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Sample records for antigen hla matched

  1. Prospective HLA-DR matching in cadaveric renal transplants: a single center study.

    PubMed

    Mendez, R; Iwaki, Y; Mendez, R; Bogaard, T; Self, B

    1983-03-01

    We reviewed 77 potential cadaveric allograft recipients who had undergone prospective HLA-A and B locus and HLA-DR antigen identification. Matching was accomplished, giving first priority to HLA-DR compatibility and relying on HLA-A and B antigen matching only in situations of total HLA-DR incompatibility. Complete HLA-DR identification occurred in 56 per cent of all patients. There were 15 patients (19.5 per cent) who received a 2/2 HLA-DR perfect match, with 86.7 plus or minus 8.8 per cent 1-year actuarial graft survival, and 41 (53 per cent) who received a 1/2 HLA-DR match, with 58.2 plus or minus 7.8 per cent 1-year actual allograft survival. Finally, 21 patients (27 per cent) received a 0/2 HLA-DR match, with 64.9 plus or minus 10.7 per cent actual survival. These results and their mirrored mismatching results showed statistically significant allograft success in only the HLA-DR 2/2 matches. Matching for HLA 2 DR donors proved a statistically significant success over the other HLA-DR allograft matches and the older controversial matching system based on HLA-A and B locus antigens. The restricted gene polymorphism of the HLA-DR systems allows for a relatively high percentage of perfect HLA-DR matches.

  2. Idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and HLA antigens.

    PubMed

    Gerbase-DeLima, M; Pereira-Santos, A; Sesso, R; Temin, J; Aragão, E S; Ajzen, H

    1998-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate a possible association between HLA class II antigens and idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). HLA-A, -B, -DR and -DQ antigens were determined in 19 Brazilian patients (16 white subjects and three subjects of Japanese origin) with biopsy-proven FSGS. Comparison of the HLA antigen frequencies between white patients and white local controls showed a significant increase in HLA-DR4 frequency among FSGS patients (37.7 vs 17.2%, P < 0.05). In addition, the three patients of Japanese extraction, not included in the statistical analysis, also presented HLA-DR4. In conclusion, our data confirm the association of FSGS with HLA-DR4 previously reported by others, thus providing further evidence for a role of genes of the HLA complex in the susceptibility to this disease. PMID:9698788

  3. HLA-Modeler: Automated Homology Modeling of Human Leukocyte Antigens.

    PubMed

    Amari, Shinji; Kataoka, Ryoichi; Ikegami, Takashi; Hirayama, Noriaki

    2013-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) structures of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules are indispensable for the studies on the functions at molecular level. We have developed a homology modeling system named HLA-modeler specialized in the HLA molecules. Segment matching algorithm is employed for modeling and the optimization of the model is carried out by use of the PFROSST force field considering the implicit solvent model. In order to efficiently construct the homology models, HLA-modeler uses a local database of the 3D structures of HLA molecules. The structure of the antigenic peptide-binding site is important for the function and the 3D structure is highly conserved between various alleles. HLA-modeler optimizes the use of this structural motif. The leave-one-out cross-validation using the crystal structures of class I and class II HLA molecules has demonstrated that the rmsds of nonhydrogen atoms of the sites between homology models and crystal structures are less than 1.0 Å in most cases. The results have indicated that the 3D structures of the antigenic peptide-binding sites can be reproduced by HLA-modeler at the level almost corresponding to the crystal structures.

  4. [HLA antigens in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Rumba, I V; Sochnev, A M; Kukaĭne, E M; Burshteĭn, A M; Benevolenskaia, L I

    1990-01-01

    Antigens of I class HLA system (locus A and B) were investigated in 67 patients of Latvian nationality suffering from juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Associations of HLA antigens with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis partially coincided with the ones revealed earlier. Typing established an increased incidence of antigen B27 (p less than 0.01) and gaplotype A2, B40 (p less than 0.01). Antigen B15 possessed a protective action with respect to JRA. Interlocus combinations demonstrated a closer association with the disease than a single antigen. The authors also revealed markers of various clinico-anatomical variants of JRA.

  5. HLA antigen expression and malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Christmas, T I; Manning, L S; Davis, M R; Robinson, B W; Garlepp, M J

    1991-09-01

    The expression of HLA antigens by a tumor may determine its progression and metastatic potential by influencing the immune response to that tumor. The upregulation of HLA antigen expression on some cell types by interferons (IFNs) may contribute to their antitumor activity. Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a tumor that has a poor prognosis and is unaffected by conventional therapy, although immunotherapy has not been adequately assessed. In this study, we have examined the constitutive and IFN-inducible expression of class I and class II HLA antigens on MM cell lines using indirect immunofluorescence and Northern blotting. All MM cell lines constitutively expressed class I, but not class II, surface antigen, and all three class I loci (HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C) were expressed. The MM cell lines were heterogeneous in their response to the IFNs. Treatment with IFN-alpha marginally increased class I surface expression, but not class II. Class I mRNA was, however, clearly increased in all cell lines after IFN-alpha treatment, suggesting that class I surface antigen was already maximally expressed. IFN-gamma increased class I mRNA expression in all but one cell line and induced DR expression on three of the cell lines. DQ-beta, but not DQ-alpha, mRNA was inducible in the same three cell lines, but DQ surface antigen was never demonstrable.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. [Frequency of HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-Cw antigens in the Slovak population].

    PubMed

    Kralovicova, J; Kusikova, M; Buc, M; Holomanova, D; Sakalova, A

    2000-01-01

    Results on HLA-A, -B and -Cw antigen frequencies in the Slovak population are presented. HLA-A, -B, -Cw antigens were determined in 654 healthy unrelated individuals. The highest frequency was observed for the antigens HLA-A2, -A1; HLA-B12, -B35, and HLA-Cw8. The least frequent antigens were HLA-A34, -A36, HLA-B58, -B67, -B70, -B77, and HLA-Cw8. The results were compared with those of the previous study and with those of Czech, Austrian and Hungarian populations. No statistically significant differences were observed. (Tab. 5, Fig. 2, Ref. 9.)

  7. HLA antigens and asthma in Greeks.

    PubMed

    Apostolakis, J; Toumbis, M; Konstantopoulos, K; Kamaroulias, D; Anagnostakis, J; Georgoulias, V; Fessas, P; Zervas, J

    1996-04-01

    HLA-A and -B antigens were determined in a group of 76 Greek asthmatic patients: 35 children (1.5-15 years) and 41 adults (18-73 years). The results were compared to those of 400 healthy unrelated controls from the same population. The standard NIH lymphocytotoxicity test was applied. When all 76 patients were compared to the controls, a statistically significant lower frequency of HLA-B5 and -B35 antigens was noted. When adults were analysed alone, an increased frequency of HLA-B8 was found. On the other hand, in the asthmatic children sub-group, the HLA-A10 antigen was significantly higher and the HLA-B5 was significantly lower than in the controls. These data imply that different HLA antigens may be involved in the pathogenesis of several clinical forms of asthma and that, in order to study the role of immunogenetic factor(s) in the pathogenesis of this disease, more adequate grouping criteria are needed.

  8. Common antigenic structures of HL-A antigens

    PubMed Central

    Nakamuro, K.; Tanigaki, N.; Kreiter, V. P.; Pressman, D.

    1974-01-01

    Spent culture media of all the human cell lines tested have been found to contain the antigenic activity present on the 11,000-Dalton HL-A common portion fragment of the HL-A antigen molecule that appears to be a characteristic, invariant portion of HL-A antigen molecules. From the culture medium of one of these lines, RPMI 1788, a lymphoid cell line, the substance carrying HL-A common activity was isolated, which was shown to be identical to the HL-A common portion fragment with respect to molecular size, electrophoretic mobility, isoelectric focusing patterns, and certain antigenic characteristics. By an isolation procedure involving differential ultrafiltration, gel filtration, and column electrophoresis, 8 litres of the culture medium yielded 1.5–2.0 A280 units of the substance representing 15–20 per cent of the HL-A common antigenic activity originally present. A single protein band with a Rf of 0.47 was obtained by disc electrophoresis. The molecular size was shown to be about 11,000 Daltons by gel filtration and by sodium dodecyl sulphate—acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Upon isoelectric focusing two bands were obtained which corresponded exactly to those obtained with HL-A common portion fragment prepared from papain-solubilized HL-A antigen preparations by acid dissociation. The isoelectric point of the major band was 5.0. The reactions of this substance with rabbit antisera against human lymphoid cell membrane and against the substance were essentially identical to the reactions of HL-A common portion fragment with these same antisera. ImagesFIG. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4476726

  9. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E and HLA-F expression in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ishigami, Sumiya; Arigami, Takaaki; Okumura, Hiroshi; Uchikado, Yasuto; Kita, Yoshiaki; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Maemura, Kosei; Kijima, Yuko; Ishihara, Yuka; Sasaki, Ken; Uenosono, Yoshikazu; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2015-04-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E and HLA-F are classified as non-classical HLA class Ib antigens. Ectopic HLA-E and HLA-F expression was recently detected in cancer cells; however, the clinical implication of their expression remains unknown. A total of 209 patients with gastric cancer were enrolled in this study. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the expression of HLA-E and HLA-F in gastric cancer specimens. HLA-E and HLA-F expression were seen in the cell membrane. HLA-E and HLA-F expression significantly correlated with depth of invasion, nodal involvement, lymphatic invasion, and venous invasion. No significant correlation between HLA-E and HLA-F expression was found (p<0.05, r=0.24). The five-year survival rate of the HLA-E-positive group and HLA-F-positive group were significantly poorer than that of their respective negative groups. Combination of HLA-E and HLA-F made the p-value smaller than single analysis (p<0.009). This is the first report detailing a clinical implication of HLA-E and HLA-F expression simultaneously in gastric cancer. We identified that the HLA-E and HLA-F in gastric cancer independently affected clinical factors, including postoperative outcome. For HLA-E- or HLA-F-positive gastric cancer, we should settle on a treatment strategy that reinforces the host immune response.

  10. Class II HLA antigens in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D H; Hornabrook, R W; Dagger, J; Fong, R

    1989-01-01

    HLA typing in Wellington revealed a stronger association of multiple sclerosis with DR2 than with DQw1. The association with DQw1 appeared to be due to linkage disequilibrium of this antigen with DR2. These results, when considered in conjunction with other studies, are most easily explained by the hypothesis that susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is influenced by multiple risk factors, with DR2 being an important risk factor in Caucasoid populations. PMID:2732726

  11. HLA antigens in individuals with down syndrome and alopecia areata

    PubMed Central

    Estefan, Juliany L; Oliveira, Juliana C; Abad, Eliane D; Saintive, Simone B; Porto, Luis Cristóvão MS; Ribeiro, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To describe human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles in individuals with Down syndrome and alopecia areata. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted, which evaluated 109 individuals. Ten with down syndrome (DS) and alopecia areata (AA), ten with DS without AA and ten with AA without DS, and their families. The individuals were matched by gender and age. The following data were computed: gender, age, ethnic group, karyotype, clinical presentation and family history of alopecia areata. Descriptive analysis: measures of central tendency and frequency distribution. Inferential analysis: Fisher’s exact test to compare categorical data between the three groups and Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA test for numerical data. RESULTS: Seventy per cent of evaluated individuals in the DS and AA group were male; presented mean age of 18.6 (SD ± 7.2) years and 70% were Caucasian. We observed involvement of the scalp, with a single lesion in 10% and multiple in 90% of subjects. It was observed that there is no significant difference in the frequency distributions of the alleles HLA loci A, B, C, DRB1 and DQB1 of subjects studied. However, according to Fisher’s exact test, there is a trend (P = 0.089) of DS group to present higher proportions of HLA-A 36 and HLA-B 15 than the AA group and AA and DS group. CONCLUSION: There was a tendency for the DS group, to present proportion of HLA-A 36 and HLA-B 15 higher than the AA group and group of individuals with AA and DS. However, there was no significant difference in the frequency distribution of the alleles. PMID:25325065

  12. Frequency of HLA antigen in asbestos workers with and without pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, C C; Lewinsöhn, H C; Evans, J M

    1977-01-01

    HLA antigens were determined in 37 patients with asbestosis and 37 matched controls with equivalent asbestos exposure but no pulmonary fibrosis. All had worked in the same textile factory. No significant differences in the prevalence of antigens were found between the two groups or between either group and controls who had not been exposed to asbestos. When the data were combined with findings from other pilot studies the previously suggested association between asbestosis and HLA-B27 was not confirmed. Subjects who were positive for HLA-B12 tended also to have advanced radiographic fibrosis. Asbestos workers without pulmonary fibrosis had an unexpectedly high frequency of HLA-BW5, which might indicate that this antigen protects against the development of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:843830

  13. [HLA and keloids: antigenic frequency and therapeutic response].

    PubMed

    Rossi, A; Bozzi, M

    1989-01-01

    Twenty keloid subjects were typed for class 1 (HLA-A, B and C) and class 2 (HLA-DR and DQ) histocompatibility antigens. Their frequencies were compared to those found in control populations. Of all the antigens belonging to class 1, B 21 was more prevalent in patients. The findings regarding class 2 antigens were noteworthy: in keloid patients there was a significant prevalence of DR 5 (RR = 3.54 and 7.93 respectively for the two control groups) and DQw 3 (RR = 16.8). The patients typed for HLA-antigens were treated with corticosteroid infiltrations. The responses to the treatments were no related to the histocompatibility antigens. PMID:2628278

  14. [Detection of common determinants of HLA antigens A2 and B17 by absorption using human HLA serum].

    PubMed

    Májský, A; Korínková, P

    1983-01-01

    Attempts of cross absorption where sera of anti-HLA A2 + B17, anti-HLA A2 and anti-HLA B17 with thrombocytes were absorbed from donors of HLA A2 positive, B17 negative and HLA A2 negative, B17 positive, revealed that anti-HLA A2 and anti-HLA B17 could be eliminated from the sera of both HLA types on the platelets. Thus, the findings allow the existence of a common determinant of HLA A2 and B17-antigens to be assumed. This is the first case where the evidence of a cross reaction between antigens of two different HLA loci with human sera could be established.

  15. HLA antigens and insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. A family study.

    PubMed

    Savi, M; Neri, T M; Zavaroni, I; Coscelli, I

    1977-12-01

    Sixteen insulin dependent diabetic patients (age at onset less than 35 years) and their families were tissue typed for HLA antigens. Glucose tolerance of relatives was also tested. Among diabetic patients two HLA antigens were found with increased frequency: B8 (31 percent, control 15 percent) and Bw35 (38 percent, control 23 percent). Among normal relatives B8 and Bw35 had the same frequency as the control group. Bw15 frequency was not increased in either group. In relatives, no correlation between HLA antigens (B8 or Bw35) and abnormal glucose tolerance, obesity and over-weight at birth was found. Present data confirm previous reports of high B8 frequency in early onset diabetic patients, but fail to demonstrate a raised frequency of abnormal glucose tolerance among relatives bearing B8 (or, in our cases, Bw35). B8 may be considered a genetic indicator for susceptibility to juvenile diabetes. On the basis of present results in families, however non genetic factors clearly also play a determinant role. Furthermore, that diabetogenesis arises from a link between Ir-genes and HLA-B8 antigen should only be considered a suggestive hypothesis. PMID:413751

  16. Human cytotoxic T cell responses to trinitrophenyl hapten and influenza virus. Diversity of restriction antigens and specificity of HLA-linked genetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Biddison, W E; Payne, S M; Shearer, G M; Shaw, S

    1980-08-01

    This report compares both the HLA restriction patterns and Ir gene regulation of human in vitro T cell-mediated cytotoxic responses to the trinitrophenyl (TNP) hapten and the type A and B influenza viruses. Comparison of the restriction patterns of these cytotoxic responses indicates that A/HK and B/HK are recognized in conjunction with polymorphic HLA-A and -B self determinants, whereas TNP is recognized in association with a more complex spectrum of self determinants. These self determinants include polymorphic HLA-A and -B determinants, polymorphic non-HLA-A and -B determinants that probably include DR antigens, and non-polymorphic determinants that appear to be species specific. Analysis of the self determinants recognized by human T cells in conjunction with influenza virus demonstrates that (a) the antigens recognized by virus-immune T cells can be distinguished from the serologically defined HLA-A and -B antigenic determinants, and (b) there may be multiple self determinants on individual HLA-A molecules that T cells can recognize in conjunction with virus. The results of family studies indicate that donors' T cells often preferentially respond to virus (and to a lesser extent TNP) in conjunction with products of one parental HLA haplotype (haplotype preference). In the family study, three HLA-identical siblings preferentially recognize paternal HLA antigens in conjunction with A/HK, and maternal HLA antigens in conjunction with B/HK and TNP, which indicates antigen-specific HLA-lined genetic control. Population studies demonstrate virus-specific differences in the ability of donors to respond to selected self HLA-A and -B antigens in conjunction with virus. These differences may be controlled by Ir genes that are distinct from HLA-A and -B, because differences are observed in the response patterns of HLA-A- and -B-matched individuals.

  17. The HLA antigens of two Negrito populations in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Horai, S; Omoto, K; Juji, T; Sonozaki, H; Mitsui, H; Misawa, S; Sumpaico, J S; Mercado, A S

    1981-03-01

    HLA antigens were determined for the A, B and C loci among 86 Aetas of west-central Luzon and 87 Mamanwas of north-eastern Mindanao, Philippines. The overall antigenic profiles of these two groups were essentially similar to those of other Asian-Pacific populations with some peculiarities in common with Papua New Guineans. However, the results of heterogeneity tests and the comparison of statistically significant phenotypic associations showed a highly significant difference between the Aeta and the Mamanwa groups. It was postulated that the two "Negrito" groups represent different migrations to the Philippines.

  18. Presentation of human minor histocompatibility antigens by HLA-B35 and HLA-B38 molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, J; Kariyone, A; Akiyama, N; Kano, K; Takiguchi, M

    1990-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones specific for human minor histocompatibility antigens (hmHAs) were produced from a patient who had been grafted with the kidneys from his mother and two HLA-identical sisters. Of eight CTL clones generated, four recognized an hmHA (hmHA-1) expressed on cells from the mother and sister 3 (second donor); two recognized another antigen (hmHA-2) on cells from the father, sister 2 (third donor), and sister 3; and the remaining two clones recognized still another antigen (hmHA-3) on cells from the father and sister 3. Panel studies revealed that CTL recognition of hmHA-1 was restricted by HLA-B35 and that of hmHA-2 and hmHA-3 was restricted by HLA-B38. The HLA-B35 restriction of the hmHA-1-specific CTL clones was substantiated by the fact that they killed HLA-A null/HLA-B null Hmy2CIR targets transfected with HLA-B35 but not HLA-B51, -Bw52, or -Bw53 transfected Hmy2CIR targets. These data demonstrated that the five amino acids substitutions on the alpha 1 domain between HLA-B35 and -Bw53, which are associated with Bw4/Bw6 epitopes, play a critical role in the relationship of hmHA-1 to HLA-B35 molecules. The fact that the hmHA-1-specific CTLs failed to kill Hmy2CIR cells expressing HLA-B35/51 chimeric molecules composed of the alpha 1 domain of HLA-B35 and other domains of HLA-B51 indicated that eight residues on the alpha 2 domain also affect the interaction of hmHA-1 and the HLA-B35 molecules. PMID:2157206

  19. ALTERNATIVE DONORS EXTEND TRANSPLANTATION FOR PATIENTS WITH LYMPHOMA WHO LACK AN HLA MATCHED DONOR

    PubMed Central

    Bachanova, Veronika; Burns, Linda J.; Wang, Tao; Carreras, Jeanette; Gale, Robert Peter; Wiernik, Peter H.; Ballen, Karen K.; Wirk, Baldeep; Munker, Reinhold; Rizzieri, David A.; Chen, Yi-Bin; Gibson, John; Akpek, Görgün; Costa, Luciano J.; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Aljurf, Mahmoud D.; Hsu, Jack W.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Schouten, Harry C.; Bacher, Ulrike; Savani, Bipin N.; Wingard, John R.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Laport, Ginna G.; Montoto, Silvia; Maloney, David G.; Smith, Sonali M.; Brunstein, Claudio; Saber, Wael

    2015-01-01

    Alternative donor transplantation is increasingly used for high risk lymphoma patients. We analyzed 1593 transplant recipients (2000 to 2010) and compared transplant outcomes in recipients of 8/8 allele human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, -B, -C, and DRB1 matched unrelated donors (MUD; n=1176), 7/8 allele HLA-matched unrelated donors (MMUD; n=275) and umbilical cord blood donors (1 or 2 units UCB; n=142). Adjusted 3-year non-relapse mortality of MMUD (44%) was higher as compared to MUD (35%; p=0.004), but similar to UCB recipients (37%; p=0.19), although UCB had lower rates of neutrophil and platelet recovery compared to unrelated donor groups. With a median follow-up of 55 months, 3-year adjusted cumulative incidence of relapse was lower after MMUD compared with MUD (25% vs 33%, p=0.003) but similar between UCB and MUD (30% vs 33%; p=0.48). In multivariate analysis UCB recipients had lower risks of acute and chronic graft versus host disease compared with adult donor groups (UCB vs MUD: HR=0.68, p=0.05; HR=0.35; p<0.001). Adjusted 3-year overall survival was comparable (43% MUD, 37% MMUD and 41% UCB). Data highlight that patients with lymphoma have acceptable survival after alternative donor transplantation. MMUD and UCB can expand the curative potential of allotransplant to patients who lack suitable HLA-matched sibling or MUD. PMID:25402415

  20. Hu Ly-m5: a unique antigen physically associated with HLA molecules.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, R L; McKenzie, I F

    1983-05-01

    A new human cell surface antigen (Hu Ly-m5) detected by a murine monoclonal antibody (E4.3) is described. The tissue distribution of the Hu Ly-m5 antigen is similar to the HLA antigens (with which it was initially confused) but it is not present on all bone marrow cells nor the U266 myeloma, and is expressed on the HLA-negative K562 cell line. Nevertheless, the Hu Ly-m5 antigen has some affinity for HLA molecules as the two entities cocap and the Hu Ly-m5 antigen copurifies with the HLA antigens on an anti-beta 2-microglobulin immunoabsorbent column; however, the antigen complexes did not withstand the procedures used for coprecipitation. Despite their similarities, the Hu Ly-m5 and HLA antigens are distinct molecular entities--Hu Ly-m5 consists of two bands of apparent molecular weight 69 and 60 K while HLA is comprised of the 43 and 12 K bands of the HLA heavy chain and beta 2-microglobulin, respectively. The function of the Hu Ly-m5 antigen is unknown, but no involvement in the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response to influenza virus-infected cells could be demonstrated. The two properties described (apparent molecular weight and physical association with the HLA antigens) suggests that the Hu Ly-m5 antigen may be a viral-encoded protein.

  1. Interplay between immune responses to HLA and non-HLA self-antigens in allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Angaswamy, Nataraju; Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Sarma, Nayan J; Subramanian, Vijay; Klein, Christina; Wellen, Jason; Shenoy, Surendra; Chapman, William C; Mohanakumar, T

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies strongly suggest an increasing role for immune responses against self-antigens (Ags) which are not encoded by the major histocompatibility complex in the immunopathogenesis of allograft rejection. Although, improved surgical techniques coupled with improved methods to detect and avoid sensitization against donor human leukocyte antigen (HLA) have improved the immediate and short term function of transplanted organs. However, acute and chronic rejection still remains a vexing problem for the long term function of the transplanted organ. Immediately following organ transplantation, several factors both immune and non immune mechanisms lead to the development of local inflammatory milieu which sets the stage for allograft rejection. Traditionally, development of antibodies (Abs) against mismatched donor HLA have been implicated in the development of Ab mediated rejection. However, recent studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that development of humoral and cellular immune responses against non-HLA self-Ags may contribute in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection. There are reports demonstrating that immune responses to self-Ags especially Abs to the self-Ags as well as cellular immune responses especially through IL17 has significant pro-fibrotic properties leading to chronic allograft failure. This review summarizes recent studies demonstrating the role for immune responses to self-Ags in allograft immunity leading to rejection as well as present recent evidence suggesting there is interplay between allo- and autoimmunity leading to allograft dysfunction.

  2. HLA-DR alleles determine responsiveness to Borrelia burgdoferi antigens

    PubMed Central

    Iliopoulou, Bettina Panagiota; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Huber, Brigitte T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Arthritis is a prominent manifestation of Lyme disease, caused upon infection with Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb). Persistent chronic Lyme arthritis, even after antibiotic treatment, is linked to HLA-DRB1*0401 (DR4) and related alleles. On the contrary, Lyme patients who resolve arthritis within 3 months post-infection show an increased frequency of HLA-DRB1*1101 (DR11). The aim of this study was to analyze the underlying mechanism by which HLA-DR alleles confer genetic susceptibility or resistance to antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis. Methods We generated DR11 transgenic (tg) mice on a murine class II−/− background and compared their immune response to Bb-antigens to that of DR4 tg mice after immunization with Bb outer surface protein (Osp)A or infection with live Bb. Results We report that the T cells of OspA-immunized and Bb-infected DR11 tg mice were defective in IFN-γ production compared to those of DR4 mice. On the other hand, DR11 tg mice developed higher titers of anti-OspA and anti-Bb Abs, respectively, than DR4 mice. In accordance with this observation, we found that Bb-infected DR11 tg mice had decreased spirochetal burden compared to DR4 mice, measured by qPCR. Conclusion This study provides direct evidence that in the presence of HLA-DR11 the immune response against Bb-antigens is directed towards a protective Ab response. In contrast, an inflammatory Th1 response is induced in the presence of DR4. These observations offer an explanation for the differential genetic susceptibility of DR4+ and DR11+ individuals for the development of chronic Lyme arthritis and eventually the progression to antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis. PMID:19950279

  3. A clinical-scale selective allodepletion approach for the treatment of HLA-mismatched and matched donor-recipient pairs using expanded T lymphocytes as antigen-presenting cells and a TH9402-based photodepletion technique

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Raquel; Rezvani, Katayoun; Fellowes, Vicki S.; Venne, Annie; Solomon, Scott R.; Fan, Yong; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A.; Scotto, Christian; Read, Elizabeth J.; Barrett, A. John

    2008-01-01

    Selective allodepletion is a strategy to eliminate host-reactive donor T cells from hematopoietic stem cell allografts to prevent graft-versus-host disease while conserving useful donor immune functions. To overcome fluctuations in activation-based surface marker expression and achieve a more consistent and effective allodepletion, we investigated a photodepletion process targeting activation-based changes in p-glycoprotein that result in an altered efflux of the photosensitizer TH9402. Expanded lymphocytes, generated using anti-CD3 and IL-2, were cocultured with responder cells from HLA-matched or -mismatched donors. Optimal results were achieved when cocultured cells were incubated with 7.5 μM TH9402, followed by dye extrusion and exposure to 5 Joule/cm2 light energy at 5 × 106 cells/mL. In mismatched stimulator-responder pairs, the median reduction of alloreactivity was 474-fold (range, 43-fold to 864-fold) compared with the unmanipulated responder. Third-party responses were maintained with a median 1.4-fold (range, 0.9-fold to 3.3-fold) reduction. In matched pairs, alloreactive helper T-lymphocyte precursors were reduced to lower than 1:100 000, while third-party responses remained higher than 1:10 000. This establishes a clinical-scale process capable of highly efficient, reproducible, selective removal of alloreactive lymphocytes from lymphocyte transplant products performed under current Good Manufacturing Practice. This procedure is currently being investigated in a clinical trial of allotransplantation. PMID:17878399

  4. HLA antigen and affective disorders: a report and critical assessment of histocompatibility studies.

    PubMed

    Temple, H; Dupont, B; Shopsin, B

    1979-01-01

    The distribution of 50 HLA antigens, of the A, B and C loci, was investigated in 38 affectively ill Caucasian patients of Eastern European Jewish ancestry. The frequencies found were compared to those of a control population matched for race as well as geographic and ethnic-religious origins. Results indicate that a negative association exists between affective disorders and Cw3 and also suggests a similar negative association between such disorders and A9. A positive association with Bw16, Bw22 and Cw1 is also indicated; Bw16 was increased in those patients with no family history of psychological illness. A review of the available literature in this area shows a glaring lack of agreement among the studies. Methodological problems exist which are likely to contribute to the variable and conflicting results and might make comparison of data irrelevant. The lack of agreement of data among the studies may also indicate that no HLA disease association exists but rather reflect the existence of a defective gene in the HLA complex but not a part of the HLA system. Additional population and family studies are required before any definitive statements can be made.

  5. A simple and safe method for single HLA-antigen-typing by a solid phase assay.

    PubMed

    Häcker-Shahin, B; Giannitsis, D J

    1991-01-01

    A rapid solid phase assay for detection of single HLA-antigens on platelets was developed. The platelets were attached to the surface of polystyrene microtitre plate wells by means of a sodium carbonate buffer and centrifugation. Uncovered areas were blocked by a gelatin blocking buffer. After incubation with commercially available anti-HLA-sera the bound anti-HLA-specific antibodies directed against HLA-antigens present on the platelets were made visible by anti-IgG-coated indicator red cells and a brief centrifugation. A positive result, meaning the presence of an HLA-antigen, was indicated by a slight red cell adherence over the reaction surface. In the absence of the HLA-antigen no binding occurred and the indicator red cells formed a small red disc-like pellet.

  6. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DR4. Positive association with rapidly progressing periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Katz, J; Goultschin, J; Benoliel, R; Brautbar, C

    1987-09-01

    The relationship between human leukocyte antigens (HLA) determinants and periodontitis has been examined by several authors without showing any particular pattern. However, no study has investigated the HLA-D determinants, which are generally associated with immune disorders, and rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP). The HLA profile of 10 RPP patients was compared with that of a healthy control population (n = 120). Although no significant difference was found for HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C, HLA-DR4 of the HLA-D group was found in 80% of patients but only in 38.3% of controls. A high frequency of HLA-DR4 has been reported in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. This finding may be significant in light of previous reports highlighting similarities between RA and periodontal disease. PMID:3498813

  7. HLA antigens in Japanese patients with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuki, K; Juji, T; Tokunaga, K; Takamizawa, M; Maeda, H; Soda, M; Nomura, Y; Segawa, M

    1990-01-01

    HLA antigens in 104 Japanese patients and 41 families with myasthenia gravis (MG) were investigated. The frequencies of DR9 and DRw13 were significantly increased in the patients who developed MG before 3 yr of age. The DQw3 antigen was positive for all the patients that developed MG before 15 yr with only one exception. All the examined cases that developed MG before 3 yr (including this DQw3 negative patient) had the same DQA and DQB DNA restriction fragments. These HLA frequencies decreased as the age of onset increased, and no significant association was observed in adult-onset MG. No patients had B8, DR3, and DQw2. The relative risk was higher for the DR9/DRw13 heterozygotes (37.4) than for DR9 (16.4) or DRw13 (7.1) in the childhood-onset MG. Statistical analysis suggested that DR9 and DRw13 (or DQw1 and DQw3) act synergistically in the disease development. Family study revealed diverse DR9 haplotypes. The most frequent DRw13 haplotype was Bw44-BFF-C4A3B1-DRw13-DQw1, which may be evolutionarily related to the caucasian B8-DR3-DQw2 haplotype. These results showed that MG in early childhood in Japanese individuals is genetically different from that in adulthood and that in caucasians. Images PMID:1974553

  8. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I restricted epitope discovery in yellow fewer and dengue viruses: importance of HLA binding strength.

    PubMed

    Lund, Ole; Nascimento, Eduardo J M; Maciel, Milton; Nielsen, Morten; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Lundegaard, Claus; Harndahl, Mikkel; Lamberth, Kasper; Buus, Søren; Salmon, Jérôme; August, Thomas J; Marques, Ernesto T A

    2011-01-01

    Epitopes from all available full-length sequences of yellow fever virus (YFV) and dengue fever virus (DENV) restricted by Human Leukocyte Antigen class I (HLA-I) alleles covering 12 HLA-I supertypes were predicted using the NetCTL algorithm. A subset of 179 predicted YFV and 158 predicted DENV epitopes were selected using the EpiSelect algorithm to allow for optimal coverage of viral strains. The selected predicted epitopes were synthesized and approximately 75% were found to bind the predicted restricting HLA molecule with an affinity, K(D), stronger than 500 nM. The immunogenicity of 25 HLA-A*02:01, 28 HLA-A*24:02 and 28 HLA-B*07:02 binding peptides was tested in three HLA-transgenic mice models and led to the identification of 17 HLA-A*02:01, 4 HLA-A*2402 and 4 HLA-B*07:02 immunogenic peptides. The immunogenic peptides bound HLA significantly stronger than the non-immunogenic peptides. All except one of the immunogenic peptides had K(D) below 100 nM and the peptides with K(D) below 5 nM were more likely to be immunogenic. In addition, all the immunogenic peptides that were identified as having a high functional avidity had K(D) below 20 nM. A*02:01 transgenic mice were also inoculated twice with the 17DD YFV vaccine strain. Three of the YFV A*02:01 restricted peptides activated T-cells from the infected mice in vitro. All three peptides that elicited responses had an HLA binding affinity of 2 nM or less. The results indicate the importance of the strength of HLA binding in shaping the immune response.

  9. Clinical implication of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-F expression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Harada, Aya; Ishigami, Sumiya; Kijima, Yuko; Nakajo, Akihiro; Arigami, Takaaki; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Kita, Yoshiaki; Yoshinaka, Heiji; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2015-11-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-F is one of the non-classical HLA class I molecules that protects the fetus in pregnancy. HLA-F expression was immunohistochemically examined and the association between clinical parameters and HLA-F expression was analyzed. Cancerous HLA-F and stromal HLA-F-positive infiltrating cells were detected in 91 (40.0%) and 186 (81.6%) cases, respectively. HLA-F positivity in cancer cells was significantly associated with tumor size (P < 0.05). There was a weak correlation between HLA-F positivity of cancer cells and HLA-F positive infiltrative cells (P < 0.01, r = 0.11). HLA-F positivity did not affect patients' survival in 209 breast cancer. However, confined to stage II breast cancer, the HLA-F positive group showed significantly poorer outcomes than the HLA-F negative group (P < 0.05). The present study provides the first evidence that HLA-F positivity in breast carcinoma affects clinicopathological factors and could be selected as a prognostic marker for limited clinical stage.

  10. Improved Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying HLA Class I Antigen Presentation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Man; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Jie; Wei, Xundong; Phiwpan, Krung; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhou, Xuyu

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I (HLA-I) transgenic mice have proven to be useful models for studying human MHC-related immune responses over the last two decades. However, differences in the processing and presentation machinery between humans and mice may have profound effects on HLA-I restricted antigen presentation. In this study, we generated a novel human TAP-LMP (hTAP-LMP) gene cluster transgenic mouse model carrying an intact human TAP complex and two human immunoproteasome LMP subunits, PSMB8/PSMB9. By crossing the hTAP-LMP strain with different HLA-I transgenic mice, we found that the expression levels of human HLA-I molecules, especially the A3 supertype members (e.g., A11 and A33), were remarkably enhanced in corresponding HLA-I/hTAP-LMP transgenic mice. Moreover, we found that humanized processing and presentation machinery increased antigen presentation of HLA-A11-restricted epitopes and promoted the rapid reduction of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in HLA-A11/hTAP-LMP mice. Together, our study highlights that HLA-I/hTAP-LMP mice are an improved model for studying antigen presentation of HLA-I molecules and their related CTL responses. PMID:27634283

  11. Improved Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying HLA Class I Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Man; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Jie; Wei, Xundong; Phiwpan, Krung; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhou, Xuyu

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I (HLA-I) transgenic mice have proven to be useful models for studying human MHC-related immune responses over the last two decades. However, differences in the processing and presentation machinery between humans and mice may have profound effects on HLA-I restricted antigen presentation. In this study, we generated a novel human TAP-LMP (hTAP-LMP) gene cluster transgenic mouse model carrying an intact human TAP complex and two human immunoproteasome LMP subunits, PSMB8/PSMB9. By crossing the hTAP-LMP strain with different HLA-I transgenic mice, we found that the expression levels of human HLA-I molecules, especially the A3 supertype members (e.g., A11 and A33), were remarkably enhanced in corresponding HLA-I/hTAP-LMP transgenic mice. Moreover, we found that humanized processing and presentation machinery increased antigen presentation of HLA-A11-restricted epitopes and promoted the rapid reduction of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in HLA-A11/hTAP-LMP mice. Together, our study highlights that HLA-I/hTAP-LMP mice are an improved model for studying antigen presentation of HLA-I molecules and their related CTL responses. PMID:27634283

  12. The T cell response of HLA-DR transgenic mice to human myelin basic protein and other antigens in the presence and absence of human CD4

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of HLA class II transgenic mice has progressed in recent years from analysis of single chain HLA class II transgenes with expression of mixed mouse/human heterodimers to double transgenic mice expressing normal human heterodimers. Previous studies have used either HLA transgenic mice in which there is a species-matched interaction with CD4 or mice which lack this interaction. Since both systems are reported to generate HLA-restricted responses, the matter of the requirement for species-matched CD4 remains unclear. We have generated triple transgenic mice expressing three human transgenes, DRA, DRB, and CD4, and compared HLA-restricted responses to peptide between human- CD4+ (Hu-CD4+) and Hu-CD4- littermates. We saw no difference between Hu- CD4+ and Hu-CD4- groups, supporting the notion that for some responses at least the requirement for species-matched CD4 may not be absolute. Evidence for positive selection of mouse T cell receptors in HLA-DR transgenic mice came both from the acquisition of new, HLA-restricted responses to various peptides and from an increased frequency of T cells using the TCR V beta 4 gene segment. An important goal with respect to the analysis of function in HLA transgenic mice is the clarification of mechanisms which underpin the recognition of self- antigens in human autoimmune disease. As a first step towards 'humanized' disease models in HLA transgenic mice, we analyzed the responses of HLA-DR transgenic mice to the human MPB 139-154 peptide which has been implicated as an epitope recognized by T cells of multiple sclerosis patients. We obtained T cell responses to this epitope in transgenic mice but not in nontransgenic controls. This study suggests that HLA transgenic mice will be valuable in the analysis of HLA-restricted T cell epitopes implicated in human disease and possibly in the design of new disease models. PMID:7532684

  13. HLA-antigen frequencies in patients with a Plummer-Vinson stricture.

    PubMed

    Middleton, D; Logan, J S; Magennis, B P; Nelson, S D

    1978-09-01

    Factors of individual susceptibility seem to be involved in the occurrence of Plummer-Vinson stricture, which is a permanent stricture of the cervical esophagus associated with long continued iron deficiency. Fifty female patients with Plummer-Vinson stricture were HLA typed and the antigen frequencies were compared with those of 75 female blood donors from the same geographic area and of the same race. A comparison was also made with the HLA antigen frequencies of a group of 200 blood donors (75 female and 125 male). There were no statistically significant differences in the HLA antigen distributions of the three groups.

  14. HLA-DR antigens in normal, inflammatory, and neoplastic salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Zarbo, R J; Regezi, J A; Lloyd, R V; Crissman, J D; Batsakis, J G

    1987-11-01

    A monoclonal antibody to HLA-DR antigens that is reactive in formalin-fixed tissues was used with the immunoperoxidase method to evaluate 212 salivary gland lesions (normal, nonspecific, and autoimmune inflammatory, benign, and malignant tumors). Results of immunostaining showed that (1) intercalated ducts, myoepithelial cells, and acinous cells of normal salivary glands express HLA-DR antigens, (2) autoimmune salivary gland disease results in greater HLA-DR expression than that seen in nonspecific inflammatory lesions or normal glands, (3) stromal cells associated with benign and malignant salivary gland tumors express HLA-DR antigens, and (4) numerous benign and malignant salivary gland tumors express HLA-DR antigens. It was of interest that lymphocyte-rich Warthin's tumors displayed epithelial immunoreactivity, whereas oncocytomas devoid of a lymphocytic component were invariably negative. This suggests a lymphocyte-mediated role in salivary epithelial HLA-DR expression. It appears that HLA-DR expression is both a normal and an inducible phenomenon in salivary glands, salivary gland neoplasia, and the desmoplastic host response. There is no discriminatory role in the immunologic detection of HLA-DR for differential diagnosis of salivary gland tumors.

  15. Influence of HLA matching and blood-transfusion on outcome of 502 London Transplant Group renal-graft recipients.

    PubMed

    Festenstein, H; Sachs, J A; Pegrum, G D; Moorhead, J F; Paris, A M

    1976-01-24

    The outcome of 502 cadaver kidney transplants has been followed for up to six years; these grafts were arranged through the Tissue Immunology Unit of the London Hospital Medical College, the coordinating centre of the London Transplant Group. An analysis of HLA (A and B) recepient-donor matching revealed, as in previous analyses, clear differences (now highly significant) between the best as compared with the lesser matched recipients. A quarter of the patients (group 4 and 3a) had a superior outcome 20-30% greater than poorly matched (2 or less group) which constituted 53% of individuals. The results in the 3b group (28% of patients) were intermediate 10-15% better than the "2 or less antigens in common" group. A small number of recipients mostly 4 or 3 matched who were retrospectively HLA-D matched showed an even better graft survival. The effect of blood-transfusion before transplantation was studied and found to improve the outlook especially in the best-matched groups. No difference was apparent between those receiving less or more than ten units except in a group of patients with cytotoxic antibodies and/or retransplants. This "immunocompetent-presensitised" group had the best outcome provided these recipients had few transfusions and were subsequently well matched. These findings emphasise the continued need for successful collaborative associations, so that improved matching can be achieved which if universally applied would ensure better graft survival for a large number of patients in renal failure.

  16. Simulation shows that HLA-matched stem cell donors can remain unidentified in donor searches.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Jürgen; Solloch, Ute V; Giani, Anette S; Hofmann, Jan A; Schmidt, Alexander H

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneous nature of HLA information in real-life stem cell donor registries may hamper unrelated donor searches. It is even possible that fully HLA-matched donors with incomplete HLA information are not identified. In our simulation study, we estimated the probability of these unnecessarily failed donor searches. For that purpose, we carried out donor searches in several virtual donor registries. The registries differed by size, composition with respect to HLA typing levels, and genetic diversity. When up to three virtual HLA typing requests were allowed within donor searches, the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches ranged from 1.19% to 4.13%, thus indicating that non-identification of completely HLA-matched stem cell donors is a problem of practical relevance. The following donor registry characteristics were positively correlated with the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches: large registry size, high genetic diversity, and, most strongly correlated, large fraction of registered donors with incomplete HLA typing. Increasing the number of virtual HLA typing requests within donor searches up to ten had a smaller effect. It follows that the problem of donor non-identification can be substantially reduced by complete high-resolution HLA typing of potential donors.

  17. Simulation shows that HLA-matched stem cell donors can remain unidentified in donor searches

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Jürgen; Solloch, Ute V.; Giani, Anette S.; Hofmann, Jan A.; Schmidt, Alexander H.

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneous nature of HLA information in real-life stem cell donor registries may hamper unrelated donor searches. It is even possible that fully HLA-matched donors with incomplete HLA information are not identified. In our simulation study, we estimated the probability of these unnecessarily failed donor searches. For that purpose, we carried out donor searches in several virtual donor registries. The registries differed by size, composition with respect to HLA typing levels, and genetic diversity. When up to three virtual HLA typing requests were allowed within donor searches, the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches ranged from 1.19% to 4.13%, thus indicating that non-identification of completely HLA-matched stem cell donors is a problem of practical relevance. The following donor registry characteristics were positively correlated with the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches: large registry size, high genetic diversity, and, most strongly correlated, large fraction of registered donors with incomplete HLA typing. Increasing the number of virtual HLA typing requests within donor searches up to ten had a smaller effect. It follows that the problem of donor non-identification can be substantially reduced by complete high-resolution HLA typing of potential donors. PMID:26876789

  18. A comparative reference study for the validation of HLA-matching algorithms in the search for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell donors and cord blood units.

    PubMed

    Bochtler, W; Gragert, L; Patel, Z I; Robinson, J; Steiner, D; Hofmann, J A; Pingel, J; Baouz, A; Melis, A; Schneider, J; Eberhard, H-P; Oudshoorn, M; Marsh, S G E; Maiers, M; Müller, C R

    2016-06-01

    The accuracy of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matching algorithms is a prerequisite for the correct and efficient identification of optimal unrelated donors for patients requiring hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The goal of this World Marrow Donor Association study was to validate established matching algorithms from different international donor registries by challenging them with simulated input data and subsequently comparing the output. This experiment addressed three specific aspects of HLA matching using different data sets for tasks of increasing complexity. The first two tasks targeted the traditional matching approach identifying discrepancies between patient and donor HLA genotypes by counting antigen and allele differences. Contemporary matching procedures predicting the probability for HLA identity using haplotype frequencies were addressed by the third task. In each task, the identified disparities between the results of the participating computer programs were analyzed, classified and quantified. This study led to a deep understanding of the algorithms participating and finally produced virtually identical results. The unresolved discrepancies total to less than 1%, 4% and 2% for the three tasks and are mostly because of individual decisions in the design of the programs. Based on these findings, reference results for the three input data sets were compiled that can be used to validate future matching algorithms and thus improve the quality of the global donor search process. PMID:27219013

  19. Role of HLA antigens in Rh (D) alloimmunized pregnant women from Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, U Shankar; Ghosh, K; Gupte, S S; Gupte, S C; Mohanty, D

    2002-03-01

    Immunogenetic studies in various diseases provide potential genetic markers. We have studied the incidence of HLA A, B, C, DR and DQ loci antigen in Rh (D) antigen isoimmunized mothers compared to those nonimmunized isoimmunized Rh negative mothers. Seventy six mothers who were immunized to Rh (D) antigen due to pregnancy (responders) and fifty four mothers who did not develop Rh (D) isoimmunization despite positive pregnancies (nonresponders) were selected for the study. Standard methods of serological HLA typing, ABO and Rh (D) groups, and screening for Rh D antibodies were used. 392 unrelated individuals from the population were compared as controls. In addition 45 unrelated individuals from the same population were typed for HLA DRB and DQB gene using PCR-SSP kits. The genotype frequencies of HLA A2, A3, A28, B13, B17, B35, B52, B60, Cw2, Cw6, DR4, and DQ3 were significantly increased, while the frequencies of the HLA A11, A29, A31, B7, B37, B51, Cw1 and DR9 were decreased in the responder women when compared to the non-responder women. HLA A30 (19) split antigen was not identified in immunized women while HLA A23 (9) split antigen was not identified in non immunized women. HLA A3, B17, Cw2 and DR4 showed a significant relative risk among the immunized responder women. When compared with Rh immunized women (responders) reported from USA, England and Hungary the phenotype frequencies of HLA A11, A24, A28, B5, B17, B40, DR2 and DR5 were increased while HLA A23, B8, B18, and DR6 were decreased in the Indian Rh immunized women. Two locus haplotype frequency analysis observed among the responders women revealed that among the significant haplotypes expressed A2-B5, B7-Cw1, DR2-DQ1 were highly significant haplotypes in positive linkage, while A1-B5, and A1-B7 were in significant negative linkage disequilibrium. The haplotype frequencies were

  20. Nucleotide sequence analysis of HLA-B*1523 and B*8101. Dominant alpha-helical motifs produce complex serologic recognition patterns for the HLA-B"DT" and HLA-B"NM5" antigens.

    PubMed

    Ellexson, M E; Zhang, G; Stewart, D; Lau, M; Teresi, G; Terasaki, P; Roe, B; Hildebrand, W

    1995-10-01

    Assigning a precise serologic specificity to the class I HLA-B"NM5" and HLA-B"DT" molecules has proven difficult, with patterns of serologic cross-reactivity suggesting that NM5 is most like antigens in the B5 CREG and that DT is either B7 or B40 like. To better understand the relationship these antigens share with other HLA-B molecules we determined the nucleotide sequence of the alleles encoding HLA-B"NM5" and HLA-B"DT". Sequencing results show that NM5 shares the most overall sequence homology with the B70 antigens and that differences at the alpha-helical Bw4/Bw6 epitope preclude serologic cross-reactivity between NM5 and the B70 antigens. Accordingly, NM5 has been assigned the name B*1523. The strong serologic impact of helical sequence conservations and variations is reiterated for the class I HLA-B"DT" molecule. Comparative analysis demonstrates that sequence conservations in the first domain's alpha-helix stimulate cross-reactivity between HLA-B"DT" and HLA-B7, whereas epitopes conserved in the second domain's alpha-helix impel cross-reactivity between HLA-B"DT" and HLA-B48. To convey the unique lineage of this hybrid B7/B48 molecule the name HLA-B*8101 has been assigned to HLA-B"DT".

  1. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) pharmacogenomic tests: potential and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ann K

    2014-02-01

    Adverse drug reactions involving a range of prescribed drugs and affecting the skin, liver and other organs show strong associations with particular HLA alleles. For some reactions, HLA typing prior to prescription, so that those positive for the risk allele are not given the drug associated with the reaction, shows high positive and negative predictive values. The best example of clinical implementation relates to the hypersensitivity reaction induced by the anti-HIV drug abacavir. When this reaction is phenotyped accurately, 100% of those who develop it are positive for HLA-B*57:01. Drug regulators worldwide now recommend genotyping for HLA-B*57:01 before abacavir is prescribed. Serious skin rashes including Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrosis can be induced by carbamazepine and other anticonvulsant drugs. In certain East Asians, these reactions are significantly associated with HLA-B*15:02, and typing for this allele is now recommended prior to carbamazepine prescription in these populations. Other HLA associations have been described for skin rash induced by carbamazepine, allopurinol and nevirapine and for liver injury induced by flucloxacillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, lapatanib, lumiracoxib and ticlopidine. However, the predictive values for typing HLA alleles associated with these adverse reactions are lower. Clinical implementation therefore seems unlikely. Performing HLA typing is relatively complex compared with genotyping assays for single nucleotide polymorphisms. With emphasis on HLA-B*57:01, the approaches used commonly, including use of sequence-specific oligonucleotide PCR primers and DNA sequencing are considered, together with their successful implementation. Genotyping single nucleotide polymorphisms tagging HLA alleles is a simpler alternative to HLA typing but appears insufficiently accurate for clinical use.

  2. Predominance of histocompatibility antigen HL-A8 in patients with gluten-sensitive enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Falchuk, Z. Myron; Rogentine, G. Nicholas; Strober, Warren

    1972-01-01

    HL-A phenotypes were determined in 24 unrelated patients with gluten-sensitive enteropathy (GSE) using a lymphocyte microcytotoxicity test. 21 of the 24 patients had HL-A8 in the second segregant series, a frequency of 0.875. In contrast, the HL-A8 frequency in 200 normal individuals was 0.215 (difference significant at P < 0.002), and in 6 patients with villous atrophy due to tropical sprue or hypogammaglobulinemia the HL-A8 frequency was 0.17 (difference from normal not significant). The HL-A types in the families of three HL-A8 positive patients with GSE indicated that the HL-A8 antigen was inherited as an autosomal dominant. Frequencies of the other HL-A antigens in the GSE group did not differ significantly from that of the normal group. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis that GSE is due to the presence of an abnormal “immune response (Ir) gene,” leading to the production of pathogenic antigluten antibody or, alternatively, to the presence of a particular membrane configuration leading to the binding of gluten to epithelial cells with subsequent tissue damage. PMID:5024049

  3. HLA-A and -B antigens and larynx carcinoma in Greeks.

    PubMed

    Theocharis, S; Konstantopoulos, K; Bannis, K; Zervas, J

    1997-01-01

    The frequency of HLA antigens in 30 Greek larynx carcinoma patients was more prominent for the A21, A28 and B17 antigens compared to 400 healthy unrelated controls from the same population. It is suggested that immunogenetic factors may contribute to the pathogenesis of this neoplasia.

  4. Serum antibodies to human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-E, HLA-F and HLA-G in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) during disease flares: Clinical relevance of HLA-F autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Jucaud, V; Ravindranath, M H; Terasaki, P I; Morales-Buenrostro, L E; Hiepe, F; Rose, T; Biesen, R

    2016-03-01

    T lymphocyte hyperactivity and progressive inflammation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients results in over-expression of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-Ib on the surface of lymphocytes. These are shed into the circulation upon inflammation, and may augment production of antibodies promoting pathogenicity of the disease. The objective was to evaluate the association of HLA-Ib (HLA-E, HLA-F and HLA-G) antibodies to the disease activity of SLE. The immunoglobulin (Ig)G/IgM reactivity to HLA-Ib and β2m in the sera of 69 German, 29 Mexican female SLE patients and 17 German female controls was measured by multiplex Luminex(®)-based flow cytometry. The values were expressed as mean flourescence intensity (MFI). Only the German SLE cohort was analysed in relation to the clinical disease activity. In the controls, anti-HLA-G IgG predominated over other HLA-Ib antibodies, whereas SLE patients had a preponderance of anti-HLA-F IgG over the other HLA-Ib antibodies. The disease activity index, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI)-2000, was reflected only in the levels of anti-HLA-F IgG. Anti-HLA-F IgG with MFI level of 500-1999 was associated with active SLE, whereas inactive SLE revealed higher MFI (>2000). When anti-HLA-F IgG were cross-reactive with other HLA-Ib alleles, their reactivity was reflected in the levels of anti-HLA-E and -G IgG. The prevalence of HLA-F-monospecific antibodies in SLE patients was also associated with the clinical disease activity. Anti-HLA-F IgG is possibly involved in the clearance of HLA-F shed from lymphocytes and inflamed tissues to lessen the disease's severity, and thus emerges as a beneficial immune biomarker. Therefore, anti-HLA-Ib IgG should be considered as a biomarker in standard SLE diagnostics.

  5. Mutant HLA-A2 antigens as restricting elements for virus-specific cytotoxic T cells.

    PubMed

    Gaston, J S; Wallace, L E; Rickinson, A B; Epstein, M A; Pious, D

    1984-01-01

    Mutants of the EB virus-transformed cell line T5-1 (HLA-A1, 2; B8, 27), bearing well-characterized alterations in HLA-A2 antigen expression and unable to bind the HLA-A2-specific monoclonal antibody BB7.2, have been tested for their susceptibility to EB virus-specific cytolysis using effector T-cell preparations functionally restricted through relevant HLA antigens. Initial experiments first confirmed that the parent line T5-1 was susceptible to cytolysis by both "common" A2-restricted and B27-restricted effector cells. While those T5-1 mutants with little or no surface A2 expression were not lysed by A2-restricted effectors, those targets with quantitatively normal expression of mutant A2 molecules were as susceptible to A2-restricted lysis as the parent line itself. In contrast, all the T5-1 mutant lines were susceptible to B27-restricted cytolysis. The results demonstrate that experimentally induced mutations of HLA-A2 antigen structure, affecting a serologically defined site on the molecule, can occur without altering that same molecule's expression of the T cell-restricting determinant(s). Such experimentally induced mutations are quite different from the naturally occurring "variant" A2 antigens which are present within the serologically defined A2 antigen group and which show changes at the T cell-restricting site. PMID:6329950

  6. HLA antigens in Spanish type 1 diabetic population. Correlations with clinical, biological and autoimmune markers.

    PubMed

    Goday, A; Motaña, E; Ercilla, G; Fernandez, J; Gomis, R; Vilardell, E

    1990-01-01

    The HLA haplotype and its relationships with clinical, biological and immunological parameters were analyzed in a group of 87 Spanish type 1 diabetic patients at the clinical onset of the disease. The frequency of HLA-B18, DR3 and DR4 antigens was significantly increased whereas DR2, DR5 and DR7 were decreased in comparison with 189 healthy unrelated controls without family history of diabetes. DR3 showed a maximum relative risk for diabetes (5.5) whereas DR4 had a lower one (4.0). HLA-DR4 patients were younger at the time of diagnosis than DR4 negative (16.7 vs 21.4 years). We found no statistically significant relationship between HLA antigens and the other variables studied including the presence of islet cell antibodies, complement fixing islet cell antibodies, insulin autoantibodies, organ-specific antibodies, fasting and maximal glucagon stimulated C-peptide levels, initial glycemia and glycosylated hemoglobin.

  7. The impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) micropolymorphism on ligand specificity within the HLA-B*41 allotypic family

    SciTech Connect

    Bade-Döding, Christina; Theodossis, Alex; Gras, Stephanie; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Eiz-Vesper, Britta; Seltsam, Axel; Huyton, Trevor; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James; Blasczyk, Rainer

    2011-09-28

    Polymorphic differences between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules affect the specificity and conformation of their bound peptides and lead to differential selection of the T-cell repertoire. Mismatching during allogeneic transplantation can, therefore, lead to immunological reactions. We investigated the structure-function relationships of six members of the HLA-B*41 allelic group that differ by six polymorphic amino acids, including positions 80, 95, 97 and 114 within the antigen-binding cleft. Peptide-binding motifs for B*41:01, *41:02, *41:03, *41:04, *41:05 and *41:06 were determined by sequencing self-peptides from recombinant B*41 molecules by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The crystal structures of HLA-B*41:03 bound to a natural 16-mer self-ligand (AEMYGSVTEHPSPSPL) and HLA-B*41:04 bound to a natural 11-mer self-ligand (HEEAVSVDRVL) were solved. Peptide analysis revealed that all B*41 alleles have an identical anchor motif at peptide position 2 (glutamic acid), but differ in their choice of C-terminal p{Omega} anchor (proline, valine, leucine). Additionally, B*41:04 displayed a greater preference for long peptides (>10 residues) when compared to the other B*41 allomorphs, while the longest peptide to be eluted from the allelic group (a 16mer) was obtained from B*41:03. The crystal structures of HLA-B*41:03 and HLA-B*41:04 revealed that both alleles interact in a highly conserved manner with the terminal regions of their respective ligands, while micropolymorphism-induced changes in the steric and electrostatic properties of the antigen-binding cleft account for differences in peptide repertoire and auxiliary anchoring. Differences in peptide repertoire, and peptide length specificity reflect the significant functional evolution of these closely related allotypes and signal their importance in allogeneic transplantation, especially B*41:03 and B*41:04, which accommodate longer peptides, creating structurally distinct peptide-HLA

  8. Increased frequency of HLA B17 antigen in girls with Turner syndrome and their fathers.

    PubMed

    Dacou-Voutetakis, C; Georgopoulos, N; Pappa, H; Vlachos, K; Tarassi, K; Chryssovergi, D; Papasteriades, C

    1993-12-01

    HLA-A, -B and -DR antigen distribution was studied in 49 girls with Turner Syndrome (TS), in 43 of their parents, as well as in 433 controls. No increased frequency of DR3, DR4 was found in our group. However, an increased frequency of HLA B17 antigen was disclosed (18.3% in TS versus 6.4% in the controls, p < 0.001 and pc < 0.01). Furthermore, the HLA B17 antigen was of paternal origin in 77.7% of the cases. The interpretation of the present findings is quite difficult. Most likely, the findings are related to the chromosomal abnormality rather than to autoimmunity. It is quite possible that genes within the region of class I genes create unfavorable circumstances leading to the loss of the sex chromosome or, alternatively, genes in this region confer protection and prevent miscarriage of the affected fetus.

  9. The role of HLA-DR antigens in PPD-stimulated lymphocyte-monocyte interactions.

    PubMed

    Haar, D; Heron, I

    1982-11-01

    Autologous monocytes are required for an optimal lymphocyte proliferative response to purified protein derivate of tuberculin (PPD) in vitro and for a mixed lymphocyte culture induced by alloantigens. In the proliferative response to PPD we found that autologous monocytes could be replaced with HLA-DR-compatible monocytes and partly with HLA-DR semi-identical. In spite of a statistically significant difference between autologous and HLA-DR disparate monocytes in their cooperative capacity with PPD-stimulated lymphocytes, replacement in nearly one third of the cases was possible. These findings were supported by more detailed studies in which increasing numbers of allogenic and autologous monocytes were added to the isolated lymphocytes in the presence of PPD. It is concluded that the serologically defined HLA-DR antigens alone give insufficient information of the restriction elements controlling the PPD-stimulated lymphocyte-monocyte interactions. PMID:6184773

  10. Comparison of Outcomes of HLA-Matched Related, Unrelated, or HLA-Haploidentical Related Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation following Nonmyeloablative Conditioning for Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, Lauri M.; O’Donnell, Paul V.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Storer, Barry E.; Luznik, Leo; Symons, Heather J.; Jones, Richard J.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Maris, Michael B.; Blume, Karl G.; Niederwieser, Dietger W.; Bruno, Benedetto; Maziarz, Richard T.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Petersen, Finn B.; Storb, Rainer; Fuchs, Ephraim J.; Maloney, David G.

    2008-01-01

    We compared the outcome of nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) based on donor cell source. Ninety patients with HL were treated with nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by HCT from HLA-matched related, n = 38, unrelated, n = 24, or HLA-haploidentical related, n = 28 donors. Patients were heavily pretreated with a median of 5 regimens and most patients had failed autologous HCT (92%) and local radiation therapy (83%). With a median follow-up of 25 months, 2-year overall survivals, progression-free survivals (OS)/(PFS), and incidences of relapsed/progressive disease were 53%, 23%, and 56% (HLA-matched related), 58%, 29%, and 63% (unrelated), and 58%, 51%, and 40% (HLA-haploidentical related), respectively. Nonrelapse mortality (NRM) was significantly lower for HLA-haploidentical related (P =.02) recipients compared to HLA-matched related recipients. There were also significantly decreased risks of relapse for HLA-haploidentical related recipients compared to HLA-matched related (P = .01) and unrelated (P = .03) recipients. The incidences of acute grades III–IV and extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD, cGVHD) were 16%/50% (HLA-matched related), 8%/63% (unrelated), and 11%/35% (HLA-haploidentical related). These data suggested that salvage allogeneic HCTusing nonmyeloablative conditioning provided antitumor activity in patients with advanced HL; however, disease relapse/progression continued to be major problems. Importantly, alternative donor stem cell sources are a viable option. PMID:18940683

  11. Suppression of allo-human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies secreted by B memory cells in vitro: intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) versus a monoclonal anti-HLA-E IgG that mimics HLA-I reactivities of IVIg

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, D; Ravindranath, M H; Terasaki, P I; Miyazaki, T; Pham, T; Jucaud, V

    2014-01-01

    B memory cells remain in circulation and secrete alloantibodies without antigen exposure > 20 years after alloimmunization postpartum or by transplantation. These long-lived B cells are resistant to cytostatic drugs. Therapeutically, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is administered to reduce allo-human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies pre- and post-transplantation, but the mechanism of reduction remains unclear. Recently, we reported that IVIg reacts with several HLA-I alleles and the HLA reactivity of IVIg is lost after its HLA-E reactivity is adsorbed out. Therefore, we have generated an anti-HLA-E monoclonal antibody that mimics the HLA-reactivity of IVIg to investigate whether this antibody suppresses IgG secretion, as does IVIg. B cells were purified from the blood of a woman in whose blood the B memory cells remained without antigen exposure > 20 years after postpartum alloimmunization. The B cells were stimulated with cytokines using a well-defined culture system. The anti-HLA-E monoclonal antibody (mAb) significantly suppressed the allo-HLA class-II IgG produced by the B cells, and that this suppression was far superior to that by IVIg. These findings were confirmed with HLA-I antibody secreted by the immortalized B cell line, developed from the blood of another alloimmunized woman. The binding affinity of the anti-HLA-E mAb for peptide sequences shared (i.e. shared epitopes) between HLA-E and other β2-microglobulin-free HLA heavy chains (open conformers) on the cell surface of B cells may act as a ligand and signal suppression of IgG production of activated B memory cells. We propose that anti-HLA-E monoclonal antibody may also be useful to suppress allo-HLA IgG production in vivo. PMID:24611451

  12. Prevalence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DRB1 alleles in Kuwaiti children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Alsaeid, Khaled; Haider, M Z; Kamal, H; Srivastva, B S; Ayoub, E M

    2002-02-01

    The prevalence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DR alleles has been determined in 69 Kuwaiti Arab children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) and compared to that in 212 ethnically matched normal healthy controls using a PCR-sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP) method. A very high incidence of DR3 was detected in JRA patients compared to the controls (P < 0.0001, RR = 2.235). The high incidence of HLA-DR3 in JRA patients was accounted for mainly by an excess of DRB1*0307 (P < 0.05, RR = 3.072) and DRB1*0308 (P < 0.009, RR = 2.663) compared to the controls. Moreover, DR3 was more prevalent when patients with ANA-positive JRA were analysed separately; 73% compared to 58% for the whole JRA patient group. The frequency of DR1 was also higher in the JRA group compared to controls (P = 0.019, RR = 3.585). Although the incidence of some alleles was higher in the control group (DR13 and DR7), none reached a statistically significant level. All the patients with iridocyclitis had either a DR1 or DR3 allele, except for one child. The frequency of DRB1*03 was found to be much higher in the polyarticular subtype of Kuwaiti JRA cases compared to the oligoarticular subgroup and the controls. Also, a non-significant increase in the frequency of the DRB1*04, *11 and *15 alleles was detected in the polyarticular subtype of the Kuwaiti JRA cases compared to the controls.

  13. BSHI Guideline: HLA matching and donor selection for haematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Little, A-M; Green, A; Harvey, J; Hemmatpour, S; Latham, K; Marsh, S G E; Poulton, K; Sage, D

    2016-10-01

    A review of the British Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics (BSHI) "Guideline for selection and HLA matching of related, adult unrelated donors and umbilical cord units for haematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation" was undertaken by a BSHI appointed writing committee. Literature searches were performed, and the data extracted were presented as recommendations according to the GRADE nomenclature. PMID:27503599

  14. Islet cell hyperexpression of HLA class I antigens: a defining feature in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Calvo, Teresa; Gerling, Ivan C.; Mathews, Clayton E.; Kaddis, John S.; Russell, Mark A.; Zeissler, Marie; Leete, Pia; Krogvold, Lars; Dahl-Jørgensen, Knut; von Herrath, Matthias; Pugliese, Alberto; Atkinson, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Human pancreatic beta cells may be complicit in their own demise in type 1 diabetes, but how this occurs remains unclear. One potentially contributing factor is hyperexpression of HLA class I antigens. This was first described approximately 30 years ago, but has never been fully characterised and was recently challenged as artefactual. Therefore, we investigated HLA class I expression at the protein and RNA levels in pancreases from three cohorts of patients with type 1 diabetes. The principal aims were to consider whether HLA class I hyperexpression is artefactual and, if not, to determine the factors driving it. Methods Pancreas samples from type 1 diabetes patients with residual insulin-containing islets (n = 26) from the Network for Pancreatic Organ donors with Diabetes (nPOD), Diabetes Virus Detection study (DiViD) and UK recent-onset type 1 diabetes collections were immunostained for HLA class I isoforms, signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), NLR family CARD domain containing 5 (NLRC5) and islet hormones. RNA was extracted from islets isolated by laser-capture microdissection from nPOD and DiViD samples and analysed using gene-expression arrays. Results Hyperexpression of HLA class I was observed in the insulin-containing islets of type 1 diabetes patients from all three tissue collections, and was confirmed at both the RNA and protein levels. The expression of β2-microglobulin (a second component required for the generation of functional HLA class I complexes) was also elevated. Both ‘classical’ HLA class I isoforms (i.e. HLA-ABC) as well as a ‘non-classical’ HLA molecule, HLA-F, were hyperexpressed in insulin-containing islets. This hyperexpression did not correlate with detectable upregulation of the transcriptional regulator NLRC5. However, it was strongly associated with increased STAT1 expression in all three cohorts. Islet hyperexpression of HLA class I molecules occurred in the insulin-containing islets

  15. Effect of HLA matching and cyclosporine A in renal transplantation. ANZDATA Registry.

    PubMed

    Disney, A P

    1986-01-01

    1. Graft survival rates increased significantly in primary and second cadaver transplants as well as in one-haplotype matched living related donor renal allografts treated with CsA. 2. HLA mismatching did not seem to influence survival of primary cadaver grafts in transfused recipients. 3. No pertinent analysis was available owing to the small size of the group of nontransfused patients. 4. HLA mismatching did not appear to influence survival of second cadaver grafts in CsA-treated patients; the number of patients was small. 5. Graft survival of living donor grafts was not influenced by haplotype identity.

  16. Primary in vitro generation of cytotoxic cells specific for human minor histocompatibility antigens between HLA-identical siblings.

    PubMed

    Tekolf, W A; Shaw, S

    1984-04-01

    A limiting dilution culture system was developed for the primary in vitro detection of human minor histocompatibility antigens by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). CTL were generated in primary in vitro culture between two HLA-identical sibling pairs and propagated as stable CTL lines. Population and family studies indicate that these CTL lines recognize minor histocompatibility antigens in an HLA-restricted manner. The antigen recognized by one CTL line is detected on six (out of 37) HLA-B7-positive donors but not on 32 HLA-B7-negative donors. The cytotoxicity of this CTL line is mediated by T3+, T8+ effector cells. The antigen detected by this CTL population is different from all known human minor histocompatibility antigens. The data of this study, like those in the mouse system, suggest that a suppressor cell is diluted out in a limiting dilution culture, which allows the activation of the CTL precursors.

  17. Differential expression of HLA-DR antigens in subsets of human CFU-GM.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J D; Sabbath, K D; Herrmann, F; Larcom, P; Nichols, K; Kornacki, M; Levine, H; Cannistra, S A

    1985-10-01

    Expression of HLA-DR surface antigens by granulocyte/monocyte colony-forming cells (CFU-GM) may be important in the regulation of proliferation of these cells. Using immunological techniques to enrich for progenitor cells, we investigated the expression of HLA-DR in subsets of CFU-GM. "Early" (day 14) CFU-GM express higher levels of HLA-DR than do "late" (day 7) CFU-GM. Among late CFU-GM, cells destined to form monocyte (alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase-positive) colonies express higher levels of HLA-DR than do CFU-GM destined to form granulocyte (chloroacetate esterase-positive) colonies. Because high-level expression of DR antigen was a marker for monocyte differentiation, we examined several lymphokines for their effects on both DR expression and in vitro commitment to monocyte differentiation by myeloid precursor cells. DR antigen density could be increased by more than twofold over 48 hours upon exposure to gamma-interferon (gamma-IFN), whereas colony-stimulating factors had no effect. This was associated with a dose-dependent inhibition of total CFU-GM number, and a relative, but not absolute, increase in the ratio of monocyte colonies to granulocyte colonies. Similarly, in day 7 suspension cultures of purified myeloid precursor cells, gamma-IFN inhibited cell proliferation and increased the ratio of monocytes to granulocytes. Thus, despite the induction of high levels of HLA-DR antigen on precursor cells (a marker of monocyte commitment), the dominant in vitro effect of gamma-IFN was inhibition of granulocyte differentiation.

  18. Approach for Identifying Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-DR Bound Peptides from Scarce Clinical Samples.

    PubMed

    Heyder, Tina; Kohler, Maxie; Tarasova, Nataliya K; Haag, Sabrina; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Rivera, Natalia V; Sandin, Charlotta; Mia, Sohel; Malmström, Vivianne; Wheelock, Åsa M; Wahlström, Jan; Holmdahl, Rikard; Eklund, Anders; Zubarev, Roman A; Grunewald, Johan; Ytterberg, A Jimmy

    2016-09-01

    Immune-mediated diseases strongly associating with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles are likely linked to specific antigens. These antigens are presented to T cells in the form of peptides bound to HLA molecules on antigen presenting cells, e.g. dendritic cells, macrophages or B cells. The identification of HLA-DR-bound peptides presents a valuable tool to investigate the human immunopeptidome. The lung is likely a key player in the activation of potentially auto-aggressive T cells prior to entering target tissues and inducing autoimmune disease. This makes the lung of exceptional interest and presents an ideal paradigm to study the human immunopeptidome and to identify antigenic peptides.Our previous investigation of HLA-DR peptide presentation in the lung required high numbers of cells (800 × 10(6) bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells). Because BAL from healthy nonsmokers typically contains 10-15 × 10(6) cells, there is a need for a highly sensitive approach to study immunopeptides in the lungs of individual patients and controls.In this work, we analyzed the HLA-DR immunopeptidome in the lung by an optimized methodology to identify HLA-DR-bound peptides from low cell numbers. We used an Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) immortalized B cell line and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells obtained from patients with sarcoidosis, an inflammatory T cell driven disease mainly occurring in the lung. Specifically, membrane complexes were isolated prior to immunoprecipitation, eluted peptides were identified by nanoLC-MS/MS and processed using the in-house developed ClusterMHCII software. With the optimized procedure we were able to identify peptides from 10 × 10(6) cells, which on average correspond to 10.9 peptides/million cells in EBV-B cells and 9.4 peptides/million cells in BAL cells. This work presents an optimized approach designed to identify HLA-DR-bound peptides from low numbers of cells, enabling the investigation of the BAL immunopeptidome from individual patients

  19. Differential recognition of the serologically defined HLA-A2 antigen by allogeneic cytotoxic T cells. I. Population studies.

    PubMed

    Horai, S; van der Poel, J J; Goulmy, E

    1982-01-01

    Human alloimmune cytotoxic T cells, sensitized selectively against the HLA-A2 antigen, were tested on a panel of selected target cells. Five HLA-A2 positive outlier cells could be identified. These outlier cells were only weakly lysed by HLA-A2 specific CTLs, although they were serologically indistinguishable from the other HLA-A2 positive, strongly lysed target cells. Furthermore, it was found that the outlier cells were poor cold target inhibitors in contrast to the other HLA-A2 positive target cells, which showed adequate inhibition of specific lysis of HLA-A2 positive target cells. Population studies indicate that the frequency of such HLA-A2 outlier cells may be approximately 10%. PMID:6183196

  20. Hybrid genes between HLA-A2 and HLA-A3 constructed by in vivo recombination allow mapping of HLA-A2 and HLA-A3 polymorphic antigenic determinants.

    PubMed

    Sire, J; Chimini, G; Boretto, J; Toubert, A; Kahn-Perles, B; Layet, C; Sodoyer, R; Lemonnier, F; Jordan, B

    1988-04-01

    HLA-A2 and -A3 genes have been modified in their third exon (second domain) by using in vivo recombination. In this method Escherichia coli are transfected with a plasmid which contains two highly homologous sequences (e.g., the third exons of HLA-A2 and -A3) and has been linearized by cleavage between these two sequences. Circularization takes place in the bacteria by homologous recombination leading to hybrid A2-A3 sequences. The analysis by DNA sequencing of a number of such recombinants shows that they indeed occur by homologous recombination (no insertions or deletions) and that the probability of crossing over decreases as the distance from the free end of DNA in the homologous region increases. No double recombinants were observed. These hybrid exons were reinserted into either HLA-A2 or HLA-A3 genes, thus generating a panel of functional hybrid genes containing one or several HLA-A2 specific substitutions in an HLA-A3 background or vice versa. These genes were expressed by transfection into murine P815-high transfection efficiency recipient cells. Serologic analysis leads to the conclusion that expression of polymorphic antigenic determinants specific for HLA-A2 (detected with M58, A2A28M1, and CR11.351 mAb) is linked to the presence of threonine residue (amino acid (AA) 142) and/or histidine residue (AA 145) and valine residue (AA 152). The expression of specific HLA-A3 polymorphic determinants (recognized by GAP-A3 mAb) is correlated with the existence of a asparagine residue (AA 127) and a aspartic residue (AA 161). But aspartic residue 161 contributes with glutamic acid residue 152 in the formation of the A3 epitope recognized by the anti-A3 mAb X1.23.2. PMID:2450922

  1. Complex preimplantation genetic diagnosis for beta-thalassaemia, sideroblastic anaemia, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typing.

    PubMed

    Kakourou, Georgia; Vrettou, Christina; Kattamis, Antonis; Destouni, Aspasia; Poulou, Myrto; Moutafi, Maria; Kokkali, Georgia; Pantos, Konstantinos; Davies, Stephen; Kitsiou-Tzeli, Sophia; Kanavakis, Emmanuel; Traeger-Synodinos, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to select histocompatible siblings to facilitate curative haematopoeitic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is now an acceptable option in the absence of an available human leukocyte antigen (HLA) compatible donor. We describe a case where the couple who requested HLA-PGD, were both carriers of two serious haematological diseases, beta-thalassaemia and sideroblastic anaemia. Their daughter, affected with sideroblastic anaemia, was programmed to have HSCT. A multiplex-fluorescent-touchdown-PCR protocol was optimized for the simultaneous amplification of: the two HBB-gene mutated regions (c.118C> T, c.25-26delAA), four short tandem repeats (STRs) in chr11p15.5 linked to the HBB gene, the SLC25A38 gene mutation (c.726C > T), two STRs in chr3p22.1 linked to the SLC25A38 gene, plus eleven informative STRs for HLA-haplotyping (chr6p22.1-21.3). This was followed by real-time nested PCR and high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) for the detection of HBB and SLC25A38 gene mutations, as well as the analysis of all STRs on an automatic genetic analyzer (sequencer). The couple completed four clinical in vitro fertilization (IVF)/PGD cycles. At least one matched unaffected embryo was identified and transferred in each cycle. A twin pregnancy was established in the fourth PGD cycle and genotyping results at all loci were confirmed by prenatal diagnosis. Two healthy baby girls were delivered at week 38 of pregnancy. The need to exclude two familial disorders for HLA-PGD is rarely encountered. The methodological approach described here is fast, accurate, clinically-validated, and of relatively low cost. PMID:26636621

  2. Is there any impact of HLA-DPB1 disparity in 10/10 HLA-matched unrelated hematopoietic SCT? Results of a French multicentric retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Gagne, K; Loiseau, P; Dubois, V; Dufossé, F; Perrier, P; Dormoy, A; Jollet, I; Renac, V; Masson, D; Picard, C; Lafarge, X; Hanau, D; Quainon, F; Delbos, F; Coeffic, B; Absi, Léna; Eliaou, J-F; Moalic, V; Fort, M; de Matteis, M; Theodorou, I; Hau, F; Batho, A; Pedron, B; Caillat-Zucman, S; Marry, E; Raus, N; Yakoub-Agha, I; Cesbron, A

    2015-02-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the impact of HLA-DPB1 mismatches in a large cohort of 1342 French patients who underwent 10/10 HLA-matched unrelated HSCT. A significant impact of HLA-DPB1 allelic mismatches (2 vs 0) was observed in severe acute GVHD (aGVHDIII-IV) (risk ratio (RR)=1.73, confidence interval (CI) 95% 1.09-2.73, P=0.019) without impact on OS, TRM, relapse and chronic GVHD (cGVHD). According to the T-cell epitope 3 (TCE3)/TCE4 HLA-DPB1 disparity algorithm, 37.6% and 58.4% pairs had nonpermissive HLA-DPB1, respectively. TCE3 and TCE4 disparities had no statistical impact on OS, TRM, relapse, aGVHD and cGVHD. When TCE3/TCE4 disparities were analyzed in the graft-vs-host or host-vs-graft (HVG) direction, only a significant impact of TCE4 nonpermissive disparities in the HVG direction was observed on relapse (RR=1.34, CI 95% 1.00-1.80, P=0.048). In conclusion, this French retrospective study shows an adverse prognosis of HLA-DPB1 mismatches (2 vs 0) on severe aGVHD and of nonpermissive TCE4 HVG disparities on relapse after HLA-matched 10/10 unrelated HSCT.

  3. Combined effect of total nucleated cell dose and HLA match on transplantation outcome in 1061 cord blood recipients with hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Scaradavou, Andromachi; Stevens, Cladd E.

    2010-01-01

    Both total nucleated cell (TNC) dose and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)–match affect the outcome of cord blood (CB) transplantation. However, how to prioritize these characteristics in unit selection is not established. Therefore, we analyzed the outcomes of 1061 patients who received single-unit myeloablative CB transplantation for leukemia or myelodysplasia. TNC dose and HLA-match each affected survival via their effect on transplant-related mortality (TRM); neither was associated with relapse. Therefore, TRM was the focus of multivariate analyses combining dose and HLA-match. Compared with our 1 HLA-mismatch (MM) reference group with TNC 2.5 to 4.9 × 107/kg, recipients of 0 MM units had the lowest TRM regardless of dose (relative risk [RR] = 0.4, P = .019). TRM for recipients of 1- or 2-MM units with TNC 5.0 × 107/kg or greater was similar to the reference group (RR = 0.8, P = .391 and RR = 1.0, P = .847) despite their greater dose. Recipients of 2 MM units with TNC 2.5 to 4.9 × 107/kg had a greater TRM (RR = 1.5, P = .014), and those with 1 or 2 MM and TNC less than 2.5 × 107/kg or 3 MM did substantially worse. These findings support new unit selection criteria that take into account both TNC dose and HLA-match and have important implications for the size of the global CB inventory needed to find an optimum CB graft. PMID:20029048

  4. Defining the HLA class I-associated viral antigen repertoire from HIV-1-infected human cells.

    PubMed

    Ternette, Nicola; Yang, Hongbing; Partridge, Thomas; Llano, Anuska; Cedeño, Samandhy; Fischer, Roman; Charles, Philip D; Dudek, Nadine L; Mothe, Beatriz; Crespo, Manuel; Fischer, William M; Korber, Bette T M; Nielsen, Morten; Borrow, Persephone; Purcell, Anthony W; Brander, Christian; Dorrell, Lucy; Kessler, Benedikt M; Hanke, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Recognition and eradication of infected cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes is a key defense mechanism against intracellular pathogens. High-throughput definition of HLA class I-associated immunopeptidomes by mass spectrometry is an increasingly important analytical tool to advance our understanding of the induction of T-cell responses against pathogens such as HIV-1. We utilized a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry workflow including de novo-assisted database searching to define the HLA class I-associated immunopeptidome of HIV-1-infected human cells. We here report for the first time the identification of 75 HIV-1-derived peptides bound to HLA class I complexes that were purified directly from HIV-1-infected human primary CD4(+) T cells and the C8166 human T-cell line. Importantly, one-third of eluted HIV-1 peptides had not been previously known to be presented by HLA class I. Over 82% of the identified sequences originated from viral protein regions for which T-cell responses have previously been reported but for which the precise HLA class I-binding sequences have not yet been defined. These results validate and expand the current knowledge of virus-specific antigenic peptide presentation during HIV-1 infection and provide novel targets for T-cell vaccine development. PMID:26467324

  5. Probability of Finding Marrow Unrelated Donor (MUD) for an Indian patient in a Multi-national Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Registry.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Aseem K; Bhati-Kushwaha, Himakshi; Kukreja, Pooja; Mishra, Vikash C; Tyagi, Neetu; Sharma, Ashish; Raina, Vimarsh

    2015-06-01

    With an increase in the number of transplants happening globally, hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) transplantation from matched unrelated donor (MUD) has begun. The increasing trend of MUD transplants across countries has been largely facilitated with the conspicuous growth of volunteer HSC donor noted in the last decade i.e. 8 million HSC donors in 2002 to more than 22 million in 2013 registered in 71 member registries of the Bone Marrow Donor Worldwide (BMDW). Some populations of the world are still very poorly represented in these registries. Since, the chances of successful engraftment and disease free survival are directly proportional to the HLA compatibility between the recipient and the prospective donor, the diversity of the HLA system at the antigenic and allelic level and the heterogeneity of HLA data of the registered donors has a bearing on the probability of finding a volunteer unrelated HSC donor for patients from such populations. In the present study 126 patients were identified suffering from hematological diseases requiring MUD transplant. Their HLA typing was performed and search was done using BMDW database. The search results for these Indian patients in the multinational registry as well as in the Indian Registries were analyzed using mean, range, standard deviation and finally evaluated in terms of probability for finding matched donor (MUD). Total Asian population is only 11 % in the BMDW making it difficult to find a MUD for an Asian patient. The current study supports this, experimentally; revealing that the probability of finding an allele match for an Indian patient in the multinational Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) registries is 16 % and a dismal 0.008 % in the Indian registries (donors in Indian registries is just 33,678 as compared to 22.5 million in BMDW). This greatly, emphasizes on enhancing the number of Indian donors in Indian and multi-national registries. PMID:25825557

  6. First successful bone marrow transplantation for X-linked chronic granulomatous disease by using preimplantation female gender typing and HLA matching.

    PubMed

    Reichenbach, Janine; Van de Velde, Hilde; De Rycke, Martine; Staessen, Cathérine; Platteau, Peter; Baetens, Patricia; Güngör, Tayfun; Ozsahin, Hulya; Scherer, Franziska; Siler, Ulrich; Seger, Reinhard A; Liebaers, Inge

    2008-09-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from an human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical donor is currently the only proven curative treatment for chronic granulomatous disease. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with alternative donors is associated with higher morbidity and mortality. Therefore, we performed in vitro fertilization and preimplantation HLA matching combined with female sexing for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in chronic granulomatous disease. Ethical and psychological issues were considered carefully. We used in vitro fertilization with X-enriched spermatozoa followed by preimplantation genetic diagnosis to identify female HLA-genoidentical embryos in a family in need of a suitable donor for their boy affected with severe X-linked chronic granulomatous disease. Two preimplantation genetic diagnosis cycles were performed in the family. In the second cycle, 2 HLA-genoidentical female embryos were transferred and a singleton pregnancy was obtained, resulting in the birth of an unaffected girl at term. Because of insufficient cell numbers in the cord-blood source, conventional hematopoietic stem cell transplantation had to be performed at 12 months of age of the donor and 5 years of age of the recipient and resulted in complete stable donor chimerism and immunologic reconstitution up to 25 months post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation after in vitro fertilization and combined female sexing and HLA matching offers a new and relatively rapid therapeutic option for patients with X-linked primary immunodeficiency such as chronic granulomatous disease who need hematopoietic stem cell transplantation but lack an HLA-genoidentical donor. PMID:18762514

  7. Uptake of HLA Alloantigens via CD89 and CD206 Does Not Enhance Antigen Presentation by Indirect Allorecognition

    PubMed Central

    Breman, Eytan; Ruben, Jurjen M.; Franken, Kees L.; Heemskerk, Mirjam H. M.; Roelen, Dave L.; Claas, Frans H.

    2016-01-01

    In organ transplantation, alloantigens are taken up by antigen presenting cells and presented via the indirect pathway to T-cells which in turn can induce allograft rejection. Monitoring of these T-cells is of major importance; however no reliable assay is available to routinely monitor indirect allorecognition. Recently we showed that HLA monomers can be successfully used to monitor indirect allorecognition. Targeting antigens to endocytic receptors on antigen presenting cells may further enhance the presentation of antigens via HLA class II and improve the efficiency of this assay. In the current study we explored targeting of HLA monomers to either CD89 expressing monocytes or mannose receptor expressing dendritic cells. Monomer-antibody complexes were generated using biotin-labeled monomers and avidin labeling of the antibodies. We demonstrate that targeting the complexes to these receptors resulted in a dose-dependent HLA class II mediated presentation to a T-cell clone. The immune-complexes were efficiently taken up and presented to T-cells. However, the level of T-cell reactivity was similar to that when only exogenous antigen was added. We conclude that HLA-A2 monomers targeted for presentation through CD89 on monocytes or mannose receptor on dendritic cells lead to proper antigen presentation but do not enhance indirect allorecognition via HLA-DR. PMID:27413760

  8. HLA-DR, DQ and T cell antigen receptor constant beta genes in Japanese patients with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, K; Atoh, M; Konoeda, Y; Yagita, A; Inoko, H; Sekiguchi, S

    1990-01-01

    We studied the T cell antigen receptor (TcR) constant beta chain genes on HLA typed Japanese patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). A TcR constant beta EcoRI 6.0-kb fragment was present in all Japanese UC patients (n = 17) but completely absent in the controls (n = 35) (chi2 = 47.6, P less than 0.001). The frequency of HLA-DR2 antigen was significantly higher in UC patients (85% versus 28% in controls, P less than 0.001). Furthermore, HLA-DQw1 antigen was also increased in UC patients (96% versus 60% in controls, P less than 0.001). However, HLA-DR4 antigen was significantly decreased in UC patients (12% versus 37%, P = 0.02). HLA-DR1 antigen was not found in UC patients and was present in only 15% of the controls. These results suggest that TcR beta chain and HLA-DQw1 antigen may be important in the pathogenesis of Japanese UC. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1973647

  9. Blood groups and HLA antigens in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Norrgård, O; Cedergren, B; Angquist, K A; Beckman, L

    1984-01-01

    Frequencies of blood groups (ABO, Rh, MNSs, P, Kell, Lewis and Duffy) and HLA antigens were studied in a series of patients from northern Sweden with abdominal aortic aneurysms. The following significant differences from the controls were found: a decreased frequency of the Rh-negative blood group and increased frequencies of the Kell-positive and MN blood groups. Previously reported associations with the ABO and Rh systems were not confirmed.

  10. HLA Bw35 antigen and mesangial IgA glomerulo-nephritis: a poor prognosis marker?

    PubMed

    Berthoux, F C; Genin, C; Gagne, A; Le Petit, J C; Sabatier, J C

    1979-01-01

    Familial cases of mesangial IgA glomerulonephritis (MGN) have raised the possibility of a genetic control in this disease. In 50 patients with MGN, diagnosed on renal biopsy, and in 105 controls, we have compared the distribution of HLA antigens (A and B loci). We found a significant increase in the frequency of HLA Bw35 antigen in the patient group compared with controls (36% versus 13%: p less than 0.02). There was no significant difference between the Bw35 positive and negative MGN subgroups, in clinical, serological, and pathological data. Both subgroups had elevated mean serum IgA levels (154% of normal), and also mean serum IgM levels (146%). However, the follow-up data exhibited a significantly worse prognosis (p less than 0.01) in the Bw35 positive subgroup: 9 out of 18 patients versus 4 out of 32 progressed to chronic renal failure (serum creatinine greater than 1.5 mg/dl). We have established a genetic linkage between the HLA complex and the occurrence of MGN. The Bw35 antigen may serve as a marker (risk of disease = 4), in particular for poor prognosis cases.

  11. Structural heterogeneity in HLA-B70, a high-frequency antigen of black populations.

    PubMed

    Domena, J D; Little, A M; Madrigal, A J; Hildebrand, W H; Johnston-Dow, L; du Toit, E; Bias, W B; Parham, P

    1993-11-01

    Although the B70 antigen exhibits allele frequencies of 8-23% in African and American black populations, it remains poorly defined. Cloning and sequencing of cDNA encoding B70 antigens from six cell lines has identified a group of three closely related alleles: B*1503, B*1509 and B*1510, that form a subgroup of the B15 family. The sequences of these alleles and, in particular, B*1503, are close to that of the HLA-B consensus consistent with the difficulty in their serological definition. The products of the three alleles correspond to three electrophoretically detected variants of the B70 antigen and some correlation with the B71 and B72 subspecificities of the B70 antigen can be made. A fourth allele, B*7901, previously described by Choo et al. (J. Immunol. 147: 174-180, 1991) that was not serologically typed as B70, differs by a single nucleotide substitution from B*1510. The sensitivity of alloantibodies to single differences in peptide binding residues suggest a role for bound peptides in the HLA-B70 alloantigenic specificities. The heavy chains encoded by the four alleles differ at four peptide binding residues of the antigen recognition site, the evolutionary modification of which can be explained in terms of interallelic recombination events.

  12. Soluble HLA class I antigen secretion by normal lymphocytes: relationship with cell activation and effect of interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Brieva, J A; Villar, L M; Leoro, G; Alvarez-Cermeño, J C; Roldán, E; Gonzalez-Porqué, P

    1990-01-01

    HLA class I antigens are thought to be integral membrane proteins. However, soluble forms of these molecules have been detected. Our laboratory has recently shown that the predominant form of these soluble proteins present in human serum, spleen tissue and culture supernatant of activated lymphocytes exhibits molecular weight and structure similar to classical HLA class I antigens, but lacks HLA A or B polymorphic determinants. In the present study, the secretion of such soluble proteins by lymphocytes has been further explored. Phytohaemagglutinin-stimulated normal lymphocytes secrete considerable quantities of soluble HLA (sHLA) class I proteins. This secretion seems to be a general property of lymphocytes, since activation of T as well as B cells by appropriate mitogens equally induce sHLA I secretion. Lymphocytes require RNA and protein synthesis, but not DNA synthesis, for the secretion to occur. Kinetic studies reveal that maximal sHLA I secretion precedes the peak of DNA synthesis by 24 h. In vitro stimulation with antigens or alloantigens also provokes sHLA I secretion. Moreover, this phenomenon has also been detected for in vivo-activated lymphocytes, as enhanced spontaneous sHLA I secretion was observed in cultures of low-density blastic B and T cells, and of blood lymphocytes obtained from normal subjects who had received a booster immunization 5 days earlier. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increases the expression of membrane-bound class I antigens but does not induce any sHLA I secretion, suggesting that both molecules are under different regulatory mechanisms. Our results indicate that human lymphocytes, upon stimulation, actively secrete considerable amounts of a soluble form of these biologically relevant proteins. PMID:2122936

  13. CD94-NKG2A Recognition of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-E Bound to an HLA Class I Leader Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie,E.; Clements, C.; Lin, J.; Sullivan, L.; Johnson, D.; Huyton, T.; Heroux, A.; Hoare, H.; Beddoe, T.; et al

    2008-01-01

    The recognition of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E by the heterodimeric CD94-NKG2 natural killer (NK) receptor family is a central innate mechanism by which NK cells monitor the expression of other HLA molecules, yet the structural basis of this highly specific interaction is unclear. Here, we describe the crystal structure of CD94-NKG2A in complex with HLA-E bound to a peptide derived from the leader sequence of HLA-G. The CD94 subunit dominated the interaction with HLA-E, whereas the NKG2A subunit was more peripheral to the interface. Moreover, the invariant CD94 subunit dominated the peptide-mediated contacts, albeit with poor surface and chemical complementarity. This unusual binding mode was consistent with mutagenesis data at the CD94-NKG2A-HLA-E interface. There were few conformational changes in either CD94-NKG2A or HLA-E upon ligation, and such a 'lock and key' interaction is typical of innate receptor-ligand interactions. Nevertheless, the structure also provided insight into how this interaction can be modulated by subtle changes in the peptide ligand or by the pairing of CD94 with other members of the NKG2 family. Differences in the docking strategies used by the NKG2D and CD94-NKG2A receptors provided a basis for understanding the promiscuous nature of ligand recognition by NKG2D compared with the fidelity of the CD94-NKG2 receptors.

  14. Amino acid residues 56 to 69 of HLA-A2 specify an antigenic determinant shared by HLA-A2 and HLA-B17.

    PubMed

    Ways, J P; Rothbard, J B; Parham, P

    1986-07-01

    The mouse monoclonal antibody MA2.1 was previously used to define an epitope shared by native HLA-A2 and HLA-B17 molecules and amino acid sequence comparison of nine HLA-A,B,C molecules identified residues 62 to 65 as the region most likely to form this epitope. An unabsorbed rabbit antiserum raised against a peptide corresponding to residues 56 to 69 of HLA-A2 gives highly specific reactions with HLA-A2 and HLA-B17 heavy chains in Western blots. No interactions with native HLA-A2 and B17 molecules were detected in a variety of assays. Although the topographic relationship between the epitopes recognized by the rabbit antiserum and the monoclonal antibody could not be determined, the results show that residues 56 to 69 of HLA-A2 can form epitopes with specificity for HLA-A2 and HLA-B17.

  15. Mixed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MELISA) for HLA class I antigen: a plasma membrane marker.

    PubMed

    Bjerrum, O W; Borregaard, N

    1990-03-01

    This study introduces a simple, reproducible assay for HLA class I antigen using antibodies against beta 2-microglobulin and the heavy chain on HLA. The sandwich technique was named mixed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MELISA), and was designed for identification of plasma membranes in neutrophil subcellular fractions. The subcellular localization of HLA was identical to that of other plasma membrane markers, [3H]concanavalin A and detergent-independent alkaline phosphatase, and was unchanged by stimulation of cells by weak and strong secretagogues. In addition to the presence as part of the HLA complex in the plasma membrane uncomplexed beta 2-microglobulin is present in the specific granules of neutrophils. However, the release of beta 2-microglobulin from intact neutrophils stimulated with formyl-methionylleucylphenylalanine was much higher than could be explained by exocytosis of specific granules. Subcellular fractionation studies demonstrated that beta 2-microglobulin is localized in fractions characterized by latent alkaline phosphatase and released from this novel secretory compartment in response to stimulation with formyl-methionylleucylphenylalanine. PMID:2181625

  16. HLA antigens and gold toxicity in American blacks with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Alarcón, G S; Barger, B O; Acton, R T; Koopman, W J

    1986-01-01

    An increase in the frequency of DR3 in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients exhibiting toxic reactions to gold salt (GS) therapy has been observed in several studies of Caucasoid patients. Likewise, the association of B35 with gold-induced mucocutaneous reactions has also been reported in Caucasoid RA patients. Similar studies in other ethnic groups have not been previously documented. The present study was performed in American black RA patients receiving GS to determine if there were similar HLA associations with toxic reactions as those reported in Caucasoids. Eight-two seropositive and 18 seronegative American black RA patients were studied. Forty-one of the seropositive (50.0%) and six of the seronegative (33.3%) developed a toxic manifestation. No significant differences in the frequency distribution of HLA-B8, HLA-B35, DR, or DQw antigens were observed between the patients who had a toxic reaction and those who did not in either the seropositive or the seronegative RA patients. In particular, DR3 was not increased in patients with renal toxicity and B35 was not increased in patients with mucocutaneous reaction. Our study demonstrates that American black RA patients exhibiting GS toxicity do not have the same HLA associations as Caucasoids. The possibility that other genetic factor(s) may account for the occurrence of gold salt toxicity in American blacks requires further investigation. PMID:3466334

  17. Myotonic dystrophy: HLA antigens and mitogen stimulated lymphocyte responses of a black American family.

    PubMed

    Hsia, S; Ho, C K; Aliffi, V B; Doran, D M; Hamilton, D

    1982-01-01

    A Black American family of four generations with 29 members was studied. Six family members spanning two generations were affected with myotonic dystrophy. HLA A, B, C and DR antigen specificities were determined for each family member using local typing trays. Twelve HLA haplotypes were identified in the family. No significant association was found between the disease and any HLA antigenic type or haplotype. This finding suggests that the involvement of the major histocompatibility complex in the etiology of myotonic dystrophy is unlikely. The cellular responses to twenty-eight family members and 20 unrelated Black Americans to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), Concanavalin A (Con A) and pokeweed mitogen (PWM), each in three concentrations, were tested with mononuclear cells prepared from peripheral blood. There was a significant difference in responses of the affected family members as compared to the unaffected family members and the unrelated Black Americans. The PHA and PWM responses of the unaffected family members are not significantly different from those of the unrelated Black American controls; however, the Con A responses of the unaffected family members are significantly higher than those of the control group at the lowest Con A dosage. The possible systemic defects of cytoskeletal structures of the affected family members are discussed.

  18. Association of Wegener's granulomatosis with HLA antigens and other genetic markers.

    PubMed Central

    Papiha, S S; Murty, G E; Ad'Hia, A; Mains, B T; Venning, M

    1992-01-01

    The frequencies of the HLA-A, B, C, DR, DQ antigens and of several other genetic markers in biopsy proved and well characterised patients with Wegener's granulomatosis were compared with control frequencies of the region. A highly significant increase in HLA-DR1 was found. The percentage combined frequency of DR1-DQw1 was significantly higher in patients than in the controls. Interestingly, association with the red cell enzyme GLOI and complement locus C4B was also seen. As both of these markers are either linked or within the major histocompatibility complex region (MHC) this is further evidence for the involvement of chromosome 6 in the pathogenesis of Wegener's granulomatosis. To understand the pathology of the disease fully molecular genetic studies of the MHC region are warranted. PMID:1550412

  19. The presence of HLA-DR antigens on lactating human breast epithelium and milk fat globule membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, R A; Ormerod, M G; Greaves, M F

    1980-01-01

    HLA-DR antigens have been demonstrated on the secretory epithelia of lactating breast using rabbit anti-p28,33 ('Ia-like') and mouse monoclonal anti-HLA-DR 'framework'. Normal non-lactating breast, benign or malignant tumours, epithelial cells from normal breast or isolated from milk and a presumptive breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7) were all HLA-DR-negative. HLA-DR, HLA (ABC 'framework') and beta 2-microglobulin determinants were also demonstrated on the surface of milk fat globules (MFG) which were unreactive with monoclonal antibodies to thymus cells or leucocytes. A monoclonal antibody detecting allelic HLA-DR determinants (HLA-DRw 1,2,6) was positive on 40% of MFG samples tested, positive reactions being concordant, when tested, with blood B lymphocytes. Antisera raised against MFG membranes also contain anti-HLA-DR activity. Whether the breast epithelial cells synthesize HLA-DR molecules or acquire these passively from mononuclear cells which infiltrate during lactation is not yet resolved. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7002399

  20. Typing of HLA class II and class I antigens using PHA-activated, IL-2-propagated T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Leshem, B; Cohen, I; Sherman, L; Brautbar, C; Kedar, E

    1988-06-28

    We describe here a simple procedure, by which HLA class II antigens can be accurately and reliably identified in those patients where there is minimal or absent expression of HLA-DR,DQw antigens on B cells, or when the total number of leukocytes recovered from the patients do not permit reliable typing. Ficoll-Hypaque-separated peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes, fresh or cryopreserved, were activated by PHA and then propagated in IL-2-containing medium until enough cells for typing were obtained (usually 7-14 days). At this stage, the cultured cells were shown to be primarily T cells (greater than 90% CD3+). Since the activated T cells propagate in the presence of IL-2, even a small number (10(4] of fresh or cryopreserved patients' cells suffice for this protocol. To date we have been able to successfully HLA-DR,DQw type 34/34 bone marrow transplantation candidates and 12/12 long-term dialysis patients, who were untypable using fresh cells. HLA-DR,DQw antigens on activated T cells from normal individuals were identical to those found on their uncultured B cells. In addition, class I antigens that were undetectable on the uncultured cells of one patient could be identified on activated T cells. The HLA antigens identified on the patients' activated T cells were confirmed by phenotypic analysis of cells from family members. PMID:3260612

  1. ALK as a novel lymphoma-associated tumor antigen: identification of 2 HLA-A2.1-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitopes.

    PubMed

    Passoni, Lorena; Scardino, Antonio; Bertazzoli, Carla; Gallo, Barbara; Coluccia, Addolorata M L; Lemonnier, François A; Kosmatopoulos, Konstadinos; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2002-03-15

    Oncogenic anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion proteins (NPM/ALK and associated variants) are expressed in about 60% of anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCLs) but are absent in normal tissues. In this study, we investigated whether ALK, which is expressed at high levels in lymphoma cells, could be a target for antigen-specific cell-mediated immunotherapy. A panel of ALK-derived peptides was tested for their binding affinity to HLA-A*0201 molecules. Binding peptides were assessed for their capacity to elicit a specific immune response mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) both in vivo, in HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice, and in vitro in the peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from healthy donors. Two HLA-A*0201-restricted CTL epitopes, p280-89 (SLAMLDLLHV) and p375-86 (GVLLWEIFSL), both located in the ALK kinase domain were identified. The p280-89- and p375-86-induced peptide-specific CTL lines were able to specifically release interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) on stimulation with ALK peptide-pulsed autologous Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells (LCLs) or T2 cells. Anti-ALK CTLs lysed HLA-matched ALCL and neuroblastoma cell lines endogenously expressing ALK proteins. CTL activity was inhibited by anti-HLA-A2 monoclonal antibody CR11.351, consistent with a class I-restricted mechanism of cytotoxicity. These results show the existence of functional anti-ALK CTL precursors within the peripheral T-cell repertoire of healthy donors, clearly indicating ALK as a tumor antigen and ALK-derived peptides, p280-89 and p375-86, as suitable epitopes for the development of vaccination strategies.

  2. HLA-A is a Predictor of Hepatitis B e Antigen Status in HIV-Positive African Adults.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Philippa C; Carlson, Jonathan M; Beloukas, Apostolos; Malik, Amna; Jooste, Pieter; Ogwu, Anthony; Shapiro, Roger; Riddell, Lynn; Chen, Fabian; Luzzi, Graz; Jesuthasan, Gerald; Jeffery, Katie; Jojic, Nebojsa; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Carrington, Mary; Goulder, Philip J R; Geretti, Anna Maria; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-04-15

    Outcomes of chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) are varied, with increased morbidity reported in the context of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. The factors driving different outcomes are not well understood, but there is increasing interest in an HLA class I effect. We therefore studied the influence of HLA class I on HBV in an African HIV-positive cohort. We demonstrated that virologic markers of HBV disease activity (hepatitis B e antigen status or HBV DNA level) are associated with HLA-A genotype. This finding supports the role of the CD8(+) T-cell response in HBV control, and potentially informs future therapeutic T-cell vaccine strategies.

  3. Polymorphisms of HLA-A, -B, -Cw and DRB1 antigens in Moroccan patients with ankylosing spondylitis and a comparison of clinical features with frequencies of HLA-B*27.

    PubMed

    El Mouraghi, I; Ouarour, A; Ghozlani, I; Collantes, E; Solana, R; El Maghraoui, A

    2015-02-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is very often associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA), particularly HLA-B*27. However, the strength of this association and clinical features may vary in different ethnic groups. Our study aims to assess the distribution of HLA-A, -B, -Cw and DRB1 alleles in Moroccan patients with AS and to compare the clinical features of AS and the frequencies of HLA-B27 in patients from Morocco with other series. Seventy-five patients diagnosed with AS and assessed for clinical manifestations were selected and compared to 100 healthy controls. HLA class I and II antigens were typed by polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific oligonucleotide. HLA-B27 subtypes were studied by polymerase chain reaction amplification with sequence-specific primers. HLA-B27 was found in 64% of patients. It was positively associated with younger age at disease onset, family history, and uveitis while it had a negative association with late onset. Six B*27 subtypes were identified in the AS group. HLA-B*2705 and B*2702 were the most common observed subtypes. Among other HLA genes, a significant increase in the prevalence of HLA-Cw*02 and HLA-DRB*15 was found in AS patients. HLA-B27 is involved in the predisposition of AS in the Moroccan population. HLA-B*2705 and B*2702 were the predominant subtypes supporting previous reports in Caucasian spondyloarthropathies. Other HLA genes, HLA-Cw*02 and HLA-DRB1*15, seem to confer predisposing effect to the disease. However, the lower frequency of HLA-B27 compared to the literature in our study suggests the existence of different genetic and/or environmental factors in Morocco.

  4. HLA antigens in insulin dependent and non-insulin dependent Spanish diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Ríos, M; Regueiro, J R; Severino, R; López-Larrea, C; Arnaiz-Villena, A

    1983-01-01

    HLA-A, -B, -C, -DR and Bw4, Bw6 antigens and Bf and GLO alleles have been studied in a sample of Spanish insulin dependent (IDD) and non-insulin dependent (NIDD) diabetic patients. In IDD's there was no significant increase of B8 and B15; an increase of B18 secondary to that of DR3 has been found. DR4 was also increased in our sample. The GLO-S/DR2 haplotype was found to be decreased in IDD. It was observed that (Aw30)-B18-Cw5-Bw6-DR3-BfF1 is the commonest ID diabetic haplotype in our population. A relationship between DR4 and early IDD onset was also found. No association was found between HLA, or Bf, and age of onset, macroangiopathy, microangiopathy, retinopathy, nephropathy and peripheral or autonomic neuropathy. In NIDD's, DR3 was increased and DR3-non BfF1 and DR3-non B18 RRs were higher than DR3 RR.Aw30 and Cw5 tended to be decreased, although not significantly. These findings further support the hypothesis that several closely linked diabetic susceptibility factors may exist within an HLA haplotype (i.e.: (Aw30)-B18-Cw5-Bw6-DR3-BfF1 in our population) and that all of them may be necessary for developing an IDD form; lack of one or several factors might lead to the acquisition of the NIDD form. PMID:6352349

  5. The production and crystallization of the human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 complexed with deamidated gliadin peptides implicated in coeliac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Kate N.; Reid, Hugh H.; Borg, Natalie A.; Broughton, Sophie E.; Huyton, Trevor; Anderson, Robert P.; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2007-12-01

    The production and crystallization of human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with deamidated gliadin peptides is reported. Crystals of HLA-DQ2{sup PQPELPYPQ} diffracted to 3.9 Å, while the HLA-DQ8{sup EGSFQPSQE} crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å, allowing structure determination by molecular replacement. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 are key risk factors in coeliac disease, as they bind deamidated gluten peptides that are subsequently recognized by CD4{sup +} T cells. Here, the production and crystallization of both HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with the deamidated gliadin peptides DQ2 α-I (PQPELPYPQ) and DQ8 α-I (EGSFQPSQE), respectively, are reported.

  6. Association of Polymorphisms in HLA Antigen Presentation-Related Genes with the Outcomes of HCV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaomei; Xu, Yin; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Yun; Yu, Rongbin; Su, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-presentation genes play a vital role in the pathogenesis of HCV infection. However, the relationship of variants of these genes with spontaneous outcomes of HCV infection has not been fully investigated. To explore novel loci in the Chinese population, 34 tagging-SNPs in 9 candidate genes were genotyped for their associations with the outcomes of HCV infection. The distributions of different genotypes and haplotypes were compared among 773 HCV-negative controls, 246 subjects with HCV natural clearance, and 218 HCV persistent carriers recruited from hemodialysis patients and intravenous drug users. Our study implicated that TAP2, HLA-DOA, HLA-DOB, and tapasin loci were novel candidate regions for susceptibility to HCV infection and viral clearance in the Chinese population. Logistic regression analyses showed that TAP2 rs1800454 A (OR = 1.48, P = 0.002) and HLA-DOB rs2071469 G (OR = 1.23, P = 0.048) were significantly associated with increased susceptibility to establishment of HCV infection. However, high-risk behavior exposure and age were stronger predictors of HCV infection. Mutation of tapasin rs9277972 T (OR = 1.57, P =0.043) increased the risk of HCV chronicity, and HLA-DOA rs3128935 C (OR = 0.62, P = 0.019) increased the chance of viral resolution. With regards to the effect of rs3128925, interactions were found with high-risk behavior (P = 0.013) and age (P = 0.035). The risk effect of rs3128925 T for persistent HCV infection was higher in injecting drug users (vs. dialysis patients) and in subjects ≥ 40 years old (vs. < 40 years old). PMID:25874709

  7. Evaluation of Human Leukocyte Antigen-A (HLA-A), Other Non-HLA Markers on Chromosome 6p21 and Risk of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wan-Lun; Tse, Ka-Po; Liang, Sharon; Chien, Yin-Chu; Su, Wen-Hui; Yu, Kelly J.; Cheng, Yu-Juen; Tsang, Ngan-Ming; Hsu, Mow-Ming; Chang, Kai-Ping; Chen, I-How; Chen, Tzu-I; Yang, Czau-Siung; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chang, Yu-Sun; Hildesheim, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Background The association between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes (located in the Major Histocompatibility Complex [MHC] region of chromosome 6p21) and NPC has been known for some time. Recently, two genome-wide association studies (GWAS) conducted in Taiwan and China confirmed that the strongest evidence for NPC association was mapped to the MHC region. It is still unclear, however, whether these findings reflect direct associations with Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) genes and/or to other genes in this gene-rich region. Methods To better understand genetic associations for NPC within the MHC region of chromosome 6, we conducted an evaluation that pooled two previously conducted NPC case-control studies in Taiwan (N = 591 cases and N = 521 controls). PCR-based genotyping was performed for 12 significant SNPs identified within 6p21 in the Taiwan NPC GWAS and for the HLA-A gene (exons 2 and 3). Findings After confirming homogeneity between the two studies, pooled odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by logistic regression. We found that HLA-A (p-trend = 0.0006) and rs29232 (within the GABBR1 gene; p-trend = 0.005) were independent risk factors for NPC after adjustment for age, gender, study and each other. NPC risk was highest among individuals who were homozygous for the HLA-A*0207 risk allele and carriers of the rs29232 risk allele (A). Conclusion Our study suggests that most of the SNPs significantly associated with NPC from GWAS reflect previously identified HLA-A associations. An independent effect of rs29232 (GABBR1), however, remained, suggesting that additional genes within this region might be associated with NPC risk. PMID:22880099

  8. Loss of monomorphic and polymorphic HLA antigens in metastatic breast and colon carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Goepel, J. R.; Rees, R. C.; Rogers, K.; Stoddard, C. J.; Thomas, W. E.; Shepherd, L.

    1991-01-01

    MHC class I antigens are intimately involved in intercellular communication, and recognition by cytotoxic T cells. Thus tumour cells that fail to express them may be at a growth or metastatic advantage. A series of ten colorectal and ten breast carcinomas, and their respective lymph node metastases, were examined immunohistologically using monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against both monomorphic and A2 polymorphic determinants, and beta-2-microglobulin (beta 2m). Four colon polypoid adenomas stained positively throughout, but 6/10 primary tumours had partial or complete loss of expression of monomorphic determinants using mAb W6/32: two node and the liver metastasis showed less, four more expression. Similar results were seen for beta 2m. HLA-A2 expression was absent or reduced in 4/4 colon tumours and all their metastases. Among the breast tumours, W6/32 staining was absent or reduced in 2/10, and node deposits showed two with less reactivity than their primary. Beta 2m staining was reduced or absent in 8/10 primaries and all the node metastases; in every case in which beta 2m was detected in the primary tumour their corresponding lymph node metastasis showed a decreased expression. HLA-A2 expression was absent or reduced in 3/4 primary breast carcinomas, and all their metastases. These results show that individual human colon and breast carcinomas often have a reduced HLA class I antigen expression, which apparently confers a metastatic advantage. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1718386

  9. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Peptides Derived from Tumor Antigens Induced by Inhibition of DNA Methylation for Development of Drug-facilitated Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shraibman, Bracha; Kadosh, Dganit Melamed; Barnea, Eilon; Admon, Arie

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of cancer cells with anticancer drugs often fails to achieve complete remission. Yet, such drug treatments may induce alteration in the tumor's gene expression patterns, including those of Cancer/Testis Antigens (CTA). The degradation products of such antigens can be presented as HLA peptides on the surface of the tumor cells and be developed into anticancer immunotherapeutics. For example, the DNA methyl transferase inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Decitabine) has limited antitumor efficacy, yet it induces the expression of many genes, including CTAs that are normally silenced in the healthy adult tissues. In this study, the presentation of many new HLA peptides derived from CTAs and induced by Decitabine was demonstrated in three human Glioblastoma cell lines. Such presentation of CTA-derived HLA peptides can be exploited for development of new treatment modalities, combining drug treatment with anti-CTA targeted immunotherapy. The Decitabine-induced HLA peptidomes include many CTAs that are not normally detected in healthy tissues or in cancer cells, unless treated with the drug. In addition, the study included large-scale analyses of the simultaneous effects of Decitabine on the transcriptomes, proteomes and HLA peptidomes of the human Glioblastoma cells. It demonstrates the poor correlations between these three levels of gene expression, both in their total levels and in their response to the drug. The proteomics and HLA peptidomics data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003790 and the transcriptomics data are available via GEO with identifier GSE80137.

  10. Donor-specific anti-HLA Abs and graft failure in matched unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ciurea, Stefan O.; Thall, Peter F.; Wang, Xuemei; Wang, Sa A.; Hu, Ying; Cano, Pedro; Aung, Fleur; Rondon, Gabriela; Molldrem, Jeffrey J.; Korbling, Martin; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; de Lima, Marcos; Champlin, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Anti-HLA donor-specific Abs (DSAs) have been reported to be associated with graft failure in mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; however, their role in the development of graft failure in matched unrelated donor (MUD) transplantation remains unclear. We hypothesize that DSAs against a mismatched HLA-DPB1 locus is associated with graft failure in this setting. The presence of anti-HLA Abs before transplantation was determined prospectively in 592 MUD transplantation recipients using mixed-screen beads in a solid-phase fluorescent assay. DSA identification was performed using single-Ag beads containing the corresponding donor's HLA-mismatched Ags. Anti-HLA Abs were detected in 116 patients (19.6%), including 20 patients (3.4%) with anti-DPB1 Abs. Overall, graft failure occurred in 19 of 592 patients (3.2%), including 16 of 584 (2.7%) patients without anti-HLA Abs compared with 3 of 8 (37.5%) patients with DSA (P = .0014). In multivariate analysis, DSAs were the only factor highly associated with graft failure (P = .0001; odds ratio = 21.3). Anti-HLA allosensitization was higher overall in women than in men (30.8% vs 12.1%; P < .0001) and higher in women with 1 (P = .008) and 2 or more pregnancies (P = .0003) than in men. We conclude that the presence of anti-DPB1 DSAs is associated with graft failure in MUD hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:21967975

  11. Human leukocyte antigen supertype matching after myeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation with 7/8 matched unrelated donor allografts: a report from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research

    PubMed Central

    Lazaryan, Aleksandr; Wang, Tao; Spellman, Stephen R.; Wang, Hai-Lin; Pidala, Joseph; Nishihori, Taiga; Askar, Medhat; Olsson, Richard; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Yong, Agnes; Gandhi, Manish; Dandoy, Christopher; Savani, Bipin; Hale, Gregory; Page, Kristin; Bitan, Menachem; Reshef, Ran; Drobyski, William; Marsh, Steven GE; Schultz, Kirk; Müller, Carlheinz R.; Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo A.; Verneris, Michael R.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Arora, Mukta; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Lee, Stephanie J.

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II alleles can be simplified by consolidating them into fewer supertypes based on functional or predicted structural similarities in epitope-binding grooves of HLA molecules. We studied the impact of matched and mismatched HLA-A (265 versus 429), -B (230 versus 92), -C (365 versus 349), and -DRB1 (153 versus 51) supertypes on clinical outcomes of 1934 patients with acute leukemias or myelodysplasia/myeloproliferative disorders. All patients were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research following single-allele mismatched unrelated donor myeloablative conditioning hematopoietic cell transplantation. Single mismatched alleles were categorized into six HLA-A (A01, A01A03, A01A24, A02, A03, A24), six HLA-B (B07, B08, B27, B44, B58, B62), two HLA-C (C1, C2), and five HLA-DRB1 (DR1, DR3, DR4, DR5, DR9) supertypes. Supertype B mismatch was associated with increased risk of grade II–IV acute graft-versus-host disease (hazard ratio =1.78, P=0.0025) compared to supertype B match. Supertype B07-B44 mismatch was associated with a higher incidence of both grade II–IV (hazard ratio=3.11, P=0.002) and III–IV (hazard ratio=3.15, P=0.01) acute graft-versus-host disease. No significant associations were detected between supertype-matched versus -mismatched groups at other HLA loci. These data suggest that avoiding HLA-B supertype mismatches can mitigate the risk of grade II–IV acute graft-versus-host disease in 7/8-mismatched unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation when multiple HLA-B supertype-matched donors are available. Future studies are needed to define the mechanisms by which supertype mismatching affects outcomes after alternative donor hematopoietic cell transplantation. PMID:27247320

  12. HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1 allele and haplotype frequencies in 6384 umbilical cord blood units and transplantation matching and engraftment statistics in the Zhejiang cord blood bank of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, F; He, J; Chen, S; Qin, F; Dai, B; Zhang, W; Zhu, F M; Lv, H J

    2014-02-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a widely accepted source of progenitor cells, and now, many cord blood banks were established. Here, we analysed the HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 allele and haplotype frequencies, HLA matching possibilities for searching potential donors and outcome of UCB transplantations in Zhejiang cord blood bank of China. A total of 6384 UCB units were characterized for 17 HLA-A, 30 HLA-B and 13 HLA-DRB1 alleles at the first field resolution level. Additionally, B*14, B*15 and B*40 were typed to the second field level. A total of 1372 distinct A-B-DRB1 haplotypes were identified. The frequencies of 7 haplotypes were more than 1%, and 439 haplotypes were <0.01%. A*02-B*46-DRB1*09, A*33-B*58-DRB1*03 and A*30-B*13-DRB1*07 were the most common haplotypes, with frequencies of 4.4%, 3.3%, and 2.9%, respectively. Linkage disequilibrium(LD) analysis showed that there were 83 A-B, 106 B-DRB1, 54 A-DRB1 haplotypes with positive LD, in which 51 A-B, 60 B-DRB1, 32 A-DRB1 haplotypes exhibited a significant LD (P < 0.05). In 682 search requests, 12.9%, 40.0% and 42.7% of patients were found to have 6 of 6, 5 of 6 and 4 of 6 HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 matching donors, respectively. A total of 30 UCB units were transplanted to 24 patients (3 patients not evaluated due to early death); 14 of 21 patients (66.7%) engrafted. This study reveals the HLA distribution and its transplantation application in the cord blood bank of Zhejiang province. These data can help to select potential UCB donors for transplantation and used to assess the scale of new cord blood banking endeavours.

  13. Artificial antigen presenting cells that express prevalent HLA alleles: A step towards the broad application of antigen-specific adoptive cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Aisha N; Selvakumar, Annamalai; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; Riviere, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel W; O'Reilly, Richard J

    2009-12-01

    The artificial antigen-presenting cells (AAPCs) described in this review were generated to facilitate the production of virus-specific T-cells for the treatment of infections in patients after bone marrow transplant. These AAPCs consist of murine 3T3 cells genetically modified to express critical human molecules needed for T-cell stimulation, such as the co-stimulatory molecules B7.1, ICAM-1, and LFA-3 and one of a series of 6 common HLA class I alleles. When T-cells were sensitized against cytomegalovirus (CMV) using AAPCs that express a shared HLA allele or using autologous antigen-presenting cells (APCs) loaded with the CMVpp65 antigen, they were activated and expanded to become HLA-restricted CMVpp65-specific T-cells. These T-cells demonstrated functional activity in vitro against CMV by producing IFN-gamma and inducing CMVpp65-specific cytotoxicity. T-cells sensitized with AAPCs recognized antigenic epitopes presented by each HLA allele known to be immunogenic in Man. Sensitization with AAPCs also permitted expansion of IFN-gamma+ cytotoxic T-cells against subdominant epitopes that were not effectively recognized by T-cells sensitized with autologous APCs. This panel of AAPCs provides a source of immediately accessible, standardizable, and replenishable "off the shelf" cellular reagents with the potential to make adoptive immunotherapy widely available for the treatment of lethal infections, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. PMID:20040272

  14. Sampling From the Proteome to the Human Leukocyte Antigen-DR (HLA-DR) Ligandome Proceeds Via High Specificity.

    PubMed

    Mommen, Geert P M; Marino, Fabio; Meiring, Hugo D; Poelen, Martien C M; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A M; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J R; van Els, Cécile A C M

    2016-04-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the complex nature of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class II ligandome is of utmost importance to understand the basis for CD4(+)T cell mediated immunity and tolerance. Here, we implemented important improvements in the analysis of the repertoire of HLA-DR-presented peptides, using hybrid mass spectrometry-based peptide fragmentation techniques on a ligandome sample isolated from matured human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). The reported data set constitutes nearly 14 thousand unique high-confident peptides,i.e.the largest single inventory of human DC derived HLA-DR ligands to date. From a technical viewpoint the most prominent finding is that no single peptide fragmentation technique could elucidate the majority of HLA-DR ligands, because of the wide range of physical chemical properties displayed by the HLA-DR ligandome. Our in-depth profiling allowed us to reveal a strikingly poor correlation between the source proteins identified in the HLA class II ligandome and the DC cellular proteome. Important selective sieving from the sampled proteome to the ligandome was evidenced by specificity in the sequences of the core regions both at their N- and C- termini, hence not only reflecting binding motifs but also dominant protease activity associated to the endolysosomal compartments. Moreover, we demonstrate that the HLA-DR ligandome reflects a surface representation of cell-compartments specific for biological events linked to the maturation of monocytes into antigen presenting cells. Our results present new perspectives into the complex nature of the HLA class II system and will aid future immunological studies in characterizing the full breadth of potential CD4(+)T cell epitopes relevant in health and disease.

  15. Sampling From the Proteome to the Human Leukocyte Antigen-DR (HLA-DR) Ligandome Proceeds Via High Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Mommen, Geert P. M.; Marino, Fabio; Meiring, Hugo D.; Poelen, Martien C. M.; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A. M.; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J. R.; van Els, Cécile A. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the complex nature of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class II ligandome is of utmost importance to understand the basis for CD4+ T cell mediated immunity and tolerance. Here, we implemented important improvements in the analysis of the repertoire of HLA-DR-presented peptides, using hybrid mass spectrometry-based peptide fragmentation techniques on a ligandome sample isolated from matured human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). The reported data set constitutes nearly 14 thousand unique high-confident peptides, i.e. the largest single inventory of human DC derived HLA-DR ligands to date. From a technical viewpoint the most prominent finding is that no single peptide fragmentation technique could elucidate the majority of HLA-DR ligands, because of the wide range of physical chemical properties displayed by the HLA-DR ligandome. Our in-depth profiling allowed us to reveal a strikingly poor correlation between the source proteins identified in the HLA class II ligandome and the DC cellular proteome. Important selective sieving from the sampled proteome to the ligandome was evidenced by specificity in the sequences of the core regions both at their N- and C- termini, hence not only reflecting binding motifs but also dominant protease activity associated to the endolysosomal compartments. Moreover, we demonstrate that the HLA-DR ligandome reflects a surface representation of cell-compartments specific for biological events linked to the maturation of monocytes into antigen presenting cells. Our results present new perspectives into the complex nature of the HLA class II system and will aid future immunological studies in characterizing the full breadth of potential CD4+ T cell epitopes relevant in health and disease. PMID:26764012

  16. Generation of minor histocompatibility antigen HA-1-specific cytotoxic T cells restricted by nonself HLA molecules: a potential strategy to treat relapsed leukemia after HLA-mismatched stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mutis, Tuna; Blokland, Els; Kester, Michel; Schrama, Ellen; Goulmy, Els

    2002-07-15

    Successful stem cell transplantation (SCT) across HLA barriers can be performed with cord blood, megadoses of stem cells, or with nonmyeloablative conditioning strategies. Because the HLA-mismatched transplants are often T-cell depleted, leukemia relapse rates are high. Treatment of relapsed leukemia after HLA-mismatched SCT is difficult. A novel potential strategy to treat relapsed leukemia after HLA-mismatched SCT is the use of patients' mismatched HLA molecules as antigen-presenting molecules to generate hematopoietic system-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) from the stem cell donor. Adoptive transfer of these hematopoietic system-specific CTLs that are restricted by nonself HLA molecules may eliminate leukemia without affecting the patient's nonhematopoietic cells or donor hematopoietic cells. We investigated the feasibility of this strategy using the hematopoietic system-specific minor histocompatibility antigen HA-1, which is known to induce HLA-A2-restricted CTLs. HLA-A2(-) peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with HLA-A2(+) T2 cells pulsed with synthetic HA-1 peptide or with dendritic cells transduced with the HA-1 cDNA. Tetrameric HLA-A2/HA-1 peptide complexes were used to monitor and enrich HA-1-specific CTLs. In the alloreactive cultures, HA-1-specific CTLs were enriched up to 7% by 3 rounds of antigen-specific stimulations and up to 87% by fluorescence-activated cell sorting of tetramer-positive T cells. The HA-1-specific CTLs showed specific lysis of the relevant target cells, including leukemic cells. Because the polyclonal CTL cultures also contained natural killer cells and allo-HLA-A2-specific CTLs, CTL clones were generated that showed the expected HA-1 specificity only. Thus, HA-1-specific CTLs restricted by nonself HLA-A2 molecules can be generated in an HLA-A2-mismatched setting. PMID:12091347

  17. Frequency of null allele of Human Leukocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) locus in subjects to recurrent miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Nazila; Mosaferi, Elnaz; Farzadi, Laya; Majidi, Jafar; Monfaredan, Amir; Yousefi, Bahman; Baradaran, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a non-classical class I molecule highly expressed by extravillous cytotrophoblast cells. Due to a single base pair deletion, its function can be compensated by other isoforms. Investigating the frequency of null allele in Recurrent Miscarriage (RM) subjects could be useful in understanding the relationship between frequency of this allele and RM in a given population. Objective: This study aimed to determine the frequency of HLA-G*0105N null allele and its potential association with down-regulation of HLA-G in subjects with RM. Materials and Methods: Western blotting was used to assess the level of HLA-G protein expression. For investigating the frequency of HLA-G*0105N null allele in RM subjects, PCR-RFLP method was used. Exon 3 of HLA-G gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequently, PpuM-1 enzyme was employed to digest the PCR products and fragments were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Results: Digestion using restriction enzyme showed the presence of heterozygous HLA-G*0105N null allele in 10% of the test population. Western blotting results confirmed the decrease in expression of HLA-G in the placental tissue of subjects with RM compared to subjects who could give normal birth. Conclusion: The frequency of heterozygous HLA-G*0105N null allele was high to some extent in subjects with RM. The mutation rate in subjects suggested that there is a significant association between RM and frequency of mutations in this allele. PMID:27525330

  18. Processing and cross-presentation of individual HLA-A, -B, or -C epitopes from NY-ESO-1 or an HLA-A epitope for Melan-A differ according to the mode of antigen delivery.

    PubMed

    Robson, Neil C; McAlpine, Tristan; Knights, Ashley J; Schnurr, Max; Shin, Amanda; Chen, Weisan; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Cebon, Jonathan

    2010-07-15

    The ability of dendritic cells (DCs) to cross-present protein tumor antigens to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) underpins the success of therapeutic cancer vaccines. We studied cross-presentation of the cancer/testis antigen, NY-ESO-1, and the melanoma differentiation antigen, Melan-A by human DC subsets. Monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) efficiently cross-presented human leukocyte associated (HLA)-A2-restricted epitopes from either a formulated NY-ESO-1/ISCOMATRIX vaccine or when either antigen was mixed with ISCOMATRIX adjuvant. HLA-A2 epitope generation required endosomal acidification and was proteasome-independent for NY-ESO-1 and proteasome-dependent for Melan-A. Both MoDCs and CD1c(+) blood DCs cross-presented NY-ESO-1-specific HLA-A2(157-165)-, HLA-B7(60-72)-, and HLA-Cw3(92-100)-restricted epitopes when formulated as an NY-ESO-1/ISCOMATRIX vaccine, but this was limited when NY-ESO-1 and ISCOMATRIX adjuvant were added separately to the DC cultures. Finally, cross-presentation of NY-ESO-1(157-165)/HLA-A2, NY-ESO-1(60-72)/HLA-B7, and NY-ESO-1(92-100)/HLA-Cw3 epitopes was proteasome-dependent when formulated as immune complexes (ICs) but only proteasome-dependent for NY-ESO-1(60-72)/HLA-B7-restricted cross-presentation facilitated by ISCOMATRIX adjuvant. We demonstrate, for the first time, proteasome-dependent and independent cross-presentation of HLA-A-, B-, and C-restricted epitopes within the same full-length tumor antigen by human DCs. Our findings identify important differences in the capacities of human DC subsets to cross-present clinically relevant, full-length tumor antigens and how vaccine formulation impacts CTL responses in vivo.

  19. Vaccines targeting the cancer-testis antigen SSX-2 elicit HLA-A2 epitope-specific cytolytic T cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Heath A; McNeel, Douglas G

    2011-10-01

    The cancer-testis antigen synovial sarcoma X breakpoint-2 (SSX-2) is a potentially attractive target for tumor immunotherapy based upon its tissue-restricted expression to germline cells and its frequent expression in malignancies. The goal of this study was to evaluate genetic vaccine encoding SSX-2 to prioritize human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2-specific epitopes and determine if a DNA vaccine can elicit SSX-2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) capable of lysing prostate cancer cells. HLA-A2-restricted epitopes were identified based on their in vitro binding affinity for HLA-A2 and by the ability of a genetic vaccine to elicit peptide-specific CTL in A2/DR1 (HLA-A2.1+/HLA-DR1+/H-2 class I-/class II-knockout) transgenic mice. We found that SSX-2 peptides p41-49 (KASEKIFYV) and p103-111 (RLQGISPKI) had high affinity for HLA-A2 and were immunogenic in vivo; however, peptide p103-111 was immunodominant with robust peptide-specific immune responses elicited in mice vaccinated with a plasmid DNA vaccine encoding SSX-2. Furthermore, p103-111-specific CTLs were able to lyse an HLA-A2+ prostate cancer cell line. The immunodominance of this epitope was found not to be due to a putative HLA-DR1 epitope (p98-112) flanking p103-111. Finally, we demonstrated that SSX-2 epitope-specific CTLs could be detected and cultured from the peripheral blood of HLA-A2+ prostate cancer patients, notably patients with advanced prostate cancer. Overall, we conclude that SSX-2 peptide p103-111 is an immunodominant HLA-A2-restricted epitope, and epitope-specific CD8 T cells can be detected in patients with prostate cancer, suggesting that tolerance to SSX-2 can be circumvented in vivo. Together, these findings suggest that SSX-2 may be a relevant target antigen for prostate cancer vaccine approaches. PMID:21904219

  20. Detection of Intergenerational Genetic Effects with Application to HLA-B Matching as a Risk Factor for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Childs, Erica J.; Sobel, Eric M.; Palmer, Christina G.S.; Sinsheimer, Janet S.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Methods Association studies using unrelated individuals cannot detect intergenerational genetic effects contributing to disease. To detect these effects, we improve the extended maternal-fetal genotype (EMFG) incompatibility test to estimate any combination of maternal effects, offspring effects, and their interactions at polymorphic loci or multiple SNPs, using any size pedigrees. We explore the advantages of using extended pedigrees rather than nuclear families. We apply our methods to schizophrenia pedigrees to investigate whether the previously associated mother-daughter HLA-B matching is a genuine risk or the result of bias. Results Simulations demonstrate that using the EMFG test with extended pedigrees increases power and precision, while partitioning extended pedigrees into nuclear families can underestimate intergenerational effects. Application to actual data demonstrates that mother-daughter HLA-B matching remains a schizophrenia risk factor. Furthermore, ascertainment and mate selection biases cannot by themselves explain the observed HLA-B matching and schizophrenia association. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the power of the EMFG test to examine intergenerational genetic effects, highlight the importance of pedigree rather than case/control or case-mother/control-mother designs, illustrate that pedigrees provide a means to examine alternative, non-causal mechanisms, and they strongly support the hypothesis that HLA-B matching is causally involved in the etiology of schizophrenia in females. PMID:22004985

  1. Possible involvement of the OKT4 molecule in T cell recognition of class II HLA antigens. Evidence from studies of cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for SB antigens.

    PubMed

    Biddison, W E; Rao, P E; Talle, M A; Goldstein, G; Shaw, S

    1982-10-01

    A recently described HLA gene, SB, which maps between GLO and HLA-DR, codes for Ia-like molecules that are similar to but distinct from HLA-DR molecules. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) specific for SB1, SB2, SB3, and SB4 were compared with HLA-A2-specific CTL with respect to their surface expression of the T cell differentiation antigens OKT3, OKT4, and OKT8. All CTL activity was eliminated by treatment with OKT3 and C'. The SB-specific cytotoxicity was eliminated by OKT4 plus C' but not by OKT8 plus C'. In contrast, HLA-A2-specific killing was completely susceptible to treatment with OKT8 plus C' but not with OKT4 plus C'. Cytotoxicity was analyzed in the presence of OKT8 and a series of monoclonal antibodies (OKT4A, 4B, 4C, and 4D) that react with distinct epitopes on the OKT4 molecule. SB1-, SB3-, and SB4-specific CTL were partially inhibited by OKT4A and 4B (45-75%), whereas HLA-A2-specific CTL were partially inhibited by OKT8 (48-63%) but not by OKT4. SB2-specific CTL were not inhibited (less than 26%) by OKT8 or by any of the OKT4-related antibodies. These results suggest that the OKT4 marker may be expressed on most T cells that recognize allogeneic Ia or self Ia plus foreign antigens; OKT4+ cells do not appear to be functionally homogeneous in that they can act both as helper/inducer and cytotoxic cells. Models are proposed for the functional involvement of the OKT4 molecule in T cell-Ia antigen interactions. PMID:6984061

  2. Frequent HLA class I and DP sequence mismatches in serologically (HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DR) and molecularly (HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1) HLA-identical unrelated bone marrow transplant pairs.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, P; Reinsmoen, N L; Lindstrom, A L; Boyce-Jacino, M T; Barbosa, J J; Faras, A J; McGlave, P B; Rich, S S

    1994-01-01

    The rates of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and rejection are significantly higher among recipients of unrelated donor marrow (BM) than in recipients of marrow from HLA-identical siblings, even when donors and recipients are mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) compatible and serologically and Dw identical. It has been hypothesized that phenotypically silent HLA class I and DP sequence mismatches might be associated with these differences, but little is known about their incidence. We have sequenced the HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DPA1, and HLA-DPB1 genes expressed by 12 unrelated marrow transplant pairs, 11 of whom were molecularly matched at DRB, DQA1, and DQB1 loci. Nine of these pairs were also HLA-A and HLA-B matched by serology. Six of these nine "HLA-identical" pairs were HLA-A (2 of 6), HLA-B (1 of 6), and HLA-C (6 of 6) mismatched at the sequence level. The mismatched class I alleles of all these pairs had strikingly different sequence motifs in the six specificity pockets of their antigen recognition site, and in five pairs they also had sequence differences at positions implicated in T-cell receptor (TCR) binding. Two of the three pairs who were serologically mismatched for one HLA-A or HLA-B antigen were also sequence mismatched at HLA-C. Finally, 10 of 11 pairs tested expressed different DP sequences. These data indicate that HLA class I, especially HLA-C, and DP sequence mismatches are frequent among unrelated subjects defined as HLA identical by current typing methods. We speculate that these sequence differences may explain, at least in part, the higher incidence of acute GVHD and rejection in unrelated BM transplantation as opposed to transplantation between HLA-identical siblings. Because of their high frequency, the role of HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, and HLA-DP mismatches in transplantation outcome is now amenable to direct study.

  3. Comparative structural analysis of HLA-A2 antigens distinguishable by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. II. Variant DK1: evidence for a discrete CTL recognition region.

    PubMed

    Krangel, M S; Biddison, W E; Strominger, J L

    1983-04-01

    Multiple amino acid sequence differences distinguish individual HLA antigens. Those residues important in immune recognition events have not been defined. Recent studies have identified HLA-A2 structural variants that, although serologically indistinguishable from other HLA-A2 antigens, are recognized poorly, if at all, by HLA-A2-restricted, influenza virus-immune, or HLA-A2-specific alloimmune CTL. In this study we utilize double-label tryptic peptide comparisons performed by both reverse-phase HPLC and cation exchange chromatography, in conjunction with conventional and microsequence analysis, to characterize the HLA-A2 heavy chains derived from variant DK1. We detect a single tryptic peptide that distinguishes DK1 HLA-A2 from the predominant HLA-A2 heavy chain species. This peptide spans residues 147 to 157 in the second heavy chain domain, and carries substitutions at positions 149, 152, and 156. Residues in this segment of the polypeptide are also altered in another HLA-A2 variant, as well as one H-2Kb mutant. Thus, this segment appears to be critical in forming determinants important in CTL recognition of class I antigens in general. On the basis of these and other results, we suggest that in contrast to recognition by alloantibodies, a discrete region of class I antigens may be crucial for CTL recognition. PMID:6601143

  4. Comparative structural analysis of HLA-A2 antigens distinguishable by cytotoxic T lymphocytes: variants M7 and DR1.

    PubMed

    Krangel, M S; Taketani, S; Biddison, W E; Strong, D M; Strominger, J L

    1982-11-23

    Comparative primary structural analyses have begun to elucidate polymorphic residues and segments of the class I antigens of the major histocompatibility complex, at least some of which presumably contribute to determinants important in immune recognition events. HLA-A2 structural variants have been described which are serologically indistinguishable from other HLA-A2 antigens, yet which can be recognized neither by HLA-A2 specific alloimmune nor by HLA-A2 restricted, virus immune cytotoxic T lymphocytes. This study utilizes double-label tryptic peptide comparisons in combination with both conventional and microsequence analyses to investigate the structure of two such variants, M7 and DR1. We find that these variants are identical with each other and differ from the predominant HLA-A2 heavy chain species by a glutamine to arginine substitution at residue 43, by an unidentified substitution in the tryptic peptide spanning residues 147-157, and by an as yet poorly defined alteration in glycosylation. Structural information from these and other variants should be useful in precisely defining functionally important determinants on the molecule. PMID:6983890

  5. High resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II allele typing in Mexican mestizo women with sporadic breast cancer: case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The development of breast cancer is multifactorial. Hormonal, environmental factors and genetic predisposition, among others, could interact in the presentation of breast carcinoma. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles play an important role in immunity (cellular immunity) and may be important genetic traits. HLAAllele-specific interaction has not been well established. Recently, several studies had been conducted in order to do so, but the results are controversial and in some instances contradictory. Methods We designed a case-control study to quantify the association of HLA class I and II genes and breast cancer. HLA typing was performed by high resolution sequence-specific oligotyping after DNA amplification (PCR-SSOP) of 100 breast cancer Mexican mestizo patients and 99 matched healthy controls. Results HLA-A frequencies that we were able to observe that there was no difference between both groups from the statistical viewpoint. HLA-B*1501 was found three times more common in the case group (OR, 3.714; p = 0.031). HLA-Cw is not a marker neither for risk, nor protection for the disease, because we did not find significant statistical differences between the two groups. DRB1*1301, which is expressed in seven cases and in only one control, observing an risk increase of up to seven times and DRB1*1602, which behaves similarly in being present solely in the cases (OR, 16.701; 95% CI, 0.947 – 294.670). DQ*0301-allele expression, which is much more common in the control group and could be protective for the presentation of the disease (OR, 0.078; 95% CI, 0.027–0.223, p = 0.00001). Conclusion Our results reveal the role of the MHC genes in the pathophysiology of breast cancer, suggesting that in the development of breast cancer exists a disorder of immune regulation. The triggering factor seems to be restricted to certain ethnic groups and certain geographical regions since the relevant MHC alleles are highly diverse. This is the first study in Mexican

  6. The clinical value of human leukocyte antigen HLA-DRB1 subtypes associated to Graves' disease in Romanian population.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sorina; Dutescu, Monica Irina; Sirbu, Anca; Barbu, Carmen; Albu, Alice; Florea, Suzana; Fica, Simona

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the primary susceptibility HLA-DRB1 alleles associated with GD in Romanian population and to seek whether specific HLA-DRB1 haplotypes are associated with differences in the clinical presentation of GD at diagnosis. Molecular typing of HLA-DRB1 alleles was performed in 77 Romanian Caucasian GD patients and 445 racially matched controls. In GD patients, age, presence of eye disease, goiter grade, autoantibody status and titer, TSH, FT4, FT3, TT3 levels were recorded at diagnosis. The allelic frequencies of HLA-DRB1*03 (41.55% vs. 17.75%, p < 0.0001, χ(2) = 20.81) and DRB1*11 (42.85% vs. 30.56%, p = 0.045, χ(2) = 3.98)were higher, whereas those of HLA-DRB1*01(3.89% vs. 16.40%, p = 0.007, χ(2) = 7.281) and DRB1*15 (10.38% vs. 21.34%, p = 0.038, χ(2) = 4.309)were lower in GD patients than in controls. FT4/TT3 ratio (p = 0.015) and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (p = 0.024) were higher in *03/11 patients compared to *X/X, *11/Z, *03/Y patients (where X is any other allele than *03 and *11, Y is any other allele than *11, Z is any other allele than *03). In conclusion, HLA-DRB1*03 and DRB1*11 may be the primary susceptibility HLA-DRB1 alleles associated with GD in Romanian population, whereas HLA-DRB1*01 and DRB1*15 seem to be protective. At diagnosis, HLA-DRB1*03/11 GD patients had higher FT4/TT3 ratio and anti-thyroglobulin antibody levels.

  7. HLA Antigens in Malay Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Association with Clinical and Autoantibody Expression

    PubMed Central

    Azizah, MR; Ainol, SS; Kong, NCT; Normaznah, Y; Rahim, MN

    2001-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown that certain genes within the major histocompatibility complex predispose to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and may influence clinical and autoantibody expression. Thus, we studied the frequency of HLA-DR, -DQA, -DQB and -DPB alleles in ethnic Malays with SLE to determine the role of these genes in determining disease susceptibility and their association with clinical and immunological manifestations. Methods: Fifty-six Malay SLE patients were enrolled into the study. Demographic, clinical and immunological findings were obtained from medical records. HLA-DR, DQ and DP typing were done using modified PCR-RELP. Controls were from ethnically-matched healthy individuals. Results: We found a strongly significant association of the DR2 and DQB1 *0501 and DQB1 *0601 (pcorr=0.03, rr=3.83, pcorr=0.0036, rr=4.56 and pcorr=0.0048 and rr=6.0, respectively). There was also a weak increase of DQB1 *0.201 and DPB1 *0.0901 with a weak decrease of DQA1 *0601 and DQB1 *0503 and *0301 which were not significant after corrections for multiple comparisons were made. There was a significant positive association of DR2 and DQB1 *0501 with renal involvement and DR8 with alopecia. A nonsignificant increase of DQB1 *0503 in patients with photosensitivity was noted. Significant autoantibody associations were also found: DQB1 *0601 with anti-Sm/RNP, DR2 with antiSSA (Ro)/SSB (La), and DR2, DQB1 *0501 and *0601 with antibodies to ds DNA. There was no specific DR, DQ or DP associations with age of disease onset (below 30 years or those at or above 30 years). Conclusion: Our data suggests the role of the HLA class II genes in conferring SLE susceptibility and in clinical and autoantibody expression PMID:11590899

  8. Vaccines Targeting the Cancer Testis Antigen SSX-2 Elicit HLA-A2 Epitope-Specific Cytolytic T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heath A.; McNeel, Douglas G.

    2011-01-01

    The cancer-testis antigen SSX-2 is a potentially attractive target for tumor immunotherapy based upon its tissue-restricted expression to germline cells and its frequent expression in malignancies. The goal of the current study was to evaluate a genetic vaccine encoding SSX-2 to prioritize HLA-A2-specific epitopes and determine if a DNA vaccine can elicit SSX-2-specific cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) capable of lysing prostate cancer cells. HLA-A2-restricted epitopes were identified based on their in vitro binding affinity for HLA-A2 and by the ability of a genetic vaccine to elicit peptide-specific CTL in A2/DR1 (HLA-A2.1+/HLA-DR1+/H-2 class I-/class II-knockout) transgenic mice. We found that SSX-2 peptides p41-49 (KASEKIFYV) and p103-111 (RLQGISPKI) had high affinity for HLA-A2 and were immunogenic in vivo, however peptide p103-111 was immunodominant with robust peptide-specific immune responses elicited in mice vaccinated with a plasmid DNA vaccine encoding SSX-2. Furthermore, p103-111-specific CTL were able to lyse an HLA-A2+ prostate cancer cell line. The immunodominance of this epitope was found not to be due to a putative HLA-DR1 epitope (p98-112) flanking p103-111. Finally, we demonstrated that SSX-2 epitope-specific CTL could be detected and cultured from the peripheral blood of HLA-A2+ prostate cancer patients, notably patients with advanced prostate cancer. Overall, we conclude that SSX-2 peptide p103-111 is an immunodominant HLA-A2-restricted epitope, and epitope-specific CD8+ T cells can be detected in patients with prostate cancer, suggesting that tolerance to SSX-2 can be circumvented in vivo. Together, these findings suggest that SSX-2 may be a relevant target antigen for prostate cancer vaccine approaches. PMID:21904219

  9. Protective Human Leucocyte Antigen Haplotype, HLA-DRB1*01-B*14, against Chronic Chagas Disease in Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    del Puerto, Florencia; Nishizawa, Juan Eiki; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Roca, Yelin; Avilas, Cinthia; Gianella, Alberto; Lora, Javier; Velarde, Freddy Udalrico Gutierrez; Miura, Sachio; Komiya, Norihiro; Maemura, Koji; Hirayama, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by the flagellate parasite Trypanosoma cruzi affects 8–10 million people in Latin America. The mechanisms that underlie the development of complications of chronic Chagas disease, characterized primarily by pathology of the heart and digestive system, are not currently understood. To identify possible host genetic factors that may influence the clinical course of Chagas disease, Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA) regional gene polymorphism was analyzed in patients presenting with differing clinical symptoms. Methodology Two hundred and twenty nine chronic Chagas disease patients in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, were examined by serological tests, electrocardiogram (ECG), and Barium enema colon X-ray. 31.4% of the examinees showed ECG alterations, 15.7% megacolon and 58.1% showed neither of them. A further 62 seropositive megacolon patients who had undergone colonectomy due to acute abdomen were recruited. We analyzed their HLA genetic polymorphisms (HLA-A, HLA-B, MICA, MICB, DRB1 and TNF-alpha promoter region) mainly through Sequence based and LABType SSO typing test using LUMINEX Technology. Principal Findings The frequencies of HLA-DRB1*01 and HLA-B*14:02 were significantly lower in patients suffering from megacolon as well as in those with ECG alteration and/or megacolon compared with a group of patients with indeterminate symptoms. The DRB1*0102, B*1402 and MICA*011 alleles were in strong Linkage Disequilibrium (LD), and the HLA-DRB1*01-B*14-MICA*011haplotype was associated with resistance against chronic Chagas disease. Conclusions This is the first report of HLA haplotype association with resistance to chronic Chagas disease. PMID:22448298

  10. The impact of HLA class I and EBV latency-II antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells on the pathogenesis of EBV(+) Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jones, K; Wockner, L; Brennan, R M; Keane, C; Chattopadhyay, P K; Roederer, M; Price, D A; Cole, D K; Hassan, B; Beck, K; Gottlieb, D; Ritchie, D S; Seymour, J F; Vari, F; Crooks, P; Burrows, S R; Gandhi, M K

    2016-02-01

    In 40% of cases of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latency-II antigens [EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)/latent membrane protein (LMP)1/LMP2A] are present (EBV(+) cHL) in the malignant cells and antigen presentation is intact. Previous studies have shown consistently that HLA-A*02 is protective in EBV(+) cHL, yet its role in disease pathogenesis is unknown. To explore the basis for this observation, gene expression was assessed in 33 cHL nodes. Interestingly, CD8 and LMP2A expression were correlated strongly and, for a given LMP2A level, CD8 was elevated markedly in HLA-A*02(-) versus HLA-A*02(+) EBV(+) cHL patients, suggesting that LMP2A-specific CD8(+) T cell anti-tumoral immunity may be relatively ineffective in HLA-A*02(-) EBV(+) cHL. To ascertain the impact of HLA class I on EBV latency antigen-specific immunodominance, we used a stepwise functional T cell approach. In newly diagnosed EBV(+) cHL, the magnitude of ex-vivo LMP1/2A-specific CD8(+) T cell responses was elevated in HLA-A*02(+) patients. Furthermore, in a controlled in-vitro assay, LMP2A-specific CD8(+) T cells from healthy HLA-A*02 heterozygotes expanded to a greater extent with HLA-A*02-restricted compared to non-HLA-A*02-restricted cell lines. In an extensive analysis of HLA class I-restricted immunity, immunodominant EBNA3A/3B/3C-specific CD8(+) T cell responses were stimulated by numerous HLA class I molecules, whereas the subdominant LMP1/2A-specific responses were confined largely to HLA-A*02. Our results demonstrate that HLA-A*02 mediates a modest, but none the less stronger, EBV-specific CD8(+) T cell response than non-HLA-A*02 alleles, an effect confined to EBV latency-II antigens. Thus, the protective effect of HLA-A*02 against EBV(+) cHL is not a surrogate association, but reflects the impact of HLA class I on EBV latency-II antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell hierarchies.

  11. Transgenic antigen-specific, HLA-A*02:01-allo-restricted cytotoxic T cells recognize tumor-associated target antigen STEAP1 with high specificity.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, David; Grünewald, Thomas G P; Klar, Richard; Schmidt, Oxana; Wohlleber, Dirk; Rubío, Rebeca Alba; Uckert, Wolfgang; Thiel, Uwe; Bohne, Felix; Busch, Dirk H; Krackhardt, Angela M; Burdach, Stefan; Richter, Günther H S

    2016-06-01

    Pediatric cancers, including Ewing sarcoma (ES), are only weakly immunogenic and the tumor-patients' immune system often is devoid of effector T cells for tumor elimination. Based on expression profiling technology, targetable tumor-associated antigens (TAA) are identified and exploited for engineered T-cell therapy. Here, the specific recognition and lytic potential of transgenic allo-restricted CD8(+) T cells, directed against the ES-associated antigen 6-transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate 1 (STEAP1), was examined. Following repetitive STEAP1(130) peptide-driven stimulations with HLA-A*02:01(+) dendritic cells (DC), allo-restricted HLA-A*02:01(-) CD8(+) T cells were sorted with HLA-A*02:01/peptide multimers and expanded by limiting dilution. After functional analysis of suitable T cell clones via ELISpot, flow cytometry and xCELLigence assay, T cell receptors' (TCR) α- and β-chains were identified, cloned into retroviral vectors, codon optimized, transfected into HLA-A*02:01(-) primary T cell populations and tested again for specificity and lytic capacity in vitro and in a Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) mouse model. Initially generated transgenic T cells specifically recognized STEAP1(130)-pulsed or transfected cells in the context of HLA-A*02:01 with minimal cross-reactivity as determined by specific interferon-γ (IFNγ) release, lysed cells and inhibited growth of HLA-A*02:01(+) ES lines more effectively than HLA-A*02:01(-) ES lines. In vivo tumor growth was inhibited more effectively with transgenic STEAP1(130)-specific T cells than with unspecific T cells. Our results identify TCRs capable of recognizing and inhibiting growth of STEAP1-expressing HLA-A*02:01(+) ES cells in vitro and in vivo in a highly restricted manner. As STEAP1 is overexpressed in a wide variety of cancers, we anticipate these STEAP1-specific TCRs to be potentially useful for immunotherapy of other STEAP1-expressing tumors. PMID:27471654

  12. Allele-Independent Turnover of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class Ia Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Prevosto, Claudia; Usmani, M. Farooq; McDonald, Sarah; Gumienny, Aleksandra M.; Key, Tim; Goodman, Reyna S.; Gaston, J. S. Hill; Deery, Michael J.; Busch, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) glycoproteins present cytosolic peptides to CD8+ T cells and regulate NK cell activity. Their heavy chains (HC) are expressed from up to three MHC gene loci (human leukocyte antigen [HLA]-A, -B, and -C in humans), whose extensive polymorphism maps predominantly to the antigen-binding groove, diversifying the bound peptide repertoire. Codominant expression of MHCI alleles is thus functionally critical, but how it is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we have examined the effect of polymorphism on the turnover rates of MHCI molecules in cell lines with functional MHCI peptide loading pathways and in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). Proteins were labeled biosynthetically with heavy water (2H2O), folded MHCI molecules immunoprecipitated, and tryptic digests analysed by mass spectrometry. MHCI-derived peptides were assigned to specific alleles and isotypes, and turnover rates quantified by 2H incorporation, after correcting for cell growth. MHCI turnover half-lives ranged from undetectable to a few hours, depending on cell type, activation state, donor, and MHCI isotype. However, in all settings, the turnover half-lives of alleles of the same isotype were similar. Thus, MHCI protein turnover rates appear to be allele-independent in normal human cells. We propose that this is an important feature enabling the normal function and codominant expression of MHCI alleles. PMID:27529174

  13. Differences in HLA antigens between patients with mixed connective tissue disease and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Ruuska, P; Hämeenkorpi, R; Forsberg, S; Julkunen, H; Mäkitalo, R; Ilonen, J; Tiilikainen, A

    1992-01-01

    Patients with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD, n = 32) or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, n = 60) were typed for HLA-A, B, C, Dw, and DR antigens. All patients with SLE fulfilled at least four criteria of SLE and the patients with MCTD met the criteria proposed by Alarcon-Segovia (1989). The presence of antibodies to Sm was not considered as an exclusion for MCTD. In the patients with SLE, Dw3, DR3, and the associated B8 and A1 antigens were increased, whereas in the patients with MCTD an increased frequency of Dw4 was found (45 v 18% in controls v 14% in SLE). Of the subtypes of DR4, Dw4 was present in all but one of the DR4 positive patients. The frequency of DR4 in patients with MCTD (52%) differed significantly from that of controls (28%). The strong association of MCTD to one DR4 subtype was further seen in the significantly increased frequency of the B15, DR4 combination. Thus the genetic background seems to be different in patients with MCTD from that in patients with SLE. This could partly explain the clinical differences between these diseases. PMID:1540038

  14. Clinical subgroups and HLA antigens in Italian patients with psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Salvarani, C; Macchioni, P L; Zizzi, F; Mantovani, W; Rossi, F; Baricchi, R; Ghirelli, L; Frizziero, L; Portioli, I

    1989-01-01

    The frequencies of HLA antigens were studied in 101 Italian patients with psoriatic arthritis. The total group showed a significant increase in frequency of A1 and B38, and a reduction of B5 when compared to healthy controls. No association between DR and/or DQw antigens and PA were demonstrated. The comparisons between the clinical subgroups and normal controls revealed a significant association of B38 with asymmetric peripheral arthritis, B27 and B39 with spondylitis (with or without peripheral involvement). When intergroup comparison were made, the patients with spondylitis had an increase in frequency of B27 and DQw3 as compared to those with symmetric and asymmetric peripheral disease. DR4 and DRw53 were associated with earlier age of onset of arthritis. There were also significant associations between DQw3 and severe disease, and between A9, B5 and presence of erosions and joint space narrowing. No association with DR4 was showed in a subgroup of patients with symmetric polyarthritis without DIP involvement. PMID:2591112

  15. Allele-Independent Turnover of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class Ia Molecules.

    PubMed

    Prevosto, Claudia; Usmani, M Farooq; McDonald, Sarah; Gumienny, Aleksandra M; Key, Tim; Goodman, Reyna S; Gaston, J S Hill; Deery, Michael J; Busch, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) glycoproteins present cytosolic peptides to CD8+ T cells and regulate NK cell activity. Their heavy chains (HC) are expressed from up to three MHC gene loci (human leukocyte antigen [HLA]-A, -B, and -C in humans), whose extensive polymorphism maps predominantly to the antigen-binding groove, diversifying the bound peptide repertoire. Codominant expression of MHCI alleles is thus functionally critical, but how it is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we have examined the effect of polymorphism on the turnover rates of MHCI molecules in cell lines with functional MHCI peptide loading pathways and in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). Proteins were labeled biosynthetically with heavy water (2H2O), folded MHCI molecules immunoprecipitated, and tryptic digests analysed by mass spectrometry. MHCI-derived peptides were assigned to specific alleles and isotypes, and turnover rates quantified by 2H incorporation, after correcting for cell growth. MHCI turnover half-lives ranged from undetectable to a few hours, depending on cell type, activation state, donor, and MHCI isotype. However, in all settings, the turnover half-lives of alleles of the same isotype were similar. Thus, MHCI protein turnover rates appear to be allele-independent in normal human cells. We propose that this is an important feature enabling the normal function and codominant expression of MHCI alleles. PMID:27529174

  16. Donor-Recipient Matching for KIR Genotypes Reduces Chronic GVHD and Missing Inhibitory KIR Ligands Protect against Relapse after Myeloablative, HLA Matched Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Faridi, Rehan Mujeeb; Kemp, Taylor J.; Dharmani-Khan, Poonam; Lewis, Victor; Rajalingam, Raja; Berka, Noureddine; Storek, Jan; Masood Khan, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Background Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can be curative for many hematologic diseases. However, complications such as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and relapse of primary malignancy remain significant and are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Effects of killer Ig-like receptors (KIR)-influenced NK cells on HCT outcomes have been extensively pursued over the last decade. However, the relevance of the reported algorithms on HLA matched myeloablative HCT with rabbit antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is used for GVHD prophylaxis remains elusive. Here we examined the role of KIR and KIR-ligands of donor-recipient pairs in modifying the outcomes of ATG conditioned HLA matched sibling and unrelated donor HCT Methods and Findings The study cohort consisted of 281 HLA matched sibling and unrelated donor-recipient pairs of first allogeneic marrow or blood stem cell transplantation allocated into ‘discovery’ (135 pairs) and ‘validation’ (146 pairs) cohorts. High resolution HLA typing was obtained from the medical charts and KIR gene repertoires were obtained by a Luminex® based SSO method. All surviving patients were followed-up for a minimum of two years. KIR and HLA class I distributions of HCT pairs were stratified as per applicable definitions and were tested for their association with cause specific outcomes [acute GVHD grade II-IV (aGVHD), chronic GVHD needing systemic therapy (cGVHD) and relapse] using a multivariate competing risks regression model as well as with survival outcomes [relapse-free survival (RFS), cGVHD & relapse free survival (cGRFS) and overall survival (OS)] by multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model. A significant association between KIR genotype mismatching (KIR-B/x donor into KIR-AA recipient or vice versa) and cGVHD was found in both discovery (p = 0.001; SHR = 2.78; 95%CI: 1.50–5.17) and validation cohorts (p = 0.005; SHR = 2.61; 95%CI: 1.33–5.11). High incidence of cGVHD associated

  17. HLA-A is a Predictor of Hepatitis B e Antigen Status in HIV-Positive African Adults.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Philippa C; Carlson, Jonathan M; Beloukas, Apostolos; Malik, Amna; Jooste, Pieter; Ogwu, Anthony; Shapiro, Roger; Riddell, Lynn; Chen, Fabian; Luzzi, Graz; Jesuthasan, Gerald; Jeffery, Katie; Jojic, Nebojsa; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Carrington, Mary; Goulder, Philip J R; Geretti, Anna Maria; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-04-15

    Outcomes of chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) are varied, with increased morbidity reported in the context of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. The factors driving different outcomes are not well understood, but there is increasing interest in an HLA class I effect. We therefore studied the influence of HLA class I on HBV in an African HIV-positive cohort. We demonstrated that virologic markers of HBV disease activity (hepatitis B e antigen status or HBV DNA level) are associated with HLA-A genotype. This finding supports the role of the CD8(+) T-cell response in HBV control, and potentially informs future therapeutic T-cell vaccine strategies. PMID:26655301

  18. Enhancement by gamma-interferon of in vivo tumor radiolocalization by a monoclonal antibody against HLA-DR antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Rowlinson, G.; Balkwill, F.; Snook, D.; Hooker, G.; Epenetos, A.A.

    1986-12-01

    Athymic nu/nu (nude) mice bearing s.c. human breast tumors were treated systemically with recombinant human gamma-interferon. These tumors were phenotypically negative for HLA-DR prior to therapy, but after 4 days of treatment, 80% of the cells expressed this antigen in vivo as assessed by immunoperoxidase (F. R. Balkwill et al., Eur. J. Cancer Clin. Oncol., in press, 1986). A radioiodine-labeled murine monoclonal antibody (TAL-1B5) against HLA-DR specifically localized to the tumors in recombinant human gamma-interferon-treated but not in control mice. An isotype-identical murine monoclonal antibody that did not react with control or recombinant human gamma-interferon-treated tumors did not show any specific localization. These results demonstrate that specific localization to tumors of radio-labeled monoclonal antibodies to HLA-DR can be facilitated by systemic therapy with gamma-interferon.

  19. HLA-A is a Predictor of Hepatitis B e Antigen Status in HIV-Positive African Adults

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Philippa C.; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Beloukas, Apostolos; Malik, Amna; Jooste, Pieter; Ogwu, Anthony; Shapiro, Roger; Riddell, Lynn; Chen, Fabian; Luzzi, Graz; Jesuthasan, Gerald; Jeffery, Katie; Jojic, Nebojsa; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Carrington, Mary; Goulder, Philip J. R.; Geretti, Anna Maria; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Outcomes of chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) are varied, with increased morbidity reported in the context of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. The factors driving different outcomes are not well understood, but there is increasing interest in an HLA class I effect. We therefore studied the influence of HLA class I on HBV in an African HIV-positive cohort. We demonstrated that virologic markers of HBV disease activity (hepatitis B e antigen status or HBV DNA level) are associated with HLA-A genotype. This finding supports the role of the CD8+ T-cell response in HBV control, and potentially informs future therapeutic T-cell vaccine strategies. PMID:26655301

  20. Defining the HLA class I‐associated viral antigen repertoire from HIV‐1‐infected human cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongbing; Partridge, Thomas; Llano, Anuska; Cedeño, Samandhy; Fischer, Roman; Charles, Philip D.; Dudek, Nadine L.; Mothe, Beatriz; Crespo, Manuel; Fischer, William M.; Korber, Bette T. M.; Nielsen, Morten; Borrow, Persephone; Purcell, Anthony W.; Brander, Christian; Dorrell, Lucy; Kessler, Benedikt M.; Hanke, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Recognition and eradication of infected cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes is a key defense mechanism against intracellular pathogens. High‐throughput definition of HLA class I‐associated immunopeptidomes by mass spectrometry is an increasingly important analytical tool to advance our understanding of the induction of T‐cell responses against pathogens such as HIV‐1. We utilized a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry workflow including de novo‐assisted database searching to define the HLA class I‐associated immunopeptidome of HIV‐1‐infected human cells. We here report for the first time the identification of 75 HIV‐1‐derived peptides bound to HLA class I complexes that were purified directly from HIV‐1‐infected human primary CD4+ T cells and the C8166 human T‐cell line. Importantly, one‐third of eluted HIV‐1 peptides had not been previously known to be presented by HLA class I. Over 82% of the identified sequences originated from viral protein regions for which T‐cell responses have previously been reported but for which the precise HLA class I‐binding sequences have not yet been defined. These results validate and expand the current knowledge of virus‐specific antigenic peptide presentation during HIV‐1 infection and provide novel targets for T‐cell vaccine development. PMID:26467324

  1. Intra-arterial transplantation of HLA-matched donor mesoangioblasts in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Cossu, Giulio; Previtali, Stefano C; Napolitano, Sara; Cicalese, Maria Pia; Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Nicastro, Francesca; Noviello, Maddalena; Roostalu, Urmas; Natali Sora, Maria Grazia; Scarlato, Marina; De Pellegrin, Maurizio; Godi, Claudia; Giuliani, Serena; Ciotti, Francesca; Tonlorenzi, Rossana; Lorenzetti, Isabella; Rivellini, Cristina; Benedetti, Sara; Gatti, Roberto; Marktel, Sarah; Mazzi, Benedetta; Tettamanti, Andrea; Ragazzi, Martina; Imro, Maria Adele; Marano, Giuseppina; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Fiori, Rossana; Sormani, Maria Pia; Bonini, Chiara; Venturini, Massimo; Politi, Letterio S; Torrente, Yvan; Ciceri, Fabio

    2015-12-01

    Intra-arterial transplantation of mesoangioblasts proved safe and partially efficacious in preclinical models of muscular dystrophy. We now report the first-in-human, exploratory, non-randomized open-label phase I-IIa clinical trial of intra-arterial HLA-matched donor cell transplantation in 5 Duchenne patients. We administered escalating doses of donor-derived mesoangioblasts in limb arteries under immunosuppressive therapy (tacrolimus). Four consecutive infusions were performed at 2-month intervals, preceded and followed by clinical, laboratory, and muscular MRI analyses. Two months after the last infusion, a muscle biopsy was performed. Safety was the primary endpoint. The study was relatively safe: One patient developed a thalamic stroke with no clinical consequences and whose correlation with mesoangioblast infusion remained unclear. MRI documented the progression of the disease in 4/5 patients. Functional measures were transiently stabilized in 2/3 ambulant patients, but no functional improvements were observed. Low level of donor DNA was detected in muscle biopsies of 4/5 patients and donor-derived dystrophin in 1. Intra-arterial transplantation of donor mesoangioblasts in human proved to be feasible and relatively safe. Future implementation of the protocol, together with a younger age of patients, will be needed to approach efficacy. PMID:26543057

  2. An evaluation of HLA cross-reactive group matching on graft survival in deceased donor kidney recipients.

    PubMed

    Lazda, V A; Mozes, M F

    2005-03-01

    Since September 20, 1999, our organ procurement organization (OPO) serving an ethnically diverse local distribution area has allocated kidneys using a cross-reactive group (CREG)-based variance. This variance awards 7 points for 0-CREG,0-DR mismatches and 6 points for 0-A,B mismatches in addition to points given for waiting time (3) and panel-reactive antibodies (PRA) > or = 80% (3). Previously, we have shown that awarding points for 0-CREG,0-DR mismatches in kidney allocation improves the access to HLA-matched transplants for racial groups, especially for the black race. In this study, we evaluated if there are outcome benefits as well. One- and 3-year uncensored graft survival data and analyses for the influence of HLA mismatching on graft outcome in black and nonblack recipients were provided by Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR). Overall, 1-year graft survival was 87.4% and not significantly different for blacks (86.1%, n = 467) vs nonblacks (88.8%, n = 730); 3-year graft survival was 74.6% and significantly lower P = .0001 for blacks (68.5%, n = 480) vs nonblacks (78.4%, n = 765). No significant advantage was observed for either the black or nonblack recipients in any of the HLA-mismatched categories, including the 0-CREG,0-DR mismatch group. An HLA matching effect also was not seen when data were stratified for patients nonsensitized (PRA < or = 10%) and sensitized (PRA > 10%) at the time of transplantation, except for the improved graft survival in sensitized nonblack recipients of 0- A,B,DR-mismatched grafts. Of the patients who lost their grafts and returned to the waiting list for retransplantation, the 0-A,B,DR mismatched were the least sensitized group (6%, n = 16), and there was a trend for less sensitization in the 0-CREG,0-DR-mismatched group (33%, n = 9), compared to those with other HLA mismatches (68%, n = 137). Thus, based on 1-year and 3-year follow-up data, there are no apparent graft outcome benefits for either CREG matching

  3. Recognition of HLA-A2 and -B7 antigens by cloned cytotoxic T lymphocytes after gene transfer into human and monkey, but not mouse, cells.

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, J A; Mentzer, S J; Minowada, G; Strominger, J L; Burakoff, S J; Biro, P A

    1984-01-01

    The genes that code for the human major histocompatibility class I antigens, HLA-A2 and HLA-B7, were introduced into human, monkey, and mouse cell lines by cotransfection with suitable biochemical markers and the fluorescence-activated cell sorter was used to identify and/or select stable cell populations expressing high surface levels of these antigens. Levels of expression obtained were similar to those observed for endogenous HLA antigens on various human cell lines and were 25-80% of those observed on the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line JY. Serologically defined HLA-A2 and HLA-B7 polymorphic determinants remained intact on all transfected recipient cells analyzed. Cloned human allospecific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) specific for HLA-A2 or HLA-B7 were capable of lysing appropriate HLA-transfected human cells with comparable efficiency to JY cell lysis. Two of 10 CTL clones lysed appropriate monkey cell transfectants with approximately equal to 20% the efficiency of human cell transfectants. No specific lysis of any HLA-transfected mouse cell lines, including a B cell lymphoma, was observed despite comparable levels of surface antigen expression or after induction of higher levels by mouse gamma-interferon. Furthermore, L cells expressing human beta 2-microglobulin in addition to HLA-A2 or -B7 were not lysed by these CTL. Thus, an additional species-specific component may be involved in lysis by allogeneic CTL--possibly related to the function(s) of other surface proteins on target cells. PMID:6390442

  4. Structural basis for the specific recognition of the major antigenic peptide from the Japanese cedar pollen allergen Cry j 1 by HLA-DP5.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Seisuke; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Satta, Yoko; Ohsawa, Noboru; Uchikubo-Kamo, Tomomi; Wakiyama, Motoaki; Ikeda, Mariko; Terada, Takaho; Yamamoto, Ken; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Shirouzu, Mikako; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2014-08-26

    The major allergen, Cry j 1, was isolated from Japanese cedar Cryptomeria japonica (Cry j) pollen and was shown to react with immunoglobulin E antibodies in the sera from pollinosis patients. We previously reported that the frequency of HLA-DP5 was significantly higher in pollinosis patients and the immunodominant peptides from Cry j 1 bound to HLA-DP5 to activate Th2 cells. In the present study, we determined the crystal structure of the HLA-DP5 heterodimer in complex with a Cry j 1-derived nine-residue peptide, at 2.4Å resolution. The peptide-binding groove recognizes the minimal peptide with 10 hydrogen bonds, including those between the negatively charged P1 pocket and the Lys side chain at the first position in the peptide sequence. We confirmed that HLA-DP5 exhibits the same Cry j 1-binding mode in solution, through pull-down experiments using structure-based mutations of Cry j 1. We also identified the characteristic residues of HLA-DP5 that are responsible for the distinct properties of the groove, by comparing the structure of HLA-DP5 and the previously reported structures of HLA-DP2 in complexes with pDRA of the self-antigen. The comparison revealed that the HLA-DP5·pCry j 1 complex forms several hydrogen bond/salt bridge networks between the receptor and the antigen that were not observed in the HLA-DP2·pDRA complex. Evolutionary considerations have led us to conclude that HLA-DP5 and HLA-DP2 represent two major groups of the HLA-DP family, in which the properties of the P1 and P4 pockets have evolved and acquired the present ranges of epitope peptide-binding specificities.

  5. HLA Type Inference via Haplotypes Identical by Descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setty, Manu N.; Gusev, Alexander; Pe'Er, Itsik

    The Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) genes play a major role in adaptive immune response and are used to differentiate self antigens from non self ones. HLA genes are hyper variable with nearly every locus harboring over a dozen alleles. This variation plays an important role in susceptibility to multiple autoimmune diseases and needs to be matched on for organ transplantation. Unfortunately, HLA typing by serological methods is time consuming and expensive compared to high throughput Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) data. We present a new computational method to infer per-locus HLA types using shared segments Identical By Descent (IBD), inferred from SNP genotype data. IBD information is modeled as graph where shared haplotypes are explored among clusters of individuals with known and unknown HLA types to identify the latter. We analyze performance of the method in a previously typed subset of the HapMap population, achieving accuracy of 96% in HLA-A, 94% in HLA-B, 95% in HLA-C, 77% in HLA-DR1, 93% in HLA-DQA1 and 90% in HLA-DQB1 genes. We compare our method to a tag SNP based approach and demonstrate higher sensitivity and specificity. Our method demonstrates the power of using shared haplotype segments for large-scale imputation at the HLA locus.

  6. Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes as probes of HLA polymorphism. Heterogeneity of T cell-restricting determinants associated with the serologically defined HLA-A2 antigen.

    PubMed

    Gaston, J S; Rickinson, A B; Epstein, M A

    1983-08-01

    Epstein-Barr (EB) virus-specific effector T cell lines were established from nine virus-immune donors positive for the serologically defined HLA-A2 antigen; of these, four lines contained a demonstrable A2-restricted cytotoxic component. When these four effector populations were each tested on the same panel of EB virus-transformed lines from 20 HLA-A2-positive individuals, 16 of the target cell lines were consistently killed at levels above 25% of the relevant autologous cell lysis. Cytotoxicity appeared to be mediated through a restricting determinant associated with the 'common A2' antigen that these lines shared; indeed the lysis could be specifically blocked by high concentrations of an HLA-A2-specific monoclonal antibody. In contrast, 4 out of 20 target cell lines were not killed by HLA-A2-restricted effector cells, even though they did express the serologically defined A2 antigen and were found in other tests to be susceptible to EB virus-specific cytolysis restricted through other HLA-A or -B antigens on their surface. These results suggest that EB virus-specific cytotoxic T cells can distinguish between serologically identical HLA-A2 molecules via the heterogeneity of their T cell-restricting determinants. Data from one of the effector cell populations further suggested that a serologically defined cross-reaction between the otherwise distinct HLA-A2 and -Bw57 antigens might also be reflected in a cross-reactivity of T cell-restricting determinants. PMID:6193217

  7. Influence of HLA-DRB1 Alleles on the Variations of Antibody Response to Tuberculosis Serodiagnostic Antigens in Active Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fangbin; Xu, Xindong; Wu, Sijia; Cui, Xiaobing; Fan, Lin; Pan, Weiqing

    2016-01-01

    Serology-based tests for tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis, though rapid, efficient and easily implemented, have so far shown unsatisfactory levels of sensitivity and specificity, probably due to variations of the antibody response in TB patients. The number and types of seropositive antigens vary from individual to individual. The person-to-person variations of antigen recognition may be linked to genetic polymorphisms of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II alleles. In the present study, we find that there is a significant increase in the frequency of HLA-DRB1*14 (P = 2.5×10−4) among subjects with high antibody response levels compared to those with low antibody levels. HLA-DRB1*15, the most frequent allelic group in the studied active TB population, positively correlates with subjects with low antibody response levels rather than subjects with high antibody response levels (P = 0.005), which indicates the loss of relevant antigens for screening of patients with this allelic group. The potential association between HLA-DRB1 allelic group and individual antigens implies that TB diagnostic yield could be improved by the addition of antigens screened at the proteome scale in infected subjects from the HLA-DRB1*15 allelic group. PMID:27788190

  8. A monoclonal antibody that recognizes an antigenic determinant shared by HLA A2 and B17.

    PubMed

    McMichael, A J; Parham, P; Rust, N; Brodsky, F

    1980-09-01

    A hybridoma monoclonal anti-HLA antibody has been produced by the technique of Kohler and Milstein [1]. This antibody recognizes a new specificity common to HLA A2 and B17. It was shown to be a single antibody by isoelectric focusing and absorption experiments.

  9. Tissue typing for hematopoietic cell transplantation: newer techniques and newer antigens for which cross-matching is helpful.

    PubMed

    Iannone, Robert; Davies, Stella M

    2005-12-01

    Refinements in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing techniques for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) have permitted a more precise assessment of donor-recipient histocompatibility, which has impacted transplantation outcomes. More recently, differences in transplant outcomes associated with killer immunoglobulin-like receptor compatibility have emphasized the potential importance of natural killer (NK) cell typing in HCT. This article reviews the current state of the art for HCT donor selection based on both HLA and NK cell typing. PMID:16305621

  10. Structural identity between HLA-A2 antigens differentially recognized by alloreactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Castaño, A R; Lauzurica, P; Domenech, N; López de Castro, J A

    1991-05-01

    Alloreactive CTL raised against HLA-A2 Ag often display heterogeneous recognition of HLA-A2+ target cells. This heterogeneity has been found to reflect structural polymorphism among the corresponding target Ag, thus defining HLA-A2 subtypes. A previous study (van der Poel et al. 1986. Human Immunol. 16:247) established the existence of a new HLA-A2.4 variant, A2-SCHU, that was distinguished from A*0206 (A2.4a) by HLA-A2-specific alloreactive CTL. The same CTL subdivided HLA-A2.1 Ag into two subgroups. In the present study, the molecular basis of this heterogeneity has been examined by double-label comparative peptide mapping analysis of differentially recognized A2.1 and A2.4 Ag. In addition, we have determined the complete sequence of polymerase chain reaction-amplified full length cDNA from A2-SCHU. The results show that: 1) A2-SCHU is indistinguishable from A*0206 by peptide mapping; 2) the cDNA sequence of A2-SCHU is identical to that of A*0206; and 3) two differentially recognized A2.1 Ag are both indistinguishable from A*0201 by comparative peptide mapping. These results indicate that differential recognition by alloreactive CTL can occur among structurally identical class I HLA Ag and suggest that allorecognition by such CTL may involve corecognition of endogenous peptides, presumably derived from polymorphic proteins. PMID:2016531

  11. Allelic frequencies of the HLA-B17 antigen group: comparative analysis by serology, IEF and PCR-SSOP typing.

    PubMed

    Levine, J E; Yang, S Y

    1995-11-01

    Current typing technology for class I HLA antigens uses serological and/or isoelectric focusing gel electrophoresis. DNA typing for the HLA class I antigens can accurately identify the class I genotype of individuals and cell lines. Here, we report correlation of DNA typing results with serological and IEF results for the B17 group. The B17 antigens are relatively common, being carried by almost 9% of Caucasians and 28% of blacks. In this study, five 10th International Histocompatibility Workshop cell lines carrying B17 and 106 individuals in 61 families carrying B17 were DNA typed for B17 using B17-allele-specific amplification and sequence specific oligonucleotide probe hybridization pattern analysis. 38 (55.07%) out of 69 unrelated haplotypes had B*5701, 23 (33.33%) had B*5801, 6 (8.70%) had B*5702, and 2 (2.90%) had B*5802. DNA typing results correlated well with serological and isoelectric focusing results. In general, there was high degree of agreement between all three methods, although heterozygosity for B17 poses a particular problem for serological and IEF methodology. Both B*5701 and B*5801 have the same electrophoretic mobility on IEF gel, corresponding to B17.2, B*5702 corresponds to B17.1, while B*5802 corresponds to B17.3.

  12. Identification of a naturally processed HLA-A*02:01-restricted CTL epitope from the human tumor-associated antigen Nectin-4.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Marc; Ghidouche, Abderrezak; Rochas, Caroline; Godelaine, Danièle; Carrasco, Javier; Colau, Didier; Hames, Gérald; Montero-Julian, Félix A; Coulie, Pierre G; Olive, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Nectin-4 is a tumor antigen present on the surface of breast, ovarian and lung carcinoma cells. It is rarely present in normal adult tissues and is therefore a candidate target for cancer immunotherapy. Here, we identified a Nectin-4 antigenic peptide that is naturally presented to T cells by HLA-A2 molecules. We first screened the 502 nonamer peptides of Nectin-4 (510 amino acids) for binding to and off-rate from eight different HLA class I molecules. We then combined biochemical, cellular and algorithmic assays to select 5 Nectin-4 peptides that bound to HLA-A*02:01 molecules. Cytolytic T lymphocytes were obtained from healthy donors, that specifically lyzed HLA-A2(+) cells pulsed with 2 out of the 5 peptides, indicating the presence of anti-Nectin-4 CD8(+) T lymphocytes in the human T cell repertoire. Finally, an HLA-A2-restricted cytolytic T cell clone derived from a breast cancer patient recognized peptide Nectin-4145-153 (VLVPPLPSL) and lyzed HLA-A2(+) Nectin-4(+) breast carcinoma cells. These results indicate that peptide Nectin-4145-153 is naturally processed for recognition by T cells on HLA-A2 molecules. It could be used to monitor antitumor T cell responses or to immunize breast cancer patients.

  13. HLA Class I typing of volunteers for a bone marrow registry: QC analysis by DNA-based methodology identifies serological typing discrepancies in the assignment of HLA-A and B antigens.

    PubMed

    Gourley, I S; Kearns, J; McKeen, M; Birkos, S; Brown, M; Kamoun, Malek

    2002-03-01

    Until recently, the majority of newly recruited volunteer donors were typed for HLA-A and -B by serology onto the National Marrow Donor Program Registry. Quality control of this serological typing performed by contracted laboratories was carried out by retesting approximately 1% of each laboratory's test volume utilizing DNA-based techniques (SSOP). The criteria used for selection included samples presumed to be homozygotes, samples with split antigen specificities and samples with antigens considered to be difficult to define. Out of 1983 samples analyzed, 156 HLA-A (3.9%) and 265 HLA-B (6.7%) locus discrepancies were identified. Review of these discrepancies by both the serological and QC laboratory revealed that the majority of discrepancies were due to errors in serological typing. Serological discrepancies were categorized as follows: blank antigens identified (36.8%) and misassignments (63.2%). Misassignments were defined as either the incorrect assignment of antigens within a group ("wrong split"), or a complete misassignment. Antigens reported as blanks most frequently belonged to the A19 and A28 groups and to the B70, 46 and 40 groups. The most frequent misassignments within groups were the A19 and A10 groups, and the B40 and B15 groups. Other HLA-A misassignments included A2 vs A28 or A2 vs A69, while other HLA-B misassignments included B35 and B70. This QC analysis showed that serological typing of class I antigens for the purposes of NMDP registry typing is prone to a significant error rate. Careful evaluation and selection of contracted laboratories by the NMDP suggests methodological limitations rather than poor performance as the main cause of these observations.

  14. Cell surface expression level variation between two common Human Leukocyte Antigen alleles, HLA-A2 and HLA-B8, is dependent on the structure of the C terminal part of the alpha 2 and the alpha 3 domains.

    PubMed

    Dellgren, Christoffer; Nehlin, Jan O; Barington, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Constitutive cell surface expression of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I antigens vary extremely from tissue to tissue and individual antigens may differ widely in expression levels. Down-regulation of class I expression is a known immune evasive mechanism used by cancer cells and viruses. Moreover, recent observations suggest that even minor differences in expression levels may influence the course of viral infections and the frequency of complications to stem cell transplantation. We have shown that some human multipotent stem cells have high expression of HLA-A while HLA-B is only weakly expressed, and demonstrate here that this is also the case for the human embryonic kidney cell line HEK293T. Using quantitative flow cytometry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction we found expression levels of endogenous HLA-A3 (median 71,204 molecules per cell) 9.2-fold higher than the expression of-B7 (P = 0.002). Transfection experiments with full-length HLA-A2 and -B8 encoding plasmids confirmed this (54,031 molecules per cell vs. 2,466, respectively, P = 0.001) independently of transcript levels suggesting a post-transcriptional regulation. Using chimeric constructs we found that the cytoplasmic tail and the transmembrane region had no impact on the differential cell surface expression. In contrast, ~65% of the difference could be mapped to the six C-terminal amino acids of the alpha 2 domain and the alpha 3 domain (amino acids 176-284), i.e. amino acids not previously shown to be of importance for differential expression levels of HLA class I molecules. We suggest that the differential cell surface expression of two common HLA-A and-B alleles is regulated by a post-translational mechanism that may involve hitherto unrecognized molecules. PMID:26258424

  15. Decreased HLA-DR antigen-associated invariant chain (CD74) mRNA expression predicts mortality after septic shock

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Septic syndromes remain the leading cause of mortality in intensive care units (ICU). Septic patients rapidly develop immune dysfunctions, the intensity and duration of which have been linked with deleterious outcomes. Decreased mRNA expressions of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-related genes have been reported after sepsis. We investigated whether their mRNA levels in whole blood could predict mortality in septic shock patients. Methods A total of 93 septic shock patients were included. On the third day after shock, the mRNA expressions of five MHC class II-related genes (CD74, HLA-DRA, HLA-DMB, HLA-DMA, CIITA) were measured by qRT-PCR and monocyte human leukocyte antigen-DR (mHLA-DR) by flow cytometry. Results A significant correlation was found among MHC class II related gene expressions. Among mRNA markers, the best prognostic value was obtained for CD74 (HLA-DR antigen-associated invariant chain). For this parameter, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated (AUC = 0.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.55 to 0.79; P = 0.01) as well as the optimal cut-off value. After stratification based on this threshold, survival curves showed that a decreased CD74 mRNA level was associated with increased mortality after septic shock (Log rank test, P = 0.0043, Hazard Ratio = 3.0, 95% CI: 1.4 to 6.5). Importantly, this association remained significant after multivariate logistic regression analysis including usual clinical confounders (that is, severity scores, P = 0.026, Odds Ratio = 3.4, 95% CI: 1.2 to 9.8). Conclusion Decreased CD74 mRNA expression significantly predicts 28-day mortality after septic shock. After validation in a larger multicentric study, this biomarker could become a robust predictor of death in septic patients. PMID:24321376

  16. [Polymorphism of human HLA-DRB1 leukocyte antigen alleles and its association to juvenile rheumatoid arthritis in a sample of Colombian mestizo children].

    PubMed

    Garavito, Gloria; Malagón, Clara; Ramírez, Luis A; De La Cruz, Oscar F; Uribe, Oscar; Navarro, Edgar; Iglesias, Antonio; Martínez, Paz; Jaraquemada, Dolores; Egea, Eduardo

    2003-09-01

    Oligotypes of the human leukocyte antigen HLA Class II, DRB1 alleles were characterized at the molecular level in a group of Colombian children suffering juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). The distribution of these alleles was examined in a group of Colombian mestizo children (genetic admixture of Amerindians, Europeans and Africans) suffering from clinically distinct JRA subsets in order to detect HLA allele frequency differences in patients with different JRA subsets. A group of 65 patients with JRA and 65 controls were characterized for the subtypes of the HLA-DRB1 alleles using polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (PCR-SSOP). The oligotyping protocol recommended by the 12th International Histocompatibility Workshop held in St. Malo, Paris, in 1996, was used. Subtype HLA-DRB1*1104 was the allele most strongly associated with susceptibility to JRA (Fisher's p = 0.013, odds ratio (OR) = 16.79, etiologic fraction (EF) = 0.93). HLA-DRB1*1602 was also associated with susceptibility to a lesser degree (Fisher's p = 0.016, OR = 8.98, EF = 0.88). HLA-DRB1 alleles participating in JRA protection were HLA-DRB1*1501 (preventive fraction (PF) = 0.466, p = 0.005) and HLA DRB1*1402 (PF = 0.49, p = 0.009). The relationship between some HLA-DRB1 alleles and clinical features was also compared. The presence of rheumatic factor was associated with the alleles HLA-DRB1*0407 (p = 0.05, OR = 11.2, EF = 0.45) and HLA-DRB1*1302 (p = 0.02, OR = 22.8, EF = 0.63). There was also an association between HLA-DRB1*0701 (p = 0.001, OR = 58, EF = 0.73) with expressing ANA +. We found that in the oligoarticular subset, the allele HLA-DRB1*1104 (p = 0.0034, OR = 41.53, EF = 0.97) was the one expressed most commonly. In the poliarticular group, the alleles most frequently expressed were HLA-DRB1*0404 (Fisher's p = 0.012, OR = 8.75, EF = 0.88). In patients with systemic JRA, the HLA-DRB1*1602 allele (p = 0.005, OR = 21.33, EF = 0.95) was most frequent. These

  17. Meta-analysis of the human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) 14 bp insertion/deletion polymorphism as a risk factor for preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Pabalan, N; Jarjanazi, H; Sun, C; Iversen, A C

    2015-09-01

    The non-classical major histocompatibility complex, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G, plays an important role in pregnancy. HLA-G mediates proper interaction between maternal immune cells and fetal trophoblasts invading the uterine wall, to ensure successful placental development and function. Several HLA-G gene variants have been shown to be associated with development of preeclampsia (PE), but the reported associations of the HLA-G 14 base pair (bp) insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism (rs66554220) with PE are inconsistent. In this meta-analysis of HLA-G 14 bp I/D in each member of the family triad, we estimated risk (odds ratio [OR], 95% confidence interval) of associations with PE based on nine published offspring, nine mother and three father case-control studies. No significant increased risk associations between PE and HLA-G 14 bp I/D were detected in any of the family triad members (offspring: OR = 1.08-1.21, P = 0.57-0.74; mothers: OR = 1.11-1.28, P = 0.07-0.44; fathers: OR = 1.09-1.65, P = 0.07-0.70). Of the 20 comparisons performed, 14 (70%) were non-heterogeneous and seven of these had zero heterogeneity (I(2) = 0%). Sensitivity treatment confirmed robustness for the overall lack of association for HLA-G 14 bp I/D. In subgroup analysis, significant association between HLA-G 14 bp I/D and PE was shown in offspring from primipara (OR = 1.66-1.95, P = 0.04) and European Caucasian pregnancies (OR = 1.37-2.03, P = 0.02-0.03). However, heterogeneity and sensitivity tests suggest that further investigation is needed to determine if HLA-G 14 bp I/D is involved in trophoblast HLA-G expression and PE development in these subgroups.

  18. Experience of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis with HLA Matching at the University Hospital Virgen del Rocío in Spain: Technical and Clinical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Raquel María; Peciña, Ana; Lozano-Arana, Maria Dolores; Sánchez, Beatriz; Guardiola, Jordi; García-Lozano, Juan Carlos; Borrego, Salud; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of genetic diseases, combined with HLA matching (PGD-HLA), is an option for couples at risk of transmitting a genetic disease to select unaffected embryos of an HLA tissue type compatible with that of an existing affected child. Here we present the results of our PGD-HLA program at the Department of Genetics, Reproduction and Fetal Medicine of the University Hospital Virgen del Rocío in Seville. Seven couples have participated in our program because of different indications. Overall, 26 cycles were performed, providing a total of 202 embryos. A conclusive molecular diagnosis and HLA-typing could be assured in 96% of the embryos. The percentage of transfers per cycle was 26.9% and the birth rate per cycle was 7.7% per transfer. Our PGD-HLA program resulted in the birth of 2 healthy babies, HLA-identical to their affected siblings, with successful subsequent haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantations. Both HSC-transplanted children are currently doing well 48 and 21 months following transplantation, respectively. All the procedures, including HSCs umbilical cord transplantation, were performed in our hospital. PMID:24868528

  19. Experience of preimplantation genetic diagnosis with HLA matching at the University Hospital Virgen del Rocío in Spain: technical and clinical overview.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Raquel María; Peciña, Ana; Lozano-Arana, Maria Dolores; Sánchez, Beatriz; Guardiola, Jordi; García-Lozano, Juan Carlos; Borrego, Salud; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of genetic diseases, combined with HLA matching (PGD-HLA), is an option for couples at risk of transmitting a genetic disease to select unaffected embryos of an HLA tissue type compatible with that of an existing affected child. Here we present the results of our PGD-HLA program at the Department of Genetics, Reproduction and Fetal Medicine of the University Hospital Virgen del Rocío in Seville. Seven couples have participated in our program because of different indications. Overall, 26 cycles were performed, providing a total of 202 embryos. A conclusive molecular diagnosis and HLA-typing could be assured in 96% of the embryos. The percentage of transfers per cycle was 26.9% and the birth rate per cycle was 7.7% per transfer. Our PGD-HLA program resulted in the birth of 2 healthy babies, HLA-identical to their affected siblings, with successful subsequent haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantations. Both HSC-transplanted children are currently doing well 48 and 21 months following transplantation, respectively. All the procedures, including HSCs umbilical cord transplantation, were performed in our hospital.

  20. Nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 mismatch increases mortality after myeloablative unrelated allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Stephanie J.; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Spellman, Stephen; Wang, Hai-Lin; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Askar, Medhat; Dehn, Jason; Fernandez Viña, Marcelo; Gratwohl, Alois; Gupta, Vikas; Hanna, Rabi; Horowitz, Mary M.; Hurley, Carolyn K.; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Kassim, Adetola A.; Nishihori, Taiga; Mueller, Carlheinz; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Prasad, Vinod; Robinson, James; Saber, Wael; Schultz, Kirk R.; Shaw, Bronwen; Storek, Jan; Wood, William A.; Woolfrey, Ann E.; Anasetti, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    We examined current outcomes of unrelated donor allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to determine the clinical implications of donor-recipient HLA matching. Adult and pediatric patients who had first undergone myeloablative-unrelated bone marrow or peripheral blood HCT for acute myelogenous leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndrome between 1999 and 2011 were included. All had high-resolution typing for HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1. Of the total (n = 8003), cases were 8/8 (n = 5449), 7/8 (n = 2071), or 6/8 (n = 483) matched. HLA mismatch (6-7/8) conferred significantly increased risk for grades II to IV and III to IV acute graft vs host disease (GVHD), chronic GVHD, transplant-related mortality (TRM), and overall mortality compared with HLA-matched cases (8/8). Type (allele/antigen) and locus (HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1) of mismatch were not associated with overall mortality. Among 8/8 matched cases, HLA-DPB1 and -DQB1 mismatch resulted in increased acute GVHD, and HLA-DPB1 mismatch had decreased relapse. Nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 allele mismatch was associated with higher TRM compared with permissive HLA-DPB1 mismatch or HLA-DPB1 match and increased overall mortality compared with permissive HLA-DPB1 mismatch in 8/8 (and 10/10) matched cases. Full matching at HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1 is required for optimal unrelated donor HCT survival, and avoidance of nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 mismatches in otherwise HLA-matched pairs is indicated. PMID:25161269

  1. Promoter methylation and mRNA expression of HLA-G in relation to HLA-G protein expression in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Swets, Marloes; Seneby, Lina; Boot, Arnoud; van Wezel, Tom; Gelderblom, Hans; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; van den Elsen, Peter J; Kuppen, Peter J K

    2016-09-01

    Expression of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a suggested mechanism used by tumor cells to escape from host immune recognition and destruction. Advances in the field have made it evident that HLA-G is expressed in different types of malignancies including colorectal cancer (CRC). We analyzed HLA-G expression in 21 low passage CRC cell lines. The level of DNA methylation of the HLA-G gene and the presence of mRNA encoding HLA-G was measured. Moreover, HLA-G protein expression was determined by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry (IHC). IHC was performed with three different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (4H84, MEM-G/1 and MEM-G/2). In addition, HLA-G protein expression was measured in matching primary tumor tissues. RNA analysis using RT-PCR followed by sequencing in 6 samples indicated strong homology of the PCR product with HLA-G3 in 5 samples. In accordance, in none of the cell lines, HLA-G1 expression was detected by flow-cytometry. Furthermore, no association between HLA-G DNA methylation patterns and HLA-G mRNA expression was observed. In addition, different immunohistochemical staining profiles among various anti-HLA-G mAbs were observed. In conclusion, the results of this study show that the HLA-G3 isoform was expressed in some of the CRC cell lines irrespective of the level of DNA methylation of HLA-G.

  2. Identification of a crucial energetic footprint on the alpha1 helix of human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2 that provides functional interactions for recognition by tax peptide/HLA-A2-specific T cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Baker, B M; Turner, R V; Gagnon, S J; Wiley, D C; Biddison, W E

    2001-03-01

    Structural studies have shown that class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted peptide-specific T cell receptor (TCR)-alpha/betas make multiple contacts with the alpha1 and alpha2 helices of the MHC, but it is unclear which or how many of these interactions contribute to functional binding. We have addressed this question by performing single amino acid mutagenesis of the 15 TCR contact sites on the human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2 molecule recognized by the A6 TCR specific for the Tax peptide presented by HLA-A2. The results demonstrate that mutagenesis of only three amino acids (R65, K66, and A69) that are clustered on the alpha1 helix affected T cell recognition of the Tax/HLA-A2 complex. At least one of these three mutants affected T cell recognition by every member of a large panel of Tax/HLA-A2-specific T cell lines. Biacore measurements showed that these three HLA-A2 mutations also altered A6 TCR binding kinetics, reducing binding affinity. These results show that for Tax/HLA-A2-specific TCRs, there is a location on the central portion of the alpha1 helix that provides interactions crucial to their function with the MHC molecule. PMID:11238586

  3. In Silico Analysis of Six Known Leishmania major Antigens and In Vitro Evaluation of Specific Epitopes Eliciting HLA-A2 Restricted CD8 T Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Seyed, Negar; Zahedifard, Farnaz; Safaiyan, Shima; Gholami, Elham; Doustdari, Fatemeh; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Mirzaei, Maryam; Saeedi Eslami, Nasir; Khadem Sadegh, Akbar; Eslami far, Ali; Sharifi, Iraj; Rafati, Sima

    2011-01-01

    Background As a potent CD8+ T cell activator, peptide vaccine has found its way in vaccine development against intracellular infections and cancer, but not against leishmaniasis. The first step toward a peptide vaccine is epitope mapping of different proteins according to the most frequent HLA types in a population. Methods and Findings Six Leishmania (L.) major-related candidate antigens (CPB,CPC,LmsTI-1,TSA,LeIF and LPG-3) were screened for potential CD8+ T cell activating 9-mer epitopes presented by HLA-A*0201 (the most frequent HLA-A allele). Online software including SYFPEITHI, BIMAS, EpiJen, Rankpep, nHLApred, NetCTL and Multipred were used. Peptides were selected only if predicted by almost all programs, according to their predictive scores. Pan-A2 presentation of selected peptides was confirmed by NetMHCPan1.1. Selected peptides were pooled in four peptide groups and the immunogenicity was evaluated by in vitro stimulation and intracellular cytokine assay of PBMCs from HLA-A2+ individuals recovered from L. major. HLA-A2− individuals recovered from L. major and HLA-A2+ healthy donors were included as control groups. Individual response of HLA-A2+ recovered volunteers as percent of CD8+/IFN-γ+ T cells after in vitro stimulation against peptide pools II and IV was notably higher than that of HLA-A2− recovered individuals. Based on cutoff scores calculated from the response of HLA-A2− recovered individuals, 31.6% and 13.3% of HLA-A2+ recovered persons responded above cutoff in pools II and IV, respectively. ELISpot and ELISA results confirmed flow cytometry analysis. The response of HLA-A2− recovered individuals against peptide pools I and III was detected similar and even higher than HLA-A2+ recovered individuals. Conclusion Using in silico prediction we demonstrated specific response to LmsTI-1 (pool II) and LPG-3- (pool IV) related peptides specifically presented in HLA-A*0201 context. This is among the very few reports mapping L. major epitopes for

  4. Pheophorbide a-Mediated Photodynamic Therapy Triggers HLA Class I-Restricted Antigen Presentation in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma1

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Patrick Ming-Kuen; Bui-Xuan, Ngoc-Ha; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Fong, Wing-Ping; Fung, Kwok-Pui

    2010-01-01

    The immunomodulatory effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) have been reported in several photosensitizers. Pheophorbide a (Pa), a chlorophyll derivative, shows antitumor effects on a number of human cancers in a PDT approach (Pa-PDT); however, the potential effect of Pa-PDT on the anticancer immunity has never been studied. In the present work, the underlying action mechanism of Pa-PDT was systemically investigated with a human hepatoma cell line HepG2. We found that Pa-PDT significantly inhibited the growth of HepG2 cells with a half maximal inhibitory concentration/endoplasmic reticulum of 0.35 µM at 24 hours by the induction of apoptosis, as shown by externalization of phosphatidylserine, release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, and activation of the caspases cascade in the treated cells. Interestingly, using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis, a 57-kDa disulfide-isomerase-like ER resident protein (ERp57) that belongs to the HLA class I-restricted antigen-processing machinery was found to be mediated during the Pa-PDT treatment. This activation of antigen presentation was confirmed by Western blot analysis and immunostaining. Furthermore, a cross-presentation of antigen with HLA class I proteins and 70-kDa heat shock protein was found in Pa-PDT-treated cells, as shown by the confocal microscopic observation and immunoprecipitation assay. Nevertheless, the immunogenicity of HepG2 cells was increased by Pa-PDT treatment that triggered phagocytic capture by human macrophages. Our findings provide the first evidence that Pa-PDT can trigger both apoptosis and cancer immunity in the tumor host. PMID:20360936

  5. Antigen Targeting to Human HLA Class II Molecules Increases Efficacy of DNA Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik; Løset, Geir Åge; Vikse, Elisabeth; Fugger, Lars

    2016-01-01

    It has been difficult to translate promising results from DNA vaccination in mice to larger animals and humans. Previously, DNA vaccines encoding proteins that target Ag to MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules on APCs have been shown to induce rapid, enhanced, and long-lasting Ag-specific Ab titers in mice. In this study, we describe two novel DNA vaccines that as proteins target HLA class II (HLA-II) molecules. These vaccine proteins cross-react with MHC-II molecules in several species of larger mammals. When tested in ferrets and pigs, a single DNA delivery with low doses of the HLA-II–targeted vaccines resulted in rapid and increased Ab responses. Importantly, painless intradermal jet delivery of DNA was as effective as delivery by needle injection followed by electroporation. As an indication that the vaccines could also be useful for human application, HLA-II–targeted vaccine proteins were found to increase human CD4+ T cell responses by a factor of ×103 in vitro. Thus, targeting of Ag to MHC-II molecules may represent an attractive strategy for increasing efficacy of DNA vaccines in larger animals and humans. PMID:27671110

  6. Extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, M.D.; Smith, J.R.; Austin, R.K.; Kelleher, D.; Nepom, G.T.; Volk, B.; Kagnoff, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. The authors previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II ..beta..-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. They now report the isolation of this ..beta..-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP ..beta..-chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP ..beta..-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DP..cap alpha..-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis. Celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion.

  7. In vivo functional efficacy of tumor-specific T cells expanded using HLA-Ig based artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC).

    PubMed

    Durai, Malarvizhi; Krueger, Christine; Ye, Zhaohui; Cheng, Linzhao; Mackensen, Andreas; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan P

    2009-02-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy for treatment of cancers and infectious diseases is often hampered by a high degree of variability in the final T cell product and in the limited in vivo function and survival of ex vivo expanded antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTL). This has stimulated interest in development of standardized artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) to reliably expand antigen specific CTL. However, for successful immunotherapy the aAPC ex vivo generated CTL must have anti-tumor activity in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that HLA-Ig based aAPC stimulated tumor-specific CTL from human peripheral blood T lymphocytes showed robust expansion and functional activity in a human/SCID mouse melanoma model. HLA-Ig based aAPC expanded CTL were detected in the peripheral blood up to 15 days after transfer. Non-invasive bioluminescence imaging of tumor bearing mice demonstrated antigen dependent localization of transferred CTL to the tumor site. Moreover, adoptive transfer of HLA-Ig based aAPC generated CTL inhibited the tumor growth both in prevention and treatment modes of therapy and was comparable to that achieved by dendritic cell expanded CTL. Thus, our data demonstrate potential therapeutic in vivo activity of HLA-Ig based aAPC expanded CTL to control tumor growth. PMID:18563409

  8. Assessment of differences in HLA-A, -B, and -DRB1 allele mismatches among African-American and non-African-American recipients of deceased kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, M; Israni, A K; Joffe, M M; Hoy, T; Kearns, J; Mange, K C; Feldman, D; Goodman, N; Rosas, S E; Abrams, J D; Brayman, K L; Feldman, H I

    2007-01-01

    Among recipients of deceased donor kidney transplants, African-Americans experience a more rapid rate of kidney allograft loss than non-African-Americans. The purpose of this study was to characterize and quantify the HLA-A, -B, and -DRB1 allele mismatches and amino acid substitutions at antigen recognition sites among African-American and non-African-American recipients of deceased donor kidney transplants matched at the antigen level. In recipients with zero HLA antigen mismatches, the degree of one or two HLA allele mismatches for both racial groups combined was 47%, 29%, and 11% at HLA-DRB1, HLA-B, and HLA-A, respectively. There was a greater number of allele mismatches in African-Americans than non-African-Americans at HLA-A (P < .0001), -B (P = .096), and -DRB1 loci (P < .0001). For both racial groups, the HLA allele mismatches were predominantly at A2 for HLA-A; B35 and B44 for HLA-B; but multiple specificities for HLA-DRB1. The observed amino acid mismatches were concentrated at a few functional positions in the antigen binding site of HLA-A and -B and -DRB1 molecules. Future studies are ongoing to assess the impact of these HLA mismatches on kidney allograft loss.

  9. Structural analysis of HLA-A2 antigen from immunoselected mutant 8.6.1: further definition of an HLA-A2-specific serological determinant.

    PubMed

    Taketani, S; Krangel, M S; Pious, D; Strominger, J L

    1983-12-01

    The HLA-A2 mutant cell line 8.6.1 was isolated previously from the lymphoblastoid B cell line T5-1 (HLA-A1, -A2, -B8, and -B27) by immunoselection with the mouse HLA-A2-specific monoclonal antibody BB7.2 and complement. The HLA-A2 molecules synthesized by 8.6.1 do not react with either the selecting antibody or with a second HLA-A2-specific monoclonal antibody, PA2.1. In this study, HLA-A2 heavy chains derived from 8.6.1 and those from the parent T5-1 cells have been analyzed by double-labeled tryptic peptide mapping by using reverse-phase HPLC, cation exchange chromatography, and microsequence analysis. We detect only a single difference between these molecules: 8.6.1 HLA-A2 differs from T5-1 HLA-A2 by the substitution of lysine for glutamic acid at position 161. This result is consistent with data derived from other immunoselected mutants, which implicate the second heavy chain domain (alpha 2) in the expression of the PA2.1 and BB7.2 epitopes, and suggests a crucial role for glutamic acid at position 161 in the formation of an HLA-A2-specific determinant. PMID:6196407

  10. HLA typing in congenital toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed Central

    Meenken, C; Rothova, A; de Waal, L P; van der Horst, A R; Mesman, B J; Kijlstra, A

    1995-01-01

    HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, and HLA-D typing was performed in 47 mothers of patients suffering from ocular toxoplasmosis to investigate whether an immunogenetic predisposition exists for developing congenital toxoplasmosis in their offspring. No significant association between any HLA antigen was observed in the mothers of patients with ocular toxoplasmosis, although a total absence of the HLA-B51 antigen was found in this group. HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C typing was also performed in their children (52 patients with ocular toxoplasmosis), to investigate a possible relation between the severity of ocular toxoplasmosis and an eventual immunogenetic factor. In the patients with ocular toxoplasmosis an increased frequency of the HLA-Bw62 antigen was observed in correlation with severe ocular involvement. PMID:7612565

  11. HLA antigen familial study in complete Behçet's syndrome affecting three sisters.

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, J L; Gonzalez-Dominguez, J; Gonzalez-Fernandez, R; Prada, J L; Peña, J; Solana, R

    1993-01-01

    Behçet's disease is a multisystemic disease affecting most organs. Although a tendency towards an association with a certain genetic type and with HLA-B51 is suspected, the incidence of several siblings with Behçet's disease in a single family is rare. A family, in which three sisters were affected with Behçet's disease, uveitis being the most severe manifestation, was studied. In this family all siblings were B51 positive. Only the female siblings, however, with a positive identical HLA phenotype: A2, A11, B51, B44, Cw6, Cw5, DR4, DRw13, DRw53, DRw52, DQw7, DQw6, developed the disease symptoms, whereas none of the male siblings was affected. PMID:8447696

  12. Disruption of HLA class II antigen presentation in Burkitt lymphoma: implication of a 47,000 MW acid labile protein in CD4+ T-cell recognition.

    PubMed

    God, Jason M; Zhao, Dan; Cameron, Christine A; Amria, Shereen; Bethard, Jennifer R; Haque, Azizul

    2014-07-01

    While Burkitt lymphoma (BL) has a well-known defect in HLA class I-mediated antigen presentation, the exact role of BL-associated HLA class II in generating a poor CD4(+) T-cell response remains unresolved. Here, we found that BL cells are deficient in their ability to optimally stimulate CD4(+) T cells via the HLA class II pathway. This defect in CD4(+) T-cell recognition was not associated with low levels of co-stimulatory molecules on BL cells, as addition of external co-stimulation failed to elicit CD4(+) T-cell activation by BL. Further, the defect was not caused by faulty antigen/class II interaction, because antigenic peptides bound with measurable affinity to BL-associated class II molecules. Interestingly, functional class II-peptide complexes were formed at acidic pH 5·5, which restored immune recognition. Acidic buffer (pH 5·5) eluate from BL cells contained molecules that impaired class II-mediated antigen presentation and CD4(+) T-cell recognition. Biochemical analysis showed that these molecules were greater than 30,000 molecular weight in size, and proteinaceous in nature. In addition, BL was found to have decreased expression of a 47,000 molecular weight enolase-like molecule that enhances class II-mediated antigen presentation in B cells, macrophages and dendritic cells, but not in BL cells. These findings demonstrate that BL likely has multiple defects in HLA class II-mediated antigen presentation and immune recognition, which may be exploited for future immunotherapies.

  13. X-ray diffraction analysis of crystals from the human major histocompatibility antigen HLA-B*2706 in complex with a viral peptide and with a self-peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Zawacka, Anna; Loll, Bernhard; Biesiadka, Jacek; Saenger, Wolfram

    2005-12-01

    The crystallization of HLA-B*2706 in complex with two peptides is reported. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles HLA-B*2704 and HLA-B*2706 show an ethnically restricted distribution and are differentially associated with ankylosing spondylitis, with HLA-B*2706 lacking association with this autoimmune disease. However, the products of the two alleles differ by only two amino acids, at heavy-chain residues 114 (His in HLA-B*2704; Asp in HLA-B*2706) and 116 (Asp in HLA-B*2704; Tyr in HLA-B*2706). Both residues could be involved in contacting amino acids of a bound peptide, suggesting that peptides presented by these subtypes play a role in disease pathogenesis. Two HLA-B*2706–peptide complexes were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG as precipitant. Data sets were collected to resolutions of 2.70 Å (viral peptide pLMP2, RRRWRRLTV; space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}) and 1.83 Å (self-peptide pVIPR, RRKWRRWHL; space group P2{sub 1}). Using HLA-B*2705 complexed with the pGR peptide (RRRWHRWRL) as a search model, unambiguous molecular-replacement solutions were found for both HLA-B*2706 complexes.

  14. HLA-DPB1 and HLA class I confer risk of and protection from narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Ollila, Hanna M; Ravel, Jean-Marie; Han, Fang; Faraco, Juliette; Lin, Ling; Zheng, Xiuwen; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Dauvilliers, Yves; Pizza, Fabio; Hong, Seung-Chul; Jennum, Poul; Knudsen, Stine; Kornum, Birgitte R; Dong, Xiao Song; Yan, Han; Hong, Heeseung; Coquillard, Cristin; Mahlios, Joshua; Jolanki, Otto; Einen, Mali; Arnulf, Isabelle; Lavault, Sophie; Högl, Birgit; Frauscher, Birgit; Crowe, Catherine; Partinen, Markku; Huang, Yu Shu; Bourgin, Patrice; Vaarala, Outi; Désautels, Alex; Montplaisir, Jacques; Mack, Steven J; Mindrinos, Michael; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy, a disorder caused by a lack of hypocretin (orexin), is so strongly associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II HLA-DQA1(∗)01:02-DQB1(∗)06:02 (DQ0602) that very few non-DQ0602 cases have been reported. A known triggering factor for narcolepsy is pandemic 2009 influenza H1N1, suggesting autoimmunity triggered by upper-airway infections. Additional effects of other HLA-DQ alleles have been reported consistently across multiple ethnic groups. Using over 3,000 case and 10,000 control individuals of European and Chinese background, we examined the effects of other HLA loci. After careful matching of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ in case and control individuals, we found strong protective effects of HLA-DPA1(∗)01:03-DPB1(∗)04:02 (DP0402; odds ratio [OR] = 0.51 [0.38-0.67], p = 1.01 × 10(-6)) and HLA-DPA1(∗)01:03-DPB1(∗)04:01 (DP0401; OR = 0.61 [0.47-0.80], p = 2.07 × 10(-4)) and predisposing effects of HLA-DPB1(∗)05:01 in Asians (OR = 1.76 [1.34-2.31], p = 4.71 × 10(-05)). Similar effects were found by conditional analysis controlling for HLA-DR and HLA-DQ with DP0402 (OR = 0.45 [0.38-0.55] p = 8.99 × 10(-17)) and DP0501 (OR = 1.38 [1.18-1.61], p = 7.11 × 10(-5)). HLA-class-II-independent associations with HLA-A(∗)11:01 (OR = 1.32 [1.13-1.54], p = 4.92 × 10(-4)), HLA-B(∗)35:03 (OR = 1.96 [1.41-2.70], p = 5.14 × 10(-5)), and HLA-B(∗)51:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.25-1.78], p = 1.09 × 10(-5)) were also seen across ethnic groups in the HLA class I region. These effects might reflect modulation of autoimmunity or indirect effects of HLA class I and HLA-DP alleles on response to viral infections such as that of influenza. PMID:25574827

  15. HLA-DPB1 and HLA class I confer risk of and protection from narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Ollila, Hanna M; Ravel, Jean-Marie; Han, Fang; Faraco, Juliette; Lin, Ling; Zheng, Xiuwen; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Dauvilliers, Yves; Pizza, Fabio; Hong, Seung-Chul; Jennum, Poul; Knudsen, Stine; Kornum, Birgitte R; Dong, Xiao Song; Yan, Han; Hong, Heeseung; Coquillard, Cristin; Mahlios, Joshua; Jolanki, Otto; Einen, Mali; Arnulf, Isabelle; Lavault, Sophie; Högl, Birgit; Frauscher, Birgit; Crowe, Catherine; Partinen, Markku; Huang, Yu Shu; Bourgin, Patrice; Vaarala, Outi; Désautels, Alex; Montplaisir, Jacques; Mack, Steven J; Mindrinos, Michael; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy, a disorder caused by a lack of hypocretin (orexin), is so strongly associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II HLA-DQA1(∗)01:02-DQB1(∗)06:02 (DQ0602) that very few non-DQ0602 cases have been reported. A known triggering factor for narcolepsy is pandemic 2009 influenza H1N1, suggesting autoimmunity triggered by upper-airway infections. Additional effects of other HLA-DQ alleles have been reported consistently across multiple ethnic groups. Using over 3,000 case and 10,000 control individuals of European and Chinese background, we examined the effects of other HLA loci. After careful matching of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ in case and control individuals, we found strong protective effects of HLA-DPA1(∗)01:03-DPB1(∗)04:02 (DP0402; odds ratio [OR] = 0.51 [0.38-0.67], p = 1.01 × 10(-6)) and HLA-DPA1(∗)01:03-DPB1(∗)04:01 (DP0401; OR = 0.61 [0.47-0.80], p = 2.07 × 10(-4)) and predisposing effects of HLA-DPB1(∗)05:01 in Asians (OR = 1.76 [1.34-2.31], p = 4.71 × 10(-05)). Similar effects were found by conditional analysis controlling for HLA-DR and HLA-DQ with DP0402 (OR = 0.45 [0.38-0.55] p = 8.99 × 10(-17)) and DP0501 (OR = 1.38 [1.18-1.61], p = 7.11 × 10(-5)). HLA-class-II-independent associations with HLA-A(∗)11:01 (OR = 1.32 [1.13-1.54], p = 4.92 × 10(-4)), HLA-B(∗)35:03 (OR = 1.96 [1.41-2.70], p = 5.14 × 10(-5)), and HLA-B(∗)51:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.25-1.78], p = 1.09 × 10(-5)) were also seen across ethnic groups in the HLA class I region. These effects might reflect modulation of autoimmunity or indirect effects of HLA class I and HLA-DP alleles on response to viral infections such as that of influenza.

  16. HLA-DPB1 and HLA Class I Confer Risk of and Protection from Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Ollila, Hanna M.; Ravel, Jean-Marie; Han, Fang; Faraco, Juliette; Lin, Ling; Zheng, Xiuwen; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Dauvilliers, Yves; Pizza, Fabio; Hong, Seung-Chul; Jennum, Poul; Knudsen, Stine; Kornum, Birgitte R.; Dong, Xiao Song; Yan, Han; Hong, Heeseung; Coquillard, Cristin; Mahlios, Joshua; Jolanki, Otto; Einen, Mali; Lavault, Sophie; Högl, Birgit; Frauscher, Birgit; Crowe, Catherine; Partinen, Markku; Huang, Yu Shu; Bourgin, Patrice; Vaarala, Outi; Désautels, Alex; Montplaisir, Jacques; Mack, Steven J.; Mindrinos, Michael; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy, a disorder caused by a lack of hypocretin (orexin), is so strongly associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II HLA-DQA1∗01:02-DQB1∗06:02 (DQ0602) that very few non-DQ0602 cases have been reported. A known triggering factor for narcolepsy is pandemic 2009 influenza H1N1, suggesting autoimmunity triggered by upper-airway infections. Additional effects of other HLA-DQ alleles have been reported consistently across multiple ethnic groups. Using over 3,000 case and 10,000 control individuals of European and Chinese background, we examined the effects of other HLA loci. After careful matching of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ in case and control individuals, we found strong protective effects of HLA-DPA1∗01:03-DPB1∗04:02 (DP0402; odds ratio [OR] = 0.51 [0.38–0.67], p = 1.01 × 10−6) and HLA-DPA1∗01:03-DPB1∗04:01 (DP0401; OR = 0.61 [0.47–0.80], p = 2.07 × 10−4) and predisposing effects of HLA-DPB1∗05:01 in Asians (OR = 1.76 [1.34–2.31], p = 4.71 × 10−05). Similar effects were found by conditional analysis controlling for HLA-DR and HLA-DQ with DP0402 (OR = 0.45 [0.38–0.55] p = 8.99 × 10−17) and DP0501 (OR = 1.38 [1.18–1.61], p = 7.11 × 10−5). HLA-class-II-independent associations with HLA-A∗11:01 (OR = 1.32 [1.13–1.54], p = 4.92 × 10−4), HLA-B∗35:03 (OR = 1.96 [1.41–2.70], p = 5.14 × 10−5), and HLA-B∗51:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.25–1.78], p = 1.09 × 10−5) were also seen across ethnic groups in the HLA class I region. These effects might reflect modulation of autoimmunity or indirect effects of HLA class I and HLA-DP alleles on response to viral infections such as that of influenza. PMID:25574827

  17. The HLA system: structure and function.

    PubMed Central

    Bodmer, W F

    1987-01-01

    The HLA system is the major histocompatibility system of man and was found through a search for blood group-like determinants on white blood cells that would be effective in matching for transplantation. The HLA system has its counterparts in other species of mammals, birds, and reptiles including the much studied H2 system of the mouse. The HLA system started from a series of antigens defined by a combination of relatively crude serology and genetics, supported by extensive statistical analysis. It has turned out to be a complex genetic region determining two major sets of cell surface products which mediate essential functional interactions between cells of the immune system, and so have a major role in the control of the immune response. Polymorphism in the HLA region is thus associated with a wide variety of diseases with an immune aetiology. PMID:3312304

  18. Differential immunogenicity of HLA mismatches: HLA-A2 versus HLA-A28.

    PubMed

    Dankers, Marlies K A; Roelen, Dave L; Van Der Meer-Prins, Ellen M W; De Lange, Peter; Korfage, Nelleke; Smits, Jacqueline M A; Persijn, Guido G; Welsh, Ken I; Doxiadis, Ilias I N; Claas, Frans H J

    2003-02-15

    The immunogenicity of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2 versus HLA-A28 was analyzed by antibody production, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) induction, and graft survival. We observed that an HLA-A2 mismatched child in HLA-A28 women leads to HLA-A2 specific antibodies in 32% of the women (n=31), whereas in the case of an HLA-A28 child and HLA-A2 women (n=30), no HLA-A28 specific antibodies were found ( P<0.002). Also, the CTL precursor frequencies were significantly lower against HLA-A28 compared with CTLp frequencies against HLA-A2 ( P=0.012). Finally, the kidney graft survival was slightly better in HLA-A2 positive recipients transplanted with HLA-A28 mismatches. We can conclude that single HLA-A28 mismatches are less immunogenic in HLA-A2 individuals compared with single HLA-A2 mismatches in HLA-A28 individuals, which is probably because the mismatched epitopes on the HLA-A2 molecule are unique epitopes, whereas the mismatched epitopes on HLA-A28 are shared by other HLA-A and HLA-B molecules. PMID:12589169

  19. Reversible HLA multimers (Streptamers) for the isolation of human cytotoxic T lymphocytes functionally active against tumor- and virus-derived antigens.

    PubMed

    Neudorfer, Julia; Schmidt, Burkhard; Huster, Katharina M; Anderl, Florian; Schiemann, Matthias; Holzapfel, Gerd; Schmidt, Thomas; Germeroth, Lothar; Wagner, Hermann; Peschel, Christian; Busch, Dirk H; Bernhard, Helga

    2007-03-30

    The development of MHC/peptide multimers has facilitated the visualization and purification of antigen-specific T cells. However, the persistence of multimers leads to prolonged T cell receptor signaling and subsequently to altered T-cell function. We have recently developed a new type of MHC/peptide multimers, which can be dissociated from the T cell. Herein, we have generated and tested for the first time reversible HLA/peptide multimers, termed Streptamers, for the isolation of human T cells. The Streptamer technique demonstrates the specificity and sensitivity of conventional HLA/peptide tetramers with regards to the sorting of human T lymphocytes. This is shown for T cells directed against immunogenic peptides derived from viral and tumor-associated antigens. We show that antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells remain functionally active following Streptamer dissociation, whereas lytic function and proliferation of the T cells is impaired in the presence of conventional tetramers. These novel HLA/peptide Streptamer reagents allow the isolation of antigen-specific T cells with preserved function and, therefore, facilitate the development of adoptive T cell transfer regimens for the treatment of patients with cancer or infectious diseases. PMID:17306825

  20. HLA-DRB1 Class II antigen level alleles are associated with persistent HPV infection in Mexican women; a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major risk factor for malignant lesions and cervical cancer. A widely studied element in the search for genetic factors influencing risk HPV infection diseases is allelic variation of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) locus. The study was designed to search for HLA susceptibility alleles contributing to the persistence of HPV infection in Mexican women. Methods A total of 172 subjects were divided into three groups: 1) HPV–persistent patients; 2) HPV–cleared; and 3) HPV–reinfected patients. They were screened for HPV types using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR-sequence specific oligonucleotide probes (PCR-SSOP) was used for HLA DRB1 and DQB1 typing. Results We observed that HLA-DQB1*0501 allele might be associated with susceptibility of reinfection with HPV (p = 0.01, OR = 4.9, CI 95% = 1.3 -18.7). Allele frequency of HLA-DRB1*14 was particularly reduced in patients with cancer when compared with the HPV–persistent group (p = 0.04), suggesting that this allele is a possible protective factor for the development of cervical cancer (OR = 2.98). HLA-DRB1*07 might be associated with viral clearance (p = 0.04). Conclusions Genetic markers for HPV infection susceptibility are different in each population, in Mexicans several HLA-DQB1 alleles might be associated with an enhanced risk for viral persistence. In contrast, DRB1*14, seems to confer protection against cervical cancer. PMID:24000898

  1. HLA Class II Antigens and Their Interactive Effect on Perinatal Mother-To-Child HIV-1 Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ma; Embree, Joanne; Ramdahin, Suzie; Bielawny, Thomas; Laycock, Tyler; Tuff, Jeffrey; Haber, Darren; Plummer, Mariel; Plummer, Francis A.

    2015-01-01

    HLA class II antigens are central in initiating antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses to HIV-1. Specific alleles have been associated with differential responses to HIV-1 infection and disease among adults. This study aims to determine the influence of HLA class II genes and their interactive effect on mother-child perinatal transmission in a drug naïve, Mother-Child HIV transmission cohort established in Kenya, Africa in 1986. Our study showed that DRB concordance between mother and child increased risk of perinatal HIV transmission by three fold (P = 0.00035/Pc = 0.0014, OR: 3.09, 95%CI, 1.64-5.83). Whereas, DPA1, DPB1 and DQB1 concordance between mother and child had no significant influence on perinatal HIV transmission. In addition, stratified analysis showed that DRB1*15:03+ phenotype (mother or child) significantly increases the risk of perinatal HIV-1 transmission. Without DRB1*15:03, DRB1 discordance between mother and child provided 5 fold protection (P = 0.00008, OR: 0.186, 95%CI: 0.081-0.427). However, the protective effect of DRB discordance was diminished if either the mother or the child was DRB1*15:03+ phenotype (P = 0.49-0.98, OR: 0.7-0.99, 95%CI: 0.246-2.956). DRB3+ children were less likely to be infected perinatally (P = 0.0006, Pc = 0.014; OR:0.343, 95%CI:0.183-0.642). However, there is a 4 fold increase in risk of being infected at birth if DRB3+ children were born to DRB1*15:03+ mother compared to those with DRB1*15:03- mother. Our study showed that DRB concordance/discordance, DRB1*15:03, children’s DRB3 phenotype and their interactions play an important role in perinatal HIV transmission. Identification of genetic factors associated with protection or increased risk in perinatal transmission will help develop alternative prevention and treatment methods in the event of increases in drug resistance of ARV. PMID:25945792

  2. HLA Engineering of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Riolobos, Laura; Hirata, Roli K; Turtle, Cameron J; Wang, Pei-Rong; Gornalusse, German G; Zavajlevski, Maja; Riddell, Stanley R; Russell, David W

    2013-01-01

    The clinical use of human pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives is limited by the rejection of transplanted cells due to differences in their human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes. This has led to the proposed use of histocompatible, patient-specific stem cells; however, the preparation of many different stem cell lines for clinical use is a daunting task. Here, we develop two distinct genetic engineering approaches that address this problem. First, we use a combination of gene targeting and mitotic recombination to derive HLA-homozygous embryonic stem cell (ESC) subclones from an HLA-heterozygous parental line. A small bank of HLA-homozygous stem cells with common haplotypes would match a significant proportion of the population. Second, we derive HLA class I–negative cells by targeted disruption of both alleles of the Beta-2 Microglobulin (B2M) gene in ESCs. Mixed leukocyte reactions and peptide-specific HLA-restricted CD8+ T cell responses were reduced in class I–negative cells that had undergone differentiation in embryoid bodies. These B2M−/− ESCs could act as universal donor cells in applications where the transplanted cells do not express HLA class II genes. Both approaches used adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors for efficient gene targeting in the absence of potentially genotoxic nucleases, and produced pluripotent, transgene-free cell lines. PMID:23629003

  3. Novel strategies for adoptive therapy following HLA disparate transplants.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Richard J; Hasan, Aisha; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; Koehne, Guenther; Prockop, Susan

    2011-09-01

    Transplants of SBA-E- allogeneic marrow or G-CSF mobilized CD34+ (ISOLEX) E- peripheral blood progenitor cells which are adequately depleted of T-cells, when administered without post-transplant immunosuppression now induce consistent engraftment with low incidences of acute and chronic GVHD both in HLA matched and HLA disparate recipients. Furthermore, the incidence of relapse post transplant is not increased in patients transplanted for AML, MDS or ALL. In our series, the incidence of severe infections in HLA-matched recipients of such T-cell depleted grafts also does not differ from that detected following similarly matched unmodified grafts. However, in recipients of HLA-haplotype disparate T-cell depleted grafts, the risk of lethal viral infections is increased and prolonged. In many cases, this risk is closely correlated with failures of immunodominant virus-specific donor T-cells transferred in the graft to recognize infected host cells because they are restricted by HLA alleles not shared by the host. To address this limitation, we have developed a panel of artificial antigen presenting cells, each expressing a single prevalent HLA-allele. Using this panel, we are able to selectively generate virus-specific cytotoxic T-cells of desired HLA restriction, to insure their effectiveness in HLA haplotype-disparate transplant recipients. We have also shown that partially HLA-matched, third party-derived EBV-specific T-cells, selected from our bank of previously generated and characterized GMP-grade cell lines on the basis of their HLA restriction, can induce durable remissions of rituximab-refractory EBV lymphomas. These approaches may thus provide new, immediately accessible resources for the generation and broad application of immune cell therapies to treat and prevent severe viral diseases post transplant. PMID:21925091

  4. Genetic editing of HLA expression in hematopoietic stem cells to broaden their human application

    PubMed Central

    Torikai, Hiroki; Mi, Tiejuan; Gragert, Loren; Maiers, Martin; Najjar, Amer; Ang, Sonny; Maiti, Sourindra; Dai, Jianliang; Switzer, Kirsten C.; Huls, Helen; Dulay, Gladys P.; Reik, Andreas; Rebar, Edward J.; Holmes, Michael C.; Gregory, Philip D.; Champlin, Richard E.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2016-01-01

    Mismatch of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) adversely impacts the outcome of patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (alloHSCT). This translates into the clinical requirement to timely identify suitable HLA-matched donors which in turn curtails the chances of recipients, especially those from a racial minority, to successfully undergo alloHSCT. We thus sought to broaden the existing pool of registered unrelated donors based on analysis that eliminating the expression of the HLA-A increases the chance for finding a donor matched at HLA-B, -C, and -DRB1 regardless of a patient’s race. Elimination of HLA-A expression in HSC was achieved using artificial zinc finger nucleases designed to target HLA-A alleles. Significantly, these engineered HSCs maintain their ability to engraft and reconstitute hematopoiesis in immunocompromised mice. This introduced loss of HLA-A expression decreases the need to recruit large number of donors to match with potential recipients and has particular importance for patients whose HLA repertoire is under-represented in the current donor pool. Furthermore, the genetic engineering of stem cells provides a translational approach to HLA-match a limited number of third-party donors with a wide number of recipients. PMID:26902653

  5. Efficient presentation of naturally processed HLA class I peptides by artificial antigen-presenting cells for the generation of effective antitumor responses.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Naoto; Butler, Marcus O; Xia, Zhinan; Berezovskaya, Alla; Murray, Andrew P; Ansén, Sascha; Nadler, Lee M

    2006-05-15

    Appropriate presentation of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) by antigen-presenting cells (APC) is required for the development of clinically relevant antitumor T-cell responses. One common approach, which uses APC pulsed with synthetic peptides, can sometimes generate ineffective immune responses. This failure may, in part, be attributed to the formation of HLA/synthetic pulsed peptide complexes that possess different conformations compared with those of endogenously presented peptides. In addition, endogenous peptides may undergo post-translational modifications, which do not occur with synthetic peptides. Because our goal is to induce immunity that can recognize TAA that are endogenously presented by tumors, we designed an APC that would not only express the required immunoaccessory molecules but also naturally process and present target antigenic peptides. In this study, we generated an artificial APC (aAPC) that can endogenously present any chosen HLA-A*0201 (A2)-restricted peptide by processing a fusion protein that contains a unique "LTK" sequence linked to the antigenic peptide. Proteasome-dependent processing is so effective that the presented peptide can be directly eluted from the cell surface and identified by biochemical methods. Furthermore, we found that aAPC, engineered to endogenously present peptide derived from the melanoma antigen MART1, can be used to prime and expand antitumor CTL that target MART1-expressing tumor cells in a HLA-A2-restricted manner. Our engineered aAPC could serve as an "off-the-shelf" APC designed to constitutively express class I-restricted TAA peptides and could be used to generate effective T-cell responses to treat human disease. PMID:16707591

  6. HLA-E: A Novel Player for Histocompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Thomas; Blasczyk, Rainer; Bade-Doeding, Christina

    2014-01-01

    The classical class I human leukocyte antigens (HLA-A, -B, and -C) present allele-specific self- or pathogenic peptides originated by intracellular processing to CD8+ immune effector cells. Even a single mismatch in the heavy chain (hc) of an HLA class I molecule can impact on the peptide binding profile. Since HLA class I molecules are highly polymorphic and most of their polymorphisms affect the peptide binding region (PBR), it becomes obvious that systematic HLA matching is crucial in determining the outcome of transplantation. The opposite holds true for the nonclassical HLA class I molecule HLA-E. HLA-E polymorphism is restricted to two functional versions and is thought to present a limited set of highly conserved peptides derived from class I leader sequences. However, HLA-E appears to be a ligand for the innate and adaptive immune system, where the immunological response to peptide-HLA-E complexes is dictated through the sequence of the bound peptide. Structural investigations clearly demonstrate how subtle amino acid differences impact the strength and response of the cognate CD94/NKG2 or T cell receptor. PMID:25401109

  7. Identification of Endogenous HLA-A2–Restricted Reactivity Against Shared Melanoma Antigens in Patients Using the Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Stacy E.; Khong, Hung T.; Kammula, Udai S.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary This study was conducted to determine whether reactivity to melanoma cells of pretreatment peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with metastatic melanoma correlated with subsequent response to treatment with interleukin-2 (IL-2). The sensitivity of the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was optimized, including the total number of cells used (3 × 106 in 1 mL), the responder-to-stimulator cell ratio (5:1), the optimal time to incubate PBMCs with tumor (2 h), the appropriate tumor stimulators (melanoma cell lines differing only in the expression of histocompatibility leukocyte antigen [HLA-A2]), the duration of recovery in the culture of PBMCs after cryopreservation (18–24 h), and the medium used (Iscove, 10% human AB serum). Using this optimized assay to detect HLA-A2–restricted antitumor reactivity in the pretreatment PBMCs from patients with melanoma, positive reactive responses were detected in 7 of 28 patients with an objective clinical response to IL-2 therapy compared with 6 of 21 positive reactive responses in nonresponding patients. None of 12 healthy donors were positive in this study. Thus, there was no significant difference in the reactivity of pretreatment PBMCs when responders were compared with nonresponders, although the melanoma patients had an increased incidence of response compared with healthy donors (p = 0.05). The PBMCs from 11 of the 13 melanoma patients with pretreatment HLA-A2–restricted antimelanoma reactivity were tested against a panel of transfectants expressing known shared melanoma antigens. Anti–MART-1 reactivity was detected in the pretreatment PBMCs of three patients. It thus appears that some melanoma patients are immunologically primed to antigens expressed on the tumor surface, although the HLA-A2–restricted antimelanoma activity detected in this real-time PCR assay was not predictive of patients’ responses to IL-2 therapy. PMID:11924911

  8. Artificial antigen-presenting cells expressing HLA class II molecules as an effective tool for amplifying human specific memory CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Garnier, Anthony; Hamieh, Mohamad; Drouet, Aurélie; Leprince, Jérôme; Vivien, Denis; Frébourg, Thierry; Le Mauff, Brigitte; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Toutirais, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    Owing to their multiple immune functions, CD4(+) T cells are of major interest for immunotherapy in chronic viral infections and cancer, as well as for severe autoimmune diseases and transplantation. Therefore, standardized methods allowing rapid generation of a large number of CD4(+) T cells for adoptive immunotherapy are still awaited. We constructed stable artificial antigen-presenting cells (AAPCs) derived from mouse fibroblasts. They were genetically modified to express human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR molecules and the human accessory molecules B7.1, Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and lymphocyte function-associated antigen-3 (LFA-3). AAPCs expressing HLA-DR1, HLA-DR15 or HLA-DR51 molecules and loaded with peptides derived from influenza hemagglutinin (HA), myelin basic protein (MBP) or factor VIII, respectively, activated specific CD4(+) T-cell clones more effectively than Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B cells. We also showed that AAPCs were able to take up and process whole Ag proteins, and present epitopes to specific T cells. In primary cultures, AAPCs loaded with HA peptide allowed generation of specific Th1 lymphocytes from healthy donors as demonstrated by tetramer and intracellular cytokine staining. Although AAPCs were less effective than autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to stimulate CD4(+) T cells in primary culture, AAPCs were more potent to reactivate and expand memory Th1 cells in a strictly Ag-dependent manner. As the availability of autologous APCs is limited, the AAPC system represents a stable and reliable tool to achieve clinically relevant numbers of CD4(+) T cells for adoptive immunotherapy. For fundamental research in immunology, AAPCs are also useful to decipher mechanisms involved in the development of human CD4 T-cell responses. PMID:26924643

  9. [METHODS FOR DETECTION OF ANTIBODIES TO HLA ANTIGENS IN PATIENTS AWAITING KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION AND COMBINED PANCREAS-KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION].

    PubMed

    Ančić, Mirela; Maravić, Blaženko; Radman, Maja; Kovačić, Vedran

    2014-12-01

    The best possibility to treat chronic renal disease is renal transplantation. Especially important fact in transplantation is the percentage of so-called panel reactive antibody (PRA) that is focused on the human leukocyte antigen. There are several methods to determine the percentage of PRA in sensitized patients awaiting kidney transplants. The most important is the complement-dependent cytotoxicity. A higher value of PRA implies greater likelihood of positive cross-match with random donor and lower probability of receiving a transplant. Comparing the sensitivity of laboratory tests for determination of PRA percentage in patient serum, it is concluded that ELISA and flow cytometry proved to be more sensitive and specific.

  10. A Structurally Based Approach to Determine HLA Compatibility at the Humoral Immune Level

    PubMed Central

    Duquesnoy, Rene J.

    2007-01-01

    HLAMatchmaker is a structurally based matching program. Each HLA antigen is viewed as a string of epitopes represented by short sequences (triplets) involving polymorphic amino acid residues in antibody-accessible positions. HLAMatchmaker determines which triplets are different between donor and recipient and this algorithm is clinically useful in determining HLA mismatch acceptability. Triplets provide however an incomplete description of the HLA epitope repertoire and expanded criteria must be used including longer sequences and polymorphic residues in discontinuous positions. Such criteria should consider the structural basis of antibody-antigen interactions including contact areas and binding energy, the essence of antigenicity. This report describes the development of a structurally defined HLA epitope repertoire based on stereochemical modeling of crystallized complexes of antibodies and different protein antigens. This analysis considered also data in the literature about contributions of amino acid residues to antigen-antibody binding energy. The results have led to the concept that HLA antigens like other antigenic proteins have structural epitopes consisting of 15–22 residues that constitute the binding face with alloantibody. Each structural epitope has a functional epitope of about 2–5 residues that dominate the strength and specificity of binding with antibody. The remaining residues of a structural epitope provide supplementary interactions that increase the stability of the antigen-antibody complex. Each functional epitope has one or more non-self residues and the term “eplet” is used to describe polymorphic HLA residues within 3.0–3.5 Ångstroms of a given sequence position on the molecular surface. Many eplets represent short linear sequences identical to those referred to as triplets but others have residues in discontinuous sequence positions that cluster together on the molecular surface. Serologically defined HLA determinants

  11. Chimerism, graft survival, and withdrawal of immunosuppressive drugs in HLA matched and mismatched patients after living donor kidney and hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Scandling, J D; Busque, S; Shizuru, J A; Lowsky, R; Hoppe, R; Dejbakhsh-Jones, S; Jensen, K; Shori, A; Strober, J A; Lavori, P; Turnbull, B B; Engleman, E G; Strober, S

    2015-03-01

    Thirty-eight HLA matched and mismatched patients given combined living donor kidney and enriched CD34(+) hematopoietic cell transplants were enrolled in tolerance protocols using posttransplant conditioning with total lymphoid irradiation and anti-thymocyte globulin. Persistent chimerism for at least 6 months was associated with successful complete withdrawal of immunosuppressive drugs in 16 of 22 matched patients without rejection episodes or kidney disease recurrence with up to 5 years follow up thereafter. One patient is in the midst of withdrawal and five are on maintenance drugs. Persistent mixed chimerism was achieved in some haplotype matched patients for at least 12 months by increasing the dose of T cells and CD34(+) cells infused as compared to matched recipients in a dose escalation study. Success of drug withdrawal in chimeric mismatched patients remains to be determined. None of the 38 patients had kidney graft loss or graft versus host disease with up to 14 years of observation. In conclusion, complete immunosuppressive drug withdrawal could be achieved thus far with the tolerance induction regimen in HLA matched patients with uniform long-term graft survival in all patients.

  12. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) A*1101-Restricted Epstein-Barr Virus-Specific T-cell Receptor Gene Transfer to Target Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong; Parsonage, Greg; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Machado, Lee R; James, Christine H; Salman, Asmaa; Searle, Peter F; Hui, Edwin P; Chan, Anthony T C; Lee, Steven P

    2015-10-01

    Infusing virus-specific T cells is effective treatment for rare Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated posttransplant lymphomas, and more limited success has been reported using this approach to treat a far more common EBV-associated malignancy, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, current approaches using EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines to reactivate EBV-specific T cells for infusion take 2 to 3 months of in vitro culture and favor outgrowth of T cells targeting viral antigens expressed within EBV(+) lymphomas, but not in NPC. Here, we explore T-cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer to rapidly and reliably generate T cells specific for the NPC-associated viral protein LMP2. We cloned a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) A*1101-restricted TCR, which would be widely applicable because 40% of NPC patients carry this HLA allele. Studying both the wild-type and modified forms, we have optimized expression of the TCR and demonstrated high-avidity antigen-specific function (proliferation, cytotoxicity, and cytokine release) in both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. The engineered T cells also inhibited LMP2(+) epithelial tumor growth in a mouse model. Furthermore, transduced T cells from patients with advanced NPC lysed LMP2-expressing NPC cell lines. Using this approach, within a few days large numbers of high-avidity LMP2-specific T cells can be generated reliably to treat NPC, thus providing an ideal clinical setting to test TCR gene transfer without the risk of autoimmunity through targeting self-antigens.

  13. Recurrent acute hemolytic transfusion reactions by antibodies against Doa antigens, not detected by cross-matching.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Ruben; van Gelder, Warry; van Wintershoven, Joyce; Maaskant-Van Wijk, Petra A; Beckers, Erik A M

    2006-02-01

    An 81-year-old male patient suffered from recurrent acute hemolytic transfusion reactions after transfusion with phenotyped cross-match-negative red blood cells (RBCs). Extensive posttransfusion workup eventually revealed Dombrock (a) (Do(a)) antibodies. Because commercially available cell panels do not allow for identification of anti-Do(a) and owing to the lack of Do(a) typing serum samples, selection of matched units of RBCs is dependent on negative cross-match results. In this case, selection of Do(a-) units by cross-matching failed, indicating that serologic methods were not reliable. A polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific priming assay was used to detect DOA and DOB alleles, which encode Do(a) and Do(b) antigens, respectively. The patient was confirmed to be DOB/DOB by DNA sequencing. Furthermore, the involved mismatched units in each of the three hemolytic episodes were shown to be Do(a+). In the presenting case, DNA typing appeared to be superior to serologic methods in selecting matched RBC units in the presence of anti-Do(a). PMID:16441602

  14. Functional polymorphism of each of the two HLA-DR beta chain loci demonstrated with antigen-specific DR3- and DRw52-restricted T cell clones

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    HLA-DR3- and HLA-DRw52-associated functional polymorphism was investigated with selected tetanus toxoid (TT)-specific T cell clones. We have shown earlier that HLA-DR antigens are encoded by two distinct loci, DR beta I and DR beta III. The alloantigenic determinant(s) defined by the serological HLA-DR3 specificity map to the former, while the supratypic HLA-DRw52 determinants map to DR beta III. Furthermore, we have recently recognized by DNA sequencing three alleles of HLA- DRw52 at locus DR beta III, referred to as 52 a, b, and c. Our objective was to correlate the pattern of T cell restriction with the gene products of individual DR beta chain loci and with the three newly described alleles of locus DR beta III. Among the selected T cell clones, 5 reacted exclusively when TT was presented by HLA-DR3+ APCs (TT-DR3-APC). In contrast, two T cell clones were stimulated by TT- DRw52-APC. More specifically, these two T cell clones (Clones 10 and 16) were stimulated by different subsets of TT-DRw52-APC. Clone 16 responded to some DR3 and TT-DRw6-APC, while clone 10 was stimulated by other TT-DR3 and TT-DRw6, and all TT-DR5-APC. This same pattern of DRw52 restriction was found in panel, as well as in family studies. Because this suggested a correlation with the pattern of DRw52 polymorphism observed earlier by DNA sequencing and oligonucleotide hybridization, the APC used in these experiments were typed for the 52 a, b, and c alleles of locus DR beta III by allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. This distribution overlapped exactly with the stimulation pattern defined by the T cell clones. Clone 16 responded to TT-52a-APC, clone 10 to TT-52b-APC, and both clones to a TT-52c-APC. The response of the T cell clones was inhibited differentially by mAbs to DR. Raising TT concentration, or increasing HLA-class II expression with INF-gamma both affected the magnitude of response of the TT- specific clones but did not modify their specificities. These results demonstrate that

  15. Up-regulation of HLA class-I antigen expression and antigen-specific CTL response in cervical cancer cells by the demethylating agent hydralazine and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid

    PubMed Central

    Mora-García, María de Lourdes; Duenas-González, Alfonso; Hernández-Montes, Jorge; De la Cruz-Hernández, Erick; Pérez-Cárdenas, Enrique; Weiss-Steider, Benny; Santiago-Osorio, Edelmiro; Ortíz-Navarrete, Vianney Francisco; Rosales, Víctor Hugo; Cantú, David; Lizano-Soberón, Marcela; Rojo-Aguilar, Martha Patricia; Monroy-García, Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Background DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation are epigenetic events that contribute to the absence or downregulated expression of different components of the tumor recognition complex. These events affect the processing and presentation of antigenic peptides to CTLs by HLA class-I molecules. In this work evaluated the effect of the DNA hypomethylating agent hydralazine and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid, on the expression of HLA class-I molecules and on the antigen-specific immune recognition of cervical cancer cells. Methods Cell lines C33A (HPV-), CaSki (HPV-16+) and MS751 (HPV-18+) were treated with hydralazine and valproic acid to assess the expression of HLA class-I molecules by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Promoter methylation of HLA class-I -A, -B and C, was also evaluated by Methylation-Specific PCR. Primary cervical tumors of four HLA-A*0201 allele patients were typed for HPV and their CTL's stimulated in vitro with the T2 cell line previously loaded with 50 μM of the HPV peptides. Cytotoxicity of stimulated CTL's was assayed against Caski and MS751 cells pre-treated with hydralazine and valproic acid. Results Valproic acid and hydralazine/valproic acid up-regulated the constitutive HLA class-I expression as evaluated by flow cytometry and RT-PCR despite constitutive promoter demethylation at these loci. Hydralazine and valproic acid in combination but no IFN-gamma hyperacetylated histone H4 as evaluated by ChiP assay. The antigenic immune recognition of CaSki and MS751 cells by CTLs specific to HPV-16/18 E6 and E7-derived epitopes, was increased by VA and H/VA and the combination of H/VA/IFN-gamma. Conclusion These results support the potential use of hydralazine and valproic acid as an adjuvant for immune intervention in cervical cancer patients whenever clinical protocols based on tumor antigen recognition is desirable, like in those cases where the application of E6 and E7 based therapeutic vaccines is used. PMID:17192185

  16. Bgb expression in relation to the HLA-B17 antigen splits Bw57 and Bw58 and the cross-reactions of anti-Bgb antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pollack, M S; Crawford, M N; Robinson, H M; Berger, R; Sabo, B; O'Neill, G J

    1982-07-01

    A substantial number of individuals typed as HLA-B17 do not have Bgb. To determine whether or not this discrepancy reflects genetic or ethnic group differences or the influence of B17 antigen subtypes, a large number of unrelated and related B17 individuals from the Caucasian, Hispanic, Black and Chinese ethnic groups were tested in parallel for Bgb and Bw57- or Bw58- B17 subtype. Higher Bgb expression was found in association with Bw57, but differences in expression of Bgb were also seen in different ethnic groups and in different related individuals carrying the same Bw57 or Bw58 haplotype. Genetic factors other than HLA thus influence the expression of HLa Antigens on red cells. Standard and antiglobulin lymphocytotoxicity tests indicate that all Bgb typing sera contain anti-Bw57 antilymphocyte antibodies and most also contain anti-Bw58 and cross-reacting anti-B12, B15 and/or Bw49 antibodies.

  17. Tumor-infiltrating HLA-matched CD4(+) T cells retargeted against Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells.

    PubMed

    Rengstl, Benjamin; Schmid, Frederike; Weiser, Christian; Döring, Claudia; Heinrich, Tim; Warner, Kathrin; Becker, Petra S A; Wistinghausen, Robin; Kameh-Var, Sima; Werling, Eva; Billmeier, Arne; Seidl, Christian; Hartmann, Sylvia; Abken, Hinrich; Küppers, Ralf; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Newrzela, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) presents with a unique histologic pattern. Pathognomonic Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells usually account for less than 1% of the tumor and are embedded in a reactive infiltrate mainly comprised of CD4(+) T cells. HRS cells induce an immunosuppressive microenvironment and thereby escape antitumor immunity. To investigate the impact of interactions between HRS cells and T cells, we performed long-term co-culture studies that were further translated into a xenograft model. Surprisingly, we revealed a strong antitumor potential of allogeneic CD4(+) T cells against HL cell lines. HRS and CD4(+) T cells interact by adhesion complexes similar to immunological synapses. Tumor-cell killing was likely based on the recognition of allogeneic major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) receptor, while CD4(+) T cells from MHC-II compatible donors did not develop any antitumor potential in case of HL cell line L428. However, gene expression profiling (GEP) of co-cultured HRS cells as well as tumor infiltration of matched CD4(+) T cells indicated cellular interactions. Moreover, matched CD4(+) T cells could be activated to kill CD30(+) HRS cells when redirected with a CD30-specific chimeric antigen receptor. Our work gives novel insights into the crosstalk between HRS and CD4(+) T cells, suggesting the latter as potent effector cells in the adoptive cell therapy of HL.

  18. Tumor-infiltrating HLA-matched CD4(+) T cells retargeted against Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells.

    PubMed

    Rengstl, Benjamin; Schmid, Frederike; Weiser, Christian; Döring, Claudia; Heinrich, Tim; Warner, Kathrin; Becker, Petra S A; Wistinghausen, Robin; Kameh-Var, Sima; Werling, Eva; Billmeier, Arne; Seidl, Christian; Hartmann, Sylvia; Abken, Hinrich; Küppers, Ralf; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Newrzela, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) presents with a unique histologic pattern. Pathognomonic Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells usually account for less than 1% of the tumor and are embedded in a reactive infiltrate mainly comprised of CD4(+) T cells. HRS cells induce an immunosuppressive microenvironment and thereby escape antitumor immunity. To investigate the impact of interactions between HRS cells and T cells, we performed long-term co-culture studies that were further translated into a xenograft model. Surprisingly, we revealed a strong antitumor potential of allogeneic CD4(+) T cells against HL cell lines. HRS and CD4(+) T cells interact by adhesion complexes similar to immunological synapses. Tumor-cell killing was likely based on the recognition of allogeneic major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) receptor, while CD4(+) T cells from MHC-II compatible donors did not develop any antitumor potential in case of HL cell line L428. However, gene expression profiling (GEP) of co-cultured HRS cells as well as tumor infiltration of matched CD4(+) T cells indicated cellular interactions. Moreover, matched CD4(+) T cells could be activated to kill CD30(+) HRS cells when redirected with a CD30-specific chimeric antigen receptor. Our work gives novel insights into the crosstalk between HRS and CD4(+) T cells, suggesting the latter as potent effector cells in the adoptive cell therapy of HL. PMID:27471632

  19. High-resolution structure of HLA-A*0201 in complex with a tumour-specific antigenic peptide encoded by the MAGE-A4 gene.

    PubMed

    Hillig, R C; Coulie, P G; Stroobant, V; Saenger, W; Ziegler, A; Hülsmeyer, M

    2001-07-27

    The heterotrimeric complex of the human major histocompatibity complex (MHC) molecule HLA-A*0201, beta2-microglobulin and the decameric peptide GVYDGREHTV derived from the melanoma antigen (MAGE-A4 protein has been determined by X-ray crystallography at 1.4 A resolution. MAGE-A4 belongs to a family of genes that are specifically expressed in a variety of tumours. MAGE-A4-derived peptides are presented by MHC molecules at the cell surface to cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. As the HLA-A*0201:MAGE-A4 complex occurs only on tumour cells, it is considered to be an appropriate target for immunotherapy. The structure presented here reveals potential epitopes specific to the complex and indicates which peptide residues could be recognised by T-cell receptors. In addition, as the structure could be refined anisotropically, it was possible to describe the movements of the bound peptide in more detail.

  20. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of crystals from the recombinantly expressed human major histocompatibility antigen HLA-B*2704 in complex with a viral peptide and with a self-peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Loll, Bernhard; Biesiadka, Jacek; Saenger, Wolfram

    2005-10-01

    Crystallization of HLA-B*2704 in complex with two peptides. The product of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene HLA-B*2704 differs from that of the prototypical subtype HLA-B*2705 by three amino acids at heavy-chain residues 77 (Ser instead of Asp), 152 (Glu instead of Val) and 211 (Gly instead of Ala). In contrast to the ubiquitous HLA-B*2705 subtype, HLA-B*2704 occurs only in orientals. Both subtypes are strongly associated with spondyloarthropathies and the peptides presented by these subtypes are suspected to play a role in disease pathogenesis. HLA-B*2704 was crystallized in complex with a viral peptide and with a self-peptide using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG as a precipitant. Both crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. Data sets were collected to 1.60 Å (complex with the self-peptide pVIPR) or to 1.90 Å (complex with the viral peptide pLMP2) resolution using synchrotron radiation. With HLA-B*2705 complexed with pVIPR as a search model, unambiguous molecular-replacement solutions were found for the complexes of HLA-B*2704 with both peptides.

  1. Expression, purification and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the human major histocompatibility antigen HLA-B*1402 in complex with a viral peptide and with a self-peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pravin; Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Volz, Armin; Ziegler, Andreas; Saenger, Wolfram

    2007-07-01

    The crystallization of HLA-B*1402 in complex with two peptides is reported. The product of the human major histocompatibility (HLA) class I allele HLA-B*1402 only differs from that of allele HLA-B*1403 at amino-acid position 156 of the heavy chain (Leu in HLA-B*1402 and Arg in HLA-B*1403). However, both subtypes are known to be differentially associated with the inflammatory rheumatic disease ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in black populations in Cameroon and Togo. HLA-B*1402 is not associated with AS, in contrast to HLA-B*1403, which is associated with this disease in the Togolese population. The products of these alleles can present peptides with Arg at position 2, a feature shared by a small group of other HLA-B antigens, including HLA-B*2705, the prototypical AS-associated subtype. Complexes of HLA-B*1402 with a viral peptide (RRRWRRLTV, termed pLMP2) and a self-peptide (IRAAPPPLF, termed pCatA) were prepared and were crystallized using polyethylene glycol as precipitant. The complexes crystallized in space groups P2{sub 1} (pLMP2) and P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} (pCatA) and diffracted synchrotron radiation to 2.55 and 1.86 Å resolution, respectively. Unambiguous solutions for both data sets were obtained by molecular replacement using a peptide-complexed HLA-B*2705 molecule (PDB code) as a search model.

  2. Closing the gap: discrimination of the expression profile of HLA questionable alleles by a cytokine-induced secretion approach using HLA-A*32:11Q.

    PubMed

    Föll, D; Hinrichs, J; Tischer, S; Battermann, A; Schambach, A; Figueiredo, C; Immenschuh, S; Blasczyk, R; Eiz-Vesper, B

    2012-05-01

    Matching of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles between donors and recipients plays a major role in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Null or questionably expressed HLA allelic variants are a major issue in HLA matching, because the aberrant expression of such alleles can have a major impact on the outcome of HSCT and/or its complications such as graft-versus-host disease. The goal of this study was to investigate the potential of a recently developed cytokine-induced secretion assay to differentiate the expression levels of HLA-A*32:11Q (questionable) into a null (N) or low (L) expression variant. An amino acid mutation at position 164 of HLA-A*32:11Q disrupts the disulfide bridge in the α2 domain. HLA-A*32:11Q is not detectable by standard microlymphocytotoxicity assay. To this end, we cloned soluble HLA-A*32:11Q and a reference allele (HLA-A*32:01) into expression vectors and transfected/transduced HEK293 and K562 cells. Allele-expressing K562 cells were simultaneously transfected/transduced with a β2-microglobulin (B2M)-encoding vector to ensure the intact HLA structure with B2M. After treatment with proinflammatory cytokines, secreted soluble HLA molecules were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in the supernatant and intracellular accumulation of the recombinant proteins by flow cytometry. HLA-A*32:11Q was nearly undetectable in untreated transfectants. Cytokine treatment increased the secretion of HLA-A*32:11Q to detectable levels and resulted in intracellular accumulation of the allele. There was no difference in mRNA transcription between the A*32 alleles. On the basis of these results, we recommend reclassification of HLA-A*32:11Q as a low expression (L) variant.

  3. Translation and assembly of HLA-DR antigens in Xenopus oocytes injected with mRNA from a human B-cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Long, E O; Gross, N; Wake, C T; Mach, J P; Carrel, S; Accolla, R; Mach, B

    1982-01-01

    HLA-DR antigens are polymorphic cell surface glycoproteins, expressed primarily in B lymphocytes and macrophages, which are thought to play an important role in the immune response. Two polypeptide chains, alpha and beta, are associated at the cell surface, and a third chain associates with alpha and beta intracellularly. RNA isolated from the human B-cell line Raji was injected in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Immunoprecipitates of translation products with several monoclonal antibodies revealed the presence of HLA-DR antigens similar to those synthesized in Raji cells. One monoclonal antibody was able to bind the beta chain after dissociation of the three polypeptide chains with detergent. The presence of all three chains was confirmed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The glycosylation pattern of the three chains was identical to that observed in vivo, as evidenced in studies using tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-linked glycosylation. The presence of alpha chains assembled with beta chains in equimolar ratio was further demonstrated by amino-terminal sequencing. An RNA fraction enriched for the three mRNAs, encoding alpha, beta, and intracellular chains, was isolated. This translation-assembly system and the availability of monoclonal antibodies make it possible to assay for mRNA encoding specific molecules among the multiple human Ia-like antigens. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:6821356

  4. Establishing Assay Cutoffs for HLA Antibody Screening of Apheresis Donors

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, Danielle M.; Norris, Philip J.; Endres, Robert O.; Pandey, Suchitra; Kleinman, Steven H.; Wright, David; Sun, Yu; Busch, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND TRALI is the leading cause of transfusion-related deaths. Donor HLA antibodies have been implicated in TRALI cases. Blood centers are implementing TRALI risk reduction strategies based on HLA antibody screening of some subpopulations of ever-pregnant apheresis platelet donors. However, if screening assay cutoffs are too sensitive, donation loss may adversely impact blood availability. STUDY DESIGN Pregnancy history and HLA antibody screening and single antigen bead (SAB) data from blood donors in the REDS-II Leukocyte Antibody Prevalence Study (LAPS) were evaluated for correlations between assay screening values, HLA antibody titer, and number of HLA antigen specificities. The probabilities of matching a cognate antigen in a recipient were calculated and examined in association with total number of specificities observed and screening values. The relative impact of imposing various screening assay cutoffs or pregnancy stratification was examined in relation to detection of HLA antibody reactive donations and loss of donors and donations. RESULTS We provide evidence that higher HLA Ab screening assay values are associated with maintaining higher screening signals upon dilution and an increased breadth of specificities compared with lower screening values; the latter correlated with an increased risk of a cognate antigen match in potential recipients. Depending upon the TRALI risk reduction strategy used, the potential loss of donations ranged between 0.9 and 6.0%. CONCLUSION This analysis should enable blood centers to decide upon a TRALI risk reduction strategy for apheresis platelets that is consistent with how much donation loss the blood center can tolerate. PMID:21332726

  5. Outcomes of HLA Matched Sibling Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Myeloablative vs. Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Sobecks, Ronald M.; Leis, Jose F.; Gale, Robert Peter; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Zhu, Xiaochun; Sabloff, Mitchell; de Lima, Marcos; Brown, Jennifer R.; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Hale, Gregory A.; Aljurf, Mahmoud D.; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Hsu, Jack W.; Pavletic, Steven Z.; Wirk, Baldeep; Seftel, Matthew D.; Lewis, Ian D.; Alyea, Edwin P.; Cortes, Jorge; Kalaycio, Matt E.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Saber, Wael

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can cure some chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) subjects. This study compared outcomes of myeloablative (MA) and reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) transplants from HLA-matched sibling donors (MSD) for CLL. Patients and Methods From 1995–2007 there were 297 CLL subjects reported to the CIBMTR who received MA (N=163) and RIC (N=134) MSD HCT. The MA subjects were less often transplanted after 2000 and less commonly received anti-thymocyte globulin (4% vs. 13%, p=0.004) or prior antibody therapy (14% vs. 53%; p<0.001). Results RIC was associated with a greater likelihood of platelet recovery and less grade 2–4 acute GvHD compared to MA conditioning. 1 and 5-year treatment related mortality (TRM) were 24% (95% confidence intervals (CI), 16–33%) vs. 37% (95% CI, 30–45%; p=0.023), and 40% (95% CI, 29–51%) vs. 54% (95% CI, 46–62%; p=0.036), and the relapse/progression rates were 21% (95% CI, 14–29%) vs. 10% (95% CI, 6–15%; p=0.020), and 35% (95% CI, 26–46%) vs. 17% (95% CI, 12–24%; p=0.003). MA conditioning was associated with better progression-free (PFS) (relative risk (RR) 0.60; 95% CI, 0.37–0.97, p=0.038) and 3-year survival in transplants before 2001, but for subsequent years RIC was associated with better PFS and survival (RR 1.49 (95% CI, 0.92–2.42), p=0.10; and RR 1.86 (95% CI, 1.11–3.13), p=0.019). Pre-transplant disease status was the most important predictor of relapse (p=0.003) and PFS (p=0.0007) for both forms of transplant conditioning. Conclusion MA and RIC MSD transplants are effective for CLL. Future strategies to decrease TRM and reduce relapses are warranted. PMID:24880021

  6. Description of a novel HLA-B allele, B*5613, identified during HLA-typing using sequence-specific oligonucleotide hybridization and sequence-specific amplification.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, B; Heymann, G A; Schoenemann, C; Nagy, M; Kiesewetter, H; Salama, A

    2004-11-01

    Here, we report on the characterization of a novel human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B allele, B*5613. The allele was identified in an adult male from North Africa who was suffering from sickle cell anemia. HLA-B*5613 most closely matches to B*5601 differing only by a substitution of three nucleotides of codon 180. Due to this substitution, low-resolution HLA-typing using sequence-specific oligonucleotide hybridization or amplification using sequence-specific primers gave inconclusive results. DNA sequencing confirmed a variation of codon 180 (CTG-->GAC) resulting in an amino acid substitution Leu156Asp. PMID:15496207

  7. Toward eliminating HLA class I expression to generate universal cells from allogeneic donors

    PubMed Central

    Torikai, Hiroki; Reik, Andreas; Soldner, Frank; Warren, Edus H.; Yuen, Carrie; Zhou, Yuanyue; Crossland, Denise L.; Huls, Helen; Littman, Nicholas; Zhang, Ziying; Tykodi, Scott S.; Kebriaei, Partow; Lee, Dean A.; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Rebar, Edward J.; Holmes, Michael C.; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Champlin, Richard E.; Gregory, Philip D.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term engraftment of allogeneic cells necessitates eluding immune-mediated rejection, which is currently achieved by matching for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) expression, immunosuppression, and/or delivery of donor-derived cells to sanctuary sites. Genetic engineering provides an alternative approach to avoid clearance of cells that are recognized as “non-self” by the recipient. To this end, we developed designer zinc finger nucleases and employed a “hit-and-run” approach to genetic editing for selective elimination of HLA expression. Electro-transfer of mRNA species coding for these engineered nucleases completely disrupted expression of HLA-A on human T cells, including CD19-specific T cells. The HLA-Aneg T-cell pools can be enriched and evade lysis by HLA-restricted cytotoxic T-cell clones. Recognition by natural killer cells of cells that had lost HLA expression was circumvented by enforced expression of nonclassical HLA molecules. Furthermore, we demonstrate that zinc finger nucleases can eliminate HLA-A expression from embryonic stem cells, which broadens the applicability of this strategy beyond infusing HLA-disparate immune cells. These findings establish that clinically appealing cell types derived from donors with disparate HLA expression can be genetically edited to evade an immune response and provide a foundation whereby cells from a single donor can be administered to multiple recipients. PMID:23741009

  8. Human Leucocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) and Its Murine Functional Homolog Qa2 in the Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Fabrício C.; Mendes-Junior, Celso T.; Silva, Maria C.; Tristão, Fabrine S. M.; Dellalibera-Joviliano, Renata; Soares, Edson G.; Menezes, Jean G.; Schmidt, André; Dantas, Roberto O.; Marin-Neto, José A.; Silva, João S.; Donadi, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility factors, parasite strain, and an adequate modulation of the immune system seem to be crucial for disease progression after Trypanosoma cruzi infection. HLA-G and its murine functional homolog Qa2 have well-recognized immunomodulatory properties. We evaluated the HLA-G 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) polymorphic sites (associated with mRNA stability and target for microRNA binding) and HLA-G tissue expression (heart, colon, and esophagus) in patients presenting Chagas disease, stratified according to the major clinical variants. Further, we investigated the transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other pro- and anti-inflammatory genes in affected mouse tissues during T. cruzi experimental acute and early chronic infection induced by the CL strain. Chagas disease patients exhibited differential HLA-G 3′UTR susceptibility allele/genotype/haplotype patterns, according to the major clinical variant (digestive/cardiac/mixed/indeterminate). HLA-G constitutive expression on cardiac muscle and colonic cells was decreased in Chagasic tissues; however, no difference was observed for Chagasic and non-Chagasic esophagus tissues. The transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other anti and proinflammatory (CTLA-4, PDCD1, IL-10, INF-γ, and NOS-2) genes were induced only during the acute T. cruzi infection in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. We present several lines of evidence indicating the role of immunomodulatory genes and molecules in human and experimental T. cruzi infection. PMID:25688175

  9. Human leucocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) and its murine functional homolog Qa2 in the Trypanosoma cruzi Infection.

    PubMed

    Dias, Fabrício C; Mendes-Junior, Celso T; Silva, Maria C; Tristão, Fabrine S M; Dellalibera-Joviliano, Renata; Moreau, Philippe; Soares, Edson G; Menezes, Jean G; Schmidt, André; Dantas, Roberto O; Marin-Neto, José A; Silva, João S; Donadi, Eduardo A

    2015-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility factors, parasite strain, and an adequate modulation of the immune system seem to be crucial for disease progression after Trypanosoma cruzi infection. HLA-G and its murine functional homolog Qa2 have well-recognized immunomodulatory properties. We evaluated the HLA-G 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) polymorphic sites (associated with mRNA stability and target for microRNA binding) and HLA-G tissue expression (heart, colon, and esophagus) in patients presenting Chagas disease, stratified according to the major clinical variants. Further, we investigated the transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other pro- and anti-inflammatory genes in affected mouse tissues during T. cruzi experimental acute and early chronic infection induced by the CL strain. Chagas disease patients exhibited differential HLA-G 3'UTR susceptibility allele/genotype/haplotype patterns, according to the major clinical variant (digestive/cardiac/mixed/indeterminate). HLA-G constitutive expression on cardiac muscle and colonic cells was decreased in Chagasic tissues; however, no difference was observed for Chagasic and non-Chagasic esophagus tissues. The transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other anti and proinflammatory (CTLA-4, PDCD1, IL-10, INF-γ, and NOS-2) genes were induced only during the acute T. cruzi infection in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. We present several lines of evidence indicating the role of immunomodulatory genes and molecules in human and experimental T. cruzi infection.

  10. HLA class II genotypes in Mexican Mestizos with familial and nonfamilial multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-de la Barrera, C; Zúñiga-Ramos, J; Ruíz-Morales, J A; Estañol, B; Granados, J; Llorente, L

    2000-12-26

    Predisposition to MS is associated with the HLA-DR2 antigen in white patients. The authors investigated the genetic factors behind the increasing frequency of MS in the Mexican population. HLA-DR and DQ were analyzed in 17 patients with MS, 15 of their first-degree relatives, and 99 healthy ethnically matched controls. DR2 or DR3 was found in 15 of 17 patients. In controls, both alleles had frequencies less than 0.05. MS in Mexican patients was associated with HLA-DR2 and DR3.

  11. Expression and gene transcript of Fc receptors for IgG, HLA class II antigens and Langerhans cells in human cervico-vaginal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, L A; Kelly, C G; Fellowes, R; Hecht, E M; Wilson, J; Chapman, M; Lehner, T

    1992-01-01

    The mechanism of transmission of HIV from the male to the female genital tract or in the reverse order is not clear. CD4 glycoprotein is the receptor for HIV and Langerhans cells and the related dendritic cells could play a role in the initial transmission of HIV. Fc receptors (FcR) for IgG might be involved in antibody-mediated binding of HIV. We carried out an immunohistological study of normal human cervical and vaginal epithelia for the presence of CD4 glycoprotein, Langerhans cells and FcR to IgG. CD4+ glycoprotein was not found in the vaginal or cervical epithelium, with the exception of a few endocervical epithelial cells. A small number of CD4+ mononuclear cells were found in the endocervical epithelium of a third of the specimens but a large number of CD4+ cells was found in the submucosa of most of the cervical and vaginal specimens. Langerhans cells expressing CD4, HLA class II, Fc gamma R2 and Fc gamma R3 were detected in most vaginal, ectocervical and transformation zone epithelia and in 9/14 endocervical tissues. Fc gamma R3 was detected in about two-thirds of the columnar endocervical epithelium and the transformation zone. A smaller number of specimens expressed Fc gamma R2 in these epithelia, but Fc gamma R1 was not detected. We then demonstrated mRNA for Fc gamma R3 in the columnar endocervical epithelial cells and transformation zone by in situ hybridization, using a CD16-RNA probe. Fc gamma R3 and Fc gamma R2 gene transcripts were also found in fetal cervical tissue by applying the polymerase chain reaction to amplify portions of the Fc gamma R3 and Fc gamma R2 coding sequences in cDNA prepared from fetal RNA. HLA-DR was found in the endocervical cells, transformation zone and in Langerhans cells of all specimens. The presence of Langerhans cells, Fc gamma receptors and HLA class II antigen offers three potential mechanisms for cervico-vaginal HIV transmission: (i) direct HIV infection of Langerhans cells, (ii) binding of HIV antibody complexes

  12. HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 allele and haplotype frequencies of 10 918 Koreans from bone marrow donor registry in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, H; Lee, Y-J; Song, E Y; Park, M H

    2016-10-01

    The human leucocyte antigen (HLA) system is the most polymorphic genetic system in humans, and HLA matching is crucial in organ transplantation, especially in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We investigated HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 allele and haplotype frequencies at allelic level in 10 918 Koreans from bone marrow donor registry in Korea. Intermediate resolution HLA typing was performed using Luminex technology (Wakunaga, Japan), and additional allelic level typing was performed using PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism method and/or sequence-based typing (Abbott Molecular, USA). Allele and haplotype frequencies were calculated by direct counting and maximum likelihood methods, respectively. A total of 39 HLA-A, 66 HLA-B and 47 HLA-DRB1 alleles were identified. High-frequency alleles found at a frequency of ≥5% were 6 HLA-A (A*02:01, *02:06, *11:01, *24:02, *31:01 and *33:03), 6 HLA-B (B*15:01, *35:01, *44:03, *51:01, 54:01 and *58:01) and 8 HLA-DRB1 (DRB1*01:01, *04:05, *04:06, *07:01, *08:03, *09:01, *13:02 and *15:01) alleles. At each locus, A*02, B*15 and DRB1*14 generic groups were most diverse at allelic level, consisting of 9, 12 and 11 different alleles, respectively. A total of 366, 197 and 21 different HLA-A-B-DRB1 haplotypes were estimated with frequencies of ≥0.05%, ≥0.1% and ≥0.5%, respectively. The five most common haplotypes with frequencies of ≥2.0% were A*33:03-B*44:03-DRB1*13:02 (4.97%), A*33:03-B*58:01-DRB1*13:02, A*33:03-B*44:03-DRB1*07:01, A*24:02-B*07:02-DRB1*01:01 and A*24:02-B*52:01-DRB1*15:02. Among 34 serologic HLA-A-B-DR haplotypes with frequencies of ≥0.5%, 17 haplotypes revealed allele-level diversity and majority of the allelic variation was arising from A2, A26, B61, B62, DR4 and DR14 specificities. Haplotype diversity obtained in this study is the most comprehensive data thus far reported in Koreans, and the information will be useful for unrelated stem cell transplantation as well as for disease

  13. HLA-mismatched cord blood transplantation: immunological studies.

    PubMed

    Vilmer, E; Quelvennec, E; Plouvier, E; Denamur, E; Rohrlich, P; Elion, J; Sterkers, G

    1994-01-01

    Two cases of HLA partially matched related cord blood transplantation were reported. The first patient remains healthy more than 4 years after graft. The second patient died from acute GVHD. In the first case, the immune reconstitution was studied over a 2 year period after graft: the alloreactive cytotoxic T-cell precursor (CTLp) frequencies were comparable between the donor and the recipient. Indirect evidence suggested that the resolution of GVHD was not due to a specific deletion of CTLp against the HLA antigens unshared between donor and recipient.

  14. Influence of genetic polymorphisms of cytokine genes in the outcome of HLA-matched allogeneic stem cell transplantation in a South East Asian population.

    PubMed

    Gan, G G; Leong, Y C; Bee, P C; Chin, E F M; Abdul Halim, H; Nadarajan, V S; Teh, A K H

    2016-02-01

    Non-HLA gene polymorphisms have been shown to be associated with the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and outcome of allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT). This study aims to investigate the role of IL6, TNFα, IL10, IL2 and IL12 gene polymorphisms in the outcome of AHSCT in a South East Asian population. A total of 67 patients and 59 donors who underwent HLA-identical matched sibling AHSCT were available for analysis. There was no significant association between the different cytokine genotypes of patients with the incidence and severity of acute GVHD. Patients with IL2 166∗T allele and patients who received donor stem cells who had IL2 166∗G allele appeared to have reduced incidence of cGVHD. Patients who received donor stem cells with IL12 1188∗C allele are found to be associated with better disease free survival. These results suggest a possible role of IL2 and IL12 gene polymorphisms in the outcome of AHSCT in a South East Asian population. PMID:26638029

  15. Performance Characteristics and Validation of Next-Generation Sequencing for Human Leucocyte Antigen Typing.

    PubMed

    Weimer, Eric T; Montgomery, Maureen; Petraroia, Rosanne; Crawford, John; Schmitz, John L

    2016-09-01

    High-resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching reduces graft-versus-host disease and improves overall patient survival after hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Sanger sequencing has been the gold standard for HLA typing since 1996. However, given the increasing number of new HLA alleles identified and the complexity of the HLA genes, clinical HLA typing by Sanger sequencing requires several rounds of additional testing to provide allele-level resolution. Although next-generation sequencing (NGS) is routinely used in molecular genetics, few clinical HLA laboratories use the technology. The performance characteristics of NGS HLA typing using TruSight HLA were determined using Sanger sequencing as the reference method. In total, 211 samples were analyzed with an overall accuracy of 99.8% (2954/2961) and 46 samples were analyzed for precision with 100% (368/368) reproducibility. Most discordant alleles were because of technical error rather than assay performance. More important, the ambiguity rate was 3.5% (103/2961). Seventy-four percentage of the ambiguities were within the DRB1 and DRB4 loci. HLA typing by NGS saves approximately $6000 per run when compared to Sanger sequencing. Thus, TruSight HLA assay enables high-throughput HLA typing with an accuracy, precision, ambiguity rate, and cost savings that should facilitate adoption of NGS technology in clinical HLA laboratories.

  16. The relationships between HLA class II alleles and antigens with gestational diabetes mellitus: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Cong-cong; Jin, Yi-mei; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Yang, Guang; Jing, Chun-xia; Yang, Xuesong

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy. It is associated with an increased risk of pregnancy complications. Susceptibility to GDM is partly determined by genetics and linked with type 1 diabetes-associated high risk HLA class II genes. However, the evidence for this relationship is still highly controversial. In this study, we assessed the relationship between HLA class II variants and GDM. We performed meta-analysis on all of literatures available in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases. The odds ratio and 95% confidence interval of each variant were estimated. All statistical analyses were conducted using the Comprehensive Meta Analysis 2.2.064 software. At the allelic analysis, DQB1*02, DQB1*0203, DQB1*0402, DQB1*0602, DRB1*03, DRB1*0301 and DRB1*1302 reached a nominal level of significance, and only DQB1*02, DQB1*0602 and DRB1*1302 were statistically significant after Bonferroni correction. At the serological analysis, none of DQ2, DQ6, DR13 and DR17 was statistically significant following Bonferroni correction although they reached a nominal level of significance. In sum, our meta-analysis demonstrated that there were the associations between HLA class II variants and GDM but more studies are required to elucidate how these variants contribute to GDM susceptibility. PMID:27721507

  17. The binding of monoclonal antibodies to cell-surface molecules. A quantitative analysis with immunoglobulin G against two alloantigenic determinants of the human transplantation antigen HLA-A2.

    PubMed Central

    Ways, J P; Parham, P

    1983-01-01

    Monoclonal IgG1 (immunoglobulin G1) PA2.1 and MA2.1 antibodies recognize polymorphic sites of the human transplantation antigen HLA-A2. They are distinguishable because MA2.1 binds HLA-A2 and HLA-B17, whereas PA2.1 binds HLA-A2 and HLA-A28. The affinities of PA2.1-Fab for HLA-A2, three HLA-A2 variants and HLA-A28 are similar and relatively low (1.9 X 10(7) M-1). The affinities of MA2.1-Fab for HLA-A2, three HLA-A2 variants and HLA-B17 are similar and high (1.2 X 10(9) M-1). The difference in affinity is due to the rates of dissociation, which give half-times of dissociation of 290 min for MA2.1-Fab and 4 min for PA2.1-Fab. For both Fab, equilibrium measurements and kinetic determinations gave consistent estimates for affinity. When PA2.1-F(ab)2 or IgG is incubated with cells it reaches equilibrium within 3 h, with most molecules bound bivalently to the cell. Under similar conditions, MA2.1-F(ab)2 does not reach equilibrium and a significant proportion of molecules bound with one and two sites are found. For the lower-affinity antibody (PA2.1), estimates of the binding constants for one- and two-site interactions could be made. By simple Scatchard analysis the avidity of F(ab)2 or IgG is 1.3 X 10(9) M-1, giving an enhancement factor of 68 between bivalent and univalent binding. This is a measure of the equilibrium constant for the interchange between bivalent and univalent binding. Analysis of the results with more realistic models indicates that the actual value is larger (10(3)-10(4) M-1) than 68 M-1. The avidities of F(ab)2 and IgG for HLA-A2 are identical, showing the Fc does not interfere with bivalent binding to cells. PMID:6197968

  18. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the human major histocompatibility antigen HLA-B*2703 complexed with a viral peptide and with a self-peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Loll, Bernhard; Biesiadka, Jacek; Saenger, Wolfram

    2005-04-01

    The product of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene HLA-B*2703 differs from that of the prototypical subtype HLA-B*2705 by a single amino acid at heavy-chain residue 59 that is involved in anchoring the peptide N-terminus within the A pocket of the molecule. Two B*2703–peptide complexes were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 8000 as a precipitant. A pocket of the molecule, two HLA-B*2703–peptide complexes were crystallized and data sets were collected to high resolution using synchrotron radiation. The product of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene HLA-B*2703 differs from that of the prototypical subtype HLA-B*2705 by a single amino acid at heavy-chain residue 59 that is involved in anchoring the peptide N-terminus within the A pocket of the molecule. Two B*2703–peptide complexes were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 8000 as a precipitant. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1} (pVIPR peptide) or P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} (pLMP2 peptide). Data sets were collected to 1.55 Å (B*2703–pVIPR) or 2.0 Å (B*2703–pLMP2) resolution using synchrotron radiation. With B*2705–pVIPR as a search model, a clear molecular-replacement solution was found for both B*2703 complexes.

  19. Defective antigen presentation by monocytes in ESRD patients not responding to hepatitis B vaccination: impaired HBsAg internalization and expression of ICAM-1 and HLA-DR/Ia molecules

    PubMed Central

    Barth, C.; Pollok, M.; Michałkiewicz, J.; Madaliński, K.; Maciejewski, J.; Baldamis, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the monocyte function of uraemic non-responders to hepatitis B vaccination. Therefore, some parameters concerning antigen processing by monocytes (Mo) as antigen presenting cells (APC) were analysed. It was found that in uraemic non-responders, (1) the internalization of HBsAg by monocytes was significantly decreasjed—HBsAg complexed with specific IgG or as immune complex isolated from patients is better internalized compared with free HBsAg; (2) during antigen presentation the expression of adhesion (ICAM-1) and accessory (HLA-DR/Ia) molecules was significantly decreased in uraemic patients, especially in non-responders; and (3) impaired internalization of HBsAg as well as a decrease in ICAM-1 and HLA-DR/Ia expression, correlated well with the blunted proliferation of CD4+ T cells stimulated by autologous monocytes induced by HBsAg. PMID:18475616

  20. Lights and shadows of anti-HLA antibodies detected by solid-phase assay.

    PubMed

    Picascia, Antonietta; Sabia, Chiara; Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Montesano, Maria Lourdes; Sommese, Linda; Schiano, Concetta; Napoli, Claudio

    2014-11-01

    Recently, management of patients awaiting solid organ transplantation has taken advantages after the development of more sensitive and accurate solid phase assays which have supported the historic complement dependent cytotoxicity. This approach has allowed the detection of antibodies in patients previously considered negative. The use of the single antigen beads resulted in a more accurate anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibody characterization. The detection of anti-HLA antibodies specific for C, DQ and DP loci that were not so well characterized has been possible through the implementation of the single antigen assay. The assessment of HLA compatibility has been expanded through the introduction of "epitope matching" concept and the definition of the unacceptable antigens for a more adequate evaluation of donor-recipient compatibility. However, the clinical impact of pre-formed and de novo anti-HLA antibodies detected by solid phase assays is still controversial due to the drawback related to result interpretation. Until today, the unresolved issues concern if all antibodies affect the medium and long term clinical outcome. An open debate on the clinical relevance of anti-HLA antibodies detected by single-antigen beads highlights needing to further investigations. Here, we describe the novel applications and the improvements of the solid-phase assay use. PMID:25171913

  1. Study of human leukocyte antigen-cw in Egyptian patients with vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Hassab El Naby, Hussein M; Alnaggar, Mohamed R; Abdelhamid, Mahmoud F; Alsaid, Khadiga; Al Shawadfy, Eslam M; Elsaie, Mohamed L

    2015-04-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antigens vary considerably in different racial groups, and an analysis of results from several geographical locations suggests that vitiligo appears to be associated with different HLA antigens in different groups. The aim of this work was to assess the association of HLA-Cw with vitiligo in the Egyptian population. Forty unrelated patients with nonsegmental vitiligo and 20 matched controls were selected. A polymerase chain reaction sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP) method was used to determine HLA DNA typing. There was a statistically significant difference in the association of HLA-Cw6 with vitiligo in the 2 studied groups. A comparatively increased number of patients showed HLA-Cw2 and HLA-Cw7 (13.64%). However, there were no statistically significant differences. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first molecular study of HLA typing in Egyptian patients with vitiligo. Our findings are in agreement with earlier studies that reported statistically increased frequencies for allele of HLA-Cw6 in Northern Italian, Kuwaiti, Chinese Han, and Saudi populations (45.45%, P<.05).

  2. The Royan Public Umbilical Cord Blood Bank: Does It Cover All Ethnic Groups in Iran Based on HLA Diversity?

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimkhani, Saeideh; Farjadian, Shirin; Ebrahimi, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Umbilical cord blood (UCB) stem cells allow the transplantation of partially human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched grafts and are a valuable resource for the treatment of hematologic malignancies and heritable hematologic, immunologic and metabolic diseases, especially when a compatible bone marrow donor is unavailable. The aim of this study was to determine how many ethnic groups in Iran are covered by the available UCB units based on HLA diversity. Methods From 2009 until mid-2013, 4,981 (30.3%) of the 16,437 UCB samples collected met the storage criteria and were cryopreserved at a public cord blood bank (CBB) in Tehran, Iran. HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 were typed in 1,793 samples. Results The mean volume of the cryopreserved samples was 81.25 ± 20.3 ml. The range of total nucleated cells per unit was 51 × 107-107 × 107. The most common HLA alleles were HLA-A*2 (17%) and HLA-A*24 (15.6%), HLA-B*35 (16.8%) and HLA-B*51 (13.9%), and HLA-DRB1*11 (20%) and HLA-DRB1*15 (14%). The predominant haplotypes were HLA-A*24-B*35-DRB1*11 (2%), HLA-A*02-B*50-DR*07 (1.8%), and HLA-A*02-B*51-DRB1*11 (1.5%). Conclusions Based on the HLA-DRB1 profiles, the UCB units available at the Royan public UCB bank are a potentially adequate resource for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for Iranian recipients belonging to particular ethnic groups. Regular educational programs to improve the public knowledge of UCB for transplantation can enhance the public CBB stocks for all Iranian ethnic groups in the future. PMID:24847189

  3. An extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, M D; Smith, J R; Austin, R K; Kelleher, D; Nepom, G T; Volk, B; Kagnoff, M F

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. We previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II beta-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. We now report the isolation of this beta-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP beta chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP beta-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP alpha-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DP alpha-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis; 84% of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 patients had a 16-kb Xba I fragment that was present in only 36% of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 controls. Moreover, 79% of these patients had both alpha- and beta-chain polymorphisms in contrast to 27% of controls. Thus, celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP alpha- and beta-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion. Images PMID:2893373

  4. The specificity of peptides bound to human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 influences the prevalence of arthritis in HLA-B27 transgenic rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, M; Sayad, A; Simmons, W A; Jones, R C; Maika, S D; Satumtira, N; Dorris, M L; Gaskell, S J; Bordoli, R S; Sartor, R B; Slaughter, C A; Richardson, J A; Hammer, R E; Taurog, J D

    1998-09-01

    Human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen B27 is highly associated with the rheumatic diseases termed spondyloarthropathies, but the mechanism is not known. B27 transgenic rats develop a spontaneous disease resembling the human spondyloarthropathies that includes arthritis and colitis. To investigate whether this disease requires the binding of specific peptides to B27, we made a minigene construct in which a peptide from influenza nucleoprotein, NP383-391 (SRYWAIRTR), which binds B27 with high affinity, is targeted directly to the ER by the signal peptide of the adenovirus E3/gp19 protein. Rats transgenic for this minigene, NP1, were made and bred with B27 rats. The production of the NP383-391 peptide in B27(+)NP1(+) rats was confirmed immunologically and by mass spectrometry. The NP1 product displaced approximately 90% of the 3H-Arg-labeled endogenous peptide fraction in B27(+)NP1(+) spleen cells. Male B27(+)NP1(+) rats had a significantly reduced prevalence of arthritis, compared with B27(+)NP- males or B27(+) males with a control construct, NP2, whereas colitis was not significantly affected by the NP1 transgene. These findings support the hypothesis that B27-related arthritis requires binding of a specific peptide or set of peptides to B27, and they demonstrate a method for efficient transgenic targeting of peptides to the ER. PMID:9730889

  5. Combined influences of Gm and HLA phenotypes upon multiple sclerosis susceptibility and severity.

    PubMed Central

    Salier, J P; Sesboüé, R; Martin-Mondière, C; Daveau, M; Cesaro, P; Cavelier, B; Coquerel, A; Legrand, L; Goust, J M; Degos, J D

    1986-01-01

    In some Caucasian populations, multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility has been independently related to given alleles of HLA or Gm systems that respectively code for major histocompatibility complex class I and II antigens or immunoglobulin G heavy chains. Whether given combinations of alleles at both series of loci simultaneously influence MS susceptibility and/or severity was investigated by comparing 147 French MS patients and 226 geographically-matched healthy controls. The G2m(-23)/HLA-B35 phenotype and G1m(-1)/HLA-B7(-)/HLA-DR2 phenotype were respectively associated with significant protection against (relative risk = 0.05) and susceptibility to (relative risk = 4.3) MS. When considering MS severity, the presence of HLA-B7 antigen correlated with a more severe disease in Gm1/Gm3 heterozygous patients, but not in Gm3/Gm3 homozygous patients. Conversely, an HLA-B12-associated milder disease was restricted to Gm3/Gm3 homozygotes. These results demonstrate the combined influence on MS of genetic loci that are unlinked but immune response-associated. Combined Gm and HLA typing is very likely able to serve as a prognostic indicator in this disease. PMID:3461005

  6. Combined influences of Gm and HLA phenotypes upon multiple sclerosis susceptibility and severity.

    PubMed

    Salier, J P; Sesboüé, R; Martin-Mondière, C; Daveau, M; Cesaro, P; Cavelier, B; Coquerel, A; Legrand, L; Goust, J M; Degos, J D

    1986-08-01

    In some Caucasian populations, multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility has been independently related to given alleles of HLA or Gm systems that respectively code for major histocompatibility complex class I and II antigens or immunoglobulin G heavy chains. Whether given combinations of alleles at both series of loci simultaneously influence MS susceptibility and/or severity was investigated by comparing 147 French MS patients and 226 geographically-matched healthy controls. The G2m(-23)/HLA-B35 phenotype and G1m(-1)/HLA-B7(-)/HLA-DR2 phenotype were respectively associated with significant protection against (relative risk = 0.05) and susceptibility to (relative risk = 4.3) MS. When considering MS severity, the presence of HLA-B7 antigen correlated with a more severe disease in Gm1/Gm3 heterozygous patients, but not in Gm3/Gm3 homozygous patients. Conversely, an HLA-B12-associated milder disease was restricted to Gm3/Gm3 homozygotes. These results demonstrate the combined influence on MS of genetic loci that are unlinked but immune response-associated. Combined Gm and HLA typing is very likely able to serve as a prognostic indicator in this disease. PMID:3461005

  7. Single-agent GVHD prophylaxis with posttransplantation cyclophosphamide after myeloablative, HLA-matched BMT for AML, ALL, and MDS

    PubMed Central

    Kanakry, Christopher G.; Tsai, Hua-Ling; Bolaños-Meade, Javier; Smith, B. Douglas; Gojo, Ivana; Kanakry, Jennifer A.; Kasamon, Yvette L.; Gladstone, Douglas E.; Matsui, William; Borrello, Ivan; Huff, Carol Ann; Swinnen, Lode J.; Powell, Jonathan D.; Pratz, Keith W.; DeZern, Amy E.; Showel, Margaret M.; McDevitt, Michael A.; Brodsky, Robert A.; Levis, Mark J.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Fuchs, Ephraim J.; Rosner, Gary L.; Jones, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    High-dose, posttransplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCy) reduces severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic blood or marrow transplantation (alloBMT), but the impact of PTCy on long-term, disease-specific outcomes is unclear. We conducted a retrospective study of 209 consecutive adult patients transplanted for acute myeloid leukemia (AML, n = 138), myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 28), or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n = 43) using PTCy as sole GVHD prophylaxis after myeloablative conditioning and HLA-matched–related or –unrelated T-cell–replete allografting. At alloBMT, 30% of patients were not in morphologic complete remission. The cumulative incidences of grades II to IV and III to IV acute GVHD at 100 days and chronic GVHD at 2 years were 45%, 11%, and 13%, respectively. Forty-three percent of patients did not require immunosuppression for any reason beyond PTCy. At 3 years, relapse cumulative incidence was 36%, disease-free survival was 46%, survival free of disease and chronic GVHD was 39%, and overall survival was 58%. Lack of remission at alloBMT, adverse cytogenetics, and low allograft nucleated cell dose were associated with inferior survival for AML patients. Minimal residual disease but not t(9;22) was associated with inferior outcomes for ALL patients. The ability to limit posttransplantation immunosuppression makes PTCy a promising transplantation platform for the integration of postgrafting strategies to prevent relapse. PMID:25316679

  8. Induction of an antitumor response using dendritic cells transfected with DNA constructs encoding the HLA-A*02:01-restricted epitopes of tumor-associated antigens in culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sennikov, Sergey Vital'evich; Shevchenko, Julia Alexandrovna; Kurilin, Vasilii Vasil'evich; Khantakova, Julia Nikolaevna; Lopatnikova, Julia Anatol'evna; Gavrilova, Elena Vasil'evna; Maksyutov, Rinat Amirovich; Bakulina, Anastasiya Yur'evna; Sidorov, Sergey Vasil'evich; Khristin, Alexander Alexandrovich; Maksyutov, Amir Zakievich

    2016-02-01

    Advances in oncoimmunology related to the definition of the basic mechanisms of the formation of antitumor immune response, as well as the opening of tumor-associated antigens recognized by immune cells, allowed to start developing ways to influence the effector cells of the immune system to generate effective antitumor cytotoxic response. We investigated the possibility to stimulate an antitumor response in a culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients by dendritic cells transfected with HLA-A*02:01-restricted DNA constructs. We isolated dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes and delivered our constructs to these cells by magnetic transfection. Additionally, a series of experiments with loading of dendritic cells with autologous tumor cell lysate antigens was conducted. We have shown that dendritic cells transfected with the HLA-A*02:01-restricted DNA constructs are effective in inducing an antitumor response in a culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients. Dendritic cells transfected with DNA constructor dendritic cells loaded with lysate antigens revealed a comparable stimulated cytotoxic response of mononuclear cells to these two ways of antigen delivery. We conclude that using DNA constructs in conjunction with patient stratification by HLA type allows the application of transfected DCs as an effective method to stimulate antitumor immunity in vitro.

  9. Improving Outcome of Aplastic Anaemia with HLA-Matched Sibling Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: An Experience of Gujarat Cancer and Research Institute (GCRI).

    PubMed

    Raut, Shreeniwas S; Shah, Sandip A; Patel, Kinnari A; Shah, Kamlesh M; Anand, Asha S; Talati, Shailesh S; Panchal, Harsha P; Patel, Apurva A; Parikh, Sonia K; Parekh, Bhavesh B; Shukla, Shilin N

    2015-03-01

    Fifteen patients, with a median age of 19 years having severe aplastic anaemia (SAA) underwent human leucocyte antigen (HLA) identical sibling donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) using conditioning regimens containing cyclophosphamide with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) or a combination of fludarabine and cyclophosphamide with or without ATG during December 2007 to May 2013. Cyclosporine and mini methotrexate were used as graft versus host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. Graft source included peripheral blood stem cells in 11, bone marrow in 3 and both in 1. One patient had primary graft failure while 14 patients were engrafted with a median neutrophil and platelet engraftment time of 13.5 days. One patient had secondary graft rejection. Acute GVHD occurred in 3 patients and chronic GVHD in 4. One year death rate in engrafted patients was 14.28 %. At a mean follow-up of 21.2 months, 12 (80 %) are alive and well. One of the donors was a patient of haemophilia but the disease did not occur in the recipient. The graft was successful and the recipient is alive till date. PMID:25548437

  10. Susceptibility to aplastic anemia is associated with HLA-DRB1*1501 in an aboriginal population in Sabah, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, J S; Wong, Lily; Kamaluddin, Muhammad Amir; Yin, Lee Yin; Murad, Shahnaz

    2011-10-01

    The incidence of aplastic anemia is reported to be higher in Asia than elsewhere. We studied the frequency of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DRB1 alleles in aplastic anemia patients from 2 genetically similar aboriginal groups, the Kadazan and the Dusun, and compared them with genetically matched community and hospital controls. HLA-DRB1*15 was significantly higher in the patients compared with controls (p = 0.005), confirming similar findings in Japanese and Caucasian studies. Further testing indicated a significantly higher frequency of HLA-DRB1*1501 in patients compared with controls (p = 0.0004) but no significant difference in the frequency of HLA-DRB1*1502. The high frequency of HLA-DRB1*15 in the Kadazan and Dusun population combined with the wide variety of environmental factors associated with aplastic anemia could be the reason for the elevated incidence of aplastic anemia in the Kadazan and Dusun in Sabah.

  11. Effects of type II collagen epitope carbamylation and citrullination in human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR4(+) monozygotic twins discordant for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    De Santis, M; Ceribelli, A; Cavaciocchi, F; Generali, E; Massarotti, M; Isailovic, N; Crotti, C; Scherer, H U; Montecucco, C; Selmi, C

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the native, citrullinated or carbamylated type II human collagen T cell- and B cell-epitopes on the adaptive immune response in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Peripheral blood T and B cells obtained from a human leucocyte D4-related (antigen DR4(-) HLA-DR4)(+) woman with early RA, her healthy monozygotic twin and an unrelated HLA-DR3(+) woman with early RA were analysed for activation (CD154/CD69), apoptosis (annexin/7-aminoactinomycin), cytokine production [interferon (IFN)γ/interleukin (IL)-17/IL-4/IL-10/IL-6] and functional phenotype (CD45Ra/CCR7) after stimulation with the collagen native T cell epitope (T261-273), the K264 carbamylated T cell epitope (carT261-273), the native B cell epitope (B359-369) or the R360 citrullinated B cell epitope (citB359-369), and the combinations of these. The T cell memory compartment was activated by T cell epitopes in both discordant DR4(+) twins, but not in the DR3(+) RA. The collagen-specific activation of CD4(+) T cells was induced with both the native and carbamylated T cell epitopes only in the RA twin. Both T cell epitopes also induced IL-17 production in the RA twin, but a greater IL-4 and IL-10 response in the healthy twin. The citrullinated B cell epitope, particularly when combined with the carbamylated T cell epitope, induced B cell activation and an increased IL-6/IL-10 ratio in the RA twin compared to a greater IL-10 production in the healthy twin. Our data suggest that circulating collagen-specific T and B cells are found in HLA-DR4(+) subjects, but only RA activated cells express co-stimulatory molecules and produce proinflammatory cytokines. Carbamylation and citrullination further modulate the activation and cytokine polarization of T and B cells. PMID:27314557

  12. Stem cell transplantation from HLA-matched related donor for Fanconi's anaemia: a retrospective review of the multicentric Italian experience on behalf of AIEOP-GITMO.

    PubMed

    Dufour, C; Rondelli, R; Locatelli, F; Miano, M; Di Girolamo, G; Bacigalupo, A; Messina, C; Porta, F; Balduzzi, A; Iorio, A P; Buket, E; Madon, E; Pession, A; Dini, G; Di Bartolomeo, P

    2001-03-01

    Twenty-seven consecutive Italian patients with Fanconi's anaemia (FA) underwent stem cell transplantation (SCT) from an HLA-matched related donor in 10 Italian centres of the Associazione Italiana Ematologia ed Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP), Gruppo Italiano di Trapianto di Midollo Osseo (GITMO). Twenty-two patients (81.5%) were conditioned with low-dose (median 20 mg/kg) cyclophosphamide (Cy) and thoraco-abdominal or total body irradiation (median dose 500 cGy), five patients (18.5%) with high-dose Cy (median 120 mg/kg). Graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis was carried out with cyclosporin A in 26 cases; methotrexate (MTX) was added in eight cases. One patient received MTX alone. The median follow-up was 36 months. Ninety-two percent of patients (25 out of 27) engrafted, grade II and III acute GVHD occurred in 28% and 8% of patients, respectively, with chronic GVHD in 12.5%. Conditioning-related toxicity was mild: 4% of patients had grade III mucositis, 7.4% had grade II haemorrhagic cystitis, 14.8% had grade III liver toxicity and 11.1% had grade III renal toxicity. Transplant-related mortality at 12 months was 19.2%, survival at 36 months was 81.5%, with a median Karnofsky score of 100%. No late tumours occurred after a mean follow-up of the survivors of 5 years. None of the studied variables significantly affected the survival, including conditioning regimen, acute GVHD and clinical non-haematological phenotype. Among the studied variables, only conditioning regimens containing high-dose Cy and the presence of genital abnormalities were significantly (P < 0.05) associated with an increased rate of acute GVHD. Our study demonstrates that the Italian FA patients undergoing SCT from an HLA-matched related donor have a very good outcome. These patients, when compared with others of different ethnic origin who underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, showed a less severe non-haematological phenotype, raising the possibility that this milder phenotype may

  13. The case to abandon human leukocyte antigen matching for kidney allocation: would it be wise to throw out the baby with the bathwater?

    PubMed

    Hiesse, Christian; Pessione, Fabienne; Houssin, Didier

    2004-02-27

    Since major histocompatibility (MHC) antigen matching was introduced in the early 1970s as the key factor determining kidney transplant allocation, several studies, mainly arising from organ-sharing organizations in the United States and Europe, have debated this complex issue. The first fundamental concern is the interaction of human leukocyte antigen matching with other transplant outcome risk factors, for example, prolongation of ischemia and matching for age. Much concordant data advocate restraining MHC antigen-based allocation in terms of space and time limits. The second fundamental concern is the balancing of the advantages of better antigen matching in terms of improved graft survival and the improved transplantation rate in immunologically high-risk patients with the major drawback of inequitable access for ethnic minorities and patients with rare MHC haplotypes. These issues have led to considering renewed kidney allocation rules, discarding human leukocyte antigen matching from algorithms, or modifying the specificity allocation level by using cross-reactive group matching or class II MHC antigen matching. The evolving concepts in the field of histocompatibility support the need for periodically updated, flexible, and hybrid allocation systems, as designed in France by the Etablissement français des Greffes.

  14. HLA-D region antigen-associated invariant polypeptides as revealed by two-dimensional gel analysis. Glycosylation and structural inter-relationships.

    PubMed

    Rudd, C E; Bodmer, J G; Bodmer, W F; Crumpton, M J

    1985-02-10

    Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel analyses of immunoprecipitates of HLA-D region antigens prepared from [35S]methionine-labeled B lymphoblastoid cells revealed a number of invariant polypeptides (Ii and theta) that co-precipitate with the alpha and beta polypeptides of the class II (Ia) antigens. The invariant polypeptides comprised at least three Ii spots of Mr = 31,000 (Ii1-Ii3) and a series of six theta spots of Mr = 34,000 (theta 1-theta 6). The structural inter-relationships of these polypeptides have been investigated. Tryptic peptide fingerprints showed that Ii and theta have closely related amino acid sequences. In contrast, the fingerprints of the HLA-DR alpha and beta polypeptides clearly differed from those of theta and Ii as well as from each other. Analyses of immunoprecipitates prepared from cells cultured in the presence of tunicamycin revealed the presence of two N-linked oligosaccharides on each invariant polypeptide and suggested that the more acidic theta polypeptides (theta 1 and theta 2) differed from the other invariant polypeptides by the presence of sialic acid on one or both N-linked oligosaccharides. Removal of sialic acid by neuraminidase simplified the pattern of theta spots into three distinct Ii-related polypeptides. Endo-beta-N-acetylglycosaminidase H digestion indicated that the individual theta polypeptides represent stages in carbohydrate processing whereby Ii with two N-linked immature oligosaccharides are converted initially to theta 6-theta 3 with one immature and one complex, but nonsialylated, oligosaccharide and finally to theta 2-theta 1 with two complex oligosaccharides. Digestion of the theta polypeptides with N-acetylgalactosamine oligosaccharidase indicated that the theta spots are also derived by O-glycosylation from the Ii polypeptides. This assignment is supported by results obtained using monensin to block glycosylation within the Golgi. At least three spots persisted after complete removal of the N- and O

  15. T cell–depleted stem-cell transplantation for adults with hematologic malignancies: sustained engraftment of HLA-matched related donor grafts without the use of antithymocyte globulin

    PubMed Central

    Small, Trudy N.; Young, James W.; Kernan, Nancy A.; Castro-Malaspina, Hugo; Hsu, Katherine C.; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Collins, Nancy; Cisek, Christine; Chiu, Michelle; van den Brink, Marcel R. M.; O'Reilly, Richard J.; Papadopoulos, Esperanza B.

    2007-01-01

    Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) has been used in allogeneic stem-cell transplantation to prevent graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Its use, however, has been associated with delayed T-cell reconstitution and prolonged susceptibility to opportunistic infections (OIs) especially in patients undergoing T cell–depleted (TCD) transplantation. Recently, a prospective trial was conducted in 52 adult patients (median age, 47 years) with various hematologic malignancies undergoing TCD transplantation from HLA-matched related donors without the use of ATG. The cytoreductive regimen consisted of hyperfractionated total body irradiation (HFTBI), thiotepa, and fludarabine. The preferred source of the graft was peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs). No additional graft rejection or GvHD prophylaxis was given. All evaluable patients engrafted without any immune-mediated graft rejections. Disease-free survival (DFS) at 3 years was 61% in all patients, and 70% in patients with standard-risk disease. Acute GvHD was limited to grade 2 in 8% and chronic GvHD in 9% of patients. Life-threatening OIs occurred in 3 of 52 patients and was fatal in 1. This study demonstrates durable engraftment with a low incidence of GvHD despite the lack of ATG, as well as the curative potential of this regimen. PMID:17717135

  16. Structures of MART-126/27-35Peptide/HLA-A2 Complexes Reveal a Remarkable Disconnect between Antigen Structural Homology and T Cell Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Borbulevych, Oleg Y; Insaidoo, Francis K; Baxter, Tiffany K; Powell, Jr., Daniel J.; Johnson, Laura A; Restifo, Nicholas P; Baker, Brian M

    2008-09-17

    Small structural changes in peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules often result in large changes in immunogenicity, supporting the notion that T cell receptors are exquisitely sensitive to antigen structure. Yet there are striking examples of TCR recognition of structurally dissimilar ligands. The resulting unpredictability of how T cells will respond to different or modified antigens impacts both our understanding of the physical bases for TCR specificity as well as efforts to engineer peptides for immunomodulation. In cancer immunotherapy, epitopes and variants derived from the MART-1/Melan-A protein are widely used as clinical vaccines. Two overlapping epitopes spanning amino acid residues 26 through 35 are of particular interest: numerous clinical studies have been performed using variants of the MART-1 26-35 decamer, although only the 27-35 nonamer has been found on the surface of targeted melanoma cells. Here, we show that the 26-35 and 27-35 peptides adopt strikingly different conformations when bound to HLA-A2. Nevertheless, clonally distinct MART-1{sub 26/27-35}-reactive T cells show broad cross-reactivity towards these ligands. Simultaneously, however, many of the cross-reactive T cells remain unable to recognize anchor-modified variants with very subtle structural differences. These dichotomous observations challenge our thinking about how structural information on unligated peptide/MHC complexes should be best used when addressing questions of TCR specificity. Our findings also indicate that caution is warranted in the design of immunotherapeutics based on the MART-1 26/27-35 epitopes, as neither cross-reactivity nor selectivity is predictable based on the analysis of the structures alone.

  17. Presence of a non-HLA B cell antigen in rheumatic fever patients and their families as defined by a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, A K; Buskirk, D R; Williams, R C; Gibofsky, A; Crow, M K; Menon, A; Fotino, M; Reid, H M; Poon-King, T; Rubinstein, P

    1989-01-01

    Numerous investigators have suspected that there is a genetic predisposition to rheumatic fever (RF). In this context we have recently produced a series of monoclonal antibodies directed against B cells obtained from RF patients one of which, labeled D8/17, identifies a B cell antigen present in 100% of all RF patients studied. While the highest percentage of positive cells were exhibited by RF probands (33.5% +/- SE), the percentage of cells in unaffected siblings and parents was 14.6 and 13%, respectively. The percentage of positive cells in APSGN probands, unaffected siblings, and parents was 2.96, 3.86, and 2.8%, respectively. A low level of B cells (5-7%) bearing the D8/17 marker was seen in control patients. The segregation pattern of the phenotypes defined by the percentage of D8/17 positive cells within HLA-typed RF families are consistent with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance not associated with the human MHC system. We postulate that these phenotypes indicate the presence of at least one necessary genetic factor for susceptibility to RF. PMID:2785121

  18. Chimeric peptide containing both B and T cells epitope of tumor-associated antigen L6 enhances anti-tumor effects in HLA-A2 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Su-I; Huang, Ming-Hsi; Chang, Yu-Wen; Chen, I-Hua; Roffler, Steve; Chen, Bing-Mae; Sher, Yuh-Pyng; Liu, Shih-Jen

    2016-07-28

    Synthetic peptides are attractive for cancer immunotherapy because of their safety and flexibility. In this report, we identified a new B cell epitope of tumor-associated antigen L6 (TAL6) that could induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vivo. We incorporated the B cell epitope with a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and a helper T (Th) epitope to form a chimeric long peptide. We formulated the chimeric peptide with different adjuvants to immunize HLA-A2 transgenic mice and evaluate their immunogenicity. The chimeric peptide formulated with an emulsion type nanoparticle (PELC) adjuvant and a toll-like receptor 9 agonist (CpG ODN) (PELC/CpG) induced the greatest ADCC and CTL responses. The induced anti-tumor immunity inhibited the growth of TAL6-positive cancer cells. Moreover, we observed that immunization with the chimeric peptide inhibited cancer cell migration in vitro and metastasis in vivo. These data suggest that a chimeric peptide containing both B and T cell epitopes of TAL6 formulated with PELC/CpG adjuvant is feasible for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27130449

  19. The two neutrophil plasma membrane markers alkaline phosphatase and HLA class I antigen localize differently in granule-deficient cytoplasts. An ideal plasma membrane marker in human neutrophils is still lacking.

    PubMed

    Pellmé, Sara; Dahlgren, Claes; Karlsson, Anna

    2007-08-31

    Neutrophil function relies largely on the ability of the cell to mobilize its different granules and vesicles to the cell surface and thereby expose and/or release effector molecules to the surrounding tissue. To properly identify these subcellular compartments is thus a prerequisite for studies of neutrophil physiology. A range of specific markers for the classical granules is available, but finding optimal markers for the secretory vesicles and plasma membrane has historically been more challenging. Latent and non-latent alkaline phosphatase activities are often used to distinguish these two light membrane structures, but the outcome using this technique depends on the level of cellular activation. Therefore, HLA-I was introduced some years ago as a specific, stimulation-independent marker for the plasma membrane. In this study we however report that detailed fractionation studies of neutrophil cytoplasts, lacking secretory vesicles, granules and other dense organelles, reveal that the HLA-I antigen is not only co-localizing with the plasma membrane marker ALP, but is also present in other, more dense organelles. Further, we found the mixed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MELISA), detecting the beta(2)-microglobulin/HLA-I complex, to be negatively influenced by uncomplexed beta(2)-microglobulin present in the specific granules and secretory vesicles, making it difficult to use HLA-I as a plasma membrane marker during maturation of for example phagolysosomes. PMID:17673253

  20. Atorvastatin for the Prophylaxis of Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease in Patients Undergoing HLA-Matched Related Donor Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (allo-HCT).

    PubMed

    Efebera, Yvonne A; Geyer, Susan; Andritsos, Leslie; Vasu, Sumithira; Jaglowski, Samantha; Bingman, Anissa; Blum, William; Klisovic, Rebecca; Hofmeister, Craig C; Benson, Don M; Penza, Sam; Elder, Patrick; Cortright, Katie; Kitzler, Rhonda; Coombes, Kevin; O'Donnell, Lynn; Daneault, Beth; Bradbury, Hillary; Zhang, Jianying; Chen, Xilin; Garman, Sabrina; Ranganathan, Parvathi; Yu, Xueyan; Hofstetter, Jessica; Yu, Jianhua; Garzon, Ramiro; Scrape, Scott R; Lozanski, Gerard; Devine, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Statins possess potent immunomodulatory effects that may play a role in preventing acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). We performed a phase II study of atorvastatin for aGVHD prophylaxis when given to allo-HCT recipients and their HLA-matched sibling donors. Atorvastatin (40 mg/day) was administered to sibling donors, beginning 14 days before the anticipated start of stem cell collection. Allo-HCT recipients (n = 40) received atorvastatin (40 mg/day) in addition to standard aGVHD prophylaxis. The primary endpoint was cumulative incidence of grades II to IV aGVHD at day 100. Atorvastatin was well tolerated, with no attributable grades III to IV toxicities in donors or their recipients. Day 100 and 180 cumulative incidences of grades II to IV aGVHD were 30% (95% confidence interval [CI], 17% to 45%) and 40% (95% CI, 25% to 55%), respectively. One-year cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 43% (95% CI, 32% to 69%). One-year nonrelapse mortality and relapse incidences were 5.5% (95% CI, .9% to 16.5%) and 38% (95% CI, 18% to 47%), respectively. One-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 54% (95% CI, 38% to 71%) and 82% (95% CI, 69% to 94%). One-year GVHD-free, relapse-free survival was 27% (95% CI, 16% to 47%). These results did not differ from our historical control subjects (n = 96). Although safe and tolerable, the addition of atorvastatin did not appear to provide any benefit to standard GVHD prophylaxis alone.

  1. Fludarabine/2 Gy TBI is Superior to 2 Gy TBI as Conditioning for HLA-Matched Related HCT: A Phase III Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kornblit, Brian; Maloney, David G.; Storb, Rainer; Storek, Jan; Hari, Parameswaran; Vucinic, Vladan; Maziarz, Richard T.; Chauncey, Thomas R.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Bruno, Benedetto; Petersen, Finn B.; Bethge, Wolfgang A.; Hübel, Kai; Bouvier, Michelle E.; Fukuda, Takahiro; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2013-01-01

    The risk/benefit of adding fludarabine to a 2 Gy total body irradiation nonmyeloablative regimen is unknown. For this reason we conducted a prospective randomized trial comparing 2 Gy TBI alone or in combination with 90mg/m2 fludarabine (FLU/TBI) before transplantation of peripheral blood stem cells from HLA-matched related donors. Eighty-five patients with hematological malignancies were randomized to be conditioned with TBI alone (n=44) or FLU/TBI (n=41). All patients had initial engraftment. Two graft rejections were observed, both in the TBI group. Infection rates, nonrelapse mortality, and GVHD were similar between groups. Three-year overall survival was lower in the TBI group (54% vs. 65%; hazard ratio (HR) 0.57; p=0.09), with higher incidences of relapse/progression (55% vs. 40%; HR 0.55; p=0.06) and relapse-related mortality (37% vs. 28%; HR 0.53; p=0.09), and a lower progression-free survival (36% vs. 53%; HR 0.56; p=0.05). Median donor T-cell chimerism levels were significantly lower in the TBI group at days 28 (61% vs. 90%; p<0.0001) and 84 (68% vs. 92%; p<0.0001), as was NK-cell chimerism on day 28 (75% vs. 96%, p=0.0005). In conclusion, this randomized trial demonstrates the importance of fludarabine in augmenting the graft-versus-tumor effect by ensuring prompt and durable high level donor engraftment early post-transplant. PMID:23769990

  2. Molecular matching for Rh and K reduces red blood cell alloimmunisation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guelsin, Gláucia A.S.; Rodrigues, Camila; Visentainer, Jeane E.L.; de Melo Campos, Paula; Traina, Fabíola; Gilli, Simone C.O.; Saad, Sara T.O.; Castilho, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Background Matching for Rh and K antigens has been used in an attempt to reduce antibody formation in patients receiving chronic transfusions but an extended phenotype matching including Fya and Jka antigens has also been recommended. The aim of this study was to identify an efficient transfusion protocol of genotype matching for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia. We also examined a possible association of HLA class II alleles with red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunisation. Materials and methods We evaluated 43 patients with MDS undergoing transfusion therapy with and without antibody formation. We investigated antigen-matched RBC units for ABO, D, C, c, E, e, K, Fya, Fyb, Jka, Jkb, S, s, Doa, Dob and Dia on the patients’ samples and on the donor units serologically matched for them based on their ABO, Rh and K phenotypes and presence of antibodies. We also determined the frequencies of HLA-DRB1 alleles in the alloimmunised and non-alloimmunised patients. Results Seventeen of the 43 patients had discrepancies or mismatches for multiple antigens between their genotype-predicted profile and the antigen profile of the units of blood serologically matched for them. We verified that 36.8% of patients had more than one RBC alloantibody and 10.5% of patients had autoantibodies. Although we were able to find a better match for the patients in our extended genotyped/phenotyped units, we verified that matching for Rh and K would be sufficient for most of the patients. We also observed an over-representation of the HLA-DRB1*13 allele in the non-alloimmunised group of patients with MDS. Discussion In our population molecular matching for C, c, E, e, K was able to reduce RBC alloimmunisation in MDS patients. An association of HLA-DRB1*13 and protection from RBC alloimmunisation should be confirmed. PMID:24960644

  3. Influence of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor/HLA ligand matching on achievement of T-cell complete donor chimerism in related donor nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sobecks, R M; Ball, E J; Askar, M; Theil, K S; Rybicki, L A; Thomas, D; Brown, S; Kalaycio, M; Andresen, S; Pohlman, B; Dean, R; Sweetenham, J; Macklis, R; Bernhard, L; Cherni, K; Copelan, E; Maciejewski, J P; Bolwell, B J

    2008-04-01

    Achievement of complete donor chimerism (CDC) after allogeneic nonmyeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (NMHSCT) is important for preventing graft rejection and for generating a graft-vs-malignancy effect. The alloreactivity of NK cells and some T-cell subsets is mediated through the interaction of their killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) with target cell HLA/KIR ligands. The influence of KIR matching on the achievement of T-cell CDC after NMHSCT has not been previously described. We analyzed 31 patients undergoing T-cell replete related donor NMHSCT following fludarabine and 200 cGy TBI. Recipient inhibitory KIR genotype and donor HLA/KIR ligand matches were used to generate an inhibitory KIR score from 1 to 4 based upon the potential number of recipient inhibitory KIRs that could be engaged with donor HLA/KIR ligands. Patients with a score of 1 were less likely to achieve T-cell CDC (P=0.016) and more likely to develop graft rejection (P=0.011) than those with scores greater than 1. Thus, patients with lower inhibitory KIR scores may have more active anti-donor immune effector cells that may reduce donor chimerism. Conversely, patients with greater inhibitory KIR scores may have less active NK cell and T-cell populations, which may make them more likely to achieve CDC.

  4. Impact of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-human leukocyte antigens ligand incompatibility among renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Alam, S.; Rangaswamy, D.; Prakash, S.; Sharma, R. K.; Khan, M. I.; Sonawane, A.; Agrawal, S.

    2015-01-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene shows a high degree of polymorphism. Natural killer cell receptor gets activated once they bind to self-human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) with specific ligand. KIR gene and HLA ligand incompatibility due to the presence/absence of KIR in the recipient and the corresponding HLA ligand in the allograft may impact graft survival in solid organ transplantation. This study evaluates the effect of matches between KIR genes and known HLA ligands. KIR genotypes were determined using sequence specific primer polymerase chain reaction. Presence of certain KIR in a recipient, where the donor lacked the corresponding HLA ligand was considered a mismatch. The allograft was considered matched when both KIR receptor and HLA alloantigen reveald compatibility among recipient and donor. The data revealed better survival among individuals with matched inhibitory KIR receptors and their corresponding HLA ligands (KIR2DL2/DL3-HLAC2, KIR3DL1-HLABw4). On the contrary, no adverse effect was seen for matched activating KIR receptors and their corresponding HLA ligands. One of the activating gene KIR2DS4 showed risk (P = 0.0413, odds ratio = 1.91, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-3.57) association with renal allograft rejection. We conclude that the presence of inhibitory KIR gene leads to better survival; whereas activating motifs show no significant role in renal allograft survival. PMID:25684869

  5. Impact of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-human leukocyte antigens ligand incompatibility among renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Alam, S; Rangaswamy, D; Prakash, S; Sharma, R K; Khan, M I; Sonawane, A; Agrawal, S

    2015-01-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene shows a high degree of polymorphism. Natural killer cell receptor gets activated once they bind to self-human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) with specific ligand. KIR gene and HLA ligand incompatibility due to the presence/absence of KIR in the recipient and the corresponding HLA ligand in the allograft may impact graft survival in solid organ transplantation. This study evaluates the effect of matches between KIR genes and known HLA ligands. KIR genotypes were determined using sequence specific primer polymerase chain reaction. Presence of certain KIR in a recipient, where the donor lacked the corresponding HLA ligand was considered a mismatch. The allograft was considered matched when both KIR receptor and HLA alloantigen reveald compatibility among recipient and donor. The data revealed better survival among individuals with matched inhibitory KIR receptors and their corresponding HLA ligands (KIR2DL2/DL3-HLAC2, KIR3DL1-HLABw4). On the contrary, no adverse effect was seen for matched activating KIR receptors and their corresponding HLA ligands. One of the activating gene KIR2DS4 showed risk (P = 0.0413, odds ratio = 1.91, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-3.57) association with renal allograft rejection. We conclude that the presence of inhibitory KIR gene leads to better survival; whereas activating motifs show no significant role in renal allograft survival.

  6. Lab-on-a-chip enabled HLA diagnostic: combined sample preparation and real time PCR for HLA-B57 diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gärtner, Claudia; Becker, Holger; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Klemm, Richard; Moche, Christian; Schattschneider, Sebastian; Frank, Rainer; Willems, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    The diverse human HLA (human leukocyte antigen) system is responsible for antigen presentation and recognition. It is essential for the immune system to maintain a stable defense line, but also is also involved in autoimmunity as well as metabolic disease. HLA-haplotype (HLA-B27), for instance, is associated with inflammatory diseases such as Bechterew's disease. The administration of the HIV drug Abacavir in combination with another HLA-haplotype (HLAB57) is associated with severe hypersensitivity reactions. Accordingly, the HLA status has to be monitored for diagnosis or prior to start of therapy. Along this line, a miniaturized microfluidic platform has been developed allowing performing the complete analytical process from "sample-in" to "answer-out" in a point-of-care environment. The main steps of the analytical cascade inside the integrated system are blood cell lysis and DNA isolation, DNA purification, real-time PCR and quantitative monitoring of the rise of a fluorescent signal appearing during the PCR based sequence amplification. All bio-analytical steps were intended to be performed inside one chip and will be actuated, controlled and monitored by a matching device. This report will show that all required processes are established and tested and all device components work well and interact with the functional modules on the chips in a harmonized fashion.

  7. Reduction in HLA-DR, HLA-DQ and HLA-DP expression by Leu-M3+ cells from the peripheral blood of patients with thermal injury.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, R A; Martinez, O M; Lim, R C; Horn, J K; Garovoy, M R

    1989-01-01

    Monocytes that bear HLA Class II antigens, such as HLA-DR, HLA-DQ, or HLA-DP, are obligatory for many cell-mediated immunological processes. Patients with thermal injury suffer from hypoimmunity and are at risk for developing life-threatening septic episodes. To determine whether an alteration in expression of HLA Class II antigens is involved in the defect, monocytes from the peripheral blood of burn patients and controls were double-stained with anti-Leu-M3 and either anti-HLA-DR, HLA-DQ, or HLA-DP monoclonal antibodies. As analysed by flow cytometry the percentage of Leu-M3+ monocytes from the peripheral blood from patients and controls was the same. The percentage of Leu-M3+ monocytes bearing the HLA Class II antigens and the density of antigen on the monocytes, however, was significantly reduced post-burn compared with controls. In nearly all cases these changes were detected as early as 24 h post-burn before any drug therapy was implemented. In-vivo re-expression of normal levels of HLA Class II coincided with patient recovery. In-vitro exposure of post-burn Leu-M3+ cells to IFN-gamma for 72 h restored HLA Class II expression to control levels. It is possible that the reductions in HLA Class II expression may be involved in the general immunosuppression that follows thermal injury. PMID:2495202

  8. Maternal human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) genetic variants associate with in utero mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 in Black South Africans.

    PubMed

    Hong, Heather A; Paximadis, Maria; Gray, Glenda E; Kuhn, Louise; Tiemessen, Caroline T

    2015-03-01

    A 14-bp insertion/deletion (indel) within the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) that affects HLA-G expression has been associated with HIV-1 mother-to-child transmission (MTCT). However, other 3'UTR single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that influence HLA-G mRNA stability have been described but not analysed in the context of MTCT, and little is known about the role of HLA-G alleles. We examined HLA-G alleles and 3'UTR SNPs, including the 14-bp indel, in 216 mother-infant pairs from Johannesburg, South Africa. Mother-infant pairs were classified as HIV-1 non-transmitting (NT, n=144) or HIV-1 transmitting (TR, n=72) with either intrapartum (IP, n=29) or in utero (IU, n=19) infected infants. We found HLA-G allele, G(∗)01:01:02 (in strong linkage disequilibrium with the 14-bp insertion) and +3187G SNP were significantly over-represented in IU-TR mothers compared to NT mothers (P=0.036, OR=2.26; P=0.011, OR=2.96, respectively). These findings suggest that maternal HLA-G alleles and/or SNPs that might alter expression of HLA-G potentially influence IU HIV-1 MTCT.

  9. Maternal human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) genetic variants associate with in utero mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 in Black South Africans

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Heather A.; Paximadis, Maria; Gray, Glenda E.; Kuhn, Louise; Tiemessen, Caroline T.

    2014-01-01

    A 14-bp insertion/deletion (indel) within the 3' untranslated region (3’UTR) that affects HLA-G expression has been associated with HIV-1 mother-to-child transmission (MTCT). However, other 3’UTR single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that influence HLA-G mRNA stability have been described but not analyzed in the context of MTCT, and little is known about the role of HLA-G alleles. We examined HLA-G alleles and 3’UTR SNPs, including the 14-bp indel, in 216 mother-infant pairs from Johannesburg, South Africa. Mother-infant pairs were classified as HIV-1 non-transmitting (NT, n=144) or HIV-1 transmitting (TR, n=72) with either intrapartum (IP, n=29) or in utero (IU, n=19) infected infants. We found HLA-G allele, G*01:01:02 (in strong linkage disequilibrium with the 14-bp insertion) and +3187G SNP were significantly over-represented in IU-TR mothers compared to NT mothers (P=0.036, OR=2.26; P=0.011, OR=2.96, respectively). These findings suggest that maternal HLA-G alleles and/or SNPs that might alter expression of HLA-G potentially influence IU HIV-1 MTCT. PMID:25541520

  10. Identification of a permissible HLA mismatch in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo A.; Wang, Tao; Lee, Stephanie J.; Haagenson, Michael; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Askar, Medhat; Battiwalla, Minoo; Baxter-Lowe, Lee-Ann; Gajewski, James; Jakubowski, Ann A.; Marino, Susana; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Marsh, Steven G. E.; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Schultz, Kirk; Turner, E. Victoria; Waller, Edmund K.; Woolfrey, Ann; Umejiego, John; Spellman, Stephen R.; Setterholm, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    In subjects mismatched in the HLA alleles C*03:03/C*03:04 no allogeneic cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses are detected in vitro. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with unrelated donors (UDs) showed no association between the HLA-C allele mismatches (CAMMs) and adverse outcomes; antigen mismatches at this and mismatches other HLA loci are deleterious. The absence of effect of the CAMM may have resulted from the predominance of the mismatch C*03:03/C*03:04. Patients with hematologic malignancies receiving UD HSCT matched in 8/8 and 7/8 HLA alleles were examined. Transplants mismatched in HLA-C antigens or mismatched in HLA-A, -B, or -DRB1 presented significant differences (P < .0001) in mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.37, 1.30), disease-free survival (HR = 1.33, 1.27), treatment-related mortality (HR = 1.54, 1.54), and grade 3-4 acute graft-versus-host disease (HR = 1.49, 1.77) compared with the 8/8 group; transplants mismatched in other CAMMs had similar outcomes with HR ranging from 1.34 to 172 for these endpoints. The C*03:03/C*03:04 mismatched and the 8/8 matched groups had identical outcomes (HR ranging from 0.96-1.05). The previous finding that CAMMs do not associate with adverse outcomes is explained by the predominance (69%) of the mismatch C*03:03/03:04 in this group that is better tolerated than other HLA mismatches. PMID:24408320

  11. HLA mismatches and hematopoietic cell transplantation: structural simulations assess the impact of changes in peptide binding specificity on transplant outcome

    PubMed Central

    Yanover, Chen; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Malkki, Mari; Gooley, Ted; Spellman, Stephen; Velardi, Andrea; Bardy, Peter; Madrigal, Alejandro; Bignon, Jean-Denis; Bradley, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The success of hematopoietic cell transplantation from an unrelated donor depends in part on the degree of Human Histocompatibility Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) matching between donor and patient. We present a structure-based analysis of HLA mismatching, focusing on individual amino acid mismatches and their effect on peptide binding specificity. Using molecular modeling simulations of HLA-peptide interactions, we find evidence that amino acid mismatches predicted to perturb peptide binding specificity are associated with higher risk of mortality in a large and diverse dataset of patient-donor pairs assembled by the International Histocompatibility Working Group in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation consortium. This analysis may represent a first step toward sequence-based prediction of relative risk for HLA allele mismatches. PMID:24482668

  12. Direct binding to antigen-coated beads refines the specificity and cross-reactivity of four monoclonal antibodies that recognize polymorphic epitopes of HLA class I molecules

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Hugo G; Parham, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies with specificity for HLA class I determinants of HLA were originally characterized using serological assays in which the targets were cells expressing 3-6 HLA class I variants. Because of this complexity, the specificities of the antibodies were defined indirectly by correlation. Here we use a direct binding assay, in which the targets are synthetic beads coated with one of 111 HLA class I variants, representing the full range of HLA-A, -B and -C variation. We studied one monoclonal antibody with monomorphic specificity (W6/32) and four with polymorphic specificity (MA2.1, PA2.1, BB7.2 and BB7.1) and compared the results with those obtained previously. W6/32 reacted with all HLA class I variants. MA2.1 exhibits high specificity for HLA-A*02, -B*57 and -B*58, but also exhibited cross-reactivity with HLA-A*11 and -B*15:16. At low concentration (1μg/ml) PA2.1 and BB7.2 were both specific for HLA-A*02 and -A*69, and at high concentration (50μg/ml) exhibited significant cross-reactions with HLA-A*68, -A*23, and -A*24. BB7.1 exhibits specificity for HLA-B*07 and -B*42, as previously described, but reacts equally well with HLA-B*81, a rare allotype defined some 16 years after the description of BB7.1. The results obtained with cell-based and bead-based assays are consistent and, in combination with amino acid sequence comparison, increase understanding of the polymorphic epitopes recognized by the MA2.1, PA2.1, BB7.2 and BB7.1 antibodies. Comparison of two overlapping but distinctive bead sets from two sources gave similar results, but the overall levels of binding were significantly different. Several weaker reactions were observed with only one of the bead sets. PMID:23510417

  13. Human HLA-G+ extravillous trophoblasts: Immune-activating cells that interact with decidual leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Tilburgs, Tamara; Crespo, Ângela C; van der Zwan, Anita; Rybalov, Basya; Raj, Towfique; Stranger, Barbara; Gardner, Lucy; Moffett, Ashley; Strominger, Jack L

    2015-06-01

    Invading human leukocyte antigen-G+ (HLA-G+) extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) are rare cells that are believed to play a key role in the prevention of a maternal immune attack on foreign fetal tissues. Here highly purified HLA-G+ EVT and HLA-G- villous trophoblasts (VT) were isolated. Culture on fibronectin that EVT encounter on invading the uterus increased HLA-G, EGF-Receptor-2, and LIF-Receptor expression on EVT, presumably representing a further differentiation state. Microarray and functional gene set enrichment analysis revealed a striking immune-activating potential for EVT that was absent in VT. Cocultures of HLA-G+ EVT with sample matched decidual natural killer cells (dNK), macrophages, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were established. Interaction of EVT with CD4+ T cells resulted in increased numbers of CD4+CD25(HI)FOXP3+CD45RA+ resting regulatory T cells (Treg) and increased the expression level of the Treg-specific transcription factor FOXP3 in these cells. However, EVT did not enhance cytokine secretion in dNK, whereas stimulation of dNK with mitogens or classical natural killer targets confirmed the distinct cytokine secretion profiles of dNK and peripheral blood NK cells (pNK). EVT are specialized cells involved in maternal-fetal tolerance, the properties of which are not imitated by HLA-G-expressing surrogate cell lines. PMID:26015573

  14. Effect of major histocompatibility complex haplotype matching by C4 and MICA genotyping on acute graft versus host disease in unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Park, Yongjung; Cheong, June-Won; Park, Myoung Hee; Kim, Myoung Soo; Kim, Jong Sun; Kim, Hyon-Suk

    2016-02-01

    We explored whether matching of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypes between the recipient and donor of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) predicted by C4 and MICA typing is associated with the incidence of acute graft versus host disease (aGVHD). DNA preparations collected from a total of 81 recipient and donor pairs were used for PCR-based C4 subtyping and/or MICA sequence-based typing. Incidences of aGVHD were compared according to C4 and MICA matching. The six most common MICA alleles were MICA*008:01, *010:01, *002:01, *004, *009:01/049, and *012:01. Among the 59 unrelated pairs, HLA alleles were matched in 34 (57.6%). C4 subtypes were identical between the recipient and donor in 28 (82.4%) HLA-matched unrelated pairs, while MICA genotypes were matched in all HLA-matched unrelated pairs. In the 22 HLA-matched related pairs, all recipients showed identical C4 subtypes with their respective donors. In multivariate analysis, C4 mismatch was a significant risk factor associated with the development of aGVHD in unrelated HSCT (hazard ratio=3.24, P=0.006). PCR-based C4 subtyping is a simple method for assessing the genetic identity of the HLA region between a recipient and unrelated donor. This test would be also useful for prediction of aGVHD in HSCT.

  15. Advantage of rare HLA supertype in HIV disease progression.

    PubMed

    Trachtenberg, Elizabeth; Korber, Bette; Sollars, Cristina; Kepler, Thomas B; Hraber, Peter T; Hayes, Elizabeth; Funkhouser, Robert; Fugate, Michael; Theiler, James; Hsu, Yen S; Kunstman, Kevin; Wu, Samuel; Phair, John; Erlich, Henry; Wolinsky, Steven

    2003-07-01

    The highly polymorphic human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules help to determine the specificity and repertoire of the immune response. The great diversity of these antigen-binding molecules confers differential advantages in responding to pathogens, but presents a major obstacle to distinguishing HLA allele-specific effects. HLA class I supertypes provide a functional classification for the many different HLA alleles that overlap in their peptide-binding specificities. We analyzed the association of these discrete HLA supertypes with HIV disease progression rates in a population of HIV-infected men. We found that HLA supertypes alone and in combination conferred a strong differential advantage in responding to HIV infection, independent of the contribution of single HLA alleles that associate with progression of the disease. The correlation of the frequency of the HLA supertypes with viral load suggests that HIV adapts to the most frequent alleles in the population, providing a selective advantage for those individuals who express rare alleles.

  16. HLA-DP, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DR-restricted epitopes in GRA5 of toxoplasma gondii strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haryati, S.; Sari, Y.; APrasetyo, A.; Sariyatun, R.

    2016-02-01

    The dense granular (GRA) proteins of Toxoplasma gondii(T. gondii) have been demonstrated as potential sources of T. gondii vaccine antigens. However, data of the GRA5 protein are limited. This study analyzed twenty-one complete GRA5 sequences of T. gondii GT1, RH, ME49, VEG, MAS, RUB, FOU, p89, VAND, and GAB2-2007-GAL-DOM2 strains to identify potential epitopes restricted by Major Histocompatibility Complex class II (MHC- II) molecules (human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DP, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DR) in the protein. In all T. gondii strains, peptides positioned at amino acid (aa) 15-29, 16-30, 17-31, 18-32, 19-33, 83-97, 84-98, 86-100, 87-101, 89-103, and 90-104 were predicted to pose high affinity and binding with HLA-DRB1*0101, HLA-DRB1*0301 (DR17), HLA-DRB1*0401 (DR4Dw4), HLA-DRB1*0701, HLA-DRB1*1101, HLA-DRB1*1501 (DR2b), and/or HLA-DRB5*0101. Considering the epitope's affinity, ligation strength, and hydrophilicity, LRLLRRRRRRAIQEE sequence (aa 90-104) restricted by HLA-DRB1*0101, HlA- DRB1*0301 (DR17), and HLA-DRB1*0401 (DR4Dw4) was considered as the most potential MHC-II epitope in GRA5 of T. gondii. These results would be useful for studies concerning in developing T. gondii vaccine and diagnostic method.

  17. HLA-A*0201 T-cell epitopes in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus nucleocapsid and spike proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, Y.-P.; Lin, J.-Y.; Jan, J.-T.; Leng, C.-H.; Chu, C.-C.; Yang, Y.-C.; Chen, S.-L. . E-mail: showlic@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2006-05-26

    The immunogenicity of HLA-A*0201-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) peptide in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nuclear capsid (N) and spike (S) proteins was determined by testing the proteins' ability to elicit a specific cellular immune response after immunization of HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice and in vitro vaccination of HLA-A2.1 positive human peripheral blood mononuclearcytes (PBMCs). First, we screened SARS N and S amino acid sequences for allele-specific motif matching those in human HLA-A2.1 MHC-I molecules. From HLA peptide binding predictions (http://thr.cit.nih.gov/molbio/hla{sub b}ind/), ten each potential N- and S-specific HLA-A2.1-binding peptides were synthesized. The high affinity HLA-A2.1 peptides were validated by T2-cell stabilization assays, with immunogenicity assays revealing peptides N223-231, N227-235, and N317-325 to be First identified HLA-A*0201-restricted CTL epitopes of SARS-CoV N protein. In addition, previous reports identified three HLA-A*0201-restricted CTL epitopes of S protein (S978-986, S1203-1211, and S1167-1175), here we found two novel peptides S787-795 and S1042-1050 as S-specific CTL epitopes. Moreover, our identified N317-325 and S1042-1050 CTL epitopes could induce recall responses when IFN-{gamma} stimulation of blood CD8{sup +} T-cells revealed significant difference between normal healthy donors and SARS-recovered patients after those PBMCs were in vitro vaccinated with their cognate antigen. Our results would provide a new insight into the development of therapeutic vaccine in SARS.

  18. High-Resolution Match Rate of 7/8 and 9/10 or Better for the Be The Match Unrelated Donor Registry.

    PubMed

    Buck, Kelly; Wadsworth, Kim; Setterholm, Michelle; Maiers, Martin; Confer, Dennis; Hartzman, Robert; Schmidt, Alexander; Yang, Soo Young; Dehn, Jason

    2016-04-01

    Estimation of the National Marrow Donor Program's Be The Match Registry 8/8 (HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1) high-resolution (HR) unrelated donor (URD) match rate was determined in a prior study for each of the 4 most frequent patient race/ethnic groups in the United States: white (WH), Hispanic (HIS), Asian/Pacific Islander (API), and African American (AFA). For patients without an 8/8 HLA-matched URD, a 7/8 match, with a single allele or antigen mismatch, is often accepted by many transplant centers. A follow-up study was designed to determine the 7/8 or better match rate among the 4 major race/ethnic groups, using the same study cohort. Of previously HR tested URDs in the Be The Match Registry, 1344 were randomly selected and treated as pseudo-patients where HR testing was performed to identify a 7/8-matched URD; 98% of WH and over 80% of non-WH race/ethnic groups (HIS, API, and AFA) had at least a 7/8 match identified. In most cases after first testing to identify an 8/8-matched URD, a 7/8-matched URD was identified after typing just 1 URD. Extending criteria to identify a 9/10 match (included HLA-DQB1) showed the 9/10 absolute match rate decreased between 14% and 21% from the 7/8 match rate for the non-WH groups. This study provides a baseline 7/8 and 9/10 or better HLA match rate that can be further supplemented using the additional worldwide URD inventory. URD match rate information can equip centers in clinical planning and the education of patients seeking a life-saving therapy.

  19. The HLA system and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cudworth, A G; Woodrow, J C

    1977-06-01

    There is a significant positive association between insulin dependent diabetes, irrespective of age of onset, and the HLA system, whereas there is no association of HLA antigens with non-insulin dependent diabetes. There is a significant concordance value for HLA antigen frequencies in insulin dependent diabetics from three different centres, indicating that the genes (s) conferring susceptibility to this type of diabetes is possibly present in all "juvenile-onset" diabetics and is in linkage disequilibrium with all the B locus alleles. PMID:892129

  20. Risk factors and outcome of graft failure after HLA matched and mismatched unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a study on behalf of SFGM-TC and SFHI.

    PubMed

    Cluzeau, T; Lambert, J; Raus, N; Dessaux, K; Absi, L; Delbos, F; Devys, A; De Matteis, M; Dubois, V; Filloux, M; Fort, M; Hau, F; Jollet, I; Labalette, M; Masson, D; Mercier, B; Pedron, B; Perrier, P; Picard, C; Quainon, F; Ramounau-Pigot, A; Renac, V; Van Endert, P; Charron, D; Peffault de la Tour, R; Taupin, J L; Loiseau, P

    2016-05-01

    Graft failure remains a severe complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Several risk factors have already been published. In this study, we re-evaluated them in a large cohort who had the benefit of the recent experience in HSCT (2006-2012). Data from 4684 unrelated donor HSCT from 2006 to 2012 were retrospectively collected from centers belonging to the French Society for Stem Cell Transplantation. Among the 2716 patients for whom HLA typing was available, 103 did not engraft leading to a low rate of no engraftment at 3.8%. In univariate analysis, only type of disease and status of disease at transplant for malignant diseases remained significant risk factors (P=0.04 and P<0.0001, respectively). In multivariate analysis, only status of disease was a significant risk factor (P<0.0001). Among the 61 patients who did not engraft and who were mismatched for 1 HLA class I and/or HLA-DP, 5 donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) were detected but only 1 was clearly involved in graft failure, for the others their role was more questionable. Second HSCT exhibited a protective although not statistically significant effect on OS (hazard ratio=0.57 [0.32-1.02]). In conclusion, only one parameter (disease status before graft) remains risk factor for graft failure in this recent cohort. PMID:26855158

  1. Nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 disparity is a significant independent risk factor for mortality after unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Crocchiolo, Roberto; Zino, Elisabetta; Vago, Luca; Oneto, Rosi; Bruno, Barbara; Pollichieni, Simona; Sacchi, Nicoletta; Sormani, Maria Pia; Marcon, Jessica; Lamparelli, Teresa; Fanin, Renato; Garbarino, Lucia; Miotti, Valeria; Bandini, Giuseppe; Bosi, Alberto; Ciceri, Fabio; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Fleischhauer, Katharina

    2009-08-13

    The importance of donor-recipient human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DPB1 matching for the clinical outcome of unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is controversial. We have previously described an algorithm for nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 disparities involving HLA-DPB1*0901,*1001,*1701,*0301,*1401,*4501, based on T-cell alloreactivity patterns. By revisiting the immunogenicity of HLA-DPB1*02, a modified algorithm was developed and retrospectively tested in 621 unrelated HSCTs facilitated through the Italian Registry for oncohematologic adult patients. The modified algorithm proved to be markedly more predictive of outcome than the original one, with significantly higher Kaplan-Meier probabilities of 2-year survival in permissive compared with nonpermissive transplantations (55% vs 39%, P = .005). This was the result of increased adjusted hazards of nonrelapse mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.74; confidence interval [CI], 1.19-2.53; P = .004) but not of relapse (HR = 1.02; CI, 0.73-1.42; P = .92). The increase in the hazards of overall mortality by nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 disparity was similar in 10 of 10 (HR = 2.12; CI, 1.23-3.64; P = .006) and 9 of 10 allele-matched transplantations (HR = 2.21; CI, 1.28-3.80; P = .004), both in early-stage and in advanced-stage disease. These data call for revisiting current HLA matching strategies for unrelated HSCT, suggesting that searches should be directed up-front toward identification of HLA-DPB1 permissive, 10 of 10 or 9 of 10 matched donors. PMID:19515726

  2. HLA dosage effect in narcolepsy with cataplexy.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, Astrid; Verduijn, Willem; Haasnoot, Geert W; Drabbels, Jos J M; Lammers, Gert J; Claas, Frans H J

    2015-01-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a sleep disorder caused by the loss of hypocretin-producing neurons in the hypothalamus. It is tightly associated with a specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-allele: HLA-DQB1*06:02. Based on this, an autoimmune process has been hypothesized. A functional HLA-DQ molecule consists of a DQα and a DQβ chain. HLA-DQB1*06:02 (DQβ) has a strong preference for binding to HLA-DQA1*01:02 (DQα), and together they form the functional DQ0602 dimer. A dosage effect would be expected if the HLA-DQ0602 dimer itself is directly involved in the aetiology. An increased expression of the HLA-DQ0602 dimer is expected in individuals homozygous for HLA-DQB1*06:02-DQA1*01:02, but is also hypothesized in individuals heterozygous for HLA-DQB1*06:02 and homozygous for HLA-DQA1*01:02. To study the impact of the expression of the HLA-DQ0602 dimer on narcolepsy susceptibility, 248 Dutch narcolepsy patients and 1272 Dutch control subjects, all of them positive for DQB1*06:02 (heterozygous and homozygous), were HLA-genotyped with attention not only to DQB1 but also to DQA1*01:02. DQB1*06:02-DQA1*01:02 homozygosity was significantly more often seen in patients compared to controls (O.R. 2.29) confirming previous observations. More importantly, a significantly higher prevalence of homozygosity for DQA1*01:02 was found in HLA-DQB1*06:02 heterozygous patients compared to controls (O.R. 2.37, p < 0.001). The latter finding clearly supports a direct role of the HLA-DQ molecule in the development of disease.

  3. Crystal structure of HLA-DP2 and implications for chronic beryllium disease

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Shaodong; Murphy, Guinevere A.; Crawford, Frances; Mack, Douglas G.; Falta, Michael T.; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W.; Fontenot, Andrew P.

    2010-06-15

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a fibrotic lung disorder caused by beryllium (Be) exposure and is characterized by granulomatous inflammation and the accumulation of Be-responsive CD4{sup +} T cells in the lung. Genetic susceptibility to CBD has been associated with certain alleles of the MHCII molecule HLA-DP, especially HLA-DPB1*0201 and other alleles that contain a glutamic acid residue at position 69 of the {beta}-chain ({beta}Glu69). The HLA-DP alleles that can present Be to T cells match those implicated in the genetic susceptibility, suggesting that the HLA contribution to disease is based on the ability of those molecules to bind and present Be to T cells. The structure of HLA-DP2 and its interaction with Be are unknown. Here, we present the HLA-DP2 structure with its antigen-binding groove occupied by a self-peptide derived from the HLA-DR {alpha}-chain. The most striking feature of the structure is an unusual solvent exposed acidic pocket formed between the peptide backbone and the HLA-DP2 {beta}-chain {alpha}-helix and containing three glutamic acids from the {beta}-chain, including {beta}Glu69. In the crystal packing, this pocket has been filled with the guanidinium group of an arginine from a neighboring molecule. This positively charged moiety forms an extensive H-bond/salt bridge network with the three glutamic acids, offering a plausible model for how Be-containing complexes might occupy this site. This idea is strengthened by the demonstration that mutation of any of the three glutamic acids in this pocket results in loss of the ability of DP2 to present Be to T cells.

  4. Neuroantibodies (NAB) in African-American Children with Heavy Metal Exposures are Associated with Cytokine and Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Polymorphisms (SNP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polymorphisms in cytokine and HLA genes are associated with allergies, autoimmunity and neurodegeneration (ND). Samples from 131 African-American children (71 males; 60 females) in the Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA) study were used to determine SNPs of IL-4, IL...

  5. Definition of four HLA-A2 subtypes by CML typing and biochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    van der Poel, J J; Mölders, H; Thompson, A; Ploegh, H L

    1983-01-01

    The population of HLA-A2-positive individuals, currently considered serologically homogeneous, can be divided into three subtypes on the basis of antigen recognition by various HLA-A2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). When these three types of HLA-A2 antigens were analyzed biochemically, they were found to be distinct. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) of HLA antigens digested with neuraminidase (NANAse) suggested that the difference(s) reside in the polypeptide backbone of the HLA-A2 heavy chain. Biochemical analysis distinguishes three distinct categories of HLA-A2 antigens: (1) a major subtype, designated HLA-A2.I, (2) a minor subtype, designated HLA-A2.II, possessing a more basic isoelectric point (IEP) and (3) a minor HLA-A2 subtype more acidic in its IEP than HLA-A2.I, designated HLA-A2.III. A fourth HLA-A2 subtype could be defined by discordance between cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) typing and biochemical analysis. The latter HLA-A2 antigen was defined as a variant by CTL, but was biochemically indistinguishable from the major subtype HLA-A2.I. PMID:6407985

  6. Prevalence of Alloimmunization to Human Platelet Antigen Glycoproteins and Human Leucocyte Antigen Class I in β Thalassemia Major Patients in Western India.

    PubMed

    Philip, Joseph; Kumar, Sudeep; Chatterjee, T; Mallhi, R S

    2014-12-01

    Present management of β thalassemia major by regular packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions poses risk of alloimmunization not only to red blood cell antigens, but also to human platelet antigens (HPA) and Human leucocyte antigens class I (HLA I). However data in this context is very limited in Indian population. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of alloimmunization to HPA and HLA I in β thalassemia major patients who have received multiple PRBC transfusions over the years. A cross sectional study was performed at our tertiary care blood bank. β thalassemia major patients of more than 6 years of age were included who were receiving fresh, leucoreduced and irradiated PRBC units regularly with annual requirement of more than ten PRBC transfusions. A total of 9 out of 80 (11.25 %) patients were found to be alloimmunized for HPA antigens of various specificity and 24 out of 80 (30 %) developed antibodies to HLA I. The awareness of development of alloimmunization to HPA and HLA antigens in multi PRBC transfused thalassemics, despite use of leucofilters will prompt us, to look for improvement in our current PRBC preparations to minimise platelet alloimmunisation. Further studies are required to validate the findings and build the base line data in this regard. This is of importance, especially in view of providing suitable cross-matched platelets when required in future especially when considering future haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).

  7. HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1 allele distribution in a large Armenian population sample.

    PubMed

    Matevosyan, L; Chattopadhyay, S; Madelian, V; Avagyan, S; Nazaretyan, M; Hyussian, A; Vardapetyan, E; Arutunyan, R; Jordan, F

    2011-07-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1 gene frequencies were investigated in 4279 unrelated Armenian bone marrow donors. HLA alleles were defined by using PCR amplification with sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP) high- and low-resolution kits. The aim of this study was to examine the HLA diversity at the high-resolution level in a large Armenian population sample, and to compare HLA allele group distribution in Armenian subpopulations. The most frequently observed alleles in the HLA class I were HLA-A*0201, A*0101, A*2402, A*0301, HLA-B*5101, HLA-B*3501, and B*4901. Among DRB1 alleles, high frequencies of DRB1*1104 and DRB1*1501 were observed, followed by DRB1*1101 and DRB1*1401. The most common three-locus haplotype found in the Armenian population was A*33-B*14-DRB1*01, followed by A*03-B*35-DRB1*01. Our results show a similar distribution of alleles in Armenian subpopulations from different countries, and from different regions of the Republics of Armenia and Karabagh. The low level of genetic distances between subpopulations indicates a high level of population homogeneity, and the genetic distances between Armenians and other populations show Armenians as a distinct ethnic group relative to others, reflecting the fact that Armenians have been an 'isolated population' throughout centuries. This study is the first comprehensive investigation of HLA-allele group distribution in a subset of Armenian populations, and the first to provide HLA-allele and haplotype frequencies at a high-resolution level. It is a valuable reference for organ transplantation and for future studies of HLA-associated diseases in Armenian populations.

  8. Minor histocompatibility antigens: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Spierings, Eric

    2014-10-01

    Minor histocompatibility (H) antigens are key molecules driving allo-immune responses in both graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD) and in graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) reactivity in human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). Dissection of the dual function of minor H antigens became evident through their different modes of tissue and cell expression, i.e. hematopoietic system-restricted or broad. Broadly expressed minor H antigens can cause both GvHD and GvL effects, while hematopoietic system-restricted minor H antigens are more prone to induce GvL responses. This phenomenon renders the latter group of minor H antigens as curative tools for HSCT-based immunotherapy of hematological malignancies and disorders, in which minor H antigen-specific responses are enhanced in order to eradicate the malignant cells. This article describes the immunogenetics of minor H antigens and methods that have been developed to identify them. Moreover, it summarizes the clinical relevance of minor H antigens in transplantation, with special regards to allogeneic HSCT and solid-organ transplantation.

  9. HLA and Disease Associations in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Stephen; Choi, Hee-Back

    2011-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA), the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in humans has been known to reside on chromosome 6 and encodes cell-surface antigen-presenting proteins and many other proteins related to immune system function. The HLA is highly polymorphic and the most genetically variable coding loci in humans. In addition to a critical role in transplantation medicine, HLA and disease associations have been widely studied across the populations world-wide and are found to be important in prediction of disease susceptibility, resistance and of evolutionary maintenance of genetic diversity. Because recently developed molecular based HLA typing has several advantages like improved specimen stability and increased resolution of HLA types, the association between HLA alleles and a given disease could be more accurately quantified. Here, in this review, we have collected HLA association data on some autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, cancers, drug responsiveness and other diseases with unknown etiology in Koreans and attempt to summarize some remarkable HLA alleles related with specific diseases. PMID:22346771

  10. Naturally processed HLA class II peptides reveal highly conserved immunogenic flanking region sequence preferences that reflect antigen processing rather than peptide-MHC interactions.

    PubMed

    Godkin, A J; Smith, K J; Willis, A; Tejada-Simon, M V; Zhang, J; Elliott, T; Hill, A V

    2001-06-01

    MHC class II heterodimers bind peptides 12-20 aa in length. The peptide flanking residues (PFRs) of these ligands extend from a central binding core consisting of nine amino acids. Increasing evidence suggests that the PFRs can alter the immunogenicity of T cell epitopes. We have previously noted that eluted peptide pool sequence data derived from an MHC class II Ag reflect patterns of enrichment not only in the core binding region but also in the PFRS: We sought to distinguish whether these enrichments reflect cellular processes or direct MHC-peptide interactions. Using the multiple sclerosis-associated allele HLA-DR2, pool sequence data from naturally processed ligands were compared with the patterns of enrichment obtained by binding semicombinatorial peptide libraries to empty HLA-DR2 molecules. Naturally processed ligands revealed patterns of enrichment reflecting both the binding motif of HLA-DR2 (position (P)1, aliphatic; P4, bulky hydrophobic; and P6, polar) as well as the nonbound flanking regions, including acidic residues at the N terminus and basic residues at the C terminus. These PFR enrichments were independent of MHC-peptide interactions. Further studies revealed similar patterns in nine other HLA alleles, with the C-terminal basic residues being as highly conserved as the previously described N-terminal prolines of MHC class II ligands. There is evidence that addition of C-terminal basic PFRs to known peptide epitopes is able to enhance both processing as well as T cell activation. Recognition of these allele-transcending patterns in the PFRs may prove useful in epitope identification and vaccine design.

  11. A gene feature enumeration approach for describing HLA allele polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Mack, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    HLA genotyping via next generation sequencing (NGS) poses challenges for the use of HLA allele names to analyze and discuss sequence polymorphism. NGS will identify many new synonymous and non-coding HLA sequence variants. Allele names identify the types of nucleotide polymorphism that define an allele (non-synonymous, synonymous and non-coding changes), but do not describe how polymorphism is distributed among the individual features (the flanking untranslated regions, exons and introns) of a gene. Further, HLA alleles cannot be named in the absence of antigen-recognition domain (ARD) encoding exons. Here, a system for describing HLA polymorphism in terms of HLA gene features (GFs) is proposed. This system enumerates the unique nucleotide sequences for each GF in an HLA gene, and records these in a GF enumeration notation that allows both more granular dissection of allele-level HLA polymorphism and the discussion and analysis of GFs in the absence of ARD-encoding exon sequences.

  12. Close genetic linkage between HLA and renal glycosuria.

    PubMed

    De Marchi, S; Cecchin, E; Basile, A; Proto, G; Donadon, W; Jengo, A; Schinella, D; Jus, A; Villalta, D; De Paoli, P

    1984-01-01

    Renal glycosuria is an inherited disorder of renal tubule function in which significant amounts of glucose are excreted in the urine in the simultaneous presence of normal blood glucose levels. Renal glucose titration analyses and HLA genotypes were performed in 5 unrelated affected families with a total of 25 patients and 40 healthy relatives. In each family the gene responsible for renal glycosuria segregates with the HLA complex suggesting a close genetic linkage. 2 cases carry intra-HLA recombinant haplotypes; in these subjects our findings indicate that the abnormal gene is closer to the HLA-A locus than the HLA-B locus. No HLA-A, HLA-B or HLA-C specific antigen is selectively increased among the 5 unrelated families affected with renal glycosuria.

  13. HLA typing from RNA-Seq sequence reads.

    PubMed

    Boegel, Sebastian; Löwer, Martin; Schäfer, Michael; Bukur, Thomas; de Graaf, Jos; Boisguérin, Valesca; Türeci, Ozlem; Diken, Mustafa; Castle, John C; Sahin, Ugur

    2012-01-01

    We present a method, seq2HLA, for obtaining an individual's human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II type and expression using standard next generation sequencing RNA-Seq data. RNA-Seq reads are mapped against a reference database of HLA alleles, and HLA type, confidence score and locus-specific expression level are determined. We successfully applied seq2HLA to 50 individuals included in the HapMap project, yielding 100% specificity and 94% sensitivity at a P-value of 0.1 for two-digit HLA types. We determined HLA type and expression for previously un-typed Illumina Body Map tissues and a cohort of Korean patients with lung cancer. Because the algorithm uses standard RNA-Seq reads and requires no change to laboratory protocols, it can be used for both existing datasets and future studies, thus adding a new dimension for HLA typing and biomarker studies. PMID:23259685

  14. Molecular analysis of HLA-DQ A alleles in coeliac disease lack of a unique disease-associated sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Mantovani, V; Corazza, G R; Angelini, G; Delfino, L; Frisoni, M; Mirri, P; Valentini, R A; Barboni, P; Gasbarrini, G; Ferrara, G B

    1991-01-01

    Susceptibility to coeliac disease is strongly associated with some HLA class II antigens, encoded by the HLA-D region. Since the HLA-DQ locus seems to be primarily involved, we have analysed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization the most polymorphic region of the HLA-DQ A1 gene. No difference was observed between the 20 coeliac patients and 20 HLA-D-matched healthy controls who took part in the study. Furthermore, in patients and controls, the restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the HLA-DQ A gene using the restriction enzyme BglII did not disclose any specific disease-associated fragment. Our results are not consistent with a unique DQ A coeliac disease-associated sequence, but rather with the hypothesis that some polymorphic residues or allelic hypervariable regions, although found also in the normal population, can predispose to coeliac disease due to their higher frequency in this condition. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:1671007

  15. Donor-Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Morin-Zorman, Sarah; Loiseau, Pascale; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) is a curative treatment for a wide variety of hematological diseases. In 30% of the cases, a geno-identical donor is available. Any other situation displays some level of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) incompatibility between donor and recipient. Deleterious effects of anti-HLA immunization have long been recognized in solid organ transplant recipients. More recently, anti-HLA immunization was shown to increase the risk of primary graft failure (PGF), a severe complication of AHSCT that occurs in 3-4% of matched unrelated donor transplantation and up to 15% in cord blood transplantation and T-cell depleted haplo-identical stem cell transplantation. Rates of PGF in patients with DSA were reported to be between 24 and 83% with the highest rates in haplo-identical and cord blood transplantation recipients. This led to the recommendation of anti-HLA antibody screening to detect donor-specific antibodies (DSA) in recipients prior to AHSCT. In this review, we highlight the role of anti-HLA antibodies in AHSCT and the mechanisms that may lead to PGF in patients with DSA, and discuss current issues in the field. PMID:27570526

  16. Post-transplantation cyclophosphamide for tolerance induction in HLA-haploidentical BMT

    PubMed Central

    Luznik, Leo; O’Donnell, Paul V.; Ephraim, J. Fuchs

    2013-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) is a potentially curative therapy for many hematologic and immunologic diseases. Further, partial or full donor hematopoietic chimerism following alloSCT may be sufficient to guarantee immunologic tolerance to solid organs from the same donor, obviating any requirement for prolonged pharmacologic immunosuppression. Despite alloSCT’s potential, the procedure is beset by two major limitations. The first relates to the procedure’s toxicity including conditioning regimen toxicity, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and infection. The second limitation is the lack of histocompatible donors. A human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling or unrelated donor cannot be identified expeditiously for up to 40% of patients. Historically, alloSCT from partially HLA-mismatched or HLA-haploidentical relatives has been complicated by unacceptably high incidences of graft rejection, severe GVHD, and non-relapse mortality. Recently, our groups have developed a method to selectively deplete alloreactive cells in vivo by administering high doses of cyclophosphamide in a narrow window after transplantation. Using high-dose, post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PT/Cy), crossing the HLA barrier in alloSCT is now feasible and donors can be found for nearly all patients. This review discusses the history of HLA-haploidentical SCT, recent clinical results and immunologic mechanisms of action of high-dose PT/Cy for prevention of graft rejection and GVHD. PMID:23206845

  17. Donor-Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Morin-Zorman, Sarah; Loiseau, Pascale; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) is a curative treatment for a wide variety of hematological diseases. In 30% of the cases, a geno-identical donor is available. Any other situation displays some level of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) incompatibility between donor and recipient. Deleterious effects of anti-HLA immunization have long been recognized in solid organ transplant recipients. More recently, anti-HLA immunization was shown to increase the risk of primary graft failure (PGF), a severe complication of AHSCT that occurs in 3–4% of matched unrelated donor transplantation and up to 15% in cord blood transplantation and T-cell depleted haplo-identical stem cell transplantation. Rates of PGF in patients with DSA were reported to be between 24 and 83% with the highest rates in haplo-identical and cord blood transplantation recipients. This led to the recommendation of anti-HLA antibody screening to detect donor-specific antibodies (DSA) in recipients prior to AHSCT. In this review, we highlight the role of anti-HLA antibodies in AHSCT and the mechanisms that may lead to PGF in patients with DSA, and discuss current issues in the field. PMID:27570526

  18. Familial spontaneous pneumothorax in three generations and its HLA.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Akitoshi; Takeda, Yoshitaka; Hayashi, Satoru; Shimizu, Kazuta

    2003-09-01

    We experienced a case of familial spontaneous pneumothorax in three generations. Six of 13 family members had episodes of spontaneous pneumothorax. It is well established that there are some diseases associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA). We performed HLA phenotyping for HLA of A, B and C. In our study, we detected the HLA haplotype A2, B61 in three of 4 who had episodes of spontaneous pneumothorax. The HLA haplotype A2, B70 were also detected in three of 4 who had episodes. This suggests that familial spontaneous pneumothorax might have hereditary factors.

  19. First report on the antibody verification of HLA-DR, HLA-DQ and HLA-DP epitopes recorded in the HLA Epitope Registry.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, Rene J; Marrari, Marilyn; Tambur, Anat R; Mulder, Arend; Sousa, Luiz Cláudio Demes da Mata; da Silva, Adalberto Socorro; do Monte, Semiramis J H

    2014-11-01

    The International Registry of Antibody-Defined HLA Epitopes (http://www.epregistry.com.br) has been recently established as a tool to understand humoral responses to HLA mismatches. These epitopes can be structurally defined as eplets by three-dimensional molecular modeling and amino acid sequence differences between HLA antigens. A major goal is to identify HLA eplets that have been verified experimentally with informative antibodies. This report addresses class II epitopes encoded by genes in the HLA-D region. Our analysis included reviews of many publications about epitope specificity of class II reactive human and murine monoclonal antibodies and informative alloantibodies from HLA sensitized patients as well as our own antibody testing results. As of July 1, 2014, 24 HLA-DRB1/3/4/5, 15 DQB, 3 DQA and 8 DPB antibody-verified epitopes have been identified and recorded. The Registry is still a work-in-progress and will become a useful resource for HLA professionals interested in histocompatibility testing at the epitope level and investigating antibody responses to HLA mismatches in transplant patients. PMID:25305456

  20. Outcomes of pediatric bone marrow transplantation for leukemia and myelodysplasia using matched sibling, mismatched related, or matched unrelated donors.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Peter J; Kan, Fangyu; Woo Ahn, Kwang; Spellman, Stephen R; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Ayas, Mouhab; Burke, Michael; Cairo, Mitchell S; Chen, Allen R; Davies, Stella M; Frangoul, Haydar; Gajewski, James; Gale, Robert Peter; Godder, Kamar; Hale, Gregory A; Heemskerk, Martin B A; Horan, John; Kamani, Naynesh; Kasow, Kimberly A; Chan, Ka Wah; Lee, Stephanie J; Leung, Wing H; Lewis, Victor A; Miklos, David; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Petersdorf, Effie W; Ringdén, Olle; Sanders, Jean; Schultz, Kirk R; Seber, Adriana; Setterholm, Michelle; Wall, Donna A; Yu, Lolie; Pulsipher, Michael A

    2010-11-11

    Although some trials have allowed matched or single human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched related donors (mmRDs) along with HLA-matched sibling donors (MSDs) for pediatric bone marrow transplantation in early-stage hematologic malignancies, whether mmRD grafts lead to similar outcomes is not known. We compared patients < 18 years old reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research with acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndrome undergoing allogeneic T-replete, myeloablative bone marrow transplantation between 1993 and 2006. In total, patients receiving bone marrow from 1208 MSDs, 266 8/8 allelic-matched unrelated donors (URDs), and 151 0-1 HLA-antigen mmRDs were studied. Multivariate analysis showed that recipients of MSD transplants had less transplantation-related mortality, acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and chronic GVHD, along with better disease-free and overall survival than the URD and mmRD groups. No differences were observed in transplant-related mortality, acute and chronic GVHD, relapse, disease-free survival, or overall survival between the mmRD and URD groups. These data show that mmRD and 8/8 URD outcomes are similar, whereas MSD outcomes are superior to the other 2 sources. Whether allele level typing could identify mmRD recipients with better outcomes will not be known unless centers alter practice and type mmRD at the allele level.

  1. HLA-A, -B and -DR allele and haplotype frequencies in Malays.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, J S; Shahnaz, M; Too, C L; Azrena, A; Maiselamah, L; Lee, Y Y; Irda, Y A; Salawati, M

    2007-03-01

    One thousand four hundreds and forty-five Malays registered with the Malaysian Marrow Donor Registry were typed for HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DR. Fifteen HLA-A, twenty nine HLA-B and fourteen HLA-DR alleles were detected. The most common HLA-A alleles and their frequencies were HLA-A24 (0.35), HLA-A11 (0.21) and HLA-A2 (0.15). The most common HLA-B alleles were HLA-B15 (0.26), HLA-B35 (0.11) and HLA-B18 (0.10) while the most common HLA-DR alleles were HLA-DR15 (0.28), HLA-DR12 (0.27) and HLA-DR7 (0.10). A24-B15-DR12 (0.047), A24-B15-DR15 (0.03) and the A24-B35-DR12 (0.03) were the most frequent haplotypes. This data may be useful in determining the probability of finding a matched donor and for estimating the incidence of HLA associated diseases.

  2. Contribution of a Non-classical HLA Gene, HLA-DOA, to the Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yukinori; Suzuki, Akari; Ikari, Katsunori; Terao, Chikashi; Kochi, Yuta; Ohmura, Koichiro; Higasa, Koichiro; Akiyama, Masato; Ashikawa, Kyota; Kanai, Masahiro; Hirata, Jun; Suita, Naomasa; Teo, Yik-Ying; Xu, Huji; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Takahashi, Atsushi; Momozawa, Yukihide; Matsuda, Koichi; Momohara, Shigeki; Taniguchi, Atsuo; Yamada, Ryo; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Kubo, Michiaki; Brown, Matthew A; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Despite the progress in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) causal variant mapping, independent localization of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) risk from classical HLA genes is challenging. Here, we conducted a large-scale MHC fine-mapping analysis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a Japanese population (6,244 RA cases and 23,731 controls) population by using HLA imputation, followed by a multi-ethnic validation study including east Asian and European populations (n = 7,097 and 23,149, respectively). Our study identified an independent risk of a synonymous mutation at HLA-DOA, a non-classical HLA gene, on anti-citrullinated protein autoantibody (ACPA)-positive RA risk (p = 1.4 × 10(-9)), which demonstrated a cis-expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL) effect on HLA-DOA expression. Trans-ethnic comparison revealed different linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns in HLA-DOA and HLA-DRB1, explaining the observed HLA-DOA variant risk heterogeneity among ethnicities, which was most evident in the Japanese population. Although previous HLA fine-mapping studies have identified amino acid polymorphisms of the classical HLA genes as driving genetic susceptibility to disease, our study additionally identifies the dosage contribution of a non-classical HLA gene to disease etiology. Our study contributes to the understanding of HLA immunology in human diseases and suggests the value of incorporating additional ancestry in MHC fine-mapping. PMID:27486778

  3. Cross-reactions in the HLA system revealed by red blood cells expressing HLA determinants, with particular reference to cross-reaction between HLA-A2 and B17.

    PubMed

    Nordhagen, R

    1983-01-01

    Sera with cytotoxic and haemagglutinating activity towards HLA-A2/28 were also shown to react with red blood cells (RBC) expressing the HLA-B17 antigen determinant. Absorption procedures with white blood cells (WBC) indicated that this was due to an HLA-A2/B17 cross-reaction. Absorption experiments with some other sera which previously had shown cytotoxic and haemagglutinating activity towards different HLA specificities, revealed broad cross-reaction related to HLA-B locus antigens.

  4. A catalog of HLA type, HLA expression, and neo-epitope candidates in human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Boegel, Sebastian; Löwer, Martin; Bukur, Thomas; Sahin, Ugur; Castle, John C

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cell lines are a tremendous resource for cancer biology and therapy development. These multipurpose tools are commonly used to examine the genetic origin of cancers, to identify potential novel tumor targets, such as tumor antigens for vaccine devel­opment, and utilized to screen potential therapies in preclinical studies. Mutations, gene expression, and drug sensitivity have been determined for many cell lines using next-generation sequencing (NGS). However, the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) type and HLA expression of tumor cell lines, characterizations necessary for the development of cancer vaccines, have remained largely incomplete and, such information, when available, has been distributed in many publications. Here, we determine the 4-digit HLA type and HLA expression of 167 cancer and 10 non-cancer cell lines from publically available RNA-Seq data. We use standard NGS RNA-Seq short reads from “whole transcriptome” sequencing, map reads to known HLA types, and statistically determine HLA type, heterozygosity, and expression. First, we present previously unreported HLA Class I and II genotypes. Second, we determine HLA expression levels in each cancer cell line, providing insights into HLA downregulation and loss in cancer. Third, using these results, we provide a fundamental cell line “barcode” to track samples and prevent sample annotation swaps and contamination. Fourth, we integrate the cancer cell-line specific HLA types and HLA expression with available cell-line specific mutation information and existing HLA binding prediction algorithms to make a catalog of predicted antigenic mutations in each cell line. The compilation of our results are a fundamental resource for all researchers selecting specific cancer cell lines based on the HLA type and HLA expression, as well as for the development of immunotherapeutic tools for novel cancer treatment modalities. PMID:25960936

  5. HLA-restricted presentation of WT1 tumor antigen in B-lymphoblastoid cell lines established using a maxi-EBV system.

    PubMed

    Kanda, T; Ochi, T; Fujiwara, H; Yasukawa, M; Okamoto, S; Mineno, J; Kuzushima, K; Tsurumi, T

    2012-08-01

    Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), which are established by in vitro infection of peripheral B-lymphocytes with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), are effective antigen-presenting cells. However, the ability of LCLs to present transduced tumor antigens has not yet been evaluated in detail. We report a single-step strategy utilizing a recombinant EBV (maxi-EBV) to convert B-lymphocytes from any individuals into indefinitely growing LCLs expressing a transgene of interest. The strategy was successfully used to establish LCLs expressing Wilms' tumor gene 1 (WT1) tumor antigen (WT1-LCLs), which is an attractive target for cancer immunotherapy. The established WT1-LCLs expressed more abundant WT1 protein than K562 leukemic cells, which are known to overexpress WT1. A WT1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte line efficiently lysed the WT1-LCL in a human leukocyte antigen-restricted manner, but poorly lysed control LCL not expressing WT1. These results indicate that the transduced WT1 antigen is processed and presented on the WT1-LCL. This experimental strategy can be applied to establish LCLs expressing other tumor antigens and will find a broad range of applications in the field of cancer immunotherapy.

  6. Specific human B lymphocyte alloantigens linked to HL-A.

    PubMed Central

    Mann, D L; Abelson, L; Henkart, P; Harris, S D; Amos, D B

    1975-01-01

    Sera, previously found to react specifically with B lymphoid cultured cells, were tested on isolated T and B peripheral blood lymphocytes in a microcytotoxicity assay. Studies were performed on lymphocytes obtained from several large Amish families. The sera used in these studies were cytotoxic to peripheral blood, B lymphocytes, but not cytotoxic to T lymphocytes. The antigens detected followed the inheritance pattern of HL-A haplotypes. The strong linkage disequilibrium with HL-A antigens suggests that genes controlling the expression of B lymphocyte antigens are linked to genes controlling HL-A alloantigens. PMID:1082138

  7. Interaction between des-Tyr1-gamma-endorphin and HLA class I molecules: serological detection of an HLA-A2 subtype.

    PubMed

    Claas, F H; van der Poel, J J; Castelli-Visser, R; Pool, J; Chen, R B; Xu, K Y; van Rood, J J

    1985-01-01

    Preincubation of lymphocytes with des-Tyr1-gamma-endorphin (DT gamma E) inhibits the reaction between some HLA alloantisera and their corresponding antigens. One HLA-A2-specific antiserum was found which could detect a subtype of the HLA-A2 antigen on DT gamma E-treated lymphocytes from some donors. Comparison with the HLA-A2 subtypes as defined by a combination of cytotoxic T lymphocyte typing and biochemistry showed a complete correlation with the previously described HLA-A2.3 subtype. PMID:3876989

  8. HLA Typing for the Next Generation

    PubMed Central

    Mayor, Neema P.; Robinson, James; McWhinnie, Alasdair J. M.; Ranade, Swati; Eng, Kevin; Midwinter, William; Bultitude, Will P.; Chin, Chen-Shan; Bowman, Brett; Marks, Patrick; Braund, Henny; Madrigal, J. Alejandro; Latham, Katy; Marsh, Steven G. E.

    2015-01-01

    Allele-level resolution data at primary HLA typing is the ideal for most histocompatibility testing laboratories. Many high-throughput molecular HLA typing approaches are unable to determine the phase of observed DNA sequence polymorphisms, leading to ambiguous results. The use of higher resolution methods is often restricted due to cost and time limitations. Here we report on the feasibility of using Pacific Biosciences’ Single Molecule Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing technology for high-resolution and high-throughput HLA typing. Seven DNA samples were typed for HLA-A, -B and -C. The results showed that SMRT DNA sequencing technology was able to generate sequences that spanned entire HLA Class I genes that allowed for accurate allele calling. Eight novel genomic HLA class I sequences were identified, four were novel alleles, three were confirmed as genomic sequence extensions and one corrected an existing genomic reference sequence. This method has the potential to revolutionize the field of HLA typing. The clinical impact of achieving this level of resolution HLA typing data is likely to considerable, particularly in applications such as organ and blood stem cell transplantation where matching donors and recipients for their HLA is of utmost importance. PMID:26018555

  9. Detection of soluble HLA-G molecules in plasma and amniotic fluid.

    PubMed

    Rebmann, V; Pfeiffer, K; Pässler, M; Ferrone, S; Maier, S; Weiss, E; Grosse-Wilde, H

    1999-01-01

    Although the cDNA sequence of HLA-G antigens is compatible with their expression as soluble molecules (sHLA-G), the determination of native sHLA-G levels in body fluids has not yet been described. The lack of this information is likely to reflect the difficulties in developing an assay suitable to measure sHLA-G antigens in the presence of soluble HLA-A, -B and -C (sHLA-I) antigens, since most of the available anti-HLA-G mAb do not detect soluble beta2-m associated HLA-G antigens or crossreact with sHLA-I antigens. Therefore, we have developed a two-step assay which eliminates the interference of classical HLA class I antigens. In the first step, the sample is depleted of sHLA-I antigens and of HLA-E antigens with mAb TP25.99. Then, HLA-G antigens are captured with mAb W6/32 and detected with anti-beta2-m mAb in ELISA. Utilizing this assay, sHLA-G antigen levels were measured in EDTA plasma from 92 controls with known HLA types, 28 women at delivery and the corresponding cord bloods and in 50 amniotic fluids. Mean sHLA-G plasma levels did not differ between males (24.9+/-3.0 SEM ng/ml; n=42) and females (20.1+/-2.1 SEM ng/ml; n = 50). However, sHLA-G levels in HLA-A11 positive probands (mean: 13.0+/-4.4 SEM ng/ml; n=12) were significantly (P<0.05) lower than in HLA-A11 negative ones (mean: 24.5+/-2.0 SEM ng/ml; n=80). sHLA-G levels in women at delivery (mean: 22.9+/-2.2 SEM ng/ml; n=28) were in the range of controls but were significantly (P<0.001) reduced in the corresponding cord bloods (mean: 13.8+/-1.5 SEM ng/ml; n=28). sHLA-G levels in amniotic fluids (mean: 15.5 + 1.0 SEM ng/ml; n=50) were significantly (P<0.001) lower than in plasma. sHLA-G levels were 5 and 11% of those of sHLA-I antigens in plasmas and amniotic fluids, respectively. Individual sHLA-G levels were not correlated with sHLA-I levels. SDS-PAGE analysis of plasma sHLA-G antigens revealed two molecular variants with a 35 kD and a 27 kD MW corresponding to the sizes of sHLA-G1 and -G2 isoforms. In

  10. Production of human anti-HLA monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, M.C.; Mercier, F.; Roger, J.; Varin, M.

    1986-03-01

    Only 40% of the several hundred anti-HLA murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that have been made detect HLA-A,B,C or DR specificities previously defined by human alloantisera, the range of recognized specificities is very narrow, and few of the MAbs have proven useful as tissue typing reagents. In hopes of obtaining HLA typing reagents, the authors are developing a protocol for the production of human anti-HLA MAbs from HLA-antigen (Ag) immunized peripheral blood B cells of volunteering renal patients, immunized to one or more HLA Ags through therapeutic blood transfusions. A simple enrichment of the donor B cells has not been sufficient for anti-HLA MAb production, the authors are currently delineating the conditions necessary for increasing the number of HLA-specific donor B cells by in vitro stimulation with cells expressing the HLA Ag to which the B cell donor is immunized. For the production of MAbs, the stimulated B cells are transformed with Epstein-Barr virus and subsequently fused with KR-4 lymphoblastoid cells. Hybridomas are selected by HAT and Ouabain. Supernatants are screened for anti-HLA activity against lymphocyte targets expressing the original immunizing HLA Ag by complement mediated /sup 51/Cr release assay. Antibody specificity is determined by the complement-dependent microcytotoxicity test used for HLA typing.

  11. The frequency of HLA alleles in the Romanian population.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Ileana; Boșcaiu, Voicu; Cianga, Petru; Dinu, Andrei-Antoniu; Gai, Elena; Melinte, Mihaela; Moise, Ana

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele frequencies is essential for bone marrow and kidney donor searches. The Romanian Caucasian population is heterogeneous and information on HLA polymorphism has not been well studied. We characterized the HLA genetic profile and allele frequencies of regional populations in Romania. HLA-A, B and DRB1 alleles were examined in 8252 individuals, belonging to the four main regions of Romania. The most common alleles found in the Romanian population are the following: HLA-A*01, A*02, A*03, A*11, A*24; HLA-B*18, B*35, B*44, B*51 and HLA-DRB1*01, DRB1*03, DRB1*07, DRB1*11, DRB1*13, DRB1*15, DRB1*16. More than half of the alleles are non-homogeneously spread in Romania. These results provide a starting point for future analyses of genetic heterogeneity in Romania.

  12. The frequency of HLA alleles in the Romanian population.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Ileana; Boșcaiu, Voicu; Cianga, Petru; Dinu, Andrei-Antoniu; Gai, Elena; Melinte, Mihaela; Moise, Ana

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele frequencies is essential for bone marrow and kidney donor searches. The Romanian Caucasian population is heterogeneous and information on HLA polymorphism has not been well studied. We characterized the HLA genetic profile and allele frequencies of regional populations in Romania. HLA-A, B and DRB1 alleles were examined in 8252 individuals, belonging to the four main regions of Romania. The most common alleles found in the Romanian population are the following: HLA-A*01, A*02, A*03, A*11, A*24; HLA-B*18, B*35, B*44, B*51 and HLA-DRB1*01, DRB1*03, DRB1*07, DRB1*11, DRB1*13, DRB1*15, DRB1*16. More than half of the alleles are non-homogeneously spread in Romania. These results provide a starting point for future analyses of genetic heterogeneity in Romania. PMID:26711124

  13. Indirectly Recognized HLA-C Mismatches and Their Potential Role in Transplant Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Thus, Kirsten A.; Te Boome, Liane; Kuball, Jürgen; Spierings, Eric

    2014-01-01

    HLA-C mismatches are clearly associated to alloreactivity after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation; in a number of large cohorts, HLA-C mismatches are correlated to an increased risk of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) or even impaired survival. While for HLA-A and -B, both antigenic as well as allelic mismatches are associated with an increased risk of acute GVHD, such an increased risk is only observed for antigenic HLA-C mismatches and not for allelic mismatches. These observations raise the question what sets HLA-C apart from HLA-A and -B. The difference may well be related to the reduced levels of cell-surface expression of HLA-C as compared to HLA-A and -B, possibly due to, among other factors, a limited peptide-binding capacity. This limited peptide-binding capacity may retain HLA-C in the ER and enhance degradation of the HLA-C protein. Once degraded, HLA-C-derived peptides can be presented to the immune system via other HLA alleles and are thus available for indirect recognition. Indeed, such HLA-C-derived peptides have previously been eluted from other HLA alleles. We have recently developed an approach to predict indirect recognition of HLA molecules, by establishing the numbers of predicted indirectly recognizable HLA epitopes (PIRCHES). The number of PIRCHES presented on HLA class I and II (PIRCHE-I and -II, respectively), are highly correlated to clinical measures of alloreactivity, such as acute GVHD. In the present “Hypothesis & Theory,” we reviewed the current knowledge on HLA-C mismatches and alloreactivity. Moreover, we speculate about the role of direct and indirect recognition of HLA-C and the consequences for donor selection in HLA-C mismatched stem-cell transplantation. PMID:24860572

  14. Modular Three-component Delivery System Facilitates HLA Class I Antigen Presentation and CD8(+) T-cell Activation Against Tumors.

    PubMed

    Umlauf, Benjamin J; Chung, Chin-Ying; Brown, Kathlynn C

    2015-06-01

    Cell-mediated immunotherapies have potential as stand-alone and adjuvant therapies for cancer. However, most current protocols suffer from one or more of three major issues: cost, safety, or efficacy. Here we present a nanoparticle delivery system that facilitates presentation of an immunogenic measles antigen specifically in cancer cells. The delivery system does not contain viral particles, toxins, or biologically derived material. Treatment with this system facilitates activation of a secondary immune response against cancer cells, bypassing the need to identify tumor-associated antigens or educate the immune system through a primary immune response. The delivery system consists of a stealth liposome displaying a cancer-specific targeting peptide, named H1299.3, on its exterior surface and encapsulating H250, an immunogenic human leukocyte antigen class 1 restricted peptide. This targeted-nanoparticle facilitates presentation of the H250 peptide in major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. Activation is dependent on the targeting peptide, previous antigen exposure, and utilizes a novel autophagy-mediated mechanism to facilitate presentation. Treatment with this liposome results in a significant reduction of tumor growth using an aggressive LLC1 model in vaccinated C57BL/6 mice. These data provide proof-of-principle for a novel cell-mediated immunotherapy that is scalable, contains no biologically derived material, and is an efficacious cancer therapy.

  15. HLA-DPB1*04:01 Protects Genetically Susceptible Children from Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in the TEDDY Study

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, David; Hagopian, William; Liu, Edwin; She, Jin-Xiong; Simell, Olli; Akolkar, Beena; Ziegler, Anette-G.; Rewers, Marian; Krischer, Jeffrey P.; Chen, Wei-Min; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Bugawan, Teodorica L.; Rich, Stephen S.; Erlich, Henry; Agardh, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGAs) represent the first evidence of celiac disease (CD) development. Associations of HLA-DR3-DQA1*05:01-DQB1*02:01 (i.e., DR3-DQ2) and, to a lesser extent, DR4-DQA1*03:01-DQB1*03:02 (i.e., DR4-DQ8) with the risk of CD differ by country, consistent with additional genetic heterogeneity that further refines risk. Therefore, we examined human leukocyte antigen (HLA) factors other than DR3-DQ2 for their contribution to developing tTGAs. METHODS The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study enrolled 8,676 infants at an increased HLA-DR-DQ risk for type 1 diabetes and CD into a 15-year prospective surveillance follow-up. Of those followed up, 21% ( n =1,813) carried DR3-DQ2/DR3-DQ2, 39% ( n =3,359) carried DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8, 20% ( n =1701) carried DR4-DQ8/DR4-DQ8, and 17% ( n =1,493) carried DR4-DQ8/DQ4. Within TEDDY, a nested case–control design of 248 children with CD autoimmunity (CDA) and 248 matched control children were genotyped for HLA-B, -DRB3, -DRB4, -DPA1, and -DPB1 genes, and the entire cohort was genotyped for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using the Illumina ImmunoChip. CDA was defined as a positive tTGA test at two consecutive clinic visits, whereas matching in those with no evidence of tTGAs was based on the presence of HLA-DQ2, country, and sex. RESULTS After adjustment for DR3-DQ2 and restriction to allele frequency (AF) ≥5%, HLA-DPB1*04:01 was inversely associated with CDA by conditional logistic regression (AF=44%, odds ratio=0.71, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.53–0.96, P =0.025). This association of time to CDA and HLA-DPB1* 04:01 was replicated with statistical significance in the remainder of the cohort using imputation for specific HLA alleles based on SNP genotyping (hazard ratio=0.84, 95% CI= 0.73–0.96, P =0.013). CONCLUSIONS HLA-DPB1*04:01 may reduce the risk of tTGAs, an early marker of CD, among DR3-DQ2 children, confirming that additional variants in

  16. A future with less HLA: potential clinical applications of HLA-universal cells.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, C; Blasczyk, R

    2015-06-01

    The high variability of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) remains a major obstacle to the application of allogeneic products in cell-based therapies. We have developed a strategy to decrease the immunogenicity of cell and tissues to improve their survival after allogeneic transplantation in the absence of immunosuppression. Using RNA interference technology, the expression of HLA class I and II was stably downregulated. HLA-silenced cells demonstrated to prevent a de novo and escape a pre-formed alloimmune response in vitro and in vivo. Also, they demonstrated to be capable of engraft and survive after allogeneic transplantation independently of the donor's and recipient's genetic background. The generation of HLA-universal cells has may open new horizons in the field of regenerative medicine. Some of the potential clinical applications of HLA universal cells will be discussed in this review.

  17. A future with less HLA: potential clinical applications of HLA-universal cells.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, C; Blasczyk, R

    2015-06-01

    The high variability of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) remains a major obstacle to the application of allogeneic products in cell-based therapies. We have developed a strategy to decrease the immunogenicity of cell and tissues to improve their survival after allogeneic transplantation in the absence of immunosuppression. Using RNA interference technology, the expression of HLA class I and II was stably downregulated. HLA-silenced cells demonstrated to prevent a de novo and escape a pre-formed alloimmune response in vitro and in vivo. Also, they demonstrated to be capable of engraft and survive after allogeneic transplantation independently of the donor's and recipient's genetic background. The generation of HLA-universal cells has may open new horizons in the field of regenerative medicine. Some of the potential clinical applications of HLA universal cells will be discussed in this review. PMID:25864470

  18. Clinically relevant interpretation of solid phase assays for HLA antibody

    PubMed Central

    Bettinotti, Maria P.; Zachary, Andrea A.; Leffell, Mary S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Accurate and timely detection and characterization of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies are critical for pre-transplant and post-transplant immunological risk assessment. Solid phase immunoassays have provided increased sensitivity and specificity, but test interpretation is not always straightforward. This review will discuss the result interpretation considering technical limitations; assessment of relative antibody strength; and the integration of data for risk stratification from complementary testing and the patient's immunological history. Recent findings Laboratory and clinical studies have provided insight into causes of test failures – false positive reactions because of antibodies to denatured HLA antigens and false negative reactions resulting from test interference and/or loss of native epitopes. Test modifications permit detection of complement-binding antibodies and determination of the IgG subclasses. The high degree of specificity of single antigen solid phase immunoassays has revealed the complexity and clinical relevance of antibodies to HLA-C, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DP antigens. Determination of antibody specificity for HLA epitopes enables identification of incompatible antigens not included in test kits. Summary Detection and characterization of HLA antibodies with solid phase immunoassays has led to increased understanding of the role of those antibodies in graft rejection, improved treatment of antibody-mediated rejection, and increased opportunities for transplantation. However, realization of these benefits requires careful and accurate interpretation of test results. PMID:27200498

  19. Tumor mRNA-transfected dendritic cells stimulate the generation of CTL that recognize neuroblastoma-associated antigens and kill tumor cells: immunotherapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Fabio; Chiesa, Sabrina; Bocca, Paola; Millo, Enrico; Salis, Annalisa; Solari, Massimo; Pistoia, Vito; Prigione, Ignazia

    2006-10-01

    Several observations suggest a potential role of T-cell-mediated immunity in the control of neuroblastoma (NB). However, the generation of NB-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) on T-cell priming with tumor mRNA-transfected dendritic cells (DC) has never been investigated before. In the present study, the feasibility of this strategy has been analyzed, both in healthy donors and in NB patients. Monocyte-derived DC were raised from three human leukocyte antigen (HLA) A2+ NB patients and seven HLA-A1+ or HLA-A2+ healthy donors transfected with mRNA from four NB cell lines and cocultured with autologous CD8+ lymphocytes. Expanded CTL expressed an effector/memory phenotype and a T cytotoxic 1-like profile of cytokine secretion. CTL specificity was demonstrated by interferon-gamma release on incubation with HLA-matched NB cell lines. The latter cell lines, but not autologous T-cell blasts, were lysed by CTL in an HLA-restricted manner. Cytotoxicity was found to involve the release of granzyme B. When tested for reactivity against NB-associated antigens, CTL from normal individuals recognized anaplastic lymphoma-associated kinase (ALK) and preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma (PRAME) peptides only, whereas patients' CTL reacted also to survivin, telomerase, and tyrosine hydroxylase peptides. This study demonstrates that DC transfected with NB mRNA induce the generation of patients' CTL specific for different NB-associated antigens, supporting the feasibility of NB T-cell immunotherapy.

  20. [Establishment of a method for HLA-DRB genotyping in cord blood by reverse dot-blot hybridization technique].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Ning; Liao, Can; Tang, Xue-Wei; Li, Yan; Xie, Xing-Mei; Zeng, Rui-Ping

    2002-04-01

    The HLA system was discovered by virtue of the fact that it was polymorphic. The impetus for its discovery was the search for polymorphic antigens to match for transplantation, by analogy with the human red cell blood groups. The most usually DNA method of HLA typing is sequence specific oligonucleotides (SSO) and PCR sequence specific primers (SSP). SSO technique is perfectly suited for analyzing large number of samples, it is not suitable for individual or small numbers. The SSP method is ideal for typing individual samples, but it is costly and requires high capacity thermal cycles for larger numbers of samples. To set up a simple, quick, cheap and high resolution DNA method, were collected sixty-three cord blood samples from Guangzhou Cord Blood Bank, got DNA from blood by the traditional guanidine hydrochloride distillation method. Each sample was simultaneously typed by SSOP, PCR-SSP and reverse dot-blot hybridization (RDB) methods. All of typed is success. The results of three DNA methods are consistent each other. 60 HLA-DRB1 alleles could be accurately distinguished with the RDB method. Our results show that RDB method is a simple, quick, cheap and high resolution method for HLA-DRB types. It can be used in any HLA typing.

  1. An HLA-A2-restricted tyrosinase antigen on melanoma cells results from posttranslational modification and suggests a novel pathway for processing of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    T lymphocytes recognize antigens consisting of peptides presented by class I and II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. The peptides identified so far have been predictable from the amino acid sequences of proteins. We have identified the natural peptide target of a CTL clone that recognizes the tyrosinase gene product on melanoma cells. The peptide results from posttranslational conversion of asparagine to aspartic acid. This change is of central importance for peptide recognition by melanoma-specific T cells, but has no impact on peptide binding to the MHC molecule. This posttranslational modification has not been previously described for any MHC-associated peptide and represents the first demonstration of posttranslational modification of a naturally processed class I-associated peptide. This observation is relevant to the identification and prediction of potential peptide antigens. The most likely mechanism for production of this peptide leads to the suggestion that antigenic peptides can be derived from proteins that are translated into the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:8627164

  2. Analysis of the functional epitopes on different HLA-A2 molecules.

    PubMed

    Goulmy, E; van der Poel, J; Giphart, M; van Rood, J J

    1984-01-01

    Recent studies show that the serologically defined HLA-A2 molecule can be subdivided according to functional and biochemical characteristics. By the use of various HLA-A2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and isoelectric focusing, the serologically homogeneous HLA-A2 molecule can be divided into four subtypes. The polymorphism of the serologically defined HLA-A2 molecule has also been demonstrated by the use of HLA-A2-restricted CTLs. This study was designed to analyze the functional epitopes on different HLA-A2 molecules with special regard to the recognition patterns of different types of HLA-A2-restricted CTLs directed against minor histocompatibility (minor H) antigens. Fifteen so-called HLA-A2 variants belonging to distinct HLA-A2 subtypes were tested as target cells in the cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) assay against (1) HLA-A2-restricted antiminor H-Y CTLs, (2) HLA-A2 and -B7-restricted antiminor H-Y CTLs, and (3) HLA-A2, -Bw62 and -B27-restricted antiminor "HA" CTLs. We found that those three CTLs recognized only one of those HLA-A2 variants. Furthermore, positive reactions by the antiminor H CTLs were only observed on those variant cells which carried, in addition to the HLA-A2 variant, either another "normal" HLA-A2 molecule or another required restricting class I molecule necessary for associative recognition. These results indicate that the absence of HLA-A2 normal allotypic target determinant(s) leads to the loss of epitope(s) necessary for recognition of minor H-Y and minor "HA" transplantation antigens by HLA-restricted CTLs. We can conclude from the present study that HLA-A2-restricted antiminor H CTLs use, in general, the same epitope (or cluster of epitopes) for cellular recognition as alloimmune HLA-A2-specific CTLs. PMID:6204938

  3. Identification of the new HLA-DRB1{sup *}0812 allele detected by sequencing based typing

    SciTech Connect

    Versluis, L.F.; Zwan, A.W. van der; Tilanus, M.G.J.; Savelkoul, P.H.M.; Berg-Loonen, E.M. van den

    1996-12-31

    HLA-DRB typing by polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific priming (PCR-SSP) and sequencing based typing (SBT) was studied within the framework of the Antigen and Haplotype Society 11 and the Sequencing Based Typing Component of the Twelfth International HLA workshop. Sequencing was performed as described by McGinnis and co-workers in 1995 on coded samples, including most DR2 subtypes, resulting in high resolution HLA-DR typing. Sequences were compared with a database containing 107 DRB1, four DRB3, and five DRB5 alleles in a similar way as described for HLA-DPB. One sample showed a new DR8 sequence, indicating the presence of a new allele. This individual (4390) is of Indonesian origin. The specific amplification of the DR8 allele and subsequent sequencing resulted in a sequence which did not match the database and new polymorphism was identified. The complementary strand was sequenced and confirmed the presence of a new DRB1 allele. Cloning and subsequent sequencing of the polymerase chain reaction fragment resulted in confirmation of the direct sequence data. Later this variant was officially named DRB1{sup *}0812. The complete nucleotide sequence of exon 2 of this new allele is shown. This allele differs from DRB1{sup *}0810 by one nucleotide at codon 85, resulting in an alanine (GTT), whereas DRB1{sup *}0810 carries a valine (GCT). 5 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Widespread non-additive and interaction effects within HLA loci modulate the risk of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Tobias L; Deutsch, Aaron J; Han, Buhm; Hu, Xinli; Okada, Yukinori; Eyre, Stephen; Knapp, Michael; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Huizinga, Tom W J; Abecasis, Gonçalo; Becker, Jessica; Boeckxstaens, Guy E; Chen, Wei-Min; Franke, Andre; Gladman, Dafna D; Gockel, Ines; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Martin, Javier; Nair, Rajan P; Nöthen, Markus M; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rahman, Proton; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Stuart, Philip E; Tsoi, Lam C; van Heel, David A; Worthington, Jane; Wouters, Mira M; Klareskog, Lars; Elder, James T; Gregersen, Peter K; Schumacher, Johannes; Rich, Stephen S; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sunyaev, Shamil R; de Bakker, Paul I W; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2015-09-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes confer substantial risk for autoimmune diseases on a log-additive scale. Here we speculated that differences in autoantigen-binding repertoires between a heterozygote's two expressed HLA variants might result in additional non-additive risk effects. We tested the non-additive disease contributions of classical HLA alleles in patients and matched controls for five common autoimmune diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (ncases = 5,337), type 1 diabetes (T1D; ncases = 5,567), psoriasis vulgaris (ncases = 3,089), idiopathic achalasia (ncases = 727) and celiac disease (ncases = 11,115). In four of the five diseases, we observed highly significant, non-additive dominance effects (rheumatoid arthritis, P = 2.5 × 10(-12); T1D, P = 2.4 × 10(-10); psoriasis, P = 5.9 × 10(-6); celiac disease, P = 1.2 × 10(-87)). In three of these diseases, the non-additive dominance effects were explained by interactions between specific classical HLA alleles (rheumatoid arthritis, P = 1.8 × 10(-3); T1D, P = 8.6 × 10(-27); celiac disease, P = 6.0 × 10(-100)). These interactions generally increased disease risk and explained moderate but significant fractions of phenotypic variance (rheumatoid arthritis, 1.4%; T1D, 4.0%; celiac disease, 4.1%) beyond a simple additive model. PMID:26258845

  5. Widespread non-additive and interaction effects within HLA loci modulate the risk of autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Tobias L.; Deutsch, Aaron J.; Han, Buhm; Hu, Xinli; Okada, Yukinori; Eyre, Stephen; Knapp, Michael; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Abecasis, Goncalo; Becker, Jessica; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Chen, Wei-Min; Franke, Andre; Gladman, Dafna D.; Gockel, Ines; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Martin, Javier; Nair, Rajan P.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rahman, Proton; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Stuart, Philip E.; Tsoi, Lam C.; Van Heel, David A.; Worthington, Jane; Wouters, Mira M.; Klareskog, Lars; Elder, James T.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Schumacher, Johannes; Rich, Stephen S.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes confer strong risk for autoimmune diseases on a log-additive scale. Here we speculated that differences in autoantigen binding repertoires between a heterozygote’s two expressed HLA variants may result in additional non-additive risk effects. We tested non-additive disease contributions of classical HLA alleles in patients and matched controls for five common autoimmune diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA, Ncases=5,337), type 1 diabetes (T1D, Ncases=5,567), psoriasis vulgaris (Ncases=3,089), idiopathic achalasia (Ncases=727), and celiac disease (Ncases=11,115). In four out of five diseases, we observed highly significant non-additive dominance effects (RA: P=2.5×1012; T1D: P=2.4×10−10; psoriasis: P=5.9×10−6; celiac disease: P=1.2×10−87). In three of these diseases, the dominance effects were explained by interactions between specific classical HLA alleles (RA: P=1.8×10−3; T1D: P=8.6×1027; celiac disease: P=6.0×10−100). These interactions generally increased disease risk and explained moderate but significant fractions of phenotypic variance (RA: 1.4%, T1D: 4.0%, and celiac disease: 4.1%, beyond a simple additive model). PMID:26258845

  6. Common Genetic Variants Found in HLA and KIR Immune Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Anthony R.; Sweeten, Thayne L.; Johnson, Randall C.; Odell, Dennis; Westover, Jonna B.; Bray-Ward, Patricia; Ward, David C.; Davies, Christopher J.; Thomas, Aaron J.; Croen, Lisa A.; Benson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The “common variant—common disease” hypothesis was proposed to explain diseases with strong inheritance. This model suggests that a genetic disease is the result of the combination of several common genetic variants. Common genetic variants are described as a 5% frequency differential between diseased vs. matched control populations. This theory was recently supported by an epidemiology paper stating that about 50% of genetic risk for autism resides in common variants. However, rare variants, rather than common variants, have been found in numerous genome wide genetic studies and many have concluded that the “common variant—common disease” hypothesis is incorrect. One interpretation is that rare variants are major contributors to genetic diseases and autism involves the interaction of many rare variants, especially in the brain. It is obvious there is much yet to be learned about autism genetics. Evidence has been mounting over the years indicating immune involvement in autism, particularly the HLA genes on chromosome 6 and KIR genes on chromosome 19. These two large multigene complexes have important immune functions and have been shown to interact to eliminate unwanted virally infected and malignant cells. HLA proteins have important functions in antigen presentation in adaptive immunity and specific epitopes on HLA class I proteins act as cognate ligands for KIR receptors in innate immunity. Data suggests that HLA alleles and KIR activating genes/haplotypes are common variants in different autism populations. For example, class I allele (HLA-A2 and HLA-G 14 bp-indel) frequencies are significantly increased by more than 5% over control populations (Table 2). The HLA-DR4 Class II and shared epitope frequencies are significantly above the control populations (Table 2). Three activating KIR genes: 3DS1, 2DS1, and 2DS2 have increased frequencies of 15, 22, and 14% in autism populations, respectively. There is a 6% increase in total activating KIR genes in

  7. Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tafti, Mehdi; Lammers, Gert J.; Dauvilliers, Yves; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Mayer, Geert; Nowak, Jacek; Pfister, Corinne; Dubois, Valérie; Eliaou, Jean-François; Eberhard, Hans-Peter; Liblau, Roland; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Geisler, Peter; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Mathis, Johannes; Lecendreux, Michel; Khatami, Ramin; Heinzer, Raphaël; Haba-Rubio, José; Feketeova, Eva; Baumann, Christian R.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Tiercy, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is tightly associated with the HLA class II allele DQB1*06:02. Evidence indicates a complex contribution of HLA class II genes to narcolepsy susceptibility with a recent independent association with HLA-DPB1. The cause of narcolepsy is supposed be an autoimmune attack against hypocretin-producing neurons. Despite the strong association with HLA class II, there is no evidence for CD4+ T-cell-mediated mechanism in narcolepsy. Since neurons express class I and not class II molecules, the final effector immune cells involved might include class I-restricted CD8+ T-cells. Methods: HLA class I (A, B, and C) and II (DQB1) genotypes were analyzed in 944 European narcolepsy with cataplexy patients and in 4,043 control subjects matched by country of origin. All patients and controls were DQB1*06:02 positive and class I associations were conditioned on DQB1 alleles. Results: HLA-A*11:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.18–1.87] P = 7.0*10−4), C*04:01 (OR = 1.34 [1.10–1.63] P = 3.23*10−3), and B*35:01 (OR = 1.46 [1.13–1.89] P = 3.64*10−3) were associated with susceptibility to narcolepsy. Analysis of polymorphic class I amino-acids revealed even stronger associations with key antigen-binding residues HLA-A-Tyr9 (OR = 1.32 [1.15–1.52] P = 6.95*10−5) and HLA-C-Ser11 (OR = 1.34 [1.15–1.57] P = 2.43*10−4). Conclusions: Our findings provide a genetic basis for increased susceptibility to infectious factors or an immune cytotoxic mechanism in narcolepsy, potentially targeting hypocretin neurons. Citation: Tafti M, Lammers GJ, Dauvilliers Y, Overeem S, Mayer G, Nowak J, Pfister C, Dubois V, Eliaou JF, Eberhard HP, Liblau R, Wierzbicka A, Geisler P, Bassetti CL, Mathis J, Lecendreux M, Khatami R, Heinzer R, Haba-Rubio J, Feketeova E, Baumann CR, Kutalik Z, Tiercy JM. Narcolepsy-associated HLA class I alleles implicate cell-mediated cytotoxicity. SLEEP 2016;39(3):581–587. PMID:26518595

  8. HLA-DQ rather than HLA-DR region might be involved in dominant nonsusceptibility to diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Sterkers, G; Zeliszewski, D; Chaussée, A M; Deschamps, I; Font, M P; Freidel, C; Hors, J; Betuel, H; Dausset, J; Levy, J P

    1988-01-01

    Since HLA-DRw15 (a subdivision of the HLA-DR2 specificity previously called DR2 long) is associated with dominant nonsusceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), while HLA-DRw16 (another subdivision of HLA-DR2, previously called DR2 short) is positively associated with the disease, we looked for particular characteristics of HLA products encoded by the DR2 haplotypes of IDDM patients. The results show the following: (i) HLA-DQ molecules of HLA-DRw15-positive IDDM patients are different from those of HLA-DRw15-positive controls, suggesting that the HLA-DQ gene of DRw15 haplotypes is involved in a protective effect. (ii) HLA-DR and -DQ products of DRw16-positive IDDM are functionally indistinguishable from those of HLA-DRw16-positive controls. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that the residue at position 57 on the DQ beta chain could play a crucial biological role in antigen presentation to T cells as far as the DRw16 haplotype is concerned. This observation fits with the recent observation of correlation between DQ beta allelic polymorphism at position 57 and both susceptibility and resistance to IDDM. PMID:2901099

  9. Seven novel HLA alleles reflect different mechanisms involved in the evolution of HLA diversity: description of the new alleles and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Adamek, Martina; Klages, Cornelia; Bauer, Manuela; Kudlek, Evelina; Drechsler, Alina; Leuser, Birte; Scherer, Sabine; Opelz, Gerhard; Tran, Thuong Hien

    2015-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci are among the most polymorphic genes in the human genome. The diversity of these genes is thought to be generated by different mechanisms including point mutation, gene conversion and crossing-over. During routine HLA typing, we discovered seven novel HLA alleles which were probably generated by different evolutionary mechanisms. HLA-B*41:21, HLA-DQB1*02:10 and HLA-DQA1*01:12 likely emerged from the common alleles of their groups by point mutations, all of which caused non-synonymous amino acid substitutions. In contrast, a deletion of one nucleotide leading to a frame shift with subsequent generation of a stop codon is responsible for the appearance of a null allele, HLA-A*01:123N. Whereas HLA-B*35:231 and HLA-B*53:31 were probably products of intralocus gene conversion between HLA-B alleles, HLA-C*07:294 presumably evolved by interlocus gene conversion between an HLA-C and an HLA-B allele. Our analysis of these novel alleles illustrates the different mechanisms which may have contributed to the evolution of HLA polymorphism.

  10. Endoplasmic Reticulum Aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) Polymorphism Relevant to Inflammatory Disease Shapes the Peptidome of the Birdshot Chorioretinopathy-Associated HLA-A*29:02 Antigen.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Navarro, Carlos; Martín-Esteban, Adrian; Barnea, Eilon; Admon, Arie; López de Castro, José A

    2015-07-01

    Birdshot chorioretinopathy is a rare ocular inflammation whose genetic association with HLA-A*29:02 is the highest between a disease and a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule. It belongs to a group of MHC-I-associated inflammatory disorders, also including ankylosing spondylitis, psoriasis, and Behçet's disease, for which endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases (ERAP) 1 and/or 2 have been identified as genetic risk factors. Since both enzymes are involved in the processing of MHC-I ligands, it seems reasonable that common peptide-mediated mechanisms may underlie the pathogenesis of these diseases. In this study, comparative immunopeptidomics was used to characterize >5000 A*29:02 ligands and quantify the effects of ERAP1 polymorphism and expression on the A*29:02 peptidome in human cells. The peptides predominant in an active ERAP1 context showed a higher frequency of nonamers and bulkier amino acid side chains at multiple positions, compared with the peptides predominant in a less active ERAP1 background. Thus, ERAP1 polymorphism has a large influence, shaping the A*29:02 peptidome through length-dependent and length-independent effects. These changes resulted in increased affinity and hydrophobicity of A*29:02 ligands in an active ERAP1 context. The results reveal the nature of the functional interaction between A*29:02 and ERAP1 and suggest that this enzyme may affect the susceptibility to birdshot chorioretinopathy by altering the A*29:02 peptidome. The complexity of these alterations is such that not only peptide presentation but also other potentially pathogenic features could be affected.

  11. HLA-A2-Restricted Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitopes from Human Heparanase as Novel Targets for Broad-Spectrum Tumor Immunotherapy1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ting; Tang, Xu-Dong; Wan, Yin; Chen, Ling; Yu, Song-Tao; Xiong, Zhen; Fang, Dian-Chun; Liang, Guang-Ping

    2008-01-01

    Peptide vaccination for cancer immunotherapy requires identification of peptide epitopes derived from antigenic proteins associated with tumors. Heparanase (Hpa) is broadly expressed in various advanced tumors and seems to be an attractive new tumor-associated antigen. The present study was designed to predict and identify HLA-A2-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes in the protein of human Hpa. For this purpose, HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitopes were identified using the following four-step procedure: 1) a computer-based epitope prediction from the amino acid sequence of human Hpa, 2) a peptide-binding assay to determine the affinity of the predicted protein with the HLA-A2 molecule, 3) stimulation of the primary T-cell response against the predicted peptides in vitro, and 4) testing of the induced CTLs toward different kinds of carcinoma cells expressing Hpa antigens and/or HLA-A2. The results demonstrated that, of the tested peptides, effectors induced by peptides of human Hpa containing residues 525–533 (PAFSYSFFV, Hpa525), 277–285 (KMLKSFLKA, Hpa277), and 405–413 (WLSLLFKKL, Hpa405) could effectively lyse various tumor cell lines that were Hpa-positive and HLA-A2-matched. We also found that these peptide-specific CTLs could not lyse autologous lymphocytes with low Hpa activity. Further study revealed that Hpa525, Hpa277, and Hpa405 peptides increased the frequency of IFN-γ-producing T cells compared to a negative peptide. Our results suggest that Hpa525, Hpa277, and Hpa405 peptides are new HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitopes capable of inducing Hpa-specific CTLs in vitro. Because Hpa is expressed in most advanced malignant tumors, Hpa525, Hpa277, and Hpa405 peptide-based vaccines may be useful for the immunotherapy for patients with advanced tumors. PMID:18714399

  12. Characteristics of HLA-E Restricted T-Cell Responses and Their Role in Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Human HLA-E can, in addition to self-antigens, also present pathogen-derived sequences, which elicit specific T-cell responses. T-cells recognize their antigen presented by HLA-E highly specifically and have unique functional and phenotypical properties. Pathogen specific HLA-E restricted CD8+ T-cells are an interesting new player in the field of immunology. Future work should address their exact roles and relative contributions in the immune response against infectious diseases.

  13. Development of a high-resolution NGS-based HLA-typing and analysis pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Wittig, Michael; Anmarkrud, Jarl A.; Kässens, Jan C.; Koch, Simon; Forster, Michael; Ellinghaus, Eva; Hov, Johannes R.; Sauer, Sascha; Schimmler, Manfred; Ziemann, Malte; Görg, Siegfried; Jacob, Frank; Karlsen, Tom H.; Franke, Andre

    2015-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex contains the most polymorphic genes in the human genome. The classical HLA class I and II genes define the specificity of adaptive immune responses. Genetic variation at the HLA genes is associated with susceptibility to autoimmune and infectious diseases and plays a major role in transplantation medicine and immunology. Currently, the HLA genes are characterized using Sanger- or next-generation sequencing (NGS) of a limited amplicon repertoire or labeled oligonucleotides for allele-specific sequences. High-quality NGS-based methods are in proprietary use and not publicly available. Here, we introduce the first highly automated open-kit/open-source HLA-typing method for NGS. The method employs in-solution targeted capturing of the classical class I (HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C) and class II HLA genes (HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1, HLA-DPA1, HLA-DPB1). The calling algorithm allows for highly confident allele-calling to three-field resolution (cDNA nucleotide variants). The method was validated on 357 commercially available DNA samples with known HLA alleles obtained by classical typing. Our results showed on average an accurate allele call rate of 0.99 in a fully automated manner, identifying also errors in the reference data. Finally, our method provides the flexibility to add further enrichment target regions. PMID:25753671

  14. Development of a high-resolution NGS-based HLA-typing and analysis pipeline.

    PubMed

    Wittig, Michael; Anmarkrud, Jarl A; Kässens, Jan C; Koch, Simon; Forster, Michael; Ellinghaus, Eva; Hov, Johannes R; Sauer, Sascha; Schimmler, Manfred; Ziemann, Malte; Görg, Siegfried; Jacob, Frank; Karlsen, Tom H; Franke, Andre

    2015-06-23

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex contains the most polymorphic genes in the human genome. The classical HLA class I and II genes define the specificity of adaptive immune responses. Genetic variation at the HLA genes is associated with susceptibility to autoimmune and infectious diseases and plays a major role in transplantation medicine and immunology. Currently, the HLA genes are characterized using Sanger- or next-generation sequencing (NGS) of a limited amplicon repertoire or labeled oligonucleotides for allele-specific sequences. High-quality NGS-based methods are in proprietary use and not publicly available. Here, we introduce the first highly automated open-kit/open-source HLA-typing method for NGS. The method employs in-solution targeted capturing of the classical class I (HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C) and class II HLA genes (HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1, HLA-DPA1, HLA-DPB1). The calling algorithm allows for highly confident allele-calling to three-field resolution (cDNA nucleotide variants). The method was validated on 357 commercially available DNA samples with known HLA alleles obtained by classical typing. Our results showed on average an accurate allele call rate of 0.99 in a fully automated manner, identifying also errors in the reference data. Finally, our method provides the flexibility to add further enrichment target regions.

  15. [The HLA system in the Moroccan population: General review].

    PubMed

    Brick, C; Atouf, O; Essakalli, M

    2015-01-01

    The Moroccan population is an interesting study model of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) polymorphism given its ethnic and genetic diversity. Through an analysis of the literature, this work proposes to establish a balance of knowledge for this population in the field of histocompatibility: HLA diversity, anthropology, transplantation and HLA associations and diseases. This analysis shows that the HLA system has not been fully explored within the Moroccan population. However, the results obtained allowed us to initiate a database reflecting the specific healthy Moroccan population HLA polymorphism to identify immigration flows and relationships with different people of the world and to reveal the association of certain HLA alleles with frequent pathologies. We also propose to analyze the reasons hindering the development of this activity in Morocco and we will try to identify some perspectives. PMID:26597780

  16. Recognition of distinct HLA-DQA1 promoter elements by a single nuclear factor containing Jun and Fos or antigenically related proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Neve Ombra, M; Autiero, M; DeLerma Barbaro, A; Barretta, R; Del Pozzo, G; Guardiola, J

    1993-01-01

    The activity of MHC class II promoters depends upon conserved regulatory signals one of which, the extended X-box, contains in its X2 subregion a sequence related to the cAMP response element, CRE and to the TPA response element, TRE. Accordingly, X2 is recognized by the AP-1 factor and by other c-Jun or c-Fos containing heterodimers. We report that the X-box dependent promoter activity of the HLA-DQA1 gene is down-modulated by an array of DNA elements each of which represented twice either in an invertedly or directly repeated orientation. In this frame, we describe a nuclear binding factor, namely DBF, promiscuously interacting with two of these additional signals, delta and sigma, and with a portion of the X-box, namely the X-core, devoid of X2. The presence of a single factor recognizing divergent DNA sequences was indicated by the finding that these activities were co-eluted from a heparin-Sepharose column and from DNA affinity columns carrying different DNA binding sites as ligands. Competition experiments made with oligonucleotides representing wild type and mutant DNA elements showed that each DNA element specifically inhibited the binding of the others, supporting the contention that DBF is involved in recognition of different targets. Furthermore, we found that DBF also exhibits CRE/TRE binding activity and that this activity can be competed out by addition of an excess of sigma, delta and X-core oligonucleotides. Anti-Jun peptide and anti-Fos peptide antibodies blocked not only the binding activity of DBF, but also its X-core and sigma binding; this blockade was removed by the addition of the Jun or Fos peptides against which the antibodies had been raised. In vitro synthesized Jun/Fos was able to bind to all these boxes, albeit with seemingly different affinities. The cooperativity of DBF interactions may explain the modulation of the X-box dependent promoter activity mediated by the accessory DNA elements described here. Images PMID:8493100

  17. A one-step DNA sequencing strategy to HLA type hematopoietic stem cell donors at recruitment - rethinking typing strategies.

    PubMed

    Tu, B; Cha, N; Yang, R; Ng, J; Hurley, C K

    2013-03-01

    In order to reduce the time required to identify a match for unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, a one-step DNA sequencing strategy was employed at the time of recruitment. The impact of this strategy on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing resolution and the effect of current registry requirements on resolution and coding of assignments were evaluated. Sanger-based DNA sequencing was used to obtain diploid exons 2 and 3 HLA-A, -B and -C assignments of 2747 unrelated African American and 1822 European American volunteers at recruitment. The results demonstrate the high resolution of the approach and challenge several aspects of the current registry typing strategy. Of the 46% of African American and 74% of European American individuals whose HLA typing resulted in alternative genotypes, the majority (≥93%) was predicted to have only a single 'common' genotype among the alternatives. The common practice of adding secondary assays to resolve alternative genotype assignments that include more than two antigen groups was also evaluated. While the percentage of assignments with greater than two antigen groups reached as high as 21% (HLA-A in European Americans), only 1.8% of individuals at most carried two common genotypes encompassing three antigen groups. The assignment of (National Marrow Donor Program) NMDP-designated allele codes to the one-pass results reduced the resolution substantially and introduced genotypes that were not included in the laboratory's assignments. We suggest the alternative strategy of using the exons 2-3 diploid nucleotide sequence as the assignment submitted to the registry with the added benefit of immortalizing the assignment in time regardless of the introduction of novel alleles. To keep pace with current donor selection criteria and with the increasing number of new alleles, it is time to rethink our recruitment typing strategies.

  18. The Potential of HLA-G-Bearing Extracellular Vesicles as a Future Element in HLA-G Immune Biology

    PubMed Central

    Rebmann, Vera; König, Lisa; Nardi, Fabiola da Silva; Wagner, Bettina; Manvailer, Luis Felipe Santos; Horn, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    The HLA-G molecule is a member of the non-classical HLA class I family. Its surface expression is physiologically restricted to the maternal–fetal interface and to immune privileged adult tissues. Despite the restricted tissue expression, HLA-G is detectable in body fluids as secreted soluble molecules. A unique feature of HLA-G is the structural diversity as surface expressed and as secreted molecules. Secreted HLA-G can be found in various body fluids either as free soluble HLA-G or as part of extracellular vesicles (EVs), which are composed of various antigens/ligands/receptors, bioactive lipids, cytokines, growth factors, and genetic information, such as mRNA and microRNA. Functionally, HLA-G and its secreted forms are considered to play a crucial role in the network of immune-regulatory tolerance mechanisms, preferentially interacting with the cognate inhibitory receptors LILRB1 and LILRB2. The HLA-G mediated tolerance is described in processes of pregnancy, inflammation, and cancer. However, almost all functional and clinical implications of HLA-G in vivo and in vitro have been established based on simple single ligand/receptor interactions at the cell surface, whereas HLA-G-bearing EVs were in minor research focus. Indeed, cytotrophoblast cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and cancer cells were recently described to secrete HLA-G-bearing EVs, displaying immunosuppressive effects and modulating the tumor microenvironment. However, numerous functional and clinical open questions persist. Here, we (i) introduce basic aspects of EVs biology, (ii) summarize the functional knowledge, clinical implications and open questions of HLA-G-bearing EVs, and (iii) discuss HLA-G-bearing EVs as a future element in HLA-G biology. PMID:27199995

  19. Types of HLA in the bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC).

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Erkan; Uğur Özalp, Ali; Cekmen, Arman; Eren, Bülent; Onal, Bülent; Akkuş, Emre; Erdoğan, Ergun

    2013-02-01

    HLA plays a complementary role in the interaction between tumor and body immunology. The aim of this study was to determine the existence of the association between the HLA system and transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Using standard micro-lymphocytotoxic method of Terasaki, HLA-A, B, DR and DQ antigen types of 30 patients with TCC of the bladder were compared with the control group (30 healthy people). In the TCC patient group, HLA -DQ6(1) and HLA -DQ7(3) antigens were detected with a significantly higher frequency than in the control group (p=0.018 and p=0.038, respectively), whereas HLA-A10, B4, DR53 and DQ1 antigens were detected with significantly higher frequency in the control group (p less 0.05 in all). It suggests that patients who had the antigens detected were at higher risk of TCC, and the ones who had the antigens displaying protective features as were detected in the control group, were at lesser risk.

  20. HLA-B27/microbial mimicry: an in vivo analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Kapasi, K; Chui, B; Inman, R D

    1992-01-01

    The association between three major spondyloarthritic diseases, ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's syndrome, and reactive arthritis, and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class 1 antigen HLA-B27 is well documented. The hypothesis of cross-reactivity between HLA-B27 and the antecedent infection-causing Gram-negative pathogens such as Salmonella, Shigella and Yersinia has been suggested by in vitro studies employing monoclonal antibodies. We have examined the possibility of such cross-reactivity in vivo using various rabbit immune sera and patient sera as the source of cross-reacting antibody. Mouse L cells were transfected with HLA-A3 or HLA-B27 and used as a source of antigen. Western blot analysis employing denatured antigen, FACS analysis employing native antigen and immunoprecipitation studies were undertaken to detect cross-reacting antibodies generated in vivo to HLA-B27 antigen. Antibodies generated in vivo by infection in patients or immunization in animals against arthritogenic bacteria did not demonstrate any cross-reactivity with HLA-B27 by any of the methods used. As defined by the humoral immune response, molecular mimicry appears unlikely to explain the role of B27 in the pathogenesis of reactive arthritis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:1478690

  1. Identification of HLA-A*0201-Restricted Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitopes Derived from HLA-DOβ as a Novel Target for Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yoon Joong; Zeng, Wanyong; Song, Weihua; Reinhold, Bruce; Choi, Jaewon; Brusic, Vladimir; Yamashita, Takuto; Munshi, Aditya; Li, Cheng; Minvielle, Stephane; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Munshi, Nikhil; Reinherz, Ellis L.; Sasada, Tetsuro

    2014-01-01

    Summary Despite the recent development of effective therapeutic agents against multiple myeloma (MM), new therapeutic approaches, including immunotherapies, remain to be developed. Here we identified novel human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-A*0201 (HLAA2)-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes from a B cell specific molecule HLA-DOβ (DOB) as a potential target for MM. By DNA microarray analysis, the HLADOB expression in MM cells was significantly higher than that in normal plasma cells. Twenty-five peptides were predicted to bind to HLA-A2 from the amino acid sequence of HLA-DOB. When screened for the immunogenicity in HLA-A2-transgenic mice immunized with HLA-DOB cDNA, 4 peptides were substantially immunogenic. By mass spectrometry analysis of peptides eluted from HLA-A2-immunoprecipitates of MM cell lines, only two epitopes, HLA-DOB232-240 (FLLGLIFLL) and HLA-DOB185-193 (VMLEMTPEL), were confirmed for their physical presence on cell surface. When healthy donor blood was repeatedly stimulated in vitro with these two peptides and assessed by antigen-specific γ-interferon secretion, HLA-DOB232-240 was more immunogenic than HLA-DOB185-193. Additionally, the HLA-DOB232-240-specific CTLs, but not the HLA-DOB185-193-specific CTLs, displayed an major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted reactivity against MM cell lines expressing both HLA-A2 and HLA-DOB. Taken together, based on the physical presence on tumour cell surface and high immunogenicity, HLA-DOB232-240 might be useful for developing a novel immunotherapy against MM. PMID:24032635

  2. Human leukocyte antigen-E alleles and expression in patients with serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Lu, Renquan; Xie, Suhong; Wen, Xuemei; Wang, Hongling; Gao, Xiang; Guo, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-E (HLA-E) is one of the most extensively studied non-classical MHC class I molecules that is almost non-polymorphic. Only two alleles (HLA-E*0101 and HLA-E*0103) are found in worldwide populations, and suggested to be functional differences between these variants. The HLA-E molecule can contribute to the escape of cancer cells from host immune surveillance. However, it is still unknown whether HLA-E gene polymorphisms might play a role in cancer immune escape. To explore the association between HLA-E alleles and the susceptibility to serous ovarian cancer (SOC), 85 primary SOC patients and 100 healthy women were enrolled. Here, we indicated that high frequency of HLA-E*0103 allele existed in SOC patients by the allele-specific quantitative real-time PCR method. The levels of HLA-E protein expression in SOC patients with the HLA-E*0103 allele were higher than those with the HLA-E*0101 allele using immunohistochemistry analysis. The cell surface expression and functional differences between the two alleles were verified by K562 cells transfected with HLA-E*0101 or HLA-E*0103 allelic heavy chains. The HLA-E*0103 allele made the transfer of the HLA-E molecule to the cell surface easier, and HLA-E/peptides complex more stable. These differences ultimately influenced the function of natural killer cells, showing that the cells transfected with HLA-E*0103 allele inhibited natural killer cells to lysis. This study reveals a novel mechanism regarding the susceptibility to SOC, which is correlated with the HLA-E*0103 allele. PMID:25711417

  3. Association and frequency of HLA-A, B and HLA-DR genes in south Tunisian patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA).

    PubMed

    Mahfoudh, Nadia; Siala, Mariam; Rihl, Markus; Kammoun, Arwa; Frikha, Faten; Fourati, Hela; Younes, Mohamed; Gdoura, Radhouane; Gaddour, Lilia; Hakim, Faiza; Bahloul, Zouheir; Baklouti, Sofien; Bargaoui, Naceur; Sellami, Sleheddine; Hammami, Adnene; Makni, Hafedh

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the association of HLA-A, B and HLA-DR gene expression and to assess an association of additional HLA antigens besides HLA-B27 in south Tunisian patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA). Eighty-five patients diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis (AS, n=68) and reactive arthrithis (ReA, n=17) were selected and compared with 100 healthy controls (HC). HLA class I antigens were typed serologically using microlymphocytotoxicity technique. HLA-DRB1* alleles were studied by polymerase chain reaction amplification with sequence-specific primers. The significance of differences between patients and controls was tested by chi-square analysis. We found significantly increased frequencies of HLA-A3 (30.6%; pC=0.04; OR=2.95), HLA-B27 (62.35%; pC=4.10(-17), OR=53.55), and HLA-DRB1*15 (17.2%; pC=0.026; RR=2.58) alleles in SpA patients compared to HC. The most frequent and strongest association was observed for HLA-B27 in AS (pC=6.6 ×10(-16), OR=52.23). When AS and ReA patients were analysed separately, HLA-DRB1*15 and HLA-A3 were increased only in AS (pC=0.01, OR=2.99 and pC=0.03, OR=3.14, respectively). In ReA patients, HLA-DRB1*04 (p=0.033, pC=NS, OR=2.89) was found to be the most common allele. By analysing the HLA-B27-negative subgroup, HLA-A3 and HLA-DRB1*15 expression was found to be dependent on the presence of HLA-B27. HLA-B27 expression was higher in male (45/53; 85%) as compared to female (8/53; 15%) patients (p=0.03). Apart from HLA-B27, HLA-A3 and HLA-DRB1*15 are the MHC class I and II alleles found most frequent in Tunisian patients with AS, whereas HLA-DRB1*04 was found most frequent in ReA patients. HLA-B27 is more frequent in male than in female patients. PMID:21360006

  4. Detection of anti-HLA antibodies in maternal blood in the second trimester to identify patients at risk for antibody-mediated maternal anti-fetal rejection and spontaneous preterm delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, JoonHo; Romero, Roberto; Xu, Yi; Miranda, Jezid; Yoo, Wonsuk; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Tarca, Adi L.; Korzeniewski, Steven J.; Hassan, Sonia S.; Than, Nandor Gabor; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Kim, Chong Jai

    2014-01-01

    Problem Maternal anti-fetal rejection is a mechanism of disease in spontaneous preterm labor. The objective of this study was to determine whether the presence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) panel-reactive antibodies (PRA) during the second trimester increases the risk for spontaneous preterm delivery. Methods of Study This longitudinal case-control study included pregnant women with spontaneous preterm deliveries (n=310) and control patients with normal term pregnancies (n=620), matched for maternal age and gravidity. Maternal plasma samples obtained at 14-16, 16-20, 20-24, and 24-28 weeks of gestation were analyzed for HLA Class I and Class II PRA positivity using flow cytometry. The fetal HLA genotype and maternal HLA alloantibody epitope were determined for a subset of patients with positive HLA PRA. Results 1) Patients with spontaneous preterm delivery were more likely to exhibit HLA Class I (adjusted OR=2.54, p<0.0001) and Class II (adjusted OR=1.98, p=0.002) PRA positivity than those delivering at term; 2) HLA Class I PRA positivity for patients with spontaneous preterm delivery between 28-34 weeks (adjusted OR=2.88; p=0.001) and after 34 weeks of gestation (adjusted OR=2.53; p<0.0001) was higher than for those delivering at term; 3) HLA Class II PRA positivity for patients with spontaneous preterm delivery after 34 weeks of gestation was higher than for those delivering at term (adjusted OR=2.04; p=0.002); 4) multiparous women were at higher risk for HLA Class I PRA positivity than nulliparous women (adjusted OR=0.097, p<0.0001 for nulliparity); 5) nulliparous women had a higher rate of HLA Class I PRA positivity with advancing gestational age (p=0.001); and 6) 78% of women whose fetuses were genotyped had allo-antibodies specific against fetal HLA class I antigens. Conclusions Pregnant women with positive HLA class I or class II PRA during the second trimester are at an increased risk for spontaneous preterm delivery due to antibody-mediated maternal

  5. HLA class II genes: typing by DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Bidwell, J L; Bidwell, E A; Bradley, B A

    1990-04-01

    A detailed understanding of the structure and function of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has ensued from studies by molecular biologist during the last decade. Virtually all of the HLA genes have now been cloned, and the nucleotide sequences of their different allelic forms have been determined. Typing for these HLA alleles is a fundamental prerequisite for tissue matching in allogeneic organ transplantation. Until very recently, typing procedures have been dominated by serological and cellular methods. The availability of cloned DNA from HLA genes has now permitted the technique of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis to be applied, with remarkable success and advantage, to phenotyping of both HLA Class I and Class II determinants. For the HLA Class II genes DR and DQ, a simple two-stage RFLP analysis permits the accurate identification of all specificities defined by serology, and of many which are defined by cellular typing. At the present time, however, RFLP typing of HLA Class I genes is not as practicable or as informative as that for HLA Class II genes. The present clinical applications of HLA-DR and DQ RFLP typing are predominantly in phenotyping of living donors, including selection of HLA-matched volunteer bone marrow donors, in allograft survival studies, and in studies of HLA Class II-associated diseases. However, the time taken to perform RFLP analysis precludes its use for the typing of cadaveric kidney donors. Nucleotide sequence data for the alleles of HLA Class II genes have now permitted the development of allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) typing, a second category of DNA analysis. This has been greatly facilitated by the ability to amplify specific HLA Class II DNA 'target' sequences using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The accuracy of DNA typing techniques should ensure that this methodology will eventually replace conventional HLA phenotyping.

  6. The structure of HLA-DR52c: Comparison to other HLA-DRB3 alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Shaodong; Crawford, Frances; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W.

    2008-09-05

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHCII) molecules present antigens to CD4{sup +} T cells. In addition to the most commonly studied human MHCII isotype, HLA-DR, whose {beta} chain is encoded by the HLA-DRB1 locus, several other isotypes that use the same {alpha} chain but have {beta} chains encoded by other genes. These other DR molecules also are expressed in antigen-presenting cells and are known to participate in peptide presentation to T cells and to be recognized as alloantigens by other T cells. Like some of the HLA-DRB1 alleles, several of these alternate DR molecules have been associated with specific autoimmune diseases and T cell hypersensitivity. Here we present the structure of an HLA-DR molecule (DR52c) containing one of these alternate {beta} chains (HLA-DRB3*0301) bound to a self-peptide derived from the Tu elongation factor. The molecule shares structurally conserved elements with other MHC class II molecules but has some unique features in the peptide-binding groove. Comparison of the three major HLA-DBR3 alleles (DR52a, b, and c) suggests that they were derived from one another by recombination events that scrambled the four major peptide-binding pockets at peptide positions 1, 4, 6, and 9 but left virtually no polymorphisms elsewhere in the molecules.

  7. Identification of multiple independent susceptibility loci in the HLA region in Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Travis; Coit, Patrick; Adler, Adam; Yilmaz, Vuslat; Aksu, Kenan; Düzgün, Nursen; Keser, Gokhan; Cefle, Ayse; Yazici, Ayten; Ergen, Andac; Alpsoy, Erkan; Salvarani, Carlo; Casali, Bruno; Kötter, Ina; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Wijmenga, Cisca; Direskeneli, Haner; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Sawalha, Amr H

    2013-03-01

    Behçet's disease is an inflammatory disease characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers and significant organ involvement. Localizing the genetic association between HLA-B*51 and Behçet's disease and exploring additional susceptibility loci in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region are complicated by the strong linkage disequilibrium in this region. We genotyped 8,572 variants in the extended HLA locus and carried out imputation and meta-analysis of 24,834 variants in 2 independent Behçet's disease cohorts from 2 ancestry groups. Genotyped SNPs were used to infer classical HLA alleles in the HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1 and HLA-DRB1 loci. Our data suggest that the robust HLA-B*51 association in Behçet's disease is explained by a variant located between the HLA-B and MICA genes (rs116799036: odds ratio (OR) = 3.88, P = 9.42 × 10(-50)). Three additional independent genetic associations within PSORS1C1 (rs12525170: OR = 3.01, P = 3.01 × 10(-26)), upstream of HLA-F-AS1 (rs114854070: OR = 1.95, P = 7.84 × 10(-14)) and with HLA-Cw*1602 (OR = 5.38, P = 6.07 × 10(-18)) were also identified and replicated.

  8. Flow cytometry with anti HLA-antibodies: a simple but highly sensitive method for monitoring chimerism and minimal residual disease after HLA-mismatched stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schumm, M; Feuchtinger, T; Pfeiffer, M; Hoelle, W; Bethge, W; Ebinger, M; Kuci, S; Handgretinger, R; Lang, P

    2007-06-01

    Transplantation of HLA-mismatched stem cells may allow determination of chimerism status of single cells by differential expression of HLA molecules. Monoclonal antibodies against HLA antigens can be used to determine the HLA type of sub-populations by standard flow cytometry. Blood samples from 23 patients transplanted from HLA-mismatched family donors were monitored using HLA-specific antibodies. Suitable antibodies could be found for all donor recipient pairs by using differences in HLA Bw4 and Bw6 groups or other serological antigens. Pretransplant controls of donor and recipient were used to correct for variable fluorescence intensities of the antibodies and sub-populations. Owing to the high sensitivity, cell populations with a minimum frequency of 0.1% were detectable. Flow-cytometric analysis was confirmed by chimerism analysis of immunomagnetically isolated T cells by standard PCR technique. In addition to chimerism evaluation, HLA antibodies improved the detection of leukemic cells after transplantation with aberrant phenotype. In conclusion, flow cytometry using antibodies against HLA antigens is an interesting tool for determination of chimerism and minimal residual disease after HLA-mismatched transplantation. Information about the chimerism status is given on a single-cell level and allows fast and convenient analysis of sub-populations.

  9. Anti-Tumor Effect of the Alphavirus-based Virus-like Particle Vector Expressing Prostate-Specific Antigen in a HLA-DR Transgenic Mouse Model of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Riabov, V.; Tretyakova, I.; Alexander, R. B.; Pushko, P.; Klyushnenkova, E. N.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine if an alphavirus-based vaccine encoding human Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) could generate an effective anti-tumor immune response in a stringent mouse model of prostate cancer. DR2bxPSA F1 male mice expressing human PSA and HLA-DRB1*1501 transgenes were vaccinated with virus-like particle vector encoding PSA (VLPV-PSA) followed by the challenge with Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate cells engineered to express PSA (TRAMP-PSA). PSA-specific cellular and humoral immune responses were measured before and after tumor challenge. PSA and CD8 reactivity in the tumors was detected by immunohistochemistry. Tumor growth was compared in vaccinated and control groups. We found that VLPV-PSA could infect mouse dendritic cells in vitro and induce a robust PSA-specific immune response in vivo. A substantial proportion of splenic CD8+ T cells (19.6±7.4%) produced IFNγ in response to the immunodominant peptide PSA65–73. In the blood of vaccinated mice, 18.4±4.1% of CD8+ T cells were PSA-specific as determined by the staining with H-2Db/PSA65–73 dextramers. VLPV-PSA vaccination also strongly stimulated production of IgG2a/b anti-PSA antibodies. Tumors in vaccinated mice showed low levels of PSA expression and significant CD8 T cell infiltration. Tumor growth in VLPV-PSA vaccinated mice was significantly delayed at early time points (p=0.002, Gehan-Breslow test). Our data suggest that TC-83-based VLPV-PSA vaccine can efficiently overcome immune tolerance to PSA, mediate rapid clearance of PSA-expressing tumor cells and delay tumor growth. The VLPV-PSA vaccine will undergo further testing for the immunotherapy of prostate cancer. PMID:26319744

  10. HLA antibody detection with solid phase assays: great expectations or expectations too great?

    PubMed

    Gebel, H M; Bray, R A

    2014-09-01

    Alloantibodies directed against HLA antigens, are a barrier to long-term solid organ allograft survival. The clinical impact of preformed, donor-directed HLA alloantibodies range from acceptable risk to unequivocal contraindication for organ transplantation. HLA antibodies are key factors that limit patient access to donor organs. Serological methods were once the only approach to identify HLA antigens and antibodies. Limitations in these technologies led to the development of solid phase approaches. In the early 1990s, the development of the polymerase chain reaction enabled DNA-based HLA antigen testing to be performed. By the mid-1990s, microparticle-based technology that utilized flow cytometry for analysis was developed to detect both classes I and II HLA antibodies. These methodologies revolutionized clinical histocompatibility testing. The strengths and weaknesses of these assays are described in detail in this review.

  11. The effect of MICA antigens on kidney transplantation outcomes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lei; Li, Zhengyu; Wu, Weidong; Luo, Guangheng; Mei, Hong; Sun, Zhaolin; Xu, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Good HLA matches do not guarantee rejection-free kidney transplantation, indicating that other antigens might be targets for rejection. The major histocompatibility complex class I-related antigens A (MICA) are polymorphic. Mismatched MICA epitopes may lead to antibodies against MICA antigens and induce immune response. Establishment of detection technique for MICA, including solid-phase, immunofluorescence, flow-crossmatch, make it possible to detect the types of MICA antibodies. Therefore, the pathological role of MICA antibodies has received an increased attention in kidney transplantation. This review describes and summarizes the data from recent studies related to the impact of MICA antibodies on kidney allografts rejection and survival. And also provides evidence that the presence of MICA antibodies before or after transplantation, as a risk factor, is likely to be responsible for transplant outcomes.

  12. HLA polymorphism in three indigenous populations of Sabah and Sarawak.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, J S; Shahnaz, M; Azrena, A; Irda, Y A; Salawati, M; Too, C L; Lee, Y Y

    2010-02-01

    One hundred and fifty-eight Kadazan, Iban and Bidayuh individuals registered with the Malaysian Marrow Donor Registry were typed for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, HLA-B and HLA-DR. Six, seven and eight HLA-A alleles as well as 13, 15 and 16 HLA-B alleles were detected in the Kadazan, Bidayuh and Iban, respectively. The most common HLA-A allele in all three groups was HLA-A*24 with a frequency of 0.456, 0.490 and 0.422 in the Kadazan, Bidayuh and Iban, respectively. The most common HLA-B allele detected in the Kadazan was HLA-B*40 with a frequency of 0.333; for the Bidayuh and the Iban it was HLA-B*15 with a frequency of 0.460 and 0.275, respectively. The HLA-DR allele with the highest frequency in the Kadazan was HLA-DR*1502 with a frequency of 0.500. In the Iban and the Bidayuh, HLA-DRB1*1202 was the most common DR allele with frequencies of 0.235 and 0.310, respectively. The two most common haplotypes for the Kadazan are A*34-B*38-DR*1502 and A*24-B*40-DR*0405, whereas for the Bidayuh they are A*24-B*15-DR*1602 and A*24-B*35-DR*1202 and for the Iban they are A*34-*B15-DR*1502 and A*24-B*15-DR*1202. PMID:20196825

  13. HLA polymorphism in three indigenous populations of Sabah and Sarawak.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, J S; Shahnaz, M; Azrena, A; Irda, Y A; Salawati, M; Too, C L; Lee, Y Y

    2010-02-01

    One hundred and fifty-eight Kadazan, Iban and Bidayuh individuals registered with the Malaysian Marrow Donor Registry were typed for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, HLA-B and HLA-DR. Six, seven and eight HLA-A alleles as well as 13, 15 and 16 HLA-B alleles were detected in the Kadazan, Bidayuh and Iban, respectively. The most common HLA-A allele in all three groups was HLA-A*24 with a frequency of 0.456, 0.490 and 0.422 in the Kadazan, Bidayuh and Iban, respectively. The most common HLA-B allele detected in the Kadazan was HLA-B*40 with a frequency of 0.333; for the Bidayuh and the Iban it was HLA-B*15 with a frequency of 0.460 and 0.275, respectively. The HLA-DR allele with the highest frequency in the Kadazan was HLA-DR*1502 with a frequency of 0.500. In the Iban and the Bidayuh, HLA-DRB1*1202 was the most common DR allele with frequencies of 0.235 and 0.310, respectively. The two most common haplotypes for the Kadazan are A*34-B*38-DR*1502 and A*24-B*40-DR*0405, whereas for the Bidayuh they are A*24-B*15-DR*1602 and A*24-B*35-DR*1202 and for the Iban they are A*34-*B15-DR*1502 and A*24-B*15-DR*1202.

  14. Differentiation antigens in lymphohemopoietic tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Miyasaka, M.; Trnka, Z.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 15 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: In Situ Characterization of Human Lymphoid Cells Using Monoclonal Antibodies; Structural and Functional Aspects of HLA Clas II Genes; Cell-Surface Differentiation Antigens Expressed on Thymocytes and T Cells of the Mouse; and Differentiation Antigens on Lymphoid Cells of the Guinea Pig.

  15. HLA-related lymphocyte responsiveness in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Gross, W L; Vorwerk, I; Westphal, E; Christophers, E; Hahn, G; Schlaak, M

    1983-01-01

    In order to find associations among the genetic, immunological and environmental factors that might be important in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, the relationship between streptococcal antigen- or mitogen-induced lymphocyte responses in vitro and HLA phenotypes was studied in 23 patients with psoriasis. Patients showed an elevated lymphocyte response to somatic A-streptococcal antigens when compared with healthy controls. In contrast, the response to mitogens (PHA, Con A, PWM) was impaired in patients with psoriasis. The impaired mitogen-induced lymphocyte transformation was found mostly in psoriatics with HLA-B13/B17. The elevated cellular immune response to somatic A-streptococcal antigens, on the other hand, was observed mainly in psoriatics without HLA-B13/B17. The results indicate that gene products of the HLA region known to be associated with psoriasis are involved in the cellular immune response, as expected from clinical trials. These findings also provide further evidence of at least two different subtypes of psoriasis, characterized by genetically and immunologically defined markers.

  16. HLA disease association and protection in HIV infection among African Americans and Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Cruse, J M; Brackin, M N; Lewis, R E; Meeks, W; Nolan, R; Brackin, B

    1991-01-01

    In a previous investigation, we demonstrated an increased progression of overt AIDS in the African American population compared to the Caucasian population as reflected by the significantly lower absolute number of CD4+ lymphocytes detected in the African American population in an earlier study. The present study elucidates some of the possible genetic factors which may contribute to disease association or protection against HIV infection. The HLA phenotypes expressed as A, B, C, DR and DQw antigens were revealed by the Amos-modified typing procedure. NIH scoring was utilized to designate positive cells taking up trypan blue. A test of proportion equivalent to the chi 2 approximation was used to compare the disease population (n = 62; 38 African Americans, 24 Caucasians) to race-matched normal heterosexual local controls (323 African Americans, 412 Caucasians). Significant p values were corrected for the number of HLA antigens tested. HLA markers associated with possible protection from infection for African Americans were Cw4 and DRw6, whereas Caucasians expressed none. Disease association markers present in the African American population were A31, B35, Cw6, Cw7, DR5, DR6, DRw11, DRw12, DQw6 and DQw7, whereas in the Caucasian population A28, Aw66, Aw48, Bw65, Bw70, Cw7, DRw10, DRw12, DQw6 and DQw7 were demonstrated. The highest phenotypic frequency for a disease association marker in the study was for HLA-DR5 (62.9%) in the HIV-infected African American population without Kaposi's sarcoma compared to a frequency of 28.9% for the regional control group (p = 0.0012). We conclude that genetic factors do have a role in HIV infection since only 50-60% of those exposed to the AIDS virus will become infected. PMID:1910527

  17. HLA ligandomics identifies histone deacetylase 1 as target for ovarian cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peper, Janet Kerstin; Bösmüller, Hans-Christian; Schuster, Heiko; Gückel, Brigitte; Hörzer, Helen; Roehle, Kevin; Schäfer, Richard; Wagner, Philipp; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanović, Stefan; Fend, Falko; Staebler, Annette

    2016-01-01

    abstract The recent approval of clincially effective immune checkpoint inhibitors illustrates the potential of cancer immunotherapy. A challenging task remains the identification of specific targets guiding immunotherapy. Facilitated by technical advances, the direct identification of physiologically relevant targets is enabled by analyzing the HLA ligandome of cancer cells. Since recent publications demonstrate the immunogenicity of ovarian cancer (OvCa), immunotherapies, including peptide-based cancer vaccines, represent a promising treatment approach. To identify vaccine peptides, we employed a combined strategy of HLA ligandomics in high-grade serous OvCa samples and immunogenicity analysis. Only few proteins were naturally presented as HLA ligands on all samples analyzed, including histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 and 2. In vitro priming of CD8+ T cells demonstrated that two HDAC1/2-derived HLA ligands can induce T-cell responses, capable of killing HLA-matched tumor cells. High HDAC1 expression shown by immunohistochemistry in 136 high-grade serous OvCa patients associated with significantly reduced overall survival (OS), whereas patients with high numbers of CD3+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in the tumor epithelium and CD8+ TILs in the tumor stroma showed improved OS. However, correlating HDAC1 expression with TILs, high levels of TILs abrogated the impact of HDAC1 on OS. This study strengthens the role of HDAC1/2 as an important tumor antigen in OvCa, demonstrating its impact on OS in a large cohort of OvCa patients. We further identified two immunogenic HDAC1-derived peptides, which frequently induce multi-functional T-cell responses in many donors, suitable for future multi-peptide vaccine trials in OvCa patients. PMID:27467910

  18. HLA ligandomics identifies histone deacetylase 1 as target for ovarian cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Peper, Janet Kerstin; Bösmüller, Hans-Christian; Schuster, Heiko; Gückel, Brigitte; Hörzer, Helen; Roehle, Kevin; Schäfer, Richard; Wagner, Philipp; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanović, Stefan; Fend, Falko; Staebler, Annette

    2016-05-01

    The recent approval of clincially effective immune checkpoint inhibitors illustrates the potential of cancer immunotherapy. A challenging task remains the identification of specific targets guiding immunotherapy. Facilitated by technical advances, the direct identification of physiologically relevant targets is enabled by analyzing the HLA ligandome of cancer cells. Since recent publications demonstrate the immunogenicity of ovarian cancer (OvCa), immunotherapies, including peptide-based cancer vaccines, represent a promising treatment approach. To identify vaccine peptides, we employed a combined strategy of HLA ligandomics in high-grade serous OvCa samples and immunogenicity analysis. Only few proteins were naturally presented as HLA ligands on all samples analyzed, including histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 and 2. In vitro priming of CD8(+) T cells demonstrated that two HDAC1/2-derived HLA ligands can induce T-cell responses, capable of killing HLA-matched tumor cells. High HDAC1 expression shown by immunohistochemistry in 136 high-grade serous OvCa patients associated with significantly reduced overall survival (OS), whereas patients with high numbers of CD3(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in the tumor epithelium and CD8(+) TILs in the tumor stroma showed improved OS. However, correlating HDAC1 expression with TILs, high levels of TILs abrogated the impact of HDAC1 on OS. This study strengthens the role of HDAC1/2 as an important tumor antigen in OvCa, demonstrating its impact on OS in a large cohort of OvCa patients. We further identified two immunogenic HDAC1-derived peptides, which frequently induce multi-functional T-cell responses in many donors, suitable for future multi-peptide vaccine trials in OvCa patients.

  19. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to hepatitis C virus-derived peptides containing the HLA A2.1 binding motif.

    PubMed Central

    Cerny, A; McHutchison, J G; Pasquinelli, C; Brown, M E; Brothers, M A; Grabscheid, B; Fowler, P; Houghton, M; Chisari, F V

    1995-01-01

    The HLA class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response is a major defense mechanism in viral infections. It has been suggested that the CTL response may contribute to viral clearance and liver cell injury during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. To test this hypothesis requires an understanding of the characteristics of HCV-specific cytotoxic effector cells and identification of the target antigens to which they respond. To begin this process we stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from a group of HLA-A2 positive patients with chronic hepatitis C with a panel of 130 HCV-derived peptides containing the HLA-A2 binding motif. Effector cells were tested for their capacity to lyse HLA-A2-matched target cells that were either sensitized with peptide or infected with a vaccinia virus construct containing HCV sequences. Using this approach we have identified nine immunogenic peptides in HCV, three of which are derived from the putative core protein, three from the nonstructural (NS) 3 domain, two from NS4 and one from NS5. Selected responses were shown to be HLA-A2 restricted, mediated by CD8+ T cells and to recognize endogenously synthesized viral antigen. Unexpectedly, peptide-specific CTL responses could also be induced in sero-negative individuals, suggesting in vitro activation of naive CTL precursors. The precursor frequency of peptide-specific CTL was 10 to 100-fold higher in infected patients compared to uninfected controls, and the responses were greatly diminished by removal of CD45 RO+ (memory) T cells. Further quantitative studies are clearly required to establish whether a correlation exists between the HCV-specific CTL response and the clinical course of this disease. Definition of the molecular targets of the human CTL response to HCV creates this opportunity, and may also contribute to the development of a T cell-based HCV vaccine. PMID:7860734

  20. HLA-sharing, recurrent spontaneous abortion, and the genetic hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, P.W.

    1988-05-01

    A number of studies indicates that there is a high sharing of HLA antigens in couples having recurrent spontaneous abortions. The genetic hypothesis to explain this phenomenon suggests that this fetal loss results from homozygosity of recessive lethal or deleterius alleles in gametic disequilibrium with HLA antigens. Theory predicting the lethality rate is derived when antigens are shared at one, two or three loci, given the disequilibrium is absolute. In addition, the effects of partial disequilibrium, inbreeding, and segregation distortion on the lethal proportion are examined.

  1. The HLA-DRB1 allele polymorphisms and nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huimin; Yu, Kaihui; Zhang, Ruoheng; Li, Jiatong; Wei, Xiaomou; Zhang, Yuening; Zhang, Chengdong; Xiao, Feifan; Zhao, Dong; Lin, Xuandong; Wu, Huayu; Yang, Xiaoli

    2016-06-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1 has been reported to influence individual's susceptibility to nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) by many studies in recent years; however, these studies provided controversial results. The meta-analysis was thus conducted here to estimate the relationship between HLA-DRB1 polymorphisms and NPC. After an extensive review of journals from various databases (PubMed, the Web of Science, Embase, China National Knowledge Internet (CNKI), and Wanfang Database), 8 out of 69 case-control studies, including 778 cases and 1148 controls, were extracted. The results showed that 4 of 13 polymorphisms allele are statistically significantly associated with NPC, among them, HLA-DRB1*3, HLA-DRB1*9, and HLA-DRB1*10 may increase the risk of NPC while HLA-DRB1*01 has the opposite effect. The pooled odds ratio and 95 % confidence interval (CI) were 1.702 [95 % CI (1.047, 2.765)], 1.363 [95 % CI (1.029, 1.806)], 1.989 [95 % CI (1.042, 3.799)], and 0.461 [95 % CI (0.315, 0.676)], respectively. In a further ethnicity-based subgroup analysis, HLA-DRB1*08, HLA-DRB1*11, and HLA-DRB1*16 were found to be linked with NPC in Asian, Tunisian, and Caucasian, respectively. In Asian, HLA-DRB1*03, 08, and 10 may elevate the risk whereas HLA-DRB1*09 could lower it. In Tunisian, HLA-DRB1*01 and 11 are the protective factors while HLA-DRB1*03 is the only risk factor. In Caucasian, HLA-DRB1*01 and 03 increase the risk and HLA-DRB1*16 lowers it. The most frequent statistically associated gene is found to be HLA-DRB1*03 which has protective influence on Asian and Tunisian. In conclusion, HLA-DRB1*01, DRB1*03, DRB1*09, and DRB1*10 are related with NPC susceptibility, and the association of HLA-DRB1*08, DRB1*11, and DRB1*16 with NPC risk are significantly different in different ethnicities. PMID:27059731

  2. Molecular genetics (HLA) of Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Mizuki, N; Inoko, H; Ohno, S

    1997-12-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) has been known to be strongly associated with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) B51. This B51 association has been confirmed in many different ethnic groups between the Middle East and Japan, and it has been proposed that BD is prevalent in those ethnic groups along the old Silk Route. The hypothesis could be made that B51 molecules are primarily involved in BD development through specific antigen presentation. However, polymorphic analyses of the TNFB gene and Tau-a microsatellite between the HLA-B and TNF genes indicate that the pathogenic gene of BD is not the HLA-B51 gene itself but another gene located around the HLA-B gene. HLA-C genotyping by the PCR-SSP method also suggests that the BD pathogenic gene is not the HLA-C gene itself but other gene located near the HLA-B gene. Recently we sequenced a single contig of 236,822 bp from the MICA gene (58.2 kb centromeric of HLA-B) to 90.8 kb telomeric of HLA-C and identified 8 novel genes designated NOB1-8 (NOB: new organization associated with HLA-B). During the course of the genomic sequence analysis we clarified the genetic structure of the MICA (MHC class I chain-related gene A) gene and found a triplet repeat microsatellite polymorphism of (GCT/AGC)n in the transmebrane (TM) region. Furthermore, the microsatellite allele consisting of 6 repetitions of GCT/AGC (MICA A6 allele) was present at a significantly higher frequency in the BD patient group than in the control group and a significant fraction of B51-negative patients were positive for this MICA A6 allele. These results suggest the possibility of a primary association of BD with MICA rather than HLA-B.

  3. Is there a stronger graft-versus-leukemia effect using HLA-haploidentical donors compared with HLA-identical siblings?

    PubMed

    Ringdén, O; Labopin, M; Ciceri, F; Velardi, A; Bacigalupo, A; Arcese, W; Ghavamzadeh, A; Hamladji, R M; Schmid, C; Nagler, A; Mohty, M

    2016-02-01

    Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCTs) are increasingly used, but it is unknown whether they have a stronger graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect. We analyzed 10 679 acute leukemia patients who underwent HSCT from an HLA-matched sibling donor (MSD, n=9815) or a haploidentical donor (⩾2 HLA-antigen disparity, n=864) between 2007 and 2012, reported to the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. In a Cox regression model, acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was added as time-dependent variables. There was no difference in probability of relapse between recipients of haploidentical and MSD grafts. Factors of importance for relapse after T-cell-replete grafts included remission status at HSCT, Karnofsky score ⩽80, acute GVHD of grade II or higher and chronic GVHD (P<10(-5)). Patients with post-transplant cyclophosphamide (n=194) had similar outcome as other T-cell-replete haploidentical transplants (n=369). Non-relapse mortality was significantly higher in the haploidentical group compared with that in MSD patients (P<10(-5)). Leukemia-free survival was superior in the MSD patients receiving T-cell-replete (P<10(-5)) or T-cell-depleted grafts (P=0.0006). The risk of relapse was the same in acute leukemia patients who received haploidentical donor grafts as in those given MSD transplants, suggesting a similar GVL effect.

  4. From HLA typing to anti-HLA antibody detection and beyond: The road ahead.

    PubMed

    Picascia, Antonietta; Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Napoli, Claudio

    2016-10-01

    The complex polymorphism of the HLA genes and the need of a proper identification of anti-HLA antibodies have led to continuously develop novel practical and feasible technologies in the field of organ and tissue transplantation. Technologies to identify HLA molecules have evolved from the serological to the molecular methods and a true innovation in the DNA sequencing has taken place with the development of next generation sequencing. An interesting field to explore is how the information resulting from the HLA-DNA sequencing can be applied in the clinical setting by including the alloimmunization assessment. Indeed, a good characterization of anti-HLA antibody at epitope level can reduce the risk of immunization. Many anti-HLA antibodies are specific for epitopes rather than for HLA antigens and the knowledge of unacceptable epitopes allows to reduce the number of mismatched antigens. Furthermore, high resolution HLA allele typing could help to understand the epitopes against which antibodies are developed. However, the improvements should not only concern the diagnostic tools in the pre-transplantation phase, but also the monitoring of post transplantation outcome. There is a growing interest in developing new non-invasive biomarkers to monitor the rejection. Currently, increasing evidence has focused on miRNAs, epigenetic markers emerged as regulators of molecular events that are differently expressed in biopsies and blood as well as in urinary samples of transplanted recipients. The implementation of next generation sequencing and genome-wide expression analysis together with functional assays may provide useful tools to evaluate the epigenetic modulation in transplantation biology but many efforts are requested for translating in the clinical arena the results obtained in experimental models. PMID:27531697

  5. Low-dose Total Body Irradiation and Fludarabine Conditioning for HLA-Class I Mismatched Donor Stem Cell Transplantation and Immunological Recovery in Patients with Hematological Malignancies: A Multi-Center Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nakamae, Hirohisa; Storer, Barry E.; Storb, Rainer; Storek, Jan; Chauncey, Thomas R.; Pulsipher, Michael; Petersen, Finn B.; Wade, James C.; Maris, Michael B.; Bruno, Benedetto; Panse, Jens; Petersdorf, Effie; Woolfrey, Ann; Maloney, David G.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2009-01-01

    HLA-mismatched grafts are a viable alternative source for patients without HLA-matched donors receiving ablative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), though their use in reduced intensity or nonmyeloablative conditioning HCT has been not well established. Here we extended HCT to recipients of HLA-class I mismatched grafts to test whether nonmyeloablative conditioning can establish stable donor engraftment. Fifty-nine patients were conditioned with fludarabine 90 mg/m2 and 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) followed by immunosuppression with cyclosporine 5.0 mg/kg twice and mycophenolate mofetil 15 mg/kg three times daily for transplantation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood cells from related (n=5) or unrelated donors (n=54) with one antigen ± one allele HLA-class I mismatch or two HLA-class I allele mismatches. Sustained donor engraftment was observed in 95% of evaluable patients. The incidences of grades II to IV acute and extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease were 69% and 41%, respectively. The cumulative probability of non-relapse mortality was 47% at 2 years. Two-year overall and progression-free survivals were 29% and 28%, respectively. Nonmyeloablative conditioning with fludarabine and low-dose TBI followed by HCT using HLA-class I mismatched donors leads to successful engraftment and long-term survival; however, the high incidence of acute GVHD and NRM needs to be addressed by alternate GVHD prophylaxis regimens. PMID:19900571

  6. Co-evolution of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class I Ligands with Killer-Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptors (KIR) in a Genetically Diverse Population of Sub-Saharan Africans

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Paul J.; Hollenbach, Jill A.; Nemat-Gorgani, Neda; Guethlein, Lisbeth A.; Hilton, Hugo G.; Pando, Marcelo J.; Koram, Kwadwo A.; Riley, Eleanor M.; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Parham, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between HLA class I molecules and killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) control natural killer cell (NK) functions in immunity and reproduction. Encoded by genes on different chromosomes, these polymorphic ligands and receptors correlate highly with disease resistance and susceptibility. Although studied at low-resolution in many populations, high-resolution analysis of combinatorial diversity of HLA class I and KIR is limited to Asian and Amerindian populations with low genetic diversity. At the other end of the spectrum is the West African population investigated here: we studied 235 individuals, including 104 mother-child pairs, from the Ga-Adangbe of Ghana. This population has a rich diversity of 175 KIR variants forming 208 KIR haplotypes, and 81 HLA-A, -B and -C variants forming 190 HLA class I haplotypes. Each individual we studied has a unique compound genotype of HLA class I and KIR, forming 1–14 functional ligand-receptor interactions. Maintaining this exceptionally high polymorphism is balancing selection. The centromeric region of the KIR locus, encoding HLA-C receptors, is highly diverse whereas the telomeric region encoding Bw4-specific KIR3DL1, lacks diversity in Africans. Present in the Ga-Adangbe are high frequencies of Bw4-bearing HLA-B*53:01 and Bw4-lacking HLA-B*35:01, which otherwise are identical. Balancing selection at key residues maintains numerous HLA-B allotypes having and lacking Bw4, and also those of stronger and weaker interaction with LILRB1, a KIR-related receptor. Correspondingly, there is a balance at key residues of KIR3DL1 that modulate its level of cell-surface expression. Thus, capacity to interact with NK cells synergizes with peptide binding diversity to drive HLA-B allele frequency distribution. These features of KIR and HLA are consistent with ongoing co-evolution and selection imposed by a pathogen endemic to West Africa. Because of the prevalence of malaria in the Ga-Adangbe and previous

  7. High-Resolution Analyses of Human Leukocyte Antigens Allele and Haplotype Frequencies Based on 169,995 Volunteers from the China Bone Marrow Donor Registry Program.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Yang; Zhu, Fa-Ming; Li, Jian-Ping; Mao, Wei; Zhang, De-Mei; Liu, Meng-Li; Hei, Ai-Lian; Dai, Da-Peng; Jiang, Ping; Shan, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Bo-Wei; Zhu, Chuan-Fu; Shen, Jie; Deng, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Zheng-Lei; Yu, Wei-Jian; Chen, Qiang; Qiao, Yan-Hui; Zhu, Xiang-Ming; Lv, Rong; Li, Guo-Ying; Li, Guo-Liang; Li, Heng-Cong; Zhang, Xu; Pei, Bin; Jiao, Li-Xin; Shen, Gang; Liu, Ying; Feng, Zhi-Hui; Su, Yu-Ping; Xu, Zhao-Xia; Di, Wen-Ying; Jiang, Yao-Qin; Fu, Hong-Lei; Liu, Xiang-Jun; Liu, Xiang; Zhou, Mei-Zhen; Du, Dan; Liu, Qi; Han, Ying; Zhang, Zhi-Xin; Cai, Jian-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a widely used and effective therapy for hematopoietic malignant diseases and numerous other disorders. High-resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotype frequency distributions not only facilitate individual donor searches but also determine the probability with which a particular patient can find HLA-matched donors in a registry. The frequencies of the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DQB1 alleles and haplotypes were estimated among 169,995 Chinese volunteers using the sequencing-based typing (SBT) method. Totals of 191 HLA-A, 244 HLA-B, 146 HLA-C, 143 HLA-DRB1 and 47 HLA-DQB1 alleles were observed, which accounted for 6.98%, 7.06%, 6.46%, 9.11% and 7.91%, respectively, of the alleles in each locus in the world (IMGT 3.16 Release, Apr. 2014). Among the 100 most common haplotypes from the 169,995 individuals, nine distinct haplotypes displayed significant regionally specific distributions. Among these, three were predominant in the South China region (i.e., the 20th, 31st, and 81sthaplotypes), another three were predominant in the Southwest China region (i.e., the 68th, 79th, and 95th haplotypes), one was predominant in the South and Southwest China regions (the 18th haplotype), one was relatively common in the Northeast and North China regions (the 94th haplotype), and one was common in the Northeast, North and Northwest China (the 40th haplotype). In conclusion, this is the first to analyze high-resolution HLA diversities across the entire country of China, based on a detailed and complete data set that covered 31 provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities. Specifically, we also evaluated the HLA matching probabilities within and between geographic regions and analyzed the regional differences in the HLA diversities in China. We believe that the data presented in this study might be useful for unrelated HLA-matched donor searches, donor registry planning, population genetic studies, and anthropogenesis

  8. High-Resolution Analyses of Human Leukocyte Antigens Allele and Haplotype Frequencies Based on 169,995 Volunteers from the China Bone Marrow Donor Registry Program

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao-Yang; Zhu, Fa-Ming; Li, Jian-Ping; Mao, Wei; Zhang, De-Mei; Liu, Meng-Li; Hei, Ai-Lian; Dai, Da-Peng; Jiang, Ping; Shan, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Bo-Wei; Zhu, Chuan-Fu; Shen, Jie; Deng, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Zheng-Lei; Yu, Wei-Jian; Chen, Qiang; Qiao, Yan-Hui; Zhu, Xiang-Ming; Lv, Rong; Li, Guo-Ying; Li, Guo-Liang; Li, Heng-Cong; Zhang, Xu; Pei, Bin; Jiao, Li-Xin; Shen, Gang; Liu, Ying; Feng, Zhi-Hui; Su, Yu-Ping; Xu, Zhao-Xia; Di, Wen-Ying; Jiang, Yao-Qin; Fu, Hong-Lei; Liu, Xiang-Jun; Liu, Xiang; Zhou, Mei-Zhen; Du, Dan; Liu, Qi; Han, Ying; Zhang, Zhi-Xin; Cai, Jian-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a widely used and effective therapy for hematopoietic malignant diseases and numerous other disorders. High-resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotype frequency distributions not only facilitate individual donor searches but also determine the probability with which a particular patient can find HLA-matched donors in a registry. The frequencies of the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DQB1 alleles and haplotypes were estimated among 169,995 Chinese volunteers using the sequencing-based typing (SBT) method. Totals of 191 HLA-A, 244 HLA-B, 146 HLA-C, 143 HLA-DRB1 and 47 HLA-DQB1 alleles were observed, which accounted for 6.98%, 7.06%, 6.46%, 9.11% and 7.91%, respectively, of the alleles in each locus in the world (IMGT 3.16 Release, Apr. 2014). Among the 100 most common haplotypes from the 169,995 individuals, nine distinct haplotypes displayed significant regionally specific distributions. Among these, three were predominant in the South China region (i.e., the 20th, 31st, and 81sthaplotypes), another three were predominant in the Southwest China region (i.e., the 68th, 79th, and 95th haplotypes), one was predominant in the South and Southwest China regions (the 18th haplotype), one was relatively common in the Northeast and North China regions (the 94th haplotype), and one was common in the Northeast, North and Northwest China (the 40th haplotype). In conclusion, this is the first to analyze high-resolution HLA diversities across the entire country of China, based on a detailed and complete data set that covered 31 provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities. Specifically, we also evaluated the HLA matching probabilities within and between geographic regions and analyzed the regional differences in the HLA diversities in China. We believe that the data presented in this study might be useful for unrelated HLA-matched donor searches, donor registry planning, population genetic studies, and anthropogenesis

  9. Effect of proteasome inhibitors on expression of HLA-G isoforms.

    PubMed

    Poláková, K; Bandzuchová, E; Bystrická, M; Pancuchárová, H; Russ, G

    2006-01-01

    HLA-G primary transcript is alternatively spliced into a number of mRNAs. In addition to full length HLA-G1 protein isoform these mRNAs might also encode truncated HLA-G protein isoforms lacking one or two extracellular domains. Whereas HLA-G1 protein isoform is regularly identified, truncated HLAG protein isoforms are not detected even if all alternative spliced mRNAs are present in cells. The absence of entire domain(s) renders the truncated HLA-G protein isoforms incapable of binding peptide and beta2-microglobulin. These features of truncated HLA-G protein isoforms may result in their rapid degradation by proteasomes. Here we show that despite the presence of all alternatively spliced HLA-G transcripts in JEG-3 cells pretreated with proteasome inhibitors only a full length HLA-G1 protein isoform was regularly detected. Interestingly, immunoblot analysis showed slight increase of HLA-G1 protein in cells pretreated with proteasome inhibitors, although the expression of HLA-G1 transcript was basically not affected. Expression of HLA-G3 transcript increased in JEG-3 cells pre-incubated with LLL, however, neither HLA-G3 nor other HLA-G short protein isoform was regularly detected. In K562 transfectants proteasome inhibitor LLL greatly enhanced expression of the HLA-G1 and -G2 transcripts as well as corresponding protein isoforms. Flow cytometry analysis showed that in cells pre-treated with proteasome inhibitors cell surface expression of HLA-G1 protein decreased but the quantity of intracellularly localized HLA-G antigens increased. Altogether our results suggest that truncated HLA-G proteins isoforms are not detected in JEG-3 cells as a result of their instability and the low translation efficiency of truncated HLA-G transcripts.

  10. Association between HLA-C*04 and American cutaneous leishmaniasis in endemic region of southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ribas-Silva, R C; Ribas, A D; Ferreira, E C; Silveira, T G V; Borelli, S D

    2015-11-23

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic infectious disease with global repercussions. American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) is endemic in southern Brazil and its pathogenesis varies according to parasite species, immune response, and host genetics. In terms of immunogenetics, many host genes, including HLA (human leukocyte antigen), could be involved in susceptibility to and protection against ACL. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between HLA class I genes (HLA-A, -B, and -C) and ACL in an endemic region of southern Brazil. The allele frequencies of 186 patients diagnosed with ACL and 278 healthy individuals were compared. HLA class I (HLA-A, -B, and -C) typing was carried out by PCR-SSO using Luminex technology. The results revealed an association between the HLA-C*04 allele and the patient study group, in which it appeared more frequently than in the control group [21.5 vs 13.49% (P = 0.0016 and Pc = 0.0258; OR = 1.7560; 95%CI = 1.2227-2.5240)], thereby suggesting an increased susceptibility to ACL. Additional allelic groups such as HLA-A*02, HLA-B*35, HLA-B*45, HLA-C*01, and HLA-C*15 were also implicated; however, further investigation is necessary to confirm their association with ACL. Therefore, the results obtained in this study demonstrate the involvement of HLA class I genes in the susceptibility or resistance to ACL, with significant association between HLA-C*04 and ACL susceptibility.

  11. Natural micropolymorphism in human leukocyte antigens provides a basis for genetic control of antigen recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Archbold, Julia K.; Macdonald, Whitney A.; Gras, Stephanie; Ely, Lauren K.; Miles, John J.; Bell, Melissa J.; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Beddoe, Travis; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Clements, Craig S.; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2009-07-10

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene polymorphism plays a critical role in protective immunity, disease susceptibility, autoimmunity, and drug hypersensitivity, yet the basis of how HLA polymorphism influences T cell receptor (TCR) recognition is unclear. We examined how a natural micropolymorphism in HLA-B44, an important and large HLA allelic family, affected antigen recognition. T cell-mediated immunity to an Epstein-Barr virus determinant (EENLLDFVRF) is enhanced when HLA-B*4405 was the presenting allotype compared with HLA-B*4402 or HLA-B*4403, each of which differ by just one amino acid. The micropolymorphism in these HLA-B44 allotypes altered the mode of binding and dynamics of the bound viral epitope. The structure of the TCR-HLA-B*4405EENLLDFVRF complex revealed that peptide flexibility was a critical parameter in enabling preferential engagement with HLA-B*4405 in comparison to HLA-B*4402/03. Accordingly, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism can alter the dynamics of the peptide-MHC landscape, resulting in fine-tuning of T cell responses between closely related allotypes.

  12. Efficacy of induction therapy with ATG and intravenous immunoglobulins in patients with low-level donor-specific HLA-antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bächler, K; Amico, P; Hönger, G; Bielmann, D; Hopfer, H; Mihatsch, M J; Steiger, J; Schaub, S

    2010-05-01

    Low-level donor-specific HLA-antibodies (HLA-DSA) (i.e. detectable by single-antigen flow beads, but negative by complement-dependent cytotoxicity crossmatch) represent a risk factor for early allograft rejection. The short-term efficacy of an induction regimen consisting of polyclonal anti-T-lymphocyte globulin (ATG) and intravenous immunoglobulins (IvIg) in patients with low-level HLA-DSA is unknown. In this study, we compared 67 patients with low-level HLA-DSA not having received ATG/IvIg induction (historic control) with 37 patients, who received ATG/IvIg induction. The two groups were equal regarding retransplants, HLA-matches, number and class of HLA-DSA. The overall incidence of clinical/subclinical antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) was lower in the ATG/IvIg than in the historic control group (38% vs. 55%; p = 0.03). This was driven by a significantly lower rate of clinical AMR (11% vs. 46%; p = 0.0002). Clinical T-cell-mediated rejection (TCR) was significantly lower in the ATG/IvIg than in the historic control group (0% vs. 50%; p < 0.0001). Within the first year, allograft loss due to AMR occurred in 7.5% in the historic control and in 0% in the ATG/IvIg group. We conclude that in patients with low-level HLA-DSA, ATG/IvIg induction significantly reduces TCR and the severity of AMR, but the high rate of subclinical AMR suggests an insufficient control of the humoral immune response.

  13. Association of HLA-G Low Expressor Genotype with Severe Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease after Sibling Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Boukouaci, Wahid; Busson, Marc; Fortier, Catherine; Amokrane, Kahina; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Robin, Marie; Krishnamoorthy, Rajagopal; Toubert, Antoine; Charron, Dominique; Socié, Gérard; Tamouza, Ryad

    2011-01-01

    Background: Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) molecules play a prominent role in immune tolerance. Structurally similar to their classical HLA homologs, they are distinct by having high rate of polymorphism in the non-coding regions including a functionally relevant 14-base pair (bp) insertion/deletion (Ins/Del) allele in the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR), rarely examined in a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) setting. Here, we analyzed the potential impact of HLA-G Ins/Del dimorphism on the incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD), transplant-related mortality (TRM), overall survival (OS), and incidence of relapse after HSCT using bone marrow (BM) as stem cell source from HLA-matched donors. Methods: One hundred fifty-seven sibling pairs, who had undergone HSCT, were studied for the distribution of the HLA-G 14 bp Ins/Del polymorphism using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based technique. Potential genetic association with the incidence of aGvHD, TRM, and OS was analyzed by monovariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Monovariate analysis showed that the homozygous state for the 14-bp Ins allele is a risk factor for severe aGvHD (grade III and IV; P = 0.008), confirmed subsequently by multivariate analysis [hazard ratio (HR) = 3.5; 95% confidence interval (95%CI) = 1.3–9.5; P = 0.012]. We did not find any association between HLA-G polymorphism and the other studied complications. Conclusion: Our data suggest that the HLA-G low expressor 14 bp Ins allele constitutes a risk factor for the incidence of severe aGvHD in patients who received BM as stem cell source. PMID:22566863

  14. HLA-B15: a widespread and diverse family of HLA-B alleles.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, W H; Domena, J D; Shen, S Y; Lau, M; Terasaki, P I; Bunce, M; Marsh, S G; Guttridge, M G; Bias, W B; Parham, P

    1994-04-01

    HLA-B15 embraces a multiplicity of antigenic specificities which vary in their distribution amongst human populations. To correlate B15 molecular structure with the serological picture we have sequenced alleles encoding the various subspecificities of the B15 antigen: B62, B63, B75, B76 and B77, and a number of "variants" of these antigens including the 8w66 split of B63. HLA-B63 (B*1517) and 8w66 (B*1516) heavy chains have sequence identity to B17 in the alpha 1 helix correlating with the antigenic crossreactivity of these molecules. HLA-B77(B*1513) and B75 (B*1502) heavy chains differ solely in segments determining the Bw4 and Bw6 public epitopes, consistent with the serological description of the B77 and B75 antigens. One allele encoding the B76 antigen (B*1512) appears to be the product of gene conversion between the HLA-A and -B loci and differs from B*1501 in codons 166 and 167. In contrast, a second allele encoding the B76 antigen (B*1514) differs from B*1501 by an unrelated substitution in codon 167 which confers similarily with B45, an antigen crossreactive with B76. A third allele encoding B76, B*1519, differs from B*1512 by a unique point substitution in exon 4. Three alleles encoding variant B15 and B62 antigens (B*1508, B*1511 and B*1515) differ from B*1501 by localized clusters of substitutions that probably result from interallelic conversion. The B15 sequences described in this paper, in combination with those previously determined, define a family of 22 alleles, including those encoding the B46 and B70 antigens. Within this family the patterns of allelic substitution are analogous to those of other HLA-A and -B families, in that pairwise differences almost always involve functional positions of the antigen recognition site and recombination is the major agent of diversification.

  15. The alpha1 domain of HLA-G1 and HLA-G2 inhibits cytotoxicity induced by natural killer cells: is HLA-G the public ligand for natural killer cell inhibitory receptors?

    PubMed

    Rouas-Freiss, N; Marchal, R E; Kirszenbaum, M; Dausset, J; Carosella, E D

    1997-05-13

    We have investigated the protective role of the membrane-bound HLA-G1 and HLA-G2 isoforms against natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity. For this purpose, HLA-G1 and HLA-G2 cDNAs were transfected into the HLA class I-negative human K562 cell line, a known reference target for NK lysis. The HLA-G1 protein, encoded by a full-length mRNA, presents a structure similar to that of classical HLA class I antigens. The HLA-G2 protein, deduced from an alternatively spliced transcript, consists of the alpha1 domain linked to the alpha3 domain. In this study we demonstrate that (i) HLA-G2 is present at the cell surface as a truncated class I molecule associated with beta2-microglobulin; (ii) NK cytolysis, observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in polyclonal CD3(-) CD16(+) CD56(+) NK cells obtained from 20 donors, is inhibited by both HLA-G1 and HLA-G2; this HLA-G-mediated inhibition is reversed by blocking HLA-G with a specific mAb; this led us to the conjecture that HLA-G is the public ligand for NK inhibitory receptors (NKIR) present in all individuals; (iii) the alpha1 domain common to HLA-G1 and HLA-G2 could mediate this protection from NK lysis; and (iv) when transfected into the K562 cell line, both HLA-G1 and HLA-G2 abolish lysis by the T cell leukemia NK-like YT2C2 clone due to interaction between the HLA-G isoform on the target cell surface and a membrane receptor on YT2C2. Because NKIR1 and NKIR2, known to interact with HLA-G, were undetectable on YT2C2, we conclude that a yet-unknown specific receptor for HLA-G1 and HLA-G2 is present on these cells.

  16. Isolation of human CD4/CD8 double-positive, graft-versus-host disease-protective, minor histocompatibility antigen-specific regulatory T cells and of a novel HLA-DR7-restricted HY-specific CD4 clone.

    PubMed

    Eljaafari, Assia; Yuruker, Ozel; Ferrand, Christophe; Farre, Annie; Addey, Caroline; Tartelin, Marie-Laure; Thomas, Xavier; Tiberghien, Pierre; Simpson, Elizabeth; Rigal, Dominique; Scott, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Minor histocompatibility (H) Ags are classically described as self-peptides derived from intracellular proteins that are expressed at the cell surface by MHC class I and class II molecules and that induce T cell alloresponses. We have isolated three different T cell populations from a skin biopsy of a patient suffering from acute graft-versus-host disease following sex-mismatched HLA-identical bone marrow transplantation. The first population was: 1) CD4(+)/CD8(+) double-positive; 2) specific for an HLA class I-restricted autosomal Ag; 3) expressed a Tr1 profile with high levels of IL-10, but low IL-2 and IFN-γ; and 4) exerted regulatory function in the presence of recipient APCs. The second was CD8 positive, specific for an HLA class I-restricted autosomally encoded minor H Ag, but was only weakly cytotoxic. The third was CD4 single positive, specific for an HLA-DR7-restricted HY epitope and exerted both proliferative and cytotoxic functions. Identification of the peptide recognized by these latter cells revealed a new human HY epitope, TGKIINFIKFDTGNL, encoded by RPS4Y and restricted by HLA-DR7. In this paper, we show human CD4/CD8 double-positive, acute graft-versus-host disease-protective, minor H Ag-specific regulatory T cells and identify a novel HLA-DR7/ HY T cell epitope, encoded by RPS4Y, a potential new therapeutic target.

  17. Soluble monomers, dimers and HLA-G-expressing extracellular vesicles: the three dimensions of structural complexity to use HLA-G as a clinical biomarker.

    PubMed

    Nardi, F da Silva; König, L; Wagner, B; Giebel, B; Santos Manvailer, L F; Rebmann, V

    2016-09-01

    The HLA-G molecule belongs to the family of nonclassical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I. At variance to classical HLA class I, HLA-G displays (i) a low number of nucleotide variations within the coding region, (ii) a high structural diversity, (iii) a restricted peptide repertoire, (iv) a limited tissue distribution and (v) strong immune-suppressive properties. The physiological HLA-G surface expression is restricted to the maternal-fetal interface and to immune-privileged adult tissues. Soluble forms of HLA-G (sHLA-G) are detectable in various body fluids. Cellular activation and pathological processes are associated with an aberrant or a neo-expression of HLA-G/sHLA-G. Functionally, HLA-G and its secreted forms are considered to be key players in the induction of short- and long-term tolerance. Thus, its unique expression profile and tolerance-inducing functions render HLA-G/sHLA-G an attractive biomarker to monitor the systemic health/disease status and disease activity/progression for clinical approaches in disease management and treatments. Here, we place emphasis on (i) the current status of the tolerance-inducing functions by HLA-G/sHLA-G, (ii) the current complexity to implement this molecule as a meaningful clinical biomarker regarding the three dimensions of structural diversity (monomers, dimers and HLA-G-expressing extracellular vesicles) with its functional implications, and (iii) novel and future approaches to detect and quantify sHLA-G structures and functions.

  18. Detection of 549 new HLA alleles in potential stem cell donors from the United States, Poland and Germany.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Frederick, C J; Cereb, N; Giani, A S; Ruppel, J; Maraszek, A; Pingel, J; Sauter, J; Schmidt, A H; Yang, S Y

    2016-01-01

    We characterized 549 new human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II alleles found in newly registered stem cell donors as a result of high-throughput HLA typing. New alleles include 101 HLA-A, 132 HLA-B, 105 HLA-C, 2 HLA-DRB1, 89 HLA-DQB1 and 120 HLA-DPB1 alleles. Mainly, new alleles comprised single nucleotide variations when compared with homologous sequences. We identified nonsynonymous nucleotide mutations in 70.7% of all new alleles, synonymous variations in 26.4% and nonsense substitutions in 2.9% (null alleles). Some new alleles (55, 10.0%) were found multiple times, HLA-DPB1 alleles being the most frequent among these. Furthermore, as several new alleles were identified in individuals from ethnic minority groups, the relevance of recruiting donors belonging to such groups and the importance of ethnicity data collection in donor centers and registries is highlighted.

  19. Association of high CD4-positive T cell infiltration with mutations in HLA class II-regulatory genes in microsatellite-unstable colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Surmann, Eva-Maria; Voigt, Anita Y; Michel, Sara; Bauer, Kathrin; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Ferrone, Soldano; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Kloor, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    Besides being expressed on professional antigen-presenting cells, HLA class II antigens are expressed on various tumors of non-lymphoid origin, including a subset of colorectal cancers (CRC). Information about the regulation of HLA class II antigen expression is important for a better understanding of their role in the interactions between tumor and immune cells. Whether lack of HLA class II antigen expression in tumors reflects the selective immune destruction of HLA class II antigen-expressing tumor cells is unknown. To address this question, we tested whether lack of HLA class II antigen expression in CRC was associated with immune cell infiltration. We selected microsatellite-unstable (MSI-H) CRC, because they show pronounced tumor antigen-specific immune responses and, in a subset of tumors, lack of HLA class II antigen expression due to mutations inactivating HLA class II-regulatory genes. We examined HLA class II antigen expression, mutations in regulatory genes, and CD4-positive T cell infiltration in 69 MSI-H CRC lesions. Mutations in RFX5, CIITA, and RFXAP were found in 13 (28.9%), 3 (6.7%), and 1 (2.2%) out of 45 HLA class II antigen-negative tumors. CD4-positive tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte counts were significantly higher in HLA class II antigen-negative tumors harboring mutations in HLA class II-regulatory genes (107.4 T cells per 0.25 mm(2)) compared to tumors without mutations (55.5 T cells per 0.25 mm(2), p = 0.008). Our results suggest that the outgrowth of tumor cells lacking HLA class II antigen expression due to mutations of regulatory genes is favored in an environment of dense CD4-positive T cell infiltration.

  20. Complete sequence of HLA-B27 cDNA identified through the characterization of structural markers unique to the HLA-A, -B, and -C allelic series

    SciTech Connect

    Szoets, H.; Reithmueller, G.; Weiss, E.; Meo, T.

    1986-03-01

    Antigen HLA-B27 is a high-risk genetic factor with respect to a group of rheumatoid disorders, especially ankylosing spondylitis. A cDNA library was constructed from an autozygous B-cell line expressing HLA-B27, HLA-Cw1, and the previously cloned HLA-A2 antigen. Clones detected with an HLA probe were isolated and sorted into homology groups by differential hybridization and restriction maps. Nucleotide sequencing allowed the unambiguous assignment of cDNAs to HLA-A, -B, and -C loci. The HLA-B27 mRNA has the structure features and the codon variability typical of an HLA class I transcript but it specifies two uncommon amino acid replacements: a cysteine in position 67 and a serine in position 131. The latter substitution may have functional consequences, because it occurs in a conserved region and at a position invariably occupied by a species-specific arginine in humans and lysine in mice. The availability of the complete sequence of HLA-B27 and of the partial sequence of HLA-Cw1 allows the recognition of locus-specific sequence markers, particularly, but not exclusively, in the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains.

  1. The distribution of KIR-HLA functional blocks is different from north to south of Italy.

    PubMed

    Fasano, M E; Rendine, S; Pasi, A; Bontadini, A; Cosentini, E; Carcassi, C; Capittini, C; Cornacchini, G; Espadas de Arias, A; Garbarino, L; Carella, G; Mariotti, M L; Mele, L; Miotti, V; Moscetti, A; Nesci, S; Ozzella, G; Piancatelli, D; Porfirio, B; Riva, M R; Romeo, G; Tagliaferri, C; Lombardo, C; Testi, M; Amoroso, A; Martinetti, M

    2014-03-01

    The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR)-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) interaction represents an example of genetic epistasis, where the concomitant presence of specific genes or alleles encoding receptor-ligand units is necessary for the activity of natural killer (NK) cells. Although KIR and HLA genes segregate independently, they co-evolved under environmental pressures to maintain particular KIR-HLA functional blocks for species survival. We investigated, in 270 Italian healthy individuals, the distribution of KIR and HLA polymorphisms in three climatic areas (from cold north to warm south), to verify their possible geographical stratification. We analyzed the presence of 13 KIR genes and genotyped KIR ligands belonging to HLA class I: HLA-C, HLA-B and HLA-A. We did not observe any genetic stratification for KIR genes and HLA-C ligands in Italy. By contrast, in a north-to-south direction, we found a decreasing trend for the HLA-A3 and HLA-A11 ligands (P = 0.012) and an increasing trend for the HLA-B ligands carrying the Bw4 epitope (P = 0.0003) and the Bw4 Ile80 epitope (P = 0.0005). The HLA-A and HLA-B KIR ligands were in negative linkage disequilibrium (correlation coefficient -0.1211), possibly as a consequence of their similar function in inhibiting NK cells. The distribution of the KIR-HLA functional blocks was different along Italy, as we observed a north-to-south ascending trend for KIR3DL1, when coupled with HLA-B Bw4 ligands (P = 0.0067) and with HLA-B Bw4 Ile80 (P = 0.0027), and a descending trend for KIR3DL2 when coupled with HLA-A3 and HLA-A11 ligands (P = 0.0044). Overall, people from South Italy preferentially use the KIR3DL1-HLA-B Bw4 functional unit, while those from the North Italy equally use both the KIR3DL2-HLA-A3/A11 and the KIR3DL1-HLA-B Bw4 functional units to fight infections. Thus, only KIR3DL receptors, which exert the unique role of microbial sensors through the specific D0 domain, and their cognate

  2. 5' and 3' untranslated regions contribute to the differential expression of specific HLA-A alleles.

    PubMed

    René, Céline; Lozano, Claire; Villalba, Martin; Eliaou, Jean-François

    2015-12-01

    In hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), when no HLA full-matched donor is available, alternative donors could include one HLA-mismatched donor. Recently, the low expressed HLA-C alleles have been identified as permissive mismatches for the best donor choice. Concerning HLA-A, the degree of variability of expression is poorly understood. Here, we evaluated HLA-A expression in healthy individuals carrying HLA-A*02 allele in different genotypes using flow cytometry and allele-specific quantitative RT-PCR. While an interindividual variability of HLA-A*02 cell surface expression, not due to the allele associated, was observed, no difference of the mRNA expression level was shown, suggesting the involvement of the posttranscriptional regulation. The results of qRT-PCR analyses exhibit a differential expression of HLA-A alleles with HLA-A*02 as the strongest expressed allele independently of the second allele. The associated non-HLA-A*02 alleles were differentially expressed, particularly the HLA-A*31 and HLA-A*33 alleles (strong expression) and the HLA-A*29 (low expression). The presence of specific polymorphisms in the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the HLA-A*31 and HLA-A*33 alleles could contribute to this high level of expression. As previously described for HLA-C, low-expressed HLA-A alleles, such as HLA-A*29, could be considered as a permissive mismatch, although this needs to be confirmed by clinical studies.

  3. Specific lysis of murine cells expressing HLA molecules by allospecific human and murine H-2-restricted anti-HLA T killer lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Achour, A; Begue, B; Gomard, E; Paul, P; Sayagh, B; Van Pel, A; Levy, J P

    1986-06-01

    The lysis by human and murine anti-HLA cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) of murine cells expressing class I HLA molecule after gene transfection has been studied using two different murine cells: LMTK- and P815-HTR-TK-. Weak but significant HLA-A11-specific lysis was found occasionally with human CTL on the HLA-A11+ L cells. On the contrary, P815-A11 or P815-A2 cells were lysed strongly and specifically by HLA-A11 or HLA-A2-specific human CTL. The T8+T4- phenotype of the effector cells was confirmed and the reaction was inhibited by anti-HLA class I monoclonal antibodies. Despite their higher sensitivity to human CTL, the P815-HLA+ cells did not express higher levels of HLA antigens than L cells, and the presence or the absence of human beta 2 microglobulin was irrelevant. Anti-human LFA-1 antibodies abrogated the lysis of P815-A11+ cells showing that the LFA-1 receptor which is apparently lacking on the L cell surface was on the contrary expressed on P815 cells. On the other hand, murine anti-HLA CTL have been prepared by immunizing mice against syngeneic HLA-A11+ L cells. They lysed very efficiently and specifically these cells, but appeared completely devoid of activity against human HLA-A11 target cells. This barrier was apparently due to the H-2 restriction of these H-2k anti-HLA murine CTL, as shown by their inability to lyse allogeneic H-2d cells expressing HLA-A11, and by the blocking of their activity by anti H-2k antibodies. By contrast, xenogeneic anti-HLA CTL obtained by immunizing murine lymphocytes against human cells lysed both human and murine HLA+ cells but they reacted with a monomorphic epitope of the HLA molecule in a nonrestricted way. These results show that human cells lyse very efficiently P815 murine cells expressing HLA class I antigens; the higher sensitivity of P815 cells compared to L cells is probably due to the presence of a LFA-1 receptor on these cells; a class I molecule of human origin can be seen as an H-2-restricted minor

  4. Utility of HLA Antibody Testing in Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Konvalinka, Ana

    2015-01-01

    HLA antigens are polymorphic proteins expressed on donor kidney allograft endothelium and are critical targets for recipient immune recognition. HLA antibodies are risk factors for acute and chronic rejection and allograft loss. Solid-phase immunoassays for HLA antibody detection represent a major advance in sensitivity and specificity over cell-based methods and are widely used in organ allocation and pretransplant risk assessment. Post-transplant, development of de novo donor–specific HLA antibodies and/or increase in donor-specific antibodies from pretransplant levels are associated with adverse outcomes. Although single antigen bead assays have allowed sensitive detection of recipient HLA antibodies and their specificities, a number of interpretive considerations must be appreciated to understand test results in clinical and research contexts. This review, which is especially relevant for clinicians caring for transplant patients, discusses the technical aspects of single antigen bead assays, emphasizes their quantitative limitations, and explores the utility of HLA antibody testing in identifying and managing important pre- and post-transplant clinical outcomes. PMID:25804279

  5. The Relevance of HLA Sequencing in Population Genetics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) is currently being adapted by different biotechnological platforms to the standard typing method for HLA polymorphism, the huge diversity of which makes this initiative particularly challenging. Boosting the molecular characterization of the HLA genes through efficient, rapid, and low-cost technologies is expected to amplify the success of tissue transplantation by enabling us to find donor-recipient matching for rare phenotypes. But the application of NGS technologies to the molecular mapping of the MHC region also anticipates essential changes in population genetic studies. Huge amounts of HLA sequence data will be available in the next years for different populations, with the potential to change our understanding of HLA variation in humans. In this review, we first explain how HLA sequencing allows a better assessment of the HLA diversity in human populations, taking also into account the methodological difficulties it introduces at the statistical level; secondly, we show how analyzing HLA sequence variation may improve our comprehension of population genetic relationships by facilitating the identification of demographic events that marked human evolution; finally, we discuss the interest of both HLA and genome-wide sequencing and genotyping in detecting functionally significant SNPs in the MHC region, the latter having also contributed to the makeup of the HLA molecular diversity observed today. PMID:25126587

  6. The role of HLA antibodies in allogeneic SCT: is the 'type-and-screen' strategy necessary not only for blood type but also for HLA?

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, S; Taniguchi, K; Ogawa, H; Saji, H

    2012-12-01

    The role of HLA antibodies in SCT has drawn increasing attention because of the significantly increased number of patients who receive HLA-mismatched SCT, including cord blood transplantation, haploidentical SCT and unrelated SCT. Technical advancements in the methods of HLA Ab testing have realized rapid, accurate and objective identification, as well as quantification of specific HLA antibodies. Recent clinical studies have suggested that the presence of donor-specific HLA antibodies (DSA) in patients is associated with graft failure in HLA-mismatched SCT when the above-listed stem cell sources are used and results in different impacts. Of note, most of the 'HLA-matched' unrelated SCT actually involve HLA mismatches in HLA-DP and the presence of antibodies against this locus has been reported to be associated with graft failure. Thus, HLA Ab should be examined as a work-up for all patients who undergo SCT from 'alternative donors.' The simplest route for preventing HLA Ab-mediated graft failure in Ab-positive patients is to avoid donors who possess the target Ag of HLA antibodies. If SCT from such donors must be performed, treatment for DSA before SCT may improve the chances of successful donor engraftment.

  7. A serological study of the HLA-B17 cross-reactive group.

    PubMed

    Darke, C

    1984-03-01

    The HLA-B17 cross-reactive group and the participation of the subdivisions of B17 ( Bw57 and Bw58 ) in cross-reactivity were investigated by the serological analysis of 81 cytotoxic HLA antisera (produced by pregnancy alone), the HLA typing of the antiserum donors and the identification of their immunizing antigens. The sera, all of which contained B17 activity, were produced in response to one of 10 HLA antigens (A2, Bw44, Bw49, Bw51, Bw55 , Bw56 , Bw57 , Bw58 , Bw62 and Bw63 ). Antisera stimulated by Bw57 and Bw58 cross-reacted with Bw49 and both subdivisions of B5 and B15, with bidirectional cross-reactivity occurring in many instances. Bidirectional cross-reactivity was also observed between Bw57 and A2 (an A2 stimulated antiserum also reacted with Bw58 ), and Bw57 and Bw55 . Immunization by Bw62 produced some antisera which showed strong cross-reactivity with Bw57 but no reactivity with Bw58 . Significant HLA-B antigen frequency disturbances were found in the responders to the B17 cross-reactive group antigens. Twenty-five HLA antigens were found to comprise the B17 cross-reactive group and its related cross-reactions. The multideterminant nature of the HLA antigens is again emphasized by these findings.

  8. HLA-B27 and pathogenesis of spondyloarthropathies.

    PubMed

    Turner, Matthew J; Colbert, Robert A

    2002-07-01

    Although the influence of HLA-B27 on the development of spondyloarthropathies is undisputed, its role in pathogenesis remains unclear. New ideas have focused on abnormal characteristics of HLA-B27 resulting from aberrant folding, disulfide bond formation, or both, rather than a predilection for selecting arthritogenic peptides. This reflects, in part, unanswered questions about whether immunologic recognition of HLA-B27 is required for disease. Recent studies suggest that CD4+ T cells, immunomodulatory killer cell Ig receptors, and Ig-like transcript receptors may recognize aberrant forms of HLA-B27. Other reports suggest that HLA-B27 expression can alter cytokine production from monocytes and T cells-effects that appear unrelated to antigen presentation. Novel bioinformatics approaches have led to the identification of HLA-B27-restricted pathogen-derived peptides and may prove useful in determining whether HLA-B27 presents arthritogenic peptides. Elucidating the role of HLA-B27 in the pathogenesis of these conditions will require an integration of information from animal models, genome-wide screens for susceptibility alleles, and translational studies using human samples.

  9. New Developments in HLA-G in Cardiac Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lazarte, Julieta; Tumiati, Laura C; Rao, Vivek; Delgado, Diego H

    2016-09-01

    Human Leukocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) is a non-classical class 1b protein, whose gene is located on chromosome 6 (6p21.31). HLA-G inhibits the immune cells' cytotoxic activity by interacting with specific receptors on their membranes. Since it is a naturally occurring immune modulator, HLA-G has been investigated in transplantation. Indeed, a number of investigations reveal that HLA-G expression is influenced by genetic polymorphisms and in turn, those polymorphisms are associated with detrimental or beneficial outcomes in various pathological situations. The present review introduces the HLA-G molecule, the gene and its polymorphisms. It focuses on the expression of HLA-G and the role of polymorphisms primarily in heart transplant outcomes, secondarily in other transplant organs, as well as the role of the allograft and effect of medical therapy. We discuss the limitations in HLA-G transplant investigations and future directions. The immune inhibiting activity of HLA-G has a great deal of potential for its utilization in enhancing diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic strategies against rejection in the setting of transplantation.

  10. HLA-B67 may be a male-specific HLA marker of susceptibility to relapsed childhood ALL in Hong Kong Chinese and HLA-A33 or HLA-B17 signifies a higher presentation leukocytosis: A retrospective analysis on 53 transplant candidates (1989-2003).

    PubMed

    Ng, Margaret H L; Lau, K M; Hawkins, B R; Chik, K W; Chan, Natalie P H; Wong, W S; Tsang, K S; Shing, Matthew M K; Li, C K

    2006-08-01

    We performed a retrospective analysis on the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) data of 53 consecutive Chinese patients with high-risk childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) diagnosed from 1989 to 2003. A significantly higher frequency of HLA-B67 in the male relapse group of patients [OR, 23.08; 95% CI, 5.31-100.36; p = 0.0042; for statistical significance after Bonferroni correction (Bc) p (Bc) < 0.0083] was identified after Bonferroni correction. Although not surviving the Bonferroni correction, gender effects on the association were also observed with HLA-A11, HLA-A32, HLA-A33, and HLA-B22, which were however more prevalent in the female patients and particularly those developing relapse. Two patients with HLA-A29 and HLA-B7 revealed significantly shortened survivals, suggestive of their potential prognostic impacts. Notably, for the first time, we found a significant correlation of leukocyte count with HLA types, where HLA-A33 (p = 0.006) or HLA-B17 (p < 0.001) signifies higher leukocytosis at presentation. Taken together, our findings support the involvement of HLA in Chinese high-risk childhood ALL.

  11. Class I gene contraction within the HLA-A subregion of the human MHC

    SciTech Connect

    Venditti, C.P.; Chorney, M.J. )

    1992-12-01

    Individuals expressing either the HLA-A24 or the HLA-A23 histocompatibility antigens have been found to possess an HLA-A class I subregion approximately 50 kb smaller in size than those studied from individuals expressing other HLA-A haplotypes. This originally manifested itself as a haplotype-associated size variation in the NotI and MluI megabase fragments observed on pulsed-field electrophoresis gels after blotting and probing with HLA-A subregion-specific genomic probes. The contracted region falls between the HLA-A and the HLA-G class I genes and specifically includes the novel HLA-A-related pseudogene, HLA-H, as well as the adjacent deteriorated class I pseudogene, 7.0 p. The intactness of locus D6S128, defined by probe pMC6.7 located telomeric to the HLA-H gene, demonstrates that the distal rearrangement point falls within a 20-kb stretch of DNA separating HLA-H from pMC6.7. This extends a previous report regarding variation in class I gene number within the human major histocompatibility complex and precisely localizes the genomic residence of sequences that may define a recombination hot spot. Because the size variation maps to a recombinogenic area, its characterization may ultimately reveal important biological information relevant to the events that shaped the organization of the human HLA class I multigene family. 54 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Analysis of HLA class I expression in different metastases from two melanoma patients undergoing peptide immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mendez, R; Serrano, A; Jäger, E; Maleno, I; Ruiz-Cabello, F; Knuth, A; Garrido, F

    2001-06-01

    We characterized the HLA class I alterations in five metastases obtained from two patients with melanoma immunized with Melan A/MART-1, tyrosinase and gp100 tumor peptides. All three metastases analyzed in the first patient (NW145) showed a similar HLA class I alteration with a dual population of melanoma cells. One population was HLA class I antigen positive and the other had loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the short arm of chromosome 6 leading to an HLA haplotype loss (A02011, B4007, Cw1). The absence of HLA-A2 antigen may explain why this patient did not develop HLA-A2 restricted, Melan A/MART-1 specificity immunization, since this HLA molecule is the restriction element for the tumor peptides used. However, this HLA-deficient population was not selected after peptide immunotherapy. The primary tumor in this patient presented LOH in region 6q, but only in the vertical growth phase of the lesion, whereas LOH at 6p was observed only in DNA from metastatic material. The second patient (NW16) also presented two metastatic lesions with an identical HLA molecular defect, i.e. HLA B locus downregulation (HLA B51011: serological B51; B1503: serological B70). One lesion expressed the tumor antigen (Melan A/ MART-1), but the other did not. Interestingly, the antigen-positive metastasis regressed after peptide immunotherapy, whereas the other progressed rapidly. These findings provide the first indication that multiple metastases generated in the same host can have identically altered HLA class I phenotypes.

  13. Clinical value of non-HLA antibodies in kidney transplantation: Still an enigma?

    PubMed

    Michielsen, Laura A; van Zuilen, Arjan D; Krebber, Merle M; Verhaar, Marianne C; Otten, Henny G

    2016-10-01

    HLA antibodies play a major role in the recipient's immune response against the renal allograft and are an established risk factor for antibody-mediated rejection and subsequent impaired graft survival. Evidence originating from HLA-identical donor-recipient pairs indicates that non-HLA antibodies may play a role as well. Numerous non-HLA antibodies have been identified in renal organ transplantation, directed against a heterogeneous subset of both allo- and autoantigens including MHC Class-I-related chain A (MICA) and Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). In this review, we will discuss the mechanisms predisposing to non-HLA antibody formation, the possible synergy with HLA-antibodies in their pathologic potential and the mechanisms involved in allograft damage. Furthermore, an overview of the identified non-HLA antibodies and antigens and their relation with rejection and graft survival will be provided. PMID:27395083

  14. Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine Strains Elicit a Greater Innate Immune Response than Antigenically-Matched Seasonal Influenza Viruses during Infection of Human Nasal Epithelial Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, William A.; Brighton, Missy; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses are global pathogens that infect approximately 10–20% of the world’s population each year. Vaccines, including the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), are the best defense against influenza infections. The LAIV is a novel vaccine that actively replicates in the human nasal epithelium and elicits both mucosal and systemic protective immune responses. The differences in replication and innate immune responses following infection of human nasal epithelium with influenza seasonal wild type (WT) and LAIV viruses remain unknown. Using a model of primary differentiated human nasal epithelial cell (hNECs) cultures, we compared influenza WT and antigenically-matched cold adapted (CA) LAIV virus replication and the subsequent innate immune response including host cellular pattern recognition protein expression, host innate immune gene expression, secreted pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and intracellular viral RNA levels. Growth curves comparing virus replication between WT and LAIV strains revealed significantly less infectious virus production during LAIV compared with WT infection. Despite this disparity in infectious virus production the LAIV strains elicited a more robust innate immune response with increased expression of RIG-I, TLR-3, IFNβ, STAT-1, IRF-7, MxA, and IP-10. There were no differences in cytotoxicity between hNEC cultures infected with WT and LAIV strains as measured by basolateral levels of LDH. Elevated levels of intracellular viral RNA during LAIV as compared with WT virus infection of hNEC cultures at 33°C may explain the augmented innate immune response via the up-regulation of pattern recognition receptors and down-stream type I IFN expression. Taken together our results suggest that the decreased replication of LAIV strains in human nasal epithelial cells is associated with a robust innate immune response that differs from infection with seasonal influenza viruses, limits LAIV shedding and plays a role in the

  15. Live attenuated influenza vaccine strains elicit a greater innate immune response than antigenically-matched seasonal influenza viruses during infection of human nasal epithelial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Fischer, William A; Chason, Kelly D; Brighton, Missy; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-03-26

    Influenza viruses are global pathogens that infect approximately 10-20% of the world's population each year. Vaccines, including the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), are the best defense against influenza infections. The LAIV is a novel vaccine that actively replicates in the human nasal epithelium and elicits both mucosal and systemic protective immune responses. The differences in replication and innate immune responses following infection of human nasal epithelium with influenza seasonal wild type (WT) and LAIV viruses remain unknown. Using a model of primary differentiated human nasal epithelial cell (hNECs) cultures, we compared influenza WT and antigenically-matched cold adapted (CA) LAIV virus replication and the subsequent innate immune response including host cellular pattern recognition protein expression, host innate immune gene expression, secreted pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and intracellular viral RNA levels. Growth curves comparing virus replication between WT and LAIV strains revealed significantly less infectious virus production during LAIV compared with WT infection. Despite this disparity in infectious virus production the LAIV strains elicited a more robust innate immune response with increased expression of RIG-I, TLR-3, IFNβ, STAT-1, IRF-7, MxA, and IP-10. There were no differences in cytotoxicity between hNEC cultures infected with WT and LAIV strains as measured by basolateral levels of LDH. Elevated levels of intracellular viral RNA during LAIV as compared with WT virus infection of hNEC cultures at 33°C may explain the augmented innate immune response via the up-regulation of pattern recognition receptors and down-stream type I IFN expression. Taken together our results suggest that the decreased replication of LAIV strains in human nasal epithelial cells is associated with a robust innate immune response that differs from infection with seasonal influenza viruses, limits LAIV shedding and plays a role in the silent

  16. Single antigen flow beads for identification of human leukocyte antigen antibody specificities in hypersensitized patients with chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Kılıçaslan-Ayna, Tülay; Özkızılcık-Koçyiğit, Aslı; Güleç, Derya; Pirim, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    Aims of this study Aims of this study were to identify class I and class II antibodies in highly sensitized patients by flow cytometry single antigen bead (FC-SAB) assay and to evaluate according to donor HLA type in order to increase their kidney transplantation chance. Material and methods We analyzed 60 hypersensitive patients of 351 individuals, who applied to our laboratory for PRA test in November 2013-December 2014. Flow cytometric PRA screening and single antigen bead commercial kits were used for these analyses. Results In our study group, 19 (31.7%) of these patients were male while 41 (68.3%) patients were female. The most common acceptable antigens were A*02 (10.11%), HLA-A*23 (10.11%), HLA-B*38 (8.79%) and HLA-DRB1*03 (7.83%) in hypersensitive patients. The highest antibody reactivity on SAB was observed against HLA-A*25, HLA-B*45, HLA-DRB1*04 and HLA-DRB1*08 antigens. Conclusions The determination of these acceptable and unacceptable antigens may increase their transplantation chance. Pre-transplant HLA antibody identifications provide prognostic information with respect to the determination of patients who are at increased risk of graft loss. PMID:27095928

  17. HLA-G coding region and 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) in two Chinese Han populations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen Yi; Tian, Wei; Liu, Xue Xiang; Li, Li Xin

    2016-08-01

    In this study, exons 2-4 and 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G gene were investigated for 201 and 104 healthy unrelated Han samples recruited from Hunan Province, southern China and central Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, northern China, respectively, using sequence-based typing and cloning methods. Totally 12 HLA-G alleles in the coding region, 9 variable sites in 3'UTR, 8 3'UTR haplotypes and 15 HLA-G extended haplotypes (EHs) incorporating the coding region and 3'UTR were observed. Very strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) was observed between HLA-A and HLA-G, and between HLA-G coding region and 3'UTR in each population (all global P=0.0000). Seven HLA-A-G haplotypes showed significant LD in both populations. Three HLA-G alleles in the coding region, 4 polymorphic sites in the 3'UTR, 3 3'UTR haplotypes and 4 HLA-G EHs differed significantly in their distributions between the 2 Chinese Han populations (all P≤0.0001). There was evidence for balancing selection acting on HLA-G 3'UTR positions +3010, +3142 and +3187 in the two populations. The NJ dendrograms demonstrated the existence of two basic HLA-G lineages and indicated that, HLA-G*01:01:01, the most common HLA-G allele, formed a separate lineage from other alleles. Our results shed new lights into HLA-G genetics among Chinese Han populations. The findings reported here are of importance for future studies related to post-transcriptional regulation of HLA-G allelic expression and the potential role of HLA-G in disease association in populations of Chinese ancestry. PMID:27262928

  18. HLA-G coding region and 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) in two Chinese Han populations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen Yi; Tian, Wei; Liu, Xue Xiang; Li, Li Xin

    2016-08-01

    In this study, exons 2-4 and 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G gene were investigated for 201 and 104 healthy unrelated Han samples recruited from Hunan Province, southern China and central Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, northern China, respectively, using sequence-based typing and cloning methods. Totally 12 HLA-G alleles in the coding region, 9 variable sites in 3'UTR, 8 3'UTR haplotypes and 15 HLA-G extended haplotypes (EHs) incorporating the coding region and 3'UTR were observed. Very strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) was observed between HLA-A and HLA-G, and between HLA-G coding region and 3'UTR in each population (all global P=0.0000). Seven HLA-A-G haplotypes showed significant LD in both populations. Three HLA-G alleles in the coding region, 4 polymorphic sites in the 3'UTR, 3 3'UTR haplotypes and 4 HLA-G EHs differed significantly in their distributions between the 2 Chinese Han populations (all P≤0.0001). There was evidence for balancing selection acting on HLA-G 3'UTR positions +3010, +3142 and +3187 in the two populations. The NJ dendrograms demonstrated the existence of two basic HLA-G lineages and indicated that, HLA-G*01:01:01, the most common HLA-G allele, formed a separate lineage from other alleles. Our results shed new lights into HLA-G genetics among Chinese Han populations. The findings reported here are of importance for future studies related to post-transcriptional regulation of HLA-G allelic expression and the potential role of HLA-G in disease association in populations of Chinese ancestry.

  19. Genetically engineered blood pharming: generation of HLA-universal platelets derived from CD34+ progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Constança; Blaszczyk, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Blood pharming is a recently designed concept to enable in vitro production of blood cells that are safe, effective and readily available. This approach represents an alternative to blood donation and may contribute to overcome the shortage of blood products. However, the high variability of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci remains a major hurdle to the application of off-the-shelf blood products. Refractoriness to platelet (PLT) transfusion caused by alloimmunization against HLA class I antigens constitutes a relevant clinical problem. Thus, it would be desirable to generate PLT units devoid of HLA antigens. To reduce the immunogenicity of cell-based therapeutics, we have permanently reduced HLA class I expression using an RNA interference strategy. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the generation of HLA class I-silenced (HLA-universal) PLTs from CD34+ progenitor cells using an shRNA targeting β2-microglobulin transcripts is feasible. CD34+ progenitor cells derived from G-CSF mobilised donors were transduced with a lentiviral vector encoding for the β2-microglobulin-specific shRNA and differentiated into PLTs using a liquid culture system. The functionality of HLA-silenced PLTs and their ability to escape HLA antibody-mediated cytotoxicity were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Platelet activation in response to ADP and thrombin were assessed in vitro. The immune-evasion capability of HLA-universal megakaryocytes (MKs) and PLTs was tested in lymphocytotoxicity assays using anti-HLA antibodies. To assess the functionality of HLA-universal PLTs in vivo, HLA-silenced MKs were infused into NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc(-/-) mice with or without anti-HLA antibodies. PLT generation was evaluated by flow cytometry using anti-CD42a and CD61 antibodies. HLA-universal PLTs demonstrated to be functionally similar to blood-derived PLTs. Lymphocytotoxicity assays showed that HLA-silencing efficiently protects MKs against HLA antibody-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity. 80

  20. Genetically engineered blood pharming: generation of HLA-universal platelets derived from CD34+ progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Constança; Blaszczyk, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Blood pharming is a recently designed concept to enable in vitro production of blood cells that are safe, effective and readily available. This approach represents an alternative to blood donation and may contribute to overcome the shortage of blood products. However, the high variability of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci remains a major hurdle to the application of off-the-shelf blood products. Refractoriness to platelet (PLT) transfusion caused by alloimmunization against HLA class I antigens constitutes a relevant clinical problem. Thus, it would be desirable to generate PLT units devoid of HLA antigens. To reduce the immunogenicity of cell-based therapeutics, we have permanently reduced HLA class I expression using an RNA interference strategy. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the generation of HLA class I-silenced (HLA-universal) PLTs from CD34+ progenitor cells using an shRNA targeting β2-microglobulin transcripts is feasible. CD34+ progenitor cells derived from G-CSF mobilised donors were transduced with a lentiviral vector encoding for the β2-microglobulin-specific shRNA and differentiated into PLTs using a liquid culture system. The functionality of HLA-silenced PLTs and their ability to escape HLA antibody-mediated cytotoxicity were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Platelet activation in response to ADP and thrombin were assessed in vitro. The immune-evasion capability of HLA-universal megakaryocytes (MKs) and PLTs was tested in lymphocytotoxicity assays using anti-HLA antibodies. To assess the functionality of HLA-universal PLTs in vivo, HLA-silenced MKs were infused into NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc(-/-) mice with or without anti-HLA antibodies. PLT generation was evaluated by flow cytometry using anti-CD42a and CD61 antibodies. HLA-universal PLTs demonstrated to be functionally similar to blood-derived PLTs. Lymphocytotoxicity assays showed that HLA-silencing efficiently protects MKs against HLA antibody-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity. 80

  1. Rapid DNA typing for HLA-C using sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP): identification of serological and non-serologically defined HLA-C alleles including several new alleles.

    PubMed

    Bunce, M; Welsh, K I

    1994-01-01

    Detection of HLA-C antigens by complement mediated cytotoxicity using human alloantisera is often difficult. Between 20 to 40% of individuals in every race have undetectable HLA-C locus antigens and 9 out of the 29 sequenced HLA-C alleles so far published encode serologically undetected antigens. In addition, HLA-C molecules are expressed at the cell surface at about 10% of the levels of HLA-A and HLA-B. Recently, amplification of DNA using sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) has proved a reliable and rapid method for typing HLA-DR, HLA-DQA and HLA-DQB genes. PCR-SSP takes two hours to perform and is therefore suitable for the genotyping of cadaveric donors. We have designed a set of primers which will positively identify the HLA-C alleles corresponding to the serologically defined series HLA-Cw1, Cw2, Cw3, Cw4, Cw5, Cw6, Cw7 and Cw8. The serologically undetectable alleles have also been detected in groups according to sequence homology. In addition, three new unsequenced variants have been identified. DNA samples from 56 International Histocompatibility Workshop reference cell lines and 103 control individuals have been typed by the HLA-C PCR-SSP technique. 4/56 cell line types and 11/103 normal control individuals types were discrepant with the reported serological types. All combinations of serologically detectable and most of the serologically blank HLA-C antigens can be readily identified. DNA typing for HLA-Cw by PCR-SSP can take as little as 130 minutes from start to finish, including DNA preparation.

  2. Study of Soluble HLA-G in Congenital Human Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielli, Liliana; Bortolotti, Daria; Gentili, Valentina; Piccirilli, Giulia; Chiereghin, Angela; Pavia, Claudia; Bolzani, Silvia; Guerra, Brunella; Simonazzi, Giuliana; Cervi, Francesca; Capretti, Maria Grazia; Luca, Dario Di; Landini, Maria Paola; Lazzarotto, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a nonclassical HLA class I antigen that is expressed during pregnancy contributing to maternal-fetal tolerance. HLA-G can be expressed as membrane-bound and soluble forms. HLA-G expression increases strongly during viral infections such as congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, with functional consequences in immunoregulation. In this work we investigated the expression of soluble (s)HLA-G and beta-2 microglobulin (component of HLA) molecules in correlation with the risk of transmission and severity of congenital HCMV infection. We analyzed 182 blood samples from 130 pregnant women and 52 nonpregnant women and 56 amniotic fluid samples from women experiencing primary HCMV infection. The median levels of sHLA-G in maternal serum of women with primary HCMV infection were higher in comparison with nonprimary and uninfected pregnant women (p < 0.001). AF from HCMV symptomatic fetuses presented higher sHLA-G levels in comparison with infected asymptomatic fetuses (p < 0.001), presence of HLA-G free-heavy chain, and a concentration gradient from amniotic fluid to maternal blood. No significant statistical difference of beta-2 microglobulin median levels was observed between all different groups. Our results suggest the determination of sHLA-G molecules in both maternal blood and amniotic fluid as a promising biomarker of diagnosis of maternal HCMV primary infection and fetal HCMV disease. PMID:27699182

  3. Study of Soluble HLA-G in Congenital Human Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielli, Liliana; Bortolotti, Daria; Gentili, Valentina; Piccirilli, Giulia; Chiereghin, Angela; Pavia, Claudia; Bolzani, Silvia; Guerra, Brunella; Simonazzi, Giuliana; Cervi, Francesca; Capretti, Maria Grazia; Luca, Dario Di; Landini, Maria Paola; Lazzarotto, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a nonclassical HLA class I antigen that is expressed during pregnancy contributing to maternal-fetal tolerance. HLA-G can be expressed as membrane-bound and soluble forms. HLA-G expression increases strongly during viral infections such as congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, with functional consequences in immunoregulation. In this work we investigated the expression of soluble (s)HLA-G and beta-2 microglobulin (component of HLA) molecules in correlation with the risk of transmission and severity of congenital HCMV infection. We analyzed 182 blood samples from 130 pregnant women and 52 nonpregnant women and 56 amniotic fluid samples from women experiencing primary HCMV infection. The median levels of sHLA-G in maternal serum of women with primary HCMV infection were higher in comparison with nonprimary and uninfected pregnant women (p < 0.001). AF from HCMV symptomatic fetuses presented higher sHLA-G levels in comparison with infected asymptomatic fetuses (p < 0.001), presence of HLA-G free-heavy chain, and a concentration gradient from amniotic fluid to maternal blood. No significant statistical difference of beta-2 microglobulin median levels was observed between all different groups. Our results suggest the determination of sHLA-G molecules in both maternal blood and amniotic fluid as a promising biomarker of diagnosis of maternal HCMV primary infection and fetal HCMV disease.

  4. Neutrophil elastase enhances antigen presentation by upregulating human leukocyte antigen class I expression on tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Akhil; Alatrash, Gheath; Philips, Anne V; Qiao, Na; Sukhumalchandra, Pariya; Kerros, Celine; Diaconu, Iulia; Gall, Victor; Neal, Samantha; Peters, Haley L; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) is an innate immune cell-derived inflammatory mediator that we have shown increases the presentation of tumor-associated peptide antigens in breast cancer. In this study, we extend these observations to show that NE uptake has a broad effect on enhancing antigen presentation by breast cancer cells. We show that NE increases human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression on the surface of breast cancer cells in a concentration and time-dependent manner. HLA class I upregulation requires internalization of enzymatically active NE. Western blots of NE-treated breast cancer cells confirm that the expression of total HLA class I as well as the antigen-processing machinery proteins TAP1, LMP2, and calnexin does not change following NE treatment. This suggests that NE does not increase the efficiency of antigen processing; rather, it mediates the upregulation of HLA class I by stabilizing and reducing membrane recycling of HLA class I molecules. Furthermore, the effects of NE extend beyond breast cancer since the uptake of NE by EBV-LCL increases the presentation of HLA class I-restricted viral peptides, as shown by their increased sensitivity to lysis by EBV-specific CD8+ T cells. Together, our results show that NE uptake increases the responsiveness of breast cancer cells to adaptive immunity by broad upregulation of membrane HLA class I and support the conclusion that the innate inflammatory mediator NE enhances tumor cell recognition and increases tumor sensitivity to the host adaptive immune response.

  5. Analysis of HLA-B15 and HLA-B27 in spondyloarthritis with peripheral and axial clinical patterns

    PubMed Central

    Londono, John; Santos, Ana Maria; Peña, Paola; Calvo, Enrique; Espinosa, Luis R; Reveille, John D; Vargas-Alarcon, Gilberto; Jaramillo, Carlos A; Valle-Oñate, Rafael; Avila, Mabel; Romero, Consuelo; Medina, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    Objective Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) B27 and HLA-B15 are associated with spondyloarthritis (SpA). Recent Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) criteria emphasise a distinction between SpA with axial and peripheral patterns. We analysed whether HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 alleles could associate with these patterns. Methods We studied 100 healthy individuals and 178 patients with SpA according to European Spondyloarthropathy Study Group (ESSG) criteria. Patients were then classified according to ASAS criteria, the axial spondyloarthritis pattern (axSpA) being defined by ascertained sacroiliitis and the peripheral pattern (pSpA) by enthesitis and/or arthritis in extremities. A combined ax/p pattern was also considered. Results Only HLA-B27 and HLA-B15 alleles were associated with SpA. ASAS criteria for axSpA were met in 152 patients (12 with isolated axSpA and 140 with a combined ax/p patterns). When the ASAS peripheral criteria were applied, 161 patients met these criteria (13 with isolated pSpA and 148 with a combined ax/p pattern). HLA-B27 was found in 83% of patients with axSpA and 43% of ax/pSpA patients according to axASAS. HLA-B27 occurred in 7% controls but not in any patient with isolated pSpA. HLA-B15 was encountered in 31% of patients with isolated pSpA and 20% of ax/pSpA patients according to pASAS criteria. Moreover, 2 healthy controls, but none of our patients with isolated axSpA were positive for HLA-B15. Conclusions Our data suggest that the presence of HLA-B15 favours the development of isolated/combined peripheral rather than isolated axSpA, while HLA-B27 promotes an isolated/combined axial disease and excludes a peripheral pattern. HLA-B15 should be considered in addition to HLA-B27 when diagnosing patients with SpA according to ASAS criteria. PMID:26560062

  6. Molecular and serological characterization of HLA-B71 in association with different class I haplotypes or in different ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, S G; Bei, M; Inamdar, A; Stewart, D; Johnson, A H; Hurley, C K

    1996-01-01

    The HLA-B70 antigen is among the most common antigens present in African Americans; however, monospecific serologic reagents defining B70 and its subtypes, B71 and B72, are rare. We have recently reported the molecular characterization of a B71 allele (B*1510) from an African American individual carrying the haplotype HLA-A30, Cw3, B71(w6). In order to better define the degree of polymorphism of molecules carrying the B71 serological specificity in the human population, we have used serology, cDNA sequencing, and PCR/SSOP typing to characterize B71 alleles from additional individuals from different ethnic populations and carrying different class I haplotypes. All carried either B*1510 or B*1518 alleles. Other HLA-B alleles isolated from these individuals (B*5001, B*4901, B*3501, B*3701) were identical to previously reported sequences except for a novel B41 allele (B*4102) identified in one Hispanic individual. This allele has concurrently been identified by Rufer and colleagues in Caucasian individuals. The B*4102 allele differs from B*4101 at codons 95 (Leu/Trp) and 97 (Ser/Arg). In addition, the B*4102 allele differs from B*4101 by two silent substitutions at codons 94 (ACC/ACT) and 99 (TAC/TAT). Since the polymorphic sequence present in B*4102 is also present in other HLA-B alleles (e.g.., B*2707, B*4002, B*0702), it may represent a gene conversion cassette. The allelic diversity at the class I loci and the scarcity of monospecific alloantisera support the importance of the application of molecular based methods to identify HLA class I alleles in matching unrelated donor/recipient pairs for bone marrow transplantation.

  7. HLA and autoimmune endocrine disease 1985.

    PubMed

    Farid, N R; Thompson, C

    1986-02-01

    We typed patient groups with type I diabetes (n = 78), Graves' disease (n = 81), goitrous autoimmune (n = 52), "silent" (n = 18) and postpartum thyroiditis (n = 15) for human leucocyte antigens (HLA) A, B, C, DR and DQ. The results were compared to those obtained from 256 healthy controls typed for HLA-A, -B, -C and 140 typed for -DR. All these 140 controls were genotyped. Previously described associations of DR3 (OR (odds ratio) = 2.68, p less than 0.005) and DR4 (OR = 3.26, p less than 0.0001) in type I diabetes is confirmed. In this series, however, HLA-DR3/DR4 heterozygotes were apparently at no greater risk for type I diabetes than DR3 or DR4 homozygotes. The relative risk conferred by DR3/DR4 heterozygotes (6.48) was less than that for DR3 homozygosity (2.8), suggesting a recessive major histocompatibility complex-related susceptibility to type I diabetes. Graves' disease was associated with DR3 (OR = 3.02, p less than 0.0005); the increased frequency of DR3 homozygotes in this series is consistent with recessive HLA-linked susceptibility to Graves' disease proposed on the basis of family data. Hashimoto's thyroiditis, on the other hand, was associated with HLA-DR4 (OR = 3.08, p less than 0.0001), the latter finding confirming our earlier report on 21 patients. The increase of HLA-DR4 in both post-partum and silent thyroiditis suggests that these conditions are immunogenetically related, and may well represent variants of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis.

  8. Charting improvements in US registry HLA typing ambiguity using a typing resolution score.

    PubMed

    Paunić, Vanja; Gragert, Loren; Schneider, Joel; Müller, Carlheinz; Maiers, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Unrelated stem cell registries have been collecting HLA typing of volunteer bone marrow donors for over 25years. Donor selection for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is based primarily on matching the alleles of donors and patients at five polymorphic HLA loci. As HLA typing technologies have continually advanced since the beginnings of stem cell transplantation, registries have accrued typings of varied HLA typing ambiguity. We present a new typing resolution score (TRS), based on the likelihood of self-match, that allows the systematic comparison of HLA typings across different methods, data sets and populations. We apply the TRS to chart improvement in HLA typing within the Be The Match Registry of the United States from the initiation of DNA-based HLA typing to the current state of high-resolution typing using next-generation sequencing technologies. In addition, we present a publicly available online tool for evaluation of any given HLA typing. This TRS objectively evaluates HLA typing methods and can help define standards for acceptable recruitment HLA typing. PMID:27163154

  9. Methylome-wide Analysis of Chronic HIV Infection Reveals Five-Year Increase in Biological Age and Epigenetic Targeting of HLA.

    PubMed

    Gross, Andrew M; Jaeger, Philipp A; Kreisberg, Jason F; Licon, Katherine; Jepsen, Kristen L; Khosroheidari, Mahdieh; Morsey, Brenda M; Swindells, Susan; Shen, Hui; Ng, Cherie T; Flagg, Ken; Chen, Daniel; Zhang, Kang; Fox, Howard S; Ideker, Trey

    2016-04-21

    HIV-infected individuals are living longer on antiretroviral therapy, but many patients display signs that in some ways resemble premature aging. To investigate and quantify the impact of chronic HIV infection on aging, we report a global analysis of the whole-blood DNA methylomes of 137 HIV+ individuals under sustained therapy along with 44 matched HIV- individuals. First, we develop and validate epigenetic models of aging that are independent of blood cell composition. Using these models, we find that both chronic and recent HIV infection lead to an average aging advancement of 4.9 years, increasing expected mortality risk by 19%. In addition, sustained infection results in global deregulation of the methylome across >80,000 CpGs and specific hypomethylation of the region encoding the human leukocyte antigen locus (HLA). We find that decreased HLA methylation is predictive of lower CD4 / CD8 T cell ratio, linking molecular aging, epigenetic regulation, and disease progression.

  10. The heterogeneous HLA genetic composition of the Brazilian population and its relevance to the optimization of hematopoietic stem cell donor recruitment.

    PubMed

    Fabreti-Oliveira, R A; Nascimento, E; Fonseca, C G; Santos, M A

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecular variation across the Brazilian population in order to determine possible regional differences, which would be highly relevant to optimizing donor recruitment strategies in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and understanding the population genetic background of this heterogeneous country. HLA data of 551 HSCT donors from five Brazilian regions were characterized by high-resolution DNA alleles at the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1 and -DQB1 loci and compared with other populations in Brazil and worldwide populations. Allele and haplotype frequencies were estimated. The analysis was performed to assess Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) and linkage disequilibrium (LD) among different loci in each recruitment center. Genetic variation was explored through genetic distance analyzed by using a new algorithm based on linear algebra, taking into account geographic regions of Brazil. The results indicated a heterogeneous genetic composition of the Brazilian population, such that HLA allele and haplotype frequencies exhibit different distributions among Brazilian regions, which has important implications for donor matching. In addition, a pronounced differentiation was observed by the absence of clustering of the regional populations in the reduced-dimension space. These data may be useful for increasing donor recruitment with more genetic representativeness in the Brazilian Volunteer Bone Marrow Donors Registry (REDOME). PMID:24724906

  11. Immune reconstitution in recipients of photodepleted HLA-identical sibling donor stem cell transplantations: T cell subset frequencies predict outcome.

    PubMed

    McIver, Zachariah A; Melenhorst, Jan J; Grim, Andrew; Naguib, Nicholas; Weber, Gerrit; Fellowes, Vicki; Khuu, Hahn; Stroncek, David S; Leitman, Susan F; Battiwalla, Minoo; Barrett, A John

    2011-12-01

    We evaluated an ex vivo photodepletion (PD) technique to selectively deplete graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) alloreacting T cells given to 24 human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling stem cell transplantation (SCT) recipients. Donor lymphocytes were activated by 72-hour exposure to irradiated in vitro expanded recipient T lymphocytes and pulsed with a TH9402 photosensitizer. Alloactivated T cells preferentially retaining the photosensitizer were eliminated by light exposure. The PD product showed an inverted CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio with greatest depletion occurring in the CD4(+) naive and central memory populations. In contrast, the CD8(+) naive and effector cells were relatively conserved, reflecting the differential extrusion of TH9402 by T cell subsets. Cytomegalovirus reactive T cells were reduced in the PD product and in recipient blood 100 days after SCT when compared with contemporaneous HLA-identical sibling donor T cell-depleted SCT recipients. Although PD SCT recipients experienced similar absolute lymphocyte counts during the first 100 days after SCT, they achieved 100% donor T cell chimerism more rapidly and had higher CD8(+) naive T cell counts early after SCT. SCT recipients of PD products with the lowest CD4 central memory content had the highest risk of developing chronic GVHD (cGVHD) (P = .04) and a poorer survival (P = .03). Although the persistence of CD8(+) naive T cells may have contributed to important antileukemia responses resulting in a relatively low relapse rate, our findings emphasize the role of donor memory T cells and CD4 cells in establishing immune competence post-SCT. Although PD is associated with excellent outcomes in the haploidentical setting, the low frequency of alloactivations in HLA-matched pairs makes the PD approach used by our group for allodepletion in HLA-matched sibling transplantations an inefficient technique. PMID:21684345

  12. Gene Map of the HLA Region, Graves' Disease and Hashimoto Thyroiditis, and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sasazuki, Takehiko; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Morishima, Satoko; Morishima, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genomic region spanning about 4 Mb is the most gene dense and the polymorphic stretches in the human genome. A total of the 269 loci were identified, including 145 protein coding genes mostly important for immunity and 50 noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Biological function of these ncRNAs remains unknown, becoming hot spot in the studies of HLA-associated diseases. The genomic diversity analysis in the HLA region facilitated by next-generation sequencing will pave the way to molecular understanding of linkage disequilibrium structure, population diversity, histocompatibility in transplantation, and associations with autoimmune diseases. The 4-digit DNA genotyping of HLA for six HLA loci, HLA-A through DP, in the patients with Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) identified six susceptible and three resistant HLA alleles. Their epistatic interactions in controlling the development of these diseases are shown. Four susceptible and one resistant HLA alleles are shared by GD and HT. Two HLA alleles associated with GD or HT control the titers of autoantibodies to thyroid antigens. All these observations led us to propose a new model for the development of GD and HT. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from unrelated donor (UR-HSCT) provides a natural experiment to elucidate the role of allogenic HLA molecules in immune response. Large cohort studies using HLA allele and clinical outcome data have elucidated that (1) HLA locus, allele, and haplotype mismatches between donor and patient, (2) specific amino acid substitution at specific positions of HLA molecules, and (3) ethnic background are all responsible for the immunological events related to UR-HSCT including acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), chronic GVHD, graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect, and graft failure.

  13. Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia due to HLA-A2 antibody.

    PubMed

    Chow, M P; Sun, K J; Yung, C H; Hu, H Y; Tzeng, J L; Lee, T D

    1992-01-01

    A male, full-term baby with thrombocytopenia was born by a G3P2A1 mother who was not associated with autoimmune disease. Platelet antibody screening was positive by using lymphocytotoxicity test, platelet suspension immunofluorescence test and solid-phase red cell adherence test. The identified HLA antibody was of A2 specificity. It was confirmed by testing the mother's and the baby's sera against the lymphocytes and platelets of 10 HLA-A2-positive donors. The possibility of platelet-specific antibody as the cause of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia was ruled out by testing against platelets of 10 HLA-A2-negative donors and the known platelet-specific antigens utilizing immobilized, purified platelet glycoprotein as targets. The mother's serum reacted strongly with both the father's and the baby's platelets and lymphocytes. This neonatal thrombocytopenia was most likely due to the maternal HLA antibody, which was induced by her antecedent gestations.

  14. Race, Ethnicity and Ancestry in Unrelated Transplant Matching for the National Marrow Donor Program: A Comparison of Multiple Forms of Self-Identification with Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Hollenbach, Jill A.; Saperstein, Aliya; Albrecht, Mark; Vierra-Green, Cynthia; Parham, Peter; Norman, Paul J.; Maiers, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a nationwide study comparing self-identification to genetic ancestry classifications in a large cohort (n = 1752) from the National Marrow Donor Program. We sought to determine how various measures of self-identification intersect with genetic ancestry, with the aim of improving matching algorithms for unrelated bone marrow transplant. Multiple dimensions of self-identification, including race/ethnicity and geographic ancestry were compared to classifications based on ancestry informative markers (AIMs), and the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, which are required for transplant matching. Nearly 20% of responses were inconsistent between reporting race/ethnicity versus geographic ancestry. Despite strong concordance between AIMs and HLA, no measure of self-identification shows complete correspondence with genetic ancestry. In certain cases geographic ancestry reporting matches genetic ancestry not reflected in race/ethnicity identification, but in other cases geographic ancestries show little correspondence to genetic measures, with important differences by gender. However, when respondents assign ancestry to grandparents, we observe sub-groups of individuals with well- defined genetic ancestries, including important differences in HLA frequencies, with implications for transplant matching. While we advocate for tailored questioning to improve accuracy of ancestry ascertainment, collection of donor grandparents’ information will improve the chances of finding matches for many patients, particularly for mixed-ancestry individuals. PMID:26287376

  15. Race, Ethnicity and Ancestry in Unrelated Transplant Matching for the National Marrow Donor Program: A Comparison of Multiple Forms of Self-Identification with Genetics.

    PubMed

    Hollenbach, Jill A; Saperstein, Aliya; Albrecht, Mark; Vierra-Green, Cynthia; Parham, Peter; Norman, Paul J; Maiers, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a nationwide study comparing self-identification to genetic ancestry classifications in a large cohort (n = 1752) from the National Marrow Donor Program. We sought to determine how various measures of self-identification intersect with genetic ancestry, with the aim of improving matching algorithms for unrelated bone marrow transplant. Multiple dimensions of self-identification, including race/ethnicity and geographic ancestry were compared to classifications based on ancestry informative markers (AIMs), and the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, which are required for transplant matching. Nearly 20% of responses were inconsistent between reporting race/ethnicity versus geographic ancestry. Despite strong concordance between AIMs and HLA, no measure of self-identification shows complete correspondence with genetic ancestry. In certain cases geographic ancestry reporting matches genetic ancestry not reflected in race/ethnicity identification, but in other cases geographic ancestries show little correspondence to genetic measures, with important differences by gender. However, when respondents assign ancestry to grandparents, we observe sub-groups of individuals with well- defined genetic ancestries, including important differences in HLA frequencies, with implications for transplant matching. While we advocate for tailored questioning to improve accuracy of ancestry ascertainment, collection of donor grandparents' information will improve the chances of finding matches for many patients, particularly for mixed-ancestry individuals.

  16. Comparison of HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 Loci Polymorphism between Kidney Transplants of Uremia Patients and Healthy Individuals in Central China

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shilin; Feng, Guiwen; Feng, Yonghua; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Xiaobai

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is becoming a global public health problem, which will usually cause uremia at the end stage of chronic kidney failure. So far, kidney transplant is the most effective and proper therapy for uremia, however, the short supply of matched donor kidney has been a persistent bottleneck for transplantation. HLA matching of HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 loci is very important for the allocation of kidney transplants. In this study, we investigated genotypes of HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 loci based on 1,464 uremia patients and 10,000 unrelated healthy individuals in Henan province of China, and compared the frequency distribution of these HLA alleles and corresponding haplotypes between patient and healthy groups. We detected 23 HLA-A, 49 HLA-B and 17 HLA-DRB1 alleles in total. The predominant alleles of HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 loci in patients are the same as those in healthy group. The seven most frequent alleles account for about 87%, 50%, and 77% at HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 loci, respectively. The haplotypes (combinations of HLA-A, -B, and -DRB1) with significantly different frequency between patients and controls mostly account for less than 1%. Overall, this suggests that HLA matching is not a potential difficulty for kidney transplant of uremia patients. However, three of the top seven frequent HLA-DRB1 alleles have a significantly different distribution in patients and controls, while only one alleles for HLA-B and zero for HLA-A loci. These HLA-DRB1 alleles may be closely associated with uremia. This study sheds new lights on the composition and difference of HLA genotypes in uremia patients and healthy populations in Central China that can serve as a guide to HLA matching for kidney transplants and a resource for HLA typing-related studies. PMID:27780235

  17. Evaluation of sequence-specific priming and real-time polymerase chain reaction assays for detecting HLA-B*51 alleles confirmed by sequence-based typing.

    PubMed

    Park, Y; Kim, Y S; Kim, S I; Kim, H; Kim, H S

    2012-10-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B*51 genotype is one of the well-known genetic factors associated with the development of Behcet's disease. We evaluated three sequence-specific priming (SSP) assays and one real-time PCR assay for detecting HLA-B*51 alleles using 93 whole blood samples, which were genotyped by high-resolution sequence-based typing (SBT). All HLA-B*51 alleles determined by SBT were detected by the four evaluated assays, and the results for all HLA-B alleles other than HLA-B*51 were negative on all assays. Thus, all HLA-B51 tests showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for detecting HLA-B*51 alleles. The three SSP assays and the real-time PCR test for HLA-B*51 genotyping are simple, but reliable for detecting HLA-B*51 alleles in clinical laboratories.

  18. Does Rh Immune Globulin Suppress HLA Sensitization in Pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Richard M.; Schlumpf, Karen S.; Wright, David J.; Triulzi, Darrell J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND How Rh immune globulin (RhIG) prevents sensitization to D antigen is unclear. If RhIG Fc delivers a nonspecific immunosuppressive signal, then RhIG may inhibit sensitization to antigens other than D. HLA antibody prevalence was compared in previously pregnant RhD negative versus RhD positive women to investigate whether RhIG suppresses HLA sensitization. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS In the Leukocyte Antibody Prevalence Study (LAPS)1, 7,920 volunteer blood donors were screened for anti-HLA antibodies and surveyed about prior pregnancies and transfusions. A secondary analysis of the LAPS database was performed. RESULTS RhD negative women ≤40 years old (presumed to have received antenatal ± postpartum RhIG in all pregnancies) had a significantly lower HLA sensitization rate than RhD positive women (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.40–0.83). When stratified by deliveries (1, 2, 3, or ≥4), RhD negative women ≤40 were HLA sensitized less often than RhD positive women in every case. In contrast, a clear relationship between RhD type and HLA sensitization was not seen in older previously pregnant women whose childbearing years are presumed to have preceded the use of routine RhIG prophylaxis. In a multivariable logistic regression model, RhD negative women ≤40 years old remained significantly less likely to be HLA sensitized compared with RhD positive women after adjusting for parity, time from last pregnancy, lost pregnancies, and transfusions (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.34–0.88). CONCLUSION Consistent with a nonspecific immunosuppressive effect of RhIG, younger previously pregnant RhD negative women were less likely than previously pregnant RhD positive women to be HLA sensitized. PMID:23252646

  19. Characteristics of HLA-E Restricted T-Cell Responses and Their Role in Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Human HLA-E can, in addition to self-antigens, also present pathogen-derived sequences, which elicit specific T-cell responses. T-cells recognize their antigen presented by HLA-E highly specifically and have unique functional and phenotypical properties. Pathogen specific HLA-E restricted CD8+ T-cells are an interesting new player in the field of immunology. Future work should address their exact roles and relative contributions in the immune response against infectious diseases. PMID:27699181

  20. Analysis of Class II human leucocyte antigens in Italian and Spanish systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Blanca; Marchini, Maurizio; Santaniello, Alessandro; Simeón, Carmen P.; Fonollosa, Vicente; Caronni, Monica; Rios-Fernandez, Raquel; Carreira, Patricia; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Moreno, Antonia; López-Nevot, Miguel A.; Escalera, Ana; González-Escribano, Maria F.; Martin, Javier; Scorza, Raffaella

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine the role of Class II HLAs in SSc patients from Italy and Spain and in SSc patients of Caucasian ancestry. Methods. Nine hundred and forty-four SSc patients (Italy 392 patients; Spain 452 patients) and 1320 ethnically matched healthy controls (Italy 398 patients; Spain 922 patients) were genotyped up to the fourth digit by PCR with sequence-specific oligonucleotides for HLA-DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 loci. Patients included 390 ACA-positive and 254 anti-topo I-positive subjects. Associations between SSc or SSc-specific antibodies and HLA alleles or HLA haplotypes were sought via the chi-square test after 10 000-fold permutation testing. A meta-analysis including this study cohort and other Caucasoids samples was also conducted. Results. In both the cohorts, the strongest association was observed between the HLA-DRB1*1104 allele and SSc or anti-topo I antibodies. The HLA-DRB1*1104 -DQA1*0501 -DQB1*0301 haplotype was overrepresented in Italian [odds ratio (OR) = 2.069, 95% asymptotic CIs (CI95) 1.486, 2.881; P < 0.001] and in Spanish patients (OR = 6.707, CI95 3.974, 11.319; P < 0.001) as well as in anti-topo-positive patients: Italy (OR = 2.642, CI95 1.78, 3.924; P < 0.001) and Spain (OR = 20.625, CI95 11.536, 36.876; P < 0.001). In both the populations we also identified an additional risk allele (HLA-DQB1*03) and a protective allele (HLA-DQB1*0501) in anti-topo-positive patients. The meta-analysis showed different statistically significant associations, the most interesting being the differential association between HLA-DRB1*01 alleles and ACAs (OR = 1.724, CI95 1.482, 2.005; P < 0.001) or topo I antibodies (OR = 0.5, CI95 0.384, 0.651; P < 0.001). Conclusions. We describe multiple robust associations between SSc and HLA Class II antigens in Caucasoids that may help to understand the genetic architecture of SSc. PMID:22087014

  1. Polymorphism in MICA rather than HLA-B/C genes is associated with psoriatic arthritis in the Jewish population.

    PubMed

    González, S; Brautbar, C; Martínez-Borra, J; López-Vazquez, A; Segal, R; Blanco-Gelaz, M A; Enk, C D; Safriman, C; López-Larrea, C

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether the association of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I genes is secondary to linkage disequilibrium with a nearby gene. We examined a sample of the Jewish population to investigate whether HLA-B/C and DR polymorphism is associated with susceptibility, or whether other closely related class I loci, such as the major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF), might play a role in disease development. Comparisons of different populations with different HLA profiles would be of value in identifying the candidate genes involved in PSA. Fifty-two patients with PsA and 73 random matched controls from a Jewish population were selected and DNA typed by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand oligonucleotide probe (PCR-SSOP) (HLA-C), PCR sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) (HLA-B, -DR), radioactive PCR (MICA-TM polymorphism in the transmembrane region), and PCR-RFLP (TNF). Some findings can be concluded from the study: (1) the frequency of HLA-B*5701, B*3801, B*39, B*27, Cw*0602, Cw*07, DRB1*0402, and DRB1*0701 were not found to be significantly increased in PsA; (2) no significant differences of TNFalpha promoter alleles at positions -308 and -238 were found between PsA and healthy controls; (3) the trinucleotide repeat polymorphism MICA-A9 was present at a higher frequency in PsA patients, (p(c) < 0.009, RR = 3.34, EF = 0.39); and (4) MICA-A9 polymorphism was found in linkage disequilibrium with HLA-B alleles (B*5701, B*3801) described to be associated with PsA in Caucasians. These results suggest that the MICA gene or other nearby gene(s) may be involved in the development of PsA, and it would thus appear that psoriasis vulgaris (PsV) and PsA are associated with different MHC susceptibility genes. PMID:11390038

  2. HLA-A2 as a target for cell-mediated lympholysis: evidence from immunoselected HLA-A2 negative mutant cell lines.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, P E; Apgar, J R; Cresswell, P

    1980-07-01

    Cloned mutants of the human B lymphoblastoid cell line SB have been isolated using mutagenesis with ethyl methanesulfonate followed by negative selection with an anti-HLA-A2 serum and complement. Absorption analysis with 125I Staphylococcus aureus protein A binding to antibody sensitized cells. HLA typing, and immune precipitation analysis showed the mutants to be serologically identical to the SB parent except for the loss of HLA-A2. When tested as target cells for cell-mediated lympholysis by cytotoxic T lymphocytes generated in the mixed lymphocyte response, the SB and mutant cell lines demonstrated comparable susceptibility when the putative targets were HLA antigens other than HLA-A2. However, when compared for susceptibility to lysis by cytotoxic T lymphocytes considered to be HLA-A2 specific, the SB parent was effectively killed whereas little or no killing of the HLA-A2 mutants was observed. The results provide a new line of evidence that HLA antigens recognized by antibody can also be the true molecular targets for cytotoxic T lymphocytes. PMID:7263311

  3. Increased epithelial expression of HLA-DQ and HLA-DP molecules in salivary glands from patients with Sjögren's syndrome compared with obstructive sialadenitis.

    PubMed Central

    Thrane, P S; Halstensen, T S; Haanaes, H R; Brandtzaeg, P

    1993-01-01

    Salivary gland specimens from 10 patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) were examined by two-colour immunofluorescence with various combinations of monoclonal and polyclonal antibody reagents of the following specificities: human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II (DR, DP and DQ), CD3, CD45 (leucocyte common antigen), various cytokeratins, and factor VIII-related antigen. Tissue specimens from 10 normal glands and 10 glands with obstructive sialadenitis (no known autoimmunity) served as controls. Only some intercalated ducts and scattered acini of the normal major glands expressed HLA class II determinants (< 5% of total epithelial area); the relative proportion of positive elements indicated differential expression (DR > DP > DQ). SS glands contained substantial T cell infiltrates and increased numbers of activated (DR+) T cells; adjacent epithelium showed extensive differential expression of HLA class II determinants (DR > DP > DQ). Glands with obstructive sialadenitis showed similarly increased epithelial expression of HLA-DR but with surprisingly small amounts of concomitant HLA-DP and -DQ expression. Epithelial HLA class II expression probably depends on cytokines as an inductive event, which is not unique for SS but particularly prominent in this disorder. Our results suggest that epithelial expression of HLA-DP or -DQ, rather than -DR, might be a prerequisite for the autoimmune process of SS to develop in genetically susceptible individuals. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8485911

  4. Recent developments in HLA-haploidentical transplantations

    PubMed Central

    Showel, Margaret; Fuchs, Ephraim J.

    2016-01-01

    While allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations have a curative potential, several patients with hematologic malignancies cannot avail themselves of this therapeutic option due to lack of matched donor availability. Although HLA-haploidentical transplantations were previously associated with poor outcomes, recent evidence with use of post transplantation cyclophosphamide indicate improved safety and efficacy. The following paper discusses the most recent developments in this area. PMID:26590771

  5. Directed selection of influenza virus produces antigenic variants that match circulating human virus isolates and escape from vaccine-mediated immune protection.

    PubMed

    DeDiego, Marta L; Anderson, Christopher S; Yang, Hongmei; Holden-Wiltse, Jeanne; Fitzgerald, Theresa; Treanor, John J; Topham, David J

    2016-06-01

    Influenza vaccination does not provide 100% protection from infection, partly due to antigenic drift of the haemagglutinin (HA) protein. Low serum antibody titres increase the risk of infection. To determine whether there were additional correlates of risk, we examined the relationship between human serum immunity and antigenic variation in seasonal H3N2 influenza viruses. Seasonal H3N2 vaccine strains grown in the presence of heterogeneous human or mono-specific ferret antisera selected variants with mutations in the HA antigenic sites. Surprisingly, circulating strains infecting human subjects in the same seasons displayed mutations in the same positions, although only in one case did the change correspond to the same amino acid. Serum antibody titres were lower against both the in vitro selected and clinical isolates compared with the vaccine strains, suggesting that the mutations are relevant to vaccine failure. Antibody titres were also significantly lower in sera from infected subjects than in non-infected subjects, suggesting relatively poor responses to vaccination in the infected subjects. Collectively, the data suggest that risk from influenza infection is a result of poor response to vaccination, as well as encounter with drifted seasonal influenza virus antigenic variants. The results also show that directed selection under human immune pressure could reveal antigenic variants relevant to real-world drifted viruses, helping in annual vaccine re-formulation.

  6. HLA-E coding and 3' untranslated region variability determined by next-generation sequencing in two West-African population samples.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Erick C; Mendes-Junior, Celso T; Sabbagh, Audrey; Porto, Iane O P; Garcia, André; Ramalho, Jaqueline; Lima, Thálitta H A; Massaro, Juliana D; Dias, Fabrício C; Collares, Cristhianna V A; Jamonneau, Vincent; Bucheton, Bruno; Camara, Mamadou; Donadi, Eduardo A

    2015-12-01

    HLA-E is a non-classical Human Leucocyte Antigen class I gene with immunomodulatory properties. Whereas HLA-E expression usually occurs at low levels, it is widely distributed amongst human tissues, has the ability to bind self and non-self antigens and to interact with NK cells and T lymphocytes, being important for immunosurveillance and also for fighting against infections. HLA-E is usually the most conserved locus among all class I genes. However, most of the previous studies evaluating HLA-E variability sequenced only a few exons or genotyped known polymorphisms. Here we report a strategy to evaluate HLA-E variability by next-generation sequencing (NGS) that might be used to other HLA loci and present the HLA-E haplotype diversity considering the segment encoding the entire HLA-E mRNA (including 5'UTR, introns and the 3'UTR) in two African population samples, Susu from Guinea-Conakry and Lobi from Burkina Faso. Our results indicate that (a) the HLA-E gene is indeed conserved, encoding mainly two different protein molecules; (b) Africans do present several unknown HLA-E alleles presenting synonymous mutations; (c) the HLA-E 3'UTR is quite polymorphic and (d) haplotypes in the HLA-E 3'UTR are in close association with HLA-E coding alleles. NGS has proved to be an important tool on data generation for future studies evaluating variability in non-classical MHC genes.

  7. The Protective Role of HLA-DRB1(∗)13 in Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Bettencourt, Andreia; Carvalho, Cláudia; Leal, Bárbara; Brás, Sandra; Lopes, Dina; Martins da Silva, Ana; Santos, Ernestina; Torres, Tiago; Almeida, Isabel; Farinha, Fátima; Barbosa, Paulo; Marinho, António; Selores, Manuela; Correia, João; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Costa, Paulo P; da Silva, Berta Martins

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are characterized by a multifactorial aetiology and a complex genetic background, with the MHC region playing a major role. We genotyped for HLA-DRB1 locus 1228 patients with AIDs-213 with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), 166 with Psoriasis or Psoriatic Arthritis (Ps + PsA), 153 with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), 67 with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc), 536 with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), and 93 with Myasthenia Gravis (MG) and 282 unrelated controls. We confirmed previously established associations of HLA-DRB1(∗)15 (OR = 2.17) and HLA-DRB1(∗)03 (OR = 1.81) alleles with MS, HLA-DRB1(∗)03 with SLE (OR = 2.49), HLA-DRB1(∗)01 (OR = 1.79) and HLA-DRB1(∗)04 (OR = 2.81) with RA, HLA-DRB1(∗)07 with Ps + PsA (OR = 1.79), HLA-DRB1(∗)01 (OR = 2.28) and HLA-DRB1(∗)08 (OR = 3.01) with SSc, and HLA-DRB1(∗)03 with MG (OR = 2.98). We further observed a consistent negative association of HLA-DRB1(∗)13 allele with SLE, Ps + PsA, RA, and SSc (18.3%, 19.3%, 16.3%, and 11.9%, resp., versus 29.8% in controls). HLA-DRB1(∗)13 frequency in the AIDs group was 20.0% (OR = 0.58). Although different alleles were associated with particular AIDs, the same allele, HLA-DRB1(∗)13, was underrepresented in all of the six diseases analysed. This observation suggests that this allele may confer protection for AIDs, particularly for systemic and rheumatic disease. The protective effect of HLA-DRB1(∗)13 could be explained by a more proficient antigen presentation by these molecules, favouring efficient clonal deletion during thymic selection. PMID:26605347

  8. An Object-Oriented Regression for Building Disease Predictive Models with Multiallelic HLA Genes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lue Ping; Bolouri, Hamid; Zhao, Michael; Geraghty, Daniel E; Lernmark, Åke

    2016-05-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies confirm that human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes have the strongest associations with several autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes (T1D), providing an impetus to reduce this genetic association to practice through an HLA-based disease predictive model. However, conventional model-building methods tend to be suboptimal when predictors are highly polymorphic with many rare alleles combined with complex patterns of sequence homology within and between genes. To circumvent this challenge, we describe an alternative methodology; treating complex genotypes of HLA genes as "objects" or "exemplars," one focuses on systemic associations of disease phenotype with "objects" via similarity measurements. Conceptually, this approach assigns disease risks base on complex genotype profiles instead of specific disease-associated genotypes or alleles. Effectively, it transforms large, discrete, and sparse HLA genotypes into a matrix of similarity-based covariates. By the Kernel representative theorem and machine learning techniques, it uses a penalized likelihood method to select disease-associated exemplars in building predictive models. To illustrate this methodology, we apply it to a T1D study with eight HLA genes (HLA-DRB1, HLA-DRB3, HLA-DRB4, HLA-DRB5, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1, HLA-DPA1, and HLA-DPB1) to build a predictive model. The resulted predictive model has an area under curve of 0.92 in the training set, and 0.89 in the validating set, indicating that this methodology is useful to build predictive models with complex HLA genotypes. PMID:27080919

  9. The Protective Role of HLA-DRB1∗13 in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bettencourt, Andreia; Carvalho, Cláudia; Leal, Bárbara; Brás, Sandra; Lopes, Dina; Martins da Silva, Ana; Santos, Ernestina; Torres, Tiago; Almeida, Isabel; Farinha, Fátima; Barbosa, Paulo; Marinho, António; Selores, Manuela; Correia, João; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Costa, Paulo P.; da Silva, Berta Martins

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are characterized by a multifactorial aetiology and a complex genetic background, with the MHC region playing a major role. We genotyped for HLA-DRB1 locus 1228 patients with AIDs-213 with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), 166 with Psoriasis or Psoriatic Arthritis (Ps + PsA), 153 with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), 67 with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc), 536 with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), and 93 with Myasthenia Gravis (MG) and 282 unrelated controls. We confirmed previously established associations of HLA-DRB1∗15 (OR = 2.17) and HLA-DRB1∗03 (OR = 1.81) alleles with MS, HLA-DRB1∗03 with SLE (OR = 2.49), HLA-DRB1∗01 (OR = 1.79) and HLA-DRB1∗04 (OR = 2.81) with RA, HLA-DRB1∗07 with Ps + PsA (OR = 1.79), HLA-DRB1∗01 (OR = 2.28) and HLA-DRB1∗08 (OR = 3.01) with SSc, and HLA-DRB1∗03 with MG (OR = 2.98). We further observed a consistent negative association of HLA-DRB1∗13 allele with SLE, Ps + PsA, RA, and SSc (18.3%, 19.3%, 16.3%, and 11.9%, resp., versus 29.8% in controls). HLA-DRB1∗13 frequency in the AIDs group was 20.0% (OR = 0.58). Although different alleles were associated with particular AIDs, the same allele, HLA-DRB1∗13, was underrepresented in all of the six diseases analysed. This observation suggests that this allele may confer protection for AIDs, particularly for systemic and rheumatic disease. The protective effect of HLA-DRB1∗13 could be explained by a more proficient antigen presentation by these molecules, favouring efficient clonal deletion during thymic selection. PMID:26605347

  10. Identification of the HLA-DM/HLA-DR interface.

    PubMed

    Davies, Matthew N; Lamikanra, Abigail; Sansom, Clare E; Flower, Darren R; Moss, David S; Travers, Paul J

    2008-02-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DM is a critical participant in antigen presentation that catalyzes the dissociation of the Class II-associated Invariant chain-derived Peptide (CLIP) from the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II molecules. There is competition amongst peptides for access to an MHC Class II groove and it has been hypothesised that DM functions as a 'peptide editor' that catalyzes the replacement of one peptide for another within the groove. It is established that the DM catalyst interacts directly with the MHC Class II but the precise location of the interface is unknown. Here, we combine previously described mutational data with molecular docking and energy minimisation simulations to identify a putative interaction site of >4000A2 which agrees with known point mutational data for both the DR and DM molecule. The docked structure is validated by comparison with experimental data and previously determined properties of protein-protein interfaces. A possible dissociation mechanism is suggested by the presence of an acidic cluster near the N terminus of the bound peptide. PMID:17870168

  11. HLA and trisomy 21. Confirmation of a trend of restricted HLA heterogeneity in parents of Down syndrome children.

    PubMed

    Aymé, S; Mercier, P; Dallest, R; Mattei, J F

    1984-03-01

    As the HLA system could play a role in the in utero selection process against abnormal fetuses, HLA-A and -B antigens were evidenced in 30 children with trisomy 21 and in their parents, using a standard microlymphocytotoxicity test. The comparison group included 60 families among whom 39 had HLA typing for paternity exclusion and 21 had been previously selected for a segregation study. Both groups consisted of nonconsanguineous Caucasians from the same geographical area. The Down syndrome (DS) children did not show a significant association with a specific HLA antigen. However, six out of 30 couples having a DS child showed two antigens shared at the A and/or B locus, compared to seven out of 60 control couples. The shared parental antigens were not selectively inherited, and the proportion of homozygote children at one locus was lower for DS (5/30) than for controls (13/60). These findings demonstrate the same trend as previously published but need to be confirmed by other investigators. Perhaps a strong selective pressure in favor of heterozygotes contributes to a better survival rate, as suggested from histocompatibility studies in animals.

  12. Low-dose total body irradiation (TBI) and fludarabine followed by hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) from HLA-matched or mismatched unrelated donors and postgrafting immunosuppression with cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) can induce durable complete chimerism and sustained remissions in patients with hematological diseases.

    PubMed

    Niederwieser, Dietger; Maris, Michael; Shizuru, Judith A; Petersdorf, Effie; Hegenbart, Ute; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Maloney, David G; Storer, Barry; Lange, Thoralf; Chauncey, Thomas; Deininger, Michael; Pönisch, Wolfram; Anasetti, Claudio; Woolfrey, Ann; Little, Marie-Terese; Blume, Karl G; McSweeney, Peter A; Storb, Rainer F

    2003-02-15

    Toxicities of high-dose conditioning regimens have limited the use of conventional unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to younger, medically fit patients. Based on preclinical studies, an HCT approach has been developed for elderly or medically infirm patients with HLA-matched or mismatched unrelated donors. In this study, 52 patients with hematological diseases were included. Most (88%) had preceding unsuccessful conventional HCT or refractory/advanced disease. Patients were treated with fludarabine 30 mg/m(2)/d from days -4 to -2, 2 Gy total body irradiation on day 0, cyclosporine at 6.25 mg/kg twice daily from day -3, and mycophenolate mofetil at 15 mg/kg twice daily from day 0. Durable donor chimerism was attained in 88% of the patients. By day 28, a median of 100% of CD56(+) cells were of donor origin. Granulocyte and T-cell donor chimerism increased to medians of 100% on day 56 and day 180 (range, 55%-100%), respectively. Acute GVHD, grade II, was seen in 42% (CI, 29%-56%); grade III in 8% (CI, 0%-15%); and grade IV in 13% (CI, 4%-23%) of patients; it was fatal in 9%. The 100-day transplantation-related mortality was 11%. Complete remissions, including molecular remissions, were seen in 45% of patients with measurable disease before transplantation. Mortality from disease progression was 27% at one year. With a median follow-up of 19 months, 18 of the 52 patients (35%) were alive and 25% were in remission. HCT from HLA-matched or mismatched unrelated donors can be performed with a reduced intensity conditioning regimen in patients ineligible for conventional HCT.

  13. HLA Class Ib Molecules and Immune Cells in Pregnancy and Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Djurisic, Snezana; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F.

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the highly prevalent pregnancy complication preeclampsia, “the disease of theories,” has remained an enigma. Indeed, the etiology of preeclampsia is largely unknown. A compiling amount of studies indicates that the pathological basis involves a complex array of genetic predisposition and immunological maladaptation, and that a contribution from the mother, the father, and the fetus is likely to be important. The Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-G is an increasing focus of research in relation to preeclampsia. The HLA-G molecule is primarily expressed by the extravillous trophoblast cells lining the placenta together with the two other HLA class Ib molecules, HLA-E and HLA-F. Soluble isoforms of HLA-G have been detected in the early endometrium, the matured cumulus–oocyte complex, maternal blood of pregnant women, in umbilical cord blood, and lately, in seminal plasma. HLA-G is believed to be involved in modulating immune responses in the context of vascular remodeling during pregnancy as well as in dampening potential harmful immune attacks raised against the semi-allogeneic fetus. In addition, HLA-G genetic variants are associated with both membrane-bound and soluble forms of HLA-G, and, in some studies, with preeclampsia. In this review, a genetic contribution from the mother, the father, and the fetus, together with the presence and function of various immune cells of relevance in pregnancy are reviewed in relation to HLA-G and preeclampsia. PMID:25566263

  14. HLA-G Expression and Role in Advanced-Stage Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Caocci, G.; Greco, M.; Fanni, D.; Senes, G.; Littera, R.; Lai, S.; Risso, P.; Carcassi, C.; Faa, G.; La Nasa, G.

    2016-01-01

    Non-classical human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-G class I molecules have an important role in tumor immune escape mechanisms. We investigated HLA-G expression in lymphonode biopsies taken from 8 controls and 20 patients with advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), in relationship to clinical outcomes and the HLA-G 14-basepair (14-bp) deletion-insertion (del-ins) polymorphism. Lymphnode tissue sections were stained using a specific murine monoclonal HLA-G antibody. HLA-G protein expression was higher in cHL patients than controls. In the group of PET-2 positive (positron emission tomography carried out after 2 cycles of standard chemotherapy) patients with a 2-year progression-free survival rate (PFS) of 40%, we observed high HLA-G protein expression within the tumor microenvironment with low expression on Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells. Conversely, PET-2 negative patients with a PFS of 86% had higher HLA-G protein expression levels on HRS cells compared to the microenvironment. Lower expression on HRS cells was significantly associated with the HLA-G 14-bp ins/ins genotype. These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2. PMID:27349312

  15. Rapid evaluation of soluble HLA-G levels in supernatants of in vitro fertilized embryos.

    PubMed

    Rebmann, Vera; Switala, Magdalena; Eue, Ines; Schwahn, Eva; Merzenich, Markus; Grosse-Wilde, Hans

    2007-04-01

    Human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) molecules are crucial for the maternal tolerance against the fetus during pregnancy. Thus, the presence of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) in embryo cultures is thought to be correlated to a successful pregnancy after assisted reproductive techniques (ART). Here, we established a rapid detection assay based on Luminex technology, which can be integrated into ART proceedings, allowing sHLA-G quantification in sample volumes of only 10 microl within 1.5 hours. Using this method, sHLA-G levels of 526 single-embryo cultures, 47 two-embryo cultures, and 15 three-embryo cultures were analyzed corresponding to 313 ART cycles. In 117 embryo cultures, sHLA-G was detectable. In single-embryo cultures, the sHLA-G levels were positively correlated to embryo quality (p = 0.048, r = 0.20, n = 100). The presence of sHLA-G in embryo cultures was significantly (p < 0.0001) associated with clinical pregnancy after intracytoplasmatic sperm injections (ICSI), especially in couples with male factor infertility, but not after in vitro fertilization (IVF) or in couples with female infertility. Importantly, in sHLA-G negative embryos, the abortion rate was increased threefold (p = 0.04). In conclusion, the results obtained by our novel method support strongly the diagnostic relevance of sHLA-G for predicting pregnancy outcome after ART. The ultimate conditions for this prediction have to be further investigated in a multicenter study.

  16. HLA Allele Frequencies in 5802 Koreans: Varied Allele Types Associated with SJS/TEN According to Culprit Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Jung; Kim, Young Joo; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Junho; Park, Kyung Hee; Park, Jung-Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are very serious forms of drug-induced cutaneous adverse reaction. SJS/TEN induced by certain drug is well known to be associated with some human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene type. We aimed to explore HLA allele frequencies and their association with SJS/TEN according to culprit drugs in Korea. Materials and Methods We enrolled 5802 subjects who had results of HLA typing test from August 2005 to July 2014. Total 28 SJS/TEN patients were categorized based on culprit drugs (allopurinol, lamotrigine, carbamazepine) and identified the presence of HLA-B*58:01, HLA-B*44:03, HLA-B*15:02, and HLA-A*31:01. Results HLA-A*24:02 (20.5%), HLA-B*44:03 (10.0%), and HLA-Cw*01:02 (17.1%) were the most frequent type in HLA-A, -B, and -C genes, respectively. Allele frequencies of HLA-B*58:01, HLA-B*44:03, HLA-A*31:01, and HLA-B*15:02 were 7.0%, 10.0%, 5.0%, and 0.3%, respectively. In 958 allopurinol users, 9 subjects (0.9%) were diagnosed with SJS/TEN. Among them, 8 subjects possessed HLA-B*58:01 allele. SJS/TEN induced by allopurinol was more frequently developed in subjects with HLA-B*58:01 than in subjects without it [odds ratio: 57.4; confidence interval (CI) 7.12-463.50; p<0.001]. Allopurinol treatment, based on screening by HLA-B*58:01 genotyping, could be more cost-effective than that not based on screening. HLA-B*44:03 may be associated with lamotrigine-induced SJS/TEN (odds ratio: 12.75; CI 1.03-157.14; p=0.053). Among carbamazepine users, only two patients experienced SJS/TEN and possessed neither HLA-B*15:02 nor HLA-A*31:03. Conclusion HLA gene frequencies varied in Korea. Screening of HLA-B*58:01 before the use of allopurinol might be needed to anticipate probability of SJS/TEN. PMID:26632391

  17. Characterization of a Proteasome and TAP-independent Presentation of Intracellular Epitopes by HLA-B27 Molecules*

    PubMed Central

    Magnacca, Adriana; Persiconi, Irene; Nurzia, Elisa; Caristi, Silvana; Meloni, Francesca; Barnaba, Vincenzo; Paladini, Fabiana; Raimondo, Domenico; Fiorillo, Maria Teresa; Sorrentino, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Nascent HLA-class I molecules are stabilized by proteasome-derived peptides in the ER and the new complexes proceed to the cell surface through the post-ER vesicles. It has been shown, however, that less stable complexes can exchange peptides in the Trans Golgi Network (TGN). HLA-B27 are the most studied HLA-class I molecules due to their association with Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS). Chimeric proteins driven by TAT of HIV have been exploited by us to deliver viral epitopes, whose cross-presentation by the HLA-B27 molecules was proteasome and TAP-independent and not restricted to Antigen-Presenting Cells (APC). Here, using these chimeric proteins as epitope suppliers, we compared with each other and with the HLA-A2 molecules, the two HLA-B*2705 and B*2709 alleles differing at residue 116 (D116H) and differentially associated with AS. We found that the antigen presentation by the two HLA-B27 molecules was proteasome-, TAP-, and APC-independent whereas the presentation by the HLA-A2 molecules required proteasome, TAP and professional APC. Assuming that such difference could be due to the unpaired, highly reactive Cys-67 distinguishing the HLA-B27 molecules, C67S mutants in HLA-B*2705 and B*2709 and V67C mutant in HLA-A*0201 were also analyzed. The results showed that this mutation did not influence the HLA-A2-restricted antigen presentation while it drastically affected the HLA-B27-restricted presentation with, however, remarkable differences between B*2705 and B*2709. The data, together with the occurrence on the cell surface of unfolded molecules in the case of C67S-B*2705 mutant but not in that of C67S-B*2709 mutant, indicates that Cys-67 has a more critical role in stabilizing the B*2705 rather than the B*2709 complexes. PMID:22807446

  18. The diversity of the HLA-E-restricted peptide repertoire explains the immunological impact of the Arg107Gly mismatch.

    PubMed

    Celik, Alexander A; Kraemer, Thomas; Huyton, Trevor; Blasczyk, Rainer; Bade-Döding, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E molecules are potent inhibitors of NK cell-mediated killing. Low in polymorphisms, two alleles are widely expressed among diverse populations: HLA-E*01:01 and HLA-E*01:03. Both alleles are distinguished by one SNP resulting in the substitution Arg107Gly. Both alleles present a limited set of peptides derived from class I leader sequences physiologically; however, HLA-E*01:01 presents non-canonical peptides in the absence of HLA class I molecules. To further assess the functional differences between both alleles, we analyzed the peptide repertoire of HLA-E*01:03 by applying soluble HLA technology followed by mass-spectrometric peptide sequencing. HLA-E*01:03 restricted peptides showed a length of 9-17 amino acids and differed in their biophysical properties, no overlap in the peptide repertoire of both allelic variants could be observed; however, both alleles shared marginal peptides from the same proteomic content. Artificial APCs expressing empty HLA-E*01:01 or E*01:03 molecules were generated and stabilized using cognate HLA class I-derived peptide ligands to analyze the impact of residue 107 within the HLA-E heavy chain on the NKG2/CD94 receptor engagement. Differences in peptide stabilization could be translated to the density and half-life time of peptide-HLA-E molecules on the cell surface that subsequently impacted NK cell inhibition as verified by cytotoxicity assays. Taken together, these data illustrate functional differences of HLA-E allelic variants induced by a single amino acid. Furthermore, the function of HLA-E in pathophysiologic situations when the HLA processing machinery is interrupted seems to be more emphasized than previously described, implying a crucial role for HLA-E in tumor or viral immune episodes.

  19. Association between KIR genotypes and HLA-B alleles on viral load in Southern Brazilian individuals infected by HIV-1 subtypes B and C.

    PubMed

    Fernandes-Cardoso, Juliana; Süffert, Theodoro Armando; Correa, Maria da Gloria; Jobim, Luiz Fernando Job; Jobim, Mariana; Salim, Patricia Hartstein; Arruda, Monica Barcelos; Boullosa, Lidia Theodoro; Tanuri, Amilcar; Porto, Luis Cristóvão; Ferreira, Orlando C

    2016-10-01

    There is a great variety of HIV-1 subtypes circulating in Brazil, including subtype C, whose prevalence is on the rise, particularly in the southern region. Many host and viral genetic factors may be involved in this trend. We evaluated the influence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles and killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genotypes on viral set point and T-CD4(+) parameters in 84 treatment-naïve HIV-1-positive individuals. Frequency data in the infected group were compared to data of 548 healthy control subjects. Individuals with the KIR AA genotype had a higher viral load (VL) than individuals with the KIR Bx genotype. The HIV-1 group was subdivided into three subgroups according to HLA-B allele presence: those with protection to disease alleles (HLA-B(+)), accelerated disease progression alleles (HLA-B(-)), or neither (HLA-B(o)) were grouped. We observed a significant effect of the HLA-B allele presence on VL. The HLA-B(+) group had significantly lower VL than the HLA-B(-) group and trended toward a lower VL than the HLA-B(o) group. There were significant differences between groups expressing extreme VL values: KIR-AA+HLA-B(-) vs. KIR Bx+HLA-B(+) and KIR-AA+HLA-B(o)vs. KIR Bx+HLA-B(+). The relationship of KIR/HLA host genetics with slow HIV disease progression in southern Brazil may be useful for vaccine developers, epidemiologists, and clinicians.

  20. High-accuracy imputation for HLA class I and II genes based on high-resolution SNP data of population-specific references.

    PubMed

    Khor, S-S; Yang, W; Kawashima, M; Kamitsuji, S; Zheng, X; Nishida, N; Sawai, H; Toyoda, H; Miyagawa, T; Honda, M; Kamatani, N; Tokunaga, K

    2015-12-01

    Statistical imputation of classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles is becoming an indispensable tool for fine-mappings of disease association signals from case-control genome-wide association studies. However, most currently available HLA imputation tools are based on European reference populations and are not suitable for direct application to non-European populations. Among the HLA imputation tools, The HIBAG R package is a flexible HLA imputation tool that is equipped with a wide range of population-based classifiers; moreover, HIBAG R enables individual researchers to build custom classifiers. Here, two data sets, each comprising data from healthy Japanese individuals of difference sample sizes, were used to build custom classifiers. HLA imputation accuracy in five HLA classes (HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQB1 and HLA-DPB1) increased from the 82.5-98.8% obtained with the original HIBAG references to 95.2-99.5% with our custom classifiers. A call threshold (CT) of 0.4 is recommended for our Japanese classifiers; in contrast, HIBAG references recommend a CT of 0.5. Finally, our classifiers could be used to identify the risk haplotypes for Japanese narcolepsy with cataplexy, HLA-DRB1*15:01 and HLA-DQB1*06:02, with 100% and 99.7% accuracy, respectively; therefore, these classifiers can be used to supplement the current lack of HLA genotyping data in widely available genome-wide association study data sets.

  1. HLA and fertility

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, C.

    1995-11-01

    The recent paper by Jin et al., reporting that class 11 region major histocompatibility complex genes may influence embryonic loss in outbred couples supports previous results of our studies of HLA and fertility in the Hutterites. However, the authors have incorrectly cited our work and have omitted the reference that is most relevant to their results. The paper by Kostyu et al. is incorrectly referred to in the introduction as providing evidence for HLA sharing being associated with recurrent spontaneous abortion. The Kostyu et al. paper does not include any data on fertility or reproduction but reports frequencies of individuals who are homozygous at the HLA-A, -C, -B, -DR, and -DQ loci in the Hutterite population. In fact, recurrent spontaneous abortion has not been observed in any of the couples in our sample of >500 Hutterite couples. References more appropriate to the association between HLA sharing and recurrent miscarriage are those by Komlos et al., Schacter et al., Gerencer and Kastelan, and Beer et al. It might also be worth pointing out that many studies of recurrent miscarriage in outbred couples have not found an association with HLA sharing; examples include the studies of Ergolu et al., Oksenberg et al., and Christiansen et al., among others. 11 refs.

  2. HLA-G and susceptibility to develop celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Catamo, Eulalia; Zupin, Luisa; Segat, Ludovica; Celsi, Fulvio; Crovella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The Human Leukocyte Antigen-G has immunomodulatory function and its expression has been associated with several diseases. In our study we analyzed HLA-G polymorphisms in order to evaluate their possible association with susceptibility to celiac disease development. A total of 420 celiac patients and 509 controls were genotyped for HLA-G polymorphisms. We sequenced 800bp upstream the ATG codon (5' upstream regulatory region) and the whole 3' untranslated region of the HLA-G gene, whereas the ΔC deletion at exon 3 was detected by RFLP-PCR. Five polymorphisms (namely -477 C>G, -369 C>A, 14bp del/ins, 3187 A>G, 3196 C>G) and one haplotype (TCGGTACGAAITCCCGAG) were significantly more frequent in celiac patients than controls and associated with increased disease susceptibility. The 14bp I/I, 3187 G/G, 3196 G/G genotypes and TCGGTACGAAITCCCGAG haplotype, were still significantly associated with increased disease susceptibility (and in addition also the 3003 C/C genotype) when the analysis was restricted to patients and controls presenting the DQ2.5 or DQ8 HLA-DQ celiac disease risk haplotypes. Our findings indicate an association between HLA-G gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to celiac disease development, suggesting that HLA-G molecule is possibly involved in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  3. Sequence analysis of the novel HLA-Cw*08 variant allele, Cw*0820, in a Chinese Han individual.

    PubMed

    Deng, Z-H; Xu, Y-P; Wang, D-M

    2009-09-01

    A novel human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele, HLA-Cw*0820, was identified in a Chinese Han individual. It differs from the closest allele Cw*080101 by single nucleotide change at genomic nucleotide (nt) 1615 G>A (coding sequence nt 652 G>A, codon 194 GTC>ATC) in exon 4, which results in an amino acid change Val194Ile.

  4. HLA-G and MHC Class II Protein Expression in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jesionek-Kupnicka, Dorota; Bojo, Marcin; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Szumera-Ciećkiewicz, Anna; Jabłońska, Joanna; Kalinka-Warzocha, Ewa; Kordek, Radzisław; Młynarski, Wojciech; Robak, Tadeusz; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Lech-Maranda, Ewa

    2016-06-01

    The expression of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) and HLA class II protein was studied by immunohistochemical staining of lymph nodes from 148 patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and related to the clinical course of the disease. Negative HLA-G expression was associated with a lower probability of achieving a complete remission (p = 0.04). Patients with negative HLA-G expression tended towards a lower 3-year overall survival (OS) rate compared to those with positive expression of HLA-G (p = 0.08). When restricting the analysis to patients receiving chemotherapy with rituximab, the estimated 3-year OS rate of patients with positive HLA-G expression was 73.3 % compared with 47.5 % (p = 0.03) in those with negative expression. Patients with negative HLA class II expression presented a lower 3-year OS rate compared to subjects with positive expression (p = 0.04). The loss of HLA class II expression (p = 0.05) and belonging to the intermediate high/high IPI risk group (p = 0.001) independently increased the risk of death. HLA class II expression also retained its prognostic value in patients receiving rituximab; the 3-year OS rate was 65.3 % in patients with positive HLA class II expression versus 29.6 % (p = 0.04) in subjects that had loss of HLA class II expression. To our knowledge, for the first time, the expression of HLA-G protein in DLBCL and its association with the clinical course of the disease was demonstrated. Moreover, the link between losing HLA class II protein expression and poor survival of patients treated with immunochemotherapy was confirmed.

  5. A molecular basis for the association of the HLA-DRB1 locus, citrullination, and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Scally, Stephen W.; Petersen, Jan; Law, Soi Cheng; Dudek, Nadine L.; Nel, Hendrik J.; Loh, Khai Lee; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C.; Eckle, Sidonia B.G.; van Heemst, Jurgen; Pike, Robert N.; McCluskey, James; Toes, Rene E.; La Gruta, Nicole L.

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is strongly associated with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1 locus that possesses the shared susceptibility epitope (SE) and the citrullination of self-antigens. We show how citrullinated aggrecan and vimentin epitopes bind to HLA-DRB1*04:01/04. Citrulline was accommodated within the electropositive P4 pocket of HLA-DRB1*04:01/04, whereas the electronegative P4 pocket of the RA-resistant HLA-DRB1*04:02 allomorph interacted with arginine or citrulline-containing epitopes. Peptide elution studies revealed P4 arginine–containing peptides from HLA-DRB1*04:02, but not from HLA-DRB1*04:01/04. Citrullination altered protease susceptibility of vimentin, thereby generating self-epitopes that are presented to T cells in HLA-DRB1*04:01+ individuals. Using HLA-II tetramers, we observed citrullinated vimentin- and aggrecan-specific CD4+ T cells in the peripheral blood of HLA-DRB1*04:01+ RA-affected and healthy individuals. In RA patients, autoreactive T cell numbers correlated with disease activity and were deficient in regulatory T cells relative to healthy individuals. These findings reshape our understanding of the association between citrullination, the HLA-DRB1 locus, and T cell autoreactivity in RA. PMID:24190431

  6. Association between HLA-E gene polymorphism and unexplained recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) in Iranian women

    PubMed Central

    Fotoohi, Maryam; Ghasemi, Nasrin; Mirghanizadeh, Seyed Ali; Vakili, Mahmood; Samadi, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human leukocyte antigen-E (HLA-E)is a non-classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigens which expressed on extra villous cytotrophoblast, which interacts with NKG2A, is an inhibitory receptor on natural killer (NK) cells and leading to down regulation of immune response in the maternal-fetal interface and provides maternal immune tolerance of the fetus. Objective: This study was designated to investigate the gene frequencies of E0101 and E0103 in HLA-E gene in Iranian women with recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA). Materials and Methods: Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS-PCR) technique was carried out to detect polymorphism in exon 3 of the HLA-E gene in women with RSA and controls (n=200). Differences between groups were analyzed by SPSS19 software using 2 test. Results: There was no significant difference in the allele frequencies of the HLA-E polymorphism between RSA and fertile controls but HLA-E 0101/0103 heterozygous genotype was found to be significantly higher in RSA group (p=0.006, OR=1.73), so this genotype might confer susceptibility to RSA. Conclusion: Our results suggest that HLA-E 0101/0103 heterozygous genotype leads to increase of RSA risk. It seems that by genotyping of HLA-E polymorphism, we can predict the risk of RSA in infertile women. PMID:27525333

  7. Discrimination of HLA null and low expression alleles by cytokine-induced secretion of recombinant soluble HLA.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, Jan; Figueiredo, Constança; Hirv, Kaimo; Mytilineos, Joannis; Blasczyk, Rainer; Horn, Peter A; Eiz-Vesper, Britta

    2009-04-01

    The disruption of disulfide bridges can decrease or abolish the cell surface expression of HLA class I molecules. Such disulfide bridges are formed by cysteine residues between amino acid (aa) positions 101/164 (alpha(2) domain) and 203/259 (alpha(3) domain). Sequence alterations in codons 101, 164, 203 and 259 have been observed in eleven HLA-A molecules. All of these variants except of A*3014L and A*3211Q have been reported to result in null expression alleles. In the case of HLA-A*3014L, a transversion at nucleotide position 563 replaces cysteine by serine at position 164 of the mature polypeptide. HLA-A*3014L is not detectable by standard microlymphocytotoxicity assay. To verify low or non-expression of this allele, we cloned soluble HLA-A*3014L and the reference allele HLA-A*3001 into a eukaryotic expression vector and transfected K562, C1R and HEK293 cells. Expression of soluble HLA-A*3014L and HLA-A*3001 was measured in the supernatants of transfected and untransfected cells incubated with or without IFN-gamma and/or TNF-alpha using a W6/32 and anti-beta(2)-microglobulin-based sandwich ELISA. Expression of mRNA transcripts of both alleles was determined by real-time RT-PCR. HLA-A*3014L was not detected in the supernatant of unstimulated transfectants. Stimulation with IFN-gamma and/or TNF-alpha led to an increase of HLA-A*3014L secretion to a detectable level and increased HLA-A*3001 expression up to 8-fold, but did not show any difference in the increase of mRNA levels between HLA-A*3014L and A*3001. Because of this lack of any difference in the mRNA transcription, the protein expression defect is most likely caused by the missing disulfide bond formation in the alpha2 domain. Thus, exposing the cells to cytokine stress allows to distinguish between low- and non-expressed alleles and to classify alleles with a questionable expression pattern (Q alleles). Classifying HLA alleles in expressed and non-expressed variants is essential for matching assessments

  8. Conjunctival HLA-DR and CD8 expression detected by impression cytology in ocular graft versus host disease

    PubMed Central

    Issleib, Susanne; Böhringer, Daniel; Mittelviefhaus, Hans; Schwartzkopff, Johannes; Finke, Juergen; Reinhard, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the expression of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR in epithelial cells and cluster of differentiation (CD8)-positive lymphocytes as possible markers of chronic ocular graft versus host disease (cGvHD) after hematological stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Methods Twenty-seven consecutive patients with dry-eye symptoms following HSCT (24 [89%] with peripheral blood stem cell transplantation and 3 [11%] with bone marrow transplants; 17 [63%] familiar allogenic grafts) and 19 age-matched controls were included. Conjunctival impression cytology specimens were stained for HLA-DR, cytokeratin 19, and CD8. Oxford grading scale, blinking frequency, Schirmer test, tear film break-up time (TBUT), and Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) were also recorded. Wilcoxon nonparametric testing was used to compare controls and HSCT recipients and to assess HSCT recipient subgroups with and without clinical cGVHD. Results Eighteen patients showed clinical signs of ocular cGVHD. TBUT and Schirmer test scores were significantly lower in patients, while Oxford grades and OSDI were significantly higher than in controls. Epithelial HLA-DR expression was generally higher in HSCT recipients than in controls, but it did not correlate with ocular cGVHD status. CD8-positive lymphocytes were identified in five patients with ocular cGvHD and one control. Conclusions A strong HLA-DR expression as detected by impression cytology appears to indicate a general HSCT response and fails to predict ocular cGVHD. However, the detection of CD8-positive lymphocytes using impression cytology was frequently associated with ocular cGvHD. Our data warrant further evaluation of CD8 expression in impression cytology, along with comparison to conjunctival biopsies and brush cytology, as impression cytology may offer a less invasive strategy for assessing cGVHD status. PMID:23878500

  9. Update of the HLA class I eplet database in the website based registry of antibody-defined HLA epitopes.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, R J

    2014-06-01

    Eplets are small configurations of polymorphic amino acid residues on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules and are considered as essential components of HLA epitopes recognized by antibodies. This report describes a new design of the eplet repertoire in HLA-ABC alleles used in Luminex kits for antibody testing. There were three steps (1): identify all combinations of polymorphic residues with HLA molecular modeling within a 3-Å radius, (2) determine polymorphic residue compositions of 3 Å patches from amino acid sequences of HLA alleles in Luminex panels and (3) annotate eplets from one or more patches present on one allele or shared by the same group of alleles. There are now 270 HLA-ABC eplets in the Registry, of which 219 are in antibody-accessible positions on the molecular surface and 51 are defined solely by residue polymorphisms located below the molecular surface. Each eplet has a list of Luminex and non-Luminex alleles for which mismatch acceptability can be determined.

  10. A novel HLA-A allele: A*0257.

    PubMed

    García-Ortiz, J E; Cox, S T; Sandoval-Ramirez, L; Little, A M; Marsh, S G E; Madrigal, J A; Argüello, J R

    2004-01-01

    A novel human leucocyte antigen-A*02 (HLA-A*02) allele was detected by reference strand-mediated conformation analysis (RSCA) of a DNA sample from a Tarahumara individual. Direct sequencing of HLA-A locus polymerase chain reaction products identified a mutation in one of the alleles. Cloning and sequencing confirmed the presence of a new allele, A*0257 which differed from A*0206 by two nucleotides at positions 355 and 362, inducing changes in residues 95 and 97, respectively, within the peptide-binding site. Those changes suggest that allele A*0257 may have resulted from an intralocus recombination event.

  11. Immunogenetics of HLA.

    PubMed

    Bach, F H

    1991-01-01

    The enormous contributions of Professor Karl Landsteiner are summarized focusing on his discovery of the ABO, MN, and P blood group systems as well as his conceptualization of the hapten concept. The HLA system, the major histocompatibility complex in humans, is discussed from the point of view of its genetic organization, the polymorphism that is recognized by T lymphocytes and the presently defined molecular polymorphism. The structure-function relationship of T cell recognition of class II molecules, based on the known crystallographic structure of an HLA class I molecule, is presented.

  12. Regulation and trafficking of the HLA-E molecules during monocyte-macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Camilli, Giorgio; Cassotta, Antonino; Battella, Simone; Palmieri, Gabriella; Santoni, Angela; Paladini, Fabiana; Fiorillo, Maria Teresa; Sorrentino, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    HLA-E is a nonclassical HLA-class I molecule whose best known role is to protect from the natural killer cells. More recently, an additional function more similar to that of classical HLA-class I molecules, i.e., antigen presentation to T cells, is emerging. However, much remains to be explored about the intracellular trafficking of the HLA-E molecules. With the use of 3 different cellular contexts, 2 monocytic cell lines, U937 and THP1, and peripheral blood monocytes, we show here a remarkable increase of HLA-E during monocyte-macrophage differentiation. This goes independently from the classical HLA-class I, the main source of HLA-E-specific peptides, which is found strongly up-regulated upon differentiation of peripheral blood monocytes but not at all in the case of U937 and THP1 cell lines. Although in all cases, there was a moderate increase of HLA-E expressed in the cell surface, lysis by natural killer cells is comparably restored by an anti-NKG2A antibody in untreated as well as in PMA-differentiated U937 cells. Instead, the great majority of the HLA-E is retained in the vesicles of the autophagy-lysosome network, where they colocalize with the microtubule-associated protein light chain 3, as well as with the lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1. We conclude that differently from the classical HLA-class I molecules, the primary destination of the newly synthesized HLA-E molecules in macrophages is, rather than the cell membrane, the intracellular autophagy-lysosomal vesicles where they are stored and where they can encounter the exogenous antigens.

  13. Association of HLA-A and Non-Classical HLA Class I Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Carlini, Federico; Ferreira, Virginia; Buhler, Stéphane; Tous, Audrey; Eliaou, Jean-François; René, Céline; Chiaroni, Jacques; Picard, Christophe; Di Cristofaro, Julie

    2016-01-01

    The HLA-A locus is surrounded by HLA class Ib genes: HLA-E, HLA-H, HLA-G and HLA-F. HLA class Ib molecules are involved in immuno-modulation with a central role for HLA-G and HLA-E, an emerging role for HLA-F and a yet unknown function for HLA-H. Thus, the principal objective of this study was to describe the main allelic associations between HLA-A and HLA-H, -G, -F and -E. Therefore, HLA-A, -E, -G, -H and -F coding polymorphisms, as well as HLA-G UnTranslated Region haplotypes (referred to as HLA-G UTRs), were explored in 191 voluntary blood donors. Allelic frequencies, Global Linkage Disequilibrium (GLD), Linkage Disequilibrium (LD) for specific pairs of alleles and two-loci haplotype frequencies were estimated. We showed that HLA-A, HLA-H, HLA-F, HLA-G and HLA-G UTRs were all in highly significant pairwise GLD, in contrast to HLA-E. Moreover, HLA-A displayed restricted associations with HLA-G UTR and HLA-H. We also confirmed several associations that were previously found to have a negative impact on transplantation outcome. In summary, our results suggest complex functional and clinical implications of the HLA-A genetic region. PMID:27701438

  14. Distribution of HLA-G extended haplotypes and one HLA-E polymorphism in a large-scale study of mother-child dyads with and without severe preeclampsia and eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, L L; Djurisic, S; Andersen, A-M N; Melbye, M; Bjerre, D; Ferrero-Miliani, L; Hackmon, R; Geraghty, D E; Hviid, T V F

    2016-10-01

    The etiological pathways and pathogenesis of preeclampsia have rendered difficult to disentangle. Accumulating evidence points toward a maladapted maternal immune system, which may involve aberrant placental expression of immunomodulatory human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ib molecules during pregnancy. Several studies have shown aberrant or reduced expression of HLA-G in the placenta and in maternal blood in cases of preeclampsia compared with controls. Unlike classical HLA class Ia loci, the nonclassical HLA-G has limited polymorphic variants. Most nucleotide variations are clustered in the 5'-upstream regulatory region (5'URR) and 3'-untranslated regulatory region (3'UTR) of HLA-G and reflect a stringent expressional control. Based on genotyping and full gene sequencing of HLA-G in a large number of cases and controls (n > 900), the present study, which to our knowledge is the largest and most comprehensive performed, investigated the association between the HLA-G 14-bp ins/del (rs66554220) and HLA-E polymorphisms in mother and newborn dyads from pregnancies complicated by severe preeclampsia/eclampsia and from uncomplicated pregnancies. Furthermore, results from extended HLA-G haplotyping in the newborns are presented in order to assess whether a combined contribution of nucleotide variations spanning the 5'URR, coding region, and 3'UTR of HLA-G describes the genetic association with severe preeclampsia more closely. In contrast to earlier findings, the HLA-G 14-bp ins/del polymorphism was not associated with severe preeclampsia. Furthermore, the polymorphism (rs1264457) defining the two nonsynonymous HLA-E alleles, HLA-E*01:01:xx:xx and HLA-E*01:03:xx:xx, were not associated with severe preeclampsia. Finally, no specific HLA-G haplotypes were significantly associated with increased risk of developing severe preeclampsia/eclampsia. PMID:27596021

  15. Distribution of HLA-G extended haplotypes and one HLA-E polymorphism in a large-scale study of mother-child dyads with and without severe preeclampsia and eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, L L; Djurisic, S; Andersen, A-M N; Melbye, M; Bjerre, D; Ferrero-Miliani, L; Hackmon, R; Geraghty, D E; Hviid, T V F

    2016-10-01

    The etiological pathways and pathogenesis of preeclampsia have rendered difficult to disentangle. Accumulating evidence points toward a maladapted maternal immune system, which may involve aberrant placental expression of immunomodulatory human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ib molecules during pregnancy. Several studies have shown aberrant or reduced expression of HLA-G in the placenta and in maternal blood in cases of preeclampsia compared with controls. Unlike classical HLA class Ia loci, the nonclassical HLA-G has limited polymorphic variants. Most nucleotide variations are clustered in the 5'-upstream regulatory region (5'URR) and 3'-untranslated regulatory region (3'UTR) of HLA-G and reflect a stringent expressional control. Based on genotyping and full gene sequencing of HLA-G in a large number of cases and controls (n > 900), the present study, which to our knowledge is the largest and most comprehensive performed, investigated the association between the HLA-G 14-bp ins/del (rs66554220) and HLA-E polymorphisms in mother and newborn dyads from pregnancies complicated by severe preeclampsia/eclampsia and from uncomplicated pregnancies. Furthermore, results from extended HLA-G haplotyping in the newborns are presented in order to assess whether a combined contribution of nucleotide variations spanning the 5'URR, coding region, and 3'UTR of HLA-G describes the genetic association with severe preeclampsia more closely. In contrast to earlier findings, the HLA-G 14-bp ins/del polymorphism was not associated with severe preeclampsia. Furthermore, the polymorphism (rs1264457) defining the two nonsynonymous HLA-E alleles, HLA-E*01:01:xx:xx and HLA-E*01:03:xx:xx, were not associated with severe preeclampsia. Finally, no specific HLA-G haplotypes were significantly associated with increased risk of developing severe preeclampsia/eclampsia.

  16. HLA class II gene associations in African American Type 1 diabetes reveal a protective HLA-DRB1*03 haplotype

    PubMed Central

    Howson, J M M; Roy, M S; Zeitels, L; Stevens, H; Todd, J A

    2013-01-01

    Aims Owing to strong linkage disequilibrium between markers, pinpointing disease associations within genetic regions is difficult in European ancestral populations, most notably the very strong association of the HLA-DRB1*03-DQA1*05:01-DQB1*02:01 haplotype with Type 1 diabetes risk, which is assumed to be because of a combination of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1. In contrast, populations of African ancestry have greater haplotype diversity, offering the possibility of narrowing down regions and strengthening support for a particular gene in a region being causal. We aimed to study the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region in African American Type 1 diabetes. Methods Two hundred and twenty-seven African American patients with Type 1 diabetes and 471 African American control subjects were tested for association at the HLA class II genes, HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1 and 5147 single nucleotide polymorphisms across the major histocompatibility complex region using logistic regression models. Population admixture was accounted for with principal components analysis. Results Single nucleotide polymorphism marker associations were explained by the HLA associations, with the major peak over the class II loci. The HLA association overall was extremely strong, as expected for Type 1 diabetes, even in African Americans in whom diabetes diagnosis is heterogeneous. In addition, there were unique features: the HLA-DRB1*03 haplotype was split into HLA-DRB1*03:01, which confers greatest susceptibility in these samples (odds ratio 3.17, 95% CI 1.72–5.83) and HLA-DRB1*03:02, an allele rarely observed in Europeans, which confers the greatest protection in these African American samples (odds ratio 0.22, 95% CI 0.09–0.55). Conclusions The unique diversity of the African HLA region we have uncovered supports a specific and major role for HLA-DRB1 in HLA-DRB1*03 haplotype-associated Type 1 diabetes risk. PMID:23398374

  17. Genetic Association of HLA-A*26, -A*31, and -B*51 with Behcet’s Disease in Saudi Patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Okaily, Fahda; Al-Rashidi, Seham; Al-Balawi, Maysoon; Mustafa, Md.; Arfin, Misbahul; Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND HLA-B*51 has been universally associated with Behcet’s disease (BD) susceptibility, while different alleles of HLA-A have also been identified as independent BD susceptibility loci in various ethnic populations. The objective of this study was to investigate associations of HLA-A and -B alleles with BD in Saudi patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS Genotyping for HLA-A and HLA-B was performed using HLA genotyping kit (Lab type(R) SSO) in 120 Saudi subjects, including 60 BD patients and 60 matched healthy controls. RESULTS Our results revealed that frequencies of HLA-A*26, -A*31, and -B*51 were significantly higher in BD patients than in controls, suggesting that HLA-A*26, -A*31, and -B*51 are associated with BD. The frequency of HLA-B*15 was significantly lower in BD patients than in controls. Stratification of genotyping results into active and nonactive forms of BD revealed that the frequency of HLA-A*31 was significantly higher in the nonactive form than in the active form of BD, while there was no significant difference in the distribution of other alleles between the two forms of BD. CONCLUSION This study suggests that HLA-A*26, -A*31, and -B*51 are associated with susceptibility risk to BD, while HLA-B*15 may be protective in Saudi patients. However, larger scale studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:27547040

  18. Genetic analysis of HLA in the U.S. Schmiedenleut Hutterites.

    PubMed Central

    Kostyu, D D; Ober, C L; Dawson, D V; Ghanayem, M; Elias, S; Martin, A O

    1989-01-01

    The Hutterites are an Anabaptist population, highly inbred, with large family sizes and extensively documented pedigrees. As part of genetic-epidemiologic studies of the impact of HLA on fertility, HLA-A, -B, -C, -DR, and -DQ typing was performed on a total of 650 Schmiedenleut Hutterities in South Dakota. An extraordinary degree of homogeneity was found. HLA-A1, -A2, -A3, -A24, and -A26 accounted for 83%, HLA-B8, -B27, -B35, -B51, -Bw60, and -Bw62 for 75%, and HLA-DR1, -DR2, -DR3, and -DR4 for 66% of the antigens at the respective HLA-A, -B, and -DR loci. All Hutterites characterized for HLA were descendants of no more than 78 ancestors. However, family analysis identified only 45 unique HLA haplotypes thought to reflect the original gene pool. Eight haplotypes were particularly frequent, accounting for nearly 50% of all observed haplotypes; four of these were consistent with a European ancestry. Coefficients measuring linkage disequilibrium were computed from haplotypes identified by family analysis. Overall, HLA analysis portrayed the Schmiedenleut Hutterities as a homogeneous and unique population, with disequilibrium among particular alleles and a spectrum of common and uncommon European haplotypes. PMID:2757031

  19. The Structure and Stability of the Monomorphic HLA-G Are Influenced by the Nature of the Bound Peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Walpole, Nicholas G.; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Kostenko, Lyudmila; McCluskey, James; Brooks, Andrew G.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Clements, Craig S.

    2010-03-26

    The highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex class Ia (MHC-Ia) molecules present a broad array of peptides to the clonotypically diverse {alpha}{beta} T-cell receptors. In contrast, MHC-Ib molecules exhibit limited polymorphism and bind a more restricted peptide repertoire, in keeping with their major role in innate immunity. Nevertheless, some MHC-Ib molecules do play a role in adaptive immunity. While human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E), the MHC-Ib molecule, binds a very restricted repertoire of peptides, the peptide binding preferences of HLA-G, the class Ib molecule, are less stringent, although the basis by which HLA-G can bind various peptides is unclear. To investigate how HLA-G can accommodate different peptides, we compared the structure of HLA-G bound to three naturally abundant self-peptides (RIIPRHLQL, KGPPAALTL and KLPQAFYIL) and their thermal stabilities. The conformation of HLA-G{sup KGPPAALTL} was very similar to that of the HLA-G{sup RIIPRHLQL} structure. However, the structure of HLA-G{sup KLPQAFYIL} not only differed in the conformation of the bound peptide but also caused a small shift in the {alpha}2 helix of HLA-G. Furthermore, the relative stability of HLA-G was observed to be dependent on the nature of the bound peptide. These peptide-dependent effects on the substructure of the monomorphic HLA-G are likely to impact on its recognition by receptors of both innate and adaptive immune systems.

  20. In vitro mutagenesis at a single residue introduces B and T cell epitopes into a class I HLA molecule.

    PubMed

    Salter, R D; Clayberger, C; Lomen, C E; Krensky, A M; Parham, P

    1987-07-01

    We have studied the interaction of HLA class I antigens with alloreactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes and monoclonal antibodies using site-directed mutagenesis and expression of an HLA-Aw68.1 gene. Two mutants containing distinct substitutions at polymorphic residues near the NH2-terminal end of the alpha 2 domain were made. One mutant with substitutions at positions 95 and 97 corresponding to residues found in HLA-A2.1 showed no alterations in binding of HLA-Aw68- or HLA-A2-specific monoclonal antibodies, but was reactive with some HLA-A2-specific CTL clones. A second mutant, in which glycine at position 107 was replaced with tryptophan found at that position in HLA-A2.1, was recognized by HLA-A2-specific CTL clones and HLA-A2, Aw69-specific monoclonal antibodies. Thus, substitution of a single amino acid residue at position 107 of the HLA-Aw68.1 molecule generates an allospecific determinant shared with HLA-A2.1 and recognized by both B and T lymphocytes. PMID:2439636

  1. HLA-F coding and regulatory segments variability determined by massively parallel sequencing procedures in a Brazilian population sample.

    PubMed

    Lima, Thálitta Hetamaro Ayala; Buttura, Renato Vidal; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio; Veiga-Castelli, Luciana Caricati; Mendes-Junior, Celso Teixeira; Castelli, Erick C

    2016-10-01

    Human Leucocyte Antigen F (HLA-F) is a non-classical HLA class I gene distinguished from its classical counterparts by low allelic polymorphism and distinctive expression patterns. Its exact function remains unknown. It is believed that HLA-F has tolerogenic and immune modulatory properties. Currently, there is little information regarding the HLA-F allelic variation among human populations and the available studies have evaluated only a fraction of the HLA-F gene segment and/or have searched for known alleles only. Here we present a strategy to evaluate the complete HLA-F variability including its 5' upstream, coding and 3' downstream segments by using massively parallel sequencing procedures. HLA-F variability was surveyed on 196 individuals from the Brazilian Southeast. The results indicate that the HLA-F gene is indeed conserved at the protein level, where thirty coding haplotypes or coding alleles were detected, encoding only four different HLA-F full-length protein molecules. Moreover, a same protein molecule is encoded by 82.45% of all coding alleles detected in this Brazilian population sample. However, the HLA-F nucleotide and haplotype variability is much higher than our current knowledge both in Brazilians and considering the 1000 Genomes Project data. This protein conservation is probably a consequence of the key role of HLA-F in the immune system physiology.

  2. Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia caused by human leucocyte antigen-B27 antibody.

    PubMed

    Thude, H; Schorner, U; Helfricht, C; Loth, M; Maak, B; Barz, D

    2006-04-01

    Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT) occurs when maternal alloantibodies to antigens presented on foetal platelets cause their immune destruction. Whether human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies can cause NAIT is controversial. Here, a patient was described who suffered from a NAIT caused by an HLA-B27 antibody. Sera from the mother and the newborn were tested for human platelet antigen antibodies and HLA antibodies by monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA) assay, solid phase-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), lymphocytotoxicity assay (LCT) and flow cytometric analysis. No antibodies against cluster designation (CD)109 and platelet glycoproteins of the father were found in patient's and mother's serum. However, HLA ELISA was used to identify HLA antibody in both sera. The antibody was specified as HLA-B27 antibody. Typing results showed that the father descended HLA-B27 antigen on patient and his brother. The mother was HLA-B27 negative. It is most conceivable that the previous pregnancy of the mother induced the production of anti-HLA-B27 antibody, which crossed the placenta and subsequently caused an NAIT in the case presented. PMID:16623921

  3. Diagnostic significance of soluble human leukocyte antigen-G for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ying-Qiu; Ruan, Yan-Yun; Peng, Jin-Bang; Han, Qiu-Yue; Zhang, Xia; Lin, Aifen; Yan, Wei-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a novel tumor marker. Increased level of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) in various tumor types has been reported. However, the potential diagnostic value of sHLA-G with other tumor markers in gastric cancer (GC) diagnosis is yet to be explored. In this study, plasma level of sHLA-G was measured in 81 GC patients, 53 benign gastric disease patients and 77 normal controls by ELISA. The serum levels of alpha fetoprotein (AFP), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cancer antigen 125 (CA125), cancer antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) and cancer antigen 72-4 (CA72-4) were also determined. Data showed that plasma level of sHLA-G in GC was dramatically increased compared with normal controls and benign gastric disease patients (both p<0.001). The AUC for sHLA-G was 0.730 (p<0.001), superior to serum AFP, CEA, CA125, CA19-9 and CA72-4. After evaluating three cut-offs of sHLA-G, we concluded sHLA-G (cut-off at 128U/ml) plus CA125 in two-biomarker panel test and CA125 plus CA199 plus sHLA-G or CA125 plus CA724 plus sHLA-G in three-biomarker panel test were better choices for GC discrimination. Our findings indicated that sHLA-G was a potential biomarker for GC diagnosis and the combination of sHLA-G with CA125, CA19-9 and CA72-4 can improve the clinical screening and diagnosis for GC.

  4. In silico analysis of HLA associations with drug-induced liver injury: use of a HLA-genotyped DNA archive from healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is one of the most common adverse reactions leading to product withdrawal post-marketing. Recently, genome-wide association studies have identified a number of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles associated with DILI; however, the cellular and chemical mechanisms are not fully understood. Methods To study these mechanisms, we established an HLA-typed cell archive from 400 healthy volunteers. In addition, we utilized HLA genotype data from more than four million individuals from publicly accessible repositories such as the Allele Frequency Net Database, Major Histocompatibility Complex Database and Immune Epitope Database to study the HLA alleles associated with DILI. We utilized novel in silico strategies to examine HLA haplotype relationships among the alleles associated with DILI by using bioinformatics tools such as NetMHCpan, PyPop, GraphViz, PHYLIP and TreeView. Results We demonstrated that many of the alleles that have been associated with liver injury induced by structurally diverse drugs (flucloxacillin, co-amoxiclav, ximelagatran, lapatinib, lumiracoxib) reside on common HLA haplotypes, which were present in populations of diverse ethnicity. Conclusions Our bioinformatic analysis indicates that there may be a connection between the different HLA alleles associated with DILI caused by therapeutically and structurally different drugs, possibly through peptide binding of one of the HLA alleles that defines the causal haplotype. Further functional work, together with next-generation sequencing techniques, will be needed to define the causal alleles associated with DILI. PMID:22732016

  5. Unraveling Multiple MHC Gene Associations with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Model Choice Indicates a Role for HLA Alleles and Non-HLA Genes in Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Morris, David L.; Taylor, Kimberly E.; Fernando, Michelle M.A.; Nititham, Joanne; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Barcellos, Lisa F.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Cotsapas, Chris; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Graham, Robert R.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Harley, John B.; Hauser, Stephen L.; Hom, Geoffrey; Langefeld, Carl D.; Noble, Janelle A.; Rioux, John D.; Seldin, Michael F.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Vyse, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    We have performed a meta-analysis of the major-histocompatibility-complex (MHC) region in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) to determine the association with both SNPs and classical human-leukocyte-antigen (HLA) alleles. More specifically, we combined results from six studies and well-known out-of-study control data sets, providing us with 3,701 independent SLE cases and 12,110 independent controls of European ancestry. This study used genotypes for 7,199 SNPs within the MHC region and for classical HLA alleles (typed and imputed). Our results from conditional analysis and model choice with the use of the Bayesian information criterion show that the best model for SLE association includes both classical loci (HLA-DRB1∗03:01, HLA-DRB1∗08:01, and HLA-DQA1∗01:02) and two SNPs, rs8192591 (in class III and upstream of NOTCH4) and rs2246618 (MICB in class I). Our approach was to perform a stepwise search from multiple baseline models deduced from a priori evidence on HLA-DRB1 lupus-associated alleles, a stepwise regression on SNPs alone, and a stepwise regression on HLA alleles. With this approach, we were able to identify a model that was an overwhelmingly better fit to the data than one identified by simple stepwise regression either on SNPs alone (Bayes factor [BF] > 50) or on classical HLA alleles alone (BF > 1,000). PMID:23084292

  6. HLA-A 31:01 and HLA-B 15:02 as genetic markers for carbamazepine hypersensitivity in children.

    PubMed

    Amstutz, U; Ross, C J D; Castro-Pastrana, L I; Rieder, M J; Shear, N H; Hayden, M R; Carleton, B C

    2013-07-01

    The occurrence of hypersensitivity reactions including rare but life-threatening Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (HSS) limits the use of the anticonvulsant carbamazepine (CBZ). Human leukocyte antigen-B (HLA)-B 15:02 and HLA-A 31:01 have been identified as predictive genetic markers for CBZ hypersensitivity in Asian and European patients. To replicate these genetic associations in pediatric patients from North America with a diverse ethnic background, we investigated HLA-A 31:01 and HLA-B 15:02 in 42 children with CBZ hypersensitivity and 91 CBZ-tolerant children from across Canada. HLA-A 31:01 was significantly associated with CBZ-HSS (odds ratio (OR): 26.4, P = 0.0025) and maculopapular exanthema (MPE) (OR: 8.6, P = 0.0037) but not with CBZ-SJS. Conversely, HLA-B 15:02 was associated with CBZ-SJS (OR: 38.6, P = 0.002) but not HSS or MPE. This study is the first to demonstrate the association of HLA-A 31:01 with CBZ hypersensitivity in children, providing important replication of this association and highlighting the importance of HLA-A 31:01 as a predictive biomarker across various ancestries.

  7. Class I-induced resistance to natural killing: identification of nonpermissive residues in HLA-A2.

    PubMed Central

    Storkus, W J; Salter, R D; Alexander, J; Ward, F E; Ruiz, R E; Cresswell, P; Dawson, J R

    1991-01-01

    Structural characteristics of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens associated with natural killer (NK)-resistance phenomena were examined. Previous research has shown that transfection of class I genomic DNA clones into class I-deficient, NK-sensitive target cell lines results in transfectants exhibiting class I+, NK-resistant phenotypes. In contrast to the HLA-A3, -B7, -B27, and -Bw58 class I molecules, the HLA-A2 class I molecules were shown not to protect target cells from NK activity. Here we show that this nonprotective phenotype maps to the alpha 1 domain of the HLA-A2 molecule by examining the NK-protective capacity of the natural interdomain recombinant HLA-Aw69 molecule. HLA-Aw69, which consists of an alpha 1 domain exhibiting homology with HLA-Aw68, and alpha 2/alpha 3/transmembrane-cytoplasmic domains, exhibiting homologies with HLA-A2, mimics HLA-Aw68 and provides HLA-A,B null target cell (C1R) transfectants with increased resistance to NK. Further, the inability of transfected HLA-A2 to confer protection against NK activity can be completely attributed to the expression of a "nonpermissive" residue at position 74 in the alpha 1 domain. Site-directed mutation of the His-74 residue in HLA-A2 to the Asp-74 (HLA-A3, -Aw68, -Aw69, -B7) residue generates a mutant that provides C1R cell line transfectants an NK-resistant phenotype. As His-74 blocks access to a side pocket in the HLA-A2 antigen-binding cleft, these results support the critical involvement of residues within the peptide-binding groove of class I molecules in determining the NK susceptibility phenotype of class I+ target cells. PMID:2068075

  8. HLA-G expression and role in advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Caocci, G; Greco, M; Fanni, D; Senes, G; Littera, R; Lai, S; Risso, P; Carcassi, C; Faa, G; La Nasa, G

    2016-01-01

    Non-classical human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-G class I molecules have an important role in tumor immune escape mechanisms. We investigated HLA-G expression in lymphonode biopsies taken from 8 controls and 20 patients with advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), in relationship to clinical outcomes and the HLA-G 14-basepair (14-bp) deletion-insertion (del-ins) polymorphism. Lymphnode tissue sections were stained using a specific murine monoclonal HLA-G antibody. HLA-G protein expression was higher in cHL patients than controls. In the group of PET-2 positive (positron emission tomography carried out after 2 cycles of standard chemotherapy) patients with a 2-year progression-free survival rate (PFS) of 40%, we observed high HLA-G protein expression within the tumor microenvironment with low expression on Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells. Conversely, PET-2 negative patients with a PFS of 86% had higher HLA-G protein expression levels on HRS cells compared to the microenvironment. Lower expression on HRS cells was significantly associated with the HLA-G 14-bp ins/ins genotype. These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2.These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2. PMID:27349312

  9. Phase-defined complete sequencing of the HLA genes by next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region, the 3.8-Mb segment of the human genome at 6p21, has been associated with more than 100 different diseases, mostly autoimmune diseases. Due to the complex nature of HLA genes, there are difficulties in elucidating complete HLA gene sequences especially HLA gene haplotype structures by the conventional sequencing method. We propose a novel, accurate, and cost-effective method for generating phase-defined complete sequencing of HLA genes by using indexed multiplex next generation sequencing. Results A total of 33 HLA homozygous samples, 11 HLA heterozygous samples, and 3 parents-child families were subjected to phase-defined HLA gene sequencing. We applied long-range PCR to amplify six HLA genes (HLA-A, -C, -B, DRB1, -DQB1, and –DPB1) followed by transposase-based library construction and multiplex sequencing with the MiSeq sequencer. Paired-end reads (2 × 250 bp) derived from the sequencer were aligned to the six HLA gene segments of UCSC hg19 allowing at most 80 bases mismatch. For HLA homozygous samples, the six amplicons of an individual were pooled and simultaneously sequenced and mapped as an individual-tagging method. The paired-end reads were aligned to corresponding genes of UCSC hg19 and unambiguous, continuous sequences were obtained. For HLA heterozygous samples, each amplicon was separately sequenced and mapped as a gene-tagging method. After alignments, we detected informative paired-end reads harboring SNVs on both forward and reverse reads that are used to separate two chromosomes and to generate two phase-defined sequences in an individual. Consequently, we were able to determine the phase-defined HLA gene sequences from promoter to 3′-UTR and assign up to 8-digit HLA allele numbers, regardless of whether the alleles are rare or novel. Parent–child trio-based sequencing validated our sequencing and phasing methods. Conclusions Our protocol generated phased-defined sequences of the entire

  10. Expression of classical HLA class I molecules: regulation and clinical impacts: Julia Bodmer Award Review 2015.

    PubMed

    René, C; Lozano, C; Eliaou, J-F

    2016-05-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I genes are ubiquitously expressed, but in a tissue specific-manner. Their expression is primarily regulated at the transcriptional level and can be modulated both positively and negatively by different stimuli. Advances in sequencing technologies led to the identification of new regulatory variants located in the untranslated regions (UTRs), which could influence the expression. After a brief description of the mechanisms underlying the transcriptional regulation of HLA class I genes expression, we will review how the expression levels of HLA class I genes could affect biological and pathological processes. Then, we will discuss on the differential expression of HLA class I genes according to the locus, allele and UTR polymorphisms and its clinical impact. This interesting field of study led to a new dimension of HLA typing, going beyond a qualitative aspect.

  11. The perfect storm: HLA antibodies, complement, FcγRs, and endothelium in transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kimberly A; Valenzuela, Nicole M; Reed, Elaine F

    2015-05-01

    The pathophysiology of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in solid organ transplants is multifaceted and predominantly caused by antibodies directed against polymorphic donor human leukocyte antigens (HLAs). Despite the clearly detrimental impact of HLA an