

    Molodavkin, G M; Voronina, T A; Meletova, O K

    2005-01-01

    The activity of fluoxetine (prozac) and tianeptine (coaxil) was studied in outbred male rats under Porsolt and S. Nomura modified forced swim tests. The antidepressant effect of tianeptine was much more pronounced that that of fluoxetine. In the conflict situation test, fluoxetine produced anxiogenic action. In contrast, tianeptine decreased (albeit not reliably) the anxiety. In combination with bicuculline (GABAA receptor blocker), the anxiolytic action was more pronounced for both antidepressants, which was manifested by a significant increase in the number of punished water takes. A neural network explaining the observed behavior is proposed, which includes GABA-ergic intemeurons inhibiting serotonin release from serotoninergic terminals.

  4. Randomized controlled study of early medication change for non-improvers to antidepressant therapy in major depression--The EMC trial.

    PubMed

    Tadić, André; Wachtlin, Daniel; Berger, Mathias; Braus, Dieter F; van Calker, Dietrich; Dahmen, Norbert; Dreimüller, Nadine; Engel, Alice; Gorbulev, Stanislav; Helmreich, Isabella; Kaiser, Anne-Katrin; Kronfeld, Kai; Schlicht, Konrad F; Tüscher, Oliver; Wagner, Stefanie; Hiemke, Christoph; Lieb, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and no improvement after two weeks of antidepressant pharmacotherapy have a high risk of treatment failure. The aim of the study was to determine whether an early medication change (EMC) strategy is superior to a guideline-based treatment in MDD patients without improvement after two weeks of antidepressant pharmacotherapy. Eight-hundred-and-eighty-nine patients with MDD were enrolled, 879 patients received the SSRI escitalopram. Of those, 192 patients had no improvement, defined as a reduction of < 20% on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17) after 14 days of treatment, and were randomly assigned to open treatment with the EMC strategy (n = 97; venlafaxine XR for study days 15-56; in case of sustained non-improvement on day 28, lithium augmentation for days 29-56) or TAU (n = 95; escitalopram continuation; non-responders on day 28 were switched to venlafaxine XR for four weeks, i.e. days 29-56). The primary outcome was remission (HAMD-17 ≤ 7) after 8 weeks of treatment as assessed by blinded raters. Remission rates were 24% for EMC and 16% for TAU, which was not significantly different (p = 0.2056). Sensitivity analyses for the primary and secondary effectiveness endpoints consistently showed favorable results for patients randomized to EMC. The results confirm data from post-hoc analyses of clinical trials showing that early non-improvement identifies patients who likely need alternate interventions. However, the herein used two-step switch/augmentation strategy for this risk group was not more effective than the control intervention. Alternate strategies and other design aspects are discussed in order to support researchers addressing the same research question. PMID:26899588

  5. Use of a 12 months' self-referral reminder to facilitate uptake of bowel scope (flexible sigmoidoscopy) screening in previous non-responders: a London-based feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Kerrison, Robert S; McGregor, Lesley M; Marshall, Sarah; Isitt, John; Counsell, Nicholas; Wardle, Jane; von Wagner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background: In March 2013, NHS England extended its national Bowel Cancer Screening Programme to include ‘one-off' Flexible Sigmoidoscopy screening (NHS Bowel Scope Screening, BSS) for men and women aged 55. With less than one in two people currently taking up the screening test offer, there is a strong public health mandate to develop system-friendly interventions to increase uptake while the programme is rolling out. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of sending a reminder to previous BSS non-responders, 12 months after the initial invitation, with consideration for its potential impact on uptake. Method: This study was conducted in the ethnically diverse London Boroughs of Brent and Harrow, where uptake is below the national average. Between September and November 2014, 160 previous non-responders were randomly selected to receive a reminder of the opportunity to self-refer 12 months after their initial invitation. The reminder included instructions on how to book an appointment, and provided options for the time and day of the appointment and the gender of the endoscopist performing the test. To address barriers to screening, the reminder was sent with a brief locally tailored information leaflet designed specifically for this study. Participants not responding within 4 weeks were sent a follow-up reminder, after which there was no further intervention. Self-referral rates were measured 8 weeks after the delivery of the follow-up reminder and accepted as final. Results: Of the 155 participants who received the 12 months' reminder (returned to sender, n=5), 30 (19.4%) self-referred for an appointment, of which 24 (15.5%) attended and were successfully screened. Attendance rates differed by gender, with significantly more women attending an appointment than men (20.7% vs 8.8%, respectively; OR=2.73, 95% CI=1.02–7.35, P=0.05), but not by area (Brent vs Harrow) or area-level deprivation. Of the 30 people who self-referred for an appointment, 27 (90

  6. Liver Function Test Abnormalities in Depressed Patients Treated with Antidepressants: A Real-World Systematic Observational Study in Psychiatric Settings

    PubMed Central

    Verstuyft, Céline; Corruble, Emmanuelle; Perlemuter, Gabriel; Colle, Romain

    2016-01-01

    Background Concerning the risk of antidepressant induced liver injury, it is not clear whether psychiatrists perform a liver function test (LFT) and whether an increase in aminotransferase levels should contraindicate antidepressant treatment. Aim To evaluate LFT availability, the prevalence of LFT abnormalities and the probable cause of an altered LFT in patients with a major depressive episode (MDE) requiring an antidepressant drug. Methods We studied LFT evaluation in a real world psychiatric setting, in a sample of 321 consecutive patients with a current major depressive episode (MDE) requiring an antidepressant drug treatment, but without current alcohol or drug dependence or unstable medical disease. Results An LFT is performed in 36.1% (116/321) of depressed patients. One fifth of antidepressant-treated patients who had an LFT evaluation had abnormal results. The most frequent causes of LFT abnormalities were: NAFLD (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease) (7/321; 2.1%), acute alcohol consumption (4/321; 1.2%), antidepressant-induced liver injury (3/321; 0.9%), hepatitis C virus infection (2/321; 0.6%) and heart failure (1/321; 0.3%). The cause of LFT abnormalities was unknown in 32% of patients (8/25) due to the absence of etiological investigations. Conclusion These results demonstrate that an LFT is infrequently performed by psychiatrists in depressed patients requiring an antidepressant drug. Baseline LFT assessment and observations during the first six months of antidepressant treatment may be useful for detection of patients with pre-existing liver disease such as NAFLD, and early identification of cases of antidepressant-induced liver injury. An increase in aminotransferase levels may be related to an underlying liver disease, but does not contraindicate antidepressant treatment. PMID:27171561

  7. In vivo studies of effects of antidepressants on parotid salivary secretion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Martin; Winder, Michael; Zawia, Hana; Lödöen, Ida; Tobin, Gunnar; Götrick, Bengt

    2016-07-01

    Tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) are well-known xerogenic drugs, while antidepressants such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are considered less xerogenic. The antimuscarinic effect of the TCAs has been considered to be the principal mechanism causing a dry mouth. Although the muscarinic receptor is commonly targeted by xerogenic pharmaceuticals, the salivation reflex arc may be affected at other levels as well. We currently wondered whether or not antidepressants exert an inhibition of the salivary reflex not only at the glandular level but at a central level as well. In this study, the effects of a TCA (clomipramine), a SSRI (citalopram) and a serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI; venlafaxine) were examined on reflex- (0.5M citric acid applied on the tongue) and methacholine-evoked salivary secretion. While all three compounds inhibited citric acid-evoked secretion (-40 to -60% at 5mg/kg i.v. of the antidepressants), only clomipramine inhibited methacholine-evoked secretion (-30% at 5mg/kg i.v.). On the contrary, both citalopram and venlafaxine increased the methacholine-evoked secretion (+44 to 49%). This was particularly obvious for the salivary protein output (>200%). In the presence of α- and β-adrenoceptor antagonists, the citalopram- and venlafaxine-induced increases were reduced. Thus, antidepressants irrespective of type may exert xerogenic effects by inhibiting the salivary reflex in the central nervous system. However, while TCAs may also hamper the secretory response by antimuscarinic effects, the SSRI and the SNRI groups of pharmaceuticals seem to lack this additional xerogenic mechanism indicating a better therapeutic profile and better opportunities for pharmacological treatment of drug-induced xerostomia. PMID:27023402

  8. Assessing the neuronal serotonergic target-based antidepressant stratagem: impact of in vivo interaction studies and knockout models.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, R; Mahesh, R

    2008-09-01

    Depression remains a challenge in the field of affective neuroscience, despite a steady research progress. Six out of nine basic antidepressant mechanisms rely on serotonin neurotransmitter system. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the significance of serotonin receptors (5-HT(1-3,6,7)), its signal transduction pathways and classical down stream targets (including neurotrophins, neurokinins, other peptides and their receptors) in antidepressant drug action. Serotonergic control of depression embraces the recent molecular requirements such as influence on proliferation, neurogenesis, plasticity, synaptic (re)modeling and transmission in the central nervous system. The present progress report analyses the credibility of each protein as therapeutically relevant target of depression. In vivo interaction studies and knockout models which identified these targets are foreseen to unearth new ligands and help them transform to drug candidates. The importance of the antidepressant assay selection at the preclinical level using salient animal models/assay systems is discussed. Such test batteries would definitely provide antidepressants with faster onset, efficacy in resistant (and co-morbid) types and with least adverse effects. Apart from the selective ligands, only those molecules which bring an overall harmony, by virtue of their affinities to various receptor subtypes, could qualify as effective antidepressants. Synchronised modulation of various serotonergic sub-pathways is the basis for a unique and balanced antidepressant profile, as that of fluoxetine (most exploited antidepressant) and such a profile may be considered as a template for the upcoming antidepressants. In conclusion, 5-HT based multi-targeted antidepressant drug discovery supported by in vivo interaction studies and knockout models is advocated as a strategy to provide classic molecules for clinical trials. PMID:19506722

  9. Antidepressant Drugs and the Risk of Intracranial Bleeding: Parsing an Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2016-02-01

    Observational studies have suggested that antidepressant drug use is associated with a small but increased risk of intracranial bleeding. Because of the widespread use of antidepressant drugs and the potential public health significance of this finding, the current article critically evaluates the methodology and findings of a recently published observational study. Observational studies reveal associations, but cannot establish causality. Establishing causality from observed associations requires evidence from different scientific perspectives. Claims arising from observational studies are likely to be wrong, especially for small effects, because of bias and confounding. Statistical testing does not prove the validity of an association, nor does a meta-analysis of multiple observational studies. A valid association may not be clinically meaningful if the magnitude of the effect is small or the outcome is rare. Based on a critical analysis of these observational studies, it is concluded that the risk of intracranial bleeding associated with antidepressant drugs is likely to be a false alarm. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(2), 21-24.]. PMID:27648870

  10. Antidepressant efficacy of agomelatine: meta-analysis of published and unpublished studies

    PubMed Central

    Sparshatt, Anna; Varma, Seema; Olofinjana, Olubanke

    2014-01-01

    Objective To systematically review published and unpublished efficacy studies of agomelatine in people with depression. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Literature search (Pubmed, Embase, Medline), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, European Medicines Agency (EMA) regulatory file for agomelatine, manufacturers of agomelatine (Servier). Eligibility criteria Double blind randomised placebo and comparator controlled trials of agomelatine in depression with standard depression rating scales. Data synthesis Studies were pooled by using a random effects model with DerSimonian and Laird weights for comparisons with placebo and comparator antidepressant. The primary efficacy measure (change in rating scale score) was summarised with standardised mean difference (SMD; a measure of effect size) and secondary outcome measures with relative risks. All results were presented with 95% confidence intervals. Statistical heterogeneity was explored by visual inspection of funnel plots and by the I2 statistic. Moderators of effect were explored by meta-regression. Results We identified 20 trials with 7460 participants meeting inclusion criteria (11 in the published literature, four from the European Medicines Agency file, and five from the manufacturer). Almost all studies used the 17 item Hamilton depression rating scale (score 0-50). Agomelatine was significantly more effective than placebo with an effect size (SMD) of 0.24 (95% confidence interval 0.12 to 0.35) and relative risk of response 1.25 (1.11 to 1.4). Compared with other antidepressants, agomelatine showed equal efficacy (SMD 0.00, −0.09 to 0.10). Significant heterogeneity was uncovered in most analyses, though risk of bias was low. Published studies were more likely than unpublished studies to have results that suggested advantages for agomelatine. Conclusions Agomelatine is an effective antidepressant with similar efficacy to standard antidepressants. Published trials generally had

  11. A Longitudinal Functional Neuroimaging Study in Medication-Naïve Depression after Antidepressant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Shingo; Pu, Shenghong; Iwanami, Akira; Hirano, Jinichi; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Mimura, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated the potential clinical use of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as a tool in assisting the diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD); however, it is still unclear whether NIRS signal changes during cognitive task are state- or trait-dependent, and whether NIRS could be a neural predictor of treatment response. Therefore, we conducted a longitudinal study to explore frontal haemodynamic changes following antidepressant treatment in medication-naïve MDD using 52-channel NIRS. This study included 25 medication-naïve individuals with MDD and 62 healthy controls (HC). We performed NIRS scans before and after antidepressant treatment and measured changes of [oxy-Hb] activation during a verbal fluency task (VFT) following treatment. Individuals with MDD showed significantly decreased [oxy-Hb] values during a VFT compared with HC in the bilateral frontal and temporal cortices at baseline. There were no [oxy-Hb] changes between pre- and post-antidepressant treatment time points in the MDD cohort despite significant improvement in depressive symptoms. There was a significant association between mean [oxy-Hb] values during a VFT at baseline and improvement in depressive symptoms following treatment in the bilateral inferior frontal and middle temporal gyri in MDD. These findings suggest that hypofrontality response to a VFT may represent a potential trait marker for depression rather than a state marker. Moreover, the correlation analysis indicates that the NIRS signals before the initiation of treatment may be a biological marker to predict patient’s clinical response to antidepressant treatment. The present study provides further evidence to support a potential application of NIRS for the diagnosis and treatment of depression. PMID:25786240

  12. A genome-wide association study of antidepressant response in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Myung, W; Kim, J; Lim, S-W; Shim, S; Won, H-H; Kim, Seonwoo; Kim, Sangha; Lee, M-S; Chang, H S; Kim, J-W; Carroll, B J; Kim, D K

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a three-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) of response to antidepressant drugs in an ethnically homogeneous sample of Korean patients in untreated episodes of nonpsychotic unipolar depression, mostly of mature onset. Strict quality control was maintained in case selection, diagnosis, verification of adherence and outcome assessments. Analyzed cases completed 6 weeks of treatment with adequate plasma drug concentrations. The overall successful completion rate was 85.5%. Four candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on three chromosomes were identified by genome-wide search in the discovery sample of 481 patients who received one of four allowed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant drugs (Stage 1). In a focused replication study of 230 SSRI-treated patients, two of these four SNP candidates were confirmed (Stage 2). Analysis of the Stage 1 and Stage 2 samples combined (n=711) revealed GWAS significance (P=1.60 × 10-8) for these two SNP candidates, which were in perfect linkage disequilibrium. These two significant SNPs were confirmed also in a focused cross-replication study of 159 patients treated with the non-SSRI antidepressant drug mirtazapine (Stage 3). Analysis of the Stage 1, Stage 2 and Stage 3 samples combined (n=870) also revealed GWAS significance for these two SNPs, which was sustained after controlling for gender, age, number of previous episodes, age at onset and baseline severity (P=3.57 × 10-8). For each SNP, the response rate decreased (odds ratio=0.31, 95% confidence interval: 0.20–0.47) as a function of the number of minor alleles (non-response alleles). The two SNPs significantly associated with antidepressant response are rs7785360 and rs12698828 of the AUTS2 gene, located on chromosome 7 in 7q11.22. This gene has multiple known linkages to human psychological functions and neurobehavioral disorders. Rigorous replication efforts in other ethnic populations are recommended. PMID:26348319

  13. CNS effects of citalopram, a new serotonin inhibitor antidepressant (a quantitative pharmaco-electroencephalography study).

    PubMed

    Itil, T M; Menon, G N; Bozak, M M; Itil, K Z

    1984-01-01

    Citalopram, a new phthalane derivative and a specific serotonin re-uptake inhibitor in animal pharmacological tests, was evaluated in a double-blind, crossover, quantitative pharmaco-EEG (QPEEGTM) study in healthy human volunteers. The CNS effects of citalopram are linear, dose- and time-related, can statistically be differentiated from placebo, and indicate a rapid onset of effects with short duration. According to the Computer Data Bank, citalopram has a mode of action similar to mood elevators (antidepressants) with fewer sedative properties. Thus the therapeutic action of citalopram is predicted to be similar to desipramine and protriptyline from the tricyclics, and fluvoxamine from non-tricyclics. According to data bank assessment, it is hypothesized that the single antidepressant dose of citalopram is to be more than 25 mg, which should be given t.i.d. in clinical trials. PMID:6592676

  14. CNS effects of citalopram, a new serotonin inhibitor antidepressant (a quantitative pharmaco-electroencephalography study).

    PubMed

    Itil, T M; Menon, G N; Bozak, M M; Itil, K Z

    1984-01-01

    Citalopram, a new phthalane derivative and a specific serotonin re-uptake inhibitor in animal pharmacological tests, was evaluated in a double-blind, crossover, quantitative pharmaco-EEG (QPEEGTM) study in healthy human volunteers. The CNS effects of citalopram are linear, dose- and time-related, can statistically be differentiated from placebo, and indicate a rapid onset of effects with short duration. According to the Computer Data Bank, citalopram has a mode of action similar to mood elevators (antidepressants) with fewer sedative properties. Thus the therapeutic action of citalopram is predicted to be similar to desipramine and protriptyline from the tricyclics, and fluvoxamine from non-tricyclics. According to data bank assessment, it is hypothesized that the single antidepressant dose of citalopram is to be more than 25 mg, which should be given t.i.d. in clinical trials.

  15. Chamomile (Matricaria recutita) May Have Antidepressant Activity in Anxious Depressed Humans - An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Amsterdam, Jay D.; Shults, Justine; Soeller, Irene; Mao, Jun James; Rockwell, Kenneth; Newberg, Andrew B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective As part of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, we examined the antidepressant action of oral chamomile (Matricaria recutita) extract in subjects with co-morbid anxiety and depression symptoms. We hypothesized that chamomile may demonstrate a clinically meaningful antidepressant activity versus placebo. Methods 57 subjects received either chamomile extract or placebo therapy. Nineteen subjects had anxiety with co-morbid depression, 16 had anxiety with past history of depression, and 22 had anxiety with no current or past depression. Generalized estimating equations analysis was used to identify clinically meaningful changes over time in Hamilton Depression Rating (HAM-D) rating outcome measures among treatment groups. Results We observed a significantly greater reduction in mean total HAM-D scores (p<0.05) and HAM-D core depression item score (p<0.05) for chamomile versus placebo in all subjects, and a non-significant trend for a greater reduction in HAM-D core depression score for chamomile versus placebo in subjects with anxiety with current co-morbid depression (p=0.062). Conclusion Chamomile may have clinically meaningful antidepressant activity that occurs in addition to its previously observed anxiolytic activity. PMID:22894890

  16. A study on evalution of antidepressant effect of imipramine adjunct with Aswagandha and Bramhi.

    PubMed

    Maity, T; Adhikari, A; Bhattacharya, K; Biswas, S; Debnath, P K; Maharana, C S

    2011-12-01

    Depressive disorders increase the risks of self-harm or even suicide in patients. Indigenous drugs are being tried to treat such patient along with conventional antidepressant drugs. This study was planned to investigate the antidepressant action of Ashwagandha and Bramhi and also to confirm its efficacy in the behavioural despair animal model of depression. Normal saline as control (5 ml/kg), Imipramine as standard (16, 32, 64 mg/ kg) and Ashwagandha (50, 100, 150 mg/kg), Bramhi (20, 40, 80 mg/kg) as test drugs were introduced to the albino rats weighing between 200-250 gm for 2 weeks, 1 hr before electric shock in Learned helplessness test (LHT) and swimming in Forced swimming test (FST). Effects of individual drugs as well as their combination were evaluated. Avoidance response, escape failure and immobility period in case of Imipramine and Ashwagandha showed highly significant (p < 0.01) result on individual use. There was no significant result in case of Bramhi used alone except in escape failure and immobility period (FST), where at higher doses it showed significant (p < 0.01) result. But combination of Bramhi and Ashwagandha in low doses with low dose of Imipramine gave a highly significant result (p < 0.01) in all the parameters. Ashwagandha had significant antidepressant action, but Bramhi had not when used alone. Combination of these two indigenous drug with Imipramine showed high efficacy in animal model.

  17. Blonanserin – A Novel Antianxiety and Antidepressant Drug? An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Limaye, Ramchandra Prabhakar; Patil, Aditi Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many psychiatric disorders show signs and symptoms of anxiety and depression. A drug with both, effects and lesser adverse effects is always desired. Blonanserin is a novel drug with postulated effect on anxiety and depression. Aim The study was aimed to evaluate the effect of Blonanserin on anxiety and depression in animal models. Materials and Methods By using elevated plus maze test and forced swimming test, the antianxiety and antidepressant effects were evaluated. Animal ethics protocols were followed strictly. Total 50 rats (10 rats per group) were used for each test. As a control drug diazepam and imipramine were used in elevated plus maze and forced swimming test respectively. Blonanserin was tested for 3 doses 0.075, 0.2 and 0.8mg. These doses were selected from previous references as well as by extrapolating human doses. Results This study showed an antianxiety effect of Blonanserin comparable to diazepam, which was statistically significant. Optimal effect was observed with 0.075mg, followed by 0.2 and 0.8mg. It also showed an antidepressant effect which was statistically significant. Optimal effect was observed at 0.2mg dose. Conclusion The results showed that at a dose range of 0.075 and 0.2mg Blonanserin has potential to exert an adjuvant antianxiety and antidepressant activity in animal models. In order to extrapolate this in patient, longer clinical studies with comparable doses should be planned. The present study underlines potential of Blonanserin as a novel drug for such studies. PMID:27790460

  18. A Meta-Analysis of Executive Dysfunction and Antidepressant Treatment Response in Late-Life Depression

    PubMed Central

    Pimontel, Monique A.; Rindskopf, David; Rutherford, Bret R.; Brown, Patrick J.; Roose, Steven P.; Sneed, Joel R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Depressed older adults with executive dysfunction (ED) may respond poorly to antidepressant treatment. ED is a multifaceted construct and different studies have measured different aspects of ED, making it unclear which aspects predict poor response. Meta-analytic methods were used to determine whether ED predicts poor antidepressant treatment response in late-life depression and to determine which domains of executive functioning are responsible for this relationship. Methods A Medline search was conducted to identify regimented treatment trials contrasting executive functioning between elderly responders and nonresponders; only regimented treatment trials for depressed outpatients aged 50 and older were included. Following the most recent PRISMA guidelines, 25 measures of executive functioning were extracted from eight studies. Six domains were identified: cognitive flexibility, planning and organization, response inhibition, selective attention, verbal fluency, and the Dementia Rating Scale Initiation/Perseveration composite score (DRS I/P). Hedge’s g was calculated for each measure of executive functioning. A three-level Bayesian hierarchical linear model (HLM) was used to estimate effect sizes for each domain of executive functioning. Results The effect of planning and organization was significantly different from zero (Bayesian HLM estimate of domain effect size: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.32–1.58), whereas cognitive flexibility, response inhibition, selective attention, verbal fluency, and the DRS I/P composite score were not. Conclusion The domain of planning and organization is meaningfully associated with poor antidepressant treatment response in late-life depression. These findings suggest that therapies that focus on planning and organization may provide effective augmentation strategies for antidepressant nonresponders with late-life depression. PMID:26282222

  19. Dopamine, depression and antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Dailly, Eric; Chenu, Franck; Renard, Caroline E; Bourin, Michel

    2004-12-01

    Abstract The relationship between depression and dopamine deficiency in the mesolimbic pathway has been hypothesized for many years. The experimental studies with animal models of depression and the human studies implicate the role of the dopamine system in depression. Not only do dopaminergic receptor agonists, but also antagonists such as olanzapine exhibit antidepressant effects associated with standard antidepressants in patients with treatment-resistant depression. This paradoxical result suggests that further investigations are necessary to understand the role played by dopamine in depression.

  20. Analysis of 23andMe antidepressant efficacy survey data: implication of circadian rhythm and neuroplasticity in bupropion response.

    PubMed

    Li, Q S; Tian, C; Seabrook, G R; Drevets, W C; Narayan, V A

    2016-01-01

    Genetic predisposition may contribute to the differences in drug-specific, class-specific or antidepressant-wide treatment resistance. Clinical studies with the genetic data are often limited in sample sizes. Drug response obtained from self-reports may offer an alternative approach to conduct a study with much larger sample size. Using the phenotype data collected from 23andMe 'Antidepressant Efficacy and Side Effects' survey and genotype data from 23andMe's research participants, we conducted genome-wide association study (GWAS) on subjects of European ancestry using four groups of phenotypes (a) non-treatment-resistant depression (n=7795) vs treatment-resistant depression (TRD, n=1311), (b) selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) responders (n=6348) vs non-responders (n=3340), (c) citalopram/escitalopram responders (n=2963) vs non-responders (n=2005), and (d) norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitor (NDRI, bupropion) responders (n=2675) vs non-responders (n=1861). Each of these subgroups was also compared with controls (n ~ 190 000). The most significant association was from bupropion responders vs non-responders analysis. Variant rs1908557 (P=2.6 × 10(-8), OR=1.35) passed the conventional genome-wide significance threshold (P=5 × 10(-8)) and was located within the intron of human spliced expressed sequence tags in chromosome 4. Gene sets associated with long-term depression, circadian rhythm and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway were enriched in the bupropion analysis. No single-nucleotide polymorphism passed genome-wide significance threshold in other analyses. The heritability estimates for each response group compared with controls were between 0.15 and 0.25, consistent with the known heritability for major depressive disorder.

  1. Analysis of 23andMe antidepressant efficacy survey data: implication of circadian rhythm and neuroplasticity in bupropion response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Q S; Tian, C; Seabrook, G R; Drevets, W C; Narayan, V A

    2016-01-01

    Genetic predisposition may contribute to the differences in drug-specific, class-specific or antidepressant-wide treatment resistance. Clinical studies with the genetic data are often limited in sample sizes. Drug response obtained from self-reports may offer an alternative approach to conduct a study with much larger sample size. Using the phenotype data collected from 23andMe ‘Antidepressant Efficacy and Side Effects' survey and genotype data from 23andMe's research participants, we conducted genome-wide association study (GWAS) on subjects of European ancestry using four groups of phenotypes (a) non-treatment-resistant depression (n=7795) vs treatment-resistant depression (TRD, n=1311), (b) selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) responders (n=6348) vs non-responders (n=3340), (c) citalopram/escitalopram responders (n=2963) vs non-responders (n=2005), and (d) norepinephrine–dopamine reuptake inhibitor (NDRI, bupropion) responders (n=2675) vs non-responders (n=1861). Each of these subgroups was also compared with controls (n ~ 190 000). The most significant association was from bupropion responders vs non-responders analysis. Variant rs1908557 (P=2.6 × 10−8, OR=1.35) passed the conventional genome-wide significance threshold (P=5 × 10−8) and was located within the intron of human spliced expressed sequence tags in chromosome 4. Gene sets associated with long-term depression, circadian rhythm and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway were enriched in the bupropion analysis. No single-nucleotide polymorphism passed genome-wide significance threshold in other analyses. The heritability estimates for each response group compared with controls were between 0.15 and 0.25, consistent with the known heritability for major depressive disorder. PMID:27622933

  2. Analysis of 23andMe antidepressant efficacy survey data: implication of circadian rhythm and neuroplasticity in bupropion response.

    PubMed

    Li, Q S; Tian, C; Seabrook, G R; Drevets, W C; Narayan, V A

    2016-01-01

    Genetic predisposition may contribute to the differences in drug-specific, class-specific or antidepressant-wide treatment resistance. Clinical studies with the genetic data are often limited in sample sizes. Drug response obtained from self-reports may offer an alternative approach to conduct a study with much larger sample size. Using the phenotype data collected from 23andMe 'Antidepressant Efficacy and Side Effects' survey and genotype data from 23andMe's research participants, we conducted genome-wide association study (GWAS) on subjects of European ancestry using four groups of phenotypes (a) non-treatment-resistant depression (n=7795) vs treatment-resistant depression (TRD, n=1311), (b) selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) responders (n=6348) vs non-responders (n=3340), (c) citalopram/escitalopram responders (n=2963) vs non-responders (n=2005), and (d) norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitor (NDRI, bupropion) responders (n=2675) vs non-responders (n=1861). Each of these subgroups was also compared with controls (n ~ 190 000). The most significant association was from bupropion responders vs non-responders analysis. Variant rs1908557 (P=2.6 × 10(-8), OR=1.35) passed the conventional genome-wide significance threshold (P=5 × 10(-8)) and was located within the intron of human spliced expressed sequence tags in chromosome 4. Gene sets associated with long-term depression, circadian rhythm and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway were enriched in the bupropion analysis. No single-nucleotide polymorphism passed genome-wide significance threshold in other analyses. The heritability estimates for each response group compared with controls were between 0.15 and 0.25, consistent with the known heritability for major depressive disorder. PMID:27622933

  3. Pharmacogenetics of antidepressant response.

    PubMed

    Keers, Robert; Aitchison, Katherine J

    2011-01-01

    There is substantial interindividual variation in response to antidepressants. Family and twin studies suggest that genetic variation may, at least in part, explain these differences. Pharmacogenetic research attempts to identify the genetic variants associated with antidepressant response to both understand the mechanism of action of pharmacotherapies and to predict outcome. Genes implicated in the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodyamics of antidepressants have been shown to predict response; however, the failure of some findings to replicate has been disappointing. More recent hypothesis-free approaches have identified novel candidates for antidepressant response. However, results have been considerably modest and suggest that treatment outcome is determined by multiple genetic variants of small effect. The small effect sizes of genetic variants and heterogeneity between studies have significantly hindered attempts to find robust genetic predictors of response to antidepressants. To allow the direct comparison of findings, future pharmacogenetic studies should employ standardized methodology and consider using intermediate phenotypes of response, such as neurogenesis, that may more closely reflect the mechanism of action of antidepressants. PMID:21158559

  4. Study protocol for the randomised controlled trial: Antiglucocorticoid augmentation of anti-Depressants in Depression (The ADD Study)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Some patients with depression do not respond to first and second line conventional antidepressants and are therefore characterised as suffering from treatment refractory depression (TRD). On-going psychosocial stress and dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis are both associated with an attenuated clinical response to antidepressants. Preclinical data shows that co-administration of corticosteroids leads to a reduction in the ability of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors to increase forebrain 5-hydroxytryptamine, while co-administration of antiglucocorticoids has the opposite effect. A Cochrane review suggests that antiglucocorticoid augmentation of antidepressants may be effective in treating TRD and includes a pilot study of the cortisol synthesis inhibitor, metyrapone. The Antiglucocorticoid augmentation of anti-Depressants in Depression (The ADD Study) is a multicentre randomised placebo controlled trial of metyrapone augmentation of serotonergic antidepressants in a large population of patients with TRD in the UK National Health Service. Methods/design Patients with moderate to severe treatment refractory Major Depression aged 18 to 65 will be randomised to metyrapone 500 mg twice daily or placebo for three weeks, in addition to on-going conventional serotonergic antidepressants. The primary outcome will be improvement in Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale score five weeks after randomisation (i.e. two weeks after trial medication discontinuation). Secondary outcomes will include the degree of persistence of treatment effect for up to 6 months, improvements in quality of life and also safety and tolerability of metyrapone. The ADD Study will also include a range of sub-studies investigating the potential mechanism of action of metyrapone. Discussion Strengths of the ADD study include broad inclusion criteria meaning that the sample will be representative of patients with TRD treated within the UK National Health

  5. Using Multiple Imputation to Assign Pesticide Use for Non-Responders in the Follow-Up Questionnaire in the Agricultural Health Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Agricultural Health Study (AHS), a large prospective cohort, was designed to elucidate associations between pesticide use and other agricultural exposures and health outcomes. The cohort includes 57,310 pesticide applicators who were enrolled between 1993 and 1997 in Iowa and...

  6. Reboxetine for ADHD in children non-responders or with poor tolerance to methylphenidate: a prospective long-term open-label study.

    PubMed

    Quintero, Javier; López-Muñoz, Francisco; Alamo, Cecilio; Loro, Mercedes; García-Campos, Natalia

    2010-11-01

    Up to 30% of patients with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) treated with psychostimulants discontinue the treatment because of intolerance or lack of therapeutic response. Therapeutic alternatives are needed for such patients. In the present case series, we study the effectiveness of reboxetine over a period of 6 months in a sample of 14 children diagnosed with ADHD according to DSM-IV-TR criteria, who had responded only partially or had presented poor tolerance to conventional treatment with methylphenidate. Clinical efficacy was evaluated through the application of the 18-item Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Rating Scale (ADHD-RS-IV) and the Clinical Global Impressions-Global Improvement Scale (CGI-I). Percentages of responders (ADHD-RS ≥ 25%) and improvers (CGI-I absolute value < 4) were 90.9 and 72.7%, respectively. No serious side-effects were observed during treatment, the most frequent effects being headaches and insomnia. The initial findings of our study show that reboxetine may constitute an effective tool for long-term treatment of children with ADHD who present poor response or poor tolerance to initial treatment with methylphenidate.

  7. Mechanistic Study on the Antidepressant-Like Effect of Danggui-Shaoyao-San, a Chinese Herbal Formula

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhen; Mao, Qing-Qiu; Zhong, Xiao-Ming; Li, Zhao-Yi; Qiu, Feng-Mei; Ip, Siu-Po

    2012-01-01

    Danggui-Shaoyao-San (DSS), a famous Chinese herbal formula, has been widely used in the treatment of various diseases. Previous studies have shown that DSS produces antidepressant-like effect in rodents. This study aims to investigate the mechanism(s) underlying the antidepressant-like action of DDS. The results showed that DSS treatment significantly antagonized reserpine-induced ptosis in mice. In addition, DSS treatment significantly increased sucrose consumption in chronic unpredictable stress- (CUS-) treated mice. DSS treatment also markedly attenuated CUS-induced decreases in noradrenaline and dopamine concentrations in mouse brain. Furthermore, DSS treatment significantly reversed CUS-induced increase in serum malondialdehyde (MDA) content and decrease in serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in mice. The results suggest that the antidepressant-like activity of DSS is probably mediated by the modulation of central monoamine neurotransmitter systems and the reduction of oxidative stress. PMID:22924052

  8. Childhood Predictors of Use and Costs of Antidepressant Medication by Age 24 Years: Findings from the Finnish Nationwide 1981 Birth Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gyllenberg, David; Sourander, Andre; Niemela, Solja; Helenius, Hans; Sillanmaki, Lauri; Ristkari, Terja; Piha, Jorma; Kumpulainen, Kirsti; Tamminen, Tuula; Moilanen, Irma; Almqvist, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Prior studies on antidepressant use in late adolescence and young adulthood have been cross-sectional, and prospective associations with childhood psychiatric problems have not been examined. The objective was to study the association between childhood problems and lifetime prevalence and costs of antidepressant medication by age 24…

  9. Repeated vaccinations do not improve specific immune defenses against Hepatitis B in non-responder health care workers.

    PubMed

    Zaffina, Salvatore; Marcellini, Valentina; Santoro, Anna Paola; Scarsella, Marco; Camisa, Vincenzo; Vinci, Maria Rosaria; Musolino, Anna Maria; Nicolosi, Luciana; Rosado, M Manuela; Carsetti, Rita

    2014-12-01

    Hepatitis B is a major infectious occupational hazard for health care workers and can be prevented with a safe and effective vaccine. The serum titer of anti-HBsAg antibodies is the most commonly used correlate of protection and post-vaccination anti-HBsAg concentrations of ≥ 10 mIU/ml are considered protective. Subjects with post-vaccination anti-HBsAg titers of <10 mIU/ml 1-6 months post-vaccination, who tested negative for HBsAg and anti-HBc, are defined as non-responders. The question of whether non-responders should be repeatedly vaccinated is still open. The aim of the study was to (i) evaluate the distribution of lymphocyte subpopulations and the percentage of HBsAg-specific memory B cells in responders and non-responders (ii) assess whether non-responders can be induced to produce antibodies after administration of a booster dose of vaccine (iii) determine whether booster vaccination increases the number of specific memory B cells in non-responders. Combining flow-cytometry, ELISPOT and serology we tested the integrity and function of the immune system in 24 health care workers, confirmed to be non-responders after at least three vaccine injections. We compared the results with those obtained in 21 responders working in the same institution. We found that the great majority of the non-responders had a functional immune system and a preserved ability to respond to other conventional antigens. Our most important findings are that the frequency of HBsAg-specific memory B cells is comparable in non-responders and controls and that booster immunization does not lead either to antibody production or memory B cell increase in non-responders.

  10. GC-MS-based metabolomic study on the antidepressant-like effects of diterpene ginkgolides in mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zihong; Bai, Shunjie; Shen, Peng; Hu, Qingchuan; Wang, Xingfa; Dong, Meixue; Wang, Wei; Li, Juan; Cheng, Ke; Zhang, Shuxiao; Zou, Dezhi; Han, Yu; Wang, Haiyang; Xie, Peng

    2016-11-01

    Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE), including EGb-761, have been suggested to have antidepressant activity based on previous behavioral and biochemical analyses. However, because GBE contain many constituents, the mechanisms underlying this suggested antidepressant activity are unclear. Here, we investigated the antidepressant-like effects of diterpene ginkgolides (DG), an important class of constituents in GBE, and studied their effects in the mouse hippocampus using a GC-MS-based metabolomics approach. Mice were randomly divided into five groups and injected daily until testing with 0.9% NaCl solution, one of three doses of DG (4.06, 12.18, and 36.54mg/kg), or venlafaxine. Sucrose preference (SPT) and tail suspension (TST) tests were then performed to evaluate depressive-like behaviors in mice. DG (12.18 and 36.54mg/kg) and venlafaxine (VLX) administration significantly increased hedonic behavior in mice in the SPT. DG (12.18mg/kg) treatment also shortened immobility time in the TST, suggestive of antidepressant-like effects. Significant differences in the metabolic profile in the DG (12.18mg/kg) compared with the control or VLX group indicative of an antidepressant-like effect were observed using multivariate analysis. Eighteen differential hippocampal metabolites were identified that discriminated the DG (12.18mg/kg) and control groups. These biochemical changes involved neurotransmitter metabolism, oxidative stress, glutathione metabolism, lipid metabolism, energy metabolism, and kynurenic acid, providing clues to the therapeutic mechanisms of DG. Thus, this study showed that DG has antidepressant-like activities in mice and shed light on the biological mechanisms underlying the effects of diterpene ginkgolides on behavior, providing an important drug candidate for the treatment of depression.

  11. GC-MS-based metabolomic study on the antidepressant-like effects of diterpene ginkgolides in mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zihong; Bai, Shunjie; Shen, Peng; Hu, Qingchuan; Wang, Xingfa; Dong, Meixue; Wang, Wei; Li, Juan; Cheng, Ke; Zhang, Shuxiao; Zou, Dezhi; Han, Yu; Wang, Haiyang; Xie, Peng

    2016-11-01

    Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE), including EGb-761, have been suggested to have antidepressant activity based on previous behavioral and biochemical analyses. However, because GBE contain many constituents, the mechanisms underlying this suggested antidepressant activity are unclear. Here, we investigated the antidepressant-like effects of diterpene ginkgolides (DG), an important class of constituents in GBE, and studied their effects in the mouse hippocampus using a GC-MS-based metabolomics approach. Mice were randomly divided into five groups and injected daily until testing with 0.9% NaCl solution, one of three doses of DG (4.06, 12.18, and 36.54mg/kg), or venlafaxine. Sucrose preference (SPT) and tail suspension (TST) tests were then performed to evaluate depressive-like behaviors in mice. DG (12.18 and 36.54mg/kg) and venlafaxine (VLX) administration significantly increased hedonic behavior in mice in the SPT. DG (12.18mg/kg) treatment also shortened immobility time in the TST, suggestive of antidepressant-like effects. Significant differences in the metabolic profile in the DG (12.18mg/kg) compared with the control or VLX group indicative of an antidepressant-like effect were observed using multivariate analysis. Eighteen differential hippocampal metabolites were identified that discriminated the DG (12.18mg/kg) and control groups. These biochemical changes involved neurotransmitter metabolism, oxidative stress, glutathione metabolism, lipid metabolism, energy metabolism, and kynurenic acid, providing clues to the therapeutic mechanisms of DG. Thus, this study showed that DG has antidepressant-like activities in mice and shed light on the biological mechanisms underlying the effects of diterpene ginkgolides on behavior, providing an important drug candidate for the treatment of depression. PMID:27498146

  12. Antidepressants and Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Hui; Hsiao, Fei-Yuan; Liu, Yen-Bin; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Wang, Chi-Chuan; Shen, Li-Jiuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Empirical evidence regarding the association between antidepressants and valvular heart disease (VHD) is scarce. Using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research database, this nested case-control study assessed the association between antidepressants and VHD in a Chinese population. Among a cohort of patients who used at least 3 prescription antidepressants, 874 cases with VHD and 3496 matched controls (1:4 ratio) were identified. Conditional logistic regression models were used to examine the timing, duration, dose and type of antidepressants use, and the risk of VHD. Current use of antidepressants was associated with a 1.4-fold increase in the risk of VHD (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17–1.77). Among current users, a dose–response association was observed in terms of the cumulative duration and the cumulative antidepressant dose. Significantly higher risks of VHD were observed among the current users of tricyclic antidepressants (aOR 1.40 [1.05–1.87]). We found that the use of antidepressants was associated with a greater risk of VHD and that the risks varied according to different antidepressants. PMID:27057841

  13. Augmenting Antidepressant Medication Treatment of Depressed Women with Emotionally Focused Therapy for Couples: A Randomized Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Wayne H.; Wittenborn, Andrea K.; Golden, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    This is the first study to evaluate adding emotionally focused therapy for couples (EFT) to antidepressant medication in the treatment of women with major depressive disorder and comorbid relationship discord. Twenty-four women and their male partners were randomized to 6 months of medication management alone (MM) or MM augmented with EFT (MM +…

  14. 5-HTR1A and 5-HTR2A genetic polymorphisms and SSRI antidepressant response in depressive Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zai-Quan; Li, Xi-Rong; He, Lin; He, Guang; Yu, Tao; Sun, Xue-Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective Genetic variabilities within the serotoninergic system may predict response or remission to antidepressant drugs. Several serotonin receptor (5-HTR) gene polymorphisms have been associated with susceptibility to psychiatric diseases. In this study, we analyzed the correlation between 5-HTR1A and 5-HTR2A polymorphisms and response or remission to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) drugs. Methods Two hundred and ninety patients who met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for major depressive disorder were involved in this study. SSRIs (fluoxetine, paroxetine, citalopram, or sertraline) were selected randomly for treatment. The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression was used to evaluate the antidepressant effect. To assess 5-HTR gene variabilities, two single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 5-HTR1A (rs1364043 and rs10042486) and three in 5-HTR2A (rs6311, rs6313, and rs17289304) were genotyped by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry using the Sequenom MassARRAY Analyzer 4 system. Results There were 220 responders and 70 nonresponders (120 remissioners and 170 nonremissioners) after 6 weeks of treatment. We found no association between any of the five 5-HTR1A and 5-HTR2A gene polymorphisms and antidepressant drug response or remission (P>0.05). It is worth mentioning that TT genotype frequency of rs10042486 was significantly different from the CT genotype frequency between responders and nonresponders, although the significance was not maintained after correcting for multiple testing. Conclusion Thus, 5-HTR1A and 5-HTR2A gene polymorphisms may not play an important role in antidepressant drug response or remission. PMID:27445478

  15. Higher anti-depressant dose and major adverse outcomes in moderate chronic kidney disease: a retrospective population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many older patients have chronic kidney disease (CKD), and a lower dose of anti-depressants paroxetine, mirtazapine and venlafaxine is recommended in patients with CKD to prevent drug accumulation from reduced elimination. Using information available in large population-based healthcare administrative databases, we conducted this study to determine if ignoring the recommendation and prescribing a higher versus lower dose of anti-depressants associates with a higher risk of adverse events. Methods We conducted a population-based cohort study to describe the 30-day risk of delirium in older adults who initiated a higher vs. lower dose of these three anti-depressants in routine care. We defined delirium using the best proxy available in our data sources - hospitalization with an urgent head computed tomography (CT) scan. We determined if CKD status modified the association between anti-depressant dose and outcome, and examined the secondary outcome of 30 day all-cause mortality. We used multivariable logistic regression analyses to estimate adjusted odds ratios (relative risk (RR)) and 95% confidence intervals. Results We identified adults (mean age 75) in Ontario who started a new study anti-depressant at a higher dose (n = 36,651; 31%) or lower dose (n = 81,160; 69%). Initiating a higher vs. lower dose was not associated with an increased risk of hospitalization with head CT (1.09% vs. 1.27% (adjusted RR 0.90; 95% CI, 0.80 to 1.02), but was associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality (0.76% vs. 0.97% RR 0.82; 95% CI, 0.71 to 0.95). Neither of these relative risks were modified by the presence of CKD (p = 0.16, 0.68, respectively). Conclusions We did not observe an increase in two adverse outcomes when study anti-depressants were initiated at a higher dose in elderly patients with moderate CKD. Contrary to our hypothesis, the 30-day risk of mortality was lower when a higher versus lower dose of anti-depressant was initiated in these

  16. Neuronal and immunological basis of action of antidepressants in chronic pain - clinical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Mika, Joanna; Zychowska, Magdalena; Makuch, Wioletta; Rojewska, Ewelina; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The current knowledge of the pharmacological actions of the tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) has slowly evolved through their over 40-year history. Chronic pain represents one of the most important public health problems, and antidepressants are an essential part of the therapeutic strategy in addition to classical analgesics. This article reviews the available evidence on the efficacy and safety of antidepressants in chronic pain conditions; namely, headaches, low back pain, fibromyalgia, cancer pain and especially neuropathic pain. TCAs are traditionally the main type of depression medication used to treat chronic pain. Recently, new antidepressants were introduced into clinical use, with a significant reduction in side effects and equivalent efficacy on mood disorders. These new drugs that are effective for chronic pain belong to the tetracyclic antidepressants (TeCAs) group (amoxapine, maprotiline), the serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) group (duloxetine, venlafaxine, milnacipran) and the atypical antidepressants group (bupropion, trazodone, mirtazapine, nefazodone). In this review, we present the available publications on TCAs (amitriptyline, doxepin, imipramine, desipramine, nortriptyline), TeCAs (amoxapine, maprotiline), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (citalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine), SNRIs (duloxetine, venlafaxine, milnacipran) and atypical antidepressants (bupropion) for the treatment of neuropathic pain. We also review analgesics acting as both opioid receptor agonists and also acting as aminergic reuptake inhibitors. Existing data are insufficient to conclude which of these new classes of antidepressants has the best clinical profile and will be the most effective in the treatment of neuropathic pain; in addition, a lower incidence of side effects should be considered. Increased experimental and translational research is a key for further improvement of the treatment of chronic pain with antidepressants. However

  17. Parental depression, maternal antidepressant use during pregnancy, and risk of autism spectrum disorders: population based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Brian K; Dalman, Christina; Golding, Jean; Lewis, Glyn; Magnusson, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the association between parental depression and maternal antidepressant use during pregnancy with autism spectrum disorders in offspring. Design Population based nested case-control study. Setting Stockholm County, Sweden, 2001-07. Participants 4429 cases of autism spectrum disorder (1828 with and 2601 without intellectual disability) and 43 277 age and sex matched controls in the full sample (1679 cases of autism spectrum disorder and 16 845 controls with data on maternal antidepressant use nested within a cohort (n=589 114) of young people aged 0-17 years. Main outcome measure A diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder, with or without intellectual disability. Exposures Parental depression and other characteristics prospectively recorded in administrative registers before the birth of the child. Maternal antidepressant use, recorded at the first antenatal interview, was available for children born from 1995 onwards. Results A history of maternal (adjusted odds ratio 1.49, 95% confidence interval 1.08 to 2.08) but not paternal depression was associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorders in offspring. In the subsample with available data on drugs, this association was confined to women reporting antidepressant use during pregnancy (3.34, 1.50 to 7.47, P=0.003), irrespective of whether selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or non-selective monoamine reuptake inhibitors were reported. All associations were higher in cases of autism without intellectual disability, there being no evidence of an increased risk of autism with intellectual disability. Assuming an unconfounded, causal association, antidepressant use during pregnancy explained 0.6% of the cases of autism spectrum disorder. Conclusions In utero exposure to both SSRIs and non-selective monoamine reuptake inhibitors (tricyclic antidepressants) was associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorders, particularly without intellectual disability

  18. Changes in antidepressant use by young people and suicidal behavior after FDA warnings and media coverage: quasi-experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Lakoma, Matthew D; Madden, Jeanne M; Rusinak, Donna; Penfold, Robert B; Simon, Gregory; Ahmedani, Brian K; Clarke, Gregory; Hunkeler, Enid M; Waitzfelder, Beth; Owen-Smith, Ashli; Raebel, Marsha A; Rossom, Rebecca; Coleman, Karen J; Copeland, Laurel A; Soumerai, Stephen B

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate if the widely publicized warnings in 2003 from the US Food and Drug Administration about a possible increased risk of suicidality with antidepressant use in young people were associated with changes in antidepressant use, suicide attempts, and completed suicides among young people. Design Quasi-experimental study assessing changes in outcomes after the warnings, controlling for pre-existing trends. Setting Automated healthcare claims data (2000-10) derived from the virtual data warehouse of 11 health plans in the US Mental Health Research Network. Participants Study cohorts included adolescents (around 1.1 million), young adults (around 1.4 million), and adults (around 5 million). Main outcome measures Rates of antidepressant dispensings, psychotropic drug poisonings (a validated proxy for suicide attempts), and completed suicides. Results Trends in antidepressant use and poisonings changed abruptly after the warnings. In the second year after the warnings, relative changes in antidepressant use were −31.0% (95% confidence interval −33.0% to −29.0%) among adolescents, −24.3% (−25.4% to −23.2%) among young adults, and −14.5% (−16.0% to −12.9%) among adults. These reflected absolute reductions of 696, 1216, and 1621 dispensings per 100 000 people among adolescents, young adults, and adults, respectively. Simultaneously, there were significant, relative increases in psychotropic drug poisonings in adolescents (21.7%, 95% confidence interval 4.9% to 38.5%) and young adults (33.7%, 26.9% to 40.4%) but not among adults (5.2%, −6.5% to 16.9%). These reflected absolute increases of 2 and 4 poisonings per 100 000 people among adolescents and young adults, respectively (approximately 77 additional poisonings in our cohort of 2.5 million young people). Completed suicides did not change for any age group. Conclusions Safety warnings about antidepressants and widespread media coverage decreased antidepressant use, and there were

  19. Antidepressant use and risk of cardiovascular outcomes in people aged 20 to 64: cohort study using primary care database

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Trevor; Morriss, Richard; Moore, Michael; Arthur, Antony; Hippisley-Cox, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess associations between different antidepressant treatments and rates of three cardiovascular outcomes (myocardial infarction, stroke or transient ischaemic attack, and arrhythmia) in people with depression. Design Cohort study. Setting UK general practices contributing to the QResearch primary care database. Participants 238 963 patients aged 20 to 64 years with a first diagnosis of depression between 1 January 2000 and 31 July 2011. Exposures Antidepressant class (tricyclic and related antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, other antidepressants), dose, duration of use, and commonly prescribed individual antidepressant drugs. Main outcome measures First diagnoses of myocardial infarction, stroke or transient ischaemic attack, and arrhythmia during five years’ follow-up. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios, adjusting for potential confounding variables. Results During five years of follow-up, 772 patients had a myocardial infarction, 1106 had a stroke or transient ischaemic attack, and 1452 were diagnosed as having arrhythmia. No significant associations were found between antidepressant class and myocardial infarction over five years’ follow-up. In the first year of follow-up, patients treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors had a significantly reduced risk of myocardial infarction (adjusted hazard ratio 0.58, 95% confidence interval 0.42 to 0.79) compared with no use of antidepressants; among individual drugs, fluoxetine was associated with a significantly reduced risk (0.44, 0.27 to 0.72) and lofepramine with a significantly increased risk (3.07, 1.50 to 6.26). No significant associations were found between antidepressant class or individual drugs and risk of stroke or transient ischaemic attack. Antidepressant class was not significantly associated with arrhythmia over five years’ follow-up, although the risk was significantly increased during the first 28 days of

  20. Stress resilience in adolescence and subsequent antidepressant and anxiolytic medication in middle aged men: Swedish cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hiyoshi, Ayako; Udumyan, Ruzan; Osika, Walter; Bihagen, Erik; Fall, Katja; Montgomery, Scott

    2015-06-01

    It is unclear whether psychological resilience to stress in adolescence represents a persistent characteristic relevant to the subsequent risk for depression and anxiety in later adulthood. We aimed to test whether low psychological stress resilience assessed in adolescence is associated with an increased risk of receiving medication for depression and anxiety in middle age. We utilized Swedish register-based cohort study. Men born between 1952 and 1956 (n = 175,699), who underwent compulsory assessment for military conscription in late adolescence were followed to examine subsequent risk of pharmaceutically-treated depression and anxiety in middle age, from 2006 to 2009 corresponding to ages between 50 and 58 years, using Cox regression. The associations of stress resilience with prescription of antidepressant and anxiolytics medication through potential mediating factors cognitive and physical function and adult socioeconomic factors were calculated. Low stress resilience was associated with elevated risks for antidepressant (hazard ratio (HR):1.5 (95% CI 1.4 1.6)) and anxiolytics (HR:2.4 (CI 2.0 2.7)) medication. Adjustment for measures of childhood living circumstances attenuated the associations somewhat. Around a third of association with low stress resilience, and a half of that with moderate resilience, was mediated through cognitive and physical function in adolescence and adult socioeconomic factors. The magnitude of the inverse association of higher cognitive function with antidepressant medication was eliminated among those with low stress resilience. These results indicate that low stress resilience in adolescence is associated with an increased risk for antidepressant and anxiolytics medication over 30 years later, in part mediated through developmental factors in adolescence and socioeconomic circumstances in adulthood, and low stress resilience can diminish or eliminate the inverse association of higher cognitive function with antidepressant

  1. Antidepressant action via the nitric oxide system: A pilot study in an acute depressive model induced by arginin.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Yuta; Ochi, Shinichiro; Yamazaki, Kiyohiro; Nakata, Shunsuke; Abe, Masao; Mori, Yoko; Ueno, Shu-ichi

    2015-07-10

    Nitric oxide (NO) may be a neurotransmitter related to major depressive disorder (MDD) because the selective neuronal NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole, induces dose-dependent antidepressant-like effects. However, its role in MDD is not yet known. The purpose of our study was to determine if antidepressants improve depression via the NO pathway using an acute depressive rat model induced by L-arginine (AR). Three types of antidepressants were examined, fluoxetine (FLX, 10 mg/kg), milnacipran (MIL, 30 mg/kg), and mirtazapine (MIR, 10 mg/kg), in a depressive model that used AR (750 mg/kg) pretreatment. mRNA expression levels of three NOS subtypes were analyzed by real-time PCR, as well as serum NO levels. Significant increases in iNOS mRNA expression levels were found in brain regions after AR treatment, although the eNOS gene tended to decrease with AR injection. After antidepressant treatment, there were no mRNA expression changes in either nNOS or iNOS. However, eNOS mRNA expression significantly increased with FLX (cerebellum, P=0.011; hippocampus, P=0.011; midbrain, P=0.011; pons, P=0.013; striatum, P=0.011; and thalamus, P<0.001). There was a statistically significant increase in serum NO levels with MIL treatment (P=0.011). We conclude that changes in eNOS mRNA levels in the brain with FLX treatment, and amount of serum NO with MIL treatment may be related to antidepressant effects of both agents, but further experiments are needed to confirm involvement of the NO system in MDD. PMID:26007704

  2. How Commonly Used Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria in Antidepressant Registration Trials Affect Study Enrollment.

    PubMed

    Preskorn, Sheldon H; Macaluso, Matthew; Trivedi, Madhukar

    2015-07-01

    In clinical trials, each specific inclusion and exclusion criterion eliminates a percentage of the potentially eligible population from trial participation and thus increases the time and effort needed for enrollment in a study. Drug developers often do not have data on how these criteria affect the pool of potentially eligible subjects for their trials and, hence, they cannot factor in the impact of these criteria when designing a study and planning the time needed to complete it. Consequently, drug developers often have ambitious timelines that are unrealistic and can lead to actions that may interfere with the ability to separate the efficacy of drug versus placebo. To investigate the effects of inclusion and exclusion criteria on study enrollment, the authors quantified the effects of the inclusion and exclusion criteria commonly used in antidepressant registration trials (ARTs) by applying these criteria to the population treated in the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study. In essence, the STAR*D study population was used as a surrogate for the general population of individuals with major depressive disorder. The effect of each criterion commonly used in ARTs was assessed in terms of the percentage of the STAR*D population that would have been excluded individually and collectively (i.e., when all criteria were applied at once). For continuous criteria such as age and severity of depression, the resulting effects have been presented graphically. Collectively, the typical inclusion and exclusion criteria used in ARTs would have eliminated at least 82% of the STAR*D population. This result means that more than 5 times the number of subjects would have to be screened to find a population that would meet the typical inclusion and exclusion criteria for an ART, directly determining the screening effort required in terms of both resources and time. Thus, developers of antidepressant drugs can use the data from this study to plan the

  3. Mechanisms underlying the antidepressant response and treatment resistance

    PubMed Central

    Levinstein, Marjorie R.; Samuels, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Depression is a complex and heterogeneous disorder affecting millions of Americans. There are several different medications and other treatments that are available and effective for many patients with depression. However, a substantial percentage of patients fail to achieve remission with these currently available interventions, and relapse rates are high. Therefore, it is necessary to determine both the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant response and the differences between responders and non-responders to treatment. Delineation of these mechanisms largely relies on experiments that utilize animal models. Therefore, this review provides an overview of the various mouse models that are currently used to assess the antidepressant response, such as chronic mild stress, social defeat, and chronic corticosterone. We discuss how these mouse models can be used to advance our understanding of the differences between responders and non-responders to antidepressant treatment. We also provide an overview of experimental treatment modalities that are used for treatment-resistant depression, such as deep brain stimulation and ketamine administration. We will then review the various genetic polymorphisms and transgenic mice that display resistance to antidepressant treatment. Finally, we synthesize the published data to describe a potential neural circuit underlying the antidepressant response and treatment resistance. PMID:25018708

  4. [Prevention of hepatitis B--HLA DR/DQ in HBs Ag nonresponder].

    PubMed

    Ouchi, E; Hoshino, A; Miura, T; Nagahara, N; Kudo, Y; Tamura, M

    1989-11-01

    To evaluate the immunological background in HBs Ag nonresponders against hepatitis B vaccine, the lymphocyte surface marker and HLA-DR/DQ antigen were determined on hospital personnel, 70 males and 256 females, injected hepatitis B vaccine for three times. The vaccine made from the plasma of HBs Ag carriers was injected at the first and second vaccination and recombinant hepatitis B vaccine was injected at the third vaccination. A month after the third vaccination, blood was withdrawn for HBs antigen test by RIA. Border line cases (cut off index 1.0-1.9) are included in nonresponder (cut off index less than 0.9). Both nonresponders and low responders (cut off index 2-49) are more often seen in males than females and high responder (cut off index 50 or more) are seen more often in young females than males. Lymphocyte surface markers were studied by flow cytometry using the following monoclonal antibodies; OKT 3, 4, 8, DR, NK, Ia 1 and B7. No differences between lymphocyte surface markers of nonresponders and responders were noted. HLA-DR/DQ antigens were studied by the cytotoxicity test using Locus DR/DQ, Terasaki Second DR W-60 Tray and using following antibodies; DR 1, DR 2, DRW 15, DR 4, DR 5, DR 7, DR 9, DRW 10, DRW 8, DRW 12, DRW 13, DRW 6, DRW 52, DRW 53, DQW 1, DQW 6, DQW 2, DQW 3, DQW 7 and DQW 4. No significant differences between HLA-DR/DQ of nonresponders and responders were noted. PMID:2601078

  5. Clinical-biochemical correlates of migraine attacks in rizatriptan responders and non-responders.

    PubMed

    Sarchielli, P; Pini, L A; Zanchin, G; Alberti, A; Maggioni, F; Rossi, C; Floridi, A; Calabresi, P

    2006-03-01

    The present study was aimed at verifying the clinical characteristics of a typical attack in 20 migraine patients, 10 responders and 10 non-responders to rizatriptan, and at investigating any differences in the levels of neuropeptides of the trigeminovascular or parasympathetic systems [calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), neurokinin A (NKA) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) measured by radioimmunoassay methods in external jugular blood] between responders and non-responders. In all responders to rizatriptan, pain was unilateral, severe, and pulsating, and in five of them at least one sign suggestive of parasympathetic system activation was recorded. Five patients who were non-responders to rizatriptan referred bilateral and non-pulsating pain, even though severe in most of them. CGRP and NKA levels measured before rizatriptan administration were significantly higher in responders than in non-responders (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.002, respectively). In the five patients with autonomic signs among rizatriptan responders, detectable VIP levels were found at baseline. One hour after rizatriptan administration, a decrease in CGRP and NKA levels was evident in the external jugular venous blood of rizatriptan responders, and this corresponded to a significant pain relief and alleviation of accompanying symptoms. VIP levels were also significantly reduced at the same time in the five patients with autonomic signs. After rizatriptan administration, CGRP and NKA levels in non-responder patients showed less significant variations at all time points after rizatriptan administration compared with rizatriptan responders. The present study, although carried out on a limited number of patients, supports recent clinical evidence of increased trigeminal activation associated with a better triptan response in migraine patients accompanied by parasympathetic activation in a subgroup of patients with autonomic signs. In contrast, the poor response seems to be correlated with a

  6. Risk of intracranial haemorrhage in antidepressant users with concurrent use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: nationwide propensity score matched study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ju-Young; Lee, Shin Haeng; Choi, So-Hyun; Kim, Mi-Hee; Choi, Nam-Kyong; Lee, Joongyub

    2015-01-01

    Objective To define the risk of intracranial haemorrhage among patients treated with antidepressants and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), compared with the risk among those treated with antidepressants without NSAIDs. Design Retrospective nationwide propensity score matched cohort study. Setting Korean nationwide health insurance database between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2013. Participants Patients who began receiving antidepressants for the first time (index date) without a history of having received a prescription for antidepressants during the preceding year. Patients who had been diagnosed as having cerebrovascular diseases within a year before the index date were excluded. Main outcome measure Time to first hospital admission with intracranial haemorrhage within 30 days after drug use. Matched Cox regression models were used to compare the risk of intracranial haemorrhage among patients who were treated with antidepressants with and without NSAIDs, after propensity score matching with a 1:1 ratio. Results After propensity score estimation and matching in a 1:1 ratio, the cohort used in the analysis included 4 145 226 people. The 30 day risk of intracranial haemorrhage during the entire study period was higher for combined use of antidepressants and NSAIDs than for use of antidepressants without NSAIDs (hazard ratio 1.6, 95% confidence interval 1.32 to 1.85). No statistically meaningful differences were found in risk of intracranial haemorrhage between the antidepressant drug classes. Conclusions Combined use of antidepressants and NSAIDs was associated with an increased risk of intracranial haemorrhage within 30 days of initial combination. PMID:26173947

  7. Follow up of patients who start treatment with antidepressants: treatment satisfaction, treatment compliance, efficacy and safety

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Measuring satisfaction with treatment has proved useful to ascertain the treatment features that are most important to the patients, and to explain increased treatment compliance. However, there are few studies that relate satisfaction to other clinical or self-perceived health status indicators. Recent studies have shown the close relationship between satisfaction with treatment, treatment compliance, and effectiveness. This study attempts to design and validate a scale to evaluate satisfaction with antidepressant drug therapy, assess treatment compliance (self-reported, validated questionnaire, drug accountability and electronic monitorization system), assess efficacy in reducing depressive symptoms and safety in patients who initiate antidepressant drug therapy, as well as to establish predictors of satisfaction, compliance and effectiveness with these drugs. Methods/design This is an observational longitudinal study with a cohort of adults initiating treatment with antidepressant drugs. A multi-centre study will be performed in which 20 Primary Care practices from Castilla-La Mancha are expected to participate. An initial interview and follow-up visits at 15 days, 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months will be conducted with all study participants. 706 subjects will be studied (95% confidence interval, precision ± 3%, expected rate of non-compliance 50%, expected non-responders and lost to follow up rate 15%). The following measurements will be performed: development and validation of a scale of satisfaction with antidepressant therapy, participant and antidepressant characteristics, treatment compliance evaluation (Haynes-Sackett Test, Morisky-Green Test, drug accountability and Medication Event Monitoring System), depression symptom reduction (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale), observation of adverse effects, and beliefs about treatment (The Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire). Discussion Antidepressant drugs are

  8. Pharmacoinformatic and molecular docking studies reveal potential novel antidepressants against neurodegenerative disorders by targeting HSPB8

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Sheikh Arslan; Mannan, Shazia; Ali, Sannia

    2016-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) disease is an inherited peripheral neuromuscular disorder characterized by length-dependent and progressive degeneration of peripheral nerves, leading to muscular weakness. Research has shown that mutated HSPB8 may be responsible for depression, neurodegenerative disorders, and improper functioning of peripheral nerves, resulting in neuromuscular disorders like CMT. In the current work, a hybrid approach of virtual screening and molecular docking studies was followed by homology modeling and pharmacophore identification. Detailed screening analyses were carried out by 2-D similarity search against prescribed antidepressant drugs with physicochemical properties. LigandScout was employed to ascertain novel molecules and pharmacophore properties. In this study, we report three novel compounds that showed maximum binding affinity with HSPB8. Docking analysis elucidated that Met37, Ser57, Ser58, Trp60, Thr63, Thr114, Lys115, Asp116, Gly117, Val152, Val154, Leu186, Asp189, Ser190, Gln191, and Glu192 are critical residues for ligand–receptor interactions. Our analyses suggested paroxetine as a potent compound for targeting HSPB8. Selected compounds have more effective energy scores than the selected drug analogs. Additionally, site-directed mutagenesis could be significant for further analysis of the binding pocket. The novel findings based on an in silico approach may be momentous for potent drug design against depression and CMT. PMID:27226709

  9. Pharmacoinformatic and molecular docking studies reveal potential novel antidepressants against neurodegenerative disorders by targeting HSPB8.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Sheikh Arslan; Mannan, Shazia; Ali, Sannia

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is an inherited peripheral neuromuscular disorder characterized by length-dependent and progressive degeneration of peripheral nerves, leading to muscular weakness. Research has shown that mutated HSPB8 may be responsible for depression, neurodegenerative disorders, and improper functioning of peripheral nerves, resulting in neuromuscular disorders like CMT. In the current work, a hybrid approach of virtual screening and molecular docking studies was followed by homology modeling and pharmacophore identification. Detailed screening analyses were carried out by 2-D similarity search against prescribed antidepressant drugs with physicochemical properties. LigandScout was employed to ascertain novel molecules and pharmacophore properties. In this study, we report three novel compounds that showed maximum binding affinity with HSPB8. Docking analysis elucidated that Met37, Ser57, Ser58, Trp60, Thr63, Thr114, Lys115, Asp116, Gly117, Val152, Val154, Leu186, Asp189, Ser190, Gln191, and Glu192 are critical residues for ligand-receptor interactions. Our analyses suggested paroxetine as a potent compound for targeting HSPB8. Selected compounds have more effective energy scores than the selected drug analogs. Additionally, site-directed mutagenesis could be significant for further analysis of the binding pocket. The novel findings based on an in silico approach may be momentous for potent drug design against depression and CMT. PMID:27226709

  10. Use of tricyclic antidepressants and risk of glioma: a nationwide case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Pottegård, Anton; García Rodríguez, Luis Alberto; Rasmussen, Lotte; Damkier, Per; Friis, Søren; Gaist, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: A protective effect of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) against gliomas has been suggested by a small number of studies. We investigated this putative association in a nationwide setting. Methods: Using a case–control design, we identified all patients with histologically verified glioma (cases) in Denmark between 2000 and 2012 and matched these 1 : 20 to population controls. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for glioma associated with long-term (⩾3 years) use of TCAs. Similar analyses were performed for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Results: We identified 3767 glioma cases and 75 340 population controls. Long-term use of TCAs was inversely associated with risk of glioma (OR 0.72, 95% CI: 0.41–1.25). Long-term SSRI use was not associated with glioma risk (OR 0.93, 95% CI: 0.75–1.16). Conclusions: Our study indicated that long-term use of TCAs may be associated with a reduced risk of glioma, however, the statistical precision was limited. A similar pattern was not observed for use of SSRIs. PMID:27115466

  11. [Advance in studies on natural antidepressant drugs and cytochrome P450].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Wang, Fei-hu; Chen, Sai-zhen; Pan, Jian-chun

    2015-03-01

    In the fast pace of modern life and under the heavy work pressure, the prevalence of depression has increased year by year. Meanwhile, the demands for antidepressant drugs have also grown, especially the high-efficiency and low-toxicity natural antidepressant drugs, mainly including polyphenols, flavonoids, organic acids, alkaloids and terpenoids. Cytochrome P450 (CYP450) is a type of enzymes involving oxidative metabolism of drugs in vivo, and can change the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of drugs. Therefore, it is of important significant to define the effect of natural antidepressant drugs on CYP450 in human bodies, in order to improve the rational clinical medication, avoid drug interactions and reduce adverse reactions. PMID:26087541

  12. [A study of three potential antidepressants (amineptin, mianserin and nomifensin) on the cardiovascular system and isolated intestine (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Delaigue, R; Schaff, G

    1982-06-10

    We studied the effects on the cardiovascular system and isolated intestine of three potential antidepressants : amineptin, nomifensin and mianserin. 1) No animals died in spite of doses well above the therapeutic range, evidencing the good tolerance of the compounds. 2) Effects on heart rate were variable; the only significant effect was cardioacceleration seen with mianserin in doses above 5 mg/kg. 3) The only significant effect on the auriculoventricular refractory period was recorded with mianserin. 4) Amineptin was the only compound that increased blood pressure. 5) Auriculoventricular conduction was slowed with mianserin in doses above 10 mg/kg. 6) On isolated rat duodenum, mianserin was spasmogenic in concentrations above 100 microgram/100 ml. 7) in comparison to tricyclic antidepressants, these three compounds carry only few risks of adverse side-effects.

  13. Tricyclic Antidepressants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Gary J.

    The use of tricyclic antidepressant drugs is becoming increasingly prevalent for the treatment of depressed patients. It has been suggested that, analogous to many other drug substances, the tricyclic drugs exhibit clinical effectiveness within a defined therapeutic concentration range (1-10). Very recently, both Dito (11) and Orsulak and Schildkraut (12) have summarized the usefulness of measuring serum concentrations of these drugs. These authors suggest that knowledge of the plasma concentrations of these drugs aid the physician in determining patient compliance and initiating the best possible drug treatment.

  14. [The comparative study on the efficacy of the combination of serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants and antipsychotics in the treatment of recurrent depressive disorders].

    PubMed

    D'iakonov, A L; Lobanova, I V

    2012-01-01

    A combination of serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (prozac and stimulaton) with atypical antipsychotics (zyprexa and solian) reduced depression in patients with recurrent depressive disorders during 10 days. The effect was evenly distributed between 10, 20 and 40 days of treatment. Other symptoms had a peculiar dynamics depending on the therapy. By the end of the study, similar effects were achieved for all groups. The addition of antipsychotics to antidepressant treatment insignificantly increased the number of adverse events.

  15. Antidepressants and testicular cancer

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Gary D.; Schwalbe, Joan; Achacoso, Ninah; Meng, Maxwell V.; Kroenke, Candyce H.; Habel, Laurel A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Re-examine association of fluoxetine and paroxetine with risk of testicular cancer noted in drug screening, with four years more follow-up and expanded study of these and other antidepressant drugs. Methods In the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program in northern California, 906 men with testicular cancer diagnosed August 1996–December 2010 were compared with 38,253 matched controls with race/ethnicity recorded regarding receipt of antidepressant drugs at least two years before diagnosis or control index date. Analyses emphasized duration of use and histological subgroups. Results With control for race/ethnicity and use of other antidepressant drugs, odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for associations with testicular cancer were: fluoxetine 1.22 (0.88–1.71), paroxetine 1.19 (0.78–1.83), and 1.21 (0.92–1.58) for all SSRI’s. There was no statistically significant association with risk of all testicular cancers or their histologic subtypes for any individual drug or for tricyclics or all antidepressants combined except for citalopram with all testicular cancers 2.55 (1.43–4.52) and those of mixed histology 4.36 (1.50–12.68) and nefazodone with embryonal cancers 9.79 (1.85–51.81). These could readily be chance findings in the context of the many analyses that were performed. Duration of use was not associated with risk for the drugs and drug groups with sufficient numbers of exposed cases for analysis. Conclusions We found little evidence to support a testicular carcinogenic effect of fluoxetine, paroxetine, or other antidepressant drugs but a weakly positive association is not ruled out. The signals in prior screening may have been due to chance and/or uncontrolled confounding. PMID:24276357

  16. Depression, Comorbidities, and Prescriptions of Antidepressants in a German Network of GPs and Specialists with Subspecialisation in Anthroposophic Medicine: A Longitudinal Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Elke; Vollmar, Horst C.; Tabali, Manuela; Matthes, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Background. Depression is a major reason for counselling in primary care. Our study aims at evaluating pharmacological treatment strategies among physicians specialised in anthroposophic medicine (AM). Methods. From 2004 to 2008, twenty-two German primary care AM-physicians participated in this prospective, multicentre observational study. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with a prescription of any antidepressant medication. Results. A total of 2444 patients with depression were included (mean age: 49.1 years (SD: 15.4); 77.3% female). 2645 prescriptions of antidepressants for 833 patients were reported. Phytotherapeutic preparations from Hypericum perforatum were the most frequently prescribed antidepressants over all (44.6% of all antidepressants), followed by amitriptyline (16.1%). The likelihood of receiving an antidepressant medication did not depend on comorbidity after controlling for age, gender, physician specialisation, and type of depression (adjusted OR (AOR) = 1.01; CI: 0.81–1.26). Patients who had cancer were significantly less likely to be prescribed an antidepressant medication than those who had no cancer (AOR = 0.75; CI: 0.57–0.97). Conclusion. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of everyday practice for the treatment of depression in AM -physicians. Further analysis regarding the occurrence of critical combinations is of high interest to health services research. PMID:23304204

  17. The Proton Pump Inhibitor Non-Responder: A Clinical Conundrum

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Zilla H; Henderson, Emily E; Maradey-Romerao, Carla; George, Nina; Fass, Ronnie; Lacy, Brian E

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a highly prevalent chronic condition where in stomach contents reflux into the esophagus causing symptoms, esophageal injury, and subsequent complications. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) remain the mainstay of therapy for acid suppression. Despite their efficacy, significant proportions of GERD patients are either partial or non-responders to PPI therapy. Patients should be assessed for mechanisms that can lead to PPI failure and may require further evaluation to investigate for alternative causes. This monograph will outline a diagnostic approach to the PPI non-responder, review mechanisms associated with PPI failure, and discuss therapeutic options for those who fail to respond to PPI therapy. PMID:26270485

  18. Psychodynamic Treatment for Separation Anxiety in a Treatment Nonresponder.

    PubMed

    Busch, Fredric N; Milrod, Barbara L

    2015-10-01

    Separation anxiety, long an area of interest for psychoanalysts, has been included in DSM-5 among general "anxiety disorders" that span across age groups. The syndrome of separation anxiety has been shown to correlate with nonresponse to treatments for anxiety and mood disorders (Milrod et al. 2014). It is therefore of public health importance to develop targeted treatments for this syndrome. Some psychoanalysts have suggested that brief psychoanalytic interventions may be of particular value in addressing separation anxiety. Our clinical work with patients with anxiety disorders with high levels of separation anxiety indicates that they have such intense anger and ambivalence in fraught intimate relationships that they feel stuck and helpless, almost eliminating more positive feelings. This ambivalence and associated unconscious conflicts inevitably emerge in the therapeutic relationship and can threaten to disrupt treatment efforts. We propose a set of focused psychodynamic psychotherapeutic interventions to address separation anxiety, developed as part of Panic-Focused Psychodynamic Psychotherapy-eXtended Range (PFPP-XR; Busch et al. 2012). We present a case from our research study of treatment nonresponders with anxiety disorders and separation anxiety. The patient was successfully treated with PFPP-XR in a 21-session treatment.

  19. The effects of antidepressants and pilocarpine on rat parotid glands: an immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Mattioli, Tatiana Maria Folador; da Silva, Silvana; Grégio, Ana Maria Trindade; Machado, Maria Ângela Naval; de Lima, Antônio Adilson Soares; Azevedo-Alanis, Luciana Reis

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of antidepressants and pilocarpine on the quantity of myoepithelial cells and on the proliferation index of the epithelial cells of rat parotid glands. INTRODUCTION: Hyposalivation, xerostomia, and alterations in saliva composition are important clinical side effects related to the use of antidepressants. METHODS: Ninety male Wistar rats were allocated to nine groups. The control groups received saline for 30 (group C30) or 60 days (group C60) or pilocarpine for 60 days (group Pilo). The experimental groups were administered fluoxetine (group F30) or venlafaxine for 30 days (group V30); fluoxetine (group FS60) or venlafaxine (group VS60) with saline for 60 days; or fluoxetine (group FP60) or venlafaxine (group VP60) with pilocarpine for 60 days. Parotid gland specimens were processed, and the immunohistochemical expression of calponin and proliferating cell nuclear anti-antigen on the myoepithelial and parenchymal cells, respectively, was evaluated. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey HSD and Games-Howell tests were applied to detect differences among groups (p<0.05). RESULTS: Compared with the controls, chronic exposure to antidepressants was associated with an increase in the number of positively stained cells for calponin. In addition, venlafaxine administration for 30 days was associated with an increase in the number of positively stained cells for proliferating cell nuclear anti-antigen. Fluoxetine and pilocarpine (group FP60) induced a significant decrease in the number of positively stained cells for calponin compared with all other groups. CONCLUSIONS: The number of positively stained cells for calponin increased after chronic administration of antidepressants. The proliferation index of the epithelial cells of rat parotid glands was not altered by the use of antidepressants for 60 days. PMID:22179167

  20. Effects of depression and antidepressant medications on hip fracture: A population-based cohort study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bi-Hua; Chen, Pau-Chung; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Lee, Chuan-Pin; Huang, Ko-En; Chen, Vincent C

    2016-09-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of depression and antidepressant medications on hip fracture. The database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance with medical records of more than 1,000,000 individuals was searched for patients who had hip fracture with or without depression from 1998 to 2009. Patients with the following conditions were excluded: hip fracture due to cancer or traffic accidents, hip fracture that occurred before the diagnosis of depression, and use of antidepressants before the diagnosis of depression. A matched cohort of 139,110 patients was investigated, including 27,822 (17,309 females; 10,513 males) with depression and 111,288 (69,236 females; 42,052 males) without depression (1:4 randomly matched with age, sex, and index date). Among these patients, 232 (158 females and 74 males) had both hip fracture and depression, and 690 (473 females and 217 males) had hip fracture only. The Cox proportional-hazards regression method was used to determine the effect of depression on hip fracture. The hazard ratio (HR) for each clinical parameter was calculated after adjusting for confounders including sex, age, Charlson comorbidity index, urbanization, osteoporosis, and antidepressants. Results showed that patients with major depressive disorder had a 61% higher incidence of hip fracture than those without depression (HR 1.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.19-2.18, P = 0.002). The risk of hip fracture for patients with less severe depressive disorder (dysthymia or depressive disorder, not otherwise specified) was not statistically higher than that of patients with no depression (HR 1.10, 95% CI = 0.91-1.34, P = 0.327). Among the patients with depression, females had a 49% higher incidence for hip fracture than males (HR 1.49, 95% CI 1.30-1.72, P < 0.001). The incidence of hip fracture also increased with age and Charlson comorbidity index scores. Analyses of both all (139,110) patients and only patients (27,822) with depression

  1. Complexation studies of cyclodextrins with tricyclic antidepressants using ion-selective electrodes.

    PubMed

    Valsami, G N; Koupparis, M A; Macheras, P E

    1992-01-01

    The complexation of six tricyclic antidepressant drugs [amitriptylin (AMN), nortriptylin (NRN), imipramin (IMN), doxepin (DXN), protriptylin (PTN), and maprotilin (MPN)] with alpha- and beta-cyclodextrins (CDs) using ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) as drug ion sensors is described. Binding parameters were calculated by nonlinear fitting of the model described by the Scatchard equation, to the experimental data of a titration of a CD solution with the ion of interest. One binding site (the CD cavity) was found in all cases with both CDs. The calculated association constants at 25 degrees C using CD concentrations in the range of 0.0100-0.0010 M, varied from 4.81 x 10(3) M-1 (MPN) to 23.9 x 10(3) M-1 (AMN) in the case of beta-CD and from 50 M-1 (DXN) to 123 M-1 (MPN) in the case of alpha-CD. The precision for the estimation of the binding parameters was 0.1-5.0% (within-run RSD%) and 8-10% (between-run RSD%; n = 3). The complexation of the drugs with beta-CD was also examined as a function of temperature in the range of 5-37 degrees C; it was found to decrease by increasing temperature. Van't Hoff analysis gave good correlations (r greater than or equal to 0.989) for all drug ions studied. The estimates of the thermodynamic parameters indicate that the formation of inclusion complexes is enthalpy driven. A compensation plot based on the thermodynamic parameters delta H and delta S resulted in a linear relationship, which is indicative of a common type of force involved in the complexation of drugs to beta-CD.

  2. Depressed College Students and Tricyclic Antidepressant Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ben Maurice

    1978-01-01

    Depressed college students representing several distinct diagnostic groups were studied. Evidence indicates that patients with depressive neurosis show optimal treatment outcomes following tricyclic antidepressant therapy. (JMF)

  3. Phase advance is an actimetric correlate of antidepressant response to sleep deprivation and light therapy in bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Francesco; Dallaspezia, Sara; Fulgosi, Mara Cigala; Barbini, Barbara; Colombo, Cristina; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2007-01-01

    The combination of total sleep deprivation (TSD) and light therapy (LT) in bipolar depression causes rapid antidepressant effects, and its mechanism of action has been hypothesized to involve the enhancement of all of the monoaminergic systems targeted by antidepressant drugs (serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine). It is still unknown if the clinical effects are paralleled by changes in biological rhythms. In a before/after design of a study of biological correlates of response, 39 inpatients affected by Type I Bipolar Disorder whose current depressive episode was without psychotic features were treated for one week with repeated TSD combined with morning LT. Wrist actigraphy was recorded throughout the study. Two-thirds of the patients responded to treatment (50% reduction in Hamilton Depression score). Responders showed an increase in daytime activity, phase-advance of the activity-rest rhythm of 57 min compared to the pre-treatment baseline, and reduced nighttime sleep. Non-responders did not show significant changes in the parameters of their activity-rest rhythm. Phase advance of the activity-rest rhythm is an actimetric correlate of the antidepressant response to TSD and LT in bipolar depression. Results are consistent with the known effects of sleep-wake manipulations and neurotransmitter function on the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

  4. Absence of evidence for increase in risk for autism or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder following antidepressant exposure during pregnancy: a replication study.

    PubMed

    Castro, V M; Kong, S W; Clements, C C; Brady, R; Kaimal, A J; Doyle, A E; Robinson, E B; Churchill, S E; Kohane, I S; Perlis, R H

    2016-01-05

    Multiple studies have examined the risk of prenatal antidepressant exposure and risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), with inconsistent results. Precisely estimating such risk, if any, is of great importance in light of the need to balance such risk with the benefit of depression and anxiety treatment. We developed a method to integrate data from multiple New England health systems, matching offspring and maternal health data in electronic health records to characterize diagnoses and medication exposure. Children with ASD or ADHD were matched 1:3 with children without neurodevelopmental disorders. Association between maternal antidepressant exposure and ASD or ADHD liability was examined using logistic regression, adjusting for potential sociodemographic and psychiatric confounding variables. In new cohorts of 1245 ASD cases and 1701 ADHD cases, along with age-, sex- and socioeconomic status matched controls, neither disorder was significantly associated with prenatal antidepressant exposure in crude or adjusted models (adjusted odds ratio 0.90, 95% confidence interval 0.50-1.54 for ASD; 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.53-1.69 for ADHD). Pre-pregnancy antidepressant exposure significantly increased risk for both disorders. These results suggest that prior reports of association between prenatal antidepressant exposure and neurodevelopmental disease are likely to represent a false-positive finding, which may arise in part through confounding by indication. They further demonstrate the potential to integrate data across electronic health records studies spanning multiple health systems to enable efficient pharmacovigilance investigation.

  5. Absence of evidence for increase in risk for autism or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder following antidepressant exposure during pregnancy: a replication study

    PubMed Central

    Castro, V M; Kong, S W; Clements, C C; Brady, R; Kaimal, A J; Doyle, A E; Robinson, E B; Churchill, S E; Kohane, I S; Perlis, R H

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies have examined the risk of prenatal antidepressant exposure and risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), with inconsistent results. Precisely estimating such risk, if any, is of great importance in light of the need to balance such risk with the benefit of depression and anxiety treatment. We developed a method to integrate data from multiple New England health systems, matching offspring and maternal health data in electronic health records to characterize diagnoses and medication exposure. Children with ASD or ADHD were matched 1:3 with children without neurodevelopmental disorders. Association between maternal antidepressant exposure and ASD or ADHD liability was examined using logistic regression, adjusting for potential sociodemographic and psychiatric confounding variables. In new cohorts of 1245 ASD cases and 1701 ADHD cases, along with age-, sex- and socioeconomic status matched controls, neither disorder was significantly associated with prenatal antidepressant exposure in crude or adjusted models (adjusted odds ratio 0.90, 95% confidence interval 0.50−1.54 for ASD; 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.53−1.69 for ADHD). Pre-pregnancy antidepressant exposure significantly increased risk for both disorders. These results suggest that prior reports of association between prenatal antidepressant exposure and neurodevelopmental disease are likely to represent a false-positive finding, which may arise in part through confounding by indication. They further demonstrate the potential to integrate data across electronic health records studies spanning multiple health systems to enable efficient pharmacovigilance investigation. PMID:26731445

  6. Brain Changes in Responders vs. Non-Responders in Chronic Migraine: Markers of Disease Reversal

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Catherine S.; Becerra, Lino; Smith, Jonathan H.; DeLange, Justin M.; Smith, Ryan M.; Black, David F.; Welker, Kirk M.; Burstein, Rami; Cutrer, Fred M.; Borsook, David

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify structural and functional brain changes that accompanied the transition from chronic (CM; ≥15 headache days/month) to episodic (EM; <15 headache days/month) migraine following prophylactic treatment with onabotulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A). Specifically, we examined whether CM patients responsive to prophylaxis (responders; n = 11), as evidenced by a reversal in disease status (defined by at least a 50% reduction in migraine frequency and <15 headache days/month), compared to CM patients whose migraine frequency remained unchanged (non-responders; n = 12), showed differences in cortical thickness using surface-based morphometry. We also investigated whether areas showing group differences in cortical thickness displayed altered resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC) using seed-to-voxel analyses. Migraine characteristics measured across groups included disease duration, pain intensity and headache frequency. Patient reports of headache frequency over the 4 weeks prior to (pre-treatment) and following (post-treatment) prophylaxis were compared (post minus pre) and this measure served as the clinical endpoint that determined group assignment. All patients were scanned within 2 weeks of the post-treatment visit. Results revealed that responders showed significant cortical thickening in the right primary somatosensory cortex (SI) and anterior insula (aINS), and left superior temporal gyrus (STG) and pars opercularis (ParsOp) compared to non-responders. In addition, disease duration was negatively correlated with cortical thickness in fronto-parietal and temporo-occipital regions in responders but not non-responders, with the exception of the primary motor cortex (MI) that showed the opposite pattern; disease duration was positively associated with MI cortical thickness in responders versus non-responders. Our seed-based RS-FC analyses revealed anti-correlations between the SI seed and lateral occipital (LOC) and dorsomedial

  7. The male heart and the female mind: a study in the gendering of antidepressants and cardiovascular drugs in advertisements in Irish medical publication.

    PubMed

    Curry, Phillip; O'Brien, Marita

    2006-04-01

    Stereotypes which suggest that cardiovascular disease and depression are related to gender can have consequences for the mental and physical health outcomes of both men and women. This study examines how these stereotypes may be reinforced by medical publications advertising for cardiovascular and antidepressant medication. A random sample of 61 (with no repeats) advertisements which appeared in Irish medical publications between July 2001 and December 2002 were analysed using both content and semiotic analysis. Results indicate that the meanings created by advertisers for cardiovascular drugs and antidepressants did in fact gender these products. Women were depicted as the predominant users of antidepressants and men as the main users of cardiovascular drugs. The images used identified two stereotyped patients: the 'male' heart patient and the depressed 'female' patient. Furthermore, the imagery and language used to promote the two categories of medication tended to strengthen gendered associations. PMID:16214280

  8. Switching and stopping antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Keks, Nicholas; Hope, Judy; Keogh, Simone

    2016-06-01

    Switching from one antidepressant to another is frequently indicated due to an inadequate treatment response or unacceptable adverse effects. All antidepressant switches must be carried out cautiously and under close observation. Conservative switching strategies involve gradually tapering the first antidepressant followed by an adequate washout period before the new antidepressant is started. This can take a long time and include periods of no treatment with the risk of potentially life-threatening exacerbations of illness. Clinical expertise is needed for more rapid or cross-taper switching as drug toxicity, including serotonin syndrome, may result from inappropriate co-administration of antidepressants. Some antidepressants must not be combined. Antidepressants can cause withdrawal syndromes if discontinued abruptly after prolonged use. Relapse and exacerbation of depression can also occur. Gradual dose reduction over days to weeks reduces the risk and severity of complications. PMID:27346915

  9. Switching and stopping antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Keks, Nicholas; Hope, Judy; Keogh, Simone

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Switching from one antidepressant to another is frequently indicated due to an inadequate treatment response or unacceptable adverse effects. All antidepressant switches must be carried out cautiously and under close observation. Conservative switching strategies involve gradually tapering the first antidepressant followed by an adequate washout period before the new antidepressant is started. This can take a long time and include periods of no treatment with the risk of potentially life-threatening exacerbations of illness. Clinical expertise is needed for more rapid or cross-taper switching as drug toxicity, including serotonin syndrome, may result from inappropriate co-administration of antidepressants. Some antidepressants must not be combined. Antidepressants can cause withdrawal syndromes if discontinued abruptly after prolonged use. Relapse and exacerbation of depression can also occur. Gradual dose reduction over days to weeks reduces the risk and severity of complications. PMID:27346915

  10. ANTIDEPRESSANT ACTIONS OF HDAC INHIBITORS

    PubMed Central

    Covington, Herbert E.; Maze, Ian; LaPlant, Quincey C.; Vialou, Vincent F.; Yoshinori, Ohnishi N.; Berton, Olivier; Fass, Dan M.; Renthal, William; Rush, Augustus J.; Wu, Emma Y.; Ghose, Subroto; Krishnan, Vaishnav; Russo, Scott J.; Tamminga, Carol; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Nestler, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Persistent symptoms of depression suggest the involvement of stable molecular adaptations in brain, which may be reflected at the level of chromatin remodeling. We find that chronic social defeat stress in mice causes a transient decrease, followed by a persistent increase, in levels of acetylated histone H3 in the nucleus accumbens, an important limbic brain region. This persistent increase in H3 acetylation is associated with decreased levels of histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) in the nucleus accumbens. Similar effects were observed in the nucleus accumbens of depressed humans studied postmortem. These changes in H3 acetylation and HDAC2 expression mediate long-lasting positive neuronal adaptations, since infusion of HDAC inhibitors into the nucleus accumbens, which increases histone acetylation, exerts robust antidepressant-like effects in the social defeat paradigm and other behavioral assays. HDAC inhibitor (MS-275) infusion also reverses the effects of chronic defeat stress on global patterns of gene expression in the nucleus accumbens, as determined by microarray analysis, with striking similarities to the effects of the standard antidepressant, fluoxetine. Stress-regulated genes whose expression is normalized selectively by MS-275 may provide promising targets for the future development of novel antidepressant treatments. Together, these findings provide new insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms of depression and antidepressant action, and support the antidepressant potential of HDAC inhibitors and perhaps other agents that act at the level of chromatin structure. PMID:19759294

  11. Pretreatment anterior cingulate activity predicts antidepressant treatment response in major depressive episodes.

    PubMed

    Rentzsch, Johannes; Adli, Mazda; Wiethoff, Katja; Gómez-Carrillo de Castro, Ana; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2014-04-01

    Major depressive disorder leads to substantial individual and socioeconomic costs. Despite the ongoing efforts to improve the treatment for this condition, a trial-and-error approach until an individually effective treatment is established still dominates clinical practice. Searching for clinically useful treatment response predictors is one of the most promising strategies to change this quandary therapeutic situation. This study evaluated the predictive value of a biological and a clinical predictor, as well as a combination of both. Pretreatment EEGs of 31 patients with a major depressive episode were analyzed with neuroelectric brain imaging technique to assess cerebral oscillations related to treatment response. Early improvement of symptoms served as a clinical predictor. Treatment response was assessed after 4 weeks of antidepressant treatment. Responders showed more slow-frequency power in the right anterior cingulate cortex compared to non-responders. Slow-frequency power in this region was found to predict response with good sensitivity (82 %) and specificity (100 %), while early improvement showed lower accuracy (73 % sensitivity and 65 % specificity). Combining both parameters did not further improve predictive accuracy. Pretreatment activity within the anterior cingulate cortex is related to antidepressive treatment response. Our results support the search for biological treatment response predictors using electric brain activity. This technique is advantageous due to its low individual and socioeconomic burden. The benefits of combining both, a clinically and a biologically based predictor, should be further evaluated using larger sample sizes.

  12. Antidepressant chronotherapeutics for bipolar depression

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Chronotherapeutics refers to treatments based on the principles of circadian rhythm organization and sleep physiology, which control the exposure to environmental stimuli that act on biological rhythms, in order to achieve therapeutic effects in the treatment of psychiatric conditions. It includes manipulations of the sleep-wake cycle such as sleep deprivation and sleep phase advance, and controlled exposure to light and dark. The antidepressant effects of chronotherapeutics are evident in difficult-to-treat conditions such as bipolar depression, which has been associated with extremely low success rates of antidepressant drugs in naturalistic settings and with stable antidepressant response to chronotherapeutics in more than half of the patients. Recent advances in the study of the effects of chronotherapeutics on neurotransmitter systems, and on the biological clock machinery, allow us to pinpoint its mechanism of action and to transform it from a neglected or “orphan” treatment to a powerful clinical instrument in everyday psychiatric practice. PMID:23393416

  13. Antidepressant chronotherapeutics for bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Francesco

    2012-12-01

    Chronotherapeutics refers to treatments based on the principles of circadian rhythm organization and sleep physiology, which control the exposure to environmental stimuli that act on biological rhythms, in order to achieve therapeutic effects in the treatment of psychiatric conditions. It includes manipulations of the sleep-wake cycle such as sleep deprivation and sleep phase advance, and controlled exposure to light and dark. The antidepressant effects of chronotherapeutics are evident in difficult-to-treat conditions such as bipolar depression, which has been associated with extremely low success rates of antidepressant drugs in naturalistic settings and with stable antidepressant response to chronotherapeutics in more than half of the patients. Recent advances in the study of the effects of chronotherapeutics on neurotransmitter systems, and on the biological clock machinery, allow us to pinpoint its mechanism of action and to transform it from a neglected or "orphan" treatment to a powerful clinical instrument in everyday psychiatric practice.

  14. Utility of event-related potentials in predicting antidepressant treatment response: An iSPOT-D report.

    PubMed

    van Dinteren, Rik; Arns, Martijn; Kenemans, Leon; Jongsma, Marijtje L A; Kessels, Roy P C; Fitzgerald, Paul; Fallahpour, Kamran; Debattista, Charles; Gordon, Evian; Williams, Leanne M

    2015-11-01

    It is essential to improve antidepressant treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) and one way this could be achieved is by reducing the number of treatment steps by employing biomarkers that can predict treatment outcome. This study investigated differences between MDD patients and healthy controls in the P3 and N1 component from the event-related potential (ERP) generated in a standard two-tone oddball paradigm. Furthermore, the P3 and N1 are investigated as predictors for treatment outcome to three different antidepressants. In the international Study to Predict Optimized Treatment in Depression (iSPOT-D)--a multi-center, international, randomized, prospective practical trial--1008 MDD participants were randomized to escitalopram, sertraline or venlafaxine-XR. The study also recruited 336 healthy controls. Treatment response and remission were established after eight weeks using the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. P3 and N1 latencies and amplitudes were analyzed using a peak-picking approach and further replicated by using exact low resolution tomography (eLORETA). A reduced P3 was found in MDD patients compared to controls by a peak-picking analysis. This was validated in a temporal global field power analysis. Source density analysis revealed that the difference in cortical activity originated from the posterior cingulate and parahippocampal gyrus. Male non-responders to venlafaxine-XR had significantly smaller N1 amplitudes than responders. This was demonstrated by both analytical methods. Male non-responders to venlafaxine-XR had less activity originating from the left insular cortex. The observed results are discussed from a neural network viewpoint. PMID:26282359

  15. Novel protective mechanisms of antidepressants against 3-nitropropionic acid induced Huntington's-like symptoms: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Puneet; Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Anil

    2011-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is characterized by progressive degeneration of neurons in the striatum, cortex and other parts of the brain, causing motor and cognitive dysfunction. 3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NP) is a well-known mycotoxin that significantly induces motor dysfunction in animals. Studies suggested the involvement of oxidative stress and nitric oxide mechanisms in HD pathogenesis. Clinical reports have also indicated the neuroprotective potential of antidepressants. Therefore, the present study has been designed to elucidate and compare the mechanistic role of different antidepressants (sertraline, venlafaxine, imipramine and trazodone) and their interaction with nitric oxide modulators if any, against 3-NP-induced neurotoxicity. Systemic 3-NP (10 mg/kg) administration for 14 days significantly reduced locomotor activity, body weight, motor coordination, oxidative defense and impaired mitochondrial complex enzyme activities in the striatum. Sertraline, venlafaxine, imipramine and trazodone treatments significantly improved behavioral, oxidative defense and mitochondrial complex enzyme activities as compared with the 3-NP-treated group. Systemic L-arginine (50 mg/kg) pretreatment with sub-effective dose of sertraline (10 mg/kg), venlafaxine (10 mg/kg), imipramine (10 mg/kg) and trazodone (10 mg/kg) for 14 days significantly attenuated their protective effect. Similarly, L-nitro-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (10 mg/kg) pretreatment with sub-effective dose of sertraline (10 mg/kg), venlafaxine (10 mg/kg), imipramine (10 mg/kg) and trazodone (10 mg/kg) for 14 days significantly potentiated their protective effects which were significant as compared with their effect alone, respectively. The results of the present study suggest that a nitric oxide mechanism might be involved in their protective effect against 3-NP-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:20305041

  16. Influence of Neuropeptide Y and antidepressants upon cerebral monoamines involved in depression: an in vivo electrochemical study.

    PubMed

    Crespi, Francesco

    2011-08-17

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and its receptors are present in the peripheral as well as the central nervous system (CNS). In vitro data have indicated NPY as an important mediator in the regulation of different diseases e.g. related to obesity, anxiety, depression, pain, memory loss and sleep disorders. In particular, studies of NPY levels in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) of depressed patients have shown a significant reduction of NPY levels when compared to control subjects. In addition, decreased concentrations of NPY were measured in the brain of suicide victims. These studies suggest that a reduction in cerebral NPY function may be associated with depressive symptoms. In the present work, a putative interaction between NPY, the catecholaminergic and serotonergic systems has been analysed by means of in vivo Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV) with treated carbon fibre micro electrodes (mCFE). It appeared that DPV with mCFE is an efficacious tool to monitor in vivo basal levels of catechols (Peak 2) and indoles (Peak 3) in discrete brain regions of rodents. Furthermore, it is shown that the peptidergic signal (Peak 5) simultaneously recorded with Peaks 2 and 3 in the amygdala could correspond to the oxidation of basal endogenous NPY. In addition, pharmacological treatments performed in vivo with exogenous NPY and with Y1 receptor antagonist BIBP3226 have indicated that these compounds interact positively with endogenous catecholaminergic and serotoninergic systems, in a way similar to that of the antidepressants imipramine and fluoxetine. In addition, the observed decrease of endogenous Peak 5 after treatment with imipramine or fluoxetine could be related to the concomitant stimulation of the catecholaminergic system with consequent reduced need for endogenous NPY. This would imply that NPY could be one of the endogenous chemicals acting on the maintenance of the mood. Thus, an antidepressant therapeutic potential of NPY and related compounds (e.g. BIBP3226) could be

  17. Citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor: clinical antidepressive and long-term effect--a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, O L; Kragh-Sørensen, P; Bjerre, M; Overø, K F; Gram, L F

    1982-01-01

    In a phase II study the antidepressive effect of citalopram, a selective and potent serotonin reuptake inhibitor, was examined in 20 endogenously and three non-endogenously depressed hospitalized patients. Four endogenously depressed patients dropped out due to deterioration early in the treatment period. The remaining 19 patients completed a 4-6 week treatment schedule. Of 16 endogenously depressed patients 11 responded, one was a partial responder and four did not respond. Of three patients with non-endogenous depressions, two responded and one did not respond. No correlation between plasma citalopram concentration and therapeutic outcome was found. Fourteen patients were given maintenance treatment for 8-113 weeks. One patient developed depression when the dose was reduced from 60 to 40 mg and one patient became manic. After discontinuation of treatment seven patients had a depressive relapse and six of these who again were treated with citalopram responded completely. Side effect rating scores of symptoms usually associated with depression or treatment with tricyclic antidepressants declined during treatment. Three patients complained of increased need of sleep for a period after several weeks of treatment. Apart from an unspecific, transient rise in liver enzymes in two patients, detailed biochemical laboratory tests were all normal. There were no effects on blood pressure, pulse rate, orthostatic reaction, or electrocardiogram. One patient took an overdose of citalopram resulting in plasma levels about six times higher than the average therapeutic level, but there were no signs of severe toxicity. In particular no change in consciousness, electrocardiogram or blood pressure occurred. Pharmacokinetic variables such as dose schedule, steady state kinetics, and metabolism are discussed. PMID:6812140

  18. Factors Associated With Depressive Symptoms and Use of Antidepressant Medications Among Participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) and Hispanic-CRIC Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Michael J.; Xie, Dawei; Jordan, Neil; Kop, Willem J.; Krousel-Wood, Marie; Tamura, Manjula Kurella; Kusek, John W.; Ford, Virginia; Rosen, Leigh K.; Strauss, Louise; Teal, Valerie L.; Yaffe, Kristine; Powe, Neil R.; Lash, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Depressive symptoms are correlated with poor health outcomes in adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The prevalence, severity, and treatment of depressive symptoms and potential risk factors, including level of kidney function, in diverse populations with CKD have not been well studied. Study Design Cross-sectional analysis Settings and Participants Participants at enrollment into the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) and Hispanic-CRIC (H-CRIC) Studies. CRIC enrolled Hispanics and non-Hispanics at seven centers from 2003-2007, and H-CRIC enrolled Hispanics at the University of Illinois from 2005-2008. Measurement Depressive symptoms measured by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) Predictors Demographic and clinical factors Outcomes Elevated depressive symptoms (BDI >= 11) and antidepressant medication use Results Among 3853 participants, 28.5% had evidence of elevated depressive symptoms and 18.2% were using antidepressant medications; 30.8% of persons with elevated depressive symptoms were using antidepressants. The prevalence of elevated depressive symptoms varied by level of kidney function: 25.2% among participants with eGFR ≥ 60 ml/min/1.73m2, and 35.1% of those with eGFR < 30 ml/min/1.73m2. Lower eGFR (OR per 10 ml/min/1.73m2 decrease, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.03-1.16), Hispanic ethnicity (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.12-2.45), and non-Hispanic black race (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.17-1.74) were each associated with increased odds of elevated depressive symptoms after controlling for other factors. In regression analyses incorporating BDI score, while female sex was associated with a greater odds of antidepressant use, Hispanic ethnicity, non-Hispanic black race, and higher levels of urine albumin were associated with decreased odds of antidepressant use (p<0.05 for each). Limitations Absence of clinical diagnosis of depression and use of non-pharmacologic treatments Conclusions Although elevated depressive symptoms were common in individuals with CKD, use of

  19. A pilot effectiveness study: placebo-controlled trial of adjunctive L-triiodothyronine (T3) used to accelerate and potentiate the antidepressant response.

    PubMed

    Posternak, Michael; Novak, Scott; Stern, Robert; Hennessey, James; Joffe, Russell; Prange, Arthur; Zimmerman, Mark

    2008-02-01

    The aim was to evaluate whether adjunctive T3 can help accelerate the antidepressant response and improve overall outcomes when used under naturalistic conditions. Fifty consecutive psychiatric outpatients diagnosed with major depressive disorder who were initiated on antidepressant therapy were randomized to receive adjunctive T3 or placebo in a double-blind manner over the course of 6 wk. There were no restrictions placed on the selection of antidepressant agent, dosing, ancillary medications, or psychotherapy, and there were few exclusion criteria. A positive response was defined as a > or = 50% reduction in Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale scores. Response rates were higher for the adjunctive T3 cohort compared to the adjunctive placebo cohort after 1 wk (45% vs. 24%) and 2 wk (57% vs. 33%) of treatment. The likelihood of experiencing a positive response at any point over the 6-wk trial was 4.5 times greater in the adjunctive T3 cohort (95% CI 1.3-15.7). The study provides preliminary evidence that T3 can successfully be used in clinical practice to accelerate the antidepressant response and improve overall outcomes. The effectiveness model may be an untapped mechanism for evaluating the value of psychopharmacological agents. PMID:17352847

  20. Prevalence and Prescription of Antidepressants in Depression with Somatic Comorbidity in Asia: The Research on East Asian Psychotropic Prescription Patterns Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao; Si, Tian-Mei; Xiang, Yu-Tao; Ungvari, Gabor S; Wang, Chuan-Yue; He, Yan-Ling; Kua, Ee-Heok; Fujii, Senta; Sim, Kang; Trivedi, Jitendra K; Chung, Eun-Kee; Udomratn, Pichet; Chee, Kok-Yoon; Sartorius, Norman; Tan, Chay-Hoon; Shinfuku, Naotaka

    2015-01-01

    Background: Depression is often comorbid with chronic somatic diseases. Few previous studies have investigated the prevalence of somatic diseases in depression or the prescription pattern of antidepressants in comorbidly depressed patients in Asia. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of somatic comorbidity (SC) in depression and compared the prescriptions of antidepressants in depressed patients with and without SC. Methods: A total of 2320 patients treated with antidepressants in 8 Asian countries were examined, and a diagnosis was based on the International Classification of Disease, 10th revision. We listed 17 common chronic somatic diseases. Patients’ socio-demographic and clinical characteristics and psychotropic drug prescriptions were recorded using a standardized protocol and data collection procedure. Results: Of the patients examined, 1240 were diagnosed with depression and 30% of them (n = 375) had SC. The most common comorbid condition was diabetes (23.7%). The patients with SC were more likely to seek help at a general hospital (74.7% vs. 47.2%), and had a higher incidence of symptoms involving sadness, disturbed sleep, and poor appetite. Noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant was prescribed more for patients with SC than for those without SC (30.4% vs. 22.9%). Conclusions: SC is common in depressed Asian patients. It is important to strengthen the recognition of depression, especially in general hospitals and when patients report some somatic discomfort. It is also a matter of urgency to establish evidence-based guidelines for the use of new antidepressants in depressed patients with SC. PMID:25836602

  1. Haplotype Analysis of GSK-3β Gene Polymorphisms in Bipolar Disorder Lithium Responders and Nonresponders

    PubMed Central

    Iwahashi, Kazuhiko; Nishizawa, Daisuke; Narita, Shin; Numajiri, Maki; Murayama, Ohoshi; Yoshihara, Eiji; Onozawa, Yuuya; Nagahori, Kenta; Fukamauchi, Fumihiko; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Ishigooka, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The GSK-3β gene, GSK3B, codes for an enzyme that is a target for the action of mood stabilizers, lithium and possibly valproic acid. In this study, the relationship between haplotypes consisting of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of GSK3B −50T/C and −1727A/T and the effect of lithium was studied among Japanese bipolar disorder lithium nonresponders and responders. The distributions of the GSK3B haplotypes (−50T/C and −1727A/T) showed a trend for significant difference between the lithium nonresponders and responders (global P=0.07074). Haplotype 1 (T-A) was associated with a higher lithium response (haplotype-specific P=0.03477), whereas haplotype 2 (C-A) was associated with a lower lithium response (haplotype-specific P=0.03443). The pairwise D′ and r2 values between the 2 SNPs in this study were 1.0 and 0.097, respectively. The 2 SNPs showed weak linkage disequilibrium with each other. PMID:24992082

  2. [Antidepressants in epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Castaño-Monsalve, Beatriz

    2013-08-01

    Depression is a common condition in patients with epilepsy that entails a deterioration of the quality of life of this population and that, therefore, requires appropriate treatment. The potential risk of antidepressants in relation to the seizure threshold is overestimated by many professionals, and this has an influence when it comes to making the decision to treat them. It sometimes means that the patients do not receive antidepressant drugs. In this regard, the aim of this review is to present the current state of the art in terms of the safety of antidepressants in patients with epilepsy. A search of the medical literature was conducted and, following its analysis, the most significant results are presented. Current information indicates that most antidepressants are safe for epileptic patients at therapeutic doses and that the risk of seizures occurs mainly in cases of overdose. Preferred drugs for treating depression in epilepsy are serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Bupropion and tricyclic antidepressants must be avoided.

  3. Circulating Plasma Micro RNAs in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder Treated with Antidepressants: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Enatescu, Virgil Radu; Papava, Ion; Enatescu, Ileana; Antonescu, Mirela; Anghel, Andrei; Seclaman, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Objective Significant progress was made in the understanding etiopathogenic factors related to MDD, including through research on the role of micro RNAs (miRs). We investigated plasma miRs as potential markers for MDD in patients treated with antidepressants. Methods At the initiation and at the end of twelve weeks of treatment, blood samples were collected and a structured diagnostic interview and a standardized depression rating scale for the presence and severity of major depression were done. The average decrease in HAMD score was 76.89%. Plasma miR expression profiling was performed by real time PCR. The lists of up-regulated (cut-off=2) and down-regulated miRs were imported into the miRWalk2.0 algorithm and used for target predictions. KEGG database pathways analysis was used to retrieve the pathways significantly targeted by at least two of the miRs. Results Of the 222 miRs detected in plasma samples of MDD patients, 40 were differentially expressed after treatment. Twenty-three miRs were significantly overexpressed with fold changes between 1.85 and 25.42, and 17 miRs were significantly downregulated with fold changes from 0.28 to 0.68. Pathway analysis revealed a list of 29 pathways for up-regulated miRs, and 20 pathways for down-regulated miRs. Six dysregulated miRs are common to all the top five pathways (Wnt signaling, Cancer, Endocytosis, Axon guidance, MAPK signaling): miR-146a-5p, miR-146b-5p, miR-221-3p, miR-24-3p, miR-26a-5p. Conclusion Overall, our miRWalk analysis of changes in plasma microRNAs after treatment of patients with major depression might open a new avenue for the understanding of Escitalopram mode of action and for its side effects. PMID:27757134

  4. [Acute intoxications by tricyclic antidepressants (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Ginies, G; Renard, J P; Lamisse, F; Choutet, P; Breteau, M

    The authors report 87 cases of acute voluntary intoxications with tricyclic antidepressants. They essentially studied the cardiac complications; and conclude that the prognosis is more severe than for other intoxications.

  5. Influence of antidepressants on hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Demian; Reber, Guido

    2007-01-01

    Antidepressants, particularly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are widely used for the treatment of depression and anxious disorders. The observation that depression is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in patients with ischemic heart disease, the assessment of the central role of serotonin in pathophysiological mechanisms of depression, and reports of cases of abnormal bleeding associated with antidepressant therapy have led to investigations of the influence of antidepressants on hemostasis markers. In this review, we summarize data regarding modifications of these markers, drawn from clinical studies and case reports. We observed an association between the type of antidepressant drug and the number of abnormal bleeding case reports, with or without modifications of hemostasis markers. Drugs with the highest degree of serotonin reuptake inhibition--fluoxetine, paroxetine, and sertraline--are more frequently associated with abnormal bleeding and modifications of hemostasis markers. The most frequent hemostatic abnormalities are decreased platelet aggregability and activity, and prolongation of bleeding time. Patients with a history of coagulation disorders, especially suspected or documented thrombocytopenia or platelet disorder, should be monitored in case of prescription of any serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI). Platelet dysfunction, coagulation disorder, and von Willebrand disease should be sought in any case of abnormal bleeding occurring during treatment with an SRI. Also, a non-SSRI antidepressant should be favored over an SSRI or an SRI in such a context. Considering the difficulty in performing platelet aggregation tests, which are the most sensitive in SRI-associated bleeding, and the low sensitivity of hemostasis tests when performed in case of uncomplicated bleeding in the general population, establishing guidelines for the assessment of SRI-associated bleeding complications remains a challenge. PMID

  6. Docking studies of antidepressants against single crystal structure of tryptophan 2, 3-dioxygenase using Molegro Virtual Docker software.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Shazia; Zarina, Shamshad; Bano, Samina

    2014-09-01

    Tryptophan 2, 3-dioxygenase (TDO) a heme containing enzyme found in mammalian liver is responsible for tryptophan (Trp) catabolism. Trp is an essential amino acid that is degraded in to N-formylkynurenine by the action of TDO. The protein ligand interaction plays a significant role in structural based drug designing. The current study illustrates the binding of established antidepressants (ADs) against TDO enzyme using in-silico docking studies. For this purpose, Fluoxetine, Paroxetine, Sertraline, Fluvoxamine, Seproxetine, Citalopram, Moclobamide, Hyperforin and Amoxepine were selected. In-silico docking studies were carried out using Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD) software. Docking results show that all ADs fit well in the active site of TDO moreover Hyperforin and Paroxetine exhibited high docking scores of -152.484k cal/mol and -139.706k cal/mol, respectively. It is concluded that Hyperforin and Paroxetine are possible lead molecules because of their high docking scores as compared to other ADs examined. Therefore, these two ADs stand as potent inhibitors of TDO enzyme.

  7. Docking studies of antidepressants against single crystal structure of tryptophan 2, 3-dioxygenase using Molegro Virtual Docker software.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Shazia; Zarina, Shamshad; Bano, Samina

    2014-09-01

    Tryptophan 2, 3-dioxygenase (TDO) a heme containing enzyme found in mammalian liver is responsible for tryptophan (Trp) catabolism. Trp is an essential amino acid that is degraded in to N-formylkynurenine by the action of TDO. The protein ligand interaction plays a significant role in structural based drug designing. The current study illustrates the binding of established antidepressants (ADs) against TDO enzyme using in-silico docking studies. For this purpose, Fluoxetine, Paroxetine, Sertraline, Fluvoxamine, Seproxetine, Citalopram, Moclobamide, Hyperforin and Amoxepine were selected. In-silico docking studies were carried out using Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD) software. Docking results show that all ADs fit well in the active site of TDO moreover Hyperforin and Paroxetine exhibited high docking scores of -152.484k cal/mol and -139.706k cal/mol, respectively. It is concluded that Hyperforin and Paroxetine are possible lead molecules because of their high docking scores as compared to other ADs examined. Therefore, these two ADs stand as potent inhibitors of TDO enzyme. PMID:25176248

  8. Risk of vaginal bleeding and postpartum hemorrhage after use of antidepressants in pregnancy: a study from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lupattelli, Angela; Spigset, Olav; Koren, Gideon; Nordeng, Hedvig

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to examine obstetric bleeding outcomes after exposure during pregnancy to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), tricyclic (TCAs), and other antidepressants (OADs).The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study and the Medical Birth Registry of Norway constituted the data source for the present study. We included 57,279 pregnant women, of which 1.02% reported use of antidepressants during pregnancy, mostly SSRIs/SNRIs (0.92%). We categorized exposure according to antidepressant use in pregnancy (SSRIs/SNRIs, n = 527; TCAs/OADs, n = 59; nonexposed, nondepressed, n = 55,411) with inclusion of a disease comparison group (nonexposed, depressed, n = 1282). We used logistic regression to estimate adjusted odds ratio (aOR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for vaginal bleeding outcomes in pregnancy and postpartum hemorrhage.Compared with nonexposed subjects, first trimester exposure to SSRIs/SNRIs or TCAs/OADs did not confer any increased risk of vaginal bleeding in early pregnancy (aOR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.72-1.16 and aOR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.36-1.92, respectively). No increased risk for vaginal bleeding in midpregnancy was observed among users of SSRIs/SNRIs (aOR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.50-1.31) or TCAs/OADs (aOR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.26-3.53) in second trimester. Exposure to SSRIs/SNRIs during gestational week 30 to childbirth did not confer any increased risk of postpartum hemorrhage after vaginal (aOR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.47-1.74) or cesarean (aOR, 1.47; 95% CI, 0.51-4.22) delivery. Women in the disease comparison group presented a significant moderate increased risk of vaginal bleeding in early pregnancy (aOR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06-1.39) and midpregnancy (aOR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.07-1.55) but not postpartum.Among this Norwegian cohort of pregnant women, use of antidepressants in pregnancy was not associated with any obstetrical bleeding outcome.

  9. The future of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Baker, G B

    1996-01-01

    A common action of many antidepressants is the inhibition of the reuptake of the biogenic amines norepinephrine, serotonin (5-HT) and/or dopamine into nerve terminals. Another postulated mechanism of action for many antidepressants is the downregulation of beta-adrenergic receptors postsynaptically after chronic administration. Many antidepressants have been reported to produce changes in the regulation of 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors chronically. None of these mechanisms is completely satisfactory as a common antidepressant mechanism of action. Is it possible to unify these hypotheses of antidepressant action? A number of receptor changes have been recognized in depression. Usually, these implicated receptors are linked to a G protein. Thus, it could be hypothesized that depression may be the result of a disorder of the large family of receptor-linked G proteins. Depression, a disorder in which there seems to be an important genetic component, could be expressed in either the receptor or in the G proteins, leading to a defective linkage between the receptor and the G protein, resulting in abnormal transduction mechanisms. The concept of antidepressants is changing rapidly as these agents appear with new therapeutic indications other than depression, such as panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, etc. It can be expected that the presently available antidepressants might eventually be considered anxiolytics or that benzodiazepines and 5-HT1A agonists could come to be viewed as disinhibiting substances.

  10. Spectroscopic correlates of antidepressant response to sleep deprivation and light therapy: a 3.0 Tesla study of bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Francesco; Calabrese, Giovanna; Bernasconi, Alessandro; Cadioli, Marcello; Colombo, Cristina; Dallaspezia, Sara; Falini, Andrea; Radaelli, Daniele; Scotti, Giuseppe; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2009-09-30

    Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter of the human brain, and recent findings suggest a role for the glutamatergic system in the pathophysiology and treatment of mood disorders. Single proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) was used to study the relative in vivo levels of brain neural metabolites. We evaluated the effect of antidepressant treatments on the relative concentration of unresolved glutamate and glutamine (Glx) with GABA contamination (2.35 ppm peak) using single voxel 1H-MRS at 3.0 Tesla. We studied 19 inpatients (7 males, 12 females) affected by bipolar disorder type I, current depressive episode without psychotic features, before and after 1 week of treatment with repeated total sleep deprivation (TSD) combined with light therapy (LT). Chronobiological treatment caused a significant amelioration in mood levels. Changes in the brain Glx/creatine ratio followed a general trend toward decrease, with individual variability. We observed that the decrease in the Glx/creatine ratio significantly correlated with the improvement of both objective and subjective measures of depression.

  11. Effectiveness of Duloxetine Monotherapy Compared to Combination Therapy with Other Antidepressants in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder: A Short-Term, Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Eun-Jin; Lee, Jun-Yeob; Choi, Joong-Hyeon; Lee, Young-Ji

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare duloxetine monotherapy to combination therapy with other antidepressants in patients with major depressive disorder in a clinical, real world setting. Methods An eight-week, retrospective, multi-center study of outpatients with major depressive disorder was undertaken. After screening 415 patients, enrolled in this study from July 2009 to June 2014 were 82 patients from among three centers who had been taking duloxetine with or without other antidepressant and not administered with atypical antipsychotics. We compared the mean changes of the Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale (CGI-S) as a primary measure and the discontinuation rate as a secondary measure between the duloxetine monotherapy group (n=36, 43.9%) and the combination therapy with other antidepressants group (n=46, 56.1%) at baseline, one, two, four and eight weeks. Results There were no significant differences across the demographic characteristics between two groups. There was, however, a statistically greater improvement on the CGI-S at weeks 2, 4 and 8 in the combination group compared with the monotherapy group. There were no significant differences in discontinuation rate and adverse events between two groups. No serious adverse events were reported in both groups during the study period. Conclusion This result suggests that the duloxetine combination therapy with other antidepressants could improve effectiveness and have comparable tolerability with the monotherapy in the treatment of outpatients with major depressive disorders in a naturalistic setting. Adequately powered, well-controlled clinical trials are strongly warranted to confirm our findings due to methodological shortcomings. PMID:27482247

  12. Antidepressant Activity of Brahmi in Albino Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kadali, SLDV Ramana Murty; M.C., Das; Rao A.S.R., Srinivasa; Sri G, Karuna

    2014-01-01

    Context: In traditional system of medicine brahmi has been used to enhance memory. Recently it has been reported to have action in psychiatric disorders. With these backgrounds the work has been undertaken to study antidepressant activity of brahmi in albino mice. Aim: To evaluate antidepressant activity of brahmi in experimental models. Materials and Methods: The antidepressant activity was studied in albino mice using forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST) and shock induced depression (SID). Imipramine (10mg/kg), fluoxetine (30mg/kg) were used as standard drugs and brahmi (10, 20, 30mg/kg) was used as test drug. Results: Brahmi exhibited significant decrease in duration of immobility in FST and reduced the shock induced decrease in activity in SID models. It didn’t show any activity in the TST model. Conclusion: Brahmi has shown antidepressant activity in FST and SID. PMID:24783074

  13. Antidepressants and ejaculation: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, fixed-dose study with paroxetine, sertraline, and nefazodone.

    PubMed

    Waldinger, M D; Zwinderman, A H; Olivier, B

    2001-06-01

    Antidepressant medication is often associated with sexual side effects. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study in men with lifelong rapid ejaculation was performed to assess the effects of two selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors--paroxetine and sertraline--and the 5-HT2 antagonist and 5-HT/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor nefazodone on the latency to ejaculate. Forty-eight men with an intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) of a maximum of 1 minute were randomly assigned to receive paroxetine (20 mg/day), sertraline (50 mg/day), nefazodone (400 mg/day), or placebo for 6 weeks. During the 1-month baseline and 6-week treatment period, IELTs were measured at home with a stopwatch. The trial was completed by 40 men. During the 6-week treatment period, the geometric mean IELT in the placebo group was stable at approximately 20 seconds. Analysis of variance revealed a between-group difference in the evolution of IELT delay over time (p = 0.002); the IELT after paroxetine and sertraline gradually increased to approximately 146 and 58 seconds, respectively, compared with 28 seconds in the nefazodone group. The paroxetine and sertraline groups differed significantly (p < 0.001 and p = 0.024, respectively) from placebo, but the nefazodone group did not (p = 0.85). Compared with baseline, paroxetine exerted the strongest delay in ejaculation, whereas sertraline delayed it only moderately. There was no clinically relevant delay in ejaculation with nefazodone.

  14. Antidepressants and ejaculation: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, fixed-dose study with paroxetine, sertraline, and nefazodone.

    PubMed

    Waldinger, M D; Zwinderman, A H; Olivier, B

    2001-06-01

    Antidepressant medication is often associated with sexual side effects. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study in men with lifelong rapid ejaculation was performed to assess the effects of two selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors--paroxetine and sertraline--and the 5-HT2 antagonist and 5-HT/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor nefazodone on the latency to ejaculate. Forty-eight men with an intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) of a maximum of 1 minute were randomly assigned to receive paroxetine (20 mg/day), sertraline (50 mg/day), nefazodone (400 mg/day), or placebo for 6 weeks. During the 1-month baseline and 6-week treatment period, IELTs were measured at home with a stopwatch. The trial was completed by 40 men. During the 6-week treatment period, the geometric mean IELT in the placebo group was stable at approximately 20 seconds. Analysis of variance revealed a between-group difference in the evolution of IELT delay over time (p = 0.002); the IELT after paroxetine and sertraline gradually increased to approximately 146 and 58 seconds, respectively, compared with 28 seconds in the nefazodone group. The paroxetine and sertraline groups differed significantly (p < 0.001 and p = 0.024, respectively) from placebo, but the nefazodone group did not (p = 0.85). Compared with baseline, paroxetine exerted the strongest delay in ejaculation, whereas sertraline delayed it only moderately. There was no clinically relevant delay in ejaculation with nefazodone. PMID:11386492

  15. Combination treatment of fingolimod with antidepressants in relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis patients with depression: a multicentre, open-label study – REGAIN

    PubMed Central

    Bayas, Antonios; Schuh, Katrin; Baier, Monika; Vormfelde, Stefan Viktor; Koppai-Reiner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Approximately one in two patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) suffer from comorbid depression. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and tolerability of fingolimod and antidepressant combination in relapsing–remitting MS patients with mild-to-moderate depression. Efficacy outcome variables were quality of life (QoL), fatigue, disability and depression. Methods: Patients received open-label fingolimod 0.5 mg over 2 weeks, followed by fingolimod plus citalopram (40 mg), fluoxetine (40 mg) or venlafaxine (150 mg) over 16 weeks. The antidepressant was selected at the physician’s discretion. Results: In total, 54 patients were recruited at 25 centres across Germany. No new safety signals (including cardiac) emerged compared with previous clinical studies. Adverse events (mostly mild-to-moderate) were reported in 43 patients. A total of three patients had serious adverse events and 10 discontinued the study. QoL (mean [95% confidence interval]) improved by 2.2 (−3.3, −1.2; Patient Reported Indices for MS questionnaire), fatigue by 8.2 (−13.1, −3.3; modified Fatigue Impact Scale) and depression by 6.3 (−8.4, −4.2; Hamilton Depression Scale) points. However, the results must be interpreted cautiously owing to limited patient numbers. Conclusions: Combination of fingolimod with antidepressant medication showed no unexpected safety signals. Patient-reported outcomes (QoL, disability, fatigue and depression) remained stable or improved. PMID:27582893

  16. Antidepressant effects of ketamine: mechanisms underlying fast-acting novel antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Caroline A.; Lucki, Irwin

    2013-01-01

    Newer antidepressants are needed for the many individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) that do not respond adequately to treatment and because of a delay of weeks before the emergence of therapeutic effects. Recent evidence from clinical trials shows that the NMDA antagonist ketamine is a revolutionary novel antidepressant because it acts rapidly and is effective for treatment-resistant patients. A single infusion of ketamine alleviates depressive symptoms in treatment-resistant depressed patients within hours and these effects may be sustained for up to 2 weeks. Although the discovery of ketamine's effects has reshaped drug discovery for antidepressants, the psychotomimetic properties of this compound limit the use of this therapy to the most severely ill patients. In order to develop additional antidepressants like ketamine, adequate preclinical behavioral screening paradigms for fast-acting antidepressants need to be established and used to identify the underlying neural mechanisms. This review examines the preclinical literature attempting to model the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine. Acute administration of ketamine has produced effects in behavioral screens for antidepressants like the forced swim test, novelty suppression of feeding and in rodent models for depression. Protracted behavioral effects of ketamine have been reported to appear after a single treatment that last for days. This temporal pattern is similar to its clinical effects and may serve as a new animal paradigm for rapid antidepressant effects in humans. In addition, protracted changes in molecules mediating synaptic plasticity have been implicated in mediating the antidepressant-like behavioral effects of ketamine. Current preclinical studies are examining compounds with more specific pharmacological effects at glutamate receptors and synapses in order to develop additional rapidly acting antidepressants without the hallucinogenic side effects or abuse potential of ketamine

  17. Pharmacogenetic analysis of genes implicated in rodent models of antidepressant response: association of TREK1 and treatment resistance in the STAR(*)D study.

    PubMed

    Perlis, Roy H; Moorjani, Priya; Fagerness, Jesen; Purcell, Shaun; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Fava, Maurizio; Rush, A John; Smoller, Jordan W

    2008-11-01

    Recent rodent models of antidepressant response implicate a novel set of genes in mechanisms of antidepressant action. The authors examined variants in four such genes (KCNK2 (TREK1), SLC18A2 (VMAT2), S100A10, and HDAC5) for association with remission in a large effectiveness trial of antidepressant treatments. Subjects were drawn from the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR(*)D) study, a multicenter, prospective, effectiveness trial in major depressive disorder (MDD). Outpatients with nonpsychotic MDD were initially treated with citalopram for up to 14 weeks; those who did not remit with citalopram were sequentially randomized to a series of next-step treatments, each for up to 12 weeks. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in four genes were examined for association with remission, defined as a clinician-rated Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS-C(16)) score < or =5. Of 1554 participants for whom DNA was available, 565 (36%) reached remission with citalopram treatment. No association with any of the four genes was identified. However, among the 751 who entered next-step treatment, variants in KCNK2 were associated with treatment response (Bonferroni-corrected, gene-based empirical p<0.001). In follow-up analyses, KCNK2 was also associated with effects of similar magnitude for third-step treatment among those with unsatisfactory benefit to both citalopram and one next-step pharmacotherapy (n=225). These findings indicate that genetic variation in KCNK2 may identify individuals at risk for treatment resistance. More broadly, they indicate the utility of animal models in identifying genes for pharmacogenetic studies of antidepressant response.

  18. An experimental antidepressant increases REM sleep.

    PubMed

    Soldatos, C R; Stefanis, C N; Bergiannaki, J D; Christodoulou, C; Botsis, A; Sakkas, P N

    1988-01-01

    1. An experimental antidepressant was studied through sleep laboratory recordings, psychoendocrinological tests and clinical measurements in terms of its efficacy, side effects and effects on sleep. 2. The design included a four-week drug administration period, preceeded and followed by a one week placebo period. 3. In the presence of antidepressant efficacy, the drug did not disturb sleep induction and maintainance. 4. The only effect on sleep stages was an increase of REM sleep during the short-term drug administration period which is contrary to the REM supressant effect of most antidepressants. 5. This finding suggests that REM supression and antidepressant efficacy are not necessarily related. 6. Further, given that the only known action of the drug is its inhibitory effect on GABAergic transmission, one can speculate that GABA mechanisms may be involved in REM sleep modulation. PMID:3241873

  19. Diabetes mellitus and comorbid depression: improvement of both diseases with milnacipran. A replication study (results of the Austrian Major Depression Diabetes Mellitus study group).

    PubMed

    Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Hofmann, Peter; Kinzl, Johann; Toplak, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    Comorbid depression is common in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and is associated with greater mortality risk and a higher incidence of diabetic complications and decreased quality of life. In an earlier pilot study, we found that treatment with the serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor antidepressant, milnacipran, significantly improved metabolic parameters in diabetic patients with comorbid depression who had an antidepressant response. We sought to replicate these results in a larger cohort (n = 135). Patients received milnacipran and metformin for 6 months and metabolic parameters and depressive symptoms were measured at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. At the end of the study, 72.6% of patients had an antidepressant response (≥50% reduction of baseline Beck Depression Inventory score). Overall, there was significant improvement in the metabolic and anthropometric parameters measured. The number of patients with glycated hemoglobin > 8% (>63.9 mmol/mol), an indicator of poor metabolic control requiring intensive therapeutic intervention, decreased from 31.9% at baseline to 11.9% during the study. As found in the pilot study, levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides were only significantly decreased in antidepressant responders. Body weight was significantly reduced in both responders and nonresponders but the effect size was significantly greater in the responder group. In contrast to the pilot study, fasting blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin were significantly decreased to a similar extent in both antidepressant-responders and nonresponders. The present study thus replicates some of the original findings. The main difference between the present and the pilot study is that in the larger cohort significant reductions in fasting blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin were found in all patients irrespective of whether or not they responded to antidepressant treatment. The present data underline the importance of diagnosis and treatment of

  20. [Are antidepressants really effective?].

    PubMed

    Ammendola, S; Kornreich, C

    2015-01-01

    Antidepressants are widely used for a long time and it is estimated that about 10 % of the belgian population is taking some of them each year. However, there are important controversies about their real efficacy. We review successively arguments for and against their efficacy. On the one hand, meta-analysis have shown no big efficacy differences between antidepressants and placebo. On the other hand, those meta-analysis have been criticized for their methodology. Animal models show a real effect of antidepressants on the brain and clinical observations, such as an impact on suicide prevention, the possibility of induced manic switch, and an efficacy on anxiety disorders are in favour of a real efficacy. Given our current state of knowledge about them it seems appropriate to continue to use anti-depressants in the treatment of depressive patients. PMID:26749632

  1. The Functional Study of a Chinese Herbal Compounded Antidepressant Medicine – Jie Yu Chu Fan Capsule on Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lingling; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Guo, Hongliang; Yuan, Junliang; Li, Shujuan; Hu, Wenli; Golden, Teresa; Wu, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Jie Yu Chu Fan capsule (JYCF) is a new compounded Chinese herbal medicine for the treatment of depression. The present study was designed to explore the antidepressant effects and the possible mechanisms of JYCF by using chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) mouse model and comparing results to that of fluoxetine. Behavioral tests including an open field test, sucrose preference test and forced swim test were performed to evaluate the antidepressant effects of JYCF. The concentrations of monoamine neurotransmitters and metabolic products including norepinephrine (NE), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), homovanillic acid (HVA) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice were determined by means of high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-EC). The results show that a successful mouse CUMS model was established through 5 weeks of continuous unpredictable stimulation, as indicated by the significant decrease in sucrose preference and locomotor activity and increase in immobility time in the forced swim test. Chronic treatment of JYCF (1.25, 2.5 and 5 g/kg) and fluoxetine (20mg/kg) significantly reversed the CUMS-induced behavioral abnormalities. JYCF (1.25, 2.5 and 5 g/kg) significantly increased NE in CUMS mouse prefrontal cortex (P < 0.01, P < 0.01, P < 0.05 respectively) and 5-HT in hippocampus (P < 0.05). In summary, our findings suggest that JYCF exerts comparable antidepressant-like effects to that of fluoxetine in CUMS mice. Besides, the antidepressant-like effect of JYCF is mediated by the increase of monoaminergic transmitters including 5-HT and NE. PMID:26186537

  2. Do antidepressants increase the risk of mania and bipolar disorder in people with depression? A retrospective electronic case register cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, Peter; Shetty, Hitesh; Broadbent, Matthew; Stewart, Robert; McGuire, Philip; Taylor, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between antidepressant therapy and the later onset of mania/bipolar disorder. Design Retrospective cohort study using an anonymised electronic health record case register. Setting South London and Maudsley National Health Service (NHS) Trust (SLaM), a large provider of inpatient and community mental healthcare in the UK. Participants 21 012 adults presenting to SLaM between 1 April 2006 and 31 March 2013 with unipolar depression. Exposure Prior antidepressant therapy recorded in electronic health records. Main outcome measure Time to subsequent diagnosis of mania or bipolar disorder from date of diagnosis of unipolar depression, censored at 31 March 2014. Methods Multivariable Cox regression analysis with age and gender as covariates. Results The overall incidence rate of mania/bipolar disorder was 10.9 per 1000 person-years. The peak incidence of mania/bipolar disorder incidence was seen in patients aged between 26 and 35 years (12.3 per 1000 person-years). Prior antidepressant treatment was associated with an increased incidence of mania/bipolar disorder ranging from 13.1 to 19.1 per 1000 person-years. Multivariable analysis indicated a significant association with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (HR 1.34, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.52) and venlafaxine (1.35, 1.07 to 1.70). Conclusions In people with unipolar depression, antidepressant treatment is associated with an increased risk of subsequent mania/bipolar disorder. These findings highlight the importance of considering risk factors for mania when treating people with depression. PMID:26667012

  3. Antidepressants and Driving in Older Adults: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Duncan H; Rapoport, Mark J

    2016-06-01

    With an increasing number of older drivers who are prescribed antidepressants, the potential consequences of antidepressant use on driving skills in an aging population are becoming a pressing issue. We conducted a systematic review using MEDLINE, targeting articles specifically pertaining to antidepressants and driving in a population or subgroup of older adults (≥ 55 years of age). The search yielded 267 references, nine of which pertained to the effects of antidepressants on driving in older adults. The single experimental study found imipramine to have detrimental effects on highway driving, whereas nefazodone did not. Seven of eight population-based studies reported a significant increased risk of involvement in a collision associated with antidepressant use. Although the studies indicated a negative effect of antidepressants on driving, the epidemiological designs cannot exclude the possibility that the underlying illness, generally major depression, is the culprit. PMID:27091414

  4. A Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network Study Evaluating Antidepressant Prescribing in Canada From 2006 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Morkem, Rachael; Barber, David; Williamson, Tyler; Patten, Scott B

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prescribing patterns of antidepressants (ADs) by primary care providers to youth, adults, and seniors, from 2006 to 2012, using data from electronic medical records (EMRs). Method: This was a retrospective cross-sectional database study that used primary care data from the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network (CPCSSN). Data on more than 600 000 Canadian primary care patients were used to determine the prevalence and incidence of AD prescribing to patients 15 years and older who had an encounter in the years of study (from 2006 to 2012). Each study year was evaluated independently. Results: The study population consisted of 86 927 patients in 2006 (mean age 48.1 years [SD 18.7], 38% male) and grew to 273 529 (mean age 49.6 years [SD 19.3], 40% male) in 2012. The prevalence of AD prescribing increased from 9.20% in 2006 to 12.80% in 2012 (P < 0.001). While the incidence rate of AD prescribing dropped from 3.54% in 2006 to 2.72% in 2008 (P < 0.001) the rate started to significantly rise again, reaching an incidence of 3.07% by 2012 (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The prevalence of AD prescribing by primary care providers in Canada continued to rise from 2006 to 2012. Conversely, incidence has remained stable or declined during the 6-year study period. While many complex factors likely contribute to the observed prevalence and incidence rates, our findings suggest that the guidelines indicating the efficacy of long-term AD therapy for patients with highly recurrent or severe depression are being followed. PMID:26720825

  5. Associations Between Personality Traits and Adherence to Antidepressants Assessed Through Self-Report, Electronic Monitoring, and Pharmacy Dispensing Data: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Hans; Amin, Darya F H; Taxis, Katja; Heerdink, Eibert R; Egberts, Antoine C G; Gardarsdottir, Helga

    2016-10-01

    Treatment with antidepressants is often compromised by substantial nonadherence. To understand nonadherence, specific medication-related behaviors and beliefs have been studied, but less is known about broader and temporally stable personality "traits." Furthermore, adherence has often been assessed by a single method. Hence, we investigated associations between the Big Five personality traits and adherence assessed by self-report, electronic drug use monitoring, and dispensing data. Using the Big Five Inventory, we assessed the personality traits "openness," "conscientiousness," "extraversion," "agreeableness," and "neuroticism" of patients treated with antidepressants who were invited through community pharmacies. Self-reported adherence was assessed with the Medication Adherence Rating Scale (score >24), electronic monitoring with medication event monitoring system (MEMS) devices (therapy days missed ≤ 10% and < 4 consecutive days missed), and dispensing data (medication possession ratio ≥ 80%). One hundred four women and 33 men participated (mean age, 51; standard deviation, 14). Paroxetine was most frequently prescribed (N = 53, 38%). Logistic regression analysis revealed that of the personality traits, the third and fourth quartiles of "conscientiousness" were associated with better self-reported adherence (odds ratio, 3.63; 95% confidence interval, 1.34-9.86 and odds ratio, 2.97; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-8.08; P ≤ 0.05). No relationships were found between personality traits and adherence assessed through electronic drug use monitoring or dispensing data. We therefore conclude that adherence to antidepressant therapy seems to be largely unrelated to personality traits. PMID:27454894

  6. Antidepressant use and 10-year incident fracture risk: the population-based Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMoS)

    PubMed Central

    Bernatsky, S.; Abrahamowicz, M.; Papaioannou, A.; Bessette, L.; Adachi, J.; Goltzman, D.; Prior, J.; Kreiger, N.; Towheed, T.; Leslie, W. D.; Kaiser, S.; Ioannidis, G.; Pickard, L.; Fraser, L.-A.; Rahme, E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary We used data from a large, prospective Canadian cohort to assess the association between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) and fracture. We found an increased risk of fractures in individuals who used SSRI or SNRI, even after controlling for multiple risk factors. Introduction Previous studies have suggested an association between SSRIs and increasing risk of fragility fractures. However, the majority of these studies were not long-term analyses or were performed using administrative data and, thus, could not fully control for potential confounders. We sought to determine whether the use of SSRIs and SNRIs is associated with increased risk of fragility fracture, in adults aged 50+. Methods We used data from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos), a prospective randomly selected population-based community cohort; our analyses focused on subjects aged 50+. Time to event methodology was used to assess the association between SSRI/SNRI use, modeled time-dependently, and fragility fracture. Results Among 6,645 subjects, 192 (2.9 %) were using SSRIs or/and SNRIs at baseline. During the 10-year study period, 978 (14.7 %) participants experienced at least one fragility fracture. In our main analysis, SSRI/SNRI use was associated with increased risk of fragility fracture (hazard ratio (HR), 1.88; 95 % confidence intervals (CI), 1.48–2.39). After controlling for multiple risk factors, including Charlson score, previous falls, and bone mineral density hip and lumbar bone density, the adjusted HR for current SSRI/SNRI use remained elevated (HR, 1.68; 95 % CI, 1.32–2.14). Conclusions Our results lend additional support to an association between SSRI/SNRI use and fragility fractures. Given the high prevalence of antidepressants use, and the impact of fractures on health, our findings may have a significant clinical impact. PMID:24566587

  7. Childhood trauma predicts antidepressant response in adults with major depression: data from the randomized international study to predict optimized treatment for depression.

    PubMed

    Williams, L M; Debattista, C; Duchemin, A-M; Schatzberg, A F; Nemeroff, C B

    2016-01-01

    Few reliable predictors indicate which depressed individuals respond to antidepressants. Several studies suggest that a history of early-life trauma predicts poorer response to antidepressant therapy but results are variable and limited in adults. The major goal of the present study was to evaluate the role of early-life trauma in predicting acute response outcomes to antidepressants in a large sample of well-characterized patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). The international Study to Predict Optimized Treatment for Depression (iSPOT-D) is a randomized clinical trial with enrollment from December 2008 to January 2012 at eight academic and nine private clinical settings in five countries. Patients (n=1008) meeting DSM-IV criteria for MDD and 336 matched healthy controls comprised the study sample. Six participants withdrew due to serious adverse events. Randomization was to 8 weeks of treatment with escitalopram, sertraline or venlafaxine with dosage adjusted by the participant's treating clinician per routine clinical practice. Exposure to 18 types of traumatic events before the age of 18 was assessed using the Early-Life Stress Questionnaire. Impact of early-life stressors-overall trauma 'load' and specific type of abuse-on treatment outcomes measures: response: (⩾50% improvement on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, HRSD17 or on the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Rated, QIDS_SR16) and remission (score ⩽7 on the HRSD17 and ⩽5 on the QIDS_SR16). Trauma prevalence in MDD was compared with controls. Depressed participants were significantly more likely to report early-life stress than controls; 62.5% of MDD participants reported more than two traumatic events compared with 28.4% of controls. The higher rate of early-life trauma was most apparent for experiences of interpersonal violation (emotional, sexual and physical abuses). Abuse and notably abuse occurring at ⩽7 years of age predicted poorer outcomes

  8. Childhood trauma predicts antidepressant response in adults with major depression: data from the randomized international study to predict optimized treatment for depression

    PubMed Central

    Williams, L M; Debattista, C; Duchemin, A-M; Schatzberg, A F; Nemeroff, C B

    2016-01-01

    Few reliable predictors indicate which depressed individuals respond to antidepressants. Several studies suggest that a history of early-life trauma predicts poorer response to antidepressant therapy but results are variable and limited in adults. The major goal of the present study was to evaluate the role of early-life trauma in predicting acute response outcomes to antidepressants in a large sample of well-characterized patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). The international Study to Predict Optimized Treatment for Depression (iSPOT-D) is a randomized clinical trial with enrollment from December 2008 to January 2012 at eight academic and nine private clinical settings in five countries. Patients (n=1008) meeting DSM-IV criteria for MDD and 336 matched healthy controls comprised the study sample. Six participants withdrew due to serious adverse events. Randomization was to 8 weeks of treatment with escitalopram, sertraline or venlafaxine with dosage adjusted by the participant's treating clinician per routine clinical practice. Exposure to 18 types of traumatic events before the age of 18 was assessed using the Early-Life Stress Questionnaire. Impact of early-life stressors—overall trauma ‘load' and specific type of abuse—on treatment outcomes measures: response: (⩾50% improvement on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, HRSD17 or on the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology—Self-Rated, QIDS_SR16) and remission (score ⩽7 on the HRSD17 and ⩽5 on the QIDS_SR16). Trauma prevalence in MDD was compared with controls. Depressed participants were significantly more likely to report early-life stress than controls; 62.5% of MDD participants reported more than two traumatic events compared with 28.4% of controls. The higher rate of early-life trauma was most apparent for experiences of interpersonal violation (emotional, sexual and physical abuses). Abuse and notably abuse occurring at ⩽7 years of age predicted poorer

  9. Use of SSRI and SNRI Antidepressants during Pregnancy: A Population-Based Study from Denmark, Iceland, Norway and Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Zoega, Helga; Kieler, Helle; Nørgaard, Mette; Furu, Kari; Valdimarsdottir, Unnur; Brandt, Lena; Haglund, Bengt

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose was to describe utilization of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), including trends in prevalence, characteristics of users, drug switching and changes in prescribed doses in a large group of pregnant women across four Nordic countries. Methods A drug utilization study based on linked individual-level data from the nationwide prescription- and medical birth registers in Denmark, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The study population comprised all pregnancies in these countries, resulting in a live birth or stillbirth after gestational week 22 from January 1st 2008 to December 31st 2012 (N = 1 162 470). In addition to the main study drugs SSRIs and SNRIs, we included (concurrent) use of other antidepressants, antipsychotics, anxiolytics and hypnotics. Results A total of 38 219 (3.3%) pregnancies were exposed to SSRIs and 5 634 (0.5%) to SNRIs. Prevalence of SSRI and SNRI use varied by country (1.8% in Norway to 7.0% in Iceland). Use and prescribed dosages decreased with each passing trimester of pregnancy; prevalence was 2.7% at conception, and 2.1%, 1.7% and 1.3% respectively in 1st, 2nd and 3rd trimester. In 0.6% of pregnancies women filled a prescription before pregnancy and in every trimester. In one third of exposed pregnancies, women were also dispensed anxiolytics, hypnotics or sedatives. Conclusion Use of SSRI and SNRI use during pregnancy varied between the Nordic countries, but the overall prevalence remained low and relatively stable from 2008 to 2012. The low prevalence of use and high proportion of women who discontinue treatment in pregnancy raise questions about adequate treatment of depression in pregnant women. PMID:26657647

  10. The Efficacy and Safety of Clonazepam in Patients with Anxiety Disorder Taking Newer Antidepressants: A Multicenter Naturalistic Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng-Min; Kim, Jung-Bum; Sakong, Jeong Kyu; Suh, Ho-Suk; Oh, Kang Seob; Woo, Jong-Min; Yoo, Sang-Woo; Lee, Sang Min; Lee, Sang-Yeol; Lim, Se-Won; Cho, Seong Jin; Chee, Ik-Seung; Chae, Jeong-Ho; Hong, Jin Pyo; Lee, Kyoung-Uk

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study compared the efficacy and tolerability of clonazepam with other benzodiazepines in patients with anxiety disorders. Methods Inclusion criteria were as follows: age >20 years, diagnosis of anxiety disorder according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th edition, text revision (DSM-IV-TR) criteria, taking only one type of antidepressant, and prescribed one of three oral benzodiazepines (alprazolam, clonazepam, or lorazepam). At baseline and week 6, clinical benefit was evaluated using the Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale (CGI-S), Clinical Global Impression-Anxiety Scale (CGI-anxiety), and Clinical Global Impression-Sleep Scale (CGI-sleep). Results Among 180 patients, no differences in demographic characteristics among the three benzodiazepine groups were noted. After six weeks of treatment, all benzodiazepine groups showed significant improvements in CGI-S, CGI-anxiety, and CGI-sleep scores (p<0.001). There were no differences in mean changes in CGI-S, CGI-anxiety and CGI-sleep among the three benzodiazepine groups. The incidence of side effects was significantly lower in the clonazepam group than with the other benzodiazepines. The incidences of adverse events for the clonazepam, alprazolam, and lorazepam groups were 26.7% (n=20), 48.4% (n=31), and 43.9% (n=18), respectively. Conclusion The present study suggests that clonazepam is as efficacious as other benzodiazepines for the treatment of various anxiety disorders. Furthermore, the safety profile of clonazepam was superior to the other benzodiazepines in this study. PMID:27121429

  11. Antidepressant augmentation with anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2014-09-01

    Antidepressant augmentation strategies are commonly employed to treat depressed patients who do not respond to antidepressant monotherapy. Neuroinflammatory mechanisms have been implicated in depression, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been found effective in animal models of depression both in monotherapy and when used to augment antidepressant drugs. However, results with NSAIDs have been mixed in human observational studies, with both better and worse depression outcomes reported. Four small (pooled N = 160) randomized controlled trials suggest that celecoxib (200-400 mg/d) augmentation of antidepressant medication improves 4-6 week outcomes in major depressive disorder. There are no data, however, to support the use of celecoxib or other NSAIDs in antidepressant-resistant depression. There are also concerns about adverse events associated with NSAID treatment, and about pharmacodynamic drug interactions between these drugs and serotonin reuptake inhibitors. A reasonable conclusion for the present is that NSAID augmentation of antidepressants is, at best, a tentative approach in nonrefractory major depression.

  12. Invasive Cervical Cancer and Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hsiang-Lin; Hsieh, Yi-Hsuan; Lin, Chiao-Fan; Liang, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Kuo-You; Chiu, Wei-Che; Lee, Yena; McIntyre, Roger S.; Chen, Vincent Chin-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To our knowledge, no prior population-based study has been published wherein the primary aim was to evaluate whether an association between psychotropic drug prescription and cervical cancer exists. Herein we have conducted the first study that primarily aimed to determine the association between antidepressants use and risk of invasive cervical cancer in the general population. This is a population-based study utilizing Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. We identified 26,262 cases with invasive cervical cancer and 129,490 controls. We adopted the conditional logistic regression model as the statistical method and adjusted for potential confounding factors. The prescription of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (adjusted OR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.84–1.04), tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), mirtazapine and bupropion, adjusting for cumulative dose, was not associated with an increased, or decreased, risk for invasive cervical cancer. An association between trazodone prescription and invasive cervical cancer was observed (adjusted OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.03–1.43). An association between the major classes of antidepressants and invasive cervical cancer was not observed herein. Our preliminary finding regarding a possible association between trazodone and cervical cancer requires replication. PMID:26496343

  13. A comparison of small monetary incentives to convert survey non-respondents: a randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Maximizing response rates is critically important in order to provide the most generalizable and unbiased research results. High response rates reduce the chance of respondents being systematically different from non-respondents, and thus, reduce the risk of results not truly reflecting the study population. Monetary incentives are often used to improve response rates, but little is known about whether larger incentives improve response rates in those who previously have been unenthusiastic about participating in research. In this study we compared the response rates and cost-effectiveness of a $5 versus $2 monetary incentive accompanying a short survey mailed to patients who did not respond or refused to participate in research study with a face-to-face survey. Methods 1,328 non-responders were randomly assigned to receive $5 or $2 and a short, 10-question survey by mail. Reminder postcards were sent to everyone; those not returning the survey were sent a second survey without incentive. Overall response rates, response rates by incentive condition, and odds of responding to the larger incentive were calculated. Total costs (materials, postage, and labor) and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were also calculated and compared by incentive condition. Results After the first mailing, the response rate within the $5 group was significantly higher (57.8% vs. 47.7%, p < .001); after the second mailing, the difference narrowed by 80%, resulting in a non-significant difference in cumulative rates between the $5 and $2 groups (67.3% vs. 65.4%, respectively, p = .47). Regardless of incentive or number of contacts, respondents were significantly more likely to be male, white, married, and 50-75 years old. Total costs were higher with the larger versus smaller incentive ($13.77 versus $9.95 per completed survey). Conclusions A $5 incentive provides a significantly higher response rate than a $2 incentive if only one survey mailing is used but not if two survey

  14. A comparison of placebo responders and nonresponders in subgroups of depressive disorder.

    PubMed Central

    Bialik, R J; Ravindran, A V; Bakish, D; Lapierre, Y D

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if the placebo treatment response varied in subgroups of depressed patients (single episode, recurrent, and double depression). Data from placebo-treated patients from seven placebo-controlled clinical trials were pooled and analyzed retrospectively. The placebo response rate was highest for females with a single episode of depression (66.7%) and lowest for females with recurrent depressive episodes (13.3%). Among patients experiencing their first episode, placebo responders had lower Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD) total scores at baseline and lower ratings of pschomotor retardation than nonresponders. For patients having a recurrence of an episode, placebo responders had lower baseline ratings of somatic anxiety. The major finding was that patients suffering from their first depressive episode differed from patients with recurrent depressive episodes in the rate of placebo response, effect of gender, and the clinical symptoms that were associated with a positive placebo response. PMID:7647079

  15. Early identification of non-responding locally advanced breast tumors receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Giessen, Martijn; Schaafsma, Boudewijn E.; Charehbili, Ayoub; Smit, Vincent T. H. B. M.; Kroep, Judith R.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan; Chan, Alan; Löwik, Clemens W. G. M.; Dijkstra, Jouke; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Wasser, Martin N. J. M.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2015-02-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) may be advantageous for monitoring tumor response during chemotherapy treatment, particularly in the early treatment stages. In this paper we perform a second analysis on the data of a clinical trial with 25 breast cancer patients that received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Patients were monitored using delayed contrast enhanced MRI and additionally with diffuse optical spectroscopy at baseline, after 1 cycle of chemotherapy, halfway therapy and before surgery. In this analysis hemoglobin content between tumor tissue and healthy tissue of the same breast is compared on all four monitoring time points. Furthermore, the predictive power of the tumor-healthy tissue difference of HbO2 for non-responder prediction is assessed. The difference in HbO2 content between tumor and healthy tissue was statistically significantly higher in responding tumors than in non-responding tumors at baseline (10.88 vs -0.57 μM, P=0.014) and after one cycle of chemotherapy (6.45 vs -1.31 μM, P=0.048). Before surgery this difference had diminished. In the data of this study, classification on the HbO2 difference between tumor and healthy tissue was able to predict tumor (non-)response at baseline and after 1 cycle with an area-under-curve of 0.95 and 0.88, respectively. While this result suggests that tumor response can be predicted before chemotherapy onset, one should be very careful with interpreting these results. A larger patient population is needed to confirm this finding.

  16. An Open Trial of Intensive Family Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in Youth with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Who Are Medication Partial Responders or Nonresponders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Lehmkuhl, Heather D.; Ricketts, Emily; Geffken, Gary R.; Marien, Wendi; Murphy, Tanya K.

    2010-01-01

    This study reports an open-trial of family-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Thirty primarily Caucasian youth with OCD (range = 7-19 years; 15 girls) who were partial responders or nonresponders to two or more medication trials that were delivered either serially or…

  17. Visual Motor Integration as a Screener for Responders and Non-Responders in Preschool and Early School Years: Implications for Inclusive Assessment in Oman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emam, Mahmoud Mohamed; Kazem, Ali Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Visual motor integration (VMI) is the ability of the eyes and hands to work together in smooth, efficient patterns. In Oman, there are few effective methods to assess VMI skills in children in inclusive settings. The current study investigated the performance of preschool and early school years responders and non-responders on a VMI test. The full…

  18. On the nature of non-responding in discrimination learning with and without errors1

    PubMed Central

    Terrace, H. S.

    1974-01-01

    In human subjects, discrimination learning with errors results in active responding incompatible with the reinforced response. The direction of such incompatible behavior is opposite to that of the reinforced response. Responding occurs only during the stimulus correlated with extinction. The frequency of active non-responding is maximal shortly after the start of discrimination training (the time at which the frequency of errors decreases most rapidly) and approaches zero as discrimination training continues. The magnitude of behavioral contrast is not related systematically to the number of errors. Instead it is related directly to the frequency of active non-responding. Active non-responding appears to be motivated by the aversiveness of self-produced frustration, in the sense that active non-responding allows the subject to avoid the aversiveness of non-reinforced responding. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2. PMID:16811774

  19. Suicidality and aggression during antidepressant treatment: systematic review and meta-analyses based on clinical study reports

    PubMed Central

    Guski, Louise Schow; Freund, Nanna; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study serious harms associated with selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Main outcome measures Mortality and suicidality. Secondary outcomes were aggressive behaviour and akathisia. Data sources Clinical study reports for duloxetine, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, and venlafaxine obtained from the European and UK drug regulators, and summary trial reports for duloxetine and fluoxetine from Eli Lilly’s website. Eligibility criteria for study selection Double blind placebo controlled trials that contained any patient narratives or individual patient listings of harms. Data extraction and analysis Two researchers extracted data independently; the outcomes were meta-analysed by Peto’s exact method (fixed effect model). Results We included 70 trials (64 381 pages of clinical study reports) with 18 526 patients. These trials had limitations in the study design and discrepancies in reporting, which may have led to serious under-reporting of harms. For example, some outcomes appeared only in individual patient listings in appendices, which we had for only 32 trials, and we did not have case report forms for any of the trials. Differences in mortality (all deaths were in adults, odds ratio 1.28, 95% confidence interval 0.40 to 4.06), suicidality (1.21, 0.84 to 1.74), and akathisia (2.04, 0.93 to 4.48) were not significant, whereas patients taking antidepressants displayed more aggressive behaviour (1.93, 1.26 to 2.95). For adults, the odds ratios were 0.81 (0.51 to 1.28) for suicidality, 1.09 (0.55 to 2.14) for aggression, and 2.00 (0.79 to 5.04) for akathisia. The corresponding values for children and adolescents were 2.39 (1.31 to 4.33), 2.79 (1.62 to 4.81), and 2.15 (0.48 to 9.65). In the summary trial reports on Eli Lilly’s website, almost all deaths were noted, but all suicidal ideation events were missing, and the information on the remaining outcomes was

  20. Amygdala Reactivity to Emotional Faces in the Prediction of General and Medication-Specific Responses to Antidepressant Treatment in the Randomized iSPOT-D Trial.

    PubMed

    Williams, Leanne M; Korgaonkar, Mayuresh S; Song, Yun C; Paton, Rebecca; Eagles, Sarah; Goldstein-Piekarski, Andrea; Grieve, Stuart M; Harris, Anthony W F; Usherwood, Tim; Etkin, Amit

    2015-09-01

    Although the cost of poor treatment outcomes of depression is staggering, we do not yet have clinically useful methods for selecting the most effective antidepressant for each depressed person. Emotional brain activation is altered in major depressive disorder (MDD) and implicated in treatment response. Identifying which aspects of emotional brain activation are predictive of general and specific responses to antidepressants may help clinicians and patients when making treatment decisions. We examined whether amygdala activation probed by emotion stimuli is a general or differential predictor of response to three commonly prescribed antidepressants, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). A test-retest design was used to assess patients with MDD in an academic setting as part of the International Study to Predict Optimized Treatment in Depression. A total of 80 MDD outpatients were scanned prior to treatment and 8 weeks after randomization to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors escitalopram and sertraline and the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, venlafaxine-extended release (XR). A total of 34 matched controls were scanned at the same timepoints. We quantified the blood oxygen level-dependent signal of the amygdala during subliminal and supraliminal viewing of facial expressions of emotion. Response to treatment was defined by ⩾50% symptom improvement on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Pre-treatment amygdala hypo-reactivity to subliminal happy and threat was a general predictor of treatment response, regardless of medication type (Cohen's d effect size 0.63 to 0.77; classification accuracy, 75%). Responders showed hypo-reactivity compared to controls at baseline, and an increase toward 'normalization' post-treatment. Pre-treatment amygdala reactivity to subliminal sadness was a differential moderator of non-response to venlafaxine-XR (Cohen's d effect size 1.5; classification accuracy, 81%). Non-responders to

  1. [Treatment of chronic back pain with antidepressant cymbalta: an experimental study].

    PubMed

    Voznesenskaia, T G; Leonova, A R; Kaverina, I V

    2007-01-01

    Thirty-two patients at the acute stage of chronic back pain have been studied. Cymbalta was used as a monotherapy in dosage 60 mg daily during 6 weeks simultaneously with traditional non-pharmacological therapy. Treatment efficacy was assessed using self-rating methods and quantitative scales measuring pain intensity as well as Spilberger trait/state anxiety inventory, Beck depression scale, Plutchik scale measuring psychological defense mechanisms, quality of sleep, quality of life and evaluation of autonomic dysfunction. The treatment with cymbalta resulted in significant reduction of pain in 90% patients, with full stopping of the syndrome in 10% and marked reduction in 55%. The stopping of pain syndrome was correlated with significant improvement of emotional status and quality of life and sleep normalization of the patients. PMID:18379477

  2. Clinical Utility of Combinatorial Pharmacogenomics-Guided Antidepressant Therapy: Evidence from Three Clinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Altar, C Anthony; Carhart, Joseph; Allen, Josiah D; Hall-Flavin, Daniel; Winner, Joel; Dechairo, Bryan

    2015-10-01

    DNA of 258 patients with treatment-resistant depression was collected in three 8-10 week, two-arm, prospective clinical trials. Forty-four allelic variations were measured in genes for the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes CYP2D6, CYPC19, and CYP1A2, the serotonin transporter (SLC6A4), and the 5-HT2A receptor (HTR2A). The combinatorial pharmacogenomic (CPGx™) GeneSight test results were provided to clinicians to support medication changes from baseline (guided arm), or they were provided at the end of each study to clinicians of unguided patients who were treated as usual (TAU). TAU subjects who at baseline were prescribed medications genetically discordant for them showed only a 12% symptom improvement, far less than the 32.5% or 28.5% improvements of the TAU subjects on yellow-category ('use with caution'; p = 0.002) or green-category medications ('use as recommended'; p = 0.02), respectively. The odds of a clinical response were increased 2.3-fold among all GeneSight-guided compared to all TAU subjects (p = 0.004), and overall, the guided group had a 53% greater improvement in depressive symptoms (p = 0.0002), a 1.7-fold relative improvement in response (p = 0.01), and a number needed to treat for one clinical response above that seen in the TAU group of 6.07. PMID:27606312

  3. Augmenting antidepressant medication with modular CBT for geriatric generalized anxiety disorder: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Stoddard, Jill A.; White, Kamila S.; Kornblith, Sander; Nguyen, Hoang; Andreescu, Carmen; Zisook, Sidney; Lenze, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a prevalent psychiatric condition in older adults with deleterious effects on health and cognition. Although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medications have some efficacy as acute treatments for geriatric GAD, incomplete response is the most common outcome of monotherapy. We therefore developed a novel sequential treatment strategy, using personalized, modular cognitive-behavioral therapy (mCBT) to augment SSRI medication. Method In an open label pilot study (N =10), subjects received a sequenced trial of 12 weeks of escitalopram followed by 16 weeks of escitalopram augmented with mCBT. We also examined the maintenance effects of mCBT over a 28-week follow-up period following drug discontinuation and termination of psychotherapy. Results Results suggest that (1) adding mCBT to escitalopram significantly reduced anxiety symptoms and pathological worry, resulting in full remission for most patients and (2) some patients maintained response after all treatments were withdrawn. Conclusion Findings suggest that mCBT may be an effective augmentation strategy when added to SSRI medication and provide limited support for the long-term benefit of mCBT after discontinuation of pharmacotherapy. PMID:20872925

  4. Referral for psychological therapy of people with long term conditions improves adherence to antidepressants and reduces emergency department attendance: Controlled before and after study

    PubMed Central

    de Lusignan, Simon; Chan, Tom; Tejerina Arreal, Maria C.; Parry, Glenys; Dent-Brown, Kim; Kendrick, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Background Referral to psychological therapies is recommended for people with common mental health problems (CMHP) however its impact on healthcare utilisation in people with long term conditions (LTCs) is not known. Method Routinely collected primary care, psychological therapy clinic and hospital data were extracted for the registered population of 20 practices (N = 121199). These data were linked using the SAPREL (Secure and Private Record Linkage) method. We linked the 1118 people referred to psychological therapies with 6711 controls, matched for age, gender and practice. We compared utilisation of healthcare resources by people with LTCs, 6 months before and after referral, and conducted a controlled before and after study to compare health utilisation with controls. We made the assumption that collection of a greater number of repeat prescriptions for antidepressants was associated with greater adherence. Results Overall 21.8% of people with an LTC had CMHP vs. 18.8% without (p < 0.001). People with LTCs before referral were more likely to use health care resources (2-tailed t-test p < 0.001). Cases with LTCs showed referral to the psychological therapies clinic was associated with increased antidepressant medication prescribing (mean differences 0.62, p < 0.001) and less use of emergency department than controls (mean difference −0.21, p = 0.003). Conclusions Referral to improved access to psychological therapies (IAPT) services appears of value to people with LTC. It is associated with the issue of a greater number of prescriptions for anti-depressant medicines and less use of emergency services. Further studies are needed to explore bed occupancy and outpatient attendance. PMID:23639304

  5. Transcriptomics and the mechanisms of antidepressant efficacy.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Karen; Tansey, Katherine E; Powell, Timothy R; Coppola, Giovanni; Uher, Rudolf; Zvezdana Dernovšek, Mojca; Mors, Ole; Hauser, Joanna; Souery, Daniel; Maier, Wolfgang; Henigsberg, Neven; Rietschel, Marcella; Placentino, Anna; Aitchison, Katherine J; Craig, Ian W; Farmer, Anne E; Breen, Gerome; McGuffin, Peter; Dobson, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which antidepressants have their effects are not clear and the reasons for variability in treatment outcomes are also unknown. However, there is evidence from candidate gene research that indicates gene expression changes may be involved in antidepressant action. In this study, we examined antidepressant-induced alterations in gene expression on a transcriptome-wide scale, exploring associations with treatment response. Blood samples were taken from a subset of depressed patients from the GENDEP study (n=136) before and after eight weeks of treatment with either escitalopram or nortriptyline. Transcriptomic data were obtained from these samples using Illumina HumanHT-12 v4 Expression BeadChip microarrays. When analysing individual genes, we observed that changes in the expression of two genes (MMP28 and KXD1) were associated with better response to nortriptyline. Considering connectivity between genes, we identified modules of genes that were highly coexpressed. In the whole sample, changes in one of the ten identified coexpression modules showed significant correlation with treatment response (cor=0.27, p=0.0029). Using transcriptomic approaches, we have identified gene expression correlates of the therapeutic effects of antidepressants, highlighting possible molecular pathways involved in efficacious antidepressant treatment.

  6. Heart rate variability in major depressive disorder and after antidepressant treatment with agomelatine and paroxetine: Findings from the Taiwan Study of Depression and Anxiety (TAISDA).

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ta-Chuan; Kao, Lien-Cheng; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Kuo, Terry B J; Huang, San-Yuan; Chang, Chuan-Chia; Chang, Hsin-An

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from previous studies suggests that heart rate variability (HRV) is reduced in major depressive disorder (MDD). However, whether this reduction is attributable to the disorder per se or to medication, since antidepressants may also affect HRV, is still debated. There is a dearth of information regarding the effects of agomelatine, a novel antidepressant, on HRV. Here, we investigated whether HRV is reduced in MDD and compared the effects of agomelatine and paroxetine on HRV. We recruited 618 physically healthy unmedicated patients with MDD and 506 healthy volunteers aged 20-65 years. Frequency-domain measures of resting HRV were obtained at the time of enrollment for all participants. For patients with MDD, these measures were obtained again after 6 weeks of either agomelatine or paroxetine monotherapy. Compared with healthy subjects, unmedicated patients with MDD exhibited significantly lower variance (total HRV), low frequency (LF), and high frequency (HF) HRV, and a higher LF/HF ratio. Depression severity independently contributed to decreased HRV and vagal tone. Fifty-six patients completed the open-label trial (n=29 for agomelatine, n=27 for paroxetine). Between-group analyses showed a significant group-by-time interaction for LF-HRV and HF-HRV, driven by increases in LF-HRV and HF-HRV only after agomelatine treatment. Within the paroxetine-treated group, there were no significant changes in mean R-R intervals or any HRV indices. We therefore concluded that MDD is associated with reduced HRV, which is inversely related to depression severity. Compared with paroxetine, agomelatine has a more vagotonic effect, suggesting greater cardiovascular safety. Clinicians should consider HRV effects while selecting antidepressants especially for depressed patients who already have decreased cardiac vagal tone.

  7. Heart rate variability in major depressive disorder and after antidepressant treatment with agomelatine and paroxetine: Findings from the Taiwan Study of Depression and Anxiety (TAISDA).

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ta-Chuan; Kao, Lien-Cheng; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Kuo, Terry B J; Huang, San-Yuan; Chang, Chuan-Chia; Chang, Hsin-An

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from previous studies suggests that heart rate variability (HRV) is reduced in major depressive disorder (MDD). However, whether this reduction is attributable to the disorder per se or to medication, since antidepressants may also affect HRV, is still debated. There is a dearth of information regarding the effects of agomelatine, a novel antidepressant, on HRV. Here, we investigated whether HRV is reduced in MDD and compared the effects of agomelatine and paroxetine on HRV. We recruited 618 physically healthy unmedicated patients with MDD and 506 healthy volunteers aged 20-65 years. Frequency-domain measures of resting HRV were obtained at the time of enrollment for all participants. For patients with MDD, these measures were obtained again after 6 weeks of either agomelatine or paroxetine monotherapy. Compared with healthy subjects, unmedicated patients with MDD exhibited significantly lower variance (total HRV), low frequency (LF), and high frequency (HF) HRV, and a higher LF/HF ratio. Depression severity independently contributed to decreased HRV and vagal tone. Fifty-six patients completed the open-label trial (n=29 for agomelatine, n=27 for paroxetine). Between-group analyses showed a significant group-by-time interaction for LF-HRV and HF-HRV, driven by increases in LF-HRV and HF-HRV only after agomelatine treatment. Within the paroxetine-treated group, there were no significant changes in mean R-R intervals or any HRV indices. We therefore concluded that MDD is associated with reduced HRV, which is inversely related to depression severity. Compared with paroxetine, agomelatine has a more vagotonic effect, suggesting greater cardiovascular safety. Clinicians should consider HRV effects while selecting antidepressants especially for depressed patients who already have decreased cardiac vagal tone. PMID:26216863

  8. Antidepressants in pregnancy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Udechuku, Adaobi; Nguyen, Tram; Hill, Rebecca; Szego, Klara

    2010-11-01

    Part of three systematic reviews on the effects of psychotropic medication exposure in pregnancy, this paper critically reviews the literature on adverse effects of antidepressant use during pregnancy, and derives recommendations for clinical practice. Electronic databases were searched for original research studies examining the effects of gestational exposure to antidepressants on pregnancy, neonatal and longer-term developmental outcomes. Most results were derived from cohort (prospective and retrospective) and casecontrol studies. There were no randomized controlled trials. Congenital malformations: 35 studies identified, 12 demonstrated a significant association between antidepressant use in early pregnancy and congenital malformations. Pregnancy outcomes: 35 articles identified, outcomes measured rates of spontaneous abortion (4 out of 7 studies reporting elevated risk), preterm birth (15 out of 19 reporting elevated risk) and abnormal birth weight (8 out of 23 reporting elevated risk). Neonatal outcomes: 17 controlled studies including one meta-analysis were identified concerning neonatal adaptation. 15 studies showed an association between gestational exposure to antidepressants and neonatal adaptation difficulties. Three studies examined an association between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) exposure and persistent pulmonary hypertension in the neonate with conflicting results. Longer-term developmental outcomes: 6 of 7 studies comparing developmental outcomes of children exposed to antidepressants in utero with non- exposed children reported no significant differences. Most of these medications remain relatively safe in pregnancy, but some significant areas of concern exist, particularly some evidence of higher risk of preterm birth, neonatal adaptation difficulties and congenital cardiac malformations (with paroxetine). The impact of these findings on the risk-benefit analysis when treating pregnant women with antidepressants is discussed.

  9. Ketamine and other potential glutamate antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Arpan; McKie, Shane; Deakin, J F William

    2015-01-30

    The need for rapid acting antidepressants is widely recognised. There has been much interest in glutamate mechanisms in major depressive disorder (MDD) as a promising target for the development of new antidepressants. A single intravenous infusion of ketamine, a N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist anaesthetic agent, can alleviate depressive symptoms in patients within hours of administration. The mechanism of action appears to be in part through glutamate release onto non-NMDA receptors including α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and metabotropic receptors. However these are also reported effects on 5-HT, dopamine and intracellular effects on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. The effects of SSRI (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor) antidepressants may also involve alterations in NMDA function. The article reviews the effect of current antidepressants on NMDA and examines the efficacy and mechanism of ketamine. Response to ketamine is also discussed and comparison with other glutamate drugs including lamotrigine, amantadine, riluzole, memantine, traxoprodil, GLYX-13, MK-0657, RO4917523, AZD2066 and Coluracetam. Future studies need to link the rapid antidepressant effects seen with ketamine to inflammatory theories in MDD.

  10. Antidepressants modulate glycine action in rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Khae Hawn; Kang, Ki-Woon; Kang, Yoo-Jin; Kim, Tae-Wook; Park, Hun-Kyung; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Antidepressants are drugs that relieve symptoms of depressive disorders. Fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran are different types of antidepressants, and they have widely been used for relieving of depression symptoms. In the present study, the effects of fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran on the glycine-induced ion current by nystatin-perforated patch clamp and on the amplitude of field potential in the hippocampal CA1 region by multichannel extracellular recording, MED64, system, were studied. In the present results, fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran reduced glycine-induced ion current in the hippocampal CA1 neurons in nystatin-perforated patch clamp method. These drugs enhanced the amplitude of the field potential in the hippocampal CA1 region in MED64 system. These results suggest that antidepressants may increase neuronal activity by enhancing field potential through inhibition on glycine-induced ion current. PMID:26730381

  11. The antidepressant effects of anticholinergic drugs.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2009-06-01

    Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter that is important for communication between neurons and muscle, is involved in direct neurotransmission in the autonomic parasympathetic nervous system, and has been implicated in cognitive processing, arousal, and attention in the brain. The cholinergic-adrenergic hypothesis of mood disorders states that a given affective state might represent a balance between central cholinergic and adrenergic neurotransmitter activity in those areas of the brain regulating moods. According to this hypothesis, depression would be the clinical manifestation of a state of cholinergic dominance, whereas mania would reflect adrenergic dominance. On the basis of this hypothesis, anticholinergic drugs have been investigated as potential treatments for depression, but study results have not shown consistent antidepressant effects. However, the dosage dependency of scopolamine's effect across different studies and the lack of antidepressant effects with other anticholinergic drugs suggest that a specific muscarinic receptor subtype might be most relevant to the potential antidepressant mechanism of action of anticholinergic drugs.

  12. Antidepressants modulate glycine action in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Khae Hawn; Kang, Ki-Woon; Kang, Yoo-Jin; Kim, Tae-Wook; Park, Hun-Kyung; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2015-12-01

    Antidepressants are drugs that relieve symptoms of depressive disorders. Fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran are different types of antidepressants, and they have widely been used for relieving of depression symptoms. In the present study, the effects of fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran on the glycine-induced ion current by nystatin-perforated patch clamp and on the amplitude of field potential in the hippocampal CA1 region by multichannel extracellular recording, MED64, system, were studied. In the present results, fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran reduced glycine-induced ion current in the hippocampal CA1 neurons in nystatin-perforated patch clamp method. These drugs enhanced the amplitude of the field potential in the hippocampal CA1 region in MED64 system. These results suggest that antidepressants may increase neuronal activity by enhancing field potential through inhibition on glycine-induced ion current. PMID:26730381

  13. Antidepressants and cardiovascular adverse events: A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Nezafati, Mohammad Hassan; Vojdanparast, Mohammad; Nezafati, Pouya

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Major depression or deterioration of previous mood disorders is a common adverse consequence of coronary heart disease, heart failure, and cardiac revascularization procedures. Therefore, treatment of depression is expected to result in improvement of mood condition in these patients. Despite demonstrated effects of anti-depressive treatment in heart disease patients, the use of some antidepressants have shown to be associated with some adverse cardiac and non-cardiac events. In this narrative review, the authors aimed to first assess the findings of published studies on beneficial and also harmful effects of different types of antidepressants used in patients with heart diseases. Finally, a new categorization for selecting antidepressants according to their cardiovascular effects was described. METHODS Using PubMed, Web of Science, SCOPUS, Index Copernicus, CINAHL, and Cochrane Database, we identified studies designed to evaluate the effects of depression and also using antidepressants on cardiovascular outcome. A 40 studies were finally assessed systematically. Among those eligible studies, 14 were cohort or historical cohort studies, 15 were randomized clinical trial, 4 were retrospective were case-control studies, 3 were meta-analyses and 2 animal studies, and 2 case studies. RESULTS According to the current review, we recommend to divide antidepressants into three categories based on the severity of cardiovascular adverse consequences including (1) the safest drugs including those drugs with cardio-protective effects on ventricular function, as well as cardiac conductive system including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, (2) neutralized drugs with no evidenced effects on cardiovascular system including serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and (3) harmful drugs with adverse effects on cardiac function, hemodynamic stability, and heart rate variability including tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin antagonist and reuptake inhibitors

  14. Review of Evidence for Use of Antidepressants in Bipolar Depression

    PubMed Central

    McInerney, Shane J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Depressive episodes predominate over the course of bipolar disorder and cause considerable functional impairment. Antidepressants are frequently prescribed in the treatment of bipolar depression, despite concerns about efficacy and risk of switching to mania. This review provides a critical examination of the evidence for and against the use of antidepressants in bipolar depression. Data Sources: English-language peer-reviewed literature and evidence-based guidelines published between January 1, 1980, and March 2014, were identified using PubMed, MEDLINE, PsycINFO/PsycLIT, and EMBASE. All searches contained the terms antidepressants, bipolar depression, depressive episodes in bipolar disorder, and treatment guidelines for bipolar depression. Meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and practice guidelines were included. Bibliographies from these publications were used to identify additional articles of interest. Data Extraction: Studies involving treatment of bipolar depression with antidepressant monotherapy, adjunctive use of antidepressant with a mood stabilizer, and meta-analysis of such studies combined were reviewed. Conclusions: The body of evidence on the use of antidepressant monotherapy to treat patients with bipolar depression is contentious, but the recommendations from evidence-based guidelines do not support antidepressant monotherapy for bipolar depression. Only when mood stabilizer or atypical antipsychotic monotherapy has failed should adjunctive treatment with an antidepressant be considered. PMID:25667812

  15. Synthesis and Behavioral Studies of Chiral Cyclopropanes as Selective α4β2-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Partial Agonists Exhibiting an Antidepressant Profile. Part III.

    PubMed

    Onajole, Oluseye K; Vallerini, Gian Paolo; Eaton, J Brek; Lukas, Ronald J; Brunner, Dani; Caldarone, Barbara J; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2016-06-15

    We report the synthesis and biological characterization of novel derivatives of 3-[(1-methyl-2(S)-pyrrolidinyl)methoxy]-5-cyclopropylpyridine (4a-f and 5) as potent and highly selective α4β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) full or partial agonists. A systematic structure-activity study was carried out on the previously described compound 3b, particularly concerning its (2-methoxyethyl)cyclopropyl side-chain, in an effort to improve its metabolic stability while maintaining receptor selectivity. Compound 4d exhibited very similar subnanomolar binding affinity for α4β2- and α4β2*-nAChRs compared to 3b, and it showed excellent potency in activating high-sensitivity (HS) α4β2-nAChRs with an EC50 value of 8.2 nM. Testing of 4d in the SmartCube assay revealed that the compound has a combined antidepressant plus antipsychotic signature. In the forced swim test at a dose of 30 mg/kg given intraperitoneally, 4d was found to be as efficacious as sertraline, thus providing evidence of the potential use of the compound as an antidepressant. Additional promise for use of 4d in humans comes from pharmacokinetic studies in mice indicating brain penetration, and additional assays show compound stability in the presence of human microsomes and hepatocytes. Thus, 4d has a very favorable preclinical drug profile. PMID:27035276

  16. Effects of Persisting Emotional Impact from Child Abuse and Norepinephrine Transporter Genetic Variation on Antidepressant Efficacy in Major Depression: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajeet Bhagat; Bousman, Chad A.; Ng, Chee Hong; Byron, Keith; Berk, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective Previous studies suggest child abuse and serotonergic polymorphism influence depression susceptibility and anti-depressant efficacy. Polymorphisms of the norepinephrine transporter (NET) may also be involved. Research in the area is possibly clouded by under reporting of abuse in researcher trials. Methods Adults (n=51) with major depressive disorder has 8 weeks treatment with escitalopram or venlafaxine. Abuse history was obtained, the ongoing emotional impact of which was measured with the 15-item impact of event scale (IES-15). The 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) was applied serially. Two NET polymorphisms (rs2242446 and rs5569) were assayed, blinded to HDRS ratings and abuse history. Results No subjects reporting abuse with high impact in adulthood (IES-15 ≥26, n=12) remitted; whereas 77% reporting low impact (IES-15 <26; n=26) remitted (p<0.001). Subjects reporting high impact abuse (n=12) had a 50-fold (95% confidence interval=4.85–514.6) greater odds of carrying rs2242446-TT genotype, but the small sample size leaves this finding vulnerable to type I error. Conclusion The level of persisting impact of child abuse appears relevant to antidepressant efficacy, with susceptibility to such possibly being influence by NET rs2242446 polymorphism. Larger studies may be merited to expand on this pilot level finding given potential for biomarker utility. PMID:25912538

  17. Antidepressant selection and use and healthcare expenditures. An empirical approach.

    PubMed

    Crown, W H; Hylan, T R; Meneades, L

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether 1-year total healthcare expenditures differed between patients who initiated therapy on a tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) or a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) after controlling for initial antidepressant selection and antidepressant use pattern. A retrospective claims database covering a privately insured population in the US was used. Patients who initiated therapy in the outpatient setting (primary care or psychiatrist) were considered. Two-stage sample selection models were estimated that included controls for initial antidepressant selection and use pattern. The analyses indicated that: (i) self-selection due to initial antidepressant selection was a statistically significant determinant of expenditures for patients who initiated therapy on a TCA but not an SSRI; (ii) after controlling for initial antidepressant selection, antidepressant use pattern was a statistically significant and positive determinant of expenditures for both TCA and SSRI patients; and (iii) after controlling for initial antidepressant selection and use pattern, 1-year total direct healthcare expenditures were significantly lower for patients who initiated therapy on an SSRI than for patients who initiated therapy on a TCA.

  18. Abuse and misuse of antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Elizabeth A; Sullivan, Maria A

    2014-01-01

    Background Rates of prescription drug abuse have reached epidemic proportions. Large-scale epidemiologic surveys of this under-recognized clinical problem have not included antidepressants despite their contribution to morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this review is to look specifically at the misuse of antidepressants and how this behavior may fit into the growing crisis of nonmedical use of prescription drugs. Methods We conducted a comprehensive search on PubMed, Medline, and PsycINFO using the search terms “antidepressant”, “abuse”, “misuse”, “nonmedical use”, “dependence”, and “addiction”, as well as individual antidepressant classes (eg, “SSRI”) and individual antidepressants (eg, “fluoxetine”) in various combinations, to identify articles of antidepressant misuse and abuse. Results A small but growing literature on the misuse and abuse of antidepressants consists largely of case reports. Most cases of antidepressant abuse have occurred in individuals with comorbid substance use and mood disorders. The most commonly reported motivation for abuse is to achieve a psychostimulant-like effect. Antidepressants are abused at high doses and via a variety of routes of administration (eg, intranasal, intravenous). Negative consequences vary based upon antidepressant class and pharmacology, but these have included seizures, confusion, and psychotic-like symptoms. Conclusion The majority of individuals prescribed antidepressants do not misuse the medication. However, certain classes of antidepressants do carry abuse potential. Vulnerable patient populations include those with a history of substance abuse and those in controlled environments. Warning signs include the presence of aberrant behaviors. Physicians should include antidepressants when screening for risky prescription medication use. When antidepressant misuse is detected, a thoughtful treatment plan, including referral to an addiction specialist, should be developed and

  19. Potential Antidepressant Constituents of Nigella sativa Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Elkhayat, Ehab S.; Alorainy, Mohammad S.; El-Ashmawy, Ibrahim M.; Fat’hi, Shawkat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nigella sativa Linn. is well known seed in the Middle East, Asia, and the Far East as a natural remedy for many ailments and as a flavoring agent proclaimed medicinal usage dating back to the ancient Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans. An authentic saying of the Prophet Muhammad (Peace Be Upon Him) about black seed is also quoted in Al-Bukhari. Objective: This study was carried out to evaluate the antidepressant effect and isolate the potential antidepressant constituents of the polar extract of N. sativa seeds. Materials and Methods: The antidepressant effect was evaluated through the immobility duration in tail suspension and forced swim tests (FSTs). Albino mice were orally treated with N. sativa polar extract and its RP-18 column chromatography fractions (50 and 100 mg/kg,). Results: The polar extract and two of its sub-fractions were significantly able to decrease the immobility time of mice when subjected to both tail suspension and FSTs, the effects are comparable to standard drug (Sertraline, 5 mg/kg). However, these treatments did not affect the number of crossings and rearing in the open field test. Phytochemical investigation of the two active fractions led to the isolation of quercetin-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside 1, quercetin-7-O-β-D-gluco- pyranoside 2, tauroside E 3, and sapindoside B as the potential antidepressant constituents. SUMMARY Phytochemical and biological evaluation the antidepressant constituents in Nigella sativa using the tail suspension and forced swim methods afforded the isolation and identification of quercetin-3-O-α-L rhamnopyranoside, quercetin-7-O-β-D gluco pyranoside, tauroside E, and sapindoside B as the potential antidepressant constituents in the polar extract of N. sativa. The isolated compounds were identified through extensive NMR analysis (1D, 2D, ESI MS). Abbreviations used: TST: Tail suspension test, FST: Forced swim test, OFT: An Open field test PMID:27041854

  20. Antidepressant Augmentation Using the NMDA-Antagonist Memantine: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Eric G.; Deligiannidis, Kristina M.; Ulbricht, Christine M.; Landolin, Chelsea S.; Patel, Jayendra K.; Rothschild, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Intravenous NMDA antagonists have shown promising results in rapidly ameliorating depression symptoms, but placebo-controlled trials of oral NMDA antagonists as monotherapy have not observed efficacy. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (NCT00344682) of the NMDA antagonist memantine as an augmentation treatment for patients with DSM-IV major depressive disorder. Method 31 participants with partial or nonresponse to their current antidepressant were randomized (from 2006–2011) to add memantine (flexible dose 5–20 mg/day, with all memantine group participants reaching the dose of 20 mg/day) (n= 15) or placebo (n= 16) to their existing treatment for 8 weeks. The primary outcome, change in Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Score (MADRS), was evaluated with repeated measures mixed effects models using last-observation-carried-forward methods. Secondary outcomes included other depression and anxiety rating scales, suicidal and delusional ideation, and other adverse effects. Results Participants receiving memantine did not show a statistically or clinically significant change in MADRS scores compared to placebo, either over the entire study (β=0.133, favoring placebo, p=0.74) or at study completion (week 8 MADRS score change: −7.13 +/−6.61 (memantine); −7.25 +/−11.14 (placebo), p=0.97). A minimal-to-small effect size (comparing change to baseline variability) was observed (d=0.19), favoring placebo. Similarly, no substantial effect sizes favoring memantine, nor statistically significant between-group differences, were observed on secondary efficacy or safety outcomes. Conclusions This trial did not detect significant statistical or effect size differences between memantine and placebo augmentation among nonresponders or poor responders to conventional antidepressants. While the small number of participants is a limitation, this study suggests memantine lacks substantial efficacy as an augmentation treatment against

  1. Parents' difficulties as co-therapists in CBT among non-responding youths with anxiety disorders: Parent and therapist experiences.

    PubMed

    Lundkvist-Houndoumadi, Irene; Thastum, Mikael; Nielsen, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    No increased effect has been associated with parent involvement in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for youths with anxiety disorders. The purpose of this study was to explore parent and therapist experiences of CBT among non-responding youths with anxiety disorders, with a primary focus on parent involvement in therapy. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was applied to 24 sets of semi-structured interviews with families and therapists of anxiety-disordered youths who had not profited from CBT with parental inclusion. From the superordinate theme parents' difficulties acting as co-therapists, which emerged from the analyses, two master themes represented the perspectives of parents (difficulty working together with the youth and feeling unqualified, with limited resources), and two represented the perspectives of therapists (family dynamics stood in the way of progress and difficulty transferring control to parents). Parent and therapist experiences complemented each other, offering two different perspectives on parent difficulties as co-therapists. However, the two groups' views on their respective roles in therapy were in conflict. Parents wished to remain being "just the parents" and for the experts to take over, while therapists wished to act as facilitators transferring the control to parents. Clinical implications are drawn for parental involvement and enhancement of treatment outcomes for likely non-responders.

  2. A Qualitative Analysis of the Perception of Stigma Among Latinos Receiving Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Interian, Alejandro; Martinez, Igda E.; Guarnaccia, Peter J.; Vega, William A.; Escobar, Javier I.

    2008-01-01

    Objective This study sought to describe the role of stigma in antidepressant adherence among Latinos. Methods The study utilized data generated from six focus groups of Latino outpatients receiving antidepressants (N=30). By using a grounded theory approach, qualitative analysis focused specifically on the role of stigma in antidepressant treatment, as well as salient Latino values. Results Perceptions of stigma were related to both the diagnosis of depression and use of antidepressant medication. Qualitative analyses showed that antidepressant use was seen as implying more severe illness, weakness or failure to cope with problems, and being under the effects of a drug. Reports of stigma were also related to social consequences. Also, the perceived negative attributes of antidepressant use were at odds with self-perceived cultural values. Conclusions Stigma was a prominent concern among Latinos receiving antidepressants, and stigma often affected adherence. Furthermore, culture is likely to play an important role in the communication of stigma and its associated complications. PMID:18048562

  3. A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study of Quetiapine-XR Monotherapy or Adjunctive Therapy to Antidepressant in Acute Major Depressive Disorder with Current Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ranran; Wu, Renrong; Chen, Jun; Kemp, David E.; Ren, Ming; Conroy, Carla; Chan, Philip; Serrano, Mary Beth; Ganocy, Stephen J.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Gao, Keming

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To pilot efficacy and safety data of quetiapine-XR monotherapy or adjunctive therapy to antidepressant(s) in the acute treatment of MDD with current generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Methods The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview was used to ascertain the diagnosis of DSM-IV Axis I disorders. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to quetiapine-XR or placebo for up to 8 weeks. Changes from baseline to endpoint in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 items (HAMD-17), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S), Quick Inventory of Depression Symptomatology-16 items Self-Report (QIDS-16-SR) total scores, and other outcome measures were analyzed with the last observation carried forward strategy and/or mixed-effects modeling for repeated measures. Results Of the 34 patients screened, 23 patients were randomized to receive quetiapine-XR (n = 11) or placebo (n = 12), with 5 and 4 completing the study, respectively. The mean dose of quetiapine-XR was 154 ± 91 mg/d. The change from baseline to endpoint in the total scores of HAMD-17, HAM-A, QIDS-16-SR, and CGI-S were significant in the quetiapine-XR group, but only the change in HAM-A total score was significant in the placebo group. The differences in these changes between the two groups were only significant in CGI-S scores, with the rest of numerical larger in the quetiapine-XR group. The most common side effects from quetiapine-XR were dry mouth, somnolence/sedation, and fatigue. Conclusions In this pilot study, quetiapine-XR was numerically superior to placebo in reducing depressive and anxiety symptoms in patients with MDD and current GAD. Large sample studies are warranted to support or refute these preliminary findings.

  4. A Comparison of Community College Responders and Nonresponders to the VEDS Student Follow-Up Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carifio, James; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A survey of respondents and nonrespondents to the Vocational Education Data System's follow-up survey of Massachusetts community college graduates was designed to measure response bias. The survey investigated employment patterns, wages, and degree of job relatedness. Results suggest original data was biased, if at all, toward underestimation, not…

  5. Understanding Faculty Survey Nonrespondents: Their Characteristics, Organizational Citizenship Behaviors, Workplace Attitudes, and Reasons for Nonparticipation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Kiernan Robert

    2013-01-01

    College and university administrators frequently survey their faculty to inform decisions affecting the academic workplace. Higher education researchers, too, rely heavily on survey methodologies in their scholarly work. Survey response rates, however, have been declining steadily for decades, and when nonrespondents and respondents systematically…

  6. The controversial link between antidepressants and suicidality risks in adults: data from a naturalistic study on a large sample of in-patients with a major depressive episode.

    PubMed

    Seemüller, Florian; Riedel, Michael; Obermeier, Michael; Bauer, Michael; Adli, Mazda; Mundt, Christoph; Holsboer, Florian; Brieger, Peter; Laux, Gerd; Bender, Wolfram; Heuser, Isabella; Zeiler, Joachim; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Jäger, Markus; Henkel, Verena; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2009-03-01

    Some meta-analyses of randomized placebo-controlled trials on antidepressants conclude that there might be an increased risk for suicidal behaviour, especially in children and adolescents but also in adults. Placebo-controlled trials exclude patients with serious suicidality and might therefore underestimate the risk of respective adverse events. The change of suicidal ideation and the prevalence of suicides and non-fatal suicide attempts were therefore analysed in a large naturalistic prospective multicentre study of depressed in-patients. Additionally, specific risk factors for new emergence of suicidal ideation were investigated. The naturalistic prospective study was performed in 12 psychiatric hospitals of the German research network on depression and suicidality (seven psychiatric university hospitals and five district hospitals) in Germany. All patients (n=1014) were hospitalized and had to meet DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder. Six events were defined for the purposes of statistical analysis: 'emergence', 'extended emergence', 'improvement' and 'worsening of suicidal ideation', 'suicide attempts' and 'suicides'. Logistic regression analysis and classification and regression trees (CART) analyses were conducted to determine specific risk factors for new emergence of suicidal ideation. The mean HAMD total score decreased from 24.8 at baseline to 10 after 10 wk. An effect on suicidality was evident by week 2 in the sense of a decrease of the mean HAMD item-3 score. Emergence, worsening and improvement of suicidal ideation occurred in 3.2%, 14.74% and 90.79% of patients, respectively. A total of 10 suicide attempts and two suicides were reported. The rate of suicides (13.44/1000 patient-years) was rather low and comparable to the rate observed in randomized controlled antidepressant trials. Five risk factors for emergence of suicidal ideation were determined with two independent statistical methods: age (with higher risk at age <45 yr), treatment

  7. Human cysticercosis: antigens, antibodies and non-responders.

    PubMed Central

    Flisser, A; Woodhouse, E; Larralde, C

    1980-01-01

    Immunoelectrophoresis of sera from patients with brain cysticercosis against a crude antigenic extract from Cysticercus cellulosae indicates that nearly 50% of the patients do not make sufficient antibodies to ostensively precipitate. The other 50% of the patients who do make precipitating antibodies show a very heterogeneous response in the number of antigens they recognize as well as in the type of antigen--as classified by their electrophoretic mobilities. The most favoured, called antigen B, is recognized by 84% of positive sera and corresponds to one or a limited number of antigens isoelectric at pH 8.6. Indirect immunofluorescence with monospecific anti-human immunoglobulins, performed upon the immunoelectrophoretic preparations, reveal that all cysticercus antigens induced the synthesis of antibodies in the immunoglobulin classes in the order G greater than M greater than E greater than A greater than D. Finally, antigen H (an anodic component) seems to favour IgE relative to its ability to induce IgG. Thus, although in natural infection a good proportion of cysticercotic patients do not seem to mount an energetic antibody response against the parasite, giving rise to some speculations about immunosuppression, the fact that 50% do synthesize antibodies allows for some optimistic expectations from vaccination of humans--in view of the good results of vaccination in experimental animals mediated by IgG antibodies. A likely prospect for a human vaccine would be antigen B because it is the most frequently detected by humans, although its immunizing and toxic properties remain to be properly studied. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 FIG. 6 PMID:7389197

  8. Human cysticercosis: antigens, antibodies and non-responders.

    PubMed

    Flisser, A; Woodhouse, E; Larralde, C

    1980-01-01

    Immunoelectrophoresis of sera from patients with brain cysticercosis against a crude antigenic extract from Cysticercus cellulosae indicates that nearly 50% of the patients do not make sufficient antibodies to ostensively precipitate. The other 50% of the patients who do make precipitating antibodies show a very heterogeneous response in the number of antigens they recognize as well as in the type of antigen--as classified by their electrophoretic mobilities. The most favoured, called antigen B, is recognized by 84% of positive sera and corresponds to one or a limited number of antigens isoelectric at pH 8.6. Indirect immunofluorescence with monospecific anti-human immunoglobulins, performed upon the immunoelectrophoretic preparations, reveal that all cysticercus antigens induced the synthesis of antibodies in the immunoglobulin classes in the order G greater than M greater than E greater than A greater than D. Finally, antigen H (an anodic component) seems to favour IgE relative to its ability to induce IgG. Thus, although in natural infection a good proportion of cysticercotic patients do not seem to mount an energetic antibody response against the parasite, giving rise to some speculations about immunosuppression, the fact that 50% do synthesize antibodies allows for some optimistic expectations from vaccination of humans--in view of the good results of vaccination in experimental animals mediated by IgG antibodies. A likely prospect for a human vaccine would be antigen B because it is the most frequently detected by humans, although its immunizing and toxic properties remain to be properly studied.

  9. Antidepressant drugs and the emergence of suicidal tendencies.

    PubMed

    Teicher, M H; Glod, C A; Cole, J O

    1993-03-01

    Although antidepressant medications represent the cornerstone of treatment for patients with moderate to severe clinical depression, they also carry serious risks. There is evidence which suggests that antidepressants can, in rare instances, induce or exacerbate suicidal tendencies. Nine clinical mechanisms have been proposed through which this may occur. These are: (a) energizing depressed patients to act on pre-existing suicidal ideation; (b) paradoxically worsening depression; (c) inducing akathisia with associated self-destructive or aggressive impulses; (d) inducing panic attacks; (e) switching patients into manic or mixed states; (f) producing severe insomnia or interfering with sleep architecture; (g) inducing an organic obsessional state; (h) producing an organic personality disorder with borderline features; and (i) exacerbating or inducing electroencephalogram (EEG) or other neurological disturbances. Epidemiological and controlled studies also provide data on the association between antidepressant drugs and suicidal ideation, attempts and fatalities. These include studies which: (a) suggest that electroconvulsive therapy may be more effective than antidepressant drugs in reducing the frequency of suicide attempts; (b) indicate that antidepressants may differ in their capacity to reduce the frequency of suicide attempts; (c) find that more overdose attempts were made by patients receiving maprotiline than placebo; and (d) suggest that fluoxetine may be associated with a greater risk of inducing de novo suicidal ideation. Evidence suggests that antidepressants may vary by at least 15-fold in the number of fatal overdoses per million prescriptions. Estimated overdose proclivity rates were derived after adjusting the fatal toxicity data by the therapeutic index of the drug. These rates were very consistent between agents with the same pharmacological properties, and correlated well with known overdose risk rates for amitriptyline, mianserin and maprotiline

  10. Non-Responders to Intravenous Immunoglobulin and Coronary Artery Dilatation in Kawasaki Disease: Predictive Parameters in Korean Children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo Young; Kim, Dongwan; Kim, Yong Hyun; Ryoo, Eell; Sun, Yong Han; Jeon, In-sang; Jung, Mi-Jin; Cho, Hye Kyung; Tchah, Hann; Choi, Deok Young

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives In Kawasaki disease (KD), high dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) significantly lowers the coronary complications. However, some patients either do not respond to initial therapy or develop coronary complications. We aimed to identify the predictive factors for unresponsiveness to initial IVIG therapy and coronary artery dilatation (CAD; defined by Z-score≥2.5) in the acute phase and convalescent phase. Subjects and Methods A retrospective review was conducted of 703 patients with KD, admitted to Gachon University Gil Medical Center between January 2005 and June 2013. The patients were divided into two groups—IVIG responders vs. non-responders—based on the IVIG treatments, and presence of fever after treatment. Further, these groups were divided into two subgroups based on their CAD. Results Among the 703 patients with KD, the rate of non-responders to initial IVIG was 16.8%. Serum total bilirubin, platelet count, and neutrophil proportion were independent predictive parameters of unresponsiveness (p<0.05). CAD was found in 234 patients (33.3%) in the acute phase, and in 32 patients (4.6%) in the convalescent phase. Male gender, fever duration, serum C-reactive protein, and white blood cell count were related to CAD (p<0.05). CAD was detected more frequently in non-responders than in the responders (47.5% vs. 31.5%, p=0.001). Kobayashi, Egami, and Sano scoring systems applied to our study population reflected low sensitivities (28.0-33.9%). Conclusion Several independent parameters were related to unresponsiveness to the initial IVIG or CAD. These parameters might be helpful in establishing more focused and careful monitoring of high-risk KD patients in Korea. PMID:27482264

  11. Reconsidering GHB: orphan drug or new model antidepressant?

    PubMed

    Bosch, Oliver G; Quednow, Boris B; Seifritz, Erich; Wetter, Thomas C

    2012-05-01

    For six decades, the principal mode of action of antidepressant drugs is the inhibition of monoamine re-uptake from the synaptic cleft. Tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the new generation of dual antidepressants all exert their antidepressant effects by this mechanism. In the early days of the monoaminergic era, other efforts have been made to ameliorate the symptoms of depression by pharmacological means. The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system was and possibly still is one of the main alternative drug targets. Gammahydroxybutyrate (GHB) was developed as an orally active GABA analogue. It was tested in animal models of depression and human studies. The effects on sleep, agitation, anhedonia and depression were promising. However, the rise of benzodiazepines and tricyclic antidepressants brought GHB out of the scope of possible treatment alternatives. GHB is a GABA(B) and GHB receptor agonist with a unique spectrum of behavioural, neuroendocrine and sleep effects, and improves daytime sleepiness in various disorders such as narcolepsy, Parkinson's disease and fibromyalgia. Although it was banned from the US market at the end of the 1990s because of its abuse and overdose potential, it later was approved for the treatment of narcolepsy. New research methods and an extended view on other neurotransmitter systems as possible treatment targets of antidepressant treatment brought GHB back to the scene. This article discusses the unique neurobiological effects of GHB, its misuse potential and possible role as a model substance for the development of novel pharmacological treatment strategies in depressive disorders.

  12. Cannabinoids, Neurogenesis and Antidepressant Drugs: Is there a Link?

    PubMed Central

    Fogaça, Manoela Viar; Galve-Roperh, Ismael; Guimarães, Francisco Silveira; Campos, Alline Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Similar to clinically used antidepressants, cannabinoids can also regulate anxiety and depressive symptoms. Although the mechanisms of these effects are not completely understood, recent evidence suggests that changes in endocannabinoid system could be involved in some actions of antidepressants. Chronic antidepressant treatment modifies the expression of CB1 receptors and endocannabinoid (EC) content in brain regions related to mood and anxiety control. Moreover, both antidepressant and cannabinoids activate mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase(PI3-K)/Akt or PKB signaling, intracellular pathways that regulate cell proliferation and neural cell survival. Facilitation of hippocampal neurogenesis is proposed as a common effect of chronic antidepressant treatment. Genetic or pharmacological manipulations of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) or enzymes responsible for endocannabinoid-metabolism have also been shown to control proliferation and neurogenesis in the hippocampus. In the present paper we reviewed the studies that have investigated the potential contribution of cannabinoids and neurogenesisto antidepressant effects. Considering the widespread brain distribution of the EC system, a better understanding of this possible interaction could contribute to the development of therapeutic alternatives to mood and anxiety disorders. PMID:24179463

  13. Phosphatidylserine: an antidepressive or a cognitive enhancer?

    PubMed

    Castilho, João C; Perry, Juliana C; Andreatini, Roberto; Vital, Maria A B F

    2004-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the putative antidepressive and cognitive enhancer effects of phosphatidylserine (BC-PS). The antidepressive effect of BC-PS (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg), compared to saline or imipramine (IMI; 25 mg/kg), was studied in the forced swimming test in rats. These drugs were administered 1 and 8 h after training and 1 h before the test. BC-PS (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg)-treated rats exhibited a significant decrease in immobility time (IT) in the test session (performed 24 h after training) when compared to control rats. Moreover, the IMI-treated group showed a significant reduction in IT in comparison to control rats. The cognitive enhancer effect of BC-PS (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) was studied in the three versions of the water maze task: spatial working memory version, spatial reference memory version, and cued version. There was no significant difference between the BC-PS-treated groups and control animals in these memory tasks. Taken together, the present results are suggestive of an antidepressive effect of BC-PS in the forced swimming test in rats but not of a cognitive enhancer effect of the drug in the water maze test.

  14. Antidepressants for children. Is scientific support necessary?

    PubMed

    Fisher, R L; Fisher, S

    1996-02-01

    This article is concerned with issues pertaining to the degree to which clinical therapeutic decisions can reasonably depart from the best available scientific data. There is a tension between the traditions of practitioner autonomy and the boundaries set by research findings. Ambiguity exists as to how much freedom practitioners have to accept or reject the existing scientific paradigm. The nature of the dilemma is explored by analyzing the current problems confronting child psychiatrists and pediatricians who choose to treat depressed children with antidepressants. Despite unanimous literature of double-blind studies indicating that antidepressants are no more effective than placebos in treating depression in children and adolescents, such medications continue to be in wide use. The strategies used to resolve this sort of contradiction are considered, and certain ethical puzzles are appraised. PMID:8596118

  15. Antidepressant efficacy of sertraline: a double-blind, placebo- and amitriptyline-controlled, multicenter comparison study in outpatients with major depression.

    PubMed

    Reimherr, F W; Chouinard, G; Cohn, C K; Cole, J O; Itil, T M; LaPierre, Y D; Masco, H L; Mendels, J

    1990-12-01

    A double-blind, placebo- and amitriptyline-controlled comparison study was performed to evaluate the antidepressant efficacy of sertraline, a specific serotonin uptake inhibitor. Patients with DSM-III-defined major depression randomly received either sertraline (N = 149), amitriptyline (N = 149), or placebo (N = 150) once daily for the 8-week study period. The mean final daily medication dose for the all-patients group was 145 mg and 104 mg for the sertraline- and amitriptyline-treatment groups, respectively. As measured by the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and the Clinical Global Impressions Scale, both the sertraline and amitriptyline treatment groups showed a significantly greater improvement from baseline (p less than or equal to .001) than the placebo group. The sertraline group had a higher proportion of gastrointestinal complaints and male sexual dysfunction than either the amitriptyline or the placebo group. The amitriptyline group showed a higher proportion of anticholinergic and sedative side effects and dizziness compared with patients who received either sertraline or placebo. PMID:2258378

  16. Economic Effects of Anti-Depressant Usage on Elective Lumbar Fusion Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sayadipour, Amirali; Kepler, Chrisopher K.; Mago, Rajnish; Certa, Kenneth M.; Rasouli, Mohammad R.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.; Albert, Todd J.; Anderson, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested, although not proven, that presence of concomitant psychiatric disorders may increase the inpatient costs for patients undergoing elective surgery. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that elective lumbar fusion surgery is more costly in patients with under treatment for depression. Methods: This is a retrospective case-control study of 142 patients who underwent elective lumbar fusion. Of those 142 patients, 41 patients were chronically using an antidepressant medication that considered as a “study group”, and 101 patients were not taking an antidepressant medication that considered as a “control group”. Data was collected for this cohort regarding antidepressant usage patient demographics, length of stay (LOS), age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index scores and cost. Costs were compared between those with a concomitant antidepressant usage and those without antidepressant usage using multivariate analysis. Results: Patients using antidepressants and those with no history of antidepressant usage were similar in terms of gender, age and number of operative levels. The LOS demonstrated a non-significant trend towards longer stays in those using anti-depressants. Total charges, payments, variable costs and fixed costs were all higher in the antidepressant group but none of the differences reached statistical significance. Using Total Charges as the dependent variable, gender and having psychiatric comorbidities were retained independent variables. Use of an antidepressant was independently predictive of a 36% increase in Total Charges. Antidepressant usage as an independent variable also conferred a 22% increase in cost and predictive of a 19% increase in Fixed Cost. Male gender was predictive of a 30% increase in Total Charges. Conclusion: This study suggests use of antidepressant in patients who undergo elective spine fusion compared with control group is associated with increasing total cost and length of

  17. Unemployment and dispensed prescribed antidepressants in Stockholm County 1998-09.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Andreas; Hansson, Anders

    2014-08-01

    The association between unemployment rates and population mental health has been studied with contradictory results. We examine the association between unemployment and antidepressants in Stockholm County. Age- and sex-specific monthly data on unemployment and dispensed prescribed antidepressants from January 1998 to January 2008 in Stockholm County were used. The association was studied with bivariate cointegration analysis with stationarity check of the residuals. We found that dispensing of antidepressants was inversely associated with unemployment. One interpretation is that antidepressants have not followed decreasing unemployment rates.

  18. Milnacipran versus other antidepressive agents for depression

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Atsuo; Watanabe, Norio; Omori, Ichiro M; Barbui, Corrado; Cipriani, Andrea; McGuire, Hugh; Churchill, Rachel; Furukawa, Toshi A

    2014-01-01

    Background Although pharmacological and psychological interventions are both effective for major depression, antidepressant drugs are frequently used as first-line treatment in primary and secondary care settings. Milnacipran, a dual serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), is one of the antidepressant drugs that clinicians use for routine depression care. Objectives To assess the evidence for the efficacy, acceptability and tolerability of milnacipran in comparison with tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), heterocyclics, SSRIs and other newer antidepressive agents in the acute-phase treatment of major depression. Search methods The Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety & Neurosis review group Controlled Trials Register (CCDANCTR-Studies and CCDANCTR-References) were electronically searched in August 2008. References of relevant trials and other reviews were also checked. Trial databases of the drug-approving agencies and ongoing clinical trial registers for all published and unpublished trials were handsearched in 2007. All relevant authors were contacted for supplemental data. No language restriction was applied. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials comparing milnacipran with any other active antidepressive agents (including non-conventional agents such as herbal products like hypericum) as monotherapy in the acute phase of major depression were selected. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently checked eligibility, assessed methodological quality and extracted data from the eligible trials using a standardised data extraction form. The number of participants who responded to treatment or those who achieved remission were calculated on an intention-to-treat basis. Random-effects meta-analyses were conducted, combining data from the included trials. Main results A total of 16 randomised controlled trials (n=2277) were included in the meta-analysis. Despite the size of this sample, the pooled 95% confidence intervals were

  19. FMRP regulates an ethanol-dependent shift in GABABR function and expression with rapid antidepressant properties

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Sarah A.; Workman, Emily R.; Heaney, Chelcie F.; Niere, Farr; Namjoshi, Sanjeev; Cacheaux, Luisa P.; Farris, Sean P.; Drew, Michael R.; Zemelman, Boris V.; Harris, R. Adron; Raab-Graham, Kimberly F.

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol promotes lasting neuroadaptive changes that may provide relief from depressive symptoms, often referred to as the self-medication hypothesis. However, the molecular/synaptic pathways that are shared by alcohol and antidepressants are unknown. In the current study, acute exposure to ethanol produced lasting antidepressant and anxiolytic behaviours. To understand the functional basis of these behaviours, we examined a molecular pathway that is activated by rapid antidepressants. Ethanol, like rapid antidepressants, alters γ-aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABABR) expression and signalling, to increase dendritic calcium. Furthermore, new GABABRs are synthesized in response to ethanol treatment, requiring fragile-X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Ethanol-dependent changes in GABABR expression, dendritic signalling, and antidepressant efficacy are absent in Fmr1-knockout (KO) mice. These findings indicate that FMRP is an important regulator of protein synthesis following alcohol exposure, providing a molecular basis for the antidepressant efficacy of acute ethanol exposure. PMID:27666021

  20. Genetic susceptibility for bipolar disorder and response to antidepressants in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Tansey, Katherine E; Guipponi, Michel; Domenici, Enrico; Lewis, Glyn; Malafosse, Alain; O'Donovan, Michael; Wendland, Jens R; Lewis, Cathryn M; McGuffin, Peter; Uher, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    The high heterogeneity of response to antidepressant treatment in major depressive disorder (MDD) makes individual treatment outcomes currently unpredictable. It has been suggested that resistance to antidepressant treatment might be due to undiagnosed bipolar disorder or bipolar spectrum features. Here, we investigate the relationship between genetic susceptibility for bipolar disorder and response to treatment with antidepressants in MDD. Polygenic scores indexing risk for bipolar disorder were derived from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium Bipolar Disorder whole genome association study. Linear regressions tested the effect of polygenic risk scores for bipolar disorder on proportional reduction in depression severity in two large samples of individuals with MDD, treated with antidepressants, NEWMEDS (n=1,791) and STAR*D (n=1,107). There was no significant association between polygenic scores for bipolar disorder and response to treatment with antidepressants. Our data indicate that molecular measure of genetic susceptibility to bipolar disorder does not aid in understanding non-response to antidepressants.

  1. Re-treatment of patients with hepatitis C who failed to respond (nonresponders) to previous treatment.

    PubMed

    Sharvadze, L G; Gogichaishvili, Sh Sh; Sakandelidze, Ts G; Zhamutashvili, M T; Chkhartishvili, N I

    2009-01-01

    The aim of four-year follow up study was evaluation of re-treatment efficacy of antiviral therapy in patients with hepatitis C who failed to respond (non responders) to previous therapy. Study enrolled 29 patients, aged 21-59 with HCV infection (15 had HCV genotype 1, and 14 had HCV non-genotype1), who previously were treated with unmodified interferon alfa (conventional interferon) 2a or 2b 5 MIU TIW plus ribavirin (1000-1200 mg/day) and who failed under this therapy. Study subjects were randomized into two groups: in group I were included 17 patients--relapsers (patient in whom HCV RNA becomes undetectable on treatment and is undetectable at the end of therapy, but is detected again after discontinuation of treatment). Group II was composed of 12 patients: 4 were non responders (patient in whom HCV RNA levels remain stable on treatment), 4--partial responders (HCV RNA levels decline by >2 logs, but never become undetectable during treatment) and 4--breakthrough non responders (HCV RNA become undetectable during treatment, but before-treatment termination again become detectable). The diagnosis of HCV infection was made based on detection of HCV antibodies by ELISA and confirmed by RIBA. Detection of HCV RNA (qualitative) and HCV RNA Viral load--by Real time PCR technique (COBAS TaqMan Test). HCV genotypes were detected by INNO-Lipa method. In group I--rapid virological response (RVR) was observed in 10 (58%) patients, early viral response (EVR) in 12 patients (70%). Among them 9 (52%) patients remained HCV RNA undetectable by the end of treatment. After 6 months sustained viral response (SVR) was received in 7 (41%) patients from group I. In group II--RVR was observed in 5 (41%), EVR in 6 (50%) patients. Among them 5 (41%) patients remained HCV RNA undetectable by the end of treatment. After 6 months Sustained Viral Response was received in 3 (25%) patients. Re-treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin in patients with hepatitis C who failed to responds

  2. Factors associated with antidepressant use in residents with and without dementia in Australian aged care facilities

    PubMed Central

    Hiltunen, Henna; Tan, Edwin C. K.; Ilomäki, Jenni; Hilmer, Sarah N.; Visvanathan, Renuka; Emery, Tina; Robson, Leonie; Jones, Mary J.; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Bell, J. Simon

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Depressive symptoms are highly prevalent in residential aged care facilities (RACFs). The prevalence of antidepressant use is increasing but the effectiveness of antidepressants in people with dementia is uncertain. The objective of the study was to investigate factors associated with antidepressant use in residents with and without dementia. Methods: This was a prospective cross-sectional study of 383 residents in six Australian RACFs. Data on health status, medications and demographics were collected by trained study nurses from April to August 2014. Logistic regression was used to compute adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for factors associated with antidepressant use. Analyses were stratified by dementia and depression. Results: Overall, 183 (47.8%) residents used antidepressants. The prevalence of antidepressant use was similar among residents with and without dementia. Clinician-observed pain was inversely associated with antidepressant use in the main analysis (AOR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.32–0.99) and in subanalyses for residents with documented depression (AOR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.27–0.96). In residents with dementia, moderate quality of life was associated with a lower odds of antidepressant use compared with poor quality of life (AOR = 0.35, 95% C I= 0.13–0.95). In residents without dementia, analgesic use was associated with antidepressant use (AOR = 2.34, 95% CI = 1.07–5.18). Conclusions: The prevalence of antidepressant use was similar in residents with and without dementia. Clinician-observed pain was inversely associated with antidepressant use but there was no association between self-reported pain and antidepressant use. PMID:27298718

  3. Antidepressant treatment in anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Bespalov, Anton Y; van Gaalen, Marcel M; Gross, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Antidepressant drug treatment is the clinical standard of care for all types of anxiety disorders. Broad efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors suggests the importance of enhanced serotonergic function of the anxiolytic properties of current antidepressants. However, analysis of the preclinical evidence indicates that most conventional "anxiolytic" drug tests are not sensitive to antidepressants. Such dissociation is not surprising because of the traditional approach to validation of preclinical tests that is to a large extent based on establishing face validity as well as sensitivity to benzodiazepine anxiolytics. The present review argues for extending the cognitive model of antidepressant drug action to cover their anxiolytic properties as well. Such an approach is based on ambiguity or uncertainty in a broad sense as the hallmark of human stress that has different expressions ready for experimental modeling. These possibilities include schedule-induced behaviors that are directly based on intermittent reinforcement, conditioning to ambiguous stimuli, social stress where agonistic confrontations are possible but not predictable or controlled by the subject, and an even larger class of behaviors that are critically dependent on the inhibition of the prepotent responses in exchange for the ambiguous possibility of a later gain in reinforcement. Interestingly, in all these cases, antidepressant drug treatment is clearly effective in preclinical laboratory settings. One of the cognitive functions that appears to be affected by antidepressant drugs is inhibitory control. Inhibition of prepotent responding has beneficial effects in the "uncertainty" stress situations discussed above and therefore it is this cognitive function that may be critical for anxiolytic effects of antidepressants and novel anxiolytic drug development. PMID:21309117

  4. Sertraline versus other antidepressive agents for depression

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Andrea; La Ferla, Teresa; Furukawa, Toshi A; Signoretti, Alessandra; Nakagawa, Atsuo; Churchill, Rachel; McGuire, Hugh; Barbui, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Background The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence clinical practice guideline on the treatment of depressive disorder recommended that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors should be the first-line option when drug therapy is indicated for a depressive episode. Preliminary evidence suggested that sertraline might be slightly superior in terms of effectiveness. Objectives To assess the evidence for the efficacy, acceptability and tolerability of sertraline in comparison with tricyclics (TCAs), heterocyclics, other SSRIs and newer agents in the acute-phase treatment of major depression. Search methods MEDLINE (1966 to 2008), EMBASE (1974 to 2008), the Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Controlled Trials Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials up to July 2008. No language restriction was applied. Reference lists of relevant papers and previous systematic reviews were hand-searched. Pharmaceutical companies and experts in this field were contacted for supplemental data. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials allocating patients with major depression to sertraline versus any other antidepressive agent. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data. Discrepancies were resolved with another member of the team. A double-entry procedure was employed by two reviewers. Information extracted included study characteristics, participant characteristics, intervention details and outcome measures in terms of efficacy (the number of patients who responded or remitted), acceptability (the number of patients who failed to complete the study) and tolerability (side-effects). Main results A total of 59 studies, mostly of low quality, were included in the review, involving multiple treatment comparisons between sertraline and other antidepressant agents. Evidence favouring sertraline over some other antidepressants for the acute phase treatment of major depression was found, either

  5. Venlafaxine: more dangerous than most "selective" serotonergic antidepressants.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    Venlafaxine is a serotonergic and noradrenergic antidepressant. It shares the same serotonergic adverse effects as the "selective" serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants while in addition provoking noradrenergic adverse effects, in particular cardiovascular disorders, yet offers no demonstrated advantages over SSRIs in terms of efficacy. Several cohort studies using data from a UK database have shown that venlafaxine overdoses are more frequently fatal than SSRI overdoses. Several meta-analyses of more than 70 published and unpublished randomised clinical trials, including about 7000 patients in total, have shown that treatment discontinuation due to adverse effects is more common with venlafaxine than with SSRI antidepressants. Venlafaxine can provoke dose-dependent blood pressure elevation, sometimes requiring treatment discontinuation. Exposure to venlafaxine during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy increases the risk of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. A cohort study in about 50 elderly patients and analysis of several hundred reported suicide attempts by venlafaxine overdose demonstrated a risk of QT interval prolongation, which can lead to torsades de pointes, an unusual and potentially fatal type of ventricular tachycardia. Large British and Danish cohort studies found no increased risk of sudden cardiac death with venlafaxine compared with other antidepressants. However, since only 3.5% and 7% of the patients were using venlafaxine, the statistical power of these studies was relatively low. In practice, the data available as of mid-2015 from clinical trials and epidemiological studies confirm the harms foreseeable from venlafaxine's pharmacological properties: a higher risk of cardiovascular adverse effects and of fatal overdoses than with most SSRI antidepressants. Since venlafaxine and SSRI antidepressants have similar and limited efficacy, venlafaxine is best avoided. An SSRI anti-depressant is a more reasonable option, with the

  6. Times to Discontinue Antidepressants Over 6 Months in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Woo-Young; Jang, Sae-Heon; Jae, Young-Myo; Kong, Bo-Geum; Kim, Ho-Chan; Choe, Byeong-Moo; Kim, Jeong-Gee; Kim, Choong-Rak

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to investigate differences in discontinuation time among antidepressants and total antidepressant discontinuation rate of patients with depression over a 6 month period in a naturalistic treatment setting. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 900 patients with major depressive disorder who were initially prescribed only one kind of antidepressant. The prescribed antidepressants and the reasons for discontinuation were surveyed at baseline and every 4 weeks during the 24 week study. We investigated the discontinuation rate and the mean time to discontinuation among six antidepressants groups. Results Mean and median overall discontinuation times were 13.8 and 12 weeks, respectively. Sertraline and escitalopram had longer discontinuation times than that of fluoxetine, and patients who used sertraline discontinued use significantly later than those taking mirtazapine. No differences in discontinuation rate were observed after 24 weeks among these antidepressants. About 73% of patients discontinued antidepressant treatment after 24 weeks. Conclusion Sertraline and escitalopram tended to have longer mean times to discontinuation, although no difference in discontinuation rate was detected between antidepressants after 24 weeks. About three-quarters of patients discontinued antidepressant maintenance therapy after 24 weeks. PMID:27482246

  7. A role of Yueju in fast-onset antidepressant action on major depressive disorder and serum BDNF expression: a randomly double-blind, fluoxetine-adjunct, placebo-controlled, pilot clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ruyan; Zhu, Dandan; Xia, Youchun; Wang, Haosen; Tao, Weiwei; Xue, Wenda; Xia, Baomei; Ren, Li; Zhou, Xin; Li, Guochun; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Conventional antidepressants, including fluoxetine, have a major disadvantage in delayed onset of efficacy. Yueju, an herbal medicine used to treat mood disorders was recently found to exhibit rapid antidepressant effects. The present study was conducted to evaluate the role of Yueju in rapidly acting on major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods Participants were MDD patients with scores of 24-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-24) ≥20 and without history of antidepressant use. They randomly received daily oral doses of Yueju (23 g/day) plus fluoxetine (20 mg/day) (experimental group) or placebo plus fluoxetine (control group) for 7 days. HDRS-24 was used as the primary outcome measurement at baseline, and on days 1, 3, 5, and 7. Concentrations of serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were assessed at baseline and on days 1 and 7. Results In all, 18 participants met the criteria for data analysis. Compared to baseline level, only experimental group showed significant decrease of HDRS-24 score from day 3 to day 7 (P<0.05). Experimental group also showed significant improvement compared with control group from day 3 to day 7 (P<0.05). No correlation between treatment outcomes with serum BDNF levels was observed. However, experimental group showed significant correlation for serum BDNF level on day 1 with day 7 (r=0.721, P=0.028), whereas the control group did not. Conclusion Yueju likely contributes to fast-onset antidepressant effects on MDD. Further investigation is necessary to firmly establish the ancient formula as a safe, efficacious, and rapidly acting alternative medicine for MDD treatment. PMID:26273204

  8. Purine and pyrimidine metabolism: Convergent evidence on chronic antidepressant treatment response in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Ik; Dournes, Carine; Sillaber, Inge; Uhr, Manfred; Asara, John M.; Gassen, Nils C.; Rein, Theo; Ising, Marcus; Webhofer, Christian; Filiou, Michaela D.; Müller, Marianne B.; Turck, Christoph W.

    2016-01-01

    Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly used drugs for the treatment of psychiatric diseases including major depressive disorder (MDD). For unknown reasons a substantial number of patients do not show any improvement during or after SSRI treatment. We treated DBA/2J mice for 28 days with paroxetine and assessed their behavioral response with the forced swim test (FST). Paroxetine-treated long-time floating (PLF) and paroxetine-treated short-time floating (PSF) groups were stratified as proxies for drug non-responder and responder mice, respectively. Proteomics and metabolomics profiles of PLF and PSF groups were acquired for the hippocampus and plasma to identify molecular pathways and biosignatures that stratify paroxetine-treated mouse sub-groups. The critical role of purine and pyrimidine metabolisms for chronic paroxetine treatment response in the mouse was further corroborated by pathway protein expression differences in both mice and patients that underwent chronic antidepressant treatment. The integrated -omics data indicate purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathway activity differences between PLF and PSF mice. Furthermore, the pathway protein levels in peripheral specimens strongly correlated with the antidepressant treatment response in patients. Our results suggest that chronic SSRI treatment differentially affects purine and pyrimidine metabolisms, which may explain the heterogeneous antidepressant treatment response and represents a potential biosignature. PMID:27731396

  9. Starting antidepressant use: a qualitative synthesis of UK and Australian data

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Claire; Kirkpatrick, Susan; Ridge, Damien; Kokanovic, Renata; Tanner, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore people's experiences of starting antidepressant treatment. Design Qualitative interpretive approach combining thematic analysis with constant comparison. Relevant coding reports from the original studies (generated using NVivo) relating to initial experiences of antidepressants were explored in further detail, focusing on the ways in which participants discussed their experiences of taking or being prescribed an antidepressant for the first time. Participants 108 men and women aged 22–84 who had taken antidepressants for depression. Setting Respondents recruited throughout the UK during 2003–2004 and 2008 and 2012–2013 and in Australia during 2010–2011. Results People expressed a wide range of feelings about initiating antidepressant use. People's attitudes towards starting antidepressant use were shaped by stereotypes and stigmas related to perceived drug dependency and potentially extreme side effects. Anxieties were expressed about starting use, and about how long the antidepressant might begin to take effect, how much it might help or hinder them, and about what to expect in the initial weeks. People worried about the possibility of experiencing adverse effects and implications for their senses of self. Where people felt they had not been given sufficient time during their consultation information or support to take the medicines, the uncertainty could be particularly unsettling and impact on their ongoing views on and use of antidepressants as a viable treatment option. Conclusions Our paper is the first to explore in-depth patient existential concerns about start of antidepressant use using multicountry data. People need additional support when they make decisions about starting antidepressants. Health professionals can use our findings to better understand and explore with patients’ their concerns before their patients start antidepressants. These insights are key to supporting patients, many of whom feel intimidated by the

  10. Depression, anxiety, antidepressant use, and cardiovascular disease among Hispanic men and women of different national backgrounds: results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL)

    PubMed Central

    Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Arredondo, EM; Cai, JianWen; Castenada, Sheila; Choca, James P; Gallo, Linda; Jung, Molly; LaVange, Lisa M; Lee-Rey, Elizabeth T; Mosley, Thomas; Penedo, Frank J; Santistaban, DA; Zee, PC

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Describe prevalence and relationships to cardiovascular morbidity of depression, anxiety and medication use among Hispanic/Latinos of different ethnic backgrounds. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of 15,864 men and women ages 18–74 in the population-based Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were assessed with shortened Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale and Spielberger Trait Anxiety Scale. Results Prevalence of high depressive symptoms ranged from low of 22.3% (95%CI: 20.4–24.3) to high of 38.0% (95%CI: 35.2–41.0) among those of Mexican or Puerto Rican background respectively. Adjusted odds ratios for depression rose monotonically with number of CVD risk factors from 1.46 (95%CI: 1.18, 1.75) for those with no risk factors to 4.36 (95%CI: 2.47, 7.70) for those with 5 risk factors. Antidepressant medication was used by 5% with striking differences between those with and without history of CVD (15.4% and 4.6% respectively) and between insured (8.2%) and uninsured (1.8%). Conclusions Among US Hispanics/Latinos, high depression and anxiety symptoms varied nearly twofold by Hispanic background and sex, history of CVD and increasing number of CVD risk factors. Antidepressant medication use was lower than in the general population, suggesting under treatment especially among those who had no health insurance. PMID:25439033

  11. Long-term antidepressant use: patient perspectives of benefits and adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Claire; Gibson, Kerry; Read, John; Cowan, Ondria; Dehar, Tamsin

    2016-01-01

    Long-term antidepressant treatment has increased and there is evidence of adverse effects; however, little is known about patients’ experiences and views of this form of treatment. This study used mixed methods to examine patients’ views and experiences of long-term antidepressant treatment, including benefits and concerns. Data from 180 patients, who were long-term users of antidepressants (3–15 years), were extracted from an anonymous online survey of patients’ experiences of antidepressants in New Zealand. Participants had completed rating scales about the effectiveness of antidepressants, levels of depression before and during antidepressant use, quality of life, and perceived adverse effects. Two open-ended questions allowed participants to comment on personal experiences. The majority (89.4%) reported that antidepressants had improved their depression although 30% reported moderate-to-severe depression on antidepressants. Common adverse effects included withdrawal effects (73.5%), sexual problems (71.8%), and weight gain (65.3%). Adverse emotional effects, such as feeling emotionally numb (64.5%) and addicted (43%), were also common. While the majority of patients were pleased with the benefits of antidepressant treatment, many were concerned about these adverse effects. Some expressed a need for more information about long-term risks and increased information and support to discontinue. PMID:27528803

  12. Long-term antidepressant use: patient perspectives of benefits and adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Claire; Gibson, Kerry; Read, John; Cowan, Ondria; Dehar, Tamsin

    2016-01-01

    Long-term antidepressant treatment has increased and there is evidence of adverse effects; however, little is known about patients' experiences and views of this form of treatment. This study used mixed methods to examine patients' views and experiences of long-term antidepressant treatment, including benefits and concerns. Data from 180 patients, who were long-term users of antidepressants (3-15 years), were extracted from an anonymous online survey of patients' experiences of antidepressants in New Zealand. Participants had completed rating scales about the effectiveness of antidepressants, levels of depression before and during antidepressant use, quality of life, and perceived adverse effects. Two open-ended questions allowed participants to comment on personal experiences. The majority (89.4%) reported that antidepressants had improved their depression although 30% reported moderate-to-severe depression on antidepressants. Common adverse effects included withdrawal effects (73.5%), sexual problems (71.8%), and weight gain (65.3%). Adverse emotional effects, such as feeling emotionally numb (64.5%) and addicted (43%), were also common. While the majority of patients were pleased with the benefits of antidepressant treatment, many were concerned about these adverse effects. Some expressed a need for more information about long-term risks and increased information and support to discontinue. PMID:27528803

  13. Antidepressants and testicular cancer: cause versus association.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2014-03-01

    A data mining study that examined associations between 105 drugs and 55 cancer sites found significant associations between 2 selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (fluoxetine and paroxetine) and testicular cancer. The study suggested several reasons why these associations merited further investigation. A later study tested specific relationships between 12 antidepressant drugs and testicular cancer and subtypes thereof; whereas significant relationships were again found, these disappeared after adjusting for confounding variables. These 2 studies are educative because they illustrate how false-positive results can easily arise in exploratory research and how confounding may be responsible for statistically significant relationships in study designs that are not randomized controlled trials.

  14. [Prospective evaluation of antidepressant discontinuation].

    PubMed

    Mourad, I; Lejoyeux, M; Adès, J

    1998-01-01

    The authors prospectively assessed symptoms induced by the interruption of antidepressants in 16 patients (11 women and 5 men), aged from 33 to 85 years (mean = 52.4 +/- 16.4), treated with antidepressants since at least two weeks. All patients were free of alcohol abuse or dependence disorder and of other dependence to psychoactive substances. None of them presented medical illness. Diagnosis were made by separate evaluations by two authors and confirmed with a semistructered assessment instrument: the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (Lifetime Version). All patients were submitted to a brutal discontinuation of their antidepressant agent. Patients were assessed twice, before the interruption of the antidepressant, and 72 hours later. Effects of antidepressant interruption were assessed by several means. Modification of anxiety and depression were evaluated using the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and the Hamilton Anxiety Scale. Symptoms of withdrawal were assessed with Cassano and al.'s scale SESSH including an evaluation of anxiety, agitation, irritability, anergy, difficulty on concentrating, depersonalization, sleep and appetite disorders, muscle pains, nausea, tremor, sweating, altered taste, hyperosmia, paresthesias, photophobia, motor incoordination, dizziness, hyperacousia pain, delirium. Fourteen of the 16 patients (87.5%) presented modifications of their somatic or psychic state 3 days after the interruption of the antidepressant treatment. Most frequent symptoms were: increase in anxiety (31%), increase in irritability (25%), sleep disorders (19%), decrease of anergia and fatigue (19%). Mean scores of anxiety and depression were not significantly modified by the withdrawal. Following TCAs interruption (7 patients) most frequent symptoms were sleep disorders; increase in anxiety, nausea. Among patients withdrawn from SSRIs (6 patients), most frequent symptoms were increase in anxiety, increase in irritability

  15. Chronic Supplementation of Curcumin Enhances the Efficacy of Antidepressants in Major Depressive Disorder: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing-Jie; Pei, Liu-Bao; Zhang, Yong; Wen, Zi-Yu; Yang, Jian-Li

    2015-08-01

    Major depressive disorder is a devastating mental illness leading to a lifetime prevalence of higher than 16% on individuals. The treatment delay and inevitable adverse effects are major limitations of current depression interventions. Emerging evidence indicates that curcumin produced significant antidepressant properties in depression in both rodents and humans without adverse effects. Therefore, it is necessary to further clarify the antidepressant actions of curcumin and the underlying mechanism in depressed patients. A total of 108 male adults aged between 31 and 59 years were systematically recruited in Tianjin Anding Hospital. Subjects were administered the Chinese version of 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale that measures different scores of depressive symptoms. The subjects were asked to take 2 capsules containing either 1000 mg of curcumin or placebo soybean powder daily for 6 weeks on the basis of their current antidepressant medications. The plasma levels of interleukin 1β, tumor necrosis factor α, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and salivary cortisol were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay before and after curcumin or placebo treatment during the 6-week procedure. Chronic supplementation with curcumin produced significant antidepressant behavioral response in depressed patients by reduction of 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale scores. Furthermore, curcumin decreases inflammatory cytokines interleukin 1β and tumor necrosis factor α level, increases plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels, and decreases salivary cortisol concentrations compared with placebo group. These findings indicate the potential benefits of further implications of supplementary administration of curcumin to reverse the development of depression and enhance the outcome of antidepressants treatment in major depressive disorder.

  16. Chronic Supplementation of Curcumin Enhances the Efficacy of Antidepressants in Major Depressive Disorder: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing-Jie; Pei, Liu-Bao; Zhang, Yong; Wen, Zi-Yu; Yang, Jian-Li

    2015-08-01

    Major depressive disorder is a devastating mental illness leading to a lifetime prevalence of higher than 16% on individuals. The treatment delay and inevitable adverse effects are major limitations of current depression interventions. Emerging evidence indicates that curcumin produced significant antidepressant properties in depression in both rodents and humans without adverse effects. Therefore, it is necessary to further clarify the antidepressant actions of curcumin and the underlying mechanism in depressed patients. A total of 108 male adults aged between 31 and 59 years were systematically recruited in Tianjin Anding Hospital. Subjects were administered the Chinese version of 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale that measures different scores of depressive symptoms. The subjects were asked to take 2 capsules containing either 1000 mg of curcumin or placebo soybean powder daily for 6 weeks on the basis of their current antidepressant medications. The plasma levels of interleukin 1β, tumor necrosis factor α, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and salivary cortisol were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay before and after curcumin or placebo treatment during the 6-week procedure. Chronic supplementation with curcumin produced significant antidepressant behavioral response in depressed patients by reduction of 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale scores. Furthermore, curcumin decreases inflammatory cytokines interleukin 1β and tumor necrosis factor α level, increases plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels, and decreases salivary cortisol concentrations compared with placebo group. These findings indicate the potential benefits of further implications of supplementary administration of curcumin to reverse the development of depression and enhance the outcome of antidepressants treatment in major depressive disorder. PMID:26066335

  17. Treatment response in relation to subthreshold bipolarity in patients with major depressive disorder receiving antidepressant monotherapy: a post hoc data analysis (KOMDD study)

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Min; Lee, Bun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this observational study was to determine whether subthreshold bipolarity affects treatment response and remission in patients with major depressive disorder receiving antidepressant (AD) monotherapy over a 6-month follow-up period. Methods Seventy-eight patients with major depressive disorder were stratified into two subgroups according to the presence of subthreshold bipolarity, identified using the Korean version of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (K-MDQ), which classifies patients as positive for a screening of bipolarity based on the cutoff for the total K-MDQ score (ie, 7 points). They received AD monotherapy such as escitalopram, sertraline, paroxetine, or tianeptine for 6 months. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD), Hamilton Anxiety Scale, and Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation were applied at baseline, 1 week, 3 weeks, 2 months, 3 months, and 6 months. Results The mean HAMD, BDI, and Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation scores were higher in the bipolarity group than in the nonbipolarity group at 3 weeks. The mean BDI score was also higher in the bipolarity group than in the nonbipolarity group at 6 months. Evaluation of the ratio of improvement for each scale revealed different patterns of percentage changes between the two groups over the 6-month follow-up period. Furthermore, the response and remission rates (as assessed using BDI and HAMD scores) were higher in the nonbipolarity group than in the bipolarity group, with the exception of HAMD scores at the 3-week follow-up time point. Conclusion The findings of this study showed that depressed patients with bipolarity had a worse response to AD monotherapy than did those without bipolarity. PMID:27274258

  18. Study of antinociceptive activity of SSRI (fluoxetine and escitalopram) and atypical antidepressants (venlafaxine and mirtazepine) and their interaction with morphine and naloxone in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sikka, Pranav; Kaushik, Sadhna; Kumar, Gyanendra; Kapoor, Seema; Bindra, V. K.; Saxena, K. K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to study the probable site of antinociceptive action of SSRI (fluoxetine, escitalopram) and atypical antidepressants (mirtazapine, venlafaxine) and their interaction with morphine and naloxone. Materials and Methods: the study was conducted on albino mice (25-35 grams) of either sex. Different doses of morphine (0.5 and 1 mg/kg), fluoxetine (2, 5 and 10 mg/kg), venlafaxine (30, 40 and 50 mg/kg), mirtazapine (3, 5 and 7 mg/kg) and escitalopram (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg) were administered subcutaneously to obtain their subanalgesic doses using tail flick analgesiometer. Tail flick latencies were obtained at 15, 30, 60 and 120 min. after drug administration. Naloxone (1 mg/kg) was administered 10 minutes prior to test drug for testing antagonism. Observations: fluoxetine (5 and 10 mg/kg), mirtazapine (5 and 7 mg/kg) and venlafaxine (40 and 50 mg/kg) were found to have antinociceptive activity but not at lower doses. Escitalopram failed to show any antinociceptive activity at any of the doses used. The antinociceptive effect of all the drugs was antagonized by naloxone (1 mg/kg). Further, subanalgesic doses of fluoxetine, mirtazapine and venlafaxine showed analgesic activity with suboptimal dose of morphine (0.5 mg/kg). Result and conclusion: fluoxetine, mirtazapine and venlafaxine have antinociceptive activity whereas escitalopram doesn’t; their site of action seems to be the same as that of opioid analgesics (‘mue’ receptors). However, other pathways (cholinergic, histaminic, noradrenergic, GABAergic) may be involved in mediation of their analgesic activity, deserving further elucidation. Results apparently show that these drugs may be useful in the management of pain as monotherapy or in combination with other opioids. PMID:21966163

  19. Breast cancer recurrence in relation to antidepressant use

    PubMed Central

    Chubak, Jessica; Bowles, Erin J.A.; Yu, Onchee; Buist, Diana S.M.; Fujii, Monica; Boudreau, Denise M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Women with breast cancer frequently use antidepressants; however, questions about the effect of these medications on breast cancer recurrence remain. Methods We identified 4216 women ≥18 years with an incident stage I or II breast cancer diagnosed between 1990–2008 in a mixed model healthcare delivery system linked to a cancer registry. Recurrences were ascertained from chart review. Medication exposures were extracted from electronic pharmacy records. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to assess the association between antidepressant use and breast cancer recurrence and mortality. We also conducted analyses restricted to tamoxifen users. Results Antidepressants overall, tricyclic antidepressants, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were not associated with risk of breast cancer recurrence or mortality. Women taking paroxetine only (adjusted HR: 1.66; 95% CI: 1.02, 2.71) and trazadone only (adjusted HR: 1.76; 95% CI: 1.06, 2.92), but not fluoxetine only (adjusted HR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.55, 1.53), had higher recurrence risks than antidepressant non-users. There was some suggestion of an increased recurrence risk with concurrent paroxetine and tamoxifen use compared to users of tamoxifen only (adjusted HR: 1.49; 95% CI: 0.79, 2.83). Conclusions In general, antidepressants did not appear increase risk of breast cancer recurrence; though there were some suggested increases in risk that warrant further investigation in other datasets. Our results combined systematically and quantitatively with results from other studies may be useful for patients and providers making decisions about antidepressant use after breast cancer diagnosis. PMID:26518198

  20. The international Study to Predict Optimized Treatment in Depression (iSPOT-D): outcomes from the acute phase of antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Saveanu, Radu; Etkin, Amit; Duchemin, Anne-Marie; Goldstein-Piekarski, Andrea; Gyurak, Anett; Debattista, Charles; Schatzberg, Alan F; Sood, Satish; Day, Claire V A; Palmer, Donna M; Rekshan, William R; Gordon, Evian; Rush, A John; Williams, Leanne M

    2015-02-01

    We aimed to characterize a large international cohort of outpatients with MDD within a practical trial design, in order to identify clinically useful predictors of outcomes with three common antidepressant medications in acute-phase treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). The international Study to Predict Optimized Treatment in Depression has presently enrolled 1008 treatment-seeking outpatients (18-65 years old) at 17 sites (five countries). At pre-treatment, we characterized participants by symptoms, clinical history, functional status and comorbidity. Participants were randomized to receive escitalopram, sertraline or venlafaxine-extended release and managed by their physician following usual treatment practices. Symptoms, function, quality of life, and side-effect outcomes were assessed 8 weeks later. The relationship of anxiety to response and remission was assessed by comorbid Axis I diagnosis, presence/absence of anxiety symptoms, and dimensionally by anxiety symptom severity. The sample had moderate-to-severe symptoms, but substantial comorbidity and functional impairment. Of completers at week 8, 62.2% responded and 45.4% reached remission on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression; 53.3% and 37.6%, respectively on the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptoms. Functional improvements were seen across all domains. Most participants had side effects that occurred with a frequency of 25% or less and were reported as being in the "none" to minimal/mild range for intensity and burden. Outcomes did not differ across medication groups. More severe anxiety symptoms at pre-treatment were associated with lower remission rates across all medications, independent of depressive severity, diagnostic comorbidity or side effects. Across medications, we found consistent and similar improvements in symptoms and function, and a dimensional prognostic effect of comorbid anxiety symptoms. These equivalent outcomes across treatments lay the foundation for

  1. Impact of maternal prenatal and parental postnatal stress on 1-year-old child development: results from the OTIS antidepressants in pregnancy study.

    PubMed

    Karam, Fatiha; Sheehy, Odile; Huneau, Marie-Claude; Chambers, Christina; Fraser, William D; Johnson, Diana; Kao, Kelly; Martin, Brigitte; Riordan, Sara H; Roth, Mark; St-André, Martin; Lavigne, Sharon Voyer; Wolfe, Lori; Bérard, Anick

    2016-10-01

    Perinatal psychological stress has been associated with unfavorable maternal and neonatal outcomes. We aimed to assess the impact of perinatal stress on infant development at 1 year of age. We recruited pregnant women calling North American Teratogen Information Services or attending outpatient clinics at CHU Sainte Justine (Montreal) between 2008 and 2010 and their spouses. To be part of our study, women had to be (1) >18 years of age, (2) <15 weeks of gestational age at recruitment, (3) living within 250-km radius of Montreal, and (4) taking antidepressants or non-teratogenic drugs. Stress was assessed using the telephone-administered four-item perceived stress scale during pregnancy in mothers and at 2 months postpartum in both parents. Child development at 1 year of age was evaluated with the Bayley III scales. Socio-demographic and potential confounders were collected through telephone interviews. Multivariable linear regression models were built to assess the association between perinatal parental stress and child development. Overall, 71 couples and their infants were included. When adjusted for potential confounders, maternal prenatal stress was positively associated with motor development (adjusted β = 1.85, CI 95 % (0.01, 3.70)). Postpartum maternal and paternal stresses were negatively associated with motor and socio-emotional development, respectively (adjusted β = -1.54, CI 95 % (-3.07, -0.01) and adjusted β = -1.67, CI 95 % (-3.25, -0.10), respectively). Maternal and paternal postnatal stress seems to be harmful for the motor and socio-emotional development in 1-year-old children. No association was demonstrated between parental stress and cognitive, language, and adaptive behavioral development. However, prenatal maternal stress appears to improve motor skills. PMID:26957509

  2. Adherence to antidepressant medications: an evaluation of community pharmacists’ counseling practices

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Wei Wen; Aslani, Parisa; Chen, Timothy F

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that pharmacists have a role in addressing antidepressant nonadherence. However, few studies have explored community pharmacists’ actual counseling practices in response to antidepressant adherence-related issues at various phases of treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate counseling practices of community pharmacists in response to antidepressant adherence-related issues. Methods A simulated patient method was used to evaluate pharmacist counseling practices in Sydney, Australia. Twenty community pharmacists received three simulated patient visits concerning antidepressant adherence-related scenarios at different phases of treatment: 1) patient receiving a first-time antidepressant prescription and hesitant to begin treatment; 2) patient perceiving lack of treatment efficacy for antidepressant after starting treatment for 2 weeks; and 3) patient wanting to discontinue antidepressant treatment after 3 months due to perceived symptom improvement. The interactions were recorded and analyzed to evaluate the content of consultations in terms of information gathering, information provision including key educational messages, and treatment recommendations. Results There was variability among community pharmacists in terms of the extent and content of information gathered and provided. In scenario 1, while some key educational messages such as possible side effects and expected benefits from antidepressants were mentioned frequently, others such as the recommended length of treatment and adherence-related messages were rarely addressed. In all scenarios, about two thirds of pharmacists explored patients’ concerns about antidepressant treatment. In scenarios 2 and 3, only half of all pharmacists’ consultations involved questions to assess the patient’s medication use. The pharmacists’ main recommendation in response to the patient query was to refer the patient back to the prescribing physician. Conclusion The

  3. Plasma level monitoring of antidepressants: theoretical basis and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Gram, L F; Kragh-Sørensen, P; Kristensen, C B; Møller, M; Pedersen, O L; Thayssen, P

    1984-01-01

    For TCAs there is a strong rationale for drug level monitoring in clinical therapy. Therapeutic drug concentration ranges have been established in controlled studies with NT, imipramine, and AT. It has been shown that by appropriate choice of antidepressant and close monitoring of drug levels, treatment with antidepressants in elderly and other risk patients can be carried out effectively and safely, reducing the use of electroconvulsive therapy. Finally, the practical clinical use of antidepressant concentration measurements is now feasible and not expensive, and the analytical procedures can be established in most hospital settings. On the basis of these premises the following can be concluded: Plasma level monitoring should be used as a routine for imipramine, NT, and AT. Further plasma level studies on other antidepressants and in overdose cases should be initiated. Plasma level monitoring is indispensable in clinical research on antidepressants (trials, new drugs, toxicology). Pharmacokinetic considerations may be useful to determine which receptor effects are clinically relevant in therapy and toxicology. PMID:6380231

  4. Antidepressants and Youth Suicide in New York City, 1999-2002

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon, Andrew C.; Marzuk, Peter M.; Tardiff, Kenneth; Bucciarelli, Angela; Piper, Tinka Markham; Galea, Sandro

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the proportion of youth suicides in New York City from 1999 to 2002 in which antidepressants were detected at autopsy. Method: This is a medical examiner surveillance study of suicides in New York City among those younger than 18 years of age. The outcome measure is serum toxicology for antidepressants. Results: From 1999…

  5. [Switching and combining strategies of antidepressant medications].

    PubMed

    Charpeaud, Thomas; Moliere, Fanny; Bubrovszky, Maxime; Haesebaert, Frédéric; Allaïli, Najib; Bation, Rémy; Nieto, Isabel; Richieri, Raphaëlle; Saba, Ghassen; Bellivier, Frank; Bennabi, Djamila; Holtzmann, Jérôme; Camus, Vincent; Courtet, Philippe; Courvoisier, Pierre; d'Amato, Thierry; Doumy, Olivier; Garnier, Marion; Bougerol, Thierry; Lançon, Christophe; Haffen, Emmanuel; Leboyer, Marion; Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Vaiva, Guillaume; El-Hage, Wissam; Aouizerate, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    Switching antidepressant medication may be helpful in depressed patients having no benefit from the initial antidepressant treatment. Before considering switching strategy, the initial antidepressant treatment should produce no therapeutic effect after at least 4 weeks of administration at adequate dosage. Choosing an antidepressant of pharmacologically distinct profile fails to consistently demonstrate a significant superiority in terms of effectiveness over the switching to another antidepressant within the same pharmacological class. Augmenting SSRI/SNRIs with mirtazapine/mianserin has become the most recommended strategy of antidepressant combinations. Augmenting SSRI with tricyclic drugs is now a less recommended strategy of antidepressant combinations given the increased risk for the occurrence of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions and adverse effects.

  6. Decisional conflict among women considering antidepressant medication use in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Walton, Georgia D; Ross, Lori E; Stewart, Donna E; Grigoriadis, Sophie; Dennis, Cindy-Lee; Vigod, Simone

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine decision-making among women considering antidepressant medication use in pregnancy. Decisional conflict was assessed using the Decisional Conflict Scale (DCS) among pregnant women considering antidepressant medication treatment (N = 40). Overall DCS and subscale scores were compared between women who were antidepressant users and non-users. Semi-structured interviews (N = 10) explored barriers and facilitators of decision-making. Twenty-one women (52 %) had moderate or high decisional conflict (DCS ≥ 25). Overall DCS scores did not differ between groups, but antidepressant use was associated with feeling more adequately informed (subscale mean 17.5, SD 17.9 vs. 42.1, SD 23.8, p = 0.001) and clear about values (subscale mean 16.7, SD 15.1 vs. 29.8, SD 24.0, p = 0.043). Barriers to decision-making were (1) difficulty weighing maternal versus infant health, (2) lack of high quality information, (3) negative external influences, and (4) emotional reactions to decision-making. Facilitators were (1) interpersonal supports, (2) accessible subspecialty care, and (3) severe depressive symptoms. Many pregnant women facing decisions regarding antidepressant medication use experience decisional conflict. Interventions that provide accurate information, assistance with weighing risks and benefits of treatment, management of problematic external influences, and emotional support may reduce decisional conflict and facilitate the decision-making process.

  7. Effects of antidepressants on cytokine production and actions.

    PubMed

    Castanon, Nathalie; Leonard, Brian E; Neveu, Pierre J; Yirmiya, Raz

    2002-10-01

    There are intriguing analogies between many features of depression and physiological and behavioral responses to infection, which are mediated by the brain effects of cytokines. These observations suggest that depression can be considered as a psychoneuroimmunological disorder where a central increase of pro-inflammatory cytokines, may have adverse consequences on the functional activity of the neurochemical and neuroendocrine systems implicated in the symptoms of the disorder. According to this hypothesis, the therapeutic effects of antidepressants should be at least partly exerted by attenuating the brain expression and/or actions of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Despite their inherent limitations, animal models of depression that are based on behavioral and pharmacological analogies with the symptoms observed in humans, represent the best available tool to test this hypothesis and to investigate the action mechanisms of the immune effects of antidepressants. Treatment with different classes of antidepressants indeed conferred protection against cytokine-induced depressive-like biological and behavioral changes. This 'anti-inflammatory' profile may be due to alterations of the pro-/anti-inflammatory cytokine balance. The mechanisms underlying these effects of antidepressants are presently unknown, but the available literature suggests several possibilities, including actions on different molecules representing potential mediators of mood disorders induced by cytokines. The studies summarized in this review have opened up new vistas in both the pathophysiology of depression and the pharmacology of antidepressants. Whether their demonstrated immune effects are a side effect or a significant part of their clinical activity still remains to be elucidated.

  8. [Mechanism of action of antidepressants and therapeutic perspectives].

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; David, D J P; Jolliet, P; Gardier, A

    2002-01-01

    Depression is an incapacitating disease which needs appropriate treatment. This article reviews the pharmacology of antidepressant drugs and the future perspectives of treating mood disorders such as depression. The foremost theory for explaining the biological basis of depression has been the monoamine hypothesis. Depression is due to a deficiency in one or other biogenic monoamines (serotonin, 5-HT; noradrenaline, NA; dopamine, DA). Antidepressant drugs are therefore classified according to their ability to improve monoaminergic transmission. Since this first theory, other explanations based on abnormal function of monoamine receptors or associated with impaired signalling pathways have been suggested. Notable progress has been accomplished in the treatment of major depressive disorders with new compounds recently discovered (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: SSRI; serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors: SNRI). Behavioural, electrophysiological and microdialysis studies have shown that serotonin (5-HT) receptors, mainly 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT2C sub-types, exert a key role in modulating antidepressant activity. Indirect activation of neurotransmitter receptors by antidepressants may also lead, via increases in endogenous levels of serotonin in synapses in specific brain regions, to activation of various G proteins coupled to a receptor, signal of transduction, transcription factors and neurotrophic factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Thus, depression may be considered as a transduction mechanism anomaly. This hypothesis needs to be clarified by molecular biology. Although antidepressants have improved the therapeutic potential compared to tricyclics (TCA) in terms of reduced side effects, a number of problems still occur with these drugs. Clinical effects are not always observed until after this time has elapsed (4-6 weeks) and a substantial proportion of depressed patients show only partial or no response to antidepressants

  9. The antidepressant-like effects of paeoniflorin in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    QIU, FENGMEI; ZHONG, XIAOMING; MAO, QINGQIU; HUANG, ZHEN

    2013-01-01

    Peony is often used in Chinese herbal medicine for the treatment of depression-like disorders. Our previous studies have demonstrated that the total glycosides of peony exert antidepressant-like effects in animal models. Paeoniflorin is the main active glycoside of peony. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antidepressant-like effects of paeoniflorin in mice, as well as its active mechanisms. The results revealed that intraperitoneally injected paeoniflorin significantly reduced the duration of immobility in forced swimming and tail suspension tests. The doses that affected the immobility response did not affect locomotor activity. Furthermore, paeoniflorin antagonized reserpine-induced ptosis, akinesia and hypothermia. Paeoniflorin also significantly increased the levels of serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the hippocampus. These results suggest that the upregulation of serotonergic systems may be an important mechanism for the antidepressant-like effects of paeoniflorin in mice. PMID:23599734

  10. Antidepressant Activity of Methanolic Extract of Amaranthus Spinosus

    PubMed Central

    Ashok Kumar, B.S; Lakshman, K; Velmurugan, C; Sridhar, S.M; Gopisetty, Saran

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Depressive disorder is a prevalent psychiatric disorder, which affects 21% of the world population. The presently using drugs can impose a variety of side-effects including cardiac toxicity, hypopiesia, sexual dysfunction, body weight gain, and sleep disorder. During the last decade, there is a growing interest in the therapeutic effects of natural products on mental disorders. Amaranthus spinosus was investigation for antidepressant activity. Methods Antidepressant activity of methanolic extract of Amaranthus spinosus (MEAS) was investigated by using Forced swimming test (FST) and Tail suspension test (TST) models. Escitalopram and Imipramine were used as reference standards. Results It has been observed from our study that both the MEAS at higher concentration showed significant (p<0.01) reduction in immobility in tail suspension and forced swim model of depression comparable to Escitalopram and Imipramine. Discussion However further study is needed to understand mechanism of action and to identify active component responsible for antidepressant like activity. PMID:25436078

  11. Fluoxetine potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect: evaluating pharmacokinetic and brain fatty acid-related aspects in rodents.

    PubMed

    Laino, Carlos Horacio; Garcia, Pilar; Podestá, María Fernanda; Höcht, Christian; Slobodianik, Nora; Reinés, Analía

    2014-10-01

    We previously reported that combined fluoxetine administration at antidepressant doses renders additive antidepressant effects, whereas non-antidepressant doses potentiate the omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate putative pharmacokinetic and brain omega-3 fatty acid-related aspects for fluoxetine potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect in rats. Coadministration of omega-3 fatty acids with a non-antidepressant dose of fluoxetine (1 mg/kg day) failed to affect both brain fluoxetine concentration and norfluoxetine plasma concentration profile. Fluoxetine plasma concentrations remained below the sensitivity limit of the detection method. Either antidepressant (10 mg/kg day) or non-antidepressant (1 mg/kg day) doses of fluoxetine in combination with omega-3 fatty acids increased hippocampal docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5 omega-3) levels. Although individual treatments had no effects on DPA concentration, DPA increase was higher when omega-3 were combined with the non-antidepressant dose of fluoxetine. Chronic DPA administration exerted antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test while increasing hippocampal docosahexaenoic (22:6 omega-3) and DPA levels. Our results suggest no pharmacokinetic interaction and reveal specific hippocampal DPA changes after fluoxetine and omega-3 combined treatments in our experimental conditions. The DPA role in the synergistic effect of fluoxetine and omega-3 combined treatments will be for sure the focus of future studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 103:3316-3325, 2014.

  12. Identification of antidepressant drug leads through the evaluation of marine natural products with neuropsychiatric pharmacophores

    PubMed Central

    Diers, Jeffrey A.; Ivey, Kelly D.; El-Alfy, Abir; Shaikh, Jamaluddin; Wang, Jiajia; Kochanowska, Anna J.; Stoker, John F.; Hamann, Mark T.; Matsumoto, Rae R.

    2015-01-01

    The marine environment is a valuable resource for drug discovery due to its diversity of life and associated secondary metabolites. However, there is very little published data on the potential application of marine natural products to treat neuropsychiatric disorders. Many natural products derived from chemically defended organisms in the marine environment have pharmacophores related to serotonin or clinically utilized antidepressant drugs. Therefore, in the present study, compounds selected for their structural similarity to serotonin or established antidepressants were evaluated for antidepressant-like activity using the forced swim and tail suspension tests in mice. The antidepressant positive controls, citalopram (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) and despiramine (tricyclic antidepressant) both dose-dependently reduced immobility time in the forced swim and tail suspension tests. Two marine natural product compounds tested, aaptamine and 5,6-dibromo-N,N-dimethyltryptamine, also produced significant antidepressant-like activity in the forced swim test. In the tail suspension test, the antidepressant-like effects of 5,6-dibromo-N,N-dimethyltryptamine were confirmed, whereas aaptamine failed to produce significant results. None of the tested compounds induced hyperlocomotion, indicating that nonspecific stimulant effects could not account for the observed antidepressant-like actions of the compounds. These studies highlight the potential to rationally select marine derived compounds for treating depression and other neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:18037479

  13. A proposal of decision tree to screen putative antidepressants using forced swim and tail suspension tests.

    PubMed

    Bourin, Michel; Chenu, Franck; Ripoll, Nadège; David, Denis Joseph Paul

    2005-11-01

    Interstrain mice variability in response to antidepressant drugs has been reported in the most commonly utilized behavioural animal models of depression: the tail suspension test (TST) and the forced swimming test (FST). The behaviour of mice was examined in both tests for screening various antidepressants with different biochemical mechanism of action. Previous studies have revealed that drug sensitivity depends on the strain and test used. Swiss mice is the most sensitive strain to detect serotonin and/or noradrenaline antidepressants whereas C57BL/6J was the only strain sensitive to bupropion (dopaminergic agent) using the FST. In the TST, all antidepressants studied decreased the immobility time in Swiss and C57BL/6J strains. Detection of an antidepressant-like activity could be performed using only one test (TST with Swiss mice or FST with Swiss and C57Bl/6 Rj mice), but both tests are necessary to conclude on the mechanism of action.

  14. Antidepressant-associated sexual dysfunction: impact, effects, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Agnes; Nash, Michael; Lynch, Aileen M

    2010-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common side effect of antidepressants and can have significant impact on the person's quality of life, relationships, mental health, and recovery. The reported incidence of sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressant medication varies considerably between studies, making it difficult to estimate the exact incidence or prevalence. The sexual problems reported range from decreased sexual desire, decreased sexual excitement, diminished or delayed orgasm, to erection or delayed ejaculation problems. There are a number of case reports of sexual side effects, such as priapism, painful ejaculation, penile anesthesia, loss of sensation in the vagina and nipples, persistent genital arousal and nonpuerperal lactation in women. The focus of this article is to explore the incidence, pathophysiology, and treatment of antidepressant iatrogenic sexual dysfunction. PMID:21701626

  15. Parasomnias and Antidepressant Therapy: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kierlin, Lara; Littner, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    There exists a varying level of evidence linking the use of antidepressant medication to the parasomnias, ranging from larger, more comprehensive studies in the area of REM sleep behavior disorder to primarily case reports in the NREM parasomnias. As such, practice guidelines are lacking regarding specific direction to the clinician who may be faced with a patient who has developed a parasomnia that appears to be temporally related to use of an antidepressant. In general, knowledge of the mechanisms of action of the medications, particularly with regard to the impact on sleep architecture, can provide some guidance. There is a potential for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, and serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors to suppress REM, as well as the anticholinergic properties of the individual drugs to further disturb normal sleep architecture. PMID:22180745

  16. Multimodal antidepressant vortioxetine increases frontal cortical oscillations unlike escitalopram and duloxetine – a quantitative EEG study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Leiser, S C; Pehrson, A L; Robichaud, P J; Sanchez, C

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose EEG studies show that 5-HT is involved in regulation of sleep–wake state and modulates cortical oscillations. Vortioxetine is a 5-HT3, 5-HT7, and 5-HT1D receptor antagonist, 5-HT1B partial agonist, 5-HT1A agonist, and 5-HT transporter inhibitor. Preclinical (animal) and clinical studies with vortioxetine show positive impact on cognitive metrics involving cortical function. Here we assess vortioxetine's effect on cortical neuronal oscillations in actively awake rats. Experimental Approach Telemetric EEG recordings were obtained with the following treatments (mg·kg−1, s.c.): vehicle, vortioxetine (0.1, 1.0, 3.0, 10), 5-HT1A agonist flesinoxan (2.5), 5-HT3 antagonist ondansetron (0.30), 5-HT7 antagonist SB-269970-A (10), escitalopram (2.0), duloxetine (10) and vortioxetine plus flesinoxan. Target occupancies were determined by ex vivo autoradiography. Key Results Vortioxetine dose-dependently increased wakefulness. Flesinoxan, duloxetine, ondansetron, but not escitalopram or SB-269970-A increased wakefulness. Quantitative spectral analyses showed vortioxetine alone and with flesinoxan increased θ (4–8 Hz), α (8–12 Hz) and γ (30–50 Hz) power. Duloxetine had no effect on θ and γ, but decreased α power, while escitalopram produced no changes. Ondansetron and SB-269970 (≈31–35% occupancy) increased θ power. Flesinoxan (≈41% occupancy) increased θ and γ power. Conclusions and Implications Vortioxetine increased wakefulness and increased frontal cortical activity, most likely because of its 5-HT7 and 5-HT3 antagonism and 5-HT1A agonism. Vortioxetine differs from escitalopram and duloxetine by increasing cortical θ, α and γ oscillations. These preclinical findings suggest a role of vortioxetine in modulating cortical circuits known to be recruited during cognitive behaviours and warrant further investigation as to their clinical impact. PMID:24846338

  17. Is dopamine a limiting factor of the antidepressant-like effect in the mouse forced swimming test?

    PubMed

    Renard, Caroline E; Dailly, Eric; Nic Dhonnchadha, Bríd A; Hascoet, Martine; Bourin, Michel

    2004-12-01

    To study the role of dopamine (DA) in antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test (FST), the relationship between the magnitude of the antidepressant-like effect of drugs [citalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors), desipramine (tricyclic antidepressant), maprotiline (tetracyclic antidepressant), bupropion (DA reuptake inhibitor), and tranylcypromine (inhibitor of monoamine oxidase)] and the corresponding concentration of DA in the whole brain of mice was investigated. A trend for an inversely proportional linear relationship [(magnitude of the antidepressant-like effect) = -0.0145 x (concentration of DA in the whole brain) +34.773 (r = 0.276)] was observed between the magnitude of the antidepressant-like effect and the concentrations of DA in the whole brain, but this correlation was not significant. This result suggests that the high concentration of DA in the whole brain could be a limiting factor for the antidepressant-like effect of antidepressants such as tranylcypromine and seems to play a minor role in the antidepressant-like activity of another antidepressant such as bupropion in the FST.

  18. EMSAM (deprenyl patch): how a promising antidepressant was underutilized

    PubMed Central

    Asnis, Gregory M; Henderson, Margaret A

    2014-01-01

    The EMSAM patch is a unique monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) being the only antidepressant utilizing a transdermal delivery system. This was welcomed by clinicians who hoped that EMSAM would be better tolerated than oral MAOIs and non-MAOI antidepressants, as well as being effective for treatment in a wide spectrum of depressed patients including atypical depression, bipolar depression, and refractory depression. Unfortunately, the clinical use of EMSAM has been underutilized and its potential usefulness overlooked. This article suggests that fear of possible side effects, particularly the “cheese reaction” and serotonin syndrome, are some of the main contributors to underutilization by clinicians. These risks have been significantly exaggerated with the 6 mg/day dose not even requiring a special diet. Other contributing factors leading to underutilization are reviewed such as: the lack of studies addressing many important clinical questions; inadequate data analyses; not evaluating the effect of EMSAM on comorbid psychiatric conditions, particularly anxiety disorders; lack of antidepressant comparators versus EMSAM; no dose–response relationship examined; various depressive subtypes and conditions are unexplored, eg, bipolar depression and refractory depression; poor insurance coverage for an expensive medication; as well as minimal marketing efforts and postmarketing studies. On the other hand, many potential advantages of EMSAM are not highlighted enough in the literature and by pharmaceutical companies which might have increased clinical interest and utilization of the antidepressant. For example, the advantages of EMSAM include: avoidance of swallowing issues, as can be seen with oral antidepressants; minimal side effects, probably due to a favorable pharmacokinetic profile; minimal evidence of suicidal behavior, probably relating to the transdermal route of administration; low rates of inducing hypomanic/manic episodes; as well as significant efficacy

  19. Long-term treatment with the combination of amantadine and ribavirin in hepatitis C nonresponders. A case series.

    PubMed

    Riley, Thomas R; Taheri, Mohammad R

    2007-12-01

    In this report, we describe five cases of chronic hepatitis C that have been treated with the combination of amantadine and ribavirin for an average of 44 months, emphasizing one case where the patient showed improvement in liver biopsy after treatment, worsening on removal, then a repeated improvement with re-initiation. The five patients in this report belong to a pool of sixty patients from a 6 month pilot study using amantadine and ribavirin where treatment was subsequently continued. The mean ALT was 82.8+/-32 U/L pre-treatment and 33.8+/-17.3 U/L post-treatment (p=0.02). The mean Knodell score was 7+/-1 pre-treatment and 3.6+/-1.5 post-treatment (p=0.13). The mean viral load was 584,155+/-248,027 lU/ml pre-treatment and 225,878+/-190,143 IU/ml post-treatment (p=0.05). In this case series we provide provocative data on the long-term use of ribavirin and amantadine in the HCV non-responder. PMID:17401686

  20. Drugs, genes and the blues: pharmacogenetics of the antidepressant response from mouse to man.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Olivia F; O'Brien, Fionn E; O'Connor, Richard M; Cryan, John F

    2014-08-01

    While antidepressant drugs are beneficial to many patients, current treatments for depression remain sub-optimal. Up to half of patients with a major depressive episode fail to achieve remission with a first line antidepressant treatment. Identification of the molecular mechanisms that dictate whether a patient will successfully respond to a particular antidepressant treatment while tolerating its side-effects is not only a major challenge in biological psychiatry research but is also one that shows great promise. This review summarises data from both clinical and preclinical studies that point to a role of specific genes in the response and resistance to antidepressant therapeutics. Moreover, we discuss how such findings have increased our understanding of the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs. Finally, we comment on how this information may potentially influence the future development of personalised medicine approaches for the treatment of depression.

  1. [Unpredictable chronic mild stress effects on antidepressants activities in forced swim test].

    PubMed

    Kudryashov, N V; Kalinina, T S; Voronina, T A

    2015-02-01

    The experiments has been designed to study unpredictable chronic mild stress effect on anti-depressive activities of amitriptyline (10 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) in forced swim test in male outbred mice. It is shown that acute treatment with fluoxetine does not produce any antidepressant effects in mice following stress of 14 days while the sub-chronic injections of fluoxetine result in more deep depressive-like behavior. In 28 daily stressed mice, antidepressant effect of fluoxetine is observed independently of the injection rates. Amitriptyline demonstrates the antidepressant activity regardless of the duration of stress or administration scheduling, but at the same time the severity of anti-immobilization effect of amitriptyline in stressed mice is weaker in compare to non-stressed trails. Thus, the injection rates and duration of unpredictable mild chronic stress are the parameters that determine the efficiency of antidepressants in the mouse forced swimming test.

  2. The effects of antidepressants in Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Frisina, Pasquale G; Tenenbaum, Harriet R; Borod, Joan C; Foldi, Nancy S

    2008-05-01

    This study explored the therapeutic effect of antidepressants in Parkinson's disease (PD) using a meta-analysis. Altogether, 24 placebo-controlled trials qualified for inclusion and revealed that tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) had a greater antidepressant effect relative to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), Qb(1) = 8.87, p < .01, and the mono-amine-oxidase inhibitor, selegiline, Qb(1) = 7.90, p < .01. Whereas TCAs produced a significant side effect profile (odds ratio = 3.07), adverse events were negligible with SSRIs (odds ratio = 1.83) and selegeline (odds ratio = 1.63). Antidepressants can be beneficial for patients with PD. However, the choice of antidepressants needs to take depressive symptomatologies into account while monitoring side effects.

  3. New use of an old drug: chloroquine reduces viral and ALT levels in HCV non-responders (a randomized, triple-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial).

    PubMed

    Peymani, Payam; Yeganeh, Behzad; Sabour, Siamak; Geramizadeh, Bita; Fattahi, Mohammad Reza; Keyvani, Hossein; Azarpira, Negar; Coombs, Kevin M; Ghavami, Saied; Lankarani, Kamran B

    2016-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection induces autophagy, but the virus assimilates the autophagic response into its own life cycle. Chloroquine (CQ) is an autophagy inhibitor that is clinically used to treat malaria. The aims of this pilot clinical trial were to evaluate the therapeutic potential and short-term safety of CQ in patients with chronic HCV genotype 1, who were unresponsive to a combination of pegylated interferon alpha and ribavirin. Ten non-responders to previous antiviral treatment(s) were randomized to receive either CQ (150 mg daily for 8 weeks) or placebo, and were followed for 4 weeks after CQ therapy. HCV RNA load and plasma alanine transaminase (ALT) levels were measured at baseline, week 4 (initial response), week 8 (end-of-treatment response), and at the end of 12 weeks. A significant decrease in HCV RNA after the treatments (week 8) was observed in all patients in the CQ group (P = 0.04). However, HCV RNA levels increased within 4 weeks after discontinuation of CQ treatment although they were still lower than baseline. In addition, the ALT normalized during treatment in the CQ group. However, this response was also lost after treatment cessation. This study provides preliminary evidence that CQ is possibly a safe treatment option for HCV non-responders.

  4. Outcome measures of antidepressive therapy.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, R

    2000-01-01

    A variety of outcome measures assessing antidepressive therapy are available. However, in randomized clinical trials, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) is often the primary outcome measure. Results from factor analysis and Rasch item analysis indicate that the HAM-D is heterogeneous and that the sum of items scores may not be an adequate measure of the severity of depression. A Melancholia Scale of 11 items has been suggested as a more valid measure of the core symptoms of affective syndrome. Other global outcome measures, focusing on health-related quality of life issues and on social functioning as well as macro-economic analyses are also used in depression. Applying stringent and well-documented outcome measures in randomized clinical trials of antidepressants may give the clinician a better indication of the most appropriate drug for treatment of the individual patient.

  5. Design of clinical trials of antidepressants: should a placebo control arm be included?

    PubMed

    Fritze, J; Möller, H J

    2001-01-01

    There is no doubt that available antidepressants are efficacious and effective. Nevertheless, more effective drugs with improved tolerability are needed. With this need in mind, some protagonists claim that future antidepressants should be proved superior to, or at least as effective as, established antidepressants, making placebo control methodologically dispensable in clinical trials. Moreover, the use of placebo control is criticised as unethical because it might result in effective treatment being withheld. There are, however, a number of methodological reasons why placebo control is indispensable for the proof of efficacy of antidepressants. Comparing investigational antidepressants only with standard antidepressants and not placebo yields ambiguous results that are difficult to interpret, be it in superiority or equivalence testing, and this method of assessment requires larger sample sizes than those required with the use of placebo control. Experimental methodology not adhering to the optimal study design is ethically questionable. Restricting the testing of investigational antidepressants only to superiority over standard antidepressants is an obstacle to therapeutic progress in terms of tolerability and the detection of innovative mechanisms of action from which certain subgroups of future patients might benefit. The use of a methodology that requires larger samples for testing of superiority or equivalence is also ethically questionable. In view of the high placebo response rates in trials of antidepressants, placebo treatment does not mean withholding effective treatment. Accepting the necessity of the clinical evaluation of new, potentially ineffective antidepressants implicitly means accepting placebo control as ethically justified. Three- or multi-arm comparisons including placebo and an active reference represent the optimal study design. PMID:11602002

  6. Leptin: a potential novel antidepressant.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xin-Yun; Kim, Chung Sub; Frazer, Alan; Zhang, Wei

    2006-01-31

    Leptin, a hormone secreted from adipose tissue, was originally discovered to regulate body weight. The localization of the leptin receptor in limbic structures suggests a potential role for leptin in emotional processes. Here, we show that rats exposed to chronic unpredictable stress and chronic social defeat exhibit low leptin levels in plasma. Systemic leptin treatment reversed the hedonic-like deficit induced by chronic unpredictable stress and improved behavioral despair dose-dependently in the forced swim test (FST), a model widely used for screening potential antidepressant efficacy. The behavioral effects of leptin in the FST were accompanied by increased neuronal activation in limbic structures, particularly in the hippocampus. Intrahippocampal infusion of leptin produced a similar antidepressant-like effect in the FST as its systemic administration. By contrast, infusion of leptin into the hypothalamus decreased body weight but had no effect on FST behavior. These findings suggest that: (i) impaired leptin production and secretion may contribute to chronic stress-induced depression-like phenotypes, (ii) the hippocampus is a brain site mediating leptin's antidepressant-like activity, and (iii) elevating leptin signaling in brain may represent a novel approach for the treatment of depressive disorders. PMID:16423896

  7. Emerging targets for antidepressant therapies

    PubMed Central

    Rakofsky, Jeffrey J; Holtzheimer, Paul E; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2015-01-01

    Despite adequate antidepressant monotherapy, the majority of depressed patients do not achieve remission. Even optimal and aggressive therapy leads to a substantial number of patients who show minimal and often only transient improvement. In order to address this substantial problem of treatment-resistant depression, a number of novel targets for antidepressant therapy have emerged as a consequence of major advances in the neurobiology of depression. Three major approaches to uncover novel therapeutic interventions are: first, optimizing the modulation of monoaminergic neurotransmission; second, developing medications that act upon neurotransmitter systems other than monoaminergic circuits; and third, using focal brain stimulation to directly modulate neuronal activity. We review the most recent data on novel therapeutic compounds and their antidepressant potential. These include triple monoamine reuptake inhibitors, atypical antipsychotic augmentation, and dopamine receptor agonists. Compounds affecting extra-monoamine neurotransmitter systems include CRF1 receptor antagonists, glucocorticoid receptor antagonists, substance P receptor antagonists, NMDA receptor antagonists, nemifitide, omega-3 fatty acids, and melatonin receptor agonists. Focal brain stimulation therapies include vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), magnetic seizure therapy (MST), transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), and deep brain stimulation (DBS). PMID:19501541

  8. Placebo-Activated Neural Systems are Linked to Antidepressant Responses

    PubMed Central

    Peciña, Marta; Bohnert, Amy S. B.; Sikora, Magdalena; Avery, Erich T.; Langenecker, Scott A.; Mickey, Brian J.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2016-01-01

    Importance High placebo responses have been observed across a wide range of pathologies, severely impacting drug development. Objective Here we examined neurochemical mechanisms underlying the formation of placebo effects in patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Participants Thirty-five medication-free MDD patients. Design and Intervention We performed a single-blinded two-week cross-over randomized controlled trial of two identical oral placebos (described as having either “active” or “inactive” fast-acting antidepressant-like effects) followed by a 10-week open-label treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or in some cases, another agent as clinically indicated. The volunteers were studied with PET and the μ-opioid receptor (MOR)-selective radiotracer [11C]carfentanil after each 1-week “inactive” and “active” oral placebo treatment. In addition, 1 mL of isotonic saline was administered intravenously (i.v.) within sight of the volunteer during PET scanning every 4 min over 20 min only after the 1-week active placebo treatment, with instructions that the compound may be associated with the activation of brain systems involved in mood improvement. This challenge stimulus was utilized to test the individual capacity to acutely activate endogenous opioid neurotransmision under expectations of antidepressant effect. Setting A University Health System. Main Outcomes and Measures Changes in depressive symptoms in response to “active” placebo and antidepressant. Baseline and activation measures of MOR binding. Results Higher baseline MOR binding in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) was associated with better response to antidepressant treatment (r=0.48; p=0.02). Reductions in depressive symptoms after 1-week of “active” placebo treatment, compared to the “inactive”, were associated with increased placebo-induced μ-opioid neurotransmission in a network of regions implicated in emotion, stress regulation, and the

  9. Primum Non Nocere: An Evolutionary Analysis of Whether Antidepressants Do More Harm than Good

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Paul W.; Thomson, J. Anderson; Amstadter, Ananda; Neale, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Antidepressant medications are the first-line treatment for people meeting current diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder. Most antidepressants are designed to perturb the mechanisms that regulate the neurotransmitter serotonin – an evolutionarily ancient biochemical found in plants, animals, and fungi. Many adaptive processes evolved to be regulated by serotonin, including emotion, development, neuronal growth and death, platelet activation and the clotting process, attention, electrolyte balance, and reproduction. It is a principle of evolutionary medicine that the disruption of evolved adaptations will degrade biological functioning. Because serotonin regulates many adaptive processes, antidepressants could have many adverse health effects. For instance, while antidepressants are modestly effective in reducing depressive symptoms, they increase the brain’s susceptibility to future episodes after they have been discontinued. Contrary to a widely held belief in psychiatry, studies that purport to show that antidepressants promote neurogenesis are flawed because they all use a method that cannot, by itself, distinguish between neurogenesis and neuronal death. In fact, antidepressants cause neuronal damage and mature neurons to revert to an immature state, both of which may explain why antidepressants also cause neurons to undergo apoptosis (programmed death). Antidepressants can also cause developmental problems, they have adverse effects on sexual and romantic life, and they increase the risk of hyponatremia (low sodium in the blood plasma), bleeding, stroke, and death in the elderly. Our review supports the conclusion that antidepressants generally do more harm than good by disrupting a number of adaptive processes regulated by serotonin. However, there may be specific conditions for which their use is warranted (e.g., cancer, recovery from stroke). We conclude that altered informed consent practices and greater caution in the prescription of

  10. Repeated ketamine administration redeems the time lag for citalopram's antidepressant-like effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G-F; Liu, W-X; Qiu, L-L; Guo, J; Wang, X-M; Sun, H-L; Yang, J-J; Zhou, Z-Q

    2015-06-01

    Current available antidepressants exhibit low remission rate with a long response lag time. Growing evidence has demonstrated acute sub-anesthetic dose of ketamine exerts rapid, robust, and lasting antidepressant effects. However, a long term use of ketamine tends to elicit its adverse reactions. The present study aimed to investigate the antidepressant-like effects of intermittent and consecutive administrations of ketamine on chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) rats, and to determine whether ketamine can redeem the time lag for treatment response of classic antidepressants. The behavioral responses were assessed by the sucrose preference test, forced swimming test, and open field test. In the first stage of experiments, all the four treatment regimens of ketamine (10mg/kg ip, once daily for 3 or 7 consecutive days, or once every 7 or 3 days, in a total 21 days) showed robust antidepressant-like effects, with no significant influence on locomotor activity and stereotype behavior in the CUMS rats. The intermittent administration regimens produced longer antidepressant-like effects than the consecutive administration regimens and the administration every 7 days presented similar antidepressant-like effects with less administration times compared with the administration every 3 days. In the second stage of experiments, the combination of ketamine (10 mg/kg ip, once every 7 days) and citalopram (20 mg/kg po, once daily) for 21 days caused more rapid and sustained antidepressant-like effects than citalopram administered alone. In summary, repeated sub-anesthestic doses of ketamine can redeem the time lag for the antidepressant-like effects of citalopram, suggesting the combination of ketamine and classic antidepressants is a promising regimen for depression with quick onset time and stable and lasting effects. PMID:25795441

  11. Utilization and mechanism of action of tricyclic antidepressants in the treatment of chronic facial pain: a review of the literature.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, R. S.; Bottomley, W. K.

    1990-01-01

    Tricyclic antidepressants show promise in the treatment of chronic facial pain. The antinociceptive activity of this class of drugs appears to be independent of any antidepressant effects. An hypothesis is proposed that tricyclics antidepressants activate a descending serotonergic (5-HT1) antinociceptive pathway which in turn influences endogenous opioids. This antinociceptive pathway appears to utilize an endogenous pain modulation system. Future studies may demonstrate the operative mechanisms of action and open understanding as to etiologic factors. PMID:2096745

  12. Effect of antidepressants on spatial memory deficit induced by dizocilpine.

    PubMed

    Tao, Chenjuan; Yan, Weiwei; Li, Yuan; Lu, Xiaodong

    2016-10-30

    Cognitive deficits are a core symptom of schizophrenia. It is controversial whether antidepressants could improve cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia patients. The present study was designed to identify the therapeutic effect of antidepressants on cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. In the present study, adolescent rats were repeatedly exposed to dizocilpine, which can induce cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia. Then these rats were treated by six antidepressants (fluvoxamine, sertraline, paroxetine, escitalopram, venlafaxine, mirtazapine) or vehicle. The rats in the control group were exposed to vehicle during the study. Lastly, all rats' spatial memory (a major part of cognition) was assessed using the Morris water maze (MWM) test, and the density of hippocampal parvalbumin (PV) interneurons was evaluated to explore possible mechanisms underlying spatial memory change in schizophrenia. The results of the present study supported the hypothesis of a therapeutic effect of fluvoxamine and escitalopram on spatial memory deficit induced by dizocilpine. Additionally, the data of the present study suggested that fluvoxamine and escitalopram remitted hippocampal PV interneuron reduction induced by dizocilpine. The neuroprotective effect of fluvoxamine and escitalopram may partly explain the therapeutic effect of antidepressants on spatial memory deficit in schizophrenia patients. PMID:27512913

  13. Factors Related to Outcome in a School-Based Intensive Mental Health Program: An Examination of Nonresponders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Anne K.; Roberts, Michael C.; Vernberg, Eric M.; Nyre, Joseph E.; Randall, Camille J.; Puddy, Richard W.

    2008-01-01

    We examined factors related to treatment responders (n = 35) and nonresponders (n = 16) in a group of 51 children admitted to the Intensive Mental Health Program (IMHP). Children's response to treatment was coded based on their functioning at intake and discharge using total CAFAS scores. Demographic variables, length of treatment, number of…

  14. Marketing 'mind mechanics': decoding antidepressant drug advertisements.

    PubMed

    Goldman, R; Montagne, M

    1986-01-01

    Advertisers have adopted the use of highly abstract visual metaphors and symbols in addressing physicians about antidepressant drugs. Campaigns built around an abstract visual aesthetics are designed to generate cognitive connections between named drug entities and the meaning of abstract visual images: these connections are called 'carry-over symbols'. In this study we critically dismantle and analyze the encoding practices used in two recent ad campaigns for antidepressants. In addition to asking what the ads mean, we ask how they mean it. This analysis is joined to a comparison of the information provided by these ads with the pharmacological and therapeutic properties of the drugs themselves. Our analysis suggests this style of drug advertising produces, as a social side-effect, a reified and medicalized account of psychiatric illness (depression). It also poses an obstacle to scientific discourse and understanding; privileges certain types of social knowledge concerning mental illness, psychiatric patients, and drug taking; and discourages professional d debate regarding therapeutic approaches to treating illness. These ads reflect a positivistic conceptualization of mental illness and doctoring as mind mechanics.

  15. Suicidality and antidepressants in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Suicide has reached epidemic proportions in the elderly, particularly in non-Hispanic white men. Unfortunately, the risk is underappreciated in this population. Known risk correlates for suicide in this population fall into three interrelated categories. Sociologic factors include such considerations as living alone and having few social interactions. Physical health factors include having more medical comorbidity and being a current smoker. The mental health risk factors include the presence of mood and anxiety disorders with a focus on the greater severity of symptoms, especially hypersomnia, hopelessness, and a history of suicide attempts. Suicide is a spectrum comprising ideation, intent, and plan. Clinical depression is never a normal part of aging and warrants aggressive treatment. Recent warnings linking antidepressants and suicide may have special relevance in the elderly. Based on preliminary studies with antipsychotic drugs, a subgroup of patients who experience akathisia may be particularly vulnerable to suicide. Upon initiation of antidepressants, it is recommended that adults be seen in follow-up three times within the first 12 weeks of treatment; if medically indicated, the first contact should be during the first week. PMID:18982077

  16. The unfulfilled promise of the antidepressant medications.

    PubMed

    Davey, Christopher G; Chanen, Andrew M

    2016-05-16

    Australia has one of the highest rates of antidepressant use in the world; it has more than doubled since 2000, despite evidence showing that the effectiveness of these medications is lower than previously thought. An increasing placebo response rate is a key reason for falling effectiveness, with the gap between response to medications and placebo narrowing. Psychotherapies are effective treatments, but recent evidence from high-quality studies suggests that their effectiveness is also modest. Combined treatment with medication and psychotherapy provides greater effectiveness than either alone. The number of patients receiving psychotherapy had been declining, although this trend is probably reversing with the Medicare Better Access to Mental Health Care initiative. Antidepressant medications still have an important role in the treatment of moderate to severe depression; they should be provided as part of an overall treatment plan that includes psychotherapy and lifestyle strategies to improve diet and increase exercise. When medications are prescribed, they should be used in a way that maximises their chance of effectiveness. PMID:27169968

  17. A magic pill? A qualitative analysis of patients’ views on the role of antidepressant therapy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies with healthy volunteers have demonstrated that antidepressants can improve immunoregulatory activity and thus they may have a potential to positively impact the disease course in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a chronic and incurable condition. However, patients’ views on the role of antidepressants in the management of their IBD are unknown. Thus, this study aimed to explore patients’ experiences and opinions regarding the effect of antidepressants on IBD course before possibly undertaking future treatment trials with antidepressants. Methods Semi-structured in-depth interviews with open-ended questions were conducted with a randomly selected sample of IBD patients recruited at the Australian public hospital IBD clinic and currently receiving antidepressants. A qualitative content analysis was undertaken to summarise patients’ responses. A Visual Analogue Scale was used to provide a quantitative assessment of patients’ experiences with antidepressants. Results Overall, 15 IBD sufferers currently on antidepressants (nine females, six males) were interviewed. All 15 reported a positive response to antidepressants reporting they improved their quality of life, with minimal side-effects. Five patients (33.3%) felt the antidepressant had specifically improved their IBD course. Three patients noted how they believed the reduction in feelings of stress mediated the positive influence of the antidepressant on IBD course. Ten patients (66.7%) felt the antidepressants had not specifically influenced their IBD. Nine patients (60.0%) had a generally positive attitude towards antidepressants, four patients (26.7%) were ambivalent, and two patients (13.3%) held a negative view towards antidepressants. Twelve patients (80.0%) stated that they would be willing to participate in clinical trials. Conclusions Antidepressants seem to be well tolerated by IBD patients. One third of patients reported an observable improvement of their IBD under the

  18. Effect of SSRI antidepressants on ejaculation: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study with fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline.

    PubMed

    Waldinger, M D; Hengeveld, M W; Zwinderman, A H; Olivier, B

    1998-08-01

    Depression is a common cause of sexual dysfunction, but also antidepressant medication is often associated with sexual side effects. This article includes two related studies. The first double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in men with lifelong rapid ejaculation and aimed to assess putative differences between the major selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline) with regard to their ejaculation-delaying effect. Sixty men with an intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) of 1 minute or less were randomly assigned to receive fluoxetine 20 mg/day, fluvoxamine 100 mg/day, paroxetine 20 mg/day, sertraline 50 mg/day, or placebo for 6 weeks. During the 1-month baseline and 6-week treatment periods, the men measured their IELT at home using a stopwatch. The trial was completed by 51 men. During the 6-week treatment period, the geometric mean IELT in the placebo group was constant at approximately 20 seconds. Analysis of variance revealed a between-groups difference in the evolution of IELT delay (p = 0.0004); in the paroxetine, fluoxetine, and sertraline groups there was a gradual increase to about 110 seconds, whereas in the fluvoxamine group, IELT was increased to only approximately 40 seconds. The paroxetine, fluoxetine, and sertraline groups differed significantly (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.017, respectively) from placebo but the fluvoxamine group did not (p = 0.38). Compared with baseline, paroxetine exerted the strongest delay in ejaculation, followed by fluoxetine and sertraline. There was no clinically relevant delay in ejaculation with fluvoxamine. In men with lifelong rapid ejaculation, paroxetine delayed ejaculation most strongly, whereas fluvoxamine delayed ejaculation the least. The second double-blind, placebo-controlled study was carried out in men with lifelong rapid ejaculation (IELT < or = 1 minute) and in men with lifelong less-rapid ejaculation (IELT > 1 minute) to

  19. Effect of SSRI antidepressants on ejaculation: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study with fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline.

    PubMed

    Waldinger, M D; Hengeveld, M W; Zwinderman, A H; Olivier, B

    1998-08-01

    Depression is a common cause of sexual dysfunction, but also antidepressant medication is often associated with sexual side effects. This article includes two related studies. The first double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in men with lifelong rapid ejaculation and aimed to assess putative differences between the major selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline) with regard to their ejaculation-delaying effect. Sixty men with an intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) of 1 minute or less were randomly assigned to receive fluoxetine 20 mg/day, fluvoxamine 100 mg/day, paroxetine 20 mg/day, sertraline 50 mg/day, or placebo for 6 weeks. During the 1-month baseline and 6-week treatment periods, the men measured their IELT at home using a stopwatch. The trial was completed by 51 men. During the 6-week treatment period, the geometric mean IELT in the placebo group was constant at approximately 20 seconds. Analysis of variance revealed a between-groups difference in the evolution of IELT delay (p = 0.0004); in the paroxetine, fluoxetine, and sertraline groups there was a gradual increase to about 110 seconds, whereas in the fluvoxamine group, IELT was increased to only approximately 40 seconds. The paroxetine, fluoxetine, and sertraline groups differed significantly (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.017, respectively) from placebo but the fluvoxamine group did not (p = 0.38). Compared with baseline, paroxetine exerted the strongest delay in ejaculation, followed by fluoxetine and sertraline. There was no clinically relevant delay in ejaculation with fluvoxamine. In men with lifelong rapid ejaculation, paroxetine delayed ejaculation most strongly, whereas fluvoxamine delayed ejaculation the least. The second double-blind, placebo-controlled study was carried out in men with lifelong rapid ejaculation (IELT < or = 1 minute) and in men with lifelong less-rapid ejaculation (IELT > 1 minute) to

  20. p11 and its role in depression and therapeutic responses to antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Svenningsson, Per; Kim, Yong; Warner-Schmidt, Jennifer; Oh, Yong-Seok; Greengard, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Studies of the multifunctional protein p11 (also known as S100A10) are shedding light on the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying depression. Here we review data implicating p11 in both the amplification of serotonergic signaling and the regulation of gene transcription. We summarize studies demonstrating that the levels of p11 are regulated in depression and by antidepressant regimens and, conversely, that p11 regulates depression-like behaviors and/or responses to antidepressants. Current and future studies of p11 may provide a molecular and cellular framework for the development of novel antidepressant therapies. PMID:24002251

  1. Antidepressants relevant to oral and maxillofacial surgical practice

    PubMed Central

    Lambrecht, J. Thomas; Greuter, Christian; Surber, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background: Depression is commonly associated with a high-carbohydrate diet, lack of interest in proper oral hygiene and xerostomia connected to the use of antidepressants. Patients often consult their dentists as a result of changes affecting the hard dental substance and the soft-tissues. Aim: The aim of this study was to identify adverse drug interactions between the antidepressants and medications commonly administered in dentistry in order to give practicing dentists an overview of the scientific literature. Objective: The objective is to identify the adverse drug interactions between antidepressants and medication commonly administered in dentistry. Study Design: The literature search was performed using PubMed, Cochrane and the specific search items. The review (1984-2009) focused on medicines used in dental practice (vasoconstrictors, non-opioid analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics, antifungals and benzodiazepines). Results: There are various drug interactions between antidepressants and medicines used in dentistry. When two or more drugs are co-administered, a drug interaction must always be anticipated though many of the interactions are potential problems, but do not seem to be real clinical issues. Conclusion: The probability of a drug interaction can be minimized by careful history-taking, skillful dose adjustment and safe administration of the therapeutic agent. PMID:24205476

  2. The role of glutamate on the action of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji

    2011-08-15

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common, chronic, recurrent mental illness that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Currently available antidepressants are known to affect the monoaminergic (e.g., serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine) systems in the brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that the glutamatergic neurotransmission via the excitatory amino acid glutamate also plays an important role in the neurobiology and treatment of this disease. Clinical studies have demonstrated that the non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine has rapid antidepressant effects in treatment-resistant patients with MDD, suggesting the role of glutamate in the pathophysiology of treatment-resistant MDD. Furthermore, a number of preclinical studies demonstrated that the agents which act at glutamate receptors such as NMDA receptors, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) might have antidepressant-like activities in animal models of depression. In this article, the author reviews the role of glutamate in the neuron-glia communication induced by potential antidepressants.

  3. The discovery of antidepressant drugs by computer-analyzed human cerebral bio-electrical potentials (CEEG).

    PubMed

    Itil, T M

    1983-01-01

    Antidepressant properties of six compounds were predicted based on their computer-analyzed human electroencephalographical (CEEG) profiles. The clinical investigations with mianserin (GB-94) confirmed the CEEG prediction. This compound has now been marketed as the first antidepressant of which the clinical effects were discovered solely by the quantitative pharmaco-EEG method. As predicted by the CEEG, clinical antidepressant properties of GC-46, mesterolone, and estradiol valerate were observed in preliminary investigations. No extensive studies with definite statistical results were yet carried out with these compounds. No systematic large studies could be conducted with cyclozocine and cyproterone acetate because of the intolerable side effects with these compounds. The optical isomers of mianserin, GF-59 and GF-60, both predicted as antidepressant by the computer EEG data base, have not yet been tested in depressive patients. None of these compounds possess the "typical" pharmacological and/or biochemical profiles of marketed antidepressants. Thus, the discovery of the established antidepressant properties of mianserin (GB-94) by computer analyzed EEG method challenges the well-known biochemical hypotheses of depression and the "classical" development of antidepressant drugs. PMID:6142498

  4. The discovery of antidepressant drugs by computer-analyzed human cerebral bio-electrical potentials (CEEG).

    PubMed

    Itil, T M

    1983-01-01

    Antidepressant properties of six compounds were predicted based on their computer-analyzed human electroencephalographical (CEEG) profiles. The clinical investigations with mianserin (GB-94) confirmed the CEEG prediction. This compound has now been marketed as the first antidepressant of which the clinical effects were discovered solely by the quantitative pharmaco-EEG method. As predicted by the CEEG, clinical antidepressant properties of GC-46, mesterolone, and estradiol valerate were observed in preliminary investigations. No extensive studies with definite statistical results were yet carried out with these compounds. No systematic large studies could be conducted with cyclozocine and cyproterone acetate because of the intolerable side effects with these compounds. The optical isomers of mianserin, GF-59 and GF-60, both predicted as antidepressant by the computer EEG data base, have not yet been tested in depressive patients. None of these compounds possess the "typical" pharmacological and/or biochemical profiles of marketed antidepressants. Thus, the discovery of the established antidepressant properties of mianserin (GB-94) by computer analyzed EEG method challenges the well-known biochemical hypotheses of depression and the "classical" development of antidepressant drugs.

  5. Assessing substrates underlying the behavioral effects of antidepressants using the modified rat forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Cryan, John F; Valentino, Rita J; Lucki, Irwin

    2005-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most widely prescribed antidepressant class today and exert their antidepressant-like effects by increasing synaptic concentrations of serotonin (5-HT). The rat forced swim test (FST) is the most widely used animal test predictive of antidepressant action. Procedural modifications recently introduced by our laboratory have enabled SSRI-induced behavioral responses to be measured in the modified FST. The use of this model to understand the pharmacological and physiological mechanisms underlying the role of 5-HT in the behavioral effects of antidepressant drugs is reviewed. Although all antidepressants reduced behavioral immobility, those antidepressants that increase serotonergic neurotransmission predominantly increase swimming behavior whereas those that increase catacholaminergic neurotransmission increase climbing behavior. The 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(1B/1D) and 5-HT(2C) receptors are the 5-HT receptors most important to the therapeutic effects of SSRIs, based on extensive evaluation of agonists and antagonists of individual 5-HT receptor subtypes. Studies involving chronic administration have shown that the effects of antidepressants are augmented following chronic treatment. Other studies have demonstrated strain differences in the response to serotonergic compounds. Finally, a physiological model of performance in the rat FST has been proposed involving the regulation of 5-HT transmission by corticotropin releasing factor (CRF).

  6. Antidepressants Accumulate in Lipid Rafts Independent of Monoamine Transporters to Modulate Redistribution of the G Protein, Gαs.

    PubMed

    Erb, Samuel J; Schappi, Jeffrey M; Rasenick, Mark M

    2016-09-16

    Depression is a significant public health problem for which currently available medications, if effective, require weeks to months of treatment before patients respond. Previous studies have shown that the G protein responsible for increasing cAMP (Gαs) is increasingly localized to lipid rafts in depressed subjects and that chronic antidepressant treatment translocates Gαs from lipid rafts. Translocation of Gαs, which shows delayed onset after chronic antidepressant treatment of rats or of C6 glioma cells, tracks with the delayed onset of therapeutic action of antidepressants. Because antidepressants appear to specifically modify Gαs localized to lipid rafts, we sought to determine whether structurally diverse antidepressants accumulate in lipid rafts. Sustained treatment of C6 glioma cells, which lack 5-hydroxytryptamine transporters, showed marked concentration of several antidepressants in raft fractions, as revealed by increased absorbance and by mass fingerprint. Closely related molecules without antidepressant activity did not concentrate in raft fractions. Thus, at least two classes of antidepressants accumulate in lipid rafts and effect translocation of Gαs to the non-raft membrane fraction, where it activates the cAMP-signaling cascade. Analysis of the structural determinants of raft localization may both help to explain the hysteresis of antidepressant action and lead to design and development of novel substrates for depression therapeutics.

  7. The biological effects of antidepressants on the molluscs and crustaceans: a review.

    PubMed

    Fong, Peter P; Ford, Alex T

    2014-06-01

    Antidepressants are among the most commonly detected human pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. Since their mode of action is by modulating the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine, aquatic invertebrates who possess transporters and receptors sensitive to activation by these pharmaceuticals are potentially affected by them. We review the various types of antidepressants, their occurrence and concentrations in aquatic environments, and the actions of neurohormones modulated by antidepressants in molluscs and crustaceans. Recent studies on the effects of antidepressants on these two important groups show that molluscan reproductive and locomotory systems are affected by antidepressants at environmentally relevant concentrations. In particular, antidepressants affect spawning and larval release in bivalves and disrupt locomotion and reduce fecundity in snails. In crustaceans, antidepressants affect freshwater amphipod activity patterns, marine amphipod photo- and geotactic behavior, crayfish aggression, and daphnid reproduction and development. We note with interest the occurrence of non-monotonic dose responses curves in many studies on effects of antidepressants on aquatic animals, often with effects at low concentrations, but not at higher concentrations, and we suggest future experiments consider testing a broader range of concentrations. Furthermore, we consider invertebrate immune responses, genomic and transcriptomic sequencing of invertebrate genes, and the ever-present and overwhelming question of how contaminant mixtures could affect the action of neurohormones as topics for future study. In addressing the question, if antidepressants affect aquatic invertebrates at concentrations currently found in the environment, there is strong evidence to suggest the answer is yes. Furthermore, the examples highlighted in this review provide compelling evidence that the effects could be quite multifaceted across a variety of biological

  8. The biological effects of antidepressants on the molluscs and crustaceans: a review.

    PubMed

    Fong, Peter P; Ford, Alex T

    2014-06-01

    Antidepressants are among the most commonly detected human pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. Since their mode of action is by modulating the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine, aquatic invertebrates who possess transporters and receptors sensitive to activation by these pharmaceuticals are potentially affected by them. We review the various types of antidepressants, their occurrence and concentrations in aquatic environments, and the actions of neurohormones modulated by antidepressants in molluscs and crustaceans. Recent studies on the effects of antidepressants on these two important groups show that molluscan reproductive and locomotory systems are affected by antidepressants at environmentally relevant concentrations. In particular, antidepressants affect spawning and larval release in bivalves and disrupt locomotion and reduce fecundity in snails. In crustaceans, antidepressants affect freshwater amphipod activity patterns, marine amphipod photo- and geotactic behavior, crayfish aggression, and daphnid reproduction and development. We note with interest the occurrence of non-monotonic dose responses curves in many studies on effects of antidepressants on aquatic animals, often with effects at low concentrations, but not at higher concentrations, and we suggest future experiments consider testing a broader range of concentrations. Furthermore, we consider invertebrate immune responses, genomic and transcriptomic sequencing of invertebrate genes, and the ever-present and overwhelming question of how contaminant mixtures could affect the action of neurohormones as topics for future study. In addressing the question, if antidepressants affect aquatic invertebrates at concentrations currently found in the environment, there is strong evidence to suggest the answer is yes. Furthermore, the examples highlighted in this review provide compelling evidence that the effects could be quite multifaceted across a variety of biological

  9. The effects of antenatal depression and antidepressant treatment on placental gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Jocelien D. A.; Åkerud, Helena; Skalkidou, Alkistis; Kaihola, Helena; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2015-01-01

    The effects of antenatal depression and antidepressant treatment during pregnancy on both mother and child are vigorously studied, but the underlying biology for these effects is largely unknown. The placenta plays a crucial role in the growth and development of the fetus. We performed a gene expression study on the fetal side of the placenta to investigate gene expression patterns in mothers with antenatal depression and in mothers using antidepressant treatment during pregnancy. Placental samples from mothers with normal pregnancies, from mothers with antenatal depression, and from mothers using antidepressants were collected. We performed a pilot microarray study to investigate alterations in the gene expression and selected several genes from the microarray for biological validation with qPCR in a larger sample. In mothers with antenatal depression 108 genes were differentially expressed, whereas 109 genes were differentially expressed in those using antidepressants. Validation of the microarray revealed more robust gene expression differences in the seven genes picked for confirmation in antidepressant-treated women than in depressed women. Among the genes that were validated ROCK2 and C12orf39 were differentially expressed in both depressed and antidepressant-treated women, whereas ROCK1, GCC2, KTN1, and DNM1L were only differentially expressed in the antidepressant-treated women. In conclusion, antenatal depression and antidepressant exposure during pregnancy are associated with altered gene expression in the placenta. Findings on those genes picked for validation were more robust among antidepressant-treated women than in depressed women, possibly due to the fact that depression is a multifactorial condition with varying degrees of endocrine disruption. It remains to be established whether the alterations found in the gene expression of the placenta are found in the fetus as well. PMID:25628539

  10. Dry Eye Related to Commonly Used New Antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Koçer, Emel; Koçer, Abdulkadir; Özsütçü, Mustafa; Dursun, Ali Emre; Krpnar, İsmet

    2015-08-01

    Antidepressants may have an impact on the course of eye dryness. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of commonly used new antidepressants on eye wetting. Fifty-four patients using new antidepressants and 57 controls were recruited. The Beck Depression Scale and Beck Anxiety Scale questionnaires were completed by the patients, and drug use time and dosages were recorded. The Schirmer test was performed without prior instillation of topical anesthesia to the ocular surface, and the wetting result was recorded for each eye. Escitalopram, duloxetine, and venlafaxine were used by 27, 13, and 14 patients, respectively. The Schirmer test results in the patients were significantly lower than in the controls (P < 0.001). The patients using selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) displayed lower wetting measurements (≤5 mm) compared with those using serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, which was independent of the duration of antidepressant usage (P < 0.05). Although SSRIs do not have anticholinergic adverse effects except paroxetine, we found that both SSRIs and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors increased the risk for eye dryness. The lower Schirmer test results of the SSRIs may be associated with a mechanism other than the anticholinergic system. An awareness of the drugs that contribute to dry eye will allow ophthalmologists, optometrists, and other physicians to better manage patients who have this problem. PMID:26075491

  11. REM sleep homeostasis in the absence of REM sleep: Effects of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Andrew; Wafford, Keith; Shanks, Elaine; Ligocki, Marcin; Edgar, Dale M; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2016-09-01

    Most antidepressants suppress rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, which is thought to be important to brain function, yet the resulting REM sleep restriction is well tolerated. This study investigated the impact of antidepressants with different mechanisms of action, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCA), on the regulation of REM sleep in rats. REM sleep was first demonstrated to be homeostatically regulated using 5, 8 and 10 h of REM-sleep specific restriction through EEG-triggered arousals, with an average of 91 ± 10% of lost REM sleep recovered following a 26-29 -hour recovery period. Acute treatment with the antidepressants paroxetine, citalopram and imipramine inhibited REM sleep by 84 ± 8, 84 ± 8 and 69 ± 9% respectively relative to vehicle control. The pharmacologically-induced REM sleep deficits by paroxetine and citalopram were not fully recovered, whereas, after imipramine the REM sleep deficit was fully compensated. Given the marked difference between REM sleep recovery following the administration of paroxetine, citalopram, imipramine and REM sleep restriction, the homeostatic response was further examined by pairing REM sleep specific restriction with the three antidepressants. Surprisingly, the physiologically-induced REM sleep deficits incurred prior to suppression of REM sleep by all antidepressants was consistently recovered. The data indicate that REM sleep homeostasis remains operative following subsequent treatment with antidepressants and is unaffected by additional pharmacological inhibition of REM sleep. PMID:27150557

  12. Antidepressants in the Treatment of Functional Dyspepsia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yaoyao; Chen, Meng; Huang, Zhiyin; Tang, Chengwei

    2016-01-01

    Background Antidepressants have been empirically used in the treatment of functional dyspepsia (FD). However, results from recent clinical trials investigating their efficacy are conflicting. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of antidepressants in the management of FD in adults. Methods Databases of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and BIOSIS Previews were searched for all randomized controlled trials (RCT) investigating efficacy of antidepressants in the management of FD in adult patients. Data of overall symptom unimproved and adverse events were compared between the antidepressants and placebo group. Results The search strategy identified 432 citations. Of those, eight RCTs met the inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled relative risk (RR) of symptom unimproved with tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) versus placebo was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.62 to 0.94, P = 0.01; I2 = 0%, P = 0.39). By contrast, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) did not show a benefit over placebo (RR = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.86 to 1.17, P = 0.95; I2 = 0%, P = 0.82). Adverse events were significantly more frequent among patients receiving antidepressants than those receiving placebos (RR = 1.64, 95% CI: 1.14 to 2.35, P = 0.007). Conclusion TCAs but not SSRIs, are effective in the treatment of FD, but antidepressants were also associated with more adverse events compared with placebo. PMID:27310135

  13. Antidepressant Use is Associated with Increased Energy Intake and Similar Levels of Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Jensen-Otsu, Elsbeth; Austin, Gregory L

    2015-11-01

    Antidepressants have been associated with weight gain, but the causes are unclear. The aims of this study were to assess the association of antidepressant use with energy intake, macronutrient diet composition, and physical activity. We used data on medication use, energy intake, diet composition, and physical activity for 3073 eligible adults from the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Potential confounding variables, including depression symptoms, were included in the models assessing energy intake, physical activity, and sedentary behavior. Antidepressant users reported consuming an additional (mean ± S.E.) 215 ± 73 kcal/day compared to non-users (p = 0.01). There were no differences in percent calories from sugar, fat, or alcohol between the two groups. Antidepressant users had similar frequencies of walking or biking, engaging in muscle-strengthening activities, and engaging in moderate or vigorous physical activity. Antidepressant users were more likely to use a computer for ≥2 h/day (OR 1.77; 95% CI: 1.09-2.90), but TV watching was similar between the two groups. These results suggest increased energy intake and sedentary behavior may contribute to weight gain associated with antidepressant use. Focusing on limiting food intake and sedentary behaviors may be important in mitigating the weight gain associated with antidepressant use. PMID:26610562

  14. Antidepressant Use is Associated with Increased Energy Intake and Similar Levels of Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Jensen-Otsu, Elsbeth; Austin, Gregory L

    2015-11-20

    Antidepressants have been associated with weight gain, but the causes are unclear. The aims of this study were to assess the association of antidepressant use with energy intake, macronutrient diet composition, and physical activity. We used data on medication use, energy intake, diet composition, and physical activity for 3073 eligible adults from the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Potential confounding variables, including depression symptoms, were included in the models assessing energy intake, physical activity, and sedentary behavior. Antidepressant users reported consuming an additional (mean ± S.E.) 215 ± 73 kcal/day compared to non-users (p = 0.01). There were no differences in percent calories from sugar, fat, or alcohol between the two groups. Antidepressant users had similar frequencies of walking or biking, engaging in muscle-strengthening activities, and engaging in moderate or vigorous physical activity. Antidepressant users were more likely to use a computer for ≥2 h/day (OR 1.77; 95% CI: 1.09-2.90), but TV watching was similar between the two groups. These results suggest increased energy intake and sedentary behavior may contribute to weight gain associated with antidepressant use. Focusing on limiting food intake and sedentary behaviors may be important in mitigating the weight gain associated with antidepressant use.

  15. Differences in diffusion of FDA antidepressant risk warnings across racial-ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    DePetris, Andrea Elizabeth; Cook, Benjamin L

    2013-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Numerous articles have identified that medical technologies diffuse more rapidly among non-Latino whites compared with other racial-ethnic groups. However, whether health risk warnings also diffuse differentially across racial-ethnic minority groups is uncertain. This study assessed racial-ethnic variation in children's antidepressant use before and after the 2004 black-box warning concerning risks of antidepressants for youths. METHODS Data consisted of responses for white, black, and Latino youths ages five through 17 from the 2002-2008 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (N=44,422). The dependent variable was any antidepressant use in the prior year. Independent variables were race-ethnicity, year, psychological impairment, income, insurance status, region, and parents' education level. Logistic regression models were used to assess antidepressant use conditional on race-ethnicity, time, interaction between race-ethnicity and time, need, socioeconomic status, and Institute of Medicine-concordant estimates of disparities in predicted antidepressant use before and after the warning. RESULTS The warnings affected antidepressant use differentially for whites, blacks, and Latinos. Usage rates among whites decreased from 3.3 to 2.1 percentage points between prewarning and postwarning, whereas usage rates remained steady among Latinos and increased among blacks. Findings were significant in multiple regression analyses, in which predictions were adjusted for need. CONCLUSIONS The findings indicate that health safety information on antidepressant usage among children diffused faster among whites than nonwhites, suggesting the need to improve infrastructure for delivering important health messages to racial-ethnic minority populations.

  16. REM sleep homeostasis in the absence of REM sleep: Effects of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Andrew; Wafford, Keith; Shanks, Elaine; Ligocki, Marcin; Edgar, Dale M; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2016-09-01

    Most antidepressants suppress rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, which is thought to be important to brain function, yet the resulting REM sleep restriction is well tolerated. This study investigated the impact of antidepressants with different mechanisms of action, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCA), on the regulation of REM sleep in rats. REM sleep was first demonstrated to be homeostatically regulated using 5, 8 and 10 h of REM-sleep specific restriction through EEG-triggered arousals, with an average of 91 ± 10% of lost REM sleep recovered following a 26-29 -hour recovery period. Acute treatment with the antidepressants paroxetine, citalopram and imipramine inhibited REM sleep by 84 ± 8, 84 ± 8 and 69 ± 9% respectively relative to vehicle control. The pharmacologically-induced REM sleep deficits by paroxetine and citalopram were not fully recovered, whereas, after imipramine the REM sleep deficit was fully compensated. Given the marked difference between REM sleep recovery following the administration of paroxetine, citalopram, imipramine and REM sleep restriction, the homeostatic response was further examined by pairing REM sleep specific restriction with the three antidepressants. Surprisingly, the physiologically-induced REM sleep deficits incurred prior to suppression of REM sleep by all antidepressants was consistently recovered. The data indicate that REM sleep homeostasis remains operative following subsequent treatment with antidepressants and is unaffected by additional pharmacological inhibition of REM sleep.

  17. Adult separation anxiety in treatment nonresponders with anxiety disorders: delineation of the syndrome and exploration of attachment-based psychotherapy and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Milrod, Barbara; Altemus, Margaret; Gross, Charles; Busch, Fredric; Silver, Gabrielle; Christos, Paul; Stieber, Joshua; Schneier, Franklin

    2016-04-01

    Clinically significant separation anxiety [SA] has been identified as being common among patients who do not respond to psychiatric interventions, regardless of intervention type (pharmacological or psychotherapeutic), across anxiety and mood disorders. An attachment formation and maintenance domain has been proposed as contributing to anxiety disorders. We therefore directly determined prevalence of SA in a population of adult treatment non-responders suffering from primary anxiety. In these separation anxious nonresponders, we pilot-tested an SA-focused, attachment-based psychotherapy for anxiety, Panic-Focused Psychodynamic Psychotherapy-eXtended Range [PFPP-XR], and assessed whether hypothesized biomarkers of attachment were engaged. We studied separation anxiety [SA] in 46 adults (ages 23-70 [mean 43.9 (14.9)]) with clinically significant anxiety symptoms (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale [HARS]≥15), and reporting a history of past non-response to psychotherapy and/or medication treatments. Thirty-seven (80%) had clinically significant symptoms of separation anxiety (Structured Clinical Interview for Separation Anxiety Symptoms [SCI-SAS] score≥8). Five of these subjects completed an open clinical trial of Panic Focused Psychodynamic Psychotherapy eXtended Range [PFPP-XR], a 21-24 session, 12-week manualized attachment-focused anxiolytic psychodynamic psychotherapy for anxiety. Patients improved on "adult threshold" SCI-SAS (current separation anxiety) (p=.016), HARS (p=0.002), and global severity, assessed by the Clinical Global Impression Scale (p=.0006), at treatment termination. Salivary oxytocin levels decreased 67% after treatment (p=.12). There was no significant change in high or low frequency HRV after treatment, but change in high frequency HRV inversely correlated with treatment change in oxytocin (p<.02), and change in low frequency HRV was positively associated with change in oxytocin (p<.02). SA is surprisingly prevalent among non-responders to

  18. Antidepressant-like effect of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and other cannabinoids isolated from Cannabis sativa L

    PubMed Central

    El-Alfy, Abir T.; Ivey, Kelly; Robinson, Keisha; Ahmed, Safwat; Radwan, Mohamed; Slade, Desmond; Khan, Ikhlas; ElSohly, Mahmoud; Ross, Samir

    2010-01-01

    The antidepressant action of cannabis as well as the interaction between antidepressants and the endocannabinoid system has been reported. This study was conducted to assess the antidepressant-like activity of Δ9-THC and other cannabinoids. Cannabinoids were initially evaluated in the mouse tetrad assay to determine doses that do not induce hypothermia or catalepsy. The automated mouse forced swim (FST) and tail suspension (TST) tests were used to determine antidepressant action. At doses lacking hypothermic and cataleptic effects (1.25, 2.5, and 5 mg/kg, i.p.), both Δ9-THC and Δ8-THC showed a U-shaped dose response with only Δ9-THC showing significant antidepressant-like effects at 2.5 mg/kg (p < 0.05) in the FST. The cannabinoids cannabigerol (CBG) and cannabinol (CBN) did not produce antidepressant-like actions up to 80 mg/kg in the mouse FST, while cannabichromene (CBC) and cannabidiol (CBD) exhibited significant effect at 20 and 200 mg/kg, respectively (p < 0.01). The antidepressant-like action of Δ9-THC and CBC was further confirmed in the TST. Δ9 -THC exhibited the same U-shaped dose response with significant antidepressant-like action at 2.5 mg/kg (p < 0.05) while CBC resulted in a significant dose dependent decrease in immobility at 40 and 80 mg/kg doses (p < 0.01). Results of this study show that Δ9-THC and other cannabinoids exert antidepressant-like actions, and thus may contribute to the overall mood-elevating properties of cannabis. PMID:20332000

  19. Prescription pattern of antidepressants in five tertiary care psychiatric centres of India

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Adarsh; Avasthi, Ajit; Desousa, Avinash; Bhagabati, Dipesh; Shah, Nilesh; Kallivayalil, Roy Abraham; Grover, Sandeep; Trivedi, J.K.; Shinfuku, Naotaka

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Limited data are available on prescription patterns of the antidepressants from India. We studied antidepressants’ prescription pattern from five geographically distant tertiary psychiatric care centers of the India. Method: In this cross-sectional study, all patients who attended outpatients department or were admitted in the psychiatry wards at Lucknow, Chandigarh, Tiruvalla, Mumbai and Guwahati on a fixed day, who were using or had been prescribed antidepressant medications, were included. The data were collected on a unified research protocol. Results: A total of 312 patients were included. Mean age was 39±14.28 yr and 149 (47.76%) were females, 277 (87.5%) were outpatients. Among the patients receiving antidepressants, 150 (48.1%) were of diagnoses other than depression. Diabetes mellitus 18 (5.78%) was the most common co-morbid medical illness. A total of 194 (62.2%) patients were using selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) with escitalopram 114 (36.53%) being the most common antidepressant used. Overall, 272 (87.18%) patients were using newer antidepressants. Thirty (9.62%) were prescribed more than one antidepressant; 159 (50.96%) patients were prescribed hypnotic or sedative medications with clonazepam being the most common (n=116; 37.18%). Interpretation & conclusions: About half of the patients with diagnoses other than depression were prescribed antidepressants. SSRIs were the most common group and escitalopram was the most common medication used. Concomitant use of two antidepressants was infrequent. Hypnotic and sedatives were frequently prescribed along with antidepressants. PMID:27377509

  20. Constraints of nonresponding flows based on cross layers in the networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhi-Chao; Xiao, Yang; Wang, Dong

    2016-02-01

    In the active queue management (AQM) scheme, core routers cannot manage and constrain user datagram protocol (UDP) data flows by the sliding window control mechanism in the transport layer due to the nonresponsive nature of such traffic flows. However, the UDP traffics occupy a large part of the network service nowadays which brings a great challenge to the stability of the more and more complex networks. To solve the uncontrollable problem, this paper proposes a cross layers random early detection (CLRED) scheme, which can control the nonresponding UDP-like flows rate effectively when congestion occurs in the access point (AP). The CLRED makes use of the MAC frame acknowledgement (ACK) transmitting congestion information to the sources nodes and utilizes the back-off windows of the MAC layer throttling data rate. Consequently, the UDP-like flows data rate can be restrained timely by the sources nodes in order to alleviate congestion in the complex networks. The proposed CLRED can constrain the nonresponsive flows availably and make the communication expedite, so that the network can sustain stable. The simulation results of network simulator-2 (NS2) verify the proposed CLRED scheme.

  1. Recent advances in vaccination of non-responders to standard dose hepatitis B virus vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Walayat, Saqib; Ahmed, Zohair; Martin, Daniel; Puli, Srinivas; Cashman, Michael; Dhillon, Sonu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global health problem. It is estimated there are more than 2 billion individuals exposed to the virus and 250 million are chronically infected. Hepatitis B is the cause of more than 600000 annual deaths due to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. An effective vaccine exists and preventative initiatives center around universal vaccination especially in those at highest risk. Effective vaccination algorithms have led to a significant decline in the development of new infections and its devastating consequences. The vaccine is administered intramuscularly in three doses, with 95% showing long lasting serologic immunity. An additional fourth dose or a repeated higher dose three course regimen is given to those that fail to show immunity. Despite these additional regimens, some remain vulnerable to hepatitis B and are deemed non-responders. Individuals with chronic disease states such as kidney disease, liver disease, diabetes mellitus, as well as those with a genetic predisposition, and those on immunomodulation therapy, have the highest likelihood of non-response. Various strategies have been developed to elicit an immune response in these individuals. These include increased vaccination dose, intradermal administration, alternative adjuvants, alternative routes of administration, co-administration with other vaccines, and other novel therapies. These alternative strategies can show improved response and lasting immunity. In summary, HBV vaccination is a major advance of modern medicine and all individuals at risk should be sought and vaccinated with subsequent adequate titers demonstrated. PMID:26523203

  2. Antidepressant-Like Effects of Central BDNF Administration in Mice of Antidepressant Sensitive Catalepsy (ASC) Strain.

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, Maria; Kulikov, Alexander V

    2012-08-31

    Although numerous data evidence the implication of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the pathophysiology of depression, the potential for BDNF to correct genetically defined depressive-like states is poorly studied. This study was aimed to reveal antidepressant-like effects of BDNF (300 ng, 2×, i.c.v.) on behavior and mRNA expression of genes associated with depression-like state in the brain in mice of antidepressant sensitive catalepsy (ASC) strain characterized by high hereditary predisposition to catalepsy and depressive-like features. Behavioral tests were held on the 7th-16th days after the first (4th-13th after the second) BDNF injection. Results showed that BDNF normalized impaired sexual motivation in the ASC males, and this BDNF effect differed, with advantageous effects, from that of widely used antidepressants. The anticataleptic effect of two BDNF injections was enhanced compared with a single administration. A tendency to decrease the immobility duration in tail-suspension test was observed in BDNF-treated ASC mice. The effects on catalepsy and sexual motivation were specific since BDNF did not alter locomotor and exploratory activity or social interest in the ASC mice. Along with behavioral antidepressant-like effects on the ASC mice, BDNF increased hippocampal mRNA levels of Bdnf and Creb1 (cAMP response element-binding protein gene). BDNF also augmented mRNA levels of Arc gene encoding Arc (Activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated) protein involved in BDNF-induced processes of neuronal and synaptic plasticity in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. The data suggest that: [1] BDNF is effective in the treatment of some genetically defined behavioral disturbances; [2] BDNF influences sexually-motivated behavior; [3] Arc mRNA levels may serve as a molecular marker of BDNF physiological activity associated with its long-lasting behavioral effects; [4] ASC mouse strain can be used as a suitable model to study mechanisms of BDNF effects on

  3. Risk of Suicidal Behavior With Antidepressants in Bipolar and Unipolar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Andrew C; Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Solomonon, David A.; Li, Chunshan; Coryell, William H.; Endicott, Jean; Fawcett, Jan; Keller, Martin B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the risk ofsuicidal behavior (suicide attempts and deaths) associated with antidepressants in participants with bipolar I, bipolar n, and unipolar major depressive disorders. Design A 27-year longitudinal (1981-2008) observational study ofmood disorders (Research Diagnostic Criteria diagnoses based on Schedule Dr Afi:ctive Disorders and Schizophrenia and review ofmedical records) was used to evaluate antidepressants and risk Dr suicidal behavior. Mixed-efi:cts logistic regression models examined propensity Dr antidepressant exposure. Mixed-efi:cts swvival models that were matched on the propensity score examined exposure status as a risk factor for time until suicidal behavior. Setting Five US academic medical centers. Results Analyses of206 participants with bipolar I disorder revealed 2,010 exposure intervals (980 exposed to antidepressants; 1,030 unexposed); 139 participants with bipolar II disorder had 1 ,407 exposure intervals (694 exposed; 713 unexposed); and 361 participants with unipolar depressive disorder had 2, 745 exposure intervals (1,328 exposed; 1,417 unexposed). Propensity score analyses confinned that more severely ill participants were more likely to initiate antidepressant treatment. In mixed-elects swvival analyses, those with bipolar I disorder had a significant reduction in risk of suicidal behavior by 54% (HR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.31-0.69; t = -3.74; P < .001) during periods of antidepressant exposure compared to propensity-matched unexposed intervals. Similarly, the risk was reduced by 35% (HR = 0.65; 95% CI, 0.43-0.99; t = −2.01; P = .045) in bipolar II disorder. By contrast, there was no evidence of an increased or decreased risk with antidepressant exposure in unipolar disorder. Condusions Based on obsetVational data adjusted Dr propensity to receive antidepressants, antidepressants may protect patients with bipolar disorders but not unipolar depressive disorder from suicidal behavior. PMID:25093469

  4. Antidepressant Medications for Children and Adolescents: Information for Parents and Caregivers

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Pediatric Antidepressant Treatment: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. JAMA . 2007;297:1683-1696. Treatment ... depression: Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS) randomized controlled trial . Journal of the American Medical Association , ...

  5. New antidepressants in the treatment of neuropathic pain. A review.

    PubMed

    Mattia, C; Paoletti, F; Coluzzi, F; Boanelli, A

    2002-03-01

    Before 1980s, tricyclics (TCAs) were considered, between antidepressants, the standard in the treatment of different kinds of neuropathic pain, for their action on noradrenergic and serotoninergic pathways, thought the high incidence of side effects. In 1980s a new class of antidepressants has been introduced, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI). We reviewed some publications, including trials comparing SSRIs with TCAs in pain management. The available literature did not show an effective superiority of the former on the latter, though improved side-effect profile. Recently new antidepressants were introduced in the clinical use, with a significant reduction in side effects and equivalent efficacy on mood disorders. These new drugs may be classified in three categories: Serotonin and Noradrenergic Reuptake Inhibitors (SNaRI), like venlafaxine and nefazodone; Noradrenergic and Specific Serotoninergic Antidepressants (NaSSA), like mirtazapine, and Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitors (NaRI), like reboxetine. In this review we present the available publications of their application in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Venlafaxine (SNaRI), the most investigated of these new drugs, was shown to be effective in the treatment of different kinds of pain, with side-effects profile significantly better than TCAs. The other new antidepressants have been less extensively studied, thus only anecdotal therapeutic results and experimental works have been found and reported. Existing data are surely insufficient to conclude which of these new classes of drugs has the best clinical profile and can be more effective in the treatment of neuropathic pain, but the lower incidence of side effects should be considered. Further evidence-based research in the safety and efficacy of these promising agents in pain relief, is warranted. PMID:11981519

  6. Clinically significant drug interactions with newer antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Spina, Edoardo; Trifirò, Gianluca; Caraci, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    After the introduction of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), other newer antidepressants with different mechanisms of action have been introduced in clinical practice. Because antidepressants are commonly prescribed in combination with other medications used to treat co-morbid psychiatric or somatic disorders, they are likely to be involved in clinically significant drug interactions. This review examines the drug interaction profiles of the following newer antidepressants: escitalopram, venlafaxine, desvenlafaxine, duloxetine, milnacipran, mirtazapine, reboxetine, bupropion, agomelatine and vilazodone. In general, by virtue of a more selective mechanism of action and receptor profile, newer antidepressants carry a relatively low risk for pharmacodynamic drug interactions, at least as compared with first-generation antidepressants, i.e. monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). On the other hand, they are susceptible to pharmacokinetic drug interactions. All new antidepressants are extensively metabolized in the liver by cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes, and therefore may be the target of metabolically based drug interactions. Concomitant administration of inhibitors or inducers of the CYP isoenzymes involved in the biotransformation of specific antidepressants may cause changes in their plasma concentrations. However, due to their relatively wide margin of safety, the consequences of such kinetic modifications are usually not clinically relevant. Conversely, some newer antidepressants may cause pharmacokinetic interactions through their ability to inhibit specific CYPs. With regard to this, duloxetine and bupropion are moderate inhibitors of CYP2D6. Therefore, potentially harmful drug interactions may occur when they are coadministered with substrates of these isoforms, especially compounds with a narrow therapeutic index. The other new antidepressants are only weak inhibitors or are not inhibitors of CYP isoforms at

  7. Prenatal Antidepressant Exposure: Clinical and Preclinical Findings

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, Chase H.; Stowe, Zachary N.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment of any maternal illness during pregnancy warrants consideration of the consequences of the illness and/or medication for both the mother and unborn child. In the case of major depressive disorder, which affects up to 10–20% of pregnant women, the deleterious effects of untreated depression on the offspring can be profound and long lasting. Progress has been made in our understanding of the mechanism(s) of action of antidepressants, fetal exposure to these medications, and serotonin’s role in development. New technologies and careful study designs have enabled the accurate sampling of maternal serum, breast milk, umbilical cord serum, and infant serum psychotropic medication concentrations to characterize the magnitude of placental transfer and exposure through human breast milk. Despite this progress, the extant clinical literature is largely composed of case series, population-based patient registry data that are reliant on nonobjective means and retrospective recall to determine both medication and maternal depression exposure, and limited inclusion of suitable control groups for maternal depression. Conclusions drawn from such studies often fail to incorporate embryology/neurotransmitter ontogeny, appropriate gestational windows, or a critical discussion of statistically versus clinically significant. Similarly, preclinical studies have predominantly relied on dosing models, leading to exposures that may not be clinically relevant. The elucidation of a defined teratological effect or mechanism, if any, has yet to be conclusively demonstrated. The extant literature indicates that, in many cases, the benefits of antidepressant use during pregnancy for a depressed pregnant woman may outweigh potential risks. PMID:24567054

  8. 21 CFR 862.3910 - Tricyclic antidepressant drugs test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tricyclic antidepressant drugs test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3910 Tricyclic antidepressant drugs test system. (a) Identification. A tricyclic antidepressant drugs test system is a device intended to measure any of the tricyclic antidepressant drugs...

  9. 21 CFR 862.3910 - Tricyclic antidepressant drugs test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tricyclic antidepressant drugs test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3910 Tricyclic antidepressant drugs test system. (a) Identification. A tricyclic antidepressant drugs test system is a device intended to measure any of the tricyclic antidepressant drugs...

  10. 21 CFR 862.3910 - Tricyclic antidepressant drugs test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tricyclic antidepressant drugs test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3910 Tricyclic antidepressant drugs test system. (a) Identification. A tricyclic antidepressant drugs test system is a device intended to measure any of the tricyclic antidepressant drugs...

  11. 21 CFR 862.3910 - Tricyclic antidepressant drugs test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tricyclic antidepressant drugs test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3910 Tricyclic antidepressant drugs test system. (a) Identification. A tricyclic antidepressant drugs test system is a device intended to measure any of the tricyclic antidepressant drugs...

  12. 21 CFR 862.3910 - Tricyclic antidepressant drugs test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tricyclic antidepressant drugs test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3910 Tricyclic antidepressant drugs test system. (a) Identification. A tricyclic antidepressant drugs test system is a device intended to measure any of the tricyclic antidepressant drugs...

  13. Association Between Antidepressants Use During Pregnancy and Autistic Spectrum Disorders: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rais, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Antidepressants have been reported in several studies in the literature to be associated with the development of autistic disorder symptoms in children exposed to them during the time of their mothers’ pregnancies. There have also been reports of neurodevelopment delays associated with exposure to antidepressants in the same conditions. Design: We searched the PUBMED, MEDLINE, PsycARTICLES, and ERIC for original articles published between January 1983 and May 2013 to identify studies on the association between autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) and neurodevelopment delays in children and exposure to antidepressants during pregnancy. Conclusion: At the end of our preliminary work, we retained only three articles that were pertinent to the purpose of our study. We extracted the available data in Excel files and then did a meta-analysis. The final results showed a positive association between the exposure to antidepressants in utero and autistic spectrum disorders. PMID:25152842

  14. Antidepressant Medication as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes and Impaired Glucose Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Katharine; Peveler, Robert C.; Holt, Richard I.G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Antidepressant use has risen sharply over recent years. Recent concerns that antidepressants may adversely affect glucose metabolism require investigation. Our aim was to assess the risk of type 2 diabetes associated with antidepressants through a systematic review. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data sources were MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, The Cochrane Library, Web of Science, meeting abstracts of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, American Diabetes Association, and Diabetes UK, Current Controlled Trials, ClinicalTrials.gov, U.K. Clinical Research Network, scrutiny of bibliographies of retrieved articles, and contact with relevant experts. Relevant studies of antidepressant effects were included. Key outcomes were diabetes incidence and change in blood glucose (fasting and random). RESULTS Three systemic reviews and 22 studies met the inclusion criteria. Research designs included 1 case series and 21 observational studies comprising 4 cross-sectional, 5 case-control, and 12 cohort studies. There was evidence that antidepressant use is associated with type 2 diabetes. Causality is not established, but rather, the picture is confused, with some antidepressants linked to worsening glucose control, particularly with higher doses and longer duration, others linked with improved control, and yet more with mixed results. The more recent, larger studies, however, suggest a modest effect. Study quality was variable. CONCLUSIONS Although evidence exists that antidepressant use may be an independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes, long-term prospective studies of the effects of individual antidepressants rather than class effects are required. Heightened alertness to potential risks is necessary until these are complete. PMID:24065841

  15. Genome-wide microarray analysis of gene expression profiling in major depression and antidepressant therapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Eugene; Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a serious health concern worldwide. Currently there are no predictive tests for the effectiveness of any particular antidepressant in an individual patient. Thus, doctors must prescribe antidepressants based on educated guesses. With the recent advent of scientific research, genome-wide gene expression microarray studies are widely utilized to analyze hundreds of thousands of biomarkers by high-throughput technologies. In addition to the candidate-gene approach, the genome-wide approach has recently been employed to investigate the determinants of MDD as well as antidepressant response to therapy. In this review, we mainly focused on gene expression studies with genome-wide approaches using RNA derived from peripheral blood cells. Furthermore, we reviewed their limitations and future directions with respect to the genome-wide gene expression profiling in MDD pathogenesis as well as in antidepressant therapy.

  16. Effects of an antidepressant mixture on the brain serotonin and predation behavior of hybrid striped bass.

    PubMed

    Bisesi, Joseph H; Sweet, Lauren E; van den Hurk, Peter; Klaine, Stephen J

    2016-04-01

    Antidepressants have been found in measurable concentrations in final treated wastewater effluent and receiving waters throughout the world. Studies have shown that these concentrations are typically not overtly toxic, but the psychotropic mode of action of these chemicals warrants examination of their behavioral effects. Exposure of hybrid striped bass to the antidepressants fluoxetine or venlafaxine alone has been shown to cause decreased brain serotonin levels and increased time to capture prey at concentrations typically 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than environmentally relevant concentrations. In the present study, equally effective doses of fluoxetine and venlafaxine were used to perform a mixture study, using a toxic unit approach to determine whether these antidepressants may act in an additive manner at lower concentrations. The results indicated that mixtures of these antidepressants caused decreased brain serotonin and increased time to capture prey at concentrations lower than reported in previous studies. Low concentration mixtures caused an additive effect on brain serotonin levels and time to capture prey, whereas higher concentrations were less than additive. The results were consistent with the dose addition concept, with higher concentration mixtures potentially saturating the effects on serotonin in the brain. Results from the present study indicate that antidepressants have the potential to be additive on the biochemical and individual scale, which necessitates more robust analysis of antidepressant mixtures and their potential to act together in low concentration scenarios. PMID:26076900

  17. Effects of an antidepressant mixture on the brain serotonin and predation behavior of hybrid striped bass.

    PubMed

    Bisesi, Joseph H; Sweet, Lauren E; van den Hurk, Peter; Klaine, Stephen J

    2016-04-01

    Antidepressants have been found in measurable concentrations in final treated wastewater effluent and receiving waters throughout the world. Studies have shown that these concentrations are typically not overtly toxic, but the psychotropic mode of action of these chemicals warrants examination of their behavioral effects. Exposure of hybrid striped bass to the antidepressants fluoxetine or venlafaxine alone has been shown to cause decreased brain serotonin levels and increased time to capture prey at concentrations typically 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than environmentally relevant concentrations. In the present study, equally effective doses of fluoxetine and venlafaxine were used to perform a mixture study, using a toxic unit approach to determine whether these antidepressants may act in an additive manner at lower concentrations. The results indicated that mixtures of these antidepressants caused decreased brain serotonin and increased time to capture prey at concentrations lower than reported in previous studies. Low concentration mixtures caused an additive effect on brain serotonin levels and time to capture prey, whereas higher concentrations were less than additive. The results were consistent with the dose addition concept, with higher concentration mixtures potentially saturating the effects on serotonin in the brain. Results from the present study indicate that antidepressants have the potential to be additive on the biochemical and individual scale, which necessitates more robust analysis of antidepressant mixtures and their potential to act together in low concentration scenarios.

  18. Electrochemical Synthesis and Kinetic Evaluation of Electrooxidation of Acetaminophen in the Presence of Antidepressant Drugs.

    PubMed

    Nematollahi, Davood; Feyzi Barnaji, Bahareh; Amani, Ameneh

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of obtaining information about drug-drug interaction (DDI) between acetaminophen and some of antidepressant drugs (fluoxetine, sertraline and nortriptyline), in the present work we studied the electrochemical oxidation of acetaminophen (paracetamol) in the presence of these drugs by means of cyclic voltammetry and Controlled-potential coulometry. The reaction between N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone-imine (NAPQI) produced from electrooxidation of acetaminophen and antidepressant drugs (see scheme 1) cause to reduce the concentration of NAPQI and decreases the effective concentration of antidepressants. The cyclic voltammetric data were analyzed by digital simulation to measure the homogeneous parameters for the suggesting electrode mechanism. The calculated observed homogeneous rate constants [Formula: see text] for the reaction of electrochemically generated N-acetyl-para benzoquinn-imine with antidepressant drugs was found to vary in the order [Formula: see text] > [Formula: see text] > [Formula: see text] at biological pH.

  19. Electrochemical Synthesis and Kinetic Evaluation of Electrooxidation of Acetaminophen in the Presence of Antidepressant Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Nematollahi, Davood; Feyzi Barnaji, Bahareh; Amani, Ameneh

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of obtaining information about drug-drug interaction (DDI) between acetaminophen and some of antidepressant drugs (fluoxetine, sertraline and nortriptyline), in the present work we studied the electrochemical oxidation of acetaminophen (paracetamol) in the presence of these drugs by means of cyclic voltammetry and Controlled-potential coulometry. The reaction between N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone-imine (NAPQI) produced from electrooxidation of acetaminophen and antidepressant drugs (see scheme 1) cause to reduce the concentration of NAPQI and decreases the effective concentration of antidepressants. The cyclic voltammetric data were analyzed by digital simulation to measure the homogeneous parameters for the suggesting electrode mechanism. The calculated observed homogeneous rate constants (kobs) for the reaction of electrochemically generated N-acetyl-para benzoquinn-imine with antidepressant drugs was found to vary in the order kobsnortriptyline > kobssertraline > kobsfluxetine at biological pH. PMID:26664378

  20. Clonidine as a sensitizing agent in the forced swimming test for revealing antidepressant activity.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Colombel, M C; Malinge, M; Bradwejn, J

    1991-11-01

    The forced swimming test (FST) in mice has failed to predict antidepressant activity for drugs having beta adrenoreceptor agonist activity and for serotonin uptake inhibitors. We investigated the potential for clonidine to render the FST sensitive to antidepressants by using a behaviorally inactive dose of this agent (0.1 mg/kg). All antidepressants studied (tricyclics, 5-HT uptake inhibitors, iprindole, mianserin, viloxazine, trazodone) showed either activity at lower doses or activity at previously inactive doses. The effect appeared specific because it did not appear with drugs other than antidepressants (diazepam, chlorpromazine, sulpiride, atropine), except for amphetamine and apomorphine which have a strong effect on the dopaminergic system. The use of behaviorally subactive doses of clonidine may thus provide an important means of increasing the sensitivity of the forced swimming test.

  1. Effect of antidepressant drugs on 6-OHDA-treated mice in the FST.

    PubMed

    Chenu, F; Dailly, E; Bourin, M

    2007-02-01

    There is growing evidence suggesting that dopamine could be indirectly involved in the appearance of behavioural effects of antidepressants. In this study, we induced a partial (over 70%) and non-reversible depletion of dopamine-containing neurons in mice by i.c.v. infusion of 6-OHDA. Then, we compared the antidepressant-like effect of drugs (citalopram, paroxetine, desipramine and imipramine) with or without dopamine depletion in the mice forced swimming test. Our results clearly show that lesion with 6-OHDA does not modify the response of mice to desipramine and imipramine, whereas dopamine depletion abolished the antidepressant-like effect of citalopram and paroxetine. It could then be suggested that antidepressant-like effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (paroxetine and citalopram) in the mice FST requires the activation of dopaminergic pathways to occur.

  2. Is retirement beneficial for mental health? Antidepressant use before and after retirement

    PubMed Central

    Oksanen, Tuula; Vahtera, Jussi; Westerlund, Hugo; Pentti, Jaana; Sjösten, Noora; Virtanen, Marianna; Kawachi, Ichiro; Kivimäki, Mika

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent studies based on self-reported data suggest that retirement may have beneficial effects on mental health, but studies using objective endpoints remain scarce. This study examines longitudinally the changes in antidepressant medication use across the 9 years spanning the transition to retirement. Methods Participants were Finnish public-sector employees: 7138 retired at statutory retirement age (76% women, mean age 61.2 years), 1238 retired early due to mental health issues (78% women, mean age 52.0 years), and 2643 retired due to physical health issues(72% women, mean age 55.4 years). Purchase of antidepressant medication four years prior to and four years after retirement year were based on comprehensive national pharmacy records in 1994-2005. Results One year before retirement, the use of antidepressants was 4% among those who would retire at statutory age, 61% among those who would retire due to mental health issues, and 14% among those who would retire due to physical health issues. Retirement-related changes in antidepressant use depended on the reason for retirement. Among old-age retirees, antidepressant medication use decreased during the transition period (age- and calendar-year-adjusted prevalence ratio for antidepressant use 1 year after vs. 1 year before retirement = 0.77 [95% confidence interval = 0.68 – 0.88]). Among those whose main reason for disability pension was mental health issues or physical health issues, there was an increasing trend in antidepressant use prior to retirement and, for mental health retirements, a decrease after retirement. Conclusions Trajectories of recorded purchases of antidepressant medication are consistent with the hypothesis that retirement is beneficial for mental health. PMID:21502864

  3. Instant and Persistent Antidepressant Response of Gardenia Yellow Pigment Is Associated with Acute Protein Synthesis and Delayed Upregulation of BDNF Expression in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ruyan; Tao, Weiwei; Zhang, Hailou; Xue, Wenda; Zou, Zhilu; Wu, Haoxin; Cai, Baochang; Doron, Ravid; Chen, Gang

    2016-08-17

    Gardenia yellow pigment (GYP) is a collection of compounds with shared structure of crocin, which confers antidepressant activity. GYP is remarkably enriched in Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, implicated in rapid antidepressant effects that are exerted through enhanced neuroplasticity. This study aims to investigate the rapid antidepressant-like activity of GYP and its underlying mechanism. After the optimal dose was determined, antidepressant responses in tail suspension test or forced swim test were monitored at 30 min, 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days post a single GYP administration. Rapid antidepressant potential was tested using learned helplessness paradigm. The expression of proteins involved in hippocampal neuroplasticity was determined. The effect of blockade of protein synthesis on GYP's antidepressant response was examined. Antidepressant response was detected at 30 min, and lasted for at least 3 days post a single administration of GYP. A single administration of GYP also reversed the deficits in learned helplessness test. Thirty minutes post GYP administration, ERK signaling was activated, and its downstream effector phosphorylated eukaryotic elongation factor 2 was inhibited, contributing to increased protein translation. Expression of synaptic proteins GluR1 and synapsin 1 was upregulated. Blockade of protein synthesis with anisomycin blunted the immediate antidepressant response of GYP. CREB signaling and BDNF expression were upregulated at 24 h, but not at 30 min. In conclusion, GYP-induced immediate antidepressant response was dependent on synthesis of proteins, including synaptic proteins. This was followed by enhanced expression of CREB and BDNF, which likely mediated the persistent antidepressant responses. PMID:27203575

  4. Tricyclic antidepressants for children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Pfefferbaum-Levine, B; Kumor, K; Cangir, A; Choroszy, M; Roseberry, E A

    1983-08-01

    Eight depressed children with cancer had a rapid clinical response to low doses of imipramine or amitriptyline. Because of the many variables affecting cancer patients, the mechanism by which tricyclic antidepressant treatment produced this response is unclear.

  5. Duloxetine versus other anti-depressive agents for depression

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Andrea; Koesters, Markus; Furukawa, Toshi A; Nosè, Michela; Purgato, Marianna; Omori, Ichiro M; Trespidi, Carlotta; Barbui, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Background Although pharmacological and psychological interventions are both effective for major depression, in primary and secondary care settings antidepressant drugs remain the mainstay of treatment. Amongst antidepressants many different agents are available. Duloxetine hydrochloride is a dual reuptake inhibitor of serotonin and norepinephrine and has been licensed by the Food and Drug Administration in the US for major depressive disorder (MDD), generalised anxiety disorder, diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain, fibromyalgia and chronic musculoskeletal pain. Objectives To assess the evidence for the efficacy, acceptability and tolerability of duloxetine in comparison with all other antidepressant agents in the acute-phase treatment of major depression. Search methods MEDLINE (1966 to 2012), EMBASE (1974 to 2012), the Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Controlled Trials Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials up to March 2012. No language restriction was applied. Reference lists of relevant papers and previous systematic reviews were hand-searched. Pharmaceutical company marketing duloxetine and experts in this field were contacted for supplemental data. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials allocating patients with major depression to duloxetine versus any other antidepressive agent. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data and a double-entry procedure was employed. Information extracted included study characteristics, participant characteristics, intervention details and outcome measures in terms of efficacy, acceptability and tolerability. Main results A total of 16 randomised controlled trials (overall 5735 participants) were included in this systematic review. Of these, three trials were unpublished. We found 11 studies (overall 3304 participants) comparing duloxetine with one selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) (six studies versus paroxetine, three studies

  6. Selective uptake and biological consequences of environmentally relevant antidepressant pharmaceutical exposures on male fathead minnows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, M.M.; Painter, M.M.; Bartell, S.E.; Logue, A.; Furlong, E.T.; Werner, S.L.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2011-01-01

    Antidepressant pharmaceuticals have been reported in wastewater effluent at the nanogram to low microgram-per-liter range, and include bupropion (BUP), fluoxetine (FLX), sertraline (SER), and venlafaxine (VEN). To assess the effects of antidepressants on reproductive anatomy, physiology, and behavior, adult male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed for 21 days either to a single concentration of the antidepressants FLX, SER, VEN, or BUP, or to an antidepressant mixture. The data demonstrated that exposure to VEN (305. ng/L and 1104. ng/L) and SER (5.2. ng/L) resulted in mortality. Anatomical alterations were noted within the testes of fish exposed to SER and FLX, both modulators of the neurotransmitter serotonin. Additionally, FLX at 28. ng/L induced vitellogenin in male fish-a common endpoint for estrogenic endocrine disruption. Significant alterations in male secondary sex characteristics were noted with single exposures. Effects of single compound exposures neither carried over, nor became additive in the antidepressant mixtures, and reproductive behavior was not affected. Analysis of brain tissues from the exposed fish suggested increased uptake of FLX, SER and BUP and minimal uptake of VEN when compared to exposure water concentrations. Furthermore, the only metabolite detected consistently in the brain tissues was norfluoxetine. Similar trends of uptake by brain tissue were observed when fish were exposed to antidepressant mixtures. The present study demonstrates that anatomy and physiology, but not reproductive behavior, can be disrupted by exposure to environmental concentrations of some antidepressants. The observation that antidepressant uptake into fish tissues is selective may have consequences on assessing the mode-of-action and effects of these compounds in future studies. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Selective uptake and biological consequences of environmentally relevant antidepressant pharmaceutical exposures on male fathead minnows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, Melissa M.; Painter, Meghan M.; Bartell, Stephen E.; Logue, Amanda; Furlong, Edward T.; Werner, Stephen L.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.

    2011-01-01

    Antidepressant pharmaceuticals have been reported in wastewater effluent at the nanogram to low microgram-per-liter range, and include bupropion (BUP), fluoxetine (FLX), sertraline (SER), and venlafaxine (VEN). To assess the effects of antidepressants on reproductive anatomy, physiology, and behavior, adult male fathead minnows (Pimeplwles promelas) were exposed for 21 days either to a single concentration of the antidepressants FLX, SER, VEN, or BUP, or to an antidepressant mixture. The data demonstrated that exposure to VEN (305 ng/L and 1104 ng/L) and SER (5.2 ng/L) resulted in mortality. Anatomical alterations were noted within the testes of fish exposed to SER and FLX, both modulators of the neurotransmitter serotonin. Additionally, FLX at 28 ng/L induced vitellogenin in male fish—a common endpoint for estrogenic endocrine disruption. Significant alterations in male secondary sex characteristics were noted with single exposures. Effects of single compound exposures neither carried over, nor became additive in the antidepressant mixtures, and reproductive behavior was not affected. Analysis of brain tissues from the exposed fish suggested increased uptake of FLX, SER and BUP and minimal uptake of VEN when compared to exposure water concentrations. Furthermore, the only metabolite detected consistently in the brain tissues was norfluoxetine. Similar trends of uptake by brain tissue were observed when fish were exposed to antidepressant mixtures. The present study demonstrates that anatomy and physiology, but not reproductive behavior, can be disrupted by exposure to environmental concentrations of some antidepressants. The observation that antidepressant uptake into fish tissues is selective may have consequences on assessing the mode-of-action and effects of these compounds in future studies.

  8. Attitudes and beliefs of patients with chronic depression toward antidepressants and depression

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Sabrina Anne; Ab Rahman, Ab Fatah; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background Many patients have erroneous views with regard to depression and its management, and it was noted that these attitudes and beliefs significantly affected their adherence rates. Objectives The primary aim of this study was to determine the attitudes and beliefs of patients with depression toward depression and antidepressants. A secondary aim was to assess the influence of ethnicity on patients’ attitudes and beliefs. Patients and methods The study involved patients with chronic depression being followed up at an outpatient clinic at a government-run hospital in Malaysia. Patients’ attitudes and beliefs were assessed using the Antidepressant Compliance Questionnaire. Results A total of 104 patients of Malay, Chinese, and Indian ethnic groups met the selection criteria. Chinese patients had significantly negative attitudes and beliefs toward depression and antidepressants compared to Malays and Indians (b=-8.96, t103=-3.22; P<0.05). Component analysis revealed that 59% of patients believed that antidepressants can cause a person to have less control over their thoughts and feelings, while 67% believed that antidepressants could alter one’s personality; 60% believed it was okay to take fewer tablets on days when they felt better, while 66% believed that antidepressants helped solve their emotional problems and helped them worry less. Conclusion Patients had an overall positive view as to the benefits of antidepressants, but the majority had incorrect views as to the acceptable dosing of antidepressants and had concerns about the safety of the medication. Assessing patients’ attitudes and beliefs, as well as the impact of their respective cultures, can be used in tailoring psychoeducation sessions accordingly. PMID:26064052

  9. The monoaminergic tripartite synapse: a putative target for currently available antidepressant drugs.

    PubMed

    Quesseveur, Gaël; Gardier, Alain M; Guiard, Bruno P

    2013-10-01

    Antidepressant drugs such as the serotonin (5-HT)/norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) reuptake inhibitors activate monoaminergic neurotransmission in various brain regions, such as the amygdala, the frontal cortex or the hippocampus. Although this property is well established, the post-synaptic mechanisms by which these pharmacological agents exert therapeutic activity in major depressive disorders (MDD) is not fully understood. Recent clinical and preclinical studies have indicated that the density and reactivity of glia and more particularly of astrocytes are reduced in MDD patients. These data along with the fact that astrocytes express monoaminergic transporters and receptors make these cells putative targets for antidepressant treatments. Accordingly, in vitro evidence has demonstrated that the application of various classes of antidepressant drugs on rodent primary astrocyte cultures elicits a wide spectrum of responses, from the rise in cytosolic calcium concentrations, as a marker of cellular activity, to the release of glucose metabolites, gliotransmitters and neurotrophic factors. Remarkably, antidepressant drugs also attenuate the release of inflammatory molecules from reactive astrocytes or microglia, suggesting that part of the beneficial effects in depressed patients or animal models of depression might result from the ability of antidepressants to regulate the synthesis and release of psychoactive substances acting on both pre- and post-synaptic neurons. Among the many long-term targets of antidepressant drugs, brainderived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been well studied because of the positive influence on adult hippocampal neurogenesis, synaptogenesis and the local serotonergic tone. This review will illustrate how the concept of the tripartite synapse, which is classically associated with different forms of plasticity involving glutamate, could be expanded to the monoaminergic systems to regulate antidepressant drug responses. The recent in

  10. Issues encountered in recent attempts to develop novel antidepressant agents.

    PubMed

    Schatzberg, Alan F

    2015-05-01

    The development of new antidepressants has had mixed results over the past decade, with several notable failures. This paper reviews a number of major initiatives in the development of new antidepressant agents. Traditional strategies to build on agents that have monoaminergic effects at the synapse (e.g., vilazodone and ketamine) have been complemented with efforts that have emphasized devices and brain circuits (e.g., deep brain stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation) or chemical agents that modulate neuroendocrine systems (e.g., glucocorticoid antagonists, mixed melatonin agonists/serotonin type-2 receptor antagonists). Interestingly, chemical agents, such as onabotulinumtoxin A, may affect brain circuits as well. We present data from recent studies in drug and device development--reviewing progress made, stumbling blocks encountered, and issues that need to be addressed in future studies. PMID:25762133

  11. [Antidepressive drugs in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Masi, G; Marcheschi, M

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the review is to define the specificity of the response to pharmacotherapy in child and adolescent mood disorders. Methodological issues, nosographic definitions and developmental modifications in neurotransmitters and neuroreceptors are discussed; these three factors can account for the apparent inefficacy of antidepressive pharmacotherapy in children and adolescents. Specific indications, dosage and administration, side effects and the clinical examinations to prevent them, are analyzed for the following antidepressants: tricyclics, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, lithium, anticonvulsants, trazadone, benzamides.

  12. The influence of multilevel upper airway surgery on CPAP tolerance in non-responders to obstructive sleep apnea surgery.

    PubMed

    Azbay, Sule; Bostanci, Asli; Aysun, Yasin; Turhan, Murat

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of multilevel upper airway surgery on subsequent continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) use and tolerance in patients with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The study cohort enrolled 67 consecutive patients, who underwent septoplasty plus modified uvulopharyngopalatoplasty (mUPPP) with or without modified tongue base suspension (mTBS) due to CPAP intolerance, and who had residual OSA requiring CPAP therapy [non-responders to surgery, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) >15 events/h] that had been confirmed by control polysomnography at the sixth month postoperatively. A questionnaire including questions on postoperative CPAP use, problems faced during CPAP use after the surgery, change in OSA symptoms, and satisfaction with the surgery was designed, and filled through interviews. Seventeen (25.4 %) patients had septoplasty plus mUPPP and 50 (74.6 %) had septoplasty plus mUPPP combined with mTBS. Postoperatively, mean AHI (45.00 ± 19.76 vs. 36.60 ± 18.34), Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) score (18.00 ± 4.45 vs. 13.00 ± 4.72), oxygen desaturation index (ODI) (48.98 ± 16.73 vs. 37.81 ± 17.03), and optimal CPAP level (11.80 ± 1.40 vs. 8.96 ± 1.20) were decreased (p < 0.001 for all parameters). Fifty-nine percent of patients reported that they fairly satisfied with the surgery and 49.2 % reported that their symptoms were completely resolved. While none of the cases could tolerate CPAP before surgery, almost half (47.8 %) of the cases used CPAP without problems postoperatively. Postoperative CPAP users had significantly higher postoperative AHI (p = 0.001), supine AHI (p = 0.009), ESS (p = 0.019), and ODI (p = 0.014), and significantly lower postoperative minimum O2 saturation (p = 0.001) compared with non-users. Multilevel upper airway surgery with less invasive techniques may improve CPAP tolerance in well-selected patients.

  13. Caffeine enhances the antidepressant-like activity of common antidepressant drugs in the forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Szopa, Aleksandra; Poleszak, Ewa; Wyska, Elżbieta; Serefko, Anna; Wośko, Sylwia; Wlaź, Aleksandra; Pieróg, Mateusz; Wróbel, Andrzej; Wlaź, Piotr

    2016-02-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used behaviorally active drug in the world which exerts its activity on central nervous system through adenosine receptors. Worrying data indicate that excessive caffeine intake applies to patients suffering from mental disorders, including depression. The main goal of the present study was to evaluate the influence of caffeine on animals' behavior in forced swim test (FST) as well as the effect of caffeine (5 mg/kg) on the activity of six typical antidepressants, such as imipramine (15 mg/kg), desipramine (10 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg), paroxetine (0.5 mg/kg), escitalopram (2 mg/kg), and reboxetine (2.5 mg/kg). Locomotor activity was estimated to verify and exclude false-positive/negative results. In order to assess the influence of caffeine on the levels of antidepressant drugs studied, their concentrations were determined in murine serum and brains using high-performance liquid chromatography. The results showed that caffeine at a dose of 10, 20, and 50 mg/kg exhibited antidepressant activity in the FST, and it was not related to changes in locomotor activity in the animals. Caffeine at a dose of 5 mg/kg potentiated the activity of all antidepressants, and the observed effects were not due to the increase in locomotor activity in the animals. The interactions between caffeine and desipramine, fluoxetine, escitalopram, and reboxetine were exclusively of pharmacodynamic character, because caffeine did not cause any changes in the concentrations of these drugs neither in blood serum nor in brain tissue. As a result of joint administration of caffeine and paroxetine, an increase in the antidepressant drug concentrations in serum was observed. No such change was noticed in the brain tissue. A decrease in the antidepressant drug concentrations in brain was observed in the case of imipramine administered together with caffeine. Therefore, it can be assumed that the interactions caffeine-paroxetine and caffeine-imipramine occur at least in

  14. The involvement of the opioidergic system in the antinociceptive mechanism of action of antidepressant compounds

    PubMed Central

    Gray, A M; Spencer, P S J; Sewell, R D E

    1998-01-01

    are consistent with the view that antidepressants may induce endogenous opioid peptide release, as shown by the acetorphan study. In this context, the ability of naltrindole to displace the antidepressant dose-response relationship to the right without affecting morphine antinociception, implicates the δ-opioid receptor and endogenous opioid peptides in antidepressant-induced antinociception. PMID:9690858

  15. An electronic health record driven algorithm to identify incident antidepressant medication users

    PubMed Central

    Bobo, William V; Pathak, Jyotishman; Kremers, Hilal Maradit; Yawn, Barbara P; Brue, Scott M; Stoppel, Cynthia J; Croarkin, Paul E; St Sauver, Jennifer; Frye, Mark A; Rocca, Walter A

    2014-01-01

    Objective We validated an algorithm designed to identify new or prevalent users of antidepressant medications via population-based drug prescription records. Patients and methods We obtained population-based drug prescription records for the entire Olmsted County, Minnesota, population from 2011 to 2012 (N=149 629) using the existing electronic medical records linkage infrastructure of the Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP). We selected electronically a random sample of 200 new antidepressant users stratified by age and sex. The algorithm required the exclusion of antidepressant use in the 6 months preceding the date of the first qualifying antidepressant prescription (index date). Medical records were manually reviewed and adjudicated to calculate the positive predictive value (PPV). We also manually reviewed the records of a random sample of 200 antihistamine users who did not meet the case definition of new antidepressant user to estimate the negative predictive value (NPV). Results 161 of the 198 subjects electronically identified as new antidepressant users were confirmed by manual record review (PPV 81.3%). Restricting the definition of new users to subjects who were prescribed typical starting doses of each agent for treating major depression in non-geriatric adults resulted in an increase in the PPV (90.9%). Extending the time windows with no antidepressant use preceding the index date resulted in only modest increases in PPV. The manual abstraction of medical records of 200 antihistamine users yielded an NPV of 98.5%. Conclusions Our study confirms that REP prescription records can be used to identify prevalent and incident users of antidepressants in the Olmsted County, Minnesota, population. PMID:24780720

  16. Antidepressants worsen rapid-cycling course in bipolar depression: A STEP-BD randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    El-Mallakh, Rif S.; Vöhringer, Paul A.; Ostacher, Michael M.; Baldassano, Claudia F.; Holtzman, Niki S.; Whitham, Elizabeth A.; Thommi, Sairah B.; Goodwin, Frederick K.; Ghaemi, S. Nassir

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of antidepressants in rapid-cycling bipolar disorder has been controversial. We report the first randomized clinical trial with modern antidepressants on this topic. Methods As part of the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD) study, we analyzed, as an a priori secondary outcome, rapid cycling as a predictor of response in 68 patients randomized to continue versus discontinue antidepressant treatment, after initial response for an acute major depressive episode. Outcomes assessed were percent time well and total number of episodes. All patients received standard mood stabilizers. Results In those continued on antidepressants (AD), rapid cycling (RC) subjects experienced 268% (3.14/1.17) more total mood episodes/year, and 293% (1.29/0.44) more depressive episodes/year, compared with non-rapid cycling (NRC) subjects (mean difference in depressive episodes per year RC vs NRC was 0.85 ± 0.37 (SE), df=28, p =0.03). In the AD continuation group, RC patients also had 28.8% less time in remission than NRC patients (95% confidence intervals [9.9%, 46.5%], p = 0.004). No such differences between RC and NRC subjects were seen in the AD discontinuation group (Table 1). Analyses within the rapid-cycling subgroup alone were consistent with the above comparisons between RC and NRC subjects, stratified by maintenance antidepressant treatment, though limited by sample size. Conclusions In an a priori analysis, despite preselection for good antidepressant response and concurrent mood stabilizer treatment, antidepressant continuation in rapid-cycling was associated with worsened maintenance outcomes, especially for depressive morbidity, versus antidepressant discontinuation. PMID:26142612

  17. Negotiating the neurochemical self: anti-depressant consumption in women's recovery from depression.

    PubMed

    Fullagar, Simone

    2009-07-01

    Anti-depressant treatment can be viewed as an exercise of biopower that is articulated through policies and practices aimed at the reduction of depression, population healthcare costs and effects on labour force productivity. Drawing upon a feminist governmentality perspective, this article examines the discourses that shaped women's experiences of anti-depressant medication in an Australian qualitative study on recovery from depression. The majority of women had been prescribed anti-depressants to treat a chemical imbalance in the brain, manage symptoms and restore normal functioning. One-third of participants identified anti-depressants as helpful in their recovery, while two-thirds were either highly ambivalent about, or critical of, medication as a solution to depression. Thirty-one women who identified the ;positive' benefits of anti-depressants actively constituted themselves as biomedical consumers seeking to redress a chemical imbalance. The problem of depression, the emergence of molecular science and the push for pharmacological solutions are contributing to the discursive formation of new subject positions - such as the neurochemically deficient self. Three themes were identified in relation to medication use, namely restoring normality, signifying recovery success and control/uncertainty. Anti-depressant medication offered women a normalized pathway to successful recovery that stood in stark contrast to the biologically deficient and morally failing self. These women's stories importantly reveal the gender relations and paradoxes arising from biopolitical technologies that shape selfhood for women in advanced liberal societies.

  18. Antidepressant-like effect of different estrogenic compounds in the forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Camarena, Erika; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso; López-Rubalcava, Carolina

    2003-05-01

    The present study evaluated the possible antidepressant-like action of the natural estrogen 17beta-estradiol (E(2), 2.5-10 microg/rat), the synthetic steroidal estrogen ethinyl-estradiol (EE(2), 1.25-10.0 microg/rat), and the nonsteroidal synthetic estrogen, diethyl-stilbestrol (DES, 0.25-1.0 mg/rat) in ovariectomized adult female Wistar rats using the forced swimming test (FST). The behavioral profile induced by the estrogens was compared with that induced by the antidepressants fluoxetine (FLX, 2.5-10 mg/kg) and desipramine (DMI, 2.5-10 mg/kg). In addition, the temporal course of the antidepressant-like action of the estrogenic compounds was analyzed. FLX and DMI induced an antidepressant-like effect characterized by a reduced immobility and increased swimming for FLX and decreased immobility and increased climbing for DMI. Both E(2) and EE(2) produced a decrease in immobility and an increase in swimming, suggesting an antidepressant-like action. DES did not affect the responses in this animal model of depression at any dose tested. The time course analysis of the actions of E(2) (10 microg/rat) and EE(2) (5 microg/rat) showed that both compounds induced an antidepressant-like effect observed 1 h after their injection lasting for 2-3 days.

  19. The Antidepressant-like Effects of Estrogen-mediated Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Liu, Changhong; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xingyi; Ren, Bingzhong; Li, Bingjin

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin, one of the brain-gut peptides, stimulates food-intake. Recently, ghrelin has also shown to play an important role in depression treatment. However, the mechanism of ghrelin’s antidepressant-like actions is unknown. On the other hand, sex differences in depression, and the fluctuation of estrogens secretion have been proved to play a key role in depression. It has been reported that women have higher level of ghrelin expression, and ghrelin can stimulate estrogen secretion while estrogen acts as a positive feedback mechanism to up-regulate ghrelin level. Ghrelin may be a potential regulator of reproductive function, and estrogen may have additional effect in ghrelin’s antidepressantlike actions. In this review, we summarize antidepressant-like effects of ghrelin and estrogen in basic and clinical studies, and provide new insight on ghrelin’s effect in depression. PMID:26412072

  20. A review of the management of antidepressant discontinuation symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Emma; Lader, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Strong evidence supports the existence of a discontinuation syndrome following the withdrawal of antidepressant medication, particularly second-generation antidepressants. The syndrome is a common phenomenon and guidance as to best avoid the symptoms is essential for both practitioners and patients. The current study reviewed the available literature on the best methods of discontinuation for antidepressants in order to avoid or prevent the occurrence of any unpleasant side effects associated with antidepressant withdrawal. Accordingly, an electronic search of the PubMed/MedLine database and Google Scholar was conducted to find relevant literature published within the last 10 years. From this, 18 related articles were identified; five clinical studies, one case series, one consensus panel’s recommendations and 11 literature reviews. Of the articles reviewed there is a general consensus as to tapering the drug slowly over a period of weeks or months. Also, in those patients who experience severe symptoms the drug should be reinstated and discontinued more gradually. The discontinuation syndrome does not occur as frequently or severely with longer-acting agents such as fluoxetine and therefore it is recommended that switching to this drug prior to withdrawal may be advisable. The articles reviewed also emphasize the need for patient education and reassurance throughout the discontinuation process. One in particular adds that cognitive behavioural therapy may be a useful tool in easing the patients’ distress. However, this review highlights the lack of controlled data to support the available guidelines. Furthermore, the guidance which is available is somewhat conflicting. Research approaches should address this issue as well as develop appropriate methods of withdrawal for specific drugs. PMID:26834969

  1. The role of 5-HT1A receptors in mediating acute negative effects of antidepressants: implications in pediatric depression

    PubMed Central

    Rahn, K A; Cao, Y-J; Hendrix, C W; Kaplin, A I

    2015-01-01

    Acute antidepressant exposure elevates the frequency of impulsive behavior and suicidal thoughts in children and adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD). Long-term antidepressant treatment, however, is beneficial for pediatric MDD, so it is necessary to explore novel treatments that prevent the potentially dangerous consequences of acute antidepressant initiation. In the present study, a treatment strategy designed to reverse the acute negative behavioral effects of antidepressants was tested in rodents. Co-administration of the 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1AR) antagonist WAY-100635 reversed the negative effects of acute fluoxetine, a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, but not reboxetine, a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, supporting the involvement of 5-HT1AR in mediating the negative consequences of acute selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment. No 5-HT1AR antagonists are currently approved for use in pediatric populations, so alternative strategies should be explored. One such strategy was suggested based on the hypothesis that the rate of 5-HT1AR activation and the subsequent inhibition of serotonergic neuron activity caused by acute SSRI administration is proportional to the loading rate of an antidepressant. Existing pharmacological data were examined, and significant correlations were observed between the half-life of antidepressants and the rate of suicide-related events (SREs). Specifically, antidepressants with longer half-lives have lower rates of SREs. On the basis of these data, novel dosing strategies were developed for five antidepressants to mimic the pharmacological profile of the antidepressant with the longest half-life, fluoxetine. These dosing strategies could be used to decrease the rate of SREs associated with acute antidepressant treatment in pediatric MDD until an improved pharmacological treatment is developed. PMID:25942044

  2. Treatment of Adults With Treatment-Resistant Depression: Electroconvulsive Therapy Plus Antidepressant or Electroconvulsive Therapy Alone? Evidence From an Indirect Comparison Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Guo-Min; Tian, Xu; Shuai, Ting; Yi, Li-Juan; Zeng, Zi; Liu, Shuang; Zhou, Jian-Guo; Wang, Yan

    2015-07-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and antidepressant are the effective treatment alternatives for patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD); however, the effects and safety of the ECT plus antidepressant relative to ECT alone remain controversial. We decide to assess the potential of ECT plus antidepressant compared with ECT alone by undertaking an indirect comparison meta-analysis.Databases from PubMed, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, Clinicaltrials.gov, EMBASE, CBM (China Biomediccal Literatures Database), and CNKI (China National Knowledge Infrastructure) were searched for relevant studies through November 21, 2014. Literature was screened, data were extracted and methodological quality of the eligible trial was assessed by 2 independent reviewers accordingly. Then, head-to-head and indirect comparison meta-analyses were carried out.A total of 17 studies which including 13 studies regarding ECT plus antidepressant versus antidepressant alone and 4 studies concerning ECT versus antidepressant alone containing a total of 1098 patients were incorporated into this meta-analysis. The head-to-head comparison suggested that response rate can be improved in the ECT plus antidepressant (RR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.55-2.14) and ECT alone group (RR, 2.24, 95% CI, 1.51-3.33) compared with antidepressant alone, respectively; adverse complications including memory deterioration and somatization were not significantly increased except incidence of memory deterioration in ECT plus antidepressant in the 4th weeks after treatment (RR, 0.09, 95% CI, 0.02-0.49). Indirect comparison meta-analysis showed that no significant differences were detected in response rate and memory deterioration between ECT plus antidepressant and ECT alone. However, ECT plus antidepressant increased the incidence of memory deterioration relative to ECT alone.With present evidence, the regime of ECT plus antidepressant should not be preferentially recommended to treat the patients with TRD relative to ECT

  3. Antidepressants, anxiolytics, and hypnotics in pregnancy and lactation

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Daya; Gandotra, S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Untreated perinatal depression and anxiety disorders are known to have significant negative impact on both maternal and fetal health. Dilemmas still remain regarding the use and safety of psychotropics in pregnant and lactating women suffering from perinatal depression and anxiety disorders. The aim of the current paper was to review the existing evidence base on the exposure and consequences of antidepressants, anxiolytics, and hypnotics in women during pregnancy and lactation and to make recommendations for clinical decision making in management of these cases. Materials and Methods: We undertook a bibliographic search of Medline/PubMed (1972 through 2014), Science Direct (1972 through 2014), Archives of Indian Journal of Psychiatry databases was done. References of retrieved articles, reference books, and dedicated websites were also checked. Results and Conclusions: The existing evidence base is extensive in studying multiple outcomes of the antidepressant or anxiolytic exposure in neonates, and some of the findings appear conflicting. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the most researched antidepressants in pregnancy and lactation. The available literature is criticized mostly on the lack of rigorous well designed controlled studies as well as lacunae in the methodologies, interpretation of statistical information, knowledge transfer, and translation of information. Research in this area in the Indian context is strikingly scarce. Appropriate risk-benefit analysis of untreated mental illness versus medication exposure, tailor-made to each patient's past response and preference within in the context of the available evidence should guide clinical decision making. PMID:26330654

  4. Effects of antidepressants on P2X7 receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Xiang, Zheng-Hua; Jiang, Chun-Lei; Liu, Wei-Zhi; Shang, Zhi-Lei

    2016-08-30

    Antidepressants including paroxetine, fluoxetine and desipramine are commonly used for treating depression. P2×7 receptors are member of the P2X family. Recent studies indicate that these receptors may constitute a novel potential target for the treatment of depression. In the present study, we examined the action of these antidepressants on cloned rat P2×7 receptors that were stably expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells by using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, and found that paroxetine at a dose of 10µM could significantly reduce the inward currents evoked by the P2×7 receptors agonist BzATP by pre-incubation for 6-12 but not by acute application (10µM) or pre-incubation for 2-6h at a dose of 1µM, 3µM or 10µM paroxetine. Neither fluoxetine nor desipramine had significant effects on currents evoked by BzATP either applied acutely or by pre-incubation at various concentrations. These results suggest that the sensitivity of rat P2×7 receptors to antidepressants is different, which may represent an unknown mechanism by which these drugs exert their therapeutic effects and side effects. PMID:27318632

  5. Biomarkers to Predict Antidepressant Response

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Ian A.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Narr, Katherine L.; Toga, Arthur; Hunter, Aimee M.; Faull, Kym; Whitelegge, Julian; Andrews, Anne M.; Loo, Joseph; Way, Baldwin; Nelson, Stanley F.; Horvath, Steven; Lebowitz, Barry D.

    2010-01-01

    During the past several years, we have achieved a deeper understanding of the etiology/pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). However, this improved understanding has not translated to improved treatment outcome. Treatment often results in symptomatic improvement, but not full recovery. Clinical approaches are largely trial-and-error, and when the first treatment does not result in recovery for the patient, there is little proven scientific basis for choosing the next. One approach to enhancing treatment outcomes in MDD has been the use of standardized sequential treatment algorithms and measurement-based care. Such treatment algorithms stand in contrast to the personalized medicine approach, in which biomarkers would guide decision making. Incorporation of biomarker measurements into treatment algorithms could speed recovery from MDD by shortening or eliminating lengthy and ineffective trials. Recent research results suggest several classes of physiologic biomarkers may be useful for predicting response. These include brain structural or functional findings, as well as genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic measures. Recent data indicate that such measures, at baseline or early in the course of treatment, may constitute useful predictors of treatment outcome. Once such biomarkers are validated, they could form the basis of new paradigms for antidepressant treatment selection. PMID:20963521

  6. The psychoactive effects of antidepressants and their association with suicidality.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Lucy; Moncrieff, Joanna

    2011-04-01

    Although antidepressants are known to produce some adverse mental effects, their full range of psychoactive effects has not been systematically described. It has been suggested that some antidepressants are associated with increased suicidal thoughts and actions, but the issue remains controversial, and the mechanism of association, if any, is unclear. In the current study we examined descriptions of the major psychoactive and physical effects experienced by users of two commonly used antidepressants, fluoxetine and venlafaxine, as reported on a patient-oriented web site. We categorised responses into common psychoactive effects and explored associations among those effects, including reported increases in suicidal ideation. In the 468 descriptions we examined, the most commonly reported drug-induced psychoactive effects were sedation, impaired cognition, reduced libido, emotional blunting, activation (feelings of arousal, insomnia and agitation) and emotional instability. There were no differences between the two drugs in the prevalence of reporting of these effects. Activation effects were associated with involuntary movements, suggesting a physical basis. Emotional blunting was associated with cognitive impairment, reduced libido and sedation. Emotional instability, which included the reported side effects of increased anxiety, anger, aggression and mood swings, was related to activation effects and was more commonly reported by younger respondents. Increased suicidal thoughts were rare but were associated with both types of emotional effect. The effects identified are consistent with other data, and suggest that some antidepressants may induce emotional effects that are experienced as unpleasant, may impact on the symptoms of mental disorders, and may account for the suggested occurrence of increased suicidal impulses in some users. PMID:21375477

  7. Translocator protein mediates the anxiolytic and antidepressant effects of midazolam.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhi-Kun; Li, Ming-Sheng; He, Jia-Li; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Guan-Hua; Lai, Sha; Ma, Jian-Chun; Zeng, Jia; Li, Yan; Wu, Hong-Wei; Chen, Yong; Shen, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    The translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) plays an important role in stress-related disorders, such as anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), caused by neurosteroids (e.g. allopregnanolone). The present study sought to evaluate the significance of TSPO in anxiolytic and antidepressant effects induced by midazolam. The animals were administrated midazolam (0.25, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.) and subjected to behavioral tests, including Vogel-type conflict test, elevated plus-maze test, forced swimming test. Midazolam produced anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects Vogel-type conflict test (1 mg/kg, i.p.), elevated plus-maze test (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), and forced swimming test (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.). These effects of Midazolam were totally blocked by the TSPO antagonist PK11195 (3 mg/kg, i.p.). To evaluate the role of allopregnanolone in the anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects of midazolam, the animals were decapitated at the end of the behavioral tests. The allopregnanolone levels of the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The allopregnanolone level of the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus was increased by midazolam (0.5, 1 mg/kg, i.p.) and the increase was reversed by PK11195 (3 mg/kg, i.p.). Overall, the results indicated that the anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects of midazolam were mediated by TSPO, via stimulation of allopregnanolone biosynthesis. PMID:26455280

  8. Antidepressant use and new-onset diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Sandipan; Bhattacharya, Rituparna; Kelley, George A.; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2016-01-01

    Summary Antidepressant use has been linked to new-onset diabetes. However, the existing literature on this relationship has yielded inconsistent findings. The primary objective of this study was to systematically synthesize the literature on the relationship between antidepressant use and new-onset diabetes using meta-analysis. A systematic literature search was conducted to identify relevant studies in seven electronic databases. Two independent reviewers identified the final list of studies to be included in the meta-analysis using a priori selection criteria. Results for the primary outcome of interest, that is, odds and hazards of developing new-onset diabetes, were pooled using a random-effects model. Egger’s regression test and the Trim and Fill method were utilized to detect the presence of any potential publication bias. Sensitivity analysis was conducted using the leave-one-out method as well as individual categories of antidepressant drugs. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria. Random effects models revealed that adults with any use of antidepressants were more likely to develop new-onset diabetes compared with those without any use of antidepressants [odd ratios = 1.50, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.08–2.10; hazards ratio = 1.19, 95% CI, 1.08–1.32]. Sensitivity analyses revealed fair robustness; selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants were more likely to be associated with the development of new-onset diabetes. Results from the Egger’s regression test and Trim and Fill method revealed no evidence of publication bias. Among adults, antidepressant use was associated with higher chances of new-onset diabetes. However, because a cause-and-effect relationship cannot be established by observational studies, future randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm this association. PMID:23390036

  9. Perinatal antidepressant use: understanding women's preferences and concerns.

    PubMed

    Battle, Cynthia L; Salisbury, Amy L; Schofield, Casey A; Ortiz-Hernandez, Samia

    2013-11-01

    Perinatal depression is prevalent and linked with a host of adverse consequences for women and newborns. Rates of engagement in depression treatment are, however, strikingly low among pregnant and postpartum women, with the majority of affected women receiving no mental health treatment. Research indicates that perinatal women are extremely reluctant to take antidepressant medications, yet the nature of women's concerns and treatment decision- making patterns have not been well documented. Developing a clearer understanding of women's treatment preferences and behaviors may help identify solutions to the under-treatment of perinatal depression. In this mixed methods study, we conducted in-depth interviews with 61 pregnant women, approximately half of whom were experiencing clinical levels of depression. In addition to assessing psychiatric diagnoses, symptoms, and functional impairment, we conducted qualitative interviews addressing women's preferences for depression treatment, concerns, and decision-making patterns. Consistent with prior reports, women were significantly more likely to voice a preference for non-pharmacologic depression treatments, as opposed to antidepressant medications. Many depressed women reported a great degree of uncertainty regarding how to treat their depression, and those with more severe depression symptoms were more likely to endorse decisional conflict. Analysis of qualitative comments yielded detailed information about the nature of women's concerns and preferences related to use of antidepressant medications and other aspects of treatment engagement. We discuss findings in the context of improving patient-centered care for perinatal depression.

  10. Perinatal Antidepressant Use: Understanding Women’s Preferences and Concerns

    PubMed Central

    BATTLE, CYNTHIA L.; SALISBURY, AMY L.; SCHOFIELD, CASEY A.; ORTIZ-HERNANDEZ, SAMIA

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal depression is prevalent and linked with a host of adverse consequences for women and newborns. Rates of engagement in depression treatment are, however, strikingly low among pregnant and postpartum women, with the majority of affected women receiving no mental health treatment. Research indicates that perinatal women are extremely reluctant to take antidepressant medications, yet the nature of women’s concerns and treatment decisionmaking patterns have not been well documented. Developing a clearer understanding of women’s treatment preferences and behaviors may help identify solutions to the under-treatment of perinatal depression. In this mixed methods study, we conducted in-depth interviews with 61 pregnant women, approximately half of whom were experiencing clinical levels of depression. In addition to assessing psychiatric diagnoses, symptoms, and functional impairment, we conducted qualitative interviews addressing women’s preferences for depression treatment, concerns, and decision-making patterns. Consistent with prior reports, women were significantly more likely to voice a preference for non-pharmacologic depression treatments, as opposed to antidepressant medications. Many depressed women reported a great degree of uncertainty regarding how to treat their depression, and those with more severe depression symptoms were more likely to endorse decisional conflict. Analysis of qualitative comments yielded detailed information about the nature of women’s concerns and preferences related to use of antidepressant medications and other aspects of treatment engagement. We discuss findings in the context of improving patient-centered care for perinatal depression. PMID:24241498

  11. Chronic Antidepressant Treatment Impairs the Acquisition of Fear Extinction

    PubMed Central

    Burghardt, Nesha S.; Sigurdsson, Torfi; Gorman, Jack M.; McEwen, Bruce S.; LeDoux, Joseph E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Like fear conditioning, the acquisition phase of extinction involves new learning that is mediated by the amygdala. During extinction training, the conditioned stimulus is repeatedly presented in the absence of the unconditioned stimulus and the expression of previously learned fear gradually becomes suppressed. Our previous study revealed that chronic treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) impairs the acquisition of auditory fear conditioning. To gain further insight into how SSRIs affect fear learning, we tested the effects of chronic SSRI treatment on the acquisition of extinction. Methods Rats were treated chronically (22 days) or subchronically (9 days) with the SSRI citalopram (10 mg/kg/day) before extinction training. The results were compared to those following chronic and subchronic treatment with tianeptine (10 mg/kg/day), an antidepressant with a different method of action. The expression of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor in the amygdala was examined after behavioral testing. Results Chronic but not subchronic administration of citalopram impaired the acquisition of extinction and downregulated the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor in the lateral and basal nuclei of the amygdala. Similar behavioral and molecular changes were found with tianeptine treatment. Conclusions These results provide further evidence that chronic antidepressant treatment can impair amygdala-dependent learning. Our findings are consistent with a role for glutamatergic neurotransmission in the final common pathway of antidepressant treatment. PMID:23260230

  12. Antidepressant-Like Effect of Ilex paraguariensis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Elizete De Moraes; Neto, Francisco Waldomiro Schreiner; Cattani, Vitória Berg; Peroza, Luis Ricardo; Busanello, Alcindo; Leal, Caroline Queiroz; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Lehmen, Tássia Fontana; Libardoni, Milena; Athayde, Margareth Linde; Fachinetto, Roselei

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the possible antidepressant-like effect of I. paraguariensis in rats. Rats were treated for four weeks with an aqueous extract of I. paraguariensis in drinking water, following the traditional preparation of this beverage. After the period of treatment, behavioral (elevated plus-maze, open field test, and forced swimming test) and biochemical parameters (lipid peroxidation assay, thiol content, vitamin C levels, and monoamine oxidase activity) were evaluated. Animals were also analyzed on forced swimming test after 24 hours of I. paraguariensis intake. An additional group was injected with selegiline 24 hours and 30 minutes before forced swimming test as positive control. HPLC analysis revealed the profile of I. paraguariensis extract. I. paraguariensis reduced the immobility time on forced swimming test without significant changes in locomotor activity in the open field test. Any anxiolytic/anxiogenic effect of I. paraguariensis was observed in rats through the elevated plus-maze test. The antidepressant-like effect of I. paraguariensis was not accompanied by inhibitory effect on monoamine oxidase activity. There were no significant alterations on lipid peroxidation, thiol content, and vitamin C levels among the groups. In conclusion, aqueous extract of I. paraguariensis decreases the time of immobility in rats suggesting an antidepressant-like effect. PMID:24895633

  13. [Experience in application of various antidepressants in gerontology].

    PubMed

    Shangina, O A; Kostin, V I

    2006-01-01

    The article presents data on the effectiveness of comorbide therapy with amlodipine and antidepressants of various groups in patients more than 65 years old suffering from coronary artery disease (CAD), arterial hypertension (AH), and comorbide depression. Eighty-eight patients with stable FC I-III stenocardia, accompanied by AH and comorbide depression, were examined. The patients were divided into three groups. Patients in group I (n = 21) received amlodipine therapy in a dose of 2.5 to 5 mg/day with amitriptyline in a dose of 25 mg/day. Group II patients (n = 25) received tianeptine in a dose of 25 mg/day in addition to amlodipine in a dose of 2.5 to 5 mg/day. Group III patients (n = 20) were treated with a combination of amlodipine 2.5 to 5 mg/day with sertraline in a dose of 50 mg/day. The comparison group consisted of 22 patients who received monotherapy in a dose of 2.5 to 5 mg/day. The study revealed that all these combinations with different antidepressants significantly lowered the average depression score and significantly improved the quality of life, unlike amlodipine monotherapy. The best combination was amlodipine plus tianeptine, which did not only demonstrate antidepressive and anxiolytic effects, but also led to improvement in prognostically significant parameters of cardiac rhythm variability in elderly patients with comorbide depressive disorders underlied by stable stenocardia and arterial hypertension.

  14. Self-reported indications for antidepressant use in a population-based cohort of middle-aged and elderly.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Nikkie; Noordam, Raymond; Hofman, Albert; Tiemeier, Henning; Stricker, Bruno H; Visser, Loes E

    2016-10-01

    Background Population-based studies investigating indications for antidepressant prescribing mostly rely on diagnoses from general practitioners. However, diagnostic codes might be incomplete and drugs may be prescribed 'off-label' for indications not investigated in clinical trials. Objective We aimed to study indications for antidepressant use based on self-report. Also, we studied the presence of depressive symptoms associated with the self-reported indications. Setting Our study population of antidepressant users was selected based on interview data between 1997 and 2013 from the prospective population-based Rotterdam Study cohort (age >45 years). Method Antidepressant use, self-reported indication for use, and presence of depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale) were based on interview. Self-reported indications were categorized by the researchers into officially approved, clinically-accepted and commonly mentioned off-label indications. Main outcome measures A score of 16 and higher on the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale was considered as indicator for clinically-relevant depressive symptoms. Results The majority of 914 antidepressant users reported 'depression' (52.4 %) as indication for treatment. Furthermore, anxiety, stress and sleep disorders were reported in selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and other antidepressant users (ranging from 5.9 to 13.3 %). The indication 'pain' was commonly mentioned by tricyclic antidepressant users (19.0 %). Indications were statistically significantly associated with higher depressive symptom scores when compared to non-users (n = 10,979). Conclusions Depression was the main indication for antidepressant treatment. However, our findings suggest that antidepressants are also used for off-label indications, subthreshold disorders and complex situations, which were all associated with clinically-relevant depressive symptoms in the middle-aged and elderly

  15. The quetiapine active metabolite N-desalkylquetiapine and the neurotensin NTS₁ receptor agonist PD149163 exhibit antidepressant-like effects on operant responding in male rats.

    PubMed

    Hillhouse, Todd M; Shankland, Zachary; Matazel, Katelin S; Keiser, Ashley A; Prus, Adam J

    2014-12-01

    Major depressive disorder is the most common mood disorder in the United States and European Union; however, the limitations of clinically available antidepressant drugs have led researchers to pursue novel pharmacological treatments. Clinical studies have reported that monotherapy with the atypical antipsychotic drug quetiapine produces a rapid reduction in depressive symptoms that is apparent after 1 week of treatment, and it is possible that the active metabolite N-desalkylquetiapine, which structurally resembles an antidepressant drug, produces antidepressant effects. Neuropharmacological evaluations of the neurotensin NTS1 receptor agonist PD149163 suggest antidepressant efficacy, but the effects of a NTS₁ receptor agonist in an antidepressant animal model have yet to be reported. The present study examined the antidepressant-like effects of N-desalkylquetiapine, PD14916, quetiapine, the tricyclic antidepressant drug imipramine, the atypical antipsychotic drug risperidone, and the typical antipsychotic drug raclopride on responding in male Sprague-Dawley rats trained on a differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate 72-s operant schedule, a procedure used for screening antidepressant drugs. Quetiapine, PD149163, risperidone, and imipramine exhibited antidepressant-like effects by increasing the number of reinforcers earned, decreasing the number of responses emitted, and shifting the interresponse time (IRT) distributions to the right. N-Desalkylquetiapine produced a partial antidepressant-like effect by decreasing the number of responses emitted and producing a rightward shift in the IRT distributions, but it did not significantly alter the number of reinforcers earned. Raclopride decreased reinforcers and responses. These data suggest that N-desalkylquetiapine likely contributes to quetiapine's antidepressant efficacy and identify NTS₁ receptor activation as a potential novel pharmacologic strategy for antidepressant drugs.

  16. Escitalopram versus other antidepressive agents for depression

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Andrea; Santilli, Claudio; Furukawa, Toshi A; Signoretti, Alessandra; Nakagawa, Atsuo; McGuire, Hugh; Churchill, Rachel; Barbui, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Background Although pharmacological and psychological interventions are both effective for major depression, antidepressant drugs remain the mainstay of treatment in primary and secondary care settings. During the last 20 years, antidepressant prescribing has risen dramatically in western countries, mainly because of the increasing consumption of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and newer antidepressants, which have progressively become the most commonly prescribed antidepressants. Escitalopram is the pure S-enantiomer of the racemic citalopram. Objectives To assess the evidence for the efficacy, acceptability and tolerability of escitalopram in comparison with tricyclics, other SSRIs, heterocyclics and newer agents in the acute-phase treatment of major depression. Search methods Electronic databases were searched up to July 2008. Trial databases of drug-approving agencies were hand-searched for published, unpublished and ongoing controlled trials. Selection criteria All randomised controlled trials comparing escitalopram against any other antidepressant (including non-conventional agents such as hypericum) for patients with major depressive disorder (regardless of the diagnostic criteria used). Data collection and analysis Data were entered by two review authors (double data entry). Responders and remitters to treatment were calculated on an intention-to-treat basis. For dichotomous data, odds ratios (ORs) were calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Continuous data were analysed using standardised mean differences (with 95% CI) using the random effects model. Main results Fourteen trials compared escitalopram with another SSRI and eight compared escitalopram with a newer antidepressive agent (venlafaxine, bupropion and duloxetine). Escitalopram was shown to be significantly more effective than citalopram in achieving acute response (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.87). Escitalopram was also more effective than citalopram in terms of remission (OR

  17. Antidepressant drug use & the risk of suicide.

    PubMed

    Healy, David; Aldred, Graham

    2005-06-01

    There have been longstanding concerns about the propensity of antidepressants to precipitate suicidality in vulnerable individuals. To investigate this further, first we have analyzed all clinical trials, and in particular trials submitted to regulators for evidence on the relative risk of antidepressants versus placebo for this hazard. Second, we have compiled current epidemiological evidence germane to the issue. Third, we have constructed a model (Investigative Medication Routine; IMR) to shed light on the interactions between drug uptake, patient numbers on treatment and suicidal events. The clinical trial data gives rise to a relative risk of suicide on antidepressants over placebo of the order of a 2.0-2.5 times greater risk with treatment. These figures are supported by epidemiological findings. Investigative Medication Routine translates such findings into estimates of likely adverse outcomes, and explains why apparently increasing consumption of antidepressants would not be expected to lead to increased national suicide rates. From this data, we conclude that there is a clear signal that suicides and suicidal acts may be linked to antidepressant usage. It would seem likely that explicit warnings and monitoring in the early stages of treatment could greatly minimize these hazards. PMID:16194787

  18. Recovery of cyclic antidepressants with gastric lavage.

    PubMed

    Watson, W A; Leighton, J; Guy, J; Bergman, R; Garriott, J C

    1989-01-01

    The role of lavage fluid volume in recovery of cyclic antidepressant with gastric lavage was determined in 13 patients treated for moderate to severe cyclic antidepressant intoxication. An orogastric tube was placed, gastric contents aspirated, and gastric lavage performed with 60 to 180 mL aliquots of tap water or 0.9% NaCl for irrigation. A volume of 12.8 +/- 4.4 liters of lavage fluid was instilled, and 97.6 +/- 6.9% of this volume was recovered. The recovered aspirate and lavage fluid were inspected for the presence of particulate matter and saved in 4 to 5 liter collections. Determination of cyclic antidepressant and metabolite concentrations was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the amount of cyclic antidepressant recovered was calculated. The mean total amount recovered was 110 mg and ranged from 2.4 mg to 342 mg. Of the total amount recovered, 88% +/- 13% was recovered in the first 4 to 5 liters of lavage fluid. An estimate of the dose ingested was available in 7 patients, with 8.7% (0.4% to 21.7%) of the estimated dose recovered by lavage. There were no cases of significant drug recovery in clear lavage fluid. We conclude that if gastric lavage is undertaken in cyclic antidepressant intoxications, it should utilize 5 liters initially and then continue only if particulate matter is seen.

  19. Modulatory Effects of Antidepressant Classes on the Innate and Adaptive Immune System in Depression.

    PubMed

    Eyre, H A; Lavretsky, H; Kartika, J; Qassim, A; Baune, B T

    2016-05-01

    Current reviews exploring for unique immune-modulatory profiles of antidepressant classes are limited by focusing mainly on cytokine modulation only and neglecting other aspects of the innate and adaptive immune system. These reviews also do not include recent comparative clinical trials, immune-genetic studies and therapeutics with unique neurotransmitter profiles (e. g., agomelatine). This systematic review extends the established literature by comprehensively reviewing the effects of antidepressants classes on both the innate and adaptive immune system. Antidepressants appear, in general, to reduce pro-inflammatory factor levels, particularly C-reactive protein (CRP), tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6. We caution against conclusions as to which antidepressant possesses the greater anti-inflammatory effect, given the methodological heterogeneity among studies and the small number of comparative studies. The effects of antidepressant classes on adaptive immune factors are complex and poorly understood, and few studies have been conducted. Methodological heterogeneity is high among these studies (e. g., length of study, cohort characteristics, dosage used and immune marker analysis). We recommend larger, comparative studies - in clinical and pre-clinical populations. PMID:26951496

  20. Modulatory Effects of Antidepressant Classes on the Innate and Adaptive Immune System in Depression.

    PubMed

    Eyre, H A; Lavretsky, H; Kartika, J; Qassim, A; Baune, B T

    2016-05-01

    Current reviews exploring for unique immune-modulatory profiles of antidepressant classes are limited by focusing mainly on cytokine modulation only and neglecting other aspects of the innate and adaptive immune system. These reviews also do not include recent comparative clinical trials, immune-genetic studies and therapeutics with unique neurotransmitter profiles (e. g., agomelatine). This systematic review extends the established literature by comprehensively reviewing the effects of antidepressants classes on both the innate and adaptive immune system. Antidepressants appear, in general, to reduce pro-inflammatory factor levels, particularly C-reactive protein (CRP), tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6. We caution against conclusions as to which antidepressant possesses the greater anti-inflammatory effect, given the methodological heterogeneity among studies and the small number of comparative studies. The effects of antidepressant classes on adaptive immune factors are complex and poorly understood, and few studies have been conducted. Methodological heterogeneity is high among these studies (e. g., length of study, cohort characteristics, dosage used and immune marker analysis). We recommend larger, comparative studies - in clinical and pre-clinical populations.

  1. Orchiectomy modifies the antidepressant-like response of nicotine in the forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Bonilla-Jaime, H; Limón-Morales, O; Arteaga-Silva, M; Hernández-González, M; Guadarrama-Cruz, G; Alarcón-Aguilar, F; Vázquez-Palacios, G

    2010-11-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that nicotine (NIC) exhibits antidepressant-like effects. In addition, it has been suggested that sexual hormones participate in the antidepressant actions of antidepressives. The present study was designed to analyze the effect of orchiectomy and the supplementation of testosterone propionate (TP) or 17β-estradiol (E(2)) on the antidepressant properties of NIC using the forced swimming test (FST), as well as to determine possible changes in the FST during different time periods after orchiectomy. In order to evaluate the influences of orchiectomy on the effects of NIC, the study first evaluated the effects of different time periods on orchiectomized rats (15, 21, 30, 45 and 60 days) that were subjected to the FST. Then, different doses of NIC (0.2, 0.4, 0.8, 1.6 mg/kg, sc) were administered for 14 days to both intact and orchiectomized rats (after 21 day) which were then also subjected to the FST. Finally, the influence of the TP or E(2) supplementation on the antidepressant-like effect of NIC on orchiectomized rats (after 21 days) was also analyzed. Results reveal that orchiectomy significantly increased immobility behavior and decreased swimming and climbing up to 60 days after castration. In contrast, NIC decreased immobility behavior and increased swimming in intact rats; whereas orchiectomy suppressed this antidepressant effect of NIC. Only with E(2) supplementation was it possible to restore the sensitivity of the castrated rats to NIC. These results suggest that E(2) was able to facilitate the antidepressant response of NIC in orchiectomized rats.

  2. Glutamate-based antidepressants: preclinical psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Pilc, Andrzej; Wierońska, Joanna M; Skolnick, Phil

    2013-06-15

    Over the past 20 years, converging lines of evidence have both linked glutamatergic dysfunction to the pathophysiology of depression and demonstrated that the glutamatergic synapse presents multiple targets for developing novel antidepressants. The robust antidepressant effects of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists ketamine and traxoprodil provide target validation for this family of ionotropic glutamate receptors. This article reviews the preclinical evidence that it may be possible to develop glutamate-based antidepressants by not only modulating ionotropic (N-methyl-D-aspartate and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid) and metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors, including mGlu2/3, mGLu5 and mGlu7 receptors, but also by altering synaptic concentrations of glutamate via specialized transporters such as glial glutamate transporter 1 (excitatory amino-acid transporter 2).

  3. Effects of depression and antidepressant medications on hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bi-Hua; Chen, Pau-Chung; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Lee, Chuan-Pin; Huang, Ko-En; Chen, Vincent C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study was conducted to investigate the effects of depression and antidepressant medications on hip fracture. The database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance with medical records of more than 1,000,000 individuals was searched for patients who had hip fracture with or without depression from 1998 to 2009. Patients with the following conditions were excluded: hip fracture due to cancer or traffic accidents, hip fracture that occurred before the diagnosis of depression, and use of antidepressants before the diagnosis of depression. A matched cohort of 139,110 patients was investigated, including 27,822 (17,309 females; 10,513 males) with depression and 111,288 (69,236 females; 42,052 males) without depression (1:4 randomly matched with age, sex, and index date). Among these patients, 232 (158 females and 74 males) had both hip fracture and depression, and 690 (473 females and 217 males) had hip fracture only. The Cox proportional-hazards regression method was used to determine the effect of depression on hip fracture. The hazard ratio (HR) for each clinical parameter was calculated after adjusting for confounders including sex, age, Charlson comorbidity index, urbanization, osteoporosis, and antidepressants. Results showed that patients with major depressive disorder had a 61% higher incidence of hip fracture than those without depression (HR 1.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.19–2.18, P = 0.002). The risk of hip fracture for patients with less severe depressive disorder (dysthymia or depressive disorder, not otherwise specified) was not statistically higher than that of patients with no depression (HR 1.10, 95% CI = 0.91–1.34, P = 0.327). Among the patients with depression, females had a 49% higher incidence for hip fracture than males (HR 1.49, 95% CI 1.30–1.72, P < 0.001). The incidence of hip fracture also increased with age and Charlson comorbidity index scores. Analyses of both all (139,110) patients and only patients (27,822) with

  4. Antidepressant Prescription and Suicide Rates: Effect of Age and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalmar, Sandor; Szanto, Katalin; Rihmer, Zoltan; Mazumdar, Sati; Harrison, Katrin; Mann, J. John

    2008-01-01

    To determine whether the effect of antidepressant exposure on suicide rate is modified by age and gender in Hungary, annual antidepressant prescription rates and suicide rates of about 10 million inhabitants between 1999-2005 were analyzed by age and gender groups. The suicide rate was inversely related to the increased use of antidepressants in…

  5. TMD chronic pain and masseter silent period in psychiatric patients on antidepressive therapy.

    PubMed

    Ivkovic, N; Mladenovic, I; Petkoci, S; Stojic, D

    2008-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the long-term effects of antidepressive therapy on chronic pain and related disability, and masseter silent period in psychiatric depressive patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The study included hospitalized psychiatric depressive patients on antidepressive therapy protocol (tetracyclic antidepressant-maprotiline and anxiolytic-diazepam) (n=30) and non-psychiatric patients seeking prosthodontic treatment (control group, n=38). TMD were diagnosed by Research Diagnostic Criteria for temporomandibular disorders proposed by Dworkin and LeResche. The surface electromyography was recorded from left and right masseter muscles and masseter inhibitory reflex (masseter silent period) was recorded after mechanical stimulation. The incidence of TMD appearance was very similar, of approximately 40% in both group of patients. The results of the study also indicated a higher prevalence of joint related TMD, a lower prevalence of muscular subtype of TMD and a lower grade of chronic pain and related disability in the psychiatric group of patients on antidepressive therapy in comparison with findings in the control group. In the patients on antidepressive therapy with TMD masseter silent period was not prolonged , while in the control group of patients with TMD the prolongation of the silent period was observed. The study provided evidence that long-term, combined therapy (maprotiline and diazepam) in psychiatric depressive patients significantly modulated signs and symptoms of TMD in comparison with the control group. PMID:18284562

  6. Bupropion: a systematic review and meta-analysis of effectiveness as an antidepressant

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Krisna; Allen, Sophie; Haque, Mariam N.; Angelescu, Ilinca; Baumeister, David; Tracy, Derek K.

    2016-01-01

    Bupropion has been used as an antidepressant for over 20 years, though its licence for such use varies and it is typically a third- or fourth-line agent. It has a unique pharmacology, inhibiting the reuptake of noradrenaline and dopamine, potentially providing pharmacological augmentation to more common antidepressants such as selective serotonergic reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). This systematic review and meta-analysis identified 51 studies, dividing into four categories: bupropion as a sole antidepressant, bupropion coprescribed with another antidepressant, bupropion in ‘other’ populations (e.g. bipolar depression, elderly populations) and primary evaluation of side effects. Methodologically more robust trials support the superiority of bupropion over placebo, and most head-to-head antidepressant trials showed an equivalent effectiveness, though some of these are hindered by a lack of a placebo arm. Most work on the coprescribing of bupropion with another antidepressant supports an additional effect, though many are open-label trials. Several large multi-medication trials, most notably STAR*D, also support a therapeutic role for bupropion; in general, it demonstrated similar effectiveness to other medications, though this literature highlights the generally low response rates in refractory cohorts. Effectiveness has been shown in ‘other’ populations, though there is an overall dearth of research. Bupropion is generally well tolerated, it has very low rates of sexual dysfunction, and is more likely to cause weight loss than gain. Our findings support the use of bupropion as a sole or coprescribed antidepressant, particularly if weight gain or sexual dysfunction are, or are likely to be, significant problems. However there are notable gaps in the literature, including less information on treatment naïve and first presentation depression, particularly when one considers the ever-reducing rates of response in more refractory illness. There are some data to

  7. Bupropion: a systematic review and meta-analysis of effectiveness as an antidepressant.

    PubMed

    Patel, Krisna; Allen, Sophie; Haque, Mariam N; Angelescu, Ilinca; Baumeister, David; Tracy, Derek K

    2016-04-01

    Bupropion has been used as an antidepressant for over 20 years, though its licence for such use varies and it is typically a third- or fourth-line agent. It has a unique pharmacology, inhibiting the reuptake of noradrenaline and dopamine, potentially providing pharmacological augmentation to more common antidepressants such as selective serotonergic reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). This systematic review and meta-analysis identified 51 studies, dividing into four categories: bupropion as a sole antidepressant, bupropion coprescribed with another antidepressant, bupropion in 'other' populations (e.g. bipolar depression, elderly populations) and primary evaluation of side effects. Methodologically more robust trials support the superiority of bupropion over placebo, and most head-to-head antidepressant trials showed an equivalent effectiveness, though some of these are hindered by a lack of a placebo arm. Most work on the coprescribing of bupropion with another antidepressant supports an additional effect, though many are open-label trials. Several large multi-medication trials, most notably STAR*D, also support a therapeutic role for bupropion; in general, it demonstrated similar effectiveness to other medications, though this literature highlights the generally low response rates in refractory cohorts. Effectiveness has been shown in 'other' populations, though there is an overall dearth of research. Bupropion is generally well tolerated, it has very low rates of sexual dysfunction, and is more likely to cause weight loss than gain. Our findings support the use of bupropion as a sole or coprescribed antidepressant, particularly if weight gain or sexual dysfunction are, or are likely to be, significant problems. However there are notable gaps in the literature, including less information on treatment naïve and first presentation depression, particularly when one considers the ever-reducing rates of response in more refractory illness. There are some data to support

  8. Bupropion: a systematic review and meta-analysis of effectiveness as an antidepressant.

    PubMed

    Patel, Krisna; Allen, Sophie; Haque, Mariam N; Angelescu, Ilinca; Baumeister, David; Tracy, Derek K

    2016-04-01

    Bupropion has been used as an antidepressant for over 20 years, though its licence for such use varies and it is typically a third- or fourth-line agent. It has a unique pharmacology, inhibiting the reuptake of noradrenaline and dopamine, potentially providing pharmacological augmentation to more common antidepressants such as selective serotonergic reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). This systematic review and meta-analysis identified 51 studies, dividing into four categories: bupropion as a sole antidepressant, bupropion coprescribed with another antidepressant, bupropion in 'other' populations (e.g. bipolar depression, elderly populations) and primary evaluation of side effects. Methodologically more robust trials support the superiority of bupropion over placebo, and most head-to-head antidepressant trials showed an equivalent effectiveness, though some of these are hindered by a lack of a placebo arm. Most work on the coprescribing of bupropion with another antidepressant supports an additional effect, though many are open-label trials. Several large multi-medication trials, most notably STAR*D, also support a therapeutic role for bupropion; in general, it demonstrated similar effectiveness to other medications, though this literature highlights the generally low response rates in refractory cohorts. Effectiveness has been shown in 'other' populations, though there is an overall dearth of research. Bupropion is generally well tolerated, it has very low rates of sexual dysfunction, and is more likely to cause weight loss than gain. Our findings support the use of bupropion as a sole or coprescribed antidepressant, particularly if weight gain or sexual dysfunction are, or are likely to be, significant problems. However there are notable gaps in the literature, including less information on treatment naïve and first presentation depression, particularly when one considers the ever-reducing rates of response in more refractory illness. There are some data to support

  9. Brain 5-HT deficiency increases stress vulnerability and impairs antidepressant responses following psychosocial stress.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Benjamin D; Ni, Jason R; Caron, Marc G

    2015-02-24

    Brain serotonin (5-HT) deficiency and exposure to psychosocial stress have both been implicated in the etiology of depression and anxiety disorders, but whether 5-HT deficiency influences susceptibility to depression- and anxiety-like phenotypes induced by psychosocial stress has not been formally established. Most clinically effective antidepressants increase the extracellular levels of 5-HT, and thus it has been hypothesized that antidepressant responses result from the reversal of endogenous 5-HT deficiency, but this hypothesis remains highly controversial. Here we evaluated the impact of brain 5-HT deficiency on stress susceptibility and antidepressant-like responses using tryptophan hydroxylase 2 knockin (Tph2KI) mice, which display 60-80% reductions in brain 5-HT. Our results demonstrate that 5-HT deficiency leads to increased susceptibility to social defeat stress (SDS), a model of psychosocial stress, and prevents the fluoxetine (FLX)-induced reversal of SDS-induced social avoidance, suggesting that 5-HT deficiency may impair antidepressant responses. In light of recent clinical and preclinical studies highlighting the potential of inhibiting the lateral habenula (LHb) to achieve antidepressant and antidepressant-like responses, we also examined whether LHb inhibition could achieve antidepressant-like responses in FLX-insensitive Tph2KI mice subjected to SDS. Our data reveal that using designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADDs) to inhibit LHb activity leads to reduced SDS-induced social avoidance behavior in both WT and Tph2KI mice. This observation provides additional preclinical evidence that inhibiting the LHb might represent a promising alternative therapeutic approach under conditions in which selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors are ineffective.

  10. Rifaximin has a Marginal Impact on Microbial Translocation, T-cell Activation and Inflammation in HIV-Positive Immune Non-responders to Antiretroviral Therapy – ACTG A5286

    PubMed Central

    Tenorio, Allan R.; Chan, Ellen S.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Macatangay, Bernard J. C.; Read, Sarah W.; Yesmin, Suria; Taiwo, Babafemi; Margolis, David M.; Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Landay, Alan L.; Wilson, Cara C.; Mellors, John W.; Keshavarzian, Ali; Rodriguez, Benigno; Aziz, Mariam; Presti, Rachel; Deeks, Steven; Ebiasah, Ruth; Myers, Laurie; Borowski, LuAnn; Plants, Jill; Palm, David A.; Weibel, Derek; Putnam, Beverly; Lindsey, Elizabeth; Player, Amy; Albrecht, Mary; Kershaw, Andrea; Sax, Paul; Keenan, Cheryl; Walton, Patricia; Baum, Jane; Stroberg, Todd; Hughes, Valery; Coster, Laura; Kumar, Princy N.; Yin, Michael T.; Noel-Connor, Jolene; Tebas, Pablo; Thomas, Aleshia; Davis, Charles E.; Redfield, Robert R.; Sbrolla, Amy; Flynn, Teri; Davis, Traci; Whitely, Kim; Singh, Baljinder; Swaminathan, Shobha; McGregor, Donna; Palella, Frank; Aberg, Judith; Cavanagh, Karen; Santana Bagur, Jorge L.; Flores, Olga Méndez; Fritsche, Janice; Sha, Beverly; Slamowitz, Debbie; Valle, Sandra; Tashima, Karen; Patterson, Helen; Harber, Heather; Para, Michael; Eaton, Molly; Maddox, Dale; Currier, Judith; Cajahuaringa, Vanessa; Luetkemeyer, Annie; Dwyer, Jay; Fichtenbaum, Carl J.; Saemann, Michelle; Ray, Graham; Campbell, Thomas; Fischl, Margaret A.; Bolivar, Hector; Oakes, Jonathan; Chicurel-Bayard, Miriam; Tripoli, Christine; Weinman, D. Renee; Adams, Mary; Hurley, Christine; Dunaway, Shelia; Storey, Sheryl; Klebert, Michael; Royal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background. Rifaximin, a nonabsorbable antibiotic that decreases lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in cirrhotics, may decrease the elevated levels of microbial translocation, T-cell activation and inflammation in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive immune nonresponders to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods. HIV-positive adults receiving ART for ≥96 weeks with undetectable viremia for ≥48 weeks and CD4+ T-cell counts <350 cells/mm3 were randomized 2:1 to rifaximin versus no study treatment for 4 weeks. T-cell activation, LPS, and soluble CD14 were measured at baseline and at weeks 2, 4, and 8. Wilcoxon rank sum tests compared changes between arms. Results. Compared with no study treatment (n = 22), rifaximin (n = 43) use was associated with a significant difference between study arms in the change from baseline to week 4 for CD8+T-cell activation (median change, 0.0% with rifaximin vs +0.6% with no treatment; P = .03). This difference was driven by an increase in the no-study-treatment arm because there was no significant change within the rifaximin arm. Similarly, although there were significant differences between study arms in change from baseline to week 2 for LPS and soluble CD14, there were no significant changes within the rifaximin arm. Conclusions. In immune nonresponders to ART, rifaximin minimally affected microbial translocation and CD8+T-cell activation. Trial registration number. NCT01466595. PMID:25214516

  11. Is increased antidepressant exposure a contributory factor to the obesity pandemic?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S H; Paz-Filho, G; Mastronardi, C; Licinio, J; Wong, M-L

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) and obesity are both common heterogeneous disorders with complex aetiology, with a major impact on public health. Antidepressant prescribing has risen nearly 400% since 1988, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In parallel, adult obesity rates have doubled since 1980, from 15 to 30 percent, while childhood obesity rates have more than tripled. Rising obesity rates have significant health consequences, contributing to increased rates of more than thirty serious diseases. Despite the concomitant rise of antidepressant use and of the obesity rates in Western societies, the association between the two, as well as the mechanisms underlying antidepressant-induced weight gain, remain under explored. In this review, we highlight the complex relationship between antidepressant use, MDD and weight gain. Clinical findings have suggested that obesity may increase the risk of developing MDD, and vice versa. Hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis activation occurs in the state of stress; concurrently, the HPA axis is also dysregulated in obesity and metabolic syndrome, making it the most well-understood shared common pathophysiological pathway with MDD. Numerous studies have investigated the effects of different classes of antidepressants on body weight. Previous clinical studies suggest that the tricyclics amitriptyline, nortriptyline and imipramine, and the serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor mirtazapine are associated with weight gain. Despite the fact that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use has been associated with weight loss during acute treatment, a number of studies have shown that SSRIs may be associated with long-term risk of weight gain; however, because of high variability and multiple confounds in clinical studies, the long-term effect of SSRI treatment and SSRI exposure on body weight remains unclear. A recently developed animal paradigm shows that the combination

  12. Antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like effects of cannabidiol: a chemical compound of Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    de Mello Schier, Alexandre R; de Oliveira Ribeiro, Natalia P; Coutinho, Danielle S; Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Crippa, Jose A; Zuardi, Antonio W; Nardi, Antonio E; Silva, Adriana C

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety and depression are pathologies that affect human beings in many aspects of life, including social life, productivity and health. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a constituent non-psychotomimetic of Cannabis sativa with great psychiatric potential, including uses as an antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like compound. The aim of this study is to review studies of animal models using CBD as an anxiolytic-like and antidepressant-like compound. Studies involving animal models, performing a variety of experiments on the above-mentioned disorders, such as the forced swimming test (FST), elevated plus maze (EPM) and Vogel conflict test (VCT), suggest that CBD exhibited an anti-anxiety and antidepressant effects in animal models discussed. Experiments with CBD demonstrated non-activation of neuroreceptors CB1 and CB2. Most of the studies demonstrated a good interaction between CBD and the 5-HT1A neuro-receptor. PMID:24923339

  13. Antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like effects of cannabidiol: a chemical compound of Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    de Mello Schier, Alexandre R; de Oliveira Ribeiro, Natalia P; Coutinho, Danielle S; Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Crippa, Jose A; Zuardi, Antonio W; Nardi, Antonio E; Silva, Adriana C

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety and depression are pathologies that affect human beings in many aspects of life, including social life, productivity and health. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a constituent non-psychotomimetic of Cannabis sativa with great psychiatric potential, including uses as an antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like compound. The aim of this study is to review studies of animal models using CBD as an anxiolytic-like and antidepressant-like compound. Studies involving animal models, performing a variety of experiments on the above-mentioned disorders, such as the forced swimming test (FST), elevated plus maze (EPM) and Vogel conflict test (VCT), suggest that CBD exhibited an anti-anxiety and antidepressant effects in animal models discussed. Experiments with CBD demonstrated non-activation of neuroreceptors CB1 and CB2. Most of the studies demonstrated a good interaction between CBD and the 5-HT1A neuro-receptor.

  14. Use of antipsychotic and antidepressant within the Psychiatric Disease Centre, Regional Health Service of Ferrara

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study aimed at describing the type and dosage of psychopharmaceuticals dispensed to patients with psychiatric disorders and to assess the percentage of patients treated with antipsychotics and antidepressants, the associated therapies, treatment adherence, and dosages used in individuals registered at the Psychiatric Disease Center (PDC), Regional Health Service of Ferrara. Methods The analysis focused on therapeutic programmes presented to the Department of Pharmacy of the University Hospital of Ferrara of 892 patients treated by the PDC (catchment area of 134605 inhabitants). All diagnoses were made according to International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9). The analysis focused on prescriptions from September 2007 to June 2009. Data on adherence to prescribed therapy have were processed by analysis of variance. Results Among the patients 63% were treated with antipsychotics and 40% with antidepressants. Among patients receiving antipsychotics 92% used second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) whereas the remaining 8% used first generation antipsychotics (FGAs). Antipsychotic doses were lower than Daily Defined Dose (DDDs), and SGAs were often given with anticholinergics to decrease side effects. Mean adherence to antipsychotic therapy was 64%. Among antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were the most often prescribed, 55%. Dosages of these were within the limits indicated by the technical datasheet but higher than DDDs. Only 26% of patients underwent monotherapy. In antidepressants polytherapy, medication was associated with another antidepressant, 6% or with an antipsychotic, 51%. Mean adherence to the antidepressant therapy was 64%. Conclusions Patients treated with antipsychotics tend to use doses lower than DDDs. The opposite tendency was noted in patients treated with antidepressants. Only a small percentage of patients (14%) modified their neuroleptic therapy by increasing the dosage. On the contrary, patients

  15. [The effectiveness of antidepressants in the treatment of chronic non-cancer pain--a review].

    PubMed

    Miller, Adam; Rabe-Jabłońska, Jolanta

    2005-01-01

    Antidepressants are often applied in the treatment of chronic pain. Analgesic action of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) has been extensively studied and proven. TCAs are associated with a number of adverse effects which are inconvenient for patients. The newer antidepressants have fewer side effects and equivalent efficacy on mood disorders. This article reviews the available publications (mainly placebo-controlled trials) concerning the efficacy of these medications in the treatment of chronic pain. The data regarding selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are conflicting. Trazodone (a serotonin-reuptake inhibitor as well as a postsynaptic serotonin receptor antagonist) does not appear to be effective for the treatment of chronic pain. No placebo-controlled studies are available for noradrenergic and specific serotoninergic antidepressant (NaSSA)--mirtazapine and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (NaRI)--reboxetine. Bupropion, a noradrenaline and dopamine-reuptake inhibitor appears to be effective in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Venlafaxine--selective serotonin and noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors (SNRI) was shown to be effective in the treatment of different kinds of pain. Duloxetine (SNRI) is effective in relieving both the emotional and painful physical symptoms of depression. Additional randomized, controlled trials are necessary to fully evaluate the role of new antidepressants in the treatment of chronic pain. PMID:15771151

  16. Antidepressant Effects of AMPA and Ketamine Combination: Role of Hippocampal BDNF, Synapsin, and mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Akinfiresoye, Luli; Tizabi, Yousef

    2013-01-01

    Rationale A number of preclinical and clinical studies suggest ketamine, a glutamate NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor antagonist, has a rapid and lasting antidepressant effect when administered either acutely or chronically. It has been postulated that this effect is due to stimulation of AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl–4-isoxazolepropionic acid) receptors. Objective In this study, we tested whether AMPA alone has an antidepressant effect and if the combination of AMPA and ketamine provides added benefit in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, a putative animal model of depression. Results Chronic AMPA treatment resulted in a dose dependent antidepressant effect in both the forced swim test (FST) and sucrose preference test. Moreover, chronic administration (10–11d) of combinations of AMPA and ketamine, at doses that were ineffective on their own, resulted in a significant antidepressant effect. The behavioral effects were associated with increases in hippocampal brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), synapsin, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Conclusion These findings are the first to provide evidence for an antidepressant effect of AMPA, and suggest the usefulness of AMPA-ketamine combination in treatment of depression. Furthermore, these effects appear to be associated with increases in markers of hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptogenesis, suggesting a mechanism of their action. PMID:23732839

  17. Inflammatory Biomarkers as Differential Predictors of Antidepressant Response

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Although antidepressants are generally effective in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD), it can still take weeks before patients feel the full antidepressant effects. Despite the efficacy of standard treatments, approximately two-thirds of patients with MDD fail to respond to pharmacotherapy. Therefore, the identification of blood biomarkers that can predict the treatment response to antidepressants would be highly useful in order to improve this situation. This article discusses inflammatory molecules as predictive biomarkers for antidepressant responses to several classes of antidepressants, including the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine. PMID:25856677

  18. Inflammatory biomarkers as differential predictors of antidepressant response.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji

    2015-04-08

    Although antidepressants are generally effective in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD), it can still take weeks before patients feel the full antidepressant effects. Despite the efficacy of standard treatments, approximately two-thirds of patients with MDD fail to respond to pharmacotherapy. Therefore, the identification of blood biomarkers that can predict the treatment response to antidepressants would be highly useful in order to improve this situation. This article discusses inflammatory molecules as predictive biomarkers for antidepressant responses to several classes of antidepressants, including the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine.

  19. Synthesis of the Commercial Antidepressant Moclobemide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    More, Jesse D.

    2008-01-01

    An experiment for the undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory is described in which students synthesize the commercial antidepressant drug moclobemide, marketed under the trade name Manerix. This one-step synthesis starts from commercially available material and produces moclobemide in high yield. The product is initially isolated as its…

  20. [Behavioral effects of a new antidepressant, setiptiline].

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Furukawa, T

    1991-01-01

    Behavioral effects of setiptiline, a new tetracyclic compound (1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-methyl-9H-dibenzo [3,4:6,7] cyclohepta [1,2-C] pyridine maleate), were investigated to determine its pharmacological characteristics as an antidepressant in rats and mice, as compared with amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant, and promethazine, a neuroleptic possessing an antihistaminic profile. Setiptiline exerted a weak stimulatory action on ambulation, spontaneous motor-activity, observed by the open field method in rats and potentiated the stimulatory effects of methamphetamine. Setiptiline also shortened the duration of immobility in rats forced to swim and inhibited catalepsy induced by haloperidol, yawning by physostigmine, body shaking as well as head twitch by 5-hydroxytryptophan in combination with Ro4-4602 and body shaking by morphine-withdrawal in rats. On the other hand, the drug did not exhibit an antagonistic effect on the hypothermia produced by reserpine in mice. From the results, it is suggested that setiptiline seems to have antidepressive activities that are pharmacologically dissimilar to those of tricyclic antidepressants.

  1. [Therapy of dementia with antipsychotics and antidepressives].

    PubMed

    Frölich, L; Hausner, L

    2015-04-01

    In dementia depressive symptoms, anxiety, hallucinations and delusions often occur and are accompanied by unspecific behavioral changes. A targeted pharmacotherapy is complicated by the underlying cognitive impairment and physical comorbidities. The current review focusses on recent evidence on the use of antidepressives and antipsychotics for psychotic disturbances, agitation and depression in dementia and analyzes currently published randomized controlled clinical trials and meta-analyses. The evidence on the use of antipsychotics for different indications favors risperidone, with lower evidence levels for quetiapine and aripiprazole, whereas haloperidol should be avoided. Increased mortality and the risk of cerebrovascular events due to antipsychotics are of major concern. With respect to antidepressives, the benefit of antidepressive pharmacotherapy in dementia is critically discussed because of limited efficacy and increased side effects; however, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), such as citalopram and sertraline have demonstrated efficacy on neuropsychiatric behavioral symptoms in general. These conclusions on the risk-benefit ratio of antidepressives and antipsychotics in dementia are in accordance with the recommendations of the German Society of Neurology and German Association for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics (DGN/DGPPN) S3 guidelines on the treatment of dementia. PMID:25787724

  2. Physiological Bases of Bulimia, and Antidepressant Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getzfeld, Andrew R.

    This paper reviews the literature on the physiological causes of bulimia and investigates the rationale behind the usage of antidepressant medication in the treatment of bulimia nervosa. No definite conclusions can be stated regarding the physiology of bulimia, but a number of hypotheses are suggested. It appears that the hypothalamus is involved…

  3. Characterizing declines in pediatric antidepressant use after new risk disclosures

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Richard G.; Martin, Andres; Barry, Colleen L.

    2010-01-01

    Steep declines in pediatric antidepressant use were documented following the 2004 release of new safety information associating antidepressants with a risk of suicidality. We examine whether declines in pediatric antidepressant use were steeper among individuals with certain clinical or family characteristics. We find that declines in antidepressant use were associated with new (as compared to ongoing) treatment episodes. Also, although rates of antidepressant use were higher among children of college educated parents prior to risk disclosures, these children were more likely to forgo antidepressant medication than children of less educated parents after risk disclosures. We find that both children with and without psychiatric impairment experienced declines in antidepressant medication use following the risk warnings, although the decline occurred more quickly in the latter group. Our findings highlight the need for additional data to assess the effects of risk disclosures on treatment patterns and health outcomes. PMID:20675349

  4. Does melatonin treatment change emotional processing? Implications for understanding the antidepressant mechanism of agomelatine.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Abbie; Bogdanovskaya, Maria; Waskett, Poppy; Zacharia, Sophie; Cowen, Philip J; Harmer, Catherine J

    2015-10-01

    The antidepressant, agomelatine, has a novel pharmacological profile, with agonist properties at M1 and M2 receptors and antagonist properties at 5HT2C receptors. Whether the antidepressant effects of this treatment are mediated by the drug's effects at the M1 and M2 receptors or the 5HT2C receptor or a synergy between these actions remains unclear. In the present study, a healthy volunteer model of emotional processing, which discriminates between effective and non-effective antidepressant compounds, was used to assess the contribution of melatonin agonism to the efficacy of agomelatine. Fifty-eight healthy volunteers were randomised to receive 7 days of once daily treatment with either 1 mg melatonin, 3 mg melatonin or placebo. Seven days treatment with 3 mg melatonin resulted in earlier bedtimes consistent with a phase advance in circadian rhythm. Some marginal effects of melatonin were observed on emotional processing; however, these were neither consistent with nor comparable to those seen following conventional antidepressant treatment or with agomelatine itself. These data suggest that the antidepressant action of agomelatine cannot be accounted for solely by its action at the M1 and M2 receptors. PMID:26174133

  5. [Antidepressant-resistant depression and the bipolar spectrum -- diagnostic and therapeutic considerations].

    PubMed

    Rihmer, Zoltán; Gonda, Xénia; Rihmer, Annamária; Döme, Péter

    2016-01-01

    According to the results of epidemiological studies mood disorders with unipolar (major and minor depressive disorder; dysthymia) or bipolar features are among the most prevalent psychiatric disorders. These disorders with their frequent comorbidities (alcohol and/or drug use disorders, smoking, suicide, cardiovascular disorders) pose great public health challenge and cause substantial individual and familar burdens as well. Since SSRIs and other new antidepressant agents entered the market the possibilities to treat depression improved substantially but 25-35 percent of major depressives do not respond even to the second antidepressant trial but the rate of patients who are resistant after the third and fourth adequate antidepressant trial are around only 15-25 and 10 percent, respectively. Pharmacotherapy-resistant depression is a multicausal phenomenon. Along with its well-known risk-factors investigations of the past decade have revealed that unrecognised or hidden (subsyndromal or subthreshold) bipolarity is one of the most frequent causes of treatment resistance. In the case of bipolar depression (either as a part of syndromal bipolar I or II disorder or a subsyndromal manifestation) antidepressant monotherapy should be avoided and, instead of it, the administration of a mood stabilizer (primarily lithium and lamotrigine) or some atypical antipsychotics (preferably quetiapine) are recommended. If antidepressant is inevitably necessary in bipolar depression, we should use it always in combination with mood stabilizers or atypical antipsychotics. PMID:27244871

  6. Antidepressants suppress neuropathic pain by a peripheral β2-adrenoceptor mediated anti-TNFα mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bohren, Yohann; Tessier, Luc-Henri; Megat, Salim; Petitjean, Hugues; Hugel, Sylvain; Daniel, Dorothée; Kremer, Mélanie; Fournel, Sylvie; Hein, Lutz; Schlichter, Rémy; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José; Yalcin, Ipek; Barrot, Michel

    2013-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system. It is usually chronic and challenging to treat. Some antidepressants are first-line pharmacological treatments for neuropathic pain. The noradrenaline that is recruited by the action of the antidepressants on reuptake transporters has been proposed to act through β2-adrenoceptors (β2-ARs) to lead to the observed therapeutic effect. However, the complex downstream mechanism mediating this action remained to be identified. In this study, we demonstrate in a mouse model of neuropathic pain that an antidepressant's effect on neuropathic allodynia involves the peripheral nervous system and the inhibition of cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) production. The antiallodynic action of nortriptyline is indeed lost after peripheral sympathectomy, but not after lesion of central descending noradrenergic pathways. More particularly, we report that antidepressant-recruited noradrenaline acts, within dorsal root ganglia, on β2-ARs expressed by non-neuronal satellite cells. This stimulation of β2-ARs decreases the neuropathy-induced production of membrane-bound TNFα, resulting in relief of neuropathic allodynia. This indirect anti-TNFα action was observed with the tricyclic antidepressant nortriptyline, the selective serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor venlafaxine and the β2-AR agonist terbutaline. Our data revealed an original therapeutic mechanism that may open novel research avenues for the management of painful peripheral neuropathies. PMID:23978467

  7. Azidobupramine, an Antidepressant-Derived Bifunctional Neurotransmitter Transporter Ligand Allowing Covalent Labeling and Attachment of Fluorophores

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Anna M.; Cuboni, Serena; Rudolf, Georg C.; Höfner, Georg; Wanner, Klaus T.; Sieber, Stephan A.; Schmidt, Ulrike; Holsboer, Florian; Rein, Theo; Hausch, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design, synthesize and validate a multifunctional antidepressant probe that is modified at two distinct positions. The purpose of these modifications was to allow covalent linkage of the probe to interaction partners, and decoration of probe-target complexes with fluorescent reporter molecules. The strategy for the design of such a probe (i.e., azidobupramine) was guided by the need for the introduction of additional functional groups, conveying the required properties while keeping the additional moieties as small as possible. This should minimize the risk of changing antidepressant-like properties of the new probe azidobupramine. To control for this, we evaluated the binding parameters of azidobupramine to known target sites such as the transporters for serotonin (SERT), norepinephrine (NET), and dopamine (DAT). The binding affinities of azidobupramine to SERT, NET, and DAT were in the range of structurally related and clinically active antidepressants. Furthermore, we successfully visualized azidobupramine-SERT complexes not only in SERT-enriched protein material but also in living cells stably overexpressing SERT. To our knowledge, azidobupramine is the first structural analogue of a tricyclic antidepressant that can be covalently linked to target structures and further attached to reporter molecules while preserving antidepressant-like properties and avoiding radioactive isotopes. PMID:26863431

  8. [An exploration in the action targets for antidepressant bioactive components of Xiaoyaosan based on network pharmacology].

    PubMed

    Gao, Yao; Gao, Li; Gao, Xiao-xia; Zhou, Yu-zhi; Qin, Xue-mei; Tian, Jun-sheng

    2015-12-01

    The present study aims to predict the action targets of antidepressant active ingredients of Xiaoyaosan to understand the "multi-components, multi-targets and multi-pathways" mechanism. Using network pharmacology, the reported antidepressant active ingredients in Xiaoyaosan (saikosaponin A, saikosaponin C, saikosaponin D, ferulic acid, Z-ligustilide, atractylenolide I, atractylenolide II, atractylenolide III, paeoniflorin, albiflorin, liquiritin, glycyrrhizic acid and pachymic acid), were used to predict the targets of main active ingredients of Xiaoyaosan according to reversed pharmacophore matching method. The prediction was made via screening of the antidepressive drug targets approved by FDA in the DrugBank database and annotating the information of targets with the aid of MAS 3.0 biological molecular function software. The Cytoscape software was used to construct the Xiaoyaosan ingredients-targets-pathways network. The network analysis indicates that the active ingredients in Xiaoyaosan involve 25 targets in the energy metabolism-immune-signal transmutation relevant biological processes. The antidepressant effect of Xiaoyaosan reflects the features of traditional Chinese medicine in multi-components, multi-targets and multi-pathways. This research provides a scientific basis for elucidation of the antidepressant pharmacological mechanism of Xiaoyaosan. PMID:27169281

  9. Effect of antidepressant drugs on the vmPFC-limbic circuitry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Celene H; Chen, Michael C; Lu, Jun

    2015-05-01

    Our recent study indicates that the lesions of the prefrontal cortex in rats result in depressive-like behavior in forced swim test and REM sleep alterations, two well-established biomarkers of depression disorder. We hypothesized that antidepressants may target the PFC to reverse depression. Systemic injections of antidepressants: the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine (DMI), the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine, and the NMDA-antagonist ketamine selectively increased cFos expression (a marker of neuronal activity) in the deep layers of the ventromedial PFC (vmPFC) in rats. Of the vmPFC's limbic system targets, only the nucleus accumbens (NAc) was also activated by DMI. Using a retrograde tracer and a neuronal toxin, we also found that DMI-activated vmPFC neurons project to the NAc and that NAc activation by DMI was lost following vmPFC lesion. These results suggest that the vmPFC may be an essential target of antidepressant drugs, its projections to the NAc may be a key circuit regulating antidepressant action, and dysfunction of this pathway may contribute to depression.

  10. A role for galanin in antidepressant actions with a focus on the dorsal raphe nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoying; Barr, Alasdair M.; Kinney, Jefferson W.; Sanna, Pietro; Conti, Bruno; Behrens, M. Margarita; Bartfai, Tamas

    2005-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, such as fluoxetine (FLX), are the most commonly used drugs in the treatment of major depression. However, there is a limited understanding of their molecular mechanism of action. Although the acute effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in elevating synaptic serotonin concentrations is well known, the clinical amelioration of depressive symptoms requires 14-21 days of treatment, suggesting that numerous other rearrangements of function in the CNS must take place. In the present study, we demonstrated that 14 days of FLX treatment up-regulated galanin mRNA levels by 100% and GalR2-binding sites by 50%, in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus, where galanin coexists with serotonin. Furthermore, a galanin receptor antagonist, M40, attenuated the antidepressant-like effect of FLX in the forced swim test, a rodent preclinical screen commonly used to evaluate antidepressant-like efficacy. Direct activation of galanin receptors by a galanin receptor agonist, galnon, was found to produce an antidepressant-like effect in the same task. Two other antidepressant treatments also affected the galaninergic system in the monoaminergic nuclei: Electroconvulsive shock elevated galanin mRNA levels in dorsal raphe nucleus, whereas sleep deprivation increased galanin mRNA levels in the locus coeruleus, further underlining the connection between activation of the galaninergic system and antidepressant action of various clinically proven treatments. PMID:15647369

  11. Therapeutic equivalence of antipsychotics and antidepressants - A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cessak, Grzegorz; Rokita, Konrad; Dąbrowska, Marta; Sejbuk-Rozbicka, Katarzyna; Zaremba, Anna; Mirowska-Guzel, Dagmara; Bałkowiec-Iskra, Ewa

    2016-04-01

    The number of newly approved generic psychotropic drugs increases every year and, in many countries, their sales exceed the sales of brand-name counterparts. In order for any generic drug to receive an approval of regulatory authorities, its bioequivalence with the corresponding reference product must be demonstrated. Moreover, generic drugs must meet the same quality standards as reference drugs. However, many psychiatrists express concerns about use of generic drugs. We carried out a systematic analysis of the relevant literature indexed in PubMed and Cochrane databases. The MeSH term "generic" was combined with terms describing antipsychotic and antidepressive drugs, including their pharmaceutical names and relevant mental disorders. All 26 articles including either clinical studies or case reports have been qualified for a detailed analysis. No cases describing switches between two generics were found. Therapeutic equivalence studies evaluating antipsychotics included clozapine, olanzapine, and risperidone. The clinical status was judged to have worsened in 15.7% patients treated with clozapine. The number of relapses before and after the switch was not significantly different in patients treated with olanzapine. Two case reports showed clinical state deterioration after switch to generic risperidone. The clinical outcome after conversion to a generic antidepressant was evaluated only in one retrospective study. That study analyzed the outcomes of treatment with citalopram and revealed mental state deterioration in 11.6% of patients. Only single reports describe cases of impaired efficacy or adverse events after the switch to a generic antidepressant, including fluoxetine, mirtazapine, and venlafaxine. No cases of suicidal attempt after the switch were reported. Although the overall number of described cases is rather modest, health professionals should be aware of possible changes in the therapeutic effectiveness after changing to a generic medicine. PMID

  12. Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Differentially Affects Lithium Sensitivity of Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines from Lithium Responder and Non-responder Bipolar Disorder Patients.

    PubMed

    Milanesi, Elena; Hadar, Adva; Maffioletti, Elisabetta; Werner, Haim; Shomron, Noam; Gennarelli, Massimo; Schulze, Thomas G; Costa, Marta; Del Zompo, Maria; Squassina, Alessio; Gurwitz, David

    2015-07-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic psychiatric illness with an unknown etiology. Lithium is considered the cornerstone in the management of BD, though about 50-60 % of patients do not respond sufficiently to chronic treatment. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) has been identified as a candidate gene for BD susceptibility, and its low expression has been suggested as a putative biomarker for lithium unresponsiveness. In this study, we examined the in vitro effects of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) on lithium sensitivity in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from lithium responder (R) and non-responder (NR) bipolar patients. Moreover, we evaluated levels of microRNA let-7c, a small RNA predicted to target IGF1. We found that exogenous IGF-1 added to serum-free media increased lithium sensitivity selectively in LCLs from NR BD patients. However, no significant differences were observed when comparing let-7c expression in LCLs from R vs. NR BD patients. Our data support a key role for IGF-1 in lithium resistance/response in the treatment of bipolar disorder.

  13. Obesity and Its Potential Effects on Antidepressant Treatment Outcomes in Patients with Depressive Disorders: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Young Sup; Seo, Hye-Jin; McIntyre, Roger S.; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence regarding clinical, neurobiological, genetic, and environmental factors suggests a bidirectional link between obesity and depressive disorders. Although a few studies have investigated the link between obesity/excess body weight and the response to antidepressants in depressive disorders, the effect of weight on treatment response remains poorly understood. In this review, we summarized recent data regarding the relationship between the response to antidepressants and obesity/excess body weight in clinical studies of patients with depressive disorders. Although several studies indicated an association between obesity/excess body weight and poor antidepressant responses, it is difficult to draw definitive conclusions due to the variability of subject composition and methodological differences among studies. Especially, differences in sex, age and menopausal status, depressive symptom subtypes, and antidepressants administered may have caused inconsistencies in the results among studies. The relationship between obesity/excess body weight and antidepressant responses should be investigated further in high-powered studies addressing the differential effects on subject characteristics and treatment. Moreover, future research should focus on the roles of mediating factors, such as inflammatory markers and neurocognitive performance, which may alter the antidepressant treatment outcome in patients with comorbid obesity and depressive disorder. PMID:26771598

  14. Obesity and Its Potential Effects on Antidepressant Treatment Outcomes in Patients with Depressive Disorders: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Woo, Young Sup; Seo, Hye-Jin; McIntyre, Roger S; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2016-01-12

    Accumulating evidence regarding clinical, neurobiological, genetic, and environmental factors suggests a bidirectional link between obesity and depressive disorders. Although a few studies have investigated the link between obesity/excess body weight and the response to antidepressants in depressive disorders, the effect of weight on treatment response remains poorly understood. In this review, we summarized recent data regarding the relationship between the response to antidepressants and obesity/excess body weight in clinical studies of patients with depressive disorders. Although several studies indicated an association between obesity/excess body weight and poor antidepressant responses, it is difficult to draw definitive conclusions due to the variability of subject composition and methodological differences among studies. Especially, differences in sex, age and menopausal status, depressive symptom subtypes, and antidepressants administered may have caused inconsistencies in the results among studies. The relationship between obesity/excess body weight and antidepressant responses should be investigated further in high-powered studies addressing the differential effects on subject characteristics and treatment. Moreover, future research should focus on the roles of mediating factors, such as inflammatory markers and neurocognitive performance, which may alter the antidepressant treatment outcome in patients with comorbid obesity and depressive disorder.

  15. Regulation of proteolytic cleavage of brain-derived neurotrophic factor precursor by antidepressants in human neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pao-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has supported the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in antidepressant effect. The precursor of BDNF (proBDNF) often exerts opposing biological effects on mature BDNF (mBDNF). Hence, the balance between proBDNF and mBDNF might be critical in total neurotrophic effects, leading to susceptibility to or recovery from depression. In the current study, we measured the protein expression levels of proBDNF, and its proteolytic products, truncated BDNF, and mBDNF, in human SH-SY5Y cells treated with different antidepressants. We found that the treatment significantly increased the production of mBDNF, but decreased the production of truncated BDNF and proBDNF. These results support that antidepressants can promote proBDNF cleavage. Further studies are needed to clarify whether proBDNF cleavage plays a role in antidepressant mechanisms. PMID:26491331

  16. Differential Effect of an Anticholinergic Antidepressant on Sleep-Dependent Memory Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Goerke, Monique; Cohrs, Stefan; Rodenbeck, Andrea; Kunz, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is considered critical to the consolidation of procedural memory – the memory of skills and habits. Many antidepressants strongly suppress REM sleep, however, and procedural memory consolidation has been shown to be impaired in depressed patients on antidepressant therapy. As a result, it is important to determine whether antidepressive therapy can lead to amnestic impairment. We thus investigated the effects of the anticholinergic antidepressant amitriptyline on sleep-dependent memory consolidation. Design: Double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, parallel-group study. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: Twenty-five healthy men (mean age: 26.8 ± 5.6 y). Interventions: 75 mg amitriptyline versus placebo. Measurements/Results: To test memory consolidation, a visual discrimination task, a finger-tapping task, the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test, and the Rey Auditory-Verbal Learning Test were performed. Sleep was measured using polysomnography. Our findings show that amitriptyline profoundly suppressed REM sleep and impaired perceptual skill learning, but not motor skill or declarative learning. Conclusions: Our study is the first to demonstrate that an antidepressant can affect procedural memory consolidation in healthy subjects. Moreover, considering the results of a recent study, in which selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors were shown not to impair procedural memory consolidation, our findings suggest that procedural memory consolidation is not facilitated by the characteristics of REM sleep captured by visual sleep scoring, but rather by the high cholinergic tone associated with REM sleep. Our study contributes to the understanding of potentially undesirable behavioral effects of amitriptyline. Citation: Goerke M, Cohrs S, Rodenbeck A, Kunz D. Differential effect of an anticholinergic antidepressant on sleep-dependent memory consolidation. SLEEP

  17. The centrally acting non-narcotic antitussive tipepidine produces antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test in rats.

    PubMed

    Kawaura, Kazuaki; Ogata, Yukino; Inoue, Masako; Honda, Sokichi; Soeda, Fumio; Shirasaki, Tetsuya; Takahama, Kazuo

    2009-12-14

    The antidepressant-like effect of tipepidine was studied in rats. Tipepidine at 20 and 40 mg/kg i.p. reduced immobility in the forced swimming test and tipepidine at 40 mg/kg, i.p. increased climbing in the test. The drug at 40 mg/kg, i.p. had no effect on the locomotor activity and motor coordination. These results suggest that tipepidine may be a novel drug with antidepressant-like activity.

  18. The impact of direct-to-consumer television and magazine advertising on antidepressant use.

    PubMed

    Avery, Rosemary J; Eisenberg, Matthew D; Simon, Kosali I

    2012-09-01

    We examine whether exposure to direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) for antidepressant drugs affects individual use of these medications among those suffering from depression. Prior studies have almost exclusively relied on making connections between national or market-level advertising volume/expenditures and national or individual-level usage of medications. This is the first study to: estimate the impact of individual-level exposure to DTCA on individual-level use of antidepressants; estimate the impact of individual-level exposure to television DTCA on individual-level use in any drug class; consider the relative and interactive impact of DTCA in two different media in any drug class; and, consider the heterogeneity of impact among different populations in an econometric framework in the antidepressant market. There are also important limitations to note. Unlike prior market level studies that use monthly data, we are limited to aggregated annual data. Our measures of potential advertising exposure are constructed assuming that media consumption patterns are stable during the year. We are also not able to study the impact of advertising on use of antidepressants for conditions other than depression, such as anxiety disorders. We find that: DTCA impacts antidepressant use in a statistically and economically significant manner; that these effects are present in both television and magazine advertising exposure but do not appear to have interactive effects; are stronger for women than for men in the magazine medium, but are about equally strong for men and women in the TV medium; and, are somewhat stronger for groups suffering from more severe forms of depression. The overall size of the effect is a 6-10 percentage point increase in antidepressant use from being exposed to television advertising; the corresponding magazine effects are between 3 and 4 percentage points.

  19. Antidepressant-like effects in various mice strains in the tail suspension test.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, Nadège; David, Denis Joseph Paul; Dailly, Eric; Hascoët, Martine; Bourin, Michel

    2003-08-14

    Several studies have reported rodent strain differences in the response to antidepressants in animal models of depression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential contribution of genetic factors to antidepressant response in an animal model of depression: the tail suspension test (TST). For this study four mice strains (Swiss and NMRI, two outbred strains and DBA/2 and C57BL/6J Rj, two inbred strains) were submitted to the TST after acute administration of five antidepressants: the tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) imipramine and desipramine, the selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) paroxetine and citalopram and the dopamine reuptake inhibitor bupropion. The C57BL/6J Rj strain had a longer baseline immobility time in comparison to the other strains. All antidepressants studied in this work decreased immobility time in the Swiss and C57BL/6J Rj strains. However, the Swiss strain displayed greater sensitivity to citalopram (from 2mg/kg) and C57BL/6J Rj to paroxetine (from 0.5mg/kg). This latter presented a greater size-effect with citalopram than with other strains and reached more than 60% from 8mg/kg. Moreover the size-effect of desipramine, paroxetine and bupropion in Swiss mice was greater than in the other strains in the TST. The NMRI and DBA/2 mice only responded to 5-HT reuptake inhibitors, both selective (paroxetine, citalopram) or non-selective (imipramine). The NMRI strain was more sensitive to imipramine and presented a size-effect (43% at 8mg/kg) superior to those of other strains. DBA/2 strain was more sensitive to citalopram than paroxetine and imipramine. Our results suggest that response to an antidepressant treatment is under control of genetic factors and that the strain of mouse is an important parameter to consider.

  20. [Between depression and fibroniyalgia: the fate of the antidepressant].

    PubMed

    Drobizhev, M Yu; Fedotova, A V; Kikta, S V; Antokhin, E Yu

    2016-01-01

    The authors present the information about one of the least studied antidepressants- milnacipran. Recommendations of its clinical use have been long based on incorrect conceptions of its pharmacological properties. Currently, milnacipran is considered as ancirepinephrine and serotonin (to a lesser degree) reuptake inhibitor and NMDA receptor blocker. Milnacipran can be successfully used in apatic, asthenic, adynamic and anhedonic depressions as well as in fibromyalgia in patients with marked fatigability and pain. However the recommendations for the latter are not registered in Russia (maybe due to the differences in the diagnosis of fibromyalgia which is traditionally more often diagnosed as neurasthenia). PMID:27386594

  1. Antidepressant Effects of Resveratrol in an Animal Model of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Akinfiresoye, Laura L. Hurley, Luli; Kalejaiye, Olubukola; Tizabi, Yousef

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol (3,4’,5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) is a natural non-flavonoid polyphenol antioxidant extracted from red grapes in the processing of wine. Initially it was studied for its potential as anticancer drug, and later was found to reduce cardiovascular disease. More recently resveratrol was shown to alleviate depressive-like symptoms induced by stress or other means in mice and rats. The major purpose of this study was to investigate whether resveratrol would manifest an antidepressant effect in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, a putative and non-induced animal model of depression, and whether this effect might be associated with an increase in hippocampal and frontal cortical brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein implicated in chronic effects of many antidepressants. Adult male WKY rats were injected with two doses of resveratrol (10 and 40 mg/kg, i.p.) and their behavior in the open field locomotor activity (LMA), forced swim test (FST: a measure of helplessness), and sucrose preference test (SPT: a measure of anhedonia) was evaluated after a single acute injection or following 7 days of daily treatment. Both acute and chronic administration of resveratrol resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in FST. However, only chronic resveratrol resulted in dose-dependent increase in sucrose consumption. LMA was not affected by any treatment. Parallel to the observed behavioral effects the level of hippocampal, but not frontal cortical, BDNF was also dose-dependently elevated after chronic resveratrol administration. These findings indicate an antidepressant-like effect of resveratrol in an animal model of depression possibly via activation of hippocampal BDNF, and suggest therapeutic potential of resveratrol in at least a subpopulation of depressed patients. PMID:24717328

  2. Antidepressant efficacy of high and low frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation in the FSL/FRL genetic rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Hesselberg, Marie Louise; Wegener, Gregers; Buchholtz, Poul Erik

    2016-11-01

    Repetitive Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) has appeared to be a potential non-invasive antidepressant method, which implies non-convulsive focal stimulation of the brain through a time varying magnetic field. The antidepressant potential of rTMS has been supported by animal studies showing a number of interesting similarities between magnetic stimulation and electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS). Despite these positive results, this method still contains many unknown issues. Importantly, there are fundamental uncertainties concerning the optimal combination of stimulus parameters (frequency, intensity, duration, and number of pulses) to obtain an antidepressant effect. Therefore, the present study aimed to qualify the choice of rTMS stimulus frequency in a well-validated genetic animal model of depression, the FSL/FRL rats. We compared the antidepressant effect of low frequency, high frequency rTMS and ECS to sham treatment in FRL and FSL rats using 6 parallel groups. We used the Forced Swim Test and the Open Field Test to screen the depression-like state in rats. We found that both the high frequency and the low frequency rTMS resulted in a significant antidepressant effect. However, this effect was inferior to the effect of ECS. The low frequency and high frequency groups, which received the same total impulse load and stimulus intensity, did not differ with respect to antidepressant efficacy in this study. In conclusion, this study provides robust evidence that both rTMS interventions are efficacious, although not as efficient as ECS. PMID:27473004

  3. Antidepressant efficacy of high and low frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation in the FSL/FRL genetic rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Hesselberg, Marie Louise; Wegener, Gregers; Buchholtz, Poul Erik

    2016-11-01

    Repetitive Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) has appeared to be a potential non-invasive antidepressant method, which implies non-convulsive focal stimulation of the brain through a time varying magnetic field. The antidepressant potential of rTMS has been supported by animal studies showing a number of interesting similarities between magnetic stimulation and electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS). Despite these positive results, this method still contains many unknown issues. Importantly, there are fundamental uncertainties concerning the optimal combination of stimulus parameters (frequency, intensity, duration, and number of pulses) to obtain an antidepressant effect. Therefore, the present study aimed to qualify the choice of rTMS stimulus frequency in a well-validated genetic animal model of depression, the FSL/FRL rats. We compared the antidepressant effect of low frequency, high frequency rTMS and ECS to sham treatment in FRL and FSL rats using 6 parallel groups. We used the Forced Swim Test and the Open Field Test to screen the depression-like state in rats. We found that both the high frequency and the low frequency rTMS resulted in a significant antidepressant effect. However, this effect was inferior to the effect of ECS. The low frequency and high frequency groups, which received the same total impulse load and stimulus intensity, did not differ with respect to antidepressant efficacy in this study. In conclusion, this study provides robust evidence that both rTMS interventions are efficacious, although not as efficient as ECS.

  4. Antidepressant-like effect of centrally acting non-narcotic antitussive caramiphen in a forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Kawaura, Kazuaki; Miki, Risa; Shima, Eriko; Honda, Sokichi; Soeda, Fumio; Shirasaki, Tetsuya; Takahama, Kazuo

    2010-09-13

    Recently, we reported that a centrally acting non-narcotic antitussive (cough suppressant drug), tipepidine produces an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test in rats. Because pharmacological properties of tipepidine apparently differ from those of typical antidepressants developed to date, we speculated that caramiphen, another centrally acting antitussive, has an antidepressant-like effect. That effect of caramiphen was studied in rats using the forced swimming test. Caramiphen at 20 and 40mg/kg i.p. significantly reduced immobility. At 40mg/kg i.p., it increased climbing behavior. Even at 40mg/kg, this drug had no effect on locomotor activity. Results suggest that a centrally acting antitussive possessing inhibition of GIRK channels has an antidepressant-like effect. PMID:20621160

  5. Antidepressant-like effect of centrally acting non-narcotic antitussive caramiphen in a forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Kawaura, Kazuaki; Miki, Risa; Shima, Eriko; Honda, Sokichi; Soeda, Fumio; Shirasaki, Tetsuya; Takahama, Kazuo

    2010-09-13

    Recently, we reported that a centrally acting non-narcotic antitussive (cough suppressant drug), tipepidine produces an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test in rats. Because pharmacological properties of tipepidine apparently differ from those of typical antidepressants developed to date, we speculated that caramiphen, another centrally acting antitussive, has an antidepressant-like effect. That effect of caramiphen was studied in rats using the forced swimming test. Caramiphen at 20 and 40mg/kg i.p. significantly reduced immobility. At 40mg/kg i.p., it increased climbing behavior. Even at 40mg/kg, this drug had no effect on locomotor activity. Results suggest that a centrally acting antitussive possessing inhibition of GIRK channels has an antidepressant-like effect.

  6. Serotonin autoreceptor function and antidepressant drug action.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, S; Bengtsson, H J; Kullberg, A; Carlzon, D; Peilot, H; Auerbach, S B

    2000-06-01

    This article briefly summarizes, within the context of a brief review of the relevant literature, the outcome of our recent rat microdialysis studies on (1) the relative importance of serotonin (5-HT)1A versus 5-HT1B autoreceptors in the mechanism of action of 5-HT reuptake blocking agents, including putative regional differences in this regard, and (2) autoreceptor responsiveness following chronic SSRI administration. First, our data are consistent with the primacy of 5-HT1A autoreceptors in restraining the elevation of 5-HT levels induced by SSRIs, whereas nerve terminal 5-HT1B autoreceptors appear to have an accessory role in this regard. Second, there is an important interplay between cell body and nerve terminal 5-HT autoreceptors, and recent findings suggest that this interplay may potentially be exploited to obtain regionally preferential effects on 5-HT neurotransmission in the central nervous system, even upon systemic drug administration. In particular, emerging data suggest that somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptor- and nerve terminal 5-HT1B autoreceptor-mediated feedback may be relatively more important in the control of 5-HT output in dorsal raphe-frontal cortex and median raphe-dorsal hippocampus systems, respectively. Third, 5-HT autoreceptors evidently retain the capability to limit the 5-HT transmission-promoting effect of SSRIs after chronic treatment. Thus, although the responsiveness of these sites is probably somewhat reduced, residual autoreceptor capacity still remains an effective restraint on large increases in extracellular 5-HT, even after prolonged treatment. If a further increase in extracellular 5-HT is crucial to the remission of depression in patients responding only partially to prolonged administration of antidepressants, then sustained adjunctive treatment with autoreceptor-blocking drugs may consequently prove useful in the long term.

  7. Out of the Black Box: Treatment of Resistant Depression in Adolescents and the Antidepressant Controversy

    PubMed Central

    Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Vitiello, Benedetto; Clarke, Gregory; Keller, Martin; Emslie, Graham J.; Ryan, Neal; Porta, Giovanna; Iyengar, Satish; Ritz, Louise; Zelanzny, Jamie; Onorato, Matthew; Brent, David

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective The purpose of this article is to describe the effects of the pediatric antidepressant controversy on the Treatment of Serotonin-Selective Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) Resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA) trial. Method Adolescents, ages 12–18 years, with SSRI resistant depression were randomized to one of four treatments for a 12 week trial: Switch to different SSRI, switch to an alternate antidepressant (venlafaxine), switch to an alternate SSRI plus cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), or switch to venlafaxine plus CBT. Results The health advisories and “black box” warnings regarding suicidality and antidepressants in adolescents occurred during the course of the TORDIA trial. Revisions to the protocol, multiple-consent form changes, and re-consenting of patients were necessary. Recruitment of participants was adversely affected. Conclusion Despite a cascade of unforeseen events that delayed the completion of the study, the TORDIA trial resulted in clinically important information about treatment-resistant depression in adolescents. PMID:22251022

  8. Preterm Birth and Antidepressant Medication Use during Pregnancy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huybrechts, Krista F.; Sanghani, Reesha Shah; Avorn, Jerry; Urato, Adam C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Preterm birth is a major contributor to neonatal morbidity and mortality and its rate has been increasing over the past two decades. Antidepressant medication use during pregnancy has also been rising, with rates up to 7.5% in the US. The objective was to systematically review the literature to determine the strength of the available evidence relating to a possible association between antidepressant use during pregnancy and preterm birth. Methods We conducted a computerized search in PUBMED, MEDLINE and PsycINFO through September 2012, supplemented with a manual search of reference lists, to identify original published research on preterm birth rates in women taking antidepressants during pregnancy. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers, and absolute and relative risks abstracted or calculated. Our a priori design was to group studies by level of confounding adjustment and by timing of antidepressant use during pregnancy; we used random-effects models to calculate summary measures of effect. Results Forty-one studies met inclusion criteria. Pooled adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) were 1.53 (1.40–1.66) for antidepressant use at any time and 1.96 (1.62–2.38) for 3rd trimester use. Controlling for a diagnosis of depression did not eliminate the effect. There was no increased risk [1.16 (0.92–1.45)] in studies that identified patients based on 1st trimester exposure. Sensitivity analyses demonstrated unmeasured confounding would have to be strong to account for the observed association. Discussion Published evidence is consistent with an increased risk of preterm birth in women taking antidepressants during the 2nd and 3rd trimesters, although the possibility of residual confounding cannot be completely ruled out. PMID:24671232

  9. Effects of Buprenorphine on Behavioral Tests for Antidepressant and Anxiolytic Drugs in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Falcon, Edgardo; Maier, Kaitlyn; Robinson, Shivon A.; Hill-Smith, Tiffany E.; Lucki, Irwin

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Buprenorphine (BPN) has been shown to rapidly improve mood in treatment-resistant depressed patients in small clinical studies. However, BPN’s effects in preclinical tests for mood and antidepressant efficacy are largely unexplored. Objective The current study examined the effects of BPN in the forced swim test (FST) and novelty-induced hypophagia (NIH) test as measures of antidepressant and anxiolytic-like effects in C57BL/6J mice. Microdialysis was used to measure whether BPN engaged KORs in the nucleus accumbens shell (NAcSh) at a behaviorally active dose (0.25 mg/kg). Methods BPN was tested in the FST at both 30 min and 24 h post administration. Also measured in the FST at 24 h post administration were the KOR antagonist norbinaltorphimine (nor-BNI), the MOR agonist morphine and the reference antidepressant desipramine. The anxiolytic effects of BPN were examined in the NIH test 24 h after treatment. The effects of acute injection of BPN and the KOR agonist U50,488 were measured on extracellular DA levels in the NAcSh. Results BPN produced significant reductions in FST immobility without changing locomotor activity and reduced approach latencies in the novel environment of the NIH test when tested 24 h after treatment. Repeated daily BPN injections for 6 d did not produce tolerance to these behavioral effects. nor-BNI produced a similar antidepressant-like response in the FST 24 h postinjection but morphine and desipramine were ineffective. BPN (0.25 mg/kg) did not alter DA levels when given alone but prevented the KOR agonist U50,488 from reducing DA levels. Conclusions Acute and subchronic treatment with BPN produced antidepressant and anxiolytic-like responses in mice at doses that engage KORs. These studies support the clinical evidence that BPN may be a novel rapid-acting antidepressant medication and provides rodent models for investigating associated neurochemical mechanisms. PMID:25178815

  10. [Antidepressants, stressors and the serotonin 1A receptor].

    PubMed

    Kirilly, Eszter; Gonda, Xénia; Bagdy, György

    2015-06-01

    5-HT(1A) receptor is a receptor of surprises. Buspirone, an anxiolytic drug with a then yet unidentified mechanism of action had been marketed for years when it was discovered that it is a 5-HT(1A) partial agonist. Several more years had to pass before it was accepted that this receptor plays the key role in the action mechanism of buspirone. This was followed by further surprises. It was discovered that in spite of its anxiolytic effect buspirone activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress axis, furthermore, it increases peripheral noradrenaline and adrenaline concentration via a central mechanism. Thus activation of this receptor leads to ACTH/corticosterone and catecholamine release and also increases beta-endorphine, oxytocin and prolactin secretion while decreasing body temperature, increasing food uptake, eliciting characteristic behavioural responses in rodents and also playing a role in the development of certain types of epilepsy. Human genetic studies revealed the role of 5-HT(1A) receptors in cognitive processes playing a role in the development of depression such as impulsiveness or response to environmental stress. This exceptionally wide spectrum of effects is attributable to the presence of 5-HT1A receptors in serotonergic as well as other, for example glutamatergic, cholinergic, dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurons. The majority of the effects of 5-HT(1A) receptors is manifested via the mediation of Gi proteins through the hyperpolarisation or inhibition of the neuron carrying the receptor. 5-HT(1A) receptors on serotonergic neurons can be found in the somatodendritic area and play a significant role in delaying the effects of antidepressants which is an obvious disadvantage. Therefore the newest serotonergic antidepressants including vilazodone and vortioxetine have been designed to possess 5-HT(1A) receptor partial agonist properties. In the present paper we focus primarily on the role of 5-HT(1A) receptors in stress and

  11. ANTIDEPRESSANT EFFECT OF OPTOGENETIC STIMULATION OF THE MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX

    PubMed Central

    Covington, Herbert E.; Lobo, Mary Kay; Maze, Ian; Vialou, Vincent; Hyman, James M; Zaman, Samir; LaPlant, Quincey; Mouzon, Ezekiel; Ghose, Subroto; Tamminga, Carol A.; Neve, Rachael L.; Deisseroth, Karl; Nestler, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Brain stimulation and imaging studies in humans have highlighted a key role for the prefrontal cortex in clinical depression, however, it remains unknown whether excitation or inhibition of prefrontal cortical neuronal activity is associated with antidepressant responses. Here, we examined cellular indicators of functional activity, including the immediate early genes (IEG), zif268 (egr1), c-fos and arc, in the prefrontal cortex of clinically depressed humans obtained postmortem. We also examined these genes in the ventral portion of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of mice after chronic social defeat stress, a mouse model of depression. In addition, we used viral vectors to overexpress channel rhodopsin 2 (a light-activated cation channel) in mouse mPFC in order to optogenetically drive “burst” patterns of cortical firing in-vivo and examine the behavioral consequences. Prefrontal cortical tissue derived from clinically depressed humans displayed significant reductions in IEG expression, consistent with a deficit in neuronal activity within this brain region. Mice subjected to chronic social defeat stress exhibited similar reductions in levels of IEG expression in mPFC. Interestingly, some of these changes were not observed in defeated mice that escape the deleterious consequences of the stress, i.e., resilient animals. In those mice that expressed a strong depressive-like phenotype, i.e., susceptible animals, optogenetic stimulation of mPFC exerted potent antidepressant-like effects, without affecting general locomotor activity, anxiety-like behaviors, or social memory. These results indicate that the activity of the mPFC is a key determinant of depression-like behavior, as well as antidepressant responses. PMID:21123555

  12. Decreased Use of Antidepressants in Youth After US Food and Drug Administration Black Box Warning

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Ashwin; Rais, Theodore; Kumari, Neeta

    2009-01-01

    Objective. This study evaluates changes in use of antidepressants in children and adolescents after the US Food and Drug Administration black box warning for increased risk of suicide. Method. A retrospective chart review was completed for children and adolescents (ages 4–17) who were diagnosed with depressive or anxiety disorders in an outpatient clinic and offered a trial of antidepressants between September 2003 and February 2004 (before the black box warning) and between January 2005 and June 2005 (after the black box warning). Statistical analyses were performed with the SPSS version 17 and R package version 2.9.1. Univariate analysis was conducted using the Fisher’s Exact test. Results. The odds ratio calculated for the different groups suggests that in all the groups, the proportion of acceptance of antidepressant use was greater before the black box warning as compared to after the black box warning (odds ratio>1). It was also found that upon combining the age groups after the warning and comparing them, based on the diagnoses, there was a greater degree of refusal of antidepressant therapy when a diagnosis of anxiety disorder was made as compared to a diagnosis of depressive disorder (p=0.017). Conclusion. There has been a decrease in the use of antidepressant therapy in children and adolescents following the US Food and Drug Administration black box warning for risk of suicide. A limitation of this study is that reasons for refusal of antidepressent therapy by parents or guardians of children and adolescents were not collected; therefore, there is no certainty that the black box warning was the primary reason for refusal. PMID:20011576

  13. From Randomized Controlled Trials of Antidepressant Drugs to the Meta-Analytic Synthesis of Evidence: Methodological Aspects Lead to Discrepant Findings.

    PubMed

    Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N; McIntyre, Roger S; Carvalho, André F

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, several meta-analytic studies employing different methodological approaches have had inconsistent conclusions regarding antidepressant efficacy. Herein, we aim to comment on methodological aspects that may have contributed to disparate findings. We initially discuss methodological inconsistencies and limitations related to the conduct of individual antidepressant randomized controlled trials (RCTs), including differences in allocated samples, limitations of psychometric scales, possible explanations for the heightened placebo response rates in antidepressant RCTs across the past two decades as well as the reporting of conflicts of interest. In the second part of this article, we briefly describe the various meta-analyses techniques (e.g., simple random effects meta-analysis and network meta-analysis) and the application of these methods to synthesize evidence related to antidepressant efficacy. Recently published antidepressant metaanalyses often provide discrepant results and similar results often lead to different interpretations. Finally, we propose strategies to improve methodology considering real-world clinical scenarios. PMID:26467410

  14. From Randomized Controlled Trials of Antidepressant Drugs to the Meta-Analytic Synthesis of Evidence: Methodological Aspects Lead to Discrepant Findings

    PubMed Central

    Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N.; McIntyre, Roger S.; Carvalho, André F.

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, several meta-analytic studies employing different methodological approaches have had inconsistent conclusions regarding antidepressant efficacy. Herein, we aim to comment on methodological aspects that may have contributed to disparate findings. We initially discuss methodological inconsistencies and limitations related to the conduct of individual antidepressant randomized controlled trials (RCTs), including differences in allocated samples, limitations of psychometric scales, possible explanations for the heightened placebo response rates in antidepressant RCTs across the past two decades as well as the reporting of conflicts of interest. In the second part of this article, we briefly describe the various meta-analyses techniques (e.g., simple random effects meta-analysis and network meta-analysis) and the application of these methods to synthesize evidence related to antidepressant efficacy. Recently published antidepressant metaanalyses often provide discrepant results and similar results often lead to different interpretations. Finally, we propose strategies to improve methodology considering real-world clinical scenarios. PMID:26467410

  15. Effects of antidepressants on DSP4/CPT-induced DNA damage response in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Hilton, Benjamin A.; Cui, Kui; Zhu, Meng-Yang

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage is a form of cell stress and injury. Increased systemic DNA damage is related to the pathogenic development of neurodegenerative diseases. Depression occurs in a relatively high percentage of patients suffering from degenerative diseases, for whom antidepressants are often used to relieve depressive symptoms. However, few studies have attempted to elucidate why different groups of antidepressants have similar effects on relieving symptoms of depression. Previously, we demonstrated that neurotoxins N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4)- and camptothecin (CPT)-induced the DNA damage response in SH-SY5Y cells, and DSP4 caused cell cycle arrest which was predominately in the S-phase. The present study shows that CPT treatment also resulted in similar cell cycle arrest. Some classic antidepressants could reduce the DNA damage response induced by DSP4 or CPT in SH-SY5Y cells. Cell viability examination demonstrated that both DSP4 and CPT caused cell death, which was prevented by spontaneous administration of some tested antidepressants. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that a majority of the tested antidepressants protect cells from being arrested in S-phase. These results suggest that blocking the DNA damage response may be an important pharmacologic characteristic of antidepressants. Exploring the underlying mechanisms may allow for advances in the effort to improve therapeutic strategies for depression appearing in degenerative and psychiatric diseases. PMID:26038195

  16. Differential role of AMPA receptors in mouse tests of antidepressant and anxiolytic action.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Jesper T; Fitzpatrick, Ciaran M; Larsen, Maria; Skovgaard, Lars; Nielsen, Simon D; Clausen, Rasmus P; Troelsen, Karin; Pickering, Darryl S

    2015-03-19

    Depression and anxiety often co-occur, and conventional monoamine-facilitating antidepressants show efficacy against symptoms in both disorders. Rodent studies indicate that antidepressant effects of monoamine-based antidepressants involve increased α-amino-3-hydroxy-5- methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid glutamate receptor (AMPAR) neurotransmission, and positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) at AMPARs produced antidepressant-like effects in rodents. While this suggests that increased AMPAR-mediated neurotransmission is beneficial in depression management, preclinical studies addressing AMPARs in relation to anxiety have given ambiguous results with both anxiolytic-like and anxiogenic-like effects observed after AMPAR blockade. This study systematically compared the effects of the AMPAR potentiator LY451646 and the AMPAR antagonist GYKI-53655 on depression-related behaviour using the mouse forced swim (FST) and tail suspension tests (TST), and anxiety-related behaviour using the elevated zero maze (EZM), marble burying (MB) and novelty-induced hypophagia (NIH) tests. The serotonin-selective antidepressant citalopram was included for comparison. Due to the importance of AMPARs in learning and memory we also tested if GYKI-53655 disrupted performance in the V-maze test for attention-dependent behaviour, and the social transmission of food preference (STFP) test of long-term memory. LY451646 (3 mg/kg) showed an antidepressant-like profile in the FST and TST, and GYKI-53655 (≥ 5 mg/kg) had a depressogenic-like effect in the TST but no effect in the FST. Conversely, GYKI-53655 produced marked anxiolytic-like effects in the EZM (≥ 2.5 mg/kg), MBT (≥ 2.5 mg/kg), and NIH tests (≥ 5 mg/kg), while LY451646 (≥ 3 mg/kg) increased anxiety-like behaviour in the EZM. Citalopram showed an antidepressant-like effect in the FST (≥ 10 mg/kg), but not TST, an anxiolytic-like effect in the EZM (≥ 3 mg/kg) and MB test (≥ 2.5 mg/kg), and an anxiogenic-like effect in the NIH

  17. Is it possible to predict the activity of a new antidepressant in animals with simple psychopharmacological tests?

    PubMed

    Bourin, M

    1990-01-01

    Behavioural tests for predicting antidepressant activity in the animal provide a closer approximation than other tests of states of depression in man but are often long and costly to perform (except the behavioural despair test). The tests proposed here presuppose a pharmacological interaction (except the Porsolt test) but are simple enough to allow screening: included are antagonism of reserpine hypothermia, ptosis and akinesia; antagonism of effects induced by oxotremorine; antagonism of high-dose apomorphine; and potentiation of yohimbine toxicity. In combination with the study of motor activity in the mouse, these tests allow assessment of the specificity of antidepressant activity by establishing a ratio between the "antidepressant" dose and the "stimulant" or "sedative" dose. It can be predicted that a substance will be antidepressant and sedative or stimulant at the same dose if the ratio is close to 1; if the ratio is less than 1, at antidepressant doses the substance will be very sedative or stimulant according to the case. The specificity of the tests discussed can be debatable. Antagonism of reserpine-induced hypothermia indicates substances with direct or indirect beta-mimetic activity, ptosis antagonism, substances with alpha-adrenergic (not antidepressants) or serotoninergic (possibly antidepressants) activity; and akinesia antagonism, a direct or indirect dopaminergic activity (sometimes found in antidepressants) with psychostimulant activity. The oxotremorine test is related to the anticholinergic activity of substances, except in the case of hypothermia antagonism. The high-dose apomorphine test seems to be specific for substances inhibiting norepinephrine reuptake. The yohimbine test is simple to carry out, relatively inexpensive and does not fail to screen any molecule known to be effective to-date. The behavioural despair test is a good complement for screening except for drugs having a beta-agonist activity, it appears that this test is

  18. NMDA receptor subunits and associated signaling molecules mediating antidepressant-related effects of NMDA-GluN2B antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Kiselycznyk, Carly; Jury, Nicholas; Halladay, Lindsay; Nakazawa, Kazu; Mishina, Masayoshi; Sprengel, Rolf; Grant, Seth G.N.; Svenningsson, Per; Holmes, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Drugs targeting the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) may be efficacious for treating mood disorders, as exemplified by the rapid antidepressant effects produced by single administration of the NMDAR antagonist ketamine. Though the precise mechanisms underlying the antidepressant-related effects of NMDAR antagonism remain unclear, recent studies implicate specific NMDAR subunits, including GluN2A and GluN2B, as well as the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor (AMPAR) subunit glutamate receptor interacting molecule, PSD-95. Here, integrating mutant and pharmacological in mice, we investigated the contribution of these subunits and molecules to antidepressant-related behaviors and the antidepressant-related effects of the GluN2B blocker, Ro 25-6981. We found that global deletion of GluA1 or PSD-95 reduced forced swim test (FST) immobility, mimicking the antidepressant-related effect produced by systemically administered Ro 25-6981 in C57BL/6J mice. Moreover, the FST antidepressant-like effects of systemic Ro 25-6981 were intact in mutants with global GluA1 deletion or GluN1 deletion in forebrain interneurons, but were absent in mutants constitutively lacking GluN2A or PSD-95. Next, we found that microinfusing Ro 25-6981 into the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), but not basolateral amygdala, of C57BL/6J mice was sufficient to produce an antidepressant-like effect. Together, these findings extend and refine current understanding of the mechanisms mediating antidepressant-like effects produced by NMDAR-GluN2B antagonists, and may inform the development of a novel class of medications for treating depression that target the GluN2B subtype of NMDAR. PMID:25800971

  19. Amisulpride is a potent 5-HT7 antagonist: relevance for antidepressant actions in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Atheir I.; Hedlund, Peter B.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Tran, Thuy B.; Meltzer, Herbert Y.; Roth, Bryan L.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Amisulpride is approved for clinical use in treating schizophrenia in a number of European countries and also for treating dysthymia, a mild form of depression, in Italy. Amisulpride has also been demonstrated to be an antidepressant for patients with major depression in many clinical trials. In part because of the selective D2/D3 receptor antagonist properties of amisulpride, it has long been widely assumed that dopaminergic modulation is the proximal event responsible for mediating its antidepressant and antipsychotic properties. Objectives The purpose of these studies was to determine if amisulpride’s antidepressant actions are mediated by off-target interactions with other receptors. Materials and Methods We performed experiments that: (1) examined the pharmacological profile of amisulpride at a large number of CNS molecular targets and (2) after finding high potency antagonist affinity for human 5-HT7a serotonin receptors, characterized the actions of amisulpride as an antidepressant in wild-type and 5-HT7 receptor knock-out mice. Results We discovered that amisulpride was a potent competitive antagonist at 5-HT7a receptors and that interactions with no other molecular target investigated here could explain its antidepressant actions in vivo. Significantly, and in contrast to their wildtype littermates, 5-HT7 receptor knockout mice did not respond to amisulpride in a widely used rodent model of depression, the tail suspension test. Conclusions These results indicate that 5-HT7a receptor antagonism, and not D2/D3 receptor antagonism, likely underlies the antidepressant actions of amisulpride. PMID:19337725

  20. Hippocampal volume correlates with attenuated negative psychotic symptoms irrespective of antidepressant medication

    PubMed Central

    Bernasconi, Raffaele; Smieskova, Renata; Schmidt, André; Harrisberger, Fabienne; Raschle, Nora Maria; Lenz, Claudia; Walter, Anna; Simon, Andor; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Lang, Undine E.; Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Borgwardt, Stefan J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Individuals with at-risk mental state for psychosis (ARMS) often suffer from depressive and anxiety symptoms, which are clinically similar to the negative symptomatology described for psychosis. Thus, many ARMS individuals are already being treated with antidepressant medication. Objectives To investigate clinical and structural differences between psychosis high-risk individuals with or without antidepressants. Methods We compared ARMS individuals currently receiving antidepressants (ARMS-AD; n = 18), ARMS individuals not receiving antidepressants (ARMS-nonAD; n = 31) and healthy subjects (HC; n = 24), in terms of brain structure abnormalities, using voxel-based morphometry. We also performed region of interest analysis for the hippocampus, anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala and precuneus. Results The ARMS-AD had higher ‘depression’ and lower ‘motor hyperactivity’ scores than the ARMS-nonAD. Compared to HC, there was significantly less GMV in the middle frontal gyrus in the whole ARMS cohort and in the superior frontal gyrus in the ARMS-AD subgroup. Compared to ARMS-nonAD, the ARMS-AD group showed more gray matter volume (GMV) in the left superior parietal lobe, but less GMV in the left hippocampus and the right precuneus. We found a significant negative correlation between attenuated negative symptoms and hippocampal volume in the whole ARMS cohort. Conclusion Reduced GMV in the hippocampus and precuneus is associated with short-term antidepressant medication and more severe depressive symptoms. Hippocampal volume is further negatively correlated with attenuated negative psychotic symptoms. Longitudinal studies are needed to distinguish whether hippocampal volume deficits in the ARMS are related to attenuated negative psychotic symptoms or to antidepressant action. PMID:26110110

  1. Effects of antidepressant drugs on synaptic protein levels and dendritic outgrowth in hippocampal neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Seo, Mi Kyoung; Lee, Chan Hong; Cho, Hye Yeon; Lee, Jung Goo; Lee, Bong Ju; Kim, Ji Eun; Seol, Wongi; Kim, Young Hoon; Park, Sung Woo

    2014-04-01

    The alteration of hippocampal plasticity has been proposed to play a critical role in both the pathophysiology and treatment of depression. In this study, the ability of different classes of antidepressant drugs (escitalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, imipramine, tranylcypromine, and tianeptine) to mediate the expression of synaptic proteins and dendritic outgrowth in rat hippocampal neurons was investigated under toxic conditions induced by B27 deprivation, which causes hippocampal cell death. Postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and synaptophysin (SYP) levels were evaluated using Western blot analyses. Additionally, dendritic outgrowth was examined to determine whether antidepressant drugs affect the dendritic morphology of hippocampal neurons in B27-deprived cultures. Escitalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, imipramine, tranylcypromine, and tianeptine significantly prevented B27 deprivation-induced decreases in levels of PSD-95, BDNF, and SYP. Moreover, the independent application of fluoxetine, paroxetine, and sertraline significantly increased levels of BDNF under normal conditions. All antidepressant drugs significantly increased the total outgrowth of hippocampal dendrites under B27 deprivation. Specific inhibitors of calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), KN-93, protein kinase A (PKA), H-89, or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), LY294002, significantly decreased the effects of antidepressant drugs on dendritic outgrowth, whereas this effect was observed only with tianeptine for the PI3K inhibitor. Taken together, these results suggest that certain antidepressant drugs can enhance synaptic protein levels and encourage dendritic outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, effects on dendritic outgrowth likely require CaMKII, PKA, or PI3K signaling pathways. The observed effects may be may be due to chronic treatment with antidepressant drugs. PMID:24296153

  2. The Neuropeptide VGF Produces Antidepressant-Like Behavioral Effects and Enhances Proliferation in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Thakker-Varia, Smita; Krol, Jennifer Jernstedt; Nettleton, Jacob; Bilimoria, Parizad M.; Bangasser, Debra A.; Shors, Tracey J.; Black, Ira B.; Alder, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is upregulated in the hippocampus by antidepressant treatments, and BDNF produces antidepressant-like effects in behavioral models of depression. In our previous work, we identified genes induced by BDNF and defined their specific roles in hippocampal neuronal development and plasticity. To identify genes downstream of BDNF that may play roles in psychiatric disorders,we examined a subset of BDNF-induced genes also regulated by 5-HT (serotonin), which includes the neuropeptide VGF (nonacronymic). To explore the function of VGF in depression, we first investigated the expression of the neuropeptide in animal models of depression. VGF was downregulated in the hippocampus after both the learned helplessness and forced swim test (FST) paradigms. Conversely, VGF infusion in the hippocampus of mice subjected to FST reduced the time spent immobile for up to 6 d, thus demonstrating a novel role for VGF as an antidepressant-like agent. Recent evidence indicates that chronic treatment of rodents with antidepressants increases neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus and that neurogenesis is required for the behavioral effects of antidepressants. Our studies using [3H]thymidine and bromodeoxyuridine as markers of DNA synthesis indicate that chronic VGF treatment enhances proliferation of hippocampal progenitor cells both in vitro and in vivo with survival up to 21 d. By double immunocytochemical analysis of hippocampal neurons, we demonstrate that VGF increases the number of dividing cells that express neuronal markers in vitro. Thus, VGF may act downstream of BDNF and exert its effects as an antidepressant-like agent by enhancing neurogenesis in the hippocampus. PMID:17989282

  3. Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Antidepressive Therapy: Shocking Relations

    PubMed Central

    Rotheneichner, Peter; Lange, Simona; O'Sullivan, Anna; Marschallinger, Julia; Zaunmair, Pia; Geretsegger, Christian; Aigner, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    Speculations on the involvement of hippocampal neurogenesis, a form of neuronal plasticity, in the aetiology of depression and the mode of action of antidepressive therapies, started to arise more than a decade ago. But still, conclusive evidence that adult neurogenesis contributes to antidepressive effects of pharmacological and physical therapies has not been generated yet. This review revisits recent findings on the close relation between the mode(s) of action of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), a powerful intervention used as second-line treatment of major depression disorders, and the neurogenic response to ECT. Following application of electroconvulsive shocks, intricate interactions between neurogenesis, angiogenesis, and microglia activation, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the secretion of neurotrophic factors have been documented. Furthermore, considering the fact that neurogenesis strongly diminishes along aging, we investigated the response to electroconvulsive shocks in young as well as in aged cohorts of mice. PMID:24967107

  4. Antidepressant Drugs to Electroconvulsive Therapy: Kristina's Story.

    PubMed

    Sammons, Kristina M; Abraham, Sam

    2016-08-01

    A mother of three children experienced depression after each delivery. The worst bout occurred after the birth of her third child. Antidepressant drugs helped initially, but a change in dosage caused severe decompensating symptoms that resulted in feelings and thoughts that life is not worth living. Health care providers would not facilitate entry into an inpatient program for help. She was told that unless actively suicidal or homicidal, she could not be admitted to an inpatient unit. None of the prescribed antidepressant medications seemed to work and the physicians said there was nothing else they could do. Family and friends searched for help and found a psychiatrist who recommended electroconvulsive therapy. Kristina tells her story of experiencing depression and recovery. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Nursing, 54(8), 43-47.].

  5. Antidepressant-Induced Female Sexual Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Tierney; Rullo, Jordan; Faubion, Stephanie

    2016-09-01

    Because 1 in 6 women in the United States takes antidepressants and a substantial proportion of patients report some disturbance of sexual function while taking these medications, it is a near certainty that the practicing clinician will need to know how to assess and manage antidepressant-related female sexual dysfunction. Adverse sexual effects can be complex because there are several potentially overlapping etiologies, including sexual dysfunction associated with the underlying mood disorder. As such, careful assessment of sexual function at the premedication visit followed by monitoring at subsequent visits is critical. Treatment of adverse sexual effects can be pharmacological (dose reduction, drug discontinuation or switching, augmentation, or using medications with lower adverse effect profiles), behavioral (exercising before sexual activity, scheduling sexual activity, vibratory stimulation, psychotherapy), complementary and integrative (acupuncture, nutraceuticals), or some combination of these modalities. PMID:27594188

  6. Antidepressant Drugs to Electroconvulsive Therapy: Kristina's Story.

    PubMed

    Sammons, Kristina M; Abraham, Sam

    2016-08-01

    A mother of three children experienced depression after each delivery. The worst bout occurred after the birth of her third child. Antidepressant drugs helped initially, but a change in dosage caused severe decompensating symptoms that resulted in feelings and thoughts that life is not worth living. Health care providers would not facilitate entry into an inpatient program for help. She was told that unless actively suicidal or homicidal, she could not be admitted to an inpatient unit. None of the prescribed antidepressant medications seemed to work and the physicians said there was nothing else they could do. Family and friends searched for help and found a psychiatrist who recommended electroconvulsive therapy. Kristina tells her story of experiencing depression and recovery. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Nursing, 54(8), 43-47.]. PMID:27479479

  7. [Vortioxetine: a new antidepressant to treat depressive episodes].

    PubMed

    Colle, R; Corruble, E

    2016-02-01

    Vortioxetine is a new antidepressant, which mechanism of action is multimodal, targeting the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, 5-HT3, 5-HT7 receptors and the serotonin transporter (5-HTT). Its efficacy and safety were assessed in fourteen studies including more than 3700 patients with a major depressive episode and treated with vortioxetine. In short-term studies (8 weeks), vortioxetine is more efficacious than placebo in decreasing depressive symptoms as measured by the MADRS total score, response rate (vortioxetine: 53.2% vs placebo: 35.2%) and remission rate (vortioxetine: 29.2% vs placebo: 19.3%). In a long-term study (52 weeks), vortioxetine is also superior to placebo in preventing relapses and recurrences. Moreover, in second line treatment, after failure of a first line selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or serotonin norepinephrin reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), vortioxetine is superior to agomelatine in improving depressive symptoms and achieving response and remission. Furthermore, the positive effects of vortioxetine on improvement of cognitive symptoms of major depressive episodes are particularly well established in several clinical trials. The tolerability profile of vortioxetine is favourable. The recommended daily posology of vortioxetine is 10mg/d. Vortioxetine is a new antidepressant drug with a multimodal mechanism of action, well-documented efficacy and safety profiles. PMID:26358483

  8. Mirtazapine--another new class of antidepressant.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    Mirtazapine (Zispin-Organon) was introduced in 1997 as "the first noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant" (or 'NaSSA'). The manufacturer claims that mirtazapine is "effective in all types of depression", with "minimal serotonergic, anticholinergic and antiadrenergic side-effects", "low propensity for interactions", and lower likelihood of relapse during maintenance treatment than with amitriptyline. Is mirtazapine an advance on existing drugs? PMID:10562767

  9. Viloxazine as a betamimetic antidepressant drug.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Ortega, A; Larousse, C

    1987-01-01

    A comparison was made between the effects of maprotiline, the sole action of which is to inhibit the reuptake of noradrenaline, of salbutamol and of viloxazine on hypothermia induced by reserpine, oxotremorine or apomorphine. The dose/effect curves in the three tests showed a similarity in profile between viloxazine and salbutamol, whereas no resemblance was evident between these two drugs and maprotiline. These facts suggest that viloxazine which has a weak effect on noradrenaline reuptake acts probably as antidepressant by betamimetic activity.

  10. Rapid Antidepressant Activity of Ethanol Extract of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis Is Associated with Upregulation of BDNF Expression in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hailou; Xue, Wenda; Wu, Runjie; Gong, Tong; Tao, Weiwei; Zhou, Xin; Jiang, Jingjing; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Nan; Cui, Yi; Chen, Chang; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol extract of Yueju pill, a Traditional Chinese Medicine herbal formula widely used to treat mood disorders, demonstrates rapid antidepressant effects similar to ketamine, likely via instant enhancement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the hippocampus. Here we investigated ethanol extracts of the constituent herbs of Yueju responsible for rapid antidepressant effects. Screening with tail suspension test in Kunming mice at 24 hours after a single administration of five individual constituent herbs of Yueju, we found that only Gardenia jasminoides Ellis (GJ) showed a significant effect. The antidepressant response started at 2 hours after GJ administration. Similar to Yueju and ketamine, a single administration of GJ significantly reduced the number of escape failures in the learned helplessness test. Furthermore, GJ decreased latency of food consumption in the novelty suppressed-feeding test. Additionally, starting from 2 hours and continuing for over 20 hours after GJ administration, BDNF expression in the hippocampus was upregulated, temporally linked with the antidepressant response. These findings suggest that GJ has rapid antidepressant effects, which are associated with the elevated expression of BDNF in the hippocampus. In Yueju formula, Yue represents GJ, as thus our study demonstrates the primary role of GJ in rapid antidepressant efficacy of Yueju. PMID:25878718

  11. Rapid Antidepressant Activity of Ethanol Extract of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis Is Associated with Upregulation of BDNF Expression in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hailou; Xue, Wenda; Wu, Runjie; Gong, Tong; Tao, Weiwei; Zhou, Xin; Jiang, Jingjing; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Nan; Cui, Yi; Chen, Chang; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol extract of Yueju pill, a Traditional Chinese Medicine herbal formula widely used to treat mood disorders, demonstrates rapid antidepressant effects similar to ketamine, likely via instant enhancement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the hippocampus. Here we investigated ethanol extracts of the constituent herbs of Yueju responsible for rapid antidepressant effects. Screening with tail suspension test in Kunming mice at 24 hours after a single administration of five individual constituent herbs of Yueju, we found that only Gardenia jasminoides Ellis (GJ) showed a significant effect. The antidepressant response started at 2 hours after GJ administration. Similar to Yueju and ketamine, a single administration of GJ significantly reduced the number of escape failures in the learned helplessness test. Furthermore, GJ decreased latency of food consumption in the novelty suppressed-feeding test. Additionally, starting from 2 hours and continuing for over 20 hours after GJ administration, BDNF expression in the hippocampus was upregulated, temporally linked with the antidepressant response. These findings suggest that GJ has rapid antidepressant effects, which are associated with the elevated expression of BDNF in the hippocampus. In Yueju formula, Yue represents GJ, as thus our study demonstrates the primary role of GJ in rapid antidepressant efficacy of Yueju. PMID:25878718

  12. Improving Access to Psychological Therapies and antidepressant prescribing rates in England: a longitudinal time-series analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sreeharan, Vaishnavee; Madden, Hugo; Lee, John Tayu; Millett, Christopher; Majeed, Azeem

    2013-01-01

    Background Antidepressant prescribing rates in England have been increasing since the 1970s. The impact of the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) initiative on antidepressant prescribing rates is unknown. Aim To investigate the impact of the establishment of IAPT services on antidepressant prescribing rates in primary care trusts (PCTs) in England. Design and setting A longitudinal time-series analysis, using PCT-level data from 2008 to 2011 set in England. Method A time-series analysis was conducted using PCT-level prescription data, dates of establishment of IAPT services, and covariate data for age, sex, and socioeconomic status. Statistical analysis was carried out using analysis of variance and a random-effect negative binomial model. Results Antidepressant prescribing rates in England increased by 10% per year during the study period (adjusted rate ratio = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.09 to 1.10). The implementation of IAPT services had no significant effect on antidepressant prescribing (adjusted rate ratio = 0.99, 95% CI = 0.99 to 1.00). Conclusion Introduction of a large-scale initiative to increase provision of psychological therapies has not curbed the long-term increased prescribing of antidepressants in England. PMID:23998846

  13. Neurochemical and metabolic aspects of antidepressants: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Baker, GB; Coutts, RT; Greenshaw, AJ

    2000-01-01

    Antidepressants, in addition to being effective therapeutic agents for depression, have also proved to be multifaceted drugs useful for treating a number of other psychiatric and neurologic disorders. Despite the widespread use of these drugs, much remains to be understood about their mechanisms of action and other important aspects, such as their metabolism and potential interactions with other drugs. This article reviews research conducted in the authors' laboratories on various aspects of antidepressants, including trace amines and antidepressants, gamma-aminobutyric acid and antidepressants, drug metabolism, development and application of rapid, sensitive assay procedures for antidepressants and their metabolites; and drug development based on analogues of the antidepressants phenelzine and tranylcypromine. The significance of this work to future drug development is also discussed. PMID:11109299

  14. The neurobiology of depression and antidepressant action.

    PubMed

    Willner, Paul; Scheel-Krüger, Jørgen; Belzung, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    We present a comprehensive overview of the neurobiology of unipolar major depression and antidepressant drug action, integrating data from affective neuroscience, neuro- and psychopharmacology, neuroendocrinology, neuroanatomy, and molecular biology. We suggest that the problem of depression comprises three sub-problems: first episodes in people with low vulnerability ('simple' depressions), which are strongly stress-dependent; an increase in vulnerability and autonomy from stress that develops over episodes of depression (kindling); and factors that confer vulnerability to a first episode (a depressive diathesis). We describe key processes in the onset of a 'simple' depression and show that kindling and depressive diatheses reproduce many of the neurobiological features of depression. We also review the neurobiological mechanisms of antidepressant drug action, and show that resistance to antidepressant treatment is associated with genetic and other factors that are largely similar to those implicated in vulnerability to depression. We discuss the implications of these conclusions for the understanding and treatment of depression, and make some strategic recommendations for future research.

  15. Designing a new generation of antidepressant drugs.

    PubMed

    Pinder, R M

    1997-01-01

    Although longer-term adaptive changes in receptor sensitivity may better explain the delayed onset of action of antidepressants, the mechanism based on acutely elevated noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) synaptic levels remains the basis for new drug design. The dual action concept, which postulates that effects on both NA and 5-HT are more advantageous than a selective action on serotonin reuptake (SSRI), has been used to design new antidepressants such as venlafaxine and mirtazapine. Both drugs enhance NA and 5-HT neurotransmission with little affinity for receptors mediating tricyclic-like side effects. Mirtazapine, the prototype noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA), specifically enhances 5-HT1 neurotransmission and blocks 5-HT2 and 5-HT3 receptors, and in contrast to venlafaxine lacks SSRI-like and adverse cardiovascular side effects. The unique pharmacological action of mirtazapine is a result of implementation of two concepts: dual action as a basis of efficacy combined with receptor-specific action as a basis of tolerability. PMID:9265946

  16. [Combination of tricyclic antidepressants and MAOI in the depressions].

    PubMed

    Abdala, E N

    1975-03-01

    This study was aimed at the assessment of therapeutic and side effects of simultaneous administration of tricyclic antidepressants and MAOI. The sample consisted of 122 patients with depressive syndromes, treated at the "Centro de Psicología Médica San Martín de Tours" (period 1970/1973), with Isocarboxazide and Trimiprimine. All patients received both drugs three times a day. The average daily dose was 20 mg of Isocarboxazide together with 125 mg of Trimiprimine. The average treatment was 70 days long. The study lead to the following conclusions: 1. There were no serious side effects. 2. The scarce side effects registered were not very different from those of the other anti-depressants. 3. The therapeutic doses were lower than those required when each drug is used alone. 4. The speed of action was higher than for each drug separately. 5. The overall percentage of improvement in patients was higher than the percentage obtained for each drug alone. 6. The lack of side effects for a theoretically risky combination of drugs is likely to be attributed to the neuroleptic action of Trimipramine.

  17. Inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase by tricyclic antidepressants and analogons

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, Nadine; Sharma, Deepa; Gulbins, Erich; Becker, Katrin Anne; Edelmann, Bärbel

    2014-01-01

    Amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant, has been used in the clinic to treat a number of disorders, in particular major depression and neuropathic pain. In the 1970s the ability of tricyclic antidepressants to inhibit acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) was discovered. The enzyme ASM catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide. ASM and ceramide were shown to play a crucial role in a wide range of diseases, including cancer, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and major depression, as well as viral (e.g., measles virus) and bacterial (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) infections. Ceramide molecules may act in these diseases by the alteration of membrane biophysics, the self-association of ceramide molecules within the cell membrane and the ultimate formation of larger ceramide-enriched membrane domains/platforms. These domains were shown to serve the clustering of certain receptors such as CD95 and may also act in the above named diseases. The potential to block the generation of ceramide by inhibiting the ASM has opened up new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of these conditions. Since amitriptyline is one of the longest used clinical drugs and side effects are well studied, it could potentially become a cheap and easily accessible medication for patients suffering from these diseases. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of current in vitro and in vivo studies and clinical trials utilizing amitriptyline to inhibit ASM and contemplate possible future applications of the drug. PMID:25228885

  18. Antidepressant pharmaceuticals in two U.S. effluent-impacted streams: Occurrence and fate in water and sediment and selective uptake in fish neural tissue

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, M.M.; Furlong, E.T.; Kolpin, D.W.; Werner, S.L.; Schoenfuss, H.L.; Barber, L.B.; Blazer, V.S.; Norris, D.O.; Vajda, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Antidepressant pharmaceuticals are widely prescribed in the United States; release of municipal wastewater effluent is a primary route introducing them to aquatic environments, where little is known about their distribution and fate. Water, bed sediment, and brain tissue from native white suckers (Catostomus commersoni)were collected upstream and atpoints progressively downstream from outfalls discharging to two effluentimpacted streams, Boulder Creek (Colorado) and Fourmile Creek (Iowa). A liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method was used to quantify antidepressants, including fluoxetine, norfluoxetine (degradate), sertraline, norsertraline (degradate), paroxetine, Citalopram, fluvoxamine, duloxetine, venlafaxine, and bupropion in all three sample matrices. Antidepressants were not present above the limit of quantitation in water samples upstream from the effluent outfalls but were present at points downstream at ng/L concentrations, even at the farthest downstream sampling site 8.4 km downstream from the outfall. The antidepressants with the highest measured concentrations in both streams were venlafaxine, bupropion, and Citalopram and typically were observed at concentrations of at least an order of magnitude greater than the more commonly investigated antidepressants fluoxetine and sertraline. Concentrations of antidepressants in bed sediment were measured at ng/g levels; venlafaxine and fluoxetine were the predominant chemicals observed. Fluoxetine, sertraline, and their degradates were the principal antidepressants observed in fish brain tissue, typically at low ng/g concentrations. Aqualitatively different antidepressant profile was observed in brain tissue compared to streamwater samples. This study documents that wastewater effluent can be a point source of antidepressants to stream ecosystems and that the qualitative composition of antidepressants in brain tissue from exposed fish differs substantially from the compositions observed in

  19. The antidepressant-like effects of glutamatergic drugs ketamine and AMPA receptor potentiator LY 451646 are preserved in bdnf⁺/⁻ heterozygous null mice.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, Jesse S O; Autio, Henri; Vesa, Liisa; Antila, Hanna; Lindemann, Lothar; Hoener, Marius C; Skolnick, Phil; Rantamäki, Tomi; Castrén, Eero

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that biogenic amine-based antidepressants act, at least in part, via regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling. Biogenic amine-based antidepressants increase BDNF synthesis and activate its signaling pathway through TrkB receptors. Moreover, the antidepressant-like effects of these molecules are abolished in BDNF deficient mice. Glutamate-based drugs, including the NMDA antagonist ketamine, and the AMPA receptor potentiator LY 451646, mimic the effects of antidepressants in preclinical tests with high predictive validity. In humans, a single intravenous dose of ketamine produces an antidepressant effect that is rapid, robust and persistent. In this study, we examined the role of BDNF in expression of the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine and an AMPA receptor potentiator (LY 451646) in the forced swim test (FST). Ketamine and LY 451646 produced antidepressant-like effects in the FST in mice at 45 min after a single injection, but no effects were observed one week after a single ketamine injection. As previously reported, the effects of imipramine in the forced swim test were blunted in heterozygous BDNF knockout (bdnf(+/-)) mice. However ketamine and LY 451646 produced similar antidepressant-like responses in wildtype and bdnf(+/-) mice. Neither ketamine nor LY 451646 significantly influenced the levels BDNF or TrkB phosphorylation in the hippocampus when assessed at 45 min or 7 days after the drug administration. These data demonstrate that under the conditions tested, neither ketamine nor the AMPA-potentiator LY 451656 activate BDNF signaling, but produce a characteristic antidepressant-like response in heterozygous bdnf(+/-) mice. These data indicate that unlike biogenic amine-based agents, BDNF signaling does not play a pivotal role in the antidepressant effects of glutamate-based compounds. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Anxiety and Depression'.

  20. Augmentation with antidepressants in schizophrenia treatment: benefit or risk

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Ye-Meng; Zhang, Ming-Dao

    2015-01-01

    We focused on the application of antidepressants in schizophrenia treatment in this review. Augmentation of antidepressants with antipsychotics is a common clinical practice to treat resistant symptoms in schizophrenia, including depressive symptoms, negative symptoms, comorbid obsessive–compulsive symptoms, and other psychotic manifestations. However, recent systematic review of the clinical effects of antidepressants is lacking. In this review, we have selected and summarized current literature on the use of antidepressants in patients with schizophrenia; the patterns of use and effectiveness, as well as risks and drug–drug interactions of this clinical practice are discussed in detail, with particular emphasis on the treatment of depressive symptoms in schizophrenia. PMID:25834445

  1. Antidepressant profile of Ptychopetalum olacoides Bentham (Marapuama) in mice.

    PubMed

    Piato, Angelo L; Rizon, Lucas P; Martins, Bárbara S; Nunes, Domingos S; Elisabetsky, Elaine

    2009-04-01

    Depression has become of universal major importance, and it is therefore vital to expand the armamentarium for treating the condition. Lack of motivation and lassitude are major symptoms treated with the use of Marapuama (Ptychopetalum olacoides, PO) remedies by communities in the Brazilian Amazon. Considering the prominence of such symptoms in depression, the present study was designed to verify the effects of a standardized PO ethanol extract (POEE) on the forced swimming (FST) and tail suspension tests (TST). POEE i.p. (15-100 mg/kg) and oral (300 mg/kg) resulted in a significant and dose-related anti-immobility effect. We further examined the involvement of dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin in these antidepressant-like effects. POEE effects were prevented when catecholamine synthesis was inhibited by -alpha-methyl-rho-tyrosine (AMPT) (100 mg/kg, i.p.), while inhibition of serotonin synthesis with rho-chlorophenylalanine methyl ester hydrochloride (PCPA) (100 mg/kg, i.p.) was devoid of effect. The blockade of beta-adrenergic (propranolol 2 mg/kg, i.p.) and D(1) dopamine (SCH 23390 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) receptors prevented POEE anti-immobility effects; by contrast, blockade of D(2) dopamine (sulpiride 2 and 50 mg/kg, i.p.) receptors was ineffective. Consistent with traditional use, the results indicate that POEE possesses antidepressant-like effects, possibly mediated by beta-adrenergic and D(1) dopamine receptors. PMID:19067380

  2. Ginkgo biloba for antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Cohen, A J; Bartlik, B

    1998-01-01

    In an open trial ginkgo biloba, an extract derived from the leaf of the Chinese ginkgo tree and noted for its cerebral enhancing effects, was found to be 84% effective in treating antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction predominately caused by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, N = 63). Women (n = 33) were more responsive to the sexually enhancing effects of ginkgo biloba than men (N = 30), with relative success rates of 91% versus 76%. Ginkgo biloba generally had a positive effect on all 4 phases of the sexual response cycle: desire, excitement (erection and lubrication), orgasm, and resolution (afterglow). This study originated from the observation that a geriatric patient on ginkgo biloba for memory enhancement noted improved erections. Patients exhibited sexual dysfunction secondary to a variety of antidepressant medications including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRIs), serotonin and nonrepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRIs) monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOIs), and tricyclics. Dosages of ginkgo biloba extract ranged from 60 mg qd to 120 mg bid (average = 209mg/d). The common side effects were gastrointestinal disturbances, headache, and general central nervous system activation. The article includes a discussion of presumed pharmacologic mechanisms, including effects on platelet activating factor, prostaglandins, peripheral vasodilatation, and central serotonin and norepinephrine receptor factor modulation.

  3. Modulation of TIM-3 expression on NK and T cell subsets in HIV immunological non-responders.

    PubMed

    de Kivit, Sander; Lempsink, Ludwijn J R; Plants, Jill; Martinson, Jeffrey; Keshavarzian, Ali; Landay, Alan L

    2015-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for the treatment of HIV infection sustains viral suppression and increases CD4(+) T cells in HIV patients. However, in 10-25% of subjects, known as immunological non-responders (INRs), HAART does not increase CD4 count. We investigated a potential role for galectin-9 and TIM-3 in INRs as galectin-9 and TIM-3 have been described to modulate NK and T cell function. PBMCs were isolated from healthy controls, HIV immunological responders (IRs, >350CD4(+) cells/mm(3)) and HIV INRs (<350CD4(+) cells/mm(3)) and TIM-3 and galectin-9 expressions on NK cell subsets and CD4(+) T cells were assessed. HIV INRs and HIV IRs showed increased galectin-9 expression on CD16(-)CD56(bright) and CD16(+)CD56(+) NK cells and CD4(+) T cells. Only HIV INRs showed a reduced frequency of TIM-3-expressing CD16(+)CD56(+), CD16(+)CD56(-) and CD4(+) cells, which correlated with low peripheral CD4 counts. These data suggest that TIM-3 expression may be characteristic for HIV INRs. PMID:25450337

  4. Responders and non-responders to bifemelane hydrochloride in Alzheimer-type and multi-infarct dementia.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, M; Nishikawa, Y; Shimizu, M; Usui, M; Hyoki, K; Kawamuro, Y

    1993-01-01

    Although metabolically active compounds sometime attenuate cognitive deficits of dementia patients, this mechanism has not been discussed or investigated. We hypothesized that these compounds improve cognitive disorders not by directly acting on this cognitive function, but by increasing the arousal level. Based on this hypothesis, we investigated the change of arousal levels and the improvement of intellectual functions in 10 patients with Alzheimer-type dementia (ATD) and 10 patients with multi-infarct dementia (MID) before and 3 months after pharmacotherapy using bifemelane hydrochloride. For each patient, a psychological test battery was carried out and the arousal level was evaluated using the frequency of rapid eye movements in the electro-oculogram (EOG) and the frequency analysis of electroencephalogram (EEG) before and after the treatment. Evaluation of the cognitive improvement was made and eight out of the 20 patients were regarded as responders to the treatment. The frequency of small rapid eye movements (SREM) in the EOG increased significantly only in responders and the rate of change in SREM appearance in responders was significantly different from that in non-responders. This finding suggests that a part of the intellectual improvement in ATD and MID results from the increased level of arousal.

  5. Neural correlates of antidepressant-related sexual dysfunction: a placebo-controlled fMRI study on healthy males under subchronic paroxetine and bupropion.

    PubMed

    Abler, Birgit; Seeringer, Angela; Hartmann, Antonie; Grön, Georg; Metzger, Coraline; Walter, Martin; Stingl, Julia

    2011-08-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common side effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) like paroxetine in the treatment of depression, imposing a considerable risk on medication adherence and hence therapeutic success. Bupropion, a norepinephrine and dopamine reuptake inhibitor, is recommended as an alternative treatment without adverse effects concerning sexual arousal and libido. We investigated the neural bases of paroxetine-related subjective sexual dysfunction when compared with bupropion and placebo. We scanned 18 healthy, heterosexual males in a randomized, double-blind, within-subject design while watching video clips of erotic and nonerotic content under steady-state conditions after taking 20 mg of paroxetine, 150 mg of bupropion, and placebo for 7 days each. Under paroxetine, ratings of subjective sexual dysfunction increased compared with placebo or bupropion. Activation along the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), including subgenual, pregenual, and midcingulate cortices, in the ventral striatum and midbrain was decreased when compared with placebo. In contrast, bupropion let subjective ratings and ACC activations unchanged and increased activity of brain regions including posterior midcingulate cortex, mediodorsal thalamus, and extended amygdala relative to placebo and paroxetine. Brain regions that have been related to the processing of motivational (ventral striatum), emotional, and autonomic components of erotic stimulation (anterior cingulate) in previous studies showed reduced responsiveness under paroxetine in our study. Drug effects on these regions may be part of the mechanism underlying SSRI-related sexual dysfunction. Increased activation under bupropion may point to an opposite effect that may relate to the lack of impaired sexual functioning. PMID:21544071

  6. [Patient with testosterone deficit syndrome and erectile dysfunction non-responder to PDE-5 inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Izquierdo, Marta; Martínez-Salamanca, Juan I; Moncada, Ignacio; Linares Espinós, Estefanía; del Portillo, Luis; Areche, Jennifer; Carballido, Joaquín

    2013-09-01

    Androgens play an essential role in the corporo-venous occlusive mechanism that provokes erection. Accordingly to various studies based on animal models,testosterone deficit syndrome causes an endothelial disorder in the corpora cavernosa with diminished secretion of NO, alteration of penile smooth muscle and tunica albuginea structure, and increase of the number of adipocytes within the erectile tissue, which favors fibrosis and impairs erection. All these alterations are reversible with the exogenous administration of androgens. There are not enough studies to get definitive conclusions about androgen supply improving erectile dysfunction in patients with hypogonadism. Studies have been published in which seems that exogenous testosterone could be useful in the treatment of this type of patients. Nevertheless,in most published randomized double blind studies comparing with placebo, testosterone supply does not provide greater benefit on erectile dysfunction than PDE-5 Inhibitors exclusively. All studies coincide in the need to optimize the treatment with PDE-5 Inhibitors since they do have proven to be effective for the treatment of erectile dysfunction in patients with testosterone deficit syndrome. PMID:24047632

  7. Decreased Total Antioxidant Activity in Major Depressive Disorder Patients Non-Responsive to Antidepressant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Song-Eun; Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Rhee, Chang-Kyu; Rho, Dae-Young; Kim, Do-Hoon; Huh, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the total antioxidant activity (TAA) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and the effect of antidepressants on TAA using a novel potentiometric method. Methods Twenty-eight patients with MDD and thirty-one healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The control group comprised 31 healthy individuals matched for gender, drinking and smoking status. We assessed symptoms of depression using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). We measured TAA using potentiometry. All measurements were made at baseline and four and eight weeks later. Results There was a significant negative correlation between BDI scores and TAA. TAA was significantly lower in the MDD group than in controls. When the MDD group was subdivided into those who showed clinical response to antidepressant therapy (response group) and those who did not (non-response group), only the non-response group showed lower TAA, while the response group showed no significant difference to controls at baseline. After eight weeks of antidepressant treatment, TAA in both the response and non-response groups was similar, and there was no significant difference among the three groups. Conclusion These results suggest that the response to antidepressant treatment in MDD patients might be predicted by measuring TAA. PMID:27081384

  8. Evolution of the concepts of the molecular mechanism of the action of antidepressants (survey)

    SciTech Connect

    Mashkovskii, M.D.; Andreeva, N.I.

    1986-09-01

    The authors discuss investigation devoted to the study of the mechanisms of the action of antidepressants. Under the conditions of an acute experiment, antidepressants exhibit high affinity for the binding sites of (/sup 3/H) WB 4101, (/sup 3/H) LSD, and (/sup 3/H) spiroperiodol (alpha/sub 1/- and S/sub 2/-receptors). Certain antidepressants also have a high affinity for the binding sites of (/sup 3/H) clonidine and (/sup 3/H) S (alpha/sub 2/- and S/sub 1/-receptors). When the method of binding of radioligands was used to study the receptors, it was found that stimulation of cAMP synthesis, induced by norepinephrine, is primarily a beta-adrenergic response. Investigations of the influence of antidepressants in the case of their acute action in vitro on serotonin receptors showed that they inhibit the binding of (/sup 3/H) LSD and (/sup 3/H) spiroperiodol in the rat brain with high affinity and the binding of (/sup 3/H) S with low affinity.

  9. Antidepressant-Like Effects of Erythropoietin: A Focus on Behavioural and Hippocampal Processes

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Meagan; Rustom, Nazneen; Clarke, Melanie; Litteljohn, Darcy; Rudyk, Chris; Anisman, Hymie; Hayley, Shawn

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a chronic and debilitating condition with a significant degree of relapse and treatment resistance that could stem, at least in part, from disturbances of neuroplasticity. This has led to an increased focus on treatment strategies that target brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), synaptic plasticity and adult neurogenesis. In the current study we aimed to assess whether erythropoietin (EPO) would have antidepressant-like effects given its already established pro-trophic actions. In particular, we assessed whether EPO would diminish the deleterious effects of a social stressor in mice. Indeed, EPO induced anxiolytic and antidepressant-like responses in a forced swim test, open field, elevated-plus maze, and a novelty test, and appeared to blunt some of the negative behavioural effects of a social stressor. Furthermore, EPO promoted adult hippocampal neurogenesis, an important feature of effective antidepressants. Finally, a separate study using the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin revealed that antagonizing this pathway prevented the impact of EPO upon forced swim performance. These data are consistent with previous findings showing that the mTOR pathway and its neurogenic and synaptogenic effects might mediate the behavioral consequences of antidepressant agents. Our findings further highlight EPO as a possible adjunct treatment for affective disorders, as well as other stressor associated disorders of impaired neuroplasticity. PMID:24019878

  10. Additive antidepressant-like effects of fasting with imipramine via modulation of 5-HT2 receptors in the mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Bingjin; Zhao, Jing; Lv, Jiayin; Tang, Fang; Liu, Lei; Sun, Zhihui; Wang, Liang; Siwela, Sibongile P; Wang, Yinuo; Song, Yunong; Manchishi, Stephen M; Cui, Ranji

    2014-01-01

    Recently, studies show that intermittent fasting and caloric restriction may improve symptoms of depression. However, there is little scientific evidence regarding the literature on the antidepressant-like effects of acute fasting. The present study aims to investigate the antidepressant-like effects and its influence on brain levels of the transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and its phosphorylated form (p-CREB) in different time periods of fasting mice. Furthermore, the additive antidepressant-like effects of fasting with imipramine and the possible involvement of the 5-HT2 receptors were examined. In the present study 9h, but not 3h and 18h of fasting significantly reduced immobility time in the forced swimming test (FST) without alteration in locomotor activity in the open field test. 9h fasting also enhanced the ratio of p-CREB/CREB in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Co-administration of 9h of fasting and imipramine (30mg/kg, i.p) produced the additive antidepressant-like effects in the FST and increased the ratio of p-CREB/CREB. Meanwhile, the additive effects were partially reversed by treatment with a 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist, (±)-1-(2, 5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane hydrochloride (DOI) (5mg/kg, s.c). Furthermore, the antidepressant-like effects of 9h fasting was also blocked by DOI compared to the non-fasting control group. Serum corticosterone level, but not 5-HT and noradrenaline, was significantly increased in a time-dependent manner following different time periods of fasting. Taken together, these results suggest that acute fasting produces antidepressant-like effects via enhancement of the p-CREB/CREB ratio, and additive antidepressant-like effects of fasting with imipramine may be related to modulating 5-HT2 receptors. PMID:24036107

  11. A complex interaction between glycine/NMDA receptors and serotonergic/noradrenergic antidepressants in the forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Poleszak, Ewa; Wlaź, Piotr; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Wlaź, Aleksandra; Kasperek, Regina; Wróbel, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel

    2011-11-01

    Both clinical and preclinical studies demonstrate the antidepressant activity of the functional NMDA receptor antagonists. In this study, we assessed the effects of two glycine/NMDA receptor ligands, namely L-701,324 (antagonist) and D: -cycloserine (a partial agonist) on the action of antidepressant drugs with different pharmacological profiles in the forced swim test in mice. Swim sessions were conducted by placing mice individually in glass cylinders filled with warmed water for 6 min. The duration of behavioral immobility during the last 4 min of the test was evaluated. The locomotor activity of mice was measured with photoresistor actimeters. L-701,324 and D: -cycloserine given with reboxetine (administered in subeffective doses) did not change the behavior of animals in the forced swim test. A potentiating effect was seen when both tested glycine site ligands were given concomitantly with imipramine or fluoxetine in this test. The lesion of noradrenaline nerve terminals produced by DSP-4 neither altered the baseline activity nor influenced the antidepressant-like action of L-701,324 or D: -cycloserine. The depletion of serotonin by p-CPA did not alter baseline activity in the forced swim test. However, it completely antagonized the antidepressant-like action produced by L-701,324 and D: -cycloserine. Moreover, the antidepressant-like effects of imipramine, fluoxetine and reboxetine were abolished by D: -serine, a full agonist of glycine/NMDA receptors. The present study demonstrates that glycine/NMDA receptor functional antagonists enhance the antidepressant-like action of serotonin, but not noradrenaline-based antidepressants and such their activity seems to depend on serotonin rather than noradrenaline pathway.

  12. Do SSRI Antidepressants Increase The Risk of Extrapyramidal Side Effects In Patients Taking Antipsychotics?

    PubMed Central

    Allsbrook, Matthew; Fries, Brant E.; Szafara, Kristina L.; Regal, Randolph E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Among antidepressants, selective serotonin reup-take inhibitors (SSRIs) have enjoyed great popularity among clinicians as well as generally wide acceptance and tolerance among patients. A potentially overlooked side effect of SSRIs is the occasional occurrence of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), which could be a concern when SSRIs are used with antipsychotics. This study was designed to explore the possible association between SSRI antidepressant use and the incidence of EPS side effects in patients who take concomitant antipsychotic medications. Methods: The University of Michigan conducted a study at the four Michigan state mental health hospitals between May 2010 and October 2010. The Michigan Public Health Institute collected data using the InterRAI Mental Health Assessment (InterRAI MH). The present study is a retrospective cohort analysis of the cross-sectional data that were collected. Within these institutions, 693 residents were using antipsychotics. We measured the observed frequency of seven EPS recorded in the InterRAI MH within three groups of patients: 1) those on antipsychotic drugs who were taking an SSRI antidepressant; 2) those on antipsychotic drugs who were not taking an antidepressant; and 3) those on antipsychotic drugs who were taking a non-SSRI antidepressant. Differences in the prevalence of EPS were tested using one-way analysis of variance. Results: There were no significant differences in the observed EPS frequencies among the three groups (F2,18 = 0.01; P < 0.9901). Conclusion: In this study, SSRIs did not appear to potentiate the occurrence of EPS in patients using antipsychotics. PMID:26909002

  13. Antidepressant activity of fingolimod in mice

    PubMed Central

    di Nuzzo, Luigi; Orlando, Rosamaria; Tognoli, Cristina; Di Pietro, Paola; Bertini, Giuseppe; Miele, Jessica; Bucci, Domenico; Motolese, Marta; Scaccianoce, Sergio; Caruso, Alessandra; Mauro, Gianluca; De Lucia, Carmine; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Bruno, Valeria; Fabene, Paolo Francesco; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that fingolimod, the first oral drug approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS), acts as a direct inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and enhances the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the CNS. Both mechanisms are relevant to the pathophysiology and treatment of major depression. We examined the antidepressant activity of fingolimod in mice subjected to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS), a model of reactive depression endowed with face and pharmacological validity. Chronic treatment with fingolimod (3 mg kg−1, i.p., once a day for 4 weeks) reduced the immobility time in the forced swim test (FST) in a large proportion of CUS mice. This treatment also caused anxiogenic-like effects in the social interaction test without affecting anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze or spatial learning in the water maze. CUS mice showed reduced BDNF levels and enhanced HDAC2 levels in the hippocampus. These changes were reversed by fingolimod exclusively in mice that showed a behavioral response to the drug in the FST. Fingolimod treatment also enhanced H3 histone K14-acetylation and adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus of CUS mice. Fingolimod did not affect most of the parameters we have tested in unstressed control mice. The antidepressant-like activity of fingolimod was confirmed in mice chronically treated with corticosterone. These findings show for the first time that fingolimod exerts antidepressant-like effect acting in a “disease-dependent” manner, and raise the interesting possibility that the drug could relieve depressive symptoms in MS patients independently of its disease-modifying effect on MS. PMID:26171219

  14. Occurrence of antidepressant residues in the sewage-impacted Vistula and Utrata rivers and in tap water in Warsaw (Poland).

    PubMed

    Giebułtowicz, Joanna; Nałęcz-Jawecki, Grzegorz

    2014-06-01

    Antidepressants, even at low concentrations, can reveal some adverse effects on aquatic life due to disturbing homeostasis throughout the central and peripheral nervous system both in vertebrates and invertebrates. To date there have not been any reports regarding the presence of these pharmaceuticals in surface and tap waters in Eastern Europe. Therefore the aim of this study was to determine the presence of 21 antidepressant pharmaceuticals at specific points of the main Polish river - the Vistula, a smaller river of the Warsaw region - the Utrata, as well as in tap water samples of Warsaw. Samples were collected twice at one month intervals and analysed using solid-phase extraction (SPE) technique coupled with the liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS) method operated under the multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM). This is the first study where active compounds such as moclobemid or trazodone in the environment have been investigated. Environmental risk assessment of antidepressants in Poland was estimated on the basis of annuals sale data extracted from the NFZ (Narodowy Fundusz Zdrowia-National Health Service) base of reimbursed pharmaceuticals(1). Predicted environmental concentration (PEC) of target pharmaceuticals were compared with their measured concentration (MEC). Moreover, the application of the EMEA/CHMP guideline for environmental risk assessment of the antidepressants was discussed. The highest concentration of antidepressants was observed in the small river Utrata. In tap water only trace amounts of antidepressants including citalopram (up to 1.5ng/l), mianserin (up to 0.9ng/l), sertraline (<3.1ng/l), moclobemid (up to 0.3ng/l) and venlafaxine (up to 1.9ng/l) were detected. However this highlights their inadequate elimination in the drinking waste treatment facility. The presence of antidepressants in drinking water and the aquatic environment could have long-term effects even at low exposure level

  15. Intervention effects for students with comorbid forms of learning disability: understanding the needs of nonresponders.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Lynn S; Fuchs, Douglas; Compton, Donald L

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we considered evidence from our intervention research programs on whether students with learning disability (LD) in reading and mathematics (comorbid LD) respond differently to intervention, compared to students with reading LD alone (RD) or to students with mathematics LD alone (MD). The goal was to gain insight into whether comorbid disorder represents an LD subtype distinct from RD or from MD, which requires differentiated forms of intervention. Our analysis suggested that students with comorbid LD respond differently than those with MD, depending on the nature of mathematics intervention, and may therefore represent a distinctive subtype. By contrast, students with RD appear to respond to intervention in similar ways, regardless of whether they experience RD alone or in combination with MD. Results also suggest that distinctions between comorbid and single-order LD may depend on whether LD is defined in terms of lower- versus higher-order academic skill. Recommendations for future study are provided. PMID:23232441

  16. Intervention Effects for Students With Comorbid Forms of Learning Disability: Understanding the Needs of Nonresponders

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Fuchs, Douglas; Compton, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we considered evidence from our intervention research programs on whether students with learning disability (LD) in reading and mathematics (comorbid LD) respond differently to intervention, compared to students with reading LD alone (RD) or to students with mathematics LD alone (MD). The goal was to gain insight into whether comorbid disorder represents an LD subtype distinct from RD or from MD, which requires differentiated forms of intervention. Our analysis suggested that students with comorbid LD respond differently than those with MD, depending on the nature of mathematics intervention, and may therefore represent a distinctive subtype. By contrast, students with RD appear to respond to intervention in similar ways, regardless of whether they experience RD alone or in combination with MD. Results also suggest that distinctions between comorbid and single-order LD may depend on whether LD is defined in terms of lower- versus higher-order academic skill. Recommendations for future study are provided. PMID:23232441

  17. Comparison of antidepressant effects of azafan, tianeptine, and paroxetine.

    PubMed

    Aleeva, G N; Molodavkin, G M; Voronina, T A

    2009-07-01

    Antidepressant activity of Russian product Azafen (pipofezine) and foreign products Paroxetine and Tianepine was compared using behavioral despair test (Porsolt test) and forced swimming test in a container with wheels (Nomura). Azafen significantly shortened the duration of depressive state in both tests. The results suggest that Azafen exhibits pronounced antidepressant activity, superior to that of the reference drugs.

  18. Challenges of withdrawal from chronic antidepressant medication: a healing odyssey.

    PubMed

    Whedon, James M; Rugo, Nancy A; Lux, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a woman with posttraumatic stress disorder secondary to childhood sexual assault who attempted withdrawal from long-term use of antidepressant medication and experimented with a plethora of different therapies. The complex case history illustrates the potential difficulty of withdrawal from chronic antidepressant medication and the role of integrative therapies for posttraumatic stress disorder. PMID:23452714

  19. Electroanalytical study of the antidepressant sertraline.

    PubMed

    Nouws, Henri P A; Delerue-Matos, Cristina; Barros, Aquiles A; Rodrigues, José A

    2005-09-01

    A flow injection square wave cathodic stripping voltammetric method has been developed for the determination of sertraline in a pharmaceutical preparation. The method shows linearity between peak current intensity and sertraline concentration for the interval between 0.20 x 10(-6) and 1.20 x 10(-6) mol L(-1). Limits of detection and quantification were found to be 1.5 x 10(-7) and 5.0 x 10 (-7) mol L(-1), respectively. Up to 70 samples per hour can be analysed with a good precision (R.S.D. = 2.5%). The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of sertraline in a commercial product. In the voltammetric determination of sertraline in flow, a high sample rate is obtained at reduced costs, opening the possibility to compete with the chromatographic methods generally used for this analysis.

  20. Antidepressant-like Effect of Insulin in Streptozotocin-induced Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Rats.

    PubMed

    Sestile, Caio C; Maraschin, Jhonatan C; Rangel, Marcel P; Cuman, Roberto K N; Audi, Elisabeth A

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the antidepressant-like effect of insulin compared to sertraline and a combination of insulin and sertraline in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rats submitted to the forced swim test (FST). Male Wistar rats were daily treated for 21 days with insulin (1 or 2 IU/kg, i.p.), with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), sertraline (10 mg/kg, i.p.), or with a combination of insulin (1 or 2 IU/kg, i.p.) and sertraline (10 mg/kg, i.p.) and submitted to the FST. We also evaluated the water and food intake, urine volume and weight gain of the rats. Rats treated with STZ showed impaired glucose tolerance. Chronic treatment with sertraline showed an antidepressant-like effect in non-diabetic and diabetic rats. Furthermore, sertraline promoted lower weight gain in diabetic rats. Insulin reduced the immobility behaviour in T2DM rats with impaired glucose tolerance. In conclusion, our results showed that insulin has an antidepressant-like effect comparable to that of sertraline. Sertraline is effective as an antidepressant and reduces weight gain, which reinforces its superiority over other SSRIs in the treatment of major depression disorder in patients with T2DM.

  1. Neural Plasticity and Proliferation in the Generation of Antidepressant Effects: Hippocampal Implication

    PubMed Central

    Pilar-Cuéllar, Fuencisla; Vidal, Rebeca; Díaz, Alvaro; Castro, Elena; dos Anjos, Severiano; Pascual-Brazo, Jesús; Linge, Raquel; Vargas, Veronica; Blanco, Helena; Martínez-Villayandre, Beatriz; Pazos, Ángel; Valdizán, Elsa M.

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that changes underlying depression and antidepressant-like effects involve not only alterations in the levels of neurotransmitters as monoamines and their receptors in the brain, but also structural and functional changes far beyond. During the last two decades, emerging theories are providing new explanations about the neurobiology of depression and the mechanism of action of antidepressant strategies based on cellular changes at the CNS level. The neurotrophic/plasticity hypothesis of depression, proposed more than a decade ago, is now supported by multiple basic and clinical studies focused on the role of intracellular-signalling cascades that govern neural proliferation and plasticity. Herein, we review the state-of-the-art of the changes in these signalling pathways which appear to underlie both depressive disorders and antidepressant actions. We will especially focus on the hippocampal cellularity and plasticity modulation by serotonin, trophic factors as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) through intracellular signalling pathways—cAMP, Wnt/β-catenin, and mTOR. Connecting the classic monoaminergic hypothesis with proliferation/neuroplasticity-related evidence is an appealing and comprehensive attempt for improving our knowledge about the neurobiological events leading to depression and associated to antidepressant therapies. PMID:23862076

  2. Tianeptine: a novel atypical antidepressant that may provide new insights into the biomolecular basis of depression.

    PubMed

    Brink, Christiaan B; Harvey, Brian H; Brand, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Tianeptine, an atypical antidepressant patented and developed by Servier, enhances the synaptic reuptake of serotonin, without affecting norepinephrine and dopamine uptake, while it lacks affinity for neurotransmitter receptors. This mechanism for an antidepressant is apparently paradoxical, since the currently employed antidepressants enhance serotonin by inhibiting its breakdown or by inhibiting monoaminergic reuptake. Although tianeptine has been shown to reduce central 5HT availability and to indirecty modulate central adrenergic and dopaminergic systems and to indirectly inhibit cholinergic hyperactivity, its antidepressant action is believed to be more directly related to central neuronal remodeling and restoration of neuronal plasticity. In reliable animal models of depression tianeptine has been shown to prevent neurodegeneration and decreases in hippocampal volume in response to chronic stress. These effects on neuroplasticity are suspected to involve the normalization of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and modulatory effects on excitatory amino acids and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Together with a body of related studies, these data provide further support for the hypothesis that depression may involve dysregulation of pathways controlling cellular resilience and that treatment should be directed towards the reversal thereof. Importantly, tianeptine is not anxiogenic and has also been shown to be effective in treatment-resistant depression, which may lead the way to a major breakthrough in the treatment of depression.

  3. Antioxidant and antidepressant-like activities of semi-synthetic α-phenylseleno citronellal.

    PubMed

    Victoria, Francine Novack; Anversa, Roberta; Penteado, Filipe; Castro, Micheli; Lenardão, Eder João; Savegnago, Lucielli

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the antioxidant and antidepressant-like activities of the semi-synthetic compound α-phenylseleno citronellal (PhSeCIT) and the natural terpenoid R-citronellal (CIT) were evaluated. The biological potential of PhSeCIT and CIT was evaluated by antioxidant in vitro assays, such as 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS), ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and linoleic acid oxidation. The compounds were also assessed by ex vivo tests to determine the acute toxicity, levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS), δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (δ-Ala-D) and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activities. The antidepressant-like activity of compounds in the tail suspension test (TST) and forced swimming test (FST) was also investigated. The results demonstrated that the addition of an organoselenium group to (R)-citronellal increased its antioxidant properties, since PhSeCIT showed better activity than CIT. The treatment of mice with both compounds did not cause death of any animals. The levels of TBARS were significantly reduced by PhSeCIT in liver and cortex of animals, whereas CIT did not alter these parameters. In the TST and FST, PhSeCIT showed promising antidepressant-like activity, while CIT was not active in this test. Taken together, these data demonstrate the role of selenium in the antioxidant and antidepressant-like activities of (R)-citronellal.

  4. The antidepressant activity of inositol in the forced swim test involves 5-HT(2) receptors.

    PubMed

    Einat, H; Clenet, F; Shaldubina, A; Belmaker, R H; Bourin, M

    2001-01-01

    The effect of inositol as an antidepressant was previously demonstrated in both animal models of depression-like behavior and in clinical trials. Unlike most antidepressant drugs, inositol does not have a clear target in the synapse and was not demonstrated to alter monoamine levels in the brain. The present study attempted to draw a psychopharmacological profile of inositol's behavioral effects by exploring the interactions between the drug and specific receptor agonists and antagonists in the forced swim test. Rats received inositol treatment (or control) in combination with the serotonergic metabolism inhibitor PCPA or with the noradrenergic neurotoxin DSP-4. Results indicated that PCPA but not DSP-4 abolished the ability of inositol to cause a reduction in immobility time in the forced swim test. In mice, the specific 5-HT(2A)/5-HT(2C) antagonist ritanserin, but not the 5-HT(1A)/5-HT(1B)/beta adrenergic antagonist pindolol, abolished inositol's effect in the forced swim test. The 5-HT(2A)/5-HT(2C) agonist DOI and the 5-HT(1A) agonist 8-OH-DPAT did not have any significant effects on inositol's activity. The present data indicates that the antidepressant effect of inositol may involve 5-HT(2) receptors. It is thus possible that the effects of reuptake antidepressant drugs and the effects of inositol may have a common final pathway.

  5. N,N-dimethylglycine differentially modulates psychotomimetic and antidepressant-like effects of ketamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Cheng; Chan, Ming-Huan; Lee, Mei-Yi; Chen, Yi-Chyan; Chen, Hwei-Hsien

    2016-11-01

    Ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic, produces rapid and sustained antidepressant effects at subanesthtic doses. However, it still inevitably induces psychotomimetic side effects. N,N-dimethylglycine (DMG) is a derivative of the amino acid glycine and is used as a dietary supplement. Recently, DMG has been found acting at glycine binding site of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). As blockade of NMDARs is one of the main mechanisms responsible for the action of ketamine on central nervous system, DMG might modulate the behavioral responses to ketamine. The present study determined the effects of DMG on the ketamine-induced psychotomimetic, anesthetic and antidepressant-like effects in mice. DMG pretreatment reversed the ketamine-induced locomotor hyperactivity and impairment in the rotarod performance, novel location and novel object recognition tests, and prepulse inhibition. In addition, DMG alone exhibited antidepressant-like effects in the forced swim test and produced additive effects when combined with ketamine. However, DMG did not affect ketamine-induced anesthesia. These results reveal that DMG could antagonize ketamine's psychotomimetic effects, yet produce additive antidepressant-like effects with ketamine, suggesting that DMG might have antipsychotic potential and be suitable as an add-on therapy to ketamine for patients with treatment-resistant depression. PMID:27296677

  6. Adaptation of a Motivational Interviewing Intervention to Improve Antidepressant Adherence among Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Interian, Alejandro; Martinez, Igda; Rios, Lisbeth Iglesias; Krejci, Jonathan; Guarnaccia, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Poor antidepressant adherence is a significant issue in depression treatment that adversely affects treatment outcomes. While being a common problem, it tends to be more common among Latinos. To address this problem, the current study adapted a Motivational Interviewing (MI) intervention to improve adherence among Latinos with depression. The adaptation process included six focus groups that elicited participants’ perspectives (N = 30), applying the intervention with test cases (N = 7) to fine tune the intervention, and eliciting feedback on the intervention (N = 5). The findings generated from these adaptation phases are described, along with a case example. Examples of adaptations to the MI included reframing antidepressant adherence as a way to luchar (struggle) against problems, focusing on motivation for improving depression and not just medication, refining methods for imparting antidepressant information, and inclusion of personalized visual feedback on dose-taking. The findings provide a description of the antidepressant issues experienced by a group of Latinos, as well as considerations for applying MI with this population. The intervention remained grounded in MI principles, but was contextualized for this Latino group. PMID:20438160

  7. Adaptation of a motivational interviewing intervention to improve antidepressant adherence among Latinos.

    PubMed

    Interian, Alejandro; Martinez, Igda; Rios, Lisbeth Iglesias; Krejci, Jonathan; Guarnaccia, Peter J

    2010-04-01

    Poor antidepressant adherence is a significant issue in depression treatment that adversely affects treatment outcomes. Although being a common problem, it tends to be more common among Latinos. To address this problem, the current study adapted a Motivational Interviewing (MI) intervention to improve adherence among Latinos with depression. The adaptation process included six focus groups that elicited participants' perspectives (N = 30), applying the intervention with test cases (N = 7) to fine-tune the intervention, and eliciting feedback on the intervention (N = 5). The findings generated from these adaptation phases are described, along with a case example. Examples of adaptations to the MI included reframing antidepressant adherence as a way to luchar (struggle) against problems, focusing on motivation for improving depression and not just medication, refining methods for imparting antidepressant information, and inclusion of personalized visual feedback on dose-taking. The findings provide a description of the antidepressant issues experienced by a group of Latinos, as well as considerations for applying MI with this population. The intervention remained grounded in MI principles, but was contextualized for this Latino group.

  8. Brain ischemia changes the long term response to antidepressant drugs in mice.

    PubMed

    Deplanque, Dominique; Venna, Venugopal Reddy; Bordet, Régis

    2011-06-01

    Depression is a frequent but often unrecognized and under treated complication of stroke that has scarcely been investigated in animal models particularly regarding treatment issues. Using the Forced Swim Test (FST) and testing spontaneous motor activity, we studied whether a transient focal cerebral ischemia modifies mice behaviours and antidepressant drug effects. We first evaluated whether FST realized 2 days or 1 week after brain reperfusion may be routinely used in male Swiss mice previously submitted to a 15, 30 or 60-min transient occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery. We then evaluated behavioural changes up to 5 weeks in mice previously submitted to a 15-min ischemia. Behaviours according to the administration of imipramine or fluvoxamine at 1 and 5 weeks after a 15-min ischemia were finally evaluated. Transient ischemia was associated with a decrease in immobility in the FST performed 2 days after reperfusion while no changes were observed in 1 and 5 weeks post-ischemia groups. Changes were related neither to brain ischemia duration nor to infarct volume. At both 1 and 5 weeks after brain ischemia, a dramatic decrease in the antidepressant response to imipramine related to a decrease in climbing behaviour was observed while the effects of fluvoxamine were improved through an increase in both climbing and swimming. Behaviours in the FST were unrelated to any spontaneous motor activity changes. Responses to anti-depressant drugs are strongly modified in mice previously submitted to brain ischemia. Present results underline that not all antidepressant drugs are appropriate after ischemic stroke.

  9. Evidences for the agmatine involvement in antidepressant like effect of bupropion in mouse forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Kotagale, Nandkishor R; Tripathi, Sunil J; Aglawe, Manish M; Chopde, Chandrabhan T; Umekar, Milind J; Taksande, Brijesh G

    2013-06-01

    Although bupropion has been widely used in the treatment of depression, the precise mechanism of its therapeutic actions is not fully understood. The present study investigated the role of agmatine in an antidepressant like effect of bupropion in mouse forced swim test. The antidepressant like effect of bupropion was potentiated by pretreatment with agmatine (10-20mg/kg, ip) and by the drugs known to increase endogenous agmatine levels in brain viz., l-arginine (40 μg/mouse, icv), an agmatine biosynthetic precursor, ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor, dl-α-difluoromethyl ornithine hydrochloride, DFMO (12.5 μg/mouse, icv), diamine oxidase inhibitor, aminoguanidine (6.5 μg/mouse, icv) and agmatinase inhibitor, arcaine (50 μg/mouse, icv) as well as imidazoline I1 receptor agonists, moxonidine (0.25mg/kg, ip) and clonidine (0.015 mg/kg, ip) and imidazoline I2 receptor agonist, 2-(2-benzofuranyl)-2-imidazoline hydrochloride, 2-BFI (5mg/kg, ip). Conversely, prior administration of I1 receptor antagonist, efaroxan (1mg/kg, ip) and I2 receptor antagonist, idazoxan (0.25mg/kg, ip) blocked the antidepressant like effect of bupropion and its synergistic combination with agmatine. These results demonstrate involvement of agmatine in the antidepressant like effect of bupropion and suggest agmatine and imidazoline receptors as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of depressive disorders.

  10. Therapeutic monitoring of treatment with antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M S; Kergueris, M F; Lapierre, Y D

    1989-09-01

    The present status of the relationship between blood plasma concentrations of tricyclic antidepressants and clinical outcome is reviewed. Plasma levels of imipramine, desmethylimipramine and nortriptyline are generally accepted as useful clinically but it is more difficult to establish a well-defined relationship between clomipramine and amitriptyline blood levels and clinical outcome. These assays are clinically relevant, particularly in cases of treatment failure, but also in the treatment of the elderly and of overdosage. The technical problems of the assay have practically been solved with the development of new analytic methods.

  11. Epigenetic alterations in depression and antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Menke, Andreas; Binder, Elisabeth B

    2014-09-01

    Epigenetic modifications control chromatin structure and function, and thus mediate changes in gene expression, ultimately influencing protein levels. Recent research indicates that environmental events can induce epigenetic changes and, by this, contribute to long-term changes in neural circuits and endocrine systems associated with altered risk for stress-related psychiatric disorders such as major depression. In this review, we describe recent approaches investigating epigenetic modifications associated with altered risk for major depression or response to antidepressant drugs, both on the candidate gene levels as well as the genome-wide level. In this review we focus on DNA methylation, as this is the most investigated epigenetic change in depression research.

  12. Emerging antidepressants to treat major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Block, Samantha G; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2014-12-01

    Depression is a common disorder with an annual risk of a depressive episode in the United States of 6.6%. Only 30-40% of patients remit with antidepressant monotherapy, leaving 60-70% of patients who do not optimally respond to therapy. Unremitted depressive patients are at increased risk for suicide. Considering the prevalence of treatment resistant depression and its consequences, treatment optimization is imperative. This review summarizes the latest treatment modalities for major depressive disorder including pharmacotherapy, electroconvulsive therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and psychotherapy. Through advancements in research to better understand the pathophysiology of depression, advances in treatment will be realized.

  13. Aquatic blues: modeling depression and antidepressant action in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Michael; Stewart, Adam Michael; Kalueff, Allan V

    2014-12-01

    Depression is a serious psychiatric condition affecting millions of patients worldwide. Unipolar depression is characterized by low mood, anhedonia, social withdrawal and other severely debilitating psychiatric symptoms. Bipolar disorder manifests in alternating depressed mood and 'hyperactive' manic/hypomanic states. Animal experimental models are an invaluable tool for research into the pathogenesis of bipolar/unipolar depression, and for the development of potential treatments. Due to their high throughput value, genetic tractability, low cost and quick reproductive cycle, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have emerged as a promising new model species for studying brain disorders. Here, we discuss the developing utility of zebrafish for studying depression disorders, and outline future areas of research in this field. We argue that zebrafish represent a useful model organism for studying depression and its behavioral, genetic and physiological mechanisms, as well as for anti-depressant drug discovery.

  14. The failure of nonresponder mice to develop IgG memory assessed by in vitro culture with an antigen-LPS conjugate.

    PubMed

    Furman, A; Sercarz, E E

    1981-06-01

    A hen egg-white lysozyme-lipopolysaccharide complex (HEL-LPS) can stimulate an in vitro IgG response, but only from HEL-primed B lymphocytes; unprimed cells only produce an IgM response. These conditions were used to determine whether IgG memory B cells are cryptically induced in B10 nonresponder (H-2b) mice after an HEL injection protocol. The usual i.p. immunization that triggers IgG memory production in congenic responder strain mice fails to yield IgG in vitro from HEL-primed B10 spleen cells after stimulation with HEL-LPS. However, injection protocols immunogenic for B10 mice do engender IgG-memory cells. These results imply that the T helper cell population necessary for triggering B cells to the IgG memory stage cannot develop in the nonresponder mouse, presumably due to HEL-specific T suppressor cells.

  15. Postsynaptic serotonergic blockade following chronic antidepressive treatment with trazodone in an animal model of depression.

    PubMed

    Hingtgen, J N; Hendrie, H C; Aprison, M H

    1984-03-01

    Acute pretreatment with clinically equivalent doses of antidepressive drugs has been observed to block D,L-5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) induced behavioral depression in rats working on a food-reinforced operant schedule. Data from studies designed to distinguish presynaptic from postsynaptic events, indicated that the antidepressants were acting in part as blockers of postsynaptic serotonergic receptors. Using the same 5-HTP model of depression, we studied both the chronic and acute effects of a recently introduced antidepressant, triazolopyridine compound. Rats working for milk reinforcement and exhibiting behavioral depression following administration of 50 mg/kg 5-HTP were pretreated (one hr before 5-HTP) with 1, 2, or 4 mg/kg trazodone with resulting blockade of 5-HTP induced depression of 35, 62 and 70% respectively. Chronic administration of trazodone (2 mg/kg trazodone/day) also resulted in a significant blockade of the 5-HTP effect (75%). Neither 2 mg/kg or 4 mg/kg trazodone was found to potentiate the shorter period of depression following 25 mg/kg 5-HTP. Chronic treatment with the antidepressant drugs, amitriptyline or mianserin also blocked 5-HTP depression. Thus, as in our earlier studies, these data suggest an important postsynaptic mechanism associated with chronic administration of trazodone, amitriptyline and mianserin which could be implicated in the therapeutic effectiveness of these drugs. The potency of trazodone in relation to other antidepressant drugs in our behavioral model of depression paralleled their potency in displacing radioligand binding to 5-HT receptors, and gives additional support for the new hypersensitive postsynaptic serotonin receptor theory of depression.

  16. The Prefrontal Dectin-1/AMPA Receptor Signaling Pathway Mediates The Robust and Prolonged Antidepressant Effect of Proteo-β-Glucan from Maitake

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Hongkun; Ran, Pengzhan; Zhu, Ming; Sun, Lijuan; Li, Bai; Hou, Yangyang; Nie, Jun; Shan, Liping; Li, Hongliang; Zheng, Shangyong; Xu, Xiufeng; Xiao, Chunjie; Du, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Proteo-β-glucan from Maitake (PGM) is a strong immune regulator, and its receptor is called Dectin-1. Cumulative evidence suggests that AMPA receptors are important for the treatment of depression. Here, we report that PGM treatment leads to a significant antidepressant effect in the tail suspension test and forced swim test after sixty minutes of treatment in mice. After five consecutive days of PGM treatment, this antidepressant effect remained. PGM treatment did not show a hyperactive effect in the open field test. PGM significantly enhanced the expression of its receptor Dectin-1, as well as p-GluA1(S845) and GluA1, but not GluA2 or GluA3 in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) after five days of treatment. The Dectin-1 inhibitor Laminarin was able to block the antidepressant effect of PGM. At the synapses of PFC, PGM treatment significantly up-regulated the p-GluA1(S845), GluA1, GluA2, and GluA3 levels. Moreover, PGM’s antidepressant effects and the increase of p-GluA1(S845)/GluA1 lasted for 3 days after stopping treatment. The AMPA-specific antagonist GYKI 52466 was able to block the antidepressant effect of PGM. This study identified PGM as a novel antidepressant with clinical potential and a new antidepressant mechanism for regulating prefrontal Dectin-1/AMPA receptor signalling. PMID:27329257

  17. Discontinuation of Antidepressant Medication Among Latinos in the US

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkin, Dominic; Volpe-Vartanian, Joanna; Alegría, Margarita

    2009-01-01

    Despite recent growth in the variety of antidepressant medications available, many patients discontinue medication prematurely, for reasons such as nonresponse, side effects, stigma and miscommunication. Some analysts have suggested that Latinos may have higher antidepressant discontinuation rates than other US residents. This paper examines Latino antidepressant discontinuation, using data from a national probability survey of Latinos in the US. In this sample, 8% of Latinos had taken an antidepressant in the preceding 12 months. Among those users, 33.3% had discontinued taking antidepressants at the time of interview, and 18.9% had done so without prior input from their physician. Even controlling for clinical and other variables, patients who reported good or excellent English proficiency were less likely to stop at all. Patients were also less likely to stop if they were older, married, had public or private insurance, or had made eight or more visits to a nonmedical therapist. PMID:17570068

  18. A barbital derivative as an atypical antidepressant drug in mice.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Menez, J F; Colombel, M C; Larousse, C

    1987-05-01

    An isopropyl derivative of barbital (5,5-diethyl-2-(isopropyloxy)pyrimidine-4,6-dione, O2IB) was administered intraperitoneally 30 min before tests in mice. Former experimental investigations have shown that O2IB has an antidepressant psychopharmacological spectrum. It increases toxicity of yohimbine in mice at 175 mg/kg, antagonises from 50 mg/kg on hypothermia induced by a high dose of apomorphine and is active on the behavioural despair test at 125 mg/kg. These effects are those observed with classical antidepressants. Since phenytoin has an antidepressant profile in mice, carbamazepine is active on manic-depressive illness and beta-mimetic drugs are antidepressants, the question presents itself whether isopropylation or anticonvulsive activity is more important for the antidepressant psychopharmacological spectrum, or whether both are of equal importance.

  19. Antidepressant prescription and suicide rates: effect of age and gender.

    PubMed

    Kalmar, Sandor; Szanto, Katalin; Rihmer, Zoltan; Mazumdar, Sati; Harrison, Katrin; Mann, J John

    2008-08-01

    To determine whether the effect of antidepressant exposure on suicide rate is modified by age and gender in Hungary, annual antidepressant prescription rates and suicide rates of about 10 million inhabitants between 1999-2005 were analyzed by age and gender groups. The suicide rate was inversely related to the increased use of antidepressants in both genders. The strongest association was found in the oldest age groups, where the increase in antidepressant use was highest, while there was no association in the under 20 or 50-69 age groups in either gender. Antidepressant prescription rate was related to suicide rate after controlling for divorce rate or unemployment rate, but not after controlling for alcohol consumption rate.

  20. Serotonergic antidepressants decrease hedonic signals but leave learning signals in the nucleus accumbens unaffected.

    PubMed

    Graf, Heiko; Metzger, Coraline D; Walter, Martin; Abler, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the effects of serotonergic antidepressants on neural correlates of visual erotic stimulation revealed decreased reactivity within the dopaminergic reward network along with decreased subjective sexual functioning compared with placebo. However, a global dampening of the reward system under serotonergic drugs is not intuitive considering clinical observations of their beneficial effects in the treatment of depression. Particularly, learning signals as coded in prediction error processing within the dopaminergic reward system can be assumed to be rather enhanced as antidepressant drugs have been demonstrated to facilitate the efficacy of psychotherapeutic interventions relying on learning processes. Within the same study sample, we now explored the effects of serotonergic and dopaminergic/noradrenergic antidepressants on prediction error signals compared with placebo by functional MRI. A total of 17 healthy male participants (mean age: 25.4 years) were investigated under the administration of paroxetine, bupropion and placebo for 7 days each within a randomized, double-blind, within-subject cross-over design. During functional MRI, we used an established monetary incentive task to explore neural prediction error signals within the bilateral nucleus accumbens as region of interest within the dopaminergic reward system. In contrast to diminished neural activations and subjective sexual functioning under the serotonergic agent paroxetine under visual erotic stimulation, we revealed unaffected or even enhanced neural prediction error processing within the nucleus accumbens under this antidepressant along with unaffected behavioural processing. Our study provides evidence that serotonergic antidepressants facilitate prediction error signalling and may support suggestions of beneficial effects of these agents on reinforced learning as an essential element in behavioural psychotherapy. PMID:26555033

  1. The Prevalence and Characteristics of REM Sleep without Atonia (RSWA) in Patients Taking Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kenneth; Baron, Kelly; Soca, Rodolfo; Attarian, Hrayr

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The association of REM sleep without atonia (RSWA) as well as REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) with the intake of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI) is well established. Our study objective was to determine the prevalence of RSWA and RBD among a group of sleep center patients taking SSRI and SNRI. Methods: A retrospective chart review was done at our tertiary sleep center, and 10,746 consecutive records from October 1, 2007, through October 31, 2013, were searched for SSRI and SNRI names using the Sleep Cataloguer Software. Results: The search resulted in 1,444 records, which were then reviewed for keywords of RSWA and RBD. The AASM scoring criteria were used to determine RSWA. Reports of 41 patients with known narcolepsy or α-synucleinopathies were excluded. The remaining records were mined for age, sex, presence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), type of antidepressant (SSRI or SNRI), and diagnosis for which antidepressant was prescribed. We used logistic regression analysis to adjust for age, OSA, and sex. Of the 1,444 participants on antidepressants, 176 (12.2%) had RSWA (all confirmed by the investigators) compared to 226 of the entire sleep lab population of 10,746 (2.1%), risk ratio (95% CI) 9.978 (8.149, 12.22). Seven of the 176 patients on antidepressants had RBD (0.48%) compared to 108 of 10,746 (1%), p = 0.005. Conclusions: SSRI and SNRI are associated with a higher prevalence of RSWA but not of RBD. This is independent of medication type. Citation: Lee K, Baron K, Soca R, Attarian H. The prevalence and characteristics of rem sleep without atonia (RSWA) in patients taking antidepressants. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(3):351–355. PMID:26446247

  2. κ-opioid receptors are not necessary for the antidepressant treatment of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Megat, Salim; Bohren, Yohann; Doridot, Stephane; Gaveriaux-Ruff, Claire; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José; Yalcin, Ipek; Barrot, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Tricyclic antidepressants are used clinically as first-line treatments for neuropathic pain. Opioid receptors participate in this pain-relieving action, and preclinical studies in receptor-deficient mice have highlighted a critical role for δ-, but not μ-opioid receptors. In this study, we investigated whether κ-opioid (KOP) receptors have a role in the antiallodynic action of tricyclic antidepressants. Experimental Approach We used a model of neuropathic pain induced by unilateral sciatic nerve cuffing. In this model, the mechanical allodynia was evaluated using von Frey filaments. Experiments were conducted in C57BL/6J mice, and in KOP receptor-deficient mice and their wild-type littermates. The tricyclic antidepressant nortriptyline (5 mg·kg−1) was delivered twice a day for over 2 weeks. Agonists and antagonists of opioid receptors were used to test the selectivity of the KOP receptor antagonist norbinaltorphimine (nor-BNI) in mice with neuropathic pain. Key Results After 12 days of treatment, nortriptyline relieved neuropathic allodynia in both wild-type and KOP receptor-deficient mice. Surprisingly, acute nor-BNI reversed the effect of nortriptyline in both wild-type and KOP receptor-deficient mice. Further experiments showed that nor-BNI action was selective for KOP receptors at a late time-point after its administration (8 h), but not at an early time-point, when it may also interact with δ-opioid (DOP) receptors. Conclusions and Implications KOP receptors are not necessary for the effect of a tricyclic antidepressant against neuropathic allodynia. These findings together with previous data indicate that the DOP receptor is the only opioid receptor that is necessary for the antiallodynic action of antidepressants. PMID:25297905

  3. The Influence of Clinical and Biological Factors on Transfusion-Associated Non-ABO Antigen Alloimmunization: Responders, Hyper-Responders, and Non-Responders.

    PubMed

    Gehrie, Eric A; Tormey, Christopher A

    2014-11-01

    In the context of transfusion medicine, alloimmunization most often refers to the development of antibodies to non-ABO red blood cell (RBC) antigens following pregnancy, transfusion, or transplantation. The development of RBC alloantibodies can have important clinical consequences, particularly in patients who require chronic transfusions. It has been suggested that alloimmunization is more common in some clinical circumstances and patient populations than in others. As such, individuals that develop alloantibodies are frequently referred to as 'responders' in the medical literature. In contrast, individuals that do not develop alloantibodies despite repeated exposures to non-self blood group antigens have been referred to as 'non-responders'. The purpose of this article is to review the phenomenon of RBC alloimmunization in the context of responders and non-responders to: i) establish a basic framework for alloimmunization as reported across several diverse patient populations; ii) more fully explore literature reports which support the concept of responders/non-responders regarding blood group antigen alloimmunization; iii) summarize the mechanisms that have been shown to predispose an individual to alloimmunization to determine how these factors may differentiate 'responders' from 'non-responders'; and iv) briefly discuss some practical approaches to prevent alloimmunization in patients who may be prone to alloantibody development.

  4. Comparative efficacy and tolerability of first-generation and newer-generation antidepressant medications for depressive disorders in children and adolescents: study protocol for a systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xinyu; Qin, Bin; Whittington, Craig; Cohen, David; Liu, Yiyun; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Michael, Kurt D; Zhang, Yuqing; Xie, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Depressive disorders are among the most common psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents, and have adverse effects on their psychosocial functioning. Questions concerning the efficacy and safety of antidepressant medications in the treatment of depression in children and adolescents, led us to integrate the direct and indirect evidence using network meta-analysis to create hierarchies of these drugs. Methods and analysis Seven databases with PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CINAHL, LiLACS and PsycINFO will be searched from 1966 to December 2013 (updated to May, 2015). There are no restrictions on language or type of publication. Randomised clinical trials assessing first-generation and newer-generation antidepressant medications against active comparator or placebo as acute treatment for depressive disorders in children and adolescents (under 18 years of age) will be included. The primary outcome for efficacy will be mean improvement in depressive symptoms, as measured by the mean change score of a depression rating scale from baseline to post-treatment. The tolerability of treatment will be defined as side effect discontinuation, as defined by the proportion of patients who discontinued treatment due to adverse events during the trial. We will also assess the secondary outcome for efficacy (response rate), acceptability (all-cause discontinuation) and suicide-related outcomes. We will perform the Bayesian network meta-analyses for all relative outcome measures. Subgroup analyses and sensitivity analyses will be conducted to assess the robustness of the findings. Dissemination The network meta-analysis will provide useful information on antidepressant treatment for child and adolescent depression. The results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publication or conference presentations. Trial registration number PROSPERO CRD42015016023. PMID:26353868

  5. Characterising the immune profile of the kidney biopsy at lupus nephritis flare differentiates early treatment responders from non-responders

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Samir V; Malvar, Ana; Song, Huijuan; Alberton, Valeria; Lococo, Bruno; Vance, Jay; Zhang, Jianying; Yu, Lianbo; Rovin, Brad H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The kidney biopsy is used to diagnose and guide initial therapy in patients with lupus nephritis (LN). Kidney histology does not correlate well with clinical measurements of kidney injury or predict how patients will respond to standard-of-care immunosuppression. We postulated that the gene expression profile of kidney tissue at the time of biopsy may differentiate patients who will from those who will not respond to treatment. Methods The expression of 511 immune-response genes was measured in kidney biopsies from 19 patients with proliferative LN and 4 normal controls. RNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded kidney biopsies done at flare. After induction therapy, 5 patients achieved a complete clinical response (CR), 10 had a partial response (PR) and 4 patients were non-responders (NRs). Transcript expression was compared with normal controls and between renal response groups. Results A principal component analysis showed that intrarenal transcript expression from normal kidney, CR biopsies and NR biopsies segregated from each other. The top genes responsible for CR clustering included several interferon pathway genes (STAT1, IRF1, IRF7, MX1, STAT2, JAK2), while complement genes (C1R, C1QB, C6, C9, C5, MASP2) were mainly responsible for NR clustering. Overall, 35 genes were uniquely expressed in NR compared with CR. Pathway analysis revealed that interferon signalling and complement activation pathways were upregulated in both groups, while BAFF, APRIL, nuclear factor-κB and interleukin-6 signalling were increased in CR but suppressed in NR. Conclusions These data suggest that molecular profiling of the kidney biopsy at LN flare may be useful in predicting treatment response to induction therapy. PMID:26629350

  6. Efficacy and Safety of Antidepressants for the Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunfeng; Yu, Ting; Wang, Yun; Jiang, Liuqin; Lin, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this meta-analysis was to analyze the efficacy and safety of antidepressants for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus and The Cochrane Library for randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy and safety of antidepressants in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Article quality was evaluated by Jadad score. RevMan 5.0 and Stata 12.0 were used for the meta-analysis. Results Twelve randomized controlled trials were included in this study and most of these trials were of high quality (Jadad score ≥4). Five articles focused on tricyclic antidepressants, six articles involved selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and one article investigated both types of treatment. The pooled risk ratio showed antidepressant treatment can improve global symptoms (RR = 1.38, 95% CI 1.08, 1.77). In the subgroup analysis, treatment with tricyclic antidepressants showed an improvement in global symptoms (RR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.07, 1.71), while treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors showed no statistically significant difference in global symptoms compared with the control groups (RR = 1.38, 95% CI 0.83, 2.28). The pooled risk ratio of dropout due to side effects following antidepressant treatment was 1.71 with 95% CI (0.98, 2.99). The subgroup analysis showed the pooled risk ratio of dropout in the tricyclic antidepressants group was 1.92 with 95% CI (0.89, 4.17). In the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors group, the pooled risk ratio of dropout was 1.5 with 95% CI (0.67, 3.37). Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors showed no benefit in alleviating abdominal pain and improving quality of life. There was no difference in the incidence of common adverse events between treatment and control groups. Conclusions TCAs can improve global symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, while there was no strong evidence to confirm the effectiveness of SSRIs for the treatment of IBS. PMID:26252008

  7. Facebook enhances antidepressant pharmacotherapy effects.

    PubMed

    Mota Pereira, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (TR-MDD) is a complex condition, with very low remission rates. In recent years some studies have been conducted on the implementation of cognitive behavioral therapy and psychodynamic psychotherapy interventions via the Internet to MDD patients, and results have been promising. However, there have been no studies in patients with TR-MDD nor with the use of Facebook with the psychiatrist as "friend." 60 TR-MDD patients were randomized to one of three groups: Facebook group with psychiatrist as "friend," Facebook group without psychiatrist as "friend," and control group (no Facebook use). Both Facebook groups spent at least 1 hour/day on Facebook, 7 days/week, during the 3 months. All patients maintained their usual pharmacotherapy. All participants were evaluated at baseline and at 1, 2, and 3 months for depressive symptoms using HAD17 and BDI-II. Results show that both Facebook groups had a decrease on HADM17 and BDI-II scores as well as higher remission and response rates than the control group, with better results if the psychiatrist was a "friend" on Facebook. Therefore, in TR-MDD, Facebook can be used as an effective enhancement therapy, adjuvant to pharmacological therapy with regular consultations, especially if the psychiatrist is the patient's online "friend."

  8. Facebook Enhances Antidepressant Pharmacotherapy Effects

    PubMed Central

    Mota Pereira, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (TR-MDD) is a complex condition, with very low remission rates. In recent years some studies have been conducted on the implementation of cognitive behavioral therapy and psychodynamic psychotherapy interventions via the Internet to MDD patients, and results have been promising. However, there have been no studies in patients with TR-MDD nor with the use of Facebook with the psychiatrist as “friend.” 60 TR-MDD patients were randomized to one of three groups: Facebook group with psychiatrist as “friend,” Facebook group without psychiatrist as “friend,” and control group (no Facebook use). Both Facebook groups spent at least 1 hour/day on Facebook, 7 days/week, during the 3 months. All patients maintained their usual pharmacotherapy. All participants were evaluated at baseline and at 1, 2, and 3 months for depressive symptoms using HAD17 and BDI-II. Results show that both Facebook groups had a decrease on HADM17 and BDI-II scores as well as higher remission and response rates than the control group, with better results if the psychiatrist was a “friend” on Facebook. Therefore, in TR-MDD, Facebook can be used as an effective enhancement therapy, adjuvant to pharmacological therapy with regular consultations, especially if the psychiatrist is the patient's online “friend.” PMID:24574930