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Sample records for antigens reflect protection

  1. Atomic structure of anthrax protective antigen pore elucidates toxin translocation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiansen; Pentelute, Bradley L; Collier, R John; Zhou, Z Hong

    2015-05-28

    Anthrax toxin, comprising protective antigen, lethal factor, and oedema factor, is the major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, an agent that causes high mortality in humans and animals. Protective antigen forms oligomeric prepores that undergo conversion to membrane-spanning pores by endosomal acidification, and these pores translocate the enzymes lethal factor and oedema factor into the cytosol of target cells. Protective antigen is not only a vaccine component and therapeutic target for anthrax infections but also an excellent model system for understanding the mechanism of protein translocation. On the basis of biochemical and electrophysiological results, researchers have proposed that a phi (Φ)-clamp composed of phenylalanine (Phe)427 residues of protective antigen catalyses protein translocation via a charge-state-dependent Brownian ratchet. Although atomic structures of protective antigen prepores are available, how protective antigen senses low pH, converts to active pore, and translocates lethal factor and oedema factor are not well defined without an atomic model of its pore. Here, by cryo-electron microscopy with direct electron counting, we determine the protective antigen pore structure at 2.9-Å resolution. The structure reveals the long-sought-after catalytic Φ-clamp and the membrane-spanning translocation channel, and supports the Brownian ratchet model for protein translocation. Comparisons of four structures reveal conformational changes in prepore to pore conversion that support a multi-step mechanism by which low pH is sensed and the membrane-spanning channel is formed.

  2. Rational design of a meningococcal antigen inducing broad protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Scarselli, Maria; Aricò, Beatrice; Brunelli, Brunella; Savino, Silvana; Di Marcello, Federica; Palumbo, Emmanuelle; Veggi, Daniele; Ciucchi, Laura; Cartocci, Elena; Bottomley, Matthew James; Malito, Enrico; Lo Surdo, Paola; Comanducci, Maurizio; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Cantini, Francesca; Dragonetti, Sara; Colaprico, Annalisa; Doro, Francesco; Giannetti, Patrizia; Pallaoro, Michele; Brogioni, Barbara; Tontini, Marta; Hilleringmann, Markus; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Banci, Lucia; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino

    2011-07-13

    The sequence variability of protective antigens is a major challenge to the development of vaccines. For Neisseria meningitidis, the bacterial pathogen that causes meningitis, the amino acid sequence of the protective antigen factor H binding protein (fHBP) has more than 300 variations. These sequence differences can be classified into three distinct groups of antigenic variants that do not induce cross-protective immunity. Our goal was to generate a single antigen that would induce immunity against all known sequence variants of N. meningitidis. To achieve this, we rationally designed, expressed, and purified 54 different mutants of fHBP and tested them in mice for the induction of protective immunity. We identified and determined the crystal structure of a lead chimeric antigen that was able to induce high levels of cross-protective antibodies in mice against all variant strains tested. The new fHBP antigen had a conserved backbone that carried an engineered surface containing specificities for all three variant groups. We demonstrate that the structure-based design of multiple immunodominant antigenic surfaces on a single protein scaffold is possible and represents an effective way to create broadly protective vaccines.

  3. Heat stability of protective antigen of Leptospira interrogans serovar lai.

    PubMed Central

    Masuzawa, T; Nakamura, R; Shimizu, T; Yanagihara, Y

    1990-01-01

    Protective antigen (PAg; glycolipid antigen; molecular size, 23 to 30 kilodaltons), the serogroup-specific antigen partially purified from leptospiral cells, is one of the most important protective antigens. The heat stability of PAg was compared with that of whole-cell (WC) antigen by using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, protective activity, opsonin-inducing activity, agglutinating antibody-inducing activity, and an inhibition test in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A band of 23 to 30 kilodaltons of PAg, which was seen in untreated PAg and WC, shifted to a position with a molecular size of ca. 20 kilodaltons after heat treatment of PAg at 80 degrees C for 30 min and WC at 100 degrees C for 30 min. In the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition test with monoclonal antibody LW2 and a sonicated antigen of WC, the inhibition rate of PAg and WC to sonicated WC was reduced by heat treatment at 80 degrees C for 30 min and at 100 degrees C for 30 min, respectively. Agglutinating antibody-inducing activities and opsonin-inducing activities of PAg and WC in mice were reduced by heat treatment under the same conditions; these activities were assayed by a microscopic agglutination test and by chemical luminescence response in serum from immunized mice, respectively. Protective activity of heated PAg and heated WC in cyclophosphamide-pretreated mice agreed with the results of immunogenicity in mice. These results indicate that the Leptospira PAg is one of the important protective antigens and is altered by heat treatment at 80 degrees C. Furthermore, the immunogenicity and antigenicity of the PAg present in WC are more stable than that of the extracted PAg, and the coexistence of other cellular components with PAg might protect and stabilize PAg from the heat treatment. Images PMID:2332463

  4. Leishmania pifanoi amastigote antigens protect mice against cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Soong, L; Duboise, S M; Kima, P; McMahon-Pratt, D

    1995-09-01

    In the search for a leishmaniasis vaccine, extensive studies have been carried out with promastigote (insect stage) molecules. Information in this regard on amastigote (mammalian host stage) molecules is limited. To investigate host immune responses to Leishmania amastigote antigens, we purified three stage-specific antigens (A2, P4, and P8) from in vitro-cultivated amastigotes of Leishmania pifanoi by using immunoaffinity chromatography. We found that with Corynebacterium parvum as an adjuvant, three intraperitoneal injections of 5 micrograms of P4 or P8 antigen provided partial to complete protection of BALB/c mice challenged with 10(5) to 10(7) L. pifanoi promastigotes. These immunized mice developed significantly smaller or no lesions and exhibited a 39- to 1.6 x 10(5)-fold reduction of lesion parasite burden after 15 to 20 weeks of infection. In addition, P8 immunization resulted in complete protection against L. amazonensis infection of CBA/J mice and partial protection of BALB/c mice, suggesting that this antigen provided cross-species protection of mice with different H-2 haplotypes. At different stages during infection, vaccinated mice exhibited profound proliferative responses to parasite antigens and increased levels of gamma interferon production, suggesting that a Th1 cell-mediated immune response is associated with the resistance in these mice. Taken together, the data in this report indicate the vaccine potential of amastigote-derived antigens.

  5. Leishmania pifanoi amastigote antigens protect mice against cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Soong, L; Duboise, S M; Kima, P; McMahon-Pratt, D

    1995-09-01

    In the search for a leishmaniasis vaccine, extensive studies have been carried out with promastigote (insect stage) molecules. Information in this regard on amastigote (mammalian host stage) molecules is limited. To investigate host immune responses to Leishmania amastigote antigens, we purified three stage-specific antigens (A2, P4, and P8) from in vitro-cultivated amastigotes of Leishmania pifanoi by using immunoaffinity chromatography. We found that with Corynebacterium parvum as an adjuvant, three intraperitoneal injections of 5 micrograms of P4 or P8 antigen provided partial to complete protection of BALB/c mice challenged with 10(5) to 10(7) L. pifanoi promastigotes. These immunized mice developed significantly smaller or no lesions and exhibited a 39- to 1.6 x 10(5)-fold reduction of lesion parasite burden after 15 to 20 weeks of infection. In addition, P8 immunization resulted in complete protection against L. amazonensis infection of CBA/J mice and partial protection of BALB/c mice, suggesting that this antigen provided cross-species protection of mice with different H-2 haplotypes. At different stages during infection, vaccinated mice exhibited profound proliferative responses to parasite antigens and increased levels of gamma interferon production, suggesting that a Th1 cell-mediated immune response is associated with the resistance in these mice. Taken together, the data in this report indicate the vaccine potential of amastigote-derived antigens. PMID:7642292

  6. Partial purification of protective antigens from Nippostrongylus brasiliensis in mice.

    PubMed

    Rhalem, A; Bourdieu, C; Luffau, G; Pery, P

    1988-01-01

    The purification of antigens from Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, through their ability to provoke cellular proliferation of immune cells and through their recognition by antibodies, led to an antigenic preparation which was extracted from adult worms and which contained only two proteins (MW 14 and 43 Kd). Mice which were vaccinated by the oral route after the entrapment of these two proteins in liposomes were strongly protected.

  7. Cysticercosis: identification and cloning of protective recombinant antigens.

    PubMed

    Manoutcharian, K; Rosas, G; Hernandez, M; Fragoso, G; Aluja, A; Villalobos, N; Rodarte, L F; Sciutto, E

    1996-04-01

    We describe the cloning and the evaluation of the protective capacity of 5 recombinant antigens expressed during the cysticercus stage of both Taenia crassiceps and Taenia solium. A cDNA library was constructed in bacteriophage lambda ZAP using mRNA isolated from larvae of T. crassiceps of the ORF strain. The recombinant phage library was screened with polyclonal antibodies against 56- and 74-kDa protective antigen fractions. This screening identified 13 recombinant clones, 5 of which were also strongly recognized by pooled sera from pigs experimentally infected with T. solium. The native antigens are proteins of 56 (clones KETcl, 4, 7) and 74 and 78 kDa (clones KETc11, 12) of T. crassiceps cysticerci. Vaccination experiments using these 5 recombinant clones against murine cysticercosis point to the relevance of KETcl, 4, 7, and 12 in host protection, whereas immunization with the clone KETc11 does not modify the parasite load in females and facilitates the parasitosis in males. We report here the DNA and the deduced amino acid sequence (100 amino acids) of the first protective antigen (KETc7) of potential interest for T. solium pig cysticercosis prevention.

  8. Antigens of Bordetella pertussis V. Separation of Agglutinogen 1 and Mouse-Protective Antigen.

    PubMed

    Ross, R F; Munoz, J

    1971-02-01

    Agglutinogen 1 of Bordetella pertussis strain 353/Z (serotype 1) was separated from protective antigen and histamine-sensitizing factor by starch-block electrophoresis. Most of the agglutinogen 1 migrated towards the cathode in starch-block electrophoresis, although some remained near the origin. Fractions containing most of the agglutinogen 1 were free of detectable mouse-protecting or histamine-sensitizing activities. Agglutinogen 1 from a serotype 1, 3 B. pertussis strain (J20) migrated similarly to the agglutinogen 1 from strain 353/Z. All agglutinogen 3 activity was found at the point of application in the starch block. No clear relationship was found between agglutinogen 1 and mouse-protecting antigen or histamine-sensitizing factor. PMID:16557960

  9. Rabies virus glycoprotein as a carrier for anthrax protective antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Mary Ellen; Koser, Martin; Xiao Sa; Siler, Catherine; McGettigan, James P.; Calkins, Catherine; Pomerantz, Roger J.; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Schnell, Matthias J. . E-mail: matthias.schnell@jefferson.edu

    2006-09-30

    Live viral vectors expressing foreign antigens have shown great promise as vaccines against viral diseases. However, safety concerns remain a major problem regarding the use of even highly attenuated viral vectors. Using the rabies virus (RV) envelope protein as a carrier molecule, we show here that inactivated RV particles can be utilized to present Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) domain-4 in the viral membrane. In addition to the RV glycoprotein (G) transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, a portion of the RV G ectodomain was required to express the chimeric RV G anthrax PA on the cell surface. The novel antigen was also efficiently incorporated into RV virions. Mice immunized with the inactivated recombinant RV virions exhibited seroconversion against both RV G and anthrax PA, and a second inoculation greatly increased these responses. These data demonstrate that a viral envelope protein can carry a bacterial protein and that a viral carrier can display whole polypeptides compared to the limited epitope presentation of previous viral systems.

  10. Antigenic analysis of divergent genotypes human Enterovirus 71 viruses by a panel of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies: current genotyping of EV71 does not reflect their antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yixin; Li, Chuan; He, Delei; Cheng, Tong; Ge, Shengxiang; Shih, James Wai-Kuo; Zhao, Qinjian; Chen, Pei-Jer; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ningshao

    2013-01-01

    In recent year, Enterovirus 71 (EV71)-associated hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) has become an important public health issue in China. EV71 has been classified into genotypes A, B1-B5 and C1-C5. With such genetic diversity, whether the convalescent or recovery antibody responses can cross-protect infections from other genotypes remains a question. Understanding of the antigenicity of such diverse genetic EV71 isolates is crucial for the EV71 vaccine development. Here, a total of 186 clones anti-EV71 MAbs was generated and characterized with Western blot and cell-based neutralization assay. Forty neutralizing anti-EV71 MAbs were further used to analyze the antigenic properties of 18 recent EV71 isolates representing seven genotypes in neutralization assay. We found that most neutralizing anti-EV71 MAbs are specific to conformational epitopes. We also classified the 40 neutralizing anti-EV71 MAbs into two classes according to their reactivity patterns with 18 EV71 isolates. Class I MAb can neutralize all isolates, suggesting conserved epitopes are present among EV71. Class II MAb includes four subclasses (IIa-IId) and neutralizes only subgroups of EV71 strains. Conversely, 18 EV71 strains were grouped into antigenic types 1 and four antigenic subtypes (2.1-2.4). These results suggest that the current genotyping of EV71 does not reflect their antigenicity which may be important in the selection of EV71 vaccine strains. This panel of neutralizing anti-EV71 MAbs may be useful for the recognition of emerging antigenic variants of EV71 and vaccine development.

  11. Subdominant Outer Membrane Antigens in Anaplasma marginale: Conservation, Antigenicity, and Protective Capacity Using Recombinant Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ducken, Deirdre R.; Brown, Wendy C.; Alperin, Debra C.; Brayton, Kelly A.; Reif, Kathryn E.; Turse, Joshua E.; Palmer, Guy H.; Noh, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Anaplasma marginale is a tick-borne rickettsial pathogen of cattle with a worldwide distribution. Currently a safe and efficacious vaccine is unavailable. Outer membrane protein (OMP) extracts or a defined surface protein complex reproducibly induce protective immunity. However, there are several knowledge gaps limiting progress in vaccine development. First, are these OMPs conserved among the diversity of A. marginale strains circulating in endemic regions? Second, are the most highly conserved outer membrane proteins in the immunogens recognized by immunized and protected animals? Lastly, can this subset of OMPs recognized by antibody from protected vaccinates and conserved among strains recapitulate the protection of outer membrane vaccines? To address the first goal, genes encoding OMPs AM202, AM368, AM854, AM936, AM1041, and AM1096, major subdominant components of the outer membrane, were cloned and sequenced from geographically diverse strains and isolates. AM202, AM936, AM854, and AM1096 share 99.9 to 100% amino acid identity. AM1041 has 97.1 to 100% and AM368 has 98.3 to 99.9% amino acid identity. While all four of the most highly conserved OMPs were recognized by IgG from animals immunized with outer membranes, linked surface protein complexes, or unlinked surface protein complexes and shown to be protected from challenge, the highest titers and consistent recognition among vaccinates were to AM854 and AM936. Consequently, animals were immunized with recombinant AM854 and AM936 and challenged. Recombinant vaccinates and purified outer membrane vaccinates had similar IgG and IgG2 responses to both proteins. However, the recombinant vaccinates developed higher bacteremia after challenge as compared to adjuvant-only controls and outer membrane vaccinates. These results provide the first evidence that vaccination with specific antigens may exacerbate disease. Progressing from the protective capacity of outer membrane formulations to recombinant vaccines

  12. Advax-adjuvanted recombinant protective antigen provides protection against inhalational anthrax that is further enhanced by addition of murabutide adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Feinen, Brandon; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Verma, Anita; Merkel, Tod J

    2014-04-01

    Subunit vaccines against anthrax based on recombinant protective antigen (PA) potentially offer more consistent and less reactogenic anthrax vaccines but require adjuvants to achieve optimal immunogenicity. This study sought to determine in a murine model of pulmonary anthrax infection whether the polysaccharide adjuvant Advax or the innate immune adjuvant murabutide alone or together could enhance PA immunogenicity by comparison to an alum adjuvant. A single immunization with PA plus Advax adjuvant afforded significantly greater protection against aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne strain 7702 than three immunizations with PA alone. Murabutide had a weaker adjuvant effect than Advax when used alone, but when murabutide was formulated together with Advax, an additive effect on immunogenicity and protection was observed, with complete protection after just two doses. The combined adjuvant formulation stimulated a robust, long-lasting B-cell memory response that protected mice against an aerosol challenge 18 months postimmunization with acceleration of the kinetics of the anamnestic IgG response to B. anthracis as reflected by ∼4-fold-higher anti-PA IgG titers by day 2 postchallenge versus mice that received PA with Alhydrogel. In addition, the combination of Advax plus murabutide induced approximately 3-fold-less inflammation than Alhydrogel as measured by in vivo imaging of cathepsin cleavage resulting from injection of ProSense 750. Thus, the combination of Advax and murabutide provided enhanced protection against inhalational anthrax with reduced localized inflammation, making this a promising next-generation anthrax vaccine adjuvanting strategy.

  13. Protective antigens against glanders identified by expression library immunization.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, Gregory C; Robida, Mark D; Judy, Barbara M; Qazi, Omar; Brown, Katherine A; Deeraksa, Arpaporn; Taylor, Katherine; Massey, Shane; Loskutov, Andrey; Borovkov, Alex Y; Brown, Kevin; Cano, Jose A; Torres, Alfredo G; Estes, D Mark; Sykes, Kathryn F

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia are highly evolved Gram-negative bacteria that primarily infect solipeds but are transmitted to humans by ingestion and cutaneous or aerosol exposures. Heightened concern over human infections of Burkholderia mallei and the very closely related species B. pseudomallei is due to the pathogens' proven effectiveness as bioweapons, and to the increased potential for natural opportunistic infections in the growing diabetic and immuno-compromised populations. These Burkholderia species are nearly impervious to antibiotic treatments and no vaccine exists. In this study, the genome of the highly virulent B. mallei ATCC23344 strain was examined by expression library immunization for gene-encoded protective antigens. This protocol for genomic-scale functional screening was customized to accommodate the unusually large complexity of Burkholderia, and yielded 12 new putative vaccine candidates. Five of the candidates were individually tested as protein immunogens and three were found to confer significant partial protection against a lethal pulmonary infection in a murine model of disease. Determinations of peripheral blood cytokine and chemokine profiles following individual protein immunizations show that interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-4 are elicited by the three confirmed candidates, but unexpectedly interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α are not. We suggest that these pathogen components, discovered using genetic immunization and confirmed in a conventional protein format, will be useful toward the development of a safe and effective glanders vaccine.

  14. Protective Antigens Against Glanders Identified by Expression Library Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Gregory C.; Robida, Mark D.; Judy, Barbara M.; Qazi, Omar; Brown, Katherine A.; Deeraksa, Arpaporn; Taylor, Katherine; Massey, Shane; Loskutov, Andrey; Borovkov, Alex Y.; Brown, Kevin; Cano, Jose A.; Magee, D. Mitchell; Torres, Alfredo G.; Estes, D. Mark; Sykes, Kathryn F.

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia are highly evolved Gram-negative bacteria that primarily infect solipeds but are transmitted to humans by ingestion and cutaneous or aerosol exposures. Heightened concern over human infections of Burkholderia mallei and the very closely related species B. pseudomallei is due to the pathogens’ proven effectiveness as bioweapons, and to the increased potential for natural opportunistic infections in the growing diabetic and immuno-compromised populations. These Burkholderia species are nearly impervious to antibiotic treatments and no vaccine exists. In this study, the genome of the highly virulent B. mallei ATCC23344 strain was examined by expression library immunization for gene-encoded protective antigens. This protocol for genomic-scale functional screening was customized to accommodate the unusually large complexity of Burkholderia, and yielded 12 new putative vaccine candidates. Five of the candidates were individually tested as protein immunogens and three were found to confer significant partial protection against a lethal pulmonary infection in a murine model of disease. Determinations of peripheral blood cytokine and chemokine profiles following individual protein immunizations show that interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-4 are elicited by the three confirmed candidates, but unexpectedly interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α are not. We suggest that these pathogen components, discovered using genetic immunization and confirmed in a conventional protein format, will be useful toward the development of a safe and effective glanders vaccine. PMID:22125550

  15. Active immunization with recombinant V antigen from Yersinia pestis protects mice against plague.

    PubMed Central

    Leary, S E; Williamson, E D; Griffin, K F; Russell, P; Eley, S M; Titball, R W

    1995-01-01

    The gene encoding V antigen from Yersinia pestis was cloned into the plasmid expression vector pGEX-5X-2. When electroporated into Escherichia coli JM109, the recombinant expressed V antigen as a stable fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase. The glutathione S-transferase-V fusion protein was isolated from recombinant E. coli and cleaved with factor Xa to yield purified V antigen as a stable product. Recombinant V antigen was inoculated intraperitoneally into mice and shown to induce a protective immune response against a subcutaneous challenge with 3.74 x 10(6) CFU of virulent Y. pestis. Protection correlated with the induction of a high titer of serum antibodies and a T-cell response specific for recombinant V antigen. These results indicate that V antigen should be a major component of an improved vaccine for plague. PMID:7622205

  16. Reflective Coatings Protect People and Animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Led by Marshall Space Flight Center, NASA engineers called upon National Metalizing of Cranbury, New Jersey, to help create a reflective sunshield to deploy on Skylab in place of a shield that was lost during launch in 1973. Years later, a former employee for National Metalizing founded Advanced Flexible Materials (AFM) Inc., of Petaluma, California, and utilized the radiant barrier technology in the public domain to produce a variety of products such as wraps to keep marathon finishers safe from hypothermia as well as a lining for mittens and vests. Recently, the material helped to keep manatees warm as they were lifted from the water as part of a tag-and-release program.

  17. Sterile Protective Immunity to Malaria is Associated with a Panel of Novel P. falciparum Antigens*

    PubMed Central

    Trieu, Angela; Kayala, Matthew A.; Burk, Chad; Molina, Douglas M.; Freilich, Daniel A.; Richie, Thomas L.; Baldi, Pierre; Felgner, Philip L.; Doolan, Denise L.

    2011-01-01

    The development of an effective malaria vaccine remains a global public health priority. Less than 0.5% of the Plasmodium falciparum genome has been assessed as potential vaccine targets and candidate vaccines have been based almost exclusively on single antigens. It is possible that the failure to develop a malaria vaccine despite decades of effort might be attributed to this historic focus. To advance malaria vaccine development, we have fabricated protein microarrays representing 23% of the entire P. falciparum proteome and have probed these arrays with plasma from subjects with sterile protection or no protection after experimental immunization with radiation attenuated P. falciparum sporozoites. A panel of 19 pre-erythrocytic stage antigens was identified as strongly associated with sporozoite-induced protective immunity; 16 of these antigens were novel and 85% have been independently identified in sporozoite and/or liver stage proteomic or transcriptomic data sets. Reactivity to any individual antigen did not correlate with protection but there was a highly significant difference in the cumulative signal intensity between protected and not protected individuals. Functional annotation indicates that most of these signature proteins are involved in cell cycle/DNA processing and protein synthesis. In addition, 21 novel blood-stage specific antigens were identified. Our data provide the first evidence that sterile protective immunity against malaria is directed against a panel of novel P. falciparum antigens rather than one antigen in isolation. These results have important implications for vaccine development, suggesting that an efficacious malaria vaccine should be multivalent and targeted at a select panel of key antigens, many of which have not been previously characterized. PMID:21628511

  18. Large-Scale Production of Protective Antigen of Bacillus anthracis in Anaerobic Cultures1

    PubMed Central

    Puziss, Milton; Manning, Lee C.; Lynch, Joe W.; Barclay, Eugene; Abelow, Ira; Wright, George G.

    1963-01-01

    A production-proving test was described for the preparation, by the anaerobic culture method, of large volumes of culture filtrate containing immunologically potent protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis. The process consisted of the anaerobic culture of a selected production strain in a chemically defined medium. The culture was then clarified and sterilized by filtration through sintered-glass filters. The sterile culture filtrate was adsorbed onto a preformed aluminum hydroxide gel, and the stabilized gel-antigen complex was concentrated. The final product had high immunizing potency, as shown by both in vivo and in vitro assays, and was well tolerated in man. Stability of the product to accelerated aging was good, and storage at 4 C for 1 year caused only a minor loss in protective activity. Large volumes of the highly antigenic gel-adsorbed protective antigen were readily produced by the method described. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:13972634

  19. Total Synthesis of the Complete Protective Antigen of Vibrio cholerae O139.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Sameh E; Kováč, Pavol

    2016-10-01

    The first chemical synthesis of the complete protective O-antigen of a human-disease-causing pathogenic bacterium is described. The synthesis involved a protecting-group strategy that facilitated the regioselectivity of the key transformations, stereoselective glycosylation reactions, and enabled the one-step global deprotection of the completely assembled, fully protected, phosphorylated hexasaccharide by hydrogenation/hydrogenolysis. The final amino-group-functionalized, linker-equipped antigen was obtained in a form ready for conjugation to suitable carriers, for example, proteins, to yield immunogens. PMID:27623688

  20. Does Antigen Masking by Ubiquitin Chains Protect from the Development of Autoimmune Diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by the production of antibodies against self-antigens and generally arise from a failure of central or peripheral tolerance. However, these diseases may develop when newly appearing antigens are not recognized as self by the immune system. The mechanism by which some antigens are “invisible” to the immune system is not completely understood. Apoptotic and complement system defects or autophagy imbalance can generate this antigenic autoreactivity. Under particular circumstances, cellular debris containing autoreactive antigens can be recognized by innate immune receptors or other sensors and can eventually lead to autoimmunity. Ubiquitination may be one of the mechanisms protecting autoreactive antigens from the immune system that, if disrupted, can lead to autoimmunity. Ubiquitination is an essential post-translational modification used by cells to target proteins for degradation or to regulate other intracellular processes. The level of ubiquitination is regulated during T cell tolerance and apoptosis and E3 ligases have emerged as a crucial signaling pathway for the regulation of T cell tolerance toward self-antigens. I propose here that an unrecognized role of ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins could be to render intracellular or foreign antigens (present in cellular debris resulting from apoptosis, complement system, or autophagy defects) invisible to the immune system in order to prevent the development of autoimmunity. PMID:24917867

  1. [Major host-protective antigens of Taeniidae cestode and their molecular biological characteristics].

    PubMed

    Yue, Long; Fu, Bao-quan

    2014-12-01

    Taeniidae cestodes are the pathogens of cysticercosis and hydatid disease, these diseases lead to substantial economic losses in animal husbandry and cause morbidity and mortality in human population. In recent years, many host-protective antigens of Taeniidae cestodes has been found, and their recombinant protein vaccines have been developed against several species, such as Taenia ovis, T. saginata, T. solium, Echinococcus granulosus, and E. multilocularis. This paper focuses on the major host-protective antigens of Taeniidae cestodes and their molecular biological characteristics. PMID:25902683

  2. Biomimetic Antigenic Nanoparticles Elicit Controlled Protective Immune Response to Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Dustin P.; Rynda-Apple, Agnieszka; Harmsen, Ann L.; Harmsen, Allen G.; Douglas, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Here we present a biomimetic strategy towards nanoparticle design for controlled immune response through encapsulation of conserved internal influenza proteins on the interior of virus like particles (VLPs) to direct CD8+ cytotoxic T cell protection. Programmed encapsulation and sequestration of the conserved nucleoprotein (NP) from influenza on the interior of a VLP, derived from the bacteriophage P22, results in a vaccine that provides multi-strain protection against 100 times lethal doses of influenza in an NP specific CD8+ T cell-dependent manner. VLP assembly and encapsulation of the immunogenic NP cargo protein is the result of a genetically programmed self-assembly making this strategy amendable to the quick production of vaccines to rapidly emerging pathogens. Addition of adjuvants or targeting molecules were not required for eliciting the protective response. PMID:23540530

  3. Protective-antigen (PA) based anthrax vaccines confer protection against inhalation anthrax by precluding the establishment of a systemic infection.

    PubMed

    Merkel, Tod J; Perera, Pin-Yu; Lee, Gloria M; Verma, Anita; Hiroi, Toyoko; Yokote, Hiroyuki; Waldmann, Thomas A; Perera, Liyanage P

    2013-09-01

    An intense effort has been launched to develop improved anthrax vaccines that confer rapid, long lasting protection preferably with an extended stability profile amenable for stockpiling. Protective antigen (PA)-based vaccines are most favored as immune responses directed against PA are singularly protective, although the actual protective mechanism remains to be unraveled. Herein we show that contrary to the prevailing view, an efficacious PA-based vaccine confers protection against inhalation anthrax by preventing the establishment of a toxin-releasing systemic infection. Equally importantly, antibodies measured by the in vitro lethal toxin neutralization activity assay (TNA) that is considered as a reliable correlate of protection, especially for PA protein-based vaccines adjuvanted with aluminum salts appear to be not absolutely essential for this protective immune response.

  4. Subdominant outer membrane antigens in anaplasma marginale: conservation, antigenicity, and protective capacity using recombinant protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaplasma marginale is a tick-borne rickettsial pathogen of cattle with a worldwide distribution. Currently a safe and efficacious vaccine is unavailable. Outer membrane protein (OMP) extracts or a well- defined surface protein complex reproducibly induce protective immunity. However, there are seve...

  5. Adjuvanticity and protective immunity elicited by Leishmania donovani antigens encapsulated in positively charged liposomes.

    PubMed Central

    Afrin, F; Ali, N

    1997-01-01

    In the search for a leishmaniasis vaccine, extensive studies of cutaneous leishmaniasis have been carried out. Investigations in this regard with the visceral form are limited. As an initial step in the identification of the protective molecules, leishmanial antigens extracted from the membranes of Leishmania donovani promastigotes, alone or in association with liposomes, were evaluated for their immunogenicity and ability to elicit a protective immune response against challenge infection. Intraperitoneal immunization of hamsters and BALB/c mice with the leishmanial antigens conferred protection against infection with the virulent promastigotes. Encapsulation in positively charged liposomes significantly enhanced the protective efficacy of these antigens. The splenic parasite burden of hamsters was reduced by 97% after 6 months of infection. BALB/c mice exhibited 87 and 81.3% protection in the liver and spleen, respectively, after 4 months of infection. These protected animals elicited profound delayed-type hypersensitivity and increased levels of Leishmania-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies. Protection in mice also coincided with elevated levels of IgM and IgA antibodies, which decreased with disease progression in the control-infected animals. Although both IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies were present in the sera of infected mice, IgG1 appeared to be the predominant isotype, suggesting a preferential induction of the Th2 type of immune response over that of Th1. Effective stimulation of all the IgG isotypes, particularly IgG2a, after immunization with liposome encapsulated antigens seems to be responsible for the significant levels of resistance against the disease. Taken together, these data indicate a potential for the liposomal antigens as a vaccine which could trigger both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. PMID:9169776

  6. Closeup view of the reflective insulation protecting the Crew Compartment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the reflective insulation protecting the Crew Compartment bulkhead, orbiter structure and landing gear housing in the void created by the removal of the Forward Reaction Control System Module from the forward section of the Orbiter Discovery. This image was taken from the service platform in the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  7. Induction of protection against porcine cysticercosis by vaccination with recombinant oncosphere antigens.

    PubMed

    Flisser, Ana; Gauci, Charles G; Zoli, André; Martinez-Ocaña, Joel; Garza-Rodriguez, Adriana; Dominguez-Alpizar, Jose Luis; Maravilla, Pablo; Rodriguez-Canul, Rossana; Avila, Guillermina; Aguilar-Vega, Laura; Kyngdon, Craig; Geerts, Stanny; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2004-09-01

    Two recombinant Taenia solium oncosphere antigens, designated TSOL18 and TSOL45-1A, were investigated as vaccines to prevent transmission of the zoonotic disease cysticercosis through pigs. Both antigens were effective in inducing very high levels of protection (up to 100%) in three independent vaccine trials in pigs against experimental challenge infection with T. solium eggs, which were undertaken in Mexico and Cameroon. This is the highest level of protection that has been achieved against T. solium infection in pigs by vaccination with a defined antigen. TSOL18 and TSOL45-1A provide the basis for development of a highly effective practical vaccine that could assist in the control and, potentially, the eradication of human neurocysticercosis.

  8. Cysticercosis vaccine: cross protecting immunity with T. solium antigens against experimental murine T. crassiceps cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Sciutto, E; Fragoso, G; Trueba, L; Lemus, D; Montoya, R M; Diaz, M L; Govezensky, T; Lomeli, C; Tapia, G; Larralde, C

    1990-11-01

    Vaccination of mice with an antigen extract from Taenia solium cysticerci induced protection against challenge with T. crassiceps cysticerci as successfully as did antigen extracts from T. crassiceps. Vaccination was more effective in male than in female mice and in the resistant strain (BALB/B) more so than in the susceptible strain (BALB/c). While only the resistant strain was completely protected by vaccination, the parasite load of the susceptible strain was significantly reduced by vaccination. Cross immunity between the human and murine parasites establishes murine T. crassiceps cysticercosis as a convenient laboratory model in which to test promising T. solium antigens aimed at vaccine development against T. solium cysticercosis. Further, results point to strong interactions of the immune system with sexual and histocompatibility factors in the host's dealing with cysticercosis.

  9. Designed Azolopyridinium Salts Block Protective Antigen Pores In Vitro and Protect Cells from Anthrax Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Duscha, Kerstin; Riedl, Zsuzsanna; Huber-Lang, Markus; Benz, Roland; Hajós, György; Barth, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Background Several intracellular acting bacterial protein toxins of the AB-type, which are known to enter cells by endocytosis, are shown to produce channels. This holds true for protective antigen (PA), the binding component of the tripartite anthrax-toxin of Bacillus anthracis. Evidence has been presented that translocation of the enzymatic components of anthrax-toxin across the endosomal membrane of target cells and channel formation by the heptameric/octameric PA63 binding/translocation component are related phenomena. Chloroquine and some 4-aminoquinolones, known as potent drugs against Plasmodium falciparium infection of humans, block efficiently the PA63-channel in a dose dependent way. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we demonstrate that related positively charged heterocyclic azolopyridinium salts block the PA63-channel in the µM range, when both, inhibitor and PA63 are added to the same side of the membrane, the cis-side, which corresponds to the lumen of acidified endosomal vesicles of target cells. Noise-analysis allowed the study of the kinetics of the plug formation by the heterocycles. In vivo experiments using J774A.1 macrophages demonstrated that the inhibitors of PA63-channel function also efficiently block intoxication of the cells by the combination lethal factor and PA63 in the same concentration range as they block the channels in vitro. Conclusions/Significance These results strongly argue in favor of a transport of lethal factor through the PA63-channel and suggest that the heterocycles used in this study could represent attractive candidates for development of novel therapeutic strategies against anthrax. PMID:23840407

  10. [Comparative study of the antigens of Streptococcus group A. Rport I. Comparative characteristics of the immunologic activity of partially purified M-protien and the cytoplasmic protective antigen].

    PubMed

    Evseev, V A; Avdeeva, Zh I; Kondrashov, G I

    1975-12-01

    Experiments were conducted on mice. A study was made of the protective properties of the cytoplasmic fraction of streptococcus, group A, Type 1 and of an antigen isolated from it by sedimentation with ammonium sulfate, in comparison with M-protein partially purified by the method of Lancefield and Perlman. Cytoplasmic antigen was not inferior by immunogenicity in comparison with M-protein. In difference from the latter, it was thermolabile and sensitive to the action of hydrochloric acid. The protective antigen was revealed in the cytoplasm not only of the virulent, but also of avirulent strains of streptococcus devoid of M-protein.

  11. African swine fever virus serotype-specific proteins are significant protective antigens for African swine fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    African swine fever (ASF) is an emerging disease threat for the swine industry worldwide. No ASF vaccine is available and progress is hindered by lack of knowledge concerning the extent of African swine fever virus (ASFV) strain diversity and the viral antigens conferring type specific protective im...

  12. Antigen export during liver infection of the malaria parasite augments protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Montagna, Georgina N; Beigier-Bompadre, Macarena; Becker, Martina; Kroczek, Richard A; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Matuschewski, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Protective immunity against preerythrocytic malaria parasite infection is difficult to achieve. Intracellular Plasmodium parasites likely minimize antigen presentation by surface-expressed major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules on infected cells, yet they actively remodel their host cells by export of parasite factors. Whether exported liver-stage proteins constitute better candidates for MHC-I antigen presentation to CD8(+) T lymphocytes remains unknown. Here, we systematically characterized the contribution of protein export to the magnitude of antigen-specific T-cell responses against Plasmodium berghei liver-stage parasites in C57BL/6 mice. We generated transgenic sporozoites that secrete a truncated ovalbumin (OVA) surrogate antigen only in the presence of an amino-terminal protein export element. Immunization with live attenuated transgenic sporozoites revealed that antigen export was not critical for CD8(+) T-cell priming but enhanced CD8(+) T-cell proliferation in the liver. Upon transfer of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells, liver-stage parasites secreting the target protein were eliminated more efficiently. We conclude that Plasmodium parasites strictly control protein export during liver infection to minimize immune recognition. Strategies that enhance the discharge of parasite proteins into infected hepatocytes could improve the efficacy of candidate preerythrocytic malaria vaccines. Importance: Vaccine development against Plasmodium parasites remains a priority in malaria research. The most advanced malaria subunit vaccine candidates contain Plasmodium surface proteins with important roles for parasite vital functions. A fundamental question is whether recognition by effector CD8(+) T cells is restricted to sporozoite surface antigens or extends to parasite proteins that are synthesized during the extensive parasite expansion phase in the liver. Using a surrogate model antigen, we found that a cytoplasmic antigen is able to induce

  13. Combination of Two Candidate Subunit Vaccine Antigens Elicits Protective Immunity to Ricin and Anthrax Toxin in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vance, David J.; Rong, Yinghui; Brey, Robert N.; Mantis, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to develop combination vaccines for biodefense, we evaluated a ricin subunit antigen, RiVax, given in conjunction with an anthrax protective antigen, DNI. The combination led to high endpoint titer antibody response, neutralizing antibodies, and protective immunity against ricin and anthrax lethal toxin. This is a natural combination vaccine, since both antigens are recombinant subunit proteins that would be given to the same target population. PMID:25475957

  14. Combination of two candidate subunit vaccine antigens elicits protective immunity to ricin and anthrax toxin in mice.

    PubMed

    Vance, David J; Rong, Yinghui; Brey, Robert N; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to develop combination vaccines for biodefense, we evaluated a ricin subunit antigen, RiVax, given in conjunction with an anthrax protective antigen, DNI. The combination led to high endpoint titer antibody response, neutralizing antibodies, and protective immunity against ricin and anthrax lethal toxin. This is a natural combination vaccine, since both antigens are recombinant subunit proteins that would be given to the same target population.

  15. Comprehensive Antigen Screening Identifies Moraxella catarrhalis Proteins That Induce Protection in a Mouse Pulmonary Clearance Model

    PubMed Central

    Verhaegh, Suzanne J. C.; Niebisch, Axel; Hanner, Markus; Selak, Sanja; Schüler, Wolfgang; Morfeldt, Eva; Hellberg, Christel; Nagy, Eszter; Lundberg, Urban; Hays, John P.; Meinke, Andreas; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is one of the three most common causative bacterial pathogens of otitis media, however no effective vaccine against M. catarrhalis has been developed so far. To identify M. catarrhalis vaccine candidate antigens, we used carefully selected sera from children with otitis media and healthy individuals to screen small-fragment genomic libraries that are expressed to display frame-selected peptides on a bacterial cell surface. This ANTIGENome technology led to the identification of 214 antigens, 23 of which were selected by in vitro or in vivo studies for additional characterization. Eight of the 23 candidates were tested in a Moraxella mouse pulmonary clearance model, and 3 of these antigens induced significantly faster bacterial clearance compared to adjuvant or to the previously characterized antigen OmpCD. The most significant protection data were obtained with the antigen MCR_1416 (Msp22), which was further investigated for its biological function by in vitro studies suggesting that Msp22 is a heme binding protein. This study comprises one of the most exhaustive studies to identify potential vaccine candidate antigens against the bacterial pathogen M. catarrhalis. PMID:23671716

  16. Targeting Antigens to Dec-205 on Dendritic Cells Induces Immune Protection in Experimental Colitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wadwa, Munisch; Klopfleisch, Robert; Buer, Jan; Westendorf, Astrid M.

    2016-01-01

    The endocytotic c-type lectin receptor DEC-205 is highly expressed on immature dendritic cells. In previous studies, it was shown that antigen-targeting to DEC-205 is a useful tool for the induction of antigen-specific Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and thereby can prevent inflammatory processes. However, whether this approach is sufficient to mediate tolerance in mucosal tissues like the gut is unknown. In this study, we established a new mouse model in which the adoptive transfer of naive hemagglutinin (HA)-specific CD4+Foxp3– T cells into VILLIN-HA transgenic mice leads to severe colitis. To analyze if antigen-targeting to DEC-205 could protect against inflammation of the gut, VILLIN-HA transgenic mice were injected with an antibody–antigen complex consisting of the immunogenic HA110–120 peptide coupled to an α-DEC-205 antibody (DEC-HA) before adoptive T cell transfer. DEC-HA-treated mice showed significantly less signs of intestinal inflammation as was demonstrated by reduced loss of body weight and histopathology in the gut. Strikingly, abrogated intestinal inflammation was mediated via the conversion of naive HA-specific CD4+Foxp3– T cells into HA-specific CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. In this study, we provide evidence that antigen-targeting to DEC-205 can be utilized for the induction of tolerance in mucosal organs that are confronted with large numbers of exogenous antigens. PMID:27141310

  17. Immunogenicity and protection efficacy of subunit-based smallpox vaccines using variola major antigens.

    PubMed

    Sakhatskyy, Pavlo; Wang, Shixia; Zhang, Chuanyou; Chou, Te-Hui; Kishko, Michael; Lu, Shan

    2008-02-01

    The viral strain responsible for smallpox infection is variola major (VARV). As a result of the successful eradication of smallpox with the vaccinia virus (VACV), the general population is no longer required to receive a smallpox vaccine, and will have no protection against smallpox. This lack of immunity is a concern due to the potential for use of smallpox as a biological weapon. Considerable progress has been made in the development of subunit-based smallpox vaccines resulting from the identification of VACV protective antigens. It also offers the possibility of using antigens from VARV to formulate the next generation subunit-based smallpox vaccines. Here, we show that codon-optimized DNA vaccines expressing three VARV antigens (A30, B7 and F8) and their recombinant protein counterparts elicited high-titer, cross-reactive, VACV neutralizing antibody responses in mice. Vaccinated mice were protected from intraperitoneal and intranasal challenges with VACV. These results suggest the feasibility of a subunit smallpox vaccine based on VARV antigen sequences to induce immunity against poxvirus infection.

  18. Superior efficacy of secreted over somatic antigen display in recombinant Salmonella vaccine induced protection against listeriosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hess, J; Gentschev, I; Miko, D; Welzel, M; Ladel, C; Goebel, W; Kaufmann, S H

    1996-01-01

    Vaccination provides the most potent measure against infectious disease, and recombinant (r) viable vaccines expressing defined pathogen-derived antigens represent powerful candidates for future vaccination strategies. In a new approach we constructed r-aroA- Salmonella typhimurium displaying p60 or listeriolysin (Hly) antigen of Listeria monocytogenes in secreted or somatic form in the host cell. Vaccination of mice with r-aroA- S. typhimurium induced protection against the intracellular pathogen L. monocytogenes only with secreted and not with somatic antigen. Secreted Hly was slightly more potent in inducing protective immunity than secreted p60. Both r-aroA- S. typhimurium secreting p60 in the endosome and r-aroA- S. typhimurium secreting Hly in the cytosol induced protective CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells suggesting CD8+ T-cell stimulation independent from intracellular residence of r-aroA- S. typhimurium carriers. Hence, not only the type of antigen but also its display by the r-carrier within the host cell critically influences vaccine efficacy. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8643654

  19. Regions of Yersinia pestis V antigen that contribute to protection against plague identified by passive and active immunization.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, J; Leary, S E; Griffin, K F; Williamson, E D; Titball, R W

    1997-01-01

    V antigen of Yersinia pestis is a multifunctional protein that has been implicated as a protective antigen, a virulence factor, and a regulatory protein. A series of V-antigen truncates expressed as glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins (GST-V truncates) have been cloned and purified to support immunogenicity and functionality studies of V antigen. Immunization studies with GST-V truncates have identified two regions of V antigen that confer protection against Y. pestis 9B (a fully virulent human pneumonic plague isolate) in a mouse model for plague. A minor protective region is located from amino acids 2 to 135 (region I), and a major protective region is found between amino acids 135 and 275 (region II). In addition, analysis of IgG titers following immunization suggested that the major antigenic region of V antigen is located between amino acids 135 and 245. A panel of monoclonal antibodies raised against recombinant V antigen was characterized by Western blotting against GST-V truncates, and epitopes of most of the monoclonal antibodies were mapped to region I or II. Monoclonal antibody 7.3, which recognizes an epitope in region II, passively protected mice against challenge with 12 median lethal doses of Y. pestis GB, indicating that region II encodes a protective epitope. This is the first report of a V-antigen-specific monoclonal antibody that will protect mice against a fully virulent strain of Y. pestis. The combined approach of passive and active immunization has therefore confirmed the importance of the central region of the protein for protection and also identified a previously unknown protective region at the N terminus of V antigen. PMID:9353022

  20. Potentiation of anthrax vaccines using protective antigen-expressing viral replicon vectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Chao; An, Huai-Jie; Yu, Yun-Zhou; Xu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    DNA vaccines require improvement for human use because they are generally weak stimulators of the immune system in humans. The efficacy of DNA vaccines can be improved using a viral replicon as vector to administer antigen of pathogen. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the conventional non-viral DNA, viral replicon DNA or viral replicon particles (VRP) vaccines encoding different forms of anthrax protective antigen (PA) for specific immunity and protective potency against anthrax. Our current results clearly suggested that these viral replicon DNA or VRP vaccines derived from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) induced stronger PA-specific immune responses than the conventional non-viral DNA vaccines when encoding the same antigen forms, which resulted in potent protection against challenge with the Bacillus anthracis strain A16R. Additionally, the naked PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines without the need for high doses or demanding particular delivery regimens elicited robust immune responses and afforded completely protective potencies, which indicated the potential of the SFV replicon as vector of anthrax vaccines for use in clinical application. Therefore, our results suggest that these PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines may be suitable as candidate vaccines against anthrax.

  1. An anthrax subunit vaccine candidate based on protective regions of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen and lethal factor.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Les W; Huwar, Theresa B; Moore, Stephen; Mellado-Sanchez, Gabriela; Rodriguez, Liliana; Neeson, Brendan N; Flick-Smith, Helen C; Jenner, Dominic C; Atkins, Helen S; Ingram, Rebecca J; Altmann, Danny M; Nataro, James P; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2010-09-24

    Studies have confirmed the key role of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) in the US and UK human anthrax vaccines. However, given the tripartite nature of the toxin, other components, including lethal factor (LF), are also likely to contribute to protection. We examined the antibody and T cell responses to PA and LF in human volunteers immunized with the UK anthrax vaccine (AVP). Individual LF domains were assessed for immunogenicity in mice when given alone or with PA. Based on the results obtained, a novel fusion protein comprising D1 of LF and the host cell-binding domain of PA (D4) was assessed for protective efficacy. Murine protection studies demonstrated that both full-length LF and D1 of LF conferred complete protection against a lethal intraperitoneal challenge with B. anthracis STI spores. Subsequent studies with the LFD1-PAD4 fusion protein showed a similar level of protection. LF is immunogenic in humans and is likely to contribute to the protection stimulated by AVP. A single vaccine comprising protective regions from LF and PA would simplify production and confer a broader spectrum of protection than that seen with PA alone. PMID:20691267

  2. An anthrax subunit vaccine candidate based on protective regions of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen and lethal factor.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Les W; Huwar, Theresa B; Moore, Stephen; Mellado-Sanchez, Gabriela; Rodriguez, Liliana; Neeson, Brendan N; Flick-Smith, Helen C; Jenner, Dominic C; Atkins, Helen S; Ingram, Rebecca J; Altmann, Danny M; Nataro, James P; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2010-09-24

    Studies have confirmed the key role of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) in the US and UK human anthrax vaccines. However, given the tripartite nature of the toxin, other components, including lethal factor (LF), are also likely to contribute to protection. We examined the antibody and T cell responses to PA and LF in human volunteers immunized with the UK anthrax vaccine (AVP). Individual LF domains were assessed for immunogenicity in mice when given alone or with PA. Based on the results obtained, a novel fusion protein comprising D1 of LF and the host cell-binding domain of PA (D4) was assessed for protective efficacy. Murine protection studies demonstrated that both full-length LF and D1 of LF conferred complete protection against a lethal intraperitoneal challenge with B. anthracis STI spores. Subsequent studies with the LFD1-PAD4 fusion protein showed a similar level of protection. LF is immunogenic in humans and is likely to contribute to the protection stimulated by AVP. A single vaccine comprising protective regions from LF and PA would simplify production and confer a broader spectrum of protection than that seen with PA alone.

  3. Disaccharides Protect Antigens from Drying-Induced Damage in Routinely Processed Tissue Sections.

    PubMed

    Boi, Giovanna; Scalia, Carla Rossana; Gendusa, Rossella; Ronchi, Susanna; Cattoretti, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Drying of the tissue section, partial or total, during immunostaining negatively affects both the staining of tissue antigens and the ability to remove previously deposited antibody layers, particularly during sequential rounds of de-staining and re-staining for multiple antigens. The cause is a progressive loss of the protein-associated water up to the removal of the non-freezable water, a step which abolishes the immunoavailability of the epitope. In order to describe and prevent these adverse effects, we tested, among other substances, sugars, which are known to protect unicellular organisms from freezing and dehydration, and stabilize drugs and reagents in solid state form in medical devices. Disaccharides (lactose, sucrose) prevented the air drying-induced antigen masking and protected tissue-bound antigens and antibodies from air drying-induced damage. Complete removal of the bound antibody layers by chemical stripping was permitted if lactose was present during air drying. Lactose, sucrose and other disaccharides prevent air drying artifacts, allow homogeneous, consistent staining and the reuse of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections for repeated immunostaining rounds by guaranteeing constant staining quality in suboptimal hydration conditions.

  4. Disaccharides Protect Antigens from Drying-Induced Damage in Routinely Processed Tissue Sections.

    PubMed

    Boi, Giovanna; Scalia, Carla Rossana; Gendusa, Rossella; Ronchi, Susanna; Cattoretti, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Drying of the tissue section, partial or total, during immunostaining negatively affects both the staining of tissue antigens and the ability to remove previously deposited antibody layers, particularly during sequential rounds of de-staining and re-staining for multiple antigens. The cause is a progressive loss of the protein-associated water up to the removal of the non-freezable water, a step which abolishes the immunoavailability of the epitope. In order to describe and prevent these adverse effects, we tested, among other substances, sugars, which are known to protect unicellular organisms from freezing and dehydration, and stabilize drugs and reagents in solid state form in medical devices. Disaccharides (lactose, sucrose) prevented the air drying-induced antigen masking and protected tissue-bound antigens and antibodies from air drying-induced damage. Complete removal of the bound antibody layers by chemical stripping was permitted if lactose was present during air drying. Lactose, sucrose and other disaccharides prevent air drying artifacts, allow homogeneous, consistent staining and the reuse of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections for repeated immunostaining rounds by guaranteeing constant staining quality in suboptimal hydration conditions. PMID:26487185

  5. Vaccination against Anthrax with Attenuated Recombinant Strains of Bacillus anthracis That Produce Protective Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, John P.; Friedlander, Arthur M.

    1999-01-01

    The protective efficacy of several live, recombinant anthrax vaccines given in a single-dose regimen was assessed with Hartley guinea pigs. These live vaccines were created by transforming ΔANR and ΔSterne, two nonencapsulated, nontoxinogenic strains of Bacillus anthracis, with four different recombinant plasmids that express the anthrax protective antigen (PA) protein to various degrees. This enabled us to assess the effect of the chromosomal background of the strain, as well as the amount of PA produced, on protective efficacy. There were no significant strain-related effects on PA production in vitro, plasmid stability in vivo, survival of the immunizing strain in the host, or protective efficacy of the immunizing infection. The protective efficacy of the live, recombinant anthrax vaccine strains correlated with the anti-PA antibody titers they elicited in vivo and the level of PA they produced in vitro. PMID:9916059

  6. Plant expressed coccidial antigens as potential vaccine candidates in protecting chicken against coccidiosis.

    PubMed

    Sathish, Kota; Sriraman, Rajan; Subramanian, B Mohana; Rao, N Hanumantha; Kasa, Balaji; Donikeni, Jagan; Narasu, M Lakshmi; Srinivasan, V A

    2012-06-22

    Coccidiosis is a disease caused by intracellular parasites belonging to the genus Eimeria. In the present study, we transiently expressed two coccidial antigens EtMIC1 and EtMIC2 as poly histidine-tagged fusion proteins in tobacco. We have evaluated the protective efficacy of plant expressed EtMIC1 as monovalent and as well as bi-valent formulation where EtMIC1 and EtMIC2 were used in combination. The protective efficacy of these formulations was evaluated using homologous challenge in chickens. We observed better serum antibody response, weight gain and reduced oocyst shedding in birds immunized with EtMIC1 and EtMIC2 as bivalent formulation compared to monovalent formulation. However, IFN-γ response was not significant in birds immunized with EtMIC1 compared to the birds immunized with EtMIC2. Our results indicate the potential use of these antigens as vaccine candidates. PMID:22554463

  7. Protection against mortality due to Vibrio cholerae infection in infant rabbits caused by immunization of mothers with cholera protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Sciortino, C V

    1996-03-01

    Vaccination of female rabbits with cholera protective antigen (CPA) protected their F1 progeny from lethal challenge with Vibrio cholerae. Protection was determined by the choleragenic score and survival rates. Serum and milk IgG, IgM, IgA titres to CPA, cholera toxin, and LPS were determined. At 8 and 20 weeks post-immunization, mothers' milk, sera, and infants' sera showed elevated CPA-specific IgG and IgA, and infants were protected. Mothers' serum and milk antibody remained elevated for 36 weeks. At 26 weeks, mothers were re-bred, but their progeny were swapped and cross-fed. Infants born to the placebo-vaccinated mothers and nursed by CPA-immune nannies were partially protected from challenge. Infants born to CPA-immune mothers and cross-fed by the placebo-vaccinated nannies were less protected. CPA stimulated both transplacental and milk antibody, but passive immunity was primarily milk-derived. A 36-week booster vaccine stimulated an anamnestic serological response that did not provide protection equivalent to the original vaccine. CPA provided partial protective immunity to the milk-fed infant rabbits that suggests that CPA may be important in the development of a cholera vaccine.

  8. Biochemical and biological characterization of the protective Leishmania pifanoi amastigote antigen P-8.

    PubMed

    Colmenares, M; Tiemeyer, M; Kima, P; McMahon-Pratt, D

    2001-11-01

    The Leishmania pifanoi amastigote antigen P-8 has been previously shown to induce protective immunity in a murine model of cutaneous leishmaniasis (L. Soong, S. M. Duboise, P. Kima, and D. McMahon-Pratt, Infect. Immun. 63:3559-3566, 1995). As this antigen is of interest for further vaccine studies, the biochemical characterization of P-8 was undertaken. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western-blot analysis, and gel filtration chromatography revealed that P-8 antigen consisted of two proteoglycolipid complexes. The P-8 epitope is associated with the L. pifanoi amastigote-specific glycolipid components found in the two complexes. The P-8 complex 1 (P-8c1) consists of a 56-kDa serine metalloproteinase, apolipoprotein E (derived from fetal bovine serum), and amastigote-specific glycolipids. The P-8 complex 2 (P-8c2) consists of a 31-kDa cysteine proteinase associated with amastigote glycolipids. Biochemical analyses suggest that the P-8 antigenic glycolipids may be distinct from previously described Leishmania glycolipids (glycosylinositol-phospholipids and sphingoglycolipids). Protective immunity studies revealed that P-8c1 (serine metalloproteinase-glycolipid complex) confers comparable protection against infection as immunopurified P-8. The isolated P-8c2 (cysteine proteinase-glycolipid complex) does not provide significant protection, nor does stimulation with P-8c2 result in significant T-cell activation in P-8- or P-8c2-vaccinated mice. Consequently, the P-8c1 complex appears to be the immunodominant component of P-8.

  9. Vaccination with intestinal tract antigens does not induce protective immunity in a permissive model of filariasis.

    PubMed

    Morris, C Paul; Torrero, Marina N; Larson, David; Evans, Holly; Shi, Yinghui; Cox, Rachel T; Mitre, Edward

    2013-09-01

    Antigens obtained from the intestinal tract of filarial nematodes have been proposed as potential safe and effective vaccine candidates. Because they may be 'hidden' from the immune response during natural infection, yet accessible by antibodies induced by vaccination, intestinal antigens may have a low potential for eliciting allergic responses when vaccinating previously infected individuals. Despite prior promising data, vaccination with intestinal antigens has yet to be tested in a permissive model of filariasis. In this study we investigated the efficacy of vaccination with filarial intestinal antigens in the permissive Litomosoides sigmodontis BALB/c model of filariasis, and we evaluated the extent to which these antigens are recognized by the immune system during and after infection. Infected BALB/c mice developed lower IgG antibody responses to soluble intestinal antigens (GutAg) than to soluble antigens of whole worms (LsAg). Similarly, GutAg induced less proliferation and less production of IL-4 and IFNγ from splenocytes of infected mice than LsAg. In contrast to these differences, active infection resulted in equivalent levels of circulating GutAg-specific IgE and LsAg-specific IgE levels. Consistent with this, basophil activation, as assessed by flow cytometric staining of intracellular basophil IL-4 expression, was equivalent in response to GutAg and LsAg. Vaccination with GutAg adsorbed to CpG/alum induced GutAg specific IgG1 and IgG2A production, with GutAg specific IgG titers greater than 5-fold higher than those measured in previously infected animals. Despite this response to GutAg vaccination, vaccinated mice harbored similar parasite burdens 8 weeks post infection when compared to non-vaccinated controls. These studies demonstrate that soluble antigens obtained from the intestinal tracts of L. sigmodontis have some qualities of 'hidden' antigens, but they still sensitize mice to allergic reactions and fail to protect against future infection

  10. Identification of protective and broadly conserved vaccine antigens from the genome of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Rappuoli, Rino; Serino, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) are a common cause of disease in both mammals and birds. A vaccine to prevent such infections would be desirable given the increasing antibiotic resistance of these bacteria. We have determined the genome sequence of ExPEC IHE3034 (ST95) isolated from a case of neonatal meningitis and compared this to available genome sequences of other ExPEC strains and a few nonpathogenic E. coli. We found 19 genomic islands present in the genome of IHE3034, which are absent in the nonpathogenic E. coli isolates. By using subtractive reverse vaccinology we identified 230 antigens present in ExPEC but absent (or present with low similarity) in nonpathogenic strains. Nine antigens were protective in a mouse challenge model. Some of them were also present in other pathogenic non-ExPEC strains, suggesting that a broadly protective E. coli vaccine may be possible. The gene encoding the most protective antigen was detected in most of the E. coli isolates, highly conserved in sequence and found to be exported by a type II secretion system which seems to be nonfunctional in nonpathogenic strains. PMID:20439758

  11. Proteome-wide antigen discovery of novel protective vaccine candidates against Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Karina Juhl; Mattsson, Andreas Holm; Pilely, Katrine; Asferg, Cecilie Antoinette; Ciofu, Oana; Vitved, Lars; Koch, Claus; Kemp, Michael

    2016-08-31

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a rapidly growing problem, especially in hospitals where MRSA cause increased morbidity and mortality and a significant rise in health expenditures. As many strains of MRSA are resistant to other antimicrobials in addition to methicillin, there is an urgent need to institute non-antimicrobial measures, such as vaccination, against the spread of MRSA. With the aim of finding new protective antigens for vaccine development, this study used a proteome-wide in silico antigen prediction platform to screen the proteome of S. aureus strain MRSA252. Thirty-five different S. aureus proteins were identified, recombinantly expressed, and tested for protection in a lethal sepsis mouse model using S. aureus strain MRSA252 as the challenge organism. We found that 13 of the 35 recombinant peptides yielded significant protection and that 12 of these antigens were highly conserved across 70 completely sequenced S. aureus strains. Thus, this in silico platform was capable of identifying novel candidates for inclusion in future vaccines against MRSA. PMID:27496278

  12. Synthetic Long Peptide Derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Latency Antigen Rv1733c Protects against Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Mariateresa; van den Eeden, Susan J F; Wilson, Louis; Franken, Kees L M C; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Geluk, Annemieke

    2015-09-01

    Responsible for 9 million new cases of active disease and nearly 2 million deaths each year, tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health threat of overwhelming dimensions. Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the only licensed vaccine available, fails to confer lifelong protection and to prevent reactivation of latent infection. Although 15 new vaccine candidates are now in clinical trials, an effective vaccine against TB remains elusive, and new strategies for vaccination are vital. BCG vaccination fails to induce immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis latency antigens. Synthetic long peptides (SLPs) combined with adjuvants have been studied mostly for therapeutic cancer vaccines, yet not for TB, and proved to induce efficient antitumor immunity. This study investigated an SLP derived from Rv1733c, a major M. tuberculosis latency antigen which is highly expressed by "dormant" M. tuberculosis and well recognized by T cells from latently M. tuberculosis-infected individuals. In order to assess its in vivo immunogenicity and protective capacity, Rv1733c SLP in CpG was administered to HLA-DR3 transgenic mice. Immunization with Rv1733c SLP elicited gamma interferon-positive/tumor necrosis factor-positive (IFN-γ(+)/TNF(+)) and IFN-γ(+) CD4(+) T cells and Rv1733c-specific antibodies and led to a significant reduction in the bacterial load in the lungs of M. tuberculosis-challenged mice. This was observed both in a pre- and in a post-M. tuberculosis challenge setting. Moreover, Rv1733c SLP immunization significantly boosted the protective efficacy of BCG, demonstrating the potential of M. tuberculosis latency antigens to improve BCG efficacy. These data suggest a promising role for M. tuberculosis latency antigen Rv1733c-derived SLPs as a novel TB vaccine approach, both in a prophylactic and in a postinfection setting.

  13. Synthetic Long Peptide Derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Latency Antigen Rv1733c Protects against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Mariateresa; van den Eeden, Susan J. F.; Wilson, Louis; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Responsible for 9 million new cases of active disease and nearly 2 million deaths each year, tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health threat of overwhelming dimensions. Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the only licensed vaccine available, fails to confer lifelong protection and to prevent reactivation of latent infection. Although 15 new vaccine candidates are now in clinical trials, an effective vaccine against TB remains elusive, and new strategies for vaccination are vital. BCG vaccination fails to induce immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis latency antigens. Synthetic long peptides (SLPs) combined with adjuvants have been studied mostly for therapeutic cancer vaccines, yet not for TB, and proved to induce efficient antitumor immunity. This study investigated an SLP derived from Rv1733c, a major M. tuberculosis latency antigen which is highly expressed by “dormant” M. tuberculosis and well recognized by T cells from latently M. tuberculosis-infected individuals. In order to assess its in vivo immunogenicity and protective capacity, Rv1733c SLP in CpG was administered to HLA-DR3 transgenic mice. Immunization with Rv1733c SLP elicited gamma interferon-positive/tumor necrosis factor-positive (IFN-γ+/TNF+) and IFN-γ+ CD4+ T cells and Rv1733c-specific antibodies and led to a significant reduction in the bacterial load in the lungs of M. tuberculosis-challenged mice. This was observed both in a pre- and in a post-M. tuberculosis challenge setting. Moreover, Rv1733c SLP immunization significantly boosted the protective efficacy of BCG, demonstrating the potential of M. tuberculosis latency antigens to improve BCG efficacy. These data suggest a promising role for M. tuberculosis latency antigen Rv1733c-derived SLPs as a novel TB vaccine approach, both in a prophylactic and in a postinfection setting. PMID:26202436

  14. Identifying protective Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine antigens recognized by both B and T cells in human adults and children

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Rasmus; Nissen, Thomas Nørrelykke; Fredslund, Sine; Rosenkrands, Ida; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Andersen, Peter; Dietrich, Jes

    2016-01-01

    No commercial vaccine exists against Group A streptococci (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) and only little is known about anti-GAS protective immunity. In our effort to discover new protective vaccine candidates, we selected 21 antigens based on an in silico evaluation. These were all well-conserved among different GAS strains, upregulated in host-pathogen interaction studies, and predicted to be extracellular or associated with the surface of the bacteria. The antigens were tested for both antibody recognition and T cell responses in human adults and children. The antigenicity of a selected group of antigens was further validated using a high-density peptide array technology that also identified the linear epitopes. Based on immunological recognition, four targets were selected and tested for protective capabilities in an experimental GAS infection model in mice. Shown for the first time, three of these targets (spy0469, spy1228 and spy1801) conferred significant protection whereas one (spy1643) did not. PMID:26911649

  15. A fusion DNA vaccine that targets antigen-presenting cells increases protection from viral challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deliyannis, Georgia; Boyle, Jefferey S.; Brady, Jamie L.; Brown, Lorena E.; Lew, Andrew M.

    2000-06-01

    Improving the immunological potency, particularly the Ab response, is a serious hurdle for the protective efficacy and hence broad application of DNA vaccines. We examined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a hemagglutinin-based influenza DNA vaccine that was targeted to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by fusion to CTLA4. The targeted vaccine was shown to induce an accelerated and increased Ab response (as compared with those receiving the nontargeted control) that was predominated by IgG1 and recognized conformationally dependent viral epitopes. Moreover, mice receiving the APC-targeted DNA vaccine had significantly reduced viral titers (100-fold) after a nonlethal virus challenge. The increased protective efficacy was most likely because of increased Ab responses, as cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses were not enhanced. Targeting was demonstrated by direct binding studies of CTLA4 fusion proteins to the cognate ligand (B7; expressed on APCs in vivo). In addition, a targeted protein was detected at 4-fold higher levels in draining lymph nodes within 2-24 h of administration. Therefore, this study demonstrates that targeting DNA-encoded antigen to APCs results in enhanced immunity and strongly suggests that this approach may be useful in improving the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines.

  16. Immunization of Mice with Anthrax Protective Antigen Limits Cardiotoxicity but Not Hepatotoxicity Following Lethal Toxin Challenge.

    PubMed

    Devera, T Scott; Prusator, Dawn K; Joshi, Sunil K; Ballard, Jimmy D; Lang, Mark L

    2015-06-25

    Protective immunity against anthrax is inferred from measurement of vaccine antigen-specific neutralizing antibody titers in serum samples. In animal models, in vivo challenges with toxin and/or spores can also be performed. However, neither of these approaches considers toxin-induced damage to specific organ systems. It is therefore important to determine to what extent anthrax vaccines and existing or candidate adjuvants can provide organ-specific protection against intoxication. We therefore compared the ability of Alum, CpG DNA and the CD1d ligand α-galactosylceramide (αGC) to enhance protective antigen-specific antibody titers, to protect mice against challenge with lethal toxin, and to block cardiotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. By measurement of serum cardiac Troponin I (cTnI), and hepatic alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), it was apparent that neither vaccine modality prevented hepatic intoxication, despite high Ab titers and ultimate survival of the subject. In contrast, cardiotoxicity was greatly diminished by prior immunization. This shows that a vaccine that confers survival following toxin exposure may still have an associated morbidity. We propose that organ-specific intoxication should be monitored routinely during research into new vaccine modalities.

  17. Intravacuolar Membranes Regulate CD8 T Cell Recognition of Membrane-Bound Toxoplasma gondii Protective Antigen.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Jodie; Bittame, Amina; Massera, Céline; Vasseur, Virginie; Effantin, Grégory; Valat, Anne; Buaillon, Célia; Allart, Sophie; Fox, Barbara A; Rommereim, Leah M; Bzik, David J; Schoehn, Guy; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Gagnon, Jean; Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Blanchard, Nicolas

    2015-12-15

    Apicomplexa parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii target effectors to and across the boundary of their parasitophorous vacuole (PV), resulting in host cell subversion and potential presentation by MHC class I molecules for CD8 T cell recognition. The host-parasite interface comprises the PV limiting membrane and a highly curved, membranous intravacuolar network (IVN) of uncertain function. Here, using a cell-free minimal system, we dissect how membrane tubules are shaped by the parasite effectors GRA2 and GRA6. We show that membrane association regulates access of the GRA6 protective antigen to the MHC I pathway in infected cells. Although insertion of GRA6 in the PV membrane is key for immunogenicity, association of GRA6 with the IVN limits presentation and curtails GRA6-specific CD8 responses in mice. Thus, membrane deformations of the PV regulate access of antigens to the MHC class I pathway, and the IVN may play a role in immune modulation.

  18. Protective immunity against a lethal respiratory Yersinia pestis challenge induced by V antigen or the F1 capsular antigen incorporated into adenovirus capsid.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Julie L; Sofer-Podesta, Carolina; Ang, John; Hackett, Neil R; Chiuchiolo, Maria J; Senina, Svetlana; Perlin, David; Crystal, Ronald G

    2010-07-01

    The aerosol form of the bacterium Yersinia pestis causes pneumonic plague, a rapidly fatal disease that is a biothreat if deliberately released. At present, no plague vaccines are available for use in the United States, but subunit vaccines based on the Y. pestis V antigen and F1 capsular protein show promise when administered with adjuvants. In the context that adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vectors have a strong adjuvant potential related to the ability to directly infect dendritic cells, we hypothesized that modification of the Ad5 capsid to display either the Y. pestis V antigen or the F1 capsular antigen on the virion surface would elicit high V antigen- or F1-specific antibody titers, permit boosting with the same Ad serotype, and provide better protection against a lethal Y. pestis challenge than immunization with equivalent amounts of V or F1 recombinant protein plus conventional adjuvant. We constructed AdYFP-pIX/V and AdLacZ-pIX/F1, E1(-), E3(-) serotype 5 Ad gene transfer vectors containing a fusion of the sequence for either the Y. pestis V antigen or the F1 capsular antigen to the carboxy-terminal sequence of pIX, a capsid protein that can accommodate the entire V antigen (37 kDa) or F1 protein (15 kDa) without disturbing Ad function. Immunization with AdYFP-pIX/V followed by a single repeat administration of the same vector at the same dose resulted in significantly better protection of immunized animals compared with immunization with a molar equivalent amount of purified recombinant V antigen plus Alhydrogel adjuvant. Similarly, immunization with AdLacZ-pIX/F1 in a prime-boost regimen resulted in significantly enhanced protection of immunized animals compared with immunization with a molar-equivalent amount of purified recombinant F1 protein plus adjuvant. These observations demonstrate that Ad vaccine vectors containing pathogen-specific antigens fused to the pIX capsid protein have strong adjuvant properties and stimulate more robust protective

  19. Protection of gerbils from amebic liver abscess by immunization with a recombinant Entamoeba histolytica antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, T; Cieslak, P R; Stanley, S L

    1994-01-01

    Amebiasis, infection by the intestinal protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica, is a leading parasitic cause of death. As a step in the development of a recombinant antigen vaccine to prevent E. histolytica infection, we looked at the ability of a recombinant version of the serine-rich E. histolytica protein (SREHP) to elicit a protective immune response against invasive amebic disease. Gerbils, a standard model for amebic liver abscess, were immunized with either a recombinant SREHP/maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion, recombinant MBP alone, or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), all combined with complete Freund's adjuvant. In the first trial (group 1), gerbils received a primary and two booster immunizations intraperitoneally; in the second trial (group 2), gerbils were immunized by a single intradermal injection. SREHP/MBP-immunized gerbils in both groups produced antibody to native SHEHP and developed delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to recombinant SREHP. All gerbils were challenged by an intrahepatic injection with 5 x 10(4) virulent E. histolytica HM1-IMSS trophozoites. Complete protection from amebic liver abscess was seen in 64% of the SHEHP/MBP-immunized gerbils in group 1 and in 100% of the SREHP/MBP-immunized gerbils in group 2. There was no protection observed in MBP- or PBS-immunized gerbils in either group. Our results indicate that the SREHP molecule has potential as a vaccine to prevent amebic infection and demonstrate that successful vaccination of animals with recombinant E. histolytica antigen vaccines is possible. Images PMID:8132322

  20. EatA, an Immunogenic Protective Antigen of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Degrades Intestinal Mucin

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pardeep; Luo, Qingwei; Vickers, Tim J.; Sheikh, Alaullah; Lewis, Warren G.

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality due to infectious diarrhea in developing countries for which there is presently no effective vaccine. A central challenge in ETEC vaccinology has been the identification of conserved surface antigens to formulate a broadly protective vaccine. Here, we demonstrate that EatA, an immunogenic secreted serine protease of ETEC, contributes to virulence by degrading MUC2, the major protein present in the small intestinal mucous layer, and that removal of this barrier in vitro accelerates toxin access to the enterocyte surface. In addition, we demonstrate that vaccination with the recombinant secreted passenger domain of EatA (rEatAp) elicits high titers of antibody and is protective against intestinal infection with ETEC. These findings may have significant implications for development of both subunit and live-attenuated vaccines against ETEC and other enteric pathogens, including Shigella flexneri, that express similar proteins. PMID:24478066

  1. Protective Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Antigens in a Murine Intranasal Challenge Model

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Hays, Mike; Lim, Francis; Foster, Leonard J.; Zhou, Mingxu; Zhu, Guoqiang; Miesner, Tracy; Hardwidge, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an endemic health threat in underdeveloped nations. Despite the significant effort extended to vaccine trials using ETEC colonization factors, these approaches have generally not been especially effective in mediating cross-protective immunity. We used quantitative proteomics to identify 24 proteins that differed in abundance in membrane protein preparations derived from wild-type vs. a type II secretion system mutant of ETEC. We expressed and purified a subset of these proteins and identified nine antigens that generated significant immune responses in mice. Sera from mice immunized with either the MltA-interacting protein MipA, the periplasmic chaperone seventeen kilodalton protein, Skp, or a long-chain fatty acid outer membrane transporter, ETEC_2479, reduced the adherence of multiple ETEC strains differing in colonization factor expression to human intestinal epithelial cells. In intranasal challenge assays of mice, immunization with ETEC_2479 protected 88% of mice from an otherwise lethal challenge with ETEC H10407. Immunization with either Skp or MipA provided an intermediate degree of protection, 68 and 64%, respectively. Protection was significantly correlated with the induction of a secretory immunoglobulin A response. This study has identified several proteins that are conserved among heterologous ETEC strains and may thus potentially improve cross-protective efficacy if incorporated into future vaccine designs. PMID:26244636

  2. Protective Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Antigens in a Murine Intranasal Challenge Model.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Hays, Mike; Lim, Francis; Foster, Leonard J; Zhou, Mingxu; Zhu, Guoqiang; Miesner, Tracy; Hardwidge, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an endemic health threat in underdeveloped nations. Despite the significant effort extended to vaccine trials using ETEC colonization factors, these approaches have generally not been especially effective in mediating cross-protective immunity. We used quantitative proteomics to identify 24 proteins that differed in abundance in membrane protein preparations derived from wild-type vs. a type II secretion system mutant of ETEC. We expressed and purified a subset of these proteins and identified nine antigens that generated significant immune responses in mice. Sera from mice immunized with either the MltA-interacting protein MipA, the periplasmic chaperone seventeen kilodalton protein, Skp, or a long-chain fatty acid outer membrane transporter, ETEC_2479, reduced the adherence of multiple ETEC strains differing in colonization factor expression to human intestinal epithelial cells. In intranasal challenge assays of mice, immunization with ETEC_2479 protected 88% of mice from an otherwise lethal challenge with ETEC H10407. Immunization with either Skp or MipA provided an intermediate degree of protection, 68 and 64%, respectively. Protection was significantly correlated with the induction of a secretory immunoglobulin A response. This study has identified several proteins that are conserved among heterologous ETEC strains and may thus potentially improve cross-protective efficacy if incorporated into future vaccine designs. PMID:26244636

  3. A novel M2e-multiple antigenic peptide providing heterologous protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Wen, Feng; Ma, Ji-Hong; Yu, Hai; Yang, Fu-Ru; Huang, Meng; Zhou, Yan-Jun; Li, Ze-Jun; Wang, Xiu-Hui; Li, Guo-Xin; Jiang, Yi-Feng; Tong, Wu; Tong, Guang-Zhi

    2016-03-01

    Swine influenza viruses (SwIVs) cause considerable morbidity and mortality in domestic pigs, resulting in a significant economic burden. Moreover, pigs have been considered to be a possible mixing vessel in which novel strains loom. Here, we developed and evaluated a novel M2e-multiple antigenic peptide (M2e-MAP) as a supplemental antigen for inactivated H3N2 vaccine to provide cross-protection against two main subtypes of SwIVs, H1N1 and H3N2. The novel tetra-branched MAP was constructed by fusing four copies of M2e to one copy of foreign T helper cell epitopes. A high-yield reassortant H3N2 virus was generated by plasmid based reverse genetics. The efficacy of the novel H3N2 inactivated vaccines with or without M2e-MAP supplementation was evaluated in a mouse model. M2e-MAP conjugated vaccine induced strong antibody responses in mice. Complete protection against the heterologous swine H1N1 virus was observed in mice vaccinated with M2e-MAP combined vaccine. Moreover, this novel peptide confers protection against lethal challenge of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1). Taken together, our results suggest the combined immunization of reassortant inactivated H3N2 vaccine and the novel M2e-MAP provided cross-protection against swine and human viruses and may serve as a promising approach for influenza vaccine development. PMID:27051342

  4. A novel M2e-multiple antigenic peptide providing heterologous protection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Feng; Ma, Ji-Hong; Yang, Fu-Ru; Huang, Meng; Zhou, Yan-Jun; Li, Ze-Jun; Wang, Xiu-Hui; Li, Guo-Xin; Jiang, Yi-Feng; Tong, Wu

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza viruses (SwIVs) cause considerable morbidity and mortality in domestic pigs, resulting in a significant economic burden. Moreover, pigs have been considered to be a possible mixing vessel in which novel strains loom. Here, we developed and evaluated a novel M2e-multiple antigenic peptide (M2e-MAP) as a supplemental antigen for inactivated H3N2 vaccine to provide cross-protection against two main subtypes of SwIVs, H1N1 and H3N2. The novel tetra-branched MAP was constructed by fusing four copies of M2e to one copy of foreign T helper cell epitopes. A high-yield reassortant H3N2 virus was generated by plasmid based reverse genetics. The efficacy of the novel H3N2 inactivated vaccines with or without M2e-MAP supplementation was evaluated in a mouse model. M2e-MAP conjugated vaccine induced strong antibody responses in mice. Complete protection against the heterologous swine H1N1 virus was observed in mice vaccinated with M2e-MAP combined vaccine. Moreover, this novel peptide confers protection against lethal challenge of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1). Taken together, our results suggest the combined immunization of reassortant inactivated H3N2 vaccine and the novel M2e-MAP provided cross-protection against swine and human viruses and may serve as a promising approach for influenza vaccine development. PMID:27051342

  5. Delayed type hypersensitivity response to recall antigens does not accurately reflect immune competence in advanced stage breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Kathy; Rinn, Kristine; Disis, Mary L

    2002-07-01

    The development of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to recall antigens has long been utilized as a measure of immune competence. It is assumed that because patients with advanced stage cancers exhibit multiple immune system defects they may not be responsive to immunization. We pre-selected patients with advanced HER-2/neu (HER2) overexpressing breast and ovarian cancers for enrolment into a phase I trial designed to evaluate the immunogenicity of a HER2 peptide vaccine based on the patient's immune competence as assessed by DTH skin testing to common recall antigens (Multitest CMI, Institut Merieux, Lyon, France). At the time of a positive DTH response to tetanus toxoid (tt) peripheral blood was obtained to measure T cell responses to tt. Of 53 patients evaluated, 38 (72%) were not anergic. Among the 15 (28%) who were, seven patients with advanced stage breast cancer were re-tested a median of 26 days (range 12-150 days) after receiving a tt bopster vaccination. Five of the seven had positive DTH responses when re-challenged with tt and six had peripheral blood tetanus specific T cell response with stimulation index >2.0. Thus, the majority of patients studied with advanced stage breast or ovarian cancer were able to mount a DTH response to common recall antigens. Moreover, a negative response by DTH testing to a battery of common recall antigens was not a reflection of the breast cancer patient's ability to mount a cell-mediated immune response to a vaccinated antigen, tt.

  6. A Recombinant Raccoon Poxvirus Vaccine Expressing both Yersinia pestis F1 and Truncated V Antigens Protects Animals against Lethal Plague.

    PubMed

    Rocke, Tonie E; Kingstad-Bakke, Brock; Berlier, Willy; Osorio, Jorge E

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated in mice and prairie dogs that simultaneous administration of two recombinant raccoon poxviruses (rRCN) expressing Yersinia pestis antigens (F1 and V307-a truncated version of the V protein) provided superior protection against plague challenge compared to individual single antigen constructs. To reduce costs of vaccine production and facilitate implementation of a sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) control program for prairie dogs, a dual antigen construct is more desirable. Here we report the construction and characterization of a novel RCN-vectored vaccine that simultaneously expresses both F1 and V307 antigens. This dual antigen vaccine provided similar levels of protection against plague in both mice and prairie dogs as compared to simultaneous administration of the two single antigen constructs and was also shown to protect mice against an F1 negative strain of Y. pestis. The equivalent safety, immunogenicity and efficacy profile of the dual RCN-F1/V307 construct warrants further evaluation in field efficacy studies in sylvatic plague endemic areas. PMID:26344891

  7. A recombinant raccoon poxvirus vaccine expressing both Yersinia pestis F1 and truncated V antigens protects animals against lethal plague.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Kingstad-Bakke, B; Berlier, W; Osorio, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated in mice and prairie dogs that simultaneous administration of two recombinant raccoon poxviruses (rRCN) expressing Yersinia pestis antigens (F1 and V307-a truncated version of the V protein) provided superior protection against plague challenge compared to individual single antigen constructs. To reduce costs of vaccine production and facilitate implementation of a sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) control program for prairie dogs, a dual antigen construct is more desirable. Here we report the construction and characterization of a novel RCN-vectored vaccine that simultaneously expresses both F1 and V307 antigens. This dual antigen vaccine provided similar levels of protection against plague in both mice and prairie dogs as compared to simultaneous administration of the two single antigen constructs and was also shown to protect mice against an F1 negative strain of Y. pestis.. The equivalent safety, immunogenicity and efficacy profile of the dual RCN-F1/V307 construct warrants further evaluation in field efficacy studies in sylvatic plague endemic areas.

  8. Murine Dendritic Cells Pulsed In Vitro with Toxoplasma gondii Antigens Induce Protective Immunity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bourguin, Isabelle; Moser, Muriel; Buzoni-Gatel, Dominique; Tielemans, Françoise; Bout, Daniel; Urbain, Jacques; Leo, Oberdan

    1998-01-01

    The activation of a predominant T-helper-cell subset plays a critical role in disease resolution. In the case of Toxoplasma gondii, the available evidence indicates that CD4+ protective cells belong to the Th1 subset. The aim of this study was to determine whether T. gondii antigens (in T. gondii sonicate [TSo]) presented by splenic dendritic cells (DC) were able to induce a specific immune response in vivo and to protect CBA/J mice orally challenged with T. gondii cysts. CBA/J mice immunized with TSo-pulsed DC exhibited significantly fewer cysts in their brains after oral infection with T. gondii 76K than control mice did. Protected mice developed a strong humoral response in vivo, with especially high levels of anti-TSo immunoglobulin G2a antibodies in serum. T. gondii antigens such as SAG1 (surface protein), SAG2 (surface protein), MIC1 (microneme protein), ROP2 through ROP4 (rhoptry proteins), and MIC2 (microneme protein) were recognized predominantly. Furthermore, DC loaded with TSo, which synthesized high levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12), triggered a strong cellular response in vivo, as assessed by the proliferation of lymph node cells in response to TSo restimulation in vitro. Cellular proliferation was associated with gamma interferon and IL-2 production. Taken together, these results indicate that immunization of CBA/J mice with TSo-pulsed DC can induce both humoral and Th1-like cellular immune responses and affords partial resistance against the establishment of chronic toxoplasmosis. PMID:9746591

  9. Multivalent Chromosomal Expression of the Clostridium botulinum Serotype A Neurotoxin Heavy-Chain Antigen and the Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen in Lactobacillus acidophilus

    PubMed Central

    Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus anthracis produce potent toxins that cause severe disease in humans. New and improved vaccines are needed for both of these pathogens. For mucosal vaccine delivery using lactic acid bacteria, chromosomal expression of antigens is preferred over plasmid-based expression systems, as chromosomal expression circumvents plasmid instability and the need for antibiotic pressure. In this study, we constructed three strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM expressing from the chromosome (i) the nontoxic host receptor-binding domain of the heavy chain of Clostridium botulinum serotype A neurotoxin (BoNT/A-Hc), (ii) the anthrax protective antigen (PA), and (iii) both the BoNT/A-Hc and the PA. The BoNT/A-Hc vaccine cassette was engineered to contain the signal peptide from the S-layer protein A from L. acidophilus and a dendritic-cell-targeting peptide. A chromosomal region downstream of lba0889 carrying a highly expressed enolase gene was selected for insertion of the vaccine cassettes. Western blot analysis confirmed the heterologous expression of the two antigens from plasmid and chromosome locations. Stability assays demonstrated loss of the vaccine cassettes from expression plasmids without antibiotic maintenance. RNA sequencing showed high expression of each antigen and that insertion of the vaccine cassettes had little to no effect on the transcription of other genes in the chromosome. This study demonstrated that chromosomal integrative recombinant strains are promising vaccine delivery vehicles when targeted into high-expression chromosomal regions. Levels of expression match high-copy-number plasmids and eliminate the requirement for antibiotic selective maintenance of recombinant plasmids. IMPORTANCE Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus anthracis produce potent neurotoxins that pose a biochemical warfare concern; therefore, effective vaccines against these bacteria are required. Chromosomal expression of antigens is

  10. A fragment of anthrax lethal factor delivers proteins to the cytosol without requiring protective antigen

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, Nicholas; Zhang, Dong; Touzjian, Neal; Essex, Max; Lieberman, Judy; Lu, Yichen

    2003-01-01

    Anthrax protective antigen (PA) is a 735-aa polypeptide that facilitates the exit of anthrax lethal factor (LF) from the endosome to the cytosol where the toxin acts. We recently found, however, that a fusion protein of the detoxified N-terminal domain of lethal factor (LFn) with a foreign peptide could induce CD8 T cell immune responses in the absence of PA. Because CD8 T cells recognize peptides derived from proteins degraded in the cytosol, this result suggests that lethal factor may be capable of entering the cytosol independently of PA. To investigate this further, the intracellular trafficking of an LFn-enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion protein (LFn-GFP) in the presence or absence of PA was examined by using confocal microscopy. LFn-GFP is able to enter the cytosol without PA. Moreover, it efficiently colocalizes with the proteosome 20s subunit, which degrades proteins into peptides for presentation to CD8 T cells by the MHC class I pathway. We further demonstrate that in the presence of an immune adjuvant LFn fusion protein without PA is able to effectively elicit anti-HIV cytotoxic T lymphocyte in inbred mice. These results indicate that LFn may be used without PA in a protein vaccine as a carrier to deliver antigens into the cytosol for efficient induction of T lymphocyte responses. Furthermore, these results enable us to propose a modified molecular mechanism of anthrax lethal toxin. PMID:12740437

  11. Domain specificity of the human antibody response to Bacillus anthracis protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Reason, Donald C; Ullal, Anuska; Liberato, Justine; Sun, Jinying; Keitel, Wendy; Zhou, Jianhui

    2008-07-29

    Protective antigen (PA) is the cell surface recognition moiety of the Bacillus anthracis A-B toxin system, and the active immunogenic component in the currently licensed human anthrax vaccine (BioThrax, or AVA). The serum antibody response to the PA protein is polyclonal and complex both in terms of the antibody combining sites utilized to bind PA and the PA-associated epitopes recognized. We have cloned, sequenced, and expressed a large panel of PA-specific human monoclonal antibodies from seven AVA-immunized donors. Dot blots, Western blots, and radiolabeled antigen capture assays employing both proteolytic fragments of PA and engineered PA sub-domain fusion proteins were used to determine the region (domain) of the PA monomer to which each of the cloned human antibodies bound. The domain specificity of the isolated monoclonals was highly biased towards the amino-terminal 20kDa fragment of PA (PA(20)), with the majority (62%) of independently arising antibody clones reacting with determinants located on this PA fragment. A similar bias in domain specificity was also demonstrated in the serum response of AVA-vaccinated donors. Since PA(20) is cleaved from the remainder of the monomer rapidly following cell surface binding and has no known role in the intoxication process, the immunodominance of PA(20)-associated epitopes may directly affect the efficacy of PA-based anthrax vaccines.

  12. Paratope diversity in the human antibody response to Bacillus anthracis protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianhui; Ullal, Anuska; Liberato, Justine; Sun, Jinying; Keitel, Wendy; Reason, Donald C

    2008-01-01

    The active component of the licensed human anthrax vaccine (BioThrax, or AVA) is a Bacillus anthracis toxin known as protective antigen (PA). Second generation anthrax vaccines currently under development are also based on a recombinant form of PA. Since the current and future anthrax vaccines are based on this toxin, it is important that the immunobiology of this protein in vaccinated humans be understood in detail. We have isolated and analyzed the PA-specific antibody repertoire from an AVA-vaccinated individual. When examined at the clonal level, we find an antibody response that is complex in terms of the combinatorial elements and immunoglobulin variable genes employed. All PA-specific antibodies had undergone somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, both signs of affinity maturation. Although the antigenic epitopes recognized by the response were distributed throughout the PA monomer, the majority of antibodies arising in this individual following vaccination recognize determinants located on the amino-terminal (PA20) sub-domain of the molecule. This latter finding may have implications for the rational design of future PA-based anthrax vaccines.

  13. Generation of protective immune response against anthrax by oral immunization with protective antigen plant-based vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gorantala, Jyotsna; Grover, Sonam; Rahi, Amit; Chaudhary, Prerna; Rajwanshi, Ravi; Sarin, Neera Bhalla; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2014-04-20

    In concern with frequent recurrence of anthrax in endemic areas and inadvertent use of its spores as biological weapon, the development of an effective anthrax vaccine suitable for both human and veterinary needs is highly desirable. A simple oral delivery through expression in plant system could offer promising alternative to the current methods that rely on injectable vaccines extracted from bacterial sources. In the present study, we have expressed protective antigen (PA) gene in Indian mustard by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and in tobacco by plastid transformation. Putative transgenic lines were verified for the presence of transgene and its expression by molecular analysis. PA expressed in transgenic lines was biologically active as evidenced by macrophage lysis assay. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) and oral immunization with plant PA in murine model indicated high serum PA specific IgG and IgA antibody titers. PA specific mucosal immune response was noted in orally immunized groups. Further, antibodies indicated lethal toxin neutralizing potential in-vitro and conferred protection against in-vivo toxin challenge. Oral immunization experiments demonstrated generation of immunoprotective response in mice. Thus, our study examines the feasibility of oral PA vaccine expressed in an edible plant system against anthrax.

  14. Vaccination with a purified blood-stage malaria antigen in mice: correlation of protection with T cell mediated immunity.

    PubMed Central

    Playfair, J H; De Souza, J B; Freeman, R R; Holder, A A

    1985-01-01

    A purified 230,000 mol wt protein antigen from the lethal mouse malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii YM which had previously been shown to be highly effective as a vaccine, was tested for its ability to stimulate specific helper T cells and T cells responsible for delayed hypersensitivity. Strong stimulation was found in both assays, but larger doses were required for delayed hypersensitivity, correlating well with the requirements for protection. It is suggested that T stimulation may be a requirement for effective protection by purified antigens in malaria. PMID:2933196

  15. Purification of serotype 2 fimbriae of Bordetella pertussis and their identification as a mouse protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J M; Cowell, J L; Steven, A C; Manclark, C R

    1985-01-01

    Fimbriae were removed from Bordetella pertussis by mechanical shearing and purified by successive precipitations with ammonium sulfate, pH 6.0 phosphate buffer, and magnesium chloride. Electron microscopy showed the purified fimbriae to be long filamentous structures (5 nm in diameter) which aggregated into bundles at pH 6.0. Sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of the purified fimbriae gave a single protein subunit with a molecular weight of 22,000. The purified fimbriae did not have hemagglutinating activity when assayed with a variety of erythrocytes and were shown to be antigenically and structurally distinct from the filamentous hemagglutinin of B. pertussis. The purified fimbriae were identified as serotype 2 agglutinogens as antibody to the purified fimbriae agglutinated B. pertussis strains serotyped as 1.2.4, 1.2.3, or 1.2.3.6, but did not agglutinate serotypes 1.3.6. Immunization of mice with the purified fimbriae (14 micrograms) protected them from a lethal respiratory infection with strain 18323 (agglutinogen serotype 1.2.3.4.6) or with strain 432 (serotype 1.3.6). Immunization of mice with purified fimbriae containing 0.02% LPF also protected them from a lethal intracerebral infection with 18323. The ED50 was about 13 micrograms. Fimbriae containing less than 0.005% LPF did not protect mice from intracerebral challenge. PMID:2872103

  16. Identification and partial characterisation of a new protective antigen of Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Cespedes, S; Andrews, E; Folch, H; Oñate, A

    2000-02-01

    Two novel Brucella abortus proteins were isolated from B. abortus strain RB51 and their immunological properties were determined. These proteins precipitated in the 40-60% saturated concentration range of ammonium sulphate and had a molecular mass of 32.2 kDa and 22.9 kDa, respectively. Both were able to induce a strong in-vitro blast transformation in lymphoid cells obtained from mice previously sensitised with a crude brucella protein extract. The protection studies showed that the 22.9-kDa protein used as a protective immunogen was as effective as the live B. abortus RB51 vaccine but the 32.2-kDa protein had a poor protective effect under similar conditions. The amino-terminal sequence of the 22.9-kDa and 32.2-kDa proteins was determined and analysed in a database. The lack of homology with other known B. abortus proteins indicated that both proteins were novel antigens.

  17. Mucosal Immunization with Iron Receptor Antigens Protects against Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sara N.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2009-01-01

    Uncomplicated infections of the urinary tract, caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli, are among the most common diseases requiring medical intervention. A preventive vaccine to reduce the morbidity and fiscal burden these infections have upon the healthcare system would be beneficial. Here, we describe the results of a large-scale selection process that incorporates bioinformatic, genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic screens to identify six vaccine candidates from the 5379 predicted proteins encoded by uropathogenic E. coli strain CFT073. The vaccine candidates, ChuA, Hma, Iha, IreA, IroN, and IutA, all belong to a functional class of molecules that is involved in iron acquisition, a process critical for pathogenesis in all microbes. Intranasal immunization of CBA/J mice with these outer membrane iron receptors elicited a systemic and mucosal immune response that included the production of antigen-specific IgM, IgG, and IgA antibodies. The cellular response to vaccination was characterized by the induction and secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17. Of the six potential vaccine candidates, IreA, Hma, and IutA provided significant protection from experimental infection. In immunized animals, class-switching from IgM to IgG and production of antigen-specific IgA in the urine represent immunological correlates of protection from E. coli bladder colonization. These findings are an important first step toward the development of a subunit vaccine to prevent urinary tract infections and demonstrate how targeting an entire class of molecules that are collectively required for pathogenesis may represent a fundamental strategy to combat infections. PMID:19806177

  18. Protective immunity induced in mice by F0 and FII antigens purified from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Diniz, S N; Reis, B S; Goes, T S; Zouain, C S; Leite, M F; Goes, A M

    2004-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis causes a chronic granulomatous mycosis prevalent in South America, and cell-mediated immunity represents the principal mode of protection against this fungal infection. We investigated whether immunization with P. brasiliensis antigens fractionated by anionic chromatography on fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) could elicit protective immunity. BALB/c mice were immunized by subcutaneous injection of either 10 microg fractions 0 (F0), II (FII) or III (FIII) in the presence of 100 microg of Corynebacterium parvum and 1 mg of Al(OH)(3) and challenged with pathogenic P. brasiliensis strain. Mice immunized with F0 presented cellular and humoral immune responses with significant production of IFN-gamma, and high levels of IgG2a and IgG3 isotypes. Immunization with FII induced significant production of IFN-gamma and IL-10 associated with high levels of IgG1 and IgG2a. It was demonstrated that immunization with F0 or FII promoted significant decrease of organ colony-forming units (CFUs) in the lung after challenge infection without fungi dissemination to the spleen or liver. In contrast, FIII immunized mice develop a progressive disseminated disease to spleen and liver presented significant levels of INF-gamma, IL-10 or TGF-beta associated with high production of IgG1 and IgG2a with low production of IgG2b and IgG3 after challenge infection. Taken together, these findings suggest that antigens of F0 and FII are reliable vaccine candidates against the paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:14670331

  19. Adenovirus-mediated delivery of an anti-V antigen monoclonal antibody protects mice against a lethal Yersinia pestis challenge.

    PubMed

    Sofer-Podesta, Carolina; Ang, John; Hackett, Neil R; Senina, Svetlana; Perlin, David; Crystal, Ronald G; Boyer, Julie L

    2009-04-01

    Pneumonic plague, caused by inhalation of Yersinia pestis, represents a major bioterrorism threat for which no vaccine is available. Based on the knowledge that genetic delivery of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vectors results in rapid, high-level antibody expression, we evaluated the hypothesis that Ad-mediated delivery of a neutralizing antibody directed against the Y. pestis V antigen would protect mice against a Y. pestis challenge. MAbs specific for the Y. pestis V antigen were generated, and the most effective in protecting mice against a lethal intranasal Y. pestis challenge was chosen for further study. The coding sequences for the heavy and light chains were isolated from the corresponding hybridoma and inserted into a replication-defective serotype 5 human Ad gene transfer vector (AdalphaV). Western analysis of AdalphaV-infected cell supernatants demonstrated completely assembled antibodies reactive with V antigen. Following AdalphaV administration to mice, high levels of anti-V antigen antibody titers were detectable as early as 1 day postadministration, peaked by day 3, and remained detectable through a 12-week time course. When animals that received AdalphaV were challenged with Y. pestis at day 4 post-AdalphaV administration, 80% of the animals were protected, while 0% of control animals survived (P < 0.01). Ad-mediated delivery of a V antigen-neutralizing antibody is an effective therapy against plague in experimental animals and could be developed as a rapidly acting antiplague therapeutic.

  20. Antibodies to Antigenic Site A of Influenza H7 Hemagglutinin Provide Protection against H7N9 Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Schmeisser, Falko; Vasudevan, Anupama; Verma, Swati; Wang, Wei; Alvarado, Esmeralda; Weiss, Carol; Atukorale, Vajini; Meseda, Clement; Weir, Jerry P.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying major antigenic and protective epitopes of the H7 hemagglutinin (HA) will be important for understanding the antibody response to vaccines developed against the novel influenza H7N9 viruses that emerged in China in 2013. To facilitate antigenic characterization of the H7N9 HA and to develop reagents for evaluation of H7N9 candidate vaccines, we generated a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to the HA of A/Shanghai/2/2013 using mammalian cell-derived virus-like particles (VLP) containing the H7 HA. Neutralizing antibodies identified an HA epitope corresponding to antigenic site A on the structurally similar influenza H3 hemagglutinin. Importantly, the neutralizing antibodies protect against A/Shanghai/2/2013 challenge. This antigenic site is conserved among many H7 viruses, including strains of both Eurasian and North American lineage, and the isolated neutralizing antibodies are cross-reactive with older H7 vaccine strains. The results indicate that the identified antigenic site is a potentially important protective epitope and suggest the potential benefit of cross-reactive antibody responses to vaccination with H7 candidate vaccines. PMID:25629172

  1. Protecting Communication Departments: Reflections on the Nebraska Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Ronald; Seiler, William

    1999-01-01

    Moves away from a discussion of crisis management to reflect on vulnerabilities and strengths of communication departments in the larger university. Considers the general strengths and weaknesses of communication departments in the context of thinking about the reasons for the University of Nebraska Lincoln's vulnerability to budget cutting and…

  2. Intranasal immunization with protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis induces a long-term immunological memory response.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sun-Je; Kang, Seok-Seong; Park, Sung-Moo; Yang, Jae Seung; Song, Man Ki; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Although intranasal vaccination has been shown to be effective for the protection against inhalational anthrax, establishment of long-term immunity has yet to be achieved. Here, we investigated whether intranasal immunization with recombinant protective antigen (rPA) of Bacillus anthracis induces immunological memory responses in the mucosal and systemic compartments. Intranasal immunization with rPA plus cholera toxin (CT) sustained PA-specific antibody responses for 6 months in lung, nasal washes, and vaginal washes as well as serum. A significant induction of PA-specific memory B cells was observed in spleen, cervical lymph nodes (CLNs) and lung after booster immunization. Furthermore, intranasal immunization with rPA plus CT remarkably generated effector memory CD4(+) T cells in the lung. PA-specific CD4(+) T cells preferentially increased the expression of Th1- and Th17-type cytokines in lung, but not in spleen or CLNs. Collectively, the intranasal immunization with rPA plus CT promoted immunologic memory responses in the mucosal and systemic compartments, providing long-term immunity.

  3. Protective immunity against Taenia crassiceps murine cysticercosis induced by DNA vaccination with a Taenia saginata tegument antigen.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Gabriela; Fragoso, Gladis; Garate, Teresa; Hernández, Beatriz; Ferrero, Patricia; Foster-Cuevas, Mildred; Parkhouse, R Michael E; Harrison, Leslie J S; Briones, Sergio López; González, Luis Miguel; Sciutto, Edda

    2002-11-01

    This study investigated the protective capacity of the recombinant Taenia saginata Tso18 antigen administered as a DNA vaccine in the Taenia crassiceps murine model of cysticercosis. This Tso18 DNA sequence, isolated from a T. saginata oncosphere cDNA library, has homologies with Taenia solium and Echinococcus sp. It was cloned in the pcDNA3.1 plasmid and injected once intramuscularly into mice. Compared to saline-vaccinated control mice, immunization reduced the parasite burden by 57.3-81.4%, while lower levels of non-specific protection were induced in control mice injected with the plasmid pcDNA3.1 (18.8-33.1%) or a plasmid with irrelevant construct, pcDNA3.1/3D15 (33.4-38.8%). Importantly, significant levels of protection were observed between the pcDNA3.1/Tso18 plasmid and pcDNA3.1/3D15 plasmid immunized mice. Mice immunized with pTso18 synthesized low levels of, primarily IgG1 sub-class, antibodies. These antibodies were shown to recognize a 66 kDa antigen fraction of T. crassiceps and T. solium. Splenocytes enriched in both CD4+CD8- and CD4-CD8+ T cells from these vaccinated mice proliferated in vitro when exposed to antigens from both T. solium and T. crassiceps cestodes. Immunolocalization studies revealed the Tso18 antigen in oncospheres of T. saginata and T. solium, in the adult tapeworm and in the tegument of T. solium cysticerci. The protective capacity of this antigen and its extensive distribution in different stages, species and genera of cestodes points to the potential of Tso18 antigen for the possible design of a vaccine against cestodes.

  4. Recombinant Salmonella Expressing Burkholderia mallei LPS O Antigen Provides Protection in a Murine Model of Melioidosis and Glanders

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Dina A.; Scarff, Jennifer M.; Garcia, Preston P.; Cassidy, Sara K. B.; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Waag, David M.; Inzana, Thomas J.; Goldberg, Joanna B.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are the etiologic agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively. These bacteria are highly infectious via the respiratory route and can cause severe and often fatal diseases in humans and animals. Both species are considered potential agents of biological warfare; they are classified as category B priority pathogens. Currently there are no human or veterinary vaccines available against these pathogens. Consequently efforts are directed towards the development of an efficacious and safe vaccine. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an immunodominant antigen and potent stimulator of host immune responses. B. mallei express LPS that is structurally similar to that expressed by B. pseudomallei, suggesting the possibility of constructing a single protective vaccine against melioidosis and glanders. Previous studies of others have shown that antibodies against B. mallei or B. pseudomallei LPS partially protect mice against subsequent lethal virulent Burkholderia challenge. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of recombinant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen against lethal intranasal infection with Burkholderia thailandensis, a surrogate for biothreat Burkholderia spp. in a murine model that mimics melioidosis and glanders. All vaccine-immunized mice developed a specific antibody response to B. mallei and B. pseudomallei O antigen and to B. thailandensis and were significantly protected against challenge with a lethal dose of B. thailandensis. These results suggest that live-attenuated SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen is a promising platform for developing a safe and effective vaccine. PMID:26148026

  5. Recombinant Salmonella Expressing Burkholderia mallei LPS O Antigen Provides Protection in a Murine Model of Melioidosis and Glanders.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Dina A; Scarff, Jennifer M; Garcia, Preston P; Cassidy, Sara K B; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Waag, David M; Inzana, Thomas J; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are the etiologic agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively. These bacteria are highly infectious via the respiratory route and can cause severe and often fatal diseases in humans and animals. Both species are considered potential agents of biological warfare; they are classified as category B priority pathogens. Currently there are no human or veterinary vaccines available against these pathogens. Consequently efforts are directed towards the development of an efficacious and safe vaccine. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an immunodominant antigen and potent stimulator of host immune responses. B. mallei express LPS that is structurally similar to that expressed by B. pseudomallei, suggesting the possibility of constructing a single protective vaccine against melioidosis and glanders. Previous studies of others have shown that antibodies against B. mallei or B. pseudomallei LPS partially protect mice against subsequent lethal virulent Burkholderia challenge. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of recombinant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen against lethal intranasal infection with Burkholderia thailandensis, a surrogate for biothreat Burkholderia spp. in a murine model that mimics melioidosis and glanders. All vaccine-immunized mice developed a specific antibody response to B. mallei and B. pseudomallei O antigen and to B. thailandensis and were significantly protected against challenge with a lethal dose of B. thailandensis. These results suggest that live-attenuated SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen is a promising platform for developing a safe and effective vaccine.

  6. Superoxide dismutase SodB is a protective antigen against Campylobacter jejuni colonisation in chickens.

    PubMed

    Chintoan-Uta, Cosmin; Cassady-Cain, Robin L; Al-Haideri, Halah; Watson, Eleanor; Kelly, David J; Smith, David G E; Sparks, Nick H C; Kaiser, Pete; Stevens, Mark P

    2015-11-17

    Campylobacter is the leading cause of foodborne diarrhoeal illness in the developed world and consumption or handling of contaminated poultry meat is the principal source of infection. Strategies to control Campylobacter in broilers prior to slaughter are urgently required and are predicted to limit the incidence of human campylobacteriosis. Towards this aim, a purified recombinant subunit vaccine based on the superoxide dismutase (SodB) protein of C. jejuni M1 was developed and tested in White Leghorn birds. Birds were vaccinated on the day of hatch and 14 days later with SodB fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST) or purified GST alone. Birds were challenged with C. jejuni M1 at 28 days of age and caecal Campylobacter counts determined at weekly intervals. Across three independent trials, the vaccine induced a statistically significant 1 log10 reduction in caecal Campylobacter numbers in vaccinated birds compared to age-matched GST-vaccinated controls. Significant induction of antigen-specific serum IgY was detected in all vaccinated birds, however the magnitude and timing of SodB-specific IgY did not correlate with lower numbers of C. jejuni. Antibodies from SodB-vaccinated chickens detected the protein in the periplasm and not membrane fractions or on the bacterial surface, suggesting that the protection observed may not be strictly antibody-mediated. SodB may be useful as a constituent of vaccines for control of C. jejuni infection in broiler birds, however modest protection was observed late relative to the life of broiler birds and further studies are required to potentiate the magnitude and timing of protection.

  7. Superoxide dismutase SodB is a protective antigen against Campylobacter jejuni colonisation in chickens.

    PubMed

    Chintoan-Uta, Cosmin; Cassady-Cain, Robin L; Al-Haideri, Halah; Watson, Eleanor; Kelly, David J; Smith, David G E; Sparks, Nick H C; Kaiser, Pete; Stevens, Mark P

    2015-11-17

    Campylobacter is the leading cause of foodborne diarrhoeal illness in the developed world and consumption or handling of contaminated poultry meat is the principal source of infection. Strategies to control Campylobacter in broilers prior to slaughter are urgently required and are predicted to limit the incidence of human campylobacteriosis. Towards this aim, a purified recombinant subunit vaccine based on the superoxide dismutase (SodB) protein of C. jejuni M1 was developed and tested in White Leghorn birds. Birds were vaccinated on the day of hatch and 14 days later with SodB fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST) or purified GST alone. Birds were challenged with C. jejuni M1 at 28 days of age and caecal Campylobacter counts determined at weekly intervals. Across three independent trials, the vaccine induced a statistically significant 1 log10 reduction in caecal Campylobacter numbers in vaccinated birds compared to age-matched GST-vaccinated controls. Significant induction of antigen-specific serum IgY was detected in all vaccinated birds, however the magnitude and timing of SodB-specific IgY did not correlate with lower numbers of C. jejuni. Antibodies from SodB-vaccinated chickens detected the protein in the periplasm and not membrane fractions or on the bacterial surface, suggesting that the protection observed may not be strictly antibody-mediated. SodB may be useful as a constituent of vaccines for control of C. jejuni infection in broiler birds, however modest protection was observed late relative to the life of broiler birds and further studies are required to potentiate the magnitude and timing of protection. PMID:26458797

  8. Antibody to a conserved antigenic target is protective against diverse prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens.

    PubMed

    Cywes-Bentley, Colette; Skurnik, David; Zaidi, Tanweer; Roux, Damien; Deoliveira, Rosane B; Garrett, Wendy S; Lu, Xi; O'Malley, Jennifer; Kinzel, Kathryn; Zaidi, Tauqeer; Rey, Astrid; Perrin, Christophe; Fichorova, Raina N; Kayatani, Alexander K K; Maira-Litràn, Tomas; Gening, Marina L; Tsvetkov, Yury E; Nifantiev, Nikolay E; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Pelton, Stephen I; Golenbock, Douglas T; Pier, Gerald B

    2013-06-11

    Microbial capsular antigens are effective vaccines but are chemically and immunologically diverse, resulting in a major barrier to their use against multiple pathogens. A β-(1→6)-linked poly-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG) surface capsule is synthesized by four proteins encoded in genetic loci designated intercellular adhesion in Staphylococcus aureus or polyglucosamine in selected Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. We report that many microbial pathogens lacking an identifiable intercellular adhesion or polyglucosamine locus produce PNAG, including Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal pathogens, as well as protozoa, e.g., Trichomonas vaginalis, Plasmodium berghei, and sporozoites and blood-stage forms of Plasmodium falciparum. Natural antibody to PNAG is common in humans and animals and binds primarily to the highly acetylated glycoform of PNAG but is not protective against infection due to lack of deposition of complement opsonins. Polyclonal animal antibody raised to deacetylated glycoforms of PNAG and a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that both bind to native and deacetylated glycoforms of PNAG mediated complement-dependent opsonic or bactericidal killing and protected mice against local and/or systemic infections by Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Listeria monocytogenes, Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B, Candida albicans, and P. berghei ANKA, and against colonic pathology in a model of infectious colitis. PNAG is also a capsular polysaccharide for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and nontypable Hemophilus influenzae, and protects cells from environmental stress. Vaccination targeting PNAG could contribute to immunity against serious and diverse prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens, and the conserved production of PNAG suggests that it is a critical factor in microbial biology. PMID:23716675

  9. Antigen Sparing and Enhanced Protection Using A Novel rOv-ASP-1 Adjuvant in Aqueous Formulation with Influenza Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jiu; Fisher, Erin M.; Hensley, Scott E.; Lustigman, Sara; Murasko, Donna M.; Shen, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Influenza is one of the most common infectious diseases endangering the health of humans, especially young children and the elderly. Although vaccination is the most effective means of protection against influenza, frequent mutations in viral surface antigens, low protective efficacy of the influenza vaccine in the elderly, slow production process and the potential of vaccine supply shortage during a pandemic are significant limitations of current vaccines. Adjuvants have been used to enhance the efficacy of a variety of vaccines; however, no adjuvant is included in current influenza vaccines approved in the United States. In this study, we found that a novel adjuvant, rOv-ASP-1, co-administrated with inactivated influenza vaccine using an aqueous formulation, substantially improved the influenza-specific antibody response and protection against lethal infection in a mouse model. rOv-ASP-1 enhanced the magnitude of the specific antibody response after immunization with low doses of influenza vaccine, allowing antigen-sparring by 10-fold. The rOv-ASP-1 formulated vaccine induced a more rapid response and a stronger Th1-associated antibody response compared to vaccine alone and to the vaccine formulated with the adjuvant alum. Importantly, rOv-ASP-1 significantly enhanced cross-reactive antibody responses and protection against challenge with an antigenically distinct strain. These results demonstrate that rOv-ASP-1 is an effective adjuvant that: 1) accelerates and enhances the specific antibody response induced by influenza vaccine; 2) allows for antigen sparing; and 3) augments a Th1-biased and cross-reactive antibody response that confers protection against an antigenically distinct strain. PMID:24681229

  10. Antigen sparing and enhanced protection using a novel rOv-ASP-1 adjuvant in aqueous formulation with influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiu; Fisher, Erin M; Hensley, Scott E; Lustigman, Sara; Murasko, Donna M; Shen, Hao

    2014-05-13

    Influenza is one of the most common infectious diseases endangering the health of humans, especially young children and the elderly. Although vaccination is the most effective means of protection against influenza, frequent mutations in viral surface antigens, low protective efficacy of the influenza vaccine in the elderly, slow production process and the potential of vaccine supply shortage during a pandemic are significant limitations of current vaccines. Adjuvants have been used to enhance the efficacy of a variety of vaccines; however, no adjuvant is included in current influenza vaccines approved in the United States. In this study, we found that a novel adjuvant, rOv-ASP-1, co-administrated with inactivated influenza vaccine using an aqueous formulation, substantially improved the influenza-specific antibody response and protection against lethal infection in a mouse model. rOv-ASP-1 enhanced the magnitude of the specific antibody response after immunization with low doses of influenza vaccine, allowing antigen-sparring by 10-fold. The rOv-ASP-1 formulated vaccine induced a more rapid response and a stronger Th1-associated antibody response compared to vaccine alone and to the vaccine formulated with the adjuvant alum. Importantly, rOv-ASP-1 significantly enhanced cross-reactive antibody responses and protection against challenge with an antigenically distinct strain. These results demonstrate that rOv-ASP-1 is an effective adjuvant that: (1) accelerates and enhances the specific antibody response induced by influenza vaccine; (2) allows for antigen sparing; and (3) augments a Th1-biased and cross-reactive antibody response that confers protection against an antigenically distinct strain.

  11. Antigen sparing and enhanced protection using a novel rOv-ASP-1 adjuvant in aqueous formulation with influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiu; Fisher, Erin M; Hensley, Scott E; Lustigman, Sara; Murasko, Donna M; Shen, Hao

    2014-05-13

    Influenza is one of the most common infectious diseases endangering the health of humans, especially young children and the elderly. Although vaccination is the most effective means of protection against influenza, frequent mutations in viral surface antigens, low protective efficacy of the influenza vaccine in the elderly, slow production process and the potential of vaccine supply shortage during a pandemic are significant limitations of current vaccines. Adjuvants have been used to enhance the efficacy of a variety of vaccines; however, no adjuvant is included in current influenza vaccines approved in the United States. In this study, we found that a novel adjuvant, rOv-ASP-1, co-administrated with inactivated influenza vaccine using an aqueous formulation, substantially improved the influenza-specific antibody response and protection against lethal infection in a mouse model. rOv-ASP-1 enhanced the magnitude of the specific antibody response after immunization with low doses of influenza vaccine, allowing antigen-sparring by 10-fold. The rOv-ASP-1 formulated vaccine induced a more rapid response and a stronger Th1-associated antibody response compared to vaccine alone and to the vaccine formulated with the adjuvant alum. Importantly, rOv-ASP-1 significantly enhanced cross-reactive antibody responses and protection against challenge with an antigenically distinct strain. These results demonstrate that rOv-ASP-1 is an effective adjuvant that: (1) accelerates and enhances the specific antibody response induced by influenza vaccine; (2) allows for antigen sparing; and (3) augments a Th1-biased and cross-reactive antibody response that confers protection against an antigenically distinct strain. PMID:24681229

  12. Expression and refolding of the protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis: A model for high-throughput screening of antigenic recombinant protein refolding.

    PubMed

    Pavan, María Elisa; Pavan, Esteban Enrique; Cairó, Fabián Martín; Pettinari, María Julia

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) is a well known and relevant immunogenic protein that is the basis for both anthrax vaccines and diagnostic methods. Properly folded antigenic PA is necessary for these applications. In this study a high level of PA was obtained in recombinant Escherichia coli. The protein was initially accumulated in inclusion bodies, which facilitated its efficient purification by simple washing steps; however, it could not be recognized by specific antibodies. Refolding conditions were subsequently analyzed in a high-throughput manner that enabled nearly a hundred different conditions to be tested simultaneously. The recovery of the ability of PA to be recognized by antibodies was screened by dot blot using a coefficient that provided a measure of properly refolded protein levels with a high degree of discrimination. The best refolding conditions resulted in a tenfold increase in the intensity of the dot blot compared to the control. The only refolding additive that consistently yielded good results was L-arginine. The statistical analysis identified both cooperative and negative interactions between the different refolding additives. The high-throughput approach described in this study that enabled overproduction, purification and refolding of PA in a simple and straightforward manner, can be potentially useful for the rapid screening of adequate refolding conditions for other overexpressed antigenic proteins. PMID:26777581

  13. Expression and refolding of the protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis: A model for high-throughput screening of antigenic recombinant protein refolding.

    PubMed

    Pavan, María Elisa; Pavan, Esteban Enrique; Cairó, Fabián Martín; Pettinari, María Julia

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) is a well known and relevant immunogenic protein that is the basis for both anthrax vaccines and diagnostic methods. Properly folded antigenic PA is necessary for these applications. In this study a high level of PA was obtained in recombinant Escherichia coli. The protein was initially accumulated in inclusion bodies, which facilitated its efficient purification by simple washing steps; however, it could not be recognized by specific antibodies. Refolding conditions were subsequently analyzed in a high-throughput manner that enabled nearly a hundred different conditions to be tested simultaneously. The recovery of the ability of PA to be recognized by antibodies was screened by dot blot using a coefficient that provided a measure of properly refolded protein levels with a high degree of discrimination. The best refolding conditions resulted in a tenfold increase in the intensity of the dot blot compared to the control. The only refolding additive that consistently yielded good results was L-arginine. The statistical analysis identified both cooperative and negative interactions between the different refolding additives. The high-throughput approach described in this study that enabled overproduction, purification and refolding of PA in a simple and straightforward manner, can be potentially useful for the rapid screening of adequate refolding conditions for other overexpressed antigenic proteins.

  14. A recombinant vaccine expressing a mammalian Mycobacterium sp. antigen is immunostimulatory but not protective in striped bass.

    PubMed

    Pasnik, David J; Vemulapalli, Ramesh; Smith, Stephen A; Schurig, Gerhardt G

    2003-09-15

    A recombinant vaccine was constructed for piscine mycobacteriosis utilizing a Brucella abortus strain RB51 vector expressing a mammalian Mycobacterium sp. 85A antigen. Juvenile striped bass were inoculated with the resulting construct at doses equivalent to 10(6), 10(7), 10(8), 10(9), and 10(10) colony-forming units/fish. Blood and tissue samples from these fish demonstrated significant specific humoral and cell-mediated immune responses towards the 85A antigen in a dose-dependent manner. However, survival studies determined that inoculated fish failed to demonstrate cross-protective responses after live Mycobacterium marinum challenge 70 days post-inoculation.

  15. Protection of pigs against Taenia solium cysticercosis by immunization with novel recombinant antigens.

    PubMed

    Gauci, Charles G; Jayashi, César M; Gonzalez, Armando E; Lackenby, Julia; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2012-06-01

    Recombinant antigens from the oncosphere stage of the parasite Taenia solium were expressed in Escherichia coli. The TSOL16, TSOL45-1A and TSOL45-1B recombinant antigens, each consisting of fibronectin type III (FnIII) domain S, were produced as fusion proteins with glutathione S-transferase (GST) and maltose binding protein (MBP). Groups of pigs were immunized twice with the GST fusions of the antigens and boosted a third time with the MBP fusions prior to receiving a challenge infection with T. solium eggs. The TSOL16 antigen was found to be capable of inducing high levels of immunity in pigs against a challenge infection with T. solium. Immunological investigations identified differences in immune responses in the pigs vaccinated with the various antigens. The results demonstrate that the TSOL16 antigen could be a valuable adjunct to current porcine vaccination approaches and may allow the further development of new vaccination strategies against T. solium cysticercosis.

  16. Thermal Aggregation of Recombinant Protective Antigen: Aggregate Morphology and Growth Rate

    PubMed Central

    Belton, Daniel J.; Miller, Aline F.

    2013-01-01

    The thermal aggregation of the biopharmaceutical protein recombinant protective antigen (rPA) has been explored, and the associated kinetics and thermodynamic parameters have been extracted using optical and environmental scanning electron microscopies (ESEMs) and ultraviolet light scattering spectroscopy (UV-LSS). Visual observations and turbidity measurements provided an overall picture of the aggregation process, suggesting a two-step mechanism. Microscopy was used to examine the structure of aggregates, revealing an open morphology formed by the clustering of the microscopic aggregate particles. UV-LSS was used and developed to elucidate the growth rate of these particles, which formed in the first stage of the aggregation process. Their growth rate is observed to be high initially, before falling to converge on a final size that correlates with the ESEM data. The results suggest that the particle growth rate is limited by rPA monomer concentration, and by obtaining data over a range of incubation temperatures, an approach was developed to model the aggregation kinetics and extract the rate constants and the temperature dependence of aggregation. In doing so, we quantified the susceptibility of rPA aggregation under different temperature and environmental conditions and moreover demonstrated a novel use of UV spectrometry to monitor the particle aggregation quantitatively, in situ, in a nondestructive and time-resolved manner. PMID:23476645

  17. Analysis of protective antigen peptide binding motifs using bacterial display technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkes, Deborah A.; Dorsey, Brandi L.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2015-05-01

    In today's fast-paced world, a new biological threat could emerge at any time, necessitating a prompt, reliable, inexpensive detection reagent in each case. Combined with magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS), bacterial display technology makes it possible to isolate selective, high affinity peptide reagents in days to weeks. Utilizing the eCPX display scaffold is also a rapid way to screen potential peptide reagents. Peptide affinity reagents for protective antigen (PA) of the biothreat Bacillus anthracis were previously discovered using bacterial display. Bioinformatics analysis resulted in the consensus sequence WXCFTC. Additionally, we have discovered PA binding peptides with a WW motif, one of which, YGLHPWWKNAPIGQR, can pull down PA from 1% human serum. The strength of these two motifs combined, to obtain a WWCFTC consensus, is assessed here using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS). While monitoring binding to PA, overall expression of the display scaffold was assessed using the YPet Mona expression control tag (YPet), and specificity was assessed by binding to Streptavidin R-Phycoerythrin (SAPE). The importance of high YPet binding is highlighted as many of the peptides in one of the three replicate experiments fell below our 80% binding threshold. We demonstrate that it is preferable to discard this experiment, due to questionable expression of the peptide itself, than to try to normalize for relative expression. The peptides containing the WWCFTC consensus were of higher affinity and greater specificity than the peptides containing the WW consensus alone, validating further investigation to optimize known PA binders.

  18. Delivery of Antibody Mimics into Mammalian Cells via Anthrax Toxin Protective Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xiaoli; Rabideau, Amy E; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2014-01-01

    Antibody mimics have significant scientific and therapeutic utility for the disruption of protein–protein interactions inside cells; however, their delivery to the cell cytosol remains a major challenge. Here we show that protective antigen (PA), a component of anthrax toxin, efficiently transports commonly used antibody mimics to the cytosol of mammalian cells when conjugated to the N-terminal domain of LF (LFN). In contrast, a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) was not able to deliver any of these antibody mimics into the cell cytosol. The refolding and binding of a transported tandem monobody to Bcr-Abl (its protein target) in chronic myeloid leukemia cells were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. We also observed inhibition of Bcr-Abl kinase activity and induction of apoptosis caused by the monobody. In a separate case, we show disruption of key interactions in the MAPK signaling pathway after PA-mediated delivery of an affibody binder that targets hRaf-1. We show for the first time that PA can deliver bioactive antibody mimics to disrupt intracellular protein–protein interactions. This technology adds a useful tool to expand the applications of these modern agents to the intracellular milieu. PMID:25250705

  19. Protection against Taenia pisiformis larval infection induced by a recombinant oncosphere antigen vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Yang, D Y; Xie, Y; Nong, X; Huang, X; Fu, Y; Gu, X B; Wang, S X; Peng, X R; Yang, G Y

    2014-02-13

    Taenia pisiformis larvae cause significant health problems to rabbits. At present, it is not known whether the recombinant antigen from the T. pisiformis oncosphere is able to confer protective immunity against T. pisiformis larval infection. The full-length cDNA was cloned into a pET32a (+) vector, and the recombinant protein was then expressed in BL21 (DE3) cells. Vaccination with the purified rTpUbc2 coupled with QuilA was carried out in New Zealand rabbits to evaluate the immunoprotective effect against T. pisiformis infection. The full-length open reading frame of the TpUbc2 gene was 444 bp, and encoded a 16.63-kDa protein. Finally, rTpUbc2 was used to evaluate the ability to induce immunoprotective responses in rabbits. A 79.3-90.8% reduction (P < 0.01) in the recovery of larvae was observed in the experimental group compared to the control group. Specific anti-rTpUbc2 antibodies from immunized rabbits had significantly higher levels of IgG (P < 0.01) compared to the control group; however, no significant difference in IgA levels was found between groups (P > 0.05). Our data support the use of rTpUbc2 as a potential candidate to develop a vaccine against T. pisiformis larvae.

  20. Targeting HER2-positive cancer cells with receptor-redirected anthrax protective antigen

    PubMed Central

    McCluskey, Andrew J.; Olive, Andrew J.; Starnbach, Michael N.; Collier, R. John

    2012-01-01

    Targeted therapeutics have emerged in recent years as an attractive approach to treating various types of cancer. One approach is to modify a cytocidal protein toxin to direct its action to a specific population of cancer cells. We created a targeted toxin in which the receptor-binding and pore-forming moiety of anthrax toxin, termed Protective Antigen (PA), was modified to redirect its receptor specificity to HER2, a marker expressed at the surface of a significant fraction of breast and ovarian tumors. The resulting fusion protein (mPA-ZHER2) delivered cytocidal effectors specifically into HER2-positive tumor cells, including a trastuzumab-resistant line, causing death of the cells. No off-target killing of HER2-negative cells was observed, either with homogeneous populations or with mixtures of HER2-positive and HER2-negative cells. A mixture of mPA variants targeting different receptors mediated killing of cells bearing either receptor, without affecting cells devoid of these receptors. Anthrax toxin may serve as an effective platform for developing therapeutics to ablate cells bearing HER2 or other tumor-specific cell-surface markers. PMID:23290417

  1. Long-Range Stabilization of Anthrax Protective Antigen upon Binding to CMG2

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA) mediates entry of edema factor (EF) and lethal factor (LF) into the cytoplasmic space of the cells through the formation of a membrane-spanning pore. To do this, PA must initially bind to a host cellular receptor. Recent mass spectrometry analysis of PA using histidine hydrogen–deuterium exchange (His-HDX) has shown that binding of the von Willebrand factor A (vWA) domain of the receptor capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2) lowers the exchange rates of the imidazole C2 hydrogen of several histidines, suggesting that receptor binding decreases the structural flexibility of PA. Here, using His-HDX and fluorescence as a function of denaturant, and protease susceptibility, we show that binding of the vWA domain of CMG2 largely increases the stability of PA and the effect reaches up to 70 Å from the receptor binding interface. We also show that the pKa values and HDX rates of histidines located in separate domains change upon receptor binding. These results indicate that when one end of the protein is anchored, the structure of PA is tightened, noncovalent interactions are strengthened, and the global stability of the protein increases. These findings suggest that CMG2 may be used to stabilize PA in future anthrax vaccines. PMID:25186975

  2. Conservation of antigen components from two recombinant hybrid proteins protective against malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, B; Nau, U; Hundt, E

    1993-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that two hybrid proteins carrying partial sequences of the blood-stage antigens SERP, HRPII, and MSAI from Plasmodium falciparum confer protective immunity on Aotus monkeys against an experimental parasite infection (B. Knapp, E. Hundt, B. Enders, and H. A. Küpper, Infect. Immun. 60:2397-2401, 1992). The malarial components of the hybrid proteins consist of amino acid residues 630 to 892 of SERP, amino acid residues 146 to 260 of MSAI, and the 189 C-terminal residues of HRPII. We have studied the diversity of these protein regions in field isolates of P. falciparum. Genomic DNA was extracted from the blood of six donors from two different areas where malaria is endemic. The gene regions of SERP and MSAI coding for the corresponding sequences of the protective hybrid proteins and the exon II region of the HRPII gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. All three regions were found to be highly conserved. In the 262-amino-acid fragment of SERP, one single conservative amino acid substitution was found. The exon II region of HRPII showed only a slight variability in number and arrangement of the repeat units. The 115-amino-acid fragment of MSAI which is located within an N-terminal region known to be conserved among different parasite strains was shown to be the most variable among the vaccine components: amino acid substitutions were found in 14 different positions of this MSAI region when both laboratory strains and field isolates were compared. PMID:8432609

  3. Mimotope-Based Vaccines of Leishmania infantum Antigens and Their Protective Efficacy against Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Lourena Emanuele; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Pereira, Nathália Cristina de Jesus; Lima, Mayara Ingrid Sousa; Duarte, Mariana Costa; Martins, Vivian Tamietti; Lage, Paula Sousa; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Ribeiro, Tatiana Gomes; Melo, Maria Norma; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Soto, Manuel; Tavares, Carlos Alberto Pereira; Chávez-Fumagalli, Miguel Angel; Coelho, Eduardo Antonio Ferraz

    2014-01-01

    Background The development of cost-effective prophylactic strategies to prevent leishmaniasis has become a high-priority. The present study has used the phage display technology to identify new immunogens, which were evaluated as vaccines in the murine model of visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Epitope-based immunogens, represented by phage-fused peptides that mimic Leishmania infantum antigens, were selected according to their affinity to antibodies from asymptomatic and symptomatic VL dogs' sera. Methodology/Main Findings Twenty phage clones were selected after three selection cycles, and were evaluated by means of in vitro assays of the immune stimulation of spleen cells derived from naive and chronically infected with L. infantum BALB/c mice. Clones that were able to induce specific Th1 immune response, represented by high levels of IFN-γ and low levels of IL-4 were selected, and based on their selectivity and specificity, two clones, namely B10 and C01, were further employed in the vaccination protocols. BALB/c mice vaccinated with clones plus saponin showed both a high and specific production of IFN-γ, IL-12, and GM-CSF after in vitro stimulation with individual clones or L. infantum extracts. Additionally, these animals, when compared to control groups (saline, saponin, wild-type phage plus saponin, or non-relevant phage clone plus saponin), showed significant reductions in the parasite burden in the liver, spleen, bone marrow, and paws' draining lymph nodes. Protection was associated with an IL-12-dependent production of IFN-γ, mainly by CD8+ T cells, against parasite proteins. These animals also presented decreased parasite-mediated IL-4 and IL-10 responses, and increased levels of parasite-specific IgG2a antibodies. Conclusions/Significance This study describes two phage clones that mimic L. infantum antigens, which were directly used as immunogens in vaccines and presented Th1-type immune responses, and that significantly reduced the parasite burden. This

  4. Surface plasmon resonance measurements of plasma antibody avidity during primary and secondary responses to anthrax protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Heather E; Stewart, Shelley M; Kepler, Thomas B; Sempowski, Gregory D; Alam, S Munir

    2014-02-01

    Establishment of humoral immunity against pathogens is dependent on events that occur in the germinal center and the subsequent induction of high-affinity neutralizing antibodies. Quantitative assays that allow monitoring of affinity maturation and duration of antibody responses can provide useful information regarding the efficacy of vaccines and adjuvants. Using an anthrax protective antigen (rPA) and alum model antigen/adjuvant system, we describe a methodology for monitoring antigen-specific serum antibody concentration and avidity by surface plasmon resonance during primary and secondary immune responses. Our analyses showed that following a priming dose in mice, rPA-specific antibody concentration and avidity increases over time and reaches a maximal response in about six weeks, but gradually declines in the absence of antigenic boost. Germinal center reactions were observed early with maximal development achieved during the primary response, which coincided with peak antibody avidity responses to primary immunization. Boosting with antigen resulted in a rapid increase in rPA-specific antibody concentration and five-fold increase in avidity, which was not dependent on sustained GC development. The described methodology couples surface plasmon resonance-based plasma avidity measurements with germinal center analysis and provides a novel way to monitor humoral responses that can play a role in facilitating vaccine and adjuvant development.

  5. Scalable synthesis of Fmoc-protected GalNAc-threonine amino acid and T(N) antigen via nickel catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; McConnell, Matthew S; Nguyen, Hien M

    2015-04-17

    The highly α-selective and scalable synthesis of the Fmoc-protected GalNAc-threonine amino acid and TN antigen in gram scale (0.5-1 g) is described. The challenging 1,2-cis-2-amino glycosidic bond is addressed through a coupling of threonine residues with C(2)-N-ortho-(trifluoromethyl)benzylidenamino trihaloacetimidate donors mediated by Ni(4-F-PhCN)4(OTf)2. The desired 1,2-cis-2-amino glycoside was obtained in 66% yield (3.77 g) with α-only selectivity and subsequently transformed into the Fmoc-protected GalNAc-threonine and TN antigen. This operationally simple procedure no longer requires utilization of the commonly used C(2)-azido donors and overcomes many of the limitations associated with the synthesis of 1,2-cis linkage.

  6. IFNγ Responses to Pre-erythrocytic and Blood-stage Malaria Antigens Exhibit Differential Associations With Past Exposure and Subsequent Protection

    PubMed Central

    Jagannathan, Prasanna; Nankya, Felistas; Stoyanov, Cristina; Eccles-James, Ijeoma; Sikyomu, Esther; Naluwu, Kate; Wamala, Samuel; Nalubega, Mayimuna; Briggs, Jessica; Bowen, Katherine; Bigira, Victor; Kapisi, James; Kamya, Moses R.; Dorsey, Grant; Feeney, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The malaria-specific T-cell response is believed to be important for protective immunity. Antimalarial chemoprevention may affect this response by altering exposure to malaria antigens. Methods. We performed interferon γ (IFNγ) ELISpot assays to assess the cellular immune response to blood-stage and pre-erythrocytic antigens longitudinally from 1 to 3 years of age in 196 children enrolled in a randomized trial of antimalarial chemoprevention in Tororo, Uganda, an area of high transmission intensity. Results. IFNγ responses to blood-stage antigens, particularly MSP1, were frequently detected, strongly associated with recent malaria exposure, and lower in those adherent to chemoprevention compared to nonadherent children and those randomized to no chemoprevention. IFNγ responses to pre-erythrocytic antigens were infrequent and similar between children randomized to chemoprevention or no chemoprevention. Responses to blood-stage antigens were not associated with subsequent protection from malaria (aHR 0.96, P = .83), but responses to pre-erythrocytic antigens were associated with protection after adjusting for prior malaria exposure (aHR 0.52, P = .009). Conclusions. In this high transmission setting, IFNγ responses to blood-stage antigens were common and associated with recent exposure to malaria but not protection from subsequent malaria. Responses to pre-erythrocytic antigens were uncommon, not associated with exposure but were associated with protection from subsequent malaria. PMID:25520427

  7. Electrostatic ratchet in the protective antigen channel promotes anthrax toxin translocation.

    PubMed

    Wynia-Smith, Sarah L; Brown, Michael J; Chirichella, Gina; Kemalyan, Gigi; Krantz, Bryan A

    2012-12-21

    Central to the power-stroke and brownian-ratchet mechanisms of protein translocation is the process through which nonequilibrium fluctuations are rectified or ratcheted by the molecular motor to transport substrate proteins along a specific axis. We investigated the ratchet mechanism using anthrax toxin as a model. Anthrax toxin is a tripartite toxin comprised of the protective antigen (PA) component, a homooligomeric transmembrane translocase, which translocates two other enzyme components, lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF), into the cytosol of the host cell under the proton motive force (PMF). The PA-binding domains of LF and EF (LF(N) and EF(N)) possess identical folds and similar solution stabilities; however, EF(N) translocates ∼10-200-fold slower than LF(N), depending on the electrical potential (Δψ) and chemical potential (ΔpH) compositions of the PMF. From an analysis of LF(N)/EF(N) chimera proteins, we identified two 10-residue cassettes comprised of charged sequence that were responsible for the impaired translocation kinetics of EF(N). These cassettes have nonspecific electrostatic requirements: one surprisingly prefers acidic residues when driven by either a Δψ or a ΔpH; the second requires basic residues only when driven by a Δψ. Through modeling and experiment, we identified a charged surface in the PA channel responsible for charge selectivity. The charged surface latches the substrate and promotes PMF-driven transport. We propose an electrostatic ratchet in the channel, comprised of opposing rings of charged residues, enforces directionality by interacting with charged cassettes in the substrate, thereby generating forces sufficient to drive unfolding. PMID:23115233

  8. A role for PACE4 in the proteolytic activation of anthrax toxin protective antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, V M; Rehemtulla, A; Leppla, S H

    1997-01-01

    Several bacterial protein toxins require activation by eukaryotic proteases. Previous studies have shown that anthrax toxin protective antigen (PA), Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE), and diphtheria toxin (DT) are cleaved by furin C-terminal to the sequences RKKR, RQPR, and RVRR, respectively. Because furin-deficient cells retain some sensitivity to PA and DT, it is evident that other cellular proteases can activate these toxins. Whereas furin has been shown to require arginine residues at positions -1 and -4 for substrate recognition, another protease with an activity which could substitute for furin in toxin activation, the furin-related protease PACE4, requires basic residues in the -1, -2, and -4 positions of the substrate sequence. To examine the relative roles of furin and PACE4 in toxin activation, we used furin-deficient CHO cells (FD11 cells) transfected with either the furin (FD11/furin cells) or PACE4 (FD11/PACE4 cells) gene. Mutant PA proteins containing the cleavage sequence RAAR or KR were cytotoxic toward cells expressing only PACE4. In vitro cleavage data demonstrated that PACE4 can recognize RAAR and, to a much lesser extent, KR and RR. When extracts from PACE4-transfected cells were used as a source of proteases, PACE4 had minimal activity, indicating that it had been partially inactivated or did not remain associated with the cell membranes. Cleavage of iodinated PA containing the sequence RKKR or RAAR was detected on the surface of all cell types tested, but cleavage of a dibasic sequence was detected only intracellularly and only in cells that expressed furin or PACE4. The data provide evidence that PACE4 is present at the exterior of cells, that it plays a role in the proteolytic activation of anthrax toxin PA, and that PACE4 can activate substrates at the sequence RAAR or KR. PMID:9234799

  9. Intranasal vaccination with adjuvant-free S. aureus antigens effectively protects mice against experimental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Stegmiller, Nataly Pescinalli; Barcelos, Estevão Carlos; Leal, Janine Miranda; Covre, Luciana Polaco; Donatele, Dirlei Molinari; de Matos Guedes, Herbet Leonel; Cunegundes, Marco Cesar; Rodrigues, Rodrigo Ribeiro; Gomes, Daniel Cláudio Oliviera

    2016-06-24

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a Gram-positive coccal bacterium comprising part of the human skin, nares and gastrointestinal tract normal microbiota. It is also an important cause of nosocomial/community-acquired infections in humans and animals, which can cause a diverse array of infections, including sepsis, which is a progressive systemic inflammation response syndrome that is frequently fatal. The emergence of drug-resistant strains and the high toxicity of the treatments used for these infections point out the need to develop an effective, inexpensive and safe vaccine that can be used prophylactically. In this work, we used an experimental sepsis model to evaluate the effectiveness of whole antigens from S. aureus (SaAg) given by the intranasal route to induce protective immunity against S. aureus infection in mice. BALB/c mice were vaccinated via intranasal or intramuscular route with two doses of SaAg, followed by biocompatibility and immunogenicity evaluations. Vaccinated animals did not show any adverse effects associated with the vaccine, as determined by transaminase and creatinine measurements. Intranasal, but not intramuscular vaccination with SaAg led to a significant reduction in IL-10 production and was associated with increased level of IFN-γ and NO. SaAg intranasal vaccination was able to prime cellular and humoral immune responses and inducing a higher proliferation index and increased production of specific IgG1/IgG2, which contributed to decrease the bacterial load in both liver and the spleen and improve survival during sepsis. These findings present the first evidence of the effectiveness of whole Ag intranasal-based vaccine administration, which expands the vaccination possibilities against S. aureus infection. PMID:27091687

  10. Naturally acquired antibodies to Bacillus anthracis protective antigen in vultures of southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, P C B; Diekmann, M; Kilian, J W; Versfeld, W; De Vos, V; Arntzen, L; Wolter, K; Bartels, P; Kotze, A

    2008-06-01

    Sera from 19 wild caught vultures in northern Namibia and 15 (12 wild caught and three captive bred but with minimal histories) in North West Province, South Africa, were examined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for antibodies to the Bacillus anthracis toxin protective antigen (PA). As assessed from the baseline established with a control group of ten captive reared vultures with well-documented histories, elevated titres were found in 12 of the 19 (63%) wild caught Namibian birds as compared with none of the 15 South African ones. There was a highly significant difference between the Namibian group as a whole and the other groups (P < 0.001) and no significant difference between the South African and control groups (P > 0.05). Numbers in the Namibian group were too small to determine any significances in species-, sex- or age-related differences within the raw data showing elevated titres in four out of six Cape Vultures, Gyps coprotheres, six out of ten White-backed Vultures, Gyps africanus, and one out of three Lappet-faced Vultures, Aegypius tracheliotus, or in five of six males versus three of seven females, and ten of 15 adults versus one of four juveniles. The results are in line with the available data on the incidence of anthrax in northern Namibia and South Africa and the likely contact of the vultures tested with anthrax carcasses. It is not known whether elevated titre indicates infection per se in vultures or absorption of incompletely digested epitopes of the toxin or both. The results are discussed in relation to distances travelled by vultures as determined by new tracking techniques, how serology can reveal anthrax activity in an area and the issue of the role of vultures in transmission of anthrax. PMID:18788202

  11. Electrostatic Ratchet in the Protective Antigen Channel Promotes Anthrax Toxin Translocation*

    PubMed Central

    Wynia-Smith, Sarah L.; Brown, Michael J.; Chirichella, Gina; Kemalyan, Gigi; Krantz, Bryan A.

    2012-01-01

    Central to the power-stroke and Brownian-ratchet mechanisms of protein translocation is the process through which nonequilibrium fluctuations are rectified or ratcheted by the molecular motor to transport substrate proteins along a specific axis. We investigated the ratchet mechanism using anthrax toxin as a model. Anthrax toxin is a tripartite toxin comprised of the protective antigen (PA) component, a homooligomeric transmembrane translocase, which translocates two other enzyme components, lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF), into the cytosol of the host cell under the proton motive force (PMF). The PA-binding domains of LF and EF (LFN and EFN) possess identical folds and similar solution stabilities; however, EFN translocates ∼10–200-fold slower than LFN, depending on the electrical potential (Δψ) and chemical potential (ΔpH) compositions of the PMF. From an analysis of LFN/EFN chimera proteins, we identified two 10-residue cassettes comprised of charged sequence that were responsible for the impaired translocation kinetics of EFN. These cassettes have nonspecific electrostatic requirements: one surprisingly prefers acidic residues when driven by either a Δψ or a ΔpH; the second requires basic residues only when driven by a Δψ. Through modeling and experiment, we identified a charged surface in the PA channel responsible for charge selectivity. The charged surface latches the substrate and promotes PMF-driven transport. We propose an electrostatic ratchet in the channel, comprised of opposing rings of charged residues, enforces directionality by interacting with charged cassettes in the substrate, thereby generating forces sufficient to drive unfolding. PMID:23115233

  12. Naturally acquired antibodies to Bacillus anthracis protective antigen in vultures of southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, P C B; Diekmann, M; Kilian, J W; Versfeld, W; De Vos, V; Arntzen, L; Wolter, K; Bartels, P; Kotze, A

    2008-06-01

    Sera from 19 wild caught vultures in northern Namibia and 15 (12 wild caught and three captive bred but with minimal histories) in North West Province, South Africa, were examined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for antibodies to the Bacillus anthracis toxin protective antigen (PA). As assessed from the baseline established with a control group of ten captive reared vultures with well-documented histories, elevated titres were found in 12 of the 19 (63%) wild caught Namibian birds as compared with none of the 15 South African ones. There was a highly significant difference between the Namibian group as a whole and the other groups (P < 0.001) and no significant difference between the South African and control groups (P > 0.05). Numbers in the Namibian group were too small to determine any significances in species-, sex- or age-related differences within the raw data showing elevated titres in four out of six Cape Vultures, Gyps coprotheres, six out of ten White-backed Vultures, Gyps africanus, and one out of three Lappet-faced Vultures, Aegypius tracheliotus, or in five of six males versus three of seven females, and ten of 15 adults versus one of four juveniles. The results are in line with the available data on the incidence of anthrax in northern Namibia and South Africa and the likely contact of the vultures tested with anthrax carcasses. It is not known whether elevated titre indicates infection per se in vultures or absorption of incompletely digested epitopes of the toxin or both. The results are discussed in relation to distances travelled by vultures as determined by new tracking techniques, how serology can reveal anthrax activity in an area and the issue of the role of vultures in transmission of anthrax.

  13. Mechanistic Analysis of the Effect of Deamidation on the Immunogenicity of Anthrax Protective Antigen.

    PubMed

    Verma, Anita; Ngundi, Miriam M; Burns, Drusilla L

    2016-05-01

    The spontaneous modification of proteins, such as deamidation of asparagine residues, can significantly affect the immunogenicity of protein-based vaccines. Using a "genetically deamidated" form of recombinant protective antigen (rPA), we have previously shown that deamidation can decrease the immunogenicity of rPA, the primary component of new-generation anthrax vaccines. In this study, we investigated the biochemical and immunological mechanisms by which deamidation of rPA might decrease the immunogenicity of the protein. We found that loss of the immunogenicity of rPA vaccine was independent of the presence of adjuvant. We assessed the effect of deamidation on the immunodominant neutralizing B-cell epitopes of rPA and found that these epitopes were not significantly affected by deamidation. In order to assess the effect of deamidation on T-cell help for antibody production elicited by rPA vaccine, we examined the ability of the wild-type and genetically deamidated forms of rPA to serve as hapten carriers. We found that when wild-type and genetically deamidated rPA were modified to similar extents with 2,4-dinitrophenyl hapten (DNP) and then used to immunize mice, higher levels of anti-DNP antibodies were elicited by wild-type DNP-rPA than those elicited by the genetically deamidated DNP-rPA, indicating that wild-type rPA elicits more T-cell help than the genetically deamidated form of the protein. These results suggest that a decrease in the ability of deamidated rPA to elicit T-cell help for antibody production is a possible contributor to its lower immunogenicity. PMID:26912784

  14. [Blood groups - minuses and pluses. Do the blood group antigens protect us from infectious diseases?].

    PubMed

    Czerwiński, Marcin

    2015-06-25

    Human blood can be divided into groups, which is a method of blood classification based on the presence or absence of inherited erythrocyte surface antigens that can elicit immune response. According to the International Society of Blood Transfusion, there are 341 blood group antigens collected in 35 blood group systems. These antigens can be proteins, glycoproteins or glycosphingolipids, and function as transmembrane transporters, ion channels, adhesion molecules or receptors for other proteins. The majority of blood group antigens is present also on another types of cells. Due to their localization on the surface of cells, blood group antigens can act as receptors for various pathogens or their toxins, such as protozoa (malaria parasites), bacteria (Helicobacter pylori, Vibrio cholerae and Shigella dysenteriae) and viruses (Noroviruses, Parvoviruses, HIV). If the presence of group antigen (or its variant which arised due to mutation) is beneficial for the host (e.g. because pathogens are not able to bind to the cells), the blood group may become a selection trait, leading to its dissemination in the population exposed to that pathogen. There are thirteen blood group systems that can be related to pathogen resistance, and it seems that the particular influence was elicit by malaria parasites. It is generally thought that the high incidence of blood groups such as O in the Amazon region, Fy(a-b-) in Africa and Ge(-) in Papua-New Guinea is the result of selective pressure from malaria parasite. This review summarizes the data about relationship between blood groups and resistance to pathogens.

  15. Protection of pigs against Taenia solium cysticercosis by immunization with novel recombinant antigens

    PubMed Central

    Gauci, Charles G.; Jayashi, César M.; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Lackenby, Julia; Lightowlers, Marshall W.

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant antigens from the oncosphere stage of the parasite Taenia solium were expressed in Escherichia coli. The TSOL16, TSOL45-1A and TSOL45-1B recombinant antigens, each consisting of fibronectin type III (FnIII) domain S, were produced as fusion proteins with glutathione S-transferase (GST) and maltose binding protein (MBP). Groups of pigs were immunized twice with the GST fusions of the antigens and boosted a third time with the MBP fusions prior to receiving a challenge infection with T. solium eggs. The TSOL16 antigen was found to be capable of inducing high levels of immunity in pigs against a challenge infection with T. solium. Immunological investigations identified differences in immune responses in the pigs vaccinated with the various antigens. The results demonstrate that the TSOL16 antigen could be a valuable adjunct to current porcine vaccination approaches and may allow the further development of new vaccination strategies against T. solium cysticercosis. PMID:22521850

  16. Live attenuated Salmonella vaccines displaying regulated delayed lysis and delayed antigen synthesis to confer protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Yang, Jiseon; Kader, Rebin; Alamuri, Praveen; Curtiss, Roy; Clark-Curtiss, Josephine E

    2012-02-01

    Live recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccine (RASV) strains have great potential to induce protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis by delivering M. tuberculosis antigens. Recently, we reported that, in orally immunized mice, RASV strains delivering the M. tuberculosis early secreted antigenic target 6-kDa (ESAT-6) protein and culture filtrate protein 10 (CFP-10) antigens via the Salmonella type III secretion system (SopE amino-terminal region residues 1 to 80 with two copies of ESAT-6 and one copy of CFP-10 [SopE(Nt80)-E2C]) afforded protection against aerosol challenge with M. tuberculosis. Here, we constructed and evaluated an improved Salmonella vaccine against M. tuberculosis. We constructed translational fusions for the synthesis of two copies of ESAT-6 plus CFP-10 fused to the OmpC signal sequence (OmpC(SS)-E2C) and amino acids 44 to 338 of antigen 85A (Ag85A(294)) flanked by the signal sequence (SS) and C-terminal peptide (CT) of β-lactamase (Bla(SS)-Ag85A(294)-Bla(CT)) to enable delivery via the Salmonella type II secretion system. The genes expressing these proteins were cloned as an operon transcribed from P(trc) into isogenic Asd(+)/MurA(+) pYA3681 lysis vector derivatives with different replication origins (pBR, p15A, pSC101), resulting in pYA4890, pYA4891, and pYA4892 for SopE(Nt80)-E2C/Ag85A(294) synthesis and pYA4893 and pYA4894 for OmpC(SS)-E2C/Ag85A(294) synthesis. Mice orally immunized with the RASV χ11021 strain engineered to display regulated delayed lysis and regulated delayed antigen synthesis in vivo and harboring pYA4891, pYA4893, or pYA4894 elicited significantly greater humoral and cellular immune responses, and the RASV χ11021 strain afforded a greater degree of protection against M. tuberculosis aerosol challenge in mice than RASVs harboring any other Asd(+)/MurA(+) lysis plasmid and immunization with M. bovis BCG, demonstrating that RASV strains displaying regulated delayed lysis with delayed antigen synthesis

  17. Immunostimulatory complexes containing Eimeria tenella antigens and low toxicity plant saponins induce antibody response and provide protection from challenge in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Berezin, V E; Bogoyavlenskyi, A P; Khudiakova, S S; Alexuk, P G; Omirtaeva, E S; Zaitceva, I A; Tustikbaeva, G B; Barfield, R C; Fetterer, R H

    2010-01-20

    Immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs) are unique multimolecular structures formed by encapsulating antigens, lipids and triterpene saponins and are one of the most successful antigen delivery systems for microbial antigens. In the current study, both the route of administration and the antigen concentration of ISCOMs, containing Eimeria tenella antigens and saponins from native plants, were evaluated in their ability to stimulate humoral immunity and to protect chickens against a challenge infection with E. tenella. Broiler chickens were immunized with ISCOM preparations containing E. tenella antigens and the purified saponins Gg6, Ah6 and Gp7 isolated from Glycyrrhiza glabra, Aesculus hippocastanum and Gipsophila paniculata, respectively. The effects of the route of administration, dose of antigen and type of saponin used for construction of ISCOMs were evaluated for ability to stimulate serum IgG and IgM and to protect chickens against a homologous challenge. A single intranasal immunization was the most effective route for administering ISCOMs although the in ovo route was also quite effective. Dose titration experiments demonstrated efficacy after single immunization with various ISCOM doses but maximum effects were observed when ISCOMs contain 5-10mug antigen. Immunization of birds by any of the three routes with E. tenella antigens alone or antigens mixed with alum hydroxide adjuvant resulted in lower serum antibody and reduced protection to challenge relative to immunization with ISCOMs. Overall the results of this study confirm that significant immunostimulation and protection to challenge are achieved by immunization of chickens with ISCOMs containing purified saponins and native E. tenella antigens and suggest that ISCOMs may be successfully used to develop a safe and effective vaccine for prevention of avian coccidiosis.

  18. Recombinant Forms of Leishmania amazonensis Excreted/Secreted Promastigote Surface Antigen (PSA) Induce Protective Immune Responses in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Petitdidier, Elodie; Pagniez, Julie; Papierok, Gérard; Vincendeau, Philippe; Lemesre, Jean-Loup; Bras-Gonçalves, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Preventive vaccination is a highly promising strategy for interrupting leishmaniasis transmission that can, additionally, contribute to elimination. A vaccine formulation based on naturally excreted secreted (ES) antigens was prepared from L. infantum promastigote culture supernatant. This vaccine achieved successful results in Phase III trials and was licensed and marketed as CaniLeish. We recently showed that newly identified ES promastigote surface antigen (PSA), from both viable promastigotes and axenically-grown amastigotes, represented the major constituent and the highly immunogenic antigen of L. infantum and L. amazonensis ES products. We report here that three immunizations with either the recombinant ES LaPSA-38S (rPSA) or its carboxy terminal part LaPSA-12S (Cter-rPSA), combined with QA-21 as adjuvant, confer high levels of protection in naive L. infantum-infected Beagle dogs, as checked by bone marrow parasite absence in respectively 78.8% and 80% of vaccinated dogs at 6 months post-challenge. The parasite burden in infected vaccinated dogs was significantly reduced compared to placebo group, as measured by q-PCR. Moreover, our results reveal humoral and cellular immune response clear-cut differences between vaccinated and control dogs. An early increase in specific IgG2 antibodies was observed in rPSA/QA-21- and Cter-rPSA/QA-21-immunized dogs only. They were found functionally active in vitro and were highly correlated with vaccine protection. In vaccinated protected dogs, IFN-γ and NO productions, as well as anti-leishmanial macrophage activity, were increased. These data strongly suggest that ES PSA or its carboxy-terminal part, in recombinant forms, induce protection in a canine model of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis by inducing a Th1-dominant immune response and an appropriate specific antibody response. These data suggest that they could be considered as important active components in vaccine candidates. PMID:27223609

  19. Antibodies to Merkel cell polyomavirus T-antigen oncoproteins reflect tumor burden in Merkel cell carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Kelly G.; Carter, Joseph J.; Johnson, Lisa G.; Cahill, Kevin W.; Iyer, Jayasri G.; Schrama, David; Becker, Juergen C.; Madeleine, Margaret M.; Nghiem, Paul; Galloway, Denise A.

    2010-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is a common infectious agent that is likely involved in the etiology of most Merkel cell carcinomas (MCCs). Serum antibodies recognizing the MCPyV capsid protein, VP1, are detectable at high titer in nearly all MCC patients, and remain stable over time. Although antibodies to the viral capsid indicate prior MCPyV infection, they provide limited clinical insight into MCC because they are also detected in more than half of the general population. We investigated whether antibodies recognizing MCPyV large and small tumor-associated antigens (T-Ags) would be more specifically associated with MCC. Among 530 population control subjects, these antibodies were present in only 0.9% and were of low titer. In contrast, among 205 MCC cases, 40.5% had serum IgG antibodies that recognize a portion of T-Ag shared between small and large T-Ags. Among cases, titers of T-Ag antibodies fell rapidly (approximately 8 fold/year) in patients whose cancer did not recur, while they rose rapidly in those with progressive disease. Importantly, in several patients who developed metastases, the rise in T-Ag titer preceded clinical detection of disease spread. These results suggest that antibodies recognizing T-Ag are relatively specifically associated with MCC, do not effectively protect against disease progression, and may serve as a clinically useful indicator of disease status. PMID:20959478

  20. A bacterial protease inhibitor protects antigens delivered in oral vaccines from digestion while triggering specific mucosal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ibañez, Andrés Esteban; Coria, Lorena Mirta; Carabajal, Marianela Verónica; Delpino, María Victoria; Risso, Gabriela Sofía; Cobiello, Paula Gonzalez; Rinaldi, Jimena; Barrionuevo, Paula; Bruno, Laura; Frank, Fernanda; Klinke, Sebastián; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto; Briones, Gabriel; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Pasquevich, Karina Alejandra; Cassataro, Juliana

    2015-12-28

    We report here that a bacterial protease inhibitor from Brucella spp. called U-Omp19 behaves as an ideal constituent for a vaccine formulation against infectious diseases. When co-administered orally with an antigen (Ag), U-Omp19: i) can bypass the harsh environment of the gastrointestinal tract by inhibiting stomach and intestine proteases and consequently increases the half-life of the co-administered Ag at immune inductive sites: Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes while ii) it induces the recruitment and activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs) and increases the amount of intracellular Ag inside APCs. Therefore, mucosal as well as systemic Ag-specific immune responses, antibodies, Th1, Th17 and CD8(+) T cells are enhanced when U-Omp19 is co-administered with the Ag orally. Finally, this bacterial protease inhibitor in an oral vaccine formulation confers mucosal protection and reduces parasite loads after oral challenge with virulent Toxoplasma gondii.

  1. [Blood groups - minuses and pluses. Do the blood group antigens protect us from infectious diseases?].

    PubMed

    Czerwiński, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Human blood can be divided into groups, which is a method of blood classification based on the presence or absence of inherited erythrocyte surface antigens that can elicit immune response. According to the International Society of Blood Transfusion, there are 341 blood group antigens collected in 35 blood group systems. These antigens can be proteins, glycoproteins or glycosphingolipids, and function as transmembrane transporters, ion channels, adhesion molecules or receptors for other proteins. The majority of blood group antigens is present also on another types of cells. Due to their localization on the surface of cells, blood group antigens can act as receptors for various pathogens or their toxins, such as protozoa (malaria parasites), bacteria (Helicobacter pylori, Vibrio cholerae and Shigella dysenteriae) and viruses (Noroviruses, Parvoviruses, HIV). If the presence of group antigen (or its variant which arised due to mutation) is beneficial for the host (e.g. because pathogens are not able to bind to the cells), the blood group may become a selection trait, leading to its dissemination in the population exposed to that pathogen. There are thirteen blood group systems that can be related to pathogen resistance, and it seems that the particular influence was elicit by malaria parasites. It is generally thought that the high incidence of blood groups such as O in the Amazon region, Fy(a-b-) in Africa and Ge(-) in Papua-New Guinea is the result of selective pressure from malaria parasite. This review summarizes the data about relationship between blood groups and resistance to pathogens. PMID:26206987

  2. Host cell-induced components of the sulfate assimilation pathway are major protective antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Rachel; Leotta, Lisa; Shanahan, Erin R; West, Nicholas P; Leyh, Thomas S; Britton, Warwick; Triccas, James A

    2013-03-01

    New therapies to control tuberculosis are urgently required because of the inability of the only available vaccine, BCG, to adequately protect against tuberculosis. Here we demonstrate that proteins of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis sulfate-assimilation pathway (SAP) represent major immunogenic targets of the bacillus, as defined by strong T-cell recognition by both mice and humans infected with M. tuberculosis. SAP proteins displayed increased expression when M. tuberculosis was resident within host cells, which may account in part for their ability to stimulate anti-M. tuberculosis host immunity. Vaccination with the first enzyme in this pathway, adenosine-5'-triphosphate sulfurylase, conferred significant protection against murine tuberculosis and boosted BCG-induced protective immunity in the lung. Therefore, we have identified SAP components as a new family of M. tuberculosis antigens, and we have demonstrated that these components are promising candidate for inclusion in new vaccines to control tuberculosis in humans. PMID:23225904

  3. Host Cell–Induced Components of the Sulfate Assimilation Pathway Are Major Protective Antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Rachel; Leotta, Lisa; Shanahan, Erin R.; West, Nicholas P.; Leyh, Thomas S.; Britton, Warwick; Triccas, James A.

    2013-01-01

    New therapies to control tuberculosis are urgently required because of the inability of the only available vaccine, BCG, to adequately protect against tuberculosis. Here we demonstrate that proteins of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis sulfate-assimilation pathway (SAP) represent major immunogenic targets of the bacillus, as defined by strong T-cell recognition by both mice and humans infected with M. tuberculosis. SAP proteins displayed increased expression when M. tuberculosis was resident within host cells, which may account in part for their ability to stimulate anti-M. tuberculosis host immunity. Vaccination with the first enzyme in this pathway, adenosine-5′-triphosphate sulfurylase, conferred significant protection against murine tuberculosis and boosted BCG-induced protective immunity in the lung. Therefore, we have identified SAP components as a new family of M. tuberculosis antigens, and we have demonstrated that these components are promising candidate for inclusion in new vaccines to control tuberculosis in humans. PMID:23225904

  4. Crystal structure of c5321: a protective antigen present in uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains displaying an SLR fold

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance among uropathogens led, among other efforts, to the application of subtractive reverse vaccinology for the identification of antigens present in extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) strains but absent or variable in non-pathogenic strains, in a quest for a broadly protective Escherichia coli vaccine. The protein coded by locus c5321 from CFT073 E. coli was identified as one of nine potential vaccine candidates against ExPEC and was able to confer protection with an efficacy of 33% in a mouse model of sepsis. c5321 (known also as EsiB) lacks functional annotation and structurally belongs to the Sel1-like repeat (SLR) family. Herein, as part of the general characterization of this potential antigen, we have focused on its structural properties. Results We report the 1.74 Å-resolution crystal structure of c5321 from CFT073 E. coli determined by Se-Met SAD phasing. The structure is composed of 11 SLR units in a topological organisation that highly resembles that found in HcpC from Helicobacter pylori, with the main difference residing in how the super-helical fold is stabilised. The stabilising effect of disulfide bridges in HcpC is replaced in c5321 by a strengthening of the inter-repeat hydrophobic core. A metal-ion binding site, uncharacteristic of SLR proteins, is detected between SLR units 3 and 4 in the region of the inter-repeat hydrophobic core. Crystal contacts are observed between the C-terminal tail of one molecule and the C-terminal amphipathic groove of a neighbouring one, resembling interactions between ligand and proteins containing tetratricopeptide-like repeats. Conclusions The structure of antigen c5321 presents a mode of stabilization of the SLR fold different from that observed in close homologs of known structure. The location of the metal-ion binding site and the observed crystal contacts suggest a potential role in regulation of conformational flexibility and interaction with yet

  5. Analysis of H7 avian influenza viruses by antigenic cartography and correlation to protection by vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The H7 hemagglutinin subtype one of the most common subtypes of avian influenza virus (AIV) in poultry world wide and since it has the potential to become highly pathogenic it is among the priority subtypes for vaccination. Selection of the optimal vaccine seed strains may now be aided by antigenic...

  6. Adoptive transfer of helminth antigen-pulsed dendritic cells protects against the development of experimental colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Matisz, Chelsea E; Leung, Gabriella; Reyes, Jose Luis; Wang, Arthur; Sharkey, Keith A; McKay, Derek M

    2015-11-01

    Infection with helminth parasites and treatment with worm extracts can suppress inflammatory disease, including colitis. Postulating that dendritic cells (DCs) participated in the suppression of inflammation and seeking to move beyond the use of helminths per se, we tested the ability of Hymenolepis diminuta antigen-pulsed DCs to suppress colitis as a novel cell-based immunotherapy. Bone marrow derived DCs pulsed with H. diminuta antigen (HD-DCs), or PBS-, BSA-, or LPS-DCs as controls, were transferred into wild-type (WT), interleukin-10 (IL-10) knock-out (KO), and RAG-1 KO mice, and the impact on dinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (DNBS)-induced colitis and splenic cytokine production assessed 72 h later. Mice receiving HD-DCs were significantly protected from DNBS-induced colitis and of the experimental groups only these mice displayed increased Th2 cytokines and IL-10 production. Adoptive transfer of HD-DCs protected neither RAG-1 nor IL-10 KO mice from DNBS-colitis. Furthermore, the transfer of CD4(+) splenocytes from recipients of HD-DCs protected naïve mice against DNBS-colitis, in an IL-10 dependent manner. Thus, HD-DCs are a novel anti-colitic immunotherapy that can educate anti-colitic CD4(+) T cells: mechanistically, the anti-colitic effect of HD-DCs requires that the host has an adaptive immune response and the ability to mobilize IL-10.

  7. Cloning and Characterization of Surface-Localized α-Enolase of Streptococcus iniae, an Effective Protective Antigen in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Kaiyu; Chen, Defang; Geng, Yi; Huang, Xiaoli; He, Yang; Ji, Lili; Liu, Tao; Wang, Erlong; Yang, Qian; Lai, Weimin

    2015-06-25

    Streptococcus iniae is a major fish pathogen that can also cause human bacteremia, cellulitis and meningitis. Screening for and identification of protective antigens plays an important role in developing therapies against S. iniae infections. In this study, we indicated that the α-enolase of S. iniae was not only distributed in the cytoplasm and associated to cell walls, but was also secreted to the bacterial cell surface. The functional identity of the purified recombinant α-enolase protein was verified by its ability to catalyze the conversion of 2-phosphoglycerate (2-PGE) to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP), and both the recombinant and native proteins interacted with human plasminogen. The rabbit anti-rENO serum blockade assay shows that α-enolase participates in S. iniae adhesion to and invasion of BHK-21 cells. In addition, the recombinant α-enolase can confer effective protection against S. iniae infection in mice, which suggests that α-enolase has potential as a vaccine candidate in mammals. We conclude that S. iniae α-enolase is a moonlighting protein that also associates with the bacterial outer surface and functions as a protective antigen in mice.

  8. Immunization with a Recombinant, Pseudomonas fluorescens-Expressed, Mutant Form of Bacillus anthracis-Derived Protective Antigen Protects Rabbits from Anthrax Infection.

    PubMed

    Reed, Matthew D; Wilder, Julie A; Mega, William M; Hutt, Julie A; Kuehl, Philip J; Valderas, Michelle W; Chew, Lawrence L; Liang, Bertrand C; Squires, Charles H

    2015-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA), one of the components of the anthrax toxin, is the major component of human anthrax vaccine (Biothrax). Human anthrax vaccines approved in the United States and Europe consist of an alum-adsorbed or precipitated (respectively) supernatant material derived from cultures of toxigenic, non-encapsulated strains of Bacillus anthracis. Approved vaccination schedules in humans with either of these vaccines requires several booster shots and occasionally causes adverse injection site reactions. Mutant derivatives of the protective antigen that will not form the anthrax toxins have been described. We have cloned and expressed both mutant (PA SNKE167-ΔFF-315-E308D) and native PA molecules recombinantly and purified them. In this study, both the mutant and native PA molecules, formulated with alum (Alhydrogel), elicited high titers of anthrax toxin neutralizing anti-PA antibodies in New Zealand White rabbits. Both mutant and native PA vaccine preparations protected rabbits from lethal, aerosolized, B. anthracis spore challenge subsequent to two immunizations at doses of less than 1 μg.

  9. Immunization with a Recombinant, Pseudomonas fluorescens-Expressed, Mutant Form of Bacillus anthracis-Derived Protective Antigen Protects Rabbits from Anthrax Infection

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Matthew D.; Wilder, Julie A.; Mega, William M.; Hutt, Julie A.; Kuehl, Philip J.; Valderas, Michelle W.; Chew, Lawrence L.; Liang, Bertrand C.; Squires, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA), one of the components of the anthrax toxin, is the major component of human anthrax vaccine (Biothrax). Human anthrax vaccines approved in the United States and Europe consist of an alum-adsorbed or precipitated (respectively) supernatant material derived from cultures of toxigenic, non-encapsulated strains of Bacillus anthracis. Approved vaccination schedules in humans with either of these vaccines requires several booster shots and occasionally causes adverse injection site reactions. Mutant derivatives of the protective antigen that will not form the anthrax toxins have been described. We have cloned and expressed both mutant (PA SNKE167-ΔFF-315-E308D) and native PA molecules recombinantly and purified them. In this study, both the mutant and native PA molecules, formulated with alum (Alhydrogel), elicited high titers of anthrax toxin neutralizing anti-PA antibodies in New Zealand White rabbits. Both mutant and native PA vaccine preparations protected rabbits from lethal, aerosolized, B. anthracis spore challenge subsequent to two immunizations at doses of less than 1 μg. PMID:26207820

  10. Protective vaccination with promastigote surface antigen 2 from Leishmania major is mediated by a TH1 type of immune response.

    PubMed

    Handman, E; Symons, F M; Baldwin, T M; Curtis, J M; Scheerlinck, J P

    1995-11-01

    Leishmania major promastigote surface antigen-2 complex (PSA-2) comprises a family of three similar but distinct polypeptides. The three PSA-2 polypeptides were purified from cultured promastigotes by a combination of detergent phase separation and monoclonal antibody affinity chromatography. Intraperitoneal vaccination of C3H/He mice with PSA-2 with Corynebacterium parvum as an adjuvant resulted in complete protection from lesion development after challenge infection with virulent L. major. Significant protection was also obtained in the genetically susceptible BALB/cH-2k and BALB/c mice. One of the PSA-2 genes was cloned and expressed in both Escherichia coli and Leishmania mexicana promastigotes. Vaccination with the recombinant PSA-2 purified from E. coli did not confer protection, in contrast to the L. mexicana-derived recombinant PSA-2, which provided excellent protection. CD4+ T cells isolated from the spleens of vaccinated mice produced large amounts of gamma interferon but no detectable interleukin 4 upon stimulation with PSA-2 in vitro. Limiting dilution analysis showed a marked increase in the precursor frequency of PSA-2-specific gamma interferon-secreting CD4+ T cells. No substantial change in precursor frequency was observed for interleukin 4-secreting T cells in the vaccinated mice. A CD4+ PSA-2 specific T-cell line generated from splenocytes of a vaccinated mouse produces a cytokine pattern consistent with a TH1 phenotype. Intravenous injection of this line into naive mice reduced significantly the parasite burden upon challenge infection. Taken together, the data suggest that vaccination with PSA-2 induces a TH1 type of immune response which protects mice from L. major infection. Moreover, a single recombinant PSA-2 polypeptide derived from a genomic clone can also vaccinate, provided that the structural form of the antigen is near native. PMID:7591056

  11. Protection against murine listeriosis by an attenuated recombinant Salmonella typhimurium vaccine strain that secretes the naturally somatic antigen superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Hess, J; Dietrich, G; Gentschev, I; Miko, D; Goebel, W; Kaufmann, S H

    1997-04-01

    A recombinant (r)-Salmonella typhimurium aroA vaccine strain was constructed which secretes the naturally somatic protein of Listeria monocytogenes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), by the HlyB/HlyD/TolC export machinery. Vaccine efficacy of the SOD-bearing carrier strain was compared with that of the p60-secreting construct, S. typhimurium p60s (J. Hess, I. Gentschev, D. Miko, M. Welzel, C. Ladel, W. Goebel, and S. H. E. Kaufmann, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93:1458-1463, 1996). Vaccination of mice with both constructs induced protection against a lethal challenge with the intracellular pathogen, L. monocytogenes. While the somatic listerial antigen, SOD, is immunologically uncharacterized, the naturally secreted protein of L. monocytogenes, p60, is known to be highly immunogenic. Our data emphasize the high vaccine potential of r-Salmonella constructs secreting antigens of somatic or secreted origin. Moreover, they suggest that the HlyB/HlyD/TolC-based antigen delivery system with attenuated Salmonella spp. as the carrier is capable of potentiating the immune response against foreign proteins independent from their immunogenicity in and display by the natural host. PMID:9119463

  12. Protection against murine listeriosis by an attenuated recombinant Salmonella typhimurium vaccine strain that secretes the naturally somatic antigen superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Hess, J; Dietrich, G; Gentschev, I; Miko, D; Goebel, W; Kaufmann, S H

    1997-04-01

    A recombinant (r)-Salmonella typhimurium aroA vaccine strain was constructed which secretes the naturally somatic protein of Listeria monocytogenes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), by the HlyB/HlyD/TolC export machinery. Vaccine efficacy of the SOD-bearing carrier strain was compared with that of the p60-secreting construct, S. typhimurium p60s (J. Hess, I. Gentschev, D. Miko, M. Welzel, C. Ladel, W. Goebel, and S. H. E. Kaufmann, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93:1458-1463, 1996). Vaccination of mice with both constructs induced protection against a lethal challenge with the intracellular pathogen, L. monocytogenes. While the somatic listerial antigen, SOD, is immunologically uncharacterized, the naturally secreted protein of L. monocytogenes, p60, is known to be highly immunogenic. Our data emphasize the high vaccine potential of r-Salmonella constructs secreting antigens of somatic or secreted origin. Moreover, they suggest that the HlyB/HlyD/TolC-based antigen delivery system with attenuated Salmonella spp. as the carrier is capable of potentiating the immune response against foreign proteins independent from their immunogenicity in and display by the natural host.

  13. Comparison of the structural stability and dynamic properties of recombinant anthrax protective antigen and its 2-fluorohistidine-labeled analogue.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lei; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Andra, Kiran K; Thakkar, Santosh V; Volkin, David B; Bann, James G; Middaugh, C Russell

    2012-11-01

    Protective antigen (PA) is the primary protein antigenic component of both the currently used anthrax vaccine and related recombinant vaccines under development. An analogue of recombinant PA (2-FHis rPA) has been recently shown to block the key steps of pore formation in the process of inducing cytotoxicity in cells, and thus can potentially be used as an antitoxin or a vaccine. This rPA analogue was produced by fermentation to incorporate the unnatural amino acid 2-fluorohistidine (2-FHis). In this study, the effects of 2-FHis labeling on rPA antigen's conformational stability and dynamic properties were investigated by various biophysical techniques. Temperature/pH stability profiles of rPA and 2-FHis rPA were analyzed by the empirical phase diagram (EPD) approach, and physical stability differences between them were identified. Results showed that rPA and 2-FHis rPA had similar stability at pH 7-8. With decreasing solution pH, however, 2-FHis rPA was found to be more stable. Dynamic sensitive measurements of the two proteins at pH 5 found that 2-FHis rPA was more dynamic and/or differentially hydrated under acidic pH conditions. The biophysical characterization and stability data provide information useful for the potential development of 2-FHis rPA as a more stable rPA vaccine candidate. PMID:22911632

  14. Brucella abortus Omp19 recombinant protein subcutaneously co-delivered with an antigen enhances antigen-specific T helper 1 memory responses and induces protection against parasite challenge.

    PubMed

    Coria, Lorena M; Ibañez, Andrés E; Pasquevich, Karina A; Cobiello, Paula L González; Frank, Fernanda M; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Cassataro, Juliana

    2016-01-20

    The discovery of effective adjuvants for many vaccines especially those with limited commercial appeal, such as vaccines to poverty-related diseases, is required. In this work, we demonstrated that subcutaneous co-administration of mice with the outer membrane protein U-Omp19 from Brucella spp. plus OVA as antigen (Ag) increases Ag-specific T cell proliferation and T helper (Th) 1 immune responses in vitro and in vivo. U-Omp19 treated dendritic cells promote IFN-γ production by specific CD4(+) T cells and increases T cell proliferation. U-Omp19 co-administration induces the production of Ag specific effector memory T cell populations (CD4(+) CD44(high) CD62L(low) T cells). Finally, subcutaneous co-administration of U-Omp19 with Trypanosoma cruzi Ags confers protection against virulent parasite challenge, reducing parasitemia and weight loss while increasing mice survival. These results indicate that the bacterial protein U-Omp19 when delivered subcutaneously could be a suitable component of vaccine formulations against infectious diseases requiring Th1 immune responses.

  15. Presentation of peptides from Bacillus anthracis protective antigen on Tobacco Mosaic Virus as an epitope targeted anthrax vaccine.

    PubMed

    McComb, Ryan C; Ho, Chi-Lee; Bradley, Kenneth A; Grill, Laurence K; Martchenko, Mikhail

    2015-11-27

    The current anthrax vaccine requires improvements for rapidly invoking longer-lasting neutralizing antibody responses with fewer doses from a well-defined formulation. Designing antigens that target neutralizing antibody epitopes of anthrax protective antigen, a component of anthrax toxin, may offer a solution for achieving a vaccine that can induce strong and long lasting antibody responses with fewer boosters. Here we report implementation of a strategy for developing epitope focused virus nanoparticle vaccines against anthrax by using immunogenic virus particles to present peptides derived from anthrax toxin previously identified in (1) neutralizing antibody epitope mapping studies, (2) toxin crystal structure analyses to identify functional regions, and (3) toxin mutational analyses. We successfully expressed two of three peptide epitopes from anthrax toxin that, in previous reports, bound antibodies that were partially neutralizing against toxin activity, discovered cross-reactivity between vaccine constructs and toxin specific antibodies raised in goats against native toxin and showed that antibodies induced by our vaccine constructs also cross-react with native toxin. While protection against intoxication in cellular and animal studies were not as effective as in previous studies, partial toxin neutralization was observed in animals, demonstrating the feasibility of using plant-virus nanoparticles as a platform for epitope defined anthrax vaccines.

  16. Binding to histo-blood group antigen-expressing bacteria protects human norovirus from acute heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Breiman, Adrien; le Pendu, Jacques; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate if histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) expressing bacteria have any protective role on human norovirus (NoV) from acute heat stress. Eleven bacterial strains were included, belonging to Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Clostridium difficile, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, and B. longum. HBGA expression of the bacteria as well as binding of human NoV virus-like particles (VLPs, GI.1, and GII.4 strains) to the bacteria were detected by flow cytometry. NoV VLPs pre-incubated with HBGA expressing or non-HBGA expressing bacteria were heated and detected by both direct ELISA and porcine gastric mucin-binding assay. The NoV-binding abilities of the bacteria correlated well with their HBGA expression profiles. Two HBGA expressing E. coli (LMG8223 and LFMFP861, both GI.1 and GII.4 binders) and one non-HBGA expressing E. coli (ATCC8739, neither GI.1 nor GII.4 binder) were selected for the heat treatment test with NoV VLPs. Compared with the same cell numbers of non-HBGA expressing E. coli, the presence of HBGA-expressing E. coli could always maintain higher antigen integrity, as well as mucin-binding ability of NoV VLPs of both GI.1 and GII.4 after heat-treatment at 90°C for 2 min. These results indicate that HBGA-expressing bacteria may protect NoVs during the food processing treatments, thereby facilitating their transmission. PMID:26191052

  17. Overexpression of protective antigen as a novel approach to enhance vaccine efficacy of Brucella abortus strain RB51.

    PubMed

    Vemulapalli, R; He, Y; Cravero, S; Sriranganathan, N; Boyle, S M; Schurig, G G

    2000-06-01

    Brucella abortus strain RB51 is an attenuated rough strain that is currently being used as the official live vaccine for bovine brucellosis in the United States and several other countries. We reasoned that overexpression of a protective antigen(s) of B. abortus in strain RB51 should enhance its vaccine efficacy. To test this hypothesis, we overexpressed Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) protein of B. abortus in strain RB51. This was accomplished by transforming strain RB51 with a broad-host-range plasmid, pBBR1MCS, containing the sodC gene along with its promoter. Strain RB51 overexpressing SOD (RB51SOD) was tested in BALB/c mice for its ability to protect against challenge infection with virulent strain 2308. Mice vaccinated with RB51SOD, but not RB51, developed antibodies and cell-mediated immune responses to Cu/Zn SOD. Strain RB51SOD vaccinated mice developed significantly (P < 0.05) more resistance to challenge than those vaccinated with strain RB51 alone. The presence of the plasmid alone in strain RB51 did not alter its vaccine efficacy. Also, overexpression of SOD did not alter the attenuation characteristic of strain RB51.

  18. Intramuscular delivery of adenovirus serotype 5 vector expressing humanized protective antigen induces rapid protection against anthrax that may bypass intranasally originated preexisting adenovirus immunity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shipo; Zhang, Zhe; Yu, Rui; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Ying; Song, Xiaohong; Yi, Shaoqiong; Liu, Ju; Chen, Jianqin; Yin, Ying; Xu, Junjie; Hou, Lihua; Chen, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Developing an effective anthrax vaccine that can induce a rapid and sustained immune response is a priority for the prevention of bioterrorism-associated anthrax infection. Here, we developed a recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus serotype 5-based vaccine expressing the humanized protective antigen (Ad5-PAopt). A single intramuscular injection of Ad5-PAopt resulted in rapid and robust humoral and cellular immune responses in Fisher 344 rats. Animals intramuscularly inoculated with a single dose of 10⁸ infectious units of Ad5-PAopt achieved 100% protection from challenge with 10 times the 50% lethal dose (LD₅₀) of anthrax lethal toxin 7 days after vaccination. Although preexisting intranasally induced immunity to Ad5 slightly weakened the humoral and cellular immune responses to Ad5-PAopt via intramuscular inoculation, 100% protection was achieved 15 days after vaccination in Fisher 344 rats. The protective efficacy conferred by intramuscular vaccination in the presence of preexisting intranasally induced immunity was significantly better than that of intranasal delivery of Ad5-PAopt and intramuscular injection with recombinant PA and aluminum adjuvant without preexisting immunity. As natural Ad5 infection often occurs via the mucosal route, the work here largely illuminates that intramuscular inoculation with Ad5-PAopt can overcome the negative effects of immunity induced by prior adenovirus infection and represents an efficient approach for protecting against emerging anthrax.

  19. Antigen-dependent and -independent contributions to primary memory CD8 T cell activation and protection following infection.

    PubMed

    Martin, Matthew D; Badovinac, Vladimir P

    2015-12-10

    Memory CD8 T-cell activation, including expression of IFN-γ and granzymeB, can be induced by antigen (Ag)-dependent signals through the T-cell-receptor, or by pathogen-derived inflammatory cytokines in an Ag-independent manner. Recent studies have come to conflicting results regarding the contributions of Ag and/or inflammation to memory CD8 T-cell activation. Additionally, research has indicated that inflammation-driven CD8 T-cell responses during un-related infections (bystander activation) have the potential to provide protection, but whether protection occurs in immuno-competent hosts is unclear. To investigate these questions, we examined activation of virus-specific memory CD8 T-cells following infection with L. monocytogenes either expressing or not cognate Ag. We show that Ag and inflammation act synergistically in vitro to induce memory activation. In vivo, we found that when memory CD8 T-cells significantly contribute to clearance of infection, early activation and continued responses by these cells are enhanced by cognate Ag recognition. Mechanistically, we show that bystander responses by memory are dependent upon the dose of infection and the amount of inflammation elicited following infection and are able to provide protection in IFN-γ deficient mice, but not in immuno-competent hosts. The data elucidate the requirements for memory CD8 T-cell activation and the protective role of bystander responses.

  20. Antigen-dependent and –independent contributions to primary memory CD8 T cell activation and protection following infection

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Matthew D.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    Memory CD8 T-cell activation, including expression of IFN-γ and granzymeB, can be induced by antigen (Ag)-dependent signals through the T-cell-receptor, or by pathogen-derived inflammatory cytokines in an Ag-independent manner. Recent studies have come to conflicting results regarding the contributions of Ag and/or inflammation to memory CD8 T-cell activation. Additionally, research has indicated that inflammation-driven CD8 T-cell responses during un-related infections (bystander activation) have the potential to provide protection, but whether protection occurs in immuno-competent hosts is unclear. To investigate these questions, we examined activation of virus-specific memory CD8 T-cells following infection with L. monocytogenes either expressing or not cognate Ag. We show that Ag and inflammation act synergistically in vitro to induce memory activation. In vivo, we found that when memory CD8 T-cells significantly contribute to clearance of infection, early activation and continued responses by these cells are enhanced by cognate Ag recognition. Mechanistically, we show that bystander responses by memory are dependent upon the dose of infection and the amount of inflammation elicited following infection and are able to provide protection in IFN-γ deficient mice, but not in immuno-competent hosts. The data elucidate the requirements for memory CD8 T-cell activation and the protective role of bystander responses. PMID:26658291

  1. Heat gain from thermal radiation through protective clothing with different insulation, reflectivity and vapour permeability.

    PubMed

    Bröde, Peter; Kuklane, Kalev; Candas, Victor; Den Hartog, Emiel A; Griefahn, Barbara; Holmér, Ingvar; Meinander, Harriet; Nocker, Wolfgang; Richards, Mark; Havenith, George

    2010-01-01

    The heat transferred through protective clothing under long wave radiation compared to a reference condition without radiant stress was determined in thermal manikin experiments. The influence of clothing insulation and reflectivity, and the interaction with wind and wet underclothing were considered. Garments with different outer materials and colours and additionally an aluminised reflective suit were combined with different number and types of dry and pre-wetted underwear layers. Under radiant stress, whole body heat loss decreased, i.e., heat gain occurred compared to the reference. This heat gain increased with radiation intensity, and decreased with air velocity and clothing insulation. Except for the reflective outer layer that showed only minimal heat gain over the whole range of radiation intensities, the influence of the outer garments' material and colour was small with dry clothing. Wetting the underclothing for simulating sweat accumulation, however, caused differing effects with higher heat gain in less permeable garments.

  2. Expression of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen in transgenic chloroplasts of tobacco, a non-food/feed crop

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Jennifer; Koya, Vijay; Leppla, Stephen H.; Daniell, Henry

    2012-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) lists Bacillus anthracis as a category A agent and estimates the cost of an anthrax attack to exceed US$ 26 billion per 100,000 exposed individuals. Concerns regarding anthrax vaccine purity, a requirement for multiple injections, and a limited supply of the protective antigen (PA), underscore the urgent need for an improved vaccine. Therefore, the 83 kDa immunogenic Bacillus anthracis protective antigen was expressed in transgenic tobacco chloroplasts. The PA gene (pag) was cloned into a chloroplast vector along with the psbA regulatory signals to enhance translation. Chloroplast integration of the transgenes was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analyses. Crude plant extracts contained up to 2.5 mg full length PA/g of fresh leaf tissue and this showed exceptional stability for several months in stored leaves or crude extracts. Maximum levels of expression were observed in mature leaves under continuous illumination. Co-expression of the ORF2 chaperonin from Bacillus thuringiensis did not increase PA accumulation or induce folding into cuboidal crystals in transgenic chloroplasts. Trypsin, chymotrypsin and furin proteolytic cleavage sites present in PA were protected in transgenic chloroplasts because only full length PA 83 was observed without any degradation products. Both CHAPS and SDS detergents extracted PA with equal efficiency and PA was observed in the soluble fraction. Chloroplast-derived PA was functionally active in lysing mouse macrophages when combined with lethal factor (LF). Crude leaf extracts contained up to 25 μg functional PA/ml. With an average yield of 172 mg of PA per plant using an experimental transgenic cultivar grown in a greenhouse, 400 million doses of vaccine (free of contaminants) could be produced per acre, a yield that could be further enhanced 18-fold using a commercial cultivar in the field. PMID:15474731

  3. Effective production and purification of the glycosylated TSOL18 antigen, which is protective against pig cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xuepeng; Yuan, Gailing; Zheng, Yadong; Luo, Xuenong; Zhang, Shaohua; Ding, Juntao; Jing, Zhizhong; Lu, Chengping

    2008-02-01

    Cysticercosis caused by Taenia solium metacestodes is a worldwide public health problem. Important progress in the development of effective and practical vaccines against this disease has been made. In this study, the promising T. solium oncospheral vaccine candidate named TSOL18 antigen was produced in a 5-liter fermentor. During the process of fermentation, the pH of the culture was always kept below 5.0, and in order to prevent foaming, an antifoam agent was added. In addition, the oxygen content of the culture was constantly kept at >50% in our experiment. A high level of the glycosylated protein (2.5 g/liter) was obtained, and the protein was easily purified by gel chromatography. Vaccination trials showed that the recombinant TSOL18 antigen induced 94 and 100% reductions in metacestode burdens in vaccinated pigs, obviously higher than the 89% reduction in pigs immunized with cysticercus crude extracts in trial 1. These are very promising results in the development of an efficient tool to control cysticercosis in Asia.

  4. Effective Production and Purification of the Glycosylated TSOL18 Antigen, Which Is Protective against Pig Cysticercosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xuepeng; Yuan, Gailing; Zheng, Yadong; Luo, Xuenong; Zhang, Shaohua; Ding, Juntao; Jing, Zhizhong; Lu, Chengping

    2008-01-01

    Cysticercosis caused by Taenia solium metacestodes is a worldwide public health problem. Important progress in the development of effective and practical vaccines against this disease has been made. In this study, the promising T. solium oncospheral vaccine candidate named TSOL18 antigen was produced in a 5-liter fermentor. During the process of fermentation, the pH of the culture was always kept below 5.0, and in order to prevent foaming, an antifoam agent was added. In addition, the oxygen content of the culture was constantly kept at >50% in our experiment. A high level of the glycosylated protein (2.5 g/liter) was obtained, and the protein was easily purified by gel chromatography. Vaccination trials showed that the recombinant TSOL18 antigen induced 94 and 100% reductions in metacestode burdens in vaccinated pigs, obviously higher than the 89% reduction in pigs immunized with cysticercus crude extracts in trial 1. These are very promising results in the development of an efficient tool to control cysticercosis in Asia. PMID:18070907

  5. Poor memory B cell generation contributes to non-protective responses to DTaP vaccine antigens in otitis-prone children.

    PubMed

    Basha, S; Pichichero, M E

    2015-12-01

    We recently identified a cohort of children with recurrent episodes of acute otitis media (AOM) who fail to generate protective antibody titres to otopathogens and several vaccine antigens. In this study we determined the antibody levels against DTaP vaccine antigens, diphtheria toxoid (DT), tetanus toxoid (TT) and acellular pertussis toxoid (PT) in sera from 15 stringently defined otitis-prone (sOP) children and 20 non-otitis-prone (NOP) children. We found significantly lower concentrations of immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies against vaccine antigens in the serum of sOP children compared to age-matched NOP children. To elucidate immunological cellular responses to the vaccines in these children, we investigated memory B cell responses to DTaP vaccination. We used fluorescently conjugated vaccine antigens to label antigen receptors on the surface of memory B cells and examined the frequency of antigen-specific CD19(+) CD27(+) memory B cells in the peripheral blood. sOP children showed a significantly lower percentage of antigen-specific CD19(+) CD27(+) memory B cells than NOP children. We also found a linear correlation between the frequencies of memory B cells and circulating IgG titres for DT, TT and PT proteins. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show significant differences in memory B cell responses to DTaP vaccine antigens and their correlation with the circulating antibodies in young children with recurrent AOM.

  6. Protective immunity evoked against anthrax lethal toxin after a single intramuscular administration of an adenovirus-based vaccine encoding humanized protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yadi; Hackett, Neil R; Boyer, Julie L; Crystal, Ronald G

    2003-11-20

    Because of the need to develop a vaccine to rapidly protect the civilian population in response to a bioterrorism attack with Bacillus anthracis, we designed AdsechPA, a replication-deficient human serotype 5 adenovirus encoding B. anthracis protective antigen (PA) with codons optimized for expression in mammalian cells. With a single intramuscular administration to mice of 10(9) particle units of AdsechPA, a dose that can be scaled to human use, anti-PA antibodies were evoked more rapidly and at a higher level than with a single administration of the new U.S. military recombinant PA/Alhydrogel vaccine. Importantly, AdsechPA afforded approximately 2.7-fold more protection than the recombinant PA vaccine against B. anthracis lethal toxin challenge 4 weeks after a single vaccination. Even at 11 days postvaccination, AdsechPA provided some survival benefit, whereas the rPA/Alhydrogel vaccine provided none. In the context that equivalent human doses of Ad vectors have already been demonstrated to be safe in humans, a single administration of AdsechPA may provide the means to rapidly protect the civilian population against B. anthracis in response to a bioterrorism attack.

  7. Defining a protective epitope on factor H binding protein, a key meningococcal virulence factor and vaccine antigen.

    PubMed

    Malito, Enrico; Faleri, Agnese; Lo Surdo, Paola; Veggi, Daniele; Maruggi, Giulietta; Grassi, Eva; Cartocci, Elena; Bertoldi, Isabella; Genovese, Alessia; Santini, Laura; Romagnoli, Giacomo; Borgogni, Erica; Brier, Sébastien; Lo Passo, Carla; Domina, Maria; Castellino, Flora; Felici, Franco; van der Veen, Stijn; Johnson, Steven; Lea, Susan M; Tang, Christoph M; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Savino, Silvana; Norais, Nathalie; Rappuoli, Rino; Bottomley, Matthew J; Masignani, Vega

    2013-02-26

    Mapping of epitopes recognized by functional monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is essential for understanding the nature of immune responses and designing improved vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostics. In recent years, identification of B-cell epitopes targeted by neutralizing antibodies has facilitated the design of peptide-based vaccines against highly variable pathogens like HIV, respiratory syncytial virus, and Helicobacter pylori; however, none of these products has yet progressed into clinical stages. Linear epitopes identified by conventional mapping techniques only partially reflect the immunogenic properties of the epitope in its natural conformation, thus limiting the success of this approach. To investigate antigen-antibody interactions and assess the potential of the most common epitope mapping techniques, we generated a series of mAbs against factor H binding protein (fHbp), a key virulence factor and vaccine antigen of Neisseria meningitidis. The interaction of fHbp with the bactericidal mAb 12C1 was studied by various epitope mapping methods. Although a 12-residue epitope in the C terminus of fHbp was identified by both Peptide Scanning and Phage Display Library screening, other approaches, such as hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (MS) and X-ray crystallography, showed that mAb 12C1 occupies an area of ∼1,000 Å(2) on fHbp, including >20 fHbp residues distributed on both N- and C-terminal domains. Collectively, these data show that linear epitope mapping techniques provide useful but incomplete descriptions of B-cell epitopes, indicating that increased efforts to fully characterize antigen-antibody interfaces are required to understand and design effective immunogens.

  8. Costimulatory Effects of an Immunodominant Parasite Antigen Paradoxically Prevent Induction of Optimal CD8 T Cell Protective Immunity.

    PubMed

    Eickhoff, Christopher S; Zhang, Xiuli; Vasconcelos, Jose R; Motz, R Geoffrey; Sullivan, Nicole L; O'Shea, Kelly; Pozzi, Nicola; Gohara, David W; Blase, Jennifer R; Di Cera, Enrico; Hoft, Daniel F

    2016-09-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi infection is controlled but not eliminated by host immunity. The T. cruzi trans-sialidase (TS) gene superfamily encodes immunodominant protective antigens, but expression of altered peptide ligands by different TS genes has been hypothesized to promote immunoevasion. We molecularly defined TS epitopes to determine their importance for protection versus parasite persistence. Peptide-pulsed dendritic cell vaccination experiments demonstrated that one pair of immunodominant CD4+ and CD8+ TS peptides alone can induce protective immunity (100% survival post-lethal parasite challenge). TS DNA vaccines have been shown by us (and others) to protect BALB/c mice against T. cruzi challenge. We generated a new TS vaccine in which the immunodominant TS CD8+ epitope MHC anchoring positions were mutated, rendering the mutant TS vaccine incapable of inducing immunity to the immunodominant CD8 epitope. Immunization of mice with wild type (WT) and mutant TS vaccines demonstrated that vaccines encoding enzymatically active protein and the immunodominant CD8+ T cell epitope enhance subdominant pathogen-specific CD8+ T cell responses. More specifically, CD8+ T cells from WT TS DNA vaccinated mice were responsive to 14 predicted CD8+ TS epitopes, while T cells from mutant TS DNA vaccinated mice were responsive to just one of these 14 predicted TS epitopes. Molecular and structural biology studies revealed that this novel costimulatory mechanism involves CD45 signaling triggered by enzymatically active TS. This enhancing effect on subdominant T cells negatively regulates protective immunity. Using peptide-pulsed DC vaccination experiments, we have shown that vaccines inducing both immunodominant and subdominant epitope responses were significantly less protective than vaccines inducing only immunodominant-specific responses. These results have important implications for T. cruzi vaccine development. Of broader significance, we demonstrate that increasing breadth of T

  9. Costimulatory Effects of an Immunodominant Parasite Antigen Paradoxically Prevent Induction of Optimal CD8 T Cell Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Jose R.; Motz, R. Geoffrey; Sullivan, Nicole L.; Gohara, David W.; Blase, Jennifer R.; Di Cera, Enrico; Hoft, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi infection is controlled but not eliminated by host immunity. The T. cruzi trans-sialidase (TS) gene superfamily encodes immunodominant protective antigens, but expression of altered peptide ligands by different TS genes has been hypothesized to promote immunoevasion. We molecularly defined TS epitopes to determine their importance for protection versus parasite persistence. Peptide-pulsed dendritic cell vaccination experiments demonstrated that one pair of immunodominant CD4+ and CD8+ TS peptides alone can induce protective immunity (100% survival post-lethal parasite challenge). TS DNA vaccines have been shown by us (and others) to protect BALB/c mice against T. cruzi challenge. We generated a new TS vaccine in which the immunodominant TS CD8+ epitope MHC anchoring positions were mutated, rendering the mutant TS vaccine incapable of inducing immunity to the immunodominant CD8 epitope. Immunization of mice with wild type (WT) and mutant TS vaccines demonstrated that vaccines encoding enzymatically active protein and the immunodominant CD8+ T cell epitope enhance subdominant pathogen-specific CD8+ T cell responses. More specifically, CD8+ T cells from WT TS DNA vaccinated mice were responsive to 14 predicted CD8+ TS epitopes, while T cells from mutant TS DNA vaccinated mice were responsive to just one of these 14 predicted TS epitopes. Molecular and structural biology studies revealed that this novel costimulatory mechanism involves CD45 signaling triggered by enzymatically active TS. This enhancing effect on subdominant T cells negatively regulates protective immunity. Using peptide-pulsed DC vaccination experiments, we have shown that vaccines inducing both immunodominant and subdominant epitope responses were significantly less protective than vaccines inducing only immunodominant-specific responses. These results have important implications for T. cruzi vaccine development. Of broader significance, we demonstrate that increasing breadth of T

  10. Vaccination with recombinant Parasite Surface Antigen 2 from Leishmania major induces a Th1 type of immune response but does not protect against infection.

    PubMed

    Sjölander, A; Baldwin, T M; Curtis, J M; Bengtsson, K L; Handman, E

    1998-12-01

    Vaccination with the native Parasite Surface Antigen 2 of Leishmania major with Corynebacterium parvum as adjuvant protects mice from leishmaniasis through a Th1 mediated response. Here we show that vaccination with a recombinant form of this protein, purified from Escherichia coli and administered in iscoms or with C. parvum as adjuvant, does not induce protective immunity despite the induction of Th1 responses. The results suggest that protective immunity depends on the ability of the vaccinating antigen to induce Th1-like T cells with ability to be recalled by infection. Therefore, the conformation of antigens may play a more major role for the induction of T cell mediated immunity than originally considered. PMID:9796067

  11. Structures of synthetic O-antigen fragments from serotype 2a Shigella flexneri in complex with a protective monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Vulliez-Le Normand, B; Saul, F A; Phalipon, A; Bélot, F; Guerreiro, C; Mulard, L A; Bentley, G A

    2008-07-22

    The anti-LPS IgG mAb F22-4, raised against Shigella flexneri serotype 2a bacteria, protects against homologous, but not heterologous, challenge in an experimental animal model. We report the crystal structures of complexes formed between Fab F22-4 and two synthetic oligosaccharides, a decasaccharide and a pentadecasaccharide that were previously shown to be both immunogenic and antigenic mimics of the S. flexneri serotype 2a O-antigen. F22-4 binds to an epitope contained within two consecutive 2a serotype pentasaccharide repeat units (RU). Six sugar residues from a contiguous nine-residue segment make direct contacts with the antibody, including the nonreducing rhamnose and both branching glucosyl residues from the two RUs. The glucosyl residue, whose position of attachment to the tetrasaccharide backbone of the RU defines the serotype 2a O-antigen, is critical for recognition by F22-4. Although the complete decasaccharide is visible in the electron density maps, the last four pentadecasaccharide residues from the reducing end, which do not contact the antibody, could not be traced. Although considerable mobility in the free oligosaccharides can thus be expected, the conformational similarity between the individual RUs, both within and between the two complexes, suggests that short-range transient ordering to a helical conformation might occur in solution. Although the observed epitope includes the terminal nonreducing residue, binding to internal epitopes within the polysaccharide chain is not precluded. Our results have implications for vaccine development because they suggest that a minimum of two RUs of synthetic serotype 2a oligosaccharide is required for optimal mimicry of O-Ag epitopes.

  12. An Antibody Screen of a Plasmodium vivax Antigen Library Identifies Novel Merozoite Proteins Associated with Clinical Protection

    PubMed Central

    França, Camila T.; Hostetler, Jessica B.; Sharma, Sumana; White, Michael T.; Lin, Enmoore; Kiniboro, Benson; Waltmann, Andreea; Darcy, Andrew W.; Li Wai Suen, Connie S. N.; Siba, Peter; King, Christopher L.; Rayner, Julian C.; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Mueller, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Background Elimination of Plasmodium vivax malaria would be greatly facilitated by the development of an effective vaccine. A comprehensive and systematic characterization of antibodies to P. vivax antigens in exposed populations is useful in guiding rational vaccine design. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we investigated antibodies to a large library of P. vivax entire ectodomain merozoite proteins in 2 Asia-Pacific populations, analysing the relationship of antibody levels with markers of current and cumulative malaria exposure, and socioeconomic and clinical indicators. 29 antigenic targets of natural immunity were identified. Of these, 12 highly-immunogenic proteins were strongly associated with age and thus cumulative lifetime exposure in Solomon Islanders (P<0.001–0.027). A subset of 6 proteins, selected on the basis of immunogenicity and expression levels, were used to examine antibody levels in plasma samples from a population of young Papua New Guinean children with well-characterized individual differences in exposure. This analysis identified a strong association between reduced risk of clinical disease and antibody levels to P12, P41, and a novel hypothetical protein that has not previously been studied, PVX_081550 (IRR 0.46–0.74; P<0.001–0.041). Conclusion/Significance These data emphasize the benefits of an unbiased screening approach in identifying novel vaccine candidate antigens. Functional studies are now required to establish whether PVX_081550 is a key component of the naturally-acquired protective immune response, a biomarker of immune status, or both. PMID:27182597

  13. Wave interaction with a partially reflecting vertical wall protected by a submerged porous bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Liu, Yong; Li, Huajun

    2016-08-01

    This study gives an analytical solution for wave interaction with a partially reflecting vertical wall protected by a submerged porous bar based on linear potential theory. The whole study domain is divided into multiple sub-regions in relation to the structures. The velocity potential in each sub-region is written as a series solution by the separation of variables. A partially reflecting boundary condition is used to describe the partial reflection of a vertical wall. Unknown expansion coefficients in the series solutions are determined by matching velocity potentials among different sub-regions. The analytical solution is verified by an independently developed multi-domain boundary element method (BEM) solution and experimental data. The wave run-up and wave force on the partially reflecting vertical wall are estimated and examined, which can be effectively reduced by the submerged porous bar. The horizontal space between the vertical wall and the submerged porous bar is a key factor, which affects the sheltering function of the porous bar. The wave resonance between the porous bar and the vertical wall may disappear when the vertical wall has a low reflection coefficient. The present analytical solution may be used to determine the optimum parameters of structures at a preliminary engineering design stage.

  14. Vaccination with cyclin-dependent kinase tick antigen confers protection against Ixodes infestation.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Helga; Moraes, Jorge; Githaka, Naftaly; Martins, Renato; Isezaki, Masayoshi; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Logullo, Carlos; Konnai, Satoru; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2015-07-30

    Among arthropods, ticks lead as vectors of animal diseases and rank second to mosquitoes in transmitting human pathogens. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) participate in cell cycle control in eukaryotes. CDKs are serine/threonine protein kinases and these catalytic subunits are activated or inactivated at specific stages of the cell cycle. To determine the potential of using CDKs as anti-tick vaccine antigens, hamsters were immunized with recombinant Ixodes persulcatus CDK10, followed by a homologous tick challenge. Though it was not exactly unexpected, IpCDK10 vaccination significantly impaired tick blood feeding and fecundity, which manifested as low engorgement weights, poor oviposition, and a reduction in 80% of hatching rates. These findings may underpin the development of more efficacious anti-tick vaccines based on the targeting of cell cycle control proteins. PMID:26073111

  15. Vaccination with cyclin-dependent kinase tick antigen confers protection against Ixodes infestation.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Helga; Moraes, Jorge; Githaka, Naftaly; Martins, Renato; Isezaki, Masayoshi; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Logullo, Carlos; Konnai, Satoru; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2015-07-30

    Among arthropods, ticks lead as vectors of animal diseases and rank second to mosquitoes in transmitting human pathogens. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) participate in cell cycle control in eukaryotes. CDKs are serine/threonine protein kinases and these catalytic subunits are activated or inactivated at specific stages of the cell cycle. To determine the potential of using CDKs as anti-tick vaccine antigens, hamsters were immunized with recombinant Ixodes persulcatus CDK10, followed by a homologous tick challenge. Though it was not exactly unexpected, IpCDK10 vaccination significantly impaired tick blood feeding and fecundity, which manifested as low engorgement weights, poor oviposition, and a reduction in 80% of hatching rates. These findings may underpin the development of more efficacious anti-tick vaccines based on the targeting of cell cycle control proteins.

  16. An antigenic recombinant serine protease from Trichinella spiralis induces protective immunity in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Yao, Jian-ping; Pan, Ai-hua; Liu, Wei; Hu, Xu-chu; Wu, Zhong-dao; Zhou, Xing-wang

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we report the cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding a Trichinella serine protease gene (TspSP-1.3) from GenBank. The recombinant TspSP-1.3 protein (rTspSP-1.3) was expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system and purified with Ni-affinity chromatography. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that TspSP-1.3 was expressed at significantly higher levels in muscle larvae and adult worms than in newborn larvae. TspSP-1.3 was detected in excretory-secretory proteins of Trichinella spiralis with western blotting. Immunization with the rTspSP-1.3 antigen induced humoral immune responses, which manifested as elevated specific anti-rTspSP-1.3 IgG and IgE antibodies and a mixed Th1/Th2 response. To determine whether purified rTspSP-1.3 had good antigenicity and could be a vaccine candidate for the control of T. spiralis infection, we immunized BALB/c mice with rTspSP-1.3 and subsequently challenged the mice with T. spiralis larvae. The results showed that mice vaccinated with rTspSP-1.3 exhibited an average reduction in the muscle larvae burden of 39 % relative to the control group. These results suggest that TspSP-1.3 could be a novel vaccine candidate for controlling Trichinella infection. PMID:23828191

  17. Label-free and real-time detection of antigen-antibody interactions by Oblique-incidence Reflectivity Difference (OIRD) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, LiPing; Sun, Yue; Dai, Jun; Wang, JingYi; Lü, HuiBin; Wang, ShuFang; Jin, KuiJuan; Zhou, YueLiang; Yang, GuoZhen

    2012-09-01

    We label-free and real-time detected three interaction processes of antigen-antibodies, Human Immunoglobulin G (IgG), Rabbit IgG, and Mouse IgG as the targets, and Goat Anti-human IgG, Goat Anti-rabbit IgG, and Goat Anti-mouse IgG as the probe, by the Oblique-incidence Reflectivity Difference (OIRD) method. The interaction dynamic curves of the OIRD signal, corresponding to the interaction processes of antigen-antibodies, are generated. The reaction times from beginning to equilibrium state are about 1800, 900, and 1200 s for Human IgG, Rabbit IgG, and Mouse IgG, respectively. The experimental results demonstrate that the OIRD method not only can distinguish biomolecular interactions, but also can be used in real-time detection of interactions and dynamic processes of biomolecules.

  18. A bacterial protease inhibitor protects antigens delivered in oral vaccines from digestion while triggering specific mucosal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ibañez, Andrés Esteban; Coria, Lorena Mirta; Carabajal, Marianela Verónica; Delpino, María Victoria; Risso, Gabriela Sofía; Cobiello, Paula Gonzalez; Rinaldi, Jimena; Barrionuevo, Paula; Bruno, Laura; Frank, Fernanda; Klinke, Sebastián; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto; Briones, Gabriel; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Pasquevich, Karina Alejandra; Cassataro, Juliana

    2015-12-28

    We report here that a bacterial protease inhibitor from Brucella spp. called U-Omp19 behaves as an ideal constituent for a vaccine formulation against infectious diseases. When co-administered orally with an antigen (Ag), U-Omp19: i) can bypass the harsh environment of the gastrointestinal tract by inhibiting stomach and intestine proteases and consequently increases the half-life of the co-administered Ag at immune inductive sites: Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes while ii) it induces the recruitment and activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs) and increases the amount of intracellular Ag inside APCs. Therefore, mucosal as well as systemic Ag-specific immune responses, antibodies, Th1, Th17 and CD8(+) T cells are enhanced when U-Omp19 is co-administered with the Ag orally. Finally, this bacterial protease inhibitor in an oral vaccine formulation confers mucosal protection and reduces parasite loads after oral challenge with virulent Toxoplasma gondii. PMID:26456256

  19. Passive immunotherapy for anthrax toxin mediated by an adenovirus expressing an anti-protective antigen single-chain antibody.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Kazuhiko; Boyer, Julie L; Tan, Yadi; Alipui, D Olivier; Hackett, Neil R; Crystal, Ronald G

    2005-02-01

    In the 2001 U.S. bioterror attacks, 33,000 individuals required postexposure prophylaxis, 18 subjects contracted anthrax (11 inhalation, 7 cutaneous), and despite optimal medical therapy, 5 deaths resulted. Rapid protection against anthrax is required in a bioterrorism scenario; this study describes an in vivo gene transfer-based therapy that uses a human adenovirus (Ad)-based vector (AdalphaPAscAb) encoding a single-chain antibody directed against protective antigen (PA), a critical component of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Following AdalphaPAscAb administration to mice, anti-PA single-chain antibody and anti-PA neutralizing activity were detected in serum over a 2-week period. Substantial survival advantage from anthrax lethal toxin was conferred by AdalphaPAscAb following administration from 1 to 14 days prior to toxin challenge, compared to no survival associated with an Ad vector expressing a control single-chain antibody. Passive immunotherapy with an Ad-based vector may be a rapid, convenient approach for protecting a susceptible population against anthrax, including use as an adjunct to antibiotic therapy.

  20. Protection of rats against Mycoplasma arthritidis-induced arthritis by active and passive immunizations with two surface antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, L R; Weaver, E J

    1997-01-01

    We previously identified two surface-exposed Mycoplasma arthritidis protein antigens, designated MAA1 and MAA2, that may be involved in cytadherence. Since adherence to host tissues is an important first step in most bacterial infections, we suggest that MAA1 and MAA2 may be virulence factors for M. arthritidis. In order to provide evidence for such a role, we conducted a series of experiments in which rats were actively immunized with each of these proteins purified from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels or passively immunized with poly- or monoclonal antibodies against MAA1 and MAA2. In each case, immunity against MAA1 and MAA2 conferred at least partial protection against M. arthritidis-induced disease. The greatest protection was achieved by passive immunization with monoclonal antibody A9a, directed against a surface-exposed epitope of putative adhesin MAA1. Because protective immunity in most bacterial infections is directed against major virulence factors, these results suggest that MAA1 and MAA2 may play a role in the pathogenesis of M. arthritidis-induced arthritis of rats, possibly by mediating initial colonization of joint tissues. PMID:9144371

  1. Protective efficacy by various doses of Salmonella ghost vaccine candidate carrying enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbrial antigen against neonatal piglet colibacillosis.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Lee, John Hwa

    2016-07-01

    Humoral immune responses and protective efficacy by various doses of Salmonella ghost cells carrying enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) fimbrial antigens for protection against piglet colibacillosis were studied. All groups were orally primed and boosted at 11 and 14 wk of pregnancy, respectively. Group A sows were inoculated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and groups B, C, and D sows were immunized with 2 × 10(9), 2 × 10(10), and 2 × 10(11) ghost cells, respectively. Serum immunoglobulin (Ig) G, and colostrum IgG and IgA levels of groups C and D sows were significantly higher than those of group A sows. In addition, serum IgG and IgA levels in group C and D piglets were significantly increased compared to those of group A piglets. After challenge with wild-type ETEC, diarrhea and mortality were not observed in group C and D piglets, while diarrhea was observed in 88.9% and 58.8% of groups A and B piglets, respectively, and 16.7% mortality was observed in group A piglets. These findings indicate that oral immunization of sows with 2 × 10(10) or 10(11) ghost cells can effectively protect their offspring from colibacillosis.

  2. Construction of Recombinant Baculoviruses Expressing Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Main Protective Antigen and Their Immune Effects on Chickens.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jingping; An, Qi; Song, Shanshan; Gao, Dongni; Ping, Wenxiang

    2015-01-01

    In order to overcome the limitations of conventional vaccines for infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), we constructed recombinant dual expression system baculoviruses with VP2 and VP2/4/3, the main protective antigens of IBDV. We compared the immune effects of the baculoviruses in avian cells and detected their control effects on chickens with infectious bursal disease. We used Western blot analysis to measure VP2 protein and VP2/4/3 polyprotein expression in avian cells infected using the Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression system. The recombinant baculoviruses were used to vaccinate specific pathogen-free chickens, which produced specific protective antibodies and strong cellular immune responses. The results of the virus challenge experiment revealed that the protective efficiency of VP2 and VP2/4/3 virus vaccines were 95.8% and 100%, respectively, both of which were higher than the vaccine group (87.5%), and significantly higher than the control group (50%). The results demonstrated that the immune effect of BV-S-ITRs-VP2/4/3 was superior to that of BV-S-ITRs-VP2. Compared with traditional attenuated vaccine and genetically engineered live vector vaccine, the dual expression viral vector vaccine has good bio-safety. The results of this study provide a foundation for the further development of poultry vaccines, in addition to providing a useful reference for developing non-replicating live vaccines against other viral diseases. PMID:26167907

  3. Protective effect of intranasal immunization with Neospora caninum membrane antigens against murine neosporosis established through the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Ferreirinha, Pedro; Dias, Joana; Correia, Alexandra; Pérez-Cabezas, Begoña; Santos, Carlos; Teixeira, Luzia; Ribeiro, Adília; Rocha, António; Vilanova, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Neospora caninum is an Apicomplexa parasite that in the last two decades was acknowledged as the main pathogenic agent responsible for economic losses in the cattle industry. In the present study, the effectiveness of intranasal immunization with N. caninum membrane antigens plus CpG adjuvant was assessed in a murine model of intragastrically established neosporosis. Immunized mice presented a lower parasitic burden in the brain on infection with 5 × 107 tachyzoites, showing that significant protection was achieved by this immunization strategy. Intestinal IgA antibodies raised by immunization markedly agglutinated live N. caninum tachyzoites whereas previous opsonization with IgG antibodies purified from immunized mice sera reduced parasite survival within macrophage cells. Although an IgG1 : IgG2a ratio < 1 was detected in the immunized mice before and after infection, indicative of a predominant T helper type 1 immune response, no increased production of interferon-γ was detected in the spleen or mesenteric lymph nodes of the immunized mice. Altogether, these results show that mucosal immunization with N. caninum membrane proteins plus CpG adjuvant protect against intragastrically established neosporosis and indicate that parasite-specific mucosal and circulating antibodies have a protective role against this parasitic infection. PMID:24128071

  4. Cationic liposomes containing soluble Leishmania antigens (SLA) plus CpG ODNs induce protection against murine model of leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Heravi Shargh, Vahid; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; Khamesipour, Ali; Jalali, Seyed Amir; Firouzmand, Hengameh; Abbasi, Azam; Badiee, Ali

    2012-07-01

    Development of an effective vaccine against leishmaniasis is possible due to the fact that individuals cured from cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) are protected from further infection. First generation Leishmania vaccines consisting of whole killed parasites reached to phase 3 clinical trials but failed to show enough efficacies mainly due to the lack of an appropriate adjuvant. In this study, an efficient liposomal protein-based vaccine against Leishmania major infection was developed using soluble Leishmania antigens (SLA) as a first generation vaccine and cytidine phosphate guanosine oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs) as an immunostimulatory adjuvant. 1, 2-Dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane was used as a cationic lipid to prepare the liposomes due to its intrinsic adjuvanticity. BALB/c mice were immunized subcutaneously (SC), three times in 2-week intervals, with Lip-SLA-CpG, Lip-SLA, SLA + CpG, SLA, or HEPES buffer. As criteria for protection, footpad swelling at the site of challenge and spleen parasite loads were assessed, and the immune responses were evaluated by determination of IFN-γ and IL-4 levels of cultured splenocytes, and IgG subtypes. The group of mice that received Lip-SLA-CpG showed a significantly smaller footpad swelling, lower spleen parasite burden, higher IgG2a antibody, and lower IL-4 level compared to the control groups. It is concluded that cationic liposomes containing SLA and CpG ODNs are appropriate to induce Th1 type of immune response and protection against leishmaniasis. PMID:22223037

  5. Protection of rats against Mycoplasma arthritidis-induced arthritis by active and passive immunizations with two surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Washburn, L R; Weaver, E J

    1997-05-01

    We previously identified two surface-exposed Mycoplasma arthritidis protein antigens, designated MAA1 and MAA2, that may be involved in cytadherence. Since adherence to host tissues is an important first step in most bacterial infections, we suggest that MAA1 and MAA2 may be virulence factors for M. arthritidis. In order to provide evidence for such a role, we conducted a series of experiments in which rats were actively immunized with each of these proteins purified from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels or passively immunized with poly- or monoclonal antibodies against MAA1 and MAA2. In each case, immunity against MAA1 and MAA2 conferred at least partial protection against M. arthritidis-induced disease. The greatest protection was achieved by passive immunization with monoclonal antibody A9a, directed against a surface-exposed epitope of putative adhesin MAA1. Because protective immunity in most bacterial infections is directed against major virulence factors, these results suggest that MAA1 and MAA2 may play a role in the pathogenesis of M. arthritidis-induced arthritis of rats, possibly by mediating initial colonization of joint tissues.

  6. Cationic liposomes containing soluble Leishmania antigens (SLA) plus CpG ODNs induce protection against murine model of leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Heravi Shargh, Vahid; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; Khamesipour, Ali; Jalali, Seyed Amir; Firouzmand, Hengameh; Abbasi, Azam; Badiee, Ali

    2012-07-01

    Development of an effective vaccine against leishmaniasis is possible due to the fact that individuals cured from cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) are protected from further infection. First generation Leishmania vaccines consisting of whole killed parasites reached to phase 3 clinical trials but failed to show enough efficacies mainly due to the lack of an appropriate adjuvant. In this study, an efficient liposomal protein-based vaccine against Leishmania major infection was developed using soluble Leishmania antigens (SLA) as a first generation vaccine and cytidine phosphate guanosine oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs) as an immunostimulatory adjuvant. 1, 2-Dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane was used as a cationic lipid to prepare the liposomes due to its intrinsic adjuvanticity. BALB/c mice were immunized subcutaneously (SC), three times in 2-week intervals, with Lip-SLA-CpG, Lip-SLA, SLA + CpG, SLA, or HEPES buffer. As criteria for protection, footpad swelling at the site of challenge and spleen parasite loads were assessed, and the immune responses were evaluated by determination of IFN-γ and IL-4 levels of cultured splenocytes, and IgG subtypes. The group of mice that received Lip-SLA-CpG showed a significantly smaller footpad swelling, lower spleen parasite burden, higher IgG2a antibody, and lower IL-4 level compared to the control groups. It is concluded that cationic liposomes containing SLA and CpG ODNs are appropriate to induce Th1 type of immune response and protection against leishmaniasis.

  7. Multiple antigens of Yersinia pestis delivered by live recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccine strains elicit protective immunity against plague.

    PubMed

    Sanapala, Shilpa; Rahav, Hannah; Patel, Hetal; Sun, Wei; Curtiss, Roy

    2016-05-01

    Based on our improved novel Salmonella vaccine delivery platform, we optimized the recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium vaccine (RASV) χ12094 to deliver multiple Yersinia pestis antigens. These included LcrV196 (amino acids, 131-326), Psn encoded on pYA5383 and F1 encoded in the chromosome, their synthesis did not cause adverse effects on bacterial growth. Oral immunization with χ12094(pYA5383) simultaneously stimulated high antibody titers to LcrV, Psn and F1 in mice and presented complete protection against both subcutaneous (s.c.) and intranasal (i.n.) challenges with high lethal doses of Y. pestis CO92. Moreover, no deaths or other disease symptoms were observed in SCID mice orally immunized with χ12094(pYA5383) over a 60-day period. Therefore, the trivalent S. typhimurium-based live vaccine shows promise for a next-generation plague vaccine. PMID:27060051

  8. Secretion of Protective Antigens by Tissue-Stage Nematode Larvae Revealed by Proteomic Analysis and Vaccination-Induced Sterile Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hewitson, James P.; Ivens, Al C.; Harcus, Yvonne; Filbey, Kara J.; McSorley, Henry J.; Murray, Janice; Bridgett, Stephen; Ashford, David; Dowle, Adam A.; Maizels, Rick M.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal nematode parasites infect over 1 billion humans, with little evidence for generation of sterilising immunity. These helminths are highly adapted to their mammalian host, following a developmental program through successive niches, while effectively down-modulating host immune responsiveness. Larvae of Heligmosomoides polygyrus, for example, encyst in the intestinal submucosa, before emerging as adult worms into the duodenal lumen. Adults release immunomodulatory excretory-secretory (ES) products, but mice immunised with adult H. polygyrus ES become fully immune to challenge infection. ES products of the intestinal wall 4th stage (L4) larvae are similarly important in host-parasite interactions, as they readily generate sterile immunity against infection, while released material from the egg stage is ineffective. Proteomic analyses of L4 ES identifies protective antigen targets as well as potential tissue-phase immunomodulatory molecules, using as comparators the adult ES proteome and a profile of H. polygyrus egg-released material. While 135 proteins are shared between L4 and adult ES, 72 are L4 ES-specific; L4-specific proteins correspond to those whose transcription is restricted to larval stages, while shared proteins are generally transcribed by all life cycle forms. Two protein families are more heavily represented in the L4 secretome, the Sushi domain, associated with complement regulation, and the ShK/SXC domain related to a toxin interfering with T cell signalling. Both adult and L4 ES contain extensive but distinct arrays of Venom allergen/Ancylostoma secreted protein-Like (VAL) members, with acetylcholinesterases (ACEs) and apyrase APY-3 particularly abundant in L4 ES. Serum antibodies from mice vaccinated with L4 and adult ES react strongly to the VAL-1 protein and to ACE-1, indicating that these two antigens represent major vaccine targets for this intestinal nematode. We have thus defined an extensive and novel repertoire of H

  9. Secretion of protective antigens by tissue-stage nematode larvae revealed by proteomic analysis and vaccination-induced sterile immunity.

    PubMed

    Hewitson, James P; Ivens, Al C; Harcus, Yvonne; Filbey, Kara J; McSorley, Henry J; Murray, Janice; Bridgett, Stephen; Ashford, David; Dowle, Adam A; Maizels, Rick M

    2013-08-01

    Gastrointestinal nematode parasites infect over 1 billion humans, with little evidence for generation of sterilising immunity. These helminths are highly adapted to their mammalian host, following a developmental program through successive niches, while effectively down-modulating host immune responsiveness. Larvae of Heligmosomoides polygyrus, for example, encyst in the intestinal submucosa, before emerging as adult worms into the duodenal lumen. Adults release immunomodulatory excretory-secretory (ES) products, but mice immunised with adult H. polygyrus ES become fully immune to challenge infection. ES products of the intestinal wall 4th stage (L4) larvae are similarly important in host-parasite interactions, as they readily generate sterile immunity against infection, while released material from the egg stage is ineffective. Proteomic analyses of L4 ES identifies protective antigen targets as well as potential tissue-phase immunomodulatory molecules, using as comparators the adult ES proteome and a profile of H. polygyrus egg-released material. While 135 proteins are shared between L4 and adult ES, 72 are L4 ES-specific; L4-specific proteins correspond to those whose transcription is restricted to larval stages, while shared proteins are generally transcribed by all life cycle forms. Two protein families are more heavily represented in the L4 secretome, the Sushi domain, associated with complement regulation, and the ShK/SXC domain related to a toxin interfering with T cell signalling. Both adult and L4 ES contain extensive but distinct arrays of Venom allergen/Ancylostoma secreted protein-Like (VAL) members, with acetylcholinesterases (ACEs) and apyrase APY-3 particularly abundant in L4 ES. Serum antibodies from mice vaccinated with L4 and adult ES react strongly to the VAL-1 protein and to ACE-1, indicating that these two antigens represent major vaccine targets for this intestinal nematode. We have thus defined an extensive and novel repertoire of H

  10. Secretion of protective antigens by tissue-stage nematode larvae revealed by proteomic analysis and vaccination-induced sterile immunity.

    PubMed

    Hewitson, James P; Ivens, Al C; Harcus, Yvonne; Filbey, Kara J; McSorley, Henry J; Murray, Janice; Bridgett, Stephen; Ashford, David; Dowle, Adam A; Maizels, Rick M

    2013-08-01

    Gastrointestinal nematode parasites infect over 1 billion humans, with little evidence for generation of sterilising immunity. These helminths are highly adapted to their mammalian host, following a developmental program through successive niches, while effectively down-modulating host immune responsiveness. Larvae of Heligmosomoides polygyrus, for example, encyst in the intestinal submucosa, before emerging as adult worms into the duodenal lumen. Adults release immunomodulatory excretory-secretory (ES) products, but mice immunised with adult H. polygyrus ES become fully immune to challenge infection. ES products of the intestinal wall 4th stage (L4) larvae are similarly important in host-parasite interactions, as they readily generate sterile immunity against infection, while released material from the egg stage is ineffective. Proteomic analyses of L4 ES identifies protective antigen targets as well as potential tissue-phase immunomodulatory molecules, using as comparators the adult ES proteome and a profile of H. polygyrus egg-released material. While 135 proteins are shared between L4 and adult ES, 72 are L4 ES-specific; L4-specific proteins correspond to those whose transcription is restricted to larval stages, while shared proteins are generally transcribed by all life cycle forms. Two protein families are more heavily represented in the L4 secretome, the Sushi domain, associated with complement regulation, and the ShK/SXC domain related to a toxin interfering with T cell signalling. Both adult and L4 ES contain extensive but distinct arrays of Venom allergen/Ancylostoma secreted protein-Like (VAL) members, with acetylcholinesterases (ACEs) and apyrase APY-3 particularly abundant in L4 ES. Serum antibodies from mice vaccinated with L4 and adult ES react strongly to the VAL-1 protein and to ACE-1, indicating that these two antigens represent major vaccine targets for this intestinal nematode. We have thus defined an extensive and novel repertoire of H

  11. Protective genotypes in HIV infection reflect superior function of KIR3DS1+ over KIR3DL1+ CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Zipperlen, Katrin; Gallant, Maureen; Stapleton, Staci; Heath, John; Barrett, Lisa; Grant, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Certain human class I histocompatibility-linked leukocyte antigen (HLA)/killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genotypic combinations confer more favourable prognoses upon exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). These combinations influence natural killer (NK) cell function, thereby implicating NK cells in protection from HIV infection or disease progression. Because CD8(+) T cells restrict HIV replication, depend upon HLA class I antigen presentation and can also express KIR molecules, we investigated how these HLA/KIR combinations relate to the phenotype and function of CD8(+) T cells from uninfected controls and individuals with chronic HIV infection. CD8(+) T cells from KIR3DL1 and KIR3DS1 homozygous individuals, and expressing the corresponding KIR, were enumerated and phenotyped for CD127, CD57 and CD45RA expression. Ex vivo and in vitro responsiveness to antigen-specific and polyclonal stimulation was compared between KIR-expressing and non-expressing CD8(+) T cells by interferon-γ production. There were higher numbers and fractions of KIR3DL1-expressing CD8(+) T cells in HIV-infected individuals independent of HLA-Bw4 co-expression, whereas expansion of KIR3DS1-expressing CD8(+) T cells reflected HLA-Bw4*80I co-expression. KIR3DL1(+) and S1(+) CD8(+) T cells were predominantly CD127(-)CD57(+)CD45RA(+). KIR3DL1-expressing CD8(+) T cells were insensitive to ex vivo stimulation with peptides from HIV or common viruses, but responded to anti-CD3 and recovered responsiveness to common viruses in vitro. Ex vivo non-responsiveness of KIR3DL1-expressing CD8(+) T cells was also independent of HLA-Bw4. KIR3DS1-expressing T cells responded normally to ex vivo antigenic stimulation, illustrating functional superiority over KIR3DL1(+) CD8(+) T cells.

  12. Studies on the protective efficacy of freeze thawed promastigote antigen of Leishmania donovani along with various adjuvants against visceral leishmaniasis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Ankita; Kaur, Harpreet; Kaur, Sukhbir

    2015-09-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania donovani persists as a major public health issue in tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Current treatment of this disease relies on use of drugs. It is doubtful that chemotherapy can alone eradicate the disease, so there is a need for an effective vaccine. Killed antigen candidates remain a good prospect considering their ease of formulation, stability, low cost and safety. To enhance the efficacy of killed vaccines suitable adjuvant and delivery system are needed. Therefore, the current study was conducted to determine the protective efficacy of freeze-thawed L. donovani antigen in combination with different adjuvants against experimental infection of VL. For this, BALB/c mice were immunized thrice at an interval of two weeks. Challenge infection was given two weeks after last immunization. Mice were sacrificed after last immunization and on different post challenge/infection days. Immunized mice showed significant reduction in parasite burden, enhanced DTH responses with increased levels of Th1 cytokines and lower levels of Th2 cytokines, thus indicating the development of a protective Th1 response. Maximum protection was achieved with liposome encapsulated freeze thawed promastigote (FTP) antigen of L. donovani and it was followed by group immunized with FTP+MPL-A, FTP+saponin, FTP+alum and FTP antigen (alone). The present study highlights greater efficacy of freeze thawed promastigote antigen as a potential vaccine candidate along with effective adjuvant formulations against experimental VL infection.

  13. Label-Free and Real-Time Detection of Antigen-Antibody Capture Processes Using the Oblique-Incidence Reflectivity Difference Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Li-Ping; Dai, Jun; Sun, Yue; Wang, Jing-Yi; Lü, Hui-Bin; Wang, Shu-Fang; Jin, Kui-Juan; Zhou, Yue-Liang; Yang, Guo-Zhen

    2012-07-01

    We successfully label-free and real-time detect the capture processes of human immunoglobulin G (IgG)/goat anti-human IgG and mouse IgG/goat anti-mouse IgG antigen-antibody pairs with different concentrations using the oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OIRD) method, and obtain the interaction kinetics curves and the interaction times. The experimental results prove that the OIRD method is a promising technique for label-free and real-time detection of the biomolecular interaction processes and achieving the quantitative information of interaction kinetics.

  14. rBCG30-induced immunity and cross-protection against Mycobacterium leprae challenge are enhanced by boosting with the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 30-kilodalton antigen 85B.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Thomas P; Tullius, Michael V; Horwitz, Marcus A

    2014-09-01

    Leprosy remains a major global health problem and typically occurs in regions in which tuberculosis is endemic. Vaccines are needed that protect against both infections and do so better than the suboptimal Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine. Here, we evaluated rBCG30, a vaccine previously demonstrated to induce protection superior to that of BCG against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis challenge in animal models, for efficacy against Mycobacterium leprae challenge in a murine model of leprosy. rBCG30 overexpresses the M. tuberculosis 30-kDa major secretory protein antigen 85B, which is 85% homologous with the M. leprae homolog (r30ML). Mice were sham immunized or immunized intradermally with BCG or rBCG30 and challenged 2.5 months later by injection of viable M. leprae into each hind footpad. After 7 months, vaccine efficacy was assessed by enumerating the M. leprae bacteria per footpad. Both BCG and rBCG30 induced significant protection against M. leprae challenge. In the one experiment in which a comparison between BCG and rBCG30 was feasible, rBCG30 induced significantly greater protection than did BCG. Immunization of mice with purified M. tuberculosis or M. leprae antigen 85B also induced protection against M. leprae challenge but less so than BCG or rBCG30. Notably, boosting rBCG30 with M. tuberculosis antigen 85B significantly enhanced r30ML-specific immune responses, substantially more so than boosting BCG, and significantly augmented protection against M. leprae challenge. Thus, rBCG30, a vaccine that induces improved protection against M. tuberculosis, induces cross-protection against M. leprae that is comparable or potentially superior to that induced by BCG, and boosting rBCG30 with antigen 85B further enhances immune responses and protective efficacy.

  15. Liposome-Antigen-Nucleic Acid Complexes Protect Mice from Lethal Challenge with Western and Eastern Equine Encephalitis Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Aaron T.; Schountz, Tony; Toth, Ann M.; Rico, Amber B.; Jarvis, Donald L.; Powers, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Alphaviruses are mosquito-borne viruses that cause significant disease in animals and humans. Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) and eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV), two New World alphaviruses, can cause fatal encephalitis, and EEEV is a select agent of concern in biodefense. However, we have no antiviral therapies against alphaviral disease, and current vaccine strategies target only a single alphavirus species. In an effort to develop new tools for a broader response to outbreaks, we designed and tested a novel alphavirus vaccine comprised of cationic lipid nucleic acid complexes (CLNCs) and the ectodomain of WEEV E1 protein (E1ecto). Interestingly, we found that the CLNC component, alone, had therapeutic efficacy, as it increased survival of CD-1 mice following lethal WEEV infection. Immunization with the CLNC-WEEV E1ecto mixture (lipid-antigen-nucleic acid complexes [LANACs]) using a prime-boost regimen provided 100% protection in mice challenged with WEEV subcutaneously, intranasally, or via mosquito. Mice immunized with LANACs mounted a strong humoral immune response but did not produce neutralizing antibodies. Passive transfer of serum from LANAC E1ecto-immunized mice to nonimmune CD-1 mice conferred protection against WEEV challenge, indicating that antibody is sufficient for protection. In addition, the LANAC E1ecto immunization protocol significantly increased survival of mice following intranasal or subcutaneous challenge with EEEV. In summary, our LANAC formulation has therapeutic potential and is an effective vaccine strategy that offers protection against two distinct species of alphavirus irrespective of the route of infection. We discuss plausible mechanisms as well the potential utility of our LANAC formulation as a pan-alphavirus vaccine. PMID:24257615

  16. Protection of pigs against Taenia solium cysticercosis using recombinant antigen or in combination with DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying-Jun; Sun, Shu-Han; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Zhu-Huan; Wang, Kai-Yu; Huang, Li; Zhang, Shu; Zhang, Hong-Ying; Wang, Qing-Min; Wu, Dan; Zhu, Wei-Jia

    2004-09-28

    In the present study, we investigated the duration of protection afforded to pigs immunized in two different prime-boost regimens: one is homologus priming and boosting with a protein vaccine, and the other is priming with a DNA vaccine and boosting with the protein vaccine. Groups of pigs that received the same vaccination regimen were then challenged with Taenia solium eggs at 6, 12 or 20 weeks post-immunization (wpi), respectively. The results showed that all vaccinated pigs challenged at 6 or 12 wpi showed significant (P < 0.05) reduction in the development of cysts. When challenged at 20 wpi, pigs primed with the DNA vaccine (pcDNA3-cC1) followed by two boosters of the protein vaccine (GST-cC1) showed significant (P < 0.05) protection against the challenge of T. solium eggs, whereas pigs receiving three injections of the protein vaccine showed no significant protection compared to non-vaccinated controls (P > 0.05). Antibody isotype assays showed that DNA prime-protein boost regimen induced a predominantly IgG2 response, compared to an IgG1 biased response for the protein prime-protein boost regimen. In addition, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) obtained from the DNA prime-protein boost group proliferated strongly in response to GST-cC1 protein, and this responsiveness persisted until 20 wpi. Taken together, our data suggest that the use of a prime-boost strategy combining DNA and protein vaccines may be better than protein alone for the longevity of protection against the challenge of T. solium eggs.

  17. Adenoviral Expression of a Bispecific VHH-Based Neutralizing Agent That Targets Protective Antigen Provides Prophylactic Protection from Anthrax in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Tremblay, Jacqueline M.; Debatis, Michelle; Dmitriev, Igor P.; Kashentseva, Elena A.; Yeh, Anthony J.; Cheung, Gordon Y. C.; Curiel, David T.; Leppla, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, secretes three polypeptides, which form the bipartite lethal and edema toxins (LT and ET, respectively). The common component in these toxins, protective antigen (PA), is responsible for binding to cellular receptors and translocating the lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF) enzymatic moieties to the cytosol. Antibodies against PA protect against anthrax. We previously isolated toxin-neutralizing variable domains of camelid heavy-chain-only antibodies (VHHs) and demonstrated their in vivo efficacy. In this work, gene therapy with an adenoviral (Ad) vector (Ad/VNA2-PA) (VNA, VHH-based neutralizing agents) promoting the expression of a bispecific VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA2-PA), consisting of two linked VHHs targeting different PA-neutralizing epitopes, was tested in two inbred mouse strains, BALB/cJ and C57BL/6J, and found to protect mice against anthrax toxin challenge and anthrax spore infection. Two weeks after a single treatment with Ad/VNA2-PA, serum VNA2-PA levels remained above 1 μg/ml, with some as high as 10 mg/ml. The levels were 10- to 100-fold higher and persisted longer in C57BL/6J than in BALB/cJ mice. Mice were challenged with a lethal dose of LT or spores at various times after Ad/VNA2-PA administration. The majority of BALB/cJ mice having serum VNA2-PA levels of >0.1 μg/ml survived LT challenge, and 9 of 10 C57BL/6J mice with serum levels of >1 μg/ml survived spore challenge. Our findings demonstrate the potential for genetic delivery of VNAs as an effective method for providing prophylactic protection from anthrax. We also extend prior findings of mouse strain-based differences in transgene expression and persistence by adenoviral vectors. PMID:26740390

  18. Temperature-mediated recombinant anthrax protective antigen aggregate development: Implications for toxin formation and immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Amador-Molina, Juan C; Valerdi-Madrigal, Esther D; Domínguez-Castillo, Rocío I; Sirota, Lev A; Arciniega, Juan L

    2016-07-29

    Anthrax vaccines containing recombinant PA (rPA) as the only antigen face a stability issue: rPA forms aggregates in solution after exposure to temperatures ⩾40°C, thus losing its ability to form lethal toxin (LeTx) with Lethal Factor. To study rPA aggregation's impact on immune response, we subjected rPA to several time and temperature combinations. rPA treated at 50°C for 30min formed high mass aggregates when analyzed by gel electrophoresis and failed to form LeTx as measured by a macrophage lysis assay (MLA). Aggregated rPA-formed LeTx was about 30 times less active than LeTx containing native rPA. Mice immunized with heat-treated rPA combined with Al(OH)3 developed antibody titers about 49 times lower than mice immunized with native rPA, as measured by a Toxicity Neutralization Assay (TNA). Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) of the same immune sera showed anti-rPA titers only 2-7 times lower than titers elicited by native rPA. Thus, rPA's ability to form LeTx correlates with its production of neutralizing antibodies, and aggregation significantly impairs the protein's antibody response. However, while these findings suggest MLA has some value as an in-process quality test for rPA in new anthrax vaccines, they also confirm the superiority of TNA for use in vaccine potency. PMID:27364097

  19. Characterization of Protective Epitopes in a Highly Conserved Plasmodium falciparum Antigenic Protein Containing Repeats of Acidic and Basic Residues

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pawan; Kumar, Anil; Singh, Balwan; Bharadwaj, Ashima; Sailaja, V. Naga; Adak, T.; Kushwaha, Ashima; Malhotra, Pawan; Chauhan, V. S.

    1998-01-01

    The delineation of putatively protective and immunogenic epitopes in vaccine candidate proteins constitutes a major research effort towards the development of an effective malaria vaccine. By virtue of its role in the formation of the immune clusters of merozoites, its location on the surface of merozoites, and its highly conserved nature both at the nucleotide sequence level and the amino acid sequence level, the antigen which contains repeats of acidic and basic residues (ABRA) of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum represents such an antigen. Based upon the predicted amino acid sequence of ABRA, we synthesized eight peptides, with six of these (AB-1 to AB-6) ranging from 12 to 18 residues covering the most hydrophilic regions of the protein, and two more peptides (AB-7 and AB-8) representing its repetitive sequences. We found that all eight constructs bound an appreciable amount of antibody in sera from a large proportion of P. falciparum malaria patients; two of these peptides (AB-1 and AB-3) also elicited a strong proliferation response in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from all 11 human subjects recovering from malaria. When used as carrier-free immunogens, six peptides induced a strong, boostable, immunoglobulin G-type antibody response in rabbits, indicating the presence of both B-cell determinants and T-helper-cell epitopes in these six constructs. These antibodies specifically cross-reacted with the parasite protein(s) in an immunoblot and in an immunofluorescence assay. In another immunoblot, rabbit antipeptide sera also recognized recombinant fragments of ABRA expressed in bacteria. More significantly, rabbit antibodies against two constructs (AB-1 and AB-5) inhibited the merozoite reinvasion of human erythrocytes in vitro up to ∼90%. These results favor further studies so as to determine possible inclusion of these two constructs in a multicomponent subunit vaccine against asexual blood stages of P. falciparum. PMID:9596765

  20. Histamine release factor from Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer): characterization and in vitro assessment as a protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Kathryn; Nisbet, Alasdair J; Offer, Jill E; Sparks, Nicholas H C; Wright, Harry W; Huntley, John F

    2009-03-01

    A cDNA encoding a 174-amino-acid orthologue of a tick histamine release factor (HRF) was identified from the haematophagous poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae. The predicted D. gallinae HRF protein (Dg-HRF-1) sequence is highly conserved with the tick HRFs (identity 52-54%) and to a lesser degree with translationally controlled tumour proteins (TCTP) from mammals and other invertebrates (range 38-47%). Phylogenetically, Dg-HRF-1 partitions with the tick HRF clade suggesting a shared linage and potentially similar function(s). A recombinant Dg-HRF-1 protein (rDg-HRF-1) was produced and shown to induce degranulation of rat peritoneal mast cells in vitro, confirming conservation of the histamine-releasing function in D. gallinae. Polyclonal antibodies were generated in rabbits and hens to rDg-HRF-1. Western blotting demonstrated that native Dg-HRF is a soluble protein and immunohistochemical staining of mite sections revealed that the distribution of Dg-HRF, although ubiquitous, is more common in mite reproductive, digestive and synganglion tissues. A survey of hens housed continuously in a mite-infested commercial poultry unit failed to identify IgY specific for recombinant or native Dg-HRF, indicating that Dg-HRF is not exposed to the host during infestation/feeding and may therefore have potential as a vaccine using the concealed antigen approach. To test the protective capability of rDg-HRF-1, fresh heparinised chicken blood was enriched with yolk-derived anti-Dg-HRF IgY antibodies and fed to semi-starved mites using an in vitro feeding system. A statistically significant increase in mortality was shown (P=0.004) in mites fed with anti-Dg-HRF IgY after just one blood meal. The work presented here demonstrates, to our knowledge for the first time, the feasibility of vaccinating hens with recombinant D. gallinae antigens to control mite infestation and the potential of rDg-HRF-1 as a vaccine antigen.

  1. Single-Dose CpG Immunization Protects Against a Heterosubtypic Challenge and Generates Antigen-Specific Memory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Alexander J.; Brown, Deborah M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite extensive research, influenza A virus (IAV) remains a major cause of morbidity, mortality, and healthcare expenditure. Emerging pandemics from highly pathogenic IAV strains, such as H5N1 and pandemic H1N1, highlight the need for universal, cross-protective vaccines. Current vaccine formulations generate strain-specific neutralizing antibodies primarily against the outer coat proteins, hemagglutinin and neuraminidase. In contrast to these highly mutable proteins, internal proteins of IAV are more conserved and are a favorable target for developing vaccines that induce strong T cell responses in addition to humoral immunity. Here, we found that intranasal administration with a single dose of CpG and inactivated x31 (H3N2) reduced viral titers and partially protected mice from a heterosubtypic challenge with a lethal dose of PR8 (H1N1). Early after immunization, vaccinated mice showed increased innate immune activation with high levels of MHCII and CD86 expression on dendritic cells in both draining lymph nodes and lungs. Three days after immunization, CD4 and CD8 cells in the lung upregulated CD69, suggesting that activated lymphocytes are present at the site of vaccine administration. The ensuing effector Th1 responses were capable of producing multiple cytokines and were present at least 30 days after immunization. Furthermore, functional memory responses were observed, as antigen-specific IFN-γ+ and GrB+ cells were detected early after lethal infection. Together, this work provides evidence for using pattern recognition receptor agonists as a mucosal vaccine platform for inducing robust T cell responses capable of protecting against heterologous IAV challenges. PMID:26161083

  2. Protection of chickens to antigenically variant avian influenza virus challenge after immunization with two antigenically unrelated strains of the same subtype

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antigenic diversity of avian influenza virus (AIV) within a subtype has been well established and is believed to be driven by the selection of immunologic escape mutants. In regions where vaccination against AIV has been implemented for prolonged periods (e.g. Vietnam and Egypt), vaccines which...

  3. Non-responsiveness of antigen-experienced CD4 T cells reflects more stringent co-stimulatory requirements.

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, M E; Noteboom, E; Kruisbeek, A M

    1998-01-01

    We recently reported that previously activated T cells, irrespective of the nature of the first stimulus they encountered, are unable to respond to Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), nor to soluble anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) presented by splenic antigen-presenting cells (APC). Such previously activated T cells are, however, fully capable of responding to plate-bound anti-CD3 plus splenic APC. These data suggest differential integration of the T-cell receptor (TCR) and co-stimulatory signalling pathways in naive versus antigen-experienced T cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, anti-CD28 mAb restores the proliferative capacity of resting ex vivo CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells (representing previously activated T cells) to both soluble anti-CD3 mAb and SEB. Interestingly, mAb-mediated engagement of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) completely negates the rescue effects mediated by anti-CD28 mAb in CD45RBlo cells. Nevertheless, the non-responsiveness of CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells cannot be reversed by anti-CTLA-4 Fab fragments, indicating that it is not related to negative regulatory effects of CTLA-4 engagement itself. Interestingly, the addition of interleukin-2 (IL-2) restores the proliferative capacity of CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells to SEB and soluble anti-CD3 mAb. Moreover, when rescued by IL-2, the cells are less susceptible to the negative regulatory effects of CTLA-4 engagement. Together, these findings suggest that the non-responsiveness of CD45RBlo CD4+ T cells to certain stimuli may be related to inadequate TCR signalling, primarily affecting IL-2 production. Images Figure 1 PMID:9640247

  4. Virus-like particles as antigenic nanomaterials for inducing protective immune responses in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Rynda-Apple, Agnieszka; Patterson, Dustin P; Douglas, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    The lung is a major entry point for many of the most detrimental pathogens to human health. The onslaught of pathogens encountered by the lung is counteracted by protective immune responses that are generated locally, which can be stimulated through vaccine strategies to prevent pathogen infections. Here, we discuss the use of virus-like particles (VLPs), nonpathogen derivatives of viruses or protein cage structures, to construct new vaccines exploiting the lung as a site for immunostimulation. VLPs are unique in their ability to be engineered with near molecular level detail and knowledge of their composition and structure. A summary of research in developing VLP-based vaccines for the lung is presented that suggests promising results for future vaccine development. PMID:25325241

  5. Vaccination with liposomal leishmanial antigens adjuvanted with monophosphoryl lipid-trehalose dicorynomycolate (MPL-TDM) confers long-term protection against visceral leishmaniasis through a human administrable route.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Rajesh; Maji, Mithun; Ali, Nahid

    2012-01-01

    The development of a long-term protective subunit vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis depends on antigens and adjuvants that can induce an appropriate immune response. The immunization of leishmanial antigens alone shows limited efficacy in the absence of an appropriate adjuvant. Earlier we demonstrated sustained protection against Leishmania donovani with leishmanial antigens entrapped in cationic liposomes through an intraperitoneal route. However, this route is not applicable for human administration. Herein, we therefore evaluated the immune response and protection induced by liposomal soluble leishmanial antigen (SLA) formulated with monophosphoryl lipid-trehalose dicorynomycolate (MPL-TDM) through a subcutaneous route. Subcutaneous immunization of BALB/c mice with SLA entrapped in liposomes or with MPL-TDM elicited partial protection against experimental visceral leishmaniasis. In contrast, liposomal SLA adjuvanted with MPL-TDM induced significantly higher levels of protection in liver and spleen in BALB/c mice challenged 10 days post-vaccination. Protection conferred by this formulation was sustained up to 12 weeks of immunization, and infection was controlled for at least 4 months of the challenge, similar to liposomal SLA immunization administered intraperitoneally. An analysis of cellular immune responses of liposomal SLA + MPL-TDM immunized mice demonstrated the induction of IFN-γ and IgG2a antibody production not only 10 days or 12 weeks post-vaccination but also 4 months after the challenge infection and a down regulation of IL-4 production after infection. Moreover, long-term immunity elicited by this formulation was associated with IFN-γ production also by CD8⁺ T cells. Taken together, our results suggest that liposomal SLA + MPL-TDM represent a good vaccine formulation for the induction of durable protection against L. donovani through a human administrable route.

  6. Enhanced and durable protective immune responses induced by a cocktail of recombinant BCG strains expressing antigens of multistage of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinping; Teng, Xindong; Yuan, Xuefeng; Zhang, Ying; Shi, Chunwei; Yue, Tingting; Zhou, Lei; Li, Jianrong; Fan, Xionglin

    2015-08-01

    Although Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine confers protection from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in children, its immune protection gradually wanes over time, and consequently leads to an inability to prevent the reactivation of latent infection of M. tuberculosis. Therefore, improving BCG for better control of tuberculosis (TB) is urgently needed. We thus hypothesized that recombinant BCG overexpressing immunodominant antigens expressed at different growth stages of M. tuberculosis could provide a more comprehensive protection against primary and latent M. tuberculosis infection. Here, a novel cocktail of recombinant BCG (rBCG) strains, namely ABX, was produced by combining rBCG::85A, rBCG::85B, and rBCG::X, which overexpressed respective multistage antigens Ag85A, Ag85B, and HspX of M. tuberculosis. Our results showed that ABX was able to induce a stronger immune protection than individual rBCGs or BCG against primary TB infection in C57BL/6 mice. Mechanistically, the immune protection was attributed to stronger antigen-specific CD4(+) Th1 responses, higher numbers of IFN-γ(+) CD4(+) TEM and IL-2(+) CD8(+) TCM cells elicited by ABX. These findings thus provide a novel strategy for the improvement of BCG efficacy and potentially a promising prophylactic TB vaccine candidate, warranting further investigation.

  7. IDO1 and TGF-β Mediate Protective Effects of IFN-α in Antigen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Pallotta, Maria Teresa; Narendra, Sudeep Chenna; Carlsson, Björn; Iacono, Alberta; Namale, Joanitah; Boon, Louis; Grohmann, Ursula; Magnusson, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    IFN-α prevents Ag-induced arthritis (AIA), and in this study we investigated the role of IDO1 and TGF-β signaling for this anti-inflammatory property of IFN-α. Arthritis was induced by methylated BSA (mBSA) in mBSA-sensitized wild-type (WT), Ido1−/−, or Ifnar−/− mice, treated or not with IFN-α or the IDO1 product kynurenine (Kyn). Enzymatic IDO1 activity, TGF-β, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) were neutralized by 1-methyltryptophan and Abs against TGF-β and pDC, respectively. IDO1 expression was determined by RT-PCR, Western blot, and FACS, and enzymatic activity by HPLC. Proliferation was measured by 3H-thymidine incorporation and TGF-β by RT-PCR and ELISA. WT but not Ido1−/− mice were protected from AIA by IFN-α, and Kyn, the main IDO1 product, also prevented AIA, both in WT and Ifnar−/− mice. Protective treatment with IFN-α increased the expression of IDO1 in pDC during AIA, and Ab-mediated depletion of pDC, either during mBSA sensitization or after triggering of arthritis, completely abrogated the protective effect of IFN-α. IFN-α treatment also increased the enzymatic IDO1 activity (Kyn/tryptophan ratio), which in turn activated production of TGF-β. Neutralization of enzymatic IDO1 activity or TGF-β signaling blocked the protective effect of IFN-α against AIA, but only during sensitization and not after triggering of arthritis. Likewise, inhibition of the IDO1 enzymatic activity in the sensitization phase, but not after triggering of arthritis, subdued the IFN-α–induced inhibition of mBSA-induced proliferation. In conclusion, presence of IFN-α at Ag sensitization activates an IDO1/TGF-β–dependent anti-inflammatory program that upon antigenic rechallenge prevents inflammation via pDC. PMID:27647832

  8. The RAG2 C-terminus and ATM protect genome integrity by controlling antigen receptor gene cleavage.

    PubMed

    Chaumeil, Julie; Micsinai, Mariann; Ntziachristos, Panagiotis; Roth, David B; Aifantis, Iannis; Kluger, Yuval; Deriano, Ludovic; Skok, Jane A

    2013-01-01

    Tight control of antigen-receptor gene rearrangement is required to preserve genome integrity and prevent the occurrence of leukaemia and lymphoma. Nonetheless, mistakes can happen, leading to the generation of aberrant rearrangements, such as Tcra/d-Igh inter-locus translocations that are a hallmark of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) deficiency. Current evidence indicates that these translocations arise from the persistence of unrepaired breaks converging at different stages of thymocyte differentiation. Here we show that a defect in feedback control of RAG2 activity gives rise to bi-locus breaks and damage on Tcra/d and Igh in the same T cell at the same developmental stage, which provides a direct mechanism for generating these inter-locus rearrangements. Both the RAG2 C-terminus and ATM prevent bi-locus RAG-mediated cleavage through modulation of three-dimensional conformation (higher-order loops) and nuclear organization of the two loci. This limits the number of potential substrates for translocation and provides an important mechanism for protecting genome stability. PMID:23900513

  9. Co-culture with podoplanin+ cells protects leukemic blast cells with leukemia-associated antigens in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    LEE, JI YOON; HAN, A-REUM; LEE, SUNG-EUN; MIN, WOO-SUNG; KIM, HEE-JE

    2016-01-01

    Podoplanin+ cells are indispensable in the tumor microenvironment. Increasing evidence suggests that podoplanin may support the growth and metastasis of solid tumors; however, to the best of our knowledge no studies have determined whether or not podoplanin serves a supportive role in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The effects of co-culture with podoplanin+ cells on the cellular activities of the leukemic cells, such as apoptosis and cell proliferation, in addition to the expression of podoplanin in leukemic cells, were investigated. Due to the fact that genetic abnormalities are the primary cause of leukemogenesis, the overexpression of the fibromyalgia-like tyrosine kinase-3 gene in colony forming units was also examined following cell sorting. Podoplanin+ cells were found to play a protective role against apoptosis in leukemic cells and to promote cell proliferation. Tumor-associated antigens, including Wilms' tumor gene 1 and survivin, were increased when leukemic cells were co-cultured with podoplanin+ cells. In combination, the present results also suggest that podoplanin+ cells can function as stromal cells for blast cell retention in the AML tumor microenvironment. PMID:27035421

  10. Identification of small molecules that inhibit the interaction of TEM8 with anthrax protective antigen using a FRET assay.

    PubMed

    Cryan, Lorna M; Habeshian, Kaiane A; Caldwell, Thomas P; Morris, Meredith T; Ackroyd, P Christine; Christensen, Kenneth A; Rogers, Michael S

    2013-07-01

    Tumor marker endothelial 8 (TEM8) is a receptor for the protective antigen (PA) component of anthrax toxin. TEM8 is upregulated on endothelial cells lining the blood vessels within tumors, compared with normal blood vessels. A number of studies have demonstrated a pivotal role for TEM8 in developmental and tumor angiogenesis. We have also shown that targeting the anthrax receptors with a mutated form of PA inhibits angiogenesis and tumor formation in vivo. Here we describe the development and testing of a high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay to identify molecules that strongly inhibit the interaction of PA and TEM8. The assay we describe is sensitive and robust, with a Z' value of 0.8. A preliminary screen of 2310 known bioactive library compounds identified ebselen and thimerosal as inhibitors of the TEM8-PA interaction. These molecules each contain a cysteine-reactive transition metal, and complementary studies indicate that their inhibition of interaction is due to modification of a cysteine residue in the TEM8 extracellular domain. This is the first demonstration of a high-throughput screening assay that identifies inhibitors of TEM8, with potential application for antianthrax and antiangiogenic diseases.

  11. Role of the protective antigen octamer in the molecular mechanism of anthrax lethal toxin stabilization in plasma

    PubMed Central

    Kintzer, Alexander F.; Sterling, Harry J.; Tang, Iok I.; Abdul-Gader, Ali; Miles, Andrew J.; Wallace, B. A.; Williams, Evan R.; Krantz, Bryan A.

    2010-01-01

    Anthrax is caused by strains of Bacillus anthracis that produce two key virulence factors, anthrax toxin (Atx) and a poly-γ-D-glutamic acid capsule. Atx is comprised of three-proteins: protective antigen (PA) and two enzymes, lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF). To disrupt cell function, these components must assemble into holotoxin complexes, which contain either a ring-shaped homooctameric or homoheptameric PA oligomer bound to multiple copies of either LF and/or EF, producing lethal toxin (LT), edema toxin, or mixtures thereof. Once a host cell endocytoses these complexes, PA converts into a membrane-inserted channel that translocates LF and EF into the cytosol. LT may assemble on host cell surfaces or extracellularly in plasma. We show that under physiological conditions in bovine plasma that LT complexes containing heptameric PA aggregate and inactivate more readily than LT complexes containing octameric PA. LT complexes containing octameric PA possess enhanced stability, channel forming activity, and macrophage cytotoxicity relative to those containing heptameric PA. Under physiological conditions, multiple biophysical probes reveal that heptameric PA can prematurely adopt the channel conformation, but octameric PA complexes remain in their soluble prechannel configuration allowing them to resist aggregation and inactivation. We conclude that PA may form an octameric oligomeric state as a means to produce a more stable and active LT complex that may circulate freely in the blood. PMID:20433851

  12. Evidence that histidine protonation of receptor-bound anthrax protective antigen is a trigger for pore formation

    PubMed Central

    Wimalasena, D. Shyamali; Janowiak, Blythe E.; Lovell, Scott; Miyagi, Masaru; Sun, Jianjun; Zhou, Haiying; Hajduch, Jan; Pooput, Chaya; Kirk, Kenneth L.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Bann, James G.

    2010-01-01

    The protective antigen (PA) component of the anthrax toxin forms pores within the low pH environment of host endosomes, through mechanisms that are poorly understood. It has been proposed that pore formation is dependent on histidine protonation. In previous work, we biosynthetically incorporated 2-fluorohistidine (2-FHis), an isosteric analog of histidine with a significantly reduced pKa (~1), into PA, and showed that the pH-dependent conversion from the soluble prepore to a pore was unchanged. However, we also observed that 2-FHisPA was non-functional in the ability to mediate cytotoxicity of CHO-K1 cells by LFN-DTA, and was defective in translocation through planar lipid bilayers. Here, we show that the defect in cytotoxicity is due to both a defect in translocation and, when bound to the host cellular receptor, an inability to undergo low pH-induced pore formation. Combining X-ray crystallography with hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange mass spectrometry, our studies lead to a model in which hydrogen bonds to the histidine ring are strengthened by receptor binding. The combination of both fluorination and receptor binding is sufficient to block low pH-induced pore formation. PMID:20672855

  13. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of recombinant Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara candidate vaccines delivering West Nile virus envelope antigens.

    PubMed

    Volz, Asisa; Lim, Stephanie; Kaserer, Martina; Lülf, Anna; Marr, Lisa; Jany, Sylvia; Deeg, Cornelia A; Pijlman, Gorben P; Koraka, Penelope; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Martina, Byron E; Sutter, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) cycles between insects and wild birds, and is transmitted via mosquito vectors to horses and humans, potentially causing severe neuroinvasive disease. Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is an advanced viral vector for developing new recombinant vaccines against infectious diseases and cancer. Here, we generated and evaluated recombinant MVA candidate vaccines that deliver WNV envelope (E) antigens and fulfil all the requirements to proceed to clinical testing in humans. Infections of human and equine cell cultures with recombinant MVA demonstrated efficient synthesis and secretion of WNV envelope proteins in mammalian cells non-permissive for MVA replication. Prime-boost immunizations in BALB/c mice readily induced circulating serum antibodies binding to recombinant WNV E protein and neutralizing WNV in tissue culture infections. Vaccinations in HLA-A2.1-/HLA-DR1-transgenic H-2 class I-/class II-knockout mice elicited WNV E-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Moreover, the MVA-WNV candidate vaccines protected C57BL/6 mice against lineage 1 and lineage 2 WNV infection and induced heterologous neutralizing antibodies. Thus, further studies are warranted to evaluate these recombinant MVA-WNV vaccines in other preclinical models and use them as candidate vaccine in humans. PMID:26939903

  14. Mining the bacterial unknown proteome: identification and characterization of a novel family of highly conserved protective antigens in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Schluepen, Christina; Malito, Enrico; Marongiu, Ambra; Schirle, Markus; McWhinnie, Elisabeth; Lo Surdo, Paola; Biancucci, Marco; Falugi, Fabiana; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Marchi, Sara; Fontana, Maria Rita; Lombardi, Benedetta; De Falco, Maria Grazia; Rinaudo, C Daniela; Spraggon, Glen; Nissum, Mikkel; Bagnoli, Fabio; Grandi, Guido; Bottomley, Matthew J; Liberatori, Sabrina

    2013-11-01

    In the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, there exists an enormous diversity of proteins containing DUFs (domains of unknown function). In the present study, we characterized the family of conserved staphylococcal antigens (Csa) classified as DUF576 and taxonomically restricted to Staphylococci. The 18 Csa paralogues in S. aureus Newman are highly similar at the sequence level, yet were found to be expressed in multiple cellular locations. Extracellular Csa1A was shown to be post-translationally processed and released. Molecular interaction studies revealed that Csa1A interacts with other Csa paralogues, suggesting that these proteins are involved in the same cellular process. The structures of Csa1A and Csa1B were determined by X-ray crystallography, unveiling a peculiar structure with limited structural similarity to other known proteins. Our results provide the first detailed biological characterization of this family and confirm the uniqueness of this family also at the structural level. We also provide evidence that Csa family members elicit protective immunity in in vivo animal models of staphylococcal infections, indicating a possible important role for these proteins in S. aureus biology and pathogenesis. These findings identify the Csa family as new potential vaccine candidates, and underline the importance of mining the bacterial unknown proteome to identify new targets for preventive vaccines.

  15. Effect of delayed anthrax vaccine dose on Bacillus anthracis protective antigen IgG response and lethal toxin neutralization activity.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Phillip R; Fisher, Diana; Quinn, Xiaofei; Schmader, Trevor; Barrera-Oro, Julio G

    2013-10-17

    We describe the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen IgG antibody response and the B. anthracis lethal toxin neutralization activity to a delayed dose of anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA, BioThrax(®)) using validated assays. 373 individuals received 1, 2, or 3 priming doses, 18-24 months afterward, they received a delayed dose of AVA. Overall, 23.6% of subjects showed detectable anti-PA IgG before the boost, compared to 99.2% (P<0.0001) 28 days after the boost. Geometric mean anti-PA IgG concentration (GMC) was 1.66 μg/mL before and 887.82 μg/mL after the boost (P<0.0001). The proportion of individuals with four-fold increase in GMC following the boost ranged from 93.8% to 100%. Robust anti-PA IgG levels and B. anthracis lethal toxin neutralization activity are induced when an AVA dose is delayed as long as two years. These data support continuing with the vaccination schedule when a dose is delayed as long as two years rather than restarting the series.

  16. A Dual TLR Agonist Adjuvant Enhances the Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of the Tuberculosis Vaccine Antigen ID93

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Mark T.; Beebe, Elyse A.; Hudson, Thomas E.; Moon, James J.; Fox, Christopher B.; Reed, Steven G.; Coler, Rhea N.

    2014-01-01

    With over eight million cases of tuberculosis each year there is a pressing need for the development of new vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Subunit vaccines consisting of recombinant proteins are an attractive vaccine approach due to their inherent safety compared to attenuated live vaccines and the uniformity of manufacture. Addition of properly formulated TLR agonist-containing adjuvants to recombinant protein vaccines enhances the antigen-specific CD4+ T cell response characterized by IFN-γ and TNF, both of which are critical for the control of TB. We have developed a clinical stage vaccine candidate consisting of a recombinant fusion protein ID93 adjuvanted with the TLR4 agonist GLA-SE. Here we examine whether ID93+GLA-SE can be improved by the addition of a second TLR agonist. Addition of CpG containing DNA to ID93+GLA-SE enhanced the magnitude of the multi-functional TH1 response against ID93 characterized by co-production of IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-2. Addition of CpG also improved the protective efficacy of ID93+GLA-SE. Finally we demonstrate that this adjuvant synergy between GLA and CpG is independent of TRIF signaling, whereas TRIF is necessary for the adjuvant activity of GLA-SE in the absence of CpG. PMID:24404140

  17. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of recombinant Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara candidate vaccines delivering West Nile virus envelope antigens.

    PubMed

    Volz, Asisa; Lim, Stephanie; Kaserer, Martina; Lülf, Anna; Marr, Lisa; Jany, Sylvia; Deeg, Cornelia A; Pijlman, Gorben P; Koraka, Penelope; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Martina, Byron E; Sutter, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) cycles between insects and wild birds, and is transmitted via mosquito vectors to horses and humans, potentially causing severe neuroinvasive disease. Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is an advanced viral vector for developing new recombinant vaccines against infectious diseases and cancer. Here, we generated and evaluated recombinant MVA candidate vaccines that deliver WNV envelope (E) antigens and fulfil all the requirements to proceed to clinical testing in humans. Infections of human and equine cell cultures with recombinant MVA demonstrated efficient synthesis and secretion of WNV envelope proteins in mammalian cells non-permissive for MVA replication. Prime-boost immunizations in BALB/c mice readily induced circulating serum antibodies binding to recombinant WNV E protein and neutralizing WNV in tissue culture infections. Vaccinations in HLA-A2.1-/HLA-DR1-transgenic H-2 class I-/class II-knockout mice elicited WNV E-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Moreover, the MVA-WNV candidate vaccines protected C57BL/6 mice against lineage 1 and lineage 2 WNV infection and induced heterologous neutralizing antibodies. Thus, further studies are warranted to evaluate these recombinant MVA-WNV vaccines in other preclinical models and use them as candidate vaccine in humans.

  18. Bacillus subtilis spores expressing the VP28 antigen: a potential oral treatment to protect Litopenaeus vannamei against white spot syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh T V; Pham, Cuong K; Pham, Huong T T; Pham, Hang L; Nguyen, Anh H; Dang, Lua T; Huynh, Hong A; Cutting, Simon M; Phan, Tuan-Nghia

    2014-09-01

    The envelope protein VP28 of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is considered a candidate antigen for use in a potential vaccine to this important shrimp pathogen (the cause of white spot syndrome, WSS). Here, we used spores of Bacillus subtilis to display VP28 on the spore surface. Trials were conducted to evaluate their ability to protect shrimps against WSSV infection. The gene cotB-vp28 was integrated into the chromosome of the laboratory strain B. subtilis PY79, and expression of CotB-VP28 was detected by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Expression of CotB-VP28 was equivalent to 1000 molecules per spore. PY79 and CotB-VP28 spores were mixed with pellets for feeding of whiteleg shrimps (Litopenaeus vannamei), followed by WSSV challenge. Superoxidase dismutase (SOD), phenoloxidase activities and mortality rates of the two shrimp groups were evaluated. Groups fed with PY79 and CotB-VP28 spores at day 7 had increased SOD activities of 29% and increased phenoloxidase activities of 15% and 33%, respectively, compared to those of the control group. Fourteen days postchallenge, 35% of vaccinated shrimps had died compared to 49% of those fed naked spores (PY79) and 66% untreated, unchallenged animals. These data suggest that spores expressing VP28 have potential as a prophylactic treatment of WSS.

  19. Self-Amplifying mRNA Vaccines Expressing Multiple Conserved Influenza Antigens Confer Protection against Homologous and Heterosubtypic Viral Challenge.

    PubMed

    Magini, Diletta; Giovani, Cinzia; Mangiavacchi, Simona; Maccari, Silvia; Cecchi, Raffaella; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; De Gregorio, Ennio; Geall, Andrew J; Brazzoli, Michela; Bertholet, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Current hemagglutinin (HA)-based seasonal influenza vaccines induce vaccine strain-specific neutralizing antibodies that usually fail to provide protection against mismatched circulating viruses. Inclusion in the vaccine of highly conserved internal proteins such as the nucleoprotein (NP) and the matrix protein 1 (M1) was shown previously to increase vaccine efficacy by eliciting cross-reactive T-cells. However, appropriate delivery systems are required for efficient priming of T-cell responses. In this study, we demonstrated that administration of novel self-amplifying mRNA (SAM®) vectors expressing influenza NP (SAM(NP)), M1 (SAM(M1)), and NP and M1 (SAM(M1-NP)) delivered with lipid nanoparticles (LNP) induced robust polyfunctional CD4 T helper 1 cells, while NP-containing SAM also induced cytotoxic CD8 T cells. Robust expansions of central memory (TCM) and effector memory (TEM) CD4 and CD8 T cells were also measured. An enhanced recruitment of NP-specific cytotoxic CD8 T cells was observed in the lungs of SAM(NP)-immunized mice after influenza infection that paralleled with reduced lung viral titers and pathology, and increased survival after homologous and heterosubtypic influenza challenge. Finally, we demonstrated for the first time that the co-administration of RNA (SAM(M1-NP)) and protein (monovalent inactivated influenza vaccine (MIIV)) was feasible, induced simultaneously NP-, M1- and HA-specific T cells and HA-specific neutralizing antibodies, and enhanced MIIV efficacy against a heterologous challenge. In conclusion, systemic administration of SAM vectors expressing conserved internal influenza antigens induced protective immune responses in mice, supporting the SAM® platform as another promising strategy for the development of broad-spectrum universal influenza vaccines. PMID:27525409

  20. Protective Antigen-Specific Memory B Cells Persist Years after Anthrax Vaccination and Correlate with Humoral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Garman, Lori; Smith, Kenneth; Farris, A. Darise; Nelson, Michael R.; Engler, Renata J. M.; James, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (AVA) generates short-lived protective antigen (PA) specific IgG that correlates with in vitro toxin neutralization and protection from Bacillus anthracis challenge. Animal studies suggest that when PA-specific IgG has waned, survival after spore challenge correlates with an activation of PA-specific memory B cells. Here, we characterize the quantity and the longevity of AVA-induced memory B cell responses in humans. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from individuals vaccinated ≥3 times with AVA (n = 50) were collected early (3–6 months, n = 27) or late after their last vaccination (2–5 years, n = 23), pan-stimulated, and assayed by ELISPOT for total and PA-specific memory B cells differentiated into antibody secreting cells (ASCs). PA-specific ASC percentages ranged from 0.02% to 6.25% (median: 1.57%) and did not differ between early and late post-vaccination individuals. PA-specific ASC percentages correlated with plasma PA-specific IgG (r = 0.42, p = 0.03) and toxin neutralization (r = 0.52, p = 0.003) early post vaccination. PA-specific ASC percentages correlated with supernatant anti-PA both early (r = 0.60, p = 0.001) and late post vaccination (r = 0.71, p < 0.0001). These data suggest PA-specific memory B cell responses are long-lived and can be estimated after recent vaccination by the magnitude and neutralization capacity of the humoral response. PMID:25123559

  1. Immunogenicity and protective role of antigenic regions from five outer membrane proteins of Flavobacterium columnare in grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhang; Liu, Zhixin; Fu, Jianping; Zhang, Qiusheng; Huang, Bei; Nie, Pin

    2016-11-01

    Flavobacterium columnare causes columnaris disease in freshwater fish. In the present study, the antigenic regions of five outer membrane proteins (OMPs), including zinc metalloprotease, prolyl oligopeptidase, thermolysin, collagenase and chondroitin AC lyase, were bioinformatically analyzed, fused together, and then expressed as a recombinant fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The expressed protein of 95.6 kDa, as estimated by 10% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was consistent with the molecular weight deduced from the amino acid sequence. The purified recombinant protein was used to vaccinate the grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella. Following vaccination of the fish their IgM antibody levels were examined, as was the expression of IgM, IgD and IgZ immunoglobulin genes and other genes such as MHC Iα and MHC IIβ, which are also involved in adaptive immunity. Interleukin genes ( IL), including IL-1β, IL-8 and IL-10, and type I and type II interferon ( IFN) genes were also examined. At 3 and 4 weeks post-vaccination (wpv), significant increases in IgM antibody levels were observed in the fish vaccinated with the recombinant fusion protein, and an increase in the expression levels of IgM, IgD and IgZ genes was also detected following the vaccinations, thus indicating that an adaptive immune response was induced by the vaccinations. Early increases in the expression levels of IL and IFN genes were also observed in the vaccinated fish. At four wpv, the fish were challenged with F. columnare, and the vaccinated fish showed a good level of protection against this pathogen, with 39% relative percent survival (RPS) compared with the control group. It can be concluded, therefore, that the five OMPs, in the form of a recombinant fusion protein vaccine, induced an immune response in fish and protection against F. columnare.

  2. Immunogenicity and protective role of antigenic regions from five outer membrane proteins of Flavobacterium columnare in grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhang; Liu, Zhixin; Fu, Jianping; Zhang, Qiusheng; Huang, Bei; Nie, Pin

    2016-02-01

    Flavobacterium columnare causes columnaris disease in freshwater fish. In the present study, the antigenic regions of five outer membrane proteins (OMPs), including zinc metalloprotease, prolyl oligopeptidase, thermolysin, collagenase and chondroitin AC lyase, were bioinformatically analyzed, fused together, and then expressed as a recombinant fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The expressed protein of 95.6 kDa, as estimated by 10% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was consistent with the molecular weight deduced from the amino acid sequence. The purified recombinant protein was used to vaccinate the grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella. Following vaccination of the fish their IgM antibody levels were examined, as was the expression of IgM, IgD and IgZ immunoglobulin genes and other genes such as MHC Iα and MHC IIβ, which are also involved in adaptive immunity. Interleukin genes (IL), including IL-1β, IL-8 and IL-10, and type I and type II interferon (IFN) genes were also examined. At 3 and 4 weeks post-vaccination (wpv), significant increases in IgM antibody levels were observed in the fish vaccinated with the recombinant fusion protein, and an increase in the expression levels of IgM, IgD and IgZ genes was also detected following the vaccinations, thus indicating that an adaptive immune response was induced by the vaccinations. Early increases in the expression levels of IL and IFN genes were also observed in the vaccinated fish. At four wpv, the fish were challenged with F. columnare, and the vaccinated fish showed a good level of protection against this pathogen, with 39% relative percent survival (RPS) compared with the control group. It can be concluded, therefore, that the five OMPs, in the form of a recombinant fusion protein vaccine, induced an immune response in fish and protection against F. columnare.

  3. Self-Amplifying mRNA Vaccines Expressing Multiple Conserved Influenza Antigens Confer Protection against Homologous and Heterosubtypic Viral Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Magini, Diletta; Giovani, Cinzia; Mangiavacchi, Simona; Maccari, Silvia; Cecchi, Raffaella; Ulmer, Jeffrey B.; De Gregorio, Ennio; Geall, Andrew J.; Brazzoli, Michela; Bertholet, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Current hemagglutinin (HA)-based seasonal influenza vaccines induce vaccine strain-specific neutralizing antibodies that usually fail to provide protection against mismatched circulating viruses. Inclusion in the vaccine of highly conserved internal proteins such as the nucleoprotein (NP) and the matrix protein 1 (M1) was shown previously to increase vaccine efficacy by eliciting cross-reactive T-cells. However, appropriate delivery systems are required for efficient priming of T-cell responses. In this study, we demonstrated that administration of novel self-amplifying mRNA (SAM®) vectors expressing influenza NP (SAM(NP)), M1 (SAM(M1)), and NP and M1 (SAM(M1-NP)) delivered with lipid nanoparticles (LNP) induced robust polyfunctional CD4 T helper 1 cells, while NP-containing SAM also induced cytotoxic CD8 T cells. Robust expansions of central memory (TCM) and effector memory (TEM) CD4 and CD8 T cells were also measured. An enhanced recruitment of NP-specific cytotoxic CD8 T cells was observed in the lungs of SAM(NP)-immunized mice after influenza infection that paralleled with reduced lung viral titers and pathology, and increased survival after homologous and heterosubtypic influenza challenge. Finally, we demonstrated for the first time that the co-administration of RNA (SAM(M1-NP)) and protein (monovalent inactivated influenza vaccine (MIIV)) was feasible, induced simultaneously NP-, M1- and HA-specific T cells and HA-specific neutralizing antibodies, and enhanced MIIV efficacy against a heterologous challenge. In conclusion, systemic administration of SAM vectors expressing conserved internal influenza antigens induced protective immune responses in mice, supporting the SAM® platform as another promising strategy for the development of broad-spectrum universal influenza vaccines. PMID:27525409

  4. Simultaneous multicolor detection system of the single-molecular microbial antigen by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy with fluorescent nanocrystal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Fujioka, Kouki; Yamamoto, Mayu; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Yasuhara, Masato; Suzuki, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2005-11-01

    Immunological diagnostic methods have been widely performed and showed high performance in molecular and cellular biology, molecular imaging, and medical diagnostics. We have developed novel methods for the fluorescent labeling of several antibodies coupled with fluorescent nanocrystals QDs. In this study we demonstrated that two bacterial toxins, diphtheria toxin and tetanus toxin, were detected simultaneously in the same view field of a cover slip by using directly QD-conjugated antibodies. We have succeeded in detecting bacterial toxins by counting luminescent spots on the evanescent field with using primary antibody conjugated to QDs. In addition, each bacterial toxin in the mixture can be separately detected by single excitation laser with emission band pass filters, and simultaneously in situ pathogen quantification was performed by calculating the luminescent density on the surface of the cover slip. Our results demonstrate that total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) enables us to distinguish each antigen from mixed samples and can simultaneously quantitate multiple antigens by QD-conjugated antibodies. Bioconjugated QDs could have great potentialities for in practical biomedical applications to develop various high-sensitivity detection systems.

  5. Directed selection of influenza virus produces antigenic variants that match circulating human virus isolates and escape from vaccine-mediated immune protection.

    PubMed

    DeDiego, Marta L; Anderson, Christopher S; Yang, Hongmei; Holden-Wiltse, Jeanne; Fitzgerald, Theresa; Treanor, John J; Topham, David J

    2016-06-01

    Influenza vaccination does not provide 100% protection from infection, partly due to antigenic drift of the haemagglutinin (HA) protein. Low serum antibody titres increase the risk of infection. To determine whether there were additional correlates of risk, we examined the relationship between human serum immunity and antigenic variation in seasonal H3N2 influenza viruses. Seasonal H3N2 vaccine strains grown in the presence of heterogeneous human or mono-specific ferret antisera selected variants with mutations in the HA antigenic sites. Surprisingly, circulating strains infecting human subjects in the same seasons displayed mutations in the same positions, although only in one case did the change correspond to the same amino acid. Serum antibody titres were lower against both the in vitro selected and clinical isolates compared with the vaccine strains, suggesting that the mutations are relevant to vaccine failure. Antibody titres were also significantly lower in sera from infected subjects than in non-infected subjects, suggesting relatively poor responses to vaccination in the infected subjects. Collectively, the data suggest that risk from influenza infection is a result of poor response to vaccination, as well as encounter with drifted seasonal influenza virus antigenic variants. The results also show that directed selection under human immune pressure could reveal antigenic variants relevant to real-world drifted viruses, helping in annual vaccine re-formulation.

  6. Vaccination with BM86, subolesin and akirin protective antigens for the control of tick infestations in white tailed deer and red deer.

    PubMed

    Carreón, Diana; de la Lastra, José M Pérez; Almazán, Consuelo; Canales, Mario; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco; Boadella, Mariana; Moreno-Cid, Juan A; Villar, Margarita; Gortázar, Christian; Reglero, Manuel; Villarreal, Ricardo; de la Fuente, José

    2012-01-01

    Red deer (Cervus elaphus) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) are hosts for different tick species and tick-borne pathogens and play a role in tick dispersal and maintenance in some regions. These factors stress the importance of controlling tick infestations in deer and several methods such as culling and acaricide treatment have been used. Tick vaccines are a cost-effective alternative for tick control that reduced cattle tick infestations and tick-borne pathogens prevalence while reducing the use of acaricides. Our hypothesis is that vaccination with vector protective antigens can be used for the control of tick infestations in deer. Herein, three experiments were conducted to characterize (1) the antibody response in red deer immunized with recombinant BM86, the antigen included in commercial tick vaccines, (2) the antibody response and control of cattle tick infestations in white-tailed deer immunized with recombinant BM86 or tick subolesin (SUB) and experimentally infested with Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, and (3) the antibody response and control of Hyalomma spp. and Rhipicephalus spp. field tick infestations in red deer immunized with mosquito akirin (AKR), the SUB ortholog and candidate protective antigen against different tick species and other ectoparasites. The results showed that deer produced an antibody response that correlated with the reduction in tick infestations and was similar to other hosts vaccinated previously with these antigens. The overall vaccine efficacy was similar between BM86 (E=76%) and SUB (E=83%) for the control of R. microplus infestations in white-tailed deer. The field trial in red deer showed a 25-33% (18-40% when only infested deer were considered) reduction in tick infestations, 14-20 weeks after the first immunization. These results demonstrated that vaccination with vector protective antigens could be used as an alternative method for the control of tick infestations in deer to reduce tick populations

  7. Vaccination with BM86, subolesin and akirin protective antigens for the control of tick infestations in white tailed deer and red deer.

    PubMed

    Carreón, Diana; de la Lastra, José M Pérez; Almazán, Consuelo; Canales, Mario; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco; Boadella, Mariana; Moreno-Cid, Juan A; Villar, Margarita; Gortázar, Christian; Reglero, Manuel; Villarreal, Ricardo; de la Fuente, José

    2012-01-01

    Red deer (Cervus elaphus) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) are hosts for different tick species and tick-borne pathogens and play a role in tick dispersal and maintenance in some regions. These factors stress the importance of controlling tick infestations in deer and several methods such as culling and acaricide treatment have been used. Tick vaccines are a cost-effective alternative for tick control that reduced cattle tick infestations and tick-borne pathogens prevalence while reducing the use of acaricides. Our hypothesis is that vaccination with vector protective antigens can be used for the control of tick infestations in deer. Herein, three experiments were conducted to characterize (1) the antibody response in red deer immunized with recombinant BM86, the antigen included in commercial tick vaccines, (2) the antibody response and control of cattle tick infestations in white-tailed deer immunized with recombinant BM86 or tick subolesin (SUB) and experimentally infested with Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, and (3) the antibody response and control of Hyalomma spp. and Rhipicephalus spp. field tick infestations in red deer immunized with mosquito akirin (AKR), the SUB ortholog and candidate protective antigen against different tick species and other ectoparasites. The results showed that deer produced an antibody response that correlated with the reduction in tick infestations and was similar to other hosts vaccinated previously with these antigens. The overall vaccine efficacy was similar between BM86 (E=76%) and SUB (E=83%) for the control of R. microplus infestations in white-tailed deer. The field trial in red deer showed a 25-33% (18-40% when only infested deer were considered) reduction in tick infestations, 14-20 weeks after the first immunization. These results demonstrated that vaccination with vector protective antigens could be used as an alternative method for the control of tick infestations in deer to reduce tick populations

  8. Recombinant Adenovirus Delivery of Calreticulin–ESAT-6 Produces an Antigen-Specific Immune Response but no Protection Against a Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Esparza-González, S. C.; Troy, A.; Troudt, J.; Loera-Arias, M. J.; Villatoro-Hernández, J.; Torres-López, E.; Ancer-Rodríguez, J.; Gutiérrez-Puente, Y.; Muñoz-Maldonado, G.; Saucedo-Cárdenas, O.; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, R.; Izzo, A.

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG) has failed to efficaciously control the worldwide spread of the disease. New vaccine development targets virulence antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that are deleted in Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Immunization with ESAT-6 and CFP10 provides protection against M. tuberculosis in a murine infection model. Further, previous studies have shown that calreticulin increases the cell-mediated immune responses to antigens. Therefore, to test whether calreticulin enhances the immune response against M. tuberculosis antigens, we fused ESAT-6 to calreticulin and constructed a recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus to express the resulting fusion protein (AdCRT–ESAT-6). The adjuvant effect of calreticulin was assayed by measuring cytokine responses specific to ESAT-6. Recombinant adenovirus expressing the fusion protein produced higher levels of interferon-γ and tumour necrosis factor-α in response to ESAT-6. This immune response was not improved by the addition of CFP-10 to the CRT-ESAT-6 fusion protein (AdCRT–ESAT-6–CFP10). Mice immunized with these recombinant adenoviruses did not decrease the mycobacterial burden after low-dose aerosol infection with M. tuberculosis. We conclude that calreticulin can be used as an adjuvant to enhance the immune response against mycobacterial antigens, but it is not enough to protect against tuberculosis. PMID:22010821

  9. Defining a protective epitope on factor H binding protein, a key meningococcal virulence factor and vaccine antigen

    PubMed Central

    Malito, Enrico; Faleri, Agnese; Lo Surdo, Paola; Veggi, Daniele; Maruggi, Giulietta; Grassi, Eva; Cartocci, Elena; Bertoldi, Isabella; Genovese, Alessia; Santini, Laura; Romagnoli, Giacomo; Borgogni, Erica; Brier, Sébastien; Lo Passo, Carla; Domina, Maria; Castellino, Flora; Felici, Franco; van der Veen, Stijn; Johnson, Steven; Lea, Susan M.; Tang, Christoph M.; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Savino, Silvana; Norais, Nathalie; Rappuoli, Rino; Bottomley, Matthew J.; Masignani, Vega

    2013-01-01

    Mapping of epitopes recognized by functional monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is essential for understanding the nature of immune responses and designing improved vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostics. In recent years, identification of B-cell epitopes targeted by neutralizing antibodies has facilitated the design of peptide-based vaccines against highly variable pathogens like HIV, respiratory syncytial virus, and Helicobacter pylori; however, none of these products has yet progressed into clinical stages. Linear epitopes identified by conventional mapping techniques only partially reflect the immunogenic properties of the epitope in its natural conformation, thus limiting the success of this approach. To investigate antigen–antibody interactions and assess the potential of the most common epitope mapping techniques, we generated a series of mAbs against factor H binding protein (fHbp), a key virulence factor and vaccine antigen of Neisseria meningitidis. The interaction of fHbp with the bactericidal mAb 12C1 was studied by various epitope mapping methods. Although a 12-residue epitope in the C terminus of fHbp was identified by both Peptide Scanning and Phage Display Library screening, other approaches, such as hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (MS) and X-ray crystallography, showed that mAb 12C1 occupies an area of ∼1,000 Å2 on fHbp, including >20 fHbp residues distributed on both N- and C-terminal domains. Collectively, these data show that linear epitope mapping techniques provide useful but incomplete descriptions of B-cell epitopes, indicating that increased efforts to fully characterize antigen–antibody interfaces are required to understand and design effective immunogens. PMID:23396847

  10. Effects of adsorption of acellular pertussis antigens onto different aluminium salts on the protective activity in an intranasal murine model of Bordetella pertussis infection.

    PubMed

    Denoël, P; Poolman, J; Carletti, G; Veitch, K

    2002-06-01

    Adsorption of the pertussis antigens, pertussis toxoid (PT), filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) and pertactin (PRN) onto aluminium phosphate rather than aluminium hydroxide leads to a lower humoral response and poorer protection against intranasal pertussis challenge in mice. These effects could be reversed by inclusion of fimbriae (FIM) 2 and 3 in the formulation. These data emphasis the importance of correct formulation for such vaccines. PMID:12057612

  11. A bivalent typhoid live vector vaccine expressing both chromosome- and plasmid-encoded Yersinia pestis antigens fully protects against murine lethal pulmonary plague infection.

    PubMed

    Galen, James E; Wang, Jin Yuan; Carrasco, Jose A; Lloyd, Scott A; Mellado-Sanchez, Gabriela; Diaz-McNair, Jovita; Franco, Olga; Buskirk, Amanda D; Nataro, James P; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2015-01-01

    Live attenuated bacteria hold great promise as multivalent mucosal vaccines against a variety of pathogens. A major challenge of this approach has been the successful delivery of sufficient amounts of vaccine antigens to adequately prime the immune system without overattenuating the live vaccine. Here we used a live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strain to create a bivalent mucosal plague vaccine that produces both the protective F1 capsular antigen of Yersinia pestis and the LcrV protein required for secretion of virulence effector proteins. To reduce the metabolic burden associated with the coexpression of F1 and LcrV within the live vector, we balanced expression of both antigens by combining plasmid-based expression of F1 with chromosomal expression of LcrV from three independent loci. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of this novel vaccine were assessed in mice by using a heterologous prime-boost immunization strategy and compared to those of a conventional strain in which F1 and LcrV were expressed from a single low-copy-number plasmid. The serum antibody responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced by the optimized bivalent vaccine were indistinguishable from those elicited by the parent strain, suggesting an adequate immunogenic capacity maintained through preservation of bacterial fitness; in contrast, LPS titers were 10-fold lower in mice immunized with the conventional vaccine strain. Importantly, mice receiving the optimized bivalent vaccine were fully protected against lethal pulmonary challenge. These results demonstrate the feasibility of distributing foreign antigen expression across both chromosomal and plasmid locations within a single vaccine organism for induction of protective immunity.

  12. Expression of VP7, a Bluetongue Virus Group Specific Antigen by Viral Vectors: Analysis of the Induced Immune Responses and Evaluation of Protective Potential in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Bouet-Cararo, Coraline; Contreras, Vanessa; Caruso, Agathe; Top, Sokunthea; Szelechowski, Marion; Bergeron, Corinne; Viarouge, Cyril; Desprat, Alexandra; Relmy, Anthony; Guibert, Jean-Michel; Dubois, Eric; Thiery, Richard; Bréard, Emmanuel; Bertagnoli, Stephane; Richardson, Jennifer; Foucras, Gilles; Meyer, Gilles; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Zientara, Stephan; Klonjkowski, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an economically important Orbivirus transmitted by biting midges to domestic and wild ruminants. The need for new vaccines has been highlighted by the occurrence of repeated outbreaks caused by different BTV serotypes since 1998. The major group-reactive antigen of BTV, VP7, is conserved in the 26 serotypes described so far, and its role in the induction of protective immunity has been proposed. Viral-based vectors as antigen delivery systems display considerable promise as veterinary vaccine candidates. In this paper we have evaluated the capacity of the BTV-2 serotype VP7 core protein expressed by either a non-replicative canine adenovirus type 2 (Cav-VP7 R0) or a leporipoxvirus (SG33-VP7), to induce immune responses in sheep. Humoral responses were elicited against VP7 in almost all animals that received the recombinant vectors. Both Cav-VP7 R0 and SG33-VP7 stimulated an antigen-specific CD4+ response and Cav-VP7 R0 stimulated substantial proliferation of antigen-specific CD8+ lymphocytes. Encouraged by the results obtained with the Cav-VP7 R0 vaccine vector, immunized animals were challenged with either the homologous BTV-2 or the heterologous BTV-8 serotype and viral burden in plasma was followed by real-time RT-PCR. The immune responses triggered by Cav-VP7 R0 were insufficient to afford protective immunity against BTV infection, despite partial protection obtained against homologous challenge. This work underscores the need to further characterize the role of BTV proteins in cross-protective immunity. PMID:25364822

  13. Expression of VP7, a Bluetongue virus group specific antigen by viral vectors: analysis of the induced immune responses and evaluation of protective potential in sheep.

    PubMed

    Bouet-Cararo, Coraline; Contreras, Vanessa; Caruso, Agathe; Top, Sokunthea; Szelechowski, Marion; Bergeron, Corinne; Viarouge, Cyril; Desprat, Alexandra; Relmy, Anthony; Guibert, Jean-Michel; Dubois, Eric; Thiery, Richard; Bréard, Emmanuel; Bertagnoli, Stephane; Richardson, Jennifer; Foucras, Gilles; Meyer, Gilles; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Zientara, Stephan; Klonjkowski, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an economically important Orbivirus transmitted by biting midges to domestic and wild ruminants. The need for new vaccines has been highlighted by the occurrence of repeated outbreaks caused by different BTV serotypes since 1998. The major group-reactive antigen of BTV, VP7, is conserved in the 26 serotypes described so far, and its role in the induction of protective immunity has been proposed. Viral-based vectors as antigen delivery systems display considerable promise as veterinary vaccine candidates. In this paper we have evaluated the capacity of the BTV-2 serotype VP7 core protein expressed by either a non-replicative canine adenovirus type 2 (Cav-VP7 R0) or a leporipoxvirus (SG33-VP7), to induce immune responses in sheep. Humoral responses were elicited against VP7 in almost all animals that received the recombinant vectors. Both Cav-VP7 R0 and SG33-VP7 stimulated an antigen-specific CD4+ response and Cav-VP7 R0 stimulated substantial proliferation of antigen-specific CD8+ lymphocytes. Encouraged by the results obtained with the Cav-VP7 R0 vaccine vector, immunized animals were challenged with either the homologous BTV-2 or the heterologous BTV-8 serotype and viral burden in plasma was followed by real-time RT-PCR. The immune responses triggered by Cav-VP7 R0 were insufficient to afford protective immunity against BTV infection, despite partial protection obtained against homologous challenge. This work underscores the need to further characterize the role of BTV proteins in cross-protective immunity. PMID:25364822

  14. pH effects on binding between the anthrax protective antigen and the host cellular receptor CMG2

    PubMed Central

    Rajapaksha, Maheshinie; Lovell, Scott; Janowiak, Blythe E; Andra, Kiran K; Battaile, Kevin P; Bann, James G

    2012-01-01

    The anthrax protective antigen (PA) binds to the host cellular receptor capillary morphogenesis protein 2 (CMG2) with high affinity. To gain a better understanding of how pH may affect binding to the receptor, we have investigated the kinetics of binding as a function of pH to the full-length monomeric PA and to two variants: a 2-fluorohistidine-labeled PA (2-FHisPA), which is ∼1 pH unit more stable to variations in pH than WT, and an ∼1 pH unit less stable variant in which Trp346 in the domain 2β3-2β4 loop is substituted with a Phe (W346F). We show using stopped-flow fluorescence that the binding rate increases as the pH is lowered for all proteins, with little influence on the rate of dissociation. In addition, we have crystallized PA and the two variants and examine the influence of pH on structure. In contrast to previous X-ray studies, the domain 2β3-2β4 loop undergoes little change in structure from pH ∼8 to 5.5 for the WT protein, but for the 2-FHis labeled and W346F mutant there are changes in structure consistent with previous X-ray studies. In accord with pH stability studies, we find that the average B-factor values increase by ∼20–30% for all three proteins at low pH. Our results suggest that for the full-length PA, low pH increases the binding affinity, likely through a change in structure that favors a more “bound-like” conformation. PMID:22855243

  15. NF-κB activation during intradermal DNA vaccination is essential for eliciting tumor protective antigen-specific CTL responses.

    PubMed

    Ligtenberg, Maarten A; Rojas-Colonelli, Nicole; Kiessling, Rolf; Lladser, Alvaro

    2013-10-01

    DNA vaccines have been shown to elicit tumor-protective cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) immunity in preclinical models, but have shown limited efficacy in cancer patients. Plasmids used for DNA vaccines can stimulate several innate immune receptors, triggering the activation of master transcription factors, including interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and nuclear factor κ B (NF-κB). These transcription factors drive the production of type I interferons (IFNs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, which promote the induction of CTL responses. Understanding the innate immune signaling pathways triggered by DNA vaccines that control the generation of CTL responses will increase our ability to design more effective vaccines. To gain insight into the contribution of these pathways, we vaccinated mice lacking different signaling components with plasmids encoding tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP2) or ovalbumin (OVA) using intradermal electroporation. Antigen-specific CTL responses were detected by intracellular IFN-γ staining and in vivo cytotoxicity. Mice lacking IRF3, IFN-α receptor, IL-1β/IL-18, TLR9 or MyD88 showed similar CTL responses to wild-type mice, arguing that none of these molecules were required for the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. To elucidate the role of NF-κB activation we co-vaccinated mice with pIκBα-SR, a plasmid encoding a mutant IκBα that blocks NF-κB activity. Mice vaccinated with pIκBα-SR and the TRP2-encoding plasmid (pTRP2) drastically reduced the frequencies of TRP2-specific CTLs and were unable to suppress lung melanoma metastasis in vivo, as compared with mice vaccinated only with pTRP2. Taken together these results indicate that the activation of NF-κB is essential for the immunogenicity of intradermal DNA vaccines. PMID:23884215

  16. Human leukocyte antigen class II DRB1*1302 allele protects against cervical cancer: At which step of multistage carcinogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Koji; Maeda, Hiroo; Oki, Akinori; Takatsuka, Naoyoshi; Yasugi, Toshiharu; Furuta, Reiko; Hirata, Ranko; Mitsuhashi, Akira; Kawana, Kei; Fujii, Takuma; Iwata, Takashi; Hirai, Yasuo; Yokoyama, Masatoshi; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Watanabe, Yoh; Nagai, Yutaka; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II alleles in multistage cervical carcinogenesis. Cross-sectional analysis for HLA association with cervical cancer included 1253 Japanese women: normal cytology (NL, n = 341), cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 (CIN1, n = 505), CIN grade 2 or 3 (CIN2/3, n = 96), or invasive cervical cancer (ICC, n = 311). The HLA class II allele frequencies were compared by Fisher’s exact test or the χ2-test. The Bonferroni adjustment corrected for multiple comparisons. Among the study subjects, 454 women with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion cytology were prospectively monitored by cytology and colposcopy every 3–4 months to analyze cumulative risk of CIN3 within the next 10 years in relation to HLA class II alleles. HLA class II DRB1*1302 allele frequency was similar between women with NL (11.7%) and CIN1 (11.9%), but significantly decreased to 5.2% for CIN2/3 and 5.8% for ICC (P = 0.0003). Correction for multiple testing did not change this finding. In women with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion cytology, the cumulative risk of CIN3 diagnosed within 10 years was significantly reduced among DRB1*1302-positive women (3.2% vs. 23.7%, P = 0.03). In conclusion, the two different types of analysis in this single study showed the protective effect of the DRB1*1302 allele against progression from CIN1 to CIN2/3. PMID:26235935

  17. Detection of anthrax protective antigen (PA) using europium labeled anti-PA monoclonal antibody and time-resolved fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Robyn A; Quinn, Conrad P; Schiffer, Jarad M; Boyer, Anne E; Goldstein, Jason; Bagarozzi, Dennis A; Soroka, Stephen D; Dauphin, Leslie A; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2014-06-01

    Inhalation anthrax is a rare but acute infectious disease following adsorption of Bacillus anthracis spores through the lungs. The disease has a high fatality rate if untreated, but early and correct diagnosis has a significant impact on case patient recovery. The early symptoms of inhalation anthrax are, however, non-specific and current anthrax diagnostics are primarily dependent upon culture and confirmatory real-time PCR. Consequently, there may be a significant delay in diagnosis and targeted treatment. Rapid, culture-independent diagnostic tests are therefore needed, particularly in the context of a large scale emergency response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of monoclonal antibodies to detect anthrax toxin proteins that are secreted early in the course of B. anthracis infection using a time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) immunoassay. We selected monoclonal antibodies that could detect protective antigen (PA), as PA83 and also PA63 and LF in the lethal toxin complex. The assay reliable detection limit (RDL) was 6.63×10(-6)μM (0.551ng/ml) for PA83 and 2.51×10(-5)μM (1.58ng/ml) for PA63. Despite variable precision and accuracy of the assay, PA was detected in 9 out of 10 sera samples from anthrax confirmed case patients with cutaneous (n=7), inhalation (n=2), and gastrointestinal (n=1) disease. Anthrax Immune Globulin (AIG), which has been used in treatment of clinical anthrax, interfered with detection of PA. This study demonstrates a culture-independent method of diagnosing anthrax through the use of monoclonal antibodies to detect PA and LF in the lethal toxin complex.

  18. O-mannosylation of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis adhesin Apa is crucial for T cell antigenicity during infection but is expendable for protection.

    PubMed

    Nandakumar, Subhadra; Kannanganat, Sunil; Dobos, Karen M; Lucas, Megan; Spencer, John S; Fang, Sunan; McDonald, Melissa A; Pohl, Jan; Birkness, Kristin; Chamcha, Venkateswarlu; Ramirez, Melissa V; Plikaytis, Bonnie B; Posey, James E; Amara, Rama Rao; Sable, Suraj B

    2013-01-01

    Glycosylation is the most abundant post-translational polypeptide chain modification in nature. Although carbohydrate modification of protein antigens from many microbial pathogens constitutes important components of B cell epitopes, the role in T cell immunity is not completely understood. Here, using ELISPOT and polychromatic flow cytometry, we show that O-mannosylation of the adhesin, Apa, of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is crucial for its T cell antigenicity in humans and mice after infection. However, subunit vaccination with both mannosylated and non-mannosylated Apa induced a comparable magnitude and quality of T cell response and imparted similar levels of protection against Mtb challenge in mice. Both forms equally improved waning BCG vaccine-induced protection in elderly mice after subunit boosting. Thus, O-mannosylation of Apa is required for antigenicity but appears to be dispensable for its immunogenicity and protective efficacy in mice. These results have implications for the development of subunit vaccines using post-translationally modified proteins such as glycoproteins against infectious diseases like tuberculosis.

  19. Hydroxychloroquine protects melanocytes from autoantibody-induced injury by reducing the binding of antigen-antibody complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-Guang; Hu, Wen-Zhi; Ma, Hui-Jun; Liu, Wen; Yang, Qing-Qi; Zhao, Guang

    2016-08-01

    Vitiligo is a polygenic autoimmune disorder characterized by loss of pigmentation due to melanocyte destruction. Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is an effective immunosuppressant widely used in the treatment of autoimmune disorders. As generalized vitiligo (GV) is commonly considered to be a T cell and autoantibody-induced immune disorder, the present study aimed to determine whether HCQ protects melanocytes from autoantibody‑induced disruption. Anti‑melanocyte antibodies were obtained from the serum of patients with progressive GV and the effects of HCQ on prevent the autoantibody‑induced disruption of melanocytes was observed. Cell‑based ELISA, indirect immunofluorescence and western blotting were used to analyze the autoantibody content of sera samples obtained from 32 patients with progressive GV. The cytotoxicity of HCQ was detected by MTT assay, and 1 µg/ml HCQ was applied to human primary melanocytes (HMCs) to examine whether it could exert protective effects against autoantibody‑induced immune injury. Flow cytometry was used to measure autoantibody binding to the surface of HMCs. Complement‑dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and antibody‑dependent cell‑mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) were monitored by MTT and lactate dehydrogenase‑releasing assays. The concentration of autoantibodies in sera samples taken from GV patients was significantly higher than in controls, particularly in patients who had >10% of their body surface affected by vitiligo. The majority of the autoantibodies presented in the HMCs and human keratinocytes (HKCs) and were predominantly localized to the cell surface and cytoplasm. The molecular weights of the autoantigens were identified as 30, 37‑39, 42, 53, 60‑75, 90, 100, 110, and 126 kDa; the 30 kDa protein was observed only in HMCs. The addition of HCQ at a concentration of 1 µg/ml produced no significant cytotoxicity in HMCs and was demonstrated to reduce the binding of GV immunoglobulin G (IgG) to the surface of HMCs

  20. Associations between subunit ectodomains promote T cell antigen receptor assembly and protect against degradation in the ER

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The T cell antigen receptor (TCR) is an oligomeric protein complex made from at least six different integral membrane proteins (alpha beta gamma delta epsilon and zeta). The TCR is assembled in the ER of T cells, and correct assembly is required for transport to the cell surface. Single subunits and partial receptor complexes are retained in the ER where TCR alpha, beta, and CD3 delta chains are degraded selectively. The information required for the ER degradation of the TCR beta chain is confined to the membrane anchor of the protein (Wileman et al., 1990c; Bonifacino et al., 1990b). In this study we show that the rapid degradation of the TCR beta chain is inhibited when it assembles with single CD3 gamma, delta, or epsilon subunits in the ER, and have started to define the role played by transmembrane anchors, and receptor ectodomains, in the masking proteolytic targeting information. Acidic residues within the membrane spanning domains of CD3 subunits were essential for binding to the TCR beta chain. TCR beta chains and CD3 subunits therefore interact via transmembrane domains. However, when sites of binding were restricted to the membrane anchor of the TCR beta chain, stabilization by CD3 subunits was markedly reduced. Interactions between membrane spanning domains were not, therefore, sufficient for the protection of the beta chain from ER proteolysis. The presence of the C beta domain, containing the first 150 amino acids of the TCR ectodomain, greatly increased the stability of complexes formed in the ER. For assembly with CD3 epsilon, stability was further enhanced by the V beta amino acids. The results showed that the efficient neutralization of transmembrane proteolytic targeting information required associations between membrane spanning domains and the presence of receptor ectodomains. Interactions between receptor ectodomains may slow the dissociation of CD3 subunits from the beta chain and prolong the masking of transmembrane targeting information. In

  1. Immobilization antigen vaccine adjuvanted by parasitic heat shock protein 70C confers high protection in fish against cryptocaryonosis.

    PubMed

    Josepriya, T A; Chien, Kuo-Hsuan; Lin, Hsin-Yun; Huang, Han-Ning; Wu, Chang-Jer; Song, Yen-Ling

    2015-08-01

    The immobilization antigen (iAg) has been demonstrated as a protective immunogen against Cryptocaryon irritans infection. In this study, C-terminal domain of heat shock protein 70 cloned from C. irritans (Hsp70C) was tested for its immuno-stimulatory effects. The iAg and Hsp70C cDNAs were constructed independently in secretory forms and were encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles. In the first immunization trial, grouper fingerlings orally intubated with iAg and iAg:Hsp70C presented 96% and 100% relative percent survival (RPS), respectively, after a lethal challenge. In the second trial, both iAg and iAg:Hsp70C groups showed 100% RPS and the skin trophont burden was significantly lowered. The iAg:Hsp70C still provides a significantly high protection of 51% RPS at 49 days post immunization, when an even more serious lethal infection occurs. RT-qPCR results showed that Hsp70C could up-regulate the expression of i) T cell markers: Cluster of Differentiation 8 alpha (CD8α) and CD4, ii) cytokine genes: Interferon gamma (IFNγ), Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFα) and Interleukin 12 p40 (IL-12/P40), iii) antibody genes: Immunoglobulin M heavy chain (IgMH) and IgTH, and iv) major histocompatibility complex (MHC-I & MHC-II), in the spleen of iAg:Hsp70C group. Furthermore, significantly high levels of iAg-specific IgM was detected in skin mucus which efficiently immobilized live theronts in iAg- and iAg:Hsp70C-immunized fish at 5 weeks post immunization. Hsp70C significantly increased the number of nonspecific CD8(+) skin leucocytes which exerted cytotoxicity against theronts, although cytotoxic activity showed no difference among the various groups. Because of this complementary cooperation of cellular and humoral immune responses, Hsp70C enhances the efficacy of iAg vaccine and constrains C. irritans infection. In view of the severe loss caused by cryptocaryonosis, application of this parasitic vaccine in farmed and ornamental fish, is worthy to be considered. PMID

  2. Recombinant V antigen protects mice against pneumonic and bubonic plague caused by F1-capsule-positive and -negative strains of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, G W; Leary, S E; Williamson, E D; Titball, R W; Welkos, S L; Worsham, P L; Friedlander, A M

    1996-11-01

    The purified recombinant V antigen from Yersinia pestis, expressed in Escherichia coli and adsorbed to aluminum hydroxide, an adjuvant approved for human use, was used to immunize outbred Hsd:ND4 mice subcutaneously. Immunization protected mice from lethal bubonic and pneumonic plague caused by CO92, a wild-type F1+ strain, or by the isogenic F1- strain C12. This work demonstrates that a subunit plague vaccine formulated for human use provides significant protection against bubonic plague caused by an F1- strain (C12) or against substantial aerosol challenges from either F1+ (CO92) or F1-(C12) Y. pestis.

  3. Cholera toxin-B (ctxB) antigen expressing Salmonella Typhimurium polyvalent vaccine exerts protective immune response against Vibrio cholerae infection.

    PubMed

    Vishwakarma, Vikalp; Sahoo, Sushree Sangita; Das, Susmita; Ray, Shilpa; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Suar, Mrutyunjay

    2015-04-01

    Live attenuated vaccines are cost effective approach for preventing a broad range of infectious diseases, and thus are of great interest. However, immune-defects can predispose the patient to infections by the vaccine candidate itself. So far, few live vaccine candidates have been designed specifically for immune compromised individuals. Recently, we reported a new Salmonella Typhimurium Z234-vaccine strain (Periaswamy et al., PLoS ONE 2012;7:e45433), which was specifically attenuated in the NADPH-oxidase deficient host. In the present study, the Z234-vaccine strain was further engineered to express heterologous antigen (Vibrio cholerae toxin antigen subunit-B, i.e. CtxB) with the intention of creating a vector for simultaneous protection against Cholera and Salmonellosis. The primary aim of this study was to ensure the expression of CtxB antigen by the recombinant vaccine strain Z234-pMS101. The antigen CtxB was expressed through Z234 as a fusion protein with N-terminal signal sequence of Salmonella outer protein (SopE), an effector protein from Salmonella under the control of SopE promoter. The CtxB-expressing plasmid construct pMS101 (pM968-pSopE-ctxB) was found to be stable both in vitro and in vivo. In an oral mouse infection model, the vaccine strain Z234-pMS101 efficiently colonized the host gut. The extent of protection was confirmed after challenging the immunized hosts with live V. cholerae. Vaccinated mice showed reduced gut colonization by V. cholerae. Further assessment of immunological parameters supported the possibility of conferring effective immune response by Z234-pMS101 vaccine strain. Overall, the Z234-pMS101 vaccine strain showed potential as a promising polyvalent vaccine candidate to protect against S. Typhimurium and V. cholerae infection simultaneously.

  4. Coadministration of the Three Antigenic Leishmania infantum Poly (A) Binding Proteins as a DNA Vaccine Induces Protection against Leishmania major Infection in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Corvo, Laura; Garde, Esther; Ramírez, Laura; Iniesta, Virginia; Bonay, Pedro; Gómez-Nieto, Carlos; González, Víctor M.; Martín, M. Elena; Alonso, Carlos; Coelho, Eduardo A. F.; Barral, Aldina; Barral-Netto, Manoel

    2015-01-01

    Background Highly conserved intracellular proteins from Leishmania have been described as antigens in natural and experimental infected mammals. The present study aimed to evaluate the antigenicity and prophylactic properties of the Leishmania infantum Poly (A) binding proteins (LiPABPs). Methodology/Principal Findings Three different members of the LiPABP family have been described. Recombinant tools based on these proteins were constructed: recombinant proteins and DNA vaccines. The three recombinant proteins were employed for coating ELISA plates. Sera from human and canine patients of visceral leishmaniasis and human patients of mucosal leishmaniasis recognized the three LiPABPs. In addition, the protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine based on the combination of the three Leishmania PABPs has been tested in a model of progressive murine leishmaniasis: BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major. The induction of a Th1-like response against the LiPABP family by genetic vaccination was able to down-regulate the IL-10 predominant responses elicited by parasite LiPABPs after infection in this murine model. This modulation resulted in a partial protection against L. major infection. LiPABP vaccinated mice showed a reduction on the pathology that was accompanied by a decrease in parasite burdens, in antibody titers against Leishmania antigens and in the IL-4 and IL-10 parasite-specific mediated responses in comparison to control mice groups immunized with saline or with the non-recombinant plasmid. Conclusion/Significance The results presented here demonstrate for the first time the prophylactic properties of a new family of Leishmania antigenic intracellular proteins, the LiPABPs. The redirection of the immune response elicited against the LiPABP family (from IL-10 towards IFN-γ mediated responses) by genetic vaccination was able to induce a partial protection against the development of the disease in a highly susceptible murine model of leishmaniasis. PMID:25955652

  5. Prevention of vertical transmission of Neospora caninum in C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51 expressing N. caninum protective antigens.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthy, Sheela; Sanakkayala, Neelima; Vemulapalli, Ramesh; Jain, Neeta; Lindsay, David S; Schurig, Gerhardt S; Boyle, Stephen M; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar

    2007-11-01

    Bovine abortions caused by the apicomplexan parasite Neospora caninum have been responsible for severe economic losses to the cattle industry. Infected cows either experience abortion or transmit the parasite transplacentally at a rate of up to 95%. Neospora caninum vaccines that can prevent vertical transmission and ensure disruption in the life cycle of the parasite greatly aid in the management of neosporosis in the cattle industry. Brucella abortus strain RB51, a commercially available vaccine for bovine brucellosis, can also be used as a vector to express plasmid-encoded proteins from other pathogens. Neospora caninum protective antigens MIC1, MIC3, GRA2, GRA6 and SRS2 were expressed in strain RB51. Female C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated with a recombinant strain RB51 expressing N. caninum antigen or irradiated tachyzoites, boosted 4 weeks later and then bred. Antigen-specific IgG, IFN-gamma and IL-10 were detected in vaccinated pregnant mice. Vaccinated mice were challenged with 5 x 10(6)N. caninum tachyzoites between days 11-13 of pregnancy. Brain tissue was collected from pups 3 weeks after birth and examined for the presence of N. caninum by real-time PCR. The RB51-MIC3, RB51-GRA6, irradiated tachyzoite vaccine, pooled strain RB51-Neospora vaccine, RB51-MIC1 and RB51-SRS2 vaccines elicited approximately 6-38% protection against vertical transmission. However, the differences in parasite burden in brain tissue of pups from the control and vaccinated groups were highly significant for all groups. Thus, B. abortus strain RB51 expressing the specific N. caninum antigens induced substantial protection against vertical transmission of N. caninum in mice.

  6. A live attenuated BCG vaccine overexpressing multistage antigens Ag85B and HspX provides superior protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xuefeng; Teng, Xindong; Jing, Yukai; Ma, Jilei; Tian, Maopeng; Yu, Qi; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Ruibo; Wang, Weihua; Li, Li; Fan, Xionglin

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the most menacing infectious diseases, although attenuated Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine has been widely used to protect children against primary TB. There are increasing evidences that rapid growing and dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) coexist in vivo after infection. However, BCG vaccine only elicits cell-mediated immune responses to secretory antigens expressed by rapid growing pathogen. BCG vaccine is thus unable to thwart the reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), and its protection wanes over age after neonatal immunization. In order to extend its ability for a durable protection, a novel recombinant BCG (rBCG) strain, named rBCG::XB, was constructed by overexpressing immunodominant multistage antigens of Ag85B and HspX, which are expressed by both rapid replicating and dormant M. tuberculosis. Long-term protective effect and immunogenicity of rBCG::XB were compared with the parental BCG in vaccinated C57BL/6 mice. Our results demonstrated that rBCG::XB provided the stronger and long-lasting protection against M. tuberculosis H37Rv intranasal infection than BCG. The rBCG::XB not only elicited the more durable multistage antigen-specific CD4(+)Th1-biased immune responses and specific polyfunctional CD4(+)T cells but also augmented the CD8(+) CTL effects against Ag85B in vivo. In particular, higher levels of CD4(+) TEM and CD8(+) TCM cells, dominated by IL2(+) CD4(+) and CD8(+) TCM cells, were obtained in the spleen of rBCG::XB vaccinated mice. Therefore, our findings indicate that rBCG::XB is a promising candidate to improve the efficacy of BCG.

  7. Over-expression of homologous antigens in a leucine auxotroph of Brucella abortus strain RB51 protects mice against a virulent B. suis challenge.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Parthiban; Surendran, Naveen; Seleem, Mohamed N; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Schurig, Gerhardt G; Boyle, Stephen M

    2011-04-12

    Infection by members of the Gram-negative bacterial genus Brucella causes brucellosis in a variety of mammals. Brucellosis in swine remains a challenge, as there is no vaccine in the USA approved for use in swine against brucellosis. Here, we developed an improved recombinant Brucella abortus vaccine strain RB51 that could afford protection against Brucella suis infection by over-expressing genes encoding homologous proteins: L7/L12 ribosomal protein, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase [SOD] and glycosyl-transferase [WboA]. Using strain RB51leuB as a platform and an antibiotic-resistance marker free plasmid, strains RB51leuB/SOD, RB51leuB/SOD/L7/L12 and RB51leuB/SOD/WboA were constructed to over-express the antigens: SOD alone, SOD and ribosomal protein L7/L12 or SOD and glycosyl-transferase, respectively. The ability of these vaccine candidates to protect against a virulent B. suis challenge were evaluated in a mouse model. All vaccine groups protected mice significantly (P<0.05) when compared to the control group. Within the vaccine groups, the mice vaccinated with strain RB51leuB/SOD/WboA were significantly better protected than those that were vaccinated with either strain RB51leuB/SOD or RB51leuB/SOD/L7/L12. These results suggest that Brucella antigens can be over-expressed in strain RB51leuB and elicit protective immune responses against brucellosis. Since the plasmid over-expressing homologous antigens does not carry an antibiotic resistance gene, it complies with federal regulations and therefore could be used to develop safer multi-species vaccines for prevention of brucellosis caused by other species of Brucella.

  8. Bacterial membranes enhance the immunogenicity and protective capacity of the surface exposed tick Subolesin-Anaplasma marginale MSP1a chimeric antigen.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Marinela; Moreno-Cid, Juan A; Domingos, Ana; Canales, Mario; Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Pérez de la Lastra, José M; Sánchez, Emilio; Merino, Octávio; Zavala, Rigoberto López; Ayllón, Nieves; Boadella, Mariana; Villar, Margarita; Gortázar, Christian; de la Fuente, José

    2015-09-01

    Ticks are vectors of diseases that affect humans and animals worldwide. Tick vaccines have been proposed as a cost-effective and environmentally sound alternative for tick control. Recently, the Rhipicephalus microplus Subolesin (SUB)-Anaplasma marginale MSP1a chimeric antigen was produced in Escherichia coli as membrane-bound and exposed protein and used to protect vaccinated cattle against tick infestations. In this research, lipidomics and proteomics characterization of the E. coli membrane-bound SUB-MSP1a antigen showed the presence of components with potential adjuvant effect. Furthermore, vaccination with membrane-free SUB-MSP1a and bacterial membranes containing SUB-MSP1a showed that bacterial membranes enhance the immunogenicity of the SUB-MSP1a antigen in animal models. R. microplus female ticks were capillary-fed with sera from pigs orally immunized with membrane-free SUB, membrane bound SUB-MSP1a and saline control. Ticks ingested antibodies added to the blood meal and the effect of these antibodies on reduction of tick weight was shown for membrane bound SUB-MSP1a but not SUB when compared to control. Using the simple and cost-effective process developed for the purification of membrane-bound SUB-MSP1a, endotoxin levels were within limits accepted for recombinant vaccines. These results provide further support for the development of tick vaccines using E. coli membranes exposing chimeric antigens such as SUB-MSP1a. PMID:26219233

  9. Evaluation of the humoral and cellular immune response to different antigens of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis in Canindé goats and their potential protection against caseous lymphadenitis.

    PubMed

    Moura-Costa, L F; Bahia, R C; Carminati, R; Vale, V L C; Paule, B J A; Portela, R W; Freire, S M; Nascimento, I; Schaer, R; Barreto, L M S; Meyer, R

    2008-11-15

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is the etiologic agent of caseous lymphadenitis, a disease that affects goats and sheep, and can cause severe economic losses. In this study, four different antigenic extracts were obtained from the attenuated strain T1, which was isolated in the state of Bahia (Brazil). Forty-four Canindé breed goats were divided in five groups, each receiving a different antigen solution and saline buffer as a control. The humoral response was monitored through the identification of specific IgG by indirect ELISA and Western Blotting, and the production of IFN-gamma was followed in order to observe the activation of cellular response. After twelve weeks of antigen inoculation, the animals were challenged with 2 x 10(5)CFU of a wild strain, also isolated in Bahia, and necropsy was performed on all animals twelve weeks afterwards. It was observed that the attenuated bacteria gave a protection of 33.3%, in addition to the weak humoral response elicited. Animals inoculated with secreted antigen associated with Freund's incomplete adjuvant and oligodeoxynucleotide containing unmethylated CpG dinucleotides (CpG ODN) showed a strong humoral response, but this inoculation could not prevent the spread of challenge bacteria in the majority of animals. These results demonstrate the immunogenic potential of the attenuated T1 strain in the development of a vaccine against caseous lymphadenitis in goats. PMID:18752855

  10. Pretreatment with antibody to eosinophil major basic protein prevents hyperresponsiveness by protecting neuronal M2 muscarinic receptors in antigen-challenged guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, C M; Fryer, A D; Jacoby, D B; Gleich, G J; Costello, R W

    1997-01-01

    In antigen-challenged guinea pigs there is recruitment of eosinophils into the lungs and to airway nerves, decreased function of inhibitory M2 muscarinic autoreceptors on parasympathetic nerves in the lungs, and airway hyperresponsiveness. A rabbit antibody to guinea pig eosinophil major basic protein was used to determine whether M2 muscarinic receptor dysfunction, and the subsequent hyperresponsiveness, are due to antagonism of the M2 receptor by eosinophil major basic protein. Guinea pigs were sensitized, challenged with ovalbumin and hyperresponsiveness, and M2 receptor function tested 24 h later with the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine. Antigen-challenged guinea pigs were hyperresponsive to electrical stimulation of the vagus nerves compared with controls. Likewise, loss of M2 receptor function was demonstrated since the agonist pilocarpine inhibited vagally-induced bronchoconstriction in control but not challenged animals. Pretreatment with rabbit antibody to guinea pig eosinophil major basic protein prevented hyperresponsiveness, and protected M2 receptor function in the antigen-challenged animals without inhibiting eosinophil accumulation in the lungs or around the nerves. Thus, hyperresponsiveness is a result of inhibition of neuronal M2 muscarinic receptor function by eosinophil major basic protein in antigen-challenged guinea pigs. PMID:9410903

  11. Multiepitope fusion antigen induces broadly protective antibodies that prevent adherence of Escherichia coli strains expressing colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I), CFA/II, and CFA/IV.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Xiaosai; Knudsen, David E; Wollenberg, Katie M; Sack, David A; Zhang, Weiping

    2014-02-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death in children younger than 5 years and continues to be a major threat to global health. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are the most common bacteria causing diarrhea in developing countries. ETEC strains are able to attach to host small intestinal epithelial cells by using bacterial colonization factor antigen (CFA) adhesins. This attachment helps to initiate the diarrheal disease. Vaccines that induce antiadhesin immunity to block adherence of ETEC strains that express immunologically heterogeneous CFA adhesins are expected to protect against ETEC diarrhea. In this study, we created a CFA multiepitope fusion antigen (MEFA) carrying representative epitopes of CFA/I, CFA/II (CS1, CS2, and CS3), and CFA/IV (CS4, CS5, and CS6), examined its immunogenicity in mice, and assessed the potential of this MEFA as an antiadhesin vaccine against ETEC. Mice intraperitoneally immunized with this CFA MEFA exhibited no adverse effects and developed immune responses to CFA/I, CFA/II, and CFA/IV adhesins. Moreover, after incubation with serum of the immunized mice, ETEC or E. coli strains expressing CFA/I, CFA/II, or CFA/IV adhesins were significantly inhibited in adherence to Caco-2 cells. Our results indicated this CFA MEFA elicited antibodies that not only cross-reacted to CFA/I, CFA/II and CFA/IV adhesins but also broadly inhibited adherence of E. coli strains expressing these seven adhesins and suggested that this CFA MEFA could be a candidate to induce broad-spectrum antiadhesin protection against ETEC diarrhea. Additionally, this antigen construction approach (creating an MEFA) may be generally used in vaccine development against heterogenic pathogens. PMID:24351757

  12. Further characterization of protective Trypanosoma cruzi-specific CD4+ T-cell clones: T helper type 1-like phenotype and reactivity with shed trypomastigote antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Nickell, S P; Keane, M; So, M

    1993-01-01

    We previously reported the isolation from immune mice of a panel of murine clonal T-cell lines which specifically recognize antigens expressed by the trypomastigote stage of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of human Chagas' disease. Our analysis indicated that distinct clones which recognize common as well as strain-specific antigenic determinants were represented. The immunoprotective potential of several of these T-cell clones was demonstrated by adoptive transfer of protection to naive syngeneic recipients. Here we report that these T-cell clones are all of the TH1 phenotype, as determined from their lymphokine secretion patterns. Significant levels of stimulatory activity for each clone were detected in trypomastigote supernatants, and the release of this activity was time and temperature dependent. Seven of 10 T-cell clones tested responded to nitrocellulose-immunoblotted trypomastigote proteins in the range of 90 to 47 kDa; no fewer than six distinct epitopes residing on at least five distinct polypeptide species were recognized by this panel of clones. Two clones (2G8 and 4B10) previously shown to protect in vivo responded to immunoblotted proteins in the range of 65 to 53 and 90 to 80 kD, respectively. Stimulatory activity for the latter clone was shown to be expressed on the surface of trypomastigotes and to bind specifically to wheat germ agglutinin, indicating that its target antigen is an 85-kDa trypomastigote surface glycoprotein. PMID:8335358

  13. Protective immunity against respiratory tract challenge with Yersinia pestis in mice immunized with an adenovirus-based vaccine vector expressing V antigen.

    PubMed

    Chiuchiolo, Maria J; Boyer, Julie L; Krause, Anja; Senina, Svetlana; Hackett, Neil R; Crystal, Ronald G

    2006-11-01

    The aerosol form of the bacterium Yersinia pestis causes the pneumonic plague, a rapidly fatal disease. At present, no plague vaccines are available for use in the United States. One candidate for the development of a subunit vaccine is the Y. pestis virulence (V) antigen, a protein that mediates the function of the Yersinia outer protein virulence factors and suppresses inflammatory responses in the host. On the basis of the knowledge that adenovirus (Ad) gene-transfer vectors act as adjuvants in eliciting host immunity against the transgene they carry, we tested the hypothesis that a single administration of a replication-defective Ad gene-transfer vector encoding the Y. pestis V antigen (AdsecV) could stimulate strong protective immune responses without a requirement for repeat administration. AdsecV elicited specific T cell responses and high IgG titers in serum within 2 weeks after a single intramuscular immunization. Importantly, the mice were protected from a lethal intranasal challenge of Y. pestis CO92 from 4 weeks up to 6 months after immunization with a single intramuscular dose of AdsecV. These observations suggest that an Ad gene-transfer vector expressing V antigen is a candidate for development of an effective anti-plague vaccine.

  14. Long-lived antigen-induced IgM plasma cells demonstrate somatic mutations and contribute to long-term protection

    PubMed Central

    Bohannon, Caitlin; Powers, Ryan; Satyabhama, Lakshmipriyadarshini; Cui, Ang; Tipton, Christopher; Michaeli, Miri; Skountzou, Ioanna; Mittler, Robert S.; Kleinstein, Steven H.; Mehr, Ramit; Lee, Frances Eun-Yun; Sanz, Ignacio; Jacob, Joshy

    2016-01-01

    Long-lived plasma cells are critical to humoral immunity as a lifelong source of protective antibodies. Antigen-activated B cells—with T-cell help—undergo affinity maturation within germinal centres and persist as long-lived IgG plasma cells in the bone marrow. Here we show that antigen-specific, induced IgM plasma cells also persist for a lifetime. Unlike long-lived IgG plasma cells, which develop in germinal centres and then home to the bone marrow, IgM plasma cells are primarily retained within the spleen and can develop even in the absence of germinal centres. Interestingly, their expressed IgV loci exhibit somatic mutations introduced by the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). However, these IgM plasma cells are probably not antigen-selected, as replacement mutations are spread through the variable segment and not enriched within the CDRs. Finally, antibodies from long-lived IgM plasma cells provide protective host immunity against a lethal virus challenge. PMID:27270306

  15. Expression, purification, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of a recombinant Tc24 antigen as a vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Campos, Viridiana; Martinez-Vega, Pedro; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus; Rosado-Vallado, Miguel; Seid, Christopher A; Hudspeth, Elissa M; Wei, Junfei; Liu, Zhuyun; Kwityn, Cliff; Hammond, Molly; Ortega-López, Jaime; Zhan, Bin; Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Dumonteil, Eric

    2015-08-26

    The Tc24 calcium binding protein from the flagellar pocket of Trypanosoma cruzi is under evaluation as a candidate vaccine antigen against Chagas disease. Previously, a DNA vaccine encoding Tc24 was shown to be an effective vaccine (both as a preventive and therapeutic intervention) in mice and dogs, as evidenced by reductions in T. cruzi parasitemia and cardiac amastigotes, as well as reduced cardiac inflammation and increased host survival. Here we developed a suitable platform for the large scale production of recombinant Tc24 (rTc24) and show that when rTc24 is combined with a monophosphoryl-lipid A (MPLA) adjuvant, the formulated vaccine induces a Th1-biased immune response in mice, comprised of elevated IgG2a antibody levels and interferon-gamma levels from splenocytes, compared to controls. These immune responses also resulted in statistically significant decreased T. cruzi parasitemia and cardiac amastigotes, as well as increased survival following T. cruzi challenge infections, compared to controls. Partial protective efficacy was shown regardless of whether the antigen was expressed in Escherichia coli or in yeast (Pichia pastoris). While mouse vaccinations will require further modifications in order to optimize protective efficacy, such studies provide a basis for further evaluations of vaccines comprised of rTc24, together with alternative adjuvants and additional recombinant antigens. PMID:26192358

  16. Expression, purification, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of a recombinant Tc24 antigen as a vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Campos, Viridiana; Martinez-Vega, Pedro; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus; Rosado-Vallado, Miguel; Seid, Christopher A; Hudspeth, Elissa M; Wei, Junfei; Liu, Zhuyun; Kwityn, Cliff; Hammond, Molly; Ortega-López, Jaime; Zhan, Bin; Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Dumonteil, Eric

    2015-08-26

    The Tc24 calcium binding protein from the flagellar pocket of Trypanosoma cruzi is under evaluation as a candidate vaccine antigen against Chagas disease. Previously, a DNA vaccine encoding Tc24 was shown to be an effective vaccine (both as a preventive and therapeutic intervention) in mice and dogs, as evidenced by reductions in T. cruzi parasitemia and cardiac amastigotes, as well as reduced cardiac inflammation and increased host survival. Here we developed a suitable platform for the large scale production of recombinant Tc24 (rTc24) and show that when rTc24 is combined with a monophosphoryl-lipid A (MPLA) adjuvant, the formulated vaccine induces a Th1-biased immune response in mice, comprised of elevated IgG2a antibody levels and interferon-gamma levels from splenocytes, compared to controls. These immune responses also resulted in statistically significant decreased T. cruzi parasitemia and cardiac amastigotes, as well as increased survival following T. cruzi challenge infections, compared to controls. Partial protective efficacy was shown regardless of whether the antigen was expressed in Escherichia coli or in yeast (Pichia pastoris). While mouse vaccinations will require further modifications in order to optimize protective efficacy, such studies provide a basis for further evaluations of vaccines comprised of rTc24, together with alternative adjuvants and additional recombinant antigens.

  17. Protective immunity induced in mice by F8.1 and F8.2 antigens purified from Schistosoma mansoni eggs.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, C C; Santoro, M M; Goes, A M

    1998-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni soluble egg antigens (SEA) were fractionated by isoelectric focusing, resulting in 20 components, characterized by pH, absorbance and protein concentration. The higher absorbance fractions were submitted to electrophoresis, and fraction 8 (F8) presented a specific pattern of bands on its isoelectric point. Protein 3 was observed only on F8, and so, it was utilized to rabbit immunization, in order to evaluate its capacity of inducing protective immunity. IgG antibodies from rabbit anti-F8 serum were coupled to Sepharose, and used to obtain the specific antigen by affinity chromatography. This antigen, submitted to electrophoresis, presented two proteic bands (F8.1 and F8.2), which were transferred to nitrocellulose membrane (PVDF) and sequenciated. The homology of F8.2 to known proteins was determined using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool program (BLASTp). Significant homologies were obtained for the rabbit cytosolic Ca2+ uptake inhibitor, and for the bird a1-proteinase inhibitor. Immunization of mice with F8.1 and F8.2, in the presence of Corynebacterium parvum and Al(OH)3 as adjuvant, induced a significant protection degree against challenge infection, as observed by the decrease on worm burden recovered from portal system. PMID:9921347

  18. Affinity binding of antibodies to supermacroporous cryogel adsorbents with immobilized protein A for removal of anthrax toxin protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Ingavle, Ganesh C; Baillie, Les W J; Zheng, Yishan; Lis, Elzbieta K; Savina, Irina N; Howell, Carol A; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V; Sandeman, Susan R

    2015-05-01

    Polymeric cryogels are efficient carriers for the immobilization of biomolecules because of their unique macroporous structure, permeability, mechanical stability and different surface chemical functionalities. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the potential use of macroporous monolithic cryogels for biotoxin removal using anthrax toxin protective antigen (PA), the central cell-binding component of the anthrax exotoxins, and covalent immobilization of monoclonal antibodies. The affinity ligand (protein A) was chemically coupled to the reactive hydroxyl and epoxy-derivatized monolithic cryogels and the binding efficiencies of protein A, monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel column were determined. Our results show differences in the binding capacity of protein A as well as monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel adsorbents caused by ligand concentrations, physical properties and morphology of surface matrices. The cytotoxicity potential of the cryogels was determined by an in vitro viability assay using V79 lung fibroblast as a model cell and the results reveal that the cryogels are non-cytotoxic. Finally, the adsorptive capacities of PA from phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were evaluated towards a non-glycosylated, plant-derived human monoclonal antibody (PANG) and a glycosylated human monoclonal antibody (Valortim(®)), both of which were covalently attached via protein A immobilization. Optimal binding capacities of 108 and 117 mg/g of antibody to the adsorbent were observed for PANG attached poly(acrylamide-allyl glycidyl ether) [poly(AAm-AGE)] and Valortim(®) attached poly(AAm-AGE) cryogels, respectively, This indicated that glycosylation status of Valortim(®) antibody could significantly increase (8%) its binding capacity relative to the PANG antibody on poly(AAm-AGE)-protien-A column (p < 0.05). The amounts of PA which remained in the solution after passing PA spiked PBS through PANG or Valortim bound poly(AAm-AGE) cryogel were significantly (p < 0

  19. Affinity binding of antibodies to supermacroporous cryogel adsorbents with immobilized protein A for removal of anthrax toxin protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Ingavle, Ganesh C; Baillie, Les W J; Zheng, Yishan; Lis, Elzbieta K; Savina, Irina N; Howell, Carol A; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V; Sandeman, Susan R

    2015-05-01

    Polymeric cryogels are efficient carriers for the immobilization of biomolecules because of their unique macroporous structure, permeability, mechanical stability and different surface chemical functionalities. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the potential use of macroporous monolithic cryogels for biotoxin removal using anthrax toxin protective antigen (PA), the central cell-binding component of the anthrax exotoxins, and covalent immobilization of monoclonal antibodies. The affinity ligand (protein A) was chemically coupled to the reactive hydroxyl and epoxy-derivatized monolithic cryogels and the binding efficiencies of protein A, monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel column were determined. Our results show differences in the binding capacity of protein A as well as monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel adsorbents caused by ligand concentrations, physical properties and morphology of surface matrices. The cytotoxicity potential of the cryogels was determined by an in vitro viability assay using V79 lung fibroblast as a model cell and the results reveal that the cryogels are non-cytotoxic. Finally, the adsorptive capacities of PA from phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were evaluated towards a non-glycosylated, plant-derived human monoclonal antibody (PANG) and a glycosylated human monoclonal antibody (Valortim(®)), both of which were covalently attached via protein A immobilization. Optimal binding capacities of 108 and 117 mg/g of antibody to the adsorbent were observed for PANG attached poly(acrylamide-allyl glycidyl ether) [poly(AAm-AGE)] and Valortim(®) attached poly(AAm-AGE) cryogels, respectively, This indicated that glycosylation status of Valortim(®) antibody could significantly increase (8%) its binding capacity relative to the PANG antibody on poly(AAm-AGE)-protien-A column (p < 0.05). The amounts of PA which remained in the solution after passing PA spiked PBS through PANG or Valortim bound poly(AAm-AGE) cryogel were significantly (p < 0

  20. Signaling When (and When Not) to Be Cautious and Self-Protective: Impulsive and Reflective Trust in Close Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Sandra L.; Pinkus, Rebecca T.; Holmes, John G.; Harris, Brianna; Gomillion, Sarah; Aloni, Maya; Derrick, Jaye L.; Leder, Sadie

    2011-01-01

    A dual process model is proposed to explain how automatic evaluative associations to the partner (i.e., impulsive trust) and deliberative expectations of partner caring (i.e., reflective trust) interact to govern self-protection in romantic relationships. Experimental and correlational studies of dating and marital relationships supported the model. Subliminally conditioning more positive evaluative associations to the partner increased confidence in the partner’s caring, suggesting that trust has an impulsive basis. Being high on impulsive trust (i.e., more positive evaluative associations to the partner on the IAT) also reduced the automatic inclination to distance in response to doubts about the partner’s trustworthiness. It similarly reduced self-protective behavioral reactions to these reflective trust concerns. The studies further revealed that the effects of impulsive trust depend on working memory capacity: Being high on impulsive trust inoculated against reflective trust concerns for people low on working memory capacity. PMID:21443370

  1. Subdominant antigens in bacterial vaccines: AM779 is subdominant in the Anaplasma marginale outer membrane vaccine but does not associate with protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Albarrak, Saleh M; Brown, Wendy C; Noh, Susan M; Reif, Kathryn E; Scoles, Glen A; Turse, Joshua E; Norimine, Junzo; Ueti, Massaro W; Palmer, Guy H

    2012-01-01

    Identification of specific antigens responsible for the ability of complex immunogens to induce protection is a major goal in development of bacterial vaccines. Much of the investigation has focused on highly abundant and highly immunodominant outer membrane proteins. Recently however, genomic and proteomic approaches have facilitated identification of minor components of the bacterial outer membrane that have previously been missed or ignored in immunological analyses. Immunization with Anaplasma marginale outer membranes or a cross-linked surface complex induces protection against bacteremia, however the components responsible for protection within these complex immunogens are unknown. Using outer membrane protein AM779 as a model, we demonstrated that this highly conserved but minor component of the A. marginale surface was immunologically sub-dominant in the context of the outer membrane or surface complex vaccines. Immunologic sub-dominance could be overcome by targeted vaccination with AM779 for T lymphocyte responses but not for antibody responses, suggesting that both abundance and intrinsic immunogenicity determine relative dominance. Importantly, immunization with AM779 supports that once priming is achieved by specific targeting, recall upon infectious challenge is achieved. While immunization with AM779 alone was not sufficient to induce protection, the ability of targeted immunization to prime the immune response to highly conserved but low abundance proteins supports continued investigation into the role of sub-dominant antigens, individually and collectively, in vaccine development for A. marginale and related bacterial pathogens.

  2. Antigen spreading-induced CD8+T cells confer protection against the lethal challenge of wild-type malignant mesothelioma by eliminating myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Boon Kiat; Tang, Jiansong; Wu, Xilin; Cheung, Ka-Wai; Lok Lo, Nathan Tin; Man, Kwan; Liu, Li; Chen, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    A key focus in cancer immunotherapy is to investigate the mechanism of efficacious vaccine responses. Using HIV-1 GAG-p24 in a model PD1-based DNA vaccine, we recently reported that vaccine-elicited CD8+ T cells conferred complete prevention and therapeutic cure of AB1-GAG malignant mesothelioma in immunocompetent BALB/c mice. Here, we further investigated the efficacy and correlation of protection on the model vaccine-mediated antigen spreading against wild-type AB1 (WT-AB1) mesothelioma. We found that this vaccine was able to protect mice completely from three consecutive lethal challenges of AB1-GAG mesothelioma. Through antigen spreading these animals also developed tumor-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, but neither CD4+ T cells nor antibodies, rejecting WT-AB1 mesothelioma. A majority of these protected mice (90%) were also completely protected against the lethal WT-AB1 challenge. Adoptive cell transfer experiments further demonstrated that antigen spreading-induced CD8+ T cells conferred efficacious therapeutic effects against established WT-AB1 mesothelioma and prevented the increase of exhausted PD-1+ and Tim-3+ CD8+ T cells. A significant inverse correlation was found between the frequency of functional PD1−Tim3− CD8+ T cells and that of MDSCs or tumor mass in vivo. Mechanistically, we found that WT-AB1 mesothelioma induced predominantly polymorphonuclear (PMN) MDSCs in vivo. In co-cultures with efficacious CD8+ T cells, a significant number of PMN-MDSCs underwent apoptosis in a dose-dependent way. Our findings indicate that efficacious CD8+ T cells capable of eliminating both tumor cells and MDSCs are likely necessary for fighting wild-type malignant mesothelioma. PMID:26431275

  3. Encapsulation of antigen in poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres protects from harmful effects of γ-irradiation as assessed in mice.

    PubMed

    Mohanan, Deepa; Gander, Bruno; Kündig, Thomas M; Johansen, Pål

    2012-02-01

    During the last two decades, synthetic polymers such as poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) have been investigated for the development of nano- or microparticles as adjuvants or antigen vehicles. To enable transfer of this technology to human settings, the issue of sterilisation is of central importance. Since most polymers are heat-sensitive, sterilisation of polymeric microspheres for parenteral administration is assured either by costly and laborious aseptical preparation or the more preferred γ-irradiation. Many studies have investigated the effect of γ-irradiation on various physiochemical properties of the microspheres, but investigations on immunological effects are rare. We prepared poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres containing ovalbumin (OVA) and tested the effect of γ-irradiation on the various immunological properties in mice. For reference, OVA was γ-irradiated and tested equivalently. The ability of encapsulated or non-encapsulated OVA to trigger activation of dendritic cells (DCs) was not affected by irradiation. However, while γ-irradiation of free OVA strongly influenced the antigen presentation, encapsulated OVA was not affected by irradiation. γ-Irradiation of OVA also reduced the immunogenicity in mice with regard to OVA-specific IgG1 production. In contrast, the antibody and the T-cell responses in mice immunised with PLGA-encapsulated OVA were similar irrespective of the γ-irradiation status. Hence, encapsulation of antigen into PLGA microspheres protects antigen from the potential detrimental effect of γ-irradiation leading to inactivation or altered immunogenicity. Sterilisation by γ-irradiation therefore enables a cost-effective production of PLGA-based antigen-delivery systems as compared to the more laborious and expensive aseptical production of such vaccines. PMID:22024408

  4. Immunochemical characterization and purification of Sm-97 a Schistosoma manosin antigen monospecifically recognized by antibodies from mice protectively immunized with a nonliving vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, E.J.; James, S.L.; Dalton, J.; Barrall, A.; Ramos, C.; Strand, M.; Sher, A.

    1986-12-01

    Mice protected against Shistosoma mansoni infection by intradermal (i.d.) vaccination with nonliving schistosomula or soluble extracts of larval or adult schistosomes (SCHLARP and SWAP, respectively) produce antibodies that react by Western blot analysis with one antigen of M/sub r/ (x 10/sup -3/) 97 in SWAP prepared in the presence of protease inhibitors and two antigens of M/sub r/ (x 10/sup -3/) 95 and 78 in SWAP prepared in their absence. Vaccine antibodies also immunoprecipitated a single 97k molecule, with a pI of 5.5, from detergent extracts of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled schistosomes. Three hybridomas, produced from spleen cells of i.d. immunized mice, all recognized both the 95k/78k doublet and one 97k antigen, indicating that the two lower M/sub r/ components are degradation products of the same 97k molecule. /sup 125/I-concanavalin a bound weakly to purified Sm-97, indicating that this antigen is minimally glycosylated. Competitive radioimmunoassays performed with /sup 125/I-labeled monoclonal antibodies and purified antigen defined at least two distinct epitopes on Sm-97. Antibodies from i.d. vaccinated mice recognized both monoclonal antibody-defined epitopes, whereas anti-Sm-97 antibodies in chronic infection sera recognized neither. Finally, purified Sm-97 was shown to elicit delayed-type hypersensitivity in i.d. vaccinated mice, suggesting that this molecule is also capable of evoking cell-mediated responses, a finding consistent with its proposed function as a vaccine immunogen.

  5. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a recombinant adenoviral based vaccine expressing heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) and K99 adhesion antigen of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in mice.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guangcun; Li, Wu; Wu, Xiaoling; Bao, Shaowen; Zeng, Jin; Zhao, Ning; Luo, Meihui; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yujiong

    2015-12-01

    The diarrheal disease of domestic animals or in humans caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infections remains a major issue for public health in developing countries. Unfortunately, there is no effective vaccine available for preventing from an ETEC infection. Therefore, the development of a safe and effective vaccine against ETEC is urgently needed. In the present study, A recombinant adenoviral vector Ad5-STa-K99 that capable of expressing a fusion protein of heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) and K99 adhesion antigen of ETEC was generated and its immunogenicity was evaluated in a murine model. The intestinal mucosal secretory IgA(sIgA), serum anti-STa-K99 antibody responses, antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells frequencies, as well as T-cell proliferation of mice immunized with the viral vector were determined as immunological indexes. The results demonstrated that Ad5-STa-K99 was able to enhance humoral responses with a dramatically augmented antigen-specific serum IgG antibody, and an elevated production of intestinal sIgA in immunized mice, suggesting the elicitation of both of humoral and mucosal immune responses. In addition, this adenoviral vector could significantly promote splenic T cell proliferation and increase the frequencies of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell populations in mice, indicative of a capacity to activate T cell responses. More importantly, vaccination of the Ad5-STa-K99 showed a potential to evoke a protective effect from ETEC challenge in mice. These data indicate that the Ad5-STa-K99 is a highly immunogenic vector able to induce a broad range of antigen-specific immune responses in vivo, and evoke a protective immune response against ETEC infections, implying that it may be a novel vaccine candidate warranted for further investigation.

  6. Evaluation of protective potential of Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein antigens as possible candidates for a new-generation recombinant plague vaccine.

    PubMed

    Erova, Tatiana E; Rosenzweig, Jason A; Sha, Jian; Suarez, Giovanni; Sierra, Johanna C; Kirtley, Michelle L; van Lier, Christina J; Telepnev, Maxim V; Motin, Vladimir L; Chopra, Ashok K

    2013-02-01

    Plague caused by Yersinia pestis manifests itself in bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic forms. Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved levofloxacin, there is no approved human vaccine against plague. The capsular antigen F1 and the low-calcium-response V antigen (LcrV) of Y. pestis represent excellent vaccine candidates; however, the inability of the immune responses to F1 and LcrV to provide protection against Y. pestis F1(-) strains or those which harbor variants of LcrV is a significant concern. Here, we show that the passive transfer of hyperimmune sera from rats infected with the plague bacterium and rescued by levofloxacin protected naive animals against pneumonic plague. Furthermore, 10 to 12 protein bands from wild-type (WT) Y. pestis CO92 reacted with the aforementioned hyperimmune sera upon Western blot analysis. Based on mass spectrometric analysis, four of these proteins were identified as attachment invasion locus (Ail/OmpX), plasminogen-activating protease (Pla), outer membrane protein A (OmpA), and F1. The genes encoding these proteins were cloned, and the recombinant proteins purified from Escherichia coli for immunization purposes before challenging mice and rats with either the F1(-) mutant or WT CO92 in bubonic and pneumonic plague models. Although antibodies to Ail and OmpA protected mice against bubonic plague when challenged with the F1(-) CO92 strain, Pla antibodies were protective against pneumonic plague. In the rat model, antibodies to Ail provided protection only against pneumonic plague after WT CO92 challenge. Together, the addition of Y. pestis outer membrane proteins to a new-generation recombinant vaccine could provide protection against a wide variety of Y. pestis strains.

  7. An IgG1 titre to the F1 and V antigens correlates with protection against plague in the mouse model

    PubMed Central

    WILLIAMSON, E D; VESEY, P M; GILLHESPY, K J; ELEY, S M; GREEN, M; TITBALL, R W

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify an immunological correlate of protection for a two-component subunit vaccine for plague, using a mouse model. The components of the vaccine are the F1 and V antigens of the plague-causing organism, Yersinia pestis, which are coadsorbed to alhydrogel and administered intramuscularly. The optimum molar ratio of the subunits was determined by keeping the dose-level of either subunit constant whilst varying the other and observing the effect on specific antibody titre. A two-fold molar excess of F1 to V, achieved by immunizing with 10 μg of each antigen, resulted in optimum antibody titres. The dose of vaccine required to protect against an upper and lower subcutaneous challenge with Y. pestis was determined by administering doses in the range 10 μg F1 + 10 μg V to 0.01 μg F1 + 0.01 μg V in a two-dose regimen. For animals immunized at the 1-μg dose level or higher with F1 + V, an increase in specific IgG1 titre was observed over the 8 months post-boost and they were fully protected against a subcutaneous challenge with 105 colony-forming units (CFU) virulent Y. pestis at this time point. However, immunization with 5 μg or more of each subunit was required to achieve protection against challenge with 107 CFU Y. pestis. A new finding of this study is that the combined titre of the IgG1 subclass, developed to F1 plus V, correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with protection. The titres of IgG1 in vaccinated mice which correlated with 90%, 50% and 10% protection have been determined and provide a useful model to predict vaccine efficacy in man. PMID:10209513

  8. The effect of different adjuvants on immune parameters and protection following vaccination of sheep with a larval-specific antigen of the gastrointestinal nematode, Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Piedrafita, David; Preston, Sarah; Kemp, Joanna; de Veer, Michael; Sherrard, Jayne; Kraska, Troy; Elhay, Martin; Meeusen, Els

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been recognised that vaccine adjuvants play a critical role in directing the nature of a vaccine induced effector response. In the present study, several adjuvants were evaluated for their ability to protect sheep after field vaccination with the larval-specific Haemonchus contortus antigen, HcsL3. Using a suboptimal antigen dose, aluminium adjuvant was shown to reduce the cumulative faecal egg counts (cFEC) and worm burden by 23% and 25% respectively, in agreement with a previous study. The addition of Quil A to the aluminium-adjuvanted vaccine brought cFEC back to control levels. Vaccination with the adjuvant DEAE-dextran almost doubled the protection compared to the aluminium-adjuvanted vaccine resulting in 40% and 41% reduction in cFEC and worm counts compared to controls. Examination of skin responses following i.d. injection of exsheathed L3, revealed that cFEC was negatively correlated with wheal size and tissue eosinophils for the DEAE-dextran and aluminium-adjuvanted groups respectively. These studies have for the first time shown the potential of DEAE-dextran adjuvant for helminth vaccines, and discovered significant cellular correlates of vaccine-induced protection.

  9. The effect of different adjuvants on immune parameters and protection following vaccination of sheep with a larval-specific antigen of the gastrointestinal nematode, Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Piedrafita, David; Preston, Sarah; Kemp, Joanna; de Veer, Michael; Sherrard, Jayne; Kraska, Troy; Elhay, Martin; Meeusen, Els

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been recognised that vaccine adjuvants play a critical role in directing the nature of a vaccine induced effector response. In the present study, several adjuvants were evaluated for their ability to protect sheep after field vaccination with the larval-specific Haemonchus contortus antigen, HcsL3. Using a suboptimal antigen dose, aluminium adjuvant was shown to reduce the cumulative faecal egg counts (cFEC) and worm burden by 23% and 25% respectively, in agreement with a previous study. The addition of Quil A to the aluminium-adjuvanted vaccine brought cFEC back to control levels. Vaccination with the adjuvant DEAE-dextran almost doubled the protection compared to the aluminium-adjuvanted vaccine resulting in 40% and 41% reduction in cFEC and worm counts compared to controls. Examination of skin responses following i.d. injection of exsheathed L3, revealed that cFEC was negatively correlated with wheal size and tissue eosinophils for the DEAE-dextran and aluminium-adjuvanted groups respectively. These studies have for the first time shown the potential of DEAE-dextran adjuvant for helminth vaccines, and discovered significant cellular correlates of vaccine-induced protection. PMID:24205209

  10. The Effect of Different Adjuvants on Immune Parameters and Protection following Vaccination of Sheep with a Larval-Specific Antigen of the Gastrointestinal Nematode, Haemonchus contortus

    PubMed Central

    Piedrafita, David; Preston, Sarah; Kemp, Joanna; de Veer, Michael; Sherrard, Jayne; Kraska, Troy; Elhay, Martin; Meeusen, Els

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been recognised that vaccine adjuvants play a critical role in directing the nature of a vaccine induced effector response. In the present study, several adjuvants were evaluated for their ability to protect sheep after field vaccination with the larval-specific Haemonchus contortus antigen, HcsL3. Using a suboptimal antigen dose, aluminium adjuvant was shown to reduce the cumulative faecal egg counts (cFEC) and worm burden by 23% and 25% respectively, in agreement with a previous study. The addition of Quil A to the aluminium-adjuvanted vaccine brought cFEC back to control levels. Vaccination with the adjuvant DEAE-dextran almost doubled the protection compared to the aluminium-adjuvanted vaccine resulting in 40% and 41% reduction in cFEC and worm counts compared to controls. Examination of skin responses following i.d. injection of exsheathed L3, revealed that cFEC was negatively correlated with wheal size and tissue eosinophils for the DEAE-dextran and aluminium-adjuvanted groups respectively. These studies have for the first time shown the potential of DEAE-dextran adjuvant for helminth vaccines, and discovered significant cellular correlates of vaccine-induced protection. PMID:24205209

  11. Optimizing Immunization Strategies for the Induction of Antigen-Specific CD4 and CD8 T Cell Responses for Protection against Intracellular Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Hofmeyer, Kimberly A.; Laurance, John D.; Favila, Michelle A.; Van Hoeven, Neal; Coler, Rhea N.; Reed, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Immunization strategies that generate either CD4 or CD8 T cell responses are relatively well described, but less is known with regard to optimizing regimens to induce both CD4 and CD8 memory T cells. Considering the importance of both CD4 and CD8 T cells in the control of intracellular pathogens such as Leishmania donovani, we wanted to identify vaccines that could raise both CD4 and CD8 T cell responses and determine how to configure immunization strategies to generate the best combined protective T cell response. We examined responses generated against the Leishmania vaccine antigen F3 following its administration in either recombinant form with the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist-containing adjuvant formulation GLA-SE (F3+GLA-SE) or as a gene product delivered in an adenoviral vector (Ad5-F3). Homologous immunization strategies using only F3+GLA-SE or Ad5-F3 preferentially generated either CD4 or CD8 T cells, respectively. In contrast, heterologous strategies generated both antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Administration of F3+GLA-SE before Ad5-F3 generated the greatest combined CD4 and CD8 responses. Cytotoxic CD8 T cell responses were highest when Th1 cells were generated prior to their induction by Ad5-F3. Finally, a single immunization with a combination of F3+GLA-SE mixed with Ad5-F3 was found to be sufficient to provide protection against experimental L. donovani infection. Taken together, our data delineate immunization regimens that induce antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell memory responses, and identify a single immunization strategy that could be used to rapidly provide protection against intracellular pathogens in regions where access to health care is limited or sporadic. PMID:27466350

  12. Optimizing Immunization Strategies for the Induction of Antigen-Specific CD4 and CD8 T Cell Responses for Protection against Intracellular Parasites.

    PubMed

    Hofmeyer, Kimberly A; Duthie, Malcolm S; Laurance, John D; Favila, Michelle A; Van Hoeven, Neal; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G

    2016-09-01

    Immunization strategies that generate either CD4 or CD8 T cell responses are relatively well described, but less is known with regard to optimizing regimens to induce both CD4 and CD8 memory T cells. Considering the importance of both CD4 and CD8 T cells in the control of intracellular pathogens such as Leishmania donovani, we wanted to identify vaccines that could raise both CD4 and CD8 T cell responses and determine how to configure immunization strategies to generate the best combined protective T cell response. We examined responses generated against the Leishmania vaccine antigen F3 following its administration in either recombinant form with the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist-containing adjuvant formulation GLA-SE (F3+GLA-SE) or as a gene product delivered in an adenoviral vector (Ad5-F3). Homologous immunization strategies using only F3+GLA-SE or Ad5-F3 preferentially generated either CD4 or CD8 T cells, respectively. In contrast, heterologous strategies generated both antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Administration of F3+GLA-SE before Ad5-F3 generated the greatest combined CD4 and CD8 responses. Cytotoxic CD8 T cell responses were highest when Th1 cells were generated prior to their induction by Ad5-F3. Finally, a single immunization with a combination of F3+GLA-SE mixed with Ad5-F3 was found to be sufficient to provide protection against experimental L. donovani infection. Taken together, our data delineate immunization regimens that induce antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell memory responses, and identify a single immunization strategy that could be used to rapidly provide protection against intracellular pathogens in regions where access to health care is limited or sporadic. PMID:27466350

  13. Expression of H5 hemagglutinin vaccine antigen in common duckweed (Lemna minor) protects against H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus challenge in immunized chickens.

    PubMed

    Bertran, Kateri; Thomas, Colleen; Guo, Xuan; Bublot, Michel; Pritchard, Nikki; Regan, Jeffrey T; Cox, Kevin M; Gasdaska, John R; Dickey, Lynn F; Kapczynski, Darrell R; Swayne, David E

    2015-07-01

    A synthetic hemagglutinin (HA) gene from the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus A/chicken/Indonesia/7/2003 (H5N1) (Indo/03) was expressed in aquatic plant Lemna minor (rLemna-HA). In Experiment 1, efficacy of rLemna-HA was tested on birds immunized with 0.2μg or 2.3 μg HA and challenged with 10(6) mean chicken embryo infectious doses (EID50) of homologous virus strain. Both dosages of rLemna-HA conferred clinical protection and dramatically reduced viral shedding. Almost all the birds immunized with either dosage of rLemna-HA elicited HA antibody titers against Indo/03 antigen, suggesting an association between levels of anti-Indo/03 antibodies and protection. In Experiment 2, efficacy of rLemna-HA was tested on birds immunized with 0.9 μg or 2.2 μg HA and challenged with 10(6) EID50 of heterologous H5N1 virus strains A/chicken/Vietnam/NCVD-421/2010 (VN/10) or A/chicken/West Java/PWT-WIJ/2006 (PWT/06). Birds challenged with VN/10 exhibited 100% survival regardless of immunization dosage, while birds challenged with PWT/06 had 50% and 30% mortality at 0.9 μg HA and 2.2 μg HA, respectively. For each challenge virus, viral shedding titers from 2.2 μg HA vaccinated birds were significantly lower than those from 0.9μg HA vaccinated birds, and titers from both immunized groups were in turn significantly lower than those from sham vaccinated birds. Even if immunized birds elicited HA titers against the vaccine antigen Indo/03, only the groups challenged with VN/10 developed humoral immunity against the challenge antigen. None (rLemna-HA 0.9 μg HA) and 40% (rLemna-HA 2.2 μg HA) of the immunized birds challenged with PWT/06 elicited pre-challenge antibody titers, respectively. In conclusion, Lemna-expressed HA demonstrated complete protective immunity against homologous challenge and suboptimal protection against heterologous challenge, the latter being similar to results from inactivated whole virus vaccines. Transgenic duckweed-derived HA could be a

  14. Affinity maturation of an anti-V antigen IgG expressed in situ through adenovirus gene delivery confers enhanced protection against Yersinia pestis challenge.

    PubMed

    Van Blarcom, T J; Sofer-Podesta, C; Ang, J; Boyer, J L; Crystal, R G; Georgiou, G

    2010-07-01

    Genetic transfer of neutralizing antibodies (Abs) has been shown to confer strong and persistent protection against bacterial and viral infectious agents. Although it is well established that for many exogenous neutralizing Abs increased antigen affinity correlates with protection, the effect of antigen affinity on Abs produced in situ after adenoviral gene transfer has not been examined. The mouse IgG2b monoclonal Ab, 2C12.4, recognizes the Yersinia pestis type III secretion apparatus protein, LcrV (V antigen), and confers protection in mice when administered as an IgG intraperitoneally or after genetic immunization with engineered, replication-defective serotype 5 human adenovirus (Ad). The 2C12.4 Ab was expressed as a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) in Escherichia coli and was shown to display an equilibrium dissociation constant (K(D))=3.5 nM by surface plasmon resonance analysis. The 2C12.4 scFv was subjected to random mutagenesis, and variants with increased affinity were isolated by flow cytometry using the anchored periplasmic expression bacterial display system. After a single round of mutagenesis, variants displaying up to 35-fold lower K(D) values (H8, K(D)=100 pM) were isolated. The variable domains of the H8 scFv were used to replace those of the parental 2C12.4 IgG encoded in the Ad vector, AdalphaV, giving rise to AdalphaV.H8. The two adenoviral vectors resulted in similar titers of anti-V antigen Abs 3 days after immunization, with 10(9), 10(10) or 10(11) particle units (pu). After intranasal challenge with 363 LD(50) (lethal dose, 50%) of Y. pestis CO92, 54% of the mice immunized with 10(10) pu of AdalphaV.H8 survived through the 14 day end point compared with only 15% survivors for the group immunized with AdalphaV expressing the lower-affinity 2C12.4 (P<0.04; AdalphaV versus AdalphaV.H8). These results indicate that affinity maturation of a neutralizing Ab delivered by genetic transfer may confer increased protection not only for Y. pestis

  15. Expression of H5 hemagglutinin vaccine antigen in common duckweed (Lemna minor) protects against H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus challenge in immunized chickens.

    PubMed

    Bertran, Kateri; Thomas, Colleen; Guo, Xuan; Bublot, Michel; Pritchard, Nikki; Regan, Jeffrey T; Cox, Kevin M; Gasdaska, John R; Dickey, Lynn F; Kapczynski, Darrell R; Swayne, David E

    2015-07-01

    A synthetic hemagglutinin (HA) gene from the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus A/chicken/Indonesia/7/2003 (H5N1) (Indo/03) was expressed in aquatic plant Lemna minor (rLemna-HA). In Experiment 1, efficacy of rLemna-HA was tested on birds immunized with 0.2μg or 2.3 μg HA and challenged with 10(6) mean chicken embryo infectious doses (EID50) of homologous virus strain. Both dosages of rLemna-HA conferred clinical protection and dramatically reduced viral shedding. Almost all the birds immunized with either dosage of rLemna-HA elicited HA antibody titers against Indo/03 antigen, suggesting an association between levels of anti-Indo/03 antibodies and protection. In Experiment 2, efficacy of rLemna-HA was tested on birds immunized with 0.9 μg or 2.2 μg HA and challenged with 10(6) EID50 of heterologous H5N1 virus strains A/chicken/Vietnam/NCVD-421/2010 (VN/10) or A/chicken/West Java/PWT-WIJ/2006 (PWT/06). Birds challenged with VN/10 exhibited 100% survival regardless of immunization dosage, while birds challenged with PWT/06 had 50% and 30% mortality at 0.9 μg HA and 2.2 μg HA, respectively. For each challenge virus, viral shedding titers from 2.2 μg HA vaccinated birds were significantly lower than those from 0.9μg HA vaccinated birds, and titers from both immunized groups were in turn significantly lower than those from sham vaccinated birds. Even if immunized birds elicited HA titers against the vaccine antigen Indo/03, only the groups challenged with VN/10 developed humoral immunity against the challenge antigen. None (rLemna-HA 0.9 μg HA) and 40% (rLemna-HA 2.2 μg HA) of the immunized birds challenged with PWT/06 elicited pre-challenge antibody titers, respectively. In conclusion, Lemna-expressed HA demonstrated complete protective immunity against homologous challenge and suboptimal protection against heterologous challenge, the latter being similar to results from inactivated whole virus vaccines. Transgenic duckweed-derived HA could be a

  16. A single intradermal administration of soluble leishmanial antigen and plasmid expressing interleukin-12 protects BALB/c mice from Leishmania major infection.

    PubMed

    Yamakami, K; Akao, S; Sato, M; Nitta, Y; Miyazaki, J; Tadakuma, T

    2001-07-01

    In murine leishmaniasis, the induction of the T-helper type 1 (Th1) response contributes to infection resistance, whereas the establishment of the Th2 response makes the mice susceptible to infection. Interleukin-12 (IL-12) plays a pivotal role in the diversification of immune responses to the Th1 type. In this study, we tested whether the co-administration of IL-12 expression plasmid which compose p35 and p40 subunits and soluble leishmanial antigen (SLA) will skew the susceptible BALB/c mice to Th1 response and protect from leishmaniasis. When the mice were intradermally injected with the combination of IL-12 plasmid and SLA 7 days prior to the challenge with 1x10(6) promastigotes of Leishmania major, the local lesions completely healed and the parasite burden in the local lymph nodes significantly decreased. The cured mice attained long-term immunity, and were resistant to any subsequent rechallenge of the lethal dose of the parasite. The protective effect was associated with the development of a Th1 response, as demonstrated by the enhanced level of antigen-specific interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and dominant production of IgG2a in the serum. In contrast, the administration of empty plasmid plus SLA or IL-12 plasmid alone failed to protect the disease and shape the Th1 response. Furthermore, the protective efficiency induced by the vaccination was clearly prevented by the injection of either neutralizing anti-IL-12 mAb or anti-IFN-gamma mAb. The IL-12 expression plasmid is thus an effective adjuvant for the elicitation of a protective Th1 response against leishmaniasis and is therefore, considered to be appropriate for vaccinations that require the induction of Th1 type immunity.

  17. Oral immunogenicity and protective efficacy in mice of transgenic rice plants producing a vaccine candidate antigen (As16) of Ascaris suum fused with cholera toxin B subunit.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yasunobu; Suzuki, Seiko; Nozoye, Tomoko; Yamakawa, Takashi; Takashima, Yasuhiro; Arakawa, Takeshi; Tsuji, Naotoshi; Takaiwa, Fumio; Hayashi, Yoshihiro

    2009-04-01

    Cereal crops such as maize and rice are considered attractive for vaccine production and oral delivery. Here, we evaluated the rice Oryza sativa for production of As16-an antigen protective against the roundworm Ascaris suum. The antigen was produced as a chimeric protein fused with cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), and its expression level in the endosperm reached 50 microg/g seed. Feeding the transgenic (Tg) rice seeds to mice elicited an As16-specific serum antibody response when administered in combination with cholera toxin (CT) as the mucosal adjuvant. Although omitting the adjuvant from the vaccine formulation resulted in failure to develop the specific immune response, subcutaneous booster immunization with bacterially expressed As16 induced the antibody response, indicating priming capability of the Tg rice. Tg rice/CT-fed mice orally administered A. suum eggs had a lower lung worm burden than control mice. This suggests that the rice-delivered antigen functions as a prophylactic edible vaccine for controlling parasitic infection in animals.

  18. DNA-Launched Alphavirus Replicons Encoding a Fusion of Mycobacterial Antigens Acr and Ag85B Are Immunogenic and Protective in a Murine Model of TB Infection.

    PubMed

    Dalmia, Neha; Klimstra, William B; Mason, Carol; Ramsay, Alistair J

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need for effective prophylactic measures against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, particularly given the highly variable efficacy of Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB). Most studies indicate that cell-mediated immune responses involving both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are necessary for effective immunity against Mtb. Genetic vaccination induces humoral and cellular immune responses, including CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses, against a variety of bacterial, viral, parasitic and tumor antigens, and this strategy may therefore hold promise for the development of more effective TB vaccines. Novel formulations and delivery strategies to improve the immunogenicity of DNA-based vaccines have recently been evaluated, and have shown varying degrees of success. In the present study, we evaluated DNA-launched Venezuelan equine encephalitis replicons (Vrep) encoding a novel fusion of the mycobacterial antigens α-crystallin (Acr) and antigen 85B (Ag85B), termed Vrep-Acr/Ag85B, for their immunogenicity and protective efficacy in a murine model of pulmonary TB. Vrep-Acr/Ag85B generated antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses that persisted for at least 10 wk post-immunization. Interestingly, parenterally administered Vrep-Acr/Ag85B also induced T cell responses in the lung tissues, the primary site of infection, and inhibited bacterial growth in both the lungs and spleens following aerosol challenge with Mtb. DNA-launched Vrep may, therefore, represent an effective approach to the development of gene-based vaccines against TB, particularly as components of heterologous prime-boost strategies or as BCG boosters. PMID:26317509

  19. Equipotent generation of protective antitumor immunity by various methods of dendritic cell loading with whole cell tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Lambert, L A; Gibson, G R; Maloney, M; Barth, R J

    2001-01-01

    Multiple clinically applicable methods have been used to induce dendritic cells (DCs) to express whole cell tumor antigens, including pulsing DCs with tumor lysate, and mixing DCs with apoptotic or live tumor cells. Herein we demonstrate, using two different tumor systems, that these methods are equipotent inducers of systemic antitumor immunity. Furthermore, tumor lysate pulsed DC vaccines generate more potent antitumor immunity than immunization with irradiated tumor cells plus the classic adjuvant, Corynebacterium parvum. PMID:11394500

  20. A Novel Method of Safely Measuring Influenza Virus Aerosol Using Antigen-Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for the Performance Evaluation of Protective Clothing Materials.

    PubMed

    Shimasaki, Noriko; Nojima, Yasuhiro; Okaue, Akira; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Kageyama, Tsutomu; Hamamoto, Itsuki; Shinohara, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Currently, threats caused by pathogens are serious public health problems worldwide. Protective clothing is essential when one is treating infected patients or dealing with unknown pathogens. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the performance of protective clothing against pathogens. In Japan, some methods for evaluating the performance of protective clothing have been established in the Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS). However, a test method against virus aerosols has not been established. Because there is a risk of infection from a live virus during the test, it is necessary to devise a safe method for the virus-aerosol-based test. Here, we propose a new method of safely measuring virus aerosols for the performance evaluation of protective clothing materials. To ensure safety, an inactivated virus was used. As a model virus, the influenza virus was selected owing to the proper small diameter of the virus particles. To quantitatively measure the particle-amount of the inactivated influenza virus, we developed an antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) targeting the M1 protein. Furthermore, we evaluated two materials using our method. Significant differences in the protection performance against the virus aerosol were observed between different sample materials, thereby confirming the applicability of our new method for performance evaluation.

  1. Use of flagellin and cholera toxin as adjuvants in intranasal vaccination of mice to enhance protective immune responses against uropathogenic Escherichia coli antigens.

    PubMed

    Asadi Karam, Mohammad Reza; Habibi, Mehri; Bouzari, Saeid

    2016-09-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are among the most common infections in human. Antibiotics are common therapy for UTIs, but increase in antibiotic resistance will complicate future treatment of the infections, making the development of an efficacious UTI vaccine more urgent. In this study, we have evaluated intranasally the efficacy of FliC and FimH antigens of UPEC in different vaccine formulations with and without cholera toxin (CT) adjuvant. Immunization of mice with FliC in fusion form or admixed with FimH elicited higher levels of serum, mucosal and cell-mediated responses than FimH alone. Furthermore, the use of CT in synergism with FliC resulted in the stimulation of a mixed Th1 and Th2 responses against FimH and FliC as antigen and maintained the antibody responses for at least 24 weeks following the last vaccine dose. Of the vaccine preparations, Fusion, Fusion + CT, and FimH admixed with FliC and CT showed the best protection against UPEC. These data indicated that intranasal administration of a FliC and CT adjuvant-based vaccine has the potential to provide protective responses against UPEC strains.

  2. Hepatitis B virus core antigen as a carrier for Chlamydia trachomatis MOMP multi-epitope peptide enhances protection against genital chlamydial infection

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yirong; Lv, Yan; Feng, Juan; Zhu, Shanli; Xue, Xiangyang; Chen, Shao; Zhang, Lifang

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) is the leading cause of sexually transmitted diseases worldwide. There is no safe and effective vaccine to control the spread of Ct. In development of Ct vaccine, selection of appropriate candidate antigens and an effective delivery system may be the main challenges. Multi-epitope of major outer membrane protein (MOMPm) is the most suitable candidate for a Ct vaccine, while hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBcAg) has unique advantages as vaccine delivery system. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity and protective immune response of a novel candidate vaccine in a murine model of chlamydial genital infection. This candidate vaccine comprises MOMPm peptide delivered with HBcAg. Our results of Ct-specific serum IgG and secretory IgA assay, cytokine assay, and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte assay revealed that immunogenicity of the candidate vaccine was much better than that of the corresponding synthetic MOMPm peptide. Furthermore, the protective effect of the candidate vaccine was also shown much better than that of the synthetic peptide by calculating the isolation of Chlamydia from vaginal swabs and histopathological analysis. Taken together, our results indicate that HBcAg carrying Ct MOMPm could be an effective immune prophylactic for chlamydial infection. PMID:26657117

  3. Induction of protection against leishmaniasis in susceptible BALB/c mice using simple DOTAP cationic nanoliposomes containing soluble Leishmania antigen (SLA).

    PubMed

    Firouzmand, Hengameh; Badiee, Ali; Khamesipour, Ali; Heravi Shargh, Vahid; Alavizadeh, Seyedeh Hoda; Abbasi, Azam; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2013-12-01

    A suitable adjuvant and delivery system are needed to develop an effective vaccine against leishmaniasis. To induce a Th1 type of response and protection in BALB/c mice against Leishmania major infection, 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) nanoliposomes bearing an intrinsic adjuvanticity, were used as an antigen delivery system and immunoadjuvant for soluble Leishmania antigens (SLA). DOTAP liposomes containing different concentrations of SLA were prepared by using lipid film method followed by sonication. The prepared vesicles showed a diameter of about 100nm, a positive zeta potential and approximately 70% encapsulation efficiency of SLA. BALB/c mice were immunized subcutaneously (SC), three times in a 3-week interval with different concentrations of liposomal SLA (12.5, 25, and 50μg of SLA/50μl/mice), free SLA and as well as free liposome. The group of mice received 50μg of SLA in DOTAP-nanoliposomes showed a significantly (p<0.001) smaller footpad swelling and the lowest spleen and footpad parasite burden after the challenge. This group also showed the highest IFN-γ production compared to the other groups, lower IL-4 level and higher IgG2a antibody titer. Taken together, the results indicated that simple DOTAP nanoliposome containing 1μg/μl SLA are appropriate delivery systems to induce a Th1 type of immune response and protection against L. major infection in BALB/c mice.

  4. Vaccination of sheep against haemonchosis with H11, a gut membrane-derived protective antigen from the adult parasite: prevention of the periparturient rise and colostral transfer of protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Andrews, S J; Hole, N J; Munn, E A; Rolph, T P

    1995-07-01

    Pregnant ewes were immunised with a fraction highly enriched in the membrane glycoprotein antigen H11, isolated from the intestinal brush border of adult Haemonchus contortus. Immunity induced by immunisation was able to abolish almost completely (98-99%) the worm egg output from pregnant ewes challenged with ca. 10,000 infective larvae of H. contortus during the last trimester. Furthermore, lambs born and reared on vaccinated ewes had substantial antibody levels to H11 derived from maternal transfer. This antibody conferred moderate protection against a bolus challenge of ca. 3000 infective larvae of H. contortus in 5-week-old lambs.

  5. Immunostimulatory complexes containing Eimeria tenella antigens and low toxicity plant saponins induce antibody response and provide protection from challenge in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs) are unique multimolecular structures formed by encapsulating antigens, lipids and triterpene saponins and are one of the most successful antigen delivery systems for microbial antigens. In the current study, both the route of administration and the antigen conce...

  6. Natural antibody response to Plasmodium falciparum merozoite antigens MSP5, MSP9 and EBA175 is associated to clinical protection in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Antibodies have an essential role in the acquired immune response against blood stage P. falciparum infection. Although several antigens have been identified as important antibody targets, it is still elusive which antigens have to be recognized for clinical protection. Herein, we analyzed antibodies from plasmas from symptomatic or asymptomatic individuals living in the same geographic area in the Western Amazon, measuring their recognition of multiple merozoite antigens. Methods Specific fragments of genes encoding merozoite proteins AMA1 and members of MSP and EBL families from circulating P. falciparum field isolates present in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients were amplified by PCR. After cloning and expression of different versions of the antigens as recombinant GST-fusion peptides, we tested the reactivity of patients’ plasmas by ELISA and the presence of IgG subclasses in the most reactive plasmas. Results 11 out of 24 recombinant antigens were recognized by plasmas from either symptomatic or asymptomatic infections. Antibodies to MSP9 (X2DF=1 = 9.26/p = 0.0047) and MSP5 (X2DF=1 = 8.29/p = 0.0069) were more prevalent in asymptomatic individuals whereas the opposite was observed for MSP1 block 2-MAD20 (X2DF=1 = 6.41/p = 0.0206, Fisher’s exact test). Plasmas from asymptomatic individuals reacted more intensely against MSP4 (U = 210.5, p < 0.03), MSP5 (U = 212, p < 0.004), MSP9 (U = 189.5, p < 0.002) and EBA175 (U = 197, p < 0.014, Mann-Whitney’s U test). IgG1 and IgG3 were predominant for all antigens, but some patients also presented with IgG2 and IgG4. The recognition of MSP5 (OR = 0.112, IC95% = 0.021-0.585) and MSP9 (OR = 0.125, IC95% = 0.030-0.529, cross tab analysis) predicted 8.9 and 8 times less chances, respectively, to present symptoms. Higher antibody levels against MSP5 and EBA175 were associated by odds ratios of 9.4 (IC95% = 1.29-69.25) and 5.7 (IC95

  7. Thin film transistors on plastic substrates with reflective coatings for radiation protection

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, Jesse D.; Theiss, Steven D.; Carey, Paul G.; Smith, Patrick M.; Wickboldt, Paul

    2003-11-04

    Fabrication of silicon thin film transistors (TFT) on low-temperature plastic substrates using a reflective coating so that inexpensive plastic substrates may be used in place of standard glass, quartz, and silicon wafer-based substrates. The TFT can be used in large area low cost electronics, such as flat panel displays and portable electronics such as video cameras, personal digital assistants, and cell phones.

  8. Thin film transistors on plastic substrates with reflective coatings for radiation protection

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, Jesse D.; Theiss, Steven D.; Carey, Paul G.; Smith, Patrick M.; Wickbold, Paul

    2006-09-26

    Fabrication of silicon thin film transistors (TFT) on low-temperature plastic substrates using a reflective coating so that inexpensive plastic substrates may be used in place of standard glass, quartz, and silicon wafer-based substrates. The TFT can be used in large area low cost electronics, such as flat panel displays and portable electronics such as video cameras, personal digital assistants, and cell phones.

  9. Discordance at human leukocyte antigen-DRB3 and protection from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmission.

    PubMed

    Hader, Shannon L; Hodge, Thomas W; Buchacz, Kate A; Bray, Robert A; Padian, Nancy S; Rausa, Alfio; Slaviniski, Sally A; Holmberg, Scott D

    2002-06-15

    Host human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) integrated into the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 envelope could theoretically determine, as in tissue transplants, whether HIV-1 is "rejected" by exposed susceptible persons, preventing transmission. HLA discordance (mismatch) was examined among 45 heterosexual partner pairs in which at least 1 partner was HIV-1 infected and exposure or transmission between partners had occurred. Immunologic discordance at class II HLA-DRB3 (present in the HIV donor partner but absent in the recipient partner) was associated with lack of transmission of HIV-1. Eight (35%) of 23 partner pairs in which HIV-1 transmission did not occur were immunologically discordant at HLA-DRB3, compared with 0 of 11 partner pairs in which HIV-1 transmission did occur (P=.027). Further investigation of the roles of class II HLAs in HIV-1 transmission and as possible components of HIV-1 vaccines should be pursued. PMID:12085318

  10. Immune pressure selects for Plasmodium falciparum parasites presenting distinct red blood cell surface antigens and inducing strain-specific protection in Saimiri sciureus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The passive transfer of specific antibodies to a naive splenectomized Saimiri sciureus monkey infected with the Palo Alto FUP/SP strain of Plasmodium falciparum resulted in the emergence of parasites resistant to the transferred antibodies. Molecular typing indicated that the original and resistant parasites were isogenic. Saimiri monkeys primed with original parasites were fully susceptible to a challenge by the resistant ones, and vice versa. This absence of crossprotection indicates that strain-specific determinants would be the major targets of protective immunity developed in these monkeys. Phenotypic analysis showed that the surface of the infected red blood cells differed in both lines. Original parasites formed rosettes, autoagglutinated, presented characteristic knobs at the surface of the infected red blood cell, and did not agglutinate in the presence of a pool of human immune sera. In contrast, the resistant parasites did not form rosettes, did not spontaneously autoagglutinate, presented abnormal flattened knobs, and formed large aggregates in the presence of a pool of human immune sera. The presence of strain-specific determinants at the surface of the resistant parasites was confirmed by surface immunofluorescence and agglutination using homologous Saimiri serum. Neither the original nor the resistant parasites cytoadhered to an amelanotic melanoma cell line, suggesting that cytoadherence and agglutination can be dissociated. These results indicate that parasites that differ by the antigens exposed at the surface of the red blood cell induce strain- specific immunity. Furthermore they show that rosetting and nonrosetting parasites differ in their antigenic properties and do not crossprotect. PMID:7807008

  11. Vaccinia virus MUC1 immunization of mice: immune response and protection against the growth of murine tumors bearing the MUC1 antigen.

    PubMed

    Acres, R B; Hareuveni, M; Balloul, J M; Kieny, M P

    1993-08-01

    MUC1 is a mucin found on the apical surfaces of some normal mammalian mucin-secreting cells. It is characterized by heavy glycosylation and a 20-amino-acid tandem repeat segment. In most cases of human breast adenocarcinoma, this antigen is overexpressed. Moreover, abnormal glycosylation exposes a novel peptide epitope within the tandem repeat, such that antibodies to this epitope can distinguish normal from malignant adenocarcinomatous breast tissue. We have constructed a vaccinia virus (VV) that carries the cDNA for the MUC1 antigen. Murine and human cells infected with this virus express the MUC1 molecule, with three to four tandem repeats per molecule and with the tumor-associated epitopes exposed. Mice immunized with this virus produce antibodies that recognize MUC1 outside the tandem repeat, within the tandem repeat, and within the tumor-associated protein core epitope. Tumorigenic P815 (DBA) and 3T3 (BALB/c) cells have been transfected with MUC1. Thirty percent of DBA mice immunized with VV-MUC1 are protected from growth of P815-MUC1 tumors when implanted with 10(5) cells. Immunized BALB/c mice show a late development of transfected 3T3 tumor cells. Immunized mice show a moderate MUC1-specific IgG titer, but it cannot be correlated with subsequent tumor rejection. No evidence for a MUC1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response has been found after immunization with VV-MUC1. PMID:8280702

  12. Novel 6xHis tagged foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine bound to nanolipoprotein adjuvant via metal ions provides antigenic distinction and effective protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Rai, Devendra K; Segundo, Fayna Diaz-San; Schafer, Elizabeth; Burrage, Thomas G; Rodriguez, Luis L; de Los Santos, Teresa; Hoeprich, Paul D; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Here, we engineered two FMD viruses with histidine residues inserted into or fused to the FMDV capsid. Both 6xHis viruses exhibited growth kinetics, plaque morphologies and antigenic characteristics similar to wild-type virus. The 6xHis tag allowed one-step purification of the mutant virions by Co(2+) affinity columns. Electron microscopy and biochemical assays showed that the 6xHis FMDVs readily assembled into antigen: adjuvant complexes in solution, by conjugating with Ni(2+)-chelated nanolipoprotein and monophosphoryl lipid A adjuvant (MPLA:NiNLP). Animals Immunized with the inactivated 6xHis-FMDV:MPLA:NiNLP vaccine acquired enhanced protective immunity against FMDV challenge compared to virions alone. Induction of anti-6xHis and anti-FMDV neutralizing antibodies in the immunized animals could be exploited in the differentiation of vaccinated from infected animals needed for the improvement of FMD control measures. The novel marker vaccine/nanolipid technology described here has broad applications for the development of distinctive and effective immune responses to other pathogens of importance. PMID:27209448

  13. Protection Induced by Simultaneous Subcutaneous and Endobronchial Vaccination with BCG/BCG and BCG/Adenovirus Expressing Antigen 85A against Mycobacterium bovis in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Gillian S.; Clifford, Derek; Whelan, Adam O.; Tchilian, Elma Z.; Beverley, Peter C. L.; Salguero, Francisco J.; Xing, Zhou; Vordermeier, Hans M.; Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in the GB has been increasing since the 1980s. Immunisation, alongside current control measures, has been proposed as a sustainable measure to control bTB. Immunisation with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been shown to protect against bTB. Furthermore, much experimental data indicates that pulmonary local immunity is important for protection against respiratory infections including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and that pulmonary immunisation is highly effective. Here, we evaluated protection against M. bovis, the main causative agent of bTB, conferred by BCG delivered subcutaneously, endobronchially or by the new strategy of simultaneous immunisation by both routes. We also tested simultaneous subcutaneous immunisation with BCG and endobronchial delivery of a recombinant type 5 adenovirus expressing mycobacterial antigen 85A. There was significantly reduced visible pathology in animals receiving the simultaneous BCG/BCG or BCG/Ad85 treatment compared to naïve controls. Furthermore, there were significantly fewer advanced microscopic granulomata in animals receiving BCG/Ad85A compared to naive controls. Thus, combining local and systemic immunisation limits the development of pathology, which in turn could decrease bTB transmission. PMID:26544594

  14. A Multi-Antigenic Adenoviral-Vectored Vaccine Improves BCG-Induced Protection of Goats against Pulmonary Tuberculosis Infection and Prevents Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Pérez de Val, Bernat; Vidal, Enric; Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Andaluz, Anna; Moll, Xavier; Martín, Maite; Nofrarías, Miquel; McShane, Helen; Vordermeier, H. Martin; Domingo, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    The “One world, one health” initiative emphasizes the need for new strategies to control human and animal tuberculosis (TB) based on their shared interface. A good example would be the development of novel universal vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) infection. This study uses the goat model, a natural TB host, to assess the protective effectiveness of a new vaccine candidate in combination with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. Thirty-three goat kids were divided in three groups: Group 1) vaccinated with BCG (week 0), Group 2) vaccinated with BCG and boosted 8 weeks later with a recombinant adenovirus expressing the MTBC antigens Ag85A, TB10.4, TB9.8 and Acr2 (AdTBF), and Group 3) unvaccinated controls. Later on, an endobronchial challenge with a low dose of M. caprae was performed (week 15). After necropsy (week 28), the pulmonary gross pathology was quantified using high resolution Computed Tomography. Small granulomatous pulmonary lesions (< 0.5 cm diameter) were also evaluated through a comprehensive qualitative histopathological analysis. M. caprae CFU were counted from pulmonary lymph nodes. The AdTBF improved the effects of BCG reducing gross lesion volume and bacterial load, as well as increasing weight gain. The number of Ag85A-specific gamma interferon-producing memory T-cells was identified as a predictor of vaccine efficacy. Specific cellular and humoral responses were measured throughout the 13-week post-challenge period, and correlated with the severity of lesions. Unvaccinated goats exhibited the typical pathological features of active TB in humans and domestic ruminants, while vaccinated goats showed only very small lesions. The data presented in this study indicate that multi-antigenic adenoviral vectored vaccines boosts protection conferred by vaccination with BCG. PMID:24278420

  15. Antigenic sites on the HN domain of botulinum neurotoxin A stimulate protective antibody responses against active toxin

    PubMed Central

    Vijayalakshmi Ayyar, B.; Tajhya, Rajeev B.; Beeton, Christine; Zouhair Atassi, M.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic substances known. BoNT intoxicates cells in a highly programmed fashion initiated by binding to the cell surface, internalization and enzymatic cleavage of substrate, thus, inhibiting synaptic exocytosis. Over the past two decades, immunological significance of BoNT/A C-terminal heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) domains were investigated extensively leading to important findings. In the current work, we explored the significance of BoNT/A heavy chain N-terminal (HN) region as a vaccine candidate. Mice were immunized with recombinant HN519–845 generating antibodies (Abs) that were found to be protective against lethal dose of BoNT/A. Immuno-dominant regions of HN519–845 were identified and individually investigated for antibody response along with synthetic peptides within those regions, using in vivo protection assays against BoNT/A. Results were confirmed by patch-clamp analysis where anti-HN antibodies were studied for the ability to block toxin-induced channel formation. This data strongly indicated that HN519–593 is an important region in generating protective antibodies and should be valuable in a vaccine design. These results are the first to describe and dissect the protective activity of the BoNT/A HN domain. PMID:26508475

  16. A method to identify protein antigens of Dermanyssus gallinae for the protection of birds from poultry mites.

    PubMed

    Makert, Gustavo R; Vorbrüggen, Susanne; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Voss, Matthias; Sohn, Kai; Buschmann, Tilo; Ulbert, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    The poultry red mite (PRM) Dermanyssus gallinae causes high economic losses and is among the most important parasites in poultry farming worldwide. Different chemical, physical, and biological strategies try to control the expansion of PRM. However, effective solutions to this problem still have to be found. Here, we present a method for the development of an immunological control strategy, based on the identification of mite protein antigens which elicit antibodies with anti-mite activity in the immunized chicken. Hens were immunized with different PRM protein extracts formulated with two different adjuvants, and IgY-antibodies were isolated from the eggs. A PRM in vitro feeding assay which used chicken blood spiked with these IgY-preparations was used to detect antibodies which caused PRM mortality. In vitro feeding of mites with IgY isolated from hens immunized with PRM extract formulated with one of the adjuvants showed a statistically significant increase in the mortality as compared to control mites. After the separation of total PRM extracts in two-dimensional gels, several protein spots were recognized by such IgY preparations. Ten protein spots were subjected to mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for the identification of the corresponding proteins. Complete protein sequences were deduced from genomic and transcriptomic assemblies derived from high throughput sequencing of total PRM DNA and RNA. The results may contribute to the development of an immunological control strategy of D. gallinae. PMID:27026505

  17. A method to identify protein antigens of Dermanyssus gallinae for the protection of birds from poultry mites.

    PubMed

    Makert, Gustavo R; Vorbrüggen, Susanne; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Voss, Matthias; Sohn, Kai; Buschmann, Tilo; Ulbert, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    The poultry red mite (PRM) Dermanyssus gallinae causes high economic losses and is among the most important parasites in poultry farming worldwide. Different chemical, physical, and biological strategies try to control the expansion of PRM. However, effective solutions to this problem still have to be found. Here, we present a method for the development of an immunological control strategy, based on the identification of mite protein antigens which elicit antibodies with anti-mite activity in the immunized chicken. Hens were immunized with different PRM protein extracts formulated with two different adjuvants, and IgY-antibodies were isolated from the eggs. A PRM in vitro feeding assay which used chicken blood spiked with these IgY-preparations was used to detect antibodies which caused PRM mortality. In vitro feeding of mites with IgY isolated from hens immunized with PRM extract formulated with one of the adjuvants showed a statistically significant increase in the mortality as compared to control mites. After the separation of total PRM extracts in two-dimensional gels, several protein spots were recognized by such IgY preparations. Ten protein spots were subjected to mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for the identification of the corresponding proteins. Complete protein sequences were deduced from genomic and transcriptomic assemblies derived from high throughput sequencing of total PRM DNA and RNA. The results may contribute to the development of an immunological control strategy of D. gallinae.

  18. Utility of a Novel Reflective Marker Visualized by Flash Photography for Assessment of Personnel Contamination During Removal of Personal Protective Equipment.

    PubMed

    Tomas, Myreen E; Cadnum, Jennifer L; Mana, Thriveen S C; Jencson, Annette L; Koganti, Sreelatha; Alhmidi, Heba; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Sunkesula, Venkata C K; Donskey, Curtis J

    2016-06-01

    In an experimental study, the frequency of contamination of healthcare personnel during removal of contaminated personal protective equipment (PPE) was similar for bacteriophage MS2 and a novel reflective marker visualized using flash photography. The reflective marker could be a useful tool to visualize and document personnel contamination during PPE removal. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:711-713. PMID:26976219

  19. Human monoclonal antibody AVP-21D9 to protective antigen reduces dissemination of the Bacillus anthracis Ames strain from the lungs in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Johnny W; Comer, Jason E; Baze, Wallace B; Noffsinger, David M; Wenglikowski, Autumn; Walberg, Kristin G; Hardcastle, Jason; Pawlik, Jennifer; Bush, Kathryn; Taormina, Joanna; Moen, Scott; Thomas, John; Chatuev, Bagram M; Sower, Laurie; Chopra, Ashok K; Stanberry, Lawrence R; Sawada, Ritsuko; Scholz, Wolfgang W; Sircar, Jagadish

    2007-07-01

    Dutch-belted and New Zealand White rabbits were passively immunized with AVP-21D9, a human monoclonal antibody to protective antigen (PA), at the time of Bacillus anthracis spore challenge using either nasal instillation or aerosol challenge techniques. AVP-21D9 (10 mg/kg) completely protected both rabbit strains against lethal infection with Bacillus anthracis Ames spores, regardless of the inoculation method. Further, all but one of the passively immunized animals (23/24) were completely resistant to rechallenge with spores by either respiratory challenge method at 5 weeks after primary challenge. Analysis of the sera at 5 weeks after primary challenge showed that residual human anti-PA levels decreased by 85 to 95%, but low titers of rabbit-specific anti-PA titers were also measured. Both sources of anti-PA could have contributed to protection from rechallenge. In a subsequent study, bacteriological and histopathology analyses revealed that B. anthracis disseminated to the bloodstream in some naïve animals as early as 24 h postchallenge and increased in frequency with time. AVP-21D9 significantly reduced the dissemination of the bacteria to the bloodstream and to various organs following infection. Examination of tissue sections from infected control animals, stained with hematoxylin-eosin and the Gram stain, showed edema and/or hemorrhage in the lungs and the presence of bacteria in mediastinal lymph nodes, with necrosis and inflammation. Tissue sections from infected rabbits dosed with AVP-21D9 appeared comparable to corresponding tissues from uninfected animals despite lethal challenge with B. anthracis Ames spores. Concomitant treatment with AVP-21D9 at the time of challenge conferred complete protection in the rabbit inhalation anthrax model. Early treatment increased the efficacy progressively and in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, AVP-21D9 could offer an adjunct or alternative clinical treatment regimen against inhalation anthrax. PMID:17452469

  20. Human Monoclonal Antibody AVP-21D9 to Protective Antigen Reduces Dissemination of the Bacillus anthracis Ames Strain from the Lungs in a Rabbit Model▿

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Johnny W.; Comer, Jason E.; Baze, Wallace B.; Noffsinger, David M.; Wenglikowski, Autumn; Walberg, Kristin G.; Hardcastle, Jason; Pawlik, Jennifer; Bush, Kathryn; Taormina, Joanna; Moen, Scott; Thomas, John; Chatuev, Bagram M.; Sower, Laurie; Chopra, Ashok K.; Stanberry, Lawrence R.; Sawada, Ritsuko; Scholz, Wolfgang W.; Sircar, Jagadish

    2007-01-01

    Dutch-belted and New Zealand White rabbits were passively immunized with AVP-21D9, a human monoclonal antibody to protective antigen (PA), at the time of Bacillus anthracis spore challenge using either nasal instillation or aerosol challenge techniques. AVP-21D9 (10 mg/kg) completely protected both rabbit strains against lethal infection with Bacillus anthracis Ames spores, regardless of the inoculation method. Further, all but one of the passively immunized animals (23/24) were completely resistant to rechallenge with spores by either respiratory challenge method at 5 weeks after primary challenge. Analysis of the sera at 5 weeks after primary challenge showed that residual human anti-PA levels decreased by 85 to 95%, but low titers of rabbit-specific anti-PA titers were also measured. Both sources of anti-PA could have contributed to protection from rechallenge. In a subsequent study, bacteriological and histopathology analyses revealed that B. anthracis disseminated to the bloodstream in some naïve animals as early as 24 h postchallenge and increased in frequency with time. AVP-21D9 significantly reduced the dissemination of the bacteria to the bloodstream and to various organs following infection. Examination of tissue sections from infected control animals, stained with hematoxylin-eosin and the Gram stain, showed edema and/or hemorrhage in the lungs and the presence of bacteria in mediastinal lymph nodes, with necrosis and inflammation. Tissue sections from infected rabbits dosed with AVP-21D9 appeared comparable to corresponding tissues from uninfected animals despite lethal challenge with B. anthracis Ames spores. Concomitant treatment with AVP-21D9 at the time of challenge conferred complete protection in the rabbit inhalation anthrax model. Early treatment increased the efficacy progressively and in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, AVP-21D9 could offer an adjunct or alternative clinical treatment regimen against inhalation anthrax. PMID:17452469

  1. Cooperation between CD4+ T Cells and Humoral Immunity Is Critical for Protection against Dengue Using a DNA Vaccine Based on the NS1 Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Antônio J. S.; Oliveira, Edson R. A.; Costa, Simone M.; Paes, Marciano V.; Silva, Juliana F. A.; Azevedo, Adriana S.; Mantuano-Barradas, Marcio; Nogueira, Ana Cristina M. A.; Almeida, Cecília J.; Alves, Ada M. B.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is spread through most tropical and subtropical areas of the world and represents a serious public health problem. At present, the control of dengue disease is mainly hampered by the absence of antivirals or a vaccine, which results in an estimated half worldwide population at risk of infection. The immune response against DENV is not yet fully understood and a better knowledge of it is now recognized as one of the main challenge for vaccine development. In previous studies, we reported that a DNA vaccine containing the signal peptide sequence from the human tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) fused to the DENV2 NS1 gene (pcTPANS1) induced protection against dengue in mice. In the present work, we aimed to elucidate the contribution of cellular and humoral responses elicited by this vaccine candidate for protective immunity. We observed that pcTPANS1 exerts a robust protection against dengue, inducing considerable levels of anti-NS1 antibodies and T cell responses. Passive immunization with anti-NS1 antibodies conferred partial protection in mice infected with low virus load (4 LD50), which was abrogated with the increase of viral dose (40 LD50). The pcTPANS1 also induced activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We detected production of IFN-γ and a cytotoxic activity by CD8+ T lymphocytes induced by this vaccine, although its contribution in the protection was not so evident when compared to CD4+ cells. Depletion of CD4+ cells in immunized mice completely abolished protection. Furthermore, transfer experiments revealed that animals receiving CD4+ T cells combined with anti-NS1 antiserum, both obtained from vaccinated mice, survived virus infection with survival rates not significantly different from pcTPANS1-immunized animals. Taken together, results showed that the protective immune response induced by the expression of NS1 antigen mediated by the pcTPANS1 requires a cooperation between CD4+ T cells and the humoral immunity. PMID:26650916

  2. Protective Human Leucocyte Antigen Haplotype, HLA-DRB1*01-B*14, against Chronic Chagas Disease in Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    del Puerto, Florencia; Nishizawa, Juan Eiki; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Roca, Yelin; Avilas, Cinthia; Gianella, Alberto; Lora, Javier; Velarde, Freddy Udalrico Gutierrez; Miura, Sachio; Komiya, Norihiro; Maemura, Koji; Hirayama, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by the flagellate parasite Trypanosoma cruzi affects 8–10 million people in Latin America. The mechanisms that underlie the development of complications of chronic Chagas disease, characterized primarily by pathology of the heart and digestive system, are not currently understood. To identify possible host genetic factors that may influence the clinical course of Chagas disease, Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA) regional gene polymorphism was analyzed in patients presenting with differing clinical symptoms. Methodology Two hundred and twenty nine chronic Chagas disease patients in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, were examined by serological tests, electrocardiogram (ECG), and Barium enema colon X-ray. 31.4% of the examinees showed ECG alterations, 15.7% megacolon and 58.1% showed neither of them. A further 62 seropositive megacolon patients who had undergone colonectomy due to acute abdomen were recruited. We analyzed their HLA genetic polymorphisms (HLA-A, HLA-B, MICA, MICB, DRB1 and TNF-alpha promoter region) mainly through Sequence based and LABType SSO typing test using LUMINEX Technology. Principal Findings The frequencies of HLA-DRB1*01 and HLA-B*14:02 were significantly lower in patients suffering from megacolon as well as in those with ECG alteration and/or megacolon compared with a group of patients with indeterminate symptoms. The DRB1*0102, B*1402 and MICA*011 alleles were in strong Linkage Disequilibrium (LD), and the HLA-DRB1*01-B*14-MICA*011haplotype was associated with resistance against chronic Chagas disease. Conclusions This is the first report of HLA haplotype association with resistance to chronic Chagas disease. PMID:22448298

  3. IgG2 antibodies against a clinical grade Plasmodium falciparum CSP vaccine antigen associate with protection against transgenic sporozoite challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Robert; DeBot, Margot; Porter, Michael; Nikki, Jennifer; Rein, Lisa; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Crisanti, Andrea; Wightman, Paul D; Ockenhouse, Christian F; Dutta, Sheetij

    2014-01-01

    The availability of a highly purified and well characterized circumsporozoite protein (CSP) is essential to improve upon the partial success of recombinant CSP-based malaria vaccine candidates. Soluble, near full-length, Plasmodium falciparum CSP vaccine antigen (CS/D) was produced in E. coli under bio-production conditions that comply with current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP). A mouse immunogenicity study was conducted using a stable oil-in-water emulsion (SE) of CS/D in combination with the Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist Glucopyranosyl Lipid A (GLA/SE), or one of two TLR7/8 agonists: R848 (un-conjugated) or 3M-051 (covalently conjugated). Compared to Alum and SE, GLA/SE induced higher CS/D specific antibody response in Balb/c mice. Subclass analysis showed higher IgG2:IgG1 ratio of GLA/SE induced antibodies as compared to Alum and SE. TLR synergy was not observed when soluble R848 was mixed with GLA/SE. Antibody response of 3M051 formulations in Balb/c was similar to GLA/SE, except for the higher IgG2:IgG1 ratio and a trend towards higher T cell responses in 3M051 containing groups. However, no synergistic enhancement of antibody and T cell response was evident when 3M051 conjugate was mixed with GLA/SE. In C57Bl/6 mice, CS/D adjuvanted with 3M051/SE or GLA/SE induced higher CSP repeat specific titers compared to SE. While, 3M051 induced antibodies had high IgG2c:IgG1 ratio, GLA/SE promoted high levels of both IgG1 and IgG2c. GLA/SE also induced more potent T-cell responses compared to SE in two independent C57/BL6 vaccination studies, suggesting a balanced and productive T(H1)/T(H2) response. GLA and 3M-051 similarly enhanced the protective efficacy of CS/D against challenge with a transgenic P. berghei parasite and most importantly, high levels of cytophilic IgG2 antibodies were associated with protection in this model. Our data indicated that the cGMP-grade, soluble CS/D antigen combined with the TLR4-containing adjuvant GLA/SE warrants further

  4. Optimal attenuation of a PR8-derived mouse pathogenic H5N1 recombinant virus for testing antigenicity and protective efficacy in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Hwan; Kwon, Hyuk-Joon; Park, Jae-Keun; Song, Chang-Seon; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2015-11-17

    The PR8-based reverse genetics vector system is widely used to generate commercial vaccine strains, but the pathogenicity of PR8-derived recombinant viruses in mice hinders further immunological studies. In the present study, we generated PR8-derived H5N1 recombinant viruses, in which haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) originated from a mouse-pathogenic H5N1 low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV), and the non-structural proteins (NS) and polymerase basic protein 2 (PB2) originated from different H9N2 LPAIVs. In contrast to the control H5N1 recombinant virus, harboring six internal genes from PR8, the NS and PB2 recombinant viruses did not cause body weight loss in mice. However, the NS recombinant virus replicated in the lungs of mice. It was more immunogenic than the PB2 recombinant virus to protect efficiently against a lethal challenge of a H5N1 highly pathogenic AIV with 89 and 88% amino acid identity in HA and NA, respectively. Therefore, the NS gene may be useful for generating nonpathogenic and immunogenic PR8-derived recombinant viruses for studies of antigenicity and protective efficacy in mice.

  5. Immunologic study and optimization of Salmonella delivery strains expressing adhesin and toxin antigens for protection against progressive atrophic rhinitis in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Byeon, Hoyeon; Lee, John Hwa

    2014-10-01

    Mice were intranasally inoculated at various times to optimize the vaccination strategy with a new live candidate vaccine expressing the antigens CP39, FimA, PtfA, and ToxA of Pasteurella multocida and F1P2 of Bordetella bronchiseptica in an attenuated live Salmonella system to protect against progressive atrophic rhinitis (PAR). Sixty BALB/c mice were divided equally into 4 groups. The group A mice were vaccinated only at 12 wk of age, the group B mice received a primary vaccination at 9 wk of age and a booster at 12 wk of age, the group C mice received a primary vaccination at 6 wk of age and boosters at 9 and 12 wk of age, and the group D mice were inoculated intranasally with sterile phosphate-buffered saline as a control. The humoral and mucosal immune responses of groups A, B, and C increased significantly compared with those of the control group. Expression of the cytokines interleukin-4 and interferon-γ in splenocytes also increased significantly. In addition, the group B mice exhibited significantly fewer gross lesions in lung tissue compared with the other vaccinated groups after challenge with a virulent P. multocida strain. These results indicate that a strategy of double intranasal vaccination can optimize protection against PAR. PMID:25355999

  6. Mechanism of Lethal Toxin Neutralization by a Human Monoclonal Antibody Specific for the PA20 Region of Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Reason, Donald; Liberato, Justine; Sun, Jinying; Camacho, Jessica; Zhou, Jianhui

    2011-01-01

    The primary immunogenic component of the currently approved anthrax vaccine is the protective antigen (PA) unit of the binary toxin system. PA-specific antibodies neutralize anthrax toxins and protect against infection. Recent research has determined that in humans, only antibodies specific for particular determinants are capable of effecting toxin neutralization, and that the neutralizing epitopes recognized by these antibodies are distributed throughout the PA monomer. The mechanisms by which the majority of these epitopes effect neutralization remain unknown. In this report we investigate the process by which a human monoclonal antibody specific for the amino-terminal domain of PA neutralizes lethal toxin in an in vitro assay of cytotoxicity, and find that it neutralizes LT by blocking the requisite cleavage of the amino-terminal 20 kD portion of the molecule (PA20) from the remainder of the PA monomer. We also demonstrate that the epitope recognized by this human monoclonal does not encompass the 166RKKR169 furin recognition sequence in domain 1 of PA. PMID:22069752

  7. Diet pills and the cataract outbreak of 1935: reflections on the evolution of consumer protection legislation.

    PubMed

    Margo, Curtis E; Harman, Lynn E

    2014-01-01

    An outbreak of cataracts in 1935 caused by dinitrophenol (DNP), the active ingredient of popular diet pills, highlighted the inability of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to prevent harmful drugs from entering the marketplace. Just two years earlier, the FDA used horrific images of ocular surface injury caused by cosmetics at the World's Fair in Chicago to garner public support for legislative reform. The FDA had to walk a fine line between a public awareness campaign and lobbying Congress while lawmakers debated the need for consumer protection. The cataract outbreak of 1935 was conspicuous in the medical literature during the height of New Deal legislation, but questions persist as to how much it affected passage of the proposed Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (of 1938). The legislation languished in committee for years. The cataract outbreak probably had little impact on the eventual outcome, but medical opinion concerning the safety of DNP may have contributed to the voluntary withdrawal of the diet drug from the market. We review the DNP cataract outbreak and examine it in context of the challenges facing regulatory reform at that time. PMID:24913328

  8. A CpG-Ficoll Nanoparticle Adjuvant for Anthrax Protective Antigen Enhances Immunogenicity and Provides Single-Immunization Protection against Inhaled Anthrax in Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kachura, Melissa A; Hickle, Colin; Kell, Sariah A; Sathe, Atul; Calacsan, Carlo; Kiwan, Radwan; Hall, Brian; Milley, Robert; Ott, Gary; Coffman, Robert L; Kanzler, Holger; Campbell, John D

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticulate delivery systems for vaccine adjuvants, designed to enhance targeting of secondary lymphoid organs and activation of APCs, have shown substantial promise for enhanced immunopotentiation. We investigated the adjuvant activity of synthetic oligonucleotides containing CpG-rich motifs linked to the sucrose polymer Ficoll, forming soluble 50-nm particles (DV230-Ficoll), each containing >100 molecules of the TLR9 ligand, DV230. DV230-Ficoll was evaluated as an adjuvant for a candidate vaccine for anthrax using recombinant protective Ag (rPA) from Bacillus anthracis. A single immunization with rPA plus DV230-Ficoll induced 10-fold higher titers of toxin-neutralizing Abs in cynomolgus monkeys at 2 wk compared with animals immunized with equivalent amounts of monomeric DV230. Monkeys immunized either once or twice with rPA plus DV230-Ficoll were completely protected from challenge with 200 LD50 aerosolized anthrax spores. In mice, DV230-Ficoll was more potent than DV230 for the induction of innate immune responses at the injection site and draining lymph nodes. DV230-Ficoll was preferentially colocalized with rPA in key APC populations and induced greater maturation marker expression (CD69 and CD86) on these cells and stronger germinal center B and T cell responses, relative to DV230. DV230-Ficoll was also preferentially retained at the injection site and draining lymph nodes and produced fewer systemic inflammatory responses. These findings support the development of DV230-Ficoll as an adjuvant platform, particularly for vaccines such as for anthrax, for which rapid induction of protective immunity and memory with a single injection is very important. PMID:26608924

  9. A CpG-Ficoll Nanoparticle Adjuvant for Anthrax Protective Antigen Enhances Immunogenicity and Provides Single-Immunization Protection against Inhaled Anthrax in Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kachura, Melissa A; Hickle, Colin; Kell, Sariah A; Sathe, Atul; Calacsan, Carlo; Kiwan, Radwan; Hall, Brian; Milley, Robert; Ott, Gary; Coffman, Robert L; Kanzler, Holger; Campbell, John D

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticulate delivery systems for vaccine adjuvants, designed to enhance targeting of secondary lymphoid organs and activation of APCs, have shown substantial promise for enhanced immunopotentiation. We investigated the adjuvant activity of synthetic oligonucleotides containing CpG-rich motifs linked to the sucrose polymer Ficoll, forming soluble 50-nm particles (DV230-Ficoll), each containing >100 molecules of the TLR9 ligand, DV230. DV230-Ficoll was evaluated as an adjuvant for a candidate vaccine for anthrax using recombinant protective Ag (rPA) from Bacillus anthracis. A single immunization with rPA plus DV230-Ficoll induced 10-fold higher titers of toxin-neutralizing Abs in cynomolgus monkeys at 2 wk compared with animals immunized with equivalent amounts of monomeric DV230. Monkeys immunized either once or twice with rPA plus DV230-Ficoll were completely protected from challenge with 200 LD50 aerosolized anthrax spores. In mice, DV230-Ficoll was more potent than DV230 for the induction of innate immune responses at the injection site and draining lymph nodes. DV230-Ficoll was preferentially colocalized with rPA in key APC populations and induced greater maturation marker expression (CD69 and CD86) on these cells and stronger germinal center B and T cell responses, relative to DV230. DV230-Ficoll was also preferentially retained at the injection site and draining lymph nodes and produced fewer systemic inflammatory responses. These findings support the development of DV230-Ficoll as an adjuvant platform, particularly for vaccines such as for anthrax, for which rapid induction of protective immunity and memory with a single injection is very important.

  10. Nonclassical MHC Ib-restricted CD8+ T Cells Recognize Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Derived Protein Antigens and Contribute to Protection Against Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Shaobin; Siddiqui, Sarah; Bian, Yao; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Chyung-Ru

    2016-01-01

    MHC Ib-restricted CD8+ T cells have been implicated in host defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. However, the relative contribution of various MHC Ib-restricted T cell populations to anti-mycobacterial immunity remains elusive. In this study, we used mice that lack MHC Ia (Kb-/-Db-/-), MHC Ia/H2-M3 (Kb-/-Db-/-M3-/-), or β2m (β2m-/-) to study the role of M3-restricted and other MHC Ib-restricted T cells in immunity against Mtb. Unlike their dominant role in Listeria infection, we found that M3-restricted CD8+ T cells only represented a small proportion of the CD8+ T cells responding to Mtb infection. Non-M3, MHC Ib-restricted CD8+ T cells expanded preferentially in the lungs of Mtb-infected Kb-/-Db-/-M3-/- mice, exhibited polyfunctional capacities and conferred protection against Mtb. These MHC Ib-restricted CD8+ T cells recognized several Mtb-derived protein antigens at a higher frequency than MHC Ia-restricted CD8+ T cells. The presentation of Mtb antigens to MHC Ib-restricted CD8+ T cells was mostly β2m-dependent but TAP-independent. Interestingly, a large proportion of Mtb-specific MHC Ib-restricted CD8+ T cells in Kb-/-Db-/-M3-/- mice were Qa-2-restricted while no considerable numbers of MR1 or CD1-restricted Mtb-specific CD8+ T cells were detected. Our findings indicate that nonclassical CD8+ T cells other than the known M3, CD1, and MR1-restricted CD8+ T cells contribute to host immune responses against Mtb infection. Targeting these MHC Ib-restricted CD8+ T cells would facilitate the design of better Mtb vaccines with broader coverage across MHC haplotypes due to the limited polymorphism of MHC class Ib molecules. PMID:27272249

  11. CD4+ T Cells Recognizing PE/PPE Antigens Directly or via Cross Reactivity Are Protective against Pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sayes, Fadel; Pawlik, Alexandre; Frigui, Wafa; Gröschel, Matthias I.; Crommelynck, Samuel; Fayolle, Catherine; Cia, Felipe; Bancroft, Gregory J.; Bottai, Daria; Leclerc, Claude; Brosch, Roland; Majlessi, Laleh

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), possesses at least three type VII secretion systems, ESX-1, -3 and -5 that are actively involved in pathogenesis and host-pathogen interaction. We recently showed that an attenuated Mtb vaccine candidate (Mtb Δppe25-pe19), which lacks the characteristic ESX-5-associated pe/ppe genes, but harbors all other components of the ESX-5 system, induces CD4+ T-cell immune responses against non-esx-5-associated PE/PPE protein homologs. These T cells strongly cross-recognize the missing esx-5-associated PE/PPE proteins. Here, we characterized the fine composition of the functional cross-reactive Th1 effector subsets specific to the shared PE/PPE epitopes in mice immunized with the Mtb Δppe25-pe19 vaccine candidate. We provide evidence that the Mtb Δppe25-pe19 strain, despite its significant attenuation, is comparable to the WT Mtb strain with regard to: (i) its antigenic repertoire related to the different ESX systems, (ii) the induced Th1 effector subset composition, (iii) the differentiation status of the Th1 cells induced, and (iv) its particular features at stimulating the innate immune response. Indeed, we found significant contribution of PE/PPE-specific Th1 effector cells in the protective immunity against pulmonary Mtb infection. These results offer detailed insights into the immune mechanisms underlying the remarkable protective efficacy of the live attenuated Mtb Δppe25-pe19 vaccine candidate, as well as the specific potential of PE/PPE proteins as protective immunogens. PMID:27467705

  12. Vaccination with Replication Deficient Adenovectors Encoding YF-17D Antigens Induces Long-Lasting Protection from Severe Yellow Fever Virus Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Maria R; Larsen, Mads A B; Kongsgaard, Michael; Rasmussen, Michael; Buus, Søren; Stryhn, Anette; Thomsen, Allan R; Christensen, Jan P

    2016-02-01

    The live attenuated yellow fever vaccine (YF-17D) has been successfully used for more than 70 years. It is generally considered a safe vaccine, however, recent reports of serious adverse events following vaccination have raised concerns and led to suggestions that even safer YF vaccines should be developed. Replication deficient adenoviruses (Ad) have been widely evaluated as recombinant vectors, particularly in the context of prophylactic vaccination against viral infections in which induction of CD8+ T-cell mediated immunity is crucial, but potent antibody responses may also be elicited using these vectors. In this study, we present two adenobased vectors targeting non-structural and structural YF antigens and characterize their immunological properties. We report that a single immunization with an Ad-vector encoding the non-structural protein 3 from YF-17D could elicit a strong CD8+ T-cell response, which afforded a high degree of protection from subsequent intracranial challenge of vaccinated mice. However, full protection was only observed using a vector encoding the structural proteins from YF-17D. This vector elicited virus-specific CD8+ T cells as well as neutralizing antibodies, and both components were shown to be important for protection thus mimicking the situation recently uncovered in YF-17D vaccinated mice. Considering that Ad-vectors are very safe, easy to produce and highly immunogenic in humans, our data indicate that a replication deficient adenovector-based YF vaccine may represent a safe and efficient alternative to the classical live attenuated YF vaccine and should be further tested.

  13. Vaccination with Replication Deficient Adenovectors Encoding YF-17D Antigens Induces Long-Lasting Protection from Severe Yellow Fever Virus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, Maria R.; Larsen, Mads A. B.; Kongsgaard, Michael; Rasmussen, Michael; Buus, Søren; Stryhn, Anette; Thomsen, Allan R.; Christensen, Jan P.

    2016-01-01

    The live attenuated yellow fever vaccine (YF-17D) has been successfully used for more than 70 years. It is generally considered a safe vaccine, however, recent reports of serious adverse events following vaccination have raised concerns and led to suggestions that even safer YF vaccines should be developed. Replication deficient adenoviruses (Ad) have been widely evaluated as recombinant vectors, particularly in the context of prophylactic vaccination against viral infections in which induction of CD8+ T-cell mediated immunity is crucial, but potent antibody responses may also be elicited using these vectors. In this study, we present two adenobased vectors targeting non-structural and structural YF antigens and characterize their immunological properties. We report that a single immunization with an Ad-vector encoding the non-structural protein 3 from YF-17D could elicit a strong CD8+ T-cell response, which afforded a high degree of protection from subsequent intracranial challenge of vaccinated mice. However, full protection was only observed using a vector encoding the structural proteins from YF-17D. This vector elicited virus-specific CD8+ T cells as well as neutralizing antibodies, and both components were shown to be important for protection thus mimicking the situation recently uncovered in YF-17D vaccinated mice. Considering that Ad-vectors are very safe, easy to produce and highly immunogenic in humans, our data indicate that a replication deficient adenovector-based YF vaccine may represent a safe and efficient alternative to the classical live attenuated YF vaccine and should be further tested. PMID:26886513

  14. Acquisition of Functional Antibodies That Block the Binding of Erythrocyte-Binding Antigen 175 and Protection Against Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Children

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Vashti; Ramsland, Paul A.; Guy, Andrew J.; Siba, Peter M.; Mueller, Ivo; Richards, Jack S.; Beeson, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The targets and mechanisms of human immunity to malaria are poorly understood, which poses a major barrier to malaria vaccine development. Antibodies play a key role in human immunity and may act by inhibiting receptor-binding functions of key merozoite invasion ligands. Antibodies to the major invasion ligand and vaccine candidate, erythrocyte-binding antigen 175 (EBA-175), have been linked with protection, but how these antibodies function has not been established. Methods. We developed 2 new assays that quantify the ability of antibodies to inhibit binding of EBA-175 to its erythrocyte receptor, glycophorin A, using either native or recombinant EBA-175. Binding-inhibitory antibodies were evaluated in a longitudinal cohort study of Papua New Guinean children and related to risk of malaria, age, infection status, and markers of parasite exposure. Results. Binding-inhibition assays (BIAs) were reproducible, and the 2 assays had a high level of agreement. Inhibitory antibodies were common among children, acquired in association with markers of increasing parasite exposure, and high in those children with active infection. Inhibitory antibodies correlated with total immunoglobulin G levels to the EBA-175 binding domain (region II). Importantly, binding-inhibitory antibodies were significantly associated with protection from symptomatic malaria when measured using either BIA. Conclusions. Findings suggest that naturally acquired binding-inhibitory antibodies are an important functional mechanism that contributes to protection against malaria and further supports the potential of EBA-175 as a vaccine candidate. Identifying vaccines and approaches that induce potent binding-inhibitory antibodies may be a valuable strategy in the development of highly efficacious malaria vaccines. PMID:26136391

  15. CD4+ T Cells Recognizing PE/PPE Antigens Directly or via Cross Reactivity Are Protective against Pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Sayes, Fadel; Pawlik, Alexandre; Frigui, Wafa; Gröschel, Matthias I; Crommelynck, Samuel; Fayolle, Catherine; Cia, Felipe; Bancroft, Gregory J; Bottai, Daria; Leclerc, Claude; Brosch, Roland; Majlessi, Laleh

    2016-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), possesses at least three type VII secretion systems, ESX-1, -3 and -5 that are actively involved in pathogenesis and host-pathogen interaction. We recently showed that an attenuated Mtb vaccine candidate (Mtb Δppe25-pe19), which lacks the characteristic ESX-5-associated pe/ppe genes, but harbors all other components of the ESX-5 system, induces CD4+ T-cell immune responses against non-esx-5-associated PE/PPE protein homologs. These T cells strongly cross-recognize the missing esx-5-associated PE/PPE proteins. Here, we characterized the fine composition of the functional cross-reactive Th1 effector subsets specific to the shared PE/PPE epitopes in mice immunized with the Mtb Δppe25-pe19 vaccine candidate. We provide evidence that the Mtb Δppe25-pe19 strain, despite its significant attenuation, is comparable to the WT Mtb strain with regard to: (i) its antigenic repertoire related to the different ESX systems, (ii) the induced Th1 effector subset composition, (iii) the differentiation status of the Th1 cells induced, and (iv) its particular features at stimulating the innate immune response. Indeed, we found significant contribution of PE/PPE-specific Th1 effector cells in the protective immunity against pulmonary Mtb infection. These results offer detailed insights into the immune mechanisms underlying the remarkable protective efficacy of the live attenuated Mtb Δppe25-pe19 vaccine candidate, as well as the specific potential of PE/PPE proteins as protective immunogens.

  16. CD4+ T Cells Recognizing PE/PPE Antigens Directly or via Cross Reactivity Are Protective against Pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Sayes, Fadel; Pawlik, Alexandre; Frigui, Wafa; Gröschel, Matthias I; Crommelynck, Samuel; Fayolle, Catherine; Cia, Felipe; Bancroft, Gregory J; Bottai, Daria; Leclerc, Claude; Brosch, Roland; Majlessi, Laleh

    2016-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), possesses at least three type VII secretion systems, ESX-1, -3 and -5 that are actively involved in pathogenesis and host-pathogen interaction. We recently showed that an attenuated Mtb vaccine candidate (Mtb Δppe25-pe19), which lacks the characteristic ESX-5-associated pe/ppe genes, but harbors all other components of the ESX-5 system, induces CD4+ T-cell immune responses against non-esx-5-associated PE/PPE protein homologs. These T cells strongly cross-recognize the missing esx-5-associated PE/PPE proteins. Here, we characterized the fine composition of the functional cross-reactive Th1 effector subsets specific to the shared PE/PPE epitopes in mice immunized with the Mtb Δppe25-pe19 vaccine candidate. We provide evidence that the Mtb Δppe25-pe19 strain, despite its significant attenuation, is comparable to the WT Mtb strain with regard to: (i) its antigenic repertoire related to the different ESX systems, (ii) the induced Th1 effector subset composition, (iii) the differentiation status of the Th1 cells induced, and (iv) its particular features at stimulating the innate immune response. Indeed, we found significant contribution of PE/PPE-specific Th1 effector cells in the protective immunity against pulmonary Mtb infection. These results offer detailed insights into the immune mechanisms underlying the remarkable protective efficacy of the live attenuated Mtb Δppe25-pe19 vaccine candidate, as well as the specific potential of PE/PPE proteins as protective immunogens. PMID:27467705

  17. Vaccination with Replication Deficient Adenovectors Encoding YF-17D Antigens Induces Long-Lasting Protection from Severe Yellow Fever Virus Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Maria R; Larsen, Mads A B; Kongsgaard, Michael; Rasmussen, Michael; Buus, Søren; Stryhn, Anette; Thomsen, Allan R; Christensen, Jan P

    2016-02-01

    The live attenuated yellow fever vaccine (YF-17D) has been successfully used for more than 70 years. It is generally considered a safe vaccine, however, recent reports of serious adverse events following vaccination have raised concerns and led to suggestions that even safer YF vaccines should be developed. Replication deficient adenoviruses (Ad) have been widely evaluated as recombinant vectors, particularly in the context of prophylactic vaccination against viral infections in which induction of CD8+ T-cell mediated immunity is crucial, but potent antibody responses may also be elicited using these vectors. In this study, we present two adenobased vectors targeting non-structural and structural YF antigens and characterize their immunological properties. We report that a single immunization with an Ad-vector encoding the non-structural protein 3 from YF-17D could elicit a strong CD8+ T-cell response, which afforded a high degree of protection from subsequent intracranial challenge of vaccinated mice. However, full protection was only observed using a vector encoding the structural proteins from YF-17D. This vector elicited virus-specific CD8+ T cells as well as neutralizing antibodies, and both components were shown to be important for protection thus mimicking the situation recently uncovered in YF-17D vaccinated mice. Considering that Ad-vectors are very safe, easy to produce and highly immunogenic in humans, our data indicate that a replication deficient adenovector-based YF vaccine may represent a safe and efficient alternative to the classical live attenuated YF vaccine and should be further tested. PMID:26886513

  18. BoHV-4-Based Vector Single Heterologous Antigen Delivery Protects STAT1(-/-) Mice from Monkeypoxvirus Lethal Challenge.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Valentina; Parker, Scott; Jacca, Sarah; Crump, Ryan W; Doronin, Konstantin; Hembrador, Edguardo; Pompilio, Daniela; Tebaldi, Giulia; Estep, Ryan D; Wong, Scott W; Buller, Mark R; Donofrio, Gaetano

    2015-06-01

    Monkeypox virus (MPXV) is the etiological agent of human (MPX). It is an emerging orthopoxvirus zoonosis in the tropical rain forest of Africa and is endemic in the Congo-basin and sporadic in West Africa; it remains a tropical neglected disease of persons in impoverished rural areas. Interaction of the human population with wildlife increases human infection with MPX virus (MPXV), and infection from human to human is possible. Smallpox vaccination provides good cross-protection against MPX; however, the vaccination campaign ended in Africa in 1980, meaning that a large proportion of the population is currently unprotected against MPXV infection. Disease control hinges on deterring zoonotic exposure to the virus and, barring that, interrupting person-to-person spread. However, there are no FDA-approved therapies against MPX, and current vaccines are limited due to safety concerns. For this reason, new studies on pathogenesis, prophylaxis and therapeutics are still of great interest, not only for the scientific community but also for the governments concerned that MPXV could be used as a bioterror agent. In the present study, a new vaccination strategy approach based on three recombinant bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) vectors, each expressing different MPXV glycoproteins, A29L, M1R and B6R were investigated in terms of protection from a lethal MPXV challenge in STAT1 knockout mice. BoHV-4-A-CMV-A29LgD106ΔTK, BoHV-4-A-EF1α-M1RgD106ΔTK and BoHV-4-A-EF1α-B6RgD106ΔTK were successfully constructed by recombineering, and their capacity to express their transgene was demonstrated. A small challenge study was performed, and all three recombinant BoHV-4 appeared safe (no weight-loss or obvious adverse events) following intraperitoneal administration. Further, BoHV-4-A-EF1α-M1RgD106ΔTK alone or in combination with BoHV-4-A-CMV-A29LgD106ΔTK and BoHV-4-A-EF1α-B6RgD106ΔTK, was shown to be able to protect, 100% alone and 80% in combination, STAT1(-/-) mice against

  19. BoHV-4-Based Vector Single Heterologous Antigen Delivery Protects STAT1(-/-) Mice from Monkeypoxvirus Lethal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Crump, Ryan W.; Doronin, Konstantin; Hembrador, Edguardo; Pompilio, Daniela; Tebaldi, Giulia; Estep, Ryan D.; Wong, Scott W.; Buller, Mark R.; Donofrio, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Monkeypox virus (MPXV) is the etiological agent of human (MPX). It is an emerging orthopoxvirus zoonosis in the tropical rain forest of Africa and is endemic in the Congo-basin and sporadic in West Africa; it remains a tropical neglected disease of persons in impoverished rural areas. Interaction of the human population with wildlife increases human infection with MPX virus (MPXV), and infection from human to human is possible. Smallpox vaccination provides good cross-protection against MPX; however, the vaccination campaign ended in Africa in 1980, meaning that a large proportion of the population is currently unprotected against MPXV infection. Disease control hinges on deterring zoonotic exposure to the virus and, barring that, interrupting person-to-person spread. However, there are no FDA-approved therapies against MPX, and current vaccines are limited due to safety concerns. For this reason, new studies on pathogenesis, prophylaxis and therapeutics are still of great interest, not only for the scientific community but also for the governments concerned that MPXV could be used as a bioterror agent. In the present study, a new vaccination strategy approach based on three recombinant bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) vectors, each expressing different MPXV glycoproteins, A29L, M1R and B6R were investigated in terms of protection from a lethal MPXV challenge in STAT1 knockout mice. BoHV-4-A-CMV-A29LgD106ΔTK, BoHV-4-A-EF1α-M1RgD106ΔTK and BoHV-4-A-EF1α-B6RgD106ΔTK were successfully constructed by recombineering, and their capacity to express their transgene was demonstrated. A small challenge study was performed, and all three recombinant BoHV-4 appeared safe (no weight-loss or obvious adverse events) following intraperitoneal administration. Further, BoHV-4-A-EF1α-M1RgD106ΔTK alone or in combination with BoHV-4-A-CMV-A29LgD106ΔTK and BoHV-4-A-EF1α-B6RgD106ΔTK, was shown to be able to protect, 100% alone and 80% in combination, STAT1(-/-) mice against

  20. BoHV-4-Based Vector Single Heterologous Antigen Delivery Protects STAT1(-/-) Mice from Monkeypoxvirus Lethal Challenge.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Valentina; Parker, Scott; Jacca, Sarah; Crump, Ryan W; Doronin, Konstantin; Hembrador, Edguardo; Pompilio, Daniela; Tebaldi, Giulia; Estep, Ryan D; Wong, Scott W; Buller, Mark R; Donofrio, Gaetano

    2015-06-01

    Monkeypox virus (MPXV) is the etiological agent of human (MPX). It is an emerging orthopoxvirus zoonosis in the tropical rain forest of Africa and is endemic in the Congo-basin and sporadic in West Africa; it remains a tropical neglected disease of persons in impoverished rural areas. Interaction of the human population with wildlife increases human infection with MPX virus (MPXV), and infection from human to human is possible. Smallpox vaccination provides good cross-protection against MPX; however, the vaccination campaign ended in Africa in 1980, meaning that a large proportion of the population is currently unprotected against MPXV infection. Disease control hinges on deterring zoonotic exposure to the virus and, barring that, interrupting person-to-person spread. However, there are no FDA-approved therapies against MPX, and current vaccines are limited due to safety concerns. For this reason, new studies on pathogenesis, prophylaxis and therapeutics are still of great interest, not only for the scientific community but also for the governments concerned that MPXV could be used as a bioterror agent. In the present study, a new vaccination strategy approach based on three recombinant bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) vectors, each expressing different MPXV glycoproteins, A29L, M1R and B6R were investigated in terms of protection from a lethal MPXV challenge in STAT1 knockout mice. BoHV-4-A-CMV-A29LgD106ΔTK, BoHV-4-A-EF1α-M1RgD106ΔTK and BoHV-4-A-EF1α-B6RgD106ΔTK were successfully constructed by recombineering, and their capacity to express their transgene was demonstrated. A small challenge study was performed, and all three recombinant BoHV-4 appeared safe (no weight-loss or obvious adverse events) following intraperitoneal administration. Further, BoHV-4-A-EF1α-M1RgD106ΔTK alone or in combination with BoHV-4-A-CMV-A29LgD106ΔTK and BoHV-4-A-EF1α-B6RgD106ΔTK, was shown to be able to protect, 100% alone and 80% in combination, STAT1(-/-) mice against

  1. Broad-spectrum sunscreens provide greater protection against ultraviolet-radiation-induced suppression of contact hypersensitivity to a recall antigen in humans.

    PubMed

    Damian, D L; Halliday, G M; Barnetson, R S

    1997-08-01

    This study investigates the extent to which sunscreens protect humans from ultraviolet (UV)-radiation-induced immunosuppression. In the presence of solar-simulated UV, three sunscreens with differing UVA transmission were assessed for their ability to protect the contact hypersensitivity (CHS) response to nickel of 16 nickel-allergic subjects. The sunscreens contained 2-ethylhexyl para-methoxycinnamate (cinnamate), cinnamate with oxybenzone, or cinnamate with zinc oxide, respectively. All had sun protection factors of 10 and hence inhibited UV erythema to similar extents. Volunteers were irradiated on their backs with suberythemal UV daily for 5 d after application of the sunscreens and their base lotion to different sites. Nickel-containing patches were then applied to both UV-treated sites and adjacent, unirradiated control sites. Erythema caused by nickel CHS at each site was quantitated 72 h later with a reflectance erythema meter. In comparison of the nickel reactions of irradiated and unirradiated skin, there was 35% mean immunosuppression in unprotected UV-treated skin. Significant immunosuppression also occurred at sites irradiated through the narrow-spectrum cinnamate-only sunscreen but was prevented by the two broad-spectrum sunscreens. To determine whether UV-induced suppression of the nickel response is specific for cell-mediated immunity or reflects suppression of nonspecific inflammation, a further 16 subjects were patch-tested with a skin irritant, sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), following a sunscreen and irradiation protocol identical to that of the nickel volunteers. UV had no significant effect on SLS responses. We conclude that nickel patch testing is a valid means of assessing UV-induced immunosuppression in humans and that even with suberythemal UV, immune protection was provided only by sunscreens filtering both UVA and UVB.

  2. Antigenic comparison of Yuli and Vnukovo-32 virus strains in monkeys: specific protection by commercial antirabies preparations.

    PubMed

    Klueva, E V; Selimov, M A; Frolova, M P; Kulikova, L G; Krapivina, M N

    1991-09-01

    A combined vaccination schedule using commercial antirabies immunoglobulin G and experimental vaccine from strains Vnukovo-32 or Yuli beginning 2 hr before intracerebral (i.c.) challenge with a high dose of Yuli virus conferred no protection to Cercopithecus aethiops monkeys. In monkeys inoculated into lip with a middle dose of Yuli virus, administration of large amounts of antirabic IgG (up to 5000 national units, NU/kg) had a clearcut effect. The disease in Yuli virus-infected monkeys showed typical signs of acute encephalitis with lethal outcome, although one animal which developed typical encephalitis recovered as evidenced by increased virus-neutralizing antibodies in its serum. Inflammatory and degenerative lesions developed in the CNS of animals with signs of acute encephalomyelitis; their intensity was less prominent in those monkeys which underwent the combined treatment. In the cytoplasm of brain neurons of monkeys infected with Yuli virus relatively small Babes-Negri bodies with more or less apparent internal structure were detected. PMID:1688075

  3. Contributions of Edema Factor and Protective Antigen to the Induction of Protective Immunity by Bacillus anthracis Edema Toxin as an Intranasal Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Duverger, Alexandra; Carré, Jeanne-Marie; Jee, Junbae; Leppla, Stephen H.; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle; Tang, Wei-Jen; Tomé, Daniel; Boyaka, Prosper N.

    2013-01-01

    We have shown that intranasal coapplication of Bacillus anthracis protective Ag (PA) together with a B. anthracis edema factor (EF) mutant having reduced adenylate cyclase activity (i.e., EF-S414N) enhances anti-PAAb responses, but also acts as a mucosal adjuvant for coadministered unrelated Ags. To elucidate the role of edema toxin (EdTx) components in its adjuvanticity, we examined how a PA mutant lacking the ability to bind EF (PA-U7) or another mutant that allows the cellular uptake of EF, but fails to efficiently mediate its translocation into the cytosol (PA-dFF), would affect EdTx-induced adaptive immunity. Native EdTx promotes costimulatory molecule expression by macrophages and B lymphocytes, and a broad spectrum of cytokine responses by cervical lymph node cells in vitro. These effects were reduced or abrogated when cells were treated with EF plus PA-dFF, or PA-U7 instead of PA. We also intranasally immunized groups of mice with a recombinant fusion protein of Yersinia pestis F1 and LcrVAgs (F1-V) together with EdTx variants consisting of wild-type or mutants PA and EF. Analysis of serum and mucosal Ab responses against F1-V or EdTx components (i.e., PA and EF) revealed no adjuvant activity in mice that received PA-U7 instead of PA. In contrast, coimmunization with PA-dFF enhanced serum Ab responses. Finally, immunization with native PA and an EF mutant lacking adenylate cyclase activity (EF-K346R) failed to enhance Ab responses. In summary, a fully functional PA and a minimum of adenylate cyclase activity are needed for EdTx to act as a mucosal adjuvant. PMID:20952678

  4. Optimization, Production, and Characterization of a CpG-Oligonucleotide-Ficoll Conjugate Nanoparticle Adjuvant for Enhanced Immunogenicity of Anthrax Protective Antigen

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We have synthesized and characterized a novel phosphorothioate CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG ODN)-Ficoll conjugated nanoparticulate adjuvant, termed DV230-Ficoll. This adjuvant was constructed from an amine-functionalized-Ficoll, a heterobifunctional linker (succinimidyl-[(N-maleimidopropionamido)-hexaethylene glycol] ester) and the CpG-ODN DV230. Herein, we describe the evaluation of the purity and reactivity of linkers of different lengths for CpG-ODN-Ficoll conjugation, optimization of linker coupling, and conjugation of thiol-functionalized CpG to maleimide-functionalized Ficoll and process scale-up. Physicochemical characterization of independently produced lots of DV230-Ficoll reveal a bioconjugate with a particle size of approximately 50 nm and covalent attachment of more than 100 molecules of CpG per Ficoll. Solutions of purified DV230-Ficoll were stable for at least 12 months at frozen and refrigerated temperatures and stability was further enhanced in lyophilized form. Compared to nonconjugated monomeric DV230, the DV230-Ficoll conjugate demonstrated improved in vitro potency for induction of IFN-α from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and induced higher titer neutralizing antibody responses against coadministered anthrax recombinant protective antigen in mice. The processes described here establish a reproducible and robust process for the synthesis of a novel, size-controlled, and stable CpG-ODN nanoparticle adjuvant suitable for manufacture and use in vaccines. PMID:27074387

  5. Optimization, Production, and Characterization of a CpG-Oligonucleotide-Ficoll Conjugate Nanoparticle Adjuvant for Enhanced Immunogenicity of Anthrax Protective Antigen.

    PubMed

    Milley, Bob; Kiwan, Radwan; Ott, Gary S; Calacsan, Carlo; Kachura, Melissa; Campbell, John D; Kanzler, Holger; Coffman, Robert L

    2016-05-18

    We have synthesized and characterized a novel phosphorothioate CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG ODN)-Ficoll conjugated nanoparticulate adjuvant, termed DV230-Ficoll. This adjuvant was constructed from an amine-functionalized-Ficoll, a heterobifunctional linker (succinimidyl-[(N-maleimidopropionamido)-hexaethylene glycol] ester) and the CpG-ODN DV230. Herein, we describe the evaluation of the purity and reactivity of linkers of different lengths for CpG-ODN-Ficoll conjugation, optimization of linker coupling, and conjugation of thiol-functionalized CpG to maleimide-functionalized Ficoll and process scale-up. Physicochemical characterization of independently produced lots of DV230-Ficoll reveal a bioconjugate with a particle size of approximately 50 nm and covalent attachment of more than 100 molecules of CpG per Ficoll. Solutions of purified DV230-Ficoll were stable for at least 12 months at frozen and refrigerated temperatures and stability was further enhanced in lyophilized form. Compared to nonconjugated monomeric DV230, the DV230-Ficoll conjugate demonstrated improved in vitro potency for induction of IFN-α from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and induced higher titer neutralizing antibody responses against coadministered anthrax recombinant protective antigen in mice. The processes described here establish a reproducible and robust process for the synthesis of a novel, size-controlled, and stable CpG-ODN nanoparticle adjuvant suitable for manufacture and use in vaccines. PMID:27074387

  6. Regulated delayed expression of rfc enhances the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a heterologous antigen delivered by live attenuated Salmonella enterica vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kong, Qingke; Liu, Qing; Jansen, Angela M; Curtiss, Roy

    2010-08-23

    The Salmonella rfc gene encodes the O-antigen polymerase. We constructed three strains in which we replaced the native rfc promoter with the arabinose-dependent araC P(BAD) promoter so that rfc expression was dependent on exogenously supplied arabinose provided during in vitro growth. The three mutant strains were designed to synthesize different amounts of Rfc by altering the ribosome-binding sequence and start codon. We examined these strains for a number of in vitro characteristics compared to an isogenic Deltarfc mutant and the wild-type parent strain. One promoter-replacement mutation, DeltaP(rfc174), yielded an optimal profile, exhibiting wild-type characteristics when grown with arabinose, and Deltarfc characteristics when grown without arabinose. In addition, when administered orally, the DeltaP(rfc174) strain was completely attenuated in for virulence in mice. The DeltaP(rfc174) mutation was introduced into attenuated Salmonella vaccine strain chi9241 (DeltapabA DeltapabB DeltaasdA) followed by introduction of an Asd(+) balanced-lethal plasmid to designed for expression of the pneumococcal surface protein PspA. Mice immunized with either chi9241 or its DeltaP(rfc174) derivative expressing pspA were protected against S. pneumoniae challenge.

  7. Expression, purification, and characterization of protective MPT64 antigen protein and identification of its multimers isolated from nontoxic Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra.

    PubMed

    Chu, Teng-Ping J; Yuann, Jeu-Ming P

    2011-05-01

    MPT64, a secreted protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), stimulates the immune reactions within cells and is a protective antigen that is lost by the bacilli Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine during propagation. To minimize the toxicity caused by MTB, we used the MPT64 gene encoded by nontoxic H37Ra MTB to carry out genetic expansion via polymerase chain reaction and gene clone MPT64. The plasmid DNA encoded MPT64 was expressed at 20°C for 22 H, and a large quantity of MPT64 was obtained. In the absence of urea, MPT64 multimers with subunits being covalently connected via disulfide bonds were detected by Western blot showing strong protein-protein interactions, as evidenced by the formation of MPT64 tetramers. Finally, with urea of decreasing concentrations, we refolded MPT64 purified in the presence of urea and determined its secondary structures using circular dichroism. MPT64 was found to contain 2.2% α-helix, 50.9% β-sheet, 19.5% turn, and 27.4% random coil. The molecular weight of MPT64 was determined by a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometer and found to be 23,497 Da, very close to the theoretical molecular weight of MPT64. The results presented here provide a sound basis for future biochemical and biophysical studies of MPT64 or any other proteins encoded by nontoxic H37Ra MTB.

  8. Influence of antigen conformation and mode of presentation on the antibody and protective responses against human respiratory syncytial virus: relevance for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Melero, José A

    2016-10-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) remains one of the most prevalent human pathogens for which a vaccine is still missing. After several decades of hesitant efforts, particularly after the harmful effects of a formalin-inactivated hRSV vaccine trial in the 1960s, hRSV vaccine development has received new impetus from structure-based studies of its main protective antigen: the fusion (F) glycoprotein. This article reviews studies done with hRSV F, either in pieces (e.g. epitopes) or as soluble or membrane-anchored molecules folded in different conformations or presented under different forms. Knowledge gained from these studies has provided the basis for novel vaccines that are now in different phases of development and has generated tools and reagents for developing other control measures such as prophylactic or therapeutic antibodies against this virus, which remains the most important cause of hospitalization in infants and one of the leading global causes of infant mortality.

  9. Outer membrane protein D15 is conserved among Haemophilus influenzae species and may represent a universal protective antigen against invasive disease.

    PubMed Central

    Loosmore, S M; Yang, Y P; Coleman, D C; Shortreed, J M; England, D M; Klein, M H

    1997-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced the d15 gene from two strains of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and two strains of nontypeable H. influenzae (NTHI). The nucleotide and deduced protein sequences of d15 are highly conserved, with only a small variable region identified near the carboxyl terminus of the protein. Analysis of upstream sequences revealed that the H. influenzae d15 gene may be part of a large potential operon of closely spaced open reading frames, including one with significant homology to the Escherichia coli cds gene encoding CDP-diglyceride synthetase. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the d15 gene is also present in H. influenzae types a, c, d, e, and f and in Haemophilus parainfluenzae. A recombinant D15 (rD15) protein was expressed in good quantity in E. coli from the inducible T7 promoter, and monospecific anti-rD15 antibodies were raised. Immunoblot analysis of H. influenzae serotypes a, b, c, d, e, and f, NTHI, and H. parainfluenzae lysates revealed that they all expressed a cross-reactive D15-like protein. Purified rD15 was found to be highly immunogenic in mice, guinea pigs, and rabbits, and passive transfer of anti-rD15 antibodies protected infant rats from challenge with H. influenzae type b or type a in infant rat models of bacteremia. Thus, D15 is a highly conserved antigen that is protective in animal models and it may be a useful component of a universal subunit vaccine against Haemophilus infection and disease. PMID:9284140

  10. Protection provided by a herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein C and D subunit antigen vaccine against genital HSV-2 infection in HSV-1-seropositive guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Sita; Balliet, John W; Flynn, Jessica A; Lubinski, John M; Shaw, Carolyn E; DiStefano, Daniel J; Cai, Michael; Brown, Martha; Smith, Judith F; Kowalski, Rose; Swoyer, Ryan; Galli, Jennifer; Copeland, Victoria; Rios, Sandra; Davidson, Robert C; Salnikova, Maya; Kingsley, Susan; Bryan, Janine; Casimiro, Danilo R; Friedman, Harvey M

    2014-02-01

    A prophylactic vaccine for genital herpes disease remains an elusive goal. We report the results of two studies performed collaboratively in different laboratories that assessed immunogenicity and vaccine efficacy in herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1)-seropositive guinea pigs immunized and subsequently challenged intravaginally with HSV-2. In study 1, HSV-2 glycoproteins C (gC2) and D (gD2) were produced in baculovirus and administered intramuscularly as monovalent or bivalent vaccines with CpG and alum. In study 2, gD2 was produced in CHO cells and given intramuscularly with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and alum, or gC2 and gD2 were produced in glycoengineered Pichia pastoris and administered intramuscularly as a bivalent vaccine with Iscomatrix and alum to HSV-1-naive or -seropositive guinea pigs. In both studies, immunization boosted neutralizing antibody responses to HSV-1 and HSV-2. In study 1, immunization with gC2, gD2, or both immunogens significantly reduced the frequency of genital lesions, with the bivalent vaccine showing the greatest protection. In study 2, both vaccines were highly protective against genital disease in naive and HSV-1-seropositive animals. Comparisons between gD2 and gC2/gD2 in study 2 must be interpreted cautiously, because different adjuvants, gD2 doses, and antigen production methods were used; however, significant differences invariably favored the bivalent vaccine. Immunization of naive animals with gC2/gD2 significantly reduced the number of days of vaginal shedding of HSV-2 DNA compared with that for mock-immunized animals. Surprisingly, in both studies, immunization of HSV-1-seropositive animals had little effect on recurrent vaginal shedding of HSV-2 DNA, despite significantly reducing genital disease. PMID:24284325

  11. Rapid, Sensitive, and Specific Lateral-Flow Immunochromatographic Device To Measure Anti-Anthrax Protective Antigen Immunoglobulin G in Serum and Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Biagini, Raymond E.; Sammons, Deborah L.; Smith, Jerome P.; MacKenzie, Barbara A.; Striley, Cynthia A. F.; Snawder, John E.; Robertson, Shirley A.; Quinn, Conrad P.

    2006-01-01

    Evidence from animals suggests that anti-anthrax protective antigen (PA) immunoglobulin G (IgG) from vaccination with anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA) is protective against Bacillus anthracis infection. Measurement of anti-PA IgG in human sera can be performed using either enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or fluorescent covalent microsphere immunoassay (ELISA) (R. E. Biagini, D. L. Sammons, J. P. Smith, B. A. MacKenzie, C. A. Striley, V. Semenova, E. Steward-Clark, K. Stamey, A. E. Freeman, C. P. Quinn, and J. E. Snawder, Clin. Diagn. Lab. Immunol. 11:50-55, 2004). Both these methods are laboratory based. We describe the development of a rapid lateral-flow immunochromatographic assay (LFIA) test kit for the measurement of anti-PA IgG in serum or whole-blood samples (30-μl samples) using colloidal gold nanoparticles as the detection reagent and an internal control. Using sera from 19 anthrax AVA vaccinees (anti-PA IgG range, 2.4 to 340 μg/ml) and 10 controls and PA-supplemented whole-blood samples, we demonstrated that the LFIA had a sensitivity of approximately 3 μg/ml anti-PA IgG in serum and ∼14 μg/ml anti-PA IgG in whole blood. Preabsorption of sera with PA yielded negative anti-PA LFIAs. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the assay were 100% using ELISA-measured anti-PA IgG as the standard. This kit has utility in determining anti-PA antibody reactivity in the sera of individuals vaccinated with AVA or individuals with clinical anthrax. PMID:16682473

  12. Mucosal priming of newborn mice with S. Typhi Ty21a expressing anthrax protective antigen (PA) followed by parenteral PA-boost induces B and T cell-mediated immunity that protects against infection bypassing maternal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Karina; Ditamo, Yanina; Galen, James E.; Baillie, Les W. J.; Pasetti, Marcela F.

    2010-01-01

    The currently licensed anthrax vaccine has several limitations and its efficacy has been proven only in adults. Effective immunization of newborns and infants requires adequate stimulation of their immune system, which is competent but not fully activated. We explored the use of the licensed live attenuated S. Typhi vaccine strain Ty21a expressing Bacillus anthracis protective antigen [Ty21a(PA)] followed PA-alum as a strategy for immunizing the pediatric population. Newborn mice primed with a single dose of Ty21a(PA) exhibited high frequencies of mucosal IgA-secreting B cells and IFN-γ-secreting T cells during the neonatal period, none of which was detected in newborns immunized with a single dose of PA-alum. Priming with Ty21a(PA) followed by PA-boost resulted in high levels of PA-specific IgG, toxin-neutralizing and opsonophagocytic antibodies and increased frequency of bone marrow IgG plasma cells and memory B cells compared with repeated immunization with PA-alum alone. Robust B and T cell responses developed even in the presence of maternal antibodies. The prime-boost protected against systemic and respiratory infection. Mucosal priming with a safe and effective S. Typhi-based anthrax vaccine followed by PA-boost could serve as a practical and effective prophylactic approach to prevent anthrax early in life. PMID:20619377

  13. Polymorphisms in the PE35 and PPE68 antigens in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains may affect strain virulence and reflect ongoing immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yi; Wei, Jianhao; Liu, Haican; Li, Guilian; Guo, Qian; Qiu, Yan; Zhao, Lili; Li, Machao; Zhao, Xiuqin; Dou, Xiangfeng; Wan, Kanglin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the Pro‑Glu/Pro‑Pro‑Glu (PE/PPE) genes in strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis exhibit high sequence variation and may be involved in antigenic variation and immune evasion. Region of Difference 1 (RD1), encoding genes from Rv3871 to Rv3879, was observed to be lost during the original derivation of Bacillus Calmette‑Guérin between 1908 and 1921. It has been previously demonstrated that two PE/PPE proteins, PE35 (Rv3872) and PPE68 (Rv3873), are encoded by RD1 and exhibit immunodominance. To explore the genetic diversity of PE35 and PPE68, and to evaluate the impact of sequence variation on the immune recognition of these proteins, 161 clinical M. tuberculosis strains were selected from China and comparative sequence analysis of PE35 and PPE68 was performed. The results indicated that polymorphisms in PE35 and PPE68 may lead to alterations in the function of these proteins, which may potentially affect strain virulence. In addition, the human T‑cell epitopes of PE35 and PPE68 were highly variable, suggesting that the two antigens may be involved in diversifying selection to evade host immunity. The prevalence of strains with PE35 mutations in the non‑Beijing family was significantly greater compared with the Beijing family, indicating that Beijing strains may be more conservative than non‑Beijing strains in this gene.

  14. Antigenicity, Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Three Proteins Expressed in the Promastigote and Amastigote Stages of Leishmania infantum against Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Martins, Vivian Tamietti; Chávez-Fumagalli, Miguel Angel; Lage, Daniela Pagliara; Duarte, Mariana Costa; Garde, Esther; Costa, Lourena Emanuele; da Silva, Viviane Grazielle; Silva, Viviane Gomes da; Oliveira, Jamil Silvano; Magalhães-Soares, Danielle Ferreira de; Teixeira, Santuza Maria Ribeiro; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Soto, Manuel; Tavares, Carlos Alberto Pereira; Coelho, Eduardo Antonio Ferraz

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, two Leishmania infantum hypothetical proteins present in the amastigote stage, LiHyp1 and LiHyp6, were combined with a promastigote protein, IgE-dependent histamine-releasing factor (HRF); to compose a polyproteins vaccine to be evaluated against L. infantum infection. Also, the antigenicity of the three proteins was analyzed, and their use for the serodiagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) was evaluated. The LiHyp1, LiHyp6, and HRF DNA coding sequences were cloned in prokaryotic expression vectors and the recombinant proteins were purified. When employed in ELISA assays, all proteins were recognized by sera from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) dogs, and presented no cross-reactivity with either sera from dogs vaccinated with a Brazilian commercial vaccine, or sera of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected or Ehrlichia canis-infected animals. In addition, the antigens were not recognized by antibodies from non-infected animals living in endemic or non-endemic areas for leishmaniasis. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the three proteins administered in the presence of saponin, individually or in combination (composing a polyproteins vaccine), were evaluated in a VL murine model: BALB/c mice infected with L. infantum. Spleen cells from mice inoculated with the individual proteins or with the polyproteins vaccine plus saponin showed a protein-specific production of IFN-γ, IL-12, and GM-CSF after an in vitro stimulation, which was maintained after infection. These animals presented significant reductions in the parasite burden in different evaluated organs, when compared to mice inoculated with saline or saponin. The decrease in parasite burden was associated with an IL-12-dependent production of IFN-γ against parasite total extracts (produced mainly by CD4+ T cells), correlated to the induction of parasite proteins-driven NO production. Mice inoculated with the recombinant protein-based vaccines showed also high levels of parasite

  15. Antigenicity, Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Three Proteins Expressed in the Promastigote and Amastigote Stages of Leishmania infantum against Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Vivian Tamietti; Chávez-Fumagalli, Miguel Angel; Lage, Daniela Pagliara; Duarte, Mariana Costa; Garde, Esther; Costa, Lourena Emanuele; da Silva, Viviane Gomes; Oliveira, Jamil Silvano; de Magalhães-Soares, Danielle Ferreira; Teixeira, Santuza Maria Ribeiro; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Soto, Manuel; Tavares, Carlos Alberto Pereira; Coelho, Eduardo Antonio Ferraz

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, two Leishmania infantum hypothetical proteins present in the amastigote stage, LiHyp1 and LiHyp6, were combined with a promastigote protein, IgE-dependent histamine-releasing factor (HRF); to compose a polyproteins vaccine to be evaluated against L. infantum infection. Also, the antigenicity of the three proteins was analyzed, and their use for the serodiagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) was evaluated. The LiHyp1, LiHyp6, and HRF DNA coding sequences were cloned in prokaryotic expression vectors and the recombinant proteins were purified. When employed in ELISA assays, all proteins were recognized by sera from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) dogs, and presented no cross-reactivity with either sera from dogs vaccinated with a Brazilian commercial vaccine, or sera of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected or Ehrlichia canis-infected animals. In addition, the antigens were not recognized by antibodies from non-infected animals living in endemic or non-endemic areas for leishmaniasis. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the three proteins administered in the presence of saponin, individually or in combination (composing a polyproteins vaccine), were evaluated in a VL murine model: BALB/c mice infected with L. infantum. Spleen cells from mice inoculated with the individual proteins or with the polyproteins vaccine plus saponin showed a protein-specific production of IFN-γ, IL-12, and GM-CSF after an in vitro stimulation, which was maintained after infection. These animals presented significant reductions in the parasite burden in different evaluated organs, when compared to mice inoculated with saline or saponin. The decrease in parasite burden was associated with an IL-12-dependent production of IFN-γ against parasite total extracts (produced mainly by CD4+ T cells), correlated to the induction of parasite proteins-driven NO production. Mice inoculated with the recombinant protein-based vaccines showed also high levels of parasite

  16. Neem leaf glycoprotein promotes dual generation of central and effector memory CD8(+) T cells against sarcoma antigen vaccine to induce protective anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sarbari; Sarkar, Madhurima; Ghosh, Tithi; Guha, Ipsita; Bhuniya, Avishek; Saha, Akata; Dasgupta, Shayani; Barik, Subhasis; Bose, Anamika; Baral, Rathindranath

    2016-03-01

    We have previously shown that Neem Leaf Glycoprotein (NLGP) mediates sustained tumor protection by activating host immune response. Now we report that adjuvant help from NLGP predominantly generates CD44(+)CD62L(high)CCR7(high) central memory (TCM; in lymph node) and CD44(+)CD62L(low)CCR7(low) effector memory (TEM; in spleen) CD8(+) T cells of Swiss mice after vaccination with sarcoma antigen (SarAg). Generated TCM and TEM participated either to replenish memory cell pool for sustained disease free states or in rapid tumor eradication respectively. TCM generated after SarAg+NLGP vaccination underwent significant proliferation and IL-2 secretion following SarAg re-stimulation. Furthermore, SarAg+NLGP vaccination helps in greater survival of the memory precursor effector cells at the peak of the effector response and their maintenance as mature memory cells, in comparison to single modality treatment. Such response is corroborated with the reduced phosphorylation of FOXO in the cytosol and increased KLF2 in the nucleus associated with enhanced CD62L, CCR7 expression of lymph node-resident CD8(+) T cells. However, spleen-resident CD8(+) T memory cells show superior efficacy for immediate memory-to-effector cell conversion. The data support in all aspects that SarAg+NLGP demonstrate superiority than SarAg vaccination alone that benefits the host by rapid effector functions whenever required, whereas, central-memory cells are thought to replenish the memory cell pool for ultimate sustained disease free survival till 60 days following post-vaccination tumor inoculation.

  17. Structural Characterization of Humanized Nanobodies with Neutralizing Activity against the Bordetella pertussis CyaA-Hemolysin: Implications for a Potential Epitope of Toxin-Protective Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Aijaz Ahmad; Imtong, Chompounoot; Sookrung, Nitat; Katzenmeier, Gerd; Chaicumpa, Wanpen; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2016-01-01

    Previously, the 126-kDa CyaA-hemolysin (CyaA-Hly) fragment cloned from Bordetella pertussis—the causative agent of whooping cough—and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli was revealed as a key determinant for CyaA-mediated hemolysis against target erythrocytes. Here, phagemid-transfected E. coli clones producing nanobodies capable of binding to CyaA-Hly were selected from a humanized-camel VH/VHH phage-display library. Subsequently verified for binding activities by indirect ELISA and Western blotting, four CyaA-Hly-specific nanobodies were obtained and designated according to the presence/absence of VHH-hallmark amino acids as VHH2, VH5, VH18 and VHH37. In vitro neutralization assay revealed that all four ~17-kDa His-tagged VH/VHH nanobodies, in particular VHH37, which were over-expressed as inclusions and successfully unfolded-refolded, were able to effectively inhibit CyaA-Hly-mediated hemolysis. Phage-mimotope searching revealed that only peptides with sequence homologous to Linker 1 connecting Blocks I and II within the CyaA-RTX subdomain were able to bind to these four CyaA-Hly-specific nanobodies. Structural analysis of VHH37 via homology modeling and intermolecular docking confirmed that this humanized nanobody directly interacts with CyaA-RTX/Linker 1 through multiple hydrogen and ionic bonds. Altogether, our present data demonstrate that CyaA-RTX/Linker 1 could serve as a potential epitope of CyaA-protective antigen that may be useful for development of peptide-based pertussis vaccines. Additionally, such toxin-specific nanobodies have a potential for test-driven development of a ready-to-use therapeutic in passive immunization for mitigation of disease severity. PMID:27043627

  18. Phase I Study Evaluating the Safety and Pharmacokinetics of MDX-1303, a Fully Human Monoclonal Antibody against Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen, in Healthy Volunteers▿

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, Valerie; Leese, Phillip; Blanset, Diann; Adamcio, Melany; Meldorf, Matthew; Lowy, Israel

    2011-01-01

    MDX-1303 (Valortim) is a fully human monoclonal antibody (hMAb) with a high affinity for Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA). MDX-1303 binds to PA and interferes with the activity of the anthrax toxin; it was selected based on its superior functional activity in the toxin neutralization activity (TNA) assay. MDX-1303 has demonstrated efficacy in the postexposure and therapeutic settings in New Zealand White rabbits, cynomolgus monkeys, and African green monkeys. This phase I study sought to characterize the safety, tolerability, immunogenicity, and pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD) of MDX-1303 in healthy human subjects. Cohorts of 3 to 10 subjects were administered MDX-1303 as either a single intravenous (i.v.) dose at dose levels of 0.3, 1, 3, 10, and 20 mg/kg of body weight or as a single intramuscular (i.m.) dose at 100 mg. Forty-six subjects were enrolled, and 16 (35%) of these subjects experienced one or more grade 1 adverse events considered to be related to treatment with MDX-1303. There were no grade 2 to 4 adverse events or serious adverse events (SAEs) considered to be related to treatment. The mean half-life of MDX-1303 ranged from 22 to 33 days across the i.v. administration cohorts and was approximately 32 days following i.m. administration. Systemic exposure following 100-mg i.m. administration was within the range of exposure following 1-mg/kg i.v. administration with a relative bioavailability of approximately 65%. MDX-1303 was generally well tolerated, and no anti-MDX-1303 antibodies were detected following a single dose. PMID:21976227

  19. Structural Characterization of Humanized Nanobodies with Neutralizing Activity against the Bordetella pertussis CyaA-Hemolysin: Implications for a Potential Epitope of Toxin-Protective Antigen.

    PubMed

    Malik, Aijaz Ahmad; Imtong, Chompounoot; Sookrung, Nitat; Katzenmeier, Gerd; Chaicumpa, Wanpen; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2016-04-01

    Previously, the 126-kDa CyaA-hemolysin (CyaA-Hly) fragment cloned from Bordetella pertussis--the causative agent of whooping cough--and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli was revealed as a key determinant for CyaA-mediated hemolysis against target erythrocytes. Here, phagemid-transfected E. coli clones producing nanobodies capable of binding to CyaA-Hly were selected from a humanized-camel VH/VHH phage-display library. Subsequently verified for binding activities by indirect ELISA and Western blotting, four CyaA-Hly-specific nanobodies were obtained and designated according to the presence/absence of VHH-hallmark amino acids as VHH2, VH5, VH18 and VHH37. In vitro neutralization assay revealed that all four ~17-kDa His-tagged VH/VHH nanobodies, in particular VHH37, which were over-expressed as inclusions and successfully unfolded-refolded, were able to effectively inhibit CyaA-Hly-mediated hemolysis. Phage-mimotope searching revealed that only peptides with sequence homologous to Linker 1 connecting Blocks I and II within the CyaA-RTX subdomain were able to bind to these four CyaA-Hly-specific nanobodies. Structural analysis of VHH37 via homology modeling and intermolecular docking confirmed that this humanized nanobody directly interacts with CyaA-RTX/Linker 1 through multiple hydrogen and ionic bonds. Altogether, our present data demonstrate that CyaA-RTX/Linker 1 could serve as a potential epitope of CyaA-protective antigen that may be useful for development of peptide-based pertussis vaccines. Additionally, such toxin-specific nanobodies have a potential for test-driven development of a ready-to-use therapeutic in passive immunization for mitigation of disease severity.

  20. 19F Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Crystallographic Studies of 5-Fluorotryptophan-Labeled Anthrax Protective Antigen and Effects of the Receptor on Stability

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The anthrax protective antigen (PA) is an 83 kDa protein that is one of three protein components of the anthrax toxin, an AB toxin secreted by Bacillus anthracis. PA is capable of undergoing several structural changes, including oligomerization to either a heptameric or octameric structure called the prepore, and at acidic pH a major conformational change to form a membrane-spanning pore. To follow these structural changes at a residue-specific level, we have conducted initial studies in which we have biosynthetically incorporated 5-fluorotryptophan (5-FTrp) into PA, and we have studied the influence of 5-FTrp labeling on the structural stability of PA and on binding to the host receptor capillary morphogenesis protein 2 (CMG2) using 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). There are seven tryptophans in PA, but of the four domains in PA, only two contain tryptophans: domain 1 (Trp65, -90, -136, -206, and -226) and domain 2 (Trp346 and -477). Trp346 is of particular interest because of its proximity to the CMG2 binding interface, and because it forms part of the membrane-spanning pore. We show that the 19F resonance of Trp346 is sensitive to changes in pH, consistent with crystallographic studies, and that receptor binding significantly stabilizes Trp346 to both pH and temperature. In addition, we provide evidence that suggests that resonances from tryptophans distant from the binding interface are also stabilized by the receptor. Our studies highlight the positive impact of receptor binding on protein stability and the use of 19F NMR in gaining insight into structural changes in a high-molecular weight protein. PMID:24387629

  1. The Disulfide Bond Cys255-Cys279 in the Immunoglobulin-Like Domain of Anthrax Toxin Receptor 2 Is Required for Membrane Insertion of Anthrax Protective Antigen Pore

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Kyle; Altiyev, Agamyrat; Puschhof, Jens; Sauter, Roland; Arigi, Emma; Ruiz, Blanca; Peng, Xiuli; Almeida, Igor; Sherman, Michael; Xiao, Chuan; Sun, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax toxin receptors act as molecular clamps or switches that control anthrax toxin entry, pH-dependent pore formation, and translocation of enzymatic moieties across the endosomal membranes. We previously reported that reduction of the disulfide bonds in the immunoglobulin-like (Ig) domain of the anthrax toxin receptor 2 (ANTXR2) inhibited the function of the protective antigen (PA) pore. In the present study, the disulfide linkage in the Ig domain was identified as Cys255-Cys279 and Cys230-Cys315. Specific disulfide bond deletion mutants were achieved by replacing Cys residues with Ala residues. Deletion of the disulfide bond C255-C279, but not C230-C315, inhibited the PA pore-induced release of the fluorescence dyes from the liposomes, suggesting that C255-C279 is essential for PA pore function. Furthermore, we found that deletion of C255-C279 did not affect PA prepore-to-pore conversion, but inhibited PA pore membrane insertion by trapping the PA membrane-inserting loops in proteinaceous hydrophobic pockets. Fluorescence spectra of Trp59, a residue adjacent to the PA-binding motif in von Willebrand factor A (VWA) domain of ANTXR2, showed that deletion of C255-C279 resulted in a significant conformational change on the receptor ectodomain. The disulfide deletion-induced conformational change on the VWA domain was further confirmed by single-particle 3D reconstruction of the negatively stained PA-receptor heptameric complexes. Together, the biochemical and structural data obtained in this study provides a mechanistic insight into the role of the receptor disulfide bond C255-C279 in anthrax toxin action. Manipulation of the redox states of the receptor, specifically targeting to C255-C279, may become a novel strategy to treat anthrax. PMID:26107617

  2. Electrochemical immunosensor based on bismuth nanocomposite film and cadmium ions functionalized titanium phosphates for the detection of anthrax protective antigen toxin.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mukesh K; Narayanan, J; Upadhyay, Sanjay; Goel, Ajay K

    2015-12-15

    Bacillus anthracis is a bioterrorism agent classified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Herein, a novel electrochemical immunosensor for the sensitive, specific and easy detection of anthrax protective antigen (PA) toxin in picogram concentration was developed. The immunosensor consists of (i) a Nafion-multiwall carbon nanotubes-bismuth nanocomposite film modified glassy carbon electrodes (BiNPs/Nafion-MWCNTs/GCE) as a sensing platform and (ii) titanium phosphate nanoparticles-cadmium ion-mouse anti-PA antibodies (TiP-Cd(2+)-MαPA antibodies) as signal amplification tags. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX), thermogravimmetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform-infra red spectroscopy (FT-IR), zeta-potential analysis, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) were employed to characterize the synthesized TiP nanoparticles and modified electrode surfaces. The immunosensing performance of BiNPs/Nafion-MWCNTs/GCE was evaluated based on sandwich immunoassay protocol. A square wave voltammetry (SWV) scan from -1.2 to -0.3 V in HAc-NaAc buffer solution (pH 4.6) without stripping process was performed to record the electrochemical responses at -0.75 V corresponding to high content of Cd(2+) ions loaded in TiP nanoparticles for the measurement of PA toxin. Under optimal conditions, the currents increased with increasing PA toxin concentrations in spiked human serum samples and showed a linear range from 0.1 ng/ml to 100 ng/ml. The limit of detection of developed immunosensor was found to be 50 pg/ml at S/N=3. The total time of analysis was 35 min. PMID:26148674

  3. Structural Characterization of Humanized Nanobodies with Neutralizing Activity against the Bordetella pertussis CyaA-Hemolysin: Implications for a Potential Epitope of Toxin-Protective Antigen.

    PubMed

    Malik, Aijaz Ahmad; Imtong, Chompounoot; Sookrung, Nitat; Katzenmeier, Gerd; Chaicumpa, Wanpen; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2016-04-01

    Previously, the 126-kDa CyaA-hemolysin (CyaA-Hly) fragment cloned from Bordetella pertussis--the causative agent of whooping cough--and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli was revealed as a key determinant for CyaA-mediated hemolysis against target erythrocytes. Here, phagemid-transfected E. coli clones producing nanobodies capable of binding to CyaA-Hly were selected from a humanized-camel VH/VHH phage-display library. Subsequently verified for binding activities by indirect ELISA and Western blotting, four CyaA-Hly-specific nanobodies were obtained and designated according to the presence/absence of VHH-hallmark amino acids as VHH2, VH5, VH18 and VHH37. In vitro neutralization assay revealed that all four ~17-kDa His-tagged VH/VHH nanobodies, in particular VHH37, which were over-expressed as inclusions and successfully unfolded-refolded, were able to effectively inhibit CyaA-Hly-mediated hemolysis. Phage-mimotope searching revealed that only peptides with sequence homologous to Linker 1 connecting Blocks I and II within the CyaA-RTX subdomain were able to bind to these four CyaA-Hly-specific nanobodies. Structural analysis of VHH37 via homology modeling and intermolecular docking confirmed that this humanized nanobody directly interacts with CyaA-RTX/Linker 1 through multiple hydrogen and ionic bonds. Altogether, our present data demonstrate that CyaA-RTX/Linker 1 could serve as a potential epitope of CyaA-protective antigen that may be useful for development of peptide-based pertussis vaccines. Additionally, such toxin-specific nanobodies have a potential for test-driven development of a ready-to-use therapeutic in passive immunization for mitigation of disease severity. PMID:27043627

  4. Development & validation of a quantitative anti-protective antigen IgG enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for serodiagnosis of cutaneous anthrax

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, N.; Gunti, D.; Lukka, H.; Reddy, B.R.; Padmaja, Jyothi; Goel, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Anthrax caused by Bacillus anthracis is primarily a disease of herbivorous animals, although several mammals are vulnerable to it. ELISA is the most widely accepted serodiagnostic assay for large scale surveillance of cutaneous anthrax. The aims of this study were to develop and evaluate a quantitative ELISA for determination of IgG antibodies against B. anthracis protective antigen (PA) in human cutaneous anthrax cases. Methods: Quantitative ELISA was developed using the recombinant PA for coating and standard reference serum AVR801 for quantification. A total of 116 human test and control serum samples were used in the study. The assay was evaluated for its precision, accuracy and linearity. Results: The minimum detection limit and lower limit of quantification of the assay for anti-PA IgG were 3.2 and 4 µg/ml, respectively. The serum samples collected from the anthrax infected patients were found to have anti-PA IgG concentrations of 5.2 to 166.3 µg/ml. The intra-assay precision per cent CV within an assay and within an operator ranged from 0.99 to 7.4 per cent and 1.7 to 3.9 per cent, respectively. The accuracy of the assay was high with a per cent error of 6.5 - 24.1 per cent. The described assay was found to be linear between the range of 4 to 80 ng/ml (R2=0.9982; slope=0.9186; intercept = 0.1108). Interpretation & conclusions: The results suggested that the developed assay could be a useful tool for quantification of anti-PA IgG response in human after anthrax infection or vaccination. PMID:26354217

  5. Prime-boost bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination with lentivirus-vectored and DNA-based vaccines expressing antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 improves protective efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Yang, Enzhuo; Wang, Jianguang; Li, Rui; Li, Guanghua; Liu, Guoyuan; Song, Na; Huang, Qi; Kong, Cong; Wang, Honghai

    2014-10-01

    To prevent the global spread of tuberculosis (TB), more effective vaccines and vaccination strategies are urgently needed. As a result of the success of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in protecting children against miliary and meningeal TB, the majority of individuals will have been vaccinated with BCG; hence, boosting BCG-primed immunity will probably be a key component of future vaccine strategies. In this study, we compared the ability of DNA-, protein- and lentiviral vector-based vaccines that express the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 to boost the effects of BCG in the context of immunity and protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in C57BL/6 mice. Our results demonstrated that prime-boost BCG vaccination with a lentiviral vector expressing the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 significantly enhanced immune responses, including T helper type 1 and CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses, compared with DNA- and protein-based vaccines. However, lentivirus-vectored and DNA-based vaccines greatly improved the protective efficacy of BCG against M. tuberculosis, as indicated by a lack of weight loss and significantly reduced bacterial loads and histological damage in the lung. Our study suggests that the use of lentiviral or DNA vaccines containing the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 to boost BCG is a good choice for the rational design of an efficient vaccination strategy against TB.

  6. Recombinant Protective Antigen Anthrax Vaccine Improves Survival when Administered as a Postexposure Prophylaxis Countermeasure with Antibiotic in the New Zealand White Rabbit Model of Inhalation Anthrax

    PubMed Central

    Bourdage, James S.; Williamson, E. Diane; Duchars, Matthew; Fuerst, Thomas R.; Fusco, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Inhalation anthrax is a potentially lethal form of disease resulting from exposure to aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores. Over the last decade, incidents spanning from the deliberate mailing of B. anthracis spores to incidental exposures in users of illegal drugs have highlighted the importance of developing new medical countermeasures to protect people who have been exposed to “anthrax spores” and are at risk of developing disease. The New Zealand White rabbit (NZWR) is a well-characterized model that has a pathogenesis and clinical presentation similar to those seen in humans. This article reports how the NZWR model was adapted to evaluate postexposure prophylaxis using a recombinant protective antigen (rPA) vaccine in combination with an oral antibiotic, levofloxacin. NZWRs were exposed to multiples of the 50% lethal dose (LD50) of B. anthracis spores and then vaccinated immediately (day 0) and again on day 7 postexposure. Levofloxacin was administered daily beginning at 6 to 12 h postexposure for 7 treatments. Rabbits were evaluated for clinical signs of disease, fever, bacteremia, immune response, and survival. A robust immune response (IgG anti-rPA and toxin-neutralizing antibodies) was observed in all vaccinated groups on days 10 to 12. Levofloxacin plus either 30 or 100 μg rPA vaccine resulted in a 100% survival rate (18 of 18 per group), and a vaccine dose as low as 10 μg rPA resulted in an 89% survival rate (16 of 18) when used in combination with levofloxacin. In NZWRs that received antibiotic alone, the survival rate was 56% (10 of 18). There was no adverse effect on the development of a specific IgG response to rPA in unchallenged NZWRs that received the combination treatment of vaccine plus antibiotic. This study demonstrated that an accelerated two-dose regimen of rPA vaccine coadministered on days 0 and 7 with 7 days of levofloxacin therapy results in a significantly greater survival rate than with antibiotic treatment alone. Combination of

  7. Evaluating the A-Subunit of the Heat-Labile Toxin (LT) As an Immunogen and a Protective Antigen Against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC).

    PubMed

    Norton, Elizabeth B; Branco, Luis M; Clements, John D

    2015-01-01

    Diarrheal illness contributes to malnutrition, stunted growth, impaired cognitive development, and high morbidity rates in children worldwide. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major contributor to this diarrheal disease burden. ETEC cause disease in the small intestine by means of colonization factors and by production of a heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) and/or a small non-immunogenic heat-stable enterotoxin (ST). Overall, the majority of ETEC produce both ST and LT. LT induces secretion via an enzymatically active A-subunit (LT-A) and a pentameric, cell-binding B-subunit (LT-B). The importance of anti-LT antibodies has been demonstrated in multiple clinical and epidemiological studies, and a number of potential ETEC vaccine candidates have included LT-B as an important immunogen. However, there is limited information about the potential contribution of LT-A to development of protective immunity. In the current study, we evaluate the immune response against the A-subunit of LT as well as the A-subunit's potential as a protective antigen when administered alone or in combination with the B-subunit of LT. We evaluated human sera from individuals challenged with a prototypic wild-type ETEC strain as well as sera from individuals living in an ETEC endemic area for the presence of anti-LT, anti-LT-A and anti-LT-B antibodies. In both cases, a significant number of individuals intentionally or endemically infected with ETEC developed antibodies against both LT subunits. In addition, animals immunized with the recombinant proteins developed robust antibody responses that were able to neutralize the enterotoxic and cytotoxic effects of native LT by blocking binding and entry into cells (anti-LT-B) or the intracellular enzymatic activity of the toxin (anti-LT-A). Moreover, antibodies to both LT subunits acted synergistically to neutralize the holotoxin when combined. Taken together, these data support the inclusion of both LT-A and LT-B in prospective vaccines

  8. Pathways of Antigen Processing

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Janice S.; Wearsch, Pamela A.; Cresswell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    T cell recognition of antigen presenting cells depends on their expression of a spectrum of peptides bound to Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC-I) and class II (MHC-II) molecules. Conversion of antigens from pathogens or transformed cells into MHC-I and MHC-II-bound peptides is critical for mounting protective T cell responses, and similar processing of self proteins is necessary to establish and maintain tolerance. Cells use a variety of mechanisms to acquire protein antigens, from translation in the cytosol to variations on the theme of endocytosis, and to degrade them once acquired. In this review we highlight the aspects of MHC-I and MHC-II biosynthesis and assembly that have evolved to intersect these pathways and sample the peptides that are produced. PMID:23298205

  9. Induction of mucosal immune responses and protection of cattle against direct-contact challenge by intranasal delivery with foot-and-mouth disease virus antigen mediated by nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li; Zhang, Zhongwang; Lv, Jianliang; Zhou, Peng; Hu, Wenfa; Fang, Yuzhen; Chen, Haotai; Liu, Xinsheng; Shao, Junjun; Zhao, Furong; Ding, Yaozhong; Lin, Tong; Chang, Huiyun; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Yongguang; Wang, Yonglu

    2014-01-01

    the Chi-PLGA-DNA nanoparticle-immunized group. Only one animal was clinically affected with mild signs after 7 days of contact challenge, after a delay of 2–3 days compared with the clinically affected negative-control group. Of the five animals directly challenged that were vaccinated by intranasal route with a double dose of Chi-Tre-Inactivated, four were clinically infected; however, the degree of severity of disease in this group was lower than in control cattle. The number of viral RNA copies in nasal swabs from the vaccinated, severely infected group was significantly higher than in swabs from the vaccinated, clinically protected group. These data suggested that intranasal delivery of Chi-PLGA-DNA nanoparticles resulted in higher levels of mucosal, systemic, and cell-mediated immunity than did of Chi-Tre-Inactivated nanoparticles. In conclusion, although intranasal delivery with FMDV antigen mediated by nanoparticles did not provide complete clinical protection, it reduced disease severity and virus excretion and delayed clinical symptoms. Chi-PLGA-DNA nanoparticle vaccines have potential as a nasal delivery system for vaccines. PMID:25506214

  10. Antigen-dependent proliferation and cytokine induction in respiratory syncytial virus-infected cotton rats reflect the presence of effector-memory T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Bettina W.M.; Onuska, Jaya M.; Niewiesk, Stefan; Prince, Gregory A.; Eichelberger, Maryna C. . E-mail: MarynaE@virionsystems.com

    2005-06-20

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of lower airway disease in infants and children. Immunity to RSV is not long lasting, resulting in re-occurring infections throughout life. Effective long-lived immunity results when central-memory T cells that proliferate vigorously and secrete IL-2 are present. In contrast, effector-memory T cells that mainly produce IFN-{gamma}, facilitate virus clearance but are not long lived. To identify the type of memory response induced after RSV-A (Long) infection, we characterized the kinetics of the antigen-specific immune response and identified the types of cytokines induced. RSV-specific lymphocytic proliferation following primary and secondary infection was similar, and in both cases responses waned within a short period of time. In addition, mRNA for IFN-{gamma} but not IL-2 was induced in RSV-specific CD4{sup +} T cells. This supports the idea that the presence of effector-memory rather than central-memory T cells contributes to the ineffectiveness of the immune response to RSV.

  11. Naturally processed HLA class II peptides reveal highly conserved immunogenic flanking region sequence preferences that reflect antigen processing rather than peptide-MHC interactions.

    PubMed

    Godkin, A J; Smith, K J; Willis, A; Tejada-Simon, M V; Zhang, J; Elliott, T; Hill, A V

    2001-06-01

    MHC class II heterodimers bind peptides 12-20 aa in length. The peptide flanking residues (PFRs) of these ligands extend from a central binding core consisting of nine amino acids. Increasing evidence suggests that the PFRs can alter the immunogenicity of T cell epitopes. We have previously noted that eluted peptide pool sequence data derived from an MHC class II Ag reflect patterns of enrichment not only in the core binding region but also in the PFRS: We sought to distinguish whether these enrichments reflect cellular processes or direct MHC-peptide interactions. Using the multiple sclerosis-associated allele HLA-DR2, pool sequence data from naturally processed ligands were compared with the patterns of enrichment obtained by binding semicombinatorial peptide libraries to empty HLA-DR2 molecules. Naturally processed ligands revealed patterns of enrichment reflecting both the binding motif of HLA-DR2 (position (P)1, aliphatic; P4, bulky hydrophobic; and P6, polar) as well as the nonbound flanking regions, including acidic residues at the N terminus and basic residues at the C terminus. These PFR enrichments were independent of MHC-peptide interactions. Further studies revealed similar patterns in nine other HLA alleles, with the C-terminal basic residues being as highly conserved as the previously described N-terminal prolines of MHC class II ligands. There is evidence that addition of C-terminal basic PFRs to known peptide epitopes is able to enhance both processing as well as T cell activation. Recognition of these allele-transcending patterns in the PFRs may prove useful in epitope identification and vaccine design.

  12. Elongation Factor-1α Is a Novel Protein Associated with Host Cell Invasion and a Potential Protective Antigen of Cryptosporidium parvum *

    PubMed Central

    Matsubayashi, Makoto; Teramoto-Kimata, Isao; Uni, Shigehiko; Lillehoj, Hyun S.; Matsuda, Haruo; Furuya, Masaru; Tani, Hiroyuki; Sasai, Kazumi

    2013-01-01

    The phylum Apicomplexa comprises obligate intracellular parasites that infect vertebrates. All invasive forms of Apicomplexa possess an apical complex, a unique assembly of organelles localized to the anterior end of the cell and involved in host cell invasion. Previously, we generated a chicken monoclonal antibody (mAb), 6D-12-G10, with specificity for an antigen located in the apical cytoskeleton of Eimeria acervulina sporozoites. This antigen was highly conserved among Apicomplexan parasites, including other Eimeria spp., Toxoplasma, Neospora, and Cryptosporidium. In the present study, we identified the apical cytoskeletal antigen of Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) and further characterized this antigen in C. parvum to assess its potential as a target molecule against cryptosporidiosis. Indirect immunofluorescence demonstrated that the reactivity of 6D-12-G10 with C. parvum sporozoites was similar to those of anti-β- and anti-γ-tubulins antibodies. Immunoelectron microscopy with the 6D-12-G10 mAb detected the antigen both on the sporozoite surface and underneath the inner membrane at the apical region of zoites. The 6D-12-G10 mAb significantly inhibited in vitro host cell invasion by C. parvum. MALDI-TOF/MS and LC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic peptides revealed that the mAb 6D-12-G10 target antigen was elongation factor-1α (EF-1α). These results indicate that C. parvum EF-1α plays an essential role in mediating host cell entry by the parasite and, as such, could be a candidate vaccine antigen against cryptosporidiosis. PMID:24085304

  13. Circulating Autoantibodies in Age-Related Macular Degeneration Recognize Human Macular Tissue Antigens Implicated in Autophagy, Immunomodulation, and Protection from Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Iannaccone, Alessandro; Giorgianni, Francesco; New, David D.; Hollingsworth, T. J.; Umfress, Allison; Alhatem, Albert H.; Neeli, Indira; Lenchik, Nataliya I.; Jennings, Barbara J.; Calzada, Jorge I.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Mathews, Dennis; Diaz, Rocio I.; Harris, Tamara; Johnson, Karen C.; Charles, Steve; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Gerling, Ivan C.; Beranova-Giorgianni, Sarka; Radic, Marko Z.

    2015-01-01

    Background We investigated sera from elderly subjects with and without age-related macular degeneration (AMD) for presence of autoantibodies (AAbs) against human macular antigens and characterized their identity. Methods Sera were collected from participants in the Age-Related Maculopathy Ancillary (ARMA) Study, a cross-sectional investigation ancillary to the Health ABC Study, enriched with participants from the general population. The resulting sample (mean age: 79.2±3.9 years old) included subjects with early to advanced AMD (n = 131) and controls (n = 231). Sera were tested by Western blots for immunoreactive bands against human donor macular tissue homogenates. Immunoreactive bands were identified and graded, and odds ratios (OR) calculated. Based on these findings, sera were immunoprecipitated, and subjected to 2D gel electrophoresis (GE). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to identify the targets recognized by circulating AAbs seen on 2D-GE, followed by ELISAs with recombinant proteins to confirm LC-MS/MS results, and quantify autoreactivities. Results In AMD, 11 immunoreactive bands were significantly more frequent and 13 were significantly stronger than in controls. Nine of the more frequent bands also showed stronger reactivity. OR estimates ranged between 4.06 and 1.93, and all clearly excluded the null value. Following immunoprecipitation, 2D-GE and LC-MS/MS, five of the possible autoreactivity targets were conclusively identified: two members of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) family, HSPA8 and HSPA9; another member of the HSP family, HSPB4, also known as alpha-crystallin A chain (CRYAA); Annexin A5 (ANXA5); and Protein S100-A9, also known as calgranulin B that, when complexed with S100A8, forms calprotectin. ELISA testing with recombinant proteins confirmed, on average, significantly higher reactivities against all targets in AMD samples compared to controls. Conclusions Consistent with other evidence supporting the

  14. Susceptible and Protective Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II Alleles and Haplotypes in Bahraini Type 2 (Non-Insulin-Dependent) Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Motala, Ayesha A.; Busson, Marc; Al-Harbi, Einas M.; Khuzam, Manal A. A.; Al-Omari, Emtiaz M. D.; Arekat, Mona R.; Almawi, Wassim Y.

    2005-01-01

    Whereas the genetic risk for type 1 diabetes is linked to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes, the HLA association in type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes is less clear. The association between HLA class II genotypes and type 2 diabetes was examined in adult Bahrainis, an Arab population with a high prevalence of type 2 diabetes. HLA-DRB1* and -DQB1* genotyping of 86 unrelated type 2 diabetes patients (age, 51.6 ± 8.2 years; mean duration of diabetes, 7.7 ± 7.1 years) who had a strong family history of diabetes (52 of 72 versus 0 of 89 for controls, P < 0.001) and 89 healthy subjects was done by PCR-sequence-specific priming. DRB1*040101 (0.1221 versus 0.0562, P = 0.019) and DRB1*070101 (0.2151 versus 0.0843, P < 0.001) were positively associated, while DRB1*110101 (0.0698 versus 0.1461, P = 0.014) and DRB1*160101 (0.0640 versus 0.1236, P = 0.038) were negatively associated with type 2 diabetes. DRB1*040101-DQB1*0302 (0.069 versus 0.0007; P = 0.004), DRB1*070101-DQB1*0201 (0.178 versus 0.0761, P = 0.007), DRB1*070101-DQB1*050101 (0.125 versus 0.0310, P = 0.002), and DRB1*150101-DQB1*060101 (0.0756 versus 0.0281, P = 0.008) were more prevalent among patients, while DRB1*160101-DQB1*050101 (0.0702 versus 0.0349, P = 0.05) was more prevalent among controls, conferring disease susceptibility or protection, respectively. In Bahrainis with type 2 diabetes, there is a significant association with select HLA class II genotypes, which were distinct from those in type 1 diabetes. PMID:15643010

  15. Major cytoplasmic membrane protein of Legionella pneumophila, a genus common antigen and member of the hsp 60 family of heat shock proteins, induces protective immunity in a guinea pig model of Legionnaires' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Blander, S J; Horwitz, M A

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the capacity of the major cytoplasmic membrane protein (MCMP) of Legionella pneumophila, a genus common antigen and member of the hsp 60 family of heat shock proteins, to induce protective immunity in a guinea pig model of Legionnaires' disease. We purified MCMP to homogeneity from L. pneumophila by buffer extraction, ion-exchange chromatography, and molecular sieve chromatography. Guinea pigs immunized with MCMP developed a strong cell-mediated immune response to the immunogen manifest by marked cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity. Guinea pigs immunized with MCMP and then challenged with a lethal aerosol dose of L. pneumophila exhibited a high level of protective immunity. Altogether, in four independent experiments, 55 of 64 (86%) animals immunized three times with 0.6-40 micrograms MCMP including 11 of 11 (100%) animals immunized three times with 40 micrograms MCMP survived aerosol challenge with L. pneumophila compared with 1 of 29 (3%) sham-immunized control animals (P < 0.0001, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel X2 statistic for pooled data). To our knowledge, MCMP is the first member of the hsp 60 family of proteins shown to induce protective immunity to a microbial pathogen. MCMP has potential as a vaccine against Legionnaires' disease. Since MCMP is a genus common antigen, vaccination with a combination of MCMPs derived from different Legionella species has the potential of inducing protective immunity against all the major Legionella species causing human disease. Images PMID:8432872

  16. Vaccination with a Fusion Protein That Introduces HIV-1 Gag Antigen into a Multitrimer CD40L Construct Results in Enhanced CD8+ T Cell Responses and Protection from Viral Challenge by Vaccinia-Gag

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin; Termini, James M.; Raffa, Francesca N.; Williams, Cindi-Ann; Kornbluth, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154) is a membrane protein that is important for the activation of dendritic cells (DCs) and DC-induced CD8+ T cell responses. To be active, CD40L must cluster CD40 receptors on responding cells. To produce a soluble form of CD40L that clusters CD40 receptors necessitates the use of a multitrimer construct. With this in mind, a tripartite fusion protein was made from surfactant protein D (SPD), HIV-1 Gag as a test antigen, and CD40L, where SPD serves as a scaffold for the multitrimer protein complex. This SPD-Gag-CD40L protein activated CD40-bearing cells and bone marrow-derived DCs in vitro. Compared to a plasmid for Gag antigen alone (pGag), DNA vaccination of mice with pSPD-Gag-CD40L induced an increased number of Gag-specific CD8+ T cells with increased avidity for major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted Gag peptide and improved vaccine-induced protection from challenge by vaccinia-Gag virus. The importance of the multitrimeric nature of the complex was shown using a plasmid lacking the N terminus of SPD that produced a single trimer fusion protein. This plasmid, pTrimer-Gag-CD40L, was only weakly active on CD40-bearing cells and did not elicit strong CD8+ T cell responses or improve protection from vaccinia-Gag challenge. An adenovirus 5 (Ad5) vaccine incorporating SPD-Gag-CD40L was much stronger than Ad5 expressing Gag alone (Ad5-Gag) and induced complete protection (i.e., sterilizing immunity) from vaccinia-Gag challenge. Overall, these results show the potential of a new vaccine design in which antigen is introduced into a construct that expresses a multitrimer soluble form of CD40L, leading to strongly protective CD8+ T cell responses. PMID:24227853

  17. Purified herpes simplex type 1 glycoprotein D (gD) genetically fused with the type 16 human papillomavirus E7 oncoprotein enhances antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses and confers protective antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Porchia, Bruna F M M; Diniz, Mariana O; Cariri, Francisco A M O; Santana, Vinícius C; Amorim, Jaime H; Balan, Andrea; Braga, Catarina J M; Ferreira, Luís Carlos S

    2011-12-01

    Type 1 herpes virus (HSV-1) glycoprotein D (gD) enhances antigen-specific immune responses, particularly CD8(+) T cell responses, in mice immunized with DNA vaccines encoding hybrid proteins genetically fused with the target antigen at a site near the C-terminal end. These effects are attributed to the interaction of gD with the herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) and the concomitant blockade of a coinhibitory mechanism mediated by the B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA). However, questions concerning the requirement for endogenous synthesis of the antigen or the adjuvant/antigen fusion itself have not been addressed so far. In the present study, we investigated these points using purified recombinant gDs, genetically fused or not with type 16 papilloma virus (HPV-16) E7 oncoprotein. Soluble recombinant gDs, but not denatured forms, retained the ability to bind surface-exposed cellular receptors of HVEM-expressing U937 cells. In addition, in vivo administration of the recombinant proteins, particularly gD genetically fused with E7 (gDE7), promoted the activation of dendritic cells (DC) and antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. More relevantly, mice immunized with the gDE7 protein developed complete preventive and partial therapeutic antitumor protection, as measured in mice following the implantation of TC-1 cells expressing HPV-16 oncoproteins. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the T cell adjuvant effects of the HSV-1 gD protein did not require endogenous synthesis and could be demonstrated in mice immunized with purified recombinant proteins.

  18. A Three-Dose Intramuscular Injection Schedule of Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed Generates Sustained Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses to Protective Antigen and Provides Long-Term Protection against Inhalation Anthrax in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Sabourin, Carol L.; Niemuth, Nancy A.; Li, Han; Semenova, Vera A.; Rudge, Thomas L.; Mayfield, Heather J.; Schiffer, Jarad; Mittler, Robert S.; Ibegbu, Chris C.; Wrammert, Jens; Ahmed, Rafi; Brys, April M.; Hunt, Robert E.; Levesque, Denyse; Estep, James E.; Barnewall, Roy E.; Robinson, David M.; Plikaytis, Brian D.; Marano, Nina

    2012-01-01

    A 3-dose (0, 1, and 6 months) intramuscular (3-IM) priming series of a human dose (HuAVA) and dilutions of up to 1:10 of anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA) provided statistically significant levels of protection (60 to 100%) against inhalation anthrax for up to 4 years in rhesus macaques. Serum anti-protective antigen (anti-PA) IgG and lethal toxin neutralization activity (TNA) were detectable following a single injection of HuAVA or 1:5 AVA or following two injections of diluted vaccine (1:10, 1:20, or 1:40 AVA). Anti-PA and TNA were highly correlated (overall r2 = 0.89 for log10-transformed data). Peak responses were seen at 6.5 months. In general, with the exception of animals receiving 1:40 AVA, serum anti-PA and TNA responses remained significantly above control levels at 28.5 months (the last time point measured for 1:20 AVA), and through 50.5 months for the HuAVA and 1:5 and 1:10 AVA groups (P < 0.05). PA-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) CD4+ cell frequencies and T cell stimulation indices were sustained through 50.5 months (the last time point measured). PA-specific memory B cell frequencies were highly variable but, in general, were detectable in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by 2 months, were significantly above control levels by 7 months, and remained detectable in the HuAVA and 1:5 and 1:20 AVA groups through 42 months (the last time point measured). HuAVA and diluted AVA elicited a combined Th1/Th2 response and robust immunological priming, with sustained production of high-avidity PA-specific functional antibody, long-term immune cell competence, and immunological memory (30 months for 1:20 AVA and 52 months for 1:10 AVA). Vaccinated animals surviving inhalation anthrax developed high-magnitude anamnestic anti-PA IgG and TNA responses. PMID:22933399

  19. Evaluation of the antigenic relatedness and cross-protective immunity of the neuraminidase between human influenza A (H1N1) virus and highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) virus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiuhua; Liu, Feng; Zeng, Hui; Sheu, Tiffany; Achenbach, Jenna E; Veguilla, Vic; Gubareva, Larisa V; Garten, Rebecca; Smith, Catherine; Yang, Hua; Stevens, James; Xu, Xiyan; Katz, Jacqueline M; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2014-04-01

    To determine the genetic and antigenic relatedness as well as the cross-protective immunity of human H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza virus neuraminidase (NA), we immunized rabbits with either a baculovirus-expressed recombinant NA from A/Beijing/262/95 (BJ/262) H1N1 or A/Hong Kong/483/97 (HK/483) H5N1 virus. Cross-reactive antibody responses were evaluated by multiple serological assays and cross-protection against H5N1 virus challenge was evaluated in mice. In a neuraminidase inhibition (NI) test, the antisera exhibited substantial inhibition of NA activity of the homologous virus, but failed to inhibit the NA activity of heterologous virus. However, these antisera exhibited low levels of cross-reactivity measured by plaque size reduction, replication inhibition, single radial hemolysis, and ELISA assays. Passive immunization with HK/483 NA-specific antisera significantly reduced virus replication and disease, and afforded almost complete protection against lethal homologous virus challenge in mice. However, passive immunization with BJ/262 (H1N1) NA-specific antisera was ineffective at providing cross-protection against lethal H5N1 virus challenge and only slightly reduced weight loss. Substantial amino acid variation among the NA antigenic sites was observed between BJ/262 and HK/483 virus, which was consistent with the lack of cross-reactive NI activity by the antibody and limited cross-protective immunity in mice. These results show a strong correlation between the lack of cross-protective immunity and low structural similarities of NA from a human seasonal H1N1 virus and an avian H5N1 influenza virus.

  20. [HLA antigens in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Rumba, I V; Sochnev, A M; Kukaĭne, E M; Burshteĭn, A M; Benevolenskaia, L I

    1990-01-01

    Antigens of I class HLA system (locus A and B) were investigated in 67 patients of Latvian nationality suffering from juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Associations of HLA antigens with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis partially coincided with the ones revealed earlier. Typing established an increased incidence of antigen B27 (p less than 0.01) and gaplotype A2, B40 (p less than 0.01). Antigen B15 possessed a protective action with respect to JRA. Interlocus combinations demonstrated a closer association with the disease than a single antigen. The authors also revealed markers of various clinico-anatomical variants of JRA.

  1. Novel 6xHis tagged foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine bound to nanolipoprotein adjuvant via metal ions provides antigenic distinction and effective protective immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here, we engineered two FMD viruses and histidine residues inserted into or fused to the FMDV capsid. Both 6xHis viruses exhibited growth kinetics, plaque morphologies and antigenic characteristics similar to wild-type virus. The 6xHis tag allowed one-step purification of the mutant virions by Co2...

  2. Intranasal Immunization with Influenza Virus-Like Particles Containing Membrane-Anchored Cholera Toxin B or Ricin Toxin B Enhances Adaptive Immune Responses and Protection against an Antigenically Distinct Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xianliang; Ren, Zhiguang; Xu, Na; Meng, Lingnan; Yu, Zhijun; Feng, Na; Sang, Xiaoyu; Li, Shengnan; Li, Yuanguo; Wang, Tiecheng; Zhao, Yongkun; Wang, Hualei; Zheng, Xuexing; Jin, Hongli; Li, Nan; Yang, Songtao; Cao, Jinshan; Liu, Wensen; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination is the most effective means to prevent influenza virus infection, although current approaches are associated with suboptimal efficacy. Here, we generated virus-like particles (VLPs) composed of the hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA) and matrix protein (M1) of A/Changchun/01/2009 (H1N1) with or without either membrane-anchored cholera toxin B (CTB) or ricin toxin B (RTB) as molecular adjuvants. The intranasal immunization of mice with VLPs containing membrane-anchored CTB or RTB elicited stronger humoral and cellular immune responses when compared to mice immunized with VLPs alone. Administration of VLPs containing CTB or RTB significantly enhanced virus-specific systemic and mucosal antibody responses, hemagglutination inhibiting antibody titers, virus neutralizing antibody titers, and the frequency of virus-specific IFN-γ and IL-4 secreting splenocytes. VLPs with and without CTB or RTB conferred complete protection against lethal challenge with a mouse-adapted homologous virus. When challenged with an antigenically distinct H1N1 virus, all mice immunized with VLPs containing CTB or RTB survived whereas mice immunized with VLPs alone showed only partial protection (80% survival). Our results suggest that membrane-anchored CTB and RTB possess strong adjuvant properties when incorporated into an intranasally-delivered influenza VLP vaccine. Chimeric influenza VLPs containing CTB or RTB may represent promising vaccine candidates for improved immunological protection against homologous and antigenically distinct influenza viruses. PMID:27110810

  3. In vitro binding of anthrax protective antigen on bacteriophage T4 capsid surface through Hoc-capsid interactions: A strategy for efficient display of large full-length proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shivachandra, Sathish B.; Rao, Mangala; Janosi, Laszlo; Sathaliyawala, Taheri; Matyas, Gary R.; Alving, Carl R.; Leppla, Stephen H.; Rao, Venigalla B. . E-mail: rao@cua.edu

    2006-02-05

    An in vitro binding system is described to display large full-length proteins on bacteriophage T4 capsid surface at high density. The phage T4 icosahedral capsid features 155 copies of a nonessential highly antigenic outer capsid protein, Hoc, at the center of each major capsid protein hexon. Gene fusions were engineered to express the 83-kDa protective antigen (PA) from Bacillus anthracis fused to the N-terminus of Hoc and the 130-kDa PA-Hoc protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The purified PA-Hoc was assembled in vitro on hoc {sup -} phage particles. Binding was specific, stable, and of high affinity. This defined in vitro system allowed manipulation of the copy number of displayed PA and imposed no significant limitation on the size of the displayed antigen. In contrast to in vivo display systems, the in vitro approach allows all the capsid binding sites to be occupied by the 130-kDa PA-Hoc fusion protein. The PA-T4 particles were immunogenic in mice in the absence of an adjuvant, eliciting strong PA-specific antibodies and anthrax lethal toxin neutralizing antibodies. The in vitro display on phage T4 offers a novel platform for potential construction of customized vaccines against anthrax and other infectious diseases.

  4. Evaluation of cross-protection between O1 Manisa and O1 Campos in cattle vaccinated with foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine incorporating different payloads of inactivated O1 Manisa antigen.

    PubMed

    Nagendrakumar, Singanallur Balasubramanian; Srinivasan, Villuppanoor Alwar; Madhanmohan, Muthukrishnan; Yuvaraj, Shanmugam; Parida, Satya; Di Nardo, Antonello; Horsington, Jacquelyn; Paton, David James

    2011-02-24

    Serology is used to predict vaccine induced protection against challenge with a heterologous strain of the same serotype of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). To evaluate the accuracy of such predictions, we compared the protection afforded to cattle vaccinated with the O(1) Manisa strain of FMDV against challenge with either a homologous (O(1) Manisa) or a heterologous strain (O(1) Campos). Serology by virus neutralization test (VNT) using O(1) Manisa antiserum predicted an acceptable protection against such a challenge. Two experiments were carried out to compare the results for consistency. A total of 78 naïve cattle were vaccinated with different antigen payloads (60-0.94 μg) of O(1) Manisa. They were challenged by intradermolingual inoculation with live FMDV, either O(1) Manisa or O(1) Campos. Unvaccinated naïve control cattle (n=20) were also challenged with either the O(1) Manisa or O(1) Campos viruses and all developed generalized FMD. The protection results for the vaccinated cattle revealed that higher payloads of O(1) Manisa vaccine were needed to protect against heterologous challenge compared to that for homologous challenge. The 50% protective dose (PD(50)) values for the vaccine in experiments 1 and 2 were found to be 28.78 and 9.44 for the homologous challenge and 3.98 and 5.01 for heterologous challenge. Furthermore, protection against O(1) Campos required a higher level of vaccine-induced antibody against this virus compared to the level of O(1) Manisa neutralizing antibody associated with protection against homologous challenge. The 50% protective level of in vitro neutralizing antibody was found to be log(10)1.827 for O(1) Campos and log(10)0.954 for O(1) Manisa based on O(1) Manisa based virus neutralization test.

  5. Transcending the Majority Rights and Minority Protection Dichotomy through Multicultural Reflective Citizenship in the African Great Lakes Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ndura, Elavie

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the author examines how colonial racist policies and western-bound post-colonial educational practices have contributed to the recurring ethnic conflicts in the Great Lakes region of Africa. After defining democracy and reflective citizenship within the African context, she discusses how teachers' roles should be redefined and…

  6. Evaluation of recombinant Neospora caninum antigens purified from silkworm larvae for the protection of N. caninum infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Mai; Otsuki, Takahiro; Itagaki, Kohei; Kato, Tatsuya; Kohsaka, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Yumino; Ike, Kazunori; Park, Enoch Y

    2015-12-01

    Three antigens (NcSAG1, NcSRS2 and NcMIC3) from Neospora caninum were expressed using the BmNPV bacmid system in silkworm larvae and purified from the hemolymph. From 20 silkworm larvae, 1.5, 1.2 and 1.4 mg of purified recombinant NcSAG1, NcSRS2 and NcMIC3 were obtained, respectively. When each purified recombinant antigen was immunized with Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA) to mice, recombinant NcSAG1 induced a Th2 immune response in immunized mice and produced a SAG1-specific antibody. In the experiment where NcSAG1-immunized mice were challenged with N. caninum, the cerebral N. caninum burden was significantly reduced compared with that of either the FIA- or PBS-immunized mice. Recombinant NcSRS2 or NcMIC3 induced both Th1 and Th2 immune responses, but NcMIC3-immunization did not induce significant production of NcMIC3-specific antibodies. These results suggest that the silkworm can produce recombinant antigens of N. caninum, which can be used as a recombinant vaccine against N. caninum.

  7. X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence diffraction studies of the adhesion of protective wax coatings on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creagh, D. C.; Otieno-Alego, V.; O'Neill, P. M.

    2001-06-01

    More than 50 years after the introduction of water displacing petroleum additives for corrosion protection, scientists are still trying to understand how and why they work. This paper continues research on corrosion preventatives used on objects in museum custody using synchrotron radiation techniques to assess the thickness and organization of the protective layers of corrosion preventative. The organization of sodium dodecylsulphate on aluminium, zinc and platinum surfaces has been studied. As well, preliminary in situ experiments using synchrotron radiation have been undertaken on electrode processes in an electrochemical cell using platinum electrodes and a sodium sulphate solution at different applied potentials.

  8. The highly antigenic 53/25 kDa Taenia solium protein fraction with cathepsin-L like activity is present in the oncosphere/cysticercus and induces non-protective IgG antibodies in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Zimic, Mirko; Pajuelo, Mónica; Gilman, Robert H.; Gutiérrez, Andrés H.; Rueda, Luis D.; Flores, Myra; Chile, Nancy; Verástegui, Manuela; Gonzalez, Armando; García, Héctor H.; Sheen, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Cathepsin L-like proteases are secreted by several parasites including Taenia solium. The mechanism used by T. solium oncospheres to degrade and penetrate the intestine and infect the host is incompletely understood. It is assumed that intestinal degradation is driven by the proteolytic activity of enzymes secreted by the oncosphere. Blocking the proteolytic activity by an antibody response would prevent the oncosphere penetration and further infection. Serine and cysteine proteases including chymotrypsin, trypsin, elastase, and cathepsin L, are secreted by T. solium and Taenia saginata oncospheres when cultured in vitro, being potential vaccine candidates. However, the purification of a sufficient quantity of proteases secreted by oncospheres to conduct a vaccine trial is costly and lengthy. A 53/25 kDa cathepsin L-like fraction partially purified from T. solium cyst fluid was described previously as an important antigen for immunodiagnostics. In this study we found that this antigen is present in the T. solium oncosphere and is also secreted by the cysticercus. This protein fraction was tested for its ability to protect pigs against an oral challenge with T. solium oncospheres in a vaccine trial. IgG antibodies against the 53/25 kDa cathepsin L-like protein fraction were elicited in the vaccinated animals but did not confer protection. PMID:22119017

  9. The highly antigenic 53/25 kDa Taenia solium protein fraction with cathepsin-L like activity is present in the oncosphere/cysticercus and induces non-protective IgG antibodies in pigs.

    PubMed

    Zimic, Mirko; Pajuelo, Mónica; Gilman, Robert H; Gutiérrez, Andrés H; Rueda, Luis D; Flores, Myra; Chile, Nancy; Verástegui, Manuela; Gonzalez, Armando; García, Héctor H; Sheen, Patricia

    2012-01-15

    Cathepsin L-like proteases are secreted by several parasites including Taenia solium. The mechanism used by T. solium oncospheres to degrade and penetrate the intestine and infect the host is incompletely understood. It is assumed that intestinal degradation is driven by the proteolytic activity of enzymes secreted by the oncosphere. Blocking the proteolytic activity by an antibody response would prevent the oncosphere penetration and further infection. Serine and cysteine proteases including chymotrypsin, trypsin, elastase, and cathepsin L, are secreted by T. solium and Taenia saginata oncospheres when cultured in vitro, being potential vaccine candidates. However, the purification of a sufficient quantity of proteases secreted by oncospheres to conduct a vaccine trial is costly and lengthy. A 53/25 kDa cathepsin L-like fraction partially purified from T. solium cyst fluid was described previously as an important antigen for immunodiagnostics. In this study we found that this antigen is present in the T. solium oncosphere and is also secreted by the cysticercus. This protein fraction was tested for its ability to protect pigs against an oral challenge with T. solium oncospheres in a vaccine trial. IgG antibodies against the 53/25 kDa cathepsin L-like protein fraction were elicited in the vaccinated animals but did not confer protection.

  10. Vaccines and viral antigenic diversity.

    PubMed

    Mumford, J A

    2007-04-01

    Antigenic diversity among ribonucleic acid (RNA) viruses occurs as a result of rapid mutation during replication and recombination/reassortment between genetic material of related strains during co-infections. Variants which have a selective advantage in terms of ability to spread or to avoid host immunity become established within populations. Examples of antigenically diverse viruses include influenza, foot and mouth disease (FMD) and bluetongue (BT). Effective vaccination against such viruses requires surveillance programmes to monitor circulating serotypes and their evolution to ensure that vaccine strains match field viruses. A formal vaccine strain selection scheme for equine influenza has been established under the auspices of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) based on an international surveillance programme. A regulatory framework has been put in place to allow rapid updating of vaccine strains withoutthe need to provide full registration data for licensing the updated vaccine. While there is extensive surveillance of FMD worldwide and antigenic and genetic characterisation of isolates, there is no formal vaccine strain selection system. A coordinated international effort has been initiated to agree harmonised approaches to virus characterisation which is aimed at providing the basis for an internationally agreed vaccine matching system for FMD supported by the OIE. The emergence and spread of BT in Europe have resulted in an intensification of vaccine evaluation in terms of safety and efficacy, particularly cross-protection within and between serotypes. The most important requirement for producing vaccines against viruses displaying antigenic diversity is a method of measuring antigenic distances between strains and developing an understanding of how these distances relate to cross-protection. Antigenic cartography, a new computational method of quantifying antigenic distances between strains has been applied to human and equine influenza to

  11. Immunization with non-replicating E. coli minicells delivering both protein antigen and DNA protects mice from lethal challenge with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus

    PubMed Central

    Giacalone, Matthew J.; Zapata, Juan C.; Berkley, Neil L.; Sabbadini, Roger A.; Chu, Yen-Lin; Salvato, Maria S.; McGuire, Kathleen L.

    2008-01-01

    In the midst of new investigations into the mechanisms of both delivery and protection of new vaccines and vaccine carriers, it has become clear that immunization with delivery mechanisms that do not involve living, replicating organisms are vastly preferred. In this report, non-replicating bacterial minicells simultaneously co-delivering the nucleoprotein (NP) of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and the corresponding DNA vaccine were tested for the ability to generate protective cellular immune responses in mice. It was found that good protection (89%) was achieved after intramuscular administration, moderate protection (31%) was achieved after intranasal administration, and less protection (7%) was achieved following gastric immunization. These results provide a solid foundation on which to pursue the use of bacterial minicells as a non-replicating vaccine delivery platform. PMID:17258845

  12. GD2-specific CAR T Cells Undergo Potent Activation and Deletion Following Antigen Encounter but can be Protected From Activation-induced Cell Death by PD-1 Blockade.

    PubMed

    Gargett, Tessa; Yu, Wenbo; Dotti, Gianpietro; Yvon, Eric S; Christo, Susan N; Hayball, John D; Lewis, Ian D; Brenner, Malcolm K; Brown, Michael P

    2016-06-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have shown great promise in the treatment of hematologic malignancies but more variable results in the treatment of solid tumors and the persistence and expansion of CAR T cells within patients has been identified as a key correlate of antitumor efficacy. Lack of immunological "space", functional exhaustion, and deletion have all been proposed as mechanisms that hamper CAR T-cell persistence. Here we describe the events following activation of third-generation CAR T cells specific for GD2. CAR T cells had highly potent immediate effector functions without evidence of functional exhaustion in vitro, although reduced cytokine production reversible by PD-1 blockade was observed after longer-term culture. Significant activation-induced cell death (AICD) of CAR T cells was observed after repeated antigen stimulation, and PD-1 blockade enhanced both CAR T-cell survival and promoted killing of PD-L1(+) tumor cell lines. Finally, we assessed CAR T-cell persistence in patients enrolled in the CARPETS phase 1 clinical trial of GD2-specific CAR T cells in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Together, these data suggest that deletion also occurs in vivo and that PD-1-targeted combination therapy approaches may be useful to augment CAR T-cell efficacy and persistence in patients.

  13. Induction of long-lasting protective immunity against Toxoplasma gondii in BALB/c mice by recombinant surface antigen 1 protein encapsulated in poly (lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Current development efforts of subunit vaccines against Toxoplasma gondii, the etiological agent of toxoplasmosis, have been focused mainly on tachyzoite surface antigen 1 (SAG1). Since microparticles made from poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) polymers have been developed as safe, potent adjuvants or delivery systems, we aimed to encapsulate recombinant SAG1 (rSAG1) with the PLG polymers to prepare PLG-encapsulated rSAG1 (PLG-rSAG1) microparticles that would sustain rSAG1 release and generate long-lasting protective immunity against T. gondii in BALB/c mice. Methods In the present study, rSAG1 was encapsulated into PLG microparticles by the double emulsion method. PLG-rSAG1 microparticles were then intraperitoneally injected twice at a 14-day interval into BALB/c mice. We examined the ability of PLG-rSAG1 microparticles to induce and prolong effective anti-Toxoplasma immune responses, in comparison with rSAG1 formulated with a Vet L-10 adjuvant (rSAG1 (Vet L-10)). Eight weeks after the last immunization, protective activities were also evaluated after a lethal subcutaneous challenge of 1x104 live T. gondii tachyzoites. Results PLG-rSAG1 microparticles, 4.25~6.58 micrometers in diameter, showed 69%~81% entrapment efficiency. The amount of released rSAG1 protein from microparticles increased gradually over a 35-day period and the protein still retained native SAG1 antigenicity. Intraperitoneal vaccination of mice with the microparticles resulted in enhanced SAG1-specific IgG titers as well as lymphocyte proliferation and, more importantly, these enhanced activities were maintained for 10 weeks. In addition, eight weeks after the last immunization, maximum production of gamma interferon was detected in mice immunized with PLG-rSAG1 microparticles. Furthermore, 80% (8/10) of mice immunized with PLG-rSAG1 microparticles survived at least 28 days after a lethal subcutaneous tachyzoite challenge. Conclusions Encapsulation of rSAG1 into PLG microparticles

  14. Antibody Titer Has Positive Predictive Value for Vaccine Protection against Challenge with Natural Antigenic-Drift Variants of H5N1 High-Pathogenicity Avian Influenza Viruses from Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, David L.; Spackman, Erica; Jadhao, Samadhan; Dauphin, Gwenaelle; Kim-Torchetti, Mia; McGrane, James; Weaver, John; Daniels, Peter; Wong, Frank; Selleck, Paul; Wiyono, Agus; Indriani, Risa; Yupiana, Yuni; Sawitri Siregar, Elly; Prajitno, Teguh; Smith, Derek; Fouchier, Ron

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vaccines are used in integrated control strategies to protect poultry against H5N1 high-pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI). H5N1 HPAI was first reported in Indonesia in 2003, and vaccination was initiated in 2004, but reports of vaccine failures began to emerge in mid-2005. This study investigated the role of Indonesian licensed vaccines, specific vaccine seed strains, and emerging variant field viruses as causes of vaccine failures. Eleven of 14 licensed vaccines contained the manufacturer's listed vaccine seed strains, but 3 vaccines contained a seed strain different from that listed on the label. Vaccines containing A/turkey/Wisconsin/1968 (WI/68), A/chicken/Mexico/28159-232/1994 (Mex/94), and A/turkey/England/N28/1973 seed strains had high serological potency in chickens (geometric mean hemagglutination inhibition [HI] titers, ≥1:169), but vaccines containing strain A/chicken/Guangdong/1/1996 generated by reverse genetics (rg; rgGD/96), A/chicken/Legok/2003 (Legok/03), A/chicken/Vietnam/C57/2004 generated by rg (rgVN/04), or A/chicken/Legok/2003 generated by rg (rgLegok/03) had lower serological potency (geometric mean HI titers, ≤1:95). In challenge studies, chickens immunized with any of the H5 avian influenza vaccines were protected against A/chicken/West Java/SMI-HAMD/2006 (SMI-HAMD/06) and were partially protected against A/chicken/Papua/TA5/2006 (Papua/06) but were not protected against A/chicken/West Java/PWT-WIJ/2006 (PWT/06). Experimental inactivated vaccines made with PWT/06 HPAI virus or rg-generated PWT/06 low-pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) virus seed strains protected chickens from lethal challenge, as did a combination of a commercially available live fowl poxvirus vaccine expressing the H5 influenza virus gene and inactivated Legok/03 vaccine. These studies indicate that antigenic variants did emerge in Indonesia following widespread H5 avian influenza vaccine usage, and efficacious inactivated vaccines can be developed using

  15. Fusion proteins with multiple copies of the major antigenic determinant of foot-and-mouth disease virus protect both the natural host and laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Broekhuijsen, M P; van Rijn, J M; Blom, A J; Pouwels, P H; Enger-Valk, B E; Brown, F; Francis, M J

    1987-12-01

    Proteins consisting of one, two or four copies of the amino acid sequence 137 to 162, which contains the major immunogenic site of VP1 of foot-and-mouth disease virus, attached to the N-terminus of beta-galactosidase have been expressed in Escherichia coli cells. In guinea-pigs the protein containing one copy (P71) of the viral determinant elicited only low levels of neutralizing antibody whereas protective levels were elicited by the proteins containing two (P72) or four (P74) copies of the determinant. Single inoculations of the P72 and P74 proteins containing as little as 2 micrograms or 0.8 micrograms of peptide respectively were sufficient to protect all the animals against challenge infection. Moreover, the equivalent of 40 micrograms of peptide in P74 protected pigs against challenge infection after one inoculation. PMID:2447225

  16. Identification and Prioritization of Merozoite Antigens as Targets of Protective Human Immunity to Plasmodium falciparum Malaria for Vaccine and Biomarker Development

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jack S.; Arumugam, Thangavelu U.; Reiling, Linda; Healer, Julie; Hodder, Anthony N.; Fowkes, Freya J. I.; Cross, Nadia; Langer, Christine; Takeo, Satoru; Uboldi, Alex D.; Thompson, Jennifer K.; Gilson, Paul R.; Coppel, Ross L.; Siba, Peter M.; King, Christopher L.; Torii, Motomi; Chitnis, Chetan E.; Narum, David L.; Mueller, Ivo; Crabb, Brendan S.; Cowman, Alan F.; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    The development of effective malaria vaccines and immune biomarkers of malaria is a high priority for malaria control and elimination. Ags expressed by merozoites of Plasmodium falciparum are likely to be important targets of human immunity and are promising vaccine candidates, but very few Ags have been studied. We developed an approach to assess Ab responses to a comprehensive repertoire of merozoite proteins and investigate whether they are targets of protective Abs. We expressed 91 recombinant proteins, located on the merozoite surface or within invasion organelles, and screened them for quality and reactivity to human Abs. Subsequently, Abs to 46 proteins were studied in a longitudinal cohort of 206 Papua New Guinean children to define Ab acquisition and associations with protective immunity. Ab responses were higher among older children and those with active parasitemia. High-level Ab responses to rhoptry and microneme proteins that function in erythrocyte invasion were identified as being most strongly associated with protective immunity compared with other Ags. Additionally, Abs to new or understudied Ags were more strongly associated with protection than were Abs to current vaccine candidates that have progressed to phase 1 or 2 vaccine trials. Combinations of Ab responses were identified that were more strongly associated with protective immunity than responses to their single-Ag components. This study identifies Ags that are likely to be key targets of protective human immunity and facilitates the prioritization of Ags for further evaluation as vaccine candidates and/or for use as biomarkers of immunity in malaria surveillance and control. PMID:23776179

  17. Mapping Epitopes on a Protein Antigen by the Proteolysis of Antigen-Antibody Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemmerson, Ronald; Paterson, Yvonne

    1986-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody bound to a protein antigen decreases the rate of proteolytic cleavage of the antigen, having the greatest effect on those regions involved in antibody contact. Thus, an epitope can be identified by the ability of the antibody to protect one region of the antigen more than others from proteolysis. By means of this approach, two distinct epitopes, both conformationally well-ordered, were characterized on horse cytochrome c.

  18. Human leukocyte antigen-DRB1*1501 and DQB1*0602 alleles are cervical cancer protective factors among Uighur and Han people in Xinjiang, China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jian Ming; Sun, Qi; Li, Ling; Liu, Chun Xia; Chen, Yun Zhao; Zou, Hong; Pang, Li Juan; Zhao, Jin; Yang, Lan; Cao, Yu Wen; Cui, Xiao Bin; Qi, Yan; Liang, Wei Hua; Zhang, Wen Jie; Li, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a major risk factor for cervical cancer. However, only some high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV)-infected women progress to cervical cancer, host immunogenetic factors human leukocyte antigen (HLA) may account for viral antigens presenting individually or together in the progression to cervical cancer. This study examined the association between the development of invasive cervical cancer (ICC) and the determinant factors including HLA-DRB1*1501 and DQB1*0602, HR-HPV infection among Chinese Uighur and Han populations. Blood samples, cervical swabs and biopsies were obtained from 287 patients with ICC (192 Uighurs and 95 Hans) and 312 healthy controls (218 Uighurs and 94 Hans). HPV DNA was detected by PCR and HLA-DRB1*1501 and DQB1*0602 alleles were performed using PCR-SSP method. HPV16 infection rates was significantly higher among Uighur and Han with ICC as compared to healthy controls (OR = 58.317; 95% CI: 39.663-85.744; OR = 33.778; 95% CI: 12.581-90.691; P < 0.05 for all). HLA-DRB1*1501 (OR = 0.305; 95% CI: 0.115-0.813; P < 0.05) and HLA-DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 haplotype frequencies (OR = 0.274; 95% CI: 0.086-0.874; P < 0.05) were significantly reduced in Han ICC. The HLA-DQB1*0602 frequency significantly decreased among Uighur women with ICC (OR = 0.482; 95% CI: 0.325-0.716; P < 0.05). Similar tendencies were observed for DQB1*0602 with HPV16-positive ICC (OR = 0.550; 95% CI: 0.362-0.837; P < 0.05). This study suggests that HLA-DRB1*1501 and DQB1*0602 alleles may influence the immune response to HPV16 infection and decrease the risk of ICC among Uighurs and Hans in Xinjiang, China. PMID:25337265

  19. A Novel Synthetic TLR-4 Agonist Adjuvant Increases the Protective Response to a Clinical-Stage West Nile Virus Vaccine Antigen in Multiple Formulations.

    PubMed

    Van Hoeven, Neal; Joshi, Sharvari Waghmare; Nana, Ghislain Ismael; Bosco-Lauth, Angela; Fox, Christopher; Bowen, Richard A; Clements, David E; Martyak, Timothy; Parks, D Elliot; Baldwin, Susan; Reed, Steven G; Coler, Rhea N

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-transmitted member of the Flaviviridae family that has emerged in recent years to become a serious public health threat. Given the sporadic nature of WNV epidemics both temporally and geographically, there is an urgent need for a vaccine that can rapidly provide effective immunity. Protection from WNV infection is correlated with antibodies to the viral envelope (E) protein, which encodes receptor binding and fusion functions. Despite many promising E-protein vaccine candidates, there are currently none licensed for use in humans. This study investigates the ability to improve the immunogenicity and protective capacity of a promising clinical-stage WNV recombinant E-protein vaccine (WN-80E) by combining it with a novel synthetic TLR-4 agonist adjuvant. Using the murine model of WNV disease, we find that inclusion of a TLR-4 agonist in either a stable oil-in-water emulsion (SE) or aluminum hydroxide (Alum) formulation provides both dose and dosage sparing functions, whereby protection can be induced after a single immunization containing only 100 ng of WN-80E. Additionally, we find that inclusion of adjuvant with a single immunization reduced viral titers in sera to levels undetectable by viral plaque assay. The enhanced protection provided by adjuvanted immunization correlated with induction of a Th1 T-cell response and the resultant shaping of the IgG response. These findings suggest that inclusion of a next generation adjuvant may greatly enhance the protective capacity of WNV recombinant subunit vaccines, and establish a baseline for future development. PMID:26901122

  20. A Novel Synthetic TLR-4 Agonist Adjuvant Increases the Protective Response to a Clinical-Stage West Nile Virus Vaccine Antigen in Multiple Formulations.

    PubMed

    Van Hoeven, Neal; Joshi, Sharvari Waghmare; Nana, Ghislain Ismael; Bosco-Lauth, Angela; Fox, Christopher; Bowen, Richard A; Clements, David E; Martyak, Timothy; Parks, D Elliot; Baldwin, Susan; Reed, Steven G; Coler, Rhea N

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-transmitted member of the Flaviviridae family that has emerged in recent years to become a serious public health threat. Given the sporadic nature of WNV epidemics both temporally and geographically, there is an urgent need for a vaccine that can rapidly provide effective immunity. Protection from WNV infection is correlated with antibodies to the viral envelope (E) protein, which encodes receptor binding and fusion functions. Despite many promising E-protein vaccine candidates, there are currently none licensed for use in humans. This study investigates the ability to improve the immunogenicity and protective capacity of a promising clinical-stage WNV recombinant E-protein vaccine (WN-80E) by combining it with a novel synthetic TLR-4 agonist adjuvant. Using the murine model of WNV disease, we find that inclusion of a TLR-4 agonist in either a stable oil-in-water emulsion (SE) or aluminum hydroxide (Alum) formulation provides both dose and dosage sparing functions, whereby protection can be induced after a single immunization containing only 100 ng of WN-80E. Additionally, we find that inclusion of adjuvant with a single immunization reduced viral titers in sera to levels undetectable by viral plaque assay. The enhanced protection provided by adjuvanted immunization correlated with induction of a Th1 T-cell response and the resultant shaping of the IgG response. These findings suggest that inclusion of a next generation adjuvant may greatly enhance the protective capacity of WNV recombinant subunit vaccines, and establish a baseline for future development.

  1. A Novel Synthetic TLR-4 Agonist Adjuvant Increases the Protective Response to a Clinical-Stage West Nile Virus Vaccine Antigen in Multiple Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Van Hoeven, Neal; Joshi, Sharvari Waghmare; Nana, Ghislain Ismael; Bosco-Lauth, Angela; Fox, Christopher; Bowen, Richard A.; Clements, David E.; Martyak, Timothy; Parks, D. Elliot; Baldwin, Susan; Reed, Steven G.; Coler, Rhea N.

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-transmitted member of the Flaviviridae family that has emerged in recent years to become a serious public health threat. Given the sporadic nature of WNV epidemics both temporally and geographically, there is an urgent need for a vaccine that can rapidly provide effective immunity. Protection from WNV infection is correlated with antibodies to the viral envelope (E) protein, which encodes receptor binding and fusion functions. Despite many promising E-protein vaccine candidates, there are currently none licensed for use in humans. This study investigates the ability to improve the immunogenicity and protective capacity of a promising clinical-stage WNV recombinant E-protein vaccine (WN-80E) by combining it with a novel synthetic TLR-4 agonist adjuvant. Using the murine model of WNV disease, we find that inclusion of a TLR-4 agonist in either a stable oil-in-water emulsion (SE) or aluminum hydroxide (Alum) formulation provides both dose and dosage sparing functions, whereby protection can be induced after a single immunization containing only 100 ng of WN-80E. Additionally, we find that inclusion of adjuvant with a single immunization reduced viral titers in sera to levels undetectable by viral plaque assay. The enhanced protection provided by adjuvanted immunization correlated with induction of a Th1 T-cell response and the resultant shaping of the IgG response. These findings suggest that inclusion of a next generation adjuvant may greatly enhance the protective capacity of WNV recombinant subunit vaccines, and establish a baseline for future development. PMID:26901122

  2. Dendritic Cells Transfected with scFv from Mab 7.B12 Mimicking Original Antigen gp43 Induces Protection against Experimental Paracoccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Karen S.; Maranhão, Andrea Q.; Garcia, Maria C. C.; Brígido, Marcelo M.; Santos, Suelen S.; Lopes, José D.; Almeida, Sandro R.

    2011-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), endemic in Latin America, is a progressive systemic mycosis caused by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (P. brasiliensis), which primarily attacks lung tissue. Dendritic cells (DCs) are able to initiate a response in naïve T cells, and they also participate in Th-cell education. Furthermore, these cells have been used for therapy in several disease models. Here we transfected DCs with a plasmid (pMAC/PS-scFv) encoding a single chain variable fragment (scFv) of an anti-Id antibody that is capable of mimicking gp43, the main antigenic component of P. brasiliensis. First, Balb/c mice were immunized subcutaneously with pMAC/PS-scFv and, after seven days, scFv protein was presented to the regional lymph nodes cells. Moreover, we showed that the DCs transfected with scFv were capable of efficiently activating proliferation of total lymph node cells and inducing a decrease in lung infection. Therefore, our results suggested that the use of scFv-transfected DCs may be a promising therapy in the paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) model. PMID:21249212

  3. A Recombinant Chimeric Ad5/3 Vector Expressing a Multistage Plasmodium Antigen Induces Protective Immunity in Mice Using Heterologous Prime-Boost Immunization Regimens.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Mora, Monica; Fonseca, Jairo Andres; Singh, Balwan; Zhao, Chunxia; Makarova, Natalia; Dmitriev, Igor; Curiel, David T; Blackwell, Jerry; Moreno, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    An ideal malaria vaccine should target several stages of the parasite life cycle and induce antiparasite and antidisease immunity. We have reported a Plasmodium yoelii chimeric multistage recombinant protein (P. yoelii linear peptide chimera/recombinant modular chimera), engineered to express several autologous T cell epitopes and sequences derived from the circumsporozoite protein and the merozoite surface protein 1. This chimeric protein elicits protective immunity, mediated by CD4(+) T cells and neutralizing Abs. However, experimental evidence, from pre-erythrocytic vaccine candidates and irradiated sporozoites, has shown that CD8(+) T cells play a significant role in protection. Recombinant viral vectors have been used as a vaccine platform to elicit effective CD8(+) T cell responses. The human adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 has been tested in malaria vaccine clinical trials with excellent safety profile. Nevertheless, a major concern for the use of Ad5 is the high prevalence of anti-vector neutralizing Abs in humans, hampering its immunogenicity. To minimize the impact of anti-vector pre-existing immunity, we developed a chimeric Ad5/3 vector in which the knob region of Ad5 was replaced with that of Ad3, conferring partial resistance to anti-Ad5 neutralizing Abs. Furthermore, we implemented heterologous Ad/protein immunization regimens that include a single immunization with recombinant Ad vectors. Our data show that immunization with the recombinant Ad5/3 vector induces protective efficacy indistinguishable from that elicited by Ad5. Our study also demonstrates that the dose of the Ad vectors has an impact on the memory profile and protective efficacy. The results support further studies with Ad5/3 for malaria vaccine development. PMID:27574299

  4. Immunogenicity and protective immunity against bubonic plague and pneumonic plague by immunization of mice with the recombinant V10 antigen, a variant of LcrV.

    PubMed

    DeBord, Kristin L; Anderson, Deborah M; Marketon, Melanie M; Overheim, Katie A; DePaolo, R William; Ciletti, Nancy A; Jabri, Bana; Schneewind, Olaf

    2006-08-01

    In contrast to Yersinia pestis LcrV, the recombinant V10 (rV10) variant (lacking residues 271 to 300) does not suppress the release of proinflammatory cytokines by immune cells. Immunization with rV10 generates robust antibody responses that protect mice against bubonic plague and pneumonic plague, suggesting that rV10 may serve as an improved plague vaccine.

  5. Effective protection against experimental Taenia solium tapeworm infection in hamsters by primo-infection and by vaccination with recombinant or synthetic heterologous antigens.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Revilla, C; Toledo, A; Rosas, G; Huerta, M; Flores-Perez, I; Peña, N; Morales, J; Cisneros-Quiñones, J; Meneses, G; Díaz-Orea, A; Anciart, N; Goldbaum, F; Aluja, A; Larralde, C; Fragoso, G; Sciutto, E

    2006-08-01

    The disease caused by Taenia solium is progressively being recognized as a growing global threat for public human health and pig husbandry that requires the development of effective control measures. A central participant in the taeniasis/cysticercosis transmission network is the human carrier of the adult tapeworm because of its great potential in spreading the infection. Herein, evidence is presented that a primary infection of golden hamsters with orally administered T. solium cysticerci improved the host's resistance against a secondary infection. Likewise, previous vaccination increased the hamster's resistance. Similar high levels of protection (> 78%) were induced by systemic or oral vaccination with the S3Pvac anticysticercosis synthetic peptide vaccine or the highly immunogenic recombinant chimera based on the protective peptide KETc1 bound to Brucella spp. lumazine synthase (BLS-KETc1). Increased resistance after primo-infection and vaccination possibly results from changes in the immune conditions prevailing in the host's intestine. The contribution to protection from the KETc1 and BLS epitopes in a chimeric vaccine is under study. Preventive vaccination of definitive hosts of T. solium against the tapeworm, the most relevant step in the taeniasis/cysticercosis transmission, may greatly impact the dynamics of endemic disease and has not been studied or tried previously.

  6. Airway-Resident Memory CD8 T Cells Provide Antigen-Specific Protection against Respiratory Virus Challenge through Rapid IFN-γ Production.

    PubMed

    McMaster, Sean R; Wilson, Jarad J; Wang, Hong; Kohlmeier, Jacob E

    2015-07-01

    CD8 airway resident memory T (TRM) cells are a distinctive TRM population with a high turnover rate and a unique phenotype influenced by their localization within the airways. Their role in mediating protective immunity to respiratory pathogens, although suggested by many studies, has not been directly proven. This study provides definitive evidence that airway CD8 TRM cells are sufficient to mediate protection against respiratory virus challenge. Despite being poorly cytolytic in vivo and failing to expand after encountering Ag, airway CD8 TRM cells rapidly express effector cytokines, with IFN-γ being produced most robustly. Notably, established airway CD8 TRM cells possess the ability to produce IFN-γ faster than systemic effector memory CD8 T cells. Furthermore, naive mice receiving intratracheal transfer of airway CD8 TRM cells lacking the ability to produce IFN-γ were less effective at controlling pathogen load upon heterologous challenge. This direct evidence of airway CD8 TRM cell-mediated protection demonstrates the importance of these cells as a first line of defense for optimal immunity against respiratory pathogens and suggests they should be considered in the development of future cell-mediated vaccines.

  7. Reflecting Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galea, Simone

    2012-01-01

    This paper demystifies reflective practice on teaching by focusing on the idea of reflection itself and how it has been conceived by two philosophers, Plato and Irigaray. It argues that reflective practice has become a standardized method of defining the teacher in teacher education and teacher accreditation systems. It explores how practices of…

  8. Seroreactivity to a Large Panel of Field-Derived Plasmodium falciparum Apical Membrane Antigen 1 and Merozoite Surface Protein 1 Variants Reflects Seasonal and Lifetime Acquired Responses to Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Jason A.; Pablo, Jozelyn; Niangaly, Amadou; Travassos, Mark A.; Ouattara, Amed; Coulibaly, Drissa; Laurens, Matthew B.; Takala-Harrison, Shannon L.; Lyke, Kirsten E.; Skinner, Jeff; Berry, Andrea A.; Jasinskas, Algis; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Kouriba, Bourema; Thera, Mahamadou A.; Felgner, Philip L.; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Plowe, Christopher V.

    2015-01-01

    Parasite antigen diversity poses an obstacle to developing an effective malaria vaccine. A protein microarray containing Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1, n = 57) and merozoite surface protein 1 19-kD (MSP119, n = 10) variants prevalent at a malaria vaccine testing site in Bandiagara, Mali, was used to assess changes in seroreactivity caused by seasonal and lifetime exposure to malaria. Malian adults had significantly higher magnitude and breadth of seroreactivity to variants of both antigens than did Malian children. Seroreactivity increased over the course of the malaria season in children and adults, but the difference was more dramatic in children. These results help to validate diversity-covering protein microarrays as a promising tool for measuring the breadth of antibody responses to highly variant proteins, and demonstrate the potential of this new tool to help guide the development of malaria vaccines with strain-transcending efficacy. PMID:25294612

  9. Seroreactivity to a large panel of field-derived Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 and merozoite surface protein 1 variants reflects seasonal and lifetime acquired responses to malaria.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jason A; Pablo, Jozelyn; Niangaly, Amadou; Travassos, Mark A; Ouattara, Amed; Coulibaly, Drissa; Laurens, Matthew B; Takala-Harrison, Shannon L; Lyke, Kirsten E; Skinner, Jeff; Berry, Andrea A; Jasinskas, Algis; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Kouriba, Bourema; Thera, Mahamadou A; Felgner, Philip L; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Plowe, Christopher V

    2015-01-01

    Parasite antigen diversity poses an obstacle to developing an effective malaria vaccine. A protein microarray containing Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1, n = 57) and merozoite surface protein 1 19-kD (MSP119, n = 10) variants prevalent at a malaria vaccine testing site in Bandiagara, Mali, was used to assess changes in seroreactivity caused by seasonal and lifetime exposure to malaria. Malian adults had significantly higher magnitude and breadth of seroreactivity to variants of both antigens than did Malian children. Seroreactivity increased over the course of the malaria season in children and adults, but the difference was more dramatic in children. These results help to validate diversity-covering protein microarrays as a promising tool for measuring the breadth of antibody responses to highly variant proteins, and demonstrate the potential of this new tool to help guide the development of malaria vaccines with strain-transcending efficacy.

  10. Coexpressed Catalase Protects Chimeric Antigen Receptor–Redirected T Cells as well as Bystander Cells from Oxidative Stress–Induced Loss of Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ligtenberg, Maarten A.; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Mukhopadhyay, Madhura; Witt, Kristina; Lladser, Alvaro; Chmielewski, Markus; Riet, Tobias; Abken, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of cancer patients by adoptive T cell therapy has yielded promising results. In solid tumors, however, T cells encounter a hostile environment, in particular with increased inflammatory activity as a hallmark of the tumor milieu that goes along with abundant reactive oxygen species (ROS) that substantially impair antitumor activity. We present a strategy to render antitumor T cells more resilient toward ROS by coexpressing catalase along with a tumor specific chimeric Ag receptor (CAR) to increase their antioxidative capacity by metabolizing H2O2. In fact, T cells engineered with a bicistronic vector that concurrently expresses catalase, along with the CAR coexpressing catalase (CAR-CAT), performed superior over CAR T cells as they showed increased levels of intracellular catalase and had a reduced oxidative state with less ROS accumulation in both the basal state and upon activation while maintaining their antitumor activity despite high H2O2 levels. Moreover, CAR-CAT T cells exerted a substantial bystander protection of nontransfected immune effector cells as measured by CD3ζ chain expression in bystander T cells even in the presence of high H2O2 concentrations. Bystander NK cells, otherwise ROS sensitive, efficiently eliminate their K562 target cells under H2O2-induced oxidative stress when admixed with CAR-CAT T cells. This approach represents a novel means for protecting tumor-infiltrating cells from tumor-associated oxidative stress–mediated repression. PMID:26673145

  11. Listeriolysin O-deficient Listeria monocytogenes as a vaccine delivery vehicle: antigen-specific CD8 T cell priming and protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Sara E; Badovinac, Vladimir P; Khanolkar, Aaruni; Harty, John T

    2006-09-15

    Strains of Listeria monocytogenes (LM) that are deficient in the virulence factor listeriolysin O (LLO) are highly attenuated and are thought not to elicit protective immunity. This failure has been attributed to the inability of the bacterium to enter the host cell cytosol and access MHC class I Ag processing machinery. We reexamined this issue using recombinant strains of LM that are deficient in LLO but express an additional CD8 T cell epitope derived from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. After infection with LLO-deficient strains, we find sizable priming of epitope-specific CD8 T cells and the development of a functional memory cell population. Mice primed with the LLO-deficient LM strain are equally resistant against high-dose challenge with virulent LM as mice primed with wild-type virulent bacteria and also resist heterologous challenge with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Interestingly, priming with a low dose of LLO-deficient LM, which occurred in environment of reduced inflammation (IFN-gamma), allowed rapid amplification of Ag-specific CD8 T cells by booster immunization, despite an undetectable primary response. We conclude that the generation of protective immunity by LLO-deficient strains of LM does in fact occur and that this highly attenuated LM strain may be a useful platform for vaccine delivery.

  12. Coexpressed Catalase Protects Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected T Cells as well as Bystander Cells from Oxidative Stress-Induced Loss of Antitumor Activity.

    PubMed

    Ligtenberg, Maarten A; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Mukhopadhyay, Madhura; Witt, Kristina; Lladser, Alvaro; Chmielewski, Markus; Riet, Tobias; Abken, Hinrich; Kiessling, Rolf

    2016-01-15

    Treatment of cancer patients by adoptive T cell therapy has yielded promising results. In solid tumors, however, T cells encounter a hostile environment, in particular with increased inflammatory activity as a hallmark of the tumor milieu that goes along with abundant reactive oxygen species (ROS) that substantially impair antitumor activity. We present a strategy to render antitumor T cells more resilient toward ROS by coexpressing catalase along with a tumor specific chimeric Ag receptor (CAR) to increase their antioxidative capacity by metabolizing H2O2. In fact, T cells engineered with a bicistronic vector that concurrently expresses catalase, along with the CAR coexpressing catalase (CAR-CAT), performed superior over CAR T cells as they showed increased levels of intracellular catalase and had a reduced oxidative state with less ROS accumulation in both the basal state and upon activation while maintaining their antitumor activity despite high H2O2 levels. Moreover, CAR-CAT T cells exerted a substantial bystander protection of nontransfected immune effector cells as measured by CD3ζ chain expression in bystander T cells even in the presence of high H2O2 concentrations. Bystander NK cells, otherwise ROS sensitive, efficiently eliminate their K562 target cells under H2O2-induced oxidative stress when admixed with CAR-CAT T cells. This approach represents a novel means for protecting tumor-infiltrating cells from tumor-associated oxidative stress-mediated repression.

  13. Vaccination with virus-like particles containing H5 antigens from three H5N1 clades protects chickens from H5N1 and H5N8 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Kapczynski, Darrell R; Tumpey, Terrence M; Hidajat, Rachmat; Zsak, Aniko; Chrzastek, Klaudia; Tretyakova, Irina; Pushko, Peter

    2016-03-18

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses, especially H5N1 strains, represent a public health threat and cause widespread morbidity and mortality in domestic poultry. Recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) represent a promising novel vaccine approach to control avian influenza including HPAI strains. Influenza VLPs contain viral hemagglutinin (HA), which can be expressed in cell culture within highly immunogenic VLPs that morphologically and antigenically resemble influenza virions, except VLPs are non-infectious. Here we describe a recombinant VLP containing HA proteins derived from three distinct clades of H5N1 viruses as an experimental, broadly protective H5 avian influenza vaccine. A baculovirus vector was configured to co-express the H5 genes from recent H5N1 HPAI isolates A/chicken/Germany/2014 (clade 2.3.4.4), A/chicken/West Java/Subang/29/2007 (clade 2.1.3) and A/chicken/Egypt/121/2012 (clade 2.2.1). Co-expression of these genes in Sf9 cells along with influenza neuraminidase (NA) and retrovirus gag genes resulted in production of triple-clade H555 VLPs that exhibited hemagglutination activity and morphologically resembled influenza virions. Vaccination of chickens with these VLPs resulted in induction of serum antibody responses and efficient protection against experimental challenges with three different viruses including the recent U.S. H5N8 HPAI isolate. We conclude that these novel triple-clade VLPs represent a feasible strategy for simultaneously evoking protective antibodies against multiple variants of H5 influenza virus.

  14. Evidence for Horizontal Gene Transfer of Two Antigenically Distinct O Antigens in Bordetella bronchiseptica▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Buboltz, Anne M.; Nicholson, Tracy L.; Karanikas, Alexia T.; Preston, Andrew; Harvill, Eric T.

    2009-01-01

    Host immunity is a major driving force of antigenic diversity, resulting in pathogens that can evade immunity induced by closely related strains. Here we show that two Bordetella bronchiseptica strains, RB50 and 1289, express two antigenically distinct O-antigen serotypes (O1 and O2, respectively). When 18 additional B. bronchiseptica strains were serotyped, all were found to express either the O1 or O2 serotype. Comparative genomic hybridization and PCR screening showed that the expression of either the O1 or O2 serotype correlated with the strain containing either the classical or alternative O-antigen locus, respectively. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of 49 B. bronchiseptica strains was used to build a phylogenetic tree, which revealed that the two O-antigen loci did not associate with a particular lineage, evidence that these loci are horizontally transferred between B. bronchiseptica strains. From experiments using mice vaccinated with purified lipopolysaccharide from strain RB50 (O1), 1289 (O2), or RB50Δwbm (O antigen deficient), our data indicate that these O antigens do not confer cross-protection in vivo. The lack of cross-immunity between O-antigen serotypes appears to contribute to inefficient antibody-mediated clearance between strains. Together, these data are consistent with the idea that the O-antigen loci of B. bronchiseptica are horizontally transferred between strains and encode antigenically distinct serotypes, resulting in inefficient cross-immunity. PMID:19528223

  15. A computational framework for influenza antigenic cartography.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2010-10-07

    Influenza viruses have been responsible for large losses of lives around the world and continue to present a great public health challenge. Antigenic characterization based on hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay is one of the routine procedures for influenza vaccine strain selection. However, HI assay is only a crude experiment reflecting the antigenic correlations among testing antigens (viruses) and reference antisera (antibodies). Moreover, antigenic characterization is usually based on more than one HI dataset. The combination of multiple datasets results in an incomplete HI matrix with many unobserved entries. This paper proposes a new computational framework for constructing an influenza antigenic cartography from this incomplete matrix, which we refer to as Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS). In this approach, we first reconstruct the HI matrices with viruses and antibodies using low-rank matrix completion, and then generate the two-dimensional antigenic cartography using multidimensional scaling. Moreover, for influenza HI tables with herd immunity effect (such as those from Human influenza viruses), we propose a temporal model to reduce the inherent temporal bias of HI tables caused by herd immunity. By applying our method in HI datasets containing H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from 1968 to 2003, we identified eleven clusters of antigenic variants, representing all major antigenic drift events in these 36 years. Our results showed that both the completed HI matrix and the antigenic cartography obtained via MC-MDS are useful in identifying influenza antigenic variants and thus can be used to facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection. The webserver is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap.

  16. The immunologically protective P-4 antigen of Leishmania amastigotes. A developmentally regulated single strand-specific nuclease associated with the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Kar, S; Soong, L; Colmenares, M; Goldsmith-Pestana, K; McMahon-Pratt, D

    2000-12-01

    The purified membrane-associated Leishmania pifanoi amastigote protein P-4 has been shown to induce protective immunity against infection and to elicit preferentially a T helper 1-like response in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with American cutaneous leishmaniasis. As this molecule is potentially important for future vaccine studies, the L. pifanoi gene encoding the P-4 membrane protein was cloned and sequenced. Southern blot analyses indicate the presence of six tandemly arrayed copies of the P-4 gene in L. pifanoi; homologues of the P-4 gene are found in all other species of the genus Leishmania examined. DNA-derived protein sequence data indicated an identity to the P1 zinc-dependent nuclease of Penicillium citrinum (20.8%) and the C-terminal domain of the 3' nucleotidase of Leishmania donovani (33.7%). Consistent with these sequence analyses, purified L. pifanoi P-4 protein possesses single strand nuclease (DNA and RNA) and phosphomonoesterase activity, with a preference for UMP > TMP > AMP > CMP. Double-labeling immunofluorescence microscopic analyses employing anti-binding protein antibodies revealed that the P-4 protein is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum of the amastigote. Northern blot analyses indicated that the gene is selectively expressed in the intracellular amastigote stage (mammalian host) but not in the promastigote stage (insect) of the parasite. Based upon its subcellular localization and single-stranded specific nuclease activity, possible roles of the P-4 nuclease in the amastigote in RNA stability (gene expression) or DNA repair are discussed.

  17. Cysteine proteinase type III is protective against Leishmania infantum infection in BALB/c mice and highly antigenic in visceral leishmaniasis individuals.

    PubMed

    Khoshgoo, Naghmeh; Zahedifard, Farnaz; Azizi, Hiva; Taslimi, Yasaman; Alonso, Maribel Jiménez; Rafati, Sima

    2008-10-29

    Visceral leishmaniasis is the most acute form of leishmaniasis and vaccination is the best approach to control it. One of the major groups of virulence factors in Leishmania belongs to cysteine proteinase family. In this study, for the first time, the protective potential of Leishmania infantum cysteine proteinase type III (CPC) by using a prime-boost strategy is evaluated in BALB/c mice. The experiment was carried out in three groups of mice. Vaccinated group was primed with pcDNA-cpc and boosted with rCPC-DHFR in combination with CpG motif and Montanide 720 as adjuvant. Control groups received pcDNA and rDHFR or PBS. The ratio of IgG2a/IgG1, nitric oxide concentration and IFN-gamma induction in vaccinated group is significantly higher than controls. Furthermore, the parasite load of vaccinated group is significantly lower than controls. In addition, sera reactivity of visceral leishmaniasis individuals was examined and showed considerable reactivities toward rCPC in comparison with cutaneous leishmaniasis. The achieved result is highly encouraging the use of cysteine proteinases types I, II and III as vaccine candidate against visceral leishmaniasis.

  18. Genes encoding homologous antigens in taeniid cestode parasites

    PubMed Central

    Gauci, Charles; Lightowlers, Marshall W.

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant vaccine antigens are being evaluated for their ability to protect livestock animals against cysticercosis and related parasitic infections. Practical use of some of these vaccines is expected to reduce parasite transmission, leading to a reduction in the incidence of neurocysticercosis and hydatid disease in humans. We recently showed that an antigen (TSOL16), expressed in Escherichia coli, confers high levels of protection against Taenia solium cysticercosis in pigs, which provides a strategy for control of T. solium parasite transmission. Here, we discuss the characteristics of this antigen that may affect the utility of TSOL16 and related antigens for development as recombinant vaccines. We also report that genes encoding antigens closely related to TSOL16 from T. solium also occur in other related species of parasites. These highly homologous antigens have the potential to be used as vaccines and may provide protection against related species of Taenia that cause infection in other hosts. PMID:23090389

  19. Reflective Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The aluminized polymer film used in spacecraft as a radiation barrier to protect both astronauts and delicate instruments has led to a number of spinoff applications. Among them are aluminized shipping bags, food cart covers and medical bags. Radiant Technologies purchases component materials and assembles a barrier made of layers of aluminized foil. The packaging reflects outside heat away from the product inside the container. The company is developing new aluminized lines, express mailers, large shipping bags, gel packs and insulated panels for the building industry.

  20. Critical components of a DNA fusion vaccine able to induce protective cytotoxic T cells against a single epitope of a tumor antigen.

    PubMed

    Rice, Jason; Buchan, Sarah; Stevenson, Freda K

    2002-10-01

    DNA vaccines can activate immunity against tumor Ags expressed as MHC class I-associated peptides. However, priming of CD8(+) CTL against weak tumor Ags may require adjuvant molecules. We have used a pathogen-derived sequence from tetanus toxin (fragment C (FrC)) fused to tumor Ag sequences to promote Ab and CD4(+) T cell responses. For induction of CD8(+) T cell responses, the FrC sequence has been engineered to remove potentially competitive MHC class I-binding epitopes and to improve presentation of tumor epitopes. The colon carcinoma CT26 expresses an endogenous retroviral gene product, gp70, containing a known H2-L(d)-restricted epitope (AH1). A DNA vaccine encoding gp70 alone was a poor inducer of CTL, and performance was not significantly improved by fusion of full-length FrC. However, use of a minimized domain of FrC, with the AH1 sequence fused to the 3' position, led to rapid induction of high levels of CTL. IFN-gamma-producing epitope-specific CTL were detectable ex vivo and these killed CT26 targets in vitro. The single epitope vaccine was more effective than GM-CSF-transfected CT26 tumor cells in inducing an AH1-specific CTL response and equally effective in providing protection against tumor challenge. Levels of AH1-specific CTL in vivo were increased following injection of tumor cells, and CTL expanded in vitro were able to kill CT26 cells in tumor bearers. Pre-existing immunity to tetanus toxoid had no effect on the induction of AH1-specific CTL. These data demonstrate the power of epitope-specific CTL against tumor cells and illustrate a strategy for priming immunity via a dual component DNA vaccine.

  1. Human Leukocyte Antigen and Systemic Sclerosis in Japanese: The Sign of the Four Independent Protective Alleles, DRB1*13:02, DRB1*14:06, DQB1*03:01, and DPB1*02:01

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Hiroshi; Oka, Shomi; Kawasaki, Aya; Shimada, Kota; Sugii, Shoji; Matsushita, Takashi; Hashimoto, Atsushi; Komiya, Akiko; Fukui, Naoshi; Kobayashi, Kouji; Osada, Atsumu; Ihata, Atsushi; Kondo, Yuya; Nagai, Tatsuo; Setoguchi, Keigo; Okamoto, Akiko; Okamoto, Akira; Chiba, Noriyuki; Suematsu, Eiichi; Kono, Hajime; Katayama, Masao; Hirohata, Shunsei; Sumida, Takayuki; Migita, Kiyoshi; Hasegawa, Minoru; Fujimoto, Manabu; Sato, Shinichi; Nagaoka, Shouhei; Takehara, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Objective Several studies on associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele frequencies and susceptibility to systemic sclerosis (SSc) have been reported. Anti-centromere antibodies (ACA) and anti-topoisomerase I antibodies (ATA) are found in SSc patients. Here, we sought to identify HLA alleles associated with SSc in Japanese, and explored their associations with SSc phenotypes including the presence of autoantibodies. Methods Associations of HLA-DRB1, DQB1, and DPB1 were analyzed in 463 Japanese SSc patients and 413 controls. Results We found that DRB1*13:02 (P = 0.0011, Pc = 0.0319, odds ratio [OR] 0.46, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.29–0.73), DRB1*14:06 (P = 6.60X10-5, Pc = 0.0020, OR 0.05, 95%CI 0.01–0.41), DQB1*03:01 (P = 0.0009, Pc = 0.0150, OR 0.56, 95%CI 0.40–0.79), and DPB1*02:01 (P = 5.16X10-6, Pc = 8.77X10-5, OR 0.52, 95%CI 0.39–0.69) were protectively associated with SSc. In addition, these four alleles seemed to be independently associated with the protection against the susceptibility of SSc. On the other hand, we could not find predisposing alleles for overall SSc. With respect to SSc subsets, a tendency for these four alleles to be protectively associated was observed. However, there was a significant association between DRB1*01:01, DRB1*10:01, DQB1*05:01, and DPB1*04:02 and the susceptibility to SSc with ACA. On the other hand, the presence of DRB1*15:02, DQB1*06:01, DPB1*03:01, and DPB1*09:01 was associated with SSc with ATA. Conclusion Thus, the present study has identified protective associations of the four HLA class II alleles with overall Japanese SSc and predisposing associations of HLA class II alleles with Japanese SSc subsets. PMID:27116456

  2. The anthrax protective antigen (PA63) bound conformation of a peptide inhibitor of the binding of lethal factor to PA63: as determined by trNOESY NMR and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Rickey P; Bhattacharjee, Apurba K; Koser, Brandon W; Traficante, Daniel D

    2004-10-21

    Anthrax protective antigen (PA) is one of the three proteins produced by the gram positive bacteria Bacillus anthracis collectively known as the "anthrax toxin" (Ascenzi, P.; Visca, P.; Ippolito, G.; Spallarossa, A.; Bolognesi, M.; et al. Anthrax toxin: a tripartite lethal combination. FEBS Lett. 2002, 531, 384-388). The role played by PA in anthrax intoxication is to transport the two enzymes lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF) into the cell. Collier and co-workers (Mourez, M.; Kane, R. S.; Mogridge, J.; Metallo, S.; Deschatelets, P.; et al. Designing a polyvalent inhibitor of anthrax toxin. Nat. Biotechnol. 2001, 958). reported the isolation of two peptides via phage display that bind to the PA63 heptamer and inhibit its interaction with LF and EF, and thereby prevent the transport of LF and EF into the cell. One of these peptides, His-Thr-Ser-Thr-Try-Trp-Trp-Leu-Asp-Gly-Ala-Pro (P1), was selected for structural investigation on the basis of its ability to prevent the binding of LF to the PA63 heptamer bundle. Two-dimensional trNOESY experiments coupled with NOE restrained simulated annealing calculations were used to determine the PA63-bound conformation of P1. On binding to PA63, P1 adopts a helical conformation involving residues 3-9 while the C- and N-terminal residues exhibit dynamic fraying.

  3. Novel antigen delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Maria; Berardinis, Piergiuseppe De

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines represent the most relevant contribution of immunology to human health. However, despite the remarkable success achieved in the past years, many vaccines are still missing in order to fight important human pathologies and to prevent emerging and re-emerging diseases. For these pathogens the known strategies for making vaccines have been unsuccessful and thus, new avenues should be investigated to overcome the failure of clinical trials and other important issues including safety concerns related to live vaccines or viral vectors, the weak immunogenicity of subunit vaccines and side effects associated with the use of adjuvants. A major hurdle of developing successful and effective vaccines is to design antigen delivery systems in such a way that optimizes antigen presentation and induces broad protective immune responses. Recent advances in vector delivery technologies, immunology, vaccinology and system biology, have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which vaccines should stimulate both arms of the adaptive immune responses, offering new strategies of vaccinations. This review is an update of current strategies with respect to live attenuated and inactivated vaccines, DNA vaccines, viral vectors, lipid-based carrier systems such as liposomes and virosomes as well as polymeric nanoparticle vaccines and virus-like particles. In addition, this article will describe our work on a versatile and immunogenic delivery system which we have studied in the past decade and which is derived from a non-pathogenic prokaryotic organism: the “E2 scaffold” of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. PMID:26279977

  4. Reflection and reflective practice.

    PubMed

    Schutz, Sue

    2007-09-01

    Reflection is an approach to the generation of understanding about practice that has become a largely accepted part of nursing education at both undergraduate and post-qualifying levels. It is also increasingly common now for healthcare professionals to use reflection in their practice communities as a part of their daily professional work. The literature is replete with accounts of the possible benefits to practitioners and clients of using reflection in practice, yet this amounts to a rather scant evidence base. For community nurses there are several challenges in the practical application of reflective practice, but these are not insurmountable. Issues such as lone-working and geographical distance may be a challenge. There are some key skills that will help public health and community practitioners get started in reflection and some important issues that should be addressed before beginning. Reflective practice has, however, the potential to help practitioners in all fields unlock the tacit knowledge and understanding that they have of their practice and use this to generate knowledge for future practice.

  5. Impact of laser-contaminant interaction on the performance of the protective capping layer of 1w high-reflection mirror coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, S. R.; Norton, M. A.; Raman, R. N.; Rubenchik, A. M.; Boley, C. D.; Rigatti, A.; Mirkarimi, P. B.; Stolz, C. J.; Matthews, M. J.

    2015-10-02

    In this paper, high dielectric constant multilayer coatings are commonly used on high-reflection mirrors for high-peak-power laser systems because of their high laser-damage resistance. However, surface contaminants often lead to damage upon laser exposure, thus limiting the mirror’s lifetime and performance. One plausible approach to improve the overall mirror resistance against laser damage, including that induced by laser-contaminant coupling, is to coat the multilayers with a thin protective capping (absentee) layer on top of the multilayer coatings. An understanding of the underlying mechanism by which laser-particle interaction leads to capping layer damage is important for the rational design and selection of capping materials of high-reflection multilayer coatings. In this paper, we examine the responses of two candidate capping layer materials, made of SiO2 and Al2O3, over silica-hafnia multilayer coatings. These are exposed to a single oblique shot of a 1053 nm laser beam (fluence ~10 J/cm2, pulse length 14 ns), in the presence of Ti particles on the surface. We find that the two capping layers show markedly different responses to the laser-particle interaction. The Al2O3 cap layer exhibits severe damage, with the capping layer becoming completely delaminated at the particle locations. The SiO2 capping layer, on the other hand, is only mildly modified by a shallow depression. Combining the observations with optical modeling and thermal/mechanical calculations, we argue that a high-temperature thermal field from plasma generated by the laser-particle interaction above a critical fluence is responsible for the surface modification of each capping layer. The great difference in damage behavior is mainly attributed to the large disparity in the thermal expansion coefficient of the two capping materials, with that of Al2O3 layer being about 15 times greater

  6. Impact of laser-contaminant interaction on the performance of the protective capping layer of 1w high-reflection mirror coatings

    DOE PAGES

    Qiu, S. R.; Norton, M. A.; Raman, R. N.; Rubenchik, A. M.; Boley, C. D.; Rigatti, A.; Mirkarimi, P. B.; Stolz, C. J.; Matthews, M. J.

    2015-10-02

    In this paper, high dielectric constant multilayer coatings are commonly used on high-reflection mirrors for high-peak-power laser systems because of their high laser-damage resistance. However, surface contaminants often lead to damage upon laser exposure, thus limiting the mirror’s lifetime and performance. One plausible approach to improve the overall mirror resistance against laser damage, including that induced by laser-contaminant coupling, is to coat the multilayers with a thin protective capping (absentee) layer on top of the multilayer coatings. An understanding of the underlying mechanism by which laser-particle interaction leads to capping layer damage is important for the rational design and selectionmore » of capping materials of high-reflection multilayer coatings. In this paper, we examine the responses of two candidate capping layer materials, made of SiO2 and Al2O3, over silica-hafnia multilayer coatings. These are exposed to a single oblique shot of a 1053 nm laser beam (fluence ~10 J/cm2, pulse length 14 ns), in the presence of Ti particles on the surface. We find that the two capping layers show markedly different responses to the laser-particle interaction. The Al2O3 cap layer exhibits severe damage, with the capping layer becoming completely delaminated at the particle locations. The SiO2 capping layer, on the other hand, is only mildly modified by a shallow depression. Combining the observations with optical modeling and thermal/mechanical calculations, we argue that a high-temperature thermal field from plasma generated by the laser-particle interaction above a critical fluence is responsible for the surface modification of each capping layer. The great difference in damage behavior is mainly attributed to the large disparity in the thermal expansion coefficient of the two capping materials, with that of Al2O3 layer being about 15 times greater than that of SiO2.« less

  7. Meningococcal vaccine antigen diversity in global databases.

    PubMed

    Brehony, Carina; Hill, Dorothea M; Lucidarme, Jay; Borrow, Ray; Maiden, Martin C

    2015-01-01

    The lack of an anti-capsular vaccine against serogroup B meningococcal disease has necessitated the exploration of alternative vaccine candidates, mostly proteins exhibiting varying degrees of antigenic variation. Analysis of variants of antigen-encoding genes is facilitated by publicly accessible online sequence repositories, such as the Neisseria PubMLST database and the associated Meningitis Research Foundation Meningococcus Genome Library (MRF-MGL). We investigated six proposed meningococcal vaccine formulations by deducing the prevalence of their components in the isolates represented in these repositories. Despite high diversity, a limited number of antigenic variants of each of the vaccine antigens were prevalent, with strong associations of particular variant combinations with given serogroups and genotypes. In the MRF-MGL and globally, the highest levels of identical sequences were observed with multicomponent/multivariant vaccines. Our analyses further demonstrated that certain combinations of antigen variants were prevalent over periods of decades in widely differing locations, indicating that vaccine formulations containing a judicious choice of antigen variants have potential for long-term protection across geographic regions. The data further indicated that formulations with multiple variants would be especially relevant at times of low disease incidence, as relative diversity was higher. Continued surveillance is required to monitor the changing prevalence of these vaccine antigens.

  8. Meningococcal vaccine antigen diversity in global databases.

    PubMed

    Brehony, Carina; Hill, Dorothea M; Lucidarme, Jay; Borrow, Ray; Maiden, Martin C

    2015-01-01

    The lack of an anti-capsular vaccine against serogroup B meningococcal disease has necessitated the exploration of alternative vaccine candidates, mostly proteins exhibiting varying degrees of antigenic variation. Analysis of variants of antigen-encoding genes is facilitated by publicly accessible online sequence repositories, such as the Neisseria PubMLST database and the associated Meningitis Research Foundation Meningococcus Genome Library (MRF-MGL). We investigated six proposed meningococcal vaccine formulations by deducing the prevalence of their components in the isolates represented in these repositories. Despite high diversity, a limited number of antigenic variants of each of the vaccine antigens were prevalent, with strong associations of particular variant combinations with given serogroups and genotypes. In the MRF-MGL and globally, the highest levels of identical sequences were observed with multicomponent/multivariant vaccines. Our analyses further demonstrated that certain combinations of antigen variants were prevalent over periods of decades in widely differing locations, indicating that vaccine formulations containing a judicious choice of antigen variants have potential for long-term protection across geographic regions. The data further indicated that formulations with multiple variants would be especially relevant at times of low disease incidence, as relative diversity was higher. Continued surveillance is required to monitor the changing prevalence of these vaccine antigens. PMID:26676305

  9. Human immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Havlir, D V; Wallis, R S; Boom, W H; Daniel, T M; Chervenak, K; Ellner, J J

    1991-01-01

    Little is known about the immunodominant or protective antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans. Cell-mediated immunity is necessary for protection, and healthy tuberculin-positive individuals are relatively resistant to exogenous reinfection. We compared the targets of the cell-mediated immune response in healthy tuberculin-positive individuals to those of tuberculosis patients and tuberculin-negative persons. By using T-cell Western blotting (immunoblotting) of nitrocellulose-bound M. tuberculosis culture filtrate, peaks of T-cell blastogenic activity were identified in the healthy tuberculin reactors at 30, 37, 44, 57, 64, 71 and 88 kDa. Three of these fractions (30, 64, and 71 kDa) coincided with previously characterized proteins: antigen 6/alpha antigen, HSP60, and HSP70, respectively. The blastogenic responses to purified M. tuberculosis antigen 6/alpha antigen and BCG HSP60 were assessed. When cultured with purified antigen 6/alpha antigen, lymphocytes of healthy tuberculin reactors demonstrated greater [3H]thymidine incorporation than either healthy tuberculin-negative controls or tuberculous patients (8,113 +/- 1,939 delta cpm versus 645 +/- 425 delta cpm and 1,019 +/- 710 delta cpm, respectively; P less than 0.01). Healthy reactors also responded to HSP60, although to a lesser degree than antigen 6/alpha antigen (4,276 +/- 1,095 delta cpm; P less than 0.05). Partially purified HSP70 bound to nitrocellulose paper elicited a significant lymphocyte blastogenic response in two of six of the tuberculous patients but in none of the eight healthy tuberculin reactors. Lymphocytes of none of five tuberculin-negative controls responded to recombinant antigens at 14 or 19 kDa or to HSP70. Antibody reactivity generally was inversely correlated with blastogenic response: tuberculous sera had high titer antibody to M. tuberculosis culture filtrate in a range from 35 to 180 kDa. This is the first systematic evaluation of the human response to a panel of native

  10. Fungal Antigens Expressed during Invasive Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Denikus, Nicole; Orfaniotou, Foteini; Wulf, Gerald; Lehmann, Paul F.; Monod, Michel; Reichard, Utz

    2005-01-01

    Rabbits that had been infected intravenously with conidiospores of Aspergillus fumigatus were used as sources of antibody for screening a λ phage cDNA expression library. The cDNA was derived from A. fumigatus mRNA that had been extracted from newly formed, germling hyphae. Thirty-six antigens were identified using antisera from six rabbits. Though many of these antigens were expected to be intracellular proteins because their genes did not encode a signal sequence, the antisera showed consistently a stronger immunoblot reaction with a cell fraction enriched for the fungal cell wall than with a fraction of predominantly intracellular components. Antibodies to eight antigens, including the glycosylhydrolase Asp f 16, were produced by more than one rabbit. In current vaccine studies, Asp f 16 is the only single antigen which has been reported to be capable of inducing protection against invasive aspergillosis in mice (S. Bozza et al., Microb. Infect. 4:1281-1290, 2002). Enolase and Aspergillus HSP90 were detected also; their homologues in Candida albicans have been tested as vaccines and have been reported to provide a partially protective response against invasive candidiasis in mice. The Aspergillus antigens reported here may have value both in diagnostic tests for different forms of aspergillosis and as vaccine candidates for protection against invasive disease. PMID:16040983

  11. Reflective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Thomas S. C.

    2013-01-01

    Thomas Farrell's "Reflective Teaching" outlines four principles that take teachers from just doing reflection to making it a way of being. Using the four principles, Reflective Practice Is Evidence Based, Reflective Practice Involves Dialogue, Reflective Practice Links Beliefs and Practices, and Reflective Practice Is a Way of Life,…

  12. Production of Functionally Active and Immunogenic Non-Glycosylated Protective Antigen from Bacillus anthracis in Nicotiana benthamiana by Co-Expression with Peptide-N-Glycosidase F (PNGase F) of Flavobacterium meningosepticum.

    PubMed

    Mamedov, Tarlan; Chichester, Jessica A; Jones, R Mark; Ghosh, Ananya; Coffin, Megan V; Herschbach, Kristina; Prokhnevsky, Alexey I; Streatfield, Stephen J; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis has long been considered a potential biological warfare agent, and therefore, there is a need for a safe, low-cost and highly efficient anthrax vaccine with demonstrated long-term stability for mass vaccination in case of an emergency. Many efforts have been made towards developing an anthrax vaccine based on recombinant protective antigen (rPA) of B. anthracis, a key component of the anthrax toxin, produced using different expression systems. Plants represent a promising recombinant protein production platform due to their relatively low cost, rapid scalability and favorable safety profile. Previous studies have shown that full-length rPA produced in Nicotiana benthamiana (pp-PA83) is immunogenic and can provide full protection against lethal spore challenge; however, further improvement in the potency and stability of the vaccine candidate is necessary. PA of B. anthracis is not a glycoprotein in its native host; however, this protein contains potential N-linked glycosylation sites, which can be aberrantly glycosylated during expression in eukaryotic systems including plants. This glycosylation could affect the availability of certain key epitopes either due to masking or misfolding of the protein. Therefore, a non-glycosylated form of pp-PA83 was engineered and produced in N. benthamiana using an in vivo deglycosylation approach based on co-expression of peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) from Flavobacterium meningosepticum. For comparison, versions of pp-PA83 containing point mutations in six potential N-glycosylation sites were also engineered and expressed in N. benthamiana. The in vivo deglycosylated pp-PA83 (pp-dPA83) was shown to have in vitro activity, in contrast to glycosylated pp-PA83, and to induce significantly higher levels of toxin-neutralizing antibody responses in mice compared with glycosylated pp-PA83, in vitro deglycosylated pp-PA83 or the mutated versions of pp-PA83. These results suggest that pp-dPA83 may offer advantages

  13. Production of Functionally Active and Immunogenic Non-Glycosylated Protective Antigen from Bacillus anthracis in Nicotiana benthamiana by Co-Expression with Peptide-N-Glycosidase F (PNGase F) of Flavobacterium meningosepticum

    PubMed Central

    Mamedov, Tarlan; Chichester, Jessica A.; Jones, R. Mark; Ghosh, Ananya; Coffin, Megan V.; Herschbach, Kristina; Prokhnevsky, Alexey I.; Streatfield, Stephen J.; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis has long been considered a potential biological warfare agent, and therefore, there is a need for a safe, low-cost and highly efficient anthrax vaccine with demonstrated long-term stability for mass vaccination in case of an emergency. Many efforts have been made towards developing an anthrax vaccine based on recombinant protective antigen (rPA) of B. anthracis, a key component of the anthrax toxin, produced using different expression systems. Plants represent a promising recombinant protein production platform due to their relatively low cost, rapid scalability and favorable safety profile. Previous studies have shown that full-length rPA produced in Nicotiana benthamiana (pp-PA83) is immunogenic and can provide full protection against lethal spore challenge; however, further improvement in the potency and stability of the vaccine candidate is necessary. PA of B. anthracis is not a glycoprotein in its native host; however, this protein contains potential N-linked glycosylation sites, which can be aberrantly glycosylated during expression in eukaryotic systems including plants. This glycosylation could affect the availability of certain key epitopes either due to masking or misfolding of the protein. Therefore, a non-glycosylated form of pp-PA83 was engineered and produced in N. benthamiana using an in vivo deglycosylation approach based on co-expression of peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) from Flavobacterium meningosepticum. For comparison, versions of pp-PA83 containing point mutations in six potential N-glycosylation sites were also engineered and expressed in N. benthamiana. The in vivo deglycosylated pp-PA83 (pp-dPA83) was shown to have in vitro activity, in contrast to glycosylated pp-PA83, and to induce significantly higher levels of toxin-neutralizing antibody responses in mice compared with glycosylated pp-PA83, in vitro deglycosylated pp-PA83 or the mutated versions of pp-PA83. These results suggest that pp-dPA83 may offer advantages

  14. Expression and Antigenic Evaluation of VacA Antigenic Fragment of Helicobacter Pylori

    PubMed Central

    Hasanzadeh, Leila; Ghaznavi-Rad, Ehsanollah; Soufian, Safieh; Farjadi, Vahideh; Abtahi, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s) : Helicobacter pylori, a human specific gastric pathogen is a causative agent of chronic active gastritis. The vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) is an effective virulence factor involved in gastric injury. The aim of this study was to construct a recombinant protein containing antigenic region of VacA gene and determine its antigenicity. Materials and Methods: The antigenic region of VacA gene was detected by bioinformatics methods. The polymerase chain reaction method was used to amplify a highly antigenic region of VacA gene from chromosomal DNA of H. pylori. The eluted product was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a. The target protein was expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS. The bacteria including pET32a-VacA plasmids were induced by IPTG. The antigenicity was finally studied by western blotting using sera of 15 H. pylori infected patients after purification. Results: Enzyme digestion analysis, PCR and DNA sequencing results showed that the target gene was inserted correctly into the recombinant vector. The expressed protein was purified successfully via affinity chromatography. Data indicated that antigenic region of VacA protein from Helicobacter pylori was recognized by all 15 patient’s sera. Conclusion : Our data showed that antigenic region of VacA protein can be expressed by in E. co.li. This protein was recognized by sera patients suffering from H. pylori infection. the recombinant protein has similar epitopes and close antigenic properties to the natural form of this antigen. Recombinant antigenic region of VacA protein also seems to be a promising antigen for protective and serologic diagnosis . PMID:23997913

  15. Cloning and expression of genes encoding Haemophilus somnus antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Corbeil, L B; Chikami, G; Yarnall, M; Smith, J; Guiney, D G

    1988-01-01

    A genomic library of Haemophilus somnus 2336, a virulent isolate from a calf with pneumonia (later used to reproduce H. somnus experimental pneumonia), was constructed in the cosmid vector pHC79. The gene bank in Escherichia coli DH1 was screened by filter immunoassay with convalescent-phase serum, which reacted with several outer membrane antigens of H. somnus. On Western blotting (immunoblotting) of immunoreactive colonies, five clones were found to express proteins which comigrated with H. somnus surface antigens. Three clones (DH1 pHS1, pHS3, and pHS4) expressed both a 120-kilodalton (kDa) antigen and a 76-kDa antigen, one clone (DH1 pHS2) expressed only the 76-kDa antigen, and the fifth clone (DH1 pHS5) expressed a 60-kDa antigen. The 120-kDa and 76-kDa antigens were found internally, whereas the 60-kDa protein was detected in the DH1 pHS5 culture supernatant as membrane blebs or insoluble protein. Both the H. somnus 120-kDa antigen and the recombinant 120-kDa antigen had immunoglobulin Fc-binding activity. Restriction endonuclease mapping demonstrated that the genomic DNA inserts of clones expressing the 76-kDa antigen shared a common 28.4-kilobase-pair region, and the three clones also expressing the 120-kDa antigen shared an additional 7.0-kilobase-pair region. The restriction endonuclease map of pHS5, which expressed the 60-kDa antigen, was not similar to the maps of the other four plasmids. Since these three H. somnus antigens reacted with protective convalescent-phase serum, the recombinants which express these proteins should be useful in further studies of protective immunity in bovine H. somnus disease. Images PMID:2843469

  16. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Shin, Meong-Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical application of antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunization targeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received much attention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigen delivery. The skin has important immunological functions with unique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years, novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually been developed; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yet been fully exploited due to the penetration barrier represented by the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport of antigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievements in transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the various strategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery and vaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1): 17-24] PMID:23351379

  17. Reflection Coefficients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses and provides an example of reflectivity approximation to determine whether reflection will occur. Provides a method to show thin-film interference on a projection screen. Also applies the reflectivity concepts to electromagnetic wave systems. (MVL)

  18. Vaccination against Taenia solium cysticercosis in pigs using native and recombinant oncosphere antigens.

    PubMed

    Plancarte, A; Flisser, A; Gauci, C G; Lightowlers, M W

    1999-04-01

    Pigs were immunised with antigens derived from Taenia solium oncospheres or with a pool of three recombinant antigens from Taenia ovis, and subsequently challenged with T. solium eggs. The native oncosphere antigens induced 83% protection against viable, and 89% protection against the total number of cysticerci established following the challenge infection. Immunisation with the recombinant T. ovis antigens induced 93% protection against the establishment of viable cysticerci, and 74% protection against the total number of cysticerci. These results, and those achieved elsewhere with Taenia saginata and T. ovis, support the possibility of developing a practical vaccine to assist in the control of transmission of T. solium through pigs.

  19. Development of a candidate influenza vaccine based on virus-like particles displaying influenza M2e peptide into the immunodominant region of hepatitis B core antigen: Broad protective efficacy of particles carrying four copies of M2e.

    PubMed

    Tsybalova, Liudmila M; Stepanova, Liudmila A; Kuprianov, Victor V; Blokhina, Elena A; Potapchuk, Marina V; Korotkov, Alexander V; Gorshkov, Andrey N; Kasyanenko, Marina A; Ravin, Nikolai V; Kiselev, Oleg I

    2015-06-26

    A long-term objective when designing influenza vaccines is to create one with broad cross-reactivity that will provide effective control over influenza, no matter which strain has caused the disease. Here we summarize the results from an investigation into the immunogenic and protective capacities inherent in variations of a recombinant protein, HBc/4M2e. This protein contains four copies of the ectodomain from the influenza virus protein M2 (M2e) fused within the immunodominant loop of the hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBc). Variations of this basic design include preparations containing M2e from the consensus human influenza virus; the M2e from the highly pathogenic avian A/H5N1 virus and a combination of two copies from human and two copies from avian influenza viruses. Intramuscular delivery in mice with preparations containing four identical copies of M2e induced high IgG titers in blood sera and bronchoalveolar lavages. It also provoked the formation of memory T-cells and antibodies were retained in the blood sera for a significant period of time post immunization. Furthermore, these preparations prevented the death of 75-100% of animals, which were challenged with lethal doses of virus. This resulted in a 1.2-3.5 log10 decrease in viral replication within the lungs. Moreover, HBc particles carrying only "human" or "avian" M2e displayed cross-reactivity in relation to human (A/H1N1, A/H2N2 and A/H3N2) or A/H5N1 and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, respectively; however, with the particles carrying both "human" and "avian" M2e this effect was much weaker, especially in relation to influenza virus A/H5N1. It is apparent from this work that to quickly produce vaccine for a pandemic it would be necessary to have several variations of a recombinant protein, containing four copies of M2e (each one against a group of likely influenza virus strains) with these relevant constructs housed within a comprehensive collection Escherichia coli-producers and maintained ready for use.

  20. Expression of Plasmodium falciparum surface antigens in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ardeshir, F; Flint, J E; Reese, R T

    1985-01-01

    The asexual blood stages of the human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum produce many antigens, only some of which are important for protective immunity. Most of the putative protective antigens are believed to be expressed in schizonts and merozoites, the late stages of the asexual cycle. With the aim of cloning and characterizing genes for important parasite antigens, we used late-stage P. falciparum mRNA to construct a library of cDNA sequences inserted in the Escherichia coli expression vector pUC8. Nine thousand clones from the expression library were immunologically screened in situ with serum from Aotus monkeys immune to P. falciparum, and 95 clones expressing parasite antigens were identified. Mice were immunized with lysates from 49 of the bacterial clones that reacted with Aotus sera, and the mouse sera were tested for their reactivity with parasite antigens by indirect immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and immunoblotting assays. Several different P. falciparum antigens were identified by these assays. Indirect immunofluorescence studies of extracellular merozoites showed that three of these antigens appear to be located on the merozoite surface. Thus, we have identified cDNA clones to three different P. falciparum antigens that may be important in protective immunity. Images PMID:3887406

  1. Nonclassical T Cells and Their Antigens in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    De Libero, Gennaro; Singhal, Amit; Lepore, Marco; Mori, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    T cells that recognize nonpeptidic antigens, and thereby are identified as nonclassical, represent important yet poorly characterized effectors of the immune response. They are present in large numbers in circulating blood and tissues and are as abundant as T cells recognizing peptide antigens. Nonclassical T cells exert multiple functions including immunoregulation, tumor control, and protection against infections. They recognize complexes of nonpeptidic antigens such as lipid and glycolipid molecules, vitamin B2 precursors, and phosphorylated metabolites of the mevalonate pathway. Each of these antigens is presented by antigen-presenting molecules other than major histocompatibility complex (MHC), including CD1, MHC class I–related molecule 1 (MR1), and butyrophilin 3A1 (BTN3A1) molecules. Here, we discuss how nonclassical T cells participate in the recognition of mycobacterial antigens and in the mycobacterial-specific immune response. PMID:25059739

  2. Attenuated Escherichia coli strains expressing the colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) and a detoxified heat-labile enterotoxin (LThK63) enhance clearance of ETEC from the lungs of mice and protect mice from intestinal ETEC colonization and LT-induced fluid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Wyatt; Boedeker, Edgar C

    2013-03-15

    Although enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infections are important causes of infantile and traveler's diarrhea there is no licensed vaccine available for those at-risk. Our goal is to develop a safe, live attenuated ETEC vaccine. We used an attenuated E. coli strain (O157:H7, Δ-intimin, Stx1-neg, Stx2-neg) as a vector (ZCR533) to prepare two vaccine strains, one strain expressing colonization factor antigen I (ZCR533-CFA/I) and one strain expressing CFA/I and a detoxified heat-labile enterotoxin (ZCR533-CFA/I+LThK63) to deliver ETEC antigens to mucosal sites in BALB/c mice. Following intranasal and intragastric immunization with the vaccine strains, serum IgG and IgA antibodies were measured to the CFA/I antigen, however, only serum IgG antibodies were detected to the heat-labile enterotoxin. Intranasal administration of the vaccine strains induced respiratory and intestinal antibody responses to the CFA/I and LT antigens, while intragastric administration induced only intestinal antibody responses with no respiratory antibodies detected to the CFA/I and LT antigens. Mice immunized intranasally with the vaccine strains showed enhanced clearance of wild-type (wt) ETEC bacteria from the lungs. Mice immunized intranasally and intragastrically with the vaccine strains were protected from intestinal colonization following oral challenge with ETEC wt bacteria. Mice immunized intragastrically with the ZCR533-CFA/I+LThK63 vaccine strain had less fluid accumulate in their intestine following challenge with ETEC wt bacteria or with purified LT as compared to the sham mice indicating that the immunized mice were protected from LT-induced intestinal fluid accumulation. Thus, mice intragastrically immunized with the ZCR533-CFA/I+LThK63 vaccine strain were able to effectively neutralize the activity of the LT enterotoxin. However, no difference in intestinal fluid accumulation was detected in the mice immunized intranasally with the vaccine strain as compared to the sham

  3. Montanide™ ISA 71 VG adjuvant enhances antibody and cell-mediated immune responses to profilin subunit antigen vaccination and promotes protection against Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria tenella. Experimental Parasitology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study was conducted to investigate the immunoenhancing effects of MontanideTM ISA 71 VG adjuvant on profilin subunit antigen vaccination. Broiler chickens were immunized subcutaneously with a purified Eimeria acervulina recombinant profilin protein, either alone or mixed with ISA 71 VG, ...

  4. The Reflective Learning Continuum: Reflecting on Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltier, James W.; Hay, Amanda; Drago, William

    2005-01-01

    The importance of reflection to marketing educators is increasingly recognized. However, there is a lack of empirical research that considers reflection within the context of both the marketing and general business education literature. This article describes the use of an instrument that can be used to measure four identified levels of a…

  5. Substitutions near the Hemagglutinin Receptor-Binding Site Determine the Antigenic Evolution of Influenza A H3N2 Viruses in U.S. Swine

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Nicola S.; Anderson, Tavis K.; Kitikoon, Pravina; Skepner, Eugene; Burke, David F.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Swine influenza A virus is an endemic and economically important pathogen in pigs, with the potential to infect other host species. The hemagglutinin (HA) protein is the primary target of protective immune responses and the major component in swine influenza A vaccines. However, as a result of antigenic drift, vaccine strains must be regularly updated to reflect currently circulating strains. Characterizing the cross-reactivity between strains in pigs and seasonal influenza virus strains in humans is also important in assessing the relative risk of interspecies transmission of viruses from one host population to the other. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay data for swine and human H3N2 viruses were used with antigenic cartography to quantify the antigenic differences among H3N2 viruses isolated from pigs in the United States from 1998 to 2013 and the relative cross-reactivity between these viruses and current human seasonal influenza A virus strains. Two primary antigenic clusters were found circulating in the pig population, but with enough diversity within and between the clusters to suggest updates in vaccine strains are needed. We identified single amino acid substitutions that are likely responsible for antigenic differences between the two primary antigenic clusters and between each antigenic cluster and outliers. The antigenic distance between current seasonal influenza virus H3 strains in humans and those endemic in swine suggests that population immunity may not prevent the introduction of human viruses into pigs, and possibly vice versa, reinforcing the need to monitor and prepare for potential incursions. IMPORTANCE Influenza A virus (IAV) is an important pathogen in pigs and humans. The hemagglutinin (HA) protein is the primary target of protective immune responses and the major target of vaccines. However, vaccine strains must be updated to reflect current strains. Characterizing the differences between seasonal IAV in humans and swine

  6. V-antigen homologs in pathogenic gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji; Katoh, Hideya; Yasumoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria cause many types of infections in animals from fish and shrimps to humans. Bacteria use Type III secretion systems (TTSSs) to translocate their toxins directly into eukaryotic cells. The V-antigen is a multifunctional protein required for the TTSS in Yersinia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. V-antigen vaccines and anti-V-antigen antisera confer protection against Yersinia or P. aeruginosa infections in animal models. The V-antigen forms a pentameric cap structure at the tip of the Type III secretory needle; this structure, which has evolved from the bacterial flagellar cap structure, is indispensable for toxin translocation. Various pathogenic gram-negative bacteria such as Photorhabdus luminescens, Vibrio spp., and Aeromonas spp. encode homologs of the V-antigen. Because the V-antigens of pathogenic gram-negative bacteria play a key role in toxin translocation, they are potential therapeutic targets for combatting bacterial virulence. In the USA and Europe, these vaccines and specific antibodies against V-antigens are in clinical trials investigating the treatment of Yersinia or P. aeruginosa infections. Pathogenic gram-negative bacteria are of great interest because of their ability to infect fish and shrimp farms, their potential for exploitation in biological terrorism attacks, and their ability to cause opportunistic infections in humans. Thus, elucidation of the roles of the V-antigen in the TTSS and mechanisms by which these functions can be blocked is critical to facilitating the development of improved anti-V-antigen strategies. PMID:24641673

  7. Discriminating antigen and non-antigen using proteome dissimilarity: bacterial antigens

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Kamna; Flower, Darren R

    2010-01-01

    It has been postulated that immunogenicity results from the overall dissimilarity of pathogenic proteins versus the host proteome. We have sought to use this concept to discriminate between antigens and non-antigens of bacterial origin. Sets of 100 known antigenic and nonantigenic peptide sequences from bacteria were compared to human and mouse proteomes. Both antigenic and non-antigenic sequences lacked human or mouse homologues. Observed distributions were compared using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. The statistical null hypothesis was accepted, indicating that antigen and non-antigens did not differ significantly. Likewise, we were unable to determine a threshold able to separate meaningfully antigen from non-antigen. Thus, antigens cannot be predicted from pathogen genomes based solely on their dissimilarity to the human genome. PMID:20975907

  8. Presentation of hepatocellular antigens

    PubMed Central

    Grakoui, Arash; Crispe, Ian Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The liver is an organ in which antigen-specific T-cell responses manifest a bias toward immune tolerance. This is clearly seen in the rejection of allogeneic liver transplants, and multiple other phenomena suggest that this effect is more general. These include tolerance toward antigens introduced via the portal vein, immune failure to several hepatotropic viruses, the lack of natural liver-stage immunity to malaria parasites, and the frequent metastasis of cancers to the liver. Here we review the mechanisms by which T cells engage with hepatocellular antigens, the context in which such encounters occur, and the mechanisms that act to suppress a full T-cell response. While many mechanisms play a role, we will argue that two important processes are the constraints on the cross-presentation of hepatocellular antigens, and the induction of negative feedback inhibition driven by interferons. The constant exposure of the liver to microbial products from the intestine may drive innate immunity, rendering the local environment unfavorable for specific T-cell responses through this mechanism. Nevertheless, tolerance toward hepatocellular antigens is not monolithic and under specific circumstances allows both effective immunity and immunopathology. PMID:26924525

  9. Comparative study of protective activities of Neospora caninum bradyzoite antigens, NcBAG1, NcBSR4, NcMAG1, and NcSAG4, in a mouse model of acute parasitic infection.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masaki; Nagashima, Kotomi; Akatsuka, Yui; Murakami, Takashi; Ito, Akira; Imai, Soichi; Ike, Kazunori

    2013-02-01

    Neospora caninum is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite that causes severe neuromuscular diseases, repeated abortion, stillbirth, and congenital infection in livestock and companion animals. The development of an effective vaccine against neosporosis in cattle is an important issue due to the significant worldwide economic impact of this disease. We evaluated the immunogenicity of four bradyzoite antigens, NcBAG1 (first described in this study), NcBSR4, NcMAG1, and NcSAG4, using an acute infection mouse model to determine synergistic effects with the tachyzoite antigen as a candidate for vaccine production. Mice were inoculated with the recombinant vaccines (r-)NcBAG1, rNcBSR4, rNcMAG1, rNcSAG4, or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (adjuvant control group) in an oil-in-water emulsion with bitter gourd extract, a Th1 immune stimulator, or PBS alone as the infection control group. Mice inoculated with each vaccine developed antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies and isolated splenocytes from mice produced high levels of interferon-γ when infected with the N. caninum tachyzoite. The mice inoculated with rNcBAG1, rNcMAG1, or rNcSAG4 developed slight to moderate clinical symptoms but did not succumb to infection. In contrast, rNcBSR4 and both control groups developed severe disease and some mice required euthanasia. The parasitic burden in the brain tissues of vaccinated mice was assessed by N. caninum-specific real-time PCR at 5 weeks after infection. The parasite load in rNcBAG1-, rNcMAG1-, and rNcSAG4-inoculated mice was significantly lower than that in adjuvant and infection control mice. Therefore, these antigens may be useful for the production of a N. caninum-specific vaccination protocol.

  10. Immunogenetic Mechanisms Driving Norovirus GII.4 Antigenic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Eric F.; Corti, Davide; Swanstrom, Jesica; Debbink, Kari; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Baric, Ralph S.

    2012-01-01

    Noroviruses are the principal cause of epidemic gastroenteritis worldwide with GII.4 strains accounting for 80% of infections. The major capsid protein of GII.4 strains is evolving rapidly, resulting in new epidemic strains with altered antigenic potentials. To test if antigenic drift may contribute to GII.4 persistence, human memory B cells were immortalized and the resulting human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) characterized for reactivity to a panel of time-ordered GII.4 virus-like particles (VLPs). Reflecting the complex exposure history of the volunteer, human anti-GII.4 mAbs grouped into three VLP reactivity patterns; ancestral (1987–1997), contemporary (2004–2009), and broad (1987–2009). NVB 114 reacted exclusively to the earliest GII.4 VLPs by EIA and blockade. NVB 97 specifically bound and blocked only contemporary GII.4 VLPs, while NBV 111 and 43.9 exclusively reacted with and blocked variants of the GII.4.2006 Minerva strain. Three mAbs had broad GII.4 reactivity. Two, NVB 37.10 and 61.3, also detected other genogroup II VLPs by EIA but did not block any VLP interactions with carbohydrate ligands. NVB 71.4 cross-neutralized the panel of time-ordered GII.4 VLPs, as measured by VLP-carbohydrate blockade assays. Using mutant VLPs designed to alter predicted antigenic epitopes, two evolving, GII.4-specific, blockade epitopes were mapped. Amino acids 294–298 and 368–372 were required for binding NVB 114, 111 and 43.9 mAbs. Amino acids 393–395 were essential for binding NVB 97, supporting earlier correlations between antibody blockade escape and carbohydrate binding variation. These data inform VLP vaccine design, provide a strategy for expanding the cross-blockade potential of chimeric VLP vaccines, and identify an antibody with broadly neutralizing therapeutic potential for the treatment of human disease. Moreover, these data support the hypothesis that GII.4 norovirus evolution is heavily influenced by antigenic variation of neutralizing epitopes

  11. Activation of antibody Fc function by antigen-induced conformational changes.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J C; Koshland, M E

    1975-01-01

    IgM antibody directed against the pheny-beta-lactoside hapten was examined for its capacity to fix complement in the presence of the hapten, monohapten-substituted antigen, and multihapten-substituted antigen. Hapten was found to have no effect; monovalent antigen induced an excellent response which could be inhibited by hapten; and multivalent antigen also induced an excellent response which was related to the number of determinants added and not to the formation of antigen-antibody aggregates. The difference between the activities of hapten and monovalent antigen was reflected in their affinities for the IgM antibody. The monovalent antigen had a lower Ka, indicating that energy from binding was used to activate the Fc complement binding sites. These data show that the expression of IgM Fc function depends on a change in Fc conformation produced by the binding of antigen at the distant Fab combining sites. PMID:1061094

  12. Activation of antibody Fc function by antigen-induced conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Brown, J C; Koshland, M E

    1975-12-01

    IgM antibody directed against the pheny-beta-lactoside hapten was examined for its capacity to fix complement in the presence of the hapten, monohapten-substituted antigen, and multihapten-substituted antigen. Hapten was found to have no effect; monovalent antigen induced an excellent response which could be inhibited by hapten; and multivalent antigen also induced an excellent response which was related to the number of determinants added and not to the formation of antigen-antibody aggregates. The difference between the activities of hapten and monovalent antigen was reflected in their affinities for the IgM antibody. The monovalent antigen had a lower Ka, indicating that energy from binding was used to activate the Fc complement binding sites. These data show that the expression of IgM Fc function depends on a change in Fc conformation produced by the binding of antigen at the distant Fab combining sites.

  13. Dengue viruses cluster antigenically but not as discrete serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Katzelnick, Leah C.; Fonville, Judith M.; Gromowski, Gregory D.; Arriaga, Jose Bustos; Green, Angela; James, Sarah L.; Lau, Louis; Montoya, Magelda; Wang, Chunling; VanBlargan, Laura A.; Russell, Colin A.; Thu, Hlaing Myat; Pierson, Theodore C.; Buchy, Philippe; Aaskov, John G.; Muñoz-Jordán, Jorge L.; Vasilakis, Nikos; Gibbons, Robert V.; Tesh, Robert B.; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.; Fouchier, Ron A.M.; Durbin, Anna; Simmons, Cameron P.; Holmes, Edward C.; Harris, Eva; Whitehead, Stephen S.; Smith, Derek J.

    2016-01-01

    The four genetically divergent dengue virus (DENV) types are traditionally classified as serotypes. Antigenic and genetic differences among the DENV types influence disease outcome, vaccine-induced protection, epidemic magnitude, and viral evolution. We characterized antigenic diversity in the DENV types by antigenic maps constructed from neutralizing antibody titers obtained from African green monkeys and after human vaccination and natural infections. Genetically, geographically, and temporally, diverse DENV isolates clustered loosely by type, but we found many are as similar antigenically to a virus of a different type as to some viruses of the same type. Primary infection antisera did not neutralize all viruses of the same DENV type any better than other types did up to two years after infection and did not show improved neutralization to homologous type isolates. That the canonical DENV types are not antigenically homogenous has implications for vaccination and research on the dynamics of immunity, disease, and the evolution of DENV. PMID:26383952

  14. Dengue viruses cluster antigenically but not as discrete serotypes.

    PubMed

    Katzelnick, Leah C; Fonville, Judith M; Gromowski, Gregory D; Bustos Arriaga, Jose; Green, Angela; James, Sarah L; Lau, Louis; Montoya, Magelda; Wang, Chunling; VanBlargan, Laura A; Russell, Colin A; Thu, Hlaing Myat; Pierson, Theodore C; Buchy, Philippe; Aaskov, John G; Muñoz-Jordán, Jorge L; Vasilakis, Nikos; Gibbons, Robert V; Tesh, Robert B; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Fouchier, Ron A M; Durbin, Anna; Simmons, Cameron P; Holmes, Edward C; Harris, Eva; Whitehead, Stephen S; Smith, Derek J

    2015-09-18

    The four genetically divergent dengue virus (DENV) types are traditionally classified as serotypes. Antigenic and genetic differences among the DENV types influence disease outcome, vaccine-induced protection, epidemic magnitude, and viral evolution. We characterized antigenic diversity in the DENV types by antigenic maps constructed from neutralizing antibody titers obtained from African green monkeys and after human vaccination and natural infections. Genetically, geographically, and temporally, diverse DENV isolates clustered loosely by type, but we found that many are as similar antigenically to a virus of a different type as to some viruses of the same type. Primary infection antisera did not neutralize all viruses of the same DENV type any better than other types did up to 2 years after infection and did not show improved neutralization to homologous type isolates. That the canonical DENV types are not antigenically homogeneous has implications for vaccination and research on the dynamics of immunity, disease, and the evolution of DENV. PMID:26383952

  15. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissues or other specimens, using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular m...

  16. A Role For Mitochondria In Antigen Processing And Presentation.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Lc; Cervantes-Silva, Mp; Ontiveros-Dotor, E; López-Villegas, Eo; Sánchez-García, Fj

    2014-09-23

    Immune synapse formation is critical for T lymphocyte activation, and mitochondria have a role in this process, by localizing close to the immune synapse, regulating intracellular calcium concentration, and providing locally required ATP. The interaction between antigen presenting cells (APCs) and T lymphocytes is a two-way signaling process. However, the role of mitochondria in antigen presenting cells during this process remains unknown. For APCs to be able to activate T lymphocytes, they must first engage in an antigen-uptake, -processing, and -presentation process. Here we show that HEL-loaded B lymphocytes, as a type of APCs, undergo a small but significant mitochondrial depolarization by 1-2 h following antigen exposure thus suggesting an increase in their metabolic demands. Inhibition of ATP synthase (oligomycin) or mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) (Ruthenium red) had no effect on antigen uptake. Therefore, antigen processing and antigen presentation were further analyzed. Oligomycin treatment reduced the amount of specific MHC-peptide complexes but not total MHC II on the cell membrane of B lymphocytes which correlated with a decrease in antigen presentation. However, oligomycin also reduced antigen presentation by B lymphocytes that endogenously express HEL and by B lymphocytes loaded with the HEL48-62 peptide, although to a lesser extent. ATP synthase inhibition and MCU inhibition had a clear inhibitory effect on antigen processing (DQ-OVA). Taking together these results suggest that ATP synthase and MCU are relevant for antigen processing and presentation. Finally, APCs mitochondria were found to re-organize towards the APC-T immune synapse. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Reflected Glory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Colin

    2006-01-01

    The scientific model of how people see things is far removed from children's real-world experience. They know that light is needed in order to see an object, but may not know that light is reflected off the object and some of that light enters the eyes. In this article, the author explores children's understanding of reflection and how to develop…

  18. What Do We Need to Protect, at All Costs, During the 21st Century? Reflections From a Curated, Interactive Co-Created Intellectual Jazz Performance.

    PubMed

    Jadad, Alejandro R; Davis, Dave

    2016-01-01

    The question that forms the title of this article, "What do we need to protect, at all costs, during the 21st century?," speaks to the sizable changes in health care systems and settings that surround the continuing professional development (CPD) provider, and the need to establish a core set of principles and practices as the field moves forward from both theoretical and practical aspects. It also provided the focus for one of the five keynote lectures presented during the 2016 World Congress on Continuing Professional Development. As the planners of this keynote session, we sought to evoke answers to the question, not from the speaker, but from the audience itself, a process enabled by a highly engaging presentation style and powered by interactive digital technologies. Further, we believed that the session would not directly lead to suggestions to improve the theory and practice of CPD, but rather to create the biopsychosocial context-a sort of platform-on which such discussions can occur. PMID:27584066

  19. What Do We Need to Protect, at All Costs, During the 21st Century? Reflections From a Curated, Interactive Co-Created Intellectual Jazz Performance.

    PubMed

    Jadad, Alejandro R; Davis, Dave

    2016-01-01

    The question that forms the title of this article, "What do we need to protect, at all costs, during the 21st century?," speaks to the sizable changes in health care systems and settings that surround the continuing professional development (CPD) provider, and the need to establish a core set of principles and practices as the field moves forward from both theoretical and practical aspects. It also provided the focus for one of the five keynote lectures presented during the 2016 World Congress on Continuing Professional Development. As the planners of this keynote session, we sought to evoke answers to the question, not from the speaker, but from the audience itself, a process enabled by a highly engaging presentation style and powered by interactive digital technologies. Further, we believed that the session would not directly lead to suggestions to improve the theory and practice of CPD, but rather to create the biopsychosocial context-a sort of platform-on which such discussions can occur.

  20. Cancer vaccine--Antigenics.

    PubMed

    2002-01-01

    Antigenics is developing a therapeutic cancer vaccine based on heat-shock proteins (HSPs). The vaccine [HSPPC-96, Oncophage] is in a pivotal phase III clinical trial for renal cancer at 80 clinical sites worldwide. The trial is enrolling at least 500 patients who are randomised to receive surgical removal of the primary tumour followed by out-patient treatment with Oncophage((R)) or surgery only. This study was initiated on the basis of results from a pilot phase I/II study and preliminary results from a phase II study in patients with renal cell cancer. In October 2001, Oncophage was designated as a fast-track product by the Food and Drug Administration in the US for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma. Oncophage is in phase I/II trials in Italy for colorectal cancer (30 patients) and melanoma. The trials in Italy are being conducted at the Istituto dei Tumouri, Milan (in association with Sigma-Tau). Preliminary data from the phase II trial for melanoma was presented at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference in Florida, USA, in October 2001. Oncophage is also in a phase I/II (42 patients) and a phase II trial (84 patients) in the US for renal cell cancer, a phase II trial in the US for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (35 patients), a phase II trial in the US for sarcoma (20-35 patients), a phase I/II trial in the US for melanoma (36 patients), and phase I/II trials in Germany for gastric (30 patients) and pancreatic cancers. A pilot phase I trial in patients with pancreatic cancer began in the US in 1997 with 5 patients enrolled. In November 2000, Antigenics announced that this trial had been expanded to a phase I/II study which would now include survival as an endpoint and would enroll 5 additional patients. The US trials are being performed at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. The trials in Germany are being carried out at Johannes Gutenberg-University Hospital, Mainz. Oncophage is an autologous vaccine consisting of

  1. The Lymph Self-Antigen Repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Cristina C.; Santambrogio, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The lymphatic fluid originates from the interstitial fluid which bathes every parenchymal organ and reflects the “omic” composition of the tissue from which it originates in its physiological or pathological signature. Several recent proteomic analyses have mapped the proteome-degradome and peptidome of this immunologically relevant fluid pointing to the lymph as an important source of tissue-derived self-antigens. A vast array of lymph-circulating peptides have been mapped deriving from a variety of processing pathways including caspases, cathepsins, MMPs, ADAMs, kallikreins, calpains, and granzymes, among others. These self peptides can be directly loaded on circulatory dendritic cells and expand the self-antigenic repertoire available for central and peripheral tolerance. PMID:24379811

  2. Antigens and allergic asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C.E.; Swanson, M.C.

    1987-06-01

    There are few reliable epidemiologic data on the overall frequency and importance of allergy. We describe a practical method for quantifying the concentration of both amorphous and morphologically defined antigens in the air. A high volume air sampler is used to collect airborne particles and has a facility to separate samples into different particle sizes. Samples are tested for allergenic activity by radioallergosorbent test inhibition assay. Preliminary findings from studies of community wide, amorphous and common household allergens are reported.

  3. Reflecting on Reflecting on Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Arthur L.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses three broad themes--reflection, power, and negotiation--that are evidenced in all of the articles in this issue. In this article, the author tries to transgress the articles at some middling altitude to seek some broader thematics. His observations about reflection, power, and negotiation do transcend individual efforts,…

  4. Radar reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-07-01

    This TOP describes a method for measuring the radar reflectivity characteristics of aircraft. It uses a rotating platform and various radar systems to obtain calibrated radar Automatic Gain Control values for each degree of aspect angle for the aircraft. The purpose of this test is to provide comparable values of radar reflectivity for Army aircraft at various radar frequencies and parameter for fixed positions and aspect angles on the aircraft. Data collected on each specific aircraft can be used to evaluate radar reflectivity characteristics of aircraft skin material, paint, and structural changes such as flat versus curved surfaces.

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi as an effective cancer antigen delivery vector.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Caroline; Santos, Luara I; Galvão-Filho, Bruno; Teixeira, Santuza M; Rodrigues, Flávia G; DaRocha, Wanderson D; Chiari, Egler; Jungbluth, Achim A; Ritter, Gerd; Gnjatic, Sacha; Old, Lloyd J; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2011-12-01

    One of the main challenges in cancer research is the development of vaccines that induce effective and long-lived protective immunity against tumors. Significant progress has been made in identifying members of the cancer testis antigen family as potential vaccine candidates. However, an ideal form for antigen delivery that induces robust and sustainable antigen-specific T-cell responses, and in particular of CD8(+) T lymphocytes, remains to be developed. Here we report the use of a recombinant nonpathogenic clone of Trypanosoma cruzi as a vaccine vector to induce vigorous and long-term T cell-mediated immunity. The rationale for using the highly attenuated T. cruzi clone was (i) the ability of the parasite to persist in host tissues and therefore to induce a long-term antigen-specific immune response; (ii) the existence of intrinsic parasite agonists for Toll-like receptors and consequent induction of highly polarized T helper cell type 1 responses; and (iii) the parasite replication in the host cell cytoplasm, leading to direct antigen presentation through the endogenous pathway and consequent induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. Importantly, we found that parasites expressing a cancer testis antigen (NY-ESO-1) were able to elicit human antigen-specific T-cell responses in vitro and solid protection against melanoma in a mouse model. Furthermore, in a therapeutic protocol, the parasites expressing NY-ESO-1 delayed the rate of tumor development in mice. We conclude that the T. cruzi vector is highly efficient in inducing T cell-mediated immunity and protection against cancer cells. More broadly, this strategy could be used to elicit a long-term T cell-mediated immunity and used for prophylaxis or therapy of chronic infectious diseases.

  6. Strategies to enhance immunogenicity of cDNA vaccine encoded antigens by modulation of antigen processing.

    PubMed

    Platteel, Anouk C M; Marit de Groot, A; Keller, Christin; Andersen, Peter; Ovaa, Huib; Kloetzel, Peter M; Mishto, Michele; Sijts, Alice J A M

    2016-09-30

    Most vaccines are based on protective humoral responses while for intracellular pathogens CD8(+) T cells are regularly needed to provide protection. However, poor processing efficiency of antigens is often a limiting factor in CD8(+) T cell priming, hampering vaccine efficacy. The multistage cDNA vaccine H56, encoding three secreted Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens, was used to test a complete strategy to enhance vaccine' immunogenicity. Potential CD8(+) T cell epitopes in H56 were predicted using the NetMHC3.4/ANN program. Mice were immunized with H56 cDNA using dermal DNA tattoo immunization and epitope candidates were tested for recognition by responding CD8(+) T cells in ex vivo assays. Seven novel CD8(+) T cell epitopes were identified. H56 immunogenicity could be substantially enhanced by two strategies: (i) fusion of the H56 sequence to cDNA of proteins that modify intracellular antigen processing or provide CD4(+) T cell help, (ii) by substitution of the epitope's hydrophobic C-terminal flanking residues for polar glutamic acid, which facilitated their proteasome-mediated generation. We conclude that this whole strategy of in silico prediction of potential CD8(+) T cell epitopes in novel antigens, followed by fusion to sequences with immunogenicity-enhancing properties or modification of epitope flanking sequences to improve proteasome-mediated processing, may be exploited to design novel vaccines against emerging or 'hard to treat' intracellular pathogens. PMID:27593157

  7. Focal Radiation Therapy Combined with 4-1BB Activation and CTLA-4 Blockade Yields Long-Term Survival and a Protective Antigen-Specific Memory Response in a Murine Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Belcaid, Zineb; Phallen, Jillian A.; Zeng, Jing; See, Alfred P.; Mathios, Dimitrios; Gottschalk, Chelsea; Nicholas, Sarah; Kellett, Meghan; Ruzevick, Jacob; Jackson, Christopher; Albesiano, Emilia; Durham, Nicholas M.; Ye, Xiaobu; Tran, Phuoc T.; Tyler, Betty; Wong, John W.; Brem, Henry; Pardoll, Drew M.; Drake, Charles G.; Lim, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor in adults and is associated with a poor prognosis. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen -4 (CTLA-4) blocking antibodies have demonstrated an ability to generate robust antitumor immune responses against a variety of solid tumors. 4-1BB (CD137) is expressed by activated T lymphocytes and served as a co-stimulatory signal, which promotes cytotoxic function. Here, we evaluate a combination immunotherapy regimen involving 4-1BB activation, CTLA-4 blockade, and focal radiation therapy in an immune-competent intracranial GBM model. Methods GL261-luciferace cells were stereotactically implanted in the striatum of C57BL/6 mice. Mice were treated with a triple therapy regimen consisted of 4-1BB agonist antibodies, CTLA-4 blocking antibodies, and focal radiation therapy using a small animal radiation research platform and mice were followed for survival. Numbers of brain-infiltrating lymphocytes were analyzed by FACS analysis. CD4 or CD8 depleting antibodies were administered to determine the relative contribution of T helper and cytotoxic T cells in this regimen. To evaluate the ability of this immunotherapy to generate an antigen-specific memory response, long-term survivors were re-challenged with GL261 glioma en B16 melanoma flank tumors. Results Mice treated with triple therapy had increased survival compared to mice treated with focal radiation therapy and immunotherapy with 4-1BB activation and CTLA-4 blockade. Animals treated with triple therapy exhibited at least 50% long-term tumor free survival. Treatment with triple therapy resulted in a higher density of CD4+ and CD8+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. Mechanistically, depletion of CD4+ T cells abrogated the antitumor efficacy of triple therapy, while depletion of CD8+ T cells had no effect on the treatment response. Conclusion Combination therapy with 4-1BB activation and CTLA-4 blockade in the setting of focal radiation therapy improves survival in

  8. A Small Peptide (CEL-1000) Derived from the β-Chain of the Human Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Molecule Induces Complete Protection against Malaria in an Antigen-Independent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Charoenvit, Yupin; Brice, Gary T.; Bacon, David; Majam, Victoria; Williams, Jackie; Abot, Esteban; Ganeshan, Harini; Sedegah, Martha; Doolan, Denise L.; Carucci, Daniel J.; Zimmerman, Daniel H.

    2004-01-01

    CEL-1000 (DGQEEKAGVVSTGLIGGG) is a novel potential preventative and therapeutic agent. We report that CEL-1000 confers a high degree of protection against Plasmodium sporozoite challenge in a murine model of malaria, as shown by the total absence of blood stage infection following challenge with 100 sporozoites (100% protection) and by a substantial reduction (400-fold) of liver stage parasite RNA following challenge with 50,000 sporozoites. CEL-1000 protection was demonstrated in A/J (H-2a) and C3H/HeJ (H-2k) mice but not in BALB/c (H-2d) or CAF1 (A/J × BALB/c F1 hybrid) mice. In CEL-1000-treated and protected mice, high levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in serum and elevated frequencies of hepatic and splenic CD4+ IFN-γ-positive T cells were detected 24 h after administration of an additional dose of CEL-1000. Treatment of A/J mice that received CEL-1000 with antibodies against IFN-γ just prior to challenge abolished the protection, and a similar treatment with antibodies against CD4+ T cells partially reduced the level of protection, while treatment with control antibodies or antibodies specific for interleukin-12 (IL-12), CD8+ T cells, or NK cells had no effect. Our data establish that the protection induced by CEL-1000 is dependent on IFN-γ and is partially dependent on CD4+ T cells but is independent of CD8+ T cells, NK cells, and IL-12 at the effector phase and does not induce a detectable antibody response. PMID:15215094

  9. Reflective Shields for Artificial Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    Report proposes reflective shield that protects spacecraft from radiant energy. Also gives some protection against particle beams and cosmic rays. Conceptual shield essentially advanced version of decorative multifaceted mirror balls often hung over dance floors. Mirror facets disperse radiant energy in many directions.

  10. Designing malaria vaccines to circumvent antigen variability.

    PubMed

    Ouattara, Amed; Barry, Alyssa E; Dutta, Sheetij; Remarque, Edmond J; Beeson, James G; Plowe, Christopher V

    2015-12-22

    Prospects for malaria eradication will be greatly enhanced by an effective vaccine, but parasite genetic diversity poses a major impediment to malaria vaccine efficacy. In recent pre-clinical and field trials, vaccines based on polymorphic Plasmodium falciparum antigens have shown efficacy only against homologous strains, raising the specter of allele-specific immunity such as that which plagues vaccines against influenza and HIV. The most advanced malaria vaccine, RTS,S, targets relatively conserved epitopes on the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein. After more than 40 years of development and testing, RTS,S, has shown significant but modest efficacy against clinical malaria in phase 2 and 3 trials. Ongoing phase 2 studies of an irradiated sporozoite vaccine will ascertain whether the full protection against homologous experimental malaria challenge conferred by high doses of a whole organism vaccine can provide protection against diverse strains in the field. Here we review and evaluate approaches being taken to design broadly cross-protective malaria vaccines.

  11. Novel antigens for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fleckenstein, James; Sheikh, Alaullah; Qadri, Firdausi

    2014-05-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the most common bacterial pathogens causing diarrhea in developing countries where they lead to hundreds of thousands of deaths, mostly in children. These organisms are a leading cause of diarrheal illness in travelers to endemic countries. ETEC pathogenesis, and consequently vaccine approaches, have largely focused on plasmid-encoded enterotoxins or fimbrial colonization factors. To date these approaches have not yielded a broadly protective vaccine. However, recent studies suggest that ETEC pathogenesis is more complex than previously appreciated and involves additional plasmid and chromosomally encoded virulence molecules that can be targeted in vaccines. Here, we review recent novel antigen discovery efforts, potential contribution of these proteins to the molecular pathogenesis of ETEC and protective immunity, and the potential implications for development of next generation vaccines for important pathogens. These proteins may help to improve the effectiveness of future vaccines by making them simpler and possibly broadly protective because of their conserved nature. PMID:24702311

  12. Antibody titer has positive predictive value for vaccine protection against challenge with natural antigenic-drift variants of H5N1 high-pathogenicity avian influenza viruses from Indonesia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beginning with Hong Kong in 2002, vaccines have been used as part of an integrated control strategy in 14 countries/regions to protect poultry against H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI). H5N1 HPAI was first reported in Indonesia in 2003 and vaccination was initiated the following year. ...

  13. Vaccination of mice against Taenia taeniaeformis using antigen fractions partitioned with Triton X-114.

    PubMed

    Schnieder, T; Bøgh, H O; Lightowlers, M W; Rickard, M D

    1996-01-01

    Taenia taeniaeformis oncosphere and metacestode antigens were fractioned using Triton X-114 into insoluble, aqueous and detergent rich fractions. These fractions were analysed in SDS-PAGE and immunoblots and used in vaccination trials against infection with T. taeniaeformis in mice. Qualitative differences were apparent in the spectrum of antigens partitioning into the different detergent phases but host-prospective antigens were present in all three fractions. The presence of individual antigenic components in the phases did not correlate with the degree of protection afforded by these fractions in the vaccination trials. Host protective immunogenicity of T. taeniaeformis oncosphere and metacestode extracts may be due to multiple protective antigens which partition into the different Triton X-114 fractions.

  14. Flaviviruses and their antigenic structure.

    PubMed

    Heinz, F X; Stiasny, Karin

    2012-12-01

    Flaviviruses comprise important arthropod-transmitted human pathogens, including yellow fever (YF), dengue (Den), Japanese encephalitis (JE), West Nile (WN) and tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) viruses that have the potential of expanding their endemic areas due to global climatic, ecological and socio-economic changes. While effective vaccines against YF, JE and TBE are in widespread use, the development of a dengue vaccine has been hampered for a long time because of concerns of immunopathological consequences of vaccination. Phase III clinical trials with a recombinant chimeric live vaccine are now ongoing and will show whether the enormous problem of dengue can be resolved or at least reduced by vaccination in the future. Unprecedented details of the flavivirus particle structure have become available through the combined use of X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy that led to novel and surprising insights into the antigenic structure of these viruses. Recent studies provided evidence for an important role of virus maturation as well as particle dynamics in virus neutralization by antibodies and thus added previously unknown layers of complexity to our understanding of flavivirus immune protection. This information is invaluable for interpreting current investigations on the functional activities of polyclonal antibody responses to flavivirus infections and vaccinations and may open new avenues for studies on flavivirus cell biology and vaccine design.

  15. Immune recognition of protein antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Laver, W.G.; Air, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 33 papers. Some of the titles are: Antigenic Structure of Influenze Virus Hemagglutinin; Germ-line and Somatic Diversity in the Antibody Response to the Influenza Virus A/PR/8/34 Hemagglutinin; Recognition of Cloned Influenza A Virus Gene Products by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes; Antigenic Structure of the Influenza Virus N2 Neuraminidase; and The Molecular and Genetic Basis of Antigenic Variation in Gonococcal Pillin.

  16. Structure and function of the Ca antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Bramwell, M. E.; Bhavanandan, V. P.; Wiseman, G.; Harris, H.

    1983-01-01

    The Ca antigen, which can be detected in a wide range of malignant human tumours by means of the Cal antibody, is a glycoprotein of the mucin type. At least 95% of the carbohydrate is 0-glycosidically linked to the polypeptide which contains high proportions of glycine, serine and glutamic acid. The carbohydrate has a very simple structure: it is composed almost entirely of tetra- tri- and disaccharides having the general formula (NeuNac)n leads to [Gal leads to GalNac] alpha leads to, where n = 0, 1 or 2. In many malignant cell lines, the antigen is produced constitutively in vitro; but in one that has been examined, its synthesis can be induced by high concentrations of lactate. Evidence is presented for the view that a primary function of this glycoprotein is to shield the cells that produce it from hydrogen ion concentrations outside of the physiological range. The presence of the Ca antigen in malignant tumours may thus be a reflection of metabolic conditions that are known to be characteristics of such tumours. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:6349673

  17. Antigenic variation in ciliates: antigen structure, function, expression.

    PubMed

    Simon, Martin C; Schmidt, Helmut J

    2007-01-01

    In the past decades, the major focus of antigen variation research has been on parasitic protists. However, antigenic variation occurs also in free-living protists. The antigenic systems of the ciliates Paramecium and Tetrahymena have been studied for more than 100 yr. In spite of different life strategies and distant phylogenetic relationships of free-living ciliates and parasitic protists, their antigenic systems have features in common, such as the presence of repeated protein motifs and multigene families. The function of variable surface antigens in free-living ciliates is still unknown. Up to now no detailed monitoring of antigen expression in free-living ciliates in natural habitats has been performed. Unlike stochastic switching in parasites, antigen expression in ciliates can be directed, e.g. by temperature, which holds great advantages for research on the expression mechanism. Regulated expression of surface antigens occurs in an exclusive way and the responsible mechanism is complex, involving both transcriptional and post-transcriptional features. The involvement of homology-dependent effects has been proposed several times but has not been proved yet.

  18. Antigenic properties of avian hepatitis E virus capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qin; Syed, Shahid Faraz; Zhou, En-Min

    2015-10-22

    Avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the main causative agent of big liver and spleen disease and hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome in chickens, and is genetically and antigenically related to mammalian HEVs. HEV capsid protein contains immunodominant epitopes and induces a protective humoral immune response. A better understanding of the antigenic composition of this protein is critically important for the development of effective vaccine and sensitive and specific serological assays. To date, six linear antigenic domains (I-VI) have been characterized in avian HEV capsid protein and analyzed for their applications in the serological diagnosis and vaccine design. Domains I and V induce strong immune response in chickens and are common to avian, human, and swine HEVs, indicating that the shared epitopes hampering differential diagnosis of avian HEV infection. Domains III and IV are not immunodominant and elicit a weak immune response. Domain VI, located in the N-terminal region of the capsid protein, can also trigger an intense immune response, but the anti-domain VI antibodies are transient. The protection analysis showed that the truncated capsid protein containing the C-terminal 268 amino acid residues expressed by the bacterial system can provide protective immunity against avian HEV infection in chickens. However, the synthetic peptides incorporating the different linear antigenic domains (I-VI) and epitopes are non-protective. The antigenic composition of avian HEV capsid protein is altogether complex. To develop an effective vaccine and accurate serological diagnostic methods, more conformational antigenic domains or epitopes are to be characterized in detail. PMID:26340899

  19. Association of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis with Histo-blood Group Antigens.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, E; Dwibedi, B; Kar, S K; Pandey, R M

    2016-07-01

    Association of rotavirus gastroenteritis with histo-blood group antigens in children younger than 5 years admitted with diarrhea (n=389) was studied. Distribution of blood groups in rotavirus positive (n=96) and rotavirus negative (n=51) diarrhea gastroenteritis cases did not show any susceptibility to any blood group; blood group O seemed to be protective. PMID:27508550

  20. Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen KidsHealth > For Parents > Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen Print A A A Text Size ... en español Muestra de materia fecal: antígeno de H. pylori What It Is Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) ...

  1. Differentiation antigens in lymphohemopoietic tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Miyasaka, M.; Trnka, Z.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 15 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: In Situ Characterization of Human Lymphoid Cells Using Monoclonal Antibodies; Structural and Functional Aspects of HLA Clas II Genes; Cell-Surface Differentiation Antigens Expressed on Thymocytes and T Cells of the Mouse; and Differentiation Antigens on Lymphoid Cells of the Guinea Pig.

  2. Intradermal delivery of Shigella IpaB and IpaD type III secretion proteins: kinetics of cell recruitment and antigen uptake, mucosal and systemic immunity, and protection across serotypes.

    PubMed

    Heine, Shannon J; Diaz-McNair, Jovita; Andar, Abhay U; Drachenberg, Cinthia B; van de Verg, Lillian; Walker, Richard; Picking, Wendy L; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2014-02-15

    Shigella is one of the leading pathogens contributing to the vast pediatric diarrheal disease burden in low-income countries. No licensed vaccine is available, and the existing candidates are only partially effective and serotype specific. Shigella type III secretion system proteins IpaB and IpaD, which are conserved across Shigella spp., are candidates for a broadly protective, subunit-based vaccine. In this study, we investigated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of IpaB and IpaD administered intradermally (i.d.) with a double-mutant of the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (dmLT) adjuvant using microneedles. Different dosage levels of IpaB and IpaD, with or without dmLT, were tested in mice. Vaccine delivery into the dermis, recruitment of neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, and Langerhans cells, and colocalization of vaccine Ag within skin-activated APC were demonstrated through histology and immunofluorescence microscopy. Ag-loaded neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, and Langerhans cells remained in the tissue at least 1 wk. IpaB, IpaD, and dmLT-specific serum IgG- and IgG-secreting cells were produced following i.d. immunization. The protective efficacy was 70% against Shigella flexneri and 50% against Shigella sonnei. Similar results were obtained when the vaccine was administered intranasally, with the i.d. route requiring 25-40 times lower doses. Distinctively, IgG was detected in mucosal secretions; secretory IgA, as well as mucosal and systemic IgA Ab-secreting cells, were seemingly absent. Vaccine-induced T cells produced IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, IL-17, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10. These results demonstrate the potential of i.d. vaccination with IpaB and IpaD to prevent Shigella infection and support further studies in humans.

  3. AIRWAY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS IN MICE FOLLOWING ANTIGEN AND PARTICULATE MATTER EXPOSURE IS VAGALLY MEDIATED

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sensory nerves within the airways can initiate a variety of protective reflexes. We hypothesized that insults such as exposure to antigen and particulate matter (PM) might dysregulate airway sensory nerve function, thereby contributing to enhanced airway inflammation and hyperre...

  4. Long-term persistence of immunity induced by OVA-coupled gas-filled microbubble vaccination partially protects mice against infection by OVA-expressing Listeria.

    PubMed

    Bioley, Gilles; Lassus, Anne; Terrettaz, Jacques; Tranquart, François; Corthésy, Blaise

    2015-07-01

    Vaccination aims at generating memory immune responses able to protect individuals against pathogenic challenges over long periods of time. Subunit vaccine formulations based on safe, but poorly immunogenic, antigenic entities must be combined with adjuvant molecules to make them efficient against infections. We have previously shown that gas-filled microbubbles (MB) are potent antigen-delivery systems. This study compares the ability of various ovalbumin-associated MB (OVA-MB) formulations to induce antigen-specific memory immune responses and evaluates long-term protection toward bacterial infections. When initially testing dendritic cells reactivity to MB constituents, palmitic acid exhibited the highest degree of activation. Subcutaneous immunization of naïve wild-type mice with the OVA-MB formulation comprising the highest palmitic acid content and devoid of PEG2000 was found to trigger the more pronounced Th1-type response, as reflected by robust IFN-γ and IL-2 production. Both T cell and antibody responses persisted for at least 6 months after immunization. At that time, systemic infection with OVA-expressing Listeria monocytgenes was performed. Partial protection of vaccinated mice was demonstrated by reduction of the bacterial load in both the spleen and liver. We conclude that antigen-bound MB exhibit promising properties as a vaccine candidate ensuring prolonged maintenance of protective immunity.

  5. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Neurath, A.R.; Strick, N.; Baker, L.; Krugman, S.

    1982-07-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid-phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bound adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure.

  6. T Cells as Antigen Carriers for Anti-tumor Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Traversari, Catia; Russo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the physiologic processing and presenting machinery of dendritic cells (DCs) by in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens may improve the immunogenic potential and clinical efficacy of DC-based cancer vaccines. The approach developed by our group was based on the clinical observation that some patients treated with the infusion of donor lymphocytes transduced to express the HSV-TK suicide gene for relapse of hematologic malignancies, after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, developed a T cell-mediated immune response specifically directed against the HSV-TK gene product.We demonstrated that lymphocytes genetically modified to express HSV-TK as well as self/tumor antigens, acting as antigen carriers, efficiently target DCs in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. The infusion of TRP-2-transduced lymphocytes induced the establishment of protective immunity and long-term memory in tumor-bearing mice by cross-presentation of the antigen mediated by the CD11c(+)CD8a(+) DCs subset. A similar approach was applied in a clinical setting. Ten patients affected by MAGE-3(+) metastatic melanoma were treated with autologous lymphocytes retrovirally transduced to express the MAGE-3 tumor antigen. In three patients, the treatment led to the increase of MAGE-3 specific CD8+ and CD4+ effectors and the development of long-term memory, which ultimately correlated with a favorable clinical outcome. Transduced lymphocytes represent an efficient way for in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens of DCs.

  7. Strategies to alleviate original antigenic sin responses to influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hyang; Davis, William G.; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Jacob, Joshy

    2012-01-01

    Original antigenic sin is a phenomenon wherein sequential exposure to closely related influenza virus variants reduces antibody (Ab) response to novel antigenic determinants in the second strain and, consequently, impairs the development of immune memory. This could pose a risk to the development of immune memory in persons previously infected with or vaccinated against influenza. Here, we explored strategies to overcome original antigenic sin responses in mice sequentially exposed to two closely related hemagglutinin 1 neuraminidase 1 (H1N1) influenza strains A/PR/8/34 and A/FM/1/47. We found that dendritic cell–activating adjuvants [Bordetella pertussis toxin (PT) or CpG ODN or a squalene-based oil-in-water nanoemulsion (NE)], upon administration during the second viral exposure, completely protected mice from a lethal challenge and enhanced neutralizing-Ab titers against the second virus. Interestingly, PT and NE adjuvants when administered during the first immunization even prevented original antigenic sin in subsequent immunization without any adjuvants. As an alternative to using adjuvants, we also found that repeated immunization with the second viral strain relieved the effects of original antigenic sin. Taken together, our studies provide at least three ways of overcoming original antigenic sin. PMID:22869731

  8. Haitian reflections.

    PubMed

    Docrat, Fathima

    2010-08-01

    Natural disasters and acts of terrorism demonstrate a similar critical need for national preparedness. As one of a team of volunteers with a local South African NGO who recently went on a medical mission, I would like to share glimpses of our experience and reflect on the mistakes - and also to state the obvious: that we do not learn from our mistakes. A simple literature search has shown that the same mistakes happen repeatedly. 'Humanitarian disasters occur with frightening regularity, yet international responses remain fragmented, with organizations and responders being forced to "reinvent the wheel" with every new event'. This is the result of an obvious lack of preparedness.

  9. A surface antigen influenza vaccine. 2. Pyrogenicity and antigenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Brady, M. I.; Furminger, I. G.

    1976-01-01

    Conventional influenza vaccine containing whole virus particles purified on a zonal centrifuge is pyrogenic and can cause systemic and local adverse side effects. An improved vaccine was therefore prepared which contained only the surface antigens of the virus adsorbed to aluminium hydroxide. The antigenicity of this vaccine was compared with conventional vaccine in chickens. Both vaccines induced similar titres of serum haemagglutination-inhibition and neuraminidase inhibition antibody. The dose response curves, however, were different. The surface antigens at vaccine strength without aluminium hydroxide were of negligible pyrogenicity in rabbits. PMID:1068196

  10. [Antigenic response against PPD and antigen 60 in tubercular patients: single antigen versus the combined test].

    PubMed

    Máttar, S; Broquetas, J M; Gea, J; Aran, X; el-Banna, N; Sauleda, J; Torres, J M

    1992-05-01

    We analyze serum samples from 70 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 50 healthy individuals. The antigenic activity (IgG) against protein purified antigen (PPD) and antigen 60 (A60) from M. tuberculosis. Thirteen patients were also HIV infected, and three patients had AIDS defined by the presence of disseminated tuberculosis. The test using antigen alone showed a 77% sensitivity and 74% specificity when PPD is used. When A60 was used, both values improved (81% sensitivity, 94% specificity). The use of a combined test (PPD and A60) improves the sensitivity (89%) but reduces the specificity (82%). The HIV infected patients showed similar responses to those of other patients. The combined use of different antigens might be useful for diagnosing tuberculosis. PMID:1390996

  11. Boosting the MHC Class II-Restricted Tumor Antigen Presentation to CD4+ T Helper Cells: A Critical Issue for Triggering Protective Immunity and Re-Orienting the Tumor Microenvironment Toward an Anti-Tumor State.

    PubMed

    Accolla, Roberto S; Lombardo, Letizia; Abdallah, Rawan; Raval, Goutham; Forlani, Greta; Tosi, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Although the existence of an immune response against tumor cells is well documented, the fact that tumors take off in cancer patients indicates that neoplastic cells can circumvent this response. Over the years many investigators have described strategies to rescue the anti-tumor immune response with the aim of creating specific and long-lasting protection against the disease. When exported to human clinical settings, these strategies have revealed in most cases a very limited, if any, positive outcome. We believe that the failure is mostly due to the inadequate triggering of the CD4+ T helper (TH) cell arm of the adaptive immunity, as TH cells are necessary to trigger all the immune effector mechanisms required to eliminate tumor cells. In this review, we focus on novel strategies that by stimulating MHC class II-restricted activation of TH cells generate a specific and persistent adaptive immunity against the tumor. This point is of critical importance for both preventive and therapeutic anti-tumor vaccination protocols, because adaptive immunity with its capacity to produce specific, long-lasting protection and memory responses is indeed the final goal of vaccination. We will discuss data from our as well as other laboratories which strongly suggest that triggering a specific and persistent anti-tumor CD4+ TH cell response stably modify not only the tumor microenvironment but also tumor-dependent extratumor microenvironments by eliminating and/or reducing the blood-derived tumor infiltrating cells that may have a pro-tumor growth function such as regulatory CD4+/CD25+ T cells and myeloid-derived-suppressor cells. Within this frame, therefore, we believe that the establishment of a pro-tumor environment is not the cause but simply the consequence of the tumor strategy to primarily counteract components of the adaptive cellular immunity, particularly TH lymphocytes.

  12. Boosting the MHC Class II-Restricted Tumor Antigen Presentation to CD4+ T Helper Cells: A Critical Issue for Triggering Protective Immunity and Re-Orienting the Tumor Microenvironment Toward an Anti-Tumor State

    <