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Sample records for antigen-based malaria vaccine

  1. Malaria vaccine.

    PubMed

    1994-05-01

    Some have argued that the vaccine against malaria developed by Manuel Pattaroyo, a Colombian scientist, is being tested prematurely in humans and that it is unlikely to be successful. While the Pattaroyo vaccine has been shown to confer protection against the relatively mild malaria found in Colombia, doubts exist over whether it will be effective in Africa. Encouraging first results, however, are emerging from field tests in Tanzania. The vaccine triggered a strong new immune response, even in individuals previously exposed to malaria. Additional steps must be taken to establish its impact upon mortality and morbidity. Five major trials are underway around the world. The creator estimates that the first ever effective malaria vaccine could be available for widespread use within five years and he has no intention of securing a patent for the discovery. In another development, malaria specialists from 35 African countries convened at an international workshop in Zimbabwe to compare notes. Participants disparaged financial outlays for the fight against malaria equivalent to 2% of total AIDS funding as insufficient; noted intercountry differences in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment; and found information exchange between anglophone and francophone doctors to be generally poor.

  2. Vaccines against malaria.

    PubMed

    Ouattara, Amed; Laurens, Matthew B

    2015-03-15

    Despite global efforts to control malaria, the illness remains a significant public health threat. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine against malaria, but an efficacious vaccine would represent an important public health tool for successful malaria elimination. Malaria vaccine development continues to be hindered by a poor understanding of antimalarial immunity, a lack of an immune correlate of protection, and the genetic diversity of malaria parasites. Current vaccine development efforts largely target Plasmodium falciparum parasites in the pre-erythrocytic and erythrocytic stages, with some research on transmission-blocking vaccines against asexual stages and vaccines against pregnancy-associated malaria. The leading pre-erythrocytic vaccine candidate is RTS,S, and early results of ongoing Phase 3 testing show overall efficacy of 46% against clinical malaria. The next steps for malaria vaccine development will focus on the design of a product that is efficacious against the highly diverse strains of malaria and the identification of a correlate of protection against disease.

  3. Vaccines Against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Ouattara, Amed; Laurens, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Despite global efforts to control malaria, the illness remains a significant public health threat. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine against malaria, but an efficacious vaccine would represent an important public health tool for successful malaria elimination. Malaria vaccine development continues to be hindered by a poor understanding of antimalarial immunity, a lack of an immune correlate of protection, and the genetic diversity of malaria parasites. Current vaccine development efforts largely target Plasmodium falciparum parasites in the pre-erythrocytic and erythrocytic stages, with some research on transmission-blocking vaccines against asexual stages and vaccines against pregnancy-associated malaria. The leading pre-erythrocytic vaccine candidate is RTS,S, and early results of ongoing Phase 3 testing show overall efficacy of 46% against clinical malaria. The next steps for malaria vaccine development will focus on the design of a product that is efficacious against the highly diverse strains of malaria and the identification of a correlate of protection against disease. PMID:25452593

  4. Research toward Malaria Vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Louis H.; Howard, Russell J.; Carter, Richard; Good, Michael F.; Nussenzweig, Victor; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.

    1986-12-01

    Malaria exacts a toll of disease to people in the Tropics that seems incomprehensible to those only familiar with medicine and human health in the developed world. The methods of molecular biology, immunology, and cell biology are now being used to develop an antimalarial vaccine. The Plasmodium parasites that cause malaria have many stages in their life cycle. Each stage is antigenically distinct and potentially could be interrupted by different vaccines. However, achieving complete protection by vaccination may require a better understanding of the complexities of B- and T-cell priming in natural infections and the development of an appropriate adjuvant for use in humans.

  5. Progress with new malaria vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Daniel; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2003-01-01

    Malaria is a parasitic disease of major global health significance that causes an estimated 2.7 million deaths each year. In this review we describe the burden of malaria and discuss the complicated life cycle of Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite responsible for most of the deaths from the disease, before reviewing the evidence that suggests that a malaria vaccine is an attainable goal. Significant advances have recently been made in vaccine science, and we review new vaccine technologies and the evaluation of candidate malaria vaccines in human and animal studies worldwide. Finally, we discuss the prospects for a malaria vaccine and the need for iterative vaccine development as well as potential hurdles to be overcome. PMID:14997243

  6. The March Toward Malaria Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Stephen L.; Vekemans, Johan; Richie, Thomas L.; Duffy, Patrick E.

    2016-01-01

    In 2013 there were an estimated 584,000 deaths and 198 million clinical illnesses due to malaria, the majority in sub-Saharan Africa. Vaccines would be the ideal addition to the existing armamentarium of anti-malaria tools. However, malaria is caused by parasites, and parasites are much more complex in terms of their biology than the viruses and bacteria for which we have vaccines, passing through multiple stages of development in the human host, each stage expressing hundreds of unique antigens. This complexity makes it more difficult to develop a vaccine for parasites than for viruses and bacteria, since an immune response targeting one stage may not offer protection against a later stage, because different antigens are the targets of protective immunity at different stages. Furthermore, depending on the life cycle stage and whether the parasite is extra- or intra-cellular, antibody and/or cellular immune responses provide protection. It is thus not surprising that there is no vaccine on the market for prevention of malaria, or any human parasitic infection. In fact, no vaccine for any disease with this breadth of targets and immune responses exists. In this limited review, we focus on four approaches to malaria vaccines, (1) a recombinant protein with adjuvant vaccine aimed at Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) pre-erythrocytic stages of the parasite cycle (RTS,S/AS01), (2) whole sporozoite vaccines aimed at Pf pre-erythrocytic stages (PfSPZ Vaccine and PfSPZ-CVac), (3) prime boost vaccines that include recombinant DNA, viruses and bacteria, and protein with adjuvant aimed primarily at Pf pre-erythrocytic, but also asexual erythrocytic stages, and (4) recombinant protein with adjuvant vaccines aimed at Pf and Plasmodium vivax sexual erythrocytic and mosquito stages. We recognize that we are not covering all approaches to malaria vaccine development, or most of the critically important work on development of vaccines against P. vivax, the second most important cause of

  7. The March Toward Malaria Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Stephen L; Vekemans, Johan; Richie, Thomas L; Duffy, Patrick E

    2015-12-01

    In 2013 there were an estimated 584,000 deaths and 198 million clinical illnesses due to malaria, the majority in sub-Saharan Africa. Vaccines would be the ideal addition to the existing armamentarium of anti-malaria tools. However, malaria is caused by parasites, and parasites are much more complex in terms of their biology than the viruses and bacteria for which we have vaccines, passing through multiple stages of development in the human host, each stage expressing hundreds of unique antigens. This complexity makes it more difficult to develop a vaccine for parasites than for viruses and bacteria, since an immune response targeting one stage may not offer protection against a later stage, because different antigens are the targets of protective immunity at different stages. Furthermore, depending on the life cycle stage and whether the parasite is extra- or intra-cellular, antibody and/or cellular immune responses provide protection. It is thus not surprising that there is no vaccine on the market for prevention of malaria, or any human parasitic infection. In fact, no vaccine for any disease with this breadth of targets and immune responses exists. In this limited review, we focus on four approaches to malaria vaccines, (1) a recombinant protein with adjuvant vaccine aimed at Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) pre-erythrocytic stages of the parasite cycle (RTS,S/AS01), (2) whole sporozoite vaccines aimed at Pf pre-erythrocytic stages (PfSPZ Vaccine and PfSPZ-CVac), (3) prime boost vaccines that include recombinant DNA, viruses and bacteria, and protein with adjuvant aimed primarily at Pf pre-erythrocytic, but also asexual erythrocytic stages, and (4) recombinant protein with adjuvant vaccines aimed at Pf and Plasmodium vivax sexual erythrocytic and mosquito stages. We recognize that we are not covering all approaches to malaria vaccine development, or most of the critically important work on development of vaccines against P. vivax, the second most important cause of

  8. The march toward malaria vaccines.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Stephen L; Vekemans, Johan; Richie, Thomas L; Duffy, Patrick E

    2015-11-27

    In 2013 there were an estimated 584,000 deaths and 198 million clinical illnesses due to malaria, the majority in sub-Saharan Africa. Vaccines would be the ideal addition to the existing armamentarium of anti-malaria tools. However, malaria is caused by parasites, and parasites are much more complex in terms of their biology than the viruses and bacteria for which we have vaccines, passing through multiple stages of development in the human host, each stage expressing hundreds of unique antigens. This complexity makes it more difficult to develop a vaccine for parasites than for viruses and bacteria, since an immune response targeting one stage may not offer protection against a later stage, because different antigens are the targets of protective immunity at different stages. Furthermore, depending on the life cycle stage and whether the parasite is extra- or intra-cellular, antibody and/or cellular immune responses provide protection. It is thus not surprising that there is no vaccine on the market for prevention of malaria, or any human parasitic infection. In fact, no vaccine for any disease with this breadth of targets and immune responses exists. In this limited review, we focus on four approaches to malaria vaccines, (1) a recombinant protein with adjuvant vaccine aimed at Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) pre-erythrocytic stages of the parasite cycle (RTS,S/AS01), (2) whole sporozoite vaccines aimed at Pf pre-erythrocytic stages (PfSPZ Vaccine and PfSPZ-CVac), (3) prime boost vaccines that include recombinant DNA, viruses and bacteria, and protein with adjuvant aimed primarily at Pf pre-erythrocytic, but also asexual erythrocytic stages, and (4) recombinant protein with adjuvant vaccines aimed at Pf and Plasmodium vivax sexual erythrocytic and mosquito stages. We recognize that we are not covering all approaches to malaria vaccine development, or most of the critically important work on development of vaccines against P. vivax, the second most important cause of

  9. Malaria: new vaccines for old?

    PubMed

    Waters, Andrew

    2006-02-24

    Detailed analyses of the 5500 genes revealed by the complete Plasmodium genome sequence are yielding new candidate parasite antigens and strategies that may contribute to a successful vaccine against malaria in the coming decade.

  10. Profiling the host response to malaria vaccination and malaria challenge

    PubMed Central

    Dunachie, Susanna; Hill, Adrian V.S.; Fletcher, Helen A.

    2015-01-01

    A vaccine for malaria is urgently required. The RTS,S vaccine represents major progress, but is only partially effective. Development of the next generation of highly effective vaccines requires elucidation of the protective immune response. Immunity to malaria is known to be complex, and pattern-based approaches such as global gene expression profiling are ideal for understanding response to vaccination and protection against disease. The availability of experimental sporozoite challenge in humans to test candidate malaria vaccines offers a precious opportunity unavailable for other current targets of vaccine research such as HIV, tuberculosis and Ebola. However, a limited number of transcriptional profiling studies in the context of malaria vaccine research have been published to date. This review outlines the background, existing studies, limits and opportunities for gene expression studies to accelerate malaria vaccine research. PMID:26256528

  11. Profiling the host response to malaria vaccination and malaria challenge.

    PubMed

    Dunachie, Susanna; Hill, Adrian V S; Fletcher, Helen A

    2015-09-29

    A vaccine for malaria is urgently required. The RTS,S vaccine represents major progress, but is only partially effective. Development of the next generation of highly effective vaccines requires elucidation of the protective immune response. Immunity to malaria is known to be complex, and pattern-based approaches such as global gene expression profiling are ideal for understanding response to vaccination and protection against disease. The availability of experimental sporozoite challenge in humans to test candidate malaria vaccines offers a precious opportunity unavailable for other current targets of vaccine research such as HIV, tuberculosis and Ebola. However, a limited number of transcriptional profiling studies in the context of malaria vaccine research have been published to date. This review outlines the background, existing studies, limits and opportunities for gene expression studies to accelerate malaria vaccine research.

  12. Designing malaria vaccines to circumvent antigen variability.

    PubMed

    Ouattara, Amed; Barry, Alyssa E; Dutta, Sheetij; Remarque, Edmond J; Beeson, James G; Plowe, Christopher V

    2015-12-22

    Prospects for malaria eradication will be greatly enhanced by an effective vaccine, but parasite genetic diversity poses a major impediment to malaria vaccine efficacy. In recent pre-clinical and field trials, vaccines based on polymorphic Plasmodium falciparum antigens have shown efficacy only against homologous strains, raising the specter of allele-specific immunity such as that which plagues vaccines against influenza and HIV. The most advanced malaria vaccine, RTS,S, targets relatively conserved epitopes on the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein. After more than 40 years of development and testing, RTS,S, has shown significant but modest efficacy against clinical malaria in phase 2 and 3 trials. Ongoing phase 2 studies of an irradiated sporozoite vaccine will ascertain whether the full protection against homologous experimental malaria challenge conferred by high doses of a whole organism vaccine can provide protection against diverse strains in the field. Here we review and evaluate approaches being taken to design broadly cross-protective malaria vaccines.

  13. Reducing empiricism in malaria vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Vasee S; Kieny, Marie Paule

    2010-03-01

    Gains in the control of malaria and the promising progress of a malaria vaccine that is partly efficacious do not reduce the need for a high-efficacy vaccine in the longer term. Evidence supports the feasibility of developing a highly efficacious malaria vaccine. However, design of candidate malaria vaccines remains empirical and is necessarily based on many unproven assumptions because much of the knowledge needed to design vaccines and to predict efficacy is not available. Data to inform key questions of vaccine science might allow the design of vaccines to progress to a less empirical stage, for example through availability of assay results associated with vaccine efficacy. We discuss six strategic gaps in knowledge that contribute to empiricism in the design of vaccines. Comparative evaluation, assay and model standardisation, greater sharing of information, collaboration and coordination between groups, and rigorous evaluation of existing datasets are steps that can be taken to enable reductions in empiricism over time.

  14. A Research Agenda for Malaria Eradication: Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Vaccines could be a crucial component of efforts to eradicate malaria. Current attempts to develop malaria vaccines are primarily focused on Plasmodium falciparum and are directed towards reducing morbidity and mortality. Continued support for these efforts is essential, but if malaria vaccines are to be used as part of a repertoire of tools for elimination or eradication of malaria, they will need to have an impact on malaria transmission. We introduce the concept of “vaccines that interrupt malaria transmission” (VIMT), which includes not only “classical” transmission-blocking vaccines that target the sexual and mosquito stages but also pre-erythrocytic and asexual stage vaccines that have an effect on transmission. VIMT may also include vaccines that target the vector to disrupt parasite development in the mosquito. Importantly, if eradication is to be achieved, malaria vaccine development efforts will need to target other malaria parasite species, especially Plasmodium vivax, where novel therapeutic vaccines against hypnozoites or preventive vaccines with effect against multiple stages could have enormous impact. A target product profile (TPP) for VIMT is proposed and a research agenda to address current knowledge gaps and develop tools necessary for design and development of VIMT is presented. PMID:21311586

  15. A research agenda for malaria eradication: vaccines.

    PubMed

    2011-01-25

    Vaccines could be a crucial component of efforts to eradicate malaria. Current attempts to develop malaria vaccines are primarily focused on Plasmodium falciparum and are directed towards reducing morbidity and mortality. Continued support for these efforts is essential, but if malaria vaccines are to be used as part of a repertoire of tools for elimination or eradication of malaria, they will need to have an impact on malaria transmission. We introduce the concept of "vaccines that interrupt malaria transmission" (VIMT), which includes not only "classical" transmission-blocking vaccines that target the sexual and mosquito stages but also pre-erythrocytic and asexual stage vaccines that have an effect on transmission. VIMT may also include vaccines that target the vector to disrupt parasite development in the mosquito. Importantly, if eradication is to be achieved, malaria vaccine development efforts will need to target other malaria parasite species, especially Plasmodium vivax, where novel therapeutic vaccines against hypnozoites or preventive vaccines with effect against multiple stages could have enormous impact. A target product profile (TPP) for VIMT is proposed and a research agenda to address current knowledge gaps and develop tools necessary for design and development of VIMT is presented.

  16. Molecular Vaccines for Malaria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    is a p:micularly elegant example of molecular design applied to a recombi nant prote in , combining rational antigen choice (the vaccine uses a major...ing list of examples concordant with these principles. One is rhe ex istence of cryptic epitopes- normally immunologically silent epitopes rhar when...to divert· the immune response from cryptic epitopes formed by the potential binding site lying within the groove,l7 AMAI illustrates the barrier

  17. Protective immunity against malaria after vaccination.

    PubMed

    de Souza, J B

    2014-03-01

    A good understanding of the immunological correlates of protective immunity is an important requirement for the development of effective vaccines against malaria. However, this concern has received little attention even in the face of two decades of intensive vaccine research. Here, we review the immune response to blood-stage malaria, with a particular focus on the type of vaccine most likely to induce the kind of response required to give strong protection against infection.

  18. Designing malaria vaccines to circumvent antigen variability✩

    PubMed Central

    Ouattara, Amed; Barry, Alyssa E.; Dutta, Sheetij; Remarque, Edmond J.; Beeson, James G.; Plowe, Christopher V.

    2016-01-01

    Prospects for malaria eradication will be greatly enhanced by an effective vaccine, but parasite genetic diversity poses a major impediment to malaria vaccine efficacy. In recent pre-clinical and field trials, vaccines based on polymorphic Plasmodium falciparum antigens have shown efficacy only against homologous strains, raising the specter of allele-specific immunity such as that which plagues vaccines against influenza and HIV. The most advanced malaria vaccine, RTS,S, targets relatively conserved epitopes on the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein. After more than 40 years of development and testing, RTS,S, has shown significant but modest efficacy against clinical malaria in phase 2 and 3 trials. Ongoing phase 2 studies of an irradiated sporozoite vaccine will ascertain whether the full protection against homologous experimental malaria challenge conferred by high doses of a whole organism vaccine can provide protection against diverse strains in the field. Here we review and evaluate approaches being taken to design broadly cross-protective malaria vaccines. PMID:26475447

  19. Status of vaccine research and development of vaccines for malaria.

    PubMed

    Birkett, Ashley J

    2016-06-03

    Despite recent progress in reducing deaths attributable to malaria, it continues to claim approximately 500,000 lives per year and is associated with approximately 200 million infections. New tools, including safe and effective vaccines, are needed to ensure that the gains of the last 15 years are leveraged toward achieving the ultimate goal of malaria parasite eradication. In 2015, the European Medicines Agency announced the adoption of a positive opinion for the malaria vaccine candidate most advanced in development, RTS,S/AS01, which provides modest protection against clinical malaria; in early 2016, WHO recommended large-scale pilot implementations of RTS,S in settings of moderate-to-high malaria transmission. In alignment with these advancements, the community goals and preferred product characteristics for next-generation vaccines have been updated to inform the development of vaccines that are highly efficacious in preventing clinical malaria, and those needed to accelerate parasite elimination. Next-generation vaccines, targeting all stages of the parasite lifecycle, are in early-stage development with the most advanced in Phase 2 trials. Importantly, progress is being made in the definition of feasible regulatory pathways to accelerate timelines, including for vaccines designed to interrupt transmission of parasites from humans to mosquitoes. The continued absence of financially lucrative, high-income markets to drive investment in malaria vaccine development points to continued heavy reliance on public and philanthropic funding.

  20. Secreted HSP Vaccine for Malaria Prophylaxis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0098 TITLE: Secreted HSP Vaccine for Malaria Prophylaxis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Eckhard R. Podack...1. REPORT DATE October 2014 2. REPORT TYPE ANNUAL 3. DATES COVERED 30 SEPT 2013 – 29 SEPT 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Secreted HSP Vaccine for...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Proposed vaccine principle relies on secreted gp96-Ig chaperoning PfCSP and PfAMA1 sporozoite proteins that are efficiently

  1. Development of vaccines for Plasmodium vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Ivo; Shakri, Ahmad Rushdi; Chitnis, Chetan E

    2015-12-22

    Plasmodium vivax continues to cause significant morbidity outside Africa with more than 50% of malaria cases in many parts of South and South-east Asia, Pacific islands, Central and South America being attributed to P. vivax infections. The unique biology of P. vivax, including its ability to form latent hypnozoites that emerge months to years later to cause blood stage infections, early appearance of gametocytes before clinical symptoms are apparent and a shorter development cycle in the vector makes elimination of P. vivax using standard control tools difficult. The availability of an effective vaccine that provides protection and prevents transmission would be a valuable tool in efforts to eliminate P. vivax. Here, we review the latest developments related to P. vivax malaria vaccines and discuss the challenges as well as directions toward the goal of developing highly efficacious vaccines against P. vivax malaria.

  2. Vaccine candidates for malaria: what's new?

    PubMed

    Takashima, Eizo; Morita, Masayuki; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Although it is more than a decade since the parasite genome information was obtained, standardized novel genome-wide selection/prioritization strategies for candidacy of malaria vaccine antigens are still sought. In the quest to systematically identify candidates, it is impossible to overemphasize the usefulness of wheat germ cell-free technology in expressing quality proteins for the post-genome vaccine candidate discovery.

  3. Malaria vaccine offers hope. International / Africa.

    PubMed

    1995-04-03

    The World Health Organization (WHO) may soon sign an agreement with the Colombian government to build a plant in Colombia for the mass production of the malaria vaccine SPf66. SPf66 consists of a combination of synthetic peptides. It will eventually be available in Africa, where 90% of all recorded malaria cases occur each year. 1 million of the 1.5-3 million malaria-related deaths each year also occur in Africa. Many of these deaths take place in children. The indirect costs of malaria in Africa is expected to increase from $800 million to $1.8 billion between 1987 and the end of 1995. Based on findings from the various clinical trials in Colombia, Thailand, The Gambia, and Tanzania, WHO's director of Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) claims that, if SPf66 can reduce the malaria incidence rate by 50% and thereby also the malaria-related death rate, the lives of 500,000 children in Africa would be spared. TDR will meet in mid-1996 to sort through all the SPf66 findings and then develop a policy for further development or production and use of SPf66. The price of each SPf66 vaccination should be around $5, comparable with the higher range of costs of other vaccines provided by WHO's Expanded Program of Immunization and UNICEF. At the 1992 WHO summit in Amsterdam, the president of the Congo called for the international community to join forces to eliminate malaria. When it was first tested on humans, in Colombia, the protection rate of SPf66 ranged from 22% to 77%, with the best results among the young and the very old. It has not caused any harmful side effects.

  4. Malaria vaccine based on Self-Assembling Protein Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Burkhard, Peter; Lanar, David E

    2016-01-01

    Summary Despite recent progress with GSK’s RTS’S malaria vaccine, there remains a desperate need for an efficient malaria vaccine. We have used a repetitive antigen display technology to display malaria specific B cell and T cell epitopes in an effort to design a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Our protein sequence when assembled into a nanoparticle induces strong, long-lived and protective immune responses against infection with the parasite. We are confident that the clinical trials with our most developed vaccine candidate will show good protection in a controlled human malaria infection trial. PMID:26468608

  5. Tailoring a Combination Preerythrocytic Malaria Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Bauza, Karolis; Malinauskas, Tomas; Blagborough, Andrew M.; Reyes-Sandoval, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    The leading malaria vaccine candidate, RTS,S, based on the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP), will likely be the first publicly adopted malaria vaccine. However, this and other subunit vaccines, such as virus-vectored thrombospondin-related adhesive protein (TRAP), provide only intermediate to low levels of protection. In this study, the Plasmodium berghei homologues of antigens CSP and TRAP are combined. TRAP is delivered using adenovirus- and vaccinia virus-based vectors in a prime-boost regime. Initially, CSP is also delivered using these viral vectors; however, a reduction of anti-CSP antibodies is seen when combined with virus-vectored TRAP, and the combination is no more protective than either subunit vaccine alone. Using an adenovirus-CSP prime, protein-CSP boost regime, however, increases anti-CSP antibody titers by an order of magnitude, which is maintained when combined with virus-vectored TRAP. This combination regime using protein CSP provided 100% protection in C57BL/6 mice compared to no protection using virus-vectored TRAP alone and 40% protection using adenovirus-CSP prime and protein-CSP boost alone. This suggests that a combination of CSP and TRAP subunit vaccines could enhance protection against malaria. PMID:26667840

  6. Particle-Based Platforms for Malaria Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yimin; Narum, David L.; Fleury, Sylvain; Jennings, Gary; Yadava, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines in general are poor immunogens likely due to the small size of peptides and proteins, combined with the lack or reduced presentation of repetitive motifs and missing complementary signal(s) for optimal triggering of the immune response. Therefore, recombinant subunit vaccines require enhancement by vaccine delivery vehicles in order to attain adequate protective immunity. Particle-based delivery platforms, including particulate antigens and particulate adjuvants, are promising delivery vehicles for modifying the way in which immunogens are presented to both the innate and adaptive immune systems. These particle delivery platforms can also co-deliver non-specific immunostimodulators as additional adjuvants. This paper reviews efforts and advances of the Particle-based delivery platforms in development of vaccines against malaria, a disease that claims over 600,000 lives per year, most of them are children under 5 years of age in sub-Sahara Africa. PMID:26458803

  7. Malaria vaccines: identifying Plasmodium falciparum liver-stage targets

    PubMed Central

    Longley, Rhea J.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Spencer, Alexandra J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of a highly efficacious and durable vaccine for malaria remains a top priority for global health researchers. Despite the huge rise in recognition of malaria as a global health problem and the concurrent rise in funding over the past 10–15 years, malaria continues to remain a widespread burden. The evidence of increasing resistance to anti-malarial drugs and insecticides is a growing concern. Hence, an efficacious and durable preventative vaccine for malaria is urgently needed. Vaccines are one of the most cost-effective tools and have successfully been used in the prevention and control of many diseases, however, the development of a vaccine for the Plasmodium parasite has proved difficult. Given the early success of whole sporozoite mosquito-bite delivered vaccination strategies, we know that a vaccine for malaria is an achievable goal, with sub-unit vaccines holding great promise as they are simple and cheap to both manufacture and deploy. However a major difficulty in development of sub-unit vaccines lies within choosing the appropriate antigenic target from the 5000 or so genes expressed by the parasite. Given the liver-stage of malaria represents a bottle-neck in the parasite’s life cycle, there is widespread agreement that a multi-component sub-unit malaria vaccine should preferably contain a liver-stage target. In this article we review progress in identifying and screening Plasmodium falciparum liver-stage targets for use in a malaria vaccine. PMID:26441899

  8. Cross-stage immunity for malaria vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Nahrendorf, Wiebke; Scholzen, Anja; Sauerwein, Robert W; Langhorne, Jean

    2015-12-22

    A vaccine against malaria is urgently needed for control and eventual eradication. Different approaches are pursued to induce either sterile immunity directed against pre-erythrocytic parasites or to mimic naturally acquired immunity by controlling blood-stage parasite densities and disease severity. Pre-erythrocytic and blood-stage malaria vaccines are often seen as opposing tactics, but it is likely that they have to be combined into a multi-stage malaria vaccine to be optimally safe and effective. Since many antigenic targets are shared between liver- and blood-stage parasites, malaria vaccines have the potential to elicit cross-stage protection with immune mechanisms against both stages complementing and enhancing each other. Here we discuss evidence from pre-erythrocytic and blood-stage subunit and whole parasite vaccination approaches that show that protection against malaria is not necessarily stage-specific. Parasites arresting at late liver-stages especially, can induce powerful blood-stage immunity, and similarly exposure to blood-stage parasites can afford pre-erythrocytic immunity. The incorporation of a blood-stage component into a multi-stage malaria vaccine would hence not only combat breakthrough infections in the blood should the pre-erythrocytic component fail to induce sterile protection, but would also actively enhance the pre-erythrocytic potency of this vaccine. We therefore advocate that future studies should concentrate on the identification of cross-stage protective malaria antigens, which can empower multi-stage malaria vaccine development.

  9. The path of malaria vaccine development: challenges and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Arama, C; Troye-Blomberg, M

    2014-05-01

    Malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by parasites of the Plasmodium genus. In many parts of the world, the parasites have developed resistance to a number of antimalarial agents. Key interventions to control malaria include prompt and effective treatment with artemisinin-based combination therapies, use of insecticidal nets by individuals at risk and active research into malaria vaccines. Protection against malaria through vaccination was demonstrated more than 30 years ago when individuals were vaccinated via repeated bites by Plasmodium falciparum-infected and irradiated but still metabolically active mosquitoes. However, vaccination with high doses of irradiated sporozoites injected into humans has long been considered impractical. Yet, following recent success using whole-organism vaccines, the approach has received renewed interest; it was recently reported that repeated injections of irradiated sporozoites increased protection in 80 vaccinated individuals. Other approaches include subunit malaria vaccines, such as the current leading candidate RTS,S (consisting of fusion between a portion of the P. falciparum-derived circumsporozoite protein and the hepatitis B surface antigen), which has been demonstrated to induce reasonably good protection. Although results have been encouraging, the level of protection is generally considered to be too low to achieve eradication of malaria. There is great interest in developing new and better formulations and stable delivery systems to improve immunogenicity. In this review, we will discuss recent strategies to develop efficient malaria vaccines.

  10. Overview of Plant-Made Vaccine Antigens against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Marina; Corigliano, Mariana G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is an overview of vaccine antigens against malaria produced in plants. Plant-based expression systems represent an interesting production platform due to their reduced manufacturing costs and high scalability. At present, different Plasmodium antigens and expression strategies have been optimized in plants. Furthermore, malaria antigens are one of the few examples of eukaryotic proteins with vaccine value expressed in plants, making plant-derived malaria antigens an interesting model to analyze. Up to now, malaria antigen expression in plants has allowed the complete synthesis of these vaccine antigens, which have been able to induce an active immune response in mice. Therefore, plant production platforms offer wonderful prospects for improving the access to malaria vaccines. PMID:22911156

  11. Large screen approaches to identify novel malaria vaccine candidates

    PubMed Central

    Davies, D. Huw; Duffy, Patrick; Bodmer, Jean-Luc; Felgner, Philip L.; Doolan, Denise L.

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, malaria vaccine development efforts have focused almost exclusively on a handful of well characterized Plasmodium falciparum antigens. Despite dedicated work by many researchers on different continents spanning more than half a century, a successful malaria vaccine remains elusive. Sequencing of the P. falciparum genome has revealed more than five thousand genes, providing the foundation for systematic approaches to discover candidate vaccine antigens. We are taking advantage of this wealth of information to discover new antigens that may be more effective vaccine targets. Herein, we describe different approaches to large-scale screening of the P. falciparum genome to identify targets of either antibody responses or T cell responses using human specimens collected in Controlled Human Malaria Infections (CHMI) or under conditions of natural exposure in the field. These genome, proteome and transcriptome based approaches offer enormous potential for the development of an efficacious malaria vaccine. PMID:26428458

  12. Recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara-based malaria vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Sarah; Gilbert, Sarah C

    2016-01-01

    A safe and effective malaria vaccine is a crucial part of the roadmap to malaria elimination/eradication by the year 2050. Viral-vectored vaccines based on adenoviruses and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing malaria immunogens are currently being used in heterologous prime-boost regimes in clinical trials for induction of strong antigen-specific T-cell responses and high-titer antibodies. Recombinant MVA is a safe and well-tolerated attenuated vector that has consistently shown significant boosting potential. Advances have been made in large-scale MVA manufacture as high-yield producer cell lines and high-throughput purification processes have recently been developed. This review describes the use of MVA as malaria vaccine vector in both preclinical and clinical studies in the past 5 years.

  13. Progress and prospects for blood-stage malaria vaccines.

    PubMed

    Miura, Kazutoyo

    2016-06-01

    There have been significant decreases in malaria mortality and morbidity in the last 10-15 years, and the most advanced pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccine, RTS,S, received a positive opinion from European regulators in July 2015. However, no blood-stage vaccine has reached a phase III trial. The first part of this review summarizes the pros and cons of various assays and models that have been and will be used to predict the efficacy of blood-stage vaccines. In the second part, blood-stage vaccine candidates that showed some efficacy in human clinical trials or controlled human malaria infection models are discussed. Then, candidates under clinical investigation are described in the third part, and other novel candidates and strategies are reviewed in the last part.

  14. Progress and prospects for blood-stage malaria vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Kazutoyo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There have been significant decreases in malaria mortality and morbidity in the last 10-15 years, and the most advanced pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccine, RTS,S, received a positive opinion from European regulators in July 2015. However, no blood-stage vaccine has reached a phase III trial. The first part of this review summarizes the pros and cons of various assays and models that have been and will be used to predict the efficacy of blood-stage vaccines. In the second part, blood-stage vaccine candidates that showed some efficacy in human clinical trials or controlled human malaria infection models are discussed. Then, candidates under clinical investigation are described in the third part, and other novel candidates and strategies are reviewed in the last part. PMID:26760062

  15. Genetic engineering of attenuated malaria parasites for vaccination.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahid M; Janse, Chris J; Kappe, Stefan H I; Mikolajczak, Sebastian A

    2012-12-01

    Vaccination with live-attenuated Plasmodium sporozoites that arrest in the liver can completely protect against a malaria infection both in animal models and in humans; this has provided the conceptual basis for the most promising, but also challenging, approach to develop an efficacious malaria vaccine. Advances in genetic manipulation of Plasmodium in conjunction with improved genomic and biological information has enabled new approaches to design genetically attenuated parasites (GAPs). In this review we discuss the principles in discovery and development of GAPs in preclinical models that are important in selecting GAP parasites for first-in-human clinical studies. Finally, we highlight the challenges in manufacture, formulation and delivery of a live-attenuated whole parasite malaria vaccine, as well as the further refinements that may be implemented in the next generation GAP vaccines.

  16. Malaria vaccine: WHO position paper, January 2016 - Recommendations.

    PubMed

    2017-04-03

    This article presents the World Health Organization's (WHO) recommendations on the use of malaria vaccine excerpted from the WHO position paper on malaria vaccine published in the Weekly epidemiological Record in January 2016 [1]. The current document is the first WHO position paper on malaria vaccination and focuses primarily on the available evidence concerning the only malaria vaccine having received a positive regulation assessment from the European Medicines Agency (EMA) [2]. The position paper gives consideration to the epidemiological features of the disease and assesses the potential use of the vaccine for public health benefits. Footnotes to this paper provide a number of core references including references to grading tables that assess the quality of the scientific evidence, and to the evidence to recommendation table. In accordance with its mandate to provide guidance to Member States on health policy matters, WHO issues a series of regularly updated position papers on vaccines and combinations of vaccines against diseases that have an international public health impact. These papers are concerned primarily with the use of vaccines in large-scale immunization programmes; they summarize essential background information on diseases and vaccines, and conclude with WHO's current position on the use of vaccines in the global context. This paper reflects the joint recommendation of the WHO's Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) on immunization and the Malaria Policy Advisory Committee (MPAC). These recommendations were discussed by SAGE and MPAC at the October 2015 SAGE meeting. Evidence presented at the meeting can be accessed at http://www.who.int/immunization/sage/previous/en/index.html.

  17. Recent advances in recombinant protein-based malaria vaccines.

    PubMed

    Draper, Simon J; Angov, Evelina; Horii, Toshihiro; Miller, Louis H; Srinivasan, Prakash; Theisen, Michael; Biswas, Sumi

    2015-12-22

    Plasmodium parasites are the causative agent of human malaria, and the development of a highly effective vaccine against infection, disease and transmission remains a key priority. It is widely established that multiple stages of the parasite's complex lifecycle within the human host and mosquito vector are susceptible to vaccine-induced antibodies. The mainstay approach to antibody induction by subunit vaccination has been the delivery of protein antigen formulated in adjuvant. Extensive efforts have been made in this endeavor with respect to malaria vaccine development, especially with regard to target antigen discovery, protein expression platforms, adjuvant testing, and development of soluble and virus-like particle (VLP) delivery platforms. The breadth of approaches to protein-based vaccines is continuing to expand as innovative new concepts in next-generation subunit design are explored, with the prospects for the development of a highly effective multi-component/multi-stage/multi-antigen formulation seeming ever more likely. This review will focus on recent progress in protein vaccine design, development and/or clinical testing for a number of leading malaria antigens from the sporozoite-, merozoite- and sexual-stages of the parasite's lifecycle-including PfCelTOS, PfMSP1, PfAMA1, PfRH5, PfSERA5, PfGLURP, PfMSP3, Pfs48/45 and Pfs25. Future prospects and challenges for the development, production, human delivery and assessment of protein-based malaria vaccines are discussed.

  18. Novel approaches to identify protective malaria vaccine candidates

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Wan Ni; Goh, Yun Shan; Rénia, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to develop vaccines against malaria have been the focus of substantial research activities for decades. Several categories of candidate vaccines are currently being developed for protection against malaria, based on antigens corresponding to the pre-erythrocytic, blood stage, or sexual stages of the parasite. Long lasting sterile protection from Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite challenge has been observed in human following vaccination with whole parasite formulations, clearly demonstrating that a protective immune response targeting predominantly the pre-erythrocytic stages can develop against malaria. However, most of vaccine candidates currently being investigated, which are mostly subunits vaccines, have not been able to induce substantial (>50%) protection thus far. This is due to the fact that the antigens responsible for protection against the different parasite stages are still yet to be known and relevant correlates of protection have remained elusive. For a vaccine to be developed in a timely manner, novel approaches are required. In this article, we review the novel approaches that have been developed to identify the antigens for the development of an effective malaria vaccine. PMID:25452745

  19. Recent advances in recombinant protein-based malaria vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Simon J.; Angov, Evelina; Horii, Toshihiro; Miller, Louis H.; Srinivasan, Prakash; Theisen, Michael; Biswas, Sumi

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium parasites are the causative agent of human malaria, and the development of a highly effective vaccine against infection, disease and transmission remains a key priority. It is widely established that multiple stages of the parasite's complex lifecycle within the human host and mosquito vector are susceptible to vaccine-induced antibodies. The mainstay approach to antibody induction by subunit vaccination has been the delivery of protein antigen formulated in adjuvant. Extensive efforts have been made in this endeavor with respect to malaria vaccine development, especially with regard to target antigen discovery, protein expression platforms, adjuvant testing, and development of soluble and virus-like particle (VLP) delivery platforms. The breadth of approaches to protein-based vaccines is continuing to expand as innovative new concepts in next-generation subunit design are explored, with the prospects for the development of a highly effective multi-component/multi-stage/multi-antigen formulation seeming ever more likely. This review will focus on recent progress in protein vaccine design, development and/or clinical testing for a number of leading malaria antigens from the sporozoite-, merozoite- and sexual-stages of the parasite's lifecycle–including PfCelTOS, PfMSP1, PfAMA1, PfRH5, PfSERA5, PfGLURP, PfMSP3, Pfs48/45 and Pfs25. Future prospects and challenges for the development, production, human delivery and assessment of protein-based malaria vaccines are discussed. PMID:26458807

  20. A 2020 vision for vaccines against HIV, tuberculosis and malaria.

    PubMed

    Rappuoli, Rino; Aderem, Alan

    2011-05-26

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), malaria and tuberculosis collectively cause more than five million deaths per year, but have nonetheless eluded conventional vaccine development; for this reason they represent one of the major global public health challenges as we enter the second decade of the twenty-first century. Recent trials have provided evidence that it is possible to develop vaccines that can prevent infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and malaria. Furthermore, advances in vaccinology, including novel adjuvants, prime-boost regimes and strategies for intracellular antigen presentation, have led to progress in developing a vaccine against tuberculosis. Here we discuss these advances and suggest that new tools such as systems biology and structure-based antigen design will lead to a deeper understanding of mechanisms of protection which, in turn, will lead to rational vaccine development. We also argue that new and innovative approaches to clinical trials will accelerate the availability of these vaccines.

  1. Pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccines: identifying the targets

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Patrick E; Sahu, Tejram; Akue, Adovi; Milman, Neta; Anderson, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccines target Plasmodium during its sporozoite and liver stages, and can prevent progression to blood-stage disease, which causes a million deaths each year. Whole organism sporozoite vaccines induce sterile immunity in animals and humans and guide subunit vaccine development. A recombinant protein-in-adjuvant pre-erythrocytic vaccine called RTS,S reduces clinical malaria without preventing infection in field studies and additional antigens may be required to achieve sterile immunity. Although few vaccine antigens have progressed to human testing, new insights into parasite biology, expression profiles and immunobiology have offered new targets for intervention. Future advances require human trials of additional antigens, as well as platforms to induce the durable antibody and cellular responses including CD8+ T cells that contribute to sterile protection. PMID:23176657

  2. Developing inexpensive malaria vaccines from plants and algae.

    PubMed

    Gregory, James A; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2014-03-01

    Malaria is a parasitic, mosquito-borne, infectious disease that threatens nearly half of the global population. The last decade has seen a dramatic drop in the number of malaria-related deaths because of vector control methods and anti-malarial drugs. Unfortunately, this strategy is not sustainable because of the emergence of insecticide-resistant mosquitoes and drug-resistant Plasmodium parasites. Eradication of malaria will ultimately require low-cost easily administered vaccines that work in concert with current control methods. Low cost and ease of administration will be essential components of any vaccine, because malaria endemic regions are poor and often lack an adequate healthcare infrastructure. Recently, several groups have begun addressing these issues using inexpensive photosynthetic organisms for producing vaccine antigens and exploring oral delivery strategies. Immune responses from plant-based injectable malaria vaccines are promising, but attempts to adapt these for oral delivery suggest we are far from a feasible strategy. Here, we review examples of these technologies and discuss the progress and potential of this research, as well as the obstacles ahead.

  3. The Power of Malaria Vaccine Trials Using Controlled Human Malaria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hermsen, Cornelus C.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; de Vlas, Sake J.

    2017-01-01

    Controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) in healthy human volunteers is an important and powerful tool in clinical malaria vaccine development. However, power calculations are essential to obtain meaningful estimates of protective efficacy, while minimizing the risk of adverse events. To optimize power calculations for CHMI-based malaria vaccine trials, we developed a novel non-linear statistical model for parasite kinetics as measured by qPCR, using data from mosquito-based CHMI experiments in 57 individuals. We robustly account for important sources of variation between and within individuals using a Bayesian framework. Study power is most dependent on the number of individuals in each treatment arm; inter-individual variation in vaccine efficacy and the number of blood samples taken per day matter relatively little. Due to high inter-individual variation in the number of first-generation parasites, hepatic vaccine trials required significantly more study subjects than erythrocytic vaccine trials. We provide power calculations for hypothetical malaria vaccine trials of various designs and conclude that so far, power calculations have been overly optimistic. We further illustrate how upcoming techniques like needle-injected CHMI may reduce required sample sizes. PMID:28081133

  4. Malaria invasion ligand RH5 and its prime candidacy in blood-stage malaria vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Ord, Rosalynn L; Rodriguez, Marilis; Lobo, Cheryl A

    2015-01-01

    With drug resistance to available therapeutics continuing to develop against Plasmodium falciparum malaria, the development of an effective vaccine candidate remains a major research goal. Successful interruption of invasion of parasites into erythrocytes during the blood stage of infection will prevent the severe clinical symptoms and complications associated with malaria. Previously studied blood stage antigens have highlighted the hurdles that are inherent to this life-cycle stage, namely that highly immunogenic antigens are also globally diverse, resulting in protection only against the vaccine strain, or that naturally acquired immunity to blood stage antigens do not always correlate with actual protection. The blood stage antigen reticulocyte binding homolog RH5 is essential for parasite viability, has globally limited diversity, and is associated with protection from disease. Here we summarize available information on this invasion ligand and recent findings that highlight its candidacy for inclusion in a blood-stage malaria vaccine. PMID:25844685

  5. The Use of Synthetic Carriers in Malaria Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Powles, Liam; Xiang, Sue D.; Selomulya, Cordelia; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Malaria vaccine research has been ongoing since the 1980s with limited success. However, recent improvements in our understanding of the immune responses required to combat each stage of infection will allow for intelligent design of both antigens and their associated delivery vaccine vehicles/vectors. Synthetic carriers (also known as vectors) are usually particulate and have multiple properties, which can be varied to control how an associated vaccine interacts with the host, and consequently how the immune response develops. This review comprehensively analyzes both historical and recent studies in which synthetic carriers are used to deliver malaria vaccines. Furthermore, the requirements for a synthetic carrier, such as size, charge, and surface chemistry are reviewed in order to understand the design of effective particle-based vaccines against malaria, as well as providing general insights. Synthetic carriers have the ability to alter and direct the immune response, and a better control of particle properties will facilitate improved vaccine design in the near future. PMID:26529028

  6. Paths to a malaria vaccine illuminated by parasite genomics.

    PubMed

    Conway, David J

    2015-02-01

    More human death and disease is caused by malaria parasites than by all other eukaryotic pathogens combined. As early as the sequencing of the first human genome, malaria parasite genomics was prioritized to fuel the discovery of vaccine candidate antigens. This stimulated increased research on malaria, generating new understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of infection and immunity. This review of recent developments illustrates how new approaches in parasite genomics, and increasingly large amounts of data from population studies, are helping to identify antigens that are promising lead targets. Although these results have been encouraging, effective discovery and characterization need to be coupled with more innovation and funding to translate findings into newly designed vaccine products for clinical trials.

  7. Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Kathryn N.; Kain, Kevin C.; Keystone, Jay S.

    2004-01-01

    Malaria is a parasitic infection of global importance. Although relatively uncommon in developed countries, where the disease occurs mainly in travellers who have returned from endemic regions, it remains one of the most prevalent infections of humans worldwide. In endemic regions, malaria is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality and creates enormous social and economic burdens. Current efforts to control malaria focus on reducing attributable morbidity and mortality. Targeted chemoprophylaxis and use of insecticide-treated bed nets have been successful in some endemic areas. For travellers to malaria-endemic regions, personal protective measures and appropriate chemoprophylaxis can significantly reduce the risk of infection. Prompt evaluation of the febrile traveller, a high degree of suspicion of malaria, rapid and accurate diagnosis, and appropriate antimalarial therapy are essential in order to optimize clinical outcomes of infected patients. Additional approaches to malaria control, including genetic manipulation of mosquitoes and malaria vaccines, are areas of ongoing research. PMID:15159369

  8. A Novel Malaria Vaccine Candidate Antigen Expressed in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Eleni-Muus, Janna; Aldag, Ingo; Samuel, Kay; Creasey, Alison M.; Hartmann, Marcus W. W.; Cavanagh, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Development of effective malaria vaccines is hampered by the problem of producing correctly folded Plasmodium proteins for use as vaccine components. We have investigated the use of a novel ciliate expression system, Tetrahymena thermophila, as a P. falciparum vaccine antigen platform. A synthetic vaccine antigen composed of N-terminal and C-terminal regions of merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1) was expressed in Tetrahymena thermophila. The recombinant antigen was secreted into the culture medium and purified by monoclonal antibody (mAb) affinity chromatography. The vaccine was immunogenic in MF1 mice, eliciting high antibody titers against both N- and C-terminal components. Sera from immunized animals reacted strongly with P. falciparum parasites from three antigenically different strains by immunofluorescence assays, confirming that the antibodies produced are able to recognize parasite antigens in their native form. Epitope mapping of serum reactivity with a peptide library derived from all three MSP-1 Block 2 serotypes confirmed that the MSP-1 Block 2 hybrid component of the vaccine had effectively targeted all three serotypes of this polymorphic region of MSP-1. This study has successfully demonstrated the use of Tetrahymena thermophila as a recombinant protein expression platform for the production of malaria vaccine antigens. PMID:24489871

  9. Malaria Vaccine Development and How External Forces Shape It: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Veronique; Karanis, Gabriele; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the current status and scientific value of malaria vaccine approaches and to provide a realistic prognosis for future developments. We systematically review previous approaches to malaria vaccination, address how vaccine efforts have developed, how this issue may be fixed, and how external forces shape vaccine development. Our analysis provides significant information on the various aspects and on the external factors that shape malaria vaccine development and reveal the importance of vaccine development in our society. PMID:24983392

  10. Experimental models in vaccine research: malaria and leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, C; Gomes, R

    2013-02-01

    Animal models have a long history of being useful tools, not only to test and select vaccines, but also to help understand the elaborate details of the immune response that follows infection. Different models have been extensively used to investigate putative immunological correlates of protection against parasitic diseases that are important to reach a successful vaccine. The greatest challenge has been the improvement and adaptation of these models to reflect the reality of human disease and the screening of vaccine candidates capable of overcoming the challenge of natural transmission. This review will discuss the advantages and challenges of using experimental animal models for vaccine development and how the knowledge achieved can be extrapolated to human disease by looking into two important parasitic diseases: malaria and leishmaniasis.

  11. Edible vaccine: a new platform for the development of malaria vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Choudhary Sudheer; Deepesh, Gupta; Mahavir, Yadav; Archana, Tiwari

    2012-01-01

    The plasmodium vivax is the most prevalent malaria parasite. The world essentially needs a malaria vaccine to alleviate the human suffering associated with the parasitic disease that kills more than one million people annually. The use of plants for the expression of the proteins of disease-causing vehicle in transgenic plants has been increasingly used in the development of experimental vaccines, largely oriented to the improvement of edible vaccines. Currently, through modern biotechnology, there has been a revival in obtaining a new edible vaccine against the malaria parasite from plant sources. Through genetic alteration, it is now recognized that plants are potentially a new source of recombinant proteins including vaccines, antibodies, blood substitutes, and other therapeutic entities. Plant-derived antibodies and other proteins are mostly valuable since they are free of mammalian viral vectors and human pathogens. Although significant progress has been achieved in the research for edible vaccine in Plasmodium falciparum, limited progress has been made in the Plasmodium vivax component that might be eligible for edible vaccine development. We describe the overall strategy recommended by plants, which include high biomass production and low cost of cultivation, relatively fast "gene to protein" time, low capital and operating costs, outstanding scalability, eukaryotic posttranslational modifications, and a relatively high protein yield.

  12. A malaria vaccine for travelers and military personnel: Requirements and top candidates.

    PubMed

    Teneza-Mora, Nimfa; Lumsden, Joanne; Villasante, Eileen

    2015-12-22

    Malaria remains an important health threat to non-immune travelers with the explosive growth of global travel. Populations at high risk of acquiring malaria infections include once semi-immune travelers who visit friends and relatives, military forces, business travelers and international tourists with destinations to sub-Saharan Africa, where malaria transmission intensity is high. Most malaria cases have been associated with poor compliance with existing preventive measures, including chemoprophylaxis. High risk groups would benefit immensely from an efficacious vaccine to protect them against malaria infection and together make up a sizable market for such a vaccine. The attributes of an ideal malaria vaccine for non-immune travelers and military personnel include a protective efficacy of 80% or greater, durability for at least 6 months, an acceptable safety profile and compatibility with existing preventive measures. It is very likely that a malaria vaccine designed to effectively prevent infection and clinical disease in the non-immune traveler and military personnel will also protect semi-immune residents of malaria-endemic areas and contribute to malaria elimination by reducing or blocking malaria transmission. The RTS,S vaccine (GlaxoSmithKline) and the PfSPZ Vaccine (Sanaria Inc) are the leading products that would make excellent vaccine candidates for these vulnerable populations.

  13. Transcriptional changes induced by candidate malaria vaccines and correlation with protection against malaria in a human challenge model

    PubMed Central

    Dunachie, Susanna; Berthoud, Tamara; Hill, Adrian V.S.; Fletcher, Helen A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The complexity of immunity to malaria is well known, and clear correlates of protection against malaria have not been established. A better understanding of immune markers induced by candidate malaria vaccines would greatly enhance vaccine development, immunogenicity monitoring and estimation of vaccine efficacy in the field. We have previously reported complete or partial efficacy against experimental sporozoite challenge by several vaccine regimens in healthy malaria-naïve subjects in Oxford. These include a prime-boost regimen with RTS,S/AS02A and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing the CSP antigen, and a DNA-prime, MVA-boost regimen expressing the ME TRAP antigens. Using samples from these trials we performed transcriptional profiling, allowing a global assessment of responses to vaccination. Methods We used Human RefSeq8 Bead Chips from Illumina to examine gene expression using PBMC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) from 16 human volunteers. To focus on antigen-specific changes, comparisons were made between PBMC stimulated with CSP or TRAP peptide pools and unstimulated PBMC post vaccination. We then correlated gene expression with protection against malaria in a human Plasmodium falciparum malaria challenge model. Results Differentially expressed genes induced by both vaccine regimens were predominantly in the IFN-γ pathway. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed antigen-specific effects on genes associated with IFN induction and proteasome modules after vaccination. Genes associated with IFN induction and antigen presentation modules were positively enriched in subjects with complete protection from malaria challenge, while genes associated with haemopoietic stem cells, regulatory monocytes and the myeloid lineage modules were negatively enriched in protected subjects. Conclusions These results represent novel insights into the immune repertoires involved in malaria vaccination. PMID:26256523

  14. Protection against Plasmodium falciparum malaria by PfSPZ Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Judith E.; Paolino, Kristopher M.; Richie, Thomas L.; Sedegah, Martha; Singer, Alexandra; Ruben, Adam J.; Chakravarty, Sumana; Stafford, April; Ruck, Richard C.; Eappen, Abraham G.; Billingsley, Peter F.; Manoj, Anita; Moser, Kara; Nielsen, Robin; Tosh, Donna; Cicatelli, Susan; Ganeshan, Harini; Case, Jessica; Padilla, Debbie; Davidson, Silas; Saverino, Elizabeth; Murshedkar, Tooba; Gunasekera, Anusha; Twomey, Patrick S.; Reyes, Sharina; Moon, James E.; James, Eric R.; KC, Natasha; Li, Minglin; Abot, Esteban; Belmonte, Arnel; Hauns, Kevin; Belmonte, Maria; Huang, Jun; Vasquez, Carlos; Remich, Shon; Carrington, Mary; Abebe, Yonas; Tillman, Amy; Hickey, Bradley; Regules, Jason; Villasante, Eileen; Sim, B. Kim Lee

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A radiation-attenuated Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) sporozoite (SPZ) malaria vaccine, PfSPZ Vaccine, protected 6 of 6 subjects (100%) against homologous Pf (same strain as in the vaccine) controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) 3 weeks after 5 doses administered intravenously. The next step was to assess protective efficacy against heterologous Pf (different from Pf in the vaccine), after fewer doses, and at 24 weeks. METHODS: The trial assessed tolerability, safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of direct venous inoculation (DVI) of 3 or 5 doses of PfSPZ Vaccine in non-immune subjects. RESULTS: Three weeks after final immunization, 5 doses of 2.7 × 105 PfSPZ protected 12 of 13 recipients (92.3% [95% CI: 48.0, 99.8]) against homologous CHMI and 4 of 5 (80.0% [10.4, 99.5]) against heterologous CHMI; 3 doses of 4.5 × 105 PfSPZ protected 13 of 15 (86.7% [35.9, 98.3]) against homologous CHMI. Twenty-four weeks after final immunization, the 5-dose regimen protected 7 of 10 (70.0% [17.3, 93.3]) against homologous and 1 of 10 (10.0% [–35.8, 45.6]) against heterologous CHMI; the 3-dose regimen protected 8 of 14 (57.1% [21.5, 76.6]) against homologous CHMI. All 22 controls developed Pf parasitemia. PfSPZ Vaccine was well tolerated, safe, and easy to administer. No antibody or T cell responses correlated with protection. CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge that PfSPZ Vaccine can protect against a 3-week heterologous CHMI in a limited group of malaria-naive adult subjects. A 3-dose regimen protected against both 3-week and 24-week homologous CHMI (87% and 57%, respectively) in this population. These results provide a foundation for developing an optimized immunization regimen for preventing malaria. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02215707. FUNDING: Support was provided through the US Army Medical Research and Development Command, Military Infectious Diseases Research Program, and the Naval Medical Research

  15. Vaccination with SPf66, a chemically synthesised vaccine, against Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Valero, M V; Amador, L R; Galindo, C; Figueroa, J; Bello, M S; Murillo, L A; Mora, A L; Patarroyo, G; Rocha, C L; Rojas, M

    1993-03-20

    Preclinical and clinical studies have established the safety and immunogenicity of the chemically synthesised SPf66 malaria vaccine. The present study is a phase III randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, efficacy trial completed in La Tola, Colombia. 1548 volunteers over one year of age received three doses of either the vaccine (n = 738) or placebo (n = 810). Active and passive case detection methods were used to document clinical episodes of malaria among the study population. The follow-up period began one month after the third dose and lasted for one year. 168 and 297 episodes of Plasmodium falciparum malaria were documented in the SPf66 group and the placebo group, respectively; this corresponds to a crude protective efficacy of 38.8%. Incidence rates for first or only P falciparum malarial episodes were 22.3% per annum among the vaccinee group and 33.5% among the placebo group (RR = 1.5; 95% Cl 1.23, 1.84). Therefore, the protective efficacy of SPf66 against first or only episodes was 33.6% (95% Cl 18.8, 45.7), being highest in children aged 1-4 years (77%) and adults older than 45 years (67%). The estimated protective efficacy against second episodes was 50.5% (95% Cl 12.9-71.9). Our study shows that the chemically synthesised SPf66 malaria vaccine is safe, immunogenic, and protective against P falciparum malaria in semi-immune populations subject to natural challenge.

  16. Virulence evolution in response to vaccination: the case of malaria.

    PubMed

    Mackinnon, M J; Gandon, S; Read, A F

    2008-07-18

    One theory of why some pathogens are virulent (i.e., they damage their host) is that they need to extract resources from their host in order to compete for transmission to new hosts, and this resource extraction can damage the host. Here we describe our studies in malaria that test and support this idea. We go on to show that host immunity can exacerbate selection for virulence and therefore that vaccines that reduce pathogen replication may select for more virulent pathogens, eroding the benefits of vaccination and putting the unvaccinated at greater risk. We suggest that in disease contexts where wild-type parasites can be transmitted through vaccinated hosts, evolutionary outcomes need to be considered.

  17. Secreted HSP Vaccine for Malaria Prophylaxis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    based vaccines secreting heat shock protein gp96-Ig (for short from here on: gp96) are safe for use in humans and represent the most efficient ... efficiently taken up and cross presented by activated DC via MHC I to CD8 CTL, thereby stimulating an avid, antigen specific, cytotoxic T cell response . This...gp96 delivered subcutaneously , induces very strong antigen specific immune response systemically as well as liver-infiltrating effector CD8 + T cells

  18. Application of wheat germ cell-free protein expression system for novel malaria vaccine candidate discovery.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Thangavelu U; Ito, Daisuke; Takashima, Eizo; Tachibana, Mayumi; Ishino, Tomoko; Torii, Motomi; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2014-01-01

    Malaria causes about 216 million clinical cases and 0.7 million deaths annually. One promising route to address malaria is vaccination. However, so far, not even a single licensed malaria vaccine has been developed. Even the effectiveness of RTS,S, the world's most advanced malaria vaccine candidate (MVC) in clinical trials, is less than 50% efficacy against the disease. This backdrop indicates that the search for a truly effective vaccine is far from over and galvanizes us to expand the arsenal of promising MVC antigens to include in a next generation subunit vaccine. In our previous proof of principle studies, we have found that the wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system (WGCFS) is one of the optimal tools for synthesis of quality malaria proteins and hence the identification of novel MVCs. This review summarizes the initial progresses so far made regarding the identification of novel MVCs using WGCFS.

  19. Vaccine approaches to malaria control and elimination: Insights from mathematical models.

    PubMed

    White, Michael T; Verity, Robert; Churcher, Thomas S; Ghani, Azra C

    2015-12-22

    A licensed malaria vaccine would provide a valuable new tool for malaria control and elimination efforts. Several candidate vaccines targeting different stages of the malaria parasite's lifecycle are currently under development, with one candidate, RTS,S/AS01 for the prevention of Plasmodium falciparum infection, having recently completed Phase III trials. Predicting the public health impact of a candidate malaria vaccine requires using clinical trial data to estimate the vaccine's efficacy profile--the initial efficacy following vaccination and the pattern of waning of efficacy over time. With an estimated vaccine efficacy profile, the effects of vaccination on malaria transmission can be simulated with the aid of mathematical models. Here, we provide an overview of methods for estimating the vaccine efficacy profiles of pre-erythrocytic vaccines and transmission-blocking vaccines from clinical trial data. In the case of RTS,S/AS01, model estimates from Phase II clinical trial data indicate a bi-phasic exponential profile of efficacy against infection, with efficacy waning rapidly in the first 6 months after vaccination followed by a slower rate of waning over the next 4 years. Transmission-blocking vaccines have yet to be tested in large-scale Phase II or Phase III clinical trials so we review ongoing work investigating how a clinical trial might be designed to ensure that vaccine efficacy can be estimated with sufficient statistical power. Finally, we demonstrate how parameters estimated from clinical trials can be used to predict the impact of vaccination campaigns on malaria using a mathematical model of malaria transmission.

  20. Unexpected fold in the circumsporozoite protein target of malaria vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Doud, Michael B.; Koksal, Adem C.; Mi, Li-Zhi; Song, Gaojie; Lu, Chafen; Springer, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Circumsporozoite (CS) protein is the major surface component of Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites and is essential for host cell invasion. A vaccine containing tandem repeats, region III, and thrombospondin type-I repeat (TSR) of CS is efficacious in phase III trials but gives only a 35% reduction in severe malaria in the first year postimmunization. We solved crystal structures showing that region III and TSR fold into a single unit, an “αTSR” domain. The αTSR domain possesses a hydrophobic pocket and core, missing in TSR domains. CS binds heparin, but αTSR does not. Interestingly, polymorphic T-cell epitopes map to specialized αTSR regions. The N and C termini are unexpectedly close, providing clues for sporozoite sheath organization. Elucidation of a unique structure of a domain within CS enables rational design of next-generation subunit vaccines and functional and medicinal chemical investigation of the conserved hydrophobic pocket. PMID:22547819

  1. Unexpected fold in the circumsporozoite protein target of malaria vaccines

    SciTech Connect

    Doud, Michael B.; Koksal, Adem C.; Mi, Li-Zhi; Song, Gaojie; Lu, Chafen; Springer, Timothy A.

    2012-10-09

    Circumsporozoite (CS) protein is the major surface component of Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites and is essential for host cell invasion. A vaccine containing tandem repeats, region III, and thrombospondin type-I repeat (TSR) of CS is efficacious in phase III trials but gives only a 35% reduction in severe malaria in the first year postimmunization. We solved crystal structures showing that region III and TSR fold into a single unit, an '{alpha}TSR' domain. The {alpha}TSR domain possesses a hydrophobic pocket and core, missing in TSR domains. CS binds heparin, but {alpha}TSR does not. Interestingly, polymorphic T-cell epitopes map to specialized {alpha}TSR regions. The N and C termini are unexpectedly close, providing clues for sporozoite sheath organization. Elucidation of a unique structure of a domain within CS enables rational design of next-generation subunit vaccines and functional and medicinal chemical investigation of the conserved hydrophobic pocket.

  2. Molecular basis of allele-specific efficacy of a blood-stage malaria vaccine: vaccine development implications.

    PubMed

    Ouattara, Amed; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Thera, Mahamadou A; Coulibaly, Drissa; Niangaly, Amadou; Saye, Renion; Tolo, Youssouf; Dutta, Sheetij; Heppner, D Gray; Soisson, Lorraine; Diggs, Carter L; Vekemans, Johan; Cohen, Joe; Blackwelder, William C; Dube, Tina; Laurens, Matthew B; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Plowe, Christopher V

    2013-02-01

    The disappointing efficacy of blood-stage malaria vaccines may be explained in part by allele-specific immune responses that are directed against polymorphic epitopes on blood-stage antigens. FMP2.1/AS02(A), a blood-stage candidate vaccine based on apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) from the 3D7 strain of Plasmodium falciparum, had allele-specific efficacy against clinical malaria in a phase II trial in Malian children. We assessed the cross-protective efficacy of the malaria vaccine and inferred which polymorphic amino acid positions in AMA1 were the targets of protective allele-specific immune responses. FMP2.1/AS02(A) had the highest efficacy against AMA1 alleles that were identical to the 3D7 vaccine-type allele at 8 highly polymorphic amino acid positions in the cluster 1 loop (c1L) but differed from 3D7 elsewhere in the molecule. Comparison of the incidence of vaccine-type alleles before and after vaccination in the malaria vaccine and control groups and examination of the patterns of allele change at polymorphic positions in consecutive malaria episodes suggest that the highly polymorphic amino acid position 197 in c1L was the most critical determinant of allele-specific efficacy. These results indicate that a multivalent AMA1 vaccine with broad efficacy could include only a limited set of key alleles of this extremely polymorphic antigen.

  3. Clinical development of placental malaria vaccines and immunoassays harmonization: a workshop report.

    PubMed

    Chêne, Arnaud; Houard, Sophie; Nielsen, Morten A; Hundt, Sophia; D'Alessio, Flavia; Sirima, Sodiomon B; Luty, Adrian J F; Duffy, Patrick; Leroy, Odile; Gamain, Benoit; Viebig, Nicola K

    2016-09-17

    Placental malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum infection constitutes a major health problem manifesting as severe disease and anaemia in the mother, impaired fetal development, low birth weight or spontaneous abortion. Prevention of placental malaria currently relies on two key strategies that are losing efficacy due to spread of resistance: long-lasting insecticide-treated nets and intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy. A placental malaria vaccine would be an attractive, cost-effective complement to the existing control tools. Two placental malaria vaccine candidates are currently in Phase Ia/b clinical trials. During two workshops hosted by the European Vaccine Initiative, one in Paris in April 2014 and the other in Brussels in November 2014, the main actors in placental malaria vaccine research discussed the harmonization of clinical development plans and of the immunoassays with a goal to define standards that will allow comparative assessment of different placental malaria vaccine candidates. The recommendations of these workshops should guide researchers and clinicians in the further development of placental malaria vaccines.

  4. Synergistic and antagonistic interactions between bednets and vaccines in the control of malaria

    PubMed Central

    Artzy-Randrup, Yael; Dobson, Andrew P.; Pascual, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    It is extremely likely that the malaria vaccines currently in development will be used in conjunction with treated bednets and other forms of malaria control. The interaction of different intervention methods is at present poorly understood in a disease such as malaria where immunity is more complex than for other pathogens that have been successfully controlled by vaccination. Here we develop a general mathematical model of malaria transmission to examine the interaction between vaccination and bednets. Counterintuitively, we find that the frailty of malaria immunity will potentially cause both synergistic and antagonistic interactions between vaccination and the use of bednets. We explore the conditions that create these tensions, and outline strategies that minimize their detrimental impact. Our analysis specifically considers the three leading vaccine classes currently in development: preerythrocytic (PEV), blood stage (BSV), and transmission blocking (TBV). We find that the combination of BSV with treated bednets can lead to increased morbidity with no added value in terms of elimination; the interaction is clearly antagonistic. In contrast, there is strong synergy between PEV and treated bednets that may facilitate elimination, although transient stages are likely to increase morbidity. The combination of TBV with treated bednets is synergistic, lowering both morbidity and elimination thresholds. Our results suggest that vaccines will not provide a straightforward solution to malaria control, and that future programs need to consider the synergistic and antagonistic interactions between vaccines and treated bednets. PMID:25605894

  5. Malaria Vaccine Adjuvants: Latest Update and Challenges in Preclinical and Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Elena; Salvador, Aiala; Igartua, Manoli; Hernández, Rosa María; Pedraz, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    There is no malaria vaccine currently available, and the most advanced candidate has recently reported a modest 30% efficacy against clinical malaria. Although many efforts have been dedicated to achieve this goal, the research was mainly directed to identify antigenic targets. Nevertheless, the latest progresses on understanding how immune system works and the data recovered from vaccination studies have conferred to the vaccine formulation its deserved relevance. Additionally to the antigen nature, the manner in which it is presented (delivery adjuvants) as well as the immunostimulatory effect of the formulation components (immunostimulants) modulates the immune response elicited. Protective immunity against malaria requires the induction of humoral, antibody-dependent cellular inhibition (ADCI) and effector and memory cell responses. This review summarizes the status of adjuvants that have been or are being employed in the malaria vaccine development, focusing on the pharmaceutical and immunological aspects, as well as on their immunization outcomings at clinical and preclinical stages. PMID:23710439

  6. Genetically engineered parasites: the solution to designing an effective malaria vaccine?

    PubMed

    Fitchett, Joseph R; Cooke, Mary K

    2010-07-01

    Genetic engineering provides an ingenious method of attenuating Plasmodium falciparum parasites for next generation vaccines. A novel approach stimulates new optimism in the struggle to eliminate the burden of malaria.

  7. Producing a successful malaria vaccine: innovation in the lab and beyond.

    PubMed

    Loucq, Christian; Birkett, Ashley; Poland, David; Botting, Carla; Nunes, Julia; Ethelston, Sally

    2011-06-01

    With approximately 225 million new cases and 800,000 deaths annually, malaria exacts a tremendous toll--mostly on African children under the age of five. Late-stage trials of an advanced malaria vaccine candidate--which, if approved, would become the world's first malaria vaccine--are under way, and it may be ready for use by 2015. This article recounts the pivotal roles in that achievement played by collaborations of nonprofit organizations, pharmaceutical companies, private and public donors, and countries whose citizens would benefit most directly from a vaccine. Just as it takes a village to raise a child, it has taken a huge number of stakeholders around the world to reach this point. Developing even more effective vaccines for malaria and other diseases will require continued hard work and creative thinking from scientists, regulators, and policy makers.

  8. Proteomic Study of Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium Vivax Liver Stages for Development of Vaccines and Drugs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-02

    Proteomic Study of Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium Vivax Liver Stages for Development of Vaccines and Drugs PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Proteomic Study of Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium Vivax 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-07-2-0090 Liver Stages...3. Production of sporozoite and preparation for transcriptome and proteomic analysis: Sporozoites harvested from salivary gland, haemolymph

  9. Evaluation of Drug and Vaccine Candidates in the Human Malaria/Aotus Monkey Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    1 ■—, AD CONTRACT NUMBER DAMD17-96-C-6051 TITLE: Evaluation of Drug and Vaccine Candidates in the Human Malaria/Aotus Monkey Model PRINCIPAL...98) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Evaluation of Drug and Vaccine Candidates in the Human Malaria/Aolus Monkey Model 6. AUTHOR(S) Obaldia 111, Nicanor...Laboratory Resources, National Research Council (NIH Publication No. 86-23, Revised 1985). For the protection of human subjects, the investigator

  10. Can growth inhibition assays (GIA) predict blood-stage malaria vaccine efficacy?

    PubMed

    Duncan, Christopher J A; Hill, Adrian V S; Ellis, Ruth D

    2012-06-01

    An effective vaccine against P. falciparum malaria remains a global health priority. Blood-stage vaccines are an important component of this effort, with some indications of recent progress. However only a fraction of potential blood-stage antigens have been tested, highlighting a critical need for efficient down-selection strategies. Functional in vitro assays such as the growth/invasion inhibition assays (GIA) are widely used, but it is unclear whether GIA activity correlates with protection or predicts vaccine efficacy. While preliminary data in controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) studies indicate a possible association between in vitro and in vivo parasite growth rates, there have been conflicting results of immunoepidemiology studies, where associations with exposure rather than protection have been observed. In addition, GIA-interfering antibodies in vaccinated individuals from endemic regions may limit assay sensitivity in heavily malaria-exposed populations. More work is needed to establish the utility of GIA for blood-stage vaccine development.

  11. Malaria vaccines: high-throughput tools for antigens discovery with potential for their development.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, Nora; Vallejo, Andrés; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Herrera, Sócrates

    2013-04-01

    Malaria is a disease induced by parasites of the Plasmodium genus, which are transmitted by Anopheles mosquitoes and represents a great socio-economic burden Worldwide. Plasmodium vivax is the second species of malaria Worldwide, but it is the most prevalent in Latin America and other regions of the planet. It is currently considered that vaccines represent a cost-effective strategy for controlling transmissible diseases and could complement other malaria control measures; however, the chemical and immunological complexity of the parasite has hindered development of effective vaccines. Recent availability of several genomes of Plasmodium species, as well as bioinformatic tools are allowing the selection of large numbers of proteins and analysis of their immune potential. Herein, we review recently developed strategies for discovery of novel antigens with potential for malaria vaccine development.

  12. The development of the RTS,S malaria vaccine candidate: challenges and lessons.

    PubMed

    Ballou, W R

    2009-09-01

    RTS,S is the world's most advanced malaria vaccine candidate and is intended to protect infants and young children living in malaria endemic areas of sub-Saharan Africa against clinical disease caused by Plasmodium falciparum. Recently, a pivotal Phase III efficacy trial of RTS,S began in Africa. The goal of the programme has been to develop a vaccine that will be safe and effective when administered via the Expanded Program for Immunization (EPI) and significantly reduce the risk of clinically important malaria disease during the first years of life. If a similar reduction in the risk of severe malaria and other important co-morbidities associated with malaria infection can be achieved, then the vaccine could become a major new tool for reducing the burden of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. Encouraging data from the ongoing phase II programme suggest that these goals may indeed be achievable. This review discusses some of the unique challenges that were faced during the development of this vaccine, highlights the complexity of developing new vaccine technologies and illustrates the power of partnerships in the ongoing fight against this killer disease.

  13. RTS,S: Toward a first landmark on the Malaria Vaccine Technology Roadmap.

    PubMed

    Kaslow, David C; Biernaux, Sophie

    2015-12-22

    The Malaria Vaccine Technology Roadmap calls for a 2015 landmark goal of a first-generation malaria vaccine that has protective efficacy against severe disease and death, lasting longer than one year. This review focuses on product development efforts over the last five years of RTS,S, a pre-erythrocytic, recombinant subunit, adjuvanted, candidate malaria vaccine designed with this goal of a first-generation malaria vaccine in mind. RTS,S recently completed a successful pivotal Phase III safety, efficacy and immunogenicity study. Although vaccine efficacy was found to be modest, a substantial number of cases of clinical malaria were averted over a 3-4 years period, particularly in settings of significant disease burden. European regulators have subsequently adopted a positive opinion under the Article 58 procedure for an indication of active immunization of children aged 6 weeks up to 17 months against malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum and against hepatitis B. Further evaluations of the benefit, risk, feasibility and cost-effectiveness of RTS,S are now anticipated through policy and financing reviews at the global and national levels.

  14. Community perceptions of malaria and vaccines in two districts of Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malaria is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in Mozambique, with nearly three-quarters of the country’s malaria-related deaths occurring in children younger than five years. A malaria vaccine is not yet available, but planning is underway for a possible introduction, as soon as one becomes available. In an effort to inform the planning process, this study explored sociocultural and health communications issues among individuals at the community level who are both responsible for decisions about vaccine use and who are likely to influence decisions about vaccine use. Methods Researchers conducted a qualitative study in two malaria-endemic districts in southern Mozambique. Using criterion-based sampling, they conducted 23 focus group discussions and 26 in-depth interviews. Implementation was guided by the engagement of community stakeholders. Results Community members recognize that malaria contributes to high death rates and affects the workforce, school attendance, and the economy. Vaccines are seen as a means to reduce the threat of childhood illnesses and to keep children and the rest of the community healthy. Perceived constraints to accessing vaccine services include long queues, staff shortages, and a lack of resources at health care facilities. Local leaders play a significant role in motivating caregivers to have their children vaccinated. Participants generally felt that a vaccine could help to prevent malaria, although some voiced concern that the focus was only on young children and not on older children, pregnant women, and the elderly. Probed on their understanding of vaccine efficacy, participants voiced various views, including the perception that while some vaccines did not fully prevent disease they still had important benefits. Overall, it would be essential for local leaders to be involved in the design of specific messages for a future malaria vaccine communications strategy, and for those messages to be translated into

  15. DNA Prime/Adenovirus Boost Malaria Vaccine Encoding P. falciparum CSP and AMA1 Induces Sterile Protection Associated with Cell-Mediated Immunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-14

    adenovirus boost malaria vaccine in a Phase 1 clinical trial with controlled human malaria infection. Methodology/Principal Findings: The vaccine regimen...falciparum malaria vaccine, in healthy, malaria -nave adults’’, work unit number 62787A 870 F 1432. The funders had no role in study design, data...fused to hepatitis B surface protein. RTS,S provides 50% protection against controlled human malaria infection, mediated primarily by the induction of

  16. Role of non-human primates in malaria vaccine development: Memorandum from a WHO Meeting*

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    This Memorandum discusses the coordination and standardization of malaria vaccine research in non-human primates to encourage optimum use of the available animals in experiments that are fully justified both scientifically and ethically. The requirements for experimentation in non-human primates, the availability of suitable animals for malaria vaccine studies, and the criteria for testing candidate vaccines are considered. The policy and legislation relevant to the use of non-human primates in biomedical research are also briefly discussed. The Memorandum concludes with eight recommendations. PMID:3266112

  17. Experience and challenges from clinical trials with malaria vaccines in Africa.

    PubMed

    Mwangoka, Grace; Ogutu, Bernhards; Msambichaka, Beverly; Mzee, Tutu; Salim, Nahya; Kafuruki, Shubis; Mpina, Maxmillian; Shekalaghe, Seif; Tanner, Marcel; Abdulla, Salim

    2013-03-04

    Malaria vaccines are considered amongst the most important modalities for potential elimination of malaria disease and transmission. Research and development in this field has been an area of intense effort by many groups over the last few decades. Despite this, there is currently no licensed malaria vaccine. Researchers, clinical trialists and vaccine developers have been working on many approached to make malaria vaccine available.African research institutions have developed and demonstrated a great capacity to undertake clinical trials in accordance to the International Conference on Harmonization-Good Clinical Practice (ICH-GCP) standards in the last decade; particularly in the field of malaria vaccines and anti-malarial drugs. This capacity is a result of networking among African scientists in collaboration with other partners; this has traversed both clinical trials and malaria control programmes as part of the Global Malaria Action Plan (GMAP). GMAP outlined and support global strategies toward the elimination and eradication of malaria in many areas, translating in reduction in public health burden, especially for African children. In the sub-Saharan region the capacity to undertake more clinical trials remains small in comparison to the actual need.However, sustainability of the already developed capacity is essential and crucial for the evaluation of different interventions and diagnostic tools/strategies for other diseases like TB, HIV, neglected tropical diseases and non-communicable diseases. There is urgent need for innovative mechanisms for the sustainability and expansion of the capacity in clinical trials in sub-Saharan Africa as the catalyst for health improvement and maintained.

  18. The first field trials of the chemically synthesized malaria vaccine SPf66: safety, immunogenicity and protectivity.

    PubMed

    Amador, R; Moreno, A; Valero, V; Murillo, L; Mora, A L; Rojas, M; Rocha, C; Salcedo, M; Guzman, F; Espejo, F

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports the results of the first field study performed to assess the safety, immunogenicity and protectivity of the synthetic malaria vaccine SPf66 directed against the asexual blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Clinical and laboratory tests were performed on all volunteers prior to and after each immunization, demonstrating that no detectable alteration was induced by the immunization process. The vaccines were grouped as high, intermediate or low responders according to their antibody titres directed against the SPf66 molecule. Two of the 185 (1.08%) SPf66-vaccinated and nine of the 214 (4.20%) placebo-vaccinated volunteers developed P. falciparum malaria. The efficacy of the vaccine was calculated as 82.3% against P. falciparum and 60.6% against Plasmodium vivax.

  19. Selection and identification of malaria vaccine target molecule using bioinformatics and DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Shuaibu, M N; Kikuchi, M; Cherif, M S; Helegbe, G K; Yanagi, T; Hirayama, K

    2010-10-04

    Following a genome-wide search for a blood stage malaria DNA-based vaccine using web-based bioinformatic tools, 29 genes from the annotated Plasmodium yoelii genome sequence (www.PlasmoDB.org and www.tigr.org) were identified as encoding GPI-anchored proteins. Target genes were those with orthologues in P. falciparum, containing an N-terminal signal sequence containing hydrophobic amino acid stretch and signal P criteria, a transmembrane-like domain and GPI anchor motif. Focusing on the blood stage, we extracted mRNA from pRBCs, PCR-amplified 22 out of the 29 selected genes, and eventually cloned nine of these into a DNA vaccine plasmid, pVAX 200-DEST. Biojector-mediated delivery of the nine DNA vaccines was conducted using ShimaJET to C57BL/6 mice at a dose of 4 μg/mouse three times at an interval of 3 weeks. Two weeks after the second booster, immunized mice were challenged with P. y. yoelii 17XL-parasitized RBCs and the level of parasitaemia, protection and survival was assessed. Immunization with one gene (PY03470) resulted in 2-4 days of delayed onset and level of parasitaemia and was associated with increased survival compared to non-immunized mice. Antibody production was, however, low following DNA vaccination, as determined by immunofluorescence assay. Recombinant protein from this gene, GPI8p transamidase-related protein (rPyTAM) in PBS or emulsified with GERBU adjuvant was also used to immunize another set of C57BL/6 mice with 10-20 μg/mouse three times at 3-week interval. Higher antibody response was obtained as determined by ELISA with similar protective effects as observed after DNA vaccination.

  20. An expanding toolkit for preclinical pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccine development: bridging traditional mouse malaria models and human trials.

    PubMed

    Steel, Ryan Wj; Kappe, Stefan Hi; Sack, Brandon K

    2016-12-01

    Malaria remains a significant public health burden with 214 million new infections and over 400,000 deaths in 2015. Elucidating relevant Plasmodium parasite biology can lead to the identification of novel ways to control and ultimately eliminate the parasite within geographic areas. Particularly, the development of an effective vaccine that targets the clinically silent pre-erythrocytic stages of infection would significantly augment existing malaria elimination tools by preventing both the onset of blood-stage infection/disease as well as spread of the parasite through mosquito transmission. In this Perspective, we discuss the role of small animal models in pre-erythrocytic stage vaccine development, highlighting how human liver-chimeric and human immune system mice are emerging as valuable components of these efforts.

  1. Merozoite surface proteins in red blood cell invasion, immunity and vaccines against malaria

    PubMed Central

    Beeson, James G.; Drew, Damien R.; Boyle, Michelle J.; Feng, Gaoqian; Fowkes, Freya J.I.; Richards, Jack S.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria accounts for an enormous burden of disease globally, with Plasmodium falciparum accounting for the majority of malaria, and P. vivax being a second important cause, especially in Asia, the Americas and the Pacific. During infection with Plasmodium spp., the merozoite form of the parasite invades red blood cells and replicates inside them. It is during the blood-stage of infection that malaria disease occurs and, therefore, understanding merozoite invasion, host immune responses to merozoite surface antigens, and targeting merozoite surface proteins and invasion ligands by novel vaccines and therapeutics have been important areas of research. Merozoite invasion involves multiple interactions and events, and substantial processing of merozoite surface proteins occurs before, during and after invasion. The merozoite surface is highly complex, presenting a multitude of antigens to the immune system. This complexity has proved challenging to our efforts to understand merozoite invasion and malaria immunity, and to developing merozoite antigens as malaria vaccines. In recent years, there has been major progress in this field, and several merozoite surface proteins show strong potential as malaria vaccines. Our current knowledge on this topic is reviewed, highlighting recent advances and research priorities. PMID:26833236

  2. Safety and immunogenicity of the malaria vaccine candidate GMZ2 in malaria-exposed, adult individuals from Lambaréné, Gabon

    PubMed Central

    Mordmüller, Benjamin; Szywon, Katja; Greutelaers, Benedikt; Esen, Meral; Mewono, Ludovic; Treut, Carolin; Mürbeth, Raymund E.; Chilengi, Roma; Noor, Ramadhani; Kilama, Wen L.; Imoukhuede, Egeruan Babatunde; Imbault, Nathalie; Leroy, Odile; Theisen, Michael; Jepsen, Søren; Milligan, Paul; Fendel, Rolf; Kremsner, Peter G.; Issifou, Saadou

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is still one of the major public health threats in sub-Saharan Africa. An effective vaccine could be a sustainable control measure that can be integrated into existing health infrastructures. The malaria vaccine candidate GMZ2 is a recombinant fusion protein of conserved parts of Plasmodium falciparum Glutamate Rich Protein and Merozoite Surface Protein 3 adjuvanted with aluminium hydroxide. GMZ2 is immunogenic and well tolerated in malaria-naive adults from Germany. To assess safety and immunogenicity in malaria exposed individuals, 40 adults from Lambaréné, Gabon were randomly assigned to receive either 100 μg GMZ2 or a rabies control vaccine three times in monthly intervals. Both vaccines were well tolerated. GMZ2 induced antibodies and memory B-cell responses, despite a high prevalence of GMZ2-specific immune reactivity due to previous intense exposure to P. falciparum. PMID:20696154

  3. Screening of novel malaria DNA vaccine candidates using full-length cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Shibui, Akiko; Nakae, Susumu; Watanabe, Junichi; Sato, Yoshitaka; Tolba, Mohammed E M; Doi, Junko; Shiibashi, Takashi; Nogami, Sadao; Sugano, Sumio; Hozumi, Nobumichi

    2013-11-01

    No licensed malaria vaccine exists, in spite of intensive development efforts. We have been investigating development of a DNA vaccine to prevent malaria infection. To date, we have established a full-length cDNA expression library from the erythrocytic-stage murine malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei. We found that immunization of mice with combined 2000 clones significantly prolonged survival after challenge infection and that splenocytes from the immunized mice showed parasite-specific cytokine production. We determined the 5'-end one-pass sequence of these clones and mapped a draft genomic sequence for P. berghei for use in screening vaccine candidates for efficacy. In this study, we annotated these cDNA clones by comparing them with the genomic sequence of Plasmodium falciparum. We then divided them into several subsets based on their characteristics and examined their protective effects against malaria infection. Consequently, we selected 104 clones that strongly induced specific IgG production and decreased the mortality rate in the early phase. Most of these 104 clones coded for unknown proteins. The results suggest that these clones represent potential novel malaria vaccine candidates.

  4. Vaccination Strategies against Malaria: novel carrier(s) more than a tour de force.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Rajeev K; Garg, Neeraj K; Sahu, Tejram

    2012-08-20

    The introduction of vaccine technology has facilitated an unprecedented multi-antigen approach to develop an effective vaccine against complex systemic inflammatory pathogens such as Plasmodium spp. that cause severe malaria. The capacity of multi subunit DNA vaccine encoding different stage Plasmodium antigens to induce CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes and interferon-γ responses in mice, monkeys and humans has been observed. Moreover, genetic vaccination may be capable of eliciting both cell mediated and humoral immune responses. The cytotoxic T cell responses are categorically needed against intracellular hepatic stage and humoral response with antibodies targeted against antigens from all stages of malaria parasite life cycle. Therefore, the key to success for any DNA based vaccine is to design a vector able to serve as a safe and efficient delivery system. This has encouraged the development of non-viral DNA-mediated gene transfer techniques such as liposome, virosomes, microsphere and nanoparticles. Efficient and relatively safe DNA transfection using lipoplexes makes them an appealing alternative to be explored for gene delivery. Also, liposome-entrapped DNA has been shown to enhance the potency of DNA vaccines, possibly by facilitating uptake of the plasmid by antigen-presenting cells (APC). Another recent technology using cationic lipids has been deployed and has generated substantial interest in this approach to gene transfer. In this review we discussed various aspects that could be decisive in the formulation of efficient and stable carrier system(s) for the development of malaria vaccine.

  5. Protection against malaria at 1 year and immune correlates following PfSPZ vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Andrew S; Lyke, Kirsten E; DeZure, Adam; Berry, Andrea A; Richie, Thomas L; Mendoza, Floreliz H; Enama, Mary E; Gordon, Ingelise J; Chang, Lee-Jah; Sarwar, Uzma N; Zephir, Kathryn L; Holman, LaSonji A; James, Eric R; Billingsley, Peter F; Gunasekera, Anusha; Chakravarty, Sumana; Manoj, Anita; Li, MingLin; Ruben, Adam J; Li, Tao; Eappen, Abraham G; Stafford, Richard E; K C, Natasha; Murshedkar, Tooba; DeCederfelt, Hope; Plummer, Sarah H; Hendel, Cynthia S; Novik, Laura; Costner, Pamela J M; Saunders, Jamie G; Laurens, Matthew B; Plowe, Christopher V; Flynn, Barbara; Whalen, William R; Todd, J P; Noor, Jay; Rao, Srinivas; Sierra-Davidson, Kailan; Lynn, Geoffrey M; Epstein, Judith E; Kemp, Margaret A; Fahle, Gary A; Mikolajczak, Sebastian A; Fishbaugher, Matthew; Sack, Brandon K; Kappe, Stefan H I; Davidson, Silas A; Garver, Lindsey S; Björkström, Niklas K; Nason, Martha C; Graham, Barney S; Roederer, Mario; Sim, B Kim Lee; Hoffman, Stephen L; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Seder, Robert A

    2016-06-01

    An attenuated Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) sporozoite (SPZ) vaccine, PfSPZ Vaccine, is highly protective against controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) 3 weeks after immunization, but the durability of protection is unknown. We assessed how vaccine dosage, regimen, and route of administration affected durable protection in malaria-naive adults. After four intravenous immunizations with 2.7 × 10(5) PfSPZ, 6/11 (55%) vaccinated subjects remained without parasitemia following CHMI 21 weeks after immunization. Five non-parasitemic subjects from this dosage group underwent repeat CHMI at 59 weeks, and none developed parasitemia. Although Pf-specific serum antibody levels correlated with protection up to 21-25 weeks after immunization, antibody levels waned substantially by 59 weeks. Pf-specific T cell responses also declined in blood by 59 weeks. To determine whether T cell responses in blood reflected responses in liver, we vaccinated nonhuman primates with PfSPZ Vaccine. Pf-specific interferon-γ-producing CD8 T cells were present at ∼100-fold higher frequencies in liver than in blood. Our findings suggest that PfSPZ Vaccine conferred durable protection to malaria through long-lived tissue-resident T cells and that administration of higher doses may further enhance protection.

  6. Fc-receptors and immunity to malaria: from models to vaccines.

    PubMed

    Pleass, R J

    2009-09-01

    The complexity and number of antigens (Ags) seen during an immune response has hampered the development of malaria vaccines. Antibodies (Abs) play an important role in immunity to malaria and their passive administration is effective at controlling the disease. Abs represent approximately 25% of all proteins undergoing clinical trials, and these 'smart biologicals' have undergone a major revival with the realization that Abs lie at the interface between innate and adaptive immunity. At least 18 Abs have FDA approval for clinical use and approximately 150 are in clinical trials, the majority for the treatment of cancer, allograft rejection or autoimmune disease. Despite these triumphs none are in development for malaria, principally because they are perceived as being too expensive for a disease mainly afflicting poor and marginalized populations. Although unlikely, at least in the foreseeable future, that Ab-based prophylaxis will be made available to the millions of people at risk from malaria, they may be incorporated into current vaccine approaches, since Abs act as correlates of protection in studies aimed at defining the best Ags to include in vaccines. Abs may also form the basis for novel vaccination strategies by targeting Ags to appropriate antigen presenting cells. Therefore, to develop the most efficacious vaccines it will be necessary to fully understand which Abs and Fc-receptors (FcRs) are best engaged for a positive outcome.

  7. Simulation of B Cell Affinity Maturation Explains Enhanced Antibody Cross-Reactivity Induced by the Polyvalent Malaria Vaccine AMA1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE...Enhanced Antibody Cross-Reactivity Induced by the Polyvalent Malaria Vaccine AMA1 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Induced by the Polyvalent Malaria Vaccine AMA1 Sidhartha Chaudhury, Jaques Reifman, and Anders Wallqvist Polyvalent vaccines use a mixture of Ags

  8. Safety and immunogenicity of the synthetic malaria vaccine SPf66 in a large field trial.

    PubMed

    Amador, R; Moreno, A; Murillo, L A; Sierra, O; Saavedra, D; Rojas, M; Mora, A L; Rocha, C L; Alvarado, F; Falla, J C

    1992-07-01

    In the first field trial with synthetic malaria vaccine SPf66 in a large population naturally exposed to malaria, 9957 persons greater than 1 year old and residing on the Colombian Pacific coast received three doses of the vaccine. To evaluate vaccine safety, clinical observations were made 30 min and 48 h after each immunization. There were no adverse reactions in 95.7% of cases. In the 4.3% of cases with adverse reactions, local induration and erythema were the most frequent. In a randomly selected group of vaccinees, anti-SPf66 antibody titers were measured after the third dose: 93% of the vaccinees raised antibodies to SPf66. Among these, 55% had titers greater than 1:1600. These results demonstrate the safety and immunogenicity of the SPf66 vaccine in a large field trial.

  9. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for malaria diagnosis and its use in malaria vaccine clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Laura; Andersen, Rikke F; Webster, Daniel; Dunachie, Susanna; Walther, R Michael; Bejon, Philip; Hunt-Cooke, Angela; Bergson, Gillian; Sanderson, Frances; Hill, Adrian V S; Gilbert, Sarah C

    2005-07-01

    The demand for an effective malaria vaccine is high, with millions of people being affected by the disease every year. A large variety of potential vaccines are under investigation worldwide, and when tested in clinical trials, researchers need to extract as much data as possible from every vaccinated and control volunteer. The use of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), carried out in real-time during the clinical trials of vaccines designed to act against the liver stage of the parasite's life cycle, provides more information than the gold standard method of microscopy alone and increases both safety and accuracy. PCR can detect malaria parasites in the blood up to 5 days before experienced microscopists see parasites on blood films, with a sensitivity of 20 parasites/mL blood. This PCR method has so far been used to follow 137 vaccinee and control volunteers in Phase IIa trials in Oxford and on 220 volunteer samples during a Phase IIb field trial in The Gambia.

  10. A Nonintegrative Lentiviral Vector-Based Vaccine Provides Long-Term Sterile Protection against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Coutant, Frédéric; Sanchez David, Raul Yusef; Félix, Tristan; Boulay, Aude; Caleechurn, Laxmee; Souque, Philippe; Thouvenot, Catherine; Bourgouin, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Trials testing the RTS,S candidate malaria vaccine and radiation-attenuated sporozoites (RAS) have shown that protective immunity against malaria can be induced and that an effective vaccine is not out of reach. However, longer-term protection and higher protection rates are required to eradicate malaria from the endemic regions. It implies that there is still a need to explore new vaccine strategies. Lentiviral vectors are very potent at inducing strong immunological memory. However their integrative status challenges their safety profile. Eliminating the integration step obviates the risk of insertional oncogenesis. Providing they confer sterile immunity, nonintegrative lentiviral vectors (NILV) hold promise as mass pediatric vaccine by meeting high safety standards. In this study, we have assessed the protective efficacy of NILV against malaria in a robust pre-clinical model. Mice were immunized with NILV encoding Plasmodium yoelii Circumsporozoite Protein (Py CSP) and challenged with sporozoites one month later. In two independent protective efficacy studies, 50% (37.5–62.5) of the animals were fully protected (p = 0.0072 and p = 0.0008 respectively when compared to naive mice). The remaining mice with detectable parasitized red blood cells exhibited a prolonged patency and reduced parasitemia. Moreover, protection was long-lasting with 42.8% sterile protection six months after the last immunization (p = 0.0042). Post-challenge CD8+ T cells to CSP, in contrast to anti-CSP antibodies, were associated with protection (r = −0.6615 and p = 0.0004 between the frequency of IFN-g secreting specific T cells in spleen and parasitemia). However, while NILV and RAS immunizations elicited comparable immunity to CSP, only RAS conferred 100% of sterile protection. Given that a better protection can be anticipated from a multi-antigen vaccine and an optimized vector design, NILV appear as a promising malaria vaccine. PMID:23133649

  11. Examining cellular immune responses to inform development of a blood-stage malaria vaccine.

    PubMed

    Stanisic, Danielle I; Good, Michael F

    2016-02-01

    Naturally acquired immunity to the blood-stage of the malaria parasite develops slowly in areas of high endemicity, but is not sterilizing. It manifests as a reduction in parasite density and clinical symptoms. Immunity as a result of blood-stage vaccination has not yet been achieved in humans, although there are many animal models where vaccination has been successful. The development of a blood-stage vaccine has been complicated by a number of factors including limited knowledge of human-parasite interactions and which antigens and immune responses are critical for protection. Opinion is divided as to whether this vaccine should aim to accelerate the acquisition of responses acquired following natural exposure, or whether it should induce a different response. Animal and experimental human models suggest that cell-mediated immune responses can control parasite growth, but these responses can also contribute to significant immunopathology if unregulated. They are largely ignored in most blood-stage malaria vaccine development strategies. Here, we discuss key observations relating to cell-mediated immune responses in the context of experimental human systems and field studies involving naturally exposed individuals and how this may inform the development of a blood-stage malaria vaccine.

  12. The rodent malaria lactate dehydrogenase assay provides a high throughput solution for in vivo vaccine studies.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Hitoshi; Yokouchi, Yuki; Iyoku, Natsumi; Tachibana, Mayumi; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Torii, Motomi

    2015-08-01

    Rodent malaria is a useful model for evaluating the efficacy of malaria vaccine candidates; however, labor-intensive microscopic parasite counting hampers the use of an in vivo parasite challenge in high-throughput screening. The measurement of malaria parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) activity, which is commonly used in the in vitro growth inhibition assay of Plasmodium falciparum, may be the cheapest and simplest alternative to microscopic parasite counting. However, the pLDH assay has not been applied in the in vivo rodent malaria model. Here, we showed that the pLDH assay is reliable and accurately determines parasitemia in the rodent malaria model. pLDH activity measured using a chromogenic substrate reflects the parasite number in the blood; it allows fast and easy assessment using a conventional microplate reader. To validate this approach, we synthesized recombinant PyMSP1-19 protein (rPyMSP1-19) using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system and immunized mice with rPyMSP1-19. The antisera showed specific reactivity on the surface of the Plasmodium yoelii merozoite and immunized mice were protected against a lethal P. yoelii 17 XL challenge. The pLDH assay quickly and easily demonstrated a significant reduction of the parasite numbers in the immunized mice. Accordingly, the pLDH assay proved to be an efficient alternative to rodent malaria parasite counting, and may therefore accelerate in vivo vaccine candidate screening.

  13. Protection against malaria by intravenous immunization with a nonreplicating sporozoite vaccine.

    PubMed

    Seder, Robert A; Chang, Lee-Jah; Enama, Mary E; Zephir, Kathryn L; Sarwar, Uzma N; Gordon, Ingelise J; Holman, LaSonji A; James, Eric R; Billingsley, Peter F; Gunasekera, Anusha; Richman, Adam; Chakravarty, Sumana; Manoj, Anita; Velmurugan, Soundarapandian; Li, MingLin; Ruben, Adam J; Li, Tao; Eappen, Abraham G; Stafford, Richard E; Plummer, Sarah H; Hendel, Cynthia S; Novik, Laura; Costner, Pamela J M; Mendoza, Floreliz H; Saunders, Jamie G; Nason, Martha C; Richardson, Jason H; Murphy, Jittawadee; Davidson, Silas A; Richie, Thomas L; Sedegah, Martha; Sutamihardja, Awalludin; Fahle, Gary A; Lyke, Kirsten E; Laurens, Matthew B; Roederer, Mario; Tewari, Kavita; Epstein, Judith E; Sim, B Kim Lee; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Graham, Barney S; Hoffman, Stephen L

    2013-09-20

    Consistent, high-level, vaccine-induced protection against human malaria has only been achieved by inoculation of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) sporozoites (SPZ) by mosquito bites. We report that the PfSPZ Vaccine--composed of attenuated, aseptic, purified, cryopreserved PfSPZ--was safe and well tolerated when administered four to six times intravenously (IV) to 40 adults. Zero of six subjects receiving five doses and three of nine subjects receiving four doses of 1.35 × 10(5) PfSPZ Vaccine and five of six nonvaccinated controls developed malaria after controlled human malaria infection (P = 0.015 in the five-dose group and P = 0.028 for overall, both versus controls). PfSPZ-specific antibody and T cell responses were dose-dependent. These data indicate that there is a dose-dependent immunological threshold for establishing high-level protection against malaria that can be achieved with IV administration of a vaccine that is safe and meets regulatory standards.

  14. Antigens for a Vaccine that Prevents Severe Malaria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Hutagalung, R . et al. (1999) Influence of hemoglobin E trait on the severity of falciparum malaria. J. Infect. Dis. 179, 283–286 8 Ruwende, C. et al...erythrocytic stage in mam- malian malaria parasites. Nature 161: 126. 2. Shortt HE, Fairley NH, Covell G, Shute PG, Garnham PC, 1951. The pre-erythrocytic...stage of Plasmodium falciparum. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 44: 405–419. 3. Schaudinn F, 1903. Studien ueber krankheitserregende Proto- zoen II

  15. Military Need for Research and Development of a Malaria Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-03

    pesti.e.ces 103-104OF (39.9 0c) or even higher. A severe headache usually develops. The fever breaks and profuse sweating occurs. A single infection ...modes. The first, and perhaps most important, is transmission by an infective female Anophelus mosquito. Of over 200 known species of Anophelus...in this thesis. Malaria may also be transmitted by transfusing blood of infected persons or by use of contaminated syringes. Finally, malaria may

  16. The wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system: a key tool for novel malaria vaccine candidate discovery.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Takafumi; Takeo, Satoru; Arumugam, Thangavelu U; Otsuki, Hitoshi; Torii, Motomi

    2010-06-01

    Malaria kills more than a million people a year, causes malady in about three hundred million people and poses risk to approximately 40% of the world's population living in malarious countries. This disease is re-emerging mainly due to the development of drug-resistant parasites and insecticide-resistant mosquitoes. Therefore, we are now forced to resort to remedy through vaccination. Until now, not even a single licensed malaria vaccine has been developed despite intensive efforts. Even the efficacy of RTS,S, the most advanced and promising vaccine candidate in the pipeline of malaria vaccine development, was only around 50% based on a number of clinical trials. These facts urge malaria researchers to urgently enrich this pipeline, as much as possible, with potential vaccine candidates. With the availability of malaria genome database, the enrichment of this pipeline is possible if we could now employ an efficient protein expression technology to decode the malaria genomic data, without any codon optimization, into quality recombinant proteins. Then, these synthesized recombinant proteins can be characterized and screened for discovering novel potential vaccine targets. The wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system will be a promising tool to this end. This review highlights the recent successes in synthesizing quality malaria proteins using this tool.

  17. Impact of acute malaria on pre-existing antibodies to viral and vaccine antigens in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Banga, Simran; Coursen, Jill D; Portugal, Silvia; Tran, Tuan M; Hancox, Lisa; Ongoiba, Aissata; Traore, Boubacar; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Harty, John T; Crompton, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine-induced immunity depends on long-lived plasma cells (LLPCs) that maintain antibody levels. A recent mouse study showed that Plasmodium chaubaudi infection reduced pre-existing influenza-specific antibodies--raising concerns that malaria may compromise pre-existing vaccine responses. We extended these findings to P. yoelii infection, observing decreases in antibodies to model antigens in inbred mice and to influenza in outbred mice, associated with LLPC depletion and increased susceptibility to influenza rechallenge. We investigated the implications of these findings in Malian children by measuring vaccine-specific IgG (tetanus, measles, hepatitis B) before and after the malaria-free 6-month dry season, 10 days after the first malaria episode of the malaria season, and after the subsequent dry season. On average, vaccine-specific IgG did not decrease following acute malaria. However, in some children malaria was associated with an accelerated decline in vaccine-specific IgG, underscoring the need to further investigate the impact of malaria on pre-existing vaccine-specific antibodies.

  18. Toward the development of effective transmission-blocking vaccines for malaria.

    PubMed

    Nikolaeva, Daria; Draper, Simon J; Biswas, Sumi

    2015-05-01

    The continued global burden of malaria can in part be attributed to a complex lifecycle, with both human hosts and mosquito vectors serving as transmission reservoirs. In preclinical models of vaccine-induced immunity, antibodies to parasite sexual-stage antigens, ingested in the mosquito blood meal, can inhibit parasite survival in the insect midgut as judged by ex vivo functional studies such as the membrane feeding assay. In an era of renewed political momentum for malaria elimination and eradication campaigns, such observations have fueled support for the development and implementation of so-called transmission-blocking vaccines. While leading candidates are being evaluated using a variety of promising vaccine platforms, the field is also beginning to capitalize on global '-omics' data for the rational genome-based selection and unbiased characterization of parasite and mosquito proteins to expand the candidate list. This review covers the progress and prospects of these recent developments.

  19. Development of malaria transmission-blocking vaccines: from concept to product.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yimin; Sinden, Robert E; Churcher, Thomas S; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2015-06-01

    Despite decades of effort battling against malaria, the disease is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Transmission-blocking vaccines (TBVs) that target sexual stage parasite development could be an integral part of measures for malaria elimination. In the 1950s, Huff et al. first demonstrated the induction of transmission-blocking immunity in chickens by repeated immunizations with Plasmodium gallinaceum-infected red blood cells. Since then, significant progress has been made in identification of parasite antigens responsible for transmission-blocking activity. Recombinant technologies accelerated evaluation of these antigens as vaccine candidates, and it is possible to induce effective transmission-blocking immunity in humans both by natural infection and now by immunization with recombinant vaccines. This chapter reviews the efforts to produce TBVs, summarizes the current status and advances and discusses the remaining challenges and approaches.

  20. Molecular adjuvants for malaria DNA vaccines based on the modulation of host-cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bergmann-Leitner, Elke S; Leitner, Wolfgang W; Duncan, Elizabeth H; Savranskaya, Tatyana; Angov, Evelina

    2009-09-18

    Malaria represents a major global health problem but despite extensive efforts, no effective vaccine is available. Various vaccine candidates have been developed that provide protection in animal models, such as a gene gun-delivered DNA vaccine encoding the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium berghei. A common shortcoming of most malaria vaccines is the requirement for multiple immunizations leaving room for improvement even for established vaccine candidates such as the CSP-DNA vaccine. In this study, we explored whether regulating apoptosis in DNA vaccine transfected host cells could accelerate the onset of protective immunity and provide significant protection after a single immunization. A pro-apoptotic gene (Bax) was used as a molecular adjuvant in an attempt to mimic the immunostimulatory apoptosis triggered by viral or virus-derived vaccines, while anti-apoptotic genes such as Bcl-XL may increase the life span of transfected cells thus prolonging antigen production. Surprisingly, co-delivery of either Bax or Bcl-XL greatly reduced CSP-DNA vaccine efficacy after a single immunization. Co-delivery of Bax for three immunizations still had a detrimental effect on protective immunity, while repeated co-delivery of Bcl-XL had no negative impact. The fine characterization of humoral and cellular immune response modulated by these two molecular adjuvants revealed a previously unknown effect, i.e., a shift in the Th-profile. These results demonstrate that pro- or anti-apoptotic molecules should not be used as molecular adjuvants without careful evaluation of the resulting immune response. This finding represents yet another example that strategies to enhance vaccine efficacy developed for other model systems such as viral diseases cannot easily be applied to any vaccine.

  1. The case for a rational genome-based vaccine against malaria

    PubMed Central

    Proietti, Carla; Doolan, Denise L.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, vaccines have been designed to mimic the immunity induced by natural exposure to the target pathogen, but this approach has not been effective for any parasitic pathogen of humans or complex pathogens that cause chronic disease in humans, such as Plasmodium. Despite intense efforts by many laboratories around the world on different aspects of Plasmodium spp. molecular and cell biology, epidemiology and immunology, progress towards the goal of an effective malaria vaccine has been disappointing. The premise of rational vaccine design is to induce the desired immune response against the key pathogen antigens or epitopes targeted by protective immune responses. We advocate that development of an optimally efficacious malaria vaccine will need to improve on nature, and that this can be accomplished by rational vaccine design facilitated by mining genomic, proteomic and transcriptomic datasets in the context of relevant biological function. In our opinion, modern genome-based rational vaccine design offers enormous potential above and beyond that of whole-organism vaccines approaches established over 200 years ago where immunity is likely suboptimal due to the many genetic and immunological host-parasite adaptations evolved to allow the Plasmodium parasite to coexist in the human host, and which are associated with logistic and regulatory hurdles for production and delivery. PMID:25657640

  2. Functional evaluation of malaria Pfs25 DNA vaccine by in vivo electroporation in olive baboons.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Nyakundi, Ruth; Kariuki, Thomas; Ozwara, Hastings; Nyamongo, Onkoba; Mlambo, Godfree; Ellefsen, Barry; Hannaman, Drew; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2013-06-28

    Plasmodium falciparum Pfs25 antigen, expressed on the surface of zygotes and ookinetes, is one of the leading targets for the development of a malaria transmission-blocking vaccine (TBV). Our laboratory has been evaluating DNA plasmid based Pfs25 vaccine in mice and non-human primates. Previously, we established that in vivo electroporation (EP) delivery is an effective method to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine encoding Pfs25 in mice. In order to optimize the in vivo EP procedure and test for its efficacy in more clinically relevant larger animal models, we employed in vivo EP to evaluate the immune response and protective efficacy of Pfs25 encoding DNA vaccine in nonhuman primates (olive baboons, Papio anubis). The results showed that at a dose of 2.5mg DNA vaccine, antibody responses were significantly enhanced with EP as compared to without EP resulting in effective transmission blocking efficiency. Similar immunogenicity enhancing effect of EP was also observed with lower doses (0.5mg and 1mg) of DNA plasmids. Further, final boosting with a single dose of recombinant Pfs25 protein resulted in dramatically enhanced antibody titers and significantly increased functional transmission blocking efficiency. Our study suggests priming with DNA vaccine via EP along with protein boost regimen as an effective method to elicit potent immunogenicity of malaria DNA vaccines in nonhuman primates and provides the basis for further evaluation in human volunteers.

  3. Development and Assessment of Transgenic Rodent Parasites for the Preclinical Evaluation of Malaria Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Diego A; Radtke, Andrea J; Zavala, Fidel

    2016-01-01

    Rodent transgenic parasites are useful tools for the preclinical evaluation of malaria vaccines. Over the last decade, several studies have reported the development of transgenic rodent parasites expressing P. falciparum antigens for the assessment of vaccine-induced immune responses, which traditionally have been limited to in vitro assays. However, the genetic manipulation of rodent Plasmodium species can have detrimental effects on the parasite's infectivity and development. In this chapter, we present a few guidelines for designing transfection plasmids, which should improve transfection efficiency and facilitate the generation of functional transgenic parasite strains. In addition, we provide a transfection protocol for the development of transgenic P. berghei parasites as well as practical methods to assess the viability and infectivity of these newly generated strains throughout different stages of their life cycle. These techniques should allow researchers to develop novel rodent malaria parasites expressing antigens from human malaria species and to determine whether these transgenic strains are fully infectious and thus represent stringent platforms for the in vivo evaluation of malaria vaccine candidates.

  4. Comparative decline in funding of European Commission malaria vaccine projects: what next for the European scientists working in this field?

    PubMed

    Thøgersen, Regitze L; Holder, Anthony A; Hill, Adrian V S; Arnot, David E; Imoukhuede, Egeruan B; Leroy, Odile

    2011-09-01

    Since 2000, under the Fifth and subsequent Framework Programmes, the European Commission has funded research to spur the development of a malaria vaccine. This funding has contributed to the promotion of an integrated infrastructure consisting of European basic, applied and clinical scientists in academia and small and medium enterprises, together with partners in Africa. Research has added basic understanding of what is required of a malaria vaccine, allowing selected candidates to be prioritized and some to be moved forward into clinical trials. To end the health burden of malaria, and its economic and social impact on development, the international community has now essentially committed itself to the eventual eradication of malaria. Given the current tentative advances towards elimination or eradication of malaria in many endemic areas, malaria vaccines constitute an additional and almost certainly essential component of any strategic plan to interrupt transmission of malaria. However, funding for malaria vaccines has been substantially reduced in the Seventh Framework Programme compared with earlier Framework Programmes, and without further support the gains made by earlier European investment will be lost.

  5. Strain-specific Plasmodium falciparum growth inhibition among Malian children immunized with a blood-stage malaria vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Kouriba, Bourema; Bergmann-Leitner, Elke; Angov, Evelina; Coulibaly, Drissa; Diarra, Issa; Daou, Modibo; Niangaly, Amadou; Blackwelder, William C.; Wu, Yukun; Cohen, Joe; Ballou, W. Ripley; Vekemans, Johan; Lanar, David E.; Dutta, Sheetij; Diggs, Carter; Soisson, Lorraine; Heppner, D. Gray; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Plowe, Christopher V.; Thera, Mahamadou A.

    2017-01-01

    The blood-stage malaria vaccine FMP2.1/AS02A, comprised of recombinant Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and the adjuvant system AS02A, had strain-specific efficacy against clinical malaria caused by P. falciparum with the vaccine strain 3D7 AMA1 sequence. To evaluate a potential correlate of protection, we measured the ability of participant sera to inhibit growth of 3D7 and FVO strains in vitro using high-throughput growth inhibition assay (GIA) testing. Sera from 400 children randomized to receive either malaria vaccine or a control rabies vaccine were assessed at baseline and over two annual malaria transmission seasons after immunization. Baseline GIA against vaccine strain 3D7 and FVO strain was similar in both groups, but more children in the malaria vaccine group than in the control group had 3D7 and FVO GIA activity ≥15% 30 days after the last vaccination (day 90) (49% vs. 16%, p<0.0001; and 71.8% vs. 60.4%, p = 0.02). From baseline to day 90, 3D7 GIA in the vaccine group was 7.4 times the mean increase in the control group (p<0.0001). In AMA1 vaccinees, 3D7 GIA activity subsequently returned to baseline one year after vaccination (day 364) and did not correlate with efficacy in the extended efficacy time period to day 730. In Cox proportional hazards regression models with time-varying covariates, there was a slight suggestion of an association between 3D7 GIA activity and increased risk of clinical malaria between day 90 and day 240. We conclude that vaccination with this AMA1-based malaria vaccine increased inhibition of parasite growth, but this increase was not associated with allele-specific efficacy in the first malaria season. These results provide a framework for testing functional immune correlates of protection against clinical malaria in field trials, and will help to guide similar analyses for next-generation malaria vaccines. Clinical trials registry: This clinical trial was registered on clinicaltrials.gov, registry

  6. Sterile protection against human malaria by chemoattenuated PfSPZ vaccine.

    PubMed

    Mordmüller, Benjamin; Surat, Güzin; Lagler, Heimo; Chakravarty, Sumana; Ishizuka, Andrew S; Lalremruata, Albert; Gmeiner, Markus; Campo, Joseph J; Esen, Meral; Ruben, Adam J; Held, Jana; Calle, Carlos Lamsfus; Mengue, Juliana B; Gebru, Tamirat; Ibáñez, Javier; Sulyok, Mihály; James, Eric R; Billingsley, Peter F; Natasha, K C; Manoj, Anita; Murshedkar, Tooba; Gunasekera, Anusha; Eappen, Abraham G; Li, Tao; Stafford, Richard E; Li, Minglin; Felgner, Phil L; Seder, Robert A; Richie, Thomas L; Sim, B Kim Lee; Hoffman, Stephen L; Kremsner, Peter G

    2017-02-23

    A highly protective malaria vaccine would greatly facilitate the prevention and elimination of malaria and containment of drug-resistant parasites. A high level (more than 90%) of protection against malaria in humans has previously been achieved only by immunization with radiation-attenuated Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) sporozoites (PfSPZ) inoculated by mosquitoes; by intravenous injection of aseptic, purified, radiation-attenuated, cryopreserved PfSPZ ('PfSPZ Vaccine'); or by infectious PfSPZ inoculated by mosquitoes to volunteers taking chloroquine or mefloquine (chemoprophylaxis with sporozoites). We assessed immunization by direct venous inoculation of aseptic, purified, cryopreserved, non-irradiated PfSPZ ('PfSPZ Challenge') to malaria-naive, healthy adult volunteers taking chloroquine for antimalarial chemoprophylaxis (vaccine approach denoted as PfSPZ-CVac). Three doses of 5.12 × 10(4) PfSPZ of PfSPZ Challenge at 28-day intervals were well tolerated and safe, and prevented infection in 9 out of 9 (100%) volunteers who underwent controlled human malaria infection ten weeks after the last dose (group III). Protective efficacy was dependent on dose and regimen. Immunization with 3.2 × 10(3) (group I) or 1.28 × 10(4) (group II) PfSPZ protected 3 out of 9 (33%) or 6 out of 9 (67%) volunteers, respectively. Three doses of 5.12 × 10(4) PfSPZ at five-day intervals protected 5 out of 8 (63%) volunteers. The frequency of Pf-specific polyfunctional CD4 memory T cells was associated with protection. On a 7,455 peptide Pf proteome array, immune sera from at least 5 out of 9 group III vaccinees recognized each of 22 proteins. PfSPZ-CVac is a highly efficacious vaccine candidate; when we are able to optimize the immunization regimen (dose, interval between doses, and drug partner), this vaccine could be used for combination mass drug administration and a mass vaccination program approach to eliminate malaria from geographically defined areas.

  7. Safety and immunogenicity of the malaria vaccine candidate GMZ2 in malaria-exposed, adult individuals from Lambaréné, Gabon.

    PubMed

    Mordmüller, Benjamin; Szywon, Katja; Greutelaers, Benedikt; Esen, Meral; Mewono, Ludovic; Treut, Carolin; Mürbeth, Raymund E; Chilengi, Roma; Noor, Ramadhani; Kilama, Wen L; Imoukhuede, Egeruan Babatunde; Imbault, Nathalie; Leroy, Odile; Theisen, Michael; Jepsen, Søren; Milligan, Paul; Fendel, Rolf; Kremsner, Peter G; Issifou, Saadou

    2010-09-24

    Malaria is still one of the major public health threats in sub-Saharan Africa. An effective vaccine could be a sustainable control measure that can be integrated into existing health infrastructures. The malaria vaccine candidate GMZ2 is a recombinant fusion protein of conserved parts of Plasmodium falciparum Glutamate Rich Protein and Merozoite Surface Protein 3 adjuvanted with aluminium hydroxide. GMZ2 is immunogenic and well tolerated in malaria-naive adults from Germany. To assess safety and immunogenicity in malaria-exposed individuals, 40 adults from Lambaréné, Gabon were randomly assigned to receive either 100 μg GMZ2 or a rabies control vaccine three times in monthly intervals. Both vaccines were well tolerated. One month after a full course of vaccination, GMZ2-vaccinated individuals had 1.4-fold (95% confidence interval: [1.1, 1.7]) higher baseline-corrected anti-GMZ2 antibody levels and more GMZ2-specific memory B-cells compared to the rabies group (p=0.039), despite a high prevalence of GMZ2-specific immune reactivity due to previous intense exposure to P. falciparum.

  8. Expression of Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Proteins in Escherichia coli for Potential Use in a Human Malaria Vaccine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, James F.; Hockmeyer, Wayne T.; Gross, Mitchell; Ripley Ballou, W.; Wirtz, Robert A.; Trosper, James H.; Beaudoin, Richard L.; Hollingdale, Michael R.; Miller, Louis H.; Diggs, Carter L.; Rosenberg, Martin

    1985-05-01

    The circumsporozoite (CS) protein of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum may be the most promising target for the development of a malaria vaccine. In this study, proteins composed of 16, 32, or 48 tandem copies of a tetrapeptide repeating sequence found in the CS protein were efficiently expressed in the bacterium Escherichia coli. When injected into mice, these recombinant products resulted in the production of high titers of antibodies that reacted with the authentic CS protein on live sporozoites and blocked sporozoite invasion of human hepatoma cells in vitro. These CS protein derivatives are therefore candidates for a human malaria vaccine.

  9. Application of a Scalable Plant Transient Gene Expression Platform for Malaria Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, Holger; Boes, Alexander; Voepel, Nadja; Beiss, Veronique; Edgue, Gueven; Rademacher, Thomas; Sack, Markus; Schillberg, Stefan; Reimann, Andreas; Fischer, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of intensive research efforts there is currently no vaccine that provides sustained sterile immunity against malaria. In this context, a large number of targets from the different stages of the Plasmodium falciparum life cycle have been evaluated as vaccine candidates. None of these candidates has fulfilled expectations, and as long as we lack a single target that induces strain-transcending protective immune responses, combining key antigens from different life cycle stages seems to be the most promising route toward the development of efficacious malaria vaccines. After the identification of potential targets using approaches such as omics-based technology and reverse immunology, the rapid expression, purification, and characterization of these proteins, as well as the generation and analysis of fusion constructs combining different promising antigens or antigen domains before committing to expensive and time consuming clinical development, represents one of the bottlenecks in the vaccine development pipeline. The production of recombinant proteins by transient gene expression in plants is a robust and versatile alternative to cell-based microbial and eukaryotic production platforms. The transfection of plant tissues and/or whole plants using Agrobacterium tumefaciens offers a low technical entry barrier, low costs, and a high degree of flexibility embedded within a rapid and scalable workflow. Recombinant proteins can easily be targeted to different subcellular compartments according to their physicochemical requirements, including post-translational modifications, to ensure optimal yields of high quality product, and to support simple and economical downstream processing. Here, we demonstrate the use of a plant transient expression platform based on transfection with A. tumefaciens as essential component of a malaria vaccine development workflow involving screens for expression, solubility, and stability using fluorescent fusion proteins. Our

  10. Malaria

    MedlinePlus

    ... common?Malaria is a health problem in many tropical and subtropical countries, including portions of Central and ... these countries. If you are traveling to a tropical area or to a country where malaria is ...

  11. What Is Known about the Immune Response Induced by Plasmodium vivax Malaria Vaccine Candidates?

    PubMed Central

    López, Carolina; Yepes-Pérez, Yoelis; Hincapié-Escobar, Natalia; Díaz-Arévalo, Diana; Patarroyo, Manuel A.

    2017-01-01

    Malaria caused by Plasmodium vivax continues being one of the most important infectious diseases around the world; P. vivax is the second most prevalent species and has the greatest geographic distribution. Developing an effective antimalarial vaccine is considered a relevant control strategy in the search for means of preventing the disease. Studying parasite-expressed proteins, which are essential in host cell invasion, has led to identifying the regions recognized by individuals who are naturally exposed to infection. Furthermore, immunogenicity studies have revealed that such regions can trigger a robust immune response that can inhibit sporozoite (hepatic stage) or merozoite (erythrocyte stage) invasion of a host cell and induce protection. This review provides a synthesis of the most important studies to date concerning the antigenicity and immunogenicity of both synthetic peptide and recombinant protein candidates for a vaccine against malaria produced by P. vivax. PMID:28243235

  12. What Is Known about the Immune Response Induced by Plasmodium vivax Malaria Vaccine Candidates?

    PubMed

    López, Carolina; Yepes-Pérez, Yoelis; Hincapié-Escobar, Natalia; Díaz-Arévalo, Diana; Patarroyo, Manuel A

    2017-01-01

    Malaria caused by Plasmodium vivax continues being one of the most important infectious diseases around the world; P. vivax is the second most prevalent species and has the greatest geographic distribution. Developing an effective antimalarial vaccine is considered a relevant control strategy in the search for means of preventing the disease. Studying parasite-expressed proteins, which are essential in host cell invasion, has led to identifying the regions recognized by individuals who are naturally exposed to infection. Furthermore, immunogenicity studies have revealed that such regions can trigger a robust immune response that can inhibit sporozoite (hepatic stage) or merozoite (erythrocyte stage) invasion of a host cell and induce protection. This review provides a synthesis of the most important studies to date concerning the antigenicity and immunogenicity of both synthetic peptide and recombinant protein candidates for a vaccine against malaria produced by P. vivax.

  13. Determination of the immunization schedule for field trials with the synthetic malaria vaccine SPf 66.

    PubMed

    Rocha, C L; Murillo, L A; Mora, A L; Rojas, M; Franco, L; Cote, J; Valero, M V; Moreno, A; Amador, R; Nuñez, F

    1992-01-01

    The synthetic malaria vaccine SPf 66 has been shown to be safe, immunogenic and effective in trials performed with controlled groups naturally and experimentally exposed to the disease. In order to continue the trials in open populations, it was necessary to standardize the vaccination characteristics. We have performed four field trials with soldier volunteers with the aim, among others, of defining the number of doses required, the intervals between applications, the protein concentration, and the adjuvant to be used. In these trials, the vaccinated individuals' immune responses were evaluated by assaying anti-SPf 66 antibody titres, in vitro growth inhibition of the P. falciparum parasite, and the vaccinees' capacity to recognize P. falciparum native proteins. From these results we conclude that the best vaccination schedule, for adults, is three doses administered subcutaneously on days 0, 30 and 180, each containing 2 mg of the synthetic polymerized petide SPf 66 adsorbed to alum hydroxide.

  14. Identification of Novel Pre-Erythrocytic Malaria Antigen Candidates for Combination Vaccines with Circumsporozoite Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Tejram; Malkov, Vlad; Morrison, Robert; Pei, Ying; Juompan, Laure; Milman, Neta; Zarling, Stasya; Anderson, Charles; Wong-Madden, Sharon; Wendler, Jason; Ishizuka, Andrew; MacMillen, Zachary W.; Garcia, Valentino; Kappe, Stefan H. I.; Krzych, Urszula; Duffy, Patrick E.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria vaccine development has been hampered by the limited availability of antigens identified through conventional discovery approaches, and improvements are needed to enhance the efficacy of the leading vaccine candidate RTS,S that targets the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of the infective sporozoite. Here we report a transcriptome-based approach to identify novel pre-erythrocytic vaccine antigens that could potentially be used in combination with CSP. We hypothesized that stage-specific upregulated genes would enrich for protective vaccine targets, and used tiling microarray to identify P. falciparum genes transcribed at higher levels during liver stage versus sporozoite or blood stages of development. We prepared DNA vaccines for 21 genes using the predicted orthologues in P. yoelii and P. berghei and tested their efficacy using different delivery methods against pre-erythrocytic malaria in rodent models. In our primary screen using P. yoelii in BALB/c mice, we found that 16 antigens significantly reduced liver stage parasite burden. In our confirmatory screen using P. berghei in C57Bl/6 mice, we confirmed 6 antigens that were protective in both models. Two antigens, when combined with CSP, provided significantly greater protection than CSP alone in both models. Based on the observations reported here, transcriptional patterns of Plasmodium genes can be useful in identifying novel pre-erythrocytic antigens that induce protective immunity alone or in combination with CSP. PMID:27434123

  15. The utility of Plasmodium berghei as a rodent model for anti-merozoite malaria vaccine assessment.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Anna L; Forbes, Emily K; Williams, Andrew R; Douglas, Alexander D; de Cassan, Simone C; Bauza, Karolis; Biswas, Sumi; Dicks, Matthew D J; Llewellyn, David; Moore, Anne C; Janse, Chris J; Franke-Fayard, Blandine M; Gilbert, Sarah C; Hill, Adrian V S; Pleass, Richard J; Draper, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    Rodent malaria species Plasmodium yoelii and P. chabaudi have been widely used to validate vaccine approaches targeting blood-stage merozoite antigens. However, increasing data suggest the P. berghei rodent malaria may be able to circumvent vaccine-induced anti-merozoite responses. Here we confirm a failure to protect against P. berghei, despite successful antibody induction against leading merozoite antigens using protein-in-adjuvant or viral vectored vaccine delivery. No subunit vaccine approach showed efficacy in mice following immunization and challenge with the wild-type P. berghei strains ANKA or NK65, or against a chimeric parasite line encoding a merozoite antigen from P. falciparum. Protection was not improved in knockout mice lacking the inhibitory Fc receptor CD32b, nor against a Δsmac P. berghei parasite line with a non-sequestering phenotype. An improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for protection, or failure of protection, against P. berghei merozoites could guide the development of an efficacious vaccine against P. falciparum.

  16. Malaria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupasquier, Isabelle

    1989-01-01

    Malaria, the greatest pandemia in the world, claims an estimated one million lives each year in Africa alone. While it may still be said that for the most part malaria is found in what is known as the world's poverty belt, cases are now frequently diagnosed in western countries. Due to resistant strains of malaria which have developed because of…

  17. Design of a Phase III cluster randomized trial to assess the efficacy and safety of a malaria transmission blocking vaccine.

    PubMed

    Delrieu, Isabelle; Leboulleux, Didier; Ivinson, Karen; Gessner, Bradford D

    2015-03-24

    Vaccines interrupting Plasmodium falciparum malaria transmission targeting sexual, sporogonic, or mosquito-stage antigens (SSM-VIMT) are currently under development to reduce malaria transmission. An international group of malaria experts was established to evaluate the feasibility and optimal design of a Phase III cluster randomized trial (CRT) that could support regulatory review and approval of an SSM-VIMT. The consensus design is a CRT with a sentinel population randomly selected from defined inner and buffer zones in each cluster, a cluster size sufficient to assess true vaccine efficacy in the inner zone, and inclusion of ongoing assessment of vaccine impact stratified by distance of residence from the cluster edge. Trials should be conducted first in areas of moderate transmission, where SSM-VIMT impact should be greatest. Sample size estimates suggest that such a trial is feasible, and within the range of previously supported trials of malaria interventions, although substantial issues to implementation exist.

  18. Vaccination and Malaria Prevention among International Travelers Departing from Athens International Airport to African Destinations

    PubMed Central

    Pavli, Androula; Spilioti, Athina; Smeti, Paraskevi; Patrinos, Stavros; Maltezou, Helena C.

    2014-01-01

    Background. International travel to Africa has grown dramatically over the last decade along with an increasing need to understand the health issues for travelers. The current survey aimed to assess vaccination and malaria prevention of travelers visiting Africa. Methods. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted from of November 1, 2011 to of April 30, 2013 at Athens International Airport. Results. A total of 360 travelers were studied; 68% were men. Their mean age was 39.9 years. Previous travel to tropical countries was reported by 71.9% of them. Most frequent destination was sub-Saharan Africa (60%). Most of them traveled for ≥1 month (62%). The main reason for travel was work (39.7%). Only 47% sought pretravel consultation. Hepatitis A, typhoid, and meningococcal vaccines were administered to 49.8%, 28%, and 26.6%, respectively, and malaria chemoprophylaxis to 66.8% of those who visited sub-Saharan Africa. A history of previous travel to a tropical country, elementary level of education, and traveling for visiting friends and relatives, and for short duration were significant determinants for not pursuing pretravel consultation. Conclusions. The current survey revealed important inadequacies in vaccine and malaria prophylaxis of travelers departing to Africa. Educational tools should be developed in order to improve awareness of travelers to risk destinations. PMID:24719621

  19. Attenuated PfSPZ Vaccine induces strain-transcending T cells and durable protection against heterologous controlled human malaria infection.

    PubMed

    Lyke, Kirsten E; Ishizuka, Andrew S; Berry, Andrea A; Chakravarty, Sumana; DeZure, Adam; Enama, Mary E; James, Eric R; Billingsley, Peter F; Gunasekera, Anusha; Manoj, Anita; Li, Minglin; Ruben, Adam J; Li, Tao; Eappen, Abraham G; Stafford, Richard E; Kc, Natasha; Murshedkar, Tooba; Mendoza, Floreliz H; Gordon, Ingelise J; Zephir, Kathryn L; Holman, LaSonji A; Plummer, Sarah H; Hendel, Cynthia S; Novik, Laura; Costner, Pamela J M; Saunders, Jamie G; Berkowitz, Nina M; Flynn, Barbara J; Nason, Martha C; Garver, Lindsay S; Laurens, Matthew B; Plowe, Christopher V; Richie, Thomas L; Graham, Barney S; Roederer, Mario; Sim, B Kim Lee; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Hoffman, Stephen L; Seder, Robert A

    2017-02-21

    A live-attenuated malaria vaccine, Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite vaccine (PfSPZ Vaccine), confers sterile protection against controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) with Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) parasites homologous to the vaccine strain up to 14 mo after final vaccination. No injectable malaria vaccine has demonstrated long-term protection against CHMI using Pf parasites heterologous to the vaccine strain. Here, we conducted an open-label trial with PfSPZ Vaccine at a dose of 9.0 × 10(5) PfSPZ administered i.v. three times at 8-wk intervals to 15 malaria-naive adults. After CHMI with homologous Pf parasites 19 wk after final immunization, nine (64%) of 14 (95% CI, 35-87%) vaccinated volunteers remained without parasitemia compared with none of six nonvaccinated controls (P = 0.012). Of the nine nonparasitemic subjects, six underwent repeat CHMI with heterologous Pf7G8 parasites 33 wk after final immunization. Five (83%) of six (95% CI, 36-99%) remained without parasitemia compared with none of six nonvaccinated controls. PfSPZ-specific T-cell and antibody responses were detected in all vaccine recipients. Cytokine production by T cells from vaccinated subjects after in vitro stimulation with homologous (NF54) or heterologous (7G8) PfSPZ were highly correlated. Interestingly, PfSPZ-specific T-cell responses in the blood peaked after the first immunization and were not enhanced by subsequent immunizations. Collectively, these data suggest durable protection against homologous and heterologous Pf parasites can be achieved with PfSPZ Vaccine. Ongoing studies will determine whether protective efficacy can be enhanced by additional alterations in the vaccine dose and number of immunizations.

  20. A Randomized Controlled Phase Ib Trial of the Malaria Vaccine Candidate GMZ2 in African Children

    PubMed Central

    Hounkpatin, Aurore B.; Schaumburg, Frieder; Ngoa, Ulysse Ateba; Esen, Meral; Fendel, Rolf; de Salazar, Pablo Martinez; Mürbeth, Raymund E.; Milligan, Paul; Imbault, Nathalie; Imoukhuede, Egeruan Babatunde; Theisen, Michael; Jepsen, Søren; Noor, Ramadhani A.; Okech, Brenda; Kremsner, Peter G.; Mordmüller, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Background GMZ2 is a fusion protein of Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 3 (MSP3) and glutamate rich protein (GLURP) that mediates an immune response against the blood stage of the parasite. Two previous phase I clinical trials, one in naïve European adults and one in malaria-exposed Gabonese adults showed that GMZ2 was well tolerated and immunogenic. Here, we present data on safety and immunogenicity of GMZ2 in one to five year old Gabonese children, a target population for future malaria vaccine efficacy trials. Methodology/Principal Findings Thirty children one to five years of age were randomized to receive three doses of either 30 µg or 100 µg of GMZ2, or rabies vaccine. GMZ2, adjuvanted in aluminum hydroxide, was administered on Days 0, 28 and 56. All participants received a full course of their respective vaccination and were followed up for one year. Both 30 µg and 100 µg GMZ2 vaccine doses were well tolerated and induced antibodies and memory B-cells against GMZ2 as well as its antigenic constituents MSP3 and GLURP. After three doses of vaccine, the geometric mean concentration of antibodies to GMZ2 was 19-fold (95%CI: 11,34) higher in the 30 µg GMZ2 group than in the rabies vaccine controls, and 16-fold (7,36) higher in the 100 µg GMZ2 group than the rabies group. Geometric mean concentration of antibodies to MSP3 was 2.7-fold (1.6,4.6) higher in the 30 µg group than in the rabies group and 3.8-fold (1.5,9.6) higher in the 100 µg group. Memory B-cells against GMZ2 developed in both GMZ2 vaccinated groups. Conclusions/Significance Both 30 µg as well as 100 µg intramuscular GMZ2 are immunogenic, well tolerated, and safe in young, malaria-exposed Gabonese children. This result confirms previous findings in naïve and malaria-exposed adults and supports further clinical development of GMZ2. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00703066 PMID:21829466

  1. Assessment of immune interference, antagonism, and diversion following human immunization with biallelic blood-stage malaria viral-vectored vaccines and controlled malaria infection.

    PubMed

    Elias, Sean C; Collins, Katharine A; Halstead, Fenella D; Choudhary, Prateek; Bliss, Carly M; Ewer, Katie J; Sheehy, Susanne H; Duncan, Christopher J A; Biswas, Sumi; Hill, Adrian V S; Draper, Simon J

    2013-02-01

    Overcoming antigenic variation is one of the major challenges in the development of an effective vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum, a causative agent of human malaria. Inclusion of multiple Ag variants in subunit vaccine candidates is one strategy that has aimed to overcome this problem for the leading blood-stage malaria vaccine targets, that is, merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) and apical membrane Ag 1 (AMA1). However, previous studies, utilizing malaria Ags, have concluded that inclusion of multiple allelic variants, encoding altered peptide ligands, in such a vaccine may be detrimental to both the priming and in vivo restimulation of Ag-experienced T cells. In this study, we analyze the T cell responses to two alleles of MSP1 and AMA1 induced by vaccination of malaria-naive adult volunteers with bivalent viral-vectored vaccine candidates. We show a significant bias to the 3D7/MAD20 allele compared with the Wellcome allele for the 33 kDa region of MSP1, but not for the 19 kDa fragment or the AMA1 Ag. Although this bias could be caused by "immune interference" at priming, the data do not support a significant role for "immune antagonism" during memory T cell restimulation, despite observation of the latter at a minimal epitope level in vitro. A lack of class I HLA epitopes in the Wellcome allele that are recognized by vaccinated volunteers may in fact contribute to the observed bias. We also show that controlled infection with 3D7 strain P. falciparum parasites neither boosts existing 3D7-specific T cell responses nor appears to "immune divert" cellular responses toward the Wellcome allele.

  2. Development of a Pfs25-EPA malaria transmission blocking vaccine as a chemically conjugated nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Shimp, Richard L; Rowe, Christopher; Reiter, Karine; Chen, Beth; Nguyen, Vu; Aebig, Joan; Rausch, Kelly M; Kumar, Krishan; Wu, Yimin; Jin, Albert J; Jones, David S; Narum, David L

    2013-06-19

    Successful efforts to control infectious diseases have often required the use of effective vaccines. The current global strategy for control of malaria, including elimination and eradication will also benefit from the development of an effective vaccine that interrupts malaria transmission. To this end, a vaccine that disrupts malaria transmission within the mosquito host has been investigated for several decades targeting a 25 kDa ookinete specific surface protein, identified as Pfs25. Phase 1 human trial results using a recombinant Pfs25H/Montanide ISA51 formulation demonstrated that human Pfs25 specific antibodies block parasite infectivity to mosquitoes; however, the extent of blocking was likely insufficient for an effective transmission blocking vaccine. To overcome the poor immunogenicity, processes to produce and characterize recombinant Pfs25H conjugated to a detoxified form of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoprotein A (EPA) have been developed and used to manufacture a cGMP pilot lot for use in human clinical trials. The Pfs25-EPA conjugate appears as a nanoparticle with an average molar mass in solution of approximately 600 kDa by static light scattering with an average diameter 20 nm (range 10-40 nm) by dynamic light scattering. The molar ratio of Pfs25H to EPA is about 3 to 1 by amino acid analysis, respectively. Outbred mice immunized with the Pfs25-EPA conjugated nanoparticle formulated on Alhydrogel(®) had a 75-110 fold increase in Pfs25H specific antibodies when compared to an unconjugated Pfs25H/Alhydrogel(®) formulation. A phase 1 human trial using the Pfs25-EPA/Alhydrogel(®) formulation is ongoing in the United States.

  3. Development of a Pfs25-EPA malaria transmission blocking vaccine as a chemically conjugated nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Shimp, Richard L.; Rowe, Christopher; Reiter, Karine; Chen, Beth; Nguyen, Vu; Aebig, Joan; Rausch, Kelly M.; Kumar, Krishan; Wu, Yimin; Jin, Albert J.; Jones, David S.; Narum, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Successful efforts to control infectious diseases have often required the use of effective vaccines. The current global strategy for control of malaria, including elimination and eradication will also benefit from the development of an effective vaccine that interrupts malaria transmission. To this end, a vaccine that disrupts malaria transmission within the mosquito host has been investigated for several decades targeting a 25 kDa ookinete specific surface protein, identified as Pfs25. Phase 1 human trial results using a recombinant Pfs25H/Montanide ISA51 formulation demonstrated that human Pfs25 specific antibodies block parasite infectivity to mosquitoes; however, the extent of blocking was likely insufficient for an effective transmission blocking vaccine. To overcome the poor immunogenicity, processes to produce and characterize recombinant Pfs25H conjugated to a detoxified form of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoprotein A (EPA) have been developed and used to manufacture a cGMP pilot lot for use in human clinical trials. The Pfs25-EPA conjugate appears as a nanoparticle with an average molar mass in solution of approximately 600 kDa by static light scattering with an average diameter 20 nm (range 10 to 40 nm) by dynamic light scattering. The molar ratio of Pfs25H to EPA is about 3 to 1 by amino acid analysis, respectively. Outbred mice immunized with the Pfs25-EPA conjugated nanoparticle formulated on Alhydrogel® had a 75 to 110 fold increase in Pfs25H specific antibodies when compared to an unconjugated Pfs25H/Alhydrogel® formulation. A phase 1 human trial using the Pfs25-EPA/Alhydrogel® formulation is ongoing in the United States. PMID:23623858

  4. Optimal vaccination and bednet maintenance for the control of malaria in a region with naturally acquired immunity.

    PubMed

    Prosper, Olivia; Ruktanonchai, Nick; Martcheva, Maia

    2014-07-21

    Following over two decades of research, the malaria vaccine candidate RTS,S has reached the final stages of vaccine trials, demonstrating an efficacy of roughly 50% in young children. Regions with high malaria prevalence tend to have high levels of naturally acquired immunity (NAI) to severe malaria; NAI is caused by repeated exposure to infectious bites and results in large asymptomatic populations. To address concerns about how these vaccines will perform in regions with existing NAI, we developed a simple malaria model incorporating vaccination and NAI. Typically, if the basic reproduction number (R0) for malaria is greater than unity, the disease will persist; otherwise, the disease will become extinct. However, analysis of this model revealed that NAI, compounded by a subpopulation with only partial protection to malaria, may render vaccination efforts ineffective and potentially detrimental to malaria control, by increasing R0 and increasing the likelihood of malaria persistence even when R0<1. The likelihood of this scenario increases when non-immune infected individuals are treated disproportionately compared with partially immune individuals - a plausible scenario since partially immune individuals are more likely to be asymptomatically infected. Consequently, we argue that active case-detection of asymptomatic infections is a critical component of an effective malaria control program. We then investigated optimal vaccination and bednet control programs under two endemic settings with varying levels of naturally acquired immunity: a typical setting under which prevalence decays when R0<1, and a setting in which subthreshold endemic equilibria exist. A qualitative comparison of the optimal control results under the first setting revealed that the optimal policy differs depending on whether the goal is to reduce total morbidity, or to reduce clinical infections. Furthermore, this comparison dictates that control programs should place less effort in

  5. Extended protection capabilities of an immature dendritic-cell targeting malaria sporozoite vaccine.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kun; Zavala, Fidel; Gordy, James; Zhang, Hong; Markham, Richard B

    2017-03-22

    Mouse studies evaluating candidate malaria vaccines have typically examined protective efficacy over the relatively short time frames of several weeks after the final of multiple immunizations. The current study examines the protective ability in a mouse model system of a novel protein vaccine construct in which the adjuvant polyinosinic polycytidilic acid (poly(I:C)) is used in combination with a vaccine in which the immature dendritic cell targeting chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein 3 alpha (MIP3α), is fused to the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum). Two vaccinations, three weeks apart, elicited extraordinarily high, MIP3α-dependent antibody responses. MIP3α was able to target the vaccine to the CCR6 receptor found predominantly on immature dendritic cells and significantly enhanced the cellular influx at the vaccination site. At three and 23 weeks after the final of two immunizations, mice were challenged by intravenous injection of 5×10(3) transgenic Plasmodium berghei sporozoites expressing P. falciparum CSP, a challenge dose approximately one order of magnitude greater than that which is encountered after mosquito bite in the clinical setting. A ninety-seven percent reduction in liver sporozoite load was observed at both time points, 23 weeks being the last time point tested.

  6. An edible vaccine for malaria using transgenic tomatoes of varying sizes, shapes and colors to carry different antigens.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Kamal; Bagasra, Omar

    2007-01-01

    Malaria, a disease caused by protozoan parasites of genus Plasmodium, is one of the world's biggest scourges. Over two billion individuals reside in the malaria endemic areas and the disease affects 300-500 million people annually. As a result of malarial-infection, an estimated three million lives are lost annually, among them over one million children (majority under 5 years of age). The mortality due to malaria has increased because of the spread of drug-resistant strains of the parasite, the breakdown of health services in many affected areas, the interaction of the disease with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and possibly the effects of climate change. Infants and young children with malaria often die from severe anemia, cerebral involvement,or prostration caused by overwhelming infection; many new borns die from complications of low birth weight caused by maternal malaria during pregnancy. The scarce economic resources and lack of communication, infrastructure and adequate means of travel in the endemic areas make it extremely difficult to implement traditional infection control measures (i.e., mosquito control, preventive anti-malarial drugs and nets). To make the matter worse, both malarial parasites and its insect vectors are increasingly becoming resistant to anti-malarial agents (chloroquine) and insecticides (both DDT and melathione and related chemicals), respectively. By conventional wisdom, the immune mechanisms responsible for protection against malaria will require a multiple of 10-15 antigen targets for proper protection against various stages of malarial infection. By standard vaccination protocols, such a large number of targets would not be appropriate to be used for vaccination as a single dose due to antigenic competition. It would be almost impossible to immunize over two billion individuals who live in malaria susceptible areas with several carefully crafted immunization schedules delivered 4-6 weeks apart in the form of two

  7. The role of pi-interactions and hydrogen bonds in fully protective synthetic malaria vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Reyes, César; Moreno-Vranich, Armando; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2017-03-11

    Analysis of our Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite peptides' (1)H-NMR database in the search for H-bonds and π-interactions led us to correlate their presence or absence with a peptide's particular immunological behavior. It was concluded that a 26.5 ± 1.5 Å between positions 1 to 9 of the HLA-DRβ1* interacting region was necessary for proper docking of 20mer-long peptides and these MHC Class II molecules for full-protective immunity. Presence of intramolecular H-bonds or π-interactions leading to righ-handed α-helix or β-turn conformation in this peptide's region induces different immune responses or none. PPIIL conformation and the absence of any intramolecular interaction thus became the first feature characterising our immune protection-inducing structures as malaria vaccine candidates.

  8. Magnetic Nanovectors for the Development of DNA Blood-Stage Malaria Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Al-Deen, Fatin M. Nawwab; Xiang, Sue D.; Ma, Charles; Wilson, Kirsty; Coppel, Ross L.; Selomulya, Cordelia; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    DNA vaccines offer cost, flexibility, and stability advantages, but administered alone have limited immunogenicity. Previously, we identified optimal configurations of magnetic vectors comprising superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), polyethylenimine (PEI), and hyaluronic acid (HA) to deliver malaria DNA encoding Plasmodium yoelii (Py) merozoite surface protein MSP119 (SPIONs/PEI/DNA + HA gene complex) to dendritic cells and transfect them with high efficiency in vitro. Herein, we evaluate their immunogenicity in vivo by administering these potential vaccine complexes into BALB/c mice. The complexes induced antibodies against PyMSP119, with higher responses induced intraperitoneally than intramuscularly, and antibody levels further enhanced by applying an external magnetic field. The predominant IgG subclasses induced were IgG2a followed by IgG1 and IgG2b. The complexes further elicited high levels of interferon gamma (IFN-γ), and moderate levels of interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-17 antigen-specific splenocytes, indicating induction of T helper 1 (Th1), Th2, and Th17 cell mediated immunity. The ability of such DNA/nanoparticle complexes to induce cytophilic antibodies together with broad spectrum cellular immunity may benefit malaria vaccines. PMID:28336871

  9. On the efficacy of malaria DNA vaccination with magnetic gene vectors.

    PubMed

    Nawwab Al-Deen, Fatin; Ma, Charles; Xiang, Sue D; Selomulya, Cordelia; Plebanski, Magdalena; Coppel, Ross L

    2013-05-28

    We investigated the efficacy and types of immune responses from plasmid malaria DNA vaccine encoding VR1020-PyMSP119 condensed on the surface of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-coated SPIONs. In vivo mouse studies were done firstly to determine the optimum magnetic vector composition, and then to observe immune responses elicited when magnetic vectors were introduced via different administration routes. Higher serum antibody titers against PyMSP119 were observed with intraperitoneal and intramuscular injections than subcutaneous and intradermal injections. Robust IgG2a and IgG1 responses were observed for intraperitoneal administration, which could be due to the physiology of peritoneum as a major reservoir of macrophages and dendritic cells. Heterologous DNA prime followed by single protein boost vaccination regime also enhanced IgG2a, IgG1, and IgG2b responses, indicating the induction of appropriate memory immunity that can be elicited by protein on recall. These outcomes support the possibility to design superparamagnetic nanoparticle-based DNA vaccines to optimally evoke desired antibody responses, useful for a variety of diseases including malaria.

  10. Progress with viral vectored malaria vaccines: A multi-stage approach involving "unnatural immunity".

    PubMed

    Ewer, Katie J; Sierra-Davidson, Kailan; Salman, Ahmed M; Illingworth, Joseph J; Draper, Simon J; Biswas, Sumi; Hill, Adrian V S

    2015-12-22

    Viral vectors used in heterologous prime-boost regimens are one of very few vaccination approaches that have yielded significant protection against controlled human malaria infections. Recently, protection induced by chimpanzee adenovirus priming and modified vaccinia Ankara boosting using the ME-TRAP insert has been correlated with the induction of potent CD8(+) T cell responses. This regimen has progressed to field studies where efficacy against infection has now been reported. The same vectors have been used pre-clinically to identify preferred protective antigens for use in vaccines against the pre-erythrocytic, blood-stage and mosquito stages of malaria and this work is reviewed here for the first time. Such antigen screening has led to the prioritization of the PfRH5 blood-stage antigen, which showed efficacy against heterologous strain challenge in non-human primates, and vectors encoding this antigen are in clinical trials. This, along with the high transmission-blocking activity of some sexual-stage antigens, illustrates well the capacity of such vectors to induce high titre protective antibodies in addition to potent T cell responses. All of the protective responses induced by these vectors exceed the levels of the same immune responses induced by natural exposure supporting the view that, for subunit vaccines to achieve even partial efficacy in humans, "unnatural immunity" comprising immune responses of very high magnitude will need to be induced.

  11. Progress with Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite (PfSPZ)-based malaria vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Richie, Thomas L.; Billingsley, Peter F.; Sim, B. Kim Lee; James, Eric R.; Chakravarty, Sumana; Epstein, Judith E.; Lyke, Kirsten E.; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Alonso, Pedro; Duffy, Patrick E.; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Tanner, Marcel; Abdulla, Salim; Kremsner, Peter G.; Seder, Robert A.; Hoffman, Stephen L.

    2016-01-01

    Sanaria Inc. has developed methods to manufacture, purify and cryopreserve aseptic Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) sporozoites (SPZ), and is using this platform technology to develop an injectable PfSPZ-based vaccine that provides high-grade, durable protection against infection with Pf malaria. Several candidate vaccines are being developed and tested, including PfSPZ Vaccine, in which the PfSPZ are attenuated by irradiation, PfSPZ-CVac, in which fully infectious PfSPZ are attenuated in vivo by concomitant administration of an anti-malarial drug, and PfSPZ-GA1, in which the PfSPZ are attenuated by gene knockout. Forty-three research groups in 15 countries, organized as the International PfSPZ Consortium (I-PfSPZ-C), are collaborating to advance this program by providing intellectual, clinical, and financial support. Fourteen clinical trials of these products have been completed in the USA, Europe and Africa, two are underway and at least 12 more are planned for 2015–2016 in the US (four trials), Germany (2 trials), Tanzania, Kenya, Mali, Burkina Faso, Ghana and Equatorial Guinea. Sanaria anticipates application to license a first generation product as early as late 2017, initially to protect adults, and a year later to protect all persons >6 months of age for at least six months. Improved vaccine candidates will be advanced as needed until the following requirements have been met: long-term protection against natural transmission, excellent safety and tolerability, and operational feasibility for population-wide administration. Here we describe the three most developed whole PfSPZ vaccine candidates, associated clinical trials, initial plans for licensure and deployment, and long-term objectives for a final product suitable for mass administration to achieve regional malaria elimination and eventual global eradication. PMID:26469720

  12. Implementation workshop of WHO guidelines on evaluation of malaria vaccines: Current regulatory concepts and issues related to vaccine quality, Pretoria, South Africa 07 Nov 2014.

    PubMed

    Ho, Mei Mei; Baca-Estrada, Maria; Conrad, Christoph; Karikari-Boateng, Eric; Kang, Hye-Na

    2015-08-26

    The current World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines on the quality, safety and efficacy of recombinant malaria vaccines targeting the pre-erythrocytic and blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum were adopted by the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization in 2012 to provide guidance on the quality, nonclinical and clinical aspects of recombinant malaria vaccines. A WHO workshop was organised to facilitate implementation into African (national/regional) regulatory practices, of the regulatory evaluation principles outlined in the guidelines regarding quality aspects. The workshop was used also to share knowledge and experience on regulatory topics of chemistry, manufacturing and control with a focus on vaccines through presentations and an interactive discussion using a case study approach. The basic principles and concepts of vaccine quality including consistency of production, quality control and manufacturing process were presented and discussed in the meeting. By reviewing and practicing a case study, better understanding on the relationship between consistency of production and batch release tests of an adjuvanted pre-erythrocytic recombinant malaria vaccine was reached. The case study exercise was considered very useful to understand regulatory evaluation principles of vaccines and a suggestion was made to WHO to provide such practices also through its Global Learning Opportunities for Vaccine Quality programme.

  13. Phase 1/2a Trial of Plasmodium vivax Malaria Vaccine Candidate VMP001/AS01B in Malaria-Naive Adults: Safety, Immunogenicity, and Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Jason W.; Yadava, Anjali; Tosh, Donna; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Komisar, Jack; Ware, Lisa A.; McCarthy, William F.; Cowden, Jessica J.; Regules, Jason; Spring, Michele D.; Paolino, Kristopher; Hartzell, Joshua D.; Cummings, James F.; Richie, Thomas L.; Lumsden, Joanne; Kamau, Edwin; Murphy, Jittawadee; Lee, Cynthia; Parekh, Falgunee; Birkett, Ashley; Cohen, Joe; Ballou, W. Ripley; Polhemus, Mark E.; Vanloubbeeck, Yannick F.; Vekemans, Johan; Ockenhouse, Christian F.

    2016-01-01

    Background A vaccine to prevent infection and disease caused by Plasmodium vivax is needed both to reduce the morbidity caused by this parasite and as a key component in efforts to eradicate malaria worldwide. Vivax malaria protein 1 (VMP001), a novel chimeric protein that incorporates the amino- and carboxy- terminal regions of the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and a truncated repeat region that contains repeat sequences from both the VK210 (type 1) and the VK247 (type 2) parasites, was developed as a vaccine candidate for global use. Methods We conducted a first-in-human Phase 1 dose escalation vaccine study with controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) of VMP001 formulated in the GSK Adjuvant System AS01B. A total of 30 volunteers divided into 3 groups (10 per group) were given 3 intramuscular injections of 15μg, 30μg, or 60μg respectively of VMP001, all formulated in 500μL of AS01B at each immunization. All vaccinated volunteers participated in a P. vivax CHMI 14 days following the third immunization. Six non-vaccinated subjects served as infectivity controls. Results The vaccine was shown to be well tolerated and immunogenic. All volunteers generated robust humoral and cellular immune responses to the vaccine antigen. Vaccination did not induce sterile protection; however, a small but significant delay in time to parasitemia was seen in 59% of vaccinated subjects compared to the control group. An association was identified between levels of anti-type 1 repeat antibodies and prepatent period. Significance This trial was the first to assess the efficacy of a P. vivax CSP vaccine candidate by CHMI. The association of type 1 repeat-specific antibody responses with delay in the prepatency period suggests that augmenting the immune responses to this domain may improve strain-specific vaccine efficacy. The availability of a P. vivax CHMI model will accelerate the process of P. vivax vaccine development, allowing better selection of candidate vaccines for

  14. A population-based clinical trial with the SPf66 synthetic Plasmodium falciparum malaria vaccine in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Noya, O; Gabaldón Berti, Y; Alarcón de Noya, B; Borges, R; Zerpa, N; Urbáez, J D; Madonna, A; Garrido, E; Jimenéz, M A; Borges, R E

    1994-08-01

    A phase III malaria vaccine trial in 13 villages in an endemic area, South Venezuela, compared incidence rates of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax infections in 1422 vaccinated and 938 nonvaccinated subjects over 18 months. The SPf66 vaccine was given in three doses, on days 0, 20, and 112. Vaccination was complete in 976 subjects (68.7%). Minor side effects requiring no treatment were reported by 123 (12.6%), with an apparent increase in frequency from the first to the third vaccine dose. No autoimmune evidence was observed in a sample of subjects. Antibodies against SPf66 were present at low titers in 24.7% of tested subjects before vaccination, increasing to 53.6% after the second dose and to 73.6% after the third dose; 26.4% of subjects initially seronegative never seroconverted. The SPf66 malaria vaccine showed a protective efficacy of 55% (95% confidence interval, 21%-75%) against P. falciparum and of 41% (19%-57%) against P. vivax malaria.

  15. Malaria

    MedlinePlus

    ... a parasite. You get it when an infected mosquito bites you. Malaria is a major cause of ... insect repellent with DEET Cover up Sleep under mosquito netting Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  16. Malaria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Malaria can be carried by mosquitoes in temperate climates, but the parasite disappears over the winter. The ... a major disease hazard for travelers to warm climates. In some areas of the world, mosquitoes that ...

  17. How reliable are models for malaria vaccine development? Lessons from irradiated sporozoite immunizations.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, S; Perignon, J L; Van Marck, E; Druilhe, P

    2006-01-01

    Models occupy a key position in the development of anti-parasitic vaccines, yet their relevance has been seldom addressed. It is customary to admit that malaria vaccine development requires easy-to-handle, laboratory models. Animal models involving predominantly inbred rodents and primates as parasite hosts are currently the basic tools for the study of host-parasite interactions. Literature however indicates that the induction of host protection is more difficult in natural host-parasite pairs than in experimental models of parasite infection. Moreover different models delineate a wide range of host-pathogen relationship profiles providing a mosaic of contradictory informations, yet there is little incentive to delineate their relevance or to exploit recent advances to develop improved model systems. In this context the analysis of natural host-parasite interactions between Plasmodium berghei and its mammalian host and reservoir, the tree rat Grammomys surdaster could ge of relevance in the study of host-parasite interactions.

  18. Malaria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    established, the infection is classi- fied as cryptic malaria. A large majority of infections are transmitted by the bite of an infected female ... female anopheline mosquitoes. Plasmodium sp infecting humans include Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium falci- parum, Plasmodium malariae, and Plasmodium ovale...paled and pigment formed within them. Later he observed male gametes form by exflagellation and described the male and female gam- etes, the

  19. Immunoscreening of Plasmodium falciparum proteins expressed in a wheat germ cell-free system reveals a novel malaria vaccine candidate

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Masayuki; Takashima, Eizo; Ito, Daisuke; Miura, Kazutoyo; Thongkukiatkul, Amporn; Diouf, Ababacar; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Diakite, Mahamadou; Long, Carole A.; Torii, Motomi; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2017-01-01

    The number of malaria vaccine candidates in preclinical and clinical development is limited. To identify novel blood-stage malaria vaccine candidates, we constructed a library of 1,827P. falciparum proteins prepared using the wheat germ cell-free system (WGCFS). Also, a high-throughput AlphaScreen procedure was developed to measure antibody reactivity to the recombinant products. Purified IgGs from residents in malaria endemic areas have shown functional activity against blood-stage parasites as judged by an in vitro parasite Growth Inhibition Assay (GIA). Therefore, we evaluated the GIA activity of 51 plasma samples prepared from Malian adults living in a malaria endemic area against the WGCFS library. Using the AlphaScreen-based immunoreactivity measurements, antibody reactivity against 3 proteins was positively associated with GIA activity. Since anti-LSA3-C responses showed the strongest correlation with GIA activity, this protein was investigated further. Anti-LSA3-C-specific antibody purified from Malian adult plasmas showed GIA activity, and expression of LSA3 in blood-stage parasites was confirmed by western blotting. Taken together, we identified LSA3 as a novel blood-stage vaccine candidate, and we propose that this system will be useful for future vaccine candidate discovery. PMID:28378857

  20. Antigen-Displaying Lipid-Enveloped PLGA Nanoparticles as Delivery Agents for a Plasmodium vivax Malaria Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Moon, James J.; Suh, Heikyung; Polhemus, Mark E.; Ockenhouse, Christian F.; Yadava, Anjali; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2012-01-01

    The parasite Plasmodium vivax is the most frequent cause of malaria outside of sub-Saharan Africa, but efforts to develop viable vaccines against P. vivax so far have been inadequate. We recently developed pathogen-mimicking polymeric vaccine nanoparticles composed of the FDA-approved biodegradable polymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA) “enveloped” by a lipid membrane. In this study, we sought to determine whether this vaccine delivery platform could be applied to enhance the immune response against P. vivax sporozoites. A candidate malaria antigen, VMP001, was conjugated to the lipid membrane of the particles, and an immunostimulatory molecule, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), was incorporated into the lipid membranes, creating pathogen-mimicking nanoparticle vaccines (VMP001-NPs). Vaccination with VMP001-NPs promoted germinal center formation and elicited durable antigen-specific antibodies with significantly higher titers and more balanced Th1/Th2 responses in vivo, compared with vaccines composed of soluble protein mixed with MPLA. Antibodies raised by NP vaccinations also exhibited enhanced avidity and affinity toward the domains within the circumsporozoite protein implicated in protection and were able to agglutinate live P. vivax sporozoites. These results demonstrate that these VMP001-NPs are promising vaccines candidates that may elicit protective immunity against P. vivax sporozoites. PMID:22328935

  1. Antibody and T-cell responses associated with experimental human malaria infection or vaccination show limited relationships.

    PubMed

    Walker, Karen M; Okitsu, Shinji; Porter, David W; Duncan, Christopher; Amacker, Mario; Pluschke, Gerd; Cavanagh, David R; Hill, Adrian V S; Todryk, Stephen M

    2015-05-01

    This study examined specific antibody and T-cell responses associated with experimental malaria infection or malaria vaccination, in malaria-naive human volunteers within phase I/IIa vaccine trials, with a view to investigating inter-relationships between these types of response. Malaria infection was via five bites of Plasmodium falciparum-infected mosquitoes, with individuals reaching patent infection by 11-12 days, having harboured four or five blood-stage cycles before drug clearance. Infection elicited a robust antibody response against merozoite surface protein-119 , correlating with parasite load. Classical class switching was seen from an early IgM to an IgG1-dominant response of increasing affinity. Malaria-specific T-cell responses were detected in the form of interferon-γ and interleukin-4 (IL-4) ELIspot, but their magnitude did not correlate with the magnitude of antibody or its avidity, or with parasite load. Different individuals who were immunized with a virosome vaccine comprising influenza antigens combined with P. falciparum antigens, demonstrated pre-existing interferon-γ, IL-2 and IL-5 ELIspot responses against the influenza antigens, and showed boosting of anti-influenza T-cell responses only for IL-5. The large IgG1-dominated anti-parasite responses showed limited correlation with T-cell responses for magnitude or avidity, both parameters being only negatively correlated for IL-5 secretion versus anti-apical membrane antigen-1 antibody titres. Overall, these findings suggest that cognate T-cell responses across a range of magnitudes contribute towards driving potentially effective antibody responses in infection-induced and vaccine-induced immunity against malaria, and their existence during immunization is beneficial, but magnitudes are mostly not inter-related.

  2. TLR9 adjuvants enhance immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the SE36/AHG malaria vaccine in nonhuman primate models

    PubMed Central

    Tougan, Takahiro; Aoshi, Taiki; Coban, Cevayir; Katakai, Yuko; Kai, Chieko; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Ishii, Ken J.; Horii, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    The SE36 antigen, derived from serine repeat antigen 5 (SERA5) of Plasmodium falciparum, is a promising blood stage malaria vaccine candidate. Ongoing clinical trials suggest the efficacy of the SE36 vaccine could be increased by the incorporation of more effective adjuvants into the vaccine formulation. In this study, we assessed the safety, immunogenicity and protective efficacy of SE36/AHG formulated with TLR9 ligand adjuvants K3 CpG oligodeoxyribonucleotides (CpG ODNs) (K3 ODN), D3 ODN or synthetic hemozoin, in two non-human primate models. SE36/AHG with or without each adjuvant was administrated to cynomolgus monkeys. A combination of TLR9 ligand adjuvant with SE36/AHG induced higher humoral and cellular immune response compared with SE36/AHG alone. Administration of a crude extract of P. falciparum parasite resulted in the induction of more SE36-specific IgG antibodies in monkeys vaccinated with a combination of SE36/AHG and adjuvant, as opposed to vaccination with SE36/AHG alone. The most effective TLR9 ligand, K3 ODN, was chosen for further vaccine trials in squirrel monkeys, in combination with SE36/AHG. All monkeys immunized with the combined SE36/AHG and K3 ODN formulation effectively suppressed parasitemia and symptoms of malaria following challenge infections. Furthermore, no serious adverse events were observed. Our results show that the novel vaccine formulation of K3 ODN with SE36/AHG demonstrates safety, potent immunogenicity and efficacy in nonhuman primates, and this vaccine formulation may form the basis of a more effective malaria vaccine. PMID:23291928

  3. Efficacy of Phase 3 Trial of RTS, S/AS01 Malaria Vaccine in infants: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Shima; Keshavarz, Hossein

    2017-01-06

    Although vaccines would be the ideal tool for control, prevention, elimination, and eradication of many infectious diseases, developing of parasites vaccines such as malaria vaccine is very complex. The most advanced malaria vaccine candidate is RTS,S, a pre-erythrocytic vaccine for which pivotal phase III trial design is underway. Few recent malaria vaccine review articles have attempted to outline of all clinical trials that have occurred globally and no meta-analysis was performed on efficacy of Phase 3 Trial of RTS, S/AS01 Malaria vaccine up to now in infants. Therefore, a systematic review and meta-analysis was carried out to review new and existing data on efficacy of Phase 3 Trial of RTS, S/AS01 Malaria Vaccine in infants. The electronic databases searched were Pubmed (1965-present) and Web of Science (1970-present) (Search date: May, 2016). After full-text review of the papers evaluating clinical/severe malaria in several well-designed phase III field efficacy trials, 5 were determined to meet the eligibility criteria for inclusion in the systematic review. Four out of the 5 publications dealing with efficacy of Phase 3 Trial of RTS, S/AS01 malaria vaccine were included in the qualitative analysis. Pooled estimate of vaccine efficacy in clinical and severe malaria in children aged 5-17 mo was 29% (95% CL: 19%-46%) and 39% (95% CI 20%-74%), while this estimate vaccine in clinical and severe malaria in children aged 6-12 mo was 19% (95% CI 14%-24%) and 21 (95% CI 19%-37%), respectively. On the other hand, higher VE was seen in both per- protocol and intention-to-treat population in children aged 5-17 than the children aged 6-12 mo. The results of this meta-analysis suggest that this candidate malaria vaccine has relatively little efficacy, and the vaccine apparently will not meet the goal of malaria eradication by itself.

  4. Malaria.

    PubMed

    Heck, J E

    1991-03-01

    Human malaria is caused by four species of the genus plasmodium. The sexual stage of the parasite occurs in the mosquito and asexual reproduction occurs in man. Symptoms of fever, chills, headache, and myalgia result from the invasion and rupture of erythrocytes. Merozoites are released from erythrocytes and invade other cells, thus propagating the infection. The most vulnerable hosts are nonimmune travelers, young children living in the tropics, and pregnant women. P. falciparum causes the most severe infections because it infects RBCs of all ages and has the propensity to develop resistance to antimalarials. Rapid diagnosis can be made with a malarial smear, and treatment should be initiated promptly. In some regions (Mexico, Central America except Panama, and North Africa) chloroquine phosphate is effective therapy. In subsaharan Africa, South America, and Southeast Asia, chloroquine resistance has become widespread, and other antimalarials are necessary. The primary care physician should have a high index of suspicion for malaria in the traveler returning from the tropics. Malaria should also be suspected in the febrile transfusion recipient and newborns of mothers with malaria.

  5. Study of the safety and immunogenicity of the synthetic malaria SPf66 vaccine in children aged 1-14 years.

    PubMed

    Patarroyo, G; Franco, L; Amador, R; Murillo, L A; Rocha, C L; Rojas, M; Patarroyo, M E

    1992-01-01

    Safety and immunogenicity tests of the SPf66 malaria vaccine have been carried out on a population of children, aged 1 to 14 years, in the town of Tumaco, Colombia. Adverse reactions measured after each vaccination were local and minimal, and observed in only a small percentage of the vaccinated children. One year later, no delayed reaction was evident. The majority of the child population developed high antibody titres against SPf66 and the degree of response did not vary with age. These induced antibodies recognize the native parasite proteins, in particular the molecules from which the amino acid sequence of this vaccine was deduced. These studies demonstrate that the SPf66 vaccine is safe and highly immunogenic for use in children greater than 1 year old.

  6. Efficacy and Safety of the RTS,S/AS01 Malaria Vaccine during 18 Months after Vaccination: A Phase 3 Randomized, Controlled Trial in Children and Young Infants at 11 African Sites

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A malaria vaccine could be an important addition to current control strategies. We report the safety and vaccine efficacy (VE) of the RTS,S/AS01 vaccine during 18 mo following vaccination at 11 African sites with varying malaria transmission. Methods and Findings 6,537 infants aged 6–12 wk and 8,923 children aged 5–17 mo were randomized to receive three doses of RTS,S/AS01 or comparator vaccine. VE against clinical malaria in children during the 18 mo after vaccine dose 3 (per protocol) was 46% (95% CI 42% to 50%) (range 40% to 77%; VE, p<0.01 across all sites). VE during the 20 mo after vaccine dose 1 (intention to treat [ITT]) was 45% (95% CI 41% to 49%). VE against severe malaria, malaria hospitalization, and all-cause hospitalization was 34% (95% CI 15% to 48%), 41% (95% CI 30% to 50%), and 19% (95% CI 11% to 27%), respectively (ITT). VE against clinical malaria in infants was 27% (95% CI 20% to 32%, per protocol; 27% [95% CI 21% to 33%], ITT), with no significant protection against severe malaria, malaria hospitalization, or all-cause hospitalization. Post-vaccination anti-circumsporozoite antibody geometric mean titer varied from 348 to 787 EU/ml across sites in children and from 117 to 335 EU/ml in infants (per protocol). VE waned over time in both age categories (Schoenfeld residuals p<0.001). The number of clinical and severe malaria cases averted per 1,000 children vaccinated ranged across sites from 37 to 2,365 and from −1 to 49, respectively; corresponding ranges among infants were −10 to 1,402 and −13 to 37, respectively (ITT). Meningitis was reported as a serious adverse event in 16/5,949 and 1/2,974 children and in 9/4,358 and 3/2,179 infants in the RTS,S/AS01 and control groups, respectively. Conclusions RTS,S/AS01 prevented many cases of clinical and severe malaria over the 18 mo after vaccine dose 3, with the highest impact in areas with the greatest malaria incidence. VE was higher in children than in infants, but even at

  7. Transient Loss of Protection Afforded by a Live Attenuated Non-typhoidal Salmonella Vaccine in Mice Co-infected with Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Lokken, Kristen L.; Nanton, Minelva R.; Nuccio, Sean-Paul; McSorley, Stephen J.; Tsolis, Renée M.

    2015-01-01

    In immunocompetent individuals, non-typhoidal Salmonella serovars (NTS) are associated with gastroenteritis, however, there is currently an epidemic of NTS bloodstream infections in sub-Saharan Africa. Plasmodium falciparum malaria is an important risk factor for invasive NTS bloodstream in African children. Here we investigated whether a live, attenuated Salmonella vaccine could be protective in mice, in the setting of concurrent malaria. Surprisingly, mice acutely infected with the nonlethal malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL exhibited a profound loss of protective immunity to NTS, but vaccine-mediated protection was restored after resolution of malaria. Absence of protective immunity during acute malaria correlated with maintenance of antibodies to NTS, but a marked reduction in effector capability of Salmonella-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Further, increased expression of the inhibitory molecule PD1 was identified on memory CD4 T cells induced by vaccination. Blockade of IL-10 restored protection against S. Typhimurium, without restoring CD4 T cell effector function. Simultaneous blockade of CTLA-4, LAG3, and PDL1 restored IFN-γ production by vaccine-induced memory CD4 T cells but was not sufficient to restore protection. Together, these data demonstrate that malaria parasite infection induces a temporary loss of an established adaptive immune response via multiple mechanisms, and suggest that in the setting of acute malaria, protection against NTS mediated by live vaccines may be interrupted. PMID:26366739

  8. Transient Loss of Protection Afforded by a Live Attenuated Non-typhoidal Salmonella Vaccine in Mice Co-infected with Malaria.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Jason P; Lee, Seung-Joo; Lokken, Kristen L; Nanton, Minelva R; Nuccio, Sean-Paul; McSorley, Stephen J; Tsolis, Renée M

    2015-01-01

    In immunocompetent individuals, non-typhoidal Salmonella serovars (NTS) are associated with gastroenteritis, however, there is currently an epidemic of NTS bloodstream infections in sub-Saharan Africa. Plasmodium falciparum malaria is an important risk factor for invasive NTS bloodstream in African children. Here we investigated whether a live, attenuated Salmonella vaccine could be protective in mice, in the setting of concurrent malaria. Surprisingly, mice acutely infected with the nonlethal malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL exhibited a profound loss of protective immunity to NTS, but vaccine-mediated protection was restored after resolution of malaria. Absence of protective immunity during acute malaria correlated with maintenance of antibodies to NTS, but a marked reduction in effector capability of Salmonella-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Further, increased expression of the inhibitory molecule PD1 was identified on memory CD4 T cells induced by vaccination. Blockade of IL-10 restored protection against S. Typhimurium, without restoring CD4 T cell effector function. Simultaneous blockade of CTLA-4, LAG3, and PDL1 restored IFN-γ production by vaccine-induced memory CD4 T cells but was not sufficient to restore protection. Together, these data demonstrate that malaria parasite infection induces a temporary loss of an established adaptive immune response via multiple mechanisms, and suggest that in the setting of acute malaria, protection against NTS mediated by live vaccines may be interrupted.

  9. A non-adjuvanted polypeptide nanoparticle vaccine confers long-lasting protection against rodent malaria1

    PubMed Central

    Abanega Kaba, Stephen; Brando, Clara; Guo, Qin; Mittelholzer, Christian; Raman, Senthilkumar; Tropel, David; Aebi, Ueli; Burkhard, Peter; Ervin Lanar, David

    2015-01-01

    We have designed and produced a prototypic malaria vaccine based on a highly versatile self-assembling polypeptide nanoparticle (SAPN) platform that can repetitively display antigenic epitopes. We used this platform to display a tandem repeat of the B cell immunodominant repeat epitope (DPPPPNPN)2D of the malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei circumsporozoite protein (CSP). Administered in saline, without the need for a heterologous adjuvant, the SAPN construct P4c-Mal conferred a long lived protective immune response to mice with a broad range of genetically distinct immune backgrounds including the H-2b, H-2d and H-2k alleles. Immunized mice produced a CD4+ T cell dependent, high titer, long lasting, high avidity antibody response against the B cell epitope. Mice were protected against an initial challenge of parasites given up to 6 months after the last immunization or for up to 15 months against a second challenge after an initial challenge of parasites had successfully been cleared. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the SAPN platform not only functions to deliver an ordered repetitive array of B cell peptide epitopes but operates as a classical immunological carrier to provide cognate help to the P4c-Mal specific B cells. PMID:19915055

  10. Contrasting Population Structures of the Genes Encoding Ten Leading Vaccine-Candidate Antigens of the Human Malaria Parasite, Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Alyssa E.; Schultz, Lee; Buckee, Caroline O.; Reeder, John C.

    2009-01-01

    The extensive diversity of Plasmodium falciparum antigens is a major obstacle to a broadly effective malaria vaccine but population genetics has rarely been used to guide vaccine design. We have completed a meta-population genetic analysis of the genes encoding ten leading P. falciparum vaccine antigens, including the pre-erythrocytic antigens csp, trap, lsa1 and glurp; the merozoite antigens eba175, ama1, msp's 1, 3 and 4, and the gametocyte antigen pfs48/45. A total of 4553 antigen sequences were assembled from published data and we estimated the range and distribution of diversity worldwide using traditional population genetics, Bayesian clustering and network analysis. Although a large number of distinct haplotypes were identified for each antigen, they were organized into a limited number of discrete subgroups. While the non-merozoite antigens showed geographically variable levels of diversity and geographic restriction of specific subgroups, the merozoite antigens had high levels of diversity globally, and a worldwide distribution of each subgroup. This shows that the diversity of the non-merozoite antigens is organized by physical or other location-specific barriers to gene flow and that of merozoite antigens by features intrinsic to all populations, one important possibility being the immune response of the human host. We also show that current malaria vaccine formulations are based upon low prevalence haplotypes from a single subgroup and thus may represent only a small proportion of the global parasite population. This study demonstrates significant contrasts in the population structure of P. falciparum vaccine candidates that are consistent with the merozoite antigens being under stronger balancing selection than non-merozoite antigens and suggesting that unique approaches to vaccine design will be required. The results of this study also provide a realistic framework for the diversity of these antigens to be incorporated into the design of next

  11. Grammomys surdaster, the Natural Host for Plasmodium berghei Parasites, as a Model to Study Whole-Organism Vaccines against Malaria.

    PubMed

    Conteh, Solomon; Anderson, Charles; Lambert, Lynn; Orr-Gonzalez, Sachy; Herrod, Jessica; Robbins, Yvette L; Carter, Dariyen; Bin Shamamba Karhemere, Stomy; Pyana, Pati; Büscher, Philippe; Duffy, Patrick E

    2017-01-23

    Inbred mice are commonly used to test candidate malaria vaccines, but have been unreliable for predicting efficacy in humans. To establish a more rigorous animal model, we acquired African woodland thicket rats of the genus Grammomys, the natural hosts for Plasmodium berghei Thicket rats were acquired and identified as Grammomys surdaster by skull and teeth measurements and mitochondrial DNA genotyping. Herein, we demonstrate that thicket rats are highly susceptible to infection by P berghei, and moderately susceptible to Plasmodium yoelii and Plasmodium chabaudi: 1-2 infected mosquito bites or 25-100 sporozoites administered by intravenous injection consistently resulted in patent parasitemia with P. berghei, and resulted in patent parasitemia with P. yoelii and P. chabaudi strains for at least 50% of animals. We then assessed efficacy of whole-organism vaccines to induce sterile immunity, and compared the thicket rat model to conventional mouse models. Using P. berghei ANKA radiation-attenuated sporozoites, and P. berghei ANKA and P. yoelii chemoprophylaxis vaccination approaches, we found that standard doses of vaccine sufficient to protect laboratory mice for long duration against malaria challenge, are insufficient to protect thicket rats, which require higher doses of vaccine to achieve even short-term sterile immunity. Thicket rats may offer a more stringent and pertinent model for evaluating whole-organism vaccines.

  12. A chimeric protein-based malaria vaccine candidate induces robust T cell responses against Plasmodium vivax MSP119

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Jairo Andres; Cabrera-Mora, Monica; Singh, Balwan; Oliveira-Ferreira, Joseli; da Costa Lima-Junior, Josué; Calvo-Calle, J. Mauricio; Lozano, Jose Manuel; Moreno, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The most widespread Plasmodium species, Plasmodium vivax, poses a significant public health threat. An effective vaccine is needed to reduce global malaria burden. Of the erythrocytic stage vaccine candidates, the 19 kDa fragment of the P. vivax Merozoite Surface Protein 1 (PvMSP119) is one of the most promising. Our group has previously defined several promiscuous T helper epitopes within the PvMSP1 protein, with features that allow them to bind multiple MHC class II alleles. We describe here a P. vivax recombinant modular chimera based on MSP1 (PvRMC-MSP1) that includes defined T cell epitopes genetically fused to PvMSP119. This vaccine candidate preserved structural elements of the native PvMSP119 and elicited cytophilic antibody responses, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells capable of recognizing PvMSP119. Although CD8+ T cells that recognize blood stage antigens have been reported to control blood infection, CD8+ T cell responses induced by P. falciparum or P. vivax vaccine candidates based on MSP119 have not been reported. To our knowledge, this is the first time a protein based subunit vaccine has been able to induce CD8+ T cell against PvMSP119. The PvRMC-MSP1 protein was also recognized by naturally acquired antibodies from individuals living in malaria endemic areas with an antibody profile associated with protection from infection. These features make PvRMC-MSP1 a promising vaccine candidate. PMID:27708348

  13. Assessment of the Plasmodium falciparum Preerythrocytic Antigen UIS3 as a Potential Candidate for a Malaria Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Halbroth, Benedict R.; Salman, Ahmed M.; Ewer, Katie J.; Hodgson, Susanne H.; Janse, Chris J.; Khan, Shahid M.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Spencer, Alexandra J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Efforts are under way to improve the efficacy of subunit malaria vaccines through assessments of new adjuvants, vaccination platforms, and antigens. In this study, we further assessed the Plasmodium falciparum antigen upregulated in infective sporozoites 3 (PfUIS3) as a vaccine candidate. PfUIS3 was expressed in the viral vectors chimpanzee adenovirus 63 (ChAd63) and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) and used to immunize mice in a prime-boost regimen. We previously demonstrated that this regimen could provide partial protection against challenge with chimeric P. berghei parasites expressing PfUIS3. We now show that ChAd63-MVA PfUIS3 can also provide partial cross-species protection against challenge with wild-type P. berghei parasites. We also show that PfUIS3-specific cellular memory responses could be recalled in human volunteers exposed to P. falciparum parasites in a controlled human malaria infection study. When ChAd63-MVA PfUIS3 was coadministered with the vaccine candidate P. falciparum thrombospondin-related adhesion protein (PfTRAP) expressed in the ChAd63-MVA system, there was no significant change in immunogenicity to either vaccine. However, when mice were challenged with double chimeric P. berghei-P. falciparum parasites expressing both PfUIS3 and PfTRAP, vaccine efficacy was improved to 100% sterile protection. This synergistic effect was evident only when the two vaccines were mixed and administered at the same site. We have therefore demonstrated that vaccination with PfUIS3 can induce a consistent delay in patent parasitemia across mouse strains and against chimeric parasites expressing PfUIS3 as well as wild-type P. berghei; when this vaccine is combined with another partially protective regimen (ChAd63-MVA PfTRAP), complete protection is induced. PMID:28031267

  14. ChAd63-MVA–vectored Blood-stage Malaria Vaccines Targeting MSP1 and AMA1: Assessment of Efficacy Against Mosquito Bite Challenge in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Susanne H; Duncan, Christopher JA; Elias, Sean C; Choudhary, Prateek; Biswas, Sumi; Halstead, Fenella D; Collins, Katharine A; Edwards, Nick J; Douglas, Alexander D; Anagnostou, Nicholas A; Ewer, Katie J; Havelock, Tom; Mahungu, Tabitha; Bliss, Carly M; Miura, Kazutoyo; Poulton, Ian D; Lillie, Patrick J; Antrobus, Richard D; Berrie, Eleanor; Moyle, Sarah; Gantlett, Katherine; Colloca, Stefano; Cortese, Riccardo; Long, Carole A; Sinden, Robert E; Gilbert, Sarah C; Lawrie, Alison M; Doherty, Tom; Faust, Saul N; Nicosia, Alfredo; Hill, Adrian VS; Draper, Simon J

    2012-01-01

    The induction of cellular immunity, in conjunction with antibodies, may be essential for vaccines to protect against blood-stage infection with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We have shown that prime-boost delivery of P. falciparum blood-stage antigens by chimpanzee adenovirus 63 (ChAd63) followed by the attenuated orthopoxvirus MVA is safe and immunogenic in healthy adults. Here, we report on vaccine efficacy against controlled human malaria infection delivered by mosquito bites. The blood-stage malaria vaccines were administered alone, or together (MSP1+AMA1), or with a pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccine candidate (MSP1+ME-TRAP). In this first human use of coadministered ChAd63-MVA regimes, we demonstrate immune interference whereby responses against merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) are dominant over apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and ME-TRAP. We also show that induction of strong cellular immunity against MSP1 and AMA1 is safe, but does not impact on parasite growth rates in the blood. In a subset of vaccinated volunteers, a delay in time to diagnosis was observed and sterilizing protection was observed in one volunteer coimmunized with MSP1+AMA1—results consistent with vaccine-induced pre-erythrocytic, rather than blood-stage, immunity. These data call into question the utility of T cell-inducing blood-stage malaria vaccines and suggest that the focus should remain on high-titer antibody induction against susceptible antigen targets. PMID:23089736

  15. Imaging murine NALT following intranasal immunization with flagellin-modified circumsporozoite protein malaria vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Nacer, Adéla; Carapau, Daniel; Mitchell, Robert; Meltzer, Abby; Shaw, Alan; Frevert, Ute; Nardin, Elizabeth H

    2013-01-01

    Intranasal (IN) immunization with a Plasmodium circumsporozoite (CS) protein conjugated to flagellin, a TLR5 agonist, was found to elicit antibody mediated protective immunity in our previous murine studies. To better understand IN elicited immune responses, we examined the nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) in immunized mice and the interaction of flagellin-modified CS with murine dendritic cells (DC) in vitro. NALT of immunized mice contained a predominance of germinal center (GC) B cells and increased numbers of CD11c+ DC localized beneath the epithelium and within the GC T cell area. We detected microfold (M) cells distributed throughout the NALT epithelial cell layer and DC dendrites extending into the nasal cavity which could potentially function in luminal CS antigen uptake. Flagellin-modified CS taken up by DC in vitro was initially localized within intracellular vesicles followed by a cytosolic distribution. Vaccine modifications to enhance delivery to the NALT and specifically target NALT APC populations will advance development of an efficacious needle-free vaccine for the 40% of the world's population at risk of malaria. PMID:23820750

  16. A Novel Virus-Like Particle Based Vaccine Platform Displaying the Placental Malaria Antigen VAR2CSA

    PubMed Central

    Thrane, Susan; Janitzek, Christoph M.; Agerbæk, Mette Ø.; Ditlev, Sisse B.; Resende, Mafalda; Nielsen, Morten A.; Theander, Thor G.; Salanti, Ali; Sander, Adam F.

    2015-01-01

    Placental malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum is a major cause of mortality and severe morbidity. Clinical testing of a soluble protein-based vaccine containing the parasite ligand, VAR2CSA, has been initiated. VAR2CSA binds to the human receptor chondroitin sulphate A (CSA) and is responsible for sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes in the placenta. It is imperative that a vaccine against malaria in pregnancy, if administered to women before they become pregnant, can induce a strong and long lasting immune response. While most soluble protein-based vaccines have failed during clinical testing, virus-like particle (VLP) based vaccines (e.g., the licensed human papillomavirus vaccines) have demonstrated high efficacy, suggesting that the spatial assembly of the vaccine antigen is a critical parameter for inducing an optimal long-lasting protective immune response. We have developed a VLP vaccine display platform by identifying regions of the HPV16 L1 coat protein where a biotin acceptor site (AviTagTM) can be inserted without compromising VLP-assembly. Subsequent biotinylation of Avi-L1 VLPs allow us to anchor monovalent streptavidin (mSA)-fused proteins to the biotin, thereby obtaining a dense and repetitive VLP-display of the vaccine antigen. The mSA-VAR2CSA antigen was delivered on the Avi-L1 VLP platform and tested in C57BL/6 mice in comparison to two soluble protein-based vaccines consisting of naked VAR2CSA and mSA-VAR2CSA. The mSA-VAR2CSA Avi-L1 VLP and soluble mSA-VAR2CSA vaccines induced higher antibody titers than the soluble naked VAR2CSA vaccine after three immunizations. The VAR2CSA Avi-L1 VLP vaccine induced statistically significantly higher endpoint titres compared to the soluble mSA-VAR2CSA vaccine, after 1st and 2nd immunization; however, this difference was not statistically significant after 3rd immunization. Importantly, the VLP-VAR2CSA induced antibodies were functional in inhibiting the binding of parasites to CSA

  17. A Novel Virus-Like Particle Based Vaccine Platform Displaying the Placental Malaria Antigen VAR2CSA.

    PubMed

    Thrane, Susan; Janitzek, Christoph M; Agerbæk, Mette Ø; Ditlev, Sisse B; Resende, Mafalda; Nielsen, Morten A; Theander, Thor G; Salanti, Ali; Sander, Adam F

    2015-01-01

    Placental malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum is a major cause of mortality and severe morbidity. Clinical testing of a soluble protein-based vaccine containing the parasite ligand, VAR2CSA, has been initiated. VAR2CSA binds to the human receptor chondroitin sulphate A (CSA) and is responsible for sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes in the placenta. It is imperative that a vaccine against malaria in pregnancy, if administered to women before they become pregnant, can induce a strong and long lasting immune response. While most soluble protein-based vaccines have failed during clinical testing, virus-like particle (VLP) based vaccines (e.g., the licensed human papillomavirus vaccines) have demonstrated high efficacy, suggesting that the spatial assembly of the vaccine antigen is a critical parameter for inducing an optimal long-lasting protective immune response. We have developed a VLP vaccine display platform by identifying regions of the HPV16 L1 coat protein where a biotin acceptor site (AviTagTM) can be inserted without compromising VLP-assembly. Subsequent biotinylation of Avi-L1 VLPs allow us to anchor monovalent streptavidin (mSA)-fused proteins to the biotin, thereby obtaining a dense and repetitive VLP-display of the vaccine antigen. The mSA-VAR2CSA antigen was delivered on the Avi-L1 VLP platform and tested in C57BL/6 mice in comparison to two soluble protein-based vaccines consisting of naked VAR2CSA and mSA-VAR2CSA. The mSA-VAR2CSA Avi-L1 VLP and soluble mSA-VAR2CSA vaccines induced higher antibody titers than the soluble naked VAR2CSA vaccine after three immunizations. The VAR2CSA Avi-L1 VLP vaccine induced statistically significantly higher endpoint titres compared to the soluble mSA-VAR2CSA vaccine, after 1st and 2nd immunization; however, this difference was not statistically significant after 3rd immunization. Importantly, the VLP-VAR2CSA induced antibodies were functional in inhibiting the binding of parasites to CSA

  18. Cloning, expression and transmission-blocking activity of anti-PvWARP, malaria vaccine candidate, in Anopheles stephensi mysorensis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Notwithstanding progress in recent years, a safe, an effective and affordable malaria vaccine is not available yet. Ookinete-secreted protein, Plasmodium vivax von Willebrand factor A domain-related protein (PvWARP), is a candidate for malaria transmission-blocking vaccines (TBVs). Methods The PvWARP was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 using the pET-23a vector and was purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography from a soluble fraction. Polyclonal antibody was raised against rPvWARP and transmission blocking activity was carried out in an Anopheles stephensi-P. vivax model. Results Expression of full length of PvWARP (minus signal peptide) expression showed a 35-kDa protein. The purified protein was recognized by mouse polyclonal antibody directed against rPvWARP. Sera from the animals displayed significantly a blocking activity in the membrane feeding assay of An. stephensi mysorensis. Conclusions This is the first report on P. vivax WARP expression in E. coli that provides an essential base for development of the malaria TBV against P. vivax. This may greatly assist in malaria elimination, especially in the oriental corner of WHO Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office (WHO/EMRO) including Afghanistan, Iran and Pakistan. PMID:20537198

  19. The application of anti-Toso antibody enhances CD8(+) T cell responses in experimental malaria vaccination and disease.

    PubMed

    Lapke, Nina; Tartz, Susanne; Lee, Kyeong-Hee; Jacobs, Thomas

    2015-11-27

    Toso is a molecule highly expressed on B cells. It influences their survival and was identified as an IgM binding molecule. B cells and natural antibodies play a role in vaccination-induced CD8(+) T cell responses. We investigated the impact of an anti-Toso antibody on vaccination efficiency in a malaria vaccination model. In this model, CD8(+) T cells exert antiparasitic functions on infected hepatocytes in the liver stage of the disease. In vaccinated anti-Toso treated mice, more antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells were induced than in control mice and after infection with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) sporozoites, the liver parasite burden was lower. In B cell deficient mice, the anti-Toso antibody did not stimulate the CD8(+) T cell response, indicating that B cells were mediating this effect. Furthermore, we analyzed the influence of anti-Toso treatment on non-vaccinated mice in the PbA infection model, in which CD8(+) T cells cause brain pathology. Anti-Toso treatment increased cerebral pathology and the accumulation of CD8(+) T cells in the brain. Thus, anti-Toso treatment enhanced the CD8(+) T cell response against PbA in a vaccination and in an infection model. Our findings indicate that Toso may be a novel target to boost vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cell responses.

  20. Antigenicity, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of Plasmodium vivax MSP1 PV200l: a potential malaria vaccine subunit.

    PubMed

    Valderrama-Aguirre, Augusto; Quintero, Gustavo; Gómez, Andrés; Castellanos, Alejandro; Pérez, Yobana; Méndez, Fabián; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Herrera, Sócrates

    2005-11-01

    The merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1) is expressed in all Plasmodium species and is considered a major malaria vaccine candidate. We found that MSP-1 from Plasmodium vivax (PvMSP-1) contains a region of significant sequence homology with the 190L subunit vaccine derived from the P. falciparum MSP-1. The fragment, termed Pv200L, was expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli (rPv200L) and used to asses its immunologic relevance as a vaccine target. A cross-sectional, seroepidemiologic study conducted in Buenaventura, Colombia showed that 52.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 39.8-64.3) of individuals previously exposed to P. vivax and 72.8% (95% CI = 61.8-82.1) of P. vivax-infected patients had IgG antibodies to rPv200L. Immunization of BALB/c mice and Aotus monkeys induced IgG antibodies (titer > 10(6)) that cross-reacted with P. vivax parasites. Immunized monkeys displayed partial protection against a challenge with P. vivax blood stages. Our results suggest that Pv200L is a new malaria vaccine subunit and deserves further testing.

  1. Passive immunoprotection of Plasmodium falciparum-infected mice designates the CyRPA as candidate malaria vaccine antigen.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, Anita M; Matile, Hugues; Papastogiannidis, Petros; Kamber, Jolanda; Favuzza, Paola; Voss, Till S; Wittlin, Sergio; Pluschke, Gerd

    2012-06-15

    An effective malaria vaccine could prove to be the most cost-effective and efficacious means of preventing severe disease and death from malaria. In an endeavor to identify novel vaccine targets, we tested predicted Plasmodium falciparum open reading frames for proteins that elicit parasite-inhibitory Abs. This has led to the identification of the cysteine-rich protective Ag (CyRPA). CyRPA is a cysteine-rich protein harboring a predicted signal sequence. The stage-specific expression of CyRPA in late schizonts resembles that of proteins known to be involved in merozoite invasion. Immunofluorescence staining localized CyRPA at the apex of merozoites. The entire protein is conserved as shown by sequencing of the CyRPA encoding gene from a diverse range of P. falciparum isolates. CyRPA-specific mAbs substantially inhibited parasite growth in vitro as well as in a P. falciparum animal model based on NOD-scid IL2Rγ(null) mice engrafted with human erythrocytes. In contrast to other P. falciparum mouse models, this system generated very consistent results and evinced a dose-response relationship and therefore represents an unprecedented in vivo model for quantitative comparison of the functional potencies of malaria-specific Abs. Our data suggest a role for CyRPA in erythrocyte invasion by the merozoite. Inhibition of merozoite invasion by CyRPA-specific mAbs in vitro and in vivo renders this protein a promising malaria asexual blood-stage vaccine candidate Ag.

  2. Feedback of research findings for vaccine trials: experiences from two malaria vaccine trials involving healthy children on the Kenyan Coast.

    PubMed

    Gikonyo, Caroline; Kamuya, Dorcas; Mbete, Bibi; Njuguna, Patricia; Olotu, Ally; Bejon, Philip; Marsh, Vicki; Molyneux, Sassy

    2013-04-01

    Internationally, calls for feedback of findings to be made an 'ethical imperative' or mandatory have been met with both strong support and opposition. Challenges include differences in issues by type of study and context, disentangling between aggregate and individual study results, and inadequate empirical evidence on which to draw. In this paper we present data from observations and interviews with key stakeholders involved in feeding back aggregate study findings for two Phase II malaria vaccine trials among children under the age of 5 years old on the Kenyan Coast. In our setting, feeding back of aggregate findings was an appreciated set of activities. The inclusion of individual results was important from the point of view of both participants and researchers, to reassure participants of trial safety, and to ensure that positive results were not over-interpreted and that individual level issues around blinding and control were clarified. Feedback sessions also offered an opportunity to re-evaluate and re-negotiate trial relationships and benefits, with potentially important implications for perceptions of and involvement in follow-up work for the trials and in future research. We found that feedback of findings is a complex but key step in a continuing set of social interactions between community members and research staff (particularly field staff who work at the interface with communities), and among community members themselves; a step which needs careful planning from the outset. We agree with others that individual and aggregate results need to be considered separately, and that for individual results, both the nature and value of the information, and the context, including social relationships, need to be taken into account.

  3. Optimization of a preparative multimodal ion exchange step for purification of a potential malaria vaccine.

    PubMed

    Paul, Jessica; Jensen, Sonja; Dukart, Arthur; Cornelissen, Gesine

    2014-10-31

    In 2000 the implementation of quality by design (QbD) was introduced by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and described in the ICH Q8, Q9 and Q10 guidelines. Since that time, systematic optimization strategies for purification of biopharmaceuticals have gained a more important role in industrial process development. In this investigation, the optimization strategy was carried out by adopting design of experiments (DoE) in small scale experiments. A combination method comprising a desalting and a multimodal ion exchange step was used for the experimental runs via the chromatographic system ÄKTA™ avant. The multimodal resin Capto™ adhere was investigated as an alternative to conventional ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction resins for the intermediate purification of the potential malaria vaccine D1M1. The ligands, used in multimodal chromatography, interact with the target molecule in different ways. The multimodal functionality includes the binding of proteins in spite of the ionic strength of the loading material. The target protein binds at specific salt conditions and can be eluted by a step gradient decreasing the pH value and reducing the ionic strength. It is possible to achieve a maximized purity and recovery of the product because degradation products and other contaminants do not bind at specific salt concentrations at which the product still binds to the ligands.

  4. Malaria vaccine candidate antigen targeting the pre-erythrocytic stage of Plasmodium falciparum produced at high level in plants.

    PubMed

    Voepel, Nadja; Boes, Alexander; Edgue, Güven; Beiss, Veronique; Kapelski, Stephanie; Reimann, Andreas; Schillberg, Stefan; Pradel, Gabriele; Fendel, Rolf; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Spiegel, Holger; Fischer, Rainer

    2014-11-01

    Plants have emerged as low-cost production platforms suitable for vaccines targeting poverty-related diseases. Besides functional efficacy, the stability, yield, and purification process determine the production costs of a vaccine and thereby the feasibility of plant-based production. We describe high-level plant production and functional characterization of a malaria vaccine candidate targeting the pre-erythrocytic stage of Plasmodium falciparum. CCT, a fusion protein composed of three sporozoite antigens (P. falciparum cell traversal protein for ookinetes and sporozoites [PfCelTOS], P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein [PfCSP], and P. falciparum thrombospondin-related adhesive protein [PfTRAP]), was transiently expressed by agroinfiltration in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, accumulated to levels up to 2 mg/g fresh leaf weight (FLW), was thermostable up to 80°C and could be purified to >95% using a simple two-step procedure. Reactivity of sera from malaria semi-immune donors indicated the immunogenic conformation of the purified fusion protein consisting of PfCelTOS, PfCSP_TSR, PfTRAP_TSR domains (CCT) protein. Total IgG from the CCT-specific mouse immune sera specifically recognized P. falciparum sporozoites in immunofluorescence assays and induced up to 35% inhibition in hepatocyte invasion assays. Featuring domains from three promising sporozoite antigens with different roles (attachment and cell traversal) in the hepatocyte invasion process, CCT has the potential to elicit broader immune responses against the pre-erythrocytic stage of P. falciparum and represents an interesting new candidate, also as a component of multi-stage, multi-subunit malaria vaccine cocktails.

  5. Skin scarification with Plasmodium falciparum peptide vaccine using synthetic TLR agonists as adjuvants elicits malaria sporozoite neutralizing immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Robert A.; Altszuler, Rita; Frevert, Ute; Nardin, Elizabeth H.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria eradication will require a combination of vector control, chemotherapy and an easily administered vaccine. Sterile immunity can be elicited in humans by immunization with sporozoites, the infective stage injected by bite of the mosquito vector, however, whole parasite vaccines present formidable logistical challenges for production, storage and administration. The “gold standard” for infectious disease eradiation, the Smallpox Eradication Programme, utilized mass immunization using the skin scarification (SS) route. SS may more closely mimic the natural route of malaria infection initiated by sporozoites injected by mosquito bite which elicits both neutralizing antibodies and protective cell mediated immunity. We investigated the potential of SS immunization using a malaria repeat peptide containing a protective B cell epitope of Plasmodium falciparum, the most lethal human species, and delivery vehicles containing TLR agonists as adjuvants. In a murine model, SS immunization with peptide in combination with TLR-7/8 and -9 agonists elicited high levels of systemic sporozoite neutralizing antibody, Th1- type CD4+ T cells and resistance to challenge by bites of infected mosquitoes. SS provides the potential to elicit humoral immunity to target Plasmodium at multiple stages of its complex life cycle. PMID:27624667

  6. Enhancing immunogenicity and transmission-blocking activity of malaria vaccines by fusing Pfs25 to IMX313 multimerization technology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanyuan; Leneghan, Darren B.; Miura, Kazutoyo; Nikolaeva, Daria; Brian, Iona J.; Dicks, Matthew D. J.; Fyfe, Alex J.; Zakutansky, Sarah E.; de Cassan, Simone; Long, Carole A.; Draper, Simon J.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Hill, Fergal; Biswas, Sumi

    2016-01-01

    Transmission-blocking vaccines (TBV) target the sexual-stages of the malaria parasite in the mosquito midgut and are widely considered to be an essential tool for malaria elimination. High-titer functional antibodies are required against target antigens to achieve effective transmission-blocking activity. We have fused Pfs25, the leading malaria TBV candidate antigen to IMX313, a molecular adjuvant and expressed it both in ChAd63 and MVA viral vectors and as a secreted protein-nanoparticle. Pfs25-IMX313 expressed from viral vectors or as a protein-nanoparticle is significantly more immunogenic and gives significantly better transmission-reducing activity than monomeric Pfs25. In addition, we demonstrate that the Pfs25-IMX313 protein-nanoparticle leads to a qualitatively improved antibody response in comparison to soluble Pfs25, as well as to significantly higher germinal centre (GC) responses. These results demonstrate that antigen multimerization using IMX313 is a very promising strategy to enhance antibody responses against Pfs25, and that Pfs25-IMX313 is a highly promising TBV candidate vaccine. PMID:26743316

  7. Enhancing immunogenicity and transmission-blocking activity of malaria vaccines by fusing Pfs25 to IMX313 multimerization technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanyuan; Leneghan, Darren B; Miura, Kazutoyo; Nikolaeva, Daria; Brian, Iona J; Dicks, Matthew D J; Fyfe, Alex J; Zakutansky, Sarah E; de Cassan, Simone; Long, Carole A; Draper, Simon J; Hill, Adrian V S; Hill, Fergal; Biswas, Sumi

    2016-01-08

    Transmission-blocking vaccines (TBV) target the sexual-stages of the malaria parasite in the mosquito midgut and are widely considered to be an essential tool for malaria elimination. High-titer functional antibodies are required against target antigens to achieve effective transmission-blocking activity. We have fused Pfs25, the leading malaria TBV candidate antigen to IMX313, a molecular adjuvant and expressed it both in ChAd63 and MVA viral vectors and as a secreted protein-nanoparticle. Pfs25-IMX313 expressed from viral vectors or as a protein-nanoparticle is significantly more immunogenic and gives significantly better transmission-reducing activity than monomeric Pfs25. In addition, we demonstrate that the Pfs25-IMX313 protein-nanoparticle leads to a qualitatively improved antibody response in comparison to soluble Pfs25, as well as to significantly higher germinal centre (GC) responses. These results demonstrate that antigen multimerization using IMX313 is a very promising strategy to enhance antibody responses against Pfs25, and that Pfs25-IMX313 is a highly promising TBV candidate vaccine.

  8. Analysis of the immune response of a new malaria vaccine based on the modification of cryptic epitopes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Wang, Jun; Huang, Yuxiao; Liang, Jiao; Liu, Xuewu; Wu, Dudu; Jiang, He; Zhao, Ya; Li, Yinghui

    2016-05-01

    Malaria is a severe, life-threatening infectious disease that endangers human health. However, there are no vaccines or immune strategy of vaccines succeeding in both erythrocytic and pre-erythrocytic stage. During the liver stage of the Plasmodium life cycle, sporozoites invade the host liver cells. The sporozoites, then, induce a cellular immune response via the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules on their surfaces. The cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) then recognize the corresponding antigen-MHC complex on the surfaces of these infected liver cells and kill them. However, dominant epitopes with high MHC affinity are prone to mutation due to immune selection pressure. CTLs evoked by the original dominant epitopes cannot recognize the mutated epitopes, leading to immune evasion. In this study, we have modified the cryptic epitopes of different antigens in the sporozoite and liver stages of Plasmodium falciparum to increase their immunogenicity without changing T cell antigen receptor (TCR)-peptide binding specificity. In addition, we have also added an important erythrocytic phase protective antigen, named apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1), to this process with the goal of constructing a complex multi-stage, multi-epitope recombinant DNA vaccine against P. falciparum. The vaccine was tested in HHD-2 mice. The method involved multiple stages of the P. falciparum life cycle as well as elucidation both humoral and cellular immunity. The conclusion drawn from the study was that the vaccine might provide an important theoretical and practical basis for generating effective preventative or therapeutic vaccine against P. falciparum.

  9. The TatD-like DNase of Plasmodium is a virulence factor and a potential malaria vaccine candidate

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Zhiguang; Jiang, Ning; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Lu, Huijun; Yin, Jigang; Wahlgren, Mats; Cheng, Xunjia; Cao, Yaming; Chen, Qijun

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), composed primarily of DNA and proteases, are released from activated neutrophils and contribute to the innate immune response by capturing pathogens. Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of severe malaria, thrives in its host by counteracting immune elimination. Here, we report the discovery of a novel virulence factor of P. falciparum, a TatD-like DNase (PfTatD) that is expressed primarily in the asexual blood stage and is likely utilized by the parasite to counteract NETs. PfTatD exhibits typical deoxyribonuclease activity, and its expression is higher in virulent parasites than in avirulent parasites. A P. berghei TatD-knockout parasite displays reduced pathogenicity in mice. Mice immunized with recombinant TatD exhibit increased immunity against lethal challenge. Our results suggest that the TatD-like DNase is an essential factor for the survival of malarial parasites in the host and is a potential malaria vaccine candidate. PMID:27151551

  10. Chloroplast-derived vaccine antigens confer dual immunity against cholera and malaria by oral or injectable delivery

    PubMed Central

    Davoodi-Semiromi, Abdoreza; Schreiber, Melissa; Nallapali, Samson; Verma, Dheeraj; Singh, Nameirakpam D.; Banks, Robert K.; Chakrabarti, Debopam; Daniell, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Summary Cholera and malaria are major diseases causing high mortality. The only licensed cholera vaccine is expensive; immunity is lost in children within 3 years and adults are not fully protected. No vaccine is yet available for malaria. Therefore, in this study, the cholera toxin-B subunit (CTB) of Vibrio cholerae fused to malarial vaccine antigens apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1) and merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP1) was expressed in lettuce and tobacco chloroplasts. Southern blot analysis confirmed homoplasmy and stable integration of transgenes. CTB-AMA1 and CTB-MSP1 fusion proteins accumulated up to 13.17% and 10.11% (total soluble protein, TSP) in tobacco and up to 7.3% and 6.1% (TSP) in lettuce respectively. Nine groups of mice (n = 10/group) were immunized subcutaneously (SQV) or orally (ORV) with purified antigens or transplastomic tobacco leaves. Significant levels of antigen-specific antibody titres of immunized mice completely inhibited proliferation of the malarial parasite and cross-reacted with the native parasite proteins in immunoblots and immunofluorescence studies. Protection against cholera toxin challenge in both ORV (100%) and SQV (89%) mice correlated with CTB-specific titres of intestinal, serum IgA and IgG1 in ORV and only IgG1 in SQV mice, but no other immunoglobulin. Increasing numbers of interleukin-10+ T cell but not Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, suppression of interferon-γ and absence of interleukin-17 were observed in protected mice, suggesting that immunity is conferred via the Tr1/Th2 immune response. Dual immunity against two major infectious diseases provided by chloroplast-derived vaccine antigens for long-term (>300 days, 50% of mouse life span) offers a realistic platform for low cost vaccines and insight into mucosal and systemic immunity. PMID:20051036

  11. Protective vaccination and blood-stage malaria modify DNA methylation of gene promoters in the liver of Balb/c mice.

    PubMed

    Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Dkhil, Mohamed A; Abdel-Baki, Abdel-Azeem S; Ghanjati, Foued; Erichsen, Lars; Santourlidis, Simeon; Wunderlich, Frank; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J

    2017-03-18

    Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation are increasingly recognized to be critical for vaccination efficacy and outcome of different infectious diseases, but corresponding information is scarcely available for host defense against malaria. In the experimental blood-stage malaria Plasmodium chabaudi, we investigate the possible effects of a blood-stage vaccine on DNA methylation of gene promoters in the liver, known as effector against blood-stage malaria, using DNA methylation microarrays. Naturally susceptible Balb/c mice acquire, by protective vaccination, the potency to survive P. chabaudi malaria and, concomitantly, modifications of constitutive DNA methylation of promoters of numerous genes in the liver; specifically, promoters of 256 genes are hyper(=up)- and 345 genes are hypo(=down)-methylated (p < 0.05). Protective vaccination also leads to changes in promoter DNA methylation upon challenge with P. chabaudi at peak parasitemia on day 8 post infection (p.i.), when 571 and 1013 gene promoters are up- and down-methylated, respectively, in relation to constitutive DNA methylation (p < 0.05). Gene set enrichment analyses reveal that both vaccination and P. chabaudi infections mainly modify promoters of those genes which are most statistically enriched with functions relating to regulation of transcription. Genes with down-methylated promoters encompass those encoding CX3CL1, GP130, and GATA2, known to be involved in monocyte recruitment, IL-6 trans-signaling, and onset of erythropoiesis, respectively. Our data suggest that vaccination may epigenetically improve parts of several effector functions of the liver against blood-stage malaria, as, e.g., recruitment of monocyte/macrophage to the liver accelerated liver regeneration and extramedullary hepatic erythropoiesis, thus leading to self-healing of otherwise lethal P. chabaudi blood-stage malaria.

  12. Microneedle Array Design Determines the Induction of Protective Memory CD8+ T Cell Responses Induced by a Recombinant Live Malaria Vaccine in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Carey, John B.; Pearson, Frances E.; Vrdoljak, Anto; McGrath, Marie G.; Crean, Abina M.; Walsh, Patrick T.; Doody, Timothy; O'Mahony, Conor; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Moore, Anne C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Vaccine delivery into the skin has received renewed interest due to ease of access to the immune system and microvasculature, however the stratum corneum (SC), must be breached for successful vaccination. This has been achieved by removing the SC by abrasion or scarification or by delivering the vaccine intradermally (ID) with traditional needle-and-syringes or with long microneedle devices. Microneedle patch-based transdermal vaccine studies have predominantly focused on antibody induction by inactivated or subunit vaccines. Here, our principal aim is to determine if the design of a microneedle patch affects the CD8+ T cell responses to a malaria antigen induced by a live vaccine. Methodology and Findings Recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing a malaria antigen was percutaneously administered to mice using a range of silicon microneedle patches, termed ImmuPatch, that differed in microneedle height, density, patch area and total pore volume. We demonstrate that microneedle arrays that have small total pore volumes induce a significantly greater proportion of central memory T cells that vigorously expand to secondary immunization. Microneedle-mediated vaccine priming induced significantly greater T cell immunity post-boost and equivalent protection against malaria challenge compared to ID vaccination. Notably, unlike ID administration, ImmuPatch-mediated vaccination did not induce inflammatory responses at the site of immunization or in draining lymph nodes. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates that the design of microneedle patches significantly influences the magnitude and memory of vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell responses and can be optimised for the induction of desired immune responses. Furthermore, ImmuPatch-mediated delivery may be of benefit to reducing unwanted vaccine reactogenicity. In addition to the advantages of low cost and lack of pain, the development of optimised microneedle array designs for the induction

  13. A Full-Length Plasmodium falciparum Recombinant Circumsporozoite Protein Expressed by Pseudomonas fluorescens Platform as a Malaria Vaccine Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangming; Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana G. A.; Funakoshi, Ryota; Giardina, Steve; Jin, Hongfan; Retallack, Diane M.; Haverstock, Ryan; Allen, Jeffrey R.; Vedvick, Thomas S.; Fox, Christopher B.; Reed, Steven G.; Ayala, Ramses; Roberts, Brian; Winram, Scott B.; Sacci, John; Tsuji, Moriya; Zavala, Fidel; Gutierrez, Gabriel M.

    2014-01-01

    The circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium falciparum is a major surface protein, which forms a dense coat on the sporozoite's surface. Preclinical research on CSP and clinical evaluation of a CSP fragment-based RTS, S/AS01 vaccine have demonstrated a modest degree of protection against P. falciparum, mediated in part by humoral immunity and in part by cell-mediated immunity. Given the partial protective efficacy of the RTS, S/AS01 vaccine in a recent Phase 3 trial, further improvement of CSP-based vaccines is crucial. In this report, we describe the preclinical development of a full-length, recombinant CSP (rCSP)-based vaccine candidate against P. falciparum malaria suitable for current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) production. Utilizing a novel high-throughput Pseudomonas fluorescens expression platform, we demonstrated greater efficacy of full-length rCSP as compared to N-terminally truncated versions, rapidly down-selected a promising lead vaccine candidate, and developed a high-yield purification process to express immunologically active, intact antigen for clinical trial material production. The rCSP, when formulated with various adjuvants, induced antigen-specific antibody responses as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunofluorescence assay (IFA), as well as CD4+ T-cell responses as determined by ELISpot. The adjuvanted rCSP vaccine conferred protection in mice when challenged with transgenic P. berghei sporozoites containing the P. falciparum repeat region of CSP. Furthermore, heterologous prime/boost regimens with adjuvanted rCSP and an adenovirus type 35-vectored CSP (Ad35CS) showed modest improvements in eliciting CSP-specific T-cell responses and anti-malarial protection, depending on the order of vaccine delivery. Collectively, these data support the importance of further clinical development of adjuvanted rCSP, either as a stand-alone product or as one of the components in a heterologous prime/boost strategy

  14. Fusion of Antigen to a Dendritic Cell Targeting Chemokine Combined with Adjuvant Yields a Malaria DNA Vaccine with Enhanced Protective Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Kun; Zhang, Hong; Zavala, Fidel; Biragyn, Arya; Espinosa, Diego A.; Markham, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Although sterilizing immunity to malaria can be elicited by irradiated sporozoite vaccination, no clinically practical subunit vaccine has been shown to be capable of preventing the approximately 600,000 annual deaths attributed to this infection. DNA vaccines offer several potential advantages for a disease that primarily affects the developing world, but new approaches are needed to improve the immunogenicity of these vaccines. By using a novel, lipid-based adjuvant, Vaxfectin, to attract immune cells to the immunization site, in combination with an antigen-chemokine DNA construct designed to target antigen to immature dendritic cells, we elicited a humoral immune response that provided sterilizing immunity to malaria challenge in a mouse model system. The chemokine, MIP3αCCL20, did not significantly enhance the cellular infiltrate or levels of cytokine or chemokine expression at the immunization site but acted with Vaxfectin to reduce liver stage malaria infection by orders of magnitude compared to vaccine constructs lacking the chemokine component. The levels of protection achieved were equivalent to those observed with irradiated sporozoites, a candidate vaccine undergoing development for further large scale clinical trial. Only vaccination with the combined regimen of adjuvant and chemokine provided 80–100% protection against the development of bloodstream infection. Treating the immunization process as requiring the independent steps of 1) attracting antigen-presenting cells to the site of immunization and 2) specifically directing vaccine antigen to the immature dendritic cells that initiate the adaptive immune response may provide a rational strategy for the development of a clinically applicable malaria DNA vaccine. PMID:24599116

  15. Fusion of antigen to a dendritic cell targeting chemokine combined with adjuvant yields a malaria DNA vaccine with enhanced protective capabilities.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kun; Zhang, Hong; Zavala, Fidel; Biragyn, Arya; Espinosa, Diego A; Markham, Richard B

    2014-01-01

    Although sterilizing immunity to malaria can be elicited by irradiated sporozoite vaccination, no clinically practical subunit vaccine has been shown to be capable of preventing the approximately 600,000 annual deaths attributed to this infection. DNA vaccines offer several potential advantages for a disease that primarily affects the developing world, but new approaches are needed to improve the immunogenicity of these vaccines. By using a novel, lipid-based adjuvant, Vaxfectin, to attract immune cells to the immunization site, in combination with an antigen-chemokine DNA construct designed to target antigen to immature dendritic cells, we elicited a humoral immune response that provided sterilizing immunity to malaria challenge in a mouse model system. The chemokine, MIP3αCCL20, did not significantly enhance the cellular infiltrate or levels of cytokine or chemokine expression at the immunization site but acted with Vaxfectin to reduce liver stage malaria infection by orders of magnitude compared to vaccine constructs lacking the chemokine component. The levels of protection achieved were equivalent to those observed with irradiated sporozoites, a candidate vaccine undergoing development for further large scale clinical trial. Only vaccination with the combined regimen of adjuvant and chemokine provided 80-100% protection against the development of bloodstream infection. Treating the immunization process as requiring the independent steps of 1) attracting antigen-presenting cells to the site of immunization and 2) specifically directing vaccine antigen to the immature dendritic cells that initiate the adaptive immune response may provide a rational strategy for the development of a clinically applicable malaria DNA vaccine.

  16. Evaluation of SPf66 malaria vaccine during a 22-month follow-up field trial in the Pacific coast of Colombia.

    PubMed

    Valero, M V; Amador, R; Aponte, J J; Narvaez, A; Galindo, C; Silva, Y; Rosas, J; Guzman, F; Patarroyo, M E

    1996-10-01

    A double-blind randomized placebo-controlled field trial with the SPf66 malaria vaccine was carried out in an endemic area consisting of 14 small villages with exclusive fluvial access, in a rain forest area along the Rosario River, Colombia. A total of 1257 subjects completed the full three dose vaccination schedule on days 0, 30 and 180 (643 vaccinated group/623 placebo group) and were followed-up by passive and active surveillance over a period of 22 months. One hundred and thirty-four Plasmodium falciparum malaria episodes were detected (53 in vaccinated group/81 in placebo group), yielding an attack rate of 5.47 cases/100 person years of follow-up (pyears) in the vaccine group and 8.44/100 pyears in the placebo group. The estimated vaccine protective efficacy was 35.2% (95% CI 8.4-54.2%, P = 0.01). This result supports earlier findings that the SPf66 malaria vaccine diminishes the risk of infection by P. falciparum in endemic areas of South America.

  17. Report of a consultation on the optimization of clinical challenge trials for evaluation of candidate blood stage malaria vaccines, 18-19 March 2009, Bethesda, MD, USA.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, V S; Diggs, C; Ferro, S; Good, M F; Herrera, S; Hill, A V; Imoukhuede, E B; Kumar, S; Loucq, C; Marsh, K; Ockenhouse, C F; Richie, T L; Sauerwein, R W

    2009-09-25

    Development and optimization of first generation malaria vaccine candidates has been facilitated by the existence of a well-established Plasmodium falciparum clinical challenge model in which infectious sporozoites are administered to human subjects via mosquito bite. While ideal for testing pre-erythrocytic stage vaccines, some researchers believe that the sporozoite challenge model is less appropriate for testing blood stage vaccines. Here we report a consultation, co-sponsored by PATH MVI, USAID, EMVI and WHO, where scientists from all institutions globally that have conducted such clinical challenges in recent years and representatives from regulatory agencies and funding agencies met to discuss clinical malaria challenge models. Participants discussed strengthening and harmonizing the sporozoite challenge model and considered the pros and cons of further developing a blood stage challenge possibly better suited for evaluating the efficacy of blood stage vaccines. This report summarizes major findings and recommendations, including an update on the Plasmodium vivax clinical challenge model, the prospects for performing experimental challenge trials in malaria endemic countries and an update on clinical safety data. While the focus of the meeting was on the optimization of clinical challenge models for evaluation of blood stage candidate malaria vaccines, many of the considerations are relevant for the application of challenge trials to other purposes.

  18. Safety and immunogenicity of the malaria candidate vaccines FP9 CS and MVA CS in adult Gambian men.

    PubMed

    Imoukhuede, E B; Berthoud, T; Milligan, P; Bojang, K; Ismaili, J; Keating, S; Nwakanma, D; Keita, S; Njie, F; Sowe, M; Todryk, S; Laidlaw, S M; Skinner, M A; Lang, T; Gilbert, S; Greenwood, B M; Hill, A V S

    2006-10-30

    We assessed the safety and immunogenicity of prime-boost vectors encoding the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite (CS) protein expressed either in the attenuated fowl-pox virus (FP9) or modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA). Thirty-two adult Gambians in groups of four to eight received one, two or three doses of FP9 CS and/or MVA CS. No serious adverse event was observed following vaccination. The most immunogenic regimen was two doses of FP9 followed by a single dose of MVA 4 weeks later (an average of 1000 IFN-gamma spot forming units/million PBMCs). This level of effector T-cell responses appears higher than that seen in previously reported studies of CS-based candidate malaria vaccines.

  19. Comparative cost models of a liquid nitrogen vapor phase (LNVP) cold chain-distributed cryopreserved malaria vaccine vs. a conventional vaccine.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Cristina Reyes; Manzi, Fatuma; Tediosi, Fabrizio; Hoffman, Stephen L; James, Eric R

    2013-01-02

    Typically, vaccines distributed through the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) use a 2-8°C cold chain with 4-5 stops. The PfSPZ Vaccine comprises whole live-attenuated cryopreserved sporozoites stored in liquid nitrogen (LN(2)) vapor phase (LNVP) below -140°C and would be distributed through a LNVP cold chain. The purpose of this study was to model LNVP cold chain distribution for the cryopreserved PfSPZ Vaccine in Tanzania, estimate the costs and compare these costs to those that would be incurred in distributing a 'conventional' malaria vaccine through the EPI. Capital and recurrent costs for storage, transportation, labor, energy usage and facilities were determined for the birth cohort in Tanzania over five years. Costs were calculated using WHO/UNESCO calculators. These were applied to a 2-8°C distribution model with national, regional, district, and health facility levels, and for the cryopreserved vaccine using a 'modified hub-and-spoke' (MH-S) LNVP distribution system comprising a central national store, peripheral health facilities and an intermediate district-level transhipment stop. Estimated costs per fully immunized child (FIC) were $ 6.11 for the LNVP-distributed cryopreserved vaccine where the LN(2) is generated, and $ 6.04 with purchased LN(2) (assuming US $ 1.00/L). The FIC costs for distributing a conventional vaccine using the four level 2-8°C cold chain were $ 6.10, and with a tariff distribution system as occurs in Tanzania the FIC cost was $ 5.53. The models, therefore, predicted little difference in 5-year distribution costs between the PfSPZ Vaccine distributed through a MH-S LNVP cold chain and a conventional vaccine distributed through the more traditional EPI system. A LNVP cold chain provides additional benefits through the use of durable dry shippers because no refrigerators, freezers or refrigerated trucks are required. Thus strain at the cold chain periphery, vaccine wastage from cold chain failures and the environmental

  20. Heat-precipitation allows the efficient purification of a functional plant-derived malaria transmission-blocking vaccine candidate fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Beiss, Veronique; Spiegel, Holger; Boes, Alexander; Kapelski, Stephanie; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Edgue, Gueven; Sack, Markus; Fendel, Rolf; Reimann, Andreas; Schillberg, Stefan; Pradel, Gabriele; Fischer, Rainer

    2015-07-01

    Malaria is a vector-borne disease affecting more than two million people and accounting for more than 600,000 deaths each year, especially in developing countries. The most serious form of malaria is caused by Plasmodium falciparum. The complex life cycle of this parasite, involving pre-erythrocytic, asexual and sexual stages, makes vaccine development cumbersome but also offers a broad spectrum of vaccine candidates targeting exactly those stages. Vaccines targeting the sexual stage of P. falciparum are called transmission-blocking vaccines (TBVs). They do not confer protection for the vaccinated individual but aim to reduce or prevent the transmission of the parasite within a population and are therefore regarded as an essential tool in the fight against the disease. Malaria predominantly affects large populations in developing countries, so TBVs need to be produced in large quantities at low cost. Combining the advantages of eukaryotic expression with a virtually unlimited upscaling potential and a good product safety profile, plant-based expression systems represent a suitable alternative for the production of TBVs. We report here the high level (300 μg/g fresh leaf weight (FLW)) transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves of an effective TBV candidate based on a fusion protein F0 comprising Pfs25 and the C0-domain of Pfs230, and the implementation of a simple and cost-effective heat treatment step for purification that yields intact recombinant protein at >90% purity with a recovery rate of >70%. The immunization of mice clearly showed that antibodies raised against plant-derived F0 completely blocked the formation of oocysts in a malaria transmission-blocking assay (TBA) making F0 an interesting TBV candidate or a component of a multi-stage malaria vaccine cocktail.

  1. Wheat Germ Cell-Free System-Based Production of Malaria Proteins for Discovery of Novel Vaccine Candidates▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Takafumi; Takeo, Satoru; Iriko, Hideyuki; Jin, Ling; Tsuchimochi, Masateru; Matsuda, Shusaku; Han, Eun-Taek; Otsuki, Hitoshi; Kaneko, Osamu; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Udomsangpetch, Rachanee; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Torii, Motomi; Endo, Yaeta

    2008-01-01

    One of the major bottlenecks in malaria research has been the difficulty in recombinant protein expression. Here, we report the application of the wheat germ cell-free system for the successful production of malaria proteins. For proof of principle, the Pfs25, PfCSP, and PfAMA1 proteins were chosen. These genes contain very high A/T sequences and are also difficult to express as recombinant proteins. In our wheat germ cell-free system, native and codon-optimized versions of the Pfs25 genes produced equal amounts of proteins. PfCSP and PfAMA1 genes without any codon optimization were also expressed. The products were soluble, with yields between 50 and 200 μg/ml of the translation mixture, indicating that the cell-free system can be used to produce malaria proteins without any prior optimization of their biased codon usage. Biochemical and immunocytochemical analyses of antibodies raised in mice against each protein revealed that every antibody retained its high specificity to the parasite protein in question. The development of parasites in mosquitoes fed patient blood carrying Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes and supplemented with our mouse anti-Pfs25 sera was strongly inhibited, indicating that both Pfs25-3D7/WG and Pfs25-TBV/WG retained their immunogenicity. Lastly, we carried out a parallel expression assay of proteins of blood-stage P. falciparum. The PCR products of 124 P. falciparum genes chosen from the available database were used directly in a small-scale format of transcription and translation reactions. Autoradiogram testing revealed the production of 93 proteins. The application of this new cell-free system-based protocol for the discovery of malaria vaccine candidates will be discussed. PMID:18268027

  2. Is maternal education a social vaccine for childhood malaria infection? A cross-sectional study from war-torn Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cary; Claude, Kasereka Masumbuko; Kibendelwa, Zacharie Tsongo; Brooks, Hannah; Zheng, Xiaonan; Hawkes, Michael

    2017-03-01

    In zones of violent conflict in the tropics, social disruption leads to elevated child mortality, of which malaria is the leading cause. Understanding the social determinants of malaria transmission may be helpful to optimize malaria control efforts. We conducted a cross-sectional study of healthy children aged 2 months to 5 years attending well-child and/or immunization visits in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Six hundred and forty-seven children were tested for malaria antigenemia by rapid diagnostic test and the accompanying parent or legal guardian simultaneously completed a survey questionnaire related to demographics, socioeconomic status, maternal education, as well as bednet use and recent febrile illness. We examined the associations between variables using multivariable logistic regression analysis, chi-squared statistic, Fisher's exact test, and Spearman's rank correlation, as appropriate. One hundred and twenty-three out of the 647 (19%) children in the study tested positive for malaria. Higher levels of maternal education were associated with a lower risk of malaria in their children. The prevalence of malaria in children of mothers with no education, primary school, and beyond primary was 41/138 (30%), 41/241 (17%), and 39/262 (15%), respectively (p = 0.001). In a multivariable logistic regression model adjusting for the effect of a child's age and study site, the following remained significant predictors of malaria antigenemia: maternal education, number of children under five per household, and HIV serostatus. Higher maternal education, through several putative causal pathways, was associated with lower malaria prevalence among children in the DRC. Our findings suggest that maternal education might be an effective 'social vaccine' against malaria in the DRC and globally.

  3. Differential miRNA Expression in the Liver of Balb/c Mice Protected by Vaccination during Crisis of Plasmodium chabaudi Blood-Stage Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Dkhil, Mohamed A.; Al-Quraishy, Saleh A.; Abdel-Baki, Abdel-Azeem S.; Delic, Denis; Wunderlich, Frank

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs are increasingly recognized as epigenetic regulators for outcome of diverse infectious diseases and vaccination efficacy, but little information referring to this exists for malaria. This study investigates possible effects of both protective vaccination and P. chabaudi malaria on the miRNome of the liver as an effector against blood-stage malaria using miRNA microarrays and quantitative PCR. Plasmodium chabaudi blood-stage malaria takes a lethal outcome in female Balb/c mice, but a self-healing course after immunization with a non-infectious blood-stage vaccine. The liver robustly expresses 71 miRNA species at varying levels, among which 65 miRNA species respond to malaria evidenced as steadily increasing or decreasing expressions reaching highest or lowest levels toward the end of the crisis phase on day 11 p.i. in lethal malaria. Protective vaccination does not affect constitutive miRNA expression, but leads to significant (p < 0.05) changes in the expression of 41 miRNA species, however evidenced only during crisis. In vaccination-induced self-healing infections, 18 miRNA-species are up- and 14 miRNA-species are down-regulated by more than 50% during crisis in relation to non-vaccinated mice. Vaccination-induced self-healing and survival of otherwise lethal infections of P. chabaudi activate epigenetic miRNA-regulated remodeling processes in the liver manifesting themselves during crisis. Especially, liver regeneration is accelerated as suggested by upregulation of let-7a-5p, let-7b-5p, let-7c-5p, let-7d-5p, let-7f-5p, let-7g-5p, let-7i-5p, miR-26a, miR-122-5p, miR30a, miR27a, and mir-29a, whereas the up-regulated expression of miR-142-3p by more than 100% is compatible with the view of enhanced hepatic erythropoiesis, possibly at expense of megakaryopoiesis, during crisis of P. chabaudi blood-stage malaria. PMID:28123381

  4. Protective Vaccination against Blood-Stage Malaria of Plasmodium chabaudi: Differential Gene Expression in the Liver of Balb/c Mice toward the End of Crisis Phase

    PubMed Central

    Al-Quraishy, Saleh A.; Dkhil, Mohamed A.; Abdel-Baki, Abdel-Azeem A.; Delic, Denis; Wunderlich, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Protective vaccination induces self-healing of otherwise fatal blood-stage malaria of Plasmodium chabaudi in female Balb/c mice. To trace processes critically involved in self-healing, the liver, an effector against blood-stage malaria, is analyzed for possible changes of its transcriptome in vaccination-protected in comparison to non-protected mice toward the end of the crisis phase. Gene expression microarray analyses reveal that vaccination does not affect constitutive expression of mRNA and lincRNA. However, malaria induces significant (p < 0.01) differences in hepatic gene and lincRNA expression in vaccination-protected vs. non-vaccinated mice toward the end of crisis phase. In vaccination-protected mice, infections induce up-regulations of 276 genes and 40 lincRNAs and down-regulations of 200 genes and 43 lincRNAs, respectively, by >3-fold as compared to the corresponding constitutive expressions. Massive up-regulations, partly by >100-fold, are found for genes as RhD, Add2, Ank1, Ermap, and Slc4a, which encode proteins of erythrocytic surface membranes, and as Gata1 and Gfi1b, which encode transcription factors involved in erythrocytic development. Also, Cldn13 previously predicted to be expressed on erythroblast surfaces is up-regulated by >200-fold, though claudins are known as main constituents of tight junctions acting as paracellular barriers between epithelial cells. Other genes are up-regulated by <100- and >10-fold, which can be subgrouped in genes encoding proteins known to be involved in mitosis, in cell cycle regulation, and in DNA repair. Our data suggest that protective vaccination enables the liver to respond to P. chabaudi infections with accelerated regeneration and extramedullary erythropoiesis during crisis, which contributes to survival of otherwise lethal blood-stage malaria. PMID:27471498

  5. Malaria DNA vaccine gp96NTD-CSP elicits both CSP-specific antibody and CD8(+) T cell response.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhangping; Zhou, TaoLi; Zheng, Hong; Ding, Yan; Xu, Wenyue

    2015-06-01

    It is ideal for the pre-erythrocytic stage subunit vaccine to induce both CSP-specific antibody and CD8(+) T cell response. Here, we designed a novel malaria DNA vaccine gp96NTD-CSP, which was constructed by fusing the full-length of CSP with the N-terminal domain of gp96 that deleted the endoplasmic reticulum-localized motif KDEL, and investigated its protective efficacy. We found that the fusion protein gp96NTD-CSP was mainly distributed on the surface of eukaryotic cells after transfection and could be sensed as a "danger signal" by the host immune system. Interestingly, both liver parasite burden and parasitemia in mice immunized with gp96NTD-CSP were significantly lower than those in the mice immunized either with gp96NTD, CSP, or gp96NTD-SYVPSAEQI, which was constructed by fusing the CSP-specific CD8(+) T cell epitope with the N-terminal domain of gp96 deleted with KDEL. Consistently, both the level of CSP-specific antibody and the frequency of IFN-γ secreted-CSP-specific CD8(+) T cells were much higher in mice immunized with gp96NTD-CSP than those in the mice immunized either with gp96NTD, CSP, or gp96NTD-SYVPSAEQI. Our results suggest that the malaria DNA vaccine gp96NTD-CSP could induce both humoral and cellular immune responses, which is attributed to the adjuvant effect of gp96NTD and full-length CSP.

  6. Analysis of a Multi-component Multi-stage Malaria Vaccine Candidate--Tackling the Cocktail Challenge.

    PubMed

    Boes, Alexander; Spiegel, Holger; Voepel, Nadja; Edgue, Gueven; Beiss, Veronique; Kapelski, Stephanie; Fendel, Rolf; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Pradel, Gabriele; Bolscher, Judith M; Behet, Marije C; Dechering, Koen J; Hermsen, Cornelus C; Sauerwein, Robert W; Schillberg, Stefan; Reimann, Andreas; Fischer, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Combining key antigens from the different stages of the P. falciparum life cycle in the context of a multi-stage-specific cocktail offers a promising approach towards the development of a malaria vaccine ideally capable of preventing initial infection, the clinical manifestation as well as the transmission of the disease. To investigate the potential of such an approach we combined proteins and domains (11 in total) from the pre-erythrocytic, blood and sexual stages of P. falciparum into a cocktail of four different components recombinantly produced in plants. After immunization of rabbits we determined the domain-specific antibody titers as well as component-specific antibody concentrations and correlated them with stage specific in vitro efficacy. Using purified rabbit immune IgG we observed strong inhibition in functional in vitro assays addressing the pre-erythrocytic (up to 80%), blood (up to 90%) and sexual parasite stages (100%). Based on the component-specific antibody concentrations we calculated the IC50 values for the pre-erythrocytic stage (17-25 μg/ml), the blood stage (40-60 μg/ml) and the sexual stage (1.75 μg/ml). While the results underline the feasibility of a multi-stage vaccine cocktail, the analysis of component-specific efficacy indicates significant differences in IC50 requirements for stage-specific antibody concentrations providing valuable insights into this complex scenario and will thereby improve future approaches towards malaria vaccine cocktail development regarding the selection of suitable antigens and the ratios of components, to fine tune overall and stage-specific efficacy.

  7. Analysis of a Multi-component Multi-stage Malaria Vaccine Candidate—Tackling the Cocktail Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Voepel, Nadja; Edgue, Gueven; Beiss, Veronique; Kapelski, Stephanie; Fendel, Rolf; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Pradel, Gabriele; Bolscher, Judith M.; Behet, Marije C.; Dechering, Koen J.; Hermsen, Cornelus C.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Schillberg, Stefan; Reimann, Andreas; Fischer, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Combining key antigens from the different stages of the P. falciparum life cycle in the context of a multi-stage-specific cocktail offers a promising approach towards the development of a malaria vaccine ideally capable of preventing initial infection, the clinical manifestation as well as the transmission of the disease. To investigate the potential of such an approach we combined proteins and domains (11 in total) from the pre-erythrocytic, blood and sexual stages of P. falciparum into a cocktail of four different components recombinantly produced in plants. After immunization of rabbits we determined the domain-specific antibody titers as well as component-specific antibody concentrations and correlated them with stage specific in vitro efficacy. Using purified rabbit immune IgG we observed strong inhibition in functional in vitro assays addressing the pre-erythrocytic (up to 80%), blood (up to 90%) and sexual parasite stages (100%). Based on the component-specific antibody concentrations we calculated the IC50 values for the pre-erythrocytic stage (17–25 μg/ml), the blood stage (40–60 μg/ml) and the sexual stage (1.75 μg/ml). While the results underline the feasibility of a multi-stage vaccine cocktail, the analysis of component-specific efficacy indicates significant differences in IC50 requirements for stage-specific antibody concentrations providing valuable insights into this complex scenario and will thereby improve future approaches towards malaria vaccine cocktail development regarding the selection of suitable antigens and the ratios of components, to fine tune overall and stage-specific efficacy. PMID:26147206

  8. Overcoming Antigenic Diversity by Enhancing the Immunogenicity of Conserved Epitopes on the Malaria Vaccine Candidate Apical Membrane Antigen-1

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sheetij; Dlugosz, Lisa S.; Drew, Damien R.; Ge, Xiopeng; Ababacar, Diouf; Rovira, Yazmin I.; Moch, J. Kathleen; Shi, Meng; Long, Carole A.; Foley, Michael; Beeson, James G.; Anders, Robin F.; Miura, Kazutoyo; Haynes, J. David; Batchelor, Adrian H.

    2013-01-01

    Malaria vaccine candidate Apical Membrane Antigen-1 (AMA1) induces protection, but only against parasite strains that are closely related to the vaccine. Overcoming the AMA1 diversity problem will require an understanding of the structural basis of cross-strain invasion inhibition. A vaccine containing four diverse allelic proteins 3D7, FVO, HB3 and W2mef (AMA1 Quadvax or QV) elicited polyclonal rabbit antibodies that similarly inhibited the invasion of four vaccine and 22 non-vaccine strains of P. falciparum. Comparing polyclonal anti-QV with antibodies against a strain-specific, monovalent, 3D7 AMA1 vaccine revealed that QV induced higher levels of broadly inhibitory antibodies which were associated with increased conserved face and domain-3 responses and reduced domain-2 response. Inhibitory monoclonal antibodies (mAb) raised against the QV reacted with a novel cross-reactive epitope at the rim of the hydrophobic trough on domain-1; this epitope mapped to the conserved face of AMA1 and it encompassed the 1e-loop. MAbs binding to the 1e-loop region (1B10, 4E8 and 4E11) were ∼10-fold more potent than previously characterized AMA1-inhibitory mAbs and a mode of action of these 1e-loop mAbs was the inhibition of AMA1 binding to its ligand RON2. Unlike the epitope of a previously characterized 3D7-specific mAb, 1F9, the 1e-loop inhibitory epitope was partially conserved across strains. Another novel mAb, 1E10, which bound to domain-3, was broadly inhibitory and it blocked the proteolytic processing of AMA1. By itself mAb 1E10 was weakly inhibitory but it synergized with a previously characterized, strain-transcending mAb, 4G2, which binds close to the hydrophobic trough on the conserved face and inhibits RON2 binding to AMA1. Novel inhibition susceptible regions and epitopes, identified here, can form the basis for improving the antigenic breadth and inhibitory response of AMA1 vaccines. Vaccination with a few diverse antigenic proteins could provide universal

  9. Microneedle-mediated immunization of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine enhances antigen-specific antibody immunity and reduces anti-vector responses compared to the intradermal route

    PubMed Central

    Carey, John B.; Vrdoljak, Anto; O'Mahony, Conor; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Draper, Simon J.; Moore, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial effort has been placed in developing efficacious recombinant attenuated adenovirus-based vaccines. However induction of immunity to the vector is a significant obstacle to its repeated use. Here we demonstrate that skin-based delivery of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine, HAdV5-PyMSP142, to mice using silicon microneedles induces equivalent or enhanced antibody responses to the encoded antigen, however it results in decreased anti-vector responses, compared to intradermal delivery. Microneedle-mediated vaccine priming and resultant induction of low anti-vector antibody titres permitted repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine vector. This resulted in significantly increased antigen-specific antibody responses in these mice compared to ID-treated mice. Boosting with a heterologous vaccine; MVA-PyMSP142 also resulted in significantly greater antibody responses in mice primed with HAdV5-PyMSP142 using MN compared to the ID route. The highest protection against blood-stage malaria challenge was observed when a heterologous route of immunization (MN/ID) was used. Therefore, microneedle-mediated immunization has potential to both overcome some of the logistic obstacles surrounding needle-and-syringe-based immunization as well as to facilitate the repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine thereby potentially reducing manufacturing costs of multiple vaccines. This could have important benefits in the clinical ease of use of adenovirus-based immunization strategies. PMID:25142082

  10. Eradicating malaria.

    PubMed

    Breman, Joel G

    2009-01-01

    The renewed interest in malaria research and control is based on the intolerable toll this disease takes on young children and pregnant women in Africa and other vulnerable populations; 150 to 300 children die each hour from malaria amounting to 1 to 2 million deaths yearly. Malaria-induced neurologic impairment, anemia, hypoglycemia, and low birth weight imperil normal development and survival. Resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to drugs and Anopheles mosquitoes to insecticides has stimulated discovery and development of artemisinin-based combination treatments (ACTs) and other drugs, long-lasting insecticide-treated bednets (with synthetic pyrethroids) and a search for non-toxic, long-lasting, affordable insecticides for indoor residual spraying (IRS). Malaria vaccine development and testing are progressing rapidly and a recombinant protein (RTS,S/AS02A) directed against the circumsporozoite protein is soon to be in Phase 3 trials. Support for malaria control, research, and advocacy through the Global Fund for HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, the U.S. President's Malaria Initiative, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, WHO and other organizations is resulting in decreasing morbidity and mortality in many malarious countries. Sustainability of effective programs through training and institution strengthening will be the key to malaria elimination coupled with improved surveillance and targeted research.

  11. A malaria vaccine based on the polymorphic block 2 region of MSP-1 that elicits a broad serotype-spanning immune response.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Graeme J M; Creasey, Alison M; Dhanasarnsombut, Kelwalin; Thomas, Alan W; Remarque, Edmond J; Cavanagh, David R

    2011-01-01

    Polymorphic parasite antigens are known targets of protective immunity to malaria, but this antigenic variation poses challenges to vaccine development. A synthetic MSP-1 Block 2 construct, based on all polymorphic variants found in natural Plasmodium falciparum isolates has been designed, combined with the relatively conserved Block 1 sequence of MSP-1 and expressed in E.coli. The MSP-1 Hybrid antigen has been produced with high yield by fed-batch fermentation and purified without the aid of affinity tags resulting in a pure and extremely thermostable antigen preparation. MSP-1 hybrid is immunogenic in experimental animals using adjuvants suitable for human use, eliciting antibodies against epitopes from all three Block 2 serotypes. Human serum antibodies from Africans naturally exposed to malaria reacted to the MSP-1 hybrid as strongly as, or better than the same serum reactivities to individual MSP-1 Block 2 antigens, and these antibody responses showed clear associations with reduced incidence of malaria episodes. The MSP-1 hybrid is designed to induce a protective antibody response to the highly polymorphic Block 2 region of MSP-1, enhancing the repertoire of MSP-1 Block 2 antibody responses found among immune and semi-immune individuals in malaria endemic areas. The target population for such a vaccine is young children and vulnerable adults, to accelerate the acquisition of a full range of malaria protective antibodies against this polymorphic parasite antigen.

  12. Public health impact and cost-effectiveness of the RTS,S/AS01 malaria vaccine: a systematic comparison of predictions from four mathematical models

    PubMed Central

    Penny, Melissa A; Verity, Robert; Bever, Caitlin A; Sauboin, Christophe; Galactionova, Katya; Flasche, Stefan; White, Michael T; Wenger, Edward A; Van de Velde, Nicolas; Pemberton-Ross, Peter; Griffin, Jamie T; Smith, Thomas A; Eckhoff, Philip A; Muhib, Farzana; Jit, Mark; Ghani, Azra C

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The phase 3 trial of the RTS,S/AS01 malaria vaccine candidate showed modest efficacy of the vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria, but was not powered to assess mortality endpoints. Impact projections and cost-effectiveness estimates for longer timeframes than the trial follow-up and across a range of settings are needed to inform policy recommendations. We aimed to assess the public health impact and cost-effectiveness of routine use of the RTS,S/AS01 vaccine in African settings. Methods We compared four malaria transmission models and their predictions to assess vaccine cost-effectiveness and impact. We used trial data for follow-up of 32 months or longer to parameterise vaccine protection in the group aged 5–17 months. Estimates of cases, deaths, and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) averted were calculated over a 15 year time horizon for a range of levels of Plasmodium falciparum parasite prevalence in 2–10 year olds (PfPR2–10; range 3–65%). We considered two vaccine schedules: three doses at ages 6, 7·5, and 9 months (three-dose schedule, 90% coverage) and including a fourth dose at age 27 months (four-dose schedule, 72% coverage). We estimated cost-effectiveness in the presence of existing malaria interventions for vaccine prices of US$2–10 per dose. Findings In regions with a PfPR2–10 of 10–65%, RTS,S/AS01 is predicted to avert a median of 93 940 (range 20 490–126 540) clinical cases and 394 (127–708) deaths for the three-dose schedule, or 116 480 (31 450–160 410) clinical cases and 484 (189–859) deaths for the four-dose schedule, per 100 000 fully vaccinated children. A positive impact is also predicted at a PfPR2–10 of 5–10%, but there is little impact at a prevalence of lower than 3%. At $5 per dose and a PfPR2–10 of 10–65%, we estimated a median incremental cost-effectiveness ratio compared with current interventions of $30 (range 18–211) per clinical case averted and $80 (44

  13. Minimal role for the circumsporozoite protein in the induction of sterile immunity by vaccination with live rodent malaria sporozoites.

    PubMed

    Mauduit, Marjorie; Tewari, Rita; Depinay, Nadya; Kayibanda, Michèle; Lallemand, Eliette; Chavatte, Jean-Marc; Snounou, Georges; Rénia, Laurent; Grüner, Anne Charlotte

    2010-05-01

    Immunization with live Plasmodium sporozoites under chloroquine prophylaxis (Spz plus CQ) induces sterile immunity against sporozoite challenge in rodents and, more importantly, in humans. Full protection is obtained with substantially fewer parasites than with the classic immunization with radiation-attenuated sporozoites. The sterile protection observed comprised a massive reduction in the hepatic parasite load and an additional effect at the blood stage level. Differences in the immune responses induced by the two protocols occur but are as yet little characterized. We have previously demonstrated that in mice immunized with irradiated sporozoites, immune responses against the circumsporozoite protein (CSP), the major component of the sporozoite's surface and the leading malaria vaccine candidate, were not essential for sterile protection. Here, we have employed transgenic Plasmodium berghei parasites in which the endogenous CSP was replaced by that of Plasmodium yoelii, another rodent malaria species, to assess the role of CSP in the sterile protection induced by the Spz-plus-CQ protocol. The data demonstrated that this role was minor because sterile immunity was obtained irrespective of the origin of CSP expressed by the parasites in this model of protection. The immunity was obtained through a single transient exposure of the host to the immunizing parasites (preerythrocytic and erythrocytic), a dose much smaller than that required for immunization with radiation-attenuated sporozoites.

  14. Single-dose microparticle delivery of a malaria transmission-blocking vaccine elicits a long-lasting functional antibody response.

    PubMed

    Dinglasan, R R; Armistead, J S; Nyland, J F; Jiang, X; Mao, H Q

    2013-05-01

    Malaria sexual stage and mosquito transmission-blocking vaccines (SSM-TBV) have recently gained prominence as a necessary tool for malaria eradication. SSM-TBVs are unique in that, with the exception of parasite gametocyte antigens, they primarily target parasite or mosquito midgut surface antigens expressed only inside the mosquito. As such, the primary perceived limitation of SSM-TBVs is that the absence of natural boosting following immunization will limit its efficacy, since the antigens are never presented to the human immune system. An ideal, safe SSM-TBV formulation must overcome this limitation. We provide a focused evaluation of relevant nano-/microparticle technologies that can be applied toward the development of leading SSM-TBV candidates, and data from a proof-of-concept study demonstrating that a single inoculation and controlled release of antigen in mice, can elicit long-lasting protective antibody titers. We conclude by identifying the remaining critical gaps in knowledge and opportunities for moving SSM-TBVs to the field.

  15. Strain-transcending immune response generated by chimeras of the malaria vaccine candidate merozoite surface protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Krishnarjuna, Bankala; Andrew, Dean; MacRaild, Christopher A.; Morales, Rodrigo A. V.; Beeson, James G.; Anders, Robin F.; Richards, Jack S.; Norton, Raymond S.

    2016-01-01

    MSP2 is an intrinsically disordered protein that is abundant on the merozoite surface and essential to the parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Naturally-acquired antibody responses to MSP2 are biased towards dimorphic sequences within the central variable region of MSP2 and have been linked to naturally-acquired protection from malaria. In a phase IIb study, an MSP2-containing vaccine induced an immune response that reduced parasitemias in a strain-specific manner. A subsequent phase I study of a vaccine that contained both dimorphic forms of MSP2 induced antibodies that exhibited functional activity in vitro. We have assessed the contribution of the conserved and variable regions of MSP2 to the generation of a strain-transcending antibody response by generating MSP2 chimeras that included conserved and variable regions of the 3D7 and FC27 alleles. Robust anti-MSP2 antibody responses targeting both conserved and variable regions were generated in mice, although the fine specificity and the balance of responses to these regions differed amongst the constructs tested. We observed significant differences in antibody subclass distribution in the responses to these chimeras. Our results suggest that chimeric MSP2 antigens can elicit a broad immune response suitable for protection against different strains of P. falciparum. PMID:26865062

  16. Strain-transcending immune response generated by chimeras of the malaria vaccine candidate merozoite surface protein 2.

    PubMed

    Krishnarjuna, Bankala; Andrew, Dean; MacRaild, Christopher A; Morales, Rodrigo A V; Beeson, James G; Anders, Robin F; Richards, Jack S; Norton, Raymond S

    2016-02-11

    MSP2 is an intrinsically disordered protein that is abundant on the merozoite surface and essential to the parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Naturally-acquired antibody responses to MSP2 are biased towards dimorphic sequences within the central variable region of MSP2 and have been linked to naturally-acquired protection from malaria. In a phase IIb study, an MSP2-containing vaccine induced an immune response that reduced parasitemias in a strain-specific manner. A subsequent phase I study of a vaccine that contained both dimorphic forms of MSP2 induced antibodies that exhibited functional activity in vitro. We have assessed the contribution of the conserved and variable regions of MSP2 to the generation of a strain-transcending antibody response by generating MSP2 chimeras that included conserved and variable regions of the 3D7 and FC27 alleles. Robust anti-MSP2 antibody responses targeting both conserved and variable regions were generated in mice, although the fine specificity and the balance of responses to these regions differed amongst the constructs tested. We observed significant differences in antibody subclass distribution in the responses to these chimeras. Our results suggest that chimeric MSP2 antigens can elicit a broad immune response suitable for protection against different strains of P. falciparum.

  17. Safety and Immunogenicity of Pfs25-EPA/Alhydrogel®, a Transmission Blocking Vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum: An Open Label Study in Malaria Naïve Adults

    PubMed Central

    Talaat, Kawsar R.; Ellis, Ruth D.; Hurd, Janet; Hentrich, Autumn; Gabriel, Erin; Hynes, Noreen A.; Rausch, Kelly M.; Zhu, Daming; Muratova, Olga; Herrera, Raul; Anderson, Charles; Jones, David; Aebig, Joan; Brockley, Sarah; MacDonald, Nicholas J.; Wang, Xiaowei; Fay, Michael P.; Healy, Sara A.; Durbin, Anna P.; Narum, David L.; Wu, Yimin; Duffy, Patrick E.

    2016-01-01

    Transmission-blocking vaccines (TBVs) that target sexual stage parasite development could be an integral part of measures for malaria elimination. Pfs25 is a leading TBV candidate, and previous studies conducted in animals demonstrated an improvement of its functional immunogenicity after conjugation to EPA, a recombinant, detoxified ExoProtein A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this report, we describe results of an open-label, dose-escalating Phase 1 trial to assess the safety and immunogenicity of Pfs25-EPA conjugates formulated with Alhydrogel®. Thirty malaria-naïve healthy adults received up to four doses of the conjugate vaccine, with 8, 16, or 47 μg of conjugated Pfs25 mass, at 0, 2, 4, and 10 months. Vaccinations were generally well tolerated. The majority of solicited adverse events were mild in severity with pain at the injection site the most common complaint. Anemia was the most common laboratory abnormality, but was considered possibly related to the study in only a minority of cases. No vaccine-related serious adverse events occurred. The peak geometric mean anti-Pfs25 antibody level in the highest dose group was 88 (95% CI 53, 147) μg/mL two weeks after the 4th vaccination, and declined to near baseline one year later. Antibody avidity increased over successive vaccinations. Transmission blocking activity demonstrated in a standard membrane feeding assay (SMFA) also increased from the second to the third dose, and correlated with antibody titer and, after the final dose, with antibody avidity. These results support the further evaluation of Pfs25-EPA/Alhydrogel® in a malaria-endemic population. PMID:27749907

  18. Safety and Immunogenicity of Pfs25-EPA/Alhydrogel®, a Transmission Blocking Vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum: An Open Label Study in Malaria Naïve Adults.

    PubMed

    Talaat, Kawsar R; Ellis, Ruth D; Hurd, Janet; Hentrich, Autumn; Gabriel, Erin; Hynes, Noreen A; Rausch, Kelly M; Zhu, Daming; Muratova, Olga; Herrera, Raul; Anderson, Charles; Jones, David; Aebig, Joan; Brockley, Sarah; MacDonald, Nicholas J; Wang, Xiaowei; Fay, Michael P; Healy, Sara A; Durbin, Anna P; Narum, David L; Wu, Yimin; Duffy, Patrick E

    2016-01-01

    Transmission-blocking vaccines (TBVs) that target sexual stage parasite development could be an integral part of measures for malaria elimination. Pfs25 is a leading TBV candidate, and previous studies conducted in animals demonstrated an improvement of its functional immunogenicity after conjugation to EPA, a recombinant, detoxified ExoProtein A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this report, we describe results of an open-label, dose-escalating Phase 1 trial to assess the safety and immunogenicity of Pfs25-EPA conjugates formulated with Alhydrogel®. Thirty malaria-naïve healthy adults received up to four doses of the conjugate vaccine, with 8, 16, or 47 μg of conjugated Pfs25 mass, at 0, 2, 4, and 10 months. Vaccinations were generally well tolerated. The majority of solicited adverse events were mild in severity with pain at the injection site the most common complaint. Anemia was the most common laboratory abnormality, but was considered possibly related to the study in only a minority of cases. No vaccine-related serious adverse events occurred. The peak geometric mean anti-Pfs25 antibody level in the highest dose group was 88 (95% CI 53, 147) μg/mL two weeks after the 4th vaccination, and declined to near baseline one year later. Antibody avidity increased over successive vaccinations. Transmission blocking activity demonstrated in a standard membrane feeding assay (SMFA) also increased from the second to the third dose, and correlated with antibody titer and, after the final dose, with antibody avidity. These results support the further evaluation of Pfs25-EPA/Alhydrogel® in a malaria-endemic population.

  19. Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Children Aged 0-2 Years: The Role of Foetal Haemoglobin and Maternal Antibodies to Two Asexual Malaria Vaccine Candidates (MSP3 and GLURP)

    PubMed Central

    Kangoye, David Tiga; Nebie, Issa; Yaro, Jean-Baptiste; Debe, Siaka; Traore, Safiatou; Ouedraogo, Oumarou; Sanou, Guillaume; Soulama, Issiaka; Diarra, Amidou; Tiono, Alfred; Marsh, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Background Children below six months are reported to be less susceptible to clinical malaria. Maternally derived antibodies and foetal haemoglobin are important putative protective factors. We examined antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 3 (MSP3) and glutamate-rich protein (GLURP), in children in their first two years of life in Burkina Faso and their risk of malaria. Methods A cohort of 140 infants aged between four and six weeks was recruited in a stable transmission area of south-western Burkina Faso and monitored for 24 months by active and passive surveillance. Malaria infections were detected by examining blood smears using light microscopy. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to quantify total Immunoglobulin G to Plasmodium falciparum antigens MSP3 and two regions of GLURP (R0 and R2) on blood samples collected at baseline, three, six, nine, 12, 18 and 24 months. Foetal haemoglobin and variant haemoglobin fractions were measured at the baseline visit using high pressure liquid chromatography. Results A total of 79.6% of children experienced one or more episodes of febrile malaria during monitoring. Antibody titres to MSP3 were prospectively associated with an increased risk of malaria while antibody responses to GLURP (R0 and R2) did not alter the risk. Antibody titres to MSP3 were higher among children in areas of high malaria risk. Foetal haemoglobin was associated with delayed first episode of febrile malaria and haemoglobin CC type was associated with reduced incidence of febrile malaria. Conclusions We did not find any evidence of association between titres of antibodies to MSP3, GLURP-R0 or GLURP-R2 as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and early protection against malaria, although anti-MSP3 antibody titres may reflect increased exposure to malaria and therefore greater risk. Foetal haemoglobin was associated with protection against febrile malaria despite the study limitations and its role is therefore

  20. Immunogenicity and in vitro Protective Efficacy of a Recombinant Multistage Plasmodium falciparum Candidate Vaccine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ya Ping; Hasnain, Seyed E.; Sacci, John B.; Holloway, Brian P.; Fujioka, Hisashi; Kumar, Nirbhay; Wohlhueter, Robert; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Collins, William E.; Lal, Altaf A.

    1999-02-01

    Compared with a single-stage antigen-based vaccine, a multistage and multivalent Plasmodium falciparum vaccine would be more efficacious by inducing "multiple layers" of immunity. We have constructed a synthetic gene that encodes for 12 B cell, 6 T cell proliferative, and 3 cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes derived from 9 stage-specific P. falciparum antigens corresponding to the sporozoite, liver, erythrocytic asexual, and sexual stages. The gene was expressed in the baculovirus system, and a 41-kDa antigen, termed CDC/NIIMALVAC-1, was purified. Immunization in rabbits with the purified protein in the presence of different adjuvants generated antibody responses that recognized vaccine antigen, linear peptides contained in the vaccine, and all stages of P. falciparum. In vitro assays of protection revealed that the vaccine-elicited antibodies strongly inhibited sporozoite invasion of hepatoma cells and growth of blood-stage parasites in the presence of monocytes. These observations demonstrate that a multicomponent, multistage malaria vaccine can induce immune responses that inhibit parasite development at multiple stages. The rationale and approach used in the development of a multicomponent P. falciparum vaccine will be useful in the development of a multispecies human malaria vaccine and vaccines against other infectious diseases.

  1. Novel antigen identification method for discovery of protective malaria antigens by rapid testing of DNA vaccines encoding exons from the parasite genome.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Diana; Bilcikova, Erika; Witney, Adam A; Carlton, Jane M; White, Charles E; Blair, Peter L; Chattopadhyay, Rana; Russell, Joshua; Abot, Esteban; Charoenvit, Yupin; Aguiar, Joao C; Carucci, Daniel J; Weiss, Walter R

    2004-03-01

    We describe a novel approach for identifying target antigens for preerythrocytic malaria vaccines. Our strategy is to rapidly test hundreds of DNA vaccines encoding exons from the Plasmodium yoelii yoelii genomic sequence. In this antigen identification method, we measure reduction in parasite burden in the liver after sporozoite challenge in mice. Orthologs of protective P. y. yoelii genes can then be identified in the genomic databases of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax and investigated as candidate antigens for a human vaccine. A pilot study to develop the antigen identification method approach used 192 P. y. yoelii exons from genes expressed during the sporozoite stage of the life cycle. A total of 182 (94%) exons were successfully cloned into a DNA immunization vector with the Gateway cloning technology. To assess immunization strategies, mice were vaccinated with 19 of the new DNA plasmids in addition to the well-characterized protective plasmid encoding P. y. yoelii circumsporozoite protein. Single plasmid immunization by gene gun identified a novel vaccine target antigen which decreased liver parasite burden by 95% and which has orthologs in P. vivax and P. knowlesi but not P. falciparum. Intramuscular injection of DNA plasmids produced a different pattern of protective responses from those seen with gene gun immunization. Intramuscular immunization with plasmid pools could reduce liver parasite burden in mice despite the fact that none of the plasmids was protective when given individually. We conclude that high-throughput cloning of exons into DNA vaccines and their screening is feasible and can rapidly identify new malaria vaccine candidate antigens.

  2. Short-Lived Effector CD8 T Cells Induced by Genetically Attenuated Malaria Parasite Vaccination Express CD11c

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, Laura A.; Gupta, Megha; Thomas, Sunil; Mikolajczak, Sebastian; Choi, Kimberly Y.; Gibson, Claire; Jang, Ihn K.; Danziger, Sam; Aitchison, John; Gardner, Malcolm J.; Kappe, Stefan H. I.

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination with a single dose of genetically attenuated malaria parasites can induce sterile protection against sporozoite challenge in the rodent Plasmodium yoelii model. Protection is dependent on CD8+ T cells, involves perforin and gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and is correlated with the expansion of effector memory CD8+ T cells in the liver. Here, we have further characterized vaccine-induced changes in the CD8+ T cell phenotype and demonstrated significant upregulation of CD11c on CD3+ CD8b+ T cells in the liver, spleen, and peripheral blood. CD11c+ CD8+ T cells are predominantly CD11ahi CD44hi CD62L−, indicative of antigen-experienced effector cells. Following in vitro restimulation with malaria-infected hepatocytes, CD11c+ CD8+ T cells expressed inflammatory cytokines and cytotoxicity markers, including IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-2 (IL-2), perforin, and CD107a. CD11c− CD8+ T cells, on the other hand, expressed negligible amounts of all inflammatory cytokines and cytotoxicity markers tested, indicating that CD11c marks multifunctional effector CD8+ T cells. Coculture of CD11c+, but not CD11c−, CD8+ T cells with sporozoite-infected primary hepatocytes significantly inhibited liver-stage parasite development. Tetramer staining for the immunodominant circumsporozoite protein (CSP)-specific CD8+ T cell epitope demonstrated that approximately two-thirds of CSP-specific cells expressed CD11c at the peak of the CD11c+ CD8+ T cell response, but CD11c expression was lost as the CD8+ T cells entered the memory phase. Further analyses showed that CD11c+ CD8+ T cells are primarily KLRG1+ CD127− terminal effectors, whereas all KLRG1− CD127+ memory precursor effector cells are CD11c− CD8+ T cells. Together, these results suggest that CD11c marks a subset of highly inflammatory, short-lived, antigen-specific effector cells, which may play an important role in eliminating infected hepatocytes. PMID:23980113

  3. Redefining an epitope of a malaria vaccine candidate, with antibodies against the N-terminal MSA-2 antigen of Plasmodium harboring non-natural peptide bonds.

    PubMed

    Lozano, José Manuel; Guerrero, Yuly Andrea; Alba, Martha Patricia; Lesmes, Liliana Patricia; Escobar, José Oswaldo; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2013-10-01

    The aim of obtaining novel vaccine candidates against malaria and other transmissible diseases can be partly based on selecting non-polymorphic peptides from relevant antigens of pathogens, which have to be then precisely modified for inducing a protective immunity against the disease. Bearing in mind the high degree of the MSA-2(21-40) peptide primary structure's genetic conservation among malaria species, and its crucial role in the high RBC binding ability of Plasmodium falciparum (the main agent causing malaria), structurally defined probes based on non-natural peptide-bond isosteres were thus designed. Thus, two peptide mimetics were obtained (so-called reduced amide pseudopeptides), in which naturally made amide bonds of the (30)FIN(32)-binding motif of MSA-2 were replaced with ψ-[CH2-NH] methylene amide isostere bonds, one between the F-I and the second between I-N amino acid pairs, respectively, coded as ψ-128 ψ-130. These peptide mimetics were used to produce poly- and monoclonal antibodies in Aotus monkeys and BALB/c mice. Parent reactive mice-derived IgM isotype cell clones were induced to Ig isotype switching to IgG sub-classes by controlled in vitro immunization experiments. These mature isotype immunoglobulins revealed a novel epitope in the MSA-2(25-32) antigen and two polypeptides of rodent malaria species. Also, these antibodies' functional activity against malaria was tested by in vitro assays, demonstrating high efficacy in controlling infection and evidencing neutralizing capacity for the rodent in vivo malaria infection. The neutralizing effect of antibodies induced by site-directed designed peptide mimetics on Plasmodium's biological development make these pseudopeptides a valuable tool for future development of immunoprophylactic strategies for controlling malarial infection.

  4. Plasmodium falciparum-Specific Cellular Immune Responses after Immunization with the RTS,S/AS02D Candidate Malaria Vaccine in Infants Living in an Area of High Endemicity in Mozambique ▿

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Arnoldo; Naniche, Denise; Aponte, John J.; Manaca, M. Nelia; Mandomando, Inacio; Aide, Pedro; Sacarlal, Jahit; Renom, Montse; Lafuente, Sarah; Ballou, W. Ripley; Alonso, Pedro L.

    2009-01-01

    Results from clinical trials in areas where malaria is endemic have shown that immunization with RTS,S/AS02A malaria vaccine candidate induces partial protection in adults and children and cellular effector and memory responses in adults. For the first time in a malaria vaccine trial, we sought to assess the cell-mediated immune responses to RTS,S antigen components in infants under 1 year of age participating in a clinical phase I/IIb trial of RTS,S/AS02D in Mozambique. Circumsporozoite protein (CSP)-specific responses were detected in approximately half of RTS,S-immunized infants and included gamma interferon (IFN-γ), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and combined IL-2/IL-4 responses. The median stimulation indices of cytokine-producing CD4+ and CD8+ cells were very low but significantly higher in RTS,S-immunized infants than in infants that received the comparator vaccine. Protection against subsequent malarial infection tended to be associated with a higher percentage of individuals with CSP-specific IL-2 in the supernatant (P = 0.053) and with higher CSP-specific IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T-cell responses (P = 0.07). These results report for the first time the detection of malaria-specific cellular immune responses after vaccination of infants less than 1 year of age and pave the way for future field studies of cellular immunity to malaria vaccine candidates. PMID:19651872

  5. One-step design of a stable variant of the malaria invasion protein RH5 for use as a vaccine immunogen

    PubMed Central

    Campeotto, Ivan; Goldenzweig, Adi; Davey, Jack; Barfod, Lea; Marshall, Jennifer M.; Silk, Sarah E.; Wright, Katherine E.; Higgins, Matthew K.; Fleishman, Sarel J.

    2017-01-01

    Many promising vaccine candidates from pathogenic viruses, bacteria, and parasites are unstable and cannot be produced cheaply for clinical use. For instance, Plasmodium falciparum reticulocyte-binding protein homolog 5 (PfRH5) is essential for erythrocyte invasion, is highly conserved among field isolates, and elicits antibodies that neutralize in vitro and protect in an animal model, making it a leading malaria vaccine candidate. However, functional RH5 is only expressible in eukaryotic systems and exhibits moderate temperature tolerance, limiting its usefulness in hot and low-income countries where malaria prevails. Current approaches to immunogen stabilization involve iterative application of rational or semirational design, random mutagenesis, and biochemical characterization. Typically, each round of optimization yields minor improvement in stability, and multiple rounds are required. In contrast, we developed a one-step design strategy using phylogenetic analysis and Rosetta atomistic calculations to design PfRH5 variants with improved packing and surface polarity. To demonstrate the robustness of this approach, we tested three PfRH5 designs, all of which showed improved stability relative to wild type. The best, bearing 18 mutations relative to PfRH5, expressed in a folded form in bacteria at >1 mg of protein per L of culture, and had 10–15 °C higher thermal tolerance than wild type, while also retaining ligand binding and immunogenic properties indistinguishable from wild type, proving its value as an immunogen for a future generation of vaccines against the malaria blood stage. We envision that this efficient computational stability design methodology will also be used to enhance the biophysical properties of other recalcitrant vaccine candidates from emerging pathogens. PMID:28096331

  6. Human vaccines & immunotherapeutics: news.

    PubMed

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2013-10-01

    Infant rotavirus vaccination provides for herd immunity Nonreplicating sporozoite vaccine protects humans against malaria Personalized brain cancer vaccine enters phase 2 trial Novel implantable therapeutic cancer vaccine to be tested in humans Clostridium difficile vaccine candidate successful in phase 1 CDC reports strong uptake of HPV vaccine in boys Whooping cough outbreak in Texas.

  7. Induction of CD8(+) T cell responses and protective efficacy following microneedle-mediated delivery of a live adenovirus-vectored malaria vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Frances E; O'Mahony, Conor; Moore, Anne C; Hill, Adrian V S

    2015-06-22

    There is an urgent need for improvements in vaccine delivery technologies. This is particularly pertinent for vaccination programmes within regions of limited resources, such as those required for adequate provision for disposal of used needles. Microneedles are micron-sized structures that penetrate the stratum corneum of the skin, creating temporary conduits for the needle-free delivery of drugs or vaccines. Here, we aimed to investigate immunity induced by the recombinant simian adenovirus-vectored vaccine ChAd63.ME-TRAP; currently undergoing clinical assessment as a candidate malaria vaccine, when delivered percutaneously by silicon microneedle arrays. In mice, we demonstrate that microneedle-mediated delivery of ChAd63.ME-TRAP induced similar numbers of transgene-specific CD8(+) T cells compared to intradermal (ID) administration with needle-and-syringe, following a single immunisation and after a ChAd63/MVA heterologous prime-boost schedule. When mice immunised with ChAd63/MVA were challenged with live Plasmodium berghei sporozoites, microneedle-mediated ChAd63.ME-TRAP priming demonstrated equivalent protective efficacy as did ID immunisation. Furthermore, responses following ChAd63/MVA immunisation correlated with a specific design parameter of the array used ('total array volume'). The level of transgene expression at the immunisation site and skin-draining lymph node (dLN) was also linked to total array volume. These findings have implications for defining silicon microneedle array design for use with live, vectored vaccines.

  8. Combining viral vectored and protein-in-adjuvant vaccines against the blood-stage malaria antigen AMA1: report on a phase 1a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Susanne H; Choudhary, Prateek; Elias, Sean C; Milne, Kathryn H; Rampling, Thomas W; Biswas, Sumi; Poulton, Ian D; Miura, Kazutoyo; Douglas, Alexander D; Alanine, Daniel Gw; Illingworth, Joseph J; de Cassan, Simone C; Zhu, Daming; Nicosia, Alfredo; Long, Carole A; Moyle, Sarah; Berrie, Eleanor; Lawrie, Alison M; Wu, Yimin; Ellis, Ruth D; Hill, Adrian V S; Draper, Simon J

    2014-12-01

    The development of effective vaccines against difficult disease targets will require the identification of new subunit vaccination strategies that can induce and maintain effective immune responses in humans. Here we report on a phase 1a clinical trial using the AMA1 antigen from the blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite delivered either as recombinant protein formulated with Alhydrogel adjuvant with and without CPG 7909, or using recombinant vectored vaccines--chimpanzee adenovirus ChAd63 and the orthopoxvirus MVA. A variety of promising "mixed-modality" regimens were tested. All volunteers were primed with ChAd63, and then subsequently boosted with MVA and/or protein-in-adjuvant using either an 8- or 16-week prime-boost interval. We report on the safety of these regimens, as well as the T cell, B cell, and serum antibody responses. Notably, IgG antibody responses primed by ChAd63 were comparably boosted by AMA1 protein vaccine, irrespective of whether CPG 7909 was included in the Alhydrogel adjuvant. The ability to improve the potency of a relatively weak aluminium-based adjuvant in humans, by previously priming with an adenoviral vaccine vector encoding the same antigen, thus offers a novel vaccination strategy for difficult or neglected disease targets when access to more potent adjuvants is not possible.

  9. Randomized, placebo-controlled trial to assess the safety and immunogenicity of an adenovirus type 35-based circumsporozoite malaria vaccine in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Creech, C Buddy; Dekker, Cornelia L; Ho, Dora; Phillips, Shanda; Mackey, Sally; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Grazia Pau, Maria; Hendriks, Jenny; Brown, Valerie; Dally, Leonard G; Versteege, Isabella; Edwards, Kathryn M

    2013-01-01

    Malaria results in over 650 000 deaths each year; thus, there is an urgent need for an effective vaccine. Pre-clinical studies and recently reported human trials suggest that pre-erythrocytic stage vaccines can provide protection against infection. A Phase 1, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation study was conducted with a vaccine composed of a replication-deficient adenovirus-35 backbone with P. falciparum circumsporozoite (CS) surface antigen (Ad35.CS.01). Healthy adult subjects received three doses of 108, 109, 1010, or 1011 vp/mL Ad35.CS.01 vaccine or saline placebo intramuscularly at 0, 1, and 6-mo intervals. Adverse events were assessed and anti-CS antibody responses were determined by ELISA. Seventy-two individuals were enrolled, with age, gender, and ethnicity similar across each study arm. While the vaccine was generally well tolerated, adverse events were more frequent in the highest dose groups (1010 and 1011 vp/mL). More robust humoral responses were also noted at the highest doses, with 73% developing a positive ELISA response after the three dose series of 1011 vp/mL. The Ad35.CS.01 vaccine was most immunogenic at the highest dosages (1010 and 1011 vp/mL). Reactogenicity findings were more common after the 1011 vp/mL dose, although most were mild or moderate in nature and resolved without therapy. PMID:23955431

  10. Induction of T helper type 1 and 2 responses to 19-kilodalton merozoite surface protein 1 in vaccinated healthy volunteers and adults naturally exposed to malaria.

    PubMed

    Lee, Edwin A M; Palmer, Dupeh R; Flanagan, Katie L; Reece, William H H; Odhiambo, Kennedy; Marsh, Kevin; Pinder, Margaret; Gravenor, Michael B; Keitel, Wendy A; Kester, Kent E; Diggs, Carter; Kaslow, David; Apostolopoulos, V; Ballou, W Ripley; Hill, Adrian V S; Krzych, Urszula; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2002-03-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is a major cause of death in the tropics. The 19-kDa subunit of P. falciparum merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1(19)), a major blood stage vaccine candidate, is the target of cellular and humoral immune responses in animals and humans. In this phase I trial of MSP-1(19), immunization of nonexposed human volunteers with either of the two allelic forms of recombinant MSP-1(19) induced high levels of antigen-specific Th1 (gamma interferon) and Th2 (interleukin 4 [IL-4] and IL-10) type lymphokines. The adjustment of the antigen dose and number of immunizations regulated the level of specificity of immune responses and Th1/Th2 bias of responses induced by vaccination. Novel conserved and allelic T-cell epitopes which induced cross-strain immune responses were identified. Importantly, responses to many of these novel epitopes were also present in adults exposed to malaria, both in east (Kenya) and west Africa (The Gambia). These data suggest that epitope-specific naturally acquired MSP-1(19) immune responses in endemic populations can be boosted by vaccination.

  11. Probability of Transmission of Malaria from Mosquito to Human Is Regulated by Mosquito Parasite Density in Naïve and Vaccinated Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Sinden, Robert E.; Poulton, Ian D.; Griffin, Jamie T.; Upton, Leanna M.; Sala, Katarzyna A.; Angrisano, Fiona; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Blagborough, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    Over a century since Ronald Ross discovered that malaria is caused by the bite of an infectious mosquito it is still unclear how the number of parasites injected influences disease transmission. Currently it is assumed that all mosquitoes with salivary gland sporozoites are equally infectious irrespective of the number of parasites they harbour, though this has never been rigorously tested. Here we analyse >1000 experimental infections of humans and mice and demonstrate a dose-dependency for probability of infection and the length of the host pre-patent period. Mosquitoes with a higher numbers of sporozoites in their salivary glands following blood-feeding are more likely to have caused infection (and have done so quicker) than mosquitoes with fewer parasites. A similar dose response for the probability of infection was seen for humans given a pre-erythrocytic vaccine candidate targeting circumsporozoite protein (CSP), and in mice with and without transfusion of anti-CSP antibodies. These interventions prevented infection more efficiently from bites made by mosquitoes with fewer parasites. The importance of parasite number has widespread implications across malariology, ranging from our basic understanding of the parasite, how vaccines are evaluated and the way in which transmission should be measured in the field. It also provides direct evidence for why the only registered malaria vaccine RTS,S was partially effective in recent clinical trials. PMID:28081253

  12. Utilizing direct skin feeding assays for development of vaccines that interrupt malaria transmission: A systematic review of methods and case study.

    PubMed

    Brickley, Elizabeth B; Coulibaly, Mamadou; Gabriel, Erin E; Healy, Sara A; Hume, Jen C C; Sagara, Issaka; Traore, Sekou F; Doumbo, Ogobara; Duffy, Patrick E

    2016-11-21

    Shifting the malaria priorities from a paradigm of control and elimination to a goal of global eradication calls for renewed attention to the interruption of malaria transmission. Sustained progress toward eradication will require both improved understanding of infectious reservoirs and efficient development of novel transmission-blocking interventions, such as rapidly acting and highly efficacious therapeutics and vaccines. Here, we review the direct skin feeding assay (DSF), which has been proposed as a valuable tool for measuring the in natura transmission of malaria parasites from human hosts to mosquito vectors across heterogeneous populations. To capture the methodological breadth of this assay's use, we first systematically review and qualitatively synthesize previously published investigations using DSFs to study malaria transmission in humans. Then, using a recent Phase 1 trial in Mali of the Pfs25H-EPA/Alhydrogel® vaccine candidate (NCT01867463) designed to interrupt Plasmodium falciparum transmission as a case study, we describe the potential opportunities and current limitations of utilizing the endpoints measured by DSF in making early clinical decisions for individually randomized transmission-interrupting intervention candidates. Using simulations based on the data collected in the clinical trial, we demonstrate that the capacity of the DSF to serve as an evaluative tool is limited by the statistical power constraints of the "effective sample size" (i.e. the number of subjects that are capable of transmitting at the time of feeding). Altogether, our findings suggest DSFs have great potential utility for assessing the public health impacts of emerging antimalarial tools, but additional research is needed to address issues of scalability and to establish correlation with community-wide clinical endpoints as well as complementary in vitro measures, such as standard membrane feeding assays.

  13. Safety and Reactogenicity of an MSP-1 Malaria Vaccine Candidate: A Randomized Phase Ib Dose-Escalation Trial in Kenyan Children

    PubMed Central

    Withers, Mark R; McKinney, Denise; Ogutu, Bernhards R; Waitumbi, John N; Milman, Jessica B; Apollo, Odika J; Allen, Otieno G; Tucker, Kathryn; Soisson, Lorraine A; Diggs, Carter; Leach, Amanda; Wittes, Janet; Dubovsky, Filip; Stewart, V. Ann; Remich, Shon A; Cohen, Joe; Ballou, W. Ripley; Holland, Carolyn A; Lyon, Jeffrey A; Angov, Evelina; Stoute, José A; Martin, Samuel K; Heppner, D. Gray

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Our aim was to evaluate the safety, reactogenicity, and immunogenicity of an investigational malaria vaccine. Design: This was an age-stratified phase Ib, double-blind, randomized, controlled, dose-escalation trial. Children were recruited into one of three cohorts (dosage groups) and randomized in 2:1 fashion to receive either the test product or a comparator. Setting: The study was conducted in a rural population in Kombewa Division, western Kenya. Participants: Subjects were 135 children, aged 12–47 mo. Interventions: Subjects received 10, 25, or 50 μg of falciparum malaria protein 1 (FMP1) formulated in 100, 250, and 500 μL, respectively, of AS02A, or they received a comparator (Imovax® rabies vaccine). Outcome Measures: We performed safety and reactogenicity parameters and assessment of adverse events during solicited (7 d) and unsolicited (30 d) periods after each vaccination. Serious adverse events were monitored for 6 mo after the last vaccination. Results: Both vaccines were safe and well tolerated. FMP1/AS02A recipients experienced significantly more pain and injection-site swelling with a dose-effect relationship. Systemic reactogenicity was low at all dose levels. Hemoglobin levels remained stable and similar across arms. Baseline geometric mean titers were comparable in all groups. Anti-FMP1 antibody titers increased in a dose-dependent manner in subjects receiving FMP1/AS02A; no increase in anti-FMP1 titers occurred in subjects who received the comparator. By study end, subjects who received either 25 or 50 μg of FMP1 had similar antibody levels, which remained significantly higher than that of those who received the comparator or 10 μg of FMP1. A longitudinal mixed effects model showed a statistically significant effect of dosage level on immune response (F3,1047 = 10.78, or F3, 995 = 11.22, p < 0.001); however, the comparison of 25 μg and 50 μg recipients indicated no significant difference (F1,1047 = 0.05; p = 0.82). Conclusions

  14. Studies on the humoral immune response to a synthetic vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo, M; Barreto, L; Rojas, M; Moya, R; Cote, J; Patarroyo, M E

    1991-01-01

    A synthetic vaccine against the asexual blood stages of P. falciparum, the SPf 66 synthetic hybrid polymer, composed of peptides derived from three merozoite membrane proteins as well as one peptide from the sporozoite CS protein, has been developed by our group and tested in different protection assays in Aotus monkeys as well as in human volunteers. This study evaluates the humoral immune response induced by the SPf 66 protein vaccination in adult human volunteers from the Colombian Pacific coast as follows: determination of specific IgG antibody levels against SPf 66 by FAST-ELISA after each immunization; analysis of antibody reactivity with P. falciparum schizont lysates by immunoblots; and determination of the in vitro parasite growth inhibition. A clear boosting effect, dependent on time and dose, was observed in the antibody production kinetics. These antibodies also specifically recognize three proteins of the P. falciparum schizont lysate corresponding to the molecular weights of the proteins from which the amino acid sequence was derived. These sera were also capable of markedly inhibiting in vitro parasite growth. PMID:2015702

  15. Optimized Blanching Reduces the Host Cell Protein Content and Substantially Enhances the Recovery and Stability of Two Plant-Derived Malaria Vaccine Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Stephan; Holland, Tanja; Boes, Alexander; Spiegel, Holger; Bolzenius, Johanna; Fischer, Rainer; Buyel, Johannes F.

    2016-01-01

    Plants provide an advantageous expression platform for biopharmaceutical proteins because of their low pathogen burden and potential for inexpensive, large-scale production. However, the purification of target proteins can be challenging due to issues with extraction, the removal of host cell proteins (HCPs), and low expression levels. The heat treatment of crude extracts can reduce the quantity of HCPs by precipitation thus increasing the purity of the target protein and streamlining downstream purification. In the overall context of downstream process (DSP) development for plant-derived malaria vaccine candidates, we applied a design-of-experiments approach to enhance HCP precipitation from Nicotiana benthamiana extracts generated after transient expression, using temperatures in the 20–80°C range, pH values of 3.0–8.0 and incubation times of 0–60 min. We also investigated the recovery of two protein-based malaria vaccine candidates under these conditions and determined their stability in the heat-treated extract while it was maintained at room temperature for 24 h. The heat precipitation of HCPs was also carried out by blanching intact plants in water or buffer prior to extraction in a blender. Our data show that all the heat precipitation methods reduced the amount of HCP in the crude plant extracts by more than 80%, simplifying the subsequent DSP steps. Furthermore, when the heat treatment was performed at 80°C rather than 65°C, both malaria vaccine candidates were more stable after extraction and the recovery of both proteins increased by more than 30%. PMID:26925077

  16. Combining Viral Vectored and Protein-in-adjuvant Vaccines Against the Blood-stage Malaria Antigen AMA1: Report on a Phase 1a Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Susanne H; Choudhary, Prateek; Elias, Sean C; Milne, Kathryn H; Rampling, Thomas W; Biswas, Sumi; Poulton, Ian D; Miura, Kazutoyo; Douglas, Alexander D; Alanine, Daniel GW; Illingworth, Joseph J; de Cassan, Simone C; Zhu, Daming; Nicosia, Alfredo; Long, Carole A; Moyle, Sarah; Berrie, Eleanor; Lawrie, Alison M; Wu, Yimin; Ellis, Ruth D; Hill, Adrian V S; Draper, Simon J

    2014-01-01

    The development of effective vaccines against difficult disease targets will require the identification of new subunit vaccination strategies that can induce and maintain effective immune responses in humans. Here we report on a phase 1a clinical trial using the AMA1 antigen from the blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite delivered either as recombinant protein formulated with Alhydrogel adjuvant with and without CPG 7909, or using recombinant vectored vaccines—chimpanzee adenovirus ChAd63 and the orthopoxvirus MVA. A variety of promising “mixed-modality” regimens were tested. All volunteers were primed with ChAd63, and then subsequently boosted with MVA and/or protein-in-adjuvant using either an 8- or 16-week prime-boost interval. We report on the safety of these regimens, as well as the T cell, B cell, and serum antibody responses. Notably, IgG antibody responses primed by ChAd63 were comparably boosted by AMA1 protein vaccine, irrespective of whether CPG 7909 was included in the Alhydrogel adjuvant. The ability to improve the potency of a relatively weak aluminium-based adjuvant in humans, by previously priming with an adenoviral vaccine vector encoding the same antigen, thus offers a novel vaccination strategy for difficult or neglected disease targets when access to more potent adjuvants is not possible. PMID:25156127

  17. Determining liver stage parasite burden by real time quantitative PCR as a method for evaluating pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Witney, A A; Doolan, D L; Anthony, R M; Weiss, W R; Hoffman, S L; Carucci, D J

    2001-12-01

    The detection and quantitation of blood stage parasitaemia is typically used as a surrogate endpoint for estimating the efficacy of vaccines targeted against the hepatic stage, as well as the erythrocytic stage, of the parasite. However, this does not provide an adequate means of evaluating the efficacy of vaccines, which may be only partially effective at the liver-stage. This is a particular concern for effective evaluation of immune enhancement strategies for candidate pre-erythrocytic stage vaccines. Here, we have developed and validated a method for detecting and quantitating liver stage parasites, using the TaqMan fluorescent real-time quantitative PCR system (PE Applied Biosystems). This method uses TaqMan primers designed to the Plasmodium yoelii 18S rRNA gene and rodent GAPDH to amplify products from infected mouse liver cDNA. The technique is highly reproducible as demonstrated with plasmid controls and capable of efficiently quantitating liver-stage parasite burden following a range of sporozoite challenge doses in strains of mice, which differ in their susceptibility to sporozoite infection. We have further demonstrated the capacity of this technique to evaluate the efficacy of a range of pre-erythrocytic stage vaccines. Our data establish this quantitative real-time PCR assay to be a fast and reproducible way of accurately assessing liver stage parasite burden and vaccine efficacy in rodent malaria models.

  18. Nanoparticle formulation enhanced protective immunity provoked by PYGPI8p-transamidase related protein (PyTAM) DNA vaccine in Plasmodium yoelii malaria model.

    PubMed

    Cherif, Mahamoud Sama; Shuaibu, Mohammed Nasir; Kodama, Yukinobu; Kurosaki, Tomoaki; Helegbe, Gideon Kofi; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Ichinose, Akitoyo; Yanagi, Tetsuo; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Yui, Katsuyuki; Tien, Nguyen Huy; Karbwang, Juntra; Hirayama, Kenji

    2014-04-07

    We have previously reported the new formulation of polyethylimine (PEI) with gamma polyglutamic acid (γ-PGA) nanoparticle (NP) to have provided Plasmodium yoelii merozoite surface protein-1 (PyMSP-1) plasmid DNA vaccine with enhanced protective cellular and humoral immunity in the lethal mouse malaria model. PyGPI8p-transamidase-related protein (PyTAM) was selected as a possible candidate vaccine antigen by using DNA vaccination screening from 29 GPI anchor and signal sequence motif positive genes picked up using web-based bioinformatics tools; though the observed protection was not complete. Here, we observed augmented protective effect of PyTAM DNA vaccine by using PEI and γ-PGA complex as delivery system. NP-coated PyTAM plasmid DNA immunized mice showed a significant survival rate from lethal P. yoelii challenge infection compared with naked PyTAM plasmid or with NP-coated empty plasmid DNA group. Antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2b subclass antibody levels, proportion of CD4 and CD8T cells producing IFN-γ in the splenocytes and IL-4, IFN-γ, IL-12 and TNF-α levels in the sera and in the supernatants from ex vivo splenocytes culture were all enhanced by the NP-coated PyTAM DNA vaccine. These data indicates that NP augments PyTAM protective immune response, and this enhancement was associated with increased DC activation and concomitant IL-12 production.

  19. Safety and Immunogenicity of EBA-175 RII-NG Malaria Vaccine Administered Intramuscularly in Semi-Immune Adults: A Phase 1, Double-Blinded Placebo Controlled Dosage Escalation Study

    PubMed Central

    Koram, Kwadwo A.; Ocran, Josephine; Karikari, Yaa S.; Adu-Amankwah, Susan; Ntiri, Michael; Abuaku, Benjamin; Dodoo, Daniel; Gyan, Ben; Kronmann, Karl C.; Nkrumah, Francis

    2016-01-01

    The erythrocyte binding antigen region II (EBA-175 RII) is a Plasmodium falciparum ligand that mediates erythrocyte invasion and is considered an important malaria vaccine candidate. A phase Ia trial in malaria naïve adults living in the United States found the recombinant non-glycosylated vaccine antigen, EBA-175 RII-NG adjuvanted with aluminium phosphate to be safe, immunogenic and capable of inducing biologically active antibodies that can inhibit parasite growth in vitro. The aim of the current study was to assess the safety and immunogenicity of this vaccine in malaria exposed semi-immune healthy adults living in a malaria endemic country, Ghana. In this double-blinded, placebo controlled, dose escalation phase I trial, eighteen subjects per group received ascending dose concentrations (5 μg, 20 μg or 80 μg) of the vaccine intramuscularly at 0, 1 and 6 months, while 6 subjects received placebo (normal saline). The primary end point was the number of subjects experiencing Grade 3 systemic or local adverse events within 14 days post-vaccination. Serious adverse events were assessed throughout the study period. Blood samples for immunological analyses were collected at days 0, 14, 28, 42, 180 and 194. A total of 52 subjects received three doses of the vaccine in the respective groups. No serious adverse events were reported. The majority of all adverse events reported were mild to moderate in severity, with local pain and tenderness being the most common. All adverse events, irrespective of severity, resolved without any sequelae. Subjects who received any of the EBA-175 RII-NG doses had high immunoglobulin G levels which moderately inhibited P. falciparum growth in vitro, compared to those in the placebo group. In conclusion, the EBA-175 RII-NG vaccine was safe, well tolerated and immunogenic in malaria semi-immune Ghanaian adults. Its further development is recommended. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov. Identifier: NCT01026246 PMID:27644034

  20. Protective immune responses elicited by immunization with a chimeric blood-stage malaria vaccine persist but are not boosted by Plasmodium yoelii challenge infection

    PubMed Central

    Alaro, James R.; Lynch, Michele M.; Burns, James M.

    2010-01-01

    An efficacious malaria vaccine remains elusive despite concerted efforts. Using the Plasmodium yoelii murine model, we previously reported that immunization with the C-terminal 19 kDa domain of merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP119) fused to full-length MSP8 protected against lethal P. yoelii 17XL, well beyond that achieved by single or combined immunizations with the component antigens. Here, we continue the evaluation of the chimeric PyMSP1/8 vaccine. We show that immunization with rPyMSP1/8 vaccine elicited an MSP8-restricted T cell response that was sufficient to provide help for both PyMSP119 and PyMSP8 specific B cells to produce high and sustained levels of protective antibodies. The enhanced efficacy of immunization with rPyMSP1/8, in comparison to a combined formulation of rPyMSP142 and rPyMSP8, was not due to improved conformation of protective B cell epitopes in the chimeric molecule. Unexpectedly, rPyMSP1/8 vaccine-induced antibody responses were not boosted by exposure to P. yoelii 17XL infected RBCs. However, rPyMSP1/8 immunized and infected mice mounted robust responses to a diverse set of blood-stage antigens. The data support the further development of an MSP1/8 chimeric vaccine but also suggest that vaccines that prime for responses to a diverse set of parasite proteins will be required to maximize vaccine efficacy. PMID:20709001

  1. [WHO's malaria program Roll Back Malaria].

    PubMed

    Myrvang, B; Godal, T

    2000-05-30

    Malaria is one of the main health problems in the world with 300-500 millions cases yearly and about one million deaths, mainly children in Sub-Saharan Africa. In the 1990s the malaria problem in Africa has increased, although we have methods to control the disease. In 1998 the new secretary general of WHO, Gro Harlem Brundtland, established the Roll Back Malaria programme, with the aim to markedly reduce malaria morbidity and mortality. Governments in malaria-affected countries have to take the lead in Roll Back Malaria. Their health systems must be improved and malaria control integrated into the general health system, and the methods available for prevention and treatment have to be intensified and improved. At the same time, Roll Back Malaria will encourage and promote malaria research which hopefully will result in new medicines, vaccines and other tools which will improve the chances of reducing malaria-related deaths and suffering. Roll Back Malaria is a cabinet project within the WHO, and the organisation has a key role as manager, co-ordinator and monitor of the project. However, it depends for resources on international support and commitment from other UN bodies, the World Bank, governments in the western world, pharmaceutical industry, philanthropists and other sources. At present an optimistic view prevails, and the preliminary aim, to halve the malaria mortality by the year 2010, seems realistic even with the control methods of today. However, if research efforts result in new and better tools to combat the disease, the task will definitely be easier.

  2. A bicistronic DNA vaccine containing apical membrane antigen 1 and merozoite surface protein 4/5 can prime humoral and cellular immune responses and partially protect mice against virulent Plasmodium chabaudi adami DS malaria.

    PubMed

    Rainczuk, A; Scorza, T; Spithill, T W; Smooker, P M

    2004-10-01

    The ultimate malaria vaccine will require the delivery of multiple antigens from different stages of the complex malaria life cycle. In order to efficiently deliver multiple antigens with use of DNA vaccine technology, new antigen delivery systems must be assessed. This study utilized a bicistronic vector construct, containing an internal ribosome entry site, expressing a combination of malarial candidate antigens: merozoite surface protein 4/5 (MSP4/5) (fused to a monocyte chemotactic protein 3 chemoattractant sequence) and apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1) (fused to a tissue plasminogen activator secretion signal). Transfection of COS 7 cells with bicistronic plasmids resulted in production and secretion of both AMA-1 and MSP4/5 in vitro. Vaccination of BALB/c mice via intraepidermal gene gun and intramuscular routes against AMA-1 and MSP4/5 resulted in antibody production and significant in vitro proliferation of splenocytes stimulated by both AMA-1 and MSP4/5. Survival of BALB/c mice vaccinated with bicistronic constructs after lethal Plasmodium chabaudi adami DS erythrocytic-stage challenge was variable, although significant increases in survival and reductions in peak parasitemia were observed in several challenge trials when the vaccine was delivered by the intramuscular route. This study using a murine model demonstrates that the delivery of malarial antigens via bicistronic vectors is feasible. Further experimentation with bicistronic delivery systems is required for the optimization and refinement of DNA vaccines to effectively prime protective immune responses against malaria.

  3. A Phase 1 study of the blood-stage malaria vaccine candidate AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel with CPG 7909, using two different formulations and dosing intervals.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Ruth D; Mullen, Gregory E D; Pierce, Mark; Martin, Laura B; Miura, Kazutoyo; Fay, Michael P; Long, Carole A; Shaffer, Donna; Saul, Allan; Miller, Louis H; Durbin, Anna P

    2009-06-24

    A Phase 1 study was conducted in 24 malaria naïve adults to assess the safety and immunogenicity of the recombinant protein vaccine apical membrane antigen 1-Combination 1 (AMA1-C1)/Alhydrogel with CPG 7909 in two different formulations (phosphate buffer and saline), and given at two different dosing schedules, 0 and 1 month or 0 and 2 months. Both formulations were well tolerated and frequency of local reactions and solicited adverse events was similar among the groups. Peak antibody levels in the groups receiving CPG 7909 in saline were not significantly different than those receiving CPG 7909 in phosphate. Peak antibody levels in the groups vaccinated at a 0,2 month interval were 2.52-fold higher than those vaccinated at a 0,1 month interval (p=0.037, 95% CI 1.03, 4.28). In vitro growth inhibition followed the antibody level: median inhibition was 51% (0,1 month interval) versus 85% (0,2 month interval) in antibody from samples taken 2 weeks post-second vaccination (p=0.056).

  4. A Phase Ia Study to Assess the Safety and Immunogenicity of New Malaria Vaccine Candidates ChAd63 CS Administered Alone and with MVA CS

    PubMed Central

    de Barra, Eoghan; Hodgson, Susanne H.; Ewer, Katie J.; Bliss, Carly M.; Hennigan, Kerrie; Collins, Ann; Berrie, Eleanor; Lawrie, Alison M.; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Nicosia, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) malaria remains a significant cause of mortality and morbidity throughout the world. Development of an effective vaccine would be a key intervention to reduce the considerable social and economic impact of malaria. Methodology We conducted a Phase Ia, non-randomized, clinical trial in 24 healthy, malaria-naïve adults of the chimpanzee adenovirus 63 (ChAd63) and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) replication-deficient viral vectored vaccines encoding the circumsporozoite protein (CS) of P. falciparum. Results ChAd63-MVA CS administered in a heterologous prime-boost regime was shown to be safe and immunogenic, inducing high-level T cell responses to CS. With a priming ChAd63 CS dose of 5×109 vp responses peaked at a mean of 1947 SFC/million PBMC (median 1524) measured by ELIspot 7 days after the MVA boost and showed a mixed CD4+/CD8+ phenotype. With a higher priming dose of ChAd63 CS dose 5×1010 vp T cell responses did not increase (mean 1659 SFC/million PBMC, median 1049). Serum IgG responses to CS were modest and peaked at day 14 post ChAd63 CS (median antibody concentration for all groups at day 14 of 1.3 µg/ml (range 0–11.9), but persisted throughout late follow-up (day 140 median antibody concentration groups 1B & 2B 0.9 µg/ml (range 0–4.7). Conclusions ChAd63-MVA is a safe and highly immunogenic delivery platform for the CS antigen in humans which warrants efficacy testing. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01450280 PMID:25522180

  5. Human CD8+ T cells mediate protective immunity induced by a human malaria vaccine in human immune system mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangming; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Min; Funakoshi, Ryota; Sheetij, Dutta; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Crisanti, Andrea; Nussenzweig, Victor; Nussenzweig, Ruth S; Tsuji, Moriya

    2016-08-31

    A number of studies have shown that CD8+ T cells mediate protective anti-malaria immunity in a mouse model. However, whether human CD8+ T cells play a role in protection against malaria remains unknown. We recently established human immune system (HIS) mice harboring functional human CD8+ T cells (HIS-CD8 mice) by transduction with HLA-A∗0201 and certain human cytokines using recombinant adeno-associated virus-based gene transfer technologies. These HIS-CD8 mice mount a potent, antigen-specific HLA-A∗0201-restricted human CD8+ T-cell response upon immunization with a recombinant adenovirus expressing a human malaria antigen, the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP), termed AdPfCSP. In the present study, we challenged AdPfCSP-immunized HIS-CD8 mice with transgenic Plasmodium berghei sporozoites expressing full-length PfCSP and found that AdPfCSP-immunized (but not naïve) mice were protected against subsequent malaria challenge. The level of the HLA-A∗0201-restricted, PfCSP-specific human CD8+ T-cell response was closely correlated with the level of malaria protection. Furthermore, depletion of human CD8+ T cells from AdPfCSP-immunized HIS-CD8 mice almost completely abolished the anti-malaria immune response. Taken together, our data show that human CD8+ T cells mediate protective anti-malaria immunity in vivo.

  6. Immunological Cross-Reactivity between Malaria Vaccine Target Antigen P48/45 in Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum and Cross–Boosting of Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yi; Bansal, Geetha P.; Merino, Kristen; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2016-01-01

    In general, malaria immunity has been suggested to be species specific with very little, if any, known cross-reactivity between Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum, both of which are responsible for >90% of human malaria, and co-endemic in many countries. It is therefore believed that species-specific immunity may be needed to target different species of Plasmodium. Pfs48/45 and Pvs48/45 are well established targets in the sexual stages of the malaria parasites, and are being pursued for the development of transmission blocking vaccines. Comparison of their sequences reveals 61% and 55% identity at the DNA and protein level, respectively raising the possibility that these two target antigens might share cross-reacting epitopes. Having succeeded in expressing recombinant Pfs48/45 and Pvs48/45 proteins, we hypothesized that these proteins will not only exhibit immunological cross–reactivity but also cross-boost immune responses. Mice were immunized with purified recombinant proteins using CFA, Montanide ISA-51 and alum as adjuvants, and the sera were analyzed by ELISA, Western blotting and indirect fixed and live IFA to address the hypothesis. Our studies revealed that Pvs48/45-immune sera showed strong cross-reactivity to full length Pfs48/45 protein, and the majority of this cross reactivity was in the amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal sub-fragments of Pfs48/45. In cross-boosting experiments Pfs48/45 and Pvs48/45 antigens were able to cross-boost each other in mouse immunization studies. Additionally we also noticed an effect of adjuvants in the overall magnitude of observed cross-reactivity. These studies may have significant implications for immunity targeting transmission of both the species of malaria parasites. PMID:27438603

  7. Vaccinations

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  8. In silico Identification and Validation of a Linear and Naturally Immunogenic B-Cell Epitope of the Plasmodium vivax Malaria Vaccine Candidate Merozoite Surface Protein-9

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues-da-Silva, Rodrigo Nunes; Martins da Silva, João Hermínio; Singh, Balwan; Jiang, Jianlin; Meyer, Esmeralda V. S.; Santos, Fátima; Banic, Dalma Maria; Moreno, Alberto; Galinski, Mary R.; Oliveira-Ferreira, Joseli; Lima-Junior, Josué da Costa

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic peptide vaccines provide the advantages of safety, stability and low cost. The success of this approach is highly dependent on efficient epitope identification and synthetic strategies for efficacious delivery. In malaria, the Merozoite Surface Protein-9 of Plasmodium vivax (PvMSP9) has been considered a vaccine candidate based on the evidence that specific antibodies were able to inhibit merozoite invasion and recombinant proteins were highly immunogenic in mice and humans. However the identities of linear B-cell epitopes within PvMSP9 as targets of functional antibodies remain undefined. We used several publicly-available algorithms for in silico analyses and prediction of relevant B cell epitopes within PMSP9. We show that the tandem repeat sequence EAAPENAEPVHENA (PvMSP9E795-A808) present at the C-terminal region is a promising target for antibodies, given its high combined score to be a linear epitope and located in a putative intrinsically unstructured region of the native protein. To confirm the predictive value of the computational approach, plasma samples from 545 naturally exposed individuals were screened for IgG reactivity against the recombinant PvMSP9-RIRII729-972 and a synthetic peptide representing the predicted B cell epitope PvMSP9E795-A808. 316 individuals (58%) were responders to the full repetitive region PvMSP9-RIRII, of which 177 (56%) also presented total IgG reactivity against the synthetic peptide, confirming it validity as a B cell epitope. The reactivity indexes of anti-PvMSP9-RIRII and anti-PvMSP9E795-A808 antibodies were correlated. Interestingly, a potential role in the acquisition of protective immunity was associated with the linear epitope, since the IgG1 subclass against PvMSP9E795-A808 was the prevalent subclass and this directly correlated with time elapsed since the last malaria episode; however this was not observed in the antibody responses against the full PvMSP9-RIRII. In conclusion, our findings identified and

  9. Controlled Human Malaria Infection (CHMI) differentially affects cell-mediated and antibody responses to CSP and AMA1 induced by adenovirus vaccines with and without DNA-priming

    PubMed Central

    Sedegah, Martha; Hollingdale, Michael R; Farooq, Fouzia; Ganeshan, Harini; Belmonte, Maria; Huang, Jun; Abot, Esteban; Limbach, Keith; Chuang, Ilin; Tamminga, Cindy; Epstein, Judith E; Villasante, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that a DNA-prime followed by an adenovirus-5 boost vaccine containing CSP and AMA1 (DNA/Ad) successfully protected 4 of 15 subjects to controlled human malaria infection (CHMI). However, the adenovirus-5 vaccine alone (AdCA) failed to induce protection despite eliciting cellular responses that were often higher than those induced by DNA/Ad. Here we determined the effect of CHMI on pre-CHMI cellular and antibody responses against CSP and AMA1 expressed as fold-changes in activities. Generally, in the DNA/Ad trial, CHMI caused pre-CHMI ELISpot IFN-γ and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses of the protected subjects to fall but among non-protected subjects, CHMI caused rises of pre-CHMI ELISpot IFN-γ but falls of CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses. In contrast in the AdCA trial, CHMI caused both pre-CHMI ELISpot IFN-γ and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses of the AdCA subjects to fall. We suggest that the falls in activities are due to migration of peripheral CD8+ T cells to the liver in response to developing liver stage parasites, and this fall, in the DNA/Ad trial, is masked in ELISpot responses of the non-protected subjects by rises in other immune cell types. In addition, CHMI caused falls in antibody activities of protected subjects, but rises in non-protected subjects in both trials to CSP, and dramatically in the AdCA trial to AMA1, reaching 380 μg/ml that is probably due to boosting by transient blood stage infection before chloroquine treatment. Taken together, these results further define differences in cellular responses between DNA/Ad and AdCA trials, and suggest that natural transmission may boost responses induced by these malaria vaccines especially when protection is not achieved. PMID:26292027

  10. Structure and Characterisation of a Key Epitope in the Conserved C-Terminal Domain of the Malaria Vaccine Candidate MSP2.

    PubMed

    Seow, Jeffrey; Morales, Rodrigo A V; MacRaild, Christopher A; Krishnarjuna, Bankala; McGowan, Sheena; Dingjan, Tamir; Jaipuria, Garima; Rouet, Romain; Wilde, Karyn L; Atreya, Hanudatta S; Richards, Jack S; Anders, Robin F; Christ, Daniel; Drinkwater, Nyssa; Norton, Raymond S

    2017-03-24

    Merozoite surface protein 2 (MSP2) is an intrinsically disordered antigen that is abundant on the surface of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The two allelic families of MSP2, 3D7 and FC27, differ in their central variable regions, which are flanked by highly conserved C-terminal and N-terminal regions. In a vaccine trial, full-length 3D7 MSP2 induced a strain-specific protective immune response despite the detectable presence of conserved region antibodies. This work focuses on the conserved C-terminal region of MSP2, which includes the only disulphide bond in the protein and encompasses key epitopes recognised by the mouse monoclonal antibodies 4D11 and 9H4. Although the 4D11 and 9H4 epitopes are overlapping, immunofluorescence assays have shown that the mouse monoclonal antibody 4D11 binds to MSP2 on the merozoite surface with a much stronger signal than 9H4. Understanding the structural basis for this antigenic difference between these antibodies will help direct the design of a broad-spectrum and MSP2-based malaria vaccine. 4D11 and 9H4 were reengineered into antibody fragments [variable region fragment (Fv) and single-chain Fv (scFv)] and were validated as suitable models for their full-sized IgG counterparts by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. An alanine scan of the 13-residue epitope 3D7-MSP2207-222 identified the minimal binding epitope of 4D11 and the key residues involved in binding. A 2.2-Å crystal structure of 4D11 Fv bound to the eight-residue epitope NKENCGAA provided valuable insight into the possible conformation of the C-terminal region of MSP2 on the parasite. This work underpins continued efforts to optimise recombinant MSP2 constructs for evaluation as potential vaccine candidates.

  11. Controlled Human Malaria Infection (CHMI) differentially affects cell-mediated and antibody responses to CSP and AMA1 induced by adenovirus vaccines with and without DNA-priming.

    PubMed

    Sedegah, Martha; Hollingdale, Michael R; Farooq, Fouzia; Ganeshan, Harini; Belmonte, Maria; Huang, Jun; Abot, Esteban; Limbach, Keith; Chuang, Ilin; Tamminga, Cindy; Epstein, Judith E; Villasante, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that a DNA-prime followed by an adenovirus-5 boost vaccine containing CSP and AMA1 (DNA/Ad) successfully protected 4 of 15 subjects to controlled human malaria infection (CHMI). However, the adenovirus-5 vaccine alone (AdCA) failed to induce protection despite eliciting cellular responses that were often higher than those induced by DNA/Ad. Here we determined the effect of CHMI on pre-CHMI cellular and antibody responses against CSP and AMA1 expressed as fold-changes in activities. Generally, in the DNA/Ad trial, CHMI caused pre-CHMI ELISpot IFN-γ and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses of the protected subjects to fall but among non-protected subjects, CHMI caused rises of pre-CHMI ELISpot IFN-γ but falls of CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses. In contrast in the AdCA trial, CHMI caused both pre-CHMI ELISpot IFN-γ and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses of the AdCA subjects to fall. We suggest that the falls in activities are due to migration of peripheral CD8+ T cells to the liver in response to developing liver stage parasites, and this fall, in the DNA/Ad trial, is masked in ELISpot responses of the non-protected subjects by rises in other immune cell types. In addition, CHMI caused falls in antibody activities of protected subjects, but rises in non-protected subjects in both trials to CSP, and dramatically in the AdCA trial to AMA1, reaching 380 μg/ml that is probably due to boosting by transient blood stage infection before chloroquine treatment. Taken together, these results further define differences in cellular responses between DNA/Ad and AdCA trials, and suggest that natural transmission may boost responses induced by these malaria vaccines especially when protection is not achieved.

  12. The dichotomy (generation of MAbs with functional heterogeneity) in antimalarial immune response in vaccinated/protected mice: a new concept in our understanding of the protective immune mechanisms in malaria.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prati Pal; Prakash, Bhanu

    2014-01-01

    Globally, vaccines have emerged as one of the most effective, safe, and cost-effective public health interventions, and are known to save 2-3 million lives, annually. However, despite various commendable efforts, a suitable human malaria vaccine is yet to see the light of the day. The lack of our complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis and immune protection in malaria appears to be responsible for this state. Earlier, our laboratory has reported that Swiss mice vaccinated with Plasmodium yoelii nigeriensis-total parasite antigens soluble in culture medium and saponin, following a 100% lethal challenge, showed 60% protection. The monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) generated from the splenocytes of these vaccinated/protected mice, following characterization by in vitro merozoite invasion inhibition assay, ex vivo macrophage phagocytosis assay, and in vivo passive transfer of protection test, belonged to 2 distinct groups-a larger group of MAbs inhibited<58% Mz invasion and transferred 30% passive protection, whereas a smaller group of MAbs inhibited 86% Mz invasion and transferred 60% passive protection. Additionally, the MAbs of the smaller group, as compared with the larger one, mediated nearly 2.4-fold enhanced macrophage phagocytosis of infected-erythrocytes, in vitro. These results thus clearly showed a dichotomy among the generated MAbs. An exploration of the phenomenon of dichotomy in protective immunity in malaria by using various hosts and malaria parasite combinations, especially at the level of antibodies, cells, and cytokines, may add new insights to our understanding of the protective immunity, and help in the identification of biomarkers/biosignatures of immune protection and development of future human malaria vaccines.

  13. Taking a Bite out of Malaria: Controlled Human Malaria Infection by Needle and Syringe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    2013 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Taking a Bite out of Malaria : Controlled Human Malaria ...American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Editorial Taking a Bite out of Malaria : Controlled Human Malaria Infection by Needle and Syringe Judith E...organism malaria vaccine, regardless of whether the parasite is attenuated by radiation, genetic modification, or concurrent chemoprophy- laxis. The whole

  14. The stage-specific in vitro efficacy of a malaria antigen cocktail provides valuable insights into the development of effective multi-stage vaccines.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Holger; Boes, Alexander; Kastilan, Robin; Kapelski, Stephanie; Edgue, Güven; Beiss, Veronique; Chubodova, Ivana; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Pradel, Gabriele; Schillberg, Stefan; Reimann, Andreas; Fischer, Rainer

    2015-10-01

    Multicomponent vaccines targeting different stages of Plasmodium falciparum represent a promising, holistic concept towards better malaria vaccines. Additionally, an effective vaccine candidate should demonstrate cross-strain specificity because many antigens are polymorphic, which can reduce vaccine efficacy. A cocktail of recombinant fusion proteins (VAMAX-Mix) featuring three diversity-covering variants of the blood-stage antigen PfAMA1, each combined with the conserved sexual-stage antigen Pfs25 and one of the pre-erythrocytic-stage antigens PfCSP_TSR or PfCelTOS, or the additional blood-stage antigen PfMSP1_19, was produced in Pichia pastoris and used to immunize rabbits. The immune sera and purified IgG were used to perform various assays determining antigen specific titers and in vitro efficacy against different parasite stages and strains. In functional in vitro assays we observed robust inhibition of blood-stage (up to 90%), and sexual-stage parasites (up to 100%) and biased inhibition of pre-erythrocytic parasites (0-40%). Cross-strain blood-stage efficacy was observed in erythrocyte invasion assays using four different P. falciparum strains. The quantification of antigen-specific IgGs allowed the determination of specific IC50 values. The significant difference in antigen-specific IC50 requirements, the direct correlation between antigen-specific IgG and the relative quantitative representation of antigens within the cocktail, provide valuable implementations for future multi-stage, multi-component vaccine designs.

  15. Patenting malarial vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2008-01-01

    Malaria is an important tropical infection affecting millions of world population each year. Malarial vaccine development is the hope for successful control of malaria. Knowledge on malaria vaccine has been considered patentable subject for decades. Due to the present advance biotechnology, the number of patent applications related to malarial vaccine is growing exponentially. Several malarial vaccine candidates have been recently identified and the genetic manipulation of these candidates is becoming more efficient with the advancement of new biotechnologies. This review summarizes some of the recent published patents on malarial vaccines covering antigens, candidate epitopes and recombinant processing.

  16. Phase 1 Trial of the Plasmodium falciparum Blood Stage Vaccine MSP142-C1/Alhydrogel with and without CPG 7909 in Malaria Naïve Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Ruth D.; Martin, Laura B.; Shaffer, Donna; Long, Carole A.; Miura, Kazutoyo; Fay, Michael P.; Narum, David L.; Zhu, Daming; Mullen, Gregory E. D.; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Miller, Louis H.; Durbin, Anna P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Merozoite surface protein 142 (MSP142) is a leading blood stage malaria vaccine candidate. In order to induce immune responses that cover the major antigenic polymorphisms, FVO and 3D7 recombinant proteins of MSP142 were mixed (MSP142-C1). To improve the level of antibody response, MSP142-C1 was formulated with Alhydrogel plus the novel adjuvant CPG 7909. Methods A Phase 1 clinical trial was conducted in healthy malaria-naïve adults at the Center for Immunization Research in Washington, D.C., to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of MSP142-C1/Alhydrogel +/− CPG 7909. Sixty volunteers were enrolled in dose escalating cohorts and randomized to receive three vaccinations of either 40 or 160 µg protein adsorbed to Alhydrogel +/− 560 µg CPG 7909 at 0, 1 and 2 months. Results Vaccinations were well tolerated, with only one related adverse event graded as severe (Grade 3 injection site erythema) and all other vaccine related adverse events graded as either mild or moderate. Local adverse events were more frequent and severe in the groups receiving CPG. The addition of CPG enhanced anti-MSP142 antibody responses following vaccination by up to 49-fold two weeks after second immunization and 8-fold two weeks after the third immunization when compared to MSP142-C1/Alhydrogel alone (p<0.0001). After the third immunization, functionality of the antibody was tested by an in vitro growth inhibition assay. Inhibition was a function of antibody titer, with an average of 3% (range −2 to 10%) in the non CPG groups versus 14% (3 to 32%) in the CPG groups. Conclusion/Significance The favorable safety profile and high antibody responses induced with MSP142-C1/Alhydrogel + CPG 7909 are encouraging. MSP142-C1/Alhydrogel is being combined with other blood stage antigens and will be taken forward in a formulation adjuvanted with CPG 7909. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00320658 PMID:20107498

  17. A rapid dipstick antigen capture assay for the diagnosis of falciparum malaria. WHO Informal Consultation on Recent Advances in Diagnostic Techniques and Vaccines for Malaria.

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Recent advances in the diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infections have made it possible to consider supplementing light microscopy with a standardized dipstick antigen capture assay based on the detection of a parasite-specific protein, which is secreted by the asexual blood stages and immature gametocytes but not by the other stages. Field trials indicate that this dipstick assay provides consistently reproducible results, with a threshold of detection of P. falciparum parasitaemia similar to that obtained by high quality routine malaria microscopy and a specificity and sensitivity of around 90% compared with standard thick blood film microscopy. The stability, reproducibility, and ease of use of the assay clearly indicate that it has potential for application in the management of malaria, particularly at the peripheral health care level, provided its accuracy can be assured and that it can be made affordable. Consideration should be given to its wider use where operational requirements and resources so justify, and where decisions are based on adequate evaluation of the existing health delivery systems. PMID:8653815

  18. Interferon-γ responses to Plasmodium falciparum vaccine candidate antigens decrease in the absence of malaria transmission

    PubMed Central

    Ochola, Lyticia; Ngwena, Gideon A.M.; Ayodo, George; Hodges, James S.; Noland, Gregory S.; John, Chandy C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Malaria elimination campaigns are planned or active in many countries. The effects of malaria elimination on immune responses such as antigen-specific IFN- γ responses are not well characterized. Methods IFN- γ responses to the P. falciparum antigens circumsporozoite protein, liver stage antigen-1, thrombospondin-related adhesive protein, apical membrane antigen-1, MB2, and merozoite surface protein-1 were tested by ELISA in 243 individuals in highland Kenya in April 2008, October 2008, and April 2009, after a one-year period of interrupted malaria transmission from April 2007 to March 2008. Results While one individual (0.4%) tested positive for P. falciparum by PCR inOctober 2008 and another two (0.9%) tested positive in April 2009, no clinical malaria cases were detected during weekly visits. Levels of IFN-γ to all antigens decreased significantly from April 2008 to April 2009 (all P < 0.001). Discussion Naturally acquired IFN- γ responses to P. falciparum antigensare short-lived in the absence of repeated P. falciparum infection. Even short periods of malaria interruption may significantly decrease IFN-γ responses to P. falciparum antigens. PMID:28097063

  19. Accelerating the clinical development of protein-based vaccines for malaria by efficient purification using a four amino acid C-terminal 'C-tag'.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jing; Hjerrild, Kathryn A; Silk, Sarah E; Brown, Rebecca E; Labbé, Geneviève M; Marshall, Jennifer M; Wright, Katherine E; Bezemer, Sandra; Clemmensen, Stine B; Biswas, Sumi; Li, Yuanyuan; El-Turabi, Aadil; Douglas, Alexander D; Hermans, Pim; Detmers, Frank J; de Jongh, Willem A; Higgins, Matthew K; Ashfield, Rebecca; Draper, Simon J

    2017-01-30

    Development of bespoke biomanufacturing processes remains a critical bottleneck for translational studies, in particular when modest quantities of a novel product are required for proof-of-concept Phase I/II clinical trials. In these instances the ability to develop a biomanufacturing process quickly and relatively cheaply, without risk to product quality or safety, provides a great advantage by allowing new antigens or concepts in immunogen design to more rapidly enter human testing. These challenges with production and purification are particularly apparent when developing recombinant protein-based vaccines for difficult parasitic diseases, with Plasmodium falciparum malaria being a prime example. To that end, we have previously reported the expression of a novel protein vaccine for malaria using the ExpreS(2)Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 stable cell line system, however, a very low overall process yield (typically <5% recovery of hexa-histidine-tagged protein) meant the initial purification strategy was not suitable for scale-up and clinical biomanufacture of such a vaccine. Here we describe a newly available affinity purification method that was ideally suited to purification of the same protein which encodes the P. falciparum reticulocyte-binding protein homolog 5 - currently the leading antigen for assessment in next generation vaccines aiming to prevent red blood cell invasion by the blood-stage parasite. This purification system makes use of a C-terminal tag known as 'C-tag', composed of the four amino acids, glutamic acid - proline - glutamic acid - alanine (E-P-E-A), which is selectively purified on a CaptureSelect™ affinity resin coupled to a camelid single chain antibody, called NbSyn2. The C-terminal fusion of this short C-tag to P. falciparum reticulocyte-binding protein homolog 5 achieved >85% recovery and >70% purity in a single step purification directly from clarified, concentrated Schneider 2 cell supernatant under mild conditions

  20. New malaria vaccine candidates based on the Plasmodium vivax Merozoite Surface Protein-1 and the TLR-5 agonist Salmonella Typhimurium FliC flagellin.

    PubMed

    Bargieri, Daniel Y; Rosa, Daniela S; Braga, Catarina J M; Carvalho, Bruna O; Costa, Fabio T M; Espíndola, Noeli Maria; Vaz, Adelaide José; Soares, Irene S; Ferreira, Luis C S; Rodrigues, Mauricio M

    2008-11-11

    The present study evaluated the immunogenicity of new malaria vaccine formulations based on the 19kDa C-terminal fragment of Plasmodium vivax Merozoite Surface Protein-1 (MSP1(19)) and the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium flagellin (FliC), a Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) agonist. FliC was used as an adjuvant either admixed or genetically linked to the P. vivax MSP1(19) and administered to C57BL/6 mice via parenteral (s.c.) or mucosal (i.n.) routes. The recombinant fusion protein preserved MSP1(19) epitopes recognized by sera collected from P. vivax infected humans and TLR5 agonist activity. Mice parenterally immunized with recombinant P. vivax MSP1(19) in the presence of FliC, either admixed or genetically linked, elicited strong and long-lasting MSP1(19)-specific systemic antibody responses with a prevailing IgG1 subclass response. Incorporation of another TLR agonist, CpG ODN 1826, resulted in a more balanced response, as evaluated by the IgG1/IgG2c ratio, and higher cell-mediated immune response measured by interferon-gamma secretion. Finally, we show that MSP1(19)-specific antibodies recognized the native protein expressed on the surface of P. vivax parasites harvested from infected humans. The present report proposes a new class of malaria vaccine formulation based on the use of malarial antigens and the innate immunity agonist FliC. It contains intrinsic adjuvant properties and enhanced ability to induce specific humoral and cellular immune responses when administered alone or in combination with other adjuvants.

  1. Enhancement of functional antibody responses to AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel, a Plasmodium falciparum malaria vaccine, with CpG oligodeoxynucleotide.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Gregory E D; Giersing, Birgitte K; Ajose-Popoola, Olubunmi; Davis, Heather L; Kothe, Cheryl; Zhou, Hong; Aebig, Joan; Dobrescu, Gelu; Saul, Allan; Long, Carole A

    2006-03-24

    Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) has been shown to be a promising malaria vaccine candidate. The multiallelic AMA1-C1 vaccine currently in Phase 1 trials in the US and Mali contains an equal mixture of the ectodomain portion of recombinant AMA1 from the FVO and 3D7 clones of Plasmodium falciparum, formulated on Alhydrogel. It is hoped that inclusion of a human-optimized CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) (CPG 7909) with our existing AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel vaccine will lead to a higher concentration of functional AMA1-C1 antibodies. Preclinical studies were performed in mice, rats and guinea pigs to assess the safety, immunogenicity and functionality of the immune response to AMA1-C1 with Alhydrogel + CPG 7909 compared to antigen with Alhydrogel alone. Day 42 mean anti-AMA1 ELISA titer values derived from individual animals were compared between Alhydrogel and Alhydrogel + CPG 7909 groups at each antigen dose for each species. Sera from Alhydrogel + CPG 7909 groups displayed significantly higher antibody titers (P < 0.025) than their comparable Alhydrogel alone group. Mouse IgG isotype analysis showed that AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel induced a predominately Th2 type response while AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel + CPG 7909 gave a mixed Th1/Th2 type response. When tested for functional activity by in vitro inhibition of parasite invasion, IgG isolated from serum pools of AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel + CPG 7909 animals was more effective against both FVO and 3D7 parasites than an equal concentration of IgG from animals receiving vaccines adjuvanted with Alhydrogel alone. These promising preclinical results have recently led to the start of a Phase 1 trial in the US.

  2. Optimization of a multi-stage, multi-subunit malaria vaccine candidate for the production in Pichia pastoris by the identification and removal of protease cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Holger; Schinkel, Helga; Kastilan, Robin; Dahm, Pia; Boes, Alexander; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Chudobová, Ivana; Maskus, Dominika; Fendel, Rolf; Schillberg, Stefan; Reimann, Andreas; Fischer, Rainer

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrated the successful optimization of a recombinant multi-subunit malaria vaccine candidate protein for production in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris by the identification and subsequent removal of two protease cleavage sites. After observing protein degradation in the culture supernatant of a fed-batch fermentation, the predominant proteolytic fragment of the secreted recombinant protein was analyzed by mass spectrometry. The MS data indicated the cleavage of an amino acid sequence matching the yeast KEX2-protease consensus motif EKRE. The cleavage in this region was completely abolished by the deletion of the EKRE motif in a modified variant. This modified variant was produced, purified, and used for immunization of rabbits, inducing high antigen specific antibody titers (2 × 10(6) ). Total IgG from rabbit immune sera recognized different stages of Plasmodium falciparum parasites in immunofluorescence assays, indicating native folding of the vaccine candidate. However, the modified variant was still degraded, albeit into different fragments. Further analysis by mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing revealed a second cleavage site downstream of the motif PEVK. We therefore removed a 17-amino-acid stretch including the PEVK motif, resulting in the subsequent production of the full-length recombinant vaccine candidate protein without significant degradation, with a yield of 53 mg per liter culture volume. We clearly demonstrate that the proteolytic degradation of recombinant proteins by endogenous P. pastoris proteases can be prevented by the identification and removal of such cleavage sites. This strategy is particularly relevant for the production of recombinant subunit vaccines, where product yield and stability play a more important role than for the production of a stringently-defined native sequence which is necessary for most therapeutic molecules.

  3. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Vaccinations are injections of antigens into the body. Once the antigens enter the blood, they circulate along ... suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of an ...

  4. Immune Escape Mechanisms are Plasmodium's Secret Weapons Foiling the Success of Potent and Persistently Efficacious Malaria Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Fouzia; Bergmann-Leitner, Elke S

    2015-12-01

    Despite decades of active research, an efficacious vaccine mediating long-term protection is still not available. This review highlights various mechanisms and the different facets by which the parasites outsmart the immune system. An understanding of how the parasites escape immune recognition and interfere with the induction of a protective immune response that provides sterilizing immunity will be crucial to vaccine design.

  5. Malaria: Biology and Disease.

    PubMed

    Cowman, Alan F; Healer, Julie; Marapana, Danushka; Marsh, Kevin

    2016-10-20

    Malaria has been a major global health problem of humans through history and is a leading cause of death and disease across many tropical and subtropical countries. Over the last fifteen years renewed efforts at control have reduced the prevalence of malaria by over half, raising the prospect that elimination and perhaps eradication may be a long-term possibility. Achievement of this goal requires the development of new tools including novel antimalarial drugs and more efficacious vaccines as well as an increased understanding of the disease and biology of the parasite. This has catalyzed a major effort resulting in development and regulatory approval of the first vaccine against malaria (RTS,S/AS01) as well as identification of novel drug targets and antimalarial compounds, some of which are in human clinical trials.

  6. Malaria Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laveran and the Discovery of the Malaria Parasite Ross and the Discovery that Mosquitoes Transmit Malaria Parasites ... for work associated with malaria: to Sir Ronald Ross (1902), Charles Louis Alphonse Laveran (1907), Julius Wagner- ...

  7. An Open Source Business Model for Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Årdal, Christine; Røttingen, John-Arne

    2015-01-01

    Greater investment is required in developing new drugs and vaccines against malaria in order to eradicate malaria. These precious funds must be carefully managed to achieve the greatest impact. We evaluate existing efforts to discover and develop new drugs and vaccines for malaria to determine how best malaria R&D can benefit from an enhanced open source approach and how such a business model may operate. We assess research articles, patents, clinical trials and conducted a smaller survey among malaria researchers. Our results demonstrate that the public and philanthropic sectors are financing and performing the majority of malaria drug/vaccine discovery and development, but are then restricting access through patents, ‘closed’ publications and hidden away physical specimens. This makes little sense since it is also the public and philanthropic sector that purchases the drugs and vaccines. We recommend that a more “open source” approach is taken by making the entire value chain more efficient through greater transparency which may lead to more extensive collaborations. This can, for example, be achieved by empowering an existing organization like the Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV) to act as a clearing house for malaria-related data. The malaria researchers that we surveyed indicated that they would utilize such registry data to increase collaboration. Finally, we question the utility of publicly or philanthropically funded patents for malaria medicines, where little to no profits are available. Malaria R&D benefits from a publicly and philanthropically funded architecture, which starts with academic research institutions, product development partnerships, commercialization assistance through UNITAID and finally procurement through mechanisms like The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and the U.S.’ President’s Malaria Initiative. We believe that a fresh look should be taken at the cost/benefit of patents particularly related to new

  8. An open source business model for malaria.

    PubMed

    Årdal, Christine; Røttingen, John-Arne

    2015-01-01

    Greater investment is required in developing new drugs and vaccines against malaria in order to eradicate malaria. These precious funds must be carefully managed to achieve the greatest impact. We evaluate existing efforts to discover and develop new drugs and vaccines for malaria to determine how best malaria R&D can benefit from an enhanced open source approach and how such a business model may operate. We assess research articles, patents, clinical trials and conducted a smaller survey among malaria researchers. Our results demonstrate that the public and philanthropic sectors are financing and performing the majority of malaria drug/vaccine discovery and development, but are then restricting access through patents, 'closed' publications and hidden away physical specimens. This makes little sense since it is also the public and philanthropic sector that purchases the drugs and vaccines. We recommend that a more "open source" approach is taken by making the entire value chain more efficient through greater transparency which may lead to more extensive collaborations. This can, for example, be achieved by empowering an existing organization like the Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV) to act as a clearing house for malaria-related data. The malaria researchers that we surveyed indicated that they would utilize such registry data to increase collaboration. Finally, we question the utility of publicly or philanthropically funded patents for malaria medicines, where little to no profits are available. Malaria R&D benefits from a publicly and philanthropically funded architecture, which starts with academic research institutions, product development partnerships, commercialization assistance through UNITAID and finally procurement through mechanisms like The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and the U.S.' President's Malaria Initiative. We believe that a fresh look should be taken at the cost/benefit of patents particularly related to new malaria

  9. A randomized and controlled Phase 1 study of the safety and immunogenicity of the AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel + CPG 7909 vaccine for Plasmodium falciparum malaria in semi-immune Malian adults.

    PubMed

    Sagara, Issaka; Ellis, Ruth D; Dicko, Alassane; Niambele, Mohamed B; Kamate, Beh; Guindo, Ousmane; Sissoko, Mahamadou S; Fay, Michael P; Guindo, Merepen A; Kante, Ousmane; Saye, Renion; Miura, Kazutoyo; Long, Carole; Mullen, Gregory E D; Pierce, Mark; Martin, Laura B; Rausch, Kelly; Dolo, Amagana; Diallo, Dapa A; Miller, Louis H; Doumbo, Ogobara K

    2009-12-09

    A double blind, randomized and controlled Phase 1 clinical trial was conducted to assess the safety and immunogenicity in malaria-exposed adults of the Plasmodium falciparum blood stage vaccine candidate Apical Membrane Antigen 1-Combination 1 (AMA1-C1)/Alhydrogel with and without the novel adjuvant CPG 7909. Participants were healthy adults 18-45 years old living in the village of Donéguébougou, Mali. A total of 24 participants received 2 doses one month apart of either 80 microg AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel or 80 microg AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel + 564 microg CPG 7909. The study started in October 2007 and completed follow up in May 2008. Both vaccines were well tolerated, with only mild local adverse events and no systemic adverse events judged related to vaccination. The difference in antibody responses were over 2-fold higher in the group receiving CPG 7909 for all time points after second vaccination and the differences are statistically significant (all p<0.05). This is the first use of the novel adjuvant CPG 7909 in a malaria-exposed population.

  10. Detailed functional characterization of glycosylated and nonglycosylated variants of malaria vaccine candidate PfAMA1 produced in Nicotiana benthamiana and analysis of growth inhibitory responses in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Boes, Alexander; Spiegel, Holger; Edgue, Gueven; Kapelski, Stephanie; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Fendel, Rolf; Remarque, Edmond; Altmann, Friedrich; Maresch, Daniel; Reimann, Andreas; Pradel, Gabriele; Schillberg, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer

    2015-02-01

    One of the most promising malaria vaccine candidate antigens is the Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (PfAMA1). Several studies have shown that this blood-stage antigen can induce strong parasite growth inhibitory antibody responses. PfAMA1 contains up to six recognition sites for N-linked glycosylation, a post-translational modification that is absent in P. falciparum. To prevent any potential negative impact of N-glycosylation, the recognition sites have been knocked out in most PfAMA1 variants expressed in eukaryotic hosts. However, N-linked glycosylation may increase efficacy by improving immunogenicity and/or focusing the response towards relevant epitopes by glycan masking. We describe the production of glycosylated and nonglycosylated PfAMA1 in Nicotiana benthamiana and its detailed characterization in terms of yield, integrity and protective efficacy. Both PfAMA1 variants accumulated to high levels (>510 μg/g fresh leaf weight) after transient expression, and high-mannose-type N-glycans were confirmed for the glycosylated variant. No significant differences between the N. benthamiana and Pichia pastoris PfAMA1 variants were detected in conformation-sensitive ligand-binding studies. Specific titres of >2 × 10(6) were induced in rabbits, and strong reactivity with P. falciparum schizonts was observed in immunofluorescence assays, as well as up to 100% parasite growth inhibition for both variants, with IC₅₀ values of ~35 μg/mL. Competition assays indicated that a number of epitopes were shielded from immune recognition by N-glycans, warranting further studies to determine how glycosylation can be used for the directed targeting of immune responses. These results highlight the potential of plant transient expression systems as a production platform for vaccine candidates.

  11. Immunogenicity of novel nanoparticle-coated MSP-1 C-terminus malaria DNA vaccine using different routes of administration.

    PubMed

    Cherif, Mahamoud Sama; Shuaibu, Mohammed Nasir; Kurosaki, Tomoaki; Helegbe, Gideon Kofi; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Yanagi, Tetsuo; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Hirayama, Kenji

    2011-11-08

    An important aspect in optimizing DNA vaccination is antigen delivery to the site of action. In this way, any alternative delivery system having higher transfection efficiency and eventual superior antibody production needs to be further explored. The novel nanoparticle, pDNA/PEI/γ-PGA complex, is one of a promising delivery system, which is taken up by cells and is shown to have high transfection efficiency. The immunostimulatory effect of this novel nanoparticle (NP) coated plasmid encoding Plasmodium yoelii MSP1-C-terminus was examined. Groups of C57BL/6 mice were immunized either with NP-coated MSP-1 plasmid, naked plasmid or NP-coated blank plasmid, by three different routes of administration; intravenous (i.v.), intraperitoneal (i.p.) and subcutaneous (s.c). Mice were primed and boosted twice at 3-week intervals, then challenged 2 weeks after; and 100%, 100% and 50% mean of survival was observed in immunized mice with coated DNA vaccine by i.p., i.v. and s.c., respectively. Coated DNA vaccine showed significant immunogenicity and elicited protective levels of antigen specific IgG and its subclass antibody, an increased proportion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and INF-γ and IL-12 levels in the serum and cultured splenocyte supernatant, as well as INF-γ producing cells in the spleen. We demonstrate that, NP-coated MSP-1 DNA-based vaccine confers protection against lethal P. yoelii challenge in murine model across the various route of administration and may therefore, be considered a promising delivery system for vaccination.

  12. World Malaria Day 2009: what malaria knows about the immune system that immunologists still do not.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Susan K; Miller, Louis H

    2009-05-01

    Malaria kills >1 million children each year, and there is little doubt that an effective vaccine would play a central role in preventing these deaths. However, the strategies that proved so successful in developing the vaccines we have today may simply not be adequate to confront complex, persistent infectious diseases, including malaria, AIDS, and tuberculosis. We believe that the development of a highly effective vaccine will require a better understanding of several features of the immune response to malaria. At the top of the list is the complex and ancient relationship between the parasite that causes malaria and the immune system that enables the parasite to persist in an otherwise functional immune system. A close second is the antigenic targets in malaria and how to overcome the enormous polymorphism of these targets. Meeting these challenges represents a call to arms of basic immunologists to advance our knowledge of malaria immunity.

  13. Antibody Responses to a Novel Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein Vaccine Correlate with Protection against Experimental Malaria Infection in Aotus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, David R.; Kocken, Clemens H. M.; White, John H.; Cowan, Graeme J. M.; Samuel, Kay; Dubbeld, Martin A.; der Wel, Annemarie Voorberg-van; Thomas, Alan W.; McBride, Jana S.; Arnot, David E.

    2014-01-01

    The Block 2 region of the merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1) of Plasmodium falciparum has been identified as a target of protective immunity by a combination of seroepidemiology and parasite population genetics. Immunogenicity studies in small animals and Aotus monkeys were used to determine the efficacy of recombinant antigens derived from this region of MSP-1 as a potential vaccine antigen. Aotus lemurinus griseimembra monkeys were immunized three times with a recombinant antigen derived from the Block 2 region of MSP-1 of the monkey-adapted challenge strain, FVO of Plasmodium falciparum, using an adjuvant suitable for use in humans. Immunofluorescent antibody assays (IFA) against erythrocytes infected with P. falciparum using sera from the immunized monkeys showed that the MSP-1 Block 2 antigen induced significant antibody responses to whole malaria parasites. MSP-1 Block 2 antigen-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) showed no significant differences in antibody titers between immunized animals. Immunized animals were challenged with the virulent P. falciparum FVO isolate and monitored for 21 days. Two out of four immunized animals were able to control their parasitaemia during the follow-up period, whereas two out of two controls developed fulminating parasitemia. Parasite-specific serum antibody titers measured by IFA were four-fold higher in protected animals than in unprotected animals. In addition, peptide-based epitope mapping of serum antibodies from immunized Aotus showed distinct differences in epitope specificities between protected and unprotected animals. PMID:24421900

  14. The effect of adjuvants on the immune response induced by a DBL4ɛ-ID4 VAR2CSA based Plasmodium falciparum vaccine against placental malaria.

    PubMed

    Pinto, V V; Salanti, A; Joergensen, L M; Dahlbäck, M; Resende, M; Ditlev, S B; Agger, E M; Arnot, D E; Theander, T G; Nielsen, M A

    2012-01-11

    A vaccine protecting women against placental malaria could be based on the sub-domains of the VAR2CSA antigen, since antibodies against the DBL4ɛ-ID4 subunit of the VAR2CSA protein can inhibit parasite binding to the placental ligand chondroitin sulphate A (CSA). Here we tested the ability of DBL4ɛ-ID4 to induce binding-inhibitory antibodies when formulated with adjuvants approved for human use. We have characterized the immune response of DBL4ɛ-ID4 in combination with Freund's complete and incomplete adjuvant and with three adjuvants currently being used in clinical trials: Montanide(®) ISA 720, Alhydrogel(®) and CAF01. Antibodies induced against DBL4ɛ-ID4 in combination with these adjuvants inhibited parasite binding to CSA from 82% to 99%. Although, different epitope recognition patterns were obtained for the different formulations, all adjuvant combinations induced strong Th1 and Th2 type responses, resulting in IgG with similar binding strength, with to the DBL4ɛ-ID4 antigen. These results demonstrate that the DBL4ɛ-ID4 antigen is highly immunogenic and that binding inhibitory antibodies are induced when formulated with any of the tested adjuvants.

  15. A prime/boost PfCS14K(M)/MVA-sPfCS(M) vaccination protocol generates robust CD8(+) T cell and antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein and protects mice against malaria.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Aneesh; Mejías-Pérez, Ernesto; Espinosa, Diego A; Raman, Suresh C; Sorzano, Carlos Oscar S; Zavala, Fidel; Esteban, Mariano

    2017-03-15

    Vaccines against the pre-erythrocytic stages of malaria are appealing, since the parasite can be eliminated before disease onset and since they offer the unique possibility of targeting the parasite with both antibodies and T cells. Although the role CD8(+) T cells in pre-erythrocytic malaria stages is well documented, a highly effective T cell-inducing vaccine remains to be advanced. Here we report the development of a prime-boost immunization regimen with the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCS) fused to the oligomer-forming vaccinia virus A27 protein and a modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vector expressing PfCS. This protocol induced polyfunctional CD8(+) T cells with effector memory phenotype and high PfCS antibody levels. These immune responses correlated with inhibition of liver stage parasitemia in 80% and sterile protection in 40% of mice challenged with a transgenic P. berghei parasite line that expressed PfCS. Our findings underscore the potential of T and B cell immunization strategies in improving protective effectiveness against malaria.

  16. TRANSVAC workshop on standardisation and harmonisation of analytical platforms for HIV, TB and malaria vaccines: 'how can big data help?'.

    PubMed

    Dutruel, Céline; Thole, Jelle; Geels, Mark; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Ottenhoff, Tom; Guzman, Carlos A; Fletcher, Helen A; Leroy, Odile; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2014-07-31

    High-throughput analyses of RNA and protein expression are increasingly used for better understanding of vaccine-induced immunity and protection against infectious disease. With an increasing number of vaccine candidates in clinical development, it is timely to consider standardisation and harmonisation of sample collection, storage and analysis to ensure results of highest quality from these precious samples. These challenges were discussed by a group of international experts during a workshop organised by TRANSVAC, a European Commission-funded Research Infrastructure project. The main conclusions were: Platforms are rarely standardised for use in preclinical and clinical studies. Coordinated efforts should continue to harmonise the experimental set up of these studies, as well as the establishment of internal standards and controls. This will ensure comparability, efficiency and feasibility of the global analyses performed on preclinical and clinical data sets.

  17. Review of DoD Malaria Research Programs,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    defined. 4. Models for P. fakiparum sporozoite infection of monkeys are expensive and not well substantiated. 5. Production and purification of recombinant...Hoffman SUBJECfl Malaria Vaccine Development OBJECTIVE: To protect against malaria by inducing immune responses that eliminate malaria infected hepatocytes...or kill the parasite within the hepatocyte. STRATEGY: 1. Identify the targets and mechanisms of protective immunity against infected hepatocytes

  18. Structure of the malaria vaccine candidate antigen CyRPA and its complex with a parasite invasion inhibitory antibody.

    PubMed

    Favuzza, Paola; Guffart, Elena; Tamborrini, Marco; Scherer, Bianca; Dreyer, Anita M; Rufer, Arne C; Erny, Johannes; Hoernschemeyer, Joerg; Thoma, Ralf; Schmid, Georg; Gsell, Bernard; Lamelas, Araceli; Benz, Joerg; Joseph, Catherine; Matile, Hugues; Pluschke, Gerd; Rudolph, Markus G

    2017-02-14

    Invasion of erythrocytes by Plasmodial merozoites is a composite process involving the interplay of several proteins. Among them, the Plasmodium falciparum Cysteine-Rich Protective Antigen (PfCyRPA) is a crucial component of a ternary complex, including Reticulocyte binding-like Homologous protein 5 (PfRH5) and the RH5-interacting protein (PfRipr), essential for erythrocyte invasion. Here we present the crystal structure of PfCyRPA and of its complex with the antigen-binding fragment of a parasite growth inhibitory antibody. While PfCyRPA adopts a 6-bladed β-propeller structure with similarity to the classic sialidase fold, it possesses no sialidase activity, indicating that it fulfills a non-enzymatic function. Characterization of the epitope recognized by protective antibodies will facilitate design of peptidomimetics that focus vaccine responses on protective epitopes. Both in vitro and in vivo anti-PfCyRPA and anti-PfRH5 antibodies showed more potent parasite growth inhibitory activity in combination than on their own, supporting a combined delivery of PfCyRPA and PfRH5 in vaccines.

  19. Structure of the malaria vaccine candidate antigen CyRPA and its complex with a parasite invasion inhibitory antibody

    PubMed Central

    Favuzza, Paola; Guffart, Elena; Tamborrini, Marco; Scherer, Bianca; Dreyer, Anita M; Rufer, Arne C; Erny, Johannes; Hoernschemeyer, Joerg; Thoma, Ralf; Schmid, Georg; Gsell, Bernard; Lamelas, Araceli; Benz, Joerg; Joseph, Catherine; Matile, Hugues; Pluschke, Gerd; Rudolph, Markus G

    2017-01-01

    Invasion of erythrocytes by Plasmodial merozoites is a composite process involving the interplay of several proteins. Among them, the Plasmodium falciparum Cysteine-Rich Protective Antigen (PfCyRPA) is a crucial component of a ternary complex, including Reticulocyte binding-like Homologous protein 5 (PfRH5) and the RH5-interacting protein (PfRipr), essential for erythrocyte invasion. Here, we present the crystal structures of PfCyRPA and its complex with the antigen-binding fragment of a parasite growth inhibitory antibody. PfCyRPA adopts a 6-bladed β-propeller structure with similarity to the classic sialidase fold, but it has no sialidase activity and fulfills a purely non-enzymatic function. Characterization of the epitope recognized by protective antibodies may facilitate design of peptidomimetics to focus vaccine responses on protective epitopes. Both in vitro and in vivo anti-PfCyRPA and anti-PfRH5 antibodies showed more potent parasite growth inhibitory activity in combination than on their own, supporting a combined delivery of PfCyRPA and PfRH5 in vaccines. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20383.001 PMID:28195038

  20. 'He is now like a brother, I can even give him some blood'--relational ethics and material exchanges in a malaria vaccine 'trial community' in The Gambia.

    PubMed

    Geissler, P Wenzel; Kelly, Ann; Imoukhuede, Babatunde; Pool, Robert

    2008-09-01

    This paper explores social relations within the 'trial community' (staff and volunteers) of a Malaria Vaccine Trial (MVT), implemented by the Medical Research Council (MRC) in The Gambia between 2001 and 2004. It situates ethical concerns with medical research within the everyday life of scientific fieldwork. Based upon discussions with volunteers and staff, we explore processes of mediation between scientific project and study population, and between formal ethics, local ethical debates and everyday practice. We observe that material contact and substantial transactions, notably of blood and medicine, are central to the construction of the MVT. These transactions are guided by a concrete and relational form of ethics, which contrasts with the abstract and vertical formal ethical principles underwriting the scientific study protocol. The success of the MVT owed much to these kinship-like ethics. One possible conclusion from these observations is that research ethics should be understood, not just as a quasi-legal frame but also as an open, searching movement, much in the same way that kinship is not merely a juridical institution and a prescriptive frame of rules, but a network made through relational work. However, this conclusion raises new problems: by contrasting formal, abstract principles to intimate, immediate relations, and economic justice to personal morality, we accept that the order of medical research is moved further out of the public and political, and into the domains of either quasi-legal claims or of private morality. Irrespective of the undeniable importance of clear-cut rules and of good face-to-face relations, a third essential foundation of medical research ethics is the democratically constituted public sphere, including equitable health services, and transparent institutions to facilitate open debate and regulate particular interests. Ultimately, the ethics of global science can rely neither on principles nor trust but requires citizenship

  1. Malaria Diagnostics in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sean C.; Shott, Joseph P.; Parikh, Sunil; Etter, Paige; Prescott, William R.; Stewart, V. Ann

    2013-01-01

    Malaria diagnostics are widely used in epidemiologic studies to investigate natural history of disease and in drug and vaccine clinical trials to exclude participants or evaluate efficacy. The Malaria Laboratory Network (MLN), managed by the Office of HIV/AIDS Network Coordination, is an international working group with mutual interests in malaria disease and diagnosis and in human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome clinical trials. The MLN considered and studied the wide array of available malaria diagnostic tests for their suitability for screening trial participants and/or obtaining study endpoints for malaria clinical trials, including studies of HIV/malaria co-infection and other malaria natural history studies. The MLN provides recommendations on microscopy, rapid diagnostic tests, serologic tests, and molecular assays to guide selection of the most appropriate test(s) for specific research objectives. In addition, this report provides recommendations regarding quality management to ensure reproducibility across sites in clinical trials. Performance evaluation, quality control, and external quality assessment are critical processes that must be implemented in all clinical trials using malaria tests. PMID:24062484

  2. Gene gun immunization to combat malaria.

    PubMed

    Bergmann-Leitner, Elke S; Leitner, Wolfgang W

    2013-01-01

    DNA immunization by gene gun against a variety of infectious diseases has yielded promising results in animal models. Skin-based DNA vaccination against these diseases is not only an attractive option for the clinic but can aid in the discovery and optimization of vaccine candidates. Vaccination against the protozoan parasite Plasmodium presents unique challenges: (a) most parasite-associated antigens are stage-specific; (b) antibodies capable of neutralizing the parasite during the probing of the mosquitoes have to be available at high titers in order to prevent infection of the liver; (c) immunity to liver-stage infection needs to be absolute in order to prevent subsequent blood-stage parasitemia. Gene gun vaccination has successfully been used to prevent the infection of mice with the rodent malaria strain P. berghei and has been employed in a macaque model of human P. falciparum. DNA plasmid delivery by gene gun offers the opportunity to economically and efficiently test novel malaria vaccine candidates and vaccination strategies, which include the evaluation of novel molecular adjuvant strategies. Here we describe the procedures involved in making and delivering a pre-clinical malaria DNA vaccine by gene gun as well as the correct approach for the in vivo evaluation of the vaccine. Furthermore, we discuss various approaches that either have already been tested or could be employed to improve DNA vaccines against malaria.

  3. Production, Quality Control, Stability and Pharmacotoxicity of a Malaria Vaccine Comprising Three Highly Similar PfAMA1 Protein Molecules to Overcome Antigenic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Houard, Sophie; Havelange, Nicolas; Drossard, Jürgen; Mertens, Hubert; Croon, Alexander; Kastilan, Robin; Byrne, Richard; van der Werff, Nicole; van der Eijk, Marjolein; Thomas, Alan W.; Kocken, Clemens H. M.; Remarque, Edmond J.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (PfAMA1) is a leading asexual blood stage vaccine candidate for malaria. In preparation for clinical trials, three Diversity Covering (DiCo) PfAMA1 ectodomain proteins, designed to overcome the intrinsic polymorphism that is present in PfAMA1, were produced under Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) in Pichia pastoris. Using identical methodology, the 3 strains were cultivated in 70-L scale fed-batch fermentations and PfAMA1-DiCos were purified by two chromatography steps, an ultrafiltration/diafiltration procedure and size exclusion chromatography, resulting in highly pure (>95%) PfAMA1-DiCo1, PfAMA1 DiCo2 and PfAMA1 DiCo3, with final yields of 1.8, 1.9 and 1.3 gram, respectively. N-terminal determinations showed that approximately 50% of each of the proteins lost 12 residues from their N-terminus, in accordance with SDS-PAGE (2 main bands) and MS-data. Under reducing conditions a site of limited proteolytic cleavage within a disulphide bonded region became evident. The three proteins quantitatively bound to the mAb 4G2 that recognizes a conformational epitope, suggesting proper folding of the proteins. The lyophilized Drug Product (1:1:1 mixture of PfAMA1-DiCo1, DiCo2, DiCo3) fulfilled all pre-set release criteria (appearance, dissolution rate, identity, purity, protein content, moisture content, sub-visible particles, immuno-potency (after reconstitution with adjuvant), abnormal toxicity, sterility and endotoxin), was stable in accelerated and real-time stability studies at -20°C for over 24 months. When formulated with adjuvants selected for clinical phase I evaluation, the Drug Product did not show adverse effect in a repeated-dose toxicity study in rabbits. The Drug Product has entered a phase Ia/Ib clinical trial. PMID:27695087

  4. Molecular basis of human cerebral malaria development.

    PubMed

    Wah, Saw Thu; Hananantachai, Hathairad; Kerdpin, Usanee; Plabplueng, Chotiros; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Nuchnoi, Pornlada

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is still a deleterious health problem in tropical countries. The wide spread of malarial drug resistance and the lack of an effective vaccine are obstacles for disease management and prevention. Parasite and human genetic factors play important roles in malaria susceptibility and disease severity. The malaria parasite exerted a potent selective signature on the human genome, which is apparent in the genetic polymorphism landscape of genes related to pathogenesis. Currently, much genomic data and a novel body of knowledge, including the identification of microRNAs, are being increasingly accumulated for the development of laboratory testing cassettes for cerebral malaria prevention. Therefore, understanding of the underlying complex molecular basis of cerebral malaria is important for the design of strategy for cerebral malaria treatment and control.

  5. Imported malaria.

    PubMed

    Schultz, M G

    1974-01-01

    There have been 4 waves of imported malaria in the USA. They occurred during the colonization of the country and during the Second World War, the UN Police Action in Korea, and the Viet-Nam conflict. The first 3 episodes are briefly described and the data on imported malaria from Viet-Nam are discussed in detail.Endemic malaria is resurgent in many tropical countries and international travel is also on the rise. This increases the likelihood of malaria being imported from an endemic area and introduced into a receptive area. The best defence for countries threatened by imported malaria is a vigorous surveillance programme. The principles of surveillance are discussed and an example of their application is provided by a description of the methods used to conduct surveillance of malaria in the USA.

  6. Coadaptation and malaria control.

    PubMed

    Tosta, Carlos Eduardo

    2007-06-01

    Malaria emerges from a disequilibrium of the system 'human-plasmodium-mosquito' (HPM). If the equilibrium is maintained, malaria does not ensue and the result is asymptomatic plasmodium infection. The relationships among the components of the system involve coadaptive linkages that lead to equilibrium. A vast body of evidence supports this assumption, including the strategies involved in the relationships between plasmodium and human and mosquito immune systems, and the emergence of resistance of plasmodia to antimalarial drugs and of mosquitoes to insecticides. Coadaptive strategies for malaria control are based on the following principles: (1) the system HPM is composed of three highly complex and dynamic components, whose interplay involves coadaptive linkages that tend to maintain the equilibrium of the system; (2) human and mosquito immune systems play a central role in the coadaptive interplay with plasmodium, and hence, in the maintenance of the system's equilibrium; the under- or overfunction of human immune system may result in malaria and influence its severity; (3) coadaptation depends on genetic and epigenetic phenomena occurring at the interfaces of the components of the system, and may involve exchange of infectrons (genes or gene fragments) between the partners; (4) plasmodia and mosquitoes have been submitted to selective pressures, leading to adaptation, for an extremely long while and are, therefore, endowed with the capacity to circumvent both natural (immunity) and artificial (drugs, insecticides, vaccines) measures aiming at destroying them; (5) since malaria represents disequilibrium of the system HPM, its control should aim at maintaining or restoring this equilibrium; (6) the disequilibrium of integrated systems involves the disequilibrium of their components, therefore the maintenance or restoration of the system's equilibrium depend on the adoption of integrated and coordinated measures acting on all components, that means, panadaptive

  7. In vivo microscopy of hemozoin: towards a needle free diagnostic for malaria

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Jennifer L.; Carns, Jennifer L.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of malaria suffers from poor specificity leading to overtreatment with antimalarial medications. Alternatives, like blood smear microscopy or antigen-based tests, require a blood sample. We investigate in vivo microscopy as a needle-free malaria diagnostic. Two optical signatures, birefringence and absorbance, of the endogenous malaria by-product hemozoin were evaluated as in vivo optical biomarkers. Hemozoin birefringence was difficult to detect in highly scattering tissue; however, hemozoin absorbance was observed in increasingly complex biological environments and detectable over a clinically-relevant range of parasitemia in vivo in a P. yoelii-infected mouse model of malaria. PMID:26417515

  8. A Plasmodium vivax plasmid DNA- and adenovirus-vectored malaria vaccine encoding blood stage antigens AMA1 and MSP142 in a prime/boost heterologous immunization regimen partially protects Aotus monkeys against blood stage challenge.

    PubMed

    Obaldia, Nicanor; Stockelman, Michael G; Otero, William; Cockrill, Jennifer A; Ganeshan, Harini; Abot, Esteban N; Zhang, Jianfeng; Limbach, Keith; Charoenvit, Yupin; Doolan, Denise L; Tang, De-Chu C; Richie, Thomas L

    2017-02-08

    Malaria is caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium that are transmitted to humans by the bites of Anopheles mosquitoes. After the elimination of P. falciparum it is predicted that Plasmodium vivax will remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality outside of Africa, stressing the importance of developing a vaccine against malaria. In this study we assess the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of two P. vivax antigens, AMA1 and MSP142 in a recombinant DNA plasmid prime/adenoviral vector (Ad) boost regimen in Aotus monkeys. Groups of 4 to 5 monkeys were immunized with DNA alone, Ad alone, prime/boost regimens of each antigen, prime/boost with both antigens, and empty vector controls, and then subjected to blood stage challenge. The heterologous immunization regimen with the antigen pair was more protective than either antigen alone or both antigens delivered with a single vaccine platform, based on their ability to induced the longest pre-patent period and time to peak parasitemia; the lowest peak and mean parasitemia; the smallest area under the parasitemia curve and the highest self-cured rate. Overall, pre-challenge MSP1 antibody titers strongly correlated with decreased parasite burden. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of immunized animals developed anemia. In conclusion, P. vivax plasmid DNA/Ad5 vaccine encoding blood stage parasite antigens AMA1 and MSP142 in a heterologous prime/boost immunization regimen, provided significant protection against blood-stage challenge in Aotus monkeys, indicating the suitability of these antigens and regimen for further development.

  9. Vaccines today, vaccines tomorrow: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines are considered as one of the major contributions of the 20th century and one of the most cost effective public health interventions. The International Vaccine Institute has as a mission to discover, develop and deliver new and improved vaccines against infectious diseases that affects developing nations. If Louis Pasteur is known across the globe, vaccinologists like Maurice Hilleman, Jonas Salk and Charles Mérieux are known among experts only despite their contribution to global health. Thanks to a vaccine, smallpox has been eradicated, polio has nearly disappeared, Haemophilus influenzae B, measles and more recently meningitis A are controlled in many countries. While a malaria vaccine is undergoing phase 3, International Vaccine Institute, in collaboration with an Indian manufacturer has brought an oral inactivated cholera vaccine to pre-qualification. The field of vaccinology has undergone major changes thanks to philanthropists such as Bill and Melinda Gates, initiatives like the Decade of Vaccines and public private partnerships. Current researches on vaccines have more challenging targets like the dengue viruses, malaria, human immunodeficiency virus, the respiratory syncytial virus and nosocomial diseases. Exciting research is taking place on new adjuvants, nanoparticles, virus like particles and new route of administration. An overcrowded infant immunization program, anti-vaccine groups, immunizing a growing number of elderlies and delivering vaccines to difficult places are among challenges faced by vaccinologists and global health experts. PMID:23596584

  10. Malaria Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... critical role in development of those next-generation strategies. Read more about malaria prevention, treatment and control Global Cooperation Collaboration involving scientists from diverse disciplines is ...

  11. Ethical aspects of malaria control and research.

    PubMed

    Jamrozik, Euzebiusz; de la Fuente-Núñez, Vânia; Reis, Andreas; Ringwald, Pascal; Selgelid, Michael J

    2015-12-22

    Malaria currently causes more harm to human beings than any other parasitic disease, and disproportionally affects low-income populations. The ethical issues raised by efforts to control or eliminate malaria have received little explicit analysis, in comparison with other major diseases of poverty. While some ethical issues associated with malaria are similar to those that have been the subject of debate in the context of other infectious diseases, malaria also raises distinct ethical issues in virtue of its unique history, epidemiology, and biology. This paper provides preliminary ethical analyses of the especially salient issues of: (i) global health justice, (ii) universal access to malaria control initiatives, (iii) multidrug resistance, including artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) resistance, (iv) mandatory screening, (v) mass drug administration, (vi) benefits and risks of primaquine, and (vii) malaria in the context of blood donation and transfusion. Several ethical issues are also raised by past, present and future malaria research initiatives, in particular: (i) controlled infection studies, (ii) human landing catches, (iii) transmission-blocking vaccines, and (iv) genetically-modified mosquitoes. This article maps the terrain of these major ethical issues surrounding malaria control and elimination. Its objective is to motivate further research and discussion of ethical issues associated with malaria--and to assist health workers, researchers, and policy makers in pursuit of ethically sound malaria control practice and policy.

  12. Emerging Vaccine Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, Rebecca J.; Johnson, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination has proven to be an invaluable means of preventing infectious diseases by reducing both incidence of disease and mortality. However, vaccines have not been effectively developed for many diseases including HIV-1, hepatitis C virus (HCV), tuberculosis and malaria, among others. The emergence of new technologies with a growing understanding of host-pathogen interactions and immunity may lead to efficacious vaccines against pathogens, previously thought impossible. PMID:26343196

  13. Clinical trial in healthy malaria-naïve adults to evaluate the safety, tolerability, immunogenicity and efficacy of MuStDO5, a five-gene, sporozoite/hepatic stage Plasmodium falciparum DNA vaccine combined with escalating dose human GM-CSF DNA

    PubMed Central

    Richie, Thomas L.; Charoenvit, Yupin; Wang, Ruobing; Epstein, Judith E.; Hedstrom, Richard C.; Kumar, Sanjai; Luke, Thomas C.; Freilich, Daniel A.; Aguiar, Joao C.; Sacci, Jr., John B.; Sedegah, Martha; Nosek, Jr., Ronald A.; De La Vega, Patricia; Berzins, Mara P.; Majam, Victoria F.; Abot, Esteban N.; Ganeshan, Harini; Richie, Nancy O.; Banania, Jo Glenna; Baraceros, Maria Fe B.; Geter, Tanya G.; Mere, Robin; Bebris, Lolita; Limbach, Keith; Hickey, Bradley W.; Lanar, David E.; Ng, Jennifer; Shi, Meng; Hobart, Peter M.; Norman, Jon A.; Soisson, Lorraine A.; Hollingdale, Michael R.; Rogers, William O.; Doolan, Denise L.; Hoffman, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    When introduced in the 1990s, immunization with DNA plasmids was considered potentially revolutionary for vaccine development, particularly for vaccines intended to induce protective CD8 T cell responses against multiple antigens. We conducted, in 1997−1998, the first clinical trial in healthy humans of a DNA vaccine, a single plasmid encoding Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP), as an initial step toward developing a multi-antigen malaria vaccine targeting the liver stages of the parasite. As the next step, we conducted in 2000–2001 a clinical trial of a five-plasmid mixture called MuStDO5 encoding pre-erythrocytic antigens PfCSP, PfSSP2/TRAP, PfEXP1, PfLSA1 and PfLSA3. Thirty-two, malaria-naïve, adult volunteers were enrolled sequentially into four cohorts receiving a mixture of 500 μg of each plasmid plus escalating doses (0, 20, 100 or 500 μg) of a sixth plasmid encoding human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF). Three doses of each formulation were administered intramuscularly by needle-less jet injection at 0, 4 and 8 weeks, and each cohort had controlled human malaria infection administered by five mosquito bites 18 d later. The vaccine was safe and well-tolerated, inducing moderate antigen-specific, MHC-restricted T cell interferon-γ responses but no antibodies. Although no volunteers were protected, T cell responses were boosted post malaria challenge. This trial demonstrated the MuStDO5 DNA and hGM-CSF plasmids to be safe and modestly immunogenic for T cell responses. It also laid the foundation for priming with DNA plasmids and boosting with recombinant viruses, an approach known for nearly 15 y to enhance the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DNA vaccines. PMID:23151451

  14. Malaria in Brazil: an overview

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Malaria is still a major public health problem in Brazil, with approximately 306 000 registered cases in 2009, but it is estimated that in the early 1940s, around six million cases of malaria occurred each year. As a result of the fight against the disease, the number of malaria cases decreased over the years and the smallest numbers of cases to-date were recorded in the 1960s. From the mid-1960s onwards, Brazil underwent a rapid and disorganized settlement process in the Amazon and this migratory movement led to a progressive increase in the number of reported cases. Although the main mosquito vector (Anopheles darlingi) is present in about 80% of the country, currently the incidence of malaria in Brazil is almost exclusively (99,8% of the cases) restricted to the region of the Amazon Basin, where a number of combined factors favors disease transmission and impair the use of standard control procedures. Plasmodium vivax accounts for 83,7% of registered cases, while Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for 16,3% and Plasmodium malariae is seldom observed. Although vivax malaria is thought to cause little mortality, compared to falciparum malaria, it accounts for much of the morbidity and for huge burdens on the prosperity of endemic communities. However, in the last few years a pattern of unusual clinical complications with fatal cases associated with P. vivax have been reported in Brazil and this is a matter of concern for Brazilian malariologists. In addition, the emergence of P. vivax strains resistant to chloroquine in some reports needs to be further investigated. In contrast, asymptomatic infection by P. falciparum and P. vivax has been detected in epidemiological studies in the states of Rondonia and Amazonas, indicating probably a pattern of clinical immunity in both autochthonous and migrant populations. Seropidemiological studies investigating the type of immune responses elicited in naturally-exposed populations to several malaria vaccine candidates in

  15. A decade of vaccines: Integrating immunology and vaccinology for rational vaccine design.

    PubMed

    D'Argenio, David A; Wilson, Christopher B

    2010-10-29

    Vaccination stands as one of the most successful public health measures of the last century. New approaches will be needed, however, to develop highly effective vaccines to prevent tuberculosis, HIV-AIDS, and malaria and to eradicate polio. Current advances in immunology and technology have set the stage for rational vaccine design to begin a "Decade of Vaccines."

  16. Malaria Treatment (United States)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Malaria Branch clinician. malaria@cdc.gov Malaria Treatment (United States) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Treatment of Malaria: Guidelines For Clinicians (United States) Download PDF version of Parts 1-3 formatted ...

  17. Malaria Pathogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Louis H.; Good, Michael F.; Milon, Genevieve

    1994-06-01

    Malaria is a disease caused by repeated cycles of growth of the parasite Plasmodium in the erythrocyte. Various cellular and molecular strategies allow the parasite to evade the human immune response for many cycles of parasite multiplication. Under certain circumstances Plasmodium infection causes severe anemia or cerebral malaria; the expression of disease is influenced by both parasite and host factors, as exemplified by the exacerbation of disease during pregnancy. This article provides an overview of malaria pathogenesis, synthesizing the recent field, laboratory, and epidemiological data that will lead to the development of strategies to reduce mortality and morbidity.

  18. Averting a malaria disaster: will insecticide resistance derail malaria control?

    PubMed

    Hemingway, Janet; Ranson, Hilary; Magill, Alan; Kolaczinski, Jan; Fornadel, Christen; Gimnig, John; Coetzee, Maureen; Simard, Frederic; Roch, Dabiré K; Hinzoumbe, Clément Kerah; Pickett, John; Schellenberg, David; Gething, Peter; Hoppé, Mark; Hamon, Nicholas

    2016-04-23

    World Malaria Day 2015 highlighted the progress made in the development of new methods of prevention (vaccines and insecticides) and treatment (single dose drugs) of the disease. However, increasing drug and insecticide resistance threatens the successes made with existing methods. Insecticide resistance has decreased the efficacy of the most commonly used insecticide class of pyrethroids. This decreased efficacy has increased mosquito survival, which is a prelude to rising incidence of malaria and fatalities. Despite intensive research efforts, new insecticides will not reach the market for at least 5 years. Elimination of malaria is not possible without effective mosquito control. Therefore, to combat the threat of resistance, key stakeholders need to rapidly embrace a multifaceted approach including a reduction in the cost of bringing new resistance management methods to market and the streamlining of associated development, policy, and implementation pathways to counter this looming public health catastrophe.

  19. Evaluation of the immune response to RTS,S/AS01 and RTS,S/AS02 adjuvanted vaccines: randomized, double-blind study in malaria-naïve adults.

    PubMed

    Leroux-Roels, Geert; Leroux-Roels, Isabel; Clement, Frédéric; Ofori-Anyinam, Opokua; Lievens, Marc; Jongert, Erik; Moris, Philippe; Ballou, W Ripley; Cohen, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This phase II, randomized, double-blind study evaluated the immunogenicity of RTS,S vaccines containing Adjuvant System AS01 or AS02 as compared with non-adjuvanted RTS,S in healthy, malaria-naïve adults (NCT00443131). Thirty-six subjects were randomized (1:1:1) to receive RTS,S/AS01, RTS,S/AS02, or RTS,S/saline at months 0, 1, and 2. Antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite (CS) and hepatitis B surface (HBs) antigens were assessed and cell-mediated immune responses evaluated by flow cytometry using intracellular cytokine staining on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Anti-CS antibody avidity was also characterized. Safety and reactogenicity after each vaccine dose were monitored. One month after the third vaccine dose, RTS,S/AS01 (160.3 EU/mL [95%CI: 114.1-225.4]) and RTS,S/AS02 (77.4 EU/mL (95%CI: 47.3-126.7)) recipients had significantly higher anti-CS antibody geometric mean titers (GMTs) than recipients of RTS,S/saline (12.2 EU/mL (95%CI: 4.8-30.7); P < 0.0001 and P = 0.0011, respectively). The anti-CS antibody GMT was significantly higher with RTS,S/AS01 than with RTS,S/AS02 (P = 0.0135). Anti-CS antibody avidity was in the same range in all groups. CS- and HBs-specific CD4(+) T cell responses were greater for both RTS,S/AS groups than for the RTS,S/saline group. Reactogenicity was in general higher for RTS,S/AS compared with RTS,S/saline. Most grade 3 solicited adverse events (AEs) were of short duration and grade 3 solicited general AEs were infrequent in the 3 groups. No serious adverse events were reported. In conclusion, in comparison with non-adjuvanted RTS,S, both RTS,S/AS vaccines exhibited better CS-specific immune responses. The anti-CS antibody response was significantly higher with RTS,S/AS01 than with RTS,S/AS02. The adjuvanted vaccines had acceptable safety profiles.

  20. Vaccines against poverty

    PubMed Central

    MacLennan, Calman A.; Saul, Allan

    2014-01-01

    With the 2010s declared the Decade of Vaccines, and Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 focused on reducing diseases that are potentially vaccine preventable, now is an exciting time for vaccines against poverty, that is, vaccines against diseases that disproportionately affect low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 has helped better understand which vaccines are most needed. In 2012, US$1.3 billion was spent on research and development for new vaccines for neglected infectious diseases. However, the majority of this went to three diseases: HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, and not neglected diseases. Much of it went to basic research rather than development, with an ongoing decline in funding for product development partnerships. Further investment in vaccines against diarrheal diseases, hepatitis C, and group A Streptococcus could lead to a major health impact in LMICs, along with vaccines to prevent sepsis, particularly among mothers and neonates. The Advanced Market Commitment strategy of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI) Alliance is helping to implement vaccines against rotavirus and pneumococcus in LMICs, and the roll out of the MenAfriVac meningococcal A vaccine in the African Meningitis Belt represents a paradigm shift in vaccines against poverty: the development of a vaccine primarily targeted at LMICs. Global health vaccine institutes and increasing capacity of vaccine manufacturers in emerging economies are helping drive forward new vaccines for LMICs. Above all, partnership is needed between those developing and manufacturing LMIC vaccines and the scientists, health care professionals, and policy makers in LMICs where such vaccines will be implemented. PMID:25136089

  1. Vaccines against poverty.

    PubMed

    MacLennan, Calman A; Saul, Allan

    2014-08-26

    With the 2010s declared the Decade of Vaccines, and Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 focused on reducing diseases that are potentially vaccine preventable, now is an exciting time for vaccines against poverty, that is, vaccines against diseases that disproportionately affect low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 has helped better understand which vaccines are most needed. In 2012, US$1.3 billion was spent on research and development for new vaccines for neglected infectious diseases. However, the majority of this went to three diseases: HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, and not neglected diseases. Much of it went to basic research rather than development, with an ongoing decline in funding for product development partnerships. Further investment in vaccines against diarrheal diseases, hepatitis C, and group A Streptococcus could lead to a major health impact in LMICs, along with vaccines to prevent sepsis, particularly among mothers and neonates. The Advanced Market Commitment strategy of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI) Alliance is helping to implement vaccines against rotavirus and pneumococcus in LMICs, and the roll out of the MenAfriVac meningococcal A vaccine in the African Meningitis Belt represents a paradigm shift in vaccines against poverty: the development of a vaccine primarily targeted at LMICs. Global health vaccine institutes and increasing capacity of vaccine manufacturers in emerging economies are helping drive forward new vaccines for LMICs. Above all, partnership is needed between those developing and manufacturing LMIC vaccines and the scientists, health care professionals, and policy makers in LMICs where such vaccines will be implemented.

  2. 75 FR 59729 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological... for protective antigen-based anthrax vaccines for a post-exposure prophylaxis indication using...

  3. Tools and Strategies for Malaria Control and Elimination: What Do We Need to Achieve a Grand Convergence in Malaria?

    PubMed

    Hemingway, Janet; Shretta, Rima; Wells, Timothy N C; Bell, David; Djimdé, Abdoulaye A; Achee, Nicole; Qi, Gao

    2016-03-01

    Progress made in malaria control during the past decade has prompted increasing global dialogue on malaria elimination and eradication. The product development pipeline for malaria has never been stronger, with promising new tools to detect, treat, and prevent malaria, including innovative diagnostics, medicines, vaccines, vector control products, and improved mechanisms for surveillance and response. There are at least 25 projects in the global malaria vaccine pipeline, as well as 47 medicines and 13 vector control products. In addition, there are several next-generation diagnostic tools and reference methods currently in development, with many expected to be introduced in the next decade. The development and adoption of these tools, bolstered by strategies that ensure rapid uptake in target populations, intensified mechanisms for information management, surveillance, and response, and continued financial and political commitment are all essential to achieving global eradication.

  4. Tools and Strategies for Malaria Control and Elimination: What Do We Need to Achieve a Grand Convergence in Malaria?

    PubMed Central

    Hemingway, Janet; Shretta, Rima; Wells, Timothy N. C.; Bell, David; Djimdé, Abdoulaye A.; Achee, Nicole; Qi, Gao

    2016-01-01

    Progress made in malaria control during the past decade has prompted increasing global dialogue on malaria elimination and eradication. The product development pipeline for malaria has never been stronger, with promising new tools to detect, treat, and prevent malaria, including innovative diagnostics, medicines, vaccines, vector control products, and improved mechanisms for surveillance and response. There are at least 25 projects in the global malaria vaccine pipeline, as well as 47 medicines and 13 vector control products. In addition, there are several next-generation diagnostic tools and reference methods currently in development, with many expected to be introduced in the next decade. The development and adoption of these tools, bolstered by strategies that ensure rapid uptake in target populations, intensified mechanisms for information management, surveillance, and response, and continued financial and political commitment are all essential to achieving global eradication. PMID:26934361

  5. Protective immunity to liver-stage malaria

    PubMed Central

    Holz, Lauren E; Fernandez-Ruiz, Daniel; Heath, William R

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of research and recent clinical trials, an efficacious long-lasting preventative vaccine for malaria remains elusive. This parasite infects mammals via mosquito bites, progressing through several stages including the relatively short asymptomatic liver stage followed by the more persistent cyclic blood stage, the latter of which is responsible for all disease symptoms. As the liver acts as a bottleneck to blood-stage infection, it represents a potential site for parasite and disease control. In this review, we discuss immunity to liver-stage malaria. It is hoped that the knowledge gained from animal models of malaria immunity will translate into a more powerful and effective vaccine to reduce this global health problem. PMID:27867517

  6. Protective immunity to liver-stage malaria.

    PubMed

    Holz, Lauren E; Fernandez-Ruiz, Daniel; Heath, William R

    2016-10-01

    Despite decades of research and recent clinical trials, an efficacious long-lasting preventative vaccine for malaria remains elusive. This parasite infects mammals via mosquito bites, progressing through several stages including the relatively short asymptomatic liver stage followed by the more persistent cyclic blood stage, the latter of which is responsible for all disease symptoms. As the liver acts as a bottleneck to blood-stage infection, it represents a potential site for parasite and disease control. In this review, we discuss immunity to liver-stage malaria. It is hoped that the knowledge gained from animal models of malaria immunity will translate into a more powerful and effective vaccine to reduce this global health problem.

  7. Cerebral Malaria.

    PubMed

    Marsden, P D; Bruce-Chwatt, L J

    1975-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is an acute diffuse encephalopathy associated only with Plasmodium falciparum. It is probably a consequence of the rapid proliferation of the parasites in the body of man in relation to red cell invasion, and results in stagnation of blood flow in cerebralcapillaries with thromobotic occlusion of large numbers of cerebral capillaries. The subsequent cerebral pathology is cerebral infarction with haemorrhage and cerebral oedema. The wide prevalence of P. falciparum in highly endemic areas results in daily challenges to patients from several infected mosquitoes. It is thus important to understand the characteristics of P. falciparum, since this is one of the most important protozoan parasites of man and severe infection from it constitutes one of the few real clinical emergencies in tropical medicine. One of the more important aspects of the practice of medicine in the tropics is to establish a good understanding of the pattern of medical practice in that area. This applies to malaria as well as to other diseases. The neophyte might be somewhat surprised to learn, for example that an experienced colleague who lives in a holoendemic malarious area such as West Africa, sees no cerebral malaria. But the explanation is simple when the doctor concerned has a practice which involves treating adults only. Cerebral malaria is rare in adults, because in highly endemic areas, by the age of 1 year most of the infants in a group under study have already experienced their first falciparum infection. By the time they reach adult life, they have a solid immunity against severe falciparum infections. In fact, "clinical malaria" could occur in such a group under only two circumstances: 1) in pregnancy, a patent infection with P. falciparum might develop, probably due to an IgG drain across the placenta to the foetus;2) in an individual who has constantly taken antimalarials and who may have an immunity at such a low level that when antimalarial therapy is interrupted

  8. DNA vaccines: roles against diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Kishwar Hayat

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination is the most successful application of immunological principles to human health. Vaccine efficacy needs to be reviewed from time to time and its safety is an overriding consideration. DNA vaccines offer simple yet effective means of inducing broad-based immunity. These vaccines work by allowing the expression of the microbial antigen inside host cells that take up the plasmid. These vaccines function by generating the desired antigen inside the cells, with the advantage that this may facilitate presentation through the major histocompatibility complex. This review article is based on a literature survey and it describes the working and designing strategies of DNA vaccines. Advantages and disadvantages for this type of vaccines have also been explained, together with applications of DNA vaccines. DNA vaccines against cancer, tuberculosis, Edwardsiella tarda, HIV, anthrax, influenza, malaria, dengue, typhoid and other diseases were explored. PMID:24432284

  9. [IgG responses to candidate malaria vaccine antigens in the urban area of Dakar (Senegal): evolution according to age and parasitemia in patients with mild symptoms].

    PubMed

    Mbengue, B; Sylla Niang, M; Ndiaye Diallo, R; Diop, G; Thiam, A; Ka, O; Touré, A; Tall, A; Perraut, R; Dièye, A

    2015-03-01

    Malaria remains a major problem in African countries despite substantial decreases in morbidity and mortality due to sustained control programs. Studies for the evaluation of qualitative or quantitative Ab responses to key targets of anti-plasmodium immunity were mostly done in rural endemic setting compared to urban area. In a cohort of 200 patients with mild malaria and living in Dakar, we analyze total and subclasses IgG responses to a panel of P. falciparum blood stage antigens: MSP1p19, MSP3, EB200, GST-5 and R23. A mean age of 15 yrs (4 to 56 yrs) and parasitemia between 0.1 to 17% were found. Levels of IgG anti-MSP3 were higher in patients with low parasitemia (≤1%) and appear negatively correlated to parasite densities (Rho =. 0.54; p= 0.021). This correlation is more significant in children (≤ 15 yrs). In addition, an increase of IgG responses against MSP1p19 is highly observed in adults having a parasitemia less than 1%. In those patients, we find that IgG1 subclasses were predominant (p <0.01). Our study shows an association between Ab responses and parasitemia. This association is dependant to IgG anti-MSP3 in children and IgG anti-MSP1p19 in adults living in urban area.

  10. [Progress of research on DNA vaccines against parasitosis].

    PubMed

    Qi, Wen-Juan; Fang, Qiang

    2011-06-01

    One of the effective prevention and treatment strategies to parasitosis is to develop safe and effective vaccines. The DNA vaccine is a new kind of vaccine developed in last 10 years. In recent years, many advances in DNA vaccines against parasitosis have been made. This article reviews the advances in the mechanism, construction, optimization, adjuvants and delivery ways of DNA vaccines and the advances in the study of DNA vaccines against some parasitosis including malaria, schistosomiasis, cysticercosis and toxoplasmosis in recent years.

  11. Malaria and Travelers

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC’s Malaria Maps are another reference to help locate areas with malaria. Conduct an individualized risk assessment Prevention of malaria involves a balance between ensuring that all people who will be at risk of infection use ...

  12. Radar Monitoring of Wetlands for Malaria Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, Kevin O.

    1997-01-01

    Malaria is the most important vector-borne tropical disease (Collins and Paskewitz, 1995) and there is no simple and universally applicable form of vector control. While new methods such as malaria vaccine or genetic manipulation of mosquitoes are being explored in the laboratories, the need for more field research on malaria transmission remains very strong. For the foreseeable future many malaria programs must focus on controlling the vector, the anopheline mosquito, often under the specter of shrinking budgets. Therefore information on which human populations are at the greatest risk is especially valuable when allocating scarce resources. The goal of the Radar Monitoring of Wetlands for Malaria Control Project is to demonstrate the feasibility of using Radarsat or other comparable satellite radar imaging systems to determine where and when human populations are at greatest risk for contracting malaria. The study area is northern Belize, a region with abundant wetlands and a potentially serious malaria problem. A key aspect of this study is the analysis of multi-temporal satellite imagery to track seasonal flooding of anopheline mosquito breeding sites. Radarsat images of the test site in Belize have been acquired one to three times a month over the last year, however,, to date only one processed image has been received from the Alaska SAR Facility for analysis. Therefore analysis at this stage is focussed on determining the radar backscatter characteristics of known anopheline breeding sites, with future work to be dedicated toward seasonal changes.

  13. Malaria and World War II: German malaria experiments 1939-45.

    PubMed

    Eckart, W U; Vondra, H

    2000-06-01

    The epidemiological and pharmacological fight against malaria and German malaria research during the Nazi dictatorship were completely under the spell of war. The Oberkommando des Heeres (German supreme command of the army) suffered the bitter experience of unexpected high losses caused by malaria especially at the Greek front (Metaxes line) but also in southern Russia and in the Ukraine. Hastily raised anti-malaria units tried to teach soldiers how to use the synthetic malaria drugs (Plasmochine, Atebrine) properly. Overdoses of these drugs were numerous during the first half of the war whereas in the second half it soon became clear that it would not be possible to support the army due to insufficient quantities of plasmochine and atebrine. During both running fights and troop withdrawals at all southern and southeastern fronts there was hardly any malaria prophylaxis or treatment. After war and captivity many soldiers returned home to endure heavy malaria attacks. In German industrial (Bayer, IG-Farben) and military malaria laboratories of the Heeres-Sanitäts-Akademie (Army Medical Academy) the situation was characterised by a hasty search for proper dosages of anti-malaria drugs, adequate mechanical and chemical prophylaxis (Petroleum, DDT, and other insecticides) as well as an anti-malaria vaccine. Most importantly, large scale research for proper atebrine and plasmochine dosages was conducted in German concentration camps and mental homes. In Dachau Professor Claus Schilling tested synthetic malaria drugs and injected helpless prisoners with high and sometimes lethal doses. Since the 1920s he had been furiously looking for an anti-malaria vaccine in Italian mental homes and from 1939 he continued his experiments in Dachau. Similar experiments were also performed in Buchenwald and in a psychiatric clinic in Thuringia, where Professor Gerhard Rose tested malaria drugs with mentally ill Russian prisoners of war. Schilling was put to death for his criminal

  14. Who pays for cooperation in global health? A comparative analysis of WHO, the World Bank, the Global Fund to Fight HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, and Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.

    PubMed

    Clinton, Chelsea; Sridhar, Devi

    2017-01-27

    In this report we assess who pays for cooperation in global health through an analysis of the financial flows of WHO, the World Bank, the Global Fund to Fight HIV/AIDS, TB and Malaria, and Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. The past few decades have seen the consolidation of influence in the disproportionate roles the USA, UK, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation have had in financing three of these four institutions. Current financing flows in all four case study institutions allow donors to finance and deliver assistance in ways that they can more closely control and monitor at every stage. We highlight three major trends in global health governance more broadly that relate to this development: towards more discretionary funding and away from core or longer-term funding; towards defined multi-stakeholder governance and away from traditional government-centred representation and decision-making; and towards narrower mandates or problem-focused vertical initiatives and away from broader systemic goals.

  15. Recent advances in oral vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    De Smet, Rebecca; Allais, Liesbeth; Cuvelier, Claude A

    2014-01-01

    Oral vaccination is the most challenging vaccination method due to the administration route. However, oral vaccination has socio-economic benefits and provides the possibility of stimulating both humoral and cellular immune responses at systemic and mucosal sites. Despite the advantages of oral vaccination, only a limited number of oral vaccines are currently approved for human use. During the last decade, extensive research regarding antigen-based oral vaccination methods have improved immunogenicity and induced desired immunological outcomes. Nevertheless, several factors such as the harsh gastro-intestinal environment and oral tolerance impede the clinical application of oral delivery systems. To date, human clinical trials investigating the efficacy of these systems are still lacking. This review addresses the rationale and key biological and physicochemical aspects of oral vaccine design and highlights the use of yeast-derived β-glucan microparticles as an oral vaccine delivery platform. PMID:24553259

  16. Cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Newton, C.; Hien, T. T.; White, N.

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral malaria may be the most common non-traumatic encephalopathy in the world. The pathogenesis is heterogenous and the neurological complications are often part of a multisystem dysfunction. The clinical presentation and pathophysiology differs between adults and children. Recent studies have elucidated the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis and raised possible interventions. Antimalarial drugs, however, remain the only intervention that unequivocally affects outcome, although increasing resistance to the established antimalarial drugs is of grave concern. Artemisinin derivatives have made an impact on treatment, but other drugs may be required. With appropriate antimalarial drugs, the prognosis of cerebral malaria often depends on the management of other complications—for example, renal failure and acidosis. Neurological sequelae are increasingly recognised, but further research on the pathogenesis of coma and neurological damage is required to develop other ancillary treatments.

 PMID:10990500

  17. [Vaccinations for international travelers].

    PubMed

    Berens-Riha, N; Alberer, M; Löscher, T

    2014-03-01

    Vaccinations are a prominent part of health preparations before international travel. They can avoid or significantly reduce the risk of numerous infectious diseases. Until recently, vaccination against yellow fever was the only obligatory vaccination. However, according to updated international health regulations, other vaccinations and prophylactic measures may be required at entry from certain countries. For all routine vaccinations as recommended in Germany, necessary revaccination and catch-up of missed vaccinations should be administered before travel. At most destinations the risk of infection is higher than in Germany. Hepatitis A vaccine is generally recommended for travelers to areas of increased risk, polio vaccine for all destinations where eradication is not yet confirmed (Asia and Africa). The indications for other travel vaccines must take into consideration travel destination and itinerary, type and duration of travel, individual risk of exposure as well as the epidemiology of the disease to be prevented. Several vaccines of potential interest for travel medicine, e.g., new vaccines against malaria and dengue fever, are under development.

  18. Vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    Price, Ric N; Tjitra, Emiliana; Guerra, Carlos A; Yeung, Shunmay; White, Nicholas J; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2009-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax threatens almost 40% of the world’s population, resulting in 132 - 391 million clinical infections each year. Most of these cases originate from South East Asia and the Western Pacific, although a significant number also occur in Africa and South America. Although often regarded as causing a benign and self-limiting infection, there is increasing evidence that the overall burden, economic impact and severity of disease from P. vivax have been underestimated. Malaria control strategies have had limited success and are confounded by the lack of access to reliable diagnosis, emergence of multidrug resistant isolates and the parasite’s ability to transmit early in the course of disease and relapse from dormant liver stages at varying time intervals after the initial infection. Progress in reducing the burden of disease will require improved access to reliable diagnosis and effective treatment of both blood-stage and latent parasites, and more detailed characterization of the epidemiology, morbidity and economic impact of vivax malaria. Without these, vivax malaria will continue to be neglected by ministries of health, policy makers, researchers and funding bodies. PMID:18165478

  19. Integrated Approach to Malaria Control

    PubMed Central

    Shiff, Clive

    2002-01-01

    Malaria draws global attention in a cyclic manner, with interest and associated financing waxing and waning according to political and humanitarian concerns. Currently we are on an upswing, which should be carefully developed. Malaria parasites have been eliminated from Europe and North America through the use of residual insecticides and manipulation of environmental and ecological characteristics; however, in many tropical and some temperate areas the incidence of disease is increasing dramatically. Much of this increase results from a breakdown of effective control methods developed and implemented in the 1960s, but it has also occurred because of a lack of trained scientists and control specialists who live and work in the areas of endemic infection. Add to this the widespread resistance to the most effective antimalarial drug, chloroquine, developing resistance to other first-line drugs such as sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, and resistance of certain vector species of mosquito to some of the previously effective insecticides and we have a crisis situation. Vaccine research has proceeded for over 30 years, but as yet there is no effective product, although research continues in many promising areas. A global strategy for malaria control has been accepted, but there are critics who suggest that the single strategy cannot confront the wide range of conditions in which malaria exists and that reliance on chemotherapy without proper control of drug usage and diagnosis will select for drug resistant parasites, thus exacerbating the problem. An integrated approach to control using vector control strategies based on the biology of the mosquito, the epidemiology of the parasite, and human behavior patterns is needed to prevent continued upsurge in malaria in the endemic areas. PMID:11932233

  20. The Influence of Sub-Unit Composition and Expression System on the Functional Antibody Response in the Development of a VAR2CSA Based Plasmodium falciparum Placental Malaria Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten A.; Resende, Mafalda; de Jongh, Willem A.; Ditlev, Sisse B.; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Houard, Sophie; Ndam, Nicaise Tuikue; Agerbæk, Mette Ø.; Hamborg, Mette; Massougbodji, Achille; Issifou, Saddou; Strøbæk, Anette; Poulsen, Lars; Leroy, Odile; Kremsner, Peter G.; Chippaux, Jean-Philippe; Luty, Adrian J. F.; Deloron, Philippe; Theander, Thor G.; Dyring, Charlotte; Salanti, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The disease caused by Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) involves different clinical manifestations that, cumulatively, kill hundreds of thousands every year. Placental malaria (PM) is one such manifestation in which Pf infected erythrocytes (IE) bind to chondroitin sulphate A (CSA) through expression of VAR2CSA, a parasite-derived antigen. Protection against PM is mediated by antibodies that inhibit binding of IE in the placental intervillous space. VAR2CSA is a large antigen incompatible with large scale recombinant protein expression. Vaccines based on sub-units encompassing the functionally constrained receptor-binding domains may, theoretically, circumvent polymorphisms, reduce the risk of escape-mutants and induce cross-reactive antibodies. However, the sub-unit composition and small differences in the borders, may lead to exposure of novel immuno-dominant antibody epitopes that lead to non-functional antibodies, and furthermore influence the folding, stability and yield of expression. Candidate antigens from the pre-clinical development expressed in High-Five insect cells using the baculovirus expression vector system were transitioned into the Drosophila Schneider-2 cell (S2) expression-system compliant with clinical development. The functional capacity of antibodies against antigens expressed in High-Five cells or in S2 cells was equivalent. This enabled an extensive down-selection of S2 insect cell-expressed antigens primarily encompassing the minimal CSA-binding region of VAR2CSA. In general, we found differential potency of inhibitory antibodies against antigens with the same borders but of different var2csa sequences. Likewise, we found that subtle size differences in antigens of the same sequence gave varying levels of inhibitory antibodies. The study shows that induction of a functional response against recombinant subunits of the VAR2CSA antigen is unpredictable, demonstrating the need for large-scale screening in order to identify antigens that induce a

  1. MALARIA: A GENERAL MINIREVIEW WITH REFERENCE TO EGYPT.

    PubMed

    Ahmad Saleh, Ahmad Megahed; Adam, Samia Mohammad; Ibrahim, Abeer Mohammad Abdallah; Morsy, Tosson A

    2016-04-01

    The majority of world's population-live in areas at risk of malaria transmission. Malaria is a serious Anopheles-borne disease that pauses symptoms like the flu, as a high fever, chills, and muscle pain also, anemia, bloody stools, coma, convulsion, fever, headache, jaundice, nausea, sweating and vomiting. Symptoms tend to come and go in cycles. Apart from Anopheles vector, malaria could be transmitted nosocomial, blood transfusion or needle-stick injury Some types of malaria may cause more serious damage problems to heart, lungs, kidneys, or brain. These types can be deadly. The primary factors contributing to the resurgence of malaria are the appearance of drug-resistant strains of the parasite, the spread of insecticide-resistant strains of the mosquito and the lack of licensed malaria vaccines of proven efficacy. In rare cases, people can get malaria if they come into contact with infected blood as in blood transfusion or needle-stick injury also nosocomial and congenital malaria was reported. This is a mini-review of malaria with information on the lethal to humans, Plasmodium falciparum, together with other recent developments in the field.

  2. Enveloped virus-like particle platforms: vaccines of the future?

    PubMed

    Pitoiset, Fabien; Vazquez, Thomas; Bellier, Bertrand

    2015-07-01

    The techniques to produce effective vaccines have evolved, and the early vaccines (live, inactivated, subunit...) are no longer considered as the most appropriate for new vaccine development. We question here what will be the future vaccines, and argue that virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccines are promising candidates. In addition to being effective vaccines against analogous viruses from which they are derived, VLPs can also be used to present foreign epitopes to the immune system. The achievement of this strategy can be illustrated by the recent development of malaria candidate vaccine. We point out recent VLP-based vaccine developments and discuss future perspectives.

  3. Military Infectious Diseases Update on Vaccine Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-24

    Research Program (MIDRP) Insect Vector ControlDiagnostics Prevention Treatment Infectious diseases adversely impact military operations. Vaccines...appropriate treatment and aids commanders in the field. Most militarily relevant infectious diseases are transmitted by biting insects and other...based Insect Repellent (1946) Vaccines Protectants Antiparasitic Drugs Research Effort Advanced Development Fielded Products Malaria Rapid

  4. Malaria: progress, perils, and prospects for eradication

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Brian M.; Fidock, David A.; Kyle, Dennis E.; Kappe, Stefan H.I.; Alonso, Pedro L.; Collins, Frank H.; Duffy, Patrick E.

    2008-01-01

    There are still approximately 500 million cases of malaria and 1 million deaths from malaria each year. Yet recently, malaria incidence has been dramatically reduced in some parts of Africa by increasing deployment of anti-mosquito measures and new artemisinin-containing treatments, prompting renewed calls for global eradication. However, treatment and mosquito control currently depend on too few compounds and thus are vulnerable to the emergence of compound-resistant parasites and mosquitoes. As discussed in this Review, new drugs, vaccines, and insecticides, as well as improved surveillance methods, are research priorities. Insights into parasite biology, human immunity, and vector behavior will guide efforts to translate parasite and mosquito genome sequences into novel interventions. PMID:18382739

  5. Prophylaxis of Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Eli

    2012-01-01

    Malaria prevention in travelers to endemic areas remains dependent principally on chemoprophylaxis. Although malaria chemoprophylaxis refers to all malaria species, a distinction should be drawn between falciparum malaria prophylaxis and the prophylaxis of the relapsing malaria species (vivax & ovale). While the emergence of drug resistant strains, as well as the costs and adverse reactions to medications, complicate falciparum prophylaxis use, there are virtually no drugs available for vivax prophylaxis, beside of primaquine. Based on traveler’s malaria data, a revised recommendation for using chemoprophylaxis in low risk areas should be considered. PMID:22811794

  6. High frequency of malaria-specific T cells in non-exposed humans.

    PubMed

    Zevering, Y; Amante, F; Smillie, A; Currier, J; Smith, G; Houghten, R A; Good, M F

    1992-03-01

    A major goal of current candidate malaria vaccines is to stimulate the expansion of clones of malaria-specific lymphocytes. We have examined the in vitro T cell responses of a group of malaria exposed and non-exposed adult Caucasian donors to recombinant circumsporozoite (CS) proteins, one of which is undergoing clinical trials, to blood-stage parasites, and to synthetic peptides copying the CS protein and defined blood-stage proteins. In nearly all individuals tested, CD4 T cell proliferation or lymphokine production occurred in response to whole parasite or CS protein stimulation, and T cells from many individuals responded to synthetic peptides. T cell responses were major histocompatibility complex-restricted, and stimulation of T cells with malaria parasites or CS protein did not appear to expand a population of T cell receptor gamma/delta cells. Malaria-specific responses were independent of prior malaria exposure, and in some cases exceeded the magnitude of response to tetanus toxoid. Specific T cells are present in high frequency in the peripheral blood of many donors who have never been exposed to malaria. Although malaria-specific CD4 T cells play an important role in immunity, these data question whether vaccines need to stimulate such cells, and focus attention on other aspects of malaria immunity which may be more critical to a successful vaccine.

  7. Histone as future drug target for malaria.

    PubMed

    Rawat, D S; Lumb, V; Sharma, Y D; Pasha, S T; Singh, G

    2007-06-01

    Malaria continues to be a major cause of mortality and morbidity in tropical countries and affecting around 100 countries of the world. As per WHO estimates, 300-500 million are being infected and 1-3 million deaths annually due to malaria. With the emerging knowledge about genome sequence of all the three counterparts involved in the disease of malaria, the parasite Plasmodium, vector Anopheles and host Homo sapien have helped the scientists to understand interactions between them. Simultaneous advancement in technology further improves the prospects to discover new targets for vaccines and drugs. Though the malaria vaccine is still far away in this situation there is need to develop a potent and affordable drug(s). Histones are the key protein of chromatin and play an important role in DNA packaging, replication and gene expression. They also show frequent post-translation modifications. The specific combinations of these posttranslational modifications are thought to alter chromatin structure by forming epigenetic bar codes that specify either transient or heritable patterns of genome function. Chromatin regulators and upstream pathways are therefore seen as promising targets for development of therapeutic drugs.

  8. HPV vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer; Genital warts - HPV vaccine; Cervical dysplasia - HPV vaccine; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine; Cancer of the cervix - HPV vaccine; Abnormal ...

  9. Malaria (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... period for malaria is the time between the mosquito bite and the release of parasites from the ... Health authorities try to prevent malaria by using mosquito-control programs aimed at killing mosquitoes that carry ...

  10. Malaria (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... it is passed from person to person (from mother to child in "congenital malaria," or through blood ... risk for malaria. Your doctor can give your family anti-malarial drugs to prevent the disease, which ...

  11. Protein expression in yeast as an approach to production of recombinant malaria antigens.

    PubMed

    Bathurst, I C

    1994-01-01

    The selection of a system suitable for expression of recombinant malaria antigens for vaccine development is, in the final analysis, empirical. However, experience gained with both malaria antigens and other recombinant proteins has provided helpful guidelines. Recombinant DNA technology has been successfully applied to the development of vaccines against a number of human diseases. For example, recombinant DNA-derived hepatitis B virus surface antigen has been produced from both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. Yeast has been demonstrated to be an excellent host for the expression of recombinant proteins with uses in diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccine production. Both intracellular and secretory systems have been developed and optimized for the production of high levels of recombinant proteins. Recombinant DNA technology, and in particular yeast expression systems, have been successfully used to produce malaria antigens, several of which have been protective in various animal models. In contrast, attempts to produce sufficient quantities of antigens for a malaria vaccine from in vitro cultures of the malaria parasite have been unsuccessful. Recombinant proteins can be produced and purified from yeast in large quantities and at low cost, each being requirements for a vaccine to be used in a global vaccination program against malaria.

  12. [Development of new vaccines].

    PubMed

    González-Romo, Fernando; Picazo, Juan J

    2015-10-01

    Recent and important advances in the fields of immunology, genomics, functional genomics, immunogenetics, immunogenomics, bioinformatics, microbiology, genetic engineering, systems biology, synthetic biochemistry, proteomics, metabolomics and nanotechnology, among others, have led to new approaches in the development of vaccines. The better identification of ideal epitopes, the strengthening of the immune response due to new adjuvants, and the search of new routes of vaccine administration, are good examples of advances that are already a reality and that will favour the development of more vaccines, their use in indicated population groups, or its production at a lower cost. There are currently more than 130 vaccines are under development against the more wished (malaria or HIV), difficult to get (CMV or RSV), severe re-emerging (Dengue or Ebola), increasing importance (Chagas disease or Leishmania), and nosocomial emerging (Clostridium difficile or Staphylococcus aureus) infectious diseases.

  13. Malaria Policy Advisory Committee to the WHO: conclusions and recommendations of March 2013 meeting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Malaria Policy Advisory Committee to the World Health Organization met in Geneva, Switzerland from 13 to 15 March, 2013. This article provides a summary of the discussions, conclusions and recommendations from that meeting. Meeting sessions included: a review of the efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapy in Guyana and Suriname; the outcomes from a consultation on non-malaria febrile illness; the outcomes from the second meeting of the Evidence Review Group on malaria burden estimation; an update on the review of the WHO Guidelines for the Treatment of Malaria; an update regarding progress on the constitution of the vector control Technical Expert Group; updates on the RTS, S/AS01 vaccine and the malaria vaccine technology roadmap; financing and resource allocation for malaria control; malaria surveillance and the need for a surveillance, monitoring and evaluation Technical Expert Group; criteria and classification related to malaria elimination; the next meeting of the Evidence Review Group on Intermittent Preventive Treatment in pregnancy; an update on the soon-to-be launched Elimination Scenario Planning Tool; and an update on the process for the Global Technical Strategy for Malaria Control and Elimination (2016–2025). Policy statements, position statements, and guidelines that arise from the MPAC meeting conclusions and recommendations will be formally issued and disseminated to World Health Organization Member States by the World Health Organization Global Malaria Programme. PMID:23787092

  14. Chemotherapy of drug-resistant malaria

    PubMed Central

    Kain, Kevin C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the impact of drug-resistant malaria on current management of plasmodial infections. DATA SOURCES: A MEDLINE search of the English-language medical literature from 1985 to 1995; bibliographies of selected papers; international malaria advisory experts. DATA SYNTHESIS: Combinations of artemisinin derivatives and mefloquine or atovaquone plus proguanil appear to be the most active drug regimens against multidrug-resistant falciparum malaria from Southeast Asia. The optimal therapy for chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium vivax is unknown, but recent data indicate that halofantrine or chloroquine plus high doses of primaquine are efficacious. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of drug-resistant malaria continues to increase at a rate that exceeds new drug development. Ultimately the control of malaria will require more creative approaches than just the development of additional inhibitory drugs. These might include the identification of biochemical pathways unique to the parasite (such as drug efflux and heme polymerization), making it possible to design new classes of antimalarial agents that are selectively toxic to the parasite; methods to block parasite development in the mosquito vector; and multistage vaccines against asexual and sexual stages to block both the pathophysiology and the transmission of disease. PMID:22514413

  15. Malaria: prevention in travellers

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Malaria transmission occurs most frequently in environments with humidity over 60% and ambient temperature of 25-30 °C. Risks increase with longer visits and depend on activity. Infection can follow a single mosquito bite. Incubation is usually 10-14 days but can be up to 18 months depending on the strain of parasite. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of non-drug preventive interventions in adult travellers? What are the effects of drug prophylaxis in adult travellers? What are the effects of antimalaria vaccines in travellers? What are the effects of antimalaria interventions in child travellers, pregnant travellers, and in airline pilots? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to February 2006 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 69 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acoustic buzzers, aerosol insecticides, amodiaquine, air conditioning and electric fans, atovaquone-proguanil, biological control measures, chloroquine (alone or with proguanil), diethyltoluamide (DEET), doxycycline, full-length and light-coloured clothing, insecticide-treated clothing/nets, mefloquine, mosquito coils and vaporising mats, primaquine, pyrimethamine-dapsone, pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine, smoke, topical (skin-applied) insect repellents, and vaccines. PMID:19450348

  16. Malaria: prevention in travellers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Malaria transmission occurs most frequently in environments with humidity greater than 60% and ambient temperature of 25 °C to 30 °C. Risks increase with longer visits and depend on activity. Infection can follow a single mosquito bite. Incubation is usually 10 to 14 days but can be up to 18 months depending on the strain of parasite. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of non-drug preventive interventions in non-pregnant adult travellers? What are the effects of drug prophylaxis in non-pregnant adult travellers? What are the effects of antimalaria vaccines in adult and child travellers? What are the effects of antimalaria interventions in child travellers, pregnant travellers, and in airline pilots? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to November 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 79 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aerosol insecticides, amodiaquine, air conditioning and electric fans, atovaquone–proguanil, biological control measures, chloroquine (alone or with proguanil), diethyltoluamide (DEET), dietary supplementation, doxycycline, electronic mosquito repellents, full-length and light-coloured clothing, insecticide-treated clothing/nets, mefloquine, mosquito coils and vapourising mats, primaquine, pyrimethamine–dapsone, pyrimethamine–sulfadoxine, smoke

  17. Malaria. Can WHO roll back malaria?

    PubMed

    Balter, M

    2000-10-20

    In October 1998, World Health Organization Director-General Gro Harlem Brundtland announced Roll Back Malaria, a multiagency crusade that aims to cut malaria mortality in half over the next 10 years. Brundtland might just be the one to pull it off, say numerous public health experts, although some researchers question whether the goal is realistic.

  18. Application of Genomics to Field Investigations of Malaria by the International Centers for Excellence in Malaria Research

    PubMed Central

    Volkman, Sarah K.; Ndiaye, Daouda; Diakite, Mahamadou; Koita, Ousmane; Nwakanma, Davis; Daniels, Rachel; Park, Danny; Neafsey, Dan; Muskavitch, Marc; Krogstad, Don; Sabeti, Pardis; Hartl, Dan; Wirth, Dyann

    2011-01-01

    Success of the global research agenda toward eradication of malaria will depend on development of new tools, including drugs, vaccines, insecticides and diagnostics. Genomic information, now available for the malaria parasites, their mosquito vectors, and human host, can be leveraged to both develop these tools and monitor their effectiveness. Although knowledge of genomic sequences for the malaria parasites, Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax, have helped advance our understanding of malaria biology, simply knowing this sequence information has not yielded a plethora of new interventions to reduce the burden of malaria. Here we review and provide specific examples of how genomic information has increased our knowledge of parasite biology, focusing on P. falciparum malaria. We then discuss how population genetics can be applied toward the epidemiological and transmission-related goals outlined by the International Centers of Excellence in Malaria Research groups recently established by the National Institutes of Health. Finally, we propose genomics is a research area that can promote coordination and collaboration between various ICEMR groups, and that working together as a community can significantly advance the value of this information toward reduction of the global malaria burden. PMID:22182668

  19. Young lives lost as B cells falter: what we are learning about antibody responses in malaria.

    PubMed

    Portugal, Silvia; Pierce, Susan K; Crompton, Peter D

    2013-04-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains a major public health threat for which there is no licensed vaccine. Abs play a key role in malaria immunity, but Ab-mediated protection is only acquired after years of repeated infections, leaving children in endemic areas vulnerable to severe malaria and death. Many P. falciparum Ags are extraordinarily diverse and clonally variant, which likely contribute to the inefficient acquisition of protective Abs. However, mounting evidence suggests that there is more to the story and that infection-induced dysregulation of B cell function also plays a role. We herein review progress toward understanding the B cell biology of P. falciparum infection, focusing on what has been learned from population-based studies in malaria-endemic areas. We suggest ways in which advances in immunology and genomics-based technology can further improve our understanding of the B cell response in malaria and perhaps illuminate new pathways to the development of effective vaccines.

  20. Functional genomic technologies applied to the control of the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Carucci, D J

    2001-05-01

    Infection with any of the four species of Plasmodium single cell parasites that infects humans causes the clinical disease, malaria. Of these, it is Plasmodium falciparum that is responsible for the majority of the 1.5-2.3 million deaths due to this disease each year. Worldwide there are between 300-500 million cases of malaria annually. To date there is no licensed vaccine and resistance to most of the available drugs used to prevent and/or treat malaria is spreading. There is therefore an urgent need to develop new and effective drugs and vaccines against this devastating parasite. We have outlined a strategy using a combination of DNA-based vaccines and the data derived from the soon-to-be completed P. falciparum genome and the genomes of other species of Plasmodium to develop new vaccines against malaria. Much of the technology that we are developing for vaccine target identification is directly applicable to the identification of potential targets for drug discovery. The publicly available genome sequence data also provides a means for researchers whose focus may not be primarily malaria to leverage their research on cancer, yeast biology and other research areas to the biological problems of malaria.

  1. Psychosomatics of malaria.

    PubMed

    Houghton, D L

    1980-03-01

    Cerebral malaria with psychosomatic manifestations is one aspect of malaria which may be mistaken for mental illness. However, the psychosomatic aspects of the disease also relate to the biological, psychological and social influences which may determine changes in disease incidence and distribution. The history of the Global Malaria Eradication Campaign and the resurgence of malaria in many countries of the world have influenced attitudes and the professional milieu in which present day malaria control programmes seek to operate. The individual in a malarious area may obstruct malaria control operations by refusing to allow indoor spraying or to take prophylactic medication. Cultural beliefs often described the history of malaria in a community and the way in which the community had come to terms with this disease. Socio-economic development and population movement may disturb this equilibrium and result in a rise in malaria incidence. Behavioural habits may increase malaria risk and the degree to which the community is prepared to become involved in malaria control may influence its experience with the disease.

  2. Malaria tolerance – for whom the cell tolls?

    PubMed Central

    Boutlis, Craig S.; Yeo, Tsin W.; Anstey, Nicholas M.

    2009-01-01

    How is it that individuals exposed to intense malaria transmission can tolerate the presence of malaria parasites in their blood at levels that would produce fever in others? In light of evidence discounting a role for nitric oxide or antibodies to plasmodial glycosylphosphatidylinositols in maintaining this tolerant state, refractoriness to toxin-induced Toll-like receptor-mediated signalling has emerged as a likely explanation that links malarial and bacterial endotoxin tolerance. Understanding the mechanisms underlying tolerance and the potential for cross-tolerization has significant implications for understanding the potential for anti-toxic vaccine strategies, as well as interactions between different malaria species and between malaria and other human parasites. PMID:16784889

  3. Interactions between worm infections and malaria.

    PubMed

    Nacher, Mathieu

    2004-04-01

    Helminths are the most prevalent parasitic infections and malaria is the deadliest parasitic disease. Helminths have been reported to be protective against the severe forms of malaria but they were also possibly linked to increased malaria-incidence and gametocyte carriage. Connecting the dots between observations suggests that statistical regularities throughout the evolution of worms and malaria parasites in the same hosts, may have led to the emergence of non-zero interactions as observed in iterated prisoners dilemma games. Thus by protecting the host, helminths protect themselves and their reproductive potential, but also favor the dissemination and reproduction of Plasmodium falciparum. The proximate causes of this evolutionarily stable strategy might be mediated by IgE and the CD23/NO pathway, the protective role of IL10 in helminth-infected patients, and possibly the hematological consequences of worms. The chronic activation of the CD23/NO pathway might be instrumental in downregulating the expression of cytoadherence receptors thus reducing sequestration of parasitized red blood cells in the deep organs. Mild anemia in helminth-infected patients might favor gametocytogenesis and send attractive cues to the vector. This framework leads to numerous testable hypotheses and could explain certain singularities regarding the double edged role of IgE and NO. Among these hypotheses, there are 2 practical ones: the impact of helminths on malaria vaccine candidates, and the theoretical risk of increasing the severity of malaria after anthelmintics. The capacity for increased IgE responses could thus have been vital in our ancestor's wormy and malarious past. Allergies may be what remains of it in the modern world.

  4. Malaria immunity in man and mosquito: insights into unsolved mysteries of a deadly infectious disease

    PubMed Central

    Crompton, Peter D.; Moebius, Jacqueline; Portugal, Silvia; Waisberg, Michael; Hart, Geoffrey; Garver, Lindsey S.; Miller, Louis H.; Barillas, Carolina; Pierce, Susan K.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by parasites of the obligate intracellular Apicomplexa family, the most deadly of which, Plasmodium falciparum, prevails in Africa. Malaria imposes a huge health burden on the world’s most vulnerable populations, claiming the lives of nearly a million children and pregnant women each year in Africa alone. Although there is keen interest in eradicating malaria, we do not yet have the necessary tools to meet this challenge, including an effective malaria vaccine and adequate vector control strategies. Here we review what is known about the mechanisms at play in immune resistance to malaria in both the human and mosquito hosts at each step in the parasite’s complex life cycle with a view towards developing the tools that will contribute to the prevention of disease and death and ultimately the goal of malaria eradication. In so doing we hope to inspire immunologists to participate in defeating this devastating disease. PMID:24655294

  5. Malaria immunity in man and mosquito: insights into unsolved mysteries of a deadly infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Crompton, Peter D; Moebius, Jacqueline; Portugal, Silvia; Waisberg, Michael; Hart, Geoffrey; Garver, Lindsey S; Miller, Louis H; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Pierce, Susan K

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by parasites of the obligate intracellular Apicomplexa phylum the most deadly of which, Plasmodium falciparum, prevails in Africa. Malaria imposes a huge health burden on the world's most vulnerable populations, claiming the lives of nearly one million children and pregnant women each year. Although there is keen interest in eradicating malaria, we do not yet have the necessary tools to meet this challenge, including an effective malaria vaccine and adequate vector control strategies. Here we review what is known about the mechanisms at play in immune resistance to malaria in both the human and mosquito hosts at each step in the parasite's complex life cycle with a view toward developing the tools that will contribute to the prevention of disease and death and, ultimately, to the goal of malaria eradication. In so doing, we hope to inspire immunologists to participate in defeating this devastating disease.

  6. Malaria Policy Advisory Committee to the WHO: conclusions and recommendations of fifth biannual meeting (March 2014).

    PubMed

    2014-07-03

    The Malaria Policy Advisory Committee to the World Health Organization (WHO) held its fifth meeting in Geneva, Switzerland from 12 to 14 March 2014. This article provides a summary of the discussions, conclusions and recommendations from that meeting.Meeting sessions covered: maintaining universal coverage of long-lasting insecticidal nets; combining indoor residual spraying with long-lasting insecticidal nets; the sound management of old long-lasting insecticidal nets; malaria diagnosis in low transmission settings; the Global Technical Strategy for Malaria (2016 -2025); and Technical Expert Group updates on vector control, the RTS,S vaccine, the Malaria Treatment Guidelines, anti-malarial drug resistance and containment, and surveillance, monitoring and evaluation.Policy statements, position statements, and guidelines that arise from the Malaria Policy Advisory Committee meeting conclusions and recommendations will be formally issued and disseminated to WHO Member States by the WHO Global Malaria Programme.

  7. Measuring the effects of an ever-changing environment on malaria control.

    PubMed

    McCutchan, Thomas F; Grim, K Christiana; Li, Jun; Weiss, Walter; Rathore, Darmendar; Sullivan, Margery; Graczyk, Thaddeus K; Kumar, Sanjai; Cranfield, Mike R

    2004-04-01

    The effectiveness of malaria control measures depends not only on the potency of the control measures themselves but also upon the influence of variables associated with the environment. Environmental variables have the capacity either to enhance or to impair the desired outcome. An optimal outcome in the field, which is ultimately the real goal of vaccine research, will result from prior knowledge of both the potency of the control measures and the role of environmental variables. Here we describe both the potential effectiveness of control measures and the problems associated with testing in an area of endemicity. We placed canaries with different immunologic backgrounds (e.g., naïve to malaria infection, vaccinated naïve, and immune) directly into an area where avian malaria, Plasmodium relictum, is endemic. In our study setting, canaries that are naïve to malaria infection routinely suffer approximately 50% mortality during their first period of exposure to the disease. In comparison, birds vaccinated and boosted with a DNA vaccine plasmid encoding the circumsporozoite protein of P. relictum exhibited a moderate degree of protection against natural infection (P < 0.01). In the second year we followed the fate of all surviving birds with no further manipulation. The vaccinated birds from the first year were no longer statistically distinguishable for protection against malaria from cages of naïve birds. During this period, 36% of vaccinated birds died of malaria. We postulate that the vaccine-induced protective immune responses prevented the acquisition of natural immunity similar to that concurrently acquired by birds in a neighboring cage. These results indicate that dominant environmental parameters associated with malaria deaths can be addressed before their application to a less malleable human system.

  8. [Malaria prevention in international travel].

    PubMed

    López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2003-05-01

    For travelers malaria represents the principal infectious risk of severe complications and death. Infection during traveling depends on the geographical area visited, the predominant species of parasite, the frequency of resistance to antimalarial agents, and whether preventive measures have been taken. Until a vaccine has been developed, prevention strategies consist of providing travelers with information, the use of barrier methods against vector bites, the correct use of chemoprophylaxis, and the possibility of self-diagnosis and treatment. The choice of chemoprophylaxis regimen should be individualized since no regimen guarantees 100% protection or is free of adverse effects or contraindications. The most effective drugs are doxycycline, atovaquone-proguanil and mefloquine while those producing severe adverse effects with the least frequency are atovaquone-proguanil and doxycycline.

  9. A Multiplex Cancer/Testis Antigen-Based Biomarker Panel to Predict Aggressive Phenotype of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0535 TITLE: A Multiplex Cancer/Testis Antigen-Based Biomarker Panel to Predict Aggressive Phenotype of Prostate...30Sep2014 - 29Sep2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: A Multiplex Cancer/Testis Antigen-Based Biomarker Panel to Predict Aggressive Phenotype of Prostate...different between aggressive and indolent tumors. For the third year of the grant, we evaluated the gene expression of these 8 CTAs in PCa and benign

  10. Malaria ecotypes and stratification.

    PubMed

    Schapira, Allan; Boutsika, Konstantina

    2012-01-01

    To deal with the variability of malaria, control programmes need to stratify their malaria problem into a number of smaller units. Such stratification may be based on the epidemiology of malaria or on its determinants such as ecology. An ecotype classification was developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) around 1990, and it is time to assess its usefulness for current malaria control as well as for malaria modelling on the basis of published research. Journal and grey literature was searched for articles on malaria or Anopheles combined with ecology or stratification. It was found that all malaria in the world today could be assigned to one or more of the following ecotypes: savanna, plains and valleys; forest and forest fringe; foothill; mountain fringe and northern and southern fringes; desert fringe; coastal and urban. However, some areas are in transitional or mixed zones; furthermore, the implications of any ecotype depend on the biogeographical region, sometimes subregion, and finally, the knowledge on physiography needs to be supplemented by local information on natural, anthropic and health system processes including malaria control. Ecotyping can therefore not be seen as a shortcut to determine control interventions, but rather as a framework to supplement available epidemiological and entomological data so as to assess malaria situations at the local level, think through the particular risks and opportunities and reinforce intersectoral action. With these caveats, it does however emerge that several ecotypic distinctions are well defined and have relatively constant implications for control within certain biogeographic regions. Forest environments in the Indo-malay and the Neotropics are, with a few exceptions, associated with much higher malaria risk than in adjacent areas; the vectors are difficult to control, and the anthropic factors also often converge to impose constraints. Urban malaria in Africa is associated with lower risk than savanna

  11. Recombinant antigen-based dipstick ELISA for the diagnosis of leptospirosis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Dey, S; Mohan, C Madhan; Ramadass, P; Nachimuthu, K

    2007-02-10

    A recombinant LipL 32 antigen-based dipstick ELISA was developed as a screening test for the detection of leptospiral antibodies in serum samples from dogs. The antibodies were detected by a change in the colour of the substrate solution when the recombinant antigen-coated dipsticks were dipped into it. The relative sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the test, compared with the standard microscopic agglutination test, were 95.9 per cent, 93.8 per cent and 94.8 per cent, respectively.

  12. Empowering Malaria Vaccination by Drug Administration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    response with drugs that neutralize suppressive functions and potentiate protective responses. Chloroquine may be a first attractive candidate...However, sterile immunity is never observed in natura lly exposed popu- lations; adults living in e ndemic areas often harbor para- si tes albeit ar low ...NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND

  13. Measuring the Effects of an Ever-Changing Environment on Malaria Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    comparison, birds vaccinated and boosted with a DNA vaccine plasmid encoding the circumsporo- zoite protein of P. relictum exhibited a moderate degree of...protection against natural infection (P < 0.01). In the second year we followed the fate of all surviving birds with no further manipulation. The...vaccinated birds from the first year were no longer statistically distinguishable for protection against malaria from cages of naïve birds . During this period

  14. HPV Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness HPV Vaccine KidsHealth > For Teens > HPV Vaccine Print A A ... starting at age 9. continue How Does the Vaccine Work? The HPV vaccine is approved for people ...

  15. HPV Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness HPV Vaccine KidsHealth > For Teens > HPV Vaccine A A A ... starting at age 9. continue How Does the Vaccine Work? The HPV vaccine is approved for people ...

  16. [Clinical research on malaria: what for the future?].

    PubMed

    Cot, M

    2005-06-01

    Malaria still remains one of the main public health problems in the world. In spite of early and numerous clinical trials, the situation seems to have been worsening in the last ten years. Malaria clinical research involves several levels: Several meta-analyses have been performed on this topic (in particular, the Cochrane Database Library has published studies on malaria prevention during pregnancy, management of clinical malaria attacks, vaccine trials or impregnated bed net trials). All these studies show the uneven quality of trials (only 10% to 50% can be kept in the analysis for methodological reasons), which seldom lead to similar conclusions. Besides, as resistances of both parasites and vectors to drugs or insecticides are regularly increasing, trials have to be repeated and new molecules have to be found and evaluated. Finally, practical application of such interventions may be difficult, due to the heterogeneity of epidemiological situations and the poverty of target populations. Various initiatives aiming to develop malaria clinical research have recently been launched. Donators are public or international (Global Fund, Roll Back Malaria Initiative, NIH, EDCTP programme), as well as private (Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation). These substantial funds should enhance the research of new antimalarial drugs and large-scale, adequately designed trials. However, to make sure these trials really benefit to populations exposed to the disease, ethical principles should be co-elaborated with developing countries, within collaborative networks between laboratories from industrialized and developing countries.

  17. Modelling malaria population structure and its implications for control.

    PubMed

    Buckee, Caroline O; Gupta, Sunetra

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical models of malaria transmission have been used to inform the design of malaria control programs since the mid 20th century, and many of these models have provided useful insights into the complexity of the disease. Among developing countries, however and particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, malaria remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality. One of the main difficulties in controlling the most virulent human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, is its genetic diversity, which confounds attempts to design an effective vaccine. The population structure of P. falciparum remains poorly understood but plays a key role in determining epidemiological patterns of disease and the development of immunity. We discuss the seminal model of malaria transmission developed by Ross and MacDonald, and the modifications that have been made since to include more realism. We show that age profiles of disease and serological data support a theoretical model in which the parasite population is diverse and structured into several antigenic types and highlight the implications of this structure for controlling malaria. Lastly, we discuss the current sequence data on parasite antigen genes that are important for the aquisition of immunity, and the results of a new analysis of P. falciparum population structure at the genomic level.

  18. Malaria Early Warning: The MalarSat project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca, M.; Escorihuela, M. J.; Martínez, D.; Torrent, M.; Aponte, J.; Nunez, F.; Garcia, J.

    2009-04-01

    Malaria is one of the major public health challenges undermining development in the world. The aim of MalarSat Project is to provide a malaria risks infection maps at global scale using Earth Observation data to support and prevent epidemic episodes. The proposed service for creating malaria risk maps would be critically useful to improve the efficiency in insecticide programs, vaccine campaigns and the logistics epidemic treatment. Different teams have already carried out studies in order to exploit the use of Earth Observation (EO) data with epidemiology purposes. In the case of malaria risk maps, it has been shown that meteorological data is not sufficient to fulfill this objective. In particular being able to map the malaria mosquito habitat would increase the accuracy of risk maps. The malaria mosquitoes mainly reproduce in new water puddles of very reduced dimensions (about 1 meter wide). There is no instrument that could detect such small patches of water unless there are many of them spread in an area of several hundreds of meters. MalarSat aims at using the radar altimeter data from the EnviSat, RA-2, to try and build indicators of mosquitoes existence. This presentation will show the scientific objectives and principles of the MalarSat project.

  19. [Malaria in Algerian Sahara].

    PubMed

    Hammadi, D; Boubidi, S C; Chaib, S E; Saber, A; Khechache, Y; Gasmi, M; Harrat, Z

    2009-08-01

    Thanks to the malaria eradication campaign launched in Algeria in 1968, the number of malaria cases fell down significantly from 95,424 cases in 1960 to 30 cases in 1978. At that time the northern part of the country was declared free of Plasmodium falciparum. Only few cases belonging to P. vivax persisted in residual foci in the middle part of the country. In the beginning of the eighties, the south of the country was marked by an increase of imported malaria cases. The resurgence of the disease in the oases coincided with the opening of the Trans-Saharan road and the booming trade with the neighbouring southern countries. Several authors insisted on the risk of introduction of malaria or its exotic potential vectors in Algeria via this new road. Now, the totality of malaria autochthonous cases in Algeria are located in the south of the country where 300 cases were declared during the period (1980-2007). The recent outbreak recorded in 2007 at the borders with Mall and the introduction of Anopheles gambiae into the Algerian territory show the vulnerability of this area to malaria which is probably emphasized by the local environmental changes. The authors assess the evolution of malaria in the Sahara region and draw up the distribution of the anopheles in this area.

  20. New insight-guided approaches to detect, cure, prevent and eliminate malaria.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sushil; Kumari, Renu; Pandey, Richa

    2015-05-01

    New challenges posed by the development of resistance against artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) as well as previous first-line therapies, and the continuing absence of vaccine, have given impetus to research in all areas of malaria control. This review portrays the ongoing progress in several directions of malaria research. The variants of RTS,S and apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) are being developed and test adapted as multicomponent and multistage malaria control vaccines, while many other vaccine candidates and methodologies to produce antigens are under experimentation. To track and prevent the spread of artemisinin resistance from Southeast Asia to other parts of the world, rolling circle-enhanced enzyme activity detection (REEAD), a time- and cost-effective malaria diagnosis in field conditions, and a DNA marker associated with artemisinin resistance have become available. Novel mosquito repellents and mosquito trapping and killing techniques much more effective than the prevalent ones are undergoing field testing. Mosquito lines stably infected with their symbiotic wild-type or genetically engineered bacteria that kill sympatric malaria parasites are being constructed and field tested for stopping malaria transmission. A complementary approach being pursued is the addition of ivermectin-like drug molecules to ACTs to cure malaria and kill mosquitoes. Experiments are in progress to eradicate malaria mosquito by making it genetically male sterile. High-throughput screening procedures are being developed and used to discover molecules that possess long in vivo half life and are active against liver and blood stages for the fast cure of malaria symptoms caused by simple or relapsing and drug-sensitive and drug-resistant types of varied malaria parasites, can stop gametocytogenesis and sporogony and could be given in one dose. Target-based antimalarial drug designing has begun. Some of the putative next-generation antimalarials that possess in their

  1. Vaccine hesitancy

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Eve; Laberge, Caroline; Guay, Maryse; Bramadat, Paul; Roy, Réal; Bettinger, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite being recognized as one of the most successful public health measures, vaccination is perceived as unsafe and unnecessary by a growing number of individuals. Lack of confidence in vaccines is now considered a threat to the success of vaccination programs. Vaccine hesitancy is believed to be responsible for decreasing vaccine coverage and an increasing risk of vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks and epidemics. This review provides an overview of the phenomenon of vaccine hesitancy. First, we will characterize vaccine hesitancy and suggest the possible causes of the apparent increase in vaccine hesitancy in the developed world. Then we will look at determinants of individual decision-making about vaccination. PMID:23584253

  2. There is need for antigen-based rapid diagnostic tests to identify common acute tropical illnesses.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Henry; Suankratay, Chusana

    2007-01-01

    Enteric fever, typhus, leptospirosis, dengue, melioidosis, and tuberculous meningitis present urgent diagnostic problems that require experience and clinical judgment to make early evidence-based management decisions. Basic and applied research dealing with reliable antigen-based diagnostics has been published and confirmed for several of these infections. This should have initiated commercial production but has not. Established international firms see little profit in such diagnostic kits since they would be used in poor countries with little prospects for return of investment capital. We attempt to illustrate this issue, using common causes of acute febrile illnesses in the Southeast Asian region. We believe that rapid diagnostic technology could prevent significant delay in starting appropriate therapy, reduce hospital expenses, and even save lives.

  3. Malaria and Vascular Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    de Alencar, Aristóteles Comte; de Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães; Okoshi, Katashi; Okoshi, Marina Politi

    2014-01-01

    Involvement of the cardiovascular system in patients with infectious and parasitic diseases can result from both intrinsic mechanisms of the disease and drug intervention. Malaria is an example, considering that the endothelial injury by Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes can cause circulatory disorders. This is a literature review aimed at discussing the relationship between malaria and endothelial impairment, especially its effects on the cardiovascular system. We discuss the implications of endothelial aggression and the interdisciplinarity that should guide the malaria patient care, whose acute infection can contribute to precipitate or aggravate a preexisting heart disease. PMID:25014058

  4. Malaria Modeling using Remote Sensing and GIS Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiang, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Malaria has been with the human race since the ancient time. In spite of the advances of biomedical research and the completion of genomic mapping of Plasmodium falciparum, the exact mechanisms of how the various strains of parasites evade the human immune system and how they have adapted and become resistant to multiple drugs remain elusive. Perhaps because of these reasons, effective vaccines against malaria are still not available. Worldwide, approximately one to three millions deaths are attributed to malaria annually. With the increased availability of remotely sensed data, researchers in medical entomology, epidemiology and ecology have started to associate environmental and ecological variables with malaria transmission. In several studies, it has been shown that transmission correlates well with certain environmental and ecological parameters, and that remote sensing can be used to measure these determinants. In a NASA project, we have taken a holistic approach to examine how remote sensing and GIs can contribute to vector and malaria controls. To gain a better understanding of the interactions among the possible promoting factors, we have been developing a habitat model, a transmission model, and a risk prediction model, all using remote sensing data as input. Our objectives are: 1) To identify the potential breeding sites of major vector species and the locations for larvicide and insecticide applications in order to reduce costs, lessen the chance of developing pesticide resistance, and minimize the damage to the environment; 2) To develop a malaria transmission model characterizing the interactions among hosts, vectors, parasites, landcover and environment in order to identify the key factors that sustain or intensify malaria transmission, and 3) To develop a risk model to predict the occurrence of malaria and its transmission intensity using epidemiological data and satellite-derived or ground-measured environmental and meteorological data.

  5. Development of humanized mouse models to study human malaria parasite infection.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Ashley M; Kappe, Stefan H I; Ploss, Alexander; Mikolajczak, Sebastian A

    2012-05-01

    Malaria is a disease caused by infection with Plasmodium parasites that are transmitted by mosquito bite. Five different species of Plasmodium infect humans with severe disease, but human malaria is primarily caused by Plasmodium falciparum. The burden of malaria on the developing world is enormous, and a fully protective vaccine is still elusive. One of the biggest challenges in the quest for the development of new antimalarial drugs and vaccines is the lack of accessible animal models to study P. falciparum infection because the parasite is restricted to the great apes and human hosts. Here, we review the current state of research in this field and provide an outlook of the development of humanized small animal models to study P. falciparum infection that will accelerate fundamental research into human parasite biology and could accelerate drug and vaccine design in the future.

  6. Challenges and prospects for dengue and malaria control in Thailand, Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Corbel, Vincent; Nosten, Francois; Thanispong, Kanutcharee; Luxemburger, Christine; Kongmee, Monthathip; Chareonviriyaphap, Theeraphap

    2013-12-01

    Despite significant advances in the search for potential dengue vaccines and new therapeutic schemes for malaria, the control of these diseases remains difficult. In Thailand, malaria incidence is falling whereas that of dengue is rising, with an increase in the proportion of reported severe cases. In the absence of antiviral therapeutic options for acute dengue, appropriate case management reduces mortality. However, the interruption of transmission still relies on vector control measures that are currently insufficient to curtail the cycle of epidemics. Drug resistance in malaria parasites is increasing, compromising malaria control and elimination. Deficiencies in our knowledge of vector biology and vectorial capacity also hinder public health efforts for vector control. Challenges to dengue and malaria control are discussed, and research priorities identified.

  7. Scientific challenges and opportunities in developing novel vaccines for the emerging and developing markets: New Technologies in Emerging Markets, October 16th-18th 2012, World Vaccine Congress, Lyon.

    PubMed

    Kochhar, Sonali

    2013-04-01

    Vaccines have had a major role in enhancing the quality of life and increasing life expectancy. Despite these successes and the development of new vaccine technologies, there remain multiple infectious diseases including AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis that require effective prophylactic vaccines. New and traditional technologies have a role in the development and delivery of the new vaccine candidates. The scientific challenges, opportunities and funding models for developing vaccines for low resource settings are highlighted here.

  8. Mapping hypoendemic, seasonal malaria in rural Bandarban, Bangladesh: a prospective surveillance

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Until recently the Chittagong Hill tracts have been hyperendemic for malaria. A past cross-sectional RDT based survey in 2007 recorded rates of approximately 15%. This study was designed to understand the present epidemiology of malaria in this region, to monitor and facilitate the uptake of malaria intervention activities of the national malaria programme and to serve as an area for developing new and innovative control strategies for malaria. Methods This research field area was established in two rural unions of Bandarban District of Bangladesh north of Bandarban city, which are known to be endemic for malaria due to Plasmodium falciparum. The project included the following elements: a) a demographic surveillance system including an initial census with updates every four months, b) periodic surveys of knowledge attitude and practice, c) a geographic information system, d) weekly active and continuous passive surveillance for malaria infections using smears, rapid tests and PCR, f) monthly mosquito surveillance, and e) daily weather measures. The programme included both traditional and molecular methods for detecting malaria as well as lab methods for speciating mosquitoes and detecting mosquitoes infected with sporozoites. Results The demographic surveillance enumerated and mapped 20,563 people, 75% of which were tribal non-Bengali. The monthly mosquito surveys identified 22 Anopheles species, eight of which were positive by circumsporozoite ELISA. The annual rate of malaria was close to 1% with 85% of cases in the rainy months of May-October. Definitive clustering identified in the low transmission season persisted during the high transmission season. Conclusion This demographically and geographically defined area, near to the Myanmar border, which is also hypoendemic for malaria, will be useful for future studies of the epidemiology of malaria and for evaluation of strategies for malaria control including new drugs and vaccines. PMID:21569599

  9. MALARIA RESEARCH PROGRAM.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Analytical clinical summaries are presented on the following: Summary and analysis of therapeutic effect of new drugs in human volunteers with...Falciparum Malaria; Summary and analysis of therapeutic effect of new drugs in human volunteers with Vivax Malaria; Potentiation by drug combination...Problems of resistance for both old and new drugs ; Analysis of P. berghei infections; Studies on mechanisms of drug action; Cumulative summary of all new drug trials.

  10. Malaria in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Jesus R; Al-Khan, Abdulla; Apuzzio, Joseph J

    2005-12-01

    Recently, there has been a resurgence of malaria in densely populated areas of the United States secondary to human migration from endemic areas where factors such as cessation of vector control, vector resistance to insecticides, disease resistance to drugs, environmental changes, political instability, and indifference, have played a role for malaria becoming an overwhelming infection of these tropical underdeveloped countries. It is important for health care providers of gravida to be alert of the disease and its effects on pregnancy.

  11. Virulence in malaria: an evolutionary viewpoint.

    PubMed Central

    Mackinnon, Margaret J; Read, Andrew F

    2004-01-01

    Malaria parasites cause much morbidity and mortality to their human hosts. From our evolutionary perspective, this is because virulence is positively associated with parasite transmission rate. Natural selection therefore drives virulence upwards, but only to the point where the cost to transmission caused by host death begins to outweigh the transmission benefits. In this review, we summarize data from the laboratory rodent malaria model, Plasmodium chabaudi, and field data on the human malaria parasite, P. falciparum, in relation to this virulence trade-off hypothesis. The data from both species show strong positive correlations between asexual multiplication, transmission rate, infection length, morbidity and mortality, and therefore support the underlying assumptions of the hypothesis. Moreover, the P. falciparum data show that expected total lifetime transmission of the parasite is maximized in young children in whom the fitness cost of host mortality balances the fitness benefits of higher transmission rates and slower clearance rates, thus exhibiting the hypothesized virulence trade-off. This evolutionary explanation of virulence appears to accord well with the clinical and molecular explanations of pathogenesis that involve cytoadherence, red cell invasion and immune evasion, although direct evidence of the fitness advantages of these mechanisms is scarce. One implication of this evolutionary view of virulence is that parasite populations are expected to evolve new levels of virulence in response to medical interventions such as vaccines and drugs. PMID:15306410

  12. [Travelers' vaccines].

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2011-09-01

    The number of Japanese oversea travelers has gradually increased year by year, however they usually pay less attention to the poor physical condition at the voyage place. Many oversea travelers caught vaccine preventable diseases in developing countries. The Vaccine Guideline for Oversea Travelers 2010 published by Japanese Society of Travel Health will be helpful for spreading the knowledge of travelers' vaccine and vaccine preventable diseases in developing countries. Many travelers' vaccines have not licensed in Japan. I hope these travelers' vaccines, such as typhoid vaccine, meningococcal vaccine, cholera vaccine and so on will be licensed in the near future.

  13. UK malaria treatment guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lalloo, David G; Shingadia, Delane; Pasvol, Geoffrey; Chiodini, Peter L; Whitty, Christopher J; Beeching, Nicholas J; Hill, David R; Warrell, David A; Bannister, Barbara A

    2007-02-01

    Malaria is the tropical disease most commonly imported into the UK, with 1500-2000 cases reported each year, and 10-20 deaths. Approximately three-quarters of reported malaria cases in the UK are caused by Plasmodium falciparum, which is capable of invading a high proportion of red blood cells and rapidly leading to severe or life-threatening multi-organ disease. Most non-falciparum malaria cases are caused by Plasmodium vivax; a few cases are caused by the other two species of Plasmodium: Plasmodium ovale or Plasmodium malariae. Mixed infections with more than 1 species of parasite can occur; they commonly involve P. falciparum with the attendant risks of severe malaria. Management of malaria depends on awareness of the diagnosis and on performing the correct diagnostic tests: the diagnosis cannot be excluded until 3 blood specimens have been examined by an experienced microscopist. There are no typical clinical features of malaria, even fever is not invariably present. The optimum diagnostic procedure is examination of thick and thin blood films by an expert to detect and speciate the malarial parasites; P. falciparum malaria can be diagnosed almost as accurately using rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) which detect plasmodial antigens or enzymes, although RDTs for other Plasmodium species are not as reliable. The treatment of choice for non-falciparum malaria is a 3-day course of oral chloroquine, to which only a limited proportion of P. vivax strains have gained resistance. Dormant parasites (hypnozoites) persist in the liver after treatment of P. vivax or P. ovale infection: the only currently effective drug for eradication of hypnozoites is primaquine. This must be avoided or given with caution under expert supervision in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD), in whom it may cause severe haemolysis. Uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria can be treated orally with quinine, atovaquone plus proguanil (Malarone) or co-artemether (Riamet

  14. A Web-Based Platform for Designing Vaccines against Existing and Emerging Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Vir, Pooja; Singla, Deepak; Gupta, Sudheer; Kumar, Shailesh

    2016-01-01

    Development of an effective vaccine against drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is crucial for saving millions of premature deaths every year due to tuberculosis. This paper describes a web portal developed for assisting researchers in designing vaccines against emerging Mtb strains using traditional and modern approaches. Firstly, we annotated 59 genomes of Mycobacterium species to understand similarity/dissimilarity between tuberculoid, non-tuberculoid and vaccine strains at genome level. Secondly, antigen-based vaccine candidates have been predicted in each Mtb strain. Thirdly, epitopes-based vaccine candidates were predicted/discovered in above antigen-based vaccine candidates that can stimulate all arms of immune system. Finally, a database of predicted vaccine candidates at epitopes as well at antigen level has been developed for above strains. In order to design vaccine against a newly sequenced genome of Mtb strain, server integrates three modules for identification of strain-, antigen-, epitope-specific vaccine candidates. We observed that 103522 unique peptides (9mers) had the potential to induce an antibody response and/or promiscuous binder to MHC alleles and/or have the capability to stimulate T lymphocytes. In summary, this web-portal will be useful for researchers working on designing vaccines against Mtb including drug-resistant strains. Availability: The database is available freely at http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/mtbveb/. PMID:27096425

  15. Sterile Protective Immunity to Malaria is Associated with a Panel of Novel P. falciparum Antigens*

    PubMed Central

    Trieu, Angela; Kayala, Matthew A.; Burk, Chad; Molina, Douglas M.; Freilich, Daniel A.; Richie, Thomas L.; Baldi, Pierre; Felgner, Philip L.; Doolan, Denise L.

    2011-01-01

    The development of an effective malaria vaccine remains a global public health priority. Less than 0.5% of the Plasmodium falciparum genome has been assessed as potential vaccine targets and candidate vaccines have been based almost exclusively on single antigens. It is possible that the failure to develop a malaria vaccine despite decades of effort might be attributed to this historic focus. To advance malaria vaccine development, we have fabricated protein microarrays representing 23% of the entire P. falciparum proteome and have probed these arrays with plasma from subjects with sterile protection or no protection after experimental immunization with radiation attenuated P. falciparum sporozoites. A panel of 19 pre-erythrocytic stage antigens was identified as strongly associated with sporozoite-induced protective immunity; 16 of these antigens were novel and 85% have been independently identified in sporozoite and/or liver stage proteomic or transcriptomic data sets. Reactivity to any individual antigen did not correlate with protection but there was a highly significant difference in the cumulative signal intensity between protected and not protected individuals. Functional annotation indicates that most of these signature proteins are involved in cell cycle/DNA processing and protein synthesis. In addition, 21 novel blood-stage specific antigens were identified. Our data provide the first evidence that sterile protective immunity against malaria is directed against a panel of novel P. falciparum antigens rather than one antigen in isolation. These results have important implications for vaccine development, suggesting that an efficacious malaria vaccine should be multivalent and targeted at a select panel of key antigens, many of which have not been previously characterized. PMID:21628511

  16. Consistent Safety and Infectivity in Sporozoite Challenge Model of Plasmodium vivax in Malaria-Naive Human Volunteers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    species in most endemic areas outside Africa. 1 Limited succes of classic malaria control measures has prompted the search for vaccines and because...invested in this parasite species than in P. vivax. However, progress is also being achieved in the development of P. vivax subunit vaccines . Two...trials. 2– 4 Recent phase I clinical trials conducted using different formulations of P. vivax CS-derived subunit vaccines based on long syn

  17. Leptospirosis vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhijun; Jin, Li; Węgrzyn, Alicja

    2007-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a serious infection disease caused by pathogenic strains of the Leptospira spirochetes, which affects not only humans but also animals. It has long been expected to find an effective vaccine to prevent leptospirosis through immunization of high risk humans or animals. Although some leptospirosis vaccines have been obtained, the vaccination is relatively unsuccessful in clinical application despite decades of research and millions of dollars spent. In this review, the recent advancements of recombinant outer membrane protein (OMP) vaccines, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) vaccines, inactivated vaccines, attenuated vaccines and DNA vaccines against leptospirosis are reviewed. A comparison of these vaccines may lead to development of new potential methods to combat leptospirosis and facilitate the leptospirosis vaccine research. Moreover, a vaccine ontology database was built for the scientists working on the leptospirosis vaccines as a starting tool. PMID:18072968

  18. The treatment of malaria.

    PubMed

    White, N J

    1996-09-12

    Increasing drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum and a resurgence of malaria in tropical areas have effected a change in treatment of malaria in the last two decades. Symptoms of malaria are fever, chills, headache, and malaise. The prognosis worsens as the parasite counts, counts of mature parasites, and counts of neutrophils containing pigment increase. Treatment depends on severity, age of patient, degree of background immunity, likely pattern of susceptibility to antimalarial drugs, and the cost and availability of drugs. Chloroquine should be used for P. vivax, P. malariae, and P. ovale. P. vivax has shown high resistance to chloroquine in Oceania, however. Primaquine may be needed to treat P. vivax and P. ovale to rid the body of hypnozoites that survive in the liver. Chloroquine can treat P. falciparum infections acquired in North Africa, Central America north of the Panama Canal, Haiti, or the Middle East but not in most of Africa and some parts of Asia and South America. In areas of low grade resistance to chloroquine, amodiaquine can be used to effectively treat falciparum malaria. A combination of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine is responsive to falciparum infections with high grade resistance to chloroquine. Mefloquine, halofantrine, or quinine with tetracycline can be used to treat multidrug-resistant P. falciparum. Derivatives of artemisinin obtained from qinghao or sweet wormwood developed as pharmaceuticals in China are the most rapidly acting of all antimalarial drugs. Children tend to tolerate antimalarial drugs well. Children who weigh less than 15 kg should not be given mefloquine. Health workers should not prescribe primaquine to pregnant women or newborns due to the risk of hemolysis. Chloroquine, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, quinine, and quinidine can be safely given in therapeutic doses throughout pregnancy. Clinical manifestations of severe malaria are hypoglycemia, convulsions, severe anemia, acute renal failure, jaundice, pulmonary edema

  19. [Malaria in the Americas].

    PubMed

    Carme, B; Venturin, C

    1999-01-01

    In 1996, malaria involving Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium falciparum, and, to a lesser extent, Plasmodium malariae was endemic in 21 countries in the Americas. The Amazon river basin and bordering areas including the Guyanas were the most affected zones. Until the mid 1970s, endemic malaria appeared to be under control. However in the ensuing 15 year period, the situation deteriorated drastically. Although trends varied depending on location, aggregate indexes indicated a twofold increase with recrudescence in previously settled areas and emergence in newly populated zones. Since 1990, the situation has worsened further in some areas where increased incidences have been associated with a high levels of drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum. However this species remains in minority except in the Guyanas where the highest annual incidences (100 to 500 cases per 1000) and the most drug-resistant Plasmodium have been reported. The causes underlying this deterioration are numerous and complex. In regions naturally prone to transmission of the disease, outbreaks have been intensified by unrestrained settlement. The resulting deforestation has created new breeding areas for Anopheles darlingi, the main vector of malaria in the Americas. Migration of poor populations to newly opened farming and mining areas has created highly exposed areas for malaria infection. Implementation of adequate medical care and prevention measures has been hindered by a lack of money and sociopolitical unrest. Climatic phenomenon related the El Nino have also been favorable to the return of malaria to the region. Except with regard to financial resources and political unrest, the same risk factors for malaria are present in French Guiana.

  20. Can plant biotechnology help break the HIV-malaria link?

    PubMed

    Vamvaka, E; Twyman, R M; Christou, P; Capell, T

    2014-01-01

    The population of sub-Saharan Africa is at risk from multiple, poverty-related endemic diseases. HIV and malaria are the most prevalent, but they disproportionately affect different groups of people, i.e. HIV predominantly affects sexually-active adults whereas malaria has a greater impact on children and pregnant women. Nevertheless, there is a significant geographical and epidemiological overlap which results in bidirectional and synergistic interactions with important consequences for public health. The immunosuppressive effects of HIV increase the risk of infection when individuals are exposed to malaria parasites and also the severity of malaria symptoms. Similarly, acute malaria can induce a temporary increase in the HIV viral load. HIV is associated with a wide range of opportunistic infections that can be misdiagnosed as malaria, resulting in the wasteful misuse of antimalarial drugs and a failure to address the genuine cause of the disease. There is also a cumulative risk of toxicity when antiretroviral and antimalarial drugs are given to the same patients. Synergistic approaches involving the control of malaria as a strategy to fight HIV/AIDS and vice versa are therefore needed in co-endemic areas. Plant biotechnology has emerged as a promising approach to tackle poverty-related diseases because plant-derived drugs and vaccines can be produced inexpensively in developing countries and may be distributed using agricultural infrastructure without the need for a cold chain. Here we explore some of the potential contributions of plant biotechnology and its integration into broader multidisciplinary public health programs to combat the two diseases in developing countries.

  1. Vaccine Hesitancy.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert M; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Finney Rutten, Lila J

    2015-11-01

    Vaccine refusal received a lot of press with the 2015 Disneyland measles outbreak, but vaccine refusal is only a fraction of a much larger problem of vaccine delay and hesitancy. Opposition to vaccination dates back to the 1800 s, Edward Jenner, and the first vaccine ever. It has never gone away despite the public's growing scientific sophistication. A variety of factors contribute to modern vaccine hesitancy, including the layperson's heuristic thinking when it comes to balancing risks and benefits as well as a number of other features of vaccination, including falling victim to its own success. Vaccine hesitancy is pervasive, affecting a quarter to a third of US parents. Clinicians report that they routinely receive requests to delay vaccines and that they routinely acquiesce. Vaccine rates vary by state and locale and by specific vaccine, and vaccine hesitancy results in personal risk and in the failure to achieve or sustain herd immunity to protect others who have contraindications to the vaccine or fail to generate immunity to the vaccine. Clinicians should adopt a variety of practices to combat vaccine hesitancy, including a variety of population health management approaches that go beyond the usual call to educate patients, clinicians, and the public. Strategies include using every visit to vaccinate, the creation of standing orders or nursing protocols to provide vaccination without clinical encounters, and adopting the practice of stating clear recommendations. Up-to-date, trusted resources exist to support clinicians' efforts in adopting these approaches to reduce vaccine hesitancy and its impact.

  2. Malaria in school-age children in Africa: an increasingly important challenge

    PubMed Central

    Nankabirwa, Joaniter; Brooker, Simon J; Clarke, Sian E; Fernando, Deepika; Gitonga, Caroline W; Schellenberg, David; Greenwood, Brian

    2014-01-01

    School-age children have attracted relatively little attention as a group in need of special measures to protect them against malaria. However, increasing success in lowering the level of malaria transmission in many previously highly endemic areas will result in children acquiring immunity to malaria later in life than has been the case in the past. Thus, it can be anticipated that in the coming years there will be an increase in the incidence of both uncomplicated and severe malaria in school-age children in many previously highly endemic areas. In this review, which focuses primarily on Africa, recent data on the prevalence of malaria parasitaemia and on the incidence of clinical malaria in African school-age children are presented and evidence that malaria adversely effects school performance is reviewed. Long-lasting insecticide treated bednets (LLIN) are an effective method of malaria control but several studies have shown that school-age children use LLINs less frequently than other population groups. Antimalarial drugs are being used in different ways to control malaria in school-age children including screening and treatment and intermittent preventive treatment. Some studies of chemoprevention in school-age children have shown reductions in anaemia and improved school performance but this has not been the case in all trials and more research is needed to identify the situations in which chemoprevention is likely to be most effective and, in these situations, which type of intervention should be used. In the longer term, malaria vaccines may have an important role in protecting this important section of the community from malaria. Regardless of the control approach selected, it is important this is incorporated into the overall programme of measures being undertaken to enhance the health of African school-age children. PMID:25145389

  3. Malaria in school-age children in Africa: an increasingly important challenge.

    PubMed

    Nankabirwa, Joaniter; Brooker, Simon J; Clarke, Sian E; Fernando, Deepika; Gitonga, Caroline W; Schellenberg, David; Greenwood, Brian

    2014-11-01

    School-age children have attracted relatively little attention as a group in need of special measures to protect them against malaria. However, increasing success in lowering the level of malaria transmission in many previously highly endemic areas will result in children acquiring immunity to malaria later in life than has been the case in the past. Thus, it can be anticipated that in the coming years there will be an increase in the incidence of both uncomplicated and severe malaria in school-age children in many previously highly endemic areas. In this review, which focuses primarily on Africa, recent data on the prevalence of malaria parasitaemia and on the incidence of clinical malaria in African school-age children are presented and evidence that malaria adversely effects school performance is reviewed. Long-lasting insecticide treated bednets (LLIN) are an effective method of malaria control but several studies have shown that school-age children use LLINs less frequently than other population groups. Antimalarial drugs are being used in different ways to control malaria in school-age children including screening and treatment and intermittent preventive treatment. Some studies of chemoprevention in school-age children have shown reductions in anaemia and improved school performance but this has not been the case in all trials and more research is needed to identify the situations in which chemoprevention is likely to be most effective and, in these situations, which type of intervention should be used. In the longer term, malaria vaccines may have an important role in protecting this important section of the community from malaria. Regardless of the control approach selected, it is important this is incorporated into the overall programme of measures being undertaken to enhance the health of African school-age children.

  4. Flying vaccinator; a transgenic mosquito delivers a Leishmania vaccine via blood feeding.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, D S; Nagumo, H; Yoshida, S

    2010-06-01

    'Flying vaccinator' is the concept of using genetically engineered hematophagous insects to deliver vaccines. Here we show the generation of a transgenic anopheline mosquito that expresses the Leishmania vaccine candidate, SP15, fused to monomeric red fluorescent protein (mDsRed) in its salivary glands. Importantly, mice bitten repeatedly by the transgenic mosquitoes raised anti-SP15 antibodies, indicating delivery of SP15 via blood feeding with its immunogenicity intact. Thus, this technology makes possible the generation of transgenic mosquitoes that match the original concept of a 'flying vaccinator'. However, medical safety issues and concerns about informed consent mitigate the use of the 'flying vaccinator' as a method to deliver vaccines. We propose that this expression system could be applied to elucidate saliva-malaria sporozoite interactions.

  5. Sickle Cell Trait is Associated with a Delayed Onset of Malaria: Implications for Time to Event Analysis in Clinical Studies of Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Crompton, Peter D.; Traore, Boubacar; Kayentao, Kassoum; Doumbo, Safiatou; Ongoiba, Aissata; Diakite, Seidina A.S.; Krause, Michael A.; Doumtabe, Didier; Kone, Younoussou; Weiss, Greta; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Doumbia, Seydou; Guindo, Aldiouma; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Miller, Louis H.; Pierce, Susan K.; Doumbo, Ogobara K.

    2008-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) recently recommended that the time to first malaria episode serve as the primary endpoint in phase III malaria vaccine trials—the first of which will be held in Africa. Although common red blood cell (RBC) polymorphisms such as sickle hemoglobin (Hb) S are known to protect against malaria in Africa, their impact on this endpoint has not been investigated. Methods A longitudinal study of 225 individuals aged 2-25 years was conducted in Mali. The association between common RBC polymorphisms and the time to first malaria episode was evaluated. Results Among children aged 2-10 years, sickle cell trait (HbAS) was associated with a 34-day delay in the median time to first malaria episode (p=0.017). Cox regression analysis showed that age (hazard ratio [HR] 0.87 [95% CI, 0.80-0.94]; p=0.001), HbAS (HR 0.48 [95% CI, 0.26-0.91]; p=0.024), and asymptomatic parasitemia at enrollment (HR 0.35 [95% CI, 0.14-0.85]; p=0.021) were associated with decreased malaria risk. Conclusion Given the delay in the time to first malaria episode associated with HbAS, it would be advisable for clinical trials and observational studies that use this endpoint to include Hb typing in the study design where HbAS is prevalent. PMID:18752444

  6. Human vaccine research in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Ole F; Lonnroth, Anna; Mulligan, Bernard

    2009-01-29

    The use of vaccines is saving millions of lives every year across the globe, but a number of important diseases such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, TB and hepatitis C continue to frustrate attempts to produce effective vaccines against them. Confronting these challenges will require new approaches and increased research efforts by the scientific community. The Sixth Framework Programme (FP6; 2002-2006) of the European Commission (EC) has been an important catalyst in this direction by allocating a financial contribution of more than EUR 210 million to a wide variety of vaccine research activities, ranging from basic vaccinology, translational research to clinical application of vaccines. Taken together, around 581 research groups from 52 countries are participating in the vaccine activities of FP6. This impressive number signals a new spirit of collaborative research, which will facilitate the exploitation of the immense possibilities in modern vaccinology.

  7. Imported malaria in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Hira, P R; Behbehani, K; Al-Kandari, S

    1985-01-01

    The number of imported malaria cases in Kuwait rose from 87 in 1980 to 504 in 1983, an increase of 579%. The continued resurgence of malaria in endemic zones, improved diagnostic techniques and a heightened awareness of imported malaria have contributed to the increase in the number of microscopically proved cases. Thick blood films fixed in acetone and stained in Giemsa proved a rapid method of diagnosis; species identification on the basis of a thin film on the same slide was performed with ease. Malaria was acquired in 38 countries. Most patients were young male adults. Most of the cases were due to Plasmodium vivax originating from India, although an increasing number of P. falciparum cases are also now being diagnosed from there. P. falciparum infections were evenly distributed throughout the year and most cases presented within 14 days of their arrival in the country. The highest number of P. vivax cases were diagnosed between May and October, when heat stress might have been a factor in precipitating a clinical attack of an infection previously acquired in the endemic zone. Attention is drawn to the importance of delayed attacks of P. vivax and, in semi-immunes, of P. falciparum. The time interval involved in establishing a history of "recent" travel in clinically suspected cases of malaria needs to be more clearly defined in each geographical area. Cases of induced malaria due to transfusion, accidental and congenital infections were identified. The fatality rate due to P. falciparum infections was low. In terms of the risk of renewed transmission, Kuwait may be considered a vulnerable area.

  8. Metabolomics and malaria biology

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Viswanathan; Rhee, Kyu Y.; Daily, Johanna P.

    2010-01-01

    Metabolomics has ushered in a novel and multi-disciplinary realm in biological research. It has provided researchers with a platform to combine powerful biochemical, statistical, computational, and bioinformatics techniques to delve into the mysteries of biology and disease. The application of metabolomics to study malaria parasites represents a major advance in our approach towards gaining a more comprehensive perspective on parasite biology and disease etiology. This review attempts to highlight some of the important aspects of the field of metabolomics, and its ongoing and potential future applications to malaria research. PMID:20970461

  9. Heterologous prime-boost vaccinations for poverty-related diseases: advantages and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Radosević, Katarina; Rodriguez, Ariane; Lemckert, Angelique; Goudsmit, Jaap

    2009-05-01

    Classical vaccination approaches, based on a single vaccine administered in a homologous prime-boost schedule and optimized to induce primarily neutralizing antibodies, are unlikely to be sufficiently efficacious to prevent TB, malaria or HIV infections. Novel vaccines, capable of inducing a more powerful immune response, in particular T-cell immunity, are desperately needed. Combining different vaccine modalities that are able to complement each other and induce broad and sustainable immunity is a promising approach. This review provides an overview of heterologous prime-boost vaccination modalities currently in development for the 'big three' poverty-related diseases and emphasizes the need for innovative vaccination approaches.

  10. Paediatric travel medicine: vaccines and medications

    PubMed Central

    Starr, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The paediatric aspects of travel medicine can be complex, and individual advice is often required. Nonetheless, children are much more likely to acquire common infections than exotic tropical diseases whilst travelling. Important exceptions are malaria and tuberculosis, which are more frequent and severe in children. Overall, travellers' diarrhoea is the most common illness affecting travellers. This review discusses vaccines and medications that may be indicated for children who are travelling overseas. It focuses on immunizations that are given as part of the routine schedule, as well as those that are more specific to travel. Malaria and travellers' diarrhoea are also discussed. PMID:23163285

  11. Assessment of Humoral Immune Responses to Blood-Stage Malaria Antigens following ChAd63-MVA Immunization, Controlled Human Malaria Infection and Natural Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Sean C.; Miura, Kazutoyo; Milne, Kathryn H.; de Cassan, Simone C.; Collins, Katharine A.; Halstead, Fenella D.; Bliss, Carly M.; Ewer, Katie J.; Osier, Faith H.; Hodgson, Susanne H.; Duncan, Christopher J. A.; O’Hara, Geraldine A.; Long, Carole A.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Draper, Simon J.

    2014-01-01

    The development of protective vaccines against many difficult infectious pathogens will necessitate the induction of effective antibody responses. Here we assess humoral immune responses against two antigens from the blood-stage merozoite of the Plasmodium falciparum human malaria parasite – MSP1 and AMA1. These antigens were delivered to healthy malaria-naïve adult volunteers in Phase Ia clinical trials using recombinant replication-deficient viral vectors – ChAd63 to prime the immune response and MVA to boost. In subsequent Phase IIa clinical trials, immunized volunteers underwent controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) with P. falciparum to assess vaccine efficacy, whereby all but one volunteer developed low-density blood-stage parasitemia. Here we assess serum antibody responses against both the MSP1 and AMA1 antigens following i) ChAd63-MVA immunization, ii) immunization and CHMI, and iii) primary malaria exposure in the context of CHMI in unimmunized control volunteers. Responses were also assessed in a cohort of naturally-immune Kenyan adults to provide comparison with those induced by a lifetime of natural malaria exposure. Serum antibody responses against MSP1 and AMA1 were characterized in terms of i) total IgG responses before and after CHMI, ii) responses to allelic variants of MSP1 and AMA1, iii) functional growth inhibitory activity (GIA), iv) IgG avidity, and v) isotype responses (IgG1-4, IgA and IgM). These data provide the first in-depth assessment of the quality of adenovirus-MVA vaccine-induced antibody responses in humans, along with assessment of how these responses are modulated by subsequent low-density parasite exposure. Notable differences were observed in qualitative aspects of the human antibody responses against these malaria antigens depending on the means of their induction and/or exposure of the host to the malaria parasite. Given the continued clinical development of viral vectored vaccines for malaria and a range of other

  12. Assessment of humoral immune responses to blood-stage malaria antigens following ChAd63-MVA immunization, controlled human malaria infection and natural exposure.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sumi; Choudhary, Prateek; Elias, Sean C; Miura, Kazutoyo; Milne, Kathryn H; de Cassan, Simone C; Collins, Katharine A; Halstead, Fenella D; Bliss, Carly M; Ewer, Katie J; Osier, Faith H; Hodgson, Susanne H; Duncan, Christopher J A; O'Hara, Geraldine A; Long, Carole A; Hill, Adrian V S; Draper, Simon J

    2014-01-01

    The development of protective vaccines against many difficult infectious pathogens will necessitate the induction of effective antibody responses. Here we assess humoral immune responses against two antigens from the blood-stage merozoite of the Plasmodium falciparum human malaria parasite--MSP1 and AMA1. These antigens were delivered to healthy malaria-naïve adult volunteers in Phase Ia clinical trials using recombinant replication-deficient viral vectors--ChAd63 to prime the immune response and MVA to boost. In subsequent Phase IIa clinical trials, immunized volunteers underwent controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) with P. falciparum to assess vaccine efficacy, whereby all but one volunteer developed low-density blood-stage parasitemia. Here we assess serum antibody responses against both the MSP1 and AMA1 antigens following i) ChAd63-MVA immunization, ii) immunization and CHMI, and iii) primary malaria exposure in the context of CHMI in unimmunized control volunteers. Responses were also assessed in a cohort of naturally-immune Kenyan adults to provide comparison with those induced by a lifetime of natural malaria exposure. Serum antibody responses against MSP1 and AMA1 were characterized in terms of i) total IgG responses before and after CHMI, ii) responses to allelic variants of MSP1 and AMA1, iii) functional growth inhibitory activity (GIA), iv) IgG avidity, and v) isotype responses (IgG1-4, IgA and IgM). These data provide the first in-depth assessment of the quality of adenovirus-MVA vaccine-induced antibody responses in humans, along with assessment of how these responses are modulated by subsequent low-density parasite exposure. Notable differences were observed in qualitative aspects of the human antibody responses against these malaria antigens depending on the means of their induction and/or exposure of the host to the malaria parasite. Given the continued clinical development of viral vectored vaccines for malaria and a range of other diseases

  13. Consistent Safety and Infectivity in Sporozoite Challenge Model of Plasmodium vivax in Malaria-Naive Human Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Sócrates; Solarte, Yezid; Jordán-Villegas, Alejandro; Echavarría, Juan Fernando; Rocha, Leonardo; Palacios, Ricardo; Ramírez, Óscar; Vélez, Juan D.; Epstein, Judith E.; Richie, Thomas L.; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam

    2011-01-01

    A safe and reproducible Plasmodium vivax infectious challenge method is required to evaluate the efficacy of malaria vaccine candidates. Seventeen healthy Duffy (+) and five Duffy (−) subjects were randomly allocated into three (A–C) groups and were exposed to the bites of 2–4 Anopheles albimanus mosquitoes infected with Plasmodium vivax derived from three donors. Duffy (−) subjects were included as controls for each group. Clinical manifestations of malaria and parasitemia were monitored beginning 7 days post-challenge. All Duffy (+) volunteers developed patent malaria infection within 16 days after challenge. Prepatent period determined by thick smear, was longer for Group A (median 14.5 d) than for Groups B and C (median 10 d/each). Infected volunteers recovered rapidly after treatment with no serious adverse events. The bite of as low as two P. vivax-infected mosquitoes provides safe and reliable infections in malaria-naive volunteers, suitable for assessing antimalarial and vaccine efficacy trials. PMID:21292872

  14. Use of vaccines as probes to define disease burden.

    PubMed

    Feikin, Daniel R; Scott, J Anthony G; Gessner, Bradford D

    2014-05-17

    Vaccine probe studies have emerged in the past 15 years as a useful way to characterise disease. By contrast, traditional studies of vaccines focus on defining the vaccine effectiveness or efficacy. The underlying basis for the vaccine probe approach is that the difference in disease burden between vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals can be ascribed to the vaccine-specific pathogen. Vaccine probe studies can increase understanding of a vaccine's public health value. For instance, even when a vaccine has a seemingly low efficacy, a high baseline disease incidence can lead to a large vaccine-preventable disease burden and thus that population-based vaccine introduction would be justified. So far, vaccines have been used as probes to characterise disease syndromes caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b, pneumococcus, rotavirus, and early infant influenza. However, vaccine probe studies have enormous potential and could be used more widely in epidemiology, for example, to define the vaccine-preventable burden of malaria, typhoid, paediatric influenza, and dengue, and to identify causal interactions between different pathogens.

  15. Edible vaccines.

    PubMed

    Meloen, R H; Hamilton, W D; Casal, J I; Dalsgaard, K; Langeveld, J P

    1998-01-01

    The ultimate vaccine is an oral vaccine which given once protects against a multitude of diseases. Furthermore this ultimate vaccine needs to be very stable and inexpensive to produce. Probably this latter condition can be met only if the vaccines are produced in plants. Such vaccines are called 'edible vaccines'. Edible vaccines can be produced in plants in many ways. Using recombinant plantvirus, CPMV, it was shown that plants can produce massive amounts of chimaeric virus particles which protect after a single injection the target animal against disease. The final step, oral administration, is being addressed at present. Preliminary experiments by others suggest that this step may be solved sooner than expected.

  16. Edible vaccines.

    PubMed

    Artnzen, C J

    1997-01-01

    Vaccines were the result of trial and error research until molecular biology and genetic engineering made possible the creation of of many new and improved vaccines. New vaccines need to be inexpensive, easily administered, and capable of being stored and transported without refrigeration; without these characteristics, developing countries find it difficult to adopt vaccination as the central strategy for preventing their most devastating diseases. The authors describe a promising approach to inexpensive and effective vaccines: producing them in plants we commonly consume.

  17. Vaccines as a global imperative--a business perspective.

    PubMed

    Stéphenne, Jean

    2011-06-01

    During the past thirty years, vaccines have experienced a renaissance. Advances in science, business, and distribution have transformed the field to the point where vaccines are recognized as a "best buy" in global health, a driver of pharmaceutical industry growth, and a key instrument of international development. With many new vaccines available and others on the horizon, the global community will need to explore new ways of ensuring access to vaccines in developing nations. So-called tiered pricing, which makes vaccines available at different prices for countries at different levels of economic development; innovative financing mechanisms such as advance market commitments or offers of long-term and high-volume contracts to vaccine producers; and technology transfers such as sharing intellectual property and production techniques among companies and countries can all play a part in bringing new life-saving vaccines for pneumonia, rotavirus, malaria, and other diseases to developing countries.

  18. c-DNA vaccination against parasitic infections: advantages and disadvantages.

    PubMed

    Kofta, W; Wedrychowicz, H

    2001-09-12

    Recently developed technology for DNA vaccination appears to offer the good prospect for the development of a multivalent vaccines that will effectively activate both the humoral and cell mediated mechanisms of the immune system. Currently, DNA vaccination against such important parasitic diseases like malaria, leishmaniosis, toxoplasmosis, cryptosporidiosis, schistosomosis, fasciolosis offers several new opportunities. However, the outcome of vaccination depends very much on vaccine formulations, dose and route of vaccine delivery, and the species and even strain of the vaccinated host. To overcome these problems much research is still needed, specifically focused on cloning and testing of new c-DNA sequences in the following: genome projects: different ways of delivery: design of vectors containing appropriate immunostimulatory sequences and very detailed studies on safety.

  19. Vaccine safety.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert M

    2003-11-01

    Rates of reported adverse events are remarkably low. VAERS identifies an adverse event rate approximating 11.4 reports per 100,000 vaccine doses. Approximately 15% of these reports represent SAEs, but less than 2% involve death; in most cases, reviews have shown no causal relation between the events and the vaccine. Across the spectrum of vaccines in use (including those directed against influenza and hepatitis B virus), many claims of adverse events regarding vaccines represent typical reactions to vaccinations. These reactions can be thought of as foreign-body reactions and predominate among the inactivated vaccines. In controlled studies, the adverse event rates that occur with vaccination resemble those that occur with placebo injections. Typical reactions associated with live viral and bacterial vaccines, such as MMR and varicella vaccines, may resemble attenuated forms of the disease for which the vaccine is directed. Other claims against vaccines represent chance-coincidence or misunderstood data; further studies of claims have vindicated the overall safety of the vaccines in most cases. Two documented safety concerns with vaccines, however, have demonstrated that vaccines (like other biologics and pharmacologic) can result in harm (eg, rotavirus and OPV vaccines). The denouement with these vaccines indicates the broad postmarketing data collection and evaluation that extends efforts made with prelicensure study to balance the benefits from vaccination with the risk for harm. Overall, measures including prelicensure study and postlicensure surveillance, such as VAERS, the Vaccine Safety Datalink Project, and the Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment Centers, have resulted in an exceptional safety profile for the vaccines in use.

  20. Nanomedicine against malaria.

    PubMed

    Urbán, Patricia; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is arguably one of the main medical concerns worldwide because of the numbers of people affected, the severity of the disease and the complexity of the life cycle of its causative agent, the protist Plasmodium sp. The clinical, social and economic burden of malaria has led for the last 100 years to several waves of serious efforts to reach its control and eventual eradication, without success to this day. With the advent of nanoscience, renewed hopes have appeared of finally obtaining the long sought-after magic bullet against malaria in the form of a nanovector for the targeted delivery of antimalarial drugs exclusively to Plasmodium-infected cells. Different types of encapsulating structure, targeting molecule, and antimalarial compound will be discussed for the assembly of Trojan horse nanocapsules capable of targeting with complete specificity diseased cells and of delivering inside them their antimalarial cargo with the objective of eliminating the parasite with a single dose. Nanotechnology can also be applied to the discovery of new antimalarials through single-molecule manipulation approaches for the identification of novel drugs targeting essential molecular components of the parasite. Finally, methods for the diagnosis of malaria can benefit from nanotools applied to the design of microfluidic-based devices for the accurate identification of the parasite's strain, its precise infective load, and the relative content of the different stages of its life cycle, whose knowledge is essential for the administration of adequate therapies. The benefits and drawbacks of these nanosystems will be considered in different possible scenarios, including cost-related issues that might be hampering the development of nanotechnology-based medicines against malaria with the dubious argument that they are too expensive to be used in developing areas.

  1. Lessons from malaria control to help meet the rising challenge of dengue.

    PubMed

    Anders, Katherine L; Hay, Simon I

    2012-12-01

    Achievements in malaria control could inform efforts to control the increasing global burden of dengue. Better methods for quantifying dengue endemicity-equivalent to parasite prevalence surveys and endemicity mapping used for malaria-would help target resources, monitor progress, and advocate for investment in dengue prevention. Success in controlling malaria has been attributed to widespread implementation of interventions with proven efficacy. An improved evidence base is needed for large-scale delivery of existing and novel interventions for vector control, alongside continued investment in dengue drug and vaccine development. Control of dengue is unlikely to be achieved without coordinated international financial and technical support for national programmes, which has proven effective in reducing the global burden of malaria.

  2. Advances in genetics and genomics: use and limitations in achieving malaria elimination goals.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Sharmini; Karunaweera, Nadira D

    2015-05-01

    Success of the global research agenda towards eradication of malaria will depend on the development of new tools, including drugs, vaccines, insecticides and diagnostics. Genetic and genomic information now available for the malaria parasites, their mosquito vectors and human host, can be harnessed to both develop these tools and monitor their effectiveness. Here we review and provide specific examples of current technological advances and how these genetic and genomic tools have increased our knowledge of host, parasite and vector biology in relation to malaria elimination and in turn enhanced the potential to reach that goal. We then discuss limitations of these tools and future prospects for the successful achievement of global malaria elimination goals.

  3. Advances in genetics and genomics: use and limitations in achieving malaria elimination goals

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardena, Sharmini; Karunaweera, Nadira D.

    2015-01-01

    Success of the global research agenda towards eradication of malaria will depend on the development of new tools, including drugs, vaccines, insecticides and diagnostics. Genetic and genomic information now available for the malaria parasites, their mosquito vectors and human host, can be harnessed to both develop these tools and monitor their effectiveness. Here we review and provide specific examples of current technological advances and how these genetic and genomic tools have increased our knowledge of host, parasite and vector biology in relation to malaria elimination and in turn enhanced the potential to reach that goal. We then discuss limitations of these tools and future prospects for the successful achievement of global malaria elimination goals. PMID:25943157

  4. Malaria-associated atypical memory B cells exhibit markedly reduced B cell receptor signaling and effector function.

    PubMed

    Portugal, Silvia; Tipton, Christopher M; Sohn, Haewon; Kone, Younoussou; Wang, Jing; Li, Shanping; Skinner, Jeff; Virtaneva, Kimmo; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Porcella, Stephen F; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Doumbo, Safiatou; Kayentao, Kassoum; Ongoiba, Aissata; Traore, Boubacar; Sanz, Inaki; Pierce, Susan K; Crompton, Peter D

    2015-05-08

    Protective antibodies in Plasmodium falciparum malaria are only acquired after years of repeated infections. Chronic malaria exposure is associated with a large increase in atypical memory B cells (MBCs) that resemble B cells expanded in a variety of persistent viral infections. Understanding the function of atypical MBCs and their relationship to classical MBCs will be critical to developing effective vaccines for malaria and other chronic infections. We show that VH gene repertoires and somatic hypermutation rates of atypical and classical MBCs are indistinguishable indicating a common developmental history. Atypical MBCs express an array of inhibitory receptors and B cell receptor (BCR) signaling is stunted in atypical MBCs resulting in impaired B cell responses including proliferation, cytokine production and antibody secretion. Thus, in response to chronic malaria exposure, atypical MBCs appear to differentiate from classical MBCs becoming refractory to BCR-mediated activation and potentially interfering with the acquisition of malaria immunity.

  5. Tutorials for Africa - Malaria: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    Tutorials for Africa: Malaria In Uganda, the burden of malaria outranks that of all other diseases. This tutorial includes information about how malaria spreads, the importance of treatment and techniques for ...

  6. Diagnosis and Treatment of Plasmodium vivax Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Baird, J. Kevin; Valecha, Neena; Duparc, Stephan; White, Nicholas J.; Price, Ric N.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of Plasmodium vivax malaria differs from that of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in fundamentally important ways. This article reviews the guiding principles, practices, and evidence underpinning the diagnosis and treatment of P. vivax malaria. PMID:27708191

  7. Vaccines for the 21st century

    PubMed Central

    Delany, Isabel; Rappuoli, Rino; De Gregorio, Ennio

    2014-01-01

    In the last century, vaccination has been the most effective medical intervention to reduce death and morbidity caused by infectious diseases. It is believed that vaccines save at least 2–3 million lives per year worldwide. Smallpox has been eradicated and polio has almost disappeared worldwide through global vaccine campaigns. Most of the viral and bacterial infections that traditionally affected children have been drastically reduced thanks to national immunization programs in developed countries. However, many diseases are not yet preventable by vaccination, and vaccines have not been fully exploited for target populations such as elderly and pregnant women. This review focuses on the state of the art of recent clinical trials of vaccines for major unmet medical needs such as HIV, malaria, TB, and cancer. In addition, we describe the innovative technologies currently used in vaccine research and development including adjuvants, vectors, nucleic acid vaccines, and structure-based antigen design. The hope is that thanks to these technologies, more diseases will be addressed in the 21st century by novel preventative and therapeutic vaccines. PMID:24803000

  8. Vaccines for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Delany, Isabel; Rappuoli, Rino; De Gregorio, Ennio

    2014-06-01

    In the last century, vaccination has been the most effective medical intervention to reduce death and morbidity caused by infectious diseases. It is believed that vaccines save at least 2-3 million lives per year worldwide. Smallpox has been eradicated and polio has almost disappeared worldwide through global vaccine campaigns. Most of the viral and bacterial infections that traditionally affected children have been drastically reduced thanks to national immunization programs in developed countries. However, many diseases are not yet preventable by vaccination, and vaccines have not been fully exploited for target populations such as elderly and pregnant women. This review focuses on the state of the art of recent clinical trials of vaccines for major unmet medical needs such as HIV, malaria, TB, and cancer. In addition, we describe the innovative technologies currently used in vaccine research and development including adjuvants, vectors, nucleic acid vaccines, and structure-based antigen design. The hope is that thanks to these technologies, more diseases will be addressed in the 21st century by novel preventative and therapeutic vaccines.

  9. Sustainable development of a GCP-compliant clinical trials platform in Africa: the Malaria Clinical Trials Alliance perspective

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Malaria Clinical Trials Alliance (MCTA), a programme of INDEPTH network of demographic surveillance centres, was launched in 2006 with two broad objectives: to facilitate the timely development of a network of centres in Africa with the capacity to conduct clinical trials of malaria vaccines and drugs under conditions of good clinical practice (GCP); and to support, strengthen and mentor the centres in the network to facilitate their progression towards self-sustaining clinical research centres. Case description Sixteen research centres in 10 African malaria-endemic countries were selected that were already working with the Malaria Vaccine Initiative (MVI) or the Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV). All centres were visited to assess their requirements for research capacity development through infrastructure strengthening and training. Support provided by MCTA included: laboratory and facility refurbishment; workshops on GCP, malaria diagnosis, strategic management and media training; and training to support staff to undertake accreditation examinations of the Association of Clinical Research Professionals (ACRP). Short attachments to other network centres were also supported to facilitate sharing practices within the Alliance. MCTA also played a key role in the creation of the African Media & Malaria Research Network (AMMREN), which aims to promote interaction between researchers and the media for appropriate publicity and media reporting of research and developments on malaria, including drug and vaccine trials. Conclusion In three years, MCTA strengthened 13 centres to perform GCP-compliant drug and vaccine trials, including 11 centres that form the backbone of a large phase III malaria vaccine trial. MCTA activities have demonstrated that centres can be brought up to GCP compliance on this time scale, but the costs are substantial and there is a need for further support of other centres to meet the growing demand for clinical trial capacity. The

  10. Rotavirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Catherine; Tate, Jacqueline E; Hyde, Terri B; Cortese, Margaret M; Lopman, Benjamin A; Jiang, Baoming; Glass, Roger I; Parashar, Umesh D

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhea among children <5 years worldwide. Currently licensed rotavirus vaccines have been efficacious and effective, with many countries reporting substantial declines in diarrheal and rotavirus-specific morbidity and mortality. However, the full public health impact of these vaccines has not been realized. Most countries, including those with the highest disease burden, have not yet introduced rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs. Research activities that may help inform vaccine introduction decisions include (1) establishing effectiveness, impact, and safety for rotavirus vaccines in low-income settings; (2) identifying potential strategies to improve performance of oral rotavirus vaccines in developing countries, such as zinc supplementation; and (3) pursuing alternate approaches to oral vaccines, such as parenteral immunization. Policy- and program-level barriers, such as financial implications of new vaccine introductions, should be addressed to ensure that countries are able to make informed decisions regarding rotavirus vaccine introduction. PMID:24755452

  11. An Economic Evaluation of a Vaccine Acquisition Strategy to Mitigate Acute Diarrheal Illness Among Deployed US Military Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-27

    always been correlated with disease burden . Certainly, existing development priorities for malaria, diarrhea, and Dengue fever vaccines could be...modified Delphi survey to develop consensus estimates in the area of epidemiology , clinical management and vaccine development of diarrheal disease in...meningococcal vaccine 0.5 9 Hemorrhagic fever and tick-borne encephalitis virus 0.8 10 Hantavirus vaccine 0.7 10 Rickettsial diseases 0.7 11 MIDRP

  12. In vitro growth-inhibitory activity and malaria risk in a cohort study in mali.

    PubMed

    Crompton, Peter D; Miura, Kazutoyo; Traore, Boubacar; Kayentao, Kassoum; Ongoiba, Aissata; Weiss, Greta; Doumbo, Safiatou; Doumtabe, Didier; Kone, Younoussou; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Miller, Louis H; Long, Carole A; Pierce, Susan K

    2010-02-01

    Immunity to the asexual blood stage of Plasmodium falciparum is complex and likely involves several effector mechanisms. Antibodies are thought to play a critical role in malaria immunity, and a corresponding in vitro correlate of antibody-mediated immunity has long been sought to facilitate malaria vaccine development. The growth inhibition assay (GIA) measures the capacity of antibodies to limit red blood cell (RBC) invasion and/or growth of P. falciparum in vitro. In humans, naturally acquired and vaccine-induced P. falciparum-specific antibodies have growth-inhibitory activity, but it is unclear if growth-inhibitory activity correlates with protection from clinical disease. In a longitudinal study in Mali, purified IgGs, obtained from plasmas collected before the malaria season from 220 individuals aged 2 to 10 and 18 to 25 years, were assayed for growth-inhibitory activity. Malaria episodes were recorded by passive surveillance over the subsequent 6-month malaria season. Logistic regression showed that greater age (odds ratio [OR], 0.78; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.63 to 0.95; P = 0.02) and growth-inhibitory activity (OR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.30 to 0.85; P = 0.01) were significantly associated with decreased malaria risk in children. A growth-inhibitory activity level of 40% was determined to be the optimal cutoff for discriminating malaria-immune and susceptible individuals in this cohort, with a sensitivity of 97.0%, but a low specificity of 24.3%, which limited the assay's ability to accurately predict protective immunity and to serve as an in vitro correlate of antibody-mediated immunity. These data suggest that antibodies which block merozoite invasion of RBC and/or inhibit the intra-RBC growth of the parasite contribute to but are not sufficient for the acquisition of malaria immunity.

  13. [Challenge of developing anti-parasite vaccines in the tropics].

    PubMed

    Rogier, C

    2007-08-01

    Much effort has been devoted to developing anti-parasite vaccines. The main obstacles to overcome involve problems in cultivating parasites, variability in antigens of cultivated parasites, insufficient immune responses that do not provide full protection, lack of animal models and difficulty in evaluating immune protection acquired naturally or after vaccination in populations living in endemic areas. Numerous clinical trials have been conducted and several parasite antigens, in particular against malaria, have been tested in endemic areas. Up to now no candidate vaccine has shown sufficient, long-term efficacy to justify its inclusion in public health program. However trials using anti-parasite vaccination under both experimental and field conditions clearly demonstrate that a certain level of clinical immunity against malaria, bilharziasis, and leishmaniasis.

  14. Plasmodium vivax Malaria in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Siv, Sovannaroth; Roca-Feltrer, Arantxa; Vinjamuri, Seshu Babu; Bouth, Denis Mey; Lek, Dysoley; Rashid, Mohammad Abdur; By, Ngau Peng; Popovici, Jean; Huy, Rekol; Menard, Didier

    2016-01-01

    The Cambodian National Strategic Plan for Elimination of Malaria aims to move step by step toward elimination of malaria across Cambodia with an initial focus on Plasmodium falciparum malaria before achieving elimination of all forms of malaria, including Plasmodium vivax in 2025. The emergence of artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum in western Cambodia over the last decade has drawn global attention to support the ultimate goal of P. falciparum elimination, whereas the control of P. vivax lags much behind, making the 2025 target gradually less achievable unless greater attention is given to P. vivax elimination in the country. The following review presents in detail the past and current situation regarding P. vivax malaria, activities of the National Malaria Control Program, and interventional measures applied. Constraints and obstacles that can jeopardize our efforts to eliminate this parasite species are discussed. PMID:27708187

  15. Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria.

    PubMed

    Visser, Theodoor; Daily, Jennifer; Hotte, Nora; Dolkart, Caitlin; Cunningham, Jane; Yadav, Prashant

    2015-12-01

    Maintaining quality, competitiveness and innovation in global health technology is a constant challenge for manufacturers, while affordability, access and equity are challenges for governments and international agencies. In this paper we discuss these issues with reference to rapid diagnostic tests for malaria. Strategies to control and eliminate malaria depend on early and accurate diagnosis. Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria require little training and equipment and can be performed by non-specialists in remote settings. Use of these tests has expanded significantly over the last few years, following recommendations to test all suspected malaria cases before treatment and the implementation of an evaluation programme to assess the performance of the malaria rapid diagnostic tests. Despite these gains, challenges exist that, if not addressed, could jeopardize the progress made to date. We discuss recent developments in rapid diagnostic tests for malaria, highlight some of the challenges and provide suggestions to address them.

  16. DENGUE VACCINES.

    PubMed

    Thisyakorn, Usa; Thisyakorn, Chule

    2015-01-01

    The uniqueness of the dengue viruses (DENVs) and the spectrum of disease resulting from infection have made dengue vaccine development difficult. Several vaccine candidates are currently being evaluated in clinical studies. The candidate currently at the most advanced clinical development stage, a live-attenuated tetravalent vaccine based on the chimeric yellow fever-dengue virus (CYD-TDV), has progressed to Phase 3 efficacy studies. Several other live-attenuated vaccines, as well as subunit, DNA, and purified inactivated vaccine candidates are at earlier stages of clinical development. Additional technological approaches, such as virus-vectored and Virus-Like Particles (VLP)-based vaccines are under evaluation in preclinical studies.

  17. Malaria in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Takem, Ebako Ndip; D’Alessandro, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    Pregnant women have a higher risk of malaria compared to non-pregnant women. This review provides an update on knowledge acquired since 2000 on P. falciparum and P.vivax infections in pregnancy. Maternal risk factors for malaria in pregnancy (MiP) include low maternal age, low parity, and low gestational age. The main effects of MIP include maternal anaemia, low birth weight (LBW), preterm delivery and increased infant and maternal mortality. P. falciparum infected erythrocytes sequester in the placenta by expressing surface antigens, mainly variant surface antigen (VAR2CSA), that bind to specific receptors, mainly chondroitin sulphate A. In stable transmission settings, the higher malaria risk in primigravidae can be explained by the non-recognition of these surface antigens by the immune system. Recently, placental sequestration has been described also for P.vivax infections. The mechanism of preterm delivery and intrauterine growth retardation is not completely understood, but fever (preterm delivery), anaemia, and high cytokines levels have been implicated. Clinical suspicion of MiP should be confirmed by parasitological diagnosis. The sensitivity of microscopy, with placenta histology as the gold standard, is 60% and 45% for peripheral and placental falciparum infections in African women, respectively. Compared to microscopy, RDTs have a lower sensitivity though when the quality of microscopy is low RDTs may be more reliable. Insecticide treated nets (ITN) and intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp) are recommended for the prevention of MiP in stable transmission settings. ITNs have been shown to reduce malaria infection and adverse pregnancy outcomes by 28–47%. Although resistance is a concern, SP has been shown to be equivalent to MQ and AQ for IPTp. For the treatment of uncomplicated malaria during the first trimester, quinine plus clindamycin for 7 days is the first line treatment and artesunate plus clindamycin for 7 days is indicated if

  18. Malaria Parasite Liver Infection and Exoerythrocytic Biology.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Ashley M; Kappe, Stefan H I

    2017-02-27

    In their infection cycle, malaria parasites undergo replication and population expansions within the vertebrate host and the mosquito vector. Host infection initiates with sporozoite invasion of hepatocytes, followed by a dramatic parasite amplification event during liver stage parasite growth and replication within hepatocytes. Each liver stage forms up to 90,000 exoerythrocytic merozoites, which are in turn capable of initiating a blood stage infection. Liver stages not only exploit host hepatocyte resources for nutritional needs but also endeavor to prevent hepatocyte cell death and detection by the host's immune system. Research over the past decade has identified numerous parasite factors that play a critical role during liver infection and has started to delineate a complex web of parasite-host interactions that sustain successful parasite colonization of the mammalian host. Targeting the parasites' obligatory infection of the liver as a gateway to the blood, with drugs and vaccines, constitutes the most effective strategy for malaria eradication, as it would prevent clinical disease and onward transmission of the parasite.

  19. Malaria management: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Enayati, A; Hemingway, J

    2010-01-01

    The prospect of malaria eradication has been raised recently by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation with support from the international community. There are significant lessons to be learned from the major successes and failures of the eradication campaign of the 1960s, but cessation of transmission in the malaria heartlands of Africa will depend on a vaccine and better drugs and insecticides. Insect control is an essential part of reducing transmission. To date, two operational scale interventions, indoor residual spraying and deployment of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLINs), are effective at reducing transmission. Our ability to monitor and evaluate these interventions needs to be improved so that scarce resources can be sensibly deployed, and new interventions that reduce transmission in a cost-effective and efficient manner need to be developed. New interventions could include using transgenic mosquitoes, larviciding in urban areas, or utilizing cost-effective consumer products. Alongside this innovative development agenda, the potential negative impact of insecticide resistance, particularly on LLINs, for which only pyrethroids are available, needs to be monitored.

  20. The Leeuwenhoek Lecture, 1993. Peptide vaccines: dream or reality?

    PubMed

    Brown, F

    1994-04-29

    Small fragments of micro-organisms which elicit protective immune responses have now been identified for several disease-causing agents. This major advance has made it possible to envisage the chemical synthesis of vaccines which could replace those in current use and may also furnish products which cannot be made by traditional methods. In my lecture I will illustrate the principles involved by describing the advances made with synthetic vaccines for foot-and-mouth disease, hepatitis B and malaria.

  1. Comparison of modeling methods to determine liver-to-blood inocula and parasite multiplication rates during controlled human malaria infection.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Alexander D; Edwards, Nick J; Duncan, Christopher J A; Thompson, Fiona M; Sheehy, Susanne H; O'Hara, Geraldine A; Anagnostou, Nicholas; Walther, Michael; Webster, Daniel P; Dunachie, Susanna J; Porter, David W; Andrews, Laura; Gilbert, Sarah C; Draper, Simon J; Hill, Adrian V S; Bejon, Philip

    2013-07-15

    Controlled human malaria infection is used to measure efficacy of candidate malaria vaccines before field studies are undertaken. Mathematical modeling using data from quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) parasitemia monitoring can discriminate between vaccine effects on the parasite's liver and blood stages. Uncertainty regarding the most appropriate modeling method hinders interpretation of such trials. We used qPCR data from 267 Plasmodium falciparum infections to compare linear, sine-wave, and normal-cumulative-density-function models. We find that the parameters estimated by these models are closely correlated, and their predictive accuracy for omitted data points was similar. We propose that future studies include the linear model.

  2. Gut microbiota elicits a protective immune response against malaria transmission.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Bahtiyar; Portugal, Silvia; Tran, Tuan M; Gozzelino, Raffaella; Ramos, Susana; Gomes, Joana; Regalado, Ana; Cowan, Peter J; d'Apice, Anthony J F; Chong, Anita S; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Traore, Boubacar; Crompton, Peter D; Silveira, Henrique; Soares, Miguel P

    2014-12-04

    Glycosylation processes are under high natural selection pressure, presumably because these can modulate resistance to infection. Here, we asked whether inactivation of the UDP-galactose:β-galactoside-α1-3-galactosyltransferase (α1,3GT) gene, which ablated the expression of the Galα1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R (α-gal) glycan and allowed for the production of anti-α-gal antibodies (Abs) in humans, confers protection against Plasmodium spp. infection, the causative agent of malaria and a major driving force in human evolution. We demonstrate that both Plasmodium spp. and the human gut pathobiont E. coli O86:B7 express α-gal and that anti-α-gal Abs are associated with protection against malaria transmission in humans as well as in α1,3GT-deficient mice, which produce protective anti-α-gal Abs when colonized by E. coli O86:B7. Anti-α-gal Abs target Plasmodium sporozoites for complement-mediated cytotoxicity in the skin, immediately after inoculation by Anopheles mosquitoes. Vaccination against α-gal confers sterile protection against malaria in mice, suggesting that a similar approach may reduce malaria transmission in humans.

  3. Vaccines (immunizations) - overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... diphtheria, mumps, measles, pertussis (whooping cough), meningitis, and polio. Many of these infections can cause serious or ... MMR - vaccine Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine Pneumococcal polysaccharide ... (vaccine) Rotavirus vaccine Tdap vaccine Tetanus - vaccine

  4. Vaccine Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... FAQs about Vaccine Safety Research Publications HDM Reports ISO Scientific Agenda Ensuring Safety History Understanding Side Effects ... Datalink Publications Emergency Preparedness Vaccine Safety Partners About ISO File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  5. Malaria control in Tanzania

    SciTech Connect

    Yhdego, M.; Majura, P. )

    1988-01-01

    A review of the malaria control programs and the problem encountered in the United Republic of Tanzania since 1945 to the year 1986 is discussed. Buguruni, one of the squatter areas in the city of Dar es Salaam, is chosen as a case study in order to evaluate the economic advantage of engineering methods for the control of malaria infection. Although the initial capital cost of engineering methods may be high, the cost effectiveness requires a much lower financial burden of only about Tshs. 3 million compared with the conventional methods of larviciding and insecticiding which requires more than Tshs. 10 million. Finally, recommendations for the adoption of engineering methods are made concerning the upgrading of existing roads and footpaths in general with particular emphasis on drainage of large pools of water which serve as breeding sites for mosquitoes.

  6. [Prophylaxis of malaria].

    PubMed

    Gentilini, M; Caumes, E; Danis, M

    1992-01-01

    The prevention of malaria is based on chemoprophylaxis and protection against the vector. Nocturnal mosquito bites can be avoided by individual and collective measures, while chemoprophylaxis involves the use of various agents according to the place and duration of stay. Three endemic zones can be defined on the basis of chemoresistance. Chloroquine, proguanil and mefloquine are the three drugs used in this setting, the latter being contraindicated for pregnant women and children. Travellers making long stays in areas of low-level chemoresistance and short stays in areas of high-level resistance and for whom mefloquine is contraindicated are advised to take antimalarial drugs at the first signs of potentially malarial fever when medical care is unavailable. Quinine, halofantrine and mefloquine are used for the curative treatment of malaria in areas of chloroquine resistance.

  7. Oxidative Stress in Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Percário, Sandro; Moreira, Danilo R.; Gomes, Bruno A. Q.; Ferreira, Michelli E. S.; Gonçalves, Ana Carolina M.; Laurindo, Paula S. O. C.; Vilhena, Thyago C.; Dolabela, Maria F.; Green, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Malaria is a significant public health problem in more than 100 countries and causes an estimated 200 million new infections every year. Despite the significant effort to eradicate this dangerous disease, lack of complete knowledge of its physiopathology compromises the success in this enterprise. In this paper we review oxidative stress mechanisms involved in the disease and discuss the potential benefits of antioxidant supplementation as an adjuvant antimalarial strategy. PMID:23208374

  8. Epidemiology of malaria in an area of seasonal transmission in Niger and implications for the design of a seasonal malaria chemoprevention strategy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Few data are available about malaria epidemiological situation in Niger. However, implementation of new strategies such as vaccination or seasonal treatment of a target population requires the knowledge of baseline epidemiological features of malaria. A population-based study was conducted to provide better characterization of malaria seasonal variations and population groups the most at risk in this particular area. Methods From July 2007 to December 2009, presumptive cases of malaria among a study population living in a typical Sahelian village of Niger were recorded, and confirmed by microscopic examination. In parallel, asymptomatic carriers were actively detected at the end of each dry season in 2007, 2008 and 2009. Results Among the 965 presumptive malaria cases recorded, 29% were confirmed by microscopic examination. The incidence of malaria was found to decrease significantly with age (p < 0.01). The mean annual incidence was 0.254. The results show that the risk of malaria was higher in children under ten years (p < 0.0001). The number of malaria episodes generally followed the temporal pattern of changes in precipitation levels, with a peak of transmission in August and September. One-thousand and ninety subjects were submitted to an active detection of asymptomatic carriage of whom 16% tested positive; asymptomatic carriage decreased with increasing age. A higher prevalence of gametocyte carriage among asymptomatic population was recorded in children aged two to ten years, though it did not reach significance. Conclusions In Southern Niger, malaria transmission mostly occurs from July to October. Children aged two to ten years are the most at risk of malaria, and may also represent the main reservoir for gametocytes. Strategies such as intermittent preventive treatment in children (IPTc) could be of interest in this area, where malaria transmission is highly seasonal. Based on these preliminary data, a pilot study could be implemented

  9. Platform for Plasmodium vivax vaccine discovery and development

    PubMed Central

    Valencia/, Sócrates Herrera; Rodríguez, Diana Carolina; Acero, Diana Lucía; Ocampo, Vanessa; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the most prevalent malaria parasite on the American continent. It generates a global burden of 80–100 million cases annually and represents a tremendous public health problem, particularly in the American and Asian continents. A malaria vaccine would be considered the most cost-effective measure against this vector-borne disease and it would contribute to a reduction in malaria cases and to eventual eradication. Although significant progress has been achieved in the search for Plasmodium falciparum antigens that could be used in a vaccine, limited progress has been made in the search for P. vivax components that might be eligible for vaccine development. This is primarily due to the lack of in vitro cultures to serve as an antigen source and to inadequate funding. While the most advanced P. falciparum vaccine candidate is currently being tested in Phase III trials in Africa, the most advanced P. vivax candidates have only advanced to Phase I trials. Herein, we describe the overall strategy and progress in P. vivax vaccine research, from antigen discovery to preclinical and clinical development and we discuss the regional potential of Latin America to develop a comprehensive platform for vaccine development. PMID:21881773

  10. Platform for Plasmodium vivax vaccine discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Sócrates Herrera; Rodríguez, Diana Carolina; Acero, Diana Lucía; Ocampo, Vanessa; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam

    2011-08-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the most prevalent malaria parasite on the American continent. It generates a global burden of 80-100 million cases annually and represents a tremendous public health problem, particularly in the American and Asian continents. A malaria vaccine would be considered the most cost-effective measure against this vector-borne disease and it would contribute to a reduction in malaria cases and to eventual eradication. Although significant progress has been achieved in the search for Plasmodium falciparum antigens that could be used in a vaccine, limited progress has been made in the search for P. vivax components that might be eligible for vaccine development. This is primarily due to the lack of in vitro cultures to serve as an antigen source and to inadequate funding. While the most advanced P. falciparum vaccine candidate is currently being tested in Phase III trials in Africa, the most advanced P. vivax candidates have only advanced to Phase I trials. Herein, we describe the overall strategy and progress in P. vivax vaccine research, from antigen discovery to preclinical and clinical development and we discuss the regional potential of Latin America to develop a comprehensive platform for vaccine development.

  11. [Malaria in hominids].

    PubMed

    Snounou, Georges; Escalante, Ananias; Kasenene, John; Rénia, Laurent; Grüner, Anne-Charlotte; Krief, Sabrina

    2011-11-01

    Malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp) that infect great apes are very poorly documented Malaria was first described in gorillas, chimpanzees and orangutans in the early 20th century, but most studies were confined to a handful of chimpanzees in the 1930-1950s and a few orangutans in the 1970s. The three Plasmodium species described in African great apes were very similar to those infecting humans. The most extensively studied was P reichenowi, because of its close phylogenetic relation to P. falciparum, the predominant parasite in Africa and the most dangerous for humans. In the last three years, independent molecular studies of various chimpanzee and gorilla populations have revealed an unexpected diversity in the Plasmodium species they harbor, which are also phylogenetically close to P falciparum. In addition, cases of non human primate infection by human malaria parasites have been observed. These observations shed fresh light on the origin and evolutionary history of P. falciparum and provide a unique opportunity to probe the biological specificities of this major human parasite.

  12. Malaria parasite clearance.

    PubMed

    White, Nicholas J

    2017-02-23

    Following anti-malarial drug treatment asexual malaria parasite killing and clearance appear to be first order processes. Damaged malaria parasites in circulating erythrocytes are removed from the circulation mainly by the spleen. Splenic clearance functions increase markedly in acute malaria. Either the entire infected erythrocytes are removed because of their reduced deformability or increased antibody binding or, for the artemisinins which act on young ring stage parasites, splenic pitting of drug-damaged parasites is an important mechanism of clearance. The once-infected erythrocytes returned to the circulation have shortened survival. This contributes to post-artesunate haemolysis that may follow recovery in non-immune hyperparasitaemic patients. As the parasites mature Plasmodium vivax-infected erythrocytes become more deformable, whereas Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes become less deformable, but they escape splenic filtration by sequestering in venules and capillaries. Sequestered parasites are killed in situ by anti-malarial drugs and then disintegrate to be cleared by phagocytic leukocytes. After treatment with artemisinin derivatives some asexual parasites become temporarily dormant within their infected erythrocytes, and these may regrow after anti-malarial drug concentrations decline. Artemisinin resistance in P. falciparum reflects reduced ring stage susceptibility and manifests as slow parasite clearance. This is best assessed from the slope of the log-linear phase of parasitaemia reduction and is commonly measured as a parasite clearance half-life. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling of anti-malarial drug effects on parasite clearance has proved useful in predicting therapeutic responses and in dose-optimization.

  13. One more shot for the road: a review and update of vaccinations for pediatric international travelers.

    PubMed

    Rebaza, Andre; Lee, Paul J

    2015-04-01

    Increasing numbers of children are traveling to developing countries where they are often at a higher risk than adults of acquiring vaccine-preventable diseases. Yet, they are less likely to receive pretravel medical advice and preventive care. This article reviews the current recommendations for pediatric travel immunizations, including specific travel vaccines such as typhoid, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis virus, and rabies as well as prospective vaccines for significant global diseases like malaria, dengue, chikungunya, and Ebola.

  14. Drug and Vaccine evaluation in the Human Aotus Plasmodium falciparum Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-07-C-0044 TITLE: Drug and Vaccine Evaluation in the Human Aotus...Apr 2010 – 30 Apr 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-07-C-0044 Drug and Vaccine Evaluation in the Human Aotus Plasmodium...The use of Aotus lemurinus lemurinus (Panamanian Aotus monkey), kariotypes VIII and IX (16) as a model to study malaria drug resistance and vaccine

  15. Taking aim at novel vaccines market.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Sita

    2009-10-01

    The World Vaccine Congress Washington 2009 was held in Chantilly, VA USA April 2O -23rd. The Vaccine congress attracted over 400 participants from across the world, including leading vaccine manufacturers, biotechs, governmental agencies, NGOs, research and academic institutes, venture capital and legal firms, contract service and equipment manufacturers. The speakers covered a wide range of topics, including the role of government and regulatory agencies, funding availability, research and development, manufacturing, packaging and post vaccine evaluations. Past vaccine development efforts have historically focused on infectious diseases. With advancements in the field of immunology, molecular biology and vaccinology, the vaccine field has begun moving in new directions. "Taking aim at novel vaccines market" session chaired by Dr. Una Ryan, Chief Executive Officer of Waltham Technologies, was focused on traditional approaches to novel targets (nosocomial infections), novel approaches to traditional targets (flu and rabies), novel approaches to novel targets (Type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis and smoking) and vaccines for developing markets (TB, malaria, rabies). The importance of collaborations among academic institutions, industries, and philanthropic foundations for developing markets was also emphasized.

  16. Highly active ozonides selected against drug resistant malaria

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Lis; de Sousa, Bruno; Cabral, Lília; Cristiano, Maria LS; Nogueira, Fátima

    2016-01-01

    Ever increasing multi-drug resistance by Plasmodium falciparum is creating new challenges in malaria chemotherapy. In the absence of licensed vaccines, treatment and prevention of malaria is heavily dependent on drugs. Potency, range of activity, safety, low cost and ease of administration are crucial issues in the design and formulation of antimalarials. We have tested three synthetic ozonides NAC89, LC50 and LCD67 in vitro and in vivo against multidrug resistant Plasmodium. In vitro, LC50 was at least 10 times more efficient inhibiting P. falciparum multidrug resistant Dd2 strain than chloroquine and mefloquine and as efficient as artemisinin (ART), artesunate and dihydroartemisinin. All three ozonides showed high efficacy in clearing parasitaemia in mice, caused by multi-drug resistant Plasmodium chabaudi strains, by subcutaneous administration, demonstrating high efficacy in vivo against ART and artesunate resistant parasites. PMID:27276364

  17. Highly active ozonides selected against drug resistant malaria.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Lis; Sousa, Bruno de; Cabral, Lília; Cristiano, Maria Ls; Nogueira, Fátima

    2016-06-07

    Ever increasing multi-drug resistance by Plasmodium falciparum is creating new challenges in malaria chemotherapy. In the absence of licensed vaccines, treatment and prevention of malaria is heavily dependent on drugs. Potency, range of activity, safety, low cost and ease of administration are crucial issues in the design and formulation of antimalarials. We have tested three synthetic ozonides NAC89, LC50 and LCD67 in vitro and in vivo against multidrug resistant Plasmodium. In vitro, LC50 was at least 10 times more efficient inhibiting P. falciparum multidrug resistant Dd2 strain than chloroquine and mefloquine and as efficient as artemisinin (ART), artesunate and dihydroartemisinin. All three ozonides showed high efficacy in clearing parasitaemia in mice, caused by multi-drug resistant Plasmodium chabaudi strains, by subcutaneous administration, demonstrating high efficacy in vivo against ART and artesunate resistant parasites.

  18. Effectiveness of combined intermittent preventive treatment for children and timely home treatment for malaria control

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Whiles awaiting for the arrival of an effective and affordable malaria vaccine, there is a need to make use of the available control tools to reduce malaria risk, especially in children under five years and pregnant women. Intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) has recently been accepted as an important component of the malaria control strategy. This study explored the potential of a strategy of intermittent preventive treatment for children (IPTC) and timely treatment of malaria-related febrile illness in the home in reducing the parasite prevalence and malaria morbidity in young children in a coastal village in Ghana. Methods The study combined home-based delivery of IPTC among six to 60 months old and home treatment of suspected febrile malaria illness within 24 hours. All children between six and 60 months of age received intermittent preventive treatment using amodiaquine and artesunate, delivered by community assistants every four months (three times in 12 months). Malaria parasite prevalence surveys were conducted before the first and after the third dose of IPTC. Results Parasite prevalence was reduced from 25% to 3% (p < 0.00, Mann-Whitney) one year after the inception of the two interventions. At baseline, 13.8% of the children were febrile (axillary temperature greater than or equal to 37.5 degree Celsius) compared to 2.2% at evaluation (post IPTC3 combined with timely home management of fever) (p < 0.00, Mann-Whitney). Conclusion The evaluation result indicates that IPTC given three times in a year combined with timely treatment of febrile malaria illness, impacts significantly on the parasite prevalence. The marked reduction in the parasite prevalence with this strategy points to the potential for reducing malaria-related childhood morbidity and mortality, and this should be explored by control programme managers. PMID:20003357

  19. Immunity to malaria in an era of declining malaria transmission.

    PubMed

    Fowkes, Freya J I; Boeuf, Philippe; Beeson, James G

    2016-02-01

    With increasing malaria control and goals of malaria elimination, many endemic areas are transitioning from high-to-low-to-no malaria transmission. Reductions in transmission will impact on the development of naturally acquired immunity to malaria, which develops after repeated exposure to Plasmodium spp. However, it is currently unclear how declining transmission and malaria exposure will affect the development and maintenance of naturally acquired immunity. Here we review the key processes which underpin this knowledge; the amount of Plasmodium spp. exposure required to generate effective immune responses, the longevity of antibody responses and the ability to mount an effective response upon re-exposure through memory responses. Lastly we identify research priorities which will increase our understanding of how changing transmission will impact on malarial immunity.

  20. Malaria risk perception, knowledge and prophylaxis practices among travellers of African ethnicity living in Paris and visiting their country of origin in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Pistone, T; Guibert, P; Gay, F; Malvy, D; Ezzedine, K; Receveur, M C; Siriwardana, M; Larouzé, B; Bouchaud, O

    2007-10-01

    An observational prospective cohort study assessed malaria risk perception, knowledge and prophylaxis practices among individuals of African ethnicity living in Paris and travelling to their country of origin to visit friends or relatives (VFR). The study compared two groups of VFR who had visited a travel clinic (TC; n=122) or a travel agency (TA; n=69) before departure. Of the 47% of VFR citing malaria as a health concern, 75% knew that malaria is mosquito-borne and that bed nets are an effective preventive measure. Perception of high malaria risk was greater in the TA group (33%) than in the TC group (7%). The availability of a malaria vaccine was mentioned by 35% of VFR, with frequent confusion between yellow fever vaccine and malaria prevention. Twenty-nine percent took adequate chemoprophylaxis with complete adherence, which was higher among the TC group (41%) than the TA group (12%). Effective antivector protection measures used were bed nets (16%), wearing long clothes at night (14%) and air conditioning (8%), with no differences between the study groups except in the use of impregnated bed nets (11% of the TC group and none of the TA group). Media coverage, malaria chemoprophylaxis repayment and cultural adaptation of preventive messages should be improved to reduce the high rate of inadequate malaria prophylaxis in VFR.

  1. Edible vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Artnzen, C J

    1997-01-01

    Vaccines were the result of trial and error research until molecular biology and genetic engineering made possible the creation of of many new and improved vaccines. New vaccines need to be inexpensive, easily administered, and capable of being stored and transported without refrigeration; without these characteristics, developing countries find it difficult to adopt vaccination as the central strategy for preventing their most devastating diseases. The authors describe a promising approach to inexpensive and effective vaccines: producing them in plants we commonly consume. Images p190-a p191-a p193-a p196-a PMID:9182305

  2. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  3. [Antiviral vaccines].

    PubMed

    Girard, M

    1999-01-01

    Vaccination has been successful in controlling numerous diseases in man and animals. Smallpox has been eradicated and poliomyelitis is on the verge of being eradicated. The traditional immunization arsenal includes vaccines using live, attenuated, and inactivated organisms. DNA recombinant technology has added two new types of vaccines, i.e. subunit vaccines based on purified antigens produced by genetic engineering in bacterial, yeast, or animal-cell cultures and live recombinant vaccines based on attenuated bacterial or viral vectors. Currently the best known examples of these new vaccines are those using poxvirus vectors (vaccinia virus, canarypox virus, or fowlpox virus) but new vectors are under development. Another application for genetic engineering in the field of vaccinology is the development of DNA vaccines using naked plasmid DNA. This technique has achieved remarkable results in small rodents but its efficacy, safety, and feasibility in man has yet to be demonstrated. Numerous studies are now under way to improve the process. In the field of synthetic vaccines, lipopeptides have shown promise for induction of cell immune response. Development of vaccines for administration by the oral or nasal route may one day revolutionize vaccination techniques. However, effective vaccines against hepatitis C and HIV have stalled in the face of the complexity and pathophysiology of these diseases. These are the greatest challenges confronting scientists at the dawn of the new millennium.

  4. Attenuated vaccinia virus-circumsporozoite protein recombinants confer protection against rodent malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Lanar, D E; Tine, J A; de Taisne, C; Seguin, M C; Cox, W I; Winslow, J P; Ware, L A; Kauffman, E B; Gordon, D; Ballou, W R; Paoletti, E; Sadoff, J C

    1996-01-01

    NYVAC-based vaccinia virus recombinants expressing the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) were evaluated in the Plasmodium berghei rodent malaria model system. Immunization of mice with a NYVAC-based CSP recombinant elicited a high level of protection (60 to 100%). Protection did not correlate with CS repeat-specific antibody responses and was abrogated by in vivo CD8+ T-cell depletion. Protection was not enhanced by modification of the subcellular localization of CSP. These results suggest the potential of poxvirus-based vectors for the development of vaccine candidates for human malaria. PMID:8613376

  5. Hepatitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  6. External quality assurance of malaria nucleic acid testing for clinical trials and eradication surveillance.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean C; Hermsen, Cornelus C; Douglas, Alexander D; Edwards, Nick J; Petersen, Ines; Fahle, Gary A; Adams, Matthew; Berry, Andrea A; Billman, Zachary P; Gilbert, Sarah C; Laurens, Matthew B; Leroy, Odile; Lyke, Kristen E; Plowe, Christopher V; Seilie, Annette M; Strauss, Kathleen A; Teelen, Karina; Hill, Adrian V S; Sauerwein, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT) for malaria parasites is an increasingly recommended diagnostic endpoint in clinical trials of vaccine and drug candidates and is also important in surveillance of malaria control and elimination efforts. A variety of reported NAT assays have been described, yet no formal external quality assurance (EQA) program provides validation for the assays in use. Here, we report results of an EQA exercise for malaria NAT assays. Among five centers conducting controlled human malaria infection trials, all centers achieved 100% specificity and demonstrated limits of detection consistent with each laboratory's pre-stated expectations. Quantitative bias of reported results compared to expected results was generally <0.5 log10 parasites/mL except for one laboratory where the EQA effort identified likely reasons for a general quantitative shift. The within-laboratory variation for all assays was low at <10% coefficient of variation across a range of parasite densities. Based on this study, we propose to create a Molecular Malaria Quality Assessment program that fulfills the need for EQA of malaria NAT assays worldwide.

  7. Chemotherapy of Rodent Malaria.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    15 ML W_____ 1 .5 1.25 1-4 1. j . .. .... AD CHEMOTHERAPY OF RODENT MALARIA /I ’ IFINAL REPORT 00 WALLACE PETERS MD DSc I!JULY 1985 Supported by US...Table 15 and detailed report sheets are appended as Tables 16 through 21. 3.1.1 WR 251855 AA This lepidine, an analogue of primaquine, is very active...in our 15 preliminary test. The remaining three compounds also exhibited toxicity in varying degrees at this dose and, consequently, even the low level

  8. [Malaria--chemoprophylaxis 2001].

    PubMed

    Hatz, F R; Beck, B; Blum, J; Funk, M; Furrer, H; Genton, B; Holzer, B; Loutan, L; Markwalder, K; Raeber, P A; Schlagenhauf, P; Siegl, G; Steffen, R; Stürchler, D; Wyss, R

    2001-06-01

    An estimated 20,000 to 30,000 cases of imported malaria are annually diagnosed in industrialised countries. Some 700 of them concern Swiss travellers and foreign guests. Exposure prophylaxis and chemoprophylaxis for high risk destinations lower the risk of malarial disease. The latter is defined as regular intake of antimalarial drugs in subtherapeutic dosage in order to suppress the development of clinical disease. Drugs are usually taken from one week before travel until four weeks after return from an endemic area. Mefloquine, doxycycline, chloroquine plus proguanil, and presumably soon also atovaquone plus proguanil are available in Switzerland for chemoprophylaxis.

  9. [Fake malaria drugs].

    PubMed

    Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    2009-03-02

    The literature on fake medicaments is sparse, even if approximately 15% of all medicaments are fake, a figure that for antimalarials in particular reaches 50% in parts of Africa and Asia. Sub-standard and fake medicines deplete the public's confidence in health systems, health professionals and in the pharmaceutical industry - and increase the risk that resistance develops. For a traveller coming from a rich Western country, choosing to buy e.g. preventive antimalarials over the internet or in poor malaria-endemic areas, the consequences may be fatal. International trade-, control- and police-collaboration is needed to manage the problem, as is the fight against poverty and poor governance.

  10. Backward bifurcation and optimal control of Plasmodium Knowlesi malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullahi, Mohammed Baba; Hasan, Yahya Abu; Abdullah, Farah Aini

    2014-07-01

    A deterministic model for the transmission dynamics of Plasmodium Knowlesi malaria with direct transmission is developed. The model is analyzed using dynamical system techniques and it shows that the backward bifurcation occurs for some range of parameters. The model is extended to assess the impact of time dependent preventive (biological and chemical control) against the mosquitoes and vaccination for susceptible humans, while treatment for infected humans. The existence of optimal control is established analytically by the use of optimal control theory. Numerical simulations of the problem, suggest that applying the four control measure can effectively reduce if not eliminate the spread of Plasmodium Knowlesi in a community.

  11. Helminth infection impairs the immunogenicity of a Plasmodium falciparum DNA vaccine, but not irradiated sporozoites, in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of an effective vaccine against malaria remains a priority. However, a significant number of individuals living in tropical areas are also likely to be co-infected with helminths, which are known to adversely affect immune responses to a number of different existing vaccines. Here we com...

  12. Placental hypoxia during placental malaria

    PubMed Central

    Boeuf, Philippe; Tan, Aimee; Romagosa, Cleofe; Radford, Jane; Mwapasa, Victor; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Meshnick, Steven R.; Hunt, Nicholas H.; Rogerson, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Placental malaria causes fetal growth retardation (FGR), which has been linked epidemiologically to placental monocyte infiltrates. We investigated whether parasite or monocyte infiltrates were associated with placental hypoxia, as a potential mechanism underlying malarial FGR. Methods We studied the hypoxia markers hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), placental growth factor, VEGF receptor 1 and its soluble form and VEGF receptor 2. We used real time PCR (in 59 women) to examine gene transcription, immunohistochemistry (in 30 women) to describe protein expression and laser capture microdissection (in 23 women) to examine syncytiotrophoblast-specific changes in gene expression. We compared gene and protein expression in relation to malaria infection, monocytes infiltrates and birth weight. Results we could not associate any hallmark of placental malaria with a transcription, expression or tissue distribution profile characteristic of a response to hypoxia but found higher HIF-1α (P=.0005) and lower VEGF levels (P=.0026) in the syncytiotrophoblast of malaria cases versus asymptomatic controls. Conclusion our data are inconsistent with a role for placental hypoxia in the pathogenesis of malaria-associated FGR. The laser capture microdissection study was small, but suggests that malaria affects syncytiotrophoblast gene transcription, and proposes novel potential mechanisms for placental malaria-associated FGR. PMID:18279052

  13. New Vaccines for the World's Poorest People.

    PubMed

    Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Strych, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The 2000 Millennium Development Goals helped stimulate the development of life-saving childhood vaccines for pneumococcal and rotavirus infections while greatly expanding coverage of existing vaccines. However, there remains an urgent need to develop new vaccines for HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, as well as for respiratory syncytial virus and those chronic and debilitating (mostly parasitic) infections known as neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). The NTDs represent the most common diseases of people living in extreme poverty and are the subject of this review. The development of NTD vaccines, including those for hookworm infection, schistosomiasis, leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease, is being led by nonprofit product development partnerships (PDPs) working in consortia of academic and industrial partners, including vaccine manufacturers in developing countries. NTD vaccines face unique challenges with respect to their product development and manufacture, as well as their preclinical and clinical testing. We emphasize global efforts to accelerate the development of NTD vaccines and some of the hurdles to ensuring their availability to the world's poorest people.

  14. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  15. Vaccines.gov

    MedlinePlus

    ... Statements Vaccine Approvals Features: News & Video Free Resources Vaccines are safe, effective, and save lives. Find answers ... by science, on vaccine safety. Are your child’s vaccines up to date? Getting all recommended vaccines on ...

  16. Ungulate malaria parasites

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Thomas J.; Asada, Masahito; Jiratanh, Montakan; Ishikawa, Sohta A.; Tiawsirisup, Sonthaya; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Namangala, Boniface; Takeda, Mika; Mohkaew, Kingdao; Ngamjituea, Supawan; Inoue, Noboru; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Inagaki, Yuji; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Kaewthamasorn, Morakot; Kaneko, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Haemosporida parasites of even-toed ungulates are diverse and globally distributed, but since their discovery in 1913 their characterization has relied exclusively on microscopy-based descriptions. In order to bring molecular approaches to bear on the identity and evolutionary relationships of ungulate malaria parasites, we conducted Plasmodium cytb-specific nested PCR surveys using blood from water buffalo in Vietnam and Thailand, and goats in Zambia. We found that Plasmodium is readily detectable from water buffalo in these countries, indicating that buffalo Plasmodium is distributed in a wider region than India, which is the only area in which buffalo Plasmodium has been reported. Two types (I and II) of Plasmodium sequences were identified from water buffalo and a third type (III) was isolated from goat. Morphology of the parasite was confirmed in Giemsa-reagent stained blood smears for the Type I sample. Complete mitochondrial DNA sequences were isolated and used to infer a phylogeny in which ungulate malaria parasites form a monophyletic clade within the Haemosporida, and branch prior to the clade containing bird, lizard and other mammalian Plasmodium. Thus it is likely that host switching of Plasmodium from birds to mammals occurred multiple times, with a switch to ungulates independently from other mammalian Plasmodium. PMID:26996979

  17. Strategies & recent development of transmission-blocking vaccines against Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Neha; Bharti, Praveen K.; Tiwari, Archana; Singh, Neeru

    2016-01-01

    Transmission blocking malaria vaccines are aimed to block the development and maturity of sexual stages of parasite within mosquitoes. The vaccine candidate antigens (Pfs25, Pfs48/45, Pfs230) that have shown transmission blocking immunity in model systems are in different stages of development. These antigens are immunogenic with limited genetic diversity. Pfs25 is a leading candidate and currently in phase I clinical trial. Efforts are now focused on the cost-effective production of potent antigens using safe adjuvants and optimization of vaccine delivery system that are capable of inducing strong immune responses. This review addresses the potential usefulness, development strategies, challenges, clinical trials and current status of Plasmodium falciparum sexual stage malaria vaccine candidate antigens for the development of transmission-blocking vaccines. PMID:27748294

  18. Correctly folded Pfs48/45 protein of Plasmodium falciparum elicits malaria transmission-blocking immunity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Outchkourov, Nikolay S.; Roeffen, Will; Kaan, Anita; Jansen, Josephine; Luty, Adrian; Schuiffel, Danielle; van Gemert, Geert Jan; van de Vegte-Bolmer, Marga; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.

    2008-01-01

    Malaria kills >1 million people each year, in particular in sub-Saharan Africa. Although asexual forms are directly responsible for disease and death, sexual stages account for the transmission of Plasmodium parasites from human to the mosquito vector and therefore the spread of the parasite in the population. Development of a malaria vaccine is urgently needed to reduce morbidity and mortality. Vaccines against sexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum are meant to decrease the force of transmission and consequently reduce malaria burden. Pfs48/45 is specifically expressed in sexual stages and is a well established transmission-blocking (TB) vaccine candidate. However, production of correctly folded recombinant Pfs48/45 protein with display of its TB epitopes has been a major challenge. Here, we show the production of a properly folded Pfs48/45 C-terminal fragment by simultaneous coexpression with four periplasmic folding catalysts in Escherichia coli. This C-terminal fragment fused to maltose binding protein was produced at medium scale with >90% purity and a stability over at least a 9-month period. It induces uniform and high antibody titers in mice and elicits functional TB antibodies in standard membrane feeding assays in 90% of the immunized mice. Our data provide a clear perspective on the clinical development of a Pfs48/45-based TB malaria vaccine. PMID:18332422

  19. Elimination of the cold-chain dependence of a nanoemulsion adjuvanted vaccine against tuberculosis by lyophilization.

    PubMed

    Orr, Mark T; Kramer, Ryan M; Barnes, Lucien; Dowling, Quinton M; Desbien, Anthony L; Beebe, Elyse A; Laurance, John D; Fox, Christopher B; Reed, Steven G; Coler, Rhea N; Vedvick, Thomas S

    2014-03-10

    Next-generation rationally-designed vaccine adjuvants represent a significant breakthrough to enable development of vaccines against challenging diseases including tuberculosis, HIV, and malaria. New vaccine candidates often require maintenance of a cold-chain process to ensure long-term stability and separate vials to enable bedside mixing of antigen and adjuvant. This presents a significant financial and technological barrier to worldwide implementation of such vaccines. Herein we describe the development and characterization of a tuberculosis vaccine comprised of both antigen and adjuvant components that are stable in a single vial at sustained elevated temperatures. Further this vaccine retains the ability to elicit both antibody and TH1 responses against the vaccine antigen and protect against experimental challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These results represent a significant breakthrough in the development of vaccine candidates that can be implemented throughout the world without being hampered by the necessity of a continuous cold chain or separate adjuvant and antigen vials.

  20. [HPV vaccination].

    PubMed

    Stronski Huwiler, Susanne; Spaar, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Human Papilloma Viruses are associated with genital carcinoma (of the cervix, anus, vulva, vagina and the penis) as well as with non-genital carcinoma (oropharyngeal carcinoma) and genital warts. In Switzerland two highly efficient and safe vaccines are available. The safety of these vaccines has been repeatedly subject of controversial discussions, however so far post marketing surveillance has always been able to confirm the safety. In Switzerland girls and young women have been offered the HPV vaccination within cantonal programmes since 2008. 2015 the recommendation for the HPV-vaccination for boys and young men was issued, and starting July 1, 2016 they as well will be offered vaccination free of charge within the cantonal programmes. This article discusses the burden of disease, efficacy and safety of the vaccines and presents facts which are important for vaccinating these young people. Specifically, aspects of the decisional capacity of adolescents to consent to the vaccination are presented. Finally, the future perspective with a focus on a new vaccine with an enlarged spectrum of HPV-types is discussed.

  1. Successful vaccination of immune suppressed recipients using Listeria vector HIV-1 vaccines in helminth infected mice.

    PubMed

    Shollenberger, Lisa M; Bui, Cac; Paterson, Yvonne; Allen, Kelsey; Harn, Donald

    2013-04-12

    Vaccines for HIV, malaria and TB remain high priorities, especially for sub-Saharan populations. The question is: will vaccines currently in development for these diseases function in populations that have a high prevalence of helminth infection? Infection with helminth parasites causes immune suppression and a CD4+ Th2 skewing of the immune system, thereby impairing Th1-type vaccine efficacy. In this study, we conduct HIV vaccine trials in mice with and without chronic helminth infection to mimic the human vaccine recipient populations in Sub-Saharan Africa and other helminth parasite endemic regions of the world, as there is large overlap in global prevalence for HIV and helminth infection. Here, we demonstrate that Listeria monocytogenes functions as a vaccine vector to drive robust and functional HIV-specific cellular immune responses, irrespective of chronic helminth infection. This observation represents a significant advance in the field of vaccine research and underscores the concept that vaccines in the developmental pipeline should be effective in the target populations.

  2. Vaccines 85: Molecular and chemical basis of resistance to parasitic, bacterial, and viral diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, R.A.; Chanock, R.M.; Brown, F.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 70 selections. Some of the selection titles are: Structure of the Gene Encoding of Immunodominant Surface Antigen on the Sprozoite of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum; Cloning and Expression in Bacteria of the Genes for Merozite-specific Antigens from the Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum; A Major Surface Antigen of Plasmodium falciparum in Merozoites: Studies on the Protein and its Gene; Genetic Construction of Cholera Vaccine Prototypes; and Viral Genes, Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes and Immunity.

  3. Malaria ecology and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, G. C.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the costs that climate change will exact on society is crucial to devising an appropriate policy response. One of the channels through while climate change will affect human society is through vector-borne diseases whose epidemiology is conditioned by ambient ecology. This paper introduces the literature on malaria, its cost on society, and the consequences of climate change to the physics community in hopes of inspiring synergistic research in the area of climate change and health. It then demonstrates the use of one ecological indicator of malaria suitability to provide an order-of-magnitude assessment of how climate change might affect the malaria burden. The average of Global Circulation Model end-of-century predictions implies a 47% average increase in the basic reproduction number of the disease in today's malarious areas, significantly complicating malaria elimination efforts.

  4. Malaria Prophylaxis: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Francesco; Odolini, Silvia; Autino, Beatrice; Foca, Emanuele; Russo, Rosario

    2010-01-01

    The flow of international travellers to and from malaria-endemic areas, especially Africa, has increased in recent years. Apart from the very high morbidity and mortality burden imposed on malaria-endemic areas, imported malaria is the main cause of fever possibly causing severe disease and death in travellers coming from tropical and subtropical areas, particularly Sub-Saharan Africa. The importance of behavioural preventive measures (bed nets, repellents, etc.), adequate chemoprophylaxis and, in selected circumstances, stand-by emergency treatment may not be overemphasized. However, no prophylactic regimen may offer complete protection. Expert advice is needed to tailor prophylactic advice according to traveller (age, baseline clinical conditions, etc.) and travel (destination, season, etc.) characteristics in order to reduce malaria risk.

  5. Prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum transmission reducing immunity among primary school children in a malaria moderate transmission region in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Paul, Noah H; Vengesai, Arthur; Mduluza, Takafira; Chipeta, James; Midzi, Nicholas; Bansal, Geetha P; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2016-11-01

    Malaria continues to cause alarming morbidity and mortality in more than 100 countries worldwide. Antigens in the various life cycle stages of malaria parasites are presented to the immune system during natural infection and it is widely recognized that after repeated malaria exposure, adults develop partially protective immunity. Specific antigens of natural immunity represent among the most important targets for the development of malaria vaccines. Immunity against the transmission stages of the malaria parasite represents an important approach to reduce malaria transmission and is believed to become an important tool for gradual elimination of malaria. Development of immunity against Plasmodium falciparum sexual stages was evaluated in primary school children aged 6-16 years in Makoni district of Zimbabwe, an area of low to modest malaria transmission. Malaria infection was screened by microscopy, rapid diagnostic tests and finally using nested PCR. Plasma samples were tested for antibodies against recombinant Pfs48/45 and Pfs47 by ELISA. Corresponding serum samples were used to test for P. falciparum transmission reducing activity in Anopheles stephensi and An. gambiae mosquitoes using the membrane feeding assay. The prevalence of malaria diagnosed by rapid diagnostic test kit (Paracheck)™ was 1.7%. However, of the randomly tested blood samples, 66% were positive by nested PCR. ELISA revealed prevalence (64% positivity at 1:500 dilution, in randomly selected 66 plasma samples) of antibodies against recombinant Pfs48/45 (mean A 405nm=0.53, CI=0.46-0.60) and Pfs47 (mean A405nm=0.91, CI=0.80-1.02); antigens specific to the sexual stages. The mosquito membrane feeding assay demonstrated measurable transmission reducing ability of the samples that were positive for Pfs48/45 antibodies by ELISA. Interestingly, 3 plasma samples revealed enhancement of infectivity of P. falciparum in An. stephensi mosquitoes. These studies revealed the presence of antibodies with

  6. Lessons from malaria control to help meet the rising challenge of dengue

    PubMed Central

    Anders, Katherine L; Hay, Simon I

    2012-01-01

    Summary Achievements in malaria control could inform efforts to control the increasing global burden of dengue. Better methods for quantifying dengue endemicity—equivalent to parasite prevalence surveys and endemicity mapping used for malaria—would help target resources, monitor progress, and advocate for investment in dengue prevention. Success in controlling malaria has been attributed to widespread implementation of interventions with proven efficacy. An improved evidence base is needed for large-scale delivery of existing and novel interventions for vector control, alongside continued investment in dengue drug and vaccine development. Control of dengue is unlikely to be achieved without coordinated international financial and technical support for national programmes, which has proven effective in reducing the global burden of malaria. PMID:23174383

  7. A Review of Plasmodium coatneyi-Macaque Models of Severe Malaria.

    PubMed

    Lombardini, E D; Gettayacamin, M; Turner, G D H; Brown, A E

    2015-11-01

    Malaria remains one of the most significant public health concerns in the world today. Approximately half the human population is at risk for infection, with children and pregnant women being most vulnerable. More than 90% of the total human malaria burden, which numbers in excess of 200 million annually, is due to Plasmodium falciparum. Lack of an effective vaccine and a dwindling stockpile of antimalarial drugs due to increased plasmodial resistance underscore the critical need for valid animal models. Plasmodium coatneyi was described in Southeast Asia 50 years ago. This plasmodium of nonhuman primates has been used sporadically as a model for severe malaria, as it mimics many of the pathophysiologic features of human disease. This review covers the reported macroscopic, microscopic, ultrastructural, and molecular pathology of P. coatneyi infection in macaques, specifically focusing on the rhesus macaque, as well as describing the critical needs still outstanding in the validation of this crucial model of human disease.

  8. Microsatellite analysis of malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Orjuela-Sánchez, Pamela; Brandi, Michelle C; Ferreira, Marcelo U

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellites have been increasingly used to investigate the population structure of malaria parasites, to map genetic loci contributing to phenotypes such as drug resistance and virulence in laboratory crosses and genome-wide association studies and to distinguish between treatment failures and new infections in clinical trials. Here, we provide optimized protocols for genotyping highly polymorphic microsatellites sampled from across the genomes of the human malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax that have been extensively used in research laboratories worldwide.

  9. Designing vaccines based on biology of human dendritic cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques; Mellman, Ira

    2010-01-01

    The effective vaccines developed against a variety of infectious agents, including polio, measles and Hepatitis B, represent major achievements in medicine. These vaccines, usually composed of microbial antigens, are often associated with an adjuvant that activates dendritic cells (DCs). Many infectious diseases are still in need of an effective vaccine including HIV, malaria, hepatitis C and tuberculosis. In some cases, the induction of cellular rather than humoral responses may be more important as the goal is to control and eliminate the existing infection rather than to prevent it. Our increased understanding of the mechanisms of antigen presentation, particularly with the description of DC subsets with distinct functions, as well as their plasticity in responding to extrinsic signals, represent opportunities to develop novel vaccines. In addition, we foresee that this increased knowledge will permit us to design vaccines that will reprogram the immune system to intervene therapeutically in cancer, allergy and autoimmunity. PMID:21029958

  10. Infection and treatment immunizations for successful parasite vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mutapi, Francisca; Billingsley, Peter F; Secor, W Evan

    2013-03-01

    Since the advent of techniques for the expression of recombinant peptide antigens, the availability of human vaccines for parasitic diseases has been 'imminent'. Yet vaccines based on recombinant proteins are still largely aspirations, not realities. It is now apparent that vaccine development needs additional knowledge about host protective immune response(s), antigen characteristics, and the delivery required to induce those responses. The most successful immune protection against parasites has been generated by infection and treatment, the induction of protective immunity by truncating the course of an infection with drug treatment. Here, we consider the characteristics of an effective, protective anti-parasite vaccine and propose a conceptual framework to aid parasite vaccine development using malaria and schistosomiasis as examples.

  11. Infection and treatment immunizations for successful parasite vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Mutapi, Francisca; Billingsley, Peter F.; Secor, W. Evan

    2013-01-01

    Since the advent of techniques for the expression of recombinant peptide antigens, the availability of human vaccines for parasitic diseases has been ‘imminent’. Yet vaccines based on recombinant proteins are still largely aspirations, not realities. It is now apparent that vaccine development needs additional knowledge about host protective immune response(s), antigen characteristics, and the delivery required to induce those responses. The most successful immune protection against parasites has been generated by infection and treatment, the induction of protective immunity by truncating the course of an infection with drug treatment. Here, we consider the characteristics of an effective, protective anti-parasite vaccine and propose a conceptual framework to aid parasite vaccine development using malaria and schistosomiasis as examples. PMID:23415733

  12. Comparison of Current Regulatory Status for Gene-Based Vaccines in the U.S., Europe and Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yoshikazu; Aruga, Atsushi

    2015-03-18

    Gene-based vaccines as typified by plasmid DNA vaccines and recombinant viral-vectored vaccines are expected as promising solutions against infectious diseases for which no effective prophylactic vaccines exist such as HIV, dengue virus, Ebola virus and malaria, and for which more improved vaccines are needed such as tuberculosis and influenza virus. Although many preclinical and clinical trials have been conducted to date, no DNA vaccines or recombinant viral-vectored vaccines expressing heterologous antigens for human use have yet been licensed in the U.S., Europe or Japan. In this research, we describe the current regulatory context for gene-based prophylactic vaccines against infectious disease in the U.S., Europe, and Japan. We identify the important considerations, in particular, on the preclinical assessments that would allow these vaccines to proceed to clinical trials, and the differences on the regulatory pathway for the marketing authorization in each region.

  13. Comparison of Current Regulatory Status for Gene-Based Vaccines in the U.S., Europe and Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Yoshikazu; Aruga, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Gene-based vaccines as typified by plasmid DNA vaccines and recombinant viral-vectored vaccines are expected as promising solutions against infectious diseases for which no effective prophylactic vaccines exist such as HIV, dengue virus, Ebola virus and malaria, and for which more improved vaccines are needed such as tuberculosis and influenza virus. Although many preclinical and clinical trials have been conducted to date, no DNA vaccines or recombinant viral-vectored vaccines expressing heterologous antigens for human use have yet been licensed in the U.S., Europe or Japan. In this research, we describe the current regulatory context for gene-based prophylactic vaccines against infectious disease in the U.S., Europe, and Japan. We identify the important considerations, in particular, on the preclinical assessments that would allow these vaccines to proceed to clinical trials, and the differences on the regulatory pathway for the marketing authorization in each region. PMID:26344953

  14. Plasmodium knowlesi malaria in children.

    PubMed

    Barber, Bridget E; William, Timothy; Jikal, Mohammad; Jilip, Jenarun; Dhararaj, Prabakaran; Menon, Jayaram; Yeo, Tsin W; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2011-05-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi can cause severe malaria in adults; however, descriptions of clinical disease in children are lacking. We reviewed case records of children (age <15 years) with a malaria diagnosis at Kudat District Hospital, serving a largely deforested area of Sabah, Malaysia, during January-November 2009. Sixteen children with PCR-confirmed P. knowlesi monoinfection were compared with 14 children with P. falciparum monoinfection diagnosed by microscopy or PCR. Four children with knowlesi malaria had a hemoglobin level at admission of <10.0 g/dL (minimum lowest level 6.4 g/dL). Minimum level platelet counts were lower in knowlesi than in falciparum malaria (median 76,500/μL vs. 156,000/mL; p = 0.01). Most (81%) children with P. knowlesi malaria received chloroquine and primaquine; median parasite clearance time was 2 days (range 1-5 days). P. knowlesi is the most common cause of childhood malaria in Kudat. Although infection is generally uncomplicated, anemia is common and thrombocytopenia universal. Transmission dynamics in this region require additional investigation.

  15. Blood Coagulation, Inflammation and Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Francischetti, Ivo M. B.; Seydel, Karl B.; Monteiro, Robson Q.

    2010-01-01

    I. ABSTRACT Malaria remains a highly prevalent disease in more than 90 countries and accounts for at least 1 million deaths every year. Plasmodium falciparum infection is often associated with a procoagulant tonus characterized by thrombocytopenia and activation of the coagulation cascade and fibrinolytic system; however, bleeding and hemorrhage are uncommon events, suggesting that a compensated state of blood coagulation activation occurs in malaria. This article i) reviews the literature related to blood coagulation and malaria in a historic perspective, ii) describes basic mechanisms of coagulation, anticoagulation, and fibrinolysis, iii) explains the laboratory changes in acute and compensated disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), iv) discusses the implications of tissue factor (TF) expression in the endothelium of P. falciparum-infected patients, and v) emphasizes the pro-coagulant role of parasitized erythrocytes (pRBC) and activated platelets in the pathogenesis of malaria. This article also presents the ‘Tissue Factor Model’ (TFM) for malaria pathogenesis, which places TF as the interface between sequestration, endothelial cell activation, blood coagulation disorder and inflammation often associated with the disease. The relevance of the coagulation-inflammation cycle for the multiorgan dysfunction and coma is discussed in the context of malaria pathogenesis. PMID:18260002

  16. [Malaria and intestinal protozoa].

    PubMed

    Rojo-Marcos, Gerardo; Cuadros-González, Juan

    2016-03-01

    Malaria is life threatening and requires urgent diagnosis and treatment. Incidence and mortality are being reduced in endemic areas. Clinical features are unspecific so in imported cases it is vital the history of staying in a malarious area. The first line treatments for Plasmodium falciparum are artemisinin combination therapies, chloroquine in most non-falciparum and intravenous artesunate if any severity criteria. Human infections with intestinal protozoa are distributed worldwide with a high global morbid-mortality. They cause diarrhea and sometimes invasive disease, although most are asymptomatic. In our environment populations at higher risk are children, including adopted abroad, immune-suppressed, travelers, immigrants, people in contact with animals or who engage in oral-anal sex. Diagnostic microscopic examination has low sensitivity improving with antigen detection or molecular methods. Antiparasitic resistances are emerging lately.

  17. Parasite Specific Antibody Increase Induced by an Episode of Acute P. falciparum Uncomplicated Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Kaddumukasa, Mark; Lwanira, Catherine; Lugaajju, Allan; Katabira, Elly; Persson, Kristina E. M.; Wahlgren, Mats; Kironde, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There is no approved vaccine for malaria, and precisely how human antibody responses to malaria parasite components and potential vaccine molecules are developed and maintained remains poorly defined. In this study, antibody anamnestic or memory response elicited by a single episode of P. falciparum infection was investigated. Methods This study involved 362 malaria patients aged between 6 months to 60 years, of whom 19% were early-diagnosed people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). On the day malaria was diagnosed and 42 days later, blood specimens were collected. Parasite density, CD4+ cells, and antibodies specific to synthetic peptides representing antigenic regions of the P. falciparum proteins GLURP, MSP3 and HRPII were measured. Results On the day of malaria diagnosis, Immunoglobulin (IgG) antibodies against GLURP, MSP3 and HRP II peptides were present in the blood of 75%, 41% and 60% of patients, respectively. 42 days later, the majority of patients had boosted their serum IgG antibody more than 1.2 fold. The increase in level of IgG antibody against the peptides was not affected by parasite density at diagnosis. The median CD4+ cell counts of PLWHAs and HIV negative individuals were not statistically different, and median post-infection increases in anti-peptide IgG were similar in both groups of patients. Conclusion In the majority (70%) of individuals, an infection of P. falciparum elicits at least 20% increase in level of anti-parasite IgG. This boost in anti-P. falciparum IgG is not affected by parasite density on the day of malaria diagnosis, or by HIV status. PMID:25906165

  18. Pulmonary pathology in pediatric cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Milner, Danny; Factor, Rachel; Whitten, Rich; Carr, Richard A; Kamiza, Steve; Pinkus, Geraldine; Molyneux, Malcolm; Taylor, Terrie

    2013-12-01

    Respiratory signs are common in African children where malaria is highly endemic, and thus, parsing the role of pulmonary pathology in illness is challenging. We examined the lungs of 100 children from an autopsy series in Blantyre, Malawi, many of whom death was attributed to Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Our aim was to describe the pathologic manifestations of fatal malaria; to understand the role of parasites, pigment, and macrophages; and to catalog comorbidities. From available patients, which included 55 patients with cerebral malaria and 45 controls, we obtained 4 cores of lung tissue for immunohistochemistry and morphological evaluation. We found that, in patients with cerebral malaria, large numbers of malaria parasites were present in pulmonary alveolar capillaries, together with extensive deposits of malaria pigment (hemozoin). The number of pulmonary macrophages in this vascular bed did not differ between patients with cerebral malaria, noncerebral malaria, and nonmalarial diagnoses. Comorbidities found in some cerebral malaria patients included pneumonia, pulmonary edema, hemorrhage, and systemic activation of coagulation. We conclude that the respiratory distress seen in patients with cerebral malaria does not appear to be anatomic in origin but that increasing malaria pigment is strongly associated with cerebral malaria at autopsy.

  19. [Current malaria situation in Turkmenistan].

    PubMed

    Amangel'diev, K A

    2001-01-01

    Malaria is one of the main health problems facing most developing countries having a hot climate. It is a problem in Turkmenistan. The country is situated in Central Asia, north of the Kopetdag mountains, between the Caspian Sea to the west and the Amu-Darya river to the east. Turkmenistan stretches for a distance of 1,100 km from west to east and 650 km from north to south. It borders Kazakhstan in the north, Uzbekistan in the east and north-east, Iran in the south, and Afghanistan in the south-east. Seven malaria vector species are found in Turkmenistan, the main ones being Anopheles superpictus, An. pulcherrimus, and An. martinius. The potentially endemic area consists of the floodplains of the Tejen and Murgab rivers, with a long chain of reservoirs built along them. In 1980 most cases of imported malaria were recorded in military personnel who had returned from service in Afghanistan. In the past years, only tertian (Plasmodium vivax) malaria has been recorded and there have been no death from malaria over that period. In the Serkhetabad (Gushgi) district there are currently 5 active foci of malaria infection, with a population of 22,000 people. In 1999, forty nine cases of P. vivax malaria were recorded in Turkmenistan. Of them, 36 cases, including 4 children under 14 years were diagnosed for the first time while 13 were relapses. There were 88 fewer cases than those in the previous year (by a factor of 2.8). There were 17 more cases of imported malaria than those in 1998 (by a factor of 1.7), most of which occurred in the foci of malaria infection (Serkhetabad, Tagtabazar, and Kerki districts), in the city of Ashkhabat and in Lebap, Dashkhovuz and Akhal Regions. The emergence of indigenous malaria in the border areas was due to the importation of the disease at intervals by infected mosquitoes flying in from neighbouring countries (e.g. Afghanistan), the lack of drugs to treat the first cases and the lack of alternative insecticides. Most patients suffer

  20. [Better vaccinations - new approaches for targeted immunomodulation in healthy and immunosuppressed].

    PubMed

    Balmer, Maria L; Berger, Christoph T

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases are the main cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The development of successful vaccines is thus one of the major achievements in medical history and may have saved more lives than antibiotics. Whereas the first vaccines were developed in a rather empiric way, new insights into the immunological mechanisms of a successful vaccine response allow modifications of the generally used vaccination protocols and are a prerequisite for the generation of vaccines against new pathogens such as HIV, malaria, dengue virus and others. The aim of effective vaccine development is an avirulent, non-invasive, non-replicating vaccine, which induces long-lived, pathogen-specific immune responses. The addition of adjuvants, modifications of the dose, dose interval and application route can improve antibody-titers and cellular immune responses and thus improve vaccination outcome. On the other hand primary or secondary immunodeficiency leads to an increased susceptibility for infectious diseases and impaired immune responses to vaccinations. These patients should be vaccinated with dead vaccines, whereas live vaccines are generally contraindicated. Here we summarize current and future approaches to enhance vaccine induced immune responses and highlight some of the issues of vaccinations in immunosuppressed individuals.

  1. Standardization of the antibody-dependent respiratory burst assay with human neutrophils and Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn, David; Miura, Kazutoyo; Fay, Michael P; Williams, Andrew R; Murungi, Linda M; Shi, Jianguo; Hodgson, Susanne H; Douglas, Alexander D; Osier, Faith H; Fairhurst, Rick M; Diakite, Mahamadou; Pleass, Richard J; Long, Carole A; Draper, Simon J

    2015-09-16

    The assessment of naturally-acquired and vaccine-induced immunity to blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria is of long-standing interest. However, the field has suffered from a paucity of in vitro assays that reproducibly measure the anti-parasitic activity induced by antibodies in conjunction with immune cells. Here we optimize the antibody-dependent respiratory burst (ADRB) assay, which assesses the ability of antibodies to activate the release of reactive oxygen species from human neutrophils in response to P. falciparum blood-stage parasites. We focus particularly on assay parameters affecting serum preparation and concentration, and importantly assess reproducibility. Our standardized protocol involves testing each serum sample in singlicate with three independent neutrophil donors, and indexing responses against a standard positive control of pooled hyper-immune Kenyan sera. The protocol can be used to quickly screen large cohorts of samples from individuals enrolled in immuno-epidemiological studies or clinical vaccine trials, and requires only 6 μL of serum per sample. Using a cohort of 86 samples, we show that malaria-exposed individuals induce higher ADRB activity than malaria-naïve individuals. The development of the ADRB assay complements the use of cell-independent assays in blood-stage malaria, such as the assay of growth inhibitory activity, and provides an important standardized cell-based assay in the field.

  2. Genomics and Integrated Systems Biology in Plasmodium falciparum: A Path to Malaria Control and Eradication

    PubMed Central

    Le Roch, Karine G.; Chung, Duk-Won D.; Ponts, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    The first draft of the human malaria parasite's genome was released in 2002. Since then, the malaria scientific community has witnessed a steady embrace of new and powerful functional genomic studies. Over the years, these approaches have slowly revolutionized malaria research and enabled the comprehensive, unbiased investigation of various aspects of the parasite's biology. These genome-wide analyses delivered a refined annotation of the parasite's genome, a better knowledge of its RNA, proteins, and metabolite derivatives, and fostered the discovery of new vaccine and drug targets. Despite the positive impacts of these genomic studies, most research and investment still focus on protein targets, drugs and vaccine candidates that were known before the publication of the parasite genome sequence. However, recent access to next-generation sequencing technologies, along with an increased number of genome-wide applications are expanding the impact of the parasite genome on biomedical research, contributing to a paradigm shift in research activities that may possibly lead to new optimized diagnosis and treatments. This review provides an update of Plasmodium falciparum genome sequences and an overview of the rapid development of genomics and system biology applications that have an immense potential of creating powerful tools for a successful malaria eradication campaign. PMID:21995286

  3. Immune protection-inducing protein structures (IMPIPS) against malaria: the weapons needed for beating Odysseus.

    PubMed

    Patarroyo, Manuel E; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Pabón, Laura; Curtidor, Hernando; Poloche, Luis A

    2015-12-22

    The review covers the functional and structural approach followed by our group for more than 34 years in the search for a methodology that allows the rational design of chemically synthesised vaccines. An analogy between Odysseus, the cunning hero of the epic poem Odyssey by Homer, and the elusive Plasmodium parasite has been made, to review our research group's main considerations when developing a rational methodology for designing second generation, modified peptide-based, minimal subunit, multi-antigen, multi-stage, chemically synthesised vaccines against Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

  4. New generation of dendritic cell vaccines.

    PubMed

    Radford, Kristen J; Caminschi, Irina

    2013-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal role in the induction and regulation of immune responses, including the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) responses. These are essential for the eradication of cancers and pathogens including HIV and malaria, for which there are currently no effective vaccines. New developments in our understanding of DC biology have identified the key DC subset responsible for CTL induction, which is now an attractive candidate to target for vaccination. These DC are characterized by expression of novel markers Clec9A and XCR1, and a specialized capacity to cross-present antigen (Ag) from tumors and pathogens that do not directly infect DC. New generation DC vaccines that specifically target the cross-presenting DC in vivo have already demonstrated potential in preclinical animal models but the challenge remains to translate these findings into clinically efficacous vaccines in man. This has been greatly facilitated by the recent identification of the equivalent Clec9A(+) XCR1(+) cross-presenting DC in human lymphoid tissues and peripheral tissues that are key sites for vaccination administration. These findings combined with further studies on DC subset biology have important implications for the design of new CTL-mediated vaccines.

  5. Vaccines and future global health needs.

    PubMed

    Nossal, G J V

    2011-10-12

    Increased international support for both research into new vaccines and their deployment in developing countries has been evident over the past decade. In particular, the GAVI Alliance has had a major impact in increasing uptake of the six common infant vaccines as well as those against hepatitis B and yellow fever. It further aims to introduce pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccines in the near future and several others, including those against human papillomavirus, meningococcal disease, rubella and typhoid not long after that. In addition, there is advanced research into vaccines against malaria, HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis. By 2030, we may have about 20 vaccines that need to be used in the developing world. Finding the requisite funds to achieve this will pose a major problem. A second and urgent question is how to complete the job of global polio eradication. The new strategic plan calls for completion by 2013, but both pre-eradication and post-eradication challenges remain. Vaccines will eventually become available beyond the field of infectious diseases. Much interesting work is being done in both autoimmunity and cancer. Cutting across disease groupings, there are issues in methods of delivery and new adjuvant formulations.

  6. 43 kDa and 66 kDa, two blood stage antigens induce immune response in Plasmodium berghei malaria.

    PubMed

    Pirta, Chhaya; Banyal, H S

    2014-08-01

    The hunt for an effective vaccine against malaria still continues. Several new target antigens as candidates for vaccine design are being explored and tested for their efficacy. In the present study the sera from mice immunized with 24,000 x g fraction of Plasmodium berghei has been used to identify highly immunogenic blood stage antigens. The protective antibodies present in immune sera were covalently immobilized on CNBr activated sepharose 4B and used for affinity chromatography purification of antigens present in blood stages of P. berghei. Two polypeptides of 66 and 43 kDa molecular weights proved to be highly immunogenic. They exhibited a strong humoral immune response in mice as evident by high titres in ELISA and IFA. Protective immunity by these two antigens was apparent by in vivo and in vitro studies. These two proteins could further be analysed and used as antigens in malaria vaccine design.

  7. Mapping residual transmission for malaria elimination.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Robert C; Le Menach, Arnaud; Kunene, Simon; Ntshalintshali, Nyasatu; Hsiang, Michelle S; Perkins, T Alex; Greenhouse, Bryan; Tatem, Andrew J; Cohen, Justin M; Smith, David L

    2015-12-29

    Eliminating malaria from a defined region involves draining the endemic parasite reservoir and minimizing local malaria transmission around imported malaria infections . In the last phases of malaria elimination, as universal interventions reap diminishing marginal returns, national resources must become increasingly devoted to identifying where residual transmission is occurring. The needs for accurate measures of progress and practical advice about how to allocate scarce resources require new analytical methods to quantify fine-grained heterogeneity in malaria risk. Using routine national surveillance data from Swaziland (a sub-Saharan country on the verge of elimination), we estimated individual reproductive numbers. Fine-grained maps of reproductive numbers and local malaria importation rates were combined to show 'malariogenic potential', a first for malaria elimination. As countries approach elimination, these individual-based measures of transmission risk provide meaningful metrics for planning programmatic responses and prioritizing areas where interventions will contribute most to malaria elimination.

  8. Malaria, photomicrograph of cellular parasites (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Malaria is a disease caused by parasites. This picture shows dark orange-stained malaria parasites inside red blood cells (a) and outside the cells (b). Note the large cells that look like targets; ...

  9. Malaria, microscopic view of cellular parasites (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Malaria is a disease caused by parasites that are carried by mosquitoes. Once in the bloodstream, the parasite inhabits the red blood cell (RBC). This picture shows purple-stained malaria parasites inside red blood cells.

  10. Major Histocompatibility Complex and Malaria: Focus on Plasmodium vivax Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Junior, Josué da Costa; Pratt-Riccio, Lilian Rose

    2016-01-01

    The importance of host and parasite genetic factors in malaria resistance or susceptibility has been investigated since the middle of the last century. Nowadays, of all diseases that affect man, malaria still plays one of the highest levels of selective pressure on human genome. Susceptibility to malaria depends on exposure profile, epidemiological characteristics, and several components of the innate and adaptive immune system that influences the quality of the immune response generated during the Plasmodium lifecycle in the vertebrate host. But it is well known that the parasite’s enormous capacity of genetic variation in conjunction with the host genetics polymorphism is also associated with a wide spectrum of susceptibility degrees to complicated or severe forms of the disease. In this scenario, variations in genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) associated with host resistance or susceptibility to malaria have been identified and used as markers in host–pathogen interaction studies, mainly those evaluating the impact on the immune response, acquisition of resistance, or increased susceptibility to infection or vulnerability to disease. However, due to the intense selective pressure, number of cases, and mortality rates, the majority of the reported associations reported concerned Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Studies on the MHC polymorphism and its association with Plasmodium vivax, which is the most widespread Plasmodium and the most prevalent species outside the African continent, are less frequent but equally important. Despite punctual contributions, there are accumulated evidences of human genetic control in P. vivax infection and disease. Herein, we review the current knowledge in the field of MHC and derived molecules (HLA Class I, Class II, TNF-α, LTA, BAT1, and CTL4) regarding P. vivax malaria. We discuss particularly the results of P. vivax studies on HLA class I and II polymorphisms in relation to host susceptibility, naturally

  11. Malaria infection and human evolution.

    PubMed

    Sabbatani, Sergio; Manfredi, Roberto; Fiorino, Sirio

    2010-03-01

    During the evolution of the genus Homo, with regard to the species habilis, erectus and sapiens, malaria has played a key biological role in influencing human development. The plasmodia causing malaria have evolved in two ways, in biological and phylogenetic terms: Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium ovale appear to have either coevolved with human mankind, or encountered human species during the most ancient phases of Homo evolution; on the other hand, Plasmodium falciparum has been transmitted to humans by monkeys in a more recent period, probably between the end of the Mesolithic and the beginning of the Neolithic age. The authors show both direct and indirect biomolecular evidence of malarial infection, detected in buried subjects, dating to ancient times and brought to light in the course of archaeological excavations in major Mediterranean sites. In this review of the literature the authors present scientific evidence confirming the role of malaria in affecting the evolution of populations in Mediterranean countries. The people living in several different Mediterranean regions, the cradle of western civilization, have been progressively influenced by malaria in the course of the spread of this endemic disease in recent millennia. In addition, populations affected by endemic malaria progressively developed cultural, dietary and behavioural adaptation mechanisms, which contributed to diminish the risk of disease. These habits were probably not fully conscious. Nevertheless it may be thought that both these customs and biological modifications, caused by malarial plasmodia, favoured the emergence of groups of people with greater resistance to malaria. All these factors have diminished the unfavourable demographic impact of the disease, also positively influencing the general development and growth of civilization.

  12. Malaria research and eradication in the USSR

    PubMed Central

    Bruce-Chwatt, Leonard J.

    1959-01-01

    Relatively little is known outside the USSR about the past history of malaria in that country, the contribution of its scientists to malaria research, the recent progress of Soviet malariology, or the achievements of the Soviet Union in the eradication of malaria. These achievements are of particular interest because the general strategy of malaria eradication in the USSR has many technical, administrative, and economic and social features not seen elsewhere. PMID:13805136

  13. The economic and social burden of malaria.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Jeffrey; Malaney, Pia

    2002-02-07

    Where malaria prospers most, human societies have prospered least. The global distribution of per-capita gross domestic product shows a striking correlation between malaria and poverty, and malaria-endemic countries also have lower rates of economic growth. There are multiple channels by which malaria impedes development, including effects on fertility, population growth, saving and investment, worker productivity, absenteeism, premature mortality and medical costs.

  14. Nanomimics of host cell membranes block invasion and expose invasive malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Najer, Adrian; Wu, Dalin; Bieri, Andrej; Brand, Françoise; Palivan, Cornelia G; Beck, Hans-Peter; Meier, Wolfgang

    2014-12-23

    The fight against most infectious diseases, including malaria, is often hampered by the emergence of drug resistance and lack or limited efficacies of vaccines. Therefore, new drugs, vaccines, or other strategies to control these diseases are needed. Here, we present an innovative nanotechnological strategy in which the nanostructure itself represents the active substance with no necessity to release compounds to attain therapeutic effect and which might act in a drug- and vaccine-like dual function. Invasion of Plasmodium falciparum parasites into red blood cells was selected as a biological model for the initial validation of this approach. Stable nanomimics-polymersomes presenting receptors required for parasite attachment to host cells-were designed to efficiently interrupt the life cycle of the parasite by inhibiting invasion. A simple way to build nanomimics without postformation modifications was established. First, a block copolymer of the receptor with a hydrophobic polymer was synthesized and then mixed with a polymersome-forming block copolymer. The resulting nanomimics bound parasite-derived ligands involved in the initial attachment to host cells and they efficiently blocked reinvasion of malaria parasites after their egress from host cells in vitro. They exhibited efficacies of more than 2 orders of magnitude higher than the soluble form of the receptor, which can be explained by multivalent interactions of several receptors on one nanomimic with multiple ligands on the infective parasite. In the future, our strategy might offer interesting treatment options for severe malaria or a way to modulate the immune response.

  15. MG7 mimotope-based DNA vaccination for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dexin; Chen, Yu; Fan, Daiming

    2006-04-01

    Gastric cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Prevention and treatment of gastric cancer through vaccination has been difficult owing to lack of a specific target and poor immunity. A number of vaccination strategies have been used to augment immune responses against gastric cancer and some progress has been made. In a series of studies, the authors have focused on gastric cancer vaccination approaches based on MG7 mimotopes, which are mimicry epitopes selected from phage-displayed oligopeptide libraries with a gastric cancer cell-specific monoclonal antibody, MG7-Ab. Strategies employed in these studies include viral or plasmid vectors in combination with carrier sequence or unmethylated CpG with synthetic peptides in nanoemulsion. The results demonstrated that MG7 mimotopes could effectively and specifically induce both cellular and humoral immune reactions and in vivo antitumor responses. In particular, a four-MG7 mimotope DNA vaccine was found to elicit much stronger antitumor immune responses in mice compared with its single-mimotope counterpart. These encouraging findings might pave the way for the development of novel MG7 antigen-based vaccination approaches for human gastric cancer. The review also discusses other immune-enhancing vaccination strategies for gastric cancer.

  16. Vaccine supply chains need to be better funded and strengthened, or lives will be at risk.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Judith R; Miller, Roger; Cheyne, James

    2011-06-01

    In the next decade, at least twelve additional vaccines that target such diseases as typhoid, malaria, and dengue will become available to lower- and middle-income countries. These vaccines must travel along what are called supply chains, which include all personnel, systems, equipment, and activities involved in ensuring that vaccines are effectively delivered from the point of production to the people who need them. But for various reasons, supply chains are already strained in many developing countries, and the potential inability to distribute new vaccines will place lives at risk. Among the many steps needed to strengthen the global vaccine supply chain, we suggest that the international community pursue improved coordination between organizations that donate and ship vaccines and the host-country officials who receive and distribute the vaccines, as well as better training for supply-chain managers.

  17. A class of tricyclic compounds blocking malaria parasite oocyst development and transmission.

    PubMed

    Eastman, Richard T; Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn; Raj, Dipak K; Dixit, Saurabh; Deng, Bingbing; Miura, Kazutoyo; Yuan, Jing; Tanaka, Takeshi Q; Johnson, Ronald L; Jiang, Hongying; Huang, Ruili; Williamson, Kim C; Lambert, Lynn E; Long, Carole; Austin, Christopher P; Wu, Yimin; Su, Xin-Zhuan

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is a deadly infectious disease in many tropical and subtropical countries. Previous efforts to eradicate malaria have failed, largely due to the emergence of drug-resistant parasites, insecticide-resistant mosquitoes and, in particular, the lack of drugs or vaccines to block parasite transmission. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are known to play a role in drug transport, metabolism, and resistance in many organisms, including malaria parasites. To investigate whether a Plasmodium falciparum ABC transporter (Pf14_0244 or PfABCG2) modulates parasite susceptibility to chemical compounds or plays a role in drug resistance, we disrupted the gene encoding PfABCG2, screened the recombinant and the wild-type 3D7 parasites against a library containing 2,816 drugs approved for human or animal use, and identified an antihistamine (ketotifen) that became less active against the PfABCG2-disrupted parasite in culture. In addition to some activity against asexual stages and gametocytes, ketotifen was highly potent in blocking oocyst development of P. falciparum and the rodent parasite Plasmodium yoelii in mosquitoes. Tests of structurally related tricyclic compounds identified additional compounds with similar activities in inhibiting transmission. Additionally, ketotifen appeared to have some activity against relapse of Plasmodium cynomolgi infection in rhesus monkeys. Further clinical evaluation of ketotifen and related compounds, including synthetic new derivatives, in blocking malaria transmission may provide new weapons for the current effort of malaria eradication.

  18. UK malaria treatment guidelines 2016.

    PubMed

    Lalloo, David G; Shingadia, Delane; Bell, David J; Beeching, Nicholas J; Whitty, Christopher J M; Chiodini, Peter L

    2016-06-01

    1.Malaria is the tropical disease most commonly imported into the UK, with 1300-1800 cases reported each year, and 2-11 deaths. 2. Approximately three quarters of reported malaria cases in the UK are caused by Plasmodium falciparum, which is capable of invading a high proportion of red blood cells and rapidly leading to severe or life-threatening multi-organ disease. 3. Most non-falciparum malaria cases are caused by Plasmodium vivax; a few cases are caused by the other species of plasmodium: Plasmodium ovale, Plasmodium malariae or Plasmodium knowlesi. 4. Mixed infections with more than one species of parasite can occur; they commonly involve P. falciparum with the attendant risks of severe malaria. 5. There are no typical clinical features of malaria; even fever is not invariably present. Malaria in children (and sometimes in adults) may present with misleading symptoms such as gastrointestinal features, sore throat or lower respiratory complaints. 6. A diagnosis of malaria must always be sought in a feverish or sick child or adult who has visited malaria-endemic areas. Specific country information on malaria can be found at http://travelhealthpro.org.uk/. P. falciparum infection rarely presents more than six months after exposure but presentation of other species can occur more than a year after exposure. 7. Management of malaria depends on awareness of the diagnosis and on performing the correct diagnostic tests: the diagnosis cannot be excluded until more than one blood specimen has been examined. Other travel related infections, especially viral haemorrhagic fevers, should also be considered. 8. The optimum diagnostic procedure is examination of thick and thin blood films by an expert to detect and speciate the malarial parasites. P. falciparum and P. vivax (depending upon the product) malaria can be diagnosed almost as accurately using rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) which detect plasmodial antigens. RDTs for other Plasmodium species are not as reliable. 9

  19. New guidelines on malaria prevention: A summary.

    PubMed

    Swales, Claire A; Chiodini, Peter L; Bannister, Barbara A

    2007-02-01

    Travellers to many tropical areas remain at risk of contracting malaria. Resistance of malaria parasites to a number of drugs continues to increase in degree and distribution, so that some older, trusted prophylactic drugs, such as chloroquine, are no longer useful in some parts of the world. Despite the introduction of new drugs and the reduction of malaria risk in some areas, such as parts of India, the number of people travelling continues to increase and malaria reports in the UK are not decreasing. New updated prevention guidelines from the Health Protection Agency Advisory Committee on Malaria Prevention (ACMP) in UK travellers (Chiodini P, Hill D, Lalloo D, Lea G, Walker E, Whitty C, et al. Guidelines for malaria prevention in travellers from the United Kingdom. London: Health Protection Agency; January 2007. Available from: http://www.hpa.org.uk/infections/topics_az/malaria/default.htm) aim to raise awareness of the risks of malaria and help UK travel health advisors in giving malaria prevention advice to all those who need it. Together with the ACMP malaria treatment guidelines it is hoped that the risk of illness and death from malaria in UK travellers can be reduced. This article summarises the new ACMP malaria prevention guidelines.

  20. Malaria transmission rates estimated from serological data.

    PubMed Central

    Burattini, M. N.; Massad, E.; Coutinho, F. A.

    1993-01-01

    A mathematical model was used to estimate malaria transmission rates based on serological data. The model is minimally stochastic and assumes an age-dependent force of infection for malaria. The transmission rates estimated were applied to a simple compartmental model in order to mimic the malaria transmission. The model has shown a good retrieving capacity for serological and parasite prevalence data. PMID:8270011

  1. New molecular detection methods of malaria parasites with multiple genes from genomes.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Himanshu; Srivastava, Shikha; Chaudhari, Sima; Vasudevan, Thanvanthri G; Hande, Manjunath H; D'souza, Sydney C; Umakanth, Shashikiran; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu

    2016-08-01

    For the effective control of malaria, development of sensitive, accurate and rapid tool to diagnose and manage the disease is essential. In humans subjects, the severe form of malaria is caused by Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) and Plasmodium vivax (Pv) and there is need to identify these parasites in acute, chronic and latent (during and post-infection) stages of the disease. In this study, we report a species specific and sensitive diagnostic method for the detection of Pf and Pv in humans. First, we identified intra and intergenic multiloci short stretch of 152 (PfMLS152) and 110 (PvMLS110) nucleotides which is present up to 44 and 34 times in the genomes of Pf and Pv respectively. We developed the single-step amplification-based method using isolated DNA or from lysed red blood cells for the detection of the two malaria parasites. The limit of detection of real-time polymerase chain reaction based assays were 0.1copyof parasite/μl for PfMLS152 and PvMLS110 target sequences. Next, we have tested 250 clinically suspected cases of malaria to validate the method. Sensitivity and specificity for both targets were 100% compared to the quantitative buffy coat microscopy analysis and real-time PCR (Pf-chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT) and Pv-lactate dehydrogenase (PvLDH)) based assays. The sensitivity of microscopy and real-time PCR (PfCRT and PvLDH primers) assays were 80.63%; 95%CI 75.22%-85.31%; p<0.05 and 97.61%; 95%CI 94.50%-99.21%; p<0.05 in detecting malaria infection respectively when compared to PfMLS152 and PvMLS110 targets to identify malaria infection in patients. These improved assays may have potential applications in evaluating malaria in asymptomatic patients, treatment, blood donors and in vaccine studies.

  2. Typhoid Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious disease. It is caused by bacteria called Salmonella Typhi. Typhoid causes a high fever, fatigue, weakness, stomach ... a typhoid carrier. Laboratory workers who work with Salmonella Typhi bacteria. Inactivated typhoid vaccine (shot)One dose provides ...

  3. Typhoid Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious disease. It is caused by bacteria called Salmonella Typhi. Typhoid causes a high fever, fatigue, weakness, ... a typhoid carrier. • Laboratory workers who work with Salmonella Typhi bacteria. Inactivated typhoid vaccine (shot) • One dose ...

  4. Vector control after malaria eradication

    PubMed Central

    Micks, D. W.

    1963-01-01

    In considerable areas now in or near the consolidation phase of malaria eradication, other vector-borne diseases present serious public health problems, even though not susceptible to control on the same world-wide scale as malaria. Several of these areas are already making plans for converting their malaria eradication services to vector control services. While it is possible to use essentially the same personnel and equipment, the methods must be adapted to the biology and habits of the vector. For a smooth and rapid transition, considerable advance planning is therefore needed—preferably well ahead of the consolidation phase. The author gives several examples of the need for flexibility in effecting the changeover and of the problems likely to arise after the completion of malaria eradication programmes. He recommends that epidemiological studies should be extended to vector-borne diseases other than malaria while eradication programmes are still in progress and that vector control programmes should be integrated into the basic health services of the country as soon as possible. He also underlines the importance of water management and other aspects of environmental sanitation in vector control programmes. PMID:20604169

  5. Immuno-epidemiology of malaria

    PubMed Central

    van der Kaay, H. J.; Klein, F.; Hagenaar—de Weerdt, M.; Meuwissen, J. H. E. T.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation of malariometric indices in relation to immunoglobulin levels, rheumatoid factors, and antithyroglobulins was carried out on 78 members of the Arfak tribe near Manokwari in Western New Guinea, in the course of a WHO assessment of malaria control activities in that region. The population investigated had been exposed to a period of epidemic malaria, as indicated by the small differences in malariometric indices between consecutive age groups. Typically high spleen sizes were recorded, as found generally among Papuans in similar situations. Falciparum malaria was most prevalent, almost equal to cases of vivax and malariae malaria together. IgM levels were very high, while those of IgG, IgA and IgD were not elevated. Total serum protein was rather low. No correlation between malariometric indices, autoantibodies, and immunoglobulin levels could be found. In particular there was no correlation between IgM levels and spleen indices, such as has been found in many other surveys. It is suggested that splenomegaly may show no correlation with the IgM level in Papuan populations without previous selection. PMID:4211055

  6. Ear Infection and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Infection and Vaccines Ear Infection and Vaccines Patient Health Information News ... or may need reinsertion over time. What about vaccines? A vaccine is a preparation administered to stimulate ...

  7. Adults Need Vaccines, Too!

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Adult Vaccinations Adults Need Vaccines, Too! Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents ... of the millions of adults not receiving the vaccines you need? What vaccines do you need? All ...

  8. Smallpox Vaccine Overview