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Sample records for antigen specific ige

  1. Rapid desensitization induces internalization of antigen-specific IgE on mouse mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Tatsuya; Rios, Eon J.; Tsai, Mindy; Kalesnikoff, Janet; Galli, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Rapid desensitization transiently prevents severe allergic reactions, allowing administration of life-saving therapies in previously sensitized patients. However, the mechanisms underlying successful rapid desensitization are not fully understood. Objectives We sought to investigate whether the mast cell (MC) is an important target of rapid desensitization in mice sensitized to exhibit IgE-dependent passive systemic anaphylaxis in vivo and to investigate the antigen specificity and underlying mechanisms of rapid desensitization in our mouse model. Methods C57BL/6 mice (in vivo) or primary isolated C57BL/6 mouse peritoneal mast cells (PMCs; in vitro) were passively sensitized with antigen-specific anti–2,4-dinitrophenyl IgE, anti-ovalbumin IgE, or both. MCs were exposed over a short period of time to increasing amounts of antigen (2,4-dinitrophenyl–human serum albumin or ovalbumin) in the presence of extracellular calcium in vitro or by means of intravenous administration to sensitized mice in vivo before challenging the mice with or exposing the PMCs to optimal amounts of specific or irrelevant antigen. Results Rapidly exposing mice or PMCs to progressively increasing amounts of specific antigen inhibited the development of antigen-induced hypothermia in sensitized mice in vivo and inhibited antigen-induced PMC degranulation and prostaglandin D2 synthesis in vitro. Such MC hyporesponsiveness was induced antigen-specifically and was associated with a significant reduction in antigen-specific IgE levels on MC surfaces. Conclusions Rapidly exposing MCs to progressively increasing amounts of antigen can both enhance the internalization of antigen-specific IgE on the MC surface and also desensitize these cells in an antigen-specific manner in vivo and in vitro. PMID:23810240

  2. Total and antigen-specific Ige levels in umbilical cord blood

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The present study was conducted to learn whether the perinatal and environmental factors could influence the total and antigen-specific IgE levels in umbilical cord blood. Retrospective data were obtained from 173 mother-infant pairs. Total and specific (for children's food, wheat/grass and house dust mite-HDM) cord blood IgE levels were determined using the immunoassay test. The total cord blood IgE was between 0.0-23.08 IU/ml (mean 0.55 ± 2.07 IU/ml; median 0.16 IU/ml). Total IgE levels were significantly higher in boys compared with girls (OR = 2.2; P = 0.007), and in newborns with complicated pregnancy (OR = 2.7; P = 0.003). A greater number of siblings correlated with increases in the total cord blood IgE (P < 0.02). We detected specific IgE in 34 newborns (40 positive tests). A long-standing contact with a cat during pregnancy decreased the specific IgE level for wheat/grass (OR = 3.2; P < 0.07) and for children's food (OR = 5.0; P < 0.04), and the contact with a dog decreased the specific-IgE for wheat/grass (OR = 0.3; P < 0.05). Exposure to tobacco smoke correlated with the positive specific IgE toward house dust mite (OR = 4.7; P = 0.005). PMID:20156762

  3. Antigen-specific regulation of IgE antibodies by non-antigen-specific γδ T cells1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yafei; Aydintug, M. Kemal; Loomis, Joshua; MacLeod, Megan K.; McKee, Amy S.; Kirchenbaum, Greg; Jakubzick, Claudia V.; Kedl, Ross M.; Sun, Deming; Jacobelli, Jordan; O'Brien, Rebecca L.; Born, Willi K.

    2013-01-01

    We re-examined the observation that γδ T cells, when transferred from mice tolerized to an inhaled conventional antigen (Ag), suppress the allergic IgE response to this Ag specifically. Using ovalbumin and hen egg lysozyme in crisscross fashion, we confirmed the Ag-specific IgE regulatory effect of the γδ T cells. Although only Vγ4+ γδ T cells are regulators, the Ag specificity does not stem from specificity of their γδ TCRs. Instead, the Vγ4+ γδ T cells failed to respond to either Ag, but rapidly acquired Ag-specific regulatory function in vivo following i.v. injection of non-T cells derived from the spleen of Ag-tolerized mice. This correlated with their in vivo Ag acquisition from i.v. injected Ag-loaded splenic non-T cells, and in vivo transfer of membrane label provided evidence for direct contact between the injected splenic non-T cells and the Vγ4+ γδ T cells. Together, our data suggest that Ag itself, when acquired by γδ T cells, directs the specificity of their IgE suppression. PMID:23275606

  4. Thermoinactivation of human IgE: antigenic and functional modifications.

    PubMed Central

    Demeulemester, C; Weyer, A; Peltre, G; Laurent, M; Marchand, F; David, B

    1986-01-01

    The thermoinactivation kinetics of IgE were studied in experimental models revealing the antigenic properties and the basophil-sensitizing capacity of these immunoglobulins. A pool of human sera containing anti-Dactylis glomerata (Dg) IgE was heated from 5 min up to 4 hr at 56 degrees. The IgE antigenicity was tested by two polyclonal 125I-labelled anti-IgE antibodies; one anti-IgE was specific of the whole Fc epsilon region, while the other had a specificity restricted to the D epsilon 2 domain. Radioimmunoassays showed that the D epsilon 2 epitopes were more rapidly altered than the D epsilon 1 epitopes. The capacity of IgE to bind to basophil Fc epsilon receptors was assayed by passive sensitization experiments. Basophil sensitivity towards the Dg pollen extract was tested by histamine release experiments in the presence of this allergen. A progressive decrease in cell sensitivity was observed when IgE samples used for cell sensitization were heated for longer than 5 min. Thermoinactivation kinetics of IgE revealed an unexpected increase in the apparent quantity and biological activity of IgE heated for 5 min at 56 degrees. This fact could be due to auto-anti-IgE antibodies linked to the unheated IgE and which interfere with the biological activities of IgE and their quantification. Images Figure 2 PMID:2420711

  5. Measurement of serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) specific for house dust mite antigens in normal cats and cats with allergic skin disease.

    PubMed

    Taglinger, K; Helps, C R; Day, M J; Foster, A P

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether cats with allergic skin disease have significant concentrations of serum Immunoglobulin E (IgE) specific for antigens derived from the house dust mites (HDM) Dermatophagoides farinae (DF) and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DP). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were developed for this purpose. Binding of serum allergen-specific IgE was detected via the use of biotinylated Fc-epsilon receptor alpha chain protein (FcvarepsilonRIalpha). Following optimisation of the assay, serum samples from 59 cats with allergic skin disease and 54 clinically normal cats were screened. Results were expressed as ELISA units per ml (EU/ml) compared to a standard curve. Serological findings were correlated with the clinical presentation of affected cats. Cats with symptoms of feline allergic skin disease were grouped as follows: self-induced alopecia without lesions (group 1), papulocrusting dermatitis (group 2), eosinophilic granuloma complex (group 3), papular/ulcerative dermatitis of head and neck/facial dermatitis (group 4), and a combination of symptoms (group 5). Control normal cats comprised the final group (group 6). The Kruskal-Wallis test was used for statistical analysis. There was no significant difference between groups for DF- and DP-specific IgE concentrations with a p-value of 0.875 and 0.705, respectively. Although the FcvarepsilonRIalpha-based ELISA was able to detect house dust mite-specific feline IgE, the presence of this allergen-specific IgE correlates poorly with the presence of clinical manifestations of allergic skin disease. The results of this study question the clinical relevance of house dust mite-specific IgE in feline allergic skin disease.

  6. Intradermal Delivery of Antigens Enhances Specific IgG and Diminishes IgE Production: Potential Use for Vaccination and Allergy Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Takuwa; Ura, Takehiro; Taniguchi, Masaru; Yoshida, Hisahiro

    2016-01-01

    Skin is protected by a tough but flexible multilayered barrier and is a front line for immune responses against invading particles. For many years now, skin has been a tissue where certain vaccines are injected for the prevention of infectious disease, however, the detailed mechanisms of the skin immune response are not yet well understood. Using thin and small injection needles, we carefully injected OVA into a restricted region of mouse skin, i.e., intradermal (ID), and examined the antibody response in comparison with subcutaneous (SC) injection or epicutaneous patch administration of OVA. Epicutaneous patches induced a high IgE response against OVA, but IgG production was low. High IgG production was induced by both ID and SC injection, moreover, ID injection induced higher IgG production without any adjutants. Furthermore, OVA-specific IgE production was diminished by ID injection. We found that ID injection could efficiently stimulate skin resident DCs, drive Th1-biased conditions and diminish IgE production. The ID injection response was regulated by Langerin+ dermal DCs, because OVA was taken up mainly by these cells and, after transiently deleting them, the IgE response was no longer diminished and IgG1 production was enhanced. We also tested whether ID injection might be an effective allergy treatment by attempting to inhibit ongoing IgE production in mice with experimentally induced high serum IgE levels. Multiple ID injections of OVA were shown to prevent elevation of serum OVA-specific IgE after repeated allergen challenge. In contrast, SC OVA injection could only transiently inhibit the OVA-specific IgE production. These findings indicated that ID injection results in higher induction of antigen-specific IgG, and thus may be useful for vaccine delivery with little or no adjuvant components. Moreover, the observed diminishment of IgE and induction of Th1-biased immune responses suggest that ID may be a useful injection route for allergy immunotherapy

  7. Allergen-specific IgG antibodies purified from mite-allergic patients sera block the IgE recognition of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus antigens: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Siman, Isabella Lima; de Aquino, Lais Martins; Ynoue, Leandro Hideki; Miranda, Juliana Silva; Pajuaba, Ana Claudia Arantes Marquez; Cunha-Júnior, Jair Pereira; Silva, Deise Aparecida Oliveira; Taketomi, Ernesto Akio

    2013-01-01

    One of the purposes of specific immunotherapy (SIT) is to modulate humoral immune response against allergens with significant increases in allergen-specific IgG levels, commonly associated with blocking activity. The present study investigated in vitro blocking activity of allergen-specific IgG antibodies on IgE reactivity to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dpt) in sera from atopic patients. Dpt-specific IgG antibodies were purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by protein-G affinity chromatography. Purity was checked by SDS-PAGE and immunoreactivity by slot-blot and immunoblot assays. The blocking activity was evaluated by inhibition ELISA. The electrophoretic profile of the ammonium sulfate precipitated fraction showed strongly stained bands in ligand fraction after chromatography, compatible with molecular weight of human whole IgG molecule. The purity degree was confirmed by detecting strong immunoreactivity to IgG, negligible to IgA, and no reactivity to IgE and IgM. Dpt-specific IgG fraction was capable of significantly reducing levels of IgE anti-Dpt, resulting in 35%-51% inhibition of IgE reactivity to Dpt in atopic patients sera. This study showed that allergen-specific IgG antibodies purified from mite-allergic patients sera block the IgE recognition of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus antigens. This approach reinforces that intermittent measurement of serum allergen-specific IgG antibodies will be an important objective laboratorial parameter that will help specialists to follow their patients under SIT.

  8. Active induction of tumor-specific IgE antibodies by oral mimotope vaccination.

    PubMed

    Riemer, Angelika B; Untersmayr, Eva; Knittelfelder, Regina; Duschl, Albert; Pehamberger, Hubert; Zielinski, Christoph C; Scheiner, Otto; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2007-04-01

    A role of IgE antibodies in cancer surveillance has been implicated for a long time. Studies dealing with IgE antibodies directly targeted to tumor antigens have shown marked anticancer effects mediated by this antibody class. Thus, the basic function of IgE antibodies may be to control tumor growth. Thus far, cancer-specific IgE has only been applied passively. Consequently, the aim of this study was to establish an active vaccination protocol to induce tumor antigen-specific IgE antibodies, and to evaluate functional properties. We previously generated epitope mimics, so-called mimotopes, for the epitope recognized by the anti-HER-2 antibody trastuzumab. Upon i.p. immunizations, IgG antibodies with trastuzumab-like properties could be elicited. In the present study, we immunized BALB/c mice via the oral route with these trastuzumab mimotopes, under simultaneous neutralization and suppression of gastric acid. As shown in preceding experiments, this feeding regimen effectively induces Th2 immune responses. Oral immunizations with trastuzumab mimotopes under hypoacidic conditions indeed resulted in the formation of IgE antibodies towards the HER-2 antigen. Moreover, anti-HER-2 IgE-sensitized effector cells mediated SK-BR-3 target cell lysis in an antibody-dependent cytotoxicity assay. We conclude that directed and epitope-specific induction of IgE against tumor antigens is feasible with an oral mimotope vaccination regimen, and that these antibodies mediate anticancer effects.

  9. Tannic acid, a higher galloylated pentagalloylglucose, suppresses antigen-specific IgE production by inhibiting ɛ germline transcription induced by STAT6 activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Hee; Yoshimoto, Miki; Nakayama, Kazuko; Tanino, Sousuke; Fujimura, Yoshinori; Yamada, Koji; Tachibana, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-4 is a critical stimulator that induces ɛ germline transcripts (ɛGT) for switch recombination to initiate immunoglobulin (Ig) E and is important in allergic disease pathogenesis. We found pentagalloylglucose (PGG) inhibited IL-4-induced ɛGT expression. PGG exerted its inhibitory function by suppressing IL-4-induced activation of IL-4Rα, JAK3 and STAT6. Furthermore, tannic acid, a higher galloylated PGG, attenuated ovalbumin-induced IgE production in vivo by inhibiting IL-4-induced ɛGT expression and the IL-4 signaling pathway. In conclusion, our results suggest that tannic acid may attenuate allergic diseases by suppressing IgE production by inhibiting IL-4-induced signaling.

  10. Involvement of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants-specific IgE in pollen allergy testing

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitake, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Yuma; Kawada, Michitsugu; Takato, Yoshiki; Shinagawa, Kiyomi; Sakurai, Hiroyuki; Saito, Koichiro

    2017-01-01

    Background Specific IgE antibodies against the low-molecular-weight carbohydrate antigen that does not bridge IgE molecules on mast cells are not associated with clinical symptoms. Cross reactivity can be determined in allergen-specific IgE detection assays when the carbohydrate structures between pollen allergens and plant derived food allergens are similar; in such cases, false positive results for grain or legume allergens can be reported for pollen allergic patients who are not sensitized to those allergens. This phenomenon arises owing to the presence of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants (CCDs). Objective This study aimed to assess the impact of CCD interference on the results for pollen allergen-specific IgE antibodies in the general adult population and to perform CCD inhibition tests evaluating the involvement of CCD on samples positive to pollen allergens. Methods Serum samples from 322 subjects were tested for IgE antibodies to pollens and CCD. The research subjects were given questionnaires about pollen allergic symptoms to help assess the presence of allergies. Allergen IgE antibodies for Japanese cedar, Japanese cypress, orchard grass, ragweed, MUXF, bromelain, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and ascorbate oxidase (ASOD) were analyzed. Results It was observed that among individuals who tested positive to any of the pollen allergens, the positive ratio of CCD-specific IgE antibody was the highest for HRP (13.5%–50.0%). The results from the inhibition tests revealed that CCD was marginally present. Although IgE antibodies for cedar pollen did not react with CCD, IgE antibodies for Japanese cypress, orchard grass, and ragweed might be detected by the presence of CCD. Conclusion The results of the inhibition tests revealed the obvious presence of CCD suggesting its involvement. Considering these findings, careful evaluation of patient IgE results should be performed for Japanese cypress, orchard grass, and ragweed. PMID:28154803

  11. Polyethylene glycol-coated graphene oxide attenuates antigen-specific IgE production and enhanced antigen-induced T-cell reactivity in ovalbumin-sensitized BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsin-Ying; Lin, Kun-Ju; Wang, Ping-Yen; Lin, Chi-Wen; Yang, Hong-Wei; Ma, Chen-Chi M; Lu, Yu-Jen; Jan, Tong-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Background Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising nanomaterial for potential application in the versatile field of biomedicine. Graphene-based nanomaterials have been reported to modulate the functionality of immune cells in culture and to induce pulmonary inflammation in mice. Evidence pertaining to the interaction between graphene-based nanomaterials and the immune system in vivo remains scarce. The present study investigated the effect of polyethylene glycol-coated GO (PEG-GO) on antigen-specific immunity in vivo. Methods BALB/c mice were intravenously administered with a single dose of PEG-GO (0.5 or 1 mg/kg) 1 hour before ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization, and antigen-specific antibody production and splenocyte reactivity were measured 7 days later. Results Exposure to PEG-GO significantly attenuated the serum level of OVA-specific immunoglobulin E. The production of interferon-γ and interleukin-4 by splenocytes restimulated with OVA in culture was enhanced by treatment with PEG-GO. In addition, PEG-GO augmented the metabolic activity of splenocytes restimulated with OVA but not with the T-cell mitogen concanavalin A. Conclusion Collectively, these results demonstrate that systemic exposure to PEG-GO modulates several aspects of antigen-specific immune responses, including the serum production of immunoglobulin E and T-cell functionality. PMID:25228804

  12. Tracing antigen signatures in the human IgE repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Marth, Katharina; Novatchkova, Maria; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Jenisch, Stefan; Jäger, Siegfried; Kabelitz, Dieter; Valenta, Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    Allergen recognition by IgE antibodies is a key event in allergic inflammation. In this study, the IgE IGHV repertoires of individuals with allergy to the major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 1, were analyzed over a four years period of allergen exposure by RT-PCR and sequencing of cDNA. Approximately half of the IgE transcripts represented non-redundant sequences, which belonged to seventeen different IGHV genes. Most variable regions contained somatic mutations but also non-mutated sequences were identified. There was no evidence for relevant increases of somatic mutations over time of allergen exposure. Highly similar IgE variable regions were found after four years of allergen exposure in the same and in genetically non-related individuals. Our results indicate that allergens select and shape a limited number of similar IgE variable regions in the human IgE repertoire. PMID:20573403

  13. Tracing antigen signatures in the human IgE repertoire.

    PubMed

    Marth, Katharina; Novatchkova, Maria; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Jenisch, Stefan; Jäger, Siegfried; Kabelitz, Dieter; Valenta, Rudolf

    2010-08-01

    Allergen recognition by IgE antibodies is a key event in allergic inflammation. In this study, the IgE IGHV repertoires of individuals with allergy to the major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 1, were analyzed over a four years period of allergen exposure by RT-PCR and sequencing of cDNA. Approximately half of the IgE transcripts represented non-redundant sequences, which belonged to seventeen different IGHV genes. Most variable regions contained somatic mutations but also non-mutated sequences were identified. There was no evidence for relevant increases of somatic mutations over time of allergen exposure. Highly similar IgE variable regions were found after four years of allergen exposure in the same and in genetically non-related individuals. Our results indicate that allergens select and shape a limited number of similar IgE variable regions in the human IgE repertoire.

  14. Specific IgE response in patients with brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Araj, G. F.; Lulu, A. R.; Khateeb, M. I.; Haj, M.

    1990-01-01

    In the search to find discriminative serological markers to differentiate between patients with acute brucellosis and those with chronic brucellosis, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to determine and compare the brucella-specific IgE response in 80 sera from patients with acute brucellosis, 37 sera from patients with chronic brucellosis, 26 sera from patients with positive blood cultures for bacteria other than brucella and 51 sera from healthy controls. The IgE findings were compared to brucella-specific IgG, IgM, IgA and IgG1-4 demonstrated by ELISA, and to microagglutination test (MAT) results. Elevated (positive) antibrucella IgE titres were detected in 89 and 81% of sera from patients with acute and chronic brucellosis respectively. The predominant antibodies found in patients with acute brucellosis were of the IgG, IgM, IgA, IgE, IgG1 and IgG3 types while in chronic brucellosis IgG, IgA, IgE and IgG4 were found. Although IgE can be detected in patients with brucellosis, it does not discriminate between the acute and chronic stages of the disease. PMID:2249721

  15. Anisakis/Ascaris IgE ratio improves specificity for the diagnosis of Anisakis simplex sensitization in travellers and immigrants.

    PubMed

    Carballeda-Sangiao, N; Rodríguez-Mahillo, A I; Puente, S; Gutiérrez, M T; Moneo, I; González-Muñoz, M

    2014-10-01

    Anisakis simplex is a fish parasite responsible for human infection and is able to induce IgE-mediated reactions with several clinical manifestations. Laboratory diagnosis of Anisakis allergy is based on the detection of specific IgE using parasite whole antigen. Unfortunately, these diagnostic tools detect cross-reactivities with other nematodes and micro-organisms leading to low specificity of the diagnostic tests. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the diagnostic value of specific IgE to Anisakis for diagnosis of A. simplex-sensitization in native Spanish residents (IMM, n=766) and subjects coming from tropical and sub-tropical geographic areas (TRO, n=233). Since Ascaris is the human parasite most closely related to Anisakis, specific IgE to Ascaris was also determined to assess Anisakis cross-reaction with other nematodes and the diagnostic value of Anisakis/Ascaris IgE ratio for Anisakis allergy was examined. IMM and TRO groups showed similar specific IgE to Anisakis levels, while TRO had higher levels of specific IgE to Ascaris than IMM group (p=0.001). ROC curve analysis determined that an Anisakis specific IgE threshold of 0.71 kU/L yielded 93% and 82% specificities in IMM and TRO groups, respectively. A cut-off value ≥4.4 for Anisakis/Ascaris IgE ratio increased specificity to 95% for samples having IgE to Ascaris ≥0.35. In conclusion, the ratio of specific IgE to Anisakis and Ascaris improved remarkably the specificity and this parameter easily obtained from the commercially available system could be useful in the diagnosis of hypersensitivity to A. simplex.

  16. T cells produce an antigen-binding factor with in vivo activity analogous to IgE antibody

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    T cell-dependent activation of resident tissue mast cells is required for the elicitation of delayed-type hypersensitivity skin reactions in mice. A T cell-derived antigen-binding factor that transfers the ability to elicit an immediate hypersensitivity-like skin reaction is described and compared with a hybridoma IgE antibody. Both the T cell factor and IgE mediate reactions with increased vascular permeability and both are mast cell dependent, as they are inactive in two different types of mast cell deficient mice (W/Wv and Sl/Sld). The T cell factor was distinguished from IgE by affinity chromatography using specific anti-IgE and anti-factor antibodies and by a shorter duration of passive sensitization. The T cell factor is a suitable candidate for participation in the mechanism by which T cells activate mast cells in delayed-type hypersensitivity. PMID:6187880

  17. Interleukin 3-dependent and -independent mast cells stimulated with IgE and antigen express multiple cytokines

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    In response to IgE and specific multivalent antigen, mast cell lines (both growth factor-dependent and -independent) induce the transcription and/or secretion of a number of cytokines having a wide spectrum of activities. We have identified IL-1, IL-3, IL-5, IL-6, IFN- gamma, GM-CSF, JE, MIP1 alpha, MIP1 beta, and TCA3 RNA in at least two of four mast cell clones. The production of these products (except JE) is activation-associated and can be induced by IgE plus antigen. In selected instances cytokine expression can also be induced by activation with Con A or phorbol ester plus ionophore, albeit to levels less than those observed with IgE plus antigen. In addition, long-term mast cell clones and primary cultures of bone marrow-derived mast cells specifically release IL-1, IL-4, and/or IL-6 bioactivity after activation. These findings suggest that in addition to their inflammatory effector function mast cells may serve as a source of growth and regulatory factors. The relationship of mast cells to cells of the T lymphocyte lineage is discussed. PMID:2473161

  18. A comparison between IgE and IgG4 as markers of allergy in children: an experimental trial in a model of natural antigen avoidance.

    PubMed

    Piacentini, G L; Guerresi, S; Kantar, A; Lubrano, L; Olivieri, F; Boner, A L; Peroni, D G

    2011-01-01

    IgG4 have been hypothesized to act as blocking antibodies capable of preventing IgE-mediated effector cell triggering. This study aims to evaluate the changes in IgG4 in children during a period of natural antigen avoidance. Serum IgE and IgG4 were evaluated in a group of asthmatic children, aged between 7 and 17 years, admitted to the residential house Istituto Pio XII (Misurina, BL, Italy), located at 1,756 m, in a natural model of antigen avoidance. All the patients were skin prick test positive to at least two of the following allergens: Dermatophagoides pteronissynus, Dermatophagoides farinae, cat epithelium, timothy grass pollen and Parietaria pollen. During the 180 days of hospitalization, serum specific IgE and IgG4 were measured six times. A significant decrease (p≤0.05) in serum specific IgE to house dust mite and pollen allergens was observed; by contrast, no significant variations were shown by IgG4 and IgG4/IgE ratio. No significant relationship was found between serum specific IgE, IgG4 and IgG4/IgE ratio variations and the re-exposure to house dust mite allergens during the Christmas holidays. A positive correlation between specific IgE and specific IgG4 was observed at each considered time (T0: r=0.57, p=0.08; T1: r=0.85, p=0.001; T3: r=0.76, p=0.01). The positive correlation between specific IgE and specific IgG4, enduring throughout the entire time of study, suggests a relationship between these classes of immunoglobulins.

  19. Application Protocol, Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES), Layered Electrical Product

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connell, L.J.

    1994-12-01

    An application protocol is an information systems engineering view of a specific product The view represents an agreement on the generic activities needed to design and fabricate the product the agreement on the information needed to support those activities, and the specific constructs of a product data standard for use in transferring some or all of the information required. This application protocol describes the data for electrical and electronic products in terms of a product description standard called the Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES). More specifically, the Layered Electrical Product IGES Application Protocol (AP) specifies the mechanisms for defining and exchanging computer-models and their associated data for those products which have been designed in two dimensional geometry so as to be produced as a series of layers in IGES format The AP defines the appropriateness of the data items for describing the geometry of the various parts of a product (shape and location), the connectivity, and the processing and material characteristics. Excluded is the behavioral requirements which the product was intended to satisfy, except as those requirements have been recorded as design rules or product testing requirements.

  20. Role of T gamma cells in the in vitro IgE response after antigenic stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Vela, C; Garcia, R; Tricas, L; Platas, C; Lahoz, C

    1981-01-01

    Fifteen patients with seasonal allergic pollenosis and five controls were investigated to elucidate the role of the T gamma-cell population in the in vitro IgE response by peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). In vitro IgE production by PBL of atopic patients after antigenic stimulation was measured in culture supernatants. The optimal dose for antigenic stimulation was found to be 0.16 micrograms/20 X 10(6) cells of purified antigen. No difference was found when comparing the percentages of T cells (E rosettes) between the two groups: mean per cent for controls was 69.2 +/- 5.76 versus 69.54 +/- 4.42 for the allergic group. With regard to the T gamma-cell population, the values obtained by rosetting with ox erythrocytes sensitized with IgG antibody were 12 +/- 0.71% in normals and 9.8 +/- 1.32% in those with allergic pollenosis. This difference, although significant, may not be enough to explain the different pattern when the in vitro IgE production of both groups investigated was compared. In order to detect the role of T gamma cells in this system, lymphocyte cultures, depleted of T gamma cells, were performed and compared with unfractionated cultures from the same donors. Our results show no differences in the in vitro IgE production when T gamma cells were depleted as compared with the unfractionated cultures. PMID:6978222

  1. Variable Region Identical IgA and IgE to Cryptococcus neoformans Capsular Polysaccharide Manifest Specificity Differences*

    PubMed Central

    Janda, Alena; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Nakouzi, Antonio; Pohl, Mary Ann; Bowen, Anthony; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years several groups have shown that isotype switching from IgM to IgG to IgA can affect the affinity and specificity of antibodies sharing identical variable (V) regions. However, whether the same applies to IgE is unknown. In this study we compared the fine specificity of V region-identical IgE and IgA to Cryptococcus neoformans capsular polysaccharide and found that these differed in specificity from each other. The IgE and IgA paratopes were probed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with 15N-labeled peptide mimetics of cryptococcal polysaccharide antigen (Ag). IgE was found to cleave the peptide at a much faster rate than V region-identical IgG subclasses and IgA, consistent with an altered paratope. Both IgE and IgA were opsonic for C. neoformans and protected against infection in mice. In summary, V-region expression in the context of the ϵ constant (C) region results in specificity changes that are greater than observed for comparable IgG subclasses. These results raise the possibility that expression of certain V regions in the context of α and ϵ C regions affects their function and contributes to the special properties of those isotypes. PMID:25778397

  2. IgE to penicillins with different specificities can be identified by a multiepitope macromolecule: Bihaptenic penicillin structures and IgE specificities.

    PubMed

    Ariza, A; Barrionuevo, E; Mayorga, C; Montañez, M I; Perez-Inestrosa, E; Ruiz-Sánchez, A; Rodríguez-Guéant, R M; Fernández, T D; Guéant, J L; Torres, M J; Blanca, M

    2014-04-01

    Quantitation of specific IgE by immunoassay is a recommended in vitro test for the diagnosis of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to betalactams (BLs), particularly when skin test results are negative. IgE antibodies that recognize the common nuclear structure of all BLs or the specific side chain structure can be mainly distinguished by immunoassays. The aim of this study was to develop an immunoassay system to detect IgE antibodies with different specificities. Cellulose discs conjugated with benzylpenicillin (BP), amoxicillin (AX) or both drugs, with poly-l-lysine (PLL) as carrier molecule, were used as solid phases in the radioallergosorbent test (RAST). Direct and inhibition radioimmunoassay studies were made to verify the structures recognized by serum IgE antibodies from penicillin-allergic patients. Our results indicated that the addition of both haptens did not decrease the capacity to capture IgE when serum specific to either BP or AX was used, at least in terms of sensitivity. In addition, the inclusion of two haptens improved significantly the levels of IgE detection in patients who recognized both BP and AX. Therefore, the use of a solid phase with a carrier molecule conjugated with two determinants (AX and BP) is helpful to recognize IgE antibodies against either of these determinants and is useful for screening sera with different specificities.

  3. Specific IgE response to purified and recombinant allergens in latex allergy

    PubMed Central

    Kurup, Viswanath P; Sussman, Gordon L; Yeang, Hoong Y; Elms, Nancy; Breiteneder, Heimo; Arif, Siti AM; Kelly, Kevin J; Bansal, Naveen K; Fink, Jordan N

    2005-01-01

    Background In recent years, allergy to natural rubber latex has emerged as a major allergy among certain occupational groups and patients with underlying diseases. The sensitization and development of latex allergy has been attributed to exposure to products containing residual latex proteins. Although improved manufacturing procedures resulted in a considerable reduction of new cases, the potential risk for some patient groups is still great. In addition the prevalent cross-reactivity of latex proteins with other food allergens poses a major concern. A number of purified allergens and a few commercial kits are currently available, but no concerted effort was undertaken to evaluate them. Methods We studied 11 purified latex allergens, Hev b 1 to Hev b 10, and Hev b 13 along with several crude allergen extracts and two commercial ImmunoCAP assays to evaluate specific IgE antibody in the sera from latex allergic patients and controls. Health care workers and spina bifida patients with clinical symptoms of latex allergy, spina bifida patients without latex allergy, and non-atopic health care workers have been studied. Results The results suggest that Hev b 2, 5, 6, and 13 together identified over 80 percent health care workers with latex allergy, while Hev b 6 along with Hev b 1 or 3 detected specific IgE antibody in all sera studied from patients with spina bifida and latex allergy. The ImmunoCAP results using both Hev b 5 amplified and non-amplified closely agreed with the clinical diagnosis of latex allergy in health care workers and in spina bifida. Conclusion Although the purified allergens and crude extracts reacted diversely with IgE from different patient groups, the results indicated that use of certain combinations of purified recombinant antigens will be useful in commercial kits or in in-house assays for detecting specific IgE antibody in the sera. The results suggest that a combination of Hev b 2, 3, 5, 6, and 13 together detected specific IgE in 80% of

  4. Factors affecting allergen-specific IgE serum levels in cats

    PubMed Central

    Belova, S.; Wilhelm, S.; Linek, M.; Beco, L.; Fontaine, J.; Bergvall, K.; Favrot, C.

    2012-01-01

    Pruritic skin diseases are common in cats and demand rigorous diagnostic workup for finding an underlying etiology. Measurement of a serum allergen-specific IgE in a pruritic cat is often used to make or confirm the diagnosis of a skin hypersensitivity disease, although current evidence suggests that elevated allergen-specific IgE do not always correlate with a clinical disease and vice versa. The aim of the study was to to assess the possible influence of age, deworming status, lifestyle, flea treatment, and gender on allergen-specific IgE levels and to evaluate the reliability of IgE testing in predicting the final diagnosis of a pruritic cat. For this purpose sera of 179 cats with pruritus of different causes and 20 healthy cats were evaluated for allergen-specific IgE against environmental, food and flea allergens using the Fc-epsilon receptor based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test. The results of the study showed positive correlation between age, outdoor life style, absence of deworming, absence of flea control measures and levels of allergen-specific IgE. Gender and living area (urban versus rural) did not seem to affect the formation of allergen-specific IgE. According to these findings, evaluating allergen-specific IgE levels, is not a reliable test to diagnose hypersensitivity to food or environmental allergens in cats. On the contrary, this test can be successfully used for diagnosing feline flea bite hypersensitivity. PMID:22754094

  5. Aspergillus oryzae lectin induces anaphylactoid oedema and mast cell activation through its interaction with fucose of mast cell-bound non-specific IgE.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, K; Yoshino, S

    2011-11-01

    We investigated whether Aspergillus oryzae lectin (AOL), a fucose-specific lectin, induces anaphylactoid reactions and mast cell activation. The injection of AOL into footpads of mice produced a dose-related acute paw oedema. The AOL-induced oedema was attenuated by predose of histamine H1 receptor blocker or pretreatment of the lectin with fucose before injection and was not observed in SCID and mast cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv mice. These results suggested that the AOL-induced anaphylactoid reaction was mediated by histamine released from mast cells. In addition, the activation of mast cells was seemed to be induced by the crosslinking of IgE on the cell surface following the binding of AOL to fucose residues in IgE. Consistent with the in vivo results, AOL induced the degranulation of the rat mast cell line RBL2H3 sensitized with monoclonal IgE. As AOL induced the increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration of IgE-sensitized RBL2H3 cells as well as antigen stimulation, AOL could input signals from FcεRI. The degranulation of IgE-sensitized RBL2H3 cells by AOL was diminished by pretreatment of AOL with fucose. Defucosylated IgE did not induce degranulation of RBL2H3 cells in response to AOL stimulation, in spite of its ability to induce degranulation by antigen stimulation as intact IgE. These results indicated that AOL bound to fucose residue of IgE causing antigen-independent IgE-mediated mast cell activation and anaphylactoid reactions in vitro and in vivo, respectively. AOL bound to human IgE as well as to mouse IgE, suggesting the possible implication of AOL in the allergic response to Aspergillus oryzae in humans.

  6. Immediate hypersensitivity to penicillins with negative skin tests--the value of specific IgE.

    PubMed

    Silva, R; Cruz, L; Botelho, C; Castro, E; Cadinha, S; Castel-Branco, M G; Rodrigues, J

    2009-08-01

    The determination of specific IgE in patients with history of penicillins hypersensitivity is simple, safe and widely available. The positive and negative predictive values of this determination, however, are not yet established. In order to evaluate them, we performed specific IgE determination and diagnostic drug challenges in a group of 22 patients with a clear history of immediate penicillins hypersensitivity but negative skin tests. In this sample, the positive and negative predictive values were 29% and 87%, respectively. This seems to indicate that a positive specific IgE is not enough to confirm the diagnosis, and further study is necessary.

  7. Evaluation of an IgE ELISA with Culicoides spp. extracts and recombinant salivary antigens for diagnosis of insect bite hypersensitivity in Warmblood horses.

    PubMed

    Peeters, L M; Janssens, S; Goddeeris, B M; De Keyser, K; Wilson, A D; Kaufmann, C; Schaffartzik, A; Marti, E; Buys, N

    2013-10-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) in horses represents an immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated hypersensitivity to salivary antigens from biting midges (Culicoides spp.). The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the performances of IgE ELISAs using recombinant Culicoides spp. Obsoletus group salivary gland antigens or crude whole body extracts ('ObsWBE'), C. nubeculosus recombinant proteins (Culn1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8 and 10) and Obsoletus group recombinant proteins (Culo1 and 2). IgE levels were measured in plasma of 343 Warmblood horses classified as IBH-affected (n=167) and IBH-unaffected (n=176) according to the owners' descriptions. IBH-affected horses were subdivided based on the severity of their clinical signs at sampling and whether or not their IBH history was considered to be classical. The accuracies of the tests increased when clinical signs at sampling were more pronounced or when the IBH history could be considered as classical. A combination of IgE levels against the three best performing Culicoides spp. recombinant proteins (Culn4, Culo1 and Culo2) and ObsWBE resulted in the best performing test. When IBH-affected horses showing a classical history of the disease and severe clinical signs were compared with IBH-unaffected horses, the Youden's index at the optimal cut-off for the three tests in combination was 0.67. This optimal cut-off had a sensitivity of 70%, a specificity of 97% and a total accuracy of 92%. The performance of the IgE ELISA was affected by the severity of IBH clinical signs at sampling and was improved when IgE levels against several recombinant proteins were combined.

  8. NASA geometry data exchange specification for computational fluid dynamics (NASA IGES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Matthew W.; Kerr, Patricia A.; Thorp, Scott A.; Jou, Jin J.

    1994-01-01

    This document specifies a subset of an existing product data exchange specification that is widely used in industry and government. The existing document is called the Initial Graphics Exchange Specification. This document, a subset of IGES, is intended for engineers analyzing product performance using tools such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This document specifies how to define mathematically and exchange the geometric model of an object. The geometry is represented utilizing nonuniform rational B-splines (NURBS) curves and surfaces. Only surface models are represented; no solid model representation is included. This specification does not include most of the other types of product information available in IGES (e.g., no material properties or surface finish properties) and does not provide all the specific file format details of IGES. The data exchange protocol specified in this document is fully conforming to the American National Standard (ANSI) IGES 5.2.

  9. Effect of walnut (Juglans regia) polyphenolic compounds on ovalbumin-specific IgE induction in female BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Comstock, Sarah S; Gershwin, Laurel J; Teuber, Suzanne S

    2010-03-01

    English walnuts are implicated in severe, IgE-mediated food allergy in humans. We sought to determine if polyphenolic compounds extracted from the edible nut could promote IgE production to a coadministered allergen. BALB/c mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) with or without alum (AL) or polyphenolic-enriched extract via intraperitoneal injection. Serum was analyzed for total IgE and OVA-specific IgE, IgG(1,) and IgG(2a/2b). Coadministration of walnut polyphenolic-enriched extract with antigen and AL increased serum concentrations of antigen-specific IgE and IgG(1). When AL was excluded from the injections, polyphenolic extract tended to enhance OVA-specific IgE and IgG(1) over levels induced by OVA alone, but the increase did not reach significance. Serum IgG(2a/2b) levels were similar between mice receiving OVA/AL and OVA/AL with polyphenolics. Thus, walnut polyphenolic extract enhanced the Th2-skewing effect of an aluminum hydroxide adjuvant. This indicates that walnut polyphenolic compounds may play a role in allergic sensitization of genetically predisposed individuals.

  10. IGES, a key interface specification for CAD/CAM systems integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B. M.; Wellington, J.

    1984-01-01

    The Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES) program has focused the efforts of 52 companies on the development and documentation of a means of graphics data base exchange among present day CAD/CAM systems. The project's brief history has seen the evolution of the Specification into preliminary industrial usage marked by public demonstrations of vendor capability, mandatory requests in procurement actions, and a formalization into an American National Standard in September 1981. Recent events have demonstrated intersystem data exchange among seven vendor systems with a total of 30 vendors committing to offer IGES capability. A full range of documentation supports the IGES project and the recently approved IGES Version 2.0 of the Specification.

  11. Serum Specific IgE to Thyroid Peroxidase Activates Basophils in Aspirin Intolerant Urticaria.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yoo Seob; Suh, Dong-Hyeon; Yang, Eun-Mi; Ye, Young-Min; Park, Hae-Sim

    2015-06-01

    Thyroid antibodies are frequently observed in urticaria patients, but their roles in urticaria are not clearly elucidated. We investigated the role of serum specific IgE to thyroid peroxidase (TPO) in patients with aspirin intolerant acute urticaria (AIAU) and aspirin intolerant chronic urticaria (AICU). We recruited 59 AIAU and 96 AICU patients with 69 normal controls (NC). Serum specific IgE to TPO was measured by manual direct ELISA, and CD203c expressions on basophil with additions of TPO were measured to prove a direct role of TPO in effector cells. The prevalences of serum specific IgE to TPO were significantly higher in AIAU (15.2%) and AICU groups (7.5%) compared to NC (0%, P=0.018: P=0.013, respectively). Flow cytometry showed CD203c induction in a dose dependent manner with serial additions of TPO in some AIAU and AICU patients having high specific IgE to TPO. Our findings show that the prevalence of serum specific IgE to TPO was significantly higher in both AIAU and AICU patients than in NC. It is suggested that specific IgE to TPO play a pathogenic role in AIAU and AICU.

  12. IgE sequences in individuals living in an area of endemic parasitism show little mutational evidence of antigen selection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Jackson, K J L; Chen, Z; Gaëta, B A; Siba, P M; Pomat, W; Walpole, E; Rimmer, J; Sewell, W A; Collins, A M

    2011-05-01

    Patterns of somatic mutation in IgE genes from allergic individuals have been a focus of study for many years, but IgE sequences have never been reported from parasitized individuals. To study the role of antigen selection in the evolution of the anti-parasite response, we therefore generated 118 IgE sequences from donors living in Papua New Guinea (PNG), an area of endemic parasitism. For comparison, we also generated IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4 sequences from these donors, as well as IgG1 sequences from Australian donors. IgE sequences had, on average, 23.0 mutations. PNG IgG sequences had average mutation levels that varied from 17.7 (IgG3) to 27.1 (IgG4). Mean mutation levels correlated significantly with the position of their genes in the constant region gene locus (IgG3 < IgG1 < IgG2 < IgG4). Interestingly, given the heavy, life-long antigen burden experienced by PNG villagers, average mutation levels in IgG sequences were little different to that seen in Australian IgG1 sequences (19.2). Patterns of mutation provide clear evidence of antigen selection in many IgG sequences. The percentage of IgG sequences that showed significant accumulations of replacement mutations in the complementarity determining regions ranged from 22% of IgG3 sequences to 39% of IgG2 sequences. By contrast, only 12% of IgE sequences had such evidence of antigen selection, and this was significantly less than in PNG IgG1, IgG2 and IgG4 subclass sequences (P < 0.01). The anti-parasite IgE response therefore has the reduced evidence of antigen selection that has previously been reported in studies of IgE sequences from allergic individuals.

  13. Glycoproteins are species-specific markers and major IgE reactants in grass pollens.

    PubMed

    Manduzio, Hélène; Fitchette, Anne-Catherine; Hrabina, Maud; Chabre, Henri; Batard, Thierry; Nony, Emmanuel; Faye, Loïc; Moingeon, Philippe; Gomord, Véronique

    2012-02-01

    Grass pollen allergic patients are concomitantly exposed and sensitized to pollens from multiple Pooideae (i.e. common grass) species. As such, they are currently desensitized by allergen-specific immunotherapy using extracts made from mixes of pollens from Anthoxanthum odoratum, Dactylis glomerata, Lolium perenne, Phleum pratense and Poa pratensis. Herein, we demonstrate that species-specific glycoprotein patterns are documented by 1D and 2D electrophoresis and Western blotting analysis, which can be used as an identity test for such pollens. Most allergens are glycoproteins bearing complex N-glycans encompassing β1,2 xylose and α1,3 fucose glycoepitopes. Glycoepitope destruction using periodate oxidation has no impact on seric IgE reactivity in 75% atopic patients (n = 24). The latter have thus no significant IgE responses to carbohydrate-containing epitopes. In contrast, periodate treatment strongly impairs IgE recognition of glycoallergens in 25% of patients tested, demonstrating the presence of carbohydrate-specific IgE in those patients. While the clinical impact of carbohydrate-specific IgE is still a matter of controversy, the presence of these IgE in the serum of many allergic patients illustrates the need for cross-reacting carbohydrate epitope-free recombinant allergens to develop relevant diagnostic tests. These data also support the pertinence of mixing multiple grass pollens to desensitize atopic patients, with the aim to broaden the repertoire of glycoepitopes in the vaccine, thus mimicking natural exposure conditions.

  14. Association between the MHC gene region and variation of serum IgE levels against specific mould allergens in the horse

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    To investigate whether the equine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene region influences the production of mould-specific immunoglobulin E antibodies (IgE), alleles of the equine leukocyte antigen (ELA-A) locus and three microsatellite markers (UM-011, HTG-05 and HMS-42) located on the same chromosome as the equine MHC were determined in 448 Lipizzan horses. Statistical analyses based on composite models, showed significant associations of the ELA-A and UM-011 loci with IgE titres against the recombinant Aspergillus fumigatus 7 antigen (rAsp f 7). UM-011 was also significantly associated with IgE titres against the recombinant Aspergillus fumigatus 8 antigen (rAsp f 8). In addition to the loci mentioned above, the MHC class II DQA and DRA loci were determined in 76 Lipizzans from one stud. For IgE levels against rAsp f 7, the composite model showed the strongest association for DQA (P < 0.01) while for rAsp f 8 specific IgE levels, similarly to the results found with all 448 horses, the strongest association was found with UM-011 (P = 0.01), which is closely linked with the MHC class II DRB locus. These results suggest that the equine MHC gene region and possibly MHC class II loci, influence the specific IgE response in the horse. However, although the strongest associations were found with DQA and UM-011, this study did not distinguish if the observed effects were due to the MHC itself or to other tightly linked genes. PMID:12927090

  15. A study on the immunological basis of the dissociation between type I-hypersensitivity skin reactions to Blomia tropicalis antigens and serum anti-B. tropicalis IgE antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Two conditions are used as markers of atopy: the presence of circulating anti-allergen IgE antibodies and the presence of positive skin prick test (SPT) reactions to allergenic extracts. The correlation between these conditions is not absolute. This study aimed at investigating immunological parameters that may mediate this lack of correlation. Individuals whose sera contained anti-B. tropicalis extract IgE antibodies (α-BtE IgE) were divided into two groups, according to the presence or absence of skin reactivity to B. tropicalis extract (BtE). The following parameters were investigated: total IgE levels; α-BtE IgE levels; an arbitrary α-BtE IgE/total IgE ratio; the proportion of carbohydrate-reactive α-BtE IgE; the proportion of α-BtE IgE that reacted with Ascaris lumbricoides extract (AlE); the production of IL-10 by BtE- and AlE-stimulated peripheral blood cells (PBMC). Results Total IgE levels were similar in the two groups, but α-BtE IgE was significantly higher in the SPT-positive group (SPT+). A large overlap of α-BtE IgE levels was found in individuals of both groups, indicating that these levels alone cannot account for the differences in SPT outcome. Individuals of the two groups did not differ, statistically, in the proportion of α-BtE IgE that reacted with carbohydrate and in the production of IL-10 by BtE- and AlE-stimulated PBMC. Both groups had part of α-BtE IgE activity absorbed out by AlE, indicating the existence of cross-reactive IgE antibodies. However, the α-BtE IgE from the SPT-negative individuals (SPT-) was more absorbed with AlE than the α-BtE IgE from the SPT+ individuals. This finding may be ascribed to avidity differences of the α-BtE IgE that is present in the two groups of individuals, and could occur if at least part of the α-BtE IgE from the SPT- individuals were elicited by A. lumbricoides infection. Conclusion The present results suggest that a low ratio of specific IgE to total IgE levels (in a minority of

  16. [Comparative study on the assay for IgE antibodies specific for Chamaecyparis obtusa pollen between AlaSTAT and CAP-RAST].

    PubMed

    Nohara, O; Imai, T; Saneyoshi, K; Endo, T; Nagakura, H; Ono, M; Moriyama, H

    1996-06-01

    Titers of IgE antibody specific for the pollen of Chamaecyparis obtusa (C. obtusa) were determined by AlaSTAT and CAP-RAST in 221 patients with Japanese cedar pollinosis. IgE antibody to C. obtusa tested positive by CAP-RAST at a higher rate (80.5%) than by AlaSTAT (52.6%). The results obtained from the two assays were compared with those from intradermal skin test. CAP-RAST had a higher sensitivity than that of AlaSTAT. Because the two methods showed no differences in the determination of IgE antibody specific for Cryptomeria japonica, the above differences between AlaSTAT and CAP-RAST are surmised to be ascribable to the differences of C. obtusa antigen used in the both assays.

  17. Allergen diagnosis microarray with high-density immobilization capacity using diamond-like carbon-coated chips for profiling allergen-specific IgE and other immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Koichi; Hiyoshi, Mineyoshi; Tada, Hitomi; Bando, Miwa; Ichioka, Takao; Kamemura, Norio; Kido, Hiroshi

    2011-11-14

    The diagnosis of antibody-mediated allergic disorders is based on clinical findings, skin prick tests and detection of allergen-specific IgE in serum. Here, we present a new microarray technique of high-density antigen immobilization using carboxylated arms on the surface of a diamond-like carbon (DLC)-coated chip. High immobilization capacity of antigen on DLC chip at (0.94-7.82)×10(9) molecules mm(-2) allowed the analysis of allergen-specific immunoglobulins against not only purified proteins but also natural allergen extracts with wide assay dynamic range. The higher sensitivity of the allergen-specific IgE detection on DLC chip was observed for comparison with the UniCAP system: the DLC chip allowed lowering the limit of dilution rate in UniCAP system to further dilution at 4-8-fold. High correlations (ρ>0.9-0.85) of allergen-specific IgE values determined by the DLC chip and UniCAP were found in most of 20 different allergens tested. The DLC chip was useful to determine allergen-induced antibodies of IgA, IgG, IgG1, and IgG4 in sera, apart from IgE, as well as secretory IgA in saliva against the same series of allergens on the chip in a minimal amount (1-2 μL) of sample.

  18. Down-modulation of antigen-induced activation of murine cultured mast cells sensitized with a highly cytokinergic IgE clone.

    PubMed

    Sakanaka, Mariko; Kurimune, Yuki; Yamada, Keiko; Hyodo, Nao; Natsuhara, Mayuko; Ichikawa, Atsushi; Furuta, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Satoshi

    2016-06-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that several IgE clones can activate mast cells during the sensitization phase even in the absence of antigen. They were found to induce pro-inflammatory cytokine release, histamine synthesis, chemotaxis, adhesion, and accelerated maturation of mast cells, although it remains unknown whether antigen-induced responses can be affected by differences of IgE clones. We compared two IgE clones, which were different in the capacity to activate mast cells during sensitization, in terms of potentials to affect antigen-induced degranulation and cytokine releases using IL-3-dependent murine bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (BMMCs). Antigen-induced degranulation and pro-inflammatory cytokine release were augmented, when BMMCs were sensitized with elevated concentrations of a clone IgE-3, which did not induce phosphorylation of JNK and cytokine release in the absence of antigen, whereas those were significantly rather decreased, when BMMCs were sensitized with elevated concentrations of a clone SPE-7, one of the most potent cytokinergic IgE clones, which intensively induced phosphorylation of JNK. This attenuated response with SPE-7 was accompanied by decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of the cellular proteins including Syk upon antigen stimulation. SP600125, which is known to inhibit JNK, restored the levels of antigen-induced degranulation and phosphorylation of Syk in BMMCs sensitized with higher concentrations of a clone SPE-7 when it was added before sensitization. Treatment with anisomycin, a potent activator of JNK, before IgE sensitization significantly suppressed antigen-induced degranulation. These findings suggest that differences of sensitizing IgE clones can affect antigen-induced responses and activation of JNK during sensitization might suppress antigen-induced activation of mast cells.

  19. Nanoparticles rapidly assess specific IgE in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf, Sarmadia; Qadri, Shahnaz; al-Ramadi, Basel; Haik, Yousef

    2012-08-01

    Allergy is the sixth leading cause of chronic disease in the world. This study demonstrates the feasibility of detecting allergy indicators in human plasma, noninvasively, at the point of care and with a comparable efficiency and reduced turnaround time compared with the gold standard. Peanut allergy was utilized as a model due to its widespread occurrence among the US population and fatality if not treated. The detection procedure utilized magnetic nanoparticles that were coated with an allergen layer (peanut protein extract). Peanut immunoglobulin E (IgE) was detected in concentrations close to the minimum detection range of CAP assay. The results were obtained in minutes compared with the CAP assay which requires more than 3 h.

  20. Renaturation of blotted allergens increases the sensitivity of specific IgE detection.

    PubMed

    Muro, M D; Fernández, C; Moneo, I

    1996-01-01

    Several authors have demonstrated that renaturation is an essential step for the appropriate recognition of blotted proteins. The use of nonionic detergents has been described as a useful alternative to enhance the antigenicity in immunoblotting, although elution from proteins by detergents has been observed. To measure the influence of different factors on the sensitivity of specific IgE by immunoblotting, we used twenty human sera from atopic patients who were allergic or nonallergic to a common, reliable allergen (grass pollen mixture). The use of Nonidet-P40 was found to be a useful alternative for the renaturation of the allergens. No elution from the membrane was found when employing this detergent, even at high concentrations (3%), and its use gave better sensitivity than methanol. On the other hand, we detected that methanol possessed renaturing properties. A transfer method using diffusion instead of electric transfer gave the best results and two membranes could be obtained from each gel. Using this method, we found that after NP-40 incubation of the membrane, the use of bovine albumin could be omitted as blocking agent and that its use had even deleterious effects.

  1. Unique Inflammatory Mediators and Specific IgE Levels Distinguish Local from Systemic Reactions after Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Garman, Lori; Smith, Kenneth; Muns, Emily E.; Velte, Cathy A.; Spooner, Christina E.; Munroe, Melissa E.; Farris, A. Darise; Nelson, Michael R.; Engler, Renata J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Although the U.S. National Academy of Sciences concluded that anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA) has an adverse event (AE) profile similar to those of other adult vaccines, 30 to 70% of queried AVA vaccinees report AEs. AEs appear to be correlated with certain demographic factors, but the underlying immunologic pathways are poorly understood. We evaluated a cohort of 2,421 AVA vaccinees and found 153 (6.3%) reported an AE. Females were more likely to experience AEs (odds ratio [OR] = 6.0 [95% confidence interval {CI} = 4.2 to 8.7]; P < 0.0001). Individuals 18 to 29 years of age were less likely to report an AE than individuals aged 30 years or older (OR = 0.31 [95% CI = 0.22 to 0.43]; P < 0.0001). No significant effects were observed for African, European, Hispanic, American Indian, or Asian ancestry after correcting for age and sex. Additionally, 103 AEs were large local reactions (LLRs), whereas 53 AEs were systemic reactions (SRs). In a subset of our cohort vaccinated 2 to 12 months prior to plasma sample collection (n = 75), individuals with LLRs (n = 33) had higher protective-antigen (PA)-specific IgE levels than matched, unaffected vaccinated individuals (n = 50; P < 0.01). Anti-PA IgE was not associated with total plasma IgE, hepatitis B-specific IgE, or anti-PA IgG in individuals who reported an AE or in matched, unaffected AVA-vaccinated individuals. IP-10 was also elevated in sera of individuals who developed LLRs (P < 0.05). Individuals reporting SRs had higher levels of systemic inflammation as measured from C-reactive protein (P < 0.01). Thus, LLRs and SRs are mediated by distinct pathways. LLRs are associated with a vaccine-specific IgE response and IP-10, whereas SRs demonstrate increased systemic inflammation without a skewed cytokine profile. PMID:27280620

  2. Laboratory diagnosis of hymenoptera venom allergy: comparative study between specific IgE, western blot and allergen leukocyte stimulation (CAST).

    PubMed

    Santos, M C Pereira; Carlos, M L Palma; Pedro, E; Carlos, A G Palma

    2002-01-01

    Allergy to hymenoptera venom is a classical IgE mediated disease with a potentially fatal course. Specific venom immunotherapy (SIT) is the most effective mean of treating this serious condition, after the diagnosis has been clearly established by a clinical history, in-vivo and in vitro tests. We have evaluated the usefulness of a cellular test (CAST) which is a recently developed ELISA method based on the evaluation of sulfidoleukotriene secretion by leukocytes stimulated with specific antigen. We also evaluated the correlation of CAST with skin tests, specific IgE (sIgE) and western blot for sIgE for hymenoptera venom sIgE. We have included in this study 14 patients, with a clinical history suggestive of hymenoptera venom allergy. None of them had previously been subjected to immunotherapy. A good correlation was obtained between skin tests, sIgE and western blot. However, there was no correlation between these methods and CAST. We conclude that the positivity of CAST method raises some questions about other mechanisms, which maybe non-IgE dependent. Although the number of patients in this study is quite small, the immunoblot analysis may be a valuable additional method in insect venom allergy.

  3. Immunization with Hypoallergens of Shrimp Allergen Tropomyosin Inhibits Shrimp Tropomyosin Specific IgE Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Wai, Christine Y. Y.; Leung, Nicki Y. H.; Ho, Marco H. K.; Gershwin, Laurel J.; Shu, Shang An; Leung, Patrick S. C.; Chu, Ka Hou

    2014-01-01

    Designer proteins deprived of its IgE-binding reactivity are being sought as a regimen for allergen-specific immunotherapy. Although shrimp tropomyosin (Met e 1) has long been identified as the major shellfish allergen, no immunotherapy is currently available. In this study, we aim at identifying the Met e 1 IgE epitopes for construction of hypoallergens and to determine the IgE inhibitory capacity of the hypoallergens. IgE-binding epitopes were defined by three online computational models, ELISA and dot-blot using sera from shrimp allergy patients. Based on the epitope data, two hypoallergenic derivatives were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis (MEM49) and epitope deletion (MED171). Nine regions on Met e 1 were defined as the major IgE-binding epitopes. Both hypoallergens MEM49 and MED171 showed marked reduction in their in vitro reactivity towards IgE from shrimp allergy patients and Met e 1-sensitized mice, as well as considerable decrease in induction of mast cell degranulation as demonstrated in passive cutaneous anaphylaxis assay. Both hypoallergens were able to induce Met e 1-recognizing IgG antibodies in mice, specifically IgG2a antibodies, that strongly inhibited IgE from shrimp allergy subjects and Met e 1-sensitized mice from binding to Met e 1. These results indicate that the two designer hypoallergenic molecules MEM49 and MED171 exhibit desirable preclinical characteristics, including marked reduction in IgE reactivity and allergenicity, as well as ability to induce blocking IgG antibodies. This approach therefore offers promises for development of immunotherapeutic regimen for shrimp tropomyosin allergy. PMID:25365343

  4. The influence of the carrier molecule on amoxicillin recognition by specific IgE in patients with immediate hypersensitivity reactions to betalactams

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Adriana; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Salas, María; Doña, Inmaculada; Martín-Serrano, Ángela; Pérez-Inestrosa, Ezequiel; Pérez-Sala, Dolores; Guzmán, Antonio E.; Montañez, María I.; Torres, María J.

    2016-01-01

    The optimal recognition of penicillin determinants, including amoxicillin (AX), by specific IgE antibodies is widely believed to require covalent binding to a carrier molecule. The nature of the carrier and its contribution to the antigenic determinant is not well known. Here we aimed to evaluate the specific-IgE recognition of different AX-derived structures. We studied patients with immediate hypersensitivity reactions to AX, classified as selective or cross-reactors to penicillins. Competitive immunoassays were performed using AX itself, amoxicilloic acid, AX bound to butylamine (AXO-BA) or to human serum albumin (AXO-HSA) in the fluid phase, as inhibitors, and amoxicilloyl-poli-L-lysine (AXO-PLL) in the solid-phase. Two distinct patterns of AX recognition by IgE were found: Group A showed a higher recognition of AX itself and AX-modified components of low molecular weights, whilst Group B showed similar recognition of both unconjugated and conjugated AX. Amoxicilloic acid was poorly recognized in both groups, which reinforces the need for AX conjugation to a carrier for optimal recognition. Remarkably, IgE recognition in Group A (selective responders to AX) is influenced by the mode of binding and/or the nature of the carrier; whereas IgE in Group B (cross-responders to penicillins) recognizes AX independently of the nature of the carrier. PMID:27731424

  5. The influence of the carrier molecule on amoxicillin recognition by specific IgE in patients with immediate hypersensitivity reactions to betalactams.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Adriana; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Salas, María; Doña, Inmaculada; Martín-Serrano, Ángela; Pérez-Inestrosa, Ezequiel; Pérez-Sala, Dolores; Guzmán, Antonio E; Montañez, María I; Torres, María J

    2016-10-12

    The optimal recognition of penicillin determinants, including amoxicillin (AX), by specific IgE antibodies is widely believed to require covalent binding to a carrier molecule. The nature of the carrier and its contribution to the antigenic determinant is not well known. Here we aimed to evaluate the specific-IgE recognition of different AX-derived structures. We studied patients with immediate hypersensitivity reactions to AX, classified as selective or cross-reactors to penicillins. Competitive immunoassays were performed using AX itself, amoxicilloic acid, AX bound to butylamine (AXO-BA) or to human serum albumin (AXO-HSA) in the fluid phase, as inhibitors, and amoxicilloyl-poli-L-lysine (AXO-PLL) in the solid-phase. Two distinct patterns of AX recognition by IgE were found: Group A showed a higher recognition of AX itself and AX-modified components of low molecular weights, whilst Group B showed similar recognition of both unconjugated and conjugated AX. Amoxicilloic acid was poorly recognized in both groups, which reinforces the need for AX conjugation to a carrier for optimal recognition. Remarkably, IgE recognition in Group A (selective responders to AX) is influenced by the mode of binding and/or the nature of the carrier; whereas IgE in Group B (cross-responders to penicillins) recognizes AX independently of the nature of the carrier.

  6. Factors associated with Culicoides Obsoletus complex spp.-specific IgE reactivity in Icelandic horses and Shetland ponies.

    PubMed

    Schurink, Anouk; van der Meide, Nathalie M A; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Ducro, Bart J; Tijhaar, Edwin

    2014-09-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is a common allergic skin disease in horses, caused by biting insects of the Culicoides spp. In The Netherlands, Culicoides spp. of the Obsoletus complex are the most important midges involved in IBH. The aim of the present study was to identify and quantify associations between several endogenous (host) and exogenous (environmental) factors and immunoglobulin E (IgE) reactivity against Obsoletus complex-derived whole body extract or seven recombinant allergens, measured by ELISA. Data from 143 Icelandic horses and 177 Shetland ponies were analysed using multivariable models. In addition, the relationship between IgE reactivity and severity of clinical signs in IBH-affected horses was examined. Positive correlations were found between Obsoletus complex-specific IgE and severity of clinical signs. Disease status (IBH affected or control), breed and the interaction between IBH status and breed were significantly associated with IgE reactivity against several Obsoletus complex allergens. Significantly greater IgE reactivity was seen in IBH-affected horses compared to controls. The differences in IgE values between cases and controls were most pronounced in Icelandic horses. Shetland pony controls had significantly greater IgE reactivity compared to Icelandic horse controls, while differences in IgE values comparing Shetland pony cases and Icelandic horse cases were not significant. Severity of clinical signs and IgE reactivity in IBH-affected horses against several Obsoletus complex allergens appeared to be related. Consideration of the factors associated with Obsoletus complex-specific IgE in horses might further improve interpretation and accuracy of IgE ELISA test results within these breeds, although further research is required.

  7. Detection of IgE, IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies against raw and processed food antigens

    PubMed Central

    Vojdani, Aristo

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the first documented case of food allergy to cooked food in 1921 by Prausnitz and Kustner, all commercial food antigens are prepared from raw food. Furthermore, all IgE and IgG antibodies against dietary proteins offered by many clinical laboratories are measured against raw food antigens. Methods We developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the measurement of IgE, IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies against raw and processed food antigens. Sera with low or high reactivity to modified food antigens were subjected to myelin basic protein, oxidized low density lipoprotein, and advanced glycation end products (AGE) such as AGE-human serum albumin and AGE-hemoglobin. Results Compared to raw food antigens, IgE antibodies showed a 3–8-fold increase against processed food antigens in 31% of the patients. Similarly, IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies against modified food antigens overall were found at much higher levels than antibody reactions against raw food antigens. Almost every tested serum with high levels of antibodies against modified food antigens showed very high levels of antibodies against myelin basic protein, oxidized low density lipoprotein, AGE-human serum albumin and AGE-hemoglobin. Conclusion We conclude that the determination of food allergy, intolerance and sensitivity would be improved by testing IgE, IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies against both raw and processed food antigens. Antibodies against modified food antigens, by reacting with AGEs and tissue proteins, may cause perturbation in degenerative and autoimmune diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, inflammation, autoimmunity, neurodegeneration and neuroautoimmunity. PMID:19435515

  8. Layered Electrical Product Application Protocol (AP). Draft: Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    An application protocol is an information systems engineering view of a specific product. The view represents an agreement on the generic activities needed to design and fabricate the product, the agreement on the information needed to support those activities, and the specific constructs of a product data standard for use in transfering some or all of the information required. This applications protocol describes the data for electrical and electronic products in terms of a product description standard called the Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES). More specifically, the Layered Electrical Product IGES Application Protocol (AP) specifies the mechanisms for defining and exchanging computer-models and their associated data for those products which have been designed in two dimensional geometry so as to be produced as a series of layers in IGES format. The AP defines the appropriateness of the data items for describing the geometry of the various parts of a product (shape and location), the connectivity, and the processing and material characteristics. Excluded is the behavioral requirements which the product was intended to satisfy, except as those requirements have been recorded as design rules or product testing requirements.

  9. Evaluation of immunoglobulin E-specific antibodies and viral antigens in nasopharyngeal secretions of children with respiratory syncytial virus infections.

    PubMed Central

    Russi, J C; Delfraro, A; Borthagaray, M D; Velazquez, B; García-Barreno, B; Hortal, M

    1993-01-01

    Enzyme immunoassays were developed to detect the presence of specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies and respiratory syncytial (RS) virus structural proteins in nasopharyngeal secretions in order to improve the knowledge on some aspects of the pathogenesis of severe acute lower respiratory tract infections caused by RS virus. These assays were used to analyze clinical specimens from children with RS virus-associated infections (bronchiolitis and pneumonia), and the findings were correlated with the patients' clinical symptoms. The results indicate the presence of specific IgE against the two external glycoproteins (G and F) and the absence of detectable IgE levels for the internal viral antigens. There was a correlation between the levels of IgE-specific antibodies and the amount of viral protein F in the secretions, indicating that the IgE response against the viral glycoproteins might be related to the antigen load. In addition, a correlation was found between higher levels of both viral protein F-specific IgE and F antigen with higher respiratory rates in children with pneumonia. These findings may be relevant because they suggest an association between the virus load and the immune response in the pathogenesis of RS virus infections. PMID:8463392

  10. Preferential induction of a Th1 immune response and inhibition of specific IgE antibody formation by plasmid DNA immunization.

    PubMed Central

    Raz, E; Tighe, H; Sato, Y; Corr, M; Dudler, J A; Roman, M; Swain, S L; Spiegelberg, H L; Carson, D A

    1996-01-01

    We compared the antigen-specific antibody isotypes and lymphokine secretion by CD4+ T cells in BALB/c mice immunized intradermally with either Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) or plasmid DNA (pDNA) encoding beta-gal in a cytomegalovirus-based expression vector (pCMV-LacZ). pCMV-LacZ induced mainly IgG2a, whereas beta-gal in saline or alum induced IgG1 and IgE beta-gal-specific antibodies. In addition, splenic CD4+ T helper (Th) cells isolated from pDNA-immunized mice secreted interferon-gamma but not interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5, whereas Th cells from beta-gal-injected mice secreted IL-4 and IL-5 but not interferon-gamma after in vitro stimulation with antigen. Together these data demonstrate that pDNA immunization induced a T helper type 1 (Th1) response, whereas protein immunization induced a T helper type 2 (Th2) response to the same antigen. Interestingly, priming of mice with pCMV-LacZ prevented IgE antibody formation to a subsequent i.p. beta-gal in alum injection. This effect was antigen-specific, because priming with pCMV-LacZ did not inhibit IgE anti-ovalbumin antibody formation. Most importantly, intradermal immunization with pCMV-LacZ (but not pCMV-OVA) of beta-gal in alum-primed mice caused a 66-75% reduction of the IgE anti-beta-gal titer in 6 weeks. Also, pCMV-LacZ induced specific IgG2a antibody titers and interferon-gamma secretion by Th cells in the beta-gal in alum-primed mice. The data demonstrate that gene immunization induces a Th1 response that dominates over an ongoing protein-induced Th2 response in an antigen-specific manner. This suggests that immunization with pDNA encoding for allergens may provide a novel type of immunotherapy for allergic diseases. PMID:8643542

  11. An optimized assay of specific IgE antibodies to reactive dyes and studies of immunologic responses in exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Wass, U; Nilsson, R; Nordlinder, R; Belin, L

    1990-03-01

    Methods of assaying reactive dye-specific IgE antibodies were investigated with a RAST. Sera from three patients, occupationally exposed to a reactive dye, Remazol black B (Chemical Abstract registry number 17095-24-8), were used. Directly dyed disks, that is, disks without any carrier protein, resulted in poor and unreliable measures of specific IgE. In contrast, optimized preparation of conjugates between the dye and human serum albumin resulted in efficient binding of specific IgE. The patients' RAST results were strongly positive, whereas sera from 36 exposed workers but without symptoms and sera from unexposed subjects with high levels of total IgE were negative. The hapten and carrier specificity of the IgE antibodies was studied by direct RAST and RAST inhibition. In one patient, the antibodies were principally hapten specific, whereas another patient was found to have antibodies with a high degree of specificity to the carrier. The third patient's antibodies were intermediate between the other two patients' antibodies in this respect, suggesting that antibody specificity is dependent not only on the nature of the hapten but also on individual immune response factors. The study demonstrates that it is important to use an optimized preparation of dye-protein conjugates to elicit reliable results and a high degree of specific IgE binding in the RAST.

  12. FAS Inactivation Releases Unconventional Germinal Center B Cells that Escape Antigen Control and Drive IgE and Autoantibody Production.

    PubMed

    Butt, Danyal; Chan, Tyani D; Bourne, Katherine; Hermes, Jana R; Nguyen, Akira; Statham, Aaron; O'Reilly, Lorraine A; Strasser, Andreas; Price, Susan; Schofield, Peter; Christ, Daniel; Basten, Antony; Ma, Cindy S; Tangye, Stuart G; Phan, Tri Giang; Rao, V Koneti; Brink, Robert

    2015-05-19

    The mechanistic links between genetic variation and autoantibody production in autoimmune disease remain obscure. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is caused by inactivating mutations in FAS or FASL, with autoantibodies thought to arise through failure of FAS-mediated removal of self-reactive germinal center (GC) B cells. Here we show that FAS is in fact not required for this process. Instead, FAS inactivation led to accumulation of a population of unconventional GC B cells that underwent somatic hypermutation, survived despite losing antigen reactivity, and differentiated into a large population of plasma cells that included autoantibody-secreting clones. IgE(+) plasma cell numbers, in particular, increased after FAS inactivation and a major cohort of ALPS-affected patients were found to have hyper-IgE. We propose that these previously unidentified cells, designated "rogue GC B cells," are a major driver of autoantibody production and provide a mechanistic explanation for the linked production of IgE and autoantibodies in autoimmune disease.

  13. Effects of Nasal Corticosteroids on Boosts of Systemic Allergen-Specific IgE Production Induced by Nasal Allergen Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Cornelia; Lupinek, Christian; Ristl, Robin; Lemell, Patrick; Horak, Friedrich; Zieglmayer, Petra; Spitzauer, Susanne; Valenta, Rudolf; Niederberger, Verena

    2015-01-01

    Background Allergen exposure via the respiratory tract and in particular via the nasal mucosa boosts systemic allergen-specific IgE production. Intranasal corticosteroids (INCS) represent a first line treatment of allergic rhinitis but their effects on this boost of allergen-specific IgE production are unclear. Aim Here we aimed to determine in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study whether therapeutic doses of an INCS preparation, i.e., nasal fluticasone propionate, have effects on boosts of allergen-specific IgE following nasal allergen exposure. Methods Subjects (n = 48) suffering from grass and birch pollen allergy were treated with daily fluticasone propionate or placebo nasal spray for four weeks. After two weeks of treatment, subjects underwent nasal provocation with either birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 or grass pollen allergen Phl p 5. Bet v 1 and Phl p 5-specific IgE, IgG1–4, IgM and IgA levels were measured in serum samples obtained at the time of provocation and one, two, four, six and eight weeks thereafter. Results Nasal allergen provocation induced a median increase to 141.1% of serum IgE levels to allergens used for provocation but not to control allergens 4 weeks after provocation. There were no significant differences regarding the boosts of allergen-specific IgE between INCS- and placebo-treated subjects. Conclusion In conclusion, the application of fluticasone propionate had no significant effects on the boosts of systemic allergen-specific IgE production following nasal allergen exposure. Trial Registration http://clinicaltrials.gov/ NCT00755066 PMID:25705889

  14. Microscale purification of antigen-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric P; Normandin, Erica; Osei-Owusu, Nana Yaw; Mahan, Alison E; Chan, Ying N; Lai, Jennifer I; Vaccari, Monica; Rao, Mangala; Franchini, Genoveffa; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E

    2015-10-01

    Glycosylation of the Fc domain is an important driver of antibody effector function. While assessment of antibody glycoform compositions observed across total plasma IgG has identified differences associated with a variety of clinical conditions, in many cases it is the glycosylation state of only antibodies against a specific antigen or set of antigens that may be of interest, for example, in defining the potential effector function of antibodies produced during disease or after vaccination. Historically, glycoprofiling such antigen-specific antibodies in clinical samples has been challenging due to their low prevalence, the high sample requirement for most methods of glycan determination, and the lack of high-throughput purification methods. New methods of glycoprofiling with lower sample requirements and higher throughput have motivated the development of microscale and automatable methods for purification of antigen-specific antibodies from polyclonal sources such as clinical serum samples. In this work, we present a robot-compatible 96-well plate-based method for purification of antigen-specific antibodies, suitable for such population level glycosylation screening. We demonstrate the utility of this method across multiple antibody sources, using both purified plasma IgG and plasma, and across multiple different antigen types, with enrichment factors greater than 1000-fold observed. Using an on-column IdeS protease treatment, we further describe staged release of Fc and Fab domains, allowing for glycoprofiling of each domain.

  15. Microscale purification of antigen-specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Eric P.; Normandin, Erica; Osei-Owusu, Nana Yaw; Mahan, Alison E.; Chan, Ying N.; Lai, Jennifer I.; Vaccari, Monica; Rao, Mangala; Franchini, Genoveffa; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation of the Fc domain is an important driver of antibody effector function. While assessment of antibody glycoform compositions observed across total plasma IgG has identified differences associated with a variety of clinical conditions, in many cases it is the glycosylation state of only antibodies against a specific antigen or set of antigens that may be of interest, for example, in defining the potential effector function of antibodies produced during disease or after vaccination. Historically, glycoprofiling such antigen-specific antibodies in clinical samples has been challenging due to their low prevalence, the high sample requirement for most methods of glycan determination, and the lack of high-throughput purification methods. New methods of glycoprofiling with lower sample requirements and higher throughput have motivated the development of microscale and automatable methods for purification of antigen-specific antibodies from polyclonal sources such as clinical serum samples. In this work, we present a robot-compatible 96-well plate-based method for purification of antigen-specific antibodies, suitable for such population level glycosylation screening. We demonstrate the utility of this method across multiple antibody sources, using both purified plasma IgG and plasma, and across multiple different antigen types, with enrichment factors greater than 1000-fold observed. Using an on-column IdeS protease treatment, we further describe staged release of Fc and Fab domains, allowing for glycoprofiling of each domain. PMID:26078040

  16. Anti-Malassezia-Specific IgE Antibodies Production in Japanese Patients with Head and Neck Atopic Dermatitis: Relationship between the Level of Specific IgE Antibody and the Colonization Frequency of Cutaneous Malassezia Species and Clinical Severity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Enshi; Tanaka, Takafumi; Tajima, Mami; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Kato, Hiroshi; Nishikawa, Akemi; Sugita, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis of the head and neck (HNAD) is recognized as a separate condition. Malassezia, the predominant skin microbiota fungus, is considered to exacerbate atopic dermatitis (AD), especially HNAD. In the present study, we investigated the relationships between the levels of specific IgE antibodies, colonization frequency of eight predominant Malassezia species, and clinical severity in 61 patients with HNAD (26 mild, 24 moderate, and 11 severe cases). As clinical severity increased, the levels of specific IgE antibodies against eight Malassezia species also increased. Species diversity of the Malassezia microbiota in scale samples from patients was analyzed by nested PCR using species-specific primers. The clinical severity of HNAD was correlated with the total level of specific IgE antibodies against Malassezia species and the number of Malassezia species detected. PMID:22253636

  17. [Investigation of mold fungi in air samples of elementary schools and evaluation of allergen-specific IgE levels in students' sera].

    PubMed

    Ovet, Habibe; Ergin, Cağrı; Kaleli, Ilknur

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric fungal spores play important role in allergic reactions in atopic individuals. Monitorization of those spores found in the environment of atopic cases is crucial for the choice of the antigens that will be included in allergen screening procedures and precautions to be taken against mold-originated health problems. Since most of the people spend plenty of time indoors in recent years, the effects of exposure to indoor air fungi on human health have gained importance. This study was aimed to investigate the indoor air mold distribution of elementary schools in Denizli province (located in west Anatolia, Turkey) and to compare the allergen-specific IgE levels of children against the most frequently detected mold genus. A questionnaire (MM080) was distributed to the 4967 students (6-8 year-old) attending first and second degrees of 16 different elementary schools with scattered locations in city center. This questionnaire form included the questions related to the general information about the child, school environment, allergic complaints since last year, home environment and nutrition. Response rate to the questionnaire was 51.6% (2565/4967). Air samples were collected from 18 classrooms in March 2009, during which high rates of allergic symptoms were observed according to the questionnaire results. Mold fungi belonging to 10 different genera (Penicillium spp. 46%; Aspergillus spp. 18%; Cladosporium spp. 17%; Alternaria spp. 15%; Drechslera spp. 1%; Chrysosporium, Fusarium, Conidiobolus and Cladothecium species 0.5%; unidentified 1%) were isolated from indoor air of classrooms. Since the most frequently detected mold was Penicillium spp. (46%), the 48 children with atopic symptoms were called to the hospital for the determination of total IgE and Penicillium specific IgE in their sera. Twenty two students accepted the invitation and serum total IgE (Immulite 2000; Diagnostic Product Corporation, USA) and allergen-specific IgE (Penicillium brevicompactum

  18. Neural antigen-specific autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Raffaele; Lennon, Vanda A

    2012-07-01

    Neural-specific autoantibodies have been documented and their diagnostic utility validated in diseases affecting the neuraxis from cerebral cortex to the somatic, autonomic, and enteric nervous system and skeletal muscle. These neurological disorders occur both idiopathically and in a paraneoplastic context. Molecular identification of the antigens has expedited development of confirmatory and high-throughput tests for serum and cerebrospinal fluid, which permit early diagnosis and reveal the underlying molecular pathogenic mechanisms. The autoantibodies are classifiable on the basis of antigen location: intracellular (nuclear or cytoplasmic) or plasma membrane. Immunohistopathological studies of patients' biopsied and autopsied tissues suggest that effector T cells mediate the autoimmune neurological disorders for which defining autoantibodies recognize intracellular antigens. Antigens within intact cells are inaccessible to circulating antibody, and the associated neurological deficits rarely improve with antibody-depleting therapies. Tumoricidal therapies may arrest neurological progression, but symptom reversal is rare. In contrast, autoantibodies specific for plasma membrane antigens have pathogenic potential, and the associated neurological deficits are often amenable to antibody-depleting immunotherapy, such as plasma exchange and anti-B-cell monoclonal antibody therapy. These reversible neurological disorders are frequently misdiagnosed as neurodegenerative. The focus of this review is the immunobiology, pathophysiology, and clinical spectrum of autoimmune neurological disorders accompanied by neural-specific IgGs.

  19. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate-specific antigen; Prostate cancer screening test; PSA ... special steps are needed to prepare for this test. ... Reasons for a PSA test: This test may be done to screen for prostate cancer. It is also used to follow people after prostate cancer ...

  20. The correlation between anti phospholipase A2 specific IgE and clinical symptoms after a bee sting in beekeepers

    PubMed Central

    Matysiak, Joanna; Bręborowicz, Anna; Dereziński, Paweł; Kokot, Zenon J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Beekeepers are a group of people with high exposure to honeybee stings and with a very high risk of allergy to bee venom. Therefore, they are a proper population to study the correlations between clinical symptoms and results of diagnostic tests. Aim The primary aim of our study was to assess the correlations between total IgE, venom- and phospholipase A2-specific IgE and clinical symptoms after a bee sting in beekeepers. The secondary aim was to compare the results of diagnostic tests in beekeepers and in individuals with standard exposure to bees. Material and methods Fifty-four individuals were divided into two groups: beekeepers and control group. The levels of total IgE (tIgE), venom-specific IgE (venom sIgE), and phospholipase A2-specific IgE (phospholipase A2 sIgE) were analyzed. Results Our study showed no statistically significant correlation between the clinical symptoms after a sting and tIgE in the entire analyzed group. There was also no correlation between venom sIgE level and clinical symptoms either in beekeepers or in the group with standard exposure to bees. We observed a statistically significant correlation between phospholipase A2 sIgE level and clinical signs after a sting in the group of beekeepers, whereas no such correlation was detected in the control group. Significantly higher venom-specific IgE levels in the beekeepers, as compared to control individuals were shown. Conclusions In beekeepers, the severity of clinical symptoms after a bee sting correlated better with phospholipase A2 sIgE than with venom sIgE levels. PMID:27512356

  1. CD23 surface density on B cells is associated with IgE levels and determines IgE-facilitated allergen uptake, as well as activation of allergen-specific T cells

    PubMed Central

    Selb, Regina; Eckl-Dorna, Julia; Neunkirchner, Alina; Schmetterer, Klaus; Marth, Katharina; Gamper, Jutta; Jahn-Schmid, Beatrice; Pickl, Winfried F.; Valenta, Rudolf; Niederberger, Verena

    2017-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests that the low-affinity receptor for IgE, CD23, plays an important role in controlling the activity of allergen-specific T cells through IgE-facilitated allergen presentation. Objective We sought to determine the number of CD23 molecules on immune cells in allergic patients and to investigate whether the number of CD23 molecules on antigen-presenting cells is associated with IgE levels and influences allergen uptake and allergen-specific T-cell activation. Methods Numbers of CD23 molecules on immune cells of allergic patients were quantified by using flow cytometry with QuantiBRITE beads and compared with total and allergen-specific IgE levels, as well as with allergen-induced immediate skin reactivity. Allergen uptake and allergen-specific T-cell activation in relation to CD23 surface density were determined by using flow cytometry in combination with confocal microscopy and T cells transfected with the T-cell receptor specific for the birch pollen allergen Bet v 1, respectively. Defined IgE-allergen immune complexes were formed with human monoclonal allergen-specific IgE and Bet v 1. Results In allergic patients the vast majority of CD23 molecules were expressed on naive IgD+ B cells. The density of CD23 molecules on B cells but not the number of CD23+ cells correlated with total IgE levels (RS = 0.53, P = .03) and allergen-induced skin reactions (RS = 0.63, P = .008). Uptake of allergen-IgE complexes into B cells and activation of allergen-specific T cells depended on IgE binding to CD23 and were associated with CD23 surface density. Addition of monoclonal IgE to cultured PBMCs significantly (P = .04) increased CD23 expression on B cells. Conclusion CD23 surface density on B cells of allergic patients is correlated with allergen-specific IgE levels and determines allergen uptake and subsequent activation of T cells. PMID:27372566

  2. Association of house dust mite-specific IgE with asthma control, medications and household pets

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, John Donnie A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Evidence is conflicting regarding the effectiveness of creating a low-allergen environment or reducing allergen exposure to control asthma exacerbations. Objective This study determined the association of house dust mite (HDM)-specific IgE levels with asthma symptom control, selected medications, family history of allergic disease, and exposure to second-hand smoke and household pets. Methods Serum samples from 102 doctor-diagnosed allergic asthma patients and 100 non-atopic controls were subjected to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using the HDM species Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp), Dermatophagoides farinae (Df), and Blomia tropicalis (Bt) allergens. Point-biserial correlation coefficient, Pearson R correlation, and logistic regression analyses were used to determine association of HDM-specific IgE levels with the abovementioned variables. Results Of the 102 cases, 38.24%, 47.06%, and 33.33% were sensitized to Bt, Df, and Dp, respectively. Sensitized patients showed greater probability [Bt (OR = 1.21), Df (OR = 1.14), and Dp (OR = 1.35)] to manifest symptoms than those who were not. Obtained p-values [Bt (p = 0.73), Df (p = 0.83), and Dp (p = 0.59)], however, proved that HDM-specific IgE levels had no significant contribution in predicting or explaining occurrence of asthma symptoms. Bt- and Df-specific IgEs showed moderately weak but significant relationship with bambuterol HCl and expectorant, respectively. Patients currently on said medications registered higher HDM-specific IgE levels than those who were not. No significant correlation between IgE levels and family history of allergic disease or with exposure to second-hand smoke was seen. Dp-specific IgE levels of patients exposed to household pets were significantly lower compared to those without exposure. Conclusion This study proves that sensitization to Bt, Df, and Dp allergens is not significantly associated with asthma symptoms and control. Although cases were shown to be sensitized

  3. Production of serum immunoglobulins and T cell antigen binding molecules specific for cow's milk antigens in adults intolerant to cow's milk.

    PubMed

    Little, C H; Georgiou, G M; Shelton, M J; Cone, R E

    1998-11-01

    The immune response to three cow's milk antigens, beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), alpha-lactalbumin (AL), and casein (CA) was studied in 15 milk-intolerant adult patients and 11 adult controls. IgG, IgE, and IgG subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4) and T cell-derived antigen-binding molecules (TABM) specific for each antigen were measured in both groups. In the patient group, a significant elevation of total IgG and TABM against each of the milk antigens was found as well as raised levels of IgG1 to BLG and CA, IgG4 to BLG, and IgE to CA. TABM specific for BLG were isolated by affinity for BLG and found to be Mr 28,000-46,000 polypeptides functionally and physically associated with TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta2. These results indicate a Th2-type immune response to the milk antigens in milk-intolerant individuals compared with the control group which shows a pattern typical of anergy or deletion.

  4. Total and specific serum IgE decreases with age in patients with allergic rhinitis, asthma and insect allergy but not in patients with atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mediaty, Anja; Neuber, Karsten

    2005-01-01

    Concerning allergic diseases, the incidence of allergic symptoms, as well as their severity, seems to decrease with age. The decline of onset of allergic symptoms observed in ageing might result from a decrease of serum total and specific IgE. Atopic disorders are complex diseases that involve interactions among several physiological systems, e.g. skin, lung, mucosae, and the immune system. It was the aim of this study to compare the effects of age on total and specific IgE in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), allergic rhinitis or asthma, and insect allergy, respectively. The study population consisted of 559 individuals (male: 229 and female: 330). Total and allergen specific IgE was measured in every individual. From the whole study population, 113 patients suffered from atopic dermatitis (AD), 132 had allergic rhinitis or asthma, and 314 were tested because of insect allergy. Total and specific serum IgE was significantly decreased as a function of age in patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma and with insect allergy. In contrast, no significant decrease of total and specific serum IgE in old individuals with AD was observed. Additionally, in the group of patients with a total IgE < 300 kU/l a reduction of total serum IgE was significantly correlated with age. In contrast, patients with IgE levels > 300 kU/l showed no correlation with age. Immunosenescence does not affect increased IgE levels in atopic patients with AD and/or high serum IgE levels indicating that in these subgroups of patients the atopic propensity remains into advanced age. One may hypothesize that either onset of allergic sensitization during life or the kind of atopic disease influences the correlation between age and IgE synthesis. PMID:15927080

  5. A single glycan on IgE is indispensable for initiation of anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Shade, Kai-Ting C.; Platzer, Barbara; Washburn, Nathaniel; Mani, Vinidhra; Bartsch, Yannic C.; Conroy, Michelle; Pagan, Jose D.; Bosques, Carlos; Mempel, Thorsten R.; Fiebiger, Edda

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin ε (IgE) antibodies are the primary mediators of allergic diseases, which affect more than 1 in 10 individuals worldwide. IgE specific for innocuous environmental antigens, or allergens, binds and sensitizes tissue-resident mast cells expressing the high-affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI. Subsequent allergen exposure cross-links mast cell–bound IgE, resulting in the release of inflammatory mediators and initiation of the allergic cascade. It is well established that precise glycosylation patterns exert profound effects on the biological activity of IgG. However, the contribution of glycosylation to IgE biology is less clear. Here, we demonstrate an absolute requirement for IgE glycosylation in allergic reactions. The obligatory glycan was mapped to a single N-linked oligomannose structure in the constant domain 3 (Cε3) of IgE, at asparagine-394 (N394) in human IgE and N384 in mouse. Genetic disruption of the site or enzymatic removal of the oligomannose glycan altered IgE secondary structure and abrogated IgE binding to FcεRI, rendering IgE incapable of eliciting mast cell degranulation, thereby preventing anaphylaxis. These results underscore an unappreciated and essential requirement of glycosylation in IgE biology. PMID:25824821

  6. A new quantitative in vitro for the detection of latex-specific IgE antibodies.

    PubMed

    Moussadeh, M; Hamedi, N; Alem, N; Alem, M

    1999-12-01

    Immediate-type hypersensitivity to latex allergens has resulted in anaphylactic shock and death in numerous reported cases. The allergenic proteins of latex are contained within the natural rubber extract of Hevea brasiliensis and are eluted into the final product during the manufacturing process. The quantity and types of latex allergens found in different latex products depends on the manufacturing process. Not all of these allergens are available for use in the latex prick skin test, and as a result, such tests may not be conclusive. Furthermore, application of such allergens to the skin of undiagnosed hypersensitive individuals may have harmful effects on their health. Therefore, it is important to be able to utilize in vitro methods, which reliably identify latex allergy without placing hypersensitive individuals at risk. We have developed a relatively simple and new enzyme immuno-assay (EIA) method for the detection of latex allergy. This in vitro method is quantitative and allows for the classification of allergy to latex in a short time. In comparative studies, ninety-nine serum specimens with documented clinical history of latex allergy were tested by this method, and the results paralleled those of the skin prick test performed by an independent group. The data showed that the specificity and sensitivity of our assay approaches 97.5% and 100%, respectively. We conclude that, by using a simple assay, the detection of specific IgE to latex proteins may be valuable for screening individuals and for the diagnosis of allergy to latex.

  7. Staphylococcal superantigen-specific IgE antibodies: degree of sensitization and association with severity of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Elabras, José; Mello, Fernanda Carvalho de Queiroz; Lupi, Omar; Bica, Blanca Elena Rios Gomes; Papi, José Angelo de Souza; França, Alfeu Tavares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the presence of staphylococcal superantigen-specific IgE antibodies and degree of IgE-mediated sensitization, as well as whether or not those are associated with the severity of asthma in adult patients. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving outpatients with asthma under treatment at a tertiary care university hospital in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Consecutive patients were divided into two groups according to the severity of asthma based on the Global Initiative for Asthma criteria: mild asthma (MA), comprising patients with mild intermittent or persistent asthma; and moderate or severe asthma (MSA). We determined the serum levels of staphylococcal toxin-specific IgE antibodies, comparing the results and performing a statistical analysis. Results: The study included 142 patients: 72 in the MA group (median age = 46 years; 59 females) and 70 in the MSA group (median age = 56 years; 60 females). In the sample as a whole, 62 patients (43.7%) presented positive results for staphylococcal toxin-specific IgE antibodies: staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), in 29 (20.4%); SEB, in 35 (24.6%); SEC, in 33 (23.2%); and toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST), in 45 (31.7%). The mean serum levels of IgE antibodies to SEA, SEB, SEC, and TSST were 0.96 U/L, 1.09 U/L, 1.21 U/L, and 1.18 U/L, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of the qualitative or quantitative results. Conclusions: Serum IgE antibodies to SEA, SEB, SEC, and TSST were detected in 43.7% of the patients in our sample. However, neither the qualitative nor quantitative results showed a statistically significant association with the clinical severity of asthma. PMID:27812635

  8. A Protein Allergen Microarray Detects Specific IgE to Pollen Surface, Cytoplasmic, and Commercial Allergen Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Vigh-Conrad, Katinka A.; Conrad, Donald F.; Preuss, Daphne

    2010-01-01

    Background Current diagnostics for allergies, such as skin prick and radioallergosorbent tests, do not allow for inexpensive, high-throughput screening of patients. Additionally, extracts used in these methods are made from washed pollen that lacks pollen surface materials that may contain allergens. Methodology/Principal Findings We sought to develop a high-throughput assay to rapidly measure allergen-specific IgE in sera and to explore the relative allergenicity of different pollen fractions (i.e. surface, cytoplasmic, commercial extracts). To do this, we generated a protein microarray containing surface, cytoplasmic, and commercial extracts from 22 pollen species, commercial extracts from nine non-pollen allergens, and five recombinant allergenic proteins. Pollen surface and cytoplasmic fractions were prepared by extraction into organic solvents and aqueous buffers, respectively. Arrays were incubated with <25 uL of serum from 176 individuals and bound IgE was detected by indirect immunofluorescence, providing a high-throughput measurement of IgE. We demonstrated that the allergen microarray is a reproducible method to measure allergen-specific IgE in small amounts of sera. Using this tool, we demonstrated that specific IgE clusters according to the phylogeny of the allergen source. We also showed that the pollen surface, which has been largely overlooked in the past, contained potent allergens. Although, as a class, cytoplasmic fractions obtained by our pulverization/precipitation method were comparable to commercial extracts, many individual allergens showed significant differences. Conclusions/Significance These results support the hypothesis that protein microarray technology is a useful tool for both research and in the clinic. It could provide a more efficient and less painful alternative to traditionally used skin prick tests, making it economically feasible to compare allergen sensitivity of different populations, monitor individual responses over time

  9. Relationship between specific serum IgE to Ascaris lumbricoides and onset of respiratory symptoms in Bangladesh immigrants.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, G; Pacor, M L; Mansueto, P; Esposito-Pellitteri, M; Scichilone, N; Ditta, V; Lo Bianco, C; Leto-Barone, M S; Di Fede, G; Corrocher, R; Mansueto, S; Rini, G B

    2006-01-01

    The role of helminths in asthma and/or rhinitis and in allergic sensitization is still unclear. We assessed the relationship between Ascaris-specific IgE, respiratory symptoms and allergic sensitization in Bangladesh immigrants. 246 individuals were examined from 1996 to 2001. Serum total IgE, Ascaris IgE, specific IgE to inhalant allergens, skin prick tests (SPT) and parasitological evaluation of the stool were performed. Total serum IgE were significantly higher in Ascaris-IgE positive (> 0.35 kU/L) individuals (806.5 [409.0-1436.0] kU/L vs. 207.0 [127.0-332.5] kU/L; P < 0.0001) and in subjects with respiratory symptoms (413.0 [239.0-1096.0] kU/L vs. 259.5 [147.0-387.0] kU/L), (P < 0.0001), but not in SPT positive subjects (413.0 [179.0-894.0] kU/L vs. 404.6 [305.0-1201.0] kU/L (P = 0.5). Ascaris-specific IgE were detected in 48 subjects with respiratory symptoms (40.0%) and in 46 subjects without respiratory symptoms (36.5%) (P = 0.5). The SPT positivity was similar between Ascaris-IgE seropositive (38.2%) and Ascaris-IgE seronegative (38.1%) subjects (P = 0.9). Total IgE and length of stay in Italy correlated with SPT positivity (OR 5.6 [CI 95% 1.5-19.8], P = 0.007, and OR 1.5 [CI 95% 1.3-1.7], P< 0.0001), and with respiratory symptoms (OR 13.7 [CI 95% 3.0-62.4];, P = 0.0007, and OR 2.4 [CI 95% 1.9-3.0], P < 0.0001). Ascaris-IgE were negatively associated with SPT positivity (OR 0.3 [CI 95% 0.1-0.8], P = 0.02) and with respiratory symptoms (OR 0.1 [CI 95% 0.04-0.7], P = 0.01). Our findings favour the role of environmental factors in the development of respiratory symptoms in immigrants, irrespective of Ascaris-IgE.

  10. A mimotope gene encoding the major IgE epitope of allergen Phl p 5 for epitope-specific immunization.

    PubMed

    Wallmann, J; Proell, M; Stepanoska, T; Hantusch, B; Pali-Schöll, I; Thalhamer, T; Thalhamer, J; Jensen-Jarolim, E; Hartl, A

    2009-01-29

    A gene vaccine based on a mammalian expression vector containing the sequence of a peptide mimotope of Phl p 5 was constructed. To test whether mimotope gene vaccines can induce allergen-specific antibody responses via molecular mimicry, BALB/c mice were immunized using the mimotope construct with or without a tetanus toxin T-helper epitope. Moreover, intradermal injection was compared to epidermal application via gene gun immunization. Immunization with both mimotope gene constructs elicited allergen-specific antibody responses. As expected, gene gun bombardment induced a Th2-biased immune response, typically associated with IgG1 and IgE antibody production. In contrast, intradermal injection of the vaccine triggered IgG2a antibody expression without any detectable IgE levels, thus biasing the immune response towards Th1. In an RBL assay, mimotope-specific IgG antibodies were able to prevent cross-linking of allergen-specific IgE by Phl p 5. A construct coding for the complete Phl p 5 induced T-cell activation, IFN-gamma and IL-4 production. In contrast, the mimotope-DNA construct being devoid of allergen-specific T-cell epitopes had no capacity to activate allergen-specific T cells. Taken together, our data show that it is feasible to induce blocking IgG antibodies with a mimotope-DNA construct when applied intradermally. Thus the mimotope-DNA strategy has two advantages: (1) the avoidance of IgE induction and (2) the avoidance of triggering allergen-specific T-lymphocytes. We therefore suggest that mimotope gene vaccines are potential candidates for epitope-specific immunotherapy of type I allergy.

  11. Establishment of two novel ELISA methods for Dermatophagoides farinae-specific IgE detection with recombinant group 2 allergen.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yubao; Zhou, Ying; Ma, Guifang; Shi, Weihong; Yang, Li; Wang, Yungang

    2012-01-01

    Dermatophagoides farinae, or the American house dust mite, is a common cause of allergy and asthma. Current tests for sensitization to D. farinae include an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method for specific IgE detection, which, while clinically useful, is time-consuming and has low sensitivity since it uses crude mite extracts. We developed two new ELISA methods to detect the group 2 allergen from D. farinae (Der f 2) and the Der f 2-specific IgE in sera of patients with asthma. Using recombinant Der f 2 protein for the analysis of Der f 2-specific IgE, we tested both indirect ELISA and avidin biotin complex ELISA (ABC-ELISA) methods in 46 patients who were also tested by Pharmacia UniCap. Both of these approaches are more specific than traditional methods using crude mite extracts. These new tests could aid in the laboratory diagnosis of asthma due to sensitization to D. farinae.

  12. PROSTATE SPECIFIC MEMBRANE ANTIGEN-BASED IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Joseph R.; Akhtar, Naveed H.; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Anand, Alok; Deh, Kofi; Tagawa, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common non-cutaneous malignancy affecting men in North America. Despite significant efforts, conventional imaging of PC does not contribute to patient management as much as imaging performed for other common cancers. Given the lack of specificity in conventional imaging techniques, one possible solution is to screen for PC specific antigenic targets and generate agents able to specifically bind. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is over-expressed in PC tissue, with low levels of expression in the small intestine, renal tubular cells and salivary gland. The first clinical agent for targeting PSMA was 111In-capromab, involving an antibody recognizing the internal domain of PSMA. The second- and third-generation humanized PSMA binding antibodies have the potential to overcome some of the limitations inherent to capromab pendetide i.e. inability to bind to live PC cells. One example is the humanized monoclonal antibody J591 (Hu mAb J591) that was developed primarily for therapeutic purposes but also has interesting imaging characteristics including the identification of bone metastases in PC. The major disadvantage of use of mAb for imaging is slow target recognition and background clearance in an appropriate timeframe for diagnostic imaging. Urea-based compounds such as small molecule inhibitors may also present promising agents for PC imaging with SPECT and PET. Two such small-molecule inhibitors targeting PSMA, MIP-1072 and MIP-1095, have exhibited high affinity for PSMA. The uptake of 123I-MIP-1072 and 123I-MIP-1095 in PC xenografts have imaged successfully with favorable properties amenable to human trials. While advances in conventional imaging will continue, Ab and small molecule imaging exemplified by PSMA targeting have the greatest potential to improve diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. PMID:22658884

  13. Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells Derived from Donors with Natural Rubber Latex Allergy Modulate Allergen-Specific T-Cell Responses and IgE Production

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Alejandro; Aguirre, Adam; Guzmán, María Antonieta; González, Rodrigo; Catalán, Diego; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Larrondo, Milton; López, Mercedes; Pesce, Barbara; Rolland, Jennifer; O’Hehir, Robyn; Aguillón, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Natural rubber latex (NRL; Hevea brasiliensis) allergy is an IgE-mediated reaction to latex proteins. When latex glove exposure is the main sensitizing agent, Hev b 5 is one of the major allergens. Dendritic cells (DC), the main antigen presenting cells, modulated with pharmacological agents can restore tolerance in several experimental models, including allergy. In the current study, we aimed to generate DC with tolerogenic properties from NRL-allergic patients and evaluate their ability to modulate allergen-specific T and B cell responses. Here we show that dexamethasone-treated DC (dxDC) differentiated into a subset of DC, characterized by low expression of MHC class II, CD40, CD80, CD86 and CD83 molecules. Compared with LPS-matured DC, dxDC secreted lower IL-12 and higher IL-10 after CD40L activation, and induced lower alloantigenic T cell proliferation. We also show that dxDC pulsed with the dominant Hev b 5 T-cell epitope peptide, Hev b 546–65, inhibited both proliferation of Hev b 5-specific T-cell lines and the production of Hev b 5-specific IgE. Additionally, dxDC induced a subpopulation of IL-10-producing regulatory T cells that suppressed proliferation of Hev b 5-primed T cells. In conclusion, dxDC generated from NRL-allergic patients can modulate allergen-specific T-cell responses and IgE production, supporting their potential use in allergen-specific immunotherapy. PMID:24465795

  14. Probiotics enhance the effect of allergy immunotherapy on regulating antigen specific B cell activity in asthma patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Chen, Feng-Hong; Qiu, Shu-Qi; Yang, Li-Tao; Zhang, Huan-Ping; Liu, Jiang-Qi; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Yang, Gui; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Jing; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Li, Hua-Bin; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Immune regulatory system dysfunction plays a role in the pathogenesis of asthma. The therapeutic effect of allergic asthma is to be improved. The immune regulatory function of probiotics has been recognized. This study tests a hypothesis that Clostridium butyricum (CB) enhances the effect of allergen specific immunotherapy (AIT) on asthma. In this study patients with allergic asthma were treated with AIT or/and CB for six months. The therapeutic effect and IgE production of the patients were observed. The results showed that administration with AIT alone alleviated the asthma symptoms; but the serum levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13 and specific IgE were not altered, which was markedly improved by the administration with CB plus AIT. Such effects were maintained only for two months in the patients treated with AIT alone; but maintained more than 12 months in those patients treated with both AIT and CB. CB facilitated AIT to induce IL-10(+) B cells (B10 cells) in asthma patients. AIT/CB therapy converted antigen specific B cells to antigen specific regulatory B cells. Butyrate modulated the gene transcription of IgE and IL-10 in the allergen specific B cells. In conclusion, administration of CB can enhance the therapeutic effect of AIT in the treatment of allergic asthma via facilitating generation of B10 cells.

  15. Probiotics enhance the effect of allergy immunotherapy on regulating antigen specific B cell activity in asthma patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Chen, Feng-hong; Qiu, Shu-Qi; Yang, Li-Tao; Zhang, Huan-Ping; Liu, Jiang-Qi; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Yang, Gui; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Jing; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Li, Hua-Bin; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Immune regulatory system dysfunction plays a role in the pathogenesis of asthma. The therapeutic effect of allergic asthma is to be improved. The immune regulatory function of probiotics has been recognized. This study tests a hypothesis that Clostridium butyricum (CB) enhances the effect of allergen specific immunotherapy (AIT) on asthma. In this study patients with allergic asthma were treated with AIT or/and CB for six months. The therapeutic effect and IgE production of the patients were observed. The results showed that administration with AIT alone alleviated the asthma symptoms; but the serum levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13 and specific IgE were not altered, which was markedly improved by the administration with CB plus AIT. Such effects were maintained only for two months in the patients treated with AIT alone; but maintained more than 12 months in those patients treated with both AIT and CB. CB facilitated AIT to induce IL-10+ B cells (B10 cells) in asthma patients. AIT/CB therapy converted antigen specific B cells to antigen specific regulatory B cells. Butyrate modulated the gene transcription of IgE and IL-10 in the allergen specific B cells. In conclusion, administration of CB can enhance the therapeutic effect of AIT in the treatment of allergic asthma via facilitating generation of B10 cells. PMID:28078000

  16. Tecemotide: An antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wurz, Gregory T; Kao, Chiao-Jung; Wolf, Michael; DeGregorio, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The identification of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) has made possible the development of antigen-specific cancer immunotherapies such as tecemotide. One of those is mucin 1 (MUC1), a cell membrane glycoprotein expressed on some epithelial tissues such as breast and lung. In cancer, MUC1 becomes overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated, exposing the immunogenic tandem repeat units in the extracellular domain of MUC1. Designed to target tumor associated MUC1, tecemotide is being evaluated in Phase III clinical trials for treatment of unresectable stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as maintenance therapy following chemoradiotherapy. Additional Phase II studies in other indications are ongoing. This review discusses the preclinical and clinical development of tecemotide, ongoing preclinical studies of tecemotide in human MUC1 transgenic mouse models of breast and lung cancer, and the potential application of these models for optimizing the timing of chemoradiotherapy and tecemotide immunotherapy to achieve the best treatment outcome for patients. PMID:25483673

  17. Antigen-Specific versus Non-Antigen-Specific Immunoadsorption in ABO-Incompatible Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Koch, Raphael; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Schuette-Nuetgen, Katharina; Busch, Veit; Wolters, Heiner; Kelsch, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction ABO-incompatible (ABOi) renal transplantation (RTx) from living donors is an established procedure to expand the donor pool for patients with end stage renal disease. Immunoadsorption (IA) is a standard procedure for the removal of preformed antibodies against the allograft. In this study, antigen-specific and non-antigen-specific IA in ABOi RTx were compared. Patients and Methods 10 patients underwent antigen-specific IA (Glycosorb group) and 13 patients non-antigen-specific IA (Immunosorba group). The effects of both procedures regarding antibody reduction, number of treatments, complications, costs, as well as the allograft function and patient survival were compared between both groups. Results Although the IgG levels were reduced equally by both procedures (p=0.82), the reduction of the IgM level was more effective in the Glycosorb group (p=0.0172). Patients in both groups required a median number of 6 IA before ABOi RTx. Allograft function at one year after AB0i RTx was similar in both groups (estimated glomerular filtration rate: 66 vs. 64 ml/min/1.73m² respectively), with a death-censored graft survival of 90.0% and 92.3% respectively. Complication rates did not differ between procedures. Due to the reuse of non-antigen-specific Immunosorba columns, costs were considerably lower in this group; however, the use of the Immunosorba-based IA was less time-efficient. Conclusion Considering upcoming alternatives as simultaneous performance of dialysis and IA or a possible reuse of Glycosorb columns, this might become less relevant in the future. PMID:26121389

  18. Agreement between allergen-specific IgE assays and ensuing immunotherapy recommendations from four commercial laboratories in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Jon D; Neradelik, Moni B; Polissar, Nayak L; Fadok, Valerie A; Scott, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    Background Canine allergen-specific IgE assays in the USA are not subjected to an independent laboratory reliability monitoring programme. Hypothesis/Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the agreement of diagnostic results and treatment recommendations of four serum IgE assays commercially available in the USA. Methods Replicate serum samples from 10 atopic dogs were submitted to each of four laboratories for allergen-specific IgE assays (ACTT®, VARL Liquid Gold, ALLERCEPT® and Greer® Aller-g-complete®). The interlaboratory agreement of standard, regional panels and ensuing treatment recommendations were analysed with the kappa statistic (κ) to account for agreement that might occur merely by chance. Six comparisons of pairs of laboratories and overall agreement among laboratories were analysed for ungrouped allergens (as tested) and also with allergens grouped according to reported cross-reactivity and taxonomy. Results The overall chance-corrected agreement of the positive/negative test results for ungrouped and grouped allergens was slight (κ = 0.14 and 0.13, respectively). Subset analysis of the laboratory pair with the highest level of diagnostic agreement (κ = 0.36) found slight agreement (κ = 0.13) for ungrouped plants and fungi, but substantial agreement (κ = 0.71) for ungrouped mites. The overall agreement of the treatment recommendations was slight (κ = 0.11). Altogether, 85.1% of ungrouped allergen treatment recommendations were unique to one laboratory or another. Conclusions and clinical importance Our study indicated that the choice of IgE assay may have a major influence on the positive/negative results and ensuing treatment recommendations. PMID:24461034

  19. IgE, IgG4 and IgA specific to Bet v 1-related food allergens do not predict oral allergy syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guhsl, E E; Hofstetter, G; Lengger, N; Hemmer, W; Ebner, C; Fröschl, R; Bublin, M; Lupinek, C; Breiteneder, H; Radauer, C

    2015-01-01

    Background Birch pollen-associated plant food allergy is caused by Bet v 1-specific IgE, but presence of cross-reactive IgE to related allergens does not predict food allergy. The role of other immunoglobulin isotypes in the birch pollen-plant food syndrome has not been investigated in detail. Methods Bet v 1-sensitized birch pollen-allergic patients (n = 35) were diagnosed for food allergy by standardized interviews, skin prick tests, prick-to-prick tests and ImmunoCAP. Concentrations of allergen-specific IgE, IgG1, IgG4 and IgA to seven Bet v 1-related food allergens were determined by ELISA. Results Bet v 1, Cor a 1, Mal d 1 and Pru p 1 bound IgE from all and IgG4 and IgA from the majority of sera. Immunoglobulins to Gly m 4, Vig r 1 and Api g 1.01 were detected in <65% of the sera. No significant correlation was observed between plant food allergy and increased or reduced levels of IgE, IgG1, IgG4 or IgA specific to most Bet v 1-related allergens. Api g 1-specific IgE was significantly (P = 0.01) elevated in celeriac-allergic compared with celeriac-tolerant patients. Likewise, frequencies of IgE (71% vs 15%; P = 0.01) and IgA (86% vs 38%; P = 0.04) binding to Api g 1.01 were increased. Conclusion Measurements of allergen-specific immunoglobulins are not suitable for diagnosing Bet v 1-mediated plant food allergy to hazelnut and Rosaceae fruits. In contrast, IgE and IgA to the distantly related allergen Api g 1 correlate with allergy to celeriac. PMID:25327982

  20. Increase of regulatory T cells and the ratio of specific IgE to total IgE are candidates for response monitoring or prognostic biomarkers in 2-year sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for Japanese cedar pollinosis.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Takashi; Yonekura, Syuji; Horiguchi, Shigetoshi; Taniguchi, Yuriko; Saito, Akemi; Yasueda, Hiroshi; Inamine, Ayako; Nakayama, Toshinori; Takemori, Toshitada; Taniguchi, Masaru; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Okamoto, Yoshitaka

    2011-04-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the therapeutic effects of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) and to identify potential biomarkers that would predict the therapeutic response in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. The trial was carried out over two pollinosis seasons in 2007 and 2008. Carry-over therapeutic effects were analyzed in 2009. SLIT significantly ameliorated the symptoms of pollinosis during the 2008 and 2009 pollen seasons. Cry j 1-specific cytokine production in a subgroup of patients with mild disease in the SLIT group was significantly attenuated. The ratio of specific IgE to total IgE before treatment correlated with the symptom-medication score in the SLIT group in 2008. Patients with increased Cry j 1-iTreg in the SLIT group had significantly improved QOL and QOL-symptom scores. In summary, the specific IgE to total IgE ratio and upregulation of Cry j 1-iTreg are candidates for biomarker of the clinical response to SLIT.

  1. IgG2 deficiency in a healthy blood donor. Concomitant lack of IgG2, IgA and IgE immunoglobulins and specific anti-carbohydrate antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Hammarström, L; Smith, C I

    1983-01-01

    Lack of serum IgG2, IgA and IgE was found in a healthy male adult blood donor. No secretory IgA could be demonstrated. In vitro activation of lymphocytes did not induce IgA secreting cells although no class specific suppressor cells could be found. Normal or slightly subnormal titres to a variety of bacterial and viral antigens were demonstrated whereas anti-carbohydrate antibodies (anti-teichoic acid, anti-dextran and anti-pneumococcal polysaccharide) were virtually absent. Isoagglutinins and heteroagglutinins were present in somewhat lower concentrations than normal. PMID:6189654

  2. IgG and IgE circulating immune complexes, total serum IgE and parasite related IgE in patients with mono- or mixed infection with Schistosoma mansoni and/or S. haematobium. Influence of therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, W J; Feldmeir, H; Bridts, C H; Daffalla, A A

    1983-01-01

    IgG and IgE containing circulating immune complexes (CIC), total serum IgE and parasite related IgE were determined in monoinfected patients with Schistosoma mansoni or S.haematobium and in patients with a mixed infection. IgE- and IgG-CIC and total serum IgE were significantly higher in the mixed infection group. There is considerable cross-reactivity between the crude S.haematobium and S.mansoni antigen preparations. The level of IgE-CIC is correlated to the levels of total serum IgE and parasite related IgE respectively. Furthermore IgE-CIC levels were related to the intensity of infection. Twelve out of 21 patients suffering from a monoinfection were reinvestigated 1-4 months after specific chemotherapy. Parasitological cure is followed by a significant decrease of total serum IgE and IgE-CIC, whereas parasite related IgE did not change significantly. The importance of the disappearance of IgE-CIC is discussed. PMID:6861371

  3. An assay that may predict the development of IgG enhancing allergen-specific IgE binding during birch immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Selb, R.; Eckl-Dorna, J.; Vrtala, S.; Valenta, R.; Niederberger, V.

    2017-01-01

    Background It has been shown that birch pollen immunotherapy can induce IgG antibodies which enhance IgE binding to Bet v 1. We aimed to develop a serological assay to predict the development of antibodies which enhance IgE binding to Bet v 1 during immunotherapy. Methods In 18 patients treated by Bet v 1-fragment-specific immunotherapy, the effects of IgG antibodies specific for the fragments on the binding of IgE antibodies to Bet v 1 were measured by ELISA. Blocking and possible enhancing effects on IgE binding were compared with skin sensitivity to Bet v 1 after treatment. Results We found that fragment-specific IgG enhanced IgE binding to Bet v 1 in two patients who also showed an increase of skin sensitivity to Bet v 1. Conclusion Our results indicate that it may be possible to develop serological tests which predict the induction of unfavourable IgG antibodies enhancing the binding of IgE to Bet v 1 during immunotherapy. PMID:23998344

  4. Comparison of intradermal skin testing (IDST) and serum allergen-specific IgE determination in an experimental model of feline asthma.

    PubMed

    Lee-Fowler, Tekla M; Cohn, Leah A; DeClue, Amy E; Spinka, Christine M; Ellebracht, Ryan D; Reinero, Carol R

    2009-11-15

    Intradermal skin testing (IDST) and allergen-specific IgE determination are used to determine allergen sensitization. In cats, studies have found poor correlation between the two tests. However, these studies were mainly conducted in pet cats sensitized to unknown allergens with unknown dose and duration of exposure. We hypothesized that in an experimental model of allergic sensitization where these variables are controlled, IDST would demonstrate greater sensitivity and specificity than would serum allergen-specific IgE determination. A model of feline asthma employing Bermuda grass allergen (BGA) or house dust mite allergen (HDMA) was used to test the hypothesis. Thirteen cats were assigned to undergo sensitization to BGA, HDMA or saline (placebo). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid confirmed development of an asthmatic phenotype. Serum collection and IDST were performed on D0, D28 and D50. A portion of serum was pooled, and an aliquot heat inactivated (HI) to destroy IgE. Individual, pooled, and pooled HI samples were used for allergen-specific IgE determination using an Fc epsilon R1 alpha-based ELISA; pooled samples were also analyzed using an enzymoimmunometric assay. Sensitivity (SE), specificity (SP), and positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were calculated for IDST and for BGA- and HDMA-specific IgE. Combined results for IDST found SE=90.9%, SP=86.7%, PPV=83.3%, and NPV=92.9%. For ELISA-based serum IgE testing, the SE=22.7%, SP=100%, PPV=100% and NPV=63.8%. The enzymoimmunometric assay did not detect sensitizing IgE, but did detect IgE reactivity to a variety of irrelevant allergens (even in HI samples). Sensitivity of IDST was greater than sensitivity of serum IgE measurement supporting use as a screening test for aeroallergens. Both IDST and allergen-specific IgE determination via ELISA were specific; either test can be used to guide selection of allergens for immunotherapy. The enzymoimmunometric assay was unreliable and cannot be recommended.

  5. Enhancement of Antigen-Specific Suppression by Muramyl Dipeptide

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Thomas A.; Krieger, Nancy J.; Pesce, Amadeo; Michael, J. Gabriel

    1983-01-01

    The effect of the synthetic adjuvant MDP (N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglu-tamine) on the generation of antigen-specific suppression was investigated. Suppression of the anti-bovine serum albumin response, which was achieved by intravenous administration of a peptic fragment of the antigen, was greatly enhanced by simultaneous administration of MDP. Induction of suppression by a combination of bovine serum albumin fragments and MDP was found to be antigen specific and appeared to occur via the generation of antigen-specific suppressor T cells. PMID:6187686

  6. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; Montaño, Sherwin P.; Kurosawa, Kohei; Zheng, Yupeng; Akin, Louesa R.; Świst-Rosowska, Kalina M.; Grzybowski, Adrian T.; Koide, Akiko; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Ruthenburg, Alexander J.; Koide, Shohei

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. This “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies. PMID:26862167

  7. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    DOE PAGES

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; ...

    2016-02-09

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. Thismore » “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies.« less

  8. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; Montaño, Sherwin P.; Kurosawa, Kohei; Zheng, Yupeng; Akin, Louesa R.; Świst-Rosowska, Kalina M.; Grzybowski, Adrian T.; Koide, Akiko; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Ruthenburg, Alexander J.; Koide, Shohei

    2016-02-09

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. This “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies.

  9. Delayed anaphylaxis, angioedema, or urticaria after consumption of red meat in patients with IgE antibodies specific for galactose-α-1,3-galactose

    PubMed Central

    Commins, Scott P.; Satinover, Shama M.; Hosen, Jacob; Mozena, Jonathan; Borish, Larry; Lewis, Barrett D.; Woodfolk, Judith A.; Platts-Mills, Thomas A. E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Carbohydrate moieties are frequently encountered in food and can elicit IgE responses, the clinical significance of which has been unclear. Recent work, however, has shown that IgE antibodies to galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-gal), a carbohydrate commonly expressed on nonprimate mammalian proteins, are capable of eliciting serious, even fatal, reactions. Objective We sought to determine whether IgE antibodies to α-gal are present in sera from patients who report anaphylaxis or urticaria after eating beef, pork, or lamb. Methods Detailed histories were taken from patients presenting to the University of Virginia Allergy Clinic. Skin prick tests (SPTs), intradermal skin tests, and serum IgE antibody analysis were performed for common indoor, outdoor, and food allergens. Results Twenty-four patients with IgE antibodies to α-gal were identified. These patients described a similar history of anaphylaxis or urticaria 3 to 6 hours after the ingestion of meat and reported fewer or no episodes when following an avoidance diet. SPTs to mammalian meat produced wheals of usually less than 4 mm, whereas intradermal or fresh-food SPTs provided larger and more consistent wheal responses. CAP-RAST testing revealed specific IgE antibodies to beef, pork, lamb, cow’s milk, cat, and dog but not turkey, chicken, or fish. Absorption experiments indicated that this pattern of sensitivity was explained by an IgE antibody specific for α-gal. Conclusion We report a novel and severe food allergy related to IgE antibodies to the carbohydrate epitope α-gal. These patients experience delayed symptoms of anaphylaxis, angioedema, or urticaria associated with eating beef, pork, or lamb. PMID:19070355

  10. Substrate Specificity of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Marc O.; Wu, Lisa Y.; Santiago, Nicholas M.; Moser, Jamie M.; Rowley, Jennifer A.; Bolstad, Erin S. D.; Berkman, Clifford E.

    2007-01-01

    A series of putative dipeptide substrates of prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) was prepared that explored α- and β/γ-linked acidic residues at the P1 position and various chromophores at the P2 position, while keeping the P1’ residue constant as L-Glu. Four chromophores were examined, including 4-phenylazobenzoyl, 1-pyrenebutyrl, 9-anthracenylcarboxyl-γ-aminobutyrl, and 4-nitrophenylbutyryl. When evaluating these chromophores, it was found that a substrate containing 4-phenylazobenzoyl at the P2 position was consumed most efficiently. Substitution at the P1 position with acidic residues showed that only γ-linked L-Glu and D-Glu were recognized by the enzyme, with the former being more readily proteolyzed. Lastly, binding modes of endogenous substrates and our best synthetic substrate (4-phenylazobenzoyl-Glu-γ-Glu) were proposed by computational docking studies into an X-ray crystal structure of the PSMA extracellular domain. PMID:17764959

  11. [Classification of allergens by positive percentage agreement and cluster analysis based on specific IgE antibodies in asthmatic children].

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, E; Baba, M

    1992-10-01

    Classification and characterization of allergens is important because allergic patients are sensitized by a variety of allergens. One hundred and sixty-one sera from asthmatic children were investigated for specific IgE antibodies against 35 allergens including 20 inhalants and 15 foods by means of the MAST method. We assessed the allergenic properties of the allergens based on positive percentage agreement and cluster analysis. There was a high positive percentage agreement of specific IgE antibodies between house dust and Dermatophagoides spp., a relatively high agreement between 5 molds, cat and dog epithelium, mugwort and wormwood and 5 grasses. Among the food allergens, the positive percentage agreements were relatively high, especially between cow's milk, casein, cheese, and between 3 cereal grains. In the cluster analysis, house dust and Dermatophagoides spp. made a big cluster; therefore 32 allergens except house dust and mites were analyzed. From the results of the cluster analysis, the major cluster consisted of (1) ragweed, (2) mugwort and wormwood, (3) timothy, sweet vernal, velvet and cultivated rye, (4) wheat, barley and rice, (5) molds, (6) cow's milk, casein, soybean and cheese, (7) shrimp and crab, (8) egg white, (9) Japanese cedar, (10) dog epithelium, (11) cat epithelium. The cluster of grass pollens and cereal grains made one cluster. These results tend to confirm the presence of species cross-reactivities within the major classes of allergens.

  12. Inhibitory Effect of Carotenoids on the Degranulation of Mast Cells via Suppression of Antigen-induced Aggregation of High Affinity IgE Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Shota; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Matsubara, Kiminori; Hirata, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Carotenoids have been demonstrated to possess antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. However, there is no report that the effects of carotenoids on degranulation of mast cell is critical for type I allergy. In this study, we focused on the effect of carotenoids on antigen-induced degranulation of mast cells. Fucoxanthin, astaxanthin, zeaxanthin, and β-carotene significantly inhibited the antigen-induced release of β-hexosaminidase in rat basophilic leukemia 2H3 cells and mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells. Those carotenoids also inhibited antigen-induced aggregation of the high affinity IgE receptor (FcϵRI), which is the most upstream of the degranulating signals of mast cells. Furthermore, carotenoids inhibited FcϵRI-mediated intracellular signaling, such as phosphorylation of Lyn kinase and Fyn kinase. It suggests that the inhibitory effect of carotenoids on the degranulation of mast cells were mainly due to suppressing the aggregation of FcϵRI followed by intracellular signaling. In addition, those carotenoids inhibited antigen-induced translocation of FcϵRI to lipid rafts, which are known as platforms of the aggregation of FcϵRI. We assume that carotenoids may modulate the function of lipid rafts and inhibit the translocation of FcϵRI to lipid rafts. This is the first report that focused on the aggregation of FcϵRI to investigate the mechanism of the inhibitory effects on the degranulation of mast cells and evaluated the functional activity of carotenoids associated with lipid rafts. PMID:19700409

  13. Host antigens on avian oncoviruses: evidence for virus envelope antigens related to specific chicken erythrocyte membrane antigens.

    PubMed

    Aupoix, M; Vigier, P; Blanchet, J P

    1980-01-01

    Avian sarcoma viruses (ASV) of subgroups A to D, produced by chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF), are inactivated to a high degree by rabbit antisera to the membrane antigens of adult chicken and chick embryo erythrocytes, notably by antisera to an antigen of embryo erythrocytes, which is lost by adult erythrocytes and to another antigen specific to the latter erythrocytes. Contrary to virus inactivation by anti-CEF serum reported earlier, virus inactivation by the antisera to these two age-specific antigens does not require complement and is not paralleled by virolysis but by aggregation of virions. The two antigens related, or identical, to the age-specific erythrocyte membrane antigens thus shown to be present on the virus envelope do not pre-exist, or pre-exist only in a low amount, on the CEF membrane, since the virus-inactivating capacity of their antisera is not removed by absorption with CEF. Their appearance on the virus does not depend on cell transformation but only on infection, since both antigens are found on a ts ASV mutant produced at restrictive temperature by untransformed CEF and the virus-inactivating capacity of their antisera is removed by absorption with CEF infected with Rous-associated virus (RAV-1). These findings suggest that infection of CEF by avian oncoviruses may elicit the appearance, or enhance the expression at the cell surface of antigens characteristic of another cell type which may contribute to the formation of specific virus budding sites.

  14. House dust-mite allergen exposure is associated with serum specific IgE but not with respiratory outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bakolis, I; Heinrich, J; Zock, J P; Norbäck, D; Svanes, C; Chen, C M; Accordini, S; Verlato, G; Olivieri, M; Jarvis, D

    2015-06-01

    Exposure to house dust has been associated with asthma in adults, and this is commonly interpreted as a direct immunologic response to dust-mite allergens in those who are IgE sensitized to house dust-mite. Mattress house dust-mite concentrations were measured in a population-based sample of 2890 adults aged between 27 and 56 years living in 22 centers in 10 countries. Generalized linear mixed models were employed to explore the association of respiratory symptoms with house dust-mite concentrations, adjusting for individual and household confounders. There was no overall association of respiratory outcomes with measured house dust-mite concentrations, even in those who reported they had symptoms on exposure to dust and those who had physician-diagnosed asthma. However, there was a positive association of high serum specific IgE levels to HDM (>3.5 kUA /l) with mattress house dust-mite concentrations and a negative association of sensitization to cat with increasing house dust-mite concentrations. In conclusion, there was no evidence that respiratory symptoms in adults were associated with exposure to house dust-mite allergen in the mattress, but an association of house mite with strong sensitization was observed.

  15. Application of photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence to detection of low serum concentrations of human IgE antibodies specific for a purified cat allergen (Fel D1).

    PubMed

    Tan, Yafang; Halsey, John F; Tang, Tiantian; Wetering, Scott Vande; Taine, Elaine; Cleve, Mark Van; Cunningham, Brian T

    2016-03-15

    We demonstrate the detection of low concentrations of allergen-specific Immunoglobulin E (IgE) in human sera using a Photonic Crystal Enhanced Fluorescence (PCEF) microarray platform. The Photonic Crystal (PC) surface, designed to provide optical resonances for the excitation wavelength and emission wavelength of Cy5, was used to amplify the fluorescence signal intensity measured from a multiplexed allergen microarray. Surface-based sandwich immunoassays were used to detect and quantify specific IgE antibodies against a highly purified cat allergen (Fel d1). A comparison of the lowest detectable concentration of IgE measured by the PC microarray system and a commercially available clinical analyzer demonstrated that the PCEF microarray system provides higher sensitivity. The PCEF system was able to detect low concentrations of specific IgE (~0.02 kU/L), which is 5-17-fold more sensitive than the commercially available FDA-approved analyzers. In preliminary experiments using multi-allergen arrays, we demonstrate selective simultaneous detection of IgE antibodies to multiple allergens.

  16. Application of Photonic Crystal Enhanced Fluorescence to Detection of Low Serum Concentrations of Human IgE Antibodies Specific for a Purified Cat Allergen (Fel d1)

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yafang; Halsey, John F.; Tang, Tiantian; Wetering, Scott Vande; Taine, Elaine; Van Cleve, Mark; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the detection of low concentrations of allergen-specific Immunoglobulin E (IgE) in human sera using a Photonic Crystal Enhanced Fluorescence (PCEF) microarray platform. The Photonic Crystal (PC) surface, designed to provide optical resonances for the excitation wavelength and emission wavelength of Cy5, was used to amplify the fluorescence signal intensity measured from a multiplexed allergen microarray. Surface-based sandwich immunoassays were used to detect and quantify specific IgE antibodies against a highly purified cat allergen (Fel d1). A comparison of the lowest detectable concentration of IgE measured by the PC microarray system and a commercially available clinical analyzer demonstrated that the PCEF microarray system provides higher sensitivity. The PCEF system was able to detect low concentrations of specific IgE (~0.02 kU/L), which is 5 to 17 -fold more sensitive than the commercially available FDA-approved analyzers. In preliminary experiments using multi-allergen arrays, we demonstrate selective simultaneous detection of IgE antibodies to multiple allergens. PMID:26406461

  17. Discordance between Aeroallergen Specific Serum IgE and Skin Testing in Children < 4 years of age

    PubMed Central

    de Vos, Gabriele; Nazari, Ramin; Ferastraoaru, Denisa; Parikh, Purvi; Geliebter, Rebecca; Pichardo, Yikania; Wiznia, Andrew; Rosenstreich, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Atopic sensitization to aeroallergens in early life has been shown to be a strong risk factor for developing persisting asthma in young children with recurrent wheeze. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the yield of skin prick test (SPT) compared to allergen specific serum IgE testing (sIgE) at identifying aeroallergen sensitization in atopic children < 4 years of age. Methods Concordance between SPT (Greer Laboratories, ComforTen™) and allergen specific sIgE (Immulite 2000™) for 7 common aeroallergens was analyzed in forty atopic inner-city children, 18–48 months of age (mean 36 +/− 9 months) with recurrent wheezing, family history of asthma and/or eczema. Results In 80% of children one or more allergen sensitizations would have been missed if only SPT had been performed, and in 38% of children one or more sensitizations would have been missed if only serum IgE testing had been performed. Agreement and between SPT and sIgE test was fair for most allergens (kappa between −0.04 and 0.50), as was correlation between sIgE levels and SPT grade (rho between 0.21 and 0.55). Children with high total sIgE (≥300 kU/l) were more likely to have sIgE positive tests with negative corresponding skin test (p=0.025). Conclusions Our study showed significant discordance between allergen specific SPT and sIgE testing results for common aeroallergens, suggesting that both SPT and sIgE testing should be done when diagnosing allergic sensitization in young children at high risk of asthma. PMID:23706713

  18. Equine IgE responses to non-viral vaccine components.

    PubMed

    Gershwin, Laurel J; Netherwood, Kristina A; Norris, Meredith Somerville; Behrens, Nicole E; Shao, Matt X

    2012-12-14

    Vaccination of horses is performed annually or semi-annually with multiple viral antigens, either in a combination vaccine or as separate injections. While this practice undoubtedly prevents infection from such diseases as rabies, equine influenza, West Nile virus, and equine herpes virus, the procedure is not without repercussions. Hypersensitivity reactions, including fatal anaphylactic shock, after vaccination, although uncommon, have increased in incidence in recent years. Studies reported herein document the development of IgE antibodies against non-target antigen components of equine viral vaccines. We hypothesize that viral vaccines can induce an IgE response to non-target antigens, which could elicit an adverse response after vaccination with another viral vaccine containing the same component. In one study IgE responses to components of West Nile virus vaccine were evaluated by ELISA before and after vaccination in 30 horses. In a second five-year study 77 horses were similarly tested for IgE antibodies against bovine serum albumin (BSA), a component of most viral vaccines. Mast cell sensitization was evaluated in horses with high, moderate, and negative serum BSA specific IgE using an intradermal skin test with BSA. Over the five-year period high IgE responder horses showed gradually increasing BSA specific serum IgE levels and positive skin test reactivity, yet none had an adverse event. Sera from horses that had developed adverse vaccine reactions were also tested for IgE antibodies. Several of these horses had extremely high levels of BSA-specific IgE. These data suggest that non-essential protein components of vaccines may sensitize horses for future adverse responses to vaccination.

  19. Beyond immediate hypersensitivity: evolving roles for IgE antibodies in immune homeostasis and allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Burton, Oliver T; Oettgen, Hans C

    2011-07-01

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies have long been recognized as the antigen-specific triggers of allergic reactions. This review briefly introduces the established functions of IgE in immediate hypersensitivity and then focuses on emerging evidence from our own investigations as well as those of others that IgE plays important roles in protective immunity against parasites and exerts regulatory influences in the expression of its own receptors, FcεRI and CD23, as well as controlling mast cell homeostasis. We provide an overview of the multifaceted ways in which IgE antibodies contribute to the pathology of food allergy and speculate regarding potential mechanisms of action of IgE blockade.

  20. Murine cell-mediated immune response recognizes an enterovirus group-specific antigen(s).

    PubMed Central

    Beck, M A; Tracy, S M

    1989-01-01

    Splenocytes taken from mice inoculated with coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) (Nancy) developed an in vitro proliferative response against CVB3 antigen. This response could not be detected earlier than 8 days postinoculation but could be detected up to 28 days after exposure to CB3. CVB3-sensitized splenocytes responded not only to the CVB3 antigen but to other enteroviruses as well. This response was found to be enterovirus specific in that no response was detected to a non-enteroviral picornavirus, encephalomyocarditis virus, or to an unrelated influenza virus. The generation of a splenocyte population capable of responding to an enterovirus group antigen(s) was not limited to inoculation of mice with CVB3, as similar responses were generated when mice were inoculated with CVB2. Cell subset depletions revealed that the major cell type responding to the enterovirus group antigen(s) was the CD4+ T cell. Current evidence suggests that the group antigen(s) resides in the structural proteins of the virus, since spleen cells from mice inoculated with a UV-inactivated, highly purified preparation of CVB3 virions also responded in vitro against enteroviral antigens. PMID:2476566

  1. Persistence of IgE-Associated Allergy and Allergen-Specific IgE despite CD4+ T Cell Loss in AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Marth, Katharina; Wollmann, Eva; Gallerano, Daniela; Ndlovu, Portia; Makupe, Ian; Valenta, Rudolf; Sibanda, Elopy

    2014-01-01

    The infection of CD4+ cells by HIV leads to the progressive destruction of CD4+ T lymphocytes and, after a severe reduction of CD4+ cells, to AIDS. The aim of the study was to investigate whether HIV-infected patients with CD4 cell counts <200 cells/µl can suffer from symptoms of IgE-mediated allergy, produce allergen-specific IgE antibody responses and show boosts of allergen-specific IgE production. HIV-infected patients with CD4 counts ≤200 cells/µl suffering from AIDS and from IgE-mediated allergy were studied. Allergy was diagnosed according to case history, physical examination, skin prick testing (SPT), and serological analyses including allergen microarrays. HIV infection was confirmed serologically and the disease was staged clinically. The predominant allergic symptoms in the studied patients were acute allergic rhinitis (73%) followed by asthma (27%) due to IgE-mediated mast cell activation whereas no late phase allergic symptoms such as atopic dermatitis, a mainly T cell-mediated skin manifestation, were found in patients suffering from AIDS. According to IgE serology allergies to house dust mites and grass pollen were most common besides IgE sensitizations to various food allergens. Interestingly, pollen allergen-specific IgE antibody levels in the patients with AIDS and in additional ten IgE-sensitized patients with HIV infections and low CD4 counts appeared to be boosted by seasonal allergen exposure and were not associated with CD4 counts. Our results indicate that secondary allergen-specific IgE production and IgE-mediated allergic inflammation do not require a fully functional CD4+ T lymphocyte repertoire. PMID:24896832

  2. Persistence of IgE-associated allergy and allergen-specific IgE despite CD4+ T cell loss in AIDS.

    PubMed

    Marth, Katharina; Wollmann, Eva; Gallerano, Daniela; Ndlovu, Portia; Makupe, Ian; Valenta, Rudolf; Sibanda, Elopy

    2014-01-01

    The infection of CD4+ cells by HIV leads to the progressive destruction of CD4+ T lymphocytes and, after a severe reduction of CD4+ cells, to AIDS. The aim of the study was to investigate whether HIV-infected patients with CD4 cell counts <200 cells/µl can suffer from symptoms of IgE-mediated allergy, produce allergen-specific IgE antibody responses and show boosts of allergen-specific IgE production. HIV-infected patients with CD4 counts ≤ 200 cells/µl suffering from AIDS and from IgE-mediated allergy were studied. Allergy was diagnosed according to case history, physical examination, skin prick testing (SPT), and serological analyses including allergen microarrays. HIV infection was confirmed serologically and the disease was staged clinically. The predominant allergic symptoms in the studied patients were acute allergic rhinitis (73%) followed by asthma (27%) due to IgE-mediated mast cell activation whereas no late phase allergic symptoms such as atopic dermatitis, a mainly T cell-mediated skin manifestation, were found in patients suffering from AIDS. According to IgE serology allergies to house dust mites and grass pollen were most common besides IgE sensitizations to various food allergens. Interestingly, pollen allergen-specific IgE antibody levels in the patients with AIDS and in additional ten IgE-sensitized patients with HIV infections and low CD4 counts appeared to be boosted by seasonal allergen exposure and were not associated with CD4 counts. Our results indicate that secondary allergen-specific IgE production and IgE-mediated allergic inflammation do not require a fully functional CD4+ T lymphocyte repertoire.

  3. Effects of maternal diet during late pregnancy and lactation on the development of IgE and egg- and milk-specific IgE and IgG antibodies in infants.

    PubMed

    Lilja, G; Dannaeus, A; Foucard, T; Graff-Lonnevig, V; Johansson, S G; Oman, H

    1991-03-01

    The IgE levels and food-allergen-specific IgE- and IgG-antibodies (Ab) to ovalbumin (OA), ovomucoid (OVO) and beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) were determined up to 18 months of age in 163 infants born to women who were atopic. A high (HIGH group) or a low (REDUCED group) intake of hen's egg and cow's milk by the mother during the third trimester gave no significant differences in the concentrations of IgE or in IgE-Ab (OVO, BLG) and IgG-Ab (OA, OVO, BLG). Similarly, a prolongation of the abstention diet to the early lactation period did not influence the immune response. The IgG-Ab levels to all three food allergens decreased significantly (P less than 0.001) in both study groups between birth and 2 months of age, but then increased significantly (P less than 0.001) between 6 and 18 months of age. The presence in serum of IgE-Ab to OVO (greater than or equal to 0.15 PRU/ml) was associated with significantly higher IgG-Ab levels to OVO at 6 months (P less than 0.001) and at 18 months (P less than 0.05). Infants with positive skin-prick tests (SPT) to OA and OVO showed higher IgG-Ab levels at 6 and 18 months of age than did infants with negative SPT reactions to the two egg allergens. This indicates a relation between the IgE- and IgG-Ab response and it also suggests that some individuals are 'high responders' to both types of immunoglobulin isotypes while others are 'low responders'.

  4. Engineering antigen-specific immunological tolerance.

    SciTech Connect

    Kontos, Stephan; Grimm, Alizee J.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-05-01

    Unwanted immunity develops in response to many protein drugs, in autoimmunity, in allergy, and in transplantation. Approaches to induce immunological tolerance aim to either prevent these responses or reverse them after they have already taken place. We present here recent developments in approaches, based on engineered peptides, proteins and biomaterials, that harness mechanisms of peripheral tolerance both prophylactically and therapeutically to induce antigenspecific immunological tolerance. These mechanisms are based on responses of B and T lymphocytes to other cells in their immune environment that result in cellular deletion or ignorance to particular antigens, or in development of active immune regulatory responses. Several of these approaches are moving toward clinical development, and some are already in early stages of clinical testing.

  5. Immunoediting and Antigen Loss: Overcoming the Achilles Heel of Immunotherapy with Antigen Non-Specific Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Monjazeb, Arta Monir; Zamora, Anthony E.; Grossenbacher, Steven K.; Mirsoian, Annie; Sckisel, Gail D.; Murphy, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a mainstream therapy option in the battle against cancer. Pre-clinical data demonstrates the ability of immunotherapy to harness the immune system to fight disseminated malignancy. Clinical translation has failed to recapitulate the promising results of pre-clinical studies although there have been some successes. In this review we explore some of the short-comings of cancer immunotherapy that have limited successful clinical translation. We will give special consideration to what we consider the most formidable hurdle to successful cancer immunotherapy: tumor-induced immune suppression and immune escape. We will discuss the need for antigen-specific immune responses for successful immunotherapy but also consider the need for antigen specificity as an Achilles heel of immunotherapy given tumor heterogeneity, immune editing, and antigen loss. Finally, we will discuss how combinatorial strategies may overcome some of the pitfalls of antigen specificity and highlight recent studies from our lab which suggest that the induction of antigen non-specific immune responses may also produce robust anti-tumor effects and bypass the need for antigen specificity. PMID:23898464

  6. Predictive value of specific IgE for clinical peanut allergy in children: relationship with eczema, asthma, and setting (primary or secondary care).

    PubMed

    van Veen, Wilma J; Dikkeschei, Lambert D; Roberts, Graham; Brand, Paul Lp

    2013-10-10

    The usefulness of peanut specific IgE levels for diagnosing peanut allergy has not been studied in primary and secondary care where most cases of suspected peanut allergy are being evaluated. We aimed to determine the relationship between peanut-specific IgE levels and clinical peanut allergy in peanut-sensitized children and how this was influenced by eczema, asthma and clinical setting (primary or secondary care). We enrolled 280 children (0-18 years) who tested positive for peanut-specific IgE (> 0.35 kU/L) requested by primary and secondary physicians. We used predefined criteria to classify participants into three groups: peanut allergy, no peanut allergy, or possible peanut allergy, based on responses to a validated questionnaire, a detailed food history, and results of oral food challenges.Fifty-two participants (18.6%) were classified as peanut allergy, 190 (67.9%) as no peanut allergy, and 38 (13.6%) as possible peanut allergy. The association between peanut-specific IgE levels and peanut allergy was significant but weak (OR 1.46 for a 10.0 kU/L increase in peanut-specific IgE, 95% CI 1.28-1.67). Eczema was the strongest risk factor for peanut allergy (aOR 3.33, 95% CI 1.07-10.35), adjusted for demographic and clinical characteristics. Asthma was not significantly related to peanut allergy (aOR 1.93, 95% CI 0.90-4.13). Peanut allergy was less likely in primary than in secondary care participants (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.25-0.86), at all levels of peanut-specific IgE.The relationship between peanut-specific IgE and peanut allergy in children is weak, is strongly dependent on eczema, and is weaker in primary compared to secondary care. This limits the usefulness of peanut-specific IgE levels in the diagnosis of peanut allergy in children.

  7. Update on antigen-specific immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Sarah A; Walter, Roland B

    2015-06-01

    Among the few drugs that have shown a benefit for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in randomized clinical trials over the last several decades is the CD33 antibody-drug conjugate, gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO). Undoubtedly, this experience has highlighted the value of antigen-specific immunotherapy in AML. A wide variety of therapeutics directed against several different antigens on AML cells are currently explored in preclinical and early clinical studies. On the one hand, these include passive strategies such as unconjugated antibodies targeting one or more antigens, antibodies armed with drugs, toxic proteins, or radionuclides, or adoptive immunotherapies, in particular utilizing T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or modified T cell receptor (TCR) genes; on the other hand, these include active strategies such as vaccinations. With the documented benefit for GO and the emerging data with several classes of therapeutics in other leukemias, in particular small bispecific antibodies and CAR T cells, the future is bright. Nevertheless, a number of important questions related to the choice of target antigen(s), patient population, exact treatment modality, and supportive care needs remain open. Addressing such questions in upcoming studies will ultimately be required to optimize the clinical use of antigen-specific immunotherapies in AML and ensure that such treatments become an effective, versatile tool for this disease for which the outcomes have remained unsatisfactory in many patients.

  8. Measurement of IgG, IgA and IgE antibodies to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus by antigen-binding assay, using a partially purified fraction of mite extract (F4P1).

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, M D; Platts-Mills, T A

    1978-01-01

    An extract of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus culture has been fractionated by chromatography on Sephadex G-100 and Pevikon block electrophoresis to obtain a partially purified allergen (F4P1). This preparation has a molecular weight of between 15--25,000 Dalton, migrates slowly on electrophoresis, and is colourless in solution. The skin-test reactivity of F1P1 was comparable to that of crude D. pteronyssinus extract. F4P1 was radio-labelled with 125I and used in an antigen-binding radioimmunoassay to measure IgG, IgA and IgE antibody (ab) to D. pteronyssinus. IgG, ab was detected in serum from 32/34 (94%) mite-allergic persons, and from 10/31 (30%) nonallergic persons. IgA ab and IgE ab were found in sera from 22/34 (65%) and 37/34 (79%) allergic persons respectively. Neither IgA nor IgE ab could be detected in sera from non-allergic persons. An excellent correlation was found between radioallergo-sorbent technique (RAST), using crude D. pteronyssinus extract and IgE-binding activity (BA) for F4P1, (r=0.94, P less than 0.001). The antigen-binding assay for IgE BA was as sensitive as RAST, but less sensitive than PK testing. There was a very good quantitative correlation between IgG BA and IgE BA (r = 0.84, P less than 0.001). IgG BA was shown to rise in the serum of three patients treated with injections of D. pteronyssinus extract. PMID:750116

  9. Evaluation of a Novel Rapid Test System for the Detection of Specific IgE to Hymenoptera Venoms

    PubMed Central

    Pfender, Nikolai; Lucassen, Ralf; Offermann, Nadine; Schulte-Pelkum, Johannes; Fooke, Margrit; Jakob, Thilo

    2012-01-01

    Background. The Allergy Lateral Flow Assay (ALFA) is a novel rapid assay for the detection of sIgE to allergens. The objective of this study is the evaluation of ALFA for the detection of sIgE to bee venom (BV) and wasp venom (WV) in insect venom allergic patients. Methods. Specific IgE to BV and WV was analyzed by ALFA, ALLERG-O-LIQ, and ImmunoCAP in 80 insect venom allergic patients and 60 control sera. Sensitivity and specificity of ALFA and correlation of ALFA and ImmunoCAP results were calculated. Results. The sensitivity/specificity of ALFA to the diagnosis was 100%/83% for BV and 82%/97% for WV. For insect venom allergic patients, the Spearman correlation coefficient for ALFA versus ImmunoCAP was 0.79 for BV and 0.80 for WV. However, significant differences in the negative control groups were observed. Conclusion. ALFA represents a simple, robust, and reliable tool for the rapid detection of sIgE to insect venoms. PMID:22500188

  10. Sensitivity and Specificity of Histoplasma Antigen Detection by Enzyme Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Lauren; Cook, Audrey; Hanzlicek, Andrew; Harkin, Kenneth; Wheat, Joseph; Goad, Carla; Kirsch, Emily

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of an antigen enzyme immunoassay (EIA) on urine samples for the diagnosis of histoplasmosis in dogs. This retrospective medical records review included canine cases with urine samples submitted for Histoplasma EIA antigen assay between 2007 and 2011 from three veterinary institutions. Cases for which urine samples were submitted for Histoplasma antigen testing were reviewed and compared to the gold standard of finding Histoplasma organisms or an alternative diagnosis on cytology or histopathology. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and the kappa coefficient and associated confidence interval were calculated for the EIA-based Histoplasma antigen assay. Sixty cases met the inclusion criteria. Seventeen cases were considered true positives based on identification of the organism, and 41 cases were considered true negatives with an alternative definitive diagnosis. Two cases were considered false negatives, and there were no false positives. Sensitivity was 89.47% and the negative predictive value was 95.35%. Specificity and the positive predictive value were both 100%. The kappa coefficient was 0.9207 (95% confidence interval, 0.8131-1). The Histoplasma antigen EIA test demonstrated high specificity and sensitivity for the diagnosis of histoplasmosis in dogs.

  11. Antigen-specific immune reactions to ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Urra, Xabier; Miró, Francesc; Chamorro, Angel; Planas, Anna M.

    2014-01-01

    Brain proteins are detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood of stroke patients and their concentration is related to the extent of brain damage. Antibodies against brain antigens develop after stroke, suggesting a humoral immune response to the brain injury. Furthermore, induced immune tolerance is beneficial in animal models of cerebral ischemia. The presence of circulating T cells sensitized against brain antigens, and antigen presenting cells (APCs) carrying brain antigens in draining lymphoid tissue of stroke patients support the notion that stroke might induce antigen-specific immune responses. After stroke, brain proteins that are normally hidden from the periphery, inflammatory mediators, and danger signals can exit the brain through several efflux routes. They can reach the blood after leaking out of the damaged blood-brain barrier (BBB) or following the drainage of interstitial fluid to the dural venous sinus, or reach the cervical lymph nodes through the nasal lymphatics following CSF drainage along the arachnoid sheaths of nerves across the nasal submucosa. The route and mode of access of brain antigens to lymphoid tissue could influence the type of response. Central and peripheral tolerance prevents autoimmunity, but the actual mechanisms of tolerance to brain antigens released into the periphery in the presence of inflammation, danger signals, and APCs, are not fully characterized. Stroke does not systematically trigger autoimmunity, but under certain circumstances, such as pronounced systemic inflammation or infection, autoreactive T cells could escape the tolerance controls. Further investigation is needed to elucidate whether antigen-specific immune events could underlie neurological complications impairing recovery from stroke. PMID:25309322

  12. A Naturally Occurring Hypoallergenic Variant of Vespid Antigen 5 from Polybia scutellaris Venom as a Candidate for Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vinzón, Sabrina E.; Marino-Buslje, Cristina; Rivera, Elena; Biscoglio de Jiménez Bonino, Mirtha

    2012-01-01

    Stings by insects from the Hymenoptera order are known to cause life-threatening allergic reactions and impair life quality. Despite the effectiveness of conventional vespid venom immunotherapy, more standardized and safer allergy vaccines are required and recombinant hypoallergenic variants are important clinical tools. Antigen 5 is a major allergen of vespid venoms and it was previously reported that Antigen 5 from Polybia scutellaris (Poly s 5) could be a hypoallergenic variant. In this work we assess the immunological behavior and allergenic activity of Poly s 5 in order to explore its suitability for specific immunotherapy. With this aim, recombinant Poly s 5 was expressed in Pichia pastoris and the presence of cross-reactive epitopes with Pol a 5, a known allergenic Antigen 5, was investigated both at the IgG and IgE levels, by ELISA assays and a basophil-mediator release assay respectively. A molecular model was also built to better understand the relationship between immunological and structural aspects. In mice, Poly s 5 induced IgG antibodies which cross-reacted with Pol a 5. However, Poly s 5 induced only minimal amounts of IgE and was a poor inducer of basophil-mediator release, even when the cells were sensitized with Pol a 5-specific IgE. Moreover, Poly s 5-specific serum showed a specific protective activity and was able to inhibit the Pol a 5-induced basophil degranulation. Structural analysis from the molecular model revealed that a few amino acid substitutions in the N-terminal region of Poly s 5 should lead to an alteration of the surface topography and electrostatic potential of the epitopes which could be responsible for its hypoallergenic behavior. These findings, taken as a whole, show that Poly s 5 is likely a naturally occurring hypoallergenic Antigen 5 variant. PMID:22844463

  13. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Alison E; Jennewein, Madeleine F; Suscovich, Todd; Dionne, Kendall; Tedesco, Jacquelynne; Chung, Amy W; Streeck, Hendrik; Pau, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Francis, Don; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna; Walker, Bruce D; Baden, Lindsey; Barouch, Dan H; Alter, Galit

    2016-03-01

    Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain) regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.  .

  14. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Suscovich, Todd; Dionne, Kendall; Tedesco, Jacquelynne; Chung, Amy W.; Streeck, Hendrik; Pau, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Francis, Don; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna; Walker, Bruce D.; Baden, Lindsey; Barouch, Dan H.; Alter, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain) regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.   PMID:26982805

  15. Predicted complementarity determining regions of the T cell antigen receptor determine antigen specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, C D; Eidelman, F J; Duncan, A; Hooshmand, F; Hedrick, S M

    1995-01-01

    The antigen receptor on T cells (TCR) has been predicted to have a structure similar to a membrane-anchored form of an immunoglobulin F(ab) fragment. Virtually all of the conserved amino acids that are important for inter- and intramolecular interactions in the VH-VL pair are also conserved in the TCR V alpha and V beta chains. A molecular model of the TCR has been constructed by homology and we have used the information from this, as well as the earlier structural predictions of others, to study the basis for specificity. Specifically, regions of a TCR cloned from an antigen-specific T cell were stitched into the corresponding framework of a second TCR. Results indicate that the substitution of amino acid sequences corresponding to the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of immunoglobulin can convey the specificity for antigen and major histocompatibility complex molecules. These data are consistent with a role, but not an exclusive role, for CDR3 in antigen peptide recognition. Images PMID:7534228

  16. Allergen-specific IgE levels against crude mould and storage mite extracts and recombinant mould allergens in sera from horses affected with chronic bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Eder, C; Crameri, R; Mayer, C; Eicher, R; Straub, R; Gerber, H; Lazary, S; Marti, E

    2000-03-15

    between healthy and CB-affected animals nor correlations between IgA and IgG or IgE titres could be found. These results show that horses suffering from CB are more often sensitised to some Aspergillus fumigatus and Alternaria alternata allergens than control horses and that they are partly sensitised to the same fungal proteins as mould-allergic human patients. Furthermore, this study shows that r-allergens allow a much more sensitive determination of specific serum antibody levels by ELISA than crude mould extracts.

  17. Determinants of total and specific IgE in infants with atopic dermatitis. ETAC Study Group. Early Treatment of the Atopic Child.

    PubMed

    1997-11-01

    ETAC (Early Treatment of the Atopic Child), a multi-centre predominantly European study to investigate the potential for cetirizine to prevent the development of asthma in infants with atopic dermatitis has completed enrollment: 817 children have been randomised to 18 months' treatment with either active or placebo and a subsequent 18 months of post-treatment follow-up. Results of the therapeutic effects will not be available for some time, but the study has provided an opportunity to investigate influences on sensitization to allergens in a large cohort of 1-2 years olds with already established atopic dermatitis, resident in different countries and in different environments. The study shows that in infants with atopic dermatitis, raised serum total IgE has significantly different determinants from that a specific allergen sensitization. In infancy, increased total IgE is more affected by factors increasing risk of intercurrent infection and non-specific airway inflammation, such as environmental tobacco smoke exposure (p < 0.001) and the use of gas cookers (p = 0.02). Specific allergen sensitization as represented by detectable IgE antibodies is influenced primarily by allergen exposure. In Sweden, low level exposure to allergens is associated with reduced specific allergen sensitization rates even though the infants already have atopic dermatitis.

  18. Diabetes tolerogenic vaccines targeting antigen-specific inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Shuang; Zhang, Huiyuan; Zhou, Xian; He, Yue; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Xie, Xiaoping; Li, Chaofan; He, Zhonghuai; Yu, Qingling; Zhong, Yiwei; Lowrie, Douglas B; Zheng, Guoxing; Wang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance controls the magnitude of inflammation, and balance between beneficial and harmful effects of inflammation is crucial for organ function and survival. Inadequate tolerance leads to various inflammatory diseases. Antigen specific tolerance is ideal for inflammation control as alternative anti-inflammatory interventions are non-specific and consequently increase the risk of infection and tumorigenesis. With inherent antigen specificity, tolerogenic vaccines are potentially ideal for control of inflammation. Although the concept of tolerogenic vaccines is still in its infancy, tolerogenic mucosal vaccines and specific immuno-therapies have long been proven effective in pioneering examples. Now a body of evidence supporting the concept of tolerogenic vaccines has also accumulated. Here we comment on recent successes of the tolerogenic vaccine concept, present new evidence with a type 1 diabetes vaccine as an example and draw conclusions on the advantages and potential for inflammatory disease control at the bedside. PMID:25622092

  19. Diabetes tolerogenic vaccines targeting antigen-specific inflammation.

    PubMed

    Geng, Shuang; Zhang, Huiyuan; Zhou, Xian; He, Yue; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Xie, Xiaoping; Li, Chaofan; He, Zhonghuai; Yu, Qingling; Zhong, Yiwei; Lowrie, Douglas B; Zheng, Guoxing; Wang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance controls the magnitude of inflammation, and balance between beneficial and harmful effects of inflammation is crucial for organ function and survival. Inadequate tolerance leads to various inflammatory diseases. Antigen specific tolerance is ideal for inflammation control as alternative anti-inflammatory interventions are non-specific and consequently increase the risk of infection and tumorigenesis. With inherent antigen specificity, tolerogenic vaccines are potentially ideal for control of inflammation. Although the concept of tolerogenic vaccines is still in its infancy, tolerogenic mucosal vaccines and specific immuno-therapies have long been proven effective in pioneering examples. Now a body of evidence supporting the concept of tolerogenic vaccines has also accumulated. Here we comment on recent successes of the tolerogenic vaccine concept, present new evidence with a type 1 diabetes vaccine as an example and draw conclusions on the advantages and potential for inflammatory disease control at the bedside.

  20. The transfer of maternal IgE and other immunoglobulins specific for Trichostrongylus colubriformis larval excretory/secretory product to the neonatal lamb.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, A; Shaw, R J; Green, R S; Phegan, M D

    2005-12-15

    The transference of immunoglobulins from six New Zealand Romney ewes to their lambs was examined. Immunoglobulin levels were determined in ewe plasma, colostrum and lamb plasma shortly after birth and before the lambs fed, in lamb plasma 2 days after birth, and lamb plasma, ewe plasma and milk 30 days after parturition. Levels of total IgE, and IgE, IgG1, IgG2, IgM, and IgA with specificity for Trichostronglus colubriformis third stage larval secretory/excretory products (TcL3E/S) were determined. Mean levels of total IgE were three times higher in colostrum than in parturient ewe plasma while only trace amounts were detected in milk at 30 days after birth (107.7, 34.3, and 0.2U ml(-1), respectively, differences between means P< or =0.01). Mean total IgE in lamb plasma rose from being undetectable before suckling to levels comparable to those of the ewes by 2 days after birth (21.7U ml(-1)) and then declined to low levels by 30 days (0.4U ml(-1)). Total IgE levels in lamb plasma were significantly correlated with levels in ewe plasma and colostrum (r=0.91, P< or =0.01; r=0.96, P< or =0.003, respectively). The transference of TcL3E/S-specific IgE, IgG1 and IgA was substantial with mean levels of these antibodies in lamb plasma at 2 days comparable to that in parturient ewe plasma (absorbance levels in lamb plasma of 0.283, 0.537, and 0.334, respectively). Proportionally less maternal IgM and IgG2 appeared to be transferred to the lambs (absorbance of 0.112 and 0.081, respectively). Levels of TcL3E/S-specific IgE and IgG1 in lamb plasma at 2 days were significantly correlated with levels in parturient ewe plasma and colostrum (r=0.89 and 0.82, 0.85 and 0.96; all P< or =0.05, respectively). These results indicate that IgE is concentrated in ewe colostrum and that substantial amounts of maternal IgE are transferred to lambs via colostrum. Further, the results suggest that humoral immunity against gastro-intestinal nematode parasites and potentially other parasites in

  1. Cut-off values of serum IgE (total and A. fumigatus -specific) and eosinophil count in differentiating allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis from asthma.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ritesh; Aggarwal, Ashutosh N; Garg, Mandeep; Saikia, Biman; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke

    2014-11-01

    The cut-off values of immunological tests employed in diagnosis of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) have never been validated. Herein, we compare the immunological findings in patients with ABPA and asthma using receiver operating characteristic analysis. Consecutive asthmatic subjects underwent all the following investigations: Aspergillus skin test, IgE levels (total and A. fumigatus-specific), Aspergillus precipitins, eosinophil count, chest radiograph and CT chest. There were 372 subjects (179 men, mean age 35.9 years) with a mean asthma duration of 8 years. ABPA was diagnosed in 76 patients (64 bronchiectasis, 12 without bronchiectasis). ABPA was separated from asthma using the best cut-off values of total IgE, A. fumigatus IgE and total eosinophil count of 2347 IU ml(-1) , 1.91 kUA l(-1) and 507 cells per μl respectively. The sensitivity/specificity of these parameters were 87/81%; 99/87%; and, 79/76% respectively. The corresponding AUC values were 0.95, 0.90 and 0.82 respectively. The combination of these three tests at the aforementioned cut-offs provided 100% specificity. Our study provides evidence-based cut-off values of IgE (total and A. fumigatus-specific) and eosinophil counts in differentiating ABPA from asthma. As this is a single centre retrospective study, further studies from different centres are required, as these values could vary by ethnicity and environmental exposure.

  2. Suppression of antigen-specific antibody responses in mice ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    T-cell-dependent antibody responses (TDAR) are suppressed in female C57BL/6N mice exposed to ≥3.75 mg/kg of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) for 15 days. To determine if suppression of humoral immunity by PFOA is peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARa)-dependent and if suppression is associated with specific targeting of T- or B-cells, three separate experiments were conducted: (1) female PPARa constitutive knockout (PPARa KO; B6.129S4-Ppar(tm1Gonz)N12) and wild-type controls (WT; C57BL/6-Tac) exposed to 0, 7.5, or 30 mg PFOA/kg for 15 days were immunized on Day 11 with a T-cell-dependent antigen and sera then collected for measures of antigen-specific lgM titers (TDAR) 5 days later; (2) female C57BL/6N WT mice exposed to 0, 0.94, 1.88, 3.75, or 7.5mg PFOA/kg for 15 days were immunized with a T-cell-independent antigen on Day 11 and sera were then collected foranalyses of antigen-specific lgM titers (TIAR) 7 days later; and (3) splenic lymphocyte phenotypes were assessed in unimmunized female C57BL/6N WT mice exposed to 0, 3.75, or 7.5 mg PFOA/kg for 10 days to investigate effects of PFOA in the absence of specific immunization. Separate groups of mice were immunized with a T-cell-dependent antigen after 11 days of exposure and splenic lymphocyte sub-populations were assessed after 13 or 15 days of exposure to assess numbers of stimulated cells. The results indicated that exposure to ≥1.88mg PFOA/kg suppressed the TIAR; exposure to 30 mg PFOA/k

  3. Suppression of Antigen-Specific Lymphocyte Activation in Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, David; Pride, Michael W.; Brown, Eric L.; Risin, Diana; Pellis, Neal R.

    1999-01-01

    Various parameters of immune suppression are observed in astronauts during and after spaceflight, and in isolated immune cells in true and simulated microgravity. Specifically, polyclonal activation of T cells is severely suppressed in true and simulated microgravity. These recent findings with various polyclonal activators suggests a suppression of oligoclonal lymphocyte activation in microgravity. We utilized rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors that simulate aspects of microgravity for cell cultures to analyze three models of antigen-specific activation. A mixed-lymphocyte reaction (MLR), as a model for a primary immune response; a tetanus toxoid (TT) response and a B. burgdorferi (Bb) response, as models of a secondary immune response, were all suppressed in the RWV bioreactor. Our findings confirm that the suppression of activation observed with polyclonal models also encompasses oligoclonal antigen-specific activation.

  4. Induction of antigen-specific T suppressor cells by soluble Paracoccidioides brasiliensis antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Finkel, B E; Murphy, J W

    1988-01-01

    In naturally acquired paracoccidioidomycosis, patients have depressed in vivo and in vitro cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis antigen. In addition, it has been reported that these patients have significant levels of circulating paracoccidioidal antigen in their sera. The primary purpose of this investigation was to assess the effects of P. brasiliensis antigen on the CMI responses in a mouse model. On the basis of findings with other fungal agents, we predicted that circulating paracoccidioidal antigen may be inducing suppressor cells which modulate the CMI response. In this study, we show (i) that a soluble P. brasiliensis culture filtrate antigen (Pb.Ag) emulsified in complete Freund adjuvant and injected subcutaneously into mice induces reasonably high levels of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) in CBA/J mice; (ii) that Pb.Ag elicits DTH reactions specific for P. brasiliensis when injected into footpads of immunized mice; and (iii) that an intravenous injection of Pb.Ag induces a population of lymph node and spleen cells which, upon adoptive transfer, suppress the afferent limb of the DTH response to paracoccidioidal antigen. The afferent suppressor cells can be detected in spleens as early as 5 days after Pb.Ag treatment, are present in significant numbers by 7 days in both spleens and lymph nodes, and are virtually absent by 14 days. In contrast, at 14 days after antigen injection, efferent suppressor cells were detected in spleens and lymph nodes. The Pb.Ag-induced afferent suppressor cells specifically inhibit the antiparacoccidioidal DTH response. They are nylon wool-nonadherent cells, and their activity is abrogated by anti-Thy-1 and complement treatment, indicating that they are T lymphocytes. The phenotype of these afferent suppressor T cells is L3T4+ Lyt-1+2- I-J+. The Pb.Ag-specific suppressor cells described in this paper are similar to the Ts1 cells in the azobenzenearsonate, 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl acetyl, and

  5. A Crystallin Fold in the Interleukin-4-inducing Principle of Schistosoma mansoni Eggs (IPSE/α-1) Mediates IgE Binding for Antigen-independent Basophil Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, N. Helge; Mayerhofer, Hubert; Tripsianes, Konstantinos; Blindow, Silke; Barths, Daniela; Mewes, Astrid; Weimar, Thomas; Köhli, Thies; Bade, Steffen; Madl, Tobias; Frey, Andreas; Haas, Helmut; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen; Sattler, Michael; Schramm, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    The IL-4-inducing principle from Schistosoma mansoni eggs (IPSE/α-1), the major secretory product of eggs from the parasitic worm S. mansoni, efficiently triggers basophils to release the immunomodulatory key cytokine interleukin-4. Activation by IPSE/α-1 requires the presence of IgE on the basophils, but the detailed molecular mechanism underlying activation is unknown. NMR and crystallographic analysis of IPSEΔNLS, a monomeric IPSE/α-1 mutant, revealed that IPSE/α-1 is a new member of the βγ-crystallin superfamily. We demonstrate that this molecule is a general immunoglobulin-binding factor with highest affinity for IgE. NMR binding studies of IPSEΔNLS with the 180-kDa molecule IgE identified a large positively charged binding surface that includes a flexible loop, which is unique to the IPSE/α-1 crystallin fold. Mutational analysis of amino acids in the binding interface showed that residues contributing to IgE binding are important for IgE-dependent activation of basophils. As IPSE/α-1 is unable to cross-link IgE, we propose that this molecule, by taking advantage of its unique IgE-binding crystallin fold, activates basophils by a novel, cross-linking-independent mechanism. PMID:26163514

  6. A Crystallin Fold in the Interleukin-4-inducing Principle of Schistosoma mansoni Eggs (IPSE/α-1) Mediates IgE Binding for Antigen-independent Basophil Activation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, N Helge; Mayerhofer, Hubert; Tripsianes, Konstantinos; Blindow, Silke; Barths, Daniela; Mewes, Astrid; Weimar, Thomas; Köhli, Thies; Bade, Steffen; Madl, Tobias; Frey, Andreas; Haas, Helmut; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen; Sattler, Michael; Schramm, Gabriele

    2015-09-04

    The IL-4-inducing principle from Schistosoma mansoni eggs (IPSE/α-1), the major secretory product of eggs from the parasitic worm S. mansoni, efficiently triggers basophils to release the immunomodulatory key cytokine interleukin-4. Activation by IPSE/α-1 requires the presence of IgE on the basophils, but the detailed molecular mechanism underlying activation is unknown. NMR and crystallographic analysis of IPSEΔNLS, a monomeric IPSE/α-1 mutant, revealed that IPSE/α-1 is a new member of the βγ-crystallin superfamily. We demonstrate that this molecule is a general immunoglobulin-binding factor with highest affinity for IgE. NMR binding studies of IPSEΔNLS with the 180-kDa molecule IgE identified a large positively charged binding surface that includes a flexible loop, which is unique to the IPSE/α-1 crystallin fold. Mutational analysis of amino acids in the binding interface showed that residues contributing to IgE binding are important for IgE-dependent activation of basophils. As IPSE/α-1 is unable to cross-link IgE, we propose that this molecule, by taking advantage of its unique IgE-binding crystallin fold, activates basophils by a novel, cross-linking-independent mechanism.

  7. Suppression of antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in modeled microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D.; Pride, M. W.; Brown, E. L.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Various parameters of immune suppression are observed in lymphocytes from astronauts during and after a space flight. It is difficult to ascribe this suppression to microgravity effects on immune cells in crew specimens, due to the complex physiological response to space flight and the resultant effect on in vitro immune performance. Use of isolated immune cells in true and modeled microgravity in immune performance tests, suggests a direct effect of microgravity on in vitro cellular function. Specifically, polyclonal activation of T-cells is severely suppressed in true and modeled microgravity. These recent findings suggest a potential suppression of oligoclonal antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in microgravity. We utilized rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors as an analog of microgravity for cell cultures to analyze three models of antigen-specific activation. A mixed-lymphocyte reaction, as a model for a primary immune response, a tetanus toxoid response and a Borrelia burgdorferi response, as models of a secondary immune response, were all suppressed in the RWV bioreactor. Our findings confirm that the suppression of activation observed with polyclonal models also encompasses oligoclonal antigen-specific activation.

  8. Suppression of antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in modeled microgravity.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D; Pride, M W; Brown, E L; Risin, D; Pellis, N R

    2001-02-01

    Various parameters of immune suppression are observed in lymphocytes from astronauts during and after a space flight. It is difficult to ascribe this suppression to microgravity effects on immune cells in crew specimens, due to the complex physiological response to space flight and the resultant effect on in vitro immune performance. Use of isolated immune cells in true and modeled microgravity in immune performance tests, suggests a direct effect of microgravity on in vitro cellular function. Specifically, polyclonal activation of T-cells is severely suppressed in true and modeled microgravity. These recent findings suggest a potential suppression of oligoclonal antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in microgravity. We utilized rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors as an analog of microgravity for cell cultures to analyze three models of antigen-specific activation. A mixed-lymphocyte reaction, as a model for a primary immune response, a tetanus toxoid response and a Borrelia burgdorferi response, as models of a secondary immune response, were all suppressed in the RWV bioreactor. Our findings confirm that the suppression of activation observed with polyclonal models also encompasses oligoclonal antigen-specific activation.

  9. Evidence of infectious asthma phenotype: Chlamydia-induced allergy and pathogen-specific IgE in a neonatal mouse model.

    PubMed

    Patel, Katir K; Webley, Wilmore C

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease whose etiology is poorly understood. Recent studies suggest that early-life respiratory infections with atypical bacteria may play an important role in the induction or exacerbation of chronic respiratory disease. The current study utilized a neonatal mouse ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization model of asthma to determine the course of early-life respiratory tract infection by Chlamydia. Neonatal (day 1) and adult (6 wks) BALB/c mice were infected intranasally with Chlamydia (MoPn) and 7 weeks later were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. Allergic airway disease was characterized by examination of serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) cellularity, cytokine production and antibody response. The presence of Chlamydia was determined by PCR and culture. Ova-specific IgE was quantified by ELISA and Chlamydia-specific IgE was determined via Western blot analysis. Chlamydial infection in neonatal mice induced increased production of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, 5, 10, and 13) in both BAL and serum, while infected adult mice produced increased Th1 cytokines (IL-2, IFN-γ). The BAL from infected neonates contained significantly elevated levels of eosinophils compared to infected adult mice. Although adult mice cleared the infection ∼30 days post infection (pi), neonates were still infected 66 days after initial infection. Chlamydia-specific IgE was detected in both the BAL and serum of neonatal mice beginning 28 days post infection, however, infected adult mice did not produce Chlamydia-specific IgE antibodies over the course of the study. When allergic airway was induced using Ova, infected neonatal mice increased their production of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 by >2 fold compared to uninfected controls and infected adult groups. Our findings demonstrate that early-life Chlamydia infection induces a Th2-dominant cytokine response in the airways of neonatal mice, leading to chronic infection. More significantly, early life respiratory

  10. Analysis of T cell responses to the major allergens from German cockroach: epitope specificity and relationship to IgE production.

    PubMed

    Oseroff, Carla; Sidney, John; Tripple, Victoria; Grey, Howard; Wood, Robert; Broide, David H; Greenbaum, Jason; Kolla, Ravi; Peters, Bjoern; Pomés, Anna; Sette, Alessandro

    2012-07-15

    Bla g allergens are major targets of IgE responses associated with cockroach allergies. However, little is known about corresponding T cell responses, despite their potential involvement in immunopathology and the clinical efficacy of specific immunotherapy. Bioinformatic predictions of the capacity of Bla g 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, and 7 peptides to bind HLA-DR, -DP, and -DQ molecules, and PBMC responses from 30 allergic donors, identified 25 T cell epitopes. Five immunodominant epitopes accounted for more than half of the response. Bla g 5, the most dominant allergen, accounted for 65% of the response, and Bla g 6 accounted for 20%. Bla g 5 induced both IL-5 and IFN-γ responses, whereas Bla g 6 induced mostly IL-5, and, conversely, Bla g 2 induced only IFN-γ. Thus, responses to allergens within a source are independently regulated, suggesting a critical role for the allergen itself, and not extraneous stimulation from other allergens or copresented immunomodulators. In comparing Ab with T cell responses for several donor/allergen combinations, we detected IgE titers in the absence of detectable T cell responses, suggesting that unlinked T cell-B cell help might support development of IgE responses. Finally, specific immunotherapy resulted in IL-5 down modulation, which was not associated with development of IFN-γ or IL-10 responses to any of the Bla g-derived peptides. In summary, the characteristics of T cell responses to Bla g allergens appear uncorrelated with IgE responses. Monitoring these responses may therefore yield important information relevant to understanding cockroach allergies and their treatment.

  11. Hay fever and predictive value of prick test and specific IgE antibodies: a prospective study in children.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Torsten; Hoelscher, Bernd; Adam, Horst; Ring, Johannes; Wichmann, H-Erich; Heinrich, Joachim

    2003-04-01

    Little is known from population-based studies in children about the diagnostic values of allergen-specific IgE antibodies (RAST) and skin prick test (SPT) with respect to hay fever. We aimed to determine and compare the diagnostic values of SPT and RAST to aeroallergens with respect to the incidence of hay fever cases in schoolchildren at different cut-off points. A prospective cohort study was performed on 1100 school children (5-7 and 8-10 years). Information on a doctor's diagnosis of hay fever was obtained by questionnaire and allergic sensitization to grass and birch pollen, cat, and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus were measured using SPT and RAST between September 1992 and July 1993. Thirty-eight children give a history of hay fever (3.5%) in 1992/93 and additionally 37 cases occurred until 1996. Allergic sensitization was present in 17.9% (SPT), 30.2% (RAST) and more frequent in children with a history of hay fever (SPT: OR 11.7, 5.5-24.7; RAST: OR 10.6, 4.3-26.4). This difference was most pronounced for sensitization to pollen allergens. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV) for SPT and RAST were 65.6, 83.7, 11.9, 98.6 and 79.3, 71.6, 9.3, 99.0, respectively, with differences for specificity being significant (p < 0.001). Whereas NPV were equally high for SPT (99.2) and RAST (99.3), the incidence of hay fever cases were predicted rather poorly though somewhat better by SPT than by RAST (PPV 16.7 vs. 9.8; p < 0.001) initially. With increasing cut-off point for RAST reactivity, the PPV increased and reached 25.0 at 17.5 kU/l, whereas the NPV decreased to 97.9, which was lower than that of SPT reactivity (p < 0.01). At the cut-off point of 1.5 kU/l almost identical predictive values for SPT and RAST were obtained. SPT and RAST perform better in the negative than positive prediction of hay fever cases in epidemiological studies. Differences in the predictive capabilities depend on the chosen cut-off point for RAST

  12. Gallium-68 Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen PET Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Michael S; Iravani, Amir

    2017-04-01

    The role of gallium-68 ((68)Ga) prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET imaging is evolving and finding its place in the imaging armamentarium for prostate cancer (PCa). Despite the progress of conventional imaging strategies, significant limitations remain, including identification of small-volume disease and assessment of bone. Clinical studies have demonstrated that (68)Ga-PSMA is a promising tracer for detection of PCa metastases, even in patients with low prostate-specific antigen. To provide an accurate interpretation of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/computed tomography, nuclear medicine specialists and radiologists should be familiar with physiologic (68)Ga-PSMA uptake, common variants, patterns of locoregional and distant spread of PCa, and inherent pitfalls.

  13. Characterization of a human antigen specific helper factor

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, B.

    1986-03-01

    While antigen (Ag) specific helper factors have been characterized in mice, similar molecules have not been identified in humans. To characterize human antigen specific helper molecules, an IL-2 dependent tetanus toxoid (T.T.) reactive T cell line was fused with a 6-thioguanine resistant CEM line, and hybrids selected in medium containing hypoxanthine and azaserine. Hybrids were screened by culturing the cells with /sup 35/S-Met then reacting the supernatants with T.T. or hepatitis vaccine immobilized on nitrocellulose. One hybrid, TT6BA-O, was identified which secreted a Met-containing molecule which bound T.T. but not hepatitis vaccine. Supernatants from TT6BA-O, but not the parent CEM line, when added to autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC's) stimulated secretion of T.T. specific antibodies (Abs). Specificity controls demonstrated that TT6BA-O supernatant did not induce antibodies to diphtheria toxoid, hepatitis vaccine or pneumococcal polysaccharide, and total immunoglobulin (lg) synthesis was minimally increased. In contrast, pokeweed mitogen stimulated significant lg synthesis as well as Ab's to pneumococcal polysaccharide and T.T. TT6BA-O supernatant induced anti-T.T.Ab's in autologous PBMC's but not PBMC's from 3 unrelated donors, suggesting that the activity of the helper factor is restricted, possibly by the MHC. The molecular weight of the helper factor was estimated at 100,000-150,000 by Sephacryl S-300 chromatography. Finally, the helper factor could be demonstrated to bind and elute from sephorose-immobilized T.T. and anti-DR antisera, but not anti-lg antisera or the T40/25 monoclonal antibody, which binds a nonpolymorphic determinant on the human T cell receptor. These results demonstrate that human Ag specific helper factors exist, bind antigen and bear class II MHC determinants.

  14. Immunochemical properties of antigen-specific monkey T-cell suppressor factor induced with a Streptococcus mutans antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, J R; Zanders, E D; Kontiainen, S; Lehner, T

    1980-01-01

    Antigen-specific suppressor factor could be released from monkey suppressor T cells induced in vitro with a protein antigen isolated from the carcinogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans. The suppressor activity was due to the factor itself and not to carryover of free antigen. Characterization of the monkey factor revealed it to have a molecular weight of ca. 70,000, and to contain a constant region and determinants encoded by the major histocompatibility complex. The presence of immunoglobulin determinants could not be demonstrated. However, by virtue of its adsorption to specific antigen, an antigen-combining site was shown to be present. The possible regulatory role of streptococcal antigen-specific suppressor factor in protection against dental caries is discussed. PMID:6164645

  15. Non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophilia syndrome is not associated with local production of specific IgE in nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Becker, Sven; Rasp, Julia; Eder, Katharina; Berghaus, Alexander; Kramer, Matthias F; Gröger, Moritz

    2016-06-01

    Non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophilia syndrome (NARES) is an eosinophilic inflammation of the nasal mucosa without evidence of an allergy or other nasal pathologies. Patients complain about perennial symptoms like nasal obstruction, rhinorrhea, itchiness and sneezing of the nose sometimes accompanied by hyposmia. The aim of the study was to better characterize NARES patients using immunoassay-biochip technology to examine serum and nasal secretion. Sera and nasal secretion of patients with NARES (perennial nasal symptoms, no evidence of acute or chronic rhinosinusitis with or without polyps, negative SX1-Screening test and/or negative skin prick test, eosinophilic cationic protein in nasal secretion >200 ng/ml) were tested by immunoassay-biochip technology (ImmunoCAP(®) ISAC, Phadia). 112 different allergen components from 51 allergen sources were tested on the chip. Furthermore, serum and nasal secretion were tested for specific IgE to Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin TSST-1 by fluorescence-enzyme-immunoassay (UniCAP(®), Phadia). Unrecognized systemic sensitization could be ruled out by negative ISAC results in sera of all patients. Testing of nasal secretion for allergen-specific IgE by ISAC chip technology was negative as well in all cases. In one patient, a systemic sensitization to Staphylococcus aureus superantigen TSST-1 was detectable but no allergen-specific IgE to TSST-1 was measurable in nasal secretion of any patient. The results demonstrate that NARES is not associated with local allergy (entopy) nor with a local inflammation driven by Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin TSST-1. Further studies are necessary to better understand the underlying mechanisms of NARES.

  16. Specific binding of antigen onto human T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Durandy, A.; Fischer, A.; Charron, D.; Griscelli, C.

    1986-05-01

    Human T lymphocytes sensitized to Candida albicans (CA) were shown to proliferate in cultures induced with mannan, a ramified polysaccharide extracted from the cell well of CA. We presently describe that, when we used strongly labeled (/sup 3/H)mannan, antigen-specific T blast cells were able to bind the labeled mannan on their membrane. The observations that irrelevant blast cells did not bind (/sup 3/H)mannan, and that mannan-specific blast cells did not bind tritiated pneumococcal polysaccharide SIII, indicate the specificity of mannan binding. Mannan binding was reversible and saturable. Mannan binding on T blast cells was inhibited by preincubation with monoclonal antibodies to T3 but not to other T cell-related molecules. The characteristics of this receptor suggest its identity with the T cell receptor for antigen. The direct binding of mannan could be either due to a cross-linking of the receptor by multivalent mannan or to a recognition of mannan in association with HLA-DQ molecules, as suggested by partial blocking of mannan binding using anti-HLA-DQ monoclonal antibodies.

  17. A Monoclonal Antibody Specific to Surface Antigen on Candida krusei

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Raymond; Faure, Odile; Carloti, Arnaud; Lebeau, Bernadette; Bernard, Christian; Marot-Leblond, Agnès; Grillot, Renée; Senet, Jean-Marcel

    1998-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb; MAb 6B3) which reacts specifically with a cell wall antigen found in all strains or isolates of Candida krusei was developed. MAb 6B3 was extensively tested by immunofluorescence assay for cross-reaction with many Candida, Cryptococcus, Saccharomyces, Trichosporon, and Rhodotorula species and was found to react only with the species C. krusei. The specific epitope is expressed on the surface of fungal cells and appears to reside on a protein moiety. Taking into account the increasing importance of fluconazole-resistant strains in nosocomial fungal infections, the very high degree of specificity of this MAb for C. krusei could be useful for the routine detection of C. krusei in culture or in tissue samples. PMID:9455893

  18. Quantitation of IgE and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) by optical beam deflection (OBD) measurement of dot-immunobinding assay patterns visualized by an ELISA technique.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, S; Kimura, H; Tu, C Y; Kitamori, T; Sawada, T

    1993-05-05

    Dot-immunobinding assays of IgE and CEA were performed by a conventional dot-ELISA technique with diaminobenzidine staining, and the quantitative results were compared by densitometry and a new, spectroscopic, optical beam deflection (OBD) method using the same membrane. It was possible with the OBD method to detect quantities of these substances at least ten times smaller than with densitometry. Better intra-assay reproducibility for IgE and CEA measurements was obtained by the OBD method. The measurable ranges of the OBD method was broader than that of densitometry, because dark bands caused OBD in proportion to their color densities. When the dot-immunobinding assay with OBD measurement for CEA was also compared with a microtube ELISA using biotin-avidin conjugates, the sensitivities and reproducibilities of the two methods were found to be similar, with a correlation coefficient of 0.991.

  19. Updates of prostate cancer staging: Prostate-specific membrane antigen

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Alastair; Nair, Rajesh; Geurts, Nicolas; Mitchell, Catherine; Lawrentschuk, Nathan L; Moon, Daniel A; Murphy, Declan G

    2016-01-01

    The ability to accurately stage prostate cancer in both the primary and secondary staging setting can have a major impact on management. Until recently radiological staging has relied on computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear bone scans to evaluate the extent of disease. However, the utility of these imaging technologies has been limited by their sensitivity and specificity especially in detecting early recurrence. Functional imaging using positron-emission tomography with a radiolabeled ligand targeted to prostate-specific membrane antigen has transformed the prostate cancer imaging landscape. Initial results suggest that it is a substantial improvement over conventional imaging in the setting of recurrence following primary therapy by having a superior ability to detect disease and to do so at an earlier stage. Additionally, it appears that the benefits seen in the secondary staging setting may also exist in the primary staging setting. PMID:27995218

  20. Development of sandwich ELISA for testing bovine β-lactoglobulin allergenic residues by specific polyclonal antibody against human IgE binding epitopes.

    PubMed

    He, Shengfa; Li, Xin; Gao, Jinyan; Tong, Ping; Chen, Hongbing

    2017-07-15

    Bovine β-lactoglobulin (BLG) is the main allergen in cows' milk, and the most commonly used method for detecting BLG is enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). However, antibodies used in commercial ELISA kits do not recognize specifically BLG IgE epitopes. Here, an antibody specific to IgE linear epitopes for BLG was used to develop a sandwich ELISA using a rabbit anti-BLG polyclonal antibody. The linear range for BLG detection was 31.25-8000ng/mL and limit of detection was 1.96ng/mL. BLG content in dairy samples was determined, and there was a good agreement between this immunoassay and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with high recovery. Additionally, BLG content in food samples had an average recovery of 104.25%. Allergenic residues were also detected in hydrolyzed infant formulas. The method developed could be a practical approach to determine BLG and its allergenic residues in food with a high degree of sensitivity, reliability and recovery.

  1. Regulator T cells: specific for antigen and/or antigen receptors?

    PubMed

    Rubin, B; de Durana, Y Diaz; Li, N; Sercarz, E E

    2003-05-01

    Adaptive immune responses are regulated by many different molecular and cellular effectors. Regulator T cells are coming to their rights again, and these T cells seem to have ordinary alpha/beta T-cell receptors (TCRs) and to develop in the thymus. Autoimmune responses are tightly regulated by such regulatory T cells, a phenomenon which is beneficial to the host in autoimmune situations. However, the regulation of autoimmune responses to tumour cells is harmful to the host, as this regulation delays the defence against the outgrowth of neoplastic cells. In the present review, we discuss whether regulatory T cells are specific for antigen and/or for antigen receptors. Our interest in these phenomena comes from the findings that T cells produce many more TCR-alpha and TCR-beta chains than are necessary for surface membrane expression of TCR-alphabeta heterodimers with CD3 complexes. Excess TCR chains are degraded by the proteasomes, and TCR peptides thus become available to the assembly pathway of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. Consequently, do T cells express two different identification markers on the cell membrane, the TCR-alphabeta clonotype for recognition by B-cell receptors and clonotypic TCR-alphabeta peptides for recognition by T cells?

  2. Specific affinity between fibronectin and the epidermolysis bullosa acquisita antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Woodley, D T; O'Keefe, E J; McDonald, J A; Reese, M J; Briggaman, R A; Gammon, W R

    1987-01-01

    Autoantibodies in the skin and sera of patients with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita bind to a large matrix molecule within the lamina densa region of skin basement membrane. At the site of these immune complexes, the epidermis separates from the dermis, which creates a subepidermal blister just below the lamina densa. The target molecule for the autoantibodies is in close apposition to fibronectin, a major extracellular matrix molecule that is abundant in the upper dermis of skin. In this report, we show specific affinity between fibronectin and the 290,000-D chain of the epidermolysis bullosa acquisita antigen, and that this affinity is mediated by the gelatin/collagen-binding domain of fibronectin (Mr = 60,000). Since blistering in epidermolysis bullosa acquisita often occurs in the absence of clinical and histological inflammation, a direct interruption in the fibronectin-epidermolysis bullosa acquisita antigen bond may be involved in the pathogenesis of epidermal-dermal disadherence that occurs in this bullous disease. Images PMID:3584471

  3. Characterization of antigen association with accessory cells: specific removal of processed antigens from the cell surface by phospholipases.

    PubMed Central

    Falo, L D; Haber, S I; Herrmann, S; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1987-01-01

    To characterize the basis for the cell surface association of processed antigen with the antigen-presenting cell (APC) we analyzed its sensitivity to enzymatic digestion. Antigen-exposed APC that are treated with phospholipase and then immediately fixed lose their ability to stimulate antigen-plus-Ia-specific T-T hybridomas. This effect is seen with highly purified phospholipase A2 and phospholipase C. In addition it is observed with three distinct antigens--ovalbumin, bovine insulin, and poly(LGlu56LLys35LPhe9) [(GluLysPhe)n]. The effect of phospholipases is highly specific. Identically treated APC are equivalent to controls in their ability to stimulate alloreactive hybridomas specific for precisely the same Ia molecule that is corecognized by antigen-plus-Ia-specific hybrids. Furthermore, the antigen-presenting function of enzyme-treated, fixed APC can be reconstituted by the addition of exogenous in vitro processed or "processing independent" antigens. In parallel studies 125I-labeled avidin was shown to specifically bind to APC that were previously exposed and allowed to process biotin-insulin. Biotin-insulin-exposed APC that are pretreated with phospholipase bind significantly less 125I-labeled avidin than do untreated, exposed APC. Identical enzyme treatment does not reduce the binding of avidin to a biotinylated antibody already bound to class II major histocompatibility complex molecules of APC. At least some of the biotin-insulin surface sites are immunologically relevant, because the presentation of processed biotin-insulin by fixed APC is blocked by avidin. This effect is specific. Avidin binding to biotin-insulin-exposed APC does not inhibit allospecific stimulation nor the presentation of unconjugated insulin. These studies demonstrate that phospholipase effectively removes processed cell surface antigen. PMID:3467371

  4. Germ tube-specific antigens of Candida albicans cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Sundstrom, P.R.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were performed to characterize the surface differences between blastospores and germ tubes of the pathogenic, dimorphic yeast, Candida albicans, and to identify components of yeast cells responsible for these differences. Investigation of surfaces differences of the two growth forms was facilitated by the production of rabbit antiserum prepared against Formalin-treated yeast possessing germ tubes. To prepare antiserum specific for germ tubes, this serum was adsorbed with stationary phase blastospores. Whereas the unadsorbed antiserum reacted with both blastospore and germ tube forms by immunofluorescence and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, the adsorbed antiserum did not react with blastospores but detected germ tube-specific antigens in hyphal forms. The differences between blastospores and germ tubes of Candida albicans, were further studied by comparing enzymatic digests of cell walls of both growth forms in radiolabeled organisms. Organisms were labeled either on the surface with /sup 125/I, or metabolically with (/sup 35/S) methionine or (/sup 3/H) mannose. Three-surface-located components (as shown by antibody adsorption and elution experiments) were precipitated from Zymolase digests. All three components were mannoproteins as shown by their ability to bind Concanavalin A, and to be labeled in protein labeling procedures, and two of these (200,000 and 155,000 molecular weight) were germ tube specific, as shown by their ability to be precipitated by germ tube-specific antiserum. Monoclonal antibodies were prepared to C. albicans, using blastospores bearing germ tubes as immunogen.

  5. HLA-DR antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus: association with specificity of autoantibody responses to nuclear antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, J S; Klippel, J H; Penner, E; Reichlin, M; Steinberg, A D; Chused, T M; Scherak, O; Graninger, W; Hartter, E; Zielinski, C C

    1987-01-01

    HLA-DR antigens and autoantibodies to the nuclear or cytoplasmic antigens Ro/SSA, La/SSB, Sm, and RNP were determined in North American and Austrian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Analysis of the association of antibodies to these ribonucleic acid (RNA)-protein antigens with HLA-DR antigens showed that HLA-DR3 was related to the presence of anti-Ro/SSA or anti-La/SSB, or both. In contrast, anti-Sm or anti-RNP, or both were associated with HLA-DR4. HLA-DR5 was associated with absence of these autoantibodies. The data extend evidence for the complexity and heterogeneity of SLE. Moreover, they indicate that, in SLE, genes linked to those coding for HLA-DR antigens, are related to the specificity of autoantibody responses rather than to the primary immunological abnormalities of this disorder. PMID:3498447

  6. Engineering HIV-Specific Immunity with Chimeric Antigen Receptors.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Scott G; Zack, Jerome A

    2016-12-01

    HIV remains a highly important public health and clinical issue despite many recent advances in attempting to develop a cure, which has remained elusive for most people infected with HIV. HIV disease can be controlled with pharmacologic therapies; however, these treatments are expensive, may have severe side effects, and are not curative. Consequently, an improved means to control or eliminate HIV replication is needed. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play a critical role in controlling viral replication and are an important part in the ability of the immune response to eradicate most viral infections. There are considerable efforts to enhance CTL responses in HIV-infected individuals in hopes of providing the immune response with armaments to more effectively control viral replication. In this review, we discuss some of these efforts and focus on the development of a gene therapy-based approach to engineer hematopoietic stem cells with an HIV-1-specific chimeric antigen receptor, which seeks to provide an inexhaustible source of HIV-1-specific immune cells that are MHC unrestricted and superior to natural antiviral T cell responses. These efforts provide the basis for further development of T cell functional enhancement to target and treat chronic HIV infection in hopes of eradicating the virus from the body.

  7. [Classification of specific IgE antibodies in children with hay fever and other atopic diseases in Germany. Results of the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS)].

    PubMed

    Langen, U

    2012-03-01

    The dependencies between sensitization to common allergens (mono- and polysensitization, IgE level and patterns) and symptomatic hay fever and other atopic diseases, respectively, in children and adolescents are shown in this analysis. The evaluation was based on the KiGGS ("Kinder- und Jugendgesundheitssurvey") study. Our analysis was performed using complex samples methods with SPSS. Participants were interviewed by a physician using a validated questionnaire asking for atopic diseases and symptoms. Specific IgE levels were measured from the age of 3 years on by using the ImmunoCap® test system. The prevalences of hay fever and polysensitizations both significantly increase with increasing age of the participants, while boys are more often affected than girls and migrants less often regarding sensitizations. Prevalence of hay fever decreases with increasing number of older siblings and increases with atopy of one or both parents. Different positive correlations between increasing IgE levels and hay fever were identified, the greatest association was observed with herbal inhalative allergens and cross-reacting food allergens. Lowest IgE levels to nearly all of the tested allergens show a positive correlation with hay fever prevalence. In conclusion, the study indicates that the clinical definition of the lowest positive IgE levels as "marginal" should be discussed as well as indications for specific immunotherapy.

  8. Specific Antibodies for the Detection of Alternaria Allergens and the Identification of Cross-Reactive Antigens in Other Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Twaroch, Teresa E.; Curin, Mirela; Sterflinger, Katja; Focke-Tejkl, Margit; Swoboda, Ines; Valenta, Rudolf

    2017-01-01

    Background The mould Alternaria alternata is an important source of respiratory allergens. A. alternata extracts show great variations regarding allergenic potency. The aim of this study was to generate antibody probes specific for important Alternaria allergens and to use them to study allergen expression, depending on different culture conditions, as well as to search for cross-reactive allergens in other mould species. Methods Synthetic peptides from antigenic regions of A. alternata allergens (Alt a 1, Alt a 2, Alt a 3, Alt a 6 and Alt a 8) were used to raise highly specific rabbit antibodies. These antibodies and IgE from allergic patients were used to detect allergens by immunoblotting in extracts of 4 A. alternata strains grown under varying culturing conditions, in commercial skin-prick extracts and in closely (Cladosporium herbarum and Aureobasidium pullulans) or distantly related (Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum) mould species. Results There was a wide variation of expression of the individual A. Alternata allergens, depending on the strain and culture conditions, but the antibody probes allowed us to distinguish strains and culture conditions with low and high allergen expression. In the commercial skin-prick solutions, varying levels of Alt a 1 were found, but no other allergens were detectable. Alt a 1 was identified as species-specific A. Alternata allergen, whereas Alt a 3, 6- and Alt a 8-cross-reactive antigens were found in C. herbarum and/or A. pullulans. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Peptide-specific antibodies are useful to analyze diagnostic and therapeutic mould extracts, to study the presence of A. Alternata allergens in biological samples and to search for cross-reactive allergens in other mould species. PMID:27780168

  9. Flagellin modulates IgE expression in B cells to initiate food allergy in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin-Jing; Ma, Na; Zeng, Lu; Mo, Li-Hua; Li, Xiao-Xi; Xu, Ling-Zhi; Yang, Bo; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Feng, Bai-Sui; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Zhang, Huan-Ping; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2016-01-01

    The initiation mechanism of IgE expression has not been fully understood. Flagellin (FGN) is an important microbial factor in the regulation of immune responses in the intestine. This study tests a hypothesis that FGN plays a crucial role in the isotype switching of IgE in B cells and the initiation of food allergy. In this study, the expression of IgE in B cells was analyzed by real time RT-PCR, Western blotting and chromatin immunoprecipitation. A mouse model was developed to assess the role of Toll like receptor-5 in the development of IgE-mediated allergic reaction in the intestinal mucosa. The results showed that exposure to FGN suppressed the expression of Bcl6 in B cells via increasing the levels of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 7; the latter up regulated the levels of methylated H3K9 and H3K27, down regulated RNA polymerase II and STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) at the Bcl6 promoter locus. Exposure to FGN and IL-4 markedly increased the expression of IgE in B cells via activating p300, H3K4, Pol II and STAT6 at the IgE promoter locus. As compared with the sensitized wild mice, the sensitized TLR5-deficient mice showed no detectable OVA-specific IgE in the serum; mast cells in the intestinal mucosa were not activated, no apparent allergic symptoms were evoked after the specific antigen challenge. In conclusion, FGN facilitates the initiation of food allergy in mice by triggering IgE transcription in B cells in a Th2 polarization environment via activating HDAC7 and suppressing Bcl6 expression.

  10. Repeat Prostate-Specific Antigen Tests Before Prostate Biopsy Decisions.

    PubMed

    Nordström, Tobias; Adolfsson, Jan; Grönberg, Henrik; Eklund, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Despite limited scientific support, a repeat prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test before prostate biopsy decisions is common. We analyzed biopsy outcomes in 1686 men from the STHLM3 study with PSA 3-10 ng/mL and two PSA tests taken within eight weeks and before prostate biopsy using percentages and multinomial logistic regression. We found that omitting prostate biopsy for men with PSA values decreasing to PSAs of 3 ng/mL or less would save 16.8% of biopsy procedures, while missing 5.4% of the cancers with Gleason scores (GSs) of 7 or higher. The proportion of cancers with GSs of 6 or lower was independent of the first PSA value, as well as of PSA change. Also, the risk of tumors with GSs of 7 or higher decreased with both decreasing and increasing PSA levels: It was 18.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 16.3% to 20.9%) for men with PSA changes of less than 20%, 12.1% (95% CI = 8.0% to 16.2%) for men with PSA levels increasing at least 20%, and 6.6% (95% CI = 3.8% to 9.3%) for men with PSA levels decreasing at least 20%.

  11. Predictors of mortality after prostate-specific antigen failure

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amico, Anthony V. . E-mail: adamico@lroc.harvard.edu; Kantoff, Phillip; Loffredo, Marian; Renshaw, Andrew A.; Loffredo, Brittany; Chen Minghui

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: We identified factors associated with the length of survival after prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure. Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 81 of 206 men enrolled on a randomized trial evaluating external-beam radiation therapy (RT) with or without androgen suppression therapy (AST) and who experienced PSA failure. Salvage AST was administered at a PSA level of {approx}10 ng/mL as per protocol. Cox regression was used to determine factors associated with length of survival after PSA failure. Results: A PSA DT (doubling time) <6 months (p = 0.04) and age at the time of PSA failure (p = 0.009) were significantly associated with length of survival. By 5 years, 35% and 65% of all-cause mortality was from prostate cancer in men whose age at PSA failure was 75 or higher vs. <75, respectively. Across all ages, 0%, 4%, as compared with 63% of men, were estimated to die of prostate cancer within 5 years after PSA failure if their PSA DT was >12, 6-12, or <6 months, respectively. Conclusions: Advanced age and a PSA DT <6 months at the time of PSA failure are associated with a significantly shorter survival.

  12. In Vitro Generation of Antigen-Specific T Cells from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells of Antigen-Specific T Cell Origin.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells derived from T lymphocyte (T-iPS cells) preserve the T cell receptor (TCR) α and β gene rearrangements identical to the original T cell clone. Re-differentiated CD8 single positive αβ T cells from the T-iPS cells exhibited antigen-specific cytotoxicity, improved proliferative response, and elongation of telomere indicating rejuvenation of antigen specific T cell immunity in vitro. To regenerate antigen specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), first, we have optimized a method for reprogramming-resistant CD8 T cell clones into T-iPS cells by using sendaiviral vectors. Second, we have optimized stepwise differentiation methods for inducing hematopoietic progenitor cells, T cell progenitors, and functionally matured CD8 single positive CTL. These protocols provide useful in vitro tools and models both for research of antigen-specific T cell immunotherapy and for research of normal and pathological thymopoiesis.

  13. Rapid profiling of the antigen regions recognized by serum antibodies using massively parallel sequencing of antigen-specific libraries.

    PubMed

    Domina, Maria; Lanza Cariccio, Veronica; Benfatto, Salvatore; D'Aliberti, Deborah; Venza, Mario; Borgogni, Erica; Castellino, Flora; Biondo, Carmelo; D'Andrea, Daniel; Grassi, Luigi; Tramontano, Anna; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for techniques capable of identifying the antigenic epitopes targeted by polyclonal antibody responses during deliberate or natural immunization. Although successful, traditional phage library screening is laborious and can map only some of the epitopes. To accelerate and improve epitope identification, we have employed massive sequencing of phage-displayed antigen-specific libraries using the Illumina MiSeq platform. This enabled us to precisely identify the regions of a model antigen, the meningococcal NadA virulence factor, targeted by serum antibodies in vaccinated individuals and to rank hundreds of antigenic fragments according to their immunoreactivity. We found that next generation sequencing can significantly empower the analysis of antigen-specific libraries by allowing simultaneous processing of dozens of library/serum combinations in less than two days, including the time required for antibody-mediated library selection. Moreover, compared with traditional plaque picking, the new technology (named Phage-based Representation OF Immuno-Ligand Epitope Repertoire or PROFILER) provides superior resolution in epitope identification. PROFILER seems ideally suited to streamline and guide rational antigen design, adjuvant selection, and quality control of newly produced vaccines. Furthermore, this method is also susceptible to find important applications in other fields covered by traditional quantitative serology.

  14. Antigen exposure shapes the ratio between antigen-specific Tregs and conventional T cells in human peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Su, Laura F.; del Alcazar, Daniel; Stelekati, Erietta; Wherry, E. John; Davis, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    The T-cell receptor (TCR) is required for maturation and function of regulatory T cells (Tregs), but the ligand specificities of Tregs outside the context of transgenic TCRs are largely unknown. Using peptide–MHC tetramers, we isolated rare specific Foxp3+ cells directly ex vivo from adult peripheral blood and defined their frequency and phenotype. We find that a proportion of circulating Tregs recognize foreign antigens and the frequency of these cells are similar to that of self-reactive Tregs in the absence of cognate infection. In contrast, the frequencies of Tregs that recognize some common microbial antigens are significantly reduced in the blood of most adults. Exposure to peripheral antigens likely has a major influence on the balance between Tregs and conventional T-cell subsets because a larger proportion of flu-specific T cells has a regulatory cell phenotype in the cord blood. Consistent with this finding, we show that lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection can directly modulate the ratio of virus-specific effectors and Tregs in mice. The resulting change in the balance within an antigen-specific T-cell population further correlates with the magnitude of effector response and the chronicity of infection. Taken together, our data highlight the importance of antigen specificity in the functional dynamics of the T-cell repertoire. Each specific population of CD4+ T cells in human peripheral blood contains a subset of Tregs at birth, but the balance between regulatory and effector subsets changes in response to peripheral antigen exposure and this could impact the robustness of antipathogen immunity. PMID:27681619

  15. Antigen-specific lymphocyte transformation in patients with recent yersiniosis.

    PubMed

    Vuento, R

    1983-04-01

    Lymphocyte transformation in patients with recent yersiniosis was studied. A micromethod using washed blood cells and Yersinia enterocolitica antigen was employed. The washed blood cells were incubated in the presence of various dilutions of heat-treated whole bacteria; these proved as antigen superior to gentamicin- or formalin-treated bacteria. Patients with recent yersiniosis had a significantly higher response against Yersinia antigen as compared to 20 healthy controls, who had either no response or a low response. No difference could be observed in responses against PPD or streptokinase-streptodornase, or in the mitogen responses between these two groups. A marked cross-reaction was observed between Yersinia and Escherichia coli antigen. The results show that patients with recent yersiniosis develop lymphocyte transformation response against Yersinia. Lymphocyte transformation test can be used in the study of host responses against infecting Yersinia in patients with different clinical pictures of yersiniosis.

  16. Antigen specificity of invariant natural killer T-cells.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, Alysia M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer T-cells, with an invariant T-cell antigen receptor α-chain (iNKT cells), are unique and conserved subset of lymphocytes capable of altering the immune system through their rapid and potent cytokine responses. They are reactive to lipid antigens presented by the CD1d molecule, an antigen-presenting molecule that is not highly polymorphic. iNKT cell responses frequently involve mixtures of cytokines that work against each other, and therefore attempts are underway to develop synthetic antigens that elicit only strong interferon-gamma (IFNγ) or only strong interleukin-4 responses but not both. Strong IFNγ responses may correlate with tighter binding to CD1d and prolonged stimulation of iNKT cells, and this may be useful for vaccine adjuvants and for stimulating anti-tumor responses. iNKT cells are self-reactive although the structure of the endogenous antigen is controversial. By contrast, bacterial and fungal lipids that engage the T-cell receptor and activate IFNγ from iNKT cells have been identified from both pathogenic and commensal organisms and the responses are in some cases highly protective from pathogens in mice. It is possible that the expanding knowledge of iNKT cell antigens and iNKT cell activation will provide the basis for therapies for patients suffering from infectious and immune diseases and cancer.

  17. Suppression of IgE production in mice treated with a traditional Chinese medicine, bu-zhong-yi-qi-tang (Japanese name: hochu-ekki-to).

    PubMed

    Kaneko, M; Kishihara, K; Kawakita, T; Nakamura, T; Takimoto, H; Nomoto, K

    1997-04-01

    The ability of a traditional herbal medicine, Bu-zhong-yi-qi-tang (Japanese name: Hochu-ekki-to, HOT), to suppress IgE production was investigated. BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally immunized with aluminium hydroxide adsorbed with DNP-KLH (DNP-KLH + alum). When oral administration of HOT was begun just after immunization, the serum level of antigen-specific IgE was significantly decreased, although those of antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2a were not influenced. In the culture of spleen cells obtained 14 days after immunization with DNP-KLH, antigen-specific IgE and IgG1 production by the cells of the HOT-treated mice was significantly suppressed compared to that in immunized mice. Furthermore, in the combination culture with CD4+ T cells and B cells separated from spleen cells, IgE production by the cells from immunized mice was inhibited by replacement of their corresponding cell population with either CD4+ T cells or B cells of HOT-treated mice. Additionally, production of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and IL-4 was significantly suppressed in HOT-treated mice but not that of IFN-gamma in comparison to the immunized mice. These results suggested that HOT decreased the IgE level in serum by inhibiting the development of IL-4-producing CD4+ T cells.

  18. Urinary prostate specific antigen levels after radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Takayama, T K; Vessella, R L; Brawer, M K; True, L D; Noteboom, J; Lange, P H

    1994-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that urinary prostate specific antigen (PSA) is discordant with serum PSA in many patients after radical prostatectomy. This observation led to the speculation that elevated urinary PSA in the face of undetectable serum PSA may indicate early disease recurrence. We measured urinary PSA levels in 30 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy for prostate carcinoma and 7 patients who had undergone cystoprostatectomy for bladder cancer. PSA levels of randomly collected urine samples ranged from 0.00 to 22.9 ng./ml. and 0.01 to 8.37 ng./ml., respectively. There was no correlation among urinary and serum PSA levels, pathological stage or type of operation. In 14 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy and who had measurable levels of urinary PSA voided specimens were divided into initial stream and end stream voided samples. The PSA levels in the end stream voided samples were significantly less than the initial stream sample in 12 of the 14 patients. In men who had undergone radical prostatectomy urethral swab samples were analyzed for PSA. Of 26 patients 24 had detectable levels of urethral swab PSA (range 0.01 to 39.04 ng./ml., median 0.93 ng./ml.). Urethral swab PSA levels did not correlate with serum PSA values or pathological stage of disease. Of 7 patients who had defunctionalized urethras after radical cystoprostatectomy 5 had significantly elevated PSA in the urethral wash or swab samples (range 4.3 to 24.5 ng./ml.). Immunohistochemical analysis of urethrectomy specimens demonstrated positive staining for PSA in 3 of 4 specimens. We conclude that the major source of urinary PSA following total prostatectomy is the urethra itself rather than residual prostate tissue. Measuring serial urinary PSA appears to have limited value in monitoring patients after radical prostatectomy. Whether this urethral PSA can ever contaminate the serum levels of PSA after radical prostatectomy is currently under investigation.

  19. Association of Diet With Prostate Specific Antigen and Prostate Volume

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Mehdi; Ariafar, Ali; Zeyghami, Shahryar; Hosseini, Mohammad Mehdi; Khezri, Abdol Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prostate is an important male reproductive system gland and its disorders can affect men's quality of life and health. Prostatitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate adenocarcinoma are major disorders that can be found in all men in different ages. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the association of diet with serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) level as well as prostate volume. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 950 men older than 40 years of age who had attended our clinic for a screening program for prostate cancer were enrolled. Data was extracted from the program database. The eligible cases included all noncancerous subjects with available data concerning serum PSA level and prostate volume; the patients had completed a 50-item self-administered food frequency questionnaire about their diet during the preceding two year. Results: No overall association was found between the consumption of foods and prostate volume as well as serum PSA level. There was a significant correlations between age and serum PSA level (r = 0.24) as well as with prostate volume (r = 0.22) (P < 0.001). In addition, there was a significant correlation between serum PSA level and prostate volume (r = 0.41 and P < 0.001). Conclusions: The results of this study confirmed the previous reports regarding the serum PSA level correlation with prostate volume. There was no evidence that dietary patterns might have any important effect on prostate volume and serum PSA in this Iranian population. PMID:25695023

  20. Prostate-Specific Antigen Velocity Before and After Elimination of Factors That Can Confound the Prostate-Specific Antigen Level

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jessica J.; Chen, Ming-Hui; Loffredo, Marian; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) velocity, like PSA level, can be confounded. In this study, we estimated the impact that confounding factors could have on correctly identifying a patient with a PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y. Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2010, a total of 50 men with newly diagnosed PC comprised the study cohort. We calculated and compared the false-positive and false-negative PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y rates for all men and those with low-risk disease using two approaches to calculate PSA velocity. First, we used PSA values obtained within 18 months of diagnosis; second, we used values within 18 months of diagnosis, substituting the prebiopsy PSA for a repeat, nonconfounded PSA that was obtained using the same assay and without confounders. Results: Using PSA levels pre-biopsy, 46% of all men had a PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y; whereas this value declined to 32% when substituting the last prebiopsy PSA for a repeat, nonconfounded PSA using the same assay and without confounders. The false-positive rate for PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y was 43% as compared with a false-negative rate of PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y of 11% (p = 0.0008) in the overall cohort. These respective values in the low-risk subgroup were 60% and 16.7% (p = 0.09). Conclusion: This study provides evidence to explain the discordance in cancer-specific outcomes among groups investigating the prognostic significance of PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y, and highlights the importance of patient education on potential confounders of the PSA test before obtaining PSA levels.

  1. Preexisting antigen-specific immune responses are modulated by oral KLH feeding in humans.

    PubMed

    Hostmann, Arwed; Meyer, Tim; Maul, Jochen; Preiss, Jan; Boortz, Bertram; Thiel, Andreas; Duchmann, Rainer; Ullrich, Reiner

    2015-07-01

    Oral tolerance is the antigen-specific inhibition of a systemic immune response after oral antigen uptake and well established in animal models. We recently showed that keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) feeding modulates subsequently induced systemic immune responses in humans as well. In the present study, we investigated whether oral KLH can also modulate preexisting antigen-specific systemic B- and T-cell responses. We induced delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions as well as systemic KLH-specific B- and T-cell responses by subcutaneous KLH injections. Subsequent oral KLH administration decreased the small proportion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells positive for the cytokine IL-17 at the end of the feeding regimen even further. After reimmunization, there was no difference in DTH reactions and the KLH-specific B-cell responses, but KLH-fed volunteers had an increased proportion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells positive for IL-10 and a reduced proportion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells positive for the skin-homing receptor cutaneous lymphocyte antigen and IL-2 and IFN-γ. Taken together, oral KLH can modulate a preexisting systemic KLH-specific immune response. These results suggest that feeding antigen may offer therapeutic strategies for the suppression of unwanted immune reactions in humans.

  2. African Americans' Perceptions of Prostate-Specific Antigen Prostate Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Jaimie C.; Vines, Anissa I.; Carlisle, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Background: In 2012, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released a hotly debated recommendation against prostate-specific antigen testing for all men. The present research examines African Americans' beliefs about their susceptibility to prostate cancer (PCa) and the effectiveness of prostate-specific antigen testing in the context of the…

  3. Hetero-bivalent Imaging Agents for Simultaneous Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) and Hepsin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Simultaneous Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen ( PSMA ) and Hepsin PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Youngjoo Byun, Ph. D. CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Hetero-bivalent Imaging Agents for Simultaneous Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen ( PSMA ) and Hepsin 5b...prostate cancer by targeting simultaneously PSMA and hepsin, which are highly expressed in advanced and metastatic prostate cancer. In Year 3, we

  4. Evaluation of risk and diagnostic value of quantitative assays for anti-Toxoplasma gondii immunoglobulin A (IgA), IgE, and IgM and analytical study of specific IgG in immunodeficient patients.

    PubMed Central

    Pinon, J M; Foudrinier, F; Mougeot, G; Marx, C; Aubert, D; Toupance, O; Niel, G; Danis, M; Camerlynck, P; Remy, G

    1995-01-01

    To determine their prognostic and diagnostic values for toxoplasmosis in immunodepressed subjects, we assayed immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgE antibodies by means of immunocapture (IC) tests, with revelation done by using a suspension of T. gondii (ICT). We also carried out a simultaneous analytical study of IgG antibodies on cellulose acetate membranes by using the comparative immunological profile method and an enzyme-linked immunofiltration assay (ELIFA). A total of 1,238 samples (serum, cerebrospinal fluid, and aqueous humor from 318 patients) were tested. IgA and IgE antibodies were detected in all heart, kidney, and liver transplant recipients with clinical manifestations of toxoplasmosis; IgA was detected in the aqueous humor of a patient with chorioretinitis. In patients with AIDS-related toxoplasmosis, including the cerebral form, IgA and IgE antibodies or a significant modification of ELIFA IgG values were observed in 38, 19, and 25% of patients, respectively. IgM was detected by ICT only in 12% of patients and aided the diagnosis in 1 of 71 patients. IC tests for specific IgA and IgE alone and combined with ELIFA were positive in 39 and 46% of patients who developed clinical toxoplasmosis, respectively. In a serial study of 16 patients in whom at least one of these three tests was positive, a significant immunological signal sometimes preceded clinical onset by 1, 6, and even 17 months. Similarly, in a group of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with evidence of previous exposure to T. gondii but no clinical manifestations, IgA, IgE, and IgA and/or IgE antibodies were detected in only 11, 4, and 12% of patients, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7790453

  5. Red blood cells as innovative antigen carrier to induce specific immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cremel, Magali; Guérin, Nathalie; Horand, Françoise; Banz, Alice; Godfrin, Yann

    2013-02-25

    The route of administration, the dose of antigen as well as the type of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) targeted are important factors to induce immune tolerance. Despite encouraging results obtained in animal models, intravenous injection of soluble antigen is unsuccessful in human clinical trials on autoimmune disease due to inefficient antigen delivery. To improve antigen delivery, we used mouse red blood cells (RBCs) as antigen vehicles to specifically target APCs which are responsible for removal of senescent RBCs after phagocytosis. In this study, we demonstrated that antigen-delivery by RBCs induced a strong decrease in the humoral response compared with the ovalbumin (OVA) free form in mice. In addition, OVA-loaded RBC treated with [bis(sulphosuccinimidyl)] suberate (BS3), a chemical compound known to enhance RBC phagocytosis, induced an inhibition of antigen-specific T cell responses and an increase in the percentage of regulatory T cells. The state of tolerance induced is long lasting, antigen-specific and sufficiently robust to withstand immunization with antigen mixed with cholera toxin adjuvant. This RBC strategy, which does not abolish the immune system, constitutes an attractive approach for induction of tolerance compared to systemic immunosuppressant therapies already in use.

  6. Increased expression of the IgE Fc receptors on rat macrophages induced by elevated serum IgE levels.

    PubMed Central

    Boltz-Nitulescu, G; Plummer, J M; Spiegelberg, H L

    1984-01-01

    Macrophages (M phi) from rats with elevated serum IgE levels induced by (i) Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (Nb) infection, (ii) IgE-secreting plasmacytoma IR 162, or (iii) i.p. injection of purified rat IgE, and M phi from normal animals cultured in the presence of 10 micrograms/ml IgE were analysed for Fc IgE receptors (Fc epsilon R) expression. To detect Fc epsilon R-bearing cells, a rosette assay employing fixed ox erythrocytes coated with rat IgE was used. With undersensitized indicator cells a significantly (P less than 0.002) greater number of M phi from animals having elevated serum IgE levels or of M phi cultured in the presence of IgE formed IgE rosettes than M phi from normal donors. The IgE rosettes were IgE class-specific, since they were inhibited by rat IgE in a dose-dependent manner, but not by any other rat Ig class, heat-denatured rat IgE or human IgE. The modulating effect of Fc epsilon R expression on M phi was IgE specific, because neither rat IgG nor heated rat IgE induced increased IgE rosette formation. Furthermore, elevated serum IgE levels did not increase the expression of Fc receptors for IgG subclasses. Studies of 125I-IgE binding showed that alveolar macrophages (AM phi) from Nb-infected rats bind IgE with similar affinity (Ka 1.1 X 10(7) M-1) as AM phi from normal animals, but they have increased numbers of IgE binding sites. Collectively, the results demonstrate that in vivo and in vitro elevated serum IgE concentrations induce increased IgE rosette formation as a result of a marked increase in the number of Fc epsilon R per macrophage. PMID:6236146

  7. Erythrocytes in human transplantation: effects of pretreatment with ABO group-specific antigens

    PubMed Central

    Rapaport, F. T.; Dausset, J.; Legrand, L.; Barge, A.; Lawrence, H. S.; Converse, J. M.

    1968-01-01

    Erythrocyte group antigens A and B can act as potent and group-specific transplantation antigens in man. ABO group-incompatible recipients pretreated with such antigens have rejected skin allografts obtained from donors incompatible for the same antigens in an accelerated (4-5 days) or white graft manner. Skin grafts applied to the same recipients from ABO-compatible donors were accorded first-set survival times. Intact erythrocyte suspensions and antigens isolated from hog (A substance) and horse (B substance) stomachs, were equally capable of inducing this type of allograft sensitivity. The latter observation broadens the spectrum of heterologous antigens capable of inducing allograft sensitivity in the mammalian host and provides a readily available, heat-stable, and water-soluble source of antigens for further studies of allograft rejection mechanisms in man. PMID:4877681

  8. Bacterial surface antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies used to detect beer spoilage pediococci.

    PubMed

    Whiting, M S; Ingledew, W M; Lee, S Y; Ziola, B

    1999-08-01

    Fourteen monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were isolated that react with surface antigens of Pediococcus beer spoilage organisms, including P. damnosus, P. pentosaceous, P. acidilactici, and unspeciated isolates. Immunoblotting, enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) of protease- and neuraminidase-treated surface antigen extracts, carbohydrate competition EIAs, and cardiolipin EIAs were used to characterize the bacterial antigens involved in Mab binding. Antigen stability in situ was tested by protease treatment or surface antigen extraction of washed bacteria. In most cases, the Mabs bind to Pediococcus surface antigens that appear to be covalently bound cell wall polymers resistant to alteration or removal from the bacterial surface. These bacterial surface antigen reactive Mabs show good potential for rapid, sensitive, and specific immunoassay detection of Pediococcus beer spoilage organisms.

  9. IgE Sensitization Profiles Differ between Adult Patients with Severe and Moderate Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Catharina; Lupinek, Christian; Lundeberg, Lena; Crameri, Reto; Valenta, Rudolf; Scheynius, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a complex chronic inflammatory disease where allergens can act as specific triggering factors. Aim To characterize the specificities of IgE-reactivity in patients with AD to a broad panel of exogenous allergens including microbial and human antigens. Methodology Adult patients with AD were grouped according to the SCORAD index, into severe (n = 53) and moderate AD (n = 126). As controls 43 patients were included with seborrhoeic eczema and 97 individuals without history of allergy or skin diseases. Specific IgE reactivity was assessed in plasma using Phadiatop®, ImmunoCap™, micro-arrayed allergens, dot-blotted recombinant Malassezia sympodialis allergens, and immune-blotted microbial and human proteins. Results IgE reactivity was detected in 92% of patients with severe and 83% of patients with moderate AD. Sensitization to cat allergens occurred most frequently, followed by sensitization to birch pollen, grass pollen, and to the skin commensal yeast M. sympodialis. Patients with severe AD showed a significantly higher frequency of IgE reactivity to allergens like cat (rFel d 1) and house dust mite (rDer p 4 and 10), to Staphylococcus aureus, M. sympodialis, and to human antigens. In contrast, there were no significant differences in the frequencies of IgE reactivity to the grass pollen allergens rPhl p 1, 2, 5b, and 6 between the two AD groups. Furthermore the IgE reactivity profile of patients with severe AD was more spread towards several different allergen molecules as compared to patients with moderate AD. Conclusion We have revealed a hitherto unknown difference regarding the molecular sensitization profile in patients with severe and moderate AD. Molecular profiling towards allergen components may provide a basis for future investigations aiming to explore the environmental, genetic and epigenetic factors which could be responsible for the different appearance and severity of disease phenotypes in AD. PMID:27228091

  10. Evaluation of cysticercus-specific IgG (total and subclasses) and IgE antibody responses in cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with neurocysticercosis showing intrathecal production of specific IgG antibodies.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Lisandra Akemi; Rossi, Cláudio Lúcio

    2013-02-01

    In the present study, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) standardized with vesicular fluid of Taenia solium cysticerci was used to screen for IgG (total and subclasses) and IgE antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients with neurocysticercosis showing intrathecal production of specific IgG antibodies and patients with other neurological disorders. The following results were obtained: IgG-ELISA: 100% sensitivity (median of the ELISA absorbances (MEA)=1.17) and 100% specificity; IgG1-ELISA: 72.7% sensitivity (MEA=0.49) and 100% specificity; IgG2-ELISA: 81.8% sensitivity (MEA=0.46) and 100% specificity; IgG3-ELISA: 63.6% sensitivity (MEA=0.12) and 100% specificity; IgG4-ELISA: 90.9% sensitivity (MEA=0.85) and 100% specificity; IgE-ELISA 93.8% sensitivity (MEA=0.60) and 100% specificity. There were no significant differences between the sensitivities and specificities in the detection of IgG-ELISA and IgE-ELISA, although in CSF samples from patients with neurocysticercosis the MEA of the IgG-ELISA was significantly higher than that of the IgE-ELISA. The sensitivity and MEA values of the IgG4-ELISA were higher than the corresponding values for the other IgG subclasses. Future studies should address the contribution of IgG4 and IgE antibodies to the physiopathology of neurocysticercosis.

  11. DEMONSTRATION OF TUMOR-SPECIFIC ANTIGENS IN HUMAN COLONIC CARCINOMATA BY IMMUNOLOGICAL TOLERANCE AND ABSORPTION TECHNIQUES

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Phil; Freedman, Samuel O.

    1965-01-01

    Two methods were used to demonstrate the presence of tumor-specific antigens in adenocarcinomata of the human colon: (a) rabbits were immunized with extracts of pooled colonic carcinomata, and the antitumor antisera thus produced were absorbed with a pooled extract of normal human colon and with human blood components; (b) newborn rabbits were made immunologically tolerant to normal colonic tissue at birth, and were then immunized with pooled tumor material in adult life. Normal and tumor tissues were obtained from the same human donors in order to avoid misinterpretation of results due to individual-specific antigenic differences. The antisera prepared by both methods were tested against normal and tumor antigens by the techniques of agar gel diffusion, immunoelectrophoresis, hemagglutination, PCA, and immunofluorescence. Distinct antibody activity directed against at least two qualitatively tumor-specific antigens, or antigenic determinants, was detected in the antisera prepared by both methods and at least two additional tumor antigens were detected exclusively in antisera prepared by the tolerance technique. Whether these additional antigens were qualitatively different from normal tissue antigens, or merely present in tumor tissue in higher concentrations than in normal tissue has not as yet been determined. Furthermore, it was shown that the tumor-specific antibodies were not directed against bacterial contaminants or against the unusually high concentrations of fibrin found in many neoplastic tissues. It was concluded from these results that the pooled tumor extracts contained tumor-specific antigens not present in normal colonic tissue. Identical tumor-specific antigens were also demonstrated in a number of individual colonic carcinomata obtained from different human donors. PMID:14270243

  12. Specific bovine brucellosis diagnosis based on in vitro antigen-specific gamma interferon production.

    PubMed Central

    Weynants, V; Godfroid, J; Limbourg, B; Saegerman, C; Letesson, J J

    1995-01-01

    In order to improve the specificity of the diagnosis of bovine brucellosis, we developed a test which can be regarded as an in vitro correlate of the delayed-type hypersensitivity test (DTH). A mixture of cytoplasmic proteins from Brucella melitensis B115 was used as a specific antigenic stimulus in bovine whole blood culture. Supernatants harvested at 18 to 24 h after the in vitro antigenic stimulus were assayed for their gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) content by using a commercial sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. The IFN-gamma assay was evaluated with 10 heifers during the course (80 days) of an experimental infection and with 14 cows from an ongoing brucellosis outbreak. All of these animals were slaughtered, and pertinent organs were subjected to classical bacteriological analyses. In addition, we analyzed 23 field cases in which false-positive serological reactions occurred. The IFN-gamma results were compared with those of the standard DTH and a battery of serological assays, and they were correlated with bacteriological data. Both for the experimental infection and for the field brucellosis outbreak, the IFN-gamma assay detected infection in more animals than any combination of the serological tests, and it detected infection earlier than these tests. Finally, none of the samples from cows showing false-positive serological reactions was classified as positive by the IFN-gamma assay, attesting to its specificity and to its usefulness in interpreting ambiguous serological results. A rapid and convenient alternative to the DTH, the IFN-gamma assay appears to be an ideal method that is complementary to the serological diagnosis protocols. PMID:7751381

  13. Type-Specific Antigens in the Psittacosis-Lymphogranuloma Venereum Group of Organisms1

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, C. E. Ovid; Berman, David T.

    1965-01-01

    Fraser, C. E. Ovid (University of Wisconsin, Madison), and David T. Berman. Type-specific antigens in the psittacosis-lymphogranuloma venereum group of organisms. J. Bacteriol. 89:943–948. 1965.—Antigens of 14 strains of the psittacosis-lymphogranuloma venereum (PLV) group of organisms were prepared by treating purified particles with deoxycholate and trypsin. In complement-fixation tests of these antigens with the homologous and heterologous antisera, specific serotype differences were observed. Application of the method of specificity differences permitted placement of the 14 strains into 7 subgroups. The possible value of these techniques in immunology, epizootiology, and taxonomy of the PLV group is discussed. PMID:14276119

  14. Characterization of New Breast Tumor-Specific Antigens Using a Novel Antigen Discovery System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-01

    The tyrosinase gene codes for an antigen recognized by autologous cytolytic T lymphocytes on HLA-A2 melanomas. JExp Med 178, no. 2:489. 2. Coulie...cold PBS, pelleted and stored at -800 C for later use. Detergent lysis buffer (1% CHAPS) and a cocktail of protease inhibitors (2 mM PMSF, 100 gM...40 REFERENCES 1. Brichard, V., Van Pel, A., Wolfel, T., Wolfel, C., De Plaen, E., Lethe, B., Coulie, P., and Boon, T. The tyrosinase gene codes for

  15. Aerobic Exercise Decreases Lung Inflammation by IgE Decrement in an OVA Mice Model.

    PubMed

    Camargo Hizume-Kunzler, Deborah; Greiffo, Flavia R; Fortkamp, Bárbara; Ribeiro Freitas, Gabriel; Keller Nascimento, Juliana; Regina Bruggemann, Thayse; Melo Avila, Leonardo; Perini, Adenir; Bobinski, Franciane; Duarte Silva, Morgana; Rocha Lapa, Fernanda; Paula Vieira, Rodolfo; Vargas Horewicz, Verônica; Soares Dos Santos, Adair Roberto; Cattelan Bonorino, Kelly

    2017-04-07

    Aerobic exercise (AE) reduces lung function decline and risk of exacerbations in asthmatic patients. However, the inflammatory lung response involved in exercise during the sensitization remains unclear. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of exercise for 2 weeks in an experimental model of sensitization and single ovalbumin-challenge. Mice were divided into 4 groups: mice non-sensitized and not submitted to exercise (Sedentary, n=10); mice non-sensitized and submitted to exercise (Exercise, n=10); mice sensitized and exposed to ovalbumin (OVA, n=10); and mice sensitized, submitted to exercise and exposed to OVA (OVA+Exercise, n=10). 24 h after the OVA/saline exposure, we counted inflammatory cells from bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF), lung levels of total IgE, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-1ra, measurements of OVA-specific IgG1 and IgE, and VEGF and NOS-2 expression via western blotting. AE reduced cell counts from BALF in the OVA group (p<0.05), total IgE, IL-4 and IL-5 lung levels and OVA-specific IgE and IgG1 titers (p<0.05). There was an increase of NOS-2 expression, IL-10 and IL-1ra lung levels in the OVA groups (p<0.05). Our results showed that AE attenuated the acute lung inflammation, suggesting immunomodulatory properties on the sensitization process in the early phases of antigen presentation in asthma.

  16. The absence of IgE antibody-mediated augmentation of immune responses in CD23-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, H; Kikutani, H; Suematsu, S; Naka, T; Yoshida, K; Yoshida, K; Tanaka, T; Suemura, M; Matsumoto, N; Kojima, S

    1994-01-01

    The CD23 antigen, a low-affinity receptor for IgE (Fc epsilon RII), is a type II membrane-bound glycoprotein expressed on various cells, particularly mature B cells. A number of functions have been ascribed to CD23, including specific regulation of IgE production, IgE-mediated cytotoxicity and release of mediators, IgE-dependent antigen focusing, promotion of B-cell growth, prevention of germinal center B cells from apoptosis, proliferation of myeloid precursors, and maturation of early thymocytes. It is not clear whether these activities represent in vivo functions. To explore in vivo functions of CD23, we have produced CD23-deficient mice. These mice displayed normal lymphocyte differentiation and could mount normal antibody responses, including IgE responses upon immunization with T-dependent antigens and infection with Nippostrongyrus brasiliensis. Germinal center formation after immunization and in vitro proliferative response of B cells were not affected in mutant mice. However, antigen-specific IgE-mediated enhancement of antibody responses was severely impaired. Images PMID:8041705

  17. Chitin enhances serum IgE in Aspergillus fumigatus induced allergy in mice.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Lalit Kumar; Moeller, Jesper Bonnet; Schlosser, Anders; Sorensen, Grith Lykke; Holmskov, Uffe

    2015-06-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) is a ubiquitous fungus that activates, suppresses or modulates the immune response by changing its cell wall structure and by secreting proteases. In this study, we show that chitin acts as an adjuvant in a murine model of A. fumigatus protease induced allergy. The mice were immunised intraperitoneally with A. fumigatus culture filtrate antigen either with or without chitin and were subsequently challenged with the culture filtrate antigen intranasally. Alum was used as an adjuvant control. Compared to alum, chitin induced a weaker inflammatory response in the lungs, measured as the total cell efflux in BAL, EPO and chitinase production. However, chitin enhanced the total IgE, specific IgE and specific IgG1 production as efficiently as alum. Pre-treatment with chitin but not with alum depressed the concentration of the Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 in BAL fluid. These results shows that chitin, in spite of a reduction of the Th2 cytokine levels in the lungs, enhanced the total and specific IgE production in A. fumigatus culture filtrate induced allergy.

  18. Recombinant IgE antibodies for passive immunotherapy of solid tumours: from concept towards clinical application.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, Sophia N; Josephs, Debra H; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Gilbert, Amy E; Saul, Louise; Rudman, Sarah M; Dodev, Tihomir; Koers, Alexander; Blower, Philip J; Corrigan, Christopher; Beavil, Andrew J; Spicer, James F; Nestle, Frank O; Gould, Hannah J

    2012-09-01

    Therapeutic antibodies have revolutionised treatment of some cancers and improved prognosis for many patients. Over half of those available are approved for haematological malignancies, but efficacious antibodies for solid tumours are still urgently needed. Clinically available antibodies belong to the IgG class, the most prevalent antibody class in human blood, while other classes have not been extensively considered. We hypothesised that the unique properties of IgE, a class of tissue-resident antibodies commonly associated with allergies, which can trigger powerful immune responses through strong affinity for their particular receptors on effector cells, could be employed for passive immunotherapy of solid tumours such as ovarian and breast carcinomas. Our laboratory has examined this concept by evaluating two chimaeric antibodies of the same specificity (MOv18) but different isotype, an IgG1 and an IgE against the tumour antigen folate receptor α (FRα). The latter demonstrates the potency of IgE to mount superior immune responses against tumours in disease-relevant models. We identified Fcε receptor-expressing cells, monocytes/macrophages and eosinophils, activated by MOv18 IgE to kill tumour cells by mechanisms such as ADCC and ADCP. We also applied this notion to a marketed therapeutic, the humanised IgG1 antibody trastuzumab and engineered an IgE counterpart, which retained the functions of trastuzumab in restricting proliferation of HER2/neu-expressing tumour cells but also activated effector cells to kill tumour cells by different mechanisms. On-going efficacy, safety evaluations and future first-in-man clinical studies of IgE therapeutics constitute key metrics for this concept, providing new scope for antibody immunotherapies for solid tumours.

  19. Levels of house dust mite-specific serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) in different cat populations using a monoclonal based anti-IgE enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Bexley, Jennifer; Hogg, Janice E; Hammerberg, Bruce; Halliwell, Richard E W

    2009-10-01

    Levels of serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) specific for the house dust mites (HDMs) Dermatophagoides farinae (DF) and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DP) in 58 cats with clinical signs suggestive of atopic dermatitis (allergic dermatitis cats), 52 cats with no history of allergic or immunological disease (nonallergic cats) and 26 specific pathogen-free (SPF) cats were measured using a monoclonal anti-IgE enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Reactivity to both native and reduced HDM allergens was compared. SPF cats had significantly lower levels of HDM-specific serum IgE than cats with allergic dermatitis and nonallergic cats. The difference in levels of HDM-specific IgE in the serum of cats with allergic dermatitis and nonallergic cats was significant for native DF allergen, but not for native DP allergen or reduced HDM allergens. The results suggest that DF in its native form may be a significant allergen in cats with allergic dermatitis. The clinical relevance of these reactions, however, remains to be proven.

  20. Heterobivalent Imaging Agents for Simultaneous Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) and Hepsin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen ( PSMA ) and Hepsin PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Youngjoo Byun, Ph. D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Korea...Simultaneous Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen ( PSMA ) and Hepsin 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0189 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...heterobivalent conjugates of PSMA /hepsin-binding ligands labeled with optical dyes or radionuclides. The sensitivity and accuracy of prostate cancer

  1. Co-Administration of Lipid Nanoparticles and Sub-Unit Vaccine Antigens Is Required for Increase in Antigen-Specific Immune Responses in Mice.

    PubMed

    Thoryk, Elizabeth A; Swaminathan, Gokul; Meschino, Steven; Cox, Kara S; Gindy, Marian; Casimiro, Danilo R; Bett, Andrew J

    2016-12-06

    A vast body of evidence suggests that nanoparticles function as potent immune-modulatory agents. We have previously shown that Merck proprietary Lipid NanoParticles (LNPs) markedly boost B-cell and T-cell responses to sub-unit vaccine antigens in mice. To further evaluate the specifics of vaccine delivery and dosing regimens in vivo, we performed immunogenicity studies in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice using two model antigens, Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) and Ovalbumin (OVA), respectively. To assess the requirement for co-administration of antigen and LNP for the elicitation of immune responses, we evaluated immune responses after administering antigen and LNP to separate limbs, or administering antigen and LNP to the same limb but separated by 24 h. We also evaluated formulations combining antigen, LNP, and aluminum-based adjuvant amorphous aluminum hydroxylphosphate sulfate (MAA) to look for synergistic adjuvant effects. Analyses of antigen-specific B-cell and T-cell responses from immunized mice revealed that the LNPs and antigens must be co-administered-both at the same time and in the same location-in order to boost antigen-specific immune responses. Mixing of antigen with MAA prior to formulation with LNP did not impact the generation of antigen-specific B-cell responses, but drastically reduced the ability of LNPs to boost antigen-specific T-cell responses. Overall, our data demonstrate that the administration of LNPs and vaccine antigen together enables their immune-stimulatory properties.

  2. Co-Administration of Lipid Nanoparticles and Sub-Unit Vaccine Antigens Is Required for Increase in Antigen-Specific Immune Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Thoryk, Elizabeth A.; Swaminathan, Gokul; Meschino, Steven; Cox, Kara S.; Gindy, Marian; Casimiro, Danilo R.; Bett, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    A vast body of evidence suggests that nanoparticles function as potent immune-modulatory agents. We have previously shown that Merck proprietary Lipid NanoParticles (LNPs) markedly boost B-cell and T-cell responses to sub-unit vaccine antigens in mice. To further evaluate the specifics of vaccine delivery and dosing regimens in vivo, we performed immunogenicity studies in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice using two model antigens, Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) and Ovalbumin (OVA), respectively. To assess the requirement for co-administration of antigen and LNP for the elicitation of immune responses, we evaluated immune responses after administering antigen and LNP to separate limbs, or administering antigen and LNP to the same limb but separated by 24 h. We also evaluated formulations combining antigen, LNP, and aluminum-based adjuvant amorphous aluminum hydroxylphosphate sulfate (MAA) to look for synergistic adjuvant effects. Analyses of antigen-specific B-cell and T-cell responses from immunized mice revealed that the LNPs and antigens must be co-administered—both at the same time and in the same location—in order to boost antigen-specific immune responses. Mixing of antigen with MAA prior to formulation with LNP did not impact the generation of antigen-specific B-cell responses, but drastically reduced the ability of LNPs to boost antigen-specific T-cell responses. Overall, our data demonstrate that the administration of LNPs and vaccine antigen together enables their immune-stimulatory properties. PMID:27929422

  3. Regulation of B cell fate by chronic activity of the IgE B cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiyong; Robinson, Marcus J; Chen, Xiangjun; Smith, Geoffrey A; Taunton, Jack; Liu, Wanli; Allen, Christopher D C

    2016-01-01

    IgE can trigger potent allergic responses, yet the mechanisms regulating IgE production are poorly understood. Here we reveal that IgE+ B cells are constrained by chronic activity of the IgE B cell receptor (BCR). In the absence of cognate antigen, the IgE BCR promoted terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells (PCs) under cell culture conditions mimicking T cell help. This antigen-independent PC differentiation involved multiple IgE domains and Syk, CD19, BLNK, Btk, and IRF4. Disruption of BCR signaling in mice led to consistently exaggerated IgE+ germinal center (GC) B cell but variably increased PC responses. We were unable to confirm reports that the IgE BCR directly promoted intrinsic apoptosis. Instead, IgE+ GC B cells exhibited poor antigen presentation and prolonged cell cycles, suggesting reduced competition for T cell help. We propose that chronic BCR activity and access to T cell help play critical roles in regulating IgE responses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21238.001 PMID:27935477

  4. Regulation of B cell fate by chronic activity of the IgE B cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyong; Robinson, Marcus J; Chen, Xiangjun; Smith, Geoffrey A; Taunton, Jack; Liu, Wanli; Allen, Christopher D C

    2016-12-09

    IgE can trigger potent allergic responses, yet the mechanisms regulating IgE production are poorly understood. Here we reveal that IgE(+) B cells are constrained by chronic activity of the IgE B cell receptor (BCR). In the absence of cognate antigen, the IgE BCR promoted terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells (PCs) under cell culture conditions mimicking T cell help. This antigen-independent PC differentiation involved multiple IgE domains and Syk, CD19, BLNK, Btk, and IRF4. Disruption of BCR signaling in mice led to consistently exaggerated IgE(+) germinal center (GC) B cell but variably increased PC responses. We were unable to confirm reports that the IgE BCR directly promoted intrinsic apoptosis. Instead, IgE(+) GC B cells exhibited poor antigen presentation and prolonged cell cycles, suggesting reduced competition for T cell help. We propose that chronic BCR activity and access to T cell help play critical roles in regulating IgE responses.

  5. Alloantigen-specific regulatory T cells generated with a chimeric antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Katherine G; Hoeppli, Romy E; Huang, Qing; Gillies, Jana; Luciani, Dan S; Orban, Paul C; Broady, Raewyn; Levings, Megan K

    2016-04-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with regulatory T cells (Tregs) is a promising treatment for allograft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Emerging data indicate that, compared with polyclonal Tregs, disease-relevant antigen-specific Tregs may have numerous advantages, such as a need for fewer cells and reduced risk of nonspecific immune suppression. Current methods to generate alloantigen-specific Tregs rely on expansion with allogeneic antigen-presenting cells, which requires access to donor and recipient cells and multiple MHC mismatches. The successful use of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) for the generation of antigen-specific effector T cells suggests that a similar approach could be used to generate alloantigen-specific Tregs. Here, we have described the creation of an HLA-A2-specific CAR (A2-CAR) and its application in the generation of alloantigen-specific human Tregs. In vitro, A2-CAR-expressing Tregs maintained their expected phenotype and suppressive function before, during, and after A2-CAR-mediated stimulation. In mouse models, human A2-CAR-expressing Tregs were superior to Tregs expressing an irrelevant CAR at preventing xenogeneic GVHD caused by HLA-A2+ T cells. Together, our results demonstrate that use of CAR technology to generate potent, functional, and stable alloantigen-specific human Tregs markedly enhances their therapeutic potential in transplantation and sets the stage for using this approach for making antigen-specific Tregs for therapy of multiple diseases.

  6. Investigation on the effects of ciclosporin (Atopica) on intradermal test reactivity and allergen-specific immunoglobulin (IgE) serology in atopic dogs.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Candice; Rosser, Edmund; Petersen, Annette; Hauptman, Joe

    2010-08-01

    The ability to use ciclosporin (Atopica®: Novartis Animal Health, Greensboro, NC, USA) prior to intradermal testing (IDT) would help avoid exacerbation of clinical disease that can be associated with drug withdrawal. This study evaluated the effects of 30 days of administration of ciclosporin at a dose of 5 mg/kg once daily on IDT reactivity (immediate phase reactions) in a group of dogs with atopic dermatitis (AD) with initial positive IDT reactions. 16 dogs diagnosed with AD were included in the study. Eight dogs (group A) were treated with ciclosporin orally at 5 mg/kg once daily for 30 days. Eight dogs (group P) were treated with a placebo orally once daily for 30 days. IDT was performed at day 0 and day 30 on all dogs enrolled using a standardized panel of 45 aqueous allergens (Greer Laboratories, Lenoir, NC, USA) appropriate to our geographical region. IDT reactivity was assessed by both subjective and objective methods at 15 min post-intradermal injection. Serum for allergen-specific immunoglobulin (IgE) serology was obtained at day 0 and day 30. The study was designed as a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. Data were analysed using a split-plot analysis of variance with the grouping factor of treatment and the repeat factor of time (SAS System for Windows). At week 4, ciclosporin did not have a statistically significant effect on IDT reactivity or serology results. It therefore appears that, no withdrawal is recommended to evaluate immediate phase reactions.

  7. Antigen-specific immunotherapy of cervical and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chien-fu; Wu, TC; Monie, Archana; Roden, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Summary We contrast the efforts to treat ovarian cancer and cervical cancer through vaccination because of their different pathobiology. A plethora of approaches have been developed for therapeutic vaccination against cancer, many of which target defined tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types is necessary cause of cervical cancer. Furthermore, cervical cancer patients frequently mount both humoral and T cell immune responses to the HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins, whose expression is required for the transformed phenotype. Numerous vaccine studies target these viral TAAs, including recent trials that may enhance clearance of pre-malignant disease. By contrast little is known about the etiology of epithelial ovarian cancer. Although it is clear that p53 mutation or loss is a critical early event in the development of epithelial ovarian cancer, no precursor lesion has been described for the most common serous histotype, and even the location of its origin is debated. These issues have complicated the selection of appropriate ovarian TAAs and the design of vaccines. Here we focus on mesothelin as a promising ovarian TAA because it is overexpressed and immunogenic at high frequency in patients, is displayed on the cell surface and potentially contributes to ovarian cancer biology. PMID:18363994

  8. Phospholipase treatment of accessory cells that have been exposed to antigen selectively inhibits antigen-specific Ia-restricted, but not allospecific, stimulation of T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Falo, L D; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1986-01-01

    The corecognition of antigen and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules (Ia molecules) by the T-cell receptor is a cell surface event. Before antigen is recognized, it must be taken up, processed, and displayed on the surface of an Ia-bearing accessory cell (antigen-presenting cell, APC). The exact nature of antigen processing and the subsequent associations of antigen with the APC plasma membrane, Ia molecules, and/or the T-cell receptor are not well defined. To further analyze these events, we have characterized the processing and presentation of the soluble polypeptide antigen bovine insulin. We found that this antigen requires APC-dependent processing, as evidenced by the inability of metabolically inactivated APCs to present native antigen to antigen plus Ia-specific T-T hybridomas. The ability of the same APCs to present antigen after uptake and processing showed that this antigen subsequently becomes stably associated with the APC plasma membrane. To characterize the basis for this association, we analyzed its sensitivity to enzymatic digestion. APCs exposed to antigen, treated with phospholipase A2, and then immediately fixed lost the ability to stimulate bovine insulin plus I-Ad-specific hybridomas. In contrast, the ability of these same APCs to stimulate I-Ad allospecific hybridomas was unaffected. This effect of phospholipase is not mimicked by the broadly active protease Pronase, nor is there evidence for contaminating proteases in the phospholipase preparation. These results suggest that one consequence of antigen processing may be an antigen-lipid association that contributes to the anchoring of antigen to the APC membrane. The implications of this model are discussed. PMID:3529095

  9. IgE isotype suppression in anti-epsilon-treated mice.

    PubMed Central

    Bozelka, B E; McCants, M L; Salvaggio, J E; Lehrer, S B

    1982-01-01

    Two groups of CBA/J mice received a total of eight intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of heavy-chain-specific rabbit anti-IgE or rabbit gammaglobulin within 48 hr of birth through day 38. A third group of animals was untreated. All mice were subsequently immunized with four i.p. injections of castor allergen plus aluminum hydroxide. Results indicate that anti-treatments severely suppressed murine serum IgE levels as compared with control mice. In addition anti-epsilon-treated mice were initially unable to produce detectable reaginic antibody upon immunization with castor bean allergens (CA). Upon further CA immunization, these animals did produce an IgE antibody response, but this was still lower than that detected in control immunized mice. Other immunoglobulin levels in the anti-epsilon-treated mice were not suppressed as compared with those in the control mice. These results suggest that neonatally administered anti-epsilon antisera selectively diminished total IgE levels as well as antigen-induced IgE antibodies in mice. PMID:6807838

  10. Rabies Group-Specific Ribonucleoprotein Antigen and a Test System for Grouping and Typing of Rhabdoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, L. G.; Dietzschold, B.; Dierks, R. E.; Matthaeus, W.; Enzmann, P.-J.; Strohmaier, K.

    1973-01-01

    Cell-associated ribonucleoprotein (RNP) was isolated from BHK-21 cells infected with several strains of rabies and rabies-related viruses. The RNP-antigen from rabies and related viruses induced the formation of complement-fixing, precipitating, and immunofluorescent antibodies, and proved to be the group-specific antigen common to all rabies viruses. Antigens of the envelope which induce virus-neutralizing antibodies are apparently determinative for the serotype of a virus as evidenced by two-way neutralization tests. A combination of these methods seems to be a useful approach to the serological grouping and typing of rhabdoviruses. Images PMID:4196634

  11. Pulmonary responses to pathogen-specific antigens in latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Jarvela, Jessica R; Tuscano, Lori; Lee, Hung; Silver, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used ELISPOT to quantify frequencies of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and peripheral blood T cells capable of producing IFNγ in response to PPD, antigen 85B, and Mtb-specific antigens CFP-10 and ESAT-6 in individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and Mtb-naïve controls. Compared to peripheral blood, BAL cells of LTBI subjects displayed significant enrichment for T cells responding to PPD, antigen 85B, and CFP-10, but not to ESAT-6. Baseline BAL cells of LTBI subjects displayed significant production of Mig (CXCL9) in response to PPD, antigen 85B, and CFP-10 as well. These findings suggest that enrichment for Mtb-specific T cells within BAL is not unique to active pulmonary tuberculosis and may, to the contrary, contribute to protection from re-infection in Mtb immune individuals.

  12. Possible Role of Trichophytin Antigen in Inducing Impaired Immunological Clearance of Fungus in Onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Chhavi; Das, Shukla; Ramachandran, V G; Saha, Rumpa; Bhattacharya, S N; Dar, Sajad Ahmad; Atri, Dharmendra

    2016-04-01

    The immunology of onychomycosis is poorly understood. Th1 and Th17 are the principal effector cells responsible for protective immunity against fungi, while it is assumed that Th2 responses are associated with deleterious effects. The study was conducted to appraise the role of interleukin-6 (IL-6), transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and immunoglobulin E (IgE) in onychomycosis patients and to study skin reactivity to trichophytin antigen in them. Serum samples of 60 cases of chronic onychomycosis and 30 healthy controls were assayed for serum IgE, IL-6 and TGF-β levels using specific immunoassay kits; 0.01 ml of trichophytin antigen, Candida antigen and phosphate-buffered saline using separate syringes were injected intradermal at three independent sites of the forearm in cases and controls. Serum IL-6 levels were significantly lower in cases as compared to controls, while serum TGF-β levels in both cases and controls were comparable. Serum IgE levels in cases were significantly higher when compared with controls. Thirty-eight patients showed immediate hypersensitivity response to trichophytin antigen, while none showed delayed hypersensitivity reaction to trichophytin antigen. Constant fungal antigenic stimuli induce a state of anergy as indicated by low serum IL-6 levels and the absence of delayed hypersensitivity reaction to trichophytin antigen in cases, leading to chronicity of infection. High total IgE may indicate a high probability of prior fungal sensitization.

  13. Killer Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells (KaAPC) for Efficient In Vitro Depletion of Human Antigen-specific T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Christian; Fleck, Martin; Schneck, Jonathan P.; Oelke, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Current treatment of T cell mediated autoimmune diseases relies mostly on strategies of global immunosuppression, which, in the long term, is accompanied by adverse side effects such as a reduced ability to control infections or malignancies. Therefore, new approaches need to be developed that target only the disease mediating cells and leave the remaining immune system intact. Over the past decade a variety of cell based immunotherapy strategies to modulate T cell mediated immune responses have been developed. Most of these approaches rely on tolerance-inducing antigen presenting cells (APC). However, in addition to being technically difficult and cumbersome, such cell-based approaches are highly sensitive to cytotoxic T cell responses, which limits their therapeutic capacity. Here we present a protocol for the generation of non-cellular killer artificial antigen presenting cells (KaAPC), which allows for the depletion of pathologic T cells while leaving the remaining immune system untouched and functional. KaAPC is an alternative solution to cellular immunotherapy which has potential for treating autoimmune diseases and allograft rejections by regulating undesirable T cell responses in an antigen specific fashion. PMID:25145915

  14. Hetero-bivalent Imaging Agents for Simultaneous Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) and Hepsin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Prostate- Specific Membrane Antigen ( PSMA ) and Hepsin PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Youngjoo Byun, Ph. D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Korea...Membrane Antigen ( PSMA ) and Hepsin 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0189 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Youngjoo Byun, Ph. D. 5d...accuracy of prostate cancer diagnosis by targeting simultaneously PSMA and hepsin, which are highly expressed in advanced and metastatic prostate

  15. Anti-Folate Receptor-α IgE but not IgG Recruits Macrophages to Attack Tumors via TNFα/MCP-1 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Josephs, Debra H; Bax, Heather J; Dodev, Tihomir; Georgouli, Mirella; Nakamura, Mano; Pellizzari, Giulia; Saul, Louise; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Cheung, Anthony; Herraiz, Cecilia; Ilieva, Kristina M; Correa, Isabel; Fittall, Matthew; Crescioli, Silvia; Gazinska, Patrycja; Woodman, Natalie; Mele, Silvia; Chiaruttini, Giulia; Gilbert, Amy E; Koers, Alexander; Bracher, Marguerite; Selkirk, Christopher; Lentfer, Heike; Barton, Claire; Lever, Elliott; Muirhead, Gareth; Tsoka, Sophia; Canevari, Silvana; Figini, Mariangela; Montes, Ana; Downes, Noel; Dombrowicz, David; Corrigan, Christopher J; Beavil, Andrew J; Nestle, Frank O; Jones, Paul S; Gould, Hannah J; Sanz-Moreno, Victoria; Blower, Philip J; Spicer, James F; Karagiannis, Sophia N

    2017-03-01

    IgE antibodies are key mediators of antiparasitic immune responses, but their potential for cancer treatment via antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) has been little studied. Recently, tumor antigen-specific IgEs were reported to restrict cancer cell growth by engaging high-affinity Fc receptors on monocytes and macrophages; however, the underlying therapeutic mechanisms were undefined and in vivo proof of concept was limited. Here, an immunocompetent rat model was designed to recapitulate the human IgE-Fcε receptor system for cancer studies. We also generated rat IgE and IgG mAbs specific for the folate receptor (FRα), which is expressed widely on human ovarian tumors, along with a syngeneic rat tumor model expressing human FRα. Compared with IgG, anti-FRα IgE reduced lung metastases. This effect was associated with increased intratumoral infiltration by TNFα(+) and CD80(+) macrophages plus elevated TNFα and the macrophage chemoattractant MCP-1 in lung bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Increased levels of TNFα and MCP-1 correlated with IgE-mediated tumor cytotoxicity by human monocytes and with longer patient survival in clinical specimens of ovarian cancer. Monocytes responded to IgE but not IgG exposure by upregulating TNFα, which in turn induced MCP-1 production by monocytes and tumor cells to promote a monocyte chemotactic response. Conversely, blocking TNFα receptor signaling abrogated induction of MCP-1, implicating it in the antitumor effects of IgE. Overall, these findings show how antitumor IgE reprograms monocytes and macrophages in the tumor microenvironment, encouraging the clinical use of IgE antibody technology to attack cancer beyond the present exclusive reliance on IgG. Cancer Res; 77(5); 1127-41. ©2017 AACR.

  16. Identification and visualization of multidimensional antigen-specific T-cell populations in polychromatic cytometry data.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Frelinger, Jacob; Jiang, Wenxin; Finak, Greg; Seshadri, Chetan; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; McElrath, Julie; DeRosa, Steve; Gottardo, Raphael

    2015-07-01

    An important aspect of immune monitoring for vaccine development, clinical trials, and research is the detection, measurement, and comparison of antigen-specific T-cells from subject samples under different conditions. Antigen-specific T-cells compose a very small fraction of total T-cells. Developments in cytometry technology over the past five years have enabled the measurement of single-cells in a multivariate and high-throughput manner. This growth in both dimensionality and quantity of data continues to pose a challenge for effective identification and visualization of rare cell subsets, such as antigen-specific T-cells. Dimension reduction and feature extraction play pivotal role in both identifying and visualizing cell populations of interest in large, multi-dimensional cytometry datasets. However, the automated identification and visualization of rare, high-dimensional cell subsets remains challenging. Here we demonstrate how a systematic and integrated approach combining targeted feature extraction with dimension reduction can be used to identify and visualize biological differences in rare, antigen-specific cell populations. By using OpenCyto to perform semi-automated gating and features extraction of flow cytometry data, followed by dimensionality reduction with t-SNE we are able to identify polyfunctional subpopulations of antigen-specific T-cells and visualize treatment-specific differences between them.

  17. [IgE antibodies in human Fasciola hepatica distomiasis].

    PubMed

    Sampaio Silva, M L; Vindimian, M; Wattré, P; Capron, A

    1985-09-01

    In patients infected by Fasciola hepatica, total IgE and specific IgE antibodies have been determined by radioimmunoassays, and IgG, IgA, IgM levels by radial immunodiffusion test (Mancini, 1965). Moreover, total and specific IgE levels have been related to parasite egg burden, age, clinical features and eosinophilia. Elevated total IgE and specific IgE antibodies levels have been found respectively in 76% and 48% of the patients whereas there was no significant variations in other immunoglobulins levels. However, though the amount of total and specific IgE was lower than in other helminthic diseases, it appears to be a significant data of the immune response to parasites as it has been reported and discussed previously. It has been shown a significant relationship between total and specific IgE levels, the number of lines by immunoelectrophoresis, and the results of the indirect haemagglutination and indirect fluorescent antibody techniques; each method appeared to be in equal value to perform the early diagnosis of human Fasciola hepatica. In addition, specific IgE antibodies levels were correlated with eosinophilia specially when it exceeds 15%. This results demonstrate the availability of their measurement in the diagnosis of fascioliasis versus other diseases with marked eosinophilia.

  18. The sequential appearance of IgG subclasses and IgE during the course of Trichinella spiralis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Ljungström, I; Hammarström, L; Kociecka, W; Smith, C I

    1988-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown that IgG1 and IgG4 are the dominant IgG subclasses in the specific response during a chronic helminthic infection. It has also been suggested that IgG4 production results from chronic or repetitive antigenic stimulation and a correlation between IgG4 and IgE levels exists. An outbreak of Trichinella spiralis infection in Poland provided the opportunity to follow the sequential appearance of the IgG subclass and IgE responses in 15 patients during the early stage of Trichinella infection and to compare these observations in sera obtained one year later from the same patients. The results show that the sequential appearance of the IgG subclasses were IgG1 before IgG3 and IgG3 before IgG4. IgG1 antibodies dominated the immune response in all patients. A statistically significant increase in the number of IgG4 positive sera was observed in patients during the chronic stage compared to the findings during the early stage of infection (13% vs 73%; p less than 0.001), supporting the view that IgG4 results from a chronic antigenic stimulation. A correlation between the appearance of IgG4 and IgE was not found. The highest levels of IgE were seen in the first serum samples obtained, with a decrease during the course of infection. PMID:3224442

  19. Hypersensitivity testing for Aspergillus fumigatus IgE is significantly more sensitive than testing for Aspergillus niger IgE.

    PubMed

    Selvaggi, Thomas A; Walco, Jeremy P; Parikh, Sujal; Walco, Gary A

    2012-02-01

    We sought to determine if sufficient redundancy exists between specific IgE testing for Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus niger to eliminate one of the assays in determining Aspergillus hypersensitivity. We reviewed regional laboratory results comparing A fumigatus-specific IgE with A niger-specific IgE using the Pharmacia UniCAP system (Pharmacia, Kalamazoo, MI). By using the Fisher exact test as an index of concordance among paired results, we showed a significant difference between 109 paired samples for the presence of specific IgE to A fumigatus and A niger (P < .0001). Of these specimens, 94 were negative for IgE to both species, 10 were positive for A fumigatus and negative for A niger; no specimen was positive for A niger and negative for A fumigatus. We conclude that A fumigatus-specific IgE is sufficient to detect Aspergillus hypersensitivity. The assay for A niger-specific IgE is redundant, less sensitive, and unnecessary if the assay for specific IgE for A fumigatus is performed.

  20. Multivalent nanomaterials: learning from vaccines and progressing to antigen-specific immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Hartwell, Brittany L; Antunez, Lorena; Sullivan, Bradley P; Thati, Sharadvi; Sestak, Joshua O; Berkland, Cory

    2015-02-01

    Continued development of multivalent nanomaterials has provided opportunities for the advancement of antigen-specific immunotherapies. New insights emerge when considering the backdrop of vaccine design, which has long employed multivalent presentation of antigen to more strongly engage and enhance an immunogenic response. Additionally, vaccines traditionally codeliver antigen with adjuvant to amplify a robust antigen-specific response. Multivalent nanomaterials have since evolved for applications where immune tolerance is desired, such as autoimmune diseases or allergies. In particular, soluble, linear polymers may be tailored to direct antigen-specific immunogenicity or tolerance by modulating polymer length, ligand valency (number), and ligand density, in addition to incorporating secondary signals. Codelivery of a secondary signal may direct, amplify, or suppress the response to a given antigen. Although the ability of multivalent nanomaterials to enact an immune response through molecular mechanisms has been established, a transport mechanism for biodistribution must also be considered. Both mechanisms are influenced by ligand display and other physical properties of the nanomaterial. This review highlights multivalent ligand display on linear polymers, the complex interplay of physical parameters in multivalent design, and the ability to direct the immune response by molecular and transport mechanisms.

  1. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis inhibition: evidence for heterogeneity in IgE mast cell interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Lehrer, S B; McCants, M L; Farris, P N; Bazin, H

    1981-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that IgE molecules are heterogeneous with respect to ability to compete with IgE myeloma for sensitization of histamine release from chopped human lung and ability to passively sensitize human basophils for antigen-induced histamine release. These observations prompted further investigation of the possibility that there exists a functional heterogeneity in the IgE molecules with respect to mast-cell binding properties. Using eight different purified rat IgE myeloma proteins, we found that they differ in their ability to inhibit the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) reaction of mouse reaginic antisera. This suggests that IgE molecules differ in their ability to bind to mast cell receptors. Since maximal inhibition of different mouse reaginic antisera and mouse IgE hybridomas is achieved with different IgE myelomas, there may exist a functional heterogeneity in mast-cell binding receptors as well. PMID:7319556

  2. Syntaxin-4 is essential for IgE secretion by plasma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Arman; DeCourcey, Joseph; Larbi, Nadia Ben; Loughran, Sinéad T.; Walls, Dermot; Loscher, Christine E.

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •Knock-down of syntaxin-4 in U266 plasma cells resulted in reduction of IgE secretion. •Knock-down of syntaxin-4 also leads to the accumulation of IgE in the cell. •Immuno-fluorescence staining shows co-localisation of IgE and syntaxin-4 in U266 cells. •Findings suggest a critical requirement for syntaxin-4 in IgE secretion from plasma cells. -- Abstract: The humoral immune system provides a crucial first defense against the invasion of microbial pathogens via the secretion of antigen specific immunoglobulins (Ig). The secretion of Ig is carried out by terminally differentiated B-lymphocytes called plasma cells. Despite the key role of plasma cells in the immune response, the mechanisms by which they constitutively traffic large volumes of Ig out of the cell is poorly understood. The involvement of Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins in the regulation of protein trafficking from cells has been well documented. Syntaxin-4, a member of the Qa SNARE syntaxin family has been implicated in fusion events at the plasma membrane in a number of cells in the immune system. In this work we show that knock-down of syntaxin-4 in the multiple myeloma U266 human plasma cell line results in a loss of IgE secretion and accumulation of IgE within the cells. Furthermore, we show that IgE co-localises with syntaxin-4 in U266 plasma cells suggesting direct involvement in secretion at the plasma membrane. This study demonstrates that syntaxin-4 plays a critical role in the secretion of IgE from plasma cells and sheds some light on the mechanisms by which these cells constitutively traffic vesicles to the surface for secretion. An understanding of this machinery may be beneficial in identifying potential therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma and autoimmune disease where over-production of Ig leads to severe pathology in patients.

  3. Selective culling of high avidity antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Ertelt, James M; Johanns, Tanner M; Mysz, Margaret A; Nanton, Minelva R; Rowe, Jared H; Aguilera, Marijo N; Way, Sing Sing

    2011-12-01

    Typhoid fever is a persistent infection caused by host-adapted Salmonella strains adept at circumventing immune-mediated host defences. Given the importance of T cells in protection, the culling of activated CD4+ T cells after primary infection has been proposed as a potential immune evasion strategy used by this pathogen. We demonstrate that the purging of activated antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection requires SPI-2 encoded virulence determinants, and is not restricted only to cells with specificity to Salmonella-expressed antigens, but extends to CD4+ T cells primed to expand by co-infection with recombinant Listeria monocytogenes. Unexpectedly, however, the loss of activated CD4+ T cells during Salmonella infection demonstrated using a monoclonal population of adoptively transferred CD4+ T cells was not reproduced among the endogenous repertoire of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells identified with MHC class II tetramer. Analysis of T-cell receptor variable segment usage revealed the selective loss and reciprocal enrichment of defined CD4+ T-cell subsets after Salmonella co-infection that is associated with the purging of antigen-specific cells with the highest intensity of tetramer staining. Hence, virulent Salmonella triggers the selective culling of high avidity activated CD4+ T-cell subsets, which re-shapes the repertoire of antigen-specific T cells that persist later after infection.

  4. Focused specificity of intestinal TH17 cells towards commensal bacterial antigens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Torchinsky, Miriam B; Gobert, Michael; Xiong, Huizhong; Xu, Mo; Linehan, Jonathan L; Alonzo, Francis; Ng, Charles; Chen, Alessandra; Lin, Xiyao; Sczesnak, Andrew; Liao, Jia-Jun; Torres, Victor J; Jenkins, Marc K; Lafaille, Juan J; Littman, Dan R

    2014-06-05

    T-helper-17 (TH17) cells have critical roles in mucosal defence and in autoimmune disease pathogenesis. They are most abundant in the small intestine lamina propria, where their presence requires colonization of mice with microbiota. Segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) are sufficient to induce TH17 cells and to promote TH17-dependent autoimmune disease in animal models. However, the specificity of TH17 cells, the mechanism of their induction by distinct bacteria, and the means by which they foster tissue-specific inflammation remain unknown. Here we show that the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) repertoire of intestinal TH17 cells in SFB-colonized mice has minimal overlap with that of other intestinal CD4(+) T cells and that most TH17 cells, but not other T cells, recognize antigens encoded by SFB. T cells with antigen receptors specific for SFB-encoded peptides differentiated into RORγt-expressing TH17 cells, even if SFB-colonized mice also harboured a strong TH1 cell inducer, Listeria monocytogenes, in their intestine. The match of T-cell effector function with antigen specificity is thus determined by the type of bacteria that produce the antigen. These findings have significant implications for understanding how commensal microbiota contribute to organ-specific autoimmunity and for developing novel mucosal vaccines.

  5. Co-expression and impact of prostate specific membrane antigen and prostate specific antigen in prostatic pathologies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The present study was undertaken to relate the co-expression of prostate-associated antigens, PSMA and PSA, with the degree of vascularization in normal and pathologic (hyperplasia and cancer) prostate tissues to elucidate their possible role in tumor progression. Methods The study was carried out in 6 normal, 44 benign prostatic hyperplastic and 39 cancerous human prostates. Immunohistochemical analysis were performed using the monoclonal antibody CD34 to determine the angiogenic activity, and the monoclonal antibodies 3E6 and ER-PR8 to assess PSMA and PSA expression, respectively. Results In our study we found that in normal prostate tissue, PSMA and PSA were equally expressed (3.7 ± 0.18 and 3.07 ± 0.11). A significant difference in their expression was see in hyperplastic and neoplastic prostates tissues (16.14 ± 0.17 and 30.72 ± 0.85, respectively) for PSMA and (34.39 ± 0.53 and 17.85 ± 1.21, respectively) for PSA. Study of prostate tumor profiles showed that the profile (PSA+, PSMA-) expression levels decreased between normal prostate, benign prostatic tissue and primary prostate cancer. In the other hand, the profile (PSA-, PSMA+) expression levels increased from normal to prostate tumor tissues. PSMA overexpression was associated with high intratumoral angiogenesis activity. By contrast, high PSA expression was associated with low angiogenesis activity. Conclusion These data suggest that these markers are regulated differentially and the difference in their expression showed a correlation with malignant transformation. With regard to the duality PSMA-PSA, this implies the significance of their investigation together in normal and pathologic prostate tissues. PMID:21189143

  6. Stereotactic Radiation Therapy Augments Antigen-Specific PD-1-Mediated Anti-Tumor Immune Responses via Cross-Presentation of Tumor Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Sharabi, Andrew B.; Nirschl, Christopher J.; Kochel, Christina M.; Nirschl, Thomas R.; Francisca, Brian J.; Velarde, Esteban; Deweese, Theodore L.; Drake, Charles G.

    2014-01-01

    The immune-modulating effects of radiation therapy have gained considerable interest recently and there have been multiple reports of synergy between radiation and immunotherapy. However, additional pre-clinical studies are needed to demonstrate the antigen-specific nature of radiation-induced immune responses and elucidate potential mechanisms of synergy with immunotherapy. Here we demonstrate the ability of stereotactic radiotherapy to induce endogenous antigen-specific immune responses when combined with anti-PD-1 checkpoint blockade immunotherapy. Using the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP), image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy delivered to B16-OVA melanoma or 4T1-HA breast carcinoma tumors resulted in the development of antigen-specific T and B cell-mediated immune responses. These immune-stimulating effects of radiotherapy were significantly increased when combined with either anti-PD-1 therapy or regulatory T cell (Treg) depletion, resulting in improved local tumor control. Phenotypic analyses of antigen-specific CD8 T cells revealed that radiotherapy increased the percentage of antigen-experienced T cells and effector memory T cells. Mechanistically we found that radiotherapy up-regulates tumor-associated antigen-MHC complexes, enhances antigen cross-presentation in the draining lymph node, and increased T-cell infiltration into tumors. These findings demonstrate the ability of radiotherapy to prime an endogenous antigen-specific immune response and provide additional mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with PD-1 blockade in the clinic. PMID:25527358

  7. Specific Antibodies Reacting with SV40 Large T Antigen Mimotopes in Serum Samples of Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Tognon, Mauro; Corallini, Alfredo; Manfrini, Marco; Taronna, Angelo; Butel, Janet S.; Pietrobon, Silvia; Trevisiol, Lorenzo; Bononi, Ilaria; Vaccher, Emanuela; Barbanti-Brodano, Giuseppe; Martini, Fernanda; Mazzoni, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Simian Virus 40, experimentally assayed in vitro in different animal and human cells and in vivo in rodents, was classified as a small DNA tumor virus. In previous studies, many groups identified Simian Virus 40 sequences in healthy individuals and cancer patients using PCR techniques, whereas others failed to detect the viral sequences in human specimens. These conflicting results prompted us to develop a novel indirect ELISA with synthetic peptides, mimicking Simian Virus 40 capsid viral protein antigens, named mimotopes. This immunologic assay allowed us to investigate the presence of serum antibodies against Simian Virus 40 and to verify whether Simian Virus 40 is circulating in humans. In this investigation two mimotopes from Simian Virus 40 large T antigen, the viral replication protein and oncoprotein, were employed to analyze for specific reactions to human sera antibodies. This indirect ELISA with synthetic peptides from Simian Virus 40 large T antigen was used to assay a new collection of serum samples from healthy subjects. This novel assay revealed that serum antibodies against Simian Virus 40 large T antigen mimotopes are detectable, at low titer, in healthy subjects aged from 18–65 years old. The overall prevalence of reactivity with the two Simian Virus 40 large T antigen peptides was 20%. This new ELISA with two mimotopes of the early viral regions is able to detect in a specific manner Simian Virus 40 large T antigen-antibody responses. PMID:26731525

  8. A human T cell clone that mediates the monocyte procoagulant response to specific sensitizing antigen.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, B S; Reitnauer, P J; Hank, J A; Sondel, P M

    1985-09-01

    A panel of human purified protein derivative of the tubercle bacillus (PPD)-reactive T cell clones was derived by cloning out of soft agar followed by cultivation on inactivated feeder cells in the presence of interleukin-2. 1 of 4 clones tested was able to mediate an increase in monocyte procoagulant activity (PCA) in response to PPD. All four clones had identical surface marker phenotypes (T4+, T8-) and proliferated in response to antigen. The reactive T cell clone possessed no PCA of its own, but upon being presented with PPD was able to instruct monocytes to increase their expression of PCA. Antigen presentation could be performed only by autologous monocytes; allogeneic monocytes from donors unrelated to the donor of the reactive clone could not present antigen to cells of the clone in a way that would initiate the procoagulant response. Cells of the reactive clone did not mediate increased monocyte PCA in response to Candida, even though peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the donor demonstrated increased PCA to both Candida and PPD. Thus, the PCA response to specific antigen can be mediated by a single clone of cells that shows specificity in the recognition of both antigen and antigen presenting cell.

  9. Degradable emulsion as vaccine adjuvant reshapes antigen-specific immunity and thereby ameliorates vaccine efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chung-Hsiung; Huang, Chiung-Yi; Cheng, Chih-Ping; Dai, Shih-Hsiung; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Chong, Pele; Liu, Shih-Jen; Huang, Ming-Hsi

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the feasibility and adjuvant mechanism of a degradable emulsion for tuning adaptive immune responses to a vaccine antigen. We featured a mouse model with ovalbumin (OVA) as the antigen to deepen our understanding of the properties of a degradable emulsion-based adjuvant, dubbed PELC, interacting with immune cells and to elucidate their roles in vaccine immunogenicity in vivo. First, we demonstrated that the emulsion, which is stabilized by an amphiphilic bioresorbable polymer, shows degradation in mimic human body conditions and considerable tolerance in vivo. Then, we confirmed the model protein could be loaded into the emulsion and released from the matrix in a sustained manner, subsequently driving the production of antigen-specific antibodies. We also comprehended that PELC not only recruits antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to the injection site but also induces the activation of the recruited APCs and migration to the draining lymph nodes. As an adjuvant for cancer immunotherapy, PELC-formulated OVA could strongly enhance antigen-specific T-cell responses as well as anti-tumor ability with respected to non-formulated OVA, using OVA protein/EG7 cells as a tumor antigen/tumor cell model. Accordingly, our data paved the way for the clinical application of degradable emulsions based on amphiphilic bioresorbable polymers as vaccine adjuvants. PMID:27827451

  10. Specific Antibodies Reacting with SV40 Large T Antigen Mimotopes in Serum Samples of Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Tognon, Mauro; Corallini, Alfredo; Manfrini, Marco; Taronna, Angelo; Butel, Janet S; Pietrobon, Silvia; Trevisiol, Lorenzo; Bononi, Ilaria; Vaccher, Emanuela; Barbanti-Brodano, Giuseppe; Martini, Fernanda; Mazzoni, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Simian Virus 40, experimentally assayed in vitro in different animal and human cells and in vivo in rodents, was classified as a small DNA tumor virus. In previous studies, many groups identified Simian Virus 40 sequences in healthy individuals and cancer patients using PCR techniques, whereas others failed to detect the viral sequences in human specimens. These conflicting results prompted us to develop a novel indirect ELISA with synthetic peptides, mimicking Simian Virus 40 capsid viral protein antigens, named mimotopes. This immunologic assay allowed us to investigate the presence of serum antibodies against Simian Virus 40 and to verify whether Simian Virus 40 is circulating in humans. In this investigation two mimotopes from Simian Virus 40 large T antigen, the viral replication protein and oncoprotein, were employed to analyze for specific reactions to human sera antibodies. This indirect ELISA with synthetic peptides from Simian Virus 40 large T antigen was used to assay a new collection of serum samples from healthy subjects. This novel assay revealed that serum antibodies against Simian Virus 40 large T antigen mimotopes are detectable, at low titer, in healthy subjects aged from 18-65 years old. The overall prevalence of reactivity with the two Simian Virus 40 large T antigen peptides was 20%. This new ELISA with two mimotopes of the early viral regions is able to detect in a specific manner Simian Virus 40 large T antigen-antibody responses.

  11. Western blot diagnosis of vivax malaria with multiple stage-specific antigens of the parasite

    PubMed Central

    Son, Eui-Sun; Kim, Tong Soo

    2001-01-01

    Western blot analysis was performed to diagnose vivax malaria using stage-specific recombinant antigens. Genomic DNA from the whole blood of a malaria patient was used as templates to amplify the coding regions for the antigenic domains of circumsporozoite protein (CSP-1), merozoite surface protein (MSP-1), apical merozoite antigen (AMA-1), serine repeat antigen (SERA), and exported antigen (EXP-1) of Plasmodium vivax. Each amplified DNA fragment was inserted into a pGEX-4T plasmid to induce the expression of GST fusion protein in Escherichia coli by IPTG. The bacterial cell extracts were separated on 10% SDS-PAGE followed by western blot analysis with patient sera which was confirmed by blood smear examination. When applied with patient sera, 147 (91.9%) out of 160 vivax malaria, 12 (92.3%) out of 13 falciparum malaria, and all 9 vivax/falciparum mixed malaria reacted with at least one antigen, while no reactions occurred with 20 normal uninfected sera. In the case of vivax malaria, CSP-1 reacted with 128 (80.0%) sera, MSP-1 with 102 (63.8%), AMA-1 with 128 (80.0%), SERA with 115 (71.9%), and EXP-1 with 89 (55.6%), respectively. We obtained higher detection rates when using 5 antigens (91.9%) rather than using each antigen solely (55.6-80%), a combination of 2 (76.3-87.5%), 3 (85.6-90.6%), or 4 antigens (89.4-91.3%). This method can be applied to serological diagnosis, mass screening in endemic regions, or safety test in transfusion of prevalent vivax malaria. PMID:11441504

  12. Western blot diagnosis of vivax malaria with multiple stage-specific antigens of the parasite.

    PubMed

    Son, E S; Kim, T S; Nam, H W

    2001-06-01

    Western blot analysis was performed to diagnose vivax malaria using stage-specific recombinant antigens. Genomic DNA from the whole blood of a malaria patient was used as templates to amplify the coding regions for the antigenic domains of circumsporozoite protein (CSP-1), merozoite surface protein (MSP-1), apical merozoite antigen (AMA-1), serine repeat antigen (SERA), and exported antigen (EXP-1) of Plasmodium vivax. Each amplified DNA fragment was inserted into a pGEX-4T plasmid to induce the expression of GST fusion protein in Escherichia coli by IPTG. The bacterial cell extracts were separated on 10% SDS-PAGE followed by western blot analysis with patient sera which was confirmed by blood smear examination. When applied with patient sera, 147 (91.9%) out of 160 vivax malaria, 12 (92.3%) out of 13 falciparum malaria, and all 9 vivax/falciparum mixed malaria reacted with at least one antigen, while no reactions occurred with 20 normal uninfected sera. In the case of vivax malaria, CSP-1 reacted with 128 (80.0%) sera, MSP-1 with 102 (63.8%), AMA-1 with 128 (80.0%), SERA with 115 (71.9%), and EXP-1 with 89 (55.6%), respectively. We obtained higher detection rates when using 5 antigens (91.9%) rather than using each antigen solely (55.6-80%), a combination of 2 (76.3-87.5%), 3 (85.6-90.6%), or 4 antigens (89.4-91.3%). This method can be applied to serological diagnosis, mass screening in endemic regions, or safety test in transfusion of prevalent vivax malaria.

  13. No significant difference in antigenicity or tissue transglutaminase substrate specificity of Irish and US wheat gliadins.

    PubMed

    Keaveny, A P; Offner, G D; Bootle, E; Nunes, D P

    2000-04-01

    The prevalence of clinical celiac disease has been shown to vary both across time and between genetically similar populations. Differences in wheat antigenicity and transglutaminase substrate properties are a possible explanation for these differences. This study assessed the antigenicity and transglutaminase substrate specificities of gliadins from regions of high and low celiac disease prevalence. Gliadin was extracted from three commercial US wheat sources and two Irish sources. SDS-PAGE and western blotting revealed minor, but significant variations in the gliadin extracts. However, ELISA showed no difference in the antigenicity of these gliadins. Transglutaminase pretreatment of gliadin resulted in no significant change in gliadin antigenicity and kinetic studies showed that the Kms of the various gliadins were very similar. Purified IgA and IgG had no effect on transglutaminase activity. In summary, minor variations in wheat gliadins are unlikely to explain the observed differences in disease expression across genetically similar populations.

  14. Dendritic cells and the promise of antigen-specific therapy in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease resulting from an autoimmune response to self-antigens, leading to inflammation of synovial tissue of joints and subsequent cartilage and bone erosion. Current disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and biologic inhibitors of TNF, IL-6, T cells and B cells block inflammation nonspecifically, which may lead to adverse effects, including infection. They do not generally induce long-term drug-free remission or restoration of immune tolerance to self-antigens, and lifelong treatment is usual. The development of antigen-specific strategies in RA has so far been limited by insufficient knowledge of autoantigens, of the autoimmune pathogenesis of RA and of the mechanisms of immune tolerance in man. Effective tolerance-inducing antigen-specific immunotherapeutic strategies hold promise of greater specificity, of lower toxicity and of a longer-term solution for controlling or even preventing RA. This paper reviews current understanding of autoantigens and their relationship to immunopathogenesis of RA, and emerging therapeutics that aim to leverage normal tolerance mechanisms for implementation of antigen-specific therapy in RA. PMID:23374912

  15. Immuno-PCR: Very sensitive antigen detection by means of specific antibody-DNA conjugates

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, T.; Smith, C.L.; Cantor, C.R. )

    1992-10-02

    An antigen detection system, termed immuno-polymerase chain reaction (immuno-PCR), was developed in which a specific DNA molecule is used as the marker. A streptavidin-protein A chimera that possesses tight and specific binding affinity both for biotin and immunoglobulin G was used to attach a biotinylated DNA specifically to antigen-monoclonal antibody complexes that had been immobilized on microtiter plate wells. Then, a segment of the attached DNA was amplified by PCR. Analysis of the PCR products by agarose gel electrophoresis after staining with ethidium bromide allowed as few as 580 antigen molecules to be readily and reproducibly detected. Direct comparison with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with the use of a chimera-alkaline phosphatase conjugate demonstrates that enhancement in detection sensitivity was obtained with the use of immuno-PCR. Given the enormous amplification capability and specificity of PCR, this immuno-PCR technology has a sensitivity greater than any existing antigen detection system and, in principle, could be applied to the detection of single antigen molecules.

  16. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 specifically induces expression of the B-cell activation antigen CD23

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F.; Gregory, C.D.; Rowe, M.; Rickinson, A.B.; Wang, D.; Birkenbach, M.; Kikutani, H.; Kishimoto, T.; Kieff, E.

    1987-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of EBV-negative Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cells includes some changes similar to those seen in normal B lymphocytes that have been growth transformed by EBV. The role of individual EBV genes in this process was evaluated by introducing each of the viral genes that are normally expressed in EBV growth-transformed and latently infected lymphoblasts into an EBV-negative BL cell line, using recombinant retrovirus-mediated transfer. Clones of cells were derived that stably express the EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1), EBNA-2, EBNA-3, EBNA-leader protein, or EBV latent membrane protein (LMP). These were compared with control clones infected with the retrovirus vector. All 10 clones converted to EBNA-2 expression differed from control clones or clones expressing other EBV proteins by growth in tight clumps and by markedly increased expression of one particular surface marker of B-cell activation, CD23. Other activation antigens were unaffected by EBNA-2 expression, as were markers already expressed on the parent BL cell line. The results indicate that EBNA-2 is a specific direct or indirect trans-activator of CD23. This establishes a link between an EBV gene and cell gene expression. Since CD23 has been implicated in the transduction of B-cell growth signals, its specific induction by EBNA-2 could be important in EBV induction of B-lymphocyte transformation.

  17. Use of recombinant purified protein derivative (PPD) antigens as specific skin test for tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Stavri, Henriette; Bucurenci, Nadia; Ulea, Irina; Costache, Adriana; Popa, Loredana; Popa, Mircea Ioan

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Purified protein derivative (PPD) is currently the only available skin test reagent used worldwide for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB). The aim of this study was to develop a Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific skin test reagent, without false positive results due to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination using recombinant antigens. Methods: Proteins in PPD IC-65 were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry and compared to proteins in M. tuberculosis culture filtrate; 54 proteins were found in common. Top candidates MPT64, ESAT 6, and CFP 10 were overexpressed in Escherichia coli expression strains and purified as recombinant proteins. To formulate optimal immunodiagnostic PPD cocktails, the antigens were evaluated by skin testing guinea pigs sensitized with M. tuberculosis H37Rv and BCG. Results: For single antigens and a cocktail mixture of these antigens, best results were obtained using 3 μg/0.1 ml, equivalent to 105 TU (tuberculin units). Each animal was simultaneously tested with PPD IC-65, 2 TU/0.1 ml, as reference. Reactivity of the multi-antigen cocktail was greater than that of any single antigen. The skin test results were between 34.3 and 76.6 per cent the level of reactivity compared to that of the reference when single antigens were tested and 124 per cent the level of reactivity compared to the reference for the multi-antigen cocktail. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that this specific cocktail could represent a potential candidate for a new skin diagnostic test for TB. PMID:23287127

  18. Characterisation of an engineered trastuzumab IgE antibody and effector cell mechanisms targeting HER2/neu-positive tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Singer, Josef; Hunt, James; Gan, Samuel K E; Rudman, Sarah M; Mechtcheriakova, Diana; Knittelfelder, Regina; Daniels, Tracy R; Hobson, Philip S; Beavil, Andrew J; Spicer, James; Nestle, Frank O; Penichet, Manuel L; Gould, Hannah J; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Karagiannis, Sophia N

    2009-06-01

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin), a humanized IgG1 antibody raised against the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu), is the main antibody in clinical use against breast cancer. Pre-clinical evidence and clinical studies indicate that trastuzumab employs several anti-tumour mechanisms that most likely contribute to enhanced survival of patients with HER2/neu-positive breast carcinomas. New strategies are aimed at improving antibody-based therapeutics like trastuzumab, e.g. by enhancing antibody-mediated effector function mechanisms. Based on our previous findings that a chimaeric ovarian tumour antigen-specific IgE antibody showed greater efficacy in tumour cell killing, compared to the corresponding IgG1 antibody, we have produced an IgE homologue of trastuzumab. Trastuzumab IgE was engineered with the same light- and heavy-chain variable-regions as trastuzumab, but with an epsilon in place of the gamma-1 heavy-chain constant region. We describe the physical characterisation and ligand binding properties of the trastuzumab IgE and elucidate its potential anti-tumour activities in functional assays. Both trastuzumab and trastuzumab IgE can activate monocytic cells to kill tumour cells, but they operate by different mechanisms: trastuzumab functions in antibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis (ADCP), whereas trastuzumab IgE functions in antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Trastuzumab IgE, incubated with mast cells and HER2/neu-expressing tumour cells, triggers mast cell degranulation, recruiting against cancer cells a potent immune response, characteristic of allergic reactions. Finally, in viability assays both antibodies mediate comparable levels of tumour cell growth arrest. These functional characteristics of trastuzumab IgE, some distinct from those of trastuzumab, indicate its potential to complement or improve upon the existing clinical benefits of trastuzumab.

  19. An antigenic threshold for maintaining human immunodeficiency virus type 1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, X.; Ogg, G.; Bonhoeffer, S.; Safrit, J.; Vesanen, M.; Bauer, D.; Chen, D.; Cao, Y.; Demoitie, M. A.; Zhang, L.; Markowitz, M.; Nixon, D.; McMichael, A.; Ho, D. D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Using the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) model in mice, a number of studies show that memory cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses are maintained in the presence of continuous antigenic stimulation. Yet, other groups found that memory CTL specific for LCMV could last for a lifetime in mice without viral antigens. Thus, the extent to which an antigen is required for the maintenance of virus-specific CTL remains controversial. In humans, very few studies have been conducted to investigate the relationship between the quantity of antigen and the magnitude of CTL responses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We quantified CTL precursors (CTLp) using a limiting-dilution analysis (LDA) and CTL effectors (CTLe) using a new Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I tetramer technology in six long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection, as well as in eight patients whose viral loads were well suppressed by antiretroviral therapy. The viremia levels in these patients were measured using an reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. The proviral DNA load in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) was also measured by PCR in four LTNPs. RESULTS: The LTNPs had high levels of HIV-1-specific memory CTLp and CTLe, while maintaining a low plasma viral load. Despite also having low viral loads, patients whose plasma viremia was well-suppressed by effective therapy had low levels of CTLe. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that a complex, rather than a monotonic, relationship exists between CTL levels and HIV-1 viremia, including what appears to be an antigenic threshold for the maintenance of CTL at a measurable level. Under conditions of "antigen excess,", CTLe levels correlate inversely with viral load. On the other hand, under conditions that are "antigen limited," the correlation appears to be direct. PMID:11071274

  20. Polymeric synthetic nanoparticles for the induction of antigen-specific immunological tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Roberto A.; LaMothe, Robert A.; Ferrari, Joseph D.; Zhang, Ai-Hong; Rossi, Robert J.; Kolte, Pallavi N.; Griset, Aaron P.; O’Neil, Conlin; Altreuter, David H.; Browning, Erica; Johnston, Lloyd; Farokhzad, Omid C.; Langer, Robert; Scott, David W.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Kishimoto, Takashi Kei

    2015-01-01

    Current treatments to control pathological or unwanted immune responses often use broadly immunosuppressive drugs. New approaches to induce antigen-specific immunological tolerance that control both cellular and humoral immune responses are desirable. Here we describe the use of synthetic, biodegradable nanoparticles carrying either protein or peptide antigens and a tolerogenic immunomodulator, rapamycin, to induce durable and antigen-specific immune tolerance, even in the presence of potent Toll-like receptor agonists. Treatment with tolerogenic nanoparticles results in the inhibition of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell activation, an increase in regulatory cells, durable B-cell tolerance resistant to multiple immunogenic challenges, and the inhibition of antigen-specific hypersensitivity reactions, relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and antibody responses against coagulation factor VIII in hemophilia A mice, even in animals previously sensitized to antigen. Only encapsulated rapamycin, not the free form, could induce immunological tolerance. Tolerogenic nanoparticle therapy represents a potential novel approach for the treatment of allergies, autoimmune diseases, and prevention of antidrug antibodies against biologic therapies. PMID:25548186

  1. Immunoregulatory adherent cells in human tuberculosis: radiation-sensitive antigen-specific suppression by monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinhenz, M.E.; Ellner, J.J.

    1985-07-01

    In human tuberculosis, adherent mononuclear cells (AMC) selectively depress in vitro responses to the mycobacterial antigen tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD). The phenotype of this antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell was characterized by examining the functional activity of adherent cells after selective depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or OKM1-reactive monocytes. Adherent cell suppression was studied in the (/sup 3/H)thymidine-incorporation microculture assay by using T cells rigorously depleted of T cells with surface receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (T gamma cells) as antigen-responsive cells. PPD-induced (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation by these non gamma T cells was uniformly reduced (mean, 42% +/- 10% (SD)) when autologous AMC were added to non gamma T cells at a ratio of 1:2. Antigen-specific suppression by AMC was not altered by depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or treatment with indomethacin. However, AMC treated with OKM1 and complement or gamma irradiation (1,500 rads) no longer suppressed tuberculin responses in vitro. These studies identify the antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell in tuberculosis as an OKM1-reactive, non-erythrocyte-rosetting monocyte. The radiosensitivity of this monocyte immunoregulatory function may facilitate its further definition.

  2. Antigen specific immunological responses of badgers (Meles meles) experimentally infected with Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Lesellier, Sandrine; Corner, Leigh; Costello, Eamon; Sleeman, Paddy; Lyashchenko, Konstantin; Greenwald, Rena; Esfandiari, Javan; Singh, Mahavir; Hewinson, R Glyn; Chambers, Mark; Gormley, Eamonn

    2008-03-15

    European badgers (Meles meles) are considered to be an important reservoir of infection for Mycobacterium bovis and are implicated in the transmission of tuberculosis to cattle in Ireland and Great Britain. Accurate tests are required for tuberculosis surveillance in badger populations and to provide a basis for the development of strategies, including vaccination, to reduce the incidence of the infection. In this study, we have developed an endobronchial M. bovis infection model in badgers in which we measured cell-mediated immune and serological responses for up to 24 weeks post-infection. Groups of badgers were subjected to necropsy at 6-week intervals and the gross lesion severity status compared with immune responses measured in blood samples taken throughout the course of the study. The panel of antigens included bovine and avian tuberculins (PPD) as well as single antigens, ESAT-6, CFP-10, MPB70, Rv3019c, Rv3873, Rv3878 and Rv3879, all known to be recognised by the immune system in other animal models of tuberculosis infection. Our results demonstrated that M. bovis infected badgers responded to specific antigens as early as 6 weeks post-infection, consistent with the presence of visible lesions. The data also revealed unique patterns of antigen recognition with high levels of PBMC proliferation in the presence of CFP-10 but low proliferation levels with ESAT-6. Using a multi-antigen print immunoassay (MAPIA), we were able to confirm that MPB83 is the dominant antigen recognised by serum antibodies in infected badgers.

  3. NB1, a new neutrophil-specific antigen involved in the pathogenesis of neonatal neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Lalezari, Parviz; Murphy, Georgette B.; Allen, Fred H.

    1971-01-01

    A new human antigen is reported which is present only on blood neutrophils. A neutrophil-specific antigen, designated NA1, has previously been identified in two unrelated families, and was shown to be involved in fetomaternal incompatibility and the development of isoimmune neonatal neutropenia in five newborns. In the present paper, a second antigen, designated NB1, is identified in four families with seven affected children. Antibodies that react with this second antigen are shown to produce selective agglutination of neutrophils but not other blood cells. They are neither absorbed by cells prepared from solid tissues nor by non-neutrophilic blood cells. By family and population studies, NB is shown to be distinct from NA, representing an independent genetic locus. 68% of the New York population are homozygous for NB1, 29% heterozygous, and 3% negative. The NB locus is shown to be independent from those of HL-A and other known leukocyte antigens. No evidence for linkage between NA, NB, and red cell antigens was obtained. PMID:5552408

  4. CTLA4 mediates antigen-specific apoptosis of human T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gribben, J G; Freeman, G J; Boussiotis, V A; Rennert, P; Jellis, C L; Greenfield, E; Barber, M; Restivo, V A; Ke, X; Gray, G S

    1995-01-01

    The regulation of T cell-mediated immune responses requires a balance between amplification and generation of effector function and subsequent selective termination by clonal deletion. Although apoptosis of previously activated T cells can be induced by signaling of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family, these molecules do not appear to regulate T-cell clonal deletion in an antigen-specific fashion. We demonstrate that cross-linking of the inducible T-cell surface molecule CTLA4 can mediate apoptosis of previously activated human T lymphocytes. This function appears to be antigen-restricted, since a concomitant signal T-cell receptor signal is required. Regulation of this pathway may provide a novel therapeutic strategy to delete antigen-specific activated T cells. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7846057

  5. The hamster model for identification of specific antigens of Taenia solium tapeworms.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Sánchez, Alicia; Jiménez, Lucía; Landa, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    Humans acquire taeniasis by ingesting pork meat infected with Taenia solium cysticerci, which are the only definitive hosts of the adult stage (tapeworm) and responsible for transmitting the human and porcine cysticercosis. Hence, detection of human tapeworm carriers is a key element in the development of viable strategies to control the disease. This paper presents the identification of specific antigens using sera from hamsters infected with T. solium tapeworms analyzed by western blot assay with crude extracts (CEs) and excretion-secretion antigens (E/S Ag) obtained from T. solium cysticerci and tapeworms and extracts from other helminthes as controls. The hamster sera infected with T. solium tapeworms recognized specific bands of 72, 48, 36, and 24  kDa, in percentages of 81, 81, 90, and 88%, respectively, using the T. solium tapeworms E/S Ag. The antigens recognized by these hamster sera could be candidates to improve diagnosis of human T. solium taeniasis.

  6. Changes over Time in IgE Sensitization to Allergens of the Fish Parasite Anisakis spp.

    PubMed Central

    Carballeda-Sangiao, Noelia; Rodríguez-Mahillo, Ana I.; Careche, Mercedes; Navas, Alfonso; Moneo, Ignacio; González-Muñoz, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background Sensitization to Anisakis spp. can produce allergic reactions after eating raw or undercooked parasitized fish. Specific IgE is detected long after the onset of symptoms, but the changes in specific IgE levels over a long follow-up period are unknown; furthermore, the influence of Anisakis spp. allergen exposure through consumption of fishery products is also unknown. Objective To analyse the changes in IgE sensitization to Anisakis spp. allergens over several years of follow-up and the influence of the consumption of fishery products in IgE sensitization. Methods Total IgE, Anisakis spp.-specific IgE, anti-Ani s 1 and anti-Ani s 4 IgE were repeatedly measured over a median follow-up duration of 49 months in 17 sensitized patients. Results Anisakis spp.-specific IgE was detected in 16/17 patients throughout the follow-up period. The comparison between baseline and last visit measurements showed significant decreases in both total IgE and specific IgE. The specific IgE values had an exponential or polynomial decay trend in 13/17 patients. In 4/17 patients, an increase in specific IgE level with the introduction of fish to the diet was observed. Three patients reported symptoms after eating aquaculture or previously frozen fish, and in two of those patients, symptom presentation was coincident with an increase in specific IgE level. Conclusions IgE sensitization to Anisakis spp. allergens lasts for many years since specific IgE was detectable in some patients after more than 8 years from the allergic episode. Specific IgE monitoring showed that specific IgE titres increase in some allergic patients and that allergen contamination of fishery products can account for the observed increase in Anisakis spp.-specific IgE level. Clinical Relevance Following sensitization to Anisakis spp. allergens, the absence of additional exposure to those allergens does not result in the loss of IgE sensitization. Exposure to Anisakis spp. allergens in fishery products can

  7. Specificity of antigens from pathogenic Aspergillus species. I. Studies with ELISA and immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    De Magaldi, S W; Mackenzie, D W

    1984-01-01

    Studies were made by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) tests on the reactivities and specificities of 13 antigens prepared from four species of Aspergillus against antisera from immunized rabbits and 64 sera from patients with aspergillosis, other systemic mycoses and nocardiosis. Although reactions in both serological tests were invariably strongest with homologous antigen: antibody systems, antisera from rabbits immunized with A. fumigatus, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Candida albicans and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis reacted in the ELISA test with all of the Aspergillus antigens. In contrast, cross-reactivity was virtually non-existent with antiserum to Histoplasma capsulatum. Of five antigens prepared from A fumigatus tested by ELISA against human sera from patients with aspergillosis and other nocardial and systemic fungal infections, sensitivities varied from 81 to 100% for sera from 32 patients with aspergillosis, and specificities from 20 to 97% for sera from 30 patients with nocardiosis and other systemic mycoses. Purified A. fumigatus C antigen reacted weakly with sera from eight of these 30 patients, but the reactions were readily distinguishable from those obtained with sera from patients with aspergillosis. At optimal serum dilutions, cross-reactivities of A. fumigatus in the IFA studies were non-existent in the sera from 28 patients with candidosis, coccidioidomycosis, cryptococcosis, histoplasmosis, paracoccidioidomycosis and nocardiosis. Sensitivities of IFA were 94% for patients with aspergilloma and 83% for patients with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.

  8. Deglycosylation of Toxocara excretory-secretory antigens improves the specificity of the serodiagnosis for human toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Roldán, W H; Elefant, G R; Ferreira, A W

    2015-11-01

    Serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis is difficult in tropical areas where other helminthiasis are endemic. Many studies have shown that glycans from helminths may be the responsible for cross-reactions in the immunoassays. In this study, we have evaluated the deglycosylation of the Toxocara canis excretory-secretory (TES) antigens for the detection of IgG antibodies using a panel of 228 serum samples (58 patients with toxocariasis, 75 patients with other helminth infections and 95 healthy individuals) by ELISA and Western blot assays. Our results showed that the deglycosylation of TES antigens resulted in a single fraction of 26 kDa (dTES) and was able to detect IgG antibodies with a sensitivity and specificity of 100% in both above-mentioned assays. The rate of cross-reactions, observed in ELISA with TES (13·3%), was significantly reduced (5·3%) when the dTES antigens were used. Likewise, the cross-reactivity observed with the fractions of 32, 55 and 70 kDa of the TES antigens was totally eliminated when the dTES were used in the Western blot. All these results showed that the deglycosylation of the TES antigens really improves the specificity of the serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis in endemic areas for helminth infections.

  9. Epitope selection to male specific antigens for sex selection in swine.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Azarm Akhavien; Tetro, Jason A; Filion, Lionel G

    2011-04-01

    Immunological approaches to gender selection have been contemplated since the discovery of the family of male-specific H-Y antigens found only on the surface of male cells. H-Y antigens are able to elicit an immune reaction when cells or tissues from a male donor are grafted to a female recipient. We describe here the development and testing of an inexpensive approach using polyclonal antibodies against four specific H-Y outer membrane proteins male enhanced antigen 1 (MEA 1), male enhanced antigen 2 (MEA 2), sex determining region Y (SRY) and testis determining factor (TDF). Epitopes based on hydrophilic primary sequences of the proteins were synthesized, N-terminal biotin-labeled, linked to streptavidin and mixed with a Ribi adjuvant prior to immunization in rabbits. The antiserum was tested to determine affinity to swine spermatozoa using anti-motility, flow cytometry and motility and sedimentation chambers. Fluorescent microscopy and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to identify the percentage of motile spermatozoa that contained the Y chromosome. We found that the polyclonal antibodies had high affinity to the spermatozoa leading to a cessation of motility. Furthermore, the majority of these non-motile spermatozoa contained the Y chromosome. We conclude that the use of polyclonal antiserum against synthetic H-Y peptide antigens may be an inexpensive and simple means to inhibit the motility of swine spermatozoa bearing the Y chromosome.

  10. Potent antigen-specific immune response induced by infusion of spleen cells coupled with succinimidyl-4-(N-maleimidomethyl cyclohexane)-1-carboxylate (SMCC) conjugated antigens.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yixian; Werbel, Tyler; Wan, Suigui; Wu, Haitao; Li, Yaohua; Clare-Salzler, Michael; Xia, Chang-Qing

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, we report our recently developed new approach to inducing antigen-specific immune response. We use two nucleophilic substitution "click" chemistry processes to successfully couple protein antigens or peptides to mouse spleen cells or T cells by a heterobifunctional crosslinker, succinimidyl-4-(N-maleimidomethyl cyclohexane)-1-carboxylate (SMCC) or sulfo-SMCC. SMCC and its water-soluble analog sulfo-SMCC contain N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester and maleimide groups, which allow stable covalent conjugation of amine- and sulfhydryl-containing molecules in trans. Protein coupling to cells relies on the free sulfhydryls (thiols) on cell surfaces and the free amines on protein antigens. Although the amount of protein coupled to cells is limited due to the limited number of cell surface thiols, the injection of spleen cells coupled with antigenic proteins, such as keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) or ovalbumin (OVA), induces a potent antigen-specific immune response in vivo, which is even stronger than that induced by the injection of a large dose of protein plus adjuvants. In addition, short peptides coupled to purified splenic T cells also potently elicit peptide-specific T cell proliferation in vivo after injection. Further studies show that antigen-coupled spleen cell treatment leads to augmented IFN-γ-producing T cells. Our study provides a unique antigen delivery method that efficiently distributes antigen to the entire immune system, subsequently eliciting a potent antigen-specific immune response with enhanced IFN-γ production. The findings in the present study suggest that this antigen-cell coupling strategy could be employed in immunotherapy for cancers, infectious diseases as well as immune-mediated disorders.

  11. Novel use of a radiolabelled antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen for the detection of occult abscesses in mammals

    DOEpatents

    Thakur, Madhukar L.

    1990-01-01

    The invention discloses improved reagents containing antibodies against stage specific embryonic antigen-1 antibodies and improved methods for detection of occult abscess and inflammation using the improved reagents.

  12. Early detection of prostate cancer. Role of prostate-specific antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakaran, V. M.

    1996-01-01

    Pressure to request prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests for early detection of prostate cancer in middle-aged and older men is increasing. However, current scientific data suggest that such testing does more harm than good. Most professional groups do not advise routine screening for prostate cancer. This paper reviews the current status of PSA testing. PMID:8653039

  13. On-chip activation and subsequent detection of individual antigen-specific T cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qing; Han, Qing; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M.; Kent, Sally C.; Raddassi, Khadir; Nilsson, Björn; Nepom, Gerald T.; Hafler, David A.; Love, J. Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The frequencies of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in samples of human tissue has been difficult to determine accurately ex vivo, particularly for autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis or Type 1 diabetes. Conventional approaches involve the expansion of primary T cells in vitro to increase the numbers of cells, and a subsequent assessment of the frequencies of antigen-specific T cells in the expanded population by limiting dilution or by using fluorescently labeled tetramers of peptide-loaded major histocompatibility complex (MHC) receptors. Here we describe an alternative approach that uses arrays of subnanoliter wells coated with recombinant peptide-loaded MHC Class II monomers to isolate and stimulate individual CD4+ T cells in an antigen-specific manner. In these experiments, activation was monitored using microengraving to capture two cytokines (IFNγ and IL-17) released from single cells. This new method should enable direct enumeration of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells ex vivo from clinical samples. PMID:20000848

  14. African swine fever virus serotype-specific proteins are significant protective antigens for African swine fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    African swine fever (ASF) is an emerging disease threat for the swine industry worldwide. No ASF vaccine is available and progress is hindered by lack of knowledge concerning the extent of African swine fever virus (ASFV) strain diversity and the viral antigens conferring type specific protective im...

  15. An audit of prostate-specific antigen and clinical symptoms in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, S.; Foster, M. C.; Thomas, D. R.; Roalfe, A. K.; Hall, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective was to devise local guidelines for the referral of patients with suspected prostatic carcinoma following evaluation by a retrospective audit of the value of the prostate-specific antigen concentration, together with age, urological symptoms, and digital rectal examination in the diagnosis of carcinoma of the prostate. Relevant details were collected from the notes of 582 patients from general practice and hospital. The significant diagnostic factors were ascertained by stepwise logistic regression. Prostate-specific antigen concentration, digital rectal examination and significant terminal dribbling were the most powerful factors in the diagnosis of carcinoma of the prostate. When prostate-specific antigen concentration was considered in isolation, a value of 6.5 ng/ml appeared appropriate for referral. Age was not significant, perhaps due to the narrow patient age range. The significant diagnostic factors were built into an algorithm calculating the probability of carcinoma of the prostate. This algorithm, together with prostate-specific antigen concentration results and digital rectal examination findings, forms the basis of the referral guidelines and a subsequent prospective study. PMID:9538483

  16. Bioactive polysaccharide-based pH-sensitive polymers for cytoplasmic delivery of antigen and activation of antigen-specific immunity.

    PubMed

    Yuba, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Ayaka; Yoshizaki, Yuta; Harada, Atsushi; Kono, Kenji

    2017-03-01

    For establishment of cancer immunotherapy, antigen carriers are needed which have functions not only to deliver antigen into cytosol of dendritic cells (DCs), which induces antigen-specific cellular immune responses, but also to activate DCs. We previously reported cytoplasmic delivery of antigen using liposomes modified with pH-sensitive polymers such as carboxylated poly(glycidol)s or dextran. Modification using these polymers provides stable liposomes with pH-sensitive fusogenic/membrane-disruptive ability. For this study, bioactive polysaccharide-based pH-sensitive polymers were constructed to achieve not only cytoplasmic delivery of antigen but also activation of DCs. Curdlan and mannan were used as bioactive polysaccharides because they are known to activate DCs via their respective interactions with Dectin-1 and Dectin-2. Carboxylated curdlan and mannan promoted Th1 cytokine production from DCs, indicating the activation of DCs by these polysaccharide derivatives. These polymer-modified liposomes released their contents at weakly acidic pH and delivered model antigenic proteins into cytosol of DCs. Subcutaneous administration of curdlan derivative-modified or mannan derivative-modified liposomes induced strong antigen-specific immune responses and stronger antitumor effects than those of liposomes modified with dextran derivative. Therefore, bioactive polysaccharide-modified liposomes that achieve both cytoplasmic delivery of antigen and activation of DCs are promising for cancer immunotherapy.

  17. Cloning of a serotype-specific antigen from Pasteurella haemolytica A1.

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Rayos, C; Lo, R Y; Shewen, P E; Beveridge, T J

    1986-01-01

    Recombinant plasmids coding for a soluble (or surface) antigen of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 were identified. Two plasmids, both containing the same 5.4 kilobase pairs of insert DNA, were recovered independently by screening a clone band of P. haemolytica A1 genomic DNA in Escherichia coli for the expression of P. haemolytica A1 soluble antigens (R. Y. C. Lo and L.A. Cameron, Can. J. Biochem. Cell Biol. 64:73-76, 1986). E. coli cells carrying the plasmids were found to be agglutinated by an antiserum raised against the P. haemolytica A1 soluble antigens. Analysis of the E. coli clones by electron microscopy revealed patches of amorphous material on the surface of the cells which were not present on the controls. Further characterization with protein A-colloidal gold labeled both these patches and the outer membranes of these cloned cells pretreated with the specific antiserum. These results indicated that the cloned antigen was expressed on the surface of the E. coli cells. The cloned antigen was found to be specific for serotype 1 when tested by slide agglutination against a collection of P. haemolytica typing antisera. Southern blot hybridization, using the cloned DNA as a probe, labeled the genomic DNA from P. haemolytica serotype 1 as well as the cross-agglutinating serotypes 2 and 7, but not DNA from the non-cross-agglutinating serotypes 3 and 4 and Pasteurella multocida. These results demonstrated that serotype specificity could be attributed to the particular antigenic determinants in the genome of the organism. Images PMID:3527985

  18. The 10 kDa protein of Taenia solium metacestodes shows genus specific antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Park, S K; Yun, D H; Chung, J Y; Kong, Y; Cho, S Y

    2000-09-01

    Genus specific antigenicity of the 10 kDa protein in cyst fluid (CF) of Taenia solium metacestodes was demonstrated by comparative immunoblot analysis. When CFs from taeniid metacestodes of T. saginata, T. solium, T. taeniaeformis and T. crassiceps were probed with specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) raised against 150 kDa protein of T. solium metacestodes, specific antibody reactions were observed in 7 and 10 kDa proteins of T. solium and in 7/8 kDa of T. saginata, T. taeniaeformis and T. crassiceps. The mAb did not react with any protein in hydatid fluid of Echinococcus granulosus and E. multilocularis. This result revealed that the 10 kDa peptide of T. solium metacestodes and its equivalent proteins of different Taenia metacestodes are genus specific antigens that are shared among different Taenia species.

  19. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuelsen, Simone V.; Solov’Yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-10-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best oligonucleotide binders in surface plasmon resonance studies to analyze binding and kinetic aspects of interactions between antigens and target DNA. These DNA and LNA/DNA sequences showed improved binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human samples of pediatric lupus patients. Our results suggest that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies.

  20. Immunohistochemical demonstration of specific antigens in the human brain fixed in zinc-ethanol-formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Korzhevskii, D E; Sukhorukova, E G; Kirik, O V; Grigorev, I P

    2015-08-05

    Tissue fixation is critical for immunohistochemistry. Recently, we developed a zinc-ethanol-formalin fixative (ZEF), and the present study was aimed to assess the applicability of the ZEF for the human brain histology and immunohistochemistry and to evaluate the detectability of different antigens in the human brain fixed with ZEF. In total, 11 antigens were tested, including NeuN, neuron-specific enolase, GFAP, Iba-1, calbindin, calretinin, choline acetyltransferase, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65), tyrosine hydroxylase, synaptophysin, and α-tubulin. The obtained data show that: i) the ZEF has potential for use in general histological practice, where detailed characterization of human brain morphology is needed; ii) the antigens tested are well-preserved in the human brain specimens fixed in the ZEF.

  1. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsen, Simone V.; Solov’yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best oligonucleotide binders in surface plasmon resonance studies to analyze binding and kinetic aspects of interactions between antigens and target DNA. These DNA and LNA/DNA sequences showed improved binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human samples of pediatric lupus patients. Our results suggest that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies. PMID:27775006

  2. IGES transformer and NURBS in grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Tzu-Yi; Soni, Bharat K.

    1993-01-01

    In the field of Grid Generation and the CAD/CAM, there are numerous geometry output formats which require the designer to spend a great deal of time manipulating geometrical entities in order to achieve a useful sculptured geometrical description for grid generation. Also in this process, there is a danger of losing fidelity of the geometry under consideration. This stresses the importance of a standard geometry definition for the communication link between varying CAD/CAM and grid system. The IGES (Initial Graphics Exchange Specification) file is a widely used communication between CAD/CAM and the analysis tools. The scientists at NASA Research Centers - including NASA Ames, NASA Langley, NASA Lewis, NASA Marshall - have recognized this importance and, therefore, in 1992 they formed the committee of the 'NASA-IGES' which is the subset of the standard IGES. This committee stresses the importance and encourages the CFD community to use the standard IGES file for the interface between the CAD/CAM and CFD analysis. Also, two of the IGES entities -- the NURBS Curve (Entity 126) and NURBS Surface (Entity 128) -- which have many useful geometric properties -- like the convex hull property, local control property and affine invariance, also widely utilized analytical geometries can be accurately represented using NURBS. This is important in today grid generation tools because of the emphasis of the interactive design. To satisfy the geometry transformation between the CAD/CAM system and Grid Generation field, the CAGI (Computer Aided Geometry Design) developed, which include the Geometry Transformation, Geometry Manipulation and Geometry Generation as well as the user interface. This paper will present the successful development IGES file transformer and application of NURBS definition in the grid generation.

  3. Enhancement of Antigen-specific functional responses by neutrophils from allergic patients

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that neutrophils from healthy donors or from patients with inflammatory disorders can bind immunoglobulin (Ig) E proteins through binding to Mac-2/epsilon bp. Functional responses to allergens were assessed by measuring the respiratory burst and intracellular Ca2+ levels, and binding of allergens to neutrophils was assessed by flow cytometry analysis and fluorescence microscopy. In this article, we demonstrate that neutrophils sensitized to specific allergens (from allergic patients), but not from healthy donors, are sensitive to allergens of the same type as those that produce clinical allergic symptoms. The activation of neutrophils was analyzed by the induction of a respiratory burst that was detected with luminol- dependent chemiluminescence. Intracellular Ca2+ levels increased parallel to those of the inducing allergens. In addition, the specific binding of allergens on the cell surface was revealed by flow cytometry and allergen-FITC-labeled staining analyses. The present data suggest a restricted recognition of allergen by sensitive neutrophils, probably associated with the specific binding of the allergen to its corresponding IgE molecule, which is bound to the Mac-2/epsilon bp structure. These findings demonstrate a functional role of allergen- associated neutrophils during the allergic state. PMID:8676078

  4. Improving antigenic peptide vaccines for cancer immunotherapy using a dominant tumor-specific T cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Buhrman, Jonathan D; Jordan, Kimberly R; Munson, Daniel J; Moore, Brandon L; Kappler, John W; Slansky, Jill E

    2013-11-15

    Vaccines that incorporate peptide mimics of tumor antigens, or mimotope vaccines, are commonly used in cancer immunotherapy and function by eliciting increased numbers of T cells that cross-react with the native tumor antigen. Unfortunately, they often elicit T cells that do not cross-react with or that have low affinity for the tumor antigen. Using a high affinity tumor-specific T cell clone, we identified a panel of mimotope vaccines for the dominant peptide antigen from a mouse colon tumor that elicits a range of tumor protection following vaccination. The TCR from this high affinity T cell clone was rarely identified in ex vivo evaluation of tumor-specific T cells elicited by mimotope vaccination. Conversely, a low affinity clone found in the tumor and following immunization was frequently identified. Using peptide libraries, we determined if this frequently identified TCR improved the discovery of efficacious mimotopes. We demonstrated that the representative TCR identified more protective mimotopes than the high affinity TCR. These results suggest that targeting a dominant fraction of tumor-specific T cells generates potent immunity and that consideration of the available T cell repertoire is necessary for targeted T cell therapy. These results have important implications when optimizing mimotope vaccines for cancer immunotherapy.

  5. Diversification of the antigen-specific T cell receptor repertoire after varicella zoster vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Qian; Cavanagh, Mary M.; Le Saux, Sabine; NamKoong, Hong; Kim, Chulwoo; Turgano, Emerson; Liu, Yi; Wang, Chen; Mackey, Sally; Swan, Gary E.; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Olshen, Richard A.; Boyd, Scott D.; Weyand, Cornelia M.; Tian, Lu; Goronzy, Jörg J.

    2016-01-01

    Diversity and size of the antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire are two critical determinants for successful control of chronic infection. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) that establishes latency during childhood is able to escape control mechanisms, in particular with increasing age. We examined the TCR diversity of VZV-reactive CD4 T cells in individuals older than 50 years by studying three identical twin pairs and three unrelated individuals before and after vaccination with live attenuated VZV. While all individuals had a small number of dominant T cell clones, the breadth of the VZV-specific repertoire differed markedly. A genetic influence was seen for the sharing of individual TCR sequences from antigen-reactive cells, but not for repertoire richness or the selection of dominant clones. VZV vaccination favored the expansion of infrequent VZV antigen-reactive TCRs including those from naïve T cells with lesser boosting of dominant T cell clones. Thus, vaccination does not reinforce the in vivo selection occurred during chronic infection but leads to a diversification of the VZV-reactive T cell repertoire. However, a single booster immunization seems insufficient to establish new clonal dominance. Our results suggest that repertoire analysis of antigen-specific TCRs can be an important read-out to assess whether a vaccination was able to generate memory cells in clonal sizes that are necessary for immune protection. PMID:27030598

  6. Detection of Avian Antigen-Specific T Cells Induced by Viral Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Dalgaard, Tina Sørensen; Norup, Liselotte Rothmann; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl

    2016-01-01

    Live attenuated viral vaccines are widely used in commercial poultry production, but the development of new effective inactivated/subunit vaccines is needed. Studies of avian antigen-specific T cells are primarily based on analyses ex vivo after activating the cells with recall antigen. There is a particular interest in developing robust high-throughput assays as chicken vaccine trials usually comprise many individuals. In many respects, the avian immune system differs from the mammalian, and T cell assessment protocols must be adjusted accordingly to account for, e.g., differences in leukocyte subsets.The carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE) method described in this chapter has been adapted to chicken cells. In this test, cells of interest are stained with CFSE. The succinimidyl ester group covalently binds to cellular amines forming fluorescent conjugates that are retained in the cells even throughout division. This leads to daughter cells containing half the fluorescence of their parents. When lymphocytes are loaded with CFSE prior to ex vivo stimulation with specific antigen, the measurement of serial halving of its fluorescence by flow cytometry identifies the cells responding to the stimulation. This method has been successfully applied to studies of chicken antigen-specific T cells.

  7. Stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 identifies human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kawanabe, Noriaki; Murata, Satoko; Fukushima, Hiroaki; Ishihara, Yoshihito; Yanagita, Takeshi; Yanagita, Emmy; Ono, Mitsuaki; Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Kamioka, Hiroshi; Itoh, Tomoo; Kuboki, Takuo; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2012-03-10

    Embryonic stem cell-associated antigens are expressed in a variety of adult stem cells as well as embryonic stem cells. In the present study, we investigated whether stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-4 can be used to isolate dental pulp (DP) stem cells. DP cells showed plastic adherence, specific surface antigen expression, and multipotent differentiation potential, similar to mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). SSEA-4+ cells were found in cultured DP cells in vitro as well as in DP tissue in vivo. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that 45.5% of the DP cells were SSEA-4+. When the DP cells were cultured in the presence of all-trans-retinoic acid, marked downregulation of SSEA-3 and SSEA-4 and the upregulation of SSEA-1 were observed. SSEA-4+ DP cells showed a greater telomere length and a higher growth rate compared to ungated and SSEA-4- cells. A clonal assay demonstrated that 65.5% of the SSEA-4+ DP cells had osteogenic potential, and the SSEA-4+ clonal DP cells showed multilineage differentiation potential toward osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and neurons in vitro. In addition, the SSEA-4+ DP cells had the capacity to form ectopic bone in vivo. Thus, our results suggest that SSEA-4 is a specific cell surface antigen that can be used to identify DP stem cells.

  8. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-specific monoclonal antibody to detect CD19-specific T cells in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Jena, Bipulendu; Maiti, Sourindra; Huls, Helen; Singh, Harjeet; Lee, Dean A; Champlin, Richard E; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials targeting CD19 on B-cell malignancies are underway with encouraging anti-tumor responses. Most infuse T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) with specificity derived from the scFv region of a CD19-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb, clone FMC63). We describe a novel anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb) to detect CD19-specific CAR(+) T cells before and after their adoptive transfer. This mouse mAb was generated by immunizing with a cellular vaccine expressing the antigen-recognition domain of FMC63. The specificity of the mAb (clone no. 136.20.1) was confined to the scFv region of the CAR as validated by inhibiting CAR-dependent lysis of CD19(+) tumor targets. This clone can be used to detect CD19-specific CAR(+) T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a sensitivity of 1∶1,000. In clinical settings the mAb is used to inform on the immunophenotype and persistence of administered CD19-specific T cells. Thus, our CD19-specific CAR mAb (clone no. 136.20.1) will be useful to investigators implementing CD19-specific CAR(+) T cells to treat B-lineage malignancies. The methodology described to develop a CAR-specific anti-idiotypic mAb could be extended to other gene therapy trials targeting different tumor associated antigens in the context of CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy.

  9. Sex steroid hormones and circulating IgE levels.

    PubMed

    Mathur, S; Mathur, R S; Goust, J M; Williamson, H O; Fudenberg, H H

    1977-12-01

    The possible influence of sex steroid hormones on circulating IgE levels in general and IgE anti-Candida antibodies in particular was studied by quantification of plasma levels of progesterone, estradiol and IgE (total and anti-Candida-specific) in females during the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle, and during pregnancy. IgE levels during the follicular and luteal phases were not significantly different, although the mean values for the luteal phase were slightly lower. This trend was apparent in daily samples from two normal females during one menstrual cycle. During pregnancy, when the levels of circulating sex steroids were high, IgE levels were only slightly higher than in the follicular and luteal phases. In men and in gonadal dysgenetics, circulating progesterone levels were similar to those of women during the follicular phase (i.e., lower than in the luteal phase or in pregnancy), but the IgE levels were not different. The apparently low levels of IgE during the luteal phase may therefore be due to physiological factors other than fluctuations in the sex steroid hormones. From the present studies, it is apparent that sex steroid hormones have little or no effect on humoral IgE levels, in marked contrast to previously described correlations for other immunoglobulins, especially anti-Candida antibodies.

  10. Isolation of human single chain variable fragment antibodies against specific sperm antigens for immunocontraceptive development

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, A.S.; Naz, R.K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Contraceptive vaccines can provide valuable alternatives to current methods of contraception. We describe here the development of sperm-reactive human single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies of defined sperm specificity for immunocontraception. METHODS Peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) from antisperm antibody-positive immunoinfertile and vasectomized men were activated with human sperm antigens in vitro, and the complementary DNA prepared and PCR-amplified using primers based on all the variable regions of heavy and light chains of immunoglobulins. The scFv repertoire was cloned into pCANTAB5E vector to create a human scFv antibody library. RESULTS Panning of the library against specific sperm antigens yielded several clones, and the four strongest reactive were selected for further analysis. These clones had novel sequences with unique complementarity-determining regions. ScFv antibodies were expressed, purified and analyzed for human sperm reactivity and effect on human sperm function. AFA-1 and FAB-7 scFv antibodies both reacted with fertilization antigen-1 antigen, but against different epitopes. YLP20 antibody reacted with the expected human sperm protein of 48 ± 5 kDa. The fourth antibody, AS16, reacted with an 18 kDa sperm protein and seems to be a human homologue of the mouse monoclonal recombinant antisperm antibody that causes sperm agglutination. All these antibodies inhibited human sperm function. CONCLUSIONS This is the first study to report the use of phage display technology to obtain antisperm scFv antibodies of defined antigen specificity. These antibodies will find clinical applications in the development of novel immunocontraceptives, and specific diagnostics for immunoinfertility. PMID:18372255

  11. Repeated spurious elevation of serum prostate-specific antigen values solved by chemiluminescence analysis: A possible interference by heterophilic antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bayó, Miquel; Muñoz-Rodríguez, Jesús; Bellido, Jose Antonio; Abascal-Junquera, Jose María; Hannaoui, Naim; Banús, Josep Maria

    2015-01-01

    Heterophilic antibodies are human immunoglobulins directed against various animal antigens. They can produce false-positive results in the analysis of different tumor markers, including prostate-specific antigen. This interference can lead to misdiagnosis, unnecessary tests, and overtreatment in some cases. We present herein the case of a 52-year-old man with repeated spurious elevation of prostate-specific antigen, reaching levels of 108.7 ng/mL, that were suspected to be caused by heterophilic antibodies. The interference was solved by changing the analysis technique. Real values of prostate-specific antigen were less than 1 ng/mL. PMID:26568798

  12. Ascaris lumbricoides-induced suppression of total and specific IgE responses in atopic subjects is interleukin 10-independent and associated with an increase of CD25(+) cells.

    PubMed

    Matera, Giovanni; Giancotti, Aida; Scalise, Sonia; Pulicari, Maria Concetta; Maselli, Rosario; Piizzi, Chiara; Pelaia, Girolamo; Tancrè, Valentina; Muto, Valentina; Doldo, Patrizia; Cosco, Vincenzo; Cosimo, Paola; Capicotto, Renata; Quirino, Angela; Scalzo, Rosaria; Liberto, Maria Carla; Parlato, Giuseppe; Focà, Alfredo

    2008-11-01

    Ascaris presence in humans has been associated with high levels of blood eosinophils and serum IgE. This study was designed to address the influence of Ascaris infection on allergic and inflammatory parameters of atopic subjects. A cross-sectional design was used, and atopic individuals to be assessed were divided into 3 groups including Ascaris-infected, anti-Ascaris IgG-positive (seropositive), and control subjects. All subjects enrolled had positive skin test reactivity to at least 1 perennial or seasonal allergen; however, levels of C-reactive protein, C3, and C4 were within normal range values. Eosinophil percentage was not significantly different among the groups studied. Total IgE and specific anti-Ascaris IgE levels in the seropositive group were significantly higher than concentrations found in both control and infected groups. Interleukin (IL)-4 release in Ascaris-infected patients was significantly increased versus seropositives, who were able to produce more IL-4 than controls. The levels of IL-10 were lower in the seropositives as well as infected subjects in comparison with controls. CD25(+) lymphocyte populations were significantly increased in the infected group versus the seropositives as well as the controls. Lung function tests of some selected seropositive subjects were significantly impaired. The same parameters of a representative infected patient were not different from controls. Our data on T helper type 2 cells (Th2) and regulatory T cells (Treg) features, as well as CD25(+) lymphocyte increase, suggest an Ascaris-induced mechanism leading to parasite survival. Moreover, the stable control of both T helper type 1 cells (Th1) and Th2 immunity cascades, paralleled by the absence of overwhelming inflammatory systemic reactions and lack of allergic syndromes, may result in a favorable host condition.

  13. Candida albicans group A-specific soluble antigens demonstrated by quantitative immunoelectrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Guinet, R M; Gabriel, S M

    1980-01-01

    Soluble cytoplasmic extracts of Candida albicans groups A and B were prepared and compared by quantitative immunoelectrophoresis experiments performed with a commercial anti-C. albicans group A immune serum. Although crossed immunoelectrophoresis, tandem crossed immunoelectrophoresis, and line immunoelectrophoresis revealed many cross-reactions between the two groups, some components seemed to be specific to group A. However, the complexity of the extracts studied did not allow us to demonstrate specific constituents with these methods. Crossed-line immunoelectrophoresis with and without absorption of antibodies in situ was then used, and four specific antigens unique to group A cytoplasmic extract were demonstrated, one of which appeared to be quantitatively important. The value of various quantitative immunoelectrophoretic methods applied to complex antigenic preparations is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:6159327

  14. Tracking antigen-specific CD8⁺ T cells using MHC class I multimers.

    PubMed

    Alanio, Cécile; Bouvier, Isabelle; Jusforgues-Saklani, Hélène; Albert, Matthew L

    2013-01-01

    The tracking of epitope-specific T cells is a useful approach for the study of adaptive immune responses. This protocol describes how Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I (MHC-I) multimers can be used to stain, enrich, and enumerate (rare) populations of CD8(+) T cells specific for a given antigen. It provides the detailed steps for multimer labeling, magnetic enrichment, and cytometric analysis. Additionally, it provides informations for multiplexing experiments in order to achieve simultaneous detection of multiple antigenic specificities, and strategies for coupling the protocol with functional assays (e.g., intracellular cytokine staining). Future developments in cytometric systems (e.g., mass spectroscopy-based cytometry) and gene expression studies (e.g., single cell PCR) will extend these approaches and provide an unprecedented assessment of the immune repertoire.

  15. Characterization of the adrenal-specific antigen IZA (inner zone antigen) and its role in the steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Min, Li; Takemori, Hiroshi; Nonaka, Yasuki; Katoh, Yoshiko; Doi, Junko; Horike, Nanao; Osamu, Hatano; Raza, Farah S; Vinson, Gavin P; Okamoto, Mitshuhiro

    2004-02-27

    Inner zone antigen (IZA) is a protein specifically expressed in the zona fasciculata and reticularis of the adrenal cortex. The cDNA encoding IZA was found to be identical to that encoding the previously reported putative membrane-associated progesterone receptor (MPR) and the TCDD-induced 25kDa protein (25-Dx). From its structure, MPR was classed as a member of a protein family containing a haem-binding domain, and progesterone was proposed to be a ligand of this domain. Indeed, when GST-tagged IZA was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified, the purified GST-IZA had a brown colour with maximum absorbance at 400 nm. The addition of dithionate shifted the absorbance peak to 420 nm, suggesting a haem-binding function. The possible role of IZA in steroidogenesis has been addressed, and the inhibition of adrenal steroidogenesis by the addition of an anti-IZA monoclonal antibody has been reported. When COS-7 cells were transformed with plasmids for appropriate steroidogenic enzymes in the presence or absence of an IZA expression plasmid and tested for their steroidogenic activities, 21-hydroxylation of progesterone was found to be specifically activated by IZA overexpression, suggesting the involvement of IZA in progesterone metabolism. Taken together, the available evidence suggests that IZA may have an important role in the functions of the adrenal zona fasciculata and reticularis.

  16. The induction of antigen-specific CTL by in situ Ad-REIC gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ariyoshi, Y; Watanabe, M; Eikawa, S; Yamazaki, C; Sadahira, T; Hirata, T; Araki, M; Ebara, S; Nasu, Y; Udono, H; Kumon, H

    2016-05-01

    An adenovirus vector carrying the human Reduced Expression in Immortalized Cell (REIC)/Dkk-3 gene (Ad-REIC) mediates simultaneous induction of cancer-selective apoptosis and augmentation of anticancer immunity. In our preclinical and clinical studies, in situ Ad-REIC gene therapy showed remarkable direct and indirect antitumor effects to realize therapeutic cancer vaccines. We herein aimed to confirm the induction of tumor-associated antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by Ad-REIC. Using an ovalbumin (OVA), a tumor-associated antigen, expressing E.G7 tumor-bearing mouse model, we investigated the induction and expansion of OVA-specific CTLs responsible for indirect, systemic effects of Ad-REIC. The intratumoral administration of Ad-REIC mediated clear antitumor effects with the accumulation of OVA-specific CTLs in the tumor tissues and spleen. The CD86-positive dendritic cells (DCs) were upregulated in the tumor draining lymph nodes of Ad-REIC-treated mice. In a dual tumor-bearing mouse model in the left and right back, Ad-REIC injection in one side significantly suppressed the tumor growth on both sides and significant infiltration of OVA-specific CTLs into non-injected tumor was also detected. Consequently, in situ Ad-REIC gene therapy is expected to realize a new-generation cancer vaccine via anticancer immune activation with DC and tumor antigen-specific CTL expansion.

  17. IgE antibodies in toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Matowicka-Karna, Joanna; Kemona, Halina

    2014-05-15

    Toxoplasmosis is a worldwide infection caused by the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii. At least a third of the world human population is infected with the parasite, making it one of the most successful parasitic infections. Primary maternal infection may cause health-threatening sequelae for the fetus, or even cause death of the uterus. Reactivation of a latent infection in immune deficiency conditions such as AIDS and organ transplantation can cause fatal toxoplasmic encephalitis. Toxoplasmosis is a major cause of chorioretinitis, especially in individuals with impaired immune systems. In the acute phase, directly after invading the body, T. gondii begins to multiply rapidly. In the majority of cases acquired toxoplasmosis is asymptomatic. In the second week of infection, specific IgM antibodies are present in the blood. IgE antibodies appear at the same time, slightly preceding specific IgA antibodies. The concentration of IgE can be one of the parameters used for diagnosing an infection with T. gondii. Laboratory diagnosis, i.e. IgE and serologic assays, plays the main role in the diagnosis of congenital infection and assists in the confirmatory diagnosis of toxoplasmic encephalitis and ocular toxoplasmosis. This article is a review of IgE in toxoplasmosis.

  18. Strategies of antigen-specific T-cell-based immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su-hu; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Wang-Gang

    2005-10-01

    The critical role of antigen-specific T-cells in the eradication of cancer has been demonstrated in numerous animal models, while significant challenges need to be conquered before antigen-specific T-cell immunotherapy can achieve true success in clinical practice. These challenges include: (1) weak or nonimmunogenicity of spontaneous tumors, (2) negative immune regulation mechanisms of the host immune system, (3) immune inhibition exerted by tumor cells, (4) physical barrier in solid tumor, and (5) escape or resistance to immune attack by tumor cells. Nonetheless, significant success has been achieved in several clinical trials recently, highlighting the possibility of successful manipulation of the immune system for control and elimination of tumor. We focused our study on summarizing the current knowledge and corresponding strategies for improving autologous cytotoxic T-cell (CTL)-based cancer immunotherapy, which include the following aspects: (1) the selection of tumor antigens for stimulation of CTL, (2) strategies of enhancing maturation and antigen presentation activity of dendritic cells (DC), (3) strategies of activation and maintenance of CTL response, and (4) recruitment of suitable immune effector cells to tumor sites. The successful manipulation of the immune system, based on the more and more detailed knowledge of tumor immunology, may finally reach the goal of "immune surveillance of malignancy."

  19. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for detection of equine antibodies specific to Sarcocystis neurona surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Hoane, Jessica S; Morrow, Jennifer K; Saville, William J; Dubey, J P; Granstrom, David E; Howe, Daniel K

    2005-09-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the primary causative agent of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM), a common neurologic disease of horses in the Americas. We have developed a set of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) based on the four major surface antigens of S. neurona (SnSAGs) to analyze the equine antibody response to S. neurona. The SnSAG ELISAs were optimized and standardized with a sample set of 36 equine sera that had been characterized by Western blotting against total S. neurona parasite antigen, the current gold standard for S. neurona serology. The recombinant SnSAG2 (rSnSAG2) ELISA showed the highest sensitivity and specificity at 95.5% and 92.9%, respectively. In contrast, only 68.2% sensitivity and 71.4% specificity were achieved with the rSnSAG1 ELISA, indicating that this antigen may not be a reliable serological marker for analyzing antibodies against S. neurona in horses. Importantly, the ELISA antigens did not show cross-reactivity with antisera to Sarcocystis fayeri or Neospora hughesi, two other equine parasites. The accuracy and reliability exhibited by the SnSAG ELISAs suggest that these assays will be valuable tools for examining the equine immune response against S. neurona infection, which may help in understanding the pathobiology of this accidental parasite-host interaction. Moreover, with modification and further investigation, the SnSAG ELISAs have potential for use as immunodiagnostic tests to aid in the identification of horses affected by EPM.

  20. The generation and antigen-specificity of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Taams, Leonie S; Curnow, S John; Vukmanovic-Stejic, M; Akbar, Arne N

    2006-09-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells are essential components of the immune system. They help to maintain immune tolerance by exerting suppressive effects on cells of the adaptive and innate immune system. In the last few years there has been an abundance of papers addressing the suppressive effects of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells and their putative role in various experimental disease models and human diseases. Despite the enormous amounts of data on these cells a number of controversial issues still exists. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells were originally described as thymus-derived anergic/suppressive T cells. Recent papers however indicate that these cells might also be generated in the periphery. Due to the thymic development of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells it was thought that these cells were specific for self-antigens. Indeed it was shown that CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells could be positively selected upon high affinity interaction with self-antigens. However, evidence is accumulating that these cells might also interact with non-self antigens. Finally, in the literature there is conflicting evidence regarding the role of soluble factors versus cell-contact in the mechanism of suppression. The aim of this review is to summarize the evidence supporting these opposing viewpoints and to combine them into a general model for the origin, function and antigen-specificity of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.

  1. Antigen-specific CD4{sup +} effector T cells: Analysis of factors regulating clonal expansion and cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuki, Kazunobu; Watanabe, Yuri; Takahashi, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Sakiko; Watanabe, Shiho; Ogawa, Shuhei; Kotani, Motoko; Kozono, Haruo; Tanabe, Kazunari; Abe, Ryo

    2009-03-20

    In order to fully understand T cell-mediated immunity, the mechanisms that regulate clonal expansion and cytokine production by CD4{sup +} antigen-specific effector T cells in response to a wide range of antigenic stimulation needs clarification. For this purpose, panels of antigen-specific CD4{sup +} T cell clones with different thresholds for antigen-induced proliferation were generated by repeated stimulation with high- or low-dose antigen. Differences in antigen sensitivities did not correlate with expression of TCR, CD4, adhesion or costimulatory molecules. There was no significant difference in antigen-dependent cytokine production by TG40 cells transfected with TCR obtained from either high- or low-dose-responding T cell clones, suggesting that the affinity of TCRs for their ligands is not primary determinant of T cell antigen reactivity. The proliferative responses of all T cell clones to both peptide stimulation and to TCR{beta} crosslinking revealed parallel dose-response curves. These results suggest that the TCR signal strength of effector T cells and threshold of antigen reactivity is determined by an intrinsic property, such as the TCR signalosome and/or intracellular signaling machinery. Finally, the antigen responses of high- and low-peptide-responding T cell clones reveal that clonal expansion and cytokine production of effector T cells occur independently of antigen concentration. Based on these results, the mechanisms underlying selection of high 'avidity' effector and memory T cells in response to pathogen are discussed.

  2. Immunochemical properties of some monoclonal IgE antibodies to 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl (NP).

    PubMed Central

    Bose, R; Bundesen, P G; Holford-Stevens, V; Stefura, W P; Kelly, K A; Jeffrey, J C; Rector, E S; Fischer, J; Sehon, A H; Schwenk, R J

    1984-01-01

    Several hybridoma cell lines secreting NP-specific, murine IgE antibodies were generated by fusion of P3-X20 (gamma, kappa) tumour cells with spleen cells from (BALB/c X C57B1/6)F1 (CB6F1) mice previously immunized with NP-ovalbumin. Four subclones (designated NP-epsilon-3.57, NP-epsilon-15.88, NP-epsilon-91.58 and NP-epsilon-95.31) were propagated in vivo and milligram quantities of the corresponding IgE antibodies were purified from ascitic fluid by gel filtration, ion exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography. Immunological analyses and sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) indicated that NP-epsilon-15.88, NP-epsilon-91.58 and NP-epsilon-95.31 all possessed lambda 1 (or possibly lambda 3) light chains; and that NP-epsilon-3.57 possessed lambda 2 light chains; NP-epsilon-95.31 also expressed the P3-X20 derived, MOPC-21 kappa light chain. Radioallergosorbent test (RAST) titration curves, generated from the interaction of the four monoclonal IgE antibodies with NP-BSA attached to paper discs (NP-BSA-P) were found to be non-overlapping. Measurements of the relative amounts of NP-epsilon-aminocaproic acid (NP-CAP) and 4-hydro-3-iodo-5-nitrophenylacetyl-epsilon-aminocaproic acid (NIP-CAP) that were required to inhibit by 50% the binding of the 4 IgE antibodies to NP-BSA-P indicated that these antibodies were all heteroclitic, since their affinity for NIP appeared to be higher than their affinity for NP. These results, in conjunction with other findings reported in the literature, suggested that the V regions of NP-specific IgE antibodies are similar to the V regions of NP-specific IgM and IgG antibodies, produced by the same mouse strains. Finally, in vitro histamine release measurements demonstrated that two of these monoclonal IgE antibodies could mediate antigen induced histamine release from passively sensitized rat peritoneal mast cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:6209208

  3. Fucoidan prevents C{epsilon} germline transcription and NF{kappa}B p52 translocation for IgE production in B cells

    SciTech Connect

    Oomizu, Souichi; Yanase, Yuhki; Suzuki, Hidenori; Kameyoshi, Yoshikazu; Hide, Michihiro . E-mail: mhide@hiroshima-u.ac.jp

    2006-11-24

    Fucoidan, a dietary fiber contained in seaweed, reduces the increase of antigen-specific IgE in mice exposed to ovalbumin. In this study, we investigated the effect of fucoidan on IgE production and intracellular events in B cells in vitro. Fucoidan inhibited the production of IgE and C{epsilon} germline transcription in murine B cells induced by IL-4 (100 ng/ml) and anti-CD40 antibodies (10 {mu}g/ml), whereas it stimulated cell proliferation. A significant effect of fucoidan on IgE production was observed when B cells were stimulated with a higher dose (5 {mu}g/ml) of anti-CD40 antibodies, but not when stimulated with lower doses (1.25, 2.5 {mu}g/ml), regardless of the IL-4 concentrations. Moreover, nuclear translocation of NF{kappa}B p52, but neither that of NF{kappa}B p65, nor the phosphorylation of JAK1 and STAT6 was reduced by fucoidan. These results suggest that fucoidan inhibited IgE production by preventing the NF{kappa}B p52-mediated pathways activated by CD40.

  4. Human melanoma immunotherapy using tumor antigen-specific T cells generated in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zheng; Xia, Jinxing; Fan, Wei; Wargo, Jennifer; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-01-01

    A major factor hindering the exploration of adoptive immunotherapy in preclinical settings is the limited availability of tumor-reactive human T cells. Here we developed a humanized mouse model that permits large-scale production of human T cells expressing the engineered melanoma antigen MART-1-specific TCR. Humanized mice, made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue and CD34+ cells virally-transduced with HLA class I-restricted melanoma antigen (MART-1)-specific TCR gene, showed efficient development of MART-1-TCR+ human T cells with predominantly CD8+ cells. Importantly, MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells developing in these mice were capable of mounting antigen-specific responses in vivo, as evidenced by their proliferation, phenotypic conversion and IFN-γ production following MART-1 peptide immunization. Moreover, these MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells mediated efficient killing of melanoma cells in an HLA/antigen-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells induced potent antitumor responses that were further enhanced by IL-15 treatment in melanoma-bearing recipients. Finally, a short incubation of MART-1-specific T cells with rapamycin acted synergistically with IL-15, leading to significantly improved tumor-free survival in recipients with metastatic melanoma. These data demonstrate the practicality of using humanized mice to produce potentially unlimited source of tumor-specific human T cells for experimental and preclinical exploration of cancer immunotherapy. This study also suggests that pretreatment of tumor-reactive T cells with rapamycin in combination with IL-15 administration may be a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:26824989

  5. IgE Antibodies, FcεRIαand IgE-mediated Local Anaphylaxis Can Limit Snake Venom Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gaudenzio, Nicolas; Reber, Laurent Lionel; Sibilano, Riccardo; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background Type 2 cytokine-related (i.e., type 2) immune responses associated with development of antigen-specific Immunoglobulin E antibodies (IgE) can contribute to pathology in allergic diseases and to fatal anaphylaxis. However, recent findings in mice indicate that IgE also can enhance defense against honeybee venom. Objective We tested whether IgE antibodies, IgE-dependent effector mechanisms, and a local anaphylactic reaction to an unrelated antigen can enhance defense against Russell's viper venom (RVV) and determined whether such responses can be influenced by immunization protocol or mouse strain. Methods We compared the resistance of RVV-immunized wild-type, IgE-deficient, and Fcer1a-deficient mice following injection of a potentially lethal dose of RVV. Results A single prior exposure to RVV enhanced the ability of wild-type mice, but not mice lacking IgE or functional FcεRI, to survive challenge with a potentially lethal amount of RVV. Moreover, IgE-dependent local passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in response to challenge with an antigen not naturally present in RVV significantly enhanced resistance to the venom. Finally, we observed different effects on resistance to RVV or honeybee venoms in BALB/c versus C57BL/6 mice which had received a second exposure to that venom prior to challenge with a high dose of that venom. Conclusion These observations illustrate the potential benefit of IgE-dependent effector mechanisms in acquired host defense against venoms. The extent to which type 2 immune responses against venoms can decrease pathology associated with envenomation seems to be influenced by the type of venom, the frequency of venom exposure, and the genetic background of the host. PMID:26410782

  6. Rice protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome with transient specific IgE to boiled rice but not to retort-processed rice.

    PubMed

    Yasutomi, Motoko; Kosaka, Takuya; Kawakita, Akiko; Hayashi, Hisako; Okazaki, Shintaro; Murai, Hiroki; Miyagawa, Kazuhiko; Mayumi, Mitsufumi; Ohshima, Yusei

    2014-02-01

    Described herein is the case of an 8-month-old girl with atypical food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome due to rice. She presented with vomiting and poor general activity 2 h after ingestion of boiled rice. Oral food challenge test using high-pressure retort-processed rice was negative, but re-exposure to boiled rice elicited gastrointestinal symptoms. On western blot analysis the patient's serum was found to contain IgE bound to crude protein extracts from rice seed or boiled rice, but not from retort-processed rice. The major protein bands were not detected in the electrophoresed gel of retort-processed rice extracts, suggesting decomposition by high-temperature and high-pressure processing. Oral food challenge for diagnosing rice allergy should be performed with boiled rice to avoid a false negative. Additionally, some patients with rice allergy might be able to ingest retort-processed rice as a substitute for boiled rice.

  7. Improved proliferation of antigen-specific cytolytic T lymphocytes using a multimodal nanovaccine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Siuta, Michael; Bright, Vanessa; Koktysh, Dmitry; Matlock, Brittany K; Dumas, Megan E; Zhu, Meiying; Holt, Alex; Stec, Donald; Deng, Shenglou; Savage, Paul B; Joyce, Sebastian; Pham, Wellington

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the immunoenhancing property of our newly designed nanovaccine, that is, its ability to induce antigen-specific immunity. This study also evaluated the synergistic effect of a novel compound PBS-44, an α-galactosylceramide analog, in boosting the immune response induced by our nanovaccine. The nanovaccine was prepared by encapsulating ovalbumin (ova) and an adjuvant within the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles. Quantitative analysis of our study data showed that the encapsulated vaccine was physically and biologically stable; the core content of our nanovaccine was found to be released steadily and slowly, and nearly 90% of the core content was slowly released over the course of 25 days. The in vivo immunization studies exhibited that the nanovaccine induced stronger and longer immune responses compared to its soluble counterpart. Similarly, intranasal inhalation of the nanovaccine induced more robust antigen-specific CD8+ T cell response than intraperitoneal injection of nanovaccine. PMID:27895483

  8. Tracking antigen specific CD4+ T-cells with soluble MHC molecules.

    PubMed

    Gebe, John A; Kwok, William W

    2007-01-01

    The advent of soluble MHC multimer technology has allowed for the flow-cytometric direct identification of specific-MHC restricted antigen-specific T cells in mixed cell populations and also enabled the direct phenotyping and cloning of these cells at the same time. To date, MHC multimers have been used in characterizing the adaptive T cell repertoire under infectious, cancerous, and autoimmune states and has increased our understanding of the dynamics of T-cell immunity. Recombinant MHC multimers have been produced where MHC-binding peptide antigens are either covalently or noncovalently bound to the MHC, with the latter having the advantage of the ability to use a single recombinant MHC to investigate multiple MHC-binding peptides and their interacting T cells. In this method we describe how to generate recombinant non-covalently bound peptide MHC-multimers in insect cells. MHC multimers are generated as tetravalent complexes using a streptavidin scaffold.

  9. Effects of treatment on IgE responses against parasite allergen-like proteins and immunity to reinfection in childhood schistosome and hookworm coinfections.

    PubMed

    Pinot de Moira, Angela; Jones, Frances M; Wilson, Shona; Tukahebwa, Edridah; Fitzsimmons, Colin M; Mwatha, Joseph K; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Kabatereine, Narcis B; Dunne, David W

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring human immunity to both schistosomiasis and hookworm infection has been associated with IgE responses against parasite allergen-like proteins. Since the two helminths frequently coinfect the same individuals, there is growing advocacy for their concurrent treatment. However, both helminths are known to exert strong immunomodulatory effects; therefore, coinfected individuals could have immune responses different from those characteristically seen in monoinfected individuals. In this study, we measured changes in IgE, IgG1, and IgG4 responses to schistosome and hookworm antigens, including the allergen-like proteins Schistosoma mansoni tegumental-allergen-like 1 protein (SmTAL1), SmTAL2, and Necator americanus Ancylostoma-secreted protein-2 (Na-ASP-2), following concurrent treatment of schoolchildren coinfected with Schistosoma mansoni and hookworm. Antibody responses to schistosome egg (soluble egg antigen and SmTAL2) or somatic adult hookworm (AHW) antigens either decreased after treatment or were unchanged, whereas those to schistosome worm antigens (soluble worm antigen and SmTAL1) increased. The observed different effects of treatment likely reflect the different modes of drug action and sites of infection for these two helminths. Importantly, there was no evidence that the simultaneous treatment of coinfected children with praziquantel and albendazole affected schistosome- and hookworm-specific humoral responses differently from those characteristic of populations in which only one organism is endemic; schistosome- and hookworm-specific responses were not associated, and there was no evidence for cross-regulation. Posttreatment increases in the levels of IgE to schistosome worm antigens were associated with lower Schistosoma mansoni reinfection intensity, while no associations between humoral responses to AHW antigen and protection from hookworm reinfection were observed in this sample of school-aged children.

  10. Localization of organ-specific antigens in the nervous system of the rat.

    PubMed

    Weinrauder, H; Lach, B

    1977-08-16

    Localization of organ-specific brain antigens in the central nervous system of the rat has been studied by means of indirect immunofluorescence. Rabbit antiserum against homogenate of rat brain, previously absorbed with normal serum and homogenates of rat organs (kidney, liver, spleen), reacted with the water-soluble antigens of rat brain prepared by extraction with phosphate buffer (pH 7.3) and ultracentrifugation at 50 000 X g to give one band in the immunodiffusion test and 2--3 precipitation arcs in immunoelectrophoresis. There was also a positive reaction with peripheral nerve. The antigen was detectable in all regions of the CNS. Cells with distinct cytoplasmic immunofluorescence were most frequently observed in cerebellar white matter, pons, cerebellar pedunculi, longitudinal tracts of the brain stem. Positive immunofluorecence reaction has appeared in the outer plexiform layer and granular layer of the retina, satelite cells of the spinal root ganglia and Schwann cells. A similar reaction was observed in human, mouse and guinea pig brain slices. Both the morphological and immunochemical reactions are indicative of glial localization of this antigen.

  11. Murine macrophage interleukin-1 release by capsularlike serotype-specific polysaccharide antigens of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, T; Nishihara, T; Ishihara, Y; Amano, K; Shibuya, N; Moro, I; Koga, T

    1991-01-01

    Serotype-specific polysaccharide antigens (SPAs) were extracted from whole cells of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29523 (serotype a), Y4 (serotype b), and NCTC 9710 (serotype c) by autoclaving and purified by chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-25 and Sephacryl S-300 columns. Y4 SPA induced interleukin-1 (IL-1) release by P388D1 murine macrophages. Polymyxin B had virtually no effect on the release of IL-1. Rabbit anti-murine IL-1 serum strongly suppressed the proliferation of C3H/HeJ mouse thymocytes induced with the culture supernatants of Y4 SPA-stimulated P388D1 cells and a submitogenic dose of concanavalin A. Gel filtration of the culture supernatants of Y4 SPA-stimulated macrophages on Sephacryl S-200 showed that an IL-1 peak at a point corresponding to approximately 16.5 kDa was eluted. The ability of SPAs from strains ATCC 29523 and NCTC 9710 to induce the release of IL-1 was lower than that of Y4 SPA. The IL-1-releasing ability of serotype a and c antigens was enhanced by deacetylation of both polysaccharides, suggesting that acetyl groups of these antigens might hinder the interaction between the antigens and macrophages. PMID:1987032

  12. Identification of an endosomal antigen specific to absorptive cells of suckling rat ileum

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    A membrane fraction enriched in apical endosomal tubules was isolated from absorptive cells of suckling rat ileum and used as an immunogen to generate anti-endosome monoclonal antibodies. By immunofluorescence, one of these antibodies bound exclusively to the region of the apical endocytic complex in ileal absorptive cells, but not to other cell types. Immunoblot analysis showed the antigen as a diffuse 55-61-kD band which was highly enriched in the endosome fraction over whole-cell homogenate. The antigen appears to be an intramembrane glycoprotein: it partitioned primarily in the detergent phase after TX-114 extraction, and shifted to 44 kD after chemical deglycosylation. EM immunocytochemistry showed that the antibody bound to the luminal side of endosomal tubule membranes, a portion of endosomal vesicle membranes, and in endocytic pits of apical plasma membranes. However, it did not bind to multivesicular bodies, the giant lysosome, or other organelles. Immunocytochemistry after uptake with adsorbed or soluble tracer proteins showed that the antigen labeled portions of both prelysosomal pathways previously described in these cells (Gonnella, P.A., and M. R. Neutra, 1984, J. Cell Biol., 99:909-917). The function of this glycoprotein is not known, but inasmuch as it has been detected only in absorptive cells of suckling rat ileum, it may serve a function specific to these cells. Nevertheless, this endosomal antigen, designated glycoprotein (gp) 55-61, will serve as a useful marker for exploring membrane dynamics in early stages of the endocytic pathway. PMID:3305521

  13. Development of a Sensitive and Specific Antigen-Detection System for Strongyloides Stercoralis and Hookworm Infections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    Development of a Sensitive and Specific Antigen-Detection System for Strongyloides Stercoralis and Hookworm Infections PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Helene...Stercoralis and Hookworm Infections 6. AUTHOR(S) Helene Paxton 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION Integrated...of S. stercoralis and human hookworms . Using commercial immunoreagents that were available during the time line of phase I, antibody capture DS

  14. Mouse anti-benzylpenicilloyl IgE monoclonal antibody: preparation, characterization and cross-reactivity.

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, H; Misaki, R; Takeuchi, M; Niinomi, Y; Harada, M

    1987-01-01

    Anti-benzylpenicilloyl (BPO-) monoclonal antibody of the IgE class was prepared from spleens of immune C57BL/6 mice whose sera reacted with BPO-hapten, penicillin G(PCG) polymer, cephalothin (CET)-hapten and CET polymer. Affinity chromatography experiments showed that the haptenic specificity of the IgE monoclonal antibody (designated BIE-13CE) was directed mainly to phenylacetyl portion of BPO group. BIE-13CE antibody reacted on passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) assay with BPO-hapten, CET-hapten, cephaloridine-hapten and CET polymer, but did not react with PCG polymer, ampicillin-hapten, or cefazolin-hapten. These results indicated that the sera of the immune C57BL/6 mice contained IgE antibodies capable of cross-reacting at the monoclonal antibody level with various forms of eliciting antigens and that the cross-reactivity of the antibody could be ascribed essentially to the structural similarity of acyl side chains of the antibiotics. The structure of the CET polymer is also discussed in terms of its PCA reactivity with the monoclonal antibody and analytical and spectral data of the polymer. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3652521

  15. Atopic dermatitis: immune deviation, barrier dysfunction, IgE autoreactivity and new therapies.

    PubMed

    Furue, Masutaka; Chiba, Takahito; Tsuji, Gaku; Ulzii, Dugarmaa; Kido-Nakahara, Makiko; Nakahara, Takeshi; Kadono, Takafumi

    2017-01-02

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic or chronically relapsing, eczematous, severely pruritic skin disorder mostly associated with IgE elevation and skin barrier dysfunction due to decreased filaggrin expression. The lesional skin of AD exhibits Th2- and Th22-deviated immune reactions that are progressive during disease chronicity. Th2 and Th22 cytokines further deteriorate the skin barrier by inhibiting filaggrin expression. Some IgEs are reactive to self-antigens. The IgE autoreactivity may precipitate the chronicity of AD. Upon activation of the ORAI1 calcium channel, atopic epidermis releases large amounts of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), which initiates the Th2 and Th22 immune response. Th2-derived interleukin-31 and TSLP induce an itch sensation. Taken together, TSLP/Th2/Th22 pathway is a promising target for developing new therapeutics for AD. Enhancing filaggrin expression using ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor may also be an adjunctive measure to restore the disrupted barrier function specifically for AD.

  16. Inhibition of antigen-specific T lymphocyte activation by structurally related Ir gene-controlled polymers. II. Competitive inhibition of I-E- restricted, antigen-specific T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Our previous studies have defined a highly specific competitive inhibition between a pair of structurally related antigens (GT and GAT) for antigen presentation by accessory cells. The present report investigates this phenomenon in a second antigenic system, which is controlled by a distinct Ir gene product. Two GL phi-specific, I-Ed- restricted, interleukin 2-producing T cell hybridomas were constructed. The antigenic fine specificity of these two hybrid clones was distinct. One hybrid reacted solely with GL phi while the second cross-reacted with GLleu and GLT. These latter two copolymers, as well as the antigen GL, were found to inhibit the GL phi response of the non-cross-reactive hybrid. The structurally related antigen G phi was not inhibitory for this clone's response. The cross-reactive GL phi hybrid could also be inhibited, but, in this case, G phi and not GL caused the inhibition. Reciprocal inhibitions could be demonstrated between these and other hybrids (e.g., GAT responsive), indicating a very high degree of specificity to the inhibition. The inhibition caused by the various copolymers was reversible by increasing the concentration of GL phi, This effect was localized to the antigen-presenting cell and not the T cell hybridoma. Functionally, this competition did not appear to be for antigen uptake or general antigen processing. These findings generalize the phenomenon of antigen competition to a second antigen system in the context of a second Ia molecule. The possible mechanisms accounting for the complex pattern of specificities in this system are discussed. PMID:6210339

  17. Taming the TCR: antigen-specific immunotherapeutic agents for autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Evan L; Cloake, Nancy C; Greer, Judith M

    2015-01-01

    Current treatments for autoimmune diseases are typically non-specific anti-inflammatory agents that affect not only the autoreactive cells but also the parts of the immune system that are required to maintain health. There is a need for the development of antigen-specific therapeutic agents that can effectively prevent the autoimmune attack while leaving the rest of the immune system functioning as normal. The simplest way to achieve this is using the autoantigen itself as a tolerizing agent; however, there is some risk involved with administering a potentially pathogenic antigen. In this review, we focus instead on the development and use of modified T cell receptor (TCR) ligands, in which the peptide ligand is modified to change the response by the T cell from a disease inducing to a protective response, and still retain the antigen-specificity necessary to target the autoreactive T cells. We review the use of modified TCR ligands as therapeutic agents in animal models of autoimmunity and in human autoimmune disease, and finally consider how they need to be improved in order to use them effectively in patients with autoimmune disease.

  18. Killer artificial antigen-presenting cells: a novel strategy to delete specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Christian; Fleck, Martin; Mackensen, Andreas; Zoso, Alessia; Halbritter, Dagmar; Schneck, Jonathan P; Oelke, Mathias

    2008-04-01

    Several cell-based immunotherapy strategies have been developed to specifically modulate T cell-mediated immune responses. These methods frequently rely on the utilization of tolerogenic cell-based antigen-presenting cells (APCs). However, APCs are highly sensitive to cytotoxic T-cell responses, thus limiting their therapeutic capacity. Here, we describe a novel bead-based approach to modulate T-cell responses in an antigen-specific fashion. We have generated killer artificial APCs (kappaaAPCs) by coupling an apoptosis-inducing alpha-Fas (CD95) IgM mAb together with HLA-A2 Ig molecules onto beads. These kappaaAPCs deplete targeted antigen-specific T cells in a Fas/Fas ligand (FasL)-dependent fashion. T-cell depletion in cocultures is rapidly initiated (30 minutes), dependent on the amount of kappaaAPCs and independent of activation-induced cell death (AICD). kappaaAPCs represent a novel technology that can control T cell-mediated immune responses, and therefore has potential for use in treatment of autoimmune diseases and allograft rejection.

  19. Free Prostate-Specific Antigen Provides More Precise Data on Benign Prostate Volume Than Total Prostate-Specific Antigen in Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoon; Park, Jae Young; Shim, Ji Sung; Kim, Jae Heon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the efficacy of total prostate-specific antigen (tPSA) and free prostate-specific antigen (fPSA) for the estimation of prostate volume (PV) in pathologically-proven benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients. Methods From January 2010 to March 2013, 165 Korean men with a PSA less than 10 ng/mL who were diagnosed without prostate cancer by prostate biopsy were enrolled. Patients were classified into three age groups: ≤60, 61-70, and >70 years old. The results were organized to estimate and compare the ability of serum tPSA and fPSA to assess the PV. Results Enrolled patients had a median age of 63.5 years (44 to 80), a median tPSA of 5.72 ng/mL, a median fPSA of 0.98 ng/mL and a median PV of 53.68 mL, respectively. Among the associations between tPSA, fPSA, age, and PV, the highest correlation was verified between fPSA and PV (r=0.377, P<0.0001); the correlation coefficient between tPSA and PV was much lower (r=0.262, P<0.001). All stratified age cohorts showed the same findings. The ROC curves (for PV greater than 30, 40, and 50 mL) showed that fPSA (area under the curve [AUC]=0.781, 0.718, and 0.700) outperformed tPSA (AUC=0.657, 0.583, and 0.67) in its ability to predict clinically significant PV enlargement. Conclusion Both tPSA and fPSA significantly correlated with PV in Korean men, while the correlation efficiency between fPSA and PV was more powerful. fPSA may be a useful tool in making therapeutic decisions and follow-up management in BPH patients. PMID:23869271

  20. Interpreting IgE sensitization tests in food allergy.

    PubMed

    Chokshi, Niti Y; Sicherer, Scott H

    2016-01-01

    Food allergies are increasing in prevalence, and with it, IgE testing to foods is becoming more commonplace. Food-specific IgE tests, including serum assays and prick skin tests, are sensitive for detecting the presence of food-specific IgE (sensitization), but specificity for predicting clinical allergy is limited. Therefore, positive tests are generally not, in isolation, diagnostic of clinical disease. However, rationale test selection and interpretation, based on clinical history and understanding of food allergy epidemiology and pathophysiology, makes these tests invaluable. Additionally, there exist highly predictive test cutoff values for common allergens in atopic children. Newer testing methodologies, such as component resolved diagnostics, are promising for increasing the utility of testing. This review highlights the use of IgE serum tests in the diagnosis of food allergy.

  1. PD-1 expression conditions T cell avidity within an antigen-specific repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Sylvain; Vignard, Virginie; Florenceau, Laetitia; Dreno, B.; Khammari, A.; Lang, F.; Labarriere, N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite its negative regulatory role on tumor-specific T cells, Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) is also a marker of activated tumor-infiltrating T cells. In cancer, PD-1 blockade partially reverses T cell dysfunction allowing the amplification of tumor reactive T cells. Here, we investigated the role of PD-1 signaling on effector/memory human T cells specific for shared melanoma antigens, derived from blood. We documented for the first time the existence of melanoma-specific T cell clones unable to express PD-1. This stable feature was due to the persistent methylation of the PDCD1 promoter. These PD-1neg clones were of lower avidity than their PD-1pos counterparts, suggesting that high-affinity-specific T cell clones unable to express PD-1 are not or rarely present in peripheral blood, as they are probably eliminated by negative selection, due to their high reactivity. We also documented the existence of such PD-1neg T cell clones in melanoma tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), which also exhibited a lower functional avidity than PD-1pos TIL clones. This clearly shows that PD-1 expression identifies antigen-specific T cell clonotypes of high functional avidity. Finally, we demonstrated that PD-1 blockade during the in vitro selection process of Melan-A-specific T cells favored the amplification of higher avidity T cell clonotypes. This preferential amplification of high-avidity memory T cells upon PD-1 blockade resonates with the expansion of reactive T cells, including neo-antigen-specific T cells observed in anti-PD-1-treated patients. This feature should also be a useful biomarker of clinical efficiency, while providing new insights for adoptive transfer treatments. PMID:26942093

  2. Tetanus toxoid IgE may be useful in predicting allergy during childhood.

    PubMed

    Ciprandi, G; De Amici, M; Quaglini, S; Labò, E; Castellazzi, A M; Miraglia Del Giudice, M; Marseglia, A; Bianchi, L; Moratti, R; Marseglia, G L

    2012-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions after immunization with tetanus toxoid are occasionally observed in atopic and non-atopic individuals. High IgE levels in infancy may predict subsequent allergy. The aims of this study were: i) to evaluate the role of specific IgE to tetanus toxoid in children in response to tetanus immunization and the possible factors associated with specific IgE levels, and ii) to investigate the correlation between specific IgE levels to tetanus toxoid and the late development of allergy (up to 12 years). Initially, 278 healthy infants (152 males and 126 females, aged 12 months) living in an urban city were screened for serum total IgE and specific IgE to tetanus toxoid, after having obtained informed consent from parents. After 12 years, 151 children could be evaluated. Total IgE summed with tetanus specific IgE were significantly associated with allergy at 12 years. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that serum total IgE and tetanus specific IgE may be predictive of subsequent allergy onset.

  3. Inhibition of effector antigen-specific T cells by intradermal administration of heme oxygenase-1 inducers.

    PubMed

    Simon, Thomas; Pogu, Julien; Rémy, Séverine; Brau, Frédéric; Pogu, Sylvie; Maquigneau, Maud; Fonteneau, Jean-François; Poirier, Nicolas; Vanhove, Bernard; Blancho, Gilles; Piaggio, Eliane; Anegon, Ignacio; Blancou, Philippe

    2017-03-22

    Developing protocols aimed at inhibiting effector T cells would be key for the treatment of T cell-dependent autoimmune diseases including type 1 autoimmune diabetes (T1D) and multiple sclerosis (MS). While heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inducers are clinically approved drugs for non-immune-related diseases, they do have immunosuppressive properties when administered systemically in rodents. Here we show that HO-1 inducers inhibit antigen-specific effector T cells when injected intradermally together with the T cell cognate antigens in mice. This phenomenon was observed in both a CD8(+) T cell-mediated model of T1D and in a CD4(+) T cell-dependent MS model. Intradermal injection of HO-1 inducers induced the recruitment of HO-1(+) monocyte-derived dendritic cell (MoDCs) exclusively to the lymph nodes (LN) draining the site of intradermal injection. After encountering HO-1(+)MoDCs, effector T-cells exhibited a lower velocity and a reduced ability to migrate towards chemokine gradients resulting in impaired accumulation to the inflamed organ. Intradermal co-injection of a clinically approved HO-1 inducer and a specific antigen to non-human primates also induced HO-1(+) MoDCs to accumulate in dermal draining LN and to suppress delayed-type hypersensitivity. Therefore, in both mice and non-human primates, HO-1 inducers delivered locally inhibited effector T-cells in an antigen-specific manner, paving the way for repositioning these drugs for the treatment of immune-mediated diseases.

  4. Splenic B cells and antigen-specific B cells process anti-Ig in a similar manner

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, C.D.; Vitetta, E.S.

    1989-06-01

    B lymphocytes can process and present antigen to T cells. However, the fate of native antigen after its binding to specific B cells, i.e., the intracellular events involved in the processing and recycling of the antigenic fragments to the cell surface for antigen presentation, are not well understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that murine B cells degrade anti-Ig molecules bound to their surface and release acid soluble fragments into the supernatant. We also demonstrate that the kinetics of this process are identical for anti-mu, anti-delta, and anti-light chain antibodies, indicating that both surface IgM and surface IgD are equally effective in binding antigen and directing its processing. We also describe the effects of azide, chloroquine, and irradiation on this process. To extend these studies to the processing of specifically bound antigen, we demonstrate that highly purified trinitrophenyl antigen-binding cells degrade anti-Ig molecules with the same kinetics as unpurified splenic B cells. Thus, this purified population provides a suitable model system for the analysis of antigen degradation by antigen-specific cells.

  5. Specific Fluorine Labeling of the HyHEL10 Antibody Affects Antigen Binding and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Acchione, Mauro; Lee, Yi-Chien; DeSantis, Morgan E.; Lipschultz, Claudia A.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Li, Mi; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Walter, Richard L.; Smith-Gill, Sandra; Barchi, Jr., Joseph J.

    2012-10-16

    To more fully understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for variations in binding affinity with antibody maturation, we explored the use of site specific fluorine labeling and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Several single-chain (scFv) antibodies, derived from an affinity-matured series of anti-hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) mouse IgG1, were constructed with either complete or individual replacement of tryptophan residues with 5-fluorotryptophan ({sup 5F}W). An array of biophysical techniques was used to gain insight into the impact of fluorine substitution on the overall protein structure and antigen binding. SPR measurements indicated that {sup 5F}W incorporation lowered binding affinity for the HEL antigen. The degree of analogue impact was residue-dependent, and the greatest decrease in affinity was observed when {sup 5F}W was substituted for residues near the binding interface. In contrast, corresponding crystal structures in complex with HEL were essentially indistinguishable from the unsubstituted antibody. {sup 19}F NMR analysis showed severe overlap of signals in the free fluorinated protein that was resolved upon binding to antigen, suggesting very distinct chemical environments for each {sup 5F}W in the complex. Preliminary relaxation analysis suggested the presence of chemical exchange in the antibody-antigen complex that could not be observed by X-ray crystallography. These data demonstrate that fluorine NMR can be an extremely useful tool for discerning structural changes in scFv antibody-antigen complexes with altered function that may not be discernible by other biophysical techniques.

  6. Profiling Humoral Immune Responses to Clostridium difficile-Specific Antigens by Protein Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Negm, Ola H.; Hamed, Mohamed R.; Dilnot, Elizabeth M.; Shone, Clifford C.; Marszalowska, Izabela; Lynch, Mark; Loscher, Christine E.; Edwards, Laura J.; Tighe, Patrick J.; Wilcox, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, Gram-positive, and spore-forming bacterium that is the leading worldwide infective cause of hospital-acquired and antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Several studies have reported associations between humoral immunity and the clinical course of C. difficile infection (CDI). Host humoral immune responses are determined using conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques. Herein, we report the first use of a novel protein microarray assay to determine systemic IgG antibody responses against a panel of highly purified C. difficile-specific antigens, including native toxins A and B (TcdA and TcdB, respectively), recombinant fragments of toxins A and B (TxA4 and TxB4, respectively), ribotype-specific surface layer proteins (SLPs; 001, 002, 027), and control proteins (tetanus toxoid and Candida albicans). Microarrays were probed with sera from a total of 327 individuals with CDI, cystic fibrosis without diarrhea, and healthy controls. For all antigens, precision profiles demonstrated <10% coefficient of variation (CV). Significant correlation was observed between microarray and ELISA in the quantification of antitoxin A and antitoxin B IgG. These results indicate that microarray is a suitable assay for defining humoral immune responses to C. difficile protein antigens and may have potential advantages in throughput, convenience, and cost. PMID:26178385

  7. Profiling Humoral Immune Responses to Clostridium difficile-Specific Antigens by Protein Microarray Analysis.

    PubMed

    Negm, Ola H; Hamed, Mohamed R; Dilnot, Elizabeth M; Shone, Clifford C; Marszalowska, Izabela; Lynch, Mark; Loscher, Christine E; Edwards, Laura J; Tighe, Patrick J; Wilcox, Mark H; Monaghan, Tanya M

    2015-09-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, Gram-positive, and spore-forming bacterium that is the leading worldwide infective cause of hospital-acquired and antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Several studies have reported associations between humoral immunity and the clinical course of C. difficile infection (CDI). Host humoral immune responses are determined using conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques. Herein, we report the first use of a novel protein microarray assay to determine systemic IgG antibody responses against a panel of highly purified C. difficile-specific antigens, including native toxins A and B (TcdA and TcdB, respectively), recombinant fragments of toxins A and B (TxA4 and TxB4, respectively), ribotype-specific surface layer proteins (SLPs; 001, 002, 027), and control proteins (tetanus toxoid and Candida albicans). Microarrays were probed with sera from a total of 327 individuals with CDI, cystic fibrosis without diarrhea, and healthy controls. For all antigens, precision profiles demonstrated <10% coefficient of variation (CV). Significant correlation was observed between microarray and ELISA in the quantification of antitoxin A and antitoxin B IgG. These results indicate that microarray is a suitable assay for defining humoral immune responses to C. difficile protein antigens and may have potential advantages in throughput, convenience, and cost.

  8. Gene Therapy Induces Antigen-Specific Tolerance in Experimental Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jirholt, Pernilla; Turesson, Olof; Wing, Kajsa; Holmdahl, Rikard; Kihlberg, Jan; Stern, Anna; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill; Henningsson, Louise; Gustafsson, Kenth; Gjertsson, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigate induction of immunological tolerance by lentiviral based gene therapy in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, collagen II-induced arthritis (CIA). Targeting the expression of the collagen type II (CII) to antigen presenting cells (APCs) induced antigen-specific tolerance, where only 5% of the mice developed arthritis as compared with 95% of the control mice. In the CII-tolerized mice, the proportion of Tregs as well as mRNA expression of SOCS1 (suppressors of cytokine signaling 1) increased at day 3 after CII immunization. Transfer of B cells or non-B cell APC, as well as T cells, from tolerized to naïve mice all mediated a certain degree of tolerance. Thus, sustainable tolerance is established very early during the course of arthritis and is mediated by both B and non-B cells as APCs. This novel approach for inducing tolerance to disease specific antigens can be used for studying tolerance mechanisms, not only in CIA but also in other autoimmune diseases. PMID:27159398

  9. Allopurinol reduces antigen-specific and polyclonal activation of human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Mazliah, Damián; Albareda, María C.; Alvarez, María G.; Lococo, Bruno; Bertocchi, Graciela L.; Petti, Marcos; Viotti, Rodolfo J.; Laucella, Susana A.

    2012-01-01

    Allopurinol is the most popular commercially available xanthine oxidase inhibitor and it is widely used for treatment of symptomatic hyperuricaemia, or gout. Although, several anti-inflammatory actions of allopurinol have been demonstrated in vivo and in vitro, there have been few studies on the action of allopurinol on T cells. In the current study, we have assessed the effect of allopurinol on antigen-specific and mitogen-driven activation and cytokine production in human T cells. Allopurinol markedly decreased the frequency of IFN-γ and IL-2-producing T cells, either after polyclonal or antigen-specific stimulation with Herpes Simplex virus 1, Influenza (Flu) virus, tetanus toxoid and Trypanosoma cruzi-derived antigens. Allopurinol attenuated CD69 upregulation after CD3 and CD28 engagement and significantly reduced the levels of spontaneous and mitogen-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species in T cells. The diminished T cell activation and cytokine production in the presence of allopurinol support a direct action of allopurinol on human T cells, offering a potential pharmacological tool for the management of cell-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:23049532

  10. Analysis of cellular phenotype during in vitro immunization of murine splenocytes for generating antigen-specific immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Takashi; Yoshimi, Tatsunari; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Kawahara, Masahiro; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2013-03-01

    Although various in vitro immunization methods to generate antigen-specific antibodies have been described, a highly effective method that can generate high-affinity immunoglobulins has not yet been reported. Herein, we analyzed a cellular phenotype during in vitro immunization of murine splenocytes for generating antigen-specific immunoglobulins. We identified a combination of T cell-dependent stimuli (IL-4, IL-5, anti-CD38 and anti-CD40 antibodies) plus lipopolysaccharides (LPS) that stimulates antigen-exposed splenocytes in vitro, followed by induction of the cells phenotypically equivalent to germinal center B cells. We also observed that LPS induced high expression levels of mRNA for activation-induced cytidine deaminase. We stimulated antigen-exposed splenocytes, followed by the accumulation of mutations in immunoglobulin genes. From the immunized splenocytes, hybridoma clones secreting antigen-specific immunoglobulins were obtained.

  11. Epitopes of HERV-Wenv induce antigen-specific humoral immunity in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Mameli, Giuseppe; Cossu, Davide; Cocco, Eleonora; Frau, Jessica; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Niegowska, Magdalena; Sechi, Leonardo Antonio

    2015-03-15

    To verify the serological response mounted against antigenic peptides from HERV-Wenv protein, we analyzed 80 multiple sclerosis (MS) serum samples, 27 of which were re-analyzed after a 6-month follow-up IFN-β therapy, and 73 healthy controls. Indirect ELISAs were carried out to detect antibodies specific for all the synthetic peptides derived from HERV-Wenv. Two antigenic peptides, HERV-Wenv93-108 (31.25%, p<0.0001) and HERV-Wenv248-262 (15%, p=0.02), were highly recognized by MS patients' antibodies when compared to healthy subjects. Moreover, antibody titer against these two peptides slightly decreased after six months of IFN-β-based therapy.

  12. Antigen-specific and non-specific CD4{sup +} T cell recruitment and proliferation during influenza infection

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Timothy J.; Castrucci, Maria R.; Padrick, Ryan C.; Bradley, Linda M.; Topham, David J. . E-mail: david_topham@urmc.rochester.edu

    2005-09-30

    To track epitope-specific CD4{sup +} T cells at a single-cell level during influenza infection, the MHC class II-restricted OVA{sub 323-339} epitope was engineered into the neuraminidase stalk of influenza/A/WSN, creating a surrogate viral antigen. The recombinant virus, influenza A/WSN/OVA{sub II}, replicated well, was cleared normally, and stimulated both wild-type and DO11.10 or OT-II TCR transgenic OVA-specific CD4{sup +} T cells. OVA-specific CD4 T cells proliferated during infection only when the OVA epitope was present. However, previously primed (but not naive) transgenic CD4{sup +} T cells were recruited to the infected lung both in the presence and absence of the OVA{sub 323-339} epitope. These data show that, when primed, CD4{sup +} T cells may traffic to the lung in the absence of antigen, but do not proliferate. These results also document a useful tool for the study of CD4 T cells in influenza infection.

  13. Effect of prolactin on carcinoembryonic antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response induced by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Matera, L; Beltramo, E; Martinuzzi, E; Buttiglieri, S

    2004-08-01

    The cytokine hormone prolactin (PRL) has been shown previously to modulate native cellular responses and maturation of antigen-presenting cells. Here we have addressed its effect on the antigen-specific response of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). CTL were generated from HLA-A2 lymphocytes after three rounds of stimulation with autologous dendritic cells loaded with HLA-A2-restricted carcinoembrionic antigen (CEA) Cap-1 (YLSGANLNL) peptide. Selected cultures were expanded on cytokine-supplemented feeder-layers, enriched for CD8+ lymphocytes and analysed for PRL-receptor (PRL-R) expression and PRL responsiveness. Resting CD8+ lymphocytes were negative for PRL-R, whereas antigen-activated CD8+ lymphocytes derived from long-term cultures were highly positive. Results of a 51Cr release assay showed CTL killing of CEA-loaded, but not unloaded, T2 cell line and the CEA-positive gastric carcinoma cell line KATO, but not of the CEA-negative T leukaemia cell line Jurkat. Interferon (IFN)-gamma release, evaluated in an ELISPOT assay against CEA-loaded T2, was enhanced (P < 0.05) by concentrations of PRL (12-25 ng/ml) very close to the physiological levels (6-20 ng/ml), but was decreased (P < 0.05) by high concentrations (200 ng/ml). Pre-incubation of the stimulators with the anti-MHC class I MoAb W6.32 induced a 40-60% decrease of the PRL-boosted IFN-gamma release, thus proving the MHC restriction of the lymphocyte response. Cytotoxicity against CEA-loaded T2 and KATO cell lines was also increased by 12-25 ng (P < 0.05) and decreased (P < 0.05) by 200 ng PRL. Pre-incubation of CTL with an antibody specific for the PRL-R almost completely abrogated this effect.

  14. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Zaunders, John James; Kelleher, Anthony Dominic

    2015-08-12

    A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants) and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated.

  15. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Zaunders, John James; Kelleher, Anthony Dominic

    2015-01-01

    A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants) and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated. PMID:26274954

  16. Antibodies to Mycobacterium paratuberculosis-specific protein antigens in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Elsaghier, A; Prantera, C; Moreno, C; Ivanyi, J

    1992-01-01

    The possible role of infection with Mycobacterium paratuberculosis (MAP) for the etiopathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD) has been a matter of long-term controversy. In addition to similarities with the pathology of ruminant paratuberculosis, DNA fingerprinting confirmed the organism isolated from gut tissue, but the specificity of the immune repertoire has not as yet been evaluated. We report here on a serological study of 29 patients with CD, 20 patients with ulcerative colitis and 18 healthy control subjects, using three antigens attributed with species-specificity and selective immunogenicity following MAP infection. Antibodies binding to the 38-kD band of MAP extract were demonstrable by the Western blot technique in 57% of CD patients. Antibody levels to the 24-kD (p24BCD) cathodic bands, determined by competition ELISA using a monospecific murine antiserum, and to the 18-kD protease-resistant purified bacterioferritin, detected by standard ELISA, were significantly elevated in 53% of CD patients. However, these three antibody specificities tested in individual CD patients did not show any correlation with each other. Thus, 18% of patients were positive for all three specificities, whilst 84% had antibodies to at least one of the specific antigens. Although the exact proportion of affected patients is yet to be defined, the serological results obtained support the view that MAP infection may play an etiological role in Crohn's disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:1281056

  17. Specific Nongluten Proteins of Wheat Are Novel Target Antigens in Celiac Disease Humoral Response

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    While the antigenic specificity and pathogenic relevance of immunologic reactivity to gluten in celiac disease have been extensively researched, the immune response to nongluten proteins of wheat has not been characterized. We aimed to investigate the level and molecular specificity of antibody response to wheat nongluten proteins in celiac disease. Serum samples from patients and controls were screened for IgG and IgA antibody reactivity to a nongluten protein extract from the wheat cultivar Triticum aestivum Butte 86. Antibodies were further analyzed for reactivity to specific nongluten proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. Immunoreactive molecules were identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Compared with healthy controls, patients exhibited significantly higher levels of antibody reactivity to nongluten proteins. The main immunoreactive nongluten antibody target proteins were identified as serpins, purinins, α-amylase/protease inhibitors, globulins, and farinins. Assessment of reactivity toward purified recombinant proteins further confirmed the presence of antibody response to specific antigens. The results demonstrate that, in addition to the well-recognized immune reaction to gluten, celiac disease is associated with a robust humoral response directed at a specific subset of the nongluten proteins of wheat. PMID:25329597

  18. Highly specific expression of luciferase gene in lungs of naive nude mice directed by prostate-specific antigen promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hongwei; Li Jinzhong; Helm, Gregory A.; Pan Dongfeng . E-mail: Dongfeng_pan@yahoo.com

    2005-09-09

    PSA promoter has been demonstrated the utility for tissue-specific toxic gene therapy in prostate cancer models. Characterization of foreign gene overexpression in normal animals elicited by PSA promoter should help evaluate therapy safety. Here we constructed an adenovirus vector (AdPSA-Luc), containing firefly luciferase gene under the control of the 5837 bp long prostate-specific antigen promoter. A charge coupled device video camera was used to non-invasively image expression of firefly luciferase in nude mice on days 3, 7, 11 after injection of 2 x 10{sup 9} PFU of AdPSA-Luc virus via tail vein. The result showed highly specific expression of the luciferase gene in lungs of mice from day 7. The finding indicates the potential limitations of the suicide gene therapy of prostate cancer based on selectivity of PSA promoter. By contrary, it has encouraging implications for further development of vectors via PSA promoter to enable gene therapy for pulmonary diseases.

  19. A study on human leukocyte antigen class I molecules in paediatric bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Mahendra N; Dudeja, Puja; Gupta, Rakesh K

    2014-04-01

    Childhood asthma, often associated with atopy, is more common in boys and may persist throughout life in 50% of cases. This case-control study was carried out to examine if any association of paediatric bronchial asthma with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I antigens. Thirty-six children with bronchial asthma diagnosed on basis of Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) criteria and an equal number of healthy controls without history of bronchial asthma were studied. Low resolution HLA- ABC typing was performed by sequence specific primers (SSP) and the frequency of HLA-ABC antigens in the two groups was compared. Total serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) estimation was done as a marker of atopy by ELISA. The study included 24 boys and 12 girls aged 13 months to 11 yrs, of which 16 (44%) had positive family history. Serum IgE levels were elevated in 20 (55%) of the cases and 33% of controls with peak values of 4877 and 627 IU/ml, respectively. No statistically significant correlation was observed between childhood asthma and HLA class I antigens, however, a statistically significant correlation was observed between serum IgE levels and asthma, which was elevated in cases, as compared to normal population. Serum IgE levels did not show a linear trend, in that a direct correlation with the severity of disease was not observed.

  20. IGES Interface for Medical 3-D Volume Data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gong; Yi, Hong; Ni, Zhonghua

    2005-01-01

    Although there are many medical image processing and virtual surgery systems that provide rather consummate 3D-visualization and data manipulation techniques, few of them can export the volume data for engineering analyze. The thesis presents an interface implementing IGES (initial graphics exchange specification). Volume data such as bones, skins and other tissues can be exported as IGES files to be directly used for engineering analysis.

  1. IgE reactivity to hen egg white allergens in dogs with cutaneous adverse food reactions.

    PubMed

    Shimakura, Hidekatsu; Uchiyama, Jumpei; Saito, Taku; Miyaji, Kazuki; Fujimura, Masato; Masuda, Kenichi; Okamoto, Noriaki; DeBoer, Douglas J; Sakaguchi, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    Dogs with cutaneous adverse food reactions (CAFR) often have specific IgE to food allergens. Egg white, which is majorly composed of ovomucoid, ovalbumin, ovotransferrin, and lysozyme, is a food allergen in dogs. Information of the IgE reactivity to purified egg white allergens supports accurate diagnosis and efficiency treatment in humans. However, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no studies on the IgE reactivity to purified egg white allergens in dogs. Here, we investigated the IgE reactivity to crude and purified allergens of hen egg white in dogs with CAFR. First, when we examined serum samples from 82 dogs with CAFR for specific IgE to crude egg white by ELISA, 9.8% (8/82) of the dogs with CAFR showed the IgE reactivity to crude egg white. We then used sera from the eight dogs with positive IgE reactivity to crude egg white to examine the IgE reactivity to four purified allergens, ovomucoid, ovalbumin, ovotransferrin, and lysozyme, by ELISA. We found that 75% (6/8) of the dogs showed IgE reactivity to both ovomucoid and ovalbumin, and that 37.5% (3/8) of the dogs showed IgE reactivity to ovotransferrin. None (0/8) showed IgE reactivity to lysozyme. Moreover, validating these results, the immunoblot analyses were performed using the sera of the three dogs showing the highest IgE reactivity to crude egg white. Both anti-ovomucoid and anti-ovalbumin IgE were detected in the sera of these dogs, while anti-ovotransferrin IgE was not detected. Considering these, ovomucoid and ovalbumin appears to be the major egg white allergens in dogs with CAFR.

  2. Presentation of antigen to T lymphocytes by non-immune B-cell hybridoma clones: evidence for specific and non-specific presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohly, H. H.; Morrison, D. R.; Zouhair Atassi, M. Z.

    1989-01-01

    Non-immune SJL (H-2s) spleen cells were fused with non-secreting, non-antigen presenting (H-2d) Balb/c 653-myeloma cells and the hybridomas were cloned by two limiting dilutions. The resulting hybrid B-cell clones were tested for their antigen presentation capability to SJL T-cell lines that were specific for either lysozyme or myoglobin. In proliferative assays, 53% of the antigen presenting B-cell clones presented both myoglobin and lysozyme (general presenters) while the other 47% presented specifically either myoglobin or lysozyme (specific presenters). The ability to selectively present either myoglobin or lysozyme indicates that antigen presentation at the clonal level can be specific or non-specific depending on the particular B-cell clone.

  3. Sequential transcriptional changes dictate safe and effective antigen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Burton, Bronwen R; Britton, Graham J; Fang, Hai; Verhagen, Johan; Smithers, Ben; Sabatos-Peyton, Catherine A; Carney, Laura J; Gough, Julian; Strobel, Stephan; Wraith, David C

    2014-09-03

    Antigen-specific immunotherapy combats autoimmunity or allergy by reinstating immunological tolerance to target antigens without compromising immune function. Optimization of dosing strategy is critical for effective modulation of pathogenic CD4(+) T-cell activity. Here we report that dose escalation is imperative for safe, subcutaneous delivery of the high self-antigen doses required for effective tolerance induction and elicits anergic, interleukin (IL)-10-secreting regulatory CD4(+) T cells. Analysis of the CD4(+) T-cell transcriptome, at consecutive stages of escalating dose immunotherapy, reveals progressive suppression of transcripts positively regulating inflammatory effector function and repression of cell cycle pathways. We identify transcription factors, c-Maf and NFIL3, and negative co-stimulatory molecules, LAG-3, TIGIT, PD-1 and TIM-3, which characterize this regulatory CD4(+) T-cell population and whose expression correlates with the immunoregulatory cytokine IL-10. These results provide a rationale for dose escalation in T-cell-directed immunotherapy and reveal novel immunological and transcriptional signatures as surrogate markers of successful immunotherapy.

  4. Sequential transcriptional changes dictate safe and effective antigen-specific immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Bronwen R.; Britton, Graham J.; Fang, Hai; Verhagen, Johan; Smithers, Ben; Sabatos-Peyton, Catherine A.; Carney, Laura J.; Gough, Julian; Strobel, Stephan; Wraith, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Antigen-specific immunotherapy combats autoimmunity or allergy by reinstating immunological tolerance to target antigens without compromising immune function. Optimization of dosing strategy is critical for effective modulation of pathogenic CD4+ T-cell activity. Here we report that dose escalation is imperative for safe, subcutaneous delivery of the high self-antigen doses required for effective tolerance induction and elicits anergic, interleukin (IL)-10-secreting regulatory CD4+ T cells. Analysis of the CD4+ T-cell transcriptome, at consecutive stages of escalating dose immunotherapy, reveals progressive suppression of transcripts positively regulating inflammatory effector function and repression of cell cycle pathways. We identify transcription factors, c-Maf and NFIL3, and negative co-stimulatory molecules, LAG-3, TIGIT, PD-1 and TIM-3, which characterize this regulatory CD4+ T-cell population and whose expression correlates with the immunoregulatory cytokine IL-10. These results provide a rationale for dose escalation in T-cell-directed immunotherapy and reveal novel immunological and transcriptional signatures as surrogate markers of successful immunotherapy. PMID:25182274

  5. Specific Detection of Antigen-Binding Cells by Localized Growth of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rotman, Boris; Cox, David R.

    1971-01-01

    A new method for the enumeration of lymphoid cells with specific surface-receptors for antigen is described, based on the use of β-D-galactosidase (EC 3.2.1.23), either directly as an antigen or as a conjugated antigen. Binding of β-D-galactosidase is revealed by its activity in releasing riboflavin from a synthetic substrate, riboflavin-β-D-galactopyranoside. The riboflavin, inactive as a vitamin in the galactosidic form, becomes active when released by the enzyme, and can be detected by bioassay. Hence, lymphoid cells with receptors for β-D-galactosidase on their surface can be detected after they have been exposed to the enzyme, washed, and then plated in agar containing riboflavin-β-D-galactopyranoside, streptomycin, riboflavin-deficient medium, and a streptomycin-resistant strain of Streptococcus faecalis that requires riboflavin. Release of riboflavin is signalled by the growth of characteristic bacterial colonies over the cell that bound β-D-galactosidase. Images PMID:5002817

  6. Seroprevalence of circulating Angiostrongylus vasorum antigen and parasite-specific antibodies in dogs from Portugal.

    PubMed

    Alho, Ana Margarida; Schnyder, Manuela; Schaper, Roland; Meireles, José; Belo, Silvana; Deplazes, Peter; de Carvalho, Luís Madeira

    2016-07-01

    Angiostrongylus vasorum is a nematode that lives in the pulmonary arteries and right cardiac ventricle of domestic dogs and wild canids. It is increasingly being reported in several European countries and North America. This parasite induces inflammatory verminous pneumonia, causing severe respiratory disease in dogs. In some instances, coagulopathies, neurological signs and even death may occur. Scant data are available regarding the occurrence of A. vasorum in Portugal. Therefore, sera of 906 shelter dogs from North to South mainland Portugal were collected. ELISAs to detect A. vasorum circulating antigen and specific antibodies against this parasite were performed. A total of six dogs [0.66 %, 95 % confidence intervals (CI) 0.24-1.43] were positive for both A. vasorum antigen and antibody detection, indicating an active infection, and 12 dogs (1.32 %, CI 0.68-2.30) were A. vasorum antibody-positive only. Regions with antigen- and antibody-positive animals overlapped and were distributed over nearly all sampled areas in the country. This is the first large-scale ELISA-based serological survey for A. vasorum in dogs from Portugal. The endemic occurrence of A. vasorum in dogs from different geographical areas of Portugal is therefore confirmed.

  7. ANTIGEN-SPECIFIC T LYMPHOCYTE PROLIFERATION DECREASES OVER TIME IN ADVANCED CHRONIC HEPATITIS C

    PubMed Central

    Morishima, Chihiro; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Rothman, Alan L.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Lindsay, Karen L.; Lee, William M.; Koziel, Margaret James; Fontana, Robert J.; Kim, Hae-Young; Wright, Elizabeth C.

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate T cell immunity in advanced liver disease, antigen-specific lymphoproliferative responses were prospectively studied in the context of the Hepatitis C Antiviral Long-term Treatment against Cirrhosis (HALT-C) trial. Peripheral blood responses to HCV, tetanus and Candida protein antigens were measured at baseline, Month 12 (M12), M24, M36 and M48 in 186 patients randomized to either low-dose PEG-IFN only or observation. Liver histology was evaluated at baseline, M24 and M48. Patients with cirrhosis (Ishak 5–6) were less likely to have positive lymphoproliferative responses to HCV at baseline than patients with fibrosis (15% vs 29%, p=0.03) and had lower levels of HCV c100 responses at baseline, M24 and M48 (p=0.11, p=0.05, p=0.02, respectively). For 97 patients with complete longitudinal data, the frequency of positive lymphoproliferative responses to HCV, tetanus and Candida antigens declined over time (p<0.003) and the slope of this decline was greater in the PEG-IFN treatment group than the observation group (p < 0.02). Lower levels of tetanus lymphoproliferative responses were associated with fibrosis progression and clinical outcomes (p=0.009). Poorer CD4+ T cell proliferative function is associated with more advanced liver disease in chronic hepatitis C, and may be further affected by long-term PEG-IFN treatment. PMID:22571902

  8. Intra and inter-laboratory reproducibility of a monoclonal antibody cocktail based ELISA for detection of allergen specific IgE in dogs: proficiency monitoring of macELISA in six laboratories.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kenneth W; Blankenship, Karen D; McCurry, Zachary M; McKinney, Brennan; Ruffner, Rick; Esch, Robert E; Tambone, Cecilia; Faas, Rebecca; Hermes, Darren; Brazis, Pilar; Drouet, Laurent

    2012-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of results yielded using a monoclonal antibody based ELISA for detection of allergen specific IgE when run in six separate affiliated laboratories. On two separate occasions, duplicate samples of 15 different sera pools were independently evaluated by each laboratory in a single blinded fashion. The average intra-assay variance among reactive assay calibrators in all laboratories was 6.2% (range 2.6-18.2%), while the average intra-laboratory inter-assay variance was 12.1% (range 8.0-17.1%). The overall inter-assay inter-laboratory variance was consistent among laboratories and averaged 15.6% (range 15.1-16.6%). All laboratories yielded similar profiles and magnitudes of responses for replicate unknown samples; dose-response profiles observed in each of the laboratories were indistinguishable. Considering positive/negative results, inter-assay inter-laboratory concordance of results exceeded 95%. Correlation of OD values between and among all laboratories was strong (r>0.9, p<0.001). Correlation of OD values between the two separate evaluations was also high for all allergens except olive, which was attributed to lot-to-lot differences of allergen coated wells. Collectively, the results demonstrated that the monoclonal antibody based ELISA for measuring allergen specific canine IgE is reproducible, and documents that consistency of results can be achieved not only in an individual laboratory, but between laboratories using the same monoclonal-based ELISA.

  9. Dendritic Cells in the Periphery Control Antigen-Specific Natural and Induced Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Sayuri; Morita, Akimichi

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells that regulate both immunity and tolerance. DCs in the periphery play a key role in expanding naturally occurring Foxp3+ CD25+ CD4+ regulatory T cells (Natural T-regs) and inducing Foxp3 expression (Induced T-regs) in Foxp3− CD4+ T cells. DCs are phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous, and further classified into several subsets depending on distinct marker expression and their location. Recent findings indicate the presence of specialized DC subsets that act to expand Natural T-regs or induce Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− CD4+ T cells. For example, two major subsets of DCs in lymphoid organs act differentially in inducing Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− cells or expanding Natural T-regs with model-antigen delivery by anti-DC subset monoclonal antibodies in vivo. Furthermore, DCs expressing CD103 in the intestine induce Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− CD4+ T cells with endogenous TGF-β and retinoic acid. In addition, antigen-presenting DCs have a capacity to generate Foxp3+ T-regs in the oral cavity where many antigens and commensals exist, similar to intestine and skin. In skin and skin-draining lymph nodes, at least six DC subsets have been identified, suggesting a complex DC-T-reg network. Here, we will review the specific activity of DCs in expanding Natural T-regs and inducing Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− precursors, and further discuss the critical function of DCs in maintaining tolerance at various locations including skin and oral cavity. PMID:23801989

  10. Postoperative Prostate-Specific Antigen Velocity Independently Predicts for Failure of Salvage Radiotherapy After Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R. Presti, Joseph C.; Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Spiotto, Michael T.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Identification of patients most likely to benefit from salvage radiotherapy (RT) using postoperative (postop) prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics. Methods and Materials: From 1984 to 2004, 81 patients who fit the following criteria formed the study population: undetectable PSA after radical prostatectomy (RP); pathologically negative nodes; biochemical relapse defined as a persistently detectable PSA; salvage RT; and two or more postop PSAs available before salvage RT. Salvage RT included the whole pelvic nodes in 55 patients and 4 months of total androgen suppression in 56 patients. The median follow-up was >5 years. All relapses were defined as a persistently detectable PSA. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards multivariable analysis were performed for all clinical, pathological, and treatment factors predicting for biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS). Results: There were 37 biochemical relapses observed after salvage RT. The 5-year bRFS after salvage RT for patients with postop prostate-specific antigen velocity {<=}1 vs. >1 ng/ml/yr was 59% vs. 29%, p = 0.002. In multivariate analysis, only postop PSAV (p = 0.0036), pre-RT PSA level {<=}1 (p = 0.037) and interval-to-relapse >10 months (p = 0.012) remained significant, whereas pelvic RT, hormone therapy, and RT dose showed a trend (p = {approx}0.06). PSAV, but not prostate-specific antigen doubling time, predicted successful salvage RT, suggesting an association of zero-order kinetics with locally recurrent disease. Conclusions: Postoperative PSA velocity independently predicts for the failure of salvage RT and can be considered in addition to high-risk features when selecting patients in need of systemic therapy following biochemical failure after RP. For well-selected patients, salvage RT can achieve high cure rates.

  11. Gamma delta T cells recognize a microbial encoded B Cell antigen to initiate a rapid antigen-specific Interleukin-17 response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gamma delta T cells contribute uniquely to host immune defense, but the way in which they do so remains an enigma. Here we show that an algae protein, phycoerythrin (PE) is recognized by gamma delta T cells from mice, bovine and humans and binds directly to specific gamma delta T cell antigen recept...

  12. Antibody specificity and antigen characterization of rat monoclonal antibodies against Streptococcus mutans cell wall-associated protein antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Ackermans, F; Klein, J P; Cormont, F; Bazin, H; Ogier, J A; Frank, R M; Vreven, J

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to Streptococcus mutans OMZ175 (serotype f) cell wall-associated antigens (wall-extracted antigens [WEA]) were derived from the fusion of Lou C plasmocytoma rat cells (IR 983 F) and spleen cells from Wistar R inbred rats immunized with WEA. Four cell lines producing monoclonal antibodies directed against a component of S. mutans WEA have been established. All four monoclonal antibodies reacted only with two antigens of WEA from S. mutans OMZ175 by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation techniques, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and competitive ELISA. Western blot analysis of WEA showed that the four monoclonal antibodies recognized two related cell wall-associated proteins with apparent molecular weights of 125,000 and 76,000. Immunoprecipitation of whole cells with the monoclonal antibodies confirmed the surface localization of the two antigens. The ELISA and competitive ELISA were used to analyze the distribution of the epitopes on seven S. mutans serotypes. All S. mutans serotypes were found to express the recognized epitopes; however, different reactivity patterns could be distinguished among the various strains tested, and the four monoclonal antibodies reacted only weakly with S. mutans serotypes d and g. Images PMID:2410364

  13. Inhibition of CD23-mediated IgE transcytosis suppresses the initiation and development of airway allergic inflammation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The epithelium lining the airway tract and allergen-specific IgE are considered essential controllers of inflammatory responses to allergens. The human IgE receptor, CD23 (Fc'RII), is capable of transporting IgE or IgE-allergen complexes across the polarized human airway epithelial cell (AEC) monola...

  14. Novel use of a radiolabelled antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen for the detection of occult abscesses in mammals

    DOEpatents

    Thakur, M.L.

    1990-04-17

    The invention discloses improved reagents containing antibodies against stage specific embryonic antigen-1 antibodies and improved methods for detection of occult abscess and inflammation using the improved reagents. No Drawings

  15. Identification of antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies using high-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju; Li, Ruihua; Liu, Kun; Li, Liangliang; Zai, Xiaodong; Chi, Xiangyang; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-22

    High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire provides a large number of antibody variable region sequences that can be used to generate human monoclonal antibodies. However, current screening methods for identifying antigen-specific antibodies are inefficient. In the present study, we developed an antibody clone screening strategy based on clone dynamics and relative frequency, and used it to identify antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that at least 52% of putative positive immunoglobulin heavy chains composed antigen-specific antibodies. Combining information on dynamics and relative frequency improved identification of positive clones and elimination of negative clones. and increase the credibility of putative positive clones. Therefore the screening strategy could simplify the subsequent experimental screening and may facilitate the generation of antigen-specific antibodies.

  16. [Prostate-specific antigen. The role in the prostate cancer diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, Luis Carlos; Paredes-Solís, César Armando; Hernández-Ordóñez, Octavio Francisco; Sánchez-Ruvalcaba, Itzel Rigel

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is a common malignant neoplasia in males over 50 years. The serum level of prostate specific antigen (PSA) is a tool in the diagnosis of PC and benign prostatic hyperplasia patients that improves the efficiency obtained with the digital rectal examination. The use of PSA increases the detection rates of organ-confined PC. The PSA must be requested by the primary care physician in male population over 45 years and if the result is above the normal levels, the patient must be send to an urologist.

  17. Direct radiolabeling of antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen for diagnostic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, B.A.

    1994-09-13

    Antibodies against stage specific embryonic antigen-1 is radiolabeled by direct means with a radionuclide for use in detection of occult abscess and inflammation. Radiolabeling is accomplished by partial reduction of the disulfide bonds of the antibody using Sn(II), or using other reducing agents followed by the addition of Sn(II), removal of excess reducing agent and reduction by-products, and addition of a specified amount of radionuclide reducing agent, such as stannous tartrate. The resulting product may be stored frozen or lyophilized, with radiolabeling accomplished by the addition of the radionuclide. No Drawings

  18. Clinical Experience with (18)F-Labeled Small Molecule Inhibitors of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Steven P; Gorin, Michael A; Salas Fragomeni, Roberto A; Drzezga, Alexander; Pomper, Martin G

    2017-04-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common noncutaneous malignancy diagnosed in men. Despite the large number of men who will suffer from PCa at some point during their lives, conventional imaging modalities for this important disease (contrast-enhanced computed tomography, bone scan, and MR imaging) have provided only marginal to moderate success in appropriately guiding patient management in certain clinical contexts. In this review, the authors discuss radiofluorinated small molecule radiotracers that have been developed to bind to the transmembrane glycoprotein prostate-specific membrane antigen, a target that is nearly universally overexpressed on PCa epithelial cells.

  19. Direct radiolabeling of antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen for diagnostic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, Buck A.

    1994-01-01

    Antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen-1 is radiolabeled by direct means with a radionuclide for use in detection of occult abscess and inflammation. Radiolabeling is accomplished by partial reduction of the disulfide bonds of the antibody using Sn(II), or using other reducing agents followed by the addition of Sn(II), removal of excess reducing agent and reduction by-products, and addition of a specified amount of radionuclide reducing agent, such as stannous tartrate. The resulting product may be store frozen or lyophilized, with radiolabeling accomplished by the addition of the radionuclide.

  20. Stage-specific embryonic antigen: determining expression in canine glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weiming; Modiano, Jaime F; Ito, Daisuke

    2017-03-30

    The expression of stage-specific embryonic antigens (SSEAs) was determined in several types of canine cancer cells. Flow cytometry showed SSEA-1 expression in glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells, although none expressed SSEA-3 or SSEA-4. Expression of SSEA-1 was not detected in lymphoma, osteosarcoma, or hemangiosarcoma cell lines. Relatively stable SSEA-1 expression was observed between 24 and 72 h of culture. After 8 days in culture, sorted SSEA-1(-) and SSEA-1(+) cells re-established SSEA-1 expression to levels comparable to those observed in unsorted cells. Our results document, for the first time, the expression of SSEA-1 in several canine cancer cell lines.

  1. Sensitive and selective detection of prostate-specific antigen using a photonic crystal nanolaser.

    PubMed

    Hachuda, Shoji; Watanabe, Takumi; Takahashi, Daichi; Baba, Toshihiko

    2016-06-13

    The detection of low-concentration biomarkers is expected to facilitate the early diagnosis of severe diseases, including malignant tumors. Using photonic crystal nanolaser sensors, we detected prostate-specific antigen (PSA) from a concentration of 1 fM, which is difficult to detect by conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The signal intensity and stability were improved by using a surfactant (i.e., ethanolamine). Even when a contaminant such as bovine serum albumin was mixed into the PSA sample, thereby increasing the concentration of the contaminant ten billion times, it was still possible to maintain a high level of detection.

  2. Nanostructured materials detect epidermal growth factor receptor, neuron specific enolase and carcinoembryonic antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Comnea-Stancu, Ionela Raluca; Surdu-Bob, Carmen Cristina; Badulescu, Marius

    2015-09-01

    New nanostructured materials based on thin films of Cu and Ni deposited on textile material (veil), as well as gold nanostructured microspheres were used for the design of new stochastic sensors. The stochastic sensors were able to detect simultaneously a panel of biomarkers comprising epidermal growth factor receptor, neuron specific enolase, and carcinoembryonic antigen from whole blood samples with high reliabilities - recovery tests higher than 97.00%, with a RSD (%) lower than 0.1%. The stochastic sensors had shown high sensitivities and low determination levels for the detection of the proposed panel of biomarkers making early detection of lung cancer possible by fast screening of whole blood.

  3. Mitochondria are required for antigen-specific T cell activation through reactive oxygen species signaling.

    PubMed

    Sena, Laura A; Li, Sha; Jairaman, Amit; Prakriya, Murali; Ezponda, Teresa; Hildeman, David A; Wang, Chyung-Ru; Schumacker, Paul T; Licht, Jonathan D; Perlman, Harris; Bryce, Paul J; Chandel, Navdeep S

    2013-02-21

    It is widely appreciated that T cells increase glycolytic flux during activation, but the role of mitochondrial flux is unclear. Here, we have shown that mitochondrial metabolism in the absence of glucose metabolism is sufficient to support interleukin-2 (IL-2) induction. Furthermore, we used mice with reduced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) production in T cells (T-Uqcrfs(-/-) mice) to show that mitochondria are required for T cell activation to produce mROS for activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and subsequent IL-2 induction. These mice could not induce antigen-specific expansion of T cells in vivo, but Uqcrfs1(-/-) T cells retained the ability to proliferate in vivo under lymphopenic conditions. This suggests that Uqcrfs1(-/-) T cells were not lacking bioenergetically but rather lacked specific ROS-dependent signaling events needed for antigen-specific expansion. Thus, mitochondrial metabolism is a critical component of T cell activation through the production of complex III ROS.

  4. [Immunochemical determination of placenta-specific and interorganic antigens in placental extract and blood serum in pregnant rats].

    PubMed

    Kan, M F; Krivonosov, S K; Tatarinova, Iu S

    1985-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that placenta extract of rats contains up to 14 antigens. Moreover, 11 of them are interorgan proteins of wide and limited specificity, two antigens (alpha 1- and alpha 2-globulins) are attributed to acute-phase proteins typical for pregnancy. beta 1-Globulin is a specific protein of rat placenta. The content of these antigens in blood serum increases with pregnancy and reaches a maximum toward the delivery; 3-4 days after delivery beta 1-globulin disappears completely from maternal blood, whereas the concentration of acute-phase proteins drops to the initial level.

  5. Prior stimulation of antigen-presenting cells with Lactobacillus regulates excessive antigen-specific cytokine responses in vitro when compared with Bacteroides

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Masato; Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Hachimura, Satoshi; Hirayama, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Kikuji; Takahashi, Kyoko; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2007-01-01

    The development of allergy is related to differences in the intestinal microbiota. Therefore, it is suggested that the immune responses induced by different genera of bacteria might be regulated through adaptive as well as innate immunity. In this study, we examined whether antigen-specific immune responses were affected by stimulation with the different genera of intestinal bacteria in vitro. Mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells isolated from germ-free ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cell receptor transgenic (OVA-Tg) mice were stimulated with OVA and intestinal bacteria. Cecal contents from conventional mice but not germ-free mice could induce OVA-specific cytokine production. Among the murine intestinal bacteria, Bacteroides acidofaciens (BA) enhanced OVA-specific IFN-γ and IL-10 production while Lactobacillusjohnsonii (LA) increased OVA-specific IL-10 production only. The expression of cell surface molecules and cytokine production by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) from germ-free Balb/c mice were analyzed. BA increased the expression of MHC II and co-stimulatory molecules on APCs compared with LA. BA increased IL-6 and IL-10 production but induced less IL-12p40 than LA. To examine the effects of prior stimulation of APCs by intestinal bacteria on the induction of antigen-specific immune responses, cytokine production was determined following co-culture with OVA, CD4+ T cells from OVA-Tg mice, and APCs which were pre-stimulated with the bacteria or not. APCs pre-stimulated with LA did not enhance OVA-specific cytokine production while BA stimulated OVA-specific IL-10 production. These results suggest that the prior stimulation of intestinal immunocytes by Lactobacillus might regulate excessive antigen-specific cytokine responses via APCs when compared with prior stimulation by Bacteroides. PMID:19002998

  6. A gene cluster for the synthesis of serotype g-specific polysaccharide antigen in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Tsuzukibashi, Osamu; Saito, Masanori; Kobayashi, Taira; Umezawa, Koji; Nagahama, Fumio; Hiroi, Takachika; Hirasawa, Masatomo; Takada, Kazuko

    2014-04-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an important pathogen related to aggressively progressive periodontal breakdown in adolescents and adults. The species can be divided into six serotypes (a-f) according to their surface carbohydrate antigens. Recently, a new serotype g of A. actinomycetemcomitans was proposed. The aim of the present study was to sequence the gene cluster associated with the biosynthesis of the serotype g-specific polysaccharide antigen and develop serotype-specific primers for PCR assay to identify serotype g strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. The serotype-specific polysaccharide (SSPS) gene cluster of the NUM-Aa 4039 strain contained 21 genes in 21,842-bp nucleotides. The similarity of the SSPS gene cluster sequence was 96.7 % compared with that of the serotype e strain. Seventeen serotype g genes showed more than 90 % homology both in nucleotide and amino acids to the serotype e strain. Three additional genes with 1,579 bp in NUM-Aa 4039 were inserted into the corresponding ORF13 of the serotype e strain. The serotype g-specific primers were designed from the insertion region of NUM-Aa 4039. Serotypes of the a-f strains were not amplified by serotype-specific g primers; only NUM-Aa 4039 showed an amplicon band. The NUM-Aa 4039 strain was three genes in the SSPS gene cluster different from those of serotype e strain. The specific primers derived from these different regions are useful for identification and distribution of serotype g strain among A. actinomycetemcomitans from clinical samples.

  7. Antigen nature and complexity influence human antibody light chain usage and specificity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenneth; Shah, Hemangi; Muther, Jennifer J; Duke, Angie L; Haley, Kathleen; James, Judith A

    2016-05-27

    Human antibodies consist of a heavy chain and one of two possible light chains, kappa (κ) or lambda (λ). Here we tested how these two possible light chains influence the overall antibody response to polysaccharide and protein antigens by measuring light chain usage in human monoclonal antibodies from antibody secreting cells obtained following vaccination with Pneumovax23. Remarkably, we found that individuals displayed restricted light chain usage to certain serotypes and that lambda antibodies have different specificities and modes of cross-reactivity than kappa antibodies. Thus, at both the monoclonal (7 kappa, no lambda) and serum levels (145μg/mL kappa, 2.82μg/mL lambda), antibodies to cell wall polysaccharide were nearly always kappa. The pneumococcal reference serum 007sp was analyzed for light chain usage to 12 pneumococcal serotypes for which it is well characterized. Similar to results at the monoclonal level, certain serotypes tended to favor one of the light chains (14 and 19A, lambda; 6A and 23F, kappa). We also explored differences in light chain usage at the serum level to a variety of antigens. We examined serum antibodies to diphtheria toxin mutant CRM197 and Epstein-Barr virus protein EBNA-1. These responses tended to be kappa dominant (average kappa-to-lambda ratios of 4.52 and 9.72 respectively). Responses to the influenza vaccine were more balanced with kappa-to-lambda ratio averages having slight strain variations: seasonal H1N1, 1.1; H3N2, 0.96; B, 0.91. We conclude that antigens with limited epitopes tend to produce antibodies with restricted light chain usage and that in most individuals, antibodies with lambda light chains have specificities different and complementary to kappa-containing antibodies.

  8. Improvement in the specificity of assays for detection of antibody to hepatitis B core antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Weare, J A; Robertson, E F; Madsen, G; Hu, R; Decker, R H

    1991-01-01

    Reducing agents dramatically alter the specificity of competitive assays for antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc). A specificity improvement was demonstrated with a new assay which utilizes microparticle membrane capture and chemiluminescence detection as well as a current radioimmunoassay procedure (Corab: Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Ill.). The effect was most noticeable with elevated negative and weakly reactive samples. In both systems, reductants increased separation of a negative population (n = 160) from assay cutoffs. With a selected population (n = 307), inclusion of reductant eliminated apparent anti-HBc activity in 54 of 81 samples in the 30 to 70% inhibition range. Reductant-stable anti-HBc samples were strongly associated with the presence of antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (21 of 27). The association persisted below the detection limits of current assays to 0.3 to 0.4 Paul Ehrlich Institute units per ml. Only 1 of 54 reduction-sensitive borderline samples was confirmed to be positive for antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen. The modified procedures had unchanged or slightly improved sensitivity for immunoglobulin G (IgG)-associated anti-HBc activity. Although IgM anti-HBc detection was reduced from four- to eightfold in the presence of reductants, sensitivities remained at least twofold greater than tha of an enzyme immunoassay (Corzyme M; Abbott) designed to detect acute-phase levels of IgM anti-HBc. The use of reducing agents should significantly improve the reliability of anti-HBc testing, especially near assay cutoffs. PMID:2037678

  9. Antigen-specific acquired immunity in human brucellosis: implications for diagnosis, prognosis, and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Cannella, Anthony P; Tsolis, Renee M; Liang, Li; Felgner, Philip L; Saito, Mayuko; Sette, Alessandro; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Vinetz, Joseph M

    2012-01-01

    Brucella spp., are Gram negative bacteria that cause disease by growing within monocyte/macrophage lineage cells. Clinical manifestations of brucellosis are immune mediated, not due to bacterial virulence factors. Acquired immunity to brucellosis has been studied through observations of naturally infected hosts (cattle, goats), mouse models (mice), and human infection. Even though Brucella spp. are known for producing mechanisms that evade the immune system, cell-mediated immune responses drive the clinical manifestations of human disease after exposure to Brucella species, as high antibody responses are not associated with protective immunity. The precise mechanisms by which cell-mediated immune responses confer protection or lead to disease manifestations remain undefined. Descriptive studies of immune responses in human brucellosis show that TH(1) (interferon-γ-producing T cells) are associated with dominant immune responses, findings consistent with animal studies. Whether these T cell responses are protective, or determine the different clinical responses associated with brucellosis is unknown, especially with regard to undulant fever manifestations, relapsing disease, or are associated with responses to distinct sets of Brucella spp. antigens are unknown. Few data regarding T cell responses in terms of specific recognition of Brucella spp. protein antigens and peptidic epitopes, either by CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, have been identified in human brucellosis patients. Additionally because current attenuated Brucella vaccines used in animals cause human disease, there is a true need for a recombinant protein subunit vaccine for human brucellosis, as well as for improved diagnostics in terms of prognosis and identification of unusual forms of brucellosis. This review will focus on current understandings of antigen-specific immune responses induced Brucella peptidic epitopes that has promise for yielding new insights into vaccine and diagnostics development, and for

  10. Immunoblot analysis of IgE and IgG antibodies to honey bee venom: cross sectional and sequential studies in bee sensitive subjects.

    PubMed

    Roberts-Thomson, P J; Koh, S; Shepherd, K; Kupa, A; Heddle, R J

    1991-12-01

    To investigate the specific IgE and IgG immune response to honey bee venom (bv), we performed immunoblot analysis of sera from 47 bee sensitive subjects and followed the response during and after venom immunotherapy in 15 of these subjects. Fifteen venom proteins varying in molecular size from 20 to 105 kDa were identified as being antigenic and consisted of a high molecular weight (HMW) group (5 to 105 kDa, containing the previously identified allergens B and C) and a low molecular weight group (LMW) containing hyaluronidase and phospholipase A. In general for a given individual the anti-venom IgE and IgG response was qualitatively similar although some variation between individuals was apparent. Reactivity with hyaluronidase and phospholipase A appeared only in those subjects showing reactivity with HMW components. During immunotherapy specific anti-venom IgG and IgE responses tended to be linked. Increased responses being seen against all components in 4 of 12 subjects, reductions in 3 and unchanged responses in the remainder. Following immunotherapy (mean 4.0 years), spontaneous reduction of IgE and IgG was seen in 5 of 5 subjects. Loss of reactivity with the LMW components was prominent in these sera.

  11. Prostate-specific antigen-retargeted recombinant newcastle disease virus for prostate cancer virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shobana, Raghunath; Samal, Siba K; Elankumaran, Subbiah

    2013-04-01

    Oncolytic virus (OV) therapies of cancer are based on the use of replication-competent, tumor-selective viruses with limited toxicity. Newcastle disease virus (NDV), an avian paramyxovirus, is a promising OV and is inherently tumor selective and cytotoxic only to tumor cells. Replication is restricted in normal cells. Despite encouraging phase I/II clinical trials with NDV, further refinements for tumor-specific targeting are needed to enhance its therapeutic index. Systemically delivered NDV fails to reach solid tumors in therapeutic concentrations and also spreads poorly within the tumors due to barriers including complement, innate immunity, and the extracellular matrix. Overcoming these hurdles is paramount to realizing the exceptional oncolytic efficacy of NDV. We engineered the F protein of NDV and generated a recombinant NDV (rNDV) whose F protein is cleavable exclusively by prostate-specific antigen (PSA). The rNDV replicated efficiently and specifically in prostate cancer (CaP) cells and 3-dimensional prostaspheres but failed to replicate in the absence of PSA. Induction of intracellular PSA production by a synthetic androgen analog (R1881) enhanced fusogenicity in androgen-responsive CaP cells. Further, PSA-cleavable rNDV caused specific lysis of androgen-independent and androgen-responsive/nonresponsive CaP cells and prostaspheres, with a half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) ranging from a multiplicity of infection of 0.01 to 0.1. PSA-retargeted NDV efficiently lysed prostasphere tumor mimics, suggesting efficacy in vivo. Also, PSA-cleavable NDV failed to replicate in chicken embryos, indicating no pathogenicity for chickens. Prostate-specific antigen targeting is likely to enhance the therapeutic index of rNDV owing to tumor-restricted replication and enhanced fusogenicity.

  12. Reconnoitring the status of prostate specific antigen and its role in women.

    PubMed

    Dash, Prakruti

    2015-04-01

    Prostate specific antigen is considered to be a tumour marker having maximum utility and specificity for prostate cancer since decades. After the discovery of methods to quantify different molecular fractions of prostate specific antigen (PSA), its usefulness in diagnosing early prostate cancer cases has increased tremendously. The "specificity" of PSA, is now challenged by many studies which proved that PSA, once believed to be secreted exclusively by prostatic epithelium, is also present in females. The exact biological role of extraprostatic PSA is still debatable though many theories substantiated by in vitro evidence has been put forward. With the advent of ultrasensitive analytical techniques, PSA is now quantifiable in female serum in its various molecular forms and this has led to many assumptions of it being useful as a marker in female breast cancers. In a similar scenario to prostate cancer, the ratio of free to total PSA is shown to be useful in detecting early breast cancer cases. It is also shown to be a good prognostic indicator and a predictor of response to therapy and recurrence. Apart from its role in breast cancer, it has been advocated to be a marker of hyper androgenic states in women like hirsutism and polycystic ovarian syndrome. Conflicting reports regarding the role of extra prostatic PSA is accumulating but it has been proven beyond doubt that PSA is no longer specific and confined to prostate gland. Various studies have registered that PSA is an ubiquitous molecule, secreted by hormone responsive organs and its synthesis is stimulated by androgens and progesterone but not oestrogens. In this article, a review of various literatures is done about the presence of extra prostatic PSA, its probable role in those sites as well as its utility as a tumour marker in breast cancer.

  13. Antigen-specific CD8{sup +} T cells induced by the ubiquitin fusion degradation pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Takashi; Duan Xuefeng; Hisaeda, Hajime; Himeno, Kunisuke

    2008-01-25

    We have developed a DNA vaccine encoding a fusion protein of ubiquitin (Ub) and target proteins at the N-terminus for effective induction of antigen-specific CD8{sup +} T cells. A series of expression plasmids encoding a model antigen, ovalbumin (OVA), fused with mutated Ub, was constructed. Western blotting analyses using COS7 cells transfected with these plasmids revealed that there were three types of amino acid causing different binding capacities between Ub and OVA. Natural Ub with a C-terminal glycine readily dissociated from OVA; on the other hand, artificially mutated Ub, the C-terminal amino acid of which had been exchanged to valine or arginine, stably united with the polypeptide, while Ub with a C-terminal alanine partially dissociated. The ability of DNA vaccination to induce OVA-specific CD8{sup +} T cells closely correlated with the stability of Ub fusion to OVA. Our strategy could be used to optimize the effect of genetic vaccines on the induction of CD8{sup +} T cells.

  14. Earliest lymphoid colonization of neonatal rat lymph nodes: an antigen-specific process?

    PubMed

    Sainte-Marie, G

    2001-07-01

    The present work studied the little known process of lymphoid cell colonization of neonatal lymph nodes, while considering the nodal site of entry of circulating lymphoid cells and the either random or antigen-specific character of the process. Tissue sections of a mesenteric, cervical and popliteal node from each of 57 rats, aged 4 hours to 3 weeks, were analysed. Observations bear on the relative importance of the implication of the subcapsular sinus versus venules of nodes, and the composition of their emerging lymphoid cell population by determining the proportion of lymphocytes and blast-related cells. At 16-20 hours after birth, cell counts yielded a mean proportion of 84% for blast-related cells which decreased to 18% at 3 weeks. These percentages are compatible with values expected for a selective antigen-specific entry of lymphoid cells in nodes, not with values that would result from a random entry of lymphocytes. Moreover, observations revealed that by far most colonizing cells initially enter nodes carried by the afferent lymph, little via their venules.

  15. Detection, phenotyping, and quantification of antigen-specific T cells using a peptide-MHC dodecamer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jun; Zeng, Xun; Sigal, Natalia; Lund, Peder J.; Su, Laura F.; Huang, Huang; Chien, Yueh-hsiu; Davis, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    Here we report a peptide-MHC (pMHC) dodecamer as a “next generation” technology that is a significantly more sensitive and versatile alternative to pMHC tetramers for the detection, isolation, and phenotypic analysis of antigen-specific T cells. In particular, dodecamers are able to detect two- to fivefold more antigen-specific T cells in both human and murine CD4+ and CD8+ αβ T-cell compartments compared with the equivalent tetramers. The low-affinity, tetramer-negative, dodecamer-positive T cells showed comparable effector cytokine responses as those of high-affinity, tetramer-positive T cells. Dodecamers are able to detect early stage CD4+CD8+ double-positive thymocytes on which T-cell receptors are 10- to 30-fold less dense than mature T cells. Dodecamers also show utility in the analysis of γδ T cells and in cytometry by time-of-flight applications. This construct has a simple structure with a central scaffold protein linked to four streptavidin molecules, each having three pMHC ligands or other molecules. The dodecamer is straightforward and inexpensive to produce and is compatible with current tetramer technology and commercially available streptavidin conjugates. PMID:26979955

  16. Antigen-Specific Induction of Osteopontin Contributes to the Chronification of Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Seier, Anne M.; Renkl, Andreas C.; Schulz, Guido; Uebele, Tanja; Sindrilaru, Anca; Iben, Sebastian; Liaw, Lucy; Kon, Shigeyuki; Uede, Toshimitsu; Weiss, Johannes M.

    2010-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a T cell-mediated immune response, which in its relapsing chronic form is of high socioeconomic impact. The phosphoglycoprotein osteopontin (OPN) has chemotactic and Th1 cytokine functions and in various models is essential for robust T cell-mediated immunity. Here we demonstrate that OPN is abundantly expressed by both effector T cells and keratinocytes in allergic contact dermatitis lesions. T cells from nickel-allergic donors secrete high levels of OPN following antigen-specific stimulation. OPN may substitute for missing IFN-γ secretion in T effector cells because low IFN-γ-producing T cell clones secrete high levels of OPN, and OPN down-modulates their interleukin-4 expression. Furthermore, interferon-γ from T effector cells augments OPN in allergic contact dermatitis by inducing OPN in keratinocytes, which in turn polarizes dendritic cells and attracts inflammatory cells. In the murine contact hypersensitivity (CHS) model for allergic contact dermatitis, OPN is strongly induced in antigen-specific proliferating T cells, and OPN null mice display a reduced chronic CHS inflammatory response due to a decreased influx of effector T cells. Importantly, because of its function for chronic allergic contact dermatitis, OPN may well be a therapeutic target, because anti-OPN antibody treatment in part suppresses established chronic CHS. PMID:20008129

  17. New Commercially Available IgG Kits and Time-Resolved Fluorometric IgE Assay for Diagnosis of Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Coralie; Richaud-Thiriez, Bénédicte; Rocchi, Steffi; Rognon, Bénédicte; Roussel, Sandrine; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Laboissière, Audrey; Dalphin, Jean-Charles; Reboux, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is difficult to diagnose; diagnosis relies on clinical, radiological, pathological, and serological criteria. Our aim was to assess the performance of two new commercially available kits and a new in-house assay: an Aspergillus fumigatus enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) IgG kit (Bordier Affinity Products), an Aspergillus Western blotting IgG kit (LDBio Diagnostics), and a new in-house time-resolved fluorometric IgE assay (dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluorescent immunoassay, or DELFIA) using recombinant proteins from an Aspergillus sp. recently developed by our laboratory for ABPA diagnosis in a retrospective study that included 26 cystic fibrosis patients. Aspergillus fumigatus-specific IgG levels measured by a commercial ELISA kit were in accordance with the level of precipitins currently used in our lab. The ELISA kit could accelerate and help standardize ABPA diagnosis. Aspergillus fumigatus-specific IgE levels measured by ImmunoCAP (Phadia) with A. fumigatus M3 antigen and by DELFIA with a purified protein extract of A. fumigatus were significantly correlated (P < 10−6). The results with recombinant antigens glucose-6-phosphate isomerase and mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase were encouraging but must be confirmed with sera from more patients. The DELFIA is an effective tool that can detect specific IgE against more fungal allergens than can be detected with other commercially available tests. PMID:26698651

  18. Phenotype and functional evaluation of ex vivo generated antigen-specific immune effector cells with potential for therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Han, Shuhong; Huang, Yuju; Liang, Yin; Ho, Yuchin; Wang, Yichen; Chang, Lung-Ji

    2009-08-06

    Ex vivo activation and expansion of lymphocytes for adoptive cell therapy has demonstrated great success. To improve safety and therapeutic efficacy, increased antigen specificity and reduced non-specific response of the ex vivo generated immune cells are necessary. Here, using a complete protein-spanning pool of pentadecapeptides of the latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a weak viral antigen which is associated with EBV lymphoproliferative diseases, we investigated the phenotype and function of immune effector cells generated based on IFN-gamma or CD137 activation marker selection and dendritic cell (DC) activation. These ex vivo prepared immune cells exhibited a donor- and antigen-dependent T cell response; the IFN-gamma-selected immune cells displayed a donor-related CD4- or CD8-dominant T cell phenotype; however, the CD137-enriched cells showed an increased ratio of CD4 T cells. Importantly, the pentadecapeptide antigens accessed both class II and class I MHC antigen processing machineries and effectively activated EBV-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Phenotype and kinetic analyses revealed that the IFN-gamma and the CD137 selections enriched more central memory T (Tcm) cells than did the DC-activation approach, and after expansion, the IFN-gamma-selected effector cells showed the highest level of antigen-specificity and effector activities. While all three approaches generated immune cells with comparable antigen-specific activities, the IFN-gamma selection followed by ex vivo expansion produced high quality and quantity of antigen-specific effector cells. Our studies presented the optimal approach for generating therapeutic immune cells with potential for emergency and routine clinical applications.

  19. Isolation and characterization of type III group B streptococcal mutants defective in biosynthesis of the type-specific antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, M K; Mattingly, S J

    1983-01-01

    Four classes of mutants of type III group B streptococcus were isolated by serial subculture of the wild-type strain in the presence of type III-specific rabbit antiserum. Class I mutants no longer synthesized sialic acid but still elaborated the core antigen. Class II mutants maintained the ability to synthesize sialic acid but could not attach it to the core antigen. Class III mutants did not produce the core antigen but still synthesized intracellular sialic acid. Class IV mutants synthesized the complete antigen; however, only approximately 4% of the antigen synthesized was found associated with the cell wall peptidoglycan (in the wild-type strain greater than 85% of the antigen synthesized is covalently attached to the cell wall peptidoglycan), whereas greater than 90% of the antigen was secreted into the growth medium. Production of other components (CAMP factor, group B antigen, beta-hemolysin, neuraminidase) by these mutants appeared similar to those of the wild-type strain. Mouse lethality studies of these strains indicated that all four classes have greater than 3 log10-higher 50% lethal dose values than that of the wild-type strain. To understand the basis for this variation, the invasive ability of the wild-type strain and the sialic acid-deficient mutant strain M-10 (class I) was examined. Mice received 10(5) CFU of each organism; they were then sacrificed at various times postinoculation, and viable group B streptococci from different organs were enumerated. Mice were able to clear M-10 more efficiently, with greater than 80% of M-10 cells being phagocytized by macrophages within 1 h, whereas the wild-type strain was able to evade phagocytic killing and disseminate to other tissues. These data, therefore, strongly indicate that the sialic acid moiety greatly enhances the virulence of the type III antigen. In addition, the level of cell-associated type-specific antigen appears to contribute significantly to the pathogenicity of the organism. PMID

  20. Posttransfusion purpura associated with alloantibody specific for the platelet antigen, Pen(a).

    PubMed

    Simon, T L; Collins, J; Kunicki, T J; Furihata, K; Smith, K J; Aster, R H

    1988-09-01

    Posttransfusion purpura (PTP) and severe thrombocytopenia occurred 9 days after transfusion of red blood cells to a 48-year-old, multiparous Navajo woman. The platelet count rose to hemostatic levels after treatment with prednisone and three plasma exchange transfusions. Serologic studies showed that the patient's serum contained the potent antibody reactive with platelets from nearly all normal subjects, but nonreactive with autologous platelets obtained after recovery. This antibody was found to be specific for a high-frequency, platelet-specific antigen, designated Pen(a),implicated previously as an immunogen in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenic purpura. An exchange of serum showed that Pena is identical with an alloantigen designated Yuk(b) by Japanese workers. We conclude that PTP can occur in association with alloimmunization against Pen(a) (Yuk(b).

  1. HIV-specific Immunity Derived From Chimeric Antigen Receptor-engineered Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Anjie; Kamata, Masakazu; Rezek, Valerie; Rick, Jonathan; Levin, Bernard; Kasparian, Saro; Chen, Irvin SY; Yang, Otto O; Zack, Jerome A; Kitchen, Scott G

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response is critical in controlling HIV infection. Since the immune response does not eliminate HIV, it would be beneficial to develop ways to enhance the HIV-specific CTL response to allow long-term viral suppression or clearance. Here, we report the use of a protective chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) in a hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC)-based approach to engineer HIV immunity. We determined that CAR-modified HSPCs differentiate into functional T cells as well as natural killer (NK) cells in vivo in humanized mice and these cells are resistant to HIV infection and suppress HIV replication. These results strongly suggest that stem cell-based gene therapy with a CAR may be feasible and effective in treating chronic HIV infection and other morbidities. PMID:26050990

  2. HIV-specific Immunity Derived From Chimeric Antigen Receptor-engineered Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Anjie; Kamata, Masakazu; Rezek, Valerie; Rick, Jonathan; Levin, Bernard; Kasparian, Saro; Chen, Irvin Sy; Yang, Otto O; Zack, Jerome A; Kitchen, Scott G

    2015-08-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response is critical in controlling HIV infection. Since the immune response does not eliminate HIV, it would be beneficial to develop ways to enhance the HIV-specific CTL response to allow long-term viral suppression or clearance. Here, we report the use of a protective chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) in a hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC)-based approach to engineer HIV immunity. We determined that CAR-modified HSPCs differentiate into functional T cells as well as natural killer (NK) cells in vivo in humanized mice and these cells are resistant to HIV infection and suppress HIV replication. These results strongly suggest that stem cell-based gene therapy with a CAR may be feasible and effective in treating chronic HIV infection and other morbidities.

  3. Induction of non-specific suppression in chicks by specific combination of maternal antibody and related antigen.

    PubMed

    Abou Elazab, Mohamed Fahmy; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Furusawa, Shuichi

    2015-11-01

    Specific immune suppression in newly hatched chicks induced by specific maternal antibodies has been reported. Laying hens were immunized with dinitrophenyl-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (DNP-KLH). Purified maternal anti-DNP and non-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) Y antibodies were transferred by yolk sac inoculation to newly hatched chicks, and then, they were immunized with an optimum immunogenic dose of DNP-KLH at 1 and 4 weeks of age. Concentrations of anti-DNP antibodies in serum samples of these chicks were measured by using Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Proportions of T-cell subsets in peripheral blood of these chicks were also measured by flow cytometric analysis at 5 weeks of age (one week after the second immunization). Suppression of anti-DNP antibody response and down-regulation of CD3(+)CD4(+) cells were observed in the chicks received high dose of maternal anti-DNP antibodies and immunized with DNP-KLH. On the other hand, normal anti-DNP antibody response and normal proportion of CD3(+)CD4(+) cells were observed in the chicks received high dose of non-specific IgY antibodies and immunized with DNP-KLH. Furthermore, when chicks received high dose of maternal anti-DNP antibodies and immunized with DNP-KLH at 1 and 4 weeks of age and then with rabbit serum albumin (RSA) at 5 and 8 weeks of age, their primary anti-RSA response was also significantly suppressed. We indicate here that specific maternal antibodies can affect both B and T cell responses and induce non-specific suppression against different antigens. However, this non-specific suppression does not continue for a long time.

  4. Antibodies to liver membrane antigens in chronic active hepatitis (CAH). II. Specificity for autoimmune CAH.

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, I H; Kronborg, I J; Mackay, I R

    1983-01-01

    An immunoradiometric assay for IgG class autoantibody to liver membrane antigens, based on serum binding to glutaraldehyde treated monkey hepatocytes, was used to examine sera from patients with chronic active hepatitis (CAH) and other acute and chronic liver diseases. All sera from normals and patients showed binding, up to a titre of 1/2,048. For comparison of assays, results were normalized by selecting two reference sera, one with a high degree of binding, and one from a healthy subject with a low degree of binding: at a dilution of 1/2,048, these sera were given binding values of 100% and 0%. The values for the binding of unknown sera at the same dilution were calculated from these two reference values. For 26 patients with autoimmune CAH, the mean (+/- s.d.) percentage binding value (70 +/- 33%) was significantly higher than the mean value for 26 healthy subjects (10 +/- 15%), and high binding values were significantly associated with biochemically active hepatitis. The mean percentage binding value was moderately increased for eight patients with HBsAg associated CAH (42 +/- 12%), 13 patients with alcoholic hepatitis with cirrhosis (37 +/- 25%) and 45 patients with acute viral hepatitis A (40 +/- 27%) or B (52 +/- 37%). At a cut-off binding value of 65%, the assay as a single diagnostic procedure was shown to have a 70% sensitivity and a 95% specificity for the diagnosis of autoimmune CAH. Better understanding of the pathogenetic significance of antibodies to liver membrane antigens in CAH and other liver diseases will depend upon biochemical analysis of the presumably multiple antigenic determinants on the hepatocyte membrane. PMID:6616969

  5. Investigation of IGES for CAD/CAE data transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zobrist, George W.

    1989-01-01

    In a CAD/CAE facility there is always the possibility that one may want to transfer the design graphics database from the native system to a non-native system. This may occur because of dissimilar systems within an organization or a new CAD/CAE system is to be purchased. The Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES) was developed in an attempt to solve this scenario. IGES is a neutral database format into which the CAD/CAE native database format can be translated to and from. Translating the native design database format to IGES requires a pre-processor and transling from IGES to the native database format requires a post-processor. IGES is an artifice to represent CAD/CAE product data in a neutral environment to allow interfacing applications, archive the database, interchange of product data between dissimilar CAD/CAE systems, and other applications. The intent here is to present test data on translating design product data from a CAD/CAE system to itself and to translate data initially prepared in IGES format to various native design formats. This information can be utilized in planning potential procurement and developing a design discipline within the CAD/CAE community.

  6. T antigen origin-binding domain of simian virus 40: determinants of specific DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Elizabeth M; Sanford, David G; Luo, Xuelian; Sudmeier, James L; Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Bullock, Peter A; Bachovchin, William W

    2004-06-08

    To better understand origin recognition and initiation of DNA replication, we have examined by NMR complexes formed between the origin-binding domain of SV40 T antigen (T-ag-obd), the initiator protein of the SV40 virus, and cognate and noncognate DNA oligomers. The results reveal two structural effects associated with "origin-specific" binding that are absent in nonspecific DNA binding. The first is the formation of a hydrogen bond (H-bond) involving His 203, a residue that genetic studies have previously identified as crucial to both specific and nonspecific DNA binding in full-length T antigen. In free T-ag-obd, the side chain of His 203 has a pK(a) value of approximately 5, titrating to the N(epsilon)(1)H tautomer at neutral pH (Sudmeier, J. L., et al. (1996) J. Magn. Reson., Ser. B 113, 236-247). In complexes with origin DNA, His 203 N(delta)(1) becomes protonated and remains nontitrating as the imidazolium cation at all pH values from 4 to 8. The H-bonded N(delta1)H resonates at 15.9 ppm, an unusually large N-H proton chemical shift, of a magnitude previously observed only in the catalytic triad of serine proteases at low pH. The formation of this H-bond requires the middle G/C base pair of the recognition pentanucleotide, GAGGC. The second structural effect is a selective distortion of the A/T base pair characterized by a large (0.6 ppm) upfield chemical-shift change of its Watson-Crick proton, while nearby H-bonded protons remain relatively unaffected. The results indicate that T antigen, like many other DNA-binding proteins, may employ "catalytic" or "transition-state-like" interactions in binding its cognate DNA (Jen-Jacobson, L. (1997) Biopolymers 44, 153-180), which may be the solution to the well-known paradox between the relatively modest DNA-binding specificity exhibited by initiator proteins and the high specificity of initiation.

  7. Prevention of Allogeneic Cardiac Graft Rejection by Transfer of Ex Vivo Expanded Antigen-Specific Regulatory T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Takasato, Fumika; Morita, Rimpei; Schichita, Takashi; Sekiya, Takashi; Morikawa, Yasuhide; Kuroda, Tatsuo; Niimi, Masanori; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    The rate of graft survival has dramatically increased using calcineurin inhibitors, however chronic graft rejection and risk of infection are difficult to manage. Induction of allograft-specific regulatory T-cells (Tregs) is considered an ideal way to achieve long-term tolerance for allografts. However, efficient in vitro methods for developing allograft-specific Tregs which is applicable to MHC full-mismatched cardiac transplant models have not been established. We compared antigen-nonspecific polyclonal-induced Tregs (iTregs) as well as antigen-specific iTregs and thymus-derived Tregs (nTregs) that were expanded via direct and indirect pathways. We found that iTregs induced via the indirect pathway had the greatest ability to prolong graft survival and suppress angiitis. Antigen-specific iTregs generated ex vivo via both direct and indirect pathways using dendritic cells from F1 mice also induced long-term engraftment without using MHC peptides. In antigen-specific Treg transferred models, activation of dendritic cells and allograft-specific CTL generation were suppressed. The present study demonstrated the potential of ex vivo antigen-specific Treg expansion for clinical cell-based therapeutic approaches to induce lifelong immunological tolerance for allogeneic cardiac transplants. PMID:24498362

  8. In vitro expansion of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells distorts the T-cell repertoire.

    PubMed

    Koning, Dan; Costa, Ana I; Hasrat, Raiza; Grady, Bart P X; Spijkers, Sanne; Nanlohy, Nening; Keşmir, Can; van Baarle, Debbie

    2014-03-01

    Short-term in vitro expansion of antigen-specific T cells is an appreciated assay for the analysis of small memory T-cell populations. However, how well short-term expanded T cells represent the direct ex vivo situation remains to be elucidated. In this study we compared the clonality of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD8(+) T cells directly ex vivo and after in vitro stimulation with antigen. Our data show that the antigen-specific T cell repertoire significantly alters after in vitro culture. Clear shifts in clonotype hierarchy were observed, with the most dominant ex vivo clonotype decreasing after stimulation at the expense of several previously subdominant clonotypes. Notably, these alterations were more pronounced in polyclonal T-cell populations compared to mono- or oligoclonal repertoires. Furthermore, TCR diversity significantly increased after culture with antigen. These results suggest that the T-cell repertoire is highly subjective to variation after in vitro stimulation with antigen. Hence, although short-term expansion of T cells provides a simple and efficient tool to examine antigen-specific immune responses, caution is required if T-cell populations are expanded prior to detailed, clonotypic analyses or other repertoire-based investigations.

  9. Immunogenic variants obtained by mutagenesis of mouse mastocytoma P815. V. H-2 associativity of variant-specific antigens.

    PubMed

    Van Snick, J; Maryanski, J; Van Pel, A; Parmiani, G; Boon, T

    1982-11-01

    By in vitro mutagenesis of mastocytoma P815, it is possible to obtain tumor cell variants that are rejected by syngeneic mice (tum-). Most of these variants carry new individual antigens and stimulate a specific cytolytic T cell (CTL) response in mixed leukocyte tumor cell culture (MLTC). The H-2 associativity of this response was examined for six different variants by measuring the inhibition of cell-mediated cytolysis by antibodies directed against products of the K or the D end of the H-2d complex. The lysis was either not inhibited (variants P91 and P116) or inhibited selectively by anti-Kd (variants P21, P32 and P198) or anti-Dd antibodies (variant P35). All these tum- variants expressed Kd and Dd antigens as measured by absorption of H-2 alloantisera. Long-term CTL clones can be obtained that are specific for individual tum- antigens. The pattern of H-2 associativity obtained with MLTC-derived CTL against four tum- variants was verified with CTL clones directed against the specific antigens of these variants. Concordant results were observed in all cases. In addition to CTL clones specific for tum- antigens, it is possible to isolate clones against a P815 tumor-associated antigen found on all P815 tum- variants. For these clones no clear associativity with either Kd or Dd products was found.

  10. Cloning of the cDNA for a hematopoietic cell-specific protein related to CD20 and the {beta} subunit of the high-affinity IgE receptor: Evidence for a family of proteins with four membrane-spanning regions

    SciTech Connect

    Adra, C.N.; Morrison, P.; Lim, B.; Lelias, J.M.; Kaghad, M.; Kobayashi, H.; Rowley, J.D.

    1994-10-11

    The authors report the cloning of the cDNA for a human gene whose mRNA is expressed specifically in hematopoietic cells. A long open reading frame in the 1.7-kb mRNA encodes a 214-aa protein of 25 kDa with four hydrophobic regions consistent with a protein that traverses the membrane four times. To reflect the structure and expression of this gene in diverse hematopoietic lineages of lymphoid and myeloid origin, the authors named the gene HTm{sub 4}. The protein is about 20% homologous to two other {open_quotes}four-transmembrane{close_quotes} proteins; the B-cell-specific antigen CD20 and the {beta} subunit of the high-affinity receptor for IgE, Fc{sub {epsilon}}RI{beta}. The highest homologies among the three proteins are found in the transmembrane domains, but conserved residues are also recognized in the inter-transmembrane domains and in the N and C termini. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, they localized HTm{sub 4} to human chromosome 11q12-13.1, where the CD20 and Fc{sub {epsilon}}RI{beta} genes are also located. Both the murine homologue for CD20, Ly-44, and the murine Fc{sub {epsilon}}RI{beta} gene map to the same region in murine chromosome 19. The authors propose that the HTm{sub 4}, CD20, and Fc{sub {epsilon}}RI{beta} genes evolved from the same ancestral gene to form a family of four-transmembrane proteins. It is possible that other related members exist. Similar to CD20 and Fc{sub {epsilon}}RI{beta}, it is likely that Htm{sub 4} has a role in signal transduction and, like Fc{sub {epsilon}}RI{beta}, might be a subunit associated with receptor complexes.

  11. Detection of Leptospira-Specific Antibodies Using a Recombinant Antigen-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Wei; Zhang, Zhiwen; Halsey, Eric S.; Guevara, Carolina; Canal, Enrique; Hall, Eric; Maves, Ryan; Tilley, Drake H.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Ching, Wei-Mei

    2013-01-01

    We produced three highly purified recombinant antigens rLipL32, rLipL41, and rLigA-Rep (leptospiral immunoglobulin-like A repeat region) for the detection of Leptospira-specific antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The performance of these recombinant antigens was evaluated using 121 human sera. Among them, 63 sera were microscopic agglutination test (MAT)-confirmed positive sera from febrile patients in Peru, 22 sera were indigenous MAT-negative febrile patient sera, and 36 sera were from patients with other febrile diseases from Southeast Asia, where leptospirosis is also endemic. Combining the results of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG detection from these three antigens, the overall sensitivity is close to 90% based on the MAT. These results suggest that an ELISA using multiple recombinant antigens may be used as an alternative method for the detection of Leptospira-specific antibodies. PMID:24166046

  12. Differentiation of antigen-specific T cells with limited functional capacity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yun Hee; Jeon, Bo-Young; Gu, Sun-Hwa; Cho, Sang-Nae; Shin, Sung Jae; Chang, Jun; Ha, Sang-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Despite the generation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific T cell immune responses during the course of infection, only 5 to 10% of exposed individuals develop active disease, while others develop a latent infection. This phenomenon suggests defective M. tuberculosis-specific immunity, which necessitates more careful characterization of M. tuberculosis-specific T cell responses. Here, we longitudinally analyzed the phenotypes and functions of M. tuberculosis-specific T cells. In contrast to the functional exhaustion of T cells observed after chronic infection, M. tuberculosis-specific CD8(+) T cells differentiated into either effector (CD127(lo) CD62L(lo)) or effector memory (CD127(hi) CD62L(lo)) cells, but not central memory cells (CD127(hi) CD62L(hi)), with low programmed death 1 (PD-1) expression, even in the presence of high levels of bacteria. Additionally, M. tuberculosis-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells produced substantial levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ), but not interleukin 2 (IL-2), upon in vitro restimulation. Among M. tuberculosis-specific CD8(+) T cells, CD127(hi) effector memory cells displayed slower ongoing turnover but greater survival potential. In addition, these cells produced more IFN-γ and TNF-α and displayed lytic activity upon antigen stimulation. However, the effector function of M. tuberculosis-specific CD8(+) CD127(hi) effector memory T cells was inferior to that of canonical CD8(+) CD127(hi) memory T cells generated after acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. Collectively, our data demonstrate that M. tuberculosis-specific T cells can differentiate into memory T cells during the course of M. tuberculosis infection independent of the bacterial burden but with limited functionality. These results provide a framework for further understanding the mechanisms of M. tuberculosis infection that can be used to develop more effective vaccines.

  13. Liver stage antigen 3 Plasmodium falciparum peptides specifically interacting with HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    García, Javier E; Curtidor, Hernando; López, Ramses; Rodríguez, Luis; Vera, Ricardo; Valbuena, John; Rosas, Jaiver; Ocampo, Marisol; Puentes, Alvaro; Forero, Martha; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2004-09-01

    Binding assays were carried out with 20 amino acid long peptides covering the complete 200-kDa Liver stage antigen (LSA) 3 protein sequence to identify its HepG2 cell binding regions. Seventeen HepG2 cell high-activity binding peptides (HABPs) were identified in the LSA-3 protein. Seven HABPs were found in the nonrepeat (NRA) region A; five of these formed a 100 amino acid long HepG2 cell binding region located between residues 21Ile and 120Thr. Six HABPs were found in the R2 region and another four in the NRB2 region. LSA-3 protein HABPS bound saturably to HepG2 cells having nanomolar affinity constants and bound specifically to 31, 44, and 70 kDa HepG2 cell membrane proteins. Some of them were located in antigenic and immunogenic LSA-3 protein regions. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting assays using goat sera immunized with LSA-3 protein peptides recognized P. falciparum (FCB-2 strain) erythrocyte stage proteins (58, 68, 72, 81, 86, 160, and 175 kDa). This reactivity was due mainly to the VEESVAEN motif present in some erythrocyte stage proteins. However, our results suggest that antibodies against LSA-3 regions had a crossed reaction with another 86-kDa protein, and that this crossed reaction was due to a motif present in the NRA region.

  14. Purification and partial characterization of an antigen specific to Lactobacillus brevis strains with beer spoilage activity.

    PubMed

    Yasui, T; Yoda, K

    1997-06-15

    Certain Lactobacillus brevis strains are resistant to hop-derived compounds such as isohumulone and are able to grow in beer. In this study, we raised an antiserum against our beer spoilage laboratory strain L. brevis 578 which reacted with 23 of 24 beer spoilers and two of 13 non-spoilers in precipitation reactions using 0.5 M NaOH cell extracts. This specific antigen to the beer spoilage L. brevis strains (SABSL) was demonstrated to be located beneath the S-layer proteins by agglutination reactions using S-layer protein-stripped cells obtained by treatment with 0.1 M NaOH. SABSL was purified using an affinity column coupled with an antibody against SABSL. The purified antigen was hydrolyzed with 2 M HCl and the hydrolyzate was analyzed by thin-layer chromatography and enzymatic analysis. The results showed that SABSL contains glycerol, phosphate, glycerophosphate, D-galactose and D-glucose. D-Galactose and D-glucose accounted for 4.7% and 0.1% of the composition, respectively. Melibiose, but not mannose, inhibited the precipitation reaction. Intense precipitation reactions were obtained with fractions which did not bind to the ConA-column. These results indicate that the immunodominant component of the SABSL is galactose and the SABSL determinant is most probably a galactosylated glycerol teichoic acid. The antiserum raised against the beer spoilage strain L. brevis 578 could distinguish between Pediococcus beer spoilers and non-spoilers in precipitation reactions.

  15. Concentration-dependent effect of fibrinogen on IgG-specific antigen binding and phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Tobias Konrad; Sojar, Hakimuddin; Denardin, Ernesto

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to characterize fibrinogen-IgG interactions, and explore how fibrinogen alters IgG-mediated phagocytosis. Using enzyme-linked binding assays, we found that fibrinogen binding to IgG is optimized for surfaces coated with high levels of IgG. Using a similar method, we have shown that for an antigen unable to specifically bind fibrinogen, fibrinogen enhances binding of antibodies towards that antigen. For binding of IgG antibodies to cells expressing Fc receptors, we found a bimodal binding response, where low levels of fibrinogen enhance binding of antibody to Fc receptors and high levels reduce it. This corresponds to a bimodal effect on phagocytosis of IgG-coated particles, which is inhibited in the presence of excess IgG during coating of the particles with antibodies and fibrinogen. We conclude that fibrinogen can modulate phagocytosis of IgG-coated particles in vitro by changing IgG binding behavior, and that high fibrinogen levels could negatively affect phagocytosis.

  16. Diagnosis of Giardia lamblia infections by detection of parasite-specific antigens.

    PubMed

    Janoff, E N; Craft, J C; Pickering, L K; Novotny, T; Blaser, M J; Knisley, C V; Reller, L B

    1989-03-01

    Antigen detection methods may facilitate diagnosis of Giardia lamblia in stool specimens. As determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and immunoblotting, G. lamblia cysts and trophozoites share several antigens, especially in the 65-kilodalton and 30- to 34-kilodalton regions. By using blind methods, we compared results obtained by counterimmunoelectrophoresis using cyst-immune rabbit serum and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using trophozoite-immune rabbit serum with results obtained by microscopic examination of a preserved, concentrated, and permanently stained stool specimen. Results were similar when these three methods were used to examine 118 stool specimens from clinical microbiology laboratories (53 specimens with G. lamblia) and specimens from 239 day-care-center toddlers (39 specimens with G. lamblia). Compared with microscopy, we found, for counterimmunoelectrophoresis and ELISA, respectively: sensitivity, 88 versus 94%; specificity, 97 versus 95%; positive predictive value, 86 versus 76%; negative predictive value, 98 versus 97%; and concordance, 89%. The false-positive rate by ELISA was 24% (10 of 42) in day-care-center toddlers but only 3% (1 of 32) in healthy adults (P less than 0.04) as corroborated by microscopy. This discrepancy suggests that the ELISA may be more sensitive than microscopy, which is considered the reference standard, and that results may be dependent, in part, on the epidemiology of the infection in the study subjects.

  17. Diagnosis of Giardia lamblia infections by detection of parasite-specific antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Janoff, E N; Craft, J C; Pickering, L K; Novotny, T; Blaser, M J; Knisley, C V; Reller, L B

    1989-01-01

    Antigen detection methods may facilitate diagnosis of Giardia lamblia in stool specimens. As determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and immunoblotting, G. lamblia cysts and trophozoites share several antigens, especially in the 65-kilodalton and 30- to 34-kilodalton regions. By using blind methods, we compared results obtained by counterimmunoelectrophoresis using cyst-immune rabbit serum and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using trophozoite-immune rabbit serum with results obtained by microscopic examination of a preserved, concentrated, and permanently stained stool specimen. Results were similar when these three methods were used to examine 118 stool specimens from clinical microbiology laboratories (53 specimens with G. lamblia) and specimens from 239 day-care-center toddlers (39 specimens with G. lamblia). Compared with microscopy, we found, for counterimmunoelectrophoresis and ELISA, respectively: sensitivity, 88 versus 94%; specificity, 97 versus 95%; positive predictive value, 86 versus 76%; negative predictive value, 98 versus 97%; and concordance, 89%. The false-positive rate by ELISA was 24% (10 of 42) in day-care-center toddlers but only 3% (1 of 32) in healthy adults (P less than 0.04) as corroborated by microscopy. This discrepancy suggests that the ELISA may be more sensitive than microscopy, which is considered the reference standard, and that results may be dependent, in part, on the epidemiology of the infection in the study subjects. Images PMID:2715318

  18. Molecular studies of Ssa1, a serotype-specific antigen of Pasteurella haemolytica A1.

    PubMed Central

    Lo, R Y; Strathdee, C A; Shewen, P E; Cooney, B J

    1991-01-01

    A serotype-specific antigen of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 encoded on the recombinant plasmid pSSA1 is characterized. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the insert DNA in pSSA1 identified the gene ssaI, which codes for a protein of approximately 100 kDa. In vivo labeling of pSSA1-encoded protein in Escherichia coli maxicells showed the expression of a 100-kDa protein from the insert DNA on the recombinant plasmid. Northern blot and primer extension analyses were used to identify the mRNA transcript in P. haemolytica A1 and the putative promoter of ssaI. The antigen (designated Ssa1) could be localized to the outer membrane of P. haemolytica A1 and E. coli clones carrying pSSA1. A rabbit serum against Ssa1 was produced by using whole cells of E. coli expressing Ssa1 on the surface as the immunogen, demonstrating that Ssa1 is immunogenic in rabbits. The results from colony immunoblot analysis with calf serum from animals that were resistant to P. haemolytica A1-induced pneumonia suggest indirectly that Ssa1 is also immunogenic in the animals. Images PMID:1840576

  19. Antigen-responsive molecular sensor enables real-time tumor-specific imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunjin; Choi, Hak Soo; Kim, Seok-Ki; Lee, Byung Il; Choi, Yongdoo

    2017-01-01

    Antibody-fluorophore conjugates have high potential for the specific fluorescence detection of target cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. However, the antibody-fluorophore conjugates described to date are inappropriate for real-time imaging of target cells because removal of unbound antibody is required to reduce background fluorescence before quantifiable analysis by microscopy. In addition, clinical applications of the conjugates have been limited by persistent background retention due to their long systemic circulation and nonspecific uptake. Here we report fast and real-time near-infrared fluorescence imaging of target cancer cells using an antigen-responsive molecular “on-off” sensor: the fluorescence of trastuzumab-ATTO680 conjugate is dark (i.e., turned off) in the extracellular region, while it becomes highly fluorescent (i.e., turned on) upon binding to the target antigen HER2 on cancer cell surface. This molecular switch enables fast and real-time imaging of target cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

  20. "Mycoplasmal antigen modulation," a novel surface variation suggested for a lipoprotein specifically localized on Mycoplasma mobile.

    PubMed

    Wu, Heng Ning; Kawaguchi, Chie; Nakane, Daisuke; Miyata, Makoto

    2012-05-01

    Mycoplasma mobile, a pathogen of freshwater fish, glides easily across surfaces, colonizes on the fish gill, and causes necrosis. The cell surface is differentiated into three parts: the head, neck, and body. Mobile variable surface proteins (Mvsps) localizing at each of these parts may be involved in surface variation including phase variation and antigenic variation, although no proof exists. In this study, we examined this possibility by focusing on MvspI, the largest Mvsp. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that MvspI is expressed on the surfaces of all cells. When anti-MvspI antibody was added at concentrations over 0.8 nM, MvspI was observed to decrease over time. After 72 h of cultivation with the antibody, the fluorescence intensity and amount of MvspI decreased up to 13 and 39%, respectively, compared to those of cells grown without antibody. These changes were reversed by the removal of the antibody. Such effects were not observed when another antibody targeting other Mvsps was used, suggesting that the decrease is specific to the relationship between MvspI and the antibody. Cell growth was also inhibited by the antibody, but the decrease in MvspI could not be explained by the selective growth of MvspI-negative variants or by the inhibition of growth with other conditions. The decrease in MvspI caused by the antibody binding may suggest a novel type of surface variation, designated here as "mycoplasmal antigen modulation."

  1. Human leukocyte antigen haplotype phasing by allele-specific enrichment with peptide nucleic acid probes

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Nicholas M; Pouton, Colin W; Irving, Helen R

    2014-01-01

    Targeted capture of large fragments of genomic DNA that enrich for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system haplotypes has utility in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Current methods of HLA matching are based on inference or familial studies of inheritance; and each approach has its own inherent limitations. We have designed and tested a probe–target-extraction method for capturing specific HLA haplotypes by hybridization of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes to alleles of the HLA-DRB1 gene. Short target fragments contained in plasmids were initially used to optimize the method followed by testing samples of genomic DNA from human subjects with preselected HLA haplotypes and obtained approximately 10% enrichment for the specific haplotype. When performed with high-molecular-weight genomic DNA, 99.0% versus 84.0% alignment match was obtained for the specific haplotype probed. The allele-specific target enrichment that we obtained can facilitate the elucidation of haplotypes between the 65 kb separating the HLA-DRB1 and the HLA-DQA1 genes, potentially spanning a total distance of at least 130 kb. Allele-specific target enrichment with PNA probes is a straightforward technique that has the capability to improve the resolution of DNA and whole genome sequencing technologies by allowing haplotyping of enriched DNA and crucially, retaining the DNA methylation profile. PMID:24936514

  2. Is Stage-Specific Embryonic Antigen 4 a Marker for Human Ductal Stem/Progenitor Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Kayali, Ayse; Lopez, Ana; Hayek, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The presence of pancreatic stem cells (PnSCs) has not been firmly demonstrated in the human or animal pancreas. Previous reports have suggested that ductal and acinar structures in the exocrine pancreas can be a potential source of progenitor cells. More recently, immature insulin precursors in the periphery of human islets have been found to self-replicate and differentiate to endocrine cells in vitro. Transplantation of these cells under the kidney capsule improves the diabetic state in mice. The controversy surrounding where PnSCs reside could be resolved if a specific marker were to be found that allowed their identification, purification, and directed differentiation to endocrine cells. We have identified in human pancreas cells positive for the stage-specific embryonic antigen 4 (SSEA4), a stem cell marker. These cells also express ductal, pancreatic progenitor, and stem cell protein markers. Interestingly, some of the SSEA4+ cells scattered in the ducts do not show a ductal cell phenotype. SSEA4+-sorted cells formed aggregate-like spheres in culture and robustly differentiated to pancreatic hormone-expressing cells in conditions of high glucose concentration and B27 supplementation. We hypothesize that SSEA4+ cells or a subpopulation of those cells residing in the pancreatic ducts may be the elusive PnSCs, and in this case, SSEA4 may represent a potential surface antigen marker for human PnSCs. The discovery of specific markers for the identification and purification of human PnSCs would greatly facilitate studies aimed at the expansion of these cells and the development of targeting tools for their potential induction to insulin-producing cells. PMID:23515456

  3. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Retargeted Measles Virotherapy for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunsheng; Hasegawa, Kosei; Russell, Stephen J.; Sadelain, Michel; Peng, Kah-Whye

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Live attenuated vaccine strain of measles virus (MV) has promising antitumor activity and is undergoing clinical testing in three different phase I cancer trials. The virus uses one of two receptors, CD46 which is ubiquitously expressed on all nucleated cells or CD150 which is expressed on immune cells, to infect cells. To minimize potential toxicity due to indiscriminate infection of normal cells, we have generated a fully retargeted MV that infects cells exclusively through the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) receptor, which is overexpressed on prostate cancer cells and tumor neovasculature. METHODS A single-chain antibody (scFv) specific for the extracellular domain of PSMA (J591) was inserted as a C-terminal extension on the MV attachment protein. Specificity of infection by the PSMA targeted virus was evaluated in parallel with the parental MV and a control virus which binds to CD38, a myeloma antigen. Antitumor activity of the PSMA retargeted virus was tested in both LNCaP and PC3-PSMA tumor xenograft models, with and without low dose external beam radiation. RESULTS Replication of the PSMA targeted virus was comparable to the parental MV. The PSMA scFv efficiently redirected virus infection and cytopathic killing exclusively to PSMA positive prostate cancer cells and not PSMA negative cells. There was an additive effect on cell killing from radiation treatment and virotherapy. The PSMA virus induced tumor regression of LNCaP and PC3-PSMA tumor xenografts. Extensive areas of MV infection and apoptosis were seen in virus treated tumors. CONCLUSIONS The PSMA retargeted virus warrants further investigation as a virotherapy agent. PMID:19367568

  4. Presentation of antigen to T lymphocytes by non-immune B-cell hybridoma clones: evidence for specific and non-specific presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohly, H. H.; Morrison, D. R.; Atassi, M. Z.

    1988-01-01

    Non-immune SJL (H-2s) spleen cells were fused with (H-2d) Balb/c 653-myeloma cells and the hybridomas were cloned by two limiting dilutions. The resulting hybrid B- cell clones were tested for their antigen presentation capability to SJL T-cell lines that were specific for either lysozyme or myoglobin. In proliferative assays, 53% of the antigen presenting B-cell clones were able to present both myoglobin and lysozyme (general presenters) while the other 47% presented specifically either myoglobin or lysozyme (specific presenters). The ability to selectively present either myoglobin or lysozyme indicates that antigen presentation at the clonal level can be specific or non-specific depending on the particular B-cell clone.

  5. Broadly-specific cytotoxic T cells targeting multiple HIV antigens are expanded from HIV+ patients: implications for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sharon; Sung, Julia; Cruz, Conrad; Castillo-Caro, Paul; Ngo, Minhtran; Garrido, Carolina; Kuruc, Joann; Archin, Nancie; Rooney, Cliona; Margolis, David; Bollard, Catherine

    2015-02-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is unable to eradicate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop novel therapies for this disease to augment anti-HIV immunity. T cell therapy is appealing in this regard as T cells have the ability to proliferate, migrate, and their antigen specificity reduces the possibility of off-target effects. However, past human studies in HIV-1 infection that administered T cells with limited specificity failed to provide ART-independent, long-term viral control. In this study, we sought to expand functional, broadly-specific cytotoxic T cells (HXTCs) from HIV-infected patients on suppressive ART as a first step toward developing cellular therapies for implementation in future HIV eradication protocols. Blood samples from seven HIV+ patients on suppressive ART were used to derive HXTCs. Multiantigen specificity was achieved by coculturing T cells with antigen-presenting cells pulsed with peptides representing Gag, Pol, and Nef. All but two lines were multispecific for all three antigens. HXTCs demonstrated efficacy as shown by release of proinflammatory cytokines, specific lysis of antigen-pulsed targets, and the ability to suppress HIV replication in vitro. In conclusion, we are able to generate broadly-specific cytotoxic T cell lines that simultaneously target multiple HIV antigens and show robust antiviral function.

  6. Isolation and characterization of antigen-specific alpaca (Lama pacos) VHH antibodies by biopanning followed by high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Nobuo; Kiyose, Norihiko; Akazawa, Yoko; Takashima, Mizuki; Hagihara, Yosihisa; Inoue, Naokazu; Matsuda, Tomonari; Ogawa, Ryu; Inoue, Seiya; Ito, Yuji

    2015-09-01

    The antigen-binding domain of camelid dimeric heavy chain antibodies, known as VHH or Nanobody, has much potential in pharmaceutical and industrial applications. To establish the isolation process of antigen-specific VHH, a VHH phage library was constructed with a diversity of 8.4 × 10(7) from cDNA of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of an alpaca (Lama pacos) immunized with a fragment of IZUMO1 (IZUMO1PFF) as a model antigen. By conventional biopanning, 13 antigen-specific VHHs were isolated. The amino acid sequences of these VHHs, designated as N-group VHHs, were very similar to each other (>93% identity). To find more diverse antibodies, we performed high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of VHH genes. By comparing the frequencies of each sequence between before and after biopanning, we found the sequences whose frequencies were increased by biopanning. The top 100 sequences of them were supplied for phylogenic tree analysis. In total 75% of them belonged to N-group VHHs, but the other were phylogenically apart from N-group VHHs (Non N-group). Two of three VHHs selected from non N-group VHHs showed sufficient antigen binding ability. These results suggested that biopanning followed by HTS provided a useful method for finding minor and diverse antigen-specific clones that could not be identified by conventional biopanning.

  7. Antigen-Specific lgA B Memory Cell Responses to Shigella Antigens Elicited in Volunteers Immunized with Live Attenuated Shigella flexneri 2a Oral Vaccine Candidates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    J.B. Harris, Antigen-specific memory B-cell responses to Vibrio cholerae 01 infection in Bangladesh, Infect. lmmun. 77 (2009) 3850-3856. [38] K.L...detectable levels of lgG BM cells and 76% had detectable levels of lgA and lgM BM cells [40]. In natural cholera infection, anti-LPS lgA BM cells

  8. Stage-specific embryonic antigen: determining expression in canine glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Daisuke

    2017-01-01

    The expression of stage-specific embryonic antigens (SSEAs) was determined in several types of canine cancer cells. Flow cytometry showed SSEA-1 expression in glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells, although none expressed SSEA-3 or SSEA-4. Expression of SSEA-1 was not detected in lymphoma, osteosarcoma, or hemangiosarcoma cell lines. Relatively stable SSEA-1 expression was observed between 24 and 72 h of culture. After 8 days in culture, sorted SSEA-1− and SSEA-1+ cells re-established SSEA-1 expression to levels comparable to those observed in unsorted cells. Our results document, for the first time, the expression of SSEA-1 in several canine cancer cell lines. PMID:27456773

  9. Primary cryptococcal prostatitis and correlation with serum prostate specific antigen in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Tahseen J; Zamani, Tanveer; Parada, Jorge P

    2005-10-01

    The prostate gland is a rare site of primary infection due to Cryptococcus neoformans; however, it may serve as a site of its sequestration after an occult or treated disseminated infection. Serum prostate specific antigen may correlate with the severity of prostatic inflammation, but its role as a diagnostic and prognostic marker is unclear. We report the first case of primary cryptococcal prostatitis in a renal transplant recipient. The diagnosis was established based on asymmetrically enlarged prostate gland, markedly elevated serum PSA levels, cryptococcal fungemia, an ultrasound-guided prostatic biopsy that demonstrated cryptococcal fungal elements and growth of C. neoformans on culture. The patient was successfully treated with a prolonged course of fluconazole and remained disease-free for more than 28 months of follow-up. In addition, we present a review of the published literature since 1946 and discuss possible correlation with PSA levels.

  10. An inexpensive, fast and sensitive quantitative lateral flow magneto-immunoassay for total prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Jacqueline M; Wraith, Patrick; Kiely, Janice; Persad, Raj; Hurley, Katrina; Hawkins, Peter; Luxton, Richard

    2014-09-01

    We describe the detection characteristics of a device the Resonant Coil Magnetometer (RCM) to quantify paramagnetic particles (PMPs) in immunochromatographic (lateral flow) assays. Lateral flow assays were developed using PMPs for the measurement of total prostate specific antigen (PSA) in serum samples. A detection limit of 0.8 ng/mL was achieved for total PSA using the RCM and is at clinically significant concentrations. Comparison of data obtained in a pilot study from the analysis of serum samples with commercially available immunoassays shows good agreement. The development of a quantitative magneto-immunoassay in lateral flow format for total PSA suggests the potential of the RCM to operate with many immunoassay formats. The RCM has the potential to be modified to quantify multiple analytes in this format. This research shows promise for the development of an inexpensive device capable of quantifying multiple analytes at the point-of-care using a magneto-immunoassay in lateral flow format.

  11. Interferon gamma response to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis specific lipopentapeptide antigen L5P in cattle.

    PubMed

    Holbert, Sébastien; Branger, Maxime; Souriau, Armel; Lamoureux, Bérénice; Ganneau, Christelle; Richard, Gaëlle; Cochard, Thierry; Tholoniat, Christophe; Bay, Sylvie; Winter, Nathalie; Moyen, Jean Louis; Biet, Franck

    2015-10-01

    After Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) infection the cell-mediated immune (CMI) response indicative of early Th1 activation may be detected using interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA). Currently, the purified protein derivatives (PPDs), i.e., the total extract of mycobacteria antigens are used to recall CMI responses against Map. This study aimed to assess the ability of the chemically synthesized Map specific cell wall lipopentapeptide L5P to induce CMI response in cows infected by Map compared to PPD. L5P and PPD elicited an IFN-γ response in 12 and 35 animals from two Map infected herds respectively, but IFN-γ was not detected in the 13 cows recruited from a non-infected herd. Levels of IFN-γ detected were higher with PPD than with L5P. There was no correlation between the IFN-γ response and the humoral response to Map or faecal culture.

  12. Potent and Selective Peptidyl Boronic Acid Inhibitors of the Serine Protease Prostate-Specific Antigen

    PubMed Central

    LeBeau, Aaron M.; Singh, Pratap; Isaacs, John T.; Denmeade, Samuel R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Prostate cancer cells produce high (microgram to milligram/milliliter) levels of the serine protease Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA). PSA is enzymatically active in the extracellular fluid surrounding prostate cancers but is found at 1,000- to 10,000-fold lower concentrations in the circulation, where it is inactivated due to binding to abundant serum protease inhibitors. The exclusive presence of high levels of active PSA within prostate cancer sites makes PSA an attractive candidate for targeted imaging and therapeutics. A synthetic approach based on a peptide substrate identified first peptide aldehyde and then boronic acid inhibitors of PSA. The best of these had the sequence Cbz-Ser-Ser-Lys-Leu-(boro)Leu, with a Ki for PSA of 65 nM. The inhibitor had a 60-fold higher Ki for chymotrypsin. A validated model of PSA’s catalytic site confirmed the critical interactions between the inhibitor and residues within the PSA enzyme. PMID:18635003

  13. DETECTION OF SPECIFIC ANTIGEN IN SV40-TRANSFORMED CELLS BY IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE

    PubMed Central

    Pope, John H.; Rowe, Wallace P.

    1964-01-01

    With an immunofluorescent technique involving the use of serum of hamsters with SV40 tumors, nuclear fluorescence was detected in each of five cell lines, derived from four mammalian species, transformed by SV40 virus. Essentially all nuclei, including those of multinuclear cells, were fluorescent-stainable. Serum of hamsters bearing SV40 tumors was also found to give nuclear fluorescence in susceptible cells (AGMK or BSC-1) acutely infected with SV40 virus. These findings provide further evidence that cellular incorporation of the SV40 viral genome, with partial expression of the genome by synthesis of at least one virus-specific antigen, is an integral property of all SV40 transformed cells. PMID:14206435

  14. An Inexpensive, Fast and Sensitive Quantitative Lateral Flow Magneto-Immunoassay for Total Prostate Specific Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Jacqueline M.; Wraith, Patrick; Kiely, Janice; Persad, Raj; Hurley, Katrina; Hawkins, Peter; Luxton, Richard

    2014-01-01

    We describe the detection characteristics of a device the Resonant Coil Magnetometer (RCM) to quantify paramagnetic particles (PMPs) in immunochromatographic (lateral flow) assays. Lateral flow assays were developed using PMPs for the measurement of total prostate specific antigen (PSA) in serum samples. A detection limit of 0.8 ng/mL was achieved for total PSA using the RCM and is at clinically significant concentrations. Comparison of data obtained in a pilot study from the analysis of serum samples with commercially available immunoassays shows good agreement. The development of a quantitative magneto-immunoassay in lateral flow format for total PSA suggests the potential of the RCM to operate with many immunoassay formats. The RCM has the potential to be modified to quantify multiple analytes in this format. This research shows promise for the development of an inexpensive device capable of quantifying multiple analytes at the point-of-care using a magneto-immunoassay in lateral flow format. PMID:25587419

  15. Gold Nanoparticle Based Activatable Probe for Sensing Ultra-Low Levels of Prostate Specific Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dingbin; Huang, Xinglu; Wang, Zhantong; Jin, Albert; Sun, Xiaolian; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Fu; Ma, Ying; Niu, Gang; HightWalker, Angela R.; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    It is still in high demand to develop extremely sensitive and accurate clinical tools for biomarkers of interest for early diagnosis and monitoring of diseases. In this report, we present a highly sensitive and compatible gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based fluorescence activatable probe for sensing ultra-low levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in patient serum samples. The limit of detection of the newly-developed probe for PSA was pushed down to 0.032 pg/mL, which is more than two orders of magnitude lower than that of the conventional fluorescence probe. The ultrahigh sensitivity of this probe was attributed to the high loading efficiency of the dyes on AuNP surfaces and high fluorescence quenching unquenching abilities of the dye-AuNP pairs. The efficiency and robustness of this probe was investigated in patient serum samples, demonstrating the great potential of this probe in real-world applications. PMID:23683064

  16. AIRE polymorphism, melanoma antigen-specific T cell immunity, and susceptibility to melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Conteduca, Giuseppina; Fenoglio, Daniela; Parodi, Alessia; Battaglia, Florinda; Kalli, Francesca; Negrini, Simone; Tardito, Samuele; Ferrera, Francesca; Salis, Annalisa; Millo, Enrico; Pasquale, Giuseppe; Barra, Giusi; Damonte, Gianluca; Indiveri, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    AIRE is involved in susceptibility to melanoma perhaps regulating T cell immunity against melanoma antigens (MA). To address this issue, AIRE and MAGEB2 expressions were measured by real time PCR in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) from two strains of C57BL/6 mice bearing either T or C allelic variant of the rs1800522 AIRE SNP. Moreover, the extent of apoptosis induced by mTECs in MAGEB2-specific T cells and the susceptibility to in vivo melanoma B16F10 cell challenge were compared in the two mouse strains. The C allelic variant, protective in humans against melanoma, induced lower AIRE and MAGEB2 expression in C57BL/6 mouse mTECs than the T allele. Moreover, mTECs expressing the C allelic variant induced lower extent of apoptosis in MAGEB2-specific syngeneic T cells than mTECs bearing the T allelic variant (p < 0.05). Vaccination against MAGEB2 induced higher frequency of MAGEB2-specific CTL and exerted higher protective effect against melanoma development in mice bearing the CC AIRE genotype than in those bearing the TT one (p < 0.05). These findings show that allelic variants of one AIRE SNP may differentially shape the MA-specific T cell repertoire potentially influencing susceptibility to melanoma. PMID:27563821

  17. Detection of Specific Antibodies to an Antigenic Mannoprotein for Diagnosis of Penicillium marneffei Penicilliosis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Liang; Chen, Da-Liang; Lee, Cindy; Chan, Che-Man; Chan, King-Man; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch; Tsang, Dominic N. C.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    1998-01-01

    The disseminated and progressive fungal disease Penicillium marneffei penicilliosis is one of the most common infectious diseases in AIDS patients in Southeast Asia. To diagnose systemic penicilliosis, we developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based antibody test with Mp1p, a purified recombinant antigenic mannoprotein of P. marneffei. Evaluation of the test with guinea pig sera against P. marneffei and other pathogenic fungi indicated that this assay was specific for P. marneffei. Clinical evaluation revealed that high levels of specific antibody were detected in two immunocompetent penicilliosis patients. Furthermore, approximately 80% (14 of 17) of the documented penicilliosis patients with human immunodeficiency virus tested positive for the specific antibody. No false-positive results were found for serum samples from 90 healthy blood donors, 20 patients with typhoid fever, and 55 patients with tuberculosis, indicating a high specificity of the test. Thus, this ELISA-based test for the detection of anti-Mp1p antibody can be of significant value as a diagnostic for penicilliosis. PMID:9738061

  18. Development of Auto Antigen-specific Regulatory T Cells for Diabetes Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for normal immune surveillance, and their dysfunction can lead to the development of autoimmune diseases, such as type-1 diabetes (T1D). T1D is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease characterized by islet β cell destruction, hypoinsulinemia, and severely altered glucose homeostasis. Tregs play a critical role in the development of T1D and participate in peripheral tolerance. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) can be utilized to obtain a renewable source of healthy Tregs to treat T1D as they have the ability to produce almost all cell types in the body, including Tregs. However, the right conditions for the development of antigen (Ag)-specific Tregs from PSCs (i.e., PSC-Tregs) remain undefined, especially molecular mechanisms that direct differentiation of such Tregs. Auto Ag-specific PSC-Tregs can be programmed to be tissue-associated and infiltrate to local inflamed tissue (e.g., islets) to suppress autoimmune responses after adoptive transfer, thereby avoiding potential overall immunosuppression from non-specific Tregs. Developing auto Ag-specific PSC-Tregs can reduce overall immunosuppression after adoptive transfer by accumulating inflamed islets, which drives forward the use of therapeutic PSC-Tregs for cell-based therapies in T1D. PMID:27799873

  19. Free and complexed prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in the early detection of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tello, F L; Prats, C H; González, M D

    2001-02-01

    We evaluated the analytical performance and diagnostic utility of complexed prostate-specific antigen (CPSA) and their ratios, complexed-to-total PSA (C/T PSA) and free-to-complexed PSA (F/C PSA), in comparison with the total PSA (TPSA) and free-to-total PSA ratio (F/T PSA) as means of diagnosing prostate cancer (PC). Samples (n=101) were drawn from men with no evidence of malignancy (n=80) and from men with PC (n=21) at biopsy. For determination of the F/T PSA ratio, the DPC Immulite-2000 method was used; and the Bayer Immuno-1 CPSA and TPSA assays were used to determine the C/T PSA ratio. The Bayer Immuno-1 CPSA assay provides accurate and precise CPSA values in human serum. The performance of the different forms and ratios was compared using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. CPSA had the greatest area under the curve (AUC, 0.689) although it was not statistically different from the other parameters. A cut-off value of 4.66 ng/ml for CPSA provided a specificity of 38% and a sensitivity of 93%. The F/C PSA ratio maintained a sensitivity of 93% and had an increased specificity of 41%. The measurement of CPSA provides a slight increase in specificity compared with the use of the TPSA in the early detection of prostate cancer.

  20. H-2 alleles contribute to antigen 85-specific interferon-gamma responses during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Beamer, Gillian L; Cyktor, Joshua; Carruthers, Bridget; Turner, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    The in vitro immune responses to mycobacterial antigens have been linked to the H-2 loci in mice. We evaluated in vitro and in vivo immune responses during early Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) pulmonary infection of C57BL/6 (H-2(b)), C57BL/6 (H-2(k)), CBA/J (H-2(k)), and C3H/HeJ (H-2(k)) mice to determine H-2(k)-dependent and -independent effects. H-2(k)-dependent effects included delayed and diminished Ag85-specific Th1 cell priming, a reduced frequency of Ag85-specific IFN-γ producing cells, reduced IFN-γ protein in vivo, and increased M.tb lung burden as demonstrated by C57BL/6 H-2(k) mice vs. C57BL/6 mice. H-2(k)-independent factors controlled the amount of Ag85-specific IFN-γ produced by each cell, T cell numbers, granuloma size, and lymphocytic infiltrates in the lungs. Overall, these results suggest that an H-2(k)-dependent suboptimal generation of Ag85-specific cells impairs control of early M.tb growth in the lungs. H-2(k)-independent factors influence the potency of IFN-γ producing cells and immune cell trafficking during pulmonary M.tb infection.

  1. Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in cancer immunity: from antigen identification to tumor prognosis and development of therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Protti, M P; De Monte, L; Monte, L D; Di Lullo, G; Lullo, G D

    2014-04-01

    CD4(+) T cells comprise a large fraction of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and it is now established that they may exert an important role in tumor immune-surveillance. Several CD4(+) T cell subsets [i.e. T helper (Th)1, Th2, T regulatory (Treg), Th17, Th22 and follicular T helper (Tfh)] have been described and differentiation of each subset depends on both the antigen presenting cells responsible for its activation and the cytokine environment present at the site of priming. Tumor antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells with different functional activity have been found in the blood of cancer patients and different CD4(+) T cell subsets have been identified at the tumor site by the expression of specific transcription factors and the profile of secreted cytokines. Importantly, depending on the subset, CD4(+) T cells may exert antitumor versus pro-tumor functions. Here we review the studies that first identified the presence of tumor-specific CD4(+) T cells in cancer patients, the techniques used to identify the tumor antigens recognized, the role of the different CD4(+) T cell subsets in tumor immunity and in cancer prognosis and the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at activating efficient antitumor CD4(+) T cell effectors.

  2. Direct Delivery of Antigens to Dendritic Cells via Antibodies Specific for Endocytic Receptors as a Promising Strategy for Future Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Christian H. K.; Heger, Lukas; Heidkamp, Gordon F.; Baranska, Anna; Lühr, Jennifer J.; Hoffmann, Alana; Dudziak, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent professional antigen presenting cells and are therefore indispensable for the control of immunity. The technique of antibody mediated antigen targeting to DC subsets has been the basis of intense research for more than a decade. Many murine studies have utilized this approach of antigen delivery to various kinds of endocytic receptors of DCs both in vitro and in vivo. Today, it is widely accepted that different DC subsets are important for the induction of select immune responses. Nevertheless, many questions still remain to be answered, such as the actual influence of the targeted receptor on the initiation of the immune response to the delivered antigen. Further efforts to better understand the induction of antigen-specific immune responses will support the transfer of this knowledge into novel treatment strategies for human diseases. In this review, we will discuss the state-of-the-art aspects of the basic principles of antibody mediated antigen targeting approaches. A table will also provide a broad overview of the latest studies using antigen targeting including addressed DC subset, targeted receptors, outcome, and applied coupling techniques. PMID:27043640

  3. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen PET/CT: False-Positive Results due to Sarcoidosis?

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Robert M.; Djannatian, Manoutschehr; Czech, Norbert; Nitsche, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    We report on a 72-year-old male patient who developed sarcoidosis of the mediastinal lymph nodes, the liver, and the prostate 11 years ago. Seven years later, he underwent transurethral resection of the prostate by laser due to hematuria. Pathology of the resected chips showed a ‘granulomatous prostatitis with epitheloid cells’. Malignancy was histologically excluded at that time. Four years later, he was diagnosed with an undifferentiated prostate carcinoma, with a Gleason score of 5 + 4 = 9. After initiation of antihormonal therapy, he underwent radical prostatectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy, which revealed a pT3b pN1 carcinoma with infiltrated resection margins. Three months later, the prostate-specific antigen level was 1.4 ng/ml, and a local recurrence was suspected by ultrasound; consequently, a 68Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT was performed. This examination seemed to confirm the local recurrence, a right pelvic lymph node metastasis, and a hepatic metastasis. However, ultrasound with contrast medium could not confirm the metastatic spread to the liver. In palliative intention, radiotherapy of the pelvis was done. After 50 Gy, the supposed recurrence had markedly shrunk, and an additional boost dose with 16.2 Gy was applied. Two years later, the patient is still free of disease. Due to this clinical development, we doubt the diagnosis of a fulminant progression of the prostate cancer as suspected by PSMA-PET/CT. Instead, we suspect a recurrence of the previously proven sarcoidosis leading to false-positive results. Our focus in this report is on the interaction between PSMA-PET/CT and sarcoidosis. Another report on a case of sarcoidosis of the spleen seems to confirm this possibility [Kobe et al: Clin Nucl Med 2015;40: 897–898]. PMID:27721768

  4. Soluble CD4 antigen reactivity in intravenous immunoglobulin preparations: is it specific?

    PubMed Central

    Perosa, F; Rizzi, R; Pulpito, V; Dammacco, F

    1995-01-01

    Soluble CD4 antigen (sCD4) was measured in seven commercially available intravenous immunoglobulin preparations (IVIg) by means of a double determinant immunoassay (DDIA), whereby two MoAbs recognizing two distinct and spatially distant epitopes on CD4 were used to capture and detect the antigen, respectively. Preincubation of six out of seven IVIg, which were found to be apparently positive for sCD4, with mouse- and bovine-derived serum or purified immunoglobulins completely neutralized DDIA reactivity for sCD4. The inhibition was specific since it was not or only partially observed when IVIg were mixed with whole serum or purified IgG from rabbit. Extensive absorption of six IVIg on insolubilized mouse IgG (mIgG) resulted in a complete loss of reactivity. Eluted human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) from any of the IVIg displayed a dose-dependent binding in a DDIA, though its extent varied from one preparation to another. Western blot analysis showed that HAMA from all IVIg contained no component with a molecular weight identical with or close to that of recombinant CD4. Purified mIgG markedly influenced the sCD4 reactivity of two IVIg (Sandoglobulin and Globuman I.V.) when sCD4 was measured with a purchased 'CD4-specific Test Kit', thus suggesting that HAMA can exceed the absorbing capacity of the sample diluent. Taken as a whole, these data indicate that sCD4-based DDIA signal is mostly, if not completely, generated by the presence of human immunoglobulin with anti-mouse immunoglobulin reactivity, thus casting doubts on the actual occurrence of sCD4 in IVIg. Images Fig. 4 PMID:7813106

  5. Clinical optimization of antigen specific modulation of type 1 diabetes with the plasmid DNA platform.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Peter; Utz, Paul J; Robinson, William; Steinman, Lawrence

    2013-12-01

    Some clinical trials in humans have aimed at modulation of type 1 diabetes (T1D) via alteration of the immune response to putative islet cell antigens, particularly proinsulin and insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase and the peptide, DiaPep 277, derived from heat shock protein 60. The focus here is on development of a specially engineered DNA plasmid encoding proinsulin to treat T1D. The plasmid is engineered to turn off adaptive immunity to proinsulin. This approach yielded exciting results in a randomized placebo controlled trial in 80 adult patients with T1D. The implications of this trial are explored in regards to the potential for sparing inflammation in islets and thus allowing the functioning beta cells to recover and produce more insulin. Strategies to further strengthen the effects seen thus far with the tolerizing DNA plasmid to proinsulin will be elucidated. The DNA platform affords an opportunity for easy modifications. In addition standard exploration of dose levels, route of administration and frequency of dose are practical. Optimization of the effects seen to date on C-peptide and on depletion of proinsulin specific CD8 T cells are feasible, with expected concomitant improvement in other parameters like hemoglobin A1c and reduction in insulin usage. T1D is one of the few autoimmune conditions where antigen specific therapy can be achieved, provided the approach is tested intelligently. Tolerizing DNA vaccines to proinsulin and other islet cell autoantigens is a worthy pursuit to potentially treat, prevent and to perhaps even 'cure' or 'prevent' type 1 diabetes.

  6. Hyperinducibility of Ia antigen on astrocytes correlates with strain-specific susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Massa, P.T.; ter Meulen, V.; Fontana, A.

    1987-06-01

    In search of a phenotypic marker determining genetically controlled susceptibility to delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions in the brain-in particular, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)- the authors have compared the ..gamma..-interferon (IFN-..gamma..) induction of Ia molecules on astrocytes and macrophages from rat and mouse strains that are susceptible or resistant to this disease. They focused on Ia expression because DTH reactions to self or foreign antigens are largely mediated by lymphocytes restricted by class II (Ia) antigens of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The data demonstrate that Lewis (fully susceptible) and Brown Norway (BN) (fully resistant) rats are very different in that Lewis astrocytes express much higher levels of Ia than BN astrocytes. Similar data were obtained from an analysis of EAE-susceptible and -resistant mouse strains (SJL and BALB/c, respectively), which suggest that this phenomenon may be universal and not limited to only one mammalian species. At least one gene responsible for Ia hyperinduction is located outside the rat RT-1 or the mouse MHC locus. Animals congenic at the RT-1 or MHC locus of the resistant strain but with background genes of the susceptible strain exhibit intermediate levels of Ia compared to fully resistant and susceptible rodents, which fits well with the reduced EAE susceptibility of these congenic animals. Furthermore, hyperinduction of Ia is astrocyte specific, since peritoneal macrophages of susceptible and resistant strains exhibit identical profiles of Ia induction. Thus, astrocyte Ia hyperinducibility may be a major strain- and tissue-specific factor that contributes to Ia-restricted DTH reactions in the brain.

  7. Prostate-Specific Antigen Bounce After High-Dose-Rate Monotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Niraj H.; Kamrava, Mitchell; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Steinberg, Michael; Demanes, Jeffrey

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To characterize the magnitude and kinetics of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounces after high-dose-rate (HDR) monotherapy and determine relationships between certain clinical factors and PSA bounce. Methods and Materials: Longitudinal PSA data and various clinical parameters were examined in 157 consecutive patients treated with HDR monotherapy between 1996 and 2005. We used the following definition for PSA bounce: rise in PSA ≥threshold, after which it returns to the prior level or lower. Prostate-specific antigen failure was defined per the Phoenix definition (nadir +2 ng/mL). Results: A PSA bounce was noted in 67 patients (43%). The number of bounces per patient was 1 in 45 cases (67%), 2 in 19 (28%), 3 in 2 (3%), 4 in 0, and 5 in 1 (1%). The median time to maximum PSA bounce was 1.3 years, its median magnitude was 0.7, and its median duration was 0.75 years. Three patients (2%) were noted to have PSA failure. None of the 3 patients who experienced biochemical failure exhibited PSA bounce. In the fully adjusted model for predicting each bounce, patients aged <55 years had a statistically significant higher likelihood of experiencing a bounce (odds ratio 2.22, 95% confidence interval 1.38-3.57, P=.001). There was also a statistically significant higher probability of experiencing a bounce for every unit decrease in Gleason score (odds ratio 1.52, 95% confidence interval 1.01-2.04, P=.045). Conclusions: A PSA bounce occurs in a significant percentage of patients treated with HDR monotherapy, with magnitudes varying from <1 in 28% of cases to ≥1 in 15%. The median duration of bounce is <1 year. More bounces were identified in patients with lower Gleason score and age <55 years. Further investigation using a model to correlate magnitude and frequency of bounces with clinical variables are under way.

  8. Characterization of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) for Use in Therapeutic and Diagnostic Strategies Against Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells in patients with prostate cancer using prostate specific membrane-derived primers in the polymerase chain reaction . Int...Limitations of reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analyses for detection of micrometastatic epithelial cancer cells in bone marrow . I. Clin. Oncol...that PSMA is expressed in the Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen 309 endothelial

  9. Antigens of Streptococcus mutans: isolation of a serotype-specific and a cross-reactive antigen from walls of strain V-100 (serotype e).

    PubMed

    Wetherell, J F; Bleiweis, A S

    1978-01-01

    Two cell wall-associated polysaccharide antigens were extracted from purified cell walls of Streptococcus mutans serotype e strain V-100. One of these purified antigens (I) is specific for serotype e, whereas the other (II) has antigenic determinants reactive with both heterologous anti-serotype c serum (GS-5) and the homologous (e) serum. When crude formamide extracts of V-100 cell walls were loaded onto a Cellex-D column and eluted with a linear gradient of ammonium carbonate (0.02 to 0.40 M), the two products mentioned above could be recovered. The purified, antigenically reactive products (I and II) were each composed only of rhamnose and glucose in approximately a 2:1 molar ratio. Immunoelectrophoresis of the crude formamide extract, peak I, and peak II showed the purified fractions to have opposite mobilities and the crude extract to have a mobility that encompassed both purified peaks when reacted with homologous antiserum (V-100). When these three fractions were immunoelectrophoresed and reacted with heterologous anti-serotype c serum (GS-5), only the anodic portion of the crude V-100 formamide extract and purified peak II formed precipitates. Ouchterlony analysis with homologous antiserum produced precipitin patterns between the crude formamide extract and both purified peaks, indicating complete identity. However, only crude extracts of V-100 and the purified peak II material reacted with heterologous (c) antiserum; peak I did not cross-react in these Ouchterlony assays. Hapten inhibition studies revealed that a beta-glucosyl moiety is the immunodeterminant for serotype e and is present on each purified fraction. The basis of the cross-reaction between anti-c sera and the purified antigen II of e is discussed.

  10. Induction of antigen-specific regulatory T lymphocytes by human dendritic cells expressing the glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Haifa; Godot, Véronique; Maillot, Marie-Christine; Prejean, Maria Victoria; Cohen, Nicolas; Krzysiek, Roman; Lemoine, François M; Zou, Weiping; Emilie, Dominique

    2007-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) determine whether antigen presentation leads to immune activation or to tolerance. Tolerance-inducing DCs (also called regulatory DCs) act partly by generating regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs). The mechanism used by DCs to switch toward regulatory DCs during their differentiation is unclear. We show here that human DCs treated in vitro with glucocorticoids produce the glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ). Antigen presentation by GILZ-expressing DCs generates CD25(high)FOXP3(+)CTLA-4/CD152(+) and interleukin-10-producing Tregs inhibiting the response of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. This inhibition is specific to the antigen presented, and only proliferating CD4(+) T lymphocytes express the Treg markers. Interleukin-10 is required for Treg induction by GILZ-expressing DCs. It is also needed for the suppressive function of Tregs. Antigen-presenting cells from patients treated with glucocorticoids generate interleukin-10-secreting Tregs ex vivo. These antigen-presenting cells produce GILZ, which is needed for Treg induction. Therefore, GILZ is critical for commitment of DCs to differentiate into regulatory DCs and to the generation of antigen-specific Tregs. This mechanism may contribute to the therapeutic effects of glucocorticoids.

  11. Specific mutation of a gammaherpesvirus-expressed antigen in response to CD8 T cell selection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Loh, Joy; Popkin, Daniel L; Droit, Lindsay; Braaten, Douglas C; Zhao, Guoyan; Zhang, Xin; Vachharajani, Punit; Myers, Nancy; Hansen, Ted H; Virgin, Herbert W

    2012-03-01

    Herpesviruses are thought to be highly genetically stable, and their use as vaccine vectors has been proposed. However, studies of the human gammaherpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus, have found viral isolates containing mutations in HLA class I-restricted epitopes. Using murine gammaherpesvirus 68 expressing ovalbumin (OVA), we examined the stability of a gammaherpesvirus antigenic locus under strong CD8 T cell selection in vivo. OVA-specific CD8 T cells selected viral isolates containing mutations in the OVA locus but minimal alterations in other genomic regions. Thus, a CD8 T cell response to a gammaherpesvirus-expressed antigen that is not essential for replication or pathogenesis can result in selective mutation of that antigen in vivo. This finding may have relevance for the use of herpesvirus vectors for chronic antigen expression in vivo.

  12. Incomplete clonal deletion as prerequisite for tissue-specific minor antigen tolerization

    PubMed Central

    Mahr, Benedikt; Unger, Lukas; Hock, Karin; Schwarz, Christoph; Farkas, Andreas M.; Baranyi, Ulrike; Wrba, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    Central clonal deletion has been considered the critical factor responsible for the robust state of tolerance achieved by chimerism-based experimental protocols, but split-tolerance models and the clinical experience are calling this assumption into question. Although clone-size reduction through deletion has been shown to be universally required for achieving allotolerance, it remains undetermined whether it is sufficient by itself. Therapeutic Treg treatment induces chimerism and tolerance in a stringent murine BM transplantation model devoid of myelosuppressive recipient treatment. In contrast to irradiation chimeras, chronic rejection (CR) of skin and heart allografts in Treg chimeras was permanently prevented, even in the absence of complete clonal deletion of donor MHC-reactive T cells. We show that minor histocompatibility antigen mismatches account for CR in irradiation chimeras without global T cell depletion. Furthermore, we show that Treg therapy–induced tolerance prevents CR in a linked suppression–like fashion, which is maintained by active regulatory mechanisms involving recruitment of thymus-derived Tregs to the graft. These data suggest that highly efficient intrathymic and peripheral deletion of donor-reactive T cells for specificities expressed on hematopoietic cells preclude the expansion of donor-specific Tregs and, hence, do not allow for spreading of tolerance to minor specificities that are not expressed by donor BM. PMID:27699263

  13. Modulation of antigen presentation by autoreactive B cell clones specific for GAD65 from a type I diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    BANGA, J P; MOORE, J K; DUHINDAN, N; MADEC, A M; VAN ENDERT, P M; ORGIAZZI, J; ENDL, J

    2004-01-01

    We used a GAD65-specific human B–T cell line cognate system in vitro to investigate the modulation of GAD65 presentation by autoantibody, assessed in a proliferation assay. Generally, if the T cell determinant overlaps or resides within the antibody epitope, effects of presentation are blunted while if they are distant can lead to potent presentation. For three different autoreactive B–T cell line cognate pairs, the modulation of GAD65 presentation followed the mode of overlapping or distant epitopes with resultant potent or undetectable presentation. However, other cognate pairs elicited variability in this pattern of presentation. Notably, one B cell line, DPC, whose antibody epitope did not overlap with the T cell determinants, was consistently poor in presenting GAD65. Using the fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor 647 conjugated to GAD65 to study receptor-mediated antigen endocytosis showed that all the antigen-specific B cell clones were efficient in intracellular accumulation of the antigen. Additionally, multicolour immunofluorescence microscopy showed that the internalized GAD65/surface IgG complexes were rapidly targeted to a perinuclear compartment in all GAD-specific B cell clones. This analysis also demonstrated that HLA-DM expression was reduced strongly in DPC compared to the stimulatory B cell clones. Thus the capability of antigen-specific B cells to capture and present antigen to human T cell lines is dependent on the spatial relationship of B and T cell epitopes as well other factors which contribute to the efficiency of presentation. PMID:14678267

  14. A novel mucosal vaccine targeting Peyer's patch M cells induces protective antigen-specific IgA responses.

    PubMed

    Shima, Hideaki; Watanabe, Takashi; Fukuda, Shinji; Fukuoka, Shin-Ichi; Ohara, Osamu; Ohno, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Mucosal vaccines can induce mucosal immunity, including antigen-specific secretory IgA production, to protect from invasion by pathogens and to neutralize toxins at mucosal surfaces. We established an effective antigen-delivering fusion protein, anti-GP2-SA, as a mucosal vaccine. The anti-GP2-SA consists of streptavidin (SA) fused to the antigen-binding fragment region from a mAb against glycoprotein 2 (GP2), an antigen-uptake receptor specifically expressed on M cells. Anti-GP2-SA targets antigen-sampling M cells in the follicle-associated epithelium covering Peyer's patches. Immunofluorescence showed that anti-GP2-SA specifically bound to M cells. Orally administered biotinylated ovalbumin peptide (bOVA) conjugated with anti-GP2-SA more efficiently induced OVA-specific fecal IgA secretion compared with bOVA alone or bOVA conjugated with SA. Furthermore, mice immunized by oral administration of the biotinylated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) lysate conjugated with anti-GP2-SA were significantly better protected from subsequent infection by virulent S. Typhimurium than mice treated with the bacterial lysate alone or conjugated with SA. These results suggest that anti-GP2-SA-based M-cell-targeting vaccines are a novel strategy for inducing efficient mucosal immunity.

  15. Antigen-Specific Priming is Dispensable in Depletion of Apoptosis-Sensitive T Cells for GvHD Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Yarkoni, Shai; Stein, Jerry; Yaniv, Isaac; Askenasy, Nadir

    2014-01-01

    Prophylactic approaches to graft versus host disease (GvHD) have employed both phenotypic reduction of T cells and selective elimination of host-primed donor T cells in vitro and in vivo. An additional approach to GvHD prophylaxis by functional depletion of apoptosis-sensitive donor T cells without host-specific sensitization ex vivo showed remarkable reduction in GHD incidence and severity. We address the role and significance of antigen-specific sensitization of donor T cells and discuss the mechanisms of functional T cell purging by apoptosis for GvHD prevention. Host-specific sensitization is dispensable because migration is antigen-independent and donor T cell sensitization is mediated by multiple and redundant mechanisms of presentation of major and minor histocompatibility complex and tissue antigens by donor and host antigen-presenting cells. Our data suggest that potential murine and human GvH effectors reside within subsets of preactivated T cells susceptible to negative regulation by apoptosis prior to encounter of and sensitization to specific antigens.

  16. Antigen-Specific Priming is Dispensable in Depletion of Apoptosis-Sensitive T Cells for GvHD Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Yarkoni, Shai; Stein, Jerry; Yaniv, Isaac; Askenasy, Nadir

    2014-01-01

    Prophylactic approaches to graft versus host disease (GvHD) have employed both phenotypic reduction of T cells and selective elimination of host-primed donor T cells in vitro and in vivo. An additional approach to GvHD prophylaxis by functional depletion of apoptosis-sensitive donor T cells without host-specific sensitization ex vivo showed remarkable reduction in GHD incidence and severity. We address the role and significance of antigen-specific sensitization of donor T cells and discuss the mechanisms of functional T cell purging by apoptosis for GvHD prevention. Host-specific sensitization is dispensable because migration is antigen-independent and donor T cell sensitization is mediated by multiple and redundant mechanisms of presentation of major and minor histocompatibility complex and tissue antigens by donor and host antigen-presenting cells. Our data suggest that potential murine and human GvH effectors reside within subsets of preactivated T cells susceptible to negative regulation by apoptosis prior to encounter of and sensitization to specific antigens. PMID:24904571

  17. Antigen-specific cytotoxicity by invariant NKT cells in vivo is CD95/CD178 dependent and is correlated with antigenic potency

    PubMed Central

    Wingender, Gerhard; Krebs, Philippe; Beutler, Bruce; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2010-01-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are a unique subset of T lymphocytes that rapidly carry out effector functions following activation with glycolipid Ags, such as the model Ag α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer). Numerous studies have investigated the mechanisms leading to Th1- and Th2 cytokine production by iNKT cells, and the effects of the copious amounts of cytokines these cells produce. Less is known, however, about the mechanisms of iNKT cell cytotoxicity. Here we investigated the effect of antigen availability and strength, as well as the molecules involved in iNKT cytotoxicity. We demonstrate that the iNKT cell cytotoxicity in vivo correlates directly with the amount of CD1d expressed by the targets as well as the TCR affinity for the target glycolipid Ag. iNKT cells from spleen, liver and thymus were comparable in their cytotoxicity in vitro. Surprisingly, we show that the antigen-specific cytotoxicity of iNKT cells in vivo depended almost exclusively on the interaction of CD95 (Fas) with CD178 (FasL), and that this mechanism can be efficiently utilized for tumor protection. Therefore unlike NK cells, which rely mostly on perforin/granzyme mediated mechanisms, the antigen-specific cytotoxicity of iNKT cells in vivo is largely restricted to the CD95/CD178 pathway. PMID:20660713

  18. Delineation of antigen-specific and antigen-nonspecific CD8+ memory T-cell responses after cytokine-based cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tietze, Julia K.; Wilkins, Danice E. C.; Sckisel, Gail D.; Bouchlaka, Myriam N.; Alderson, Kory L.; Weiss, Jonathan M.; Ames, Erik; Bruhn, Kevin W.; Craft, Noah; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Longo, Dan L.; Lanier, Lewis L.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Redelman, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Memory T cells exhibit tremendous antigen specificity within the immune system and accumulate with age. Our studies reveal an antigen-independent expansion of memory, but not naive, CD8+ T cells after several immunotherapeutic regimens for cancer resulting in a distinctive phenotype. Signaling through T-cell receptors (TCRs) or CD3 in both mouse and human memory CD8+ T cells markedly up-regulated programmed death-1 (PD-1) and CD25 (IL-2 receptor α chain), and led to antigen-specific tumor cell killing. In contrast, exposure to cytokine alone in vitro or with immunotherapy in vivo did not up-regulate these markers but resulted in expanded memory CD8+ T cells expressing NKG2D, granzyme B, and possessing broadly lytic capabilities. Blockade of NKG2D in mice also resulted in significantly diminished antitumor effects after immunotherapy. Treatment of TCR-transgenic mice bearing nonantigen expressing tumors with immunotherapy still resulted in significant antitumor effects. Human melanoma tissue biopsies obtained from patients after topically applied immunodulatory treatment resulted in increased numbers of these CD8+ CD25− cells within the tumor site. These findings demonstrate that memory CD8+ T cells can express differential phenotypes indicative of adaptive or innate effectors based on the nature of the stimuli in a process conserved across species. PMID:22251483

  19. Characterization of specific immune responses to different Aspergillus antigens during the course of invasive Aspergillosis in hematologic patients.

    PubMed

    Potenza, Leonardo; Vallerini, Daniela; Barozzi, Patrizia; Riva, Giovanni; Forghieri, Fabio; Beauvais, Anne; Beau, Remi; Candoni, Anna; Maertens, Johan; Rossi, Giulio; Morselli, Monica; Zanetti, Eleonora; Quadrelli, Chiara; Codeluppi, Mauro; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Pagano, Livio; Caira, Morena; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Maccaferri, Monica; Stefani, Alessandro; Morandi, Uliano; Tazzioli, Giovanni; Girardis, Massimo; Delia, Mario; Specchia, Giorgina; Longo, Giuseppe; Marasca, Roberto; Narni, Franco; Merli, Francesco; Imovilli, Annalisa; Apolone, Giovanni; Carvalho, Agostinho; Comoli, Patrizia; Romani, Luigina; Latgè, Jean Paul; Luppi, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Several studies in mouse model of invasive aspergillosis (IA) and in healthy donors have shown that different Aspergillus antigens may stimulate different adaptive immune responses. However, the occurrence of Aspergillus-specific T cells have not yet been reported in patients with the disease. In patients with IA, we have investigated during the infection: a) whether and how specific T-cell responses to different Aspergillus antigens occur and develop; b) which antigens elicit the highest frequencies of protective immune responses and, c) whether such protective T cells could be expanded ex-vivo. Forty hematologic patients have been studied, including 22 patients with IA and 18 controls. Specific T cells producing IL-10, IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-17A have been characterized through enzyme linked immunospot and cytokine secretion assays on 88 peripheral blood (PB) samples, by using the following recombinant antigens: GEL1p, CRF1p, PEP1p, SOD1p, α1-3glucan, β1-3glucan, galactomannan. Specific T cells were expanded through short term culture. Aspergillus-specific T cells producing non-protective interleukin-10 (IL-10) and protective interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) have been detected to all the antigens only in IA patients. Lower numbers of specific T cells producing IL-4 and IL-17A have also been shown. Protective T cells targeted predominantly Aspergillus cell wall antigens, tended to increase during the IA course and to be associated with a better clinical outcome. Aspergillus-specific T cells could be successfully generated from the PB of 8 out of 8 patients with IA and included cytotoxic subsets able to lyse Aspergillus hyphae. Aspergillus specific T-cell responses contribute to the clearance of the pathogen in immunosuppressed patients with IA and Aspergillus cell wall antigens are those mainly targeted by protective immune responses. Cytotoxic specific T cells can be expanded from immunosuppressed patients even during the infection by using the above mentioned antigens

  20. Induction of antigen-specific immunity by pH-sensitive carbonate apatite as a potent vaccine carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Hebishima, Takehisa; Tada, Seiichi; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Akaike, Toshihiro; Ito, Yoshihiro; Aida, Yoko

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To develop effective vaccine, we examined the effects of CO{sub 3}Ap as an antigen carrier. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OVA contained in CO{sub 3}Ap was taken up by BMDCs more effectively than free OVA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OVA-immunized splenocytes was activated by OVA contained in CO{sub 3}Ap effectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OVA contained in CO{sub 3}Ap induced strong OVA-specific immune responses to C57BL/6 mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 3}Ap is promising antigen carrier for the achievement of effective vaccine. -- Abstract: The ability of carbonate apatite (CO{sub 3}Ap) to enhance antigen-specific immunity was examined in vitro and in vivo to investigate its utility as a vaccine carrier. Murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells took up ovalbumin (OVA) containing CO{sub 3}Ap more effectively than free OVA. Interestingly, mice immunized with OVA-containing CO{sub 3}Ap produced OVA-specific antibodies more effectively than mice immunized with free OVA. Furthermore, immunization of C57BL/6 mice with OVA-containing CO{sub 3}Ap induced the proliferation and antigen-specific production of IFN-{gamma} by splenocytes more strongly than immunization with free OVA. Moreover, no significant differences were detected in the induction of delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, an immune reaction involving an antigen-specific, cell-mediated immune response between OVA-containing CO{sub 3}Ap and OVA-containing alumina salt (Alum), suggesting that CO{sub 3}Ap induced cell-mediated immune response to the same degree as Alum, which is commonly used for clinical applications. This study is the first to demonstrate the induction of antigen-specific immune responses in vivo by CO{sub 3}Ap.

  1. Regulation network of serum cytokines induced by tuberculosis-specific antigens reveals biomarkers for tuberculosis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Wei, M; Wu, Z Y; Lin, J H; Li, Y; Qian, Z X; Xie, Y Q; Su, H; Zhou, W

    2015-12-17

    In this study, we identified potential serum biomarkers for the diagnosis of active tuberculosis (TB) and screening for latent TB infections (LTBIs). Peripheral blood samples from 40 healthy individuals, 40 patients with TB, and 40 LTBI individuals were stimulated with the TB-specific antigens ESAT-6 and CFP-10. Human inflammatory cytokine arrays were used to detect the expression of inflammatory cytokines. Cytokines with significant changes were screened to construct a cytokine regulation network. The levels of the cytokines CCL1 (I-309), CXCL9 (MIG), IL-10, IL-6, CSF2, CSF3, IL-8, IL-1α, IL-7, TGF-β1, CCL2, IL-2, IL-13, and TNFα were significantly upregulated in the active TB group. The levels of CCL3, IL-1β, CCL8, IFNγ, and CXCL10 were significantly increased in the TB groups compared to those in the healthy control group. sTNF RII was upregulated in the LTBI group. CCL4 and MIP1d were significantly increased in all groups.The upregulated cytokines were mainly found in the IFNγ and IL-1α regulatory networks. Importantly, we found that CXCL10 (IP-10), CCL3, CCL8, and IL-1β may be more suitable than IFNγ for active or latent TB infection screening. Furthermore, we found that levels of CCL1 (I-309), CXCL9 (MIG), IL-10, IL-6, CSF2, CSF3, IL-8, IL-1α, IL-7, TGF-β1, CCL2, IL-2, and IL-13 after TB antigen stimulation may help distinguish between active and latent TB.

  2. Antigen-Specific Regulatory T Cells and Low Dose of IL-2 in Treatment of Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pham, Minh N; von Herrath, Matthias G; Vela, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in preventing effector T-cell (Teff) targeting of self-antigens that can lead to tissue destruction in autoimmune settings, including type 1 diabetes (T1D). Autoimmunity is caused in part by an imbalance between Teff and Tregs. Early attempts to treat with immunosuppressive agents have led to serious side effects, thus requiring a more targeted approach. Low-dose IL-2 (LD IL-2) can provide immunoregulation with few side effects by preferentially acting on Tregs to drive tolerance. The concept of LD IL-2 as a therapeutic approach is supported by data in mouse models where autoimmunity is cured and further strengthened by success in human clinical studies in hepatitis C virus-induced vasculitis, chronic graft-versus-host disease, and Alopecia areata. Treatment will require identification of a safe therapeutic window, which is a difficult task given that patients are reported to have deficient or defective IL-2 production or signaling and have experienced mild activation of NK cells and eosinophils with LD IL-2 therapy. In T1D, an LD IL-2 clinical trial concluded that Tregs can be safely expanded in humans; however, the study was not designed to address efficacy. Antigen-specific therapies have also aimed at regulation of the autoimmune response but have been filled with disappointment despite an extensive list of diverse islet antigens tested in humans. This approach could be enhanced through the addition of LD IL-2 to the antigenic treatment regimen to improve the frequency and function of antigen-specific Tregs, without global immunosuppression. Here, we will discuss the use of LD IL-2 and islet antigen to enhance antigen-specific Tregs in T1D and focus on what is known about their immunological impact, their safety, and potential efficacy, and need for better methods to identify therapeutic effectiveness.

  3. Prostate Cancer Detection and Prognosis: From Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) to Exosomal Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Filella, Xavier; Foj, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) remains the most used biomarker in the management of early prostate cancer (PCa), in spite of the problems related to false positive results and overdiagnosis. New biomarkers have been proposed in recent years with the aim of increasing specificity and distinguishing aggressive from non-aggressive PCa. The emerging role of the prostate health index and the 4Kscore is reviewed in this article. Both are blood-based tests related to the aggressiveness of the tumor, which provide the risk of suffering PCa and avoiding negative biopsies. Furthermore, the use of urine has emerged as a non-invasive way to identify new biomarkers in recent years, including the PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG fusion gene. Available results about the PCA3 score showed its usefulness to decide the repetition of biopsy in patients with a previous negative result, although its relationship with the aggressiveness of the tumor is controversial. More recently, aberrant microRNA expression in PCa has been reported by different authors. Preliminary results suggest the utility of circulating and urinary microRNAs in the detection and prognosis of PCa. Although several of these new biomarkers have been recommended by different guidelines, large prospective and comparative studies are necessary to establish their value in PCa detection and prognosis. PMID:27792187

  4. Pasteurella haemolytica serotype 2 contains the gene for a noncapsular serotype 1-specific antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, C T; Maheswaran, S K; Murtaugh, M P

    1995-01-01

    An ssa1-homologous genomic fragment cloned from Pasteurella haemolytica serotype 2 (ST2) enabled transformation of Escherichia coli DH5 alpha to a serotype 1 (ST1) phenotype through expression of the ST1-specific antigen (Ssa1). The Ssa1 protein expressed by ssa1-transformed E. coli was susceptible to heat and protease treatment and was distinct from P. haemolytica ST1-specific capsular polysaccharide. Electrophoretic analysis of in vitro-translated proteins, as well as the predicted amino acid sequence, demonstrated that Ssa1 proteins encoded from either ST1- or ST2-derived ssa1 genes were essentially identical. A comparison of the nucleotide sequences of ssa1 genes derived from P. haemolytica ST1 and ST2 revealed greater than 99% homology. Amino acid sequence homology of the predicted products of ST1- and ST2-derived ssa1 genes was greater than 98%. Northern (RNA) blot studies revealed that the presence of an increased level of ssa1 transcript in P. haemolytica ST1 grown as surface-adherent cultures on solid medium was correlated with a serologically detectable Ssa1 protein. Expression of the ssa1 transcript in ST1 was similarly upregulated by a high iron concentration in the growth medium. PMID:7890392

  5. Antigen-specific memory in B-1a and its relationship to natural immunity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Ghosn, Eliver Eid Bou; Cole, Leah E; Obukhanych, Tetyana V; Sadate-Ngatchou, Patricia; Vogel, Stefanie N; Herzenberg, Leonard A; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2012-04-03

    In the companion article by Yang and colleagues [Yang Y, et al. (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 109, 10.1073/pnas.1121631109], we have shown that priming with glycolipid (FtL) from Francisella tularensis live-vaccine strain (i) induces FtL-specific B-1a to produce robust primary responses (IgM >IgG); (ii) establishes persistent long-term production of serum IgM and IgG anti-FtL at natural antibody levels; and (iii) elicits FtL-specific B-1a memory cells that arise in spleen but rapidly migrate to the peritoneal cavity, where they persist indefinitely but divide only rarely. Here, we show that FtL rechallenge alone induces these PerC B-1a memory cells to divide extensively and to express a unique activation signature. However, FtL rechallenge in the context of a Toll-like receptor 4 agonist-stimulated inflammatory response readily induces these memory cells to migrate to spleen and initiate production of dominant IgM anti-FtL secondary responses. Thus, studies here reveal unique mechanisms that govern B-1a memory development and expression, and introduce B-1a memory as an active participant in immune defenses. In addition, at a practical level, these studies suggest previously unexplored vaccination strategies for pathogen-associated antigens that target the B-1a repertoire.

  6. Diagnostic value of tissue polypeptide-specific antigen (TPS) in neuroblastoma and Wilms' tumour.

    PubMed Central

    Rebhandl, W.; Rami, B.; Turnbull, J.; Felberbauer, F. X.; Paya, K.; Bancher-Todesca, D.; Gherardini, R.; Mittlboeck, M.; Horcher, E.

    1998-01-01

    Although tissue polypeptide-specific antigen (TPS) has been described as a potentially useful serum marker of tumour activity in adult epithelial tumours, few data are available for childhood malignancies. Neuroblastomas and Wilms' tumours are the commonest types of solid malignancies found in the retroperitoneum of children. At this time, a widely used marker for Wilms' tumour is not available. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit, serum TPS levels in 23 children with neuroblastomas, nine with Wilms' tumours and 22 with benign tumours were evaluated to test the usefulness of the marker in identifying malignancies. Compared with healthy children (n = 110), the preoperative least-square means (LSM) of serum TPS were considerably elevated in both neuroblastoma (LSM = 209 U l(-1)) and Wilms' tumour (LSM = 235 U l(-1)), whereas values in benign tumours were only slightly elevated. Although the Wilms' tumours were associated with higher preoperative serum TPS levels, there was no statistically significant difference compared with neuroblastomas. Receiver operating characteristic analysis (ROC curves) showed a high sensitivity and specificity for both malignancies. Successful treatment resulted in decrease in TPS serum values. Serum TPS measurements in children presenting with abdominal masses can help in diagnosing the two commonest extracranial solid malignancies of childhood. Furthermore, TPS could acquire a pivotal role in monitoring therapy. PMID:9836484

  7. Tolerance induction in hemophilia A animal models: battling inhibitors with antigen-specific immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Adair, Patrick; Su, Yan; Scott, David W

    2013-05-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked recessive bleeding disorder due to either a lack of or greatly reduced activity in the blood coagulation protein factor VIII (FVIII), due to mutations in the F8 gene. This poses significant challenges for FVIII replacement therapy since hemophilic patients are not immunologically tolerant to the protein. Thus, a proportion of patients who receive plasma-derived or recombinant FVIII replacement therapy develop anti FVIII neutralizing antibodies, known as "inhibitors." These patients require long-term regimens of high dose FVIII administration, which has varying success rates and prohibitive costs. Therefore, therapeutics for tolerance induction in such patients with inhibitors are desired. In this review, we address the current progress of immunotherapies for inducing FVIII specific tolerance in animal models of hemophilia A. Specifically we discuss the beneficial effects of B-cell depletion on immune tolerance induction (ITI), B-cell mediated gene therapy, antigen-coupled lymphocyte therapy, and regulatory T-cell epitopes (Tregitopes).

  8. Comparative analysis of prostate-specific antigen by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Barrabés, Sílvia; Farina-Gomez, Noemi; Llop, Esther; Puerta, Angel; Diez-Masa, Jose Carlos; Perry, Antoinette; de Llorens, Rafael; de Frutos, Mercedes; Peracaula, Rosa

    2017-02-01

    Serum levels of Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) are not fully specific for prostate cancer (PCa) diagnosis and several efforts are focused on searching to improve PCa markers through the study of PSA subforms that could be cancer associated. We have previously reported by 2DE a decrease in the sialic acid content of PSA from PCa compared to benign prostatic hyperplasia patients based on the different proportion of the PSA spots. However, faster and more quantitative techniques, easier to automate than 2DE, are desirable. In this study, we examined the potential of CE for resolving PSA subforms in different samples and compared the results with those obtained by 2DE. We first fractionated by OFFGEL the subforms of PSA from seminal plasma according to their pIs and analyzed each separated fraction by 2DE and CE. We also analyzed PSA and high pI PSA, both from seminal plasma, and PSA from urine of a PCa patient. These samples with different PSA spots proportions by 2DE, due to different posttranslational modifications, also presented different CE profiles. This study shows that CE is a useful and complementary technique to 2DE for analyzing samples with different PSA subforms, which is of high clinical interest.

  9. N protein is the predominant antigen recognized by vesicular stomatitis virus-specific cytotoxic T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Puddington, L; Bevan, M J; Rose, J K; Lefrançois, L

    1986-01-01

    The specificity of anti-vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-specific cytotoxic T cells was explored with cell lines expressing VSV genes introduced by electroporation. Low levels of nucleocapsid (N) protein were detected on the surface of VSV-infected cells, but N protein could not be detected on the plasma membrane of transfected EL4 cells. Intracellular N protein was detectable by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or immunoprecipitation in some of the transfected cell lines but not in others, unless the transfected genes were induced by sodium butyrate. However, all of the stably transfected EL4 cell lines expressing the VSV-Indiana N protein were efficiently lysed by serotype-specific and cross-reactive anti-VSV cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Primary cross-reactive anti-VSV CTLs appeared to be specific solely for N protein, based on cold-target competition assays using infected and transfected target cells. Cell lines expressing 100- to 1,000-fold less N protein than did VSV-infected cells were efficiently lysed by both primary and secondary anti-VSV CTLs. Cell lines expressing 100-fold less G protein than did VSV-infected cells were not lysed by either population of effectors. Significantly, cold-target competition studies with secondary CTLs demonstrated that N protein-expressing cell lines were more efficient competitors than were VSV-infected cells even though the latter expressed 100- to 1,000-fold more N protein. This was not an artifact of viral infection since infection of the transfected cell lines did not affect their ability to compete. The possibility that cell lines constitutively expressing internal virus proteins present antigen more effectively than infected cells do is discussed. Images PMID:3022003

  10. Preparation, characterization, and determination of immunological activities of transfer factor specific to human sperm antigen.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianwei; Kong, Cui; Yuan, Zhaohong; Luo, Junmin; Ma, Rui; Yu, Jiang; Cao, Jinghe

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The objective of this study was to prepare, characterize, and determine immunological activities of specific transfer factor (STF) specific to human sperm antigen (HSA) for the preparation of antisperm contraceptive vaccine that can be used as an immunocontraceptive. METHODS. HSA-STF was prepared using the spleens of rabbits vaccinated with HSA. The specific immunological activities were examined by lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT), leukocyte adhesion inhibition test (LAIT), and by determining the concentrations of IL-4, γ -IFN, and IL-21. HSA-STF was a helveolous substance, having a pH value of 7.0 ± 0.4 and UV absorption maxima at 258 ± 6 nm. It contained seventeen amino acids; glycine and glutamic acids were the highest in terms of concentrations (38.8 μ g/mL and 36.3 μ g/mL, resp.). RESULTS. The concentration of polypeptide was 2.34 ± 0.31 mg/mL, and ribose was 0.717 ± 0.043 mg/mL. The stimulation index for lymphocyte proliferation test was 1.84, and the leukocyte adhesion inhibition rate was 37.7%. There was a statistically significant difference between the cultural lymphocytes with HSA-STF and non-HSA-STF for γ -IFN and IL-21 (P < 0.05), but there was no statistical significance for IL-4 (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION. HSA-STF was prepared and characterized successfully. It had immunological activity which could transfer the immune response specific to HSA and prove to be a potential candidate for the development of male immunocontraceptive agents.

  11. Fully human CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptors for T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Sommermeyer, D; Hill, T; Shamah, S M; Salter, A I; Chen, Y; Mohler, K M; Riddell, S R

    2017-02-16

    Impressive results have been achieved by adoptively transferring T-cells expressing CD19-specific CARs with binding domains from murine mAbs to treat B-cell malignancies. T-cell mediated immune responses specific for peptides from the murine scFv antigen-binding domain of the CAR can develop in patients and result in premature elimination of CAR-T-cells increasing the risk of tumor relapse. As fully human scFv might reduce immunogenicity, we generated CD19-specific human scFvs with similar binding characteristics as the murine FMC63-derived scFv using human Ab/DNA-libraries. CARs were constructed in various formats from several scFvs and used to transduce primary human T-cells. The resulting CD19-CAR-T-cells were specifically activated by and lysed CD19-positive tumor cell lines and primary CLL cells, and eliminated human lymphoma xenografts in immunodeficient mice. Certain fully human CAR constructs were superior to the FMC63-CAR, which is widely used in clinical trials. Imaging of cell surface distribution of the human CARs revealed no evidence of clustering without target cell engagement, and tonic signaling was not observed. To further reduce potential immunogenicity of the CARs, we also modified the fusion sites between different CAR components. The described fully human CARs for a validated clinical target may reduce immune rejection compared with murine based CARs.Leukemia accepted article preview online, 16 February 2017. doi:10.1038/leu.2017.57.

  12. IgE epitope proximity determines immune complex shape and effector cell activation capacity

    PubMed Central

    Gieras, Anna; Linhart, Birgit; Roux, Kenneth H.; Dutta, Moumita; Khodoun, Marat; Zafred, Domen; Cabauatan, Clarissa R.; Lupinek, Christian; Weber, Milena; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Keller, Walter; Finkelman, Fred D.; Valenta, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background IgE-allergen complexes induce mast cell and basophil activation and thus immediate allergic inflammation. They are also important for IgE-facilitated allergen presentation to T cells by antigen-presenting cells. Objective To investigate whether the proximity of IgE binding sites on an allergen affects immune complex shape and subsequent effector cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Methods We constructed artificial allergens by grafting IgE epitopes in different numbers and proximity onto a scaffold protein. The shape of immune complexes formed between artificial allergens and the corresponding IgE was studied by negative-stain electron microscopy. Allergenic activity was determined using basophil activation assays. Mice were primed with IgE, followed by injection of artificial allergens to evaluate their in vivo allergenic activity. Severity of systemic anaphylaxis was measured by changes in body temperature. Results We could demonstrate simultaneous binding of 4 IgE antibodies in close vicinity to each other. The proximity of IgE binding sites on allergens influenced the shape of the resulting immune complexes and the magnitude of effector cell activation and in vivo inflammation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the proximity of IgE epitopes on an allergen affects its allergenic activity. We thus identified a novel mechanism by which IgE-allergen complexes regulate allergic inflammation. This mechanism should be important for allergy and other immune complex–mediated diseases. PMID:26684291

  13. A Soluble Form of the High Affinity IgE Receptor, Fc-Epsilon-RI, Circulates in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Dehlink, Eleonora; Platzer, Barbara; Baker, Alexandra H.; LaRosa, Jessica; Pardo, Michael; Dwyer, Peter; Yen, Elizabeth H.; Szépfalusi, Zsolt

    2011-01-01

    Soluble IgE receptors are potential in vivo modulators of IgE-mediated immune responses and are thus important for our basic understanding of allergic responses. We here characterize a novel soluble version of the IgE-binding alpha-chain of Fc-epsilon-RI (sFcεRI), the high affinity receptor for IgE. sFcεRI immunoprecipitates as a protein of ∼40 kDa and contains an intact IgE-binding site. In human serum, sFcεRI is found as a soluble free IgE receptor as well as a complex with IgE. Using a newly established ELISA, we show that serum sFcεRI levels correlate with serum IgE in patients with elevated IgE. We also show that serum of individuals with normal IgE levels can be found to contain high levels of sFcεRI. After IgE-antigen-mediated crosslinking of surface FcεRI, we detect sFcεRI in the exosome-depleted, soluble fraction of cell culture supernatants. We further show that sFcεRI can block binding of IgE to FcεRI expressed at the cell surface. In summary, we here describe the alpha-chain of FcεRI as a circulating soluble IgE receptor isoform in human serum. PMID:21544204

  14. Specificity and kinetics of norovirus binding to magnetic bead- conjugated histo-blood group antigens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Histo-blood group antigens (HBGA) have been identified as candidate receptors for human norovirus (NOR). Type A, type H1, and Lewis histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) in humans have been identified as major targets for NOR binding. Pig HBGA-conjugated magnetic beads have been utilized as a means ...

  15. Placental restriction of fetal growth reduces cutaneous responses to antigen after sensitization in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Wooldridge, Amy L.; Bischof, Robert J.; Meeusen, Els N.; Liu, Hong; Heinemann, Gary K.; Hunter, Damien S.; Giles, Lynne C.; Kind, Karen L.; Owens, Julie A.; Clifton, Vicki L.

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal and early childhood exposures are implicated as causes of allergy, but the effects of intrauterine growth restriction on immune function and allergy are poorly defined. We therefore evaluated effects of experimental restriction of fetal growth on immune function and allergic sensitization in adolescent sheep. Immune function (circulating total red and white blood cells, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, and basophils, and the antibody response to Clostridial vaccination) and responses to house dust mite (HDM) allergen and ovalbumin (OVA) antigen sensitization (specific total Ig, IgG1, and IgE antibodies, and cutaneous hypersensitivity) were investigated in adolescent sheep from placentally restricted (PR, n = 23) and control (n = 40) pregnancies. Increases in circulating HDM-specific IgE (P = 0.007) and OVA-specific IgE (P = 0.038) were greater in PR than control progeny. PR did not alter total Ig, IgG1, or IgM responses to either antigen. PR increased OVA-specific but not HDM-specific IgA responses in females only (P = 0.023). Multiple birth increased Ig responses to OVA in a sex-specific manner. PR decreased the proportion of positive cutaneous hypersensitivity responders to OVA at 24 h (P = 0.030) but had no effect on cutaneous responses to HDM. Acute wheal responses to intradermal histamine correlated positively with birth weight in singletons (P = 0.023). Intrauterine growth restriction may suppress inflammatory responses in skin downstream of IgE induction, without impairment in antibody responses to a nonpolysaccharide vaccine. Discord between cutaneous and IgE responses following sensitization suggests new mechanisms for prenatal allergy programming. PMID:24500430

  16. Protection against Nasopharyngeal Colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae Is Mediated by Antigen-Specific CD4+ T Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Trzciński, Krzysztof; Thompson, Claudette M.; Srivastava, Amit; Basset, Alan; Malley, Richard; Lipsitch, Marc

    2008-01-01

    CD4+ T-cell-dependent acquired immunity confers antibody-independent protection against pneumococcal colonization. Since this mechanism is poorly understood for extracellular bacteria, we assessed the antigen specificity of the induction and recall of this immune response by using BALB/c DO11.10Rag−/− mice, which lack mature B and T cells except for CD4+ T cells specific for the OVA323-339 peptide derived from ovalbumin. Serotype 6B Streptococcus pneumoniae strain 603S and unencapsulated strain Rx1ΔlytA were modified to express OVA323-339 as a fusion protein with surface protein A (PspA) (strains 603OVA1 and Rx1ΔlytAOVA1) or with PspA, neuraminidase A, and pneumolysin (Rx1ΔlytAOVA3). Whole-cell vaccines (WCV) were made of ethanol-killed cells of Rx1ΔlytA plus cholera toxin (CT) adjuvant, of Rx1ΔlytAOVA1 + CT (WCV-OVA1), and of Rx1ΔlytAOVA3 + CT (WCV-OVA3). Mice intranasally immunized with WCV-OVA1, but not with WCV or CT alone, were protected against intranasal challenge with 603OVA1. There was no protection against strain 603S in mice immunized with WCV-OVA1. These results indicate antigen specificity of both immune induction and the recall response. Effector action was not restricted to antigen-bearing bacteria since colonization by 603S was reduced in animals immunized with vaccines made of OVA-expressing strains when ovalbumin or killed Rx1ΔlytAOVA3 antigen was administered around the time of challenge. CD4+ T-cell-mediated protection against pneumococcal colonization can be induced in an antigen-specific fashion and requires specific antigen for effective bacterial clearance, but this activity may extend beyond antigen-expressing bacteria. These results are consistent with the recruitment and/or activation of phagocytic or other nonspecific effectors by antigen-specific CD4+ T cells. PMID:18391006

  17. Inhibition of autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction by monoclonal antibodies specific for the beta chain of HLA-DR antigens.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, M; Ikeda, H; Ogasawara, K; Ishikawa, N; Okuyama, T; Fukasawa, Y; Kojima, H; Kunikane, H; Hawkin, S; Ohhashi, T

    1984-09-01

    Recent studies using rabbit antisera to the separated HLA-DR alpha and beta subunits have suggested that alpha chain-specific, but not beta chain-specific, antisera inhibit T cell proliferative responses in primary and secondary human autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction (AMLR). In the present study, with the aid of sequential co-precipitation assays and Western blotting methods, a monoclonal rat alloantibody 1E4, specific for the beta chain of rat class II molecules carrying an Ia determinant Ba-2.7, was characterized to recognize a monomorphic determinant located on the beta chain of DR antigens. This antibody and a murine monoclonal antibody HU-4, also specific for the beta chain of DR antigens, strongly inhibited both primary and secondary AMLR through a mechanism distinct from an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity reaction. These results indicate that the inhibition of AMLR is not a unique feature of DR alpha-specific antibodies.

  18. Nasal mast cells in perennial allergic rhinitics exhibit increased expression of the Fc epsilonRI, CD40L, IL-4, and IL-13, and can induce IgE synthesis in B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pawankar, R; Okuda, M; Yssel, H; Okumura, K; Ra, C

    1997-01-01

    Cross-linking of allergen specific IgE bound to the high affinity IgE receptor (FC epsilonRI) on the surface of mast cells with multivalent allergens results in the release of both pre-formed and newly generated mediators, and in the manifestation of allergic symptoms. The expression of Fc epsilonRI, and the synthesis of IgE are therefore critical for the development of allergic diseases. In this study, we report that nasal mast cells (NMC) from patients with perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR) expressed significantly greater levels of the Fc epsilonRI, CD40L, IL-4, and IL-13 as compared to NMC from patients with chronic infective rhinitis (CIR). The level of Fc epsilonRI expression in NMC of PAR patients strongly correlated with the levels of serum total (r = 0.8, P < 0.003) and specific IgE (r = 0.89, P < 0.0004) antibodies. In addition, stimulation of NMC with IL-4, upregulated the Fc epsilonRIalpha chain expression both at the protein and mRNA levels, as detected by flow cytometry and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, NMC from PAR, but not CIR, patients induced IgE synthesis by purified B cells in the presence of Der fII (mite antigen). These results suggest novel and critical roles for mast cells in promoting the allergic reaction through the increased expression of Fc epsilonRI and by enhancing and amplifying the IgE production, within the local microenvironment. PMID:9119992

  19. IMMORTALIZATION OF HUMAN AND RHESUS MACAQUE PRIMARY ANTIGEN-SPECIFIC T CELLS BY RETROVIRALLY TRANSDUCED TELOMERASE REVERSE TRANSCRIPTASE

    PubMed Central

    Barsov, Eugene V.

    2011-01-01

    Human and rhesus macaque primary antigen-specific T cells derived from infected or immunized individuals or animals are a valuable material with which to study cellular immune responses against pathogens and tumors. Antigen-specific T cells can be expanded in vitro but have a finite proliferative life span. After a limited period in culture, primary T cells undergo replicative senescence and stop dividing. This restricts their applicability to short term experiments and complicates their use in adoptive immunotherapy. The proliferative life span of primary human and rhesus macaque T cells can be considerably extended by ectopically expressed human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). Antigen-specific T cells transduced with TERT-expressing retroviral vectors can proliferate and expand in culture for long periods of time while maintaining their primary T cell characteristics including antigen-specific responses. Thus, TERT-immortalized T cells are an important and valuable resource for studying T cell immune responses and, potentially, for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:22048804

  20. Characterization of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) for Use in Therapeutic and Diagnostic Strategies against Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    polymerase chain reaction analyses for detection of micrometastatic epithelial cancer cells in bone marrow . J Clin...Edwards, G. J. Wise and et al. (1994). Sensitive nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction detection of circulating prostatic tumor cells ...transcription polymerase chain reaction assay based on prostate- specific membrane antigen . Clin Chem 41: 1698-704. 44.

  1. Intracerebral delivery of a third generation EGFRvIII-specific chimeric antigen receptor is efficacious against human glioma.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bryan D; Suryadevara, Carter M; Gedeon, Patrick C; Herndon, James E; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Bigner, Darell D; Sampson, John H

    2014-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CAR)-transduced T cells hold great promise in the treatment of malignant disease. Here, we demonstrate that intracerebral injection with a human, epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII)-specific, third generation CAR successfully treats glioma in mice. Importantly, these results endorse clinical translation of this CAR in patients with EGFRvIII-expressing brain tumors.

  2. T-cell receptor alpha chain plays a critical role in antigen-specific suppressor cell function.

    PubMed Central

    Kuchroo, V K; Byrne, M C; Atsumi, Y; Greenfield, E; Connolly, J B; Whitters, M J; O'Hara, R M; Collins, M; Dorf, M E

    1991-01-01

    Antigen-specific suppressor T-cell hybridomas release soluble suppressor factors (TsF) in the supernatant that modulate both in vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity and in vitro plaque-forming cell responses in an antigen-specific manner. To study the relationship between the T-cell receptor (TcR) and TsF, we developed a series of TcR alpha- or TcR beta- expression variants from suppressor T-cell hybridomas that expressed the CD3-TcR alpha/beta complex. We demonstrate that loss of TcR alpha but not TcR beta mRNA was accompanied by the concomitant loss of suppressor bioactivity. Homologous transfection of TcR alpha cDNA into a TcR alpha- beta+ clone reconstituted both CD3-TcR expression and suppressor function. Furthermore, suppressor activity from TcR beta- variants was specifically absorbed by antigen and anti-TcR alpha antibodies, but not by anti-CD3 or anti-TcR beta affinity columns. These data directly establish a role for the TcR alpha chain in suppressor T-cell function and suggest that the TcR alpha chain is part of the antigen-specific TsF molecule. Images PMID:1833764

  3. Antigen-Specific Th17 Cells Are Primed by Distinct and Complementary Dendritic Cell Subsets in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, Florian R.; Becattini, Simone; Rülicke, Thomas; Sallusto, Federica; LeibundGut-Landmann, Salomé

    2015-01-01

    Candida spp. can cause severe and chronic mucocutaneous and systemic infections in immunocompromised individuals. Protection from mucocutaneous candidiasis depends on T helper cells, in particular those secreting IL-17. The events regulating T cell activation and differentiation toward effector fates in response to fungal invasion in different tissues are poorly understood. Here we generated a Candida-specific TCR transgenic mouse reactive to a novel endogenous antigen that is conserved in multiple distant species of Candida, including the clinically highly relevant C. albicans and C. glabrata. Using TCR transgenic T cells in combination with an experimental model of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) we investigated antigen presentation and Th17 priming by different subsets of dendritic cells (DCs) present in the infected oral mucosa. Candida-derived endogenous antigen accesses the draining lymph nodes and is directly presented by migratory DCs. Tissue-resident Flt3L-dependent DCs and CCR2-dependent monocyte-derived DCs collaborate in antigen presentation and T cell priming during OPC. In contrast, Langerhans cells, which are also present in the oral mucosa and have been shown to prime Th17 cells in the skin, are not required for induction of the Candida-specific T cell response upon oral challenge. This highlights the functional compartmentalization of specific DC subsets in different tissues. These data provide important new insights to our understanding of tissue-specific antifungal immunity. PMID:26431538

  4. Surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence on Au nanohole array for prostate-specific antigen detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingwen; Wu, Lin; Wong, Ten It; Zhang, Jinling; Liu, Xiaohu; Zhou, Xiaodong; Bai, Ping; Liedberg, Bo; Wang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Localized surface plasmon (LSP) has been widely applied for the enhancement of fluorescence emission for biosensing owing to its potential for strong field enhancement. However, due to its small penetration depth, LSP offers limited fluorescence enhancement over a whole sensor chip and, therefore, insufficient sensitivity for the detection of biomolecules, especially large molecules. We demonstrate the simultaneous excitation of LSP and propagating surface plasmon (PSP) on an Au nanohole array under Kretschmann configuration for the detection of prostate-specific antigen with a sandwich immunoassay. The proposed method combines the advantages of high field enhancement by LSP and large surface area probed by PSP field. The simulated results indicated that a maximum enhancement of electric field intensity up to 1,600 times can be achieved under the simultaneous excitation of LSP and PSP modes. The sandwich assay of PSA carried out on gold nanohole array substrate showed a limit of detection of 140 fM supporting coexcitation of LSP and PSP modes. The limit of detection was approximately sevenfold lower than that when only LSP was resonantly excited on the same substrate. The results of this study demonstrate high fluorescence enhancement through the coexcitation of LSP and PSP modes and pave a way for its implementation as a highly sensitive bioassay. PMID:28392689

  5. The Stability of Prostate-Specific Antigen in Semen Under Various Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Srettabunjong, Supawon; Betset, Parimol; Limawongpranee, Suvit; Ekpo, Pattama

    2015-11-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is most commonly used for identifying semen, especially in the absence of sperm. However, PSA concentration varies according to storage temperature and duration, and little is known about its stability in semen. This study was therefore aimed to determine the stability under five different temperatures: -80, -20, 4, 25, and 37°C; and nine different durations: 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 14, 30, 90, and 180 days. All samples were stored at -80°C after being secreted from the volunteers' body until analyzed. Results showed that the PSA concentration declined significantly over time under all temperatures studied except -80°C. At -20 and 4°C, PSA was still detectable on Day 180 with 50% and 70% decrease from its original concentration, respectively. At 25 and 37°C, PSA was detected up to Day 7 and 3, respectively. This information might assist forensic scientists understand more about PSA nature and integrate it into their works.

  6. [Prostate-specific antigen use among men without prostate cancer in France (2008-2010)].

    PubMed

    Tuppin, Philippe; Samson, Solène; Perrin, Paul; Ruffion, Alain; Millat, Bertrand; Weill, Alain; Ricordeau, Philippe; Allemand, Hubert

    2012-05-01

    This study evaluated the rate of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) dosage in men age 40 or older, affiliated to the general social security system in France between 2008 and 2010: 10.9 million men, excluding those with known prostate cancer. In 2010, 30.7% of this male population had at least one dosage of PSA, i.e. 12.3% of those between 40 and 54, 47.7% of those between 55 and 74, and 47.6% of those 75 years old or older. Percentages of men who had at least one dosage in the three-year period were 26.2%, 77.3% and 75.6% for the same age brackets, respectively. Overall, 13% of men age 40 or older, and in particular 21% of men 75 years old or older had more than three PSA dosages during the three-year time period. Eighty-eight percent of PSA dosages performed in 2010 were prescribed by a general practitioner and 3.2% by an urologist. Conflicting with French and internationally published recommendations regarding PSA dosage, the present results demonstrate a shift toward chaotic mass screening of prostate cancer particularly in men aged 75 or older.

  7. Surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence on Au nanohole array for prostate-specific antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingwen; Wu, Lin; Wong, Ten It; Zhang, Jinling; Liu, Xiaohu; Zhou, Xiaodong; Bai, Ping; Liedberg, Bo; Wang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Localized surface plasmon (LSP) has been widely applied for the enhancement of fluorescence emission for biosensing owing to its potential for strong field enhancement. However, due to its small penetration depth, LSP offers limited fluorescence enhancement over a whole sensor chip and, therefore, insufficient sensitivity for the detection of biomolecules, especially large molecules. We demonstrate the simultaneous excitation of LSP and propagating surface plasmon (PSP) on an Au nanohole array under Kretschmann configuration for the detection of prostate-specific antigen with a sandwich immunoassay. The proposed method combines the advantages of high field enhancement by LSP and large surface area probed by PSP field. The simulated results indicated that a maximum enhancement of electric field intensity up to 1,600 times can be achieved under the simultaneous excitation of LSP and PSP modes. The sandwich assay of PSA carried out on gold nanohole array substrate showed a limit of detection of 140 fM supporting coexcitation of LSP and PSP modes. The limit of detection was approximately sevenfold lower than that when only LSP was resonantly excited on the same substrate. The results of this study demonstrate high fluorescence enhancement through the coexcitation of LSP and PSP modes and pave a way for its implementation as a highly sensitive bioassay.

  8. Synthetic peptides from Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1) specifically interacting with human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Valbuena, J; Rodríguez, L; Vera, R; Puentes, A; Curtidor, H; Cortés, J; Rosas, J; Patarroyo, M E

    2006-10-01

    Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1) is expressed during both the sporozoite and merozoite stage of the parasite's life cycle. The role placed by AMA-1 during sporozoite invasion of hepatocytes has not been made sufficiently clear to date. Identifying the sequences involved in binding to hepatocytes is an important step towards understanding the structural basis for sporozoite-hepatocyte interaction. Binding assays between P. falciparum AMA-1 peptides and HepG2 cell were performed in this study to identify possible AMA-1 functional regions. Four AMA-1 high activity binding peptides (HABPs) bound specifically to hepatocytes: 4310 ((74)QHAYPIDHEGAEPAPQEQNL(93)), 4316 ((194)TLDEMRHFYKDNKYVKNLDE(213)), 4321 ((294)VVDNWEKVCPRKNLQNAKFGY(313)) and 4332 ((514)AEVTSNNEVVVKEEYKDEYA(533)). Their binding to these cells became saturable and resistant to treatment with neuraminidase. Most of these peptides were located in AMA-1 domains I and III, these being target regions for protective antibody responses. These peptides interacted with 36 and 58 kDa proteins on the erythrocyte surface. Some of the peptides were found in exposed regions of the AMA-1 protein, thereby facilitating their interaction with host cells. It is thus probable that AMA-1 regions defined by the four peptides mentioned above are involved in sporozoite-hepatocyte interaction.

  9. Serine repeat antigen peptides which bind specifically to red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Puentes, A; Garcia, J; Vera, R; Lopez, Q R; Urquiza, M; Vanegas, M; Salazar, L M; Patarroyo, M E

    2000-08-01

    It has been reported that serine repeat antigen (SERA) binds directly to human erythrocyte membranes, inside-out vesicles and intact mouse erythrocytes. Similarly, mAbs specific against SERA are effective in blocking red blood cell (RBC) invasion by P. falciparum merozoites. Furthermore, the N-terminal recombinant SERA fragment inhibits the merozoite invasion of erythrocyte. In this study of 49 non-overlapping 20-residue-long peptides encompassing the whole SERA protein FCR3 strain, seven peptides having high RBC binding activity were found. Six of these peptides (three from the SERA N-terminal domain) are located in conserved regions and show affinity constants between 150 and 1100 nM, Hill coefficients between 1.5 and 3.0 and 30000-120000 binding sites per cell. Some of these peptides inhibited in vitro merozoite invasion of erythrocyte and intra-erythrocytic development. Residues which are critical in the binding to erythrocytes (in bold face), i.e. 6725 (YLKETNNAISFESNSGSLEKK), 6733 (YALGSDIPEKCDTLASNCFLS), 6737 (YDNILVKMFKTNENNDKSELI), 6746 (DQGNCDTSWIFASKYHLETI), 6754 (YKKVQNLCGDDTADHAVNIVG) and 6762 (NEVSERVHVYHILKHIKDGK), were determined by means of competition assays with high-binding peptide glycine analogues. The identification of peptides which bind to erythrocyte membrane is important in understanding the process of RBC invasion by P. falciparum merozoites.

  10. A lab-in-a-briefcase for rapid prostate specific antigen (PSA) screening from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Ana I; Castanheira, Ana P; Edwards, Alexander D; Reis, Nuno M

    2014-08-21

    We present a new concept for rapid and fully portable prostate specific antigen (PSA) measurements, termed "lab-in-a-briefcase", which integrates an affordable microfluidic ELISA platform utilising a melt-extruded fluoropolymer microcapillary film (MCF) containing an array of 10 200 μm internal diameter capillaries, a disposable multi-syringe aspirator (MSA), a sample tray pre-loaded with all of the required immunoassay reagents, and a portable film scanner for colorimetric signal digital quantification. Each MSA can perform 10 replicate microfluidic immunoassays on 8 samples, allowing 80 measurements to be made in less than 15 minutes based on semi-automated operation, without the need of additional fluid handling equipment. The assay was optimised for the measurement of a clinically relevant range of PSA of 0.9 to 60.0 ng ml(-1) in 15 minutes with CVs on the order of 5% based on intra-assay variability when read using a consumer flatbed film scanner. The PSA assay performance in the MSA remained robust in undiluted or 1 : 2 diluted human serum or whole blood, and the matrix effect could simply be overcome by extending sample incubation times. The PSA "lab-in-a-briefcase" is particularly suited to a low-resource health setting, where diagnostic labs and automated immunoassay systems are not accessible, by allowing PSA measurement outside the laboratory using affordable equipment.

  11. Spaceflight impairs antigen-specific tolerance induction in vivo and increases inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tammy T; Spurlock, Sandra M; Candelario, Tara Lynne T; Grenon, S Marlene; Hughes-Fulford, Millie

    2015-10-01

    The health risks of a dysregulated immune response during spaceflight are important to understand as plans emerge for humans to embark on long-term space travel to Mars. In this first-of-its-kind study, we used adoptive transfer of T-cell receptor transgenic OT-II CD4 T cells to track an in vivo antigen-specific immune response that was induced during the course of spaceflight. Experimental mice destined for spaceflight and mice that remained on the ground received transferred OT-II cells and cognate peptide stimulation with ovalbumin (OVA) 323-339 plus the inflammatory adjuvant, monophosphoryl lipid A. Control mice in both flight and ground cohorts received monophosphoryl lipid A alone without additional OVA stimulation. Numbers of OT-II cells in flight mice treated with OVA were significantly increased by 2-fold compared with ground mice treated with OVA, suggesting that tolerance induction was impaired by spaceflight. Production of proinflammatory cytokines were significantly increased in flight compared with ground mice, including a 5-fold increase in IFN-γ and a 10-fold increase in IL-17. This study is the first to show that immune tolerance may be impaired in spaceflight, leading to excessive inflammatory responses.

  12. Semenogelins I and II bind zinc and regulate the activity of prostate-specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Magnus; Linse, Sara; Frohm, Birgitta; Lundwall, Ake; Malm, Johan

    2005-04-15

    In semen, the gel proteins SgI and SgII (semenogelins I and II) are digested by PSA (prostate-specific antigen), resulting in liquefaction and release of motile spermatozoa. Semen contains a high concentration of Zn2+, which is known to inhibit the protease activity of PSA. We characterized the binding of Zn2+ to SgI and SgII and found evidence that these proteins are involved in regulating the activity of PSA. Intact SgI and SgII and synthetic semenogelin peptides were used in the experiments. Binding of Zn2+ was studied by radioligand blotting, titration with a zinc (II) fluorophore chelator and NMR analysis. A chromogenic substrate was used to measure the enzymatic activity of PSA. SgI and SgII bound Zn2+ with a stoichiometry of at least 10 mol (mol of protein)(-1) and with an average dissociation constant of approx. 5 microM per site. Moreover, Zn2+-inhibited PSA was activated by exposure to SgI or SgII. Since both proteins have high affinity for Zn2+ and are the dominating proteins in semen, they probably represent the major Zn2+ binders in semen, one function of which may be to regulate the activity of PSA. The system is self-regulating, and PSA is maintained in an active state by its substrate.

  13. Antigen-specific immunodeficiency and its relation to the spectrum of American cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Convit, J; Ulrich, M

    1993-01-01

    Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and antibodies against Leishmania have been studied in 207 Venezuelan patients with localized, muco-cutaneous and diffuse forms of American cutaneous leishmaniasis, representing the clinical spectrum of this disease. Muco-cutaneous disease appears to be related to inadequate immunomodulation or defective killing mechanisms; about 40% of these patients show exaggerated DTH, which is inversely related to antibody levels and is more pronounced in less extensive lesions. Patients with diffuse disease present severe antigen-specific immunodeficiency, apparently limited to T cell-mediated protection, DTH and its in vitro correlates. Treatment of patients with diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis using a combination of chemotherapy and combined vaccine immunotherapy (heat-killed promastigotes plus BCG) has induced clinical inactivity and positive DTH in about one third of these patients, accompanied by marked lowering of antibody levels. These results are discussed in terms of Type 1 T cell responses, protective in cell-mediated immune reactions, and Type 2 T cell responses, non-protective in cell-mediated reactions, in the spectrum of leishmaniasis. Factors related to the induction of favorable Type 1 responses to intracellular pathogens are discussed in terms of a possible mechanism of the combined vaccine efficacy and priorities in vaccine development.

  14. Enzymatic Triggered Release of an HIV-1 Entry Inhibitor from Prostate Specific Antigen Degradable Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Meredith R.; Aliyar, Hyder A.; Lee, Chang-won; Jay, Julie I.; Gupta, Kavita M.; Watson, Karen M.; Stewart, Russell J.; Buckheit, Robert W.; Kiser, Patrick F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the design, construction and characterization of the first anti-HIV drug delivery system that is triggered to release its contents in the presence of human semen. Microgel particles were synthesized with a crosslinker containing a peptide substrate for the seminal serine protease prostate specific antigen (PSA) and were loaded with the HIV-1 entry inhibitor sodium poly(styrene-4-sulfonate) (pSS). The particles were composed of N-2-hydroxyproplymethacrylamide and bis-methacrylamide functionalized peptides based on the PSA substrates GISSFYSSK and GISSQYSSK. Exposure to human seminal plasma (HSP) degraded the microgel network and triggered the release of the entrapped antiviral polymer. Particles with the crosslinker composed of the substrate GISSFYSSK showed 17 times faster degradation in seminal plasma than that of the crosslinker composed of GISSQYSSK. The microgel particles containing 1 mol% GISSFYSSK peptide crosslinker showed complete degradation in 30 hours in the presence of HSP at 37 °C and pSS released from the microgels within 30 minutes reached a concentration of 10 µg/mL, equivalent to the published IC90 for pSS. The released pSS inactivated HIV-1 in the presence of HSP. The solid phase synthesis of the crosslinkers, preparation of the particles by inverse microemulsion polymerization, HSP-triggered release of pSS and inactivation of HIV-1 studies are described. PMID:21511017

  15. PET Imaging in Prostate Cancer: Focus on Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Mease, Ronnie C.; Foss, Catherine A.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in American men. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with emerging radiopharmaceuticals promises accurate staging of primary disease, restaging of recurrent disease, detection of metastatic lesions and, ultimately, for predicting the aggressiveness of disease. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a well-characterized imaging biomarker of PCa. Because PSMA levels are directly related to androgen independence, metastasis and progression, PSMA could prove an important target for the development of new radiopharmaceuticals for PET. Preclinical data for new PSMA-based radiotracers are discussed and include new 89Zr- and 64Cu-labeled anti-PSMA antibodies and antibody fragments, 64Cu-labeled aptamers, and 11C-, 18F-, 68Ga-, 64Cu-, and 86Y-labeled low molecular weight inhibitors of PSMA. Several of these agents, namely 68Ga-HBED-CC conjugate 15, 18F-DCFBC 8, and BAY1075553 are particularly promising, each having detected sites of PCa in initial clinical studies. These early clinical results suggest that PET/CT using PSMA-targeted agents, especially with compounds of low molecular weight, will make valuable contributions to the management of PCa. PMID:23590171

  16. Prostate-specific membrane antigen as a target for cancer imaging and therapy

    PubMed Central

    KIESS, A. P.; BANERJEE, S. R.; MEASE, R. C.; ROWE, S. P.; RAO, A.; FOSS, C. A.; CHEN, Y.; YANG, X.; CHO, S. Y.; NIMMAGADDA, S.; POMPER, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a molecular target whose use has resulted in some of the most productive work toward imaging and treating prostate cancer over the past two decades. A wide variety of imaging agents extending from intact antibodies to low-molecular-weight compounds permeate the literature. In parallel there is a rapidly expanding pool of antibody-drug conjugates, radiopharmaceutical therapeutics, small-molecule drug conjugates, theranostics and nanomedicines targeting PSMA. Such productivity is motivated by the abundant expression of PSMA on the surface of prostate cancer cells and within the neovasculature of other solid tumors, with limited expression in most normal tissues. Animating the field is a variety of small-molecule scaffolds upon which the radionuclides, drugs, MR-detectable species and nanoparticles can be placed with relative ease. Among those, the urea-based agents have been most extensively leveraged, with expanding clinical use for detection and more recently for radiopharmaceutical therapy of prostate cancer, with surprisingly little toxicity. PSMA imaging of other cancers is also appearing in the clinical literature, and may overtake FDG for certain indications. Targeting PSMA may provide a viable alternative or first-line approach to managing prostate and other cancers. PMID:26213140

  17. Determining the binding affinities of prostate-specific antigen to lectins: SPR and microarray approaches.

    PubMed

    Damborský, Pavel; Zámorová, Martina; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-12-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common newly diagnosed cancers among men and we focused on its traditional biomarker, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), using targeted glycomics-based strategies. The aberrant glycosylation pattern of PSA may serve as a valuable tool for improving PCa diagnosis including its early-stage. In this study, we evaluated the usability of two techniques, surface plasmon resonance and protein microarray assay, for the study and characterization of interactions of PSA (both free and complexed) with six lectins (SNA, ConA, RCA, AAL, WGA and MAA II). The information on the character of such interactions is important for the application of lectins as prospective bioreceptors for biomarker glycoprofiling in a follow-up biosensing assays. SPR as well as established bioanalytical techniques allowed determination of KD values of PSA-lectin interactions in a more reliable way than protein microarray. The protein microarray method did not allow accurate quantification of KD values. However, the features of a microarray approach, such as speed and costs, enabled the screening and estimation of the nature of lectin-glycan biomarker interaction in an effective and time-saving way. All of the tested lectins interacted with commercial PSA standard isolated from healthy persons, except MAA II which reacted only very weakly.

  18. Fluorescence of prostate-specific antigen as measured with a portable 1D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byeong C.; Jeong, Jin H.; Jeong, Dong S.; Kim, Young M.; Oh, Sang W.; Choi, Eui Y.; Kim, Jae H.; Nahm, Kie B.

    2005-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an androgen-dependent glycoprotein protease (M.W. 33 kDa) and a member of kallikrein super-family of serine protease, and has chymotrypsin-like enzymatic activity. It is synthesized by the prostate epithelial cells and found in the prostate gland and seminal plasma as a major protein. It is widely used as a clinical marker for diagnosis, screening, monitoring and prognosis of prostate cancer. In normal male adults, the concentration of PSA in the blood is below 4 ng/ml and this value increases in patients with the prostate cancer or the benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) due to its leakage into the circulatory system. As such, systematic monitoring of the PSA level in the blood can provide critical information about the progress of the prostatic disease. We have developed a compact integral system that can quantitatively measure the concentration of total PSA in human blood. This system utilizes the fluorescence emitted from the dye molecules attached to PSA molecules after appropriate immunoassay-based processing. Developed for the purpose of providing an affordable means of fast point-of-care testing of the prostate cancer, this system proved to be able to detect the presence of the PSA at the level of 0.18 ng/ml in less than 12 minutes, with the actual measurement taking less than 2 minutes. The design concept for this system is presented together with the result for a few representative samples.

  19. Single-dilution enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for quantification of antigen-specific salmonid antibody

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alcorn, S.W.; Pascho, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed on the basis of testing a single dilution of serum to quantify the level of antibody to the p57 protein of Renibaclerium salmoninarum in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). The levels of antibody were interpolated from a standard curve constructed by relating the optical densities (OD) produced by several dilutions of a high-titer rainbow trout (O. mykiss) antiserum to the p57 protein. The ELISA OD values produced by as many as 36 test sera on each microplate were compared with the standard curve to calculate the antigen-specific antibody activity. Repeated measurements of 36 samples on 3 microplates on each of 6 assay dates indicated that the mean intraassay coefficient of variation (CV) was 6.68% (range, 0-23%) and the mean interassay CV was 8.29% (range, 4-16%). The antibody levels determined for the serum sample from 24 sockeye salmon vaccinated with a recombinant p57 protein generally were correlated with the levels determined by endpoint titration (r2 = 0.936) and with results from another ELISA that was based on extrapolation of antibody levels from a standard curve (r2 = 0.956). The single-dilution antibody ELISA described here increases the number of samples that can be tested on each microplate compared with immunoassays based on analysis of several dilutions of each test serum. It includes controls for interassay standardization and can be used to test fish weighing <3 g.

  20. Chronic follicular bronchiolitis requires antigen-specific regulatory T cell control to prevent fatal disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Erica G.; Haribhai, Dipica; Jeschke, Jonathan C.; Co, Dominic O.; Ziegelbauer, Jennifer; Yan, Ke; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Mishra, Manoj K.; Simpson, Pippa; Salzman, Nita H.; Williams, Calvin B.

    2014-01-01

    In order to study regulatory T (Treg) cell control of chronic autoimmunity in a lymphoreplete host, we created and characterized a new model of autoimmune lung inflammation that targets the medium and small airways. We generated transgenic mice that express a chimeric membrane protein consisting of hen egg lysozyme (mHEL) and a hemoglobin (Hb) epitope tag under the control of the Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP) promoter, which largely limited transgene expression to the respiratory bronchioles. When CCSP-mHEL/Hb transgenic mice were crossed to N3.L2 TCR transgenic mice that recognize the Hb epitope, the bigenic progeny developed dense, pseudo-follicular lymphocytic peribronchiolar infiltrates that resembled the histological pattern of follicular bronchiolitis. Aggregates of activated IFN-γ- and IL-17A-secreting CD4+ T cells as well as B cells surrounded the airways. Lung pathology was similar in Ifng−/− and Il17a−/− mice, indicating that either cytokine is sufficient to establish chronic disease. A large number of antigen-specific Treg cells accumulated in the lesions and Treg cell-depletion in the affected mice led to an interstitial spread of the disease that ultimately proved fatal. Thus Treg cells act to restrain autoimmune responses, resulting in an organized and controlled chronic pathological process rather than a progressive disease. PMID:24163409

  1. Association between polymorphisms in the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) promoter and release of PSA.

    PubMed

    Sävblom, C; Giwercman, A; Malm, J; Halldén, C; Lundin, K; Lilja, H; Giwercman, Y

    2009-10-01

    Variations in serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) have been ascribed to A/G nucleotide polymorphisms located at -158 bp (rs266882) and -4643 bp (rs925013), relative to the transcription start site within the promoter of the PSA gene. PSA is also an androgen receptor target (AR) gene and polymorphisms in AR gene are known to affect AR function. Our objective was to compare the impact of these A/G polymorphisms separately or in combination with AR CAG micro satellite on regulation of PSA secretion into seminal plasma and blood in young men. Leukocyte DNA was extracted from 291 conscripts and genotyping performed with the Sequenom Mass Array System. PSA was measured with an immunofluorometric assay. Linear regression analysis was used to test the association of polymorphism frequencies with serum and seminal plasma levels of PSA. PSA gene polymorphisms at -158 bp or -4643 bp did not alone influence total PSA (tPSA) levels in seminal plasma or in blood. Homozygotes for the A-allele at -158 bp in combination with CAG > 22 had significantly higher serum levels of tPSA than subjects carrying the G-allele (p = 0.01). In conclusion, the PSA gene polymorphisms did not importantly influence the levels of tPSA in seminal plasma or in blood. tPSA in serum was influenced by interactions between PSA promoter variants and AR CAG polymorphism.

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of constrained phosphoramidate inhibitors of prostate-specific membrane antigen.

    PubMed

    Ley, Corinne R; Beattie, Nathan R; Dannoon, Shorouk; Regan, Melanie; VanBrocklin, Henry; Berkman, Clifford E

    2015-06-15

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a cell-surface enzyme-biomarker that is actively pursued for targeted delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents for prostate cancer. Our lab has developed PSMA inhibitors based on a phosphoramidate scaffold, which has shown both high selectivity for PSMA-positive tumors and rapid clearance in vivo when radiolabeled with (18)F. However, this scaffold exhibits hydrolytic instability under low pH and high temperature conditions, barring the use of other imaging or therapeutic radionuclides such as (68)Ga or (177)Lu. Previous studies in our lab have shown a trend in increasing acid stability as the distance between the phosphoramidate core and the α-carboxylate of the P1 residue is increased. Therefore, a new generation of phosphoramidate inhibitors was developed based on trans-4-hydroxyproline as the P1 residue to restrict the interaction of the α-carboxylate to the phosphoramidate core. These hydroxyproline inhibitors demonstrated comparable IC50 values to earlier generations as well as enhanced thermal and acid stability.

  3. Prostate-Specific Antigen Working Group’s Guidelines on PSA Doubling Time

    PubMed Central

    Arlen, Philip M.; Bianco, Fernando; Dahut, William L.; D’Amico, Anthony; Figg, William D.; Freedland, Stephen J.; Gulley, James L.; Kantoff, Philip W.; Kattan, Michael W.; Lee, Andrew; Regan, Meredith M.; Sartor, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Prostate-specific antigen is a glycoprotein found almost exclusively in normal and neoplastic prostate cells. PSA doubling time, or the change in PSA level over time, has emerged as a useful predictive marker for assessing disease outcome in patients with prostate cancer. It is important to agree on definitions and values for the calculation of PSADT and to develop a common approach to outcome analysis and reporting. Methods In September 2006 a conference was held at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland to define these parameters and develop guidelines for their use. Results The PSA Working Group defined the following criteria regarding PSADT: (1) calculation of PSADT, (2) evidence to support PSADT as a predictive factor in the setting of biochemical recurrence, and (3) use of PSADT as a stratification factor in clinical trials. Conclusions We propose that investigators calculate PSADT prior to enrolling patients on clinical studies and calculate it as an additional measurement of therapeutic activity. We believe we have developed practical guidelines for the calculation of PSADT and its use as a measurement of prognosis and outcome. Furthermore, the use of common standards for PSADT in clinical trials is important as we determine which treatments should progress to randomized trials in which “hard” end points such as survival will be employed. PMID:18423743

  4. Diagnostic tools for hypersensitivity to platinum drugs and taxanes: skin testing, specific IgE, and mast cell/basophil mediators.

    PubMed

    Caiado, Joana; Picard, Matthieu

    2014-08-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to platinum drugs and taxanes are increasing in cancer patients, and rapid drug desensitization has emerged as a safe and effective method to reintroduce these drugs in reactive patients. Optimal management of patients presenting HSRs to chemotherapy depends on the use of various diagnostic tools, which include measurement of mast cell/basophil mediator release following a HSR and skin testing. Serum tryptase should be measured in patients presenting chemotherapy HSRs, and its elevation would support mast cell/basophil activation. Skin testing to platinum drugs has a high sensitivity and specificity and is critical to guide the management of platinum-reactive patients. Taxane skin testing is also emerging as a useful diagnostic and risk stratification tool in the evaluation of patients with HSRs to taxanes. Platinum sIgE assays have been recently developed and can be helpful in combination with skin testing or as an alternative when skin testing is not available.

  5. A biodegradable nanoparticle platform for the induction of antigen-specific immune tolerance for treatment of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Zoe; McCarthy, Derrick P; Yap, Woon Teck; Harp, Christopher T; Getts, Daniel R; Shea, Lonnie D; Miller, Stephen D

    2014-03-25

    Targeted immune tolerance is a coveted therapy for the treatment of a variety of autoimmune diseases, as current treatment options often involve nonspecific immunosuppression. Intravenous (iv) infusion of apoptotic syngeneic splenocytes linked with peptide or protein autoantigens using ethylene carbodiimide (ECDI) has been demonstrated to be an effective method for inducing peripheral, antigen-specific tolerance for treatment of autoimmune disease. Here, we show the ability of biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLG) nanoparticles to function as a safe, cost-effective, and highly efficient alternative to cellular carriers for the induction of antigen-specific T cell tolerance. We describe the formulation of tolerogenic PLG particles and demonstrate that administration of myelin antigen-coupled particles both prevented and treated relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (R-EAE), a CD4 T cell-mediated mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS). PLG particles made on-site with surfactant modifications surpass the efficacy of commercially available particles in their ability to couple peptide and to prevent disease induction. Most importantly, myelin antigen-coupled PLG nanoparticles are able to significantly ameliorate ongoing disease and subsequent relapses when administered at onset or at peak of acute disease, and minimize epitope spreading when administered during disease remission. Therapeutic treatment results in significantly reduced CNS infiltration of encephalitogenic Th1 (IFN-γ) and Th17 (IL-17a) cells as well as inflammatory monocytes/macrophages. Together, these data describe a platform for antigen display that is safe, low-cost, and highly effective at inducing antigen-specific T cell tolerance. The development of such a platform carries broad implications for the treatment of a variety of immune-mediated diseases.

  6. Subdominant H60 antigen-specific CD8 T-cell response precedes dominant H4 antigen-specific response during the initial phase of allogenic skin graft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Kang Il; Jeon, Ji Yeong; Ryu, Su Jeong; Nam, Giri; Youn, Hyewon; Choi, Eun Young

    2015-01-01

    In allogeneic transplantation, including the B6 anti-BALB.B settings, H60 and H4 are two representative dominant minor histocompatibility antigens that induce strong CD8 T-cell responses. With different distribution patterns, H60 expression is restricted to hematopoietic cells, whereas H4 is ubiquitously expressed. H60-specific CD8 T-cell response has been known to be dominant in most cases of B6 anti-BALB.B allo-responses, except in the case of skin transplantation. To understand the mechanism underlying the subdominance of H60 during allogeneic skin transplantation, we investigated the dynamics of the H60-specific CD8 T cells in B6 mice transplanted with allogeneic BALB.B tail skin. Unexpectedly, longitudinal bioluminescence imaging and flow cytometric analyses revealed that H60-specific CD8 T cells were not always subdominant to H4-specific cells but instead showed a brief dominance before the H4 response became predominant. H60-specific CD8 T cells could expand in the draining lymph node and migrate to the BALB.B allografts, indicating their active participation in the anti-BALB.B allo-response. Enhancing the frequencies of H60-reactive CD8 T cells prior to skin transplantation reversed the immune hierarchy between H60 and H4. Additionally, H60 became predominant when antigen presentation was limited to the direct pathway. However, when antigen presentation was restricted to the indirect pathway, the expansion of H60-specific CD8 T cells was limited, whereas H4-specific CD8 T cells expanded significantly, suggesting that the temporary immunodominance and eventual subdominance of H60 could be due to their reliance on the direct antigen presentation pathway. These results enhance our understanding of the immunodominance phenomenon following allogeneic tissue transplantation. PMID:25676063

  7. Tyrosine-phosphorylated Galectin-3 Protein Is Resistant to Prostate-specific Antigen (PSA) Cleavage*

    PubMed Central

    Balan, Vitaly; Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Kho, Dhong Hyo; Wang, Yi; Raz, Avraham

    2012-01-01

    Galectin-3 is a chimeric carbohydrate-binding protein, which interacts with cell surface carbohydrate-containing molecules and extracellular matrix glycoproteins and has been implicated in various biological processes such as cell growth, angiogenesis, motility, and metastasis. It is expressed in a wide range of tumor cells and is associated with tumor progression. The functions of galectin-3 are dependent on its localization and post-translational modifications such as cleavage and phosphorylation. Recently, we showed that galectin-3 Tyr-107 is phosphorylated by c-Abl; concomitantly, it was also shown that galectin-3 can be cleaved at this site by prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a chymotrypsin-like serine protease, after Tyr-107, resulting in loss of galectin-3 multivalency while preserving its carbohydrate binding activity. Galectin-3 is largely a monomer in solution but may form a homodimer by self-association through its carbohydrate recognition domain, whereas, in the presence of a ligand, galectin-3 polymerizes up to pentamers utilizing its N-terminal domain. Oligomerization is a unique feature of secreted galectin-3, which allows its function by forming ordered galectin-glycan structures, i.e. lattices, on the cell surface or through direct engagement of specific cell surface glycoconjugates by traditional ligand-receptor binding. We questioned whether Tyr-107 phosphorylation by c-Abl affects galectin-3 cleavage by PSA. The data suggest a role for galectin-3 in prostate cells associated with increased activity of c-Abl kinase and loss of phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) activity. In addition, the ratio of phosphorylated/dephosphorylated galectin-3 might be used as a complementary value to that of PSA for prognosis of prostate cancer and a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:22232548

  8. Triple sensitivity amplification for ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhongxue; Wang, Liyuan; Ma, Zhanfang

    2017-06-15

    In general, current difference (ΔI) due to immunoreactions is significant in determining biosensor sensitivity. In this work, a new strategy of triple sensitivity amplification for ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) was developed. Au-poly(methylene blue) (Au-PMB) was implemented as a redox species with strong current signal at -0.144V and used to fabricate the substrate of the biosensor. Conductive reduced graphene oxide-Au nanocomposites (Au-rGO) were coated on the Au-PMB modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) to amplify current signal. After peptides (CEHSSKLQLAK-NH2) were fixed on the Au-rGO/Au-PMB/GCE, the fixed peptides reacted with glutaraldehyde to immobilize polydopamine-Au-horse radish peroxidase nanocomposites (PDA-Au-HRP). The electrochemical sensing interface for PSA was realized. Due to smaller resistance compared to antibodies, the peptides which can be cleaved specifically by PSA were employed. After the incubation of PSA, a large ΔI was obtained and behaved as the decrease of current signal. Then the remaining PDA-Au-HRP accelerated an enzyme-catalyzed precipitation reaction between 4-chloro-1-naphthol and H2O2. A further decrease in current signal (namely the increase in ΔI) resulted from the poorly conductive precipitation adhering onto the biosensor. The designed biosensor presented a wide linear range from 1.0fgmL(-1) to 100ngmL(-1) with an ultralow detection limit of 0.11fgmL(-1).

  9. Four major sequence elements of simian virus 40 large T antigen coordinate its specific and nonspecific DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, D T; Loeber, G; Tegtmeyer, P

    1990-01-01

    By mutational analysis, we have identified a motif critical to the proper recognition and binding of simian virus 40 large tumor antigen (T antigen) to virus DNA sequences at the origin of DNA replication. This motif is tripartite and consists of two elements (termed A1 and B2) that are necessary for sequence-specific binding of the origin and a central element (B1) which is required for nonspecific DNA-binding activity. Certain amino acids in elements A1 (residues 152 to 155) and B2 (203 to 207) may make direct contact with the GAGGC pentanucleotide sequences in binding sites I and II on the DNA. Alternatively, these two elements could determine the proper structure of the DNA-binding domain, although for a number of reasons we favor the first possibility. In contrast, element B1 (183 to 187) is most likely important for recognizing a general structural feature of DNA. Elements A1 and B2 are nearly identical in all known papovavirus T antigens, whereas B1 is identical only in the closely related papovaviruses simian virus 40, BK virus, and JC virus. In addition to these three elements, a fourth (B3; residues 215 to 219) is necessary for the binding of T antigen to site II but not to site I. We propose that additional contact sites on T antigen are involved in the interaction with site II to initiate the replication of the viral DNA. PMID:2157865

  10. Mycoplasma pneumoniae CARDS toxin elicits a functional IgE response in Balb/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Jorge L.; Brooks, Edward G.; Chaparro, Adriana

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is strongly associated with new onset asthma and asthma exacerbations. Until recently, the molecular mechanisms utilized by M. pneumoniae to influence asthma symptoms were unknown. However, we recently reported that an ADP-ribosylating and vacuolating toxin called the Community Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome toxin, CARDS toxin, produced by M. pneumoniae was sufficient to promote allergic inflammation and asthma-like disease in mice. A mouse model of CARDS toxin exposure was used to evaluate total and CARDS-toxin specific serum IgE responses. Mast cell sensitization, challenge, and degranulation studies determined functionality of the CARDS toxin-specific IgE. In the current study, we report that a single mucosal exposure to CARDS toxin was sufficient to increase total serum IgE and CARDS toxin-specific IgE in mice. Mice given a second mucosal challenge of CARDS toxin responded with significant increases in total and CARDS toxin-specific IgE. CARDS toxin-specific IgE bound to an N-terminal peptide of CARDS toxin but not the C-terminal peptide. Likewise, full-length CARDS toxin and the N-terminal peptide induced mast cell degranulation. Altogether, these data demonstrate that exposure to CARDS toxin is sufficient to generate functional IgE in mice. M. pneumoniae and CARDS toxin are strongly associated with asthma exacerbations raising the possibility that the CARDS toxin-specific IgE-mast cell axis contributes to disease pathogenesis. PMID:28199385

  11. IGE IN ASTHMATIC HUMAN SERA IS REACTIVE AGAINST MOLD EXTRACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molds have been associated with various health effects including asthma, but their role in induction of asthma is unclear. However, the presence of mold-specific IgE indicates their capacity to induce allergic responses and possibly exacerbate asthma symptoms. This study was und...

  12. [Prevention of an IgE response to bovine beta-lactoglobulin by gene immunization in mice].

    PubMed

    Adel-Patient, K; Créminon, Ch; Boquet, D; Wal, J M; Chatel, J M

    2002-03-01

    The therapeutic routes for the treatment of allergy have as their objective to prevent or diminish the specific IgE responsible for the appearance of the allergic reaction. This allergic reaction survives in the genetically predisposed subject and results in a dis-equilibrium of the "Th1-Th2 balance" by increasing the Th2 response. This Th2 response induces the production of IgE against environmental antigens, which from that time on become allergens. In this context, use of gene immunisation seems to be very interesting. The immunisation consists of the injection of an expression vector of bacterial origin, containing the cDNA of a protein of interest. Different studies have shown that the injection of such a plasmid into mice initiates a specific immune response of Th1 (IgG2a) type, stopping all further response of the Th2 (IgG1 and IgE) type. This "non-allergic" response is due to the intrinsic properties of the bacterial ADN, notably the presence of sequences of immunostimulants, the adjuvant of the Th1 response. We have sought to show such a preventative effect in the case of a food protein, bovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), a major allergen of cow's milk. Firstly, we made a expression plasmid that contained the cDNA of BLG. Intramuscular administration of this plasmid to mice allowed expression of the BLG in the native form at the site of the injection. The primary response induced by this type of immunisation is characterised by a mixed IgG1/IgG2a response and an absence of anti-BLG IgE. In addition, pre-immunisation of the mice with a plasmid that contained the cDNA of BLG prevented all further sensitisation with the protein administered by the intra-peritoneal route in the presence of alum, an adjuvant of the Th2 response. It appeared further that the preventative effect is dependent on the latent time between gene and protein immunisation. Prevention of the anti-BLG IgE response seems to result in an active inhibition by the cytokines such as interferon

  13. Higher Plasma Concentration of Food-Specific Antibodies in Persons with Autistic Disorder in Comparison to Their Siblings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trajkovski, Vladimir; Petlichkovski, Aleksandar; Efinska-Mladenovska, Olivija; Trajkov, Dejan; Arsov, Todor; Strezova, Ana; Ajdinski, Ljubomir; Spiroski, Mirko

    2008-01-01

    Specific IgA, IgG, and IgE antibodies to food antigens in 35 participants with autistic disorder and 21 of their siblings in the Republic of Macedonia were examined. Statistically significant higher plasma concentration of IgA antibodies against alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, casein, and gliadin were found in the children with autistic…

  14. Glycosylation of the T-cell antigen-specific receptor and its potential role in lectin-mediated cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, S.C.; Kranz, D.M.; Longmore, G.D.; Sitkovsky, M.V.; Eisen, H.N.

    1986-03-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) normally destroy only those cells (target cells) whose surface antigens they recognize. However, in the presence of lectins such as Con A, CTLs destroy virtually any cell, regardless of its antigens. The oligosaccharides of the T-cell antigen-specific receptor, a dimeric surface glycoprotein composed of disulfide-linked ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits, are of interest because of their potential involvement in this lectin-dependent cytotoxic activity. The authors report here that three or four asparagine-linked oligosaccharides could be enzymatically removed from each of the receptor subunits expressed by a cloned line of murine CTLs (clone 2C), consistent with the presence of glycosylation sites deduced from cDNA sequences of the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. genes expressed in this clone. All the N-linked glycans on the ..cap alpha.. subunit were of the complex type, but the ..beta.. subunit carried two or three endoglycosidase H-sensitive oligosaccharides. High-mannose glycans can bind tightly to Con A and, indeed, this lectin was found to bind specifically to solubilized 2C T-cell receptor. The Con A-dependent cytotoxic activity of clone 2C, but not of other CTL clones, was inhibited by a monoclonal antibody (1B2) that is specific for the T-cell receptor of clone 2C. Antibody 1B2 also inhibited clone 2C cytotoxicity mediated by phytohemagglutinin, lentil-lectin, and wheat-germ agglutinin. These results suggest that, although lectin-dependent lysis of target cells by CTLs is antigen nonspecific, the cytolytic activity can be triggered by binding of the lectin to the T-cell antigen-specific receptor.

  15. A novel system of artificial antigen-presenting cells efficiently stimulates Flu peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hui; Peng, Ji-Run; Chen, Peng-Cheng; Gong, Lei; Qiao, Shi-Shi; Wang, Wen-Zhen; Cui, Zhu-Qingqing; Yu, Xin; Wei, Yu-Hua; Leng, Xi-Sheng

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Adoptive immunotherapy depends on relevant numbers of cytolytic T lymphocytes. {yields} An ideal artificial APCs system was successfully prepared in vivo. {yields} Controlled release of IL-2 leads to much more T-cell expansion. {yields} This system is better than general cellular APCs on T-cell expansion. -- Abstract: Therapeutic numbers of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are key effectors in successful adoptive immunotherapy. However, efficient and reproducible methods to meet the qualification remain poor. To address this issue, we designed the artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) system based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). A modified emulsion method was used for the preparation of PLGA particles encapsulating interleukin-2 (IL-2). Biotinylated molecular ligands for recognition and co-stimulation of T cells were attached to the particle surface through the binding of avidin-biotin. These formed the aAPC system. The function of aAPCs in the proliferation of specific CTLs against human Flu antigen was detected by enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) and MTT staining methods. Finally, we successfully prepared this suitable aAPC system. The results show that IL-2 is released from aAPCs in a sustained manner over 30 days. This dramatically improves the stimulatory capacity of this system as compared to the effect of exogenous addition of cytokine. In addition, our aAPCs promote the proliferation of Flu antigen-specific CTLs more effectively than the autologous cellular APCs. Here, this aAPC platform is proved to be suitable for expansion of human antigen-specific T cells.

  16. A novel T cell receptor single-chain signaling complex mediates antigen-specific T cell activity and tumor control

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jennifer D.; Harris, Daniel T.; Soto, Carolina M.; Chervin, Adam S.; Aggen, David H.; Roy, Edward J.; Kranz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of genetically modified T cells to treat cancer has shown promise in several clinical trials. Two main strategies have been applied to redirect T cells against cancer: 1) introduction of a full-length T cell receptor (TCR) specific for a tumor-associated peptide-MHC, or 2) introduction of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), including an antibody fragment specific for a tumor cell surface antigen, linked intracellularly to T cell signaling domains. Each strategy has advantages and disadvantages for clinical applications. Here, we present data on the in vitro and in vivo effectiveness of a single-chain signaling receptor incorporating a TCR variable fragment as the targeting element (referred to as TCR-SCS). This receptor contained a single-chain TCR (Vβ-linker-Vα) from a high-affinity TCR called m33, linked to the intracellular signaling domains of CD28 and CD3ζ. This format avoided mispairing with endogenous TCR chains, and mediated specific T cell activity when expressed in either CD4 or CD8 T cells. TCR-SCS-transduced CD8-negative cells showed an intriguing sensitivity, compared to full-length TCRs, to higher densities of less stable pepMHC targets. T cells that expressed this peptide-specific receptor persisted in vivo, and exhibited polyfunctional responses. Growth of metastatic antigen-positive tumors was significantly inhibited by T cells that expressed this receptor, and tumor cells that escaped were antigen loss variants. TCR-SCS receptors represent an alternative targeting receptor strategy that combines the advantages of single-chain expression, avoidance of TCR chain mispairing, and targeting of intracellular antigens presented in complex with MHC proteins. PMID:25082071

  17. NY-ESO-1 specific TCR engineered T-cells mediate sustained antigen-specific antitumor effects in myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Goloubeva, Olga; Vogl, Dan T.; Lacey, Simon F.; Badros, Ashraf Z.; Garfall, Alfred; Weiss, Brendan; Finklestein, Jeffrey; Kulikovskaya, Irina; Sinha, Sanjoy K.; Kronsberg, Shari; Gupta, Minnal; Bond, Sarah; Melchiori, Luca; Brewer, Joanna E.; Bennett, Alan D.; Gerry, Andrew B.; Pumphrey, Nicholas J.; Williams, Daniel; Tayton-Martin, Helen K.; Ribeiro, Lilliam; Holdich, Tom; Yanovich, Saul; Hardy, Nancy; Yared, Jean; Kerr, Naseem; Philip, Sunita; Westphal, Sandra; Siegel, Don L.; Levine, Bruce L.; Jakobsen, Bent K.; Kalos, Michael; June, Carl H.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent therapeutic advances, multiple myeloma (MM) remains largely incurable. Herein we report results of a phase I/II trial to evaluate the safety and activity of autologous T-cells engineered to express an affinity-enhanced T-cell receptor (TCR) recognizing a naturally processed peptide shared by the cancer-testis antigens NY-ESO-1 and LAGE-1. Twenty patients with antigen-positive MM received an average 2.4×109 engineered T cells two days after autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). Infusions were well-tolerated without clinically apparent cytokine release syndrome, despite high IL-6 levels. Engineered T-cells expanded, persisted, trafficked to marrow and exhibited a cytotoxic phenotype. Persistence of engineered T cells in blood was inversely associated with NY-ESO-1 levels in the marrow. Disease progression was associated with loss of T cell persistence or antigen escape, consistent with the expected mechanism of action of the transferred T cells. Encouraging clinical responses were observed in 16 of 20 patients (80%) with advanced disease, with a median progression free survival of 19.1 months. NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1 TCR-engineered T-cells were safe, trafficked to marrow and showed extended persistence that correlated with clinical activity against antigen-positive myeloma. PMID:26193344

  18. Validation of prostate‐specific antigen laboratory values recorded in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registries

    PubMed Central

    Adamo, Margaret (Peggy); Boten, Jessica A.; Coyle, Linda M.; Lam, Clara J. K.; Negoita, Serban; Penberthy, Lynne; Stevens, Jennifer L.; Ward, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Researchers have used prostate‐specific antigen (PSA) values collected by central cancer registries to evaluate tumors for potential aggressive clinical disease. An independent study collecting PSA values suggested a high error rate (18%) related to implied decimal points. To evaluate the error rate in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program, a comprehensive review of PSA values recorded across all SEER registries was performed. METHODS Consolidated PSA values for eligible prostate cancer cases in SEER registries were reviewed and compared with text documentation from abstracted records. Four types of classification errors were identified: implied decimal point errors, abstraction or coding implementation errors, nonsignificant errors, and changes related to “unknown” values. RESULTS A total of 50,277 prostate cancer cases diagnosed in 2012 were reviewed. Approximately 94.15% of cases did not have meaningful changes (85.85% correct, 5.58% with a nonsignificant change of <1 ng/mL, and 2.80% with no clinical change). Approximately 5.70% of cases had meaningful changes (1.93% due to implied decimal point errors, 1.54% due to abstract or coding errors, and 2.23% due to errors related to unknown categories). Only 419 of the original 50,277 cases (0.83%) resulted in a change in disease stage due to a corrected PSA value. CONCLUSIONS The implied decimal error rate was only 1.93% of all cases in the current validation study, with a meaningful error rate of 5.81%. The reasons for the lower error rate in SEER are likely due to ongoing and rigorous quality control and visual editing processes by the central registries. The SEER program currently is reviewing and correcting PSA values back to 2004 and will re‐release these data in the public use research file. Cancer 2017;123:697–703. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:27783399

  19. Prostate-specific membrane antigen-radioguided surgery for metastatic lymph nodes in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Tobias; Weirich, Gregor; Schottelius, Margret; Weineisen, Martina; Frisch, Benjamin; Okur, Asli; Kübler, Hubert; Thalgott, Mark; Navab, Nassir; Schwaiger, Markus; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Gschwend, Jürgen E; Eiber, Matthias

    2015-09-01

    With the advent of (68)Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen-N,N'-bis[2-hydroxy-5-(carboxyethyl)benzyl]ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid ((68)Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC) positron emission tomography (PET) hybrid imaging in prostate cancer (PCa), even small metastatic lymph nodes (LNs) can be visualized. However, intraoperative detection of such LNs may not be easy owing to their inconspicuous morphology and/or atypical localization. The aim of our feasibility study was to evaluate PSMA-radioguided surgery for detection of metastatic LNs. One patient with primary PCa and evidence of LN metastases and four PCa patients with evidence of recurrent disease to regional LNs on (68)Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET hybrid imaging received an intravenous injection of an (111)In-PSMA investigation and therapy agent 24h before surgery. Metastatic LNs were tracked intraoperatively using a gamma probe with acoustic and visual feedback. All radioactive-positive LN specimens detected in vivo were confirmed by ex vivo measurements and corresponded to PSMA-avid metastatic disease according to histopathology analysis. Intraoperative use of the gamma probe detected all PSMA-positive lesions identified on preoperative (68)Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET. Detection of small subcentimeter metastatic LNs was facilitated, and PSMA-radioguided surgery in two patients revealed additional lesions close to known tumor deposits that were not detected by preoperative (68)Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET. However, greater patient numbers and long-term follow-up data are needed to determine the future role of PSMA-radioguided surgery.

  20. Biological characterization and partial purification of an idiotype and antigen specific T cell lymphokine

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    An idiotype (Id) and antigen-specific T cell lymphokine has been partially purified and characterized biologically. This lymphokine appears to be derived from the T helper/sub 2/ (Th/sub 2/) lymphocyte and plays a key role in the optimal expression of the cross-reactive idiotype (CRI/sup +/-TMA) associated with both anti-phenyltrimethylammonium (TMA) and anti-trinitrophenyl (TNP) antibodies. An apparent molecular weight of 30-35 Kd was determined using molecular sieve chromatography. Upon SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) however, the biological activity migrated to 68 Kd as well as 35 Kd. Equivalent amounts of activity are found in both SDS-PAGE fractions. The Th/sub 2/F has two isoelectric points, 5.7 and 6.3, although 99% of the activity is found at pH 6.3. The Id-enhancing factor is an acid stable and heat labile protein. As in the case for the expression of serum CRI-TMA, the production of the Th/sub 2/F is linked to the allotype (Igh-1/sup e/) of the heavy chain locus. Using Con A Sns from various genetically distinct strains of mice, it has been shown that the production of the Th/sub 2/F is allotype-linked, and works across major histocompatibility (MHC) barriers. Isolation of Th/sub 2/F has been carried out using a combination of affinity chromatography and gel filtration. The partially purified material has been /sup 125/I labeled and analyzed by SDS-PAGE and flat bed isoelectric focusing. Two radiolabeled proteins which could be the Th/sub 2/F were identified.

  1. High specificity of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote ribonucleoprotein as antigen in serodiagnosis of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Solana, M E; Katzin, A M; Umezawa, E S; Miatello, C S

    1995-01-01

    We assessed the performance of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with the Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote ribosomal fraction (Tulahuen and Y strains) in order to improve the diagnostic specificity of the test. A total of 100 serum samples from patients with chronic Chagas' disease from Brazil and Argentina were studied. Sera from 116 patients, without Chagas' disease, including 10 with active mucocutaneous leishmaniasis and 20 with visceral leishmaniasis, were used as controls. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against the ribosomal fraction (ribonucleoproteins [RNPs]) in the ELISA were found in 97% of samples from patients with Chagas' disease. A total of 99% of the sera from patients without the disease were negative, including sera from patients with mucocutaneous and visceral leishmaniases. The distribution of IgG isotypes in randomly chosen serum samples was determined by ELISA; IgG1 and IgG3 were predominant (100% exhibited IgG1 and 85% exhibited IgG3, and 50% also presented the IgG2 isotype. The distribution of the IgG subclasses was confirmed by the Western blot (immunoblot) technique. When total IgG was assayed by Western blot assay, no correlation was found between the pattern of serum reactivity and the clinical features of the patients with Chagas' disease. Therefore, no typical profile of polypeptide recognition could be associated with any clinical form of Chagas' disease (cardiomyopathy or megaviscera). Our results showed that sera from patients with Chagas' disease react with ribosomal antigens and display a typical profile of IgG isotypes (IgG1 plus IgG3).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7650167

  2. Association of black race with follow-up of an abnormal prostate-specific antigen test.

    PubMed

    Turner, Barbara J; Mavandadi, Shahrzad; Weiner, Mark G

    2011-02-01

    Delayed evaluation after a clearly abnormal prostate-specific antigen (PSA) result may contribute to more advanced prostate cancer at diagnosis in black men. In 46 primary care practices over a period of 4.5 years, we studied men aged more than 50 years without known prostate cancer who had a PSA of at least 10.0 ng/mL for the first time. PSA follow-up included: a urology appointment, a new prostate diagnosis, or repeat PSA test. Cox proportional hazards models assessed time to follow-up, adjusting for demographic, clinical, and health care factors with censoring at a time that represents excessive delay (200 days). Among all 724 study men (27% black), delay until PSA follow-up averaged 115.2 days (+/- 79.7 d) and the unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) for follow-up was shorter for black men than nonblack men (HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.00-1.51). However, black men were more likely to have had prior urology care and had higher index PSA levels than other men; both factors were associated with shorter follow-up. After adjustment, delay did not differ for black vs nonblack race (HR, 1.05; 95% Cl, 0.78-1.43) but men aged at least 75 years had a longer delay than men aged 74 years or less (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.59-0.89). Despite black men having greater risk of advanced prostate disease at diagnosis and better linkage to urologic care, follow-up was delayed, on average, by more than 3 months and did not differ by race. These results reveal a potentially important, remediable factor to improve prostate cancer prevention and care for black men.

  3. The enhanced detection of persistent disease after prostatectomy with a new prostate specific antigen immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Takayama, T K; Vessella, R L; Brawer, M K; Noteboom, J; Lange, P H

    1993-08-01

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) determinations after radical prostatectomy are valuable in detecting persistent disease. Previously, we determined that 0.4 ng./ml. PSA was a reliable clinical threshold using the Hybritech Tandem-R PSA assay. Recently, we reported that a new PSA immunoassay (Abbott IMx PSA) correlated well with results of the Tandem-R immunoradiometric PSA assay and had a lower threshold. Using a conservative threshold of 0.1 ng./ml. PSA for the IMx PSA assay, we analyzed IMx PSA values in serial postoperative serum from 72 radical prostatectomy patients whose initial Tandem-R levels were less than 0.4 ng./ml. PSA. The lower detection limits of the IMx PSA assay allowed approximately a third (15 of 42) more detection of persistent disease within 8 months of surgery. When the PSA level remained undetectable for more than 8 months but the disease eventually recurred the lead times averaged 9 to 12 months when 0.1 ng./ml. PSA was used to signify persistent disease. All patients whose PSA levels reached 0.1 ng./ml. PSA and were subsequently followed for more than 3 months continued to have increasing levels. Also, every man who eventually had recurrence also had a PSA serum level of at least 0.1 ng./ml. PSA within 28 months postoperatively, although the subsequent increase from 0.1 to 0.4 ng./ml. PSA sometimes took several years. Although the clinical impact of these findings is yet unknown, new or altered PSA assays with lower detection limits can provide unique information that may offer opportunities for improved clinical investigation and possibly patient management.

  4. Fifth-Generation Digital Immunoassay for Prostate Specific Antigen Using Single Molecule Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D.H.; Hanlon, D.W.; Provuncher, G.K.; Chang, L.; Song, L.; Patel, P.P.; Ferrell, E.P.; Lepor, H; Partin, A.W.; Chan, D.W.; Sokoll, L.J.; Cheli, C.D.; Thiel, R.P.; Fournier, D.R.; Duffy, D.C.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Measurement of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in prostate cancer patients following radical prostatectomy (RP) has been limited by the sensitivity of available assays. Because radical prostatectomy removes the tissue responsible for PSA production, post-surgical PSA is typically undetectable with current assay methods. However, evidence suggests that more sensitive determination of PSA status following RP could improve assessment of patient prognosis, response to treatment, and better target secondary therapy to those who may benefit most. We report the development and validation of an investigational digital immunoassay with two logs greater sensitivity than today’s ultrasensitive third-generation PSA assays. METHODS Reagents were developed for a paramagnetic bead-based ELISA for use with high-density arrays of femtoliter-volume wells. Anti-PSA capture-beads with immunocomplexes and associated enzyme labels were singulated within the wells of the arrays and interrogated for the presence of enzymatic product. Analytical performance of the assay was characterized, its accuracy compared with a commercially available test, and longitudinal serum samples from a pilot study of 33 RP patients were analyzed. RESULTS The assay exhibited a functional sensitivity (20% inter-assay CV) of less than 0.00005 ng/mL (0.05 pg/mL), total imprecision of less than 10% from 1 to 50 pg/mL, and excellent agreement with the comparator method. All RP samples were well within the assay measurement capability. PSA values following surgery were examined in the context of five-year biochemical cancer recurrence. CONCLUSION The assay demonstrated a robust two-log advance in measurement sensitivity relative to current ultrasensitive assays, and the analytical performance for accurate assessment of PSA status after RP. PMID:21998342

  5. Body mass index in relation to serum prostate-specific antigen levels and prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Bonn, Stephanie E; Sjölander, Arvid; Tillander,