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Sample records for antiepileptic compound valproic

  1. Current Research on Antiepileptic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Wei, Cheng-Xi; Bian, Ming; Gong, Guo-Hua

    2015-11-20

    Epilepsy affects about 1% of the world's population. Due to the fact all antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have some undesirable side effects and about 30% of epileptic patients are not seizure-free with the existing AEDs, there is still an urgent need for the development of more effective and safer AEDs. Based on our research work on antiepileptic compounds and other references in recent years, this review covers the reported work on antiepileptic compounds which are classified according to their structures. This review summarized 244 significant anticonvulsant compounds which are classified by functional groups according to the animal model data, although there are some limitations in the data. This review highlights the properties of new compounds endowed with promising antiepileptic properties, which may be proven to be more effective and selective, and possibly free of unwanted side effects. The reviewed compounds represent an interesting possibility to overcome refractory seizures and to reduce the percentage of patients with a poor response to drug therapy.

  2. Modulation of Antioxidant Enzymatic Activities by Certain Antiepileptic Drugs (Valproic Acid, Oxcarbazepine, and Topiramate): Evidence in Humans and Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Romero-Toledo, Arantxa; Sampieri, Aristides III; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that at least 100 million people worldwide will suffer from epilepsy at some point in their lives. This neurological disorder induces brain death due to the excessive liberation of glutamate, which activates the postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, which in turn cause the reuptake of intracellular calcium (excitotoxicity). This excitotoxicity elicits a series of events leading to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Several studies in experimental models and in humans have demonstrated that certain antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exhibit antioxidant effects by modulating the activity of various enzymes associated with this type of stress. Considering the above-mentioned data, we aimed to compile evidence elucidating how AEDs such as valproic acid (VPA), oxcarbazepine (OXC), and topiramate (TPM) modulate oxidative stress. PMID:24454986

  3. Modulation of antioxidant enzymatic activities by certain antiepileptic drugs (valproic acid, oxcarbazepine, and topiramate): evidence in humans and experimental models.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Romero-Toledo, Arantxa; Sampieri, Aristides; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that at least 100 million people worldwide will suffer from epilepsy at some point in their lives. This neurological disorder induces brain death due to the excessive liberation of glutamate, which activates the postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, which in turn cause the reuptake of intracellular calcium (excitotoxicity). This excitotoxicity elicits a series of events leading to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Several studies in experimental models and in humans have demonstrated that certain antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exhibit antioxidant effects by modulating the activity of various enzymes associated with this type of stress. Considering the above-mentioned data, we aimed to compile evidence elucidating how AEDs such as valproic acid (VPA), oxcarbazepine (OXC), and topiramate (TPM) modulate oxidative stress.

  4. Valproic Acid Induces Antimicrobial Compound Production in Doratomyces microspores

    PubMed Central

    Zutz, Christoph; Bacher, Markus; Parich, Alexandra; Kluger, Bernhard; Gacek-Matthews, Agnieszka; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Wagner, Martin; Rychli, Kathrin; Strauss, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in public health is the rising number of antibiotic resistant pathogens and the lack of novel antibiotics. In recent years there is a rising focus on fungi as sources of antimicrobial compounds due to their ability to produce a large variety of bioactive compounds and the observation that virtually every fungus may still contain yet unknown so called “cryptic,” often silenced, compounds. These putative metabolites could include novel bioactive compounds. Considerable effort is spent on methods to induce production of these “cryptic” metabolites. One approach is the use of small molecule effectors, potentially influencing chromatin landscape in fungi. We observed that the supernatant of the fungus Doratomyces (D.) microsporus treated with valproic acid (VPA) displayed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and two methicillin resistant clinical S. aureus isolates. VPA treatment resulted in enhanced production of seven antimicrobial compounds: cyclo-(L-proline-L-methionine) (cPM), p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, cyclo-(phenylalanine-proline) (cFP), indole-3-carboxylic acid, phenylacetic acid (PAA) and indole-3-acetic acid. The production of the antimicrobial compound phenyllactic acid was exclusively detectable after VPA treatment. Furthermore three compounds, cPM, cFP, and PAA, were able to boost the antimicrobial activity of other antimicrobial compounds. cPM, for the first time isolated from fungi, and to a lesser extent PAA, are even able to decrease the minimal inhibitory concentration of ampicillin in MRSA strains. In conclusion we could show in this study that VPA treatment is a potent tool for induction of “cryptic” antimicrobial compound production in fungi, and that the induced compounds are not exclusively linked to the secondary metabolism. Furthermore this is the first discovery of the rare diketopiperazine cPM in fungi. Additionally we could demonstrate that cPM and PAA boost antibiotic activity

  5. The effects of antiepileptic drugs on the growth of glioblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ching-Yi; Lai, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Angela; Chan, She-Hung; Hsiao, Ling-Ping; Lee, Shih-Tseng

    2016-05-01

    To determine the effects of antiepileptic drug compounds on glioblastoma cellular growth, we exposed glioblastoma cell lines to select antiepileptic drugs. The effects of selected antiepileptic drugs on glioblastoma cells were measured by MTT assay. For compounds showing significant inhibition, cell cycle analysis was performed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS. The antiepileptic compounds selected for screening included carbamazepine, ethosuximide, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, magnesium sulfate, oxcarbazepine, phenytoin, primidone, tiagabine, topiramate, valproic acid, and vigabatrin. Dexamethasone and temozolomide were used as a negative and positive control respectively. Our results showed temozolomide and oxcarbazepine significantly inhibited glioblastoma cell growth and reached IC50 at therapeutic concentrations. The other antiepileptic drugs screened were unable to reach IC50 at therapeutic concentrations. The metabolites of oxcarbazepine were also unable to reach IC50. Dexamethasone, ethosuximide, levetiracetam, and vigabatrin showed some growth enhancement though they did not reach statistical significance. The growth enhancement effects of ethosuximide, levetiracetam, and vigabatrin found in the study may indicate that these compounds should not be used for prophylaxis or short term treatment of epilepsy in glioblastoma. While valproic acid and oxcarbazepine were effective, the required dose of valproic acid was far above that used for the treatment of epilepsy and the metabolites of oxcarbazepine failed to reach significant growth inhibition ruling out the use of oral oxcarbazepine or valproic acid as monotherapy in glioblastoma. The possibility of using these compounds as local treatment is a future area of study.

  6. Conserved valproic-acid-induced lipid droplet formation in Dictyostelium and human hepatocytes identifies structurally active compounds.

    PubMed

    Elphick, Lucy M; Pawolleck, Nadine; Guschina, Irina A; Chaieb, Leila; Eikel, Daniel; Nau, Heinz; Harwood, John L; Plant, Nick J; Williams, Robin S B

    2012-03-01

    Lipid droplet formation and subsequent steatosis (the abnormal retention of lipids within a cell) has been reported to contribute to hepatotoxicity and is an adverse effect of many pharmacological agents including the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA). In this study, we have developed a simple model system (Dictyostelium discoideum) to investigate the effects of VPA and related compounds in lipid droplet formation. In mammalian hepatocytes, VPA increases lipid droplet accumulation over a 24-hour period, giving rise to liver cell damage, and we show a similar effect in Dictyostelium following 30 minutes of VPA treatment. Using (3)H-labelled polyunsaturated (arachidonic) or saturated (palmitic) fatty acids, we shown that VPA treatment of Dictyostelium gives rise to an increased accumulation of both types of fatty acids in phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and non-polar lipids in this time period, with a similar trend observed in human hepatocytes (Huh7 cells) labelled with [(3)H]arachidonic acid. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of β-oxidation in Dictyostelium phenocopies fatty acid accumulation, in agreement with data reported in mammalian systems. Using Dictyostelium, we then screened a range of VPA-related compounds to identify those with high and low lipid-accumulation potential, and validated these activities for effects on lipid droplet formation by using human hepatocytes. Structure-activity relationships for these VPA-related compounds suggest that lipid accumulation is independent of VPA-catalysed teratogenicity and inositol depletion. These results suggest that Dictyostelium could provide both a novel model system for the analysis of lipid droplet formation in human hepatocytes and a rapid method for identifying VPA-related compounds that show liver toxicology.

  7. Lacosamide-induced valproic acid toxicity.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gina L; Popli, Gautam S; Silvia, Mary T

    2013-04-01

    Valproic acid is commonly used in the treatment of both focal and generalized epilepsies and is often well tolerated. There are many reported cases of hyperammonemic encephalopathy and other well-known side effects reported during use of valproic acid either alone or in combination with other antiepileptics. This case report demonstrates valproic acid toxicity in the presence of lacosamide, which has not previously been reported. Full recovery occurred after withdrawal of both valproic acid and lacosamide.

  8. The antiepileptic drug valproic acid and other medium-chain fatty acids acutely reduce phosphoinositide levels independently of inositol in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pishan; Orabi, Benoit; Deranieh, Rania M; Dham, Manik; Hoeller, Oliver; Shimshoni, Jakob A; Yagen, Boris; Bialer, Meir; Greenberg, Miriam L; Walker, Matthew C; Williams, Robin S B

    2012-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is the most widely prescribed epilepsy treatment worldwide, but its mechanism of action remains unclear. Our previous work identified a previously unknown effect of VPA in reducing phosphoinositide production in the simple model Dictyostelium followed by the transfer of data to a mammalian synaptic release model. In our current study, we show that the reduction in phosphoinositide [PtdInsP (also known as PIP) and PtdInsP(2) (also known as PIP(2))] production caused by VPA is acute and dose dependent, and that this effect occurs independently of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity, inositol recycling and inositol synthesis. In characterising the structural requirements for this effect, we also identify a family of medium-chain fatty acids that show increased efficacy compared with VPA. Within the group of active compounds is a little-studied group previously associated with seizure control, and analysis of two of these compounds (nonanoic acid and 4-methyloctanoic acid) shows around a threefold enhanced potency compared with VPA for protection in an in vitro acute rat seizure model. Together, our data show that VPA and a newly identified group of medium-chain fatty acids reduce phosphoinositide levels independently of inositol regulation, and suggest the reinvestigation of these compounds as treatments for epilepsy.

  9. Antiepileptic Drugs and Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J.; Palacios, Ana M.; George, Timothy M.; Finnell, Richard H.

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of epilepsy in women of reproductive age remains a clinical challenge. While most women with epilepsy require anticonvulsant drugs for adequate control of their seizures, the teratogenicity associated with some antiepileptic drugs is a risk that needs to be carefully addressed. Antiepileptic medications are also used to treat an ever broadening range of medical conditions such as bipolar disorder, migraine prophylaxis, cancer and neuropathic pain. Despite the fact that the majority of pregnancies of women with epilepsy who are receiving pharmacological treatment are normal, studies have demonstrated that the risk of having a pregnancy complicated by a major congenital malformation is doubled when comparing the risk of untreated pregnancies. Furthermore, when antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used in polytherapy regimens, the risk is tripled, especially when valproic acid (VPA) is included. However, it should be noted that the risks are specific for each anticonvulsant drug. Some investigations have suggested that the risk of teratogenicity is increased in a dose-dependent manner. More recent studies have reported that in utero exposure to AEDs can have detrimental effects on the cognitive functions and language skills in later stages of life. In fact, the FDA just issued a safety announcement on the impact of VPA on cognition (Safety Announcement 6-30-2011). The purpose of this document is to review the most commonly used compounds in the treatment of women with epilepsy, and to provide information on the latest experimental and human epidemiological studies of the effects of antiepileptic drugs in the exposed embryos. PMID:22711424

  10. In silico inhibition of GABARAP activity using antiepileptic medicinal derived compounds

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Shilu; Faheem, Muhammad; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L; Kumosani, Taha A; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder affecting more than 50 million people worldwide. It can be controlled by antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) but more than 30% patients are still resistant to AEDs. To overcome this problem, researchers are trying to develop novel approaches to treat epilepsy including the use of herbal medicines. The γ-amino butyric acid type-A receptor associated protein (GABARAP) is ubiquitin-like modifier implicated in the intracellular trafficking of GABAAR. An in silico mutation was created at 116 amino acid position G116A, and an in silico study was carried out to identify the potential binding inhibitors (with antiepileptic properties) against the active sites of GABARAP. Five different plant derived compounds namely (a) Aconitine (b) Berberine (c) Montanine (d) Raubasine (e) Safranal were selected, and their quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) have been conducted to search the inhibitory activity of the selected compounds. The results have shown maximum number of hydrogen bond (H-bond) interactions of Raubasine with highest interaction energy among all of the five compounds. So, Raubasine could be the best fit ligand of GABARAP but in vitro, and in vivo studies are necessary for further confirmation. PMID:26124559

  11. Valproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Valproic acid is used alone or with other medications to treat certain types of seizures. Valproic acid is also used to treat mania (episodes of ... to relieve headaches that have already begun. Valproic acid is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. ...

  12. Teratogenicity of Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Güveli, Betül Tekin; Rosti, Rasim Özgür; Güzeltaş, Alper; Tuna, Elif Bahar; Ataklı, Dilek; Sencer, Serra; Yekeler, Ensar; Kayserili, Hülya; Dirican, Ahmet; Bebek, Nerses; Baykan, Betül; Gökyiğit, Ayşen; Gürses, Candan

    2017-01-01

    Objective Antiepileptic drugs (AED) have chronic teratogenic effects, the most common of which are congenital heart disease, cleft lip/palate, urogenital and neural tube defects. The aim of our study is to examine teratogenic effects of AED and the correlation between these malformations and AED in single or multiple pregnancies. Methods This is a retrospective study of malformations in children born to mothers currently followed up by our outpatient clinics who used or discontinued AED during their pregnancy. Their children were then investigated using echocardiography, urinary ultrasound, cranial magnetic resonance image, and examined by geneticists and pediatric dentists. Results One hundred and seventeen children were included in the study. Ninety one of these children were exposed to AED during pregnancy. The most commonly used AED were valproic acid and carbamazepine in monotherapy. The percentage of major anomaly was 6.8% in all children. Dysmorphic features and dental anomalies were observed more in children exposed especially to valproic acid. There were 26 mothers with two and four mothers with three pregnancies from the same fathers. No correlation was found between the distribution of malformations in recurring pregnancies and AED usage. Conclusion Our study has the highest number of dysmorphism examined in literature, found in all the children exposed to valproic acid, which may account for the higher rate of facial dysmorphism and dental anomalies. On lower doses of valproic acid, major malformations are not seen, although the risk increases with polytherapy. Our data also indicate possible effects of genetic and environmental factors on malformations. PMID:28138106

  13. Valproic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Valproic Acid and Pregnancy Wednesday, 01 July 2015 In every ... This sheet talks about whether exposure to valproic acid may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  14. Antiepileptic Drugs with Mood Stabilizing Properties and Their Relation with Psychotropic Drug Use in Institutionalized Epilepsy Patients with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leunissen, C. L. F.; de la Parra, N. M.; Tan, I. Y.; Rentmeester, Th. W.; Vader, C. I.; Veendrick-Meekes, M. J. B. M.; Aldenkamp, A. P.

    2011-01-01

    A large number of patients with epilepsy and intellectual disability take medication, amongst which antiepileptic and psychotropic drugs, often simultaneously. Certain antiepileptic drugs have mood-stabilizing properties, e.g. carbamazepine, valproic acid and lamotrigine. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of these…

  15. Valproic acid increases conservative homologous recombination frequency and reactive oxygen species formation: a potential mechanism for valproic acid-induced neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Defoort, Ericka N; Kim, Perry M; Winn, Louise M

    2006-04-01

    Valproic acid, a commonly used antiepileptic agent, is associated with a 1 to 2% incidence of neural tube defects when taken during pregnancy; however, the molecular mechanism by which this occurs has not been elucidated. Previous research suggests that valproic acid exposure leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). DNA damage due to ROS can result in DNA double-strand breaks, which can be repaired through homologous recombination (HR), a process that is not error-free and can result in detrimental genetic changes. Because the developing embryo requires tight regulation of gene expression to develop properly, we propose that the loss or dysfunction of genes involved in embryonic development through aberrant HR may ultimately cause neural tube defects. To determine whether valproic acid induces HR, Chinese hamster ovary 3-6 cells, containing a neomycin direct repeat recombination substrate, were exposed to valproic acid for 4 or 24 h. A significant increase in HR after exposure to valproic acid (5 and 10 mM) for 24 h was observed, which seems to occur through a conservative HR mechanism. We also demonstrated that exposure to valproic acid (5 and 10 mM) significantly increased intracellular ROS levels, which were attenuated by preincubation with polyethylene glycol-conjugated (PEG)-catalase. A significant change in the ratio of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine/2'-de-oxyguanosine, a measure of DNA oxidation, was not observed after valproic acid exposure; however, preincubation with PEG-catalase significantly blocked the increase in HR. These data demonstrate that valproic acid increases HR frequency and provides a possible mechanism for valproic acid-induced neural tube defects.

  16. No pharmacokinetic interaction between lacosamide and valproic acid in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Cawello, Willi; Bonn, Rainer

    2012-11-01

    Two open-label, randomized, multiple-dose clinical studies evaluated the potential for pharmacokinetic interaction between the antiepileptic drugs lacosamide and valproic acid. The influence of lacosamide on valproic acid pharmacokinetics (trial A) and valproic acid on lacosamide pharmacokinetics (trial B) was investigated in 32 healthy male volunteers, 16 in each trial. Volunteers in trial A received valproic acid (300 mg bid) with randomization to either early or late addition of lacosamide (200 mg bid). Those in trial B received lacosamide (200 mg bid) with randomization to either early or late addition of valproic acid (300 mg bid). Area under the concentration-time curve during a 12-hour dosing interval at steady state (AUC(τ,ss)) and maximum steady-state plasma drug concentration (C(max,ss)) were measured for each drug alone and together and tested for equivalence. The point estimates (90% confidence intervals) for AUC(τ,ss) and C(max,ss) were 104% (99%-109%) and 101% (97%-107%), respectively, for valproic acid and 100% (98%-103%) and 101% (96%-107%), respectively, for lacosamide, which were within the generally accepted equivalence range of 80% to 125%. No changes in the rate or extent of absorption, terminal half-life, or time to maximum concentration were observed. These results suggest that lacosamide and valproic acid have no relevant pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction.

  17. Serum nitrite and nitrate levels in epileptic children using valproic acid or carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Karabiber, Hamza; Yakinci, Cengiz; Durmaz, Yasar; Temel, Ismail; Mehmet, Nihayet

    2004-01-01

    In experimental epilepsy studies, nitric oxide was found to act as both proconvulsant and anticonvulsant. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of valproic acid and carbamazepine on serum levels of nitrite and nitrate, which are the metabolites of nitric oxide. To achieve this goal, serum nitrite and nitrate levels were determined in active epileptic 34 children using valproic acid and 23 children using carbamazepine and in non-active epileptic 38 children (control group) not using any antiepileptic drug. In the valproic acid group serum nitrite and nitrate levels were 2.66 +/- 2.11 micromol/l and 69.35 +/- 23.20 micromol/l, 1.89 +/- 1.01 micromol/l and 49.39 +/- 10.61 micromol/l in the carbamazepine group, and 1.22 +/- 0.55 micromol/l, 29.53 +/- 10.05 micromol in the control group, respectively. Nitrite and nitrate levels were significantly high in both valproic acid and carbamazepine groups compared to the control group (P < 0.01). When valproic acid and carbamazepine groups were compared to each other, level of nitrate was found statistically higher in the valproic acid group in relation to the carbamazepine group (P < 0.01), however, there was no statistically significant difference in the levels of nitrite (P > 0.05). No relation could be found between serum drug levels and nitrite and nitrate levels. According to these results, it can be suggested that valproic acid and carbamazepine might have antiepileptic effects through nitric oxide.

  18. Adiponectin and visfatin concentrations in children treated with valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Rauchenzauner, Markus; Haberlandt, Edda; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine; Ernst, Barbara; Hoppichler, Fritz; Karall, Daniela; Ebenbichler, Christoph F; Rostasy, Kevin; Luef, Gerhard

    2008-02-01

    Chronic antiepileptic therapy with valproic acid (VPA) is associated with increased body weight and insulin resistance in adults and children. Attempts to determine the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms have failed. Adipocytokines have recently been defined as a link between glucose and fat metabolism. We herein demonstrate that VPA-associated overweight is accompanied by lower adiponectin and higher leptin concentrations in children. The absence of any relationship with visfatin concentration does not suggest a role of this novel insulin-mimetic hormone in VPA-associated metabolic alterations. Therefore, adiponectin and leptin but not visfatin may be considered as potential regulators of glucose and fat metabolism during VPA-therapy.

  19. Potential new methods for antiepileptic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Robert S; Ho, Jet

    2002-01-01

    Use of novel drug delivery methods could enhance the efficacy and reduce the toxicity of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Slow-release oral forms of medication or depot drugs such as skin patches might improve compliance and therefore seizure control. In emergency situations, administration via rectal, nasal or buccal mucosa can deliver the drug more quickly than can oral administration. Slow-release oral forms and rectal forms of AEDs are already approved for use, nasal and buccal administration is currently off-label and skin patches for AEDs are an attractive but currently hypothetical option. Therapies under development may result in the delivery of AEDs directly to the regions of the brain involved in seizures. Experimental protocols are underway to allow continuous infusion of potent excitatory amino acid antagonists into the CSF. In experiments with animal models of epilepsy, AEDs have been delivered successfully to seizure foci in the brain by programmed infusion pumps, acting in response to computerised EEG seizure detection. Inactive prodrugs can be given systemically and activated at the site of the seizure focus by locally released compounds. One such drug under development is DP-VPA (or DP16), which is cleaved to valproic acid (sodium valproate) by phospholipases at the seizure focus. Liposomes and nanoparticles are engineered micro-reservoirs of a drug, with attached antibodies or receptor-specific binding agents designed to target the particles to a specific region of the body. Liposomes in theory could deliver a high concentration of an AED to a seizure focus. Penetration of the blood-brain barrier can be accomplished by linking large particles to iron transferrin or biological toxins that can cross the barrier. In the near future, it is likely that cell transplants that generate neurotransmitters and neuromodulators will accomplish renewable endogenous drug delivery. However, the survival and viability of transplanted cells have yet to be demonstrated

  20. Molecular and Therapeutic Potential and Toxicity of Valproic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Chateauvieux, Sébastien; Morceau, Franck; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA), a branched short-chain fatty acid, is widely used as an antiepileptic drug and a mood stabilizer. Antiepileptic properties have been attributed to inhibition of Gamma Amino Butyrate (GABA) transaminobutyrate and of ion channels. VPA was recently classified among the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors, acting directly at the level of gene transcription by inhibiting histone deacetylation and making transcription sites more accessible. VPA is a widely used drug, particularly for children suffering from epilepsy. Due to the increasing number of clinical trials involving VPA, and interesting results obtained, this molecule will be implicated in an increasing number of therapies. However side effects of VPA are substantially described in the literature whereas they are poorly discussed in articles focusing on its therapeutic use. This paper aims to give an overview of the different clinical-trials involving VPA and its side effects encountered during treatment as well as its molecular properties. PMID:20798865

  1. Resistance to valproic acid as predictor of treatment resistance in genetic generalized epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Gesche, Joanna; Khanevski, Marina; Solberg, Carl; Beier, Christoph Patrick

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed at defining clinical predictors of drug resistance in adults with genetic generalized epilepsy (GGE) who were treated with a broad spectrum of antiepileptic drugs. Of a cohort of 137 unselected adult GGE patients with long-term follow up, clinical and demographic data, putative prognostic factors (e.g., psychiatric comorbidities, electroencephalography [EEG]), treatment response, and data indicative of social status were collected. Fifty-eight patients had seizures within the past year. Thirty-three patients met the definition of "drug-resistant epilepsy" according to the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) definition. Psychiatric comorbidities, age at first diagnosis, and absences were associated with worse seizure control, whereas focal changes in EEG remained without prognostic impact. Resistance to valproic acid was the most important prognostic factor for refractory seizures. Resistance to valproic acid had a specificity of 100% to identify patients with drug resistance and correlated strongly with bad social outcome and seizure burden. Conversely, 21.2% of all patients with refractory seizures according to the ILAE definition later became seizure free (mainly with valproic acid). Our data suggest that "drug resistant GGE" must not be declared unless patients were adequately treated with valproic acid, and advocate resistance to valproic acid as a new clinical biomarker for drug-resistant GGE. A PowerPoint slide summarizing this article is available for download in the Supporting Information section here.

  2. Prescription of antiepileptics and the risk of road traffic crash.

    PubMed

    Orriols, Ludivine; Foubert-Samier, Alexandra; Gadegbeku, Blandine; Delorme, Bernard; Tricotel, Aurore; Philip, Pierre; Moore, Nicholas; Lagarde, Emmanuel

    2013-03-01

    Studies assessing the impact of epilepsy and its medication on the risk of road traffic crashes have shown inconsistent results. The aim in this study was to assess this risk using French databases. Data from three French national databases were extracted and matched: the national health care insurance database, police reports, and the national police database of injurious crashes. Only antiepileptics prescribed predominantly in epilepsy were studied (phenobarbital, phenytoin, ethosuximide, valproic acid, vigabatrin, tiagabin, levitiracetam, zonisamide, and lacosamide). A case-control analysis comparing responsible and non-responsible drivers and a case-crossover analysis were performed. Drivers (72 685) involved in an injurious crash in France between July 2005 and May 2008, were included. Drivers exposed to prescribed antiepileptic medicines (n = 251) had an increased risk of being responsible for a crash (OR 1.74 [1.29-2.34]). The association was also significant for the most severe epileptic patients (n = 99; OR = 2.20 [1.31-3.69]). Case-crossover analysis found no association between crash risk and treatment prescription. Patients with prescription of antiepileptic drugs should be cautioned about their potential risk of road traffic crash. This risk is however more likely to be related to seizures than to the effect of antiepileptic medicines.

  3. [Use of antiepileptic drugs for the preventive treatment of migraine].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Junichi

    2009-10-01

    Migraine and epilepsy share several common characteristic clinical features, and epilepsy is a comorbid disorder of migraine. Clinical studies have shown that some antiepileptic drugs are effective for the preventive treatment of migraine. The rationale for the use of these antiepileptic drugs in migraine prophylaxis is the hypothesis that migraine and epilepsy have several common pathophysiological mechanisms. It has been suggested that in these 2 pathological conditions, an imbalance exists between excitatory glutamate-mediated transmission and inhibitory GABA-mediated transmission in cerebral tissues, mainly in specific brain areas. Moreover, it has been postulated that abnormal activation of some kinds of voltage-gated ionic channels has been postulated to have a key role in both migraine and epilepsy, especially when caused by a genetic abnormality. It has been found that cortical spreading depression is involved in the pathophysiological mechanism of epilepsy, in addition to the generation of migraine aura. Preventive antiepileptic drugs can be chosen for treatment after considering clinical efficacy- scientific evidence, side effects, and patients' specific personal conditions. Recently, scientific evidence was found to demonstrate efficacy of valproic acid and topiramate in the preventive treatment of migraine. These drugs can reduce the incidence of migraine attacks in the large clinical studies. Other new antiepileptic drugs can be tried in future clinical study.

  4. Valproic acid inhibits excess dopamine release in response to a fear-conditioned stimulus in the basolateral complex of the amygdala of methamphetamine-sensitized rats.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Junko; Oshibuchi, Hidehiro; Kasai, Akiko; Inada, Ken; Ishigooka, Jun

    2014-05-05

    Valproic acid, an established antiepileptic and antimanic drug, has recently emerged as a promising emotion-stabilizing agent for patients with psychosis. Although dopamine transmission in the amygdala plays a key role in emotional processing, there has been no direct evidence about how valproic acid acts on the dopaminergic system in the brain during emotional processing. In the present study, we tested the effect of valproic acid on a trait marker of vulnerability to emotional stress in psychosis, which is excess dopamine release in response to a fear-conditioned stimulus (CS) in the basolateral complex of the amygdala of methamphetamine-sensitized rats. Extracellular dopamine was collected from the amygdala of freely moving methamphetamine-sensitized rats by in vivo microdialysis and was measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. During microdialysis, valproic acid was intraperitoneally injected followed by CS exposure. Valproic acid treatment decreased baseline levels of dopamine and also attenuated the excess dopamine release in response to the CS in the amygdala of methamphetamine-sensitized rats. The results prove that valproic acid inhibits spontaneous dopamine release and also attenuates excess dopaminergic signaling in response to emotional stress in the amygdala. These findings suggest that the mechanisms of the emotion-stabilizing effect of valproic acid in psychosis involve modulation of dopaminergic transmission in emotional processing.

  5. Teratogenic potential of antiepileptic drugs in the zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Hak; Kang, Jung Won; Lin, Tao; Lee, Jae Eun; Jin, Dong Il

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish model is an attractive candidate for screening of developmental toxicity during early drug development. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) arouse concern for the risk of teratogenicity, but the data are limited. In this study, we evaluated the teratogenic potential of seven AEDs (carbamazepine (CBZ), ethosuximide (ETX), valproic acid (VPN), lamotrigine (LMT), lacosamide (LCM), levetiracetam (LVT), and topiramate (TPM)) in the zebrafish model. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to AEDs from initiation of gastrula (5.25 hours post-fertilization (hpf)) to termination of hatching (72 hpf) which mimic the mammalian teratogenic experimental design. The lethality and teratogenic index (TI) of AEDs were determined and the TI values of each drug were compared with the US FDA human pregnancy categories. Zebrafish model was useful screening model for teratogenic potential of antiepilepsy drugs and was in concordance with in vivo mammalian data and human clinical data.

  6. Methods of assessment of antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Milligan, N; Richens, A

    1981-01-01

    Epilepsy is a symptom with protean manifestations and as such it is a difficult disease in which to carry out a therapeutic trial. The methods available to research workers for the assessment of new antiepileptic drugs are hampered by the fact that epilepsy is a fluctuant condition. Although it is a chronic disorder open to study using cross-over trials and within-patient comparisons, accurate assessment cannot be easily made at any one point in time. Research workers are therefore automatically placed at a time factor disadvantage and this is especially so for those searching for quick methods of evaluating new compounds. The need for a quick and reliable method of assessing a new antiepileptic drug has long been appreciated. This article will discuss the methods currently available and we will begin by considering the most commonly used method of assessment with particular reference to some of the problems involved in conducting a controlled clinical trial in epilepsy. PMID:7272157

  7. Effects of antiepileptic drugs on antioxidant and oxidant molecular pathways: focus on trace elements.

    PubMed

    Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Yürekli, Vedat Ali

    2013-07-01

    Current reports on trace elements, oxidative stress, and the effect of antiepileptic drugs are poor and controversial. We aimed to review effects of most common used antiepileptics on antioxidant, trace element, calcium ion (Ca(2+)) influx, and oxidant systems in human and experimental animal models. Observations of lower blood or tissue antioxidant levels in epileptic patients and animals compared to controls in recent publications may commonly support the proposed crucial role of antioxidants in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Effects of old and new antiepileptics on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in epilepsy are controversial. The old antiepileptic drugs like valproic acid, phenytoin, and carbamazepine induced ROS overproduction, while new epileptic drugs (e.g., topiramate and zonisamide) induced scavenger effects on over production of ROS in human and animals. Antioxidant trace element levels such as selenium, copper, and zinc were generally low in the blood of epileptic patients, indicating trace element deficiencies in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Recent papers indicate that selenium with/without topiramate administration in human and animals decreased seizure levels, although antioxidant values were increased. Recent studies also reported that sustained depolarization of mitochondrial membranes, enhanced ROS production and Ca(2+) influx may be modulated by topiramate. In conclusion, there is a large number of recent studies about the role of antioxidants or neuroprotectants in clinical and experimental models of epilepsy. New antiepileptic drugs are more prone to restore antioxidant redox systems in brain and neurons.

  8. Comparison of trichostatin A and valproic acid treatment regimens in a mouse model of kidney fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Van Beneden, Katrien; Geers, Caroline; Pauwels, Marina; Mannaerts, Inge; Wissing, Karl M.; Van den Branden, Christiane; Grunsven, Leo A. van

    2013-09-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are promising new compounds for the therapy of fibrotic diseases. In this study we compared the effect of two HDAC inhibitors, trichostatin A and valproic acid, in an experimental model of kidney fibrosis. In mice, doxorubicin (adriamycin) can cause nephropathy characterized by chronic proteinuria, glomerular damage and interstitial inflammation and fibrosis, as seen in human focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Two treatment regimens were applied, treatment was either started prior to the doxorubicin insult or delayed until a significant degree of proteinuria and fibrosis was present. Pre-treatment of trichostatin A significantly hampered glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis, as did the pre-treatment with valproic acid. In contrast, the development of proteinuria was only completely inhibited in the pre-treated valproic acid group, and not in the pre-treated trichostatin A animals. In the postponed treatment with valproic acid, a complete resolution of established doxorubicin-induced proteinuria was achieved within three days, whereas trichostatin A could not correct proteinuria in such a treatment regimen. However, both postponed regimens have comparable efficacy in maintaining the kidney fibrosis to the level reached at the start of the treatments. Moreover, not only the process of fibrosis, but also renal inflammation was attenuated by both HDAC inhibitors. Our data confirm a role for HDACs in renal fibrogenesis and point towards a therapeutic potential for HDAC inhibitors. The effect on renal disease progression and manifestation can however be different for individual HDAC inhibitors. - Highlights: • Valproic acid is a potent antiproteinuric drug, whereas trichostatin A is not. • Trichostatin A and valproic acid reduce kidney fibrosis in doxorubicin nephropathy. • Both valproic acid and trichostatin A attenuate renal inflammation.

  9. Zebrafish embryotoxicity test for developmental (neuro)toxicity: Demo case of an integrated screening approach system using anti-epileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Beker van Woudenberg, Anna; Snel, Cor; Rijkmans, Eke; de Groot, Didima; Bouma, Marga; Hermsen, Sanne; Piersma, Aldert; Menke, Aswin; Wolterbeek, André

    2014-11-01

    To improve the predictability of the zebrafish embryotoxicity test (ZET) for developmental (neuro)toxicity screening, we used a multiple-endpoints strategy, including morphology, motor activity (MA), histopathology and kinetics. The model compounds used were antiepileptic drugs (AEDs): valproic acid (VPA), carbamazepine (CBZ), ethosuximide (ETH) and levetiracetam (LEV). For VPA, histopathology was the most sensitive parameter, showing effects already at 60μM. For CBZ, morphology and MA were the most sensitive parameters, showing effects at 180μM. For ETH, all endpoints showed similar sensitivity (6.6mM), whereas MA was the most sensitive parameter for LEV (40mM). Inclusion of kinetics did not alter the absolute ranking of the compounds, but the relative potency was changed considerably. Taking all together, this demo-case study showed that inclusion of multiple-endpoints in ZET may increase the sensitivity of the assay, contribute to the elucidation of the mode of toxic action and to a better definition of the applicability domain of ZET.

  10. Pediatric Sialadenosis Due to Valproic Acid.

    PubMed

    Derin, Hatice; Derin, Serhan; Oltulu, Pembe; Özbek, Orhan; Çaksen, Hüseyin

    2016-12-23

    Sialadenosis is a rare entity characterized by bilateral diffuse, painless swelling of the parotid glands. Its etiology is not clear; however, it may occur due to adverse effects of some drugs. To our knowledge, sialadenosis due to valproic acid has not been reported in the literature up to date in any child. In this article, the authors presented a child who developed sialadenosis due to valproic acid, and improved after stopping use of the drug.

  11. Psychiatric uses of antiepileptic treatments.

    PubMed

    Boylan, Laura S.; Devinsky, Orrin; Barry, John J.; Ketter, Terence A.

    2002-10-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) possess potent negative or positive psychotropic effects. Clear evidence of benefit exists for valproate, carbamazepine, and lamotrigine in bipolar disorder. Reports of benefit from various AEDs in mood, anxiety, impulse control, and personality disorder are reviewed. Further research is needed to clarify which patients are likely to benefit. Clinicians must closely attend to the ongoing risk/benefit analysis and consider possible iatrogenic worsening of neuropsychiatric symptoms.

  12. [Antiepileptic drugs for the prevention of pediatric migraine].

    PubMed

    Cuvellier, J-C

    2009-12-01

    Migraine, according to the criteria of the International Headache Society, occurs in about 5 to 10% of children and adolescents. Pediatric migraine can cause a significant impact on quality of life. As stated by the American Academy of Neurology and Child Neurology Society's migraine guidelines, situations for prophylaxis consideration include recurring migraines that significantly interfere with daily activities, despite acute therapy; frequent headaches; contraindication, overuse, or failure of acute therapy; adverse reactions to acute therapy; cost of acute and preventive therapies; patient preferences; and presence of uncommon migraine conditions. Preventive therapy may be warranted in as many as 30% of young patients with migraine seen in tertiary headache centers. Headache related disability can be measured by scoring systems such as the Pediatric Migraine Disability Assessment Scale. Numerous medications have been studied to prevent migraines in children, including antihistamines, antidepressants, and antihypertensive agents. However, few high quality clinical trials actually demonstrate efficacy in this population. Recently, many studies dealt with the use of antiepileptic drugs in this indication but there is a paucity of placebo controlled studies. Both topiramate (TPM) and divalproex sodium have been studied in a randomized-controlled study. Only TPM showed efficacy, though, clearly, further controlled trials are needed to confirm these data. Besides unproven efficacy, adverse effects of valproic acid, such as weight gain, somnolence, and alopecia may limit its use. Additional studies are warranted before recommending levetiracetam (LVT), zonisamide (ZNS) and gabapentin (GBP) agents for migraine prophylaxis in children and adolescents.

  13. Antiepileptic Activity of Preferential Inhibitors of Persistent Sodium Current

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Lyndsey L.; Thompson, Christopher H.; Hawkins, Nicole A.; Nath, Ravi D.; Petersohn, Adam A.; Rajamani, Sridharan; Bush, William S.; Frankel, Wayne N.; Vanoye, Carlos G.; Kearney, Jennifer A.; George, Alfred L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Evidence from basic neurophysiology and molecular genetics has implicated persistent sodium current conducted by voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels as a contributor to the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Many antiepileptic drugs target NaV channels and modulate neuronal excitability mainly by a use-dependent block of transient sodium current, although suppression of persistent current may also contribute to the efficacy of these drugs. We hypothesized that a drug or compound capable of preferential inhibition of persistent sodium current would have antiepileptic activity. Methods We examined the antiepileptic activity of two selective persistent sodium current blockers ranolazine, an FDA-approved drug for treatment of angina pectoris, and GS967, a novel compound with more potent effects on persistent current, in the epileptic Scn2aQ54 mouse model. We also examined the effect of GS967 in the maximal electroshock model and evaluated effects of the compound on neuronal excitability, propensity for hilar neuron loss, development of mossy fiber sprouting and survival of Scn2aQ54 mice. Results We found that ranolazine was capable of reducing seizure frequency by ~50% in Scn2aQ54 mice. The more potent persistent current blocker GS967 reduced seizure frequency by greater than 90% in Scn2aQ54 mice and protected against induced seizures in the maximal electroshock model. GS967 greatly attenuated abnormal spontaneous action potential firing in pyramidal neurons acutely isolated from Scn2aQ54 mice. In addition to seizure suppression in vivo, GS967 treatment greatly improved the survival of Scn2aQ54 mice, prevented hilar neuron loss, and suppressed the development of hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting. Significance Our findings indicate that the selective persistent sodium current blocker GS967 has potent antiepileptic activity and this compound could inform development of new agents. PMID:24862204

  14. Synthesis and antiepileptic activity of schiff's bases of dialkylamino alkoxy isatin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Swathi, Konda; Sarangapani, Manda

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, some new 5-[2(3)-dialkylamino alkoxy] Indole 3-thiosemicarbazone 2-ones and 5-[2(3)-dialkylamino alkoxy] Indole 3-hydrazone 2-one were prepared from 5-hydroxy isatin. The structures of the products were characterized by IR, NMR, and MASS Spectral studies. All the compounds were examined for antiepileptic activity by maximal electroshock seizure (MES) and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced convulsion method. These compounds were also evaluated for their neurotoxicity study by rotarod method. Some of these compounds showed good antiepileptic activity when compared with standard drug Phenytoin and all the compounds showed less neurotoxicity when compared with standard drug Diazepam.

  15. Molecular dissection of the valproic acid effects on glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoja, Sabine; Schulze, Markus; Rehli, Michael; Proescholdt, Martin; Herold-Mende, Christel; Hau, Peter; Riemenschneider, Markus J.

    2016-01-01

    Many glioblastoma patients suffer from seizures why they are treated with antiepileptic agents. Valproic acid (VPA) is a histone deacetylase inhibitor that apart from its anticonvulsive effects in some retrospective studies has been suggested to lead to a superior outcome of glioblastoma patients. However, the exact molecular effects of VPA treatment on glioblastoma cells have not yet been deciphered. We treated glioblastoma cells with VPA, recorded the functional effects of this treatment and performed a global and unbiased next generation sequencing study on the chromatin (ChIP) and RNA level. 1) VPA treatment clearly sensitized glioma cells to temozolomide: A protruding VPA-induced molecular feature in this context was the transcriptional upregulation/reexpression of numerous solute carrier (SLC) transporters that was also reflected by euchromatinization on the histone level and a reexpression of SLC transporters in human biopsy samples after VPA treatment. DNA repair genes were adversely reduced. 2) VPA treatment, however, also reduced cell proliferation in temozolomide-naive cells: On the molecular level in this context we observed a transcriptional upregulation/reexpression and euchromatinization of several glioblastoma relevant tumor suppressor genes and a reduction of stemness markers, while transcriptional subtype classification (mesenchymal/proneural) remained unaltered. Taken together, these findings argue for both temozolomide-dependent and -independent effects of VPA. VPA might increase the uptake of temozolomide and simultaneously lead to a less malignant glioblastoma phenotype. From a mere molecular perspective these findings might indicate a surplus value of VPA in glioblastoma therapy and could therefore contribute an additional ratio for clinical decision making. PMID:27556305

  16. Antiepileptic drugs and brain development.

    PubMed

    Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Turski, Lechoslaw

    2010-01-01

    Epilepsy, the most common neurological disorder in young humans, has its highest incidence during the first year of life. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) which are used to treat seizures in infants, children and pregnant women target ion channels, neurotransmitters and second messenger systems in the brain. The same targets regulate brain processes essential both for propagation of seizures and for brain development, learning, memory and emotional behavior. Here we review adverse effects of AEDs in the developing mammalian brain. In addition, we discuss mechanisms explaining adverse effects of AEDs in the developing mammalian brain including interference with cell proliferation and migration, neurogenesis, axonal arborization, synaptogenesis, synaptic plasticity and physiological apoptotic cell death.

  17. The influence of established and new antiepileptic drugs on visual perception. II. A controlled study in patients with epilepsy under long-term antiepileptic medication.

    PubMed

    Steinhoff, B J; Freudenthaler, N; Paulus, W

    1997-12-01

    In this study, we investigated visual performance under chronic antiepileptic drug treatment. Patients were under carbamazepine (CBZ) (n = 18), valproic acid (VPA) (n = 9), CBZ and vigabatrin (VGB) (n = 4), CBZ and gabapentin (GBP) (n = 8), and under CBZ and topiramate (TPR) (n = 6), respectively. Seven untreated patients with epilepsy and 42 healthy volunteers served as controls. The test battery comprised the Lanthony-D15-désaturé colour perception test, increment, postadaptation and transient tritanopia (TT) threshold measurements, visual perception threshold assessments for monochromatic and chromatic gratings and gaussian dots, and critical flicker fusion (CFF) tests. No differences were seen between naive patients and healthy controls. Patients under drug treatment always showed alterations of visual perception. Postadaptation and TT thresholds were altered under each drug regimen after short delays between switching off the adaptation light and switching on the blue test light. Threshold elevations were maximum under the combination of CBZ and TPR and lowest under CBZ and GBP. Consistent impairment of the CFF was seen under combined CBZ and TPR whereas VPA as well as combined CBZ and VGB led to ameliorations the mechanisms of which are discussed. The other tests were less sensitive. In conclusion, alterations of visual function were apparent under chronic antiepileptic drug treatment both with established and new agents. However, it may be difficult to distinguish between effects based on specific modes of action and nonspecific retino- and neurotoxicity.

  18. [Hemoperfusion in the treatment of acute valproic acid intoxication].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Fernández, E J; Sánchez, R J; Peces, C; Montero, A; Selgas, R

    2007-01-01

    Valproic acid is increasingly used in the treatment of epilepsy, and also prescribed for bipolar affective disorders, schizoaffective disorders, schizophrenia and migraine prophylaxis. Valproic acid intoxication with suicide attempt is a relatively common clinical problem that can result in coma, respiratory depression, pancytopenia, hemodynamic instability and death. The drug's relatively low molecular weight, small volume of distribution and saturable protein-binding render it potentially amenable to exracorporeal removal (hemodialysis, hemoperfusion or hemofiltration ), but published experience is scarce. We describe a case report involving valproic acid intoxication with ingestion of ethanol, who was successfully treated with charcoal hemoperfusion. With this treatment the half-life of valproic acid was reduced with rapid lowering of valproic acid levels and clinical improvement. Based on our experience in this patient and a review of previously reported cases, charcoal hemoperfusion should be considered for serious valproic acid intoxication because free as well as bound drug fractions are eliminated via this technique.

  19. The Impact of Anti-Epileptic Drugs on Growth and Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Lee, Herng-Shen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lee, Yi-Yen; Lai, Hsin-Chuan; Hung, Pi-Lien; Lee, Hsiu-Fen; Chi, Ching-Shiang

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder worldwide and anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) are always the first choice for treatment. However, more than 50% of patients with epilepsy who take AEDs have reported bone abnormalities. Cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isoenzymes are induced by AEDs, especially the classical AEDs, such as benzodiazepines (BZDs), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PT), phenobarbital (PB), and valproic acid (VPA). The induction of CYP450 isoenzymes may cause vitamin D deficiency, hypocalcemia, increased fracture risks, and altered bone turnover, leading to impaired bone mineral density (BMD). Newer AEDs, such as levetiracetam (LEV), oxcarbazepine (OXC), lamotrigine (LTG), topiramate (TPM), gabapentin (GP), and vigabatrin (VB) have broader spectra, and are safer and better tolerated than the classical AEDs. The effects of AEDs on bone health are controversial. This review focuses on the impact of AEDs on growth and bone metabolism and emphasizes the need for caution and timely withdrawal of these medications to avoid serious disabilities. PMID:27490534

  20. Weight-reducing side effects of the antiepileptic agents topiramate and zonisamide.

    PubMed

    Antel, J; Hebebrand, J

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced weight alteration can be a serious side effect that applies to several therapeutic agents and must be referred to in the respective approved labeling texts. The side effect may become health threatening in case of significant weight change in either direction. Several antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are associated with weight gain such as gabapentin, pregabalin, valproic acid, and vigabatrin and to some extent carbamazepine. Others are weight neutral such as lamotrigine, levetiracetam, and phenytoin or associated with slight weight loss as, e.g., felbamate. The focus of this chapter is on the two AEDs causing strong weight loss: topiramate and zonisamide. For both drugs, several molecular mechanisms of actions are published. We provide a review of these potential mechanisms, some of which are based on in vivo studies in animal models for obesity, and of clinical studies exploring these two drugs as single entities or in combinations with other agents.

  1. Are antiepileptic drugs used in the treatment of migraine associated with an increased risk of suicidality?

    PubMed

    Kanner, Andres M

    2011-06-01

    Three antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), valproic acid, gabapentin, and topiramate (TPM), are used frequently in the prophylactic treatment of migraines. In December 2008, the US Food and Drug Administration issued a warning suggesting that the use of all AEDs is associated with an increased risk of suicidal ideation and behavior. This warning has been received by the medical community with great skepticism, and the validity of the findings of the meta-analysis that led to its publication has been questioned because of various methodological problems. Yet, migraine by itself is associated with an increased risk of suicidal ideation and behavior as well as with an increased risk of psychiatric disorders that facilitate the development of suicidal behavior. Furthermore, TPM has been associated with psychiatric adverse events that potentially could result in suicidal ideation and behavior. In this article, we review data to determine whether the AEDs used in the prevention of migraine are associated with an increased risk of suicidality.

  2. Long-term antiepileptic treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors may reduce the risk of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Stettner, Mark; Krämer, Günter; Strauss, Arne; Kvitkina, Tatjana; Ohle, Sandra; Kieseier, Bernd C; Thelen, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Various antiepileptic drugs such as valproic acid, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine and levetiracetam are known to exert histone deacetylase inhibitory (HDACi) properties, which can modify aberrantly silenced gene expression by an epigenetic mechanism. This study was initiated to examine a potential beneficial effect of these drugs on prostate cancer (PC) development. The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels of 106 patients under long-term treatment with antiepileptic drugs and known HDACi properties were examined. PSA represents a hallmark in the early detection of PC, and its levels may predict an invasive disease in subsequent years. For in-vitro experiments, the PC cell line LNCaP was treated with HDACi drugs; subsequently, PSA and further PC markers were assessed. When men over 50 years of age were treated with HDACi drugs they had lower age-corrected PSA levels compared with control groups, according to the following ranking: valproic acid>levetiracetam>carbamazepine/oxcarbazepine>lamotrigine. Furthermore, there was a correlation between PSA reduction and the number of HDACi drugs within the medication, lending credence to the idea that a synergistic effect might be possible. Moreover, in vitro, HDACi drugs decrease PSA on mRNA and protein levels and exhibit further oncoprotective properties.The fact that HDACi drugs exert antiproliferative effects on neoplastic cells in vitro and in vivo, which are paralleled by expression alterations of aberrantly regulated genes, underlines the potential therapeutic value of HDACi drugs. These data suggest that long-term HDACi treatment can positively influence the characteristically slow transformation of tumour precursor cells in the prostate and may thus reduce a patient's risk of developing PC.

  3. Update on the Genetic Polymorphisms of Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes in Antiepileptic Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Saruwatari, Junji; Ishitsu, Takateru; Nakagawa, Kazuko

    2010-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in the genes that encode drug-metabolizing enzymes are implicated in the inter-individual variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmaco-dynamics of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). However, the clinical impact of these polymorphisms on AED therapy still remains controversial. The defective alleles of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C9 and/or CYP2C19 could affect not only the pharmacokinetics, but also the pharmacodynamics of phenytoin therapy. CYP2C19 deficient genotypes were associated with the higher serum concentration of an active metabolite of clobazam, N-desmethylclobazam, and with the higher clinical efficacy of clobazam therapy than the other CYP2C19 genotypes. The defective alleles of CYP2C9 and/or CYP2C19 were also found to have clinically significant effects on the inter-individual variabilities in the population pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital, valproic acid and zonisamide. EPHX1 polymorphisms may be associated with the pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine and the risk of phenytoin-induced congenital malformations. Similarly, the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B7 genotype may affect the pharmacokinetics of lamotrigine. Gluthatione S-transferase null genotypes are implicated in an increased risk of hepatotoxicity caused by carbamazepine and valproic acid. This article summarizes the state of research on the effects of mutations of drug-metabolizing enzymes on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of AED therapies. Future directions for the dose-adjustment of AED are discussed. PMID:27713373

  4. Why are antiepileptic drugs used for nonepileptic conditions?

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir

    2012-12-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used to treat various nonepileptic central nervous system (CNS) disorders, both in neurology and psychiatry. Most AEDs have multiple mechanisms of action (MOAs), which include modulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission, and alteration of voltage-gated ion channels or intracellular signaling pathways. These MOAs may explain the efficacy of AEDs in the treatment of bipolar disorder and neuropathic pain. Bipolar disorder and epilepsy have some common features, such as their episodic nature and associated kindling phenomena, which led to the regulatory approval and use of the AEDs carbamazepine (CBZ), valproic acid (VPA), and lamotrigine (LTG) in the treatment of bipolar disorder. A major limitation for the development of drugs with improved mood-stabilizing activity is the lack of knowledge on the mechanism of treatment for bipolar disorder. In contrast to epilepsy, no animal models in bipolar disorder are universally accepted and no model is able to exhibit the characteristic mood swings. Although most AEDs have now been investigated for their mood-stabilizing effects, only three (e.g., VPA, CBZ, and LTG) demonstrated clinical efficacy in patients. This suggests that the mechanism of drug action in mood disorder and in epilepsy only partially overlaps. Peripheral nerve damage leads to the initiation of cellular and molecular changes in the nervous system resulting in ectopic, repetitive firing perceived as chronic pain. Epileptic seizures are also characterized by hyperexcitability of neurons in the brain. The spontaneous electrogenesis in neuropathic pain has similarities to that of epilepsy. Alteration in sodium channels expression suggests that the mechanism underlying epileptic hyperexcitability may be similar to those underlying neuropathic pain. The AEDs gabapentin (GBP) and pregabalin (PGB) have become the mainstay of treatment for various neuropathic pain syndromes, owing to their ability

  5. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome triggered by a combination of clobazam, lamotrigine and valproic acid in a 7-year-old child.

    PubMed

    Yapici, A K; Fidanci, M K; Kilic, S; Balamtekin, N; Mutluay Arslan, M; Yavuz, S T; Kalman, S

    2014-09-30

    Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are diseases within the spectrum of severe cutaneous adverse reactions affecting skin and mucous membranes. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used in combination, leading to potential pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic interactions, causing more adverse effects than might occur when the AED is taken as monotherapy. Here, we report a rare case of SJS triggered by a combination of clobazam, lamotrigine and valproic acid in a 7-year-old boy. Because of inadequate seizure control, lorazepam was replaced with clobazam. Four weeks after the addition of clobazam, the patient developed SJS with a generalized rash, fever, with liver and kidney involvement, and eosinophilia one week after the initiation of treatment. All antiepileptic drugs were discontinued, and intravenous methylprednisolone, prophylactic systemic antibiotics, intravenous fluid supplement, antipyretic, special wound care, and supportive medical care for SJS were administered. He was discharged in a stable condition on the 18th day. Our case suggests that a drug-drug interaction between valproate, lamotrigine and clobazam contributed to the development of SJS. When the clobazam was added to valproic acid and lamotrigine co-medication, the lamotrigine dose should have been decreased.

  6. Suppression of NMDA receptor function in mice prenatally exposed to valproic acid improves social deficits and repetitive behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jaeseung; Kim, Eunjoon

    2015-01-01

    Animals prenatally exposed to valproic acid (VPA), an antiepileptic agent, have been used as a model for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Previous studies have identified enhanced NMDA receptor (NMDAR) function in the brain of VPA rats, and demonstrated that pharmacological suppression of NMDAR function normalizes social deficits in these animals. However, whether repetitive behavior, another key feature of ASDs, can be rescued by NMDAR inhibition remains unknown. We report here that memantine, an NMDAR antagonist, administered to VPA mice rescues both social deficits and repetitive behaviors such as self-grooming and jumping. These results suggest that suppression of elevated NMDAR function in VPA animals normalizes repetitive behaviors in addition to social deficits. PMID:26074764

  7. Design and synthesis of chroman derivatives with dual anti-breast cancer and antiepileptic activities

    PubMed Central

    Rawat, Pinki; Verma, Saurabh Manaswita

    2016-01-01

    A series of chroman derivatives was designed, prepared, and examined for their anti-breast cancer and antiepileptic activities. All synthesized compounds yielded results that were in good agreement with spectral data. The bioassay showed that some of the resultant compounds exerted remarkable inhibitory effects on growth of human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. In particular, compound 6i (the concentration required for 50% inhibition of cell growth [GI50] =34.7 µM) exerted promising anticancer activity toward MCF-7 cell line. Additionally, compounds 6b, 6c, 6d, 6e, 6g, 6i, and 6l showed advanced antiepileptic activity than reference drugs. None of the compounds showed neurotoxicity, as determined by the rotarod test. The obtained results proved that these distinctive compounds could be relevant as models for future discovery and research, as well as for the production of more number of active derivatives. PMID:27621598

  8. Effects of Valproic Acid on Axonal Regeneration and Recovery of Motor Function after Peripheral Nerve Injury in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Ting; Wu, Fei; Xing, Danmou; Peng, Zhengren; Ren, Dong; Feng, Wei; Chen, Yan; Zhao, Zhiming; Wang, Huan; Wang, Junweng; Kan, Wusheng; Zhang, Qingsong

    2014-01-01

    Background: Valproic acid (VPA) is used to be an effective anti-epileptic drug and mood stabilizer. It has recently been demonstrated that VPA could promote neurite outgrowth, activate the extracellular signal regulated kinase pathway, and increases bcl-2 and growth cone-associated protein 43 levels in spinal cord. In the present research we demonstrate the effect of VPA on peripheral nerve regeneration and recovery of motor function following sciatic nerve transaction in rats. Methods: The rats in VPA group and control group were administered with valproic acid (300mg/kg) and sodium chloride respectively after operation. Each animal was observed sciatic nerve index (SFI) at 2-week intervals and studied electrophysiology at 4-week intervals for 12 weeks. Histological and morphometrical analyses were performed 12 weeks after operation. Using the digital image-analysis system, thickness of the myelin sheath was measured, and total numbers of regenerated axons were counted. Results: There was a significant difference in SFI, electrophysiological index (motor-nerve conduct velocity), and morphometrical results (regenerated axon number and thickness of myelin sheath) in nerve regeneration between the VPA group and controls (P<0.05). Conclusions: The results demonstrated that VPA is able to enhance sciatic nerve regeneration in rats, suggesting the potential clinical application of VPA for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury in humans. PMID:25207308

  9. [Mechanism of action of antiepileptic drugs].

    PubMed

    Saidón, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (DAEs) act through different mechanisms of action: increase in central inhibition, inhibition of excitatorios mechanisms and modification of the excitability through their action on the ionic channels. Epilepsy is characterized by an abnormal and hypersynchronic unloading of a neuronal population. The activity of numerous drugs is associated to increase in gabaergic activity. Another group of drugs decreases excitatory mechanisms, through the inhibition of ionic channels, or through a decrease in the activity of the excitatory neurotransmitters. There are some of antiepileptic drugs, especially within the group of drugs of recent appearance, for wich the mechanism of action remains unknown.

  10. Valproic acid, a molecular lead to multiple regulatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Kostrouchová, M; Kostrouch, Z; Kostrouchová, M

    2007-01-01

    Valproic acid (2-propyl pentanoic acid) is a drug used for the treatment of epilepsy and bipolar disorder. Although very rare, side effects such as spina bifida and other defects of neural tube closure indicate that valproic acid interferes with developmental regulatory pathways. Recently obtained data show that valproic acid affects cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis and immunogenicity of cultured cancer cells and tumours. Focused studies uncovered the potential of valproic acid to interfere with multiple regulatory mechanisms including histone deacetylases, GSK3 alpha and beta, Akt, the ERK pathway, the phosphoinositol pathway, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, GABA, and the OXPHOS system. Valproic acid is emerging as a potential anticancer drug and may also serve as a molecular lead that can help design drugs with more specific and more potent effects on the one side and drugs with wide additive but weaker effects on the other. Valproic acid is thus a powerful molecular tool for better understanding and therapeutic targeting of pathways that regulate the behaviour of cancer cells.

  11. Valproic Acid Limits Pancreatic Recovery after Pancreatitis by Inhibiting Histone Deacetylases and Preventing Acinar Redifferentiation Programs.

    PubMed

    Eisses, John F; Criscimanna, Angela; Dionise, Zachary R; Orabi, Abrahim I; Javed, Tanveer A; Sarwar, Sheharyar; Jin, Shunqian; Zhou, Lili; Singh, Sucha; Poddar, Minakshi; Davis, Amy W; Tosun, Akif Burak; Ozolek, John A; Lowe, Mark E; Monga, Satdarshan P; Rohde, Gustavo K; Esni, Farzad; Husain, Sohail Z

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms by which drugs induce pancreatitis are unknown. A definite cause of pancreatitis is due to the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA). On the basis of three crucial observations-that VPA inhibits histone deacetylases (HDACs), HDACs mediate pancreas development, and aspects of pancreas development are recapitulated during recovery of the pancreas after injury-we hypothesized that VPA does not cause injury on its own, but it predisposes patients to pancreatitis by inhibiting HDACs and provoking an imbalance in pancreatic recovery. In an experimental model of pancreatic injury, we found that VPA delayed recovery of the pancreas and reduced acinar cell proliferation. In addition, pancreatic expression of class I HDACs (which are the primary VPA targets) increased in the midphase of pancreatic recovery. VPA administration inhibited pancreatic HDAC activity and led to the persistence of acinar-to-ductal metaplastic complexes, with prolonged Sox9 expression and sustained β-catenin nuclear activation, findings that characterize a delay in regenerative reprogramming. These effects were not observed with valpromide, an analog of VPA that lacks HDAC inhibition. This is the first report, to our knowledge, that VPA shifts the balance toward pancreatic injury and pancreatitis through HDAC inhibition. The work also identifies a new paradigm for therapies that could exploit epigenetic reprogramming to enhance pancreatic recovery and disorders of pancreatic injury.

  12. Increased BDNF expression in fetal brain in the valproic acid model of autism.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Luis E F; Roby, Clinton D; Krueger, Bruce K

    2014-03-01

    Human fetal exposure to valproic acid (VPA), a widely-used anti-epileptic and mood-stabilizing drug, leads to an increased incidence of behavioral and intellectual impairments including autism; VPA administration to pregnant rats and mice at gestational days 12.5 (E12.5) or E13.5 leads to autistic-like symptoms in the offspring and is widely used as an animal model for autism. We report here that this VPA administration protocol transiently increased both BDNF mRNA and BDNF protein levels 5-6-fold in the fetal mouse brain. VPA exposure in utero induced smaller increases in the expression of mRNA encoding the other neurotrophins, NT3 (2.5-fold) and NT4 (2-fold). Expression of the neurotrophin receptors, trkA, trkB and trkC were minimally affected, while levels of the low-affinity neurotrophin receptor, p75(NTR), doubled. Of the nine 5'-untranslated exons of the mouse BDNF gene, only expression of exons I, IV and VI was stimulated by VPA in utero. In light of the well-established role of BDNF in regulating neurogenesis and the laminar fate of postmitotic neurons in the developing cortex, an aberrant increase in BDNF expression in the fetal brain may contribute to VPA-induced cognitive disorders by altering brain development.

  13. Valproic Acid Limits Pancreatic Recovery after Pancreatitis by Inhibiting Histone Deacetylases and Preventing Acinar Redifferentiation Programs

    PubMed Central

    Eisses, John F.; Criscimanna, Angela; Dionise, Zachary R.; Orabi, Abrahim I.; Javed, Tanveer A.; Sarwar, Sheharyar; Jin, Shunqian; Zhou, Lili; Singh, Sucha; Poddar, Minakshi; Davis, Amy W.; Tosun, Akif Burak; Ozolek, John A.; Lowe, Mark E.; Monga, Satdarshan P.; Rohde, Gustavo K.; Esni, Farzad; Husain, Sohail Z.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which drugs induce pancreatitis are unknown. A definite cause of pancreatitis is due to the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA). On the basis of three crucial observations—that VPA inhibits histone deacetylases (HDACs), HDACs mediate pancreas development, and aspects of pancreas development are recapitulated during recovery of the pancreas after injury—we hypothesized that VPA does not cause injury on its own, but it predisposes patients to pancreatitis by inhibiting HDACs and provoking an imbalance in pancreatic recovery. In an experimental model of pancreatic injury, we found that VPA delayed recovery of the pancreas and reduced acinar cell proliferation. In addition, pancreatic expression of class I HDACs (which are the primary VPA targets) increased in the midphase of pancreatic recovery. VPA administration inhibited pancreatic HDAC activity and led to the persistence of acinar-to-ductal metaplastic complexes, with prolonged Sox9 expression and sustained β-catenin nuclear activation, findings that characterize a delay in regenerative reprogramming. These effects were not observed with valpromide, an analog of VPA that lacks HDAC inhibition. This is the first report, to our knowledge, that VPA shifts the balance toward pancreatic injury and pancreatitis through HDAC inhibition. The work also identifies a new paradigm for therapies that could exploit epigenetic reprogramming to enhance pancreatic recovery and disorders of pancreatic injury. PMID:26476347

  14. Chromatin Remodeling, Cell Proliferation and Cell Death in Valproic Acid-Treated HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Felisbino, Marina Barreto; Tamashiro, Wirla M. S. C.; Mello, Maria Luiza S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Valproic acid (VPA) is a potent anticonvulsant that inhibits histone deacetylases. Because of this inhibitory action, we investigated whether VPA would affect chromatin supraorganization, mitotic indices and the frequency of chromosome abnormalities and cell death in HeLa cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Image analysis was performed by scanning microspectrophotometry for cells cultivated for 24 h, treated with 0.05, 0.5 or 1.0 mM VPA for 1–24 h, and subjected to the Feulgen reaction. TSA-treated cells were used as a predictable positive control. DNA fragmentation was investigated with the TUNEL assay. Chromatin decondensation was demonstrated under TSA and all VPA treatments, but no changes in chromosome abnormalities, mitotic indices or morphologically identified cell death were found with the VPA treatment conditions mentioned above, although decreased mitotic indices were detected under higher VPA concentration and longer exposure time. The frequency of DNA fragmentation identified with the TUNEL assay in HeLa cells increased after a 24-h VPA treatment, although this fragmentation occurred much earlier after treatment with TSA. Conclusions/Significance The inhibition of histone deacetylases by VPA induces chromatin remodeling in HeLa cells, which suggests an association to altered gene expression. Under VPA doses close to the therapeutic antiepileptic plasma range no changes in cell proliferation or chromosome abnormalities are elicited. The DNA fragmentation results indicate that a longer exposure to VPA or a higher VPA concentration is required for the induction of cell death. PMID:22206001

  15. Valproic Acid Induces Cutaneous Wound Healing In Vivo and Enhances Keratinocyte Motility

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soung-Hoon; Zahoor, Muhammad; Hwang, Jae-Kwan; Min, Do Sik; Choi, Kang-Yell

    2012-01-01

    Background Cutaneous wound healing is a complex process involving several signaling pathways such as the Wnt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Valproic acid (VPA) is a commonly used antiepileptic drug that acts on these signaling pathways; however, the effect of VPA on cutaneous wound healing is unknown. Methods and Findings We created full-thickness wounds on the backs of C3H mice and then applied VPA. After 7 d, we observed marked healing and reduced wound size in VPA-treated mice. In the neo-epidermis of the wounds, β-catenin and markers for keratinocyte terminal differentiation were increased after VPA treatment. In addition, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), collagen I and collagen III in the wounds were significantly increased. VPA induced proliferation and suppressed apoptosis of cells in the wounds, as determined by Ki67 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining analyses, respectively. In vitro, VPA enhanced the motility of HaCaT keratinocytes by activating Wnt/β-catenin, ERK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase)/Akt signaling pathways. Conclusions VPA enhances cutaneous wound healing in a murine model and induces migration of HaCaT keratinocytes. PMID:23144972

  16. Comparative persistence of antiepileptic drugs in patients with epilepsy: A STROBE-compliant retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Edward Chia-Cheng; Hsieh, Cheng-Yang; Su, Chien-Chou; Yang, Yea-Huei Kao; Huang, Chin-Wei; Lin, Swu-Jane; Setoguchi, Soko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We compared persistence of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) including carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, topiramate, valproic acid, and phenytoin in an Asian population with epilepsy. A retrospective cohort study was conducted by analyzing Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Adult epilepsy patients newly prescribed with AEDs between 2005 and 2009 were included. The primary outcome was persistence, defined as the treatment duration from the date of AED initiation to the date of AED discontinuation, switching, hospitalization due to seizure or disenrollment from databases, whichever came first. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the risk of non-persistence with AEDs. Among the 13,061 new users of AED monotherapy (mean age: 58 years; 60% men), the persistence ranged from 218.8 (gabapentin) to 275.9 (oxcarbazepine) days in the first treatment year. The risks of non-persistence in patients receiving oxcarbazepine (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.78; 95% CI, 0.74–0.83), valproic acid (0.88; 0.85–0.92), lamotrigine (0.72; 0.65–0.81), and topiramate (0.90; 0.82–0.98) were significantly lower than in the carbamazepine group. Compared with carbamazepine users, the non-persistence risk was higher in phenytoin users (1.10; 1.06–1.13), while gabapentin users (1.03; 0.98–1.09) had similar risk. For risk of hospitalization due to seizure and in comparison with carbamazepine users, oxcarbazepine (0.66; 0.58–0.74) and lamotrigine (0.46; 0.35–0.62) users had lower risk, while phenytoin (1.35; 1.26–1.44) users had higher risk. The results remained consistent throughout series of sensitivity and stratification analyses. The persistence varied among AEDs and was better for oxcarbazepine, valproic acid, lamotrigine, and topiramate, but worse for phenytoin when compared with carbamazepine. PMID:27583857

  17. Case Report: Valproic Acid and Risperidone Treatment Leading to Development of Hyperammonemia and Mania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Teri; Reynolds, Charles A.; Caplan, Rochelle

    2007-01-01

    This case report describes two children who developed hyperammonemia together with frank manic behavior during treatment with a combination of valproic acid and risperidone. One child had been maintained on valproic acid for years and risperidone was added. In the second case, valproic acid was introduced to a child who had been treated with…

  18. Antiepileptics for aggression and associated impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Huband, Nick; Ferriter, Michael; Nathan, Rajan; Jones, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Background Aggression is a major public health issue and is integral to several mental health disorders. Antiepileptic drugs may reduce aggression by acting on the central nervous system to reduce neuronal hyper-excitability associated with aggression. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in reducing aggression and associated impulsivity. Search methods We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) and ClinicalTrials.gov to April 2009. We also searched Cochrane Schizophrenia Group’s register of trials on aggression, National Research Record and handsearched for studies. Selection criteria Prospective, placebo-controlled trials of antiepileptic drugs taken regularly by individuals with recurrent aggression to reduce the frequency or intensity of aggressive outbursts. Data collection and analysis Three authors independently selected studies and two authors independently extracted data. We calculated standardised mean differences (SMDs), with odds ratios (ORs) for dichotomous data. Main results Fourteen studies with data from 672 participants met the inclusion criteria. Five different antiepileptic drugs were examined. Sodium valproate/divalproex was superior to placebo for outpatient men with recurrent impulsive aggression, for impulsively aggressive adults with cluster B personality disorders, and for youths with conduct disorder, but not for children and adolescents with pervasive developmental disorder. Carbamazepine was superior to placebo in reducing acts of self-directed aggression in women with borderline personality disorder, but not in children with conduct disorder. Oxcarbazepine was superior to placebo for verbal aggression and aggression against objects in adult outpatients. Phenytoin was superior to placebo on the frequency of aggressive acts in male prisoners and in outpatient men including those with personality disorder, but not on the frequency of ‘behavioral incidents’ in

  19. Adverse effects of new antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Onat, Filiz; Ozkara, Cigdem

    2004-04-01

    Starting with phenobarbital in the 1900s, it took almost 70-80 years to introduce old-generation agents for the treatment of epilepsy. Then, in eleven years, nine more new antiepileptic drugs were added to the armamentarium. These drugs produce a nearly 40-50% decrease in seizure incidence in refractory patients, but few patients have been able to achieve complete freedom from seizures. So the search for more effective drugs with minimal adverse effect profiles will continue. Although the new antiepileptic drugs do not demonstrate a superior efficacy compared to the older ones, they do offer some advantages in terms of tolerability, fewer drug interactions and simpler pharmacokinetics. However, our knowledge concerning their safety profiles can not yet be considered adequate due to the relatively short time these drugs have been on the market and to the limited number of patients exposed to them. The fact that the serious side effects of felbamate and vigabatrine appeared late after marketing should be taken as an important lesson because it implies the potential for unknown side effects at any time during treatment. Antiepileptic drug treatment should begin with diagnosis of the seizure and epileptic syndrome, followed by selection of the drug most appropriate for treatment of the individual patient, and continued with monitoring of not only the seizures but the adverse effect profile as well.

  20. Valproic acid-induced hyperammonaemic coma and unrecognised portosystemic shunt.

    PubMed

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Carrapatoso, Leonor; Ferreira, Fátima; Basilio, Carlos

    2013-06-01

    Hyperammonaemic encephalopathy is a rare and potentially fatal complication of valproic acid treatment. The clinical presentation of hyperammonaemic encephalopathy is wide and includes seizures and coma. We present a case of hyperammonaemic coma precipitated by sodium valproate use for symptomatic epilepsy in a patient with unrecognised portosystemic shunt, secondary to earlier alcoholism. The absence of any stigmata of chronic liver disease and laboratory markers of liver dysfunction delayed the recognition of this alcohol-related complication. The portal vein bypass led to a refractory, valproic acid-induced hyperammonaemic coma. The patient fully recovered after dialysis treatment.

  1. Ethosuximide, Valproic Acid, and Lamotrigine in Childhood Absence Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Glauser, Tracy A.; Cnaan, Avital; Shinnar, Shlomo; Hirtz, Deborah G.; Dlugos, Dennis; Masur, David; Clark, Peggy O.; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Adamson, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Childhood absence epilepsy, the most common pediatric epilepsy syndrome, is usually treated with ethosuximide, valproic acid, or lamotrigine. The most efficacious and tolerable initial empirical treatment has not been defined. METHODS In a double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial, we compared the efficacy, tolerability, and neuropsychological effects of ethosuximide, valproic acid, and lamotrigine in children with newly diagnosed childhood absence epilepsy. Drug doses were incrementally increased until the child was free of seizures, the maximal allowable or highest tolerable dose was reached, or a criterion indicating treatment failure was met. The primary outcome was freedom from treatment failure after 16 weeks of therapy; the secondary outcome was attentional dysfunction. Differential drug effects were determined by means of pairwise comparisons. RESULTS The 453 children who were randomly assigned to treatment with ethosuximide (156), lamotrigine (149), or valproic acid (148) were similar with respect to their demographic characteristics. After 16 weeks of therapy, the freedom-from-failure rates for ethosuximide and valproic acid were similar (53% and 58%, respectively; odds ratio with valproic acid vs. ethosuximide, 1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.80 to 1.98; P = 0.35) and were higher than the rate for lamotrigine (29%; odds ratio with ethosuximide vs. lamotrigine, 2.66; 95% CI, 1.65 to 4.28; odds ratio with valproic acid vs. lamotrigine, 3.34; 95% CI, 2.06 to 5.42; P<0.001 for both comparisons). There were no significant differences among the three drugs with regard to discontinuation because of adverse events. Attentional dysfunction was more common with valproic acid than with ethosuximide (in 49% of the children vs. 33%; odds ratio, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.12 to 3.41; P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS Ethosuximide and valproic acid are more effective than lamotrigine in the treatment of childhood absence epilepsy. Ethosuximide is associated with

  2. Valproic acid mediates the synaptic excitatory/inhibitory balance through astrocytes--a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Chuan; Chen, Po See; Hsu, Chien-Wen; Wu, Shou-Jung; Lin, Chieh-Ting; Gean, Po Wu

    2012-04-27

    Valproic acid (VPA) is one of the most widely used anticonvulsant and mood-stabilizing agents for the treatment of epilepsy and bipolar disorder. However, the underlying therapeutic mechanisms of the treatment of each disease remain unclear. Recently, the anti-epileptic effect of VPA has been found to lead to modulation of the synaptic excitatory/inhibitory balance. In addition, the therapeutic action of VPA has been linked to its effect on astrocytes by regulating gene expression at the molecular level, perhaps through an epigenetic mechanism as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. To provide insight into the mechanisms underlying the actions of VPA, this study investigated whether the synaptic excitatory/inhibitory (E/I) balance could be mediated by VPA through astrocytes. First, using the primary rat neuronal, astroglial, and neuro-glial mixed culture systems, we demonstrated that VPA treatment could regulate the mRNA levels of two post-synaptic cell adhesion molecules(neuroligin-1 and neuregulin-1) and two extracellular matrices (neuronal pentraxin-1and thrombospondin-3) in primary rat astrocyte cultures in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, the up-regulation effect of VPA was noted in astrocytes, but not in neurons. In addition, these regulatory effects could be mimicked by sodium butyrate, a HDAC inhibitor, but not by lithium or two other glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta inhibitors. With the known role of these four proteins in regulating the synaptic E/I balance, we further demonstrated that VPA increased excitatory post-synaptic protein (postsynaptic density 95) and inhibitory post-synaptic protein (Gephyrin) in cortical neuro-glial mixed cultures. Our results suggested that VPA might affect the synaptic excitatory/inhibitory balance through its effect on astrocytes. This work provides the basis for future evaluation of the role of astroglial cell adhesion molecules and the extracellular matrix on the control of excitatory and

  3. Valproic Acid Use During Radiation Therapy for Glioblastoma Associated With Improved Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Christopher A.; Bishop, Andrew J.; Chang, Maria; Beal, Kathryn; Chan, Timothy A.

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: Valproic acid (VA) is an antiepileptic drug (AED) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor taken by patients with glioblastoma (GB) to manage seizures, and it can modulate the biologic effects of radiation therapy (RT). We investigated whether VA use during RT for GB was associated with overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Medical records of 544 adults with GB were retrospectively reviewed. Analyses were performed to determine the association of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis (RTOG RPA) class, seizure history, and concurrent temozolomide (TMZ) and AED use during RT with OS. Results: Seizures before the end of RT were noted in 217 (40%) patients, and 403 (74%) were taking an AED during RT; 29 (7%) were taking VA. Median OS in patients taking VA was 16.9 months (vs 13.6 months taking another AED, P=.16). Among patients taking an AED during RT, OS was associated with VA (P=.047; hazard ratio [HR], 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27-1.07), and RTOG RPA class (P<.0001; HR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.37-1.61). Of the 5 most common AEDs, only VA was associated with OS. Median OS of patients receiving VA and TMZ during RT was 23.9 months (vs 15.2 months for patients taking another AED, P=.26). When the analysis was restricted to patients who received concurrent TMZ, VA use was marginally associated with OS (P=.057; HR, 0.54; 95% CI, −0.09 to 1.17), independently of RTOG RPA class and seizure history. Conclusions: VA use during RT for GB was associated with improved OS, independently of RTOG RPA, seizure history, and concurrent TMZ use. Further studies of treatment that combines HDAC inhibitors and RT are warranted.

  4. Vitamin U, a novel free radical scavenger, prevents lens injury in rats administered with valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Tunali, S; Kahraman, S; Yanardag, R

    2015-09-01

    Valproic acid (2-propyl-pentanoic acid, VPA) is the most widely prescribed antiepileptic drug due to its ability to treat a broad spectrum of seizure types. VPA exhibits various side effects such as organ toxicity, teratogenicity, and visual disturbances. S-Methylmethioninesulfonium is a derivative of the amino acid methionine and it is widely referred to as vitamin U (Vit U). This study was aimed to investigate the effects of Vit U on lens damage parameters of rats exposed to VPA. Female Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups. Group I comprised control animals. Group II included control rats supplemented with Vit U (50 mg/kg/day) for 15 days. Group III was given only VPA (500 mg/kg/day) for 15 days. Group IV was given VPA + Vit U (in same dose and time). Vit U was given to rats by gavage and VPA was given intraperitoneally. On the 16th day of experiment, all the animals which were fasted overnight were killed. Lens was taken from animals, homogenized in 0.9% saline to make up to 10% (w/v) homogenate. The homogenates were used for protein, glutathione, lipid peroxidation levels, and antioxidant enzymes activities. Lens lipid peroxidation levels and aldose reductase and sorbitol dehydrogenase activities were increased in VPA group. On the other hand, glutathione levels, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase, and paraoxonase activities were decreased in VPA groups. Treatment with Vit U reversed these effects. This study showed that Vit U exerted antioxidant properties and may prevent lens damage caused by VPA.

  5. Severe Hyponatremia Due to Valproic Acid Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ena; Kunjal, Ryan; Cury, James D

    2015-09-01

    Hyponatremia is a very commonly encountered clinical entity with potentially dangerous effects and for which many precipitating factors have been identified. We present a case of valproic acid (VPA) overdose causing profound hyponatremia, with one of the lowest serum sodium levels ever documented in literature. A 54-year-old woman with hypothyroidism, hypertension and bipolar disorder presented with somnolence after intentionally ingesting 7,500 mg VPA. She was drowsy but easily arousable with no hemodynamic compromise and an unremarkable physical exam. There was no clinical suspicion for organic neurological or pulmonary disease, adrenal insufficiency or volume depletion. She was found to have a serum sodium of 99 mEq/L, low plasma osmolality (211 mOsm/kg H2O), and high urine osmolality (115 mOsm/kg H2O). Her urine sodium was 18 mEq/L. She was euthyroid (TSH: 3.06 mIU/L) and compliant with thyroxine replacement. She was admitted to the intensive care unit for close monitoring and VPA was withheld. Over 36 hours her VPA level fell from 59.3 mg/L to 22.8 mg/L, serum sodium steadily rose to 125 mEq/L and there was concomitant improvement in her mental status. At 72 hours, she was transferred for an inpatient psychiatric evaluation and her sodium level was 135 mEq/L. She luckily did not experience any seizures or decline in neurological function. The clinical presentation in this patient is consistent with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) leading to a dramatic fall in sodium to a level of 99 mEq/L. Chronic VPA use has been associated with SIADH and chronic hyponatremia. Review of records in this patient from 1 year prior revealed that her last measured sodium level was 127 mEq/L. It is therefore most likely that our case is one of acute on chronic hyponatremia provoked by VPA overdose in the setting of chronic VPA use. Whilst our patient's course was relatively benign, this case illustrates a rare consequence of VPA toxicity, which

  6. Antiepileptic Drug Withdrawal in Dogs with Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gesell, Felix Kaspar; Hoppe, Sonja; Löscher, Wolfgang; Tipold, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs and is treated by chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In human beings with epilepsy, it is common clinical practice to consider drug withdrawal after a patient has been in remission (seizure free) for three or more years, but withdrawal is associated with the risk of relapse. In the present study, the consequences of AED withdrawal were studied in dogs with epilepsy. Therefore, 200 owners of dogs with idiopathic or presumed idiopathic epilepsy were contacted by telephone interview, 138 cases could be enrolled. In 11 cases, the therapy had been stopped after the dogs had become seizure free for a median time of 1 year. Reasons for AED withdrawal were appearance or fear of adverse side effects, financial aspects, and the idea that the medication could be unnecessary. Following AED withdrawal, four of these dogs remained seizure free, seven dogs suffered from seizure recurrence, of which only three dogs could regain seizure freedom after resuming AED therapy. Due to the restricted case number, an exact percentage of dogs with seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal cannot be given. However, the present study gives a hint that similar numbers as in human patients are found, and the data can help owners of epileptic dogs and the responsible clinician to decide when and why to stop antiepileptic medication.

  7. Antiepileptic Drug Withdrawal in Dogs with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Gesell, Felix Kaspar; Hoppe, Sonja; Löscher, Wolfgang; Tipold, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs and is treated by chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In human beings with epilepsy, it is common clinical practice to consider drug withdrawal after a patient has been in remission (seizure free) for three or more years, but withdrawal is associated with the risk of relapse. In the present study, the consequences of AED withdrawal were studied in dogs with epilepsy. Therefore, 200 owners of dogs with idiopathic or presumed idiopathic epilepsy were contacted by telephone interview, 138 cases could be enrolled. In 11 cases, the therapy had been stopped after the dogs had become seizure free for a median time of 1 year. Reasons for AED withdrawal were appearance or fear of adverse side effects, financial aspects, and the idea that the medication could be unnecessary. Following AED withdrawal, four of these dogs remained seizure free, seven dogs suffered from seizure recurrence, of which only three dogs could regain seizure freedom after resuming AED therapy. Due to the restricted case number, an exact percentage of dogs with seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal cannot be given. However, the present study gives a hint that similar numbers as in human patients are found, and the data can help owners of epileptic dogs and the responsible clinician to decide when and why to stop antiepileptic medication. PMID:26664952

  8. Psychotic disorders induced by antiepileptic drugs in people with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ziyi; Lusicic, Ana; O'Brien, Terence J; Velakoulis, Dennis; Adams, Sophia J; Kwan, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Antiepileptic drug treatment can induce psychosis in some patients. However, there are no agreed definitions or diagnostic criteria for antiepileptic drug-induced psychotic disorder in the classification systems of either epileptology or psychiatry. In this study we investigated the clinical spectrum of antiepileptic drug-induced psychotic disorder in patients with epilepsy. The medical records of all patients with epilepsy who were diagnosed by a neuropsychiatrist as having a psychotic disorder at the Royal Melbourne Hospital from January 1993 to June 2015 were reviewed. Data were extracted regarding epilepsy and its treatment, psychotic symptoms profile and outcome. The diagnosis of epilepsy was established in accordance to the classification system of the International League Against Epilepsy while that of psychotic disorder was made according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition and the proposal on neuropsychiatric disorders in epilepsy. Patients with antiepileptic drug-induced psychotic disorder were compared to those with psychotic disorders unrelated to antiepileptic drugs assessed over the same period (non-antiepileptic drug induced psychotic disorder group). Univariate comparisons were performed and variables with a value of P < 0.1 were selected for the multivariate logistic regression analysis. The records of 2630 in-patients and outpatients with epilepsy were screened, from which 98 (3.7%) with psychotic disorders were identified. Among these, 14 (14.3%) were diagnosed to have antiepileptic drug-induced psychotic disorder. Excluding one patient who developed psychosis after valproate withdrawal, 76.9% in the antiepileptic drug induced psychotic disorder group were female and the percentage of temporal lobe involvement was higher in the antiepileptic drug induced psychotic disorder group (69.2% versus 38.1%, P < 0.05). Current use of levetiracetam was higher in antiepileptic drug-induced psychotic disorder group (84

  9. Pros and cons for the development of new antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir; Walker, Matthew C; Sander, Josemir W

    2002-01-01

    There continues to be an escalation in the number of new antiepileptic drugs, with many recently marketed drugs and many more entering clinical trials. This growth begs the question as to whether we need additional antiepileptic drugs. We consider the answer to this question from the medical perspective and also from the viewpoint of the pharmaceutical industry, health providers and from a more global, international perspective. There is undoubtedly a medical need for new antiepileptic drugs, and despite growing competition, the antiepileptic drug market remains profitable. However, in health services with limited resources, it is important that this expense is not offset by failure to research more appropriate use of existing antiepileptic drugs that may have a greater impact on healthcare. This is especially true for developing countries where resources would be much better spent on prevention and closing the treatment gap (the difference between those who can be treated and those who are treated).

  10. Antiepileptic drug selection for people with HIV/AIDS: evidence-based guidelines from the ILAE and AAN.

    PubMed

    Birbeck, Gretchen L; French, Jacqueline A; Perucca, Emilio; Simpson, David M; Fraimow, Henry; George, Jomy M; Okulicz, Jason F; Clifford, David B; Hachad, Houda; Levy, René H

    2012-01-01

    A joint panel of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) convened to develop guidelines for selection of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) among people with HIV/AIDS. The literature was systematically reviewed to assess the global burden of relevant comorbid entities, to determine the number of patients who potentially utilize AEDs and antiretroviral agents (ARVs), and to address AED-ARV interactions. Key findings from this literature search included the following: AED-ARV administration may be indicated in up to 55% of people taking ARVs. Patients receiving phenytoin may require a lopinavir/ritonavir dosage increase of approximately 50% to maintain unchanged serum concentrations (Level C). Patients receiving valproic acid may require a zidovudine dosage reduction to maintain unchanged serum zidovudine concentrations (Level C). Coadministration of valproic acid and efavirenz may not require efavirenz dosage adjustment (Level C). Patients receiving ritonavir/atazanavir may require a lamotrigine dosage increase of approximately 50% to maintain unchanged lamotrigine serum concentrations (Level C). Coadministration of raltegravir/atazanavir and lamotrigine may not require lamotrigine dosage adjustment (Level C). Coadministration of raltegravir and midazolam may not require midazolam dosage adjustment (Level C). Patients may be counseled that it is unclear whether dosage adjustment is necessary when other AEDs and ARVs are combined (Level U). It may be important to avoid enzyme-inducing AEDs in people on ARV regimens that include protease inhibitors or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors because pharmacokinetic interactions may result in virologic failure, which has clinical implications for disease progression and development of ARV resistance. If such regimens are required for seizure control, patients may be monitored through pharmacokinetic assessments to ensure efficacy of the ARV regimen (Level C).

  11. Embryological exposure to valproic acid induces social interaction deficits in zebrafish (Danio rerio): A developmental behavior analysis.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Fernanda Francine; Gaspary, Karina Vidarte; Leite, Carlos Eduardo; De Paula Cognato, Giana; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2015-01-01

    Changes in social behavior are associated with brain disorders, including mood disorders, stress, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Autism is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by deficits in social interaction, impaired communication, anxiety, hyperactivity, and the presence of restricted interests. Zebrafish is one of the most social vertebrates used as a model in biomedical research, contributing to an understanding of the mechanisms that underlie social behavior. Valproic acid (VPA) is used as an anti-epileptic drug and mood stabilizer; however, prenatal VPA exposure in humans has been associated with an increased incidence of autism and it can also affect fetal brain development. Therefore, we conducted a behavioral screening at different periods of zebrafish development at 6, 30, 70, and 120dpf (days postfertilization) after VPA exposure in the early development stage to investigate social behavior, locomotion, aggression, and anxiety. VPA (48μM) exposure during the first 48hpf (hours postfertilization) did not promote changes on survival, morphology, and hatching rate at 24hpf, 48hpf, and 72hpf. The behavioral patterns suggest that VPA exposure induces changes in locomotor activity and anxiety at different developmental periods in zebrafish. Furthermore, a social interaction deficit is present at 70dpf and 120dpf. VPA exposure did not affect aggression in the adult stage at 70dpf and 120dpf. This is the first study that demonstrated zebrafish exposed to VPA during the first 48h of development exhibit deficits in social interaction, anxiety, and hyperactivity at different developmental periods.

  12. Developmental outcomes at preschool age after fetal exposure to valproic acid and lamotrigine: cognitive, motor, sensory and behavioral function.

    PubMed

    Rihtman, Tanya; Parush, Shula; Ornoy, Asher

    2013-11-01

    This prospective, observational study assessed the development of preschool children aged 3-6 years, 11 months (n=124) after in-utero anti-epileptic drug (AED) monotherapy exposure to valproic acid (VPA) (n=30, mean age 52.00[±15.22] months) and lamotrigine (LT) (n=42, mean age 50.12[±12.77] months), compared to non-exposed control children (n=52, mean age 59.96[±14.51] months). As a combined group, AED-exposed children showed reduced non-verbal IQ scores, and lower scores on motor measures, sensory measures, and parent-report executive function, behavioral and attentional measures. When the VPA- and LT-exposed groups were analyzed separately, no cognitive differences were found, but control-VPA and control-LT differences emerged for most motor and sensory measures as well as control-VPA parent-report behavioral and attentional differences. No differences were noted between the VPA and LT groups. These findings suggest that VPA- and LT-exposed children should be monitored on a wider range of developmental measures than currently used, and at differing developmental stages.

  13. Science review: Carnitine in the treatment of valproic acid-induced toxicity – what is the evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Lheureux, Philippe ER; Penaloza, Andrea; Zahir, Soheil; Gris, Mireille

    2005-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a broad-spectrum antiepileptic drug and is usually well tolerated, but rare serious complications may occur in some patients receiving VPA chronically, including haemorrhagic pancreatitis, bone marrow suppression, VPA-induced hepatotoxicity (VHT) and VPA-induced hyperammonaemic encephalopathy (VHE). Some data suggest that VHT and VHE may be promoted by carnitine deficiency. Acute VPA intoxication also occurs as a consequence of intentional or accidental overdose and its incidence is increasing, because of use of VPA in psychiatric disorders. Although it usually results in mild central nervous system depression, serious toxicity and even fatal cases have been reported. Several studies or isolated clinical observations have suggested the potential value of oral L-carnitine in reversing carnitine deficiency or preventing its development as well as some adverse effects due to VPA. Carnitine supplementation during VPA therapy in high-risk patients is now recommended by some scientific committees and textbooks, especially paediatricians. L-carnitine therapy could also be valuable in those patients who develop VHT or VHE. A few isolated observations also suggest that L-carnitine may be useful in patients with coma or in preventing hepatic dysfunction after acute VPA overdose. However, these issues deserve further investigation in controlled, randomized and probably multicentre trials to evaluate the clinical value and the appropriate dosage of L-carnitine in each of these conditions. PMID:16277730

  14. Reversible Encephalopathy due to Valproic Acid Induced Hyperammonemia in a Patient with Bipolar I Disorder: A Cautionary Report

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Neel; Landry, Katherine B.; Fargason, Rachel E.; Birur, Badari

    2017-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is an FDA-approved medication widely prescribed for seizures, migraines, and mixed or manic episodes in bipolar disorder. Hyperammonemia is a rare complication of VPA use, which can result in high morbidity and occasionally fatal encephalopathy. The scant literature on Valproate Induced Hyperammonemic Encephalopathy (VIHE) is characterized by acute onset of decreasing level of consciousness, drowsiness, lethargy which in rare instances can lead to seizures, stupor, coma, and persistent morbidity and cortical damage. Below we describe a case report of a patient with Bipolar I Disorder with no primary evidence of hepatic dysfunction that was initiated on VPA and olanzapine to address manic and psychotic symptoms. This patient subsequently developed elevated ammonia (NH4) levels that led to a reversible encephalopathy. This cautionary case report highlights the potential for a rare but serious complication from VPA, a medication increasingly used in both neurologic and neuropsychiatric settings. It is imperative that clinicians perform a thorough physical, neurological and diagnostic evaluation, routinely check NH4 and VPA levels when prescribing these agents and exercise caution when VPA is concomitantly prescribed with antipsychotics and cytochrome P450 inducing antiepileptic medications. PMID:28138203

  15. Antiepileptic Drugs 2012: Recent Advances and Trends

    PubMed Central

    Sirven, Joseph I.; Noe, Katherine; Hoerth, Matthew; Drazkowski, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    There are now 24 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) approved for use in epilepsy in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration. A literature search was conducted using PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google for all English-language articles that discuss newly approved AEDs and the use of AEDs in epilepsy in the United States from January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2011. Five new agents were identified that have come onto the market within the past 2 years. Moreover, 3 trends involving AEDs have become clinically important and must be considered by all who treat patients with epilepsy. These trends include issues of generic substitution of AEDs, pharmacogenomics predicting serious adverse events in certain ethnic populations, and the issue of the suicide risk involving the entire class of AEDs. This article discusses the most recent AEDs approved for use in the United States and the 3 important trends shaping the modern medical management of epilepsy. PMID:22958992

  16. Use of antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy and lactation: Type of information provided by searching Google.

    PubMed

    Lavi-Blau, Tal; Ekstein, Dana; Neufeld, Miri Y; Eyal, Sara

    2016-02-01

    Surveys among women with epilepsy (WWE) show that they receive their essential pregnancy-related information from many sources, including the internet. Our aim was to assess the types of websites provided by searching Google for the use of four antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) during pregnancy and lactation. The search was performed on 40 computers used by health-care professionals, on 40 computers used by nonhealth-care professionals, and on 5 computers used by WWE in Israel and on 8 computers used by nonhealth-care professionals in the U.S. On each computer, a Google search was conducted for term combinations that included one AED name ("carbamazepine","valproic acid", "lamotrigine", "levetiracetam", or "Keppra") and "Pregnancy", "Lactation", or "Breastfeeding". The top three and top ten websites retrieved in every search were mapped (a total of 45 and 150 websites, respectively, from each computer). Across all searches in English, on both U.S. and Israeli computers, the majority of websites listed among the first three and first ten results were those of independent health portals. The representation of the Epilepsy Foundation website was 10% or less, and only a few results were obtained from the NIH's general public-oriented MedlinePlus. In Hebrew, results included almost exclusively Israeli or Hebrew-translated websites. As in English, results from public-oriented, professionally-written websites in Hebrew accounted for less than 50% of entries. Overall, the availability of readable and high-quality information on AEDs used by pregnant and breastfeeding women is limited. Guiding patients towards accurate web resources can help them navigate among the huge amount of available online information.

  17. Apgar-score in children prenatally exposed to antiepileptic drugs: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Jakob; Pedersen, Henrik Søndergaard; Kjaersgaard, Maiken Ina Siegismund; Parner, Erik Thorlund; Vestergaard, Mogens; Sørensen, Merete Juul; Olsen, Jørn; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Pedersen, Lars Henning

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It is unknown if prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) increases the risk of low Apgar score in offspring. Setting Population-based study using health registers in Denmark. Participants We identified all 677 021 singletons born in Denmark from 1997 to 2008 and linked the Apgar score from the Medical Birth Register with information on the women's prescriptions for AEDs during pregnancy from the Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. We used the Danish National Hospital Registry to identify mothers diagnosed with epilepsy before birth of the child. Results were adjusted for smoking and maternal age. Results Among 2906 children exposed to AEDs, 55 (1.9%) were born with an Apgar score ≤7 as compared with 8797 (1.3%) children among 674 115 pregnancies unexposed to AEDs (adjusted relative risk (aRR)=1.41 (95% CI 1.07 to 1.85). When analyses were restricted to the 2215 children born of mothers with epilepsy, the aRR of having a low Apgar score associated with AED exposure was 1.34 (95% CI 0.90 to 2.01) When assessing individual AEDs, we found increased, unadjusted RR for exposure to carbamazepine (RR=1.86 (95% CI 1.01 to 3.42)), valproic acid (RR=1.85 (95% CI 1.04 to 3.30)) and topiramate (RR=2.97 (95% CI 1.26 to 7.01)) when compared to unexposed children. Conclusions Prenatal exposure to AEDs was associated with increased risk of being born with a low Apgar score, but the absolute risk of a low Apgar score was <2%. Risk associated with individual AEDs indicate that the increased risk is not a class effect, but that there may be particularly high risks of a low Apgar score associated with certain AEDs. PMID:26359281

  18. Antiepileptic drug trials: the view from the clinic.

    PubMed

    Faught, Edward

    2012-06-01

    A golden age of antiepileptic drug development has yielded over a dozen useful new compounds, but the nature of clinical trials has made translation to practical use in the clinic difficult. Most clinical trials are designed for regulatory purposes and fail to answer critical clinical questions. These questions include: which drug is best as initial therapy, which drugs work as monotherapy, what are good drug combinations, what is the best starting dose and titration schedule, what is a reasonable target dose, what is the shape of the dose-response curve and does it vary significantly between patients, what is the true incidence of side effects, and what is the long-term efficacy of the drug? Most of these questions could be answered by changing trial designs, but many changes would entail additional time and money. There are encouraging signs that trials with procedures more directly applicable to the clinic are becoming common. These include direct comparative trials, longer trials with emphasis on seizure freedom, and trials with more flexible dosing schedules. In the past, funding of longer and more naturalistic trials has fallen to government agencies, but commercial funding has been obtained for several recent studies. Better quality control, innovative endpoints, structured searching for side effects, and standardisation of data collection are also promising topics for development.

  19. Efficacy of Anti-Epileptic Drugs in the Treatment of Tumor and Its Associated Epilepsy: An in vitro Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Taranjeet; Manchanda, Shaffi; Saini, Vedangana; Lakhman, Sukhwinder S.; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2016-01-01

    The change in the therapeutic targets from neuron to glia has proved beneficial in the treatment of many psychiatric disorders. The anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) have been widely prescribed for the treatment of partial and complete seizures, bipolar disorder among others. The current study was carried out to explore the efficacy of some conventional and novel AEDs for the treatment of tumor-associated epilepsy which develops in 29-49% of the patients diagnosed with brain tumors. We used C6 glioma cell line as model system to study the effect of selected AEDs, viz., gabapentin (GBP), valproic acid (VPA) and topiramate (TPM). Morphometry, cell cycle analysis, apoptosis, expression of different protein markers, viz., GFAP, HSP70 and nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) were studied in AED-treated cultures. The study was further extended to rat hypothalamic primary explant cultures, and cell migration and expression of plasticity markers - neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and polysialylation of NCAM (PSA-NCAM) - were studied in the explants. TPM was observed to show more pronounced increase in apoptosis of glioblastoma cells accompanied by significant downregulation in the expression of HSP70 and NFκB. TPM-treated explants also showed highest process ramification and cellular migration accompanied by intense expression of the plasticity markers as compared to those treated with GBP and VPA. Among the 3 AEDs tested, TPM was observed to show more promising effects on cytoprotection and plasticity of C6 glioma cells. PMID:27536020

  20. The effects of antiepileptic inducers in neuropsychopharmacology, a neglected issue. Part I: A summary of the current state for clinicians.

    PubMed

    de Leon, Jose

    2015-01-01

    The literature on inducers in epilepsy and bipolar disorder is seriously contaminated by false negative findings. This is part i of a comprehensive review on antiepileptic drug (AED) inducers using both mechanistic pharmacological and evidence-based medicine to provide practical recommendations to neurologists and psychiatrists concerning how to control for them. Carbamazepine, phenobarbital and phenytoin, are clinically relevant AED inducers; correction factors were calculated for studied induced drugs. These correction factors are rough simplifications for orienting clinicians, since there is great variability in the population regarding inductive effects. As new information is published, the correction factors may need to be modified. Some of the correction factors are so high that the drugs (e.g., bupropion, quetiapine or lurasidone) should not co-prescribed with potent inducers. Clobazam, eslicarbazepine, felbamate, lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, rufinamide, topiramate, vigabatrin and valproic acid are grouped as mild inducers which may (i)be inducers only in high doses; (ii)frequently combine with inhibitory properties; and (iii)take months to reach maximum effects or de-induction, definitively longer than the potent inducers. Potent inducers, definitively, and mild inducers, possibly, have relevant effects in the endogenous metabolism of (i)sexual hormones, (ii) vitamin D, (iii)thyroid hormones, (iv)lipid metabolism, and (v)folic acid.

  1. Neurodevelopmental effects of fetal antiepileptic drug exposure.

    PubMed

    Velez-Ruiz, Naymee J; Meador, Kimford J

    2015-03-01

    Many studies investigating cognitive outcomes in children of women with epilepsy report an increased risk of mental impairment. Verbal scores on neuropsychometric measures may be selectively more involved. While a variety of factors contribute to the cognitive problems of children of women with epilepsy, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) appear to play a major role. The mechanisms by which AEDs affect neurodevelopmental outcomes remain poorly defined. Animal models suggest that AED-induced apoptosis, altered neurotransmitter environment, and impaired synaptogenesis are some of the mechanisms responsible for cognitive and behavioral teratogenesis. AEDs that are known to induce apoptosis, such as valproate, appear to affect children's neurodevelopment in a more severe fashion. Fetal valproate exposure has dose-dependent associations with reduced cognitive abilities across a range of domains, and these appear to persist at least until the age of 6. Some studies have shown neurodevelopmental deficiencies associated with the use of phenobarbital and possibly phenytoin. So far, most of the investigations available suggest that fetal exposures to lamotrigine or levetiracetam are safer with regard to cognition when compared with other AEDs. Studies on carbamazepine show contradictory results, but most information available suggests that major poor cognitive outcomes should not be attributed to this medication. Overall, children exposed to polytherapy prenatally appear to have worse cognitive and behavioral outcomes compared with children exposed to monotherapy, and with the unexposed. There is an increase risk of neurodevelopmental deficits when polytherapy involves the use of valproate versus other agents.

  2. The Controversy over Generic Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Susan J.; Hartman, Adam L.

    2010-01-01

    As patent protection ends for the next generation of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), a complex debate continues over generic substitution of AEDs. On one hand, generic drug formulations provide cost savings for patients and society. On the other hand, patients with epilepsy and physicians are wary about the adequacy and efficacy of the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) standards for generics. This article reviews current and proposed bioequivalence test procedures, summarizes new generic AED formulations and their costs, and discusses potential pitfalls in the current standards. These shortcomings include certain pharmacokinetic factors and clinical pharmacologic factors that may affect bioequivalence of generic AEDs, and statistical limitations of the standards. While the drug concentration differences between the brand name drug and each generic formulation are unlikely to be substantial, the differences with generic-to-generic switches will be greater and potentially clinically significant. Conversely, owing to their more favorable pharmacokinetic profile, newer AEDs may be less prone to problems with generic substitution than older ones. Unfortunately, very few data are available to guide decisions regarding what is best for an individual patient. Based on new prediction methods, generic substitution should be safe for many patients but identifying them ultimately requires more rigorous study. PMID:22477799

  3. Metabolic concerns associated with antiepileptic medications.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Raj D

    2004-11-23

    Because treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is often for years or lifelong, physicians should be aware of the metabolic changes that can be associated with AED use and the potential effects of these changes during long-term therapy. Alterations of bone metabolism leading to decreased bone mineral density, associated particularly but not exclusively with the hepatic enzyme-inducing AEDs, can worsen the risk for fractures, which is already increased in patients with epilepsy by factors such as seizure-related falls and trauma. Some AEDs are associated with weight gain, an effect that is not only distressing to many patients but may be sufficient to increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and other disorders associated with excessive body weight. The carbonic anhydrase-inhibiting properties of some AEDs can lead to metabolic acidosis. The AEDs that inhibit carbonic anhydrase are also associated with an increase in risk for renal stones, as is the ketogenic diet. Awareness of the potential metabolic disturbances associated with AED use is particularly important because many of them are subtle and may take years to become clinically apparent.

  4. Valproic Acid Increases CD133 Positive Cells that Show Low Sensitivity to Cytostatics in Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Mohamed Ashraf; Hraběta, Jan; Groh, Tomáš; Procházka, Pavel; Doktorová, Helena; Eckschlager, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a well-known antiepileptic drug that exhibits antitumor activities through its action as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. CD133 is considered to be a cancer stem cell marker in several tumors including neuroblastoma. CD133 transcription is strictly regulated by epigenetic modifications. We evaluated the epigenetic effects of treatment with 1mM VPA and its influence on the expression of CD133 in four human neuroblastoma cell lines. Chemoresistance and cell cycle of CD133+ and CD133− populations were examined by flow cytometry. We performed bisulfite conversion followed by methylation-sensitive high resolution melting analysis to assess the methylation status of CD133 promoters P1 and P3. Our results revealed that VPA induced CD133 expression that was associated with increased acetylation of histones H3 and H4. On treatment with VPA and cytostatics, CD133+ cells were mainly detected in the S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle and they showed less activated caspase-3 compared to CD133− cells. UKF-NB-3 neuroblastoma cells which express CD133 displayed higher colony and neurosphere formation capacities when treated with VPA, unlike IMR-32 which lacks for CD133 protein. Induction of CD133 in UKF-NB-3 was associated with increased expression of phosphorylated Akt and pluripotency transcription factors Nanog, Oct-4 and Sox2. VPA did not induce CD133 expression in cell lines with methylated P1 and P3 promoters, where the CD133 protein was not detected. Applying the demethylating agent 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine to the cell lines with methylated promoters resulted in CD133 re-expression that was associated with a drop in P1 and P3 methylation level. In conclusion, CD133 expression in neuroblastoma can be regulated by histone acetylation and/or methylation of its CpG promoters. VPA can induce CD133+ cells which display high proliferation potential and low sensitivity to cytostatics in neuroblastoma. These results give new insight into the possible

  5. Enhanced rat sciatic nerve regeneration through silicon tubes implanted with valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fei; Xing, Danmou; Peng, Zhengren; Rao, Ting

    2008-05-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is an effective antiepileptic drug and mood stabilizer. It has recently been demonstrated that VPA could promote neurite outgrowth, activate the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway, and increase B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 (bcl-2)and growth cone-associated protein 43 (GAP-43) levels in spinal cord. We hypothesized that VPA could enhance axonal regeneration in the rat. In the present research, we demonstrate the effect of VPA on peripheral nerve regeneration and recovery of motor function through a silicon tube implanted with VPA. The left sciatic nerves were exposed through dorsal-splitting incisions, and 8-mm nerve sections were excised at the middle of the thigh. Then, a 1.0-cm-long silicone tube (internal diameter,1.0 mm; exterior diameter, 2.0 mm) was used to bridge the nerve deficit, anchored to the proximal and distal terminals of the excised deficit of sciatic nerves with 9-0 nylon epineural suture. Sterile petroleum jelly was used to seal the ends of the tubes to avoid leakage. The rats in the VPA group and control group were locally delivered 10 muL VPA injection (400 mg/5 mL) and normal saline, respectively, after the operation. The sciatic nerve index (SFI) was observed in each animal at 2-week intervals and electrophysiology was studied at 4-week intervals for 12 weeks. Histological and morphometrical analyses were performed at the end of the experiment (12 weeks after the operation). Using the digital image-analysis system, the thickness of the myelin sheath was measured, and total numbers of regenerated axons were counted. There was a significant difference in SFI, electrophysiological index (motor-nerve conduct velocity, amplitude of activity potential), and morphometrical results (regenerated axon number and thickness of myelin sheath) in nerve regeneration between the VPA group and controls ( P < 0.05). The results demonstrated that VPA is able to enhance sciatic nerve regeneration in rats, suggesting the potential

  6. Effect of Valproic Acid on Acute Lung Injury in a Rodent Model of Intestinal Ischemia Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyuseok; Li, Yongqing; Jin, Guang; Chong, Wei; Liu, Baoling; Lu, Jennifer; Lee, Kyoungbun; deMoya, Marc; Velmahos, George; Alam, Hasan B.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Acute lung injury (ALI) is developed in many clinical situations and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Valproic acid (VPA), a well-known anti-epileptic drug, has been shown to have anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in various ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) models. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether VPA could affect survival and development of ALI in a rat model of intestinal I/R. Methods Two experiments were performed. Experiment I: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250–300 g) were subjected to intestinal ischemia (1 hour) and reperfusion (3 hours). They were randomized into 2 groups (n=7/group) 30 min after ischemia: Vehicle (Veh) and VPA (300 mg/kg, IV). Primary end-point for this study was survival over 4 hours from the start of ischemia. Experiment II: The histological and biochemical effects of VPA treatment on lungs were examined 3 hours (1 hr ischemia + 2 hrs reperfusion) after intestinal I/R injury (Veh vs. VPA, n = 9/group). An objective histological score was used to grade the degree of ALI. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to measure serum levels of cytokine interleukins (IL-6 and 10), and lung tissue of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). In addition, the activity of 8-isoprostane was analyzed for pulmonary oxidative damage. Results In Experiment I, four-hour survival rate was significantly higher in VPA treated animals compared to Veh animals (71.4% vs. 14.3%, p = 0.006). In Experiment II, ALI was apparent in all of the Veh group animals. Treatment with VPA prevented the development of ALI, with a reduction in the histological score (3.4 ± 0.3 vs. 5.3 ± 0.6, p = 0.025). Moreover, compared to the Veh control group the animals from the VPA group displayed decreased serum levels of IL-6 (952 ± 213 vs. 7709 ± 1990 pg/ml, p = 0.011), and lung tissue concentrations of CINC (1188 ± 28 vs. 1298 ± 27, p < 0.05), MPO activity (368 ± 23 vs. 490

  7. Molecular Targets for Antiepileptic Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Meldrum, Brian S.; Rogawski, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary This review considers how recent advances in the physiology of ion channels and other potential molecular targets, in conjunction with new information on the genetics of idiopathic epilepsies, can be applied to the search for improved antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Marketed AEDs predominantly target voltage-gated cation channels (the α subunits of voltage-gated Na+ channels and also T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels) or influence GABA-mediated inhibition. Recently, α2–δ voltage-gated Ca2+ channel subunits and the SV2A synaptic vesicle protein have been recognized as likely targets. Genetic studies of familial idiopathic epilepsies have identified numerous genes associated with diverse epilepsy syndromes, including genes encoding Na+ channels and GABAA receptors, which are known AED targets. A strategy based on genes associated with epilepsy in animal models and humans suggests other potential AED targets, including various voltage-gated Ca2+ channel subunits and auxiliary proteins, A- or M-type voltage-gated K+ channels, and ionotropic glutamate receptors. Recent progress in ion channel research brought about by molecular cloning of the channel subunit proteins and studies in epilepsy models suggest additional targets, including G-protein-coupled receptors, such as GABAB and metabotropic glutamate receptors; hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channel subunits, responsible for hyperpolarization-activated current Ih; connexins, which make up gap junctions; and neurotransmitter transporters, particularly plasma membrane and vesicular transporters for GABA and glutamate. New information from the structural characterization of ion channels, along with better understanding of ion channel function, may allow for more selective targeting. For example, Na+ channels underlying persistent Na+ currents or GABAA receptor isoforms responsible for tonic (extrasynaptic) currents represent attractive targets. The growing understanding of the

  8. Effects of fetal antiepileptic drug exposure

    PubMed Central

    Baker, G.A.; Browning, N.; Cohen, M.J.; Bromley, R.L.; Clayton-Smith, J.; Kalayjian, L.A.; Kanner, A.; Liporace, J.D.; Pennell, P.B.; Privitera, M.; Loring, D.W.; Labiner, David; Moon, Jennifer; Sherman, Scott; Combs Cantrell, Deborah T.; Silver, Cheryl; Goyal, Monisha; Schoenberg, Mike R.; Pack, Alison; Palmese, Christina; Echo, Joyce; Meador, Kimford J.; Loring, David; Pennell, Page; Drane, Daniel; Moore, Eugene; Denham, Megan; Epstein, Charles; Gess, Jennifer; Helmers, Sandra; Henry, Thomas; Motamedi, Gholam; Flax, Erin; Bromfield, Edward; Boyer, Katrina; Dworetzky, Barbara; Cole, Andrew; Halperin, Lucila; Shavel-Jessop, Sara; Barkley, Gregory; Moir, Barbara; Harden, Cynthia; Tamny-Young, Tara; Lee, Gregory; Cohen, Morris; Penovich, Patricia; Minter, Donna; Moore, Layne; Murdock, Kathryn; Liporace, Joyce; Wilcox, Kathryn; Kanner, Andres; Nelson, Michael N.; Rosenfeld, William; Meyer, Michelle; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Mawer, George; Kini, Usha; Martin, Roy; Privitera, Michael; Bellman, Jennifer; Ficker, David; Baade, Lyle; Liow, Kore; Baker, Gus; Booth, Alison; Bromley, Rebecca; Casswell, Miranda; Barrie, Claire; Ramsay, Eugene; Arena, Patricia; Kalayjian, Laura; Heck, Christianne; Padilla, Sonia; Miller, John; Rosenbaum, Gail; Wilensky, Alan; Constantino, Tawnya; Smith, Julien; Adab, Naghme; Veling-Warnke, Gisela; Sam, Maria; O'Donovan, Cormac; Naylor, Cecile; Nobles, Shelli; Santos, Cesar; Holmes, Gregory L.; Druzin, Maurice; Morrell, Martha; Nelson, Lorene; Finnell, Richard; Yerby, Mark; Adeli, Khosrow; Wells, Peter; Browning, Nancy; Blalock, Temperance; Crawford, Todd; Hendrickson, Linda; Jolles, Bernadette; Kunchai, Meghan Kelly; Loblein, Hayley; Ogunsola, Yinka; Russell, Steve; Winestone, Jamie; Wolff, Mark; Zaia, Phyllis; Zajdowicz, Thad

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine outcomes at age 4.5 years and compare to earlier ages in children with fetal antiepileptic drug (AED) exposure. Methods: The NEAD Study is an ongoing prospective observational multicenter study, which enrolled pregnant women with epilepsy on AED monotherapy (1999–2004) to determine if differential long-term neurodevelopmental effects exist across 4 commonly used AEDs (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, phenytoin, or valproate). The primary outcome is IQ at 6 years of age. Planned analyses were conducted using Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID at age 2) and Differential Ability Scale (IQ at ages 3 and 4.5). Results: Multivariate intent-to-treat (n = 310) and completer (n = 209) analyses of age 4.5 IQ revealed significant effects for AED group. IQ for children exposed to valproate was lower than each other AED. Adjusted means (95% confidence intervals) were carbamazepine 106 (102–109), lamotrigine 106 (102–109), phenytoin 105 (102–109), valproate 96 (91–100). IQ was negatively associated with valproate dose, but not other AEDs. Maternal IQ correlated with child IQ for children exposed to the other AEDs, but not valproate. Age 4.5 IQ correlated with age 2 BSID and age 3 IQ. Frequency of marked intellectual impairment diminished with age except for valproate (10% with IQ <70 at 4.5 years). Verbal abilities were impaired for all 4 AED groups compared to nonverbal skills. Conclusions: Adverse cognitive effects of fetal valproate exposure persist to 4.5 years and are related to performances at earlier ages. Verbal abilities may be impaired by commonly used AEDs. Additional research is needed. PMID:22491865

  9. 14C-NaVP and 14C-PEV repeated dose study in rat. Pharmacokinetic study in rats after repeated oral administrations of 14C-valproic acid sodium salt and 14C-valproic acid pivaloyl oxymethyl ester.

    PubMed

    Bertolino, M; Acerbi, D; Canali, S; Giachetti, C; Poli, G; Ventura, P; Zanolo, G

    1998-01-01

    The absorption, excretion and tissue distribution of radioactivity after repeated oral equimolar doses of 14C-valproic acid sodium salt (NaVP) or 14C-valproic acid pivaloyl oxymethyl ester (PEV) was investigated in male rats treated once a day for 14 consecutive days. The 14th day plasma time-course of radioactivity after PEV administrations was characterised by a slow absorption rate with a delayed peak (tmax 2 h, Cmax 7.52 +/- 1.35 microg eq./ml), followed by a plateau lasting up to 8 h. After NaVP treatment, the main peak of radioactivity was observed 0.5 h after administration (Cmax 8.30 +/- 1.26 microg eq./ml) followed by a secondary peak due to biliary enterohepatic recycling. Starting from 4 h onwards, radioactivity levels after PEV treatment were higher than those after NaVP (AUCtau = 113.3 h.microg eq./ml after PEV vs 71.9 h.microg eq./ml after NaVP), but concentrations declined with similar terminal half-lives (52.8 h for PEV and 49.7 h for NaVP). Radioactivity recovered (0-432 h interval) in urine accounted for 79.3% (PEV) and 56.1% (NaVP) while, in faeces accounted for 9.1% (PEV) and 26.1% (NaVP) of total administered dose (14 days). The difference is attributable to a higher excretion of radioactivity in the bile for NaVP. The missing fraction in the total radioactivity balance is probably excreted in expired air, as observed in single dose studies. Radioactivity excreted in bile (0-8 h interval of the last 14th day) accounted for 5.1% (NaVP) and 0.23% (PEV) of the total administered dose (14 days). A possible explanation of this difference may be a different metabolism pattern for the two compounds. The negligible biliary excretion observed after PEV administration is probably due to an inhibition of the glucuronation of valproic acid (or other metabolites) caused by the pivalic acid. Due to the presence of the enterohepatic recycle, the radioactivity levels in intestine, 0.5 and 2 h after administration, were higher after NaVP administration

  10. Does Valproic Acid or Levetiracetam Improve Survival in Glioblastoma? A Pooled Analysis of Prospective Clinical Trials in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Happold, Caroline; Gorlia, Thierry; Chinot, Olivier; Gilbert, Mark R.; Nabors, L. Burt; Wick, Wolfgang; Pugh, Stephanie L.; Hegi, Monika; Cloughesy, Timothy; Roth, Patrick; Reardon, David A.; Perry, James R.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Stupp, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Symptomatic epilepsy is a common complication of glioblastoma and requires pharmacotherapy. Several uncontrolled retrospective case series and a post hoc analysis of the registration trial for temozolomide indicated an association between valproic acid (VPA) use and improved survival outcomes in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Patients and Methods To confirm the hypothesis suggested above, a combined analysis of survival association of antiepileptic drug use at the start of chemoradiotherapy with temozolomide was performed in the pooled patient cohort (n = 1,869) of four contemporary randomized clinical trials in newly diagnosed glioblastoma: AVAGlio (Avastin in Glioblastoma; NCT00943826), CENTRIC (Cilengitide, Temozolomide, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma and Methylated Gene Promoter Status; NCT00689221), CORE (Cilengitide, Temozolomide, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma and Unmethylated Gene Promoter Status; NCT00813943), and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0825 (NCT00884741). Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were compared between: (1) any VPA use and no VPA use at baseline or (2) VPA use both at start of and still after chemoradiotherapy. Results of Cox regression models stratified by trial and adjusted for baseline prognostic factors were analyzed. The same analyses were performed with levetiracetam (LEV). Results VPA use at start of chemoradiotherapy was not associated with improved PFS or OS compared with all other patients pooled (PFS: hazard ratio [HR], 0.91; 95% CI, 0.77 to 1.07; P = .241; OS: HR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.80 to 1.15; P = .633). Furthermore, PFS and OS of patients taking VPA both at start of and still after chemoradiotherapy were not different from those without antiepileptic drug use at both time points (PFS: HR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.74 to 1.15; P = .467; OS: HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.40; P = .440). Similarly, no

  11. TrkB/BDNF-dependent striatal plasticity and behavior in a genetic model of epilepsy: modulation by valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Ghiglieri, Veronica; Sgobio, Carmelo; Patassini, Stefano; Bagetta, Vincenza; Fejtova, Anna; Giampà, Carmela; Marinucci, Silvia; Heyden, Alexandra; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Fusco, Francesca R; Calabresi, Paolo; Picconi, Barbara

    2010-06-01

    In mice lacking the central domain of the presynaptic scaffold Bassoon the occurrence of repeated cortical seizures induces cell-type-specific plasticity changes resulting in a general enhancement of the feedforward inhibition within the striatal microcircuit. Early antiepileptic treatment with valproic acid (VPA) reduces epileptic attacks, inhibits the emergence of pathological form of plasticity in fast-spiking (FS) interneurons and restores physiological striatal synaptic plasticity in medium spiny (MS) neurons. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key factor for the induction and maintenance of synaptic plasticity and it is also implicated in the mechanisms underlying epilepsy-induced adaptive changes. In this study, we explore the possibility that the TrkB/BDNF system is involved in the striatal modifications associated with the Bassoon gene (Bsn) mutation. In epileptic mice abnormal striatum-dependent learning was paralleled by higher TrkB levels and an altered distribution of BDNF. Accordingly, subchronic intrastriatal administration of k252a, an inhibitor of TrkB receptor tyrosine kinase activity, reversed behavioral alterations in Bsn mutant mice. In addition, in vitro manipulations of the TrkB/BDNF complex by k252a, prevented the emergence of pathological plasticity in FS interneurons. Chronic treatment with VPA, by reducing seizures, was able to rebalance TrkB to control levels favoring a physiological redistribution of BDNF between MS neurons and FS interneurons with a concomitant recovery of striatal plasticity. Our results provide the first indication that BDNF is involved in determining the striatal alterations occurring in the early-onset epileptic syndrome associated with the absence of presynaptic protein Bassoon.

  12. TrkB/BDNF-Dependent Striatal Plasticity and Behavior in a Genetic Model of Epilepsy: Modulation by Valproic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Ghiglieri, Veronica; Sgobio, Carmelo; Patassini, Stefano; Bagetta, Vincenza; Fejtova, Anna; Giampà, Carmela; Marinucci, Silvia; Heyden, Alexandra; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Fusco, Francesca R; Calabresi, Paolo; Picconi, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    In mice lacking the central domain of the presynaptic scaffold Bassoon the occurrence of repeated cortical seizures induces cell-type-specific plasticity changes resulting in a general enhancement of the feedforward inhibition within the striatal microcircuit. Early antiepileptic treatment with valproic acid (VPA) reduces epileptic attacks, inhibits the emergence of pathological form of plasticity in fast-spiking (FS) interneurons and restores physiological striatal synaptic plasticity in medium spiny (MS) neurons. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key factor for the induction and maintenance of synaptic plasticity and it is also implicated in the mechanisms underlying epilepsy-induced adaptive changes. In this study, we explore the possibility that the TrkB/BDNF system is involved in the striatal modifications associated with the Bassoon gene (Bsn) mutation. In epileptic mice abnormal striatum-dependent learning was paralleled by higher TrkB levels and an altered distribution of BDNF. Accordingly, subchronic intrastriatal administration of k252a, an inhibitor of TrkB receptor tyrosine kinase activity, reversed behavioral alterations in Bsn mutant mice. In addition, in vitro manipulations of the TrkB/BDNF complex by k252a, prevented the emergence of pathological plasticity in FS interneurons. Chronic treatment with VPA, by reducing seizures, was able to rebalance TrkB to control levels favoring a physiological redistribution of BDNF between MS neurons and FS interneurons with a concomitant recovery of striatal plasticity. Our results provide the first indication that BDNF is involved in determining the striatal alterations occurring in the early-onset epileptic syndrome associated with the absence of presynaptic protein Bassoon. PMID:20200504

  13. Functional roles of benzothiazole motif in antiepileptic drug research.

    PubMed

    Amir, Mohammad; Hassan, Mohd Zaheen

    2013-12-01

    Benzothiazoles are promising candidates for the design of novel antiepileptic drugs. The endocyclic sulphur and nitrogen functions present in this heterocyclic nucleus have been shown to be critical for the anticonvulsant activity. The present review outlines the rational design and anticonvulsant potential of promising benzothiazole lead molecules. Particular focus has been placed on the structure activity relationship of different benzothiazole derivatives giving selected examples of molecules with significant activity being that these molecules may serve as prototypes for the development of more active antiepileptic drugs.

  14. Non-imidazole histamine H3 receptor ligands incorporating antiepileptic moieties.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Bassem; Schwed, Johannes Stephan; Subramanian, Dhanasekaran; Weizel, Lilia; Walter, Miriam; Adem, Abdu; Stark, Holger

    2014-04-22

    A small series of histamine H3 receptor (H3R) ligands (1-5) incorporating different antiepileptic structural motifs has been newly synthesized. All compounds exhibited moderate to high in vitro hH3R affinities up to a sub-nanomolar concentration range with pKi values in the range of 6.25-9.62 with varying preferences for this receptor subtype. The compounds (1-5) were further investigated in vivo on anticonvulsant effects against maximum electroshock (MES)-induced and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindled convulsions in rats having phenytoin (PHT) as the reference antiepileptic drug (AED). Surprisingly, animals pretreated with 1 mg/kg, i.p. of 5,5-diphenyl-3-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propyl)imidazolidine-2,4-dione (4) were only moderately protected and no protection was observed for compounds 1-3 and 5 in three different doses (1 mg, 5 mg, and 10 mg/kg i.p.). Compound 4 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) failed to modify PTZ-kindled convulsion. However, a dose of 10 mg/kg significantly reduced convulsions in both models. In contrast, 5,5-diphenyl-3-(4-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)benzyl)imidazolidine-2,4-dione (5) (1, 5, and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) showed proconvulsant effects in the MES model with further confirmation of these results in the PTZ model as no protection was observed against convulsion in the doses tested (1 and 10 mg/kg). In addition, compound 4 (10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly prolonged myoclonic latency time and shortened total convulsion duration when compared to control, PHT or standard H3R inverse agonist/antagonist pitolisant (PIT). Our results showed that H3R pharmacophores could successfully be structurally combined to antiepileptic moieties, especially phenytoin partial structures, maintaining the H3R affinity. However, the new derivatives for multiple-target approaches in epilepsy models are complex and show that pharmacophore elements are not easily pharmacologically combinable.

  15. Updated ILAE evidence review of antiepileptic drug efficacy and effectiveness as initial monotherapy for epileptic seizures and syndromes.

    PubMed

    Glauser, Tracy; Ben-Menachem, Elinor; Bourgeois, Blaise; Cnaan, Avital; Guerreiro, Carlos; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Mattson, Richard; French, Jacqueline A; Perucca, Emilio; Tomson, Torbjorn

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this report was to update the 2006 International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) report and identify the level of evidence for long-term efficacy or effectiveness for antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) as initial monotherapy for patients with newly diagnosed or untreated epilepsy. All applicable articles from July 2005 until March 2012 were identified, evaluated, and combined with the previous analysis (Glauser et al., 2006) to provide a comprehensive update. The prior analysis methodology was utilized with three modifications: (1) the detectable noninferiority boundary approach was dropped and both failed superiority studies and prespecified noninferiority studies were analyzed using a noninferiority approach, (2) the definition of an adequate comparator was clarified and now includes an absolute minimum point estimate for efficacy/effectiveness, and (3) the relationship table between clinical trial ratings, level of evidence, and conclusions no longer includes a recommendation column to reinforce that this review of efficacy/evidence for specific seizure types does not imply treatment recommendations. This evidence review contains one clarification: The commission has determined that class I superiority studies can be designed to detect up to a 20% absolute (rather than relative) difference in the point estimate of efficacy/effectiveness between study treatment and comparator using an intent-to-treat analysis. Since July, 2005, three class I randomized controlled trials (RCT) and 11 class III RCTs have been published. The combined analysis (1940-2012) now includes a total of 64 RCTs (7 with class I evidence, 2 with class II evidence) and 11 meta-analyses. New efficacy/effectiveness findings include the following: levetiracetam and zonisamide have level A evidence in adults with partial onset seizures and both ethosuximide and valproic acid have level A evidence in children with childhood absence epilepsy. There are no major changes in the level of evidence

  16. Two cases of valproic acid poisoning treated with L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Chan, Y C; Tse, M L; Lau, F L

    2007-12-01

    Two cases of acute valproic acid poisoning with central nervous system depression and raised ammonia level without hepatotoxicity were reported. They were treated successfully with the use of the antidotes: L-carnitine and other supportive measures. Clinical manifestation and progress was described, and discussion is focused on the use of L-carnitine in valproic acid-induced hyperammonemia, from its mechanism to the clinical experiences in the literature. Based on the favorable response of our two cases and the literature review, we recommend the administration of intravenous L-carnitine in patients of valproic acid overdose with hyperammonemia or valproic acid-induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy and hepatotoxicity at a dose of 50 mg/kg every 8 h for the first initial 24 h with further individual assessment.

  17. Absorption of valproic acid from the gastrointestinal tract of the piglet.

    PubMed

    Nahata, M C; Breech, L; Ailabouni, A; Murray, R D

    1992-01-01

    Valproic acid is a commonly used drug for the treatment of epilepsy. Since valproic acid can only be given orally, its absorption from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract especially in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS) and in neonates is important. The specific sites of absorption for valproic acid in the small intestine and colon have not been investigated. It is currently unknown whether these patients are able to absorb oral valproic acid sufficiently to maintain a therapeutic serum concentration. The primary objectives of the study were to: (a) determine the relative absorption of valproic acid from specific sites in the GI tract; and (b) investigate the influence of intestinal development on valproic acid absorption using the newborn piglet as a model. Two groups were studied: Group I included 5 piglets 18-21 days of age, and Group II included 5 piglets 1-3 days of age. A valproic acid solution was simultaneously perfused through 5 partitioned segments of the gastrointestinal tract: the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, right colon and left colon. Tritiated [3H] polyethylene glycol was co-administered to monitor water movement across the GI mucosa. Following steady state, samples were collected from each segment, and analyzed by a specific enzyme-mediated immunoassay. The absorption rates (micrograms/min/cm) of valproic acid in Group I were as follows: 9.96 +/- 2.8 duodenum; 11.28 +/- 2.79, jejunum; 9.42 +/- 3.34, ileum; 10.88 +/- 3.35, right colon; 10.96 +/- 2.92, left colon.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzumura, Akitoshi; Watanabe, Masaki; Nagasako, Naoyuki; Asahi, Ryoji

    2014-06-01

    Recently, Cu-based chalcogenides such as Cu3SbSe4, Cu2Se, and Cu2SnSe3 have attracted much attention because of their high thermoelectric performance and their common feature of very low thermal conductivity. However, for practical use, materials without toxic elements such as selenium are preferable. In this paper, we report Se-free Cu3SbS4 thermoelectric material and improvement of its figure of merit ( ZT) by chemical substitutions. Substitutions of 3 at.% Ag for Cu and 2 at.% Ge for Sb lead to significant reductions in the thermal conductivity by 37% and 22%, respectively. These substitutions do not sacrifice the power factor, thus resulting in enhancement of the ZT value. The sensitivity of the thermal conductivity to chemical substitutions in these compounds is discussed in terms of the calculated phonon dispersion and previously proposed models for Cu-based chalcogenides. To improve the power factor, we optimize the hole carrier concentration by substitution of Ge for Sb, achieving a power factor of 16 μW/cm K2 at 573 K, which is better than the best reported for Se-based Cu3SbSe4 compounds.

  19. Infantile Spasms and Cytomegalovirus Infection: Antiviral and Antiepileptic Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunin-Wasowicz, Dorota; Kasprzyk-Obara, Jolanta; Jurkiewicz, Elzbieta; Kapusta, Monika; Milewska-Bobula, Bogumila

    2007-01-01

    From 1 January 1995 to 31 December 2004, 22 patients (13 males, nine females; age range 2-12mo) with infantile spasms and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection were treated with intravenous ganciclovir (GCV) and antiepileptic drugs. GCV was given for 3 to 12 weeks with a 1-month interval (one, two, or three courses). Epileptic spasms occurred before…

  20. The Effects of Antiepileptic Drugs on Classroom Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titus, Jeffrey B.; Thio, Liu Lin

    2009-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in children, and it has been associated with an increased risk of cognitive, psychiatric, and learning problems. Although side effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been long studied in adults, an understanding of how they manifest in children is only beginning to emerge. Careful…

  1. Hypoactive sexual desire disorder caused by antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Singh, M; Bathla, Manish; Martin, A; Aneja, J

    2015-01-01

    Female sexual dysfunction is common but poorly understood sexual problem in women. Sexual dysfunction in female is multi-factorial in origin and also observed with intake of drug acting on central nervous system. This case report describes a female epileptic patient who developed sexual dysfunction with intake of antiepileptic drugs.

  2. Neurologic birth defects after prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Uziel, Daniela; Rozental, Renato

    2008-12-01

    Maternal epilepsy has a potential for fetal injury, either antiepileptic drug (AED)--induced or as a consequence of seizures per se. The intent of this article is to explore this relationship, discussing similar patterns of malformations seen with AEDs or different disease exposure during pregnancy, and the potential role of gap junctional intercellular communication in abnormal morphogenesis.

  3. Antiepileptic Drug Nonadherence and Its Predictors among People with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Getnet, Asmamaw; Woldeyohannes, Solomon Meseret; Bekana, Lulu; Menberu, Melak; Yimer, Solomon; Assaye, Adisu; Belete, Habte

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Antiepileptic drugs are effective in the treatment of epilepsy to the extent that about 70% of people with epilepsy can be seizure-free, but poor adherence to medication is major problem to sustained remission and functional restoration. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and associated factors of antiepileptic drug nonadherence. Methods. Cross-sectional study was conducted on 450 individuals who were selected by systematic random sampling method. Antiepileptic drug nonadherence was measured by Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS) and logistic regression was used to look for significant associations. Result. The prevalence of AEDs nonadherence was 37.8%. Being on treatment for 6 years and above [AOR = 3.47, 95% CI: 1.88, 6.40], payment for AEDs [AOR = 2.76, 95% CI: 1.73, 4.42], lack of health information [AOR = 2.20, 95% CI: 1.41,3.43], poor social support [AOR = 1.88, 95%, CI: 1.01, 3.50], perceived stigma [AOR = 2.27, 95% CI: 1.45, 3.56], and experience side effect [AOR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.06, 2.72] were significantly associated with antiepileptic drug nonadherence. Conclusion. More than one-third of people with epilepsy were not compliant with their AEDs. Giving health information about epilepsy and its management and consequent reduction in stigma will help for medication adherence. PMID:28053370

  4. Valproic Acid Increases the Hepatic Differentiation Potential of Salivary Gland Cells

    PubMed Central

    Petrakova, O. S.; Ashapkin, V. V.; Shtratnikova, V. Y.; Kutueva, L. I.; Vorotelyak, E. A.; Borisov, M. A.; Terskikh, V. V.; Gvazava, I. G.; Vasiliev, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    The studies of cell plasticity and differentiation abilities are important problems in modern cellular biology. The use of histone deacetylase inhibitor - valproic acid is a promising approach to increasing the differentiation efficiency of various cell types. In this paper we investigate the ability of mouse submandibular salivary gland cells to differentiate into the hepatic direction and the effect of valproic acid on the efficiency of this differentiation. It was shown that the gene expression levels of hepatocyte markers (Aat, Afp, G6p, Pepck, Tat, Cyp3a13) and liver-enriched transcription factors (Hnf-3α, Hnf-3β, Hnf-4α, Hnf-6) were increased after differentiation in salivary gland cells. Valproic acid increases the specificity of hepatic differentiation, reducing the expression levels of the ductal (Krt19, Hhex1, Cyp7a1) and acinar (Ptf1a) markers. After valproic acid exposure, the efficiency of hepatic differentiation also increases, as evidenced by the increase in the gene expression level of Alb and Tdo, and increase in urea production by differentiated cells. No change was found in DNA methylation of the promoter regions of the genes; however, valproic acid treatment and subsequent hepatic differentiation largely affected the histone H3 methylation of liver-enriched genes. Thus, mouse submandibular salivary gland cells are capable of effective differentiation in the hepatic direction. Valproic acid increases the specificity and efficiency of the hepatic differentiation of these cells. PMID:26798494

  5. Minocycline ameliorates prenatal valproic acid induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopment disorder. One percent worldwide population suffers with autism and males suffer more than females. Microglia plays an important role in neurodevelopment, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. The present study has been designed to investigate the role of minocycline in prenatal valproic acid induced autism in rats. Animals with prenatal valproic acid have reduced social interaction (three chamber social behaviour apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (both in prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complexes I, II, IV). Furthermore, prenatal valproic acid treated animals have shown an increase in locomotion (actophotometer), anxiety (elevated plus maze), brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (both in brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Treatment with minocycline significantly attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, minocycline has also attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Thus, it may be concluded that prenatal valproic acid has induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairment in animals, which were significantly attenuated by minocycline. Minocycline should be explored further for its therapeutic benefits in autism.

  6. Exploring the Validity of Valproic Acid Animal Model of Autism

    PubMed Central

    Mabunga, Darine Froy N.; Gonzales, Edson Luck T.; Kim, Ji-woon; Kim, Ki Chan

    2015-01-01

    The valproic acid (VPA) animal model of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is one of the most widely used animal model in the field. Like any other disease models, it can't model the totality of the features seen in autism. Then, is it valid to model autism? This model demonstrates many of the structural and behavioral features that can be observed in individuals with autism. These similarities enable the model to define relevant pathways of developmental dysregulation resulting from environmental manipulation. The uncovering of these complex pathways resulted to the growing pool of potential therapeutic candidates addressing the core symptoms of ASD. Here, we summarize the validity points of VPA that may or may not qualify it as a valid animal model of ASD. PMID:26713077

  7. Can valproic acid be an inducer of clozapine metabolism?

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Francisco J.; Eap, Chin B.; Ansermot, Nicolas; Crettol, Severine; Spina, Edoardo; de Leon, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Prior clozapine studies indicated no effects, mild inhibition or induction of valproic acid (VPA) on clozapine metabolism. The hypotheses that 1) VPA is a net inducer of clozapine metabolism, and 2) smoking modifies this inductive effect were tested in a therapeutic drug monitoring study. Methods After excluding strong inhibitors and inducers, 353 steady-state total clozapine (clozapine plus norclozapine) concentrations provided by 151 patients were analyzed using a random intercept linear model. Results VPA appeared to be an inducer of clozapine metabolism since total plasma clozapine concentrations in subjects taking VPA were significantly lower (27% lower; 95% confidence interval, 14% to 39%) after controlling for confounding variables including smoking (35% lower, 28% to 56%). Discussion Prospective studies are needed to definitively establish that VPA may 1) be an inducer of clozapine metabolism when induction prevails over competitive inhibition, and 2) be an inducer even in smokers who are under the influence of smoking inductive effects on clozapine metabolism. PMID:24764199

  8. A dual action of valproic acid upon morphine analgesia and morphine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, L; Contreras, E

    1983-01-01

    Effects of valproic acid administration on morphine analgesia and on morphine tolerance and dependence were investigated in mice. Valproate increased the reaction time to thermal stimulation in naive animals. This effect was additive with morphine when valproate was administered shortly before the analgesic. However, an antagonism was observed if a 4-hour period elapsed between valproate and morphine administration. When administered to mice receiving a sustained release preparation of morphine, valproate antagonized the development of tolerance to morphine. Valproate elicited a dual action on the abstinence signs observed after naloxone administration in morphine-treated mice. The effect consisted in a reduction of abstinence behavior if the anticonvulsant was administered a few minutes before naloxone; the same treatment increased the severity of the abstinence behavior when valproate was injected 1 h before the precipitating dose of naloxone. In this latter schedule, concomitant administration of gamma-vinyl-GABA failed to reduce the severity of the convulsions observed during the abstinence syndrome. These results suggest that valproate is metabolized to a compound responsible for decreased analgesia and intensified withdrawal signs.

  9. Limited Effect of Chronic Valproic Acid Treatment in a Mouse Model of Machado-Joseph Disease

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Sofia; Duarte-Silva, Sara; Naia, Luana; Neves-Carvalho, Andreia; Teixeira-Castro, Andreia; Rego, Ana Cristina; Silva-Fernandes, Anabela; Maciel, Patrícia

    2015-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease, caused by a CAG repeat expansion within the coding region of ATXN3 gene, and which currently lacks effective treatment. In this work we tested the therapeutic efficacy of chronic treatment with valproic acid (VPA) (200mg/kg), a compound with known neuroprotection activity, and previously shown to be effective in cell, fly and nematode models of MJD. We show that chronic VPA treatment in the CMVMJD135 mouse model had limited effects in the motor deficits of these mice, seen mostly at late stages in the motor swimming, beam walk, rotarod and spontaneous locomotor activity tests, and did not modify the ATXN3 inclusion load and astrogliosis in affected brain regions. However, VPA chronic treatment was able to increase GRP78 protein levels at 30 weeks of age, one of its known neuroprotective effects, confirming target engagement. In spite of limited results, the use of another dosage of VPA or of VPA in a combined therapy with molecules targeting other pathways, cannot be excluded as potential strategies for MJD therapeutics. PMID:26505994

  10. Profibrinolytic Effect of the Epigenetic Modifier Valproic Acid in Man

    PubMed Central

    Saluveer, Ott; Larsson, Pia; Ridderstråle, Wilhelm; Hrafnkelsdóttir, Thórdís J.; Jern, Sverker; Bergh, Niklas

    2014-01-01

    Aims The aim of the study was to test if pharmacological intervention by valproic acid (VPA) treatment can modulate the fibrinolytic system in man, by means of increased acute release capacity of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) as well as an altered t-PA/Plasminogen activator inhibitor -1 (PAI-1) balance. Recent data from in vitro research demonstrate that the fibrinolytic system is epigenetically regulated mainly by histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. HDAC inhibitors, including VPA markedly upregulate t-PA gene expression in vitro. Methods and Results The trial had a cross-over design where healthy men (n = 10), were treated with VPA (Ergenyl Retard) 500 mg depot tablets twice daily for 2 weeks. Capacity for stimulated t-PA release was assessed in the perfused-forearm model using intra-brachial Substance P infusion and venous occlusion plethysmography. Each subject was investigated twice, untreated and after VPA treatment, with 5 weeks wash-out in-between. VPA treatment resulted in considerably decreased levels of circulating PAI-1 antigen from 22.2 (4.6) to 10.8 (2.1) ng/ml (p<0.05). It slightly decreased the levels of circulating venous t-PA antigen (p<0.05), and the t-PA:PAI-1 antigen ratio increased (p<0.01). Substance P infusion resulted in an increase in forearm blood flow (FBF) on both occasions (p<0.0001 for both). The acute t-PA release in response to Substance P was not affected by VPA (p = ns). Conclusion Valproic acid treatment lowers plasma PAI-1 antigen levels and changes the fibrinolytic balance measured as t-PA/PAI-1 ratio in a profibrinolytic direction. This may in part explain the reduction in incidence of myocardial infarctions by VPA treatment observed in recent pharmacoepidemiological studies. Trial Registration The EU Clinical Trials Register 2009-011723-31 PMID:25295869

  11. Valproic Acid Downregulates RBP4 and Elicits Hypervitaminosis A-Teratogenesis—A Kinetic Analysis on Retinol/Retinoic Acid Homeostatic System

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Chao-Ming; Chang, Chi-Huang; Wang, Hui-Er; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Peng, Chiung-Chi; Hsieh, Chiu-Lan; Peng, Robert Y.

    2012-01-01

    Background Valproic acid (VPA) is an antiepileptic and anti-migraine prophylactic drug. VPA exhibits two severe side effects, namely acute liver toxicity and teratogenicity. These side effects are usually seen at the genetic and somatic levels. The cited action mechanisms involve inhibition of histone deacetylase, hypofolatenemia, hyperhomocysteinemia, and reactive oxidative stress. The proteomic information associated with VPA teratogenicity is still unavailable. We hypothesized that proteomic analysis might help us identify functional proteins that could be relevantly affected by VPA, and this phenomenon could be very sensitive in early embryonic stage, resulting in VPA teratogenicity. Methodology/Principal Findings Proteomic analysis on the chicken embryos at Hamburger and Hamilton (HH) stage 28 showed that there were significant downregulations of ovotransferrins, carbonic anhydrase-2, retinol binding protein-4 (RBP4), NADH cytochrome b5 reductase 2 (CYB5R2), apolipoprotein A1, and protein SET, together with upregulation of 60S ribosomal protein L22. Among these, RBP4 was the most significantly downregulated (−32%). Kinetic analysis suggested that this situation could trigger hypervitaminosis A (+39.3%), a condition that has been well known to induce teratogenesis.. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report showing that VPA dowregulates RBP4. Our finding not only has led to a possible mechanism of VPA teratogenesis, but also has initiated new preventive strategies for avoiding VPA teratogeneis. PMID:23028466

  12. Zinc/Aluminum layered double hydroxide-titanium dioxide composite nanosheet film as novel solid phase microextraction fiber for the gas chromatographic determination of valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Matin, Amir Abbas; Biparva, Pourya; Amanzadeh, Hatam; Farhadi, Khalil

    2013-01-15

    A nanosheet thin film based on Zn/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) and TiO(2) composite was prepared via sol-gel process on capillary glass rod. Characterization of the fiber coating using X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that it consists of a large number of intercrossed and curved nanosheets with hexagonal architecture. The thickness of these plates is about few nanometers, and the lateral dimension is varying from 400 to 1000 nm. Application of the proposed coating as a solid phase microextraction fiber was investigated. As a model analyte, valproic acid (VPA, antiepileptic drug) was selected and its extraction from biological (human serum) and pharmaceutical (tablet and syrup) samples were performed without any considerable matrix effect. Analytical merits of the method, under optimum conditions (extraction temperature: 50 ± 1°C, extraction time: 15 min, desorption temperature: 250°C, desorption time: 2 min, solution pH: 1.5, salt concentration: 5 mol L(-1)), are 70 μg L(-1) and 0.20-100 mg L(-1) for LOD and LDR, respectively.

  13. Differentiation of rat adipose tissue-derived stem cells into neuron-like cells by valproic acid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Takumi; Hayashi, Daiki; Yaguchi, Takayuki; Fujita, Yudai; Sakaue, Motoharu; Suzuki, Takehito; Tsukamoto, Atsushi; Murayama, Ohoshi; Lynch, Jonathan; Miyazaki, Yoko; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Takizawa, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a widely used antiepileptic drug, which has recently been reported to modulate the neuronal differentiation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) in humans and dogs. However, controversy exists as to whether VPA really acts as an inducer of neuronal differentiation of ASCs. The present study aimed to elucidate the effect of VPA in neuronal differentiation of rat ASCs. One or three days of pretreatment with VPA (2 mM) followed by neuronal induction enhanced the ratio of immature neuron marker βIII-tubulin-positive cells in a time-dependent manner, where the majority of cells also had a positive signal for neurofilament medium polypeptide (NEFM), a mature neuron marker. RT-PCR analysis revealed increases in the mRNA expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and NEFM mature neuron markers, even without neuronal induction. Three-days pretreatment of VPA increased acetylation of histone H3 of ASCs as revealed by immunofluorescence staining. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay also showed that the status of histone acetylation at H3K9 correlated with the gene expression of TUBB3 in ASCs by VPA. These results indicate that VPA significantly promotes the differentiation of rat ASCs into neuron-like cells through acetylation of histone H3, which suggests that VPA may serve as a useful tool for producing transplantable cells for future applications in clinical treatments.

  14. Large-Scale Phenotype-Based Antiepileptic Drug Screening in a Zebrafish Model of Dravet Syndrome1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Dinday, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mutations in a voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN1A) result in Dravet Syndrome (DS), a catastrophic childhood epilepsy. Zebrafish with a mutation in scn1Lab recapitulate salient phenotypes associated with DS, including seizures, early fatality, and resistance to antiepileptic drugs. To discover new drug candidates for the treatment of DS, we screened a chemical library of ∼1000 compounds and identified 4 compounds that rescued the behavioral seizure component, including 1 compound (dimethadione) that suppressed associated electrographic seizure activity. Fenfluramine, but not huperzine A, also showed antiepileptic activity in our zebrafish assays. The effectiveness of compounds that block neuronal calcium current (dimethadione) or enhance serotonin signaling (fenfluramine) in our zebrafish model suggests that these may be important therapeutic targets in patients with DS. Over 150 compounds resulting in fatality were also identified. We conclude that the combination of behavioral and electrophysiological assays provide a convenient, sensitive, and rapid basis for phenotype-based drug screening in zebrafish mimicking a genetic form of epilepsy. PMID:26465006

  15. The influence of established and new antiepileptic drugs on visual perception. 1. A placebo-controlled, double-blind, single-dose study in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Steinhoff, B J; Freudenthaler, N; Paulus, W

    1997-12-01

    The influence of single oral dosages of carbamazepine (CBZ), valproic acid, vigabatrin (VGB), lamotrigine (LTG), gabapentin (GBP), and losigamone (LSG) on visual perception was investigated in ten healthy volunteers according to a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study design. The test battery comprised visual acuity, the Lanthony-D-15-désaturé colour perception test, increment, postadaptation and transient tritanopia threshold measurements, perception threshold assessment for monochromatic and chromatic gaussian dots, monochromatic gratings and gratings of differing spatial frequency, and critical flicker fusion tests with various stimuli. The only consistent and partly significant effects were seen after VGB and GBP. After VGB, increment, postadaptation and transient tritanopia thresholds and the critical flicker fusion increased, whereas GBP led to a somewhat converse profile. The other tests were not influenced consistently by any antiepileptic drug (AED). We conclude that: (i) gamma-amino-butyric acid-(GABA)-related properties as under the prototype drug VGB result in specific alterations of the transient tritanopia phenomenon which is consistent with the physiological hypothesis for this retinal paradigm based on extracellular recordings in primates. The possible mechanisms why VGB improved critical flicker fusion as the only AED in this trial are discussed. The profile of GBP indicates a unique mechanism of action. We have not observed specific influences on visual perception under AEDs which act mainly via alterations of ion membrane conductance. The transient tritanopia and flicker fusion paradigms we used appear to be promising to investigate antiepileptic drugs with hitherto unknown modes of actions in human noninvasively.

  16. Design, synthesis and antiepileptic properties of novel 1-(substituted benzylidene)-3-(1-(morpholino/piperidino methyl)-2,3-dioxoindolin-5-yl)urea derivatives.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Chinnasamy Rajaram; Raja, Sundararajan

    2011-12-01

    Twenty new 1-(substituted benzylidene)-3-(1-(morpholino/piperidino methyl)-2,3-dioxoindolin-5-yl) urea derivatives were designed and synthesized. Antiepileptic screening was performed using MES and scPTZ seizures tests. The neurotoxicity was determined by rotorod test. In the preliminary screening, compounds 5c, 5g, 5j and 5n were found active in MES model, while 5o showed significant antiepileptic activity in scPTZ model. Further all these five compounds were administered orally to rats, 5c, 5g and 5n showed better activity than Phenytoin in oral route. Among these compounds 5c revealed protection in MES at a dose of 30 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg 0.5 h and 4 h after i.p. administration respectively. This molecule provided also protection in the scPTZ at a dose of 300 mg/kg in both time intervals.

  17. [The "cost-benefit" analysis of new antiepileptic drugs].

    PubMed

    Vlasov, P N; Orekhova, N V

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to optimize the pharmaceutical treatment of epileptic patients and to evaluate the clinical-economical effectiveness of new antiepileptic drugs (AED)--levetiracetam, lamotrigine, topiramate and oxcarbazepine. The study included 134 patients with different types of seizures who received earlier antiepileptics with the addition of new AED as mono- or polytherapy. The cost of treatment and pharmacoeconomic "cost-benefit" index were calculated before and after the treatment optimization. After one year of the treatment with "news" AED, the decrease in seizure frequency was 75-92%. The "cost-benefit" ratio was significantly (p < 0.05) decreased by 2-3 times in all types of seizures despite the increase of direst costs of the treatment. The significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the cost of treatment of epilepsy was noted in all groups studied. In conclusion, the rational treatment using "new" AED allows to reduce both the total cost of treatment and ccost-benefits ratio.

  18. Seizures and antiepileptic drugs: does exposure alter normal brain development?

    PubMed

    Marsh, Eric D; Brooks-Kayal, Amy R; Porter, Brenda E

    2006-12-01

    Seizures and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) affect brain development and have long-term neurological consequences. The specific molecular and cellular changes, the precise timing of their influence during brain development, and the full extent of the long-term consequences of seizures and AEDs exposure have not been established. This review critically assesses both the basic and clinical science literature on the effects of seizures and AEDs on the developing brain and finds that evidence exists to support the hypothesis that both seizures and antiepileptic drugs influence a variety of biological process, at specific times during development, which alter long-term cognition and epilepsy susceptibility. More research, both clinical and experimental, is needed before changes in current clinical practice, based on the scientific data, can be recommended.

  19. Neurological and Psychiatric Sequelae of Developmental Exposure to Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Gedzelman, Evan R.; Meador, Kimford J.

    2012-01-01

    The neurons in the developing mammalian brain are susceptible to antiepileptic drug (AED) effects. It is known that later in life deficits in cognitive performance as well as psychiatric deficits can manifest after early AED exposure. The extent of these deficits will be addressed. This review will attempt to draw parallels between the existent animal models and human studies. Through analysis of these studies, important future research will be elucidated and possible new and emerging therapies will be discussed. PMID:23293628

  20. Current discoveries on the cognitive effects of antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Meador, K J

    2000-08-01

    The cognitive effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are of particular concern to clinicians because these drugs are the primary therapeutic modality for managing epilepsy. In general, the cognitive effects of most AEDs are modest and offset by their benefit in reducing seizures. Nonetheless, the cognitive effects of a particular AED may be clinically significant when treating specific patient populations, such as children and the elderly.

  1. Effect of anti-epileptic drugs in pregnancy and teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Sowbhagya; Sunanda, Kulkarni

    2008-07-01

    Epilepsy raises special concern in women during pregnancy. Antiepileptic drugs are known to induce major and minor malformations in the foetus. Aim of the study was to find an association between maternal serum alpha fetoprotein levels, foetal abnormalities and antiepileptic drugs mediated teratogenicity. Maternal serum alpha feto protein levels, kidney and liver function tests in age matched normal pregnant women and seizure free epileptic pregnant women during 12-14 weeks of gestation were estimated. Cases were subjected to ultrasonography at 11(th)-14(th) week of pregnancy and again at 20(th) week of pregnancy. maternal serum alfa feto protein was assayed by a specific Electro Chemiluminescence Immuno Assay test. There was no significant difference in kidney and liver function tests in cases as compared to controls. There were elevated levels of alpha feto protein in cases as compared to controls but this was not statistically significant. No anomalies were detected in ultrasound reports. Most women had normal full term delivery with healthy children but of low birth weight. No correlation was seen between maternal serum alfa feto protein levels and antiepileptic drug leading to teratogenesis.

  2. Levetiracetam as an antiepileptic, neuroprotective, and hyperalgesic drug.

    PubMed

    Cortes-Altamirano, J L; Olmos-Hernández, A; Bonilla-Jaime, H; Bandala, C; González-Maciel, A; Alfaro-Rodríguez, A

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this review was to expound upon the mechanism of action of Levetiracetam (LEV) as an antiepileptic, neuroprotective, and hyperalgesic drug. LEV is a second-generation anti-epileptic drug (AED) that is approved for clinical use as monotherapy and may also be used for adjunctive treatment of patients with seizures. Several researchers have recommended LEV as a treatment option in different diseases causing neuronal damage, and recently, LEV has been used as an antihyperalgesic drug. LEV exhibits favorable characteristics, including a low potential for interaction, a short elimination half-life, and has neither active metabolites nor major negative effects on cognition. This has generated many new research avenues for the utilization of this drug. However, the precise mechanism of action of LEV has not been fully elucidated. In this review, a search was conducted on PubMed, ProQuest, EBSCO, and the Science Citation index for studies evaluating the effects of LEV as an antiepileptic, neuroprotective, and hyperalgesic drug. A total of 32 studies related to the use of LEV suggested different mechanisms of action, such as binding to the synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A (SV2A) protein, inhibition of Ca2+ N-type channels, and its presence as a neuromodulator. These studies concluded that the pharmacodynamics of LEV should be viewed as a single pathway, and should not be based on specific molecular targets that depend on the physiological or pathological conditions prevalent at that time.

  3. Antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Elon; River, Yaron; Shifrin, Ala; Krivoy, Norberto

    2007-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs are an effective treatment for various forms of neuropathic pain of peripheral origin, although they rarely provide complete pain relief. Multiple multicentre randomised controlled trials have shown clear efficacy of gabapentin and pregabalin for postherpetic neuralgia and painful diabetic neuropathy. Theses drugs can be rapidly titrated and are well tolerated. Topiramate, lamotrigine, carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine are alternatives for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy, but should be titrated slowly. Carbamazepine remains the drug of choice for trigeminal neuralgia; however, oxcarbazepine and lamotrigine are potential alternatives. There is an apparent need for large-scale randomised controlled trials on the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in neuropathic pain in general, and in cancer-related neuropathic pain and neuropathic pain of central origin in particular. Trials with long-term follow-up are required to establish the long-term efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in neuropathic pain. There is only limited scientific evidence to support the idea that drug combinations are likely to be more efficacious and safer than each drug alone; further studies are warranted in this area.

  4. The Current Availability of Antiepileptic Drugs in Zambia: Implications for the ILAE/WHO “Out of the Shadows” Campaign

    PubMed Central

    Chomba, Elwyn Nachanya; Haworth, Alan; Mbewe, Edward; Atadzhanov, Masharip; Ndubani, Philimon; Kansembe, Henry; Birbeck, Gretchen Lano

    2010-01-01

    Recent concerns regarding antiepileptic drug (AED) availability in Zambia led us to conduct a study in the Lusaka and Southern Provinces to quantify the availability and cost of AEDs and assess determinants. Among 111 pharmacies, almost one-half did not carry AEDs (N = 54; 49.1%). Available AEDs were phenobarbitone (21; 18.9%), carbamazepine (27; 24.3%), valproic acid (4; 3.6%), and phenytoin (3; 2.7%). Adult out-of-pocket monthly costs ranged from US $7 to $30. Pediatric syrups were universally unavailable. Interviews revealed several barriers to AED provision, including that handling phenobarbitone (historically the most affordable AED) has become increasingly difficult because of newly enforced regulatory requirements. Personal communications with epilepsy-care providers in other low income countries suggest that this problem may be widespread. Improved enforcement of existing drug regulations may be contributing to the AED shortage. Social programs aimed at encouraging people with epilepsy to come “out of the shadows” must be preceded by improved AED access. PMID:20810822

  5. Study of Valproic Acid-Enhanced Hepatocyte Steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Renin; Chou, Mei-Chia; Hung, Li-Ying; Wang, Mu-En; Hsu, Meng-Chieh; Chiu, Chih-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is one of the most widely used antiepilepsy drugs. However, several side effects, including weight gain and fatty liver, have been reported in patients following VPA treatment. In this study, we explored the molecular mechanisms of VPA-induced hepatic steatosis using FL83B cell line-based in vitro model. Using fluorescent lipid staining technique, we found that VPA enhanced oleic acid- (OLA-) induced lipid accumulation in a dose-dependent manner in hepatocytes; this may be due to upregulated lipid uptake, triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis, and lipid droplet formation. Real-time PCR results showed that, following VPA treatment, the expression levels of genes encoding cluster of differentiation 36 (Cd36), low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (Lrp1), diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 (Dgat2), and perilipin 2 (Plin2) were increased, that of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I a (Cpt1a) was not affected, and those of acetyl-Co A carboxylase α (Acca) and fatty acid synthase (Fasn) were decreased. Furthermore, using immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometry analyses, we found that VPA also induced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) nuclear translocation and increased levels of cell-surface CD36. Based on these results, we propose that VPA may enhance OLA-induced hepatocyte steatosis through the upregulation of PPARγ- and CD36-dependent lipid uptake, TAG synthesis, and lipid droplet formation. PMID:27034954

  6. Exposure to antiepileptic drugs in utero and child development

    PubMed Central

    Veiby, Gyri; Daltveit, Anne Kjersti; Schjølberg, Synnve; Stoltenberg, Camilla; Øyen, Anne-Siri; Vollset, Stein Emil; Engelsen, Bernt A.; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2013-01-01

    Summary Purpose Antiepileptic drugs may cause congenital malformations. Less is known about the effect on development in infancy and childhood. The aim of this study was to examine whether exposure to antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy has an impact on early child development. Methods From mid-year 1999 through December 2008, children of mothers recruited at 13–17 weeks of pregnancy were studied in the ongoing prospective Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Information on birth outcomes were obtained from the Medical Birth Registry (108,264 –children), and mothers reported on their child’s motor development, language, social skills, and autistic traits using items from standardized screening tools at 18 months (61,351 children) and 36 months of age (44,147 children). The relative risk of adverse outcomes in children according to maternal or paternal epilepsy with and without prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs was estimated as odds ratios (ORs), using logistic regression with adjustment for maternal age, parity, education, smoking, depression/anxiety, folate-supplementation, and child congenital malformation or low birth weight. Key findings A total of 333 children were exposed to antiepileptic drugs in utero. At 18 months, the exposed children had increased risk of abnormal scores for gross motor skills (7.1 % vs. 2.9 %; OR, 2.0; 95 % Confidence Interval [CI], 1.1–3.7) and autistic traits (3.5 % vs. 0.9 %; OR, 2.7; CI, 1.1–6.7) compared to children of parents without epilepsy. At 36 months, the exposed children had increased risk of abnormal score for gross motor skills (7.5 % vs. 3.3 %; OR, 2.2; CI, 1.1–4.2), sentence skills (11.2 % vs. 4.8 %; OR, 2.1; CI, 1.2–3.6), and autistic traits (6.0 % vs. 1.5 %; OR, 3.4; CI, 1.6–7.0). The drug-exposed children also had increased risk of congenital malformations (6.1 % vs. 2.9 %; OR, 2.1; CI, 1.4–3.4), but exclusion of congenital malformations did not affect the risk of adverse development

  7. Analysis of Valproic Acid, Salicylic Acid and Ibuprofen in Whole Blood by GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Jon B; Flater, Melanie L; Bain, Lisa T

    2016-10-01

    The Georgia Bureau of Investigation utilized a silylation method of analysis for low molecular weight carboxylic acids in the past. Due to the negative impact such derivatizations can have on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) systems an alternative means of analysis was investigated. The described method is a whole blood solid phase extraction of valproic acid, salicylic acid and ibuprofen utilizing butylation for sensitivity and improved chromatography by GC-MS. The method produced a limit of detection and limit of quantitation at 1 mg/L for valproic acid, 2 mg/L for salicylic acid and 0.25 mg/L for ibuprofen. The variability based upon the middle of the calibration curve estimated to be 7% for valproic acid, 8% for salicylic acid and 11% for ibuprofen established upon a 95% confidence interval, with the highest percent coefficient of variation being 5.3% for ibuprofen.

  8. Valproic Acid as a Potentiator of Metabolic Syndrome In Institutionalized Residents on Concomitant Antipsychotics: Fat Chance, or Slim to None?

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Silu; Fries, Brant E.; Szafara, Kristina; Regal, Randolph

    2015-01-01

    Background: Valproic acid (VPA) is one of the most commonly used antiepileptic medications worldwide; it is also a popular mood stabilizer for use in bipolar disorder and dementia. This study assessed whether VPA may potentiate metabolic side effects in patients with psychiatric disorders taking concomitant antipsychotics (APs). VPA alone has been associated with weight gain, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes. Patients with psychiatric disorders, especially those on second-generation (atypical) APs, appear to be at increased risk of these metabolic effects. A secondary purpose was to determine if a linear dose–response relationship exists between the VPA dose and adverse metabolic effects. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted using data collected on all patients in the four state-operated psychiatric hospitals in Michigan using a comprehensive assessment instrument, the interRAI Mental Health. All patients taking both VPA and APs (n = 200) were compared to a control group of patients taking APs without VPA (n = 426). Patients were assessed for the presence of the following surrogate indicators of metabolic syndrome: weight gain; high body mass index (BMI greater than 30 kg/m2); very high BMI (BMI greater than 40 kg/m2); a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus; use of a prescribed statin medication; diagnosis of hyperlipidemia or dyslipidemia; hypertension; or the combination of any three of these factors: high BMI, hyperlipidemia or dyslipidemia, diabetes, and hypertension. Analysis also included assessment of the effect of VPA dosage on metabolic side effects. Results: Patients in the VPA plus APs group were 3.2 kg heavier than those in the APs group (P = 0.05) at baseline. Compared with the APs group, the VPA plus APs group had a higher prevalence of high and very high BMI, diabetes, hypertension, and the combination of any three factors of high BMI, hyperlipidemia/dyslipidemia, diabetes, and hypertension. However, these differences were not

  9. A Phase 2 Study of Concurrent Radiation Therapy, Temozolomide, and the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Valproic Acid For Patients With Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Krauze, Andra V.; Myrehaug, Sten D.; Chang, Michael G.; Holdford, Diane J.; Smith, Sharon; Shih, Joanna; Tofilon, Philip J.; Fine, Howard A.; Camphausen, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Valproic acid (VPA) is an antiepileptic agent with histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) activity shown to sensitize glioblastoma (GBM) cells to radiation in pre-clinical models. We evaluated the addition of VPA to standard radiation therapy (RT) and temozolomide (TMZ) in patients with newly diagnosed GBM. Methods and Materials Thirty-seven patients with newly diagnosed GBM were enrolled between July 2006 and April 2013. Patients received VPA, 25 mg/kg orally, divided into 2 daily doses concurrent with RT and TMZ. The first dose of VPA was given 1 week before the first day of RT at 10 to 15 mg/kg/day and subsequently increased up to 25 mg/kg/day over the week prior to radiation. VPA- and TMZ-related acute toxicities were evaluated using Common Toxicity Criteria version 3.0 (National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program) and Cancer Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme for toxicity and adverse event reporting (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment). Results A total of 81% of patients took VPA according to protocol. Median overall survival (OS) was 29.6 months (range: 21–63.8 months), and median progression-free survival (PFS) was 10.5 months (range: 6.8–51.2 months). OS at 6, 12, and 24 months was 97%, 86%, and 56%, respectively. PFS at 6, 12, and 24 months was 70%, 43%, and 38% respectively. The most common grade 3/4 toxicities of VPA in conjunction with RT/TMZ therapy were blood and bone marrow toxicity (32%), neurological toxicity (11%), and metabolic and laboratory toxicity (8%). Younger age and class V recursive partitioning analysis results were significant for both OS and PFS. VPA levels were not correlated with grade 3/4 toxicity levels. Conclusions Addition of VPA to concurrent RT/TMZ in patients with newly diagnosed GBM was well tolerated. Additionally, VPA may result in improved outcomes compared to historical data and merits further study. PMID:26194676

  10. A Phase 2 Study of Concurrent Radiation Therapy, Temozolomide, and the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Valproic Acid for Patients With Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Krauze, Andra V.; Chang, Michael G.; Holdford, Diane J.; Smith, Sharon; Shih, Joanna; Tofilon, Philip J.; Camphausen, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Valproic acid (VPA) is an antiepileptic agent with histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) activity shown to sensitize glioblastoma (GBM) cells to radiation in preclinical models. We evaluated the addition of VPA to standard radiation therapy (RT) plus temozolomide (TMZ) in patients with newly diagnosed GBM. Methods and Materials: Thirty-seven patients with newly diagnosed GBM were enrolled between July 2006 and April 2013. Patients received VPA, 25 mg/kg orally, divided into 2 daily doses concurrent with RT and TMZ. The first dose of VPA was given 1 week before the first day of RT at 10 to 15 mg/kg/day and subsequently increased up to 25 mg/kg/day over the week prior to radiation. VPA- and TMZ-related acute toxicities were evaluated using Common Toxicity Criteria version 3.0 (National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program) and Cancer Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme for toxicity and adverse event reporting (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment). Results: A total of 81% of patients took VPA according to protocol. Median overall survival (OS) was 29.6 months (range: 21-63.8 months), and median progression-free survival (PFS) was 10.5 months (range: 6.8-51.2 months). OS at 6, 12, and 24 months was 97%, 86%, and 56%, respectively. PFS at 6, 12, and 24 months was 70%, 43%, and 38% respectively. The most common grade 3/4 toxicities of VPA in conjunction with RT/TMZ therapy were blood and bone marrow toxicity (32%), neurological toxicity (11%), and metabolic and laboratory toxicity (8%). Younger age and class V recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) results were significant for both OS and PFS. VPA levels were not correlated with grade 3 or 4 toxicity levels. Conclusions: Addition of VPA to concurrent RT/TMZ in patients with newly diagnosed GBM was well tolerated. Additionally, VPA may result in improved outcomes compared to historical data and merits further study.

  11. The rise and fall of borax as an antiepileptic drug.

    PubMed

    Jensen, John P A

    2006-04-01

    Five hundred eighty-six patients with epilepsy were treated with borax (hydrated sodium tetraborate) between 1912 and 1948 at the Kolonien Filadelfia Epilepsy Hospital, Dianalund, Denmark. A rough estimation shows that less than 5% experienced a more than 50% reduction in the total number of seizures. Charts were reviewed to find a connection between the concept of Bacillus epilepticus (1916) and the so-called renaissance of borax treatment described in 1923, and to find an explanation for the popularity of this seemingly ineffective antiepileptic drug.

  12. Pharmacy and generic substitution of antiepileptic drugs: missing in action?

    PubMed

    Welty, Timothy E

    2007-06-01

    Generic substitution of antiepileptic drugs is an issue that is gathering a lot of attention in the neurology community but is not receiving much attention within pharmacy. Several proposals have been drafted that restrict a pharmacist's decision-making in generic substitution. These proposals highlight concerns about the pharmacy community related to generic substitution. Careful consideration needs to be given to these issues by pharmacists and pharmacy professional organizations. Unless pharmacy as a profession takes strong positions in support of a pharmacist's ability to make decisions about pharmacotherapy and addresses many of the pharmacy-related problems of generic substitution, policies that negatively impact pharmacy will be established.

  13. Therapeutic strategies in the choice of antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    de Borchgrave, V; Delvaux, V; de Tourchaninoff, M; Dubru, J M; Ghariani, S; Grisar, Th; Legros, B; Ossemann, M; Sadzot, B; Tugendhaft, P; Van Bogaert, P; van Rijckevorsel, K

    2002-03-01

    The choice of treatment of newly diagnosed epilepsy involves many factors such as age, sex, life style, general health and concomitant medication. The seizure type, syndrome, and the pharmacology, efficacy and safety of the antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) should also be considered. Some of the new AEDs appear to provide at least equivalent efficacy with better tolerability. Some of these drugs have the potential to become drugs of first choice in newly diagnosed epilepsy. At the present time, we also must consider the criteria of reimbursement of these drugs. In this paper, we try to describe common and practical strategies to start a treatment of newly diagnosed epilepsy.

  14. Epigenetic modifications in valproic acid-induced teratogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Emily W.Y.; Winn, Louise M.

    2010-11-01

    Exposure to the anticonvulsant drug valproic acid (VPA) in utero is associated with a 1-2% increase in neural tube defects (NTDs), however the molecular mechanisms by which VPA induces teratogenesis are unknown. Previous studies demonstrated that VPA, a direct inhibitor of histone deacetylase, can induce histone hyperacetylation and other epigenetic changes such as histone methylation and DNA demethylation. The objective of this study was to determine if maternal exposure to VPA in mice has the ability to cause these epigenetic alterations in the embryo and thus contribute to its mechanism of teratogenesis. Pregnant CD-1 mice (GD 9.0) were administered a teratogenic dose of VPA (400 mg/kg, s.c.) and embryos extracted 1, 3, 6, and 24 h after injection. To assess embryonic histone acetylation and histone methylation, Western blotting was performed on whole embryo homogenates, as well as immunohistochemical staining on embryonic sections. To measure DNA methylation changes, the cytosine extension assay was performed. Results demonstrated that a significant increase in histone acetylation that peaked 3 h after VPA exposure was accompanied by an increase in histone methylation at histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) and a decrease in histone methylation at histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9). Immunohistochemical staining revealed increased histone acetylation in the neuroepithelium, heart, and somites. A decrease in methylated histone H3K9 staining was observed in the neuroepithelium and somites, METHYLATED histone H3K4 staining was observed in the neuroepithelium. No significant differences in global or CpG island DNA methylation were observed in embryo homogenates. These results support the possibility that epigenetic modifications caused by VPA during early mouse organogenesis results in congenital malformations.

  15. Epigenetic modifications in valproic acid-induced teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tung, Emily W Y; Winn, Louise M

    2010-11-01

    Exposure to the anticonvulsant drug valproic acid (VPA) in utero is associated with a 1-2% increase in neural tube defects (NTDs), however the molecular mechanisms by which VPA induces teratogenesis are unknown. Previous studies demonstrated that VPA, a direct inhibitor of histone deacetylase, can induce histone hyperacetylation and other epigenetic changes such as histone methylation and DNA demethylation. The objective of this study was to determine if maternal exposure to VPA in mice has the ability to cause these epigenetic alterations in the embryo and thus contribute to its mechanism of teratogenesis. Pregnant CD-1 mice (GD 9.0) were administered a teratogenic dose of VPA (400mg/kg, s.c.) and embryos extracted 1, 3, 6, and 24h after injection. To assess embryonic histone acetylation and histone methylation, Western blotting was performed on whole embryo homogenates, as well as immunohistochemical staining on embryonic sections. To measure DNA methylation changes, the cytosine extension assay was performed. Results demonstrated that a significant increase in histone acetylation that peaked 3h after VPA exposure was accompanied by an increase in histone methylation at histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) and a decrease in histone methylation at histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9). Immunohistochemical staining revealed increased histone acetylation in the neuroepithelium, heart, and somites. A decrease in methylated histone H3K9 staining was observed in the neuroepithelium and somites, METHYLATED histone H3K4 staining was observed in the neuroepithelium. No significant differences in global or CpG island DNA methylation were observed in embryo homogenates. These results support the possibility that epigenetic modifications caused by VPA during early mouse organogenesis results in congenital malformations.

  16. Proteomic analysis of MOLT-4 cells treated by valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Vávrová, Jirina; Janovská, Sylva; Rezácová, Martina; Hernychová, Lenka; Tichá, Zuzana; Vokurková, Doris; Záskodová, Darina; Lukásová, Emilie

    2007-09-01

    The effect of valproic acid (VA) on protein expression in human T-lymphocytic leukemia cells MOLT-4 was studied. VA is an inhibitor of histonedeacetylases and has a potential use as antitumor agent in leukemia treatment. The authors in this work prove that 4 h long incubation with 2 mmol/l VA causes phosphorylation of histone H2A.X and its colocalization with 53BP1 in nuclear foci. Their co-localization is typical for DSB signaling machinery. These foci were detected in cells after 4 h exposure without increase of Annexin V positive apoptotic cells. Slight increase in apoptosis (Annexin V positivity) after 24 h is accompanied by more intensive increase in phosphorylation of H2A.X and also by formation of nuclear foci containing gammaH2A.X and 53BP1. Treatment of cells with 2 mmol/l VA resulted in induction of apoptosis affecting about 30% of cells after incubation for 72 h. The changes in protein expression were examined after cell incubation with 2 mmol/l VA for 4 h. Proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and quantified using image evaluation system. Those exhibiting significant VA-induced abundance alterations were identified by mass spectrometry. Changes in expression of 22 proteins were detected, of which 15 proteins were down-regulated. Proteomic analysis resulted in successful identification of three proteins involving alfa-tubulin 3, tubulin-specific chaperone and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucloprotein F. Expression of seven proteins was up-regulated, including heterogeneous nuclear ribonucloprotein A/B. Identified proteins are related to microtubular system and hnRNP family. Suppression of microtubular proteins and changes of balance among hnRNPs can contribute to proliferation arrest and apoptosis induction.

  17. sec-Butylpropylacetamide (SPD), a new amide derivative of valproic acid for the treatment of neuropathic and inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Dan; West, Peter J; Smith, Misty D; Yagen, Boris; Bialer, Meir; Devor, Marshall; White, H Steve; Brennan, K C

    2017-03-01

    Chronic pain is a multifactorial disease comprised of both inflammatory and neuropathic components that affect ∼20% of the world's population. sec-Butylpropylacetamide (SPD) is a novel amide analogue of valproic acid (VPA) previously shown to possess a broad spectrum of anticonvulsant activity. In this study, we defined the pharmacokinetic parameters of SPD in rat and mouse, and then evaluated its antinociceptive potential in neuropathic and acute inflammatory pain models. In the sciatic nerve ligation (SNL) model of neuropathic pain, SPD was equipotent to gabapentin and more potent than its parent compound VPA. SPD also showed either higher or equal potency to VPA in the formalin, carrageenan, and writhing tests of inflammatory pain. SPD showed no effects on compound action potential properties in a sciatic nerve preparation, suggesting that its mechanism of action is distinct from local anesthetics and membrane stabilizing drugs. SPD's activity in both neuropathic and inflammatory pain warrants its development as a potential broad-spectrum anti-nociceptive drug.

  18. Drug Reaction With Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms Induced by Valproic Acid: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Darban, Mahboubeh; Bagheri, Bahador

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a rare but life-threatening reaction to drugs such as carbamazepine and allopurinol. The condition is characterized by skin rashes, fever, hematological disturbances, lymphadenopathy, and organ failure, most probably hepatic dysfunction. To date, only a few cases of valproate-induced DRESS syndrome have been reported. Case Presentation We report on the case of a 60-year-old man who had been treated with valproic acid some time before being referred to Kowsar Hospital, Semnan, Iran in December 2015. He was given valproic acid 1000 mg PO, and after 20 days, he had developed widespread rashes, fever, esophagitis, cervical lymphadenopathy, and tender hepatomegaly. Laboratory results at Kowsar showed a drop in hemoglobin, in addition to lymphocytosis, thrombocytopenia, and elevated serum transaminases. DRESS was diagnosed, and corticosteroid therapy was initiated. Administration of the culprit drug to the patient was also stopped. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) improved the general condition of the patient. Conclusions Only a small number of case reports have described valproic acid-induced DRESS syndrome; therefore, the condition is difficult to prevent. Rechallenge with valproic acid should be avoided in patients with a history of reaction to the drug. PMID:28144463

  19. The Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Valproic Acid Enhances Acquisition, Extinction, and Reconsolidation of Conditioned Fear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredy, Timothy W.; Barad, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Histone modifications contribute to the epigenetic regulation of gene expression, a process now recognized to be important for the consolidation of long-term memory. Valproic acid (VPA), used for many years as an anticonvulsant and a mood stabilizer, has effects on learning and memory and enhances the extinction of conditioned fear through its…

  20. Preparation of Coated Valproic Acid and Sodium Valproate Sustained-release Matrix Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Phaechamud, T.; Mueannoom, W.; Tuntarawongsa, S.; Chitrattha, S.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the technique for preparation of coated valproic acid and sodium valproate sustained-release matrix tablets. Different diluents were tested and selected as the effective absorbent for oily valproic acid. Effect of the amount of absorbent and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose on drug release from valproic acid-sodium valproate matrix tablets prepared with wet granulation technique was evaluated in pH change system. Colloidal silicon dioxide effectively adsorbed liquid valproic acid during wet granulation and granule preparation. The amounts of colloidal silicon dioxide and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose employed in tablet formulations affected drug release from the tablets. The drug release was prominently sustained for over 12 h using hydroxypropylmethylcellulose-based hydrophilic matrix system. The mechanism of drug release through the matrix polymer was a diffusion control. The drug release profile of the developed matrix tablet was similar to Depakine Chrono®, providing the values of similarity factor (f2) and difference factor (f1) of 85.56 and 2.37, respectively. Eudragit® L 30 D-55 was used as effective subcoating material for core matrix tablets before over coating with hydroxypropylmethylcellulose film with organic base solvent. Drug release profile of coated matrix tablet was almost similar to that of Depakine Chrono®. PMID:20838520

  1. AT-33A PHASE II STUDY OF CONCURRENT RADIATION THERAPY, TEMOZOLOMIDE AND THE HISTONE DEACETYLASE INHIBITOR VALPROIC ACID FOR PATIENTS WITH GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME

    PubMed Central

    Krauze, Andra V.; Myrehaug, Sten D.; Chang, Michael G.; Holdford, Diane J.; Smith, Sharon; Shih, Joanna; Tofilon, Peter; Fine, Howard; Camphausen, Kevin A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma (GBM) remains an aggressive brain tumor with poor prognosis. Valproic acid (VPA) is an antiepileptic agent that has been shown to have HDACi activity and to radiosensitize GBM cells in preclinical models. This phase II study aimed to determine if the addition of VPA to standard radiation therapy and temozolomide would improve OS and PFS. METHODS: We prospectively assessed survival, radiological and clinical progression in 37 newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients with the administration of VPA at 25 mg/kg orally BID concurrent with radiation therapy (RT) and temozolomide (TMZ). The first dose of VPA was given 1 week before the first day of RT at 10 to 15 mg/kg/day and subsequently tapered up to 25 mg/kg/day over the week prior to radiation. RESULTS: 81% of patients took VPA according to protocol. Median OS was 29.6 months (21- 63.8), median PFS was 10.5 (6.8 - 51.2). OS at 6, 12, 24 months was 97%, 86%, 56% respectively. PFS at 6, 12, 24 months was 70%, 43%, 38% respectively. The most common grade 3 or 4 toxicities of VPA in conjunction with TMZ were blood/ bone marrow toxicity (32%), neurological (11%), metabolic/laboratory (8%). At the end of the study 26 (70%) patients were dead, 7 were live without disease, 4 alive with disease. Younger age (<= 50 years) compared to older age and class V RPA were significant for both OS and PFS. Using a landmark analysis, an early progression was related to a shorter interval between progression and death, whereas, a later progression was related to a longer interval between progression and death (p = 0.0002) HR 4.7. CONCLUSION: The addition of VPA to concurrent RT and TMZ in the treatment of newly diagnosed GBM may result in superior outcomes as compared to contemporary and historical data and merits further study.

  2. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for Valproic acid in adults and children.

    PubMed

    Ogungbenro, Kayode; Aarons, Leon

    2014-10-15

    Valproic acid is an anti-convulscant drug that is widely used in the treatment of different types of epilepsy and since its introduction the clinical use has increased rapidly both as a sole agent and in combination therapies. The mechanism of action has been linked to blockade of voltage-dependent sodium channels and potentiation of GABAergic transmission. The most widely used route of administration of Valproic acid is oral, although it can also be given intravenously and rectally and its pharmacokinetics has been studied extensively. The aim of this work was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for plasma and tissue/organ prediction in children and adults following intravenous and oral dosing of Valproic acid. The plasma/tissue concentration profile will be used for clinical trial simulation in Dravet syndrome, a rare form of epilepsy in children where the combination of Valproic acid, stiripentol and clobazam has shown remarkable results. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed with compartments for gut lumen, enterocyte, gut tissue, systemic blood, kidney, liver, brain, spleen, muscle and rest of body. System and drug specific parameters for the model were obtained from the literature from in vitro and in vivo experiments. The model was initially developed for adults and scaled to children using age-dependent changes in anatomical and physiological parameters and ontogeny functions for enzyme maturation assuming the same elimination pathways in adults and children. The results from the model validation showed satisfactory prediction of plasma concentration both in terms of mean prediction and variability in children and adults following intravenous and oral dosing especially after single doses. The model also adequately predicts clearance in children. Due to limited distribution of Valproic acid into tissues, the concentration in plasma is about 8-9 times higher than tissues/organs. The model could help to improve

  3. Interaction of valproic acid and the antidepressant drugs doxepin and venlafaxine: analysis of therapeutic drug monitoring data under naturalistic conditions.

    PubMed

    Unterecker, Stefan; Reif, Andreas; Hempel, Susanne; Proft, Florian; Riederer, Peter; Deckert, Jürgen; Pfuhlmann, Bruno

    2014-07-01

    Valproic acid and the antidepressants doxepin and venlafaxine are frequently used psychotropic drugs. In the literature, an influence of valproic acid on serum levels of antidepressants has been described, although studies have focused on amitriptyline. The authors assessed their therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) database for patients receiving a combination of doxepin or venlafaxine and valproic acid and compared these samples with matched controls without valproic acid comedication in terms of the serum concentration of antidepressants. The mean dose-corrected serum concentration of doxepin+N-doxepin in 16 patients who received valproic acid comedication was higher (2.171±1.482 ng/ml/mg) than that in the matched controls (0.971±0.857 ng/ml/mg, P<0.003). We also found a significant correlation between valproic acid serum level and dose-corrected doxepin+N-doxepin serum level (Spearman's ρ r=0.602, P<0.014). The mean dose-corrected serum level of venlafaxine+O-desmethylvenlafaxine in 41 patients who received valproic acid comedication did not differ significantly from that of the matched controls (P<0.089), but there was a significant difference between both groups in the dose-corrected serum level of O-desmethylvenlafaxine (1.403±0.665 vs. 1.102±0.444, P<0.017). As a consequence, if a combination of valproic acid with doxepin or venlafaxine is administered, cautious dosing is advisable and TDM should be performed.

  4. Ethosuximide, Valproic Acid and Lamotrigine in Childhood Absence Epilepsy: Initial Monotherapy Outcomes at 12 months

    PubMed Central

    Glauser, Tracy A.; Cnaan, Avital; Shinnar, Shlomo; Hirtz, Deborah G.; Dlugos, Dennis; Masur, David; Clark, Peggy O.; Adamson, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Determine the optimal initial monotherapy for children with newly diagnosed childhood absence epilepsy based on 12 months of double blind therapy. Methods A double-blind, randomized controlled clinical trial compared the efficacy, tolerability and neuropsychological effects of ethosuximide, valproic acid and lamotrigine in children with newly diagnosed childhood absence epilepsy. Study medications were titrated to clinical response and subjects remained in the trial unless they reached a treatment failure criterion. Maximal target doses were ethosuximide 60 mg/kg/day or 2000 mg/day, valproic acid 60 mg/kg/day or 3000 mg/day and lamotrigine 12 mg/kg/day or 600 mg/day. Original primary outcome was at 16–20 weeks and included a video EEG assessment. For this report, the main effectiveness outcome was the freedom from failure rate 12 months after randomization and included a video EEG assessment; differential drug effects were determined by pairwise comparisons. The main cognitive outcome was the percentage of subjects experiencing attentional dysfunction at the Month 12 visit. Key Findings A total of 453 children were enrolled and randomized; seven were deemed ineligible and 446 subjects comprised the overall efficacy cohort. There were no demographic differences between the three cohorts. By 12 months after starting therapy, only 37% of all enrolled subjects were free from treatment failure on their first medication. At the Month 12 visit, the freedom-from-failure rates for ethosuximide and valproic acid were similar (45% and 44%, respectively; odds ratio with valproic acid vs. ethosuximide, 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.60 to 1.48; P = 0.82) and were higher than the rate for lamotrigine (21%; odds ratio with ethosuximide vs. lamotrigine, 3.09; 95% CI, 1.86 to 5.13; odds ratio with valproic acid vs. lamotrigine, 2.90; 95% CI, 1.74 to 4.83; P<0.001 for both comparisons). The frequency of treatment failures due to lack of seizure control (p < 0

  5. Requirements for generic antiepileptic medicines: a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Trinka, Eugen; Krämer, Günter; Graf, Martin

    2011-12-01

    Many antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are now available as a generic product. This can potentially save the healthcare providers massive costs. Hence, governmental authorities have introduced rules and incentives for clinicians to switch from the original branded AED to a generic product. Clinicians and patients with epilepsy are reluctant to switch. The licensing of generic AEDs is based on the equation that bioavailability means therapeutic equivalence. However, from a clinical standpoint one has to consider several other relevant issues: (1) Do generic AEDs have the same efficacy, safety and quality? (2) Can generic AEDs be used as substitutions for brand AEDs? (3) Can generic products of AEDs be used interchangeably? (4) Does the generic AED manufacturer guarantee the long-term consistency of availability on the market? (4) Do generic AEDs reduce the costs, and--if so--are these costs worth any additional risk to patient's safety? This article reviews the clinical issues related to current bioequivalence, prescribability, and switchability of AEDs.

  6. Neurological teratogenic effects of antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Qingmei; Su, Baohua; Wei, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the few neurologic disorders that requires a constant treatment during pregnancy. Epilepsy affects 0.3–0.8% of pregnant women. Prescription of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) to pregnant women with epilepsy requires monitoring and maintaining a balance between limiting seizures and decreasing fetal exposure to the potential teratogenic effects. AEDs are also commonly used for psychiatric disorders, pain disorders, and migraines. The types of malformations that can result in fetuses exposed to AEDs include minor anomalies, major congenital malformations, intrauterine growth retardation, cognitive dysfunction, low IQ, microcephaly, and infant mortality. In the present review, we analyzed and summarized the current understanding of neurological development in fetuses that are exposed to various AEDs administered to pregnant epileptic women. PMID:27698740

  7. Antiepileptic hypersensitivity syndrome: clinicians beware and be aware.

    PubMed

    Bessmertny, Olga; Pham, Trinh

    2002-01-01

    Antiepileptic hypersensitivity syndrome is a serious idiosyncratic, non-dose-related adverse reaction reported to occur with phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, primidone, and lamotrigine. The reaction usually develops 1 to 12 weeks after initiation of therapy with one of the above agents and is recognized by the classic triad of fever, rash, and internal organ involvement. Immediate discontinuation of the suspected anticonvulsant is essential for good outcome. Patients usually are managed supportively with hydration, antihistamines, H(2)-receptor blockers, and topical corticosteroids. In severe cases, the use of systemic corticosteroids may be necessary. The use of intravenous immune globulin should be limited to severe cases where Kawasaki disease or idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura cannot be ruled out. Education of health care professionals and patients is imperative to improving outcomes and prevention of this reaction in the future.

  8. Use of Antiepileptic Drugs for Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalchi, A; Gallelli, L; De Sarro, G

    2010-01-01

    Many studies investigated the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in several neurological diseases other than epilepsy. These neurological disorders, usually, involve neuronal excitability through the modulating of ion channels, receptors and intracellular signaling pathways, and are the targets of the AEDs. This article provides a review of the clinical efficacy of both conventional and newer AEDs in hyperkinetic movement disorders. Some of these indications for AEDs have been established, while others are under investigation. The modulation of GABAergic transmission may explain the neuronal hyper-excitability that underlies some forms of hyperkinetic movement disorders. So, AEDs able to increase GABAergic neurotransmission may play a role in hyperkinetic movement disorders treatment. Therefore, AEDs could represent a useful therapeutic option in the management of hyperkinetic movement disorders where the available treatments are ineffective. PMID:21629443

  9. Antiepileptic drug effects on mood and behavior: molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Perucca, Piero; Mula, Marco

    2013-03-01

    With almost 100 years of clinical experience, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) remain the mainstay of epilepsy treatment. They suppress epileptic seizures by acting on a variety of mechanisms and molecular targets involved in the regulation of neuronal excitability. These include inhibitory-GABAergic and excitatory-glutamatergic neurotransmission, as well as ion (sodium and calcium) conductance through voltage-gated channels. On the other hand, accruing evidence indicates that these mechanisms and targets are also implicated in the regulation of mood and behavior, which may explain why each AED is associated with specific psychotropic effects. These effects, however, cannot be explained solely on the basis of the known mode of action of each AED, and other mechanisms or targets are likely to be implicated. In this article, we review positive and negative effects of AEDs on mood and behavior, discuss putative underlying mechanisms, and highlight knowledge gaps which should be addressed in future studies.

  10. Epilepsy as a pyridoxine-dependent condition: quantified urinary biomarkers for status evaluation and monitoring antiepileptic treatment.

    PubMed

    Dolina, Svetlana; Margalit, Dov; Malitsky, Sergey; Pressman, Eugeny; Rabinkov, Aharon

    2012-08-01

    The study testifies an assumption on epilepsy as an inborn error of pyridoxine metabolism and suggests non-invasive quantitative biomarkers for clarified evaluation of clinical status and monitoring an individual treatment by antiepileptic drugs. Urinary parameters of pyridoxal-phosphate (PLP)-dependent tryptophan degradation and the level of 4-pyridoxic acid, the end product of pyridoxine metabolism, were measured by HPLC method with simultaneous ultraviolet and fluorimetric detection in children with different forms of epilepsy and matched healthy controls. The concentrations of compounds formed or metabolized in the course of tryptophan degradation (kynurenines, indoxyl-sulfate) along with correlations between them turned out to be quantitative biomarkers useful for both clarifying patient's clinical state and monitoring antiepileptic treatment. In particular, the value of the ratio of 4-pyridoxic acid to kynurenine appears to be an index of an experienced seizure attack, while the ratio of 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid to 3-hydroxykynurenine reflects activity of kynureninase, the enzyme of critical sensitivity to PLP supply. Growing progressively worse, epilepsy is accompanied by aggravation of PLP-dependent disturbances of tryptophan metabolism and expanding inhibition of kynureninase. The affected pyridoxine metabolism is discussed as an inborn genetic trait in epilepsy in general, rather than a specific sign of pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy solely.

  11. Adverse cognitive effects of antiepileptic pharmacotherapy: Each additional drug matters.

    PubMed

    Witt, Juri-Alexander; Elger, Christian E; Helmstaedter, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    The study was set up to evaluate the impact of the total drug load of antiepileptic pharmacotherapy on cognition. Retrospective analyses were based on 834 patients with epilepsy who underwent a brief routine assessment of executive function and verbal memory (EpiTrack Plus) at our department. The total drug load was quantified in two ways: (1) number of concurrent antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and (2) total drug load according to the defined daily dose (DDD) provided by the World Health Organization. The cognitive measures showed higher inverse correlations with the number of AEDs (executive function: r=-0.35, p<0.001; memory: r=-0.22, p<0.001) than with the total DDD (executive function: r=-0.27, p<0.001; memory: r=-0.17, p<0.001). Reanalysis with statistical control for disease severity hardly changed the aforementioned results. With each additional drug in polytherapy, we observed a significantly lower performance in executive function. In this regard an additional explorative approach revealed that regimens combining AEDs with favorable cognitive profiles were associated with higher cognitive performance. Correlations between indicators of disease severity and drug load indices were low: altogether explaining only up to 9% of the observed variance in drug load. The findings demonstrate a considerable adverse effect of a higher drug load on cognition, especially on executive functions. Simply counting the number of drugs may be sufficient as a rough estimate of the risk of side effects. However, the combination of AEDs with favorable cognitive profiles may attenuate the negative effect of the total drug load.

  12. Antiepileptic popular ketogenic diet: emerging twists in an ancient story.

    PubMed

    Vamecq, Joseph; Vallée, Louis; Lesage, Florian; Gressens, Pierre; Stables, James P

    2005-01-01

    The antiepileptic activity associated with ketogenic diets (KD) have been known for some time. First reports date back to the Middle Ages and even Biblical times where KD was achieved by fasting (i.e. "water diet") [see Swink, T.D., Vining, E.P.G., Freeman, J.M., 1997. The ketogenic diet: 1997. Adv. Pediatr. 44, 297-329, and references therein]. In the early 20th century, changes in the design of the KD were introduced, shifting the so-called "water diet" to a high-fat diet. Initial clinical evaluations undertaken between the 1920s and 1940s were enthusiastic, but the popularity of the KD was retrograded upon clinical introduction of phenytoin and subsequently other antiepileptic drugs. Today, despite a pharmacological arsenal targeting cerebral receptors and specific events in seizure initiation and development, about 30-40% patients are still refractory to available medications. Thus, the KD has been re-introduced in recent years as an alternative therapy, averring to be efficacious against some instances of resistant or intractable epilepsy. Despite a long historical background and enlarged clinical use, identification of the underlying anticonvulsant mechanisms associated with this nonpharmacological approach is still in stagnation. The present review is an attempt to encourage current research orientation through well-based and directed proposals for putative emerging candidates mediating KD anticonvulsant mechanisms. The reader is provided with a special emphasis on ATP-sensitive and recently cloned two-pore (or tandem) domain potassium channels, as well as several emerging conceptual views and advances such as nuclear receptors, uncoupling proteins and gap junctions that the authors speculate may contribute to understanding the basic mechanisms linked to the KD.

  13. In Vivo Screening Using Transgenic Zebrafish Embryos Reveals New Effects of HDAC Inhibitors Trichostatin A and Valproic Acid on Organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Bonneton, François; Tohme, Marie; Bernard, Laure; Chen, Xiao Yong; Laudet, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on reproduction are well known, whereas their developmental effects are much less characterized. However, exposure to endocrine disruptors during organogenesis may lead to deleterious and permanent problems later in life. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) transgenic lines expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in specific organs and tissues are powerful tools to uncover developmental defects elicited by EDCs. Here, we used seven transgenic lines to visualize in vivo whether a series of EDCs and other pharmaceutical compounds can alter organogenesis in zebrafish. We used transgenic lines expressing GFP in pancreas, liver, blood vessels, inner ear, nervous system, pharyngeal tooth and pectoral fins. This screen revealed that four of the tested chemicals have detectable effects on different organs, which shows that the range of effects elicited by EDCs is wider than anticipated. The endocrine disruptor tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA), as well as the three drugs diclofenac, trichostatin A (TSA) and valproic acid (VPA) induced abnormalities in the embryonic vascular system of zebrafish. Moreover, TSA and VPA induced specific alterations during the development of pancreas, an observation that was confirmed by in situ hybridization with specific markers. Developmental delays were also induced by TSA and VPA in the liver and in pharyngeal teeth, resulting in smaller organ size. Our results show that EDCs can induce a large range of developmental alterations during embryogenesis of zebrafish and establish GFP transgenic lines as powerful tools to screen for EDCs effects in vivo. PMID:26900852

  14. Old and new antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy and lactation--report of a case.

    PubMed

    Rauchenzauner, Markus; Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, Ursula; Rostasy, Kevin; Luef, Gerhard

    2011-04-01

    We describe a case of a woman with epilepsy treated with primidone/phenobarbital (so-called "old" antiepileptic drug) and levetiracetam (so-called "new" antiepileptic drug) who was discouraged from breastfeeding, resulting in clinically significant withdrawal seizures in her newborn. As a consequence, even when two or more antiepileptic drugs are needed for the treatment of women with epilepsy, breastfeeding should be recommended, mothers should be informed about the possibility of drug effects on the neonate, and infants of mothers treated with primidone/phenobarbital should be closely monitored for possible signs of sedation.

  15. Are adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs different in symptomatic partial and idiopathic generalized epilepsies? The Portuguese-Brazilian validation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile.

    PubMed

    Martins, H H; Alonso, N B; Vidal-Dourado, M; Carbonel, T D; de Araújo Filho, G M; Caboclo, L O; Yacubian, E M; Guilhoto, L M

    2011-11-01

    We report the results of administration of the Portuguese-Brazilian translation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile (LAEP) to 100 patients (mean age=34.5, SD=12.12; 56 females), 61 with symptomatic partial epilepsy (SPE) and 39 with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) (ILAE, 1989) who were on a stable antiepileptic drug (AED) regimen and being treated in a Brazilian tertiary epilepsy center. Carbamazepine was the most commonly used AED (43.0%), followed by valproic acid (32.0%). Two or more AEDs were used by 69.0% of patients. The mean LAEP score (19 questions) was 37.6 (SD=13.35). The most common adverse effects were sleepiness (35.0%), memory problems (35.0%), and difficulty in concentrating (25.0%). Higher LAEP scores were associated with polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.005), female gender (P<0.001), older age (P<0.001), and uncontrolled seizures (P=0.045). The intraclass coefficient (test-retest reliability) for LAEP overall score was 0.848 (95% CI=0.782-0.895), with a range from 0.370 (unsteadiness) to 0.750 (memory problems). Cronbach's α coefficient (internal consistency) was 0.903. The LAEP was highly correlated with Quality of Life in Epilepsy-31 inventory (r=-0.804, P>0.001) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (Depression: r=0.637, P<0.001; Anxiety: r=0.621, P<0.001) dimensions. LAEP overall scores were similar in people with SPE and IGE and were not helpful in differentiating adverse effects in these two groups. Clinical variables that influenced global LAEP were seizure frequency (P=0.050) and generalized tonic-clonic seizures in the last month (P=0.031) in the IGE group, and polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.003 and P=0.003) in both IGE and SPE groups.

  16. Valproic acid improves second-line regimen of small cell lung carcinoma in preclinical models

    PubMed Central

    Hubaux, Roland; Vandermeers, Fabian; Cosse, Jean-Philippe; Crisanti, Cecilia; Kapoor, Veena; Albelda, Steven M.; Mascaux, Céline; Delvenne, Philippe; Hubert, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    With 5-year survival rates below 5%, small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) has very poor prognosis and requires improved therapies. Despite an excellent overall response to first-line therapy, relapses are frequent and further treatments are disappointing. The goal of the study was to improve second-line therapy of SCLC. The effect of chemotherapeutic agents was evaluated in cell lines (apoptosis, reactive oxygen species, and RNA and protein expression) and in mouse models (tumour development). We demonstrate here that valproic acid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, improves the efficacy of a second-line regimen (vindesine, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide) in SCLC cells and in mouse models. Transcriptomic profiling integrating microRNA and mRNA data identifies key signalling pathways in the response of SCLC cells to valproic acid, opening new prospects for improved therapies. PMID:27730151

  17. The Association of Valproic Acid and Incident Breast Cancer in a Managed Care Cohort

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    The possible role of histone deacetylase inhibitors ( HDACi ) in breast cancer treatment is an area of active investigation. However, its potential as...a preventive agent has not been studied. Valproic acid (VPA) is an HDACi which has been used for many decades to safely treat neurological disorders...The rationale for the use of HDACi in breast cancer prevention is a previously unexplored area of research that is based on compelling preclinical data.

  18. Persistent behavioral effects following early life exposure to retinoic acid or valproic acid in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Jordan M.; Oliveri, Anthony N.; Karbhari, Nishika; Brooks, Roy A.J.; De La Rocha, Amberlene J.; Janardhan, Sheila; Levin, Edward D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Moderate to severe dysregulation in retinoid signaling during early development is associated with a constellation of physical malformations and/or neural tube defects, including spina bifida. It is thought that more subtle dysregulation of this system, which might be achievable via dietary (i.e. hypervitaminosis A) or pharmacological (i.e. valproic acid) exposure in humans, will manifest on behavioral domains including sociability, without overt physical abnormalities. METHODS During early life, zebrafish were exposed to low doses of two chemicals that disrupt retinoid signaling. From 0-5 dpf, larvae were reared in aqueous solutions containing retinoic acid (0, 0.02, 0.2 or 2 nM) or valproic acid (0, 0.5, 5.0 or 50 uM). One cohort of zebrafish was assessed using a locomotor activity screen at 6-dpf; another was reared to adulthood and assessed using a neurobehavioral test battery (startle habituation, novel tank exploration, shoaling, and predator escape/avoidance). RESULTS There was no significant increase in the incidence of physical malformation among exposed fish compared to controls. Both retinoic acid and valproic acid exposures during development disrupted larval activity with persisting behavioral alterations later in life, primarily manifesting as decreased social affiliation. CONCLUSIONS Social behavior and some aspects of motor function were altered in exposed fish; the importance of examining emotional or psychological consequences of early life exposure to retinoid acting chemicals is discussed. PMID:26439099

  19. Selected pharmacokinetic issues of the use of antiepileptic drugs and parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To conduct a systematic review for the evidence supporting or disproving the reality of parenteral nutrition- antiepileptic drugs interaction, especially with respect to the plasma protein-binding of the drug. Methods The articles related to the topic were identified through Medline and PubMed search (1968-Feburary 2010) for English language on the interaction between parenteral nutrition and antiepileptic drugs; the search terms used were anti-epileptic drugs, parenteral nutrition, and/or interaction, and/or in vitro. The search looked for prospective randomized and nonrandomized controlled studies; prospective nonrandomized uncontrolled studies; retrospective studies; case reports; and in vitro studies. Full text of the articles were then traced from the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) library subscribed databases, including Wiley-Blackwell Library, Cochrane Library, EBSCOHost, OVID, ScienceDirect, SAGE Premier, Scopus, SpringerLINK, and Wiley InterScience. The articles from journals not listed by USM library were traced through inter library loan. Results There were interactions between parenteral nutrition and drugs, including antiepileptics. Several guidelines were designed for the management of illnesses such as traumatic brain injuries or cancer patients, involving the use of parenteral nutrition and antiepileptics. Moreover, many studies demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo parenteral nutrition -drugs interactions, especially with antiepileptics. Conclusions There was no evidence supporting the existence of parenteral nutrition-antiepileptic drugs interaction. The issue has not been studied in formal researches, but several case reports and anecdotes demonstrate this drug-nutrition interaction. However, alteration in the drug-free fraction result from parenteral nutrition-drug (i.e. antiepileptics) interactions may necessitate scrupulous reassessment of drug dosages in patients receiving these therapies. This reassessment may be particularly

  20. Assessment of the role of in situ generated (E)-2,4-diene-valproic acid in the toxicity of valproic acid and (E)-2-ene-valproic acid in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Surendradoss, Jayakumar; Chang, Thomas K.H.; Abbott, Frank S.

    2012-11-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) undergoes cytochrome P450-mediated desaturation to form 4-ene-VPA, which subsequently yields (E)-2,4-diene-VPA by β-oxidation. Another biotransformation pathway involves β-oxidation of VPA to form (E)-2-ene-VPA, which also generates (E)-2,4-diene-VPA by cytochrome P450-mediated desaturation. Although the synthetic form of (E)-2,4-diene-VPA is more hepatotoxic than VPA as shown in various experimental models, there is no conclusive evidence to implicate the in situ generated (E)-2,4-diene-VPA in VPA hepatotoxicity. The present study investigated the effects of modulating the in situ formation of (E)-2,4-diene-VPA on markers of oxidative stress (formation of 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein; DCF), steatosis (accumulation of BODIPY 558/568 C{sub 12}), necrosis (release of lactate dehydrogenase; LDH), and on cellular total glutathione (GSH) levels in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes treated with VPA or (E)-2-ene-VPA. Treatment with either of these chemicals alone increased each of the toxicity endpoints. In VPA-treated hepatocytes, (E)-2,4-diene-VPA was detected only at trace levels, even after phenobarbital (PB) pretreatment and there was no effect on the toxicity of VPA. Furthermore, pretreatment with a cytochrome P450 enzyme inhibitor, 1-aminobenzotriazole (1-ABT), did not influence the extent of VPA toxicity in both PB-pretreated and vehicle-pretreated hepatocytes. However, in (E)-2-ene-VPA-treated hepatocytes, PB pretreatment greatly enhanced the levels of (E)-2,4-diene-VPA and this was accompanied by a further enhancement of the effects of (E)-2-ene-VPA on DCF formation, BODIPY accumulation, LDH release, and GSH depletion. Pretreatment with 1-ABT reduced the concentrations of (E)-2,4-diene-VPA and the extent of (E)-2-ene-VPA toxicity; however, this occurred in PB-pretreated hepatocytes, but not in control hepatocytes. In conclusion, in situ generated (E)-2,4-diene-VPA is not responsible for the hepatocyte toxicity of VPA, whereas it

  1. Modulating Behavior in C. elegans Using Electroshock and Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Kailiang; Grill, Brock; Dawson-Scully, Ken

    2016-01-01

    The microscopic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has emerged as a valuable model for understanding the molecular and cellular basis of neurological disorders. The worm offers important physiological similarities to mammalian models such as conserved neuron morphology, ion channels, and neurotransmitters. While a wide-array of behavioral assays are available in C. elegans, an assay for electroshock/electroconvulsion remains absent. Here, we have developed a quantitative behavioral method to assess the locomotor response following electric shock in C. elegans. Electric shock impairs normal locomotion, and induces paralysis and muscle twitching; after a brief recovery period, shocked animals resume normal locomotion. We tested electric shock responses in loss-of-function mutants for unc-25, which encodes the GABA biosynthetic enzyme GAD, and unc-49, which encodes the GABAA receptor. unc-25 and unc-49 mutants have decreased inhibitory GABAergic transmission to muscles, and take significantly more time to recover normal locomotion following electric shock compared to wild-type. Importantly, increased sensitivity of unc-25 and unc-49 mutants to electric shock is rescued by treatment with antiepileptic drugs, such as retigabine. Additionally, we show that pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), a GABAA receptor antagonist and proconvulsant in mammalian and C. elegans seizure models, increases susceptibility of worms to electric shock. PMID:27668426

  2. Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions in Dogs Treated with Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Tina; Mueller, Ralf S.; Dobenecker, Britta; Fischer, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic disorders in dogs and life-long treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AED) is frequently required. Adverse events of AED targeting the skin are only rarely reported in veterinary medicine and the true incidence and spectrum of cutaneous reactions in epileptic dogs remains unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that cutaneous reactions commonly occur in epileptic dogs and are related to AED treatment. A retrospective case review of 185 dogs treated for epilepsy identified 20.0% with simultaneous appearance of dermatologic signs. In a subsequent prospective case investigation (n = 137), we identified newly appearing or distinct worsening of skin lesions following initiation of AED therapy in 10.9% of dogs treated for epilepsy (95% CI 6.8–17.7%). Cutaneous lesions were classified as probably drug-induced in 40.0% of these cases. Patch testing and intradermal testing were further investigated as potential diagnostic methods to confirm AED hypersensitivity. They were of high specificity but sensitivity and positive predictive value appeared inappropriate to recommend their routine use in clinical practice. PMID:27148543

  3. Antiepileptic drugs and adverse skin reactions: An update.

    PubMed

    Błaszczyk, Barbara; Lasoń, Władysław; Czuczwar, Stanisław Jerzy

    2015-06-01

    This paper summarizes current views on clinical manifestation, pathogenesis, prognosis and management of antiepileptic drug (AED)-induced adverse skin reactions. Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE (PubMed) and ISI Web of Knowledge were searched. The recent classification, among drug-induced skin injuries, points to Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis and hypersensitivity syndrome (HSS), which may be also recognized as a drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS). The use of aromatic AEDs, e.g. phenytoin, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, phenobarbital, primidone, zonisamide, and lamotrigine is more frequently associated with cutaneous eruption and other signs or symptoms of drug hypersensitivity. There is a high degree of cross-reactivity (40-80%) in patients with hypersensitivity or allergic reactions to AEDs. Pharmacogenetic variations in drug biotransformation may also play a role in inducing these undesired effects. It is suggested that avoidance of specific AEDs in populations at special risk, cautious dose titration and careful monitoring of clinical response and, if applicable, laboratory parameters can minimize the serious consequences of idiosyncratic reactions.

  4. Prediction of antiepileptic drug treatment outcomes using machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colic, Sinisa; Wither, Robert G.; Lang, Min; Zhang, Liang; Eubanks, James H.; Bardakjian, Berj L.

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Antiepileptic drug (AED) treatments produce inconsistent outcomes, often necessitating patients to go through several drug trials until a successful treatment can be found. This study proposes the use of machine learning techniques to predict epilepsy treatment outcomes of commonly used AEDs. Approach. Machine learning algorithms were trained and evaluated using features obtained from intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG) recordings of the epileptiform discharges observed in Mecp2-deficient mouse model of the Rett Syndrome. Previous work have linked the presence of cross-frequency coupling (I CFC) of the delta (2-5 Hz) rhythm with the fast ripple (400-600 Hz) rhythm in epileptiform discharges. Using the I CFC to label post-treatment outcomes we compared support vector machines (SVMs) and random forest (RF) machine learning classifiers for providing likelihood scores of successful treatment outcomes. Main results. (a) There was heterogeneity in AED treatment outcomes, (b) machine learning techniques could be used to rank the efficacy of AEDs by estimating likelihood scores for successful treatment outcome, (c) I CFC features yielded the most effective a priori identification of appropriate AED treatment, and (d) both classifiers performed comparably. Significance. Machine learning approaches yielded predictions of successful drug treatment outcomes which in turn could reduce the burdens of drug trials and lead to substantial improvements in patient quality of life.

  5. Epilepsy, Antiepileptic Drugs, and Aggression: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Besag, Frank; Ettinger, Alan B.; Mula, Marco; Gobbi, Gabriella; Comai, Stefano; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; Steinhoff, Bernhard J.

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have many benefits but also many side effects, including aggression, agitation, and irritability, in some patients with epilepsy. This article offers a comprehensive summary of current understanding of aggressive behaviors in patients with epilepsy, including an evidence-based review of aggression during AED treatment. Aggression is seen in a minority of people with epilepsy. It is rarely seizure related but is interictal, sometimes occurring as part of complex psychiatric and behavioral comorbidities, and it is sometimes associated with AED treatment. We review the common neurotransmitter systems and brain regions implicated in both epilepsy and aggression, including the GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline systems and the hippocampus, amygdala, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and temporal lobes. Few controlled clinical studies have used behavioral measures to specifically examine aggression with AEDs, and most evidence comes from adverse event reporting from clinical and observational studies. A systematic approach was used to identify relevant publications, and we present a comprehensive, evidence-based summary of available data surrounding aggression-related behaviors with each of the currently available AEDs in both adults and in children/adolescents with epilepsy. A psychiatric history and history of a propensity toward aggression/anger should routinely be sought from patients, family members, and carers; its presence does not preclude the use of any specific AEDs, but those most likely to be implicated in these behaviors should be used with caution in such cases. PMID:27255267

  6. Histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid promotes the induction of pluripotency in mouse fibroblasts by suppressing reprogramming-induced senescence stress

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Yingying; Chen, Xi; Yu, Dehai; Li, Tao; Cui, Jiuwei; Wang, Guanjun; Hu, Ji-Fan; Li, Wei

    2015-09-10

    Histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) has been used to increase the reprogramming efficiency of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) from somatic cells, yet the specific molecular mechanisms underlying this effect is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that reprogramming with lentiviruses carrying the iPSC-inducing factors (Oct4-Sox2-Klf4-cMyc, OSKM) caused senescence in mouse fibroblasts, establishing a stress barrier for cell reprogramming. Administration of VPA protected cells from reprogramming-induced senescent stress. Using an in vitro pre-mature senescence model, we found that VPA treatment increased cell proliferation and inhibited apoptosis through the suppression of the p16/p21 pathway. In addition, VPA also inhibited the G2/M phase blockage derived from the senescence stress. These findings highlight the role of VPA in breaking the cell senescence barrier required for the induction of pluripotency. - Highlights: • Histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid enhances iPSC induction. • Valproic acid suppresses reprogramming-induced senescence stress. • Valproic acid downregulates the p16/p21 pathway in reprogramming. • This study demonstrates a new mechanistic role of valproic acid in enhancing reprogramming.

  7. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) or hyponatraemia associated with valproic Acid: four case reports from the Netherlands and a case/non-case analysis of vigibase.

    PubMed

    Beers, Erna; van Puijenbroek, Eugène P; Bartelink, Imke H; van der Linden, Carolien M J; Jansen, Paul A F

    2010-01-01

    The Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre Lareb received four cases of severe symptomatic hyponatraemia or syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) in association with valproic acid use, in which a causal relationship was suspected. This study describes these cases and gives support for this association from Vigibase, the adverse drug reaction (ADR) database of the WHO Collaborating Centre for International Drug Monitoring, the Uppsala Monitoring Centre. Cases of hyponatraemia in valproic acid users are described. In a case/non-case analysis, the strength of the association between reported cases of hyponatraemia and the use of valproic acid in Vigibase was established by calculating a reporting odds ratio, adjusted for possible confounding by concomitant medication. Four females aged 57, 67, 71 and 88 years developed symptomatic hyponatraemia or SIADH after starting valproic acid. Despite concomitant medication or co-morbidity, a causal relationship was plausible. In Vigibase, valproic acid is disproportionally associated with hyponatraemia and SIADH (corrected reporting odds ratio 1.83 [95% CI 1.61, 2.08]). Based on the described cases and the reports from Vigibase, a causal relationship between valproic acid use and hyponatraemia or SIADH can be suspected. The mechanism by which valproic acid could cause hyponatraemia or SIADH has not been fully elucidated. Valproic acid use could lead to reduced sensitivity of hypothalamic osmoreceptors. It also might directly affect tubular cell function, thereby leading to SIADH. It might be expected that a combination of effects on the osmoreceptors and a lack of compensation of the salt-water unbalance by the nephrons causes SIADH in some patients using valproic acid. It could be a dose- or concentration-related adverse effect. In this report, severe symptomatic hyponatraemia and SIADH have been associated with the use of valproic acid. With this study, not only is the number of published cases

  8. [Antiepileptic drugs as mood stabilizers: what did we learn from the epileptology?].

    PubMed

    Rajna, Péter

    2008-09-30

    Author summarizes the practical aspects of psychiatric application of mood stabilizing antiepileptic drugs. He observes how to transfer experiences taken from the "epileptologic" practice into the psychiatric care of bipolar patients. He shortly demonstrates the relevant information on the mechanisms of action, controversies and possible clinical effects influenced by the seizure inhibiting effect of the concerning molecules. By the opinion of the author the clinical importance of pharmacokinetic parameters are underestimated in the psychiatric practice. Therefore--as an original approach in the literature--he summarizes the detailed clinical indications of serum level measurements of antiepileptic drugs applied in psychiatry as mood stabilizers. The therapeutic experiences in epilepsy added a lot of practices for the most effective dosing, building, tapering and exchange of the mood stabilizer antiepileptics. Drug interactions (appear among the psychotropic drugs or with the commonly used medicines). As in any chronic therapies the main condition of patient's compliance is the lacking or very mild presence of the applied therapy. The paper discusses the most frequently occurring and drug-specific side effects in table forms. Using the term of "relative therapeutic potential" the need of balance between the efficacy (influenced by the choice and dosing) and the tolerance are pointed. Rules of application can change significantly in special populations like in pregnancy, obesity, chronic diseases or in chronic comorbid states and in case of polytherapy. As for the special therapeutic effects, the experiences are not completed even in group of antiepileptics: we have larger and more favorable knowledge on the traditional drugs (carbamazepine and valproate) and on lamotrigine (from the newer generation) but promising but not enough information exists on the newest antiepileptic molecules. Further targeted studies are needed for the identification and positioning of

  9. Intranasal delivery of antiepileptic medications for treatment of seizures.

    PubMed

    Wermeling, Daniel P

    2009-04-01

    Acute isolated seizure, repetitive or recurrent seizures, and status epilepticus are all deemed medical emergencies. Mortality and worse neurologic outcome are directly associated with the duration of seizure activity. A number of recent reviews have described consensus statements regarding the pharmacologic treatment protocols for seizures when patients are in pre-hospital, institutional, and home-bound settings. Benzodiazepines, such as lorazepam, diazepam, midazolam, and clonazepam are considered to be medications of first choice. The rapidity by which a medication can be delivered to the systemic circulation and then to the brain plays a significant role in reducing the time needed to treat seizures and reduce opportunity for damage to the CNS. Speed of delivery, particularly outside of the hospital, is enhanced when transmucosal routes of delivery are used in place of an intravenous injection. Intranasal transmucosal delivery of benzodiazepines is useful in reducing time to drug administration and cessation of seizures in the pre-hospital setting, when actively seizing patients arrive in the emergency room, and at home where caregivers treat their dependents. This review summarizes factors to consider when choosing a benzodiazepine for intranasal administration, including formulation and device considerations, pharmacology and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profiles. A review of the most relevant clinical studies in epilepsy patients will provide context for the relative success of this technique with a number of benzodiazepines and relatively less sophisticated nasal preparations. Neuropeptides delivered intranasally, crossing the blood-brain barrier via the olfactory system, may increase the availability of medications for treatment of epilepsy. Consequently, there remains a significant unmet medical need to serve the pharamcotherapeutic requirements of epilepsy patients through commercial development and marketing of intranasal antiepileptic products.

  10. Polycystic ovary syndrome in patients on antiepileptic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Lakshminarayanapuram G.; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy; Bhimani, Bipin C.; Reddy, Janardhan YC; Rama Murthy, Batchu S.; Subbakrishna, Doddaballapura K.; Sinha, Sanjib

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to discuss the prevalence of polycystic ovary (PCO) and Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in women with epilepsy (WWE) on valproate (VPA), carbamazepine (CBZ), or phenobarbitone (PB), drug naive WWE and women with bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) on VPA. Materials and Methods: This prospective study included 190 women aged 18–45 years, who had epilepsy or BPAD (on VPA), and consented for study. Patients were grouped as Group 1 (n = 40): WWE on VPA, Group 2 (n = 50): WWE on CBZ, Group 3 (n = 50): WWE on PB, Group 4 (n = 30): drug naïve WWE, and Group 5 (n = 20): women with BPAD on VPA. All women were interviewed for medical, menstrual, drug and treatment history, nature of epilepsy, and seizure control. Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test were done to compare results between the groups. Results: Fifty-two women (52/190; 27.4%) had menstrual disturbances, in which oligomenorrhea was the most common (55.8%). There was a significant difference in the occurrence of PCOS in patients on VPA versus normal population (P = 0.05) and patients on other antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) (P = 0.02). There was, however, no significant difference in the occurrence of PCO between patients on VPA and the untreated epileptic women. VPA group (Epilepsy + BPAD) had a significantly higher occurrence of obesity than other treatment groups (P = 0.043, OR = 2.11). Conclusions: The study observed significantly higher occurrence of PCO in patients on VPA compared to other AEDs and the normal population. The importance of proper clinical evaluation before initiating VPA is highlighted. PMID:27570385

  11. Adsorption of the antiepileptic carbamazepine onto agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Calisto, Vania; Esteves, Valdemar I

    2012-05-01

    Carbamazepine is an antiepileptic pharmaceutical which is commonly found in environmental matrices. It passes through wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) almost completely unaffected and has been found to be highly persistent in the environment. The application of sludge in agricultural fields and the use of WWTP effluents for irrigation constitute a potential source of soil contamination. Consequently, the assessment of the interaction between carbamazepine and soils is of crucial importance to understand its fate in the environment. To monitor the sorption behavior of carbamazepine onto agricultural soils, batch equilibrium experiments were performed using soils subjected to distinct long-term fertilizations. In order to follow the adsorption experiments, an UV spectral deconvolution methodology was applied and the results compared with those from micellar electrokinetic chromatography. The results obtained by both methods did not present significant statistical differences at 95% confidence level. Therefore, it was proven that, in the context of adsorption studies, UV spectral deconvolution is a valid alternative to common chromatographic methods, with the major advantage of being a simple and fast procedure. The adsorption of carbamazepine onto the selected soils was satisfactorily described by the Freundlich model. The obtained Freundlich parameters (K(F)) (between 1.79 ± 0.07 and 4.8 ± 0.2 mg kg(-1) (mg L(-1))(-N)) indicate that the adsorption behavior of carbamazepine is dependent on the soil fertilization. Also, it is not extensively sorbed, indicating that carbamazepine present in soils can be a potential source of contamination of surface and ground waters through run-off and infiltration.

  12. N-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-2-propylpentanamide, a valproic acid aryl derivative designed in silico with improved anti-proliferative activity in HeLa, rhabdomyosarcoma and breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Prestegui-Martel, Berenice; Bermúdez-Lugo, Jorge Antonio; Chávez-Blanco, Alma; Dueñas-González, Alfonso; García-Sánchez, José Rubén; Pérez-González, Oscar Alberto; Padilla-Martínez, Itzia Irene; Fragoso-Vázquez, Manuel Jonathan; Mendieta-Wejebe, Jessica Elena; Correa-Basurto, Ana María; Méndez-Luna, David; Trujillo-Ferrara, José; Correa-Basurto, José

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations are associated with cancer and their targeting is a promising approach for treatment of this disease. Among current epigenetic drugs, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors induce changes in gene expression that can lead to cell death in tumors. Valproic acid (VPA) is a HDAC inhibitor that has antitumor activity at mM range. However, it is known that VPA is a hepatotoxic drug. Therefore, the aim of this study was to design a set of VPA derivatives adding the arylamine core of the suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) with different substituents at its carboxyl group. These derivatives were submitted to docking simulations to select the most promising compound. The compound 2 (N-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-2-propylpentanamide) was the best candidate to be synthesized and evaluated in vitro as an anti-cancer agent against HeLa, rhabdomyosarcoma and breast cancer cell lines. Compound 2 showed a better IC50 (μM range) than VPA (mM range) on these cancer cells. And also, 2 was particularly effective on triple negative breast cancer cells. In conclusion, 2 is an example of drugs designed in silico that show biological properties against human cancer difficult to treat as triple negative breast cancer.

  13. Examination by EPR spectroscopy of free radicals in melanins isolated from A-375 cells exposed on valproic acid and cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Chodurek, Ewa; Zdybel, Magdalena; Pilawa, Barbara; Dzierzewicz, Zofia

    2012-01-01

    Drug binding by melanin biopolymers influence the effectiveness of the chemotherapy, radiotherapy and photodynamic therapy. Free radicals of melanins take part in formation of their complex with drugs. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of the two compounds: valproic acid (VPA) and cisplatin (CPT) on free radicals properties of melanin isolated from A-375 melanoma cells. Free radicals were examined by an X-band (9.3 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. EPR spectra were measured for the model synthetic eumelanin - DOPA-melanin, the melanin isolated from the control A-375 cells and these cells treated by VPA, CPT and both VPA and CPT. For all the examined samples broad EPR lines (deltaBpp: 0.48-0.68 mT) with g-factors of 2.0045-2.0060 characteristic for o-semiquinone free radicals were observed. Free radicals concentrations (N) in the tested samples, g-factors, amplitudes (A), integral intensities (I) and linewidths (deltaBpp) of the EPR spectra, were analyzed. The EPR lines were homogeneously broadened. Continuous microwave saturation of the EPR spectra indicated that slow spin-lattice relaxation processes existed in all the tested melanin samples. The relatively slowest spin-lattice relaxation processes characterized melanin isolated from A-375 cells treated with both VPA and CPT. The changes of the EPR spectra with increasing microwave power in the range of 2.2-70 mW were evaluated. Free radicals concentrations in the melanin from A-375 cells were higher than in the synthetic DOPA-melanin. The strong increase of free radicals concentration in the melanin from A-375 cells was observed after their treating by VPA. CPT also caused the increase of free radicals concentrations in the examined natural melanin. The free radicals concentration in melanin isolated from A-375 cells treated with both VPA and CPT was slightly higher than those in melanin from the control cells.

  14. Valproic Acid Neuroprotection in the 6-OHDA Model of Parkinson's Disease Is Possibly Related to Its Anti-Inflammatory and HDAC Inhibitory Properties

    PubMed Central

    Ximenes, José Christian Machado; Neves, Kelly Rose Tavares; Leal, Luzia Kalyne A. M.; do Carmo, Marta Regina Santos; Brito, Gerly Anne de Castro; Naffah-Mazzacoratti, Maria da Graça; Cavalheiro, Ésper Abrão; Viana, Glauce Socorro de Barros

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder where the main hallmark is the dopaminergic neuronal loss. Besides motor symptoms, PD also causes cognitive decline. Although current therapies focus on the restoration of dopamine levels in the striatum, prevention or disease-modifying therapies are urgently needed. Valproic acid (VA) is a wide spectrum antiepileptic drug, exerting many biochemical and physiological effects. It has been shown to inhibit histone deacetylase which seems to be associated with the drug neuroprotective action. The objectives were to study the neuroprotective properties of VA in a model of Parkinson's disease, consisting in the unilateral striatal injection of the neurotoxin 6-OHDA. For that, male Wistar rats (250 g) were divided into the groups: sham-operated (SO), untreated 6-OHDA-lesioned, and 6-OHDA-lesioned treated with VA (25 or 50 mg/kg). Oral treatments started 24 h after the stereotaxic surgery and continued daily for 2 weeks, when the animals were subjected to behavioral evaluations (apomorphine-induced rotations and open-field tests). Then, they were sacrificed and had their mesencephalon, striatum, and hippocampus dissected for neurochemical (DA and DOPAC determinations), histological (Fluoro-Jade staining), and immunohistochemistry evaluations (TH, OX-42, GFAP, TNF-alpha, and HDAC). The results showed that VA partly reversed behavioral and neurochemical alterations observed in the untreated 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Besides, VA also decreased neuron degeneration in the striatum and reversed the TH depletion observed in the mesencephalon of the untreated 6-OHDA groups. This neurotoxin increased the OX-42 and GFAP immunoreactivities in the mesencephalon, indicating increased microglia and astrocyte reactivities, respectively, which were reversed by VA. In addition, the immunostainings for TNF-alpha and HDAC demonstrated in the untreated 6-OHDA-lesioned rats were also decreased after VA treatments. These results were

  15. Current Status of the New Antiepileptic Drugs in Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Harpreet S; Sadhotra, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are extensively used worldwide to treat a wide range of disorders other than epilepsy, such as neuropathic pain, migraine, and bipolar disorder. Due to this situation more than 20 new third-generation AEDs have been introduced in the market recently. The future design of new AEDs must also have potential to help in the non-epileptic disorders. The wide acceptance of second generation AEDs for the management of various non-epileptic disorders has caused the emergence of generics in the market. The wide use of approved AEDs outside epilepsy is based on both economic and scientific reasons. Bipolar disorders, migraine prophylaxis, fibromyalgia, and neuropathic pain represent the most attractive indication expansion opportunities for anticonvulsant developers, providing blockbuster revenues. Strong growth in non-epilepsy conditions will see Pfizer's Lyrica become the market leading brand by 2018. In this review, we mainly focus on the current status of new AEDs in the treatment of chronic pain and migraine prophylaxis. AEDs have a strong analgesic potential and this is demonstrated by the wide use of carbamazepine in trigeminal neuralgia and sodium valproate in migraine prophylaxis. At present, data on the new AEDs for non-epileptic conditions are inconclusive. Not all AEDs are effective in the management of neuropathic pain and migraine. Only those AEDs whose mechanisms of action are match with pathophysiology of the disease, have potential to show efficacy in non-epileptic disorder. For this better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and mechanisms of action of new AEDs are essential requirement before initiating pre-clinical and clinical trials. Many new AEDs show good results in the animal model and open-label studies but fail to provide strong evidence at randomized, placebo-controlled trials. The final decision regarding the clinical efficacy of the particular AEDs in a specific non-epileptic disorder should be

  16. Neuroactive Peptides as Putative Mediators of Antiepileptic Ketogenic Diets

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Carmela; Marchiò, Maddalena; Timofeeva, Elena; Biagini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    mechanisms involved in the beneficial effects of KDs. In this review, we summarize the current evidence for altered regulation of the synthesis of neuropeptides and peripheral hormones in response to KDs, and we try to define a possible role for specific neuroactive peptides in mediating the antiepileptic properties of diet-induced ketogenesis. PMID:24808888

  17. Current Status of the New Antiepileptic Drugs in Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Harpreet S.; Sadhotra, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are extensively used worldwide to treat a wide range of disorders other than epilepsy, such as neuropathic pain, migraine, and bipolar disorder. Due to this situation more than 20 new third-generation AEDs have been introduced in the market recently. The future design of new AEDs must also have potential to help in the non-epileptic disorders. The wide acceptance of second generation AEDs for the management of various non-epileptic disorders has caused the emergence of generics in the market. The wide use of approved AEDs outside epilepsy is based on both economic and scientific reasons. Bipolar disorders, migraine prophylaxis, fibromyalgia, and neuropathic pain represent the most attractive indication expansion opportunities for anticonvulsant developers, providing blockbuster revenues. Strong growth in non-epilepsy conditions will see Pfizer’s Lyrica become the market leading brand by 2018. In this review, we mainly focus on the current status of new AEDs in the treatment of chronic pain and migraine prophylaxis. AEDs have a strong analgesic potential and this is demonstrated by the wide use of carbamazepine in trigeminal neuralgia and sodium valproate in migraine prophylaxis. At present, data on the new AEDs for non-epileptic conditions are inconclusive. Not all AEDs are effective in the management of neuropathic pain and migraine. Only those AEDs whose mechanisms of action are match with pathophysiology of the disease, have potential to show efficacy in non-epileptic disorder. For this better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and mechanisms of action of new AEDs are essential requirement before initiating pre-clinical and clinical trials. Many new AEDs show good results in the animal model and open-label studies but fail to provide strong evidence at randomized, placebo-controlled trials. The final decision regarding the clinical efficacy of the particular AEDs in a specific non-epileptic disorder should be

  18. Valproic acid-induced acute pancreatitis in pediatric age: case series and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    COFINI, M.; QUADROZZI, F.; FAVORITI, P.; FAVORITI, M.; COFINI, G.

    2015-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is commonly prescribed medication for epilepsy, migraine and bipolar disorder. Although the common adverse effect associated with VPA are typically benign, less common adverse effect can occur; these include hepatotixicity, teratogenicity and acute pancreatitis (AP). VPA-induced pancreatitis does not depend on valproic acid serum level and may occur anytime after onset of therapy. Re-challenge with VPA is dangerous and should be avoided. The diagnosis of VPA-induced pancreatitis seems to be underestimated because of difficulties in determining the causative agent and the need for a retrospective re-evaluation of the causative factor. More of idiopathic pancreatitis should be a drug-induced pancreatitis. We report four cases of VPA-induced AP found in a group of 52 cases of AP in children come to our attention from January 2008 to December 2012. The aim of these reports is to point out our experience about clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, outcome in children with VPA-induced AP and review of literature. PMID:26712070

  19. Synergistically killing activity of aspirin and histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) on hepatocellular cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaofei; Zhu, Yanshuang; He, Huabin; Lou, Lianqing; Ye, Weiwei; Chen, Yongxin; Wang, Jinghe

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Novel combination therapy using aspirin and valproic acid (VPA). •Combination of aspirin and VPA elicits synergistic cytotoxic effects. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly reduces the drug dosage required alone. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly inhibit tumor growth. •Lower dose of aspirin in combination therapy will minimize side effects of aspirin. -- Abstract: Aspirin and valproic acid (VPA) have been extensively studied for inducing various malignancies growth inhibition respectively, despite their severe side effects. Here, we developed a novel combination by aspirin and VPA on hepatocellular cancer cells (HCCs). The viability of HCC lines were analyzed by MTT assay, apoptotic analysis of HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cell was performed. Real time-PCR and Western blotting were performed to determine the expression of apoptosis related genes and proteins such as Survivin, Bcl-2/Bax, Cyclin D1 and p15. Moreover, orthotopic xenograft tumors were challenged in nude mice to establish murine model, and then therapeutic effect was analyzed after drug combination therapy. The viability of HCC lines’ significantly decreased after drug combination treatment, and cancer cell apoptosis in combination group increasingly induced compared with single drug use. Therapeutic effect was significantly enhanced by combination therapy in tumor volume and tumor weight decrease. From the data shown here, aspirin and VPA combination have a synergistic killing effect on hepatocellular cancers cells proliferation and apoptosis.

  20. Valproic acid-associated sialadenosis of the parotid and submandibular glands: diagnostic and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Mauz, P S; Mörike, K; Kaiserling, E; Brosch, S

    2005-04-01

    Sialadenosis has been defined as a non-inflammatory, parenchymatous salivary gland disease causing recurrent, bilateral swelling of the salivary glands. As an adverse drug reaction of valproic acid, sialadenosis is very rare. To our knowledge, it has been reported only once in the world literature to date. We present herein the case of a patient with valproic acid-associated sialadenosis of both the parotid and submandibular glands. This appears to be the first published case of a patient who received surgical treatment. On light and electron microscopy of all the affected salivary glands, granular sialadenosis with predominantly moderate electron-dense secretory cytoplasmatic granules was observed. No relevant degenerative alterations were seen. There was no histological evidence of peripheral neuropathy of the nerve supply, leading to disordered activity of acinar cells by loss of neurosecretory granules. Lateral parotidectomy, performed under neuromonitoring control for safety reasons, is the treatment of choice for chronic recurrent parotitis that does not respond to conservative therapy, particularly if the cosmetic deformity is unacceptable to the patient. If the submandibular glands are involved, partial removal is recommended.

  1. VAC chemotherapy with valproic acid for refractory/relapsing small cell lung cancer: a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Berghmans, Thierry; Lafitte, Jean-Jacques; Scherpereel, Arnaud; Ameye, Lieveke; Paesmans, Marianne; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Colinet, Benoit; Tulippe, Christian; Willems, Luc; Leclercq, Nathalie; Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2015-10-01

    Salvage chemotherapy (CT) for relapsing or refractory small cell lung cancer (SCLC) remains disappointing. In vitro experiments showed that valproic acid increases apoptosis of SCLC cell lines exposed to doxorubicin, vindesine and bis(2-chloroethyl)amine. The primary objective of this phase II study was to determine whether epigenetic modulation with valproic acid in addition to a doxorubicin, vindesine and cyclophosphamide (VAC) regimen improves 6-month progression-free survival (PFS). Patients with pathologically proven SCLC refractory to prior platinum derivatives and etoposide were eligible. After central registration, patients received VAC plus daily oral valproic acid. 64 patients were registered, of whom six were ineligible. Seven patients did not receive any CT, leaving 51 patients assessable for the primary end-point. The objective response rate was 19.6%. Median PFS was 2.8 months (95% CI 2.5-3.6 months) and 6-month PFS was 6%. Median survival time was 5.9 months (95% CI 4.7-7.5 months). Toxicity was mainly haematological, with 88% and 26% grade 3-4 neutropenia and thrombopenia, respectively. Despite an interesting response rate, the addition of valproic acid to VAC did not translate into adequate PFS in relapsing SCLC or SCLC refractory to platinum-etoposide.

  2. The role side effects play in the choice of antiepileptic therapy in brain tumor-related epilepsy: a comparative study on traditional antiepileptic drugs versus oxcarbazepine

    PubMed Central

    Maschio, Marta; Dinapoli, Loredana; Vidiri, Antonello; Pace, Andrea; Fabi, Alessandra; Pompili, Alfredo; Carapella, Maria Carmine; Jandolo, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Background Seizure control doesn't represent the only challenging goal in patients with brain tumor-related epilepsy. Side effects have often taken precedence for patients' quality of life. Methods We performed an observational retrospective study on patients with brain tumor-related epilepsy: 35 who had assumed oxcarbazepine monotherapy and 35 patients who had undergone treatment with traditional antiepileptic drugs. Primary variable of efficacy was the mean seizure frequency per month and safety variables were the drop-out for side effects and total incidence of side effects. We applied the Propensity Score technique to minimize selection bias. Results Our results showed a similar efficacy of oxcarbazepine and traditional antiepileptic drugs over time, but the difference in safety and tolerability between the two groups was significant: traditional AEDs caused more side effects, both serious and non serious. Conclusion This study highlights the importance of taking into consideration not only seizure control but also the appearance of side effects when choosing antiepileptic drugs in this patients population. PMID:19419544

  3. Astaxanthin improves behavioral disorder and oxidative stress in prenatal valproic acid-induced mice model of autism.

    PubMed

    Al-Amin, Md Mamun; Rahman, Md Mahbubur; Khan, Fazlur Rahman; Zaman, Fahmida; Mahmud Reza, Hasan

    2015-06-01

    Prenatal exposure to valproic acid on gestational day 12.5 may lead to the impaired behavior in the offspring, which is similar to the human autistic symptoms. To the contrary, astaxanthin shows neuroprotective effect by its antioxidant mechanism. We aimed to (i) develop mice model of autism and (ii) investigate the effect of astaxanthin on such model animals. Valproic acid (600 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally to the pregnant mice on gestational day 12.5. Prenatal valproic acid-exposed mice were divided into 2 groups on postnatal day 25 and astaxanthin (2mg/kg) was given to the experimental group (VPA_AST, n=10) while saline was given to the control group (VPA, n=10) for 4 weeks. Behavioral test including social interaction, open field and hot-plate were conducted on postnatal day 25 and oxidative stress markers such as lipid peroxidation, advanced protein oxidation product, nitric oxide, glutathione, and activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase were estimated on postnatal day 26 to confirm mice model of autism and on postnatal day 56 to assess the effect of astaxanthin. On postnatal day 25, prenatal valproic acid-exposed mice exhibited (i) delayed eye opening (ii) longer latency to respond painful stimuli, (iii) poor sociability and social novelty and (iv) high level of anxiety. In addition, an increased level of oxidative stress was found by determining different oxidative stress markers. Treatment with astaxanthin significantly (p<0.05) improved the behavioral disorder and reduced the oxidative stress in brain and liver. In conclusion, prenatal exposure to valproic day in pregnant mice leads to the development of autism-like features. Astaxanthin improves the impaired behavior in animal model of autism presumably by its antioxidant activity.

  4. EPR studies of free radicals in A-2058 human melanoma cells treated by valproic acid and 5,7-dimethoxycoumarin.

    PubMed

    Zdybel, Magdalena; Chodurek, Ewa; Pilawa, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Free radicals in A-2058 human melanoma cells were studied by the use of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The aim of this work was to determine the changes in relative free radical concentrations in tumor A-2058 cells after treatment by valproic acid (VPA) and 5,7-dimethoxycoumarin (DMC). The influences of VPA and DMC on free radicals in A-2058 cells were compared with those for human melanoma malignum A-375 and G-361 cells, which were tested by us earlier. Human malignant melanoma A-2058 cells were exposed to interactions with VPA, DMC, and both VPA and DMC. The tumor cells A-2058 were purchased from LGC Standards (Lomianki, Poland), and they were grown in the standard conditions: at 37°C and in an atmosphere containing 95% air and 5% CO2, in the Minimum Essential Medium Eagle (MEM, Sigma-Aldrich). The A-2058 cells were incubated with VPA (1 mM) and DMC (10 μM) for 4 days. The first-derivative EPR spectra of the control A-2058 cells, and the cells treated with VPA, DMC, and both VPA and DMC, were measured by the electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer of Radiopan (Poznań, Poland) with microwaves from an X-band (9.3 GHz). The parameters of the EPR lines: amplitudes (A), integral intensities (I), line widths (ΔBpp), and g-factors, were analyzed. The changes of amplitudes and line widths with microwave power increasing from 2.2 to 70 mW were drawn evaluated, o-Semiquinone free radicals of melanin biopolymer are mainly responsible for the EPR lines of A-2058 melanoma malignum cells. The amounts of free radicals in A-2058 cells treated with VPA, and both VPA and DMC, were lower than in the untreated control cells. Application of the tested substances (VPA, and both VPA and DMC) as the antitumor compounds was discussed. DMC without VPA did not decrease free radicals concentration in A-2058 cells. The studies con-firmed that EPR spectroscopy may be used to examine interactions of free radicals with antitumor compounds.

  5. Antiepileptic Medications in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirota, Tomoya; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Hollander, Eric; Kishi, Taro

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalogram-recorded epileptiform activity is common in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), even without clinical seizures. A systematic literature search identified 7 randomized, placebo-controlled trials of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in ASD (total n = 171), including three of valproate, and one each of lamotrigine,…

  6. Human placental perfusion method in the assessment of transplacental passage of antiepileptic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Myllynen, Paeivi . E-mail: paivi.k.myllynen@oulu.fi; Pienimaeki, Paeivi; Vaehaekangas, Kirsi

    2005-09-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases, affecting about 0.5 to 1% of pregnant women. It is commonly accepted that older antiepileptic drugs bear teratogenic potential. So far, no agreement has been reached about the safest antiepileptic drug during pregnancy. It is known that nearly all drugs cross the placenta at least to some extent. Nowadays, there is very little information available of the pharmacokinetics of drugs in the feto-placental unit. Detailed information about drug transport across the placenta would be valuable for the development of safe and effective treatments. For reasons of safety, human studies on placental transfer are restricted to a limited number of drugs. Interspecies differences limit the extrapolation of animal data to humans. Several in vitro methods for the study of placental transfer have been developed over the past decades. The placental perfusion method is the only experimental method that has been used to study human placental transfer of substances in organized placental tissue. The aim of this article is to review human placental perfusion data on antiepileptic drugs. According to perfusion data, it seems that most of the antiepileptic drugs are transferred across the placenta meaning significant fetal exposure.

  7. Bone mass and turnover in women with epilepsy on antiepileptic drug monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pack, Alison M; Morrell, Martha J; Marcus, Robert; Holloway, Leah; Flaster, Edith; Doñe, Silvia; Randall, Alison; Seale, Cairn; Shane, Elizabeth

    2005-02-01

    Antiepileptic drugs, particularly cytochrome P450 enzyme inducers, are associated with disorders of bone metabolism. We studied premenopausal women with epilepsy receiving antiepileptic drug monotherapy (phenytoin, carbamazepine, valproate, and lamotrigine). Subjects completed exercise and nutrition questionnaires and bone mineral density studies. Serum was analyzed for indices of bone metabolism including calcium, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone, insulin growth factor I, insulin binding protein III, and bone formation markers, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin. Urine was analyzed for cross-linked N-telopeptide of type I collagen, a bone resorption marker. Calcium concentrations were significantly less in subjects receiving carbamazepine, phenytoin, and valproate than in those receiving lamotrigine (p = 0.008). Insulin growth factor-I was significantly reduced in subjects receiving phenytoin compared with those receiving lamotrigine (p = 0.017). Subjects receiving phenytoin had significantly greater levels of bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (p = 0.007). Our results demonstrate that phenytoin is associated with changes in bone metabolism and increased bone turnover. The lower calcium concentrations in subjects taking carbamazepine or valproate compared with those taking other antiepileptic drugs suggest that these antiepileptic drugs may have long-term effects. Subjects receiving lamotrigine had no significant reductions in calcium or increases in markers of bone turnover, suggesting this agent is less likely to have long-term adverse effects on bone.

  8. The Relationship among Side Effects Associated with Anti-Epileptic Medications in Those with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sipes, Megan; Matson, Johnny L.; Belva, Brian; Turygin, Nicole; Kozlowski, Alison M.; Horovitz, Max

    2011-01-01

    Seizures are fairly common in those with intellectual disabilities. In order to treat these seizures, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are often used and in many cases are effective. However, these medications often create a variety of associated side effects. In order to monitor these side effects, measures such as the SEIZES-B have been used. While…

  9. The Effects of Antiepileptic Medications on the Social Skills of Individuals with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Luke, Melissa A.; Mayville, Stephen B.

    2004-01-01

    Prevalence rates of epilepsy are much higher among persons with developmental disabilities compared to the general population. Anticonvulsant medication is the most common method of treating seizure disorders. Many of these antiepileptic medications (AEDs) are associated with various side effects, which may have detrimental effects on the social…

  10. Foetal Antiepileptic Drug Exposure and Verbal versus Non-Verbal Abilities at Three Years of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meador, Kimford J.; Baker, Gus A.; Browning, Nancy; Cohen, Morris J.; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Kalayjian, Laura A.; Kanner, Andres; Liporace, Joyce D.; Pennell, Page B.; Privitera, Michael; Loring, David W.

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that foetal valproate exposure impairs intelligence quotient. In this follow-up investigation, we examined dose-related effects of foetal antiepileptic drug exposure on verbal and non-verbal cognitive measures. This investigation is an ongoing prospective observational multi-centre study in the USA and UK, which has enrolled…

  11. Antiepileptic drugs for the treatment of neuropathic pain: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Espinosa, Maríam L.; Sanmartí-García, Gemma; Vázquez-Delgado, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Many therapies have been proposed for the management of neuropathic pain, and they include the use of different antiepileptic drugs. However, the lack of high quality studies indicates that results on the different neuropathic disorders under study do not recommend a particular drug treatment. This study makes a systematic review of the published literature on the use of several antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain, and has the objective of considering both its clinical characteristics and pharmacological use, which will depend on their level of scientific evidence and will follow the principles of evidence-based dentistry. The articles were stratified according to their scientific evidence using the SORT criteria (Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy), and it included those articles that only have level 1 or 2. Randomized clinical trials were stratified according to their level of quality using the JADAD scale, an instrument described by Jadad et al. (7). to assess the quality of clinical trials, while studies with a level below 3 were discarded. Recently, type A or B recommendations are given in favor or against the use of antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain on the basis of their scientific quality. Key words:Neuropathic pain, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), trigeminal neuralgia, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, post- herpetic neuralgia, burning mouth syndrome, persistent idiopathic facial pain. PMID:22549682

  12. Discontinuance of Antiepileptic Medications in Patients with Developmental Disability and Diagnosis of Epilepsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Norberto

    1989-01-01

    Followup 8 years after reduction of antiepileptic drugs in 50 institutionalized developmentally disabled epileptic patients found recurrence of seizures in 26 patients. Predictors for a seizure-free state off medication included few documented seizures in lifetime, no gross neurological abnormalities, and persistently normal electroencephalograms.…

  13. Fully validated method for rapid and simultaneous measurement of six antiepileptic drugs in serum and plasma using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Joachim; Knabbe, Cornelius

    2013-06-15

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) may be very useful in the clinical management of antiepileptic drug therapy for multiple reasons, such as individual variability, metabolism, genetic factors or drug-drug or drug-food interactions. In addition, TDM is helpful to study the variation in pharmacokinetics that occurs between individuals. Here, we describe a rapid assay using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry to measure the antiepileptic drugs lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, primidone, topiramate, and zonisamide. After the addition of internal standards (ISs) and protein precipitation of serum or plasma, 1 μl of sample was separated on a 2.1×50 mm reverse phase column (Waters, Acquity UPLC BEH Phenyl, 1.7 μm). Analytes were then ionized and detected by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with multiple reaction monitoring. Runtime was 2.5 min per injection. Matrix effects were investigated by systematical ion suppression and in-source fragmentation experiments. The calibration curves of the 6 antiepileptic drugs were linear over the working range between 0.05 and 50 mg/L (r>0.99). The limit of detection (LOD) was <0.05 mg/L, whereas the limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 0.10 mg/L of all drugs measured in the assay. The intraassay and interassay coefficients of variation for all compounds were <15% for very low concentration (0.1 mg/L) and <8% in the clinically relevant concentration range (>1.0 mg/L). Mean recoveries were between 87.8 and 98.6% for all drugs. There were no significant ion suppressions detected at the elution times of the analytes. The mean differences between serum and heparinized plasma values were less than 6% for the 6 antiepileptic drugs. All drugs were stable in serum at -20°C, 4°C, and even at RT for at least 1 month. In summary, a specific and sensitive stable isotope dilution UPLC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for routine clinical monitoring of lacosamide

  14. The novel antiepileptic drug levetiracetam (ucb L059) appears to act via a specific binding site in CNS membranes.

    PubMed

    Noyer, M; Gillard, M; Matagne, A; Hénichart, J P; Wülfert, E

    1995-11-14

    Levetiracetam ((S)-alpha-ethyl-2-oxo-pyrrolidine acetamide, ucb L059) is a novel potential antiepileptic agent presently in clinical development with unknown mechanism of action. The finding that its anticonvulsant activity is highly stereoselective (Gower et al., 1992) led us to investigate the presence of specific binding sites for [3H]levetiracetam in rat central nervous system (CNS). Binding assays, performed on crude membranes, revealed the existence of a reversible, saturable and stereoselective specific binding site. Results obtained in hippocampal membranes suggest that [3H]levetiracetam labels a single class of binding sites (nH = 0.92 +/- 0.06) with modest affinity (Kd = 780 +/- 115 nM) and with a high binding capacity (Bmax = 9.1 +/- 1.2 pmol/mg protein). Similar Kd and Bmax values were obtained in other brain regions (cortex, cerebellum and striatum). ucb L060, the (R) enantiomer of levetiracetam, displayed about 1000 times less affinity for these sites. The binding of [3H]levetiracetam is confined to the synaptic plasma membranes in the central nervous system since no specific binding was observed in a range of peripheral tissues including heart, kidneys, spleen, pancreas, adrenals, lungs and liver. The commonly used antiepileptic drugs carbamazepine, phenytoin, valproate, phenobarbital and clonazepam, as well as the convulsant agent t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS), picrotoxin and bicuculline did not displace [3H]levetiracetam binding. However, ethosuximide (pKi = 3.5 +/- 0.1), pentobarbital (pKi = 3.8 +/- 0.1), pentylenetetrazole (pKi = 4.1 +/- 0.1) and bemegride (pKi = 5.0 +/- 0.1) competed with [3H]levetiracetam with pKi values comparable to active drug concentrations observed in vivo. Structurally related compounds, including piracetam and aniracetam, also displaced [3H]levetiracetam binding. (S) Stereoisomer homologues of levetiracetam demonstrated a rank order of affinity for [3H]levetiracetam binding in correlation with their

  15. Risk of falls associated with antiepileptic drug use in ambulatory elderly populations

    PubMed Central

    Maximos, Mira; Chang, Feng; Patel, Tejal

    2017-01-01

    Background: Falls are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in older adults. About a third of those aged 65 years or older fall at least once each year, which can result in hospitalizations, hip fractures and nursing home admissions that incur high costs to individuals, families and society. The objective of this clinical review was to assess the risk of falls in ambulatory older adults who take antiepileptic drugs, medications that can increase fall risk and decrease bone density. Methods: PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library electronic databases were searched from inception to July 2014. Case-control, quasi-experimental and observational design studies published in English that assessed quantifiable fall risk associated with antiepileptic drug use in ambulatory patient populations with a mean or median age of 65 years or older were eligible for inclusion. One author screened all titles and abstracts from the initial search. Two authors independently reviewed and abstracted data from full-text articles that met eligibility criteria. Results: Searches yielded 399 unique articles, of which 7 met inclusion criteria—4 prospective or longitudinal cohort studies, 1 cohort study with a nested case-control, 1 cross-sectional survey and 1 retrospective cross-sectional database analysis. Studies that calculated the relative risk of falls associated with antiepileptic drug use reported a range of 1.29 to 1.62. Studies that reported odds ratios of falls associated with antiepileptic drug use ranged from 1.75 to 6.2 for 1 fall or at least 1 fall and from 2.56 to 7.1 for more frequent falls. Discussion: Health care professionals should monitor older adults while they take antiepileptic drugs to balance the need for such pharmacotherapy against an increased risk of falling and injuries from falls.

  16. Acetylome and phosphoproteome modifications in imatinib resistant chronic myeloid leukaemia cells treated with valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Buchi, Francesca; Pastorelli, Roberta; Ferrari, Germano; Spinelli, Elena; Gozzini, Antonella; Sassolini, Francesca; Bosi, Alberto; Tombaccini, Donatella; Santini, Valeria

    2011-07-01

    Chronic myeloid leukaemia has a specific therapy: BCR/ABL inhibitor imatinib. Resistance due to BCR/ABL dependent and independent mechanisms is partially reversible by histone deacetylase inhibitors. We analysed by 2D-electrophoresis and anti-pan-acetylated and anti-phosphotyrosine immunoblots, followed by spot-matching and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, which proteome modifications would parallel restoration of sensitivity to imatinib by valproic acid (VPA). VPA plus imatinib significantly increased acetylation of HSP90 and hnRNP L and decreased phosphorylation of HSPs and hnRNPs in imatinib resistant cells. VPA was able to modify profoundly acetylome and phosphoproteome of CML cells, while reverting resistance to imatinib.

  17. A Case of Mania Presenting with Hypersexual Behavior and Gender Dysphoria that Resolved with Valproic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Heare, Michelle R.; Barsky, Maria; Faziola, Lawrence R.

    2016-01-01

    Hypersexuality and gender dysphoria have both been described in the literature as symptoms of mania. Hypersexuality is listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5 as part of the diagnostic criteria for bipolar disorder. Gender dysphoria is less often described and its relation to mania remains unclear. This case report describes a young homosexual man presenting in a manic episode with co-morbid amphetamine abuse whose mania was marked by hypersexuality and the new onset desire to be a woman. Both of these symptoms resolved with the addition of valproic acid to antipsychotics. This case report presents the existing literature on hypersexuality and gender dysphoria in mania and describes a treatment option that has not been previously reported. PMID:27994833

  18. Modular glass chip system measuring the electric activity and adhesion of neuronal cells--application and drug testing with sodium valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Koester, Philipp Julian; Buehler, Sebastian Moritz; Stubbe, Marco; Tautorat, Carsten; Niendorf, Mathias; Baumann, Werner; Gimsa, Jan

    2010-06-21

    We developed a modular neurochip system by combining a small (16x16 mm2) glass neurochip (GNC) with a homemade head stage and commercial data acquisition hardware and software. The system is designed for the detection of the electric activity of cultivated nerve or muscle cells by a 52-microelectrode array (MEA). In parallel, cell adhesion can be registered from the electric impedance of an interdigitated electrode structure (IDES). The GNC was tested with various cell lines and primary cells. It is fully autoclavable and re-useable. Murine embryonic primary cells were used as a model system to correlate the electric activity and adhesion of neuronal networks in a drug test with sodium valproic acid. The test showed the advantage of the parallel IDES and MEA measurements, i.e. the parallel detection of cytotoxic and neurotoxic effects. Toxic exposure of the cells during neuronal network formation allows for the characterization of developmental neurotoxic effects even at drug concentrations below the EC50-value for acute neurotoxic effects. At high drug concentrations, the degree of cytotoxic damage can still be assessed from the IDES data in the event that no electric activity develops. The GNC provides optimal cell culture conditions for up to months in combination with full microscopic observability. The 4'' glass wafer technology allows for a high precision of the GNC structures and an economic production of our new system that can be applied in general and developmental toxicity tests as well as in the search for neuro-active compounds.

  19. Resveratrol prevents oxidative damage and loss of sperm motility induced by long-term treatment with valproic acid in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ourique, Giovana M; Pês, Tanise S; Saccol, Etiane M H; Finamor, Isabela A; Glanzner, Werner G; Baldisserotto, Bernardo; Pavanato, Maria A; Gonçalves, Paulo B D; Barreto, Kátia P

    2016-09-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a drug widely use for the treatment of epilepsy in both children and adults. Evidence suggests that long-term use of VPA may lead to an impairment in the male reproductive function. Oxidative stress is considered to play a major role in VPA associated toxicity. In the present work, we demonstrated that the natural antioxidant compound resveratrol (RSV) can be use to prevent VPA oxidative damage. Wistar rats treated with VPA (400mgkg(-1)) by gavage for 28days showed decrease in sperm motility accompanied by increase in oxidative damage to lipids and proteins. Additionally, VPA administration leaded to depletion of reduced glutathione and decrease in total antioxidant potential in testes and epididymides of Wistar rats. The co-administration of RSV (10mgkg(-1)) efficiently prevented VPA pro-oxidant effects. In summary, RSV was shown to protect the reproductive system from the damage induced by VPA. Altogether, our data strongly suggests that RSV administration might be a valuable strategy to minimize reproductive impairment in patients requiring long-term VPA treatment.

  20. Stepwise optimization approach for improving LC-MS/MS analysis of zwitterionic antiepileptic drugs with implementation of experimental design.

    PubMed

    Kostić, Nađa; Dotsikas, Yannis; Malenović, Anđelija; Jančić Stojanović, Biljana; Rakić, Tijana; Ivanović, Darko; Medenica, Mirjana

    2013-07-01

    In this article, a step-by-step optimization procedure for improving analyte response with implementation of experimental design is described. Zwitterionic antiepileptics, namely vigabatrin, pregabalin and gabapentin, were chosen as model compounds to undergo chloroformate-mediated derivatization followed by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Application of a planned stepwise optimization procedure allowed responses of analytes, expressed as areas and signal-to-noise ratios, to be improved, enabling achievement of lower limit of detection values. Results from the current study demonstrate that optimization of parameters such as scan time, geometry of ion source, sheath and auxiliary gas pressure, capillary temperature, collision pressure and mobile phase composition can have a positive impact on sensitivity of LC-MS/MS methods. Optimization of LC and MS parameters led to a total increment of 53.9%, 83.3% and 95.7% in areas of derivatized vigabatrin, pregabalin and gabapentin, respectively, while for signal-to-noise values, an improvement of 140.0%, 93.6% and 124.0% was achieved, compared to autotune settings. After defining the final optimal conditions, a time-segmented method was validated for the determination of mentioned drugs in plasma. The method proved to be accurate and precise with excellent linearity for the tested concentration range (40.0 ng ml(-1)-10.0 × 10(3)  ng ml(-1)).

  1. Non-24-hour sleep–wake syndrome improved by low-dose valproic acid: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kurita, Masatake; Moriya, Takahiro; Nishino, Satoshi; Hirata, Eishin; Hirasawa, Noriyasu; Okubo, Yoshiro; Sato, Tadahiro

    2016-01-01

    A woman was diagnosed with non-24-hour sleep–wake syndrome and depressive symptoms. Her depressive symptoms did not respond to standard doses of several antidepressants or mood stabilizers. Furthermore, her sleep–wake cycle remained non-entrained despite treatment with a melatonin-related drug, vitamin B12, and phototherapy. Ultimately, her sleep–wake rhythm was restored to a 24-hour pattern with a low dose of valproic acid, and her depressive symptoms tended to improve as a result of synchronization without antidepressants. Low-dose valproic acid appears to be one of the effective means of entraining circadian rhythms in patients with non-24-hour sleep–wake syndrome, which in turn likely improves associated depressive symptoms. PMID:28008257

  2. Significance of the EEG in the decision to initiate antiepileptic treatment in patients with epilepsy: a perspective on recent evidence.

    PubMed

    Jaseja, Harinder

    2009-10-01

    The significance of electroencephalography in the prediction of seizure recurrence after a first unprovoked seizure remains a topic of debate. Opinion on the initiation of antiepileptic treatment after a first seizure also remains divided. However, in view of recent evidence, this article is intended to highlight the significance of a properly performed EEG in the decision to initiate antiepileptic drug treatment as early as possible to prevent further morbidity and other consequences.

  3. The Australian Register of antiepileptic drugs in pregnancy: changes over time in the epileptic population.

    PubMed

    Vajda, F J E; O'Brien, T J; Graham, J; Lander, C M; Eadie, M J

    2014-09-01

    The demographic characteristics, details of pregnancies, epilepsies, and treatment of 855 pregnant women with epilepsy enrolled in the Australian Antiepileptic Drugs in Pregnancy Register during 1999-2005 were compared with the corresponding data for the 801 women enrolled from 2006-2012. We estimate that the Register captures approximately 1 in 12 of all pregnancies in Australian women with epilepsy. A number of statistically significant changes were found, with nearly all explained by factors such as re-enrolment of women who had enrolled earlier pregnancies, changes in general population behaviour, altered attitudes to prescribing valproate and using it in lower doses, and the advent of newer antiepileptic drugs which have displaced the use of older agents. It appears that the Register has continued to capture a reasonably representative sample of pregnant Australian women with epilepsy as time has passed.

  4. Progress report on new antiepileptic drugs: a summary of the Fifth Eilat Conference (EILAT V).

    PubMed

    Bialer, M; Johannessen, S I; Kupferberg, H J; Levy, R H; Loiseau, P; Perucca, E

    2001-01-01

    The Fifth Eilat Conference on New Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) took place at the Dan Hotel, Eilat, Israel, 25-29 June 2000. Basic scientists, clinical pharmacologists and neurologists from 20 countries attended the conference, whose main themes included recognition of unexpected adverse effects, new indications of AEDs, and patient-tailored AED therapy. According to tradition, the central part of the conference was devoted to a review of AEDs in development, as well to updates on AEDs that have been marketed in recent years. This article summarizes the information presented on drugs in preclinical and clinical development, including AWD 131-138, DP-valproate, harkoseride, LY300164, NPS 1776, NW 1015, pregabalin, remacemide, retigabine, rufinamide and valrocemide. The potential value of an innovative strategy, porcine embryonic GABAergic cell transplants, is also discussed. Finally, updates on felbamate, fosphenytoin, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin, zonisamide, and the antiepileptic vagal stimulator device are presented.

  5. Role of adenosine in the antiepileptic effects of deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Maisa F.; Hamani, Clement; de Almeida, Antônio-Carlos G.; Amorim, Beatriz O.; Macedo, Carlos E.; Fernandes, Maria José S.; Nobrega, José N.; Aarão, Mayra C.; Madureira, Ana Paula; Rodrigues, Antônio M.; Andersen, Monica L.; Tufik, Sergio; Mello, Luiz E.; Covolan, Luciene

    2014-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of anterior thalamic nucleus (AN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of epilepsy, mechanisms responsible for the antiepileptic effects of this therapy remain elusive. As adenosine modulates neuronal excitability and seizure activity in animal models, we hypothesized that this nucleoside could be one of the substrates involved in the effects of AN DBS. We applied 5 days of stimulation to rats rendered chronically epileptic by pilocarpine injections and recorded epileptiform activity in hippocampal slices. We found that slices from animals given DBS had reduced hippocampal excitability and were less susceptible to develop ictal activity. In live animals, AN DBS significantly increased adenosine levels in the hippocampus as measured by microdialysis. The reduced excitability of DBS in vitro was completely abolished in animals pre-treated with A1 receptor antagonists and was strongly potentiated by A1 receptor agonists. We conclude that some of the antiepileptic effects of DBS may be mediated by adenosine. PMID:25324724

  6. Is primary prevention with antiepileptic drugs effective in brain tumors or brain metastases?

    PubMed

    Lobos-Urbina, Diego; Kittsteiner-Manubens, Lucas; Peña, José

    2017-03-21

    Patients with brain tumors –primary or metastatic- have an increased risk of presenting seizures during the course of their disease. So, prophylactic antiepileptic drugs have been proposed. However, the effects of this intervention are not yet clear. To answer this question, we searched in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening multiple databases. We identified 12 systematic reviews including 80 studies overall. Twelve corresponded to randomized trials, but only two answered the question of interest. We extracted data, conducted a meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table using the GRADE method. We concluded primary prevention with antiepileptic drugs might not reduce the risk of seizures, and it is associated to frequent adverse effects.

  7. Antiepileptic drug use in a nursing home setting: a retrospective study in older adults.

    PubMed

    Callegari, Camilla; Ielmini, M; Bianchi, L; Lucano, M; Bertù, Lorenza; Vender, Simone

    2016-01-01

    The authors set out to examine qualitatively the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a population of older adults in a nursing home setting, evaluating aspects such as specialist prescriptions and changes in dosage. This retrospective prevalence study was carried out in a state-funded nursing home that provides care and rehabilitation for elderly people. The first objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of AED use in this population. The second objective was to monitor AED dosage modifications during the fifteen-month study period, focusing on the safety and the tolerability of AEDs. In the period of time considered, 129 of 402 monitored patients received at least one anti-epileptic therapy. The prevalence of AED use was therefore 32%. Gabapentin was found to be the most commonly prescribed drug, with a frequency of 29%, and it was used mainly for anxiety disorders, psychosis, neuropathic pain and mood disorders.

  8. Antiepileptic drug use in a nursing home setting: a retrospective study in older adults.

    PubMed

    Callegari, Camilla; Ielmini, M; Bianchi, L; Lucano, M; Bertù, L; Vender, Simone

    2016-05-13

    The authors set out to examine qualitatively the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a population of older adults in a nursing home setting, evaluating aspects such as specialist prescriptions and changes in dosage. This retrospective prevalence study was carried out in a state-funded nursing home that provides care and rehabilitation for elderly people. The first objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of AED use in this population. The second objective was to monitor AED dosage modifications during the fifteen-month study period, focusing on the safety and the tolerability of AEDs. In the period of time considered, 129 of 402 monitored patients received at least one anti-epileptic therapy. The prevalence of AED use was therefore 32%. Gabapentin was found to be the most commonly prescribed drug, with a frequency of 29%, and it was used mainly for anxiety disorders, psychosis, neuropathic pain and mood disorders.

  9. Antiepileptic drug use in a nursing home setting: a retrospective study in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Callegari, Camilla; Ielmini, Marta; Bianchi, Lucia; Lucano, Melissa; Bertù, Lorenza; Vender, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Summary The authors set out to examine qualitatively the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a population of older adults in a nursing home setting, evaluating aspects such as specialist prescriptions and changes in dosage. This retrospective prevalence study was carried out in a state-funded nursing home that provides care and rehabilitation for elderly people. The first objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of AED use in this population. The second objective was to monitor AED dosage modifications during the fifteen-month study period, focusing on the safety and the tolerability of AEDs. In the period of time considered, 129 of 402 monitored patients received at least one anti-epileptic therapy. The prevalence of AED use was therefore 32%. Gabapentin was found to be the most commonly prescribed drug, with a frequency of 29%, and it was used mainly for anxiety disorders, psychosis, neuropathic pain and mood disorders. PMID:27358221

  10. Valproic Acid Influences MTNR1A Intracellular Trafficking and Signaling in a β-Arrestin 2-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ling-juan; Jiang, Quan; Long, Sen; Wang, Huan; Zhang, Ling-di; Tian, Yun; Wang, Cheng-kun; Cao, Jing-jing; Tao, Rong-rong; Huang, Ji-yun; Liao, Mei-hua; Lu, Ying-mei; Fukunaga, Kohji; Zhou, Nai-ming; Han, Feng

    2016-03-01

    Valproate exposure is associated with increased risks of autism spectrum disorder. To date, the mechanistic details of disturbance of melatonin receptor subtype 1 (MTNR1A) internalization upon valproate exposure remain elusive. By expressing epitope-tagged receptors (MTNR1A-EGFP) in HEK-293 and Neuro-2a cells, we recorded the dynamic changes of MTNR1A intracellular trafficking after melatonin treatment. Using time-lapse confocal microscopy, we showed in living cells that valproic acid interfered with the internalization kinetics of MTNR1A in the presence of melatonin. This attenuating effect was associated with a decrease in the phosphorylation of PKA (Thr197) and ERK (Thr202/Tyr204). VPA treatment did not alter the whole-cell currents of cells with or without melatonin. Furthermore, fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging data demonstrated that valproic acid reduced the melatonin-initiated association between YFP-labeled β-arrestin 2 and CFP-labeled MTNR1A. Together, we suggest that valproic acid influences MTNR1A intracellular trafficking and signaling in a β-arrestin 2-dependent manner.

  11. Inhibition of aminophylline-induced convulsions in mice by antiepileptic drugs and other agents.

    PubMed

    Czuczwar, S J; Janusz, W; Wamil, A; Kleinrok, Z

    1987-12-15

    Common antiepileptic drugs and agents affecting different neurotransmitter systems were studied against aminophylline (280 mg/kg i.p.)-induced convulsions in mice. All drugs and agents were administered i.p. Diazepam and phenobarbital antagonized the whole seizure pattern and the respective ED50 values for the clonic phase were 3.5 and 62 mg/kg. Valproate at 500 mg/kg protected fewer than 50% of mice against the clonic phase. The remaining antiepileptics (acetazolamide, up to 1,000 mg/kg; carbamazepine and diphenylhydantoin, up to 50 mg/kg; ethosuximide, 500 mg/kg and trimethadione, 400 mg/kg) were totally ineffective in this respect. Propranolol (up to 20 mg/kg), baclofen (20 mg/kg), gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (300 mg/kg), aminooxyacetic acid (20 mg/kg), clonidine (up to 0.2 mg/kg), ketamine (30 mg/kg), atropine (20 mg/kg), papaverine (50 mg/kg) and L-phenylisopropyladenosine (2 mg/kg) did not affect the clonic phase either. Only antagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid excitation, 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid and 2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid afforded protection against aminophylline-induced clonic seizure activity. The results show that aminophylline convulsions are relatively resistant to antiepileptic drugs and suggest that antagonists of excitatory transmission are potential antiaminophylline drugs.

  12. Brain Graph Topology Changes Associated with Anti-Epileptic Drug Use.

    PubMed

    Haneef, Zulfi; Levin, Harvey S; Chiang, Sharon

    2015-06-01

    Neuroimaging studies of functional connectivity using graph theory have furthered our understanding of the network structure in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Brain network effects of anti-epileptic drugs could influence such studies, but have not been systematically studied. Resting-state functional MRI was analyzed in 25 patients with TLE using graph theory analysis. Patients were divided into two groups based on anti-epileptic medication use: those taking carbamazepine/oxcarbazepine (CBZ/OXC) (n=9) and those not taking CBZ/OXC (n=16) as a part of their medication regimen. The following graph topology metrics were analyzed: global efficiency, betweenness centrality (BC), clustering coefficient, and small-world index. Multiple linear regression was used to examine the association of CBZ/OXC with graph topology. The two groups did not differ from each other based on epilepsy characteristics. Use of CBZ/OXC was associated with a lower BC. Longer epilepsy duration was also associated with a lower BC. These findings can inform graph theory-based studies in patients with TLE. The changes observed are discussed in relation to the anti-epileptic mechanism of action and adverse effects of CBZ/OXC.

  13. Antiepileptic drugs for the treatment of neuropathic pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Espinosa, María-Lucila; Sanmartí-García, Gemma; Vázquez-Delgado, Eduardo; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2012-09-01

    Many therapies have been proposed for the management of neuropathic pain, and they include the use of different antiepileptic drugs. However, the lack of high quality studies indicates that results on the different neuropathic disorders under study do not recommend a particular drug treatment. This study makes a systematic review of the published literature on the use of several antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain, and has the objective of considering both its clinical characteristics and pharmacological use, which will depend on their level of scientific evidence and will follow the principles of evidence-based dentistry. The articles were stratified according to their scientific evidence using the SORT criteria (Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy), and it included those articles that only have level 1 or 2. Randomized clinical trials were stratified according to their level of quality using the JADAD scale, an instrument described by Jadad et al. (7). to assess the quality of clinical trials, while studies with a level below 3 were discarded. Recently, type A or B recommendations are given in favor or against the use of antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain on the basis of their scientific quality.

  14. [Influence of co-administered antiepileptic drugs on nitrazepam tolerance in mice].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Nagai, T; Okada, S

    1998-11-01

    In the treatment of epilepsy, benzodiazepines are often administered in combination with other antiepileptic drug (s) because of the development of tolerance. In this study, the influence of concurrently administered antiepileptic drugs on tolerance to the anticonvulsant action of the nitrazepam (NZP) was studied using an animal tolerance model. Mice were given vehicle, NZP alone or NZP concurrently with one of six antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine CBZ, phenytoin PHT, zonisamide ZNS, vigabatrin VGB, lamotrigine LTG, or flunarizine FNR) twice daily for 5 days. Tolerance was assessed by the ability of NZP to prevent pentylenetetrazol-induced clonic convulsions. Tolerance developed in mice treated with NZP alone, NZP plus CBZ, PHT, ZNS, VGB or LTG. On the other hand, mice receiving NZP + FNR showed no tolerance; there was no significant difference in seizure frequency between the vehicle group and NZP + FNR group. These data suggest that co-administration of FNR but not CBZ, PHT, ZNS, VGB or LTG may delay if not prevent development of tolerance to the anticonvulsant action of benzodiazepines.

  15. Valproic Acid, a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, in Combination with Paclitaxel for Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Results of a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Phase II/III Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pugliese, Mariateresa; Gallo, Marco; Brignardello, Enrico; Milla, Paola; Orlandi, Fabio; Limone, Paolo Piero; Arvat, Emanuela; Boccuzzi, Giuseppe; Piovesan, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) has a median survival less than 5 months and, to date, no effective therapy exists. Taxanes have recently been stated as the main drug treatment for ATC, and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid efficiently potentiates the effects of paclitaxel in vitro. Based on these data, this trial assessed the efficacy and safety of the combination of paclitaxel and valproic acid for the treatment of ATC. This was a randomized, controlled phase II/III trial, performed on 25 ATC patients across 5 centers in northwest Italy. The experimental arm received the combination of paclitaxel (80 mg/m2/weekly) and valproic acid (1,000 mg/day); the control arm received paclitaxel alone. Overall survival and disease progression, evaluated in terms of progression-free survival, were the primary outcomes. The secondary outcome was the pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel. The coadministration of valproic acid did not influence the pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel. Neither median survival nor median time to progression was statistically different in the two arms. Median survival of operated-on patients was significantly better than that of patients who were not operated on. The present trial demonstrates that the addition of valproic acid to paclitaxel has no effect on overall survival and disease progression of ATC patients. This trial is registered with EudraCT 2008-005221-11. PMID:27766105

  16. Valproic Acid versus Lamotrigine as First-line Monotherapy in Newly Diagnosed Idiopathic Generalized Tonic –Clonic Seizures in Adults – A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Om Prakash; Khan, Farhan Ahmad; Kumar, Narendra; Kumar, Ajay; Haque, Ataul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic Generalized Tonic-Clonic Seizures (GTCS) are frequently encountered in adults. Their successful control is necessary to improve the quality of life of these patients. Valproic acid is a simple branched-chain carboxylic acid and lamotrigine is a phenyltriazine derivative. Opinions differ in regards to their effectiveness in idiopathic GTCS. Aim To compare the effectiveness of valproic acid and lamotrigine in newly diagnosed adults with idiopathic generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Materials and Methods The present prospective randomized study was conducted on 60 patients suffering from idiopathic GTCS. Thirty patients received valproic acid and rest 30 patients received lamotrigine. All patients were followed regularly monthly for one year for treatment response and adverse effects. Results After 12 months follow-up, 76.67% patients taking valproic acid and 56.67% patients taking lamotrigine were seizure-free. Common adverse effects recorded were nausea, dyspepsia, headache and skin rash. Conclusion Valproic acid is more effective than lamotrigine as first-line drug in the treatment of adults with newly diagnosed idiopathic generalized tonic-clonic seizures. PMID:27630862

  17. Antifibrogenic role of valproic acid in streptozotocin induced diabetic rat penis.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, O; Karaguzel, E; Gurgen, S G; Okatan, A E; Kutlu, S; Bayraktar, C; Kazaz, I O; Eren, H

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the therapeutic effects of valproic acid (VPA) on erectile dysfunction and reducing penile fibrosis in streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Eighteen male rats were divided into three experimental groups (Control, STZ-DM, STZ-DM plus VPA) and diabetes was induced by transperitoneal single dose STZ. Eight weeks after, VPA and placebo treatments were given according to groups for 15 days. All rats were anesthetised for the measurement of in vivo erectile response to cavernous nerve stimulation. Afterward penes were evaluated histologically in terms of immune labelling scores of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Slides were also evaluated in terms of collagen/smooth muscle ratio and penile apoptosis. After the treatment with VPA, erectile responses were found as improved when compared with STZ-DM rats but not statistically meaningful. eNOS and VEGF immune expressions diminished in penile corpora of STZ-DM rats and improved with VPA treatment. VPA led to decrease in TGF-β1 expression and collagen content of diabetic rats' penes. Penile apoptosis was not diminished with VPA. In conclusion, VPA treatment seems to be effective for reducing penile fibrosis in diabetic rats and more prolonged treatment period may enhance erectile functions.

  18. Valproic Acid and topiramate induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy in a patient with normal serum carnitine.

    PubMed

    Blackford, Martha G; Do, Stephanie T; Enlow, Thomas C; Reed, Michael D

    2013-04-01

    A 17-year-old female developed hyperammonemic encephalopathy 2 weeks after valproic acid (VPA), 500 mg twice a day, was added to her regimen of topiramate (TPM), 200 mg twice a day. She presented to the emergency department (ED) with altered mental status, hypotension, bradycardia, and lethargy. Laboratory analysis showed mild non-anion gap hyperchloremic acidosis, serum VPA concentration of 86 mg/L, and urine drug screen result that was positive for marijuana. She was admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit for persistent symptoms, prolonged QTc, and medical history. Blood ammonia concentrations were obtained because of her persistent altered mental status, initially 94 μmol/L and a peak of 252 μmol/L. A serum carnitine profile was obtained at the time of hyperammonemia and was found to be normal (results were available postdischarge). VPA and TPM were discontinued on day 1 and day 2, respectively, as the patient's blood ammonia concentration remained elevated. On day 3, her mental status had returned to baseline, and blood ammonia concentrations trended downward; by day 4 her blood ammonia concentration was 23 μmol/L. VPA has been associated with numerous side effects including hyperammonemia and encephalopathy. Recently, drug interactions with TPM and VPA have been reported; however, serum carnitine concentrations have not been available. We discuss the possible mechanisms that VPA and TPM may affect serum ammonia and carnitine concentrations and the use of levocarnitine for patients or treating toxicity.

  19. Valproic Acid and Topiramate Induced Hyperammonemic Encephalopathy in a Patient With Normal Serum Carnitine

    PubMed Central

    Blackford, Martha G.; Do, Stephanie T.; Enlow, Thomas C.; Reed, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    A 17-year-old female developed hyperammonemic encephalopathy 2 weeks after valproic acid (VPA), 500 mg twice a day, was added to her regimen of topiramate (TPM), 200 mg twice a day. She presented to the emergency department (ED) with altered mental status, hypotension, bradycardia, and lethargy. Laboratory analysis showed mild non-anion gap hyperchloremic acidosis, serum VPA concentration of 86 mg/L, and urine drug screen result that was positive for marijuana. She was admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit for persistent symptoms, prolonged QTc, and medical history. Blood ammonia concentrations were obtained because of her persistent altered mental status, initially 94 μmol/L and a peak of 252 μmol/L. A serum carnitine profile was obtained at the time of hyperammonemia and was found to be normal (results were available postdischarge). VPA and TPM were discontinued on day 1 and day 2, respectively, as the patient's blood ammonia concentration remained elevated. On day 3, her mental status had returned to baseline, and blood ammonia concentrations trended downward; by day 4 her blood ammonia concentration was 23 μmol/L. VPA has been associated with numerous side effects including hyperammonemia and encephalopathy. Recently, drug interactions with TPM and VPA have been reported; however, serum carnitine concentrations have not been available. We discuss the possible mechanisms that VPA and TPM may affect serum ammonia and carnitine concentrations and the use of levocarnitine for patients or treating toxicity. PMID:23798907

  20. Valproic acid induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Maria G; Fortunati, Nicoletta; Pugliese, Mariateresa; Costantino, Lucia; Poli, Roberta; Bosco, Ornella; Boccuzzi, Giuseppe

    2005-03-01

    Poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma is an aggressive human cancer that is resistant to conventional therapy. Histone deacetylase inhibitors are a promising class of drugs, acting as antiproliferative agents by promoting differentiation, as well as inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Valproic acid (VPA), a class I selective histone deacetylase inhibitor widely used as an anticonvulsant, promotes differentiation in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells by inducing Na(+)/I(-) symporter and increasing iodine uptake. Here, we show that it is also highly effective at suppressing growth in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cell lines (N-PA and BHT-101). Apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest are the underlying mechanisms of VPA's effect on cell growth. It induces apoptosis by activating the intrinsic pathway; caspases 3 and 9 are activated but not caspase 8. Cell cycle is selectively arrested in G(1) and is associated with the increased expression of p21 and the reduced expression of cyclin A. Both apoptosis and cell cycle arrest are induced by treatment with 1 mm VPA, a dose that promotes cell redifferentiation and that is slightly above the serum concentration reached in patients treated for epilepsy. These multifaceted properties make VPA of clinical interest as a new approach to treating poorly differentiated thyroid cancer.

  1. Valproic Acid Exposure during Early Postnatal Gliogenesis Leads to Autistic-like Behaviors in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mony, Tamanna Jahan; Lee, Jae Won; Dreyfus, Cheryl; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel; Lee, Hee Jae

    2016-01-01

    Objective We reported that postnatal exposure of rats to valproic acid (VPA) stimulated proliferation of glial precursors during cortical gliogenesis. However, there are no reports whether enhanced postnatal gliogenesis affects behaviors related to neuropsychiatric disorders. Methods After VPA treatment during the postnatal day (PND) 2 to PND 4, four behavioral test, such as open field locomotor test, elevated plus maze test, three-chamber social interaction test, and passive avoidance test, were performed at PND 21 or 22. Results VPA treated rats showed significant hyperactive behavior in the open field locomotor test (p<0.05). Moreover, the velocity of movement in the VPA group was increased by 69.5% (p<0.01). In the elevated plus maze test, VPA exposed rats expressed significantly lower percentage of time spent on and of entries into open arms more than the control group (p<0.05). Also, both sociability and social preference indices with strangers in the three-chamber social interaction test were significantly lower in the VPA exposed rats (p<0.05). Conclusion Our results suggest that altered glial cell development is another locus at which pathogenetic factors can operate to contribute to the neurodevelopmental disorder. PMID:27776385

  2. Valproic acid induces neuronal cell death through a novel calpain-dependent necroptosis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bollino, Dominique; Balan, Irina; Aurelian, Laure

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor used to treat epilepsy and mood disorders, has HDAC-related and -unrelated neurotoxic activity, the mechanism of which is still poorly understood. We report that VPA induces neuronal cell death through an atypical calpain-dependent necroptosis pathway that initiates with downstream activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and increased expression of receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP-1) and is accompanied by cleavage and mitochondrial release/nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing-factor (AIF), mitochondrial release of Smac/DIABLO, and inhibition of the anti-apoptotic protein X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP). Coinciding with AIF nuclear translocation, VPA induces phosphorylation of the necroptosis-associated histone H2A family member H2AX, which is known to contribute to lethal DNA degradation. These signals are inhibited in neuronal cells that express constitutively activated MEK/ERK and/or PI3-K/Akt survival pathways, allowing them to resist VPA-induced cell death. The data indicate that VPA has neurotoxic activity and identify a novel calpain-dependent necroptosis pathway that includes JNK1 activation and RIP-1 expression. PMID:25581256

  3. Agmatine rescues autistic behaviors in the valproic acid-induced animal model of autism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Woon; Seung, Hana; Kim, Ki Chan; Gonzales, Edson Luck T; Oh, Hyun Ah; Yang, Sung Min; Ko, Mee Jung; Han, Seol-Heui; Banerjee, Sourav; Shin, Chan Young

    2017-02-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is an immensely challenging developmental disorder characterized primarily by two core behavioral symptoms of social communication deficits and restricted/repetitive behaviors. Investigating the etiological process and identifying an appropriate therapeutic target remain as formidable challenges to overcome ASD due to numerous risk factors and complex symptoms associated with the disorder. Among the various mechanisms that contribute to ASD, the maintenance of excitation and inhibition balance emerged as a key factor to regulate proper functioning of neuronal circuitry. Interestingly, our previous study involving the valproic acid animal model of autism (VPA animal model) has demonstrated excitatory-inhibitory imbalance (E/I imbalance) due to enhanced differentiation of glutamatergic neurons and reduced GABAergic neurons. Here, we investigated the potential of agmatine, an endogenous NMDA receptor antagonist, as a novel therapeutic candidate in ameliorating ASD symptoms by modulating E/I imbalance using the VPA animal model. We observed that a single treatment of agmatine rescued the impaired social behaviors as well as hyperactive and repetitive behaviors in the VPA animal model. We also observed that agmatine treatment rescued the overly activated ERK1/2 signaling in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of VPA animal models, possibly, by modulating over-excitability due to enhanced excitatory neural circuit. Taken together, our results have provided experimental evidence suggesting a possible therapeutic role of agmatine in ameliorating ASD-like symptoms in the VPA animal model of ASD.

  4. Effects of the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Valproic Acid on Human Pericytes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Friman, Tomas; Dencker, Lennart; Sundberg, Christian; Scholz, Birger

    2011-01-01

    Microvascular pericytes are of key importance in neoformation of blood vessels, in stabilization of newly formed vessels as well as maintenance of angiostasis in resting tissues. Furthermore, pericytes are capable of differentiating into pro-fibrotic collagen type I producing fibroblasts. The present study investigates the effects of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) on pericyte proliferation, cell viability, migration and differentiation. The results show that HDAC inhibition through exposure of pericytes to VPA in vitro causes the inhibition of pericyte proliferation and migration with no effect on cell viability. Pericyte exposure to the potent HDAC inhibitor Trichostatin A caused similar effects on pericyte proliferation, migration and cell viability. HDAC inhibition also inhibited pericyte differentiation into collagen type I producing fibroblasts. Given the importance of pericytes in blood vessel biology a qPCR array focusing on the expression of mRNAs coding for proteins that regulate angiogenesis was performed. The results showed that HDAC inhibition promoted transcription of genes involved in vessel stabilization/maturation in human microvascular pericytes. The present in vitro study demonstrates that VPA influences several aspects of microvascular pericyte biology and suggests an alternative mechanism by which HDAC inhibition affects blood vessels. The results raise the possibility that HDAC inhibition inhibits angiogenesis partly through promoting a pericyte phenotype associated with stabilization/maturation of blood vessels. PMID:21966390

  5. M-current preservation contributes to anticonvulsant effects of valproic acid

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Hee Yeon; Greene, Derek L.; Kang, Seungwoo; Kosenko, Anastasia; Hoshi, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) has been widely used for decades to treat epilepsy; however, its mechanism of action remains poorly understood. Here, we report that the anticonvulsant effects of nonacute VPA treatment involve preservation of the M-current, a low-threshold noninactivating potassium current, during seizures. In a wide variety of neurons, activation of Gq-coupled receptors, such as the m1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, suppresses the M-current and induces hyperexcitability. We demonstrated that VPA treatment disrupts muscarinic suppression of the M-current and prevents resultant agonist-induced neuronal hyperexcitability. We also determined that VPA treatment interferes with M-channel signaling by inhibiting palmitoylation of a signaling scaffold protein, AKAP79/150, in cultured neurons. In a kainate-induced murine seizure model, administration of a dose of an M-channel inhibitor that did not affect kainate-induced seizure transiently eliminated the anticonvulsant effects of VPA. Retigabine, an M-channel opener that does not open receptor-suppressed M-channels, provided anticonvulsant effects only when administered prior to seizure induction in control animals. In contrast, treatment of VPA-treated mice with retigabine induced anticonvulsant effects even when administered after seizure induction. Together, these results suggest that receptor-induced M-current suppression plays a role in the pathophysiology of seizures and that preservation of the M-current during seizures has potential as an effective therapeutic strategy. PMID:26348896

  6. Differential Radiosensitizing Effect of Valproic Acid in Differentiation Versus Self-Renewal Promoting Culture Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Debeb, Bisrat G.; Xu Wei; Mok, Henry; Li Li; Robertson, Fredika; Ueno, Naoto T.; Reuben, Jim; Lucci, Anthony; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: It has been shown that valproic acid (VA) enhances the proliferation and self-renewal of normal hematopoietic stem cells and that breast cancer stem/progenitor cells can be resistant to radiation. From these data, we hypothesized that VA would fail to radiosensitize breast cancer stem/progenitor cells grown to three-dimensional (3D) mammospheres. Methods and Materials: We used the MCF7 breast cancer cell line grown under stem cell-promoting culture conditions (3D mammosphere) and standard nonstem cell monolayer culture conditions (two-dimensional) to examine the effect of pretreatment with VA on radiation sensitivity in clonogenic survival assays and on the expression of embryonic stem cell transcription factors. Results: 3D-cultured MCF-7 cells expressed higher levels of Oct4, Nanog, and Sox2. The 3D passage enriched self-renewal and increased radioresistance in the 3D mammosphere formation assays. VA radiosensitized adherent cells but radioprotected 3D cells in single-fraction clonogenic assays. Moreover, fractionated radiation sensitized VA-treated adherent MCF7 cells but did not have a significant effect on VA-treated single cells grown to mammospheres. Conclusion: We have concluded that VA might preferentially radiosensitize differentiated cells compared with those expressing stem cell surrogates and that stem cell-promoting culture is a useful tool for in vitro evaluation of novel cancer therapeutic agents and radiosensitizers.

  7. Targeting Prolyl Endopeptidase with Valproic Acid as a Potential Modulator of Neutrophilic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Roda, Mojtaba; Sadik, Mariam; Gaggar, Amit; Hardison, Matthew T.; Jablonsky, Michael J.; Braber, Saskia; Blalock, James Edwin; Redegeld, Frank A.; Folkerts, Gert; Jackson, Patricia L.

    2014-01-01

    A novel neutrophil chemoattractant derived from collagen, proline-glycine-proline (PGP), has been recently characterized in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This peptide is derived via the proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteases (MMP's)-8/9 and PE, enzymes produced by neutrophils and present in COPD serum and sputum. Valproic acid (VPA) is an inhibitor of PE and could possibly have an effect on the severity of chronic inflammation. Here the interaction site of VPA to PE and the resulting effect on the secondary structure of PE is investigated. Also, the potential inhibition of PGP-generation by VPA was examined in vitro and in vivo to improve our understanding of the biological role of VPA. UV- visible, fluorescence spectroscopy, CD and NMR were used to determine kinetic information and structural interactions between VPA and PE. In vitro, PGP generation was significantly inhibited by VPA. In vivo, VPA significantly reduced cigarette-smoke induced neutrophil influx. Investigating the molecular interaction between VPA and PE showed that VPA modified the secondary structure of PE, making substrate binding at the catalytic side of PE impossible. Revealing the molecular interaction VPA to PE may lead to a better understanding of the involvement of PE and PGP in inflammatory conditions. In addition, the model of VPA interaction with PE suggests that PE inhibitors have a great potential to serve as therapeutics in inflammatory disorders. PMID:24835793

  8. Carrier-mediated placental transport of cimetidine and valproic acid across differentiating JEG-3 cell layers.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, K; Ueda, C; Yamada, K; Nakamura, A; Hatsuda, Y; Kawanishi, S; Nishii, S; Ogawa, M

    2015-07-01

    Human choriocarcinoma has been used as a model to study trophoblast transcellular drug transport in the placenta. Previous models had limitations regarding low molecular weight drug transport through the intracellular gap junction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate placental carrier-mediated transport across a differentiating JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cell (DJEGs) layer model in which the intracellular gap junction was restricted. Cimetidine is the substrate of an efflux transporter, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). BCRP highly expressed in the placenta, and its function in the DJEGs model was investigated. In addition, the placental drug transport of another efflux transporter, multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs), and an influx transporter, monocarboxylate transporter (MCT), were examined with various substrates. Cimetidine permeated from the fetal side to the maternal side at significantly high levels and saturated in a dose-dependent manner. The permeability coefficient of a MRP substrate, fluorescein, across the DJEGs model was significantly increased by inhibiting MRP function with probenecid. On the other hand, permeation in the influx direction to the fetal side with a substrate of MCT, valproic acid, had a gentle dose-dependent saturation. These findings suggest that the DJEGs model could be used to evaluate transcellular placental drug transport mediated by major placental transporters.

  9. Pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in developing rats prenatally exposed to valproic acid

    PubMed Central

    Puig-Lagunes, Angel A.; Manzo, Jorge; Beltrán-Parrazal, Luis; Morgado-Valle, Consuelo; Toledo-Cárdenas, Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    Background Epidemiological evidence indicates epilepsy is more common in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) (20–25%) than in the general population. The aim of this project was to analyze seizure susceptibility in developing rats prenatally exposed to valproic acid (VPA) as autism model. Methods Pregnant females were injected with VPA during the twelfth embryonic day. Seizures were induced in fourteen-days-old rat pups using two models of convulsions: pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) and lithium-pilocarpine (Li-Pilo). Results Two subgroups with different PTZ-induced seizure susceptibility in rats exposed to VPA were found: a high susceptibility (VPA+) (28/42, seizure severity 5) and a low susceptibility (VPA−) (14/42, seizure severity 2). The VPA+ subgroup exhibited an increased duration of the generalized tonic-clonic seizure (GTCS; 45 ± 2.7 min), a higher number of rats showed several GTCS (14/28) and developed status epilepticus (SE) after PTZ injection (19/27) compared with control animals (36.6 ± 1.9 min; 10/39; 15/39, respectively). No differences in seizure severity, latency or duration of SE induced by Li-Pilo were detected between VPA and control animals. Discussion Prenatal VPA modifies the susceptibility to PTZ-induced seizures in developing rats, which may be linked to an alteration in the GABAergic transmission. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the comorbidity between autism and epilepsy. PMID:27917314

  10. Wnt signaling pathway participates in valproic acid-induced neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Liu, Yuan; Li, Sen; Long, Zai-Yun; Wu, Ya-Min

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent cells that have the capacity for differentiation into the major cell types of the nervous system, i.e. neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Valproic acid (VPA) is a widely prescribed drug for seizures and bipolar disorder in clinic. Previously, a number of researches have been shown that VPA has differential effects on growth, proliferation and differentiation in many types of cells. However, whether VPA can induce NSCs from embryonic cerebral cortex differentiate into neurons and its possible molecular mechanism is also not clear. Wnt signaling is implicated in the control of cell growth and differentiation during CNS development in animal model, but its action at the cellular level has been poorly understood. In this experiment, we examined neuronal differentiation of NSCs induced by VPA culture media using vitro immunochemistry assay. The neuronal differentiation of NSCs was examined after treated with 0.75 mM VPA for three, seven and ten days. RT-PCR assay was employed to examine the level of Wnt-3α and β-catenin. The results indicated that there were more β-tublin III positive cells in NSCs treated with VPA medium compared to the control group. The expression of Wnt-3α and β-catenin in NSCs treated with VPA medium was significantly greater compared to that of control media. In conclusion, these findings indicated that VPA could induce neuronal differentiation of NSCs by activating Wnt signal pathway.

  11. Edaravone ameliorates the adverse effects of valproic acid toxicity in small intestine.

    PubMed

    Oktay, S; Alev, B; Tunali, S; Emekli-Alturfan, E; Tunali-Akbay, T; Koc-Ozturk, L; Yanardag, R; Yarat, A

    2015-06-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a drug used for the treatment of epilepsy, bipolar psychiatric disorders, and migraine. Previous studies have reported an increased generation of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in the toxic mechanism of VPA. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger for clinical use, can quench free radical reaction by trapping a variety of free radical species. In this study, effect of edaravone on some small intestine biochemical parameters in VPA-induced toxicity was investigated. Thirty seven Sprague Dawley female rats were randomly divided into four groups. The groups include control group, edaravone (30 mg(-1) kg(-1) day(-1)) given group, VPA (0.5 g(-1) kg(-1) day(-1)) given group, VPA + edaravone (in same dose) given group. Edaravone and VPA were given intraperitoneally for 7 days. Biochemical parameters such as malondialdehyde, as an index of lipid peroxidation(LPO), sialic acid (SA), glutathione levels and glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, myeloperoxidase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and tissue factor (TF) activities were determined in small intestine samples by colorimetric methods. Decreased small intestine antioxidant enzyme activities, increased LPO and SA levels, and increased activities of ALP and TF were detected in the VPA group. Based on our results edaravone may be suggested to reverse the oxidative stress and inflammation due to VPA-induced small intestine toxicity.

  12. Prevention of valproic acid-induced neural tube defects by sildenafil citrate.

    PubMed

    Tiboni, Gian Mario; Ponzano, Adalisa

    2015-08-15

    This study was undertaken to test the effects of sildenafil citrate (SC), a type 5 phosphodiesterase inhibitor, on valproic acid (VPA)-induced teratogenesis. On gestation day (GD) 8, ICR (CD-1) mice were treated by gastric intubation with SC at 0 (vehicle), 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 or 10mg/kg. One hour later, animals received a teratogenic dose of VPA (600mg/kg) or vehicle. Developmental endpoints were evaluated near the end of gestation. Twenty-eighth percent of fetuses exposed to VPA had neural tube defects (exencephaly). Pretreatment with SC at 2.5, 5.0 or 10mg/kg significantly reduced the rate of VPA-induced exencephaly to 15.9%, 13.7%, and 10.0%, respectively. Axial skeletal defects were observed in 75.8% of VPA-exposed fetuses. Pre-treatment with SC at 10mg/kg, but not at lower doses, significantly decreased the rate of skeletally affected fetuses to 61.6%. These results show that SC, which prolongs nitric oxide (NO) signaling action protects from VPA-induced teratogenesis.

  13. The histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid enhances acquisition, extinction, and reconsolidation of conditioned fear.

    PubMed

    Bredy, Timothy W; Barad, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Histone modifications contribute to the epigenetic regulation of gene expression, a process now recognized to be important for the consolidation of long-term memory. Valproic acid (VPA), used for many years as an anticonvulsant and a mood stabilizer, has effects on learning and memory and enhances the extinction of conditioned fear through its function as a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDAC). Here we report that VPA enhances long-term memory for both acquisition and extinction of cued-fear. Interestingly, VPA enhances extinction, but also enhances renewal of the original conditioned fear when tested in a within-subjects design. This effect appears to be related to a reconsolidation-like process since a single CS reminder in the presence of VPA can enhance long-term memory for the original fear in the context in which fear conditioning takes place. We also show that by modifying the intertrial interval during extinction training, VPA can strengthen reconsolidation of the original fear memory or enhance long-term memory for extinction such that it becomes independent of context. These findings have important implications for the use of HDAC inhibitors as adjuncts to behavior therapy in the treatment of phobia and related anxiety disorders.

  14. Cross-Species Functional Genomic Analysis Identifies Resistance Genes of the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Valproic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Forthun, Rakel Brendsdal; SenGupta, Tanima; Skjeldam, Hanne Kim; Lindvall, Jessica Margareta; McCormack, Emmet; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Nilsen, Hilde

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms of successful epigenetic reprogramming in cancer are not well characterized as they involve coordinated removal of repressive marks and deposition of activating marks by a large number of histone and DNA modification enzymes. Here, we have used a cross-species functional genomic approach to identify conserved genetic interactions to improve therapeutic effect of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) valproic acid, which increases survival in more than 20% of patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Using a bidirectional synthetic lethality screen revealing genes that increased or decreased VPA sensitivity in C. elegans, we identified novel conserved sensitizers and synthetic lethal interactors of VPA. One sensitizer identified as a conserved determinant of therapeutic success of HDACi was UTX (KDM6A), which demonstrates a functional relationship between protein acetylation and lysine-specific methylation. The synthetic lethal screen identified resistance programs that compensated for the HDACi-induced global hyper-acetylation, and confirmed MAPKAPK2, HSP90AA1, HSP90AB1 and ACTB as conserved hubs in a resistance program for HDACi that are drugable in human AML cell lines. Hence, these resistance hubs represent promising novel targets for refinement of combinatorial epigenetic anti-cancer therapy. PMID:23155442

  15. Effect of chronic valproic Acid treatment on hepatic gene expression profile in wfs1 knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Punapart, Marite; Eltermaa, Mall; Oflijan, Julia; Sütt, Silva; Must, Anne; Kõks, Sulev; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Fernandes, Catherine; Vasar, Eero; Soomets, Ursel; Terasmaa, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a widely used anticonvulsant and mood-stabilizing drug whose use is often associated with drug-induced weight gain. Treatment with VPA has been shown to upregulate Wfs1 expression in vitro. Aim of the present study was to compare the effect of chronic VPA treatment in wild type (WT) and Wfs1 knockout (KO) mice on hepatic gene expression profile. Wild type, Wfs1 heterozygous, and homozygous mice were treated with VPA for three months (300 mg/kg i.p. daily) and gene expression profiles in liver were evaluated using Affymetrix Mouse GeneChip 1.0 ST array. We identified 42 genes affected by Wfs1 genotype, 10 genes regulated by VPA treatment, and 9 genes whose regulation by VPA was dependent on genotype. Among the genes that were regulated differentially by VPA depending on genotype was peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (Ppard), whose expression was upregulated in response to VPA treatment in WT, but not in Wfs1 KO mice. Thus, regulation of Ppard by VPA is dependent on Wfs1 genotype.

  16. Generation of Novel Thyroid Cancer Stem-Like Cell Clones: Effects of Resveratrol and Valproic Acid.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Heather; Yu, Xiao-Min; Harrison, April D; Larrain, Carolina; Zhang, Ranran; Chen, Jidong; Chen, Herbert; Lloyd, Ricardo V

    2016-06-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer is an aggressive and highly lethal cancer for which conventional therapies have proved ineffective. Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) represent a small fraction of cells in the cancer that are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation therapy and are responsible for tumor reoccurrence and metastasis. We characterized CSCs in thyroid carcinomas and generated clones of CSC lines. Our study showed that anaplastic thyroid cancers had significantly more CSCs than well-differentiated thyroid cancers. We also showed that Aldefluor-positive cells revealed significantly higher expression of stem cell markers, self-renewal properties, thyrosphere formation, and enhanced tumorigenicity. In vivo passaging of Aldefluor-positive cells resulted in the growth of larger, more aggressive tumors. We isolated and generated two clonal spheroid CSC lines derived from anaplastic thyroid cancer that were even more enriched with stem cell markers and more tumorigenic than the freshly isolated Aldefluor-positive cells. Resveratrol and valproic acid treatment of one of the CSC lines resulted in a significant decrease in stem cell markers, Aldefluor expression, proliferation, and invasiveness, with an increase in apoptosis and thyroid differentiation markers, suggesting that these cell lines may be useful for discovering new adjuvant therapies for aggressive thyroid cancers. For the first time, we have two thyroid CSC lines that will be useful tools for the study of thyroid CSC targeted therapies.

  17. Valproic acid developmental toxicity and pharmacokinetics in the rhesus monkey: an interspecies comparison.

    PubMed

    Hendrickx, A G; Nau, H; Binkerd, P; Rowland, J M; Rowland, J R; Cukierski, M J; Cukierski, M A

    1988-10-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the developmental toxicity and drug distributional and metabolic characteristics of prenatal valproic acid (VPA) exposure in rhesus monkeys. Oral administration of 20-600 mg/kg/day VPA (approximately 1-15 X human therapeutic dose) to 33 animals on variable gestational days (GD) during organogenesis resulted in dose-dependent developmental toxicity manifested as increased embryo/fetal mortality, intrauterine growth retardation, and craniofacial and skeletal defects. Biphasic plasma elimination curves were observed for total and free VPA on the first (GD 21) and last (GD 50) days of treatment in the 100- and 200-mg/kg/day dose groups. VPA exhibited dose-independent elimination kinetics at the plasma concentrations observed in this study. There was no significant change in pharmacokinetic parameters (maternal plasma elimination rate, area under the curve, peak plasma concentration) between the first and last days of treatment at either dose level. Placental transfer studies indicated that embryos were exposed to half the free VPA concentrations present in maternal plasma on GD 37. Comparisons of interspecies sensitivity to VPA-induced developmental toxicity in the mouse, rat, monkey, and man are made.

  18. Effects of Valproic Acid on Radiation-Induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Di Tomaso, María Vittoria; Gregoire, Eric; Martínez-López, Wilner

    2017-01-01

    One of the most widely employed histone deacetylases inhibitors in the clinic is the valproic acid (VA), proving to have a good tolerance and low side effects on human health. VA induces changes in chromatin structure making DNA more susceptible to damage induction and influence DNA repair efficiency. VA is also proposed as a radiosensitizing agent. To know if VA is suitable to sensitize human lymphocytes γ-irradiation in vitro, different types of chromosomal aberrations in the lymphocytes, either in the absence or presence of VA, were analyzed. For this purpose, blood samples from four healthy donors were exposed to γ-rays at a dose of 1.5 Gy and then treated with two different doses of VA (0.35 or 0.70 mM). Unstable and stable chromosomal aberrations were analyzed by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization. Human lymphocytes treated with VA alone did not show any increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations. However, a moderate degree of sensitization was observed, through the increase of chromosomal aberrations, when 0.35 mM VA was employed after γ-irradiation, whereas 0.70 mM VA did not modify chromosomal aberration frequencies. The lower number of chromosomal aberrations obtained when VA was employed at higher dose after γ-irradiation, could be related to the induction of a cell cycle arrest, a fact that should be taken into consideration when VA is employed in combination with physical or chemical agents. PMID:28250911

  19. Resveratrol prevents social deficits in animal model of autism induced by valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Bambini-Junior, Victorio; Zanatta, Geancarlo; Della Flora Nunes, Gustavo; Mueller de Melo, Gabriela; Michels, Marcus; Fontes-Dutra, Mellanie; Nogueira Freire, Valder; Riesgo, Rudimar; Gottfried, Carmem

    2014-11-07

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) involve a complex interplay of both genetic and environmental risk factors, such as prenatal exposure to valproic acid (VPA). Considering the neuroprotective, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of resveratrol (RSV), we investigated the influence of prenatal RSV treatment on social behaviors of a rodent model of autism induced by prenatal exposure to VPA. In the three-chambered apparatus test, the VPA group showed a reduced place preference conditioned by conspecific and no preference between exploring a wire-cage or a rat enclosed inside a wire cage, revealing sociability impairments. Prenatal administration of RSV prevented the VPA-induced social impairments evaluated in this study. A bioinformatics analysis was used to discard possible molecular interactions between VPA and RSV during administration. The interaction energy between RSV and VPA is weak and highly unstable, suggesting cellular effects instead of a single chemical process. In summary, the present study highlights a promising experimental strategy to evaluate new molecular targets possibly involved in the etiology of autism and developmental alterations implicated in neural and behavioral impairments in ASD.

  20. Interaction between naloxone, chlordiazepoxide and valproic acid evaluated by emotional operant behaviour in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cannizzaro, G; Flugy, A; Novara, V; Provenzano, P M

    1987-01-01

    The effects of chlordiazepoxide (CDP, 5 mg/kg i.p.), the sodium salt of valproic acid (VPA, 200 mg/kg i.p.) and naloxone (Nx, 1 mg/kg s.c.) alone and CDP-Nx, VPA-Nx association on schedule controlled behaviour with signalled unpunished and punished periods, were investigated. Our results show that CDP and VPA under both the unemotional (variable ratio reinforcement schedule 20%) and the emotional (continuous reinforced schedule associated with electric shock) components significantly increase responding in the Skinner box. Nx, on the multiple schedule, non-significantly reduces responding under both components. With CDP-Nx association the increase in responding under the unemotional component is less than in the case of the benzodiazepine alone, while under the emotional component the increase in responding is not appreciably affected. With the VPA-Nx association the responding rate is lower than that of the control under the unemotional component while under the emotional component the increase in responding is reduced compared to the VPA alone. The higher rates of unemotional and emotional responding with both CDP and VPA depend on the dipsogenic and disinhibiting effects by both drugs. The different rate of emotional and unemotional responding with CDP-Nx and VPA-Nx associations indicates a specific influence on GABAergic and other systems by CDP and VPA.

  1. Valproic acid decreases the reparation capacity of irradiated MOLT-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Muthna, D; Vavrova, J; Lukasova, E; Tichy, A; Knizek, J; Kohlerova, R; Mazankova, N; Rezacova, M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our work was to evaluate mechanisms leading to radiosensitization of MOLT-4 leukemia cells following valproic acid (VA) treatment. Cells were pretreated with 2 mM VA for 24 h followed by irradiation with a dose of 0.5 or 1 Gy. The effect of both noxae, alone and combined, was detected 1 and 24 hours after the irradiation. Induction of apoptosis was evaluated by a flow cytometry. The extent of DNA damage was further determined by phosphorylation of histone H2AX using confocal microscopy. Changes in protein expression were identified by SDS-PAGE/immunoblotting. Two-millimolar VA increased apoptosis induction after irradiation as well as phosphorylation of H2AX and provokes an increase in the level of p53 and its phosphorylation at Ser392 in 4 h post-irradiation. Likewise, p21 protein reached its maximal expression in 4 h after the irradiation of VA-treated cells. Twenty four hours later, only the p53 phosphorylated at Ser15 was detected. At the same time, the protein mdm2 (negative regulator of p53) was maximally activated. The 24-hour treatment of MOLT-4 leukemia cells with 2 mM VA results in radiosensitizing, increases apoptosis induction, H2AX phosphorylation, and also p53 and p21 activation.

  2. Synaptic and intrinsic balancing during postnatal development in rat pups exposed to valproic acid in utero.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Elisabeth C; Higgins, Emily A; Desai, Niraj S

    2011-09-14

    Valproic acid (VPA) is among the most teratogenic of commonly prescribed anticonvulsants, increasing the risk in humans of major malformations and impaired cognitive development. Likewise, rats exposed prenatally to VPA exhibit a variety of neuroanatomical and behavioral abnormalities. Previous work has shown that pyramidal neuron physiology in young VPA-exposed animals is marked by two strong abnormalities: an impairment in intrinsic neuronal excitability and an increase in NMDA synaptic currents. In this study, we investigated these abnormalities across postnatal development using whole-cell patch recordings from layer 2/3 neurons of medial prefrontal cortex. We found that both abnormalities were at a peak soon after birth but were gradually corrected as animals matured, to the extent that normal excitability and NMDA currents had been restored by early adolescence. The manner in which this correction happened suggested coordination between the two processes. Using computational models fitted to the physiological data, we argue that the two abnormalities trade off against each other, with the effects on network activity of the one balancing the effects of the other. This may constitute part of the nervous system's homeostatic response to teratogenic insult: an attempt to maintain stability despite a strong challenge.

  3. Inhibition of tumor-stromal interaction through HGF/Met signaling by valproic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Yohsuke; Motoki, Takahiro; Kubota, Satoshi; Takigawa, Masaharu; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Gohda, Eiichi

    2008-02-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), which is produced by surrounding stromal cells, including fibroblasts and endothelial cells, has been shown to be a significant factor responsible for cancer cell invasion mediated by tumor-stromal interactions. We found in this study that the anti-tumor agent valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, strongly inhibited tumor-stromal interaction. VPA inhibited HGF production in fibroblasts induced by epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} without any appreciable cytotoxic effect. Other HDAC inhibitors, including butyric acid and trichostatin A (TSA), showed similar inhibitory effects on HGF production stimulated by various inducers. Up-regulations of HGF gene expression induced by PMA and EGF were also suppressed by VPA and TSA. Furthermore, VPA significantly inhibited HGF-induced invasion of HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. VPA, however, did not affect the increases in phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt in HGF-treated HepG2 cells. These results demonstrated that VPA inhibited two critical processes of tumor-stromal interaction, induction of fibroblastic HGF production and HGF-induced invasion of HepG2 cells, and suggest that those activities serve for other anti-tumor mechanisms of VPA besides causing proliferation arrest, differentiation, and/or apoptosis of tumor cells.

  4. Antiepileptic potential of matrine via regulation the levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamic acid in the brain.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jun; Jiang, Yugang

    2013-12-05

    Our present study aimed to determine the antiepileptic activity of matrine, and explore the possible molecular mechanism. To evaluate the antiepileptic activity of matrine, seizures in mice induced by PTZ and MES were established, then the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests in mice were also carried out. For the molecular mechanism investigations, contents of aspartic acid (Asp), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamic acid (Glu), glycine (Gly) in seizures mice were determined; then, the chronic seizures rats induced by PTZ were prepared, and western blotting was used to determine the expressions of GAD 65, GABAA and GABAB in the brains. In the results, matrine showed significant antiepileptic effects on seizures mice induced by MES and PTZ. Moreover, the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests were also demonstrated that matrine had obvious antiepileptic effects. Additionally, our results revealed that after treatment with matrine, contents of GABA can be elevated, and the contents of Glu were obviously decreased. Furthermore, western blotting revealed that the mechanism regarding the antiepileptic effect of may be related to the up-regulations of GAD 65 and GABAA in the brain. Collectively, we suggested that matrine can be developed as an effective antiseptic drug.

  5. Effect of the Anti-depressant Sertraline, the Novel Anti-seizure Drug Vinpocetine and Several Conventional Antiepileptic Drugs on the Epileptiform EEG Activity Induced by 4-Aminopyridine.

    PubMed

    Sitges, Maria; Aldana, Blanca Irene; Reed, Ronald Charles

    2016-06-01

    Seizures are accompanied by an exacerbated activation of cerebral ion channels. 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) is a pro-convulsive agent which mechanism of action involves activation of Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels, and several antiepileptic drugs control seizures by reducing these channels permeability. The antidepressant, sertraline, and the anti-seizure drug vinpocetine are effective inhibitors of cerebral presynaptic Na(+) channels. Here the effectiveness of these compounds to prevent the epileptiform EEG activity induced by 4-AP was compared with the effectiveness of seven conventional antiepileptic drugs. For this purpose, EEG recordings before and at three intervals within the next 30 min following 4-AP (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) were taken in anesthetized animals; and the EEG-highest peak amplitude values (HPAV) calculated. In control animals, the marked increase in the EEG-HPAV observed near 20 min following 4-AP reached its maximum at 30 min. Results show that this epileptiform EEG activity induced by 4-AP is prevented by sertraline and vinpocetine at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg, and by carbamazepine, phenytoin, lamotrigine and oxcarbazepine at a higher dose (25 mg/kg). In contrast, topiramate (25 mg/kg), valproate (100 mg/kg) and levetiracetam (100 mg/kg) failed to prevent the epileptiform EEG activity induced by 4-AP. It is concluded that 4-AP is a useful tool to elicit the mechanism of action of anti-seizure drugs at clinical meaningful doses. The particular efficacy of sertraline and vinpocetine to prevent seizures induced by 4-AP is explained by their high effectiveness to reduce brain presynaptic Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels permeability.

  6. Feasibility and acceptance of salivary monitoring of antiepileptic drugs via the US Postal Service.

    PubMed

    Tennison, Michael; Ali, Imran; Miles, Michael V; D'Cruz, O'Neill; Vaughn, Bradley; Greenwood, Robert

    2004-06-01

    Salivary and serum levels of phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and phenytoin are closely correlated. Salivary monitoring of antiepileptic drugs has a number of advantages including the potential for home collection if measured levels are unaffected by transit in the mail. Saliva was collected from 60 adult and 42 pediatric patients in the clinic. A control aliquot was immediately frozen, and a second aliquot was packaged and mailed to the laboratory. Patients were also asked to collect another sample at the same time on the following day and mail it to the laboratory. On receipt, all samples were held frozen and analyzed as a single batch by fluorescence polarization immunoassay. The effects of mailing, the duration in transit, and the season were assessed by multivariable, repeated-measures analysis of variance. One hundred two saliva samples were collected in a mean of 2.6 minutes, and the mailed aliquot was received in a mean of 6.4 days. Two children and 3 adults (4.9% of total) preferred blood collection, but the rest preferred saliva collection or had no preference. There was no significant difference between the control sample and the clinic mailed samples for any of the 3 medications. There were no significant effects of the duration in transit or the season on reliability. Transit of saliva samples in the mail does not adversely affect accuracy of antiepileptic drug measurement. Patients prefer and can successful collect saliva samples at home. Home monitoring of salivary antiepileptic drug levels is a cost-effective technique that deserves additional study.

  7. Cancer risk in people with epilepsy: the role of antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gagandeep; Driever, Pablo Hernáiz; Sander, Josemir W

    2005-01-01

    There has been considerable debate about the relationship between epilepsy and cancer, in particular whether the incidence of cancer is increased in people with epilepsy and whether antiepileptic drugs promote or protect against cancer. We review available evidence from animal experiments, genotoxicity studies and clinico-epidemiological observations, and discuss proposed mechanisms underlying the association between epilepsy and cancer. A carcinoma-promoting effect has been seen unequivocally in rodent models for phenobarbital and phenytoin; phenobarbital promoted liver tumours and phenytoin caused lymphoid cell and liver tumours in rats. Early human epidemiological studies found an association between phenobarbital and hepatocellular carcinoma, and several subsequent studies suggested an association with lung cancer. An association with brain tumours has also been demonstrated. Phenytoin has been causally implicated in three human cancers: lymphoma, myeloma and neuroblastoma, the latter specifically in the setting of foetal hydantoin syndrome. However, despite considerable long-term pharmaco-epidemiological data being available for both antiepileptic drugs, evidence for human carcinogenicity is not consistent and both are considered only possibly carcinogenic to humans. Valproate, however, has been found to exert an antiproliferative effect on certain cancer cell lines both in vitro and in vivo. A corresponding cancer-suppressive effect has not been studied in human epidemiological studies, though there are now preliminary reports of the use of valproate in human haematological and solid tumours. The anticancer activity of valproate appears to be driven by histone deacetylase inhibition and to be independent of hormone or multidrug protein resistance dependent mechanisms. The newer antiepileptic drugs appear to be safe, as no carcinogenicity has been demonstrated either during regulatory testing or in post-marketing surveillance. Nevertheless, the subject of

  8. Effects of valproate derivatives I. Antiepileptic efficacy of amides, structural analogs and esters.

    PubMed

    Redecker, C; Altrup, U; Hoppe, D; Düsing, R; Speckmann, E J

    2000-01-04

    Derivatives of the antiepileptic drug valproate (VPA, 2-propylpentanoic acid) have been synthesized and tested in order to improve the intracellular availability of VPA. The buccal ganglia of Helix pomatia were used as a test nervous system and antiepileptic efficacies were reconfirmed using rat cortex in vivo. Epileptiform activities consisted of typical paroxysmal depolarization shifts (PDS) which appeared in the identified neuron B3 with application of pentylenetetrazol. Epileptiform activities were found to be accelerated, unaffected or blocked. (i) The Amide-derivatives 2-propylpentanamide and N,N-dipropyl-2-propylpentanamide, and short chain ester derivatives 1-O-(2-propylpentanoyl)-2,3-propandiol, 2,2-di(hydroxymethyl)-1-O-(2-propylpentanoyl)-1,3-propanediol and 2,2-di(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-di-O-(2-propylpentanoyl)-1,3-propanediol accelerated epileptiform activities. Membrane potential often shifted to a permanent depolarization which corresponded to the PDS-inactivation level. (ii) The structural analogs 1-cycloheptene-1-carboxylic acid and cyclooctanecarboxylic acid accelerated epileptiform activities only slightly or were without effects. (iii) The small VPA-ester, 2-propylpentanoic acid ethyl ester, decreased the epileptiform activities in a way that is comparable to the effects of VPA well known from previous studies. It thus could be thought as a VPA-pro-drug. (iv) The mannitol-esters 1-O-(2-propylpentanoyl)-D-mannitol and 3,4;5,6-Di-O-isopropylidene-1-O-(2-propylpentanoyl)-D-mannitol blocked the PDS in a way which is different from the known effects of VPA. These substances are interpreted not to exert their effects after being metabolized to VPA and thus they are thought to be new antiepileptic substances.

  9. Antiepileptic and antipsychotic activities of standardized Śilājatu (Shilajit) in experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Durg, Sharanbasappa; Veerapur, Veeresh P.; Thippeswamy, B. S.; Ahamed, Syed Mansoor

    2015-01-01

    Background: Śilājatu (Shilajit; SJ) is claimed in traditional Indian medical practice to be useful in the treatment of nervous disorders, epilepsy and as antistress. Aim: To investigate whether SJ possesses antiepileptic and antipsychotic activities in rodents. Materials and Methods: Isonicotinyl hydrazine (INH), pentylenetetrazole (PTZ), apomorphine, phenytoin, diazepam, haloperidol and other chemicals of analytical grade were procured from standard companies. The antiepileptic activity of SJ was assessed using maximal electro shock (MES)-induced seizures in rats, INH and PTZ-induced seizures in mice. The antipsychotic effect of SJ was evaluated using apomorphine-induced climbing and stereotyped behaviours respectively, in mice and rats. Settings and Designs: SJ (25 and 50 mg/kg, p.o.) was given orally once daily for 15 days in all the rodent models. On the test day, SJ was administered 1 h prior to electric shock or chemical inducers (INH/PTZ/apomorphine) in experimental animals; the animals were then observed for different phases of seizures and psychotic behaviours. In addition, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content in the brain of rats and mice was estimated in seizure models. Statistical Analysis: The data were expressed as mean ± standard error of mean. Statistical comparisons were performed by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post-test using Graph Pad Prism version 5.0, USA. A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results and Conclusions: SJ pretreatment significantly inhibited the seizures induced by MES, INH and PTZ in a dose dependent manner. Further, SJ augmented brain GABA levels to normal, decreased by INH and PTZ in mice brain. SJ pretreatment also significantly inhibited the climbing and stereotyped behaviours induced by apomorphine. The present data seems to confirm the antiepileptic activity of SJ which may be because of enhancing the GABAergic system. The antipsychotic activity observed may be due to anti-dopaminergic and/or GABA

  10. Current understanding of the mechanism of action of the antiepileptic drug lacosamide.

    PubMed

    Rogawski, Michael A; Tofighy, Azita; White, H Steve; Matagne, Alain; Wolff, Christian

    2015-02-01

    The antiepileptic drug lacosamide [(R)-2-acetamido-N-benzyl-3-methoxypropanamide], a chiral functionalized amino acid, was originally identified by virtue of activity in the mouse and rat maximal electroshock (MES) test. Attention was drawn to lacosamide because of its high oral potency and stereoselectivity. Lacosamide is also active in the 6 Hz seizure model but inactive against clonic seizures in rodents induced by subcutaneous pentylenetetrazol, bicuculline and picrotoxin. It is also ineffective in genetic models of absence epilepsy. At doses greater than those required to confer protection in the MES test, lacosamide inhibits behavioral and electrographic seizures in hippocampal kindled rats. It also effectively terminates seizures in the rat perforant path stimulation status epilepticus model when administered early after the onset of seizures. Lacosamide does not exhibit antiepileptogenic effects in kindling or post-status epilepticus models. The profile of lacosamide in animal seizure and epilepsy models is similar to that of sodium channel blocking antiepileptic drugs, such as phenytoin and carbamazepine. However, unlike these agents, lacosamide does not affect sustained repetitive firing (SRF) on a time scale of hundreds of milliseconds or affect fast inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels; however, it terminates SRF on a time scale of seconds by an apparent effect on sodium channel slow inactivation. Lacosamide shifts the slow inactivation curve to more hyperpolarized potentials and enhances the maximal fraction of channels that are in the slow inactivated state. Currently, lacosamide is the only known antiepileptic drug in clinical practice that exerts its anticonvulsant activity predominantly by selectively enhancing slow sodium channel inactivation.

  11. Critical review of current animal models of seizures and epilepsy used in the discovery and development of new antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Löscher, Wolfgang

    2011-06-01

    Animal models for seizures and epilepsy have played a fundamental role in advancing our understanding of basic mechanisms underlying ictogenesis and epileptogenesis and have been instrumental in the discovery and preclinical development of novel antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). However, there is growing concern that the efficacy of drug treatment of epilepsy has not substantially improved with the introduction of new AEDs, which, at least in part, may be due to the fact that the same simple screening models, i.e., the maximal electroshock seizure (MES) and s.c. pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) seizure tests, have been used as gatekeepers in AED discovery for >6 decades. It has been argued that these old models may identify only drugs that share characteristics with existing drugs, and are unlikely to have an effect on refractory epilepsies. Indeed, accumulating evidence with several novel AEDs, including levetiracetan, has shown that the MES and PTZ models do not identify all potential AEDs but instead may fail to discover compounds that have great potential efficacy but work through mechanisms not tested by these models. Awareness of the limitations of acute seizure models comes at a critical crossroad. Clearly, preclinical strategies of AED discovery and development need a conceptual shift that is moving away from using models that identify therapies for the symptomatic treatment of epilepsy to those that may be useful for identifying therapies that are more effective in the refractory population and that may ultimately lead to an effective cure in susceptible individuals by interfering with the processes underlying epilepsy. To realize this goal, the molecular mechanisms of the next generation of therapies must necessarily evolve to include targets that contribute to epileptogenesis and pharmacoresistance in relevant epilepsy models.

  12. Determination of valproic acid in human plasma using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli-Bakhtiyari, Rana; Panahi-Azar, Vahid; Sorouraddin, Mohammad Hossein; Jouyban, Abolghasem

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with gas chromatography (GC)-flame ionization detector was developed for the determination of valproic acid (VPA) in human plasma. Materials and Methods: Using a syringe, a mixture of suitable extraction solvent (40 µl chloroform) and disperser (1 ml acetone) was quickly added to 10 ml of diluted plasma sample containing VPA (pH, 1.0; concentration of NaCl, 4% (w/v)), resulting in a cloudy solution. After centrifugation (6000 rpm for 6 min), an aliquot (1 µl) of the sedimented organic phase was removed using a 1-µl GC microsyringe and injected into the GC system for analysis. One variable at a time optimization method was used to study various parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of target analyte. Then, the developed method was fully validated for its accuracy, precision, recovery, stability, and robustness. Results: Under the optimum extraction conditions, good linearity range was obtained for the calibration graph, with correlation coefficient higher than 0.998. Limit of detection and lower limit of quantitation were 3.2 and 6 μg/ml, respectively. The relative standard deviations of intra and inter-day analysis of examined compound were less than 11.5%. The relative recoveries were found in the range of 97 to 107.5%. Finally, the validated method was successfully applied to the analysis of VPA in patient sample. Conclusion: The presented method has acceptable levels of precision, accuracy and relative recovery and could be used for therapeutic drug monitoring of VPA in human plasma. PMID:26730332

  13. Ultrasonic emulsification of parenteral valproic acid-loaded nanoemulsion with response surface methodology and evaluation of its stability.

    PubMed

    Tan, Suk Fei; Masoumi, Hamid Reza Fard; Karjiban, Roghayeh Abedi; Stanslas, Johnson; Kirby, Brian P; Basri, Mahiran; Basri, Hamidon Bin

    2016-03-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize the formulation of a nanoemulsion for central delivery following parenteral administration. A mixture of medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) and safflower seed oil (SSO) was determined as a sole phase from the emulsification properties. Similarly, a natural surfactant (lecithin) and non-ionic surfactant (Tween 80) (ratio 1:2) were used in the formulation. A central composite design (CCD) with three-factor at five-levels was used to optimize the processing method of high energy ultrasonicator. Effects of pre-sonication ultrasonic intensity (A), sonication time (B), and temperature (C) were studied on the preparation of nanoemulsion loaded with valproic acid. Influence of the aforementioned specifically the effects of the ultrasonic processing parameters on droplet size and polydispersity index were investigated. From the analysis, it was found that the interaction between ultrasonic intensity and sonication time was the most influential factor on the droplet size of nanoemulsion formulated. Ultrasonic intensity (A) significantly affects the polydispersity index value. With this optimization method, a favorable droplet size of a nanoemulsion with reasonable polydispersity index was able to be formulated within a short sonication time. A valproic acid loaded nanoemulsion can be obtained with 60% power intensity for 15 min at 60 °C. Droplet size of 43.21±0.11 nm with polydispersity index of 0.211 were produced. The drug content was then increased to 1.5%. Stability study of nanoemulsion containing 1.5% of valproic acid had a good stability as there are no significant changes in physicochemical aspects such as droplet size and polydispersity index. With the characteristisation study of pH, viscosity, transmission electron microscope (TEM) and stability assessment study the formulated nanoemulsion has the potential to penetrate blood-brain barrier in the treatment of epilepsy.

  14. Synergistic effect of docosahexaenoic acid on anticonvulsant activity of valproic acid and lamotrigine in animal seizure models.

    PubMed

    Gavzan, Hakimeh; Sayyah, Mohammad; Sardari, Soroush; Babapour, Vahab

    2015-10-01

    Add-on therapy is a common strategy to improve efficacy and tolerability of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Anticonvulsant potential and appropriate safety of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) makes it a promising candidate for combination therapy. We evaluated influence of DHA on anticonvulsant activity of AEDs phenytoin, valproate, and lamotrigine in maximal electroshock (MES), pentylenetetrazole (PTZ), and kindling models of epilepsy. The dose-response to DHA was obtained 15 min after intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection in PTZ model of clonic seizures in mice, MES model of tonic seizures in mice, and kindling model of complex partial seizures in rats. The dose-response curve of valproate (30 min after i.p. injection to mice) in PTZ, phenytoin (60 min after i.p. injection to mice) in MES, and lamotrigine (60 min after i.p. injection to rats) in kindling models were obtained. Dose-response curves of the AEDs were then achieved in the presence of ED25 of DHA. DHA had no anticonvulsant effect in the MES model. However, it showed a dose-dependent protective effect against PTZ (ED50 = 0.13 μM) and kindled seizures (ED50 = 1.08 mM). DHA at ED25 caused a 3.6-fold increase in potency of valproate as its ED50 value from 117.5 (98.3-135.3) decreased to 32.5 (21.6-44.1) mg/kg. Moreover, a 4.9-fold increase in potency of lamotrigine occurred, as its ED50 value from 13.10 (11.50-14.9) decreased to 2.65 (0.8-5.6) mg/kg. CompuSyn analysis indicated synergistic anticonvulsant interaction between DHA and both valproate and lamotrigine. Co-administration strategy of the safe and inexpensive anticonvulsant compound DHA with AEDs should be favorably regarded in clinical studies of epilepsy treatment.

  15. Middle and inner ear malformations in two siblings exposed to valproic acid during pregnancy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Van Houtte, Evelyne; Casselman, Jan; Janssens, Sandra; De Kegel, Alexandra; Maes, Leen; Dhooge, Ingeborg

    2014-11-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a known teratogenic drug. Exposure to VPA during the pregnancy can lead to a distinct facial appearance, a cluster of major and minor anomalies and developmental delay. In this case report, two siblings with fetal valproate syndrome and a mild conductive hearing loss were investigated. Radiologic evaluation showed middle and inner ear malformations in both children. Audiologic, vestibular and motor examination was performed. This is the first case report to describe middle and inner ear malformations in children exposed to VPA.

  16. Valproic acid and progestin inhibit lesion growth and reduce hyperalgesia in experimentally induced endometriosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Maohua; Liu, Xishi; Zhang, Yuqiu; Guo, Sun-Wei

    2012-04-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that endometriosis is an epigenetic disease. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of valproic acid (VPA) and progesterone (P4) in a rat model of endometriosis on serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels, hot plate and tail-flick latencies, lesion size, and body weight. We used 77 adult female rats, and endometriosis was induced by autotransplanting pieces of uterus (ENDO) or fat (SHAM) to the pelvic cavity. The BLANK group received no surgery. After 2 weeks, the ENDO group was further divided, randomly, into 5 groups, receiving, respectively, treatment with low- and high-dose VPA, P4 alone, VPA + P4, and no treatment. The SHAM rats received no treatment. The BLANK rats were further divided into 2 groups, one received VPA treatment and the other, no treatment. After 4 weeks, all rats were sacrificed. Response latency in hot plate and tail-flick tests, body weight, and serum TNF-α levels were measured before the surgery, before and after the treatment, along with lesion size. We found that induced endometriosis reduced response latency. ENDO rats receiving VPA and/or P4 treatment had significantly reduced lesion size as compared with untreated ones, and had significantly improved response to noxious thermal stimuli. They also had significantly increased weight gain. Serum TNF-α levels increased following surgery but eventually decreased regardless of treatment or not. In conclusion, VPA is well tolerated. Treatment with VPA significantly reduces lesion growth and improves sensitivity to nocifensive stimuli. The improvement is specific to endometriosis-induced hyperalgesia. Thus, histone deacetylase inhibitors may be a promising therapeutics for treating endometriosis.

  17. Inhibition of carnitine biosynthesis by valproic acid in rats--the biochemical mechanism of inhibition.

    PubMed

    Farkas, V; Bock, I; Cseko, J; Sandor, A

    1996-11-08

    The anticonvulsive drug, valproic acid (VPA), inhibits the biosynthesis of carnitine, and may contribute in this way to carnitine deficiency associated with VPA therapy. The conversion of [3H]-butyrobetaine into [3H]-carnitine was determined 60 min following a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) dose of 1.2 mmol/kg VPA in rats. The fraction of radioactivity found in [3H]-carnitine in the liver decreased from 63.2 +/- 1.50% to 39.2 +/- 1.11% (mean +/- SEM). Total carnitine in the liver also decreased, whereas the precursor butyrobetaine increased from 5.01 +/- 0.71 nmol/g to 8.22 +/- 0.82 nmol/g (mean +/- SEM). VPA also exhibited a dramatic effect on the conversion of an unlabeled loading amount of butyrobetaine. The increment in total carnitine caused by butyrobetaine in liver was reduced from 161 +/- 15.4 nmol/g to 53.2 +/- 5.11 nmol/g (mean +/- SEM). These data prove that VPA reduces the flux through butyrobetaine hydroxylase (EC 1.14.11.1.). The drug in vitro, however, did not inhibit the enzyme directly. Searching for the mechanism of action, we found that VPA decreased the level of alpha-ketoglutarate (alpha-KG; a cofactor of butyrobetaine hydroxylase) from 73.5 +/- 2.90 nmol/g to 52.9 +/- 2.2 nmol/g (mean +/- SEM) in the liver. The level of 1-glutamate showed a rather dramatic decrease in the liver. Moreover, alpha-KG proved to have a protective role against VPA in the [3H]-butyrobetaine conversion experiment.

  18. Tactile stimulation improves neuroanatomical pathology but not behavior in rats prenatally exposed to valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Raza, S; Harker, A; Richards, S; Kolb, B; Gibb, R

    2015-04-01

    Autism is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with a population prevalence of 1 in 68, and dramatically increasing. While no single pharmacologic intervention has successfully targeted the core symptoms of autism, emerging evidence suggests that postnatal environmental manipulations may offer greater therapeutic efficacy. Massage therapy, or tactile stimulation (TS), early in life has repeatedly been shown to be an effective, low-cost, therapeutic approach in ameliorating the cognitive, social, and emotional symptoms of autism. While early TS treatment attenuates many of the behavioral aberrations among children with autism, the neuroanatomical correlates driving such changes are unknown. The present study assessed the therapeutic effects of early TS treatment on behavior and neuroanatomy using the valproic acid (VPA) rodent model of autism. Rats were prenatally exposed to VPA on gestational day 12.5 and received TS shortly following birth. Whereas TS reversed almost all the VPA-induced alterations in neuroanatomy, it failed to do so behaviorally. The TS VPA animals, when compared to VPA animals, did not exhibit altered or improved behavior in the delayed non-match-to-sample T-maze, Whishaw tray reaching, activity box, or elevated plus maze tasks. Anatomically, however, there were significant increases in dendritic branching and spine density in the medial prefrontal cortex, orbital frontal cortex, and amygdala in VPA animals following early TS treatment, suggesting a complete reversal or remediation of the VPA-induced effects in these regions. The results suggest that postnatal TS, during a critical period in development, acts as a powerful reorganization tool that can ameliorate the neuroanatomical consequences of prenatal VPA exposure.

  19. Gene expression profiles of murine fatty liver induced by the administration of valproic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Min-Ho; Hong, Il; Kim, Mingoo; Lee, Byung Hoon; Kim, Ju-Han; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Yoon, Byung-Il; Chung, Heekyoung; Kong, Gu; Lee, Mi-Ock . E-mail: molee@snu.ac.kr

    2007-04-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) has been used as anticonvulsants, however, it induces hepatotoxicity such as microvesicular steatosis and necrosis in the liver. To explore the mechanisms of VPA-induced steatosis, we profiled the gene expression patterns of the mouse liver that were altered by treatment with VPA using microarray analysis. VPA was orally administered as a single dose of 100 mg/kg (low-dose) or 1000 mg/kg (high-dose) to ICR mice and the animals were killed at 6, 24, or 72 h after treatment. Serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels were not significantly altered in the experimental animals. However, symptoms of steatosis were observed at 72 h with low-dose and at 24 h and 72 h with high-dose. After microarray data analysis, 1910 genes were selected by two-way ANOVA (P < 0.05) as VPA-responsive genes. Hierarchical clustering revealed that gene expression changes depended on the time rather than the dose of VPA treatment. Gene profiling data showed striking changes in the expression of genes associated with lipid, fatty acid, and steroid metabolism, oncogenesis, signal transduction, and development. Functional categorization of 1156 characteristically up- and down-regulated genes (cutoff > 1.5-fold) revealed that 60 genes were involved in lipid metabolism that was interconnected with biological pathways for biosynthesis of triglyceride and cholesterol, catabolism of fatty acid, and lipid transport. This gene expression profile may be associated with the known steatogenic hepatotoxicity of VPA and it may provide useful information for prediction of hepatotoxicity of unknown chemicals or new drug candidates through pattern recognition.

  20. Subchronic effects of valproic acid on gene expression profiles for lipid metabolism in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Min-Ho |; Kim, Mingoo |; Lee, Byung-Hoon |; Kim, Ju-Han |; Kang, Kyung-Sun |; Kim, Hyung-Lae |; Yoon, Byung-Il |; Chung, Heekyoung; Kong, Gu |; Lee, Mi-Ock ||

    2008-02-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is used clinically to treat epilepsy, however it induces hepatotoxicity such as microvesicular steatosis. Acute hepatotoxicity of VPA has been well documented by biochemical studies and microarray analysis, but little is known about the chronic effects of VPA in the liver. In the present investigation, we profiled gene expression patterns in the mouse liver after subchronic treatment with VPA. VPA was administered orally at a dose of 100 mg/kg/day or 500 mg/kg/day to ICR mice, and the livers were obtained after 1, 2, or 4 weeks. The activities of serum liver enzymes did not change, whereas triglyceride concentration increased significantly. Microarray analysis revealed that 1325 genes of a set of 32,996 individual genes were VPA responsive when examined by two-way ANOVA (P < 0.05) and fold change (> 1.5). Consistent with our previous results obtained using an acute VPA exposure model (Lee et al., Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 220:45-59, 2007), the most significantly over-represented biological terms for these genes included lipid, fatty acid, and steroid metabolism. Biological pathway analysis suggests that the genes responsible for increased biosynthesis of cholesterol and triglyceride, and for decreased fatty acid {beta}-oxidation contribute to the abnormalities in lipid metabolism induced by subchronic VPA treatment. A comparison of the VPA-responsive genes in the acute and subchronic models extracted 15 commonly altered genes, such as Cyp4a14 and Adpn, which may have predictive power to distinguish the mode of action of hepatotoxicants. Our data provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of VPA-induced hepatotoxicity and useful information to predict steatogenic hepatotoxicity.

  1. Interaction of valproic acid and amitriptyline: analysis of therapeutic drug monitoring data under naturalistic conditions.

    PubMed

    Unterecker, Stefan; Burger, Rainer; Hohage, Amelie; Deckert, Jürgen; Pfuhlmann, Bruno

    2013-08-01

    Amitriptyline (AMI) and valproic acid (VPA) are common psychotropic drugs which are frequently used in psychiatry and also administered in neurology or anesthesia in the absence of a psychiatric indication. On the basis of the case of a 73-year-old man with therapy-resistant major depressive episode who experienced anticholinergic delirium after adding VPA to AMI, we retrospectively analyzed therapeutic drug monitoring data of the years 2008 to 2010. We assessed cases receiving a combination of AMI and VPA, and obtained a control sample of AMI patients without VPA which were matched for sex, age, daily dose, and comedication. Both samples were compared regarding the serum levels of AMI and nortriptyline (NOR) as well as the ratio of NOR and AMI with the Mann-Whitney U test. The combination of AMI and VPA led to a remarkable increase of AMI and NOR serum levels. When comparing 33 patients who received comedication with VPA versus 33 matched controls, the total concentration by combining mean AMI and NOR serum levels (237.1 [119.9] vs 126.4 [52.8] ng/mL) and NOR/AMI ratio (1.300 [0.905] vs 0.865 [0.455]) was significantly higher. Both AMI and VPA are widely prescribed drugs. A combination of both is common for psychiatric or neurologic patients. A cautious dosing of AMI with VPA comedication is advisable, and therapeutic drug monitoring should be performed because this combination may lead to a remarkable increase of AMI and NOR serum levels.

  2. Effects of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid on the pharmacokinetics of valproic acid

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo-Yun; Huh, Wooseong; Jung, Jin Ah; Yoo, Hye Min; Ko, Jae-Wook; Kim, Jung-Ryul

    2015-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is mainly metabolized via glucuronide, which is hydrolyzed by β-glucuronidase and undergoes enterohepatic circulation. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC) administration leads to decreased levels of β-glucuronidase-producing bacteria, suggesting that these antibiotics could interrupt enterohepatic circulation and thereby alter the pharmacokinetics of VPA. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of AMC on the pharmacokinetics of VPA. This was an open-label, two-treatment, one-sequence study in 16 healthy volunteers. Two treatments were evaluated; treatment VPA, in which a single dose of VPA 500 mg was administered, and treatment AMC + VPA, in which multiple doses of AMC 500/125 mg were administered three times daily for 7 days and then a single dose of VPA was administered. Blood samples were collected up to 48 hours. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using noncompartmental methods. Fifteen subjects completed the study. Systemic exposures and peak concentrations of VPA were slightly lower with treatment AMC + VPA than with treatment VPA (AUClast, 851.0 h·mg/L vs 889.6 h·mg/L; Cmax, 52.1 mg/L vs 53.0 mg/L). There were no significant between-treatment effects on pharmacokinetics (95% confidence interval [CI]) of AUClast and Cmax (95.7 [85.9–106.5] and 98.3 [91.6–105.6], respectively). Multiple doses of AMC had no significant effects on the pharmacokinetics of VPA; thus, no dose adjustment is necessary. PMID:26309401

  3. Valproic acid in pregnancy: how much are we endangering the embryo and fetus?

    PubMed

    Ornoy, Asher

    2009-07-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a known human teratogen. Exposure in pregnancy is associated with approximately three-fold increase in the rate of major anomalies, mainly spina bifida and only rarely anencephaly (NTD), cardiac, craniofacial, skeletal and limb defects and a possible set of dysmorphic features, the "valproate syndrome" with decreased intrauterine growth. This was demonstrated by prospective and retrospective studies. There is also, mainly in the children with the "valproate syndrome", a significant increase in the rate of developmental problems, manifested by decreased verbal intelligence often with communication problems of the autistic spectrum disorder (ASD). VPA is teratogenic in most animal species tested, but the human embryo seems to be the most susceptible. A daily dose of 1000 mg or more and/or polytherapy are associated with a higher teratogenic risk. It seems that several other AEDs potentiate the teratogenic effects of VPA. Thus, when valproate cannot be avoided in pregnancy, the lowest possible effective dose should be prescribed in 2-3 divided doses, preferably as monotherapy. Women exposed to valproate in pregnancy should be given periconceptional folic acid and followed up in a high risk pregnancy clinic. Appropriate ultrasonographic and other examinations, focusing on the possible different anomalies described with this agent, should be carried out. The specific inhibition by VPA of histone deacetylase and changes in gene expression may explain the teratogenicity of this drug. Other possible explanations are: increased fetal oxidative stress induced by VPA, with the brain being more susceptible to oxidative stress in comparison to other fetal organs, or the folic acid inhibitory action of this drug.

  4. Valproic acid induces the glutamate transporter excitatory amino acid transporter-3 in human oligodendroglioma cells.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, M G; Franchi-Gazzola, R; Reia, L; Allegri, M; Uggeri, J; Chiu, M; Sala, R; Bussolati, O

    2012-12-27

    Glutamate transport in early, undifferentiated oligodendrocytic precursors has not been characterized thus far. Here we show that human oligodendroglioma Hs683 cells are not endowed with EAAT-dependent anionic amino acid transport. However, in these cells, but not in U373 human glioblastoma cells, valproic acid (VPA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylases, markedly induces SLC1A1 mRNA, which encodes for the glutamate transporter EAAT3. The effect is detectable after 8h and persists up to 120h of treatment. EAAT3 protein increase becomes detectable after 24h of treatment and reaches its maximum after 72-96h, when it is eightfold more abundant than control. The initial influx of d-aspartate increases in parallel, exhibiting the typical features of an EAAT3-mediated process. SLC1A1 mRNA induction is associated with the increased expression of PDGFRA mRNA (+150%), a marker of early oligodendrocyte precursor cells, while the expression of GFAP, CNP and TUBB3 remains unchanged. Short term experiments have indicated that the VPA effect is shared by trichostatin A, another inhibitor of histone deacetylases. On the contrary, EAAT3 induction is neither prevented by inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinases nor triggered by a prolonged incubation with lithium, thus excluding a role for the GSK3β/β-catenin pathway. Thus, the VPA-dependent induction of the glutamate transporter EAAT3 in human oligodendroglioma cells likely occurs through an epigenetic mechanism and may represent an early indicator of commitment to oligodendrocytic differentiation.

  5. Increased hippocampal cell density and enhanced spatial memory in the valproic acid rat model of autism.

    PubMed

    Edalatmanesh, Mohammad Amin; Nikfarjam, Haniyeh; Vafaee, Farzaneh; Moghadas, Marzieh

    2013-08-14

    Autism is characterized by behavioral impairments in three main domains: social interaction; language, communication and imaginative play; and the range of interests and activities. However, neuronal processing studies have suggested that hyper-perception, hyper-attention, and enhanced memory, which may lie at the heart of most autistic symptoms. Pregnant Wistar rats were administered by either Valproic Acid (VPA, 500mg/kg) or Phosphate Buffer Saline (PBS) during fetal neural tube development on embryonic day 12.5. All offspring were subjected to various tests. The present study examined social interaction, repetitive behaviors, nociception and tactile threshold, anxiety as well as spatial memory. Histological analyses of cells in five regions of the hippocampus were done to determine neuronal density in both groups. A single intra-peritoneal injection of VPA to pregnant rats produced severe autistic-like symptoms in the offspring. The results showed significant behavioral impairments such as a lower tendency to initiate social interactions, enhanced stereotyped, repetitive behaviors, increased nociception threshold and anxiety at postnatal day (PND) 30 and PND 60. The Morris water maze learning paradigm revealed enhanced spatial memory at PND 60. Furthermore, histological analysis showed that the neuronal density in five separate regions of hippocampus (CA1, CA2, CA3, Dentate gyrus and Subiculum) were increased at PND 67. This work suggests that early embryonic exposure to VPA in rats provides a good model for several specific aspects of autism and should help to continue to explore pathophysiological and neuroanatomical hypotheses. This study provides further evidence to support the notion that spatial memory and hippocampal cell density are increased in this animal model of autism.

  6. Therapeutic Potential of Mood Stabilizers Lithium and Valproic Acid: Beyond Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chi-Tso; Wang, Zhifei; Hunsberger, Joshua G.

    2013-01-01

    The mood stabilizers lithium and valproic acid (VPA) are traditionally used to treat bipolar disorder (BD), a severe mental illness arising from complex interactions between genes and environment that drive deficits in cellular plasticity and resiliency. The therapeutic potential of these drugs in other central nervous system diseases is also gaining support. This article reviews the various mechanisms of action of lithium and VPA gleaned from cellular and animal models of neurologic, neurodegenerative, and neuropsychiatric disorders. Clinical evidence is included when available to provide a comprehensive perspective of the field and to acknowledge some of the limitations of these treatments. First, the review describes how action at these drugs’ primary targets—glycogen synthase kinase-3 for lithium and histone deacetylases for VPA—induces the transcription and expression of neurotrophic, angiogenic, and neuroprotective proteins. Cell survival signaling cascades, oxidative stress pathways, and protein quality control mechanisms may further underlie lithium and VPA’s beneficial actions. The ability of cotreatment to augment neuroprotection and enhance stem cell homing and migration is also discussed, as are microRNAs as new therapeutic targets. Finally, preclinical findings have shown that the neuroprotective benefits of these agents facilitate anti-inflammation, angiogenesis, neurogenesis, blood-brain barrier integrity, and disease-specific neuroprotection. These mechanisms can be compared with dysregulated disease mechanisms to suggest core cellular and molecular disturbances identifiable by specific risk biomarkers. Future clinical endeavors are warranted to determine the therapeutic potential of lithium and VPA across the spectrum of central nervous system diseases, with particular emphasis on a personalized medicine approach toward treating these disorders. PMID:23300133

  7. Autism-like behaviours with transient histone hyperacetylation in mice treated prenatally with valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Shunsuke; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Hara, Yuta; Maeda, Yuko; Ago, Yukio; Matsuda, Toshio

    2013-02-01

    Maternal use of valproic acid (VPA) during pregnancy has been implicated in the aetiology of autism spectrum disorders in children, and rodents prenatally exposed to VPA showed behavioural alterations similar to those observed in humans with autism. However, the exact mechanism for VPA-induced behavioural alterations is not known. To study this point, we examined the effects of prenatal exposure to VPA and valpromide, a VPA analog lacking histone deacetylase inhibition activity, on behaviours, cortical pathology and histone acetylation levels in mice. Mice exposed to VPA at embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5), but not at E9 and E14.5, displayed social interaction deficits, anxiety-like behaviour and memory deficits at age 4-8 wk. In contrast to male mice, the social interaction deficits (a decrease in sniffing behaviour) were not observed in female mice at age 8 wk. The exposure to VPA at E12.5 decreased the number of Nissl-positive cells in the middle and lower layers of the prefrontal cortex and in the lower layers of the somatosensory cortex at age 8 wk. Furthermore, VPA exposure caused a transient increase in acetylated histone levels in the embryonic brain, followed by an increase in apoptotic cell death in the neocortex and a decrease in cell proliferation in the ganglionic eminence. In contrast, prenatal exposure to valpromide at E12.5 did not affect the behavioural, biochemical and histological parameters. Furthermore, these findings suggest that VPA-induced histone hyperacetylation plays a key role in cortical pathology and abnormal autism-like behaviours in mice.

  8. Post-insult valproic acid-regulated microRNAs: potential targets for cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Hunsberger, Joshua G; Fessler, Emily B; Wang, Zhifei; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Chuang, De-Maw

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating brain injury that is a leading cause of adult disability with limited treatment options. Using a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) to induce cerebral ischemia, we profiled microRNAs (miRNAs), small non-protein coding RNAs, in the ischemic cortex. Many miRNAs were confirmed by qPCR to be robustly upregulated 24 hours following MCAO surgery including miR-155, miR-297a, miR-466f, miR-466h, and miR-1224. In addition, we treated MCAO rats with valproic acid (VPA), a mood stabilizer and histone deacetylase inhibitor. This post-insult treatment was shown to improve neurological deficits and motor performance following MCAO. To provide mechanistic insight into the potential targets and pathways that may underlie these benefits, we profiled miRNAs regulated following this VPA treatment. Two promising post-insult VPA-regulated candidates were miR-331 and miR-885-3p. miR-331 was also regulated by VPA pre-treatment in rat cortical neuronal cultures subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation, an in vitro ischemic model. The predicted targets of these miRNAs analyzed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) identified networks involved in hematological system development, cell death, and nervous system development. These predicted networks were further filtered using IPA and showed significant associations with neurological diseases including movement disorders, neurodegenerative disorders, damage to cerebral cortex, and seizure disorders among others. Collectively, these data support common disease mechanisms that may be under miRNA control and provide exciting directions for further investigations aimed at elucidating the miRNA mechanisms and targets that may yield new therapies for neurological disorders. PMID:22937209

  9. Direct hepatic differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells induced by valproic acid and cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Guo-Rong; Zhou, Qing-Jun; Pan, Ruo-Lang; Chen, Ye; Xiang, Li-Xin; Shao, Jian-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To develop a protocol for direct hepatic lineage differentiation from early developmental progenitors to a population of mature hepatocytes. METHODS: Hepatic progenitor cells and then mature hepatocytes from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were obtained in a sequential manner, induced by valproic acid (VPA) and cytokines (hepatocyte growth factor, epidermal growth factor and insulin). Morphological changes of the differentiated cells were examined by phase-contrast microscopy and electron microscopy. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemical analyses were used to evaluate the gene expression profiles of the VPA-induced hepatic progenitors and the hepatic progenitor-derived hepatocytes. Glycogen storage, cytochrome P450 activity, transplantation assay, differentiation of bile duct-like structures and tumorigenic analyses were performed for the functional identification of the differentiated cells. Furthermore, FACS and electron microscopy were used for the analyses of cell cycle profile and apoptosis in VPA-induced hepatic differentiated cells. RESULTS: Based on the combination of VPA and cytokines, mouse ES cells differentiated into a uniform and homogeneous cell population of hepatic progenitor cells and then matured into functional hepatocytes. The progenitor population shared several characteristics with ES cells and hepatic stem/progenitor cells, and represented a novel progenitor cell between ES and hepatic oval cells in embryonic development. The differentiated hepatocytes from progenitor cells shared typical characteristics with mature hepatocytes, including the patterns of gene expression, immunological markers, in vitro hepatocyte functions and in vivo capacity to restore acute-damaged liver function. In addition, the differentiation of hepatic progenitor cells from ES cells was accompanied by significant cell cycle arrest and selective survival of differentiating cells towards hepatic lineages. CONCLUSION: Hepatic cells

  10. Abnormal emotional learning in a rat model of autism exposed to valproic acid in utero

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Anwesha; Engineer, Crystal T.; Sauls, Bethany L.; Morales, Anna A.; Kilgard, Michael P.; Ploski, Jonathan E.

    2014-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are complex neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by repetitive behavior and impaired social communication and interactions. Apart from these core symptoms, a significant number of ASD individuals display higher levels of anxiety and some ASD individuals exhibit impaired emotional learning. We therefore sought to further examine anxiety and emotional learning in an environmentally induced animal model of ASD that utilizes the administration of the known teratogen, valproic acid (VPA) during gestation. Specifically we exposed dams to one of two different doses of VPA (500 and 600 mg/kg) or vehicle on day 12.5 of gestation and examined the resultant progeny. Our data indicate that animals exposed to VPA in utero exhibit enhanced anxiety in the open field test and normal object recognition memory compared to control animals. Animals exposed to 500 mg/kg of VPA displayed normal acquisition of auditory fear conditioning, and exhibited reduced extinction of fear memory and normal litter survival rates as compared to control animals. We observed that animals exposed to 600 mg/kg of VPA exhibited a significant reduction in the acquisition of fear conditioning, a significant reduction in social interaction and a significant reduction in litter survival rates as compared to control animals. VPA (600 mg/kg) exposed animals exhibited similar shock sensitivity and hearing as compared to control animals indicating the fear conditioning deficit observed in these animals was not likely due to sensory deficits, but rather due to deficits in learning or memory retrieval. In conclusion, considering that progeny from dams exposed to rather similar doses of VPA exhibit striking differences in emotional learning, the VPA model may serve as a useful tool to explore the molecular and cellular mechanisms that contribute to not only ASD, but also emotional learning. PMID:25429264

  11. Valproic Acid Increases Expression of Neuronal Stem/Progenitor Cell in Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Woo-Seok; Cho, Dae-Chul; Kim, Hye-Jeong; Sung, Joo-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study investigates the effect of valproic acid (VPA) on expression of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) in a rat spinal cord injury (SCI) model. Methods Adult male rats (n=24) were randomly and blindly allocated into three groups. Laminectomy at T9 was performed in all three groups. In group 1 (sham), only laminectomy was performed. In group 2 (SCI-VPA), the animals received a dose of 200 mg/kg of VPA. In group 3 (SCI-saline), animals received 1.0 mL of the saline vehicle solution. A modified aneurysm clip with a closing force of 30 grams was applied extradurally around the spinal cord at T9, and then rapidly released with cord compression persisting for 2 minutes. The rats were sacrificed and the spinal cord were collected one week after SCI. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and western blotting sample were obtained from 5 mm rostral region to the lesion and prepared. We analyzed the nestin immunoreactivity from the white matter of ventral cord and the ependyma of central canal. Nestin and SOX2 were used for markers for NSPCs and analyzed by IHC and western blotting, respectively. Results Nestin and SOX2 were expressed significantly in the SCI groups but not in the sham group. Comparing SCI groups, nestin and SOX2 expression were much stronger in SCI-VPA group than in SCI-saline group. Conclusion Nestin and SOX2 as markers for NSPCs showed increased expression in SCI-VPA group in comparison with SCI-saline group. This result suggests VPA increases expression of spinal NSPCs in SCI. PMID:24044073

  12. Analysis of Extracellular Nucleotide Metabolism in Adult Zebrafish After Embryological Exposure to Valproic Acid.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Fernanda Francine; Gaspary, Karina Vidarte; Siebel, Anna Maria; Leite, Carlos Eduardo; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Mauricio Reis; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2016-05-17

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by symptoms related to stereotyped movements, deficits in social interaction, impaired communication, anxiety, hyperactivity, and the presence of restricted interests. Evidence indicates an important role of extracellular ATP and adenosine as signaling molecules in autism. ATP hydrolysis by ectonucleotidases is an important source of adenosine, and adenosine deaminase (ADA) contributes to the control of the nucleoside concentrations. Considering zebrafish is an animal model that may contribute towards to understanding the mechanisms that underlie social behavior, we investigated the purinergic signaling in a model of embryological exposure to valproic acid (VPA) that induces social interaction deficit in adult zebrafish. We demonstrated embryological exposure to VPA did not change ATP and ADP hydrolysis in zebrafish at 120 dpf, and the cytosolic (soluble) ADA activity was not altered. However, we observed an increase of AMP hydrolysis (12.5 %) whereas the ecto-ADA activity was decreased (19.2 %) in adult zebrafish submitted to embryological exposure to VPA. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analysis showed changes on ntpd8, ADA 2.1, and A2a1 mRNA transcript levels. Brain ATP metabolism showed a rapid catabolism of ATP and ADP, whereas the extracellular metabolism of AMP and adenosine (ADO) occurred slowly. We demonstrated that embryological exposure to VPA altered biochemical and molecular parameters related to purinergic system in adult zebrafish. These findings indicate that the enzyme activities involved in the control of ATP and adenosine levels may be involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of diseases related to the impairment of social interaction, such as autism.

  13. Valproic acid overcomes transforming growth factor-β-mediated sorafenib resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Yasunobu; Wakai, Toshifumi; Kubota, Masayuki; Osawa, Mami; Hirose, Yuki; Sakata, Jun; Kobayashi, Takashi; Fujimaki, Shun; Takamura, Masaaki; Yamagiwa, Satoshi; Aoyagi, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Sorafenib is a multi-kinase inhibitor approved for hepatocellular carcinoma, but rarely causes tumor regression in patients with chronic liver diseases. To investigate whether growth factor-mediated signaling is involved in sorafenib resistance, HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells were exposed to epidermal growth factor (EGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) or transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) prior to treatment with sorafenib. Furthermore, to identify an effective combination treatment with sorafenib, growth factor-sensitized cells were treated with sorafenib alone or in combination with celecoxib, lovastatin or valproic acid (VPA). Trypan blue staining and Annexin V assays showed that the cytotoxic effect of sorafenib was inhibited by 15-54% in cells sensitized to TGF-β (P<0.05). Western blotting analysis showed that TGF-β significantly activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-mediated AKT signaling, and sorafenib failed to suppress both ERK and AKT in TGF-β-sensitized cells. The decreased anti-tumor effect of sorafenib was rescued by chemical inhibition of ERK and AKT. When TGF-β-sensitized cells were treated with sorafenib plus VPA, the levels of phosphorylated ERK and AKT were considerably suppressed and the numbers of dead cells were increased by 3.7-5.7-fold compared with those exposed to sorafenib alone (P<0.05). Moreover, low dose sorafenib-induced cell migration was effectively suppressed by combination treatment with sorafenib and VPA. Collectively, TGF-β/ERK/AKT signaling might play a critical role in sorafenib resistance in hepatoma cells, and combination treatment with VPA may be effective against this drug resistance. PMID:24817927

  14. Effect of Antiepileptic drugs on plasma lipoprotein (a) and other lipid levels in childhood.

    PubMed

    Aynaci, F M; Orhan, F; Orem, A; Yildirmis, S; Gedik, Y

    2001-05-01

    Antiepileptic drugs may alter plasma lipid status in epileptic patients. We conducted a study to assess the effect of phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and valproate on plasma levels of lipoprotein (a), total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein A, and apolipoprotein B in 22 epileptic children. The children were separated as group 1, seven children, mean age 1.6+/-0.2 years, treated with phenobarbital, 5 mg/kg/day, twice daily; group 2, seven children, mean age 9.8+/-1.2 years, treated with carbamazepine, 20 mg/kg/day, twice daily; and group 3, eight children, mean age 6.8+/-0.6 years, treated with valproate, 20 mg/kg/day, twice daily. Plasma lipoprotein (a) and other lipid levels were studied before (pretreatment) and at 3 and 6 months of treatment. Friedman two-way analysis of variance and Wilcoxon's signed-rank test were used for statistical analysis, and the results were expressed as the mean and standard error of the mean. The mean age of children in group 1 was significantly low, compared with groups 2 and, 3 (P < .001). The mean pretreatment lipid levels between the groups were not significant. The increase in lipoprotein (a) at 3 and 6 months and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol at 6 months was statistically significant in group 1 (P < .025). We suggest a careful monitoring of plasma levels of lipoprotein (a) and other lipids in epileptic children treated with antiepileptic drugs.

  15. Use of antiepileptic or benzodiazepine medication and suicidal ideation--The Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, I; Jääskeläinen, E; Isohanni, M; Koponen, H; Ansakorpi, H; Miettunen, J

    2015-05-01

    Both antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and benzodiazepines (BZDs) have previously been associated with an increased risk of suicidality. Our aim was to study the association between the use of conventional AEDs and BZDs and suicidal ideation in a large population-based cohort. Information on the medications used in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 was collected from the subjects at the age of 31 years, using a postal questionnaire (N=8211). The presence of suicidal ideation and other symptoms of depression and anxiety was assessed via the Hopkins Symptom Checklist - 25 questionnaire. The associations between medications and suicidal ideation were studied in different diagnostic groups and adjusted for symptoms of depression and anxiety. No difference was observed in suicidal ideation between AED users (n=54) and nonusers (n=8157). Subjects using BZDs (n=147) had greater suicidal ideation compared with nonusers (n=8064). Antiepileptic drug and benzodiazepine users more often exhibited other depression and anxiety symptoms. After adjustment for these symptoms, both AED and BZD users had less suicidal ideation compared with nonusers. In conclusion, in this population-based cohort, neither the use of AEDs nor that of BZDs was found to be associated with increased suicidal ideation when the symptoms of depression and anxiety were taken into account.

  16. Epileptiform activity and cognitive deficits in SNAP-25(+/-) mice are normalized by antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Corradini, Irene; Donzelli, Andrea; Antonucci, Flavia; Welzl, Hans; Loos, Maarten; Martucci, Roberta; De Astis, Silvia; Pattini, Linda; Inverardi, Francesca; Wolfer, David; Caleo, Matteo; Bozzi, Yuri; Verderio, Claudia; Frassoni, Carolina; Braida, Daniela; Clerici, Mario; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Sala, Mariaelvina; Matteoli, Michela

    2014-02-01

    Synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) is a protein that participates in the regulation of synaptic vesicle exocytosis through the formation of the soluble NSF attachment protein receptor complex and modulates voltage-gated calcium channels activity. The Snap25 gene has been associated with schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and bipolar disorder, and lower levels of SNAP-25 have been described in patients with schizophrenia. We used SNAP-25 heterozygous (SNAP-25(+/-)) mice to investigate at which extent the reduction of the protein levels affects neuronal network function and mouse behavior. As interactions of genotype with the specific laboratory conditions may impact behavioral results, the study was performed through a multilaboratory study in which behavioral tests were replicated in at least 2 of 3 distinct European laboratories. Reductions of SNAP-25 levels were associated with a moderate hyperactivity, which disappeared in the adult animals, and with impaired associative learning and memory. Electroencephalographic recordings revealed the occurrence of frequent spikes, suggesting a diffuse network hyperexcitability. Consistently, SNAP-25(+/-) mice displayed higher susceptibility to kainate-induced seizures, paralleled by degeneration of hilar neurons. Notably, both EEG profile and cognitive defects were improved by antiepileptic drugs. These results indicate that reduction of SNAP-25 expression is associated to generation of epileptiform discharges and cognitive dysfunctions, which can be effectively treated by antiepileptic drugs.

  17. Relationship of child IQ to parental IQ and education in children with fetal antiepileptic drug exposure.

    PubMed

    Meador, Kimford J; Baker, Gus A; Browning, Nancy; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Cohen, Morris J; Kalayjian, Laura A; Kanner, Andres; Liporace, Joyce D; Pennell, Page B; Privitera, Michael; Loring, David W

    2011-06-01

    Clinical trial designs need to control for genetic and environmental influences when examining cognitive outcomes in children for whom clinical considerations preclude randomization. However, the contributions of maternal and paternal IQ and education to pediatric cognitive outcomes are uncertain in disease populations. The Neurodevelopmental Effects of Antiepileptic Drugs (NEAD) Study is an ongoing prospective observational multicenter study in the United States and United Kingdom, which enrolled pregnant women with epilepsy to determine if differential long-term neurodevelopmental effects exist across four commonly used antiepileptic drugs. Here, we examined the relationship of IQ and education in both parents to child IQ at age 3 years. IQ and education for both parents were statistically correlated to child IQ. However, paternal IQ and education were not significant after accounting for maternal IQ effects. Because maternal IQ and education are independently related to child cognitive outcome, both should be assessed in studies investigating the effects of fetal drug exposures or other environmental factors that could affect the child's cognitive outcome.

  18. Forebrain-selective AMPA-receptor antagonism guided by TARP γ-8 as an antiepileptic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kato, Akihiko S; Burris, Kevin D; Gardinier, Kevin M; Gernert, Douglas L; Porter, Warren J; Reel, Jon; Ding, Chunjin; Tu, Yuan; Schober, Douglas A; Lee, Matthew R; Heinz, Beverly A; Fitch, Thomas E; Gleason, Scott D; Catlow, John T; Yu, Hong; Fitzjohn, Stephen M; Pasqui, Francesca; Wang, He; Qian, Yuewei; Sher, Emanuele; Zwart, Ruud; Wafford, Keith A; Rasmussen, Kurt; Ornstein, Paul L; Isaac, John T R; Nisenbaum, Eric S; Bredt, David S; Witkin, Jeffrey M

    2016-12-01

    Pharmacological manipulation of specific neural circuits to optimize therapeutic index is an unrealized goal in neurology and psychiatry. AMPA receptors are important for excitatory synaptic transmission, and their antagonists are antiepileptic. Although efficacious, AMPA-receptor antagonists, including perampanel (Fycompa), the only approved antagonist for epilepsy, induce dizziness and motor impairment. We hypothesized that blockade of forebrain AMPA receptors without blocking cerebellar AMPA receptors would be antiepileptic and devoid of motor impairment. Taking advantage of an AMPA receptor auxiliary protein, TARP γ-8, which is selectively expressed in the forebrain and modulates the pharmacological properties of AMPA receptors, we discovered that LY3130481 selectively antagonized recombinant and native AMPA receptors containing γ-8, but not γ-2 (cerebellum) or other TARP members. Two amino acid residues unique to γ-8 determined this selectivity. We also observed antagonism of AMPA receptors expressed in hippocampal, but not cerebellar, tissue from an patient with epilepsy. Corresponding to this selective activity, LY3130481 prevented multiple seizure types in rats and mice and without motor side effects. These findings demonstrate the first rationally discovered molecule targeting specific neural circuitries for therapeutic advantage.

  19. Progress report on new antiepileptic drugs: a summary of the fourth Eilat conference (EILAT IV).

    PubMed

    Bialer, M; Johannessen, S I; Kupferberg, H J; Levy, R H; Loiseau, P; Perucca, E

    1999-03-01

    The Fourth Eilat Conference on New Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) was held at the Royal Beach Hotel, Eilat, Israel, from 6th to 10th September 1998. Epileptologists and scientists from 20 countries attended the conference, which was held to discuss a number of issues in drug development, including outcome assessment in epilepsy (long-term efficacy, quality of life, safety), cost-effectiveness, an update on drugs in development, a progress report on recently marketed AEDs, and controversies in strategies for drug development. This review focuses on drugs in development and recently marketed AEDs. Drugs in development include ADCI, AWD 131-138, DP16, ganaxolone (CCD 1042), levetiracetam (ucb L059), losigamone, pregabalin (isobutyl GABA [CI-1008]), remacemide hydrochloride, retigabine (D-23129), rufinamide (CGP 33101), soretolide (D2916), TV1901, and 534U87. New information on the safety and efficacy of recently marketed drugs (felbamate, fosphenytoin, gabapentin, lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin, zonisamide) and of a new antiepileptic device, the neurocybernetic prosthesis (NCP), has become available. This paper summarizes the presentations made at the conference.

  20. Antiepileptics for post-herpetic neuralgia in the elderly: current and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Gisèle

    2014-09-01

    Post-herpetic neuralgia is a painful condition and its prevalence increases with age. It is a burden for older patients and the association of age-related pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes, high co-morbidity and polypharmacy leads to the risk of adverse drug reactions and interactions. This type of neuropathic pain is particularly difficult to treat and guidelines recommend the use of gabapentinoids and some antidepressants, the utility of which may be hampered by adverse effects such as sedation, dizziness and impaired age-related renal function. Re-formulations of antiepileptics (anticonvulsants) are being developed and/or marketed and suggest interesting innovative profiles with improved bioavailability, low drug-drug interactions and better tolerability that need to be confirmed in future studies. However, there are no new antiepileptics being developed for post-herpetic neuralgia, and prospective studies specifically focused on the older population are still missing, while this age group is particularly at risk of developing shingles and chronic neuropathic pain with a deleterious impact on quality of life.

  1. Reduction of voltage-operated potassium currents by levetiracetam: a novel antiepileptic mechanism of action?

    PubMed

    Madeja, Michael; Margineanu, Doru Georg; Gorji, Ali; Siep, Elke; Boerrigter, Paul; Klitgaard, Henrik; Speckmann, Erwin-Josef

    2003-10-01

    Levetiracetam (ucb L059; Keppra) is a novel antiepileptic drug. Its effects on action potential generation and voltage-operated potassium currents were studied in acutely isolated hippocampal CA1 neurones from rat and guinea pig, using the patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration. (i) Levetiracetam reduced repetitive action potential generation and affected the single action potential. Levetiracetam, 100 microM, decreased the total number of action potentials and reduced the total depolarisation area of repetitive action potentials by 21%. Furthermore, levetiracetam increased the duration of the first action potential slightly, prolonged that of the second action potential by 13% and decreased the slope of rise by 23%. (ii) Levetiracetam decreased the voltage-operated potassium current. Without effect on sodium and A-type potassium currents, levetiracetam, 100 microM, reduced the delayed rectifier current by 26%. The concentration of half-maximal block was 47 microM for guinea pig and 6 microM for rat neurones. Thus, the reduction of repetitive action potential generation by levetiracetam can be attributed, unexpectedly, to a moderate reduction of the delayed rectifier potassium current, as supported by a simulation of action potential generation. This suggests that a reduction of potassium currents may contribute to the antiepileptic effect(s) of levetiracetam.

  2. Sedative and antiepileptic effects of Anthocephalus cadamba Roxb. in mice and rats

    PubMed Central

    Nagakannan, Pandian; Shivasharan, Basavaraj D.; Veerapur, Veeresh P.; Thippeswamy, Boreddy S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the sedative and antiepileptic activities of ethanolic extract of Anthocephalus cadamba (ACE) bark in various experimental animal models. Materials and Methods: ACE was tested at three doses viz. 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg p.o. We used ketamine-induced sleeping time model to test the sedative property of the extract where, onset and duration of sleep were observed. A paradigm of anticonvulsant models (pentylenetetrazole, isoniazid and maximal electroshock-induced seizures) were used to evaluate its protective effect against absence and generalized types of seizures. Onset of clonic convulsions, tonic extension and time of death were observed in PTZ and INH-induced seizure models. In MES model, duration of tonic hind leg extension and onset of stupor were observed. Results: ACE showed significant increase in ketamine induced sleeping time. It also exhibited significant increase (P<0.05, 0.01 and 0.001) in latency to clonic convulsion, tonic extension and time of death in PTZ and INH models at all tested doses, whereas in the MES model, the lower dose was found to be effective when compared with the higher doses (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.). Conclusion: The results of the present investigation demonstrated that ACE possesses sedative and antiepileptic activities. PMID:22144777

  3. Targeting Mitochondrial STAT3 with the Novel Phospho-Valproic Acid (MDC-1112) Inhibits Pancreatic Cancer Growth in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Gerardo G.; Huang, Liqun; Alston, Ninche; Ouyang, Nengtai; Vrankova, Kvetoslava; Mattheolabakis, George; Constantinides, Panayiotis P.; Rigas, Basil

    2013-01-01

    New agents are needed to treat pancreatic cancer, one of the most lethal human malignancies. We synthesized phospho-valproic acid, a novel valproic acid derivative, (P-V; MDC-1112) and evaluated its efficacy in the control of pancreatic cancer. P-V inhibited the growth of human pancreatic cancer xenografts in mice by 60%–97%, and 100% when combined with cimetidine. The dominant molecular target of P-V was STAT3. P-V inhibited the phosphorylation of JAK2 and Src, and the Hsp90-STAT3 association, suppressing the activating phosphorylation of STAT3, which in turn reduced the expression of STAT3-dependent proteins Bcl-xL, Mcl-1 and survivin. P-V also reduced STAT3 levels in the mitochondria by preventing its translocation from the cytosol, and enhanced the mitochondrial levels of reactive oxygen species, which triggered apoptosis. Inhibition of mitochondrial STAT3 by P-V was required for its anticancer effect; mitochondrial STAT3 overexpression rescued animals from the tumor growth inhibition by P-V. Our results indicate that P-V is a promising candidate drug against pancreatic cancer and establish mitochondrial STAT3 as its key molecular target. PMID:23650499

  4. Successful treatment of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma with a combination of oral valproic acid, chemotherapy, radiation and surgery.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Hiroto; Murakami, Tsukasa; Hirai, Keisuke; Noguchi, Yasushi; Maruta, Junko; Yokoi, Tadao; Noguchi, Shiro

    2009-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is the most aggressive of thyroid cancers whose treatment is not yet established and mortality is extremely high. Recent in vitro studies have shown that valproic acid (VA), a newly identified histone deacetilase (HDAC) inhibitor, induces apoptosis, modulates differentiation gene expression of thyroid tumors and enhances the sensitivity of anaplastic cancer cell lines to doxorubicin. We report a case of successful treatment of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma with a combination of oral valproic acid, chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin and doxorubicin, external and intra-operative radiation and surgery. Tumor volume decreased by 50.7% under CT measurement and 44.6% under sonogram measurement over the course of the treatment. No significant rebound of tumor size was observed between each cycle of chemotherapy. Serial cytology performed via fine needle aspiration (FNA) presented a rapidly changing profile of cell types, starting with anaplastic and proceeding through increasingly well differentiated presentations. Only microscopic remnants of ATC cells were found in the histological examination of the resected thyroid. Ga scintigraphy and whole body PET scan six months after surgery revealed no evidence of recurrence or metastasis. As of Nov. 22, 2008, the patient is alive and disease free two years after diagnosis.

  5. Valproic acid induces differentiation and transient tumor regression, but spares leukemia-initiating activity in mouse models of APL.

    PubMed

    Leiva, M; Moretti, S; Soilihi, H; Pallavicini, I; Peres, L; Mercurio, C; Dal Zuffo, R; Minucci, S; de Thé, H

    2012-07-01

    Aberrant histone acetylation was physiopathologically associated with the development of acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs). Reversal of histone deacetylation by histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACis) activates a cell death program that allows tumor regression in mouse models of AMLs. We have used several models of PML-RARA-driven acute promyelocytic leukemias (APLs) to analyze the in vivo effects of valproic acid, a well-characterized HDACis. Valproic acid (VPA)-induced rapid tumor regression and sharply prolonged survival. However, discontinuation of treatment was associated to an immediate relapse. In vivo, as well as ex vivo, VPA-induced terminal granulocytic differentiation. Yet, despite full differentiation, leukemia-initiating cell (LIC) activity was actually enhanced by VPA treatment. In contrast to all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) or arsenic, VPA did not degrade PML-RARA. However, in combination with ATRA, VPA synergized for PML-RARA degradation and LIC eradication in vivo. Our studies indicate that VPA triggers differentiation, but spares LIC activity, further uncouple differentiation from APL clearance and stress the importance of PML-RARA degradation in APL cure.

  6. Benefits of agomelatine in behavioral, neurochemical and blood brain barrier alterations in prenatal valproic acid induced autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, B M; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2015-12-01

    Valproic acid administration during gestational period causes behavior and biochemical deficits similar to those observed in humans with autism spectrum disorder. Although worldwide prevalence of autism spectrum disorder has been increased continuously, therapeutic agents to ameliorate the social impairment are very limited. The present study has been structured to investigate the therapeutic potential of melatonin receptor agonist, agomelatine in prenatal valproic acid (Pre-VPA) induced autism spectrum disorder in animals. Pre-VPA has produced reduction in social interaction (three chamber social behavior apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complex I, II, IV). Furthermore, Pre-VPA has increased locomotor activity (actophotometer), anxiety, brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, and catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium levels and blood brain barrier leakage in animals. Treatment with agomelatine has significantly attenuated Pre-VPA induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, agomelatine also attenuated Pre-VPA induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative stress, nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium levels and blood brain barrier leakage. It is concluded that, Pre-VPA has induced autism spectrum disorder, which was attenuated by agomelatine. Agomelatine has shown ameliorative effect on behavioral, neurochemical and blood brain barrier alteration in Pre-VPA exposed animals. Thus melatonin receptor agonists may provide beneficial therapeutic strategy for managing autism spectrum disorder.

  7. In vivo inhibition of acylpeptide hydrolase by carbapenem antibiotics causes the decrease of plasma concentration of valproic acid in dogs.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Eiko; Nakai, Daisuke; Ikenaga, Hidenori; Fusegawa, Keiichi; Goda, Ryoya; Kobayashi, Nobuhiro; Kuga, Hiroshi; Izumi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    1. Our previous in vitro studies suggest that inhibition of the acylpeptide hydrolase (APEH) activity as valproic acid glucuronide (VPA-G) hydrolase by carbapenems in human liver cytosol is a key process for clinical drug-drug interaction (DDI) of valproic acid (VPA) with carbapenems. Here, we investigated whether in vivo DDI of VPA with meropenem (MEPM) was caused via inhibition of APEH in dogs. 2. More rapid decrease of plasma VPA levels and increased urinary excretion of VPA-G were observed after co-administration with MEPM compared with those after without co-administration, whereas the plasma level and bile excretion of VPA-G showed no change. 3. Dog VPA-G hydrolase activity, inhibited by carbapenems, was mainly located in cytosol from both the liver and kidney. APEH-immunodepleted cytosols lacked VPA-G hydrolase activity. Hepatic and renal APEH activity was negligible even at 24 h after dosing of MEPM to a dog. 4. In conclusion, DDI of VPA with carbapenems in dogs is caused by long-lasting inhibition of APEH-mediated VPA-G hydrolysis by carbapenems, which could explain the delayed recovery of plasma VPA levels to the therapeutic window even after discontinuation of carbapenems in humans.

  8. The Portland Neurotoxicity Scale: Validation of a Brief Self-Report Measure of Antiepileptic-Drug-Related Neurotoxicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinsky, Martin C.; Storzbach, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The Portland Neurotoxicity Scale (PNS) is a brief patient-based survey of neurotoxicity complaints commonly encountered with the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The authors present data on the validity of this scale, particularly when used in longitudinal studies. Participants included 55 healthy controls, 23 epilepsy patient controls, and 86…

  9. A Survey of the Use of Antiepileptic and Muscle Relaxant Medication in a Sample of Children with Neuromotor Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Bobby G.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A longitudinal survey of 424 preschoolers and infants with neuromotor disorders served by a children's rehabilitation center was conducted to determine the number who were receiving muscle relaxant or anticonvulsant medication, as well as average daily dosages. An increase in the number of antiepileptic prescriptions was found from 1962 to 1986.…

  10. The role of antiepileptic drugs in free radicals generation and antioxidant levels in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Eldin, Essam Eldin Mohamed Nour; Elshebiny, Hosam Abdel-Fattah; Mohamed, Tarek Mostafa; Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed Abdel-Azim; El-Readi, Mahmoud Zaki

    2016-01-01

    Many risk factors are encountered during the pathogenesis of epilepsy. In this study, the effect of seizure frequency on free radical generation and antioxidants levels in epileptic patients was evaluated. This study was carried out on 15 healthy controls (GI) and 60 epileptic patients treated with mono- or poly-therapy of carbamazepine, valproic acid, or phenytoin. The treated epileptic patients were divided into 2 main groups according to the seizure frequency: controlled seizure patients GII (n = 30) and uncontrolled seizure patients GIII (n = 30). GII included the GIIA subgroup (n = 15) which had been seizure free for more than 12 months and the GIIB subgroup (n = 15) which had been seizure free for a period from 6 to12 months. GIII included GIIIA (n = 15) and GIIIB (n = 15) for patients which had a seizure frequency of less than and more than four times/month, respectively. In comparison to the control group (GI), the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and malondialdehyde/creatinine ratio were significantly increased in GIIB, GIIIA, and GIIIB, while vitamins A and E levels were significantly decreased in GIIIB. Serum NO levels had significant negative correlations with serum vitamin E in the GIIA and GIIB groups, and with vitamin A in the GIIIA and GIIIB groups. However, serum NO had positive correlation with urinary MDA/Cr ratio. The imbalance between free radical generation and antioxidant system in epileptic patients may be a factor in seizure frequency.

  11. The mood stabilizer valproic acid opposes the effects of dopamine on circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, Dominic; Joiner, William J; McCarthy, Michael J; Kiessling, Silke; Barandas, Rita; Young, Jared W; Cermakian, Nicolas; Welsh, David K

    2016-08-01

    Endogenous circadian (∼24 h) clocks regulate key physiological and cognitive processes via rhythmic expression of clock genes. The main circadian pacemaker is the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Mood disorders, including bipolar disorder (BD), are commonly associated with disturbed circadian rhythms. Dopamine (DA) contributes to mania in BD and has direct impact on clock gene expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that high levels of DA during episodes of mania contribute to disturbed circadian rhythms in BD. The mood stabilizer valproic acid (VPA) also affects circadian rhythms. Thus, we further hypothesized that VPA normalizes circadian disturbances caused by elevated levels of DA. To test these hypotheses, we examined locomotor rhythms and circadian gene cycling in mice with reduced expression of the dopamine transporter (DAT-KD mice), which results in elevated DA levels and mania-like behavior. We found that elevated DA signaling lengthened the circadian period of behavioral rhythms in DAT-KD mice and clock gene expression rhythms in SCN explants. In contrast, we found that VPA shortened circadian period of behavioral rhythms in DAT-KD mice and clock gene expression rhythms in SCN explants, hippocampal cell lines, and human fibroblasts from BD patients. Thus, DA and VPA have opposing effects on circadian period. To test whether the impact of VPA on circadian rhythms contributes to its behavioral effects, we fed VPA to DAT-deficient Drosophila with and without functioning circadian clocks. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that VPA had potent activity-suppressing effects in hyperactive DAT-deficient flies with intact circadian clocks. However, these effects were attenuated in DAT-deficient flies in which circadian clocks were disrupted, suggesting that VPA functions partly through the circadian clock to suppress activity. Here, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence across species that elevated DA signaling lengthens the circadian

  12. Sexual dysfunction in women with epilepsy: role of antiepileptic drugs and psychotropic medications.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Mary A; Mushtaq, Romila; Stimmel, Glen

    2008-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a frequently encountered comorbid disorder in patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders. Importantly, sexual dysfunction can also occur as a treatment emergent adverse effect of a number of commonly used psychotropic and antiepileptic medications, and can include decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, disordered arousal, delayed orgasm, and anorgasmia. These effects can occur in both men and women, and can be seen across age groups. Understanding the neurobiology of normal sexual response, as well as the pharmacologic mechanisms of these commonly used medications can enable the clinician to predict how medication use may impact different phases of sexual response. Discussion of the current treatment strategies for female sexual dysfunction is also elucidated in this chapter.

  13. Antiepileptic drug intervention decouples electroencephalogram (EEG) signals: a case study in Unverricht-Lundborg Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-Chia; Xanthopoulos, Petros; Chaovalitwongse, W; Pardalos, Panos M; Uthman, Basim M

    2008-01-01

    Change in severity of myoclonus as an outcome measure of antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment in patients with Unverricht-Lundborg Disease (ULD) has been estimated by utilizing the Unified Myoclonus Rating Scale (UMRS). In this study, we measure treatment effects through EEG analysis using mutual information approach to quantify interdependence/coupling strength among different electrode sites. Mutual information is known to have the ability to capture linear and non-linear dependencies between EEG time series with superior performance over the traditional linear measures. One subject with ULD participated in this study and 1-hour EEG recordings were acquired before and after treatment of AED. Our results indicate that the mutual information is significantly lower after taking the add-on AED for four weeks at least. This finding could lead to a new insight for developing a new outcome measure for patient with ULD, when UMRS could potentially fail to detect a significant difference.

  14. An Update on Maternal Use of Antiepileptic Medications in Pregnancy and Neurodevelopment Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Elizabeth E; Meador, Kimford J

    2015-06-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are prescribed commonly to women of childbearing age. In utero exposure to some AEDs can have significant cognitive and behavioral consequences for the unborn child. Recently, prospective studies of women taking AEDs during pregnancy have added significantly to our understanding of cognitive and behavioral teratogenic risks posed by fetal AED exposure. Valproate is clearly associated with impaired cognitive development as well as an increased risk of disorders such as autism and autism spectrum disorder. Exposure to carbamazepine, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, or phenytoin monotherapy is associated with more favorable cognitive and behavioral outcomes than valproate, but more data are required to clarify if these AEDs have more subtle effects on cognition and behavior. There are insufficient data on the developmental effects of other AEDs in humans. Further, the underlying mechanisms of cognitive teratogenesis are poorly understood, including the genetic factors that affect susceptibility to AEDs.

  15. Association of antiepileptic drugs, vitamin D, and calcium supplementation with bone fracture occurrence in epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Patricio S; Perez, David L; Abner, Erin; Ryan, Melody

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether calcium and vitamin D supplementation reduces the risk of bone fractures in adult epilepsy patients. Records were obtained on 7716 patients with epilepsy prescribed antiepileptic drugs (AED) from the Veteran Affairs Hospital in Lexington, Kentucky. We performed a single center, retrospective cohort study to examine the proportion of fractures in 3303 patients on AED who took supplements compared to patients on AED not taking supplements. Patients prescribed long-term AEDs taking calcium and vitamin D were as likely to have fractures as those who did not take these supplements (11.7% vs. 9.9%, χ(2)=0.59, p=0.44). Phenytoin use was associated with a statistically significant increased risk of fractures OR=1.55 (1.10-2.24). Thus, in this group of patients with epilepsy on AED, bone fractures were not prevented in individuals taking calcium and vitamin D supplementation.

  16. Antiepileptic Drugs-induced Stevens–Johnson syndrome: A case Series

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Bhavi S.; Darji, Nishita H.; Malhotra, Supriya D.; Patel, Pankaj R.

    2016-01-01

    Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS) is an acute life-threatening mucocutaneous reaction, characterized by extensive necrosis and detachment of the epidermis from the skin. The overall incidence of SJS is seen in five cases per million people per year. SJS is typically caused by drugs and is a kind of idiosyncratic reaction. Adverse drug reactions such an SJS have a remarkable effect on patient's safety issues. We encountered nine cases of antiepileptic drug (AED)-induced SJS, specifically with carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, and phenytoin. To manage the reaction, the clinician withdrew the drug in all 8 cases, and in 1 case, the patient was shifted to valproate and symptomatic treatment was provided. There is still a controversy whether or not all AEDs can cause SJS. Recent studies have investigated the role of genetic factors - HLAB*502 allele in the development of AED-induced SJS in patients of Asian ancestry. PMID:28104975

  17. An Update on Maternal Use of Antiepileptic Medications in Pregnancy and Neurodevelopment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gerard, Elizabeth E.; Meador, Kimford J.

    2015-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are prescribed commonly to women of childbearing age. In utero exposure to some AEDs can have significant cognitive and behavioral consequences for the unborn child. Recently, prospective studies of women taking AEDs during pregnancy have added significantly to our understanding of cognitive and behavioral teratogenic risks posed by fetal AED exposure. Valproate is clearly associated with impaired cognitive development as well as an increased risk of disorders such as autism and autism spectrum disorder. Exposure to carbamazepine, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, or phenytoin monotherapy is associated with more favorable cognitive and behavioral outcomes than valproate, but more data are required to clarify if these AEDs have more subtle effects on cognition and behavior. There are insufficient data on the developmental effects of other AEDs in humans. Further, the underlying mechanisms of cognitive teratogenesis are poorly understood, including the genetic factors that affect susceptibility to AEDs. PMID:27617120

  18. Disorders of reproduction in patients with epilepsy: antiepileptic drug related mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Isojärvi, Jouko

    2008-03-01

    Epilepsy, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), and the reproductive system have complex interactions. Fertility is lower in both men and women with epilepsy than in the general population. Moreover, reproductive endocrine disorders are more common among patients with epilepsy than among the population in general. These disorders have been attributed both to epilepsy itself and to AEDs. The use of the liver enzyme inducing AEDs phenobarbital, phenytoin and carbamazepine increases serum sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations in both men and women with epilepsy. Over time the increase in serum SHBG levels leads to diminished bioactivity of testosterone and estradiol, which may result in diminished potency in men and menstrual disorders in some women, and, thus, to reduced fertility. Valproate (VPA) medication may have effects on serum androgen concentrations and it reduces serum follicle stimulating hormone levels in men with epilepsy. However, the clinical significance of the VPA related reproductive endocrine changes in men is unknown. On the other hand, in women the use of VPA is associated with a frequent occurrence of reproductive endocrine disorders characterized by polycystic changes in the ovaries, high serum testosterone concentrations (hyperandrogenism) and menstrual disorders. Young women with epilepsy seem to be especially vulnerable to the effects of VPA on serum androgen levels. The endocrine effects of the new AEDs have not been widely studied. However, it seems they may offer an alternative if reproductive endocrine problems emerge during treatment with the older antiepileptic drugs. On the other hand, it seems that in many cases the reproductive endocrine effects of the AEDs are reversible, if the medication is discontinued.

  19. Direct evidence of nonadherence to antiepileptic medication in refractory focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Nicolas; Jonas, Jacques; Frismand, Solène; Vignal, Jean-Pierre; Rikir, Estelle; Baumann, Cédric; Lapicque, Françoise; Saint-Marcoux, Franck; Vespignani, Hervé; Maillard, Louis

    2013-01-01

    The adherence to medication in drug-resistant focal epilepsy (RFE) remains largely unknown. The present work aimed to assess the frequency of recent adherence to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in patients with RFE. This prospective observational study screened all patients with RFE, admitted to the Nancy University Hospital between April 2006 and September 2008, for a 5-day hospitalization without AED tapering. The adherence to AEDs was assessed by measuring serum drug levels on day 1 (reflecting the recent "at home" adherence) and day 5 (reflecting the individual reference concentration when drug ingestion was supervised). A patient was considered nonadherent if at least one of their serum drug levels was different between days 1 and 5. The day-1 value was considered different from day 5 when it was at least 30% lower (underdosed) or 30% higher (overdosed). Nonadherent patients were classified as under-consumers in the case of one or more underdosed day-1 values, over-consumers in the case of one or more overdosed day-1 values, or undefined if they exhibited both underdosed and overdosed day-1 values. Forty-four of the 48 screened patients were included. Eighteen (40.9%) of 44 patients were nonadherent. Among them, 12 (66.7%) were over-consumers, 4 (22.2%) were under-consumers, and 2 (11.1%) were undefined nonadherents. The study indicates that recent adherence to antiepileptic medication in this group of patients with RFE is poor. Overconsumption is the most frequent form of nonadherence in this population and should be specifically assessed to prevent its possible consequences in terms of AEDs dose-dependent adverse events.

  20. Felbamate displays in vitro antiepileptic effects as a broad spectrum excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Domenici, M R; Sagratella, S; Ongini, E; Longo, R; Scotti de Carolis, A

    1994-12-27

    The in vitro antiepileptic activity of the novel anticonvulsant drug felbamate was tested in rat hippocampal slices on the CA1 epileptiform bursting induced by different chemical epileptogenic agents. The effects of felbamate were compared with those of the anticonvulsant drugs diphenylhydantoin and pentobarbitone and with the effects of excitatory amino acid antagonists acting at both N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors. Like the non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), felbamate at a minimum effective concentration of 1 mM induced a significant (P < 0.01) reduction of the duration of the CA1 epileptiform bursting due to the K+ channel blocker, 4-aminopyridine, and the excitatory amino acids, kainate and quisqualate. Like the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine, felbamate (1.6 mM) significantly (P < 0.01) decreased the duration of the CA1 epileptiform bursting caused by 'Mg(2+)-free' solutions. Conversely, felbamate (1.6 mM), CNQX (100 microM) and ketamine (100 microM) failed to affect the epileptiform bursting induced by the GABA antagonist penicillin. Pentobarbitone (100 microM) significantly (P < 0.01) decreased the duration of the CA1 epileptiform bursting caused by 'Mg(2+)-free' solutions, 4-aminopyridine or penicillin, while diphenylhydantoin (up to concentrations of 100 microM) failed to have an effect. The results indicate that felbamate displays a unique profile of in vitro antiepileptic effects as a broad spectrum antagonist of excitatory amino acid transmission.

  1. Do ATP-binding cassette transporters cause pharmacoresistance in epilepsy? Problems and approaches in determining which antiepileptic drugs are affected.

    PubMed

    Löscher, Wolfgang; Luna-Tortós, Carlos; Römermann, Kerstin; Fedrowitz, Maren

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to multiple antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is a common problem in epilepsy, affecting at least 30% of patients. One prominent hypothesis to explain this resistance suggests an inadequate penetration or excess efflux of AEDs across the blood - brain barrier (BBB) as a result of overexpressed efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp), the encoded product of the multidrug resistance- 1 (MDR1, ABCB1) gene. Pgp and MDR1 are markedly increased in epileptogenic brain tissue of patients with AED-resistant partial epilepsy and following seizures in rodent models of partial epilepsy. In rodent models, AED-resistant rats exhibit higher Pgp levels than responsive animals; increased Pgp expression is associated with lower brain levels of AEDs; and, most importantly, co-administration of Pgp inhibitors reverses AED resistance. Thus, it is reasonable to conclude that Pgp plays a significant role in mediating resistance to AEDs in rodent models of epilepsy - however, whether this phenomenon extends to at least some human refractory epilepsy remains unclear, particularly because it is still a matter of debate which AEDs, if any, are transported by human Pgp. The difficulty in determining which AEDs are substrates of human Pgp is mainly a consequence of the fact that AEDs are highly permeable compounds, which are not easily identified as Pgp substrates in in vitro models of the BBB, such as monolayer (Transwell(®)) efflux assays. By using a modified assay (concentration equilibrium transport assay; CETA), which minimizes the influence of high transcellular permeability, two groups have recently demonstrated that several major AEDs are transported by human Pgp. Importantly, it was demonstrated in these studies that Pgp-mediated transport highly depends on the AED concentration and may not be identified if concentrations below or above the therapeutic range are used. In addition to the efflux transporters, seizure-induced alterations in BBB integrity and activity of

  2. Subchronic treatment of donepezil rescues impaired social, hyperactive, and stereotypic behavior in valproic acid-induced animal model of autism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Woon; Seung, Hana; Kwon, Kyung Ja; Ko, Mee Jung; Lee, Eun Joo; Oh, Hyun Ah; Choi, Chang Soon; Kim, Ki Chan; Gonzales, Edson Luck; You, Jueng Soo; Choi, Dong-Hee; Lee, Jongmin; Han, Seol-Heui; Yang, Sung Min; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Shin, Chan Young; Bahn, Geon Ho

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of pervasive developmental disorders with core symptoms such as sociability deficit, language impairment, and repetitive/restricted behaviors. Although worldwide prevalence of ASD has been increased continuously, therapeutic agents to ameliorate the core symptoms especially social deficits, are very limited. In this study, we investigated therapeutic potential of donepezil for ASD using valproic acid-induced autistic animal model (VPA animal model). We found that prenatal exposure of valproic acid (VPA) induced dysregulation of cholinergic neuronal development, most notably the up-regulation of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the prefrontal cortex of affected rat and mouse offspring. Similarly, differentiating cortical neural progenitor cell in culture treated with VPA showed increased expression of AChE in vitro. Chromatin precipitation experiments revealed that acetylation of histone H3 bound to AChE promoter region was increased by VPA. In addition, other histone deacetyalse inhibitors (HDACIs) such as trichostatin A and sodium butyrate also increased the expression of AChE in differentiating neural progenitor cells suggesting the essential role of HDACIs in the regulation of AChE expression. For behavioral analysis, we injected PBS or donepezil (0.3 mg/kg) intraperitoneally to control and VPA mice once daily from postnatal day 14 all throughout the experiment. Subchronic treatment of donepezil improved sociability and prevented repetitive behavior and hyperactivity of VPA-treated mice offspring. Taken together, these results provide evidence that dysregulation of ACh system represented by the up-regulation of AChE may serve as an effective pharmacological therapeutic target against autistic behaviors in VPA animal model of ASD, which should be subjected for further investigation to verify the clinical relevance.

  3. [Medical and medico-social case management of drug-resistant partial epilepsy. Specific implementation of long-term antiepileptic treatment in the adult].

    PubMed

    Chassagnon, S

    2004-06-01

    Medical treatment of refractory localisation-related epilepsies in adults should always be considered with regard to surgical possibilities. When long-term therapy with antiepileptic drugs is necessary, the treatment tries to achieve maximal efficacy with the lowest unavoidable toxicity. Until an evidence-based choice can be made, the management is currently based on empirical knowledge. In this article, the available literature on effectiveness and monitoring of long term antiepileptic therapy is reviewed.

  4. Effect of antiepileptic drugs on plasma lipids, lipoprotein (a), and liver enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sonmez, Fatma Mujgan; Demir, Ercan; Orem, Asim; Yildirmis, Sermet; Orhan, Fazil; Aslan, Adnan; Topbas, Murat

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a study to assess the effect of phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and valproate on serum lipid profiles and lipoprotein (a) in 64 children with epilepsy (aged between 1 and 15 years) admitted to the child neurology outpatient clinic between July 2000 and July 2002. The children were separated as group 1 (18 children), treated with phenobarbital, 5 mg/kg/day; group 2 (22 children), treated with carbamazepine, 10 to 15 mg/kg/day; and group 3 (24 children), treated with sodium valproate, 20 mg/kg/day. Plasma lipoprotein (a), total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein A and apolipoprotein B levels, and liver enzymes alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and gamma-glutamyltransferase were determined before the initiation of the treatment and at 3, 6, and 12 months of the treatment period. The mean age of children in group 1 was significantly low compared with those in groups 2 and 3 (P <.05). The mean pretreatment lipid levels among the groups were not significantly increased. The mean lipoprotein (a) levels were significantly increased in all groups at 3, 6, and 12 months of the treatment period (P <.05). The increase in alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol at 3, 6, and 12 months was statistically significant in group 1 (P <.05). The higher levels in lipoprotein (a) (mean > 30 mg/dL) were observed only in carbamazepine-treated patients at 6 and 12 months. The percentage of children with lipoprotein (a) levels over 30 mg/dL was 44%, 63%, and 33% in the phenobarbital-, carbamazepine-, and valproate-treated children, respectively. Antiepileptic drugs significantly increase the level of lipoprotein (a), which is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis, and also have variable effects on other lipid parameters

  5. Neuropsychological effects of antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine versus valproate) in adult males with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Shehata, Ghaydaa A; Bateh, Abd El-aziz M; Hamed, Sherifa A; Rageh, Tarek A; Elsorogy, Yaser B

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on cognition and behavior in adult epileptic males controlled on treatment with conventional antiepileptic medications. Methods: Cognitive, mood, behavior and personality traits were assessed in 45 epileptic patients treated with carbamazepine and/or valproate and free of seizures for ≥1 year. Thirty-four newly diagnosed or untreated patients with epilepsy and 58 matched healthy subjects were also included for comparison. A battery of psychometric tests was utilized including Stanford-Binet (4th edition), Beck Inventory for Depression, Aggressive Scale and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Results: Compared to matched control subjects, treated and untreated epileptic patients had poor performance in different cognitive and behavioral functions testing. Treated patients had worse scores in memory for digits forward and backward, total short-term memory, extroversion and psychosis. The duration of AEDs intake was correlated with memory of objects (r = −0.323; P = 0.030), bead memory (r = −0.314; P = 0.036) and total nonverbal short-term memory (r = −0.346; P = 0.020). Treated and untreated epileptic patients had poor performance of similar extent in behavioral functions testing (depression, aggression and neurosis). The dose of AEDs was correlated with testing scores for neurosis (r = 0.307; P = 0.040), verbal aggression (r = 0.483; P = 0.001) and nonverbal aggression (r = 0.526; P = 0.000), and duration of drug intake was correlated with scores for depression (r = 0.384; P = 0.009), psychosis (r = 0.586; P = 0.0001) and nonverbal aggression (r = 0.300; P = 0.045). Conclusions: This study provides support for the notion that AEDs can impair performance in cognition, mood and behavior. Duration of drug intake and the number of the utilized AEDs are the main confounding variables. This study did not provide clues on how to exclude the effect of epilepsy itself and psychosocial variables as

  6. Comparison of the effectiveness of four antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of status epilepticus according to four different efficacy criteria.

    PubMed

    Redecker, Juliane; Wittstock, Matthias; Benecke, Reiner; Rösche, Johannes

    2015-08-01

    The preliminary data presented here shall give an impression on how different criteria for the identification of an antiepileptic drug (AED) with a possible or certain treatment effect can have an influence on the results of retrospective case series. We present a data subset from a large retrospective study which, when completed, will cover all treatment episodes of status epilepticus (SE) at the neurological department of the Universitätsmedizin Rostock from January 2010 to June 2013. We compare and contrast the results of four different efficacy criteria for the effectiveness of phenytoin (PHT), valproate (VPA), levetiracetam (LEV), and lacosamide (LCM): criterion 1 = the last AED administered before SE termination; criterion 2 = the last drug introduced into the antiepileptic therapy within 72 h before SE termination and without changes in the comedication; criterion 3 = the last drug introduced into the antiepileptic therapy or increased in dose within 24h before SE termination without changes in the comedication; and criterion 4 = the last drug introduced into the antiepileptic therapy within 72 h before SE termination, even allowing changes in the comedication. Thirty-seven treatment episodes in 32 patients (13 male and 19 female, mean age at first episode: 68 years, SD: 17) could be analyzed. In 31 episodes, at least one AED was given intravenously. Efficacy rates in the whole case series according to all four criteria were not significantly different between the four AEDs, but there was a considerable difference in the efficacy rates of each AED when evaluating them with the different efficacy criteria. Our data show that statistically significant results concerning the efficacy of different AEDs in different subtypes of SE may depend on the outcome criteria. Therefore, efficacy criteria for the effectiveness of AEDs in the treatment of SE should be standardized. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Status Epilepticus.

  7. Effects of levetiracetam and valproic acid monotherapy on sex-steroid hormones in prepubertal children--results from a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rauchenzauner, Markus; Bitsche, Gabriele; Svalheim, Sigrid; Tauboll, Erik; Haberlandt, Edda; Wildt, Ludwig; Rostasy, Kevin; Luef, Gerhard

    2010-02-01

    The influence of levetiracetam (LEV) and valproic acid (VPA) monotherapy on sex-steroid hormone profile was investigated in thirty prepubertal children. VPA-treated children showed greatest androstendione concentrations when compared to LEV treated children (p=0.016) and to controls (p=0.011). All other reproductive endocrine hormones were similar among groups. In conclusion, LEV does not seem to induce changes in reproductive endocrine functions as well as clinically relevant endocrine side effects in prepubertal children.

  8. Results of Phase II Randomized Study of Low-Dose Decitabine with or without Valproic Acid in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Jean Pierre; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Huang, Xuelin; Cortes, Jorge; Ravandi, Farhad; Jabbour, Elias; Borthakur, Gautam; Brandt, Mark; Pierce, Sherry; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypomethylating agents have shown activity in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Pre-clinical and single-arm trials have suggested that adding histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors may synergize the epigenetic modulation of hypomethylating agents and improve treatment results. Study Aim To evaluate the possible benefit of adding valproic acid, an HDAC inhibitor, to decitabine, in the treatment of MDS and AML. Methods Patients with higher risk MDS or with AML and age 60 years or older were eligible. Patients were randomized in a Bayesian response-adaptive design to decitabine 20mg/m2 intravenously (IV) daily for 5 days or to decitabine with valproic acid 50mg/1kg orally daily for 7 days. Courses were repeated every 4 to 6 weeks. A maximum of 150 patients were to be treated. Results A total of 149 patients were treated on study, including 87 patients with MDS and 62 patients with AML. The median age was 69 years (range 20 to 89 years; 42% ≥ 70 years). Overall, 34% of patients achieved CR and 55% had an objective response. The median survival was 11.9 months and the estimated 2-year survival rate was 27%. Outcome was not different with the addition of valproic acid to decitabine versus decitabine alone in relation to CR, overall response, or survival. Subset analyses did not demonstrate a benefit within the MDS or AML categories. Toxicities were higher with the combination, in particular neurotoxicity. Conclusions Adding valproic acid to decitabine was not associated with improved outcome in the treatment of MDS or elderly AML. Future therapies may consider combining hypomethylating agents with better HDAC inhibitors and using different schedules. PMID:25336333

  9. Determination of valproic acid in human serum and pharmaceutical preparations by headspace liquid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-flame ionization detection without prior derivatization.

    PubMed

    Shahdousti, Parvin; Mohammadi, Abdorreza; Alizadeh, Naader

    2007-05-01

    An efficient and fast extraction technique for the enrichment of valproic acid from human blood serum samples using the headspace liquid phase microextraction (HS-LPME) combined with gas chromatography (GC) analysis has been developed. The extraction was conducted by suspending a 2 microL drop of organic solvent in a 1 mL serum sample; following 20 min of extraction, withdrawing organic solvent into a syringe and injection into a GC with a flame ionization detector (FID), without any further pre-treatment. Four organic solvents, 1-decanole, benzyl alcohol, 1-octanol and n-dodecane, were studied as extractants, and n-dodecane was found to be the most sensitive solvent for valproic acid. The results revealed that HS-LPME is suitable for the successful extraction of valproic acid from human blood serum samples. Parameters like extraction time, ionic strength, pH, organic solvent volume, and temperature of the sample were studied and optimized to obtain the best extraction results. An enrichment factor of 27-fold was achieved in 20 min. The procedure resulted in a relative standard deviation of <13.2% (n=7) and a linear calibration range from 2 to 20 microg mL(-1) (r>0.98), and the limit of detection was 0.8 microg mL(-1) in serum blank samples. Overall, LPME proved to be a fast, sensitive and simple tool for the preconcentration of valproic acid from real samples. The proposed method was also applied to the analysis of valproate in pharmaceutical preparations.

  10. Atherosclerotic effects of long-term old and new antiepileptic drugs monotherapy: a cross-sectional comparative study.

    PubMed

    El-Farahaty, Reham M; El-Mitwalli, Ashraf; Azzam, Hanan; Wasel, Yasser; Elrakhawy, Mohamed M; Hasaneen, Bothina Mohammed

    2015-03-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the metabolic and atherogenic effects of long-term antiepileptic drugs in a group of Egyptian epileptic patients. Sixty-nine epileptic patients on antiepileptic drug monotherapy for at least 2 years and 34 control subjects were recruited in this study. Patients were divided into 5 subgroups according to antiepileptic drugs used (valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine, topiramate, and levetiracetam). Fasting lipid profile (total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol), lipoprotein(a), homocysteine, free thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and common carotid artery intima-media thickness were measured for all subjects. Significant higher mean values of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein / high-density lipoprotein ratio, lipoprotein(a), homocysteine, significantly lower mean value of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and significantly larger diameter of common carotid artery intima-media thickness were observed in each drug-treated group versus control group. Our study supports that long-term monotherapy treatment with valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine, and topiramate had altered markers of vascular risk that might enhance atherosclerosis, whereas levetiracetam exerted minimal effect.

  11. Understanding patients' perspective in the use of generic antiepileptic drugs: compelling lessons for physicians to improve physician/patient communication

    PubMed Central

    Liow, Kore

    2009-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is a condition in which consistency of treatment is paramount to successful management and for most patients, effective seizure control can be achieved. Given the severe consequences of even a single breakthrough seizure, patients should be afforded every opportunity to succeed on their given regimens. Discussion Some experts argue that global policy on generic antiepileptic drug substitution in epilepsy should be limited – occurring at the discretion of and with careful monitoring by the physician. While the debate continues, physicians still have daily responsibilities to their patients to help them best manage their epilepsy within the context of the current environment – the reality of which may involve switching to a generic antiepileptic drug or navigating various formulations between generics. Summary To provide context, this paper first reviews the main "hot button" issues fueling the ongoing generic debate, including a broad overview of the current state of the literature. The main goal however is to provide physicians with a patient perspective on generic antiepileptic drug use in epilepsy as a source of clinically useful, everyday advice to improve communication and increase patient self-advocacy, both of which are necessary for optimal patient outcome. PMID:19292903

  12. Systematic mining of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) flavor chemicals for bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Mayorga, Karina; Peppard, Terry L; López-Vallejo, Fabian; Yongye, Austin B; Medina-Franco, José L

    2013-08-07

    Bioactive food compounds can be both therapeutically and nutritionally relevant. Screening strategies are widely employed to identify bioactive compounds from edible plants. Flavor additives contained in the so-called FEMA GRAS (generally recognized as safe) list of approved flavoring ingredients is an additional source of potentially bioactive compounds. This work used the principles of molecular similarity to identify compounds with potential mood-modulating properties. The ability of certain GRAS molecules to inhibit histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC1), proposed as an important player in mood modulation, was assayed. Two GRAS chemicals were identified as HDAC1 inhibitors in the micromolar range, results similar to what was observed for the structurally related mood prescription drug valproic acid. Additional studies on bioavailability, toxicity at higher concentrations, and off-target effects are warranted. The methodology described in this work could be employed to identify potentially bioactive flavor chemicals present in the FEMA GRAS list.

  13. Dexamethasone alone and in combination with desipramine, phenytoin, valproic acid or levetiracetam interferes with 5-ALA-mediated PpIX production and cellular retention in glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Johnathan E; Steele, Christopher J; Rovin, Richard A; Belton, Robert J; Winn, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Extent of resection of glioblastoma (GBM) correlates with overall survival. Fluorescence-guided resection (FGR) using 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) can improve the extent of resection. Unfortunately not all patients given 5-ALA accumulate sufficient quantities of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) for successful FGR. In this study, we investigated the effects of dexamethasone, desipramine, phenytoin, valproic acid, and levetiracetam on the production and accumulation of PpIX in U87MG cells. All of these drugs, except levetiracetam, reduce the total amount of PpIX produced by GBM cells (p < 0.05). When dexamethasone is mixed with another drug (desipramine, phenytoin, valproic acid or levetiracetam) the amount of PpIX produced is further decreased (p < 0.01). However, when cells are analyzed for PpIX cellular retention, dexamethasone accumulated significantly more PpIX than the vehicle control (p < 0.05). Cellular retention of PpIX was not different from controls in cells treated with dexamethasone plus desipramine, valproic acid or levetiracetam, but was significantly less for dexamethasone plus phenytoin (p < 0.01). These data suggest that medications given before and during surgery may interfere with PpIX accumulation in malignant cells. At this time, levetiracetam appears to be the best medication in its class (anticonvulsants) for patients undergoing 5-ALA-mediated FGR.

  14. Continuous Infusion Antiepileptic Medications for Refractory Status Epilepticus: A Review for Nurses.

    PubMed

    Wiss, Adam L; Samarin, Michael; Marler, Jacob; Jones, G Morgan

    Status epilepticus requires treatment with emergent initial therapy with a benzodiazepine and urgent control therapy with an additional antiepileptic drug (AED) to terminate clinical and/or electrographic seizure activity. However, nearly one-third of patients will prove refractory to the aforementioned therapies and are prone to a higher degree of neuronal injury, resistance to pharmacotherapy, and death. Current guidelines for refractory status epilepticus (RSE) recommend initiating a continuous intravenous (CIV) anesthetic over bolus dosing with a different AED. Continuous intravenous agents most commonly used for this indication include midazolam, propofol, and pentobarbital, but ketamine is an alternative option. Comparative studies illustrating the optimal agent are lacking, and selection is often based on adverse effect profiles and patient-specific factors. In addition, dosing and titration are largely based on small studies and expert opinion with continuous electroencephalogram monitoring used to guide intensity and duration of treatment. Nonetheless, the doses required to halt seizure activity are likely to produce profound adverse effects that clinicians should anticipate and combat. The purpose of this review was to summarize the available RSE literature focusing on CIV midazolam, pentobarbital, propofol, and ketamine, and to serve as a primer for nurses providing care to these patients.

  15. New antiepileptic medication linked to blue discoloration of the skin and eyes.

    PubMed

    Clark, Sarah; Antell, Alexandra; Kaufman, Kimberly

    2015-02-01

    Ezogabine is an antiepileptic medication approved in June 2011 by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as an adjunctive treatment for partial seizures. Minimal drug interactions and a novel mechanism of action made ezogabine an appealing new treatment option. However, adverse effects reported during clinical trials and following drug approval have been alarming. A Risk Evaluation Mitigation Strategy (REMS) program has been established for urinary retention. A safety alert was published in April 2013 warning ezogabine may cause retinal pigment abnormalities and/or blue-gray discoloration, most notably on or near the lips, nail beds, sclera and conjunctiva with long-term use. In October 2013, the FDA announced a formal label change to ezogabine to include a black boxed warning emphasizing the previously reported warnings of eye and skin discoloration and permanent vision changes. Given the unknown nature of the pathophysiology, consequences and potential for reversibility of these effects, GlaxoSmithKline and the FDA have published recommendations for patients currently receiving ezogabine. Further data from published case reports and long-term safety trials in the future may lend additional insight into these concerning effects.

  16. Neuropeptide Y as an endogenous antiepileptic, neuroprotective and pro-neurogenic peptide.

    PubMed

    Xapelli, Sara; Agasse, Fabienne; Ferreira, Raquel; Silva, Ana P; Malva, João O

    2006-11-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a small peptide important in cardiovascular physiology, feeding, anxiety, depression and epilepsy. In the hippocampus, NPY is mainly produced and released by GABAergic interneurons and inhibits glutamatergic neurotransmission in the excitatory tri-synaptic circuit. Under epileptic conditions, there is a robust overexpression of NPY and NPY receptors particularly in the granular and pyramidal cells, contributing to the tonic inhibition of glutamate release and consequently to control the spread of excitability into other brain structures. Recently, an important role was attributed to NPY in neuroprotection against excitotoxicity and in the modulation of neurogenesis. In the present review we discuss the potential relevance of NPY and NPY receptors in neuroprotection and neurogenesis, with implications for brain repair strategies. Recent patents describing new NPY receptor antagonists directed to treat obesity and cardiovascular disorders were published. However, the NPYergic system may also prove to be a good target for the treatment of pharmaco-resistant forms of temporal lobe epilepsy, by acting on hyperexcitability, neuronal death or brain repair. In order to achieve new NPY-based antiepileptic and brain repair strategies, selective NPY receptor agonists able to reach their targets in the epileptic brain must be developed in the near future.

  17. Developmental effects of antiepileptic drugs and the need for improved regulations

    PubMed Central

    Loring, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are among the most common teratogenic drugs prescribed to women of childbearing age. AEDs can induce both anatomical (malformations) and behavioral (cognitive/behavioral deficits) teratogenicity. Only in the last decade have we begun to truly discriminate differential AED developmental effects. Fetal valproate exposure carries a special risk for both anatomical and behavioral teratogenic abnormalities, but the mechanisms and reasons for individual variability are unknown. Intermediate anatomical risks exist for phenobarbital and topiramate. Several AEDs (e.g., lamotrigine and levetiracetam) appear to possess low risks for both anatomical and behavioral teratogenesis. Despite advances in the past decade, our knowledge of the teratogenic risks for most AEDs and the underlying mechanisms remain inadequate. Further, the long-term effects of AEDs in neonates and older children remain uncertain. The pace of progress is slow given the lifelong consequences of diminished developmental outcomes, exposing children unnecessarily to potential adverse effects. It is imperative that new approaches be employed to determine risks more expediently. Our recommendations include a national reporting system for congenital malformations, federal funding of the North American AED Pregnancy Registry, routine meta-analyses of cohort studies to detect teratogenic signals, monitoring of AED prescription practices for women, routine preclinical testing of all new AEDs for neurodevelopmental effects, more specific Food and Drug Administration requirements to establish differential AED cognitive effects in children, and improved funding of basic and clinical research to fully delineate risks and underlying mechanisms for AED-induced anatomical and behavioral teratogenesis. PMID:26519545

  18. A pilot randomized controlled clinical trial to improve antiepileptic drug adherence in young children with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Modi, Avani C; Guilfoyle, Shanna M; Mann, Krista A; Rausch, Joseph R

    2016-03-01

    The primary aim was to examine the preliminary efficacy of a family tailored problem-solving intervention to improve antiepileptic drug (AED) adherence in families of children with new-onset epilepsy. Secondary aims were to assess changes in targeted mechanisms and treatment feasibility and acceptability. Fifty families (M(age) = 7.6 ± 3.0; 80% Caucasian; 42% idiopathic localization related) completed baseline questionnaires and were given an electronic monitor to observe daily AED adherence. If adherence was ≤ 95% in the first 7 months of the study, families were randomized (Supporting Treatment Adherence Regimens (STAR): n = 11; Treatment as Usual (TAU): n = 12). Twenty-one families were not randomized due to adherence being ≥95%. The STAR intervention included four face-to-face and two telephone problem-solving sessions over 8 weeks. Significant group differences in adherence were found during active intervention (weeks 4-6; TAU = -12.0 vs. STAR = 18.1, p < 0.01; and weeks session 6-8: TAU = -9.7 vs. STAR = 15.3, p < 0.05). Children who received the STAR intervention exhibited improved adherence compared to children in the TAU group during active treatment. Significant changes in epilepsy knowledge and management were noted for the STAR group. Families expressed benefitting from the STAR intervention. Future studies should include a larger sample size and booster intervention sessions to maintain treatment effects over time.

  19. Hyperammonaemia and hepatotoxicity during chronic valproate therapy: enhancement by combination with other antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Ratnaike, R N; Schapel, G J; Purdie, G; Rischbieth, R H; Hoffmann, S

    1986-01-01

    Erythrocyte (ENH3) and plasma (PNH3) ammonia levels, liver function tests and plasma valproate concentration were measured in 81 epileptic patients, comprising three therapeutic groups: Group 1 (23 patients) received sodium valproate (VPA) monotherapy, group 2 (33 patients) received sodium valproate combined with phenytoin, carbamazepine, phenobarbitone and/or primidone and group 3 (25 patients) received one or more of these anti-epileptic drugs without sodium valproate. The mean ENH3 and PNH3 of patients in group 1 (41.1 +/- 30.7 mumol l-1 and 37.1 +/- 31.8 mumol l-1, respectively) and group 2 (44.5 +/- 21.3 and 37.6 +/- 21.4 mumol l-1, respectively) were significantly (P less than 0.01) higher than those in group 3 (28.7 +/- 10.6 and 21.5 +/- 7.8 mumol l-1, respectively) and the reference range (30.1 +/- 7.9 and 20.8 +/- 5.7 mumol l-1, respectively). Hyperammonaemia was more prevalent amongst patients in group 2, for both ENH3 (45.5%) and PNH3 (54.6%), than amongst patients in group 1 (30.4% and 52.2%, respectively) and group 3 (8% and 8%, respectively). There was a significant (P less than 0.05) positive correlation between plasma VPA and total bilirubin concentrations. Chronic VPA therapy was also associated with an increase in bilirubin concentrations measured on average four months apart. PMID:3091053

  20. Psychological factors and use of antiepileptic drugs: pilot work using an objective measure of adherence.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Steven; Feely, Morgan; Hay, Alastair; Wild, Heather; Cooper, Cathryn

    2007-01-01

    Given the current emphasis on the "concordance" prescribing model, a study was designed to determine the influence of patients' beliefs about epilepsy, beliefs about medication and a range of neuroepilepsy variables on drug adherence among a sample of epilepsy patients. A special feature of the study was the use of a credible objective measure of drug adherence. Psychological health was also assessed. Thirty-seven patients were recruited from a local epilepsy clinic. Beliefs about epilepsy (illness representations), beliefs about epilepsy medication, anxiety, depression, neuroepilepsy status and adherence were all measured. Data were collected via clinical interview and questionnaire methods. Adherence with drug treatment was determined by an objective measure using low-dose phenobarbital as an indicator of adherence and, or, measurement of antiepileptic drug levels. Neither illness representations nor beliefs about epilepsy drugs were related to adherence. With the exception of time since last seizure, which was positively related to adherence, neuroepilepsy variables were unrelated to adherence. A number of significant associations between cognitive representations of epilepsy and mood were found.

  1. Lacosamide neurotoxicity associated with concomitant use of sodium channel-blocking antiepileptic drugs: a pharmacodynamic interaction?

    PubMed

    Novy, Jan; Patsalos, Philip N; Sander, Josemir W; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2011-01-01

    Lacosamide is a new antiepileptic drug (AED) apparently devoid of major pharmacokinetic interactions. Data from a small postmarketing assessment suggest people who had lacosamide co-prescribed with a voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC)-blocking AED seemed more likely to discontinue lacosamide because of tolerability problems. Among 39 people with refractory epilepsy who developed neurotoxicity (diplopia, dizziness, drowsiness) on lacosamide treatment given in combination with VGSC-blocking AEDs, we identified 7 (17.9%) without any changes in serum levels of other AEDs in whom the symptoms were ameliorated by dose reduction of the concomitant VGSC-blocking AED. Symptoms in these people seem to have arisen from a pharmacodynamic interaction between lacosamide and other VGSC-blocking AEDs. Slow-inactivated VGSCs targeted by lacosamide might be more sensitive to the effects of conventional VGSC-blocking AEDs. Advising people to reduce concomitantly the conventional VGSC-blocking AEDs during lacosamide uptitration in cases of neurotoxicity might improve the tolerability of combination treatment.

  2. Local anesthetic and antiepileptic drug access and binding to a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Boiteux, Céline; Vorobyov, Igor; French, Robert J; French, Christopher; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Allen, Toby W

    2014-09-09

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are important targets in the treatment of a range of pathologies. Bacterial channels, for which crystal structures have been solved, exhibit modulation by local anesthetic and anti-epileptic agents, allowing molecular-level investigations into sodium channel-drug interactions. These structures reveal no basis for the "hinged lid"-based fast inactivation, seen in eukaryotic Nav channels. Thus, they enable examination of potential mechanisms of use- or state-dependent drug action based on activation gating, or slower pore-based inactivation processes. Multimicrosecond simulations of NavAb reveal high-affinity binding of benzocaine to F203 that is a surrogate for FS6, conserved in helix S6 of Domain IV of mammalian sodium channels, as well as low-affinity sites suggested to stabilize different states of the channel. Phenytoin exhibits a different binding distribution owing to preferential interactions at the membrane and water-protein interfaces. Two drug-access pathways into the pore are observed: via lateral fenestrations connecting to the membrane lipid phase, as well as via an aqueous pathway through the intracellular activation gate, despite being closed. These observations provide insight into drug modulation that will guide further developments of Nav inhibitors.

  3. Homocysteine, folate, vitamin B-12 and vitamin B-6 in patients receiving antiepileptic drug monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tamura, T; Aiso, K; Johnston, K E; Black, L; Faught, E

    2000-06-01

    We hypothesized that elevated plasma homocysteine concentrations (hyperhomocysteinemia) exist in patients receiving antiepileptic drugs (AED), and a long-term administration of AED may result in an increased risk of occlusive vascular disease in these patients. A total of 62 patients who received AED monotherapy (phenytoin, lamotrigine, carbamazepine or valproate) participated in this study. Blood concentrations of homocysteine, folate, vitamin B-12 and pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP, a coenzyme form of vitamin B-6) were measured, and thermolabile genotypes of 5, 10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) were also determined. Of 62 patients, only seven (11.4%) had hyperhomocysteinemia. Of 20 patients who received phenytoin, three (15.0%) had hyperhomocysteinemia, whereas 85% of these had plasma folate concentrations below the normal range. However, erythrocyte folate concentrations were abnormally low in only 25% of the patients who received phenytoin. Valproate administration increased serum vitamin B-12 concentrations. Over 55% of the entire patients had PLP concentrations below the normal range, although the reason is unknown. Only three patients had the homozygous thermolabile genotype of MTHFR; therefore, meaningful statistical analysis was not possible in this study. However, one patient with homozygous genotype who received phenytoin therapy had hyperhomocysteinemia with poor folate nutritional status, and the other two had normal homocysteine concentrations with normal folate status. Our data suggest that hyperhomocysteinemia is not a serious clinical concern in epileptic patients when folate nutriture is adequate.

  4. Impact of antiepileptic drugs on bone health: Need for monitoring, treatment, and prevention strategies

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Ekta; Singh, Harmanjit; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder affecting approximately 50 million people worldwide. In India, overall prevalence of epilepsy is reported to be 5.59/1000 population. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) constitute the main-stay of treatment with a large number of AEDs available in the market. High incidence of adverse effects is a major limitation with AEDs. One of the major concerns is significant metabolic effects on the bone. However, little attention has been paid to this issue because most of the bone effects remain subclinical for a long time and may take years to manifest clinically. The main effects include hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia, reduced serum levels of Vitamin D, increase in parathormone (PTH) levels, and alterations in bone turnover markers. The CYP450 enzyme-inducing AEDs such as phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and primidone are the most common AEDs associated with bone disorders while the data regarding the effect of valproate and newer AEDs such as lamotrigine, gabapentin, vigabatrin, levetiracetam, and topiramate on bone metabolism and bone density are scanty and controversial. Deficiency of Vitamin D is commonly described as a cause for the bone loss in epileptic patients while others being decreased absorption of calcium, increased PTH levels, and inhibition of calcitonin secretion, etc. However, there are no formal practical guidelines for the management of bone disease among those taking AEDs. Evidence-based strategies regarding monitoring, prevention, and treatment of bone diseases in patients on AED therapy are needed. PMID:27843822

  5. Selecting anti-epileptic drugs: a pediatric epileptologist’s view, a computer’s view

    PubMed Central

    Pestian, J; Matykiewicz, P; Holland-Bouley, K; Standridge, S; Spencer, M; Glauser, T

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify which clinical characteristics are important to include in clinical decision support systems developed for Antiepileptic Drug (AEDs) selection. Methods Twenty-three epileptologists from the Childhood Absence Epilepsy network completed a survey related to AED selection. Using cluster analysis their responses where classified into subject matter groups and weighted for importance. Results Five distinct subject matter groups were identified and their relative weighting for importance were determined: disease characteristics (weight 4.8 ± 0.049), drug toxicities (3.82 ± 0.098), medical history (3.12 ± 0.102), systemic characteristics (2.57 ± 0.048) and genetic characteristics (1.08 ± 0.046). Conclusion Research about prescribing patterns exists but research on how such data can be used to train advanced technology is novel. As machine learning algorithms becomes more and more prevalent in clinical decisions support systems, developing methods for determining which data should be part of those algorithms is equally important. PMID:22998126

  6. Is breast-feeding of infants advisable for epileptic mothers taking antiepileptic drugs?

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Liu, Fang; Yoshida, Shuichi; Kaneko, Sunao

    2010-10-01

    Epilepsy is a relatively common maternal complication affecting 0.3-0.5% of pregnant women. For most mothers with epilepsy, the use of antiepileptic drugs (AED) is unavoidable, even during pregnancy and lactation. Therefore, the fetus is indirectly exposed to AED via the placenta and breast milk. AED are also prescribed for female patients with other diseases, such as bipolar disorders. In clinical settings, physicians are frequently questioned whether or not women patients taking AED should breast-feed their offspring. Thus, it is necessary to establish an optimum AED regimen for women taking AED, in particular for those with epilepsy during pregnancy and lactation. In this article, we critically review the effects of AED on infants via breast milk and attempt to provide suggestions for clinicians regarding these effects during breast-feeding, based on the data of transplacental passage of AED, breast milk concentration/maternal serum concentration ratios, AED metabolism in infants and the effects of AED in breast milk on infants.

  7. Development and validation of sensitive spectrophotometric method for determination of two antiepileptics in pharmaceutical formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouda, Ayman A.; Malah, Zakia Al

    2013-03-01

    Rapid, sensitive and validated spectrophotometric methods for the determination of two antiepileptics (gabapentin (GAB) and pregabalin (PRG)) in pure forms and in pharmaceutical formulations was developed. The method is based on the formation of charge transfer complex between drug and the chromogenic reagents quinalizarin (Quinz) and alizarin red S (ARS) producing charge transfer complexes in methanolic medium which showed an absorption maximum at 571 and 528 nm for GAB and 572 and 538 nm for PRG using Quinz and ARS, respectively. The optimization of the reaction conditions such as the type of solvent, reagent concentration and reaction time were investigated. Beer's law is obeyed in the concentration ranges 0.4-8.0 and 0.5-10 μg mL-1 for GAB and PRG using Quinz and ARS, respectively. The molar absorptivity, Sandell sensitivity, detection and quantification limits are also calculated. The correlation coefficients were ⩾0.9992 with a relative standard deviation (RSD%) of ⩽1.76. The methods are successfully applied to the determination of GAB and PRG in pharmaceutical formulations and the validity assesses by applying the standard addition technique, which compared with those obtained using the reported methods.

  8. Progress report on new antiepileptic drugs: A summary of the Twelfth Eilat Conference (EILAT XII).

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir; Johannessen, Svein I; Levy, René H; Perucca, Emilio; Tomson, Torbjörn; White, H Steve

    2015-03-01

    The Twelfth Eilat Conference on New Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) - EILAT XII, took place in Madrid, Spain from August 31st to September 3rd 2014. About 130 basic scientists, clinical pharmacologists and neurologists from 22 countries attended the conference, whose main themes included "Conquering pharmacoresistant epilepsy", "Innovative emergency treatments", "Progress report on second-generation treatment" and "New methods and formulations". Consistent with previous formats of this conference, a large part of the program was devoted to a review of AEDs in development, as well as updates on AEDs introduced since 2004. Like the EILAT X and EILAT XI reports, the current article focuses on the preclinical and clinical pharmacology of AEDs that are currently in development. These include adenosine-releasing silk, allopregnanolone (SAGE-547), AMP-X-0079, brivaracetam, bumetanide, cannabidiol, cannabidivarin, 2-deoxy-glucose, everolimus, ganaxolone, huperzine A, imepitoin, minocycline, NAX 801-2, pitolisant, PRX 0023, SAGE-217, valnoctamide and its homologue sec-butyl-propylacetamide (SPD), and VLB-01. Since the previous Eilat conference, perampanel has been introduced into the market and twelve novel potential epilepsy treatments are presented for the first time.

  9. Generic products of antiepileptic drugs: a perspective on bioequivalence and interchangeability.

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir; Midha, Kamal K

    2010-06-01

    Most antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are currently available as generic products, yet neurologists and patients are reluctant to switch to generics. Generic AEDs are regarded as bioequivalent to brand AEDs after meeting the average bioequivalence criteria; consequently, they are considered to be interchangeable with their respective brands without loss of efficacy and safety. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the present bioequivalence requirements are already so rigorous and constrained that there is little possibility that generics that meet regulatory bioequivalence criteria could lead to therapeutic problems. So is there a scientific rationale for the concerns about switching patients with epilepsy to bioequivalent generics? Herein we discuss the assessment of bioequivalence and propose a scaled-average bioequivalence approach where scaling of bioequivalence is carried out based on brand lot-to-lot variance as an alternative to the conventional bioequivalence test as a means to determine whether switching patients to generic formulations, or vice versa, is a safe and effective therapeutic option. Meeting the proposed scaled-average bioequivalence requirements will ensure that when an individual patient is switched, he or she has fluctuations in plasma levels similar to those from lot-to-lot of the brand reference levels and thus should make these generic products safely switchable without change in efficacy and safety outcomes.

  10. Varied effects of conventional antiepileptics on responding maintained by negative versus positive reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Celeste; Harvey, Mark T; May, Michael E; Valdovinos, Maria G; Patterson, Tina G; Couppis, Maria H; Kennedy, Craig H

    2008-02-27

    We analyzed the effects of four conventional antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) - carbamazepine (CBZ), ethosuximide (ETH), phenytoin (PHT), and valproate (VPA) - on operant behavior maintained by negative or positive reinforcement contingencies. Rats were trained to lever press on a free-operant avoidance schedule or variable-interval (VI) schedule of appetitive reinforcement. Dose-effect functions were separately established on each reinforcement contingency for CBZ (12.5-100 mg/kg), ETH (25-200 mg/kg), PHT (12.5-50 mg/kg), and VPA (50-400 mg/kg). CBZ and PHT reduced responding on free-operant avoidance and VI appetitive reinforcement tasks, with positively reinforced behavior reduced at lower drug dosages than negatively reinforced responding. ETH and VPA reduced responding on the VI appetitive reinforcement task, but did not alter behavior maintained on the free-operant avoidance schedule. Our results suggest that conventional AEDs vary in their effect on operant behavior, depending on the type of reinforcement process maintaining responding.

  11. Rapid HPLC analysis of the antiepileptic lamotrigine and its metabolites in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Saracino, Maria Addolorata; Bugamelli, Francesca; Conti, Matteo; Amore, Mario; Raggi, Maria Augusta

    2007-09-01

    A liquid chromatographic method with diode array detection (DAD) has been developed for the analysis of the antiepileptic agent lamotrigine (LTG) and its metabolites, lamotrigine 2-N-glucuronide and 2-N-methylated in plasma samples. The analytes were separated on a C8 RP column, using a mobile phase composed of methanol and a 0.45 mM, pH 3.5 phosphate buffer containing 0.17% triethylamine (24:76 v/v). Melatonin was used as the internal standard (IS). The DAD detector was set at 220 nm for the detection of all the analytes. A simple protein precipitation with methanol guaranteed high extraction yield values (>90%) and good purification from matrix interference. Good linearity was obtained in the 0.1-15.0 microg/mL range for LTG and lamotrigine 2-N-glucuronide and in the 0.1-2.0 microg/mL range for lamotrigine 2-N-methylated. The analytical method was validated in terms of precision, extraction yield, and accuracy. These assays gave RSD% values for precision always lower than 4.3% and mean accuracy higher than 80%. The method seems to be suitable for the analysis of plasma samples from patients treated with Lamictal.

  12. Effect of antiepileptic drugs on the postictal state. A critical overview.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Dieter

    2010-10-01

    Although postictal events contribute to seizure severity and thus affect quality of life, the effect of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on the postictal state is not well known. This review assesses the available evidence from randomized controlled trials on the effect of AEDs on postictal events. The instruments used in AED trials include postictal items of The Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale (LSSS) and Seizure Severity Scale (SSQ) and postictal recovery of electroencephalography (EEG) background activity. The effect of AEDs on postictal components of LSSS, if documented separately or at all, was either too small to be clinically significant (for lamotrigine) or not different from that of controls (topiramate, valproate). However, lacosamide showed improvement on the SSQ over placebo, and levetiracetam was associated with a speedier postictal recovery of EEG background activity compared with placebo. Although measuring the effect of AEDs on postictal state is of great clinical interest, the limited evidence found in this review suggests that further work is needed to evaluate current instruments used to assess AED-associated changes in postictal events.

  13. Solid Dispersion Approach Improving Dissolution Rate of Stiripentol: a Novel Antiepileptic Drug

    PubMed Central

    Afifi, Samar

    2015-01-01

    Some drugs have low bioavailability due to their poor aqueous solubility and/or slow dissolution rate in biological fluids. Stiripentol (STP) is a novel anticonvulsant drug that is structurally unrelated to the currently available antiepileptics. It has poor aqueous solubility and its solubility has to be enhanced accordingly. Polyethyleneglycol 6000 (PEG-6000) is commonly utilized as a hydrophilic carrier for poorly water soluble drugs in order to improve their bioavailability. STP and PEG-6000 binary system was obtained by physical mixture, solvent evaporation, co-evaporation and melting methods using different weight ratios. The properties of the prepared binary systems were evaluated using dissolution rate, phase solubility, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies. The FTIR spectroscopic studies showed the stability of STP and absence of STP-PEG-6000 interaction. The DSC and SEM studies indicated the amorphous state of STP in its binary systems with PEG-6000. Dissolution profile of STP was significantly improved via complexation with PEG-6000 as compared with the pure drug. The binary system which was prepared using melting method showed the highest dissolution rate. The promising results of the prepared binary systems open the avenue for further oral formulation of STP. PMID:26664367

  14. Solid Dispersion Approach Improving Dissolution Rate of Stiripentol: a Novel Antiepileptic Drug.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Samar

    2015-01-01

    Some drugs have low bioavailability due to their poor aqueous solubility and/or slow dissolution rate in biological fluids. Stiripentol (STP) is a novel anticonvulsant drug that is structurally unrelated to the currently available antiepileptics. It has poor aqueous solubility and its solubility has to be enhanced accordingly. Polyethyleneglycol 6000 (PEG-6000) is commonly utilized as a hydrophilic carrier for poorly water soluble drugs in order to improve their bioavailability. STP and PEG-6000 binary system was obtained by physical mixture, solvent evaporation, co-evaporation and melting methods using different weight ratios. The properties of the prepared binary systems were evaluated using dissolution rate, phase solubility, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies. The FTIR spectroscopic studies showed the stability of STP and absence of STP-PEG-6000 interaction. The DSC and SEM studies indicated the amorphous state of STP in its binary systems with PEG-6000. Dissolution profile of STP was significantly improved via complexation with PEG-6000 as compared with the pure drug. The binary system which was prepared using melting method showed the highest dissolution rate. The promising results of the prepared binary systems open the avenue for further oral formulation of STP.

  15. Several major antiepileptic drugs are substrates for human P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Luna-Tortós, Carlos; Fedrowitz, Maren; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2008-12-01

    One of the current hypotheses of pharmacoresistant epilepsy proposes that transport of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) by drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp) at the blood-brain barrier may play a significant role in pharmacoresistance in epilepsy by extruding AEDs from their intended site of action. However, several recent in vitro studies using cell lines that overexpress efflux transporters indicate that human Pgp may not transport AEDs to any relevant extent. In this respect it has to be considered that most AEDs are highly permeable, so that conventional bi-directional transport assays as used in these previous studies may fail to identify AEDs as Pgp substrates, particularly if these drugs are not high-affinity substrates for Pgp. In the present study, we used a modified transport assay that allows evaluating active transport independently of the passive permeability component. In this concentration equilibrium transport assay (CETA), the drug is initially added at identical concentration to both sides of a polarized, Pgp-overexpressing cell monolayer instead of applying the drug to either the apical or basolateral side for studying bi-directional transport. Direct comparison of the conventional bi-directional (concentration gradient) assay with the CETA, using MDR1-transfected LLC cells, demonstrated that CETA, but not the conventional assay, identified phenytoin and phenobarbital as substrates of human Pgp. Furthermore, directional transport was determined for lamotrigine and levetiracetam, but not carbamazepine. Transport of AEDs could be completely or partially (>50%) inhibited by the selective Pgp inhibitor, tariquidar. However, transport of phenobarbital and levetiracetam was also inhibited by MK571, which preferentially blocks transport by multidrug resistance transporters (MRPs), indicating that, in addition to Pgp, these AEDs are substrates of MRPs. The present study provides the first direct evidence that several AEDS are substrates of

  16. Lamotrigine, an antiepileptic drug, inhibits 5-HT3 receptor currents in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Jung; Jeun, Seung Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Lamotrigine is an antiepileptic drug widely used to treat epileptic seizures. Using whole-cell voltage clamp recordings in combination with a fast drug application approach, we investigated the effects of lamotrigine on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)3 receptors in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells. Co-application of lamotrigine (1~300 µM) resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in peak amplitude of currents induced by 3 µM of 5-HT for an IC50 value of 28.2±3.6 µM with a Hill coefficient of 1.2±0.1. These peak amplitude decreases were accompanied by the rise slope reduction. In addition, 5-HT3-mediated currents evoked by 1 mM dopamine, a partial 5-HT3 receptor agonist, were inhibited by lamotrigine co-application. The EC50 of 5-HT for 5-HT3 receptor currents were shifted to the right by co-application of lamotrigine without a significant change of maximal effect. Currents activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application in the presence of 1 min pretreatment of lamotrigine were similar to those activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application alone. Moreover, subsequent application of lamotrigine in the presence of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindole, known to attenuate 5-HT3 receptor desensitization, inhibited 5-HT3 receptor currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The deactivation of 5-HT3 receptor was delayed by washing with an external solution containing lamotrigine. Lamotrigine accelerated the desensitization process of 5-HT3 receptors. There was no voltage-dependency in the inhibitory effects of lamotrigine on the 5-HT3 receptor currents. These results indicate that lamotrigine inhibits 5-HT3-activated currents in a competitive manner by binding to the open state of the channels and blocking channel activation or accelerating receptor desensitization. PMID:28280410

  17. Antiepileptic drug teratogenesis: what are the risks for congenital malformations and adverse cognitive outcomes?

    PubMed

    Harden, Cynthia L

    2008-01-01

    Antiepileptic drug (AED) exposure in utero has been associated with major congenital malformations (MCMs) and adverse cognitive outcomes in the offspring of women with epilepsy (WWE). However, determining the exact risk and the relative risks of AEDs for these outcomes has been challenging, and only in recent years has improved study designs enabled us to get a clearer picture of the risks. Still, there is a startling lack of information for many of the newer and widely used AEDs. At this point of time, studies clearly show that valproate (VPA) as a part of polytherapy or when used as a monotherapy is associated with an increased risk of MCMs, and that it poses about threefold the risk of carbamazepine (CBZ). It is unclear if any other AEDs studied pose an increased risk of MCM occurrence; in the best available large study the absolute rates of MCMs with other several other AEDs were not different from untreated WWE. The absolute risks have been reported as CBZ 2.2%, lamotrigine (LTG) 3.2%, phenytoin (PHT) 3.7%, untreated WWE 3.5%, with VPA as the outlier at 6.2%. In utero VPA exposure is also associated with a risk of lower verbal intelligence quotient (IQ) in children, at approximately 10 points lower than controls. CBZ appears to pose no risk to cognitive outcome, and there is some evidence that PHT and phenobarbital (PB) may be associated with risk of reduced cognitive outcome. Polytherapy is associated with greater risk than monotherapy for both MCMs and cognitive outcome. Although more information is needed and hopefully will be obtained from ongoing prospective studies, it is clear that WWE taking VPA and planning pregnancy should have a discussion with their physician about considering changing to another AED before pregnancy, if possible.

  18. Antiepileptic drug treatment of rolandic epilepsy and Panayiotopoulos syndrome: clinical practice survey and clinical trial feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Mellish, Louise C; Dunkley, Colin; Ferrie, Colin D; Pal, Deb K

    2015-01-01

    Background The evidence base for management of childhood epilepsy is poor, especially for the most common specific syndromes such as rolandic epilepsy (RE) and Panayiotopoulos syndrome (PS). Considerable international variation in management and controversy about non-treatment indicate the need for high quality randomised controlled trials (RCT). The aim of this study is, therefore, to describe current UK practice and explore the feasibility of different RCT designs for RE and PS. Methods We conducted an online survey of 590 UK paediatricians who treat epilepsy. Thirty-two questions covered annual caseload, investigation and management practice, factors influencing treatment, antiepileptic drug preferences and hypothetical trial design preferences. Results 132 responded (22%): 81% were paediatricians and 95% at consultant seniority. We estimated, annually, 751 new RE cases and 233 PS cases. Electroencephalography (EEG) is requested at least half the time in approximately 70% of cases; MRI brain at least half the time in 40%–65% cases and neuropsychological evaluation in 7%–8%. Clinicians reported non-treatment in 40%: main reasons were low frequency of seizures and parent/child preferences. Carbamazepine is the preferred older, and levetiracetam the preferred newer, RCT arm. Approximately one-half considered active and placebo designs acceptable, choosing seizures as primary and cognitive/behavioural measures as secondary outcomes. Conclusions Management among respondents is broadly in line with national guidance, although with possible overuse of brain imaging and underuse of EEG and neuropsychological assessments. A large proportion of patients in the UK remains untreated, and clinicians seem amenable to a range of RCT designs, with carbamazepine and levetiracetam the preferred active drugs. PMID:25202134

  19. Inhibition of the enzyme, GABA-aminotransferase in human platelets by vigabatrin, a potential antiepileptic drug.

    PubMed Central

    Rimmer, E; Kongola, G; Richens, A

    1988-01-01

    1. The effect of the new antiepileptic drug, vigabatrin (gamma-vinyl GABA), on the platelet enzyme, GABA-aminotransferase (GABA-T) was investigated in volunteers and patients. Platelets GABA-T activity was assayed using a radioenzymic method. 2. Three single oral doses of vigabatrin (1 g, 2 g and 4 g) were given to six healthy male volunteers in an open randomised cross over study and compared with a baseline period preceding the three treatments. 3. Significant inhibition of the platelet GABA-T was produced by treatment with all three doses and a dose-response relationship was demonstrated. The minimum enzyme activities after 1 g, 2 g and 4 g doses were 43%, 30% and 21% respectively compared with the control values. 4. A significant depression of enzyme activity occurred at 30 min after drug administration and the values remained below control values for 72 h post-dose, outlasting the presence of the drug itself in the plasma. 5. Eight patients with chronic refractory epilepsy were treated with vigabatrin for 6 weeks. After taking the 2 g daily dose for 1 week there was a marked reduction in platelet enzyme activity in all subjects but the enzyme inhibition produced by the 3 g dose was not significantly different from that produced by the 2 g dose, even after 4 weeks treatment with the larger dose. The mean enzyme activity was approximately 30% throughout the active treatment period. One week after stopping vigabatrin, the enzyme levels were not significantly different from the baseline values.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3358887

  20. New generation antiepileptic drugs: what do they offer in terms of improved tolerability and safety?

    PubMed Central

    Gazzola, Deana M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last two decades a total of 11 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been introduced to the US market. Randomized, placebo-controlled trials have yielded information about each drug’s efficacy, tolerability, and safety profile; however, few studies have compared the newer generation AEDs directly with the older generation. Comparative studies are not always straightforward in their interpretation, as many characteristics of drugs, both favorable and unfavorable, may not be highlighted by such studies. In general, findings from the literature suggest that the newer generation AEDs (including vigabatrin, felbamate, gabapentin, lamotrigine, tiagabine, topiramate, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, zonisamide, pregabalin, rufinamide, and lacosamide) enjoy both improved tolerability and safety compared with older agents such as phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine, and valproate. This is partially supported by some of the findings of the QSS and the TTA Committee of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), whose review of four AEDs (gabapentin, lamotrigine, topiramate, and tiagabine) is discussed. Briefly, when compared with carbamazepine, lamotrigine was better tolerated; topiramate adverse events (AEs) were fairly comparable to carbamazepine and valproate; and tiagabine compared with placebo was associated with a higher discontinuation rate due to AEs. The findings of the SANAD trial are also presented; when administered to patients with partial epilepsy, carbamazepine was most likely to fail due to AEs, and lamotrigine and gabapentin were least likely to fail due to AEs. When administered to patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy, topiramate was most frequently associated with AE-related discontinuation, followed by valproate; and while valproate was the most efficacious drug in this arm of the study, lamotrigine was more tolerable. What makes the SANAD study valuable and somewhat unique is its head-to-head comparison of one drug with another. Such

  1. Effects of antiepileptic drugs on associative LTP-like plasticity in human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Tonio; Krakow, Karsten; Ziemann, Ulf

    2010-10-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used extensively in clinical practice but relatively little is known on their specific effects at the systems level of human cortex. Here we tested, using a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled crossover design in healthy subjects, the effects of a single therapeutic oral dose of seven AEDs with different modes of action (tiagabine, diazepam, gabapentin, lamotrigine, topiramate, levetiracetam and piracetam) on long-term potentiation (LTP)-like motor cortical plasticity induced by paired associative transcranial magnetic stimulation (PAS). PAS-induced LTP-like plasticity was assessed from the increase in motor evoked potential amplitude in a hand muscle contralateral to the stimulated motor cortex. Levetiracetam significantly reduced LTP-like plasticity when compared to the placebo condition. Tiagabine, diazepam, lamotrigine and piracetam resulted in nonsignificant trends towards reduction of LTP-like plasticity while gabapentin and topiramate had no effect. The particularly depressant effect of levetiracetam is probably explained by its unique mode of action through binding at the vesicle membrane protein SV2A. Enhancement of gamma-amino butyric acid-dependent cortical inhibition by tiagabine, diazepam and possibly levetiracetam, and blockage of voltage-gated sodium channels by lamotrigine, may also depress PAS-induced LTP-like plasticity but these mechanisms appear to be less relevant. Findings may inform about AED-related adverse effects on important LTP-dependent central nervous systems processes such as learning or memory formation. The particular depressant effect of levetiracetam on LTP-like plasticity may also relate to the unique properties of this drug to inhibit epileptogenesis, a potentially LTP-associated process.

  2. Antiepileptic drugs prescribed in pregnancy and prevalence of major congenital malformations: comparative prevalence studies

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Irene; Collings, Shuk-Li; McCrea, Rachel L; Nazareth, Irwin; Osborn, David P; Cowen, Phil J; Sammon, Cormac J

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of major congenital malformations associated with antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment in pregnancy. Patients and methods Using data from The Health Improvement Network, we identified women who have given live birth and their offspring. Four subgroups were selected based on the AED treatment in early pregnancy, valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine and women not receiving AED treatment. We compared the prevalence of major congenital malformations within children of these four groups and estimated prevalence ratios (PRs) using Poisson regression adjusted for maternal age, sex of child, quintiles of Townsend deprivation score and indication for treatment. Results In total, 240,071 women were included in the study. A total of 229 women were prescribed valproate in pregnancy, 357 were prescribed lamotrigine and 334 were prescribed carbamazepine and 239,151 women were not prescribed AEDs. Fifteen out of 229 (6.6%) women prescribed valproate gave birth to a child with a major congenital malformation. The figures for lamotrigine, carbamazepine and women not prescribed AEDs were 2.7%, 3.3% and 2.2%, respectively. The prevalence of major congenital malformation was similar for women prescribed lamotrigine or carbamazepine compared to women with no AED treatment in pregnancy. For women prescribed valproate in polytherapy, the prevalence was fourfold higher. After adjustments, the effect of estimates attenuated, but the prevalence remained two- to threefold higher in women prescribed valproate. Conclusion The results of our study suggest that lamotrigine and carbamazepine are safer treatment options than valproate in pregnancy and should be considered as alternative treatment options for women of childbearing potential and in pregnancy. PMID:28243149

  3. Early pediatric antiepileptic drug nonadherence is related to lower long-term seizure freedom

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, Joseph R.; Glauser, Tracy A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between previously identified nonadherence trajectories during the first 6 months of antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy and long-term seizure-free rates (defined as ≥1 year of seizure freedom at the 4 years postdiagnosis milestone) in a cohort of children with newly diagnosed epilepsy. Methods: A prospective longitudinal observational study of AED adherence and seizure freedom in a consecutive cohort of 124 children (ages 2–12 years) with newly diagnosed epilepsy was conducted. The association between previously identified AED adherence trajectories (i.e., near-perfect adherence [e.g., average adherence = 96.8%] vs nonadherent) and seizure freedom for ≥1 year at the 4 years postdiagnosis milestone was determined. Results: Children who exhibited nonadherence to AED therapy in the first 6 months of treatment were 3.24 times more likely not to have achieved ≥1 year of seizure freedom at the 4 years postdiagnosis milestone compared to children in the near-perfect adherence group (χ2 = 5.13; p = 0.02). Specifically, at the 4 years postdiagnosis milestone, only 12% of children in the near-perfect adherence group were continuing to experience seizures compared to 31% of children in the nonadherent group. Conclusions: Children with epilepsy who achieved near-perfect adherence during the first 6 months of therapy experienced a higher rate of seizure freedom 4 years postdiagnosis compared with those children who demonstrated early nonadherence. This suggests that adherence intervention early in the course of treatment could play a role in improving long-term seizure freedom rates in children with epilepsy. PMID:24463625

  4. Lamotrigine, an antiepileptic drug, inhibits 5-HT3 receptor currents in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Jung; Jeun, Seung Hyun; Sung, Ki-Wug

    2017-03-01

    Lamotrigine is an antiepileptic drug widely used to treat epileptic seizures. Using whole-cell voltage clamp recordings in combination with a fast drug application approach, we investigated the effects of lamotrigine on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)3 receptors in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells. Co-application of lamotrigine (1~300 µM) resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in peak amplitude of currents induced by 3 µM of 5-HT for an IC50 value of 28.2±3.6 µM with a Hill coefficient of 1.2±0.1. These peak amplitude decreases were accompanied by the rise slope reduction. In addition, 5-HT3-mediated currents evoked by 1 mM dopamine, a partial 5-HT3 receptor agonist, were inhibited by lamotrigine co-application. The EC50 of 5-HT for 5-HT3 receptor currents were shifted to the right by co-application of lamotrigine without a significant change of maximal effect. Currents activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application in the presence of 1 min pretreatment of lamotrigine were similar to those activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application alone. Moreover, subsequent application of lamotrigine in the presence of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindole, known to attenuate 5-HT3 receptor desensitization, inhibited 5-HT3 receptor currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The deactivation of 5-HT3 receptor was delayed by washing with an external solution containing lamotrigine. Lamotrigine accelerated the desensitization process of 5-HT3 receptors. There was no voltage-dependency in the inhibitory effects of lamotrigine on the 5-HT3 receptor currents. These results indicate that lamotrigine inhibits 5-HT3-activated currents in a competitive manner by binding to the open state of the channels and blocking channel activation or accelerating receptor desensitization.

  5. Discontinuing antiepileptic drugs in patients who are seizure free on monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Specchio, L; Tramacere, L; La Neve, A; Beghi, E

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the recurrence rate of epilepsy attributable to discontinuation of treatment in seizure free patients and to identify the risk factors for recurrence. Methods: 330 patients referred to an epilepsy centre who were seizure free for at least 2 years while on stable monotherapy were the study population. Discontinuation of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) was proposed to all eligible patients or to their carers after discussion of the risks and benefits. Depending on whether they accepted or refused treatment withdrawal, the patients were stratified into two cohorts and followed up until seizure relapse or 31 March 1999, whichever came first. For each patient, records were taken of the main demographic and clinical variables. Results: The sample comprised 225 patients who entered the discontinuation programme and 105 who decided to continue treatment. Twenty nine patients (28%) continuing treatment had a relapse, compared with 113 (50%) of those entering the withdrawal programme. For patients continuing treatment, the probability of remission was 95% at 6 months, 91% at 12 months, 82% at 24 months, 80% at 36 months, and 68% at 60 months. The corresponding values for patients discontinuing treatment were 88%, 74%, 57%, 51%, and 48%. After adjusting for the principal prognostic factors, in patients discontinuing AEDs the risk of seizure relapse was 2.9 times that of patients continuing treatment. A relation was also found between relapse and duration of active disease, number of years of remission while on treatment, and abnormal psychiatric findings. Conclusions: Seizure free referral patients on stable monotherapy who elect to withdraw drug treatment are at higher risk of seizure relapse compared with patients continuing treatment. Severity of disease and seizure free period are significant prognostic factors. PMID:11784819

  6. Comparative study of lacosamide and classical sodium channel blocking antiepileptic drugs on sodium channel slow inactivation.

    PubMed

    Niespodziany, Isabelle; Leclère, Nathalie; Vandenplas, Catherine; Foerch, Patrik; Wolff, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Many antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exert their therapeutic activity by modifying the inactivation properties of voltage-gated sodium (Na(v) ) channels. Lacosamide is unique among AEDs in that it selectively enhances the slow inactivation component. Although numerous studies have investigated the effects of AEDs on Na(v) channel inactivation, a direct comparison of results cannot be made because of varying experimental conditions. In this study, the effects of different AEDs on Na(v) channel steady-state slow inactivation were investigated under identical experimental conditions using whole-cell patch-clamp in N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. All drugs were tested at 100 μM, and results were compared with those from time-matched control groups. Lacosamide significantly shifted the voltage dependence of Na(v) current (I(Na) ) slow inactivation toward more hyperpolarized potentials (by -33 ± 7 mV), whereas the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels and the curve slope did not differ significantly. Neither SPM6953 (lacosamide inactive enantiomer), nor carbamazepine, nor zonisamide affected the voltage dependence of I(Na) slow inactivation, the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels, or the curve slope. Phenytoin significantly increased the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels (by 28% ± 9%) in a voltage-independent manner but did not affect the curve slope. Lamotrigine slightly increased the fraction of inactivated currents (by 15% ± 4%) and widened the range of the slow inactivation voltage dependence. Lamotrigine and rufinamide induced weak, but significant, shifts of I(Na) slow inactivation toward more depolarized potentials. The effects of lacosamide on Na(v) channel slow inactivation corroborate previous observations that lacosamide has a unique mode of action among AEDs that act on Na(v) channels.

  7. Developmental Enamel Defects in Children Prenatally Exposed to Anti-Epileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Pernille E.; Henriksen, Tine B.; Haubek, Dorte; Østergaard, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Some anti-epileptic drugs (AED) have well-known teratogenic effects. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the effect of prenatal exposure to AED and the risk of enamel defects in the primary and permanent dentition. Methods A total of 38 exposed and 129 non-exposed children, 6–10 years of age, were recruited from the Aarhus Birth Cohort and the Department of Neurology, Viborg Regional Hospital, Denmark. Medication during pregnancy was confirmed by the Danish Prescription Database. All children had their teeth examined and outcomes in terms of enamel opacities and enamel hypoplasia were recorded. Results Children prenatally exposed to AED have an increased prevalence of enamel hypoplasia (11% vs. 4%, odds ratio (OR) = 3.6 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.9 to 15.4]), diffuse opacities (18% vs. 7%, OR = 3.0; [95% CI: 1.0 to 8.7, p<0.05]), and numerous (>3) white opacities (18% vs. 10%, OR = 2.2; [95% CI: 0.8 to 6.1]) in the primary dentition. In the permanent dentition, an increased risk of numerous (>3) white opacities (34% vs. 12%, OR = 3.3; [95% CI: 1.3 to 8.4]) was found. Conclusions The present study shows that children prenatally exposed to AED have an increased risk of developing numerous teeth with white opacities in their primary and permanent dentition. In addition, they also have an increased risk of developing diffuse opacities and enamel hypoplasia in their primary teeth. PMID:23520494

  8. Valproic acid inhibits the invasion of PC3 prostate cancer cells by upregulating the metastasis suppressor protein NDRG1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Eun; Kim, Jung Hwa

    2015-12-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a clinically available histone deacetylase inhibitor with promising anticancer attributes. Recent studies have demonstrated the anticancer effects of VPA on prostate cancer cells. However, little is known about the differential effects of VPA between metastatic and non-metastatic prostate cancer cells and the relationship between the expression of metastasis suppressor proteins and VPA. In the present study, we demonstrate that inhibition of cell viability and invasion by VPA was more effective in the metastatic prostate cancer cell line PC3 than in the tumorigenic but non-metastatic prostate cell line, RWPE2. Further, we identified that the metastasis suppressor NDRG1 is upregulated in PC3 by VPA treatment. In contrast, NDRG1 was not increased in RWPE2 cells. Also, the suppressed invasion of PC3 cells by VPA treatment was relieved by NDRG1 knockdown. Taken together, we suggest that the anticancer effect of VPA on prostate cancer cells is, in part, mediated through upregulation of NDRG1. We also conclude that VPA has differential effects on the metastasis suppressor gene and invasion ability between non-metastatic and metastatic prostate cancer cells.

  9. Treadmill exercise ameliorates motor dysfunction through inhibition of Purkinje cell loss in cerebellum of valproic acid-induced autistic rats

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Han-Sam; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Park, Hye-Sang; Shin, Mal-Soon; Baek, Seung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a complex developmental disorder with impairments in social interaction, communication, repetitive behavior and motor skills. Exercise enhances cognitive function, ameliorates motor dysfunction, and provides protective profits against neurodegeneration. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of treadmill exercise on the motor coordination and Purkinje cell loss in relation with reactive astrocytes and microglial activation in the cerebellum using valproic acid (VPA)-induced autism rat model. On the 12th day of pregnancy, the pregnant rats in the VPA-exposed group received intraperitoneal injections of 600-mg/kg VPA. After birth, the rat pups were divided into four groups: the control group, the exercise group, the VPA-treated group, the VPA-treated and exercise group. The rat pups in the exercise groups were forced to run on a treadmill for 30 min once a day, 5 times a week for 4 weeks. In the present results, motor balance and coordination was disturbed by induction of autism, in contrast, treadmill exercise alleviated motor dysfunction in the autistic rats. Purkinje cell loss, reactive astrocytes, and microglial activation were occurred by induction of autism, in contrast, treadmill exercise enhanced survival rate of Purkinje neurons through inhibition of reactive astrocytes and microglia in the autistic rats. The present study showed that exercise may provide a potential therapeutic strategy for the alleviation of motor dysfunction in autistic patients. PMID:27656625

  10. In vivo effects of naproxen, salicylic acid, and valproic acid on the pharmacokinetics of trichloroethylene and metabolites in rats.

    PubMed

    Rouhou, Mouna Cheikh; Charest-Tardif, Ginette; Haddad, Sami

    2015-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that some drugs modulate in vitro metabolism of trichloroethylene (TCE) in humans and rats. The objective was to assess in vivo interactions between TCE and three drugs: naproxen (NA), valproic acid (VA), and salicylic acid (SA). Animals were exposed to TCE by inhalation (50 ppm for 6 h) and administered a bolus dose of drug by gavage, equivalent to 10-fold greater than the recommended daily dose. Samples of blood, urine, and collected tissues were analyzed by headspace gas chromatography coupled to an electron capture detector for TCE and metabolites (trichloroethanol [TCOH] and trichloroacetate [TCA]) levels. Coexposure to NA and TCE significantly increased (up to 50%) total and free TCOH (TCOHtotal and TCOHfree, respectively) in blood. This modulation may be explained by an inhibition of glucuronidation. VA significantly elevated TCE levels in blood (up to 50%) with a marked effect on TCOHtotal excretion in urine but not in blood. In contrast, SA produced an increase in TCOHtotal levels in blood at 30, 60, and 90 min and urine after coexposure. Data confirm in vitro observations that NA, VA, and SA affect in vivo TCE kinetics. Future efforts need to be directed to evaluate whether populations chronically medicated with the considered drugs display greater health risks related to TCE exposure.

  11. Seizure-induced reduction in PIP3 levels contributes to seizure-activity and is rescued by valproic acid☆

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pishan; Walker, Matthew C.; Williams, Robin S.B.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (3–5) trisphosphate (PIP3) is a central regulator of diverse neuronal functions that are critical for seizure progression, however its role in seizures is unclear. We have recently hypothesised that valproic acid (VPA), one of the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of epilepsy, may target PIP3 signalling as a therapeutic mode of action. Here, we show that seizure induction using kainic acid in a rat in vivo epilepsy model resulted in a decrease in hippocampal PIP3 levels and reduced protein kinase B (PKB/AKT) phosphorylation, measured using ELISA mass assays and Western blot analysis, and both changes were restored following VPA treatment. These finding were reproduced in cultured rat hippocampal primary neurons and entorhinal cortex–hippocampal slices during exposure to the GABA(A) receptor antagonist pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), which is widely used to generate seizures and seizure-like (paroxysmal) activity. Moreover, VPA's effect on paroxysmal activity in the PTZ slice model is blocked by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibition or PIP2 sequestration by neomycin, indicating that VPA's efficacy is dependent upon PIP3 signalling. PIP3 depletion following PTZ treatment may also provide a positive feedback loop, since enhancing PIP3 depletion increases, and conversely, reducing PIP3 dephosphorylation reduces paroxysmal activity and this effect is dependent upon AMPA receptor activation. Our results therefore indicate that PIP3 depletion occurs with seizure activity, and that VPA functions to reverse these effects, providing a novel mechanism for VPA in epilepsy treatment. PMID:24148856

  12. Early Behavioral Abnormalities and Perinatal Alterations of PTEN/AKT Pathway in Valproic Acid Autism Model Mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Eun-Jeong; Ahn, Sangzin; Lee, Kihwan; Mahmood, Usman; Kim, Hye-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to valproic acid (VPA) during pregnancy has been linked with increased incidence of autism, and has repeatedly been demonstrated as a useful autism mouse model. We examined the early behavioral and anatomical changes as well as molecular changes in mice prenatally exposed to VPA (VPA mice). In this study, we first showed that VPA mice showed developmental delays as assessed with self-righting, eye opening tests and impaired social recognition. In addition, we provide the first evidence that primary cultured neurons from VPA-treated embryos present an increase in dendritic spines, compared with those from control mice. Mutations in phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene are also known to be associated with autism, and mice with PTEN knockout show autistic characteristics. Protein expression of PTEN was decreased and the ratio of p-AKT/AKT was increased in the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus, and a distinctive anatomical change in the CA1 region of the hippocampus was observed. Taken together, our study suggests that prenatal exposure to VPA induces developmental delays and neuroanatomical changes via the reduction of PTEN level and these changes were detectable in the early days of life.

  13. Valproic acid reduces insulin-resistance, fat deposition and FOXO1-mediated gluconeogenesis in type-2 diabetic rat.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sabbir; Kumar, Sandeep; Jena, Gopabandhu

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidences highlighted the role of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in insulin-resistance, gluconeogenesis and islet function. HDACs can modulate the expression of various genes, which directly or indirectly affect glucose metabolism. This study was aimed to evaluate the role of valproic acid (VPA) on fat deposition, insulin-resistance and gluconeogenesis in type-2 diabetic rat. Diabetes was developed in Sprague-Dawley rats by the combination of high-fat diet and low dose streptozotocin. VPA at the doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg/day and metformin (positive control) 150 mg/kg twice daily for 10 weeks were administered by oral gavage. Insulin-resistance, dyslipidemia and glycemia were evaluated by biochemical estimations, while fat accumulation and structural alteration were assessed by histopathology. Protein expression and insulin signaling were evaluated by western blot and immunohistochemistry. VPA treatment significantly reduced the plasma glucose, HbA1c, insulin-resistance, fat deposition in brown adipose tissue, white adipose tissue and liver, which are comparable to metformin treatment. Further, VPA inhibited the gluconeogenesis and glucagon expression as well as restored the histopathological alterations in pancreas and liver. Our findings provide new insights on the anti-diabetic role of VPA in type-2 diabetes mellitus by the modulation of insulin signaling and forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1)-mediated gluconeogenesis. Since VPA is a well established clinical drug, the detailed molecular mechanisms of the present findings can be further investigated for possible clinical use.

  14. Synergistic combination of valproic acid and oncolytic parvovirus H-1PV as a potential therapy against cervical and pancreatic carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Li, Junwei; Bonifati, Serena; Hristov, Georgi; Marttila, Tiina; Valmary-Degano, Séverine; Stanzel, Sven; Schnölzer, Martina; Mougin, Christiane; Aprahamian, Marc; Grekova, Svitlana P; Raykov, Zahari; Rommelaere, Jean; Marchini, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    The rat parvovirus H-1PV has oncolytic and tumour-suppressive properties potentially exploitable in cancer therapy. This possibility is being explored and results are encouraging, but it is necessary to improve the oncotoxicity of the virus. Here we show that this can be achieved by co-treating cancer cells with H-1PV and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) such as valproic acid (VPA). We demonstrate that these agents act synergistically to kill a range of human cervical carcinoma and pancreatic carcinoma cell lines by inducing oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis. Strikingly, in rat and mouse xenograft models, H-1PV/VPA co-treatment strongly inhibits tumour growth promoting complete tumour remission in all co-treated animals. At the molecular level, we found acetylation of the parvovirus nonstructural protein NS1 at residues K85 and K257 to modulate NS1-mediated transcription and cytotoxicity, both of which are enhanced by VPA treatment. These results warrant clinical evaluation of H-1PV/VPA co-treatment against cervical and pancreatic ductal carcinomas.

  15. Valproic acid may exerts its cytotoxic effect through rassf1a expression induction in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Davood, Zare-Abdollahi; Shamsi, Safari; Ghaedi, Hamid; Sahand, Riazi-Isfahani; Mojtaba, Ghadyani; Mahdi, Tabarraee; Reza, Mirfakhraie; Ebrahimi, Mohammad Javad; Miri-Moosavi, Reyhaneh Sadat; Boosaliki, Sara; Davood, Omrani Mir

    2016-08-01

    In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), despite the acceptance of standard intensive chemotherapy as an optimal induction regimen for all age groups, in the elderly patients, the best treatment should meet the challenge of multiple factors like age, comorbidities, and cytogenetics, making them ineligible for standard induction chemotherapy. Using the current low-intensity therapies like decitabine, azacitidine, and low-dose cytarabine as a single arm, outcomes for these patients remain poor. As a histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) exhibit anticancer activity by triggering apoptosis, the mechanism of which is not yet completely clarified. To explore the possible connection between VPA treatment and the Hippo pathway as an apoptosis stimulating route, we also explore the expression of major components of this pathway and for the first time we postulate a relationship between VPA treatment and cell death induction through RASSF1A expression induction. Furthermore, we demonstrate that autophagy inhibition by chloroquine (CQ) significantly augmented the cytotoxic effect of VPA on AML cells, especially in those with unfavorable and normal karyotype. Regarding that VPA and CQ are well-tolerated drugs and our presumptive results of usefulness of VPA + CQ in three cytogenetic risk groups of AML, this combinatorial therapy could represent an attractive treatment option for older AML patients unfit for intensive therapy.

  16. Targeting anandamide metabolism rescues core and associated autistic-like symptoms in rats prenatally exposed to valproic acid

    PubMed Central

    Servadio, M; Melancia, F; Manduca, A; di Masi, A; Schiavi, S; Cartocci, V; Pallottini, V; Campolongo, P; Ascenzi, P; Trezza, V

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by altered sociability, compromised communication and stereotyped/repetitive behaviors, for which no specific treatments are currently available. Prenatal exposure to valproic acid (VPA) is a known, although still underestimated, environmental risk factor for ASD. Altered endocannabinoid activity has been observed in autistic patients, and endocannabinoids are known to modulate behavioral traits that are typically affected in ASD. On this basis, we tested the hypothesis that changes in the endocannabinoid tone contribute to the altered phenotype induced by prenatal VPA exposure in rats, with focus on behavioral features that resemble the core and associated symptoms of ASD. In the course of development, VPA-exposed rats showed early deficits in social communication and discrimination, compromised sociability and social play behavior, stereotypies and increased anxiety, thus providing preclinical proof of the long-lasting deleterious effects induced by prenatal VPA exposure. At the neurochemical level, VPA-exposed rats displayed altered phosphorylation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in different brain areas, associated with changes in anandamide metabolism from infancy to adulthood. Interestingly, enhancing anandamide signaling through inhibition of its degradation rescued the behavioral deficits displayed by VPA-exposed rats at infancy, adolescence and adulthood. This study therefore shows that abnormalities in anandamide activity may underlie the deleterious impact of environmental risk factors on ASD-relevant behaviors and that the endocannabinoid system may represent a therapeutic target for the core and associated symptoms displayed by autistic patients. PMID:27676443

  17. Early Behavioral Abnormalities and Perinatal Alterations of PTEN/AKT Pathway in Valproic Acid Autism Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Eun-Jeong; Ahn, Sangzin; Lee, Kihwan; Mahmood, Usman; Kim, Hye-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to valproic acid (VPA) during pregnancy has been linked with increased incidence of autism, and has repeatedly been demonstrated as a useful autism mouse model. We examined the early behavioral and anatomical changes as well as molecular changes in mice prenatally exposed to VPA (VPA mice). In this study, we first showed that VPA mice showed developmental delays as assessed with self-righting, eye opening tests and impaired social recognition. In addition, we provide the first evidence that primary cultured neurons from VPA-treated embryos present an increase in dendritic spines, compared with those from control mice. Mutations in phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene are also known to be associated with autism, and mice with PTEN knockout show autistic characteristics. Protein expression of PTEN was decreased and the ratio of p-AKT/AKT was increased in the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus, and a distinctive anatomical change in the CA1 region of the hippocampus was observed. Taken together, our study suggests that prenatal exposure to VPA induces developmental delays and neuroanatomical changes via the reduction of PTEN level and these changes were detectable in the early days of life. PMID:27071011

  18. Birth of Cloned Microminipigs Derived from Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryos That Have Been Transiently Treated with Valproic Acid.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Kazuchika; Kawaguchi, Hiroaki; Maeda, Kosuke; Sato, Masahiro; Akioka, Kohei; Noguchi, Michiko; Horiuchi, Masahisa; Tanimoto, Akihide

    2016-11-01

    In our previous study, we found that treatment of miniature pig somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos with 4 mM valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, for 48 hours after activation enhanced blastocyst formation rate and octamer-binding transcription factor-3/4 (Oct-3/4) gene expression at the late blastocyst stage; however, the production of viable cloned pups failed, when those VPA-treated SCNT embryos were transferred to recipients. This failure suggests that the present VPA treatment is suboptimal. In the present study, we explored the optimal conditions for VPA to have beneficial effects on the development of SCNT embryos. When miniature pig SCNT embryos were treated with 8 mM VPA for 24 hours after activation, both the rates of blastocyst formation and blastocysts expressing the Oct-3/4 gene were significantly (p < 0.05) improved. A similar increase in blastocyst formation was also observed when microminipig-derived cells were used as SCNT donors. Five cloned piglets were obtained after the transfer of 152 microminipig SCNT embryos that had been treated with 8 mM VPA for 24 hours. The results indicated that a short duration of treatment with VPA improves the development of both miniature pig and microminipig SCNT embryos, possibly via an enhanced reprogramming mechanism.

  19. Large amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) prodrugs of valproic acid: new prodrug design ideas for central nervous system delivery.

    PubMed

    Peura, Lauri; Malmioja, Kalle; Laine, Krista; Leppänen, Jukka; Gynther, Mikko; Isotalo, Antti; Rautio, Jarkko

    2011-10-03

    Central nervous system (CNS) drug delivery is a major challenge in drug development because the blood-brain barrier (BBB) efficiently restricts the entry of drug molecules into the CNS at sufficient amounts. The brain uptake of poorly penetrating drugs could be improved by utilizing the transporters at the BBB with a prodrug approach. In this study, we designed four phenylalanine derivatives of valproic acid and studied their ability to utilize a large amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) in CNS delivery with an aim to show that the meta-substituted phenylalanine prodrugs bind to LAT1 with a higher affinity compared with the affinity of the para-substituted derivatives. All of the prodrugs crossed the BBB carrier mediatedly via LAT1 in in situ rat brain perfusion. For the first time, we introduced a novel meta-substituted phenylalanine analogue promoiety which improved the LAT1 affinity 10-fold and more importantly the rat brain uptake of the prodrug 2-fold compared with those of the para-substituted derivatives. Therefore, we have characterized a new prodrug design idea for CNS drug delivery utilizing a transporter-mediated prodrug approach.

  20. Anticancer effects of valproic acid on oral squamous cell carcinoma via SUMOylation in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Zhijian; Sun, Yang; Ruan, Hong; Cheng, Yong; Ding, Xiaojun; Yu, Youcheng

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant histone deacetylase (HDAC) has a key role in the neoplastic process associated with the epigenetic patterns of tumor-related genes. The present study was performed to investigate the effects and determine the mechanism of action of the HDAC inhibitor, valproic acid (VPA), on the CAL27 cell line derived from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The effects of VPA on the viability of CAL27 cells were investigated using MTT assays. Alterations in the cell cycle and apoptosis were also examined using propidium iodide (PI) and Annexin V-PI assays, and were subequently analyzed by flow cytometry. Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO)-related genes were evaluated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. In addition, the effects of VPA were assessed using a xenograft model in vivo. The present results demonstrated significant dose-dependent inhibition of cell viability following VPA treatment. Treatment with VPA increased the distribution of CAL27 cells in the G1 phase and reduced cells in the S phase, and significantly increased the expression levels of SUMO1 and SUMO2 (P<0.01). Using a xenograft model, the mean tumor volume in VPA-treated animals was demonstrated to be significantly reduced, and the rate of apoptosis was significantly increased, as compared with the control animals. These results suggested that VPA may regulate SUMOylation, producing an anticancer effect in vivo. Further investigation into the role of VPA in tumorigenesis may identify novel therapeutic targets for OSCC. PMID:28101176

  1. Influence of Ivabradine on the Anticonvulsant Action of Four Classical Antiepileptic Drugs Against Maximal Electroshock-Induced Seizures in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sawicka, Katarzyna M; Wawryniuk, Agnieszka; Zwolak, Agnieszka; Daniluk, Jadwiga; Szpringer, Monika; Florek-Luszczki, Magdalena; Drop, Bartlomiej; Zolkowska, Dorota; Luszczki, Jarogniew J

    2017-01-12

    Although the role of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission is still unclear, it is postulated that the HCN channels may be involved in seizure activity. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of ivabradine (an HCN channel inhibitor) on the protective action of four classical antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin and valproate) against maximal electroshock-induced seizures in mice. Tonic seizures (maximal electroconvulsions) were evoked in adult male albino Swiss mice by an electric current (sine-wave, 25 mA, 0.2 s stimulus duration) delivered via auricular electrodes. Acute adverse-effect profiles of the combinations of ivabradine with classical antiepileptic drugs were measured in mice along with total brain antiepileptic drug concentrations. Results indicate that ivabradine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly enhanced the anticonvulsant activity of valproate and considerably reduced that of phenytoin in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model. Ivabradine (10 mg/kg) had no impact on the anticonvulsant potency of carbamazepine and phenobarbital in the maximal electroshock-induced seizure test in mice. Ivabradine (10 mg/kg) significantly diminished total brain concentration of phenytoin and had no effect on total brain valproate concentration in mice. In conclusion, the enhanced anticonvulsant action of valproate by ivabradine in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model was pharmacodynamic in nature. A special attention is required when combining ivabradine with phenytoin due to a pharmacokinetic interaction and reduction of the anticonvulsant action of phenytoin in mice. The combinations of ivabradine with carbamazepine and phenobarbital were neutral from a preclinical viewpoint.

  2. The novel antiepileptic drug imepitoin compares favourably to other GABA-mimetic drugs in a seizure threshold model in mice and dogs.

    PubMed

    Löscher, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Katrin; Twele, Friederike; Potschka, Heidrun; Töllner, Kathrin

    2013-11-01

    Recently, the imidazolinone derivative imepitoin has been approved for treatment of canine epilepsy. Imepitoin acts as a low-affinity partial agonist at the benzodiazepine (BZD) site of the GABAA receptor and is the first compound with such mechanism that has been developed as an antiepileptic drug (AED). This mechanism offers several advantages compared to full agonists, including less severe adverse effects and a lack of tolerance and dependence liability, which has been demonstrated in rodents, dogs, and nonhuman primates. In clinical trials in epileptic dogs, imepitoin was shown to be an effective and safe AED. Recently, seizures in dogs have been proposed as a translational platform for human therapeutic trials on new epilepsy treatments. In the present study, we compared the anticonvulsant efficacy of imepitoin, phenobarbital and the high-affinity partial BZD agonist abecarnil in the timed i.v. pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) seizure threshold test in dogs and, for comparison, in mice. Furthermore, adverse effects of treatments were compared in both species. All drugs dose-dependently increased the PTZ threshold in both species, but anticonvulsant efficacy was higher in dogs than mice. At the doses selected for this study, imepitoin was slightly less potent than phenobarbital in increasing seizure threshold, but markedly more tolerable in both species. Effective doses of imepitoin in the PTZ seizure model were in the same range as those suppressing spontaneous recurrent seizures in epileptic dogs. The study demonstrates that low-affinity partial agonists at the benzodiazepine site of the GABAA receptor, such as imepitoin, offer advantages as a new category of AEDs.

  3. Anti-convulsive and anti-epileptic properties of brivaracetam (ucb 34714), a high-affinity ligand for the synaptic vesicle protein, SV2A

    PubMed Central

    Matagne, A; Margineanu, D-G; Kenda, B; Michel, P; Klitgaard, H

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Screening of 12 000 compounds for binding affinity to the synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A), identified a high-affinity pyrrolidone derivative, brivaracetam (ucb 34714). This study examined its pharmacological profile in various in vitro and in vivo models of seizures and epilepsy, to evaluate its potential as a new antiepileptic drug. Experimental approach: The effects of brivaracetam and levetiracetam on epileptiform activity and seizure expression were examined in rat hippocampal slices, corneally kindled mice, audiogenic seizure–susceptible mice, maximal electroshock and pentylenetetrazol seizures in mice, hippocampal-kindled rats, amygdala-kindled rats and genetic absence epilepsy rats. Key results: Brivaracetam and levetiracetam reduced epileptiform responses in rat hippocampal slices, brivaracetam being most potent. Brivaracetam also differed from levetiracetam by its ability to protect against seizures in normal mice induced by a maximal electroshock or maximal dose of pentylenetetrazol. In corneally kindled mice and hippocampal-kindled rats, brivaracetam induced potent protection against secondarily generalized motor seizures and showed anti-kindling properties superior to levetiracetam. In amygdala-kindled rats, brivaracetam induced a significant suppression in motor-seizure severity and, contrary to levetiracetam, reduced the after-discharge at a higher dose. Audiogenic seizure–susceptible mice were protected more potently against the expression of clonic convulsions by brivaracetam than by levetiracetam. Brivaracetam induced a more complete suppression of spontaneous spike-and-wave discharges in genetic absence epilepsy rats than levetiracetam. Conclusions and implications: Brivaracetam has higher potency and efficacy than levetiracetam as an anti-seizure and anti-epileptogenic agent in various experimental models of epilepsy, and a wide therapeutic index. PMID:18500360

  4. Prescribing pattern of anti-epileptic drugs in an Italian setting of elderly outpatients: a population-based study during 2004–07

    PubMed Central

    Oteri, Alessandro; Trifirò, Gianluca; Gagliostro, Maria Silvia; Tari, Daniele Ugo; Moretti, Salvatore; Bramanti, Placido; Spina, Edoardo; Caputi, Achille Patrizio; Arcoraci, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    AIMS The aims of the study were to assess the trend of older and newer anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) in the elderly population and to analyze the effects of a health-policy intervention with regard to AED use in general practice in a setting in Southern Italy. METHODS Data were extracted from the ‘Caserta-1’ Local-Health-Unit Arianna database in the years 2004–07. Patients aged over 65 years, receiving at least one AED prescription and registered in the lists of 88 general practitioners, were selected. The use of older and newer AEDs was calculated as 1 year prevalence and incidence of use and defined daily dose (DDD) per 1000 inhabitants day−1. Sub-analyses by gender, age and indication of use were performed. RESULTS Most of AED users were treated because of neuropathic pain (64.8%). However, the main indication of use for older AEDs (57.8%) was epilepsy, whereas newer AEDs (79.5%) were used for neuropathic pain. Prevalence and incidence of newer AED use increased until 2006, followed by a reduction in 2007. Newer AEDs, particularly gabapentin and pregabalin, were used in the treatment of more patients than older AEDs. However phenobarbital, accounting for more than 50% of total AED volume, was the most prescribed medication during the entire study period. CONCLUSIONS An increasing use of AEDs has been observed during 2004–07, mostly due to the prescription of newer compounds for neuropathic pain. The fall in the use of newer AEDs during 2007 coincides with revised re-imbursement criteria for gabapentin and pregabalin. The large use of phenobarbital in the elderly should be considered in the light of a risk of adverse drug reactions. PMID:20840443

  5. Antiepileptic drugs in non-epilepsy disorders: relations between mechanisms of action and clinical efficacy.

    PubMed

    Johannessen Landmark, Cecilie

    2008-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used extensively to treat multiple non-epilepsy disorders, both in neurology and psychiatry. This article provides a review of the clinical efficacy of AEDs in non-epilepsy disorders based on recently published preclinical and clinical studies, and attempts to relate this efficacy to the mechanism of action of AEDs and pathophysiological processes associated with the disorders. Some newer indications for AEDs have been established, while others are under investigation. The disorders where AEDs have been demonstrated to be of clinical importance include neurological disorders, such as essential tremor, neuropathic pain and migraine, and psychiatric disorders, including anxiety, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Many of the AEDs have various targets of action in the synapse and have several proposed relevant mechanisms of action in epilepsy and in other disorders. Pathophysiological processes disturb neuronal excitability by modulating ion channels, receptors and intracellular signalling pathways, and these are targets for the pharmacological action of various AEDs. Attention is focused on the glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses. In psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, AEDs such as valproate, carbamazepine and lamotrigine appear to have clear roles based on their effect on intracellular pathways. On the other hand, some AEDs, e.g. topiramate, have efficacy for nonpsychiatric disorders including migraine, possibly by enhancing GABAergic and reducing glutamatergic neurotransmission. AEDs that seem to enhance GABAergic neurotransmission, e.g. tiagabine, valproate, gabapentin and possibly levetiracetam, may have a role in treating neurological disorders such as essential tremor, or anxiety disorders. AEDs with effects on voltage-gated sodium or calcium channels may be advantageous in treating neuropathic pain, e.g. gabapentin, pregabalin, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine and valproate. Co

  6. Clinical pharmacokinetics of new-generation antiepileptic drugs at the extremes of age: an update.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Domenico; Perucca, Emilio

    2013-08-01

    Epilepsies occur across the entire age range, and their incidence peaks in the first years of life and in the elderly. Therefore, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are commonly used at the extremes of age. Rational prescribing in these age groups requires not only an understanding of the drugs' pharmacodynamic properties, but also careful consideration of potential age-related changes in their pharmacokinetic profile. The present article, which updates a review published in 2006 in this journal, focuses on recent findings on the pharmacokinetics of new-generation AEDs in neonates, infants, children, and the elderly. Significant new information on the pharmacokinetics of new AEDs in the perinatal period has been acquired, particularly for lamotrigine and levetiracetam. As a result of slow maturation of the enzymes involved in glucuronide conjugation, lamotrigine elimination occurs at a particularly slow rate in neonates, and becomes gradually more efficient during the first months of life. In the case of levetiracetam, elimination occurs primarily by renal excretion and is also slow at birth, but drug clearance increases rapidly thereafter and can even double within 1 week. In general, infants older than 2-3 months and children show higher drug clearance (normalized for body weight) than adults. This pattern was confirmed in recent studies that investigated the pediatric pharmacokinetics of several new AEDs, including levetiracetam, rufinamide, stiripentol, and eslicarbazepine acetate. At the other extreme of age, in the elderly, drug clearance is generally reduced compared with younger adults because of less efficient drug-metabolizing activity, decreased renal function, or both. This general pattern, described previously for several AEDs, was confirmed in recent studies on the effect of old age on the clearance of felbamate, levetiracetam, pregabalin, lacosamide, and retigabine. For those drugs which are predominantly eliminated by renal excretion, aging

  7. Effects of antiepileptic drugs on the serum folate and vitamin B12 in various epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hong-Li; Zhou, Hao; Wang, Nuan; Yu, Chun-Yu

    2016-10-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurodegenerative disease with an increasing morbidity. Clinical treatment of epilepsy includes symptomatic treatment, etiological treatment, surgery and prevention. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on serum folate and vitamin B12 in various epileptic patients, and to examine the correlation between these effects and secondary cerebrovascular events. A total of 68 epileptic patients, diagnosed between May 2012 and May 2014, were included in the present study. The study included 8 cases of autonomic seizures, 10 cases of absence seizures, 13 cases of complex partial seizures, 28 cases of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and 9 cases of simple partial seizures. The patients received appropriate AED treatment according to the characteristics of epileptic seizure and the treatment guidance. The differences in the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these patients, and the differences in the secondary cerebrovascular events in these patients after 1 year follow-up were analyzed. The difference in the AEDs used by various epileptic patients was statistically significant (P<0.05). The proportion of AED monotherapy in the autonomic seizure group and petit mal group was highest, and the proportion of two AED in combination with the psychomotor seizure, grand mal and simple partial seizure groups was highest. The serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these patients following treatment were significantly lower than those prior to treatment (P<0.05). The differences in the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these groups following treatment were not statistically significant (P>0.05). The difference in the incidence of cerebrovascular events in these groups at follow up was not statistically significant (P>0.05). The multifactorial logistic regression analysis revealed that the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 were the independent risk factors for epilepsy with secondary

  8. Valproic Acid and Other HDAC Inhibitors Upregulate FGF21 Gene Expression and Promote Process Elongation in Glia by Inhibiting HDAC2 and 3

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junyu; Wang, Zhifei; Liao, Hsiao-Mei; Wei, Monica; Leeds, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fibroblast growth factor 21, a novel regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism, has robust protective properties in neurons. However, its expression and function in glia are unknown. Valproic acid, a mood stabilizer and anticonvulsant, is a histone deacetylase inhibitor and a dynamic gene regulator. We investigated whether histone deacetylase inhibition by valproic acid and other inhibitors upregulates fibroblast growth factor 21 expression and, if so, sought to identify the histone deacetylase isoform(s) involved and their role in altering glial cell morphology. Methods: C6 glioma or primary cortical glial cultures were treated with histone deacetylase inhibitors, and fibroblast growth factor 21 levels and length of cell processes were subsequently measured. Histone deacetylase 1, 2, or 3 was also knocked down to detect which isoform was involved in regulating fibroblast growth factor 21 mRNA levels. Finally, knockdown and overexpression of fibroblast growth factor 21 were performed to determine whether it played a role in regulating cell process length. Results: Treatment of C6 cells or primary glial cultures with valproic acid elevated fibroblast growth factor 21 mRNA levels, extended cell process length, and markedly increased acetylated histone-H3 levels. Other histone deacetylase inhibitors including pan- and class I-specific inhibitors, or selective knockdown of histone deacetylase 2 or 3 isoform produced similar effects. Knockdown or overexpression of fibroblast growth factor 21 significantly decreased or increased C6 cell process length, respectively. Conclusions: In glial cell line and primary glia, using pharmacological inhibition and selective gene silencing of histone deacetylases to boost fibroblast growth factor 21 mRNA levels results in elongation of cell processes. Our study provides a new mechanism via which histone deacetylase 2 and 3 participate in upregulating fibroblast growth factor 21 transcription and extending process outgrowth

  9. A New Derivative of Valproic Acid Amide Possesses a Broad-spectrum Antiseizure Profile and Unique Activity Against Status Epilepticus and Organophosphate Neuronal Damage

    PubMed Central

    White, H. Steve; Alex, Anitha B.; Pollock, Amanda; Hen, Naama; Shekh-Ahmad, Tawfeeq; Wilcox, Karen S.; McDonough, John H.; Stables, James P.; Kaufmann, Dan; Yagen, Boris; Bialer, Meir

    2011-01-01

    Summary Purpose sec-Butyl-propylacetamide (SPD) is a one-carbon homologue of valnoctamide (VCD), a CNS-active amide derivative of valproic acid (VPA) currently in phase II clinical trials. The current study evaluated the anticonvulsant activity of SPD in a battery of rodent seizure and epilepsy models and assessed its efficacy in rat and guinea pig models of status epilepticus (SE) and neuroprotection in an organotypic hippocampal slice model of excitotoxic cell death. Methods SPD’s anticonvulsant activity was evaluated in several rodent seizure and epilepsy models including: maximal electroshock (MES), 6Hz psychomotor, subcutaneous (s.c.) metrazol-, s.c., picrotoxin, s.c. bicuculline, audiogenic and corneal and hippocampal kindled seizures following intraperitoneal administration. Results obtained with SPD are discussed in relationship to those obtained with VPA and VCD. SPD was also evaluated for its ability to block benzodiazepine-resistant SE induced by pilocarpine (rats) and soman (rats and guinea pigs) following intraperitoneal administration. SPD was tested for its ability to block excitotoxic cell death induced by the glutamate agonists N-methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) and kainic acid (KA) using organotypic hippocampal slices and SE-induced hippocampal cell death using FluoroJade B staining. The cognitive function of SPD-treated rats that were protected against pilocarpine-induced convulsive SE was examined 10-14 days post SE using the Morris water maze (MWM). The relationship between the pharmacokinetic profile of SPD and its efficacy against soman-induced SE was evaluated in two parallel studies following SPD (60 mg/kg, i.p.) administration in the soman SE rat model. Key Findings SPD was highly effective and displayed a wide protective index (PI=TD50/ED50) in the standardized seizure and epilepsy models employed. SPD’s wide PI values demonstrate that it is effective at doses well below those that produce behavioral impairment. Unlike VCD, SPD also

  10. Treatment of cardiac arrhythmias in a mouse model of Rett syndrome with Na+-channel-blocking antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Herrera, José A; Ward, Christopher S; Pitcher, Meagan R; Percy, Alan K; Skinner, Steven; Kaufmann, Walter E; Glaze, Daniel G; Wehrens, Xander H T; Neul, Jeffrey L

    2015-04-01

    One quarter of deaths associated with Rett syndrome (RTT), an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder, are sudden and unexpected. RTT is associated with prolonged QTc interval (LQT), and LQT-associated cardiac arrhythmias are a potential cause of unexpected death. The standard of care for LQT in RTT is treatment with β-adrenergic antagonists; however, recent work indicates that acute treatment of mice with RTT with a β-antagonist, propranolol, does not prevent lethal arrhythmias. In contrast, acute treatment with the Na(+) channel blocker phenytoin prevented arrhythmias. Chronic dosing of propranolol may be required for efficacy; therefore, we tested the efficacy of chronic treatment with either propranolol or phenytoin on RTT mice. Phenytoin completely abolished arrhythmias, whereas propranolol showed no benefit. Surprisingly, phenytoin also normalized weight and activity, but worsened breathing patterns. To explore the role of Na(+) channel blockers on QT in people with RTT, we performed a retrospective analysis of QT status before and after Na(+) channel blocker antiepileptic therapies. Individuals with RTT and LQT significantly improved their QT interval status after being started on Na(+) channel blocker antiepileptic therapies. Thus, Na(+) channel blockers should be considered for the clinical management of LQT in individuals with RTT.

  11. Antiepileptic action of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibition in an animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tai, Tina Y; Warner, Lindsay N; Jones, Terrance D; Jung, Sangwook; Concepcion, Francis A; Skyrud, David W; Fender, Jason; Liu, Yusha; Williams, Aaron D; Neumaier, John F; D'Ambrosio, Raimondo; Poolos, Nicholas P

    2017-02-22

    Several phosphorylation signaling pathways have been implicated in the pathogenesis of epilepsy arising from both genetic causes and acquired insults to the brain. Identification of dysfunctional signaling pathways in epilepsy may provide novel targets for antiepileptic therapies. We previously described a deficit in phosphorylation signaling mediated by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) that occurs in an animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy, and that produces neuronal hyperexcitability measured in vitro. We asked whether in vivo pharmacological manipulation of p38 MAPK activity would influence seizure frequency in chronically epileptic animals. Administration of a p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, markedly worsened spontaneous seizure frequency, consistent with prior in vitro results. However, anisomycin, a non-specific p38 MAPK activator, significantly increased seizure frequency. We hypothesized that this unexpected result was due to activation of a related MAPK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Administration of JNK inhibitor SP600125 significantly decreased seizure frequency in a dose-dependent manner without causing overt behavioral abnormalities. Biochemical analysis showed increased JNK expression and activity in untreated epileptic animals. These results show for the first time that JNK is hyperactivated in an animal model of epilepsy, and that phosphorylation signaling mediated by JNK may represent a novel antiepileptic target.

  12. Genetic and maternal effects on valproic acid teratogenesis in C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice.

    PubMed

    Downing, Chris; Biers, Jami; Larson, Colin; Kimball, Alexi; Wright, Hali; Ishii, Takamasa; Gilliam, David; Johnson, Thomas

    2010-08-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is used worldwide to treat epilepsy, migraine headaches, and bipolar disorder. However, VPA is teratogenic and in utero exposure can lead to congenital malformations. Using inbred C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA/2J (D2) mice, we asked whether genetic variation could play a role in susceptibility to VPA teratogenesis. Whereas B6 fetuses were more susceptible than D2 fetuses to digit and vertebral malformations, D2 fetuses were more susceptible to rib malformations. In a reciprocal cross between B6 and D2, genetically identical F1 mice carried in a B6 mother had a greater percentage of vertebral malformations following prenatal VPA exposure than F1 mice carried in a D2 mother. This reciprocal F1 difference is known as a maternal effect and shows that maternal genotype/uterine environment is an important mediator of VPA teratogenecity. VPA is a histone deacetylase inhibitor, and it is possible that the differential teratogenesis in B6 and D2 is because of strain differences in histone acetylation. We observed strain differences in acetylation of histones H3 and H4 in both embryo and placenta following in utero VPA exposure, but additional studies are needed to determine the significance of these changes in mediating teratogenesis. Our results provide additional support that genetic factors, both maternal and fetal, play a role in VPA teratogenesis. Lines of mice derived from B6 and D2 will be a useful model for elucidating the genetic architecture underlying susceptibility to VPA teratogenesis.

  13. Valproic acid enhances the efficacy of radiation therapy by protecting normal hippocampal neurons and sensitizing malignant glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Thotala, Dinesh; Karvas, Rowan M.; Engelbach, John A.; Garbow, Joel R.; Hallahan, Andrew N.; DeWees, Todd A.; Laszlo, Andrei; Hallahan, Dennis E.

    2015-01-01

    Neurocognitive deficits are serious sequelae that follow cranial irradiation used to treat patients with medulloblastoma and other brain neoplasms. Cranial irradiation causes apoptosis in the subgranular zone of the hippocampus leading to cognitive deficits. Valproic acid (VPA) treatment protected hippocampal neurons from radiation-induced damage in both cell culture and animal models. Radioprotection was observed in VPA-treated neuronal cells compared to cells treated with radiation alone. This protection is specific to normal neuronal cells and did not extend to cancer cells. In fact, VPA acted as a radiosensitizer in brain cancer cells. VPA treatment induced cell cycle arrest in cancer cells but not in normal neuronal cells. The level of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was increased and the pro-apoptotic protein Bax was reduced in VPA treated normal cells. VPA inhibited the activities of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), the latter of which is only inhibited in normal cells. The combination of VPA and radiation was most effective in inhibiting tumor growth in heterotopic brain tumor models. An intracranial orthotopic glioma tumor model was used to evaluate tumor growth by using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE MRI) and mouse survival following treatment with VPA and radiation. VPA, in combination with radiation, significantly delayed tumor growth and improved mouse survival. Overall, VPA protects normal hippocampal neurons and not cancer cells from radiation-induced cytotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo. VPA treatment has the potential for attenuating neurocognitive deficits associated with cranial irradiation while enhancing the efficiency of glioma radiotherapy. PMID:26413814

  14. Folic acid and pantothenic acid protection against valproic acid-induced neural tube defects in CD-1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Jennifer E.; Raymond, Angela M.; Winn, Louise M. . E-mail: winnl@biology.queensu.ca

    2006-03-01

    In utero exposure to valproic acid (VPA) during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of neural tube defects (NTDs). Although the mechanism by which VPA mediates these effects is unknown, VPA-initiated changes in embryonic protein levels have been implicated. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of in utero VPA exposure on embryonic protein levels of p53, NF-{kappa}B, Pim-1, c-Myb, Bax, and Bcl-2 in the CD-1 mouse. We also evaluated the protective effects of folic acid and pantothenic acid on VPA-induced NTDs and VPA-induced embryonic protein changes in this model. Pregnant CD-1 mice were administered a teratogenic dose of VPA prior to neural tube closure and embryonic protein levels were analyzed. In our study, VPA (400 mg/kg)-induced NTDs (24%) and VPA-exposed embryos with an NTD showed a 2-fold increase in p53, and 4-fold decreases in NF-{kappa}B, Pim-1, and c-Myb protein levels compared to their phenotypically normal littermates (P < 0.05). Additionally, VPA increased the ratio of embryonic Bax/Bcl-2 protein levels (P < 0.05). Pretreatment of pregnant dams with either folic acid or pantothenic acid prior to VPA significantly protected against VPA-induced NTDs (P < 0.05). Folic acid also reduced VPA-induced alterations in p53, NF-{kappa}B, Pim-1, c-Myb, and Bax/Bcl-2 protein levels, while pantothenic acid prevented VPA-induced alterations in NF-{kappa}B, Pim-1, and c-Myb. We hypothesize that folic acid and pantothenic acid protect CD-1 embryos from VPA-induced NTDs by independent, but not mutually exclusive mechanisms, both of which may be mediated by the prevention of VPA-induced alterations in proteins involved in neurulation.

  15. Valproic acid effects in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex in an animal model of post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C Brad; McLaughlin, Leslie D; Ebenezer, Philip J; Nair, Anand R; Francis, Joseph

    2014-07-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (PIC) are upregulated in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) modify genetic transcription and can diminish ROS and PIC escalation. They can also modulate levels of neurotransmitters such as catecholamines and serotonin (5-HT). Thus, this study sought to analyze the effects of the HDACi valproic acid (VA) on oxidative stress, inflammation, and neurotransmitter modulation via a predator exposure/psychosocial stress animal model of PTSD. PTSD-like effects were induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=6/group×4 groups). The rats were secured in Plexiglas cylinders and placed in a cage with a cat for 1h on days 1, 11, and 40 of a 40-day stress regimen. PTSD rats were also subjected to psychosocial stress via daily cage cohort changes. At the conclusion of the stress regimen, the treatment group (PTSD+VA) and control group (Control+VA) rats were given VA in their drinking water for 30 days. The rats were then euthanized and their brains were dissected to remove the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Whole blood was collected to assess systemic oxidative stress. ROS and PIC mRNA and protein elevation in the PTSD group were normalized with VA. Anxiety decreased in this group via improved performance on the elevated plus-maze (EPM). No changes were attributed to VA in the control group, and no improvements were noted in the vehicle groups. Results indicate VA can attenuate oxidative stress and inflammation, enhance fear extinction, and correct neurotransmitter aberrancies in a rat model of PTSD.

  16. Phase I Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Evaluation of Combined Valproic Acid/Doxorubicin Treatment in Dogs with Spontaneous Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wittenburg, Luke A.; Gustafson, Daniel L.; Thamm, Douglas H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are targeted anti-cancer agents with a well-documented ability to act synergistically with cytotoxic agents. We recently demonstrated that the HDACi valproic acid (VPA) sensitizes osteosarcoma cells to doxorubicin (DOX) in vitro and in vivo. As there are no published reports on the clinical utility of HDACi in dogs with spontaneous cancers, we sought to determine a safe and biologically effective dose of VPA administered prior to a standard dose of DOX. Methods 21 dogs were enrolled into eight cohorts in an accelerated dose-escalation trial consisting of pre-treatment with oral VPA followed by DOX on a three-week cycle. Blood and tumor tissue were collected for determination of serum VPA concentration and evaluation of pharmcodynamic effects by immunofluorescence cytochemistry and immunohistochemistry. Serum and complete blood counts were obtained for determination of changes in DOX pharmacokinetics or hematologic effects. Results All doses of VPA were well tolerated. Serum VPA concentrations increased linearly with dose. DOX pharmacokinetics were comparable to those in dogs receiving DOX alone. A positive correlation was detected between VPA dose and histone hyperacetylation in PBMC. No potentiation of DOX-induced myelosuppression was observed. Histone hyperacetylation was documented in tumor and PBMC. Responses included 2/21 complete, 3/21 partial, 5/21 stable disease, and 11/21 progressive disease. Conclusions VPA can be administered to dogs at doses up to 240 mg/kg/day prior to a standard dose of DOX. In addition, we have developed the PK/PD tools necessary for future studies of novel HDACi in the clinical setting of canine cancer. PMID:20705615

  17. Effects of an H3R Antagonist on the Animal Model of Autism Induced by Prenatal Exposure to Valproic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Baronio, Diego; Castro, Kamila; Gonchoroski, Taylor; de Melo, Gabriela Mueller; Nunes, Gustavo Della Flora; Bambini-Junior, Victorio; Gottfried, Carmem; Riesgo, Rudimar

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders primarily characterized by impaired social interaction and communication, and by restricted repetitive behaviors and interests. Ligands of histamine receptor 3 (H3R) are considered potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of different brain disorders and cognitive impairments. Considering this, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the actions of ciproxifan (CPX), an H3R antagonist, on the animal model of autism induced by prenatal exposure to valproic acid (VPA). Swiss mice were prenatally exposed to VPA on embryonic day 11 and assessed for social behavior, nociceptive threshold and repetitive behavior at 50 days of life. The treatment with CPX (3 mg/kg) or saline was administered 30 minutes before each behavioral test. The VPA group presented lower sociability index compared to VPA animals that were treated with CPX. Compared to the Control group, VPA animals presented a significantly higher nociceptive threshold, and treatment with CPX was not able to modify this parameter. In the marble burying test, the number of marbles buried by VPA animals was consistent with markedly repetitive behavior. VPA animals that received CPX buried a reduced amount of marbles. In summary, we report that an acute dose of CPX is able to attenuate sociability deficits and stereotypies present in the VPA model of autism. Our findings have the potential to help the investigations of both the molecular underpinnings of ASD and of possible treatments to ameliorate the ASD symptomatology, although more research is still necessary to corroborate and expand this initial data. PMID:25560049

  18. The application of multiple analyte adduct formation in the LC-MS(3) analysis of valproic acid in human serum.

    PubMed

    Dziadosz, Marek

    2017-01-01

    LC-MS using electrospray ionisation (negative ion mode) and low-energy collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometric (CID-MS/MS) analysis, together with the multiple analyte adduct formation with the components of the mobile phase, were applied to analyse valproic acid in human serum with LC-MS(3). The CID-fragmentation of the precursor analyte adduct [M+2CH3COONa-H](-) was applied in the method validation (307.1/225.1/143.0). Chromatographic separation was performed with a Luna 5μm C18 (2) 100A, 150mm×2mm column and the elution with a mobile phase consisting of A (H2O/methanol=95/5, v/v) and B (H2O/methanol=3/97, v/v), both with 10mM ammonium acetate and 0.1% acetic acid. A binary flow pumping mode with a total flow rate of 0.400mL/min was used. The calculated limit of detection/quantification of the method calibrated in the range of 10-200μg/mL was 0.31/1.0μg/mL. The sample preparation based on protein precipitation with 1mL of H2O/methanol solution (3/97, v/v) with 10mM sodium acetate and 100mM acetic acid. On the basis of the experiments performed could be demonstrated, that multiple analyte adduct formation can be applied to generate MS(3) quantitation of analytes with problematic fragmentation. The presented new strategy makes the analysis of small drugs, which do not produce any stable product ions at all, on the basis of LC-MS(3) possible.

  19. Brain delivery of valproic acid via intranasal administration of nanostructured lipid carriers: in vivo pharmacodynamic studies using rat electroshock model.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Sharareh; Varshosaz, Jaleh; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Tabbakhian, Majid

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of brain disorders is one of the greatest challenges in drug delivery because of a variety of main barriers in effective drug transport and maintaining therapeutic concentrations in the brain for a prolonged period. The objective of this study was delivery of valproic acid (VPA) to the brain by intranasal route. For this purpose, nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) were prepared by solvent diffusion method followed by ultrasonication and characterized for size, zeta potential, drug-loading percentage, and release. Six groups of rats each containing six animals received drug-loaded NLCs intraperitoneally (IP) or intranasally. Brain responses were then examined by using maximal electroshock (MES). The hind limb tonic extension:flexion inhibition ratio was measured at 15-, 30-, 60-, 90-, and 120-minute intervals. The drug concentration was also measured in plasma and brain at the most protective point using gas chromatography method. The particle size of NLCs was 154 ± 16 nm with drug-loading percentage of 47% ± 0.8% and drug release of 75% ± 1.9% after 21 days. In vivo results showed that there was a significant difference between protective effects of NLCs of VPA and control group 15, 30, 60, and 90 minutes after treatment via intranasal route (P < 0.05). Similar protective effect was observed in rats treated with NLCs of VPA in intranasal route and positive control in IP route (P > 0.05). Results of drug determination in brain and plasma showed that brain:plasma concentration ratio was much higher after intranasal administration of NLCs of VPA than the positive control group (IP route). In conclusion, intranasal administration of NLCs of VPA provided a better protection against MES seizure.

  20. Association of LEPR and ANKK1 Gene Polymorphisms with Weight Gain in Epilepsy Patients Receiving Valproic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongliang; Wang, Xueding; Zhou, Yafang; Ni, Guanzhong; Su, Qibiao; Chen, Ziyi; Chen, Zhuojia; Li, Jiali; Chen, Xinmeng; Hou, Xiangyu; Xie, Wen; Xin, Shuang; Zhou, Liemin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Weight gain is the most frequent adverse effect of valproic acid (VPA) treatment, resulting in poor compliance and many endocrine disturbances. Similarities in the weight change of monozygotic twins receiving VPA strongly suggests that genetic factors are involved in this effect. However, few studies have been conducted to identify the relevant genetic polymorphisms. Additionally, the causal relationship between the VPA concentration and weight gain has been controversial. Thus, we investigated the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in several appetite stimulation and energy homeostasis genes and the steady state plasma concentrations (Css) of VPA on the occurrence of weight gain in patients. Methods: A total of 212 epilepsy patients receiving VPA were enrolled. Nineteen SNPs in 11 genes were detected using the Sequenom MassArray iPlex platform, and VPA Css was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results: After 6 months of treatment, 20.28% of patients were found to gain a significant amount of weight (weight gained ≥7%). Three SNPs in the leptin receptor (LEPR), ankyrin repeat kinase domain containing 1 (ANKK1), and α catalytic subunit of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) showed significant associations with VPA-induced weight gain (p < 0.001, p = 0.017 and p = 0.020, respectively). After Bonferroni correction for multiple tests, the genotypic association of LEPR rs1137101, the allelic association of LEPR rs1137101, and ANKK1 rs1800497 with weight gain remained significant. However, the VPA Css in patents who gained weight were not significantly different from those who did not gain weight (p = 0.121). Conclusions: LEPR and ANKK1 genetic polymorphisms may have value in predicting VPA-induced weight gain. PMID:25740917

  1. Folic acid and pantothenic acid protection against valproic acid-induced neural tube defects in CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Jennifer E; Raymond, Angela M; Winn, Louise M

    2006-03-01

    In utero exposure to valproic acid (VPA) during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of neural tube defects (NTDs). Although the mechanism by which VPA mediates these effects is unknown, VPA-initiated changes in embryonic protein levels have been implicated. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of in utero VPA exposure on embryonic protein levels of p53, NF-kappaB, Pim-1, c-Myb, Bax, and Bcl-2 in the CD-1 mouse. We also evaluated the protective effects of folic acid and pantothenic acid on VPA-induced NTDs and VPA-induced embryonic protein changes in this model. Pregnant CD-1 mice were administered a teratogenic dose of VPA prior to neural tube closure and embryonic protein levels were analyzed. In our study, VPA (400 mg/kg)-induced NTDs (24%) and VPA-exposed embryos with an NTD showed a 2-fold increase in p53, and 4-fold decreases in NF-kappaB, Pim-1, and c-Myb protein levels compared to their phenotypically normal littermates (P<0.05). Additionally, VPA increased the ratio of embryonic Bax/Bcl-2 protein levels (P<0.05). Pretreatment of pregnant dams with either folic acid or pantothenic acid prior to VPA significantly protected against VPA-induced NTDs (P<0.05). Folic acid also reduced VPA-induced alterations in p53, NF-kappaB, Pim-1, c-Myb, and Bax/Bcl-2 protein levels, while pantothenic acid prevented VPA-induced alterations in NF-kappaB, Pim-1, and c-Myb. We hypothesize that folic acid and pantothenic acid protect CD-1 embryos from VPA-induced NTDs by independent, but not mutually exclusive mechanisms, both of which may be mediated by the prevention of VPA-induced alterations in proteins involved in neurulation.

  2. Effects of an H3R antagonist on the animal model of autism induced by prenatal exposure to valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Baronio, Diego; Castro, Kamila; Gonchoroski, Taylor; de Melo, Gabriela Mueller; Nunes, Gustavo Della Flora; Bambini-Junior, Victorio; Gottfried, Carmem; Riesgo, Rudimar

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders primarily characterized by impaired social interaction and communication, and by restricted repetitive behaviors and interests. Ligands of histamine receptor 3 (H3R) are considered potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of different brain disorders and cognitive impairments. Considering this, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the actions of ciproxifan (CPX), an H3R antagonist, on the animal model of autism induced by prenatal exposure to valproic acid (VPA). Swiss mice were prenatally exposed to VPA on embryonic day 11 and assessed for social behavior, nociceptive threshold and repetitive behavior at 50 days of life. The treatment with CPX (3 mg/kg) or saline was administered 30 minutes before each behavioral test. The VPA group presented lower sociability index compared to VPA animals that were treated with CPX. Compared to the Control group, VPA animals presented a significantly higher nociceptive threshold, and treatment with CPX was not able to modify this parameter. In the marble burying test, the number of marbles buried by VPA animals was consistent with markedly repetitive behavior. VPA animals that received CPX buried a reduced amount of marbles. In summary, we report that an acute dose of CPX is able to attenuate sociability deficits and stereotypies present in the VPA model of autism. Our findings have the potential to help the investigations of both the molecular underpinnings of ASD and of possible treatments to ameliorate the ASD symptomatology, although more research is still necessary to corroborate and expand this initial data.

  3. Pax6-dependent cortical glutamatergic neuronal differentiation regulates autism-like behavior in prenatally valproic acid-exposed rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Chan; Lee, Dong-Keun; Go, Hyo Sang; Kim, Pitna; Choi, Chang Soon; Kim, Ji-Woon; Jeon, Se Jin; Song, Mi-Ryoung; Shin, Chan Young

    2014-02-01

    Imbalance in excitatory/inhibitory signal in the brain has been proposed as one of the main pathological features in autism spectrum disorders, although the underlying cellular and molecular mechanism is unclear yet. Because excitatory/inhibitory imbalance can be induced by aberration in glutamatergic/GABAergic neuronal differentiation, we investigated the mechanism of dysregulated neuronal differentiation between excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the embryonic and postnatal brain of prenatally valproic acid-exposed rat offspring, which is often used as an animal model of autism spectrum disorders. Transcription factor Pax6, implicated in glutamatergic neuronal differentiation, was transiently increased in embryonic cortex by valproate exposure, which resulted in the increased expression of glutamatergic proteins in postnatal brain of offspring. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed increased acetylated histone binding on Pax6 promoter region, which may underlie the transcriptional up-regulation of Pax6. Other histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors including TSA and SB but not valpromide, which is devoid of HDAC inhibitor activity, induced Pax6 up-regulation. Silencing Pax6 expression in cultured rat primary neural progenitor cells demonstrated that up-regulation of Pax6 plays an essential role in valproate-induced glutamatergic differentiation. Blocking glutamatergic transmission with MK-801 or memantine treatment, and to a lesser extent with MPEP treatment, reversed the impaired social behaviors and seizure susceptibility of prenatally valproate-exposed offspring. Together, environmental factors may contribute to the imbalance in excitatory/inhibitory neuronal activity in autistic brain by altering expression of transcription factors governing glutamatergic/GABAergic differentiation during fetal neural development, in conjunction with the genetic preload.

  4. Comparative Network-Based Recovery Analysis and Proteomic Profiling of Neurological Changes in Valproic Acid-Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite its prominence for characterization of complex mixtures, LC–MS/MS frequently fails to identify many proteins. Network-based analysis methods, based on protein–protein interaction networks (PPINs), biological pathways, and protein complexes, are useful for recovering non-detected proteins, thereby enhancing analytical resolution. However, network-based analysis methods do come in varied flavors for which the respective efficacies are largely unknown. We compare the recovery performance and functional insights from three distinct instances of PPIN-based approaches, viz., Proteomics Expansion Pipeline (PEP), Functional Class Scoring (FCS), and Maxlink, in a test scenario of valproic acid (VPA)-treated mice. We find that the most comprehensive functional insights, as well as best non-detected protein recovery performance, are derived from FCS utilizing real biological complexes. This outstrips other network-based methods such as Maxlink or Proteomics Expansion Pipeline (PEP). From FCS, we identified known biological complexes involved in epigenetic modifications, neuronal system development, and cytoskeletal rearrangements. This is congruent with the observed phenotype where adult mice showed an increase in dendritic branching to allow the rewiring of visual cortical circuitry and an improvement in their visual acuity when tested behaviorally. In addition, PEP also identified a novel complex, comprising YWHAB, NR1, NR2B, ACTB, and TJP1, which is functionally related to the observed phenotype. Although our results suggest different network analysis methods can produce different results, on the whole, the findings are mutually supportive. More critically, the non-overlapping information each provides can provide greater holistic understanding of complex phenotypes. PMID:23557376

  5. Alteration of spontaneous spectral powers and coherences of local field potential in prenatal valproic acid mouse model of autism.

    PubMed

    Cheaha, Dania; Kumarnsit, Ekkasit

    2015-01-01

    Previously, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been identified mainly by social communication deficits and behavioral symptoms. However, a link between behaviors and learning process in the brain of animal model of autism remained largely unexplored. Particularly, spontaneous neural signaling in learning-related brain areas has not been studied. This study investigated local field potential (LFP) of the hippocampus (HP), the olfactory bulb (OB) and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in mice prenatally exposed to valproic acid (VPA) on gestational day 13. Adult male Swiss albino mouse offspring implanted with intracranial electrodes were used. VPA-exposed mice exhibited ASD-associated behaviors. Hippocampal LFP analysis revealed that VPA group significantly increased low gamma activity (25-45 Hz) during awake immobility. Regression analyses confirmed positive correlations between locomotor speed and hippocampal theta oscillations in control but not VPA group. VPA group exhibited increases in delta (1-4 Hz) and beta (25-35 Hz) activities in OB during awake immobility and active exploring, respectively. Moreover, significantly increased and decreased coherences between HP and OB of VPA animals were seen within gamma (active exploration) and theta (awake immobility) ranges, respectively. In addition, significant increase in coherence between HP and mPFC was seen within delta range during active exploration. In addition to three ASD symptoms, VPA animals also exhibited differential patterns of olfacto-hippocampal LFP, altered locomotor speed-related hippocampal theta activities and distinct interplays between HP and learning-related brain areas. The altered olfacto-hippocampal and medial prefrontal cortex-hippocampal networks may underlie impairments in autism mouse model.

  6. Gender-specific behavioral and immunological alterations in an animal model of autism induced by prenatal exposure to valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Tomasz; Roman, Adam; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka; Kubera, Marta; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Schneider, Karolina; Przewłocki, Ryszard

    2008-07-01

    Autism is a severe behavioral disorder characterized by pervasive impairments in social interactions, deficits in verbal and non-verbal communication, and stereotyped behaviors, with a four times higher incidence in boys than in girls. The core symptoms are frequently accompanied by a spectrum of neurobehavioral and immunological derangements, including: aberrant sensitivity to sensory stimulation, anxiety, and decreased cellular immune capacity. Recently, a new potential rodent model of autism induced by prenatal exposure to valproic acid (VPA rats) has been proposed. In order to determine if gender has an influence on alterations observed in VPA rats, male and female rats have been evaluated in a battery of behavioral, immunological, and endocrinological tests. A plethora of aberrations has been found in male VPA rats: lower sensitivity to pain, increased repetitive/stereotypic-like activity, higher anxiety, decreased level of social interaction, increased basal level of corticosterone, decreased weight of the thymus, decreased splenocytes proliferative response to concanavaline A, lower IFN-gamma/IL-10 ratio, and increased production of NO by peritoneal macrophages. Female VPA rats exhibited only increased repetitive/stereotypic-like activity and decreased IFN-gamma/IL-10 ratio. Sexual dimorphism characteristics for measured parameters have been observed in both groups of animals, except social interaction in VPA rats. Our results confirm existence of similarities between the observed pattern of aberrations in VPA rats and features of disturbed behavior and immune function in autistic patients, and suggest that they are gender-specific, which is intriguing in light of disproportion in boys to girls ratio in autism.

  7. Developmental profiling of ASD-related shank3 transcripts and their differential regulation by valproic acid in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Xue; Peng, Xiao-Lan; Hu, Chun-Chun; Li, Chun-Yang; Li, Qiang; Xu, Xiu

    2016-11-01

    SHANK3 is a scaffolding protein that binds to various synaptic proteins at the postsynaptic density (PSD) of excitatory glutamatergic synapses. SHANK3 is not only strongly implicated in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) but also plays a critical role in human Phelan-McDermid syndrome (22q13.3 deletion syndrome). Accumulated experimental evidence demonstrates that the zebrafish model system is useful for studying the functions of ASD-related gene during early development. However, many basic features of shank3 transcript expression in zebrafish remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated temporal, spatial, and isoform-specific expression patterns of shank3 during zebrafish development on the basis of previous researches and the differential effects of each shank3 transcript expression after exposure to valproic acid (VPA), an ASD-associated drug. At first, we observed that both shank3a and shank3b were barely expressed at very early ages (before 24 h post-fertilization (hpf)), whereas their expression levels were increased and mainly enriched in the nervous system after 24 hpf. Secondly, all of the six shank3 transcripts gradually increased during the first 7 hpf and then decreased. Subsequently, they exhibited a second increasing peak between 1 month post-fertilization (mpf) and adulthood. Thirdly, VPA treatment affected the isoform-specific expression of zebrafish shank3. In particular, the mRNA expression levels of those isoforms that contain a SAM domain were significantly increased, whereas the mRNA expression level of those which contained an ANK domain but without a SAM domain was decreased. To conclude, our findings support the molecular diversity of shank3 in zebrafish and provide a molecular framework to understand the isoform-specific function of shank3 in zebrafish.

  8. Combined prenatal and postnatal butyl paraben exposure produces autism-like symptoms in offspring: comparison with valproic acid autistic model.

    PubMed

    Ali, Elham H A; Elgoly, Amany H Mahmoud

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the impact of butyl paraben (BP) in brain of the pups developed for mothers administered BP from early pregnancy till weaning and its effect on studying the behavior, brain neurotransmitters and brain derived neurotrophic factor BDNF via comparing the results with valproic acid (VA) autistic-rat model preparing by a single oral injection dose of VA (800 mg/kg b.wt) at the 12.5 days of gestation. Butyl paraben was orally and subcutaneously administered (200 mg/kg b.wt) to pregnant rats from gestation day 1 to lactation day 21. The offspring male rats were subjected at the last 3 days of lactation to Morris water maze and three chamber sociability test then decapitated and the brain was excised and dissected to the cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, midbrain and pons for the determination of norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin (NE, DA and 5-HT) and cortex amino acids and whole brain BDNF. The results showed similar social and learning and memory behavioral deficits in VA rat model and the butyl paraben offspring in comparison with the controls. Also, some similar alterations were observed in monoamine content, amino acids and BDNF factor in the autistic-like model and butyl paraben offspring in comparison with the controls. The alterations were recorded notably in hippocampus and pons NE, midbrain DA, hippocampus and midbrain 5-HT, and frontal cortex GABA and asparagine. These data suggest that prenatal exposure to butyl paraben induced neuro-developmental disorders similar to some of the neurodevelopmental disorders observed in the VA model of autism.

  9. Pharmacodynamic potentiation of antiepileptic drugs' effects by some HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors against audiogenic seizures in DBA/2 mice.

    PubMed

    Russo, Emilio; Donato di Paola, Eugenio; Gareri, Pietro; Siniscalchi, Antonio; Labate, Angelo; Gallelli, Luca; Citraro, Rita; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2013-04-01

    It is known that the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) are effective in both the primary and the secondary prevention of ischemic heart disease. Increasing evidence indicates that statins have protective effects in several neurological diseases including stroke, cerebral ischemia, Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury and epilepsy. The aim of the present research was to evaluate the effects of some HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (i.e. lovastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin, fluvastatin and pravastatin) commonly used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia in the DBA/2 mice, an animal model of generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Furthermore, the co-administration of these compounds with some antiepileptic drugs (AEDs; i.e. carbamazepine, diazepam, felbamate, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, topiramate and valproate) was studied in order to identify possible positive pharmacological interactions. Simvastatin only was active against both the tonic and clonic phase of audiogenic seizures, whereas the other statins tested were only partially effective against the tonic phase with the following order of potency: lovastatin>fluvastatin>atorvastatin; pravastatin was completely ineffective up to the dose of 150mg/kg. The co-administration of ineffective doses of all statins with AEDs generally increased the potency of the latter reducing their ED50 values. In particular, simvastatin was the most active in potentiating the activity of AEDs and the combinations of statins with carbamazepine, diazepam, felbamate, lamotrigine, topiramate and valproate were the most favorable, whereas, the co-administrations with the other AEDs studied was in most cases neutral. The increase in potency was generally associated with an enhancement of motor impairment (TD50); however, the therapeutic index (TD50/ED50) of combined treatment of AEDs with statins was predominantly more

  10. TRIFLUOROMETHYL COMPOUNDS OF GERMANIUM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FLUORIDES, *GERMANIUM COMPOUNDS, *HALIDES, *ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS, ALKYL RADICALS, ARSENIC COMPOUNDS, CHEMICAL BONDS, CHEMICAL REACTIONS ...CHLORIDES, CHLORINE COMPOUNDS, HYDROLYSIS, IODIDES, METHYL RADICALS, POTASSIUM COMPOUNDS, PYROLYSIS, STABILITY, SYNTHESIS, TIN COMPOUNDS.

  11. The Effectiveness of Mood Stabilizers and Antiepileptic Medication for the Management of Behaviour Problems in Adults with Intellectual Disability: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deb, S.; Chaplin, R.; Sohanpal, S.; Unwin, G.; Soni, R.; Lenotre, L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Psychotropic medications are used to manage behaviour problems in adults with intellectual disability (ID). One group of psychotropic medication are mood stabilizers such as lithium and some antiepileptic drugs. Method: A comprehensive systematic review was performed to determine the evidence base for the effectiveness of mood…

  12. The Secondary Effects of Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) in Children and Their Implications on Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) Processes: A Best-Evidence Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, Saranya

    2009-01-01

    This study uses a best-evidence synthesis method to investigate the secondary effects of various antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and their implications on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) processes. Epilepsy is a common serious neurological disorder, a concomitant condition in individuals with severe developmental and intellectual…

  13. Pregnancy outcome in women exposed to antiepileptic drugs: teratogenic role of maternal epilepsy and its pharmacologic treatment.

    PubMed

    Cassina, Matteo; Dilaghi, Arianna; Di Gianantonio, Elena; Cesari, Elena; De Santis, Marco; Mannaioni, Guido; Pistelli, Alessandra; Clementi, Maurizio

    2013-08-01

    Infants born to epileptic women treated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have an increased risk of major congenital malformations (MCMs). In order to determine the role of maternal epilepsy we conducted a prospective cohort study on three cohorts of pregnant women: (i) 385 epileptic women treated with AEDs, (ii) 310 non-epileptic women treated with AEDs, (iii) 867 healthy women not exposed to AEDs (control group). The rate of MCMs in the epileptic group (7.7%) was not statistically higher than in the non-epileptic one (3.9%) (p=0.068). The rate in the first group was higher compared to the control group (p=0.001), while the rate in the second one was not (p=0.534). Our data confirm that AEDs therapy is the main cause of the increased risk of malformations in the offspring of epileptic women; however a teratogenic role of the maternal epilepsy itself cannot be excluded.

  14. Predictive value of isolated epileptiform discharges for a favorable therapeutic response to antiepileptic drugs in nonepileptic psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Boutros, Nash N; Kirollos, Sandra B; Pogarell, Oliver; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2014-02-01

    The efficacy of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in treating behavioral symptoms in nonepileptic psychiatric patients with abnormal EEGs is currently unknown. Although isolated epileptiform discharges have been reported in many psychiatric conditions, they are most commonly observed in patients with aggression, panic, or autistic spectrum disorders. The literature search was guided by 3 criteria: (1) studies had patients who did not experience seizures, (2) patients had EEGs, and (3) an AED was administered. Most important finding is that the number of "controlled" studies was extremely small. Overall, most reports suggest that the use of an AED can be associated with clinical and, at times, improved EEG abnormalities. Additionally, six controlled studies were found for other psychiatric disorders, such as learning disabilities with similar results. Overall, the use of anticonvulsants to treat nonepileptic psychiatric patients needs further controlled studies to better define indications, adequate EEG work-up, best AED to be used, and optimal durations of treatment attempts.

  15. Markers of bone turnover in patients with epilepsy and their relationship to management of bone diseases induced by antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Sherifa A

    2016-01-01

    Data from cross-sectional and prospective studies revealed that patients with epilepsy and on long-term treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are at increased risk for metabolic bone diseases. Bone diseases were reported in about 50% of patients on AEDs. Low bone mineral density, osteopenia/osteoporosis, osteomalacia, rickets, altered concentration of bone turnover markers and fractures were reported with phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine, valproate, oxcarbazepine and lamotrigine. The mechanisms for AEDs-induced bone diseases are heterogeneous and include hypovitaminosis D, hypocalcemia and direct acceleration of bone loss and/or reduction of bone formation. This article reviews the evidence, predictors and mechanisms of AEDs-induced bone abnormalities and its clinical implications. For patients on AEDs, regular monitoring of bone health is recommended. Prophylactic administration of calcium and vitamin D is recommended for all patients. Treatment doses of calcium and vitamin D and even anti-resorptive drug therapy are reserved for patients at high risk of pathological fracture.

  16. Homeostasis or channelopathy? Acquired cell type-specific ion channel changes in temporal lobe epilepsy and their antiepileptic potential

    PubMed Central

    Wolfart, Jakob; Laker, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Neurons continuously adapt the expression and functionality of their ion channels. For example, exposed to chronic excitotoxicity, neurons homeostatically downscale their intrinsic excitability. In contrast, the “acquired channelopathy” hypothesis suggests that proepileptic channel characteristics develop during epilepsy. We review cell type-specific channel alterations under different epileptic conditions and discuss the potential of channels that undergo homeostatic adaptations, as targets for antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Most of the relevant studies have been performed on temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), a widespread AED-refractory, focal epilepsy. The TLE patients, who undergo epilepsy surgery, frequently display hippocampal sclerosis (HS), which is associated with degeneration of cornu ammonis subfield 1 pyramidal cells (CA1 PCs). Although the resected human tissue offers insights, controlled data largely stem from animal models simulating different aspects of TLE and other epilepsies. Most of the cell type-specific information is available for CA1 PCs and dentate gyrus granule cells (DG GCs). Between these two cell types, a dichotomy can be observed: while DG GCs acquire properties decreasing the intrinsic excitability (in TLE models and patients with HS), CA1 PCs develop channel characteristics increasing intrinsic excitability (in TLE models without HS only). However, thorough examination of data on these and other cell types reveals the coexistence of protective and permissive intrinsic plasticity within neurons. These mechanisms appear differentially regulated, depending on the cell type and seizure condition. Interestingly, the same channel molecules that are upregulated in DG GCs during HS-related TLE, appear as promising targets for future AEDs and gene therapies. Hence, GCs provide an example of homeostatic ion channel adaptation which can serve as a primer when designing novel anti-epileptic strategies. PMID:26124723

  17. Antiepileptic and Antioxidant Effect of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Ferula Assa Foetida Gum on Pentylentetrazole- induced Kindling in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kiasalari, Zahra; Khalili, Mohsen; Roghani, Mehrdad; Heidari, Hamid; Azizi, Yaser

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Considering the prevalence of epilepsy and the failure of available treatments for many epileptic patients, finding more effective drugs in the treatment of epilepsy seems necessary. Oxidative stress has a special role in the pathogenesis of epileptic syndrome. Therefore, in the present study, we have examined the anti-epileptic and anti-oxidant properties of the Ferula Assa Foetida gum extract, using the pentylentetrazole (PTZ) kindling method. In this experimental study, sixty male Albino mice weighing 25-30 g were selected and were randomly divided into 6 groups. 1- the control group, 2- PTZ-kindled mice, 3- positive control group which received valproate (100 mg/kg) as anti-convulsant drug, 4-5 & 6- the groups of kindled mice that pretreated with 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg doses of Ferula Assa Foetida gum extract. Methods Kindling has been induced in all groups, except for the control group via 11 PTZ injections (35 mg /kg; ip) every other day for 22 days. In the 24th day, the PTZ challenge dose was injected (75 mg / kg) to all groups except the control group. The intensity of seizures were observed and noted until 30 minutes after PTZ injection. At list, the mice were decapitated and the brains of all the mice were removed.. and their biochemical factors levels including malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and nitric oxide (NO) were determined. Results Results of this study show that Ferula Assa Foetida gum extract is able to reduce seizure duration and its intensity. In addition, this extract has reduced MDA and NO levels and increased the level of SOD in the brain tissue compared to the PTZ- kindled mice. Discussion It can be concluded that Ferula Assa Foetida gum extract, in specific doses, is able to show an anti-epileptic effect because of its antioxidant properties, probably acting through an enzyme activity mechanism. PMID:25337361

  18. An Australian nationwide survey on medicinal cannabis use for epilepsy: History of antiepileptic drug treatment predicts medicinal cannabis use.

    PubMed

    Suraev, Anastasia S; Todd, Lisa; Bowen, Michael T; Allsop, David J; McGregor, Iain S; Ireland, Carol; Lintzeris, Nicholas

    2017-02-24

    Epilepsy Action Australia conducted an Australian nationwide online survey seeking opinions on and experiences with the use of cannabis-based products for the treatment of epilepsy. The survey was promoted via the Epilepsy Action Australia's main website, on their Facebook page, and by word of mouth. The survey consisted of 39 questions assessing demographics, clinical factors, including diagnosis and seizure types, and experiences with and opinions towards cannabis use in epilepsy. A total of 976 responses met the inclusion criteria. Results show that 15% of adults with epilepsy and 13% of parents/guardians of children with epilepsy were currently using, or had previously used, cannabis products to treat epilepsy. Of those with a history of cannabis product use, 90% of adults and 71% of parents reported success in reducing seizure frequency after commencing cannabis products. The main reasons for medicinal cannabis use were to manage treatment-resistant epilepsy and to obtain a more favorable side-effect profile compared to standard antiepileptic drugs. The number of past antiepileptic drugs tried was a significant predictor of medicinal cannabis use in both adults and children with epilepsy. Fifty-six percent of adults with epilepsy and 62% of parents/guardians of children with epilepsy expressed willingness to participate in clinical trials of cannabinoids. This survey provides insight into the use of cannabis products for epilepsy, in particular some of the likely factors influencing use, as well as novel insights into the experiences of and attitudes towards medicinal cannabis in people with epilepsy in the Australian community. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Cannabinoids and Epilepsy".

  19. Transcriptomic analysis in the developing zebrafish embryo after compound exposure: Individual gene expression and pathway regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hermsen, Sanne A.B.; Pronk, Tessa E.; Brandhof, Evert-Jan van den; Ven, Leo T.M. van der; Piersma, Aldert H.

    2013-10-01

    The zebrafish embryotoxicity test is a promising alternative assay for developmental toxicity. Classically, morphological assessment of the embryos is applied to evaluate the effects of compound exposure. However, by applying differential gene expression analysis the sensitivity and predictability of the test may be increased. For defining gene expression signatures of developmental toxicity, we explored the possibility of using gene expression signatures of compound exposures based on commonly expressed individual genes as well as based on regulated gene pathways. Four developmental toxic compounds were tested in concentration-response design, caffeine, carbamazepine, retinoic acid and valproic acid, and two non-embryotoxic compounds, D-mannitol and saccharin, were included. With transcriptomic analyses we were able to identify commonly expressed genes, which were mostly development related, after exposure to the embryotoxicants. We also identified gene pathways regulated by the embryotoxicants, suggestive of their modes of action. Furthermore, whereas pathways may be regulated by all compounds, individual gene expression within these pathways can differ for each compound. Overall, the present study suggests that the use of individual gene expression signatures as well as pathway regulation may be useful starting points for defining gene biomarkers for predicting embryotoxicity. - Highlights: • The zebrafish embryotoxicity test in combination with transcriptomics was used. • We explored two approaches of defining gene biomarkers for developmental toxicity. • Four compounds in concentration-response design were tested. • We identified commonly expressed individual genes as well as regulated gene pathways. • Both approaches seem suitable starting points for defining gene biomarkers.

  20. Polybenzimidazole compounds

    DOEpatents

    Klaehn, John R [Idaho Falls, ID; Peterson, Eric S [Idaho Falls, ID; Orme, Christopher J [Shelley, ID; Jones, Michael G [Chubbuck, ID; Wertsching, Alan K [Idaho Falls, ID; Luther, Thomas A [Idaho Falls, ID; Trowbridge, Tammy L [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-11-22

    A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with a moiety containing a carbonyl group, the substituted imidazole nitrogens being bonded to carbon of the carbonyl group. At least 85% of the nitrogens may be substituted. The carbonyl-containing moiety may include RCO--, where R is alkoxy or haloalkyl. The PBI compound may exhibit a first temperature marking an onset of weight loss corresponding to reversion of the substituted PBI that is less than a second temperature marking an onset of decomposition of an otherwise identical PBI compound without the substituted moiety. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may use more than 5 equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted.

  1. Polybenzimidazole compounds

    DOEpatents

    Klaehn, John R.; Peterson, Eric S.; Wertsching, Alan K.; Orme, Christopher J.; Luther, Thomas A.; Jones, Michael G.

    2010-08-10

    A PBI compound that includes imidazole nitrogens, at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2--, where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The PBI compound may exhibit similar thermal properties in comparison to the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may exhibit a solubility in an organic solvent greater than the solubility of the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may occur at about room temperature and/or at about atmospheric pressure. Substituting may use at least five equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted or, preferably, about fifteen equivalents.

  2. Association of UGT2B7 and UGT1A4 Polymorphisms with Serum Concentration of Antiepileptic Drugs in Children

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhongliang; Jiao, Yukun; Shi, Lianting

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to analyze the relationship of UGT2B7 and UGT1A4 polymorphisms with metabolism of valproic acid (VPA) and lamotrigine (LTG) in epileptic children. Material/Methods We administered VPA (102) and LTG (102) to 204 children with epilepsy. Blood samples were collected before the morning dose. Serum concentration of LTG was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Serum VPA concentration was tested by fluorescence polarization immunoassay. UGT2B7 A268G, C802T, and G211T polymorphisms, as well as UGT1A4 L48V polymorphism, were assayed by direct automated DNA sequencing after PCR. Evaluation of efficacy was conducted using the Engel method. Results The adjusted serum concentration of VPA was 4.26 μg/mL per mg/kg and LTG was 1.56 μg/mL per mg/kg. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that VPA or LTG adjusted concentration showed a good linear relation with sex and age. UGT2B7 A268G and C802T polymorphisms were demonstrated to affect the serum concentration of VPA (F=3.147, P=0.047; F=22.754, P=0.000). UGT1A4 L48V polymorphism was not related with the serum concentration of LTG (F=5.328, P=0.006). In the efficacy analysis, we found that C802T polymorphism exerted strong effects on efficacy of VPA (χ2=9.265, P=0.010). L48V polymorphism also showed effects on efficacy of LTG (χ2=17.397, P=0.001). Conclusions UGT2B7, UGT1A4 polymorphisms play crucial roles in metabolism of VPA and LTG. PMID:27795544

  3. Music application alleviates short-term memory impairments through increasing cell proliferation in the hippocampus of valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Min; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Choi, Hyun-Hee

    2016-06-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder and this disorder shows impairment in reciprocal social interactions, deficits in communication, and restrictive and repetitive patterns of behaviors and interests. The effect of music on short-term memory in the view of cell proliferation in the hippocampus was evaluated using valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups. Animal model of autism was made by subcutaneous injection of 400-mg/kg valproic acid into the rat pups on the postnatal day 14. The rat pups in the music-applied groups were exposed to the 65-dB comfortable classic music for 1 hr once a day, starting postnatal day 15 and continued until postnatal day 28. In the present results, short-term memory was deteriorated by autism induction. The numbers of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyridine (BrdU)-positive, Ki-67-positive, and doublecortin (DCX)-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were decreased by autism induction. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) expressions in the hippocampus were also suppressed in the autistic rat pups. Music application alleviated short-term memory deficits with enhancing the numbers of BrdU-positive, Ki-67-positive, and DCX-positive cells in the autistic rat pups. Music application also enhanced BDNF and TrkB expressions in the autistic rat pups. The present study show that application of music enhanced hippocampal cell proliferation and alleviated short-term memory impairment through stimulating BDNF-TrkB signaling in the autistic rat pups. Music can be suggested as the therapeutic strategy to overcome the autism-induced memory deficits.

  4. Music application alleviates short-term memory impairments through increasing cell proliferation in the hippocampus of valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Min; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Choi, Hyun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder and this disorder shows impairment in reciprocal social interactions, deficits in communication, and restrictive and repetitive patterns of behaviors and interests. The effect of music on short-term memory in the view of cell proliferation in the hippocampus was evaluated using valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups. Animal model of autism was made by subcutaneous injection of 400-mg/kg valproic acid into the rat pups on the postnatal day 14. The rat pups in the music-applied groups were exposed to the 65-dB comfortable classic music for 1 hr once a day, starting postnatal day 15 and continued until postnatal day 28. In the present results, short-term memory was deteriorated by autism induction. The numbers of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyridine (BrdU)-positive, Ki-67-positive, and doublecortin (DCX)-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were decreased by autism induction. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) expressions in the hippocampus were also suppressed in the autistic rat pups. Music application alleviated short-term memory deficits with enhancing the numbers of BrdU-positive, Ki-67-positive, and DCX-positive cells in the autistic rat pups. Music application also enhanced BDNF and TrkB expressions in the autistic rat pups. The present study show that application of music enhanced hippocampal cell proliferation and alleviated short-term memory impairment through stimulating BDNF-TrkB signaling in the autistic rat pups. Music can be suggested as the therapeutic strategy to overcome the autism-induced memory deficits. PMID:27419108

  5. Palladium-benzodiazepine derivatives as promising metallodrugs for the development of antiepileptic therapies.

    PubMed

    Barros, Walleska Bismaida Zacarias Galvão; da Silva, Allysson Haide Queiroz; Barbosa, Ana Soraya Lima; Nunes, Ábner Magalhães; Reys, José Rui Machado; de Araújo-Filho, Heitor Gomes; de Souza Siqueira Quintans, Jullyana; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo José; Pfeffer, Michel; Dos Santos Malta, Valéria Rodrigues; Meneghetti, Mario Roberto

    2016-02-01

    We synthesized two organometallic diazepam-palladium(II) derivatives by C-H activation of diazepam (DZP) with palladium salts, i.e., PdCl2 and Pd(OAc)2 (OAc=acetate). Both compounds obtained are air stable and were isolated in good yields. The anticonvulsant potential of the complexes, labeled [(DZP)PdCl]2 and [(DZP)PdOAc]2, was evaluated through two animal models: pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)- and picrotoxin (PTX)-induced convulsions. The organometallic DZP-palladium(II) acetate complex, [(DZP)PdOAc]2, significantly increased (p<0.01 or p<0.001) latencies and protected the animals against convulsions induced by PTZ and PTX, while the analogous chloro derivative, [(DZP)PdCl]2, was effective (p<0.01) only in the PTZ model. These effects appear to be mediated through the GABAergic system. The possible mechanism of action of the DZP-palladium(II) complexes was also confirmed with the use of flumazenil (FLU), a GABAA-benzodiazepine receptor complex site antagonist. Herein, we present the first report of the anticonvulsant properties of organometallic DZP-palladium(II) complexes as well as evidence that these compounds may play an important role in the study of new drugs to treat patients with epilepsy.

  6. Transcriptomic analysis in the developing zebrafish embryo after compound exposure: individual gene expression and pathway regulation.

    PubMed

    Hermsen, Sanne A B; Pronk, Tessa E; van den Brandhof, Evert-Jan; van der Ven, Leo T M; Piersma, Aldert H

    2013-10-01

    The zebrafish embryotoxicity test is a promising alternative assay for developmental toxicity. Classically, morphological assessment of the embryos is applied to evaluate the effects of compound exposure. However, by applying differential gene expression analysis the sensitivity and predictability of the test may be increased. For defining gene expression signatures of developmental toxicity, we explored the possibility of using gene expression signatures of compound exposures based on commonly expressed individual genes as well as based on regulated gene pathways. Four developmental toxic compounds were tested in concentration-response design, caffeine, carbamazepine, retinoic acid and valproic acid, and two non-embryotoxic compounds, d-mannitol and saccharin, were included. With transcriptomic analyses we were able to identify commonly expressed genes, which were mostly development related, after exposure to the embryotoxicants. We also identified gene pathways regulated by the embryotoxicants, suggestive of their modes of action. Furthermore, whereas pathways may be regulated by all compounds, individual gene expression within these pathways can differ for each compound. Overall, the present study suggests that the use of individual gene expression signatures as well as pathway regulation may be useful starting points for defining gene biomarkers for predicting embryotoxicity.

  7. Common Variants of KCNJ10 Are Associated with Susceptibility and Anti-Epileptic Drug Resistance in Chinese Genetic Generalized Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yong; Yan, Kui Po; Qu, Qiang; Qu, Jian; Chen, Zi Gui; Song, Tao; Luo, Xiang-Ying; Sun, Zhong-Yi; Bi, Chang-Long; Liu, Jin-Fang

    2015-01-01

    To explore genetic mechanism of genetic generalized epilepsies (GGEs) is challenging because of their complex heritance pattern and genetic heterogeneity. KCNJ10 gene encodes Kir4.1 channels and plays a major role in modulating resting membrane potentials in excitable cells. It may cause GGEs if mutated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible association between KCNJ10 common variants and the susceptibility and drug resistance of GGEs in Chinese population. The allele-specific MALDI–TOF mass spectrometry method was used to assess 8 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of KCNJ10 in 284 healthy controls and 483 Chinese GGEs patients including 279 anti-epileptic drug responsive patients and 204 drug resistant patients. We found the rs6690889 TC+TT genotypes were lower frequency in the GGEs group than that in the healthy controls (6.7% vs 9.5%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.50[0.29–0.86]). The frequency of rs1053074 G allele was lower in the childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) group than that in the healthy controls (28.4% vs 36.2%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.70[0.53–0.93]). The frequency of rs12729701 G allele and AG+GG genotypes was lower in the CAE group than that in the healthy controls (21.2% vs 28.4%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.74[0.59–0.94] and 36.3% vs 48.1%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.83[0.72–0.96], respectively). The frequency of rs12402969 C allele and the CC+CT genotypes were higher in the GGEs drug responsive patients than that in the drug resistant patients (9.3% vs 5.6%, OR = 1.73[1.06–2.85], p = 0.026 and 36.3% vs 48.1%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.83[0.72–0.96], respectively). This study identifies potential SNPs of KCNJ10 gene that may contribute to seizure susceptibility and anti-epileptic drug resistance. PMID:25874548

  8. Inferring Alcoholism SNPs and Regulatory Chemical Compounds Based on Ensemble Bayesian Network.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan; Sun, Jiatong; Jiang, Hong; Wang, Xianyue; Wu, Lingxiang; Wu, Wei; Wang, Qh

    2016-12-20

    The disturbance of consciousness is one of the most common symptoms of those have alcoholism and may cause disability and mortality. Previous studies indicated that several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) increase the susceptibility of alcoholism. In this study, we utilized the Ensemble Bayesian Network (EBN) method to identify causal SNPs of alcoholism based on the verified GAW14 data. Thirteen out of eighteen SNPs directly connected with alcoholism were found concordance with potential risk regions of alcoholism in OMIM database. As a number of SNPs were found contributing to alteration on gene expression, known as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs), we further sought to identify chemical compounds acting as regulators of alcoholism genes captured by causal SNPs. Chloroprene and valproic acid were identified as the expression regulators for genes C11orf66 and SALL3 which were captured by alcoholism SNPs, respectively.

  9. Multipurpose Compound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Specially formulated derivatives of an unusual basic compound known as Alcide may be the answer to effective treatment and prevention of the disease bovine mastitis, a bacterial inflammation of a cow's mammary gland that results in loss of milk production and in extreme cases, death. Manufactured by Alcide Corporation the Alcide compound has killed all tested bacteria, virus and fungi, shortly after contact, with minimal toxic effects on humans or animals. Alcide Corporation credits the existence of the mastitis treatment/prevention products to assistance provided the company by NERAC, Inc.

  10. Effect of ethacrynic acid on the anticonvulsant activity of the second-generation antiepileptics against maximal electroshock-induced seizures in mice.

    PubMed

    Łukawski, Krzysztof; Swiderska, Grazyna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2009-12-01

    Recent experimental studies show that ethacrynic acid (ETA), a loop diuretic, exerts the anticonvulsant activity. Therefore, we tested the effect of ETA on the protective action of some second-generation antiepileptic drugs (oxcarbazepine [OXC], lamotrigine [LTG] and topiramate [TPM]) in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure (MES) model. ETA was administered acutely (50 and 100 mg/kg i.p.) or chronically, for 7 days (12.5 mg/kg i.p.). Both ETA acute (up to 100 mg/kg) and chronic (up to 12.5 mg/kg) treatment did not influence the threshold for electroconvulsions. In the MES test, ETA (100 mg/kg) potentiated the protective activity of TPM, decreasing its ED(50) value from 38.1 to 18.7 mg/kg (P<0.01). In contrast, ETA (100 mg/kg) remained without effect on the anticonvulsant action of the other antiepileptics (OXC and LTG) in mice. Chronic administration of ETA (12.5 mg/kg) did not affect the protective action of tested antiepileptics. The observed interaction between acute ETA and TPM was pharmacodynamic in nature because neither plasma nor total brain TPM concentrations were altered after injection of ETA.These results indicate existing interactions between ETA and TPM, which may have some clinical importance for epileptic patients treated with TPM and additionally ETA due to other medical causes.

  11. Perfluorinated Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorinated compounds such as the perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) and their derivatives are important man-made chemicals that have wide consumer and industrial applications. They are relatively contemporary chemicals, being in use only since the 1950s, and until recently, have be...

  12. Identification of the antiepileptic racetam binding site in the synaptic vesicle protein 2A by molecular dynamics and docking simulations.

    PubMed

    Correa-Basurto, José; Cuevas-Hernández, Roberto I; Phillips-Farfán, Bryan V; Martínez-Archundia, Marlet; Romo-Mancillas, Antonio; Ramírez-Salinas, Gema L; Pérez-González, Óscar A; Trujillo-Ferrara, José; Mendoza-Torreblanca, Julieta G

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) is an integral membrane protein necessary for the proper function of the central nervous system and is associated to the physiopathology of epilepsy. SV2A is the molecular target of the anti-epileptic drug levetiracetam and its racetam analogs. The racetam binding site in SV2A and the non-covalent interactions between racetams and SV2A are currently unknown; therefore, an in silico study was performed to explore these issues. Since SV2A has not been structurally characterized with X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance, a three-dimensional (3D) model was built. The model was refined by performing a molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) and the interactions of SV2A with the racetams were determined by docking studies. A reliable 3D model of SV2A was obtained; it reached structural equilibrium during the last 15 ns of the MDS (50 ns) with remaining structural motions in the N-terminus and long cytoplasmic loop. The docking studies revealed that hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds participate importantly in ligand recognition within the binding site. Residues T456, S665, W666, D670 and L689 were important for racetam binding within the trans-membrane hydrophilic core of SV2A. Identifying the racetam binding site within SV2A should facilitate the synthesis of suitable radio-ligands to study treatment response and possibly epilepsy progression.

  13. Identification of the antiepileptic racetam binding site in the synaptic vesicle protein 2A by molecular dynamics and docking simulations

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Basurto, José; Cuevas-Hernández, Roberto I.; Phillips-Farfán, Bryan V.; Martínez-Archundia, Marlet; Romo-Mancillas, Antonio; Ramírez-Salinas, Gema L.; Pérez-González, Óscar A.; Trujillo-Ferrara, José; Mendoza-Torreblanca, Julieta G.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) is an integral membrane protein necessary for the proper function of the central nervous system and is associated to the physiopathology of epilepsy. SV2A is the molecular target of the anti-epileptic drug levetiracetam and its racetam analogs. The racetam binding site in SV2A and the non-covalent interactions between racetams and SV2A are currently unknown; therefore, an in silico study was performed to explore these issues. Since SV2A has not been structurally characterized with X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance, a three-dimensional (3D) model was built. The model was refined by performing a molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) and the interactions of SV2A with the racetams were determined by docking studies. A reliable 3D model of SV2A was obtained; it reached structural equilibrium during the last 15 ns of the MDS (50 ns) with remaining structural motions in the N-terminus and long cytoplasmic loop. The docking studies revealed that hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds participate importantly in ligand recognition within the binding site. Residues T456, S665, W666, D670 and L689 were important for racetam binding within the trans-membrane hydrophilic core of SV2A. Identifying the racetam binding site within SV2A should facilitate the synthesis of suitable radio-ligands to study treatment response and possibly epilepsy progression. PMID:25914622

  14. Effects of levetiracetam, a novel antiepileptic drug, on convulsant activity in two genetic rat models of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gower, A J; Hirsch, E; Boehrer, A; Noyer, M; Marescaux, C

    1995-11-01

    The anticonvulsant effects of levetiracetam were assessed in two genetic rat models. In the audiogenic-seizure prone rat, levetiracetam, 5.4 to 96 mg/kg i.p. dose-dependently inhibited both wild running and tonic-clonic convulsions. In the GAERS model of petit mal epilepsy, levetiracetam markedly suppressed spontaneous spike-and-wave discharge (SWD) but left the underlying EEG trace normal. The effects were already marked at 5.4 mg/kg and did not increase significantly up to 170 mg/kg although more animals were completely protected. Levetiracetam produced no observable effects on behaviour apart from slight reversible sedation at 170 mg/kg. In contrast, piracetam, a structural analogue of levetiracetam, significantly and consistently suppressed SWD in GAERS rats only at the high dose of 1000 mg/kg with some slight effects at lower doses. The effect of piracetam appeared to be due to increased sleeping rather than to a direct antiepileptic effect. The results with levetiracetam argue for a clinical application in both petit mal, absence epilepsy and in treating generalised tonic-clonic and partial seizures.

  15. New Molecular Targets for Antiepileptic Drugs: α2δ, SV2A, and Kv7/KCNQ/M Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Rogawski, Michael A.; Bazil, Carl W.

    2008-01-01

    Many currently prescribed antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) act via voltage-gated sodium channels, through effects on γ-aminobutyric acid–mediated inhibition, or via voltage-gated calcium channels. Some newer AEDs do not act via these traditional mechanisms. The molecular targets for several of these nontraditional AEDs have been defined using cellular electrophysiology and molecular approaches. Here, we describe three of these targets: α2δ, auxiliary subunits of voltage-gated calcium channels through which the gabapentinoids gabapentin and pregabalin exert their anticonvulsant and analgesic actions; SV2A, a ubiquitous synaptic vesicle glycoprotein that may prepare vesicles for fusion and serves as the target for levetiracetam and its analog brivaracetam (which is currently in late-stage clinical development); and Kv7/KCNQ/M potassium channels that mediate the M-current, which acts a brake on repetitive firing and burst generation and serves as the target for the investigational AEDs retigabine and ICA-105665. Functionally, all of the new targets modulate neurotransmitter output at synapses, focusing attention on presynaptic terminals as critical sites of action for AEDs. PMID:18590620

  16. Effects of levetiracetam, an antiepileptic drug, on memory impairments associated with aging and Alzheimer's disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Devi, Latha; Ohno, Masuo

    2013-05-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that elevated hippocampal activation may be important for disrupting cognitive functions in aged subjects as well as patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, reducing deleterious overactivity of the hippocampus may have therapeutic benefits. This study was designed to compare the effects of levetiracetam, an antiepileptic drug, on memory deficits associated with normal aging and AD in mouse models. Pretraining administration of levetiracetam ameliorated memory impairments of aged C57BL/6 mice (17-20months of age) in the contextual fear conditioning paradigm. Acute levetiracetam immediately after training was also efficacious in rescuing contextual memory decline in aged mice, whereas administration at a later posttraining interval (3h) had no effect. These results suggest that suppressing overexcitation with acute levetiracetam around the time of acquisition or early consolidation may be sufficient to reverse memory decline associated with aging. In contrast, pretraining administration of levetiracetam was not able to rescue memory deficits in 5XFAD transgenic mice harboring amyloid plaque pathologies at moderate (6-8months old) or massive (12-15months old) levels, differentiating between normal aging- and AD-related memory impairments in the responsiveness to acute levetiracetam treatment.

  17. A Review for the Analysis of Antidepressant, Antiepileptic and Quinolone Type Drugs in Pharmaceuticals and Environmental Samples.

    PubMed

    Rani, Susheela; Malik, Ashok Kumar; Kaur, Ramandeep; Kaur, Ripneel

    2016-09-02

    The analysis of drugs in various biological fluids is an important criterion for the determination of the physiological performance of a drug. After sampling of the biological fluid, the next step in the analytical process is sample preparation. Sample preparation is essential for isolation of desired components from complex biological matrices and greatly influences their reliable and accurate determination. The complexity of biological fluids adds to the challenge of direct determination of the drug by chromatographic analysis, therefore demanding a sample preparation step that is often time consuming, tedious and frequently overlooked. However, direct online injection methods offer the advantage of reducing sample preparation steps and enabling effective pre-concentration and clean-up of biological fluids. These procedures can be automated and therefore reduce the requirements for handling potentially infectious biomaterial, improve reproducibility, and minimize sample manipulations and potential contamination. This review is focused on the discovery and development of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC) with different detectors. The drugs covered in this review are antiepileptics, antidepressant (AD), and quinolones. The application of these methods for determination of these drugs in biological, environmental and pharmaceutical samples has also been discussed.

  18. Drug interactions involving antiepileptic drugs: assessment of the consistency among three drug compendia and FDA-approved labels.

    PubMed

    Ekstein, Dana; Tirosh, Matanya; Eyal, Yonatan; Eyal, Sara

    2015-03-01

    Interactions of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) with other substances may lead to adverse effects and treatment failure. To avoid such interactions, clinicians often rely on drug interaction compendia. Our objective was to compare the concordance for twenty-two AEDs among three drug interaction compendia (Micromedex, Lexi-Interact, and Clinical Pharmacology) and the US Food and Drug Administration-approved product labels. For each AED, the overall concordance among data sources regarding existence of interactions and their classification was poor, with less than twenty percent of interactions listed in all four sources. Concordance among the three drug compendia decreased with the fraction of the drug excreted unchanged and was greater for established inducers of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes than for the drugs that are not inducers (R-square=0.83, P<0.01). For interactions classified as contraindications, major, and severe, concordance among the four data sources was, in most cases, less than 30%. Prescribers should be aware of the differences between drug interaction sources of information for both older AEDs and newer AEDs, in particular for those AEDs which are not involved in hepatic enzyme-mediated interactions.

  19. Disseminating findings from a drug class review: using best practices to inform prescription of antiepileptic drugs for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Melvin, Cathy L; Ranney, Leah M; Carey, Timothy S; Evans, W Douglas; AED Dissemination Panel; Kreps, Gary; Linden, Thomas; Oldham, John

    2008-03-01

    Evidence from drug class reviews is often not accessible to practicing clinicians nor is it presented in a way that allows clinicians to use the information to guide treatment and prescribing decisions. Nevertheless, information from such reviews can be very helpful to clinicians as they evaluate the "evidence" provided to them through marketing strategies implemented, primarily, by the pharmaceutical industry and designed to influence their prescribing behavior. Unfortunately, these marketing strategies can be used to promote the off-label use of drugs that may not be efficacious. One example is the pharmaceutical marketing to promote off-label use of gabapentin (Neurontin) for the treatment of bipolar disorder, the legality of which was later addressed in a major lawsuit by the National Association of Attorneys General. We describe an effort to use counter-marketing strategies to compete with those implemented by the pharmaceutical industry and to help clinicians, principally psychiatrists, make use of available evidence to inform their prescription of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in the treatment of bipolar disorder. A growing body of literature describes industry marketing practices designed to influence prescriber behavior. This literature suggests that use of competing approaches involving the same underlying strategies to deliver highly credible information from trusted sources can inform prescriber knowledge and prescribing practice. We describe our use of existing evidence to develop accurate and convincing messages and materials to be disseminated nationally to counter industry misinformation and promote evidence-based prescription of AEDs.

  20. Intrinsic excitability measures track antiepileptic drug action and uncover increasing/decreasing excitability over the wake/sleep cycle

    PubMed Central

    Meisel, Christian; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Freestone, Dean; Cook, Mark James; Achermann, Peter; Plenz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Pathological changes in excitability of cortical tissue commonly underlie the initiation and spread of seizure activity in patients suffering from epilepsy. Accordingly, monitoring excitability and controlling its degree using antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is of prime importance for clinical care and treatment. To date, adequate measures of excitability and action of AEDs have been difficult to identify. Recent insights into ongoing cortical activity have identified global levels of phase synchronization as measures that characterize normal levels of excitability and quantify any deviation therefrom. Here, we explore the usefulness of these intrinsic measures to quantify cortical excitability in humans. First, we observe a correlation of such markers with stimulation-evoked responses suggesting them to be viable excitability measures based on ongoing activity. Second, we report a significant covariation with the level of AED load and a wake-dependent modulation. Our results indicate that excitability in epileptic networks is effectively reduced by AEDs and suggest the proposed markers as useful candidates to quantify excitability in routine clinical conditions overcoming the limitations of electrical or magnetic stimulation. The wake-dependent time course of these metrics suggests a homeostatic role of sleep, to rebalance cortical excitability. PMID:26554021

  1. The effects of antiepileptic inducers in neuropsychopharmacology, a neglected issue. Part II: Pharmacological issues and further understanding.

    PubMed

    de Leon, Jose

    2015-01-01

    The literature on inducers in epilepsy and bipolar disorder is seriously contaminated by false negative findings. Part II of this comprehensive review on antiepileptic drug (AED) inducers provides clinicians with further educational material about the complexity of interpreting AED drug-drug interactions. The basic pharmacology of induction is reviewed including the cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes, the Uridine Diphosphate Glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), and P-glycoprotein (P-gp). CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 are very sensitive to induction. CYP1A2 is moderately sensitive while CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 are only mildly sensitive. CYP2D6 cannot be induced by medications. Induction of UGT and P-gp are poorly understood. The induction of metabolic enzymes such as CYPs and UGTs, and transporters such as P-gp, implies that the amount of these proteins increases when they are induced; this is almost always explained by increasing synthesis mediated by the so-called nuclear receptors (constitutive androstane, estrogen, glucocorticoid receptors and pregnaneX receptors). Although parti provides correction factors for AEDs, extrapolation from an average to an individual patient may be influenced by administration route, absence of metabolic enzyme for genetic reasons, and presence of inhibitors or other inducers. AED pharmacodynamic DDIs may also be important. Six patients with extreme sensitivity to AED inductive effects are described.

  2. Influence of ethacrynic acid on the anticonvulsant activity of conventional antiepileptic drugs in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure model.

    PubMed

    Łukawski, Krzysztof; Swiderska, Grażyna; Łuszczki, Jarogniew J; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether ethacrynic acid (EA), a loop diuretic with anticonvulsant activity, would affect the protective action of the conventional antiepileptics (AEDs) carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PHT), valproate (VPA) and phenobarbital (PB) in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure (MES) model. The effects of acute and chronic treatment with EA on these AEDs were examined. At a single dose of 100 mg/kg ip, EA enhanced the antielectroshock activity of VPA, decreasing its ED₅₀ value from 225.6 to 146.6 mg/kg (p < 0.05), but enhancement was not observed following continuous administration of EA (12.5 mg/kg) for seven days. Combined treatment of EA with other AEDs had no effect on their ED₅₀ values. The observed interaction between EA and VPA was pharmacodynamic in nature as EA did not alter free plasma (non-protein-bound) and total brain concentrations of VPA. Taking into consideration the clinical use of both drugs, this interaction between EA and VPA can be important for patients receiving these drugs.

  3. Transformation of the antiepileptic drug oxcarbazepine upon different water disinfection processes.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Fenet, Hélène; Gomez, Elena; Chiron, Serge

    2011-02-01

    Transformation of the pharmaceutical oxcarbazepine (OXC), a keto analogue of carbamazepine (CBZ) was investigated under different water disinfection processes (ozonation, chlorination and UV irradiation) to compare its persistence, toxicity and degradation pathways with those of CBZ. Analysis by LC-ion trap-MS(n) allowed for the identification of up to thirteen transformation products (TPs). The major abundant and persistent TPs (10,11-dihydro-10,11-trans-dihydroxy-carbamazepine (DiOH-CBZ), acridine (ACIN) and 1-(2-benzaldehyde)-(1H, 3H)-quinazoline-2,4-dione (BQD)) were identical to those previously reported during water treatment of CBZ. Only one new compound arising from an intramolecular cyclisation reaction was identified during UV irradiation. OXC reacted quickly with hydroxyl radical and relatively rapidly with free chlorine while slow reaction rates were recorded in presence of ozone and upon UV irradiation. An increase of the acute toxicity of UV irradiated solutions, monitored by a Daphnia magna bioassay, was recorded, probably due to the accumulation of ACIN. The formation of ACIN is of concern due to the carcinogenic properties of this chemical. ACIN was also generated during the direct UV photo transformation of DiOH-CBZ and 10-hydroxy-10,11-dihydro-carbamazepine (OH-CBZ), two metabolites of OXC and CBZ widely detected in water resources. Analysis of tap water samples revealed the occurrence at ng/L levels of the major TPs detected under laboratory scale experiments, except ACIN.

  4. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production during 2002. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida. They were also recovered from well brines in Michigan by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And they were recovered from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals.

  5. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, seawater and natural brines accounted for 51% of US magnesium compounds production. World magnesia production was estimated to be 14.5 Mt. Most of the production came from China, North Korea, Russia and Turkey. Although no specific production figures are available, Japan and the United States are estimated to account for almost one-half of the world's capacity from seawater and brines.

  6. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60% of US magnesium compounds production in 2001. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater in Florida by Premier Chemicals. They were also recovered from Michigan well brines by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And Premier Chemicals recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from magnesite in Nevada. Reilly Industries and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah.

  7. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 54 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2010. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  8. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 40 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2009. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover, and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  9. The antiepileptic drug lamotrigine is a substrate of mouse and human breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2).

    PubMed

    Römermann, Kerstin; Helmer, Renate; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    Resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is the major problem in the treatment of epilepsy. One hypothesis to explain AED resistance suggests that seizure-induced overexpression of efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts AEDs to reach their brain targets. Various studies examined whether AEDs are substrates of P-glycoprotein (Pgp; MDR1; ABCB1), whereas information about the potential role of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; ABCG2) is scanty. We used a highly sensitive in vitro assay (concentration equilibrium transport assay; CETA) with MDCKII cells transduced with murine Bcrp1 or human BCRP to evaluate whether AEDs are substrates of this major efflux transporter. Six of 7 AEDs examined, namely phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, levetiracetam, topiramate, and valproate, were not transported by Bcrp at therapeutic concentrations, whereas lamotrigine exhibited a marked asymmetric, Bcrp-mediated transport in the CETA, which could be almost completely inhibited with the Bcrp inhibitor Ko143. Significant but less marked transport of lamotrigine was determined in MDCK cells transfected with human BCRP. Lamotrigine is also a substrate of human Pgp, so that this drug is the first AED that has been identified as a dual substrate of the two major human efflux transporters at the BBB. Previous in vivo studies have demonstrated a synergistic or cooperative role of Pgp and Bcrp in the efflux of dual substrates at the BBB, so that transport of lamotrigine by Pgp and BCRP may be an important mechanism of pharmacoresistance in epilepsy patients in whom both transporters are overexpressed.

  10. Association of SCN1A gene polymorphism with antiepileptic drug responsiveness in the population of Thrace, Greece

    PubMed Central

    Veletza, Stavroula; Heliopoulos, Ioannis; Vadikolias, Konstantinos; Tripsianis, Grigorios; Stathi, Chrysa; Piperidou, Charitomeni

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim was to examine the influence of the SCN1A gene polymorphism IVS5-91 rs3812718 G>A on the response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in monotherapy or polytherapy. Material and methods Two hundred epilepsy patients and 200 healthy subjects were genotyped for SCN1A IVS5-91 rs3812718 G>A polymorphism using TaqMan assay. Patients were divided into drug-responsive and drug-resistant patients. The drug-responsive group was further studied, comparing monotherapy in maximum and minimum doses and monotherapy-responsive and -resistant groups. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the allelic frequencies and genotype distributions between patients and controls (p = 0.178). The distribution of SCN1A IVS5-91 rs3812718 G>A genotypes was similar between drug-responsive and drug-resistant patients (p = 0.463). The differences in genotype distributions (A/A or A/G vs. G/G) between monotherapy-responsive and -resistant groups were statistically significant (p = 0.021). Within the monotherapy-responsive group, patients with the A/A or A/G genotype needed higher dose AEDs than patients with the G/G genotype (p = 0.032). The relative risk for generalized epilepsy due to A-containing genotypes was of marginal statistical significance when compared with the G/G genotype (p = 0.05). Conclusions Overall, our findings demonstrate an association of SCN1A IVS5-91 rs3812718 G>A polymorphism with AED responsiveness in monotherapy without evidence of an effect on drug-resistant epilepsy. PMID:28144265

  11. Low plasma antioxidant status in patients with epilepsy and the role of antiepileptic drugs on oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Bindu; Ramalingam, Krishnan; Kumar, Rajendiran Vinoth

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress has been implicated in various disorders including epilepsy. We studied the antioxidant status in patients with epilepsy and aimed at determining whether there was any difference in the antioxidant levels between patients and controls, patients who are not on antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), and on treatment, between individual AEDs and patients on monotherapy and polytherapy. Materials and Methods: Antioxidant levels like catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), vitamin E, glutathione (GSH), thiol group (SH), uric acid, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were compared between 100 patients with epilepsy and equal number of controls. Twenty-five patients who were not on AEDs were compared with patients on AEDs and the control group. Patients were divided into monotherapy and polytherapy group and antioxidant status was compared between the two groups and between individual drugs. Results: Catalase, SH, vitamin E, and TAC were significantly low in patients with epilepsy than those in the control group (P < 0.001). GSH and uric acid did not show any difference; GPx in patients was significantly higher than those in the control group There were no differences in the antioxidant levels between the treated and the untreated groups; however, it was lower in untreated patients than controls (P < 0.001), suggesting that AEDs do not modify the oxidative stress. Patients on Valproate (VPA) showed higher catalase and GPx levels. Catalase was higher in the monotherapy than polytherapy group (P < 0.04). Conclusion: Our study found significantly low levels of antioxidant in patients as compared to controls. AED did not influence the antioxidant status suggesting that seizures induce oxidative stress. PMID:25506160

  12. A microdialysis study of the novel antiepileptic drug levetiracetam: extracellular pharmacokinetics and effect on taurine in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Tong, X; Patsalos, P N

    2001-01-01

    Using a rat model which allows serial blood sampling and concurrent brain microdialysis sampling, we have investigated the temporal kinetic inter-relationship of levetiracetam in serum and brain extracellular fluid (frontal cortex and hippocampus) following systemic administration of levetiracetam, a new antiepileptic drug. Concurrent extracellular amino acid concentrations were also determined. After administration (40 or 80 mg kg−1), levetiracetam rapidly appeared in both serum (Tmax, 0.4 – 0.7 h) and extracellular fluid (Tmax, 2.0 – 2.5 h) and concentrations rose linearly and dose-dependently, suggesting that transport across the blood-brain barrier is rapid and not rate-limiting. The serum free fraction (free/total serum concentration ratio; mean±s.e.mean range 0.93 – 1.05) was independent of concentration and confirms that levetiracetam is not bound to blood proteins. The kinetic profiles for the hippocampus and frontal cortex were indistinguishable suggesting that levetiracetam distribution in the brain is not brain region specific. However, t1/2 values were significantly larger than those for serum (mean range, 3.0 – 3.3 h vs 2.1 – 2.3 h) and concentrations did not attain equilibrium with respect to serum. Levetiracetam (80 mg kg−1) was associated with a significant reduction in taurine in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Other amino acids were unaffected by levetiracetam. Levetiracetam readily and rapidly enters the brain without regional specificity. Its prolonged efflux from and slow equilibration within the brain may explain, in part, its long duration of action. The concurrent changes in taurine may contribute to its mechanism of action. PMID:11454660

  13. Evaluation of anti-epileptic activity of leaf extracts of Punica granatum on experimental models of epilepsy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Viswanatha, Gollapalle L.; Venkataranganna, Marikunte V.; Prasad, Nunna Bheema Lingeswara; Ashok, Godavarthi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study was aimed to examine the anti-epileptic activity of leaf extracts of Punica granatum in experimental models of epilepsy in Swiss albino mice. Materials and Methods: Petroleum ether leaf extract of P. granatum (PLPG), methanolic LPG (MLPG), and aqueous LPG (ALPG) extracts of P. granatum leaves was initially evaluated against 6-Hz-induced seizure model; the potent extract was further evaluated against maximal electroshock (MES) and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced convulsions. Further, the potent extract was evaluated for its influence on Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) levels in brain, to explore the possible mechanism of action. In addition, the potent extract was subjected to actophotometer test to assess its possible locomotor activity deficit inducing action. Results: In 6-Hz seizure test, the MLPG has alleviated 6-Hz-induced seizures significantly and dose dependently at doses 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg. In contrast, PLPG and ALPG did not show any protection, only high dose of ALPG (400 and 800 mg/kg, p.o.) showed very slight inhibition. Based on these observations, only MLPG was tested in MES and PTZ models. Interestingly, the MLPG (50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) has offered significant and dose-dependent protection against MES (P < 0.01) and PTZ-induced (P < 0.01) seizures in mice. Further, MLPG showed a significant increase in brain GABA levels (P < 0.01) compared to control and showed insignificant change in locomotor activity in all tested doses (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg). Interestingly, higher dose of MLPG (400 mg/kg, p.o.) and Diazepam (5 mg/mg, p.o.) have completely abolished the convulsions in all the anticonvulsant tests. Conclusion: These findings suggest that MLPG possesses significant anticonvulsant property, and one of the possible mechanisms behind the anticonvulsant activity of MLPG may be through enhanced GABA levels in the brain. PMID:27757273

  14. Effects of antiepileptic drug therapy on vitamin D status and biochemical markers of bone turnover in children with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Nettekoven, Sina; Ströhle, Alexander; Trunz, Birgit; Wolters, Maike; Hoffmann, Susanne; Horn, Rüdiger; Steinert, Martin; Brabant, Georg; Lichtinghagen, Ralf; Welkoborsky, Hans-Jürgen; Tuxhorn, Ingrid; Hahn, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    Reports of decreased serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) and altered bone metabolism associated with antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment are inconsistent and predominantly restricted to adults. In this cross-sectional observational study, the aim was to evaluate the influence of AED treatment on vitamin D status and markers of bone turnover in children with epilepsy. In 38 children taking AEDs and 44 healthy control subjects, blood samples were collected to determine the levels of serum 25-OHD, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), calcium (Ca), phosphate (P), bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), osteocalcin (OC) and C terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP). More than 75% of the patients were vitamin D deficient (serum 25-OHD<20 ng/mL) and 21% of the patients had an insufficient vitamin D status (serum 25-OHD=20-30 ng/mL). In the patients, the serum levels of OC (p = 0.002) and BAP (p < 0.001) were significantly increased, but ICTP (p = 0.002) concentrations were significantly decreased compared with the control group. When patients where divided into two groups according to their medication (mono- or polytherapy), significantly lower 25-OHD (p = 0.038) and ICTP (p = 0.005) levels and elevated BAP (p = 0.023) concentrations were found in patients under polytherapy. An association between 25-OHD and the measured bone markers could not be determined. Our results indicate that the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in epilepsy patients under AED treatment is high, especially under polytherapy, and alteration markers of bone formation and resorption suggests an accelerated skeletal turnover. The routine monitoring of serum 25-OHD and vitamin D supplementation on an individual basis should be considered.

  15. Seizure Outcomes Following Use of Generic vs. Brand-Name Antiepileptic Drugs: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kesselheim, Aaron S.; Stedman, Margaret R.; Bubrick, Ellen J.; Gagne, Joshua J.; Misono, Alexander S.; Lee, Joy L.; Brookhart, M. Alan; Avorn, Jerry; Shrank, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Background The automatic substitution of bioequivalent generic for brand-name antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) has been linked by anecdotal report to loss of seizure control. Objective To evaluate studies comparing brand-name and generic AEDs and determine whether evidence exists of superiority of the brand-name version in maintaining seizure control. Data Sources English-language human studies identified in searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1984 to August 2009). Study Selection Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies comparing seizure events or seizure-related outcomes between one brand-name AED and at least one alternate version produced by a distinct manufacturer. Data Extraction We identified 16 articles (9 RCTs, 1 prospective nonrandomized trial, 6 observational studies). We assessed characteristics of the studies and, for RCTs, extracted counts for patients whose seizures were characterized as “controlled” and “uncontrolled.” Data Synthesis Seven RCTs were included in the meta-analysis. The aggregate odds ratio (n=204) was 1.0 (95% confidence interval: 0.7–1.4), indicating no difference in the odds of uncontrolled seizure for patients on generic medications compared to patients on brand-name medications. In contrast, the observational studies identified trends in drug or health services utilization that the authors attributed to changes in seizure control. Conclusions Though most RCTs were short-term evaluations, the available evidence does not suggest an association between loss of seizure control and generic substitution of at least three types of AEDs. The observational study data may be explained by factors such as undue concern from patients or physicians about the effectiveness of generic AEDs after a recent switch. In the absence of better data, physicians may want to consider more intensive monitoring of high-risk patients taking AEDs when any switch occurs. PMID:20329806

  16. Does brain slices from pentylenetetrazole-kindled mice provide a more predictive screening model for antiepileptic drugs?

    PubMed

    Hansen, Suzanne L; Sterjev, Zoran; Werngreen, Marie; Simonsen, Bodil J; Knudsen, Katrine E; Nielsen, Ane H; Pedersen, Mikael E; Badolo, Lassiana; Kristiansen, Uffe; Vestergaard, Henrik T

    2012-05-05

    The cortical wedge is a commonly applied model for in vitro screening of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and has been extensively used in characterization of well-known AEDs. However, the predictive validity of this model as a screening model has been questioned as, e.g., carbamazepine has been reported to lack effect in this model. The neuroplastic changes induced in acute and chronic animal models of epilepsy are known to affect the pharmacological profile of AEDs in vivo. Hence, we investigated whether brain slices from pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindled animals could provide a more predictive screening model for AEDs. To this end, we compared the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological profile of several selected AEDs (phenobarbital, phenytoin, tiagabine, fosphenytoin, valproate, and carbamazepine) along with citalopram using the PTZ-kindled model and brain slices from naïve, saline-injected and PTZ-kindled mice. Our data suggest that the use of slices from PTZ-kindled mice in the cortical wedge does not increase the predictive validity of the model as an in vitro screening model for AEDs. Traditionally, the incidence of certain seizure types is widely used as a measure to characterize drug action in animal models of epilepsy. In our study, the anticonvulsant effect of the AEDs was investigated in vivo using several observational parameters (i.e., incidence and duration of convulsions, latency to clonic convulsions, and severity of convulsions). We found that including the observational parameter "severity" offered important additional information about the drug profile that would otherwise be lost if only a single parameter as "incidence" was used.

  17. Brain tumors in eloquent areas: A European multicenter survey of intraoperative mapping techniques, intraoperative seizures occurrence, and antiepileptic drug prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Spena, Giannantonio; Schucht, Philippe; Seidel, Kathleen; Rutten, Geert-Jan; Freyschlag, Christian Franz; D'Agata, Federico; Costi, Emanule; Zappa, Francesca; Fontanella, Marco; Fontaine, Denys; Almairac, Fabien; Cavallo, Michele; De Bonis, Pasquale; Conesa, Gerardo; Foroglou, Nicholas; Gil-Robles, Santiago; Mandonnet, Emanuel; Martino, Juan; Picht, Thomas; Viegas, Catarina; Wager, Michel; Pallud, Johan

    2017-04-01

    Intraoperative mapping and monitoring techniques for eloquent area tumors are routinely used world wide. Very few data are available regarding mapping and monitoring methods and preferences, intraoperative seizures occurrence and perioperative antiepileptic drug management. A questionnaire was sent to 20 European centers with experience in intraoperative mapping or neurophysiological monitoring for the treatment of eloquent area tumors. Fifteen centers returned the completed questionnaires. Data was available on 2098 patients. 863 patients (41.1%) were operated on through awake surgery and intraoperative mapping, while 1235 patients (58.8%) received asleep surgery and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring or mapping. There was great heterogeneity between centers with some totally AW oriented (up to 100%) and other almost totally ASL oriented (up to 92%) (31% SD). For awake surgery, 79.9% centers preferred an asleep-awake-asleep anesthesia protocol. Only 53.3% of the centers used ECoG or transcutaneous EEG. The incidence of intraoperative seizures varied significantly between centers, ranging from 2.5% to 54% (p < 0.001). It there appears to be a statistically significant link between the mastery of mapping technique and the risk of intraoperative seizures. Moreover, history of preoperative seizures can significantly increase the risk of intraoperative seizures (p < 0.001). Intraoperative seizures occurrence was similar in patients with or without perioperative drugs (12% vs. 12%, p = 0.2). This is the first European survey to assess intraoperative functional mapping and monitoring protocols and the management of peri- and intraoperative seizures. This data can help identify specific aspects that need to be investigated in prospective and controlled studies.

  18. Antiepileptic Drug Use, Falls, Fractures, and BMD in Postmenopausal Women: Findings From the Women's Health Initiative (WHI)

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Laura D; Johnson, Karen C; Robbins, John; Larson, Joseph C; Curb, J David; Watson, Kathleen; Gass, Margery; LaCroix, Andrea Z

    2010-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used increasingly in clinical practice to treat a number of conditions. However, the relationship between the use of these medications, particularly the newer AEDs, and fracture risk has not been well characterized. We used data from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) to determine the relationship bewteen the use of AEDs and falls, fractures, and bone mineral density (BMD) over an average of 7.7 years of follow-up. We included 138,667 women (1,385 users of AEDs and 137,282 nonusers) aged 50 to 79 years in this longitudinal cohort analyses. After adjustment for covariates, use of AEDs was positively associated with total fractures [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30–1.61], all site-specific fractures including the hip (HR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.05–2.17), clinical vertebral fractures (HR = 1.60, 95% CI 1.20–2.12), lower arm or wrist fractures (HR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.11–1.76), and other clinical fractures (HR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.29–1.65) and two or more falls (HR = 1.62, 95% CI 1.50–1.74) but not with baseline BMD or changes in BMD (p ≥ .064 for all sites). Use of more than one and use of enzyme-inducing AEDs were significantly associated with total fractures (HR = 1.55, 95% CI 1.15–2.09 and HR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.09–1.69, respectively). We conclude that in clinical practice, postmenopausal women who use AEDs should be considered at increased risk for fracture, and attention to fall prevention may be particularly important in these women. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:19839772

  19. An evaluation of factors affecting adherence to antiepileptic drugs in patients with epilepsy: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Gurumurthy, Ranjana; Chanda, Kulkarni; Sarma, GRK

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Adherence to antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy is important for controlling seizures in patients with epilepsy (PWE). It is vital to identify the factors influencing adherence to AED therapy using validated tools. This study aimed to evaluate the pattern and extent of AED adherence among PWE and to identify the factors that influence adherence. METHODS This was a cross-sectional study involving PWE who had a confirmed diagnosis. Treatment adherence was assessed using the four-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Univariate analysis with chi-square test was used to observe the association between different variables and AED adherence. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to identify the predictors of adherence. RESULTS 451 PWE (mean age 27.3 ± 8.1 years) were enrolled in the study; 251 (55.7%) were male and 198 (43.9%) were from the lower socioeconomic class. 326 (72.3%) patients had high adherence to AED therapy, while 125 (27.7%) had low adherence. AED adherence was significantly associated with socioeconomic status (p = 0.043) and type of epilepsy (p = 0.033). However, no significant difference was observed between adherence and age, gender, marital status, epilepsy duration, number and type of AEDs, and occurrence of adverse drug reactions. Patients with focal epilepsy and those from the middle/lower-middle socioeconomic classes were less likely to be nonadherent. The primary reason for nonadherence was forgetfulness. CONCLUSION This study found that a majority of PWE have optimal rates of AED adherence and that forgetfulness is the primary reason for nonadherence among PWE. PMID:26805666

  20. Prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs and use of primary healthcare during childhood: a population-based cohort study in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Würtz, Anne Mette; Vestergaard, Claus Høstrup; Vestergaard, Mogens; Bech, Bodil Hammer

    2017-01-01

    Objective Prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) has been associated with adverse outcomes in the offspring such as congenital malformations and neuropsychiatric disorders. The objective of this study was to investigate whether prenatal exposure to AEDs is also associated with more frequent use of primary healthcare during childhood. Design Population-based cohort study. Setting Nationwide national registers in Denmark. Participants All live-born singletons in Denmark during 1997–2012 identified in the Danish National Patient Register and followed until 31 December 2013 (n=963 010). Information on prenatal exposure to AEDs for maternal indication of epilepsy and other neurological conditions was obtained from the Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. Main outcome measures The primary outcome measure was the number and type of contacts with the general practitioner (GP), excluding routine well-child visits and vaccinations. The secondary outcome measure was specific services provided at the GP contact. The association between prenatal exposure to AEDs and contacts with the GP was estimated by using negative binomial regression adjusting for sex and date of birth of the child, maternal age, cohabitation status, income, education, substance abuse, depression, severe psychiatric disorders and use of antipsychotics, antidepressants and insulin. Results Children exposed prenatally to AEDs (n=4478) had 3% (95% CI 0 to 5%) more GP contacts during the study period than unexposed children. This was primarily accounted for by the number of phone contacts. Within each year of follow-up, exposed children tended to have more contacts than unexposed children, but the differences were small. We found no difference between exposed and unexposed children with regard to specific services provided at the GP contact. For the individual AEDs, we found that exposure to valproate or oxcarbazepine was associated with more GP contacts. Conclusions We found only minor

  1. Intestinal absorption of the antiepileptic drug substance vigabatrin is altered by infant formula in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Nøhr, Martha Kampp; Thale, Zia I; Brodin, Birger; Hansen, Steen H; Holm, René; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd

    2014-01-01

    Vigabatrin is an antiepileptic drug substance mainly used in pediatric treatment of infantile spasms. The main source of nutrition for infants is breast milk and/or infant formula. Our hypothesis was that infant formula may affect the intestinal absorption of vigabatrin. The aim was therefore to investigate the potential effect of coadministration of infant formula with vigabatrin on the oral absorption in vitro and in vivo. The effect of vigabatrin given with an infant formula on the oral uptake and transepithelial transport was investigated in vitro in Caco-2 cells. In vivo effects of infant formula and selected amino acids on the pharmacokinetic profile of vigabatrin was investigated after oral coadministration to male Sprague–Dawley rats using acetaminophen as a marker for gastric emptying. The presence of infant formula significantly reduced the uptake rate and permeability of vigabatrin in Caco-2 cells. Oral coadministration of vigabatrin and infant formula significantly reduced Cmax and prolonged tmax of vigabatrin absorption. Ligands for the proton-coupled amino acid transporter PAT1, sarcosine, and proline/l-tryptophan had similar effects on the pharmacokinetic profile of vigabatrin. The infant formula decreased the rate of gastric emptying. Here we provide experimental evidence for an in vivo role of PAT1 in the intestinal absorption of vigabatrin. The effect of infant formula on the oral absorption of vigabatrin was found to be due to delayed gastric emptying, however, it seems reasonable that infant formula may also directly affect the intestinal absorption rate of vigabatrin possibly via PAT1. PMID:25505585

  2. Non alcoholic fatty liver disease, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and atherogenic ratios in epileptic children and adolescents on long term antiepileptic drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Dina Ahmed Amin; Ismail, Mona Ahmed; Ibrahim, Ayman Mohamed

    2012-01-15

    This study explores the occurrence of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD), Insulin Resistance (IR), dyslipidemia and atherogenic ratios in epileptic children and adolescents receiving Valproic Acid (VPA), Carbamazepine (CBZ) or both (combination therapy) compared to healthy controls. Abdominal Computerized Tomography (CT), measurements of serum fasting insulin, glucose, serum lipids and liver enzymes were performed in VPA (n = 14), CBZ (n = 14) or both (n = 10) treated non-diabetic non-obese epileptic patients compared to healthy controls (n = 10). Abdominal CT demonstrated characteristics of fatty liver disease in 42.8% of VPA, in 21.4% of CBZ, in 60% of combination therapy treated patients and none of the healthy controls. All of them were overweight and 53.3% had IR. In conclusion VPA therapy was associated with increased risk of IR and NAFLD, while CBZ therapy was associated with dyslipidemia and combination therapy was associated with all these risks.

  3. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 52 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2006. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from sea-water by Premier Chemicals in Florida; from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas; and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from brucite by Applied Chemical Magnesias in Texas, from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas from their operations mentioned above. About 59 percent of the magnesium compounds consumed in the United States was used for refractories that are used mainly to line steelmaking furnaces. The remaining 41 percent was consumed in agricultural, chemical, construction, environmental and industrial applications.

  4. Intermetallic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagiwa, Y.; Matsuura, Y.; Kimura, K.

    2014-06-01

    We have focused on the binary narrow-bandgap intermetallic compounds FeGa3 and RuGa3 as thermoelectric materials. Their crystal structure is FeGa3-type (tetragonal, P42/ mnm) with 16 atoms per unit cell. Despite their simple crystal structure, their room temperature thermal conductivity is in the range 4-5-W-m-1-K-1. Both compounds have narrow-bandgaps of approximately 0.3-eV near the Fermi level. Because their Seebeck coefficients are quite large negative values in the range 350-<-| S 373K|-<-550- μV-K-1 for undoped samples, it should be possible to obtain highly efficient thermoelectric materials both by adjusting the carrier concentration and by reducing the thermal conductivity. Here, we report the effects of doping on the thermoelectric properties of FeGa3 and RuGa3 as n and p-type materials. The dimensionless figure of merit, ZT, was significantly improved by substitution of Sn for Ga in FeGa3 (electron-doping) and by substitution of Zn for Ga in RuGa3 (hole-doping), mainly as a result of optimization of the electronic part, S 2 σ.

  5. Indications of newer and older anti-epileptic drug use: findings from a southern Italian general practice setting from 2005–2011

    PubMed Central

    Italiano, Domenico; Capuano, Annalisa; Alibrandi, Angela; Ferrara, Rosarita; Cannata, Angelo; Trifirò, Gianluca; Sultana, Janet; Ferrajolo, Carmen; Tari, Michele; Tari, Daniele Ugo; Perrotta, Margherita; Pagliaro, Claudia; Rafaniello, Concita; Spina, Edoardo; Arcoraci, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aim of the study was to analyze the prescribing pattern of both newer and older AEDs. Methods A population of almost 150 000 individuals registered with 123 general practitioners was included in this study. Patients who received at least one AED prescription over 2005–2011 were identified. The 1 year prevalence and cumulative incidence of AED use, by drug class and individual drug, were calculated over the study period. Potential predictors of starting therapy with newer AEDs were also investigated. Results The prevalence of use per 1000 inhabitants of older AEDs increased from 10.7 (95% CI10.1, 11.2) in 2005 to 13.0 (95% CI12.4, 13.6) in 2011, while the incidence remained stable. Newer AED incidence decreased from 9.4 (95% CI 8.9, 9.9) in 2005 to 7.0 (95% CI 6.6, 7.5) in 2011, with a peak of 15.5 (95% CI 14.8, 16.1) in 2006. Phenobarbital and valproic acid were the most commonly prescribed AEDs as starting therapy for epilepsy. Gabapentin and pregabalin accounted for most new pain-related prescriptions, while valproic acid and lamotrigine were increasingly used for mood disorders. Female gender (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.20, 1.53), age ranging between 45–54 years (OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.16, 1.66) and pain as an indication (OR 16.7, 95% CI, 13.1, 21.2) were associated with newer AEDs starting therapy. Conclusions Older AEDs were mainly used for epileptic and mood disorders, while newer drugs were preferred for neuropathic pain. Gender, age, indication of use and year of starting therapy influenced the choice of AED type. The decrease of newer AED use during 2007 is probably related to the restricted reimbursement criteria for gabapentin and pregabalin. PMID:25556909

  6. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 57 percent of magnesium compounds produced in the United States in 2011. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties LLC from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia LLC in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash Wendover LLC and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma Inc. in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its brine operation in Michigan.

  7. Bismaleimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Johnnie E.; Jamieson, Donald R.

    1986-01-14

    Bismaleimides of the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, C1 or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the alkylene bridging group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine, form polybismaleimide resins which have valuable physical properties. Uniquely, these compounds permit extended cure times, i.e., they remain fluid for a time sufficient to permit the formation of a homogeneous melt prior to curing.

  8. Bismaleimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Adams, J.E.; Jamieson, D.R.

    1986-01-14

    Bismaleimides of the formula shown in the diagram wherein R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] each independently is H, C[sub 1-4]-alkyl, C[sub 1-4]-alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1--3; and the alkylene bridging group, optionally, is substituted by 1--3 methyl groups or by fluorine, form polybismaleimide resins which have valuable physical properties. Uniquely, these compounds permit extended cure times, i.e., they remain fluid for a time sufficient to permit the formation of a homogeneous melt prior to curing.

  9. Differences in histone modifications between slow- and fast-twitch muscle of adult rats and following overload, denervation, or valproic acid administration.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Fuminori; Nimura, Keisuke; Ishino, Saki; Nakai, Naoya; Nakata, Ken; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2015-11-15

    Numerous studies have reported alterations in skeletal muscle properties and phenotypes in response to various stimuli such as exercise, unloading, and gene mutation. However, a shift in muscle fiber phenotype from fast twitch to slow twitch is not completely induced by stimuli. This limitation is hypothesized to result from the epigenetic differences between muscle types. The main purpose of the present study was to identify the differences in histone modification for the plantaris (fast) and soleus (slow) muscles of adult rats. Genome-wide analysis by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by DNA sequencing revealed that trimethylation at lysine 4 and acetylation of histone 3, which occurs at transcriptionally active gene loci, was less prevalent in the genes specific to the slow-twitch soleus muscle. Conversely, gene loci specific to the fast-twitch plantaris muscle were associated with the aforementioned histone modifications. We also found that upregulation of slow genes in the plantaris muscle, which are related to enhanced muscular activity, is not associated with activating histone modifications. Furthermore, silencing of muscle activity by denervation caused the displacement of acetylated histone and RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in 5' ends of genes in plantaris, but minor effects were observed in soleus. Increased recruitment of Pol II induced by forced acetylation of histone was also suppressed in valproic acid-treated soleus. Our present data indicate that the slow-twitch soleus muscle has a unique set of histone modifications, which may relate to the preservation of the genetic backbone against physiological stimuli.

  10. Encapsulation of valproic acid and sodic phenytoin in ordered mesoporous SiO 2 solids for the treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, T.; Basaldella, E. I.; Ojeda, M. L.; Manjarrez, J.; Alexander-Katz, R.

    2006-10-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is one of the most frequent types of human neurological diseases, and a variety of surgical procedures have been developed for the treatment of intractable cases. An alternative is the use of drug-containing reservoirs based on nanostructured materials of controlled pore sizes in order to deliver the drug without causing secondary effects. Ordered SiO 2 nanostructures were developed as drug reservoirs. The latter were prepared by the sol-gel process using tetraethyl orthosilicate TEOS as precursor to form the "sol" and P123 surfactant as the organic structure-directing agent. In addition to the nontoxic nature of amorphous silica, uniform and tunable pore sizes between 2.5 and 30 nm can be obtained in this way. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of these materials for the storage and release of drugs in the brain. For that, we loaded valproic acid (VH) and sodic phenytoin (PH) molecules into an ordered mesoporous SiO 2 by impregnation and characterized the drug impregnated SiO 2 by standard physical and spectroscopic techniques to identify the parameters necessary to improve the capacity and quality of the reservoirs. Finally, a study of neurohistopathology of the effects of these reservoirs on brain tissue is presented.

  11. Phase 1/2 study of the combination of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine with valproic acid in patients with leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Blanca; Yang, Hui; Rosner, Gary; Verstovsek, Srdan; Rytting, Michael; Wierda, William G.; Ravandi, Farhad; Koller, Charles; Xiao, Lianchun; Faderl, Stefan; Estrov, Zeev; Cortes, Jorge; O'Brien, Susan; Estey, Elihu; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Fiorentino, Jackie; Jabbour, Elias; Issa, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a phase 1/2 study of the combination of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (decitabine) and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) in patients with advanced leukemia, including older untreated patients. A group of 54 patients were treated with a fixed dose of decitabine (15 mg/m2 by IV daily for 10 days) administered concomitantly with escalating doses of VPA orally for 10 days. A 50 mg/kg daily dose of VPA was found to be safe. Twelve (22%) patients had objective response, including 10 (19%) complete remissions (CRs), and 2 (3%) CRs with incomplete platelet recovery (CRp). Among 10 elderly patients with acute myelogenous leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome, 5 (50%) had a response (4CRs, 1CRp's). Induction mortality was observed in 1 (2%) patient. Major cytogenetic response was documented in 6 of 8 responders. Remission duration was 7.2 months (range, 1.3-12.6+ months). Overall survival was 15.3 months (range, 4.6-20.2+ months) in responders. Transient DNA hypomethylation and global histone H3 and H4 acetylation were induced, and were associated with p15 reactivation. Patients with lower pretreatment levels of p15 methylation had a significantly higher response rate. In summary, this combination of epigenetic therapy in leukemia was safe and active, and was associated with transient reversal of aberrant epigenetic marks. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00075010. PMID:16882711

  12. Effects of Korean red ginseng extracts on neural tube defects and impairment of social interaction induced by prenatal exposure to valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Pitna; Park, Jin Hee; Kwon, Kyoung Ja; Kim, Ki Chan; Kim, Hee Jin; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Hahn Young; Han, Seol-Heui; Shin, Chan Young

    2013-01-01

    Ginseng is one of the most widely used medicinal plants, which belongs to the genus Panax. Compared to uncured white ginseng, red ginseng has been generally regarded to produce superior pharmacological effects with lesser side/adverse effects, which made it popular in a variety of formulation from tea to oriental medicine. Using the prenatal valproic acid (VPA)-injection model of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in rats, which produces social impairrment and altered seizure susceptibility as in human ASD patients as well as mild neural tube defects like crooked tail phenotype, we examined whether chronic administration of red ginseng extract may rescue the social impairment and crooked tail phenotype in prenatally VPA-exposed rat offspring. VPA-induced impairment in social interactions tested using sociability and social preference paradigms as well as crooked tail phenotypes were significantly improved by administration of Korean red ginseng (KRG) in a dose dependent manner. Rat offspring prenatally exposed to VPA showed higher sensitivity to electric shock seizure and increased locomotor activity in open-field test. KRG treatment reversed abnormal locomotor activity and sensitivity to electric shock to control level. These results suggest that KRG may modulate neurobehavioral and structural organization of nervous system adversely affected by prenatal exposure to VPA.

  13. Valproic acid (VPA) promotes the epithelial mesenchymal transition of hepatocarcinoma cells via transcriptional and post-transcriptional up regulation of Snail.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Feng, Hua; Hu, Jinhua; Tian, Xiangguo; Zhang, Chunqing

    2016-12-01

    Due to the low cost and favorable safety profile, valproic acid (VPA) has been considered as a potential candidate drug for therapy of various cancers. Our present study revealed that VPA, at the concentration (1mM) which has no effect on cell proliferation, can significantly increase the in vitro migration and invasion of hepatocarcinoma (HCC) HepG2 and Huh7 cells via induction of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). VPA treatment can significantly increase the mRNA and protein expression of Snail, the key transcription factor of EMT. While knockdown of Snail can abolish VPA induced EMT of HCC cells. It suggested that Snail is essential for VPA induced EMT of HCC cells. VPA treatment also increased the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65. BAY 11-7082, the inhibitor of NF-κB, can significantly abolish VPA induced up regulation of Snail mRNA. Furthermore, VPA can increase the protein expression of Snail since 1h treatment via up regulation of half-lives of Snail protein. The increased protein stabilization of Snail can be attributed to VPA induced phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3β. Collectively, our present study revealed that VPA can promote the EMT of HCC cells via up regulation of Snail through activation of NF-κB and Akt/GSK-3β signals.

  14. Effects of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor (Valproic Acid) on the Expression of Hypoxia-inducible Factor-1 Alpha in Human Retinal Müller Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Jun; Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Na Rae

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects of valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI), on the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in human retinal Müller cells under hypoxic conditions. Methods Chemical hypoxia was induced in human retinal Müller cells (MIO-M1) by treatment with increasing concentrations of cobalt(II) chloride (CoCl2). Müller cells were also treated with a set concentration of CoCl2, along with various concentrations of VPA. The expression of HIF-1α and VEGF in the treated Müller cells was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Exposure of human retinal Müller cells to increasing concentrations of CoCl2 produced a dose-dependent increase in HIF-1α expression. The addition of increasing concentrations of VPA lead to a dose-dependent decrease in expression of HIF-1α and VEGF in Müller cells exposed to a set concentration of CoCl2. Conclusions HDACI VPA downregulated the expressions of HIF-1α and VEGF in human retinal Müller cells under hypoxic conditions. Using HDACI to target HIF-1α expression in Müller cells could be a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of retinal vascular diseases. PMID:28243027

  15. c-Jun Amino-Terminal Kinase is Involved in Valproic Acid-Mediated Neuronal Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic NSCs and Neurite Outgrowth of NSC-Derived Neurons.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Zhou, Hengxing; Pan, Bin; Li, Xueying; Fu, Zheng; Liu, Jun; Shi, Zhongju; Chu, Tianci; Wei, Zhijian; Ning, Guangzhi; Feng, Shiqing

    2017-04-01

    Valproic acid (VPA), an anticonvulsant and mood-stabilizing drug, can induce neuronal differentiation, promote neurite extension and exert a neuroprotective effect in central nervous system (CNS) injuries; however, comparatively little is known regarding its action on mouse embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs) and the underlying molecular mechanism. Recent studies suggested that c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is required for neurite outgrowth and neuronal differentiation during neuronal development. In the present study, we cultured mouse embryonic NSCs and treated the cells with 1 mM VPA for up to 7 days. The results indicate that VPA promotes the neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic NSCs and neurite outgrowth of NSC-derived neurons; moreover, VPA induces the phosphorylation of c-Jun by JNK. In contrast, the specific JNK inhibitor SP600125 decreased the VPA-stimulated increase in neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic NSCs and neurite outgrowth of NSC-derived neurons. Taken together, these results suggest that VPA promotes neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic NSCs and neurite outgrowth of NSC-derived neurons. Moreover, JNK activation is involved in the effects of VPA stimulation.

  16. Combined Transcriptomics and Chemical-Genetics Reveal Molecular Mode of Action of Valproic acid, an Anticancer Molecule using Budding Yeast Model

    PubMed Central

    Golla, Upendarrao; Joseph, Deepthi; Tomar, Raghuvir Singh

    2016-01-01

    Valproic acid (VA) is a pharmacologically important histone deacetylase inhibitor that recently garnered attention as an anticancer agent. Since the molecular mechanisms behind the multiple effects of VA are unclear, this study was aimed to unravel the comprehensive cellular processes affected by VA and its molecular targets in vivo using budding yeast as a model organism. Interestingly, genome-wide transcriptome analysis of cells treated with VA showed differential regulation of 30% of the genome. Functional enrichment analysis of VA transcriptome evidenced alteration of various cellular processes including cell cycle, cell wall biogenesis, DNA repair, ion homeostasis, metabolism, stress response, transport and ribosomal biogenesis, etc. Moreover, our genetic screening analysis revealed VA molecular targets belonging to oxidative and osmotic stress, DNA repair, cell wall integrity, and iron homeostasis. Further, our results demonstrated the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) Hog1 (p38) and Slt2 (p44/42) upon VA treatment. Our results also exhibited that VA acts through alteration of mitochondrial, ER architecture and functions. Especially, VA effects were neutralized in cells lacking lipid particles. Altogether, our results deciphered the novel molecular insights and mechanistic links to strengthen our knowledge on diverse cellular effects of VA along with its probable therapeutic targets and detoxification approaches. PMID:27734932

  17. Antitumor effects of a combined 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine and valproic acid treatment on rhabdomyosarcoma and medulloblastoma in Ptch mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Ecke, Ines; Petry, Frauke; Rosenberger, Albert; Tauber, Svantje; Mönkemeyer, Sven; Hess, Ina; Dullin, Christian; Kimmina, Sarah; Pirngruber, Judith; Johnsen, Steven A; Uhmann, Anja; Nitzki, Frauke; Wojnowski, Leszek; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter; Witt, Olaf; Hahn, Heidi

    2009-02-01

    Patched (Ptch) heterozygous mice develop medulloblastoma (MB) and rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) resembling the corresponding human tumors. We have previously shown that epigenetic silencing of the intact Ptch allele contributes to tumor formation in this model. Here, we investigated whether targeting of epigenetic silencing mechanisms could be useful in the treatment of Ptch-associated cancers. A reduction of endogenous DNA methyltransferase1 (Dnmt1) activity significantly reduced tumor incidence in heterozygous Ptch knockout mice. A combined treatment with the Dnmt inhibitor 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) and the histone deacetlyase (HDAC) inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) efficiently prevented MB and RMS formation, whereas monotherapies with either drug were less effective. Wild-type Ptch expression was efficiently reactivated in tumors by 5-aza-dC/VPA combination therapy. This was associated with reduced methylation of the Ptch promoter and induction of histone hyperacetylation suggesting inhibition of HDACs in vivo. However, the treatment was not effective in clinically overt, advanced stage tumors. This is a first in vivo demonstration that targeting of Dnmt and HDAC activities is highly effective in preventing formation of Ptch-associated tumors. The results suggest a novel clinical strategy for consolidation therapy of corresponding tumors in humans after completion of conventional treatment. Our data also suggest that epigenetic therapy may be less effective in treating advanced stages of tumors, at least in this tumor model.

  18. Quantitation of valproic acid in pharmaceutical preparations using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection without prior derivatization.

    PubMed

    Sobhi, Hamid Reza; Kashtiaray, Amir; Farahani, Hadi; Abrahimpour, Farshad; Esrafili, Ali

    2010-07-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), coupled with gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID), has been successfully used for the extraction and determination of valproic acid (VPA) in pharmaceutical preparations. In the developed method, an appropriate mixture of extracting and disperser solvents was rapidly injected into an aqueous sample. Having formed a cloudy solution, the mixture was centrifuged and then the extracting solvent was sedimented at the bottom of a conical test tube. The extract was then injected into a GC system directly, without any further pretreatment. Initially, microextraction efficiency factors were optimized and the optimum experimental conditions found were as follows: tetrachloroethylene (9.0 µL) as extracting solvent; acetone (1.0 mL) as disperser solvent; 5 mL acidic aqueous sample (pH 1) without salt addition. Under the selected conditions, the calibration curve showed linearity in the range of 0.1-5.0 mg/L with regression coefficient corresponding to 0.9998. The limit of detection was found to be 0.05 mg/L. Finally, the method was applied for the determination of VPA in two different pharmaceutical preparations. A reasonable intra-assay (3.9-10.8%, n = 3) and inter-assay (5.6-11.4%, n = 3) precision illustrated the good performance of the analytical procedure. The protocol proved to be rapid and cost-effective for screening purposes.

  19. Neuroprotective effects of docosahexaenoic acid on hippocampal cell death and learning and memory impairments in a valproic acid-induced rat autism model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jingquan; Wang, Xuelai; Sun, Hongli; Cao, Yonggang; Liang, Shuang; Wang, Han; Wang, Yanming; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Fengyu; Wu, Lijie

    2016-04-01

    Prenatal exposure to valproic acid (VPA) in rat offspring is capable of inducing experimental autism with neurobehavioral aberrations. This study investigated the effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on hippocampal cell death, learning and memory alteration in an experimental rat autism model. We found that DHA supplementation (75, 150 or 300 mg/kg/day, 21 days) rescued the VPA (600 mg/kg) induced DHA reduction in plasma and hippocampus in a dose-dependent manner, increased the levels of hippocampal p-CaMKII and p-CREB without affecting total protein level, and altered BDNF-AKT-Bcl-2 signaling pathway, as well as inhibited the activity of caspase-3. DHA also influenced the content of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activities of antioxidant enzymes in the VPA-treated offspring. Consistent with the previous results, we also observed that 300 mg/kg DHA supplementation markedly increased the cell survival, decreased the cell apoptosis, and increased mature neuronal cell in the hippocampus in VPA-treated offspring. Utilizing the Morris water maze test, we found that DHA prevented cognitive impairment in offspring of VPA-treated rats. The data suggested that DHA may play a neuroprotective role in hippocampal neuronal cell and ameliorates dysfunctions in learning and memory in this rat autism model. Thus, DHA could be used as treatment intervention for mitigating behavioral dysfunctions in autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

  20. Elevated microRNA-181c and microRNA-30d levels in the enlarged amygdala of the valproic acid rat model of autism.

    PubMed

    Olde Loohuis, N F M; Kole, K; Glennon, J C; Karel, P; Van der Borg, G; Van Gemert, Y; Van den Bosch, D; Meinhardt, J; Kos, A; Shahabipour, F; Tiesinga, P; van Bokhoven, H; Martens, G J M; Kaplan, B B; Homberg, J R; Aschrafi, A

    2015-08-01

    Autism spectrum disorders are severe neurodevelopmental disorders, marked by impairments in reciprocal social interaction, delays in early language and communication, and the presence of restrictive, repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. Accumulating evidence suggests that dysfunction of the amygdala may be partially responsible for the impairment of social behavior that is a hallmark feature of ASD. Our studies suggest that a valproic acid (VPA) rat model of ASD exhibits an enlargement of the amygdala as compared to controls rats, similar to that observed in adolescent ASD individuals. Since recent research suggests that altered neuronal development and morphology, as seen in ASD, may result from a common post-transcriptional process that is under tight regulation by microRNAs (miRs), we examined genome-wide transcriptomics expression in the amygdala of rats prenatally exposed to VPA, and detected elevated miR-181c and miR-30d expression levels as well as dysregulated expression of their cognate mRNA targets encoding proteins involved in neuronal system development. Furthermore, selective suppression of miR-181c function attenuates neurite outgrowth and branching, and results in reduced synaptic density in primary amygdalar neurons in vitro. Collectively, these results implicate the small non-coding miR-181c in neuronal morphology, and provide a framework of understanding how dysregulation of a neurodevelopmentally relevant miR in the amygdala may contribute to the pathophysiology of ASD.

  1. The histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid inhibits NKG2D expression in natural killer cells through suppression of STAT3 and HDAC3

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Lulu; Wang, Lixin; Yao, Chao; Ni, Zhongya; Liu, Fei; Gong, Chenyuan; Zhu, Xiaowen; Yan, Xuewei; Watowich, Stephanie S.; Lee, Dean A.; Zhu, Shiguo

    2017-01-01

    NKG2D is a major activating receptor of NK cells and plays a critical role in tumor immunosurveillance. NKG2D expression in NK cells is inhibited by the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) and enhanced by the narrow-spectrum HDAC inhibitor entinostat. We previously demonstrated that entinostat enhanced NKG2D transcription by increasing acetylation of Histones H3 and H4. However, the mechanism by which VPA reduces NKG2D expression in NK cells is not known. We have also shown that NKG2D transcription is regulated by STAT3 phosphorylation. In this study, we investigated regulation of NKG2D expression in NK cells by VPA and entinostat by assessing protein expression, phosphorylation, and interaction of HDACs and STAT3. We find that VPA selectively inhibits STAT3 tyrosine705 phosphorylation, but entinostat does not. STAT3 complexes with HDAC3, and HDAC3 inhibition represses STAT3 phosphorylation and therefore NKG2D expression. NK cells from STAT3 wild-type mice downregulate NKG2D in response to VPA, but not NK cells from STAT3 knockout mice. These results show that VPA is a potent inhibitor of STAT3 phosphorylation and demonstrate that histone acetylation and STAT3 tyrosine705 phosphorylation cooperate in regulating NKG2D expression in NK cells. PMID:28338101

  2. Morphological abnormalities of embryonic cranial nerves after in utero exposure to valproic acid: implications for the pathogenesis of autism with multiple developmental anomalies.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Yasura; Oyabu, Akiko; Imura, Yoshio; Uchida, Atsuko; Narita, Naoko; Narita, Masaaki

    2011-06-01

    Autism is often associated with multiple developmental anomalies including asymmetric facial palsy. In order to establish the etiology of autism with facial palsy, research into developmental abnormalities of the peripheral facial nerves is necessary. In the present study, to investigate the development of peripheral cranial nerves for use in an animal model of autism, rat embryos were treated with valproic acid (VPA) in utero and their cranial nerves were visualized by immunostaining. Treatment with VPA after embryonic day 9 had a significant effect on the peripheral fibers of several cranial nerves. Following VPA treatment, immunoreactivity within the trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves was significantly reduced. Additionally, abnormal axonal pathways were observed in the peripheral facial nerves. Thus, the morphology of several cranial nerves, including the facial nerve, can be affected by prenatal VPA exposure as early as E13. Our findings indicate that disruption of early facial n