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Sample records for antigen dramatically improves

  1. Dramatic Cataplexy Improvement Following Right Parietal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fam, David J.; Shammi, Prathiba; Mainprize, Todd G.; Murray, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    This is the case of a 34-year-old woman with severe narcolepsy with cataplexy who experienced a dramatic reduction in cataplexy symptoms after resection of a right parietal astrocytoma. The patient underwent detailed neurological exam, neuropsychological testing, polysomnography and multiple sleep latency testing following surgery. Citation: Fam DJ, Shammi P, Mainprize TG, Murray BJ. Dramatic cataplexy improvement following right parietal surgery. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(7):829–830. PMID:25902819

  2. Dramatic Improvements to Feature Based Stereo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyansky, V. N.; Morris, R. D.; Kuehnel, F. O.; Maluf, D. A.; Cheeseman, P.

    2004-01-01

    The camera registration extracted from feature based stereo is usually considered sufficient to accurately localize the 3D points. However, for natural scenes the feature localization is not as precise as in man-made environments. This results in small camera registration errors. We show that even very small registration errors result in large errors in dense surface reconstruction. We describe a method for registering entire images to the inaccurate surface model. This gives small, but crucially important improvements to the camera parameters. The new registration gives dramatically better dense surface reconstruction.

  3. Microalloying Boron Carbide with Silicon to Achieve Dramatically Improved Ductility.

    PubMed

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A

    2014-12-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a hard material whose value for extended engineering applications such as body armor; is limited by its brittleness under impact. To improve the ductility while retaining hardness, we used density functional theory to examine modifying B4C ductility through microalloying. We found that replacing the CBC chain in B4C with Si-Si, denoted as (B11Cp)-Si2, dramatically improves the ductility, allowing a continuous shear to a large strain of 0.802 (about twice of B4C failure strain) without brittle failure. Moreover, (B11C)-Si2 retains low density and high hardness. This ductility improvement arises because the Si-Si linkages enable the icosahedra accommodate additional shear by rotating instead of breaking bonds.

  4. Dramatic Improvements in Beach Water Quality Following Gull Removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gulls are often cited as important contributors of fecal contamination to surface waters, and some recreational beaches have used gull control measures to improve microbial water quality. In this study, gulls were chased from a Lake Michigan beach using specially trained dogs, a...

  5. Can k-point integration for metals be dramatically improved?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Gus; Jorgensen, Jeremy; Gopal, Priya; Buongiorno-Nardelli, Marco

    Our group has spent hundreds of millions of cpu hours calculating the energies of different materials and their competing structures. The energy of the occupied electron states is a small part of the total energy of a given material, but electron energy accounts for almost all of the numerical error in these calculations (at least in metals). Current methods of integrating electron band energies are simple (usually rectangle rule + smearing) but converge very slowly, requiring many, many k-points, even for simple metals. But integration approaches with better convergence rates, such Gauss quadrature, are hard to utilize. Because of the multivalued nature of electron bands (leading to crossings, kissings, etc.) standard interpolation methods are ineffective. We will discuss a number of improvements we have made and discuss a possible solution to the interpolation problem.

  6. Recent improvements in antigene technology.

    PubMed

    Buchini, Sabrina; Leumann, Christian J

    2003-12-01

    DNA triple-helix-based approaches to control and modulate cellular functions on the level of genomic DNA (antigene technology) suffered in the past from a stepmother-like treatment in comparison to the flourishing field of oligonucleotide-based control of translation (antisense technology). This was mostly due to lack of affinity of triplex-forming oligonucleotides to their DNA target, to sequence restriction constraints imposed by the triple helical recognition motifs and by open questions to the accessibility of the target DNA. Recent developments in the area have brought about new bases that specifically recognize pyrimidine-purine inversion sites as well as sugar modifications, for example, the 2'-aminoethoxy-oligonucleotides or oligonucleotides based on the locked nucleic acid sugar unit, which greatly enhance triplex stability and alleviate in part the sequence restriction constraints. With this, sequence-specific genomic DNA manipulation is starting to become a useful tool in biotechnology.

  7. DRAMATIC IMPROVEMENTS IN CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF CESIUM THROUGH MORE EFFICIENT STRIPPING

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Bazelaire, Eve; Bonnesen, Peter V; Engle, Nancy L; Gorbunova, Maryna; Haverlock, Tamara; Moyer, Bruce A; Ensor, Dale; Meadors, Viola M; Harmon, Ben; Bartsch, Richard A.; Surowiec, Malgorzata A.; Zhou, Hui

    2008-01-01

    Dramatic potential improvements to the chemistry of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process are presented as related to enhancement of cesium stripping. The current process for removing cesium from the alkaline high-level waste (HLW) at the USDOE Savannah River Site employs acidic scrub and strip stages and shows remarkable extraction and selectivity properties for cesium. It was determined that cesium stripping can be greatly improved with caustic or near-neutral stages using sodium hydroxide and boric acid as scrub and strip solutions, respectively. Improvements can also be achieved by appending pH-sensitive functional groups to the calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant. Addition of a proton-ionizable group to the calixarene frame leads to a dramatic "pH swing" of up to 6 orders of magnitude change in cesium distribution ratio.

  8. Dramatic Improvement of Diabetes Mellitus Following the Treatment of Coexisting Acromegaly and Cushing's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Kyoung; Kim, Bo Ra; Kim, Kyongyoung; Kim, Sungsu; Jung, Jung Hwa; Hahm, Jong Ryeal; Jung, Jaehoon

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine diseases are frequently accompanied by diabetes mellitus and treatment of an underlying endocrine disease often improves glucose control. The co-occurrence of acromegaly and Cushing's syndrome is extremely rare. We herein describe a patient who showed a dramatic improvement in glucose control following treatment for co-existing acromegaly and Cushing's syndrome. An adrenal mass was incidentally discovered during a routine evaluation of a 56-year-old woman who was subsequently diagnosed with acromegaly and a unilateral cortisol-producing adrenal adenoma. Her blood glucose was poorly controlled despite receiving high-dose insulin therapy. After undergoing adrenalectomy for Cushing's syndrome, her insulin dosage was decreased by almost 50%. The insulin treatment was discontinued following the treatment of acromegaly.

  9. Dramatic Improvement of Diabetes Mellitus Following the Treatment of Coexisting Acromegaly and Cushing's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Kyoung; Kim, Bo Ra; Kim, Kyongyoung; Kim, Sungsu; Jung, Jung Hwa; Hahm, Jong Ryeal; Jung, Jaehoon

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine diseases are frequently accompanied by diabetes mellitus and treatment of an underlying endocrine disease often improves glucose control. The co-occurrence of acromegaly and Cushing's syndrome is extremely rare. We herein describe a patient who showed a dramatic improvement in glucose control following treatment for co-existing acromegaly and Cushing's syndrome. An adrenal mass was incidentally discovered during a routine evaluation of a 56-year-old woman who was subsequently diagnosed with acromegaly and a unilateral cortisol-producing adrenal adenoma. Her blood glucose was poorly controlled despite receiving high-dose insulin therapy. After undergoing adrenalectomy for Cushing's syndrome, her insulin dosage was decreased by almost 50%. The insulin treatment was discontinued following the treatment of acromegaly. PMID:26424306

  10. Emulating a crowded intracellular environment in vitro dramatically improves RT-PCR performance

    SciTech Connect

    Lareu, Ricky R.; Harve, Karthik S.; Raghunath, Michael

    2007-11-09

    The polymerase chain reaction's (PCR) phenomenal success in advancing fields as diverse as Medicine, Agriculture, Conservation, or Paleontology is based on the ability of using isolated prokaryotic thermostable DNA polymerases in vitro to copy DNA irrespective of origin. This process occurs intracellularly and has evolved to function efficiently under crowded conditions, namely in an environment packed with macromolecules. However, current in vitro practice ignores this important biophysical parameter of life. In order to more closely emulate conditions of intracellular biochemistry in vitro we added inert macromolecules into reverse transcription (RT) and PCR. We show dramatic improvements in all parameters of RT-PCR including 8- to 10-fold greater sensitivity, enhanced polymerase processivity, higher specific amplicon yield, greater primer annealing and specificity, and enhanced DNA polymerase thermal stability. The faster and more efficient reaction kinetics was a consequence of the cumulative molecular and thermodynamic effects of the excluded volume effect created by macromolecular crowding.

  11. Safety Improves Dramatically In Fluor Hanford Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, A.L.; Gerber, M.S.; VonBargen, B.H.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes dramatic improvements in the safety record of the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington state over the past four years. During a period of enormous growth in project work and scope, contractor Fluor Hanford reduced injuries, accidents, and other safety-related incidents and enhanced a safety culture that earned the SGRP Star Status in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) in 2007. This paper outlines the complex and multi-faceted work of Fluor Hanford's SGRP and details the steps taken by the project's Field Operations and Safety organizations to improve safety. Holding field safety meetings and walk-downs, broadening safety inspections, organizing employee safety councils, intensively flowing down safety requirements to subcontractors, and adopting other methods to achieve remarkable improvement in safety are discussed. The roles of management, labor and subcontractors are detailed. Finally, SGRP's safety improvements are discussed within the context of overall safety enhancements made by Fluor Hanford in the company's 11 years of managing nuclear waste cleanup at the Hanford Site. (authors)

  12. SAFETY IMPROVES DRAMATICALLY IN FLUOR HANFORD SOIL AND GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    GERBER MS

    2007-12-05

    This paper describes dramatic improvements in the safety record of the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington state over the past four years. During a period of enormous growth in project work and scope, contractor Fluor Hanford reduced injuries, accidents, and other safety-related incidents and enhanced a safety culture that earned the SGRP Star Status in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) in 2007. This paper outlines the complex and multi-faceted work of Fluor Hanford's SGRP and details the steps taken by the project's Field Operations and Safety organizations to improve safety. Holding field safety meetings and walkdowns, broadening safety inspections, organizing employee safety councils, intensively flowing down safety requirements to subcontractors, and adopting other methods to achieve remarkable improvement in safety are discussed. The roles of management, labor and subcontractors are detailed. Finally, SGRP's safety improvements are discussed within the context of overall safety enhancements made by Fluor Hanford in the company's 11 years of managing nuclear waste cleanup at the Hanford Site.

  13. Use of microsecond current prepulse for dramatic improvements of wire array Z-pinch implosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calamy, H.; Lassalle, F.; Loyen, A.; Zucchini, F.; Chittenden, J. P.; Hamann, F.; Maury, P.; Georges, A.; Bedoch, J. P.; Morell, A.

    2008-01-01

    The Sphinx machine [F. Lassalle et al., "Status on the SPHINX machine based on the 1microsecond LTD technology"] based on microsecond linear transformer driver (LTD) technology is used to implode an aluminium wire array with an outer diameter up to 140mm and maximum current from 3.5to5MA. 700to800ns implosion Z-pinch experiments are performed on this driver essentially with aluminium. Best results obtained before the improvement described in this paper were 1-3TW radial total power, 100-300kJ total yield, and 20-30kJ energy above 1keV. An auxiliary generator was added to the Sphinx machine in order to allow a multi microsecond current to be injected through the wire array load before the start of the main current. Amplitude and duration of this current prepulse are adjustable, with maxima ˜10kA and 50μs. This prepulse dramatically changes the ablation phase leading to an improvement of the axial homogeneity of both the implosion and the final radiating column. Total power was multiplied by a factor of 6, total yield by a factor of 2.5 with a reproducible behavior. This paper presents experimental results, magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and analysis of the effect of such a long current prepulse.

  14. Use of microsecond current prepulse for dramatic improvements of wire array Z-pinch implosion

    SciTech Connect

    Calamy, H.; Lassalle, F.; Loyen, A.; Zucchini, F.; Chittenden, J. P.; Hamann, F.; Maury, P.; Georges, A.; Bedoch, J. P.; Morell, A.

    2008-01-15

    The Sphinx machine [F. Lassalle et al., 'Status on the SPHINX machine based on the 1microsecond LTD technology'] based on microsecond linear transformer driver (LTD) technology is used to implode an aluminium wire array with an outer diameter up to 140 mm and maximum current from 3.5 to 5 MA. 700 to 800 ns implosion Z-pinch experiments are performed on this driver essentially with aluminium. Best results obtained before the improvement described in this paper were 1-3 TW radial total power, 100-300 kJ total yield, and 20-30 kJ energy above 1 keV. An auxiliary generator was added to the Sphinx machine in order to allow a multi microsecond current to be injected through the wire array load before the start of the main current. Amplitude and duration of this current prepulse are adjustable, with maxima {approx}10 kA and 50 {mu}s. This prepulse dramatically changes the ablation phase leading to an improvement of the axial homogeneity of both the implosion and the final radiating column. Total power was multiplied by a factor of 6, total yield by a factor of 2.5 with a reproducible behavior. This paper presents experimental results, magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and analysis of the effect of such a long current prepulse.

  15. Dramatic improvement of anti-SS-A/Ro-associated interstitial lung disease after immunosuppressive treatment.

    PubMed

    Paola, Caramaschi; Giuliana, Festi; Giovanni, Orsolini; Cristian, Caimmi; Domenico, Biasi

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to report three patients affected by interstitial lung disease associated with positive anti-SS-A/Ro autoantibody who showed a dramatic improvement after immunosuppressive treatment. Medical charts were reviewed to obtain clinical data, laboratory parameters, lung function tests, high-resolution computed tomography results and response to immunosuppressive treatment. The three patients showed a clinical picture of a lung-dominant connective tissue disease characterized by a sudden onset with dyspnea, cough and subtle extrathoracic features together with positive anti-SS-A/Ro antibody and weak titer antinuclear antibodies. All three patients responded favorably to immunosuppressive therapy: Two cases were treated with a combination of corticosteroid and cyclophosphamide followed by mycophenolate mofetil; in the third patient, clinical benefit was obtained after rituximab was added to corticosteroid and immunosuppressant drug. In spite of an abrupt onset with significant lung function impairment, all three patients had a favorable clinical response to immunosuppressive therapy. This report may be useful in making therapeutic decisions in case of interstitial lung disease associated with anti-SS-A antibody.

  16. Correcting Inadequate Model Snow Process Descriptions Dramatically Improves Mountain Hydrology Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomeroy, J. W.; Fang, X.

    2014-12-01

    The vast effort in hydrology devoted to parameter calibration as a means to improve model performance assumes that the models concerned are not fundamentally wrong. By focussing on finding optimal parameter sets and ascribing poor model performance to parameter or data uncertainty, these efforts may fail to consider the need to improve models with more intelligent descriptions of hydrological processes. To test this hypothesis, a flexible physically based hydrological model including a full suite of snow hydrology processes as well as warm season, hillslope and groundwater hydrology was applied to Marmot Creek Research Basin, Canadian Rocky Mountains where excellent driving meteorology and basin biophysical descriptions exist. Model parameters were set from values found in the basin or from similar environments; no parameters were calibrated. The model was tested against snow surveys and streamflow observations. The model used algorithms that describe snow redistribution, sublimation and forest canopy effects on snowmelt and evaporative processes that are rarely implemented in hydrological models. To investigate the contribution of these processes to model predictive capability, the model was "falsified" by deleting parameterisations for forest canopy snow mass and energy, blowing snow, intercepted rain evaporation, and sublimation. Model falsification by ignoring forest canopy processes contributed to a large increase in SWE errors for forested portions of the research basin with RMSE increasing from 19 to 55 mm and mean bias (MB) increasing from 0.004 to 0.62. In the alpine tundra portion, removing blowing processes resulted in an increase in model SWE MB from 0.04 to 2.55 on north-facing slopes and -0.006 to -0.48 on south-facing slopes. Eliminating these algorithms degraded streamflow prediction with the Nash Sutcliffe efficiency dropping from 0.58 to 0.22 and MB increasing from 0.01 to 0.09. These results show dramatic model improvements by including snow

  17. Dramatic Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Debbie; Precious, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    The setting: the science classroom. The characters: you and your students. The scene: Your students acting out scientific discoveries, modeling a frog's life cycle, mimicking the transition from liquid to solid. This is "dramatic science", a teaching approach that uses acting techniques to explore and develop young children's ideas about science.…

  18. Dramatic Teaching for Dramatic Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Ressler's "Dramatic Changes" is a powerful guide for anyone brave enough to create a space for young people to discuss sexual orientation and gender identity. Her accessible style and tangible suggestions describe a creative and educationally sound approach to supporting youth in thoughtfully wrestling with one of the most controversial social…

  19. OrthoFinder: solving fundamental biases in whole genome comparisons dramatically improves orthogroup inference accuracy.

    PubMed

    Emms, David M; Kelly, Steven

    2015-08-06

    Identifying homology relationships between sequences is fundamental to biological research. Here we provide a novel orthogroup inference algorithm called OrthoFinder that solves a previously undetected gene length bias in orthogroup inference, resulting in significant improvements in accuracy. Using real benchmark datasets we demonstrate that OrthoFinder is more accurate than other orthogroup inference methods by between 8 % and 33 %. Furthermore, we demonstrate the utility of OrthoFinder by providing a complete classification of transcription factor gene families in plants revealing 6.9 million previously unobserved relationships.

  20. Dramatic improvement of membrane performance for microalgae harvesting with a simple bubble-generator plate.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Taewoon; Oh, You-Kwan; Kim, Bohwa; Han, Jong-In

    2015-06-01

    To overcome fouling issue in membrane-based algae harvesting and thus make an otherwise promising harvesting option more competitive, a bubble-generator plate was developed. According to computational fluid dynamics analysis, the plate generated substantial hydrodynamic power in terms of high pressure, velocity, and shear stress. When installed in a membrane filtration system with membranes of different surface and structural characteristics (one prepared by the phase inversion method, and a commercial one) the bubble-generator was indeed effective in reducing fouling. Without the plate, the much cheaper homemade membrane had the similar performance as the commercial one. Use of the bubble-generator considerably improved the performance of both membranes, and revealed a valuable synergy with the asymmetrical structure of the homemade membrane. This result clearly showed that the ever-problematic fouling could be mitigated in a rather easy manner, and in so doing, that membrane technology could indeed become a practical option for algae harvesting.

  1. Nanocellulose-based Translucent Diffuser for Optoelectronic Device Applications with Dramatic Improvement of Light Coupling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Tassi, Nancy G; Zhu, Hongli; Fang, Zhiqiang; Hu, Liangbing

    2015-12-01

    Nanocellulose is a biogenerated and biorenewable organic material. Using a process based on 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)/NaClO/NaBr system, a highly translucent and light-diffusive film consisting of many layers of nanocellulose fibers and wood pulp microfibers was made. The film demonstrates a combination of large optical transmittance of ∼90% and tunable diffuse transmission of up to ∼78% across the visible and near-infrared spectra. The detailed characterizations of the film indicate the combination of high optical transmittance and haze is due to the film's large packing density and microstructured surface. The superior optical properties make the film a translucent light diffuser and applicable for improving the efficiencies of optoelectronic devices such as thin-film silicon solar cells and organic light-emitting devices. PMID:26572592

  2. Dramatic enhancement of genome editing by CRISPR/Cas9 through improved guide RNA design.

    PubMed

    Farboud, Behnom; Meyer, Barbara J

    2015-04-01

    Success with genome editing by the RNA-programmed nuclease Cas9 has been limited by the inability to predict effective guide RNAs and DNA target sites. Not all guide RNAs have been successful, and even those that were, varied widely in their efficacy. Here we describe and validate a strategy for Caenorhabditis elegans that reliably achieved a high frequency of genome editing for all targets tested in vivo. The key innovation was to design guide RNAs with a GG motif at the 3' end of their target-specific sequences. All guides designed using this simple principle induced a high frequency of targeted mutagenesis via nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and a high frequency of precise DNA integration from exogenous DNA templates via homology-directed repair (HDR). Related guide RNAs having the GG motif shifted by only three nucleotides showed severely reduced or no genome editing. We also combined the 3' GG guide improvement with a co-CRISPR/co-conversion approach. For this co-conversion scheme, animals were only screened for genome editing at designated targets if they exhibited a dominant phenotype caused by Cas9-dependent editing of an unrelated target. Combining the two strategies further enhanced the ease of mutant recovery, thereby providing a powerful means to obtain desired genetic changes in an otherwise unaltered genome.

  3. Dramatic Improvement of Crystal Quality for Low-temperature-grown Rabbit Muscle Aldolase

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.; Rangarajan, E; Sygusch, J; Izard, T

    2010-01-01

    Rabbit muscle aldolase (RMA) was crystallized in complex with the low-complexity domain (LC4) of sorting nexin 9. Monoclinic crystals were obtained at room temperature that displayed large mosaicity and poor X-ray diffraction. However, orthorhombic RMA-LC4 crystals grown at 277 K under similar conditions exhibited low mosaicity, allowing data collection to 2.2 {angstrom} Bragg spacing and structure determination. It was concluded that the improvement of crystal quality as indicated by the higher resolution of the new RMA-LC4 complex crystals was a consequence of the introduction of new lattice contacts at lower temperature. The lattice contacts corresponded to an increased number of interactions between high-entropy side chains that mitigate the lattice strain incurred upon cryocooling and accompanying mosaic spread increases. The thermodynamically unfavorable immobilization of high-entropy side chains used in lattice formation was compensated by an entropic increase in the bulk-solvent content owing to the greater solvent content of the crystal lattice.

  4. Dramatic enhancement of genome editing by CRISPR/Cas9 through improved guide RNA design.

    PubMed

    Farboud, Behnom; Meyer, Barbara J

    2015-04-01

    Success with genome editing by the RNA-programmed nuclease Cas9 has been limited by the inability to predict effective guide RNAs and DNA target sites. Not all guide RNAs have been successful, and even those that were, varied widely in their efficacy. Here we describe and validate a strategy for Caenorhabditis elegans that reliably achieved a high frequency of genome editing for all targets tested in vivo. The key innovation was to design guide RNAs with a GG motif at the 3' end of their target-specific sequences. All guides designed using this simple principle induced a high frequency of targeted mutagenesis via nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and a high frequency of precise DNA integration from exogenous DNA templates via homology-directed repair (HDR). Related guide RNAs having the GG motif shifted by only three nucleotides showed severely reduced or no genome editing. We also combined the 3' GG guide improvement with a co-CRISPR/co-conversion approach. For this co-conversion scheme, animals were only screened for genome editing at designated targets if they exhibited a dominant phenotype caused by Cas9-dependent editing of an unrelated target. Combining the two strategies further enhanced the ease of mutant recovery, thereby providing a powerful means to obtain desired genetic changes in an otherwise unaltered genome. PMID:25695951

  5. Primary extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the lung presenting with bilateral, patchy infiltrates dramatically improving after corticosteroid therapy.

    PubMed

    Boon, E S; Graal, M B; van Noord, J A

    1993-10-01

    A 63-year-old man was admitted to the hospital with fever and bilateral, peripheral infiltrates. Infectious disease and malignancy seemed to be excluded by fiberoptic diagnostic procedures. Subsequently, respiratory insufficiency developed, making open lung biopsy impossible. The diagnosis of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) was strongly considered and treatment with corticosteroids was started; this led to dramatic clinical and radiologic improvement for a short time. Eventually, an open lung biopsy specimen disclosed primary extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of T-cell origin, immunoblastic, of high-grade malignancy according to the Kiel classification. After the first course of chemotherapy, total respiratory insufficiency developed and the patient died. This case is unique in a patient without AIDS.

  6. A Rural School/Community: A Case Study of a Dramatic Turnaround & Its Implications for School Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Robert V.

    This paper presents a case study of a rural community exhibiting a dramatic turnaround in community support for a new school bond issue. Demographic change was partly responsible for the change in community attitudes, with two waves of immigration altering the long-term conservative orientation of this community. After a series of failed…

  7. A Bacterial Glycoengineered Antigen for Improved Serodiagnosis of Porcine Brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Cortina, María E; Balzano, Rodrigo E; Rey Serantes, Diego A; Caillava, Ana J; Elena, Sebastián; Ferreira, A C; Nicola, Ana M; Ugalde, Juan E; Comerci, Diego J; Ciocchini, Andrés E

    2016-06-01

    Brucellosis is a highly zoonotic disease that affects animals and human beings. Brucella suis is the etiological agent of porcine brucellosis and one of the major human brucellosis pathogens. Laboratory diagnosis of porcine brucellosis mainly relies on serological tests, and it has been widely demonstrated that serological assays based on the detection of anti O-polysaccharide antibodies are the most sensitive tests. Here, we validate a recombinant glycoprotein antigen, an N-formylperosamine O-polysaccharide-protein conjugate (OAg-AcrA), for diagnosis of porcine brucellosis. An indirect immunoassay based on the detection of anti-O-polysaccharide IgG antibodies was developed coupling OAg-AcrA to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plates (glyco-iELISA). To validate the assay, 563 serum samples obtained from experimentally infected and immunized pigs, as well as animals naturally infected with B. suis biovar 1 or 2, were tested. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed, and based on this analysis, the optimum cutoff value was 0.56 (relative reactivity), which resulted in a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 99.7%, respectively. A cutoff value of 0.78 resulted in a test sensitivity of 98.4% and a test specificity of 100%. Overall, our results demonstrate that the glyco-iELISA is highly accurate for diagnosis of porcine brucellosis, improving the diagnostic performance of current serological tests. The recombinant glycoprotein OAg-AcrA can be produced in large homogeneous batches in a standardized way, making it an ideal candidate for further validation as a universal antigen for diagnosis of "smooth" brucellosis in animals and humans.

  8. A Bacterial Glycoengineered Antigen for Improved Serodiagnosis of Porcine Brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Cortina, María E; Balzano, Rodrigo E; Rey Serantes, Diego A; Caillava, Ana J; Elena, Sebastián; Ferreira, A C; Nicola, Ana M; Ugalde, Juan E; Comerci, Diego J; Ciocchini, Andrés E

    2016-06-01

    Brucellosis is a highly zoonotic disease that affects animals and human beings. Brucella suis is the etiological agent of porcine brucellosis and one of the major human brucellosis pathogens. Laboratory diagnosis of porcine brucellosis mainly relies on serological tests, and it has been widely demonstrated that serological assays based on the detection of anti O-polysaccharide antibodies are the most sensitive tests. Here, we validate a recombinant glycoprotein antigen, an N-formylperosamine O-polysaccharide-protein conjugate (OAg-AcrA), for diagnosis of porcine brucellosis. An indirect immunoassay based on the detection of anti-O-polysaccharide IgG antibodies was developed coupling OAg-AcrA to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plates (glyco-iELISA). To validate the assay, 563 serum samples obtained from experimentally infected and immunized pigs, as well as animals naturally infected with B. suis biovar 1 or 2, were tested. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed, and based on this analysis, the optimum cutoff value was 0.56 (relative reactivity), which resulted in a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 99.7%, respectively. A cutoff value of 0.78 resulted in a test sensitivity of 98.4% and a test specificity of 100%. Overall, our results demonstrate that the glyco-iELISA is highly accurate for diagnosis of porcine brucellosis, improving the diagnostic performance of current serological tests. The recombinant glycoprotein OAg-AcrA can be produced in large homogeneous batches in a standardized way, making it an ideal candidate for further validation as a universal antigen for diagnosis of "smooth" brucellosis in animals and humans. PMID:26984975

  9. Multi-scale silica structures for improved HIV-1 Capsid (p24) antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sophia; Hedde, Per Niklas; Venugopalan, Vasan; Gratton, Enrico; Khine, Michelle

    2016-06-20

    Silica (SiO2) micro- and nanostructures fabricated with pre-stressed thermoplastic shrink wrap film have been shown to yield far-field fluorescence signal enhancements over their planar or wrinkled counterparts. The SiO2 structures have previously been used for improved detection of fluorescently labelled proteins and DNA. In this work, we probe the mechanism responsible for the dramatic increases in fluorescence signal intensity. Optical characterization studies attribute the fluorescence signal enhancements to increased surface density and light scattering from the rough SiO2 structures. Using this information, we come up with a theoretical approximation for the enhancement factor based off the scattering effects alone. We show that increased deposition thickness of SiO2 yields improved fluorescence signal enhancements, with an optimal SiO2 thin layer achieved at 20 nm. Finally, we show that the SiO2 substrates serve as a suitable platform for disease diagnostics, and show improved limits of detection (LOD) for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) p24 antigen. PMID:27163263

  10. Mechanistic Studies Lead to Dramatically Improved Reaction Conditions for the Cu-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydroamination of Olefins.

    PubMed

    Bandar, Jeffrey S; Pirnot, Michael T; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2015-11-25

    Enantioselective copper(I) hydride (CuH)-catalyzed hydroamination has undergone significant development over the past several years. To gain a general understanding of the factors governing these reactions, kinetic and spectroscopic studies were performed on the CuH-catalyzed hydroamination of styrene. Reaction profile analysis, rate order assessment, and Hammett studies indicate that the turnover-limiting step is regeneration of the CuH catalyst by reaction with a silane, with a phosphine-ligated copper(I) benzoate as the catalyst resting state. Spectroscopic, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and nonlinear effect studies are consistent with a monomeric active catalyst. With this insight, targeted reagent optimization led to the development of an optimized protocol with an operationally simple setup (ligated copper(II) precatalyst, open to air) and short reaction times (<30 min). This improved protocol is amenable to a diverse range of alkene and alkyne substrate classes. PMID:26522837

  11. Embryonic stem cell transplantation after experimental traumatic brain injury dramatically improves neurological outcome, but may cause tumors.

    PubMed

    Riess, Peter; Molcanyi, Marek; Bentz, Kristine; Maegele, Mark; Simanski, Christian; Carlitscheck, Christoph; Schneider, Annette; Hescheler, Jürgen; Bouillon, Bertil; Schäfer, Ute; Neugebauer, Edmund

    2007-01-01

    Transplantation of embryonic stem (ES) cells may provide cures for the damaged nervous system. Pre-differentiated ES or neuronal precursor cells have been investigated in various animal models of neurodegenerative diseases including traumatic brain injury (TBI). To our knowledge, no study has yet examined the effects of undifferentiated, murine ES cells on functional recovery and tumorigenity following implantation into injured rat brains. We evaluated the effect of transplantation of undifferentiated, murine embryonic cells on the recovery of motor function following lateral fluid percussion brain injury in Sprague-Dawley rats. At 3 days post-injury, animals received stereotactic injections of either embryonic stem cell suspension or injections of phosphate buffered saline without cells (control) into the injured cortex. Neurological motor function assessments were performed before injury, 72 h, 1, 3, and 6 weeks after transplantation using a Rotatrod and a Composite Neuroscore test. During this time period brain injured animals receiving ES cell transplantation showed a significant improvement in the Rotarod Test and in the Composite Neuroscore Test as compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-treated animals. At 1 week post-transplantation, ES cells were detectable in 100% of transplanted animals. At 7 weeks following transplantation, EScells were detectable in only one animal. Two of 10 xenotransplanted animals revealed tumor formation over the observation period. These findings provide evidence for therapeutic potency of embryonic stem cell transplantation after TBI in rat, but also raise serious safety concerns about the use of such cells in human.

  12. Antigen-adjuvant nanoconjugates for nasal vaccination: an improvement over the use of nanoparticles?

    PubMed

    Slütter, Bram; Bal, Suzanne M; Que, Ivo; Kaijzel, Eric; Löwik, Clemens; Bouwstra, Joke; Jiskoot, Wim

    2010-12-01

    Entrapment of antigens in mucoadhesive nanoparticles prepared from N-trimethyl chitosan (TMC) has been shown to increase their immunogenicity. However, because of their large size compared to soluble antigens, particles poorly diffuse through the nasal epithelium. The aim of this work was to study whether nasal vaccination with a much smaller TMC-antigen nanoconjugate would result in higher antibody responses as compared to TMC nanoparticles. TMC was covalently linked to a model antigen, ovalbumin (OVA), using thiol chemistry. For comparison, TMC/OVA nanoparticles and solutions of OVA and a physical mixture of TMC and OVA were made. As shown previously for TMC/OVA nanoparticles, TMC-OVA conjugate prolonged the nasal residence time of the antigen. TMC-OVA conjugate diffused significantly better through a monolayer of lung carcinoma (Calu-3) cells than TMC/OVA nanoparticles did. Moreover, nasal immunization of mice with the conjugate resulted in significantly more OVA positive DCs in the cervical lymph nodes as compared to TMC/OVA nanoparticles. Mice nasally immunized with TMC-OVA conjugate produced high levels of secretory IgA in nasal washes and higher titers of OVA-specific IgG than mice immunized with TMC/OVA nanoparticles after a priming dose. Moreover, as compared to TMC/OVA nanoparticles, TMC-OVA conjugate induced a more balanced IgG1/IgG2a response. In conclusion, the TMC-antigen nanoconjugate improves nasal delivery and immunogenicity of the antigen. This suggests that efficient codelivery of antigen and adjuvant to DCs, rather than a particulate form of the antigen/adjuvant combination, is decisive for the immunogenicity of the antigen.

  13. Creative Dramatics. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Julia; Sidlovskaya, Olga; Stotter, Ruth; Haugen, Kirsten; Leithold, Naomi

    2000-01-01

    Presents five articles on using creative dramatics in early childhood education: (1) "Drama: A Rehearsal for Life" (Julia Gabriel); (2) "Fairy Tales Enhance Imagination and Creative Thinking" (Olga Sidlovskaya); (3) "Starting with a Story" (Ruth Stotter); (4) "Using Creative Dramatics to Include All Children" (Kirsten Haugen); and (5) "Helping…

  14. Creative Dramatics Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia School District, PA. Office of Early Childhood Programs.

    This handbook on creative dramatics at the elementary school level is primarily intended to assist the teacher who already has some training in creative dramatics. The handbook contains sections on (1) the philosophy and objectives of the program, including a discussion of an affective curriculum; (2) definitions of key concepts, including general…

  15. Improvement of the immune efficacy of carbohydrate vaccines by chemical modification on the GM3 antigen.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiu-Jing; Yang, Fan; Zheng, Mingwei; Huo, Chang-Xin; Zhang, Ye; Ye, Xin-Shan

    2015-06-14

    Tumor cells often display aberrant levels and patterns of cell surface glycosylation, which provides a potential opportunity to develop carbohydrate-based anticancer vaccines for cancer immunotherapy. However, one of the most addressed challenges in this field is the low efficiency of the carbohydrate vaccination due to poor immunogenicity of carbohydrate antigens. In this article, a number of structure-modified GM3 antigen analogues were designed and chemically synthesized. The modified GM3 antigens were conjugated to protein carriers for vaccination. The vaccination results on mice show that the modification on the GM3 antigen could improve the efficiency of the vaccination, and in particular, two glycoconjugates (3-KLH and 8-KLH) elicited higher titers of anti-GM3 antibodies than the unmodified GM3-protein conjugate (2-KLH) did.

  16. Novel diarylpyrimidines and diaryltriazines as potent HIV-1 NNRTIs with dramatically improved solubility: a patent evaluation of US20140378443A1.

    PubMed

    Huang, Boshi; Kang, Dongwei; Yang, Jiapei; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-01-01

    Diarylpyrimidine and diaryltriazine derivatives, two representative structurally related classes of HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) with robust potencies against wild-type and several mutant strains of HIV-1, have attracted more and more attention in the last decade. However, they have been suffering from poor aqueous solubility. A series of novel diarylpyrimidines and diaryltriazines with solubilizing substituents attached to the central rings were reported as potent NNRTIs in the patent US20140378443A1. Some compounds exhibited potencies against wild-type HIV-1 which were comparable or even superior to those of dapivirine, etravirine and rilpivirine. In addition, dramatically enhanced solubilities were observed for these new compounds. Moreover, some structure optimization strategies for improving aqueous solubility are detailed in this review, providing new insights into development of next-generation NNRTIs endowed with favorable solubility. We anticipate that application of these strategies will ultimately lead to discovery of new anti-HIV drug candidates.

  17. Improved Serodiagnosis of Cystic Echinococcosis Using the New Recombinant 2B2t Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-González, Ana; Santivañez, Saúl; García, Héctor H.; Rodríguez, Silvia; Muñoz, Santiago; Ramos, Guillermo; Orduña, Antonio; Siles-Lucas, Mar

    2012-01-01

    A standardized test for the serodiagnosis of human cystic echinococcosis (CE) is still needed, because of the low specificity and sensitivity of the currently available commercial tools and the lack of proper evaluation of the existing recombinant antigens. In a previous work, we defined the new ELISA-B2t diagnostic tool for the detection of specific IgGs in CE patients, which showed high sensitivity and specificity, and was useful in monitoring the clinical evolution of surgically treated CE patients. Nevertheless, this recombinant antigen gave rise to false-negative results in a percentage of CE patients. Therefore, in an attempt to improve its sensitivity, we constructed B2t-derived recombinant antigens with two, four and eight tandem repeat of B2t units, and tested them by ELISA on serum samples of CE patients and patients with related parasites. The best diagnostic values were obtained with the two tandem repeat 2B2t antigen. The influence of several clinical variables on the performance of the tests was also evaluated. Finally, the diagnostic performance of the 2B2t-ELISA was compared with that of an indirect haemagglutination commercial test. The 2B2t recombinant antigen performed better than the HF and B2t antigens, and the IHA commercial kit. Therefore, this new 2B2t-ELISA is a promising candidate test for the serodiagnosis of CE in clinical settings. PMID:22802975

  18. Percoll-purified Treponema pallidum, an improved fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorbed antigen.

    PubMed

    Hanff, P A; Fernandez, C; Folds, J D

    1986-05-01

    Percoll-purified Treponema pallidum was evaluated as a fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorbed antigen. Borderline and false-positive reactions were essentially eliminated, resulting in sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 95.5%, respectively. The lack of background debris improved the ease and speed of reading the test.

  19. Surface modification of alignment layer by ultraviolet irradiation to dramatically improve the detection limit of liquid-crystal-based immunoassay for the cancer biomarker CA125

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hui-Wen; Lee, Mon-Juan; Lee, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Liquid crystal (LC)-based biosensing has attracted much attention in recent years. We focus on improving the detection limit of LC-based immunoassay techniques by surface modification of the surfactant alignment layer consisting of dimethyloctadecyl[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ammonium chloride (DMOAP). The cancer biomarker CA125 was detected with an array of anti-CA125 antibodies immobilized on the ultraviolet (UV)-modified DMOAP monolayer. Compared with a pristine counterpart, UV irradiation enhanced the binding affinity of the CA125 antibody and reproducibility of immunodetection in which a detection limit of 0.01 ng/ml for the cancer biomarker CA125 was achieved. Additionally, the optical texture observed under a crossed polarized microscope was correlated with the analyte concentration. In a proof-of-concept experiment using CA125-spiked human serum as the analyte, specific binding between the CA125 antigen and the anti-CA125 antibody resulted in a distinct and concentration-dependent optical response despite the high background caused by nonspecific binding of other biomolecules in the human serum. Results from this study indicate that UV modification of the alignment layer, as well as detection with LCs of large birefringence, contributes to the enhanced performance of the label-free LC-based immunodetection, which may be considered a promising alternative to conventional label-based methods.

  20. Surface modification of alignment layer by ultraviolet irradiation to dramatically improve the detection limit of liquid-crystal-based immunoassay for the cancer biomarker CA125.

    PubMed

    Su, Hui-Wen; Lee, Mon-Juan; Lee, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Liquid crystal (LC)-based biosensing has attracted much attention in recent years. We focus on improving the detection limit of LC-based immunoassay techniques by surface modification of the surfactant alignment layer consisting of dimethyloctadecyl[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ammonium chloride (DMOAP). The cancer biomarker CA125 was detected with an array of anti-CA125 antibodies immobilized on the ultraviolet (UV)-modified DMOAP monolayer. Compared with a pristine counterpart, UV irradiation enhanced the binding affinity of the CA125 antibody and reproducibility of immunodetection in which a detection limit of 0.01 ng∕ml for the cancer biomarker CA125 was achieved. Additionally, the optical texture observed under a crossed polarized microscope was correlated with the analyte concentration. In a proof-of-concept experiment using CA125-spiked human serum as the analyte, specific binding between the CA125 antigen and the anti-CA125 antibody resulted in a distinct and concentration-dependent optical response despite the high background caused by nonspecific binding of other biomolecules in the human serum. Results from this study indicate that UVmodification of the alignment layer, as well as detection with LCs of large birefringence, contributes to the enhanced performance of the label-free LC-based immunodetection, which may be considered a promising alternative to conventional label-based methods. PMID:26000796

  1. Delivery of antigen to sialoadhesin or CD163 improves the specific immune response in pigs.

    PubMed

    Poderoso, Teresa; Martínez, Paloma; Álvarez, Belén; Handler, Ana; Moreno, Sara; Alonso, Fernando; Ezquerra, Ángel; Domínguez, Javier; Revilla, Concepción

    2011-06-24

    Delivery of antigens to antigen presenting cell surface receptors represents a promising strategy to improve immune response to weak immunogenic antigens. We have analyzed the potential of porcine sialoadhesin (Sn) and CD163 as antigen targeting receptors using mouse Igs as surrogate antigens. Sn and CD163 are two endocytic receptors mainly expressed on macrophages located in antigen-sampling zones of secondary lymphoid organs. MAbs to CD163 induced in vitro PBMC proliferation at concentrations 50-80 fold lower than the control mAb when using, as responder cells, cells from pigs immunized with mouse serum IgGs. To evaluate in vivo targeting, pigs were immunized s.c. with anti-Sn, anti-CD163 or control mAbs, and the immune response induced to mouse Ig was analyzed. Two weeks after the first immunization, pigs receiving either anti-Sn or anti-CD163 mAbs started to show higher anti-mouse-IgG serum titres than controls. Boosting 6 weeks later, further increased the anti-IgG titres up to 15-60 fold those of controls. In addition, differences in the relative predominance of IgG1 or IgG2 subclasses in the response depending on Sn or CD163 targeting were observed. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from pigs immunized with anti-Sn mAb showed a higher proliferative response to mouse IgG than cells from pigs immunized with control mAb. These results show that targeting antigen to Sn or CD163 can enhance the immune response in pigs.

  2. Combined Overexpression of JARID2, PRDM14, ESRRB, and SALL4A Dramatically Improves Efficiency and Kinetics of Reprogramming to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Iseki, Hiroyoshi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Hishida, Tomoaki; Yamashita-Sugahara, Yzumi; Hirasaki, Masataka; Ueda, Atsushi; Tanimoto, Yoko; Iijima, Saori; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Yagami, Ken-ichi; Takahashi, Satoru; Okuda, Akihiko; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2016-02-01

    Identification of a gene set capable of driving rapid and proper reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is an important issue. Here we show that the efficiency and kinetics of iPSC reprogramming are dramatically improved by the combined expression of Jarid2 and genes encoding its associated proteins. We demonstrate that forced expression of JARID2 promotes iPSC reprogramming by suppressing the expression of Arf, a known reprogramming barrier, and that the N-terminal half of JARID2 is sufficient for such promotion. Moreover, JARID2 accelerated silencing of the retroviral Klf4 transgene and demethylation of the Nanog promoter, underpinning the potentiating activity of JARID2 in iPSC reprogramming. We further show that JARID2 physically interacts with ESRRB, SALL4A, and PRDM14, and that these JARID2-associated proteins synergistically and robustly facilitate iPSC reprogramming in a JARID2-dependent manner. Our findings provide an insight into the important roles of JARID2 during reprogramming and suggest that the JARID2-associated protein network contributes to overcoming reprogramming barriers.

  3. Teaching Dramatic Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloskey, Susan

    1984-01-01

    Describes the use of scene work, informal presentations of dramatic passages, to explore aspects of plays that readers are likely to overlook. Finds that this scene work increases the pertinence of students' comments in class and the ambitiousness of their written work. (MM)

  4. Deglycosylation of Toxocara excretory-secretory antigens improves the specificity of the serodiagnosis for human toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Roldán, W H; Elefant, G R; Ferreira, A W

    2015-11-01

    Serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis is difficult in tropical areas where other helminthiasis are endemic. Many studies have shown that glycans from helminths may be the responsible for cross-reactions in the immunoassays. In this study, we have evaluated the deglycosylation of the Toxocara canis excretory-secretory (TES) antigens for the detection of IgG antibodies using a panel of 228 serum samples (58 patients with toxocariasis, 75 patients with other helminth infections and 95 healthy individuals) by ELISA and Western blot assays. Our results showed that the deglycosylation of TES antigens resulted in a single fraction of 26 kDa (dTES) and was able to detect IgG antibodies with a sensitivity and specificity of 100% in both above-mentioned assays. The rate of cross-reactions, observed in ELISA with TES (13·3%), was significantly reduced (5·3%) when the dTES antigens were used. Likewise, the cross-reactivity observed with the fractions of 32, 55 and 70 kDa of the TES antigens was totally eliminated when the dTES were used in the Western blot. All these results showed that the deglycosylation of the TES antigens really improves the specificity of the serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis in endemic areas for helminth infections. PMID:26315805

  5. Optimized Protocols for In Vitro Maturation of Rat Oocytes Dramatically Improve Their Developmental Competence to a Level Similar to That of Ovulated Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Guang-Zhong; Cui, Wei; Yang, Rui; Lin, Juan; Gong, Shuai; Lian, Hua-Yu; Sun, Ming-Ju; Tan, Jing-He

    2016-02-01

    The developmental capacity of in vitro-matured (IVM) oocytes is markedly lower than that of their in vivo-matured (IVO) counterparts, suggesting the need for optimization of IVM protocols in different species. There are few studies on IVM of rat oocytes, and there are even fewer attempts to improve ooplasmic maturation compared to those reported in other species. Furthermore, rat oocytes are well known to undergo spontaneous activation (SA) after leaving the oviduct; however, whether IVM rat oocytes have lower SA rates than IVO oocytes and can potentially be used for nuclear transfer is unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of maturation protocols on cytoplasmic maturation of IVM rat oocytes and observed the possibility to reduce SA by using IVM rat oocytes. Ooplasmic maturation was assessed using multiple markers, including pre- and postimplantation development, meiotic progression, CG redistribution, redox state, and the expression of developmental potential- and apoptosis-related genes. The results showed that the best protocol consisting of modified Tissue Culture Medium-199 (TCM-199) supplemented with cysteamine/cystine and the cumulus cell monolayer dramatically improved the developmental competence of rat oocytes and supported both pre- and postimplantation development and other ooplasmic maturation makers to levels similar to that observed in ovulated oocytes. Rates of SA were significantly lower in IVM oocytes than in IVO oocytes when observed at the same intervals after nuclear maturation. In conclusion, we have optimized protocols for IVM of rat oocytes that sustain ooplasmic maturation to a level similar to ovulated oocytes. The results suggest that IVM rat oocytes might be used to reduce SA for rat cloning. PMID:26679437

  6. Dramatic Developments in the Neurosciences Challenge Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylwester, Robert

    1986-01-01

    Recent dramatic developments in brain research and technology suggest that a comprehensive understanding of how the human brain works may soon be within reach. Just as the ability of the medical profession to treat patients improved dramatically with the advent of effective research skills and technology concerning the structure, biochemistry, and…

  7. Evaluation of RNA Amplification Methods to Improve DC Immunotherapy Antigen Presentation and Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Slagter-Jäger, Jacoba G; Raney, Alexa; Lewis, Whitney E; DeBenedette, Mark A; Nicolette, Charles A; Tcherepanova, Irina Y

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) transfected with total amplified tumor cell RNA have the potential to induce broad antitumor immune responses. However, analytical methods required for quantitatively assessing the integrity, fidelity, and functionality of the amplified RNA are lacking. We have developed a series of assays including gel electrophoresis, northern blot, capping efficiency, and microarray analysis to determine integrity and fidelity and a model system to assess functionality after transfection into human DCs. We employed these tools to demonstrate that modifications to our previously reported total cellular RNA amplification process including the use of the Fast Start High Fidelity (FSHF) PCR enzyme, T7 Powerswitch primer, post-transcriptional capping and incorporation of a type 1 cap result in amplification of longer transcripts, greater translational competence, and a higher fidelity representation of the starting total RNA population. To study the properties of amplified RNA after transfection into human DCs, we measured protein expression levels of defined antigens coamplified with the starting total RNA populations and measured antigen-specific T cell expansion in autologous DC-T cell co-cultured in vitro. We conclude from these analyses that the improved RNA amplification process results in superior protein expression levels and a greater capacity of the transfected DCs to induce multifunctional antigen-specific memory T cells. PMID:23653155

  8. Improved Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying HLA Class I Antigen Presentation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Man; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Jie; Wei, Xundong; Phiwpan, Krung; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhou, Xuyu

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I (HLA-I) transgenic mice have proven to be useful models for studying human MHC-related immune responses over the last two decades. However, differences in the processing and presentation machinery between humans and mice may have profound effects on HLA-I restricted antigen presentation. In this study, we generated a novel human TAP-LMP (hTAP-LMP) gene cluster transgenic mouse model carrying an intact human TAP complex and two human immunoproteasome LMP subunits, PSMB8/PSMB9. By crossing the hTAP-LMP strain with different HLA-I transgenic mice, we found that the expression levels of human HLA-I molecules, especially the A3 supertype members (e.g., A11 and A33), were remarkably enhanced in corresponding HLA-I/hTAP-LMP transgenic mice. Moreover, we found that humanized processing and presentation machinery increased antigen presentation of HLA-A11-restricted epitopes and promoted the rapid reduction of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in HLA-A11/hTAP-LMP mice. Together, our study highlights that HLA-I/hTAP-LMP mice are an improved model for studying antigen presentation of HLA-I molecules and their related CTL responses. PMID:27634283

  9. Improved Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying HLA Class I Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Man; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Jie; Wei, Xundong; Phiwpan, Krung; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhou, Xuyu

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I (HLA-I) transgenic mice have proven to be useful models for studying human MHC-related immune responses over the last two decades. However, differences in the processing and presentation machinery between humans and mice may have profound effects on HLA-I restricted antigen presentation. In this study, we generated a novel human TAP-LMP (hTAP-LMP) gene cluster transgenic mouse model carrying an intact human TAP complex and two human immunoproteasome LMP subunits, PSMB8/PSMB9. By crossing the hTAP-LMP strain with different HLA-I transgenic mice, we found that the expression levels of human HLA-I molecules, especially the A3 supertype members (e.g., A11 and A33), were remarkably enhanced in corresponding HLA-I/hTAP-LMP transgenic mice. Moreover, we found that humanized processing and presentation machinery increased antigen presentation of HLA-A11-restricted epitopes and promoted the rapid reduction of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in HLA-A11/hTAP-LMP mice. Together, our study highlights that HLA-I/hTAP-LMP mice are an improved model for studying antigen presentation of HLA-I molecules and their related CTL responses. PMID:27634283

  10. Interleukin 18 secretion and its effect in improving Chimeric Antigen Receptors efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Kun

    Clinical trials have shown that chimeric antigen receptor T cells modified to target cancer cells expressing a surface antigen found on immature B-cells. The purpose of this experiment is to take a pro-inflammatory cytokine, and analyze its effect in improving the efficiency of the T cells. IL-18 has been previously shown to recruit T cells to the tumor site and improve their secretion of cytotoxic cytokines. A human model of the proposed armored T cell has been created and has shown success in combating cancer cells in vitro. The next step is to design and produce a murine model to test in vivo in immunocompetent mice. This research project aimed to create two models: one utilizing 2A peptides and another utilizing IRES elements as a multicistronic vector. Both models would require the insertion of the desired genes into SFG backbones. IRES, a DNA element which acts as a binding site for the transcriptional machinery to recognize which part of the DNA to transcribe, commonly found in bicistronic vectors, is large with 500-600 base pairs, and has a lower transgene expression rate. P2A is smaller, only consisting of about 20 amino acids, and typically has a higher transgene expression rate, which may or may not result in higher effectiveness of the model. I would like to thank Dr. Renier Brentjens for being a mentor who cared about giving his interns as much educational value as possible.

  11. Achieving Dramatic School Improvement: An Exploratory Study. A Cross-Site Analysis from the Evaluation of Comprehensive School Reform Program Implementation and Outcomes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aladjem, Daniel K.; Birman, Beatrice F.; Orland, Martin; Harr-Robins, Jenifer; Heredia, Alberto; Parrish, Thomas B.; Ruffini, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study describes approaches to improving schools through retrospective, in-depth qualitative case studies. To select schools to be examined, the authors sought to identify Comprehensive School Reform (CSR) schools demonstrating two distinctive patterns of improved student achievement between 2000 and 2005, rapid-improvement (i.e.,…

  12. Improved Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Surface Antigen by a New Rapid Automated Assay

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Bernard; Bayer, Anja; Kirch, Peter; Schlüter, Volker; Schlieper, Dietmar; Melchior, Walter

    1999-01-01

    The performance of hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) screening assays is continuously improved in order to reduce the residual risk of transfusion-associated hepatitis B. In a multicenter study, a new automated rapid screening assay, Elecsys HBsAg (Roche Diagnostics), was compared to well-established tests (Auszyme Monoclonal [overnight incubation] version B and IMx HBsAg [Abbott]). Included in the evaluation were 23 seroconversion panels; sera from the acute and chronic phases of infection; dilution series of various HBsAg standards, HBV subtypes, and S gene mutants; and isolated anti-HBV core antigen-positive samples. To challenge the specificity of the new assay, sera from HBsAg-negative blood donors, pregnant women, and dialysis and hospitalized patients and potentially cross-reactive samples were investigated. Elecsys HBsAg showed a higher sensitivity for HBsAg subtypes ad, ay, adw2, adw4, ayw1, ayw2, ayw4, and adr detection in dilution series of different standards or sera than Auszyme Monoclonal version B and/or IMx HBsAg. Acute hepatitis B was detected in 11 to 16 of 23 seroconversion panels between 2 and 16 days earlier with Elecsys HBsAg than with the alternative assays. Elecsys HBsAg and Auszyme Monoclonal version B detected HBsAg surface mutants with equal sensitivity. The sensitivity and specificity of Elecsys HBsAg were 100%. Auszyme Monoclonal version B had a 99.9% specificity, and its sensitivity was 96.6%. IMx HBsAg showed a poorer sensitivity and specificity than the other assays. In conclusion, Elecsys HBsAg permits earlier detection of acute hepatitis B and different HBV subtypes than the alternative assays. By using highly sensitive HBsAg screening assays, low-level HBsAg carriers among isolated anti-HBV core antigen-positive individuals can be detected. PMID:10405414

  13. mTOR inhibition improves antitumor effects of vaccination with antigen-encoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Vascotto, Fulvia; Selmi, Abderraouf; Attig, Sebastian; Diekmann, Jan; Huber, Christoph; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2013-12-01

    Vaccination with in vitro transcribed RNA encoding tumor antigens is an emerging approach in cancer immunotherapy. Attempting to further improve RNA vaccine efficacy, we have explored combining RNA with immunomodulators such as rapamycin. Rapamycin, the inhibitor of mTOR, was used originally for immunosuppression. Recent reports in mouse systems, however, suggest that mTOR inhibition may enhance the formation and differentiation of the memory CD8(+) T-cell pool. Because memory T-cell formation is critical to the outcome of vaccination approaches, we studied the impact of rapamycin on the in vivo primed RNA vaccine-induced immune response using the chicken ovalbumin-expressing B16 melanoma model in C57BL/6 mice. Our data show that treatment with rapamycin at the effector-to-memory transition phase skews the vaccine-induced immune response toward the formation of a quantitatively and qualitatively superior memory pool and results in a better recall response. Tumor-infiltrating immune cells from these mice display a favorable ratio of effector versus suppressor cell populations. Survival of mice treated with the combined regimen of RNA vaccination with rapamycin is significantly longer (91.5 days) than that in the control groups receiving only one of these compounds (32 and 46 days, respectively). Our findings indicate that rapamycin enhances therapeutic efficacy of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells induced by RNA vaccination, and we propose further clinical exploration of rapamycin as a component of immunotherapeutic regimens. PMID:24778131

  14. Soluble recombinant merozoite surface antigen-142kDa of Plasmodium vivax: An improved diagnostic antigen for vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    Mirahmadi, Hadi; Fallahi, Shirzad; Seyyed Tabaei, Seyyed Javad

    2016-04-01

    Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), as a serological test, can be a beneficial tool for epidemiological studies by screening blood donors and diagnosis of specific antibodies from Plasmodium vivax (P. vivax) infected cases. Since P. vivax cannot easily be acquired in vitro, ELISA assays using total or semi-purified antigens are seldom used. On the basis of this restriction, we examined whether recombinant protein 42 kDa related to C-terminal region of the merozoite surface antigen-1 of P. vivax (MSA-1(42)) could be suitable for serological detection of vivax malaria infection. Purified recombinant protein produced in Escherichia coli (E. coli) (GST-MSA-1(42)) was examined for its ability to bind to IgG antibodies of individuals with patent P. vivax infection. The method was tested with 262 serum samples collected from individuals living in the south and southeastern regions of Iran where malaria is endemic. Samples exposed to Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) infection and patients with other infectious disease (toxoplasmosis, Leishmania infantum infection, echinococcosis and FUO (fever with unknown origin)) except for P. falciparum were residing in non- malaria endemic areas in Iran. Generally, the sensitivity of ELISA evaluated with sera from naturally infected individuals was 86.9%. The specificity value of the ELISA determined with sera from healthy individuals and from individuals with other infectious diseases was 94.05%. The positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) provided, and the diagnostic efficiency of anti-rPvMSA-1(42) antibody using indirect ELISA were determined 93.58, 87.77 and 91.06% respectively. Our study demonstrated that, because MSA-1(42) kDa contains both the 33 and 19 kDa fragments in its structure, it can serve as the basis for the development of a sensitive serological test which can be used for epidemiological studies, screening blood donors and diagnosis of P. vivax malaria. PMID:26851675

  15. Improving therapy of chronic lymphocytic leukemia with chimeric antigen receptor T cells.

    PubMed

    Fraietta, Joseph A; Schwab, Robert D; Maus, Marcela V

    2016-04-01

    Adoptive cell immunotherapy for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has heralded a new era of synthetic biology. The infusion of genetically engineered, autologous chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells directed against CD19 expressed by normal and malignant B cells represents a novel approach to cancer therapy. The results of recent clinical trials of CAR T cells in relapsed and refractory CLL have demonstrated long-term disease-free remissions, underscoring the power of harnessing and redirecting the immune system against cancer. This review will briefly summarize T-cell therapies in development for CLL disease. We discuss the role of T-cell function and phenotype, T-cell culture optimization, CAR design, and approaches to potentiate the survival and anti-tumor effects of infused lymphocytes. Future efforts will focus on improving the efficacy of CAR T cells for the treatment of CLL and incorporating adoptive cell immunotherapy into standard medical management of CLL.

  16. Amperometric immunosensor using electric field to improve the interaction between antibody and antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jizhou; Bian, Chao; Qu, Lan; Xia, Shanhong

    2008-03-01

    This paper proposes a method that using an electric field to improve the immobilization of analyte in an amperometric immunosensor. The amperometric immunosensor, which has a two-microelectrode system enclosed in a SU-8 reaction microwell, has been developed with MEMS technology for the detection of the human immunoglobulin (HIgG). Electric field has been applied above the working electrode by setting the appropriate potential between two electrodes to enable more antigen "IgG" to be assembled to the sensing interface with less time. The results demonstrate that the immunochemical incubation time spent on the immobilization of HIgG has been shortened, and the property of the immunosensor has been enhanced.

  17. Combining BRAF inhibitor and anti PD-L1 antibody dramatically improves tumor regression and anti tumor immunity in an immunocompetent murine model of anaplastic thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Borre, Pierre Vanden; Zurakowski, David; Kim, Yon Seon; Dennett, Kate Virginia; Amin, Salma; Freeman, Gordon James; Parangi, Sareh

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of programmed cell death-1 and its ligand is widely studied in cancer. Monoclonal antibodies blocking these molecules have had great success but little is known about them in thyroid cancer. We investigated the role of PD-L1 in thyroid cancer with respect to BRAF mutation and MAP kinase pathway activity and the effect of anti PD-L1 antibody therapy on tumor regression and intra-tumoral immune response alone or in combination with BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi). BRAFV600E cells showed significantly higher baseline expression of PD-L1 at mRNA and protein levels compared to BRAFWT cells. MEK inhibitor treatment resulted in a decrease of PD-L1 expression across all cell lines. BRAFi treatment decreased PD-L1 expression in BRAFV600E cells, but paradoxically increased its expression in BRAFWT cells. BRAFV600E mutated patients samples had a higher level of PD-L1 mRNA compared to BRAFWT (p=0.015). Immunocompetent mice (B6129SF1/J) implanted with syngeneic 3747 BRAFV600E/WT P53−/− murine tumor cells were randomized to control, PLX4720, anti PD-L1 antibody and their combination. In this model of aggressive thyroid cancer, control tumor volume reached 782.3±174.6mm3 at two weeks. The combination dramatically reduced tumor volume to 147.3±60.8, compared to PLX4720 (439.3±188.4 mm3, P=0.023) or PD-L1 antibody (716.7±62.1, P<0.001) alone. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed intense CD8+ CTL infiltration and cytotoxicity and favorable CD8+:Treg ratio compared to each individual treatment. Our results show anti PD-L1 treatment potentiates the effect of BRAFi on tumor regression and intensifies anti tumor immune response in an immunocompetent model of ATC. Clinical trials of this therapeutic combination may be of benefit in patients with ATC. PMID:26943572

  18. Combining BRAF inhibitor and anti PD-L1 antibody dramatically improves tumor regression and anti tumor immunity in an immunocompetent murine model of anaplastic thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Brauner, Eran; Gunda, Viswanath; Vanden Borre, Pierre; Zurakowski, David; Kim, Yon Seon; Dennett, Kate Virginia; Amin, Salma; Freeman, Gordon James; Parangi, Sareh

    2016-03-29

    The interaction of programmed cell death-1 and its ligand is widely studied in cancer. Monoclonal antibodies blocking these molecules have had great success but little is known about them in thyroid cancer. We investigated the role of PD-L1 in thyroid cancer with respect to BRAF mutation and MAP kinase pathway activity and the effect of anti PD-L1 antibody therapy on tumor regression and intra-tumoral immune response alone or in combination with BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi). BRAFV600E cells showed significantly higher baseline expression of PD-L1 at mRNA and protein levels compared to BRAFWT cells. MEK inhibitor treatment resulted in a decrease of PD-L1 expression across all cell lines. BRAFi treatment decreased PD-L1 expression in BRAFV600E cells, but paradoxically increased its expression in BRAFWT cells. BRAFV600E mutated patients samples had a higher level of PD-L1 mRNA compared to BRAFWT (p=0.015). Immunocompetent mice (B6129SF1/J) implanted with syngeneic 3747 BRAFV600E/WT P53-/- murine tumor cells were randomized to control, PLX4720, anti PD-L1 antibody and their combination. In this model of aggressive thyroid cancer, control tumor volume reached 782.3±174.6mm3 at two weeks. The combination dramatically reduced tumor volume to 147.3±60.8, compared to PLX4720 (439.3±188.4 mm3, P=0.023) or PD-L1 antibody (716.7±62.1, P<0.001) alone. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed intense CD8+ CTL infiltration and cytotoxicity and favorable CD8+:Treg ratio compared to each individual treatment. Our results show anti PD-L1 treatment potentiates the effect of BRAFi on tumor regression and intensifies anti tumor immune response in an immunocompetent model of ATC. Clinical trials of this therapeutic combination may be of benefit in patients with ATC.

  19. Primary Care DirectConnect: How the Marriage of Call Center Technology and the EMR Brought Dramatic Results-A Service Quality Improvement Study.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Brent; Smith, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Of the key Health Plan patient satisfaction measures used in Kaiser Permanente Colorado, ease of contacting the physician's office with a medical question was consistently rated as the lowest quarterly patient satisfaction measure. Furthermore, medical office staff had become dissatisfied with their inability to contact patients who had previously left messages. In addition to the shear volume of messages, the return calls were often unanswered, leading to subsequent attempts to reach patients, creating additional work for medical office staff.DirectConnect-the project name for a system and set of processes focused on improving patient satisfaction with the ability to contact Primary Care delivery teams by telephone-focuses on isolating medical advice calls from the other types of calls handled by the centralized Call Center. The system identifies the patient using his/her unique electronic medical record number, then automatically routes medical advice calls directly to the appropriate Primary Care Physician (PCP) or staff. The clinician may then evaluate and respond to the patient's need quickly, thus managing more of their panel's requests in real time.How is DirectConnect different from simply having the patient contact their PCP's office directly? The primary difference is "one-number" convenience that allows all patients to dial one number to access their PCP's team. In addition, calls are routed to various staff as available to reduce long telephone queues and wait times.The DirectConnect system has resulted in statistically significant improvement in key service quality measures. Patient satisfaction improved from a pre-implementation nine quarter mean of 55.9% to a post-implementation 12 quarter mean of 70.2%. Fourteen percent to 17% of all Primary Care calls are now handled by the patient's home medical office team, creating a 54% improvement in the centralized Call Center's speed of answering calls in the first quarter post implementation-making no

  20. Primary Care DirectConnect: How the Marriage of Call Center Technology and the EMR Brought Dramatic Results—A Service Quality Improvement Study

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Brent; Smith, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Of the key Health Plan patient satisfaction measures used in Kaiser Permanente Colorado, ease of contacting the physician's office with a medical question was consistently rated as the lowest quarterly patient satisfaction measure. Furthermore, medical office staff had become dissatisfied with their inability to contact patients who had previously left messages. In addition to the shear volume of messages, the return calls were often unanswered, leading to subsequent attempts to reach patients, creating additional work for medical office staff. DirectConnect—the project name for a system and set of processes focused on improving patient satisfaction with the ability to contact Primary Care delivery teams by telephone—focuses on isolating medical advice calls from the other types of calls handled by the centralized Call Center. The system identifies the patient using his/her unique electronic medical record number, then automatically routes medical advice calls directly to the appropriate Primary Care Physician (PCP) or staff. The clinician may then evaluate and respond to the patient's need quickly, thus managing more of their panel's requests in real time. How is DirectConnect different from simply having the patient contact their PCP's office directly? The primary difference is “one-number” convenience that allows all patients to dial one number to access their PCP's team. In addition, calls are routed to various staff as available to reduce long telephone queues and wait times. The DirectConnect system has resulted in statistically significant improvement in key service quality measures. Patient satisfaction improved from a pre-implementation nine quarter mean of 55.9% to a post-implementation 12 quarter mean of 70.2%. Fourteen percent to 17% of all Primary Care calls are now handled by the patient's home medical office team, creating a 54% improvement in the centralized Call Center's speed of answering calls in the first quarter post implementation

  1. In Vivo Targeting of Antigens to Maturing Dendritic Cells via the DEC-205 Receptor Improves T Cell Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Bonifaz, Laura C.; Bonnyay, David P.; Charalambous, Anna; Darguste, Dara I.; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Soares, Helena; Brimnes, Marie K.; Moltedo, Bruno; Moran, Thomas M.; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2004-01-01

    The prevention and treatment of prevalent infectious diseases and tumors should benefit from improvements in the induction of antigen-specific T cell immunity. To assess the potential of antigen targeting to dendritic cells to improve immunity, we incorporated ovalbumin protein into a monoclonal antibody to the DEC-205 receptor, an endocytic receptor that is abundant on these cells in lymphoid tissues. Simultaneously, we injected agonistic α-CD40 antibody to mature the dendritic cells. We found that a single low dose of antibody-conjugated ovalbumin initiated immunity from the naive CD4+ and CD8+ T cell repertoire. Unexpectedly, the αDEC-205 antigen conjugates, given s.c., targeted to dendritic cells systemically and for long periods, and ovalbumin peptide was presented on MHC class I for 2 weeks. This was associated with stronger CD8+ T cell–mediated immunity relative to other forms of antigen delivery, even when the latter was given at a thousand times higher doses. In parallel, the mice showed enhanced resistance to an established rapidly growing tumor and to viral infection at a mucosal site. By better harnessing the immunizing functions of maturing dendritic cells, antibody-mediated antigen targeting via the DEC-205 receptor increases the efficiency of vaccination for T cell immunity, including systemic and mucosal resistance in disease models. PMID:15024047

  2. In vivo targeting of antigens to maturing dendritic cells via the DEC-205 receptor improves T cell vaccination.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Laura C; Bonnyay, David P; Charalambous, Anna; Darguste, Dara I; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Soares, Helena; Brimnes, Marie K; Moltedo, Bruno; Moran, Thomas M; Steinman, Ralph M

    2004-03-15

    The prevention and treatment of prevalent infectious diseases and tumors should benefit from improvements in the induction of antigen-specific T cell immunity. To assess the potential of antigen targeting to dendritic cells to improve immunity, we incorporated ovalbumin protein into a monoclonal antibody to the DEC-205 receptor, an endocytic receptor that is abundant on these cells in lymphoid tissues. Simultaneously, we injected agonistic alpha-CD40 antibody to mature the dendritic cells. We found that a single low dose of antibody-conjugated ovalbumin initiated immunity from the naive CD4+ and CD8+ T cell repertoire. Unexpectedly, the alphaDEC-205 antigen conjugates, given s.c., targeted to dendritic cells systemically and for long periods, and ovalbumin peptide was presented on MHC class I for 2 weeks. This was associated with stronger CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity relative to other forms of antigen delivery, even when the latter was given at a thousand times higher doses. In parallel, the mice showed enhanced resistance to an established rapidly growing tumor and to viral infection at a mucosal site. By better harnessing the immunizing functions of maturing dendritic cells, antibody-mediated antigen targeting via the DEC-205 receptor increases the efficiency of vaccination for T cell immunity, including systemic and mucosal resistance in disease models.

  3. Poly(2,5-dimercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole) as a cathode for rechargeable lithium batteries with dramatically improved performance.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Lowe, Michael A; Conte, Sean; Burkhardt, Stephen E; Abruña, Héctor D

    2012-07-01

    Organosulfur compounds with multiple thiol groups are promising for high gravimetric energy density electrochemical energy storage. We have synthesized a poly(2,5-dimercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole) (PDMcT)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) composite cathode for lithium-ion batteries with a new method and investigated its electrochemical behavior by charge/discharge cycles and cyclic voltammetry (CV) in an ether-based electrolyte. Based on a comparison of the electrochemical performance with a carbonate-based electrolyte, we found a much higher discharge capacity, but also a very attractive cycling performance of PDMcT by using a tetra(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether (TEGDME)-based electrolyte. The first discharge capacity of the as-synthesized PDMcT/PEDOT composite approached 210 mAh g(-1) in the TEGDME-based electrolyte. CV results clearly show that the redox reactions of PDMcT are highly reversible in this TEGDME-based electrolyte. The reversible capacity remained around 120 mAh g(-1) after 20 charge/discharge cycles. With improved cycling performance and very low cost, PDMcT could become a very promising cathode material when combined with a TEGDME-based electrolyte. The poor capacity in the carbonate-based electrolyte is a consequence of the irreversible reaction of the DMcT monomer and dimer with the solvent, emphasizing the importance of electrolyte chemistry when studying molecular-based battery materials. PMID:22644940

  4. Co-injection of a targeted, reversibly masked endosomolytic polymer dramatically improves the efficacy of cholesterol-conjugated small interfering RNAs in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wong, So C; Klein, Jason J; Hamilton, Holly L; Chu, Qili; Frey, Christina L; Trubetskoy, Vladimir S; Hegge, Julia; Wakefield, Darren; Rozema, David B; Lewis, David L

    2012-12-01

    Effective in vivo delivery of small interfering (siRNA) has been a major obstacle in the development of RNA interference therapeutics. One of the first attempts to overcome this obstacle utilized intravenous injection of cholesterol-conjugated siRNA (chol-siRNA). Although studies in mice revealed target gene knockdown in the liver, delivery was relatively inefficient, requiring 3 daily injections of 50 mg/kg of chol-siRNA to obtain measurable reduction in gene expression. Here we present a new delivery approach that increases the efficacy of the chol-siRNA over 500-fold and allows over 90% reduction in target gene expression in mice and, for the first time, high levels of gene knockdown in non-human primates. This improved efficacy is achieved by the co-injection of a hepatocyte-targeted and reversibly masked endosomolytic polymer. We show that knockdown is absolutely dependent on the presence of hepatocyte-targeting ligand on the polymer, the cognate hepatocyte receptor, and the cholesterol moiety of the siRNA. Importantly, we provide evidence that this increase in efficacy is not dependent on interactions between the chol-siRNA with the polymer prior to injection or in the bloodstream. The simplicity of the formulation and efficacy of this mode of siRNA delivery should prove beneficial in the use of siRNA as a therapeutic.

  5. Co-Injection of a Targeted, Reversibly Masked Endosomolytic Polymer Dramatically Improves the Efficacy of Cholesterol-Conjugated Small Interfering RNAs In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wong, So C.; Klein, Jason J.; Hamilton, Holly L.; Chu, Qili; Frey, Christina L.; Trubetskoy, Vladimir S.; Hegge, Julia; Wakefield, Darren; Rozema, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Effective in vivo delivery of small interfering (siRNA) has been a major obstacle in the development of RNA interference therapeutics. One of the first attempts to overcome this obstacle utilized intravenous injection of cholesterol-conjugated siRNA (chol-siRNA). Although studies in mice revealed target gene knockdown in the liver, delivery was relatively inefficient, requiring 3 daily injections of 50 mg/kg of chol-siRNA to obtain measurable reduction in gene expression. Here we present a new delivery approach that increases the efficacy of the chol-siRNA over 500-fold and allows over 90% reduction in target gene expression in mice and, for the first time, high levels of gene knockdown in non-human primates. This improved efficacy is achieved by the co-injection of a hepatocyte-targeted and reversibly masked endosomolytic polymer. We show that knockdown is absolutely dependent on the presence of hepatocyte-targeting ligand on the polymer, the cognate hepatocyte receptor, and the cholesterol moiety of the siRNA. Importantly, we provide evidence that this increase in efficacy is not dependent on interactions between the chol-siRNA with the polymer prior to injection or in the bloodstream. The simplicity of the formulation and efficacy of this mode of siRNA delivery should prove beneficial in the use of siRNA as a therapeutic. PMID:23181701

  6. Poly(2,5-dimercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole) as a cathode for rechargeable lithium batteries with dramatically improved performance.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Lowe, Michael A; Conte, Sean; Burkhardt, Stephen E; Abruña, Héctor D

    2012-07-01

    Organosulfur compounds with multiple thiol groups are promising for high gravimetric energy density electrochemical energy storage. We have synthesized a poly(2,5-dimercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole) (PDMcT)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) composite cathode for lithium-ion batteries with a new method and investigated its electrochemical behavior by charge/discharge cycles and cyclic voltammetry (CV) in an ether-based electrolyte. Based on a comparison of the electrochemical performance with a carbonate-based electrolyte, we found a much higher discharge capacity, but also a very attractive cycling performance of PDMcT by using a tetra(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether (TEGDME)-based electrolyte. The first discharge capacity of the as-synthesized PDMcT/PEDOT composite approached 210 mAh g(-1) in the TEGDME-based electrolyte. CV results clearly show that the redox reactions of PDMcT are highly reversible in this TEGDME-based electrolyte. The reversible capacity remained around 120 mAh g(-1) after 20 charge/discharge cycles. With improved cycling performance and very low cost, PDMcT could become a very promising cathode material when combined with a TEGDME-based electrolyte. The poor capacity in the carbonate-based electrolyte is a consequence of the irreversible reaction of the DMcT monomer and dimer with the solvent, emphasizing the importance of electrolyte chemistry when studying molecular-based battery materials.

  7. Proper exercise decreases plasma carcinoembryonic antigen levels with the improvement of body condition in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Ko, Il-Gyu; Park, Eung-Mi; Choi, Hye-Jung; Yoo, Jaehyun; Lee, Jong-Kyun; Jee, Yong-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Aging increases the risk of chronic diseases including cancers. Physical exercise has the beneficial effects for the elderly susceptible to the development of cancers, through maintaining a healthy body condition and improving the immune system. However, excessive or insufficient exercise might increase the risk for cancer. In the present study, we investigated what exercise frequency improves cancer-related biomarkers, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), alpha fetoprotein (AFP), red blood cell (RBC), and white blood cell (WBC), and the body composition of elderly women. Fifty-four females, aged 70 to 77 years, were divided into 4 groups: control, 1-day exercise (1E), 2-3-day exercise (2-3E), and 5-day exercise (5E) groups. The control group did not participate in any physical activity, while the subjects in the exercise groups underwent the exercise program for 12 weeks. As results, CEA was significantly decreased in the exercise groups, with the lowest values in 2-3E group. In contrast, AFP, RBC and WBC were not significantly changed. CEA is an oncofetal glycoprotein that is overexpressed in adenocarcinomas. Although the function of CEA has not been fully understood, CEA has been suggested to be involved in the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines via stimulating monocytes and macrophages. Moreover, body weight and body mass index were improved in the exercise groups, with the lowest levels in 5E group. Thus, we suggest that exercise for 2-3 days per week decreases the expression of CEA and improves body condition, without loading fatigue or stress, which may contribute to preventing cancer in the elderly women.

  8. Targeting to porcine sialoadhesin receptor improves antigen presentation to T cells

    PubMed Central

    Revilla, Concepción; Poderoso, Teresa; Martínez, Paloma; Álvarez, Belén; López-Fuertes, Laura; Alonso, Fernando; Ezquerra, Angel; Domínguez, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Antibody-mediated targeting of antigen to specific antigen presenting cells (APC) receptors is an attractive strategy to enhance T cell immune responses to weak immunogenic antigens. Here, we describe the characterization of two monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against different epitopes of porcine sialoadhesin (Sn) and evaluate in vitro the potential of targeting this receptor for delivery of antigens to APC for T cell stimulation. The specificity of these mAb was determined by amino acid sequence analysis of peptides derived from the affinity purified antigen. Porcine Sn is expressed by macrophages present in the border between white and red pulp of the spleen and in the subcapsular sinus of lymph nodes, an appropriate location for trapping blood and lymph-borne antigens. It is also expressed by alveolar macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC). Blood monocytes are negative for this molecule, but its expression can be induced by treatment with IFN-a. MAb bound to Sn is rapidly endocytosed. MAb to sialoadhesin induced in vitro T cell proliferation at concentrations 100-fold lower than the non-targeting control mAb when using T lymphocytes from pigs immunized with mouse immunoglobulins as responder cells and IFN-a treated monocytes or MoDC as APC, suggesting a role of sialoadhesin in antigen uptake and/or delivery into the presentation pathway in APC. PMID:19081005

  9. Targeting to porcine sialoadhesin receptor improves antigen presentation to T cells.

    PubMed

    Revilla, Concepción; Poderoso, Teresa; Martínez, Paloma; Alvarez, Belén; López-Fuertes, Laura; Alonso, Fernando; Ezquerra, Angel; Domínguez, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Antibody-mediated targeting of antigen to specific antigen presenting cells (APC) receptors is an attractive strategy to enhance T cell immune responses to weak immunogenic antigens. Here, we describe the characterization of two monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against different epitopes of porcine sialoadhesin (Sn) and evaluate in vitro the potential of targeting this receptor for delivery of antigens to APC for T cell stimulation. The specificity of these mAb was determined by amino acid sequence analysis of peptides derived from the affinity purified antigen. Porcine Sn is expressed by macrophages present in the border between white and red pulp of the spleen and in the subcapsular sinus of lymph nodes, an appropriate location for trapping blood and lymph-borne antigens. It is also expressed by alveolar macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC). Blood monocytes are negative for this molecule, but its expression can be induced by treatment with IFN-alpha. MAb bound to Sn is rapidly endocytosed. MAb to sialoadhesin induced in vitro T cell proliferation at concentrations 100-fold lower than the non-targeting control mAb when using T lymphocytes from pigs immunized with mouse immunoglobulins as responder cells and IFN-alpha treated monocytes or MoDC as APC, suggesting a role of sialoadhesin in antigen uptake and/or delivery into the presentation pathway in APC.

  10. A Mutant Library Approach to Identify Improved Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein Vaccine Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Konar, Monica; Rossi, Raffaella; Walter, Helen; Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Factor H binding protein (FHbp) is a virulence factor used by meningococci to evade the host complement system. FHbp elicits bactericidal antibodies in humans and is part of two recently licensed vaccines. Using human complement Factor H (FH) transgenic mice, we previously showed that binding of FH decreased the protective antibody responses to FHbp vaccination. Therefore, in the present study we devised a library-based method to identify mutant FHbp antigens with very low binding of FH. Using an FHbp sequence variant in one of the two licensed vaccines, we displayed an error-prone PCR mutant FHbp library on the surface of Escherichia coli. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate FHbp mutants with very low binding of human FH and preserved binding of control anti-FHbp monoclonal antibodies. We sequenced the gene encoding FHbp from selected clones and introduced the mutations into a soluble FHbp construct. Using this approach, we identified several new mutant FHbp vaccine antigens that had very low binding of FH as measured by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. The new mutant FHbp antigens elicited protective antibody responses in human FH transgenic mice that were up to 20-fold higher than those elicited by the wild-type FHbp antigen. This approach offers the potential to discover mutant antigens that might not be predictable even with protein structural information and potentially can be applied to other microbial vaccine antigens that bind host proteins. PMID:26057742

  11. Improved Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Histoplasmosis by Combining Antigen and Antibody Detection

    PubMed Central

    Richer, Sarah M.; Smedema, Melinda L.; Durkin, Michelle M.; Herman, Katie M.; Hage, Chadi A.; Fuller, Deanna; Wheat, L. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute pulmonary histoplasmosis can be severe, especially following heavy inoculum exposure. Rapid diagnosis is critical and often possible by detection of antigen, but this test may be falsely negative in 17% of such cases. Antibody detection by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) may increase sensitivity and permit the measurement of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) classes of antibodies separately. Methods. Microplates coated with Histoplasma antigen were used for testing of serum from patients with acute pulmonary histoplasmosis and controls in the MVista Histoplasma antibody EIA. Results for IgG and IgM were reported independently. Results. IgG antibodies were detected in 87.5%, IgM antibodies in 67.5%, and IgG and/or IgM antibodies in 88.8% of patients with acute pulmonary histoplasmosis in this assay, while immunodiffusion, complement fixation, and antigen testing showed sensitivities of 55.0%, 73.1%, and 67.5%, respectively (n = 80). Combining antigen and antibody detection increased the sensitivity to 96.3%. Conclusions. The MVista Histoplasma antibody EIA offers increased sensitivity over current antibody tests while also allowing separate detection of IgG and IgM antibodies and complementing antigen detection. Combining antigen and EIA antibody testing provides an optimal method for diagnosis of acute pulmonary histoplasmosis. PMID:26797210

  12. Dramatizing Nonfiction with Emerging Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam, Lynne

    1991-01-01

    Presents scenarios from a kindergarten classroom in which dramatization is used extensively in conjunction with nonfiction books. Shows how the children acted out topics that ranged from the Pilgrims' first Thanksgiving to the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., showing that they were able to develop rich representations of nonfiction materials.…

  13. Dramatic Techniques in ESL Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radin, Barbara

    Three techniques have been found to be helpful in using dramatic techniques to provide motivation, self-confidence, and self-esteem to students of English as a second language at Hostos Community College. Strategic interaction is a technique based on the open-ended scenario, in which students are free to respond to the problem presented in the…

  14. Improvement of arbovirus HA antigens by treatment with a colloidal silica gel and sonication.

    PubMed

    Traavik, T

    1977-01-01

    A remarkable increase in HA titers for weakly haemagglutinating Norwegian arbovirus strains, Uukuniemi and Runde viruses, was achieved by including treatment with the colloidal silica gel Aerosil in the antigen preparation scheme. By combining this procedure with sonication, the titers of sucrose-aceton extracted, infected suckling mouse brains could be increased several hundred times. Good antigens also were obtained from virus grown in BHK21/c 13 cell cultures and concentrated by polyethylene glycol 6000/NaCl. Rubella virus HA antigen and HBsAg were adsorbed to the gel, and excluded from a preparation by treatment with Aerosil. This indicates a limitation to the universal use of the method, presumably related to the particle size.

  15. Conjugation of ovalbumin to trimethyl chitosan improves immunogenicity of the antigen.

    PubMed

    Slütter, Bram; Soema, Peter Christiaan; Ding, Zhi; Verheul, Rolf; Hennink, Wim; Jiskoot, Wim

    2010-04-19

    Subunit vaccines are generally safer, but often less effective than live attenuated vaccines as they lack the necessary co-stimulatory factors. The formulation of an adjuvant like N-trimethyl chitosan (TMC) with an antigen can overcome its poor immunogenicity. Recent data suggest the importance of incorporating the antigen and the adjuvant into one entity for maximum immunostimulatory effect, e.g. by using (nano)particles. In the present paper we introduce the conjugation of an antigen, ovalbumin (OVA), to TMC as an alternative to nanoparticles for subunit vaccination. OVA was covalently linked to TMC using thiol chemistry (SPDP method). The uptake of the resulting TMC-OVA conjugate by dendritic cells (DC) and its effect on DC maturation was assessed in vitro and its immunogenicity was investigated in mice. We found that with the SPDP method a reducible covalent bond between TMC and OVA could be introduced, without disrupting the protein's antigenicity and structure. Uptake of TMC-OVA conjugate by dendritic cells was similar to the uptake of TMC/OVA nanoparticles, over 5-fold increased compared to a solution of OVA and TMC. Mice immunized with TMC-OVA conjugate produced 1000-fold higher OVA specific IgG titers than mice immunized with either OVA or a physical mixture of TMC and OVA. Moreover, these antibody titers were slightly elevated compared to the titers obtained with TMC/OVA nanoparticles. Conjugation of the antigen to an adjuvant is therefore a viable strategy to increase the immunogenicity of subunit vaccines and may provide an alternative to the use of particles.

  16. Codon optimisation to improve expression of a Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis-specific membrane-associated antigen by Lactobacillus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Christopher; Douarre, Pierre E; Soulimane, Tewfik; Pletzer, Daniel; Weingart, Helge; MacSharry, John; Coffey, Aidan; Sleator, Roy D; O'Mahony, Jim

    2013-06-01

    Subunit and DNA-based vaccines against Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) attempt to overcome inherent issues associated with whole-cell formulations. However, these vaccines can be hampered by poor expression of recombinant antigens from a number of disparate hosts. The high G+C content of MAP invariably leads to a codon bias throughout gene expression. To investigate if the codon bias affects recombinant MAP antigen expression, the open reading frame of a MAP-specific antigen MptD (MAP3733c) was codon optimised for expression against a Lactobacillus salivarius host. Of the total 209 codons which constitute MAP3733c, 172 were modified resulting in a reduced G+C content from 61% for the native gene to 32.7% for the modified form. Both genes were placed under the transcriptional control of the PnisA promoter; allowing controlled heterologous expression in L. salivarius. Expression was monitored using fluorescence microscopy and microplate fluorometry via GFP tags translationally fused to the C-termini of the two MptD genes. A > 37-fold increase in expression was observed for the codon-optimised MAP3733synth variant over the native gene. Due to the low cost and improved expression achieved, codon optimisation significantly improves the potential of L. salivarius as an oral vaccine stratagem against Johne's disease. PMID:23620276

  17. Controlled and targeted release of antigens by intelligent shell for improving applicability of oral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zeng, Zhanzhuang; Hu, Chaohua; Bellis, Susan L; Yang, Wendi; Su, Yintao; Zhang, Xinyan; Wu, Yunkun

    2016-01-01

    Conventional oral vaccines with simple architecture face barriers with regard to stimulating effective immunity. Here we describe oral vaccines with an intelligent phase-transitional shielding layer, poly[(methyl methacrylate)-co-(methyl acrylate)-co-(methacrylic acid)]-poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PMMMA-PLGA), which can protect antigens in the gastro-intestinal tract and achieve targeted vaccination in the large intestine. With the surface immunogenic protein (SIP) from group B Streptococcus (GBS) entrapped as the antigen, oral administration with PMMMA-PLGA (PTRBL)/Trx-SIP nanoparticles stimulated robust immunity in tilapia, an animal with a relatively simple immune system. The vaccine succeeded in protecting against Streptococcus agalactiae, a pathogen of worldwide importance that threatens human health and is transmitted in water with infected fish. After oral vaccination with PTRBL/Trx-SIP, tilapia produced enhanced levels of SIP specific antibodies and displayed durability of immune protection. 100% of the vaccinated tilapia were protected from GBS infection, whereas the control groups without vaccines or vaccinated with Trx-SIP only exhibited respective infection rates of 100% or >60% within the initial 5 months after primary vaccination. Experiments in vivo demonstrated that the recombinant antigen Trx-SIP labeled with FITC was localized in colon, spleen and kidney, which are critical sites for mounting an immune response. Our results revealed that, rather than the size of the nanoparticles, it is more likely that the negative charge repulsion produced by ionization of the carboxyl groups in PMMMA shielded the nanoparticles from uptake by small intestinal epithelial cells. This system resolves challenges arising from gastrointestinal damage to antigens, and more importantly, offers a new approach applicable for oral vaccination.

  18. [Case of continuous trans-arterial calcium gluconate infusion using a direct arterial sphygmomanometry line that exhibited dramatic improvement of chemical burns on the fingers caused by hydrofluoric acid].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Kazuyuki; Shimizu, Makiko; Tanaka, Kotaro; Minemura, Atsuko; Tamatsukuri, Tatsuro; Miyake, Yasufumi; Aruga, Tohru

    2014-12-01

    Hydrofluoric acid (HFA) is commonly used and many injuries occur on the upper extremities following exposure to HFA. The use of calcium gluconate (CG) -containing gel or local injections of CG are widely used for the initial treatment of HFA exposure. However, severe pain continues in some cases despite the treatment. There was a report that trans-arterial CG infusion could improve HFA burns, however, such treatment is not an established clinical procedure. A 30-year-old male presented at our hospital with severe pain in his left thumb. He had been cleaning tiles with an HFA-containing detergent. We diagnosed him with a chemical burn due to HFA exposure. Local CG injections were tried several times, but his terrible pain continued. Therefore, a direct arterial sphygmomanometry line was inserted from the left radial artery, and continuous transarterial CG injection was performed. His terrible pain dramatically improved. Direct arterial sphygmomanometry systems are widely used in the critical care field to monitor the hemodynamics and ICU staffs are used to dealing with it. Moreover, continuous saline infusion prevents the tube obstruction. Continuous CG infusion from a direct arterial sphygmomanometry line is simple and safe way to administer CG in HFA burns.

  19. The Dramatic Methods of Hans van Dam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Water, Manon

    1994-01-01

    Interprets for the American reader the untranslated dramatic methods of Hans van Dam, a leading drama theorist in the Netherlands. Discusses the functions of drama as a method, closed dramatic methods, open dramatic methods, and applying van Dam's methods. (SR)

  20. Conjugating influenza a (H1N1) antigen to n-trimethylaminoethylmethacrylate chitosan nanoparticles improves the immunogenicity of the antigen after nasal administration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingfeng; Zheng, Xiaoyao; Zhang, Chi; Shao, Xiayan; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Qizhi; Jiang, Xinguo

    2015-11-01

    As one of the most serious infectious respiratory diseases, influenza A (H1N1) is a great threat to human health, and it has created an urgent demand for effective vaccines. Nasal immunization can induce both systemic and mucosal immune responses against viruses, and it can serve as an ideal route for vaccination. However, the low immunogenicity of antigens on nasal mucosa is a high barrier for the development of nasal vaccines. In this study, we covalently conjugated an influenza A (H1N1) antigen to the surface of N-trimethylaminoethylmethacrylate chitosan (TMC) nanoparticles (H1N1-TMC/NP) through thioester bonds to increase the immunogenicity of the antigen after nasal administration. SDS-PAGE revealed that most of the antigen was conjugated on TMC nanoparticles, and an in vitro biological activity assay confirmed the stability of the antigen after conjugation. After three nasal immunizations, the H1N1-TMC/NP induced significantly higher levels of serum IgG and mucosal sIgA compared with free antigen. A hemagglutination inhibition assay showed that H1N1-TMC/NP induced much more protective antibodies than antigen-encapsulated nanoparticles or alum-precipitated antigen (I.M.). In the mechanistic study, H1N1-TMC/NP was shown to stimulate macrophages to produce IL-1β and IL-6 and to stimulate spleen lymphocytes to produce IL-2 and IFN-γ. These results indicated that H1N1-TMC/NP may be an effective vaccine against influenza A (H1N1) viruses for use in nasal immunization.

  1. Modification of a deoxynivalenol-antigen-mimicking nanobody to improve immunoassay sensitivity by site-saturation mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yu-Lou; He, Qing-Hua; Xu, Yang; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yuan-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    A nanobody (N-28) which can act as a deoxynivalenol (DON) antigen has been generated, and its residues Thr102-Ser106 were identified to bind with anti-DON monoclonal antibody by alanine-scanning mutagenesis. Site-saturation mutagenesis was used to analyze the plasticity of five residues and to improve the sensitivity of the N-28-based immunoassay. After mutagenesis, three mutants were selected by phage immunoassay and were sequenced. The half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of the immunoassay based on mutants N-28-T102Y, N-28-V103L, and N-28-Y105F were 24.49 ± 1.0, 51.83 ± 2.5, and 35.65 ± 1.6 ng/mL, respectively, showing the assay was, respectively, 3.2, 1.5, and 2.2 times more sensitive than the wild-type-based assay. The best mutant, N-28-T102Y, was used to develop a competitive phage ELISA to detect DON in cereals with high specificity and accuracy. In addition, the structural properties of N-28-T102Y and N-28 were investigated, revealing that the affinity of N-28-T102Y decreased because of increased steric hindrance with the large side chain. The lower-binding-affinity antigen mimetic may contribute to the improvement of the sensitivity of competitive immunoassays. These results demonstrate that nanobodies would be a favorable tool for engineering. Moreover, our results have laid a solid foundation for site-saturation mutagenesis of antigen-mimicking nanobodies to improve immunoassay sensitivity for small molecules.

  2. Improved poliovirus D-antigen yields by application of different Vero cell cultivation methods.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Yvonne E; Rubingh, Olaf; Wijffels, René H; van der Pol, Leo A; Bakker, Wilfried A M

    2014-05-19

    Vero cells were grown adherent to microcarriers (Cytodex 1; 3 g L(-1)) using animal component free media in stirred-tank type bioreactors. Different strategies for media refreshment, daily media replacement (semi-batch), continuous media replacement (perfusion) and recirculation of media, were compared with batch cultivation. Cell densities increased using a feed strategy from 1×10(6) cells mL(-1) during batch cultivation to 1.8, 2.7 and 5.0×10(6) cells mL(-1) during semi-batch, perfusion and recirculation, respectively. The effects of these different cell culture strategies on subsequent poliovirus production were investigated. Increased cell densities allowed up to 3 times higher D-antigen levels when compared with that obtained from batch-wise Vero cell culture. However, the cell specific D-antigen production was lower when cells were infected at higher cell densities. This cell density effect is in good agreement with observations for different cell lines and virus types. From the evaluated alternative culture methods, application of a semi-batch mode of operations allowed the highest cell specific D-antigen production. The increased product yields that can easily be reached using these higher cell density cultivation methods, showed the possibility for better use of bioreactor capacity for the manufacturing of polio vaccines to ultimately reduce vaccine cost per dose. Further, the use of animal-component-free cell- and virus culture media shows opportunities for modernization of human viral vaccine manufacturing. PMID:24583004

  3. A combined approach of human leukocyte antigen ligandomics and immunogenicity analysis to improve peptide-based cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Peper, Janet Kerstin; Stevanović, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    The breakthrough development of immune checkpoint inhibitors as clinically effective novel therapies demonstrates the potential of cancer immunotherapy. The identification of suitable targets for specific immunotherapy, however, remains a challenging task. Most peptides previously used for vaccination in clinical trials were able to elicit strong immunological responses but failed with regard to clinical benefit. This might, at least partly, be caused by an inadequate peptide selection, usually derived from established tumor-associated antigens which are not necessarily presented as human leukocyte antigen (HLA) ligands. Recently, HLA ligandome analysis revealed cancer-associated peptides, which have been used in clinical trials showing encouraging impact on survival. To improve peptide-based cancer immunotherapy, our group established a combined approach of HLA ligandomics and immunogenicity analysis for the identification of vaccine peptides. This approach is based on the identification of naturally presented HLA ligands on tumor samples, the selection of tumor-associated/tumor-specific HLA ligands and their subsequent testing for immunogenicity in vitro. In this review, we want to present our pipeline for the identification of vaccine peptides, focusing on ovarian cancer, and want to discuss differences to other approaches. Furthermore, we want to give a short outlook of a potential multi-peptide vaccination trial using the novel identified peptides.

  4. Dramatic Education, An Interdisciplinary Approach to Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landy, Robert Jay

    This thesis argues that dramatic education is a subject matter whose content is four interrelated disciplines: theater, language arts, humanistic education, and social-psychology. It is also a process of learning crucial artistic, linguistic, humanistic, and scientific issues through the basic dramatic method of dramatization. The history of…

  5. Dramatic weight loss with rufinamide.

    PubMed

    Mourand, Isabelle; Crespel, Arielle; Gelisse, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Rufinamide (RUF) is a novel antiepileptic drug considered as second-line therapy in the treatment of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) have consisted mainly of drowsiness, irritability, vomiting, and loss of appetite. RUF is considered as a "weight-neutral" drug. We found clinically significant weight loss in 7 of 15 consecutive adult patients (47%; 3 male, 4 female, aged 18-31 years) treated with RUF as add-on therapy (800-2,400 mg/day: 23.5-57.1 mg/kg/day). The body mass index (BMI) decreased by 7.3-18.7%. Two patients were obese class I before RUF. Five patients (71%) were underweight before RUF (mild in one case, moderate in two cases, and severe in two cases). Four of these patients stopped RUF because of this adverse effect. RUF was recommenced in two patients using a lower and slower dosing strategy; one patient showed improvement in seizure control and no weight loss but RUF was re-stopped in the second patient because of continued weight loss. Despite of weight loss, RUF was continued in two other patients because it reduced seizure activity. We primarily related weight loss to reduced food intake, that is, loss of appetite and nausea, although in two patients no obvious loss of appetite was reported. RUF can cause clinically significant weight loss in adult patients, even at low dose. This AE can affect patients who are already underweight. There is a possibility that lower starting doses and slower escalation might minimize weight loss, but further information is required to determine whether this is the case. PMID:22780580

  6. Dramatic Play in Childhood: Rehearsal for Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koste, Virginia Glasgow

    The purpose of this book is to help parents and teachers recognize and understand dramatic play in childhood as a process whereby the child acts out human experience in an attempt to order, clarify, and understand it. Written by a person experienced in theatre and drama, the book considers the following aspects of dramatic play: the importance of…

  7. Incorporating structure context of HA protein to improve antigenicity calculation for influenza virus A/H3N2.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jingxuan; Qiu, Tianyi; Yang, Yiyan; Wu, Dingfeng; Cao, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    The rapid and consistent mutation of influenza requires frequent evaluation of antigenicity variation among newly emerged strains, during which several in-silico methods have been reported to facilitate the assays. In this paper, we designed a structure-based antigenicity scoring model instead of those sequence-based previously published. Protein structural context was adopted to derive the antigenicity-dominant positions, as well as the physic-chemical change of local micro-environment in correlation with antigenicity change. Then a position specific scoring matrix (PSSM) profile and local environmental change over above positions were integrated to predict the antigenicity variance. Independent testing showed a high accuracy of 0.875, and sensitivity of 0.986, with a significant ability to discover antigenic-escaping strains. When applying this model to the historical data, global and regional antigenic drift events can be successfully detected. Furthermore, two well-known vaccine failure events were clearly suggested. Therefore, this structure-context model may be particularly useful to identify those to-be-failed vaccine strains, in addition to suggest potential new vaccine strains. PMID:27498613

  8. Incorporating structure context of HA protein to improve antigenicity calculation for influenza virus A/H3N2

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jingxuan; Qiu, Tianyi; Yang, Yiyan; Wu, Dingfeng; Cao, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    The rapid and consistent mutation of influenza requires frequent evaluation of antigenicity variation among newly emerged strains, during which several in-silico methods have been reported to facilitate the assays. In this paper, we designed a structure-based antigenicity scoring model instead of those sequence-based previously published. Protein structural context was adopted to derive the antigenicity-dominant positions, as well as the physic-chemical change of local micro-environment in correlation with antigenicity change. Then a position specific scoring matrix (PSSM) profile and local environmental change over above positions were integrated to predict the antigenicity variance. Independent testing showed a high accuracy of 0.875, and sensitivity of 0.986, with a significant ability to discover antigenic-escaping strains. When applying this model to the historical data, global and regional antigenic drift events can be successfully detected. Furthermore, two well-known vaccine failure events were clearly suggested. Therefore, this structure-context model may be particularly useful to identify those to-be-failed vaccine strains, in addition to suggest potential new vaccine strains. PMID:27498613

  9. [Improvement of sensitivity in the second generation HCV core antigen assay by a novel concentration method using polyethylene glycol (PEG)].

    PubMed

    Higashimoto, Makiko; Takahashi, Masahiko; Jokyu, Ritsuko; Syundou, Hiromi; Saito, Hidetsugu

    2007-11-01

    A HCV core antigen (Ag) detection assay system, Lumipulse Ortho HCV Ag has been developed and is commercially available in Japan with a lower detection level limit of 50 fmol/l, which is equivalent to 20 KIU/ml in PCR quantitative assay. HCV core Ag assay has an advantage of broader dynamic range compared with PCR assay, however the sensitivity is lower than PCR. We developed a novel HCV core Ag concentration method using polyethylene glycol (PEG), which can improve the sensitivity five times better than the original assay. The reproducibility was examined by consecutive five-time measurement of HCV patients serum, in which the results of HCV core Ag original and concentrated method were 56.8 +/- 8.1 fmol/l (mean +/- SD), CV 14.2% and 322.9 +/- 45.5 fmol/l CV 14.0%, respectively. The assay results of HCV negative samples in original HCV core Ag were all 0.1 fmol/l and the results were same even in the concentration method. The results of concentration method were 5.7 times higher than original assay, which was almost equal to theoretical rate as expected. The assay results of serially diluted samples were also as same as expected data in both original and concentration assay. We confirmed that the sensitivity of HCV core Ag concentration method had almost as same sensitivity as PCR high range assay in the competitive assay study using the serially monitored samples of five HCV patients during interferon therapy. A novel concentration method using PEG in HCV core Ag assay system seems to be useful for assessing and monitoring interferon treatment for HCV.

  10. Building Family and Community Demand for Dramatic Change in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinson, Dana; Steiner, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    District-led, dramatic change efforts in failing schools--including turnarounds and school closures--often face strong resistance from families and communities. Resistance may be based on years of tension and distrust between districts and communities, failed past school improvement efforts, or a lack of understanding about the chasm between a…

  11. Second antibody clearance of /sup 131/I-labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen for improved tumor imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, R.M.; Primus, F.J.; Goldenberg, D.M.

    1985-05-01

    The authors have investigated the use of a second antibody (SA) directed against the radiolabeled primary anti-tumor antibody (PA) to enhance the clearance rate of the PA from the circulation and nontarget tissues. Administration of 50 or 250 ..mu..g of anti-goat IgG (SA) hr after the administration of 10 ..mu..g of /sup 131/I-goat anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody (PA) to hamsters bearing human colonic tumor xenografts resulted in a 5-fold reduction in the level of circulating PA after 4 hr in comparison to the control group only given /sup 131/I-PA. The percentage of PA in the blood decreased rapidly over 72 hr in animals given 250 ..mu..g of the SA, but at 50 ..mu..g of SA the level of activity in the blood after 24 hr was similar to the control. Tumor accretion was identical after 4 hr, but after 24 hr the animals given 250 ..mu..g of SA had 2-3 fold less PA in the tumor than either the control group or the 50 ..mu..g dose of SA. Tumor/nontumor ratios for all major organs but the spleen improved 6-8 fold within 48 hr after injection of 250 ..mu..g of the SA with tumor/blood ratios as high as 40:1. A SA dose of 50 ..mu..g resulted in a significantly higher tumor/blood ratio after only 4 hr; tumor/nontumor ratios at later times were similar to the control group. Tumors located in the hind legs were visible in all groups by imaging 24 hr after injection of the SA, but only the 250 ..mu..g dose of SA showed a significant reduction in total body activity. These results suggest that the SA approach may be used to reduce the total background radioactivity while maintaining tumor accretion of /sup 131/I-PA to allow for selective tumor imaging.

  12. The Psychodrama-Social Dramatics Separation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klepac, Richard L.

    Social dramatics is a therapeutic and educational program that can act as a mirror to reflect images of the self in action with others. It is the modality for experiential learning to correct social dysfunction by providing models for imitation, opportunities to practice and develop individual forms from that model, and risk free environments for…

  13. Evaluation of Selected Borrelia burgdorferi lp54 Plasmid-Encoded Gene Products Expressed during Mammalian Infection as Antigens To Improve Serodiagnostic Testing for Early Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Zachary P; Crew, Rebecca M; Brandt, Kevin S; Ullmann, Amy J; Schriefer, Martin E; Molins, Claudia R; Gilmore, Robert D

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory testing for the diagnosis of Lyme disease is performed primarily by serologic assays and is accurate for detection beyond the acute stage of the infection. Serodiagnostic assays to detect the early stages of infection, however, are limited in their sensitivity, and improvement is warranted. We analyzed a series of Borrelia burgdorferi proteins known to be induced within feeding ticks and/or during mammalian infection for their utility as serodiagnostic markers against a comprehensive panel of Lyme disease patient serum samples. The antigens were assayed for IgM and IgG reactivity in line immunoblots and separately by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), with a focus on reactivity against early Lyme disease with erythema migrans (EM), early disseminated Lyme neuroborreliosis, and early Lyme carditis patient serum samples. By IgM immunoblotting, we found that recombinant proteins BBA65, BBA70, and BBA73 reacted with early Lyme EM samples at levels comparable to those of the OspC antigen used in the current IgM blotting criteria. Additionally, these proteins reacted with serum samples from patients with early neuroborreliosis and early carditis, suggesting value in detecting early stages of this disease progression. We also found serological reactivity against recombinant proteins BBA69 and BBA73 with early-Lyme-disease samples using IgG immunoblotting and ELISA. Significantly, some samples that had been scored negative by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-recommended 2-tiered testing algorithm demonstrated positive reactivity to one or more of the antigens by IgM/IgG immunoblot and ELISA. These results suggest that incorporating additional in vivo-expressed antigens into the current IgM/IgG immunoblotting tier in a recombinant protein platform assay may improve the performance of early-Lyme-disease serologic testing.

  14. Care initiation area yields dramatic results.

    PubMed

    2009-03-01

    The ED at Gaston Memorial Hospital in Gastonia, NC, has achieved dramatic results in key department metrics with a Care Initiation Area (CIA) and a physician in triage. Here's how the ED arrived at this winning solution: Leadership was trained in and implemented the Kaizen method, which eliminates redundant or inefficient process steps. Simulation software helped determine additional space needed by analyzing arrival patterns and other key data. After only two days of meetings, new ideas were implemented and tested.

  15. Dramatic Response of Nail Psoriasis to Infliximab

    PubMed Central

    Safa, Gilles; Darrieux, Laure

    2011-01-01

    Nail psoriasis, affecting up to 50% of psoriatic patients, is an important cause of serious psychological and physical distress. Traditional treatments for nail psoriasis, which include topical or intralesional corticosteroids, topical vitamin D analogues, photochemotherapy, oral retinoids, methotrexate, and cyclosporin, can be time-consuming, painful, or limited by significant toxicities. Biological agents may have the potential to revolutionize the management of patients with disabling nail psoriasis. We present another case of disabling nail psoriasis that responded dramatically to infliximab. PMID:21629846

  16. Dramatic reduction of culture time of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodbane, Ramzi; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2014-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture, a critical technique for routine diagnosis of tuberculosis, takes more than two weeks. Here, step-by-step improvements in the protocol including a new medium, microaerophlic atmosphere or ascorbic-acid supplement and autofluorescence detection dramatically shortened this delay. In the best case, primary culture and rifampicin susceptibility testing were achieved in 72 hours when specimens were inoculated directly on the medium supplemented by antibiotic at the beginning of the culture.

  17. Potential To Streamline Heterologous DNA Prime and NYVAC/Protein Boost HIV Vaccine Regimens in Rhesus Macaques by Employing Improved Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Asbach, Benedikt; Kliche, Alexander; Köstler, Josef; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Esteban, Mariano; Jacobs, Bertram L.; Montefiori, David C.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Yates, Nicole L.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Ferrari, Guido; Foulds, Kathryn E.; Roederer, Mario; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N.; Seaman, Michael S.; Hawkins, Natalie; Self, Steven G.; Sato, Alicia; Gottardo, Raphael; Phogat, Sanjay; Tartaglia, James; Barnett, Susan W.; Burke, Brian; Cristillo, Anthony D.; Weiss, Deborah E.; Francis, Jesse; Galmin, Lindsey; Ding, Song; Heeney, Jonathan L.; Pantaleo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In a follow-up to the modest efficacy observed in the RV144 trial, researchers in the HIV vaccine field seek to substantiate and extend the results by evaluating other poxvirus vectors and combinations with DNA and protein vaccines. Earlier clinical trials (EuroVacc trials 01 to 03) evaluated the immunogenicity of HIV-1 clade C GagPolNef and gp120 antigens delivered via the poxviral vector NYVAC. These showed that a vaccination regimen including DNA-C priming prior to a NYVAC-C boost considerably enhanced vaccine-elicited immune responses compared to those with NYVAC-C alone. Moreover, responses were improved by using three as opposed to two DNA-C primes. In the present study, we assessed in nonhuman primates whether such vaccination regimens can be streamlined further by using fewer and accelerated immunizations and employing a novel generation of improved DNA-C and NYVAC-C vaccine candidates designed for higher expression levels and more balanced immune responses. Three different DNA-C prime/NYVAC-C+ protein boost vaccination regimens were tested in rhesus macaques. All regimens elicited vigorous and well-balanced CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses that were broad and polyfunctional. Very high IgG binding titers, substantial antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), and modest antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI), but very low neutralization activity, were measured after the final immunizations. Overall, immune responses elicited in all three groups were very similar and of greater magnitude, breadth, and quality than those of earlier EuroVacc vaccines. In conclusion, these findings indicate that vaccination schemes can be simplified by using improved antigens and regimens. This may offer a more practical and affordable means to elicit potentially protective immune responses upon vaccination, especially in resource-constrained settings. IMPORTANCE Within the EuroVacc clinical trials, we previously assessed the immunogenicity of

  18. The hyperactive Sleeping Beauty transposase SB100X improves the genetic modification of T cells to express a chimeric antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z; Maiti, S; Huls, H; Singh, H; Olivares, S; Mátés, L; Izsvák, Z; Ivics, Z; Lee, D A; Champlin, R E; Cooper, L J N

    2011-09-01

    Sleeping Beauty (SB3) transposon and transposase constitute a DNA plasmid system used for therapeutic human cell genetic engineering. Here we report a comparison of SB100X, a newly developed hyperactive SB transposase, to a previous generation SB11 transposase to achieve stable expression of a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR3) in primary human T cells. The electro-transfer of SB100X expressed from a DNA plasmid or as an introduced mRNA species had superior transposase activity in T cells based on the measurement of excision circles released after transposition and emergence of CAR expression on T cells selectively propagated upon CD19+ artificial antigen-presenting cells. Given that T cells modified with SB100X and SB11 integrate on average one copy of the CAR transposon in each T-cell genome, the improved transposition mediated by SB100X apparently leads to an augmented founder effect of electroporated T cells with durable integration of CAR. In aggregate, SB100X improves SB transposition in primary human T cells and can be titrated with an SB transposon plasmid to improve the generation of CD19-specific CAR+ T cells. PMID:21451576

  19. Heat treatment of unclarified Escherichia coli homogenate improved the recovery efficiency of recombinant hepatitis B core antigen.

    PubMed

    Ng, Michelle Y T; Tan, Wen Siang; Abdullah, Norhafizah; Ling, Tau Chuan; Tey, Beng Ti

    2006-10-01

    Heat precipitation procedure has been regularly incorporated as a selective purification step in various thermostable proteins expressed in different hosts. This method is efficient in precipitation of most of the host proteins and also deactivates various host proteases that can be harmful to the desired gene products. In this study, introduction of heat treatment procedure in the purification of hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) produced in Escherichia coli has been investigated. Thermal treatment of the cell homogenate at 60 degrees C for 30 min prior to subsequent clarification steps has resulted in 1.4 times and 18% higher in purity and recovery yield, respectively, compared to the non-heat-treated cell homogenate. In direct capture of HBcAg by using anion-exchangers from unclarified feedstock, pre-conditioning the feedstock by heat treatment at 60 degrees C for 45 min has increased the recovery yield of HBcAg by 2.9-fold and 42% in purity compared to that treated for 10 min. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis showed that the antigenicity of the core particles was not affected by the heat treatment process. PMID:16860402

  20. An Experimentally Determined Evolutionary Model Dramatically Improves Phylogenetic Fit

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Jesse D.

    2014-01-01

    All modern approaches to molecular phylogenetics require a quantitative model for how genes evolve. Unfortunately, existing evolutionary models do not realistically represent the site-heterogeneous selection that governs actual sequence change. Attempts to remedy this problem have involved augmenting these models with a burgeoning number of free parameters. Here, I demonstrate an alternative: Experimental determination of a parameter-free evolutionary model via mutagenesis, functional selection, and deep sequencing. Using this strategy, I create an evolutionary model for influenza nucleoprotein that describes the gene phylogeny far better than existing models with dozens or even hundreds of free parameters. Emerging high-throughput experimental strategies such as the one employed here provide fundamentally new information that has the potential to transform the sensitivity of phylogenetic and genetic analyses. PMID:24859245

  1. Improvement of the antigenicity of antirabies vaccine by pooling checked by post-challenge vaccination of guinea-pigs

    PubMed Central

    Veeraraghavan, N.

    1959-01-01

    The author describes some studies carried out at the Pasteur Institute of Southern India, Coonoor, with the object of developing an antirabies vaccine of uniform potency. It was found that by pooling batches of vaccine from several infected sheep brains a vaccine was produced which was superior in antigenicity (as determined by potency tests in mice) to the NIH (United States National Institutes of Health) Reference Vaccine 155-D as well as to most of the individual batches of vaccine tested. Furthermore, the pooled vaccine conferred a significant degree of protection on guinea-pigs challenged with virulent strains of street virus, even when not administered until an hour after infection. A brief outline is given of the method used for pooling the vaccine. PMID:13638794

  2. Improving influenza virological surveillance in Europe: strain-based reporting of antigenic and genetic characterisation data, 11 European countries, influenza season 2013/14

    PubMed Central

    Broberg, Eeva; Hungnes, Olav; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Prosenc, Katarina; Daniels, Rod; Guiomar, Raquel; Ikonen, Niina; Kossyvakis, Athanasios; Pozo, Francisco; Puzelli, Simona; Thomas, Isabelle; Waters, Allison; Wiman, Åsa; Meijer, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Influenza antigenic and genetic characterisation data are crucial for influenza vaccine composition decision making. Previously, aggregate data were reported to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control by European Union/European Economic Area (EU/EEA) countries. A system for collecting case-specific influenza antigenic and genetic characterisation data was established for the 2013/14 influenza season. In a pilot study, 11 EU/EEA countries reported through the new mechanism. We demonstrated feasibility of reporting strain-based antigenic and genetic data and ca 10% of influenza virus-positive specimens were selected for further characterisation. Proportions of characterised virus (sub)types were similar to influenza virus circulation levels. The main genetic clades were represented by A/StPetersburg/27/2011(H1N1)pdm09 and A/Texas/50/2012(H3N2). A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses were more prevalent in age groups (by years) < 1 (65%; p = 0.0111), 20–39 (50%; p = 0.0046) and 40–64 (55%; p = 0.00001) while A(H3N2) viruses were most prevalent in those ≥ 65 years (62%*; p = 0.0012). Hospitalised patients in the age groups 6–19 years (67%; p = 0.0494) and ≥ 65 years (52%; p = 0.0005) were more frequently infected by A/Texas/50/2012 A(H3N2)-like viruses compared with hospitalised cases in other age groups. Strain-based reporting enabled deeper understanding of influenza virus circulation among hospitalised patients and substantially improved the reporting of virus characterisation data. Therefore, strain-based reporting of readily available data is recommended to all reporting countries within the EU/EEA. PMID:27762211

  3. Affinity improvement of a therapeutic antibody by structure-based computational design: generation of electrostatic interactions in the transition state stabilizes the antibody-antigen complex.

    PubMed

    Kiyoshi, Masato; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Miura, Eri; Nagatoishi, Satoru; Nakakido, Makoto; Soga, Shinji; Shirai, Hiroki; Kawabata, Shigeki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2014-01-01

    The optimization of antibodies is a desirable goal towards the development of better therapeutic strategies. The antibody 11K2 was previously developed as a therapeutic tool for inflammatory diseases, and displays very high affinity (4.6 pM) for its antigen the chemokine MCP-1 (monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1). We have employed a virtual library of mutations of 11K2 to identify antibody variants of potentially higher affinity, and to establish benchmarks in the engineering of a mature therapeutic antibody. The most promising candidates identified in the virtual screening were examined by surface plasmon resonance to validate the computational predictions, and to characterize their binding affinity and key thermodynamic properties in detail. Only mutations in the light-chain of the antibody are effective at enhancing its affinity for the antigen in vitro, suggesting that the interaction surface of the heavy-chain (dominated by the hot-spot residue Phe101) is not amenable to optimization. The single-mutation with the highest affinity is L-N31R (4.6-fold higher affinity than wild-type antibody). Importantly, all the single-mutations showing increase affinity incorporate a charged residue (Arg, Asp, or Glu). The characterization of the relevant thermodynamic parameters clarifies the energetic mechanism. Essentially, the formation of new electrostatic interactions early in the binding reaction coordinate (transition state or earlier) benefits the durability of the antibody-antigen complex. The combination of in silico calculations and thermodynamic analysis is an effective strategy to improve the affinity of a matured therapeutic antibody. PMID:24475232

  4. Novel ISCOMs from Quillaja brasiliensis saponins induce mucosal and systemic antibody production, T-cell responses and improved antigen uptake.

    PubMed

    Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; Quirici, Lenora; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Ferreira, Fernando; Silveira, Fernando

    2016-02-24

    In the last decades, significant efforts have been dedicated to the search for novel vaccine adjuvants. In this regard, saponins and its formulations as "immunostimulating complexes" (ISCOMs) have shown to be capable of stimulating potent humoral and cellular immune responses, enhanced cytokine production and activation of cytotoxic T cells. The immunological activity of ISCOMs formulated with a saponin fraction extracted from Quillaja brasiliensis (QB-90 fraction) as an alternative to classical ISCOMs based on Quil A(®) (IQA) is presented here. The ISCOMs prepared with QB-90, named IQB-90, typically consist of 40-50 nm, spherical, cage-like particles, built up by QB-90, cholesterol, phospholipids and antigen (ovalbumin, OVA). These nanoparticles were efficiently uptaken in vitro by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Subcutaneously inoculated IQB-90 induced strong serum antibody responses encompassing specific IgG1 and IgG2a, robust DTH reactions, significant T cell proliferation and increases in Th1 (IFN-γ and IL-2) cytokine responses. Intranasally delivered IQB-90 elicited serum IgG and IgG1, and mucosal IgA responses at distal systemic sites (nasal passages, large intestine and vaginal lumen). These results indicate that IQB-90 is a promising alternative to classic ISCOMs as vaccine adjuvants, capable of enhancing humoral and cellular immunity to levels comparable to those induced by ISCOMs manufactured with Quillaja saponaria saponins. PMID:26826546

  5. Novel ISCOMs from Quillaja brasiliensis saponins induce mucosal and systemic antibody production, T-cell responses and improved antigen uptake.

    PubMed

    Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; Quirici, Lenora; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Ferreira, Fernando; Silveira, Fernando

    2016-02-24

    In the last decades, significant efforts have been dedicated to the search for novel vaccine adjuvants. In this regard, saponins and its formulations as "immunostimulating complexes" (ISCOMs) have shown to be capable of stimulating potent humoral and cellular immune responses, enhanced cytokine production and activation of cytotoxic T cells. The immunological activity of ISCOMs formulated with a saponin fraction extracted from Quillaja brasiliensis (QB-90 fraction) as an alternative to classical ISCOMs based on Quil A(®) (IQA) is presented here. The ISCOMs prepared with QB-90, named IQB-90, typically consist of 40-50 nm, spherical, cage-like particles, built up by QB-90, cholesterol, phospholipids and antigen (ovalbumin, OVA). These nanoparticles were efficiently uptaken in vitro by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Subcutaneously inoculated IQB-90 induced strong serum antibody responses encompassing specific IgG1 and IgG2a, robust DTH reactions, significant T cell proliferation and increases in Th1 (IFN-γ and IL-2) cytokine responses. Intranasally delivered IQB-90 elicited serum IgG and IgG1, and mucosal IgA responses at distal systemic sites (nasal passages, large intestine and vaginal lumen). These results indicate that IQB-90 is a promising alternative to classic ISCOMs as vaccine adjuvants, capable of enhancing humoral and cellular immunity to levels comparable to those induced by ISCOMs manufactured with Quillaja saponaria saponins.

  6. Ozonated laundering: Radical concept claims dramatic savings

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, B.

    1993-12-31

    An innovative commercial laundering technology that uses no hot water and no detergent holds promise of dramatic savings in energy, water, chemicals, labor, and sewage fees. Users report good results, but the conservative laundry industry is likely to be skeptical, especially in light of the powerful role played by chemical and equipment manufacturers. While ozonated laundering technology uses more electricity than conventional approaches in some applications, the reported advantages in terms of overall resource efficiency and cost savings could make it an attractive option from the perspective of end-users and utility companies alike. As yet, there are many unanswered questions about the process. There is no theoretical basis to explain how ozone cleans, and no third-party testing to verify these impressive savings. Reports from installations at two Marriott hotels, however, appear to corroborate the manufacturer`s claims. This report assesses the controversial elements of the ozonated laundering process, compiles users` comments and concerns, and reports on current research about how the process works. More independent study will be needed, however, to provide a basis for acceptance of such a radical divergence from the norm in commercial laundering.

  7. Combination of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 and viral capsid antigen immunoglobulin A for improved detection of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yu-Hui; Xu, Yi-Wei; Qiu, Si-Qi; Hong, Chao-Qun; Zhai, Tian-Tian; Li, En-Min; Xu, Li-Yan

    2014-09-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is one of the most common malignant tumors in Southern China and Southeast Asia, and early detection remains a challenge. Autoantibodies have been found to precede the manifestations of symptomatic cancer by several months to years, making their identification of particular relevance for early detection. In the present study, the diagnostic value of serum autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 in NPC patients was evaluated. The study included 112 patients with NPC and 138 normal controls. Serum levels of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 and classical Epstein-Barr virus marker, viral capsid antigen immunoglobulin A (VCA-IgA), were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Measurement of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 and VCA-IgA demonstrated a sensitivity/specificity of 42.9/94.9% [95% confidence interval (CI), 33.7-52.6/89.4-97.8%] and 55.4/95.7% (95% CI, 45.7-64.7/90.4-98.2%), respectively. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve for autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 (0.821; 95% CI, 0.771-0.871) was marginally lower than that for VCA-IgA (0.860; 95% CI, 0.810-0.910) in NPC. The combination of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 and VCA-IgA yielded an enhanced sensitivity of 80.4% (95% CI, 71.6-87.0%) and a specificity of 90.6% (95% CI, 84.1-94.7%). Moreover, detection of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 could differentiate early-stage NPC patients from normal controls. Our results suggest that autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 may serve as a potential biomarker, as a supplement to VCA-IgA, for the screening and diagnosis of NPC.

  8. Maverick Comet Splits during Dramatic Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-01-01

    New ESO Observations of P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 A few months ago, Periodic Comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 underwent a dramatic and completely unexpected, thousand-fold brightening. At that time, the cause for this interesting event was unknown. However, observations with the two largest ESO telescopes have now shown that the ``dirty snowball'' nucleus of this comet has recently split into at least four individual pieces [1]. There is little doubt that the outburst and the splitting event(s) are closely related and that the greatly increased dust and gas production is due to ``fresh'' material of the icy cometary nucleus becoming exposed to the surrounding space for the first time. A Comet with a Troubled History Comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 was discovered on May 2, 1930, on a photographic plate obtained at the Hamburg Observatory (Germany) by two astronomers at this institution, Arnold Schwassmann and Arthur Arno Wachmann. The subsequent observations showed that the comet moved in an elliptical orbit with a revolution period of somewhat more than 5 years. Great efforts were expended to observe the comet during the next returns, but it was not recovered until nearly 50 years and eight revolutions later, when its faint image was found of a plate obtained in August 1979 with a telescope at the Perth Observatory in Western Australia. It was missed in 1984, but was sighted again in 1989 and most recently in 1994. Thus this comet has only been observed during four out of thirteen approaches since 1930. While this may be partly due to a less advantageous location in the sky at some returns, it is also a strong indication that the comet behaves unpredictably and must have a quite variable brightness. For the sake of convenience this comet is often referred to as ``SW-3'' by professional astronomers. Recent orbital calculations have shown that it was inserted into the present, short-period orbit by the strong gravitational pull of Jupiter during several, relatively close

  9. Different-Sized Gold Nanoparticle Activator/Antigen Increases Dendritic Cells Accumulation in Liver-Draining Lymph Nodes and CD8+ T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qianqian; Zhang, Yulong; Du, Juan; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Yong; Fu, Qiuxia; Zhang, Jingang; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhan, Linsheng

    2016-02-23

    The lack of efficient antigen and activator delivery systems, as well as the restricted migration of dendritic cells (DCs) to secondary lymph organs, dramatically limits DC-based adoptive immunotherapy. We selected two spherical gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based vehicles of optimal size for activator and antigen delivery. Their combination (termed the NanoAu-Cocktail) was associated with the dual targeting of CpG oligonucleotides (CpG-ODNs) and an OVA peptide (OVAp) to DC subcellular compartments, inducing enhanced antigen cross-presentation, upregulated expression of costimulatory molecules and elevated secretion of T helper1 cytokines. We demonstrated that the intravenously transfused NanoAu-Cocktail pulsed DCs showed dramatically improved in vivo homing ability to lymphoid tissues and were settled in T cell area. Especially, by tissue-distribution analysis, we found that more than 60% of lymphoid tissues-homing DCs accumulated in liver-draining lymph nodes (LLNs). The improved homing ability of NanoAu-Cocktail pulsed DCs was associated with the high expression of chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) and rearrangement of the cytoskeletons. In addition, by antigen-specific tetramers detection, NanoAu-Cocktail pulsed DCs were proved able to elicit strong antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses, which provided enhanced protection from viral invasions. This study highlights the importance of codelivering antigen/adjuvant using different sized gold nanoparticles to improve DC homing and therapy. PMID:26771692

  10. [Antigenic response against PPD and antigen 60 in tubercular patients: single antigen versus the combined test].

    PubMed

    Máttar, S; Broquetas, J M; Gea, J; Aran, X; el-Banna, N; Sauleda, J; Torres, J M

    1992-05-01

    We analyze serum samples from 70 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 50 healthy individuals. The antigenic activity (IgG) against protein purified antigen (PPD) and antigen 60 (A60) from M. tuberculosis. Thirteen patients were also HIV infected, and three patients had AIDS defined by the presence of disseminated tuberculosis. The test using antigen alone showed a 77% sensitivity and 74% specificity when PPD is used. When A60 was used, both values improved (81% sensitivity, 94% specificity). The use of a combined test (PPD and A60) improves the sensitivity (89%) but reduces the specificity (82%). The HIV infected patients showed similar responses to those of other patients. The combined use of different antigens might be useful for diagnosing tuberculosis. PMID:1390996

  11. Dramatic effects of stress on metamorphic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, John

    2014-05-01

    controlled by fluid pressure not confining pressure: implications of dehydration experiments with gypsum. Contributions To Mineralogy And Petrology 164, 69-79. Sheldon, H. A. & Wheeler, J. 2003. Influence of pore fluid chemistry on the state of stress in sedimentary basins. Geology 31(1), 59-62. Wheeler, J. 1987. The significance of grain-scale stresses in the kinetics of metamorphism. Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology 97, 397-404. Wheeler, J. 1992. The importance of pressure solution and Coble creep in the deformation of polymineralic rocks. Journal of Geophysical Research 97, 4579-4586. Wheeler, J. submitted. Dramatic effects of stress on metamorphic reactions. Geology.

  12. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion.

  13. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion. PMID:26764596

  14. Loss of T Cell Antigen Recognition Arising from Changes in Peptide and Major Histocompatibility Complex Protein Flexibility: Implications for Vaccine Design

    SciTech Connect

    Insaidoo, Francis K.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Hossain, Moushumi; Santhanagopolan, Sujatha M.; Baxter, Tiffany K.; Baker, Brian M.

    2012-05-08

    Modification of the primary anchor positions of antigenic peptides to improve binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins is a commonly used strategy for engineering peptide-based vaccine candidates. However, such peptide modifications do not always improve antigenicity, complicating efforts to design effective vaccines for cancer and infectious disease. Here we investigated the MART-1{sub 27-35} tumor antigen, for which anchor modification (replacement of the position two alanine with leucine) dramatically reduces or ablates antigenicity with a wide range of T cell clones despite significantly improving peptide binding to MHC. We found that anchor modification in the MART-1{sub 27-35} antigen enhances the flexibility of both the peptide and the HLA-A*0201 molecule. Although the resulting entropic effects contribute to the improved binding of the peptide to MHC, they also negatively impact T cell receptor binding to the peptide {center_dot} MHC complex. These results help explain how the 'anchor-fixing' strategy fails to improve antigenicity in this case, and more generally, may be relevant for understanding the high specificity characteristic of the T cell repertoire. In addition to impacting vaccine design, modulation of peptide and MHC flexibility through changes to antigenic peptides may present an evolutionary strategy for the escape of pathogens from immune destruction.

  15. A Multi-Antigenic Adenoviral-Vectored Vaccine Improves BCG-Induced Protection of Goats against Pulmonary Tuberculosis Infection and Prevents Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Pérez de Val, Bernat; Vidal, Enric; Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Andaluz, Anna; Moll, Xavier; Martín, Maite; Nofrarías, Miquel; McShane, Helen; Vordermeier, H. Martin; Domingo, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    The “One world, one health” initiative emphasizes the need for new strategies to control human and animal tuberculosis (TB) based on their shared interface. A good example would be the development of novel universal vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) infection. This study uses the goat model, a natural TB host, to assess the protective effectiveness of a new vaccine candidate in combination with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. Thirty-three goat kids were divided in three groups: Group 1) vaccinated with BCG (week 0), Group 2) vaccinated with BCG and boosted 8 weeks later with a recombinant adenovirus expressing the MTBC antigens Ag85A, TB10.4, TB9.8 and Acr2 (AdTBF), and Group 3) unvaccinated controls. Later on, an endobronchial challenge with a low dose of M. caprae was performed (week 15). After necropsy (week 28), the pulmonary gross pathology was quantified using high resolution Computed Tomography. Small granulomatous pulmonary lesions (< 0.5 cm diameter) were also evaluated through a comprehensive qualitative histopathological analysis. M. caprae CFU were counted from pulmonary lymph nodes. The AdTBF improved the effects of BCG reducing gross lesion volume and bacterial load, as well as increasing weight gain. The number of Ag85A-specific gamma interferon-producing memory T-cells was identified as a predictor of vaccine efficacy. Specific cellular and humoral responses were measured throughout the 13-week post-challenge period, and correlated with the severity of lesions. Unvaccinated goats exhibited the typical pathological features of active TB in humans and domestic ruminants, while vaccinated goats showed only very small lesions. The data presented in this study indicate that multi-antigenic adenoviral vectored vaccines boosts protection conferred by vaccination with BCG. PMID:24278420

  16. Improved immunogenicity of a H44/76 group B outer membrane vesicle vaccine with over-expressed genome-derived Neisserial antigen 1870.

    PubMed

    Koeberling, Oliver; Welsch, Jo Anne; Granoff, Dan M

    2007-02-26

    A broadly protective vaccine against meningococcal group B disease is not available. We previously reported that an outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine containing over-expressed genome-derived antigen (GNA) 1870 elicited broader protective antibody responses than recombinant GNA1870 or conventional OMV vaccines prepared from a strain that naturally expresses low amounts of GNA1870. Certain wildtype strains such as H44/76 naturally express larger amounts of GNA1870 and, potentially, could be used to prepare an improved OMV vaccine without genetic over-expression of the antigen. We transformed H44/76 with a shuttle vector to over-express variant 1 (v.1) GNA1870 and compared the immunogenicity in mice of OMV vaccines prepared from wildtype H44/76 (v.1), the mutant, and a recombinant v.1 GNA1870 vaccine. Mice immunized with OMV with over-expressed GNA1870 developed broader serum bactericidal and/or greater C3 deposition activity on the surface of encapsulated strains of N. meningitidis than control mice immunized with the OMV vaccine prepared from the wildtype strain, or the rGNA1870 vaccine. When a panel of group B strains from patients in California was tested, sera from mice immunized with the OMV vaccine containing over-expressed GNA1870 were bactericidal against 100% of the v.1 strains. In contrast, only 20% of isolates that expressed subvariants of the v.1 GNA1870 protein were susceptible to bactericidal activity of antibodies elicited by the rGNA1870 or conventional OMV vaccines. Thus, even a modest increase in GNA1870 expression in a strain that naturally is a high producer of GNA1870 results in an OMV vaccine that elicits broader protection against meningococcal disease.

  17. Dramatic Outburst Reveals Nearest Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    Scientists have discovered the closest black hole yet, a mere 1,600 light years from Earth. Its discovery was heralded by four of the most dramatic rapid X-ray intensity changes ever seen from one star. Astronomers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the National Science Foundation's National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) announced their findings at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Atlanta. The black hole in the constellation Sagittarius, along with a normal star dubbed V4641 Sgr, form a violent system that briefly flooded part of our Milky Way Galaxy with X-rays and ejected subatomic particles moving at nearly the speed of light one day last September. At the peak of its X-ray output, V4641 Sgr was the brightest X-ray emitter in the sky. Astronomers call this type of system an X-ray nova because it suddenly becomes a bright source of X-rays, but this object shows characteristics never seen in an X-ray nova. "V4641 Sgr turns on and off so fast that it seems to represent a new subclass of X-ray novae," said Donald A. Smith, postdoctoral associate in MIT's Center for Space Research. Smith worked on data from this object with MIT principal research scientist Ronald Remillard and NRAO astronomer Robert Hjellming. "In X-rays, the intensity rose by a factor of more than 1,000 in seven hours, then dropped by a factor of 100 in two hours," Remillard said. The radio emission was seen as an image of an expanding "jet" of particles shooting out from the binary system. After reaching a maximum, the radio intensity dropped by a factor of nearly 40 within two days. "Radio telescopes give us a quick glimpse of something moving at a fantastically high velocity," Hjellming said. Black holes harbor enormous gravitational force that can literally rip the gas away from a nearby star. This transfer of gas is visible in many forms of radiation. Both orbiting X-ray telescopes and ground-based radio and optical telescopes saw the outburst of V4641

  18. In Vivo Synthesis of Cyclic-di-GMP Using a Recombinant Adenovirus Preferentially Improves Adaptive Immune Responses against Extracellular Antigens.

    PubMed

    Alyaqoub, Fadel S; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Koestler, Benjamin J; Bruger, Eric L; Seregin, Sergey S; Pereira-Hicks, Cristiane; Godbehere, Sarah; Waters, Christopher M; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2016-02-15

    There is a compelling need for more effective vaccine adjuvants to augment induction of Ag-specific adaptive immune responses. Recent reports suggested the bacterial second messenger bis-(3'-5')-cyclic-dimeric-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) acts as an innate immune system modulator. We recently incorporated a Vibrio cholerae diguanylate cyclase into an adenovirus vaccine, fostering production of c-di-GMP as well as proinflammatory responses in mice. In this study, we recombined a more potent diguanylate cyclase gene, VCA0848, into a nonreplicating adenovirus serotype 5 (AdVCA0848) that produces elevated amounts of c-di-GMP when expressed in mammalian cells in vivo. This novel platform further improved induction of type I IFN-β and activation of innate and adaptive immune cells early after administration into mice as compared with control vectors. Coadministration of the extracellular protein OVA and the AdVCA0848 adjuvant significantly improved OVA-specific T cell responses as detected by IFN-γ and IL-2 ELISPOT, while also improving OVA-specific humoral B cell adaptive responses. In addition, we found that coadministration of AdVCA0848 with another adenovirus serotype 5 vector expressing the HIV-1-derived Gag Ag or the Clostridium difficile-derived toxin B resulted in significant inhibitory effects on the induction of Gag and toxin B-specific adaptive immune responses. As a proof of principle, these data confirm that in vivo synthesis of c-di-GMP stimulates strong innate immune responses that correlate with enhanced adaptive immune responses to concomitantly administered extracellular Ag, which can be used as an adjuvant to heighten effective immune responses for protein-based vaccine platforms against microbial infections and cancers. PMID:26792800

  19. Improving the Specificity of the Prostate-Specific Antigen Substrate Glutaryl-Hyp-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln as a Promoiety.

    PubMed

    Aloysius, Herve; Hu, Longqin

    2015-10-01

    To develop PSA peptide substrates with improved specificity and plasma stability from the known substrate sequence glutaryl-Hyp-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln, systematic replacements of the N-terminal segment with D-retro-inverso-peptides were performed with the incorporation of 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (7-AMC) after Gln for convenient fluorometric determination and ranking of the PSA substrate activity. The D-retro-inverso-peptide conjugates with P2-P5 D-amino acid substitutions were moderate but poorer PSA substrates as compared to the original peptide, suggesting that inversion of the amide bonds and/or incorporation of the additional atom as in the urea linker adversely affected PSA binding. However, P5 substitution of Hyp with Ser showed significant improvements in PSA cleavage rate; the resulting AMC conjugate, glutaryl-Ser-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln-AMC (11), exhibited the fastest PSA cleavage rate of 351 pmol/min/100 nmol PSA. In addition, GABA←mGly-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln-AMC (conjugate 6) was the second best PSA substrate and released 7-AMC at a rate of 225 pmol/min/100 nmol PSA as compared to 171 pmol/min/100 nmol PSA for the control conjugate glutaryl-Hyp-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln-AMC. Incubations of selected AMC conjugates with mouse and human plasma revealed that GABA←D-Ser-ψ[NH-CO-NH]-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln-AMC (5) and GABA←mGly-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln-AMC (6) were most stable to non-PSA-mediated proteolysis. Our results suggest that the PSA specificity of glutaryl-Hyp-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln is improved with Ser and mGly substitutions of Hyp at the P5.

  20. In Vivo Synthesis of Cyclic-di-GMP Using a Recombinant Adenovirus Preferentially Improves Adaptive Immune Responses against Extracellular Antigens.

    PubMed

    Alyaqoub, Fadel S; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Koestler, Benjamin J; Bruger, Eric L; Seregin, Sergey S; Pereira-Hicks, Cristiane; Godbehere, Sarah; Waters, Christopher M; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2016-02-15

    There is a compelling need for more effective vaccine adjuvants to augment induction of Ag-specific adaptive immune responses. Recent reports suggested the bacterial second messenger bis-(3'-5')-cyclic-dimeric-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) acts as an innate immune system modulator. We recently incorporated a Vibrio cholerae diguanylate cyclase into an adenovirus vaccine, fostering production of c-di-GMP as well as proinflammatory responses in mice. In this study, we recombined a more potent diguanylate cyclase gene, VCA0848, into a nonreplicating adenovirus serotype 5 (AdVCA0848) that produces elevated amounts of c-di-GMP when expressed in mammalian cells in vivo. This novel platform further improved induction of type I IFN-β and activation of innate and adaptive immune cells early after administration into mice as compared with control vectors. Coadministration of the extracellular protein OVA and the AdVCA0848 adjuvant significantly improved OVA-specific T cell responses as detected by IFN-γ and IL-2 ELISPOT, while also improving OVA-specific humoral B cell adaptive responses. In addition, we found that coadministration of AdVCA0848 with another adenovirus serotype 5 vector expressing the HIV-1-derived Gag Ag or the Clostridium difficile-derived toxin B resulted in significant inhibitory effects on the induction of Gag and toxin B-specific adaptive immune responses. As a proof of principle, these data confirm that in vivo synthesis of c-di-GMP stimulates strong innate immune responses that correlate with enhanced adaptive immune responses to concomitantly administered extracellular Ag, which can be used as an adjuvant to heighten effective immune responses for protein-based vaccine platforms against microbial infections and cancers.

  1. Improved Detection of Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis Arising during Leukemia Treatment Using a Panel of Host Response Proteins and Fungal Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Hyunsu; Wheat, L. Joseph; Baden, Lindsey; Stafford, Susan; Wu, Zheng; Issa, Nicolas; Caliendo, Angela M.; Denning, David W.; Soman, Kizhake; Clancy, Cornelius J.; Nguyen, M. Hong; Sugrue, Michele W.; Alexander, Barbara D.; Wingard, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is an opportunistic fungal infection in patients undergoing chemotherapy for hematological malignancy, hematopoietic stem cell transplant, or other forms of immunosuppression. In this group, Aspergillus infections account for the majority of deaths due to mold pathogens. Although early detection is associated with improved outcomes, current diagnostic regimens lack sensitivity and specificity. Patients undergoing chemotherapy, stem cell transplantation and lung transplantation were enrolled in a multi-site prospective observational trial. Proven and probable IPA cases and matched controls were subjected to discovery proteomics analyses using a biofluid analysis platform, fractionating plasma into reproducible protein and peptide pools. From 556 spots identified by 2D gel electrophoresis, 66 differentially expressed post-translationally modified plasma proteins were identified in the leukemic subgroup only. This protein group was rich in complement components, acute-phase reactants and coagulation factors. Low molecular weight peptides corresponding to abundant plasma proteins were identified. A candidate marker panel of host response (9 plasma proteins, 4 peptides), fungal polysaccharides (galactomannan), and cell wall components (β-D glucan) were selected by statistical filtering for patients with leukemia as a primary underlying diagnosis. Quantitative measurements were developed to qualify the differential expression of the candidate host response proteins using selective reaction monitoring mass spectrometry assays, and then applied to a separate cohort of 57 patients with leukemia. In this verification cohort, a machine learning ensemble-based algorithm, generalized pathseeker (GPS) produced a greater case classification accuracy than galactomannan (GM) or host proteins alone. In conclusion, Integration of host response proteins with GM improves the diagnostic detection of probable IPA in patients undergoing treatment

  2. A surface antigen influenza vaccine. 2. Pyrogenicity and antigenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Brady, M. I.; Furminger, I. G.

    1976-01-01

    Conventional influenza vaccine containing whole virus particles purified on a zonal centrifuge is pyrogenic and can cause systemic and local adverse side effects. An improved vaccine was therefore prepared which contained only the surface antigens of the virus adsorbed to aluminium hydroxide. The antigenicity of this vaccine was compared with conventional vaccine in chickens. Both vaccines induced similar titres of serum haemagglutination-inhibition and neuraminidase inhibition antibody. The dose response curves, however, were different. The surface antigens at vaccine strength without aluminium hydroxide were of negligible pyrogenicity in rabbits. PMID:1068196

  3. A comprehensive platform for ex vivo T-cell expansion based on biodegradable polymeric artificial antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Steenblock, Erin R; Fahmy, Tarek M

    2008-04-01

    Efficient T-cell stimulation and proliferation in response to specific antigens is a goal of immunotherapy against infectious disease and cancer. Manipulation of this response can be accomplished by adoptive immunotherapy involving the infusion of antigen-specific T-cell populations expanded ex vivo with antigen presenting cells. We mimicked physiological antigen presentation on a biodegradable microparticle constructed from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), a polymer system whose safety has been established for use in humans. These particles present a high density of adaptor elements for attaching both recognition ligands and co-stimulatory ligands to a biodegradable core encapsulating the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2). We demonstrate the utility of this system in efficient polyclonal and antigen-specific T-cell stimulation and expansion, showing that sustained release of IL-2 in the vicinity of T-cell contacts dramatically improves the stimulatory capacity of these acellular systems, as compared to the effect of exogenous addition of cytokine. This results in a 45-fold enhancement in T-cell expansion. In addition, this mode of antigen presentation skews the expansion toward the CD8(+) T-cell phenotype. This comprehensive acellular platform, capable of delivering recognition, co-stimulatory, and cytokine signals, represents a promising new technology for artificial antigen presentation. PMID:18334990

  4. Improved porous silicon (P-Si) microarray based PSA (prostate specific antigen) immunoassay by optimized surface density of the capture antibody

    PubMed Central

    Lee, SangWook; Kim, Soyoun; Malm, Johan; Jeong, Ok Chan; Lilja, Hans; Laurell, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Enriching the surface density of immobilized capture antibodies enhances the detection signal of antibody sandwich microarrays. In this study, we improved the detection sensitivity of our previously developed P-Si (porous silicon) antibody microarray by optimizing concentrations of the capturing antibody. We investigated immunoassays using a P-Si microarray at three different capture antibody (PSA - prostate specific antigen) concentrations, analyzing the influence of the antibody density on the assay detection sensitivity. The LOD (limit of detection) for PSA was 2.5ngmL−1, 80pgmL−1, and 800fgmL−1 when arraying the PSA antibody, H117 at the concentration 15µgmL−1, 35µgmL−1 and 154µgmL−1, respectively. We further investigated PSA spiked into human female serum in the range of 800fgmL−1 to 500ngmL−1. The microarray showed a LOD of 800fgmL−1 and a dynamic range of 800 fgmL−1 to 80ngmL−1 in serum spiked samples. PMID:24016590

  5. Inhaled extended-release microparticles of heparin elicit improved pulmonary pharmacodynamics against antigen-mediated airway hyper-reactivity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Ayca; John, Elinor; Özsoy, Yildiz; Araman, Ahmet; Birchall, James C; Broadley, Kenneth J; Gumbleton, Mark

    2012-09-10

    Inhaled heparin appears to provide benefit in the management of airway hyper-reactivity and inflammation. The pharmacodynamics of inhaled heparin are however transient. Providing sustained heparin concentrations in the respiratory tract should provide for an extended duration of action. We examined the in-vivo efficacy of a nebulised controlled-release microparticle formulation of heparin in modifying antigen-induced airway hyper-reactivity (AHR) and lung inflammation. Heparin-loaded biodegradable poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles were prepared by spray-drying. Aerosol properties for both nebulised heparin solution and heparin microparticles displayed characteristics consistent with heparin delivery to the respiratory tract. In vitro release assays showed heparin to be released from the microparticles over 8-12 h and for the heparin to remain functional. Temporal pharmacodynamic responses were studied in an ovalbumin-sensitised in vivo model exhibiting AHR and airway inflammation. Despite a reduced total dose of heparin deposited in the airways following nebulisation with heparin microparticles, this treatment led to a more sustained inhibitory effect upon AHR and airway inflammation than equivalent doses of nebulised heparin solution. The work supports extended-release heparin as an inhalation dosing strategy in experimental therapeutic applications aimed at improving the pharmacodynamics of heparin in the treatment of AHR and lung inflammation.

  6. Engineering NK Cells Modified With an EGFRvIII-specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor to Overexpress CXCR4 Improves Immunotherapy of CXCL12/SDF-1α-secreting Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Müller, Nadja; Michen, Susanne; Tietze, Stefanie; Töpfer, Katrin; Schulte, Alexander; Lamszus, Katrin; Schmitz, Marc; Schackert, Gabriele; Pastan, Ira; Temme, Achim

    2015-06-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are promising effector cells for adjuvant immunotherapy of cancer. So far, several preclinical studies have shown the feasibility of gene-engineered NK cells, which upon expression of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are redirected to otherwise NK cell-resistant tumors. Yet, we reasoned that the efficiency of an immunotherapy using CAR-modified NK cells critically relies on efficient migration to the tumor site and might be improved by the engraftment of a receptor specific for a chemokine released by the tumor. On the basis of the DNAX-activation protein 12 (DAP12), a signaling adapter molecule involved in signal transduction of activating NK cell receptors, we constructed an epidermal growth factor variant III (EGFRvIII)-CAR, designated MR1.1-DAP12 which confers specific cytotoxicity of NK cell towards EGFRvIII glioblastoma cells in vitro and to established subcutaneous U87-MG tumor xenografts. So far, infusion of NK cells with expression of MR1.1-DAP12 caused a moderate but significantly delayed tumor growth and increased median survival time when compared with NK cells transduced with an ITAM-defective CAR. Notably, the further genetic engineering of these EGFRvIII-specific NK cells with the chemokine receptor CXCR4 conferred a specific chemotaxis to CXCL12/SDF-1α secreting U87-MG glioblastoma cells. Moreover, the administration of such NK cells resulted in complete tumor remission in a number of mice and a significantly increased survival when compared with the treatment of xenografts with NK cells expressing only the EGFRvIII-specific CAR or mock control. We conclude that chemokine receptor-engineered NK cells with concomitant expression of a tumor-specific CAR are a promising tool to improve adoptive tumor immunotherapy.

  7. Engineering NK cells modified with an EGFRvIII-specific chimeric antigen receptor to overexpress CXCR4 improves immunotherapy of CXCL12/SDF-1α-secreting glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Nadja; Michen, Susanne; Tietze, Stefanie; Töpfer, Katrin; Schulte, Alexander; Lamszus, Katrin; Schmitz, Marc; Schackert, Gabriele; Pastan, Ira; Temme, Achim

    2015-01-01

    NK cells are promising effector cells for adjuvant immunotherapy of cancer. So far, several preclinical studies have shown the feasibility of gene-engineered NK cells, which upon expression of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are redirected to otherwise NK-cell resistant tumors. Yet, we reasoned that the efficiency of an immunotherapy using CAR-modified NK cells critically relies on efficient migration to the tumor site and might be improved by the engraftment of a receptor specific for a chemokine released by the tumor. Based on the DNAX-activation protein 12 (DAP12), a signaling adapter molecule involved in signal transduction of activating NK cell receptors, we constructed an EGFRvIII-CAR, designated MR1.1-DAP12 which confers specific cytotoxicity of NK cell towards EGFRvIII+ glioblastoma cells in vitro and to established subcutaneous U87-MGEGFRvIII tumor xenografts. So far, infusion of NK cells with expression of MR1.1-DAP12 caused a moderate but significantly delayed tumor growth and increased median survival time when compared to NK cells transduced with an ITAM-defective CAR. Notably, the further genetic engineering of these EGFRvIII-specific NK cells with the chemokine receptor CXCR4 conferred a specific chemotaxis to CXCL12/SDF-1α secreting U87-MG glioblastoma cells. Moreover, the administration of such NK cells resulted in complete tumor remission in a number of mice and a significantly increased survival when compared to the treatment of xenografts with NK cells expressing only the EGFRvIII-specific CAR or mock control. We conclude that chemokine receptor engineered NK cells with concomitant expression of a tumor-specific CAR are a promising tool to improve adoptive tumor immunotherapy. PMID:25962108

  8. Cognitive Psychology and Audience-Oriented Dramatic Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratt, David

    Cognitive psychology's most useful contribution to dramatic theory is the concept of schemata, or the mental structures that make up part of the perceptual cycle. In regard to an audience-oriented dramatic theory, this suggests that analysis of a script ought to identify the sorts of schemata that are to be aroused in the audience's minds and the…

  9. Improved cell mediated immune responses after successful re-vaccination of non-responders to the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) vaccine using the combined hepatitis A and B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Jessica; Cardell, Kristina; Björnsdottir, Thora Björg; Fryden, Aril; Hultgren, Catharina; Sällberg, Matti

    2008-11-01

    We successfully re-vaccinated hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine non-responders using a double dose of the combined hepatitis A virus (HAV) and HBV vaccine. The hope was to improve priming of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-specific cell mediated immune response (CMI) by an increased antigen dose and a theoretical adjuvant-effect from the local presence of a HAV-specific CMI. A few non-responders had a detectable HBsAg-specific CMI before re-vaccination. An in vitro detectable HBsAg-specific CMI was primed equally effective in non-responders (58%) as in first time vaccine recipients (68%). After the third dose a weak, albeit significant, association was observed between the magnitude of HBsAg-specific proliferation and anti-HBs levels. This regimen improves the priming of HBsAg-specific CMIs and antibodies.

  10. Improved Efficacy of a pegylated interferon-α-2a stepwise optimization treatment strategy in the treatment of hepatitis B e antigen-positive chronic hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Pu; Yang, Feifei; Wang, Jinyu; Mao, Richeng; Qi, Xun; Huang, Yuxian; Zhang, Jiming

    2015-05-01

    Current pegylated interferon-α (PEG-IFN) treatment for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) e-antigen (HBeAg)-positive patients are suboptimal, and effective ways of improving PEG-IFN treatment efficacy are needed.This retrospective cohort study compared the efficacy of a PEG-IFN stepwise optimization treatment (PEG-IFN SOT) strategy with that of a 48-week PEG-IFN standard therapy (PEG-IFN ST) in HBeAg-positive CHB patients.A total of 110 patients were included in our study. Of these, 70 received the PEG-IFN SOT and 40 received the PEG-IFN ST (control group). We based the decision whether to add adefovir and/or extend the PEG-IFN-based treatment to 96 weeks on the patients' 12-week or 24-week early virological response (12W EVR, at least a 2 log10 reduction in HBV DNA copies/mL at week 12; 24W EVR, at least 1 log10 reduction in HBsAg IU/mL or HBsAg <1500 IU/mL at week 24) and their 48-week partial response (48W PR, 1.0 ≤HBeAg ≤10.0 S/CO or HBeAg >10.0 S/CO but HBsAg <1000 IU/mL).The HBeAg seroconversion rate 24 weeks post-PEG-IFN treatment was significantly higher in the PEG-IFN SOT than the PEG-IFN ST group (50% vs 22.5%, P = 0.005). The HBsAg clearance rates in the PEG-IFN SOT and ST groups were 10% and 0% (P = 0.04), respectively. Receiving PEG-IFN SOT (OR = 0.26, P = 0.01), ALT × ULN at baseline (OR = 0.74, P = 0.003), and achieving 12 and 24W EVR (OR = 0.29, P = 0.03) were independent factors associated with HBeAg seroconversion.PEG-IFN SOT is a promising strategy for achieving high rates of serological response in HBeAg-positive CHB patients.

  11. Socio-Dramatic Affective-Relational Intervention for Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome & High Functioning Autism: Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Matthew D.; Mikami, Amori Yee; Levine, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a novel intervention called "socio-dramatic affective-relational intervention" (SDARI), intended to improve social skills among adolescents with Asperger syndrome and high functioning autism diagnoses. SDARI adapts dramatic training activities to focus on in vivo practice of areas of social skill deficit…

  12. Video Taping and Abnormal Psychology: Dramatized Clinical Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Michael J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Students in an abnormal psychology course worked in teams to produce dramatizations of diagnostic interviews and then presented them in class. Positive and negative aspects of the activity are discussed. (RM)

  13. Some Practical Guidelines for Teaching Dramatic Analysis to Beginning Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelias, Ronald J.; Ralph, Stephen D.

    1985-01-01

    Outlines common abuses that occur when students first use dramatic analysis in oral interpretation. Offers guidelines to help make students' efforts more productive; uses William Carlos Williams's poem "The Red Wheelbarrow" as an example. (PD)

  14. Formaldehyde scavengers function as novel antigen retrieval agents.

    PubMed

    Vollert, Craig T; Moree, Wilna J; Gregory, Steven; Bark, Steven J; Eriksen, Jason L

    2015-11-27

    Antigen retrieval agents improve the detection of formaldehyde-fixed proteins, but how they work is not well understood. We demonstrate that formaldehyde scavenging represents a key characteristic associated with effective antigen retrieval; under controlled temperature and pH conditions, scavenging improves the typical antigen retrieval process through reversal of formaldehyde-protein adduct formation. This approach provides a rational framework for the identification and development of more effective antigen retrieval agents.

  15. Formaldehyde scavengers function as novel antigen retrieval agents

    PubMed Central

    Vollert, Craig T.; Moree, Wilna J.; Gregory, Steven; Bark, Steven J.; Eriksen, Jason L.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen retrieval agents improve the detection of formaldehyde-fixed proteins, but how they work is not well understood. We demonstrate that formaldehyde scavenging represents a key characteristic associated with effective antigen retrieval; under controlled temperature and pH conditions, scavenging improves the typical antigen retrieval process through reversal of formaldehyde-protein adduct formation. This approach provides a rational framework for the identification and development of more effective antigen retrieval agents. PMID:26612041

  16. Hierarchy among multiple H-2b-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes within simian virus 40 T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Mylin, L M; Bonneau, R H; Lippolis, J D; Tevethia, S S

    1995-01-01

    Simian virus 40 large tumor (T) antigen contains three H-2Db-restricted (I, II/III, and V) and one H-2Kb-restricted (IV) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes. We demonstrate that a hierarchy exists among these CTL epitopes, since vigorous CTL responses against epitopes I, II/III, and IV are detected following immunization of H-2b mice with syngeneic, T-antigen-expressing cells. By contrast, a weak CTL response against the H-2Db-restricted epitope V was detected only following immunization of H-2b mice with epitope loss variant B6/K-3,1,4 cells, which have lost expression of CTL epitopes I, II/III, and IV. Limiting-dilution analysis confirmed that the lack of epitope V-specific CTL activity in bulk culture splenocytes correlated with inefficient expansion and priming of epitope V-specific CTL precursors in vivo. We examined whether defined genetic alterations of T antigen might improve processing and presentation of epitope V to the epitope V-specific CTL clone Y-5 in vitro and/or overcome the recessive nature of epitope V in vivo. Deletion of the H-2Db-restricted epitopes I and II/III from T antigen did not increase target cell lysis by epitope V-specific CTL clones in vitro. The amino acid sequence SMIKNLEYM, which species an optimized H-2Db binding motif and was found to induce CTL in H-2b mice, did not further reduce epitope V presentation in vitro when inserted within T antigen. Epitope V-containing T-antigen derivatives which retained epitopes I and II/III or epitope IV did not induce epitope V-specific CTL in vivo: T-antigen derivatives in which epitope V replaced epitope I failed to induce epitope V-specific CTL. Recognition of epitope V-H-2Db complexes by multiple independently derived epitope V-specific CTL clones was rapidly and dramatically reduced by incubation of target cells in the presence of brefeldin A compared with the recognition of the other T-antigen CTL epitopes by epitope specific CTL, suggesting that the epitope V-H-2Db complexes either are

  17. How to Know when Dramatic Change Is on Track: Leading Indicators of School Turnarounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowal, Julie; Ableidinger, Joe

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, national policymakers have placed new emphasis on "school turnarounds" as a strategy for rapid, dramatic improvement in chronically failing schools, calling on education leaders to turn around performance in the 5,000 lowest-achieving schools nationwide. This goal may seem daunting, given the dismal success rates of school…

  18. Prime-boost bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination with lentivirus-vectored and DNA-based vaccines expressing antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 improves protective efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Yang, Enzhuo; Wang, Jianguang; Li, Rui; Li, Guanghua; Liu, Guoyuan; Song, Na; Huang, Qi; Kong, Cong; Wang, Honghai

    2014-10-01

    To prevent the global spread of tuberculosis (TB), more effective vaccines and vaccination strategies are urgently needed. As a result of the success of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in protecting children against miliary and meningeal TB, the majority of individuals will have been vaccinated with BCG; hence, boosting BCG-primed immunity will probably be a key component of future vaccine strategies. In this study, we compared the ability of DNA-, protein- and lentiviral vector-based vaccines that express the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 to boost the effects of BCG in the context of immunity and protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in C57BL/6 mice. Our results demonstrated that prime-boost BCG vaccination with a lentiviral vector expressing the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 significantly enhanced immune responses, including T helper type 1 and CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses, compared with DNA- and protein-based vaccines. However, lentivirus-vectored and DNA-based vaccines greatly improved the protective efficacy of BCG against M. tuberculosis, as indicated by a lack of weight loss and significantly reduced bacterial loads and histological damage in the lung. Our study suggests that the use of lentiviral or DNA vaccines containing the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 to boost BCG is a good choice for the rational design of an efficient vaccination strategy against TB.

  19. Windows into Children's Thinking: A Guide to Storytelling and Dramatization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Cheryl; Bacigalupa, Chiara; Black, Tyler; Burton, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Telling and dramatizing stories is an increasingly popular addition to the preschool curriculum, largely due to the attention this activity has received through the writings of Vivian Paley (Bad guys don't have birthdays: fantasy play at four. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1988; The boy who would be a helicopter: the uses of…

  20. Piaget in Performance: The Role of "Games" in Creative Dramatics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratliff, Gerald Lee

    Jean Piaget's theories of child development and the nature of intelligence are adapted to creative dramatics in this description of two games for children aged 6 through 12. The first game discussed incorporates a "touchy-feely box," a cardboard construction with openings on two sides so that a child may reach inside, select, and describe an…

  1. The Dramatic Difference: Drama in the Preschool and Kindergarten Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Victoria; Pleydell, Sarah

    Noting that there are few resources available for preschool or kindergarten teachers committed to providing high-quality drama experiences to students, this book explores ways teachers can maximize the drama experience in preschool and kindergarten classrooms. Topics discussed in the book's introduction include dramatic play and early development,…

  2. Soaps and Suspicious Activity: Dramatic Experiences in British Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferree, Angela M.

    2001-01-01

    Offers examples of dramatic experiences (student produced soap operas) in two classrooms in British comprehensive secondary schools. Concludes that students in other countries would find such experiences as meaningful and enjoyable as their British counterparts. Notes that the two teachers managed to be flexible, appropriating effective…

  3. Dramatic Play: Root Meaning of Drama/Theatre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koste, Virginia Glasgow

    The processes involved in drama and the dramatic play of children are essentially the same in that they rely on an imitation of nature, involve a transformation of reality through imagination, connect seemingly irrelevant elements creatively, and bring a temporary, limited order to an emotional experience. When child's play is used as a basis for…

  4. Astronaut to Zoologist: Changing the Dramatic Play Area!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouette, Scott J.

    Changing the dramatic play area in a child care setting promotes creativity and gives children the chance to experience a place they may never experience in real life. Whenever possible, the children should be involved in the process of changing the area, by moving furniture and exchanging props, as well as brainstorming ideas for changes. The…

  5. Burke Bingo: Using Active Learning to Introduce Dramatism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, Ben

    2011-01-01

    Kenneth Burke is typically regarded as the single most significant figure in 20th-century rhetorical studies. Undergraduate textbooks in rhetorical criticism, rhetorical theory, and communication theory typically include coverage of Burke's theory of dramatism. In this article, the author describes a classroom activity dubbed "Burke Bingo" that…

  6. Frost Bite: A Dramatic Tale of Research in Aesthetic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Miriam

    2008-01-01

    This article follows the author's research on the integration of an aesthetic arts initiative in a private elementary school with an established traditional arts program. The narrative describes the sequence of events, interpersonal interactions, and learning experiences in the format of a full-length dramatic performance. Informed by Ben Peretz's…

  7. Combining a CD20 chimeric antigen receptor and an inducible caspase 9 suicide switch to improve the efficacy and safety of T cell adoptive immunotherapy for lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Budde, Lihua E; Berger, Carolina; Lin, Yukang; Wang, Jinjuan; Lin, Xubin; Frayo, Shani E; Brouns, Shaunda A; Spencer, David M; Till, Brian G; Jensen, Michael C; Riddell, Stanley R; Press, Oliver W

    2013-01-01

    Modification of T cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) has emerged as a promising treatment modality for human malignancies. Integration of co-stimulatory domains into CARs can augment the activation and function of genetically targeted T cells against tumors. However, the potential for insertional mutagenesis and toxicities due to the infused cells have made development of safe methods for removing transferred cells an important consideration. We have genetically modified human T cells with a lentiviral vector to express a CD20-CAR containing both CD28 and CD137 co-stimulatory domains, a "suicide gene" relying on inducible activation of caspase 9 (iC9), and a truncated CD19 selectable marker. Rapid expansion (2000 fold) of the transduced T cells was achieved in 28 days after stimulation with artificial antigen presenting cells. Transduced T cells exhibited effective CD20-specific cytotoxic activity in vitro and in a mouse xenograft tumor model. Activation of the iC9 suicide switch resulted in efficient removal of transduced T cells both in vitro and in vivo. Our work demonstrates the feasibility and promise of this approach for treating CD20(+) malignancies in a safe and more efficient manner. A phase I clinical trial using this approach in patients with relapsed indolent B-NHL is planned. PMID:24358223

  8. Fusion of HCV Nonstructural Antigen to MHC Class II–associated Invariant Chain Enhances T-cell Responses Induced by Vectored Vaccines in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Capone, Stefania; Naddeo, Mariarosaria; D'Alise, Anna Morena; Abbate, Adele; Grazioli, Fabiana; Del Gaudio, Annunziata; Del Sorbo, Mariarosaria; Esposito, Maria Luisa; Ammendola, Virginia; Perretta, Gemma; Taglioni, Alessandra; Colloca, Stefano; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Folgori, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Despite viral vectors being potent inducers of antigen-specific T cells, strategies to further improve their immunogenicity are actively pursued. Of the numerous approaches investigated, fusion of the encoded antigen to major histocompatibility complex class II–associated invariant chain (Ii) has been reported to enhance CD8+ T-cell responses. We have previously shown that adenovirus vaccine encoding nonstructural (NS) hepatitis C virus (HCV) proteins induces potent T-cell responses in humans. However, even higher T-cell responses might be required to achieve efficacy against different HCV genotypes or therapeutic effect in chronically infected HCV patients. In this study, we assessed fusion of the HCV NS antigen to murine and human Ii expressed by the chimpanzee adenovirus vector ChAd3 or recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara in mice and nonhuman primates (NHPs). A dramatic increase was observed in outbred mice in which vaccination with ChAd3 expressing the fusion antigen resulted in a 10-fold increase in interferon-γ+ CD8+ T cells. In NHPs, CD8+ T-cell responses were enhanced and accelerated with vectors encoding the Ii-fused antigen. These data show for the first time that the enhancement induced by vector vaccines encoding li-fused antigen was not species specific and can be translated from mice to NHPs, opening the way for testing in humans. PMID:24476798

  9. Dramatic changes in electronic structure revealed by fractionally charged nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Aron J.; Mori-Sánchez, Paula

    2014-01-28

    Discontinuous changes in the electronic structure upon infinitesimal changes to the Hamiltonian are demonstrated. These are revealed in one and two electron molecular systems by full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations when the realm of the nuclear charge is extended to be fractional. FCI electron densities in these systems show dramatic changes in real space and illustrate the transfer, hopping, and removal of electrons. This is due to the particle nature of electrons seen in stretched systems and is a manifestation of an energy derivative discontinuity at constant number of electrons. Dramatic errors of density functional theory densities are seen in real space as this physics is missing from currently used approximations. The movements of electrons in these simple systems encapsulate those in real physical processes, from chemical reactions to electron transport and pose a great challenge for the development of new electronic structure methods.

  10. Adjuvant Effect of Biogenic Selenium Nanoparticles Improves the Immune Responses and Survival of Mice Receiving 4T1 Cell Antigens as Vaccine in Breast Cancer Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Mohammad Hossein; Varastehmoradi, Bardia; Faghfuri, Elnaz; Mavandadnejad, Faranak; Mahdavi, Mehdi; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza

    2015-12-01

    The modification of tumor-associated antigen-based vaccine to elicit a more robust immune response has been addressed in several ways. In the present work, we aimed to investigate the immunomodulatory effect of selenium nanoparticles as an immunoadjuvant in formulation of a tumor-associated antigen-based vaccine in a preventive form. Fortyfive female inbred BALB/c mice five-to-seven weeks old were used and divided into three groups of test and control, each containing fifteen mice. Group one injected by PBS and used as a control. Group two injected by breast tumor cell lysate alone as vaccine. Group three injected by SeNPs with tumor cell lysate as vaccine. All injections were carried out on day fourteen, twentyone and twentyeight of the study. Tumor induction was done at day thirty. Twenty days after tumor induction serum samples were gathered to measure the cytokine assay. Tumor growth and weight of mice as well as delayed type hyper sensitivity (DTH) response were monitored during the study. Results of the present work showed a significant increase in the level of serum IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-12 and decreased TGF-β in SeNPs/vaccine injected mice as well as lower tumor volume, more potent DTH responses and longer survival rate in comparison to control and tumor lysate vaccine. Taken together, it can be deduced from this work that SeNPs can be considered as an adjuvant in vaccine in triggering robust immune response against breast cancer. But further evaluations are still needed to find the best formula for this agent in antitumor vaccines. PMID:26682463

  11. Improved cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune responses to a tumor antigen by vaccines co-expressing the SLAM-associated adaptor EAT-2.

    PubMed

    Aldhamen, Y A; Seregin, S S; Kousa, Y A; Rastall, D P W; Appledorn, D M; Godbehere, S; Schutte, B C; Amalfitano, A

    2013-10-01

    The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated adaptor Ewing's sarcoma's-activated transcript 2 (EAT-2) is primarily expressed in dendritic cells, macrophages and natural killer cells. Including EAT-2 in a vaccination regimen enhanced innate and adaptive immune responses toward pathogen-derived antigens, even in the face of pre-existing vaccine immunity. Herein, we investigate whether co-vaccinations with two recombinant Ad5 (rAd5) vectors, one expressing the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and one expressing EAT-2, can induce more potent CEA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and antitumor activity in the therapeutic CEA-expressing MC-38 tumor model. Our results suggest that inclusion of EAT-2 significantly alters the kinetics of Th1-biasing proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses, and enhances anti-CEA-specific CTL responses. As a result, rAd5-EAT2-augmented rAd5-CEA vaccinations are more efficient in eliminating CEA-expressing target cells as measured by an in vivo CTL assay. Administration of rAd5-EAT2 vaccines also reduced the rate of growth of MC-38 tumor growth in vivo. Also, an increase in MC-38 tumor cell apoptosis (as measured by hematoxylin and eosin staining, active caspase-3 and granzyme B levels within the tumors) was observed. These data provide evidence that more efficient, CEA-specific effector T cells are generated by rAd5 vaccines expressing CEA, when augmented by rAd5 vaccines expressing EAT-2, and this regimen may be a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy in general.

  12. LATERAL FLOW ASSAY FOR CRYPTOCOCCAL ANTIGEN: AN IMPORTANT ADVANCE TO IMPROVE THE CONTINUUM OF HIV CARE AND REDUCE CRYPTOCOCCAL MENINGITIS-RELATED MORTALITY

    PubMed Central

    VIDAL, Jose E.; BOULWARE, David R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY AIDS-related cryptococcal meningitis continues to cause a substantial burden of death in low and middle income countries. The diagnostic use for detection of cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide antigen (CrAg) in serum and cerebrospinal fluid by latex agglutination test (CrAg-latex) or enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA) has been available for over decades. Better diagnostics in asymptomatic and symptomatic phases of cryptococcosis are key components to reduce mortality. Recently, the cryptococcal antigen lateral flow assay (CrAg LFA) was included in the armamentarium for diagnosis. Unlike the other tests, the CrAg LFA is a dipstick immunochromatographic assay, in a format similar to the home pregnancy test, and requires little or no lab infrastructure. This test meets all of the World Health Organization ASSURED criteria (Affordable, Sensitive, Specific, User friendly, Rapid/robust, Equipment-free, and Delivered). CrAg LFA in serum, plasma, whole blood, or cerebrospinal fluid is useful for the diagnosis of disease caused by Cryptococcus species. The CrAg LFA has better analytical sensitivity for C. gattii than CrAg-latex or EIA. Prevention of cryptococcal disease is new application of CrAg LFA via screening of blood for subclinical infection in asymptomatic HIV-infected persons with CD4 counts < 100 cells/mL who are not receiving effective antiretroviral therapy. CrAg screening of leftover plasma specimens after CD4 testing can identify persons with asymptomatic infection who urgently require pre-emptive fluconazole, who will otherwise progress to symptomatic infection and/or die. PMID:26465368

  13. Urinary microRNA-based signature improves accuracy of detection of clinically relevant prostate cancer within the prostate-specific antigen grey zone.

    PubMed

    Salido-Guadarrama, Alberto Ivan; Morales-Montor, Jorge Gustavo; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Langley, Elizabeth; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Cruz Colin, Jose Luis; Rodriguez-Dorantes, Mauricio

    2016-06-01

    At present, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is used as a clinical biomarker for prostate cancer (PCa) diagnosis; however, a large number of patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) with PSA levels in the 'gray area' (4-10 ng/ml) are currently subjected to unnecessary biopsy due to overdiagnosis. Certain microRNAs (miRs) have been proven to be useful biomarkers, several of which are detectable in bodily fluids. The present study identified and validated a urinary miR‑based signature to enhance the specificity of PCa diagnosis and to reduce the number of patients with benign conditions undergoing biopsy. Seventy‑three urine samples from Mexican patients with diagnosis of PCa with a Gleason score ≥7 and 70 patients diagnosed with BPH were collected after digital rectal examination (DRE) of the prostate. miR expression profiles were determined using TaqMan Low Density Array experiments, and normalized Ct values for the miRs were compared between PCa and BPH groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate whether miR detection in urine is suitable for distinguishing patients with PCa from those with BPH. The identified miR‑100/200b signature was significantly correlated with PCa. Using a multivariable logistic regression approach, a base model including the clinical variables age, prostate‑specific antigen (PSA), the percentage of free PSA and DRE was generated, and a second base model additionally contained the miR‑100/200b signature. ROC analysis demonstrated that the combined model significantly outperformed the capacity of PSA (P<0.001) and the base model (P=0.01) to discriminate between PCa and BPH patients. In terms of evaluation of the sub‑group of patients in the gray zone of PSA levels, the performance of the combined model for predicting PCa cases was significantly superior to PSA level determination (P<0.001) and the base model (P=0.009). In addition, decision curve analysis demonstrated that the

  14. Branched Polyethylenimine-Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (bPEI-SPIONs) Improve the Immunogenicity of Tumor Antigens and Enhance Th1 Polarization of Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Hoang, My-Dung; Lee, Hwa-Jeong; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Choi, Nu-Ri; Vo, Manh-Cuong; Nguyen-Pham, Thanh-Nhan; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Park, In-Kyu; Lee, Je-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles in the field of dendritic cell (DC) research are emerging as a promising method of enhancing the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. We investigated the effect of branched polyethylenimine-superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (bPEI-SPIONs) on tumor cells loaded onto DCs. The tumor antigens were prepared as follows: (1) apoptotic U266 cells with ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation followed by a 2 h incubation in the absence (2 h postirradiated cells) or (2) presence of bPEI-SPIONs (bPEI-SPION 2 h postirradiated cells) and (3) apoptotic U266 cells with UVB irradiation followed by an overnight 16 h incubation (16 h postirradiated cells). bPEI-SPIONs render U266 cells sensitive to UVB irradiation through reactive oxygen species production to accelerate apoptotic death. The 2 h postirradiated cells and bPEI-SPION 2 h postirradiated cells released immunogenic proteins, including Hsp70, Hsp90, and HMGB1. The DCs loaded with bPEI-SPION 2 h postirradiated cells showed the highest IL-12p70 production and Th1 polarization compared with other DCs. These results suggest that bPEI-SPIONs are a promising method of enhancing the immunogenicity of tumor cells and promoting Th1 polarization of DCs loaded with these tumor cells. PMID:26221615

  15. Dramatic response to levetiracetam in post-ischaemic Holmes’ tremor

    PubMed Central

    Striano, P; Elefante, Andrea; Coppola, Antonietta; Tortora, Fabio; Zara, Federico; Minetti, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Holmes’ tremor refers to an unusual combination of rest, postural and kinetic tremor of extremities. Common causes of Holmes’ tremor include stroke, trauma, vascular malformations and multiple sclerosis, with lesions involving the thalamus, brain stem or cerebellum. Although some drugs (eg, levodopa and dopaminergic drugs, clonazepam and propranolol) have been occasionally reported to give some benefit, medical treatment of Holmes’ tremor is unsatisfactory, and many patients require thalamic surgery to achieve satisfactory control. We report a patient in whom post-ischaemic Holmes’ tremor dramatically responded to levetiracetam treatment. PMID:21686707

  16. Diagnostic significance of soluble human leukocyte antigen-G for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ying-Qiu; Ruan, Yan-Yun; Peng, Jin-Bang; Han, Qiu-Yue; Zhang, Xia; Lin, Aifen; Yan, Wei-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a novel tumor marker. Increased level of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) in various tumor types has been reported. However, the potential diagnostic value of sHLA-G with other tumor markers in gastric cancer (GC) diagnosis is yet to be explored. In this study, plasma level of sHLA-G was measured in 81 GC patients, 53 benign gastric disease patients and 77 normal controls by ELISA. The serum levels of alpha fetoprotein (AFP), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cancer antigen 125 (CA125), cancer antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) and cancer antigen 72-4 (CA72-4) were also determined. Data showed that plasma level of sHLA-G in GC was dramatically increased compared with normal controls and benign gastric disease patients (both p<0.001). The AUC for sHLA-G was 0.730 (p<0.001), superior to serum AFP, CEA, CA125, CA19-9 and CA72-4. After evaluating three cut-offs of sHLA-G, we concluded sHLA-G (cut-off at 128U/ml) plus CA125 in two-biomarker panel test and CA125 plus CA199 plus sHLA-G or CA125 plus CA724 plus sHLA-G in three-biomarker panel test were better choices for GC discrimination. Our findings indicated that sHLA-G was a potential biomarker for GC diagnosis and the combination of sHLA-G with CA125, CA19-9 and CA72-4 can improve the clinical screening and diagnosis for GC.

  17. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Shin, Meong-Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical application of antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunization targeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received much attention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigen delivery. The skin has important immunological functions with unique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years, novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually been developed; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yet been fully exploited due to the penetration barrier represented by the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport of antigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievements in transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the various strategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery and vaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1): 17-24] PMID:23351379

  18. Bacterial fermentation of recombinant major wasp allergen Antigen 5 using oxygen limiting growth conditions improves yield and quality of inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Kischnick, Stefanie; Weber, Bernhard; Verdino, Petra; Keller, Walter; Sanders, Ernst A; Anspach, F Birger; Fiebig, Helmut; Cromwell, Oliver; Suck, Roland

    2006-06-01

    A process for bacterial expression and purification of the recombinant major wasp allergen Antigen 5 (Ves v 5) was developed to produce protein for diagnostic and therapeutic applications for type 1 allergic diseases. Special attention was focused on medium selection, fermentation conditions, and efficient refolding procedures. A soy based medium was used for fermentation to avoid peptone from animal origin. Animal-derived peptone required the use of isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) for the induction of expression. In the case of soy peptone, a constitutive expression was observed, suggesting the presence of a component that mimics IPTG. Batch cultivation at reduced stirrer speed caused a reduced biomass due to oxygen limitation. However, subsequent purification and processing of inclusion bodies yielded significantly higher amount of product. Furthermore, the protein composition of the inclusion bodies differed. Inclusion bodies were denatured and subjected to diafiltration. Detailed monitoring of diafiltration enabled the determination of the transition point. Final purification was conducted using cation-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified recombinant Ves v 5 was analyzed by RP-HPLC, CD-spectroscopy, SDS-PAGE, and quantification ELISA. Up to 15 mg highly purified Ves v 5 per litre bioreactor volume were obtained, with endotoxin concentrations less than 20 EU mg(-1) protein and high comparability to the natural counterpart. Analytical results confirm the suitability of the recombinant protein for diagnostic and clinical applications. The results clearly demonstrate that not only biomass, but especially growth conditions play a key role in the production of recombinant Ves v 5. This has an influence on inclusion body formation, which in turn influences the renaturation rate and absolute product yield. This might also be true for other recombinant proteins that accumulate as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli.

  19. Improved tumor localization with increasing dose of indium-111-labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody ZCE-025 in metastatic colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, Y.Z.; Lamki, L.M.; Haynie, T.P.; Unger, M.W.; Rosenblum, M.G.; Shirkhoda, A.; Murray, J.L.

    1988-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) react with human colorectal cancer cells, and when labeled with a gamma-emitting radioisotope, may help to localize known and occult metastatic disease. We tested ZCE-025, a high-affinity immune gamma globulin1 (IgG1) MoAb anti-CEA that does not react with normal granulocyte glycoproteins in a phase I/II trial to determine the reagent's toxicity and its maximum efficacy in detecting metastatic colorectal cancer. Increasing doses of unlabeled ZCE-025 were mixed with 1 mg of Indium-111 (111In)-radiolabeled MoAb and administered intravenously (IV) to 34 patients who had metastatic colorectal cancer. Planar nuclear or single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) scans were performed 48 to 72 and 120 to 144 hours later. Total dose of MoAb and scanning sensitivity (number of imaged lesions/number of known lesions) were correlated up to 80 mg. At doses of 2.5 to 20 mg, a mean of 22% of the lesions were imaged; at 40 mg, 77% were imaged (P less than .01). Liver metastases were detected as areas of increased activity (hot) at the 40 mg dose but showed decreased MoAb uptake at lower doses. At the 40 mg dose normal liver parenchymal uptake of the labeled MoAb was lower with respect to blood pool compared with the other doses. At 80 mg, however, sensitivity of detection declined to 21%. One milligram of 111In-labeled ZCE-025 antibody coinfused with 39 mg of unlabeled antibody appeared optimal for detecting metastatic colorectal cancer, particularly in the liver. Although the exact mechanism(s) for this dose effect is currently unknown, a partial blocking effect of unlabeled antibody with a change in MoAb biodistribution may be occurring.

  20. Recombinant Protective Antigen Anthrax Vaccine Improves Survival when Administered as a Postexposure Prophylaxis Countermeasure with Antibiotic in the New Zealand White Rabbit Model of Inhalation Anthrax

    PubMed Central

    Bourdage, James S.; Williamson, E. Diane; Duchars, Matthew; Fuerst, Thomas R.; Fusco, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Inhalation anthrax is a potentially lethal form of disease resulting from exposure to aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores. Over the last decade, incidents spanning from the deliberate mailing of B. anthracis spores to incidental exposures in users of illegal drugs have highlighted the importance of developing new medical countermeasures to protect people who have been exposed to “anthrax spores” and are at risk of developing disease. The New Zealand White rabbit (NZWR) is a well-characterized model that has a pathogenesis and clinical presentation similar to those seen in humans. This article reports how the NZWR model was adapted to evaluate postexposure prophylaxis using a recombinant protective antigen (rPA) vaccine in combination with an oral antibiotic, levofloxacin. NZWRs were exposed to multiples of the 50% lethal dose (LD50) of B. anthracis spores and then vaccinated immediately (day 0) and again on day 7 postexposure. Levofloxacin was administered daily beginning at 6 to 12 h postexposure for 7 treatments. Rabbits were evaluated for clinical signs of disease, fever, bacteremia, immune response, and survival. A robust immune response (IgG anti-rPA and toxin-neutralizing antibodies) was observed in all vaccinated groups on days 10 to 12. Levofloxacin plus either 30 or 100 μg rPA vaccine resulted in a 100% survival rate (18 of 18 per group), and a vaccine dose as low as 10 μg rPA resulted in an 89% survival rate (16 of 18) when used in combination with levofloxacin. In NZWRs that received antibiotic alone, the survival rate was 56% (10 of 18). There was no adverse effect on the development of a specific IgG response to rPA in unchallenged NZWRs that received the combination treatment of vaccine plus antibiotic. This study demonstrated that an accelerated two-dose regimen of rPA vaccine coadministered on days 0 and 7 with 7 days of levofloxacin therapy results in a significantly greater survival rate than with antibiotic treatment alone. Combination of

  1. Conditioning with rabbit versus horse ATG dramatically alters clinical outcomes in identical twins with severe aplastic anemia transplanted with the same allogeneic donor.

    PubMed

    Vo, P T; Pantin, J; Ramos, C; Cook, L; Cho, E; Kurlander, R; Khuu, H; Barrett, J; Leitman, S; Childs, R W

    2015-01-01

    Severe aplastic anemia (SAA) is a rare disorder leading to bone marrow failure, which if left untreated, is invariably fatal. Conventional therapies with immunosuppressive therapy or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are highly effective. HSCT can offer a greater outcome in younger patients who have an available HLA match-related donor. Recent studies showing the addition of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) to the conditioning regimen improves engraftment and reduces the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD).There are currently two ATG preparations in the USA, equine (or horse) and rabbit ATG. These agents are pharmacologically distinct, having significant differences in their pharmacokinetics and in vivo immunosuppressive effects [N Engl J Med 365(5):430-438, 2011]. Here, we report a case of two monozygotic twins with constitutional SAA that evolved to myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) who both underwent allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSC) from the same single HLA antigen mismatched sibling donor with the only difference in the transplant regimen being the type of ATG used in the preparative regimen; one twin received horse ATG and the other received rabbit ATG during conditioning. This report emphasizes that dramatic differences in donor T cell chimerism and clinical outcomes including GVHD can occur as a consequence of the type of ATG that is utilized in the transplant conditioning regimen. These differences highlight that these agents should not be considered interchangeable drugs when used in this setting. PMID:26113077

  2. The Relationship between Dramatic Play and Self-Concept in Middle Class Kindergarten Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gootman, Marilyn Eisenstadt

    This study attempted to determine the relationships between the dramatic play of children aged three to seven and their self-concept; between dramatic play and two components of self-concept--self-esteem and identification with friends; between dramatic play ability and self-concept; and between dramatic play and the teacher's attitude toward…

  3. Anions dramatically enhance proton transfer through aqueous interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Himanshu; Enami, Shinichi; Nielsen, Robert J.; Hoffmann, Michael R.; Goddard, William A.; Colussi, Agustín J.

    2012-01-01

    Proton transfer (PT) through and across aqueous interfaces is a fundamental process in chemistry and biology. Notwithstanding its importance, it is not generally realized that interfacial PT is quite different from conventional PT in bulk water. Here we show that, in contrast with the behavior of strong nitric acid in aqueous solution, gas-phase HNO3 does not dissociate upon collision with the surface of water unless a few ions (> 1 per 106 H2O) are present. By applying online electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to monitor in situ the surface of aqueous jets exposed to HNO3(g) beams we found that production increases dramatically on > 30-μM inert electrolyte solutions. We also performed quantum mechanical calculations confirming that the sizable barrier hindering HNO3 dissociation on the surface of small water clusters is drastically lowered in the presence of anions. Anions electrostatically assist in drawing the proton away from lingering outside the cluster, whose incorporation is hampered by the energetic cost of opening a cavity therein. Present results provide both direct experimental evidence and mechanistic insights on the counterintuitive slowness of PT at water-hydrophobe boundaries and its remarkable sensitivity to electrostatic effects. PMID:22689964

  4. New therapies for hereditary angioedema: disease outlook changes dramatically.

    PubMed

    Frank, Michael M; Jiang, Haixiang

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disease associated with episodic attacks of nonpitting edema that may affect any external or mucosal body surface. Attacks most often affect the extremities, causing local swelling, the GI tract, leading to severe abdominal pain, and the mouth and throat, at times causing asphyxiation. Most patients with HAE have low levels of the plasma serine protease inhibitor C1 inhibitor. The edema in these patients is caused by unregulated generation of bradykinin. Effective chronic therapy of patients with impeded androgens or plasmin inhibitors has been available for decades, but in the United States, we do not have therapy for acute attacks. Five companies have completed or are in the process of conducting phase 3 clinical trials, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of products designed to terminate acute attacks or to be used in prophylaxis. Two companies, Lev Pharmaceuticals and CSL Behring, have preparations of C1 inhibitor purified from plasma that have been used in Europe for decades (trade names Cinryze and Berinert P, respectively). One company, Pharming, has developed a recombinant C1 inhibitor preparation. One company, Dyax, is testing a kallikrein inhibitor (ecallantide), and one company, Jerini, is completing testing of a bradykinin type 2 receptor antagonist (Icatibant). Although little has been published thus far, all of these products may prove effective. It is likely that HAE treatment will change dramatically within the next few years.

  5. Dramatic long-term X-ray variability in AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Edward C.

    2016-04-01

    Dramatic X-ray and optical variability on ˜ 10 year timescales has been discovered recently in a handful of quasars, which may provide important new insight into the issue of how luminous AGNs are fueled. We have assembled a new sample of extremely variable X-ray sources from archival Einstein and ROSAT data that could increase substantially the number of such objects known. The sources in our sample varied in X-ray flux by at least a factor of 7-8 over a 10-year span, and most exhibited significantly larger variability amplitudes (10 to over 100). We present the details of how our sample was assembled and preliminary results regarding the identifications, properties, and X-ray histories of the objects. Although a heterogeneous population is expected, some sources in the sample are associated with broad-line AGNs, including a radio-quiet quasar at z = 1.3 that decreased in X-ray luminosity by a factor of 40.

  6. New therapies for hereditary angioedema: disease outlook changes dramatically.

    PubMed

    Frank, Michael M; Jiang, Haixiang

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disease associated with episodic attacks of nonpitting edema that may affect any external or mucosal body surface. Attacks most often affect the extremities, causing local swelling, the GI tract, leading to severe abdominal pain, and the mouth and throat, at times causing asphyxiation. Most patients with HAE have low levels of the plasma serine protease inhibitor C1 inhibitor. The edema in these patients is caused by unregulated generation of bradykinin. Effective chronic therapy of patients with impeded androgens or plasmin inhibitors has been available for decades, but in the United States, we do not have therapy for acute attacks. Five companies have completed or are in the process of conducting phase 3 clinical trials, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of products designed to terminate acute attacks or to be used in prophylaxis. Two companies, Lev Pharmaceuticals and CSL Behring, have preparations of C1 inhibitor purified from plasma that have been used in Europe for decades (trade names Cinryze and Berinert P, respectively). One company, Pharming, has developed a recombinant C1 inhibitor preparation. One company, Dyax, is testing a kallikrein inhibitor (ecallantide), and one company, Jerini, is completing testing of a bradykinin type 2 receptor antagonist (Icatibant). Although little has been published thus far, all of these products may prove effective. It is likely that HAE treatment will change dramatically within the next few years. PMID:18206518

  7. Taming Self-Organization Dynamics to Dramatically Control Porous Architectures.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ronan; Sader, John E; Boland, John J

    2016-03-22

    We demonstrate templating of functional materials with unexpected and intricate micro- and nanostructures by controlling the condensation, packing, and evaporation of water droplets on a polymer solution. Spontaneous evaporation of a polymer solution induces cooling of the liquid surface and water microdroplet condensation from the ambient vapor. These droplets pack together and act as a template to imprint an entangled polymer film. This breath figure (BF) phenomenon is an example of self-organization that involves the long-range ordering of droplets. Equilibrium-based analysis provides many insights into contact angles and drop stability of individual drops, but the BF phenomenon remains poorly understood thus far, preventing translation to real applications. Here we investigate the dynamics of this phenomenon to separate out the competing influences and then introduce a modulation scheme to ultimately manipulate the water vapor-liquid equilibrium independently from the solvent evaporation. This approach to BF control provides insights into the mechanism, a rationale for microstructure design, and evidence for the benefits of dynamical control of self-organization systems. We finally present dramatically different porous architectures from this approach reminiscent of microscale Petri dishes, conical flasks, and test tubes. PMID:26828573

  8. Polyanhydride Nanoparticle Delivery Platform Dramatically Enhances Killing of Filarial Worms

    PubMed Central

    Binnebose, Andrea M.; Haughney, Shannon L.; Martin, Richard; Imerman, Paula M.; Narasimhan, Balaji; Bellaire, Bryan H.

    2015-01-01

    Filarial diseases represent a significant social and economic burden to over 120 million people worldwide and are caused by endoparasites that require the presence of symbiotic bacteria of the genus Wolbachia for fertility and viability of the host parasite. Targeting Wolbachia for elimination is a therapeutic approach that shows promise in the treatment of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis. Here we demonstrate the use of a biodegradable polyanhydride nanoparticle-based platform for the co-delivery of the antibiotic doxycycline with the antiparasitic drug, ivermectin, to reduce microfilarial burden and rapidly kill adult worms. When doxycycline and ivermectin were co-delivered within polyanhydride nanoparticles, effective killing of adult female Brugia malayi filarial worms was achieved with approximately 4,000-fold reduction in the amount of drug used. Additionally the time to death of the macrofilaria was also significantly reduced (five-fold) when the anti-filarial drug cocktail was delivered within polyanhydride nanoparticles. We hypothesize that the mechanism behind this dramatically enhanced killing of the macrofilaria is the ability of the polyanhydride nanoparticles to behave as a Trojan horse and penetrate the cuticle, bypassing excretory pumps of B. malayi, and effectively deliver drug directly to both the worm and Wolbachia at high enough microenvironmental concentrations to cause death. These provocative findings may have significant consequences for the reduction in the amount of drug and the length of treatment required for filarial infections in terms of patient compliance and reduced cost of treatment. PMID:26496201

  9. Mimivirus shows dramatic genome reduction after intraamoebal culture.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Mickaël; Azza, Saïd; Barrassi, Lina; Klose, Thomas; Campocasso, Angélique; Pagnier, Isabelle; Fournous, Ghislain; Borg, Audrey; Robert, Catherine; Zhang, Xinzheng; Desnues, Christelle; Henrissat, Bernard; Rossmann, Michael G; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2011-06-21

    Most phagocytic protist viruses have large particles and genomes as well as many laterally acquired genes that may be associated with a sympatric intracellular life (a community-associated lifestyle with viruses, bacteria, and eukaryotes) and the presence of virophages. By subculturing Mimivirus 150 times in a germ-free amoebal host, we observed the emergence of a bald form of the virus that lacked surface fibers and replicated in a morphologically different type of viral factory. When studying a 0.40-μm filtered cloned particle, we found that its genome size shifted from 1.2 (M1) to 0.993 Mb (M4), mainly due to large deletions occurring at both ends of the genome. Some of the lost genes are encoding enzymes required for posttranslational modification of the structural viral proteins, such as glycosyltransferases and ankyrin repeat proteins. Proteomic analysis allowed identification of three proteins, probably required for the assembly of virus fibers. The genes for two of these were found to be deleted from the M4 virus genome. The proteins associated with fibers are highly antigenic and can be recognized by mouse and human antimimivirus antibodies. In addition, the bald strain (M4) was not able to propagate the sputnik virophage. Overall, the Mimivirus transition from a sympatric to an allopatric lifestyle was associated with a stepwise genome reduction and the production of a predominantly bald virophage resistant strain. The new axenic ecosystem allowed the allopatric Mimivirus to lose unnecessary genes that might be involved in the control of competitors. PMID:21646533

  10. Mimivirus shows dramatic genome reduction after intraamoebal culture

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Mickaël; Azza, Saïd; Barrassi, Lina; Klose, Thomas; Campocasso, Angélique; Pagnier, Isabelle; Fournous, Ghislain; Borg, Audrey; Robert, Catherine; Zhang, Xinzheng; Desnues, Christelle; Henrissat, Bernard; Rossmann, Michael G.; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2011-01-01

    Most phagocytic protist viruses have large particles and genomes as well as many laterally acquired genes that may be associated with a sympatric intracellular life (a community-associated lifestyle with viruses, bacteria, and eukaryotes) and the presence of virophages. By subculturing Mimivirus 150 times in a germ-free amoebal host, we observed the emergence of a bald form of the virus that lacked surface fibers and replicated in a morphologically different type of viral factory. When studying a 0.40-μm filtered cloned particle, we found that its genome size shifted from 1.2 (M1) to 0.993 Mb (M4), mainly due to large deletions occurring at both ends of the genome. Some of the lost genes are encoding enzymes required for posttranslational modification of the structural viral proteins, such as glycosyltransferases and ankyrin repeat proteins. Proteomic analysis allowed identification of three proteins, probably required for the assembly of virus fibers. The genes for two of these were found to be deleted from the M4 virus genome. The proteins associated with fibers are highly antigenic and can be recognized by mouse and human antimimivirus antibodies. In addition, the bald strain (M4) was not able to propagate the sputnik virophage. Overall, the Mimivirus transition from a sympatric to an allopatric lifestyle was associated with a stepwise genome reduction and the production of a predominantly bald virophage resistant strain. The new axenic ecosystem allowed the allopatric Mimivirus to lose unnecessary genes that might be involved in the control of competitors. PMID:21646533

  11. Dramatically changing rates and reasons for hospitalization in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Lawrence; Marriott, James; Cossoy, Michael; Blanchard, James; Tennakoon, Aruni; Yu, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to describe hospitalizations in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population, and to evaluate temporal trends in hospitalizations in the MS population compared to the general population. Methods: Using population-based administrative data, we identified 5,797 persons with MS and a matched general population cohort of 28,769 persons. Using general linear models, we evaluated temporal trends in hospitalization rates and length of stay in the 2 populations over the period 1984–2011. Results: In 1984 the hospitalization rate was 35 per 100 person-years in the MS population and 10.5 in the matched population (relative risk [RR] 3.33; 95% confidence interval: 1.67–6.64). Over the study period hospitalizations declined 75% in the MS population but only 41% in the matched population. The proportion of hospitalizations due to MS declined substantially from 43.4% in 1984 to 7.8% in 2011. The 3 most common non–MS-related reasons for admission in the MS population were diseases of the digestive, genitourinary, and circulatory systems. Admissions for bacterial pneumonia, influenza, urinary tract infections, and pressure ulcers occurred more often in the MS population than in the general population, while admissions for circulatory system disease and neoplasms occurred less often. Older age, male sex, and lower socioeconomic status were associated with increased hospitalization rates for non–MS-related reasons. Conclusions: Although hospitalization rates have declined dramatically in the MS population over the last quarter century, they remain higher than in the general population. Admissions for MS-related reasons now constitute only a small proportion of the reasons for hospitalization. PMID:25085638

  12. Dorsal Raphe Neuroinflammation Promotes Dramatic Behavioral Stress Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Howerton, Alexis R.; Roland, Alison V.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity, risk-taking behavior, and elevated stress responsivity are prominent symptoms of mania, a behavioral state common to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Though inflammatory processes activated within the brain are involved in the pathophysiology of both disorders, the specific mechanisms by which neuroinflammation drives manic behavior are not well understood. Serotonin cell bodies originating within the dorsal raphe (DR) play a major role in the regulation of behavioral features characteristic of mania. Therefore, we hypothesized that the link between neuroinflammation and manic behavior may be mediated by actions on serotonergic neurocircuitry. To examine this, we induced local neuroinflammation in the DR by viral delivery of Cre recombinase into interleukin (IL)-1βXAT transgenic male and female mice, resulting in overexpressing of the proinflammatory cytokine, IL-1β. For assertion of brain-region specificity of these outcomes, the prefrontal cortex (PFC), as a downstream target of DR serotonergic projections, was also infused. Inflammation within the DR, but not the PFC, resulted in a profound display of manic-like behavior, characterized by increased stress-induced locomotion and responsivity, and reduced risk-aversion/fearfulness. Microarray analysis of the DR revealed a dramatic increase in immune-related genes, and dysregulation of genes important in GABAergic, glutamatergic, and serotonergic neurotransmission. Behavioral and physiological changes were driven by a loss of serotonergic neurons and reduced output as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, demonstrating inflammation-induced serotonergic hypofunction. Behavioral changes were rescued by acute selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment, supporting the hypothesis that serotonin dysregulation stemming from neuroinflammation in the DR underlies manic-like behaviors. PMID:24849347

  13. Impacts on coralligenous outcrop biodiversity of a dramatic coastal storm.

    PubMed

    Teixidó, Núria; Casas, Edgar; Cebrián, Emma; Linares, Cristina; Garrabou, Joaquim

    2013-01-01

    Extreme events are rare, stochastic perturbations that can cause abrupt and dramatic ecological change within a short period of time relative to the lifespan of organisms. Studies over time provide exceptional opportunities to detect the effects of extreme climatic events and to measure their impacts by quantifying rates of change at population and community levels. In this study, we show how an extreme storm event affected the dynamics of benthic coralligenous outcrops in the NW Mediterranean Sea using data acquired before (2006-2008) and after the impact (2009-2010) at four different sites. Storms of comparable severity have been documented to occur occasionally within periods of 50 years in the Mediterranean Sea. We assessed the effects derived from the storm comparing changes in benthic community composition at sites exposed to and sheltered from this extreme event. The sites analyzed showed different damage from severe to negligible. The most exposed and impacted site experienced a major shift immediately after the storm, represented by changes in the species richness and beta diversity of benthic species. This site also showed higher compositional variability immediately after the storm and over the following year. The loss of cover of benthic species resulted between 22% and 58%. The damage across these species (e.g. calcareous algae, sponges, anthozoans, bryozoans, tunicates) was uneven, and those with fragile forms were the most impacted, showing cover losses up to 50 to 100%. Interestingly, small patches survived after the storm and began to grow slightly during the following year. In contrast, sheltered sites showed no significant changes in all the studied parameters, indicating no variations due to the storm. This study provides new insights into the responses to large and rare extreme events of Mediterranean communities with low dynamics and long-lived species, which are among the most threatened by the effects of global change.

  14. Impacts on Coralligenous Outcrop Biodiversity of a Dramatic Coastal Storm

    PubMed Central

    Teixidó, Núria; Casas, Edgar; Cebrián, Emma; Linares, Cristina; Garrabou, Joaquim

    2013-01-01

    Extreme events are rare, stochastic perturbations that can cause abrupt and dramatic ecological change within a short period of time relative to the lifespan of organisms. Studies over time provide exceptional opportunities to detect the effects of extreme climatic events and to measure their impacts by quantifying rates of change at population and community levels. In this study, we show how an extreme storm event affected the dynamics of benthic coralligenous outcrops in the NW Mediterranean Sea using data acquired before (2006–2008) and after the impact (2009–2010) at four different sites. Storms of comparable severity have been documented to occur occasionally within periods of 50 years in the Mediterranean Sea. We assessed the effects derived from the storm comparing changes in benthic community composition at sites exposed to and sheltered from this extreme event. The sites analyzed showed different damage from severe to negligible. The most exposed and impacted site experienced a major shift immediately after the storm, represented by changes in the species richness and beta diversity of benthic species. This site also showed higher compositional variability immediately after the storm and over the following year. The loss of cover of benthic species resulted between 22% and 58%. The damage across these species (e.g. calcareous algae, sponges, anthozoans, bryozoans, tunicates) was uneven, and those with fragile forms were the most impacted, showing cover losses up to 50 to 100%. Interestingly, small patches survived after the storm and began to grow slightly during the following year. In contrast, sheltered sites showed no significant changes in all the studied parameters, indicating no variations due to the storm. This study provides new insights into the responses to large and rare extreme events of Mediterranean communities with low dynamics and long-lived species, which are among the most threatened by the effects of global change. PMID:23326496

  15. Dramatic response of follicular thyroid carcinoma with superior vena cava syndrome and tracheal obstruction to external-beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wilford, M.R.; Chertow, B.S.; Lepanto, P.B.; Leidy, J.W. Jr. )

    1991-06-01

    We report a patient with follicular thyroid carcinoma progressing to superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome and tracheal obstruction despite multiple doses of radioactive iodine therapy but subsequently responding dramatically to external-beam radiotherapy (RT). Although RT is not considered to be the treatment of choice for follicular carcinoma, RT in our patient produced unequivocal improvement of SVC syndrome and tracheal obstruction.

  16. Discriminating antigen and non-antigen using proteome dissimilarity: bacterial antigens

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Kamna; Flower, Darren R

    2010-01-01

    It has been postulated that immunogenicity results from the overall dissimilarity of pathogenic proteins versus the host proteome. We have sought to use this concept to discriminate between antigens and non-antigens of bacterial origin. Sets of 100 known antigenic and nonantigenic peptide sequences from bacteria were compared to human and mouse proteomes. Both antigenic and non-antigenic sequences lacked human or mouse homologues. Observed distributions were compared using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. The statistical null hypothesis was accepted, indicating that antigen and non-antigens did not differ significantly. Likewise, we were unable to determine a threshold able to separate meaningfully antigen from non-antigen. Thus, antigens cannot be predicted from pathogen genomes based solely on their dissimilarity to the human genome. PMID:20975907

  17. Presentation of hepatocellular antigens

    PubMed Central

    Grakoui, Arash; Crispe, Ian Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The liver is an organ in which antigen-specific T-cell responses manifest a bias toward immune tolerance. This is clearly seen in the rejection of allogeneic liver transplants, and multiple other phenomena suggest that this effect is more general. These include tolerance toward antigens introduced via the portal vein, immune failure to several hepatotropic viruses, the lack of natural liver-stage immunity to malaria parasites, and the frequent metastasis of cancers to the liver. Here we review the mechanisms by which T cells engage with hepatocellular antigens, the context in which such encounters occur, and the mechanisms that act to suppress a full T-cell response. While many mechanisms play a role, we will argue that two important processes are the constraints on the cross-presentation of hepatocellular antigens, and the induction of negative feedback inhibition driven by interferons. The constant exposure of the liver to microbial products from the intestine may drive innate immunity, rendering the local environment unfavorable for specific T-cell responses through this mechanism. Nevertheless, tolerance toward hepatocellular antigens is not monolithic and under specific circumstances allows both effective immunity and immunopathology. PMID:26924525

  18. Liven up Your Student Dramatics with Commedia dell' Arte.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Jonathan

    1980-01-01

    Suggests using the ancient Commedia dell' Arte technique of establishing characters and a plot and then allowing the actors to create their own play. Indicates that this improves student performances even in more traditional plays. (TJ)

  19. Pathways of Antigen Processing

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Janice S.; Wearsch, Pamela A.; Cresswell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    T cell recognition of antigen presenting cells depends on their expression of a spectrum of peptides bound to Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC-I) and class II (MHC-II) molecules. Conversion of antigens from pathogens or transformed cells into MHC-I and MHC-II-bound peptides is critical for mounting protective T cell responses, and similar processing of self proteins is necessary to establish and maintain tolerance. Cells use a variety of mechanisms to acquire protein antigens, from translation in the cytosol to variations on the theme of endocytosis, and to degrade them once acquired. In this review we highlight the aspects of MHC-I and MHC-II biosynthesis and assembly that have evolved to intersect these pathways and sample the peptides that are produced. PMID:23298205

  20. Overview of Plant-Made Vaccine Antigens against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Marina; Corigliano, Mariana G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is an overview of vaccine antigens against malaria produced in plants. Plant-based expression systems represent an interesting production platform due to their reduced manufacturing costs and high scalability. At present, different Plasmodium antigens and expression strategies have been optimized in plants. Furthermore, malaria antigens are one of the few examples of eukaryotic proteins with vaccine value expressed in plants, making plant-derived malaria antigens an interesting model to analyze. Up to now, malaria antigen expression in plants has allowed the complete synthesis of these vaccine antigens, which have been able to induce an active immune response in mice. Therefore, plant production platforms offer wonderful prospects for improving the access to malaria vaccines. PMID:22911156

  1. Antigenic analysis of classical swine fever virus E2 glycoprotein using pig antibodies identifies residues contributing to antigenic variation of the vaccine C-strain and group 2 strains circulating in China

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glycoprotein E2, the immunodominant protein of classical swine fever virus (CSFV), can induce neutralizing antibodies and confer protective immunity in pigs. Our previous phylogenetic analysis showed that subgroup 2.1 viruses branched away from subgroup 1.1, the vaccine C-strain lineage, and became dominant in China. The E2 glycoproteins of CSFV C-strain and recent subgroup 2.1 field isolates are genetically different. However, it has not been clearly demonstrated how this diversity affects antigenicity of the protein. Results Antigenic variation of glycoprotein E2 was observed not only between CSFV vaccine C-strain and subgroup 2.1 strains, but also among strains of the same subgroup 2.1 as determined by ELISA-based binding assay using pig antisera to the C-strain and a representative subgroup 2.1 strain QZ-07 currently circulating in China. Antigenic incompatibility of E2 proteins markedly reduced neutralization efficiency against heterologous strains. Single amino acid substitutions of D705N, L709P, G713E, N723S, and S779A on C-strain recombinant E2 (rE2) proteins significantly increased heterologous binding to anti-QZ-07 serum, suggesting that these residues may be responsible for the antigenic variation between the C-strain and subgroup 2.1 strains. Notably, a G713E substitution caused the most dramatic enhancement of binding of the variant C-strain rE2 protein to anti-QZ-07 serum. Multiple sequence alignment revealed that the glutamic acid residue at this position is conserved within group 2 strains, while the glycine residue is invariant among the vaccine strains, highlighting the role of the residue at this position as a major determinant of antigenic variation of E2. A variant Simpson's index analysis showed that both codons and amino acids of the residues contributing to antigenic variation have undergone similar diversification. Conclusions These results demonstrate that CSFV vaccine C-strain and group 2 strains circulating in China differ in

  2. Novel use of a radiolabelled antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen for the detection of occult abscesses in mammals

    DOEpatents

    Thakur, Madhukar L.

    1990-01-01

    The invention discloses improved reagents containing antibodies against stage specific embryonic antigen-1 antibodies and improved methods for detection of occult abscess and inflammation using the improved reagents.

  3. Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb): a compendium of antigen-antibody interactions.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila; Raskar-Renuse, Snehal; Natekar-Kalantre, Girija; Saxena, Smita A

    2014-01-01

    Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb) is an immunoinformatics resource developed at the Bioinformatics Centre, University of Pune, and is available online at http://bioinfo.net.in/AgAbDb.htm. Antigen-antibody interactions are a special class of protein-protein interactions that are characterized by high affinity and strict specificity of antibodies towards their antigens. Several co-crystal structures of antigen-antibody complexes have been solved and are available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). AgAbDb is a derived knowledgebase developed with an objective to compile, curate, and analyze determinants of interactions between the respective antigen-antibody molecules. AgAbDb lists not only the residues of binding sites of antigens and antibodies, but also interacting residue pairs. It also helps in the identification of interacting residues and buried residues that constitute antibody-binding sites of protein and peptide antigens. The Antigen-Antibody Interaction Finder (AAIF), a program developed in-house, is used to compile the molecular interactions, viz. van der Waals interactions, salt bridges, and hydrogen bonds. A module for curating water-mediated interactions has also been developed. In addition, various residue-level features, viz. accessible surface area, data on epitope segment, and secondary structural state of binding site residues, are also compiled. Apart from the PDB numbering, Wu-Kabat numbering and explicit definitions of complementarity-determining regions are provided for residues of antibodies. The molecular interactions can be visualized using the program Jmol. AgAbDb can be used as a benchmark dataset to validate algorithms for prediction of B-cell epitopes. It can as well be used to improve accuracy of existing algorithms and to design new algorithms. AgAbDb can also be used to design mimotopes representing antigens as well as aid in designing processes leading to humanization of antibodies. PMID:25048123

  4. A novel system of artificial antigen-presenting cells efficiently stimulates Flu peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hui; Peng, Ji-Run; Chen, Peng-Cheng; Gong, Lei; Qiao, Shi-Shi; Wang, Wen-Zhen; Cui, Zhu-Qingqing; Yu, Xin; Wei, Yu-Hua; Leng, Xi-Sheng

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Adoptive immunotherapy depends on relevant numbers of cytolytic T lymphocytes. {yields} An ideal artificial APCs system was successfully prepared in vivo. {yields} Controlled release of IL-2 leads to much more T-cell expansion. {yields} This system is better than general cellular APCs on T-cell expansion. -- Abstract: Therapeutic numbers of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are key effectors in successful adoptive immunotherapy. However, efficient and reproducible methods to meet the qualification remain poor. To address this issue, we designed the artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) system based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). A modified emulsion method was used for the preparation of PLGA particles encapsulating interleukin-2 (IL-2). Biotinylated molecular ligands for recognition and co-stimulation of T cells were attached to the particle surface through the binding of avidin-biotin. These formed the aAPC system. The function of aAPCs in the proliferation of specific CTLs against human Flu antigen was detected by enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) and MTT staining methods. Finally, we successfully prepared this suitable aAPC system. The results show that IL-2 is released from aAPCs in a sustained manner over 30 days. This dramatically improves the stimulatory capacity of this system as compared to the effect of exogenous addition of cytokine. In addition, our aAPCs promote the proliferation of Flu antigen-specific CTLs more effectively than the autologous cellular APCs. Here, this aAPC platform is proved to be suitable for expansion of human antigen-specific T cells.

  5. The use of high-throughput DNA sequencing in the investigation of antigenic variation: application to Neisseria species.

    PubMed

    Davies, John K; Harrison, Paul F; Lin, Ya-Hsun; Bartley, Stephanie; Khoo, Chen Ai; Seemann, Torsten; Ryan, Catherine S; Kahler, Charlene M; Hill, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Antigenic variation occurs in a broad range of species. This process resembles gene conversion in that variant DNA is unidirectionally transferred from partial gene copies (or silent loci) into an expression locus. Previous studies of antigenic variation have involved the amplification and sequencing of individual genes from hundreds of colonies. Using the pilE gene from Neisseria gonorrhoeae we have demonstrated that it is possible to use PCR amplification, followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing and a novel assembly process, to detect individual antigenic variation events. The ability to detect these events was much greater than has previously been possible. In N. gonorrhoeae most silent loci contain multiple partial gene copies. Here we show that there is a bias towards using the copy at the 3' end of the silent loci (copy 1) as the donor sequence. The pilE gene of N. gonorrhoeae and some strains of Neisseria meningitidis encode class I pilin, but strains of N. meningitidis from clonal complexes 8 and 11 encode a class II pilin. We have confirmed that the class II pili of meningococcal strain FAM18 (clonal complex 11) are non-variable, and this is also true for the class II pili of strain NMB from clonal complex 8. In addition when a gene encoding class I pilin was moved into the meningococcal strain NMB background there was no evidence of antigenic variation. Finally we investigated several members of the opa gene family of N. gonorrhoeae, where it has been suggested that limited variation occurs. Variation was detected in the opaK gene that is located close to pilE, but not at the opaJ gene located elsewhere on the genome. The approach described here promises to dramatically improve studies of the extent and nature of antigenic variation systems in a variety of species.

  6. Prostate Health Index (Phi) and Prostate Cancer Antigen 3 (PCA3) significantly improve prostate cancer detection at initial biopsy in a total PSA range of 2-10 ng/ml.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Matteo; Bruzzese, Dario; Perdonà, Sisto; Marino, Ada; Mazzarella, Claudia; Perruolo, Giuseppe; D'Esposito, Vittoria; Cosimato, Vincenzo; Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Musi, Gennaro; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Chun, Felix K; Terracciano, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Many efforts to reduce prostate specific antigen (PSA) overdiagnosis and overtreatment have been made. To this aim, Prostate Health Index (Phi) and Prostate Cancer Antigen 3 (PCA3) have been proposed as new more specific biomarkers. We evaluated the ability of phi and PCA3 to identify prostate cancer (PCa) at initial prostate biopsy in men with total PSA range of 2-10 ng/ml. The performance of phi and PCA3 were evaluated in 300 patients undergoing first prostate biopsy. ROC curve analyses tested the accuracy (AUC) of phi and PCA3 in predicting PCa. Decision curve analyses (DCA) were used to compare the clinical benefit of the two biomarkers. We found that the AUC value of phi (0.77) was comparable to those of %p2PSA (0.76) and PCA3 (0.73) with no significant differences in pairwise comparison (%p2PSA vs phi p = 0.673, %p2PSA vs. PCA3 p = 0.417 and phi vs. PCA3 p = 0.247). These three biomarkers significantly outperformed fPSA (AUC = 0.60), % fPSA (AUC = 0.62) and p2PSA (AUC = 0.63). At DCA, phi and PCA3 exhibited a very close net benefit profile until the threshold probability of 25%, then phi index showed higher net benefit than PCA3. Multivariable analysis showed that the addition of phi and PCA3 to the base multivariable model (age, PSA, %fPSA, DRE, prostate volume) increased predictive accuracy, whereas no model improved single biomarker performance. Finally we showed that subjects with active surveillance (AS) compatible cancer had significantly lower phi and PCA3 values (p<0.001 and p = 0.01, respectively). In conclusion, both phi and PCA3 comparably increase the accuracy in predicting the presence of PCa in total PSA range 2-10 ng/ml at initial biopsy, outperforming currently used %fPSA.

  7. The 5' noncoding sequences from a less virulent Theiler's virus dramatically attenuate GDVII neurovirulence.

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, H L; Calenoff, M; Bandyopadhyay, P; Miller, S D; Dal Canto, M C; Gerety, S; Jensen, K

    1991-01-01

    RNA transcripts derived from recombinant chimeras between the highly virulent GDVII virus and the less virulent BeAn virus were constructed to study the molecular pathogenesis of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection. The presence of the BeAn 5' noncoding sequences in chimera 2 (BeAn 5' noncoding sequences joined with the GDVII nucleotides encoding the polyprotein and present in the 3' end) resulted in dramatic attenuation of GDVII neurovirulence and development of poliomyelitis in mice. This reduced neurovirulence was associated with slower virus growth and lower peak titers in the brain and spinal cord than with parental GDVII virus replication. On the other hand, the sites of replication following chimera 2 infection were the same as those seen in GDVII-infected mice; the distribution of virus antigen and histopathological changes indicated that chimera 2 replicates in neurons in the brain, e.g., in the neocortex, hippocampus, caudate putamen, and brain stem, as well as in anterior-horn cells in the spinal cord. Chimera 2 was efficiently cleared from the mouse central nervous system by day 30 postinfection, in marked contrast to the persistence of the BeAn parent in the central nervous system. This suggests that elements in the BeAn sequences that encode the polyprotein or are present in the 3' noncoding region are necessary for viral persistence. It is of interest that chimera 2-infected mice developed localized inflammatory, demyelinating lesions which were detected at day 28 postinfection but these lesions did not become larger with time. Thus, virus persistence appears to be required for maintenance and progression of immune-mediated demyelination. If the demyelinating lesions become sufficiently large, clinical signs and disease may develop. Images PMID:2072455

  8. The 5' noncoding sequences from a less virulent Theiler's virus dramatically attenuate GDVII neurovirulence.

    PubMed

    Lipton, H L; Calenoff, M; Bandyopadhyay, P; Miller, S D; Dal Canto, M C; Gerety, S; Jensen, K

    1991-08-01

    RNA transcripts derived from recombinant chimeras between the highly virulent GDVII virus and the less virulent BeAn virus were constructed to study the molecular pathogenesis of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection. The presence of the BeAn 5' noncoding sequences in chimera 2 (BeAn 5' noncoding sequences joined with the GDVII nucleotides encoding the polyprotein and present in the 3' end) resulted in dramatic attenuation of GDVII neurovirulence and development of poliomyelitis in mice. This reduced neurovirulence was associated with slower virus growth and lower peak titers in the brain and spinal cord than with parental GDVII virus replication. On the other hand, the sites of replication following chimera 2 infection were the same as those seen in GDVII-infected mice; the distribution of virus antigen and histopathological changes indicated that chimera 2 replicates in neurons in the brain, e.g., in the neocortex, hippocampus, caudate putamen, and brain stem, as well as in anterior-horn cells in the spinal cord. Chimera 2 was efficiently cleared from the mouse central nervous system by day 30 postinfection, in marked contrast to the persistence of the BeAn parent in the central nervous system. This suggests that elements in the BeAn sequences that encode the polyprotein or are present in the 3' noncoding region are necessary for viral persistence. It is of interest that chimera 2-infected mice developed localized inflammatory, demyelinating lesions which were detected at day 28 postinfection but these lesions did not become larger with time. Thus, virus persistence appears to be required for maintenance and progression of immune-mediated demyelination. If the demyelinating lesions become sufficiently large, clinical signs and disease may develop.

  9. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissues or other specimens, using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular m...

  10. Integrated System Dramatically Improves Hydrogen Molar Yield from Biomass via Fermentation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in fermentative and electrohydrogenic production of hydrogen from corn stover. Work was performed by NREL's Biosciences Center and Pennsylvania State University.

  11. Accuracy of Numerical Simulations of Tip Clearance Flow in Transonic Compressor Rotors Improved Dramatically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.; Strazisar, Anthony J.; Wood, Jerry R.; Hathaway, Michael D.; Okiishi, Theodore H.

    2000-01-01

    The tip clearance flows of transonic compressor rotors have a significant impact on rotor and stage performance. Although numerical simulations of these flows are quite sophisticated, they are seldom verified through rigorous comparisons of numerical and measured data because, in high-speed machines, measurements acquired in sufficient detail to be useful are rare. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field compared measured tip clearance flow details (e.g., trajectory and radial extent) of the NASA Rotor 35 with results obtained from a numerical simulation. Previous investigations had focused on capturing the detailed development of the jetlike flow leaking through the clearance gap between the rotating blade tip and the stationary compressor shroud. However, we discovered that the simulation accuracy depends primarily on capturing the detailed development of a wall-bounded shear layer formed by the relative motion between the leakage jet and the shroud.

  12. Dramatic improvements in viral inactivation with brominated psoralens, naphthalenes and anthracenes.

    PubMed

    Rai, S; Kasturi, C; Grayzar, J; Platz, M S; Goodrich, R P; Yerram, N R; Wong, V; Tay-Goodrich, B H

    1993-07-01

    Amino or polyamino derivatives of naphthalene (N-H), anthracene (A-H) and 8-alkoxypsoralen (PSR-H) were prepared along with their monobrominated analogs (N-Br, A-Br and PSR-Br). The ammonium salts of these compounds are all water soluble and bind strongly to calf thymus DNA and to lambda phage, a double-helical DNA, protein-coated virus. Binding of the sensitizer to DNA occurs, presumably by a mixture of hydrophobic, intercalative and electrostatic interactions. Relative binding constants to calf thymus DNA and to lambda phage were measured by the ethidium bromide fluorescence quenching assay. In general the brominated analogs bind more tightly to calf thymus DNA and to the virus than to the nonhalogenated analogs. It is demonstrated that the brominated aromatics are much more effective at inactivating lambda phage upon photoactivation (lambda approximately 310 or 350 nm) than are their nonbrominated analogs. At identical sensitizer concentrations (by weight) and light flux N-Br, A-Br, and PSR-Br produce 5-6 more logs of viral inactivation than their nonbrominated counterparts (N-H, A-H and PSR-H, respectively). The bromine effect may originate from light-induced electron transfer and subsequent cleavage of the C-Br bond of the sensitizer radical anion bonds to form aryl radicals. Singlet oxygen cannot be responsible for the viral inactivation because the brominated sensitizers are equally effective in the presence and absence of oxygen. Dithiothreitol does not protect lambda phage from light-induced inactivation by the brominated sensitizer thereby demonstrating that the photogenerated reactive intermediates responsible for the effect are complexed to the virus and are not generated free in solution. PMID:8378434

  13. President Obama and Education: The Possibility for Dramatic Improvements in Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling-Hammond, Linda

    2009-01-01

    From the unique perspective gained heading Obama's education policy transition team, Darling-Hammond describes President Obama's commitment to making the education of every child a collective responsibility and reviews the major tenets of the new administration's plans for education. She reflects on the importance of suggested policy changes,…

  14. Increasing magnetite contents of polymeric magnetic particles dramatically improves labeling of neural stem cell transplant populations.

    PubMed

    Adams, Christopher F; Rai, Ahmad; Sneddon, Gregor; Yiu, Humphrey H P; Polyak, Boris; Chari, Divya M

    2015-01-01

    Safe and efficient delivery of therapeutic cells to sites of injury/disease in the central nervous system is a key goal for the translation of clinical cell transplantation therapies. Recently, 'magnetic cell localization strategies' have emerged as a promising and safe approach for targeted delivery of magnetic particle (MP) labeled stem cells to pathology sites. For neuroregenerative applications, this approach is limited by the lack of available neurocompatible MPs, and low cell labeling achieved in neural stem/precursor populations. We demonstrate that high magnetite content, self-sedimenting polymeric MPs [unfunctionalized poly(lactic acid) coated, without a transfecting component] achieve efficient labeling (≥90%) of primary neural stem cells (NSCs)-a 'hard-to-label' transplant population of major clinical relevance. Our protocols showed high safety with respect to key stem cell regenerative parameters. Critically, labeled cells were effectively localized in an in vitro flow system by magnetic force highlighting the translational potential of the methods used.

  15. Energetic-Energetic Cocrystals of Diacetone Diperoxide (DADP): Dramatic and Divergent Sensitivity Modifications via Cocrystallization.

    PubMed

    Landenberger, Kira B; Bolton, Onas; Matzger, Adam J

    2015-04-22

    Here we report a series of energetic-energetic cocrystals that incorporate the primary explosive diacetone diperoxide (DADP) with a series of trihalotrinitrobenzene explosives: 1:1 DADP/1,3,5-trichloro-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TCTNB), 1:1 DADP/1,3,5-tribromo-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TBTNB), and 1:1 DADP/1,3,5-triiodo-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TITNB). Acetone peroxides are attractive for their inexpensive and facile synthesis, but undesirable properties such as poor stability, intractably high sensitivity and low density, an indicator for low explosive power, have limited their application. Here through cocrystallization the density, oxygen balance, and stability of DADP are dramatically improved. Regarding sensitivity, in the case of the DADP/TCTNB cocrystal, the high impact sensitivity of DADP is retained by the cocrystal, making it a denser and less volatile form of DADP that remains viable as a primary explosive. Conversely, the DADP/TITNB cocrystal features impact sensitivity that is greatly reduced relative to both pure DADP and pure TITNB, demonstrating for the first time an energetic cocrystal that is less sensitive to impact than either of its pure components. This dramatic difference in cocrystal sensitivities may stem from the significantly different halogen-peroxide interactions seen in each cocrystal structure. These results highlight how sensitivity is defined by complex relationships between inherent bond strengths and solid-state properties, and cocrystal series such as that presented here provide a powerful experimental platform to probe this relationship.

  16. V-antigen homologs in pathogenic gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji; Katoh, Hideya; Yasumoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria cause many types of infections in animals from fish and shrimps to humans. Bacteria use Type III secretion systems (TTSSs) to translocate their toxins directly into eukaryotic cells. The V-antigen is a multifunctional protein required for the TTSS in Yersinia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. V-antigen vaccines and anti-V-antigen antisera confer protection against Yersinia or P. aeruginosa infections in animal models. The V-antigen forms a pentameric cap structure at the tip of the Type III secretory needle; this structure, which has evolved from the bacterial flagellar cap structure, is indispensable for toxin translocation. Various pathogenic gram-negative bacteria such as Photorhabdus luminescens, Vibrio spp., and Aeromonas spp. encode homologs of the V-antigen. Because the V-antigens of pathogenic gram-negative bacteria play a key role in toxin translocation, they are potential therapeutic targets for combatting bacterial virulence. In the USA and Europe, these vaccines and specific antibodies against V-antigens are in clinical trials investigating the treatment of Yersinia or P. aeruginosa infections. Pathogenic gram-negative bacteria are of great interest because of their ability to infect fish and shrimp farms, their potential for exploitation in biological terrorism attacks, and their ability to cause opportunistic infections in humans. Thus, elucidation of the roles of the V-antigen in the TTSS and mechanisms by which these functions can be blocked is critical to facilitating the development of improved anti-V-antigen strategies. PMID:24641673

  17. World-Wide Effort Produces Dramatic "Movie" of Cosmic Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-05-01

    Astronomers using a world-wide collection of radio telescopes, including the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), have made a dramatic "movie" of a voracious, superdense neutron star repeatedly spitting out subatomic particles at nearly the speed of light into two narrow jets as it pulls material from a companion star. The movie shows these jets ejecting clouds of hot plasma that are then "zapped" by pulses of energy in the jets as they move away from the neutron star. Frame from Radio-Telescope 'Movie' of Scorpius X-1 "We have directly measured the speed of energy flow in a cosmic jet for the first time," said Ed Fomalont, an astronomer at the NRAO in Charlottesville, Virginia. Fomalont worked with Barry Geldzahler and Charles Bradshaw of George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. The astronomers used the VLBA, the NSF's Very Large Array (VLA) and the Green Bank 140-foot telescope, along with radio telescopes from the European VLBI Network, Australia, Japan and South Africa to record the double-star system's eruptions continuously for 56 hours. "This study is going to be extremely valuable in helping us understand a phenomenon that we see throughout the universe," Fomalont said. Cosmic jets of superfast particles are ejected from the cores of numerous galaxies. On a smaller scale, similar jets are ejected from binary-star systems closer to home, in our own Milky Way Galaxy. While the jets from galaxy cores are thought to be powered by supermassive black holes millions of times more massive than the Sun, the closer "microquasars" are powered by much smaller black holes or by neutron stars only a few times more massive than the sun. "Studying one of the closer, smaller examples will help us understand how they all work, including the bigger ones," Geldzahler said. "The jets coming from distant galaxies are harder to study because of their much greater distance and the slowness of their

  18. Restricted Field IMRT Dramatically Enhances IMRT Planning for Mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Aaron M. Schofield, Deborah; Hacker, Fred; Court, Laurence E.; Czerminska, Maria M.S.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To improve the target coverage and normal tissue sparing of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for mesothelioma after extrapleural pneumonectomy. Methods and Materials: Thirteen plans from patients previously treated with IMRT for mesothelioma were replanned using a restricted field technique. This technique was novel in two ways. It limited the entrance beams to 200{sup o} around the target and three to four beams per case had their field apertures restricted down to the level of the heart or liver to further limit the contralateral lung dose. New constraints were added that included a mean lung dose of <9.5 Gy and volume receiving {>=}5 Gy of <55%. Results: In all cases, the planning target volume coverage was excellent, with an average of 97% coverage of the planning target volume by the target dose. No change was seen in the target coverage with the new technique. The heart, kidneys, and esophagus were all kept under tolerance in all cases. The average mean lung dose, volume receiving {>=}20 Gy, and volume receiving {>=}5 Gy with the new technique was 6.6 Gy, 3.0%, and 50.8%, respectively, compared with 13.8 Gy, 15%, and 90% with the previous technique (p < 0.0001 for all three comparisons). The maximal value for any case in the cohort was 8.0 Gy, 7.3%, and 57.5% for the mean lung dose, volume receiving {>=}20 Gy, and volume receiving {>=}5 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: Restricted field IMRT provides an improved method to deliver IMRT to a complex target after extrapleural pneumonectomy. An upcoming Phase I trial will provide validation of these results.

  19. Cancer vaccine--Antigenics.

    PubMed

    2002-01-01

    Antigenics is developing a therapeutic cancer vaccine based on heat-shock proteins (HSPs). The vaccine [HSPPC-96, Oncophage] is in a pivotal phase III clinical trial for renal cancer at 80 clinical sites worldwide. The trial is enrolling at least 500 patients who are randomised to receive surgical removal of the primary tumour followed by out-patient treatment with Oncophage((R)) or surgery only. This study was initiated on the basis of results from a pilot phase I/II study and preliminary results from a phase II study in patients with renal cell cancer. In October 2001, Oncophage was designated as a fast-track product by the Food and Drug Administration in the US for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma. Oncophage is in phase I/II trials in Italy for colorectal cancer (30 patients) and melanoma. The trials in Italy are being conducted at the Istituto dei Tumouri, Milan (in association with Sigma-Tau). Preliminary data from the phase II trial for melanoma was presented at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference in Florida, USA, in October 2001. Oncophage is also in a phase I/II (42 patients) and a phase II trial (84 patients) in the US for renal cell cancer, a phase II trial in the US for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (35 patients), a phase II trial in the US for sarcoma (20-35 patients), a phase I/II trial in the US for melanoma (36 patients), and phase I/II trials in Germany for gastric (30 patients) and pancreatic cancers. A pilot phase I trial in patients with pancreatic cancer began in the US in 1997 with 5 patients enrolled. In November 2000, Antigenics announced that this trial had been expanded to a phase I/II study which would now include survival as an endpoint and would enroll 5 additional patients. The US trials are being performed at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. The trials in Germany are being carried out at Johannes Gutenberg-University Hospital, Mainz. Oncophage is an autologous vaccine consisting of

  20. Intractable chronic motor tics dramatically respond to Clerodendrum inerme (L) Gaertn.

    PubMed

    Fan, Pi-Chuan; Huang, Wei-Jan; Chiou, Lih-Chu

    2009-07-01

    Tics are characterized by involuntary, sudden, rapid, repetitive, nonrhythmic, stereotyped movements or phonic productions. Those who suffer from either motor or phonic tics, but not both, for more than 1 year are diagnosed with chronic tic disorder. Several pharmacological interventions have been proposed for the treatment of tic disorder. Dopamine D2 receptor blockers and dopamine depletors are thought to be the most effective ones clinically. However, such treatments are suboptimal in terms of effectiveness and side effects, such as body weight gain and extrapyramidal symptoms. We report on a 13-year-old girl, with chronic motor tic disorder refractory to multiple anti-tic therapies, who showed dramatic improvement and remission after taking the crude leaf extract of Clerodendrum inerme (L) Gaertn. No side effects were observed during a follow-up of more than 2 years. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the anti-tic effect of Clerodendrum inerme.

  1. Dramatic niche shifts and morphological change in two insular bird species

    PubMed Central

    Alström, Per; Jønsson, Knud A.; Fjeldså, Jon; Ödeen, Anders; Ericson, Per G. P.; Irestedt, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Colonizations of islands are often associated with rapid morphological divergence. We present two previously unrecognized cases of dramatic morphological change and niche shifts in connection with colonization of tropical forest-covered islands. These evolutionary changes have concealed the fact that the passerine birds madanga, Madanga ruficollis, from Buru, Indonesia, and São Tomé shorttail, Amaurocichla bocagii, from São Tomé, Gulf of Guinea, are forest-adapted members of the family Motacillidae (pipits and wagtails). We show that Madanga has diverged mainly in plumage, which may be the result of selection for improved camouflage in its new arboreal niche, while selection pressures for other morphological changes have probably been weak owing to preadaptations for the novel niche. By contrast, we suggest that Amaurocichla's niche change has led to divergence in both structure and plumage. PMID:26064613

  2. Dramatic niche shifts and morphological change in two insular bird species.

    PubMed

    Alström, Per; Jønsson, Knud A; Fjeldså, Jon; Ödeen, Anders; Ericson, Per G P; Irestedt, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Colonizations of islands are often associated with rapid morphological divergence. We present two previously unrecognized cases of dramatic morphological change and niche shifts in connection with colonization of tropical forest-covered islands. These evolutionary changes have concealed the fact that the passerine birds madanga, Madanga ruficollis, from Buru, Indonesia, and São Tomé shorttail, Amaurocichla bocagii, from São Tomé, Gulf of Guinea, are forest-adapted members of the family Motacillidae (pipits and wagtails). We show that Madanga has diverged mainly in plumage, which may be the result of selection for improved camouflage in its new arboreal niche, while selection pressures for other morphological changes have probably been weak owing to preadaptations for the novel niche. By contrast, we suggest that Amaurocichla's niche change has led to divergence in both structure and plumage. PMID:26064613

  3. Antigens and allergic asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C.E.; Swanson, M.C.

    1987-06-01

    There are few reliable epidemiologic data on the overall frequency and importance of allergy. We describe a practical method for quantifying the concentration of both amorphous and morphologically defined antigens in the air. A high volume air sampler is used to collect airborne particles and has a facility to separate samples into different particle sizes. Samples are tested for allergenic activity by radioallergosorbent test inhibition assay. Preliminary findings from studies of community wide, amorphous and common household allergens are reported.

  4. Cholera Toxin B Subunit as a Carrier Molecule Promotes Antigen Presentation and Increases CD40 and CD86 Expression on Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    George-Chandy, Annie; Eriksson, Kristina; Lebens, Michael; Nordström, Inger; Schön, Emma; Holmgren, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) is an efficient mucosal carrier molecule for the generation of mucosal antibody responses and/or induction of systemic T-cell tolerance to linked antigens. CTB binds with high affinity to GM1 ganglioside cell surface receptors. In this study, we evaluated how conjugation of a peptide or protein antigen to CTB by chemical coupling or genetic fusion influences the T-cell-activating capacity of different antigen-presenting cell (APC) subsets. Using an in vitro system in which antigen-pulsed APCs were incubated with antigen-specific, T-cell receptor-transgenic T cells, we found that the dose of antigen required for T-cell activation could be decreased >10,000-fold using CTB-conjugated compared to free antigen. In contrast, no beneficial effects were observed when CTB was simply admixed with antigen. CTB conjugation enhanced the antigen-presenting capacity not only of dendritic cells and B cells but also of macrophages, which expressed low levels of cell surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and were normally poor activators of naive T cells. Enhanced antigen-presenting activity by CTB-linked antigen resulted in both increased T-cell proliferation and increased interleukin-12 and gamma interferon secretion and was associated with up-regulation of CD40 and CD86 on the APC surface. These results imply that conjugation to CTB dramatically lowers the threshold concentration of antigen required for immune cell activation and also permits low-MHC II-expressing APCs to prime for a specific immune response. PMID:11500448

  5. Dramatic increase in fatigue life in hierarchical graphene composites.

    PubMed

    Yavari, F; Rafiee, M A; Rafiee, J; Yu, Z-Z; Koratkar, N

    2010-10-01

    We report the synthesis and fatigue characterization of fiberglass/epoxy composites with various weight fractions of graphene platelets infiltrated into the epoxy resin as well as directly spray-coated on to the glass microfibers. Remarkably only ∼0.2% (with respect to the epoxy resin weight and ∼0.02% with respect to the entire laminate weight) of graphene additives enhanced the fatigue life of the composite in the flexural bending mode by up to 1200-fold. By contrast, under uniaxial tensile fatigue conditions, the graphene fillers resulted in ∼3-5-fold increase in fatigue life. The fatigue life increase (in the flexural bending mode) with graphene additives was ∼1-2 orders of magnitude superior to those obtained using carbon nanotubes. In situ ultrasound analysis of the nanocomposite during the cyclic fatigue test suggests that the graphene network toughens the fiberglass/epoxy-matrix interface and prevents the delamination/buckling of the glass microfibers under compressive stress. Such fatigue-resistant hierarchical materials show potential to improve the safety, reliability, and cost effectiveness of fiber-reinforced composites that are increasingly the material of choice in the aerospace, automotive, marine, sports, biomedical, and wind energy industries.

  6. PACS implementation dramatically impacts people and radiology work processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouvry, Ann

    1997-05-01

    The technology is not the bottleneck anymore in PACS implementation, it has become clear that the key to the success of PACS is understanding the current process, the end-user requirements, and how these processes will change with the introduction of PACS. We will discuss how implementation of PACS changed the working procedures in the Radiology department of Visby Hospital. Visby Hospital in Gotland, Sweden has approximately 160 beds. The Radiology department performs approximately 33,000 examinations per year and is capable of offering a broad range of diagnostic imaging services including CT and MRI. When a new facility was built in 1994, the decision was made to go for filmless operation and a modern information infrastructure. The new facility went operational by the end of 1994, in August 1995 almost filmless operation was reached. Continuing effort and attention is being paid to further simplify the workflow and working procedures in the Radiology department, and to improve the services offered to referring physicians. Although the project aimed at filmless operation, the main goal was to organize for efficient operation and excellent service, thereby maintaining high quality standards and employee satisfaction.

  7. Clinical Implication of p16, Ki-67, and Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen Expression in Cervical Neoplasia: Improvement of Diagnostic Accuracy for High-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion and Prediction of Resection Margin Involvement on Conization Specimen

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hun; Han, Jee Hye; Shin, Eun; Noh, Jae Hong; Kim, Hee Seung; Song, Yong Sang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grading is subjective and affected by substantial rates of discordance among pathologists. Although the use of p16INK4a (p16) staining has been proven to improve diagnostic accuracy for high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), the clinical evidence for use of Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is insufficient to make an independent recommendation for use, alone or in combination. The primary objective was to evaluate clinical utility of Ki-67 and PCNA in combination with p16 in diagnosing HSIL. Also, we assessed the correlation between expressions of three biomarkers and resection margin status of conization specimen. Methods: The expressions of p16, Ki-67, and PCNA were evaluated by immunohistochemical methods in 149 cervical tissues encompassing 17 negative lesion, 31 CIN 1, 25 CIN 2, 41 CIN 3, and 35 invasive squamous cell carcinoma. The immunohistochemical staining results were classified into four grades: 0, 1+, 2+ and 3+. Results: The expression of three biomarkers was positively associated with CIN grade. Ki-67 immunostaining did not increase the accuracy of HSIL diagnosis when combined with p16 immunostaining compared with p16 immunostaining alone. In contrast, combining the staining results for p16 and PCNA (p16 = 3+ and PCNA ≥2+) increased its specificity (66.7% vs. 75.0%, P = 0.031) without decrease of its sensitivity (98.7% vs. 98.7%) for diagnosis of CIN 3 and more sever lesion. Subgroup analysis for conization specimen with CIN 2 and CIN 3 showed that positive Ki-67 immunostaining was an independent risk factor for predicting resection margin positivity (odds ratio = 6.52, 95% confidence interval 1.07–39.64). Conclusions: We found that the combined use of p16 and PCNA immunostaining enhanced diagnostic accuracy for HSIL. Positive Ki-67 immunostaining was associated with incomplete excision. PMID:25853106

  8. Yeast surface display of a noncovalent MHC class II heterodimer complexed with antigenic peptide.

    PubMed

    Boder, Eric T; Bill, Jerome R; Nields, Andrew W; Marrack, Philippa C; Kappler, John W

    2005-11-20

    Microbial protein display technologies have enabled directed molecular evolution of binding and stability properties in numerous protein systems. In particular, dramatic improvements to antibody binding affinity and kinetics have been accomplished using these tools in recent years. Examples of successful application of display technologies to other immunological proteins have been limited to date. Herein, we describe the expression of human class II major histocompatibility complex allele (MHCII) HLA-DR4 on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a noncovalently associated heterodimer. The yeast-displayed MHCII is fully native as assessed by binding of conformationally specific monoclonal antibodies; failure of antibodies specific for empty HLA-DR4 to bind yeast-displayed protein indicates antigenic peptide is bound. This report represents the first example of a noncovalent protein dimer displayed on yeast and of successful display of wild-type MHCII. Results further point to the potential for using yeast surface display for engineering and analyzing the antigen binding properties of MHCII.

  9. Socio-dramatic affective-relational intervention for adolescents with asperger syndrome & high functioning autism: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Matthew D; Mikami, Amori Yee; Levine, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a novel intervention called 'socio-dramatic affective-relational intervention' (SDARI), intended to improve social skills among adolescents with Asperger syndrome and high functioning autism diagnoses. SDARI adapts dramatic training activities to focus on in vivo practice of areas of social skill deficit among this population. SDARI was administered as a six-week summer program in a community human service agency. Nine SDARI participants and eight age- and diagnosis-group matched adolescents not receiving SDARI were compared on child- and parent-report of social functioning at three week intervals beginning six weeks prior to intervention and ending six weeks post-intervention. Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) was used to estimate growth trends between groups to assess treatment outcomes and post-treatment maintenance. Results indicated significant improvement and post-treatment maintenance among SDARI participants on several measures of child social functioning. Implications for practice and research are discussed.

  10. Dengue viruses cluster antigenically but not as discrete serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Katzelnick, Leah C.; Fonville, Judith M.; Gromowski, Gregory D.; Arriaga, Jose Bustos; Green, Angela; James, Sarah L.; Lau, Louis; Montoya, Magelda; Wang, Chunling; VanBlargan, Laura A.; Russell, Colin A.; Thu, Hlaing Myat; Pierson, Theodore C.; Buchy, Philippe; Aaskov, John G.; Muñoz-Jordán, Jorge L.; Vasilakis, Nikos; Gibbons, Robert V.; Tesh, Robert B.; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.; Fouchier, Ron A.M.; Durbin, Anna; Simmons, Cameron P.; Holmes, Edward C.; Harris, Eva; Whitehead, Stephen S.; Smith, Derek J.

    2016-01-01

    The four genetically divergent dengue virus (DENV) types are traditionally classified as serotypes. Antigenic and genetic differences among the DENV types influence disease outcome, vaccine-induced protection, epidemic magnitude, and viral evolution. We characterized antigenic diversity in the DENV types by antigenic maps constructed from neutralizing antibody titers obtained from African green monkeys and after human vaccination and natural infections. Genetically, geographically, and temporally, diverse DENV isolates clustered loosely by type, but we found many are as similar antigenically to a virus of a different type as to some viruses of the same type. Primary infection antisera did not neutralize all viruses of the same DENV type any better than other types did up to two years after infection and did not show improved neutralization to homologous type isolates. That the canonical DENV types are not antigenically homogenous has implications for vaccination and research on the dynamics of immunity, disease, and the evolution of DENV. PMID:26383952

  11. Dengue viruses cluster antigenically but not as discrete serotypes.

    PubMed

    Katzelnick, Leah C; Fonville, Judith M; Gromowski, Gregory D; Bustos Arriaga, Jose; Green, Angela; James, Sarah L; Lau, Louis; Montoya, Magelda; Wang, Chunling; VanBlargan, Laura A; Russell, Colin A; Thu, Hlaing Myat; Pierson, Theodore C; Buchy, Philippe; Aaskov, John G; Muñoz-Jordán, Jorge L; Vasilakis, Nikos; Gibbons, Robert V; Tesh, Robert B; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Fouchier, Ron A M; Durbin, Anna; Simmons, Cameron P; Holmes, Edward C; Harris, Eva; Whitehead, Stephen S; Smith, Derek J

    2015-09-18

    The four genetically divergent dengue virus (DENV) types are traditionally classified as serotypes. Antigenic and genetic differences among the DENV types influence disease outcome, vaccine-induced protection, epidemic magnitude, and viral evolution. We characterized antigenic diversity in the DENV types by antigenic maps constructed from neutralizing antibody titers obtained from African green monkeys and after human vaccination and natural infections. Genetically, geographically, and temporally, diverse DENV isolates clustered loosely by type, but we found that many are as similar antigenically to a virus of a different type as to some viruses of the same type. Primary infection antisera did not neutralize all viruses of the same DENV type any better than other types did up to 2 years after infection and did not show improved neutralization to homologous type isolates. That the canonical DENV types are not antigenically homogeneous has implications for vaccination and research on the dynamics of immunity, disease, and the evolution of DENV. PMID:26383952

  12. Immune recognition of protein antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Laver, W.G.; Air, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 33 papers. Some of the titles are: Antigenic Structure of Influenze Virus Hemagglutinin; Germ-line and Somatic Diversity in the Antibody Response to the Influenza Virus A/PR/8/34 Hemagglutinin; Recognition of Cloned Influenza A Virus Gene Products by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes; Antigenic Structure of the Influenza Virus N2 Neuraminidase; and The Molecular and Genetic Basis of Antigenic Variation in Gonococcal Pillin.

  13. Dramatic Photosynthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlsson, Britta

    2003-01-01

    Presents a creative way to teach photosynthesis. Revolves around the growth of a lily planted and stored in the classroom. Combines the concepts of particle theory, transformation, and changes of phase and mass in a holistic approach. The six-step teaching sequence is founded on the notions of challenge, variation, and drama. (Author/NB)

  14. Antigenic variation in ciliates: antigen structure, function, expression.

    PubMed

    Simon, Martin C; Schmidt, Helmut J

    2007-01-01

    In the past decades, the major focus of antigen variation research has been on parasitic protists. However, antigenic variation occurs also in free-living protists. The antigenic systems of the ciliates Paramecium and Tetrahymena have been studied for more than 100 yr. In spite of different life strategies and distant phylogenetic relationships of free-living ciliates and parasitic protists, their antigenic systems have features in common, such as the presence of repeated protein motifs and multigene families. The function of variable surface antigens in free-living ciliates is still unknown. Up to now no detailed monitoring of antigen expression in free-living ciliates in natural habitats has been performed. Unlike stochastic switching in parasites, antigen expression in ciliates can be directed, e.g. by temperature, which holds great advantages for research on the expression mechanism. Regulated expression of surface antigens occurs in an exclusive way and the responsible mechanism is complex, involving both transcriptional and post-transcriptional features. The involvement of homology-dependent effects has been proposed several times but has not been proved yet.

  15. "I Did Not Wash My Feet with that Woman": Using Dramatic Performance to Teach Biblical Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torbett, David

    2010-01-01

    The student dramatic performance is an effective way for undergraduates to learn biblical studies. In this article I will give an example of a dramatic performance assignment that I developed over a number of courses and used most recently and most successfully in an undergraduate course in the Hebrew Bible at a small liberal arts college in the…

  16. The Impact of Dramatic Play Centre on Promoting the Development of Children's Early Writing Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ihmeideh, Fathi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of dramatic play centre (DPC) on promoting the development of children's early writing skills in the Jordanian context. It also intends to investigate the forms of children's writing skills that emerge through the use of dramatic play. Observations and interviews were conducted to obtain…

  17. Guiding the Noticing: Using a Dramatic Performance Experience to Promote Tellability in Narrative Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Shanetia

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes her use of dramatic performance to promote tellability in narrative writing within a seventh and eighth grade English and language arts classroom. By experiencing dramatic performance, the students were able to actively and physically perform the writing process: brainstorming, drafting, revising, and editing.…

  18. Use of Dramatization to Teach Cardiac Cycle Physiology to Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowlati, Ehsan; Musick, David W.; Zhang, Lin; Thornton, Katherine; Carvalho, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Part of the educator's mission is to develop new methodologies that promote active learning. This study examines the use of dramatization of the cardiac cycle in medical school. Two groups (n = 42, 21 each) of first-year medical students participated. Group A was initially taught through dramatization alone, while Group B was taught through…

  19. Cell recruitment and antigen trafficking in afferent lymph after injection of antigen and poly(I:C) containing liposomes, in aqueous or oil-based formulations.

    PubMed

    de Veer, Michael; Neeland, Melanie; Burke, Melissa; Pleasance, Jill; Nathanielsz, Jackie; Elhay, Martin; Meeusen, Els

    2013-02-01

    After vaccination, innate cell populations transport antigen from the tissue, via the afferent lymphatic vessels, into the local lymph node where they provide critical signals for the generation of an adaptive immune response. The present study uses a unique lymphatic cannulation model to examine, in real time, changes in afferent lymph after injection of a liposome-based delivery system, incorporating diptheria toxoid (DT) and the innate stimulator, poly(I:C). There was a dramatic but temporal recruitment of innate cell populations over time, with neutrophils and monocytes peaking at 6h and 28h post vaccination respectively. The number of dendritic cells (DC) did not increase over the 198h time period, while lymphocytes were slightly elevated at the latest times, indicating the start of an adaptive response. Monocytes and neutrophils were the predominant cell types transporting antigen at the early time points while DC were the most dominant antigen-carrying cells after 78h, predominantly the Sirp-α(high) DC subtype. Resuspending liposomes in oil instead of aqueous solutions has recently been shown to dramatically increase the level and persistence of an immune response and forms the basis of the novel adjuvant formulations, Vaccimax© and Depovax©. In the present study, formulation of the DT and poly(I:C) containing liposomes in an oil carrier dramatically reduced antigen transport to the draining lymph nodes. Examination of the injection site revealed the creation of an ectopic lymphoid tissue with prominent antigen foci and organized lymphoid cells, providing a possible mechanism for the persistence of an immune response in liposome-in-oil adjuvant formulation. Together, the present studies demonstrate the real-time innate in vivo response to vaccination of two novel liposome-based adjuvant systems and the dramatic effect of different carrier formulations.

  20. Novel antigen delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Maria; Berardinis, Piergiuseppe De

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines represent the most relevant contribution of immunology to human health. However, despite the remarkable success achieved in the past years, many vaccines are still missing in order to fight important human pathologies and to prevent emerging and re-emerging diseases. For these pathogens the known strategies for making vaccines have been unsuccessful and thus, new avenues should be investigated to overcome the failure of clinical trials and other important issues including safety concerns related to live vaccines or viral vectors, the weak immunogenicity of subunit vaccines and side effects associated with the use of adjuvants. A major hurdle of developing successful and effective vaccines is to design antigen delivery systems in such a way that optimizes antigen presentation and induces broad protective immune responses. Recent advances in vector delivery technologies, immunology, vaccinology and system biology, have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which vaccines should stimulate both arms of the adaptive immune responses, offering new strategies of vaccinations. This review is an update of current strategies with respect to live attenuated and inactivated vaccines, DNA vaccines, viral vectors, lipid-based carrier systems such as liposomes and virosomes as well as polymeric nanoparticle vaccines and virus-like particles. In addition, this article will describe our work on a versatile and immunogenic delivery system which we have studied in the past decade and which is derived from a non-pathogenic prokaryotic organism: the “E2 scaffold” of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. PMID:26279977

  1. Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen KidsHealth > For Parents > Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen Print A A A Text Size ... en español Muestra de materia fecal: antígeno de H. pylori What It Is Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) ...

  2. Differentiation antigens in lymphohemopoietic tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Miyasaka, M.; Trnka, Z.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 15 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: In Situ Characterization of Human Lymphoid Cells Using Monoclonal Antibodies; Structural and Functional Aspects of HLA Clas II Genes; Cell-Surface Differentiation Antigens Expressed on Thymocytes and T Cells of the Mouse; and Differentiation Antigens on Lymphoid Cells of the Guinea Pig.

  3. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Neurath, A.R.; Strick, N.; Baker, L.; Krugman, S.

    1982-07-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid-phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bound adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure.

  4. Enzyme immunoassay for swine trichinellosis using antigens purified by immunoaffinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Seawright, G L; Despommier, D; Zimmermann, W; Isenstein, R S

    1983-11-01

    Various preparations of crude and a purified preparation of Trichinella spiralis antigens were compared in a rapid, micro-enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for detecting trichinellosis in swine. The crude antigen preparations (XM-300 or S3 fraction) were lipid-free, cell-free fractions of muscle larvae, and the purified antigen was prepared by immunoaffinity chromatography of the soluble fraction of stichocyte secretory granules from rat muscle larvae. The antigens were tested against normal and immune swine sera for sensitivity and specificity, and for their ability to detect seroconversions early in the immune response. At optimum concentrations, absorbance values from immune and nonimmune sera produced sample to noise (S/N) ratios three-fold higher for the column antigen than for XM-300. Tests of sequential sera from experimentally-infected pigs showed that the column antigen produced lower absorbances with pre-infection sera and, from 18 days post-infection, higher absorbances with positive sera. From 21-28 days post-infection, absorbances and S/N ratios with column antigen were nearly twice those with XM-300. Column antigen detected antibodies more often than XM-300 antigen in sera collected prior to the appearance of larvae. Crude antigen did not distinguish all true negatives from weakly positives in a study involving 100 sera from muscle digestion-negative pigs and 75 sera from experimentally infected pigs, whereas the column antigen distinguished all negatives from positives. In a larger scale test of the column antigen, 1,130 pigs from Puerto Rico were tested in the micro-EIA test. Puerto Rico has no endogenous trichinellosis, and all 1,130 pigs were shown to be muscle digestion negative. These same pigs were all negative using the column antigen. These results show that the column antigen out-performs the crude antigens in sensitivity, specificity, and early detection. The column antigen is therefore a major improvement in the EIA for swine trichinellosis.

  5. Leaks can dramatically decrease FiO2 on home ventilators: a bench study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Long term oxygen therapy improves survival in hypoxemic patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Because pressure support ventilation with a home care ventilator is largely unsupervised, there is considerable risk of leakage occurring, which could affect delivered FiO2. We have therefore conducted a bench study in order to measure the effect of different levels of O2 supply and degrees of leakage on delivered FiO2. Ventilator tested: Legendair® (Airox™, Pau, France). Thirty-six measures were performed in each four ventilators with zero, 5 and 10 l.min-1 leakage and 1,2,4 and 8 l O2 flow. Findings FiO2 decreased significantly with 5 l.min-1 leakage for all O2 flow rates, and with 10 l.min-1 at 4 and 8 l.min-1 O2. Conclusion During application of NIV on home ventilators, leakage can dramatically decrease inspired FiO2 making it less effective. It is important to know the FiO2 dispensed when NIV is used for COPD at home. We would encourage industry to develop methods for FiO2 regulation Chronic use of NIV for COPD with controlled FiO2 or SpO2 requires further studys. PMID:23870165

  6. 25OHD analogues and vacuum blood collection tubes dramatically affect the accuracy of automated immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Songlin; Cheng, Xinqi; Fang, Huiling; Zhang, Ruiping; Han, Jianhua; Qin, Xuzhen; Cheng, Qian; Su, Wei; Hou, Li’an; Xia, Liangyu; Qiu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Variations in vitamin D quantification methods are large, and influences of vitamin D analogues and blood collection methods have not been systematically examined. We evaluated the effects of vitamin D analogues 25OHD2 and 3-epi 25OHD3 and blood collection methods on vitamin D measurement, using five immunoassay systems and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Serum samples (332) were selected from routine vitamin D assay requests, including samples with or without 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3, and analysed using various immunoassay systems. In samples with no 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3, all immunoassays correlated well with LC-MS/MS. However, the Siemens system produced a large positive mean bias of 12.5 ng/mL and a poor Kappa value when using tubes with clot activator and gel separator. When 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3 was present, correlations and clinical agreement decreased for all immunoassays. Serum 25OHD in VACUETTE tubes with gel and clot activator, as measured by the Siemens system, produced significantly higher values than did samples collected in VACUETTE tubes with no additives. Bias decreased and clinical agreement improved significantly when using tubes with no additives. In conclusion, most automated immunoassays showed acceptable correlation and agreement with LC-MS/MS; however, 25OHD analogues and blood collection tubes dramatically affected accuracy. PMID:26420221

  7. Serospecific antigens of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Otten, S; Iyer, S; Johnson, W; Montgomery, R

    1986-01-01

    Serospecific antigens isolated by EDTA extraction from four serogroups of Legionella pneumophila were analyzed for their chemical composition, molecular heterogeneity by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and immunological properties. The antigens were shown to be lipopolysaccharides and to differ from the lipopolysaccharides of other gram-negative bacteria. The serospecific antigens contained rhamnose, mannose, glucosamine, and two unidentified sugars together with 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate, phosphate, and fatty acids. The fatty acid composition was predominantly branched-chain acids with smaller amounts of 3-hydroxymyristic acid. The antigens contain periodate-sensitive groups; mannosyl residues were completely cleaved by periodate oxidation. Hydrolysis of the total lipopolysaccharide by acetic acid resulted in the separation of a lipid A-like material that cross-reacted with the antiserum to lipid A from Salmonella minnesota but did not comigrate with it on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. None of the four antigens contained heptose. All of the antigen preparations showed endotoxicity when tested by the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. The results of this study indicate that the serogroup-specific antigens of L. pneumophila are lipopolysaccharides containing an unusual lipid A and core structure and different from those of other gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:3017918

  8. Antigen Retrieval Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shan-Rong; Shi, Yan; Taylor, Clive R.

    2011-01-01

    As a review for the 20th anniversary of publishing the antigen retrieval (AR) technique in this journal, the authors intend briefly to summarize developments in AR-immunohistochemistry (IHC)–based research and diagnostics, with particular emphasis on current challenges and future research directions. Over the past 20 years, the efforts of many different investigators have coalesced in extending the AR approach to all areas of anatomic pathology diagnosis and research and further have led to AR-based protein extraction techniques and tissue-based proteomics. As a result, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) archival tissue collections are now seen as a literal treasure of materials for clinical and translational research to an extent unimaginable just two decades ago. Further research in AR-IHC is likely to focus on tissue proteomics, developing a more efficient protocol for protein extraction from FFPE tissue based on the AR principle, and combining the proteomics approach with AR-IHC to establish a practical, sophisticated platform for identifying and using biomarkers in personalized medicine. PMID:21339172

  9. Oncogenic cancer/testis antigens: prime candidates for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Andersen, Mads H; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-06-30

    Recent developments have set the stage for immunotherapy as a supplement to conventional cancer treatment. Consequently, a significant effort is required to further improve efficacy and specificity, particularly the identification of optimal therapeutic targets for clinical testing. Cancer/testis antigens are immunogenic, highly cancer-specific, and frequently expressed in various types of cancer, which make them promising candidate targets for cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccination and adoptive T-cell transfer with chimeric T-cell receptors. Our current understanding of tumor immunology and immune escape suggests that targeting oncogenic antigens may be beneficial, meaning that identification of cancer/testis antigens with oncogenic properties is of high priority. Recent work from our lab and others provide evidence that many cancer/testis antigens, in fact, have oncogenic functions, including support of growth, survival and metastasis. This novel insight into the function of cancer/testis antigens has the potential to deliver more effective cancer vaccines. Moreover, immune targeting of oncogenic cancer/testis antigens in combination with conventional cytotoxic therapies or novel immunotherapies such as checkpoint blockade or adoptive transfer, represents a highly synergistic approach with the potential to improve patient survival.

  10. The Interview: Dramatization Techniques in Dance--A New Approach to Teaching Modern Dance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamm, Gwendolyn Croom; Snygg, Fran

    1979-01-01

    The use of the interview dramatization as a teaching technique for presenting historical and chronological background information in the field of modern dance is described. Samples of the interviews are included. (JMF)

  11. Modeling attitude towards drug treament: the role of internal motivation, external pressure, and dramatic relief.

    PubMed

    Conner, Bradley T; Longshore, Douglas; Anglin, M Douglas

    2009-04-01

    Motivation for change has historically been viewed as the crucial element affecting responsiveness to drug treatment. Various external pressures, such as legal coercion, may engender motivation in an individual previously resistant to change. Dramatic relief may be the change process that is most salient as individuals internalize such external pressures. Results of structural equation modeling on data from 465 drug users (58.9% male; 21.3% Black, 34.2% Hispanic/Latino, and 35.1% White) entering drug treatment indicated that internal motivation and external pressure significantly and positively predicted dramatic relief and that dramatic relief significantly predicted attitudes towards drug treatment: chi (2) = 142.20, df = 100, p < 0.01; Robust Comparative Fit Index = 0.97, Root Mean Squared Error of Approximation = 0.03. These results indicate that when external pressure and internal motivation are high, dramatic relief is also likely to be high. When dramatic relief is high, attitudes towards drug treatment are likely to be positive. The findings indicate that interventions to get individuals into drug treatment should include processes that promote Dramatic Relief. Implications for addictions health services are discussed.

  12. Therapeutic cancer vaccines: Using unique antigens

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jonathan J.

    2004-01-01

    A decade ago, it seemed rational that our rapidly increasing knowledge of the molecular identities of tumor antigens and a deeper understanding of basic immunology would point the way to an effective therapeutic cancer vaccine. Significant progress has been made, but we do not yet have a cancer vaccine that can reliably and consistently induce tumor destruction or improve patient survival. Random mutations in cancer cells generate unique antigens in each individual, and this may be important in terms of generating a therapeutic immune response. Autologous heat shock protein–peptide complexes produced from each patient's tumor is a logical personalized approach that may obviate the need to identify the unique antigens contained in the individual vaccine. Heat shock proteins elicit adaptive and innate immune responses and have been tested in a variety of animal models and different human cancers. Activity has been seen in several animal studies. Early-phase human studies have also suggested some activity in certain cancers. Large, randomized phase 3 studies are ongoing, and these will effectively answer the question of efficacy regarding this approach to therapeutic vaccination. There are sufficient data to support the notion that cancer vaccines can induce anti-tumor immune responses in humans with cancer. How best to translate this increase in immune responsiveness to consistently and reproducibly induce objective cancer regression or increased survival remains unclear at this time. PMID:15297620

  13. Strategies to enhance immunogenicity of cDNA vaccine encoded antigens by modulation of antigen processing.

    PubMed

    Platteel, Anouk C M; Marit de Groot, A; Keller, Christin; Andersen, Peter; Ovaa, Huib; Kloetzel, Peter M; Mishto, Michele; Sijts, Alice J A M

    2016-09-30

    Most vaccines are based on protective humoral responses while for intracellular pathogens CD8(+) T cells are regularly needed to provide protection. However, poor processing efficiency of antigens is often a limiting factor in CD8(+) T cell priming, hampering vaccine efficacy. The multistage cDNA vaccine H56, encoding three secreted Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens, was used to test a complete strategy to enhance vaccine' immunogenicity. Potential CD8(+) T cell epitopes in H56 were predicted using the NetMHC3.4/ANN program. Mice were immunized with H56 cDNA using dermal DNA tattoo immunization and epitope candidates were tested for recognition by responding CD8(+) T cells in ex vivo assays. Seven novel CD8(+) T cell epitopes were identified. H56 immunogenicity could be substantially enhanced by two strategies: (i) fusion of the H56 sequence to cDNA of proteins that modify intracellular antigen processing or provide CD4(+) T cell help, (ii) by substitution of the epitope's hydrophobic C-terminal flanking residues for polar glutamic acid, which facilitated their proteasome-mediated generation. We conclude that this whole strategy of in silico prediction of potential CD8(+) T cell epitopes in novel antigens, followed by fusion to sequences with immunogenicity-enhancing properties or modification of epitope flanking sequences to improve proteasome-mediated processing, may be exploited to design novel vaccines against emerging or 'hard to treat' intracellular pathogens. PMID:27593157

  14. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    PubMed

    Graves, Christopher J; Ros, Vera I D; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections.

  15. Vaccines and viral antigenic diversity.

    PubMed

    Mumford, J A

    2007-04-01

    Antigenic diversity among ribonucleic acid (RNA) viruses occurs as a result of rapid mutation during replication and recombination/reassortment between genetic material of related strains during co-infections. Variants which have a selective advantage in terms of ability to spread or to avoid host immunity become established within populations. Examples of antigenically diverse viruses include influenza, foot and mouth disease (FMD) and bluetongue (BT). Effective vaccination against such viruses requires surveillance programmes to monitor circulating serotypes and their evolution to ensure that vaccine strains match field viruses. A formal vaccine strain selection scheme for equine influenza has been established under the auspices of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) based on an international surveillance programme. A regulatory framework has been put in place to allow rapid updating of vaccine strains withoutthe need to provide full registration data for licensing the updated vaccine. While there is extensive surveillance of FMD worldwide and antigenic and genetic characterisation of isolates, there is no formal vaccine strain selection system. A coordinated international effort has been initiated to agree harmonised approaches to virus characterisation which is aimed at providing the basis for an internationally agreed vaccine matching system for FMD supported by the OIE. The emergence and spread of BT in Europe have resulted in an intensification of vaccine evaluation in terms of safety and efficacy, particularly cross-protection within and between serotypes. The most important requirement for producing vaccines against viruses displaying antigenic diversity is a method of measuring antigenic distances between strains and developing an understanding of how these distances relate to cross-protection. Antigenic cartography, a new computational method of quantifying antigenic distances between strains has been applied to human and equine influenza to

  16. Evaluation of Gastrothylax crumenifer antigenic preparation in serodiagnosis of paramphistomiasis in sheep.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Tariq; Reshi, Mohammad Latif; Cheshti, M Z; Tanveer, Syed; Shah, Zaffar Amin; Fomada, Bashir Ahmad; Raina, O K

    2014-04-01

    An evaluation of Gastrothylax crumenifer crude antigen preparation viz., Somatic Antigen (SAg), Excretory Secretory Antigen (ESAg) and Egg Antigen (EAg) in serodiagnosis of disease was undertaken. Test sera samples were obtained from 30 Paramphistomiasis Positive and 30 Gastrothylax free sheep slaughtered at Hazratbal Kashmir. The referral antigenic preparation were evaluated against Paramphistomiasis positive sera, via., control negative sera, using double immunodiffusion test (DID), (IEP) Immunoelectrophoretic assay and ELISA. The performance of referral antigens, as assessed from percent sensitivity and specificity, revealed an increasing trend from DID (Double immunodiffusion-An immunological technique used in the detection, identification and quantification of antibodies and antigens) to IEP (immunoelectrophoresis-A general name for a number of biochemical methods for separation and characterization of proteins based on electrophoresis and reaction with antibodies), followed by ELISA, detecting higher number of sheep positive for paramphistomiasis. In ELISA the ESAg and SAg were evaluated as most reactive antigens with no significant difference and EAg was the least antigenic. In IEP, EAg had the higher sensitivity (60%) and analogous specificity of SAg and ESAg. The formation of the preceptin lines in the proximity to EAg containing wells (cathode end) in IEP was suggestive of higher molecular weight of G. crumenifer specific protein molecules with slower rate of migration. Purification and characterization of G. crumenifer and identification of specific antigenic molecules, particularly in EAg has been suggested for qualitative improvement of diagnostic value of the antigens in the tests used here in.

  17. Comparable quality attributes of hepatitis E vaccine antigen with and without adjuvant adsorption-dissolution treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Li, Min; Yang, Fan; Li, Yufang; Zheng, Zizheng; Zhang, Xiao; Lin, Qingshan; Wang, Ying; Li, Shaowei; Xia, Ningshao; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Qinjian

    2015-01-01

    Most vaccines require adjuvants for antigen stabilization and immune potentiation. Aluminum-based adjuvants are the most widely used adjuvants for human vaccines. Previous reports demonstrated the preservation of antigen conformation and other antigen characteristics after recovery from adjuvanted Hepatitis B and human papillomavirus vaccines. In this study, we used a combination of various physiochemical and immunochemical methods to analyze hepatitis E vaccine antigen quality attributes after recovery from adjuvants. All biochemical and biophysical methods showed similar characteristics of the p239 protein after recovery from adjuvanted vaccine formulation compared to the antigen in solution which never experienced adsorption/desorption process. Most importantly, we demonstrated full preservation of key antigen epitopes post-recovery from adjuvanted vaccine using a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies as exquisite probes. Antigenicity of p239 was probed with a panel of 9 mAbs using competition/blocking ELISA, surface plasmon resonance and sandwich ELISA methods. These multifaceted analyses demonstrated the preservation of antigen key epitopes and comparable protein thermal stability when adsorbed on adjuvants or of the recovered antigen post-dissolution treatment. A better understanding of the antigen conformation in adjuvanted vaccine will enhanced our knowledge of antigen-adjuvant interactions and facilitate an improved process control and development of stable vaccine formulation.

  18. Comparable quality attributes of hepatitis E vaccine antigen with and without adjuvant adsorption-dissolution treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Li, Min; Yang, Fan; Li, Yufang; Zheng, Zizheng; Zhang, Xiao; Lin, Qingshan; Wang, Ying; Li, Shaowei; Xia, Ningshao; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Qinjian

    2015-01-01

    Most vaccines require adjuvants for antigen stabilization and immune potentiation. Aluminum-based adjuvants are the most widely used adjuvants for human vaccines. Previous reports demonstrated the preservation of antigen conformation and other antigen characteristics after recovery from adjuvanted Hepatitis B and human papillomavirus vaccines. In this study, we used a combination of various physiochemical and immunochemical methods to analyze hepatitis E vaccine antigen quality attributes after recovery from adjuvants. All biochemical and biophysical methods showed similar characteristics of the p239 protein after recovery from adjuvanted vaccine formulation compared to the antigen in solution which never experienced adsorption/desorption process. Most importantly, we demonstrated full preservation of key antigen epitopes post-recovery from adjuvanted vaccine using a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies as exquisite probes. Antigenicity of p239 was probed with a panel of 9 mAbs using competition/blocking ELISA, surface plasmon resonance and sandwich ELISA methods. These multifaceted analyses demonstrated the preservation of antigen key epitopes and comparable protein thermal stability when adsorbed on adjuvants or of the recovered antigen post-dissolution treatment. A better understanding of the antigen conformation in adjuvanted vaccine will enhanced our knowledge of antigen-adjuvant interactions and facilitate an improved process control and development of stable vaccine formulation. PMID:26018442

  19. Targeting of folate receptor β on acute myeloid leukemia blasts with chimeric antigen receptor–expressing T cells

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Rachel C.; Poussin, Mathilde; Kalota, Anna; Feng, Yang; Low, Philip S.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2015-01-01

    T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) can produce dramatic results in lymphocytic leukemia patients; however, therapeutic strategies for myeloid leukemia remain limited. Folate receptor β (FRβ) is a myeloid-lineage antigen expressed on 70% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples. Here, we describe the development and evaluation of the first CARs specific for human FRβ (m909) in vitro and in vivo. m909 CAR T cells exhibited selective activation and lytic function against engineered C30-FRβ as well as endogenous FRβ+ AML cell lines in vitro. In mouse models of human AML, m909 CAR T cells mediated the regression of engrafted FRβ+ THP1 AML in vivo. In addition, we demonstrated that treatment of AML with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) enhanced FRβ expression, resulting in improved immune recognition by m909 CAR T cells. Because many cell surface markers are shared between AML blasts and healthy hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSCs), we evaluated FRβ expression and recognition of HSCs by CAR T cells. m909 CAR T cells were not toxic against healthy human CD34+ HSCs in vitro. Our results indicate that FRβ is a promising target for CAR T-cell therapy of AML, which may be augmented by combination with ATRA. PMID:25887778

  20. Permeability enhancers dramatically increase zanamivir absolute bioavailability in rats: implications for an orally bioavailable influenza treatment.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Eric H; Devalapally, Harikrishna; Li, Libin; Perdue, Michael L; Ostrander, Gary K

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated that simple formulations composed of the parent drug in combination with generally regarded as safe (GRAS) permeability enhancers are capable of dramatically increasing the absolute bioavailability of zanamivir. This has the advantage of not requiring modification of the drug structure to promote absorption, thus reducing the regulatory challenges involved in conversion of an inhaled to oral route of administration of an approved drug. Absolute bioavailability increases of up to 24-fold were observed when Capmul MCM L8 (composed of mono- and diglycerides of caprylic/capric acids in glycerol) was mixed with 1.5 mg of zanamivir and administered intraduodenally to rats. Rapid uptake (t(max) of 5 min) and a C(max) of over 7200 ng/mL was achieved. Variation of the drug load or amount of enhancer demonstrated a generally linear variation in absorption, indicating an ability to optimize a formulation for a desired outcome such as a targeted C(max) for enzyme saturation. No absorption enhancement was observed when the enhancer was given 2 hr prior to drug administration, indicating, in combination with the observed tmax, that absorption enhancement is temporary. This property is significant and aligns well with therapeutic applications to limit undesirable drug-drug interactions, potentially due to the presence of other poorly absorbed polar drugs. These results suggest that optimal human oral dosage forms of zanamivir should be enteric-coated gelcaps or softgels for intraduodenal release. There continues to be a strong need and market for multiple neuraminidase inhibitors for influenza treatment. Creation of orally available formulations of inhibitor drugs that are currently administered intravenously or by inhalation would provide a significant improvement in treatment of influenza. The very simple GRAS formulation components and anticipated dosage forms would require low manufacturing costs and yield enhanced convenience. These results are being

  1. Permeability enhancers dramatically increase zanamivir absolute bioavailability in rats: implications for an orally bioavailable influenza treatment.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Eric H; Devalapally, Harikrishna; Li, Libin; Perdue, Michael L; Ostrander, Gary K

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated that simple formulations composed of the parent drug in combination with generally regarded as safe (GRAS) permeability enhancers are capable of dramatically increasing the absolute bioavailability of zanamivir. This has the advantage of not requiring modification of the drug structure to promote absorption, thus reducing the regulatory challenges involved in conversion of an inhaled to oral route of administration of an approved drug. Absolute bioavailability increases of up to 24-fold were observed when Capmul MCM L8 (composed of mono- and diglycerides of caprylic/capric acids in glycerol) was mixed with 1.5 mg of zanamivir and administered intraduodenally to rats. Rapid uptake (t(max) of 5 min) and a C(max) of over 7200 ng/mL was achieved. Variation of the drug load or amount of enhancer demonstrated a generally linear variation in absorption, indicating an ability to optimize a formulation for a desired outcome such as a targeted C(max) for enzyme saturation. No absorption enhancement was observed when the enhancer was given 2 hr prior to drug administration, indicating, in combination with the observed tmax, that absorption enhancement is temporary. This property is significant and aligns well with therapeutic applications to limit undesirable drug-drug interactions, potentially due to the presence of other poorly absorbed polar drugs. These results suggest that optimal human oral dosage forms of zanamivir should be enteric-coated gelcaps or softgels for intraduodenal release. There continues to be a strong need and market for multiple neuraminidase inhibitors for influenza treatment. Creation of orally available formulations of inhibitor drugs that are currently administered intravenously or by inhalation would provide a significant improvement in treatment of influenza. The very simple GRAS formulation components and anticipated dosage forms would require low manufacturing costs and yield enhanced convenience. These results are being

  2. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Suscovich, Todd; Dionne, Kendall; Tedesco, Jacquelynne; Chung, Amy W.; Streeck, Hendrik; Pau, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Francis, Don; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna; Walker, Bruce D.; Baden, Lindsey; Barouch, Dan H.; Alter, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain) regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.   PMID:26982805

  3. T Cells as Antigen Carriers for Anti-tumor Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Traversari, Catia; Russo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the physiologic processing and presenting machinery of dendritic cells (DCs) by in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens may improve the immunogenic potential and clinical efficacy of DC-based cancer vaccines. The approach developed by our group was based on the clinical observation that some patients treated with the infusion of donor lymphocytes transduced to express the HSV-TK suicide gene for relapse of hematologic malignancies, after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, developed a T cell-mediated immune response specifically directed against the HSV-TK gene product.We demonstrated that lymphocytes genetically modified to express HSV-TK as well as self/tumor antigens, acting as antigen carriers, efficiently target DCs in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. The infusion of TRP-2-transduced lymphocytes induced the establishment of protective immunity and long-term memory in tumor-bearing mice by cross-presentation of the antigen mediated by the CD11c(+)CD8a(+) DCs subset. A similar approach was applied in a clinical setting. Ten patients affected by MAGE-3(+) metastatic melanoma were treated with autologous lymphocytes retrovirally transduced to express the MAGE-3 tumor antigen. In three patients, the treatment led to the increase of MAGE-3 specific CD8+ and CD4+ effectors and the development of long-term memory, which ultimately correlated with a favorable clinical outcome. Transduced lymphocytes represent an efficient way for in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens of DCs.

  4. Enzyme immunoassay for swine trichinellosis using antigens purified by immunoaffinity chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Seawright, G.L.; Despommier, D.; Zimmermann, W.; Isenstein, R.S.

    1983-11-01

    Various preparations of crude and a purified preparation of Trichinella spiralis antigens were compared in a rapid, micro-enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for detecting trichinellosis in swine. The crude antigen preparations (XM-300 or S/sub 3/ fraction) were lipid-free, cell-free fractions of muscle larvae, and the purified antigen was prepared by immunoaffinity chromatography of the soluble fraction of stichocyte secretory granules from rat muscle larvae. The antigens were tested against normal and immune swine sera for sensitivity and specificity, and for their ability to detect seroconversions early in the immune response. Tests of sequential sera from experimentally-infected pigs showed that the column antigen produced lower absorbances with pre-infection sera and, from 18 days post-infection, higher absorbances with positive sera. From 21-28 days post-infection, absorbances and S/N ratios with column antigen were nearly twice those with XM-300. Column antigen detected antibodies more often than XM-300 antigen in sera collected prior to the appearance of larvae. Crude antigen did not distinguish all true negatives from weakly positives in a study involving 100 sera from muscle digestion-negative pigs and 75 sera from experimentally infected pigs, whereas the column antigen distinguished all negatives from positives. In a larger scale test of the column antigen, 1130 pigs from Puerto Rico were tested in the micro-EIA test. Puerto Rico has no endogenous trichinellosis, and all 1130 pigs were shown to be muscle digestion negative. These results show that the column antigen out-performs the crude antigens in sensitivity, specificity, and early detection. The column antigen is therefore a major improvement in the EIA for swine trichinellosis.

  5. Improvement of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for equine herpesvirus type 4 by using a synthetic-peptide 24-mer repeat sequence of glycoprotein G as an antigen.

    PubMed

    Bannai, Hiroshi; Nemoto, Manabu; Tsujimura, Koji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Maeda, Ken; Kondo, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    To increase the sensitivity of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for equine herpesvirus type 4 (EHV-4) that uses a 12-mer peptide of glycoprotein G (gG4-12-mer: MKNNPIYSEGSL) [4], we used a longer peptide consisting of a 24-mer repeat sequence (gG4-24-mer: MKNNPIYSEGSLMLNVQHDDSIHT) as an antigen. Sera of horses experimentally infected with EHV-4 reacted much more strongly to the gG4-24-mer peptide than to the gG4-12-mer peptide. We used peptide ELISAs to test paired sera from horses naturally infected with EHV-4 (n=40). gG4-24-mer ELISA detected 37 positive samples (92.5%), whereas gG4-12-mer ELISA detected only 28 (70.0%). gG4-24-mer ELISA was much more sensitive than gG4-12-mer ELISA.

  6. Improvement of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for equine herpesvirus type 4 by using a synthetic-peptide 24-mer repeat sequence of glycoprotein G as an antigen

    PubMed Central

    BANNAI, Hiroshi; NEMOTO, Manabu; TSUJIMURA, Koji; YAMANAKA, Takashi; MAEDA, Ken; KONDO, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    To increase the sensitivity of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for equine herpesvirus type 4 (EHV-4) that uses a 12-mer peptide of glycoprotein G (gG4-12-mer: MKNNPIYSEGSL) [4], we used a longer peptide consisting of a 24-mer repeat sequence (gG4-24-mer: MKNNPIYSEGSLMLNVQHDDSIHT) as an antigen. Sera of horses experimentally infected with EHV-4 reacted much more strongly to the gG4-24-mer peptide than to the gG4-12-mer peptide. We used peptide ELISAs to test paired sera from horses naturally infected with EHV-4 (n=40). gG4-24-mer ELISA detected 37 positive samples (92.5%), whereas gG4-12-mer ELISA detected only 28 (70.0%). gG4-24-mer ELISA was much more sensitive than gG4-12-mer ELISA. PMID:26424485

  7. Common antigenic structures of HL-A antigens

    PubMed Central

    Nakamuro, K.; Tanigaki, N.; Kreiter, V. P.; Pressman, D.

    1974-01-01

    Spent culture media of all the human cell lines tested have been found to contain the antigenic activity present on the 11,000-Dalton HL-A common portion fragment of the HL-A antigen molecule that appears to be a characteristic, invariant portion of HL-A antigen molecules. From the culture medium of one of these lines, RPMI 1788, a lymphoid cell line, the substance carrying HL-A common activity was isolated, which was shown to be identical to the HL-A common portion fragment with respect to molecular size, electrophoretic mobility, isoelectric focusing patterns, and certain antigenic characteristics. By an isolation procedure involving differential ultrafiltration, gel filtration, and column electrophoresis, 8 litres of the culture medium yielded 1.5–2.0 A280 units of the substance representing 15–20 per cent of the HL-A common antigenic activity originally present. A single protein band with a Rf of 0.47 was obtained by disc electrophoresis. The molecular size was shown to be about 11,000 Daltons by gel filtration and by sodium dodecyl sulphate—acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Upon isoelectric focusing two bands were obtained which corresponded exactly to those obtained with HL-A common portion fragment prepared from papain-solubilized HL-A antigen preparations by acid dissociation. The isoelectric point of the major band was 5.0. The reactions of this substance with rabbit antisera against human lymphoid cell membrane and against the substance were essentially identical to the reactions of HL-A common portion fragment with these same antisera. ImagesFIG. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4476726

  8. Marked Response to 177Lu Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Treatment in Patient With Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Soydal, Cigdem; Ozkan, Elgin; Akyurek, Serap; Kucuk, Nuriye Ozlem

    2016-02-01

    We present pretreatment Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT and posttreatment Lu-PSMA whole-body scintigraphy images of a 60-year-old patient with metastatic prostate cancer who is dramatically responding to Lu-PSMA treatment. PMID:26505861

  9. Marked Response to 177Lu Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Treatment in Patient With Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Soydal, Cigdem; Ozkan, Elgin; Akyurek, Serap; Kucuk, Nuriye Ozlem

    2016-02-01

    We present pretreatment Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT and posttreatment Lu-PSMA whole-body scintigraphy images of a 60-year-old patient with metastatic prostate cancer who is dramatically responding to Lu-PSMA treatment.

  10. Organ-Specific Membrane Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Sell, K. W.; Mori, W.; Rack, J. H.; Gurner, B. W.; Coombs, R. R. A.

    1969-01-01

    A satisfactory system for testing the reaction of rabbit antisera with membrane antigens of human tissue cells is described. This method allows the differentiation between IgG and IgM antibodies and provides an extremely sensitive method for the detection of antigens on all cells including non-viable fixed cells. Anti-organ serum before selective absorption showed very little organ specificity in their reactions, but may be made specific by extensive absorption although often the resulting specific titre was very low. Organ-specific membrane antigens were also identified and shown to be represented on tumour cells, although in some cases such as the colon the reactions were weaker with tumour cells than with normal parenchymal cells of an organ. On the other hand, in one case of carcinoma of the kidney the organ-specific antigens were detectably stronger on tumour cells than on normal kidney cells. Preliminary studies on human ascitic tumour cells from 4 different cancer patients show that species-specific membrane antigens can be demonstrated. Unfortunately none of the cases were derived from organs whose origin could be identified with the antisera which had been prepared for this series of experiments. ImagesFigs. 2-3 PMID:5806432

  11. PK/PD analysis of a novel pH-dependent antigen-binding antibody using a dynamic antibody-antigen binding model.

    PubMed

    Haraya, Kenta; Tachibana, Tatsuhiko; Iwayanagi, Yuki; Maeda, Atsuhiko; Ozeki, Kazuhisa; Nezu, Junichi; Ishigai, Masaki; Igawa, Tomoyuki

    2016-04-01

    Previously, we have reported novel engineered antibody with pH-dependent antigen-binding (recycling antibody), and with both pH-dependent antigen-binding and increased FcRn-binding at neutral pH (sweeping antibody). The purpose of this study is to perform PK/PD predictions to better understand the potential applications of the antibodies as therapeutics. To demonstrate the applicability of recycling and sweeping antibodies over conventional antibodies, PK/PD analyses were performed. PK/PD parameters for antibody and antigen dynamics were estimated from the results of a pharmacokinetic study in human FcRn transgenic mice. A simulation study was performed using the estimated PK/PD parameters with various target antigen profiles. In comparison to conventional antibody, recycling antibody enhanced antibody-antigen complex clearance by 3 folds, while sweeping antibody accelerated antigen clearance by 10 folds in a pharmacokinetic study. Simulation results showed that recycling and sweeping antibodies can improve dosage frequency and reduce the required dose for target antigens with various clearances, plasma concentrations or binding kinetics. Moreover, importance of the association rate constant to enhance the beneficial effect of antibodies was shown. These results support the conclusion that recycling and sweeping antibodies can be applied to various target antigens with different profiles, and expand the number of antigens that antibodies can target. PMID:26944099

  12. A Case of Aripiprazole-Induced Tardive Dyskinesia with Dramatic Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Heitzmann, Edwige; Weiner, Luisa; Michel, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Aripiprazole is reported to be a good clinical safety profile antipsychotic. However, recent data suggest that the risk of tardive dyskinesia could be higher than initially thought. We report the case of aripiprazole-induced tardive dyskinesia with dramatic evolution in a patient with several risk factors, including older age and exposure to antipsychotic over a period longer than six months. This case and its dramatic evolution, associated with other cases recently published, suggest reconsidering the real risk of tardive dyskinesia associated with aripiprazole, particularly in the elderly.

  13. Surface antigens of smooth brucellae.

    PubMed

    Diaz, R; Jones, L M; Leong, D; Wilson, J B

    1968-10-01

    Surface antigens of smooth brucellae were extracted by ether-water, phenol-water, trichloroacetic acid, and saline and examined by immunoelectrophoresis and gel diffusion with antisera from infected and immunized rabbits. Ether-water extracts of Brucella melitensis contained a lipopolysaccharide protein component, which was specific for the surface of smooth brucellae and was correlated with the M agglutinogen of Wilson and Miles, a polysaccharide protein component devoid of lipid which was not restricted to the surface of smooth brucellae and was not correlated with the smooth agglutinogen (component 1), and several protein components which were associated with internal antigens of rough and smooth brucellae. Immunoelectrophoretic analysis of ether-water extracts of B. abortus revealed only two components, a lipopolysaccharide protein component, which was correlated with the A agglutinogen, and component 1. Component 1 from B. melitensis and B. abortus showed identity in gel diffusion tests, whereas component M from B. melitensis and component A from B. abortus showed partial identity with unabsorbed antisera and no cross-reactions with monospecific sera. Attempts to prepare monospecific sera directly by immunization of rabbits with cell walls or ether-water extracts were unsuccessful. Absorption of antisera with heavy fraction of ether-water extracts did not always result in monospecific sera. It was concluded (as has been described before) that the A and M antigens are present on a single antigenic complex, in different proportions depending upon the species and biotype, and that this component is a lipopolysaccharide protein complex of high molecular weight that diffuses poorly through agar gel. Components 1, A, and M were also demonstrated in trichloroacetic acid and phenol-water extracts. With all extracts, B. melitensis antigen showed greater diffusibility in agar than B. abortus antigens. After mild acid hydrolysis, B. abortus ether-water extract was able

  14. Novel use of a radiolabelled antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen for the detection of occult abscesses in mammals

    DOEpatents

    Thakur, M.L.

    1990-04-17

    The invention discloses improved reagents containing antibodies against stage specific embryonic antigen-1 antibodies and improved methods for detection of occult abscess and inflammation using the improved reagents. No Drawings

  15. Active immunization with recombinant V antigen from Yersinia pestis protects mice against plague.

    PubMed Central

    Leary, S E; Williamson, E D; Griffin, K F; Russell, P; Eley, S M; Titball, R W

    1995-01-01

    The gene encoding V antigen from Yersinia pestis was cloned into the plasmid expression vector pGEX-5X-2. When electroporated into Escherichia coli JM109, the recombinant expressed V antigen as a stable fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase. The glutathione S-transferase-V fusion protein was isolated from recombinant E. coli and cleaved with factor Xa to yield purified V antigen as a stable product. Recombinant V antigen was inoculated intraperitoneally into mice and shown to induce a protective immune response against a subcutaneous challenge with 3.74 x 10(6) CFU of virulent Y. pestis. Protection correlated with the induction of a high titer of serum antibodies and a T-cell response specific for recombinant V antigen. These results indicate that V antigen should be a major component of an improved vaccine for plague. PMID:7622205

  16. Occupational Awareness through Dramatic Play: A Curriculum Guide for Primary Grades: Parts 1 and 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, Loretta

    Designed for grades K-3, the career education curriculum guide focuses on dramatic play to create an environment which will stimulate children to explore various occupations within the community. At the beginning of the program, the community includes only a few structures. As the students realize the need for more buildings and services, the…

  17. Playing around with Improvisation: An Analysis of the Text Creation Processes Used within Preadolescent Dramatic Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Julie

    2008-01-01

    When children come together to play dramatically they are involved in the creation of an improvised text. This text emerges spontaneously via the moment-by-moment contributions of individual players who must operate in a highly collaborative way in order to achieve cohesion. This paper reports on a research project involving several groups of 11-…

  18. Language through the Seasons: Dramatic Play Activities for Early Childhood Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amdur, Judith

    This workbook brings together activities to aid in motivating children to concentrate, listen, respond, think, and learn. The activities rely upon play-like tasks involving drama, music, and other forms of creative expression. The activities are organized by the season in which they are appropriate and include songs, dramatic sequences, stories,…

  19. Art-House Cinema, Avant-Garde Film, and Dramatic Modernism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardullo, Bert

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about art-house cinema, avant-garde film, and dramatic modernism. He believes that the most important modes of film practice are art-house cinema and the avant-garde, both of which contrast with the classical Hollywood mode of film practice. While the latter is characterized by its commercial imperative, corporate…

  20. Teenagers' Significant Experiences in Aesthetic Areas: Some Empirical Observations Regarding the Role of Dramatic Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnas, Leif

    2008-01-01

    Fifteen sixteen-year-old Fenno-Swedish compulsory school pupils' descriptions and evaluations of significant, i.e. more or less "strong", experiences relating to dramatic art (film, theatre) were analysed and compared with reported experiences in other aesthetic areas (music, nature etc.). The drama area was represented in many experiences, but…

  1. Lord Kelvin and the Age-of-the-Earth Debate: A Dramatization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinner, Art; Tecihman, Jurgen

    2003-01-01

    Presents a dramatization of a fictitious debate about the age of the earth that takes place at the Royal Institution, London, England, in the year 1872 among Sir William Thomson, T.H. Huxley, Sir Charles Lyell, and Hermann von Helmholtz. (Contains 17 references.) (Author/YDS)

  2. Athenian and Shakespearean Tragedies in Oceania: Teaching Dramatic Literatures in Fiji

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anae, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a theorised classroom-based narrative discussing the author's interdisciplinary approach to the teaching of English dramatic literatures--in particular, Sophocles' "Oedipus the King" and Shakespeare's "Macbeth"--to i-Taukei, Indo-Fijian and Pacific Islander tertiary students at a South Pacific…

  3. Erotic Language as Dramatic Action in Plays by Lyly and Shakespeare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoll, Gillian

    2012-01-01

    This study closely examines the language of desire in the dramatic works of John Lyly and William Shakespeare, and argues that contemplative and analytical speeches about desire function as modes of action in their plays. Erotic speeches do more than express desire in a purely descriptive or perlocutionary capacity distinct from the action of the…

  4. Creating Drama with Poetry: Teaching English as a Second Language through Dramatization and Improvisation. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasparro, Marie; Falletta, Bernadette

    The use of poetry as drama in the English as a Second Language (ESL) classroom enables students to explore the linguistic and conceptual aspects of the written text without concentrating on the mechanics of language. Students are able to develop a sense of awareness of self in the target culture through dramatic interpretations of the poems.…

  5. Collaborative College Playwriting and Performance: A Core Course "Trespassing" onto the Dramatic Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedetti, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Arts integration is relevant in the context of the increased demand for creative thinkers in a global economy. However, reaching across disciplinary boundaries is less common in higher education. Arts integration is one way that a literature class can "trespass" onto the dramatic arts. This paper reports on a study of integrating the…

  6. Engaging in Dramatic Activities in English as a Foreign Language Classes at the University Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algarra Carrasco, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we discuss how, through dramatic activities, fiction and reality can work together to help the English as a Foreign language learner communicate in a more personal and meaningful way. The kind of activities proposed are designed to help engender a space where students can personally engage with each other in an atmosphere that is…

  7. Mantle of the Expert: Integrating Dramatic Inquiry and Visual Arts in Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Edric C.; Liu, Katrina; Goble, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces the social studies field to Dorothy Heatchote's Mantle of Expert (MOE). MOE is a dramatic inquiry approach used in several subject areas and can work at all levels in the social studies curriculum. The authors go into the development of using this approach in an elementary and middle teacher education program. After sharing…

  8. Some Therapeutic Uses of Dramatic Play with the Aggressive Child in the Preschool Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginnane, Patrick

    The primary purpose of this master's thesis is to describe some therapeutic uses of dramatic play with the mildly aggressive preschool child. The child for whom the suggested play interventions are considered appropriate is characterized by sociality and attachment to both peers and adults, and is not chronically aggressive. After the first…

  9. The Accessibility of Socio-Dramatic Play to Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Australian Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scrafton, Eleanor; Whitington, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Socio-dramatic play is preschool children's leading learning activity (Karpov 2005; Vygotsky 1978). Yet entering play often poses challenges (Corsaro 2003), particularly for culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) children (Hruska 2007). At preschool four-year-old CALD children are both acquiring a new language, and learning new rules, social…

  10. Effects of Dramatized Depictions of Accidents on Grade School Children's Reception of Safety Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omdahl, Becky L.; Cantor, Joanne

    A study examined a format for fear appeal messages that introduced a threat through one medium (i.e., a segment of dramatic television programming) and the recommended action through another medium (i.e., the verbal presentation of safety guidelines by an adult to a child). Subjects, 138 elementary school children from a middle-class elementary…

  11. An Investigation of the Effects of Creative Dramatics on Ninth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridel, Shelby Jean Harvey

    The purposes of this study were to describe the use of creative dramatics within an average ninth grade arts class and to document the behavior changes in verbal and nonverbal communications, creative thinking and behavior, feeling of group closeness, self-confidence, and attitude toward the course. A teacher inexperienced in drama conducted the…

  12. Examining Young Children's Perception toward Augmented Reality-Infused Dramatic Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Jeonghye; Jo, Miheon; Hyun, Eunja; So, Hyo-jeong

    2015-01-01

    Amid the increasing interest in applying augmented reality (AR) in educational settings, this study explores the design and enactment of an AR-infused robot system to enhance children's satisfaction and sensory engagement with dramatic play activities. In particular, we conducted an exploratory study to empirically examine children's perceptions…

  13. Do Props Matter in the Dramatic Play Center? The Effects of Prop Realism on Children's Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Claudia; Howe, Nina

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of prop realism on the play of 24 preschoolers. Observations of play sessions revealed that highly realistic props and low-realism props elicited equal amounts of group dramatic play. However, low- realism props generated greater diversity of play themes, more fantasy role enactments, and more nonintended use of…

  14. "Welcome to Philadelphia": An Original Dramatization of Life in the 1780s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stakes, Mary E.

    Teachers can create an interest in the founding period of U.S. history and present students with an authentic view of this time period through the presentation of this play. The dramatic pretense of the play is that the audience, by their presence, is part of the drama. The audience plays the part of travelers visiting a Philadelphia home in the…

  15. National Lighting Bureau Reports Dramatic Energy Savings Possible through Minor Lighting Modifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Store Journal, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Dramatic savings are possible by implementing minor modifications including: energy efficient light bulbs and tubes, ballasts, luminaires (fixtures), controls, operating practices, and revised maintenance. Many different changes can be made without affecting productivity, safety and security, visual comfort, aesthetic appeal, consumer discretion,…

  16. Antigenic determinants and functional domains in core antigen and e antigen from hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Salfeld, J; Pfaff, E; Noah, M; Schaller, H

    1989-01-01

    The precore/core gene of hepatitis B virus directs the synthesis of two polypeptides, the 21-kilodalton subunit (p21c) forming the viral nucleocapsid (serologically defined as core antigen [HBcAg]) and a secreted processed protein (p17e, serologically defined as HBe antigen [HBeAg]). Although most of their primary amino acid sequences are identical, HBcAg and HBeAg display different antigenic properties that are widely used in hepatitis B virus diagnosis. To locate and to characterize the corresponding determinants, segments of the core gene were expressed in Escherichia coli and probed with a panel of polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoassays or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blots, and competition assays. Three distinct major determinants were characterized. The single conformational determinant responsible for HBc antigenicity in the assembled core (HBc) and a linear HBe-related determinant (HBe1) were both mapped to an overlapping hydrophilic sequence around amino acid 80; a second HBe determinant (HBe2) was assigned to a location in the vicinity of amino acid 138 but found to require for its antigenicity the intramolecular participation of the extended sequence between amino acids 10 and 140. It is postulated that HBcAg and HBeAg share common basic three-dimensional structure exposing the common linear determinant HBe1 but that they differ in the presentation of two conformational determinants that are either introduced (HBc) or masked (HBe2) in the assembled core. The simultaneous presentation of HBe1 and HBc, two distinctly different antigenic determinants with overlapping amino acid sequences, is interpreted to indicate the presence of slightly differently folded, stable conformational states of p21c in the hepatitis B virus nucleocapsid. Images PMID:2463383

  17. Sensitivity improvement of a sandwich-type ELISA immunosensor for the detection of different prostate-specific antigen isoforms in human serum using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and an ordered and hierarchically organized interfacial supramolecular architecture.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Zúñiga, Gabriela Guadalupe; Hernández-López, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    A gold millielectrode (GME) functionalized with a mixed (16-MHA + EG3SH) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) was used to fabricate an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) immunosensor for the sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a prostate cancer (PCa) biomarker, in human serum samples. To address and minimize the issue of non-specific protein adsorption, an organic matrix (amine-PEG3-biotin/avidin) was assembled on the previously functionalized electrode surface to build up an ordered and hierarchically organized interfacial supramolecular architecture: Au/16-MHA/EG3SH/amine-PEG3-biotin/avidin. The electrode was then exposed to serum samples at different concentrations of a sandwich-type immunocomplex molecule ((Btn)Ab-AgPSA-(HRP)Ab), and its interfacial properties were characterized using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Calibration curves for polarization resistance (RP) and capacitance (1/C) vs. total and free PSA concentrations were obtained and their analytical quality parameters were determined. This approach was compared with results obtained from a commercially available ELISA immunosensor. The results obtained in this work showed that the proposed immunosensor can be successfully applied to analyze serum samples of patients representative of the Mexican population.

  18. Sensitivity improvement of a sandwich-type ELISA immunosensor for the detection of different prostate-specific antigen isoforms in human serum using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and an ordered and hierarchically organized interfacial supramolecular architecture.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Zúñiga, Gabriela Guadalupe; Hernández-López, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    A gold millielectrode (GME) functionalized with a mixed (16-MHA + EG3SH) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) was used to fabricate an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) immunosensor for the sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a prostate cancer (PCa) biomarker, in human serum samples. To address and minimize the issue of non-specific protein adsorption, an organic matrix (amine-PEG3-biotin/avidin) was assembled on the previously functionalized electrode surface to build up an ordered and hierarchically organized interfacial supramolecular architecture: Au/16-MHA/EG3SH/amine-PEG3-biotin/avidin. The electrode was then exposed to serum samples at different concentrations of a sandwich-type immunocomplex molecule ((Btn)Ab-AgPSA-(HRP)Ab), and its interfacial properties were characterized using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Calibration curves for polarization resistance (RP) and capacitance (1/C) vs. total and free PSA concentrations were obtained and their analytical quality parameters were determined. This approach was compared with results obtained from a commercially available ELISA immunosensor. The results obtained in this work showed that the proposed immunosensor can be successfully applied to analyze serum samples of patients representative of the Mexican population. PMID:26703258

  19. Identification of Antigenic Proteins of the Nosocomial Pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Sebastian; Bier, Frank F.; von Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The continuous expansion of nosocomial infections around the globe has become a precarious situation. Key challenges include mounting dissemination of multiple resistances to antibiotics, the easy transmission and the growing mortality rates of hospital-acquired bacterial diseases. Thus, new ways to rapidly detect these infections are vital. Consequently, researchers around the globe pursue innovative approaches for point-of-care devices. In many cases the specific interaction of an antigen and a corresponding antibody is pivotal. However, the knowledge about suitable antigens is lacking. The aim of this study was to identify novel antigens as specific diagnostic markers. Additionally, these proteins might be aptly used for the generation of vaccines to improve current treatment options. Hence, a cDNA-based expression library was constructed and screened via microarrays to detect novel antigens of Klebsiella pneumoniae, a prominent agent of nosocomial infections well-known for its extensive antibiotics resistance, especially by extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL). After screening 1536 clones, 14 previously unknown immunogenic proteins were identified. Subsequently, each protein was expressed in full-length and its immunodominant character examined by ELISA and microarray analyses. Consequently, six proteins were selected for epitope mapping and three thereof possessed linear epitopes. After specificity analysis, homology survey and 3d structural modelling, one epitope sequence GAVVALSTTFA of KPN_00363, an ion channel protein, was identified harboring specificity for K. pneumoniae. The remaining epitopes showed ambiguous results regarding the specificity for K. pneumoniae. The approach adopted herein has been successfully utilized to discover novel antigens of Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella enterica antigens before. Now, we have transferred this knowledge to the key nosocomial agent, K. pneumoniae. By identifying several novel antigens and their linear

  20. Concepts and applications for influenza antigenic cartography

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Influenza antigenic cartography projects influenza antigens into a two or three dimensional map based on immunological datasets, such as hemagglutination inhibition and microneutralization assays. A robust antigenic cartography can facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection since the antigenic map can simplify data interpretation through intuitive antigenic map. However, antigenic cartography construction is not trivial due to the challenging features embedded in the immunological data, such as data incompleteness, high noises, and low reactors. To overcome these challenges, we developed a computational method, temporal Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS), by adapting the low rank MC concept from the movie recommendation system in Netflix and the MDS method from geographic cartography construction. The application on H3N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses demonstrates that temporal MC-MDS is effective and efficient in constructing influenza antigenic cartography. The web sever is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap. PMID:21761589

  1. Boron-doped bismuth oxybromide microspheres with enhanced surface hydroxyl groups: Synthesis, characterization and dramatic photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, ZhangSheng; Liu, JinLong; Wang, HaiYang; Cao, Gang; Niu, JiNan

    2016-02-01

    B-doped BiOBr photocatalysts were successfully synthesized via a facile solvothermal method with boric acid used as boron source. As-obtained products consist of novel hierarchical microspheres, whose nanosheet building units were formed by nanoparticles splicing. They showed dramatic photocatalytic efficiency toward the degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) and phenol under the visible-light irradiation and the highest activity was achieved by 0.075B-BiOBr. The enhanced photocatalytic activity could be attributed to the enriched surface hydroxyl groups on B-doped BiOBr samples, which not only improved the adsorption of pollutant on the photocatalyst but also promoted the separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs. In addition, it was found that the main reactive species responsible for the degradation of organic pollutant were h(+) and O2(-) radicals, instead of OH radicals. PMID:26590875

  2. Identity transformation and a changed lifestyle following dramatic weight loss and body-contouring surgery: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Gilmartin, Jo; Long, Andrew; Soldin, Mark

    2015-10-01

    This article reports on two major quality-of-life perception changes for patients who had undergone plastic surgery following dramatic weight loss. The exploratory, qualitative study was undertaken with 20 patients from one teaching hospital. In-depth interviews were conducted, and a thematic analysis of the data was undertaken. The results provide unique glimpses of surgical consumption empowering and facilitating 'identity transformation', embracing improved physical function and enhanced self-esteem, confidence and quality of life, and a 'changed lifestyle'. For a minority, identity transformation was sometimes interrupted by 'identity lag', posing the need for additional health-care support throughout the adjustment process. The study provides additional insight into existing quantitative studies, adding to the body of knowledge in this area.

  3. Boron-doped bismuth oxybromide microspheres with enhanced surface hydroxyl groups: Synthesis, characterization and dramatic photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, ZhangSheng; Liu, JinLong; Wang, HaiYang; Cao, Gang; Niu, JiNan

    2016-02-01

    B-doped BiOBr photocatalysts were successfully synthesized via a facile solvothermal method with boric acid used as boron source. As-obtained products consist of novel hierarchical microspheres, whose nanosheet building units were formed by nanoparticles splicing. They showed dramatic photocatalytic efficiency toward the degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) and phenol under the visible-light irradiation and the highest activity was achieved by 0.075B-BiOBr. The enhanced photocatalytic activity could be attributed to the enriched surface hydroxyl groups on B-doped BiOBr samples, which not only improved the adsorption of pollutant on the photocatalyst but also promoted the separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs. In addition, it was found that the main reactive species responsible for the degradation of organic pollutant were h(+) and O2(-) radicals, instead of OH radicals.

  4. Antigen targeting to APC: from mice to veterinary species.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, B; Poderoso, T; Alonso, F; Ezquerra, A; Domínguez, J; Revilla, C

    2013-10-01

    Antigen delivery to receptors expressed on antigen presenting cells (APC) has shown to improve immunogenicity of vaccines in mice. An enhancement of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), helper T cell or humoral responses was obtained depending on the type of APC and the surface molecule targeted. Although this strategy is being also evaluated in livestock animals with promising results, some discrepancies have been found between species and pathogens. The genetic diversity of livestock animals, the different pattern of expression of some receptors among species, the use of different markers to characterize APC in large animals and sometimes the lack of reagents make difficult to compare results obtained in different species. In this review, we summarize the data available regarding antigen targeting to APC receptors in cattle, sheep and pig and discuss the results found in these animals in the context of what has been obtained in mice. PMID:23648645

  5. Antigen targeting to APC: from mice to veterinary species.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, B; Poderoso, T; Alonso, F; Ezquerra, A; Domínguez, J; Revilla, C

    2013-10-01

    Antigen delivery to receptors expressed on antigen presenting cells (APC) has shown to improve immunogenicity of vaccines in mice. An enhancement of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), helper T cell or humoral responses was obtained depending on the type of APC and the surface molecule targeted. Although this strategy is being also evaluated in livestock animals with promising results, some discrepancies have been found between species and pathogens. The genetic diversity of livestock animals, the different pattern of expression of some receptors among species, the use of different markers to characterize APC in large animals and sometimes the lack of reagents make difficult to compare results obtained in different species. In this review, we summarize the data available regarding antigen targeting to APC receptors in cattle, sheep and pig and discuss the results found in these animals in the context of what has been obtained in mice.

  6. Antigenic and molecular characterization of rabies virus in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Cisterna, Daniel; Bonaventura, Romina; Caillou, Susana; Pozo, Oscar; Andreau, Maria Lidia; Fontana, Liliana Dalla; Echegoyen, Cristina; de Mattos, Carlos; de Mattos, Cecilia; Russo, Susana; Novaro, Laura; Elberger, Diana; Freire, María Cecilia

    2005-05-01

    The nucleoprotein genes of 54 human, domestic and wild animals rabies isolates obtained in Argentina between 1995 and 2002 were characterized using monoclonal antibodies and partial gene sequence analysis. The antigenic and genetic diversities of rabies virus in samples from bat and bat-related cases were studied, leading to the identification of five distinct genetic variants. Rabies viruses isolated from vampire bat related cases were very similar to each other, showing 98.9% overall similarity. Specific antigenic variants (AgV) were detected associated with different insectivorous bats species, in samples from Tadarida brasiliensis and Eumops patagonicus bats. In contrast, isolates from Myotis sp. and Histiotus sp. bats could not be matched to any antigenic type. Additionally, bat rabies cases were also detected in southern provinces previously considered rabies-free. Finally, two independent antigenic and genetic variants co-circulating in northern Argentina were found in isolates obtained from dogs and dog-related cases, suggesting two independent cycles of virus transmission. This is the first national coordinated study of antigenic as well as molecular epidemiology of rabies in Argentina. The information presented here will improve our knowledge about rabies epidemiology and therefore, will assist preventing fatal human cases. PMID:15763144

  7. Autophagy proteins in antigen processing for presentation on MHC molecules.

    PubMed

    Münz, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Autophagy describes catabolic pathways that deliver cytoplasmic constituents for lysosomal degradation. Since major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules sample protein degradation products and present them to T cells for adaptive immunity, it is maybe not too surprising that autophagy contributes to this protein antigen processing for MHC presentation. However, the recently recognized breath of pathways, by which autophagy contributes to MHC antigen processing, is exciting. Macroautophagy does not only seem to deliver intracellular but facilitates also extracellular antigen processing by lysosomal hydrolysis for MHC class II presentation. Moreover, even MHC class I molecules that usually display proteasomal products are regulated by macroautophagy, probably using a pool of these molecules outside the endoplasmic reticulum, where MHC class I molecules are loaded with peptide during canonical MHC class I antigen processing. This review aims to summarize these recent developments and point out gaps of knowledge, which should be filled by further investigation, in order to harness the different antigen-processing pathways via autophagy for vaccine improvement. PMID:27319339

  8. Antigenic determinants and functional domains in core antigen and e antigen from hepatitis B virus

    SciTech Connect

    Salfeld, J.; Pfaff, E.; Noah, M.; Schaller, H.

    1989-02-01

    The precore/core gene of hepatitis B virus directs the synthesis of two polypeptides, the 21-kilodalton subunit (p21c) forming the viral nucleocapsid (serologically defined as core antigen (HBcAg)) and a secreted processed protein (p17e, serologically defined as HBe antigen (HBeAg)). Although most of their primary amino acid sequences are identical, HBcAg and HBeAg display different antigenic properties that are widely used in hepatitis B virus diagnosis. To locate and to characterize the corresponding determinants, segments of the core gene were expressed in Escherichia coli and probed with a panel of polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoassays or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blots, and competition assays. Three distinct major determinants were characterized. It is postulated that HBcAg and HBeAg share common basic three-dimensional structure exposing the common linear determinant HBe1 but that they differ in the presentation of two conformational determinants that are either introduced (HBc) or masked (HBe2) in the assembled core. The simultaneous presentation of HBe1 and HBc, two distinctly different antigenic determinants with overlapping amino acid sequences, is interpreted to indicate the presence of slightly differently folded, stable conformational states of p21c in the hepatitis virus nucleocapsid.

  9. Stereotactic Radiation Therapy Augments Antigen-Specific PD-1-Mediated Anti-Tumor Immune Responses via Cross-Presentation of Tumor Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Sharabi, Andrew B.; Nirschl, Christopher J.; Kochel, Christina M.; Nirschl, Thomas R.; Francisca, Brian J.; Velarde, Esteban; Deweese, Theodore L.; Drake, Charles G.

    2014-01-01

    The immune-modulating effects of radiation therapy have gained considerable interest recently and there have been multiple reports of synergy between radiation and immunotherapy. However, additional pre-clinical studies are needed to demonstrate the antigen-specific nature of radiation-induced immune responses and elucidate potential mechanisms of synergy with immunotherapy. Here we demonstrate the ability of stereotactic radiotherapy to induce endogenous antigen-specific immune responses when combined with anti-PD-1 checkpoint blockade immunotherapy. Using the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP), image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy delivered to B16-OVA melanoma or 4T1-HA breast carcinoma tumors resulted in the development of antigen-specific T and B cell-mediated immune responses. These immune-stimulating effects of radiotherapy were significantly increased when combined with either anti-PD-1 therapy or regulatory T cell (Treg) depletion, resulting in improved local tumor control. Phenotypic analyses of antigen-specific CD8 T cells revealed that radiotherapy increased the percentage of antigen-experienced T cells and effector memory T cells. Mechanistically we found that radiotherapy up-regulates tumor-associated antigen-MHC complexes, enhances antigen cross-presentation in the draining lymph node, and increased T-cell infiltration into tumors. These findings demonstrate the ability of radiotherapy to prime an endogenous antigen-specific immune response and provide additional mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with PD-1 blockade in the clinic. PMID:25527358

  10. Consequential classes of resources: Subtle global bifurcation with dramatic ecological consequences in a simple population model.

    PubMed

    Vandermeer, John; King, Aaron

    2010-03-21

    Numerous situations exist in which a consumer uses two different kinds of resources, one fixed, the other renewable, e.g., nesting resources and food resources. With an elementary modification of the basic Lotka-Volterra consumer resource equations, we investigate the population dynamics of a consumer dependent on two resources, one fixed, the other renewable. Emerging from this structure is a situation of alternative attractors that remain qualitatively robust over a significant range of parameter values. However, a dramatic change in basins of attraction is induced by very small changes in parameters due to a global bifurcation. Noteworthy is the fact that the qualitative nature of the alternative equilibria remains constant but the dramatic change in the basins does not arise from subtle differences in initial conditions. Rather, there is a major restructuring of the vector field such that a permanent change involving large sets of initial conditions results from very small changes in parameters.

  11. Chimeric antigen receptor therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Barrett, David M; Singh, Nathan; Porter, David L; Grupp, Stephan A; June, Carl H

    2014-01-01

    Improved outcomes for patients with cancer hinge on the development of new targeted therapies with acceptable short-term and long-term toxicity. Progress in basic, preclinical, and clinical arenas spanning cellular immunology, synthetic biology, and cell-processing technologies has paved the way for clinical applications of chimeric antigen receptor-based therapies. This new form of targeted immunotherapy merges the exquisite targeting specificity of monoclonal antibodies with the potent cytotoxicity and long-term persistence provided by cytotoxic T cells. Although this field is still in its infancy, clinical trials have already shown clinically significant antitumor activity in neuroblastoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and B cell lymphoma, and trials targeting a variety of other adult and pediatric malignancies are under way. Ongoing work is focused on identifying optimal tumor targets and on elucidating and manipulating both cell- and host-associated factors to support expansion and persistence of the genetically engineered cells in vivo. The potential to target essentially any tumor-associated cell-surface antigen for which a monoclonal antibody can be made opens up an entirely new arena for targeted therapy of cancer.

  12. Dramatic reduction in tumor burden with neoadjuvant sunitinib prior to bilateral nephron-sparing surgery.

    PubMed

    Gorin, Michael A; Ekwenna, Obi; Soloway, Mark S; Ciancio, Gaetano

    2012-02-01

    Neoadjuvant sunitinib has recently been described for the management of renal cell carcinoma. We present the pre and posttreatment images of a 49-year-old male with bilateral biopsy-proven clear cell renal cell carcinoma who underwent treatment with sunitinib prior to nephron-sparing surgery. After four four-week cycles of daily 50 mg sunitinib, the patient demonstrated a dramatic reduction in tumor burden allowing for successful bilateral partial nephrectomy.

  13. Isotopic evidence for dramatic climatic changes in East Africa during the Pleistocene.

    PubMed

    Cerling, T E; Hay, R L; O'Neil, J R

    1977-05-12

    Rainfall decreased dramatically in the Lake Turkana region 1.8-2.0 Myr ago and in the Olduvai Gorge region 0.5-0.6 Myr ago. This is documented by a major increase in the delta18O values of pedogenic and groundwater carbonates at these times. The data suggest that meteoric water of the earlier, more humid climate was 2-4 per mil lower in 18O content than modern waters of these regions. PMID:16073417

  14. Identification of Antigenic Proteins from Lichtheimia corymbifera for Farmer’s Lung Disease Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Rognon, Bénédicte; Barrera, Coralie; Monod, Michel; Valot, Benoit; Roussel, Sandrine; Quadroni, Manfredo; Jouneau, Stephane; Court-Fortune, Isabelle; Caillaud, Denis; Fellrath, Jean-Marc; Dalphin, Jean-Charles; Reboux, Gabriel; Millon, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    The use of recombinant antigens has been shown to improve both the sensitivity and the standardization of the serological diagnosis of Farmer’s lung disease (FLD). The aim of this study was to complete the panel of recombinant antigens available for FLD serodiagnosis with antigens of Lichtheimia corymbifera, known to be involved in FLD. L. corymbifera proteins were thus separated by 2D electrophoresis and subjected to western blotting with sera from 7 patients with FLD and 9 healthy exposed controls (HEC). FLD-associated immunoreactive proteins were identified by mass spectrometry based on a protein database specifically created for this study and subsequently produced as recombinant antigens. The ability of recombinant antigens to discriminate patients with FLD from controls was assessed by ELISA performed with sera from FLD patients (n = 41) and controls (n = 43) recruited from five university hospital pneumology departments of France and Switzerland. Forty-one FLD-associated immunoreactive proteins from L. corymbifera were identified. Six of them were produced as recombinant antigens. With a sensitivity and specificity of 81.4 and 77.3% respectively, dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase was the most effective antigen for discriminating FLD patients from HEC. ELISA performed with the putative proteasome subunit alpha type as an antigen was especially specific (88.6%) and could thus be used for FLD confirmation. The production of recombinant antigens from L. corymbifera represents an additional step towards the development of a standardized ELISA kit for FLD diagnosis. PMID:27490813

  15. Discrimination, developmental science, and the law: addressing dramatic shifts in civil rights jurisprudence.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Roger J R

    2014-01-01

    The civil rights movement fostered dramatic shifts in legal responses to discrimination based on race, gender, and a host of other group characteristics. The legal system now evinces yet another dramatic shift, as it moves from considering difference to focusing on neutrality, from efforts that seek to counter subjugation to those that adopt a "color-blind" approach. The shifting approach already has reached laws regulating responses to the group that spurred massive civil rights reform: minority youth. The shift requires a different body of empirical evidence to address it and a new look at equality jurisprudence. This article notes the need to turn to the current understanding of prejudice and discrimination for guidance, and uses, as illustration, developmental science to shed light on the development, manifestation, and alleviation of invidious discrimination. Using that understanding, the analysis details how the legal system can benefit from that research and better address discrimination in light of dramatic changes in law. The article articulates the need to address discrimination by recognizing and enlisting the law's inculcative powers through multiple sites of inculcation, ranging from families, schools, health and justice systems to religious and community groups. The discussion concludes with brief suggestions for reform benefiting from understandings of prejudice and its expression.

  16. Discrimination, developmental science, and the law: addressing dramatic shifts in civil rights jurisprudence.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Roger J R

    2014-01-01

    The civil rights movement fostered dramatic shifts in legal responses to discrimination based on race, gender, and a host of other group characteristics. The legal system now evinces yet another dramatic shift, as it moves from considering difference to focusing on neutrality, from efforts that seek to counter subjugation to those that adopt a "color-blind" approach. The shifting approach already has reached laws regulating responses to the group that spurred massive civil rights reform: minority youth. The shift requires a different body of empirical evidence to address it and a new look at equality jurisprudence. This article notes the need to turn to the current understanding of prejudice and discrimination for guidance, and uses, as illustration, developmental science to shed light on the development, manifestation, and alleviation of invidious discrimination. Using that understanding, the analysis details how the legal system can benefit from that research and better address discrimination in light of dramatic changes in law. The article articulates the need to address discrimination by recognizing and enlisting the law's inculcative powers through multiple sites of inculcation, ranging from families, schools, health and justice systems to religious and community groups. The discussion concludes with brief suggestions for reform benefiting from understandings of prejudice and its expression. PMID:24826823

  17. Gallium arsenide exposure impairs processing of particulate antigen by macrophages: modification of the antigen reverses the functional defect.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Constance B; McCoy, Kathleen L

    2004-06-11

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), a semiconductor used in the electronics industry, causes systemic immunosuppression in animals. The chemical's impact on macrophages to process the particulate antigen, sheep red blood cells (SRBC), for a T cell response in culture was examined after in vivo exposure of mice. GaAs-exposed splenic macrophages were defective in activating SRBC-primed lymph node T cells that could not be attributed to impaired phagocytosis. Modified forms of SRBC were generated to examine the compromised function of GaAs-exposed macrophages. SRBC were fixed to maintain their particulate nature and subsequently delipidated with detergent. Delipidation of intact SRBC was insufficient to restore normal antigen processing in GaAs-exposed macrophages. However, chemically exposed cells efficiently processed soluble sheep proteins. These findings suggest that the problem may lie in the release of sequestered sheep protein antigens, which then could be effectively cleaved to peptides. Furthermore, opsonization of SRBC with IgG compensated for the macrophage processing defect. The influence of signal transduction and phagocytosis via Fcgamma receptors on improved antigen processing could be dissociated. Immobilized anti-Fcgamma receptor antibody activated macrophages to secrete a chemokine, but did not enhance processing of unmodified SRBC by GaAs-exposed macrophages. Restoration of normal processing of particulate SRBC by chemically exposed macrophages involved phagocytosis through Fcgamma receptors. Hence, initial immune responses may be very sensitive to GaAs exposure, and the chemical's immunosuppression may be averted by opsonized particulate antigens.

  18. High Expression of the Very Late Antigen-4 Integrin Independently Predicts Reduced Risk of Relapse and Improved Outcome in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Roland B.; Alonzo, Todd A.; Gerbing, Robert B.; Ho, Phoenix A.; Smith, Franklin O.; Raimondi, Susana C.; Hirsch, Betsy A.; Gamis, Alan S.; Franklin, Janet L.; Hurwitz, Craig A.; Loken, Michael R.; Meshinchi, Soheil

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the prognostic significance of the integrin cell adhesion molecule very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients and Methods We prospectively quantified VLA-4 expression in 216 patients enrolled onto COG-AAML03P1 by flow cytometry and correlated expression levels with disease characteristics and clinical outcome. Results VLA-4 mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) varied 35-fold (range, 30 to 1,110; median, 219.5). High VLA-4 expression (> median MFI), compared with low expression, was associated with younger age (7.1 v 12.1 years, respectively; P < .001), lower FLT3 internal tandem duplication prevalence (4% v 21%, respectively; P < .001), and higher likelihood of extramedullary disease (16% v 5%, respectively; P = .013). In low- and high-expression groups, rates of remission (89% v 80%, respectively; P = .137) and minimal residual disease (29% v 25%, respectively; P = .700) were similar. Patients with low VLA-4 expression, compared with high expression, had a higher relapse rate (RR; 44% ± 10% v 24% ± 9%, respectively; P = .011) and lower disease-free survival (DFS; 48% ± 11% v 67% ± 10%, respectively; P = .023) after 3 years. Multivariate analyses showed that low VLA-4 expression was an independent adverse prognostic factor for DFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.98; P = .038) and RR (HR = 2.77; P = .009). Subgroup analyses indicated that the prognostic role of VLA-4 expression was most prominent in patients with standard-risk AML, in whom low VLA-4 expression was associated with inferior DFS (34% ± 16% v 69% ± 14% for high expression; P = .011) and higher RR (61% ± 16% v 26% ± 14% for high expression; P = .009). A similar trend was seen in low-risk but not high-risk patients. Conclusion High VLA-4 expression is associated with better clinical outcome in pediatric AML and is an independent predictor of relapse that may refine our abilities to stratify patients without identifiable cytogenetic or molecular risk factors. PMID

  19. Antigenic Variation in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Petter, Michaela; Duffy, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is the protozoan parasite that causes most malaria-associated morbidity and mortality in humans with over 500,000 deaths annually. The disease symptoms are associated with repeated cycles of invasion and asexual multiplication inside red blood cells of the parasite. Partial, non-sterile immunity to P. falciparum malaria develops only after repeated infections and continuous exposure. The successful evasion of the human immune system relies on the large repertoire of antigenically diverse parasite proteins displayed on the red blood cell surface and on the merozoite membrane where they are exposed to the human immune system. Expression switching of these polymorphic proteins between asexual parasite generations provides an efficient mechanism to adapt to the changing environment in the host and to maintain chronic infection. This chapter discusses antigenic diversity and variation in the malaria parasite and our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that direct the expression of these proteins. PMID:26537377

  20. [HLA antigens in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Rumba, I V; Sochnev, A M; Kukaĭne, E M; Burshteĭn, A M; Benevolenskaia, L I

    1990-01-01

    Antigens of I class HLA system (locus A and B) were investigated in 67 patients of Latvian nationality suffering from juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Associations of HLA antigens with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis partially coincided with the ones revealed earlier. Typing established an increased incidence of antigen B27 (p less than 0.01) and gaplotype A2, B40 (p less than 0.01). Antigen B15 possessed a protective action with respect to JRA. Interlocus combinations demonstrated a closer association with the disease than a single antigen. The authors also revealed markers of various clinico-anatomical variants of JRA.

  1. Meningococcal protein antigens and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Feavers, Ian M; Pizza, Mariagrazia

    2009-06-24

    The development of a comprehensive vaccine against meningococcal disease has been challenging. Recent developments in molecular genetics have provided both explanations for these challenges and possible solutions. Since genome sequence data became available there has been a marked increase in number of protein antigens that have been suggested as prospective vaccine components. This review catalogues the proposed vaccine candidates and examines the evidence for their inclusion in potential protein vaccine formulations.

  2. Common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers

    PubMed Central

    Daneshpour, Shima; Bahadoran, Mehran; Hejazi, Seyed Hossein; Eskandarian, Abas Ali; Mahmoudzadeh, Mehdi; Darani, Hossein Yousofi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Different research groups reported a negative correlation between cancers and parasitical infections. As an example, the prevalence of a hydatid cyst among patients with cancer was significantly lower than its prevalence among normal population. Tn antigens exist both in cancer and hydatid cyst. This common antigen may be involved in the effect of parasite on cancer growth. So in this work, common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers have been investigated. Materials and Methods: Different hydatid cyst antigens including hydatid fluid, laminated and germinal layer antigens, and excretory secretory antigens of protoscolices were run in SDS PAGE and transferred to NCP paper. In western immunoblotting, those antigens were probed with sera of patients with different cancer and also sera of non-cancer patients. Also, cross reaction among excretory secretory products of cancer cells and antisera raised against different hydatid cyst antigen was investigated. Results: In western immunoblotting, antisera raised against laminated and germinal layers of hydatid cyst reacted with excretory secretory products of cancer cells. Also, a reaction was detected between hydatid cyst antigens and sera of patients with some cancers. Conclusion: Results of this work emphasize existence of common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers. More investigation about these common antigens is recommended. PMID:26962511

  3. Stable solid-phase Rh antigen.

    PubMed

    Yared, M A; Moise, K J; Rodkey, L S

    1997-12-01

    Numerous investigators have attempted to isolate the Rh antigens in a stable, immunologically reactive form since the discovery of the Rh system over 56 years ago. We report here a successful and reproducible approach to solubilizing and adsorbing the human Rh antigen(s) to a solid-phase matrix in an antigenically active form. Similar results were obtained with rabbit A/D/F red blood cell antigens. The antigen preparation was made by dissolution of the red blood cell membrane lipid followed by fragmentation of the residual cytoskeleton in an EDTA solution at low ionic strength. The antigenic activity of the soluble preparations was labile in standard buffers but was stable in zwitterionic buffers for extended periods of time. Further studies showed that the antigenic activity of these preparations was enhanced, as was their affinity for plastic surfaces, in the presence of acidic zwitterionic buffers. Adherence to plastic surfaces at low pH maintained antigenic reactivity and specificity for antibody was retained. The data show that this approach yields a stable form of antigenically active human Rh D antigen that could be used in a red blood cell-free assay for quantitative analysis of Rh D antibody and for Rh D antibody immunoadsorption and purification.

  4. Simultaneous targeting of two ligand-binding sites on VEGFR2 using biparatopic Affibody molecules results in dramatically improved affinity

    PubMed Central

    Fleetwood, Filippa; Klint, Susanne; Hanze, Martin; Gunneriusson, Elin; Frejd, Fredrik Y.; Ståhl, Stefan; Löfblom, John

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in cancer and ophthalmic disorders such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family and corresponding receptors are regulators of angiogenesis and have been much investigated as therapeutic targets. The aim of this work was to generate antagonistic VEGFR2-specific affinity proteins having adjustable pharmacokinetic properties allowing for either therapy or molecular imaging. Two antagonistic Affibody molecules that were cross-reactive for human and murine VEGFR2 were selected by phage and bacterial display. Surprisingly, although both binders independently blocked VEGF-A binding, competition assays revealed interaction with non-overlapping epitopes on the receptor. Biparatopic molecules, comprising the two Affibody domains, were hence engineered to potentially increase affinity even further through avidity. Moreover, an albumin-binding domain was included for half-life extension in future in vivo experiments. The best-performing of the biparatopic constructs demonstrated up to 180-fold slower dissociation than the monomers. The new Affibody constructs were also able to specifically target VEGFR2 on human cells, while simultaneously binding to albumin, as well as inhibit VEGF-induced signaling. In summary, we have generated small antagonistic biparatopic Affibody molecules with high affinity for VEGFR2, which have potential for both future therapeutic and diagnostic purposes in angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:25515662

  5. Collaboration Takes Center Stage: Interactive Teaching through a Schoolwide Focus on the Performing Arts Leads to Dramatic Improvements in Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Jeff; Zimmerman, Diane

    2009-01-01

    In the Old Adobe Union School District in Petaluma, California, the school staff's goal is to assure that all teachers make the fundamental shift from teacher-centric to learner-centric thinking. For them, this is what distinguishes great teachers from good teachers. They believe this level of expertise takes years to develop and that schools play…

  6. Reformatting Rituximab into Human IgG2 and IgG4 Isotypes Dramatically Improves Apoptosis Induction In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Könitzer, Jennifer D.; Sieron, Annette; Wacker, Angelika; Enenkel, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The direct induction of cell death, or apoptosis, in target cells is one of the effector mechanisms for the anti CD20 antibody Rituximab. Here we provide evidence that Rituximab’s apoptotic ability is linked to the antibody IgG isotype. Reformatting Rituximab from the standard human IgG1 heavy chain into IgG2 or IgG4 boosted in vitro apoptosis induction in the Burkitt’s lymphoma B cell line Ramos five and four-fold respectively. The determinants for this behavior are located in the hinge region and CH1 domain of the heavy chain. By transplanting individual IgG2 or IgG4 specific amino acid residues onto otherwise IgG1 like backbones, thereby creating hybrid antibodies, the same enhancement of apoptosis induction could be achieved. The cysteines at position 131 of the CH1 domain and 219 in the hinge region, involved in IgG2 and IgG4 disulfide formation, were found to be of particular structural importance. Our data indicates that the hybrid antibodies possess a different CD20 binding mode than standard Rituximab, which appears to be key in enhancing apoptotic ability. The presented work opens up an interesting engineering route for enhancing the direct cytotoxic ability of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:26713448

  7. DEER Sensitivity between Iron Centers and Nitroxides in Heme-Containing Proteins Improves Dramatically Using Broadband, High-Field EPR

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of making sensitive nanometer distance measurements between Fe(III) heme centers and nitroxide spin labels in proteins using the double electron–electron resonance (DEER) pulsed EPR technique at 94 GHz. Techniques to measure accurately long distances in many classes of heme proteins using DEER are currently strongly limited by sensitivity. In this paper we demonstrate sensitivity gains of more than 30 times compared with previous lower frequency (X-band) DEER measurements on both human neuroglobin and sperm whale myoglobin. This is achieved by taking advantage of recent instrumental advances, employing wideband excitation techniques based on composite pulses and exploiting more favorable relaxation properties of low-spin Fe(III) in high magnetic fields. This gain in sensitivity potentially allows the DEER technique to be routinely used as a sensitive probe of structure and conformation in the large number of heme and many other metalloproteins. PMID:27035368

  8. DEER Sensitivity between Iron Centers and Nitroxides in Heme-Containing Proteins Improves Dramatically Using Broadband, High-Field EPR.

    PubMed

    Motion, Claire L; Lovett, Janet E; Bell, Stacey; Cassidy, Scott L; Cruickshank, Paul A S; Bolton, David R; Hunter, Robert I; El Mkami, Hassane; Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Smith, Graham M

    2016-04-21

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of making sensitive nanometer distance measurements between Fe(III) heme centers and nitroxide spin labels in proteins using the double electron-electron resonance (DEER) pulsed EPR technique at 94 GHz. Techniques to measure accurately long distances in many classes of heme proteins using DEER are currently strongly limited by sensitivity. In this paper we demonstrate sensitivity gains of more than 30 times compared with previous lower frequency (X-band) DEER measurements on both human neuroglobin and sperm whale myoglobin. This is achieved by taking advantage of recent instrumental advances, employing wideband excitation techniques based on composite pulses and exploiting more favorable relaxation properties of low-spin Fe(III) in high magnetic fields. This gain in sensitivity potentially allows the DEER technique to be routinely used as a sensitive probe of structure and conformation in the large number of heme and many other metalloproteins. PMID:27035368

  9. Dramatic improvement in water retention and proton conductivity in electrically aligned functionalized CNT/SPEEK nanohybrid PEM.

    PubMed

    Gahlot, Swati; Kulshrestha, Vaibhav

    2015-01-14

    Nanohybrid membranes of electrically aligned functionalized carbon nanotube f CNT with sulfonated poly ether ether ketone (SPEEK) have been successfully prepared by solution casting. Functionalization of CNTs was done through a carboxylation and sulfonation route. Further, a constant electric field (500 V·cm(-2)) has been applied to align CNTs in the same direction during the membrane drying process. All the membranes are characterized chemically, thermally, and mechanically by the means of FTIR, DSC, DMA, UTM, SEM, TEM, and AFM techniques. Intermolecular interactions between the components in hybrid membranes are established by FTIR. Physicochemical measurements were done to analyze membrane stability. Membranes are evaluated for proton conductivity (30-90 °C) and methanol crossover resistance to reveal their potential for direct methanol fuel cell application. Incorporation of f CNT reasonably increases the ion-exchange capacity, water retention, and proton conductivity while it reduces the methanol permeability. The maximum proton conductivity has been found in the S-sCNT-5 nanohybrid PEM with higher methanol crossover resistance. The prepared membranes can be also used for electrode material for fuel cells and batteries.

  10. A Study of Effect of Dramatic Activities on Improving English Communicative Speaking Skill of Grade 11th Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iamsaard, Prisana; Kerdpol, Sakon

    2015-01-01

    This paper aimed to reexamine the current EFL communicative speaking skill in high school level in Thailand due to the coming of the entry to ASEAN at the end of the year 2015. Thai students need to be well prepared for workforce in the future since English is used as the working language in ASEAN. The purposes of this paper were to study the…

  11. Spinal cord injury, immunodepression, and antigenic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Held, Katherine S.; Lane, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The inability to effectively control microbial infection is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in individuals affected by spinal cord injury (SCI). Available evidence from clinical studies as well as animal models of SCI demonstrate that increased susceptibility to infection is derived from disruption of central nervous system (CNS) communication with the host immune system that ultimately leads to immunodepression. Understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms governing muted cellular and humoral responses that occur post-injury resulting in impaired host defense following infection is critical for improving the overall quality of life of individuals with SCI. This review focuses on studies performed using preclinical animal models of SCI to evaluate how injury impacts T and B lymphocyte responses following either viral infection or antigenic challenge. PMID:24747011

  12. Novel antigens for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fleckenstein, James; Sheikh, Alaullah; Qadri, Firdausi

    2014-05-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the most common bacterial pathogens causing diarrhea in developing countries where they lead to hundreds of thousands of deaths, mostly in children. These organisms are a leading cause of diarrheal illness in travelers to endemic countries. ETEC pathogenesis, and consequently vaccine approaches, have largely focused on plasmid-encoded enterotoxins or fimbrial colonization factors. To date these approaches have not yielded a broadly protective vaccine. However, recent studies suggest that ETEC pathogenesis is more complex than previously appreciated and involves additional plasmid and chromosomally encoded virulence molecules that can be targeted in vaccines. Here, we review recent novel antigen discovery efforts, potential contribution of these proteins to the molecular pathogenesis of ETEC and protective immunity, and the potential implications for development of next generation vaccines for important pathogens. These proteins may help to improve the effectiveness of future vaccines by making them simpler and possibly broadly protective because of their conserved nature. PMID:24702311

  13. Gorham-Stout Disease of the Skull Base With Hearing Loss: Dramatic Recovery and Antiangiogenic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Akifumi; Ozeki, Michio; Kuze, Bunya; Asano, Takahiko; Matsuoka, Kentaro; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    Gorham-Stout disease (GSD) is a rare disorder of unknown etiology. We present a 6-year-old male with GSD involving the skull base who presented with recurrent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea, severe hearing loss, and facial palsy secondary to cerebellar herniation into the internal auditory canal. After 2 months of treatment with pegylated interferon (IFN) α-2b (50 μg/week), his hearing recovered dramatically. Two years later, new bone formation appeared radiologically and IFN was switched to sirolimus. One year after the switch, CSF rhinorrhea disappeared. Antiangiogenic therapy might inhibit proliferation of vascular endothelial cells in osteolytic lesions and lead to new bone formation.

  14. Dramatic role of critical current anisotropy on flux avalanches in MgB2 films.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, J; Matveev, A T; Strempfer, J; Habermeier, H-U; Shantsev, D V; Galperin, Y M; Johansen, T H

    2007-03-16

    Anisotropic penetration of magnetic flux in MgB(2) films grown on vicinal sapphire substrates is investigated using magneto-optical imaging. Regular penetration above 10 K proceeds more easily along the substrate surface steps, the anisotropy of the critical current being 6%. At lower temperatures the penetration occurs via abrupt dendritic avalanches that preferentially propagate perpendicular to the surface steps. This inverse anisotropy in the penetration pattern becomes dramatic very close to 10 K where all flux avalanches propagate in the strongest pinning direction. The observed behavior is fully explained using a thermomagnetic model of the dendritic instability.

  15. Gorham-Stout Disease of the Skull Base With Hearing Loss: Dramatic Recovery and Antiangiogenic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Akifumi; Ozeki, Michio; Kuze, Bunya; Asano, Takahiko; Matsuoka, Kentaro; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    Gorham-Stout disease (GSD) is a rare disorder of unknown etiology. We present a 6-year-old male with GSD involving the skull base who presented with recurrent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea, severe hearing loss, and facial palsy secondary to cerebellar herniation into the internal auditory canal. After 2 months of treatment with pegylated interferon (IFN) α-2b (50 μg/week), his hearing recovered dramatically. Two years later, new bone formation appeared radiologically and IFN was switched to sirolimus. One year after the switch, CSF rhinorrhea disappeared. Antiangiogenic therapy might inhibit proliferation of vascular endothelial cells in osteolytic lesions and lead to new bone formation. PMID:26713883

  16. Dramatic changes in the magnetic coupling mechanism for La-doped CaMnO3.

    PubMed

    Granado, E; Moreno, N O; Martinho, H; García, A; Sanjurjo, J A; Torriani, I; Rettori, C; Neumeier, J J; Oseroff, S B

    2001-06-01

    The exchange interactions in polycrystalline samples of Ca1-xLaxMnO3 (0.00< or =x< or =0.05) are studied by means of Raman scattering and electron paramagnetic resonance. Dramatic reductions in the spin-phonon interactions and magnetic correlations are observed for La doping levels as small as approximately 2%-3%. These results show that the charge carriers play an important role in the overall exchange coupling in the electron-doped manganites, even at very low doping levels.

  17. Blood group antigen distribution in Lao blood donors.

    PubMed

    Keokhamphoui, C; Urwijitaroon, Y; Kongphaly, D; Thammavong, T

    2012-01-01

    Blood group antigens can be distributed differently within different nationalities. Therefore, information about the prevalence of blood group antigens in the Lao population will be useful for providing better blood transfusion services in the Lao People's Democratic Republic. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of blood group antigens in Lao blood donors. Blood samples from 464 Lao national volunteer blood donors were typed for antigens in various blood group systems including ABO, MNS, P1PK, Rh, Kell, Lewis, Duffy, Kidd, and Diego. The results show similar antigen prevalence to that among Northeast Thais for ABO, MNS, P1PK, Rh, Kell, and Duffy systems. In the ABO system, 0 was the highest at 37.72 percent,followed by 35.56 percent B, 19.83 percent A1, 6.47 percent A1B,and 0.43 percent A2B. The common phenotypes were D+C+E-ce+at 60.43 percent, M+N-S-s+ at 46.55 percent, Fy(a+b-) at 80.82 percent, Jk(a+b+) at 39.44 percent, and kk at 99.72 percent.Interestingly, Le(a-b-) was found at 50.43 percent, which was significantly higher than previous reports in Thais and Taiwanese.The P1 antigen was found in only 18.97 percent, which is much lower than in Whites and Blacks. Rare phenotypes were Fy(a-b+)and Jk(a-b-), found at 0.22 percent and 4.31 percent, respectively.In terms of negative antigens the study shows 0.22 percent Fy(a-), 35.34 percent Jk(a-), 29.53 percent Jk(b-), 3.04 percent C-, 2.39 percent e-, and 5.17 percent M-. The high prevalence of C, e, and Fy" and immunogenicity of these antigens may induce alloimmunization in transfusion-dependent patients, creating difficulties providing blood from Lao donors. The information obtained from this study will be useful for improving transfusion therapy in the country, especially for estimation of the availability of compatible blood for patients who have produced antibodies. PMID:23421543

  18. Immune profiling with a Salmonella Typhi antigen microarray identifies new diagnostic biomarkers of human typhoid.

    PubMed

    Liang, Li; Juarez, Silvia; Nga, Tran Vu Thieu; Dunstan, Sarah; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Davies, D Huw; McSorley, Stephen; Baker, Stephen; Felgner, Philip L

    2013-01-01

    Current serological diagnostic assays for typhoid fever are based on detecting antibodies against Salmonella LPS or flagellum, resulting in a high false-positive rate. Here we used a protein microarray containing 2,724 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi antigens (>63% of proteome) and identified antibodies against 16 IgG antigens and 77 IgM antigens that were differentially reactive among acute typhoid patients and healthy controls. The IgG target antigens produced a sensitivity of 97% and specificity of 80%, whereas the IgM target antigens produced 97% and 91% sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Our analyses indicated certain features such as membrane association, secretion, and protein expression were significant enriching features of the reactive antigens. About 72% of the serodiagnostic antigens were within the top 25% of the ranked antigen list using a Naïve bayes classifier. These data provide an important resource for improved diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccine development against an important human pathogen. PMID:23304434

  19. BIOCHEMICAL STUDIES ON SO-CALLED SYPHILIS ANTIGEN.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, H; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1911-01-01

    of tissue is very variable. (c) Substances Soluble in Ether, Alcohol, and Aceton.-In this group are found varying amounts of fatty acids, both saturated and unsaturated, some neutral fats, cholesterin and many unidentified lipoidal bodies. This group causes either hemolysis or inhibition, of hemolysis. In other words, it is anticomplementary as well as hemolytic in the majority of preparations. At the same time, in some preparations it is, to a certain extent, antigenic. This great variation in the amounts of these substances in given extracts renders their presence in the antigen preparation undesirable. It is not denied, however, that, when added in adequate quantities, some of these substances may improve the activity of the antigenic lipoids. (d) Substances Insoluble in Aceton.-This group of substances consists of phosphatids. The best known among them is, of course, lecithin. Besides lecithin, however, there must be various other phosphatids present in this fraction. It will be noticed that the precipitate formed by mixing the ethereal solution with aceton contains a certain amount of lipoids insoluble in ether as well as in alcohol. Before the fractionation in aceton, all lipoids were soluble in ether or ethyl alcohol. Further analytical work on the nature of the phosphatids contained in this fraction is necessary. This fraction, in general, is more constant in amount in the various liver extracts. Biologically considered, it is the most important. It is usually non-hemolytic, frequently anticomplementary, but much more strongly antigenic than the other fractions. The antigenic strength varies with different preparations, being almost absent in the extracts derived from fatty livers. An aceton insoluble fraction may be strongly antigenic without any other auxiliary effects, or may be accompanied by an anticomplementary property. This fraction does not cause the so-called non-specific reaction with an active human serum. For these reasons it is recommended (as

  20. Killed poliovirus antigen titration in humans.

    PubMed

    Salk, J; Cohen, H; Fillastre, C; Stoeckel, P; Rey, J L; Schlumberger, M; Nicolas, A; van Steenis, G; van Wezel, A L; Triau, R; Saliou, P; Barry, L F; Moreau, J P; Mérieux, C

    1978-01-01

    To establish the antigen content of a killed poliovirus vaccine sufficiently potent to induce immunity with one or two doses and to establish a reference standard vaccine which has been tested under field conditions, a titration was carried out in infants to determine the amount of each of the three antigenic types of poliovirus vaccine required to induce seroconversion with a single dose. It has been observed that over a critical range of antigen concentration there is an essentially linear relationship between antibody response and quantity of antigen administered. More than 90 percent of the groups studied had detectable antibody after receiving single injections of 80, 8 and 64 D-antigen units of Types I, II and III, respectively. Four-fold less antigen for each of the three types was less effective. The implications of these findings for an efficient immunization procedure are discussed.

  1. Acquired loss of red cell Kell antigens.

    PubMed

    Vengelen-Tyler, V; Gonzalez, B; Garratty, G; Kruppe, C; Johnson, C L; Mueller, K A; Marsh, W L

    1987-02-01

    A 19-year-old patient with a long history of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura developed a potent antibody against a high-incidence antigen in the Kell blood group system. The direct antiglobulin test on his red cells was negative. His cells exhibited profound depression of Kell blood group antigens, but antigens of other blood groups were normal. Transfusion of incompatible blood was well tolerated and differential agglutination tests, using selected Rh antisera, showed in vivo survival of the transfused red cells for more than 8 weeks. However, the transfused red cells also showed acquired loss of Kell antigens. Five months after the initial findings, Kell-related antibody disappeared and Kell antigens reappeared on his red cells. The patient's serum stored from the initial investigation now reacted with his freshly collected red cells. These data suggest that an environmental agent in the patient's plasma was responsible for the temporary loss of Kell antigens from red cells in his circulation.

  2. Identification of the antigen content of electroimmunoprecipitates.

    PubMed

    Beyer, N Helena; Heegaard, Niels H H

    2013-01-01

    Polyclonal antibodies including purified antibody fractions and animal or human antisera may react with unknown antigens or antigens other than their main specificity in reactions that are best visualized by gel electroimmunoprecipitation methods, e.g., when analyzing complex antigen mixtures. The great advantage of gel immunoprecipitation approaches is that each immunoprecipitate contains antigen in a pure form and that the precipitate is separated by position, shape, and size from other precipitates in the complex patterns of crossed immunoelectrophoresis. The identification of the antigen content of such immunoprecipitates is important but challenging because of the very stable, high affinity complex formation leading to precipitation in the gels. Here, we present detailed step-by-step recipes for identifying the antigen content of electroimmunoprecipitates.

  3. The ABCs of artificial antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyun V; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Rivière, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel

    2004-04-01

    Artificial antigen presentation aims to accelerate the establishment of therapeutic cellular immunity. Artificial antigen-presenting cells (AAPCs) and their cell-free substitutes are designed to stimulate the expansion and acquisition of optimal therapeutic features of T cells before therapeutic infusion, without the need for autologous antigen-presenting cells. Compelling recent advances include fibroblast AAPCs that process antigens, magnetic beads that are antigen specific, novel T-cell costimulatory combinations, the augmentation of therapeutic potency of adoptively transferred T lymphocytes by interleukin-15, and the safe use of dendritic cell-derived exosomes pulsed with tumor antigen. Whereas the safety and potency of the various systems warrant further preclinical and clinical studies, these emerging technologies are poised to have a major impact on adoptive T-cell therapy and the investigation of T cell-mediated immunity. PMID:15060556

  4. The Impact of Songwriting, Dramatization, and Performance on Third Graders' Ability To Learn and Retain Social Studies Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Deborah

    A study examined the impact of song writing, dramatization, and performance on third graders' ability to learn and retain social studies concepts. Students (n=18) were taught a unit on natural land forms and bodies of water in which they dramatized and performed songs which incorporated the main ideas of each unit. Upon completion of each unit,…

  5. Antigenic structures stably expressed by recombinant TGEV-derived vectors.

    PubMed

    Becares, Martina; Sanchez, Carlos M; Sola, Isabel; Enjuanes, Luis; Zuñiga, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are positive-stranded RNA viruses with potential as immunization vectors, expressing high levels of heterologous genes and eliciting both secretory and systemic immune responses. Nevertheless, its high recombination rate may result in the loss of the full-length foreign gene, limiting their use as vectors. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was engineered to express porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) small protein domains, as a strategy to improve heterologous gene stability. After serial passage in tissue cultures, stable expression of small PRRSV protein antigenic domains was achieved. Therefore, size reduction of the heterologous genes inserted in CoV-derived vectors led to the stable expression of antigenic domains. Immunization of piglets with these TGEV vectors led to partial protection against a challenge with a virulent PRRSV strain, as immunized animals showed reduced clinical signs and lung damage. Further improvement of TGEV-derived vectors will require the engineering of vectors with decreased recombination rate.

  6. Human Leukocyte Antigen Diversity: A Southern African Perspective.

    PubMed

    Tshabalala, Mqondisi; Mellet, Juanita; Pepper, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasingly well-documented evidence of high genetic, ethnic, and linguistic diversity amongst African populations, there is limited data on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) diversity in these populations. HLA is part of the host defense mechanism mediated through antigen presentation to effector cells of the immune system. With the high disease burden in southern Africa, HLA diversity data is increasingly important in the design of population-specific vaccines and the improvement of transplantation therapeutic interventions. This review highlights the paucity of HLA diversity data amongst southern African populations and defines a need for information of this kind. This information will support disease association studies, provide guidance in vaccine design, and improve transplantation outcomes. PMID:26347896

  7. Human Leukocyte Antigen Diversity: A Southern African Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Tshabalala, Mqondisi; Mellet, Juanita; Pepper, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasingly well-documented evidence of high genetic, ethnic, and linguistic diversity amongst African populations, there is limited data on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) diversity in these populations. HLA is part of the host defense mechanism mediated through antigen presentation to effector cells of the immune system. With the high disease burden in southern Africa, HLA diversity data is increasingly important in the design of population-specific vaccines and the improvement of transplantation therapeutic interventions. This review highlights the paucity of HLA diversity data amongst southern African populations and defines a need for information of this kind. This information will support disease association studies, provide guidance in vaccine design, and improve transplantation outcomes. PMID:26347896

  8. PROSTATE SPECIFIC MEMBRANE ANTIGEN-BASED IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Joseph R.; Akhtar, Naveed H.; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Anand, Alok; Deh, Kofi; Tagawa, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common non-cutaneous malignancy affecting men in North America. Despite significant efforts, conventional imaging of PC does not contribute to patient management as much as imaging performed for other common cancers. Given the lack of specificity in conventional imaging techniques, one possible solution is to screen for PC specific antigenic targets and generate agents able to specifically bind. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is over-expressed in PC tissue, with low levels of expression in the small intestine, renal tubular cells and salivary gland. The first clinical agent for targeting PSMA was 111In-capromab, involving an antibody recognizing the internal domain of PSMA. The second- and third-generation humanized PSMA binding antibodies have the potential to overcome some of the limitations inherent to capromab pendetide i.e. inability to bind to live PC cells. One example is the humanized monoclonal antibody J591 (Hu mAb J591) that was developed primarily for therapeutic purposes but also has interesting imaging characteristics including the identification of bone metastases in PC. The major disadvantage of use of mAb for imaging is slow target recognition and background clearance in an appropriate timeframe for diagnostic imaging. Urea-based compounds such as small molecule inhibitors may also present promising agents for PC imaging with SPECT and PET. Two such small-molecule inhibitors targeting PSMA, MIP-1072 and MIP-1095, have exhibited high affinity for PSMA. The uptake of 123I-MIP-1072 and 123I-MIP-1095 in PC xenografts have imaged successfully with favorable properties amenable to human trials. While advances in conventional imaging will continue, Ab and small molecule imaging exemplified by PSMA targeting have the greatest potential to improve diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. PMID:22658884

  9. Mosquito Passage Dramatically Changes var Gene Expression in Controlled Human Plasmodium falciparum Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Anna; Petter, Michaela; Krumkamp, Ralf; Esen, Meral; Held, Jana; Scholz, Judith A. M.; Li, Tao; Sim, B. Kim Lee; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Kremsner, Peter G.; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Duffy, Michael F.; Tannich, Egbert

    2016-01-01

    Virulence of the most deadly malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is linked to the variant surface antigen PfEMP1, which is encoded by about 60 var genes per parasite genome. Although the expression of particular variants has been associated with different clinical outcomes, little is known about var gene expression at the onset of infection. By analyzing controlled human malaria infections via quantitative real-time PCR, we show that parasite populations from 18 volunteers expressed virtually identical transcript patterns that were dominated by the subtelomeric var gene group B and, to a lesser extent, group A. Furthermore, major changes in composition and frequency of var gene transcripts were detected between the parental parasite culture that was used to infect mosquitoes and Plasmodia recovered from infected volunteers, suggesting that P. falciparum resets its var gene expression during mosquito passage and starts with the broad expression of a specific subset of var genes when entering the human blood phase. PMID:27070311

  10. Mosquito Passage Dramatically Changes var Gene Expression in Controlled Human Plasmodium falciparum Infections.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Anna; Petter, Michaela; Krumkamp, Ralf; Esen, Meral; Held, Jana; Scholz, Judith A M; Li, Tao; Sim, B Kim Lee; Hoffman, Stephen L; Kremsner, Peter G; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Duffy, Michael F; Tannich, Egbert

    2016-04-01

    Virulence of the most deadly malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is linked to the variant surface antigen PfEMP1, which is encoded by about 60 var genes per parasite genome. Although the expression of particular variants has been associated with different clinical outcomes, little is known about var gene expression at the onset of infection. By analyzing controlled human malaria infections via quantitative real-time PCR, we show that parasite populations from 18 volunteers expressed virtually identical transcript patterns that were dominated by the subtelomeric var gene group B and, to a lesser extent, group A. Furthermore, major changes in composition and frequency of var gene transcripts were detected between the parental parasite culture that was used to infect mosquitoes and Plasmodia recovered from infected volunteers, suggesting that P. falciparum resets its var gene expression during mosquito passage and starts with the broad expression of a specific subset of var genes when entering the human blood phase.

  11. Antigenic variation in African trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Horn, David

    2014-01-01

    Studies on Variant Surface Glycoproteins (VSGs) and antigenic variation in the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, have yielded a remarkable range of novel and important insights. The features first identified in T. brucei extend from unique to conserved-among-trypanosomatids to conserved-among-eukaryotes. Consequently, much of what we now know about trypanosomatid biology and much of the technology available has its origin in studies related to VSGs. T. brucei is now probably the most advanced early branched eukaryote in terms of experimental tractability and can be approached as a pathogen, as a model for studies on fundamental processes, as a model for studies on eukaryotic evolution or often all of the above. In terms of antigenic variation itself, substantial progress has been made in understanding the expression and switching of the VSG coat, while outstanding questions continue to stimulate innovative new approaches. There are large numbers of VSG genes in the genome but only one is expressed at a time, always immediately adjacent to a telomere. DNA repair processes allow a new VSG to be copied into the single transcribed locus. A coordinated transcriptional switch can also allow a new VSG gene to be activated without any detectable change in the DNA sequence, thereby maintaining singular expression, also known as allelic exclusion. I review the story behind VSGs; the genes, their expression and switching, their central role in T. brucei virulence, the discoveries that emerged along the way and the persistent questions relating to allelic exclusion in particular. PMID:24859277

  12. Minor histocompatibility antigens: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Spierings, Eric

    2014-10-01

    Minor histocompatibility (H) antigens are key molecules driving allo-immune responses in both graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD) and in graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) reactivity in human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). Dissection of the dual function of minor H antigens became evident through their different modes of tissue and cell expression, i.e. hematopoietic system-restricted or broad. Broadly expressed minor H antigens can cause both GvHD and GvL effects, while hematopoietic system-restricted minor H antigens are more prone to induce GvL responses. This phenomenon renders the latter group of minor H antigens as curative tools for HSCT-based immunotherapy of hematological malignancies and disorders, in which minor H antigen-specific responses are enhanced in order to eradicate the malignant cells. This article describes the immunogenetics of minor H antigens and methods that have been developed to identify them. Moreover, it summarizes the clinical relevance of minor H antigens in transplantation, with special regards to allogeneic HSCT and solid-organ transplantation.

  13. Tumor-associated antigens in gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    DiSaia, P J

    1975-12-01

    If the study of tumor immunology is to have a profound impact on clinical medicine, certain hypotheses must be proven to be valid. First and foremost, it must be demonstrated that malignant tissue possesses antigenic substances (probably protein moieties) that are unique to that particular malignant process. In addition, these antigenic substances must be very similar in histologically similar tumors. Second, the host defense mechanisms must be capable of reacting to these tumor-associated antigens. The reaction is, of course, necessary in order to develop both diagnostic and therapeutic routes of application. The reaction of the immunologic system to these tumor-associated antigens could be monitored as an early serodiagnostic tool for subclinical cancer, and the cytotoxic reaction holds great promise as an immunotherapeutic tool. The essence of tumor immunologic research can thus be stated in the form of the following questions: 1. Do histologically similar cancers from identical primary sites share common tumor-associated antigens? 2. Does the immunologic system react to these antigens? 3. Can this reaction be assayed on one hand for serodiagnosis and augmented on the other for immunotherapy? Specific antigens have been found in animal tumors and have been divided into two classes: the viral induced tumors, which share common antigens when caused by the same viral agent, and carcinogen-induced tumors, which appear to have unique antigenic determinants for each tumor. In recent years a great many human tumors have been found to have tumor-associated antigens; these include colonic carcinoma, neuroblastoma, melanoma, soft tissue and osteogenic sarcoma, bladder carcinoma and Burkitt's lymphoma. This report includes evidence for the existence of such antigens in adenocarcinoma of the ovary and squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. The laboratory evidence that has been presented would suggest that there are both a cell-mediated response and humoral response to the

  14. Integrating influenza antigenic dynamics with molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A; Lemey, Philippe; Dudas, Gytis; Gregory, Victoria; Hay, Alan J; McCauley, John W; Russell, Colin A; Smith, Derek J; Rambaut, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic evolution allowing mutant viruses to evade host immunity acquired to previous virus strains. Antigenic phenotype is often assessed through pairwise measurement of cross-reactivity between influenza strains using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Here, we extend previous approaches to antigenic cartography, and simultaneously characterize antigenic and genetic evolution by modeling the diffusion of antigenic phenotype over a shared virus phylogeny. Using HI data from influenza lineages A/H3N2, A/H1N1, B/Victoria and B/Yamagata, we determine patterns of antigenic drift across viral lineages, showing that A/H3N2 evolves faster and in a more punctuated fashion than other influenza lineages. We also show that year-to-year antigenic drift appears to drive incidence patterns within each influenza lineage. This work makes possible substantial future advances in investigating the dynamics of influenza and other antigenically-variable pathogens by providing a model that intimately combines molecular and antigenic evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01914.001 PMID:24497547

  15. Antigen-induced generation of lyso-phospholipids in human airways

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to examine the formation of phospholipids, 1-radyl-2-lysosn-glycero-phospholipids (lyso-PL) and 2- acetylated phospholipids (such as PAF) as well as mechanisms responsible for generating these phospholipids in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAI.F) from allergic subjects challenged with antigen. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed in normal and allergic subjects before, 5-30 min, 6 h, and 20 h after segmental antigen challenge via a wedged bronchoscope. Levels of 1-hexadecyl-2-lyso-phospholipids and 1- hexadecyl-2-acetyl-phospholipids were initially determined by negative ion chemical ionization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (NICI- GC/MS). Antigen dramatically elevated quantities of 1-hexadecyl-2-lyso- phospholipids in allergic subjects 20 h after challenge when compared to non-allergic controls. In contrast, there was not a significant increase in levels of 1-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-phospholipids after antigen challenge. Closer examination of 1-radyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine (GPC) revealed that 1-palmitoyl-2-lyso-GPC, 1-myristoyl- 2-lyso-GPC and 1-hexadecyl-2-lyso-GPC were three major molecular species produced after antigen challenge. 1-palmitoyl-2-lyso-GPC increased sevenfold to levels of 222 +/- 75 ng/ml of BALF 20 h after antigen challenge. The elevated levels of lyso-PL correlated with levels of albumin used to assess plasma exudation induced by allergen challenge. In contrast, the time course of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) or 9 alpha, 11 beta PGF2 (11 beta PGF2) formation did not correlate with lyso-PL generation. To examine the mechanism leading to lyso- phospholipid formation in antigen-challenged allergic subjects, secretory phospholipase A2 (PI.A2) and acetyl hydrolase activities were measured. There was a significant increase in PLA2 activity found in BALF of allergic subjects challenged with antigen when compared to saline controls. This activity was neutralized by an antibody directed against low molecular

  16. On the potentially dramatic history of the super-Earth ρ 55 Cancri e

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Bradley M. S.; Zink, Jonathon

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate that tidal evolution of the inner planet (`e') of the system orbiting the star ρ 55 Cancri could have led to passage through two secular resonances with other planets in the system. The consequence of this evolution is excitation of both the planetary eccentricity and inclination relative to the original orbital plane. The large mass ratio between the innermost planet and the others means that these excitations can be of substantial amplitude and can have dramatic consequences for the system organization. Such evolution can potentially explain the large observed mutual inclination between the innermost and outermost planets in the system, and implies that tidal heating could have substantially modified the structure of planet e, and possibly reduced its mass by Roche lobe overflow. Similar inner secular resonances may be found in many multiple planet systems and suggest that many of the innermost planets in these systems could have suffered similar evolutions.

  17. Dramatic Response to Cisplatin Window Therapy in a Boy With Advanced Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Trizzino, Antonino; Ziino, Ottavio; Parafioriti, Antonina; Podda, Marta; Tropia, Serena; Luksch, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) is the second most common type of primary bone malignancy, and retains a high propensity to metastasize; the prognosis of patients with disseminated disease is very poor, with an event-free survival rate of <20%. Current multimodality treatment for ES consists of combined chemotherapy before and concurrent with surgery and local radiotherapy for the involved bone. Cisplatin is one of the most widely used drugs for the treatment of bone tumors in children, but is not currently used in ES. We describe a child with multifocal ES, treated with a phase II trial including a single-drug window therapy, which displayed a dramatic response to 2 courses of cisplatin and had a favorable outcome. PMID:23892353

  18. Publications on Peripheral Nerve Injuries during World War I: A Dramatic Increase in Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Publications from French (Jules Tinel and Chiriachitza Athanassio-Bénisty), English (James Purves-Stewart, Arthur Henry Evans and Hartley Sidney Carter), German (Otfrid Foerster and Hermann Oppenheim) and American (Charles Harrison Frazier and Byron Stookey) physicians from both sides of the front during World War I (WWI) contributed to a dramatic increase in knowledge about peripheral nerve injuries. Silas Weir Mitchell's original experience with respect to these injuries, and particularly causalgia, during the American Civil War was further expanded in Europe during WWI. Following the translation of one of his books, he was referred to mainly by French physicians. During WWI, several French books were in turn translated into English, which influenced American physicians, as was observed in the case of Byron Stookey. The establishment of neurological centres played an important role in the concentration of experience and knowledge. Several eponyms originated during this period (including the Hoffmann-Tinel sign and the Froment sign). Electrodiagnostic tools were increasingly used.

  19. Dramatic inundation changes of China's two largest freshwater lakes linked to the Three Gorges Dam.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lian; Hu, Chuanmin; Chen, Xiaoling; Zhao, Xi

    2013-09-01

    Ever since its planning in the 1990s, the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) caused endless debate in China on its potential impacts on the environment and humans. However, to date, synoptic assessment of environmental changes and their potential linkage with the TGD is still lacking. Here, we combine remote sensing, meteorological, and hydrological observations to investigate the potential influence of the TGD on the downstream freshwater lakes. A 10 year Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) time series from 2000 to 2009 revealed significantly decreasing trends (3.3 and 3.6%/year) in the inundation areas of the two largest freshwater lakes of China (Poyang Lake and Dongting Lake) downstream of the TGD since its impoundment in 2003, after which both relative humidity and surface runoff coefficient of the lakes' drainages also dropped dramatically. These environmental changes appear to be linked to the TGD.

  20. Idiopathic myenteric ganglionitis underlying acute 'dramatic' intestinal pseudoobstruction: report of an exceptional case.

    PubMed

    Racalbuto, A; Magro, G; Lanteri, R; Aliotta, I; Santangelo, M; Di Cataldo, A

    2008-09-01

    Inflammation of the myenteric plexus of the gastrointestinal tract is a very rare pathological condition, with few reports in the medical literature. This pathological condition causes atonic gut motor dysfunction and is principally secondary to other diseases, being reported nearly solely as a paraneoplastic phenomenon in neuroendocrine lung tumors, including small cell carcinomas or neuroblastomas. In addition it can also be associated with disorders of the central nervous system, although it has rarely been described in Chagas disease. It has been named 'idiopathic myenteric ganglionitis' because no apparent causes can be demonstrated. We report the clinicopathologic findings of an exceptional case of a young woman affected by severe chronic constipation suddenly changing into acute intestinal pseudoobstruction with dramatic evolution. Relationships between ganglionitis, idiopathic constipation and acute intestinal pseudoobstruction as well as therapeutic implications are discussed.

  1. Dramatic inundation changes of China's two largest freshwater lakes linked to the Three Gorges Dam.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lian; Hu, Chuanmin; Chen, Xiaoling; Zhao, Xi

    2013-09-01

    Ever since its planning in the 1990s, the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) caused endless debate in China on its potential impacts on the environment and humans. However, to date, synoptic assessment of environmental changes and their potential linkage with the TGD is still lacking. Here, we combine remote sensing, meteorological, and hydrological observations to investigate the potential influence of the TGD on the downstream freshwater lakes. A 10 year Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) time series from 2000 to 2009 revealed significantly decreasing trends (3.3 and 3.6%/year) in the inundation areas of the two largest freshwater lakes of China (Poyang Lake and Dongting Lake) downstream of the TGD since its impoundment in 2003, after which both relative humidity and surface runoff coefficient of the lakes' drainages also dropped dramatically. These environmental changes appear to be linked to the TGD. PMID:23919680

  2. Antigens for CD4 and CD8 T Cells in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia S.; Lewinsohn, David; Sette, Alessandro; Lewinsohn, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), represents an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide for which an improved vaccine and immunodiagnostics are urgently needed. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells play an important role in host defense to TB. Definition of the antigens recognized by these T cells is critical for improved understanding of the immunobiology of TB and for development of vaccines and diagnostics. Herein, the antigens and epitopes recognized by classically HLA class I– and II–restricted CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in humans infected with MTB are reviewed. Immunodominant antigens and epitopes have been defined using approaches targeting particular TB proteins or classes of proteins and by genome-wide discovery approaches. Antigens and epitopes recognized by classically restricted CD4+ and CD8+ T cells show extensive breadth and diversity in MTB-infected humans. PMID:24852051

  3. Antigenically Modified Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Generate Antigen-Presenting Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jieming; Wu, Chunxiao; Wang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide a promising platform to produce dendritic cell (DC) vaccine. To streamline the production process, we investigated a unique antigen-loading strategy that suits this novel platform. Specifically, we stably modified hPSCs using tumour antigen genes in the form of a full-length tumour antigen gene or an artificial tumour antigen epitope-coding minigene. Such antigenically modified hPSCs were able to differentiate into tumour antigen-presenting DCs. Without conventional antigen-loading, DCs derived from the minigene-modified hPSCs were ready to prime a tumour antigen-specific T cell response and further expand these specific T cells in restimulation processes. These expanded tumour antigen-specific T cells were potent effectors with central memory or effector memory phenotype. Thus, we demonstrated that immunocompetent tumour antigen-loaded DCs can be directly generated from antigenically modified hPSCs. Using such strategy, we can completely eliminate the conventional antigen-loading step and significantly simplify the production of DC vaccine from hPSCs. PMID:26471005

  4. Enhanced specificity of immunoblotting using radiolabeled antigen overlay: studies of blood coagulation factor XII and prekallikrein in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Laemmle, B.; Berrettini, M.; Griffin, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Immunoblotting of blood coagulation Factor XII and plasma prekallikrein in whole plasma was performed using radiolabeled antigen for detection. After sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of plasma and transfer to nitrocellulose sheets, the blots were first reacted with polyclonal goat anti-Factor XII or anti-prekallikrein antisera and then with /sup 125/I-Factor XII or /sup 125/I-prekallikrein, respectively. A major advantage of using radiolabeled antigen rather than radiolabeled secondary antibody was enhanced specificity of immunodetection of these antigens in plasma. This procedure was sensitive to approx.0.3 ng of either Factor XII or prekallikrein antigen and was useful for detection of Factor XII cleavage fragments in contact activated plasma. Radiolabeled antigen overlay may improve the specificity of immunoblotting of trace antigens in any complex mixtures.

  5. A computational framework for influenza antigenic cartography.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2010-10-07

    Influenza viruses have been responsible for large losses of lives around the world and continue to present a great public health challenge. Antigenic characterization based on hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay is one of the routine procedures for influenza vaccine strain selection. However, HI assay is only a crude experiment reflecting the antigenic correlations among testing antigens (viruses) and reference antisera (antibodies). Moreover, antigenic characterization is usually based on more than one HI dataset. The combination of multiple datasets results in an incomplete HI matrix with many unobserved entries. This paper proposes a new computational framework for constructing an influenza antigenic cartography from this incomplete matrix, which we refer to as Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS). In this approach, we first reconstruct the HI matrices with viruses and antibodies using low-rank matrix completion, and then generate the two-dimensional antigenic cartography using multidimensional scaling. Moreover, for influenza HI tables with herd immunity effect (such as those from Human influenza viruses), we propose a temporal model to reduce the inherent temporal bias of HI tables caused by herd immunity. By applying our method in HI datasets containing H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from 1968 to 2003, we identified eleven clusters of antigenic variants, representing all major antigenic drift events in these 36 years. Our results showed that both the completed HI matrix and the antigenic cartography obtained via MC-MDS are useful in identifying influenza antigenic variants and thus can be used to facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection. The webserver is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap.

  6. Honokiol nanosuspensions: preparation, increased oral bioavailability and dramatically enhanced biodistribution in the cardio-cerebro-vascular system.

    PubMed

    Han, Meihua; Yu, Xin; Guo, Yifei; Wang, Yanhong; Kuang, Haixue; Wang, Xiangtao

    2014-04-01

    Honokiol is a phytochemical component with multiple pharmacological activities, but Honokiol's wider use has been restricted by its poor solubility. Using bovine serum albumin and polyvinylpyrrolidone as stabilisers in a solvent precipitation-ultrasonication method, Honokiol nanosuspensions were prepared with a mean particle size of 116.2 nm (±2 nm), a zeta potential of -44.7 mV (±1.7 mV) and a high drug payload of 50.4 ± 0.6% (w/w). X-ray powder diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry indicated that Honokiol was in an amorphous state in the nanosuspensions, in contrast with bulk Honokiol powder. Honokiol was released faster in vitro from nanosuspensions with no burst release, and the highest 98% cumulative release was after 60 h. Honokiol nanosuspensions improved the oral bioavailability of Honokiol in in vivo studies in rats with a 3.94-fold Cmax and a 2.2-fold AUC(0-t). Remarkably, in contrast to oral administration, intraperitoneal administration of Honokiol nanosuspensions could dramatically alter the biodistribution of Honokiol, resulting in a much higher drug level and tissue bioavailability in the blood, heart and brain, benefitting the treatment of cardio-cerebro-vascular diseases.

  7. Abatacept (cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4-immunoglobulin) improves B cell function and regulatory T cell inhibitory capacity in rheumatoid arthritis patients non-responding to anti-tumour necrosis factor-α agents

    PubMed Central

    Picchianti Diamanti, A; Rosado, M M; Scarsella, M; Germano, V; Giorda, E; Cascioli, S; Laganà, B; D'Amelio, R; Carsetti, R

    2014-01-01

    The use of biological agents combined with methotrexate (MTX) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients has strongly improved disease outcome. In this study, the effects of abatacept on the size and function of circulating B and T cells in RA patients not responding to anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α have been analysed, with the aim of identifying immunological parameters helpful to choosing suitable tailored therapies. We analysed the frequency of peripheral B and T cell subsets, B cell function and T regulatory cell (Treg) inhibitory function in 20 moderate/severe RA patients, according to the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR)/American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, primary non-responders to one TNF-α blocking agent, who received abatacept + MTX. Patients were studied before and 6 months after therapy. We found that abatacept therapy significantly reduced disease activity score on 44 joints (DAS)/erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) values without causing severe side effects. The size of the circulating B and T cell compartments in RA patients was not significantly different from healthy donors, but B cell proliferation and plasma cell differentiation was impaired before therapy and restored by abatacept. While Treg cell frequency was normal, its inhibitory function was absent before therapy and was partially recovered 6 months after abatacept. B and Treg cell function is impaired in RA patients not responding to the first anti-TNF-α agent. Abatacept therapy was able to rescue immune function and led to an effective and safe clinical outcome, suggesting that RA patients, in whom anti-TNF-α failed, are immunologically prone to benefit from an agent targeting a different pathway. PMID:24773026

  8. BINDING OF ANTIGEN BY IMMUNOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Bystryn, Jean-Claude; Siskind, Gregory W.; Uhr, Jonathan W.

    1973-01-01

    The binding of antigen to cells with antibody on their surface has been studied in a model system consisting of murine myeloma cells (MOPC 315) and DNP conjugates. Specific binding occurred between the DNP groups of DNP conjugates and cell surface immunoglobulin. Using this model, the binding affinities of multivalent and univalent DNP conjugates were measured directly by equilibrium-binding techniques and indirectly by displacement of bound conjugate with univalent hapten. With both approaches the multivalent conjugate was shown to bind to cells with an avidity 100–300 fold greater than the univalent hapten. Nonspecific binding of unrelated protein and repeated washing of cells was found to markedly dedecrease the specific binding of univalent conjugates, presumably because the relatively weak bonds dissociate readily. PMID:4734402

  9. Pecking order among tumor-specific antigens.

    PubMed

    Urban, J L; Van Waes, C; Schreiber, H

    1984-02-01

    The ultraviolet light-induced fibrosarcoma 1591 is regularly rejected upon transplantation into young syngeneic mice; in rare instances, however, this tumor grows progressively and the tumors that develop are then heritably stable variant progressor tumors (1591-PRO tumors). In this study, we have induced transplantation resistance to 1591-PRO tumors and determined which antigens were recognized by mice that rejected these progressor tumors. We found that cytolytic T cells of such mice recognized a 1591-specific antigen that was present not only on all the independently derived 1591-PRO tumors but also on the parental regressor tumor (1591-RE). However, the cytolytic immune response of mice that rejected 1591-RE lysed 1591-RE tumor cells but not 1591-PRO tumor cells. Thus, the 1591-RE tumor seemed to express two antigens that were specific for tumors of the 1591 lineage, one that was lost and a second that was retained by 1591-PRO tumor cells. Mice challenged with 1591-R# tumor cells mounted a response to only one of the tumor-specific antigens which was therefore "immunodominant" over the other "immunorecessive" antigen. This immunorecessive antigen became the target of the immune response once the immunodominant antigen was lost. This "pecking order" interfered with the simultaneous recognition of two tumor-specific antigens and this mechanism may favor immune escape.

  10. Lipase Processing of Complex Lipid Antigens.

    PubMed

    Sander, Peter; Becker, Katja; Molin, Michael Dal

    2016-09-22

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis synthesizes a wide variety of complex lipids that can serve as antigens in immune recognition of the bacterium. In this issue of Cell Chemical Biology, Gilleron et al. (2016) identify key enzymes essential for lipid antigen processing, which is required for CD1b-restricted T cell activation. PMID:27662250

  11. Astrocytes produce interferon that enhances the expression of H-2 antigens on a subpopulation of brain cells

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Using primary culture methods, we show that purified astrocytes from embryonic mouse or rat central nervous system (CNS) can be induced to produce interferon (IFN) activity when pretreated with a standard IFN- superinducing regimen of polyribonucleotide, cycloheximide, and actinomycin D, whereas IFN activity was not inducible in neuronal cultures derived from mouse CNS. Astrocyte IFN displays inductive, kinetic, physicochemical, and antigenic properties similar to those of IFN-alpha/beta, but is dissimilar to lymphocyte IFN (IFN-gamma). Treatment of pure astrocytic cultures or astrocytes cultured with neurons with astrocyte IFN or IFN-alpha/beta induced a dramatic increase in the expression of H-2 antigens on a subpopulation of astrocytes. Neither neurons nor oligodendroglia expressed detectable levels of H-2 antigens when exposed to astrocyte IFN, IFN-alpha/beta, or to IFN-beta. Injection of astrocyte IFN or IFN-alpha/beta directly into brains of newborn mice indicated that H-2 antigens were also induced in vivo. None of the IFNs (astrocyte, alpha/beta, or beta) tested induced Ia antigens on CNS cells in vitro or in vivo. Since H-2 antigens have a critical role in immune responses, astrocyte IFN may initiate and participate in immune reactions that contribute to immunoprotective and immunopathological responses in the CNS. PMID:2423537

  12. Two-dimensional periodic relief grating as a versatile platform for selective immunosorbent assay and visualizing of antigens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jem-Kun; Zhou, Gang-Yan; Huang, Chih-Feng; Chang, Jia-Yaw

    2013-04-24

    In this study, we fabricated a nanopillar array of silicon oxide, involving very-large-scale integration (VLSI) and reactive ion etching (RIE), as two-dimensional periodic relief gratings (2DPRGs) on Si surfaces. Antihuman ALB was successively oriented on the pillar surface of 2DPRG modified protein G as an optical detector that is specific for targeted antigen. The antibody modified 2DPRG alone produces insignificant structure change, but upon immunocapture of antigens, the antigen filling in the 2DPRG leads to a dramatic change of the pillar scale. Binding of the antibodies to the 2DPRG occurs in a way that still allows them to function and selectively bind antigen. The performance of the sensor was evaluated by capturing HRP-human ALB on the antibody-modified 2DPRG and measuring the effective refractive index (neff) resulting from the attachment of antigens. The neff values of the 2DPRG are found to relate with the pillar scale of the 2DPRG, generated by antigen coupling, resulting in color change from pure green to orange, observed by the naked eye along an incident angle of 10-20°. Moreover, we calculated the filling factors inside the 2DPRG with effective-medium theory to verify the pillar structure changes. This technique eliminates much of the surface modifications and the secondary immunochemical or enzyme-linked steps that are common in immunoassays. Such films have potential applications as optical biosensors.

  13. Protein antigen delivery by gene gun-mediated epidermal antigen incorporation (EAI).

    PubMed

    Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Ritter, Uwe; Thalhamer, Josef; Weiss, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The gene gun technology can not only be employed for efficient transfer of gene vaccines into upper layers of the skin, but also for application of protein antigens. As a tissue rich in professional antigen presenting cells, the skin represents an attractive target for immunizations. In this chapter we present a method for delivery of the model antigen ovalbumin into the skin of mice termed epidermal antigen incorporation and describe in detail how antigen-specific proliferation in draining lymph nodes can be followed by flow cytometry.

  14. Obstetrical APS: is there a place for hydroxychloroquine to improve the pregnancy outcome?

    PubMed

    Mekinian, Arsene; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Masseau, Agathe; Tincani, Angela; De Caroli, Sara; Alijotas-Reig, Jaume; Ruffatti, Amelia; Ambrozic, Ales; Botta, Angela; Le Guern, Véronique; Fritsch-Stork, Ruth; Nicaise-Roland, Pascale; Carbonne, Bruno; Carbillon, Lionel; Fain, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The use of the conventional APS treatment (the combination of low-dose aspirin and LMWH) dramatically improved the obstetrical prognosis in primary obstetrical APS (OAPS). The persistence of adverse pregnancy outcome raises the need to find other drugs to improve obstetrical outcome. Hydroxychloroquine is widely used in patients with various autoimmune diseases, particularly SLE. Antimalarials have many anti-inflammatory, anti-aggregant and immune-regulatory properties: they inhibit phospholipase activity, stabilize lysosomal membranes, block the production of several pro-inflammatory cytokines and, in addition, impair complement-dependent antigen-antibody reactions. There is ample evidence of protective effects of hydroxychloroquine in OAPS similar to the situation in SLE arising from in vitro studies of pathophysiological working mechanism of hydroxychloroquine. However, the clinical data on the use of hydroxychloroquine in primary APS are lacking and prospective studies are necessary.

  15. Lymphoid-specific antigen: distribution and behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Potworowski, E. F.; Nairn, R. C.

    1968-01-01

    The distribution of a lymphoid-specific antigen has been studied by immunofluorescence in the thymus and other lymphoid organs of the rat and in the thymuses of other vertebrate species. It was demonstrable in all rat lymphocytes except those of the bone marrow. The thymic lymphocytes of all warm-blooded vertebrates also reacted with the lymphoid-specific serum. Plasma cells in antigenically stimulated lymph nodes did not seem to possess the antigen but similar cells appearing in lymph nodes of rats which had been irradiated and injected with marrow cells of the same strain showed a strong reaction with the antiserum. The antigen is depleted in human and murine leukaemic lymphocytes. X-irradiation did not appear to affect the antigen significantly in cells surviving the treatment. ImagesFIG. 1-6 PMID:4871349

  16. A mouse model for nonsense mutation bypass therapy shows a dramatic multiday response to geneticin

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunmei; Feng, Jinong; Song, Wenjia; Wang, Jicheng; Tsai, Becky; Zhang, Yunwu; Scaringe, William A.; Hill, Kathleen A.; Margaritis, Paris; High, Katherine A.; Sommer, Steve S.

    2007-01-01

    Aminoglycosides can bypass nonsense mutations and are the prototypic agents for translational bypass therapy (TBT). Initial results demonstrate the need for more potent drugs and an in vivo model system for quantitative assessment of TBT. Herein, we present an in vivo system for evaluating the efficacy of premature stop codon management therapies: in vivo quantitative stop codon management repli-sampling TBT efficacy assay (IQSCMaRTEA). Application of IQSCMaRTEA reveals that geneticin is much more efficacious in vivo than gentamicin. Treatment with geneticin elicits a multiday response, and residual F9 antigen can be detected after 3 weeks. These data demonstrate the utility of IQSCMaRTEA for evaluating drugs that bypass nonsense mutations. In addition, IQSCMaRTEA may be helpful for testing inhibitors of nonsense-mediated decay, as stop codon management therapy will sometimes require inhibition of nonsense-mediated decay and translational bypass of the nonsense mutation. Furthermore, geneticin, its metabolites, or better tolerated analogues should be evaluated as a general treatment with multiday response for severe genetic disease caused by nonsense mutation. PMID:17881586

  17. Organizing Schools for Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryk, Anthony S.

    2010-01-01

    How schools are organized and interact with the local community can dramatically alter the odds for improving student achievement. There are five essential supports for school improvement: a coherent instructional guidance system, the professional capacity of its faculty, strong parent-community-school ties, a student-centered learning climate,…

  18. Calcium-dependent antigen binding as a novel modality for antibody recycling by endosomal antigen dissociation.

    PubMed

    Hironiwa, N; Ishii, S; Kadono, S; Iwayanagi, Y; Mimoto, F; Habu, K; Igawa, T; Hattori, K

    2016-01-01

    The pH-dependent antigen binding antibody, termed a recycling antibody, has recently been reported as an attractive type of second-generation engineered therapeutic antibody. A recycling antibody can dissociate antigen in the acidic endosome, and thus bind to its antigen multiple times. As a consequence, a recycling antibody can neutralize large amounts of antigen in plasma. Because this approach relies on histidine residues to achieve pH-dependent antigen binding, which could limit the epitopes that can be targeted and affect the rate of antigen dissociation in the endosome, we explored an alternative approach for generating recycling antibodies. Since calcium ion concentration is known to be lower in endosome than in plasma, we hypothesized that an antibody with antigen-binding properties that are calcium-dependent could be used as recycling antibody. Here, we report a novel anti-interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) antibody, identified from a phage library that binds to IL-6R only in the presence of a calcium ion. Thermal dynamics and a crystal structure study revealed that the calcium ion binds to the heavy chain CDR3 region (HCDR3), which changes and possibly stabilizes the structure of HCDR3 to make it bind to antigen calcium dependently (PDB 5AZE). In vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that this calcium-dependent antigen-binding antibody can dissociate its antigen in the endosome and accelerate antigen clearance from plasma, making it a novel approach for generating recycling antibody.

  19. Increased competition for antigen during priming negatively impacts the generation of memory CD4 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Blair, David A.; Lefrançois, Leo

    2007-01-01

    The factors involved in the differentiation of memory CD4 T cells from naïve precursors are poorly understood. We developed a system to examine the effect of increased competition for antigen by CD4 T cells on the generation of memory in response to infection with a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus. Competition was initially regulated by increasing the precursor frequency of adoptively transferred naïve T cell antigen receptor transgenic CD4 T cells. Despite robust proliferation at high precursor frequencies, memory CD4 T cells did not develop, whereas decreasing the input number of naïve CD4 T cells promoted memory development after infection. The lack of memory development was linked to reduced blastogenesis and poor effector cell induction, but not to initial recruitment or proliferation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells. To prove that availability of antigen alone could regulate memory CD4 T cell development, we used treatment with an mAb specific for the epitope recognized by the transferred CD4 T cells. At high doses, this mAb effectively inhibited the antigen-specific CD4 T cell response. However, at a very low dose of mAb, primary CD4 T cell expansion was unaffected, although memory development was dramatically reduced. Moreover, the induction of effector function was concomitantly inhibited. Thus, competition for antigen during CD4 T cell priming is a major contributing factor to the development of the memory CD4 T cell pool. PMID:17827281

  20. Surface Polysaccharide Mutants Reveal that Absence of O Antigen Reduces Biofilm Formation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Hathroubi, S.; Hancock, M. A.; Langford, P. R.; Tremblay, Y. D. N.; Labrie, J.

    2015-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family and the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, a highly contagious lung disease causing important economic losses. Surface polysaccharides, including lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and capsular polysaccharides (CPS), are implicated in the adhesion and virulence of A. pleuropneumoniae, but their role in biofilm formation is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the requirement for these surface polysaccharides in biofilm formation by A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1. Well-characterized mutants were used: an O-antigen LPS mutant, a truncated core LPS mutant with an intact O antigen, a capsule mutant, and a poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PGA) mutant. We compared the amount of biofilm produced by the parental strain and the isogenic mutants using static and dynamic systems. Compared to the findings for the biofilm of the parental or other strains, the biofilm of the O antigen and the PGA mutants was dramatically reduced, and it had less cell-associated PGA. Real-time PCR analyses revealed a significant reduction in the level of pgaA, cpxR, and cpxA mRNA in the biofilm cells of the O-antigen mutant compared to that in the biofilm cells of the parental strain. Specific binding between PGA and LPS was consistently detected by surface plasmon resonance, but the lack of O antigen did not abolish these interactions. In conclusion, the absence of the O antigen reduces the ability of A. pleuropneumoniae to form a biofilm, and this is associated with the reduced expression and production of PGA. PMID:26483403

  1. Surface Polysaccharide Mutants Reveal that Absence of O Antigen Reduces Biofilm Formation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Hathroubi, S; Hancock, M A; Bossé, J T; Langford, P R; Tremblay, Y D N; Labrie, J; Jacques, M

    2016-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family and the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, a highly contagious lung disease causing important economic losses. Surface polysaccharides, including lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and capsular polysaccharides (CPS), are implicated in the adhesion and virulence of A. pleuropneumoniae, but their role in biofilm formation is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the requirement for these surface polysaccharides in biofilm formation by A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1. Well-characterized mutants were used: an O-antigen LPS mutant, a truncated core LPS mutant with an intact O antigen, a capsule mutant, and a poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PGA) mutant. We compared the amount of biofilm produced by the parental strain and the isogenic mutants using static and dynamic systems. Compared to the findings for the biofilm of the parental or other strains, the biofilm of the O antigen and the PGA mutants was dramatically reduced, and it had less cell-associated PGA. Real-time PCR analyses revealed a significant reduction in the level of pgaA, cpxR, and cpxA mRNA in the biofilm cells of the O-antigen mutant compared to that in the biofilm cells of the parental strain. Specific binding between PGA and LPS was consistently detected by surface plasmon resonance, but the lack of O antigen did not abolish these interactions. In conclusion, the absence of the O antigen reduces the ability of A. pleuropneumoniae to form a biofilm, and this is associated with the reduced expression and production of PGA. PMID:26483403

  2. Tiny T antigen: an autonomous polyomavirus T antigen amino-terminal domain.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, M I; Yoo, W; Mda, N Y; Folk, W R

    1997-01-01

    Three mRNAs from the murine polyomavirus early region encode the three well-characterized tumor antigens. We report the existence of a fourth alternatively spliced mRNA which encodes a fourth tumor antigen, tiny T antigen, which comprises the amino-terminal domain common to all of the T antigens but is extended by six unique amino acid residues. The amount of tiny T antigen in infected cells is small because of its short half-life. Tiny T antigen stimulates the ATPase activity of Hsc70, most likely because of its DnaJ-like motif. The common amino-terminal domain may interface with chaperone complexes to assist the T antigens in carrying out their diverse functions of replication, transcription, and transformation in the appropriate cellular compartments. PMID:9223500

  3. Patterns and potential drivers of dramatic changes in Tibetan lakes, 1972-2010.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingkui; Liao, Jingjuan; Guo, Huadong; Liu, Zewen; Shen, Guozhuang

    2014-01-01

    Most glaciers in the Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau are retreating, and glacier melt has been emphasized as the dominant driver for recent lake expansions on the Tibetan Plateau. By investigating detailed changes in lake extents and levels across the Tibetan Plateau from Landsat/ICESat data, we found a pattern of dramatic lake changes from 1970 to 2010 (especially after 2000) with a southwest-northeast transition from shrinking, to stable, to rapidly expanding. This pattern is in distinct contrast to the spatial characteristics of glacier retreat, suggesting limited influence of glacier melt on lake dynamics. The plateau-wide pattern of lake change is related to precipitation variation and consistent with the pattern of permafrost degradation induced by rising temperature. More than 79% of lakes we observed on the central-northern plateau (with continuous permafrost) are rapidly expanding, even without glacial contributions, while lakes fed by retreating glaciers in southern regions (with isolated permafrost) are relatively stable or shrinking. Our study shows the limited role of glacier melt and highlights the potentially important contribution of permafrost degradation in predicting future water availability in this region, where understanding these processes is of critical importance to drinking water, agriculture, and hydropower supply of densely populated areas in South and East Asia. PMID:25372787

  4. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions.

    PubMed

    Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F; Weber, William J

    2016-06-02

    We report on unexpected dramatic radial variations in ion tracks formed by irradiation with energetic ions (2.3 GeV (208)Pb) at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore-structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements in the Gd2TixZr(1-x)O7 system, the present work clearly reveals the importance of the recrystallization process in ion track formation in this system, which leads to more morphological complexities in tracks than currently accepted behavior. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform for a constant value of electronic energy-loss. This study reveals the diameter variations to be as large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to the partial substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms, which have a large difference in ionic radii, on the B-site in pyrochlore lattice. This random distribution of Ti and Zr atoms leads to a local competition between amorphous phase formation (favored by Ti atoms) and defect-fluorite phase formation (favored by Zr atoms) during the recrystallization process and finally introduces large radial variations in track morphology.

  5. Dramatic Expression in Opera, and Its Implications for Conversational Agents. Chapter 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. Lewis

    2007-01-01

    This article has discussed principles, techniques, and methods of dramatic portrayal in opera, and their application to the development of embodied conversational agents. Investigations such as this complement studies of natural human behavior, and offer insights as to how to make such behavior understandable and interesting when adapted for use by embodied conversational agents. However, one should use caution in applying such lessons. The unique characteristics of computer-based media are still being identified and explored. In any case, one must always be careful about applying principles blindly to any artistic form. Such principles are post-hoc analysis of the intuitive skill of great artists; this was as true in Aristotle's day as it is today. We should not let structural principles stand in the way of injecting creativity into the design of ECAs. Opera at its best possesses an element of magic that is difficult to describe, much less analytically reconstruct. We can only hope to achieve a similar result with conversational agents.

  6. Dramatic Increases of Soil Microbial Functional Gene Diversity at the Treeline Ecotone of Changbai Mountain

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Congcong; Shi, Yu; Ni, Yingying; Deng, Ye; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Chu, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    The elevational and latitudinal diversity patterns of microbial taxa have attracted great attention in the past decade. Recently, the distribution of functional attributes has been in the spotlight. Here, we report a study profiling soil microbial communities along an elevation gradient (500–2200 m) on Changbai Mountain. Using a comprehensive functional gene microarray (GeoChip 5.0), we found that microbial functional gene richness exhibited a dramatic increase at the treeline ecotone, but the bacterial taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing did not exhibit such a similar trend. However, the β-diversity (compositional dissimilarity among sites) pattern for both bacterial taxa and functional genes was similar, showing significant elevational distance-decay patterns which presented increased dissimilarity with elevation. The bacterial taxonomic diversity/structure was strongly influenced by soil pH, while the functional gene diversity/structure was significantly correlated with soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC). This finding highlights that soil DOC may be a good predictor in determining the elevational distribution of microbial functional genes. The finding of significant shifts in functional gene diversity at the treeline ecotone could also provide valuable information for predicting the responses of microbial functions to climate change. PMID:27524983

  7. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Weber, William J.

    2016-06-01

    We report on unexpected dramatic radial variations in ion tracks formed by irradiation with energetic ions (2.3 GeV 208Pb) at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore-structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements in the Gd2TixZr(1-x)O7 system, the present work clearly reveals the importance of the recrystallization process in ion track formation in this system, which leads to more morphological complexities in tracks than currently accepted behavior. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform for a constant value of electronic energy-loss. This study reveals the diameter variations to be as large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to the partial substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms, which have a large difference in ionic radii, on the B-site in pyrochlore lattice. This random distribution of Ti and Zr atoms leads to a local competition between amorphous phase formation (favored by Ti atoms) and defect-fluorite phase formation (favored by Zr atoms) during the recrystallization process and finally introduces large radial variations in track morphology.

  8. STABILIZING CLOUD FEEDBACK DRAMATICALLY EXPANDS THE HABITABLE ZONE OF TIDALLY LOCKED PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Jun; Abbot, Dorian S.; Cowan, Nicolas B.

    2013-07-10

    The habitable zone (HZ) is the circumstellar region where a planet can sustain surface liquid water. Searching for terrestrial planets in the HZ of nearby stars is the stated goal of ongoing and planned extrasolar planet surveys. Previous estimates of the inner edge of the HZ were based on one-dimensional radiative-convective models. The most serious limitation of these models is the inability to predict cloud behavior. Here we use global climate models with sophisticated cloud schemes to show that due to a stabilizing cloud feedback, tidally locked planets can be habitable at twice the stellar flux found by previous studies. This dramatically expands the HZ and roughly doubles the frequency of habitable planets orbiting red dwarf stars. At high stellar flux, strong convection produces thick water clouds near the substellar location that greatly increase the planetary albedo and reduce surface temperatures. Higher insolation produces stronger substellar convection and therefore higher albedo, making this phenomenon a stabilizing climate feedback. Substellar clouds also effectively block outgoing radiation from the surface, reducing or even completely reversing the thermal emission contrast between dayside and nightside. The presence of substellar water clouds and the resulting clement surface conditions will therefore be detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  9. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions

    DOE PAGES

    Sachan, Ritesh; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Weber, William J.; Zarkadoula, Eva

    2016-06-02

    We discuss the insights on the unexpected dramatic radial variations in the ion tracks formed by energetic ion (2.3 GeV 208Pb) irradiation at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements, this work brings further clarity on why quantitative analysis of ion track formation in Gd2TixZr(1-x)O7 systems can be more complicated than the currently accepted behavior for ion tracks. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform at constant values of the electronic energy-loss. This study shows the diameter variations to be asmore » large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to (i) the stochastic nature of inelastic energy loss along the track and (ii) the random substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms on the B-site in the pyrochlore lattice. Furthermore, the partial substitution of Ti by Zr increases the favorability of the defect-fluorite structure formation over amorphous phase stochastically, by introducing localized inhomogeneity in atomic structure, density and strain.« less

  10. Dramatic enhancement of superconductivity in single-crystalline nanowire arrays of Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Wong, Chi Ho; Shen, Junying; Sze, Sin Ting; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Haijing; Dong, Yan; Xu, Hui; Yan, Zifeng; Li, Yingying; Hu, Xijun; Lortz, Rolf

    2016-09-01

    Sn is a classical superconductor on the border between type I and type II with critical temperature of 3.7 K. We show that its critical parameters can be dramatically increased if it is brought in the form of loosely bound bundles of thin nanowires. The specific heat displays a pronounced double phase transition at 3.7 K and 5.5 K, which we attribute to the inner ‘bulk’ contribution of the nanowires and to the surface contribution, respectively. The latter is visible only because of the large volume fraction of the surface layer in relation to the bulk volume. The upper transition coincides with the onset of the resistive transition, while zero resistance is gradually approached below the lower transition. In contrast to the low critical field Hc = 0.03 T of Sn in its bulk form, a magnetic field of more than 3 T is required to fully restore the normal state.

  11. Platinum and Palladium Overlayers Dramatically Enhance the Activity of Ruthenium Nanotubes for Alkaline Hydrogen Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    St. John, Samuel; Atkinson, Robert W.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Papandrew, Alexander B.

    2015-10-18

    Templated vapor synthesis and thermal annealing were used to synthesize unsupported metallic Ru nanotubes with Pt or Pd overlayers. By controlling the elemental composition and thickness of these overlayers, we obtain nanostructures with very high alkaline hydrogen oxidation activity. For nanotubes with a nominal atomic composition of Ru0.90Pt0.10 display a surface-specific activity (2.4 mA/cm2) that is 35 times greater than that of pure Ru nanotubes at a 50 mV overpotential and 2.5 times greater than that of pure Pt nanotubes (0.98 mA/cm2). The surface-segregated structure also confers dramatically increased Pt utilization efficiency. We find a platinum-mass-specific activity of 1240 A/gPt for the optimized nanotube versus 280 A/gPt for carbon-supported Pt nanoparticles and 109 A/gPt for monometallic Pt nanotubes. Here, we attribute the enhancement of both area- and platinum-mass-specific activity to the atomic-scale homeomorphism of the nanotube form factor with adlayer-modified polycrystals. Subsurface ligand and bifunctional effects previously observed on segregated, adlayer-modified polycrystals are translated to nanoscale catalysts.

  12. Dramatic enhancement of superconductivity in single-crystalline nanowire arrays of Sn

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Wong, Chi Ho; Shen, Junying; Sze, Sin Ting; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Haijing; Dong, Yan; Xu, Hui; Yan, Zifeng; Li, Yingying; Hu, Xijun; Lortz, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Sn is a classical superconductor on the border between type I and type II with critical temperature of 3.7 K. We show that its critical parameters can be dramatically increased if it is brought in the form of loosely bound bundles of thin nanowires. The specific heat displays a pronounced double phase transition at 3.7 K and 5.5 K, which we attribute to the inner ‘bulk’ contribution of the nanowires and to the surface contribution, respectively. The latter is visible only because of the large volume fraction of the surface layer in relation to the bulk volume. The upper transition coincides with the onset of the resistive transition, while zero resistance is gradually approached below the lower transition. In contrast to the low critical field Hc = 0.03 T of Sn in its bulk form, a magnetic field of more than 3 T is required to fully restore the normal state. PMID:27595646

  13. Patterns and potential drivers of dramatic changes in Tibetan lakes, 1972-2010.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingkui; Liao, Jingjuan; Guo, Huadong; Liu, Zewen; Shen, Guozhuang

    2014-01-01

    Most glaciers in the Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau are retreating, and glacier melt has been emphasized as the dominant driver for recent lake expansions on the Tibetan Plateau. By investigating detailed changes in lake extents and levels across the Tibetan Plateau from Landsat/ICESat data, we found a pattern of dramatic lake changes from 1970 to 2010 (especially after 2000) with a southwest-northeast transition from shrinking, to stable, to rapidly expanding. This pattern is in distinct contrast to the spatial characteristics of glacier retreat, suggesting limited influence of glacier melt on lake dynamics. The plateau-wide pattern of lake change is related to precipitation variation and consistent with the pattern of permafrost degradation induced by rising temperature. More than 79% of lakes we observed on the central-northern plateau (with continuous permafrost) are rapidly expanding, even without glacial contributions, while lakes fed by retreating glaciers in southern regions (with isolated permafrost) are relatively stable or shrinking. Our study shows the limited role of glacier melt and highlights the potentially important contribution of permafrost degradation in predicting future water availability in this region, where understanding these processes is of critical importance to drinking water, agriculture, and hydropower supply of densely populated areas in South and East Asia.

  14. Platinum and Palladium Overlayers Dramatically Enhance the Activity of Ruthenium Nanotubes for Alkaline Hydrogen Oxidation

    DOE PAGES

    St. John, Samuel; Atkinson, Robert W.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Papandrew, Alexander B.

    2015-10-18

    Templated vapor synthesis and thermal annealing were used to synthesize unsupported metallic Ru nanotubes with Pt or Pd overlayers. By controlling the elemental composition and thickness of these overlayers, we obtain nanostructures with very high alkaline hydrogen oxidation activity. For nanotubes with a nominal atomic composition of Ru0.90Pt0.10 display a surface-specific activity (2.4 mA/cm2) that is 35 times greater than that of pure Ru nanotubes at a 50 mV overpotential and 2.5 times greater than that of pure Pt nanotubes (0.98 mA/cm2). The surface-segregated structure also confers dramatically increased Pt utilization efficiency. We find a platinum-mass-specific activity of 1240 A/gPtmore » for the optimized nanotube versus 280 A/gPt for carbon-supported Pt nanoparticles and 109 A/gPt for monometallic Pt nanotubes. Here, we attribute the enhancement of both area- and platinum-mass-specific activity to the atomic-scale homeomorphism of the nanotube form factor with adlayer-modified polycrystals. Subsurface ligand and bifunctional effects previously observed on segregated, adlayer-modified polycrystals are translated to nanoscale catalysts.« less

  15. Dramatic Increases of Soil Microbial Functional Gene Diversity at the Treeline Ecotone of Changbai Mountain.

    PubMed

    Shen, Congcong; Shi, Yu; Ni, Yingying; Deng, Ye; Van Nostrand, Joy D; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Chu, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    The elevational and latitudinal diversity patterns of microbial taxa have attracted great attention in the past decade. Recently, the distribution of functional attributes has been in the spotlight. Here, we report a study profiling soil microbial communities along an elevation gradient (500-2200 m) on Changbai Mountain. Using a comprehensive functional gene microarray (GeoChip 5.0), we found that microbial functional gene richness exhibited a dramatic increase at the treeline ecotone, but the bacterial taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing did not exhibit such a similar trend. However, the β-diversity (compositional dissimilarity among sites) pattern for both bacterial taxa and functional genes was similar, showing significant elevational distance-decay patterns which presented increased dissimilarity with elevation. The bacterial taxonomic diversity/structure was strongly influenced by soil pH, while the functional gene diversity/structure was significantly correlated with soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC). This finding highlights that soil DOC may be a good predictor in determining the elevational distribution of microbial functional genes. The finding of significant shifts in functional gene diversity at the treeline ecotone could also provide valuable information for predicting the responses of microbial functions to climate change. PMID:27524983

  16. Dramatic variations in emergent wetland area in China's largest freshwater lake, Poyang Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Xuefei; Dai, Zhijun; Fagherazzi, Sergio; Chen, Jiyu

    2016-10-01

    Freshwater wetlands are important ecosystems experiencing rapid degradation around the world. As much as 64% of world's wetland area has been lost since 1900; the situation is even more serious in Asia, where land reclamation and anthropogenic modifications of rivers are increasing the rate of wetland disappearance. In this study, we provide a first complete estimation of daily Emergent Wetland Area (EWA) in Poyang Lake, China's largest freshwater lake, from 1955 to 2012. A wavelet analysis indicates a strong periodicity in the monthly EWA time series with two oscillations having a period of 12 and 60-72 months, respectively. A dramatic increase in mean annual EWA is detected since 2003, when the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) was completed, mainly due to the seasonal drying of 1078 km2 of wetlands in October. It is found that the timing of wetland emergence during the dry season has been anticipated of one month, from November to October, since the establishment of TGD. It is argued that a significant increase in wetland exposure and an observable shift in the seasonal timing of flooding and drying will seriously degrade the wetland system and threaten the endangered migratory birds that inhabit it unless effective countermeasures are implemented.

  17. Combination of clopidogrel and everolimus dramatically reduced the development of transplant arteriosclerosis in murine aortic allografts.

    PubMed

    Eckl, Sebastian; Heim, Christian; Abele-Ohl, Silke; Hoffmann, Julia; Ramsperger-Gleixner, Martina; Weyand, Michael; Ensminger, Stephan M

    2010-09-01

    Our group has shown that platelet inhibition with clopidogrel, an antagonist of the P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate receptor on platelets, reduced the formation of transplant arteriosclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a combination of cyclosporin or everolimus with clopidogrel has a beneficial effect on the development of transplant arteriosclerosis. Fully MHC mismatched C57Bl/6 (H2(b)) donor aortas were transplanted into CBA.J (H2(k)) recipients and mice received either clopidogrel alone (1 mg/kg/day) or in combination with cyclosporin (2 mg/kg/day) or everolimus (0.05 mg/kg/day). Grafts were analysed by histology and morphometry on day 30 after transplantation. In mice treated with clopidogrel alone, transplant arteriosclerosis was significantly reduced [intima proliferation 56 +/- 11% vs. 81 +/- 7% (control)/n = 7]. Daily application of everolimus reduced the development of transplant arteriosclerosis compared with untreated controls [intima proliferation of 29 +/- 9% vs. 81 +/- 7% (control)/n = 7]. Strikingly, combination of clopidogrel and everolimus almost abolished the formation of transplant arteriosclerosis [intima proliferation: 11 +/- 8% vs. 81 +/- 7% (control)/n = 7]. By contrast, combination of cyclosporin and clopidogrel compared with clopidogrel alone showed no additive effect. These results demonstrate that combination of platelet- and mammalian target of Rapamycin-inhibition can dramatically reduce the development of transplant arteriosclerosis.

  18. Dramatic colour changes in a bird of paradise caused by uniquely structured breast feather barbules

    PubMed Central

    Stavenga, Doekele G.; Leertouwer, Hein L.; Marshall, N. Justin; Osorio, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The breast-plate plumage of male Lawes' parotia (Parotia lawesii) produces dramatic colour changes when this bird of paradise displays on its forest-floor lek. We show that this effect is achieved not solely by the iridescence—that is an angular-dependent spectral shift of the reflected light—which is inherent in structural coloration, but is based on a unique anatomical modification of the breast-feather barbule. The barbules have a segmental structure, and in common with many other iridescent feathers, they contain stacked melanin rodlets surrounded by a keratin film. The unique property of the parotia barbules is their boomerang-like cross section. This allows each barbule to work as three coloured mirrors: a yellow-orange reflector in the plane of the feather, and two symmetrically positioned bluish reflectors at respective angles of about 30°. Movement during the parotia's courtship displays thereby achieves much larger and more abrupt colour changes than is possible with ordinary iridescent plumage. To our knowledge, this is the first example of multiple thin film or multi-layer reflectors incorporated in a single structure (engineered or biological). It nicely illustrates how subtle modification of the basic feather structure can achieve novel visual effects. The fact that the parotia's breast feathers seem to be specifically adapted to give much stronger colour changes than normal structural coloration implies that colour change is important in their courtship display. PMID:21159676

  19. Dramatic enhancement of superconductivity in single-crystalline nanowire arrays of Sn.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wong, Chi Ho; Shen, Junying; Sze, Sin Ting; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Haijing; Dong, Yan; Xu, Hui; Yan, Zifeng; Li, Yingying; Hu, Xijun; Lortz, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Sn is a classical superconductor on the border between type I and type II with critical temperature of 3.7 K. We show that its critical parameters can be dramatically increased if it is brought in the form of loosely bound bundles of thin nanowires. The specific heat displays a pronounced double phase transition at 3.7 K and 5.5 K, which we attribute to the inner 'bulk' contribution of the nanowires and to the surface contribution, respectively. The latter is visible only because of the large volume fraction of the surface layer in relation to the bulk volume. The upper transition coincides with the onset of the resistive transition, while zero resistance is gradually approached below the lower transition. In contrast to the low critical field Hc = 0.03 T of Sn in its bulk form, a magnetic field of more than 3 T is required to fully restore the normal state. PMID:27595646

  20. A DRAMATICALLY REDUCED SIZE IN THE GANTRY DESIGN FOR THE PROTON-CARBON THERAPY.

    SciTech Connect

    TRBOJEVIC, D.; GUPTA, R.; PARKER, B.; KEIL, E.; SESSLER, A.M.

    2006-06-23

    Gantries in the proton/carbon cancer therapy machines represent the major cost and are of the largest size. This report explains a new way to the gantry design. The size and cost of the gantries are reduced and their use is simplified by using the fixed magnetic field. The ''new'' gantry is made of a very large momentum acceptance non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) quarter and half arc beam lines. The gantry is made of combined function magnets with a very strong focusing and small dispersion function. Additional magnets with a fast response are required to allow adjustments of the beam position for different energies at the beginning of the gantry. Additional strong focusing magnets following the gantry have also to be adjustable to provide required spot size and radial scanning above the patients. The fixed field combined function magnets could be made of small permanent magnets for the proton machine, or of the high temperature superconductors or superconductors for the carbon machine, reducing dramatically the size.

  1. Regulated Breathing Effect of Silicon Negative Electrode for Dramatically Enhanced Performance of Li-Ion Battery

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Xingcheng; Zhou, Weidong; Kim, Youngnam; Ryu, Ill; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Liu, Gao; Liu, Zhongyi; Gao, Huajian

    2015-03-01

    Si is an attractive negative electrode material for lithium ion batteries due to its high specifi c capacity (≈3600 mAh g –1 ). However, the huge volume swelling and shrinking during cycling, which mimics a breathing effect at the material/electrode/cell level, leads to several coupled issues including fracture of Si particles, unstable solid electrolyte interphase, and low Coulombic effi ciency. In this work, the regulation of the breathing effect is reported by using Si–C yolk–shell nanocomposite which has been well-developed by other researchers. The focus is on understanding how the nanoscaled materials design impacts the mechanical and electrochemical response at electrode level. For the fi rst time, it is possible to observe one order of magnitude of reduction on breathing effect at the electrode level during cycling: the electrode thickness variation reduced down to 10%, comparing with 100% in the electrode with Si nanoparticles as active materials. The Si–C yolk–shell nanocomposite electrode exhibits excellent capacity retention and high cycle effi ciency. In situ transmission electron microscopy and fi nite element simulations consistently reveals that the dramatically enhanced performance is associated with the regulated breathing of the Si in the new composite, therefore the suppression of the overall electrode expansion.

  2. Optimal temperature for malaria transmission is dramatically lower than previously predicted

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mordecai, Erin A.; Paaijmans, Krijn P.; Johnson, Leah R.; Balzer, Christian; Ben-Horin, Tal; de Moor, Emily; McNally, Amy; Pawar, Samraat; Ryan, Sadie J.; Smith, Thomas C.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    The ecology of mosquito vectors and malaria parasites affect the incidence, seasonal transmission and geographical range of malaria. Most malaria models to date assume constant or linear responses of mosquito and parasite life-history traits to temperature, predicting optimal transmission at 31 °C. These models are at odds with field observations of transmission dating back nearly a century. We build a model with more realistic ecological assumptions about the thermal physiology of insects. Our model, which includes empirically derived nonlinear thermal responses, predicts optimal malaria transmission at 25 °C (6 °C lower than previous models). Moreover, the model predicts that transmission decreases dramatically at temperatures > 28 °C, altering predictions about how climate change will affect malaria. A large data set on malaria transmission risk in Africa validates both the 25 °C optimum and the decline above 28 °C. Using these more accurate nonlinear thermal-response models will aid in understanding the effects of current and future temperature regimes on disease transmission.

  3. Membrane Proteins Are Dramatically Less Conserved than Water-Soluble Proteins across the Tree of Life

    PubMed Central

    Sojo, Victor; Dessimoz, Christophe; Pomiankowski, Andrew; Lane, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are crucial in transport, signaling, bioenergetics, catalysis, and as drug targets. Here, we show that membrane proteins have dramatically fewer detectable orthologs than water-soluble proteins, less than half in most species analyzed. This sparse distribution could reflect rapid divergence or gene loss. We find that both mechanisms operate. First, membrane proteins evolve faster than water-soluble proteins, particularly in their exterior-facing portions. Second, we demonstrate that predicted ancestral membrane proteins are preferentially lost compared with water-soluble proteins in closely related species of archaea and bacteria. These patterns are consistent across the whole tree of life, and in each of the three domains of archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes. Our findings point to a fundamental evolutionary principle: membrane proteins evolve faster due to stronger adaptive selection in changing environments, whereas cytosolic proteins are under more stringent purifying selection in the homeostatic interior of the cell. This effect should be strongest in prokaryotes, weaker in unicellular eukaryotes (with intracellular membranes), and weakest in multicellular eukaryotes (with extracellular homeostasis). We demonstrate that this is indeed the case. Similarly, we show that extracellular water-soluble proteins exhibit an even stronger pattern of low homology than membrane proteins. These striking differences in conservation of membrane proteins versus water-soluble proteins have important implications for evolution and medicine. PMID:27501943

  4. Atmospheric drying as the main driver of dramatic glacier wastage in the southern Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Favier, V.; Verfaillie, D.; Berthier, E.; Menegoz, M.; Jomelli, V.; Kay, J. E.; Ducret, L.; Malbéteau, Y.; Brunstein, D.; Gallée, H.; Park, Y.-H.; Rinterknecht, V.

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing retreat of glaciers at southern sub-polar latitudes is particularly rapid and widespread. Akin to northern sub-polar latitudes, this retreat is generally assumed to be linked to warming. However, no long-term and well-constrained glacier modeling has ever been performed to confirm this hypothesis. Here, we model the Cook Ice Cap mass balance on the Kerguelen Islands (Southern Indian Ocean, 49°S) since the 1850s. We show that glacier wastage during the 2000s in the Kerguelen was among the most dramatic on Earth. We attribute 77% of the increasingly negative mass balance since the 1960s to atmospheric drying associated with a poleward shift of the mid-latitude storm track. Because precipitation modeling is very challenging for the current generation of climate models over the study area, models incorrectly simulate the climate drivers behind the recent glacier wastage in the Kerguelen. This suggests that future glacier wastage projections should be considered cautiously where changes in atmospheric circulation are expected. PMID:27580801

  5. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions.

    PubMed

    Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F; Weber, William J

    2016-01-01

    We report on unexpected dramatic radial variations in ion tracks formed by irradiation with energetic ions (2.3 GeV (208)Pb) at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore-structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements in the Gd2TixZr(1-x)O7 system, the present work clearly reveals the importance of the recrystallization process in ion track formation in this system, which leads to more morphological complexities in tracks than currently accepted behavior. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform for a constant value of electronic energy-loss. This study reveals the diameter variations to be as large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to the partial substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms, which have a large difference in ionic radii, on the B-site in pyrochlore lattice. This random distribution of Ti and Zr atoms leads to a local competition between amorphous phase formation (favored by Ti atoms) and defect-fluorite phase formation (favored by Zr atoms) during the recrystallization process and finally introduces large radial variations in track morphology. PMID:27250764

  6. Dramatic changes in DNA conductance with stretching: structural polymorphism at a critical extension.

    PubMed

    Bag, Saientan; Mogurampelly, Santosh; Goddard Iii, William A; Maiti, Prabal K

    2016-09-21

    In order to interpret recent experimental studies of the dependence of conductance of ds-DNA as the DNA is pulled from the 3'end1-3'end2 ends, which find a sharp conductance jump for a very short (4.5%) stretching length, we carried out multiscale modeling to predict the conductance of dsDNA as it is mechanically stretched to promote various structural polymorphisms. We calculate the current along the stretched DNA using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations, non-equilibrium pulling simulations, quantum mechanics calculations, and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. For 5'end1-5'end2 attachments we find an abrupt jump in the current within a very short stretching length (6 Å or 17%) leading to a melted DNA state. In contrast, for 3'end1-3'end2 pulling it takes almost 32 Å (84%) of stretching to cause a similar jump in the current. Thus, we demonstrate that charge transport in DNA can occur over stretching lengths of several nanometers. We find that this unexpected behaviour in the B to S conformational DNA transition arises from highly inclined base pair geometries that result from this pulling protocol. We found that the dramatically different conductance behaviors for two different pulling protocols arise from how the hydrogen bonds of DNA base pairs break. PMID:27545499

  7. Who gets custody now? Dramatic changes in children's living arrangements after divorce.

    PubMed

    Cancian, Maria; Meyer, Daniel R; Brown, Patricia R; Cook, Steven T

    2014-08-01

    This article reexamines the living arrangements of children following their parents' divorce, using Wisconsin Court Records, updating an analysis that showed relatively small but significant increases in shared custody in the late 1980s and early 1990s. These changes have accelerated markedly in the intervening years: between 1988 and 2008, the proportion of mothers granted sole physical custody fell substantially, the proportion of parents sharing custody increased dramatically, and father-sole custody remained relatively stable. We explore changes in the correlates of alternative custody outcomes, showing that some results from the earlier analysis still hold (for example, cases with higher total family income are more likely to have shared custody), but other differences have lessened (shared-custody cases have become less distinctive as they have become more common). Despite the considerable changes in marriage and divorce patterns over this period, we do not find strong evidence that the changes in custody are related to changes in the characteristics of families experiencing a divorce; rather, changes in custody may be the result of changes in social norms and the process by which custody is determined.

  8. Publications on Peripheral Nerve Injuries during World War I: A Dramatic Increase in Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Publications from French (Jules Tinel and Chiriachitza Athanassio-Bénisty), English (James Purves-Stewart, Arthur Henry Evans and Hartley Sidney Carter), German (Otfrid Foerster and Hermann Oppenheim) and American (Charles Harrison Frazier and Byron Stookey) physicians from both sides of the front during World War I (WWI) contributed to a dramatic increase in knowledge about peripheral nerve injuries. Silas Weir Mitchell's original experience with respect to these injuries, and particularly causalgia, during the American Civil War was further expanded in Europe during WWI. Following the translation of one of his books, he was referred to mainly by French physicians. During WWI, several French books were in turn translated into English, which influenced American physicians, as was observed in the case of Byron Stookey. The establishment of neurological centres played an important role in the concentration of experience and knowledge. Several eponyms originated during this period (including the Hoffmann-Tinel sign and the Froment sign). Electrodiagnostic tools were increasingly used. PMID:27035152

  9. Lord Kelvin and the Age-of-the-Earth Debate: A Dramatization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinner, Art; Teichmann, Jürgen

    This is a dramatization of a fictitious debate about the age of the earth that takes place in the Royal Institution, London, England, in the year 1872. The debate is among Sir William Thomson (later Kelvin), T.H. Huxley (Darwin's Bulldog), Sir Charles Lyell, and Hermann von Helmholtz. In 1862 Thomson published his celebrated and widely studied The Secular Cooling of the Earth that raised the post-Darwinian debate of the age of the earth above the level of popular controversy. He entered the debate with all the arrogance of a newly established science of the century, namely the recently drafted laws of thermodynamics. The debate is partly based on a lively exchange of comments and arguments that occurred between T.H. Huxley and William Thomson, starting in 1868, when Thomson addressed the Glasgow Geological Society. This long public discussion also involved the ideas and the work of geologist Charles Lyell and those of the celebrated German physicist Hermann von Helmholtz. The confrontation is between the unyielding physicists and the insecure biologists and geologists who required a much longer time for the age of the earth than the physicists were prepared to give them. However, the debate ends on a conciliatory note, suggesting that perhaps Sir William's storehouse of creation may contain a hereto undiscovered source of energy that is more bountiful than gravitational energy.

  10. Altering Antimalarial Drug Regimens May Dramatically Enhance and Restore Drug Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kay, Katherine; Hodel, Eva Maria; Hastings, Ian M

    2015-10-01

    There is considerable concern that malaria parasites are starting to evolve resistance to the current generation of antimalarial drugs, the artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). We use pharmacological modeling to investigate changes in ACT effectiveness likely to occur if current regimens are extended from 3 to 5 days or, alternatively, given twice daily over 3 days. We show that the pharmacology of artemisinins allows both regimen changes to substantially increase the artemisinin killing rate. Malaria patients rarely contain more than 10(12) parasites, while the standard dosing regimens allow approximately 1 in 10(10) parasites to survive artemisinin treatment. Parasite survival falls dramatically, to around 1 in 10(17) parasites if the dose is extended or split; theoretically, this increase in drug killing appears to be more than sufficient to restore failing ACT efficacy. One of the most widely used dosing regimens, artemether-lumefantrine, already successfully employs a twice-daily dosing regimen, and we argue that twice-daily dosing should be incorporated into all ACT regimen design considerations as a simple and effective way of ensuring the continued long-term effectiveness of ACTs. PMID:26239993

  11. Dramatic enhancement of superconductivity in single-crystalline nanowire arrays of Sn.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wong, Chi Ho; Shen, Junying; Sze, Sin Ting; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Haijing; Dong, Yan; Xu, Hui; Yan, Zifeng; Li, Yingying; Hu, Xijun; Lortz, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Sn is a classical superconductor on the border between type I and type II with critical temperature of 3.7 K. We show that its critical parameters can be dramatically increased if it is brought in the form of loosely bound bundles of thin nanowires. The specific heat displays a pronounced double phase transition at 3.7 K and 5.5 K, which we attribute to the inner 'bulk' contribution of the nanowires and to the surface contribution, respectively. The latter is visible only because of the large volume fraction of the surface layer in relation to the bulk volume. The upper transition coincides with the onset of the resistive transition, while zero resistance is gradually approached below the lower transition. In contrast to the low critical field Hc = 0.03 T of Sn in its bulk form, a magnetic field of more than 3 T is required to fully restore the normal state.

  12. Atmospheric drying as the main driver of dramatic glacier wastage in the southern Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favier, V.; Verfaillie, D.; Berthier, E.; Menegoz, M.; Jomelli, V.; Kay, J. E.; Ducret, L.; Malbéteau, Y.; Brunstein, D.; Gallée, H.; Park, Y.-H.; Rinterknecht, V.

    2016-09-01

    The ongoing retreat of glaciers at southern sub-polar latitudes is particularly rapid and widespread. Akin to northern sub-polar latitudes, this retreat is generally assumed to be linked to warming. However, no long-term and well-constrained glacier modeling has ever been performed to confirm this hypothesis. Here, we model the Cook Ice Cap mass balance on the Kerguelen Islands (Southern Indian Ocean, 49°S) since the 1850s. We show that glacier wastage during the 2000s in the Kerguelen was among the most dramatic on Earth. We attribute 77% of the increasingly negative mass balance since the 1960s to atmospheric drying associated with a poleward shift of the mid-latitude storm track. Because precipitation modeling is very challenging for the current generation of climate models over the study area, models incorrectly simulate the climate drivers behind the recent glacier wastage in the Kerguelen. This suggests that future glacier wastage projections should be considered cautiously where changes in atmospheric circulation are expected.

  13. Zeolite molecular sieves have dramatic acid-base effects on enzymes in nonaqueous media.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Nuno; Partridge, Johann; Halling, Peter J; Barreiros, Susana

    2002-02-01

    Zeolite molecular sieves very commonly are used as in situ drying agents in reaction mixtures of enzymes in nonaqueous media. They often affect enzyme behavior, and this has been interpreted in terms of altered hydration. Here, we show that zeolites can also have dramatic acid-base effects on enzymes in low water media, resulting from their cation-exchange ability. Initial rates of transesterification catalyzed by cross-linked crystals of subtilisin were compared in supercritical ethane, hexane, and acetonitrile with water activity fixed by pre-equilibration. Addition of zeolite NaA (4 A powder) still caused remarkable rate enhancements (up to 20-fold), despite the separate control of hydration. In the presence of excess of an alternative solid-state acid-base buffer, however, zeolite addition had no effect. The more commonly used Merck molecular sieves (type 3 A beads) had similar but somewhat smaller effects. All zeolites have ion-exchange ability and can exchange H+ for cations such as Na+ and K+. These exchanges will tend to affect the protonation state of acidic groups in the protein and, hence, enzymatic activity. Zeolites pre-equilibrated in aqueous suspensions of varying pH-pNa gave very different enzyme activities. Their differing basicities were demonstrated directly by equilibration with an indicator dissolved in toluene. The potential of zeolites as acid-base buffers for low-water media is discussed, and their ability to overcome pH memory is demonstrated.

  14. Fatal Haemoptysis Associated with Dramatic Response to Crizotinib in an ALK-Rearranged Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mussat, Elodie; Giraud, Violaine; Julie, Catherine; Chinet, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The presence of an ALK (Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase) rearrangement is a rare molecular feature in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC), and concerns mainly non- or light smokers, young patients, with adenocarcinoma histological type. These tumours are particularly sensitive to Alk-targeted therapies, as crizotinib. Crizotinib is usually well-tolerated. We report a case of fatal haemoptysis associated with dramatic response to crizotinib in a patient with an ALK-rearranged lung adenocarcinoma. The patient presented a mediastinal invasion with tracheal involvement and compression of the right pulmonary artery. The initial evolution under crizotinib was good with tumour response. At 6 weeks of crizotinib the patient presented a massive haemoptysis with a tracheobronchial fistula and pneumomediastinum. She died of acute respiratory failure. Our case is the first to report a fatal effect of crizotinib associated with tumour necrosis and good tumour response on a massive mediastinal infiltration. Precautions are recommended with the use of crizotinib in proximal lung tumours with vascular invasion. PMID:27134984

  15. Mammalian Brain Development is Accompanied by a Dramatic Increase in Bipolar DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ming-an; Sun, Zhixiong; Wu, Xiaowei; Rajaram, Veena; Keimig, David; Lim, Jessica; Zhu, Hongxiao; Xie, Hehuang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism critical for tissue development and cell specification. Mammalian brains consist of many different types of cells with assumedly distinct DNA methylation profiles, and thus some genomic loci may demonstrate bipolar DNA methylation pattern, i.e. hypermethylated in one cell subset but hypomethylated in others. Currently, how extensive methylation patterns vary among brain cells is unknown and bipolar methylated genomic loci remain largely unexplored. In this study, we implemented a procedure to infer cell-subset specific methylated (CSM) loci from the methylomes of human and mouse frontal cortices at different developmental stages. With the genome-scale hairpin bisulfite sequencing approach, we demonstrated that the majority of CSM loci predicted likely resulted from the methylation differences among brain cells rather than from asymmetric DNA methylation between DNA double strands. Correlated with enhancer-associated histone modifications, putative CSM loci increased dramatically during early stages of brain development and were enriched for GWAS variants associated with neurological disorder-related diseases/traits. Altogether, this study provides a procedure to identify genomic regions showing methylation differences in a mixed cell population and our results suggest that a set of cis-regulatory elements are primed in early postnatal life whose functions may be compromised in human neurological disorders. PMID:27585862

  16. Dramatic colour changes in a bird of paradise caused by uniquely structured breast feather barbules.

    PubMed

    Stavenga, Doekele G; Leertouwer, Hein L; Marshall, N Justin; Osorio, Daniel

    2011-07-22

    The breast-plate plumage of male Lawes' parotia (Parotia lawesii) produces dramatic colour changes when this bird of paradise displays on its forest-floor lek. We show that this effect is achieved not solely by the iridescence--that is an angular-dependent spectral shift of the reflected light--which is inherent in structural coloration, but is based on a unique anatomical modification of the breast-feather barbule. The barbules have a segmental structure, and in common with many other iridescent feathers, they contain stacked melanin rodlets surrounded by a keratin film. The unique property of the parotia barbules is their boomerang-like cross section. This allows each barbule to work as three coloured mirrors: a yellow-orange reflector in the plane of the feather, and two symmetrically positioned bluish reflectors at respective angles of about 30°. Movement during the parotia's courtship displays thereby achieves much larger and more abrupt colour changes than is possible with ordinary iridescent plumage. To our knowledge, this is the first example of multiple thin film or multi-layer reflectors incorporated in a single structure (engineered or biological). It nicely illustrates how subtle modification of the basic feather structure can achieve novel visual effects. The fact that the parotia's breast feathers seem to be specifically adapted to give much stronger colour changes than normal structural coloration implies that colour change is important in their courtship display.

  17. Mammalian Brain Development is Accompanied by a Dramatic Increase in Bipolar DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-An; Sun, Zhixiong; Wu, Xiaowei; Rajaram, Veena; Keimig, David; Lim, Jessica; Zhu, Hongxiao; Xie, Hehuang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism critical for tissue development and cell specification. Mammalian brains consist of many different types of cells with assumedly distinct DNA methylation profiles, and thus some genomic loci may demonstrate bipolar DNA methylation pattern, i.e. hypermethylated in one cell subset but hypomethylated in others. Currently, how extensive methylation patterns vary among brain cells is unknown and bipolar methylated genomic loci remain largely unexplored. In this study, we implemented a procedure to infer cell-subset specific methylated (CSM) loci from the methylomes of human and mouse frontal cortices at different developmental stages. With the genome-scale hairpin bisulfite sequencing approach, we demonstrated that the majority of CSM loci predicted likely resulted from the methylation differences among brain cells rather than from asymmetric DNA methylation between DNA double strands. Correlated with enhancer-associated histone modifications, putative CSM loci increased dramatically during early stages of brain development and were enriched for GWAS variants associated with neurological disorder-related diseases/traits. Altogether, this study provides a procedure to identify genomic regions showing methylation differences in a mixed cell population and our results suggest that a set of cis-regulatory elements are primed in early postnatal life whose functions may be compromised in human neurological disorders. PMID:27585862

  18. Effect of dramatic land use change on gaseous pollutant emissions from biomass burning in Northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongmei; Tong, Daniel Q.; Gao, Chuanyu; Wang, Guoping

    2015-02-01

    Biomass burning contributes a substantial amount of gas and particle emissions to the atmosphere. As China's breadbasket, northeast China has experienced dramatic land use change in the past century, converting approximately 55 × 104 ha of wetland into farmland to feed a rapidly growing population. This study combines measured emission factors of dominant crops (rice and soybean) and wetland plants (Calamagrostis angu-stifolia, Carex lasiocarpa, Carex pseudo-curaica) and remote sensing land use data to estimate the effect of the unprecedented land use change on gaseous pollutants emissions from biomass burning. Our biomass burning emission estimates resulting from land use changes have increased because of increased post-harvest crop residue burning and decreased burning of wetland plants. From 1986 to 2005, the total emissions of CO2, CO, CXHY, SO2 and NO have increased by 18.6%, 35.7%, 26.8%, 66.2% and 33.2%, respectively. We have found two trends in agricultural burning: increased dryland crop residue burning and decreased wetland (rice paddy) burning. Our results revealed that the large scale land use change in northeastern China has induced more active biomass-burning emissions. The regional emission inventory of gaseous pollutants derived from this work may be used to support further examination of the subsequent effects on regional climate and air quality simulations with numerical atmospheric models.

  19. Preventing domestic violence in the african american community: assessing the impact of a dramatic radio serial.

    PubMed

    Wray, Ricardo J; Hornik, Robert M; Gandy, Oscar H; Stryker, Jo; Ghez, Marissa; Mitchell-Clark, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    This article reports on the evaluation of "It's Your Business," a dramatic radio serial promoting domestic violence prevention in the African-American community that was made available for national broadcast. Radio stations in 4 study cities committed to airing the broadcasts. However, in only 1 of the 4 was the broadcast carried out in even a limited way. Consequently, only data from one city could be used to assess impact. Even there only 9 percent of the sample could confidently be called exposed, answering a recall question correctly and claiming to hear more than 2 episodes. These moderately exposed respondents scored higher than non-exposed respondents on 21 out of 27 anti-domestic violence beliefs and behaviors; 10 differences were statistically significant. However, the moderate exposure group only displayed stronger outcomes than a group who claimed exposure but could not recall much about the program in 2 out of the 27 outcomes at a statistically significant level. We conclude that the association of moderate exposure and anti-domestic violence outcomes was most likely an artifact of selective perception, and not a result of exposure alone. The evaluation points to the need to better understand how exposure can be achieved to complement our work on developing messages.

  20. Atmospheric drying as the main driver of dramatic glacier wastage in the southern Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Favier, V; Verfaillie, D; Berthier, E; Menegoz, M; Jomelli, V; Kay, J E; Ducret, L; Malbéteau, Y; Brunstein, D; Gallée, H; Park, Y-H; Rinterknecht, V

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing retreat of glaciers at southern sub-polar latitudes is particularly rapid and widespread. Akin to northern sub-polar latitudes, this retreat is generally assumed to be linked to warming. However, no long-term and well-constrained glacier modeling has ever been performed to confirm this hypothesis. Here, we model the Cook Ice Cap mass balance on the Kerguelen Islands (Southern Indian Ocean, 49°S) since the 1850s. We show that glacier wastage during the 2000s in the Kerguelen was among the most dramatic on Earth. We attribute 77% of the increasingly negative mass balance since the 1960s to atmospheric drying associated with a poleward shift of the mid-latitude storm track. Because precipitation modeling is very challenging for the current generation of climate models over the study area, models incorrectly simulate the climate drivers behind the recent glacier wastage in the Kerguelen. This suggests that future glacier wastage projections should be considered cautiously where changes in atmospheric circulation are expected. PMID:27580801

  1. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions

    PubMed Central

    Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Weber, William J.

    2016-01-01

    We report on unexpected dramatic radial variations in ion tracks formed by irradiation with energetic ions (2.3 GeV 208Pb) at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore-structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements in the Gd2TixZr(1−x)O7 system, the present work clearly reveals the importance of the recrystallization process in ion track formation in this system, which leads to more morphological complexities in tracks than currently accepted behavior. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform for a constant value of electronic energy-loss. This study reveals the diameter variations to be as large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to the partial substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms, which have a large difference in ionic radii, on the B-site in pyrochlore lattice. This random distribution of Ti and Zr atoms leads to a local competition between amorphous phase formation (favored by Ti atoms) and defect-fluorite phase formation (favored by Zr atoms) during the recrystallization process and finally introduces large radial variations in track morphology. PMID:27250764

  2. Altering Antimalarial Drug Regimens May Dramatically Enhance and Restore Drug Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable concern that malaria parasites are starting to evolve resistance to the current generation of antimalarial drugs, the artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). We use pharmacological modeling to investigate changes in ACT effectiveness likely to occur if current regimens are extended from 3 to 5 days or, alternatively, given twice daily over 3 days. We show that the pharmacology of artemisinins allows both regimen changes to substantially increase the artemisinin killing rate. Malaria patients rarely contain more than 1012 parasites, while the standard dosing regimens allow approximately 1 in 1010 parasites to survive artemisinin treatment. Parasite survival falls dramatically, to around 1 in 1017 parasites if the dose is extended or split; theoretically, this increase in drug killing appears to be more than sufficient to restore failing ACT efficacy. One of the most widely used dosing regimens, artemether-lumefantrine, already successfully employs a twice-daily dosing regimen, and we argue that twice-daily dosing should be incorporated into all ACT regimen design considerations as a simple and effective way of ensuring the continued long-term effectiveness of ACTs. PMID:26239993

  3. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun

    2016-01-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy. PMID:26819347

  4. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun; Han, Weidong

    2016-07-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy.

  5. Benchtop Antigen Detection Technique using Nanofiltration and Fluorescent Dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Varaljay, Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    The designed benchtop technique is primed to detect bacteria and viruses from antigenic surface marker proteins in solutions, initially water. This inclusive bio-immunoassay uniquely combines nanofiltration and near infrared (NIR) dyes conjugated to antibodies to isolate and distinguish microbial antigens, using laser excitation and spectrometric analysis. The project goals include detecting microorganisms aboard the International Space Station, space shuttle, Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), and human habitats on future Moon and Mars missions, ensuring astronaut safety. The technique is intended to improve and advance water contamination testing both commercially and environmentally as well. Lastly, this streamlined technique poses to greatly simplify and expedite testing of pathogens in complex matrices, such as blood, in hospital and laboratory clinics.

  6. Heat treatment prior to testing allows detection of antigen of Dirofilaria immitis in feline serum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of Dirofilaria immitis infection in cats is complicated by the difficulty associated with reliable detection of antigen in feline blood and serum samples. Methods To determine if antigen-antibody complex formation may interfere with detection of antigen in feline samples, we evaluated the performance of four different commercially available heartworm tests using serum samples from six cats experimentally infected with D. immitis and confirmed to harbor a low number of adult worms (mean = 2.0). Sera collected 168 (n = 6), 196 (n = 6), and 224 (n = 6) days post infection were tested both directly and following heat treatment. Results Antigen was detected in serum samples from 0 or 1 of 6 infected cats using the assays according to manufacturer’s directions, but after heat treatment of serum samples, as many as 5 of 6 cats had detectable antigen 6–8 months post infection. Antibodies to D. immitis were detected in all six infected cats by commercial in-clinic assay and at a reference laboratory. Conclusions These results indicate that heat treatment of samples prior to testing can improve the sensitivity of antigen assays in feline patients, supporting more accurate diagnosis of this infection in cats. Surveys conducted by antigen testing without prior heat treatment of samples likely underestimate the true prevalence of infection in cats. PMID:24411014

  7. Expression and immunogenicity of novel subunit enterovirus 71 VP1 antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Juan; Wang, Shixia; Gan, Weihua; Zhang, Wenhong; Ju, Liwen; Huang, Zuhu; Lu, Shan

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EV71 is a major emerging infectious disease in many Asian countries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inactivated EV71 vaccines are in clinical studies but their safety and efficacy are unknown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Developing subunit based EV71 vaccines is significant and novel antigen design is needed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA immunization is an efficient tool to test the immunogenicity of VP1 based EV71 vaccines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiple VP1 antigens are developed showing immunogenic potential. -- Abstract: Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a common viral illness in young children. HFMD is caused by viruses belonging to the enterovirus genus of the picornavirus family. Recently, enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a virulent agent for HFMD with severe clinical outcomes. In the current report, we conducted a pilot antigen engineering study to optimize the expression and immunogenicity of subunit VP1 antigen for the design of EV71 vaccines. DNA immunization was adopted as a simple technical approach to test different designs of VP1 antigens without the need to express VP1 protein in vitro first. Our studies indicated that the expression and immunogenicity of VP1 protein can be improved with alternated VP1 antigen designs. Data presented in the current report revealed novel pathways to optimize the design of VP1 antigen-based EV71 vaccines.

  8. Tandem repeat protein as potential diagnostic antigen for Trypanosoma evansi infection.

    PubMed

    Thuy, Nguyen Thu; Goto, Yasuyuki; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Kawazu, Shin-Ichiro; Inoue, Noboru

    2012-02-01

    Trypanosoma evansi infection (surra) causes significant losses in livestock production in tropical and sub-tropical areas. The current ELISA recommended by OIE for diagnosis of the disease is based on trypanosome lysate antigen. However, antigenic variation and unstable nature of cell lysate antigen make it difficult to standardize the assay. Thus, there are needs to develop recombinant antigen-based ELISA that improve stability, sensitivity, and specificity of the test. Since tandem repeat (TR) proteins of trypanosomatid parasites generally possess high antigenicity, they have been considered to be the promising antigens for trypanosomosis and leishmaniosis. In this study, IgG responses against 14 recombinant TR proteins of trypanosomes were examined by ELISA. Serum samples were obtained from three water buffaloes experimentally infected with T. evansi. Since Trypanosoma congolense GM6 (TcoGM6) elicited highest IgG responses to all water buffaloes, we further bioinformatically and molecular biologically identified Trypanosoma brucei brucei GM6 (TbbGM6) and T. evansi GM6 (TeGM6) TR genes, respectively. As expected, predicted amino acid sequences of TbbGM6 and TeGM6 were identical while the nucleic acid sequence homology between TbbGM6 and TcoGM6 was 63.8%. All buffaloes became clearly positive in recombinant TbbGM6 (rTbbGM6)-based ELISA at 48 days post-infection, suggesting that rTbbGM6 is usable as a serodiagnostic antigen for chronic T. evansi infection.

  9. Antigenic mapping of an H9N2 avian influenza virus reveals two discrete antigenic sites and a novel mechanism of immune escape

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, Thomas; Reddy, Kolli; James, Joe; Adamiak, Beata; Barclay, Wendy; Shelton, Holly; Iqbal, Munir

    2016-01-01

    H9N2 avian influenza virus is a major cause of poultry production loss across Asia leading to the wide use of vaccines. Efficacy of vaccines is often compromised due to the rapid emergence of antigenic variants. To improve the effectiveness of vaccines in the field, a better understanding of the antigenic epitopes of the major antigen, hemagglutinin, is required. To address this, a panel of nine monoclonal antibodies were generated against a contemporary Pakistani H9N2 isolate, which represents a major Asian H9N2 viral lineage. Antibodies were characterized in detail and used to select a total of 26 unique ‘escape’ mutants with substitutions across nine different amino acid residues in hemagglutinin including seven that have not been described as antigenic determinants for H9N2 viruses before. Competition assays and structural mapping revealed two novel, discrete antigenic sites “H9-A” and “H9-B”. Additionally, a second subset of escape mutants contained amino acid deletions within the hemagglutinin receptor binding site. This constitutes a novel method of escape for group 1 hemagglutinins and could represent an alternative means for H9N2 viruses to overcome vaccine induced immunity. These results will guide surveillance efforts for arising antigenic variants as well as evidence based vaccine seed selection and vaccine design. PMID:26738561

  10. Shared themes of antigenic variation and virulence in bacterial, protozoal, and fungal infections.

    PubMed Central

    Deitsch, K W; Moxon, E R; Wellems, T E

    1997-01-01

    Pathogenic microbes have evolved highly sophisticated mechanisms for colonizing host tissues and evading or deflecting assault by the immune response. The ability of these microbes to avoid clearance prolongs infection, thereby promoting their long-term survival within individual hosts and, through transmission, between hosts. Many pathogens are capable of extensive antigenic changes in the face of the multiple constitutive and dynamic components of host immune defenses. As a result, highly diverse populations that have widely different virulence properties can arise from a single infecting organism (clone). In this review, we consider the molecular and genetic features of antigenic variation and corresponding host-parasite interactions of different pathogenic bacterial, fungal, and protozoan microorganisms. The host and microbial molecules involved in these interactions often determine the adhesive, invasive, and antigenic properties of the infecting organisms and can dramatically affect the virulence and pathobiology of individual infections. Pathogens capable of such antigenic variation exhibit mechanisms of rapid mutability in confined chromosomal regions containing specialized genes designated contingency genes. The mechanisms of hypermutability of contingency genes are common to a variety of bacterial and eukaryotic pathogens and include promoter alterations, reading-frame shifts, gene conversion events, genomic rearrangements, and point mutations. PMID:9293182

  11. Structure of the Malaria Antigen AMA1 in Complex with a Growth-Inhibitory Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Tao; Kim, Hanna; Anders, Robin F; Foley, Michael; Batchelor, Adrian H

    2007-01-01

    Identifying functionally critical regions of the malaria antigen AMA1 (apical membrane antigen 1) is necessary to understand the significance of the polymorphisms within this antigen for vaccine development. The crystal structure of AMA1 in complex with the Fab fragment of inhibitory monoclonal antibody 1F9 reveals that 1F9 binds to the AMA1 solvent-exposed hydrophobic trough, confirming its importance. 1F9 uses the heavy and light chain complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) to wrap around the polymorphic loops adjacent to the trough, but uses a ridge of framework residues to bind to the hydrophobic trough. The resulting 1F9-AMA1–combined buried surface of 2,470 Å2 is considerably larger than previously reported Fab–antigen interfaces. Mutations of polymorphic AMA1 residues within the 1F9 epitope disrupt 1F9 binding and dramatically reduce the binding of affinity-purified human antibodies. Moreover, 1F9 binding to AMA1 is competed by naturally acquired human antibodies, confirming that the 1F9 epitope is a frequent target of immunological attack. PMID:17907804

  12. Antigenic variation: Molecular and genetic mechanisms of relapsing disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, J.M.; Lewis, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. They are: Contemporary Concepts of Antigenic Variation; Antigenic Variation in the Influenza Viruses; Mechanisms of Escape of Visna Lentiviruses from Immunological Control; A Review of Antigenic Variation by the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus; Biologic and Molecular Variations in AIDS Retrovirus Isolates; Rabies Virus Infection: Genetic Mutations and the Impact on Viral Pathogenicity and Immunity; Immunobiology of Relapsing Fever; Antigenic Variation in African Trypanosomes; Antigenic Variation and Antigenic Diversity in Malaria; and Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Schistosomiasis.

  13. Cyclosporine inhibits macrophage-mediated antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, H.K.; Palay, D.; Wentworth, P.; Cluff, C.

    1986-03-01

    The influence of cyclosporine on antigen-specific, macrophage-dependent T cell activation was analyzed in vitro. Murine T cell activation by antigens derived from Listeria monocytogenes was monitored by the production of interleukin-2. Pretreatment (2 hrs., 37/sup 0/C) of macrophages with cyclosporine resulted in a population of macrophages with a markedly diminished capacity to support the activation of T lymphocytes. When cyclosporine-pretreated macrophages were added to cultures of antigen and untreated T cells, the dose of cyclosporine which produced 50% inhibition was 1.5 ..mu..g/ml. Appropriate control experiments indicated that cyclosporine was indeed inhibiting at the macrophage level. The addition of interleukin-1 or indomethacin to the cultures did not alter the inhibitory effect of cyclosporine. Under conditions which produced >90% inhibition of antigen presentation, macrophage surface Ia expression was not altered, and the uptake and catabolism of radiolabelled antigen was normal. Thus, cyclosporine inhibits antigen presentation by a mechanism which appears unrelated to changes in Il-1 elaboration, prostaglandin production, Ia expression, or antigen uptake and catabolism.

  14. Meningococcal vaccine antigen diversity in global databases.

    PubMed

    Brehony, Carina; Hill, Dorothea M; Lucidarme, Jay; Borrow, Ray; Maiden, Martin C

    2015-01-01

    The lack of an anti-capsular vaccine against serogroup B meningococcal disease has necessitated the exploration of alternative vaccine candidates, mostly proteins exhibiting varying degrees of antigenic variation. Analysis of variants of antigen-encoding genes is facilitated by publicly accessible online sequence repositories, such as the Neisseria PubMLST database and the associated Meningitis Research Foundation Meningococcus Genome Library (MRF-MGL). We investigated six proposed meningococcal vaccine formulations by deducing the prevalence of their components in the isolates represented in these repositories. Despite high diversity, a limited number of antigenic variants of each of the vaccine antigens were prevalent, with strong associations of particular variant combinations with given serogroups and genotypes. In the MRF-MGL and globally, the highest levels of identical sequences were observed with multicomponent/multivariant vaccines. Our analyses further demonstrated that certain combinations of antigen variants were prevalent over periods of decades in widely differing locations, indicating that vaccine formulations containing a judicious choice of antigen variants have potential for long-term protection across geographic regions. The data further indicated that formulations with multiple variants would be especially relevant at times of low disease incidence, as relative diversity was higher. Continued surveillance is required to monitor the changing prevalence of these vaccine antigens.

  15. Meningococcal vaccine antigen diversity in global databases.

    PubMed

    Brehony, Carina; Hill, Dorothea M; Lucidarme, Jay; Borrow, Ray; Maiden, Martin C

    2015-01-01

    The lack of an anti-capsular vaccine against serogroup B meningococcal disease has necessitated the exploration of alternative vaccine candidates, mostly proteins exhibiting varying degrees of antigenic variation. Analysis of variants of antigen-encoding genes is facilitated by publicly accessible online sequence repositories, such as the Neisseria PubMLST database and the associated Meningitis Research Foundation Meningococcus Genome Library (MRF-MGL). We investigated six proposed meningococcal vaccine formulations by deducing the prevalence of their components in the isolates represented in these repositories. Despite high diversity, a limited number of antigenic variants of each of the vaccine antigens were prevalent, with strong associations of particular variant combinations with given serogroups and genotypes. In the MRF-MGL and globally, the highest levels of identical sequences were observed with multicomponent/multivariant vaccines. Our analyses further demonstrated that certain combinations of antigen variants were prevalent over periods of decades in widely differing locations, indicating that vaccine formulations containing a judicious choice of antigen variants have potential for long-term protection across geographic regions. The data further indicated that formulations with multiple variants would be especially relevant at times of low disease incidence, as relative diversity was higher. Continued surveillance is required to monitor the changing prevalence of these vaccine antigens. PMID:26676305

  16. Digestibility and antigenicity of β-lactoglobulin as affected by heat, pH and applied shear.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Toheder; Vasiljevic, Todor; Ramchandran, Lata

    2017-02-15

    Processing induced conformational changes can modulate digestibility of food allergens and thereby their antigenicity. Effect of different pH (3, 5, 7), temperature (room temperature, 120°C) and shear (0s(-1), 1000s(-1)) on simulated gastrointestinal digestibility of β-lg and post digestion antigenic characteristics have been studied. At all pH levels unheated β-lg showed resistance to peptic digestion with high antigenic value while it was fairly susceptible to pancreatin with moderate reduction in antigenicity. Heating at 120°C significantly improved both peptic and pancreatic digestion attributed to structural alterations that resulted in much lower antigenicity; the level of reduction being pH dependant. The lowest antigenicity was recorded at pH 5. Shearing (1000s(-1)) had a minor impact reducing digestibility and thereby enhancing antigenicity of unheated β-lg at pH 5 and 7 slightly; however in conjunction with heating (120°C) it reduced antigenicity further irrespective of the pH. Overall, treatment at pH 5, 120°C and 1000s(-1) could potentially reduce post digestion antigenicity of β-lg. PMID:27664667

  17. Digestibility and antigenicity of β-lactoglobulin as affected by heat, pH and applied shear.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Toheder; Vasiljevic, Todor; Ramchandran, Lata

    2017-02-15

    Processing induced conformational changes can modulate digestibility of food allergens and thereby their antigenicity. Effect of different pH (3, 5, 7), temperature (room temperature, 120°C) and shear (0s(-1), 1000s(-1)) on simulated gastrointestinal digestibility of β-lg and post digestion antigenic characteristics have been studied. At all pH levels unheated β-lg showed resistance to peptic digestion with high antigenic value while it was fairly susceptible to pancreatin with moderate reduction in antigenicity. Heating at 120°C significantly improved both peptic and pancreatic digestion attributed to structural alterations that resulted in much lower antigenicity; the level of reduction being pH dependant. The lowest antigenicity was recorded at pH 5. Shearing (1000s(-1)) had a minor impact reducing digestibility and thereby enhancing antigenicity of unheated β-lg at pH 5 and 7 slightly; however in conjunction with heating (120°C) it reduced antigenicity further irrespective of the pH. Overall, treatment at pH 5, 120°C and 1000s(-1) could potentially reduce post digestion antigenicity of β-lg.

  18. The significance of erythrocyte antigen site density

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Leon W.; Trabold, Norma C.

    1971-01-01

    The importance of antigen site density has been studied by means of a model passive hemolysis system using red cells coupled with sulfanilic acid groups. Relative site numbers were estimated from the covalent linkage of sulfanilic acid-35S to red cell membrane protein, and the effective antigen site number was determined with 125I-labeled rabbit IgG anti-sulfanilic acid (anti-S). Immune hemolysis was demonstrated for red cells which had greater than a threshold number of antigen sites, the value of which was different for normal human cells (80,000 sites/cell), cells from a patient with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) (40,000 sites/cell), and sheep red blood cells (RBC) (15,000 sites/cell). Cells with antigen site densities below these values did not hemolyze when tested with 1 mg/ml purified rabbit IgM anti-S. 2-8 times greater antigen site densities were required to obtain hemolysis with IgG anti-S. Above the threshold value, hemolysis titers were proportional to the antigen site number until maximal values were obtained. The greater hemolytic efficiency of IgM antibody was demonstrated in this system, and it was established that the magnitude of the difference was related to the test cell antigen site density. These data, taken with previously reported hemagglutination studies, have been used to develop a general classification of immune hemolysis and hemagglutination based on antigen site density and antibody class. It is suggested that the heterogeneity of blood group systems is caused by differences in the site separation of erythrocyte membrane antigens. PMID:5105661

  19. Dramatic Decomposition Weakening of Simulated Faults in Carrara Marble at Seismic Slip-rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, R.; Shimamoto, T.; Hirose, T.; Ree, J.

    2005-12-01

    Evolution of fault-zone strength and its weakening mechanisms during an earthquake are critical for understanding of earthquake rupture process. We report dramatic weakening of dry simulated faults in Carrara marble at seismic slip-rates, with frictional coefficient as low as 0.04 (probably the lowest record as rock friction). Calcite decomposition was confirmed by in-situ CO2 detection and other methods and the weakening may require new weakening mechanisms other than currently suggested ones such as frictional melting, thermal pressurization and silica gel formation. We conducted rotary-shear friction experiments on Carrara marble at slip-rates (V) of 0.09-1.24 m/s and normal stresses (σn) of 2.5-13.4 MPa. For preventing a thermal fracturing and applying a high normal load, we used solid cylindrical specimens jacketed with aluminum tubes. Narrow gap was left between the two aluminum tubes to avoid metal-to-metal contact. Our main results can be summarized as follows: (1) Slip weakening occurs in all experiments except for the runs at the lowest V (0.09 m/s); (2) Steady-state friction coefficient (μss) decreases as slip-rate and normal load increase; (3) At the highest V (1.13-1.24 m/s) and σn = 7.3 MPa, the average friction coefficient of initial peak friction (μp) is 0.61 (± 0.02), but the average μss is 0.04! (± 0.01) which is much lower than μp; (4) Decrease in average temperature of sliding surfaces corresponds to increase in friction, and strength recovery occurs very rapidly and completely upon cooling of specimens; (5) XRD and EPMA data show that the gouge for the specimens at V > 0.09 m/s is composed of calcite, lime (CaO) and/or hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2); (6) CO2 gas was detected with sensors during the weakening; (7) Decomposed calcite forms a fault zone consisting of ultrafine-grained gouge, but no melt or amorphous material was identified by optical microscopy or XRD analysis. Calcite decomposition clearly indicates that temperature in the fault

  20. Evidence for Horizontal Gene Transfer of Two Antigenically Distinct O Antigens in Bordetella bronchiseptica▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Buboltz, Anne M.; Nicholson, Tracy L.; Karanikas, Alexia T.; Preston, Andrew; Harvill, Eric T.

    2009-01-01

    Host immunity is a major driving force of antigenic diversity, resulting in pathogens that can evade immunity induced by closely related strains. Here we show that two Bordetella bronchiseptica strains, RB50 and 1289, express two antigenically distinct O-antigen serotypes (O1 and O2, respectively). When 18 additional B. bronchiseptica strains were serotyped, all were found to express either the O1 or O2 serotype. Comparative genomic hybridization and PCR screening showed that the expression of either the O1 or O2 serotype correlated with the strain containing either the classical or alternative O-antigen locus, respectively. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of 49 B. bronchiseptica strains was used to build a phylogenetic tree, which revealed that the two O-antigen loci did not associate with a particular lineage, evidence that these loci are horizontally transferred between B. bronchiseptica strains. From experiments using mice vaccinated with purified lipopolysaccharide from strain RB50 (O1), 1289 (O2), or RB50Δwbm (O antigen deficient), our data indicate that these O antigens do not confer cross-protection in vivo. The lack of cross-immunity between O-antigen serotypes appears to contribute to inefficient antibody-mediated clearance between strains. Together, these data are consistent with the idea that the O-antigen loci of B. bronchiseptica are horizontally transferred between strains and encode antigenically distinct serotypes, resulting in inefficient cross-immunity. PMID:19528223

  1. New Radar Altimeter Missions are Providing a Dramatically Sharper Image of Global Marine Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandwell, D. T.; Müller, D.; Garcia, E.; Matthews, K. J.; Smith, W. H. F.; Zaron, E.; Zhang, S.; Bassett, D.; Francis, R.

    2015-12-01

    Marine gravity, derived from satellite radar altimetry, is a powerful tool for mapping tectonic structures, especially in the deep ocean basins where the topography remains unmapped by ships or is buried by thick sediment. The ability to infer seafloor tectonics from space was first demonstrated in 1978 using Seasat altimeter data but the spatial coverage was incomplete because of the short three-month lifetime of the satellite. Most ocean altimeters have repeat ground tracks with spacings of hundreds of kilometers so they do not resolve tectonic structures. Adequate altimeter coverage became available in 1995 when the United States Navy declassified the Geosat radar altimeter data and the ERS-1 altimeter completed a 1-year mapping phase. These mid-1990's altimeter-derived images of the ocean basins remained static for 15 years because there were no new non-repeat altimeter missions. This situation changed dramatically in 2010 when CryoSat-2, with its advanced radar altimeter, was launched into a non-repeat orbit and continues to collect data until perhaps 2020. In addition the Jason-1 altimeter was placed into a 14-month geodetic phase at the end of its lifetime. More recently the 1.5 times higher precision measurements from the AltiKa altimeter aboard the SARAL spacecraft began to drift away from its 35-day repeat trackline. The Chinese HY-2 altimeter is scheduled to begin a dense mapping phase in early 2016. Moreover in 2020 we may enjoy significantly higher resolution maps of the ocean basins from the planned SWOT altimeter mission with its advanced swath mapping ability. All of this new data will provide a much sharper image of the tectonics of the deep ocean basins and continental margins. During this talk we will tour of the new tectonic structures revealed by CryoSat-2 and Jason-1 and speculate on the tectonic views of the ocean basins in 2020 and beyond.

  2. Cellulolytic protist numbers rise and fall dramatically in termite queens and kings during colony foundation.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Keisuke; Lo, Nathan; Kitade, Osamu; Wakui, Akane; Maekawa, Kiyoto

    2013-04-01

    Among the best-known examples of mutualistic symbioses is that between lower termites and the cellulolytic flagellate protists in their hindguts. Although the symbiosis in worker termites has attracted much attention, there have been only a few studies of protists in other castes. We have performed the first examination of protist population dynamics in queens and kings during termite colony foundation. Protist numbers, as well as measurements of hindgut and reproductive tissue sizes, were undertaken at five time points over 400 days in incipient colonies of Reticulitermes speratus, as well as in other castes of mature colonies of this species. We found that protist numbers increased dramatically in both queens and kings during the first 50 days of colony foundation but began to decrease by day 100, eventually disappearing by day 400. Hindgut width followed a pattern similar to that of protist numbers, while ovary and testis widths increased significantly only at day 400. Kings were found to contain higher numbers of protists than queens in incipient colonies, which may be linked to higher levels of nutrient transfer from kings to queens than vice versa, as is known in some other termite species. Protists were found to be abundant in soldiers from mature colonies but absent in neotenics. This probably reflects feeding of soldiers by workers via proctodeal trophallaxis and of reproductives via stomodeal trophallaxis. The results reveal the dynamic nature of protist numbers during colony foundation and highlight the trade-offs that exist between reproduction and parental care during this critical phase of the termite life cycle.

  3. Urbanization dramatically altered the water balances of a paddy field dominated basin in Southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, L.; Sun, G.; Liu, Y.; Wan, J.; Qin, M.; Qian, H.; Liu, C.; John, R.; Fan, P.; Chen, J.

    2015-02-01

    Rice paddy fields provide important ecosystem services (e.g., food production, water retention, carbon sequestration) to a large population globally. However, these benefits are declining as a result of rapid environmental and socioeconomic transformations characterized by population growth, urbanization, and climate change in many Asian countries. This case study examined the responses of streamflow and watershed water balances to the decline of rice paddy fields due to urbanization in the Qinhuai River Basin in southern China where massive industrialization has occurred in the region during the past three decades. We found that streamflow increased by 58% and evapotranspiration (ET) decreased by 23% during 1986-2013 as a result of an increase in urban areas of three folds and reduction of rice paddy field by 27%. Both highflows and lowflows increased significantly by about 28% from 2002 to 2013. The increases in streamflow were consistent with the decreases in ET and leaf area index monitored by independent remote sensing MODIS data. The reduction in ET and increase in streamflow was attributed to the large cropland conversion that overwhelmed the effects of regional climate warming and climate variability. Converting traditional rice paddy fields to urban use dramatically altered land surface conditions from a water-dominated to a human-dominated landscape, and thus was considered as one of the extreme types of contemporary hydrologic disturbances. The ongoing large-scale urbanization in the rice paddy-dominated regions in the humid southern China, and East Asia, will likely elevate stormflow volume, aggravate flood risks, and intensify urban heat island effects. Understanding the linkage between land use change and changes in hydrological processes is essential for better management of urbanizing watersheds.

  4. Antigen retrieval techniques: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Shi, S R; Cote, R J; Taylor, C R

    2001-08-01

    Development of the antigen retrieval (AR) technique, a simple method of boiling archival paraffin-embedded tissue sections in water to enhance the signal of immunohistochemistry (IHC), was the fruit of pioneering efforts guided by the philosophy of rendering IHC applicable to routine formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues for wide application of IHC in research and clinical pathology. On the basis of thousands of articles and many reviews, a book has recently been published that summarizes basic principles for practice and further development of the AR technique. Major topics with respect to several critical issues, such as the definition, application, technical principles, and further studies of the AR technique, are highlighted in this article. In particular, a further application of the heat-induced retrieval approach for sufficient extraction of nucleic acids in addition to proteins, and standardization of routine IHC based on the AR technique in terms of a test battery approach, are also addressed. Furthermore, understanding the mechanism of the AR technique may shed light on facilitating the development of molecular morphology.

  5. Hepatitis C Virus Antigenic Convergence

    PubMed Central

    Campo, David S.; Dimitrova, Zoya; Yokosawa, Jonny; Hoang, Duc; Perez, Nestor O.; Ramachandran, Sumathi; Khudyakov, Yury

    2012-01-01

    Vaccine development against hepatitis C virus (HCV) is hindered by poor understanding of factors defining cross-immunoreactivity among heterogeneous epitopes. Using synthetic peptides and mouse immunization as a model, we conducted a quantitative analysis of cross-immunoreactivity among variants of the HCV hypervariable region 1 (HVR1). Analysis of 26,883 immunological reactions among pairs of peptides showed that the distribution of cross-immunoreactivity among HVR1 variants was skewed, with antibodies against a few variants reacting with all tested peptides. The HVR1 cross-immunoreactivity was accurately modeled based on amino acid sequence alone. The tested peptides were mapped in the HVR1 sequence space, which was visualized as a network of 11,319 sequences. The HVR1 variants with a greater network centrality showed a broader cross-immunoreactivity. The entire sequence space is explored by each HCV genotype and subtype. These findings indicate that HVR1 antigenic diversity is extensively convergent and effectively limited, suggesting significant implications for vaccine development. PMID:22355779

  6. Flaviviruses and their antigenic structure.

    PubMed

    Heinz, F X; Stiasny, Karin

    2012-12-01

    Flaviviruses comprise important arthropod-transmitted human pathogens, including yellow fever (YF), dengue (Den), Japanese encephalitis (JE), West Nile (WN) and tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) viruses that have the potential of expanding their endemic areas due to global climatic, ecological and socio-economic changes. While effective vaccines against YF, JE and TBE are in widespread use, the development of a dengue vaccine has been hampered for a long time because of concerns of immunopathological consequences of vaccination. Phase III clinical trials with a recombinant chimeric live vaccine are now ongoing and will show whether the enormous problem of dengue can be resolved or at least reduced by vaccination in the future. Unprecedented details of the flavivirus particle structure have become available through the combined use of X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy that led to novel and surprising insights into the antigenic structure of these viruses. Recent studies provided evidence for an important role of virus maturation as well as particle dynamics in virus neutralization by antibodies and thus added previously unknown layers of complexity to our understanding of flavivirus immune protection. This information is invaluable for interpreting current investigations on the functional activities of polyclonal antibody responses to flavivirus infections and vaccinations and may open new avenues for studies on flavivirus cell biology and vaccine design.

  7. Human immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Havlir, D V; Wallis, R S; Boom, W H; Daniel, T M; Chervenak, K; Ellner, J J

    1991-01-01

    Little is known about the immunodominant or protective antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans. Cell-mediated immunity is necessary for protection, and healthy tuberculin-positive individuals are relatively resistant to exogenous reinfection. We compared the targets of the cell-mediated immune response in healthy tuberculin-positive individuals to those of tuberculosis patients and tuberculin-negative persons. By using T-cell Western blotting (immunoblotting) of nitrocellulose-bound M. tuberculosis culture filtrate, peaks of T-cell blastogenic activity were identified in the healthy tuberculin reactors at 30, 37, 44, 57, 64, 71 and 88 kDa. Three of these fractions (30, 64, and 71 kDa) coincided with previously characterized proteins: antigen 6/alpha antigen, HSP60, and HSP70, respectively. The blastogenic responses to purified M. tuberculosis antigen 6/alpha antigen and BCG HSP60 were assessed. When cultured with purified antigen 6/alpha antigen, lymphocytes of healthy tuberculin reactors demonstrated greater [3H]thymidine incorporation than either healthy tuberculin-negative controls or tuberculous patients (8,113 +/- 1,939 delta cpm versus 645 +/- 425 delta cpm and 1,019 +/- 710 delta cpm, respectively; P less than 0.01). Healthy reactors also responded to HSP60, although to a lesser degree than antigen 6/alpha antigen (4,276 +/- 1,095 delta cpm; P less than 0.05). Partially purified HSP70 bound to nitrocellulose paper elicited a significant lymphocyte blastogenic response in two of six of the tuberculous patients but in none of the eight healthy tuberculin reactors. Lymphocytes of none of five tuberculin-negative controls responded to recombinant antigens at 14 or 19 kDa or to HSP70. Antibody reactivity generally was inversely correlated with blastogenic response: tuberculous sera had high titer antibody to M. tuberculosis culture filtrate in a range from 35 to 180 kDa. This is the first systematic evaluation of the human response to a panel of native

  8. Optical properties of high aspect ratio plasma etched silicon nanowires: fabrication-induced variability dramatically reduces reflectance.

    PubMed

    Smyrnakis, A; Almpanis, E; Constantoudis, V; Papanikolaou, N; Gogolides, E

    2015-02-27

    In this work we investigate both experimentally and theoretically the optical properties of aligned, perpendicular to the substrate, high aspect ratio (AR), plasma etched Si nanowires (SiNWs) with controlled variability. We focus on the role of imperfections in fabrication, which manifest themselves as dimensional variability of SiNW, lattice defects or positional randomization. SiNW arrays are fabricated by e-beam lithography (perfectly ordered array) or colloidal particle self-assembly (quasi-ordered array) followed by cryogenic Si plasma etching, which offers fast etch rate (up to 3 μm min(-1)) combined with clean, smooth, and controllable sidewall profile, but induces some dimensional variability on the diameters of the SiNWs. Sub-200 nm diameter SiNWs having AR as high as 37:1 are demonstrated. The total reflectance of SiNWs is below 2% in a wide range of the optical spectrum. We experimentally demonstrate improved light absorption when moving from a perfectly ordered (after e-beam lithography) to a defective and quasi-ordered (after colloidal self-assembly) SiNW array. In addition our measured reflectivity (for both ordered and quasi-ordered SiNWs) is much lower compared to the one predicted theoretically for a perfect SiNWs array, using full-electrodynamic calculations with the layer-multiple-scattering method. To explain such low reflectivity, we model the influence of disorder using the average T-matrix approximation and show that even small dimensional variability (10-20%) leads to dramatic reduction of the reflectance (matching the experimental results) and increased light trapping inside the SiNW justifying their possible application in photovoltaic devices. PMID:25648611

  9. Optical properties of high aspect ratio plasma etched silicon nanowires: fabrication-induced variability dramatically reduces reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyrnakis, A.; Almpanis, E.; Constantoudis, V.; Papanikolaou, N.; Gogolides, E.

    2015-02-01

    In this work we investigate both experimentally and theoretically the optical properties of aligned, perpendicular to the substrate, high aspect ratio (AR), plasma etched Si nanowires (SiNWs) with controlled variability. We focus on the role of imperfections in fabrication, which manifest themselves as dimensional variability of SiNW, lattice defects or positional randomization. SiNW arrays are fabricated by e-beam lithography (perfectly ordered array) or colloidal particle self-assembly (quasi-ordered array) followed by cryogenic Si plasma etching, which offers fast etch rate (up to 3 μm min-1) combined with clean, smooth, and controllable sidewall profile, but induces some dimensional variability on the diameters of the SiNWs. Sub-200 nm diameter SiNWs having AR as high as 37:1 are demonstrated. The total reflectance of SiNWs is below 2% in a wide range of the optical spectrum. We experimentally demonstrate improved light absorption when moving from a perfectly ordered (after e-beam lithography) to a defective and quasi-ordered (after colloidal self-assembly) SiNW array. In addition our measured reflectivity (for both ordered and quasi-ordered SiNWs) is much lower compared to the one predicted theoretically for a perfect SiNWs array, using full-electrodynamic calculations with the layer-multiple-scattering method. To explain such low reflectivity, we model the influence of disorder using the average T-matrix approximation and show that even small dimensional variability (10-20%) leads to dramatic reduction of the reflectance (matching the experimental results) and increased light trapping inside the SiNW justifying their possible application in photovoltaic devices.

  10. Cloning, Characterization, and Expression of a 200-Kilodalton Diagnostic Antigen of Babesia bigemina†

    PubMed Central

    Tebele, N.; Skilton, R. A.; Katende, J.; Wells, C. W.; Nene, V.; McElwain, T.; Morzaria, S. P.; Musoke, A. J.

    2000-01-01

    Current serological tests for Babesia bigemina use semipurified merozoite antigens derived from infected erythrocytes. One of the major drawbacks of these tests is that antigen quality can vary from batch to batch. Since the quality of the antigen contributes to the sensitivity and specificity of serological tests, the use of standardized recombinant antigens should ensure consistency in assay quality. Previously, a 200-kDa merozoite antigen (p200) was identified as a candidate diagnostic antigen for use in a serological assay for the detection of B. bigemina antibodies in infected cattle. In this study, we have cloned, characterized, and expressed p200. A 3.5-kbp cDNA clone encoding p200 was isolated and shown to be almost full length, lacking approximately 300 bp at the 5′ end. The predicted amino acid sequence shows that p200 consists of a long, highly charged central repeat region of an uninterrupted α helix, indicative of a fibrous protein. Immunoelectron microscopy localized p200 to the merozoite cytoplasm, suggesting that the antigen may be a structural protein involved in forming filament structures within the cytoskeleton. The 3.5-kbp cDNA was expressed in bacteria as a fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase (GST), but the yield was poor. To improve the yield, cDNA fragments encoding antigenic domains of p200 were expressed as fusions with GST. One of these fusion proteins, C1A-GST, is composed of a 7-kDa fragment of the p200 repeat region and contains epitopes that react strongly with sera from cattle experimentally infected with B. bigemina. Recombinant C1A-GST should permit the development of an improved enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of antibodies against B. bigemina. PMID:10834983

  11. Relationship between major histocompatibility antigens and disease

    PubMed Central

    Oldstone, Michael B. A.

    1975-01-01

    Histocompatibility antigens, virus infections, and disease are discussed relative to avenues of research in humans with arenavirus infections. The data implicating a relationship between histocompatibility complexes in man and animals and diseases of the central nervous system are reviewed. Histocompatibility antigens may share common antigenic determinants with viruses, act as receptor sites for attachment of viruses, and be altered by viruses. In addition, genes regulating immune responses to a variety of natural and synthetic antigens are linked, in many species, to the major histocompatibility complex. Since injury associated with virus infections may be largely due to the activity of the immune system, study of immune response genes may provide insight into understanding resistance to disease. Further, histoincompatibility reactions can activate latent viruses with resultant disease. PMID:60183

  12. Lymphocyte activation by streptococcal antigens in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Gross, W L; Packhäuser, U; Hahn, G; Westphal, E; Christophers, E; Schlaak, M

    1977-11-01

    Cell-mediated immune responses in 28 hospitalized patients with psoriasis and in 36 healthy controls were studied using the two-step leukocyte migration agarose test. Specific cell-mediated immunity to A-streptococcal cell wall and cell membrane antigens occurred significantly more often in patients with psoriasis than in the control group. A statistically significant correlation between psoriasis-associated antigens of the HLA-B locus and cellular immune reactivity to A-streptococcal antigens or clinical course was not found. When patients with guttate psoriasis were compared separately with the control group, leukocyte migration inhibition induced by cell-free supernatants of A-streptococcal antigen-exposed mononuclear cell cultures was found to be more frequent than in other forms of psoriasis.

  13. Reverse immunoediting: When immunity is edited by antigen.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Anna; Santa, Silvia Dalla; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Zanovello, Paola; Rosato, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Immune selective pressure occurring during cancer immunoediting shapes tumor features revealed at clinical presentation. However, in the "Escape" phase, the tumor itself has the chance to influence the immunological response. Therefore, the capacity of the immune response to sculpt the tumor characteristics is only one side of the coin and even the opposite is likely true, i.e. that an antigen can shape the immune response in a sort of "reverse immunoediting". This reciprocal modeling probably occurs continuously, whenever the immune system encounters a tumor/foreign antigen, and can be operative in the pathogen/immune system interplay, thus possibly permeating the protective immunity as a whole. In line with this view, the characterization of a T cell response as well as the design of both active and passive immunotherapy strategies should also take into account all Ag features (type, load and presentation). Overall, we suggest that the "reverse immunoediting" hypothesis could help to dissect the complex interplay between antigens and the immune repertoire, and to improve the outcome of immunotherapeutic approaches, where T cell responses are manipulated and reprogrammed.

  14. Intestinal Calcium Absorption Decreases Dramatically After Gastric Bypass Surgery Despite Optimization of Vitamin D Status.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Anne L; Weaver, Connie M; Black, Dennis M; Wheeler, Amber L; Chang, Hanling; Szefc, Gina V; Stewart, Lygia; Rogers, Stanley J; Carter, Jonathan T; Posselt, Andrew M; Shoback, Dolores M; Sellmeyer, Deborah E

    2015-08-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery has negative effects on bone, mediated in part by effects on nutrient absorption. Not only can RYGB result in vitamin D malabsorption, but the bypassed duodenum and proximal jejunum are also the predominant sites of active, transcellular, 1,25(OH)2 D-mediated calcium (Ca) uptake. However, Ca absorption occurs throughout the intestine, and those who undergo RYGB might maintain sufficient Ca absorption, particularly if vitamin D status and Ca intake are robust. We determined the effects of RYGB on intestinal fractional Ca absorption (FCA) while maintaining ample 25OHD levels (goal ≥30 ng/mL) and Ca intake (1200 mg daily) in a prospective cohort of 33 obese adults (BMI 44.7 ± 7.4 kg/m(2)). FCA was measured preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively with a dual stable isotope method. Other measures included calciotropic hormones, bone turnover markers, and BMD by DXA and QCT. Mean 6-month weight loss was 32.5 ± 8.4 kg (25.8% ± 5.2% of preoperative weight). FCA decreased from 32.7% ± 14.0% preoperatively to 6.9% ± 3.8% postoperatively (p < 0.0001), despite median (interquartile range) 25OHD levels of 41.0 (33.1 to 48.5) and 36.5 (28.8 to 40.4) ng/mL, respectively. Consistent with the FCA decline, 24-hour urinary Ca decreased, PTH increased, and 1,25(OH)2 D increased (p ≤ 0.02). Bone turnover markers increased markedly, areal BMD decreased at the proximal femur, and volumetric BMD decreased at the spine (p < 0.001). Those with lower postoperative FCA had greater increases in serum CTx (ρ = -0.43, p = 0.01). Declines in FCA and BMD were not correlated over the 6 months. In conclusion, FCA decreased dramatically after RYGB, even with most 25OHD levels ≥30 ng/mL and with recommended Ca intake. RYGB patients may need high Ca intake to prevent perturbations in Ca homeostasis, although the approach to Ca supplementation needs further study. Decline in FCA could contribute to

  15. Urbanization dramatically altered the water balances of a paddy field-dominated basin in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, L.; Sun, G.; Liu, Y.; Wan, J.; Qin, M.; Qian, H.; Liu, C.; Zheng, J.; John, R.; Fan, P.; Chen, J.

    2015-07-01

    Rice paddy fields provide important ecosystem services (e.g., food production, water retention, carbon sequestration) to a large population globally. However, these benefits are diminishing as a result of rapid environmental and socioeconomic transformations, characterized by population growth, urbanization, and climate change in many Asian countries. This case study examined the responses of stream flow and watershed water balances to the decline of rice paddy fields due to urbanization in the Qinhuai River basin in southern China, where massive industrialization has occurred during the past 3 decades. We found that stream flow increased by 58 % and evapotranspiration (ET) decreased by 23 % during 1986-2013 as a result of a three-fold increase in urban areas and a reduction of rice paddy fields by 27 %. Both high flows and low flows increased significantly by about 28 % from 2002 to 2013. The increases in stream flow were consistent with the decreases in ET and leaf area index monitored by independent remote sensing MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data. Attribution analysis, based on two empirical models, indicated that land-use/land-cover change contributed about 82-108 % of the observed increase in stream flow from 353 ± 287 mm yr-1 during 1986-2002 to 556 ± 145 during 2003-2013. We concluded that the reduction in ET was largely attributed to the conversion of cropland to urban use. The effects of land-use change overwhelmed the effects of regional climate warming and climate variability. Converting traditional rice paddy fields to urban use dramatically altered land surface conditions from an artificial wetland-dominated landscape to an urban land-use- dominated one, and thus was considered an extreme type of contemporary hydrologic disturbance. The ongoing large-scale urbanization of the rice paddy-dominated regions, in humid southern China and East Asia, will likely elevate storm-flow volume, aggravate flood risks, and intensify urban

  16. Non-small cell lung cancer is characterized by dramatic changes in phospholipid profiles

    PubMed Central

    Marien, Eyra; Meister, Michael; Muley, Thomas; Fieuws, Steffen; Bordel, Sergio; Derua, Rita; Spraggins, Jeffrey; Van de Plas, Raf; Dehairs, Jonas; Wouters, Jens; Bagadi, Muralidhararao; Dienemann, Hendrik; Thomas, Michael; Schnabel, Philipp A; Caprioli, Richard M; Waelkens, Etienne; Swinnen, Johannes V

    2015-01-01

    of phospholipid profiles uncovered dramatic differences between NSCLC and normal lung tissue. The differences were confirmed via 2D-imaging lipidomics in tissue sections. Lipid markers capable of discriminating between tumor and normal tissue and between different NSCLC subtypes were identified. The observed alterations in NSCLC phospholipid profiles may be biologically significant. PMID:25784292

  17. Intestinal Calcium Absorption Decreases Dramatically After Gastric Bypass Surgery Despite Optimization of Vitamin D Status

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Anne L; Weaver, Connie M; Black, Dennis M; Wheeler, Amber L; Chang, Hanling; Szefc, Gina V; Stewart, Lygia; Rogers, Stanley J; Carter, Jonathan T; Posselt, Andrew M; Shoback, Dolores M; Sellmeyer, Deborah E

    2015-01-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery has negative effects on bone, mediated in part by effects on nutrient absorption. Not only can RYGB result in vitamin D malabsorption, but the bypassed duodenum and proximal jejunum are also the predominant sites of active, transcellular, 1,25(OH)2D-mediated calcium (Ca) uptake. However, Ca absorption occurs throughout the intestine, and those who undergo RYGB might maintain sufficient Ca absorption, particularly if vitamin D status and Ca intake are robust. We determined the effects of RYGB on intestinal fractional Ca absorption (FCA) while maintaining ample 25OHD levels (goal ≥30 ng/mL) and Ca intake (1200 mg daily) in a prospective cohort of 33 obese adults (BMI 44.7 ± 7.4 kg/m2). FCA was measured preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively with a dual stable isotope method. Other measures included calciotropic hormones, bone turnover markers, and BMD by DXA and QCT. Mean 6-month weight loss was 32.5 ± 8.4 kg (25.8% ± 5.2% of preoperative weight). FCA decreased from 32.7% ± 14.0% preoperatively to 6.9% ± 3.8% postoperatively (p < 0.0001), despite median (interquartile range) 25OHD levels of 41.0 (33.1 to 48.5) and 36.5 (28.8 to 40.4) ng/mL, respectively. Consistent with the FCA decline, 24-hour urinary Ca decreased, PTH increased, and 1,25(OH)2D increased (p ≤ 0.02). Bone turnover markers increased markedly, areal BMD decreased at the proximal femur, and volumetric BMD decreased at the spine (p < 0.001). Those with lower postoperative FCA had greater increases in serum CTx (ρ = −0.43, p = 0.01). Declines in FCA and BMD were not correlated over the 6 months. In conclusion, FCA decreased dramatically after RYGB, even with most 25OHD levels ≥30 ng/mL and with recommended Ca intake. RYGB patients may need high Ca intake to prevent perturbations in Ca homeostasis, although the approach to Ca supplementation needs further study. Decline in FCA could contribute to the decline in BMD after RYGB, and strategies to

  18. THE SUBCELLULAR DISTRIBUTION OF ANTIGEN IN MACROPHAGES

    PubMed Central

    Kölsch, E.; Mitchison, N. A.

    1968-01-01

    The intracellular fate of phagocytosed antigens in cells from peritoneal exudate in CBA mice has been studied by using 126I and 131I labeled antigens. After uptake of labeled antigen, cells were homogenized and the subcellular fractions were analyzed by isopycnic centrifugation in a sucrose gradient. The uptake of heat-denatured BSA (c BSA) by these cells in vivo is 3.5 µg/mg c BSA injected/108 cells. The uptake by cells in animals which were exposed 2 days earlier to 900 r whole body irradiation is slightly lower but does not differ significantly. 90% of the phagocytosed material is degraded within 2–3 hr, the residual 10% is retained at least over an 8 hr periods. Using a pulse and chase technique, with 125I and 131I c BSA in vitro and in vivo it was shown that newly phagocytosed antigen is found mainly in a lysosomal turnover compartment of a density 1.19 g cm–3. Antigen which has been in the cells for longer was found in a denser fraction (1.26 g cm–3). In a comparison of nhrmal and X-irradiated cells it can be shown that after irradiation with 900 r less c BSA is found in this storage compartment. Binding of the antigen to the subcellular fractions, and its behavior towards several detergents has been studied. Subcellular fractions do not have the increased immunogenic capacity of antigen enclosed in living macrophages. Two synthetic polypeptide antigens, poly(D-Tyr, D-Glu, D-Ala) and poly-(L-Tyr, L-Glu) have a different subcellular distribution from c BSA, BSA, or bovine gamma globulin. Apart from also being found in the 1.26 storage compartment the polypeptide antigens are mainly located in a 1.15 compartment and only to a small extent in the 1.19 compartment. The half-life of these antigens in the cells is much longer than the half-life of the protein antigens studied. The finding of several subcellular compartments is discussed in connection with the functions possibly performed by macrophages. PMID:5682940

  19. Mapping Epitopes on a Protein Antigen by the Proteolysis of Antigen-Antibody Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemmerson, Ronald; Paterson, Yvonne

    1986-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody bound to a protein antigen decreases the rate of proteolytic cleavage of the antigen, having the greatest effect on those regions involved in antibody contact. Thus, an epitope can be identified by the ability of the antibody to protect one region of the antigen more than others from proteolysis. By means of this approach, two distinct epitopes, both conformationally well-ordered, were characterized on horse cytochrome c.

  20. Vertebrate Cells Express Protozoan Antigen after Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Mark St. J.; Dvorak, James A.

    1980-04-01

    Epimastigotes, the invertebrate host stage of Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite causing Chagas' disease in man, were fused with vertebrate cells by using polyethylene glycol. Hybrid cells were selected on the basis of T. cruzi DNA complementation of biochemical deficiencies in the vertebrate cells. Some clones of the hybrid cells expressed T. cruzi-specific antigen. It might be possible to use selected antigens obtained from the hybrids as vaccines for immunodiagnosis or for elucidation of the pathogenesis of Chagas' disease.

  1. Tales of Antigen Evasion from CAR Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sadelain, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Both T cells bearing chimeric antigen receptors and tumor-specific antibodies can successfully target some malignancies, but antigen escape can lead to relapse. Two articles in this issue of Cancer Immunology Research explore what effective countermeasures may prevent it. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 473-473. ©2016 AACRSee articles by Zah et al., p. 498, and Rufener et al., p. 509. PMID:27252092

  2. Intravenous application of an anticalin dramatically lowers plasma digoxin levels and reduces its toxic effects in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Eyer, Florian; Steimer, Werner; Nitzsche, Thomas; Jung, Nicole; Neuberger, Heidi; Müller, Christine; Schlapschy, Martin; Zilker, Thomas; Skerra, Arne

    2012-09-15

    Lipocalins tailored with high affinity for prescribed ligands, so-called anticalins, constitute promising candidates as antidotes. Here, we present an animal study to investigate both pharmacokinetic and clinical effects of an anticalin specific for the digitalis compound digoxin. Intravenous digoxin (2.5–50 μg/kg/min) was administered to rats until first changes in the ECG occurred (dose finding study) or a priori for 30 min (kinetic study). The anticalin DigA16(H86N), dubbed DigiCal, was administered intravenously at absolute doses of 1, 5, 10 and 20 mg, while the control group received isotonic saline. Hemodynamic changes, several ECG parameters and digoxin concentration in plasma were monitored at given time intervals. After DigiCal administration free digoxin concentration in plasma ultrafiltrate declined dramatically within 1 min to the presumably non-toxic range. There was also a significant and DigiCal dose-dependent effect on longer survival, less ECG alterations, arrhythmia, and improved hemodynamics. Infusion of a lower digoxin dose (2.5 μg/kg/min) resulted in a more sustained reduction of free digoxin in plasma after DigiCal administration compared to a higher digoxin dose (25 μg/kg/min), whereas ECG and hemodynamic parameters did not markedly differ, reflecting the known relative insensitivity of rats towards digoxin toxicity. Notably, we observed a re-increase of free digoxin in plasma some time after bolus administration of DigiCal, which was presumably due to toxin redistribution from tissue in combination with the relatively fast renal clearance of the rather small protein antidote. We conclude that anticalins with appropriately engineered drug-binding activities and, possibly, prolonged plasma half-life offer prospects for next-generation antidotal therapy. -- Highlights: ► We provide an advanced model of digoxin toxicity in rats. ► We report on binding of digoxin to a novel designed anticalin. ► We report on pharmacokinetics of digoxin

  3. Advances in chimeric antigen receptor immunotherapy for neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Heczey, Andras; Louis, Chrystal U

    2013-12-01

    Neuroblastoma (NBL) is the most common extracranial pediatric solid tumor and has heterogeneous biology and behavior. Patients with high-risk disease have poor prognosis despite complex multimodal therapy; therefore, novel curative approaches are needed. Immunotherapy is a novel therapeutic approach that harnesses the inherent activity of the immune system to control and eliminate malignant cells. One form of immunotherapy uses chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) to target tumor-associated antigens. CARs are derived from the antigen-binding domain of a monoclonal antibody (MAb) coupled with the intracellular signaling portion of the T cell receptor. CARs can combine the specificity and effectiveness of MAbs with the active bio-distribution, direct cytotoxicity, and long-term persistence of T cells. NBL provides an attractive target for CAR immunotherapy as many of its tumor-associated antigens are not expressed at significant levels on normal tissues, thus decreasing potential treatment related toxicity. Two previous clinical trials utilizing L1-cell adhesion molecule (L1-CAM) and disialoganglioside (GD2) specific CARs (GD2-CAR) have demonstrated safety and anti-tumor efficacy in heavily pretreated relapsed/refractory neuroblastoma patients. Based on these promising results and on improved techniques that can further potentiate CAR therapies, two clinical trials are currently investigating the use of GD2-CARs in children with NBL. Several approaches may further enhance anti-tumor activity and persistence of CAR modified cells, and if these can be safely translated into the clinic, CAR-based immunotherapy could become a viable adjunct or potential alternative to conventional treatment options for patients with NBL.

  4. Advances in Chimeric Antigen Receptor Immunotherapy for Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Heczey, Andras; Louis, Chrystal U.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NBL) is the most common extracranial pediatric solid tumor and has heterogeneous biology and behavior. Patients with high-risk disease have poor prognosis despite complex multimodal therapy; therefore, novel curative approaches are needed. Immunotherapy is a novel therapeutic approach that harnesses the inherent activity of the immune system to control and eliminate malignant cells. One form of immunotherapy uses chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) to target tumor-associated antigens. CARs are derived from the antigen-binding domain of a monoclonal antibody (MAb) coupled with the intracellular signaling portion of the T cell receptor. CARs can combine the specificity and effectiveness of MAbs with the active bio-distribution, direct cytotoxicity, and long-term persistence of T cells. NBL provides an attractive target for CAR immunotherapy as many of its tumor-associated antigens are not expressed at significant levels on normal tissues, thus decreasing potential treatment related toxicity. Two previous clinical trials utilizing L1-cell adhesion molecule (L1-CAM) and disialoganglioside (GD2) specific CARs (GD2-CAR) have demonstrated safety and anti-tumor efficacy in heavily pretreated relapsed/refractory neuroblastoma patients. Based on these promising results and on improved techniques that can further potentiate CAR therapies, two clinical trials are currently investigating the use of GD2-CARs in children with NBL. Several approaches may further enhance anti-tumor activity and persistence of CAR modified cells, and if these can be safely translated into the clinic, CAR-based immunotherapy could become a viable adjunct or potential alternative to conventional treatment options for patients with NBL. PMID:24333408

  5. Antigens of Streptococcus sanguis: purification and characterization of the b antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Appelbaum, B; Rosan, B

    1978-01-01

    The antigen defining Streptococcus sanguis serotype 2 has been designated the b antigen. This antigen can be detected in extracts, obtained from whole cells by autoclaving (Rantz and Randall extraction), as a single precipitin band using a reference antiserum (M-5). However, the extract can also be shown to contain a teichoic acid using anti-polyglycerol phosphate serum. This teichoic acid does not contain the antigenic determinant for group H specificity. Studies of the b antigen have been hampered because of the difficulty in separating the b antigen from the teichoic acid using ion-exchange and molecular sieve chromatography. However, a relatively pure preparation has been obtained by affinity chromatography using anti-polyglycerol phosphate serum coupled to Sepharose. The isolated b antigen is a typical streptococcal cell wall polysaccharide composed of glucose, rhamnose, and N-acetylglucosamine in a molar ratio of 2.5:1.0:0.1. The antigen appears to have a single antigenic determinant closely related to isomaltose (glucose alpha-1,6-glucoside) based upon hapten inhibition studies. Images PMID:711341

  6. Heat shock protein derivatives for delivery of antigens to antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Makiya; Takemoto, Seiji; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2008-04-16

    Delivery of antigens to antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a key issue for developing effective cancer vaccines. Controlling the tissue distribution of antigens can increase antigen-specific immune responses, including the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) forms complexes with a variety of tumor-related antigens via its polypeptide-binding domain. Because Hsp70 is taken up by APCs through recognition by Hsp receptors, such as CD91 and LOX-1, its application to antigen delivery systems has been examined both in experimental and clinical settings. A tissue distribution study revealed that Hsp70 is mainly taken up by the liver, especially by hepatocytes, after intravenous injection in mice. A significant amount of Hsp70 was also delivered to regional lymph nodes when it was injected subcutaneously, supporting the hypothesis that Hsp70 is a natural targeting system for APCs. Model antigens were complexed with or conjugated to Hsp70, resulting in greater antigen-specific immune responses. Cytoplasmic delivery of Hsp70-antigen further increased the efficacy of the Hsp70-based vaccines. These findings indicate that effective cancer therapy can be achieved by developing Hsp70-based anticancer vaccines when their tissue and intracellular distribution is properly controlled. PMID:17980980

  7. Microscale purification of antigen-specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Eric P.; Normandin, Erica; Osei-Owusu, Nana Yaw; Mahan, Alison E.; Chan, Ying N.; Lai, Jennifer I.; Vaccari, Monica; Rao, Mangala; Franchini, Genoveffa; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation of the Fc domain is an important driver of antibody effector function. While assessment of antibody glycoform compositions observed across total plasma IgG has identified differences associated with a variety of clinical conditions, in many cases it is the glycosylation state of only antibodies against a specific antigen or set of antigens that may be of interest, for example, in defining the potential effector function of antibodies produced during disease or after vaccination. Historically, glycoprofiling such antigen-specific antibodies in clinical samples has been challenging due to their low prevalence, the high sample requirement for most methods of glycan determination, and the lack of high-throughput purification methods. New methods of glycoprofiling with lower sample requirements and higher throughput have motivated the development of microscale and automatable methods for purification of antigen-specific antibodies from polyclonal sources such as clinical serum samples. In this work, we present a robot-compatible 96-well plate-based method for purification of antigen-specific antibodies, suitable for such population level glycosylation screening. We demonstrate the utility of this method across multiple antibody sources, using both purified plasma IgG and plasma, and across multiple different antigen types, with enrichment factors greater than 1000-fold observed. Using an on-column IdeS protease treatment, we further describe staged release of Fc and Fab domains, allowing for glycoprofiling of each domain. PMID:26078040

  8. Microscale purification of antigen-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric P; Normandin, Erica; Osei-Owusu, Nana Yaw; Mahan, Alison E; Chan, Ying N; Lai, Jennifer I; Vaccari, Monica; Rao, Mangala; Franchini, Genoveffa; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E

    2015-10-01

    Glycosylation of the Fc domain is an important driver of antibody effector function. While assessment of antibody glycoform compositions observed across total plasma IgG has identified differences associated with a variety of clinical conditions, in many cases it is the glycosylation state of only antibodies against a specific antigen or set of antigens that may be of interest, for example, in defining the potential effector function of antibodies produced during disease or after vaccination. Historically, glycoprofiling such antigen-specific antibodies in clinical samples has been challenging due to their low prevalence, the high sample requirement for most methods of glycan determination, and the lack of high-throughput purification methods. New methods of glycoprofiling with lower sample requirements and higher throughput have motivated the development of microscale and automatable methods for purification of antigen-specific antibodies from polyclonal sources such as clinical serum samples. In this work, we present a robot-compatible 96-well plate-based method for purification of antigen-specific antibodies, suitable for such population level glycosylation screening. We demonstrate the utility of this method across multiple antibody sources, using both purified plasma IgG and plasma, and across multiple different antigen types, with enrichment factors greater than 1000-fold observed. Using an on-column IdeS protease treatment, we further describe staged release of Fc and Fab domains, allowing for glycoprofiling of each domain.

  9. HLA antigen expression and malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Christmas, T I; Manning, L S; Davis, M R; Robinson, B W; Garlepp, M J

    1991-09-01

    The expression of HLA antigens by a tumor may determine its progression and metastatic potential by influencing the immune response to that tumor. The upregulation of HLA antigen expression on some cell types by interferons (IFNs) may contribute to their antitumor activity. Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a tumor that has a poor prognosis and is unaffected by conventional therapy, although immunotherapy has not been adequately assessed. In this study, we have examined the constitutive and IFN-inducible expression of class I and class II HLA antigens on MM cell lines using indirect immunofluorescence and Northern blotting. All MM cell lines constitutively expressed class I, but not class II, surface antigen, and all three class I loci (HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C) were expressed. The MM cell lines were heterogeneous in their response to the IFNs. Treatment with IFN-alpha marginally increased class I surface expression, but not class II. Class I mRNA was, however, clearly increased in all cell lines after IFN-alpha treatment, suggesting that class I surface antigen was already maximally expressed. IFN-gamma increased class I mRNA expression in all but one cell line and induced DR expression on three of the cell lines. DQ-beta, but not DQ-alpha, mRNA was inducible in the same three cell lines, but DQ surface antigen was never demonstrable.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Physiological Level Production of Antigen-Specific Human Immunoglobulin in Cloned Transchromosomic Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-An; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J.; Wang, Zhongde; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs) derived from pooled plasma from human donors are Food and Drug Administration approved biologics used in the treatment of a variety of human diseases. Powered by the natural diversity of immune response, hpAbs are effective in treating diseases caused by complex or quickly-evolving antigens such as viruses. We previously showed that transchromosomic (Tc) cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC) comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin heavy-chain (hIGH) and kappa-chain (hIGK) germline loci (named as κHAC) are capable of producing functional hpAbs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, are homozygously inactivated (double knockouts or DKO). However, B lymphocyte development in these Tc cattle is compromised, and the overall production of hpAbs is low. Here, we report the construction of an improved HAC, designated as cKSL-HACΔ, by incorporating all of the human immunoglobulin germline loci into the HAC. Furthermore, for avoiding the possible human-bovine interspecies incompatibility between the human immunoglobulin mu chain protein (hIgM) and bovine transmembrane α and β immunoglobulins (bIgα and bIgβ) in the pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR) complex, we partially replaced (bovinized) the hIgM constant domain with the counterpart of bovine IgM (bIgM) that is involved in the interaction between bIgM and bIgα/Igβ; human IgM bovinization would also improve the functionality of hIgM in supporting B cell activation and proliferation. We also report the successful production of DKO Tc cattle carrying the cKSL-HACΔ (cKSL-HACΔ/DKO), the dramatic improvement of B cell development in these cattle and the high level production of hpAbs (as measured for the human IgG isotype) in the plasma. We further demonstrate that, upon immunization by tumor immunogens, high titer tumor immunogen-specific human IgG (hIgG) can be produced from such Tc cattle. PMID:24205120

  11. Physiological level production of antigen-specific human immunoglobulin in cloned transchromosomic cattle.

    PubMed

    Sano, Akiko; Matsushita, Hiroaki; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-An; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J; Wang, Zhongde; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs) derived from pooled plasma from human donors are Food and Drug Administration approved biologics used in the treatment of a variety of human diseases. Powered by the natural diversity of immune response, hpAbs are effective in treating diseases caused by complex or quickly-evolving antigens such as viruses. We previously showed that transchromosomic (Tc) cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC) comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin heavy-chain (hIGH) and kappa-chain (hIGK) germline loci (named as κHAC) are capable of producing functional hpAbs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, are homozygously inactivated (double knockouts or DKO). However, B lymphocyte development in these Tc cattle is compromised, and the overall production of hpAbs is low. Here, we report the construction of an improved HAC, designated as cKSL-HACΔ, by incorporating all of the human immunoglobulin germline loci into the HAC. Furthermore, for avoiding the possible human-bovine interspecies incompatibility between the human immunoglobulin mu chain protein (hIgM) and bovine transmembrane α and β immunoglobulins (bIgα and bIgβ) in the pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR) complex, we partially replaced (bovinized) the hIgM constant domain with the counterpart of bovine IgM (bIgM) that is involved in the interaction between bIgM and bIgα/Igβ; human IgM bovinization would also improve the functionality of hIgM in supporting B cell activation and proliferation. We also report the successful production of DKO Tc cattle carrying the cKSL-HACΔ (cKSL-HACΔ/DKO), the dramatic improvement of B cell development in these cattle and the high level production of hpAbs (as measured for the human IgG isotype) in the plasma. We further demonstrate that, upon immunization by tumor immunogens, high titer tumor immunogen-specific human IgG (hIgG) can be produced from such Tc cattle.

  12. Learning to Lead against the Grain: Dramatizing the Emotional Toll of Teacher Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cranston, Jerome; Kusanovich, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Tremendous research on teacher leadership over the last decade has revealed both the prevalence of and the imperatives for a model teaching force that can actively participate in school improvement (Harrison & Killion, 2007; Katzenmeyer & Moller, 2001; Leithwood & Riehl, 2003). The highly participative teacher leader paradigm is so…

  13. Using Creative Dramatics to Foster Conceptual Learning in a Science Enrichment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Rebecca Compton

    2011-01-01

    This study made analysis of how the integration of creative drama into a science enrichment program enhanced the learning of elementary school students' understanding of sound physics and solar energy. The study also sought to determine if student attitudes toward science could be improved with the inclusion of creative drama as an extension…

  14. Burke's Method of Dramatism and Its Use as a Tool for Teaching Developmental Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raign, Kathryn Rosser

    Many basic writers, who are virtually unable to create a coherent paragraph, are nonetheless capable of presenting orally well-constructed narratives of depth and feeling. Thus, teachers must try to get students to harness the strength of their oral abilities to improve their writing skills, and Kenneth Burke's pentad may provide a key. Burke's…

  15. Prevention of Allogeneic Cardiac Graft Rejection by Transfer of Ex Vivo Expanded Antigen-Specific Regulatory T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Takasato, Fumika; Morita, Rimpei; Schichita, Takashi; Sekiya, Takashi; Morikawa, Yasuhide; Kuroda, Tatsuo; Niimi, Masanori; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    The rate of graft survival has dramatically increased using calcineurin inhibitors, however chronic graft rejection and risk of infection are difficult to manage. Induction of allograft-specific regulatory T-cells (Tregs) is considered an ideal way to achieve long-term tolerance for allografts. However, efficient in vitro methods for developing allograft-specific Tregs which is applicable to MHC full-mismatched cardiac transplant models have not been established. We compared antigen-nonspecific polyclonal-induced Tregs (iTregs) as well as antigen-specific iTregs and thymus-derived Tregs (nTregs) that were expanded via direct and indirect pathways. We found that iTregs induced via the indirect pathway had the greatest ability to prolong graft survival and suppress angiitis. Antigen-specific iTregs generated ex vivo via both direct and indirect pathways using dendritic cells from F1 mice also induced long-term engraftment without using MHC peptides. In antigen-specific Treg transferred models, activation of dendritic cells and allograft-specific CTL generation were suppressed. The present study demonstrated the potential of ex vivo antigen-specific Treg expansion for clinical cell-based therapeutic approaches to induce lifelong immunological tolerance for allogeneic cardiac transplants. PMID:24498362

  16. Immaturity associated antigens are lost during induction for T cell lymphoblastic leukemia: implications for minimal residual disease detection

    PubMed Central

    Roshal, Mikhail; Fromm, Jonathan R; Winter, Stuart; Dunsmore, Kimberly; Wood, Brent

    2011-01-01

    Background Induction chemotherapy for acute leukemia often leads to antigenic shifts in residual abnormal blast populations. Studies in precursor B cell ALL (B-ALL) and AML have demonstrated that chemotherapy commonly results in the loss of antigens associated with immaturity, limiting their utility for minimal residual disease (MRD) detection. Little information is available about the stability of these antigens in precursor T cell ALL (T-ALL) though it is presumed that CD99 and TdT are highly informative based on limited studies. Methods In a longitudinal investigation, we explored patterns of lineage specific and immaturity associated antigens in T-ALL in a large cohort of patients treated under the multicenter Children's Oncology Group (COG) protocol. All samples were analyzed using multicolor flow cytometry in a standardized fashion at a single institution. Results We report that markers of immaturity particularly, TdT and CD99 dramatically decline on leukemic blasts during therapy. CD34 and CD10 expression is confined to a minority of pre-treatment samples and is also not stable. In contrast, lineage associated markers including CD2, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD7 and CD8 failed to show significant trends. Conclusions Our study strongly argues for expansion of immunophenotyping panels for T-ALL MRD to decrease reliance on immature antigens. This study represents the first demonstration of consistent immunophenotypic shifts in T-ALL. PMID:20155852

  17. Tandem CAR T cells targeting HER2 and IL13Rα2 mitigate tumor antigen escape.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Meenakshi; Mukherjee, Malini; Grada, Zakaria; Pignata, Antonella; Landi, Daniel; Navai, Shoba A; Wakefield, Amanda; Fousek, Kristen; Bielamowicz, Kevin; Chow, Kevin K H; Brawley, Vita S; Byrd, Tiara T; Krebs, Simone; Gottschalk, Stephen; Wels, Winfried S; Baker, Matthew L; Dotti, Gianpietro; Mamonkin, Maksim; Brenner, Malcolm K; Orange, Jordan S; Ahmed, Nabil

    2016-08-01

    In preclinical models of glioblastoma, antigen escape variants can lead to tumor recurrence after treatment with CAR T cells that are redirected to single tumor antigens. Given the heterogeneous expression of antigens on glioblastomas, we hypothesized that a bispecific CAR molecule would mitigate antigen escape and improve the antitumor activity of T cells. Here, we created a CAR that joins a HER2-binding scFv and an IL13Rα2-binding IL-13 mutein to make a tandem CAR exodomain (TanCAR) and a CD28.ζ endodomain. We determined that patient TanCAR T cells showed distinct binding to HER2 or IL13Rα2 and had the capability to lyse autologous glioblastoma. TanCAR T cells exhibited activation dynamics that were comparable to those of single CAR T cells upon encounter of HER2 or IL13Rα2. We observed that TanCARs engaged HER2 and IL13Rα2 simultaneously by inducing HER2-IL13Rα2 heterodimers, which promoted superadditive T cell activation when both antigens were encountered concurrently. TanCAR T cell activity was more sustained but not more exhaustible than that of T cells that coexpressed a HER2 CAR and an IL13Rα2 CAR, T cells with a unispecific CAR, or a pooled product. In a murine glioblastoma model, TanCAR T cells mitigated antigen escape, displayed enhanced antitumor efficacy, and improved animal survival. Thus, TanCAR T cells show therapeutic potential to improve glioblastoma control by coengaging HER2 and IL13Rα2 in an augmented, bivalent immune synapse that enhances T cell functionality and reduces antigen escape.

  18. Tandem CAR T cells targeting HER2 and IL13Rα2 mitigate tumor antigen escape.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Meenakshi; Mukherjee, Malini; Grada, Zakaria; Pignata, Antonella; Landi, Daniel; Navai, Shoba A; Wakefield, Amanda; Fousek, Kristen; Bielamowicz, Kevin; Chow, Kevin K H; Brawley, Vita S; Byrd, Tiara T; Krebs, Simone; Gottschalk, Stephen; Wels, Winfried S; Baker, Matthew L; Dotti, Gianpietro; Mamonkin, Maksim; Brenner, Malcolm K; Orange, Jordan S; Ahmed, Nabil

    2016-08-01

    In preclinical models of glioblastoma, antigen escape variants can lead to tumor recurrence after treatment with CAR T cells that are redirected to single tumor antigens. Given the heterogeneous expression of antigens on glioblastomas, we hypothesized that a bispecific CAR molecule would mitigate antigen escape and improve the antitumor activity of T cells. Here, we created a CAR that joins a HER2-binding scFv and an IL13Rα2-binding IL-13 mutein to make a tandem CAR exodomain (TanCAR) and a CD28.ζ endodomain. We determined that patient TanCAR T cells showed distinct binding to HER2 or IL13Rα2 and had the capability to lyse autologous glioblastoma. TanCAR T cells exhibited activation dynamics that were comparable to those of single CAR T cells upon encounter of HER2 or IL13Rα2. We observed that TanCARs engaged HER2 and IL13Rα2 simultaneously by inducing HER2-IL13Rα2 heterodimers, which promoted superadditive T cell activation when both antigens were encountered concurrently. TanCAR T cell activity was more sustained but not more exhaustible than that of T cells that coexpressed a HER2 CAR and an IL13Rα2 CAR, T cells with a unispecific CAR, or a pooled product. In a murine glioblastoma model, TanCAR T cells mitigated antigen escape, displayed enhanced antitumor efficacy, and improved animal survival. Thus, TanCAR T cells show therapeutic potential to improve glioblastoma control by coengaging HER2 and IL13Rα2 in an augmented, bivalent immune synapse that enhances T cell functionality and reduces antigen escape. PMID:27427982

  19. Dramatical Impact Of Low Amounts of Swelling Clays On The Rheology Of Alpine Debris Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardou, E.; Bowen, P.; Banfill, P. G.; Boivin, P.

    2004-12-01

    Field observations show that the role and amount of swelling clays in the complex hard suspensions of alpine debris flow type were underestimated (see Boivin et al., this session). This work aims at exploring to which extent the swelling clay content influences the global rheology of a flow of rock grains from which the size spectrum extends from clays to gravel. We made a sample from calibrated materials with a grain size distribution similar to that of a viscoplastic debris flow (Bardou et al., 2003). Four replicates were made with the same grading curve. The clay content of the samples was 2% dry weight only, and different 2:1 swelling clay to 1:1 clay ratio were used. The swelling clay ratio (SCR) was calculated as the percentage of 2:1 clay in the clay fraction of the bulk samples. The 1:1 clay was (industrial) kaolinite and the 2:1 clay was a natural soil smectite. The smectite content in the bulk sample ranged from 0% to 2% dry weight, corresponding to SCR ranging from 0 to 80%. The four prepared samples were sheared in the large-size apparatus fully described in Tattersall and Banfill (1983). This apparatus is based on the measure of the torque necessary to rotate an impeller immersed in the sample. The impeller has the form of an "H" and moves in a plane according to two parallel axes. The observed behaviour were very contrasted. The sample with SCR=0 was poorly sensitive to changes in the solid concentration, in contrast to the three samples with SCR>0. Moreover, a small change in the SCR of the clay fraction induced a dramatic change of the behaviour of the mixture. For SCR=0, only little changes in the rheological parameters of the bulk samples were observed with respect to changes in the solid concentration. On the contrary the rheological parameters of the bulk samples with SCR>0, apparently followed a power law according to solid concentration. These tests carried out in the laboratory accord with observations realised on natural debris flow material

  20. Antigen Processing and Presentation Mechanisms in Myeloid Cells.

    PubMed

    Roche, Paul A; Cresswell, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Unlike B cells, CD8-positive and CD4-positive T cells of the adaptive immune system do not recognize intact foreign proteins but instead recognize polypeptide fragments of potential antigens. These antigenic peptides are expressed on the surface of antigen presenting cells bound to MHC class I and MHC class II proteins. Here, we review the basics of antigen acquisition by antigen presenting cells, antigen proteolysis into polypeptide fragments, antigenic peptide binding to MHC proteins, and surface display of both MHC class I-peptide and MHC class II-peptide complexes.

  1. Expression and Antigenic Evaluation of VacA Antigenic Fragment of Helicobacter Pylori

    PubMed Central

    Hasanzadeh, Leila; Ghaznavi-Rad, Ehsanollah; Soufian, Safieh; Farjadi, Vahideh; Abtahi, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s) : Helicobacter pylori, a human specific gastric pathogen is a causative agent of chronic active gastritis. The vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) is an effective virulence factor involved in gastric injury. The aim of this study was to construct a recombinant protein containing antigenic region of VacA gene and determine its antigenicity. Materials and Methods: The antigenic region of VacA gene was detected by bioinformatics methods. The polymerase chain reaction method was used to amplify a highly antigenic region of VacA gene from chromosomal DNA of H. pylori. The eluted product was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a. The target protein was expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS. The bacteria including pET32a-VacA plasmids were induced by IPTG. The antigenicity was finally studied by western blotting using sera of 15 H. pylori infected patients after purification. Results: Enzyme digestion analysis, PCR and DNA sequencing results showed that the target gene was inserted correctly into the recombinant vector. The expressed protein was purified successfully via affinity chromatography. Data indicated that antigenic region of VacA protein from Helicobacter pylori was recognized by all 15 patient’s sera. Conclusion : Our data showed that antigenic region of VacA protein can be expressed by in E. co.li. This protein was recognized by sera patients suffering from H. pylori infection. the recombinant protein has similar epitopes and close antigenic properties to the natural form of this antigen. Recombinant antigenic region of VacA protein also seems to be a promising antigen for protective and serologic diagnosis . PMID:23997913

  2. Bullous pemphigoid antigens: extraction and degradation of antigens during epidermal preparation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, L J; Taylor, T B; Kadunce, D P; Thuong-Nguyen, V; Zone, J J

    1991-06-01

    Although two groups of bullous pemphigoid antigens have been well characterized, different research groups have shown strikingly different prevalence rates of antibodies to these antigens in their patients. Potential explanations for this phenomena include a patient population that has different prevalence of antibodies, or that the antigen preparations used by the different groups contain different relative amounts of these antigens. We have compared the relative concentration of the different bullous pemphigoid antigens in epidermal extract preparations made by three different procedures commonly used to separate dermis from epidermis: NaCl, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and heat. We have found that the amount of the 180-kD antigen present in extracts is dependent on the techniques involved in separation of the epidermis from dermis. NaCl- and EDTA-separation procedures result in partial proteolysis of the 180-kD antigen to smaller forms, including major brands at 160 kD and 97 kD in the EDTA preparation. Fragments of the 180-kD antigen are present in both the separation and wash fluids, associated with a significant reduction of the 180-kD form in the extract of the NaCl-separated skin. We conclude that the native molecular weight of the previously described minor bullous pemphigoid antigen is 180 kD, and that the apparent difference in patient reaction to the 180-kD antigen may be due to different preparations of the antigen rather than underlying differences in seropositivity in the patient population. PMID:1904470

  3. Development of an Antigen-driven Colitis Model to Study Presentation of Antigens by Antigen Presenting Cells to T Cells.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Valerio; Radulovic, Katarina; Riedel, Christian U; Niess, Jan Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammation which affects the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). One of the best ways to study the immunological mechanisms involved during the disease is the T cell transfer model of colitis. In this model, immunodeficient mice (RAG(-/-) recipients) are reconstituted with naive CD4(+) T cells from healthy wild type hosts. This model allows examination of the earliest immunological events leading to disease and chronic inflammation, when the gut inflammation perpetuates but does not depend on a defined antigen. To study the potential role of antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the disease process, it is helpful to have an antigen-driven disease model, in which a defined commensal-derived antigen leads to colitis. An antigen driven-colitis model has hence been developed. In this model OT-II CD4(+) T cells, that can recognize only specific epitopes in the OVA protein, are transferred into RAG(-/-) hosts challenged with CFP-OVA-expressing E. coli. This model allows the examination of interactions between APCs and T cells in the lamina propria. PMID:27684040

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigen testing to detect HIV infection in female sex workers in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chan, R K; Ali, K; Thoe, S Y

    1995-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is characterised by seroconversion after a ¿window¿ period of 2 to 3 months. After this period antibodies are usually detectable by screening tests (enzyme immunoassay or particle agglutination) confirmed by Western blot analysis. We studied 1000 newly enrolled female sex workers who had not been previously tested for HIV to assess the usefulness of HIV antigen testing to improve the efficacy of HIV infection detection. Blood was taken at enrollment for HIV antigen and HIV antibody testing. The Abbott HIVAG-1 test was used to detect antigen; antibody detection was by the Abbott recombinant HIV-1/HIV-2 3rd generation enzyme immunoassay (EIA) test, the Fujirebio Serodia-HIV particle agglutination (PA) test for screening, and the Diagnostic Biotechnology HIV Blot 2.2 Western blot (WB) test for antibody confirmation. Of the 1000 samples, 26 were positive for HIV antibody testing (26/26 for EIA, 25/25 for PA, 26/26 for WB), giving a prevalence rate of 2.6%, Of these 26 seropositive samples 1 was positive on HIV antigen testing. There were no samples which were antigen-positive and antibody-negative. HIV antigen testing does not add to increased efficacy of HIV detection among female sex workers in Singapore.

  5. Evaluation of Recombinant SAG1, SAG2, and SAG3 Antigens for Serodiagnosis of Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Khanaliha, Khadijeh; Kazemi, Bahram; Shahriari, Bahador; Bandehpour, Mojgan; Sharifniya, Zarin

    2014-01-01

    Serologic tests are widely accepted for diagnosing Toxoplasma gondii but purification and standardization of antigen needs to be improved. Recently, surface tachyzoite and bradyzoite antigens have become more attractive for this purpose. In this study, diagnostic usefulness of 3 recombinant antigens (SAG1, SAG2, and SAG3) were evaluated, and their efficacy was compared with the available commercial ELISA. The recombinant plasmids were transformed to JM109 strain of Escherichia coli, and the recombinants were expressed and purified. Recombinant SAG1, SAG2, and SAG3 antigens were evaluated using different groups of sera in an ELISA system, and the results were compared to those of a commercial IgG and IgM ELISA kit. The sensitivity and specificity of recombinant surface antigens for detection of anti-Toxoplasma IgG in comparison with commercially available ELISA were as follows: SAG1 (93.6% and 92.9%), SAG2 (100.0% and 89.4%), and SAG3 (95.4% and 91.2%), respectively. A high degree of agreement (96.9%) was observed between recombinant SAG2 and commercial ELISA in terms of detecting IgG anti-Toxoplasma antibodies. P22 had the best performance in detecting anti-Toxoplasma IgM in comparison with the other 2 recombinant antigens. Recombinant SAG1, SAG2, and SAG3 could all be used for diagnosis of IgG-specific antibodies against T. gondii. PMID:24850956

  6. Identification of Novel Pre-Erythrocytic Malaria Antigen Candidates for Combination Vaccines with Circumsporozoite Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Tejram; Malkov, Vlad; Morrison, Robert; Pei, Ying; Juompan, Laure; Milman, Neta; Zarling, Stasya; Anderson, Charles; Wong-Madden, Sharon; Wendler, Jason; Ishizuka, Andrew; MacMillen, Zachary W.; Garcia, Valentino; Kappe, Stefan H. I.; Krzych, Urszula; Duffy, Patrick E.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria vaccine development has been hampered by the limited availability of antigens identified through conventional discovery approaches, and improvements are needed to enhance the efficacy of the leading vaccine candidate RTS,S that targets the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of the infective sporozoite. Here we report a transcriptome-based approach to identify novel pre-erythrocytic vaccine antigens that could potentially be used in combination with CSP. We hypothesized that stage-specific upregulated genes would enrich for protective vaccine targets, and used tiling microarray to identify P. falciparum genes transcribed at higher levels during liver stage versus sporozoite or blood stages of development. We prepared DNA vaccines for 21 genes using the predicted orthologues in P. yoelii and P. berghei and tested their efficacy using different delivery methods against pre-erythrocytic malaria in rodent models. In our primary screen using P. yoelii in BALB/c mice, we found that 16 antigens significantly reduced liver stage parasite burden. In our confirmatory screen using P. berghei in C57Bl/6 mice, we confirmed 6 antigens that were protective in both models. Two antigens, when combined with CSP, provided significantly greater protection than CSP alone in both models. Based on the observations reported here, transcriptional patterns of Plasmodium genes can be useful in identifying novel pre-erythrocytic antigens that induce protective immunity alone or in combination with CSP. PMID:27434123

  7. Blockade of LFA-1 augments in vitro differentiation of antigen-induced Foxp3+ Treg cells

    PubMed Central

    Verhagen, Johan; Wraith, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific, in vitro-induced Foxp3+ Treg (iTreg) cells protects against autoimmune disease. To generate antigen-specific iTreg cells at high purity, however, remains a challenge. Whereas polyclonal T cell stimulation with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibody yields Foxp3+ iTreg cells at a purity of 90–95%, antigen-induced iTreg cells typically do not exceed a purity of 65–75%, even in a TCR-transgenic model. In a similar vein to thymic Treg cell selection, iTreg cell differentiation is influenced not only by antigen recognition and the availability of TGF-β but also by co-factors including costimulation and adhesion molecules. In this study, we demonstrate that blockade of the T cell integrin Leukocyte Function-associated Antigen-1 (LFA-1) during antigen-mediated iTreg cell differentiation augments Foxp3 induction, leading to approximately 90% purity of Foxp3+ iTreg cells. This increased efficacy not only boosts the yield of Foxp3+ iTreg cells, it also reduces contamination with activated effector T cells, thus improving the safety of adoptive transfer immunotherapy. PMID:25108241

  8. Identification of Novel Pre-Erythrocytic Malaria Antigen Candidates for Combination Vaccines with Circumsporozoite Protein.

    PubMed

    Speake, Cate; Pichugin, Alexander; Sahu, Tejram; Malkov, Vlad; Morrison, Robert; Pei, Ying; Juompan, Laure; Milman, Neta; Zarling, Stasya; Anderson, Charles; Wong-Madden, Sharon; Wendler, Jason; Ishizuka, Andrew; MacMillen, Zachary W; Garcia, Valentino; Kappe, Stefan H I; Krzych, Urszula; Duffy, Patrick E

    2016-01-01

    Malaria vaccine development has been hampered by the limited availability of antigens identified through conventional discovery approaches, and improvements are needed to enhance the efficacy of the leading vaccine candidate RTS,S that targets the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of the infective sporozoite. Here we report a transcriptome-based approach to identify novel pre-erythrocytic vaccine antigens that could potentially be used in combination with CSP. We hypothesized that stage-specific upregulated genes would enrich for protective vaccine targets, and used tiling microarray to identify P. falciparum genes transcribed at higher levels during liver stage versus sporozoite or blood stages of development. We prepared DNA vaccines for 21 genes using the predicted orthologues in P. yoelii and P. berghei and tested their efficacy using different delivery methods against pre-erythrocytic malaria in rodent models. In our primary screen using P. yoelii in BALB/c mice, we found that 16 antigens significantly reduced liver stage parasite burden. In our confirmatory screen using P. berghei in C57Bl/6 mice, we confirmed 6 antigens that were protective in both models. Two antigens, when combined with CSP, provided significantly greater protection than CSP alone in both models. Based on the observations reported here, transcriptional patterns of Plasmodium genes can be useful in identifying novel pre-erythrocytic antigens that induce protective immunity alone or in combination with CSP. PMID:27434123

  9. A proposal to speed translation of healthcare research into practice: dramatic change is needed.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Rodger; Glasgow, Russell E

    2011-06-01

    Efficacy trials have generated interventions to improve health behaviors and biomarkers. However, these efforts have had limited impact on practice and policy. It is suggested that key methodologic and contextual issues have contributed to this state of affairs. Current research paradigms generally have not provided the answers needed for more probable and more rapid translation. A major shift is proposed to produce research with more rapid clinical, public health, and policy impact.

  10. Metal based nanoparticles as cancer antigen delivery vehicles for macrophage based antitumor vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Sourav; Dash, Sandeep Kumar; Mandal, Debasis; Das, Balaram; Tripathy, Satyajit; Dey, Aditi; Pramanik, Panchanan; Roy, Somenath

    2016-02-10

    In the present study, we would like to evaluate the efficacy of modified metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) as cancer antigen delivery vehicles for macrophage (MФs) based antitumor vaccine. The cobalt oxide nanoparticles (CoO NPs) were promising tools for delivery of antigens to antigen presenting cells and have induced an antitumor immune response. Synthesized CoO NPs were modified by N-phosphonomethyliminodiacetic acid (PMIDA), facilitated the conjugation of lysate antigen, i.e. cancer antigen derived from lysis of cancer cells. The cancer cell lysate antigen conjugated PMIDA-CoO NPs (Ag-PMIDA-CoO NPs) successfully activated macrophage (MФ) evident by the increasing the serum IFN-γ and TNF-α level. Immunization of mice with the Ag-PMIDA-CoO NPs constructed an efficient immunological adjuvant induced anticancer IgG responses, and increased the antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) response than only lysate antigen treated group to combat the cancer cell. The nanocomplexes enhanced the anticancer CD4(+)T cell response in mice. The result showed that Ag-PMIDA-CoO NPs can stimulate the immune responses over only lysate antigens, which are the most important findings in this study. These NP-mediated Ag deliveries may significantly improve the anticancer immune response by activating MФs and may act as adjuvant and will balance the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory immunoresponse. The crosstalk between the activated MФ with other immune competent cells will be monitored by measuring the cytokines which illustrate the total immunological network setups.

  11. Assembly and Immunological Processing of Polyelectrolyte Multilayers Composed of Antigens and Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    While biomaterials provide a platform to control the delivery of vaccines, the recently discovered intrinsic inflammatory characteristics of many polymeric carriers can also complicate rational design because the carrier itself can alter the response to other vaccine components. To address this challenge, we recently developed immune-polyelectrolyte multilayer (iPEMs) capsules electrostatically assembled entirely from peptide antigen and molecular adjuvants. Here, we use iPEMs built from SIINFEKL model antigen and polyIC, a stimulatory toll-like receptor agonist, to investigate the impact of pH on iPEM assembly, the processing and interactions of each iPEM component with primary immune cells, and the role of these interactions during antigen-specific T cell responses in coculture and mice. We discovered that iPEM assembly is pH dependent with respect to both the antigen and adjuvant component. Controlling the pH also allows tuning of the relative loading of SIINFEKL and polyIC in iPEM capsules. During in vitro studies with primary dendritic cells (DCs), iPEM capsules ensure that greater than 95% of cells containing at least one signal (i.e., antigen, adjuvant) also contained the other signal. This codelivery leads to DC maturation and SIINFEKL presentation via the MHC-I antigen presentation pathway, resulting in antigen-specific T cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. In mice, iPEM capsules potently expand antigen-specific T cells compared with equivalent admixed formulations. Of note, these enhancements become more pronounced with successive booster injections, suggesting that iPEMs functionally improve memory recall response. Together our results reveal some of the features that can be tuned to modulate the properties of iPEM capsules, and how these modular vaccine structures can be used to enhance interactions with immune cells in vitro and in mice. PMID:27380137

  12. Assembly and Immunological Processing of Polyelectrolyte Multilayers Composed of Antigens and Adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yu-Chieh; Gammon, Joshua M; Andorko, James I; Tostanoski, Lisa H; Jewell, Christopher M

    2016-07-27

    While biomaterials provide a platform to control the delivery of vaccines, the recently discovered intrinsic inflammatory characteristics of many polymeric carriers can also complicate rational design because the carrier itself can alter the response to other vaccine components. To address this challenge, we recently developed immune-polyelectrolyte multilayer (iPEMs) capsules electrostatically assembled entirely from peptide antigen and molecular adjuvants. Here, we use iPEMs built from SIINFEKL model antigen and polyIC, a stimulatory toll-like receptor agonist, to investigate the impact of pH on iPEM assembly, the processing and interactions of each iPEM component with primary immune cells, and the role of these interactions during antigen-specific T cell responses in coculture and mice. We discovered that iPEM assembly is pH dependent with respect to both the antigen and adjuvant component. Controlling the pH also allows tuning of the relative loading of SIINFEKL and polyIC in iPEM capsules. During in vitro studies with primary dendritic cells (DCs), iPEM capsules ensure that greater than 95% of cells containing at least one signal (i.e., antigen, adjuvant) also contained the other signal. This codelivery leads to DC maturation and SIINFEKL presentation via the MHC-I antigen presentation pathway, resulting in antigen-specific T cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. In mice, iPEM capsules potently expand antigen-specific T cells compared with equivalent admixed formulations. Of note, these enhancements become more pronounced with successive booster injections, suggesting that iPEMs functionally improve memory recall response. Together our results reveal some of the features that can be tuned to modulate the properties of iPEM capsules, and how these modular vaccine structures can be used to enhance interactions with immune cells in vitro and in mice. PMID:27380137

  13. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    PubMed Central

    Tandrup Schmidt, Signe; Foged, Camilla; Smith Korsholm, Karen; Rades, Thomas; Christensen, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce protective immunity, and they are often combined with adjuvants to ensure robust immune responses. Adjuvants are capable of enhancing and/or modulating immune responses by exposing antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) concomitantly with conferring immune activation signals. Few adjuvant systems have been licensed for use in human vaccines, and they mainly stimulate humoral immunity. Thus, there is an unmet demand for the development of safe and efficient adjuvant systems that can also stimulate cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Adjuvants constitute a heterogeneous group of compounds, which can broadly be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode. Immunostimulators represent highly diverse classes of molecules, e.g., lipids, nucleic acids, proteins and peptides, and they are ligands for pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), which are differentially expressed on APC subsets. Different formulation strategies might thus be required for incorporation of immunostimulators and antigens, respectively, into liposomes, and the choice of immunostimulator should ideally be based on knowledge regarding the specific PRR

  14. Prevalence of Alloimmunization to Human Platelet Antigen Glycoproteins and Human Leucocyte Antigen Class I in β Thalassemia Major Patients in Western India.

    PubMed

    Philip, Joseph; Kumar, Sudeep; Chatterjee, T; Mallhi, R S

    2014-12-01

    Present management of β thalassemia major by regular packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions poses risk of alloimmunization not only to red blood cell antigens, but also to human platelet antigens (HPA) and Human leucocyte antigens class I (HLA I). However data in this context is very limited in Indian population. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of alloimmunization to HPA and HLA I in β thalassemia major patients who have received multiple PRBC transfusions over the years. A cross sectional study was performed at our tertiary care blood bank. β thalassemia major patients of more than 6 years of age were included who were receiving fresh, leucoreduced and irradiated PRBC units regularly with annual requirement of more than ten PRBC transfusions. A total of 9 out of 80 (11.25 %) patients were found to be alloimmunized for HPA antigens of various specificity and 24 out of 80 (30 %) developed antibodies to HLA I. The awareness of development of alloimmunization to HPA and HLA antigens in multi PRBC transfused thalassemics, despite use of leucofilters will prompt us, to look for improvement in our current PRBC preparations to minimise platelet alloimmunisation. Further studies are required to validate the findings and build the base line data in this regard. This is of importance, especially in view of providing suitable cross-matched platelets when required in future especially when considering future haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).

  15. Tresyl-based conjugation of protein antigen to lipid nanoparticles increases antigen immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anekant; Yan, Weili; Miller, Keith R; O'Carra, Ronan; Woodward, Jerold G; Mumper, Russell J

    2010-11-30

    The present studies were aimed at investigating the engineering of NPs with protein-conjugated-surfactant at their surface. In order to increase the immunogenicity of a protein antigen, Brij 78 was functionalized by tresyl chloride and then further reacted with the primary amine of the model proteins ovalbumin (OVA) or horseradish peroxide (HRP). The reaction yielded Brij 78-OVA and Brij 78-HRP conjugates which were then used directly to form NP-OVA or NP-HRP using a one-step warm oil-in-water microemulsion precursor method with emulsifying wax as the oil phase, and Brij 78 and the Brij 78-OVA or Brij 78-HRP conjugate as surfactants. Similarly, Brij 700 was conjugated to HIV p24 antigen to yield Brij 700-p24 conjugate. The utility of these NPs for enhancing the immune responses to protein-based vaccines was evaluated in vivo using ovalbumin (OVA) as model protein and p24 as a relevant HIV antigen. In separate in vivo studies, female BALB/c mice were immunized by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection with NP-OVA and NP-p24 formulations along with several control formulations. These results suggested that with multiple antigens, covalent attachment of the antigen to the NP significantly enhanced antigen-specific immune responses. This facile covalent conjugation and incorporation method may be utilized to further incorporate other protein antigens, even multiple antigens, into an enhanced vaccine delivery system. PMID:20837122

  16. Tresyl-Based Conjugation of Protein Antigen to Lipid Nanoparticles Increases Antigen Immunogencity

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anekant; Yan, Weili; Miller, Keith R.; O'Carra, Ronan; Woodward, Jerold G.; Mumper, Russell J.

    2010-01-01

    The present studies were aimed at investigating the engineering of NPs with protein-conjugated-surfactant at their surface. In order to increase the immunogenicity of a protein antigen, Brij 78 was functionalized by tresyl chloride and then further reacted with the primary amine of the model proteins ovalbumin (OVA) or horseradish peroxide (HRP). The reaction yielded Brij 78-OVA and Brij 78-HRP conjugates which were then used directly to form NP-OVA or NP-HRP using a one-step warm oil-in-water microemulsion precursor method with emulsifying wax as the oil phase, and Brij 78 and the Brij 78-OVA or Brij 78-HRP conjugate as surfactants. Similarly, Brij 700 was conjugated to HIV p24 antigen to yield Brij 700-p24 conjugate. The utility of these NPs for enhancing the immune responses to protein-based vaccines was evaluated in vivo using ovalbumin (OVA) as model protein and p24 as a relevant HIV antigen. In separate in vivo studies, female BALB/c mice were immunized by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection with NP-OVA and NP-p24 formulations along with several control formulations. These results suggested that with multiple antigens, covalent attachment of the antigen to the NP significantly enhanced antigen-specific immune responses. This facile covalent conjugation and incorporation method may be utilized to further incorporate other protein antigens, even multiple antigens, into an enhanced vaccine delivery system. PMID:20837122

  17. The Development of Evaluation Model for Internal Quality Assurance System of Dramatic Arts College of Bunditpattanasilpa Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinthukhot, Kittisak; Srihamongkol, Yannapat; Luanganggoon, Nuchwana; Suwannoi, Paisan

    2013-01-01

    The research purpose was to develop an evaluation model for the internal quality assurance system of the dramatic arts College of Bunditpattanasilpa Institute. The Research and Development method was used as research methodology which was divided into three phases; "developing the model and its guideline", "trying out the actual…

  18. Antigenic determinant of the Lancefield group H antigen of Streptococcus sanguis.

    PubMed Central

    Rosan, B; Argenbright, L

    1982-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that the teichoic acid isolated from strains of Streptococcus sanguis was group specific and defined the Lancefield group H streptococci. To determine the specific antigenic determinants, the antigen was extracted from a group H streptococcus (ATCC 903) by the phenol-water method and purified by column chromatography. The isolated antigen had a glycerol/phosphate/glucose molar ratio of 1:0.9:0.3; the lipid concentration was 7.6% of its dry weight. No nucleic acids were detected, and amino acids constituted approximately 2% of the dry weight. The minimum concentration of antigen required to sensitize erythrocytes for hemagglutination with a 1:1,000 dilution of either group H antiserum or antiteichoic acid serum was 0.02 microgram/ml. Hemagglutination inhibition studies suggested that the major antigenic determinant consisted of an alpha-glucose linked to the glycerol phosphate backbone. Images PMID:6185428

  19. School Climate Improvement Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Eugene; Jackson, David

    As a means of dramatizing the interrelationships that determine the climate of a school, a simulation experience was created for participants in this workshop on school climate improvement. A discussion of the intent of the experience includes descriptions of "good" and "poor" school environments and their impact on the school community.…

  20. Isolated intramedullary spinal cysticercosis in a 10-year-old female showing dramatic response with albendazole

    PubMed Central

    Azfar, Shah F.; Kirmani, Sanna; Badar, Farheen; Ahmad, Ibne

    2011-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is the most common parasitic infection of the central nervous system caused by larvae of Taenia solium. Spinal cysticercosis is an uncommon site of cysticercal infection, and isolated intramedullary involvement is even rarer. We present a case of 10-year-old girl who presented with gradual onset paraparesis with sensory loss and bowel and bladder incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of spine revealed a cystic lesion with mural nodule (scolex) which was diagnostic for cysticercosis. Patient was treated with antihelminthic, which led to marked clinico-radiological improvement. PMID:21977090

  1. The significance of erythrocyte antigen site density

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Leon W.; Trabold, Norma C.

    1970-01-01

    The importance of antigen site density has been studied by means of a model passive hemagglutination system using human red cells coupled with sulfanilic acid groups. Relative site numbers were estimated from the covalent linkage of sulfanilic acid-35S to red cell membrane protein and the effective antigen site number was determined with 125I-labeled rabbit IgG antisulfanilic acid. Cells which had fewer than 20,000 antigen sites per cell were not agglutinated. As greater numbers of sulfanilic groups were coupled to the red cells, the agglutination titers increased to maximum values with red fanilic groups were coupled to the red cells, the agglutination titers of purified IgM antibody were 10-20 times greater than IgG antibody when preparations with the same protein concentration were compared, but this difference was not noted when IgG antibody was measured by antiglobulin reactions. These findings emphasize the need to consider differences in antigen site density when comparing blood group systems. They are consistent with the hypothesis that those blood group antigens which have a very low site number will not be detected by IgG antibodies in saline hemagglutination determinations. PMID:5409811

  2. Genetic and antigenic changes in porcine rubulavirus

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Betancourt, José I.; Trujillo, María E.; Mendoza, Susana E.; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Alonso, Rogelio A.

    2012-01-01

    Blue eye disease, caused by a porcine rubulavirus (PoRV), is an emergent viral swine disease that has been endemic in Mexico since 1980. Atypical outbreaks were detected in 1990 and 2003. Growing and adult pigs presented neurological signs, mild neurological signs were observed in piglets, and severe reproductive problems were observed in adults. Amino acid sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein revealed genetically different lineages. We used cross-neutralization assays, with homologous and heterologous antisera, to determine the antigenic relatedness values for the PoRV isolates. We found antigenic changes among several strains and identified a highly divergent one, making up a new serogroup. It seems that genetically and antigenically different PoRV strains are circulating simultaneously in the swine population in the geographical region studied. The cross neutralization studies suggest that the HN is not the only antigenic determinant participating in the antigenic changes among the different PoRV strains. PMID:22754092

  3. Antigen Presentation by MHC-Dressed Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as conventional dendritic cells (DCs) process protein antigens to MHC-bound peptides and then present the peptide–MHC complexes to T cells. In addition to this canonical antigen presentation pathway, recent studies have revealed that DCs and non-APCs can acquire MHC class I (MHCI) and/or MHC class II (MHCII) from neighboring cells through a process of cell–cell contact-dependent membrane transfer called trogocytosis. These MHC-dressed cells subsequently activate or regulate T cells via the preformed antigen peptide–MHC complexes without requiring any further processing. In addition to trogocytosis, intercellular transfer of MHCI and MHCII can be mediated by secretion of membrane vesicles such as exosomes from APCs, generating MHC-dressed cells. This review focuses on the physiological role of antigen presentation by MHCI- or MHCII-dressed cells, and also discusses differences and similarities between trogocytosis and exosome-mediated transfer of MHC. PMID:25601867

  4. Red cell antigens: Structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Pourazar, Abbasali

    2007-01-01

    Landsteiner and his colleagues demonstrated that human beings could be classified into four groups depending on the presence of one (A) or another (B) or both (AB) or none (O) of the antigens on their red cells. The number of the blood group antigens up to 1984 was 410. In the next 20 years, there were 16 systems with 144 antigens and quite a collection of antigens waiting to be assigned to systems, pending the discovery of new information about their relationship to the established systems. The importance of most blood group antigens had been recognized by immunological complications of blood transfusion or pregnancies; their molecular structure and function however remained undefined for many decades. Recent advances in molecular genetics and cellular biochemistry resulted in an abundance of new information in this field of research. In this review, we try to give some examples of advances made in the field of ‘structure and function of the red cell surface molecules.’ PMID:21938229

  5. Whole Tumor Antigen Vaccines: Where Are We?

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Cheryl Lai-Lai; Coukos, George; Kandalaft, Lana E.

    2015-01-01

    With its vast amount of uncharacterized and characterized T cell epitopes available for activating CD4+ T helper and CD8+ cytotoxic lymphocytes simultaneously, whole tumor antigen represents an attractive alternative source of antigens as compared to tumor-derived peptides and full-length recombinant tumor proteins for dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy. Unlike defined tumor-derived peptides and proteins, whole tumor lysate therapy is applicable to all patients regardless of their HLA type. DCs are essentially the master regulators of immune response, and are the most potent antigen-presenting cell population for priming and activating naïve T cells to target tumors. Because of these unique properties, numerous DC-based immunotherapies have been initiated in the clinics. In this review, we describe the different types of whole tumor antigens that we could use to pulse DCs ex vivo and in vivo. We also discuss the different routes of delivering whole tumor antigens to DCs in vivo and activating them with toll-like receptor agonists. PMID:26343191

  6. ANTIGEN RECOGNITION AND THE IMMUNE RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Maurice E.; Alkan, Sefik S.; Nitecki, Danute E.; Goodman, Joel W.

    1972-01-01

    L-Tyrosine-p-azobenzenearsonate (RAT) induces cellular immunity without humoral antibody in guinea pigs. Asymmetric bifunctional antigens composed of one RAT moiety and one dinitrophenyl (DNP) group separated by flexible spacers induce anti-RAT cellular immunity and an anti-DNP humoral response. Symmetrical bifunctional antigens of similar design but comprised of two RAT determinants induce cellular immunity without demonstrable anti-RAT antibody. However, when the flexible spacer is replaced by a rigid decaproline chain, humoral anti-RAT responses are provoked. Since RAT contains both electropositive (azo) and electronegative (arsonate) centers, the failure of bifunctional RAT compounds with flexible spacers to induce humoral immunity might be ascribed either to intramolecular stacking, which compromises their bifunctional character, or to interaction of both determinants with receptors on the same cell surface, which would fail to satisfy the requirement for cooperation. In order to distinguish between these alternatives, symmetrical bifunctional antigens composed of two L-tyrosine-p-azophenyltrimethylammonium (TAT) determinants separated by flexible or rigid spacers were synthesized. TAT is immunogenic and does not cross-react with RAT. Furthermore, it contains only electropositive centers and consequently bifunctional molecules do not undergo intramolecular stacking. Immunization with either flexibly or rigidly spaced bifunctional TAT antigens raised anti-TAT antibody. These results conclusively demonstrate that "self-help," cooperation between bone marrow-derived and thymus-derived lymphocytes of identical or similar specificity, can occur, provided the determinants on the antigen are prevented from associating with each other. PMID:4118413

  7. Persistence of Antigen in Rabbit Synovial Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Webb, F. W. S.; Ford, P. M.; Glynn, L. E.

    1971-01-01

    It is already known that rabbits which show delayed-type hypersensitivity to an antigen will, after a single injection of the same antigen into a knee joint develop a chronic proliferative synovitis. It is also known that almost all of a foreign protein injected into a normal knee joint is rapidly cleared in a few days. It has now been shown that if an animal is given foreign protein into a knee joint, and delayed-type hypersensitivity is produced later, that a chronic proliferative synovitis can also develop. This suggests that minute amounts of foreign protein can persist in an antigenic form in normal rabbit synovial membrane. It is possible that the persistence of this small amount of antigen may account in part for the chronicity of this form of experimental synovitis, and the fact that unlike human rheumatoid arthritis this type of experimental synovitis is confined to the joint injected with antigen. ImagesFigs. 3-4Figs. 1-2 PMID:5547654

  8. Antigenic Properties of N Protein of Hantavirus

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Arikawa, Jiro

    2014-01-01

    Hantavirus causes two important rodent-borne viral zoonoses, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Eurasia and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in North and South America. Twenty-four species that represent sero- and genotypes have been registered within the genus Hantavirus by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). Among the viral proteins, nucleocapsid (N) protein possesses an immunodominant antigen. The antigenicitiy of N protein is conserved compared with that of envelope glycoproteins. Therefore, N protein has been used for serological diagnoses and seroepidemiological studies. An understanding of the antigenic properties of N protein is important for the interpretation of results from serological tests using N antigen. N protein consists of about 430 amino acids and possesses various epitopes. The N-terminal quarter of N protein bears linear and immunodominant epitopes. However, a serotype-specific and multimerization-dependent antigenic site was found in the C-terminal half of N protein. In this paper, the structure, function, and antigenicity of N protein are reviewed. PMID:25123683

  9. Fungal Antigens Expressed during Invasive Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Denikus, Nicole; Orfaniotou, Foteini; Wulf, Gerald; Lehmann, Paul F.; Monod, Michel; Reichard, Utz

    2005-01-01

    Rabbits that had been infected intravenously with conidiospores of Aspergillus fumigatus were used as sources of antibody for screening a λ phage cDNA expression library. The cDNA was derived from A. fumigatus mRNA that had been extracted from newly formed, germling hyphae. Thirty-six antigens were identified using antisera from six rabbits. Though many of these antigens were expected to be intracellular proteins because their genes did not encode a signal sequence, the antisera showed consistently a stronger immunoblot reaction with a cell fraction enriched for the fungal cell wall than with a fraction of predominantly intracellular components. Antibodies to eight antigens, including the glycosylhydrolase Asp f 16, were produced by more than one rabbit. In current vaccine studies, Asp f 16 is the only single antigen which has been reported to be capable of inducing protection against invasive aspergillosis in mice (S. Bozza et al., Microb. Infect. 4:1281-1290, 2002). Enolase and Aspergillus HSP90 were detected also; their homologues in Candida albicans have been tested as vaccines and have been reported to provide a partially protective response against invasive candidiasis in mice. The Aspergillus antigens reported here may have value both in diagnostic tests for different forms of aspergillosis and as vaccine candidates for protection against invasive disease. PMID:16040983

  10. Beyond antigens and adjuvants: formulating future vaccines.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Tyson J; Zmolek, Andrew C; Irvine, Darrell J

    2016-03-01

    The need to optimize vaccine potency while minimizing toxicity in healthy recipients has motivated studies of the formulation of vaccines to control how, when, and where antigens and adjuvants encounter immune cells and other cells/tissues following administration. An effective subunit vaccine must traffic to lymph nodes (LNs), activate both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system, and persist for a sufficient time to promote a mature immune response. Here, we review approaches to tailor these three aspects of vaccine function through optimized formulations. Traditional vaccine adjuvants activate innate immune cells, promote cell-mediated transport of antigen to lymphoid tissues, and promote antigen retention in LNs. Recent studies using nanoparticles and other lymphatic-targeting strategies suggest that direct targeting of antigens and adjuvant compounds to LNs can also enhance vaccine potency without sacrificing safety. The use of formulations to regulate biodistribution and promote antigen and inflammatory cue co-uptake in immune cells may be important for next-generation molecular adjuvants. Finally, strategies to program vaccine kinetics through novel formulation and delivery strategies provide another means to enhance immune responses independent of the choice of adjuvant. These technologies offer the prospect of enhanced efficacy while maintaining high safety profiles necessary for successful vaccines.

  11. Improvement of the Pharmacological Properties of Maize RIP by Cysteine-Specific PEGylation

    PubMed Central

    Au, Ka-Yee; Shi, Wei-Wei; Qian, Shuai; Zuo, Zhong; Shaw, Pang-Chui

    2016-01-01

    To improve the pharmacological properties of maize ribosome-inactivating protein (maize RIP) for targeting HIV-infected cells, the previously engineered TAT-fused active form of maize RIP (MOD) was further engineered for cysteine-directed PEGylation. In this work, two potential antigenic sites, namely Lys-78 and Lys-264, were identified. They were mutated to cysteine residue and conjugated with PEG5k or PEG20k. The resultant PEG derivatives of MOD variants were examined for ribosome-inactivating activity, circulating half-life and immunogenicity. Our results showed that MOD-PEG conjugates had two- to five-fold lower biological activity compared to the wild-type. Mutation of the two sites respectively did not decrease the anti-MOD IgG and IgE level in mice, but the conjugation of PEG did dramatically reduce the antigenicity. Furthermore, pharmacokinetics studies demonstrated that attachment of PEG20k prolonged the plasma half-life by five-fold for MOD-K78C and 17-fold for MOD-K264C, respectively. The site-specific mutation together with PEGylation therefore generated MOD derivatives with improved pharmacological properties. PMID:27763506

  12. 4-1BB Costimulation Ameliorates T Cell Exhaustion Induced by Tonic Signaling of Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Long, Adrienne H.; Haso, Waleed M.; Shern, Jack F.; Wanhainen, Kelsey M.; Murgai, Meera; Ingaramo, Maria; Smith, Jillian P.; Walker, Alec J.; Kohler, M. Eric; Venkateshwara, Vikas R.; Kaplan, Rosandra N.; Patterson, George H.; Fry, Terry J.; Orentas, Rimas J.; Mackall, Crystal L.

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19 have mediated dramatic anti-tumor responses in hematologic malignancies, but tumor regression has rarely occurred using CARs targeting other antigens. It remains unknown whether the impressive effects of CD19 CARs relate to greater susceptibility of hematologic malignancies to CAR therapies, or superior functionality of the CD19 CAR itself. We discovered that tonic CAR CD3ζ phosphorylation, triggered by antigen-independent clustering of CAR scFvs, can induce early exhaustion of CAR T cells that limits anti-tumor efficacy. Such activation is present to varying degrees in all CARs studied, with the exception of the highly effective CD19 CAR. We further identify that CD28 costimulation augments, while 4-1BB costimulation ameliorates, exhaustion induced by persistent CAR signaling. Our results provide biological explanations for the dramatic anti-tumor effects of CD19 CARs and for the observations that CD19.BBz CAR T cells are more persistent than CD19.28z CAR T cells in clinical trials. PMID:25939063

  13. An intertidal snail shows a dramatic size increase over the past century.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jonathan A D; Rhile, Erika C; Liu, Harrison; Petraitis, Peter S

    2009-03-31

    Changes in the shell architecture of marine snails enhance defenses and greatly improve survival against predators. In the northwest Atlantic Ocean, shorter and thicker shells have been reported for several species following the introduction of predatory Carcinus maenas crabs early in the 20th century. But we report that the shell lengths of Nucella lapillus actually increased by an average of 22.6% over the past century, with no evidence of shell thickening after correcting for shell length. The increases in shell length were greatest on sheltered shores, highlighting the interaction between wave exposure and the sampling period. Comparisons were based on archived shells collected in 1915-1922 from sites that were resampled in 2007. N. lapillus is an important member of North Atlantic marine ecosystems, and our results suggest that the impacts of historical changes in species' key morphological traits on marine ecosystems remain underappreciated. PMID:19307561

  14. An intertidal snail shows a dramatic size increase over the past century.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jonathan A D; Rhile, Erika C; Liu, Harrison; Petraitis, Peter S

    2009-03-31

    Changes in the shell architecture of marine snails enhance defenses and greatly improve survival against predators. In the northwest Atlantic Ocean, shorter and thicker shells have been reported for several species following the introduction of predatory Carcinus maenas crabs early in the 20th century. But we report that the shell lengths of Nucella lapillus actually increased by an average of 22.6% over the past century, with no evidence of shell thickening after correcting for shell length. The increases in shell length were greatest on sheltered shores, highlighting the interaction between wave exposure and the sampling period. Comparisons were based on archived shells collected in 1915-1922 from sites that were resampled in 2007. N. lapillus is an important member of North Atlantic marine ecosystems, and our results suggest that the impacts of historical changes in species' key morphological traits on marine ecosystems remain underappreciated.

  15. Dramatic and sustained responsiveness of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis-associated pulmonary hypertension to vasodilator therapy

    PubMed Central

    May, Adam; Kane, Garvan; Yi, Eunhee; Frantz, Robert; Vassallo, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is an uncommon diffuse lung disease characterized by the abnormal accumulation of Langerhans' cells around small airways and other distal lung compartments. Although pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a frequent complication of PLCH, the role of advanced PH therapies for PLCH-related PH is not well-established. We describe a PLCH patient with severe, disease-related PH that responded unexpectedly well to advanced PH therapy with sustained improvement over a 10 year follow-up period. This case indicates that PLCH-associated PH may, in certain instances, be highly responsive to advanced PH therapies and emphasizes the importance of trialing these therapies among patients with PLCH-related PH. PMID:26029568

  16. An intertidal snail shows a dramatic size increase over the past century

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jonathan A. D.; Rhile, Erika C.; Liu, Harrison; Petraitis, Peter S.

    2009-01-01

    Changes in the shell architecture of marine snails enhance defenses and greatly improve survival against predators. In the northwest Atlantic Ocean, shorter and thicker shells have been reported for several species following the introduction of predatory Carcinus maenas crabs early in the 20th century. But we report that the shell lengths of Nucella lapillus actually increased by an average of 22.6% over the past century, with no evidence of shell thickening after correcting for shell length. The increases in shell length were greatest on sheltered shores, highlighting the interaction between wave exposure and the sampling period. Comparisons were based on archived shells collected in 1915–1922 from sites that were resampled in 2007. N. lapillus is an important member of North Atlantic marine ecosystems, and our results suggest that the impacts of historical changes in species' key morphological traits on marine ecosystems remain underappreciated. PMID:19307561

  17. Idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and HLA antigens.

    PubMed

    Gerbase-DeLima, M; Pereira-Santos, A; Sesso, R; Temin, J; Aragão, E S; Ajzen, H

    1998-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate a possible association between HLA class II antigens and idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). HLA-A, -B, -DR and -DQ antigens were determined in 19 Brazilian patients (16 white subjects and three subjects of Japanese origin) with biopsy-proven FSGS. Comparison of the HLA antigen frequencies between white patients and white local controls showed a significant increase in HLA-DR4 frequency among FSGS patients (37.7 vs 17.2%, P < 0.05). In addition, the three patients of Japanese extraction, not included in the statistical analysis, also presented HLA-DR4. In conclusion, our data confirm the association of FSGS with HLA-DR4 previously reported by others, thus providing further evidence for a role of genes of the HLA complex in the susceptibility to this disease. PMID:9698788

  18. Eosinophilic prostatitis and prostatic specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Miller, P D; Holmes, S A; Christmas, T J; Kirby, R S

    1992-01-01

    Eosinophilic prostatitis is a rare form of abacterial prostatitis with uncertain aetiology. Its clinical presentation, like other types of abacterial prostatitis, commonly mimics carcinoma of the prostate. Transrectal ultrasound may be helpful in the diagnosis of prostatitis but histological confirmation is necessary. Prostatic specific antigen has been widely used in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with prostatic carcinoma. High levels of this antigen (greater than 30 micrograms/l) have been claimed to be highly specific for prostate cancer, although lesser elevations may also occur in patients with large benign prostate glands and in bacterial prostatitis. We report 3 patients with histologically proven eosinophilic prostatitis and high levels of prostatic specific antigen. This diagnosis may closely mimic carcinoma of the prostate and must be excluded by histological examination of biopsy material before treatment for presumed prostate carcinoma is initiated.

  19. Multivalent Chromosomal Expression of the Clostridium botulinum Serotype A Neurotoxin Heavy-Chain Antigen and the Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen in Lactobacillus acidophilus

    PubMed Central

    Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus anthracis produce potent toxins that cause severe disease in humans. New and improved vaccines are needed for both of these pathogens. For mucosal vaccine delivery using lactic acid bacteria, chromosomal expression of antigens is preferred over plasmid-based expression systems, as chromosomal expression circumvents plasmid instability and the need for antibiotic pressure. In this study, we constructed three strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM expressing from the chromosome (i) the nontoxic host receptor-binding domain of the heavy chain of Clostridium botulinum serotype A neurotoxin (BoNT/A-Hc), (ii) the anthrax protective antigen (PA), and (iii) both the BoNT/A-Hc and the PA. The BoNT/A-Hc vaccine cassette was engineered to contain the signal peptide from the S-layer protein A from L. acidophilus and a dendritic-cell-targeting peptide. A chromosomal region downstream of lba0889 carrying a highly expressed enolase gene was selected for insertion of the vaccine cassettes. Western blot analysis confirmed the heterologous expression of the two antigens from plasmid and chromosome locations. Stability assays demonstrated loss of the vaccine cassettes from expression plasmids without antibiotic maintenance. RNA sequencing showed high expression of each antigen and that insertion of the vaccine cassettes had little to no effect on the transcription of other genes in the chromosome. This study demonstrated that chromosomal integrative recombinant strains are promising vaccine delivery vehicles when targeted into high-expression chromosomal regions. Levels of expression match high-copy-number plasmids and eliminate the requirement for antibiotic selective maintenance of recombinant plasmids. IMPORTANCE Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus anthracis produce potent neurotoxins that pose a biochemical warfare concern; therefore, effective vaccines against these bacteria are required. Chromosomal expression of antigens is

  20. Separation of soluble Brucella antigens by gel-filtration chromatography.

    PubMed

    McGhee, J R; Freeman, B A

    1970-07-01

    Soluble precipitating antigens of Brucella suis have been, in various degrees, purified by filtration on Sephadex gels. The most useful gels employed were Sephadex G-150, Sephadex G-200, and Sepharose 4B. Although not all fractions proved to be immunologically pure, some crude molecular-size estimates of most of the 13 soluble antigens of the Brucella cell could be given. In addition, monospecific antisera to three purified Brucella antigens have been prepared. By using purified preparations, physical and chemical data were obtained on two major antigens, E and 1, and a minor antigen, f. Antigen E is not an agglutinogen and may be toxic. Antigen 1 is of low molecular weight and is neither toxic nor agglutinogenic. The minor antigen f is an agglutinogen as well as a precipitinogen and is found on the cell surface. Both major antigens, when purified, were immunogenic in rabbits. PMID:16557798